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Sample records for range particle irradiation

  1. Long range alpha particle detector

    DOEpatents

    MacArthur, Duncan W.; Wolf, Michael A.; McAtee, James L.; Unruh, Wesley P.; Cucchiara, Alfred L.; Huchton, Roger L.

    1993-01-01

    An alpha particle detector capable of detecting alpha radiation from distant sources. In one embodiment, a high voltage is generated in a first electrically conductive mesh while a fan draws air containing air molecules ionized by alpha particles through an air passage and across a second electrically conductive mesh. The current in the second electrically conductive mesh can be detected and used for measurement or alarm. The detector can be used for area, personnel and equipment monitoring.

  2. Long range alpha particle detector

    DOEpatents

    MacArthur, D.W.; Wolf, M.A.; McAtee, J.L.; Unruh, W.P.; Cucchiara, A.L.; Huchton, R.L.

    1993-02-02

    An alpha particle detector capable of detecting alpha radiation from distant sources. In one embodiment, a high voltage is generated in a first electrically conductive mesh while a fan draws air containing air molecules ionized by alpha particles through an air passage and across a second electrically conductive mesh. The current in the second electrically conductive mesh can be detected and used for measurement or alarm. The detector can be used for area, personnel and equipment monitoring.

  3. Microscopic analysis of irradiated AGR-1 coated particle fuel compacts

    SciTech Connect

    Scott Ploger; Paul Demkowicz; John Hunn; Robert Morris

    2012-10-01

    The AGR-1 experiment involved irradiation of 72 TRISO-coated particle fuel compacts to a peak burnup of 19.5% FIMA with no in-pile failures observed out of 3×105 total particles. Irradiated AGR-1 fuel compacts have been cross-sectioned and analyzed with optical microscopy to characterize kernel, buffer, and coating behavior. Five compacts have been examined so far, spanning a range of irradiation conditions (burnup, fast fluence, and irradiation temperature) and including all four TRISO coating variations irradiated in the AGR-1 experiment. The cylindrical specimens were sectioned both transversely and longitudinally, then polished to expose between approximately 40-80 individual particles on each mount. The analysis focused primarily on kernel swelling and porosity, buffer densification and fracturing, buffer-IPyC debonding, and fractures in the IPyC and SiC layers. Characteristic morphologies have been identified, over 800 particles have been classified, and spatial distributions of particle types have been mapped. No significant spatial patterns were discovered in these cross sections. However, some trends were found between morphological types and certain behavioral aspects. Buffer fractures were found in approximately 23% of the particles, and these fractures often resulted in unconstrained kernel swelling into the open cavities. Fractured buffers and buffers that stayed bonded to IPyC layers appear related to larger pore size in kernels. Buffer-IPyC interface integrity evidently factored into initiation of rare IPyC fractures. Fractures through part of the SiC layer were found in only three particles, all in conjunction with IPyC-SiC debonding. Compiled results suggest that the deliberate coating fabrication variations influenced the frequencies of IPyC fractures, IPyC-SiC debonds, and SiC fractures.

  4. Microscopic analysis of irradiated AGR-1 coated particle fuel compacts

    SciTech Connect

    Scott A. Ploger; Paul A. Demkowicz; John D. Hunn; Jay S. Kehn

    2014-05-01

    The AGR-1 experiment involved irradiation of 72 TRISO-coated particle fuel compacts to a peak compact-average burnup of 19.5% FIMA with no in-pile failures observed out of 3 x 105 total particles. Irradiated AGR-1 fuel compacts have been cross-sectioned and analyzed with optical microscopy to characterize kernel, buffer, and coating behavior. Six compacts have been examined, spanning a range of irradiation conditions (burnup, fast fluence, and irradiation temperature) and including all four TRISO coating variations irradiated in the AGR-1 experiment. The cylindrical specimens were sectioned both transversely and longitudinally, then polished to expose from 36 to 79 individual particles near midplane on each mount. The analysis focused primarily on kernel swelling and porosity, buffer densification and fracturing, buffer–IPyC debonding, and fractures in the IPyC and SiC layers. Characteristic morphologies have been identified, 981 particles have been classified, and spatial distributions of particle types have been mapped. No significant spatial patterns were discovered in these cross sections. However, some trends were found between morphological types and certain behavioral aspects. Buffer fractures were found in 23% of the particles, and these fractures often resulted in unconstrained kernel protrusion into the open cavities. Fractured buffers and buffers that stayed bonded to IPyC layers appear related to larger pore size in kernels. Buffer–IPyC interface integrity evidently factored into initiation of rare IPyC fractures. Fractures through part of the SiC layer were found in only four classified particles, all in conjunction with IPyC–SiC debonding. Compiled results suggest that the deliberate coating fabrication variations influenced the frequencies of IPyC fractures and IPyC–SiC debonds.

  5. Luminescence imaging of water during alpha particle irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Komori, Masataka; Koyama, Shuji; Toshito, Toshiyuki

    2016-05-01

    The luminescence imaging of water using the alpha particle irradiation of several MeV energy range is thought to be impossible because this alpha particle energy is far below the Cerenkov-light threshold and the secondary electrons produced in this energy range do not emit Cerenkov-light. Contrary to this consensus, we found that the luminescence imaging of water was possible with 5.5 MeV alpha particle irradiation. We placed a 2 MBq of 241Am alpha source in water, and luminescence images of the source were conducted with a high-sensitivity, cooled charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. We also carried out such imaging of the alpha source in three different conditions to compare the photon productions with that of water, in air, with a plastic scintillator, and an acrylic plate. The luminescence imaging of water was observed from 10 to 20 s acquisition, and the intensity was linearly increased with time. The intensity of the luminescence with the alpha irradiation of water was 0.05% of that with the plastic scintillator, 4% with air, and 15% with the acrylic plate. The resolution of the luminescence image of water was better than 0.25 mm FWHM. Alpha particles of 5.5 MeV energy emit luminescence in water. Although the intensity of the luminescence was smaller than that in air, it was clearly observable. The luminescence of water with alpha particles would be a new method for alpha particle detection and distribution measurements in water.

  6. Charge collection studies in irradiated HV-CMOS particle detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Affolder, A.; Andelković, M.; Arndt, K.; Bates, R.; Blue, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Buttar, C.; Caragiulo, P.; Cindro, V.; Das, D.; Dopke, J.; Dragone, A.; Ehrler, F.; Fadeyev, V.; Galloway, Z.; Gorišek, A.; Grabas, H.; Gregor, I. M.; Grenier, P.; Grillo, A.; Hommels, L. B. A.; Huffman, T.; John, J.; Kanisauskas, K.; Kenney, C.; Kramberger, G.; Liang, Z.; Mandić, I.; Maneuski, D.; McMahon, S.; Mikuž, M.; Muenstermann, D.; Nickerson, R.; Perić, I.; Phillips, P.; Plackett, R.; Rubbo, F.; Segal, J.; Seiden, A.; Shipsey, I.; Song, W.; Stanitzki, M.; Su, D.; Tamma, C.; Turchetta, R.; Vigani, L.; Volk, J.; Wang, R.; Warren, M.; Wilson, F.; Worm, S.; Xiu, Q.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zhang, J.; Zhu, H.

    2016-04-01

    Charge collection properties of particle detectors made in HV-CMOS technology were investigated before and after irradiation with reactor neutrons. Two different sensor types were designed and processed in 180 and 350 nm technology by AMS. Edge-TCT and charge collection measurements with electrons from 90Sr source were employed. Diffusion of generated carriers from undepleted substrate contributes significantly to the charge collection before irradiation, while after irradiation the drift contribution prevails as shown by charge measurements at different shaping times. The depleted region at a given bias voltage was found to grow with irradiation in the fluence range of interest for strip detectors at the HL-LHC. This leads to large gains in the measured charge with respect to the one before irradiation. The increase of the depleted region was attributed to removal of effective acceptors. The evolution of depleted region with fluence was investigated and modeled. Initial studies show a small effect of short term annealing on charge collection.

  7. NANOSTRUCTURE PATTERNING UNDER ENERGETIC PARTICLE BEAM IRRADIATION

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lumin; Lu, Wei

    2013-01-31

    Energetic ion bombardment can lead to the development of complex and diverse nanostructures on or beneath the material surface through induced self-organization processes. These self-organized structures have received particular interest recently as promising candidates as simple, inexpensive, and large area patterns, whose optical, electronic and magnetic properties are different from those in the bulk materials [1-5]. Compared to the low mass efficiency production rate of lithographic methods, these self-organized approaches display new routes for the fabrication of nanostructures over large areas in a short processing time at the nanoscale, beyond the limits of lithography [1,4]. Although it is believed that surface nanostructure formation is based on the morphological instability of the sputtered surface, driven by a kinetic balance between roughening and smoothing actions [6,7], the fundamental mechanisms and experimental conditions for the formation of these nanostructures has still not been well established, the formation of the 3-D naopatterns beneath the irradiated surface especially needs more exploration. During the last funding period, we have focused our efforts on irradiation-induced nanostructures in a broad range of materials. These structures have been studied primarily through in situ electron microscopy during electron or ion irradiation. In particular, we have performed studies on 3-D void/bubble lattices (in metals and CaF2), embedded sponge-like porous structure with uniform nanofibers in irradiated semiconductors (Ge, GaSb, and InSb), 2-D highly ordered pattern of nanodroplets (on the surface of GaAs), hexagonally ordered nanoholes (on the surface of Ge), and 1-D highly ordered ripple and periodic arrays (of Cu nanoparticles) [3,8-11]. The amazing common feature in those nanopatterns is the uniformity of the size of nanoelements (nanoripples, nanodots, nanovoids or nanofibers) and the distance separating them. Our research focuses on the

  8. Gated Irradiation With Scanned Particle Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Bert, Christoph Gemmel, Alexander; Saito, Nami; Rietzel, Eike

    2009-03-15

    Purpose: To demonstrate mitigation of the interplay effects of scanned particle beams and residual target motion within a gating window by increased overlap of pencil beams. Methods and Materials: Lateral overlap was increased by increasing the pencil beam widths or by decreasing the distance between the pencil beams (scan grid). Longitudinal overlap was increased by reducing the distance between iso-range slices. For scanned carbon ion beams, simulation studies were performed and validated experimentally to determine the required parameters for different residual motion characteristics. The dose distributions were characterized by the maximal local deviations representing local over- and underdosage. Results: For residual lateral motion, the local deviations were <5% for 2, 4, and 7 mm residual motion within the gating window for a 2-mm scan grid and pencil beams of 10, 14, and 18 mm full width at half maximum, respectively. Decreasing the iso-range slice distance from 3 mm to 1 mm effectively mitigated {<=}10 mm water-equivalent range changes. Experimental data reproduced the simulation results. Conclusion: In charged particle therapy with a scanned beam, interplay effects between gated beam delivery and residual target motion can be decreased effectively by increasing the overlap between pencil beams laterally, as well as longitudinally.

  9. Instability of nanoscale metallic particles under electron irradiation in TEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X. Y.; Zhang, S. G.; Xia, M. X.; Li, J. G.

    2016-03-01

    The stability of nano metallic glass under electron beam in transmission electron microscope (TEM) was investigated. The most common voltage of TEM used in metallic materials characterization was either 200 kV or 300 kV. Both situations were investigated in this work. An amorphous metallic particle with a dimension of a few hundred nanometers was tested under 300 keV electron irradiation. New phase decomposed from the parent phase was observed. Moreover, a crystal particle with the same composition and dimension was tested under 200 keV irradiation. Decomposition process also occurred in this situation. Besides, crystal orientation modification was observed during irradiation. These results proved that the electron beam in TEM have an effect on the stability of nanoscale samples during long time irradiation. Atomic displacement was induced and diffusion was enhanced by electron irradiation. Thus, artifacts would be induced when a nanoscale metallic sample was characterized in TEM.

  10. Metal particle manipulation by laser irradiation in borosilicate glass.

    PubMed

    Hidai, Hirofumi; Yamazaki, Takato; Itoh, Sho; Hiromatsu, Kuniaki; Tokura, Hitoshi

    2010-09-13

    We propose a new technique of manipulating a metal particle in borosilicate glass. A metal particle that is heated by laser illumination heats the surrounding glass by radiation and conduction. A softened glass enabled metal particle migration. A 1-µm-thick platinum film was deposited on the back surface of a glass plate and irradiated with a green CW laser beam through the glass. As a result, the platinum film was melted and implanted into the glass as a particle. Platinum particles with diameters of 3 to 50 μm migrated at speeds up to 10 mm/s. In addition to platinum particles, nickel and austenitic stainless steel (SUS304) particles can be implanted.

  11. Development of a focused charged particle microbeam for the irradiation of individual cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barberet, Ph.; Balana, A.; Incerti, S.; Michelet-Habchi, C.; Moretto, Ph.; Pouthier, Th.

    2005-01-01

    An irradiation facility, able to expose cellular and subcellular targets to a precise number of particles, has been developed at CENBG for applications in radiobiology. The development of this facility was based on an existing horizontal focused microbeam developed in the early 90's for material analysis. The focusing properties of the line allow the delivering of proton or alpha particle beams in the 1-3.5MeV energy range with a spatial resolution down to about 1μm under vacuum. For irradiation of living cells, a removable stage has been developed to extract the beam into air while preserving the analytical capabilities of the microbeam line under vacuum. This stage includes a high resolution epifluorescence microscope for online visualization of the cells and a motorized stage for cell positioning. Single particle control is ensured by a fast electrostatic deflector triggered by the signal induced by the particles through a transmission detector just before reaching the target. A dedicated software, based on an object-oriented architecture, has been designed to control the entire experiment. This includes semiautomatic calibration procedures (necessary to achieve the micron precision) and semiautomatic irradiation procedures used for targeting a large number of individual cells. In air irradiation of solid track detectors has permitted us to estimate that 99.5% of the particles are delivered on the target at a distance lower than 5μm from the beam center when an alpha particles beam is used. The targeting precision of the overall irradiation procedure, which reflects the alignment precision of the beam center with the target center, has been estimated to be within ±2μm. First experiments involving cells in culture have permitted to estimate an irradiation rate of 2000 cells per hour. This article presents the overall experimental facility and the tests performed for its validation for the irradiation of individual cells in their culture medium.

  12. Comparison of heavy particle with X-irradiation on the hamster lung.

    PubMed Central

    Woodruff, K. H.; Leith, J. T.; Powers-Risius, P.; Havens, V.; Lyman, J. T.; Howard, J.; Tobias, C. A.

    1979-01-01

    Important new modalities for cancer therapy are being developed, and one of the most promising is heavy charged particle irradiation. We are currently assessing the effects of 375-MeV/nucleon neon irradiation in the plateau region of ionization compared to 230KVp X-rays on the whole thorax of hamsters. Single dose levels for neon irradiation ranged from 150-1000 rad. Dose levels for X-irradiation ranged from 225-1500 rad. The animals were followed for 1 year after irradiation, and the most useful results emerged, using morphometric methods. One year after irradiation, pulmonary parenchyma and nonparenchyma appear morphometrically unchanged. However, the volume density of pulmonary septums, septal cells, all tissue, connective tissue, and alveolar Type II cells was increased while the volume densities of alveoli, empty alveolar space, and capillary lumens were diminished. Most of these changes were dose dependent not clearly demonstrable until a year after irradiation. The relative biologic effect of neon compared to X-irradiation using this techniques is 1.6-1.8. PMID:453334

  13. Range assessment in particle therapy based on prompt γ-ray timing measurements.

    PubMed

    Golnik, Christian; Hueso-González, Fernando; Müller, Andreas; Dendooven, Peter; Enghardt, Wolfgang; Fiedler, Fine; Kormoll, Thomas; Roemer, Katja; Petzoldt, Johannes; Wagner, Andreas; Pausch, Guntram

    2014-09-21

    Proton and ion beams open up new vistas for the curative treatment of tumors, but adequate technologies for monitoring the compliance of dose delivery with treatment plans in real time are still missing. Range assessment, meaning the monitoring of therapy-particle ranges in tissue during dose delivery (treatment), is a continuous challenge considered a key for tapping the full potential of particle therapies. In this context the paper introduces an unconventional concept of range assessment by prompt-gamma timing (PGT), which is based on an elementary physical effect not considered so far: therapy particles penetrating tissue move very fast, but still need a finite transit time--about 1-2 ns in case of protons with a 5-20 cm range--from entering the patient's body until stopping in the target volume. The transit time increases with the particle range. This causes measurable effects in PGT spectra, usable for range verification. The concept was verified by proton irradiation experiments at the AGOR cyclotron, KVI-CART, University of Groningen. Based on the presented kinematical relations, we describe model calculations that very precisely reproduce the experimental results. As the clinical treatment conditions entail measurement constraints (e.g. limited treatment time), we propose a setup, based on clinical irradiation conditions, capable of determining proton range deviations within a few seconds of irradiation, thus allowing for a fast safety survey. Range variations of 2 mm are expected to be clearly detectable.

  14. Alternating current long range alpha particle detector

    DOEpatents

    MacArthur, Duncan W.; McAtee, James L.

    1993-01-01

    An alpha particle detector, utilizing alternating currents, whcih is capable of detecting alpha particles from distinct sources. The use of alternating currents allows use of simpler ac circuits which, in turn, are not susceptible to dc error components. It also allows the benefit of gas gain, if desired. In the invention, a voltage source creates an electric field between two conductive grids, and between the grids and a conductive enclosure. Air containing air ions created by collision with alpha particles is drawn into the enclosure and detected. In some embodiments, the air flow into the enclosure is interrupted, creating an alternating flow of ions. In another embodiment, a modulated voltage is applied to the grid, also modulating the detection of ions.

  15. Development of a Charged Particle Microbeam for Targeted and Single Particle Subcellular Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Yanch, Jacquelyn C.

    2004-03-12

    The development of a charged particle microbeam for single particle, subcellular irradiations at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Laboratory for Accelerator Beam Applications (MIT LABA) was initiated under this NEER aeard. The Microbeam apparatus makes use of a pre-existing electrostatic accelerator with a horizontal beam tube.

  16. Detectability of active triangulation range finder: a solar irradiance approach.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huizhe; Gao, Jason; Bui, Viet Phuong; Liu, Zhengtong; Lee, Kenneth Eng Kian; Peh, Li-Shiuan; Png, Ching Eng

    2016-06-27

    Active triangulation range finders are widely used in a variety of applications such as robotics and assistive technologies. The power of the laser source should be carefully selected in order to satisfy detectability and still remain eye-safe. In this paper, we present a systematic approach to assess the detectability of an active triangulation range finder in an outdoor environment. For the first time, we accurately quantify the background noise of a laser system due to solar irradiance by coupling the Perez all-weather sky model and ray tracing techniques. The model is validated with measurements with a modeling error of less than 14.0%. Being highly generic and sufficiently flexible, the proposed model serves as a guide to define a laser system for any geographical location and microclimate.

  17. Particle characteristics of different materials after ultra-short pulsed laser (USPL) irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meister, Joerg; Schelle, Florian; Kowalczyk, Philip; Frentzen, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    The exposition of nanoparticles caused by laser application in dental health care is an open discussion. Based on the fact that nanoparticles can penetrate through the mucosa, the knowledge about particle characteristics after irradiation with an USPL is of high importance. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the particle characteristics, especially the size of the ablated debris after USPL irradiation. The irradiation was carried out with an USP Nd:YVO4 laser with a center wavelength of 1064 nm. Based on the pulse duration of 8 ps and a pulse repetition rate of 500 kHz the laser emits an average power of 9 W. The materials investigated were dental tissues and dental restorative materials (composite and amalgam), ceramic and different metals (gold and aluminium). The samples were irradiated with a power density in the order of 300 GW/cm2 at distances of 5, 10, 15, and 20 mm. The debris was collected on an object plate. SEM pictures were used for analysis of the ablation debris. Depending on the irradiated material, we observed different kinds of structures: vitreous, flocculent, and pellet-like. The mean particle sizes were 10 x 10 up to 30 x 30 μm2. In addition, a cluster of ablated matter (nanometer range) distributed over the whole irradiated area was found. With increasing distances the cluster structure reduced from multi-layer to mono-layer clusters. Particle sizes in the micrometer and nanometer range were found after irradiation with an USPL. The nanoparticles create a cluster structure which is influenced by increasing distances.

  18. Modulation of graphene field effect by heavy charged particle irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazalas, Edward; Sarker, Biddut K.; Childres, Isaac; Chen, Yong P.; Jovanovic, Igor

    2016-12-01

    Device architectures based on the two-dimensional material graphene can be used for sensing of electromagnetic and particle radiation. The sensing mechanism may be direct, by absorbance of radiation by the graphene or the immediately adjacent material, and indirect, via the field effect principle, whereby the change in conductivity within a semiconducting absorber substrate induces electric field change at graphene. Here, we report on a graphene field effect transistor (GFET) sensitive to heavy charged particle radiation (α particles) at MeV energies by use of the indirect sensing mechanism. Both the continuous and discrete changes of graphene are observed, and the latter are attributed to single α particle interactions with the GFET. While this study provides the basis for understanding of the irradiation effects, it also opens prospects for the use of GFETs as heavy charged particle detectors.

  19. Range assessment in particle therapy based on prompt γ-ray timing measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golnik, Christian; Hueso-González, Fernando; Müller, Andreas; Dendooven, Peter; Enghardt, Wolfgang; Fiedler, Fine; Kormoll, Thomas; Roemer, Katja; Petzoldt, Johannes; Wagner, Andreas; Pausch, Guntram

    2014-09-01

    Proton and ion beams open up new vistas for the curative treatment of tumors, but adequate technologies for monitoring the compliance of dose delivery with treatment plans in real time are still missing. Range assessment, meaning the monitoring of therapy-particle ranges in tissue during dose delivery (treatment), is a continuous challenge considered a key for tapping the full potential of particle therapies. In this context the paper introduces an unconventional concept of range assessment by prompt-gamma timing (PGT), which is based on an elementary physical effect not considered so far: therapy particles penetrating tissue move very fast, but still need a finite transit time—about 1-2 ns in case of protons with a 5-20 cm range—from entering the patient’s body until stopping in the target volume. The transit time increases with the particle range. This causes measurable effects in PGT spectra, usable for range verification. The concept was verified by proton irradiation experiments at the AGOR cyclotron, KVI-CART, University of Groningen. Based on the presented kinematical relations, we describe model calculations that very precisely reproduce the experimental results. As the clinical treatment conditions entail measurement constraints (e.g. limited treatment time), we propose a setup, based on clinical irradiation conditions, capable of determining proton range deviations within a few seconds of irradiation, thus allowing for a fast safety survey. Range variations of 2 mm are expected to be clearly detectable.

  20. Sample Targeting During Single-Particle Single-Cell Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigelow, A. W.; Randers-Pehrson, G.; Michel, K. A.; Brenner, D. J.; Dymnikov, A. D.

    2003-08-01

    An apertured microbeam is used for single-particle single-cell irradiation to study radiobiological effects at the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF), Center for Radiological Research, Columbia University. The present sample targeting system involves imaging techniques and a stepping motor stage to sequentially position a cell nucleus above a vertical ion beam. An interest expressed by the biology research community in targeting subnuclear components has spurred the development of microbeam II, a next-generation facility to include a focused ion beam and a more precise sample manipulator, a voice coil stage. Sample positioning precision will rely on a feedback circuit incorporating linear variable differential transformer (LVDT) position measurements. In addition, post-lens electrostatic deflection is a contender for a point-and-shoot system that could speed up the cell irradiation process for cells within an image frame. Crucial to this development is that ion beam blow up must be minimal during deflection.

  1. Early Energetic Particle Irradiation of the HED Parent Body Regolith

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogard, D. D.; Garrison, D. H.; Rao, M. N.

    1996-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that many individual grains within the dark phase of the Kapoeta howardite were irradiated with energetic particles while residing on the surface of the early HED regolith. Particle tracks in these grains vary in density by more than an order of magnitude and undoubtedly were formed by energetic heavy (Fe) ions associated with early solar flares. Early Irradiation of HED Regolith: Concentrations of excess Ne alone are not sufficient to decide between competing galactic and solar irradiation models. However, from recent studies of depth samples of oriented lunar rocks, we have shown that the cosmogenic 21-Ne/22-Ne ratio produced in feldspar differs substantially between Galactic Cosmic Radiation (GCR) and solar protons, and that this difference is exactly that predicted from cross-section data. Using Ne literature data and new isotopic data we obtained on acid-etched, separated feldspar from both the light and dark phases of Kapoeta, we derive 21-Ne/22-Ne = 0.80 for the recent GCR irradiation and 21-Ne/22-Ne = 0.68 for the early regolith irradiation. This derived ratio indicates that the early Ne production in the regolith occurred by both galactic and solar protons. If we adopt a likely one-component regolith model in which all grains were exposed to galactic protons but individual grains had variable exposure to solar protons, we estimate that this early GCR irradiation lasted for about 3-6 m.y. More complex two-component regolith models involving separate solar and galactic irradiation would permit this GCR age to be longer. Higher-energy solar protons would permit the GCR to be longer. Higher-energy solar protons would permit the GCR age to be shorter. Further, cosmogenic 126(Xe) in Kapoeta dark is no more than a factor of about 2 higher than that observed in Kapoeta light. Because 126(Xe) can only be formed by galactic protons and not solar protons, these data support a short GCR irradiation for the HED regolith. This would also be

  2. Particle therapy of moving targets-the strategies for tumour motion monitoring and moving targets irradiation.

    PubMed

    Kubiak, Tomasz

    2016-10-01

    Particle therapy of moving targets is still a great challenge. The motion of organs situated in the thorax and abdomen strongly affects the precision of proton and carbon ion radiotherapy. The motion is responsible for not only the dislocation of the tumour but also the alterations in the internal density along the beam path, which influence the range of particle beams. Furthermore, in case of pencil beam scanning, there is an interference between the target movement and dynamic beam delivery. This review presents the strategies for tumour motion monitoring and moving target irradiation in the context of hadron therapy. Methods enabling the direct determination of tumour position (fluoroscopic imaging of implanted radio-opaque fiducial markers, electromagnetic detection of inserted transponders and ultrasonic tumour localization systems) are presented. Attention is also drawn to the techniques which use external surrogate motion for an indirect estimation of target displacement during irradiation. The role of respiratory-correlated CT [four-dimensional CT (4DCT)] in the determination of motion pattern prior to the particle treatment is also considered. An essential part of the article is the review of the main approaches to moving target irradiation in hadron therapy: gating, rescanning (repainting), gated rescanning and tumour tracking. The advantages, drawbacks and development trends of these methods are discussed. The new accelerators, called "cyclinacs", are presented, because their application to particle therapy will allow making a breakthrough in the 4D spot scanning treatment of moving organs.

  3. Particle therapy of moving targets—the strategies for tumour motion monitoring and moving targets irradiation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Particle therapy of moving targets is still a great challenge. The motion of organs situated in the thorax and abdomen strongly affects the precision of proton and carbon ion radiotherapy. The motion is responsible for not only the dislocation of the tumour but also the alterations in the internal density along the beam path, which influence the range of particle beams. Furthermore, in case of pencil beam scanning, there is an interference between the target movement and dynamic beam delivery. This review presents the strategies for tumour motion monitoring and moving target irradiation in the context of hadron therapy. Methods enabling the direct determination of tumour position (fluoroscopic imaging of implanted radio-opaque fiducial markers, electromagnetic detection of inserted transponders and ultrasonic tumour localization systems) are presented. Attention is also drawn to the techniques which use external surrogate motion for an indirect estimation of target displacement during irradiation. The role of respiratory-correlated CT [four-dimensional CT (4DCT)] in the determination of motion pattern prior to the particle treatment is also considered. An essential part of the article is the review of the main approaches to moving target irradiation in hadron therapy: gating, rescanning (repainting), gated rescanning and tumour tracking. The advantages, drawbacks and development trends of these methods are discussed. The new accelerators, called “cyclinacs”, are presented, because their application to particle therapy will allow making a breakthrough in the 4D spot scanning treatment of moving organs. PMID:27376637

  4. Irradiation of a wide range of water ice samples in laboratory with electrons and heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galli, André; Vorburger, Audrey; Pommerol, Antoine; Poch, Olivier; Wurz, Peter

    2017-04-01

    Airless bodies in space are subject to a continuous bombardment of charged particles from the plasma environment. This bombardment triggers chemical reactions in the surface and also acts as an atmospheric release process. The O2 atmosphere around Europa, e.g., probably is the result of magnetospheric O+ and S+ ions sputtering the surface ice. We experimentally investigate the interaction of charged particles with water ice by irradiating samples with electrons (0.1 - 10 keV) and ions (1 - 100 keV). The water ice samples are prepared with various techniques, resulting in 100 nm ice films or centimeter-thick icy regolith with a range of grain sizes. In this presentation, we summarize our results of all electron irradiation experiments. The results allow us to assess if sputtering due to electrons plays a role for the icy moons of Jupiter and Saturn compared to the better studied sputtering due to ions. We also will show our most recent results of multiply charged Ar+ ions and ionized molecules (O2+ for instance) impacting water ice. Finally, we compare the results from thin and compact ice films with those from more realistic deep and porous samples and their respective relevance for the study of water ice sputtering in the laboratory.

  5. Amorphization of complex ceramics by heavy-particle irradiations

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, R.C.; Wang, L.M.; Weber, W.J.

    1994-11-01

    Complex ceramics, for the purpose of this paper, include materials that are generally strongly bonded (mixed ionic and covalent), refractory and frequently good insulators. They are distinguished from simple, compact ceramics (e.g., MgO and UO{sub 2}) by structural features which include: (1) open network structures, best characterized by a consideration of the shape, size and connectivity of coordination polyhedra; (2) complex compositions which characteristically lead to multiple cation sites and lower symmetry; (3) directional bonding; (4) bond-type variations within the structure. The heavy particle irradiations include ion-beam irradiations and recoil-nucleus damage resulting from a-decay events from constituent actinides. The latter effects are responsible for the radiation-induced transformation to the metamict state in minerals. The responses of these materials to irradiation are complex, as energy may be dissipated ballistically by transfer of kinetic energy from an incident projectile or radiolytically by conversion of radiation-induced electronic excitations into atomic motion. This results in isolated Frenkel defect pairs, defect aggregates, isolated collision cascades or bulk amorphization. Thus, the amorphization process is heterogeneous. Only recently have there been systematic studies of heavy particle irradiations of complex ceramics on a wide variety of structure-types and compositions as a function of dose and temperature. In this paper, we review the conditions for amorphization for the tetragonal orthosilicate, zircon [ZrSiO{sub 4}]; the hexagonal orthosilicate/phosphate apatite structure-type [X{sub 10}(ZO{sub 4}){sub 6}(F,Cl,O){sub 2}]; the isometric pyrochlores [A{sub 1-2}B{sub 2}O{sub 6}(O,OH,F){sub 0-1p}H{sub 2}O] and its monoclinic derivative zirconotite [CaZrTi{sub 2}O{sub 7}]; the olivine (derivative - hcp) structure types, {alpha}-{sup VI}A{sub 2}{sup IV}BO{sub 4}, and spinel (ccp), {gamma}-{sup VI}A{sub 2}{sup IV}BO{sub 4}.

  6. Charge distribution of particles in an irradiated dust cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh Sodha, Mahendra; Dixit, Amrit; Srivastava, Sweta; Mishra, S. K.; Verma, M. P.; Bhasin, L.

    2010-01-01

    This communication is a discussion on the charge distribution of the dust particles in an illuminated dust cloud in near space when the photoelectric emission is the dominant mechanism for electron generation. An analytical model has been developed on the basis of charge neutrality condition and balance of number density and energy of electrons; the approach of statistical mechanics has been followed. Computations correspond to a metallic dust cloud in near space environment, where Lyman-α spectral line radiation is the dominant one for photoelectric emission. A comparison of results from the present statistical theory of charge distribution with the uniform charge theory has been presented. As an interesting conclusion, the theory predicts negative charging of a few dust particles for a certain range of parameters leading to the formation of bigger particles on account of electrostatic attraction between oppositely charged particles.

  7. Promotion of nucleation for nano-particle formation by two-stage microwave irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishijima, S.; Matsumura, S.; Asakuma, Y.; Saptoro, A.

    2017-06-01

    Microwave has been widely used for nano-particle synthesis because rapid growth and mono-dispersed particle size can be obtained. In our previous work, it was found that bubble formation during the irradiation is greatly affected by particle size and suspension density. Nevertheless, the underlying mechanism has not been clearly understood, especially pertinent to superheat behavior caused by the higher power when colloidal particle of ferric hydroxide was produced by heating ferric chloride solution under the irradiation. In this study, to prevent superheat behavior, two-stage irradiation was proposed in nano-particle formation process. Based on in-situ measurement data, such as the profiles of bubble size, final particle size and brightness of scattering light of suspension, it is evident that nucleation of nano-particle is promoted by higher power of the first irradiation. As a result, particle number density became higher, and then microwave absorbance energy was evenly distributed to each particle. Due to suppression of heat generation in a particle, bubble size became smaller. Two-stage irradiation became more advantageous in obtaining smaller particle than continuous irradiation because lower power of the second irradiation prevents superheat behavior.

  8. Long-range attraction of particles adhered to lipid vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarfati, Raphael; Dufresne, Eric R.

    2016-07-01

    Many biological systems fold thin sheets of lipid membrane into complex three-dimensional structures. This microscopic origami is often mediated by the adsorption and self-assembly of proteins on a membrane. As a model system to study adsorption-mediated interactions, we study the collective behavior of micrometric particles adhered to a lipid vesicle. We estimate the colloidal interactions using a maximum likelihood analysis of particle trajectories. When the particles are highly wrapped by a tense membrane, we observe strong long-range attractions with a typical binding energy of 150 kBT and significant forces extending a few microns.

  9. Measurements of particle emission from discharge sites in Teflon irradiated by high energy electron beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hazelton, R. C.; Churchill, R. J.; Yadlowsky, E. J.

    1979-01-01

    Anomalous behavior of synchronous orbit satellites manifested by overall degradation of system performance and reduced operating life is associated with electrical discharges resulting from differential charging of the spacecraft surface by fluxes of high energy electrons. During a laboratory simulation silver-backed Teflon samples have been irradiated by electron beams having energies in the range 16-26 keV. Charged particles emitted from the resultant electrical discharges have been measured with a biased Faraday cup and retarding potential analyser. Measurements indicate the presence of two distinct fluxes of particles, the first being an early pulse (0-600ns) of high energy (about 7keV) electrons, while the second is a late pulse (1-5 microseconds) of low energy electrons (less than 1eV) and ions (70eV) leaving the discharge site as a quasi plasma. Calculations indicate an electrostatic field as the dominant accelerating mechanism for charged particles.

  10. Measurements of particle emission from discharge sites in Teflon irradiated by high energy electron beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hazelton, R. C.; Churchill, R. J.; Yadlowsky, E. J.

    1979-01-01

    Anomalous behavior of synchronous orbit satellites manifested by overall degradation of system performance and reduced operating life is associated with electrical discharges resulting from differential charging of the spacecraft surface by fluxes of high energy electrons. During a laboratory simulation silver-backed Teflon samples have been irradiated by electron beams having energies in the range 16-26 keV. Charged particles emitted from the resultant electrical discharges have been measured with a biased Faraday cup and retarding potential analyser. Measurements indicate the presence of two distinct fluxes of particles, the first being an early pulse (0-600ns) of high energy (about 7keV) electrons, while the second is a late pulse (1-5 microseconds) of low energy electrons (less than 1eV) and ions (70eV) leaving the discharge site as a quasi plasma. Calculations indicate an electrostatic field as the dominant accelerating mechanism for charged particles.

  11. Particle LET spectra from microelectronics packaging materials subjected to neutron and proton irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browning, J. S.; Holtkamp, D. B.

    1988-12-01

    Cumulative fractions for LET spectra were measured for particles ejected from microelectronics packaging materials subjected to neutron and proton irradiation. The measurements for the neutron irradiation compare well with Monte Carlo theoretical calculations. The spectra can be used to access microelectronics vulnerabilities in strategic-nuclear- weapon, space-trapped, and neutral-beam directed-energy particle environments.

  12. Volumetric response of intracranial meningioma after photon or particle irradiation.

    PubMed

    Mozes, Petra; Dittmar, Jan Oliver; Habermehl, Daniel; Tonndorf-Martini, Eric; Hideghety, Katalin; Dittmar, Anne; Debus, Jürgen; Combs, Stephanie E

    2017-03-01

    Meningiomas are usually slow growing, well circumscribed intracranial tumors. In symptom-free cases observation with close follow-up imaging could be performed. Symptomatic meningiomas could be surgically removed and/or treated with radiotherapy. The study aimed to evaluate the volumetric response of intracranial meningiomas at different time points after photon, proton, and a mixed photon and carbon ion boost irradiation. In Group A 38 patients received proton therapy (median dose: 56 GyE in 1.8-2 GyE daily fractions) or a mixed photon/carbon ion therapy (50 Gy in 2 Gy daily fractions with intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and 18 GyE in 3 GyE daily dose carbon ion boost). Thirty-nine patients (Group B) were treated by photon therapy with IMRT or fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy technique (median dose: 56 Gy in 1.8-2 Gy daily fractions). The delineation of the tumor volume was based on the initial, one- and two-year follow-up magnetic resonance imaging and these volumes were compared to evaluate the volumetric tumor response. Significant tumor volume shrinkage was detected at one- and at two-year follow-up both after irradiation by particles and by photons. No significant difference in tumor volume change was observed between photon, proton or combined photon plus carbon ion boost treated patients. WHO grade and gender appear to be determining factors for tumor volume shrinkage. Significant volumetric shrinkage of meningiomas could be observed independently of the applied radiation modality. Long-term follow-up is recommended to evaluate further dynamic of size reduction and its correlation with outcome data.

  13. Particle filter for long range radar in RUV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romeo, Kevin; Willett, Peter; Bar-Shalom, Yaakov

    2014-06-01

    In this paper we present an approach for tracking with a high-bandwidth active radar in long range scenarios with 3-D measurements in r-u-v coordinates. The 3-D low-process-noise scenarios considered are much more difficult than the ones we have previously investigated where measurements were in 2-D (i.e., polar coordinates). We show that in these 3-D scenarios the extended Kalman filter and its variants are not desirable as they suffer from either major consistency problems or degraded range accuracy, and most flavors of particle filter suffer from a loss of diversity among particles after resampling. This leads to sample impoverishment and divergence of the filter. In the scenarios studied, this loss of diversity can be attributed to the very low process noise. However, a regularized particle filter is shown to avoid this diversity problem while producing consistent results. The regularization is accomplished using a modified version of the Epanechnikov kernel.

  14. Range Verification Methods in Particle Therapy: Underlying Physics and Monte Carlo Modeling.

    PubMed

    Kraan, Aafke Christine

    2015-01-01

    Hadron therapy allows for highly conformal dose distributions and better sparing of organs-at-risk, thanks to the characteristic dose deposition as function of depth. However, the quality of hadron therapy treatments is closely connected with the ability to predict and achieve a given beam range in the patient. Currently, uncertainties in particle range lead to the employment of safety margins, at the expense of treatment quality. Much research in particle therapy is therefore aimed at developing methods to verify the particle range in patients. Non-invasive in vivo monitoring of the particle range can be performed by detecting secondary radiation, emitted from the patient as a result of nuclear interactions of charged hadrons with tissue, including β (+) emitters, prompt photons, and charged fragments. The correctness of the dose delivery can be verified by comparing measured and pre-calculated distributions of the secondary particles. The reliability of Monte Carlo (MC) predictions is a key issue. Correctly modeling the production of secondaries is a non-trivial task, because it involves nuclear physics interactions at energies, where no rigorous theories exist to describe them. The goal of this review is to provide a comprehensive overview of various aspects in modeling the physics processes for range verification with secondary particles produced in proton, carbon, and heavier ion irradiation. We discuss electromagnetic and nuclear interactions of charged hadrons in matter, which is followed by a summary of some widely used MC codes in hadron therapy. Then, we describe selected examples of how these codes have been validated and used in three range verification techniques: PET, prompt gamma, and charged particle detection. We include research studies and clinically applied methods. For each of the techniques, we point out advantages and disadvantages, as well as clinical challenges still to be addressed, focusing on MC simulation aspects.

  15. Range Verification Methods in Particle Therapy: Underlying Physics and Monte Carlo Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Kraan, Aafke Christine

    2015-01-01

    Hadron therapy allows for highly conformal dose distributions and better sparing of organs-at-risk, thanks to the characteristic dose deposition as function of depth. However, the quality of hadron therapy treatments is closely connected with the ability to predict and achieve a given beam range in the patient. Currently, uncertainties in particle range lead to the employment of safety margins, at the expense of treatment quality. Much research in particle therapy is therefore aimed at developing methods to verify the particle range in patients. Non-invasive in vivo monitoring of the particle range can be performed by detecting secondary radiation, emitted from the patient as a result of nuclear interactions of charged hadrons with tissue, including β+ emitters, prompt photons, and charged fragments. The correctness of the dose delivery can be verified by comparing measured and pre-calculated distributions of the secondary particles. The reliability of Monte Carlo (MC) predictions is a key issue. Correctly modeling the production of secondaries is a non-trivial task, because it involves nuclear physics interactions at energies, where no rigorous theories exist to describe them. The goal of this review is to provide a comprehensive overview of various aspects in modeling the physics processes for range verification with secondary particles produced in proton, carbon, and heavier ion irradiation. We discuss electromagnetic and nuclear interactions of charged hadrons in matter, which is followed by a summary of some widely used MC codes in hadron therapy. Then, we describe selected examples of how these codes have been validated and used in three range verification techniques: PET, prompt gamma, and charged particle detection. We include research studies and clinically applied methods. For each of the techniques, we point out advantages and disadvantages, as well as clinical challenges still to be addressed, focusing on MC simulation aspects. PMID:26217586

  16. Performance of HTGR biso- and triso-coated fertile particles irradiated in capsule HT-34

    SciTech Connect

    Long, E.L. Jr.; Tiegs, T.N.; Robbins, J.M.; Kania, M.J.

    1981-08-01

    Experiment HT-34, irradiated in the target region of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), was designed to correlate HTGR Biso- and Triso-coated particle performance with fabrication parameters. Gamma analysis of the irradiated Triso-coated ThO/sub 2/ particles showed that the SiC deposited at the highest coating rate apparently had the best cesium-retention properties. Results of a similar analysis of the irradiated Biso-coated ThO/sub 2/ particles showed no differences in performance that could be related to coating conditions, but all the particles showed a significant loss of cesium (> 50%) at the higher temperatures. Pressure-vessel failures occurred with a significant number of particles; however, fission-gas-content measurements made at room temperature showed that the intact Biso particles from all batches except one became permeable during irradiation.

  17. A focused scanning vertical beam for charged particle irradiation of living cells with single counted particles.

    PubMed

    Merchant, Michael J; Jeynes, Jonathan C G; Grime, Geoffrey W; Palitsin, Vladimir; Tullis, Iain D W; Barber, Paul R; Vojnovic, Boris; Webb, Roger P; Kirkby, Karen J

    2012-09-01

    The Surrey vertical beam is a new facility for targeted irradiation of cells in medium with singly counted ions. A duo-plasmatron ion source and a 2 MV Tandem™ accelerator supply a range of ions from protons to calcium for this beamline and microscope endstation, with energy ranges from 0.5 to 12 MeV. A magnetic quadrupole triplet lens is used to focus the beam of ions. We present the design of this beamline, and early results showing the capability to count single ions with 98% certainty on CR-39 track etch. We also show that the beam targeting accuracy is within 5 μm and selectively target human fibroblasts with a <5 μm carbon beam, using γ-H2AX immunofluorescence to demonstrate which cell nuclei were irradiated. We discuss future commissioning steps necessary to achieve submicron targeting accuracy with this beamline.

  18. Understanding and simulating the material behavior during multi-particle irradiations

    PubMed Central

    Mir, Anamul H.; Toulemonde, M.; Jegou, C.; Miro, S.; Serruys, Y.; Bouffard, S.; Peuget, S.

    2016-01-01

    A number of studies have suggested that the irradiation behavior and damage processes occurring during sequential and simultaneous particle irradiations can significantly differ. Currently, there is no definite answer as to why and when such differences are seen. Additionally, the conventional multi-particle irradiation facilities cannot correctly reproduce the complex irradiation scenarios experienced in a number of environments like space and nuclear reactors. Therefore, a better understanding of multi-particle irradiation problems and possible alternatives are needed. This study shows ionization induced thermal spike and defect recovery during sequential and simultaneous ion irradiation of amorphous silica. The simultaneous irradiation scenario is shown to be equivalent to multiple small sequential irradiation scenarios containing latent damage formation and recovery mechanisms. The results highlight the absence of any new damage mechanism and time-space correlation between various damage events during simultaneous irradiation of amorphous silica. This offers a new and convenient way to simulate and understand complex multi-particle irradiation problems. PMID:27466040

  19. SILICON CARBIDE GRAIN BOUNDARY DISTRIBUTIONS, IRRADIATION CONDITIONS, AND SILVER RETENTION IN IRRADIATED AGR-1 TRISO FUEL PARTICLES

    SciTech Connect

    Lillo, T. M.; Rooyen, I. J.; Aguiar, J. A.

    2016-11-01

    Precession electron diffraction in the transmission electron microscope was used to map grain orientation and ultimately determine grain boundary misorientation angle distributions, relative fractions of grain boundary types (random high angle, low angle or coincident site lattice (CSL)-related boundaries) and the distributions of CSL-related grain boundaries in the SiC layer of irradiated TRISO-coated fuel particles. Two particles from the AGR-1 experiment exhibiting high Ag-110m retention (>80%) were compared to a particle exhibiting low Ag-110m retention (<19%). Irradiated particles with high Ag-110m retention exhibited a lower fraction of random, high angle grain boundaries compared to the low Ag-110m retention particle. An inverse relationship between the random, high angle grain boundary fraction and Ag-110m retention is found and is consistent with grain boundary percolation theory. Also, comparison of the grain boundary distributions with previously reported unirradiated grain boundary distributions, based on SEM-based EBSD for similarly fabricated particles, showed only small differences, i.e. a greater low angle grain boundary fraction in unirradiated SiC. It was, thus, concluded that SiC layers with grain boundary distributions susceptible to Ag-110m release were present prior to irradiation. Finally, irradiation parameters were found to have little effect on the association of fission product precipitates with specific grain boundary types.

  20. Secondary particle tracks generated by ion beam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, Gustavo

    2015-05-01

    The Low Energy Particle Track Simulation (LEPTS) procedure is a powerful complementary tool to include the effect of low energy electrons and positrons in medical applications of radiation. In particular, for ion-beam cancer treatments provides a detailed description of the role of the secondary electrons abundantly generated around the Bragg peak as well as the possibility of using transmuted positron emitters (C11, O15) as a complement for ion-beam dosimetry. In this study we present interaction probability data derived from IAM-SCAR corrective factors for liquid environments. Using these data, single electron and positron tracks in liquid water and pyrimidine have been simulated providing information about energy deposition as well as the number and type of interactions taking place in any selected ``nanovolume'' of the irradiated area. In collaboration with Francisco Blanco, Universidad Complutense de Madrid; Antonio Mu noz, Centro de Investigaciones Energéticas Medioambientales y Tecnológicas and Diogo Almeida, Filipe Ferreira da Silva, Paulo Lim ao-Vieira, Universidade Nova de Lisboa. Supported by the Spanish and Portuguese governments.

  1. Luminescence imaging of water during carbon-ion irradiation for range estimation.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Komori, Masataka; Akagi, Takashi; Yamashita, Tomohiro; Koyama, Shuji; Morishita, Yuki; Sekihara, Eri; Toshito, Toshiyuki

    2016-05-01

    The authors previously reported successful luminescence imaging of water during proton irradiation and its application to range estimation. However, since the feasibility of this approach for carbon-ion irradiation remained unclear, the authors conducted luminescence imaging during carbon-ion irradiation and estimated the ranges. The authors placed a pure-water phantom on the patient couch of a carbon-ion therapy system and measured the luminescence images with a high-sensitivity, cooled charge-coupled device camera during carbon-ion irradiation. The authors also carried out imaging of three types of phantoms (tap-water, an acrylic block, and a plastic scintillator) and compared their intensities and distributions with those of a phantom containing pure-water. The luminescence images of pure-water phantoms during carbon-ion irradiation showed clear Bragg peaks, and the measured carbon-ion ranges from the images were almost the same as those obtained by simulation. The image of the tap-water phantom showed almost the same distribution as that of the pure-water phantom. The acrylic block phantom's luminescence image produced seven times higher luminescence and had a 13% shorter range than that of the water phantoms; the range with the acrylic phantom generally matched the calculated value. The plastic scintillator showed ∼15 000 times higher light than that of water. Luminescence imaging during carbon-ion irradiation of water is not only possible but also a promising method for range estimation in carbon-ion therapy.

  2. Dynamic range multiwavelength particle characterization using analytical ultracentrifugation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, Johannes; Peukert, Wolfgang

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate how a sophisticated data analysis methodology enables us to perform multiwavelength evaluations of dynamic rotor speed gradient experiments obtained by analytical ultracentrifugation equipped with a multiwavelength detector. Our data evaluation tool HDR-MULTIFIT allows for the accurate analysis of sedimentation coefficient distributions which can be converted to particle size distributions. By means of multiwavelength evaluation, species dependent extinction spectra can be determined even for complex mixtures. Moreover, optical and hydrodynamic properties can be correlated for spherical particles of known optical properties applying multiwavelength evaluation and Mie's theory leading to a significant increase in the dynamic range of the experiment. We provide the theoretical background about the operation principle of our methodology and compare the performance of the multiwavelength analysis to the conventional single wavelength analysis as it is applied in turbidity analysis. We validate our technique using NIST traceable reference particles and show that our technique is universally applicable to materials of known and unknown optical properties, thus clearly extending the possibilities of particle analysis.

  3. CAPTURE OF MERCURY IN COMBUSTION SYSTEMS BY IN SITU-GENERATED TITANIA PARTICLES WITH UV IRRADIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    In-situ-generated sorbent titania particles with ultraviolet (UV) irradiation have been shown to be effective in capture of mercury in combustor exhausts. Results of experiments conducted with the (1) sorbent precursor only, (2) mercury only, (3) mercury and UV irradiation, and (...

  4. CAPTURE OF MERCURY IN COMBUSTION SYSTEMS BY IN SITU-GENERATED TITANIA PARTICLES WITH UV IRRADIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    In-situ-generated sorbent titania particles with ultraviolet (UV) irradiation have been shown to be effective in capture of mercury in combustor exhausts. Results of experiments conducted with the (1) sorbent precursor only, (2) mercury only, (3) mercury and UV irradiation, and (...

  5. 3D range-modulator for scanned particle therapy: development, Monte Carlo simulations and experimental evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simeonov, Yuri; Weber, Uli; Penchev, Petar; Printz Ringbæk, Toke; Schuy, Christoph; Brons, Stephan; Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita; Bliedtner, Jens; Zink, Klemens

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this work was to design and manufacture a 3D range-modulator for scanned particle therapy. The modulator is intended to create a highly conformal dose distribution with only one fixed energy, simultaneously reducing considerably the treatment time. As a proof of concept, a 3D range-modulator was developed for a spherical target volume with a diameter of 5 cm, placed at a depth of 25 cm in a water phantom. It consists of a large number of thin pins with a well-defined shape and different lengths to modulate the necessary shift of the Bragg peak. The 3D range-modulator was manufactured with a rapid prototyping technique. The FLUKA Monte Carlo package was used to simulate the modulating effect of the 3D range-modulator and the resulting dose distribution. For that purpose, a special user routine was implemented to handle its complex geometrical contour. Additionally, FLUKA was extended with the capability of intensity modulated scanning. To validate the simulation results, dose measurements were carried out at the Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center with a 400.41 MeV/u 12C beam. The high resolution dosimetric measurements show a good agreement between simulated and measured dose distributions. Irradiation of the monoenergetic raster plan took 3 s, which is approximately 20 times shorter than a comparable plan with 16 different energies. The combination of only one energy and a 3D range-modulator leads to a tremendous decrease in irradiation time. ‘Interplay effects’, typical for moving targets and pencil beam scanning, can be immensely reduced or disappear completely, making the delivery of a homogeneous dose to moving targets more reliable. Combining high dose conformity, very good homogeneity and extremely short irradiation times, the 3D range-modulator is considered to become a clinically applicable method for very fast treatment of lung tumours.

  6. Experience in charged particle irradiation of tumors of the skull base

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, J.R.; Linstadt, D.E.; Bahary, J.P.; Petti, P.L.; Daftari, I. Collier, J.M.; Gutin, P.H.; Gauger, G.; Phillips, T.L.

    1994-07-01

    The purpose was to review the experience at University of California Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory in using charged particles to irradiate primary neoplasms of the skull base and those extending to the skull base from the nasopharynx and paranasal sinuses. During the period from 1977 to 1992, 223 patients were irradiated with charged particles at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory for tumors either arising in or extending to the skull base, of whom 48 (22%) had recurrent lesions, either post previous surgery or radiotherapy. One hundred twenty-six patients had lesions arising in the cranial base, mostly chordoma (53), chondrosarcoma (27), paraclival meningioma (27) with 19 patients having other histologies such as osteosarcoma or neurofibrosarcoma. There were also 31 patients with primary or recurrent squamous carcinoma of the nasopharynx extending to the skull base, 44 patients with major or minor salivary gland tumors, mostly adenocarcinoma, and 22 patients with squamous carcinoma of the paranasal sinuses, all with cranial base extension. Local control and survival appeared improved in tumors arising in the skull base, following the ability with charged particles to deliver high doses (mean of 65 GY-equivalent) with relative sparing of the adjacent normal tissues. The Kaplan-Meier 5-year local control was 85% for meningioma, 78% for chondrosarcoma, 63% for chordoma and 58% for other sarcoma. Follow-up ranged from 4-191 months with a median of 51 months. Charged particle radiotherapy is highly effective in controlling cranial base lesions which have been partially resected. Better tumor localization with CT and MRI, improved 3-D treatment planning and beam delivery techniques have continued to reduce the level of serious complications and increase local control and survival. 35 refs., 4 figs., 8 tabs.

  7. Particle Accelerator Applications: Ion and Electron Irradiation in Materials Science, Biology and Medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez-Fernandez, Luis

    2010-09-10

    Although the developments of particle accelerators are devoted to basic study of matter constituents, since the beginning these machines have been applied with different purposes in many areas also. Today particle accelerators are essential instruments for science and technology. This work presents an overview of the main application for direct particle irradiation with accelerator in material science, biology and medicine. They are used for material synthesis by ion implantation and charged particle irradiation; to make coatings and micromachining; to characterize broad kind of samples by ion beam analysis techniques; as mass spectrometers for atomic isotopes determination. In biomedicine the accelerators are applied for the study of effects by charged particles on cells. In medicine the radiotherapy by electron irradiation is widely used, while hadrontherapy is still under development. Also, they are necessary for short life radioisotopes production required in radiodiagnostic.

  8. Particle Accelerator Applications: Ion and Electron Irradiation in Materials Science, Biology and Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Fernández, Luis

    2010-09-01

    Although the developments of particle accelerators are devoted to basic study of matter constituents, since the beginning these machines have been applied with different purposes in many areas also. Today particle accelerators are essential instruments for science and technology. This work presents an overview of the main application for direct particle irradiation with accelerator in material science, biology and medicine. They are used for material synthesis by ion implantation and charged particle irradiation; to make coatings and micromachining; to characterize broad kind of samples by ion beam analysis techniques; as mass spectrometers for atomic isotopes determination. In biomedicine the accelerators are applied for the study of effects by charged particles on cells. In medicine the radiotherapy by electron irradiation is widely used, while hadrontherapy is still under development. Also, they are necessary for short life radioisotopes production required in radiodiagnostic.

  9. Pre-irradiation spatial distribution and stability of boride particles in rapidly solidified boron-doped stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Kanani, N.; Arnberg, L.; Harling, O.K.

    1981-01-01

    The time temperature behavior of boride particles has been studied in rapidly solidified ultra low carbon and nitrogen modified 316 stainless steel with 0.088% boron and 0.45% zirconium. The results show that the as-splat-cooled specimens exhibit precipitates at the grain boundaries and triple junctions. For temperatures up to about 750/sup 0/C no significant microstructural changes occur for short heat treatment times. In the temperature range of 750 to 950/sup 0/C, however, particles typically 100 to 500 A in diameter containing Zr and B are formed within the grains. Higher temperatures enhance the formation of such particles and give rise to particle networks. The results show that a fine and uniform distribution of the boride particles almost exclusively within the grains can be achieved if proper annealing conditions are chosen. This type of distribution is an important requirement for the homogeneous production of helium during neutron irradiation in fast reactors.

  10. Disordering by γ-irradiation on long range order of liquid crystalline phases of cholesteryl esters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, S. L.; Dhar, R.

    1992-10-01

    Effect of γ-irradiation from Co60 of radiation doze 50 MRad on the dielectric and thermodynamical properties of cholesteryl myristate (ChM) and cholesteryl pelargonate (ChP) have been studied by an electric impedance analyzer and differential scanning calorimeter (DSC). The mesophase transition temperatures, the enthalpy and the entropy of the transitions are depressed, and transition curves become asymmetric and wide on γ-irradiation. From the depressions in crystal to mesophase transition temperatures of ChM and ChP, we have estimated the molar fraction of impurity like fragments produced due to γ-irradiation of 50 MRad doze to be about 10%. Dielectric study of planar oriented samples of these two esters in the frequency range of 1 kHz to 10 MHz shows that due to γ-irradiation dielectric loss (ɛ`) is increased by 50 to 150% in different mesophases while dielectric constant (ɛ') is almost unchanged.

  11. Luminescence imaging of water during carbon-ion irradiation for range estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Seiichi Komori, Masataka; Koyama, Shuji; Morishita, Yuki; Sekihara, Eri; Akagi, Takashi; Yamashita, Tomohiro; Toshito, Toshiyuki

    2016-05-15

    Purpose: The authors previously reported successful luminescence imaging of water during proton irradiation and its application to range estimation. However, since the feasibility of this approach for carbon-ion irradiation remained unclear, the authors conducted luminescence imaging during carbon-ion irradiation and estimated the ranges. Methods: The authors placed a pure-water phantom on the patient couch of a carbon-ion therapy system and measured the luminescence images with a high-sensitivity, cooled charge-coupled device camera during carbon-ion irradiation. The authors also carried out imaging of three types of phantoms (tap-water, an acrylic block, and a plastic scintillator) and compared their intensities and distributions with those of a phantom containing pure-water. Results: The luminescence images of pure-water phantoms during carbon-ion irradiation showed clear Bragg peaks, and the measured carbon-ion ranges from the images were almost the same as those obtained by simulation. The image of the tap-water phantom showed almost the same distribution as that of the pure-water phantom. The acrylic block phantom’s luminescence image produced seven times higher luminescence and had a 13% shorter range than that of the water phantoms; the range with the acrylic phantom generally matched the calculated value. The plastic scintillator showed ∼15 000 times higher light than that of water. Conclusions: Luminescence imaging during carbon-ion irradiation of water is not only possible but also a promising method for range estimation in carbon-ion therapy.

  12. Effects of gamma irradiation and silver nano particles on microbiological characteristics of saffron, using hurdle technology.

    PubMed

    Hamid Sales, E; Motamedi Sedeh, F; Rajabifar, S

    2012-03-01

    Saffron, a plant from the Iridaceae family, is the world's most expensive spice. Gamma irradiation and silver nano particles whose uses are gradually increasing worldwide, have positive effects on preventing decay by sterilizing the microorganisms and by improving the safety without compromising the nutritional properties and sensory quality of the foods. In the present study combination effects of gamma irradiation and silver nano particles packaging on the microbial contamination of saffron were considered during storage. A combination of hurdles can ensure stability and microbial safety of foods. For this purpose, saffron samples were packaged by Poly Ethylene films that posses up to 300 ppm nano silver particles as antimicrobial agents and then irradiated in cobalt-60 irradiator (gamma cell PX30, dose rate 0.55 Gry/Sec) to 0, 1, 2,3 and 4 kGy at room temperature. The antimicrobial activities against Total Aerobic Mesophilic Bacteria, Entrobacteriace, Escherichia Coli and Clostridium Perfringines were higher in the irradiated samples, demonstrating the inhibition zone for their growth. Irradiation of the saffron samples packaged by Poly Ethylene films with nano silver particles showed the best results for decreasing microbial contamination at 2 kGy and for Poly Ethylene films without silver nano particles; it was 4 kGy.

  13. Inactivation of a Human Norovirus Surrogate, Human Norovirus Virus-Like Particles, and Vesicular Stomatitis Virus by Gamma Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Kurtis; Divers, Erin; Ma, Yuanmei; Li, Jianrong

    2011-01-01

    Gamma irradiation is a nonthermal processing technology that has been used for the preservation of a variety of food products. This technology has been shown to effectively inactivate bacterial pathogens. Currently, the FDA has approved doses of up to 4.0 kGy to control food-borne pathogens in fresh iceberg lettuce and spinach. However, whether this dose range effectively inactivates food-borne viruses is less understood. We have performed a systematic study on the inactivation of a human norovirus surrogate (murine norovirus 1 [MNV-1]), human norovirus virus-like particles (VLPs), and vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) by gamma irradiation. We demonstrated that MNV-1 and human norovirus VLPs were resistant to gamma irradiation. For MNV-1, only a 1.7- to 2.4-log virus reduction in fresh produce at the dose of 5.6 kGy was observed. However, VSV was more susceptible to gamma irradiation, and a 3.3-log virus reduction at a dose of 5.6 kGy in Dulbecco's modified Eagle medium (DMEM) was achieved. We further demonstrated that gamma irradiation disrupted virion structure and degraded viral proteins and genomic RNA, which resulted in virus inactivation. Using human norovirus VLPs as a model, we provide the first evidence that the capsid of human norovirus has stability similar to that of MNV-1 after exposure to gamma irradiation. Overall, our results suggest that viruses are much more resistant to irradiation than bacterial pathogens. Although gamma irradiation used to eliminate the virus contaminants in fresh produce by the FDA-approved irradiation dose limits seems impractical, this technology may be practical to inactivate viruses for other purposes, such as sterilization of medical equipment. PMID:21441330

  14. Non-random distribution of DNA double-strand breaks induced by particle irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lobrich, M.; Cooper, P. K.; Rydberg, B.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    Induction of DNA double-strand breaks (dsbs) in mammalian cells is dependent on the spatial distribution of energy deposition from the ionizing radiation. For high LET particle radiations the primary ionization sites occur in a correlated manner along the track of the particles, while for X-rays these sites are much more randomly distributed throughout the volume of the cell. It can therefore be expected that the distribution of dsbs linearly along the DNA molecule also varies with the type of radiation and the ionization density. Using pulsed-field gel and conventional gel techniques, we measured the size distribution of DNA molecules from irradiated human fibroblasts in the total range of 0.1 kbp-10 Mbp for X-rays and high LET particles (N ions, 97 keV/microns and Fe ions, 150 keV/microns). On a mega base pair scale we applied conventional pulsed-field gel electrophoresis techniques such as measurement of the fraction of DNA released from the well (FAR) and measurement of breakage within a specific NotI restriction fragment (hybridization assay). The induction rate for widely spaced breaks was found to decrease with LET. However, when the entire distribution of radiation-induced fragments was analysed, we detected an excess of fragments with sizes below about 200 kbp for the particles compared with X-irradiation. X-rays are thus more effective than high LET radiations in producing large DNA fragments but less effective in the production of smaller fragments. We determined the total induction rate of dsbs for the three radiations based on a quantitative analysis of all the measured radiation-induced fragments and found that the high LET particles were more efficient than X-rays at inducing dsbs, indicating an increasing total efficiency with LET. Conventional assays that are based only on the measurement of large fragments are therefore misleading when determining total dsb induction rates of high LET particles. The possible biological significance of this non

  15. PIE on Safety-Tested Loose Particles from Irradiated Compact 4-4-2

    SciTech Connect

    Hunn, John D.; Gerczak, Tyler J.; Morris, Robert Noel; Baldwin, Charles A.; Montgomery, Fred C.

    2016-04-01

    Post-irradiation examination (PIE) is being performed in support of tristructural isotropic (TRISO) coated particle fuel development and qualification for High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors (HTGRs). This work is sponsored by the Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) through the Advanced Reactor Technologies (ART) Office under the Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification (AGR) Program. The AGR-1 experiment was the first in a series of TRISO fuel irradiation tests initiated in 2006. The AGR-1 TRISO particles and fuel compacts were fabricated at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in 2006 using laboratory-scale equipment and irradiated for 3 years in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to demonstrate and evaluate fuel performance under HTGR irradiation conditions. Post-irradiation examination was performed at INL and ORNL to study how the fuel behaved during irradiation, and to test fuel performance during exposure to elevated temperatures at or above temperatures that could occur during a depressurized conduction cooldown event. This report summarizes safety testing and post-safety testing PIE conducted at ORNL on loose particles extracted from irradiated AGR-1 Compact 4-4-2.

  16. Cell and tissue kinetics of the subependymal layer in mouse brain following heavy charged particle irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Manley, N.B.

    1988-01-01

    The following studies investigate the cellular response and cell population kinetics of the subependymal layer in the mouse brain exposed to heavy charged particle irradiation. Partial brain irradiation with helium and neon ions was confined to one cortex of the brain. Both the irradiated and the unirradiated contralateral cortex showed similar disturbances of the cell and tissue kinetics in the subependymal layers. The irradiated hemisphere exhibited histological damage, whereas the unirradiated side appeared normal histologically. The decrease in the values of the labeling indices 1 week after charged particle irradiation was dose- and ion-dependent. Mitotic indices 1 week after 10 and 25 Gy helium and after 10 Gy neon were the same as those seen in the control mice. Analysis of cell kinetics 1 week after 10 Gy helium and 10 Gy neon irradiation suggests the presence of a progenitor subpopulation that is proliferating with a shorter cell cycle. Comparison of the responses to the different charged particle beams indicates that neon ions are more effective in producing direct cellular damage than the helium ions, but the surviving proliferating cells several divisions later continue to maintain active cell renewal. Based on the 1 week post-irradiation H{sup 3}-TdR labeling indices, a rough estimate of the RBE for neon ions is at least 2.5 when compared to helium ions.

  17. Cancer Cell Radiobiological Studies Using In-House-Developed α-Particle Irradiator.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Jenny; Bauden, Monika Posaric; Nilsson, Jonas M; Strand, Sven-Erik; Elgqvist, Jörgen

    2015-11-01

    An α-particle irradiator, enabling high-precision irradiation of cells for in vitro studies, has been constructed. The irradiation source was a (241)Am source, on which well inserts containing cancer cells growing in monolayer were placed. The total radioactivity, uniformity, and α-particle spectrum were determined by use of HPGe detector, Gafchromic dosimetry film, and PIPS detector measurements, respectively. Monte Carlo simulations were used for dosimetry. Three prostate cancer (LNCaP, DU145, PC3) and three pancreatic cancer (Capan-1, Panc-1, BxPC-3) cell lines were irradiated by α-particles to the absorbed doses 0, 0.5, 1, and 2 Gy. For reference, cells were irradiated using (137)Cs to the absorbed doses 0, 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 Gy. Radiation sensitivity was estimated using a tetrazolium salt-based colorimetric assay with absorbance measurements at 450 nm. The relative biological effectiveness for α-particles relative to γ-irradiation at 37% cell survival for the LNCaP, DU145, PC3, Capan-1, Panc-1, and BxPC-3 cells was 7.9 ± 1.7, 8.0 ± 0.8, 7.0 ± 1.1, 12.5 ± 1.6, 9.4 ± 0.9, and 6.2 ± 0.7, respectively. The results show the feasibility of constructing a desktop α-particle irradiator as well as indicate that both prostate and pancreatic cancers are good candidates for further studies of α-particle radioimmunotherapy.

  18. Single α-particle irradiation permits real-time visualization of RNF8 accumulation at DNA damaged sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muggiolu, Giovanna; Pomorski, Michal; Claverie, Gérard; Berthet, Guillaume; Mer-Calfati, Christine; Saada, Samuel; Devès, Guillaume; Simon, Marina; Seznec, Hervé; Barberet, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    As well as being a significant source of environmental radiation exposure, α-particles are increasingly considered for use in targeted radiation therapy. A better understanding of α-particle induced damage at the DNA scale can be achieved by following their tracks in real-time in targeted living cells. Focused α-particle microbeams can facilitate this but, due to their low energy (up to a few MeV) and limited range, α-particles detection, delivery, and follow-up observations of radiation-induced damage remain difficult. In this study, we developed a thin Boron-doped Nano-Crystalline Diamond membrane that allows reliable single α-particles detection and single cell irradiation with negligible beam scattering. The radiation-induced responses of single 3 MeV α-particles delivered with focused microbeam are visualized in situ over thirty minutes after irradiation by the accumulation of the GFP-tagged RNF8 protein at DNA damaged sites.

  19. Single α-particle irradiation permits real-time visualization of RNF8 accumulation at DNA damaged sites

    PubMed Central

    Muggiolu, Giovanna; Pomorski, Michal; Claverie, Gérard; Berthet, Guillaume; Mer-Calfati, Christine; Saada, Samuel; Devès, Guillaume; Simon, Marina; Seznec, Hervé; Barberet, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    As well as being a significant source of environmental radiation exposure, α-particles are increasingly considered for use in targeted radiation therapy. A better understanding of α-particle induced damage at the DNA scale can be achieved by following their tracks in real-time in targeted living cells. Focused α-particle microbeams can facilitate this but, due to their low energy (up to a few MeV) and limited range, α-particles detection, delivery, and follow-up observations of radiation-induced damage remain difficult. In this study, we developed a thin Boron-doped Nano-Crystalline Diamond membrane that allows reliable single α-particles detection and single cell irradiation with negligible beam scattering. The radiation-induced responses of single 3 MeV α-particles delivered with focused microbeam are visualized in situ over thirty minutes after irradiation by the accumulation of the GFP-tagged RNF8 protein at DNA damaged sites. PMID:28139723

  20. Single α-particle irradiation permits real-time visualization of RNF8 accumulation at DNA damaged sites.

    PubMed

    Muggiolu, Giovanna; Pomorski, Michal; Claverie, Gérard; Berthet, Guillaume; Mer-Calfati, Christine; Saada, Samuel; Devès, Guillaume; Simon, Marina; Seznec, Hervé; Barberet, Philippe

    2017-01-31

    As well as being a significant source of environmental radiation exposure, α-particles are increasingly considered for use in targeted radiation therapy. A better understanding of α-particle induced damage at the DNA scale can be achieved by following their tracks in real-time in targeted living cells. Focused α-particle microbeams can facilitate this but, due to their low energy (up to a few MeV) and limited range, α-particles detection, delivery, and follow-up observations of radiation-induced damage remain difficult. In this study, we developed a thin Boron-doped Nano-Crystalline Diamond membrane that allows reliable single α-particles detection and single cell irradiation with negligible beam scattering. The radiation-induced responses of single 3 MeV α-particles delivered with focused microbeam are visualized in situ over thirty minutes after irradiation by the accumulation of the GFP-tagged RNF8 protein at DNA damaged sites.

  1. Luminescence imaging of water during proton-beam irradiation for range estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Seiichi Okumura, Satoshi; Komori, Masataka; Toshito, Toshiyuki

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: Proton therapy has the ability to selectively deliver a dose to the target tumor, so the dose distribution should be accurately measured by a precise and efficient method. The authors found that luminescence was emitted from water during proton irradiation and conjectured that this phenomenon could be used for estimating the dose distribution. Methods: To achieve more accurate dose distribution, the authors set water phantoms on a table with a spot scanning proton therapy system and measured the luminescence images of these phantoms with a high-sensitivity, cooled charge coupled device camera during proton-beam irradiation. The authors imaged the phantoms of pure water, fluorescein solution, and an acrylic block. Results: The luminescence images of water phantoms taken during proton-beam irradiation showed clear Bragg peaks, and the measured proton ranges from the images were almost the same as those obtained with an ionization chamber. Furthermore, the image of the pure-water phantom showed almost the same distribution as the tap-water phantom, indicating that the luminescence image was not related to impurities in the water. The luminescence image of the fluorescein solution had ∼3 times higher intensity than water, with the same proton range as that of water. The luminescence image of the acrylic phantom had a 14.5% shorter proton range than that of water; the proton range in the acrylic phantom generally matched the calculated value. The luminescence images of the tap-water phantom during proton irradiation could be obtained in less than 2 s. Conclusions: Luminescence imaging during proton-beam irradiation is promising as an effective method for range estimation in proton therapy.

  2. 4D particle therapy PET simulation for moving targets irradiated with scanned ion beams.

    PubMed

    Laube, K; Menkel, S; Bert, C; Enghardt, W; Helmbrecht, S; Saito, N; Fiedler, F

    2013-02-07

    Particle therapy positron emission tomography (PT-PET) allows for an in vivo and in situ verification of applied dose distributions in ion beam therapy. Since the dose distribution cannot be extracted directly from the β(+)-activity distribution gained from the PET scan the validation is done by means of a comparison between the reconstructed β(+)-activity distributions from a PT-PET measurement and from a PT-PET simulation. Thus, the simulation software for generating PET data predicted from the treatment planning is an essential part of the dose verification routine. For the dose monitoring of intra-fractionally moving target volumes the PET data simulation needs to be upgraded by using time resolved (4D) algorithms to account correctly for the motion dependent displacement of the positron emitters. Moreover, it has to consider the time dependent relative movement between target volume and scanned beam to simulate the accurate positron emitter distribution generated during irradiation. Such a simulation program is presented which properly proceeds with motion compensated dose delivery by scanned ion beams to intra-fractionally moving targets. By means of a preclinical phantom study it is demonstrated that even the sophisticated motion-mitigated beam delivery technique of range compensated target tracking can be handled correctly by this simulation code. The new program is widely based on the 3D PT-PET simulation program which had been developed at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Germany (HZDR) for application within a pilot project to simulate in-beam PET data for about 440 patients with static tumor entities irradiated at the former treatment facility of the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt, Germany (GSI). A simulation example for a phantom geometry irradiated with a tracked (12)C-ion beam is presented for demonstrating the proper functionality of the program.

  3. Measurement of kernel swelling and buffer densification in irradiated UCO-TRISO particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bower, Gordon R.; Ploger, Scott A.; Demkowicz, Paul A.; Hunn, John D.

    2017-04-01

    Radiation-induced volume changes in the fuel kernels and buffer layers of UCO-TRISO particles irradiated to an average burnup of 16.1% FIMA have been determined. Measurements of particle dimensions were made on polished cross-sections of 56 irradiated particles at several different polish planes. The data were then analyzed to compute the equivalent spherical diameters of the kernels and the various coating layers, and these were compared to the average as-fabricated values to determine changes due to irradiation. The kernel volume was found to have increased by an average of 26 ± 6%. Buffer volume decreased by an average of 39 ± 2% due to densification.

  4. Cell and tissue kinetics of the subependymal layer in mouse brain following heavy charged particle irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Manley, N.B.; Fabrikant, J.I.; Alpen, E.L.

    1988-12-01

    The following studies investigate the cellular response and cell population kinetics of the subependymal layer in the mouse brain exposed to heavy charged particle irradiation. Partial brain irradiation with helium and neon ions was confined to one cortex of the brain. Both the irradiated and the unirradiated contralateral cortex showed similar disturbances of the cell and tissue kinetics in the subependymal layers. The irradiated hemisphere exhibited histological damage, whereas the unirradiated side appeared normal histologically. This study concerns the cell population and cell cycle kinetics of the subependymal layer in the mouse brain, and the effects of charged particle irradiations on this cell population. Quantitative high resolution autoradiography was used to study the kinetic parameters in this cell layer. This study should help in understanding the effects of these high-energy heavy ions on normal mammalian brain tissue. The response of the mammalian brain exposure to charged particle ionizing radiation may be extremely variable. It varies from minimal physiological changes to overt tissue necrosis depending on a number of factors such as: the administered dose, dose-rate, the volume of the irradiated tissue, and the biological end-point being examined.

  5. Late structural changes in mouse coronary arteries after iron-particle irradiation of the orbital region.

    PubMed

    Yang, V C

    1993-06-01

    A single dose of 0.1 or 0.2 Gy iron particles was given to B6CF1 female mice at 4 months of age. Degenerative changes in the coronary arteries due to orbital irradiation were observed 15 months after irradiation. The major changes included smooth muscle degeneration with fibrosis and accumulation of debris and extracellular matrix in the medial layer of the vessels. Quantitative analysis indicates that the average fractional volume of degenerated area is 12% in the unirradiated group. The corresponding percentages are 28% (P < 0.01) and 24% (P < 0.01) after 0.1 and 0.2 Gy irradiation, respectively.

  6. INSIDE in-beam positron emission tomography system for particle range monitoring in hadrontherapy.

    PubMed

    Bisogni, Maria Giuseppina; Attili, Andrea; Battistoni, Giuseppe; Belcari, Nicola; Camarlinghi, Niccolo'; Cerello, Piergiorgio; Coli, Silvia; Del Guerra, Alberto; Ferrari, Alfredo; Ferrero, Veronica; Fiorina, Elisa; Giraudo, Giuseppe; Kostara, Eleftheria; Morrocchi, Matteo; Pennazio, Francesco; Peroni, Cristiana; Piliero, Maria Antonietta; Pirrone, Giovanni; Rivetti, Angelo; Rolo, Manuel D; Rosso, Valeria; Sala, Paola; Sportelli, Giancarlo; Wheadon, Richard

    2017-01-01

    The quality assurance of particle therapy treatment is a fundamental issue that can be addressed by developing reliable monitoring techniques and indicators of the treatment plan correctness. Among the available imaging techniques, positron emission tomography (PET) has long been investigated and then clinically applied to proton and carbon beams. In 2013, the Innovative Solutions for Dosimetry in Hadrontherapy (INSIDE) collaboration proposed an innovative bimodal imaging concept that combines an in-beam PET scanner with a tracking system for charged particle imaging. This paper presents the general architecture of the INSIDE project but focuses on the in-beam PET scanner that has been designed to reconstruct the particles range with millimetric resolution within a fraction of the dose delivered in a treatment of head and neck tumors. The in-beam PET scanner has been recently installed at the Italian National Center of Oncologic Hadrontherapy (CNAO) in Pavia, Italy, and the commissioning phase has just started. The results of the first beam test with clinical proton beams on phantoms clearly show the capability of the in-beam PET to operate during the irradiation delivery and to reconstruct on-line the beam-induced activity map. The accuracy in the activity distal fall-off determination is millimetric for therapeutic doses.

  7. Response of Ni/4H-SiC Schottky barrier diodes to alpha-particle irradiation at different fluences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omotoso, E.; Meyer, W. E.; Auret, F. D.; Diale, M.; Ngoepe, P. N. M.

    2016-01-01

    Irradiation experiments have been carried out on 1.9×1016 cm-3 nitrogen-doped 4H-SiC at room temperature using 5.4 MeV alpha-particle irradiation over a fluence ranges from 2.6×1010 to 9.2×1011 cm-2. Current-voltage (I-V), capacitance-voltage (C-V) and deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) measurements have been carried out to study the change in characteristics of the devices and free carrier removal rate due to alpha-particle irradiation, respectively. As radiation fluence increases, the ideality factors increased from 1.20 to 1.85 but the Schottky barrier height (SBHI-V) decreased from 1.47 to 1.34 eV. Free carrier concentration, Nd decreased with increasing fluence from 1.7×1016 to 1.1×1016 cm-2 at approximately 0.70 μm depth. The reduction in Nd shows that defects were induced during the irradiation and have effect on compensating the free carrier. The free carrier removal rate was estimated to be 6480±70 cm-1. Alpha-particle irradiation introduced two electron traps (E0.39 and E0.62), with activation energies of 0.39±0.03 eV and 0.62±0.08 eV, respectively. The E0.39 as attribute related to silicon or carbon vacancy, while the E0.62 has the attribute of Z1/Z2.

  8. Genotoxicity and gene expression in the nematode C. elegans in response to charged particle irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, G. A.; Bayeta, E. J.; Jones, T. A.; Lloyd, E. M.; Perez, C. P.; Tian, J.

    We use the simple invertebrate worm, C. elegans, as a test system to investigate the unique biological responses to high LET charged particles, including iron ions. In the germ line, autosomal recessive lethal mutations in a 12 Mbp genetic region have been measured for particles of atomic number (Z) ranging from 1 to 57 and specific energies (E) of from 150 MeV/n to 5 GeV/n. Fluence vs. responses, RBE's and mutation cross sections have been determined as functions of particle type and specific energy. In the 34-cell somatic intestine, anaphase bridges have been similarly quantified over comparable ranges of Z and E. The individual gut cell responses have been mapped in vivo; they show spatial regulation and up to 3-fold differences in radiosensitivity, even amongst sibling cells. Evidence for non-autonomous (bystander) regulation has been obtained and we hypothesize that signals from the germ-line modulate gut responses. Microarray analysis of gene transcription patterns from the 19,000 genes of worms demonstrates striking differences in the identities and magnitudes of expression for genes in worms irradiated with 3 Gray of gamma rays, 250 MeV protons or 1 Gev/n iron ions. Hierarchical clustering analysis demonstrates well-defined groups of highly-correlated responding genes unique to each radiation species. Several clusters involve genes required for extracellular matrix synthesis and include many collagens associated with the exoskeletal cuticle secreted by hypodermal cells. Differentially regulated genes of currently unknown function are being tested for their effects on radiosensitivity using an RNA interference method to knock down their activities prior to radiation exposure. The authors gratefully acknowledge NASA for sponsoring the reported studies.

  9. Comparison of dispersion behavior of agglomerated particles in liquid between ultrasonic irradiation and mechanical stirring.

    PubMed

    Sumitomo, Syunsuke; Koizumi, Hayato; Uddin, Md Azhar; Kato, Yoshiei

    2018-01-01

    The particle dispersion behavior was compared for ultrasonic irradiation and mechanical stirring. The experiment and calculation were carried out with polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) particles. The dispersion rate of the agglomerated particles increased with the decreasing ultrasonic frequency and the increasing electric power, whereas it increased with the increasing rotation speed for the mechanical stirring. The temporal change in the particle dispersion proceeded stably after passage of a long time. The dispersion of the ultrasonic irradiation was suggested to occur by the erosion from the surface of the cluster one by one due to the bulk cavitation as well as the division into smaller particles because of the inner cavitation, and that of the mechanical stirring mainly by the division into smaller clusters due to the shear stress flow. Based on the experimental results, mathematical models for the ultrasonic irradiation and mechanical stirring were developed with the dispersion and agglomeration terms and the calculation of the temporal change in the total cluster number at the different operational factors agreed with the experiments. The dispersion efficiency of the ultrasonic irradiation was larger than that of the mechanical stirring at the lower input power, but it was reversed at the higher input power. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Thermally and optically stimulated luminescence of new ZnO nanophosphors exposed to beta particle irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz-v&Ázquez, C.; Burruel-Ibarra, S. E.; Grijalva-Monteverde, H.; Chernov, V.; Bernal, R.

    In this work, we report on the thermoluminescence (TL) and the optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) of ZnO nanophosphors obtained by thermal annealing of ZnS powders synthesized by precipitation in a chemical bath deposition reaction. To obtain nanocrystalline ZnO, ZnS pellet-shaped samples were subjected to a sintering process at 700 °C during 24 h exposed to air at atmospheric pressure. Some samples were exposed to beta particles in the 0.15-10.15 kGy dose range and the integrated TL as a function of dose increased with dose level, with no saturation indication for the tested dose levels. Computerized glow-curve deconvolution of the experimental glow curves in individual peaks revealed a second-order kinetics. In order to test the OSL response, samples were irradiated with beta particles with doses up to 600 Gy, and an increasing intensity as dose increased was observed. We conclude that the new ZnO phosphors under investigation are good candidates to be used as dosimetric materials.

  11. Progress report of the single particle irradiation system to cell (SPICE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imaseki, Hitoshi; Ishikawa, Takahiro; Iso, Hiroyuki; Konishi, Teruaki; Suya, Noriyoshi; Hamano, Takeshi; Wang, Xufei; Yasuda, Nakahiro; Yukawa, Masae

    2007-07-01

    At the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), we constructed a microbeam system in 2003, the single particle irradiation to cell, SPICE. From the beginning of 2005, we redesigned it to improve the stability of the optical alignment of the system, and obtained an reduction of the beam size proportional to the vertical dimension of the object slits. As a result, SPICE is now capable of producing a beam size of approximately 10 μm diameter, and the particle numbers controllable to an intensity as low as single particles per second, and therefore a single particle irradiation facility has been successfully implemented. Moreover, these conditions can be easily reproduced with a employing a routine procedure. We describe in detail the modifications of the beam line and results, demonstrating the improvements. In addition, results from our first biological experiments are shown.

  12. Radiosensitivity of Prostate Cancer Cell Lines for Irradiation from Beta Particle-emitting Radionuclide ¹⁷⁷Lu Compared to Alpha Particles and Gamma Rays.

    PubMed

    Elgqvist, Jörgen; Timmermand, Oskar Vilhelmsson; Larsson, Erik; Strand, Sven-Erik

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the radiosensitivity of the prostate cancer cell lines LNCaP, DU145, and PC3 when irradiated with beta particles emitted from (177)Lu, and to compare the effect with irradiation using alpha particles or gamma rays. Cells were irradiated with beta particles emitted from (177)Lu, alpha particles from (241)Am, or gamma rays from (137)Cs. A non-specific polyclonal antibody was labeled with (177)Lu and used to irradiate cells in suspension with beta particles. A previously described in-house developed alpha-particle irradiator based on a (241)Am source was used to irradiate cells with alpha particles. External gamma-ray irradiation was achieved using a standard (137)Cs irradiator. Cells were irradiated to absorbed doses equal to 0, 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, or 10 Gy. The absorbed doses were calculated as mean absorbed doses. For evaluation of cell survival, the tetrazolium-based WST-1 assay was used. After irradiation, WST-1 was added to the cell solutions, incubated, and then measured for level of absorbance at 450 nm, indicating the live and viable cells. LNCaP, DU145, and PC3 cell lines all had similar patterns of survival for the different radiation types. No significant difference in surviving fractions were observed between cells treated with beta-particle and gamma-ray irradiation, represented for example by the surviving fraction values (mean±SD) at 2, 6, and 10 Gy (SF2, SF6, and SF10) for DU145 after beta-particle irradiation: 0.700±0.090, 0.186±0.050 and 0.056±0.010, respectively. A strong radiosensitivity to alpha particles was observed, with SF2 values of 0.048±0.008, 0.018±0.006 and 0.015±0.005 for LNCaP, DU145, and PC3, respectively. The surviving fractions after irradiation using beta particles or gamma rays did not differ significantly at the absorbed dose levels and dose rates used. Irradiation using alpha particles led to a high level of cell killing. The results show that the beta-particle emitter

  13. Measurements of Fluorescent Bioaerosol Particles in the Colorado Front Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perring, A. E.; Emerson, J. B.; Fierer, N.; Schwarz, J. P.; Fahey, D. W.

    2013-12-01

    Bioaerosols are of atmospheric interest due to their potential importance as cloud condensation and heterogeneous ice nuclei and because they represent a sizeable fraction of coarse mode aerosol in some locations. Relatively little data exists, however, regarding diurnal, seasonal and annual cycles of bioaerosols and the meteorological processes that control them. Newly developed real-time instrumentation allows for sensitive, high time resolution detection of fluorescent bioaerosols and is uniquely suited to address key uncertainties in the sources, distributions and behavior of these particles in the atmosphere. Here we present observations of ambient fluorescent biological aerosol made on the Front Range of Colorado using a custom-modified Wideband Integrated Bioaerosol Sensor (WIBS) during the summer and fall of 2013. The summertime measurements were made from the roof of the NOAA ESRL David Skaggs Research Center in Boulder and the fall measurements were made both at the surface and aloft at the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory Tall Tower. We examine diurnal variations in loading and size distribution of fluorescent bioaerosol at the two locations. We also investigate the relationship between meteorological events and fluorescent bioaerosol. For example, we observe higher concentrations and markedly different number distributions associated with precipitation events. Simultaneous filter samples were collected for DNA sequencing and flow cytometry. To our knowledge this represents the first such comparison for the WIBS under ambient conditions and the microbial identification accomplished with the filters adds significantly to the analysis. This data set will provide useful insight into the sources, loadings and properties of fluorescent bioaerosol and the local and regional processes that drive them.

  14. Broad-Host Range Vector-Particle: Gene Transfer Particles From Thermal Vents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiura, H. X.; Nakamura, K.; Fukazawa, Y.; Nakata, D.; Tomaru, A.; Okita, N.; Hoaki, T.

    2002-12-01

    Viruses or virus-like particles (VLPs) are common in aquatic ecosystems, however, VLP-host interactions and its commitments to gene transfer in the environment is yet unclear. We have proposed that at least some of the widely distributed VLPs could be general gene transfer agents among a wide range of microbial host cells, and might function as a universal vector (1-4). To elucidate such a broad host range gene transfer mediated by "VLP", the sampling site was extended to the hyper hydrothermal vent, and boring cores. VLP (v) and cell (b) abundances per ml water samples from drilling holes of Suiyo seamount were: APSK04 (28°34.303'N, 140°38.618'E, 1385 m deep, 21°C, b = 8.26 *E^{6}, v = 6.03 x 10^{6}); APSK07 (28°34.299'N, 140°38.690'E, 1386 m deep, 250.5°C, b = 5.33 \\times 104, v = 2.52 \\times 104); a natural vent near APSK05 (28°34.322'N, 140°38.594'E, 1382 m deep, 304.7°C, b = 3.23 x 10^{4}, v = 1.85 x 10^{4}). A boring core sample was obtained from APSK06 (28°34.313'N, 140°38.617', 1386 m deep), from which a hyper thermophilic Archaean, Thermococcus kodakaraensis was successfully cultivated in sulphur supplemented medium between 70 and 90°C. VLP production was observed from T. kodakaraensis, whose VLP (v) and cell (b) abundances per ml at 480 h culture at 70°C were: b = 3.61 *E^{9}, v = 3.46 *E^{9}. Transduction experiment at multiplicity of infection of ca 0.2 using particles from APSK07 and T. kodakaraensis showed a plate efficiency on recipient Escherichia coli AB1157 by ca 72 % and ca 89 % regardless of UV treatment of the particle. Gene transfer frequency of APSK07 particle was (x 10^{-5} cfu/particle) between 2.4 and 0.92, and that of T. kodakaraensis particle was between x 10^{-4} and x 10^{-5}$ cfu/particle. These findings suggest the non-specific gene transfer by such particles may be a ubiquitous event in the natural environment. Such gene transfer particles may have mediated gene flux among phylogenetically diverse microbial

  15. Spectral irradiance model for tungsten halogen lamps in 340-850 nm wavelength range

    SciTech Connect

    Ojanen, Maija; Kaerhae, Petri; Ikonen, Erkki

    2010-02-10

    We have developed a physical model for the spectral irradiance of 1 kW tungsten halogen incandescent lamps for the wavelength range 340-850 nm. The model consists of the Planck's radiation law, published values for the emissivity of tungsten, and a residual spectral correction function taking into account unknown factors of the lamp. The correction function was determined by measuring the spectra of a 1000 W, quartz-halogen, tungsten coiled filament (FEL) lamp at different temperatures. The new model was tested with lamps of types FEL and 1000 W, 120 V quartz halogen (DXW). Comparisons with measurements of two national standards laboratories indicate that the model can account for the spectral irradiance values of lamps with an agreement better than 1% throughout the spectral region studied. We further demonstrate that the spectral irradiance of a lamp can be predicted with an expanded uncertainty of 2.6% if the color temperature and illuminance values for the lamp are known with expanded uncertainties of 20 K and 2%, respectively. In addition, it is suggested that the spectral irradiance may be derived from resistance measurements of the filament with lamp on and off.

  16. Ultraviolet Mutagenesis in Bacteriophage T4 I. Irradiation of Extracellular Phage Particles

    PubMed Central

    Drake, John W.

    1966-01-01

    Drake, John W. (University of Illinois, Urbana). Ultraviolet mutagenesis in bacteriophage T4. I. Irradiation of extracellular phage particles. J. Bacteriol. 91:1775–1780. 1966.—Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation of extracellular T4 phage particles induces about 2 × 10−4r mutations per lethal hit. The mutants largely escape detection unless the irradiated phages are plated with very soft overlay agar. Multiplicity reactivation is not a prerequisite for mutagenesis. A much higher frequency of base pair substitution-type mutants is induced than is found in the spontaneous background, but sign mutants are also induced. Nearly half of the mutants map into previously identified UV hot spots. The rII mutants induced extracellularly are very similar to those induced intracellularly. The mutants also appear to result from direct radiation effects upon the bacteriophage deoxyribonucleic acid. PMID:5937237

  17. Ultrasonic irradiation of deuterium-loaded palladium particles suspended in heavy water

    SciTech Connect

    Jorne, J.

    1996-01-01

    Ultrasonic irradiation of a slurry of deuterium-loaded palladium powder (1 {mu}m) suspended in heavy water causes cavitation and high-speed collisions between the palladium particles. High local temperatures, estimated at above the melting point of palladium (1828 K), cause melting and interparticle fusion. The expectation that such collisions can induce high stresses within the palladium particles and lead to favorable conditions for nuclear cold fusion of the deuterium atoms within the palladium lattice is checked by measuring the neutron rates during ultrasonic irradiation. Several bursts of neutron counting are observed and can be accounted for as background anomalism, although the highest observed neutron rate is about four times the background and cannot be explained as background. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis of the deuterium-loaded palladium powders reveals that after ultrasonic irradiation in heavy water, the palladium powder becomes partially oxidized and undergoes some compositional changes. 18 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Electrical potentials in bone induced by ultrasound irradiation in the megahertz range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okino, M.; Coutelou, S.; Mizuno, K.; Yanagitani, T.; Matsukawa, M.

    2013-09-01

    Low frequency mechanical studies have reported the contribution of stress-induced electrical potentials to bone metabolism. However, the healing mechanism of bone fractures by low intensity ultrasound is not yet clear. We demonstrate that bone can generate electrical potentials by ultrasound irradiation in the MHz range. Electrical potentials were obtained from the output of bovine cortical bone transducers. In the range of 0.7-2.5 MHz, sensitivities of bone transducers were around 1/1000 of a poly (vinylidene fluoride) ultrasonic transducer and did not depend on magnitude and alignment of hydroxyapatite crystallites in bone.

  19. Influence of solution chemistry on the inactivation of particle-associated viruses by UV irradiation.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zhe; Lu, Ruiqing; Yuan, Baoling; Zhou, Zhenming; Wu, Qingqing; Nguyen, Thanh H

    2016-12-01

    MS2 inactivation by UV irradiance was investigated with the focus on how the disinfection efficacy is influenced by bacteriophage MS2 aggregation and adsorption to particles in solutions with different compositions. Kaolinite and Microcystis aeruginosa were used as model inorganic and organic particles, respectively. In the absence of model particles, MS2 aggregates formed in either 1mM NaCl at pH=3 or 50-200mM ionic strength CaCl2 solutions at pH=7 led to a decrease in the MS2 inactivation efficacy because the virions located inside the aggregate were protected from the UV irradiation. In the presence of kaolinite and Microcystis aeruginosa, MS2 adsorbed onto the particles in either 1mM NaCl at pH=3 or 50-200mM CaCl2 solutions at pH=7. In contrast to MS2 aggregates formed without the presence of particles, more MS2 virions adsorbed on these particles were exposed to UV irradiation to allow an increase in MS2 inactivation. In either 1mM NaCl at pH from 4 to 8 or 2-200mM NaCl solutions at pH=7, the absence of MS2 aggregation and adsorption onto the model particles explained why MS2 inactivation was not influenced by pH, ionic strength, and the presence of model particles in these conditions. The influence of virus adsorption and aggregation on the UV disinfection efficiency found in this research suggests the necessity of accounting for particles and cation composition in virus inactivation for drinking water. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Photodegradation of malachite green and malachite green carbinol under irradiation with different wavelength ranges.

    PubMed

    Fischer, A R; Werner, P; Goss, K-U

    2011-01-01

    The dye malachite green (MG) is used worldwide as a fungicide in aquaculture. It is a toxic substance which in aqueous solutions is partly converted into its non-ionic colorless form (leucocarbinol). The equilibrium between these two forms is pH-dependent (pK=6.9). To assess the photodegradation of MG under sunlight conditions, both species were irradiated separately in aqueous solutions with different pH values (4.0 and 12.0) using various ultraviolet and visible wavelength ranges (UV/VIS). A 700 W high-pressure mercury lamp with special filters was used. No artificial photooxidizers such as H₂O₂ or TiO₂ were added. MG leucocarbinol proved to be much more sensitive to irradiation than the dye form. Quantum yields Φ were calculated for some wavelength ranges as follows: MG carbinol: Φ((280-312 nm)) is 4.3 × 10⁻³, Φ((313 - 410 nm)) is 5.8 × 10⁻³, and MG dye: Φ((280 - 312 nm)) is 4.8 × 10(-5), Φ((313-365nm)) is 1.1×10⁻⁵, and Φ((> 365nm)) is 0, respectively. Therefore, the solar photolysis of MG is an important sink and primarily depends on the photodegradation of the colorless leucocarbinol. During the irradiation of MG leucocarbinol with wavelengths > 365 nm, an intermediate was formed which has photocatalytical properties.

  1. Viruslike particles in the tissues of normal and gamma-irradiated Drosophila melanogaster.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miquel, J.; Bensch, K. G.; Philpott, D. E.

    1972-01-01

    A new finding of viruslike particles in the salivary and accessory glands, muscles, and nerves of normal and gamma-irradiated Drosophila melanogaster is discussed. In morphology and size, the particles seemed identical to those described in earlier reports. On the basis of the available results, it cannot be affirmed that these particles infect only dividing cells, since they are found in all the Drosophila tissues so far examined. Their relation to the aging process is felt to be an interesting subject for further study.

  2. Effects of heavy particle irradiation and diet on object recognition memory in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabin, Bernard M.; Carrihill-Knoll, Kirsty; Hinchman, Marie; Shukitt-Hale, Barbara; Joseph, James A.; Foster, Brian C.

    2009-04-01

    On long-duration missions to other planets astronauts will be exposed to types and doses of radiation that are not experienced in low earth orbit. Previous research using a ground-based model for exposure to cosmic rays has shown that exposure to heavy particles, such as 56Fe, disrupts spatial learning and memory measured using the Morris water maze. Maintaining rats on diets containing antioxidant phytochemicals for 2 weeks prior to irradiation ameliorated this deficit. The present experiments were designed to determine: (1) the generality of the particle-induced disruption of memory by examining the effects of exposure to 56Fe particles on object recognition memory; and (2) whether maintaining rats on these antioxidant diets for 2 weeks prior to irradiation would also ameliorate any potential deficit. The results showed that exposure to low doses of 56Fe particles does disrupt recognition memory and that maintaining rats on antioxidant diets containing blueberry and strawberry extract for only 2 weeks was effective in ameliorating the disruptive effects of irradiation. The results are discussed in terms of the mechanisms by which exposure to these particles may produce effects on neurocognitive performance.

  3. Measurement of kernel swelling and buffer densification in irradiated UCO-TRISO particles

    DOE PAGES

    Bower, Gordon R.; Ploger, Scott A.; Demkowicz, Paul A.; ...

    2017-01-06

    We determined from radiation-induced volume changes in the fuel kernels and buffer layers of UCO-TRISO particles an average burnup of 16.1% FIMA. Measurements of particle dimensions were made on polished cross-sections of 56 irradiated particles at several different polish planes. Furthermore, the data were then analyzed to compute the equivalent spherical diameters of the kernels and the various coating layers, and these were compared to the average as-fabricated values to determine changes due to irradiation. The kernel volume was found to have increased by an average of 26 ± 6%. Buffer volume decreased by an average of 39 ± 2%more » due to densification.« less

  4. Development of a High Irradiance LED Configuration for Small Field of View Motion Estimation of Fertilizer Particles

    PubMed Central

    Cool, Simon; Pieters, Jan G.; Mertens, Koen C.; Mora, Sergio; Cointault, Frédéric; Dubois, Julien; van de Gucht, Tim; Vangeyte, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    Better characterization of the fertilizer spreading process, especially the fertilizer pattern distribution on the ground, requires an accurate measurement of individual particle properties and dynamics. Both 2D and 3D high speed imaging techniques have been developed for this purpose. To maximize the accuracy of the predictions, a specific illumination level is required. This paper describes the development of a high irradiance LED system for high speed motion estimation of fertilizer particles. A spectral sensitivity factor was used to select the optimal LED in relation to the used camera from a range of commercially available high power LEDs. A multiple objective genetic algorithm was used to find the optimal configuration of LEDs resulting in the most homogeneous irradiance in the target area. Simulations were carried out for different lenses and number of LEDs. The chosen configuration resulted in an average irradiance level of 452 W/m2 with coefficient of variation less than 2%. The algorithm proved superior and more flexible to other approaches reported in the literature and can be used for various other applications. PMID:26569261

  5. Development of a High Irradiance LED Configuration for Small Field of View Motion Estimation of Fertilizer Particles.

    PubMed

    Cool, Simon; Pieters, Jan G; Mertens, Koen C; Mora, Sergio; Cointault, Frédéric; Dubois, Julien; van de Gucht, Tim; Vangeyte, Jürgen

    2015-11-12

    Better characterization of the fertilizer spreading process, especially the fertilizer pattern distribution on the ground, requires an accurate measurement of individual particle properties and dynamics. Both 2D and 3D high speed imaging techniques have been developed for this purpose. To maximize the accuracy of the predictions, a specific illumination level is required. This paper describes the development of a high irradiance LED system for high speed motion estimation of fertilizer particles. A spectral sensitivity factor was used to select the optimal LED in relation to the used camera from a range of commercially available high power LEDs. A multiple objective genetic algorithm was used to find the optimal configuration of LEDs resulting in the most homogeneous irradiance in the target area. Simulations were carried out for different lenses and number of LEDs. The chosen configuration resulted in an average irradiance level of 452 W/m² with coefficient of variation less than 2%. The algorithm proved superior and more flexible to other approaches reported in the literature and can be used for various other applications.

  6. The 2175-A feature from irradiated graphitic particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorrell, Wilfred H.

    1990-01-01

    In diffuse clouds, a subpopulation of the carbon grains is graphitized by UV starlight during cloud lifetimes of roughly 100 Myr. Graphitic dust created in this way will behave like monosize Rayleigh particles and produce a 2175-A absorption band showing a Lorentzian profile. A physical model is outlined in which the strength and width of the band correlate with the dust grain environment, but the central wavelength is fixed by the Froehlich frequency for surface plasmons in a homogeneous sphere. On this model, the band appears strong and narrow only in dust clouds where the flux of UV starlight is high and the H atom gas density is low. The width of the band increases from diffuse to dense clouds mainly as a result of gas-phase H atoms accreted on to the grain surface. It is shown that hydrogenation weakens the band in dense clouds, and thus explains the anticorrelation between band strength and high carbon depletion. The model as a whole uses only 30 percent of the cosmic carbon and gives good agreement with observations of the 2175-A feature and the average interstellar extinction law.

  7. The 2175-A feature from irradiated graphitic particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorrell, Wilfred H.

    1990-01-01

    In diffuse clouds, a subpopulation of the carbon grains is graphitized by UV starlight during cloud lifetimes of roughly 100 Myr. Graphitic dust created in this way will behave like monosize Rayleigh particles and produce a 2175-A absorption band showing a Lorentzian profile. A physical model is outlined in which the strength and width of the band correlate with the dust grain environment, but the central wavelength is fixed by the Froehlich frequency for surface plasmons in a homogeneous sphere. On this model, the band appears strong and narrow only in dust clouds where the flux of UV starlight is high and the H atom gas density is low. The width of the band increases from diffuse to dense clouds mainly as a result of gas-phase H atoms accreted on to the grain surface. It is shown that hydrogenation weakens the band in dense clouds, and thus explains the anticorrelation between band strength and high carbon depletion. The model as a whole uses only 30 percent of the cosmic carbon and gives good agreement with observations of the 2175-A feature and the average interstellar extinction law.

  8. Dose Rate Calibration of a Commercial Beta-Particle Irradiator Used In Archeological and Geological Dating

    SciTech Connect

    Bernal, S.M.

    2004-10-31

    The 801E Multiple Sample Irradiator, manufactured by Daybreak Nuclear Systems, is capable of exposing up to 30 samples to beta radiation by placing each sample one by one directly beneath a heavily shielded ceramic Sr-90/Y-90 source and opening a specially designed shutter. Daybreak Nuclear Systems does not provide the {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y dose rate to the sample because of variations of up to 20% in the nominal activity of the beta sources (separately manufactured by AEA Technology). Thus it is left to the end user to determine. Here aluminum oxide doped with carbon (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C), in the form of Landauer's Luxel{trademark}, was irradiated to different known doses using a calibrated {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y beta particle irradiator, and the OSL signal monitored after each irradiation to generate a calibration curve. Comparison of the OSL Signal from the unknown 801E Irradiator dose with the calibration curve enabled the dose and therefore dose rate to be determined. The timing accuracy of the 801E Irradiator was also evaluated and found to be +/- 0.5 seconds. The dose rate of the beta source was found to be 0.147 +/- 0.007 Gy/s.

  9. Accelerator-Based Irradiation Creep of Pyrolytic Carbon Used in TRISO Fuel Particles for the (VHTR) Very Hight Temperature Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Lumin Wang; Gary Was

    2010-07-30

    Pyrolytic carbon (PyC) is one of the important structural materials in the TRISO fuel particles which will be used in the next generation of gas-cooled very-high-temperature reactors (VHTR). When the TRISO particles are under irradiation at high temperatures, creep of the PyC layers may cause radial cracking leading to catastrophic particle failure. Therefore, a fundamental understanding of the creep behavior of PyC during irradiation is required to predict the overall fuel performance.

  10. Effect of Alpha-Particle Irradiation on Brain Glycogen in the Rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfe, L. S.; Klatzo, Igor; Miquel, Jaime; Tobias, Cornelius; Haymaker, Webb

    1962-01-01

    The studies of Klatzo, Miquel, Tobias and Haymaker (1961) have shown that one of the earliest and most sensitive indications of the effects of alpha-particle irradiation on rat bran is the appearance of glycogen granules mainly in the neuroglia of the exposed area of the brain. Periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) positive, alpha-amylase soluble granules were demonstrated within 12 hr after irradiation, preceding by approximately 36 hr the first microscopically detectable vascular permeability disturbances, as shown by the fluorescein labeled serum protein technique. These studies suggested that the injurious effects of alpha-particle energy were on cellular elements primarily, according to the physical properties and distribution of the radiation in the tissue, and that the vascular permeability disturbances played a secondary role in pathogenesis. The purpose of this study was to correlate the histochemical observations on glycogen with a quantitative assessment of the glycogen in the irradiated brain tissue. It is felt that such a study may contribute to the understanding of radiation injury at the molecular level. A practical aspect of this problem is that the information on biological radiation effects due to accelerated particles from the cyclotron source, is employed in this study, is applicable to radiation from cosmic particles both in free space and entrapped in the Van Allen belts.

  11. The effects of heavy particle irradiation on exploration and response to environmental change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casadesus, G.; Shukitt-Hale, B.; Cantuti-Castelvetri, I.; Rabin, B. M.; Joseph, J. A.

    2004-01-01

    Free radicals produced by exposure to heavy particles have been found to produce motor and cognitive behavioral toxicity effects in rats similar to those found during aging. The present research was designed to investigate the effects of exposure to 56Fe particles on the ability of male Sprague-Dawley rats to detect novel arrangements in a given environment. Using a test of spatial memory previously demonstrated to be sensitive to aging, open field activity and reaction to spatial and non-spatial changes were measured in a group that received a dose of 1.5 Gy (n=10) of 56Fe heavy particle radiation or in non-radiated controls (n=10). Animals irradiated with 1.5 Gy of 56Fe particles exhibited some age-like effects in rats tested, even though they were, for the most part, subtle. Animals took longer to enter, visited less and spent significantly less time in the middle and the center portions of the open field, independently of total frequency and duration of activity of both groups. Likewise, irradiated subjects spend significantly more time exploring novel objects placed in the open field than did controls. However, irradiated subjects did not vary from controls in their exploration patterns when objects in the open field were spatially rearranged. Thus, irradiation with a dose of 1.5 Gy of 56Fe high-energy particle radiation elicited age-like effects in general open field exploratory behavior, but did not elicit age-like effects during the spatial and non-spatial rearrangement tasks. Published by Elsevier Ltd on behalf of COSPAR.

  12. The effects of heavy particle irradiation on exploration and response to environmental change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casadesus, G.; Shukitt-Hale, B.; Cantuti-Castelvetri, I.; Rabin, B. M.; Joseph, J. A.

    2004-01-01

    Free radicals produced by exposure to heavy particles have been found to produce motor and cognitive behavioral toxicity effects in rats similar to those found during aging. The present research was designed to investigate the effects of exposure to 56Fe particles on the ability of male Sprague-Dawley rats to detect novel arrangements in a given environment. Using a test of spatial memory previously demonstrated to be sensitive to aging, open field activity and reaction to spatial and non-spatial changes were measured in a group that received a dose of 1.5 Gy (n=10) of 56Fe heavy particle radiation or in non-radiated controls (n=10). Animals irradiated with 1.5 Gy of 56Fe particles exhibited some age-like effects in rats tested, even though they were, for the most part, subtle. Animals took longer to enter, visited less and spent significantly less time in the middle and the center portions of the open field, independently of total frequency and duration of activity of both groups. Likewise, irradiated subjects spend significantly more time exploring novel objects placed in the open field than did controls. However, irradiated subjects did not vary from controls in their exploration patterns when objects in the open field were spatially rearranged. Thus, irradiation with a dose of 1.5 Gy of 56Fe high-energy particle radiation elicited age-like effects in general open field exploratory behavior, but did not elicit age-like effects during the spatial and non-spatial rearrangement tasks. Published by Elsevier Ltd on behalf of COSPAR.

  13. Trace the polymerization induced by gamma-ray irradiated silica particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hoik; Ryu, Jungju; Kim, Myungwoong; Im, Seung Soon; Kim, Ick Soo; Sohn, Daewon

    2016-08-01

    A γ-ray irradiation to inorganic particles is a promising technique for preparation of organic/inorganic composites as it offers a number of advantages such as an additive-free polymerizations conducted under mild conditions, avoiding undesired damage to organic components in the composites. Herein, we demonstrated a step-wise formation mechanism of organic/inorganic nanocomposite hydrogel in detail. The γ-ray irradiation to silica particles dispersed in water generates peroxide groups on their surface, enabling surface-initiated polymerization of acrylic acid from the inorganic material. As a result, poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) covers the silica particles in the form of a core-shell at the initial stage. Then, PAA-coated silica particles associate with each other by combination of radicals at the end of chains on different particles, leading to micro-gel domains. Finally, the micro-gels are further associated with each other to form a 3D network structure. We investigated this mechanism using dynamic light scattering (DLS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Our result strongly suggests that controlling reaction time is critical to achieve specific and desirable organic/inorganic nanocomposite structure among core-shell particles, micro-gels and 3D network bulk hydrogel.

  14. Calculation of dose contributions of electron and charged heavy particles inside phantoms irradiated by monoenergetic neutron.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Daiki; Takahashi, Fumiaki; Endo, Akira; Ohmachi, Yasushi; Miyahara, Nobuyuki

    2008-09-01

    The radiation-transport code PHITS with an event generator mode has been applied to analyze energy depositions of electrons and charged heavy particles in two spherical phantoms and a voxel-based mouse phantom upon neutron irradiation. The calculations using the spherical phantoms quantitatively clarified the type and energy of charged particles which are released through interactions of neutrons with the phantom elements and contribute to the radiation dose. The relative contribution of electrons increased with an increase in the size of the phantom and with a decrease in the energy of the incident neutrons. Calculations with the voxel-based mouse phantom for 2.0-MeV neutron irradiation revealed that the doses to different locations inside the body are uniform, and that the energy is mainly deposited by recoil protons. The present study has demonstrated that analysis using PHITS can yield dose distributions that are accurate enough for RBE evaluation.

  15. Optical and THz investigations of mid-IR materials exposed to alpha particle irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sporea, Dan; Mihai, Laura; Sporea, Adelina; Vâţã, Ion

    2017-01-01

    The paper is the first comprehensive study on alpha particle irradiation effects on four mid-IR materials: CaF2, BaF2, Al2O3 (sapphire) and ZnSe. The measurements of the optical spectral transmittance, spectral diffuse reflectance, radioluminescent emission, terahertz (THz) spectral response, transmittance, absorbance, refractive index, real and imaginary parts of the dielectric constant and THz imaging are used as complementary investigations to evaluate these effects. The simulations were run to estimate: (i) the penetration depth, (ii) the scattering of alpha particle beam, (iii) the amount of material affected by this interaction, and (iv) the number of vacancies produced by the radiation exposure for each type of material. The simulation results are compared to the off-line measurement outcomes. The delay and spectral composition change of the reflected THz signal highlight the modification induced in the tested materials by the irradiation process.

  16. Optical and THz investigations of mid-IR materials exposed to alpha particle irradiation.

    PubMed

    Sporea, Dan; Mihai, Laura; Sporea, Adelina; Vâţã, Ion

    2017-01-09

    The paper is the first comprehensive study on alpha particle irradiation effects on four mid-IR materials: CaF2, BaF2, Al2O3 (sapphire) and ZnSe. The measurements of the optical spectral transmittance, spectral diffuse reflectance, radioluminescent emission, terahertz (THz) spectral response, transmittance, absorbance, refractive index, real and imaginary parts of the dielectric constant and THz imaging are used as complementary investigations to evaluate these effects. The simulations were run to estimate: (i) the penetration depth, (ii) the scattering of alpha particle beam, (iii) the amount of material affected by this interaction, and (iv) the number of vacancies produced by the radiation exposure for each type of material. The simulation results are compared to the off-line measurement outcomes. The delay and spectral composition change of the reflected THz signal highlight the modification induced in the tested materials by the irradiation process.

  17. Optical and THz investigations of mid-IR materials exposed to alpha particle irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Sporea, Dan; Mihai, Laura; Sporea, Adelina; Vâţã, Ion

    2017-01-01

    The paper is the first comprehensive study on alpha particle irradiation effects on four mid-IR materials: CaF2, BaF2, Al2O3 (sapphire) and ZnSe. The measurements of the optical spectral transmittance, spectral diffuse reflectance, radioluminescent emission, terahertz (THz) spectral response, transmittance, absorbance, refractive index, real and imaginary parts of the dielectric constant and THz imaging are used as complementary investigations to evaluate these effects. The simulations were run to estimate: (i) the penetration depth, (ii) the scattering of alpha particle beam, (iii) the amount of material affected by this interaction, and (iv) the number of vacancies produced by the radiation exposure for each type of material. The simulation results are compared to the off-line measurement outcomes. The delay and spectral composition change of the reflected THz signal highlight the modification induced in the tested materials by the irradiation process. PMID:28067289

  18. Targeted Cytoplasmic Irradiation with Alpha Particles Induces Mutations in Mammalian Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Li-Jun; Randers-Pehrson, Gerhard; Xu, An; Waldren, Charles A.; Geard, Charles R.; Yu, Zengliang; Hei, Tom K.

    1999-04-01

    Ever since x-rays were shown to induce mutation in Drosophila more than 70 years ago, prevailing dogma considered the genotoxic effects of ionizing radiation, such as mutations and carcinogenesis, as being due mostly to direct damage to the nucleus. Although there was indication that alpha particle traversal through cellular cytoplasm was innocuous, the full impact remained unknown. The availability of the microbeam at the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility of Columbia University made it possible to target and irradiate the cytoplasm of individual cells in a highly localized spatial region. By using dual fluorochrome dyes (Hoechst and Nile Red) to locate nucleus and cellular cytoplasm, respectively, thereby avoiding inadvertent traversal of nuclei, we show here that cytoplasmic irradiation is mutagenic at the CD59 (S1) locus of human-hamster hybrid (AL) cells, while inflicting minimal cytotoxicity. The principal class of mutations induced are similar to those of spontaneous origin and are entirely different from those of nuclear irradiation. Furthermore, experiments with radical scavenger and inhibitor of intracellular glutathione indicated that the mutagenicity of cytoplasmic irradiation depends on generation of reactive oxygen species. These findings suggest that cytoplasm is an important target for genotoxic effects of ionizing radiation, particularly radon, the second leading cause of lung cancer in the United States. In addition, cytoplasmic traversal by alpha particles may be more dangerous than nuclear traversal, because the mutagenicity is accomplished by little or no killing of the target cells.

  19. Automation and uncertainty analysis of a method for in-vivo range verification in particle therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, K.; Unholtz, D.; Bauer, J.; Debus, J.; Min, C. H.; Bortfeld, T.; Paganetti, H.; Parodi, K.

    2014-10-01

    We introduce the automation of the range difference calculation deduced from particle-irradiation induced β+-activity distributions with the so-called most-likely-shift approach, and evaluate its reliability via the monitoring of algorithm- and patient-specific uncertainty factors. The calculation of the range deviation is based on the minimization of the absolute profile differences in the distal part of two activity depth profiles shifted against each other. Depending on the workflow of positron emission tomography (PET)-based range verification, the two profiles under evaluation can correspond to measured and simulated distributions, or only measured data from different treatment sessions. In comparison to previous work, the proposed approach includes an automated identification of the distal region of interest for each pair of PET depth profiles and under consideration of the planned dose distribution, resulting in the optimal shift distance. Moreover, it introduces an estimate of uncertainty associated to the identified shift, which is then used as weighting factor to ‘red flag’ problematic large range differences. Furthermore, additional patient-specific uncertainty factors are calculated using available computed tomography (CT) data to support the range analysis. The performance of the new method for in-vivo treatment verification in the clinical routine is investigated with in-room PET images for proton therapy as well as with offline PET images for proton and carbon ion therapy. The comparison between measured PET activity distributions and predictions obtained by Monte Carlo simulations or measurements from previous treatment fractions is performed. For this purpose, a total of 15 patient datasets were analyzed, which were acquired at Massachusetts General Hospital and Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center with in-room PET and offline PET/CT scanners, respectively. Calculated range differences between the compared activity distributions are reported in

  20. Nanobump arrays fabricated by laser irradiation of polystyrene particle layers on silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, S.M.; Sun, Z.; Luk'yanchuk, B.S.; Hong, M.H.; Shi, L.P.

    2005-04-18

    Two-dimensional (2D) nanobump arrays were fabricated by laser irradiation of a regular lattice of absorptive polystyrene (PS) microspheres on an undoped (100) Si wafer. The experiments were performed with single-pulse 248 nm KrF laser radiation. The structure of the arrays fabricated by this method was characterized by field emission scanning electron microscope and atomic force microscope. The near-field effects under the absorptive particle are studied. The ablation and thermal processes induced by the optical near-field around the particles are investigated. The formation mechanism of nanobumps is discussed.

  1. Influence of the nucleus area distribution on the survival fraction after charged particles broad beam irradiation.

    PubMed

    Wéra, A-C; Barazzuol, L; Jeynes, J C G; Merchant, M J; Suzuki, M; Kirkby, K J

    2014-08-07

    It is well known that broad beam irradiation with heavy ions leads to variation in the number of hit(s) received by each cell as the distribution of particles follows the Poisson statistics. Although the nucleus area will determine the number of hit(s) received for a given dose, variation amongst its irradiated cell population is generally not considered. In this work, we investigate the effect of the nucleus area's distribution on the survival fraction. More specifically, this work aims to explain the deviation, or tail, which might be observed in the survival fraction at high irradiation doses. For this purpose, the nucleus area distribution was added to the beam Poisson statistics and the Linear-Quadratic model in order to fit the experimental data. As shown in this study, nucleus size variation, and the associated Poisson statistics, can lead to an upward survival trend after broad beam irradiation. The influence of the distribution parameters (mean area and standard deviation) was studied using a normal distribution, along with the Linear-Quadratic model parameters (α and β). Finally, the model proposed here was successfully tested to the survival fraction of LN18 cells irradiated with a 85 keV µm(- 1) carbon ion broad beam for which the distribution in the area of the nucleus had been determined.

  2. Post Irradiation TEM Investigation of ZrN Coated U(Mo) Particles Prepared with FIB

    SciTech Connect

    Van Renterghem, W.; Leenaers, A.; Van den Berghe, S.; Miller, B. D.; Gan, J.; Madden, J. W.; Keiser, D. D.; Palancher, H.; Hofman, G. L.; Breitkreuz, H.

    2015-10-01

    In the framework of the Selenium project, two dispersion fuel plates were fabricated with Si and ZrN coated fuel particles and irradiated in the Br2 reactor of SCK•CEN to high burn-up. The first analysis of the irradiated plate proved the reduced swelling of the fuel plate and interaction layer growth up to 70% burn-up. The question was raised how the structure of the interaction layer had been affected by the irradiation and how the structure of the fuel particles had evolved. Hereto, samples from the ZrN coated UMo particles were prepared for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) using focused ion beam milling (FIB) at INL. The FIB technique allowed to precisely select the area of the interaction layer and/or fuel to produce a sample that is TEM transparent over an area of 20 by 20 µm. In this contribution, the first TEM results will be presented from the 66% burn-up sample.

  3. Grafting poly(vinyl alcohol) onto polybutadiene rubber latex particles by pre-irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Bo; Dong, Wei; Liu, Yuguang

    2017-06-01

    Poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) was grafted on polybutadiene rubber latex (PBL) particles (PB-g-PVA) by pre-irradiation via emulsion grafting copolymerization. The grafting degree (G%) increased almost linearly with the reaction time and the weight ratio of PVA to the PB latex, while decreased gradually when the irradiation dose is over 30 kGy and the reaction temperature is higher than 60 °C. The grafting efficiency (GE%) has the same trend of the G% but the weight ratio of PVA to PBL, GE% decreased with increasing of PVA adding to PB latex. FTIR spectroscopy indicated that the PVA was grafted onto the PB particles. The dynamic light scattering measurement showed that the particle size of PB-g-PVA particles was larger than that of the pristine PBL particles, and it increased with increment of G%. Transmission electron microscopy images of the PB-g-PVA latex particles demonstrated that the size of PB-g-PVA particle was enlarged by the layer of grafted PVA surrounding the PBL particles. Thermal behavior exhibited the phase separation in the PB-g-PVA films, Tg1 and Tg2 related to the PB and PVA respectively, both of which shifted to a higher temperature with increasing of G%, but the Tg2 was still lower than that of the virgin PVA. The increment of the surface free energy of PB-g-PVA films was attributed to the incorporation of the polar PVA, which also resulted in improvement of the hydrophilic properties.

  4. Corrosion under argon irradiation of titanium in the low MeV range: A study coupling AFM and Spectroscopic Ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Do, Ngoc-Long; Garcia-Caurel, Enric; Bérerd, Nicolas; Moncoffre, Nathalie; Gorse-Pomonti, Dominique

    2014-05-01

    This paper reports on a recent study of the corrosion under argon ion irradiation of titanium in the low MeV range (1-9 MeV), associating AFM and Spectroscopic Ellipsometry. Irradiation with MeV Arn+ (n = 1, 3) ions produces damages on the titanium surface. Large craters form on the oxidized titanium surface whose characteristics vary as a function of the argon energy between 2 and 9 MeV. The superficial oxide grows thicker under irradiation over the same energy range, especially near 3 MeV. It is suggested that collisions cascades play a significant role in the overall damage process.

  5. Neutron irradiation of bacteria in the presence and absence of secondary charged-particle equilibrium

    SciTech Connect

    Lunec, J.; Cramp, W.A.; Hornsey, S.

    1980-09-01

    The survival rate of Shigella flexneri has been measured for irradiation with 7-MeV neutrons in the presence and absence of secondary charged-particle equilibrium. The data were analyzed to assess the separate response of the cells to the knock-on proton and ..cap alpha..-particle plus heavy-recoil components. A detailed consideration of the frequency of ..cap alpha..-particle and heavy-recoil traversals of the cell has been made to explain our results, and in addition we have applied this approach to analyze the earlier results obtained with mammalian cells. We conclude that of the secondary charged-particles produced by the Hammersmith neutron beam, the highest LET particles, the heavy-recoil nuclei, contribute a minor proportion of damage to bacteria but form a major contribution of damage in mammalian cells. The reduction in oxygen enhancement ratio (OER) with neutrons compared with low LET radiation for mammalian cells is due almost entirely to the influence of the heavy recoils and the contribution of the ..cap alpha..-particle and knock-on protons to the reduction of the OER is relatively minor. For Shigella flexneri the ..cap alpha.. particles and heavy recoils make approximately equal contributions to the reduction in OER.

  6. Effect of competing short-range attraction and long-range repulsion on the dynamics of globular particle suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riest, Jonas; Naegele, Gerhard

    2015-03-01

    The dynamic clustering of globular particle suspensions exhibiting competing short-range attraction and long-range repulsion such as protein solutions has gained a lot of interest in the last years. We investigate the influence of clustering on the phase behavior, and in particular on the dynamics of globular particle systems. To this end, we explore various pair potential models by a combination of static and dynamic analytic calculation methods in conjunction with Molecular Dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations. Our results show that the cluster peak (intermediate-range-order peak) is present also in the hydrodynamic function characterizing the short-time dynamics. Moreover, an enhanced short-range attraction leads to a larger sedimentation velocity and a smaller self-diffusion coefficient. Our results are useful also for technical applications, such as in the ultrafiltration of proteins.

  7. Mass Spectrometry of Liquid Aniline Aerosol Particles by IR/UV Laser Irradiation.

    PubMed

    Zelenyuk, A; Cabalo, J; Baer, T; Miller, R E

    1999-05-01

    The first results are reported from a new single-particle two-color laser time-of-flight mass spectrometer, incorporating a combination of infrared (CO(2)) and UV (excimer) laser irradiation. This combination of lasers has the capability to effectively separate the desorption or evaporation step from the ionization step, thereby greatly improving the analytical capabilities of such an instrument. The results on liquid aerosols, such as aniline, show that prior evaporation of the aerosol particle with the IR laser increases the ion signal produced by the excimer laser by more than 2 orders of magnitude. In the case of nitrobenzene aerosols, the excimer laser alone produces no ions, while a very large signal is observed when the aerosol is first irradiated with the CO(2) laser. A simple model, based on the Coulomb explosion of the ionized aerosol, is used to estimate the number of ions generated by the excimer laser (∼10(5) ions). Experimental evidence based on the observed time delay of protonated aniline parent ions indicates that the laser irradiation of the liquid aerosol results in a stable neutral plasma which separates into positive and negative charges only after a 100-500-ns delay.

  8. Decomposition Behavior of Curcumin during Solar Irradiation when Contact with Inorganic Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandiyanto, A. B. D.; Wiryani, A. S.; Rusli, A.; Purnamasari, A.; Abdullah, A. G.; Riza, L. S.

    2017-03-01

    Curcumin is one of materials which have been widely used in medicine, Asian cuisine, and traditional cosmetic. Therefore, understanding the stability of curcumin has been widely studied. The purpose of this study was to investigate the stability of curcumin solution against solar irradiation when making contact with inorganic material. As a model for the inorganic material, titanium dioxide (TiO2) was used. In the experimental method, the curcumin solution was irradiated using a solar irradiation. To confirm the stability of curcumin when contact with inorganic material, we added TiO2 micro particles with different concentrations. The results showed that the concentration of curcumin decreased during solar irradiation. The less concentration of curcumin affected the more decomposition rate obtained. The decomposition rate was increased greatly when TiO2 was added, in which the more TiO2 concentration added allowed the faster decomposition rate. Based on the result, we conclude that the curcumin is relatively stable as long as using higher concentration of curcumin and is no inorganic material existed. Then, the decomposition can be minimized by avoiding contact with inorganic material.

  9. Irradiation of Neurons with High-Energy Charged Particles: An In Silico Modeling Approach

    PubMed Central

    Alp, Murat; Parihar, Vipan K.; Limoli, Charles L.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2015-01-01

    In this work, a stochastic computational model of microscopic energy deposition events is used to study for the first time damage to irradiated neuronal cells of the mouse hippocampus. An extensive library of radiation tracks for different particle types is created to score energy deposition in small voxels and volume segments describing a neuron’s morphology that later are sampled for given particle fluence or dose. Methods included the construction of in silico mouse hippocampal granule cells from neuromorpho.org with spine and filopodia segments stochastically distributed along the dendritic branches. The model is tested with high-energy 56Fe, 12C, and 1H particles and electrons. Results indicate that the tree-like structure of the neuronal morphology and the microscopic dose deposition of distinct particles may lead to different outcomes when cellular injury is assessed, leading to differences in structural damage for the same absorbed dose. The significance of the microscopic dose in neuron components is to introduce specific local and global modes of cellular injury that likely contribute to spine, filopodia, and dendrite pruning, impacting cognition and possibly the collapse of the neuron. Results show that the heterogeneity of heavy particle tracks at low doses, compared to the more uniform dose distribution of electrons, juxtaposed with neuron morphology make it necessary to model the spatial dose painting for specific neuronal components. Going forward, this work can directly support the development of biophysical models of the modifications of spine and dendritic morphology observed after low dose charged particle irradiation by providing accurate descriptions of the underlying physical insults to complex neuron structures at the nano-meter scale. PMID:26252394

  10. Strain Hardening and Long-Range Internal Stress in the Localized Deformation of Irradiated Polycrystalline Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Byun, Thak Sang; Hashimoto, Naoyuki

    2006-01-01

    Low-temperature irradiation can significantly harden metallic materials and often results in microscopic strain localization such as dislocation channeling during deformation. In true stress-true strain analyses, however, the strain localization does not significantly affect macroscopic strain-hardening behavior. It was attempted to explain the strain-hardening behavior during strain localization in terms of long-range back stresses. In theoretical modeling the long-range back stress was formulated as a function of the number of residual pileup dislocations at a grain boundary and the number of localized bands formed in a grain. The strain-hardening rates in channel deformation were calculated for ten face-centered cubic (fcc) and body-centered cubic (bcc) metals. A few residual dislocations in each channel could account for the strain-hardening rates as high as those for uniform deformation. It was also shown that the strain-hardening behavior predicted by the long-range back stress model resembled the empirical strain-hardening behaviors, which result from both localized and non-localized deformations. The predicted plastic instability stress was comparable to the tensile test data.

  11. Strain hardening and long-range internal stress in the localized deformation of irradiated polycrystalline metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byun, Thak Sang; Hashimoto, Naoyuki

    2006-08-01

    Low-temperature irradiation can significantly harden metallic materials and often results in microscopic strain localization such as dislocation channeling during deformation. In true stress-true strain analyses, however, the strain localization does not significantly affect macroscopic strain-hardening behavior. It was attempted to explain the strain-hardening behavior during strain localization in terms of long-range back stresses. In theoretical modeling the long-range back stress was formulated as a function of the number of residual pileup dislocations at a grain boundary and the number of localized bands formed in a grain. The strain-hardening rates in channel deformation were calculated for ten face-centered cubic (fcc) and body-centered cubic (bcc) metals. A few residual dislocations in each channel could account for the strain-hardening rates as high as those for uniform deformation. It was also shown that the strain-hardening behavior predicted by the long-range back stress model resembled the empirical strain-hardening behaviors, which result from both localized and non-localized deformations. The predicted plastic instability stress was comparable to the tensile test data.

  12. Investigation of point and extended defects in electron irradiated silicon—Dependence on the particle energy

    SciTech Connect

    Radu, R.; Pintilie, I.; Nistor, L. C.; Fretwurst, E.; Lindstroem, G.; Makarenko, L. F.

    2015-04-28

    This work is focusing on generation, time evolution, and impact on the electrical performance of silicon diodes impaired by radiation induced active defects. n-type silicon diodes had been irradiated with electrons ranging from 1.5 MeV to 27 MeV. It is shown that the formation of small clusters starts already after irradiation with high fluence of 1.5 MeV electrons. An increase of the introduction rates of both point defects and small clusters with increasing energy is seen, showing saturation for electron energies above ∼15 MeV. The changes in the leakage current at low irradiation fluence-values proved to be determined by the change in the configuration of the tri-vacancy (V{sub 3}). Similar to V{sub 3}, other cluster related defects are showing bistability indicating that they might be associated with larger vacancy clusters. The change of the space charge density with irradiation and with annealing time after irradiation is fully described by accounting for the radiation induced trapping centers. High resolution electron microscopy investigations correlated with the annealing experiments revealed changes in the spatial structure of the defects. Furthermore, it is shown that while the generation of point defects is well described by the classical Non Ionizing Energy Loss (NIEL), the formation of small defect clusters is better described by the “effective NIEL” using results from molecular dynamics simulations.

  13. Relative toxicity of chronic irradiation by 45Ca beta particles and 242Cm alpha particles with respect to the production of lung tumors in CBA/Ca mice.

    PubMed

    Priest, N D; Hoel, D G; Brooks, P N

    2006-11-01

    Approximately 1800 female CBA/Ca mice were exposed by inhalation at three dose levels to beta particles from (45)Ca-labeled fused aluminosilicate particles (FAP), to alpha particles from (242)Cm-labeled FAP, or to carrier control FAP. Another group of mice inhaled no FAP and were designated as untreated cage controls. The FAP in combination with these radionuclides was used to achieve the same spatial and temporal distribution of alpha- and beta-particle dose within the irradiated mice. Some mice were killed to determine the clearance of radiolabeled FAP from their lungs, and the remainder were allocated to a life-span study. All animals were subjected to a detailed necropsy. To facilitate the identification of small tumors, the lungs were rendered transparent in methyl salicylate and examined under back illumination for the presence of lesions. Lung nodules and other microscopic lesions were excised for histological examination. The median survival of mice in all groups was approximately 910 days. The control animals lived longer than those that were irradiated, but it was difficult to determine a dose-response relationship for survival among the exposed mice. Benign adenomas and, less frequently, malignant adenocarcinomas were identified in all animal groups. The prevalence of these tumors was approximately 28.8% in the control mice, which is consistent with the results of other studies using the same strain of mouse. After exposure to radionuclide-labeled FAP, there was a significant dose-related increase in the prevalence of lung tumors in (242)Cm- (peak prevalence 55%) and (45)Ca-exposed (peak prevalence 48.6%) mice. The prevalence of tumors in the mice that received (242)Cm-labeled FAP was approximately twice that in the mice that inhaled (45)Ca-labeled FAP within the range of doses employed (0.55-4.69 Gy). Using the ratio of the slope of the linear component of the dose-response curves, the toxicity of the alpha particles relative to the beta particles was 1

  14. Hemispheric and Topographic Asymmetry of Magnetospheric Particle Irradiation for Icy Moon Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, John F.; Sturner, S. J.

    2007-01-01

    All surfaces of icy moons without significant atmospheres, i.e. all except Titan in the giant planet systems, are irradiated by hot plasma and more energetic charged particles from the local magnetospheric environments. This irradiation can significantly impact the chemical composition, albedo, and detectable presence of signs of life on the sensible surfaces, while also limiting lifetimes and science operations of orbital spacecraft for extreme radiation environments as at Europa. Planning of surface remote sensing and lander operations, and interpretation of remote sensing and in-situ measurements, should include consideration of natural shielding afforded by the body of the moon, by any intrinsic or induced magnetic fields as at Ganyrnede, and by topographic structures.

  15. Differential gene expression in human fibroblasts after alpha-particle emitter (211)At compared with (60)Co irradiation.

    PubMed

    Danielsson, Anna; Claesson, Kristina; Parris, Toshima Z; Helou, Khalil; Nemes, Szilárd; Elmroth, Kecke; Elgqvist, Jörgen; Jensen, Holger; Hultborn, Ragnar

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to identify gene expression profiles distinguishing alpha-particle (211)At and (60)Co irradiation. Gene expression microarray profiling was performed using total RNA from confluent human fibroblasts 5 hours after exposure to (211)At labeled trastuzumab monoclonal antibody (0.25, 0.5, and 1 Gy) and (60)Co (1, 2, and 3 Gy). We report gene expression profiles that distinguish the effect different radiation qualities and absorbed doses have on cellular functions in human fibroblasts. In addition, we identified commonly expressed transcripts between (211)At and (60)Co irradiation. A greater number of transcripts were modulated by (211)At than (60)Co irradiation. In addition, down-regulation was more prevalent than up-regulation following (211)At irradiation. Several biological processes were enriched for both irradiation qualities such as transcription, cell cycle regulation, and cell cycle arrest, whereas mitosis, spindle assembly checkpoint, and apoptotic chromosome condensation were uniquely enriched for alpha particle irradiation. LET-dependent transcriptional modulations were observed in human fibroblasts 5 hours after irradiation exposure. These findings suggest that in comparison with (60)Co, (211)At has the clearest influence on both tumor protein p53-activated and repressed genes, which impose a greater overall burden to the cell following alpha particle irradiation.

  16. Renal tubulointerstitial changes after internal irradiation with alpha-particle-emitting actinium daughters.

    PubMed

    Jaggi, Jaspreet Singh; Seshan, Surya V; McDevitt, Michael R; LaPerle, Krista; Sgouros, George; Scheinberg, David A

    2005-09-01

    The effect of external gamma irradiation on the kidneys is well described. However, the mechanisms of radiation nephropathy as a consequence of targeted radionuclide therapies are poorly understood. The functional and morphologic changes were studied chronologically (from 10 to 40 wk) in mouse kidneys after injection with an actinium-225 (225Ac) nanogenerator, a molecular-sized, antibody-targeted, in vivo generator of alpha-particle-emitting elements. Renal irradiation from free, radioactive daughters of 225Ac led to time-dependent reduction in renal function manifesting as increase in blood urea nitrogen. The histopathologic changes corresponded with the decline in renal function. Glomerular, tubular, and endothelial cell nuclear pleomorphism and focal tubular cell injury, lysis, and karyorrhexis were observed as early as 10 wk. Progressive thinning of the cortex as a result of widespread tubulolysis, collapsed tubules, glomerular crowding, decrease in glomerular cellularity, interstitial inflammation, and an elevated juxtaglomerular cell count were noted at 20 to 30 wk after treatment. By 35 to 40 wk, regeneration of simplified tubules with tubular atrophy and loss with focal, mild interstitial fibrosis had occurred. A lower juxtaglomerular cell count with focal cytoplasmic vacuolization, suggesting increased degranulation, was also observed in this period. A focal increase in tubular and interstitial cell TGF-beta1 expression starting at 20 wk, peaking at 25 wk, and later declining in intensity with mild increase in the extracellular matrix deposition was noticed. These findings suggest that internally delivered alpha-particle irradiation-induced loss of tubular epithelial cells triggers a chain of adaptive changes that result in progressive renal parenchymal damage accompanied by a loss of renal function. These findings are dissimilar to those seen after gamma or beta irradiation of kidneys.

  17. Particle irradiation induces FGF2 expression in normal human lens cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, P. Y.; Bjornstad K, A.; Chang, E.; McNamara, M.; Barcellos-Hoff, M. H.; Lin, S. P.; Aragon, G.; Polansky, J. R.; Lui, G. M.; Blakely, E. A.

    2000-01-01

    Particle Irradiation Induces FGF2 Expression in Normal Human Lens Cells. Particle radiations, including both proton and helium-ion beams, have been used to successfully treat choroidal melanoma, but with the complication of radiation-induced cataract. We have investigated a role for radiation-induced changes in the expression of basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF2) gene expression as part of the mechanism(s) underlying lens cell injury associated with cataract. Normal human lens epithelial (HLE) cells were cultured in vitro on extracellular matrix (ECM) originated from bovine corneal endothelial cells. This study reports evidence for rapid but transient induction of FGF2 transcripts, an increase of between 5- and 8-fold, within 0.5 h after exposure to particle radiation, followed by another wave of increased transcription at 2-3 h postirradiation. Immunofluorescence results confirm the enhanced levels of FGF2 protein rapidly after exposure to protons or helium ions, followed by another wave of increased activity unique to helium at 6 h postirradiation. This second wave of increased immunoreactivity was not observed in the proton-irradiated samples. Total FGF2 protein analysis after helium-ion exposures shows induced expression of three FGF2 isoforms, with an increase of up to 2-fold in the 18-kDa low-molecular-weight species. Studies of the effects of protons on individual FGF2 protein isoforms are in progress. Several mechanisms involving a role for FGF2 in radiation-induced cataract are discussed.

  18. Particle irradiation induces FGF2 expression in normal human lens cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, P. Y.; Bjornstad K, A.; Chang, E.; McNamara, M.; Barcellos-Hoff, M. H.; Lin, S. P.; Aragon, G.; Polansky, J. R.; Lui, G. M.; Blakely, E. A.

    2000-01-01

    Particle Irradiation Induces FGF2 Expression in Normal Human Lens Cells. Particle radiations, including both proton and helium-ion beams, have been used to successfully treat choroidal melanoma, but with the complication of radiation-induced cataract. We have investigated a role for radiation-induced changes in the expression of basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF2) gene expression as part of the mechanism(s) underlying lens cell injury associated with cataract. Normal human lens epithelial (HLE) cells were cultured in vitro on extracellular matrix (ECM) originated from bovine corneal endothelial cells. This study reports evidence for rapid but transient induction of FGF2 transcripts, an increase of between 5- and 8-fold, within 0.5 h after exposure to particle radiation, followed by another wave of increased transcription at 2-3 h postirradiation. Immunofluorescence results confirm the enhanced levels of FGF2 protein rapidly after exposure to protons or helium ions, followed by another wave of increased activity unique to helium at 6 h postirradiation. This second wave of increased immunoreactivity was not observed in the proton-irradiated samples. Total FGF2 protein analysis after helium-ion exposures shows induced expression of three FGF2 isoforms, with an increase of up to 2-fold in the 18-kDa low-molecular-weight species. Studies of the effects of protons on individual FGF2 protein isoforms are in progress. Several mechanisms involving a role for FGF2 in radiation-induced cataract are discussed.

  19. Gas Generation from K East Basin Sludges and Irradiated Metallic Uranium Fuel Particles Series III Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Andrew J.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Bryan, Samuel A.; Elmore, Monte R.; Sell, Rachel L.; Silvers, Kurt L.; Gano, Susan R.; Thornton, Brenda M.

    2003-08-01

    The path forward for managing of Hanford K Basin sludge calls for it to be packaged, shipped, and stored at T Plant until final processing at a future date. An important consideration for the design and cost of retrieval, transportation, and storage systems is the potential for heat and gas generation through oxidation reactions between uranium metal and water. This report, the third in a series (Series III), describes work performed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to assess corrosion and gas generation from irradiated metallic uranium particles (fuel particles) with and without K Basin sludge addition. The testing described in this report consisted of 12 tests. In 10 of the tests, 4.3 to 26.4 g of fuel particles of selected size distribution were placed into 60- or 800-ml reaction vessels with 0 to 100 g settled sludge. In another test, a single 3.72-g fuel fragment (i.e., 7150-mm particle) was placed in a 60 ml reaction vessel with no added sludge. The twelfth test contained only sludge. The fuel particles were prepared by crushing archived coupons (samples) from an irradiated metallic uranium fuel element. After loading the sludge materials (whether fuel particles, mixtures of fuel particles and sludge, or sludge-only) into reaction vessels, the solids were covered with an excess of K Basin water, the vessels closed and connected to a gas measurement manifold, and the vessels back-flushed with inert neon cover gas. The vessels were then heated to a constant temperature. The gas pressures and temperatures were monitored continuously from the times the vessels were purged. Gas samples were collected at various times during the tests, and the samples analyzed by mass spectrometry. Data on the reaction rates of uranium metal fuel particles with water as a function of temperature and particle size were generated. The data were compared with published studies on metallic uranium corrosion kinetics. The effects of an intimate overlying sludge layer

  20. Extended calibration range for prompt photon emission in ion beam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellini, F.; Boehlen, T. T.; Chin, M. P. W.; Collamati, F.; De Lucia, E.; Faccini, R.; Ferrari, A.; Lanza, L.; Mancini-Terracciano, C.; Marafini, M.; Mattei, I.; Morganti, S.; Ortega, P. G.; Patera, V.; Piersanti, L.; Russomando, A.; Sala, P. R.; Sarti, A.; Sciubba, A.; Solfaroli Camillocci, E.; Voena, C.

    2014-05-01

    Monitoring the dose delivered during proton and carbon ion therapy is still a matter of research. Among the possible solutions, several exploit the measurement of the single photon emission from nuclear decays induced by the irradiation. To fully characterize such emission the detectors need development, since the energy spectrum spans the range above the MeV that is not traditionally used in medical applications. On the other hand, a deeper understanding of the reactions involving gamma production is needed in order to improve the physic models of Monte Carlo codes, relevant for an accurate prediction of the prompt-gamma energy spectrum. This paper describes a calibration technique tailored for the range of energy of interest and reanalyzes the data of the interaction of a 80 MeV/u fully stripped carbon ion beam with a Poly-methyl methacrylate target. By adopting the FLUKA simulation with the appropriate calibration and resolution a significant improvement in the agreement between data and simulation is reported.

  1. Formation of long-range ordered quantum dots arrays in amorphous matrix by ion beam irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Buljan, M.; Bogdanovic-Radovic, I.; Karlusic, M.; Desnica, U. V.; Radic, N.; Dubcek, P.; Drazic, G.; Salamon, K.; Bernstorff, S.; Holy, V.

    2009-08-10

    We demonstrate the production of a well ordered three-dimensional array of Ge quantum dots in amorphous silica matrix. The ordering is achieved by ion beam irradiation and annealing of a multilayer film. Structural analysis shows that quantum dots nucleate along the direction of the ion beam used for irradiation, while the mutual distance of the quantum dots is determined by the diffusion properties of the multilayer material rather than the distances between traces of ions that are used for irradiation.

  2. NIEL calculations for estimating the displacement damage introduced in GaAs irradiated with charged particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Allam, E.; Inguimbert, C.; Addarkaoui, S.; Meulenberg, A.; Jorio, A.; Zorkani, I.

    2017-03-01

    The application of Non-Ionizing Energy Loss (NIEL) in estimating the impact of electron, proton, and heavy ion irradiations on Gallium Arsenide is presented in this paper. The NIEL for deuteron, alpha particle, lithium ion and oxygen ion is computed using the SR-NIEL and NEMO codes. The NIEL calculations are compared with the introduction rate of displacement damage measured in n-type GaAs. Very good agreement is found between the NIEL and experimental results for protons (< 20 MeV), electrons, and a variety of ions. However, a discrepancy can be observed for high-energy protons.

  3. Alpha particles are extremely damaging to developing hemopoiesis compared to gamma irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Tie-Nan Jiang ); Lord, B.I.; Hendry, J.H. )

    1994-03-01

    Estimates of risk of stochastic effects from contamination with [alpha]-particle-emitting radionuclides are based on equivalent doses which take into account the RBE of the high-LET radiation. It is assumed that the RBEs for deterministic effects are considerably less than those for stochastic effects. However, the offspring of mice injected with 30 Bq g[sup [minus]1] [sup 239]Pu at 13 days gestation develop a persistent deficit in hemopoietic stem cells which is primarily the result of damage to their regulatory microenvironment. Their spatial distribution in the marrow is also perturbed, and recent observations on those mice suggested a considerably higher factor than 20. To define a more realistic RBE for hemopoiesis, the effects of external [gamma] irradiation during the fetal development period have been compared directly with those of [sup 239]Pu incorporated via placental transfer on the development of hemopoietic tissue. Pregnant mice were irradiated with [sup 60]Co [gamma] rays (a) continuously from day 13 of gestation to birth at 0.15 or 0.6 Gy/day; (b) six repeated acute doses (0.6 Gy/min) at 0.1 or 0.3 Gy from day 13 of gestation; (c) one acute dose of 0.6 or 1.8 Gy on day 15 of gestation. The spatial distribution of hemopoietic stem cells in 8-week-old offspring was then determined and compared to that resulting from [alpha]-particle irradiation. In each case, the higher dose was required to match the results for [alpha] particles, suggesting an RBE for developing hemopoiesis of 250-360 compared to a continuous [gamma]-ray dose and a rather lower value of 130-180 compared to a single acute dose of [gamma] rays. This contrasts greatly to values for direct irradiation of the stem cells but argues that the effective RBE, measured for long-term effects in vivo, is the more realistic. It is concluded that an all-embracing factor can be grossly misleading and can greatly underestimate the risks of exposure to [alpha] particles. 21 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Single-cell/Single-particle Irradiation Using Heavy-ion Microbeams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Yasuhiko

    Heavy charged particles transfer their energy to biological organisms through high-density ionization along the particle trajectories. The population of cells exposed to a very low dose of heavy-ion beams contains a few cells hit by a particle, while the majority of the cells receive no radiation damage. At somewhat higher doses, some of the cells receive two or more events according to the Poisson distribution of ion injections. This fluctuation of particle trajectories through individual cells makes interpretation of radiological effects of heavy ions difficult. Furthermore, there has recently been an increasing interest in ionizing radiation-induced “bystander effects”, that is, radiation effects transmitted from hit cells to neighboring un-hit cells. Therefore, we have established a single-cell/single-particle irradiation system using a heavy-ion microbeam apparatus at JAEA-Takasaki to study radiobiological processes in hit cells and bystander cells exposed to low dose and low dose-rate high-LET radiations, in ways that cannot be achieved using conventional broad-field exposures.

  5. Irradiation performance of HTGR coated particle fuels with ZrC coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Homan, F J; Kania, M J

    1985-01-01

    During the past 25 years of fuel development for the High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) the Triso particle has evolved as the favored design to optimize economics and performance. The Triso particle consists of a kernel (fissile or fertile), a buffer [porous pyrocarbon (PyC)], an inner PyC layer, a dense SiC layer, and an outer PyC layer. Consideration has been given to replacing the SiC layer with ZrC for applications requiring very high fuel operating temperatures. Other designs using ZrC have also been considered and tested. This report reviews all the irradiation testing data collected within the US program on HTGR fuel particles with ZrC coatings. Fission product retentiveness of particles with ZrC coatings has generally been inferior to that of similar particles with the Triso design, but it is emphasized that the fabrication of ZrC coatings has not been optimized to nearly the extent of that of SiC coatings.

  6. Acoustically mediated long-range interaction among multiple spherical particles exposed to a plane standing wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shenwei; Qiu, Chunyin; Wang, Mudi; Ke, Manzhu; Liu, Zhengyou

    2016-11-01

    In this work, we study the acoustically mediated interaction forces among multiple well-separated spherical particles trapped in the same node or antinode plane of a standing wave. An analytical expression of the acoustic interaction force is derived, which is accurate even for the particles beyond the Rayleigh limit. Interestingly, the multi-particle system can be decomposed into a series of independent two-particle systems described by pairwise interactions. Each pairwise interaction is a long-range interaction, as characterized by a soft oscillatory attenuation (at the power exponent of n = -1 or -2). The vector additivity of the acoustic interaction force, which is not well expected considering the nonlinear nature of the acoustic radiation force, is greatly useful for exploring a system consisting of a large number of particles. The capability of self-organizing a big particle cluster can be anticipated through such acoustically controllable long-range interaction.

  7. Performance of HTGR fertile particles irradiated in HFIR capsule HT-32

    SciTech Connect

    Long, E.L. Jr.; Robbins, J.M.; Tiegs, T.N.; Kania, M.J.

    1980-04-01

    The HT-32 experiment was an uninstrumented capsule irradiated for four cycles in the target position of the High-Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). The experiment was designed to: provide supplemental simulated fuel rods for thermal transport and expansion measurements; test fertile kernels with Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ and SiO/sub 2/ additives for improved fission product retention; study the stability and permeability of low-temperature isotropic (LTI) pyrocarbon coatings; test Biso- and Triso-coatings derived in a large (0.24-m-dia) coating furnace with a frit distributor; investigate the performance of particles with an outer layer of SiC both as loose particles and as resin-bonded fuel rods; and evaluate high-density alumina as a potential high-temperature thermometry sheathing material.

  8. Impact of Particle Irradiation on the Immune System: From the Clinic to Mars

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Gonzalo, Rodrigo; Baatout, Sarah; Moreels, Marjan

    2017-01-01

    Despite the generalized use of photon-based radiation (i.e., gamma rays and X-rays) to treat different cancer types, particle radiotherapy (i.e., protons and carbon ions) is becoming a popular, and more effective tool to treat specific tumors due to the improved physical properties and biological effectiveness. Current scientific evidence indicates that conventional radiation therapy affects the tumor immunological profile in a particular manner, which in turn, might induce beneficial effects both at local and systemic (i.e., abscopal effects) levels. The interaction between radiotherapy and the immune system is being explored to combine immune and radiation (including particles) treatments, which in many cases have a greater clinical effect than any of the therapies alone. Contrary to localized, clinical irradiation, astronauts are exposed to whole body, chronic cosmic radiation, where protons and heavy ions are an important component. The effects of this extreme environment during long periods of time, e.g., a potential mission to Mars, will have an impact on the immune system that could jeopardize the health of the astronauts, hence the success of the mission. To this background, the purpose of this mini review is to briefly present the current knowledge in local and systemic immune alterations triggered by particle irradiation and to propose new lines of future research. Immune effects induced by particle radiation relevant to clinical applications will be covered, together with examples of combined radiotherapy and immunotherapy. Then, the focus will move to outer space, where the immune system alterations induced by cosmic radiation during spaceflight will be discussed. PMID:28275377

  9. Impact of Particle Irradiation on the Immune System: From the Clinic to Mars.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Gonzalo, Rodrigo; Baatout, Sarah; Moreels, Marjan

    2017-01-01

    Despite the generalized use of photon-based radiation (i.e., gamma rays and X-rays) to treat different cancer types, particle radiotherapy (i.e., protons and carbon ions) is becoming a popular, and more effective tool to treat specific tumors due to the improved physical properties and biological effectiveness. Current scientific evidence indicates that conventional radiation therapy affects the tumor immunological profile in a particular manner, which in turn, might induce beneficial effects both at local and systemic (i.e., abscopal effects) levels. The interaction between radiotherapy and the immune system is being explored to combine immune and radiation (including particles) treatments, which in many cases have a greater clinical effect than any of the therapies alone. Contrary to localized, clinical irradiation, astronauts are exposed to whole body, chronic cosmic radiation, where protons and heavy ions are an important component. The effects of this extreme environment during long periods of time, e.g., a potential mission to Mars, will have an impact on the immune system that could jeopardize the health of the astronauts, hence the success of the mission. To this background, the purpose of this mini review is to briefly present the current knowledge in local and systemic immune alterations triggered by particle irradiation and to propose new lines of future research. Immune effects induced by particle radiation relevant to clinical applications will be covered, together with examples of combined radiotherapy and immunotherapy. Then, the focus will move to outer space, where the immune system alterations induced by cosmic radiation during spaceflight will be discussed.

  10. Incident particle range dependence of radiation damage in a power bipolar junction transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chao-Ming; Li, Xing-Ji; Geng, Hong-Bin; Rui, Er-Ming; Guo, Li-Xin; Yang, Jian-Qun

    2012-10-01

    The characteristic degradations in silicon NPN bipolar junction transistors (BJTs) of type 3DD155 are examined under the irradiations of 25-MeV carbon (C), 40-MeV silicon (Si), and 40-MeV chlorine (Cl) ions respectively. Different electrical parameters are measured in-situ during the exposure of heavy ions. The experimental data shows that the changes in the reciprocal of the gain variation (Δ(1/β)) of 3DD155 transistors irradiated respectively by 25-MeV C, 40-MeV Si, and 40-MeV Cl ions each present a nonlinear behaviour at a low fluence and a linear response at a high fluence. The Δ(1/β) of 3DD155 BJT irradiated by 25-MeV C ions is greatest at a given fluence, a little smaller when the device is irradiated by 40-MeV Si ions, and smallest in the case of the 40-MeV Cl ions irradiation. The measured and calculated results clearly show that the range of heavy ions in the base region of BJT affects the level of radiation damage.

  11. Pre- and post-irradiation characterization and properties measurements of ZrC coated surrogate TRISO particles

    SciTech Connect

    Vasudevamurthy, Gokul; Katoh, Yutai; Hunn, John D; Snead, Lance Lewis

    2010-09-01

    Zirconium carbide is a candidate to either replace or supplement silicon carbide as a coating material in TRISO fuel particles for high temperature gas-cooled reactor fuels. Six sets of ZrC coated surrogate microsphere samples, fabricated by the Japan Atomic Energy Agency using the fluidized bed chemical vapor deposition method, were irradiated in the High Flux Isotope Reactor at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. These developmental samples available for the irradiation experiment were in conditions of either as-fabricated coated particles or particles that had been heat-treated to simulate the fuel compacting process. Five sets of samples were composed of nominally stoichiometric compositions, with the sixth being richer in carbon (C/Zr = 1.4). The samples were irradiated at 800 and 1250 C with fast neutron fluences of 2 and 6 dpa. Post-irradiation, the samples were retrieved from the irradiation capsules followed by microstructural examination performed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Low Activation Materials Development and Analysis Laboratory. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy's Advanced Gas Reactor program as part of International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative collaboration with Japan. This report includes progress from that INERI collaboration, as well as results of some follow-up examination of the irradiated specimens. Post-irradiation examination items included microstructural characterization, and nanoindentation hardness/modulus measurements. The examinations revealed grain size enhancement and softening as the primary effects of both heat-treatment and irradiation in stoichiometric ZrC with a non-layered, homogeneous grain structure, raising serious concerns on the mechanical suitability of these particular developmental coatings as a replacement for SiC in TRISO fuel. Samples with either free carbon or carbon-rich layers dispersed in the ZrC coatings experienced negligible grain size

  12. Observing visible-range photoluminescence in GaAs nanowires modified by laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseev, P. A.; Dunaevskiy, M. S.; Kirilenko, D. A.; Smirnov, A. N.; Davydov, V. Yu.; Berkovits, V. L.

    2017-02-01

    We study the structural and chemical transformations induced by focused laser beam in GaAs nanowires with an axial zinc-blende/wurtzite (ZB/WZ) heterostructure. The experiments are performed using a combination of transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, Raman scattering, and photoluminescence spectroscopy. For both the components of heterostructure, laser irradiation under atmospheric air is found to produce a double surface layer which is composed of crystalline arsenic and of amorphous GaOx. The latter compound is responsible for the appearance of a peak at 1.76 eV in photoluminescence spectra of GaAs nanowires. Under an increased laser power density, due to sample heating, evaporation of the surface crystalline arsenic and formation of β-Ga2O3 nanocrystals proceed on the surface of the zinc-blende part of nanowire. The formed nanocrystals reveal a photoluminescence band in a visible range of 1.7-2.4 eV. At the same power density for wurtzite part of the nanowire, total amorphization with the formation of β-Ga2O3 nanocrystals occurs. Observed transformation of WZ-GaAs to β-Ga2O3 nanocrystals presents an available way for the creation of axial and radial heterostructures ZB-GaAs/β-Ga2O3 for optoelectronic and photonic applications.

  13. Immunohistochemical evidence of rapid extracellular matrix remodeling after iron-particle irradiation of mouse mammary gland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehrhart, E. J.; Gillette, E. L.; Barcellos-Hoff, M. H.; Chaterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    High-LET radiation has unique physical and biological properties compared to sparsely ionizing radiation. Recent studies demonstrate that sparsely ionizing radiation rapidly alters the pattern of extracellular matrix expression in several tissues, but little is known about the effect of heavy-ion radiation. This study investigates densely ionizing radiation-induced changes in extracellular matrix localization in the mammary glands of adult female BALB/c mice after whole-body irradiation with 0.8 Gy 600 MeV iron particles. The basement membrane and interstitial extracellular matrix proteins of the mammary gland stroma were mapped with respect to time postirradiation using immunofluorescence. Collagen III was induced in the adipose stroma within 1 day, continued to increase through day 9 and was resolved by day 14. Immunoreactive tenascin was induced in the epithelium by day 1, was evident at the epithelial-stromal interface by day 5-9 and persisted as a condensed layer beneath the basement membrane through day 14. These findings parallel similar changes induced by gamma irradiation but demonstrate different onset and chronicity. In contrast, the integrity of epithelial basement membrane, which was unaffected by sparsely ionizing radiation, was disrupted by iron-particle irradiation. Laminin immunoreactivity was mildly irregular at 1 h postirradiation and showed discontinuities and thickening from days 1 to 9. Continuity was restored by day 14. Thus high-LET radiation, like sparsely ionizing radiation, induces rapid-remodeling of the stromal extracellular matrix but also appears to alter the integrity of the epithelial basement membrane, which is an important regulator of epithelial cell proliferation and differentiation.

  14. Immunohistochemical evidence of rapid extracellular matrix remodeling after iron-particle irradiation of mouse mammary gland

    SciTech Connect

    Ehrhart, E.J.; Gillette, E.L.; Barcellos-Hoff, M.H.

    1996-02-01

    High-LET radiation has unique physical and biological properties compared to sparsely ionizing radiation. Recent studies demonstrate that sparsely ionizing radiation rapidly alters the pattern of extracellular matrix expression in several tissues, but little is known about the effect of heavy-ion radiation. This study investigates densely ionizing radiation-induced changes in extracellular matrix localization in the mammary glands of adult female BALB/c mice after whole-body irradiation with 0.8 Gy 600 MeV iron particles. The basement membrane and interstitial extracellular matrix proteins of the mammary gland stroma were mapped with respect to time postirradiation using immunofluorescence. Collagen III was induced in the adipose stroma within 1 day, continued to increase through day 9 and was resolved by day 14. Immunoreactive tenascin was induced in the epithelium by day 1, was evident at the epithelial-stromal interface by day 5-9 and persisted as a condensed layer beneath the basement membrane through day 14. These findings parallel similar changes induced by {gamma} irradiation but demonstrate different onset and chronicity. In contrast, the integrity of epithelial basement membrane, which was unaffected by sparsely ionizing radiation, was disrupted by iron-particle irradiation. Laminin inummoreactivity was mildly irregular at 1 h postirradiation and showed discontinuities and thickening from days 1 to 9. Continuity was restored by day 14. Thus high-LET radiation, like sparsely ionizing radiation, induces rapid remodeling of the stromal extracellular matrix but also appears to alter the integrity of the epithelial basement membrane, which is an important regulator of epithelial cell proliferation and differentiation. 40 refs., 3 figs.

  15. Immunohistochemical evidence of rapid extracellular matrix remodeling after iron-particle irradiation of mouse mammary gland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehrhart, E. J.; Gillette, E. L.; Barcellos-Hoff, M. H.; Chaterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    High-LET radiation has unique physical and biological properties compared to sparsely ionizing radiation. Recent studies demonstrate that sparsely ionizing radiation rapidly alters the pattern of extracellular matrix expression in several tissues, but little is known about the effect of heavy-ion radiation. This study investigates densely ionizing radiation-induced changes in extracellular matrix localization in the mammary glands of adult female BALB/c mice after whole-body irradiation with 0.8 Gy 600 MeV iron particles. The basement membrane and interstitial extracellular matrix proteins of the mammary gland stroma were mapped with respect to time postirradiation using immunofluorescence. Collagen III was induced in the adipose stroma within 1 day, continued to increase through day 9 and was resolved by day 14. Immunoreactive tenascin was induced in the epithelium by day 1, was evident at the epithelial-stromal interface by day 5-9 and persisted as a condensed layer beneath the basement membrane through day 14. These findings parallel similar changes induced by gamma irradiation but demonstrate different onset and chronicity. In contrast, the integrity of epithelial basement membrane, which was unaffected by sparsely ionizing radiation, was disrupted by iron-particle irradiation. Laminin immunoreactivity was mildly irregular at 1 h postirradiation and showed discontinuities and thickening from days 1 to 9. Continuity was restored by day 14. Thus high-LET radiation, like sparsely ionizing radiation, induces rapid-remodeling of the stromal extracellular matrix but also appears to alter the integrity of the epithelial basement membrane, which is an important regulator of epithelial cell proliferation and differentiation.

  16. Precipitation of nanometer scale Zn crystalline particles in ZnO-B2O3-SiO2 glass during electron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Nan; Qiu, Jianrong; Silcox, John

    2000-12-01

    In this letter, we report precipitation of nanometer scale Zn crystalline particles in Zn borosilicate glass induced by 100 keV electron irradiation. Nanometer Zn crystalline particles precipitate rapidly in the glass under high intensity electron irradiation. A double ionization mechanism is proposed in interpretation of the formation of Zn particles. Thermal effects are less important than ionization interactions.

  17. Heavy particle irradiation, neurochemistry and behavior: thresholds, dose-response curves and recovery of function.

    PubMed

    Rabin, B M; Joseph, J A; Shukitt-Hale, B

    2004-01-01

    Exposure to heavy particles can affect the functioning of the central nervous system (CNS), particularly the dopaminergic system. In turn, the radiation-induced disruption of dopaminergic function affects a variety of behaviors that are dependent upon the integrity of this system, including motor behavior (upper body strength), amphetamine (dopamine)-mediated taste aversion learning, and operant conditioning (fixed-ratio bar pressing). Although the relationships between heavy particle irradiation and the effects of exposure depend, to some extent, upon the specific behavioral or neurochemical endpoint under consideration, a review of the available research leads to the hypothesis that the endpoints mediated by the CNS have certain characteristics in common. These include: (1) a threshold, below which there is no apparent effect; (2) the lack of a dose-response relationship, or an extremely steep dose-response curve, depending on the particular endpoint; and (3) the absence of recovery of function, such that the heavy particle-induced behavioral and neural changes are present when tested up to one year following exposure. The current report reviews the data relevant to the degree to which these characteristics are common to neurochemical and behavioral endpoints that are mediated by the effects of exposure to heavy particles on CNS activity.

  18. Heavy particle irradiation, neurochemistry and behavior: thresholds, dose-response curves and recovery of function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabin, B. M.; Joseph, J. A.; Shukitt-Hale, B.

    2004-01-01

    Exposure to heavy particles can affect the functioning of the central nervous system (CNS), particularly the dopaminergic system. In turn, the radiation-induced disruption of dopaminergic function affects a variety of behaviors that are dependent upon the integrity of this system, including motor behavior (upper body strength), amphetamine (dopamine)-mediated taste aversion learning, and operant conditioning (fixed-ratio bar pressing). Although the relationships between heavy particle irradiation and the effects of exposure depend, to some extent, upon the specific behavioral or neurochemical endpoint under consideration, a review of the available research leads to the hypothesis that the endpoints mediated by the CNS have certain characteristics in common. These include: (1) a threshold, below which there is no apparent effect; (2) the lack of a dose-response relationship, or an extremely steep dose-response curve, depending on the particular endpoint; and (3) the absence of recovery of function, such that the heavy particle-induced behavioral and neural changes are present when tested up to one year following exposure. The current report reviews the data relevant to the degree to which these characteristics are common to neurochemical and behavioral endpoints that are mediated by the effects of exposure to heavy particles on CNS activity.

  19. Heavy particle irradiation, neurochemistry and behavior: thresholds, dose- response curves and recovery of function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabin, B.; Joseph, J.; Shukitt-Hale, B.

    Exposure to heavy particles can affect the functioning of the central nervous system (CNS), particularly the dopaminergic system. In turn, the radiation- induced disruption of dopaminergic function disrupts a variety of behaviors that are dependent upon the integrity of the dopaminergic system, including motor behavior (upper body strength), amphetamine (dopamine)-mediated taste aversion learning, spatial learning and memory (Morris water maze), and operant conditioning (fixed-ratio bar pressing). Although the relationships between heavy particle irradiation and the effects of exposure depend, to some extent, upon the specific behavioral or neurochemical endpoint under consideration, a review of the available research leads to the hypothesis that the endpoints mediated by the CNS have certain characteristics in common. These include: (1) a threshold, below which there is no apparent effect; (2) the lack of a dose-response relationship, or an extremely steep dose-response curve, depending on the particular endpoint; and (3) the absence of recovery of function, such that the heavy particle-induced behavioral and neural changes are present when tested up to one year following exposure. The current presentation will review the data relevant to the degree to which these characteristics are in fact common to neurochemical and behavioral endpoints that are mediated by the effects of exposure to heavy particles on CNS activity. Supported by N.A.S.A. Grant NAG9-1190.

  20. Heavy particle irradiation, neurochemistry and behavior: thresholds, dose-response curves and recovery of function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rabin, B. M.; Joseph, J. A.; Shukitt-Hale, B.

    2004-01-01

    Exposure to heavy particles can affect the functioning of the central nervous system (CNS), particularly the dopaminergic system. In turn, the radiation-induced disruption of dopaminergic function affects a variety of behaviors that are dependent upon the integrity of this system, including motor behavior (upper body strength), amphetamine (dopamine)-mediated taste aversion learning, and operant conditioning (fixed-ratio bar pressing). Although the relationships between heavy particle irradiation and the effects of exposure depend, to some extent, upon the specific behavioral or neurochemical endpoint under consideration, a review of the available research leads to the hypothesis that the endpoints mediated by the CNS have certain characteristics in common. These include: (1) a threshold, below which there is no apparent effect; (2) the lack of a dose-response relationship, or an extremely steep dose-response curve, depending on the particular endpoint; and (3) the absence of recovery of function, such that the heavy particle-induced behavioral and neural changes are present when tested up to one year following exposure. The current report reviews the data relevant to the degree to which these characteristics are common to neurochemical and behavioral endpoints that are mediated by the effects of exposure to heavy particles on CNS activity. c2004 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Heavy particle irradiation, neurochemistry and behavior: thresholds, dose-response curves and recovery of function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rabin, B. M.; Joseph, J. A.; Shukitt-Hale, B.

    2004-01-01

    Exposure to heavy particles can affect the functioning of the central nervous system (CNS), particularly the dopaminergic system. In turn, the radiation-induced disruption of dopaminergic function affects a variety of behaviors that are dependent upon the integrity of this system, including motor behavior (upper body strength), amphetamine (dopamine)-mediated taste aversion learning, and operant conditioning (fixed-ratio bar pressing). Although the relationships between heavy particle irradiation and the effects of exposure depend, to some extent, upon the specific behavioral or neurochemical endpoint under consideration, a review of the available research leads to the hypothesis that the endpoints mediated by the CNS have certain characteristics in common. These include: (1) a threshold, below which there is no apparent effect; (2) the lack of a dose-response relationship, or an extremely steep dose-response curve, depending on the particular endpoint; and (3) the absence of recovery of function, such that the heavy particle-induced behavioral and neural changes are present when tested up to one year following exposure. The current report reviews the data relevant to the degree to which these characteristics are common to neurochemical and behavioral endpoints that are mediated by the effects of exposure to heavy particles on CNS activity. c2004 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Magnetic Susceptibility Analyses of Nanophase Iron Particle Diameters and Volumes Produced through Laser Irradiation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markley, M. M.; Kletetschka, G.

    2015-12-01

    Micrometeorite impacts greatly modify surfaces exposed to the space environment. This interaction vaporizes the surficial material and allows for the re-precipitation of minerals and iron. Characterizing the recondensed iron or nanophase metallic iron (npFe0) improves our interpretations in remote sensing of planetary surfaces. We irradiated olivine samples with energies simulating micrometeorite impact energies from around the inner Solar System. They revealed npFe0 as single domain (SD) and superparamagnetic (SPM) iron grains varying in size. Spectrally they changed the spectral reflectance of silicate minerals and contribute to "space weathering": (1) darkens the overall reflectance, (2) steepens (or reddens) the spectral slope, and (3) decreases the contrast in the silicate 1 µm band. Using frequency dependent magnetic susceptibility (MS), we revealed patterns of npFe0 sizes. Fresh samples contained some nanophase magnetic sources due to decreasing magnetic susceptibility, when changing frequency from 4 kHz to 16 kHz. Using the fresh olivine as a standard, the lunar analog displayed increased MS at the lower 4 kHz indicating that more iron was transformed into magnetic sources. At 16 kHz, the MS decreased due to SPM particles that were being formed with sizes <10 nm. With the Mercury analog, at higher 16 kHz frequencies the MS increased rather than decreased. We can infer that the excess energy from our laser converted the amount of smaller <10 nm SPM particles by growth into an increasing volume of >10 nm particles. With the asteroid analog, we found a lower MS at 16 kHz, but nothing less MS than the Lunar analog. The 4 kHz MS was similar to the fresh olivine. At the lowest irradiation energy for the asteroid sample we have evidence that we are producing npFe0 particles. Our data compares well with traditional methods of forming npFe0, such as thermal processing of olivine, suggesting that with laser irradiation there is a linear increase of nanoparticles

  3. Roles of charged particles and reactive species on cell membrane permeabilization induced by atmospheric-pressure plasma irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Shota; Kanzaki, Makoto; Hokari, Yutaro; Tominami, Kanako; Mokudai, Takayuki; Kanetaka, Hiroyasu; Kaneko, Toshiro

    2016-07-01

    As factors that influence cell membrane permeabilization during direct and indirect atmospheric-pressure plasma irradiation, charged particle influx, superoxide anion radicals (O2 -•), and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in plasma-irradiated solution were evaluated. These are the three strong candidate factors and might multiply contribute to cell membrane permeabilization. In particular, a shorter plasma diffusion distance leads to the enhancement of the direct effects such as charged particle influx and further increase cell membrane permeability. In addition, O2 -• dissipates over time (a life span of the order of minutes) in plasma-irradiated water, and the deactivation of a plasma-irradiated solution in term of cell membrane permeabilization occurs in a life span of the same order. These results could promote the understanding of the mechanism of plasma-induced cell membrane permeabilization.

  4. Monte Carlo simulation of small OpenPET prototype with (11)C beam irradiation: effects of secondary particles on in-beam imaging.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Yoshiyuki; Yoshida, Eiji; Kinouchi, Shoko; Nishikido, Fumihiko; Inadma, Naoko; Murayama, Hideo; Yamaya, Taiga

    2014-04-07

    In-beam positron emission tomography (PET) can enable visualization of an irradiated field using positron emitters (β+ decay). In particle therapies, many kinds of secondary particles are produced by nuclear interactions, which affect PET imaging. Our purpose in this work was to evaluate effects of secondary particles on in-beam PET imaging using the Monte Carlo simulation code, Geant4, by reproducing an experiment with a small OpenPET prototype in which a PMMA phantom was irradiated by a (11)C beam. The number of incident particles to the detectors and their spectra, background coincidence for the PET scan, and reconstructed images were evaluated for three periods, spill-time (beam irradiation), pause-time (accelerating the particles) and beam-off time (duration after the final spill). For spill-time, we tested a background reduction technique in which coincidence events correlated with the accelerator radiofrequency were discarded (RF gated) that has been proposed in the literature. Also, background generation processes were identified. For spill-time, most background coincidences were caused by prompt gamma rays, and only 1.4% of the total coincidences generated β+ signals. Differently, for pause-time and beam-off time, more than 75% of the total coincidence events were signals. Using these coincidence events, we failed to reconstruct images during the spill-time, but we obtained successful reconstructions for the pause-time and beam-off time, which was consistent with the experimental results. From the simulation, we found that the absence of materials in the beam line and using the RF gated technique improved the signal-to-noise ratio for the spill-time. From an additional simulation with range shifter-less irradiation and the RF gated technique, we showed the feasibility of image reconstruction during the spill-time.

  5. Monte Carlo simulation of small OpenPET prototype with 11C beam irradiation: effects of secondary particles on in-beam imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirano, Yoshiyuki; Yoshida, Eiji; Kinouchi, Shoko; Nishikido, Fumihiko; Inadma, Naoko; Murayama, Hideo; Yamaya, Taiga

    2014-04-01

    In-beam positron emission tomography (PET) can enable visualization of an irradiated field using positron emitters (β+ decay). In particle therapies, many kinds of secondary particles are produced by nuclear interactions, which affect PET imaging. Our purpose in this work was to evaluate effects of secondary particles on in-beam PET imaging using the Monte Carlo simulation code, Geant4, by reproducing an experiment with a small OpenPET prototype in which a PMMA phantom was irradiated by a 11C beam. The number of incident particles to the detectors and their spectra, background coincidence for the PET scan, and reconstructed images were evaluated for three periods, spill-time (beam irradiation), pause-time (accelerating the particles) and beam-off time (duration after the final spill). For spill-time, we tested a background reduction technique in which coincidence events correlated with the accelerator radiofrequency were discarded (RF gated) that has been proposed in the literature. Also, background generation processes were identified. For spill-time, most background coincidences were caused by prompt gamma rays, and only 1.4% of the total coincidences generated β+ signals. Differently, for pause-time and beam-off time, more than 75% of the total coincidence events were signals. Using these coincidence events, we failed to reconstruct images during the spill-time, but we obtained successful reconstructions for the pause-time and beam-off time, which was consistent with the experimental results. From the simulation, we found that the absence of materials in the beam line and using the RF gated technique improved the signal-to-noise ratio for the spill-time. From an additional simulation with range shifter-less irradiation and the RF gated technique, we showed the feasibility of image reconstruction during the spill-time.

  6. The thermoluminescence response of doped SiO2 optical fibres subjected to alpha-particle irradiation.

    PubMed

    Ramli, Ahmad Termizi; Bradley, D A; Hashim, Suhairul; Wagiran, Husin

    2009-03-01

    Ion beams are used in radiotherapy to deliver a more precise dose to the target volume while minimizing dose to the surrounding healthy tissue. For optimum dose monitoring in ion-beam therapy, it is essential to be able to measure the delivered dose with a sensitivity, spatial resolution and dynamic range that is sufficient to meet the demands of the various therapy situations. Optical fibres have been demonstrated by this group to show promising thermoluminescence properties with respect to photon, electron and proton irradiation. In particular, and also given the flexibility and small size of optical fibre cores, for example 125.0+/-0.1 microm for the Al- and Ge-doped fibres used in this study, these fibres have the potential to fulfill the above requirements. This study investigates the thermoluminescence dosimetric characteristics of variously doped SiO(2) optical fibres irradiated with alpha particles from (241)Am. Following subtraction of the gamma contribution from the above source, the thermoluminescence characteristics of variously doped SiO(2) optical fibres have been compared with that of TLD-100 rods. The irradiations were performed in a bell jar. Of related potential significance is the effective atomic number, Z(eff) of the fibre, modifying measured dose from that deposited in tissues; in the present work, a scanning electron microscope and associated energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy facility have been used to provide evaluation of Z(eff). For Ge-doped fibres, the effective atomic numbers value was 11.4, the equivalent value for Al-doped fibres was 12.3. This paper further presents results on dose response and the glow curves obtained. The results obtained indicate there to be good potential for use of variously doped SiO(2) optical fibres in measuring ion-beam doses in radiotherapeutic applications.

  7. Swift Heavy Ion Irradiation Effect On Nanometer Range W/Fe Multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Bagchi, Sharmistha; Jani, N. P. Lalla Snehal; Lakshmi, N.

    2010-10-04

    The present study reports the effect of swift heavy ion irradiation on structural and magnetic properties of sputtered Fe/W multilayer structure (MLS) having a bilayer composition of [W(30A)/Fe(20A)]{sub 10BL}. The MLS was irradiated by 120 MeV Au{sup 9+} ions up to fluence of 4x10{sup 13} ions/cm{sup 2}. Structural study of pristine and irradiated MLS reveals that intra-layer microstructure of Fe-layers in the MLS becomes nano-crystalline on irradiation. Magnetic studies show increase in coercivity at higher fluence which may be due to increase in surface and interface roughness after recrystallization of Fe-layers.

  8. Fluorescent nuclear track images of Ag-activated phosphate glass irradiated with photons and heavy charged particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurobori, Toshio; Yanagida, Yuka; Kodaira, Satoshi; Shirao, Taichi

    2017-05-01

    In this paper we report about the demonstration of the nuclear track imaging capabilities of Ag-activated phosphate glass. A 375 nm laser and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) were respectively used for track excitation and detection. Specifically, the blue and orange radiophotoluminescent (RPL) tracks and dose distributions observed after irradiation with soft X-rays, gamma rays and heavy charged particles (HCPs) are examined. In addition, the origins of the reductions in RPL efficiency for high-dose X-ray irradiation and for irradiation with HCPs with high linear energy transfer (LET) values are investigated via a CLSM and a conventional fluorescent reader and discussed.

  9. Comment on 'Zero-range potentials for Dirac particles: Scattering and related continuum problems'

    SciTech Connect

    Coutinho, F. A. B.; Nogami, Y.

    2006-02-15

    In a recent paper, Szmytkowski proposed zero-range potentials for Dirac particles in three space dimensions. On the other hand, there is a theorem, proved by Svendsen a long time ago, which implies that zero-range potentials cannot be defined for the Dirac equation in two and three space dimensions. We discuss a difficulty that underlies Szmytkowski's approach.

  10. Effect of flow characteristics on ultrafine particle emissions from range hoods.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Li-Ching; Chen, Chih-Chieh

    2013-08-01

    In order to understand the physical mechanisms of the production of nanometer-sized particulate generated from cooking oils, the ventilation of kitchen hoods was studied by determining the particle concentration, particle size distribution, particle dimensions, and hood's flow characteristics under several cooking scenarios. This research varied the temperature of the frying operation on one cooking operation, with three kinds of commercial cooking oils including soybean oil, olive oil, and sunflower oil. The variations of particle concentration and size distributions with the elevated cooking oil temperatures were presented. The particle concentration increases as a function of temperature. For oil temperatures ranging between 180°C and 210°C, a 5°C increase in temperature increased the number concentration of ultrafine particles by 20-50%. The maximum concentration of ultrafine particles was found to be approximately 6 × 10(6) particles per cm(3) at 260°C. Flow visualization techniques and particle distribution measurement were performed for two types of hood designs, a wall-mounted range hood and an island hood, at a suction flow rate of 15 m(3) min(-1). The flow visualization results showed that different configurations of kitchen hoods induce different aerodynamic characteristics. By comparing the results of flow visualizations and nanoparticle measurements, it was found that the areas with large-scale turbulent vortices are more prone to dispersion of ultrafine particle leakage because of the complex interaction between the shear layers and the suction movement that results from turbulent dispersion. We conclude that the evolution of ultrafine particle concentration fluctuations is strongly affected by the location of the hood, which can alter the aerodynamic features. We suggest that there is a correlation between flow characteristics and amount of contaminant leakage. This provides a comprehensive strategy to evaluate the effectiveness of kitchen hoods

  11. Particle Motion Analysis Reveals Nanoscale Bond Characteristics and Enhances Dynamic Range for Biosensing.

    PubMed

    Visser, Emiel W A; van IJzendoorn, Leo J; Prins, Menno W J

    2016-03-22

    Biofunctionalized colloidal particles are widely used as labels in bioanalytical assays, lab-on-chip devices, biophysical research, and in studies on live biological systems. With detection resolution going down to the level of single particles and single molecules, understanding the nature of the interaction of the particles with surfaces and substrates becomes of paramount importance. Here, we present a comprehensive study of motion patterns of colloidal particles maintained in close proximity to a substrate by short molecular tethers (40 nm). The motion of the particles (500-1000 nm) was optically tracked with a very high localization accuracy (below 3 nm). A surprisingly large variation in motion patterns was observed, which can be attributed to properties of the particle-molecule-substrate system, namely the bond number, the nature of the bond, particle protrusions, and substrate nonuniformities. Experimentally observed motion patterns were compared to numerical Monte Carlo simulations, revealing a close correspondence between the observed motion patterns and properties of the molecular system. Particles bound via single tethers show distinct disc-, ring-, and bell-shaped motion patterns, where the ring- and bell-shaped patterns are caused by protrusions on the particle in the direct vicinity of the molecular attachment point. Double and triple tethered particles exhibit stripe-shaped and triangular-shaped motion patterns, respectively. The developed motion pattern analysis allows for discrimination between particles bound by different bond types, which opens the possibility to improve the limit of detection and the dynamic range of bioanalytical assays, with a projected increase of dynamic range by nearly 2 orders of magnitude.

  12. High-resolution and multi-range particle separation by microscopic vibration in an optofluidic chip.

    PubMed

    Shi, Y Z; Xiong, S; Chin, L K; Yang, Y; Zhang, J B; Ser, W; Wu, J H; Chen, T N; Yang, Z C; Hao, Y L; Liedberg, B; Yap, P H; Zhang, Y; Liu, A Q

    2017-07-11

    An optofluidic chip is demonstrated in experiments for high-resolution and multi-range particle separation through the optically-induced microscopic vibration effect, where nanoparticles are trapped in loosely overdamped optical potential wells created with combined optical and fluidic constraints. It is the first demonstration of separating single nanoparticles with diameters ranging from 60 to 100 nm with a resolution of 10 nm. Nanoparticles vibrate with an amplitude of 3-7 μm in the loosely overdamped potential wells in the microchannel. The proposed optofluidic device is capable of high-resolution particle separation at both nanoscale and microscale without reconfiguring the device. The separation of bacteria from other larger cells is accomplished using the same chip and operation conditions. The unique trapping mechanism and the superb performance in high-resolution and multi-range particle separation of the proposed optofluidic chip promise great potential for a diverse range of biomedical applications.

  13. Indetermination of particle sizing by laser diffraction in the anomalous size ranges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Linchao; Ge, Baozhen; Zhang, Fugen

    2017-09-01

    The laser diffraction method is widely used to measure particle size distributions. It is generally accepted that the scattering angle becomes smaller and the angles to the location of the main peak of scattered energy distributions in laser diffraction instruments shift to smaller values with increasing particle size. This specific principle forms the foundation of the laser diffraction method. However, this principle is not entirely correct for non-absorbing particles in certain size ranges and these particle size ranges are called anomalous size ranges. Here, we derive the analytical formulae for the bounds of the anomalous size ranges and discuss the influence of the width of the size segments on the signature of the Mie scattering kernel. This anomalous signature of the Mie scattering kernel will result in an indetermination of the particle size distribution when measured by laser diffraction instruments in the anomalous size ranges. By using the singular-value decomposition method we interpret the mechanism of occurrence of this indetermination in detail and then validate its existence by using inversion simulations.

  14. Neuroimmune response and sleep studies after whole body irradiation with high-LET particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marquette, C.; Mathieu, J.; Bertho, J.-M.; Galonnier, M.; Wysoki, J.; Maubert, C.; Balanzat, E.; Gerbin, R.; Aigueperse, J.; Clarençon, D.

    2009-10-01

    In order to investigate the biological effects of galactic rays on astronaut cerebral functions after space flight, mice were exposed to different heavy ions (HZE) in whole-body conditions at doses comparable to the galactic flux: 12C, 16O and 20Ne (95 MeV/u, at 42-76 mGy). Animals were also exposed to 42 mGy of 60Co radiation for comparison with HZE. The neuroimmune response, evaluated by interleukin-1 (IL-1) measurement, showed that this cytokine was produced 3 h after irradiation by 16O or 60Co. In contrast, neither 12C (56.7 mGy) nor 20Ne (76 mGy) induced IL-1 production. However, immunohistochemical staining of 12C-irradiated mouse brain tissue showed 2 months later a marked inflammatory reaction in the hippocampus and a diffuse response in parenchyma. Sleep studies were realized before and after exposure to 42 mGy of 16O and 76 mGy of 20Ne: only the 20Ne radiation displayed a small effect. A slight decrease in paradoxical sleep, corresponding to a reduction in the number of episodes of paradoxical sleep, was manifested between 8 and 22 days after exposure. Exposure to 12C and 16O induced no changes either in cellularity of spleen or thymus, or in caspase 3 activity (as much as four months after irradiation). Taken together, these data indicate that the CNS could be sensitive to heavy ions and that responses to HZE impact depend on the nature of the particle, the dose threshold and the time delay to develop biological processes. Differences in responses to different HZE highlight the complex biological phenomena to which astronauts are submitted during space flight.

  15. [Comparative studies of particle distribution range of aerosol cromolyn sodium generated by MDI systems].

    PubMed

    Gradoń, L; Sosnowski, T R

    1999-05-01

    Particles size distribution of the sodium cromoglycate preparations: CROPOZ PLUS and CROMOGEN EB generated with MDI and for under-pressure releasing methods were measured. Results of measurements indicate a significant repeatability of each sample properties. An average contribution of mass of the respirable fraction for both aerosolized pharmaceuticals is in the range of 40% of the generated dose. CROMOGEN EB with optimizer (spacer) gives a higher contribution of the respirable fraction--up to 50% of dose, with simultaneous lower value of the released mass of aerosol. Particles size distribution of CROPOZ PLUS within a respirable fraction indicates an efficient penetration and deposition of particles in the upper, central and peripheral parts of tracheobronchial tree (TB). High contribution of submicron particles of CROMOGEN EB with optimizer gives efficient penetration and deposition of these particles in the lungs.

  16. Pre- and postirradiation evaluation of TRISO ThO/sub 2/ particles irradiated in capsule HT-34

    SciTech Connect

    Young, C.A.; Jones, C.S.

    1980-10-01

    Capsule HT-34 was irradiated jointly by General Atomic Company (GA) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This report presents the pre- and postirradiation evaluation conducted by GA. The purpose of the test was to characterize the mechanical and chemical performance and fission product release of TRISO ThO/sub 2/ particles. Sixteen TRISO ThO/sub 2/ samples, which had been fabricated in the production-line (240-mm-ID) coater, were irradiated at approximately 1200 and 1450/sup 0/C to neutron fluences of 5.1 to 10.2 x 10/sup 25/ n/m/sup 2/ (E > 29 fJ)/sub HTGR/, and burnups of 5.1 to 12.7% FIMA. Following are the results of the postirradiation examination: the OPyC coating failure of the 800-..mu..m-diameter particles irradiated at 1200/sup 0/C was less than or equal to 1.8%; the pressure-vessel model overpredicted failure up to seven times the observed failure for the samples irradiated at 1200/sup 0/C; palladium attack and internal corrosion of the SiC coating was observed in the samples irradiated at 1200/sup 0/C; internal corrosion of the SiC coating caused SiC failure up to 100% in the samples irradiated at 1450/sup 0/C; and an average of 16 and 90% of the Cs was released from failed particles irradiated at 1200 and 1450/sup 0/C, respectively, after 2686 h of irradiation.

  17. Induced radioactivities in concrete constituents irradiated by high-energy particles.

    PubMed

    Kondo, K; Hirayama, H; Ban, S; Taino, M; Ishii, H

    1984-06-01

    The powdered concrete constituents of magnetite ore, pyrites ore, marble, gravel and Portland cement were prepared and irradiated by 12- GeV protons and secondary particles at the slow extracted beam line of the National Laboratory for High Energy Physics ( KEK ) 12- GeV proton synchrotron. The saturated activities for individual nuclides produced were calculated, and the time variation of photon exposure rate due to the residual activities was also evaluated for each sample. The exposure rates ranked in the following order: magnetite ore greater than pyrites ore greater than gravel greater than or equal to cement greater than marble. The levels of photon exposure rates from heavy, ordinary and marble concretes were also estimated on the basis of the results obtained for each constituent. It is suggested that the use of marble concrete in the inside wall of accelerator tunnels can reduce considerably the exposure to the accelerator maintenance workers, compared with heavy and ordinary concretes commonly used.

  18. THE IRRADIATION-INDUCED OLIVINE TO AMORPHOUS PYROXENE TRANSFORMATION PRESERVED IN AN INTERPLANETARY DUST PARTICLE

    SciTech Connect

    Rietmeijer, Frans J. M.

    2009-11-01

    Amorphization of crystalline olivine to glass with a pyroxene composition is well known from high-energy irradiation experiments. This report is on the first natural occurrence of this process preserved in a chondritic aggregate interplanetary dust particle. The Fe-rich olivine grain textures and compositions and the glass grain compositions delineate this transformation that yielded glass with Fe-rich pyroxene compositions. The average glass composition, (Mg, Fe){sub 3}Si{sub 2}O{sub 7}, is a serpentine-dehydroxylate with O/Si = 3.56 +- 0.25, (Mg+Fe)/Si = 1.53 +- 0.24, and Mg/(Mg+Fe) = 0.74 +- 0.1. These measured atomic ratios match the ratios that have been proposed for amorphous interstellar silicate grains very well, albeit the measured Mg/(Mg+Fe) ratio is lower than was proposed for amorphous interstellar silicate grains, Mg/(Mg+Fe) > 0.9.

  19. Hippocampal Neurogenesis and Neuroinflammation after Cranial Irradiation with 56Fe Particles

    PubMed Central

    Rola, Radoslaw; Fishman, Kelly; Baure, Jennifer; Rosi, Susanna; Lamborn, Kathleen R.; Obenaus, Andre; Nelson, Gregory A.; Fike, John R.

    2008-01-01

    Exposure to heavy-ion radiation is considered a potential health risk in long-term space travel. In the central nervous system (CNS), loss of critical cellular components may lead to performance decrements that could ultimately compromise mission goals and long-term quality of life. Hippocampal-dependent cognitive impairments occur after exposure to ionizing radiation, and while the pathogenesis of this effect is not yet clear, it may involve the production of newly born neurons (neurogenesis) in the hippocampal dentate gyrus. We irradiated mice with 0.5–4 Gy of 56Fe ions and 2 months later quantified neurogenesis and numbers of activated microglia as a measure of neuroinflammation in the dentate gyrus. Results showed that there were few changes after 0.5 Gy, but that there was a dose-related decrease in hippocampal neurogenesis and a dose-related increase in numbers of newly born activated microglia from 0.5–4.0 Gy. While those findings were similar to what was reported after X irradiation, there were also some differences, particularly in the response of newly born glia. Overall, this study showed that hippocampal neurogenesis was sensitive to relatively low doses of 56Fe particles, and that those effects were associated with neuroinflammation. Whether these changes will result in functional impairments or if/how they can be managed are topics for further investigation. PMID:18494546

  20. Hippocampal neurogenesis and neuroinflammation after cranial irradiation with (56)Fe particles.

    PubMed

    Rola, Radoslaw; Fishman, Kelly; Baure, Jennifer; Rosi, Susanna; Lamborn, Kathleen R; Obenaus, Andre; Nelson, Gregory A; Fike, John R

    2008-06-01

    Exposure to heavy-ion radiation is considered a potential health risk in long-term space travel. In the central nervous system (CNS), loss of critical cellular components may lead to performance decrements that could ultimately compromise mission goals and long-term quality of life. Hippocampal-dependent cognitive impairments occur after exposure to ionizing radiation, and while the pathogenesis of this effect is not yet clear, it may involve the production of newly born neurons (neurogenesis) in the hippocampal dentate gyrus. We irradiated mice with 0.5-4 Gy of (56)Fe ions and 2 months later quantified neurogenesis and numbers of activated microglia as a measure of neuroinflammation in the dentate gyrus. Results showed that there were few changes after 0.5 Gy, but that there was a dose-related decrease in hippocampal neurogenesis and a dose-related increase in numbers of newly born activated microglia from 0.5-4.0 Gy. While those findings were similar to what was reported after X irradiation, there were also some differences, particularly in the response of newly born glia. Overall, this study showed that hippocampal neurogenesis was sensitive to relatively low doses of (56)Fe particles, and that those effects were associated with neuroinflammation. Whether these changes will result in functional impairments or if/how they can be managed are topics for further investigation.

  1. Long-term effects of irradiation with iron-56 particles on the nigrostriatal dopamine system.

    PubMed

    Rice, Onarae V; Grande, Alicia V; Dehktyar, Natasha; Bruneus, Magalie; Robinson, John K; Gatley, Samuel J

    2009-04-01

    Exposure to heavy ions during a Mars mission might damage the brain, thus compromising mission success and the quality of life of returning astronauts. Several workers have suggested that the dopamine system is particularly sensitive to heavy ion radiation, but direct evidence for this notion is lacking. We examined measures of brain dopamine viability at times up to 15 months after acute exposure of rats to (56)Fe (1.2-2.4 Gy). No effects were seen in brain sections stained for tyrosine hydroxylase, the classical marker for dopamine cells and nerve terminals. Locomotion stimulated by cocaine, which directly activates the dopamine system, was reduced at 6 months but not at 12 months. Furthermore, in a visually cued lever-pressing test, reaction times, which are prolonged by dopamine system damage, were identical in irradiated and control animals. However, learning times were increased by irradiation. Our data suggest that the midbrain dopamine system is not especially sensitive to damage by (56)Fe particles at doses much higher than would be associated with travel to and from Mars.

  2. The generation of diesel exhaust particle aerosols from a bulk source in an aerodynamic size range similar to atmospheric particles

    PubMed Central

    Cooney, Daniel J; Hickey, Anthony J

    2008-01-01

    The influence of diesel exhaust particles (DEP) on the lungs and heart is currently a topic of great interest in inhalation toxicology. Epidemiological data and animal studies have implicated airborne particulate matter and DEP in increased morbidity and mortality due to a number of cardiopulmonary diseases including asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder, and lung cancer. The pathogeneses of these diseases are being studied using animal models and cell culture techniques. Real-time exposures to freshly combusted diesel fuel are complex and require significant infrastructure including engine operations, dilution air, and monitoring and control of gases. A method of generating DEP aerosols from a bulk source in an aerodynamic size range similar to atmospheric DEP would be a desirable and useful alternative. Metered dose inhaler technology was adopted to generate aerosols from suspensions of DEP in the propellant hydrofluoroalkane 134a. Inertial impaction data indicated that the particle size distributions of the generated aerosols were trimodal, with count median aerodynamic diameters less than 100 nm. Scanning electron microscopy of deposited particles showed tightly aggregated particles, as would be expected from an evaporative process. Chemical analysis indicated that there were no major changes in the mass proportion of 2 specific aromatic hydrocarbons (benzo[a]pyrene and benzo[k]fluoranthene) in the particles resulting from the aerosolization process. PMID:19337412

  3. Mitigation of radiation nephropathy after internal alpha-particle irradiation of kidneys.

    PubMed

    Jaggi, Jaspreet Singh; Seshan, Surya V; McDevitt, Michael R; Sgouros, George; Hyjek, Elizabeth; Scheinberg, David A

    2006-04-01

    Internal irradiation of kidneys as a consequence of radioimmunotherapy, radiation accidents, or nuclear terrorism can result in radiation nephropathy. We attempted to modify pharmacologically, the functional and morphologic changes in mouse kidneys after injection with the actinium ((225)Ac) nanogenerator, an in vivo generator of alpha- and beta-particle emitting elements. The animals were injected with 0.35 muCi of the (225)Ac nanogenerator, which delivers a dose of 27.6 Gy to the kidneys. Then, they were randomized to receive captopril (angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor), L-158,809 (angiotensin II receptor-1 blocker), spironolactone (aldosterone receptor antagonist), or a placebo. Forty weeks after the (225)Ac injection, the placebo-control mice showed a significant increase in blood urea nitrogen (BUN) (87.6 +/- 6.9 mg/dL), dilated Bowman spaces, and tubulolysis with basement membrane thickening. Captopril treatment accentuated the functional (BUN 119.0 +/- 4.0 mg/dL; p <0.01 vs. placebo controls) and histopathologic damage. In contrast, L-158,809 offered moderate protection (BUN 66.6 +/- 3.9 mg/dL; p = 0.02 vs. placebo controls). Spironolactone treatment, however, significantly prevented the development of histopathologic and functional changes (BUN 31.2 +/- 2.5 mg/dL; p <0.001 vs. placebo controls). Low-dose spironolactone and, to a lesser extent, angiotensin receptor-1 blockade can offer renal protection in a mouse model of internal alpha-particle irradiation.

  4. Mitigation of radiation nephropathy after internal {alpha}-particle irradiation of kidneys

    SciTech Connect

    Jaggi, Jaspreet Singh; Seshan, Surya V.; McDevitt, Michael R.; Sgouros, George; Hyjek, Elizabeth; Scheinberg, David A. . E-mail: d-scheinberg@ski.mskcc.org

    2006-04-01

    Purpose: Internal irradiation of kidneys as a consequence of radioimmunotherapy, radiation accidents, or nuclear terrorism can result in radiation nephropathy. We attempted to modify pharmacologically, the functional and morphologic changes in mouse kidneys after injection with the actinium ({sup 225}Ac) nanogenerator, an in vivo generator of {alpha}- and {beta}-particle emitting elements. Methods and Materials: The animals were injected with 0.35 {mu}Ci of the {sup 225}Ac nanogenerator, which delivers a dose of 27.6 Gy to the kidneys. Then, they were randomized to receive captopril (angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor), L-158,809 (angiotensin II receptor-1 blocker), spironolactone (aldosterone receptor antagonist), or a placebo. Results: Forty weeks after the {sup 225}Ac injection, the placebo-control mice showed a significant increase in blood urea nitrogen (BUN) (87.6 {+-} 6.9 mg/dL), dilated Bowman spaces, and tubulolysis with basement membrane thickening. Captopril treatment accentuated the functional (BUN 119.0 {+-} 4.0 mg/dL; p <0.01 vs. placebo controls) and histopathologic damage. In contrast, L-158,809 offered moderate protection (BUN 66.6 {+-} 3.9 mg/dL; p = 0.02 vs. placebo controls). Spironolactone treatment, however, significantly prevented the development of histopathologic and functional changes (BUN 31.2 {+-} 2.5 mg/dL; p <0.001 vs. placebo controls). Conclusions: Low-dose spironolactone and, to a lesser extent, angiotensin receptor-1 blockade can offer renal protection in a mouse model of internal {alpha}-particle irradiation.

  5. Effect of long-range repulsive Coulomb interactions on packing structure of adhesive particles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sheng; Li, Shuiqing; Liu, Wenwei; Makse, Hernán A

    2016-02-14

    The packing of charged micron-sized particles is investigated using discrete element simulations based on adhesive contact dynamic model. The formation process and the final obtained structures of ballistic packings are studied to show the effect of interparticle Coulomb force. It is found that increasing the charge on particles causes a remarkable decrease of the packing volume fraction ϕ and the average coordination number 〈Z〉, indicating a looser and chainlike structure. Force-scaling analysis shows that the long-range Coulomb interaction changes packing structures through its influence on particle inertia before they are bonded into the force networks. Once contact networks are formed, the expansion effect caused by repulsive Coulomb forces are dominated by short-range adhesion. Based on abundant results from simulations, a dimensionless adhesion parameter Ad*, which combines the effects of the particle inertia, the short-range adhesion and the long-range Coulomb interaction, is proposed and successfully scales the packing results for micron-sized particles within the latest derived adhesive loose packing (ALP) regime. The structural properties of our packings follow well the recent theoretical prediction which is described by an ensemble approach based on a coarse-grained volume function, indicating some kind of universality in the low packing density regime of the phase diagram regardless of adhesion or particle charge. Based on the comprehensive consideration of the complicated inter-particle interactions, our findings provide insight into the roles of short-range adhesion and repulsive Coulomb force during packing formation and should be useful for further design of packings.

  6. Tailored long range forces on polarizable particles by collective scattering of broadband radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzmann, D.; Ritsch, H.

    2016-10-01

    Collective coherent light scattering by polarizable particles creates surprisingly strong, long range inter-particle forces originating from interference of the light scattered by different particles. While for monochromatic laser beams this interaction decays with the inverse distance, we show here that in general the effective interaction range and geometry can be controlled by the illumination bandwidth and geometry. As generic example we study the modifications inter-particle forces within a 1D chain of atoms trapped in the field of a confined optical nanofiber mode. For two particles we find short range attraction as well as optical binding at multiple distances. The range of stable distances shrinks with increasing light bandwidth and for a very large bandwidth field as e.g. blackbody radiation. We find a strongly attractive potential up to a critical distance beyond which the force gets repulsive. Including multiple scattering can even lead to the appearance of a stable configuration at a large distance. Such broadband scattering forces should be observable contributions in ultra-cold atom interferometers or atomic clocks setups. They could be studied in detail in 1D geometries with ultra-cold atoms trapped along or within an optical nanofiber. Broadband radiation force interactions might also contribute in astrophysical scenarios as illuminated cold dust clouds.

  7. Radiation Quality Effects on Transcriptome Profiles in 3-d Cultures After Particle Irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Z. S.; Kidane, Y. H.; Huff, J. L.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we evaluate the differential effects of low- and high-LET radiation on 3-D organotypic cultures in order to investigate radiation quality impacts on gene expression and cellular responses. Reducing uncertainties in current risk models requires new knowledge on the fundamental differences in biological responses (the so-called radiation quality effects) triggered by heavy ion particle radiation versus low-LET radiation associated with Earth-based exposures. We are utilizing novel 3-D organotypic human tissue models that provide a format for study of human cells within a realistic tissue framework, thereby bridging the gap between 2-D monolayer culture and animal models for risk extrapolation to humans. To identify biological pathway signatures unique to heavy ion particle exposure, functional gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) was used with whole transcriptome profiling. GSEA has been used extensively as a method to garner biological information in a variety of model systems but has not been commonly used to analyze radiation effects. It is a powerful approach for assessing the functional significance of radiation quality-dependent changes from datasets where the changes are subtle but broad, and where single gene based analysis using rankings of fold-change may not reveal important biological information. We identified 45 statistically significant gene sets at 0.05 q-value cutoff, including 14 gene sets common to gamma and titanium irradiation, 19 gene sets specific to gamma irradiation, and 12 titanium-specific gene sets. Common gene sets largely align with DNA damage, cell cycle, early immune response, and inflammatory cytokine pathway activation. The top gene set enriched for the gamma- and titanium-irradiated samples involved KRAS pathway activation and genes activated in TNF-treated cells, respectively. Another difference noted for the high-LET samples was an apparent enrichment in gene sets involved in cycle cycle/mitotic control. It is

  8. Effects of Alpha Particle and Proton Beam Irradiation as Putative Cross-Talk between A549 Cancer Cells and the Endothelial Cells in a Co-Culture System

    PubMed Central

    Riquier, Hélène; Abel, Denis; Wera, Anne-Catherine; Heuskin, Anne-Catherine; Genard, Géraldine; Lucas, Stéphane; Michiels, Carine

    2015-01-01

    Background: High-LET ion irradiation is being more and more often used to control tumors in patients. Given that tumors are now considered as complex organs composed of multiple cell types that can influence radiosensitivity, we investigated the effects of proton and alpha particle irradiation on the possible radioprotective cross-talk between cancer and endothelial cells. Materials and Methods: We designed new irradiation chambers that allow co-culture study of cells irradiated with a particle beam. A549 lung carcinoma cells and endothelial cells (EC) were exposed to 1.5 Gy of proton beam or 1 and 2 Gy of alpha particles. Cell responses were studied by clonogenic assays and cell cycle was analyzed by flow cytometry. Gene expression studies were performed using Taqman low density array and by RT-qPCR. Results: A549 cells and EC displayed similar survival fraction and they had similar cell cycle distribution when irradiated alone or in co-culture. Both types of irradiation induced the overexpression of genes involved in cell growth, inflammation and angiogenesis. Conclusions: We set up new irradiation chamber in which two cell types were irradiated together with a particle beam. We could not show that tumor cells and endothelial cells were able to protect each other from particle irradiation. Gene expression changes were observed after particle irradiation that could suggest a possible radioprotective inter-cellular communication between the two cell types but further investigations are needed to confirm these results. PMID:25794049

  9. Relative biological effectiveness in canine osteosarcoma cells irradiated with accelerated charged particles

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Junko; Cartwright, Ian M.; Haskins, Jeremy S.; Fujii, Yoshihiro; Fujisawa, Hiroshi; Hirakawa, Hirokazu; Uesaka, Mitsuru; Kitamura, Hisashi; Fujimori, Akira; Thamm, Douglas H.; Kato, Takamitsu A.

    2016-01-01

    Heavy ions, characterized by high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation, have advantages compared with low LET protons and photons in their biological effects. The application of heavy ions within veterinary clinics requires additional background information to determine heavy ion efficacy. In the present study, comparison of the cell-killing effects of photons, protons and heavy ions was investigated in canine osteosarcoma (OSA) cells in vitro. A total of four canine OSA cell lines with various radiosensitivities were irradiated with 137Cs gamma-rays, monoenergetic proton beams, 50 keV/µm carbon ion spread out Bragg peak beams and 200 keV/µm iron ion monoenergetic beams. Clonogenic survival was examined using colony-forming as says, and relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values were calculated relative to gamma-rays using the D10 value, which is determined as the dose (Gy) resulting in 10% survival. For proton irradiation, the RBE values for all four cell lines were 1.0–1.1. For all four cell lines, exposure to carbon ions yielded a decreased cell survival compared with gamma-rays, with the RBE values ranging from 1.56–2.10. Iron ions yielded the lowest cell survival among tested radiation types, with RBE values ranging from 3.51–3.69 observed in the three radioresistant cell lines. The radiosensitive cell line investigated demonstrated similar cell survival for carbon and iron ion irradiation. The results of the present study suggest that heavy ions are more effective for killing radioresistant canine OSA cells when compared with gamma-rays and protons. This markedly increased efficiency of cell killing is an attractive reason for utilizing heavy ions for radioresistant canine OSA. PMID:27446477

  10. Gradual modification of ITO particle's crystal structure and optical properties by pulsed UV laser irradiation in a free liquid jet.

    PubMed

    Lau, Marcus; Straube, Thomas; Aggarwal, A Vikas; Hagemann, Ulrich; de Oliveira Viestel, Bernardo; Hartmann, Nils; Textor, Torsten; Lutz, Harald; Gutmann, Jochen S; Barcikowski, Stephan

    2017-05-09

    Indium tin oxide (ITO) particle coatings are known for high transparency in the visible, good conductive properties and near-infrared absorption. These properties depend on ITO particle's stoichiometric composition, defects and size. Here we present a method to gradually change ITO particle's optical properties by a simple and controlled laser irradiation process. The defined irradiation process and controlled energy dose input allows one to engineer the absorption and transmission of coatings made from these particles. We investigate the role of the surrounding solvent, influence of laser fluence and the specific energy dose targeting modification of the ITO particle's morphology and chemistry by stepwise laser irradiation in a free liquid jet. TEM, SEM, EDX, XPS, XRD and Raman are used to elucidate the structural, morphological and chemical changes of the laser-induced ITO particles. On the basis of these results the observed modification of the optical properties is tentatively attributed to chemical changes, e.g. laser-induced defects or partial reduction.

  11. Visible to deep ultraviolet range optical absorption of electron irradiated borosilicate glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tie-Shan; Duan, Bing-Huang; Tian, Feng; Peng, Hai-Bo; Chen, Liang; Zhang, Li-Min; Yuan, Wei

    2015-07-01

    To study the room-temperature stable defects induced by electron irradiation, commercial borosilicate glasses were irradiated by 1.2 MeV electrons and then ultraviolet (UV) optical absorption (OA) spectra were measured. Two characteristic bands were revealed before irradiation, and they were attributed to silicon dangling bond (E’-center) and Fe3+ species, respectively. The existence of Fe3+ was confirmed by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) measurements. After irradiation, the absorption spectra revealed irradiation-induced changes, while the content of E’-center did not change in the deep ultraviolet (DUV) region. The slightly reduced OA spectra at 4.9 eV was supposed to transform Fe3+ species to Fe2+ species and this transformation leads to the appearance of 4.3 eV OA band. By calculating intensity variation, the transformation of Fe was estimated to be about 5% and the optical absorption cross section of Fe2+ species is calculated to be 2.2 times larger than that of Fe3+ species. Peroxy linkage (POL, ≡Si-O-O-Si≡), which results in a 3.7 eV OA band, is speculated not to be from Si-O bond break but from Si-O-B bond, Si-O-Al bond, or Si-O-Na bond break. The co-presence defect with POL is probably responsible for 2.9-eV OA band. Project supported by the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities of China (Grant No. lzujbky-2014-16).

  12. Activation cross sections of longer-lived radionuclides produced in germanium by alpha particle irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takács, S.; Takács, M. P.; Ditrói, F.; Aikawa, M.; Haba, H.; Komori, Y.

    2016-09-01

    The cross sections of alpha particles induced nuclear reactions on natural germanium were investigated by using the standard stacked foil target technique, the activation method and high resolution gamma spectrometry. Targets with thickness of about 1 μm were prepared from natural Ge by vacuum evaporation onto 25 μm thick polyimide (Kapton) backing foils. Stacks were composed of Kapton-Ge-Ge-Kapton sandwich target foils and additional titanium monitor foils with nominal thickness of 11 μm to monitor the beam parameters using the natTi(α,x)51Cr reaction. The irradiations were done with Eα = 20.7 and Eα = 51.25 MeV, Iα = 50 nA alpha particle beams for about 1 h. Direct or cumulative activation cross sections were determined for production of the 72,73,75Se, 71,72,74,76,78As, and 69Ge radionuclides. The obtained experimental cross sections were compared to the results of theoretical calculations taken from the TENDL data library based on the TALYS computer code. A comparison was made with available experimental data measured earlier. Thick target yields were deduced from the experimental cross sections and compared with the data published before.

  13. Electrophisiological signatures linked to particle irradiation on rodents within ALTEA-MICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narici, L.; Altea-Mice Team

    After several dry and test runs we performed in July 2004 a full scale electrophysiological experiment on normal mice that provided a first objective functional measure of heavy ions effect on the visual system Twentytwo mice was studied Electrophysiological signals were recorded from the retina and visual cortex during and with time information with luminance stimulation and beam bursts Repeated bursts of 12 C ions at 200 MeV i e below the Cerenkov threshold were delivered to the retina of dark-adapted mice In particular three- to five hundred 12 C bursts with nominal length of 1-5 ms intensity of 10 3 -10 4 particles burst 200 MeV n and 3 s interval between consecutive bursts were delivered by beam Light stimulation light flashes of 1 ms was performed before and after irradiation Ion bursts evoked a transient electrophysiological signal from the retina with waveform comparable to the response to light but longer latencies and smaller amplitude Variability among animals was high and may be accounted for by differences due to e g anaesthesia in the sensitivity saturation threshold of the cone rod systems contributing to the response or by effects on photoreceptors of the energy locally supplemented by the heat The amplitude of the retinal signal was correlated with the number of particles burst in one mouse with a signal-to-noise ratio and amplitude allowing measurements on the responses to single ion bursts

  14. Study of Particle Motion in He II Counterflow Across a Wide Heat Flux Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastracci, Brian; Takada, Suguru; Guo, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Some discrepancy exists in the results of He II counterflow experiments obtained using particle image velocimetry (PIV) when compared with those obtained using particle tracking velocimetry (PTV): using PIV, it was observed that tracer particles move at roughly half the expected normal fluid velocity, v_n/2 , while tracer particles observed using PTV moved at approximately v_n . A suggested explanation is that two different flow regimes were examined since the range of heat flux applied in each experiment was adjacent but non-overlapping. Another PTV experiment attempted to test this model, but the applied heat flux did not overlap with any PIV experiments. We report on the beginnings of a study of solid D_2 particle motion in counterflow using PTV, and the heat flux range overlaps that of all previous visualization studies. The observed particle velocity distribution transitions from a two-peak structure to a single peak as the heat flux is increased. Furthermore, the mean value of one peak in the bi-modal distributions grows at approximately the same rate as v_n , while the mean value of the single-peak distributions grows at roughly 0.4v_n , in reasonable agreement with both previous experiments and with the suggested model.

  15. Cell growth kinetics of the human cell line Colo-205 irradiated with photons and astatine-211 alpha-particles.

    PubMed

    Palm, S; Andersson, H; Bäck, T; Claesson, I; Delle, U; Hultborn, R; Jacobsson, L; Köpf, I; Lindegren, S

    2000-01-01

    Cell growth kinetics following Astatine-211 (211At, alpha-particle emitter) and photon irradiation were studied for the human colorectal cell line Colo-205. A growth assay using 96-well plates was chosen. The growth kinetics could be simulated by assuming certain fractions of cells with various proliferative capacities, i.e. from none up to 5 cell doublings, in addition to the defined survivors with remaining unlimited clonogenic capacity. No significant difference in cell growth characteristics was seen between 211At and photon irradiation. The cell doubling time, as calculated from the increment in optical density, was compared with the results from BrdU experiments in the early phases of growth (Tpot = 18.5 +/- 0.6 h for LDR (low dose rate) photon irradiated and 20.3 +/- 0.8 hours for sham-irradiated cells 40-45 hours post-irradiation) confirming the transient accelerated growth of irradiated cells. No statistically significant difference in growth was found between LDR, MDR (medium dose rate) and HDR (high dose rate) photon irradiation.

  16. Cell Cycle Checkpoint Proteins p21 and Hus1 Regulating Intercellular Signaling Induced By Alpha Particle Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Lijun; Zhao, Ye; Wang, Jun; Hang, Haiying

    In recent years, the attentions for radiation induced bystander effects (RIBE) have been paid on the intercellular signaling events connecting the irradiated and non-irradiated cells. p21 is a member of the Cip/Kip family and plays essential roles in cell cycle progression arrest after cellular irradiation. DNA damage checkpoint protein Hus1 is a member of the Rad9-Rad1-Hus1 complex and functions as scaffold at the damage sites to facilitate the activation of downstream effectors. Using the medium trasfer method and the cells of MEF, MEF (p21-/-), MEF (p21-/-Hus1-/-) as either medium donor or receptor cells, it was found that with 5cGy alpha particle irradiation, the bystander cells showed a significant induction of -H2AX for normal MEFs (p¡0.05). However, the absence of p21 resulted in deficiency in inducing bystander effects. Further results indicated p21 affected the intercellular DNA damage signaling mainly through disrupting the production or release of the damage signals from irradiated cells. When Hus1 and p21 were both knocked out, an obvious induction of -H2AX recurred in bystander cells and the induction of -H2AX was GJIC (gap junction-mediated intercellular communication) dependent, indicating the interrelationship between p21 and Hus1 regulated the production and relay of DNA damage signals from irradiated cells to non-irradiated bystander cells.

  17. Particle simulation algorithms with short-range forces in MHD and fluid flow

    SciTech Connect

    Cable, S.; Tajima, T.; Umegaki, K.

    1992-07-01

    Attempts are made to develop numerical algorithms for handling fluid flows involving liquids and liquid-gas mixtures. In these types of systems, the short-range intermolecular interactions are important enough to significantly alter behavior predicted on the basis of standard fluid mechanics and magnetohydrodynamics alone. We have constructed a particle-in-cell (PIC) code for the purpose of studying the effects of these interactions. Of the algorithms considered, the one which has been successfully implemented is based on a MHD particle code developed by Brunel et al. In the version presented here, short range forces are included in particle motion by, first, calculating the forces between individual particles and then, to prevent aliasing, interpolating these forces to the computational grid points, then interpolating the forces back to the particles. The code has been used to model a simple two-fluid Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Limitations to the accuracy of the code exist at short wavelengths, where the effects of the short-range forces would be expected to be most pronounced.

  18. Evaluating Attenuation of Vibration Response using Particle Impact Damping for a Range of Equipment Assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Brent; Parsons, David; Smith, Andrew; Hunt, Ron; LaVerde, Bruce; Towner, Robert; Craigmyle, Ben

    2013-01-01

    Particle dampers provide a mechanism for diverting energy away from resonant structural vibrations. This experimental study provides data from a series of acoustically excited tests to determine the effectiveness of these dampers for equipment mounted to a curved orthogrid panel for a launch vehicle application. Vibration attenuation trends are examined for variations in particle damper fill level, component mass, and excitation energy. A significant response reduction at the component level was achieved, suggesting that comparatively small, strategically placed, particle damper devices might be advantageously used in launch vehicle design. These test results were compared to baseline acoustic response tests without particle damping devices, over a range of isolation and damping parameters. Instrumentation consisting of accelerometers, microphones, and still photography data will be collected to correlate with the analytical results.

  19. Electron microscopic evaluation and fission product identification of irradiated TRISO coated particles from the AGR-1 experiment: A preliminary Study

    SciTech Connect

    I J van Rooyen; D E Janney; B D Miller; J L Riesterer; P A Demkowicz

    2012-10-01

    ABSTRACT Post-irradiation examination of coated particle fuel from the AGR-1 experiment is in progress at Idaho National Laboratory and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. In this presentation a brief summary of results from characterization of microstructures in the coating layers of selected irradiated fuel particles with burnup of 11.3% and 19.3% FIMA will be given. The main objective of the characterization were to study irradiation effects, fuel kernel porosity, layer debonding, layer degradation or corrosion, fission-product precipitation, grain sizes, and transport of fission products from the kernels across the TRISO layers. Characterization techniques such as scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and wavelength dispersive spectroscopy were used. A new approach to microscopic quantification of fission-product precipitates is also briefly demonstrated. The characterization emphasized fission-product precipitates in the SiC-IPyC interface, SiC layer and the fuel-buffer interlayer, and provided significant new insights into mechanisms of fission-product transport. Although Pd-rich precipitates were identified at the SiC-IPyC interlayer, no significant SiC-layer thinning was observed for the particles investigated. Characterization of these precipitates highlighted the difficulty of measuring low concentration Ag in precipitates with significantly higher concentrations of contain Pd and U. Different approaches to resolving this problem are discussed. Possible microstructural differences between particles with high and low releases of Ag particles are also briefly discussed, and an initial hypothesis is provided to explain fission-product precipitate compositions and locations. No SiC phase transformations or debonding of the SiC-IPyC interlayer as a result of irradiation were observed. Lessons learned from the post-irradiation examination are described and future actions are recommended.

  20. Simple experimental method for alpha particle range determination in lead iodide films

    SciTech Connect

    Dmitriev, Yuri; Bennett, Paul R.; Cirignano, Leonard J.; Klugerman, Mikhail; Shah, Kanai S.

    2007-05-15

    An experimental method for determining the range of alpha particles in films based on I-V{sub s} analysis has been suggested. The range of 5.5 MeV alpha particles in PbI{sub 2} films determined by this technique is 30{+-}5 {mu}m, and this value is in agreement with the value calculated by SRIM (the stopping and range of ions in matter), r=24 {mu}m in PbI{sub 2}. More than 100 I-V{sub s} of PbI{sub 2} films with different thicknesses and quality have been analyzed, and the influence of alpha particle radiation on PbI{sub 2} I-V{sub s} curves has been studied. Developed analytical methods (dependence of current density on electric field and conception of surface defects) were used, and the method limitations are discussed. It was shown that I-V{sub s} demonstrate the tendency to obey Ohm's law under alpha radiation. On the other hand, dark conductivity of the lead iodide films shows a typical impure character that can lead to an overestimation of the alpha particles' range in PbI{sub 2} films. After films were exposed to alpha radiation, the dark resistivity and I-V shape of some films improved. Also, a weak decrease of the charge carrier concentration, due to a decrease of the ''surface defect'' concentration (''surface refining''), was registered after successive measurements of I-V{sub s}.

  1. First elevated-temperature performance testing of coated particle fuel compacts from the AGR-1 irradiation experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Charles A. Baldwin; John D. Hunn; Robert N. Morris; Fred C. Montgomery; Chinthaka M. Silva; Paul A. Demkowicz

    2014-05-01

    In the AGR-1 irradiation experiment, 72 coated-particle fuel compacts were taken to a peak burnup of 19.5% fissions per initial metal atom with no in-pile failures. This paper discusses the first post-irradiation test of these mixed uranium oxide/uranium carbide fuel compacts at elevated temperature to examine the fuel performance under a simulated depressurized conduction cooldown event. A compact was heated for 400 h at 1600 degrees C. Release of 85Kr was monitored throughout the furnace test as an indicator of coating failure, while other fission product releases from the compact were periodically measured by capturing them on exchangeable, water-cooled deposition cups. No coating failure was detected during the furnace test, and this result was verified by subsequent electrolytic deconsolidation and acid leaching of the compact, which showed that all SiC layers were still intact. However, the deposition cups recovered significant quantities of silver, europium, and strontium. Based on comparison of calculated compact inventories at the end of irradiation versus analysis of these fission products released to the deposition cups and furnace internals, the minimum estimated fractional losses from the compact during the furnace test were 1.9 x 10-2 for silver, 1.4 x 10-3 for europium, and 1.1 x 10-5 for strontium. Other post-irradiation examination of AGR-1 compacts indicates that similar fractions of europium and silver may have already been released by the intact coated particles during irradiation, and it is therefore likely that the detected fission products released from the compact in this 1600 degrees C furnace test were from residual fission products in the matrix. Gamma analysis of coated particles deconsolidated from the compact after the heating test revealed that silver content within each particle varied considerably; a result that is probably not related to the furnace test, because it has also been observed in other as-irradiated AGR-1 compacts. X

  2. Survival of human lung epithelial cells following in vitro alpha-particle irradiation with absolute determination of the number of alpha-particle traversals of individual cells.

    PubMed

    Søyland, C; Hassfjell, S P

    2000-10-01

    To throw light on human exposure to domestic radon and radon progeny, the effects of low doses of alpha-particle irradiation on normal human lung epithelial cells has been studied. At such low exposure levels the concept of dose is inadequate due to the stochastic variation in the number of alpha-particle traversals per cell. The objective of the current study was to establish an accurate survival curve for human lung epithelial cells with absolute determination of the exact number of alpha-particle traversals of individual cells. Irradiation of L132 cells growing in tracketch detector-based cell dishes, was performed using a collimated alpha-particle beam from a 210Po source. The number of alpha-particle traversals through each individual cell was scored by using a technique of retrospective track-etch dosimetry. This technique is based upon image matching and mapping of corresponding cell and alpha-particle track images. The spatial resolution of the hit determination procedure was +/-0.9/microm. Surviving fractions of cells (SF) showed strict dependence on the number of nuclear traversals (n), with SF(n)= a exp(-bn), a=0.957 (+/- 0.046), b = 0.587 (+/- 0.059), R2 =98.8%. No significant dependence on the number of nuclear membrane traversals (m) or the number of cytoplasm traversals (c) was observed.

  3. Emergent ultra-long-range interactions between active particles in hybrid active-inactive systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steimel, Joshua P.; Aragones, Juan L.; Hu, Helen; Qureshi, Naser

    2016-04-01

    Particle-particle interactions determine the state of a system. Control over the range of such interactions as well as their magnitude has been an active area of research for decades due to the fundamental challenges it poses in science and technology. Very recently, effective interactions between active particles have gathered much attention as they can lead to out-of-equilibrium cooperative states such as flocking. Inspired by nature, where active living cells coexist with lifeless objects and structures, here we study the effective interactions that appear in systems composed of active and passive mixtures of colloids. Our systems are 2D colloidal monolayers composed primarily of passive (inactive) colloids, and a very small fraction of active (spinning) ferromagnetic colloids. We find an emergent ultra-long-range attractive interaction induced by the activity of the spinning particles and mediated by the elasticity of the passive medium. Interestingly, the appearance of such interaction depends on the spinning protocol and has a minimum actuation timescale below which no attraction is observed. Overall, these results clearly show that, in the presence of elastic components, active particles can interact across very long distances without any chemical modification of the environment. Such a mechanism might potentially be important for some biological systems and can be harnessed for newer developments in synthetic active soft materials.

  4. Measurements of inertial range scaling in rotations of rigid particles in turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voth, Greg; Cole, Brendan; Kramel, Stefan

    2016-11-01

    We measure the rotation rate of 3D-printed particles with sizes spanning the inertial range in a turbulent flow between oscillating grids. Tetrads, composed of four slender rods in tetrahedral symmetry, and triads, three slender rods in triangular planar symmetry, are tracked in a flow with Rλ = 156 and Rλ = 214 using four high-speed cameras. Tetrads rotate like spheres and triads rotate like disks. Measurements of tetrads' solid body rotation rates as a function of particle size are direct measurements of the coarse-grained vorticity and provide a new way to measure inertial range scaling in turbulent flows. We observe Kolmogorov scaling for the mean square solid body rotation rate of tetrads, <Ω2 > r - 4 / 3 , extending earlier work on rods by Parsa and Voth to particles that do not experience preferential orientation. The theory is extended to higher moments and intermittent scaling, but experiments do not yet resolve intermittency corrections. For triads, the solid-body rotation rate is preferentially aligned with the particle orientation, and we find that the preferential alignment of these large planar particles is quite different than was previously observed for small tracer disks. Supported by NSF Grant DMR-1508575.

  5. Effects of 5.4 MeV alpha-particle irradiation on the electrical properties of nickel Schottky diodes on 4H-SiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omotoso, E.; Meyer, W. E.; Auret, F. D.; Paradzah, A. T.; Diale, M.; Coelho, S. M. M.; Janse van Rensburg, P. J.; Ngoepe, P. N. M.

    2015-12-01

    Current-voltage, capacitance-voltage and conventional deep level transient spectroscopy at temperature ranges from 40 to 300 K have been employed to study the influence of alpha-particle irradiation from an 241Am source on Ni/4H-SiC Schottky contacts. The nickel Schottky barrier diodes were resistively evaporated on n-type 4H-SiC samples of doping density of 7.1 × 1015 cm-3. It was observed that radiation damage caused an increase in ideality factors of the samples from 1.04 to 1.07, an increase in Schottky barrier height from 1.25 to 1.31 eV, an increase in series resistance from 48 to 270 Ω but a decrease in saturation current density from 55 to 9 × 10-12 A m-2 from I-V plots at 300 K. The free carrier concentration of the sample decreased slightly after irradiation. Conventional DLTS showed peaks due to four deep levels for as-grown and five deep levels after irradiation. The Richardson constant, as determined from a modified Richardson plot assuming a Gaussian distribution of barrier heights for the as-grown and irradiated samples were 133 and 151 A cm-2 K-2, respectively. These values are similar to literature values.

  6. Systematic Ion Irradiation Experiments to Olivine: Comparison with Space Weathered Rims of Itokawa Regolith Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, T.; Tsuchiyama, A.; Watanabe, N.; Yasuda, K.; Miyake, A.; Nakauchi, Y.; Okada, T.; Abe, M.; Yada, T.; Uesugi, M.; Karouji, Y.; Nakato, A.; Hashiguschi, M.; Kumagai, K.

    2015-11-01

    We performed H and He ion irradiation experiments using olivine fragments, in order to reveal formation time-scales of space weathered rims and formation processes of blisters by solar wind irradiation.

  7. Effects of heavy particle irradiation and diet on amphetamine- and lithium chloride-induced taste avoidance learning in rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rabin, Bernard M.; Shukitt-Hale, Barbara; Szprengiel, Aleksandra; Joseph, James A.

    2002-01-01

    Rats were maintained on diets containing either 2% blueberry or strawberry extract or a control diet for 8 weeks prior to being exposed to 1.5 Gy of 56Fe particles in the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Three days following irradiation, the rats were tested for the effects of irradiation on the acquisition of an amphetamine- or lithium chloride-induced (LiCl) conditioned taste avoidance (CTA). The rats maintained on the control diet failed to show the acquisition of a CTA following injection of amphetamine. In contrast, the rats maintained on antioxidant diets (strawberry or blueberry extract) continued to show the development of an amphetamine-induced CTA following exposure to 56Fe particles. Neither irradiation nor diet had an effect on the acquisition of a LiCl-induced CTA. The results are interpreted as indicating that oxidative stress following exposure to 56Fe particles may be responsible for the disruption of the dopamine-mediated amphetamine-induced CTA in rats fed control diets; and that a reduction in oxidative stress produced by the antioxidant diets functions to reinstate the dopamine-mediated CTA. The failure of either irradiation or diet to influence LiCl-induced responding suggests that oxidative stress may not be involved in CTA learning following injection of LiCl.

  8. Effects of heavy particle irradiation and diet on amphetamine- and lithium chloride-induced taste avoidance learning in rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rabin, Bernard M.; Shukitt-Hale, Barbara; Szprengiel, Aleksandra; Joseph, James A.

    2002-01-01

    Rats were maintained on diets containing either 2% blueberry or strawberry extract or a control diet for 8 weeks prior to being exposed to 1.5 Gy of 56Fe particles in the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Three days following irradiation, the rats were tested for the effects of irradiation on the acquisition of an amphetamine- or lithium chloride-induced (LiCl) conditioned taste avoidance (CTA). The rats maintained on the control diet failed to show the acquisition of a CTA following injection of amphetamine. In contrast, the rats maintained on antioxidant diets (strawberry or blueberry extract) continued to show the development of an amphetamine-induced CTA following exposure to 56Fe particles. Neither irradiation nor diet had an effect on the acquisition of a LiCl-induced CTA. The results are interpreted as indicating that oxidative stress following exposure to 56Fe particles may be responsible for the disruption of the dopamine-mediated amphetamine-induced CTA in rats fed control diets; and that a reduction in oxidative stress produced by the antioxidant diets functions to reinstate the dopamine-mediated CTA. The failure of either irradiation or diet to influence LiCl-induced responding suggests that oxidative stress may not be involved in CTA learning following injection of LiCl.

  9. Risk Assessment of Face Skin Exposure to UV Irradiance from Different Rotation Angle Ranges

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fang; Gao, Qian; Deng, Yan; Chen, Rentong; Liu, Yang

    2017-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) is one of the environmental pathogenic factors causing skin damage. Aiming to assess the risk of face skin exposure to UV irradiance from different rotation angles, a rotating model was used to monitor the exposure of the skin on the face to UV irradiance, with skin damage action spectra used to determine the biologically effective UV irradiance (UVBEskin) and UVBEskin radiant exposure (HBEskin) causing skin damage. The results indicate that the UVBEskin is directly influenced by variations in rotation angles. A significant decrease of approximately 52.70% and 52.10% in UVBEskin was found when the cheek and nose measurement sites was rotated from 0° to 90°, while a decrease of approximately 62.70% was shown when the forehead measurement sites was rotated from an angle of 0° to 108°. When HBEskin was compared to the exposure limits (ELs; 30 J·m−2), the maximum relative risk ratios (RR) for cheek, nose, and forehead were found to be approximately 2.01, 2.40, and 2.90, respectively, which were all measured at a rotation angle of 0°. The maximal increase in the percentage of the average HBEskin for rotation angles of 60°, 120°, 180°, and 360° facing the sun to ELs were found to be approximately 62.10%, 52.72%, 43.43%, and 26.27% for the cheek; approximately 130.61%, 109.68%, 86.43%, and 50.06% for the nose; and approximately 178.61%, 159.19%, 134.38%, and 83.41% for the forehead, respectively. PMID:28587318

  10. Effects of fuel particle size and fission-fragment-enhanced irradiation creep on the in-pile behavior in CERCER composite pellets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yunmei; Ding, Shurong; Zhang, Xunchao; Wang, Canglong; Yang, Lei

    2016-12-01

    The micro-scale finite element models for CERCER pellets with different-sized fuel particles are developed. With consideration of a grain-scale mechanistic irradiation swelling model in the fuel particles and the irradiation creep in the matrix, numerical simulations are performed to explore the effects of the particle size and the fission-fragment-enhanced irradiation creep on the thermo-mechanical behavior of CERCER pellets. The enhanced irradiation creep effect is applied in the 10 μm-thick fission fragment damage matrix layer surrounding the fuel particles. The obtained results indicate that (1) lower maximum temperature occurs in the cases with smaller-sized particles, and the effects of particle size on the mechanical behavior in pellets are intricate; (2) the first principal stress and radial axial stress remain compressive in the fission fragment damage layer at higher burnup, thus the mechanism of radial cracking found in the experiment can be better explained.

  11. Total Body Irradiation in the "Hematopoietic" Dose Range Induces Substantial Intestinal Injury in Non-Human Primates.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junru; Shao, Lijian; Hendrickson, Howard P; Liu, Liya; Chang, Jianhui; Luo, Yi; Seng, John; Pouliot, Mylene; Authier, Simon; Zhou, Daohong; Allaben, William; Hauer-Jensen, Martin

    2015-11-01

    The non-human primate has been a useful model for studies of human acute radiation syndrome (ARS). However, to date structural changes in various parts of the intestine after total body irradiation (TBI) have not been systematically studied in this model. Here we report on our current study of TBI-induced intestinal structural injury in the non-human primate after doses typically associated with hematopoietic ARS. Twenty-four non-human primates were divided into three groups: sham-irradiated control group; and total body cobalt-60 (60Co) 6.7 Gy gamma-irradiated group; and total body 60Co 7.4 Gy gamma-irradiated group. After animals were euthanized at day 4, 7 and 12 postirradiation, sections of small intestine (duodenum, proximal jejunum, distal jejunum and ileum) were collected and fixed in 10% formalin. The intestinal mucosal surface length, villus height and crypt depths were assessed by computer-assisted image analysis. Plasma citrulline levels were determined using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Total bone marrow cells were counted and hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells in bone marrow were analyzed by flow cytometer. Histopathologically, all segments exhibited conspicuous disappearance of plicae circulares and prominent atrophy of crypts and villi. Intestinal mucosal surface length was significantly decreased in all intestinal segments on day 4, 7 and 12 after irradiation (P < 0.02-P < 0.001). Villus height was significantly reduced in all segments on day 4 and 7 (P = 0.02-0.005), whereas it had recovered by day 12 (P > 0.05). Crypt depth was also significantly reduced in all segments on day 4, 7 and 12 after irradiation (P < 0.04-P < 0.001). Plasma citrulline levels were dramatically reduced after irradiation, consistent with intestinal mucosal injury. Both 6.7 and 7.4 Gy TBI reduced total number of bone marrow cells. And further analysis showed that the number and function of CD45(+)CD34(+) hematopoietic stem/progenitors in bone

  12. Electronic and Optical Properties of Energetic Particle-IrradiatedIn-rich InGaN

    SciTech Connect

    Li, S.X.; Yu, K.M.; Jones, R.E.; Wu, J.; Walukiewicz, W.; AgerIII, J.W.; Shan, W.; Haller, E.E.; Lu, Hai; Schaff, William J.; Kemp, W.

    2005-04-13

    We have carried out a systematic study of the effects of irradiation on the electronic and optical properties of InGaN alloys over the entire composition range. High energy electrons, protons, and {sup 4}He{sup +} were used to produce displacement damage doses (D{sub d}) spanning over five orders of magnitude. The free electron concentrations in InN and In-rich InGaN increase with D{sub d} and finally saturate after a sufficiently high D{sub d}. The saturation of carrier density is attributed to the formation of native donors and the Fermi level pinning at the Fermi Stabilization Energy (E{sub FS}), as predicted by the amphoteric native defect model. Electrochemical capacitance-voltage (ECV) measurements reveal a surface electron accumulation whose concentration is determined by pinning at E{sub FS}.

  13. Enhanced sputter yields of ion irradiated Au nano particles: energy and size dependence.

    PubMed

    Holland-Moritz, Henry; Scheeler, Sebastian; Stanglmair, Christoph; Pacholski, Claudia; Ronning, Carsten

    2015-08-14

    Hexagonally arranged Au nanoparticles exhibiting a broad Gaussian-shaped size distribution ranging from 30 nm to 80 nm were deposited on Si substrates and irradiated with Ar(+) and Ga(+) ions with various energies from 20 to 350 keV and 1 to 30 keV, respectively. The size and energy dependence of the sputter yield were measured using high-resolution scanning electron microscopy image analysis. These results were compared to simulation results obtained by iradina, a Monte Carlo code, which takes the specifics of the nano geometry into account. The experimental sputter yields are significantly higher than simulated sputter yields for both bulk and the nano geometry. The difference can be clearly attributed to thermally driven effects, which significantly increase the measured sputter yields.

  14. Separation of no-carrier-added astatine radionuclides from α-particle irradiated lead bismuth eutectic target: A classical method.

    PubMed

    Maiti, Moumita; Lahiri, Susanta; Kumar, Deepak; Choudhury, Dibyasree

    2017-09-01

    Possibility of separation of no-carrier-added (NCA) astatine radionuclides from the bulk lead-bismuth-eutectic (LBE) target was explored in a simple way in the laboratory scale. A LBE target was irradiated by 40MeV α-particles delivered from a cyclotron facility, India. Quantitative analysis of the irradiated target indicated the production of (210,209)At, (207)Po radionuclides in the target matrix. The (210,209)At radionuclides were separated by precipitation of bulk Pb, Bi and NCA radiotoxic Po radionuclides. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. NOTE: Ranges of ions in metals for use in particle treatment planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jäkel, Oliver

    2006-05-01

    In proton and ion radiotherapy, the range of particles is calculated from x-ray computed tomography (CT) numbers. Due to the strong absorption of x-rays in a metal and a cut-off for large Hounsfield units (HU) in the software of most CT-scanners, a range calculation in metals cannot be based on the measured HU. This is of special importance when metal implants such as gold fillings or hip prostheses are close to the treatment volume. In order to overcome this problem in treatment planning for heavy charged particles, the correct ranges of ions in the metal relative to water have to be assigned in the CT data. Measurements and calculations of carbon ion ranges in various metals are presented that can be used in treatment planning to allow for a more accurate range calculation of carbon ion beams in titanium, steel, tungsten and gold. The suggested values for the relative water-equivalent range and their uncertainties are 3.13 (±3%) for titanium, 5.59 (±3%) for stainless steel and 10.25 (±4%) for gold.

  16. Crystalline particle packings on a sphere with long-range power-law potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowick, Mark J.; Cacciuto, Angelo; Nelson, David R.; Travesset, Alex

    2006-01-01

    The original Thomson problem of “spherical crystallography” seeks the ground state of electron shells interacting via the Coulomb potential; however one can also study crystalline ground states of particles interacting with other potentials. We focus here on long-range power-law interactions of the form 1/rγ (0<γ<2) , with the classic Thomson problem given by γ=1 . At large R/a , where R is the sphere radius and a is the particle spacing, the problem can be reformulated as a continuum elastic model that depends on the Young’s modulus of particles packed in the plane and the universal (independent of the pair potential) geometrical interactions between disclination defects. The energy of the continuum model can be expressed as an expansion in powers of the total number of particles, Mtilde (R/a)2 , with coefficients explicitly related to both geometric and potential-dependent terms. For icosahedral configurations of 12 five-fold disclinations, the first nontrivial coefficient of the expansion agrees with explicit numerical evaluation for discrete particle arrangements to four significant digits; the discrepancy in the fifth digit arises from a contribution to the energy that is sensitive to the particular icosadeltahedral configuration and that is neglected in the continuum calculation. In the limit of a very large number of particles, an instability toward grain boundaries can be understood in terms of a “Debye-Huckel” solution, where dislocations have continuous Burgers’ vector “charges.” Discrete dislocations in grain boundaries for intermediate particle numbers are discussed as well.

  17. Emergent ultra–long-range interactions between active particles in hybrid active–inactive systems

    PubMed Central

    Steimel, Joshua P.; Aragones, Juan L.; Hu, Helen; Qureshi, Naser; Alexander-Katz, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Particle–particle interactions determine the state of a system. Control over the range of such interactions as well as their magnitude has been an active area of research for decades due to the fundamental challenges it poses in science and technology. Very recently, effective interactions between active particles have gathered much attention as they can lead to out-of-equilibrium cooperative states such as flocking. Inspired by nature, where active living cells coexist with lifeless objects and structures, here we study the effective interactions that appear in systems composed of active and passive mixtures of colloids. Our systems are 2D colloidal monolayers composed primarily of passive (inactive) colloids, and a very small fraction of active (spinning) ferromagnetic colloids. We find an emergent ultra–long-range attractive interaction induced by the activity of the spinning particles and mediated by the elasticity of the passive medium. Interestingly, the appearance of such interaction depends on the spinning protocol and has a minimum actuation timescale below which no attraction is observed. Overall, these results clearly show that, in the presence of elastic components, active particles can interact across very long distances without any chemical modification of the environment. Such a mechanism might potentially be important for some biological systems and can be harnessed for newer developments in synthetic active soft materials. PMID:27071096

  18. Effect of low-energy alpha-particles irradiation on surface structure and physical-mechanical properties of high-purity tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldabergenova, T. M.; Kislitsin, S. B.; Larionov, A. S.; Yar-Mukhamedova, G. S.

    2016-11-01

    Effect of radiation by low-energy alpha-particles on the surface structure and physical-mechanical properties of high-purity tungsten was studied. Samples of tungsten were irradiated by 4He+2 ions with the energy of 45 keV at low-energy channel of accelerator DC-60 in Astana branch of Institute Nuclear Physics. Irradiation fluence was 1.5 × 1018 cm-2, irradiation temperature was 150°C. Experimentally found that irradiation with low-energy alpha particles results in formation of helium filled bubbles in the straggling region.

  19. Identification of Silver and Palladium in Irradiated TRISO Coated Particles of the AGR-1 Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    van Rooyen, Y. J.; Lillo, T. M.; Wu, Y. Q.

    2014-03-01

    Evidence of the release of certain metallic fission product through intact tristructural isotropic (TRISO) particles has been seen for decades around the world, as well as in the recent AGR-1 experiment at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). However, understanding the basic mechanism of transport is still lacking. This understanding is important because the TRISO coating is part of the high temperature gas reactor functional containment and critical for the safety strategy for licensing purposes. Our approach to identify fission products in irradiated AGR-1 TRISO fuel using scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (EELS) and Energy Filtered TEM (EFTEM), has led to first-of-a-kind data at the nano-scale indicating the presence of silver at triple points and grain boundaries of the SiC layer in the TRISO particle. Cadmium was also found in the triple junctions. In this initial study, the silver was only identified in SiC grain boundaries and triple points on the edge of the SiC-IPyC interface up to a depth of approximately 0.5 um. Palladium was identified as the main constituent of micron-sized precipitates present at the SiC grain boundaries. Additionally spherical nano-sized palladium rich precipitates were found inside the SiC grains. These nano-sized Pd precipitates were distributed up to a depth of 5 um away from the SiC-IPyC interlayer. No silver was found in the center of the micron-sized fission product precipitates using these techniques, although silver was found on the outer edge of one of the Pd-U-Si containing precipitates which was facing the IPyC layer. Only Pd-U containing precipitates were identified in the IPyC layer and no silver was identified in the IPyC layer. The identification of silver alongside the grain boundaries and the findings of Pd alongside grain boundaries as well as inside the grains, provide significant knowledge for understanding silver and palladium transport in TIRSO fuel, which has been

  20. Advanced Electron Microscopy and Micro analytical technique development and application for Irradiated TRISO Coated Particles from the AGR-1 Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Van Rooyen, Isabella Johanna; Lillo, Thomas Martin; Wen, Haiming; Wright, Karen Elizabeth; Madden, James Wayne; Aguiar, Jeffery Andrew

    2017-01-01

    A series of up to seven irradiation experiments are planned for the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Quantification Program, with irradiation completed at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for the first experiment (i.e., AGR-1) in November 2009 for an effective 620 full power days. The objective of the AGR-1 experiment was primarily to provide lessons learned on the multi-capsule test train design and to provide early data on fuel performance for use in fuel fabrication process development and post-irradiation safety testing data at high temperatures. This report describes the advanced microscopy and micro-analysis results on selected AGR-1 coated particles.

  1. Electron Microscopic Examination of Irradiated TRISO Coated Particles of Compact 6-3-2 of AGR-1 Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Van Rooyen, Isabella Johanna; Demkowicz, Paul Andrew; Riesterer, Jessica Lori; Miller, Brandon Douglas; Janney, Dawn Elizabeth; Harp, Jason Michael; Ploger, Scott Arden

    2012-12-01

    The electron microscopic examination of selected irradiated TRISO coated particles of the AGR-1 experiment of fuel compact 6-3-2 are presented in this report. Compact 6-3-2 refers to the compact in Capsule 6 at level 3 of Stack 2. The fuel used in capsule 6 compacts, are called the “baseline” fuel as it is fabricated with refined coating process conditions used to fabricate historic German fuel, because of its excellent irradiation performance with UO2 kernels. The AGR-1 fuel is however made of low-enriched uranium oxycarbide (UCO). Kernel diameters are approximately 350 µm with a U-235 enrichment of approximately 19.7%. Compact 6-3-2 has been irradiated to 11.3% FIMA compact average burn-up with a time average, volume average temperature of 1070.2°C and with a compact average fast fluence of 2.38E21 n/cm

  2. Differences in fecal particle size between free-ranging and captive individuals of two browser species.

    PubMed

    Hummel, Jürgen; Fritz, Julia; Kienzle, Ellen; Medici, E Patricia; Lang, Stefanie; Zimmermann, Waltraut; Streich, W Jürgen; Clauss, Marcus

    2008-01-01

    Data from captive animals indicated that browsing (BR) ruminants have larger fecal particles-indicative of lesser chewing efficiency-than grazers (GR). To answer whether this reflects fundamental differences between the animal groups, or different reactions of basically similar organisms to diets fed in captivity, we compared mean fecal particle size (MPS) in a GR and a BR ruminant (aurox Bos primigenius taurus, giraffe Giraffa camelopardalis) and a GR and a BR hindgut fermenter (Przewalski's horse Equus ferus przewalskii, lowland tapir Tapirus terrestris), both from captivity and from the wild. As would be expected owing to a proportion of finely ground, pelleted feeds in captive diets, MPS was smaller in captive than free-ranging GR. In contrast, MPS was drastically higher in captive than in free-ranging BR of either digestion type. Thus, the difference in MPS between GR and BR was much more pronounced among captive than free-ranging animals. The results indicate that BR teeth have adapted to their natural diet so that in the wild, they achieve a particle size reduction similar to that of GR. However, although GR teeth seem equally adapted to food ingested in captivity, the BR teeth seem less well suited to efficiently chew captive diets. In the case of ruminants, less efficient particle size reduction could contribute to potential clinical problems like "rumen blockage" and bezoar formation. Comparisons of MPS between free-ranging and captive animals might offer indications for the physical suitability of zoo diets. Zoo Biol 27:70-77, 2008. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. 3D Air Filtration Modeling for Nanofiber Based Filters in the Ultrafine Particle Size Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sambaer, Wannes; Zatloukal, Martin; Kimmer, Dusan

    2011-07-01

    In this work, novel 3D filtration model for nanofiber based filters has been proposed and tested. For the model validation purposes, filtration efficiency characteristics of two different polyurethane nanofiber based structures (prepared by the electrospinning process) were determined experimentally in the ultrafine particle size range (20-400 nm). It has been found that the proposed model is able to reasonably predict the measured filtration efficiency curves for both tested samples.

  4. Validity of the no-pumping theorem in systems with finite-range interactions between particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahav, Saar

    2017-01-01

    The no-pumping theorem states that seemingly natural driving cycles of stochastic machines fail to generate directed motion. Initially derived for single particle systems, the no-pumping theorem was recently extended to many-particle systems with zero-range interactions. Interestingly, it is known that the theorem is violated by systems with exclusion interactions. These two paradigmatic interactions differ by two qualitative aspects: the range of interactions and the dependence of branching fractions on the state of the system. In this work two different models are studied in order to identify the qualitative property of the interaction that leads to breakdown of no pumping. A model with finite-range interaction is shown analytically to satisfy no pumping. In contrast, a model in which the interaction affects the probabilities of reaching different sites, given that a particle is making a transition, is shown numerically to violate the no-pumping theorem. The results suggest that systems with interactions that lead to state-dependent branching fractions do not satisfy the no-pumping theorem.

  5. Direct Observation of Defect Range and Evolution in Ion-Irradiated Single Crystalline Ni and Ni Binary Alloys

    DOE PAGES

    Lu, Chenyang; Jin, Ke; Béland, Laurent K.; ...

    2016-02-01

    We report that energetic ions have been widely used to evaluate the irradiation tolerance of structural materials for nuclear power applications and to modify material properties. It is important to understand the defect production, annihilation and migration mechanisms during and after collision cascades. In this study, single crystalline pure nickel metal and single-phase concentrated solid solution alloys of 50%Ni50%Co (NiCo) and 50%Ni50%Fe (NiFe) without apparent preexisting defect sinks were employed to study defect dynamics under ion irradiation. Both cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy characterization (TEM) and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry channeling (RBS-C) spectra show that the range of radiation-induced defect clusters farmore » exceed the theoretically predicted depth in all materials after high-dose irradiation. Defects in nickel migrate faster than in NiCo and NiFe. Both vacancy-type stacking fault tetrahedra (SFT) and interstitial loops coexist in the same region, which is consistent with molecular dynamics simulations. Kinetic activation relaxation technique (k-ART) simulations for nickel showed that small vacancy clusters, such as di-vacancies and tri-vacancies, created by collision cascades are highly mobile, even at room temperature. The slower migration of defects in the alloy along with more localized energy dissipation of the displacement cascade may lead to enhanced radiation tolerance.« less

  6. Direct Observation of Defect Range and Evolution in Ion-Irradiated Single Crystalline Ni and Ni Binary Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Chenyang; Jin, Ke; Béland, Laurent K.; Zhang, Feifei; Yang, Taini; Qiao, Liang; Zhang, Yanwen; Bei, Hongbin; Christen, Hans M.; Stoller, Roger E.; Wang, Lumin

    2016-02-01

    We report that energetic ions have been widely used to evaluate the irradiation tolerance of structural materials for nuclear power applications and to modify material properties. It is important to understand the defect production, annihilation and migration mechanisms during and after collision cascades. In this study, single crystalline pure nickel metal and single-phase concentrated solid solution alloys of 50%Ni50%Co (NiCo) and 50%Ni50%Fe (NiFe) without apparent preexisting defect sinks were employed to study defect dynamics under ion irradiation. Both cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy characterization (TEM) and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry channeling (RBS-C) spectra show that the range of radiation-induced defect clusters far exceed the theoretically predicted depth in all materials after high-dose irradiation. Defects in nickel migrate faster than in NiCo and NiFe. Both vacancy-type stacking fault tetrahedra (SFT) and interstitial loops coexist in the same region, which is consistent with molecular dynamics simulations. Kinetic activation relaxation technique (k-ART) simulations for nickel showed that small vacancy clusters, such as di-vacancies and tri-vacancies, created by collision cascades are highly mobile, even at room temperature. The slower migration of defects in the alloy along with more localized energy dissipation of the displacement cascade may lead to enhanced radiation tolerance.

  7. Direct Observation of Defect Range and Evolution in Ion-Irradiated Single Crystalline Ni and Ni Binary Alloys

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Chenyang; Jin, Ke; Béland, Laurent K.; Zhang, Feifei; Yang, Taini; Qiao, Liang; Zhang, Yanwen; Bei, Hongbin; Christen, Hans M.; Stoller, Roger E.; Wang, Lumin

    2016-01-01

    Energetic ions have been widely used to evaluate the irradiation tolerance of structural materials for nuclear power applications and to modify material properties. It is important to understand the defect production, annihilation and migration mechanisms during and after collision cascades. In this study, single crystalline pure nickel metal and single-phase concentrated solid solution alloys of 50%Ni50%Co (NiCo) and 50%Ni50%Fe (NiFe) without apparent preexisting defect sinks were employed to study defect dynamics under ion irradiation. Both cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy characterization (TEM) and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry channeling (RBS-C) spectra show that the range of radiation-induced defect clusters far exceed the theoretically predicted depth in all materials after high-dose irradiation. Defects in nickel migrate faster than in NiCo and NiFe. Both vacancy-type stacking fault tetrahedra (SFT) and interstitial loops coexist in the same region, which is consistent with molecular dynamics simulations. Kinetic activation relaxation technique (k-ART) simulations for nickel showed that small vacancy clusters, such as di-vacancies and tri-vacancies, created by collision cascades are highly mobile, even at room temperature. The slower migration of defects in the alloy along with more localized energy dissipation of the displacement cascade may lead to enhanced radiation tolerance. PMID:26829570

  8. Direct Observation of Defect Range and Evolution in Ion-Irradiated Single Crystalline Ni and Ni Binary Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Chenyang; Jin, Ke; Béland, Laurent K.; Zhang, Feifei; Yang, Taini; Qiao, Liang; Zhang, Yanwen; Bei, Hongbin; Christen, Hans M.; Stoller, Roger E.; Wang, Lumin

    2016-02-01

    Energetic ions have been widely used to evaluate the irradiation tolerance of structural materials for nuclear power applications and to modify material properties. It is important to understand the defect production, annihilation and migration mechanisms during and after collision cascades. In this study, single crystalline pure nickel metal and single-phase concentrated solid solution alloys of 50%Ni50%Co (NiCo) and 50%Ni50%Fe (NiFe) without apparent preexisting defect sinks were employed to study defect dynamics under ion irradiation. Both cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy characterization (TEM) and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry channeling (RBS-C) spectra show that the range of radiation-induced defect clusters far exceed the theoretically predicted depth in all materials after high-dose irradiation. Defects in nickel migrate faster than in NiCo and NiFe. Both vacancy-type stacking fault tetrahedra (SFT) and interstitial loops coexist in the same region, which is consistent with molecular dynamics simulations. Kinetic activation relaxation technique (k-ART) simulations for nickel showed that small vacancy clusters, such as di-vacancies and tri-vacancies, created by collision cascades are highly mobile, even at room temperature. The slower migration of defects in the alloy along with more localized energy dissipation of the displacement cascade may lead to enhanced radiation tolerance.

  9. SEM Characterization of an Irradiated Dispersion Fuel Plate with U-10Mo Particles and 6061 Al Matrix

    SciTech Connect

    D. D. Keiser; J. F. Jue; A. B. Robinson; P. G. Medvedev; M. R. Finlay

    2009-11-01

    It has been observed that during irradiation of a dispersion fuel plate, fuel/matrix interactions can impact the overall fuel plate performance. To continue the investigation of the irradiation performance of Si-rich fuel/matrix interaction layers, RERTR-6 fuel plate V1R010 (U- 10Mo/6061 Al) was characterized using scanning electron microscopy. This fuel plate was of particular interest because of its similarities to fuel plate R1R010, which had U-7Mo particles dispersed in 6061 Al. Both fuel plates were irradiated as part of the RERTR-6 experiment and saw very similar irradiation conditions. R1R010 was characterized in another study and was observed to form relatively uniform Si-rich layers during fabrication that remained stable during irradiation. Since U-10Mo does not interact as much with 6061 Al at high temperatures to form layers, it was of interest to characterize a fuel plate with these particles since it would allow for a comparison of fuel plates with different amounts of preirradiation interaction zone formation, which were then exposed to similar irradiation conditions. This paper demonstrates how the lower amount of interaction layer development in V1R010 during fabrication appears to impact the overall performance of the fuel plate, such that it does not behave as well as R1R010 in terms of interaction layer stability. Additionally, the results of this study are applied to improve the understanding of fuel/cladding interactions in monolithic fuel plates that consist of U-10Mo foils encased in 6061 Al cladding.

  10. Distribution of Pd, Ag & U in the SiC Layer of an Irradiated TRISO Fuel Particle

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas M. Lillo; Isabella J. van Rooyen

    2014-08-01

    The distribution of silver, uranium and palladium in the silicon carbide (SiC) layer of an irradiated TRISO fuel particle was studied using samples extracted from the SiC layer using focused ion beam (FIB) techniques. Transmission electron microscopy in conjunction with energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy was used to identify the presence of the specific elements of interest at grain boundaries, triple junctions and precipitates in the interior of SiC grains. Details on sample fabrication, errors associated with measurements of elemental migration distances and the distances migrated by silver, palladium and uranium in the SiC layer of an irradiated TRISO particle from the AGR-1 program are reported.

  11. Effect of particle settling on lidar profiles of long-range transported Saharan aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasteiger, Josef; Groß, Silke

    2016-04-01

    A large amount of desert aerosol is transported in the Saharan Air Layer (SAL) westwards from Africa over the Atlantic Ocean. Lidar profiles of transported Saharan aerosol may contain some information about the vertically-resolved aerosol microphysics that could be used to characterize processes that affected the measured aerosol during transport. We present modelled lidar profiles of long-range transported Saharan aerosol assuming that initially the SAL is well-mixed and that there is no vertical mixing of air within the SAL as soon as it reaches the Atlantic. We consider Stokes gravitational settling of aerosol particles over the ocean. The lidar profiles are calculated using optical models for irregularly-shaped mineral dust particles assuming settling-induced particle removal as function of distance from the SAL top. Within the SAL we find a decrease of both the backscatter coefficients and the linear depolarization ratios with decreasing distance from the SAL top. For example, the linear depolarization ratio at a wavelength of 532nm decreases from 0.289 at 1000m to 0.256 at 200m and 0.215 at 100m below SAL top. We compare the modelled backscatter coefficients and linear depolarization ratios to ground-based lidar measurements performed during the SALTRACE field campaign in Barbados (Caribbean) and find agreement within the estimated uncertainties. We discuss the uncertainties of our modeling approach in our presentation. Assumed mineral dust particle shapes, assumed particle mixture properties, and assumptions about processes in the SAL over the continent and the ocean are important aspects to be considered. Uncertainties are relevant for the potential of lidar measurements of transported Saharan dust to learn something about processes occuring in the SAL during long-range transport. We also compare our modeling results to modeling results previously published in the literature.

  12. Recommendations to mitigate against human health risks incurred due to energetic particle irradiation beyond low earth orbit/BLEO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenna-Lawlor, Susan; Bhardwaj, Anil; Ferrari, Franco; Kuznetsov, Nikolay; Lal, Ajay K.; Li, Yinghui; Nagamatsu, Aiko; Nymmik, Rikho; Panasyuk, Michael; Petrov, Vladislav; Reitz, Günther; Pinsky, Lawrence; Shukor, Muszaphar (Sheikh); Singhvi, Ashok K.; Straube, Ulrich; Tomi, Leena; Lawrence, Townsend

    2015-04-01

    An account is provided of the main sources of energetic particle radiation in interplanetary space (Galactic Cosmic Radiation and Solar Energetic Particles) and career dose limits presently utilized by NASA to mitigate against the cancer and non-cancer effects potentially incurred by astronauts due to irradiation by these components are presented. Certain gaps in knowledge that presently militate against mounting viable human exploration in deep space due to the inherent health risks are identified and recommendations made as to how these gaps might be closed within a framework of global international cooperation.

  13. Lead particle size and its association with firing conditions and range maintenance: implications for treatment.

    PubMed

    Dermatas, Dimitris; Chrysochoou, Maria

    2007-08-01

    Six firing range soils were analyzed, representing different environments, firing conditions, and maintenance practices. The particle size distribution and lead (Pb) concentration in each soil fraction were determined for samples obtained from the backstop berms. The main factors that were found to influence Pb fragment size were the type of soil used to construct the berms and the type of weapon fired. The firing of high velocity weapons, i.e., rifles, onto highly angular soils induced significant fragmentation of the bullets and/or pulverization of the soil itself. This resulted in the accumulation of Pb in the finer soil fractions and the spread of Pb contamination beyond the vicinity of the backstop berm. Conversely, the use of clay as backstop and the use of low velocity pistols proved to be favorable for soil clean-up and range maintenance, since Pb was mainly present as large metallic fragments that can be recovered by a simple screening process. Other factors that played important roles in Pb particle size distribution were soil chemistry, firing distance, and maintenance practices, such as the use of water spray for dust suppression and deflectors prior to impact. Overall, coarse Pb particles provide much easier and more cost-effective maintenance, soil clean-up, and remediation via physical separation. Fine Pb particles release Pb more easily, pose an airborne Pb hazard, and require the application of stabilization/solidification treatment methods. Thus, to ensure sustainable firing range operations by means of cost-effective design, maintenance, and clean-up, especially when high velocity weapons are used, the above mentioned factors should be carefully considered.

  14. Charged particle's flux measurement from PMMA irradiated by 80 MeV/u carbon ion beam.

    PubMed

    Agodi, C; Battistoni, G; Bellini, F; Cirrone, G A P; Collamati, F; Cuttone, G; De Lucia, E; De Napoli, M; Domenico, A Di; Faccini, R; Ferroni, F; Fiore, S; Gauzzi, P; Iarocci, E; Marafini, M; Mattei, I; Muraro, S; Paoloni, A; Patera, V; Piersanti, L; Romano, F; Sarti, A; Sciubba, A; Vitale, E; Voena, C

    2012-09-21

    Hadrontherapy is an emerging technique in cancer therapy that uses beams of charged particles. To meet the improved capability of hadrontherapy in matching the dose release with the cancer position, new dose-monitoring techniques need to be developed and introduced into clinical use. The measurement of the fluxes of the secondary particles produced by the hadron beam is of fundamental importance in the design of any dose-monitoring device and is eagerly needed to tune Monte Carlo simulations. We report the measurements carried out with charged secondary particles produced from the interaction of a 80 MeV/u fully stripped carbon ion beam at the INFN Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania, with a poly-methyl methacrylate target. Charged secondary particles, produced at 90° with respect to the beam axis, have been tracked with a drift chamber, while their energy and time of flight have been measured by means of a LYSO scintillator. Secondary protons have been identified exploiting the energy and time-of-flight information, and their emission region has been reconstructed backtracking from the drift chamber to the target. Moreover, a position scan of the target indicates that the reconstructed emission region follows the movement of the expected Bragg peak position. Exploiting the reconstruction of the emission region, an accuracy on the Bragg peak determination in the submillimeter range has been obtained. The measured differential production rate for protons produced with E(Prod)(kin) > 83 MeV and emitted at 90° with respect to the beam line is dN(P)/(dN(C)dΩ) (E(Prod)(kin) > 83 MeV, θ = 90°) = (2.69 ± 0.08(stat) ± 0.12(sys)) × 10⁻⁴ sr⁻¹.

  15. Mechanisms for the clustering of inertial particles in the inertial range of isotropic turbulence.

    PubMed

    Bragg, Andrew D; Ireland, Peter J; Collins, Lance R

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we consider the physical mechanism for the clustering of inertial particles in the inertial range of isotropic turbulence. We analyze the exact, but unclosed, equation governing the radial distribution function (RDF) and compare the mechanisms it describes for clustering in the dissipation and inertial ranges. We demonstrate that in the limit Str≪1, where Str is the Stokes number based on the eddy turnover time scale at separation r, the clustering in the inertial range can be understood to be due to the preferential sampling of the coarse-grained fluid velocity gradient tensor at that scale. When Str≳O(1) this mechanism gives way to a nonlocal clustering mechanism. These findings reveal that the clustering mechanisms in the inertial range are analogous to the mechanisms that we identified for the dissipation regime [see New J. Phys. 16, 055013 (2014)]. Further, we discuss the similarities and differences between the clustering mechanisms we identify in the inertial range and the "sweep-stick" mechanism developed by Coleman and Vassilicos [Phys. Fluids 21, 113301 (2009)]. We show that the idea that initial particles are swept along with acceleration stagnation points is only approximately true because there always exists a finite difference between the velocity of the acceleration stagnation points and the local fluid velocity. This relative velocity is sufficient to allow particles to traverse the average distance between the stagnation points within the correlation time scale of the acceleration field. We also show that the stick part of the mechanism is only valid for Str≪1 in the inertial range. We emphasize that our clustering mechanism provides the more fundamental explanation since it, unlike the sweep-stick mechanism, is able to explain clustering in arbitrary spatially correlated velocity fields. We then consider the closed, model equation for the RDF given in Zaichik and Alipchenkov [Phys. Fluids 19, 113308 (2007)] and use this

  16. Mechanisms for the clustering of inertial particles in the inertial range of isotropic turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Bragg, Andrew D.; Ireland, Peter J.; Collins, Lance R.

    2015-08-27

    In this study, we consider the physical mechanism for the clustering of inertial particles in the inertial range of isotropic turbulence. We analyze the exact, but unclosed, equation governing the radial distribution function (RDF) and compare the mechanisms it describes for clustering in the dissipation and inertial ranges. We demonstrate that in the limit Str <<1, where Str is the Stokes number based on the eddy turnover time scale at separation r, the clustering in the inertial range can be understood to be due to the preferential sampling of the coarse-grained fluid velocity gradient tensor at that scale. When Str≳O(1) this mechanism gives way to a nonlocal clustering mechanism. These findings reveal that the clustering mechanisms in the inertial range are analogous to the mechanisms that we identified for the dissipation regime. Further, we discuss the similarities and differences between the clustering mechanisms we identify in the inertial range and the “sweep-stick” mechanism developed by Coleman and Vassilicos. We show that the idea that initial particles are swept along with acceleration stagnation points is only approximately true because there always exists a finite difference between the velocity of the acceleration stagnation points and the local fluid velocity. This relative velocity is sufficient to allow particles to traverse the average distance between the stagnation points within the correlation time scale of the acceleration field. We also show that the stick part of the mechanism is only valid for Str<<1 in the inertial range. We emphasize that our clustering mechanism provides the more fundamental explanation since it, unlike the sweep-stick mechanism, is able to explain clustering in arbitrary spatially correlated velocity fields. We then consider the closed, model equation for the RDF given in Zaichik and Alipchenkov and use this, together with the results from our analysis, to predict the

  17. Mechanisms for the clustering of inertial particles in the inertial range of isotropic turbulence

    DOE PAGES

    Bragg, Andrew D.; Ireland, Peter J.; Collins, Lance R.

    2015-08-27

    In this study, we consider the physical mechanism for the clustering of inertial particles in the inertial range of isotropic turbulence. We analyze the exact, but unclosed, equation governing the radial distribution function (RDF) and compare the mechanisms it describes for clustering in the dissipation and inertial ranges. We demonstrate that in the limit Str <<1, where Str is the Stokes number based on the eddy turnover time scale at separation r, the clustering in the inertial range can be understood to be due to the preferential sampling of the coarse-grained fluid velocity gradient tensor at that scale. When Str≳O(1)more » this mechanism gives way to a nonlocal clustering mechanism. These findings reveal that the clustering mechanisms in the inertial range are analogous to the mechanisms that we identified for the dissipation regime. Further, we discuss the similarities and differences between the clustering mechanisms we identify in the inertial range and the “sweep-stick” mechanism developed by Coleman and Vassilicos. We show that the idea that initial particles are swept along with acceleration stagnation points is only approximately true because there always exists a finite difference between the velocity of the acceleration stagnation points and the local fluid velocity. This relative velocity is sufficient to allow particles to traverse the average distance between the stagnation points within the correlation time scale of the acceleration field. We also show that the stick part of the mechanism is only valid for Str<<1 in the inertial range. We emphasize that our clustering mechanism provides the more fundamental explanation since it, unlike the sweep-stick mechanism, is able to explain clustering in arbitrary spatially correlated velocity fields. We then consider the closed, model equation for the RDF given in Zaichik and Alipchenkov and use this, together with the results from our analysis, to predict the analytic form of the RDF in the

  18. Mechanisms for the clustering of inertial particles in the inertial range of isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bragg, Andrew D.; Ireland, Peter J.; Collins, Lance R.

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we consider the physical mechanism for the clustering of inertial particles in the inertial range of isotropic turbulence. We analyze the exact, but unclosed, equation governing the radial distribution function (RDF) and compare the mechanisms it describes for clustering in the dissipation and inertial ranges. We demonstrate that in the limit Str≪1 , where Str is the Stokes number based on the eddy turnover time scale at separation r , the clustering in the inertial range can be understood to be due to the preferential sampling of the coarse-grained fluid velocity gradient tensor at that scale. When Str≳O (1 ) this mechanism gives way to a nonlocal clustering mechanism. These findings reveal that the clustering mechanisms in the inertial range are analogous to the mechanisms that we identified for the dissipation regime [see New J. Phys. 16, 055013 (2014), 10.1088/1367-2630/16/5/055013]. Further, we discuss the similarities and differences between the clustering mechanisms we identify in the inertial range and the "sweep-stick" mechanism developed by Coleman and Vassilicos [Phys. Fluids 21, 113301 (2009), 10.1063/1.3257638]. We show that the idea that initial particles are swept along with acceleration stagnation points is only approximately true because there always exists a finite difference between the velocity of the acceleration stagnation points and the local fluid velocity. This relative velocity is sufficient to allow particles to traverse the average distance between the stagnation points within the correlation time scale of the acceleration field. We also show that the stick part of the mechanism is only valid for Str≪1 in the inertial range. We emphasize that our clustering mechanism provides the more fundamental explanation since it, unlike the sweep-stick mechanism, is able to explain clustering in arbitrary spatially correlated velocity fields. We then consider the closed, model equation for the RDF given in Zaichik and

  19. Irradiation of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells with Low and High Doses of Alpha Particles Induces Senescence and/or Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Alessio, Nicola; Esposito, Giuseppe; Galano, Giovanni; De Rosa, Roberto; Anello, Pasquale; Peluso, Gianfranco; Tabocchini, Maria Antonella; Galderisi, Umberto

    2017-03-02

    The use of high-linear energy transfer charged particles is gaining attention as a medical tool because of the emission of radiations with an efficient cell-killing ability. Considerable interest has developed in the use of targeted alpha-particle therapy for the treatment of micrometastases. Moreover, the use of helium beams is gaining momentum, especially for treating pediatric tumors. We analyzed the effects of alpha particles on bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), which have a subpopulation of stem cells capable of generating adipocytes, chondrocytes, and osteocytes. Further, these cells contribute toward maintenance of homeostasis in the body. MSCs were irradiated with low and high doses of alpha particles or X-rays and a comparative biological analysis was performed. At a low dose (40 mGy), alpha particles exhibited a limited negative effect on the biology of MSCs compared with X-rays. No significant perturbation of cell cycle was observed, and a minimal increase in apoptosis or senescence was detected. Self-renewal was preserved as revealed by the CFU assay. On the contrary, with 2000 mGy alpha particles we observed adverse effects on the vitality, functionality, and stemness of MSCs. These results are the consequence of different proportion of cells targeted by alpha particles or X-rays and the quality of induced DNA damage. The present study suggests that radiotherapy with alpha particles may spare healthy stem cells more efficaciously than X-ray treatments, an observation that should be taken into consideration by physicians while planning irradiation of tumor areas close to stem cell niches, such as bone marrow. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  20. Atmospheric particles acting as Ice Forming Nuclei in different size ranges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santachiara, G.; Di Matteo, L.; Prodi, F.; Belosi, F.

    2010-05-01

    The work presents the results of an experimental campaign performed at a rural site (S. Pietro Capofiume, near Bologna July 2007) concerning measurements of ice nuclei in different size classes of aerosol: PM1, PM2.5, PM10 and total suspended particles (TSP). Simultaneous measurements of particle number concentrations were also performed. Aerosol in the PM1 fraction contributes about 50% of the measured ice nuclei number concentration, and in the PM10 fraction contributes about 70-90%. Consequently, the dominant fraction of aerosol that can be activated as ice nuclei involves particles with aerodynamic diameter less than 10 μm. A positive correlation is observed between higher supersaturation with respect to ice and water ( Sice and Sw, respectively) values, and ice nuclei number concentration. The variations of Sw from 2 to 10% and Sice from 20 to 32% ( Tair = - 15 °C) determine an approximately threefold increase (from 110 to 337 m - 3 ) in the ice nuclei average number concentration. There is no correlation between ice nuclei measured in the different size ranges, either with the particle number concentration measured with the counter spectrometer ( d > 0.3 μm) or with the condensation nuclei counter.

  1. On the mechanism for the clustering of inertial particles in the inertial range of isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Lance; Bragg, Andrew; Ireland, Peter

    2014-11-01

    In this talk, we consider the physical mechanism for the clustering of inertial particles in the inertial range of turbulence. By comparisons with DNS data we demonstrate that the mechanism in the theory of Zaichik et al. (Phys. Fluids 19, 113308, 2007) quantitatively describes the clustering of particles in the inertial range. We then analyze the theory for isotropic turbulence in the limit Reλ --> ∞ . For arbitrary St (Stokes number), there exists a separation in the inertial range beyond which Str << 1 , where Str is the Stokes number based on the eddy turnover timescale at separation r. The inertial-range clustering in this limit can be understood to be due to the preferential sampling of the coarse-grained velocity gradient tensor at that scale. At smaller separations, there may be transitions to Str ~ 1 , where a path history symmetry breaking effect dominates the clustering mechanism, and in some cases Str >> 1 , which implies ballistic behavior and a flat RDF. The scaling for each of these regimes is derived and compared to DNS, where applicable. Finally, we compare the results with the ``sweep-stick'' mechanism by Coleman and Vassilicos (Phys. Fluids 21, 113301, 2009) and discuss the similarities and differences between the two theories.

  2. Eulerian models for particle trajectory crossing in turbulent flows over a large range of Stokes numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Rodney O.; Vie, Aymeric; Laurent, Frederique; Chalons, Christophe; Massot, Marc

    2012-11-01

    Numerous applications involve a disperse phase carried by a gaseous flow. To simulate such flows, one can resort to a number density function (NDF) governed a kinetic equation. Traditionally, Lagrangian Monte-Carlo methods are used to solve for the NDF, but are expensive as the number of numerical particles needed must be large to control statistical errors. Moreover, such methods are not well adapted to high-performance computing because of the intrinsic inhomogeneity of the NDF. To overcome these issues, Eulerian methods can be used to solve for the moments of the NDF resulting in an unclosed Eulerian system of hyperbolic conservation laws. To obtain closure, in this work a multivariate bi-Gaussian quadrature is used, which can account for particle trajectory crossing (PTC) over a large range of Stokes numbers. This closure uses up to four quadrature points in 2-D velocity phase space to capture large-scale PTC, and an anisotropic Gaussian distribution around each quadrature point to model small-scale PTC. Simulations of 2-D particle-laden isotropic turbulence at different Stokes numbers are employed to validate the Eulerian models against results from the Lagrangian approach. Good agreement is found for the number density fields over the entire range of Stokes numbers tested. Research carried out at the Center for Turbulence Research 2012 Summer Program.

  3. Robust dead reckoning system for mobile robots based on particle filter and raw range scan.

    PubMed

    Duan, Zhuohua; Cai, Zixing; Min, Huaqing

    2014-09-04

    Robust dead reckoning is a complicated problem for wheeled mobile robots (WMRs), where the robots are faulty, such as the sticking of sensors or the slippage of wheels, for the discrete fault models and the continuous states have to be estimated simultaneously to reach a reliable fault diagnosis and accurate dead reckoning. Particle filters are one of the most promising approaches to handle hybrid system estimation problems, and they have also been widely used in many WMRs applications, such as pose tracking, SLAM, video tracking, fault identification, etc. In this paper, the readings of a laser range finder, which may be also interfered with by noises, are used to reach accurate dead reckoning. The main contribution is that a systematic method to implement fault diagnosis and dead reckoning in a particle filter framework concurrently is proposed. Firstly, the perception model of a laser range finder is given, where the raw scan may be faulty. Secondly, the kinematics of the normal model and different fault models for WMRs are given. Thirdly, the particle filter for fault diagnosis and dead reckoning is discussed. At last, experiments and analyses are reported to show the accuracy and efficiency of the presented method.

  4. Robust Dead Reckoning System for Mobile Robots Based on Particle Filter and Raw Range Scan

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Zhuohua; Cai, Zixing; Min, Huaqing

    2014-01-01

    Robust dead reckoning is a complicated problem for wheeled mobile robots (WMRs), where the robots are faulty, such as the sticking of sensors or the slippage of wheels, for the discrete fault models and the continuous states have to be estimated simultaneously to reach a reliable fault diagnosis and accurate dead reckoning. Particle filters are one of the most promising approaches to handle hybrid system estimation problems, and they have also been widely used in many WMRs applications, such as pose tracking, SLAM, video tracking, fault identification, etc. In this paper, the readings of a laser range finder, which may be also interfered with by noises, are used to reach accurate dead reckoning. The main contribution is that a systematic method to implement fault diagnosis and dead reckoning in a particle filter framework concurrently is proposed. Firstly, the perception model of a laser range finder is given, where the raw scan may be faulty. Secondly, the kinematics of the normal model and different fault models for WMRs are given. Thirdly, the particle filter for fault diagnosis and dead reckoning is discussed. At last, experiments and analyses are reported to show the accuracy and efficiency of the presented method. PMID:25192318

  5. In situ transmission-electron-microscopy investigation of melting in submicron Al-Si alloy particles under electron-beam irradiation.

    PubMed

    Yokota, Takeshi; Murayama, M; Howe, J M

    2003-12-31

    In situ heating and electron-beam irradiation in the transmission electron microscope were performed to study melting of submicron Al-11.6 at. % Si particles supported on a C thin film. It was found that electron irradiation could be used to melt the particles, even when the hot-stage sample holder was kept at a much lower temperature ( approximately 125 degrees C) than the initial melting point of the particles. Comparison between the experimentally observed melting behavior and analytical calculations indicate that melting of the submicron Al-Si particles under electron-beam irradiation is caused by a temperature rise due to electron thermal spikes in the particles and poor thermal conduction away from the particles. These results have important implications in transmission electron microscopy studies of nanoparticles supported on thin films or poorly conducting substrates.

  6. STEM-EDS analysis of fission products in neutron-irradiated TRISO fuel particles from AGR-1 experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leng, B.; van Rooyen, I. J.; Wu, Y. Q.; Szlufarska, I.; Sridharan, K.

    2016-07-01

    Historic and recent post-irradiation-examination from the German AVR and Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Project have shown that 110 m Ag is released from intact tristructural isotropic (TRISO) fuel. Although TRISO fuel particle research has been performed over the last few decades, little is known about how metallic fission products are transported through the SiC layer, and it was not until March 2013 that Ag was first identified in the SiC layer of a neutron-irradiated TRISO fuel particle. The existence of Pd- and Ag-rich grain boundary precipitates, triple junction precipitates, and Pd nano-sized intragranular precipitates in neutron-irradiated TRISO particle coatings was investigated using Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy analysis to obtain more information on the chemical composition of the fission product precipitates. A U-rich fission product honeycomb shape precipitate network was found near a micron-sized precipitate in a SiC grain about ∼5 μm from the SiC-inner pyrolytic carbon interlayer, indicating a possible intragranular transport path for uranium. A single Ag-Pd nano-sized precipitate was found inside a SiC grain, and this is the first research showing such finding in irradiated SiC. This finding may possibly suggest a possible Pd-assisted intragranular transport mechanism for Ag and may be related to void or dislocation networks inside SiC grains. Preliminary semi-quantitative analysis indicated the micron-sized precipitates to be Pd2Si2U with carbon existing inside these precipitates. However, the results of such analysis for nano-sized precipitates may be influenced by the SiC matrix. The results reported in this paper confirm the co-existence of Cd with Ag in triple points reported previously.

  7. Ice cloud formation potential by free tropospheric particles from long-range transport over the Northern Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    China, Swarup; Alpert, Peter A.; Zhang, Bo; Schum, Simeon; Dzepina, Katja; Wright, Kendra; Owen, R. Chris; Fialho, Paulo; Mazzoleni, Lynn R.; Mazzoleni, Claudio; Knopf, Daniel A.

    2017-03-01

    Long-range transported free tropospheric particles can play a significant role on heterogeneous ice nucleation. Using optical and electron microscopy we examine the physicochemical characteristics of ice nucleating particles (INPs). Particles were collected on substrates from the free troposphere at the remote Pico Mountain Observatory in the Azores Islands, after long-range transport and aging over the Atlantic Ocean. We investigate four specific events to study the ice formation potential by the collected particles with different ages and transport patterns. We use single-particle analysis, as well as bulk analysis to characterize particle populations. Both analyses show substantial differences in particle composition between samples from the four events; in addition, single-particle microscopy analysis indicates that most particles are coated by organic material. The identified INPs contained mixtures of dust, aged sea salt and soot, and organic material acquired either at the source or during transport. The temperature and relative humidity (RH) at which ice formed, varied only by 5% between samples, despite differences in particle composition, sources, and transport patterns. We hypothesize that this small variation in the onset RH may be due to the coating material on the particles. This study underscores and motivates the need to further investigate how long-range transported and atmospherically aged free tropospheric particles impact ice cloud formation.

  8. Ice cloud formation potential by free tropospheric particles from long-range transport over the Northern Atlantic Ocean

    DOE PAGES

    China, Swarup; Alpert, Peter A.; Zhang, Bo; ...

    2017-02-27

    Long-range transported free tropospheric particles can play a significant role on heterogeneous ice nucleation. Using optical and electron microscopy we examine the physicochemical characteristics of ice nucleating particles (INPs). Particles were collected on substrates from the free troposphere at the remote Pico Mountain Observatory in the Azores Islands, after long-range transport and aging over the Atlantic Ocean. We investigate four specific events to study the ice formation potential by the collected particles with different ages and transport patterns. We use single-particle analysis, as well as bulk analysis to characterize particle populations. Both analyses show substantial differences in particle composition betweenmore » samples from the four events; in addition, single-particle microscopy analysis indicates that most particles are coated by organic material. The identified INPs contained mixtures of dust, aged sea salt and soot, and organic material acquired either at the source or during transport. The temperature and relative humidity (RH) at which ice formed, varied only by 5% between samples, despite differences in particle composition, sources, and transport patterns. We hypothesize that this small variation in the onset RH may be due to the coating material on the particles. Finally, this study underscores and motivates the need to further investigate how long-range transported and atmospherically aged free tropospheric particles impact ice cloud formation.« less

  9. Sonocatalytic degradation of Rhodamine B catalyzed by β-Bi2O3 particles under ultrasonic irradiation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xuefu; Dai, Jianfeng; Shi, Gaofeng; Li, Lan; Wang, Guoying; Yang, Hua

    2016-03-01

    β-Bi2O3 particles were synthesized by a polyacrylamide sol-gel method. The sonocatalytic activity of β-Bi2O3 particles was evaluated by degrading Rhodamine B (RhB) under the ultrasonic irradiation, revealing that β-Bi2O3 particles exhibit a good sonocatalytic activity. The effects of various experimental factors including ultrasonic frequency (f), solution temperature (T), catalyst dosage (Ccatalyst) and initial RhB concentration (CRhB) on the sonocatalysis efficiency were investigated. The optimum conditions for sonocatalytic degradation of RhB are obtained to be f=60 kHz, T=40 °C, Ccatalyst=3 g L(-1), and CRhB=5 mg L(-1). The percentage degradation of RhB after sonocatalysis for 90 min is 98.7%. Detected by the photoluminescence technique that of using terephthalic acid as a probe molecule, hydroxyl radicals (OH) are found to be produced on the irradiated by β-Bi2O3 particles. Based on the experimental results, OH radicals are suggested to be the major active species which are responsible for the degradation reaction.

  10. Long-ranged and soft interactions between charged colloidal particles induced by multivalent coions.

    PubMed

    Montes Ruiz-Cabello, F Javier; Moazzami-Gudarzi, Mohsen; Elzbieciak-Wodka, Magdalena; Maroni, Plinio; Labbez, Christophe; Borkovec, Michal; Trefalt, Gregor

    2015-02-28

    Forces between charged particles in aqueous solutions containing multivalent coions and monovalent counterions are studied by the colloidal probe technique. Here, the multivalent ions have the same charge as the particles, which must be contrasted to the frequently studied case where multivalent ions have the opposite sign as the substrate. In the present case, the forces remain repulsive and are dominated by the interactions of the double layers. The valence of the multivalent coion is found to have a profound influence on the shape of the force curve. While for monovalent coions the force profile is exponential down to separations of a few nanometers, the interaction is much softer and longer-ranged in the presence of multivalent coions. The force profiles in the presence of multivalent coions and in the mixtures of monovalent and multivalent coions can be accurately described by Poisson-Boltzmann theory. These results are accurate for different surfaces and even in the case of highly charged particles. This behavior can be explained by the fact that the force profile follows the near-field limit to much larger distances for multivalent coions than for monovalent ones. This limit corresponds to the conditions with no salt, where the coions are expelled between the two surfaces.

  11. The effects of intense gamma-irradiation on the alpha-particle response of silicon carbide semiconductor radiation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruddy, Frank H.; Seidel, John G.

    2007-10-01

    Silicon Carbide (SiC) semiconductor radiation detectors are being developed for alpha-particle, X-ray and Gamma-ray, and fast-neutron energy spectrometry. SiC detectors have been operated at temperatures up to 306 °C and have also been found to be highly resistant to the radiation effects of fast-neutron and charged-particle bombardments. In the present work, the alpha-particle response of a SiC detector based on a Schottky diode design has been carefully monitored as a function of 137Cs gamma-ray exposure. The changes in response have been found to be negligible for gamma exposures up to and including 5.4 MGy, and irradiations to higher doses are in progress.

  12. Effect of particle size on the photocatalytic activity of BiNbO4 under visible light irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, S. P.; Lachgar, A.

    2016-10-01

    Numerous attempts have focused on developing more efficient visible-light active photocatalysts. Bismuth niobate (BiNbO4) was reported as a potential candidate for photocatalytic water splitting and for the degradation of organic molecule under visible-light irradiation because of its small band gap and appropriate band positions. Here, three BiNbO4 samples with different, uniform particle sizes were synthesized. The effect of BiNbO4 particle size on its photocatalytic activity was studied by using the reduction of 4-nitroaniline as model reaction. Results show that the photocatalytic degradation of 4-nitroaniline varies systematically with the change in particle size and surface areas. To better understand the correlation between structure, composition, morphology, and optical properties, the catalysts were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscope (SEM), Powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area, UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS), and photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL).

  13. Arcing and rf signal generation during target irradiation by a high-energy, pulsed neutral particle beam

    SciTech Connect

    Robiscoe, R.T.

    1988-02-01

    We present a theory describing the dynamics of arc discharges in bulk dielectric materials on board space-based vehicles. Such ''punch-through'' arcs can occur in target satellites irradiated by high-energy (250 MeV), pulsed (100 mA x 10 ms) neutral particle beams. We treat the arc as a capacitively limited avalanche current in the target dielectric material, and we find expressions for the arc duration, charge transport, currents, and discharge energy. These quantities are adjusted to be consistent with known scaling laws for the area of charge depleted by the arc. After a brief account of the statistical distribution of voltages at which the arc starts and stops, we calculate the signal strength and frequency spectrum of the electromagnetic radiation broadcast by the arc. We find that arcs from thick ()similarreverse arrowto)1 cm) targets can generate rf signals detectable up to 1000 km from the target, bu a radio receiver operating at frequency 80 MHz, bandwidth 100 kHz, and detection threshold -105 dBm. These thick-target arc signals are 10 to 20 dB above ambient noise at the receiver, and they provide target hit assessment if the signal spectrum can be sampled at several frequencies in the nominal range 30-200 MHz. Thin-target ()similarreverse arrowto)1 mm) arc signals are much weaker, but when they are detecable in conjunction with thick-target signals, target discrimination is possible by comparing the signal frequency spectra. 24 refs., 12 figs.

  14. Short DNA Fragments Are a Hallmark of Heavy Charged-Particle Irradiation and May Underlie Their Greater Therapeutic Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Dalong; Chasovskikh, Sergey; Rodgers, James E.; Dritschilo, Anatoly

    2016-01-01

    Growing interest in proton and heavy ion therapy has reinvigorated research into the fundamental biological mechanisms underlying the therapeutic efficacy of charged-particle radiation. To improve our understanding of the greater biological effectiveness of high-LET radiations, we have investigated DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) following exposure of plasmid DNA to low-LET Co-60 gamma photon and electron irradiation and to high-LET Beryllium and Argon ions with atomic force microscopy. The sizes of DNA fragments following radiation exposure were individually measured to construct fragment size distributions from which the DSB per DNA molecule and DSB spatial distributions were derived. We report that heavy charged particles induce a significantly larger proportion of short DNA fragments in irradiated DNA molecules, reflecting densely and clustered damage patterns of high-LET energy depositions. We attribute the enhanced short DNA fragmentation following high-LET radiations as an important determinant of the observed, enhanced biological effectiveness of high-LET irradiations. PMID:27376024

  15. Performance of diethylene glycol-based particle counters in the sub-3 nm size range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wimmer, D.; Lehtipalo, K.; Franchin, A.; Kangasluoma, J.; Kreissl, F.; Kürten, A.; Kupc, A.; Metzger, A.; Mikkilä, J.; Petäjä, T.; Riccobono, F.; Vanhanen, J.; Kulmala, M.; Curtius, J.

    2013-07-01

    When studying new particle formation, the uncertainty in determining the "true" nucleation rate is considerably reduced when using condensation particle counters (CPCs) capable of measuring concentrations of aerosol particles at sizes close to or even at the critical cluster size (1-2 nm). Recently, CPCs able to reliably detect particles below 2 nm in size and even close to 1 nm became available. Using these instruments, the corrections needed for calculating nucleation rates are substantially reduced compared to scaling the observed formation rate to the nucleation rate at the critical cluster size. However, this improved instrumentation requires a careful characterization of their cut-off size and the shape of the detection efficiency curve because relatively small shifts in the cut-off size can translate into larger relative errors when measuring particles close to the cut-off size. Here we describe the development of two continuous-flow CPCs using diethylene glycol (DEG) as the working fluid. The design is based on two TSI 3776 counters. Several sets of measurements to characterize their performance at different temperature settings were carried out. Furthermore, two mixing-type particle size magnifiers (PSM) A09 from Airmodus were characterized in parallel. One PSM was operated at the highest mixing ratio (1 L min-1 saturator flow), and the other was operated in a scanning mode, where the mixing ratios are changed periodically, resulting in a range of cut-off sizes. The mixing ratios are determined by varying the saturator flow, where the aerosol flow stays constant at 2.5 L min-1. Different test aerosols were generated using a nano-differential mobility analyser (nano-DMA) or a high-resolution DMA, to obtain detection efficiency curves for all four CPCs. One calibration setup included a high-resolution mass spectrometer (APi-TOF) for the determination of the chemical composition of the generated clusters. The lowest cut-off sizes were achieved with negatively

  16. Performance of diethylene glycol based particle counters in the sub 3 nm size range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wimmer, D.; Lehtipalo, K.; Franchin, A.; Kangasluoma, J.; Kreissl, F.; Kürten, A.; Kupc, A.; Metzger, A.; Mikkilä, J.; Petäjä, T.; Riccobono, F.; Vanhanen, J.; Kulmala, M.; Curtius, J.

    2013-02-01

    When studying new particle formation, the uncertainty in determining the "true" nucleation rate is considerably reduced when using Condensation Particle Counters (CPCs) capable of measuring concentrations of aerosol particles at sizes close to or even at the critical cluster size (1-2 nm). Recently CPCs, able to reliably detect particles below 2 nm in size and even close to 1 nm became available. The corrections needed to calculate nucleation rates are substantially reduced compared to scaling the observed formation rate to the nucleation rate at the critical cluster size. However, this improved instrumentation requires a careful characterization of their cut-off size and the shape of the detection efficiency curve because relatively small shifts in the cut-off size can translate into larger relative errors when measuring particles close to the cut-off size. Here we describe the development of two continuous flow CPCs using diethylene glycol (DEG) as the working fluid. The design is based on two TSI 3776 counters. Several sets of measurements to characterize their performance at different temperature settings were carried out. Furthermore two mixing-type Particle Size Magnifiers (PSM) A09 from Airmodus were characterized in parallel. One PSM was operated at the highest mixing ratio (1 L min-1 saturator flow), and the other was operated in a scanning mode, where the mixing ratios are changed periodically, resulting in a range of cut-off sizes. Different test aerosols were generated using a nano-Differential Mobility Analyzer (nano-DMA) or a high resolution DMA, to obtain detection efficiency curves for all four CPCs. One calibration setup included a high resolution mass spectrometer (APi-TOF) for the determination of the chemical composition of the generated clusters. The lowest cut-off sizes were achieved with negatively charged ammonium sulphate clusters, resulting in cut-offs of 1.4 nm for the laminar flow CPCs and 1.2 and 1.1 nm for the PSMs. A comparison of one

  17. Coloration and darkening of methane clathrate and other ices by charged particle irradiation - Applications to the outer solar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, W. Reid; Murray, B. G. J. P. T.; Khare, B. N.; Sagan, Carl

    1987-01-01

    The results of laboratory experiments simulating the irradiation of hydrocarbon-H2O or hydrocarbon-H2O/NH3 clathrates by charged particles in the outer solar system are reported. Ices produced by condensing and boiling liquid CH4 on an H2O frost surface at 100 K or by cocondensing frosts from gaseous mixtures were exposed to coronal-discharge electron irradiation at 77 K, and the spectral properties of the irradiated surfaces were determined. Significant darkening of the initially white ices was observed at doses of 1 Gerg/sq cm, corresponding to 8-500 yrs of irradiation by Uranian magnetospheric electrons on the surfaces of the principal Uranian satellites, or to total destruction of CH4 in the upper 1 mm of the satellite surfaces after 0.05-3.0 Myr. It is estimated that 10 m or more of icy satellite or comet surfaces would be radiation-hardened to a CH4-free ice-tholin mixture over 4 Gyr.

  18. Coloration and darkening of methane clathrate and other ices by charged particle irradiation - Applications to the outer solar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, W. Reid; Murray, B. G. J. P. T.; Khare, B. N.; Sagan, Carl

    1987-01-01

    The results of laboratory experiments simulating the irradiation of hydrocarbon-H2O or hydrocarbon-H2O/NH3 clathrates by charged particles in the outer solar system are reported. Ices produced by condensing and boiling liquid CH4 on an H2O frost surface at 100 K or by cocondensing frosts from gaseous mixtures were exposed to coronal-discharge electron irradiation at 77 K, and the spectral properties of the irradiated surfaces were determined. Significant darkening of the initially white ices was observed at doses of 1 Gerg/sq cm, corresponding to 8-500 yrs of irradiation by Uranian magnetospheric electrons on the surfaces of the principal Uranian satellites, or to total destruction of CH4 in the upper 1 mm of the satellite surfaces after 0.05-3.0 Myr. It is estimated that 10 m or more of icy satellite or comet surfaces would be radiation-hardened to a CH4-free ice-tholin mixture over 4 Gyr.

  19. Determining particle size distributions in the inhalable size range for wood dust collected by air samplers.

    PubMed

    Harper, Martin; Muller, Brian S; Bartolucci, Al

    2002-10-01

    In the absence of methods for determining particle size distributions in the inhalable size range with good discrimination, the samples collected by personal air sampling devices can only be characterized by their total mass. This parameter gives no information regarding the size distribution of the aerosol or the size-selection characteristics of different samplers in field use conditions. A method is described where the particles collected by a sampler are removed, suspended, and re-deposited on a mixed cellulose-ester filter, and examined by optical microscopy to determine particle aerodynamic diameters. This method is particularly appropriate to wood dust particles which are generally large and close to rectangular prisms in shape. Over 200 wood dust samples have been collected in three different wood-products industries, using the traditional closed-face polystyrene/acrylonitrile cassette, the Institute of Occupational Medicine inhalable sampler, and the Button sampler developed by the University of Cincinnati. A portion of these samples has been analyzed to determine the limitations of this method. Extensive quality control measures are being developed to improve the robustness of the procedure, and preliminary results suggest the method has an accuracy similar to that required of National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) methods. The results should provide valuable insights into the collection characteristics of the samplers and the impact of these characteristics on comparison of sampler results to present and potential future limit values. The NIOSH Deep South Education and Research Center has a focus on research into hazards of the forestry and associated wood-products industry, and it is hoped to expand this activity in the future.

  20. Long-range two-particle correlations of strange hadrons with charged particles in pPb and PbPb collisions at LHC energies

    DOE PAGES

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-01-26

    The measurements of two-particle angular correlations between an identified strange hadron ( K0s or Λ/Λ- ) and a charged particle, emitted in pPb collisions, are presented over a wide range in pseudorapidity and full azimuth. The data, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of approximately 35 nb-1, were collected at a nucleon–nucleon center-of-mass energy (√sNN ) of 5.02 TeV with the CMS detector at the LHC. Our results are compared to semi-peripheral PbPb collision data at √sNN , covering similar charged-particle multiplicities in the events. The observed azimuthal correlations at large relative pseudorapidity are used to extract the second-order (v2) andmore » third-order (v3) anisotropy harmonics of K0s and Λ/Λ- particles. These quantities are studied as a function of the charged-particle multiplicity in the event and the transverse momentum of the particles. For high-multiplicity pPb events, a clear particle species dependence of v2 and v3 is observed. For pT<2 GeV, the v2 and v3 values of K0s particles are larger than those of particles at the same pT. This splitting effect between two particle species is found to be stronger in pPb than in PbPb collisions in the same multiplicity range. When divided by the number of constituent quarks and compared at the same transverse kinetic energy per quark, both v2 and v3 for K0s particles are observed to be consistent with those for Λ/Λ- particles at the 10% level in pPb collisions. This consistency extends over a wide range of particle transverse kinetic energy and event multiplicities.« less

  1. Long-range interactions between soft colloidal particles in slit-pore geometries.

    PubMed

    Klapp, Sabine H L; Qu, D; Klitzing, Regine V

    2007-02-15

    Combining theoretical and experimental techniques, we investigate the structure formation of charged colloidal suspensions of silica particles in bulk and in spatial confinement (slit-pore geometry). Our focus is to identify characteristic length scales determining typical quantities, such as the position of the main peak of the bulk structure factor and the period of the oscillatory force profile in the slitpore. We obtain these quantities from integral equations/SANS experiments (bulk) and Monte Carlo simulations/colloidal probe-AFM measurements (confinement), in which the theoretical calculations are based on the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeck (DLVO) potential. Both in bulk and in the slitpore, we find excellent qualitative and quantitative agreement between theory and experiment as long as the ionic strength chosen in the DLVO potential is sufficiently low (implying a relatively long-ranged interaction). In particular, the bulk properties of these systems obey the widely accepted density scaling of xi proportional to phi(-1/3). On the other hand, systems with larger ionic strengths and, consequently, more short-ranged interactions do not obey such power law behavior and rather resemble an uncharged hard-sphere fluid, in which the relevant length scale is the particle diameter.

  2. Some new results on the frequency characteristics on quartz crystals irradiated by ionizing and particle radiations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahadur, H.; Parshad, R.

    1981-01-01

    The frequency behavior of AT-cut quartz crystals irradiated by X -, gamma rays and fast neutrons. Initial instability in frequency for gamma and neutron irradiated crystals was found. All the different radiations first give a negative frequency shift at lower doses which are followed by positive frequency shift for increased doses. Results are explained in terms of the fundamental crystal structure. Applications of the frequency results for radiation hardening are proposed.

  3. Synthesis of zinc oxide nanostructures catalytically active in the optical range without irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasumov, M. M.

    2012-09-01

    A technique for synthesizing catalytically active zinc oxide-based nanostructures is described. The synthesis product represents a blue-gray powder. When it is introduced into a water solution of methyl orange the latter bleaches out both under daylight and in the dark. The activity of the material is measured by the Kubelka-Munk formula in the wavelength range 0.3-1.8 μm. As follows from X-ray phase analysis data, the synthesized material is a composite consisting of hexagonal structures with the parameters ZnO [ a: 3.2491, c: 5.2046] and Zn [ a: 2.6639, c: 4.9397]. A mechanism underlying the formation of a ZnO-Zn nanocomposite is suggested.

  4. Attenuation of an ultrasonic beam by suspended particles and range of acoustic flow meters in sewer networks.

    PubMed

    Larrarte, Frédérique; François, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Ultrasonic flow meters are commonly used in wastewater management. Under certain circumstances, a reduction in the flow meter range may occur and cause significant error in the flow rate measurement. Attenuation due to suspended particles is one of the phenomena capable of reducing the flow meter range. The present paper examines attenuation resulting from re-suspended pond sediment over a wide range of concentration values. It appears that a formula established for sand suspensions provides a good estimate of ultrasound attenuation for these types of particles as well. Experiments conducted for wastewater under particle concentrations commonly encountered in sewer networks demonstrate that the attenuation by particles only contributes to a negligible extent towards intensity decay, in accordance with theoretical predictions. We also theoretically determine herein the operating conditions under which the range of an ultrasonic flow meter would be significantly reduced due to particle attenuation.

  5. Dynamics of Edge Dislocations in a Low-Stability FCC-System Irradiated by High-Energy Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starostenkov, M. D.; Potekaev, A. I.; Markidonov, A. V.; Kulagina, V. V.; Grinkevich, L. S.

    2017-01-01

    Using the method of molecular dynamics, the behavior of plastic deformation and defect structure selforganization are investigated in a low-stability condensed FCC-system irradiated with high-energy particles. An analysis of the dynamics of a single edge dislocation and elementary dislocation ensembles, subjected to the action of a post-cascade shock wave, demonstrates that as a result of this action the dislocations are displaced towards the wave source. As this goes on, the roles of both collective effects and external influences on the ensembles of complex interacting defects increase. In particular, the investigation performed in this work demonstrates that the post-cascade shock waves can give rise to migration of not only single edge dislocation but also elementary dislocation ensembles. It is demonstrated that the changes in the dislocation structure of the irradiated material result from the unloading waves following the post-cascade waves, rather than from the latter waves themselves.

  6. Effects of Fe particle irradiation on human endothelial barrier structure and function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Preety; Guida, Peter; Grabham, Peter

    2014-07-01

    Space travel involves exposure to biologically effective heavy ion radiation and there is consequently a concern for possible degenerative disorders in humans. A significant target for radiation effects is the microvascular system, which is crucial to healthy functioning of the tissues. Its pathology is linked to disrupted endothelial barrier function and is not only a primary event in a range of degenerative diseases but also an important influencing factor in many others. Thus, an assessment of the effects of heavy ion radiation on endothelial barrier function would be useful for estimating the risks of space travel. This study was aimed at understanding the effects of high LET Fe particles (1 GeV/n) and is the first investigation of the effects of charged particles on the function of the human endothelial barrier. We used a set of established and novel endpoints to assess barrier function after exposure. These include, trans-endothelial electrical resistance (TEER), morphological effects, localization of adhesion and cell junction proteins (in 2D monolayers and in 3D tissue models), and permeability of molecules through the endothelial barrier. A dose of 0.50 Gy was sufficient to cause a progressive reduction in TEER measurements that were significant 48 hours after exposure. Concurrently, there were morphological changes and a 14% loss of cells from monolayers. Gaps also appeared in the normally continuous cell-border localization of the tight junction protein - ZO-1 but not the Platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule (PECAM-1) in both monolayers and in 3D vessel models. Disruption of barrier function was confirmed by increased permeability to 3 kDa and 10 kDa dextran molecules. A dose of 0.25 Gy caused no detectible change in cell number, morphology, or TEER, but did cause barrier disruption since there were gaps in the cell border localization of ZO-1 and an increased permeability to 3 kDa dextran. These results indicate that Fe particles potently have

  7. Comparison of changes over time in leukocyte counts in Yucatan minipigs irradiated with simulated solar particle event-like radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanzari, Jenine K.; Steven Wan, X.; Muehlmatt, Amy; Lin, Liyong; Kennedy, Ann R.

    2015-01-01

    During a major solar particle event (SPE), astronauts in space are at risk of exposure to an increased dose of proton radiation. The whole body distribution of the absorbed SPE proton dose is inhomogeneous, and such an inhomogeneous SPE proton dose can be simulated by electron radiation. Using Yucatan minipigs as an animal model, we compared the time courses of leukocyte count changes after exposure to proton simulated SPE (pSPE) radiation or electron simulated SPE (eSPE) radiation. The results demonstrated that the time required after irradiation to reach the lowest leukocyte counts was generally comparable between the pSPE and eSPE radiation exposures. However, the leukocyte count often recovered faster after electron irradiation compared to proton irradiation at the corresponding doses. In addition, the radiation dose required to achieve comparable magnitudes of leukocyte count decrease was higher in the eSPE animals than for the pSPE animals. In conclusion, based on the magnitude of the decrease and the time required to reach the lowest leukocyte counts after irradiation, the pSPE radiation was more effective than the eSPE radiation in reducing the peripheral leukocyte counts. Lymphocytes appeared to be the most sensitive type of leukocytes in response to either type of SPE radiation. It is particularly noteworthy that following exposure to pSPE radiation at the skin doses >5 Gy, the neutrophils do not recover from the radiation damage at times up to 30 days, and the neutrophils have not recovered to their baseline levels even at 90 days post-irradiation. These results suggest a marked difference in the ability of the neutrophils to recover from pSPE radiation compared with the results observed for eSPE radiation.

  8. Comparison of changes over time in leukocyte counts in Yucatan minipigs irradiated with simulated solar particle event-like radiation

    PubMed Central

    Sanzari, Jenine K.; Wan, X. Steven; Muehlmatt, Amy; Lin, Liyong; Kennedy, Ann R.

    2015-01-01

    During a major solar particle event (SPE), astronauts in space are at risk of exposure to an increased dose of proton radiation. The whole body distribution of the absorbed SPE proton dose is inhomogeneous, and such an inhomogeneous SPE proton dose can be simulated by electron radiation. Using Yucatan minipigs as an animal model, we compared the time courses of leukocyte count changes after exposure to proton simulated SPE (pSPE) radiation or electron simulated SPE (eSPE) radiation. The results demonstrated that the time required after irradiation to reach the lowest leukocyte counts was generally comparable between the pSPE and eSPE radiation exposures. However, the leukocyte count often recovered faster after electron irradiation compared to proton irradiation at the corresponding doses. In addition, the radiation dose required to achieve comparable magnitudes of leukocyte count decrease was higher in the eSPE animals than for the pSPE animals. In conclusion, based on the magnitude of the decrease and the time required to reach the lowest leukocyte counts after irradiation, the pSPE radiation was more effective than the eSPE radiation in reducing the peripheral leukocyte counts. Lymphocytes appeared to be the most sensitive type of leukocytes in response to either type of SPE radiation. It is particularly noteworthy that following exposure to pSPE radiation at the skin doses >5 Gy, the neutrophils do not recover from the radiation damage at times up to 30 days, and the neutrophils have not recovered to their baseline levels even at 90 days post-irradiation. These results suggest a marked difference in the ability of the neutrophils to recover from pSPE radiation compared the results observed for eSPE radiation. PMID:25774341

  9. Comparison of changes over time in leukocyte counts in Yucatan minipigs irradiated with simulated solar particle event-like radiation.

    PubMed

    Sanzari, Jenine K; Wan, X Steven; Muehlmatt, Amy; Lin, Liyong; Kennedy, Ann R

    2015-01-01

    During a major solar particle event (SPE), astronauts in space are at risk of exposure to an increased dose of proton radiation. The whole body distribution of the absorbed SPE proton dose is inhomogeneous, and such an inhomogeneous SPE proton dose can be simulated by electron radiation. Using Yucatan minipigs as an animal model, we compared the time courses of leukocyte count changes after exposure to proton simulated SPE (pSPE) radiation or electron simulated SPE (eSPE) radiation. The results demonstrated that the time required after irradiation to reach the lowest leukocyte counts was generally comparable between the pSPE and eSPE radiation exposures. However, the leukocyte count often recovered faster after electron irradiation compared to proton irradiation at the corresponding doses. In addition, the radiation dose required to achieve comparable magnitudes of leukocyte count decrease was higher in the eSPE animals than for the pSPE animals. In conclusion, based on the magnitude of the decrease and the time required to reach the lowest leukocyte counts after irradiation, the pSPE radiation was more effective than the eSPE radiation in reducing the peripheral leukocyte counts. Lymphocytes appeared to be the most sensitive type of leukocytes in response to either type of SPE radiation. It is particularly noteworthy that following exposure to pSPE radiation at the skin doses >5 Gy, the neutrophils do not recover from the radiation damage at times up to 30 days, and the neutrophils have not recovered to their baseline levels even at 90 days post-irradiation. These results suggest a marked difference in the ability of the neutrophils to recover from pSPE radiation compared with the results observed for eSPE radiation.

  10. A Multi-port Low-Fluence Alpha-Particle Irradiator: Fabrication, Testing and Benchmark Radiobiological Studies

    PubMed Central

    Neti, Prasad V. S. V.; de Toledo, Sonia M.; Perumal, Venkatachalam; Azzam, Edouard I.; Howell, Roger W.

    2011-01-01

    A new multi-port irradiator, designed to facilitate the study of the effects of low fluences of α particles on monolayer cultures, has been developed. The irradiator consists of four individual planar 241Am α-particle sources that are housed inside a helium-filled Lucite chamber. Three of the radioactive sources consist of 20 MBq of 241Am dioxide foil. The fourth source, used to produce higher dose rates, has an activity of 500 MBq. The four sources are mounted on rotating turntables parallel to their respective 1.5-μm-thick Mylar exit windows. A stainless steel honeycomb collimator is placed between the four sources and their exit windows by a cantilever attachment to the platform of an orbital shaker that moves its table in an orbit of 2 cm. Each exit window is equipped with a beam delimiter to optimize the uniformity of the beam and with a high-precision electronic shutter. Opening and closing of the shutters is controlled with a high-precision timer. Custom-designed stainless steel Mylar-bottomed culture dishes are placed on an adapter on the shutter. The α particles that strike the cells have a mean energy of 2.9 MeV. The corresponding LET distribution of the particles has a mean value of 132 keV/μm. Clonogenic cell survival experiments with AG1522 human fibroblasts indicate that the RBE of the α particles compared to 137Cs γ rays is about 7.6 for this biological end point. PMID:15161346

  11. A multi-port low-fluence alpha-particle irradiator: fabrication, testing and benchmark radiobiological studies.

    PubMed

    Neti, Prasad V S V; de Toledo, Sonia M; Perumal, Venkatachalam; Azzam, Edouard I; Howell, Roger W

    2004-06-01

    A new multi-port irradiator, designed to facilitate the study of the effects of low fluences of alpha particles on monolayer cultures, has been developed. The irradiator consists of four individual planar (241)Am alpha-particle sources that are housed inside a helium-filled Lucite chamber. Three of the radioactive sources consist of 20 MBq of (241)Am dioxide foil. The fourth source, used to produce higher dose rates, has an activity of 500 MBq. The four sources are mounted on rotating turntables parallel to their respective 1.5-microm-thick Mylar exit windows. A stainless steel honeycomb collimator is placed between the four sources and their exit windows by a cantilever attachment to the platform of an orbital shaker that moves its table in an orbit of 2 cm. Each exit window is equipped with a beam delimiter to optimize the uniformity of the beam and with a high-precision electronic shutter. Opening and closing of the shutters is controlled with a high-precision timer. Custom-designed stainless steel Mylar-bottomed culture dishes are placed on an adapter on the shutter. The alpha particles that strike the cells have a mean energy of 2.9 MeV. The corresponding LET distribution of the particles has a mean value of 132 keV/microm. Clonogenic cell survival experiments with AG1522 human fibroblasts indicate that the RBE of the alpha particles compared to (137)Cs gamma rays is about 7.6 for this biological end point.

  12. Production of medical isotopes from a thorium target irradiated by light charged particles up to 70 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duchemin, C.; Guertin, A.; Haddad, F.; Michel, N.; Métivier, V.

    2015-02-01

    The irradiation of a thorium target by light charged particles (protons and deuterons) leads to the production of several isotopes of medical interest. Direct nuclear reaction allows the production of Protactinium-230 which decays to Uranium-230 the mother nucleus of Thorium-226, a promising isotope for alpha radionuclide therapy. The fission of Thorium-232 produces fragments of interest like Molybdenum-99, Iodine-131 and Cadmium-115g. We focus our study on the production of these isotopes, performing new cross section measurements and calculating production yields. Our new sets of data are compared with the literature and the last version of the TALYS code.

  13. Production of medical isotopes from a thorium target irradiated by light charged particles up to 70 MeV.

    PubMed

    Duchemin, C; Guertin, A; Haddad, F; Michel, N; Métivier, V

    2015-02-07

    The irradiation of a thorium target by light charged particles (protons and deuterons) leads to the production of several isotopes of medical interest. Direct nuclear reaction allows the production of Protactinium-230 which decays to Uranium-230 the mother nucleus of Thorium-226, a promising isotope for alpha radionuclide therapy. The fission of Thorium-232 produces fragments of interest like Molybdenum-99, Iodine-131 and Cadmium-115g. We focus our study on the production of these isotopes, performing new cross section measurements and calculating production yields. Our new sets of data are compared with the literature and the last version of the TALYS code.

  14. Particle size analysis of radioactive aerosols formed by irradiation of argon using 65 MeV quasi-monoenergetic neutrons.

    PubMed

    Endo, A; Noguchi, H; Tanaka, Su; Kanda, Y; Oki, Y; Iida, T; Sato, K; Tsuda, S

    2002-04-01

    The size distributions of 38Cl and 39Cl aerosols formed from the irradiation of argon gas containing di-octyl phthalate (DOP) aerosols by 65 MeV quasi-monoenergetic neutrons were measured to study the formation mechanism of radioactive aerosols in high-energy radiation fields. Both the number size distribution and the activity-weighted size distribution were measured using an electrical low-pressure impactor. It was found that the 35Cl and 39Cl aerosols are formed by attachment of the radioactive atoms generated by the neutron-induced reaction to the DOP aerosol particles.

  15. Observations and Characteristics of Particles in the 0.5 to 2.5 micron Size Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeMott, P. J.; Kreidenweis, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    The size distributions of particles with diameters between ~0.5 and 2.5 microns are difficult to characterize accurately. However, these particles frequently constitute large fractions of the PM2.5 or "fine mode" aerosol mass concentrations; contribute non-negligibly to aerosol extinction; and may represent key cloud-active particles that include giant cloud condensation nuclei and ice nucleating particles. Some fraction of these particles is derived from sources in common with true coarse mode particles (diameters between ~2.5 and 10 microns), while the remainder are derived from sources that dominate submicron particles, including cloud processing. In this presentation we review measurements by our group in various U.S.-based field studies to demonstrate the variability in this mode and in its contributions to the aforementioned characteristics of atmospheric relevance. Size-resolved composition data demonstrate the complexity of the aerosol sources contributing to this size range.

  16. Metabolic oxygen consumption measurement with a single-cell biosensor after particle microbeam irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bo; Messerli, Mark; Randers-Pehrson, Gerhard; Hei, Tom K.; Brenner, David J.

    2015-01-01

    A noninvasive, self-referencing biosensor/probe system has been integrated into the Columbia University Radiological Research Accelerator Facility Microbeam II end station. A single-cell oxygen consumption measurement has been conducted with this type of oxygen probe in 37°C Krebs–Ringer Bicarbonate buffer immediately before and after a single-cell microbeam irradiation. It is the first such measurement made for a microbeam irradiation, and a six fold increment of oxygen flux induced during a 15-s period of time has been observed following radiation exposure. The experimental procedure and the results are discussed. PMID:25335641

  17. Long-range transport episodes of fine particles in southern Finland during 1999-2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemi, Jarkko V.; Saarikoski, Sanna; Aurela, Minna; Tervahattu, Heikki; Hillamo, Risto; Westphal, Douglas L.; Aarnio, Päivi; Koskentalo, Tarja; Makkonen, Ulla; Vehkamäki, Hanna; Kulmala, Markku

    The frequency, strength and sources of long-range transport (LRT) episodes of fine particles (PM 2.5) were studied in southern Finland using air quality monitoring results, backward air mass trajectories, remote sensing of fire hot spots, transport and dispersion modelling of smoke and chemical analysis of particle samples (black carbon, monosaccharide anhydrides, oxalate, succinate, malonate, SO 42-, NO 3-, K + and NH 4+). At an urban background site in Helsinki, the daily WHO guideline value (24-h PM 2.5 mean 25 μg m -3) was exceeded during 1-7 LRT episodes per year in 1999-2007. The 24-h mean maximum concentrations varied between 25 and 49 μg m -3 during the episodes, which was 3-6 times higher than the local mean concentration (8.7 μg m -3) in 1999-2007. The highest particle concentrations (max. 1-h mean 163 μg m -3) and the longest episodes (max. 9 days) were mainly caused by the emissions from open biomass burning, especially during springs and late-summers in 2002 and 2006. During the period 2001-2007, the satellite remote sensing of active fire hot spots and transport and dispersion modelling of smoke indicated that approximately half of the episodes were caused partly by the emissions from wildfires and/or agricultural waste burning in fields in Eastern Europe, especially in Russia, Belarus and Ukraine. Other episodes were mainly caused by the LRT of ordinary anthropogenic pollutants, e.g. from energy production, traffic, industry and wood combustion. During those 'other episodes', air masses also arrived from Eastern Europe, including Poland. The highest concentrations of biomass-burning tracers, such as monosaccharide anhydrides (levoglucosan + mannosan + galactosan) and K +, were observed during open biomass-burning episodes, but quite high values were also measured during some winter episodes due to wood combustion emissions. Our results indicate that open biomass burning in Eastern Europe causes high fine particle concentration peaks in large

  18. The induction of chromosome aberrations in human lymphocytes by in vitro irradiation with alpha-particles from plutonium-239.

    PubMed

    Purrott, R J; Edwards, A A; Lloyd, D C; Stather, J W

    1980-09-01

    The yields of unstable chromosome aberrations induced in human lymphocytes by alpha-particles from plutonium-239 have been measured. Plutonium citrate solution was mixed with heparinized blood so that doses of 13--160 rad were delivered in 24 hours. Dicentric aberration yields (Y) fitted best to the linear expression Y = 3 . 72 +/- 0 . 23 x 10(-3) rad-1. Inclusion of a 6 . 5 rad point resulting from a 1 . 7 hour irradiation raised the yield coefficient insignificantly to 3 . 75 +/- 0 . 24 x 10(-3). The aberration yields are in good agreement with data from curium-242 alpha-particles obtained in this laboratory but they are much lower than those obtained in two other laboratories. Reasons for this disagreement are examined.

  19. Irradiation behavior of the interaction product of U-Mo fuel particle dispersion in an Al matrix.

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Y.S.; Hofman, G.

    2012-06-01

    Irradiation performance of U-Mo fuel particles dispersed in Al matrix is stable in terms of fuel swelling and is suitable for the conversion of research and test reactors from highly enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU). However, tests of the fuel at high temperatures and high burnups revealed obstacles caused by the interaction layers forming between the fuel particle and matrix. In some cases, fission gas filled pores grow and interconnect in the interdiffusion layer resulting in fuel plate failure. Postirradiation observations are made to examine the behavior of the interdiffusion layers. The interdiffusion layers show a fluid-like behavior characteristic of amorphous materials. In the amorphous interdiffusion layers, fission gas diffusivity is high and the material viscosity is low so that the fission gas pores readily form and grow. Based on the observations, a pore formation mechanism is proposed and potential remedies to suppress the pore growth are also introduced.

  20. The New Climate Data Record of Solar Irradiance: Comparisons with Observations and Solar Irradiance Models Over a Range of Solar Activity Time Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coddington, O.; Lean, J.; Pilewskie, P.; Richard, E. C.; Snow, M. A.; Kopp, G.; Lindholm, C.

    2016-12-01

    A new publically available climate data record (CDR) of total and spectral solar irradiance became operational in November 2015 as part of the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA's) National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) Climate Data Record Program. The data record, which is updated regularly, is available from 1610 to the present day as yearly-average values and from 1882 to the present day as monthly- and daily-averages, with associated time and wavelength-dependent uncertainties. It was developed jointly by the University of Colorado at Boulder's Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP) and the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) and, together with the source code and supporting documentation, is available at https://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/cdr/. Total solar irradiance (TSI) and solar spectral irradiance (SSI) are estimated from models that determine the changes from quiet Sun conditions arising from bright faculae and dark sunspots on the solar disk. The models are constructed using linear regression of proxies of solar sunspot and facular features with the approximately decade-long irradiance observations from the SOlar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE). We describe the model formulation, uncertainty estimates, and validation approach. We present comparisons of the modeled TSI and SSI with observational records and with other solar irradiance models on solar-rotational, solar-cycle, and multi-decadal timescales. We discuss ongoing efforts to improve the irradiance uncertainty estimates arising from model assumptions and the operational approach to make these updated uncertainty estimates publicly available in a future revision of the Solar Irradiance CDR.

  1. Commissioning of full energy scanning irradiation with carbon-ion beams ranging from 55.6 to 430 MeV/u at the NIRS-HIMAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hara, Y.; Furukawa, T.; Mizushima, K.; Inaniwa, T.; Saotome, N.; Tansho, R.; Saraya, Y.; Shirai, T.; Noda, K.

    2017-09-01

    Since 2011, a three-dimensional (3D) scanning irradiation system has been utilized for treatments at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences-Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (NIRS-HIMAC). In 2012, a hybrid depth scanning method was introduced for the depth direction, in which 11 discrete beam energies are used in conjunction with the range shifter. To suppress beam spread due to multiple scattering and nuclear reactions, we then developed a full energy scanning method. Accelerator tuning and beam commissioning tests prior to a treatment with this method are time-consuming, however. We therefore devised a new approach to obtain the pencil beam dataset, including consideration of the contribution of large-angle scattered (LAS) particles, which reduces the time spent on beam data preparation. The accuracy of 3D dose delivery using this new approach was verified by measuring the dose distributions for different target volumes. Results confirmed that the measured dose distributions agreed well with calculated doses. Following this evaluation, treatments using the full energy scanning method were commenced in September 2015.

  2. Induction of acute brain injury in mice by irradiation with high-LET charged particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Zhang, Hong

    The present study was performed to evaluate the induction of acute brain injury in mice after 235 Mev/u carbon ion irradiation. In our study, young outbred Kunming mice were divided into four treatment groups according to the penetration depth of carbon ions. Animals were irradiated with a sublethal dose of carbon ion beams prior to the Bragg curve. An experiment was performed to evaluate the acute alterations in histology, DNA double-strand breaks (DNA DSBs) as well as p53and Bax expression in the brain 96 h post-irradiation. The results demonstrated that various histopathological changes, a significant number of DNA DSBs and elevated p53 and Bax protein expression were induced in the brain following exposure to carbon ions. This was particularly true for mice irradiated with ions having a 9.1 cm-pentration depth, indicating that carbon ions can led to deleterious lesions in the brain of young animals within 96 h. Moreover, there was a remarkable increase in DNA DSBs and in the severity of histopathological changes as the penetration depths of ions increased, which may be associated with the complex track structure of heavy ions. These data reveal that carbon ions can promote serious neuropathological degeneration in the cerebral cortex of young mice. Given that damaged neurons cannot regenerate, these findings warrant further investigation of the adverse effects of the space radiation and the passage of a therapeutic heavy ion beam in the plateau region of the Bragg curve through healthy brain tissue.

  3. Energy distribution of the particles obtained after irradiation of carbon nanotubes with carbon projectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denton, Cristian D.; Moreno-Marín, Juan Carlos; Heredia-Avalos, Santiago

    2015-06-01

    The idea of using carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as masks against irradiation has recently emerged, because of the region of a given material covered by a CNT can be protected from the effects of irradiation, creating nanowires. In this case, it is interesting to know in detail the number of generated recoils and their energy. In order to obtain these data, we simulate the irradiation of CNTs with carbon ions using a molecular dynamics code. To describe the interaction between carbon ions we use the Brenner potential joined smoothly to the Universal ZBL potential at short distances. We have analyzed the energy distributions of the carbon atoms emerging from the CNT for single projectile irradiation with incident energies from 30 eV to 5 keV. Our results show that the number and the energy of the recoil carbon atoms emerging from the CNT increases with the projectile incident energy. In average, each projectile with incident energy of 1 keV produces ∼3.6 recoils, which have a mean energy of 150 eV, while projectiles with 5 keV produce ∼7 recoils with a mean energy of 400 eV.

  4. Suppression effect of nano-sized oxide particles on helium irradiation hardening in F82H-ODS steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S.; Wang, Y.; Tadaki, K.; Hashimoto, N.; Ohnuki, S.

    2014-12-01

    Helium implantation was performed to investigate irradiation hardening in ferritic/martensitic steels. Depth dependence of nano-hardness was obtained using a Berkovich nano-indenter, and then nano-hardness was extracted from Nix-Gao model. The correlation between irradiation hardening and the concentration 500-2000 appm of helium was plotted. Nano-hardness increases as a function of helium concentration. F82H-ODS with a higher nano-hardness provides a lower irradiation hardening than F82H-IEA. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (XTEM) revealed that cavities with a uniform distribution were formed after helium implantation at 2000 appm helium concentration, showing a mean size of 1.1 nm with an average number density of 4.9 × 1023 m-3 in F82H-IEA and 1.3 nm with 7.4 × 1023 m-3 in F82H-ODS. Orowan model was applied to evaluate the hardening from dispersed cavities. The significant difference of hardening between calculation and nano-indentation result of F82H-ODS indicates that oxide particles may shield the hardening effect from cavities because of the complex multi-interaction.

  5. Impact of interaction range and curvature on crystal growth of particles confined to spherical surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paquay, Stefan; Both, Gert-Jan; van der Schoot, Paul

    2017-07-01

    When colloidal particles form a crystal phase on a spherical template, their packing is governed by the effective interaction between them and the elastic strain of bending the growing crystal. For example, if growth commences under appropriate conditions, and the isotropic crystal that forms reaches a critical size, growth continues via the incorporation of defects to alleviate elastic strain. Recently, it was experimentally found that, if defect formation is somehow not possible, the crystal instead continues growing in ribbons that protrude from the original crystal. Here we report on computer simulations in which we observe both the formation of ribbons at short interaction ranges and packings that incorporate defects if the interaction is longer-ranged. The ribbons only form above some critical crystal size, below which the nucleus is disk-shaped. We find that the scaling of the critical crystal size differs slightly from the one proposed in the literature, and we argue that this is because the actual morphology transition is caused by the competition between line tension and elastic stress, rather than the competition between chemical potential and elastic stress.

  6. An all-particle primary energy spectrum in the 3 200 PeV energy range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garyaka, A. P.; Martirosov, R. M.; Ter-Antonyan, S. V.; Erlykin, A. D.; Nikolskaya, N. M.; Gallant, Y. A.; Jones, L. W.; Procureur, J.

    2008-11-01

    We present an all-particle primary cosmic-ray energy spectrum in the 3 × 106-2 × 108 GeV energy range obtained by a multi-parametric event-by-event evaluation of the primary energy. The results are obtained on the basis of an expanded EAS data set detected at mountain level (700 g cm-2) by the GAMMA experiment. The energy evaluation method has been developed using the EAS simulation with the SIBYLL interaction model taking into account the response of GAMMA detectors and reconstruction uncertainties of EAS parameters. Nearly unbiased (<5%) energy estimations regardless of a primary nuclear mass with an accuracy of about 15-10% in the 3 × 106-2 × 108 GeV energy range respectively are attained. An irregularity ('bump') in the spectrum is observed at primary energies of ~7.4 × 107 GeV. This bump exceeds a smooth power-law fit to the data by about 4 standard deviations. By not rejecting the stochastic nature of the bump completely, we examined the systematic uncertainties of our methods and conclude that they cannot be responsible for the observed feature.

  7. Study of energetic-particle-irradiation induced biological effect on Rhizopus oryzae through synchrotron-FTIR micro-spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jinghua; Qi, Zeming; Huang, Qing; Wei, Xiaoli; Ke, Zhigang; Fang, Yusheng; Tian, Yangchao; Yu, Zengliang

    2013-01-01

    Energetic particles exist ubiquitously and cause varied biological effects such as DNA strand breaks, lipid peroxidation, protein modification, cell apoptosis or death. An emerging biotechnology based on ion-beam technique has been developed to serve as an effective tool for mutation breeding of crops and microbes. In order to improve the effectiveness of ion-beam biotechnology for mutation breeding, it is indispensible to gain a better understanding of the mechanism of the interactions between the energetic ions and biological systems which is still elusive. A new trend is to conduct more comprehensive research which is based on micro-scaled observation of the changes of the cellular structures and compositions under the interactions. For this purpose, advanced synchrotron FTIR (s-FTIR) microscopy was employed to monitor the cellular changes of single fungal hyphae under irradiation of α-particles from 241Am. Intracellular contents of ROS, MDA, GSSG/GSH and activities of CAT and SOD were measured via biochemical assay. Ion-irradiation on Rhizopus oryzae causes localized vacuolation, autolysis of cell wall and membrane, lipid peroxidation, DNA damage and conformational changes of proteins, which have been clearly revealed by the s-FTIR microspectroscopy. The different changes of cell viability, SOD and CAT activities can be explained by the ROS-involved chemical reactions. Evidently, the elevated level of ROS in hyphal cells upon irradiation plays the key role in the caused biological effect. This study demonstrates that s-FTIR microspectroscopy is an effective tool to study the damage of fungal hyphae caused by ionizing radiation and it facilitates the exploit of the mechanism for the interactions between the energetic ions and biological systems.

  8. Smooth- and rough-wall boundary layer structure from high spatial range particle image velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Squire, D. T.; Morrill-Winter, C.; Hutchins, N.; Marusic, I.; Schultz, M. P.; Klewicki, J. C.

    2016-10-01

    Two particle image velocimetry arrangements are used to make true spatial comparisons between smooth- and rough-wall boundary layers at high Reynolds numbers across a very wide range of streamwise scales. Together, the arrangements resolve scales ranging from motions on the order of the Kolmogorov microscale to those longer than twice the boundary layer thickness. The rough-wall experiments were obtained above a continuous sandpaper sheet, identical to that used by Squire et al. [J. Fluid Mech. 795, 210 (2016), 10.1017/jfm.2016.196], and cover a range of friction and equivalent sand-grain roughness Reynolds numbers (12 000 ≲δ+≲ 18000, 62 ≲ks+≲104 ). The smooth-wall experiments comprise new and previously published data spanning 6500 ≲δ+≲17 000 . Flow statistics from all experiments show similar Reynolds number trends and behaviors to recent, well-resolved hot-wire anemometry measurements above the same rough surface. Comparisons, at matched δ+, between smooth- and rough-wall two-point correlation maps and two-point magnitude-squared coherence maps demonstrate that spatially the outer region of the boundary layer is the same between the two flows. This is apparently true even at wall-normal locations where the total (inner-normalized) energy differs between the smooth and rough wall. Generally, the present results provide strong support for Townsend's [The Structure of Turbulent Shear Flow (Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1956), Vol. 1] wall-similarity hypothesis in high Reynolds number fully rough boundary layer flows.

  9. On the extent of size range and power law scaling for particles of natural carbonate fault cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billi, Andrea

    2007-09-01

    To determine the size range and both type and extent of the scaling laws for particles of loose natural carbonate fault rocks, six granular fault cores from Mesozoic carbonate strata of central Italy were sampled. Particle size distributions of twelve samples were determined by combining sieving and sedimentation methods. Results show that, regardless of the fault geometry, kinematics, and tectonic history, the size of fault rock particles respects a power law distribution across approximately four orders of magnitude. The fractal dimension ( D) of the particle size distribution in the analysed samples ranges between ˜2.0 and ˜3.5. A lower bound to the power law trend is evident in all samples except in those with the highest D-values; in these samples, the smallest analysed particles (˜0.0005 mm in diameter) were also included in the power law interval, meaning that the lower size limit of the power law distribution decreases for increasing D-values and that smallest particles start to be comminuted with increasing strain (i.e. increasing fault displacement and D-values). For increasing D-values, also the largest particles tends to decrease in number, but this evidence may be affected by a censoring bias connected with the sample size. Stick-slip behaviour is suggested for the studied faults on the basis of the inferred particle size evolutions. Although further analyses are necessary to make the results of this study more generalizable, the preliminary definition of the scaling rules for fault rock particles may serve as a tool for predicting a large scale of fault rock particles once a limited range is known. In particular, data from this study may result useful as input numbers in numerical models addressing the packing of fault rock particles for frictional and hydraulic purposes.

  10. Charged-particle acceleration through laser irradiation of thin foils at Prague Asterix Laser System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrisi, Lorenzo; Cutroneo, Maria; Cavallaro, Salvatore; Musumeci, Paolo; Calcagno, Lucia; Wolowski, Jerzy; Rosinski, Marcin; Zaras-Szydlowska, Agnieszka; Ullschmied, Jiri; Krousky, Eduard; Pfeifer, Miroslav; Skala, Jiri; Velyhan, Andreiy

    2014-05-01

    Thin foils, 0.5-50 μm in thickness, have been irradiated in vacuum at Prague Asterix Laser System in Prague using 1015-16 W cm-2 laser intensity, 1315 nm wavelength, 300 ps pulse duration and different focal positions. Produced plasmas from metals and polymers films have been monitored in the forward and backward directions. Ion and electron accelerations have been investigated by using Thomson parabola spectrometer, x-ray streak camera, ion collectors and SiC semiconductor detectors, the latter employed in time-of-flight configuration. Ion acceleration up to about 3 MeV per charge state was measured in the forward direction. Ion and electron emissions were detected at different angles as a function of the irradiation conditions.

  11. External beam re-irradiation, combination chemoradiotherapy, and particle therapy for the treatment of recurrent glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Taunk, Neil K.; Moraes, Fabio Y.; Escorcia, Freddy E.; Mendez, Lucas Castro; Beal, Kathryn; Marta, Gustavo N.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Glioblastoma is a common aggressive primary malignant brain tumor, and is nearly universal in progression and mortality after initial treatment. Re-irradiation presents a promising treatment option for progressive disease, both palliating symptoms and potentially extending survival. Highly conformal radiation techniques such as stereotactic radiosurgery and hypofractionated radiosurgery are effective short courses of treatment that allow delivery of high doses of therapeutic radiation with steep dose gradients to protect normal tissue. Patients with higher performance status, younger age, and longer interval between primary treatment and progression represent the best candidates for re-irradiation. Multiple studies are also underway involving combinations of radiation and systemic therapy to bend the survival curve and improve the therapeutic index. In the multimodal treatment of recurrent high-grade glioma, the use of surgery, radiation, and systemic therapy should be highly individualized. Here we comprehensively review radiation therapy and techniques, along with discussion of combination treatment and novel strategies. PMID:26781426

  12. Morphochemical characteristics and mixing state of long range transported wildfire particles at Ny-Ålesund (Svalbard Islands)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moroni, Beatrice; Cappelletti, David; Crocchianti, Stefano; Becagli, Silvia; Caiazzo, Laura; Traversi, Rita; Udisti, Roberto; Mazzola, Mauro; Markowicz, Krzysztof; Ritter, Christoph; Zielinski, Tymon

    2017-05-01

    A prolonged and exceptionally intense air mass advection event transporting biomass burning aerosols generated in Alaska affected Ny-Ålesund in the mid of July 2015. This paper reports the morphochemical characteristics and mixing state of individual aerosol particles collected during the event. To this aim aerosol samples were collected on nucleopore polycarbonate membrane filters using a DEKATI 12-stage low volume impactor and analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques. Results of SEM investigations depict a complex aerosol characterized by an external mixing between a main part of carbonaceous organic particles (tar balls and organic particles), lower ammonium sulfate and minor potassium chloride and mineral dust amounts. The carbonaceous particles are spherical to slightly elongated and the organic particles show an internal mixing of low density organics and/or ammonium sulfate upon denser nuclei. Most particles are in the accumulation mode size range although the size and the morphology of the chloride and the sulfate salts evidence the growth of these species both in the air and upon the sampling membranes. Individual particle analyses were complemented by aerosol size distribution (Aerodynamic Particle Sizer, Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer) and optical (Particle Soot Absorption Photometer, nephelometer) measurements at ground level in order to retrieve the optical and radiative properties of the aerosol in the atmosphere and to predict the fate and behaviour of particles upon deposition at ground level. Individual particle analyses were also compared with bulk chemical analyses on daily sampling filters and back-trajectory analyses of the air mass movement in order to enucleate distinct sources of the aerosol during the long range transport.

  13. A numerical model for investigation of emission of particle debris from laser-irradiated metal targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Akira; Sunahara, Atsushi; Nishihara, Katsunobu; Nishikawa, Takeshi

    2017-09-01

    A simulation model of the hydrodynamics of emission of particle debris from laser ablation is presented. On the basis of a Lagrangian description of the fluid, numerical methods for the placement of a mesh along the distribution of the material to investigate the dynamics of gas bubbles in liquid as well as liquid particles in gas are developed. As an application of the methods, liquid-to-gas transitions are represented. By dividing cells and rearranging the meshes, an appropriate ratio between the volume of liquid and gas region of the material is reproduced. Using the model, an estimation of a criterion of emission of particle debris from the laser ablation is presented.

  14. Particle-in-cell simulation of electron trajectories and irradiation uniformity in an annular cathode high current pulsed electron beam source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Wei; Wang, Langping; Zhou, Guangxue; Wang, Xiaofeng

    2017-02-01

    In order to study electron trajectories in an annular cathode high current pulsed electron beam (HCPEB) source based on carbon fiber bunches, the transmission process of electrons emitted from the annular cathode was simulated using a particle-in-cell model with Monte Carlo collisions (PIC-MCC). The simulation results show that the intense flow of the electrons emitted from the annular cathode are expanded during the transmission process, and the uniformity of the electron distribution is improved in the transportation process. The irradiation current decreases with the irradiation distance and the pressure, and increases with the negative voltage. In addition, when the irradiation distance and the cathode voltage are larger than 40 mm and -15 kV, respectively, a uniform irradiation current distribution along the circumference of the anode can be obtained. The simulation results show that good irradiation uniformity of circular components can be achieved by this annular cathode HCPEB source.

  15. Influence of medium range transport of particles from nucleation burst on particle number concentration within the urban airshed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, H. C.; Morawska, L.; Ristovski, Z. D.; Wainwright, D.

    2012-06-01

    An elevated particle number concentration (PNC) observed during nucleation events could play a significant contribution to the total particle load and therefore to the air pollution in the urban environments. Therefore, a field measurement study of PNC was commenced to investigate the temporal and spatial variations of PNC within the urban airshed of Brisbane, Australia. PNC was monitored at urban (QUT), roadside (WOO) and semi-urban (ROC) areas around the Brisbane region during 2009. During the morning traffic peak period, the highest relative fraction of PNC reached about 5% at QUT and WOO on weekdays. PNC peaks were observed around noon, which correlated with the highest solar radiation levels at all three stations, thus suggesting that high PNC levels were likely to be associated with new particle formation caused by photochemical reactions. Wind rose plots showed relatively higher PNC for the NE direction, which was associated with industrial pollution, accounting for 12%, 9% and 14% of overall PNC at QUT, WOO and ROC, respectively. Although there was no significant correlation between PNC at each station, the variation of PNC was well correlated among three stations during regional nucleation events. In addition, PNC at ROC was significantly influenced by upwind urban pollution during the nucleation burst events, with the average enrichment factor of 15.4. This study provides an insight into the influence of regional nucleation events on PNC in the Brisbane region and it the first study to quantify the effect of urban pollution on semi-urban PNC through the nucleation events.

  16. Kinetics of heterogeneous reaction of CaCO3 particles with gaseous HNO3 over a wide range of humidity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Gibson, E R; Cain, J P; Wang, H; Grassian, V H; Laskin, A

    2008-02-21

    Heterogeneous reaction kinetics of gaseous nitric acid (HNO3) with calcium carbonate (CaCO3) particles was investigated using a particle-on-substrate stagnation flow reactor (PS-SFR). This technique utilizes the exposure of substrate deposited, isolated, and narrowly dispersed particles to a gas mixture of HNO3/H2O/N2, followed by microanalysis of individual reacted particles using computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (CCSEM/EDX). The first series of experiments were conducted at atmospheric pressure, room temperature and constant relative humidity (40%) with a median dry particle diameter of Dp = 0.85 mum, particle loading densities 2 x 104 particles as a function of particle loading. Quantitative treatment of the data using a diffusion-kinetic model yields a lower limit to the net reaction probability gammanet >/= 0.06 (x3//2). In a second series of experiments, HNO3 uptake on CaCO3 particles of the same size was examined over a wide range of relative humidity, from 10 to 80%. The net reaction probability was found to increase with increasing relative humidity, from gammanet >/= 0.003 at RH = 10% to 0.21 at 80%.

  17. Influence of medium range transport of particles from nucleation burst on particle number concentration within the urban airshed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, H. C.; Morawska, L.; Ristovski, Z. D.; Wainwright, D.

    2011-12-01

    Elevated particle number concentration (PNC) observed during nucleation events could make a significant contribution to the total particle load and thus air pollution in urban environments. Therefore, a field measurement study of PNC was conducted to investigate the temporal and spatial variations of PNC within the urban airshed of Brisbane, Australia. PNC was monitored at urban (QUT), roadside (WOO) and semi-urban (ROC) areas around the Brisbane region during 2009. The results showed that morning traffic exhaust emissions were the main contributor to high PNCs at QUT and WOO which contributed 5.5% and 5.1 5 during the week, respectively, with a less significant contribution on weekends. PNC peaks were observed around noon, which correlated with the highest solar radiation levels at all three stations, thus suggesting that high PNC levels were likely to be associated with new particle formation caused by photochemical reactions. Wind rose plots showed relatively higher PNC for the NE direction, which was associated with industrial pollution, accounting for 12%, 9% and 14% of overall PNC at QUT, WOO and ROC, respectively. Although there was no significant correlation between PNC at each station, the variation of PNC was well correlated among three stations during regional nucleation events. In addition, PNC at ROC was significantly influenced by upwind urban pollution during the nucleation burst events, with the average enrichment factor of 15.4. This study provides an insight into the influence of regional nucleation events on PNC in the Brisbane region and is the first study to quantify the effect of urban pollution on semi-urban PNC through the nucleation events.

  18. Unrestrained swelling of uranium-nitride fuel irradiated at temperatures ranging from 1100 to 1400 K (1980 to 2520 R)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohal, R. G.; Tambling, T. N.

    1973-01-01

    Six fuel pins were assembled, encapsulated, and irradiated in the Plum Brook Reactor. The fuel pins employed uranium mononitride (UN) in a stainless steel (type 304L) clad. The pins were irradiated for approximately 4000 hours to burnups of about 2.0 atom percent uranium. The average clad surface temperature during irradiation was about 1100 K (1980 deg R). Since stainless steel has a very low creep strength relative to that of UN at this temperature, these tests simulated unrestrained swelling of UN. The tests indicated that at 1 percent uranium atom burnup the unrestrained diametrical swelling of UN is about 0.5, 0.8, and 1.0 percent at 1223, 1264, and 1306 K (2200, deg 2273 deg, and 2350 deg R), respectively. The tests also indicated that the irradiation induced swelling of unrestrained UN fuel pellets appears to be isotropic.

  19. Early and late damages induced by heavy charged particle irradiation in embryonic tissue of Arabidopsis seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bork, U.; Gartenbach, K. E.; Kranz, A. R.

    Early and late effects of accelerated heavy ions (HZE) on the embryonic tissue of Arabidopsis thaliana seeds were investigated seeing that initial cells of the plant eumeristems resemble the original cells of animal and human tissues with continuous cell proliferation. The endpoints measured were lethality and tumorization in the M1-generation for early effects and embryonic lethality in the M2-generation for late effects. The biological endpoints are plotted as functions of the physical parameters of the irradiation i.e. ion fluence (p/cm2), dose (Gray), charge Z and linear energy transfer (LET). The results presented contribute to the estimation of the principles of biological HZE effects and thus may help to develop a unified theory which could explain the whole sequence from physical and chemical reactions to biological responses connected with heavy ion radiation. Additionally, the data of this paper may be used for the discussion of the quality factor for heavy ion irradiation needed for space missions and for HZE-application in radio-therapy by use of accelerators (UNILAC, (SIS/ESR), BEVALAC).

  20. Eigenenergies of a Relativistic Particle in an Infinite Range Linear Potential Using WKB Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shivalingaswamy, T.; Kagali, B. A.

    2011-01-01

    Energy eigenvalues for a non-relativistic particle in a linear potential well are available. In this paper we obtain the eigenenergies for a relativistic spin less particle in a similar potential using an extension of the well-known WKB method treating the potential as the time component of a four-vector potential. Since genuine bound states do…

  1. Ultrafast melting and resolidification of gold particle irradiated by pico- to femtosecond lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Yuwen; Chen, J. K.

    2008-09-01

    Ultrafast melting and resolidification of a submicron gold particle subject to pico- to femtosecond laser pulse are studied in this paper. The nonequilibrium heat transfer in the electrons and lattice is described using a two-temperature model, and the locations of the solid-liquid interface are determined using an interfacial tracking method. The interfacial velocity, as well as elevated melting temperature and depressed solidification temperature, is obtained by considering the interfacial energy balance and nucleation dynamics. The results showed that the maximum melting depth, peak interfacial temperature, and velocity increase with the decreasing particle size and pulse width or with the increasing laser fluence.

  2. Photosensitization of plasmid-DNA loaded with platinum nano-particles and irradiated by low energy X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porcel, E.; Kobayashi, K.; Usami, N.; Remita, H.; Le Sech, C.; Lacombe, S.

    2011-01-01

    Damage in DNA plasmids (pBR322) loaded with platinum nanoparticles (NP-Pt) DNA-NP and irradiated with monochromatic X-rays tuned to the resonant photoabsorption energy of the LIII and MIII electronic inner-shell of platinum - respectively 11556 eV and 2649 eV - and off-resonant X-rays - 11536 eV and 2639 eV- is investigated. In all the experiments, an enhancement of the single and double strand break - SSB and DSB - yields is observed when NP-Pt are present. Amplification effects are almost similar for the irradiations performed at on and off the L or M shell resonance suggesting that a non resonant mechanism is responsible for the major part of the DNA breaks enhancement.The amount of DNA breaks measured in the present work is compared to the results in similar experiments made with complexes of plasmid-DNA containing platinum molecule : chloroterpyridine platinum (PtTC). The average number of PtTC molecules in the solution is the same as in the experiments made with NP-Pt in order to study a possible difference in the radiosensitization efficiency when the high-Z atoms are clustered (NP-Pt) or dispersed in the system (PtTC). A mechanism is suggested involving photoelectrons which can efficiently ionize the platinum atoms. These results are consistent with those observed when DNA-NP complexes are irradiated by fast atomic ions. These findings suggest that any nanoparticle made of high-Z atoms might behaves as radiation enhancer whatever the ionizing radiation is electromagnetic or charged particle source.

  3. Single-file diffusion of particles with long-range interactions: damping and finite-size effects.

    PubMed

    Delfau, Jean-Baptiste; Coste, Christophe; Saint Jean, Michel

    2011-07-01

    We study the single file diffusion of a cyclic chain of particles that cannot cross each other, in a thermal bath, with long-ranged interactions and arbitrary damping. We present simulations that exhibit new behaviors specifically associated with systems of small numbers of particles and with small damping. In order to understand those results, we present an original analysis based on the decomposition of the particles' motion in the normal modes of the chain. Our model explains all dynamic regimes observed in our simulations and provides convincing estimates of the crossover times between those regimes.

  4. Motion mitigation in intensity modulated particle therapy by internal target volumes covering range changes.

    PubMed

    Graeff, Christian; Durante, Marco; Bert, Christoph

    2012-10-01

    Particle therapy offers benefits over conventional photon therapy but also introduces sensitivity to changes in the water-equivalent path length (WEPL) in case of target motion, e.g., breathing. Target motion can be addressed by the internal target volume (ITV) approach, defined as the CTV plus target movement. In photon therapy, the ITV can be constructed as the geometric union of CTVs in all motion states (GEO-ITV) of a 4D-CT, but this does not account for WEPL-changes. An ITV including WEPL-changes can be defined as the union of all CTVs transformed to a WEPL-equivalent axis along beam's eye view. The resulting WEPL-ITV is field-specific and thus unsuitable for intensity modulated particle therapy (IMPT). The purpose of this study was an IMPT-compatible ITV by splitting geometrical motion and field-specific WEPL changes, following ICRU 78 recommendations. For all fields, the GEO-ITV was used as a common target. This identical geometry for all fields was mapped to an enlarged WEPL extent with a field-specific transformation. As the dose distribution is determined by the WEPL, this is sufficient to achieve equivalent dose coverage as for a geometrically enlarged target volume. The WEPL enlargement is only visible to the specific field and therefore does not increase the target volume of other fields. This avoids unnecessary lateral field extensions, reducing the dose to normal tissue. Homogeneous dose coverage in IMPT is achieved only if the inhomogeneous doses from the individual fields match up during delivery. As the course of the WEPL within each motion phase differs, this cannot be guaranteed by optimizing the fields only in the reference phase. The WEPL-ITV for the reference phase can be amended by CTVs from a subset of motion phases (4D-WEPL-ITV). Here, end-exhale as the reference phase was combined with end-inhale to cover the whole motion range. The GEO-ITV, WEPL-ITV, and 4D-WEPL-ITV were applied in an IMPT simulation of a lung cancer patient case using a

  5. Dosimetry of a 238Pu-based alpha-particle irradiator and its biological application in a study of the bystander effect.

    PubMed

    Dahle, Jostein; Kalanxhi, Erta; Tisnek, Nikolai

    2011-06-01

    A better understanding of the non-targeted (bystander) effects of radiation may have important implications with regards to radiation risk assessment, radiation protection, and targeted cancer therapy. In the present study, the direct and bystander effects of α-particle irradiation in immortalized human fibroblasts (F11hTERT) and breast cancer cells (MCF-7) was investigated. To ensure a more accurate dose delivery to these different cell lines, an existing 238Pu α-particle irradiator was improved by the addition of a collimator and the development of an analytical equation for calculation of the radiation dose to cells. The mean dose rate and α-particle fluence were calculated for each cell line by taking into consideration the size of their nuclei. Bystander effect experiments were performed by transferring medium from irradiated to unirradiated cells and by measuring micronucleus formation in the cells. Both the immortalized human fibroblasts and the breast cancer cells displayed a bystander effect. In conclusion, the broad-beam α-particle irradiator improved in this study represents a useful tool in the investigation of direct and non-targeted effects of α-particle radiation.

  6. Deep level transient spectroscopy study of particle irradiation induced defects in n-6H-SiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X. D.; Gong, M.; Fung, S.; Beling, C. D.; Ling, C. C.

    2004-03-01

    Neutron and electron irradiation induced deep level defects in n-type 6H-SiC have been investigated using deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) combined with annealing experiments. Deep levels ED1, E1/E2, Ei, and Z1/Z2 were observed in n-type 6H-SiC material irradiated with neutron. Thermal annealing studies of these deep levels revealed that ED1 and Ei annealed at a temperature below 350^oC, Z1/Z2 levels annealed out at 900^oC, while the intensity of the E1/E2 peaks increased with annealing temperature, reached a maximum at about 500-750^oC, and finally annealed out at 1400^oC. Upon further annealing at 1600^oC, four deep levels labeled NE1 at EC-0.44eV, NE2 EC-0.53eV, NE3 EC-0.64eV, and NE4 EC-0.68eV are produced. Ionization energies of these levels are similar to E1/E2 and Z1/Z2 respectively, but their capture cross sections are different. Samples were irradiated with electrons with different energies ranging from 0.2MeV to 1.7MeV. No deep level was detected in samples irradiated with 0.2MeV electron and deep levels ED1, E1/E2, and Ei were induced with electron energy larger than 0.3MeV.

  7. The GCR All-Particle Spectrum in the 0.1-100 TeV Energy Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolstaya, Ekaterina D.; Grigorov, N. L.

    2003-07-01

    The results of direct measurements of the all particle spectra by five different instruments on satellites and balloons are considered. It is shown, that is the representatio as the flux multiplied by energy to the power of 2.6 the all-particle spectrum shows a 'step'. The parameters of this 'step' and its origin are analyzed. Historically it has so happ ened that the all-particle spectrum obtained as the sum individual components, the energy range 1 < E < (5 - 10) TeV in the proton spectrum is not covered by direct measurements. Usually this energy interval in the all-particle spectrum is filled via interp olation, which is bases on the assumption that the proton spectrum is similar to the spectrum of nuclei. This spectrum is usually considered to be the all-particle GCR spectrum Io (E ) [1]. Direct information on the all-particle spectrum in the energy range from 1 to 10 TeV can be obtained using direct measurements of the of the all-particle spectrum by electronic instruments. For the first time such information was obtained in 1972 as a result of the all-particle spectrum measurements by the SEZ-14 instrument on the 'Proton1,2,3' satellites and the SEZ-15 instrument on the 'Proton-4' satellite [2,3]. These measurements revealed an anomaly in the all-particle spectrum in the 1-10 TeV energy range. In 1997 the spectrum was measured again by the TIC instrument [4]. The TIC instrument measured the energy release of all-particles arriving from arbitrary directions. As it was shown by the authors in [4,5] the energy release spectrum revealed the same anomaly in the all-particle spectrum, previously observed in the measurements made on 'Proton' satellites [2]. The results of the measurements made by the TIC, SEZ-14 and SEZ-15 are shown in Fig.1. The solid line in Fig.1 shows the function Φ(E ), which gives a good approximation of the experimental all-particle spectrum at a =0.4 TeV. Φ(E ) = E 2.6 Io (E ) (E /a)3 0.11 } + 0.130m-2s-1 sr -1 T eV 1.6 (1) {1 + 0.37 = [1

  8. Improved adhesion for SiO/sub 2/ particles in silica substrates using helium-ion irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Musket, R.G.; Thomas, I.M.

    1988-03-01

    We have examined the effects of irradiation with 200-keV helium ions on the adhesion and optical transmission properties of 220 nm thick antireflective, optical coatings that consisted of layers of spherical, 20 nm diameter silica particles. In the as-deposited state these sol-gel coatings have very low adhesion to the fused silica subtrates. Results for adhesion and optical transmission have been obtained for doses of 10/sup 13/-10/sup 17/ Hecm/sup 2/. Significant improvement in adhesion was found for doses exceeding about 2 /times/ 10/sup 14/ Hecm/sup 2/. Optical transmission measurements for wavelengths of 200-1200 nm showed increasing absorption with dose. We have evidence that the helium ions decompose various contaminants in the coating into two types of degradation products. One is volatile and the other remains in the coating as optically absorbing species. UVoxidative-gas treatment effectively removes the absorbing species.

  9. Characterization and irradiation performance of HTGR Biso-coated fertile particles in HFIR experiments HT-28, -29, and -30

    SciTech Connect

    Long, E.L. Jr.; Krautwasser, P.; Beatty, R.L.; Kania, M.J.; Morgan, C.S. Jr.; Yust, C.S.

    1980-07-01

    Capsules HT-28, -29, and -30 were irradiated in the target region of the High Flux Isotope Reactor at ORNL to determine the relative fast-neutron stability of pyrolytic carbons that had been prepared in a small laboratory coating furnace with various deposition conditions. The pyrolytic carbon coatings of 22 batches of particles of HTGR design were characterized by various methods, including optical anisotropy measurements, hot gaseous chlorine leaching, plasma oxidation, small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) measurements, mercury intrusion, immersion density, and, in a few cases, neon-helium permeability measurements. The results of the above measurements were used to quantify microstructural differences between pyrolytic coatings derived at various conditions and to correlate the performance of the coatings with the measured properties. The most consistent results were obtained by comparing various pore size distributions within the coatings (determined from SAXS measurements) with immersion density, mercury intrusion, chlorine leaching, and neon-helium permeability results and with irradiation performance of the coatings. This study also demonstrated that care must be exercised if experiments on coatings containing inert carbon kernels that were codeposited along with dense thoria kernels are to yield meaningful results.

  10. particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Yu; Chen, Zhihong; Zhang, Zhengguo; Fang, Xiaoming; Liang, Guozheng

    2014-05-01

    We explore a facile and nontoxic hydrothermal route for synthesis of a Cu2ZnSnS4 nanocrystalline material by using l-cysteine as the sulfur source and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) as the complexing agent. The effects of the amount of EDTA, the mole ratio of the three metal ions, and the hydrothermal temperature and time on the phase composition of the obtained product have been systematically investigated. The addition of EDTA and an excessive dose of ZnCl2 in the hydrothermal reaction system favor the generation of kesterite Cu2ZnSnS4. Pure kesterite Cu2ZnSnS4 has been synthesized at 180°C for 12 h from the reaction system containing 2 mmol of EDTA at 2:2:1 of Cu/Zn/Sn. It is confirmed by Raman spectroscopy that those binary and ternary phases are absent in the kesterite Cu2ZnSnS4 product. The kesterite Cu2ZnSnS4 material synthesized by the hydrothermal process consists of flower-like particles with 250 to 400 nm in size. It is revealed that the flower-like particles are assembled from single-crystal Cu2ZnSnS4 nanoflakes with ca. 20 nm in size. The band gap of the Cu2ZnSnS4 nanocrystalline material is estimated to be 1.55 eV. The films fabricated from the hierarchical Cu2ZnSnS4 particles exhibit fast photocurrent responses under intermittent visible-light irradiation, implying that they show potentials for use in solar cells and photocatalysis.

  11. Effects of heavy particle irradiation on diet on object recognition memory in rats

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    On long duration missions to other planets astronauts will be exposed to types and doses of radiation that are not experienced in low earth orbit. Previous research using a ground-based model for exposure to cosmic rays has shown that exposure to heavy particles, such as 56Fe, disrupts spatial learn...

  12. DIESEL EXHAUST PARTICLE-INDUCED EPITHELIAL TOXICITY IS MODULATED BY UV-IRRADIATION -- NCSU

    EPA Science Inventory

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the airways affecting nearly 20 million individuals in the U.S alone. Asthmatic symptoms can be exacerbated by environmental insults like exposure to particulate matter (PM). Diesel exhaust particles (DEP) account for a portion of PM...

  13. DIESEL EXHAUST PARTICLE-INDUCED EPITHELIAL TOXICITY IS MODULATED BY UV-IRRADIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the airways affecting nearly 20 million individuals in the U.S alone. Asthmatic symptoms can be exacerbated by environmental insults like exposure to particulate matter (PM). Diesel exhaust particles (DEP) account for a significant por...

  14. DIESEL EXHAUST PARTICLE-INDUCED EPITHELIAL TOXICITY IS MODULATED BY UV-IRRADIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the airways affecting nearly 20 million individuals in the U.S alone. Asthmatic symptoms can be exacerbated by environmental insults like exposure to particulate matter (PM). Diesel exhaust particles (DEP) account for a significant por...

  15. DIESEL EXHAUST PARTICLE-INDUCED EPITHELIAL TOXICITY IS MODULATED BY UV-IRRADIATION -- NCSU

    EPA Science Inventory

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the airways affecting nearly 20 million individuals in the U.S alone. Asthmatic symptoms can be exacerbated by environmental insults like exposure to particulate matter (PM). Diesel exhaust particles (DEP) account for a portion of PM...

  16. COMPARISON OF PARTICLE-TRACKING FEATURES IN GEANT4 AND MCNPX CODES FOR APPLICATIONS IN MAPPING OF PROTON RANGE UNCERTAINTY

    PubMed Central

    BEDNARZ, BRYAN; CHEN, GTY; PAGANETTI, HARALD; HAN, BIN; DING, AIPING; XU, X. GEORGE

    2012-01-01

    The accuracy of proton therapy is partially limited by uncertainties that result from changing pathological conditions in the patient such as tumor motion and shrinkage. These uncertainties can be minimized with the help of a time-resolved range telescope. Monte Carlo methods can help improve the performance of range telescopes by tracking proton interactions on a particle-by-particle basis thus broadening our understanding on the behavior of protons within the patient and the detector. This paper compared the proton multiple coulomb scattering algorithms in the Monte Carlo codes MCNPX and Geant4 to well-established scattering theories. We focus only on beam energies associated with proton imaging. Despite slight discrepancies between scattering algorithms, both codes appear to be capable of providing useful particle-tracking information for applications such as the proton range telescope. PMID:22389531

  17. Relative diffusion of a pair of inertial particles in the inertial sub-range of turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enohata, Kei; Morishita, Koji; Ishihara, Takashi

    2015-11-01

    Turbulent diffusion of a pair of inertial particles in 3-dimensional homogeneous and isotropic turbulence was studied using direct numerical simulation (DNS) with 20483 grid points; the Taylor micro-scale Reynolds number in the DNS is approximately 425. For each set of the inertial particles with different values of the Stokes number (St = 0 , 0 . 1 , 0 . 2 , 0 . 5 , 1 , 2 , 5 , 10), 2563 particles are tracked using cubic spline interpolation for the velocity data in the DNS. Here St = 0 corresponds to fluid particles. The DNS showed that for each value of St , the mean square of the distance δx between the two inertial particles grows with time t as < δx2 > ~ Cɛt3 in the inertial subrange, which is in agreement with Richardson (1926) and Obukhov (1941). Here ɛ is the mean energy dissipation rate per unit mass, and C is a constant of O(1) depending on the value of St and the initial distance between the inertial particles. The DNS shows also that large clusters of strong vortices enhance relative diffusion of inertial particles of St > 1 .

  18. Physicochemical characterisation of depleted uranium (DU) particles at a UK firing test range.

    PubMed

    Sajih, Mustafa; Livens, Francis R; Alvarez, Rebeca; Morgan, Mathew

    2010-11-01

    Depleted uranium (DU) particles were isolated from soils at Eskmeals, UK, where DU munitions have been tested against hard targets and unfired DU buried in soils for corrosion studies. Using electron microscopy and X-ray analyses, three classes of particles were identified: (1) DU aerosols and fragments, typically 1-20 μm diameter, composed mainly of uranium as UO(2) and U(3)O(8), (2) solidified molten particles, typically 200-500 μm diameter, composed of U, mixed with Fe from target materials and (3) deposits and coatings, often of metaschoepite on sand grains up to 500 μm diameter. The first two particle types are derived from firing impacts, the last from corrosion of buried uranium metal. Alpha and mass spectrometry allowed quantitative elemental and isotopic characterisation of DU-containing particulate environmental samples. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Key differences in the fabrication, irradiation and high temperature accident testing of US and German TRISO-coated particle fuel, and their implications on fuel performance

    SciTech Connect

    Petti, David Andrew; Buongiorno, Jacopo; Maki, John Thomas; Hobbins, Richard Redfield

    2003-06-01

    Historically, the irradiation performance of TRISO-coated gas reactor particle fuel in Germany has been superior to that in the US. German fuel generally has displayed gas release values during irradiation three orders of magnitude lower than US fuel. Thus, we have critically examined the TRISO-coated fuel fabrication processes in the US and Germany and the associated irradiation database with a goal of understanding why the German fuel behaves acceptably, why the US fuel has not faired as well, and what process/production parameters impart the reliable performance to this fuel form. The postirradiation examination results are also reviewed to identify failure mechanisms that may be the cause of the poorer US irradiation performance. This comparison will help determine the roles that particle fuel process/product attributes and irradiation conditions (burnup, fast neutron fluence, temperature, degree of acceleration) have on the behavior of the fuel during irradiation and provide a more quantitative linkage between acceptable processing parameters, as-fabricated fuel properties and subsequent in-reactor performance.

  20. Key Differences in the Fabrication, Irradiation, and Safety Testing of U.S. and German TRISO-coated Particle Fuel and Their Implications on Fuel Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Petti, David Andrew; Maki, John Thomas; Buongiorno, Jacopo; Hobbins, Richard Redfield

    2002-06-01

    High temperature gas reactor technology is achieving a renaissance around the world. This technology relies on high quality production and performance of coated particle fuel. Historically, the irradiation performance of TRISO-coated gas reactor particle fuel in Germany has been superior to that in the United States. German fuel generally displayed in-pile gas release values that were three orders of magnitude lower than U.S. fuel. Thus, we have critically examined the TRISO-coated fuel fabrication processes in the U.S. and Germany and the associated irradiation database with a goal of understanding why the German fuel behaves acceptably, why the U.S. fuel has not faired as well, and what process/ production parameters impart the reliable performance to this fuel form. The postirradiation examination results are also reviewed to identify failure mechanisms that may be the cause of the poorer U.S. irradiation performance. This comparison will help determine the roles that particle fuel process/product attributes and irradiation conditions (burnup, fast neutron fluence, temperature, and degree of acceleration) have on the behavior of the fuel during irradiation and provide a more quantitative linkage between acceptable processing parameters, as-fabricated fuel properties and subsequent in-reactor performance.

  1. Closing the Gap: Counting and Sizing of Particles Across Submicron Range by Flow Cytometry in Therapeutic Protein Products.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liling; Shi, Shuai; Antochshuk, Valentyn

    2017-06-15

    Quantification and size distribution characterization of subvisible particles in parenteral biopharmaceutics, present as both proteinaceous and nonproteinaceous particles in the size range from 0.1 to 100 μm, are important for biopharmaceutical industry due to their potential safety and efficacy implications. Although a number of analytical techniques are available to count and size subvisible particles, characterization of particles ≤2 μm remains a significant challenge due to technical limitations of existing particle counting instruments. In this article, we demonstrate the ability of an optimized flow cytometry system to detect and quantify size distribution of subvisible particles without additional labeling that includes the critical submicron range in biopharmaceutical formulations. In addition, these qualitative and quantitative determinations are performed in a high-throughput manner using sample volumes that allow statistically significant evaluations. This approach can be used not only to ascertain the quality of therapeutic protein products but also to evaluate numerous conditions during the screening of drug candidates and their prospective formulations. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. On the rms errors and dynamic ranges of triple- and quadruple-pulse particle tracking velocimetry (PTV)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Liuyang; Adrian, Ronald; Gogineni, Sivaram

    2016-11-01

    Multi-pulse PTV extends conventional dual-pulse PTV by fitting a polynomial to particle locations measured from three or four pulses in a burst, aiming at more accurately resolving a particle short-period trajectory. Particle velocity and acceleration are then evaluated at an optimal time minimizing rms errors. Numerical simulations were performed to completely study the behaviors of position, velocity, and acceleration rms errors of triple- and quadruple-pulse PTV in a 4-D space spanned by four dimensionless variables - normalized time, normalized displacement, normalized particle locating noise, and acceleration factor. We compared three analysis methods - 3-pulse with quadratic fitting, 4-pulse with cubic fitting and 4-pulse with quadratic least-square fitting. In addition, generalized definitions of dynamic spatial range (DSR) and dynamic velocity range (DVR) are proposed for multi-pulse analyses. We calculated DSR ratios and DVR ratios between the multi-pulse and 2-pulse under various flow conditions and noise levels. It is found that the DSR and DVR could be improved by up to 100 times and 10 times, respectively, when the particle trajectory is strongly curved, deceleration is pronounced, and particle locations are accurately determined. This work is supported by ONR N00014-14-C-0095.

  3. Effects of neutron irradiation of Ti3SiC2 and Ti3AlC2 in the 121-1085 °C temperature range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tallman, Darin J.; He, Lingfeng; Gan, Jian; Caspi, El'ad N.; Hoffman, Elizabeth N.; Barsoum, Michel W.

    2017-02-01

    Herein we report on the formation of defects in response to neutron irradiation of polycrystalline Ti3SiC2 and Ti3AlC2 samples exposed to total fluences of ≈6 × 1020 n/m2, 5 × 1021 n/m2 and 1.7 × 1022 n/m2 at irradiation temperatures of 121(12), 735(6) and 1085(68)°C. These fluences correspond to 0.14, 1.6 and 3.4 dpa, respectively. After irradiation to 0.14 dpa at 121 °C and 735 °C, black spots are observed via transmission electron microscopy in both Ti3SiC2 and Ti3AlC2. After irradiation to 1.6 and 3.4 dpa at 735 °C, basal dislocation loops, with a Burgers vector of b = ½ [0001] are observed in Ti3SiC2, with loop diameters of 21(6) and 30(8) nm after 1.6 dpa and 3.4 dpa, respectively. In Ti3AlC2, larger dislocation loops, 75(34) nm in diameter are observed after 3.4 dpa at 735 °C, in addition to stacking faults. Impurity particles of TiC, as well as stacking fault TiC platelets in the MAX phases, are seen to form extensive dislocation loops under all conditions. Cavities were observed at grain boundaries and within stacking faults after 3.4 dpa irradiation, with extensive cavity formation in the TiC regions at 1085 °C. Remarkably, denuded zones on the order of 1 μm are observed in Ti3SiC2 after irradiation to 3.4 dpa at 735 °C. Small grains, 3-5 μm in diameter, are damage free after irradiation at 1085 °C at this dose. The results shown herein confirm once again that the presence of the A-layers in the MAX phases considerably enhance their irradiation tolerance. Based on these results, and up to 3.4 dpa, Ti3SiC2 remains a promising candidate for high temperature nuclear applications as long as the temperature remains >700 °C.

  4. Chemical and physical characteristics of long-range transport submicron particles at the central Tibet Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, J.; Zhang, Q.; Shi, J.; Ge, X.; Xie, C.; Wang, J.

    2016-12-01

    Tibetan Plateau, the biggest and highest plateau on the Earth, is an ideal location for studying long range transport of air pollution due to the minimum of local emission. Recent studies in this region have revealed a significant influx of air pollution from south Asia during pre-monsoon period because of the favorable atmospheric circulation and less precipitation. In order to characterize the chemical composition of aerosol particles in this pristine area and elucidate the sources and optical properties of transported aerosol pollutants, we conducted an intensive field study during June 2015 at a high elevation station (4730 m a.s.l) on the central Tibetan Plateau by deploying a suite of advanced instruments including an Aerodyne high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS), a nephelometer, and a multi-angle absorption photometer (MAAP). The average mass concentration of submicron particular matter (PM1) for the whole campaign period was 1.85 µg m-3, with organics accounting for 64% of the mass, followed by sulfate (16%), black carbon (9%), ammonium (8%), and nitrate (3%). The mass concentrations and chemical properties of PM1 were significantly different between pre-monsoon and monsoon periods. Elevated aerosol pollution episodes were observed during pre-monsoon period, while aerosol concentrations were persistently low during monsoon period. Aerosol composition was generally similar during the whole campaign period. However, organic aerosol was more oxidized during premonsoon period with an average atomic oxygen-to-carbon (O/C) ratio of = 0.7 compared to O/C = 0.52 during monsoon period. HYSPLIT trajectory calculations revealed that most of the arriving air masses traveled long distances (>1,000 km) and went through the northwest of India during premonsoon period. Positive matrix factorization of the HR-ToF-AMS spectra of organic aerosol identified two oxygenated organic aerosol (OOA) factors - a less oxidized OOA (LO-OOA) and a more

  5. Humidity influenced capacitance and resistance of an Al/DNA/Al Schottky diode irradiated by alpha particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Ta’Ii, Hassan Maktuff Jaber; Amin, Yusoff Mohd; Periasamy, Vengadesh

    2016-05-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid or DNA based sensors, especially as humidity and alpha particle sensors have become quite popular in recent times due to flexible and highly optimizable nature of this fundamental biomaterial. Application of DNA electronics allow for more sensitive, accurate and effective sensors to be developed and fabricated. In this work, we examined the effect of different humidity conditions on the capacitive and resistive response of Aluminum (Al)/DNA/Al Schottky barrier structure when bombarded by time-dependent dosages of alpha particles. Based on current-voltage profiles, which demonstrated rectifying behaviours, Schottky diode parameters such as ideality factor, barrier height and series resistance was calculated. Results observed generally pointed towards a decrease in the resistance value from the pristine to the radiated structures. It was also demonstrated that under the effect of humidity, the capacitance of the DNA thin film increased from 0.05894 to 92.736 nF, with rising relative humidity level. We also observed the occurrence of the hypersensitivity phenomena after alpha irradiation between 2 to 4 min by observing a drop in the series resistance, crucial in the study of DNA damage and repair mechanisms. These observations may also suggest the exciting possibility of utilizing Al/DNA/Al Schottky diodes as potentially sensitive humidity sensors.

  6. Humidity influenced capacitance and resistance of an Al/DNA/Al Schottky diode irradiated by alpha particles

    PubMed Central

    Al-Ta’ii, Hassan Maktuff Jaber; Amin, Yusoff Mohd; Periasamy, Vengadesh

    2016-01-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid or DNA based sensors, especially as humidity and alpha particle sensors have become quite popular in recent times due to flexible and highly optimizable nature of this fundamental biomaterial. Application of DNA electronics allow for more sensitive, accurate and effective sensors to be developed and fabricated. In this work, we examined the effect of different humidity conditions on the capacitive and resistive response of Aluminum (Al)/DNA/Al Schottky barrier structure when bombarded by time-dependent dosages of alpha particles. Based on current-voltage profiles, which demonstrated rectifying behaviours, Schottky diode parameters such as ideality factor, barrier height and series resistance was calculated. Results observed generally pointed towards a decrease in the resistance value from the pristine to the radiated structures. It was also demonstrated that under the effect of humidity, the capacitance of the DNA thin film increased from 0.05894 to 92.736 nF, with rising relative humidity level. We also observed the occurrence of the hypersensitivity phenomena after alpha irradiation between 2 to 4 min by observing a drop in the series resistance, crucial in the study of DNA damage and repair mechanisms. These observations may also suggest the exciting possibility of utilizing Al/DNA/Al Schottky diodes as potentially sensitive humidity sensors. PMID:27160654

  7. A forward-angle-scattering method for the determination of optical constants and particle size distribution by collimated laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Yatao; Qi, Hong; Yu, Xiaoying; Ruan, Liming

    2017-04-01

    This study examined the feasibility of using a secondary optimization technique and forward-angle-scattering method to retrieve optical constants (or complex refractive indices) and particle size distribution (PSD) simultaneously. In this work, two continuous wave lasers of different wavelengths were applied to irradiate the participating samples, and the scattered light of samples with different acceptance angles was obtained. First, the scattered signals within different acceptance angles were calculated by solving the radiative transfer equation. Then, the complex refractive index and PSD were retrieved simultaneously by applying quantum particle swarm optimization. However, the estimated results of PSD were inaccurate. Thus, a secondary optimization, which using the directional radiative intensity as input, was performed to improve the accuracy of PSD based on the first optimization process. Four commonly used kinds of monomodal PSD functions, i.e., the Rosin-Rammler, standard Normal, Logarithmic Normal, and Junge distribution, were retrieved. All results showed that the proposed technique can estimate the complex refractive index and PSD accurately.

  8. Particle size reduction to the nanometer range: a promising approach to improve buccal absorption of poorly water-soluble drugs

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Shasha; Song, Yunmei; Peddie, Frank; Evans, Allan M

    2011-01-01

    Poorly water-soluble drugs, such as phenylephrine, offer challenging problems for buccal drug delivery. In order to overcome these problems, particle size reduction (to the nanometer range) and cyclodextrin complexation were investigated for permeability enhancement. The apparent solubility in water and the buccal permeation of the original phenylephrine coarse powder, a phenylephrine–cyclodextrin complex and phenylephrine nanosuspensions were characterized. The particle size and particle surface properties of phenylephrine nanosuspensions were used to optimize the size reduction process. The optimized phenylephrine nanosuspension was then freeze dried and incorporated into a multi-layered buccal patch, consisting of a small tablet adhered to a mucoadhesive film, yielding a phenylephrine buccal product with good dosage accuracy and improved mucosal permeability. The design of the buccal patch allows for drug incorporation without the need to change the mucoadhesive component, and is potentially suited to a range of poorly water-soluble compounds. PMID:21753876

  9. Probing novel long-range correlation phenomena in pPb collisions with identified particles at CMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhenyu; CMS Collaboration

    2015-05-01

    Observation of a long-range near-side two-particle correlation (known as the ”Ridge”) in high-multiplicity pp and pPb collisions opened up new opportunities of exploring novel QCD dynamics in small collision systems. To further investigate the origin of this phenomenon, studies of two-particle correlations with identified K0s and Λ/\\barΛ trigger particles in 5.02 TeV pPb collisions are presented, and compared to PbPb collisions over a similar multiplicity range. The K0s and Λ/\\barΛ are cleanly reconstructed via their secondary decay vertices over a wide pseudorapidity and transverse momentum range. The second-order anisotropy harmonics (v2) of K0s and Λ/\\barΛ are extracted from long-range correlations as a function of particle multiplicity and pT. The wide pT coverage and rich sample of high multiplicity pPb events allow: (1) a precise examination of the mass ordering effect of vn at low pT as predicted by hydrodynamics for a collectively expanding medium; (2) exploration of possible constituent quark number scaling of v2 between mesons and baryons as was observed in high-energy nucleus- nucleus collisions.

  10. The charging of dust particles in the range of very high discharge frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Antonova, T.; Khrapak, S. A.; Du, C.-R.; Steffes, B.; Thomas, H. M.; Morfill, G. E.

    2011-11-29

    Capacitively coupled plasmas are widely used in a variety of thin film etching and deposition applications. The studies and experimental investigations in this field have shown that increasing frequencies above the conventional 13.56 MHz results in the increase of the deposition rate and at the same time minimizes the film damage. On the other hand dust particles are often present in the plasma reactors as a sputtering or nucleation product and may influence the manufacturing. Therefore, controlling the behavior of dust particles is essential for improving of the manufacturing techniques in the low temperature plasma processing.

  11. Computational modeling of stress transient and bubble evolution in short-pulse laser irradiated melanosome particles

    SciTech Connect

    Strauss, M.; Amendt, P.A.; London, R.A.; Maitland, D.J.; Glinsky, M.E.; Lin, C.P.; Kelly, M.W.

    1997-03-04

    Objective is to study retinal injury by subnanosecond laser pulses absorbed in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells. The absorption centers in the RPE cell are melanosomes of order 1 {mu}m radius. Each melanosome includes many melanin particles of 10-15 nm radius, which are the local absorbers of the laser light and generate a discrete structure of hot spots. This work use the hydrodynamic code LATIS (LAser-TISsue interaction modeling) and a water equation of state to first simulate the small melanin particle of 15 nm responsible for initiating the hot spot and the pressure field. A average melanosome of 1 {mu}m scale is next simulated. Supersonic shocks and fast vapor bubbles are generated in both cases: the melanin scale and the melanosome scale. The hot spot induces a shock wave pressure than with a uniform deposition of laser energy. It is found that an absorption coefficient of 6000 -8000 cm{sup -1} can explain the enhanced shock wave emitted by the melanosome. An experimental and theoretical effort should be considered to identify the mechanism for generating shock wave enhancement.

  12. Sexual modification of female spinach seeds (Spinacia oleracea L.) by irradiation with ion particles.

    PubMed

    Komai, F; Shikazono, N; Tanaka, A

    2003-04-01

    The female seeds of a spinach plant (Spinacia orelacea L.) were exposed to He (12.5 MeV/n) and C (18.3 MeV/n) ions in order to investigate the effects of ion particles on sex expression. He ions did not affect germination rates or flowering at doses up to 50 Gy. C ions did not affect germination rates or flowering at doses up to 15 Gy, but a dose of 25 Gy resulted in many plants with morphological aberrations. When unexposed female plants were grown without cross-fertilization for 10 weeks after sowing, 5.6-14.3% of the plants produced anthers from female flowers. These sex-modified plants could self-pollinate and form seeds, which expressed only female organs. Conversely, gynomonoecious plants were induced from these female seeds by exposure to He ions (5-50 Gy) and C ions (5-25 Gy) without any difference in the rates of flowered progeny. Moreover, andromonoecious plants were induced from female seeds by exposure to He ions at 50 Gy. These results suggest that the sex of a spinach plant is expressed as a flexible phenotype, converging from female to gyno- and andromonoecy after exposure to ion particles.

  13. Effects of heat and electron irradiation on the melting behavior of Al-Si alloy particles and motion of the Al nanosphere within.

    PubMed

    Howe, James M; Yokota, Takeshi; Murayama, Mitsuhiro; Jesser, William A

    2004-01-01

    In situ heating and electron-beam irradiation in the transmission electron microscope were performed to study melting of Al-11.6 at.% Si alloy submicron particles supported on an amorphous-C thin film. It was found that electron irradiation could be used to melt the particles, even when the hot-stage specimen holder was kept at a much lower temperature than the bulk melting point (i.e. the eutectic temperature) of the particles. The critical current densities required to achieve partial melting increased linearly with the incident electron-beam energy for a given temperature. Comparison between this behavior and analytical calculations indicates that melting under electron-beam irradiation is caused by a temperature rise due to electron thermal spikes in the particles and poor thermal conduction away from the particles. The motion of the crystalline Al nanosphere inside the partially molten particles was also investigated, using the electron beam to both stimulate and observe the motion of the nanosphere. The irregular motion observed was quantified as antipersistent fractional Brownian motion. Analysis of possible phenomena contributing to the motion demonstrates that the incident electrons provide the fractional force that moves the Al nanosphere, and that gravity and the oxide shell on the partially molten particle cause the antipersistent behavior. Another interesting phenomenon observed in this study was that the crystalline Al nanosphere inside the partially molten Al-Si alloy particle followed a focused electron beam as it was moved about on the partially molten particle. This observation suggests that it may be possible to manipulate metallic nanospheres inside opaque liquids using an electron beam.

  14. Experimental determination of particle range and dose distribution in thick targets through fragmentation reactions of stable heavy ions.

    PubMed

    Inaniwa, Taku; Kohno, Toshiyuki; Tomitani, Takehiro; Urakabe, Eriko; Sato, Shinji; Kanazawa, Mitsutaka; Kanai, Tatsuaki

    2006-09-07

    In radiation therapy with highly energetic heavy ions, the conformal irradiation of a tumour can be achieved by using their advantageous features such as the good dose localization and the high relative biological effectiveness around their mean range. For effective utilization of such properties, it is necessary to evaluate the range of incident ions and the deposited dose distribution in a patient's body. Several methods have been proposed to derive such physical quantities; one of them uses positron emitters generated through projectile fragmentation reactions of incident ions with target nuclei. We have proposed the application of the maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) method to a detected annihilation gamma-ray distribution for determination of the range of incident ions in a target and we have demonstrated the effectiveness of the method with computer simulations. In this paper, a water, a polyethylene and a polymethyl methacrylate target were each irradiated with stable (12)C, (14)N, (16)O and (20)Ne beams. Except for a few combinations of incident beams and targets, the MLE method could determine the range of incident ions R(MLE) with a difference between R(MLE) and the experimental range of less than 2.0 mm under the circumstance that the measurement of annihilation gamma rays was started just after the irradiation of 61.4 s and lasted for 500 s. In the process of evaluating the range of incident ions with the MLE method, we must calculate many physical quantities such as the fluence and the energy of both primary ions and fragments as a function of depth in a target. Consequently, by using them we can obtain the dose distribution. Thus, when the mean range of incident ions is determined with the MLE method, the annihilation gamma-ray distribution and the deposited dose distribution can be derived simultaneously. The derived dose distributions in water for the mono-energetic heavy-ion beams of four species were compared with those measured with an

  15. Total-body irradiation with high-LET particles: acute and chronic effects on the immune system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gridley, Daila S.; Pecaut, Michael J.; Nelson, Gregory A.

    2002-01-01

    Although the immune system is highly susceptible to radiation-induced damage, consequences of high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation remain unclear. This study evaluated the effects of 0.1 gray (Gy), 0.5 Gy, and 2.0 Gy iron ion (56Fe(26)) radiation on lymphoid cells and organs of C57BL/6 mice on days 4 and 113 after whole body exposure; a group irradiated with 2.0 Gy silicon ions (28Si) was euthanized on day 113. On day 4 after 56Fe irradiation, dose-dependent decreases were noted in spleen and thymus masses and all major leukocyte populations in blood and spleen. The CD19(+) B lymphocytes were most radiosensitive and NK1.1(+) natural killer (NK) cells were most resistant. CD3(+) T cells were moderately radiosensitive and a greater loss of CD3(+)/CD8(+) T(C) cells than CD3(+)/CD4(+) T(H) cells was noted. Basal DNA synthesis was elevated on day 4, but response to mitogens and secretion of interleukin-2 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha were unaffected. Signs of anemia were noted. By day 113, high B cell numbers and low T(C) cell and monocyte percents were found in the 2.0 Gy 56Fe group; the 2.0 Gy 2)Si mice had low NK cells, decreased basal DNA synthesis, and a somewhat increased response to two mitogens. Collectively, the data show that lymphoid cells and tissues are markedly affected by high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation at relatively low doses, that some aberrations persist long after exposure, and that different consequences may be induced by various densely ionizing particles. Thus simultaneous exposure to multiple radiation sources could lead to a broader spectrum of immune dysfunction than currently anticipated.

  16. Quantitative image analysis of laminin immunoreactivity in skin basement membrane irradiated with 1 GeV/nucleon iron particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costes, S.; Streuli, C. H.; Barcellos-Hoff, M. H.

    2000-01-01

    We previously reported that laminin immunoreactivity in mouse mammary epithelium is altered shortly after whole-body irradiation with 0.8 Gy from 600 MeV/nucleon iron ions but is unaffected after exposure to sparsely ionizing radiation. This observation led us to propose that the effect could be due to protein damage from the high ionization density of the ion tracks. If so, we predicted that it would be evident soon after radiation exposure in basement membranes of other tissues and would depend on ion fluence. To test this hypothesis, we used immunofluorescence, confocal laser scanning microscopy, and image segmentation techniques to quantify changes in the basement membrane of mouse skin epidermis. At 1 h after exposure to 1 GeV/nucleon iron ions with doses from 0.03 to 1.6 Gy, neither the visual appearance nor the mean pixel intensity of laminin in the basement membrane of mouse dorsal skin epidermis was altered compared to sham-irradiated tissue. This result does not support the hypothesis that particle traversal directly affects laminin protein integrity. However, the mean pixel intensity of laminin immunoreactivity was significantly decreased in epidermal basement membrane at 48 and 96 h after exposure to 0.8 Gy 1 GeV/nucleon iron ions. We confirmed this effect with two additional antibodies raised against affinity-purified laminin 1 and the E3 fragment of the long-arm of laminin 1. In contrast, collagen type IV, another component of the basement membrane, was unaffected. Our studies demonstrate quantitatively that densely ionizing radiation elicits changes in skin microenvironments distinct from those induced by sparsely ionizing radiation. Such effects may might contribute to the carcinogenic potential of densely ionizing radiation by altering cellular signaling cascades mediated by cell-extracellular matrix interactions.

  17. Total-body irradiation with high-LET particles: acute and chronic effects on the immune system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gridley, Daila S.; Pecaut, Michael J.; Nelson, Gregory A.

    2002-01-01

    Although the immune system is highly susceptible to radiation-induced damage, consequences of high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation remain unclear. This study evaluated the effects of 0.1 gray (Gy), 0.5 Gy, and 2.0 Gy iron ion (56Fe(26)) radiation on lymphoid cells and organs of C57BL/6 mice on days 4 and 113 after whole body exposure; a group irradiated with 2.0 Gy silicon ions (28Si) was euthanized on day 113. On day 4 after 56Fe irradiation, dose-dependent decreases were noted in spleen and thymus masses and all major leukocyte populations in blood and spleen. The CD19(+) B lymphocytes were most radiosensitive and NK1.1(+) natural killer (NK) cells were most resistant. CD3(+) T cells were moderately radiosensitive and a greater loss of CD3(+)/CD8(+) T(C) cells than CD3(+)/CD4(+) T(H) cells was noted. Basal DNA synthesis was elevated on day 4, but response to mitogens and secretion of interleukin-2 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha were unaffected. Signs of anemia were noted. By day 113, high B cell numbers and low T(C) cell and monocyte percents were found in the 2.0 Gy 56Fe group; the 2.0 Gy 2)Si mice had low NK cells, decreased basal DNA synthesis, and a somewhat increased response to two mitogens. Collectively, the data show that lymphoid cells and tissues are markedly affected by high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation at relatively low doses, that some aberrations persist long after exposure, and that different consequences may be induced by various densely ionizing particles. Thus simultaneous exposure to multiple radiation sources could lead to a broader spectrum of immune dysfunction than currently anticipated.

  18. Quantitative image analysis of laminin immunoreactivity in skin basement membrane irradiated with 1 GeV/nucleon iron particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costes, S.; Streuli, C. H.; Barcellos-Hoff, M. H.

    2000-01-01

    We previously reported that laminin immunoreactivity in mouse mammary epithelium is altered shortly after whole-body irradiation with 0.8 Gy from 600 MeV/nucleon iron ions but is unaffected after exposure to sparsely ionizing radiation. This observation led us to propose that the effect could be due to protein damage from the high ionization density of the ion tracks. If so, we predicted that it would be evident soon after radiation exposure in basement membranes of other tissues and would depend on ion fluence. To test this hypothesis, we used immunofluorescence, confocal laser scanning microscopy, and image segmentation techniques to quantify changes in the basement membrane of mouse skin epidermis. At 1 h after exposure to 1 GeV/nucleon iron ions with doses from 0.03 to 1.6 Gy, neither the visual appearance nor the mean pixel intensity of laminin in the basement membrane of mouse dorsal skin epidermis was altered compared to sham-irradiated tissue. This result does not support the hypothesis that particle traversal directly affects laminin protein integrity. However, the mean pixel intensity of laminin immunoreactivity was significantly decreased in epidermal basement membrane at 48 and 96 h after exposure to 0.8 Gy 1 GeV/nucleon iron ions. We confirmed this effect with two additional antibodies raised against affinity-purified laminin 1 and the E3 fragment of the long-arm of laminin 1. In contrast, collagen type IV, another component of the basement membrane, was unaffected. Our studies demonstrate quantitatively that densely ionizing radiation elicits changes in skin microenvironments distinct from those induced by sparsely ionizing radiation. Such effects may might contribute to the carcinogenic potential of densely ionizing radiation by altering cellular signaling cascades mediated by cell-extracellular matrix interactions.

  19. Scale dependence of multiplier distributions for particle concentration, enstrophy, and dissipation in the inertial range of homogeneous turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartlep, Thomas; Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.; Weston, Brian

    2017-03-01

    Turbulent flows preferentially concentrate inertial particles depending on their stopping time or Stokes number, which can lead to significant spatial variations in the particle concentration. Cascade models are one way to describe this process in statistical terms. Here, we use a direct numerical simulation (DNS) dataset of homogeneous, isotropic turbulence to determine probability distribution functions (PDFs) for cascade multipliers, which determine the ratio by which a property is partitioned into subvolumes as an eddy is envisioned to decay into smaller eddies. We present a technique for correcting effects of small particle numbers in the statistics. We determine multiplier PDFs for particle number, flow dissipation, and enstrophy, all of which are shown to be scale dependent. However, the particle multiplier PDFs collapse when scaled with an appropriately defined local Stokes number. As anticipated from earlier works, dissipation and enstrophy multiplier PDFs reach an asymptote for sufficiently small spatial scales. From the DNS measurements, we derive a cascade model that is used it to make predictions for the radial distribution function (RDF) for arbitrarily high Reynolds numbers, Re, finding good agreement with the asymptotic, infinite Re inertial range theory of Zaichik and Alipchenkov [New J. Phys. 11, 103018 (2009), 10.1088/1367-2630/11/10/103018]. We discuss implications of these results for the statistical modeling of the turbulent clustering process in the inertial range for high Reynolds numbers inaccessible to numerical simulations.

  20. Enhanced α-particle optical potential at low energies, for the mass range A∼45-209

    SciTech Connect

    Avrigeanu, V.; Avrigeanu, M.; Mănăilescu, C.

    2015-02-24

    An updated optical potential is thus provided for α-particles on nuclei within the mass number range 45≤A≤209, below the Coulomb barrier (B), on the basis of recent high-precision measurements of α-particle induced reaction data below B that made possible the understanding of actual limits and possible improvement of the α-particle optical-model potentials. The main revision concerns actually only the surface imaginary potential depth at the lowest α-particle energies well below B, and in fact only for the mass range above A∼130. A further regional point is the underestimation of reaction cross sections for the rare-earth nuclei by using the spherical optical potential unless a 7% larger value of the surface imaginary potential radius is taken into account. Involvement of this potential for further description of both the scattering and α-particles induced reactions is moreover discussed in the present work, of equal interest for nuclear astrophysics and nuclear technology for fusion devices.

  1. First-order phase transition in a model of self-propelled particles with variable angular range of interaction.

    PubMed

    Durve, Mihir; Sayeed, Ahmed

    2016-05-01

    We have carried out a Monte Carlo simulation of a modified version of Vicsek model for the motion of self-propelled particles in two dimensions. In this model the neighborhood of interaction of a particle is a sector of the circle with the particle at the center (rather than the whole circle as in the original Vicsek model). The sector is centered along the direction of the velocity of the particle, and the half-opening angle of this sector is called the "view angle." We vary the view angle over its entire range and study the change in the nature of the collective motion of the particles. We find that ordered collective motion persists down to remarkably small view angles. And at a certain transition view angle the collective motion of the system undergoes a first-order phase transition to a disordered state. We also find that the reduction in the view angle can in fact increase the order in the system significantly. We show that the directionality of the interaction, and not only the radial range of the interaction, plays an important role in the determination of the nature of the above phase transition.

  2. Production of Low Enriched Uranium Nitride Kernels for TRISO Particle Irradiation Testing

    SciTech Connect

    McMurray, J. W.; Silva, C. M.; Helmreich, G. W.; Gerczak, T. J.; Dyer, J. A.; Collins, J. L.; Hunt, R. D.; Lindemer, T. B.; Terrani, K. A.

    2016-06-01

    A large batch of UN microspheres to be used as kernels for TRISO particle fuel was produced using carbothermic reduction and nitriding of a sol-gel feedstock bearing tailored amounts of low-enriched uranium (LEU) oxide and carbon. The process parameters, established in a previous study, produced phasepure NaCl structure UN with dissolved C on the N sublattice. The composition, calculated by refinement of the lattice parameter from X-ray diffraction, was determined to be UC0.27N0.73. The final accepted product weighed 197.4 g. The microspheres had an average diameter of 797±1.35 μm and a composite mean theoretical density of 89.9±0.5% for a solid solution of UC and UN with the same atomic ratio; both values are reported with their corresponding calculated standard error.

  3. Radiation Quality Effects on Transcriptome Profiles in 3-D Cultures After Charged Particle Irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Zarana S.; Kidane, Yared H.; Huff, Janice L.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we evaluated the differential effects of low- and high-LET radiation on 3-D organotypic cultures in order to investigate radiation quality impacts on gene expression and cellular responses. Current risk models for assessment of space radiation-induced cancer have large uncertainties because the models for adverse health effects following radiation exposure are founded on epidemiological analyses of human populations exposed to low-LET radiation. Reducing these uncertainties requires new knowledge on the fundamental differences in biological responses (the so-called radiation quality effects) triggered by heavy ion particle radiation versus low-LET radiation associated with Earth-based exposures. In order to better quantify these radiation quality effects in biological systems, we are utilizing novel 3-D organotypic human tissue models for space radiation research. These models hold promise for risk assessment as they provide a format for study of human cells within a realistic tissue framework, thereby bridging the gap between 2-D monolayer culture and animal models for risk extrapolation to humans. To identify biological pathway signatures unique to heavy ion particle exposure, functional gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) was used with whole transcriptome profiling. GSEA has been used extensively as a method to garner biological information in a variety of model systems but has not been commonly used to analyze radiation effects. It is a powerful approach for assessing the functional significance of radiation quality-dependent changes from datasets where the changes are subtle but broad, and where single gene based analysis using rankings of fold-change may not reveal important biological information.

  4. Iterative load-balancing method with multigrid level relaxation for particle simulation with short-range interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furuichi, Mikito; Nishiura, Daisuke

    2017-10-01

    We developed dynamic load-balancing algorithms for Particle Simulation Methods (PSM) involving short-range interactions, such as Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH), Moving Particle Semi-implicit method (MPS), and Discrete Element method (DEM). These are needed to handle billions of particles modeled in large distributed-memory computer systems. Our method utilizes flexible orthogonal domain decomposition, allowing the sub-domain boundaries in the column to be different for each row. The imbalances in the execution time between parallel logical processes are treated as a nonlinear residual. Load-balancing is achieved by minimizing the residual within the framework of an iterative nonlinear solver, combined with a multigrid technique in the local smoother. Our iterative method is suitable for adjusting the sub-domain frequently by monitoring the performance of each computational process because it is computationally cheaper in terms of communication and memory costs than non-iterative methods. Numerical tests demonstrated the ability of our approach to handle workload imbalances arising from a non-uniform particle distribution, differences in particle types, or heterogeneous computer architecture which was difficult with previously proposed methods. We analyzed the parallel efficiency and scalability of our method using Earth simulator and K-computer supercomputer systems.

  5. The role of short-ranged and long-ranged hydrodynamic interactions on aggregation of colloidal particle in colloid-polymer mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boromand, Arman; Jamali, Safa; Maia, Joao

    2014-11-01

    Colloidal Gels i.e. disordered arrested systems has been studied extensively during the past decades both experimentally and computationally. Despite their widespread applications in various industries e.g. cosmetic, food, their physical principals are still far beyond being understood. The interplay between different types of interactions e.g. quantum scale, short-ranged, and long-ranged turned dynamics and thermodynamics of the colloidal systems to one the most intriguing areas in Physics. Many authors have implemented different simulation techniques such as molecular dynamics (MD) and Brownian dynamics (BD) to capture better picture during phase separation in colloidal system with short-ranged attractive force e.g. colloid-polymer mixtures. However, BD neglects multi-body hydrodynamic interactions (HI) and MD is limited considering the time and length scale of gel formation and long-time dynamics. In this presentation we used Core-modified dissipative particle dynamics (CM-DPD) with modified depletion potential, as a coarse-grain model, to address the gel formation process in short ranged-attractive colloidal systems. Due to the possibility to study short- and long-ranged HI separately in this method we studied the effect of each of those interactions on the final morphology and report on one of the controversial question in this field. In the second part of the presentation, we include colloidal-polymer interactions to extend/modify the Asakura-Oosawa potential model to semi-dilute region of polymer solution.

  6. An approach to improving transporting velocity in the long-range ultrasonic transportation of micro-particles

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Jianxin; Mei, Deqing Yang, Keji; Fan, Zongwei

    2014-08-14

    In existing ultrasonic transportation methods, the long-range transportation of micro-particles is always realized in step-by-step way. Due to the substantial decrease of the driving force in each step, the transportation is lower-speed and stair-stepping. To improve the transporting velocity, a non-stepping ultrasonic transportation approach is proposed. By quantitatively analyzing the acoustic potential well, an optimal region is defined as the position, where the largest driving force is provided under the condition that the driving force is simultaneously the major component of an acoustic radiation force. To keep the micro-particle trapped in the optimal region during the whole transportation process, an approach of optimizing the phase-shifting velocity and phase-shifting step is adopted. Due to the stable and large driving force, the displacement of the micro-particle is an approximately linear function of time, instead of a stair-stepping function of time as in the existing step-by-step methods. An experimental setup is also developed to validate this approach. Long-range ultrasonic transportations of zirconium beads with high transporting velocity were realized. The experimental results demonstrated that this approach is an effective way to improve transporting velocity in the long-range ultrasonic transportation of micro-particles.

  7. Development of a robotic patient positioning system with a wide beam-angle range for fixed-beam particle therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Hongseok; Park, Jong-Oh; Ko, Seong Young; Park, Sukho; Cho, Sungho; Jung, Won-Gyun; Park, Yong Kyun; Kang, Jung Suk

    2016-10-01

    This paper describes a robotic patient positioning system (PPS) for a fixed-beam heavy-ion therapy system. In order to extend the limited irradiation angle range of the fixed beam, we developed a 6-degree-of-freedom (6-DOF) serial-link robotic arm and used it as the robotic PPS for the fixed-beam heavy-ion therapy system. This research aims to develop a robotic PPS for use in the Korea Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator (KHIMA) system, which is under development at the Korea Institute of Radiological & Medical Sciences (KIRAMS). In particular, we select constraints and criteria that will be used for designing and evaluating the robotic PPS through full consultation with KIRAMS. In accordance with the constraints and criteria, we develop a 6-DOF serial-link robotic arm that consists of six revolute joints for the robotic PPS, where the robotic arm covers the upper body of a patient as a treatment area and achieves a 15 ° roll and pitch angle in the treatment area without any collision. Various preliminary experiments confirm that the robotic PPS can meet all criteria for extension of the limited irradiation angle range in the treatment area and has a positioning repeatability of 0.275 mm.

  8. Age/Radiation Parallels in the Effects of 56Fe Particle Irradiation and Protection by Berry Diets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph, James; Bielinski, Donna; Carrihill-Knoll, Kirsty; Rabin, Bernard; Shukitt-Hale, Barbara

    Exposing young rats to particles of high-energy and charge (HZE particles) enhances indices of oxidative stress and inflammation and disrupts the functioning of the dopaminergic system and behaviors mediated by this system in a manner similar to that seen in aged animals Previous research has shown that diets supplemented with 2% blueberry or strawberry extracts have the ability to retard and even reverse age-related deficits in behavior and signal transduction in rats, perhaps due to their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. A subsequent study has shown that whole-body irradiation with 1.5 Gy of 1 GeV/n high-energy 56 Fe particles impaired performance in the Morris water maze and measures of dopamine release one month following radiation; these deficits were protected by the antioxidant diets. The strawberry diet offered better protection against spatial deficits in the maze because strawberry-fed animals were better able to retain place information, while the blueberry-supplemented animals showed enhanced learning that was dependent on striatal functioning. Additional experiments in cell models to examine possible mechanisms involved in these beneficial effects have shown that, in addition to the well known free radical scavenging effects of berries, it appears that berry fruit can directly reduce stress signaling and enhance protective signals, suggesting the involvement of multiple mechanisms in the beneficial effects observed. Enhancements of "protective" signals (e.g., extracellular signal regulated kinase, ERK) include those that are involved in neuronal communication, neurogenesis, and learning and memory. Reductions in stress signaling include inhibiting nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and cytokines, among others, induced by oxidative and inflammatory stressors. We have found these changes in both BV2 mouse microglial and hippocampal cells. We believe that the possible addition of colorful fruits such as berry fruits to the diet can possibly

  9. Signaling factors and pathways of α-particle irradiation induced bilateral bystander responses between Beas-2B and U937 cells.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jiamei; Wang, Juan; Wang, Xiangdong; Wang, Ping; Xu, Jinping; Zhou, Cuiping; Bai, Yang; Shao, Chunlin

    2016-07-01

    Although radiation induced bystander effects (RIBE) have been investigated for decades for their potential health risk, the underlying gene regulation is still largely unclear, especially the roles of immune system and inflammatory response in RIBE. In the present study, macrophage U937 cells and epithelial Beas-2B cells were co-cultured to disclose the cascades of bystander signaling factors and intercellular communications. After α-particle irradiation, both ERK and p38 pathways were activated in Beas-2B cells and were associated with the autocrine and paracrine signaling of TNF-α and IL-8, resulting in direct damage to the irradiated cells. Similar upregulation of TNF-α and IL-8 was induced in the bystander U937 cells after co-culture with α-irradiated Beas-2B cells. This upregulation was dependent on the activation of NF-κB pathway and was responsible for the enhanced damage of α-irradiated Beas-2B cells. Interestingly, the increased expressions of TNF-α and IL-8 mRNAs in the bystander U937 cells were clearly relayed on the activated ERK and p38 pathways in the irradiated Beas-2B cells, and the upregulation of TNF-α and IL-8 mRNAs in co-cultured Beas-2B cells was also partly due to the activated NF-κB pathway in the bystander U937 cells. With the pretreatment of U0126 (MEK1/2 inhibitor), SB203580 (p38 inhibitor) or BAY 11-7082 (NF-κB inhibitor), the aggravated damage in the α-irradiated Beas-2B cells could be largely alleviated. Our results disclosed novel signaling cascades of macrophage-mediated bilateral bystander responses that the release of TNF-α and IL-8 regulated by MAPK and NF-κB pathways synergistically increased cellular injury after α-particle irradiation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Irradiation with heavy-ion particles changes the cellular distribution of human histone acetyltranferase HAT1

    SciTech Connect

    Lebel, E.A.; Tafrov, S.; Boukamp, P.

    2010-06-01

    Hat1 was the first histone acetyltransferase identified, however its biological function is still unclear. In this report, we show that the human Hat1 has two isoforms. Isoform a has 418 amino acids (aa) and is localized exclusively in the nuclear matrix of normal human keratinocytes (NHKs). Isoform b has 334 aa and is located in thecytoplasm, the nucleoplasm, attached to the chromatin and to the nuclear matrix. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed that the bulk of Hat1 is confined to the nucleus, with much lesser amounts in the cytoplasm. Cells undergoing mitotic division have an elevated amount of Hat1 compared to non-mitotic ones. NHKs exposed to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) or to a beam of high mass and energy (HZE) ion particles expressed bright nuclear staining for Hat1, a phenotype that was not observed in NHKs exposed to &947;-rays. We established that the enhanced nuclear staining for Hat1 in response to these treatments is regulated by the PI3K and the MAPK signaling pathways. Our observations clearly implicate Hat1 in the cellular response assuring the survival of the treated cells.

  11. Key role of the short-range order on the response of the titanate pyrochlore Y2T i2O7 to irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sattonnay, G.; Cammelli, S.; Menut, D.; Sellami, N.; Grygiel, C.; Monnet, I.; Béchade, J. L.; Crocombette, J. P.; Chartier, A.; Soulié, A.; Tétot, R.; Legros, C.; Simon, P.; Miro, S.; Thomé, L.

    2016-12-01

    Ordering and disordering processes in complex oxides strongly influence their physicochemical properties when they are submitted to severe conditions, such as high temperature, high pressure, or irradiation. This paper examines the role played by the local atomic order on the structural stability of Y2T i2O7 pyrochlore submitted to ion irradiation by combining experimental and atomistic computation studies. X-ray absorption spectroscopy at the Ti K edge, molecular dynamics simulations, and calculations using a tight-binding variable-charge model show that the short-range order around Ti atoms in Y2T i2O7 is strongly modified by irradiation. Strong local distortions around Ti defects occur due to a decrease of the Ti coordination number. These local atomic rearrangements trigger the overall amorphization of the compound. These results show that the local short-range order influences the long-range structural stability of complex oxides, thus providing a key feature for the control of the functional properties of these materials.

  12. Functional Consequences of Radiation-Induced Oxidative Stress in Cultured Neural Stem Cells and the Brain Exposed to Charged Particle Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Bertrand P.; Giedzinski, Erich; Izadi, Atefeh; Suarez, Tatiana; Lan, Mary L.; Tran, Katherine K.; Acharya, Munjal M.; Nelson, Gregory A.; Raber, Jacob; Parihar, Vipan K.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Redox homeostasis is critical in regulating the fate and function of multipotent cells in the central nervous system (CNS). Here, we investigated whether low dose charged particle irradiation could elicit oxidative stress in neural stem and precursor cells and whether radiation-induced changes in redox metabolism would coincide with cognitive impairment. Results: Low doses (<1 Gy) of charged particles caused an acute and persistent oxidative stress. Early after (<1 week) irradiation, increased levels of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species were generally dose responsive, but were less dependent on dose weeks to months thereafter. Exposure to ion fluences resulting in less than one ion traversal per cell was sufficient to elicit radiation-induced oxidative stress. Whole body irradiation triggered a compensatory response in the rodent brain that led to a significant increase in antioxidant capacity 2 weeks following exposure, before returning to background levels at week 4. Low dose irradiation was also found to significantly impair novel object recognition in mice 2 and 12 weeks following irradiation. Innovation: Data provide evidence that acute exposure of neural stem cells and the CNS to very low doses and fluences of charged particles can elicit a persisting oxidative stress lasting weeks to months that is associated with impaired cognition. Conclusions: Exposure to low doses of charged particles causes a persistent oxidative stress and cognitive impairment over protracted times. Data suggest that astronauts subjected to space radiation may develop a heightened risk for mission critical performance decrements in space, along with a risk of developing long-term neurocognitive sequelae. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 1410–1422. PMID:23802883

  13. Integrated single particle-bulk chemical approach for the characterization of local and long range sources of particulate pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moroni, Beatrice; Cappelletti, David; Marmottini, Fabio; Scardazza, Francesco; Ferrero, Luca; Bolzacchini, Ezio

    2012-04-01

    The feasibility of an integrated approach based on multivariate statistical analysis and individual particle micro-analyses to characterize airborne particulate matter (PM) sampled at urban and regional background sites was tested. The proposed methodology encompasses data from ICP-AES, GC-MS and SEM-EDS analyses on ground and vertical profile PM samples. Source apportionment analysis of bulk chemical data allowed the identification and quantification of five distinct source categories for the fine and coarse particle size ranges. Results of quantitative phase analysis were included in the statistical investigation in order to correlate type and relevance of PM sources with relative abundance and texture of particles at ground level. Results were finally evaluated in the light of back-trajectory calculations and atmospheric vertical profile measurements. This approach allowed to discriminate between local from Saharan dust crustal contributions, and urban from regional secondary aerosol anthropogenic inputs.

  14. Ultraviolet and charged particle irradiation of proposed solar cell coverslide materials and conductive coatings for the Helios spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fry, J.; Nicoletta, C. A.

    1972-01-01

    Coverslide materials consisting of Corning 7940 fused silica, multilayers of titanium and manganese oxides (blue reflector), and indium oxide (conductive-coating) were exposed to 16 UVSC up to 800 EUVSH in vacuum. Slight changes in optical transmittance and optical absorptance were found in the (200-360) millimicron regions of the fused silica and conductive coating respectively. Exposure to 4 KeV protons and 4.5 KeV electrons in vacuum, produced decreases of several percent in transmittance, (200-360) millimicron region in the fused silicas after total fluxes less or = 10 to the 14th power particles/sq cm. Sheet resistance of the conductive coating increased above 1.0 kilo-ohm/square after a total flux less or = 10 to the 14th power particles/sq cm. Solar cells with coverglasses utilizing the indium oxide conductive coating were exposed to 1 Mev electrons and 1 Mev protons in air and in vacuum. Total fluxes ranged from 10 to the 11th power particles/sq cm to 10 to the 15th power particle/sq cm. There was no appreciable degradation in the resistance of the conductive coating during or after these tests.

  15. Restoring The Azimuthal Symmetry Of Charged Particle Lateral Density In The Range Of KASCADE-Grande

    SciTech Connect

    Sima, O.; Rebel, H.; Apel, W. D.; Bekk, K.; Bozdog, H.; Daumiller, K.; Doll, P.; Engel, R.; Engler, J.; Finger, M.; Gils, H. J.; Haungs, A.; Heck, D.; Huege, T.; Isar, P. G.; Klages, H. O.; Mathes, H. J.; Mayer, H. J.; Milke, J.; Nehls, S.

    2010-11-24

    KASCADE-Grande, an extension of the former KASCADE experiment, is a multi-component Extensive Air Shower (EAS) experiment located in Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (Campus North), Germany. An important observable for analyzing the EAS is the lateral density of charged particles in the intrinsic shower plane. This observable is deduced from the basic information provided by the Grande scintillators - the energy deposit - first in the observation plane, by using a Lateral Energy Correction Function (LECF), then in the intrinsic shower plane, by applying an adequate mapping procedure. In both steps azimuthal.

  16. Properties of a previously unobserved donor-related electrically active defect in Ge induced by alpha particle irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnard, Abraham W.; Meyer, Walter E.; Auret, F. Danie

    2017-09-01

    Alpha particle irradiation was used to study the radiation-induced defects in n-type germanium (Ge). Investigation of the well-known antimony (Sb)-vacancy complex (commonly known as the E-center) in Ge, with an activation energy of 0.37 eV (E0.37), has led to the discovery of another defect with a DLTS signature virtually indistinguishable from the E-center, but with different annealing characteristics. We shall refer to this new defect as the E-prime. Although the two defects are easily distinguishable by annealing, the DLTS signal produced by the E-center and E-prime were not distinguishable through conventional deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS). Separation of the two peaks was only possible through the use of low noise equipment in conjunction with high resolution Laplace-DLTS. The activation energy of the Sb-vacancy and the E-prime was determined to be 0.370 ± 0.005 eV and 0.375 ± 0.005 eV. Depth profiles showed uniform distributions of both defects below the Schottky junction.

  17. Long-range interacting pendula: A simple model for understanding complex dynamics of charged particles in an electronic curtain device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, Owen; Del Maestro, Adrian; Wu, Junru; Marshall, Jeffrey S.

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, we investigate the equilibrium and non-equilibrium properties of a model that shares several important characteristics with charged particles interacting in an Electric Curtain (EC) device. An EC comprises a periodic array of parallel electrodes, applied to each is an alternating electric potential. Depending on the applied potentials and the geometry of the electrodes, a wide variety of field structures above the plane of the electrodes are possible. The EC has multiple applications in the control and manipulation of small particles, but is under utilized in industry and science because of difficulties in predicting and understanding the particle dynamics. One particular challenge in understanding the dynamics is the many-body coulomb interactions. To better understand the role of the interactions, we study a one-dimensional analytically tractable model that encapsulates their long-range nature. Specifically, we study a Hamiltonian similar to that of the Hamiltonian mean field model but with the inclusion of an index dependent phase in the interaction term that, as we show, reflects the periodic structure of an EC field. We solve for the canonical partition function and also investigate some of the non-equilibrium behaviors. In the study of the non-equilibrium behaviors, we find an interesting property, namely that a quasistationary (lifetime diverges as the number of particles is increased) clustered state can exist when an initial configuration is ordered by the particle indices.

  18. Convective stability of turbulent Boussinesq flow in the dissipative range and flow around small particles.

    PubMed

    Fouxon, Itzhak; Leshansky, Alexander

    2014-11-01

    We consider arbitrary, possibly turbulent, Boussinesq flow which is smooth below a dissipative scale l_{d}. It is demonstrated that the stability of the flow with respect to growth of fluctuations with scale smaller than l_{d} leads to a nontrivial constraint. That involves the dimensionless strength of fluctuations of the gradients of the scalar in the direction of gravity Fl and the Rayleigh scale L depending on the Rayleigh number Ra, the Nusselt number Nu, and l_{d}. The constraint implies that the stratified fluid at rest, which is linearly stable, develops instability in the limit of large Ra. This limits observability of solution for the flow around small swimmer in quiescent stratified fluid that has closed streamlines at scale L [A. M. Ardekani and R. Stocker, Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 084502 (2010)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.105.084502]. Correspondingly, to study the flow at scale L one has to take turbulence into account. We demonstrate that the resulting turbulent flow around small particles or swimmers can be described by a scalar integro-differential advection-diffusion equation. Describing the solutions, we show that closed streamlines persist with finite probability. Our results seem to be the necessary basis in understanding flows around small particles and swimmers in natural marine environments.

  19. The influence of nano silica particles on gamma-irradiation ageing of elastomers based on chlorosulphonated polyethylene and acrylonitrile butadiene rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marković, G.; Marinović-Cincović, M.; Tanasić, Lj.; Jovanović, V.; Samaržija-Jovanović, S.; Vukić, N.; Budinski-Simendić, J.

    2011-12-01

    The goal of this work was to study gamma irradiation ageing of rubber blends based on acrylonitrile butadiene rubber (NBR) and chlorosulphonated polyethylene rubber (CSM) reinforced by silica nano particles. The NBR/CSM compounds (50: 50, w/w) filled with different content of filler (0-100 phr) were crosslinked by sulfur. The vulcanization characteristics were assessed using the rheometer with an oscillating disk. The vulcanizates were prepared in a hydraulic press. The obtained materials were exposed to the different irradiation doses (100, 200, 300 and 400 kGy). The mechanical properties (hardness, modulus at 100% elongation, tensile strength and elongation at break) and swelling numbers were assessed before and after gamma irradiation ageing.

  20. Development of a low-energy x-ray camera for the imaging of secondary electron bremsstrahlung x-ray emitted during proton irradiation for range estimation.

    PubMed

    Ando, Koki; Yamaguchi, Mitsutaka; Yamamoto, Seiichi; Toshito, Toshiyuki; Kawachi, Naoki

    2017-06-21

    Imaging of secondary electron bremsstrahlung x-ray emitted during proton irradiation is a possible method for measurement of the proton beam distribution in phantom. However, it is not clear that the method is used for range estimation of protons. For this purpose, we developed a low-energy x-ray camera and conducted imaging of the bremsstrahlung x-ray produced during irradiation of proton beams. We used a 20 mm  ×  20 mm  ×  1 mm finely grooved GAGG scintillator that was optically coupled to a one-inch square high quantum efficiency (HQE)-type position-sensitive photomultiplier tube to form an imaging detector. The imaging detector was encased in a 2 cm-thick tungsten container, and a pinhole collimator was attached to its camera head. After performance of the camera was evaluated, secondary electron bremsstrahlung x-ray imaging was conducted during irradiation of the proton beams for three different proton energies, and the results were compared with Monte Carlo simulation as well as calculated value. The system spatial resolution and sensitivity of the developed x-ray camera with 1.5 mm-diameter pinhole collimator were estimated to be 32 mm FWHM and 5.2  ×  10(-7) for ~35 keV x-ray photons at 100 cm from the collimator surface, respectively. We could image the proton beam tracks by measuring the secondary electron bremsstrahlung x-ray during irradiation of the proton beams, and the ranges for different proton energies could be estimated from the images. The measured ranges from the images were well matched with the Monte Carlo simulation, and slightly smaller than the calculated values. We confirmed that the imaging of the secondary electron bremsstrahlung x-ray emitted during proton irradiation with the developed x-ray camera has the potential to be a new tool for proton range estimations.

  1. Development of a low-energy x-ray camera for the imaging of secondary electron bremsstrahlung x-ray emitted during proton irradiation for range estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Koki; Yamaguchi, Mitsutaka; Yamamoto, Seiichi; Toshito, Toshiyuki; Kawachi, Naoki

    2017-06-01

    Imaging of secondary electron bremsstrahlung x-ray emitted during proton irradiation is a possible method for measurement of the proton beam distribution in phantom. However, it is not clear that the method is used for range estimation of protons. For this purpose, we developed a low-energy x-ray camera and conducted imaging of the bremsstrahlung x-ray produced during irradiation of proton beams. We used a 20 mm  ×  20 mm  ×  1 mm finely grooved GAGG scintillator that was optically coupled to a one-inch square high quantum efficiency (HQE)-type position-sensitive photomultiplier tube to form an imaging detector. The imaging detector was encased in a 2 cm-thick tungsten container, and a pinhole collimator was attached to its camera head. After performance of the camera was evaluated, secondary electron bremsstrahlung x-ray imaging was conducted during irradiation of the proton beams for three different proton energies, and the results were compared with Monte Carlo simulation as well as calculated value. The system spatial resolution and sensitivity of the developed x-ray camera with 1.5 mm-diameter pinhole collimator were estimated to be 32 mm FWHM and 5.2  ×  10-7 for ~35 keV x-ray photons at 100 cm from the collimator surface, respectively. We could image the proton beam tracks by measuring the secondary electron bremsstrahlung x-ray during irradiation of the proton beams, and the ranges for different proton energies could be estimated from the images. The measured ranges from the images were well matched with the Monte Carlo simulation, and slightly smaller than the calculated values. We confirmed that the imaging of the secondary electron bremsstrahlung x-ray emitted during proton irradiation with the developed x-ray camera has the potential to be a new tool for proton range estimations.

  2. The application of PIV (particle image velocimetry) to long range transonic flow measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bryanston-Cross, P.J.

    1995-12-31

    A number of PIV (particle image velocity) measurements have been made at transonic speeds. The initial objective of the work has been to explore if such measurements could be made remotely and processed in an accurate and automatic fashion. Subsequently PIV measurements have been made remotely at optical stand-off distance of up to 1m. PIV results are presented, made at ARA Bedford on a 1/12th scale model of an Airbus wing, where a separation induced shock has been measured in three dimensions. The paper also presents results achieved using PIV at DRA Pyestock in mapping the flow within a full size annular turbine cascade with a velocity measurement accuracy of 1%. Measurements are presented showing the wake measured downstream of an annular turbine stator row. The measurements clearly show the presence of a vortex street which has a width of approximately 3mm.

  3. Application of PIV (particle image velocimetry) to long-range transonic flow measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryanston-Cross, Peter J.

    1995-09-01

    A number of PIV (Particle Image Velocity) measurements have been made at transonic speeds. The initial objective of the work has been to explore if such measurements could be made remotely and processed in an accurate and automatic fashion. Subsequently PIV measurements have been made remotely at optical stand-off distance of up to 1 m. PIV results are presented, made at ARA Bedford on a 1/12 th scale model of an Airbus wing, where a separation induced shock has been measured in three dimensions. The paper also presents results achieve using PIV at DRA Pyestock in mapping the flow within a full size annular turbine cascade with a velocity measurement accuracy of 1%. Measurements are presented showing the wake measured downstream of a annular turbine stator row. The measurements clearly show the presence of a vortex street which has a width of approximately 3 mm.

  4. Depth dose distribution study within a phantom torso after irradiation with a simulated Solar Particle Event at NSRL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Thomas; Matthiä, Daniel; Koerner, Christine; George, Kerry; Rhone, Jordan; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Reitz, Guenther

    The adequate knowledge of the radiation environment and the doses incurred during a space mission is essential for estimating an astronaut's health risk. The space radiation environment is complex and variable, and exposures inside the spacecraft and the astronaut's body are com-pounded by the interactions of the primary particles with the atoms of the structural materials and with the body itself. Astronauts' radiation exposures are measured by means of personal dosimetry, but there remains substantial uncertainty associated with the computational extrap-olation of skin dose to organ dose, which can lead to over-or under-estimation of the health risk. Comparisons of models to data showed that the astronaut's Effective dose (E) can be pre-dicted to within about a +10In the research experiment "Depth dose distribution study within a phantom torso" at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at BNL, Brookhaven, USA the large 1972 SPE spectrum was simulated using seven different proton energies from 50 up to 450 MeV. A phantom torso constructed of natural bones and realistic distributions of human tissue equivalent materials, which is comparable to the torso of the MATROSHKA phantom currently on the ISS, was equipped with a comprehensive set of thermoluminescence detectors and human cells. The detectors are applied to assess the depth dose distribution and radiation transport codes (e.g. GEANT4) are used to assess the radiation field and interactions of the radiation field with the phantom torso. Lymphocyte cells are strategically embedded at selected locations at the skin and internal organs and are processed after irradiation to assess the effects of shielding on the yield of chromosome damage. The first focus of the pre-sented experiment is to correlate biological results with physical dosimetry measurements in the phantom torso. Further on the results of the passive dosimetry using the anthropomorphic phantoms represent the best tool to generate reliable to

  5. Microphysical characterization of long-range transported biomass burning particles from North America at three EARLINET stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz-Amezcua, Pablo; Guerrero-Rascado, Juan Luis; José Granados-Muñoz, María; Benavent-Oltra, José Antonio; Böckmann, Christine; Samaras, Stefanos; Stachlewska, Iwona S.; Janicka, Łucja; Baars, Holger; Bohlmann, Stephanie; Alados-Arboledas, Lucas

    2017-05-01

    Strong events of long-range transported biomass burning aerosol were detected during July 2013 at three EARLINET (European Aerosol Research Lidar Network) stations, namely Granada (Spain), Leipzig (Germany) and Warsaw (Poland). Satellite observations from MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) and CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization) instruments, as well as modeling tools such as HYSPLIT (Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory) and NAAPS (Navy Aerosol Analysis and Prediction System), have been used to estimate the sources and transport paths of those North American forest fire smoke particles. A multiwavelength Raman lidar technique was applied to obtain vertically resolved particle optical properties, and further inversion of those properties with a regularization algorithm allowed for retrieving microphysical information on the studied particles. The results highlight the presence of smoke layers of 1-2 km thickness, located at about 5 km a.s.l. altitude over Granada and Leipzig and around 2.5 km a.s.l. at Warsaw. These layers were intense, as they accounted for more than 30 % of the total AOD (aerosol optical depth) in all cases, and presented optical and microphysical features typical for different aging degrees: color ratio of lidar ratios (LR532 / LR355) around 2, α-related ångström exponents of less than 1, effective radii of 0.3 µm and large values of single scattering albedos (SSA), nearly spectrally independent. The intensive microphysical properties were compared with columnar retrievals form co-located AERONET (Aerosol Robotic Network) stations. The intensity of the layers was also characterized in terms of particle volume concentration, and then an experimental relationship between this magnitude and the particle extinction coefficient was established.

  6. Angular and Long Range Rapidity Correlations in Particle Production at High Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovner, Alex; Lublinsky, Michael

    2013-01-01

    We discuss the general mechanism leading to long-range rapidity and angular correlations produced in high energy collisions (the "ridge"). This effect naturally appears in the high energy QCD and is strongly sensitive to physics of the gluon saturation. We comment on various recent practical realizations of the main idea, paying special attention to Nc counting and stress the relevance of Pomeron loops.

  7. New particle formation under the influence of the long-range transport of air pollutants in East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Indra; Kim, Seyoung; Seto, Takafumi; Otani, Yoshio; Takami, Akinori; Yoshino, Ayako; Irei, Satoshi; Park, Kihong; Takamura, Tamio; Kaneyasu, Naoki; Hatakeyama, Shiro

    2016-09-01

    Field observations to investigate the correlation between New Particle Formation (NPF) and the long-range transport of air pollutants in the East Asia region were carried out on a rural Island of Japan in the East-China Sea (Fukue Island, 32.8°N, 128.7°E) over three periods (February 23 to March 7, 2013; November 7 to 20, 2013; and November 2 to 24, 2014). Frequent NPF events were identified (16 events in 50 days), typically in association with sudden increases in particle number concentrations and the successive growth of particles to mobility diameters of several tens of nanometers. The NPF events were classified into two types (A and B) according to the initially detected particle sizes (onset diameters). Type-A consisted of strong NPF events with onset diameters as small as 5 nm. Type-B consisted of NPF events whose onset (<10 nm) was not clearly identifiable. The correlations of SO2 concentrations, solar radiation, PM2.5 concentrations, and chemical composition were analyzed based on the types of NPF events.

  8. A fine-particle sodium tracer for long-range transport of the Kuwaiti oil-fire smoke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowenthal, Douglas H.; Borys, Randolph D.; Rogers, C. Fred; Chow, Judith C.; Stevens, Robert K.; Pinto, Joe P.; Ondov, John M.

    1993-04-01

    Evidence for long-range transport of the Kuwaiti oil-fire smoke during the months following the Persian Gulf War has been more or less indirect. For example, high concentrations of aerosol particles containing soot and oil-combustion tracers such as vanadium observed at great distances from the Middle East may have come from sources other than the oil fires. However, more-recent data on the aerosol chemistry of Kuwaiti oil-fire plumes provides a direct link between those fires and aerosols collected at the Mauna Loa Observatory (MLO) during the late spring and summer of 1991.By itself, temporal covariation of fine-particle concentrations of elemental carbon, sulfur, and the noncrustal V / Zn ratio in MLO aerosols suggested a link to large-scale oil-combustion sources, but not necessarily to Kuwait. However, high concentrations of fine-particle (0.1-1.0 µm diameter) NaCl were observed in the “white” oil-fire plumes over Kuwait during the summer of 1991. Further analysis of the Mauna Loa data indicates strong temporal correspondence between the noncrustal V / Zn and noncrustal Na / Zn ratios and strong consistency between the noncrustal Na to noncrustal V ratios found at Mauna Loa and in the Kuwaiti oil-fire plume. In the absence of other demonstrable sources of fine-particle Na, these relationships provide a direct link between the Kuwaiti oil fires and aerosol composition observed at MLO.

  9. Fission-product behaviour in irradiated TRISO-coated particles: Results of the HFR-EU1bis experiment and their interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrachin, M.; Dubourg, R.; de Groot, S.; Kissane, M. P.; Bakker, K.

    2011-08-01

    It is important to understand fission-product (FP) and kernel micro-structure evolution in TRISO-coated fuel particles. FP behaviour, while central to severe-accident evaluation, impacts: evolution of the kernel oxygen potential governing in turn carbon oxidation (amoeba effect and pressurization); particle pressurization through fission-gas release from the kernel; and coating mechanical resistance via reaction with some FPs (Pd, Cs, Sr). The HFR-Eu1bis experiment irradiated five HTR fuel pebbles containing TRISO-coated UO 2 particles and went beyond current HTR specifications (e.g., central temperature of 1523 K). This study presents ceramographic and EPMA examinations of irradiated urania kernels and coatings. Significant evolutions of the kernel (grain structure, porosity, metallic-inclusion size, intergranular bubbles) as a function of temperature are shown. Results concerning FP migration are presented, e.g., significant xenon, caesium and palladium release from the kernel, molybdenum and ruthenium mainly present in metallic precipitates. The observed FP and micro-structural evolutions are interpreted and explanations proposed. The effect of high flux rate and high temperature on fission-gas behaviour, grain-size evolution and kernel swelling is discussed. Furthermore, Cs, Mo and Zr behaviour is interpreted in connection with oxygen-potential. This paper shows that combining state-of-the-art post-irradiation examination and state-of-the-art modelling fundamentally improves understanding of HTR fuel behaviour.

  10. Computer simulation of heat and mass transfer in tissue during high-intensity long-range laser irradiation.

    PubMed

    Director, L B; Frid, S E; Mendeleev VYa; Scovorod'Ko, S N

    1998-09-11

    Three-dimensional transient finite difference numerical model of the biological tissue irradiated by powerful laser beam is developed. It is used to simulate the thermal behavior of tissue assuming that radiation wavelength is chosen to give rise for volumetric heat sources. A three-dimensional seven-flow model is used to calculate radiation propagation. Evaporation and burn-out of tissue resulting in a through hole along the axis of the beam are taken into account. Besides the water boiling and corresponding changes of thermal and optical tissue properties the model takes into account one of the heat steam transfer mechanisms. Estimates are carried out for the effects of diffusion transfer and vaporization of water from the tissue surface. Kinetics of protein denaturation process are calculated by Arrenius equation. The problem is solved numerically using discrete grid technique and adaptive time-step control algorithm.

  11. Photocatalytic removal of gaseous nitrogen oxides using WO3/TiO2 particles under visible light irradiation: Effect of surface modification.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, Joseph Albert; Lee, Dong Hoon; Kang, Joo-Hyon

    2017-09-01

    Photocatalytic nanoparticles have been receiving considerable attention for their potential use in many environmental management applications, including urban air quality control. This paper investigates the performance of surface modified WO3/TiO2 composite particles in removing gaseous nitrogen oxides (NOx) under visible light irradiation. The WO3/TiO2 composite particles were synthesized using a modified wet chemical method with different concentrations of NaOH solution used as a surface modification agent for the host TiO2 particles. The NOx removal efficiency of the WO3/TiO2 particles was evaluated using a lab-scale continuous gas flow photo-reactor with a gas contact time of 1 min. Results showed that surface modification using NaOH can enhance the photocatalytic activity of the WO3/TiO2 particles. The NOx removal efficiency of the surface modified WO3/TiO2 was greater than 90%, while that of WO3/TiO2 particles prepared by the conventional wet chemical method was ∼75%. The enhanced removal efficiency might be attributed to the formation of oxygen vacancies on the TiO2 surface, providing sites for WO3 particles to effectively bind with TiO2. However, excess amount of NaOH >3 M deteriorated the photocatalytic performance due to the increased agglomeration of the host TiO2 particles. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Depth Dose Distribution Study within a Phantom Torso after Irradiation with a Simulated Solar Particle Event at NSRL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, Thomas; Matthiae, Daniel; Koerner, Christine; George, Kerry; Rhone, Jordan; Cucinotta, Francis; Reitz, Guenther

    2010-01-01

    The adequate knowledge of the radiation environment and the doses incurred during a space mission is essential for estimating an astronaut's health risk. The space radiation environment is complex and variable, and exposures inside the spacecraft and the astronaut's body are compounded by the interactions of the primary particles with the atoms of the structural materials and with the body itself Astronauts' radiation exposures are measured by means of personal dosimetry, but there remains substantial uncertainty associated with the computational extrapolation of skin dose to organ dose, which can lead to over- or underestimation of the health risk. Comparisons of models to data showed that the astronaut's Effective dose (E) can be predicted to within about a +10% accuracy using space radiation transport models for galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and trapped radiation behind shielding. However for solar particle event (SPE) with steep energy spectra and for extra-vehicular activities on the surface of the moon where only tissue shielding is present, transport models predict that there are large differences in model assumptions in projecting organ doses. Therefore experimental verification of SPE induced organ doses may be crucial for the design of lunar missions. In the research experiment "Depth dose distribution study within a phantom torso" at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at BNL, Brookhaven, USA the large 1972 SPE spectrum was simulated using seven different proton energies from 50 up to 450 MeV. A phantom torso constructed of natural bones and realistic distributions of human tissue equivalent materials, which is comparable to the torso of the MATROSHKA phantom currently on the ISS, was equipped with a comprehensive set of thermoluminescence detectors and human cells. The detectors are applied to assess the depth dose distribution and radiation transport codes (e.g. GEANT4) are used to assess the radiation field and interactions of the radiation field

  13. Transverse magneto-optical anisotropy in bidisperse ferrofluids with long range particle correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elfimova, E. A.; Ivanov, A. O.; Popescu, L. B.; Socoliuc, V.

    2017-06-01

    A comparative study between experiment and the predictions of a theoretical model developed for the description of magnetically induced dichroism in ferrofluids with long range interacting bidisperse spherical nanoparticles is presented. Magnetically induced dichroism in dilution series of two ferrofluids with different surfactant thickness was measured. Both ferrofluids show a concave solid volume fraction dependence of the specific dichroism, whose characteristics are very well qualitatively explained by the theoretical model. The theory fails to satisfactorily explain the magnetic field dependence of the highly concentrated samples specific dichroism, due to inherent approximations in the virial expansion of the pair correlation function.

  14. Gelation and glass transition of particles with short-range attraction induced by adsorbing microgel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Guangcui; Luo, Junhua; Han, Charles C.

    2015-03-01

    Mixed suspensions of large hard polystyrene microsphere and small poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) microgel is used as model systems to investigate the static and viscoelastic properties of suspensions which go through liquid to gel and to glass transitions. The microgels cause short-range attraction between microspheres through bridging and depletion mechanism whose strength can be tuned by the microgel concentration. Baxter's sticky hard-sphere model is used to extract the effective inter-microsphere interaction introduced by bridging or depletion of microgels despite the fact that the physical mechanisms of bridging attraction and depletion attraction are different at a molecular level. A new state diagram of gelation and even of glass transition was constructed by taking the bridges as a short-ranged attractive interaction With the help of the well-defined bridging bonds, some controversies regarding to the interference between two origins for ergodic to\\ non-ergodic transition in condensed system, i.e. cage effect and bond effect, were clarified. This work is supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (973 Program, 2012CB821503).

  15. Source apportionment of wide range particle size spectra and black carbon collected at the airport of Venice (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masiol, Mauro; Vu, Tuan V.; Beddows, David C. S.; Harrison, Roy M.

    2016-08-01

    Atmospheric particles are of high concern due to their toxic properties and effects on climate, and large airports are known as significant sources of particles. This study investigates the contribution of the Airport of Venice (Italy) to black carbon (BC), total particle number concentrations (PNC) and particle number size distributions (PNSD) over a large range (14 nm-20 μm). Continuous measurements were conducted between April and June 2014 at a site located 110 m from the main taxiway and 300 m from the runway. Results revealed no significantly elevated levels of BC and PNC, but exhibited characteristic diurnal profiles. PNSD were then analysed using both k-means cluster analysis and positive matrix factorization. Five clusters were extracted and identified as midday nucleation events, road traffic, aircraft, airport and nighttime pollution. Six factors were apportioned and identified as probable sources according to the size profiles, directional association, diurnal variation, road and airport traffic volumes and their relationships to micrometeorology and common air pollutants. Photochemical nucleation accounted for ∼44% of total number, followed by road + shipping traffic (26%). Airport-related emissions accounted for ∼20% of total PNC and showed a main mode at 80 nm and a second mode beyond the lower limit of the SMPS (<14 nm). The remaining factors accounted for less than 10% of number counts, but were relevant for total volume concentrations: nighttime nitrate, regional pollution and local resuspension. An analysis of BC levels over different wind sectors revealed no especially significant contributions from specific directions associated with the main local sources, but a potentially significant role of diurnal dynamics of the mixing layer on BC levels. The approaches adopted in this study have identified and apportioned the main sources of particles and BC at an international airport located in area affected by a complex emission scenario. The

  16. Impacts of long range transported dust and biological particles on clouds and precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prather, K. A.; Creamean, J.; Suski, K. J.; Cuadra-Rodriguez, L. A.; Fitzgerald, E.; DeMott, P. J.; Cazorla, A.

    2012-12-01

    Aerosols play a profound role in impacting cloud properties and precipitation processes. Some studies suggest air pollution aerosols suppress orographic precipitation, whereas other studies show a precipitation enhancement during periods with long range dust transport. To gain a more complete understanding of aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions, we have performed two field studies, CalWater and ICE-T, probing clouds over California and the Caribbean. Ground and aircraft measurements were used to characterize the sources of aerosols seeding clouds and the resulting impact on cloud microphysics. This presentation will focus on how dust and biological aerosols transported from the Sahara, Middle East, and Asia appeared in glaciated high-altitude clouds coincident with elevated ice nuclei (IN) concentrations. Our results suggest that dust and biological IN are persistent components of the upper atmosphere and thus could be playing important roles in affecting orographic precipitation processes over many regions of the world.

  17. Observation of chemical modification of Asian Dust particles during long-range transport by the combined use of quantitative ED-EPMA and ATR-FT-IR imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Young-Chul; Eom, Hyo-Jin; Jung, Hae-Jin; Malek, Md Abdul; Kim, HyeKyeong; Ro, Chul-Un

    2012-10-01

    In our previous works, it was demonstrated that the combined use of quantitative energy-dispersive electron probe X-ray microanalysis (ED-EPMA), which is also known as low-Z particle EPMA, and attenuated total reflectance FT-IR (ATR-FT-IR) imaging has great potential for a detailed characterization of individual aerosol particles. In this study, individual Asian Dust particles collected during an Asian Dust storm event on 11 November 2011 in Korea were characterized by the combined use of low-Z particle EPMA and ATR-FT-IR imaging. The combined use of the two single-particle analytical techniques on the same individual particles showed that Asian Dust particles had experienced extensive chemical modification during long-range transport. Overall, 109 individual particles were classified into four particle types based on their morphology, elemental concentrations, and molecular species and/or functional groups of individual particles available from the two analytical techniques: Ca-containing (38%); NaNO3-containing (30%); silicate (22%); and miscellaneous particles (10%). Among the 41 Ca-containing particles, 10, 8, and 14 particles contained nitrate, sulfate, and both, respectively, whereas only two particles contained unreacted CaCO3. Airborne amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) particles were observed in this Asian Dust sample for the first time, where their IR peaks for the insufficient symmetric environment of CO32- ions of ACC were clearly differentiated from those of crystalline CaCO3. This paper also reports the field observations of CaCl2 particles converted from CaCO3 for the Asian Dust sample collected in the planetary boundary layer. Thirty three particles contained NaNO3, which are the reaction products of sea-salt and NOx/HNO3, whereas no genuine sea-salt particles were encountered, indicating that sea-salt particles are more reactive than CaCO3 particles. Some silicate particles were observed to contain nitrate, sulfate, and water. Among 24 silicate

  18. A simple method to increase the current range of the TERA chip in charged particle therapy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirio, R.; Fausti, F.; Fanola Guarachi, L.; Giordanengo, S.; Marchetto, F.; Mazza, G.; Monaco, V.; Sacchi, R.; Talpacci, E.; Varasteh Anvar, M.; Vignati, A.

    2015-10-01

    The development of the next generation of accelerators for charged particle radiotherapy aims to reduce dimensions and operational complexity of the machines by engineering pulsed beams accelerators. The drawback is the increased difficulty to monitor the beam delivery. Within each pulse, instantaneous currents larger by two to three orders of magnitude than present applications are expected, which would saturate the readout of the monitor chambers. In this paper, we report of a simple method to increase by almost two orders of magnitude the current range of an Application Specific Integrated Circuit chip previously developed by our group to read out monitor ionization chambers.

  19. Development of a low-energy particle irradiation facility for the study of the biological effectiveness of the ion track end

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manti, L.; Campajola, L.; Perozziello, F. M.; Kavanagh, J. N.; Schettino, G.

    2012-07-01

    Uncertainties surround the radiobiological consequences of exposure to charged particles, despite the increasing use of accelerated ion beams for cancer treatment (hadrontherapy). In particular, little is known about the long-term effects on normal tissue at the beam entrance or in the distal part of the Spread-Out Bragg Peak (SOBP). Moreover, although the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of particle radiation has been traditionally related to the radiation linear energy transfer (LET), it has become increasingly evident that radiation-induced cell death, as well as long term radiation effects, is not adequately described by this parameter. Hence, exploring the effectiveness of various ion beams at or around the Bragg peak of monoenergetic ion beams can prove useful to gain insights into the role played by parameters other than the particle LET in determining the outcome of particle radiation exposures. In this context, the upgrade of the Tandem irradiation facility at Naples University here described, has allowed us to perform a series of preliminary radiobiological measurements using proton and carbon ion beams. The facility is currently used to irradiate normal and cancer cell lines with ion beams such as oxygen and fluorine.

  20. Scenario-based radiation therapy margins for patient setup, organ motion, and particle range uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bokrantz, Rasmus; Fredriksson, Albin

    2017-02-01

    This work extends and validates the scenario-based generalization of margins presented in Fredriksson and Bokrantz (2016 Phys. Med. Biol. 61 2067-82). Scenario-based margins are, in their original form, a method for robust planning under setup uncertainty where the sum of a plan evaluation criterion over a set of scenarios is optimized. The voxelwise penalties in the summands are weighted by a distribution of coefficients defined such that the method is mathematically equivalent to the use of conventional geometric margins if the scenario doses are calculated using the static dose cloud approximation. The purpose of this work is to extend scenario-based margins to general types of geometric uncertainty and to validate their use on clinical cases. Specifically, we outline how to incorporate density heterogeneity in the calculation of coefficients and demonstrate the extended method’s ability to safeguard against setup errors, organ motion, and range shifts (and combinations thereof). For a water phantom with a high-density slab partly covering the target, the extended form of scenario-based margins method led to improved target coverage robustness compared to the original method. At most minor differences in robustness were, however, observed between the extended and original method for a prostate and two lung patients, all treated with intensity-modulated proton therapy, yielding evidence that the calculation of weighting coefficients is generally insensitive to tissue heterogeneities. The scenario-based margins were, furthermore, verified to provide a comparable level of robustness to expected value and worst case optimization while circumventing some known shortcomings of these methods.

  1. Scenario-based radiation therapy margins for patient setup, organ motion, and particle range uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Bokrantz, Rasmus; Fredriksson, Albin

    2017-02-21

    This work extends and validates the scenario-based generalization of margins presented in Fredriksson and Bokrantz (2016 Phys. Med. Biol. 61 2067-82). Scenario-based margins are, in their original form, a method for robust planning under setup uncertainty where the sum of a plan evaluation criterion over a set of scenarios is optimized. The voxelwise penalties in the summands are weighted by a distribution of coefficients defined such that the method is mathematically equivalent to the use of conventional geometric margins if the scenario doses are calculated using the static dose cloud approximation. The purpose of this work is to extend scenario-based margins to general types of geometric uncertainty and to validate their use on clinical cases. Specifically, we outline how to incorporate density heterogeneity in the calculation of coefficients and demonstrate the extended method's ability to safeguard against setup errors, organ motion, and range shifts (and combinations thereof). For a water phantom with a high-density slab partly covering the target, the extended form of scenario-based margins method led to improved target coverage robustness compared to the original method. At most minor differences in robustness were, however, observed between the extended and original method for a prostate and two lung patients, all treated with intensity-modulated proton therapy, yielding evidence that the calculation of weighting coefficients is generally insensitive to tissue heterogeneities. The scenario-based margins were, furthermore, verified to provide a comparable level of robustness to expected value and worst case optimization while circumventing some known shortcomings of these methods.

  2. Application of the reduction of scale range in a Lorentz boosted frame to the numerical simulation of particle acceleration devices.

    SciTech Connect

    Vay, J; Fawley, W M; Geddes, C G; Cormier-Michel, E; Grote, D P

    2009-05-05

    It has been shown that the ratio of longest to shortest space and time scales of a system of two or more components crossing at relativistic velocities is not invariant under Lorentz transformation. This implies the existence of a frame of reference minimizing an aggregate measure of the ratio of space and time scales. It was demonstrated that this translated into a reduction by orders of magnitude in computer simulation run times, using methods based on first principles (e.g., Particle-In-Cell), for particle acceleration devices and for problems such as: free electron laser, laser-plasma accelerator, and particle beams interacting with electron clouds. Since then, speed-ups ranging from 75 to more than four orders of magnitude have been reported for the simulation of either scaled or reduced models of the above-cited problems. In it was shown that to achieve full benefits of the calculation in a boosted frame, some of the standard numerical techniques needed to be revised. The theory behind the speed-up of numerical simulation in a boosted frame, latest developments of numerical methods, and example applications with new opportunities that they offer are all presented.

  3. Fine-particle sodium tracer for long-range transport of the Kuwaiti oil-fire smoke

    SciTech Connect

    Lowenthal, D.H.; Borys, R.D.; Rogers, C.F.; Chow, J.C.; Stevens, R.K.

    1993-04-23

    Evidence for long-range transport of the Kuwaiti oil-fire smoke during the months following the Persian Gulf War has been more or less indirect. However, more-recent data on the aerosol chemistry of Kuwaiti oil-fire plumes provides a direct link between those fires and aerosols collected at the Mauna Loa Observatory (MLO) during the late spring and summer of 1991. By itself, temporal covariation of fine-particle concentrations of elemental carbon, sulfur, and the noncrustal V/Zn ratio in MLO aerosols suggested a link to large-scale oil-combustion sources, but not necessarily to Kuwait. However, high concentrations of fine-particle (0.1-1.0 microm diameter) NaCl were observed in the 'white' oil-fire plumes over Kuwait during the summer of 1991. In the absence of other demonstratable sources of fine-particle Na, these relationships provide a direct link between the Kuwaiti oil-fires and aerosol composition observed at MLO. (Copyright (c) 1993 American Geophysical Union.)

  4. Resolution and Sensitivity of Inline Focused Beam Reflectance Measurement During Wet Granulation in Pharmaceutically Relevant Particle Size Ranges.

    PubMed

    Narang, Ajit S; Stevens, Timothy; Hubert, Mario; Paruchuri, Srinivasa; Macias, Kevin; Bindra, Dilbir; Gao, Zhihui; Badawy, Sherif

    2016-12-01

    Real-time process monitoring using a process analytical technology for granule size distribution can enable quality-by-design in drug product manufacturing. In this study, the resolution and sensitivity of chord length distribution (CLD) measured inline inside a high shear granulator using focused beam reflectance measurement (FBRM) C35 probe was investigated using different particle size grades of microcrystalline cellulose (MCC). In addition, the impact of water and impeller tip speed on the measurement accuracy as well as correlation with offline particle sizing techniques (FBRM, laser diffraction [Malvern Mastersizer(®)], microscopy [Sympatec QicPic(®)], and nested sieve analysis) was studied. Inline FBRM resolved size differences between different MCC grades, and the data correlated well with offline analyses. Impeller tip speed changed the number density of inline CLD measurements while addition of water reduced the CLD of dry MCC, likely due to deagglomeration of primary particles. In summary, inline FBRM CLD measurement in high shear granulator provides adequate resolution and reproducible measurements in the pharmaceutically relevant size range both in the presence and in the absence of water. Therefore, inline FBRM can be a valuable tool for the monitoring of high shear wet granulation.

  5. 6.7-nm Emission from Gd and Tb Plasmas over a Broad Range of Irradiation Parameters Using a Single Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Liang; Wang, Hanchen; Reagan, Brendan A.; Baumgarten, Cory; Gullikson, Eric; Berrill, Mark; Shlyaptsev, Vyacheslav N.; Rocca, Jorge J.

    2016-09-01

    We report a comprehensive study of the emission from Gd and Tb laser-produced plasmas in the 6.5-6.7-nm wavelength region for a broad range of laser-irradiation parameters using a single λ =1030 nm laser with tunable pulse duration in the 120-ps-to-4-ns range. The results are of interest for beyond-extreme-ultraviolet (BEUV) lithography of integrated circuits. BEUV emission spectra are measured as a function of laser-pulse duration, emission angle, and spatial location within the plasma. Images of the BEUV-emitting plasma region at the BEUV wavelength are obtained as a function of irradiation parameters. The emission spectrum is observed to broaden and to shift to a longer wavelength as the duration of the driver laser pulses is shortened from nanoseconds to hundreds of picoseconds. Transient self-consistent hydrodynamic and atomic physics simulations show that the picosecond irradiation creates significantly hotter plasmas in which the dominant emission originates from more highly ionized species. Gd-plasma emission driven by nanosecond laser pulses spectrally best matches the responsivity of the energy monitors used, centered near λ =6.74 nm . Spatially resolved spectra of the Gd plasma are acquired for different laser-pulse durations. The conversion efficiency (CE) of Gd /Tb plasma into a 0.6% bandwidth in a 2 π solid angle is determined by integrating angularly resolved measurements obtained using an array of calibrated energy monitors. Similar maximum CEs of about 0.47% for both the Gd and Tb plasmas are obtained. The source size is measured to approximately match the spot size of the laser on target, in agreement with simulations.

  6. Modeling Transport in Fractured Porous Media with the Random-Walk Particle Method: The Transient Activity Range and the Particle-Transfer Probability

    SciTech Connect

    Lehua Pan; G.S. Bodvarsson

    2001-10-22

    Multiscale features of transport processes in fractured porous media make numerical modeling a difficult task, both in conceptualization and computation. Modeling the mass transfer through the fracture-matrix interface is one of the critical issues in the simulation of transport in a fractured porous medium. Because conventional dual-continuum-based numerical methods are unable to capture the transient features of the diffusion depth into the matrix (unless they assume a passive matrix medium), such methods will overestimate the transport of tracers through the fractures, especially for the cases with large fracture spacing, resulting in artificial early breakthroughs. We have developed a new method for calculating the particle-transfer probability that can capture the transient features of diffusion depth into the matrix within the framework of the dual-continuum random-walk particle method (RWPM) by introducing a new concept of activity range of a particle within the matrix. Unlike the multiple-continuum approach, the new dual-continuum RWPM does not require using additional grid blocks to represent the matrix. It does not assume a passive matrix medium and can be applied to the cases where global water flow exists in both continua. The new method has been verified against analytical solutions for transport in the fracture-matrix systems with various fracture spacing. The calculations of the breakthrough curves of radionuclides from a potential repository to the water table in Yucca Mountain demonstrate the effectiveness of the new method for simulating 3-D, mountain-scale transport in a heterogeneous, fractured porous medium under variably saturated conditions.

  7. Effect of different sulphur precursors on morphology and band-gap on the formation of Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) particles with microwave irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patro, Bharati; Vijaylakshmi, S.; Sharma, Pratibha

    2016-05-01

    Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) is a promising semiconductor material for ecological cost effective thin film Photovoltaic (PV) devices. As it contains earth abundant and non-toxic elements, it has the advantages over commercially available CIGS and CdTe thin film PV devices. In the present work, the pure phase Cu2ZnSnS4 particles were successfully synthesised with microwave irradiation. The morphology and phase study was carried out for the samples prepared with two different sulphur precursors viz. thiourea and thioacetamide (TAA). CZTS particles with thiourea as sulphur precursor are more crystalline than CZTS particles with TAA. The band gap of 1.654eV and 1.713eV were calculated for the samples prepared with thiourea and TAA respectively.

  8. Electrical characterization of deep levels created by bombarding nitrogen-doped 4H-SiC with alpha-particle irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omotoso, Ezekiel; Meyer, Walter E.; Auret, F. Danie; Paradzah, Alexander T.; Legodi, Matshisa J.

    2016-03-01

    Deep-level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) and Laplace-DLTS were used to investigate the effect of alpha-particle irradiation on the electrical properties of nitrogen-doped 4H-SiC. The samples were bombarded with alpha-particles at room temperature (300 K) using an americium-241 (241Am) radionuclide source. DLTS revealed the presence of four deep levels in the as-grown samples, E0.09, E0.11, E0.16 and E0.65. After irradiation with a fluence of 4.1 × 1010 alpha-particles-cm-2, DLTS measurements indicated the presence of two new deep levels, E0.39 and E0.62 with energy levels, EC - 0.39 eV and EC - 0.62 eV, with an apparent capture cross sections of 2 × 10-16 and 2 × 10-14 cm2, respectively. Furthermore, irradiation with fluence of 8.9 × 1010 alpha-particles-cm-2 resulted in the disappearance of shallow defects due to a lowering of the Fermi level. These defects re-appeared after annealing at 300 °C for 20 min. Defects, E0.39 and E0.42 with close emission rates were attributed to silicon or carbon vacancy and could only be separated by using high resolution Laplace-DLTS. The DLTS peaks at EC - (0.55-0.70) eV (known as Z1/Z2) were attributed to an isolated carbon vacancy (VC).

  9. Application of a Halbach magnetic array for long-range cell and particle separations in biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Joo H.; Driscoll, Harry; Super, Michael; Ingber, Donald E.

    2016-05-01

    Here, we describe a versatile application of a planar Halbach permanent magnet array for an efficient long-range magnetic separation of living cells and microparticles over distances up to 30 mm. A Halbach array was constructed from rectangular bar magnets using 3D-printed holders and compared to a conventional alternating array of identical magnets. We theoretically predicted the superiority of the Halbach array for a long-range magnetic separation and then experimentally validated that the Halbach configuration outperforms the alternating array for isolating magnetic microparticles or microparticle-bound bacterial cells at longer distances. Magnetophoretic velocities (ymag) of magnetic particles (7.9 μm diameter) induced by the Halbach array in a microfluidic device were significantly higher and extended over a larger area than those induced by the alternating magnet array (ymag = 178 versus 0 μm/s at 10 mm, respectively). When applied to 50 ml tubes (˜30 mm diameter), the Halbach array removed >95% of Staphylococcus aureus bacterial cells bound with 1 μm magnetic particles compared to ˜70% removed using the alternating array. In addition, the Halbach array enabled manipulation of 1 μm magnetic beads in a deep 96-well plate for ELISA applications, which was not possible with the conventional magnet arrays. Our analysis demonstrates the utility of the Halbach array for the future design of devices for high-throughput magnetic separations of cells, molecules, and toxins.

  10. Average fast neutron flux in three energy ranges in the Quinta assembly irradiated by two types of beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strugalska-Gola, Elzbieta; Bielewicz, Marcin; Kilim, Stanislaw; Szuta, Marcin; Tyutyunnikov, Sergey

    2017-03-01

    This work was performed within the international project "Energy plus Transmutation of Radioactive Wastes" (E&T - RAW) for investigations of energy production and transmutation of radioactive waste of the nuclear power industry. 89Y (Yttrium 89) samples were located in the Quinta assembly in order to measure an average high neutron flux density in three different energy ranges using deuteron and proton beams from Dubna accelerators. Our analysis showed that the neutron density flux for the neutron energy range 20.8 - 32.7 MeV is higher than for the neutron energy range 11.5 - 20.8 MeV both for protons with an energy of 0.66 GeV and deuterons with an energy of 2 GeV, while for deuteron beams of 4 and 6 GeV we did not observe this.

  11. The coming revolution in particle physics: Report of the Fermilab Long Range Planning Committee

    SciTech Connect

    Jeff Appel et al.

    2004-06-22

    In early 2003, the Fermilab Director formed a committee (Appendix A) to examine options for the long-range future of Fermilab. Specifically, the committee was asked to respond to a charge (Appendix B), which laid out the assumptions, which were to underlie our discussions. The committee met a few times during the spring of 2003 and formulated a plan of action. It identified a number of issues that deserved attention, and a subcommittee was formed to focus on each. We agreed that in addressing these key issues, a broader participation was appropriate. The manner in which that was achieved varied from subcommittee to subcommittee to group. In some cases the expanded membership participated in all the discussions, in others, particular presentations were solicited and heard. Some subgroups met regularly over several months, others convened only for a small number of discussions. We have attempted to list participants in Appendix C. General presentations indicating the purpose of the work were given, for example at the Fermilab Users Annual Meeting. Towards the end of the summer some sense of direction developed and a series of open meetings was organized by the different subgroups. These meetings of two and more hour's duration gave the broader laboratory and user community a further chance to react to perceived directions and to make their opinions known. They were extremely well attended. In all, nearly 100 people have participated in the process including the development of initial drafts and proto-recommendations. A larger number attended the various open sessions. It is therefore likely, even expected, that the general thrusts of this report are no surprise. Nevertheless, the committee met in a number of plenary closed sessions including a two-day retreat in which all the issues were discussed and a common view was developed. The Director and Deputy Director heard and interacted with the discussions in most of these meetings. In attempting to converge, we have

  12. No significant level of inheritable interchromosomal aberrations in the progeny of bystander primary human fibroblasts after alpha particle irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Burong; Zhu, Jiayun; Zhou, Hongning; Hei, Tom K.

    2013-02-01

    A major concern for bystander effects is the probability that normal healthy cells adjacent to the irradiated cells become genomically unstable and undergo further carcinogenesis after therapeutic irradiation or space mission where astronauts are exposed to low dose of heavy ions. Genomic instability is a hallmark of cancer cells. In the present study, two irradiation protocols were performed in order to ensure pure populations of bystander cells and the genomic instability in their progeny were investigated. After irradiation, chromosomal aberrations of cells were analyzed at designated time points using G2 phase premature chromosome condensation (G2-PCC) coupled with Giemsa staining and with multiplex fluorescent in situ hybridization (mFISH). Our Giemsa staining assay demonstrated that elevated yields of chromatid breaks were induced in the progeny of pure bystander primary fibroblasts up to 20 days after irradiation. mFISH assay showed no significant level of inheritable interchromosomal aberrations were induced in the progeny of the bystander cell groups, while the fractions of gross aberrations (chromatid breaks or chromosomal breaks) significantly increased in some bystander cell groups. These results suggest that genomic instability occurred in the progeny of the irradiation associated bystander normal fibroblasts exclude the inheritable interchromosomal aberration.

  13. No significant level of inheritable interchromosomal aberrations in the progeny of bystander primary human fibroblast after alpha particle irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Burong; Zhu, Jiayun; Zhou, Hongning; Hei, Tom K.

    2012-01-01

    A major concern for bystander effects is the probability that normal healthy cells adjacent to the irradiated cells become genomically unstable and undergo further carcinogenesis after therapeutic irradiation or space mission where astronauts are exposed to low dose of heavy ions. Genomic instability is a hallmark of cancer cells. In the present study, two irradiation protocols were performed in order to ensure pure populations of bystander cells and the genomic instability in their progeny were investigated. After irradiation, chromosomal aberrations of cells were analyzed at designated time points using G2 phase premature chromosome condensation (G2-PCC) coupled with Giemsa staining and with multiplex fluorescent in situ hybridization (mFISH). Our Giemsa staining assay demonstrated that elevated yields of chromatid breaks were induced in the progeny of pure bystander primary fibroblasts up to 20 days after irradiation. MFISH assay showed no significant level of inheritable interchromosomal aberrations were induced in the progeny of the bystander cell groups, while the fractions of gross aberrations (chromatid breaks or chromosomal breaks) significantly increased in some bystander cell groups. These results suggest that genomic instability occurred in the progeny of the irradiation associated bystander normal fibroblasts exclude the inheritable interchromosomal aberration. PMID:23503090

  14. Dynamics and statistics of the Fermi-Pasta-Ulam β-model with different ranges of particle interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christodoulidi, Helen; Bountis, Tassos; Tsallis, Constantino; Drossos, Lambros

    2016-12-01

    In the present work we study the Fermi-Pasta-Ulam (FPU) β -model involving long-range interactions (LRI) in both the quadratic and quartic potentials, by introducing two independent exponents {α1} and {α2} respectively, which make the forces decay with distance r. Our results demonstrate that weak chaos, in the sense of decreasing Lyapunov exponents, and q-Gaussian probability density functions (pdfs) of sums of the momenta, occurs only when long-range interactions are included in the quartic part. More importantly, for 0≤slant {α2}<1 , we obtain extrapolated values for q\\equiv {{q}∞}>1 , as N\\to ∞ , suggesting that these pdfs persist in that limit. On the other hand, when long-range interactions are imposed only on the quadratic part, strong chaos and purely Gaussian pdfs are always obtained for the momenta. We have also focused on similar pdfs for the particle energies and have obtained q E -exponentials (with q E   >  1) when the quartic-term interactions are long-ranged, otherwise we get the standard Boltzmann-Gibbs weight, with q  =  1. The values of q E coincide, within small discrepancies, with the values of q obtained by the momentum distributions.

  15. Heating dynamics of CO{sub 2}-laser irradiated silica particles with evaporative shrinking: Measurements and modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Elhadj, S.; Qiu, S. R.; Stolz, C. J.; Monterrosa, A. M.

    2012-05-01

    The heating dynamics of CO{sub 2}-laser heated micron-sized particles were determined for temperatures <3500 K measured using infrared imaging. A coupled mass and energy conservation model is derived to predict single particle temperatures and sizes, which were compared with data from particles deposited on non-absorbing substrates to assess the relevant heat transfer processes. Analysis reveals substrate conduction dominates all other heat losses, while laser absorption determined from Mie theory is strongly modulated by particle evaporative shrinking. This study provides insights into the light coupling and heating of particle arrays where the material optical properties are temperature-dependent and particle size changes are significant.

  16. Catalytic property of an indium-deposited powder-type material containing silicon and its dependence on the dose of indium nano-particles irradiated by a pulse arc plasma process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimura, Satoru; Nishimoto, Yoshihiro; Kiuchi, Masato; Agawa, Yoshiaki; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Yasuda, Makoto

    2017-06-01

    Indium nano-particle irradiations onto zeolite powders were carried out using a pulse arc plasma source system. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic and scanning electron microscopic studies of an indium irradiated zeolite sample revealed that indium nano-particles were successfully deposited on the sample. Besides, the sample was found to be capable of catalyzing an organic chemical reaction (i.e., Friedel-Crafts alkylation). Then, we examined whether or not the catalytic ability depends on the irradiated indium dose, having established the optimal indium dose for inducing the catalytic effect.

  17. OBSERVATIONS OF SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLES FROM {sup 3}He-RICH EVENTS OVER A WIDE RANGE OF HELIOGRAPHIC LONGITUDE

    SciTech Connect

    Wiedenbeck, M. E.; Mason, G. M.; Haggerty, D. K; Cohen, C. M. S.; Nitta, N. V.; Gomez-Herrero, R.

    2013-01-01

    A prevailing model for the origin of {sup 3}He-rich solar energetic particle (SEP) events attributes particle acceleration to processes associated with the reconnection between closed magnetic field lines in an active region and neighboring open field lines. The open field from the small reconnection volume then provides a path along which accelerated particles escape into a relatively narrow range of angles in the heliosphere. The narrow width (standard deviation <20 Degree-Sign ) of the distribution of X-ray flare longitudes found to be associated with {sup 3}He-rich SEP events detected at a single spacecraft at 1 AU supports this model. We report multispacecraft observations of individual {sup 3}He-rich SEP events that occurred during the solar minimum time period from 2007 January through 2011 January using instrumentation carried by the two Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory spacecraft and the Advanced Composition Explorer. We find that detections of {sup 3}He-rich events at pairs of spacecraft are not uncommon, even when their longitudinal separation is >60 Degree-Sign . We present the observations of the {sup 3}He-rich event of 2010 February 7, which was detected at all three spacecraft when they spanned 136 Degree-Sign in heliographic longitude. Measured fluences of {sup 3}He in this event were found to have a strong dependence on longitude which is well fit by a Gaussian with standard deviation {approx}48 Degree-Sign centered at the longitude that is connected to the source region by a nominal Parker spiral magnetic field. We discuss several mechanisms for distributing flare-accelerated particles over a wide range of heliographic longitudes including interplanetary diffusion perpendicular to the magnetic field, spreading of a compact cluster of open field lines between the active region and the source surface where the field becomes radial and opens out into the heliosphere, and distortion of the interplanetary field by a preceding coronal mass

  18. Novel RGO/α-FeOOH supported catalyst for Fenton oxidation of phenol at a wide pH range using solar-light-driven irradiation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Fang, Jiasheng; Crittenden, John C; Shen, Chanchan

    2017-01-23

    A novel solar-light-driven (SLD) Fenton catalyst was developed by reducing the ferrous-ion onto graphene oxide (GO) and forming reduced graphene oxide/α-FeOOH composites (RF) via in-situ induced self-assembly process. The RF was supported on several mesoporous supports (i.e., Al-MCM-41, MCM-41 and γ-Al2O3). The activity, stability and energy use for phenol oxidation were systematically studied for a wide pH range. Furthermore, the catalytic mechanism at acid and alkaline aqueous conditions was also elucidated. The results showed that Fe(II) was reduced onto GO nanosheets and α-FeOOH crystals were formed during the self-assembly process. Compared with Fenton reaction without SLD irradiation, the visible light irradiation not only dramatically accelerated the rate of Fenton-based reactions, but also extended the operating pH for the Fenton reaction (from 4.0 to 8.0). The phenol oxidation on RF supported catalysts was fitting well with the pseudo-first-order kinetics, and needed low initiating energy, insensitive to the reacting temperature changes (273-318K). The Al-MCM-41 supported RF was a more highly energy-efficient catalyst with the prominent catalytic activity at wide operating pHs. During the reaction, OH radicals were generated by the SLD irradiation from H2O2 reduction and H2O oxidation in the Fe(Ⅱ)/Fe(Ⅲ) and Fe(Ⅲ)/Fe(Ⅳ) cycling processes.

  19. Determination of integral cross sections of 3 H in Al foils monitors irradiated by protons with energies ranging from 40 to 2600 MeV

    DOE PAGES

    Titarenko, Yu. E.; Batyaev, V. F.; Chauzova, M. V.; ...

    2016-01-01

    Our results of 3H production in Al foil monitors (~ 59 mg/cm2 thickness) are presented. We irradiated these foils in 15×15 mm polyethylene bags of ~ 14 mg/cm2 thickness together with foils of Cr (~ 395 mg/cm2 thickness) and 56Fe (~ 332 mg/cm2 thickness) by protons of different energies in a range of 0.04 – 2.6 GeV. The diameters of all the foils were 10.5 mm. The irradiations were carried out at the ITEP accelerator U–10 under the ISTC Project # 3266 in 2006–2009. 3H has been extracted from Al foils using an A307 Sample Oxidizer. We then used anmore » ultra low level liquid scintillation spectrometer Quantulus1220 to measure the 3H β–spectra and the SpectraDec software package was applied for spectra processing, deconvolution and 3H activity determination. The values of the Al (p, x)3H reaction cross sections obtained in these experiments are compared with data measured at other labs and with results of simulations by the MCNP6 radiation transport code using the CEM03.03 event generator.« less

  20. Role of composition, bond covalency, and short-range order in the disordering of stannate pyrochlores by swift heavy ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tracy, Cameron L.; Shamblin, Jacob; Park, Sulgiye; Zhang, Fuxiang; Trautmann, Christina; Lang, Maik; Ewing, Rodney C.

    2016-08-01

    A2S n2O7 (A =Nd ,Sm,Gd,Er,Yb,and Y) materials with the pyrochlore structure were irradiated with 2.2 GeV Au ions to systematically investigate disordering of this system in response to dense electronic excitation. Structural modifications were characterized, over multiple length scales, by transmission electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and Raman spectroscopy. Transformations to amorphous and disordered phases were observed, with disordering dominating the structural response of materials with small A -site cation ionic radii. Both the disordered and amorphous phases were found to possess weberite-type local ordering, differing only in that the disordered phase exhibits a long-range, modulated arrangement of weberite-type structural units into an average defect-fluorite structure, while the amorphous phase remains fully aperiodic. Comparison with the behavior of titanate and zirconate pyrochlores showed minimal influence of the high covalency of the Sn-O bond on this phase behavior. An analytical model of damage accumulation was developed to account for simultaneous amorphization and recrystallization of the disordered phase during irradiation.

  1. Determination of integral cross sections of 3 H in Al foils monitors irradiated by protons with energies ranging from 40 to 2600 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Titarenko, Yu. E.; Batyaev, V. F.; Chauzova, M. V.; Chauzova, M. V.; Kashirin, I. A.; Malinovskiy, S. V.; Pavlov, K. V.; Rogov, V. I.; Titarenko, A. Yu.; Zhivun, V. M.; Mashnik, S. G.; Stankovskiy, A. Yu.

    2016-01-01

    Our results of 3H production in Al foil monitors (~ 59 mg/cm2 thickness) are presented. We irradiated these foils in 15×15 mm polyethylene bags of ~ 14 mg/cm2 thickness together with foils of Cr (~ 395 mg/cm2 thickness) and 56Fe (~ 332 mg/cm2 thickness) by protons of different energies in a range of 0.04 – 2.6 GeV. The diameters of all the foils were 10.5 mm. The irradiations were carried out at the ITEP accelerator U–10 under the ISTC Project # 3266 in 2006–2009. 3H has been extracted from Al foils using an A307 Sample Oxidizer. We then used an ultra low level liquid scintillation spectrometer Quantulus1220 to measure the 3H β–spectra and the SpectraDec software package was applied for spectra processing, deconvolution and 3H activity determination. The values of the Al (p, x)3H reaction cross sections obtained in these experiments are compared with data measured at other labs and with results of simulations by the MCNP6 radiation transport code using the CEM03.03 event generator.

  2. Determination of integral cross sections of 3H in Al foils monitors irradiated by protons with energies ranging from 40 to 2600 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titarenko, Yu. E.; Batyaev, V. F.; Chauzova, M. V.; Chauzova, M. V.; Kashirin, I. A.; Malinovskiy, S. V.; Pavlov, K. V.; Rogov, V. I.; Titarenko, A. Yu.; Zhivun, V. M.; Mashnik, S. G.; Stankovskiy, A. Yu.

    2016-05-01

    The results of 3H production in Al foil monitors (˜ 59 mg/cm2 thickness) are presented. These foils have been irradiated in 15×15 mm polyethylene bags of ˜ 14 mg/cm2 thickness together with foils of Cr (˜ 395 mg/cm2 thickness) and 56Fe (˜ 332 mg/cm2 thickness) by protons of different energies in a range of 0.04 - 2.6 GeV. The diameters of all the foils were 10.5 mm. The irradiations were carried out at the ITEP accelerator U-10 under the ISTC Project # 3266 in 2006-2009. 3H has been extracted from Al foils using an A307 Sample Oxidizer. An ultra low level liquid scintillation spectrometer Quantulus1220 was used to measure the 3H β-spectra and the SpectraDec software package was applied for spectra processing, deconvolution and 3H activity determination. The values of the Al (p, x)3H reaction cross sections obtained in these experiments are compared with data measured at other labs and with results of simulations by the MCNP6 radiation transport code using the CEM03.03 event generator.

  3. Radiation Stability of Triple Coatings Based on Transition-Metal Nitrides Under Irradiation By Alpha Particles and Argon Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potekaev, A. I.; Kislitsyn, S. B.; Uglov, V. V.; Klopotov, A. A.; Gorlachev, I. D.; Klopotov, V. D.; Grinkevich, L. S.

    2016-05-01

    The data on the influence of irradiation of (Ti, Cr)N1-x coatings by helium and argon ions on their surface structure are presented. The (Ti, Cr)N1-x coatings 50-300 nm in thickness were formed on carbon steel substrates by vacuum-arc deposition. Irradiation of the coated specimens was performed in a DC-60 heavy-ion accelerator by low-energy 4He+1, 4He+2 and 40Ar5+ ions and high-energy 40Ar5+ ions up to the fluence 1.0·1017 ion/cm2 at the irradiation temperature not higher than 150°C. It is shown that irradiation of the (Ti, Cr)N1-x coating surface by 4He+1, 4He+2 and 40Ar5+ ions with the energy 20 keV/charge does not give rise to any noticeable structural changes nor any surface blistering, while its irradiation by 40Ar5+ ions with the energy 1.50 MeV/amu causes blistering.

  4. Pixel pitch and particle energy influence on the dark current distribution of neutron irradiated CMOS image sensors.

    PubMed

    Belloir, Jean-Marc; Goiffon, Vincent; Virmontois, Cédric; Raine, Mélanie; Paillet, Philippe; Duhamel, Olivier; Gaillardin, Marc; Molina, Romain; Magnan, Pierre; Gilard, Olivier

    2016-02-22

    The dark current produced by neutron irradiation in CMOS Image Sensors (CIS) is investigated. Several CIS with different photodiode types and pixel pitches are irradiated with various neutron energies and fluences to study the influence of each of these optical detector and irradiation parameters on the dark current distribution. An empirical model is tested on the experimental data and validated on all the irradiated optical imagers. This model is able to describe all the presented dark current distributions with no parameter variation for neutron energies of 14 MeV or higher, regardless of the optical detector and irradiation characteristics. For energies below 1 MeV, it is shown that a single parameter has to be adjusted because of the lower mean damage energy per nuclear interaction. This model and these conclusions can be transposed to any silicon based solid-state optical imagers such as CIS or Charged Coupled Devices (CCD). This work can also be used when designing an optical imager instrument, to anticipate the dark current increase or to choose a mitigation technique.

  5. Test of hadron interaction models in the most important energy range of secondary particles in spectra of atmospheric muons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dedenko, L. G.; Roganova, T. M.; Fedorova, G. F.

    2014-10-01

    A simple method has been proposed for testing hadron interaction models, which are used to simulate extensive air showers, in observed spectra of atmospheric muons. It has been shown that muon flux intensities in the energy range of 102-104 GeV that are calculated within the SIBYLL 2.1, QGSJETII-04, and QGSJET01 models exceed the data of the classical experiments L3 + Cosmic, MACRO, and LVD on the spectra of atmospheric muons by a factor of 1.5-2. It has been concluded that these tested models overestimate the generation of secondary particles with the highest energies in elementary events of interaction between hadrons in agreement with the LHCf and TOTEM accelerator experiments.

  6. mFISH analysis of irradiated human fibroblasts: a comparison among radiations with different quality in the low-dose range.

    PubMed

    Berardinelli, F; Nieri, D; Tanzarella, C; Cherubini, R; De Nadal, V; Gerardi, S; Sgura, A; Antoccia, A

    2015-09-01

    The present investigation aimed to characterise the shape of dose-response curve and determining the frequency distribution of various aberration types as a function of dose and radiation quality in AG01522 primary human fibroblasts in the 0.1- to 1-Gy dose range. For this purpose, the cells were irradiated with 7.7 and 28.5 keV µm(-1) low-energy protons, 62 keV µm(-1 4)He(2+) ions (LNL Radiobiology facility) or X rays and samples collected for 24-colour mFISH analysis. X rays and 7.7 keV µm(-1) protons displayed a quadratic dose-response curve solely for total and simple exchanges, whereas for high-linear energy transfer radiations, a linear dose-response curve was observed for all the aberration categories, with the exception of complex exchanges.

  7. Optimal irradiation condition of demineralized dentin treatment with a nanosecond pulsed laser at 5.8 μm wavelength range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Katsunori; Saiki, Masayuki; Kita, Tetsuya; Yoshikawa, Kazushi; Yasuo, Kenzo; Yamamoto, Kazuyo; Awazu, Kunio

    2012-06-01

    Conventional dental lasers have not realized a selective excavation of carious dentin. Objective of this study is to determine the optimal irradiation condition for the selective excavation by using a wavelength around 5.8 μm. A nanosecond pulsed laser with a wavelength of 5.8 μm was obtained by difference-frequency generation technique. The laser delivers 5 ns pulse width at a repetition rate of 10 Hz. 5.8 μm wavelength range, a short wavelength required high excavation energy and a long wavelength required low excavation energy to induce the selective excavation with a low thermal side effect. 5.8 μm wavelength provides a selective excavation technique for minimal intervention.

  8. Optically stimulated luminescence and thermoluminescence efficiencies for high-energy heavy charged particle irradiation in Al2O3:C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yukihara, E. G.; Gaza, R.; McKeever, S. W. S.; Soares, C. G.

    2004-01-01

    The thermally and optically stimulated luminescence (TL and OSL) response to high energy heavy-charged particles (HCPs) was investigated for two types of Al2O3:C luminescence dosimeters. The OSL signal was measured in both continuous-wave (CW) and pulsed mode. The efficiencies of the HCPs at producing TL or OSL, relative to gamma radiation, were obtained using four different HCPs beams (150 MeV/u 4He, 400 MeV/u 12C, 490 MeV/u 28Si, and 500 MeV/u 56Fe). The efficiencies were determined as a function of the HCP linear energy transfer (LET). It was observed that the efficiency depends on the type of detector, measurement technique, and the choice of signal. Additionally, it is shown that the shape of the CW-OSL decay curve from Al2O3:C depends on the type of radiation, and, in principle, this can be used to extract information concerning the LET of an unknown radiation field. The response of the dosimeters to low-LET radiation was also investigated for doses in the range from about 1-1000 Gy. These data were used to explain the different efficiency values obtained for the different materials and techniques, as well as the LET dependence of the CW-OSL decay curve shape. c2003 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Optically stimulated luminescence and thermoluminescence efficiencies for high-energy heavy charged particle irradiation in Al2O3:C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yukihara, E. G.; Gaza, R.; McKeever, S. W. S.; Soares, C. G.

    2004-01-01

    The thermally and optically stimulated luminescence (TL and OSL) response to high energy heavy-charged particles (HCPs) was investigated for two types of Al2O3:C luminescence dosimeters. The OSL signal was measured in both continuous-wave (CW) and pulsed mode. The efficiencies of the HCPs at producing TL or OSL, relative to gamma radiation, were obtained using four different HCPs beams (150 MeV/u 4He, 400 MeV/u 12C, 490 MeV/u 28Si, and 500 MeV/u 56Fe). The efficiencies were determined as a function of the HCP linear energy transfer (LET). It was observed that the efficiency depends on the type of detector, measurement technique, and the choice of signal. Additionally, it is shown that the shape of the CW-OSL decay curve from Al2O3:C depends on the type of radiation, and, in principle, this can be used to extract information concerning the LET of an unknown radiation field. The response of the dosimeters to low-LET radiation was also investigated for doses in the range from about 1-1000 Gy. These data were used to explain the different efficiency values obtained for the different materials and techniques, as well as the LET dependence of the CW-OSL decay curve shape. c2003 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Membrane-Dependent Bystander Effect Contributes to Amplification of the Response to Alpha-Particle Irradiation in Targeted and Nontargeted Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hanot, Maite; Hoarau, Jim; Carriere, Marie; Angulo, Jaime F.; Khodja, Hicham

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: Free radicals are believed to play an active role in the bystander response. This study investigated their origin as well as their temporal and spatial impacts in the bystander effect. Methods and Materials: We employed a precise alpha-particle microbeam to target a small fraction of subconfluent osteoblastic cells (MC3T3-E1). gammaH2AX-53BP1 foci, oxidative metabolism changes, and micronuclei induction in targeted and bystander cells were assessed. Results: Cellular membranes and mitochondria were identified as two distinct reactive oxygen species producers. The global oxidative stress observed after irradiation was significantly attenuated after cells were treated with filipin, evidence for the primal role of membrane in the bystander effect. To determine the membrane's impact at a cellular level, micronuclei yield was measured when various fractions of the cell population were individually targeted while the dose per cell remained constant. Induction of micronuclei increased in bystander cells as well as in targeted cells and was attenuated by filipin treatment, demonstrating a role for bystander signals between irradiated cells in an autocrine/paracrine manner. Conclusions: A complex interaction of direct irradiation and bystander signals leads to a membrane-dependent amplification of cell responses that could influence therapeutic outcomes in tissues exposed to low doses or to environmental exposure.

  11. Observations of Heavy Element Abundances over a Broad Energy Range in 3He-rich Solar Energetic Particle Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedenbeck, M. E.; Mason, G. M.; Cohen, C. M.; Leske, R. A.; Cummings, A. C.; Dwyer, J. R.; Mazur, J. E.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Stone, E. C.; von Rosenvinge, T. T.

    2006-05-01

    During the maximum of solar cycle 23 a number of 3He-rich solar energetic particle (SEP) events with measurable intensities of heavy elements (Z≥6) at energies >10 MeV/nuc were observed with instrumentation on the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) spacecraft. This represents a relatively small fraction of all the 3He-rich SEP events that were detected since heavy-ion intensities at these energies were frequently too low to be measured. Using data from two ACE instruments (SIS covering ~10--60 MeV/nuc and ULEIS ~0.2--1 MeV/nuc) we have investigated heavy element abundances over a broad energy range in this special set of events. We report the average abundance ratios and the correlations between different ratios in the two energy intervals. Furthermore we compare the results from the two different energy ranges, both statistically and on an event-by-event basis. In addition, we compare the statistical properties observed in the SIS and ULEIS data sets with previously-published results obtained at intermediate energies (~1--3 MeV/nuc) from instruments on ISEE-3 during the maximum of solar cycle 21 (Mason et al. 1986, Reames et al. 1994).

  12. SYNCHROTRON POLARIZATION AND SYNCHROTRON SELF-ABSORPTION SPECTRA FOR A POWER-LAW PARTICLE DISTRIBUTION WITH FINITE ENERGY RANGE

    SciTech Connect

    Fouka, M.; Ouichaoui, S. E-mail: souichaoui@usthb.dz

    2011-12-10

    We have derived asymptotic forms for the degree of polarization of the optically thin synchrotron and for synchrotron self-absorption (SSA) spectra assuming a power-law particle distribution of the form N({gamma}) {approx} {gamma}{sup -p} with {gamma}{sub 1} < {gamma} < {gamma}{sub 2}, especially for a finite high-energy limit, {gamma}{sub 2}, in the case of an arbitrary pitch angle. The new results inferred concern more especially the high-frequency range x >> {eta}{sup 2} with parameter {eta} = {gamma}{sub 2}/{gamma}{sub 1}. The calculated SSA spectra concern instantaneous photon emission where cooling effects are not considered. They have been obtained by also ignoring likely effects such as Comptonization, pair creation and annihilation, as well as magnetic photon splitting. To that aim, in addition to the two usual absorption frequencies, a third possible one has been derived and expressed in terms of the Lambert W function based on the analytical asymptotic form of the absorption coefficient, {alpha}{sub {nu}}, for the high-frequency range {nu} >> {nu}{sub 2} (with {nu}{sub 2} the synchrotron frequency corresponding to {gamma}{sub 2}). We have shown that the latter frequency may not have realistic applications in astrophysics, except in the case of an adequate set of parameters allowing one to neglect Comptonization effects. More detailed calculations and discussions are presented.

  13. Synchrotron Polarization and Synchrotron Self-absorption Spectra for a Power-law Particle Distribution with Finite Energy Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fouka, M.; Ouichaoui, S.

    2011-12-01

    We have derived asymptotic forms for the degree of polarization of the optically thin synchrotron and for synchrotron self-absorption (SSA) spectra assuming a power-law particle distribution of the form N(γ) ~ γ-p with γ1 < γ < γ2, especially for a finite high-energy limit, γ2, in the case of an arbitrary pitch angle. The new results inferred concern more especially the high-frequency range x Gt η2 with parameter η = γ2/γ1. The calculated SSA spectra concern instantaneous photon emission where cooling effects are not considered. They have been obtained by also ignoring likely effects such as Comptonization, pair creation and annihilation, as well as magnetic photon splitting. To that aim, in addition to the two usual absorption frequencies, a third possible one has been derived and expressed in terms of the Lambert W function based on the analytical asymptotic form of the absorption coefficient, αν, for the high-frequency range ν Gt ν2 (with ν2 the synchrotron frequency corresponding to γ2). We have shown that the latter frequency may not have realistic applications in astrophysics, except in the case of an adequate set of parameters allowing one to neglect Comptonization effects. More detailed calculations and discussions are presented.

  14. Irradiation of Fe-Mn Supersaturated Solid Solution with Ions of Various Atomic Masses (Ar+, Xe+) and Analysis of the Role of Nanosized Dynamic Effects in the Activation Processes of Long-Range Type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovchinnikov, V. V.; Makhin'ko, F. F.; Semionkin, V. A.; Shalomov, K. V.

    2017-05-01

    A multiple increase in the atom mobility in metastable supersaturated (quenched from 850 °C) Fe-8.16 at % Mn solid solution is detected at temperatures less than 250°C under irradiation with 5-keV Ar+ and Xe+ ions of different masses. The irradiation-induced atom redistribution in the entire volume of foils 30 μm thick at a projected Ar+ and Xe+ ion ranges as much as 20-30 nm only is found and studied by the transmission Mössbauer spectroscopy. Long-range effects at low irradiation doses and anomalously low temperatures are attributed to “radiation shaking” of metastable media with post-cascade solitary waves in contrast to thermally stimulated radiation-enhanced processes in the narrow nanoscale near-surface layers of the alloy. It has been shown that heavier Xe+ ions at higher irradiation doses have a stronger impact on the solid solution than Ar+ ions.

  15. Differential Superiority of Heavy Charged-Particle Irradiation to X-Rays: Studies on Biological Effectiveness and Side Effect Mechanisms in Multicellular Tumor and Normal Tissue Models

    PubMed Central

    Walenta, Stefan; Mueller-Klieser, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    This review is focused on the radiobiology of carbon ions compared to X-rays using multicellular models of tumors and normal mucosa. The first part summarizes basic radiobiological effects, as observed in cancer cells. The second, more clinically oriented part of the review, deals with radiation-induced cell migration and mucositis. Multicellular spheroids from V79 hamster cells were irradiated with X-rays or carbon ions under ambient or restricted oxygen supply conditions. Reliable oxygen enhancement ratios could be derived to be 2.9, 2.8, and 1.4 for irradiation with photons, 12C+6 in the plateau region, and 12C+6 in the Bragg peak, respectively. Similarly, a relative biological effectiveness of 4.3 and 2.1 for ambient pO2 and hypoxia was obtained, respectively. The high effectiveness of carbon ions was reflected by an enhanced accumulation of cells in G2/M and a dose-dependent massive induction of apoptosis. These data clearly show that heavy charged particles are more efficient in sterilizing tumor cells than conventional irradiation even under hypoxic conditions. Clinically relevant doses (3 Gy) of X-rays induced an increase in migratory activity of U87 but not of LN229 or HCT116 tumor cells. Such an increase in cell motility following irradiation in situ could be the source of recurrence. In contrast, carbon ion treatment was associated with a dose-dependent decrease in migration with all cell lines and under all conditions investigated. The radiation-induced loss of cell motility was correlated, in most cases, with corresponding changes in β1 integrin expression. The photon-induced increase in cell migration was paralleled by an elevated phosphorylation status of the epidermal growth factor receptor and AKT-ERK1/2 pathway. Such a hyperphosphorylation did not occur during 12C+6 irradiation under all conditions registered. Comparing the gene toxicity of X-rays with that of particles using the γH2AX technique in organotypic cultures of the oral mucosa, the

  16. Differential Superiority of Heavy Charged-Particle Irradiation to X-Rays: Studies on Biological Effectiveness and Side Effect Mechanisms in Multicellular Tumor and Normal Tissue Models.

    PubMed

    Walenta, Stefan; Mueller-Klieser, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    This review is focused on the radiobiology of carbon ions compared to X-rays using multicellular models of tumors and normal mucosa. The first part summarizes basic radiobiological effects, as observed in cancer cells. The second, more clinically oriented part of the review, deals with radiation-induced cell migration and mucositis. Multicellular spheroids from V79 hamster cells were irradiated with X-rays or carbon ions under ambient or restricted oxygen supply conditions. Reliable oxygen enhancement ratios could be derived to be 2.9, 2.8, and 1.4 for irradiation with photons, (12)C(+6) in the plateau region, and (12)C(+6) in the Bragg peak, respectively. Similarly, a relative biological effectiveness of 4.3 and 2.1 for ambient pO2 and hypoxia was obtained, respectively. The high effectiveness of carbon ions was reflected by an enhanced accumulation of cells in G2/M and a dose-dependent massive induction of apoptosis. These data clearly show that heavy charged particles are more efficient in sterilizing tumor cells than conventional irradiation even under hypoxic conditions. Clinically relevant doses (3 Gy) of X-rays induced an increase in migratory activity of U87 but not of LN229 or HCT116 tumor cells. Such an increase in cell motility following irradiation in situ could be the source of recurrence. In contrast, carbon ion treatment was associated with a dose-dependent decrease in migration with all cell lines and under all conditions investigated. The radiation-induced loss of cell motility was correlated, in most cases, with corresponding changes in β1 integrin expression. The photon-induced increase in cell migration was paralleled by an elevated phosphorylation status of the epidermal growth factor receptor and AKT-ERK1/2 pathway. Such a hyperphosphorylation did not occur during (12)C(+6) irradiation under all conditions registered. Comparing the gene toxicity of X-rays with that of particles using the γH2AX technique in organotypic cultures of the oral

  17. Fission products silver, palladium, and cadmium identification in neutron-irradiated SiC TRISO particles using a Cs-Corrected HRTEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Rooyen, I. J.; Olivier, E. J.; Neethling, J. H.

    2016-08-01

    Electron microscopy investigations of selected coated particles from the first advanced gas reactor experiment at Idaho National Laboratory provided important information on fission product distribution and chemical composition in the silicon-carbide (SiC) layer. Silver precipitates were nano-sized, and therefore high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) was used to provide more information at the atomic level. Based on gamma-ray analysis, this particle which was irradiated to an average burnup of 19.38% fissions per initial metal atom, may have released as much as 10% of its available Ag-110 m inventory during irradiation. The HRTEM investigation focused on silver, palladium, and cadmium due to interest in silver transport mechanisms and possible correlation with palladium and silver previously found. Palladium, silver, and cadmium were found to co-exist in some of the SiC grain boundaries and triple junctions. This study confirmed palladium both at inter and intragranular sites. Phosphor was identified in SiC grain boundaries and triple points.

  18. Hydrothermal synthesis of meso/macroporous BiVO4 hierarchical particles and their photocatalytic degradation properties under visible light irradiation.

    PubMed

    Madhusudan, Puttaswamy; Kumar, Malahalli Vijaya; Ishigaki, Tadashi; Toda, Kenji; Uematsu, Kazuyoshi; Sato, Mineo

    2013-09-01

    An ordered hierarchical meso/macroporous monoclinic bismuth vanadate (BiVO4) particle was fabricated for the first time by a simple two-step melamine template hydrothermal method followed by calcination. The physiochemical parameters of as-prepared porous materials were characterized by means of X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, Raman, Barrett-Emmett-Teller, and UV-vis techniques. The nitrogen adsorption-desorption measurement and pore size distribution curve suggest that meso/macropores exist in these hierarchical microarchitectures. Further, it is found that melamine plays a significant role in the formation of porous BiVO4 particles, and when a known amount of melamine was added, the surface area and pore size of such porous BiVO4 particles were increased. The photocatalytic activities of the as-prepared hierarchical BiVO4 samples were measured for the photodegradation of Congo red aqueous dye solution under visible light irradiation. Surprisingly, the porous BiVO4 particles showed outstanding photocatalytic activities than polycrystalline BiVO4 sample. The possible enhancement of such catalytic performance has also been further discussed.

  19. KEY RESULTS FROM IRRADIATION AND POST-IRRADIATION EXAMINATION OF AGR-1 UCO TRISO FUEL

    SciTech Connect

    Demkowicz, Paul A.; Hunn, John D.; Petti, David A.; Morris, Robert N.

    2016-11-01

    The AGR-1 irradiation experiment was performed as the first test of tristructural isotropic (TRISO) fuel in the US Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Program. The experiment consisted of 72 right cylinder fuel compacts containing approximately 3×105 coated fuel particles with uranium oxide/uranium carbide (UCO) fuel kernels. The fuel was irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor for a total of 620 effective full power days. Fuel burnup ranged from 11.3 to 19.6% fissions per initial metal atom and time average, volume average irradiation temperatures of the individual compacts ranged from 955 to 1136°C. This paper focuses on key results from the irradiation and post-irradiation examination, which revealed a robust fuel with excellent performance characteristics under the conditions tested and have significantly improved the understanding of UCO coated particle fuel irradiation behavior within the US program. The fuel exhibited a very low incidence of TRISO coating failure during irradiation and post-irradiation safety testing at temperatures up to 1800°C. Advanced PIE methods have allowed particles with SiC coating failure to be isolated and meticulously examined, which has elucidated the specific causes of SiC failure in these specimens. The level of fission product release from the fuel during irradiation and post-irradiation safety testing has been studied in detail. Results indicated very low release of krypton and cesium through intact SiC and modest release of europium and strontium, while also confirming the potential for significant silver release through the coatings depending on irradiation conditions. Focused study of fission products within the coating layers of irradiated particles down to nanometer length scales has provided new insights into fission product transport through the coating layers and the role various fission products may have on coating integrity. The broader implications of these results and the application of

  20. Measurement of Long-Range Near-Side Two-Particle Angular Correlations in p p Collisions at √{s }=13 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Asilar, E.; Bergauer, T.; Brandstetter, J.; Brondolin, E.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Flechl, M.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Knünz, V.; König, A.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Matsushita, T.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schieck, J.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Cornelis, T.; de Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Lauwers, J.; Luyckx, S.; van de Klundert, M.; van Haevermaet, H.; van Mechelen, P.; van Remortel, N.; van Spilbeeck, A.; Abu Zeid, S.; Blekman, F.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; de Bruyn, I.; Deroover, K.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Moreels, L.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; van Doninck, W.; van Mulders, P.; van Onsem, G. P.; van Parijs, I.; Barria, P.; Brun, H.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; de Lentdecker, G.; Fasanella, G.; Favart, L.; Grebenyuk, A.; Karapostoli, G.; Lenzi, T.; Léonard, A.; Maerschalk, T.; Marinov, A.; Perniè, L.; Randle-Conde, A.; Seva, T.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Yonamine, R.; Zenoni, F.; Zhang, F.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Crucy, S.; Dobur, D.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Gul, M.; McCartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Poyraz, D.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva, S.; Sigamani, M.; Tytgat, M.; van Driessche, W.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bondu, O.; Brochet, S.; Bruno, G.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; da Silveira, G. G.; Delaere, C.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Mertens, A.; Musich, M.; Nuttens, C.; Perrini, L.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Beliy, N.; Hammad, G. H.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, F. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Hamer, M.; Hensel, C.; Moraes, A.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; da Costa, E. M.; de Jesus Damiao, D.; de Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca de Souza, S.; Huertas Guativa, L. M.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mora Herrera, C.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Ahuja, S.; Bernardes, C. A.; de Souza Santos, A.; Dogra, S.; Tomei, T. R. Fernandez Perez; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Moon, C. S.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Romero Abad, D.; Ruiz Vargas, J. C.; Aleksandrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Ahmad, M.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Plestina, R.; Romeo, F.; Shaheen, S. M.; Spiezia, A.; Tao, J.; Wang, C.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, H.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Puljak, I.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Micanovic, S.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Bodlak, M.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; El-Khateeb, E.; Elkafrawy, T.; Mohamed, A.; Salama, E.; Calpas, B.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Veelken, C.; Eerola, P.; Pekkanen, J.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Machet, M.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Zghiche, A.; Antropov, I.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Cadamuro, L.; Chapon, E.; Charlot, C.; Davignon, O.; Filipovic, N.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Jo, M.; Lisniak, S.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Miné, P.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Ortona, G.; Paganini, P.; Pigard, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J. B.; Sirois, Y.; Strebler, T.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Buttignol, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Chanon, N.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Coubez, X.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Merlin, J. A.; Skovpen, K.; van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.; Beauceron, S.

    2016-04-01

    Results on two-particle angular correlations for charged particles produced in p p collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV are presented. The data were taken with the CMS detector at the LHC and correspond to an integrated luminosity of about 270 nb-1 . The correlations are studied over a broad range of pseudorapidity (|η | <2.4 ) and over the full azimuth (ϕ ) as a function of charged particle multiplicity and transverse momentum (pT ). In high-multiplicity events, a long-range (|Δ η | >2.0 ), near-side (Δ ϕ ≈0 ) structure emerges in the two-particle Δ η -Δ ϕ correlation functions. The magnitude of the correlation exhibits a pronounced maximum in the range 1.0 particle multiplicity, with an overall correlation strength similar to that found in earlier p p data at √{s }=7 TeV . The present measurement extends the study of near-side long-range correlations up to charged particle multiplicities Nch˜180 , a region so far unexplored in p p collisions. The observed long-range correlations are compared to those seen in p p , p Pb , and PbPb collisions at lower collision energies.

  1. Measurement of Long-Range Near-Side Two-Particle Angular Correlations in pp Collisions at sqrt[s]=13  TeV.

    PubMed

    Khachatryan, V; Sirunyan, A M; Tumasyan, A; Adam, W; Asilar, E; Bergauer, T; Brandstetter, J; Brondolin, E; Dragicevic, M; Erö, J; Flechl, M; Friedl, M; Frühwirth, R; Ghete, V M; Hartl, C; Hörmann, N; Hrubec, J; Jeitler, M; Knünz, V; König, A; Krammer, M; Krätschmer, I; Liko, D; Matsushita, T; Mikulec, I; Rabady, D; Rahbaran, B; Rohringer, H; Schieck, J; Schöfbeck, R; Strauss, J; Treberer-Treberspurg, W; Waltenberger, W; Wulz, C-E; Mossolov, V; Shumeiko, N; Suarez Gonzalez, J; Alderweireldt, S; Cornelis, T; De Wolf, E A; Janssen, X; Knutsson, A; Lauwers, J; Luyckx, S; Van De Klundert, M; Van Haevermaet, H; Van Mechelen, P; Van Remortel, N; Van Spilbeeck, A; Abu Zeid, S; Blekman, F; D'Hondt, J; Daci, N; De Bruyn, I; Deroover, K; Heracleous, N; Keaveney, J; Lowette, S; Moreels, L; Olbrechts, A; Python, Q; Strom, D; Tavernier, S; Van Doninck, W; Van Mulders, P; Van Onsem, G P; Van Parijs, I; Barria, P; Brun, H; Caillol, C; Clerbaux, B; De Lentdecker, G; Fasanella, G; Favart, L; Grebenyuk, A; Karapostoli, G; Lenzi, T; Léonard, A; Maerschalk, T; Marinov, A; Perniè, L; Randle-Conde, A; Seva, T; Vander Velde, C; Vanlaer, P; Yonamine, R; Zenoni, F; Zhang, F; Beernaert, K; Benucci, L; Cimmino, A; Crucy, S; Dobur, D; Fagot, A; Garcia, G; Gul, M; Mccartin, J; Ocampo Rios, A A; Poyraz, D; Ryckbosch, D; Salva, S; Sigamani, M; Tytgat, M; Van Driessche, W; Yazgan, E; Zaganidis, N; Basegmez, S; Beluffi, C; Bondu, O; Brochet, S; Bruno, G; Caudron, A; Ceard, L; Da Silveira, G G; Delaere, C; Favart, D; Forthomme, L; Giammanco, A; Hollar, J; Jafari, A; Jez, P; Komm, M; Lemaitre, V; Mertens, A; Musich, M; Nuttens, C; Perrini, L; Pin, A; Piotrzkowski, K; Popov, A; Quertenmont, L; Selvaggi, M; Vidal Marono, M; Beliy, N; Hammad, G H; Aldá Júnior, W L; Alves, F L; Alves, G A; Brito, L; Correa Martins Junior, M; Hamer, M; Hensel, C; Moraes, A; Pol, M E; Rebello Teles, P; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, E; Carvalho, W; Chinellato, J; Custódio, A; Da Costa, E M; De Jesus Damiao, D; De Oliveira Martins, C; 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Hall-Wilton, R; Herndon, M; Hervé, A; Klabbers, P; Lanaro, A; Levine, A; Long, K; Loveless, R; Mohapatra, A; Ojalvo, I; Perry, T; Pierro, G A; Polese, G; Ruggles, T; Sarangi, T; Savin, A; Sharma, A; Smith, N; Smith, W H; Taylor, D; Verwilligen, P; Woods, N

    2016-04-29

    Results on two-particle angular correlations for charged particles produced in pp collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV are presented. The data were taken with the CMS detector at the LHC and correspond to an integrated luminosity of about 270  nb^{-1}. The correlations are studied over a broad range of pseudorapidity (|η|<2.4) and over the full azimuth (ϕ) as a function of charged particle multiplicity and transverse momentum (p_{T}). In high-multiplicity events, a long-range (|Δη|>2.0), near-side (Δϕ≈0) structure emerges in the two-particle Δη-Δϕ correlation functions. The magnitude of the correlation exhibits a pronounced maximum in the range 1.0particle multiplicity, with an overall correlation strength similar to that found in earlier pp data at sqrt[s]=7  TeV. The present measurement extends the study of near-side long-range correlations up to charged particle multiplicities N_{ch}∼180, a region so far unexplored in pp collisions. The observed long-range correlations are compared to those seen in pp, pPb, and PbPb collisions at lower collision energies.

  2. Poster - Thurs Eve-37: Energy and irradiation modality independence of calibration coefficients for water equivalent plastic scintillation detectors in the megavoltage range.

    PubMed

    Guillot, M; Lacroix, F; Thériault, F; Beaulieu, L; Gingras, L

    2008-07-01

    To demonstrate that the independence of the calibration coefficients of plastic scintillation detector (PSD) for both photon and electron beams in the megavoltage energy range. The PSD consists in a small 1 mm diameter and 2 mm long plastic scintillating fiber made of a polystyrene core (BCF-12, Saint-Gobain, inc.). The scintillator was coupled to a 2 meters long non-scintillating plastic optical fiber and a color CCD camera (Apogee instruments inc.) was used as photodetector. The calibration coefficients of the PSD where extracted for 6 MV, 23 MV photon beams and 9,12,15 and 18 MeV electron beams using a Farmer ionization chamber (Exradin). Complete removal of the Cerenkov radiation produced in the optical fiber was performed with a chromatic discrimination technique using the blue and green channel of the CCD camera. All measurements were performed according to the recommendations of the AAPM TG-51 protocol for clinical dosimetry. The PSD exhibits a maximum deviation of less than 1.7 % (about the mean) of its calibration coefficients over the measured energy range for both irradiation modalities. The energy independence of the calibration coefficients for PSD was demonstrated experimentally for the first time for both photons and electrons. PSDs have the potential to simplify and improve accuracy of dose measurements in clinical situations where photons and electrons are both present in the beam such as electron contamination in photon beams or bremsstrahlung contaminated electron beams. © 2008 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  3. Particle Formation from Pulsed Laser Irradiation of SootAggregates studied with scanning mobility particle sizer, transmissionelectron microscope and near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure.

    SciTech Connect

    Michelsen, Hope A.; Tivanski, Alexei V.; Gilles, Mary K.; vanPoppel, Laura H.; Dansson, Mark A.; Buseck, Peter R.; Buseck, Peter R.

    2007-02-20

    We investigated the physical and chemical changes induced in soot aggregates exposed to laser radiation using a scanning mobility particle sizer, a transmission electron microscope, and a scanning transmission x-ray microscope to perform near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy. Laser-induced nanoparticle production was observed at fluences above 0.12 J/cm(2) at 532 nm and 0.22 J/cm(2) at 1064 nm. Our results indicate that new particle formation proceeds via (1) vaporization of small carbon clusters by thermal or photolytic mechanisms, followed by homogeneous nucleation, (2) heterogeneous nucleation of vaporized carbon clusters onto material ablated from primary particles, or (3) both processes.

  4. Long range transport of smoke particles from Canadian forest fires to the Mediterranean basin during June 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Iorio, T.; Anello, F.; Bommarito, C.; Cacciani, M.; Denjean, C.; De Silvestri, L.; Di Biagio, C.; di Sarra, A.; Ellul, R.; Formenti, P.; Gómez-Amo, J.; Martinez-Lozano, J. A.; Meloni, D.; Monteleone, F.; Pace, G.; Piacentino, S.; Schioppo, R.; Sferlazzo, D.

    2013-12-01

    23, as also revealed by MODIS, OMI, and CALIOP images and data. The circulation systems of those days was favorable to the long range eastward transport of these aerosol plumes towards Europe, down to the Mediterranean Sea. A further confirmation of the advection of Canadian airmasses over the Mediterranean central region during this period is provided by measurements made at Gozo. The Gozo AERONET Cimel data analysis on June 27 shows a single scattering albedo with spectral characteristics typical of biomass burning, with the contribution of fine particles to the total AOD growing progressively up to 92% in the early afternoon. At Capo Granitola the AOD peaked at about 0.8 in the late afternoon of June 27, with elevated values (> 2) of the AE. The ATR42 overflew the area on those days and additional observational evidence will be sought in its data.

  5. First comprehensive inter-comparison of aerosol electrometers for particle sizes up to 200 nm and concentration range 1000 cm-3 to 17 000 cm-3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Högström, Richard; Quincey, Paul; Sarantaridis, Dimitris; Lüönd, Felix; Nowak, Andreas; Riccobono, Francesco; Tuch, Thomas; Sakurai, Hiromu; Owen, Miles; Heinonen, Martti; Keskinen, Jorma; Yli-Ojanperä, Jaakko

    2014-06-01

    The concentration of nanometre-sized particles is frequently measured in terms of particle number concentration using well-established measuring instruments, e.g. condensation particle counters. Traceability for these measurements can be achieved by means of calibrations using an aerosol electrometer (AE) as a reference. A number of national metrology institutes (NMIs) and expert laboratories provide such calibrations, but the metrological basis is at present not well established because the equivalence between the unit realizations has not been investigated by means of an inter-laboratory comparison. This paper presents the results of the first comprehensive comparison of AEs involving NMIs and expert laboratories worldwide. The comparison covered the particle size and charge concentrations ranges 20 nm to 200 nm and 0.16 × 10-15 C cm-3 to 2.72 × 10-15 C cm-3 (equivalent to 1000 cm-3 to 17 000 cm-3 singly charged particles), respectively. The obtained results agreed to within about ±3%, which was within stated uncertainties, with only a few exceptions, such as at low concentrations. Additional measurements with sub-20 nm particles show that comparisons in this size range are more challenging and require special considerations, though agreement to within about ±5% was still found with 6 nm particles. This comparison is the first and vital step towards internationally recognized SI traceability in particle number concentration measurements.

  6. Differential Radiosensitivity Phenotypes of DNA-PKcs Mutations Affecting NHEJ and HRR Systems following Irradiation with Gamma-Rays or Very Low Fluences of Alpha Particles

    PubMed Central

    Little, John B.; Kato, Takamitsu A.; Shih, Hung-Ying; Xie, Xian-Jin; Wilson Jr., Paul F.; Brogan, John R.; Kurimasa, Akihiro; Chen, David J.; Bedford, Joel S.; Chen, Benjamin P. C.

    2014-01-01

    We have examined cell-cycle dependence of chromosomal aberration induction and cell killing after high or low dose-rate γ irradiation in cells bearing DNA-PKcs mutations in the S2056 cluster, the T2609 cluster, or the kinase domain. We also compared sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) production by very low fluences of α-particles in DNA-PKcs mutant cells, and in homologous recombination repair (HRR) mutant cells including Rad51C, Rad51D, and Fancg/xrcc9. Generally, chromosomal aberrations and cell killing by γ-rays were similarly affected by mutations in DNA-PKcs, and these mutant cells were more sensitive in G1 than in S/G2 phase. In G1-irradiated DNA-PKcs mutant cells, both chromosome- and chromatid-type breaks and exchanges were in excess than wild-type cells. For cells irradiated in late S/G2 phase, mutant cells showed very high yields of chromatid breaks compared to wild-type cells. Few exchanges were seen in DNA-PKcs-null, Ku80-null, or DNA-PKcs kinase dead mutants, but exchanges in excess were detected in the S2506 or T2609 cluster mutants. SCE induction by very low doses of α-particles is resulted from bystander effects in cells not traversed by α-particles. SCE seen in wild-type cells was completely abolished in Rad51C- or Rad51D-deficient cells, but near normal in Fancg/xrcc9 cells. In marked contrast, very high levels of SCEs were observed in DNA-PKcs-null, DNA-PKcs kinase-dead and Ku80-null mutants. SCE induction was also abolished in T2609 cluster mutant cells, but was only slightly reduced in the S2056 cluster mutant cells. Since both non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) and HRR systems utilize initial DNA lesions as a substrate, these results suggest the possibility of a competitive interference phenomenon operating between NHEJ and at least the Rad51C/D components of HRR; the level of interaction between damaged DNA and a particular DNA-PK component may determine the level of interaction of such DNA with a relevant HRR component. PMID:24714417

  7. Differential radiosensitivity phenotypes of DNA-PKcs mutations affecting NHEJ and HRR systems following irradiation with gamma-rays or very low fluences of alpha particles.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yu-Fen; Nagasawa, Hatsumi; Little, John B; Kato, Takamitsu A; Shih, Hung-Ying; Xie, Xian-Jin; Wilson, Paul F; Brogan, John R; Kurimasa, Akihiro; Chen, David J; Bedford, Joel S; Chen, Benjamin P C

    2014-01-01

    We have examined cell-cycle dependence of chromosomal aberration induction and cell killing after high or low dose-rate γ irradiation in cells bearing DNA-PKcs mutations in the S2056 cluster, the T2609 cluster, or the kinase domain. We also compared sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) production by very low fluences of α-particles in DNA-PKcs mutant cells, and in homologous recombination repair (HRR) mutant cells including Rad51C, Rad51D, and Fancg/xrcc9. Generally, chromosomal aberrations and cell killing by γ-rays were similarly affected by mutations in DNA-PKcs, and these mutant cells were more sensitive in G1 than in S/G2 phase. In G1-irradiated DNA-PKcs mutant cells, both chromosome- and chromatid-type breaks and exchanges were in excess than wild-type cells. For cells irradiated in late S/G2 phase, mutant cells showed very high yields of chromatid breaks compared to wild-type cells. Few exchanges were seen in DNA-PKcs-null, Ku80-null, or DNA-PKcs kinase dead mutants, but exchanges in excess were detected in the S2506 or T2609 cluster mutants. SCE induction by very low doses of α-particles is resulted from bystander effects in cells not traversed by α-particles. SCE seen in wild-type cells was completely abolished in Rad51C- or Rad51D-deficient cells, but near normal in Fancg/xrcc9 cells. In marked contrast, very high levels of SCEs were observed in DNA-PKcs-null, DNA-PKcs kinase-dead and Ku80-null mutants. SCE induction was also abolished in T2609 cluster mutant cells, but was only slightly reduced in the S2056 cluster mutant cells. Since both non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) and HRR systems utilize initial DNA lesions as a substrate, these results suggest the possibility of a competitive interference phenomenon operating between NHEJ and at least the Rad51C/D components of HRR; the level of interaction between damaged DNA and a particular DNA-PK component may determine the level of interaction of such DNA with a relevant HRR component.

  8. Differences in photoluminescence properties and thermal degradation between nanoparticle and bulk particle BaMgAl10O17:Eu2+ phosphors under UV?VUV irradiation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bitao; Xin, Shuangyu; Li, Fenghua; Zhang, Jiachi; Wang, Yuhua

    2014-05-01

    BaMgAl10O17:Eu2+ (BAM) phosphors used for plasma display panels and three-band fluorescence lamps are exposed to an oxidizing environment at about 500 degrees C, which is currently unavoidable in actual applications. We investigated the mechanism of the luminance degradation of BAM caused by annealing at 500 degrees C based on the difference in luminance degradation of bulk particle and nanoparticle samples under various excitation source irradiations. When the samples were excited by the different light sources, more than 30% degradation of luminance occurred under 147 nm while less than 10% degradation occurred under 254 nm both for nanoparticle and bulk particle samples. In addition, the luminescence degradation of nanophosphors shows a different tendency compared to the bulk phosphors. With a model based on the particle size and excitation light penetration depth, we demonstrate that the degradation is still mainly ascribed to the oxidized of divalent Eu. The differences in luminescence properties between nanophosphors and bulk phosphors are also illustrated by this model. As a result, the potential industrial applications of nanophosphors are evaluated.

  9. Interactions of secondary particles with thorium samples in the setup QUINTA irradiated with 6 GeV deuterons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khushvaktov, J.; Adam, J.; Baldin, A. A.; Chilap, V. V.; Furman, V. I.; Sagimbaeva, F.; Solnyshkin, A. A.; Stegailov, V. I.; Tichy, P.; Tsoupko-Sitnikov, V. M.; Tyutyunnikov, S. I.; Vespalec, R.; Vrzalova, J.; Yuldashev, B. S.; Wagner, V.; Zavorka, L.; Zeman, M.

    2016-08-01

    The natural uranium assembly, QUINTA, was irradiated with 6 GeV deuterons. The 232Th samples were placed at the central axis of the setup QUINTA. The spectra of gamma rays emitted by the activated 232Th samples have been analysed and more than one hundred nuclei produced have been identified. For each of those products, reaction rates have been determined. The ratio of the weight of produced 233U to 232Th is presented. Experimental results were compared with the results of Monte Carlo simulations by FLUKA code.

  10. Irradiation creep of candidate materials for advanced nuclear plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J.; Jung, P.; Hoffelner, W.

    2013-10-01

    In the present paper, irradiation creep results of an intermetallic TiAl alloy and two ferritic oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels are summarized. In situ irradiation creep measurements were performed using homogeneous implantation with α- and p-particles to maximum doses of 0.8 dpa at displacement damage rates of 2-8 × 10-6 dpa/s. The strains of miniaturized flat dog-bone specimens were monitored under uniaxial tensile stresses ranging from 20 to 400 MPa at temperatures of 573, 673 and 773 K, respectively. The effects of material composition, ODS particle size, and bombarding particle on the irradiation creep compliance was studied and results are compared to literature data. Evolution of microstructure during helium implantation was investigated in detail by TEM and is discussed with respect to irradiation creep models.

  11. Study of LiOH etching of polyethyleneterephtalate irradiated with 11.4 MeV/amu Pb ions by neutron depth profiling and alpha particle transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vacík, J.; Červená, J.; Hnatowicz, V.; Fink, D.; Strauss, P.

    1998-12-01

    Polyethyleneterephtalate (PETP) foils, 23 μm thick, irradiated with 11.4 MeV/amu Pb ions to the fluence of about 1 × 107 cm-2 were etched in 5M LiOH solution at the temperature of 40°C for 30-570 min and the etching process kinetics was examined by combined alpha particle transmission (APT) and neutron depth profiling (NDP) techniques. The etching process was visualized from very initial stages up to the breakthrough and the appearance of first openings after about 300 min of etching. Several parameters characterizing the etching process were determined and the pore internal profile was determined by comparing the measured APT spectra with those simulated by Monte-Carlo method.

  12. Measurement of long-range near-side two-particle angular correlations in pp collisions at $$\\sqrt{s}$$ = 13 TeV

    DOE PAGES

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2016-04-27

    Our results on two-particle angular correlations for charged particles produced in pp collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV are presented. The data were taken with the CMS detector at the LHC and correspond to an integrated luminosity of about 270 nb-1. The correlations are studied over a broad range of pseudorapidity (|η| < 2.4) and over the full azimuth (Φ) as a function of charged particle multiplicity and transverse momentum (pT). In high-multiplicity events, a long-range (|Δη| > 2.0), near-side (ΔΦ≈ 0) structure emerges in the two-particle Dh–Df correlation functions. The magnitude of the correlation exhibits a pronouncedmore » maximum in the range 1.0 < pT < 2.0 GeV/c and an approximately linear increase with the charged particle multiplicity. The overall correlation strength at √s = 13 TeV is similar to that found in earlier pp data at √s = 7 TeV, but is measured up to much higher multiplicity values. We observed long-range correlations are compared to those seen in pp, pPb, and PbPb collisions at lower collision energies.« less

  13. Measurement of charged particle yields from PMMA irradiated by a 220 MeV/u 12C beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piersanti, L.; Bellini, F.; Bini, F.; Collamati, F.; De Lucia, E.; Durante, M.; Faccini, R.; Ferroni, F.; Fiore, S.; Iarocci, E.; La Tessa, C.; Marafini, M.; Mattei, I.; Patera, V.; Ortega, P. G.; Sarti, A.; Schuy, C.; Sciubba, A.; Vanstalle, M.; Voena, C.

    2014-04-01

    The radiation used in hadrontherapy treatments interacts with the patient body producing secondary particles, either neutral or charged, that can be used for dose and Bragg peak monitoring and to provide a fast feedback on the treatment plans. Recent results obtained from the authors on simplified setups (mono-energetic primary beams interacting with homogeneous tissue-like target) have already indicated the correlation that exists between the flux of these secondaries coming from the target (e.g. protons and photons) and the position of the primary beam Bragg peak. In this paper, the measurements of charged particle fluxes produced by the interaction of a 220 MeV/u carbon ion beam at GSI, Darmstadt, with a polymethyl methacrylate target are reported. The emission region of protons (p), deuterons (d) and tritons (t) has been characterized using a drift chamber while the particle time-of-flight, used to compute the kinetic energy spectra, was measured with a LYSO scintillator. The energy released in the LYSO crystal was used for particle identification purposes. The measurements were repeated with the setup at 60° and 90° with respect to the primary beam direction. The accuracy on the fragments emission profile reconstruction and its relationship with the Bragg peak position have been studied. Based on the acquired experimental evidence, a method to monitor the dose profile and the position of the Bragg peak inside the target is proposed.

  14. Measurement of charged particle yields from PMMA irradiated by a 220 MeV/u (12)C beam.

    PubMed

    Piersanti, L; Bellini, F; Bini, F; Collamati, F; De Lucia, E; Durante, M; Faccini, R; Ferroni, F; Fiore, S; Iarocci, E; La Tessa, C; Marafini, M; Mattei, I; Patera, V; Ortega, P G; Sarti, A; Schuy, C; Sciubba, A; Vanstalle, M; Voena, C

    2014-04-07

    The radiation used in hadrontherapy treatments interacts with the patient body producing secondary particles, either neutral or charged, that can be used for dose and Bragg peak monitoring and to provide a fast feedback on the treatment plans. Recent results obtained from the authors on simplified setups (mono-energetic primary beams interacting with homogeneous tissue-like target) have already indicated the correlation that exists between the flux of these secondaries coming from the target (e.g. protons and photons) and the position of the primary beam Bragg peak. In this paper, the measurements of charged particle fluxes produced by the interaction of a 220 MeV/u carbon ion beam at GSI, Darmstadt, with a polymethyl methacrylate target are reported. The emission region of protons (p), deuterons (d) and tritons (t) has been characterized using a drift chamber while the particle time-of-flight, used to compute the kinetic energy spectra, was measured with a LYSO scintillator. The energy released in the LYSO crystal was used for particle identification purposes. The measurements were repeated with the setup at 60° and 90° with respect to the primary beam direction. The accuracy on the fragments emission profile reconstruction and its relationship with the Bragg peak position have been studied. Based on the acquired experimental evidence, a method to monitor the dose profile and the position of the Bragg peak inside the target is proposed.

  15. Complete MALDI-ToF MS analysis of cross-linked peptide–RNA oligonucleotides derived from nonlabeled UV-irradiated ribonucleoprotein particles

    PubMed Central

    KÜHN-HÖLSKEN, EVA; LENZ, CHRISTOF; SANDER, BJÖRN; LÜHRMANN, REINHARD; URLAUB, HENNING

    2005-01-01

    Protein–RNA cross-linking combined with mass spectrometry is a powerful tool to elucidate hitherto noncharacterized protein–RNA contacts in ribonucleoprotein particles, as, for example, within spliceosomes. Here, we describe an improved methodology for the sequence analysis of purified peptide–RNA oligonucleotide cross-links that is based solely on MALDI-ToF mass spectrometry. The utility of this methodology is demonstrated on cross-links isolated from UV-irradiated spliceosomal particles; these were (1) [15.5K–61K–U4atac] small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP) particles prepared by reconstitution in vitro, and (2) U1 snRNP particles purified from HeLa cells. We show that the use of 2′,4′,6′-trihydroxyacetophenone (THAP) as MALDI matrix allows analysis of cross-linked peptide–RNA oligonucleotides in the reflectron mode at high resolution, enabling sufficient accuracy to assign unambiguously cross-linked RNA sequences. Most important, post-source decay (PSD) analysis under these conditions was successfully applied to obtain sequence information about the cross-linked peptide and RNA moieties within a single spectrum, including the identification of the actual cross-linking site. Thus, in U4atac snRNA we identified His270 in the spliceosomal U4/U6 snRNP-specific protein 61K (hPrp31p) cross-linked to U44; in the U1 snRNP we show that Leu175 of the U1 snRNP-specific 70K protein is cross-linked to U30 of U1 snRNA. This type of analysis is applicable to any type of RNP complex and may be expected to pave the way for the further analysis of protein–RNA complexes in much lower abundance and/or of cross-links that are obtained in low yield. PMID:16314460

  16. Hydrophobization of polymer particles by tetrafluoromethane (CF4) plasma irradiation using a barrel-plasma-treatment system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsubara, Keisuke; Danno, Masato; Inoue, Mitsuhiro; Nishizawa, Hideki; Honda, Yuji; Abe, Takayuki

    2013-11-01

    In this study, tetrafluoromethane (CF4) plasma-treatments of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) powder were performed using a polygonal barrel-plasma-treatment system to improve the PMMA's hydrophobicity. Characterization of the treated samples showed that the PMMA particle surfaces were fluorinated by the CF4 treatment. The smooth surfaces of the particles changed into nano-sized worm-like structures after the plasma-treatment. The hydrophobicity of the treated PMMA samples was superior to that of the untreated samples. It was noted that the hydrophobicity of the treated samples and the surface fluorination level depended on the plasma-treatment time and radiofrequency (RF) power; high RF power increased the sample temperature, which in turn decreased the hydrophobicity of the treated samples and the surface fluorination because of the thermal decomposition of PMMA. The water-repellent effects were evaluated by using paper towels to show the application of the plasma-treated PMMA particles, with the result that the paper towel coated with the treated sample was highly water-repellent.

  17. Performance of a focused cavity aerosol spectrometer for measurements in the stratosphere of particle size in the 0.06-2.0-micrometer-diameter range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jonsson, H. H.; Wilson, J. C.; Brock, C. A.; Knollenberg, R. G.; Newton, R.; Dye, J. E.; Baumgardner, D.; Borrmann, S.; Ferry, G. V.; Pueschel, R.

    1995-01-01

    A focused cavity aerosol spectrometer aboard a NASA ER-2 high-altitude aircraft provided high-resolution measurements of the size of the stratospheric particles in the 0.06-2.0-micrometer-diameter range in flights following the eruption of Mount Pinatubo in 1991. Effects of anisokinetic sampling and evaporation in the sampling system were accounted for by means adapted and specifically developed for this instrument. Calibrations with monodisperse aerosol particles provided the instrument's response matrix, which upon inversion during data reduction yielded the particle size distributions. The resultant dataset is internally consistent and generally shows agreement to within a factor of 2 with comparable measurements simultaneously obtained by a condensation nuclei counter, a forward-scattering spectrometer probe, and aerosol particle impactors, as well as with nearby extinction profiles obtained by satellite measurements and with lidar measurements of backscatter.

  18. Development of the Small Package Single Particle Soot Photometer with extended range (SP2-XR) and black carbon detection efficiency compared to its predecessor, the SP2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, H.; Kok, G. L.; Zanatta, M.; Schwarz, J. P.; Herber, A. B.

    2016-12-01

    Black carbon (BC) aerosol is an important contributor to climate change due to its ability to very efficiently absorb solar radiation. The Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2) is an instrument that quantifies the refractory mass of individual BC-containing particles with a laser-induced incandescence method. The SP2 has been deployed on ships, at ground based sites, and on research aircraft to quantify BC's mass loadings and microphysical properties. However, the SP2's particle detection range is generally limited to 70-700 nm volume-equivalent diameter for ambient BC. Ambient air typically contains substantial number concentrations below and mass concentrations above the limits of this range. To account for the unquantified particles, it is common to fit a log-normal distribution to the measured size distributions — an approach that leaves the BC community with uncertain results, and a need to learn about the occurrence of very small particles or very large BC aggregates. The SP2 is also large and heavy enough to limit its usability for aircraft and unmanned or towed airborne vehicles. We have developed a miniaturized SP2 to dramatically extend the range of applications for which the SP2 technique can be used. This new instrument, with the additional target of an extended measurement range, has been named the SP2-XR, and incorporates a newly designed optical block with updated electronics for signal recording and on-the-fly processing (gain stitching and peak analysis). The optical block improves the light-collection of both scattered and incandescent light from sampled particles. The target measurement range is 40-1000 nm. At the same time, the SP2-XR weighs less than half of an SP2 (15 kg for the complete system), and about 1/4 the volume ( 20 cm x 20 cm x 40 cm). The instrument software is designed to produce ready to use particle mass and binned size distributions or full particle trace records, according to different scientific needs. Thus, an SP2-XR may

  19. A Supra-Thermal Energetic Particle detector (STEP) for composition measurements in the range approximately 20 keV/nucleon to 1 MeV/nucleon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, G. M.; Gloeckler, G.

    1981-01-01

    A detector system is described, employing a time-of-flight versus residual energy technique which allows measurement of particle composition (H-Fe), energy spectral and anisotropies in an energy range unaccessible with previously flown sensors. Applications of this method to measurements of the solar wind ion composition are discussed.

  20. A supra-thermal energetic particle detector /STEP/ for composition measurements in the range of about 20 keV/nucleon to 1 MeV/nucleon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, G. M.; Gloeckler, G.

    1981-01-01

    A novel detector system is described, employing a time-of-flight versus residual energy technique which allows measurement of particle composition (H-Fe), energy spectra and anisotropies in an energy range unaccessible with previously flown sensors. Applications of this method to measurements of the solar wind ion composition are also discussed.

  1. Effect of particle water on ozone and secondary organic aerosol formation from benzene-NO2-NaCl irradiations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yujie; Luo, Hao; Jia, Long; Ge, Shuangshuang

    2016-09-01

    Ozone (O3) and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) are important pollutants in the urban atmosphere. Benzene is one of the most important aromatic species in urban air, which could produce O3 and SOA in the presence of NOx (x = 1, 2) and UV light. A series of experiments was carried out to study the effect of particle water on O3 and SOA formation from benzene under various humid conditions in an indoor smog chamber. The results show that the peak O3 concentrations decreased with the increase of RH or the mass concentration of liquid NaCl particles. The peak O3 concentration reduced by 30% as RH increased from 9% to 87% with the similar initial concentrations of NaCl (about 46 μg m-3), and decreased by 10% as the initial NaCl concentrations increased from 36.0 μg m-3 to 152.1 μg m-3 at about 73% RH. The relationships between liquid water content (LWC) and O3 or SOA were investigated. The results show that LWC is the key factor that leads to an opposite effect on O3 and SOA formation from benzene. The peak O3 concentration exponentially decreased 37% as LWC0 increased from zero to 349.8 μg m-3. Heterogeneous reaction of dinitrogen pentoxide (N2O5) with particle water is the major reason for the decrease of O3. The yields of SOA increased from 5.2 to 10.5% as LWC0 increased from zero to 349.8 μg m-3. The relative intensities of bands Osbnd H, Cdbnd O, Csbnd OH and NO3- increased by 22.9, 6.8, 6.7 and 13.1 times respectively as compared with dry condition. Alcohols or hydrates are confirmed to be the major contributors to SOA with increasing LWC.

  2. Sn-doped polyhedral In{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles: Synthesis, characterization, and origins of luminous emission in wide visible range

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu Yunqing; Chen Yiqing

    2012-02-15

    Sn-doped octahedronal and tetrakaidecahedronal In{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles were successfully synthesized by simple thermal evaporation of indium grains using SnO as dopant. Structural characterization results demonstrated that the Sn-doped tetrakaidecahedronal In{sub 2}O{sub 3} particle had additional six {l_brace}001{r_brace} crystal surfaces compared with the octahedronal one. The luminous properties of both samples were characterized by photoluminescence (PL) and cathodoluminescence (CL) spectroscopy. A broad visible luminous emission around 570 nm was observed. Studies revealed that the emission consisted of three peaks of 511 nm, 564 nm, and 622 nm, which were attributed to radioactive recombination centers such as single ionized oxygen vacancy, indium interstitial, and antisite oxygen, respectively. We believe that the Sn donor level plays an important role in the visible luminous emission. - Graphical abstract: With more oxygen vacancies and tin doping. ITO particles can exhibit a better CL performance. Sn donor level near the conduction band edge plays an important role in luminous emission in wide visible range. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Polyhedral ITO particles synthesized by thermal evaporation using SnO as dopant. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Broad visible luminous emission around 570 nm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sn donor level plays an important role in the visible emission. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ITO particles with more oxygen vacancies have better CL performance in visible range.

  3. The transition probability and the probability for the left-most particle's position of the q-totally asymmetric zero range process

    SciTech Connect

    Korhonen, Marko; Lee, Eunghyun

    2014-01-15

    We treat the N-particle zero range process whose jumping rates satisfy a certain condition. This condition is required to use the Bethe ansatz and the resulting model is the q-boson model by Sasamoto and Wadati [“Exact results for one-dimensional totally asymmetric diffusion models,” J. Phys. A 31, 6057–6071 (1998)] or the q-totally asymmetric zero range process (TAZRP) by Borodin and Corwin [“Macdonald processes,” Probab. Theory Relat. Fields (to be published)]. We find the explicit formula of the transition probability of the q-TAZRP via the Bethe ansatz. By using the transition probability we find the probability distribution of the left-most particle's position at time t. To find the probability for the left-most particle's position we find a new identity corresponding to identity for the asymmetric simple exclusion process by Tracy and Widom [“Integral formulas for the asymmetric simple exclusion process,” Commun. Math. Phys. 279, 815–844 (2008)]. For the initial state that all particles occupy a single site, the probability distribution of the left-most particle's position at time t is represented by the contour integral of a determinant.

  4. Effects of neutron irradiation of Ti3SiC2 and Ti3AlC2 in the 121–1085 °C temperature range

    SciTech Connect

    Tallman, Darin J.; He, Lingfeng; Gan, Jian; Caspi, El'ad N.; Hoffman, Elizabeth N.; Barsoum, Michel W.

    2016-11-19

    Herein we report on the formation of defects in response to neutron irradiation of polycrystalline Ti3SiC2 and Ti3AlC2 samples exposed to doses of 0.14±0.01, 1.6±0.1, and 3.4±0.1 displacements per atom (dpa) at irradiation temperatures of 121±12, 735±6 and 1085±68 °C. After irradiation to 0.14 dpa at 121 °C and 735 °C, black spots are observed in both Ti3SiC2 and Ti3AlC2. After irradiation to 1.6 and 3.4 dpa at 735 °C, basal dislocation loops, with a Burgers vector of b = ½ [0001] are observed in Ti3SiC2, with loop diameters of 21±6 and 30±8 nm for 1.6 dpa and 3.4 dpa, respectively. In Ti3AlC2, larger dislocation loops, 75±34 nm in diameter are observed after 3.4 dpa at 735 °C, in addition to stacking faults. Impurity particles of TiC, as well as stacking fault TiC platelets in the MAX phases, are seen to form extensive dislocation loops under all conditions. Voids are observed at grain boundaries and within stacking faults after 3.4 dpa irradiation, with extensive void formation in the TiC regions at 1085 °C. Remarkably, denuded zones on the order of 1 µm are observed in Ti3SiC2 after irradiation to 3.4 dpa at 735 °C. Small grains, 3-5 µm in diameter, are damage free after irradiation at 1085 °C at this dose. The presence of the A-layer in the MAX phases is seen to provide enhanced irradiation tolerance. Based on these results, and up to 3.41 dpa, Ti3SiC2 remains a promising candidate for high temperature nuclear applications.

  5. Effects of neutron irradiation of Ti3SiC2 and Ti3AlC2 in the 121–1085 °C temperature range

    DOE PAGES

    Tallman, Darin J.; He, Lingfeng; Gan, Jian; ...

    2016-11-19

    Herein we report on the formation of defects in response to neutron irradiation of polycrystalline Ti3SiC2 and Ti3AlC2 samples exposed to doses of 0.14±0.01, 1.6±0.1, and 3.4±0.1 displacements per atom (dpa) at irradiation temperatures of 121±12, 735±6 and 1085±68 °C. After irradiation to 0.14 dpa at 121 °C and 735 °C, black spots are observed in both Ti3SiC2 and Ti3AlC2. After irradiation to 1.6 and 3.4 dpa at 735 °C, basal dislocation loops, with a Burgers vector of b = ½ [0001] are observed in Ti3SiC2, with loop diameters of 21±6 and 30±8 nm for 1.6 dpa and 3.4 dpa,more » respectively. In Ti3AlC2, larger dislocation loops, 75±34 nm in diameter are observed after 3.4 dpa at 735 °C, in addition to stacking faults. Impurity particles of TiC, as well as stacking fault TiC platelets in the MAX phases, are seen to form extensive dislocation loops under all conditions. Voids are observed at grain boundaries and within stacking faults after 3.4 dpa irradiation, with extensive void formation in the TiC regions at 1085 °C. Remarkably, denuded zones on the order of 1 µm are observed in Ti3SiC2 after irradiation to 3.4 dpa at 735 °C. Small grains, 3-5 µm in diameter, are damage free after irradiation at 1085 °C at this dose. The presence of the A-layer in the MAX phases is seen to provide enhanced irradiation tolerance. Based on these results, and up to 3.41 dpa, Ti3SiC2 remains a promising candidate for high temperature nuclear applications.« less

  6. Impacts of goethite particles on UV disinfection of drinking water.

    PubMed

    Wu, Youxian; Clevenger, Thomas; Deng, Baolin

    2005-07-01

    A unique association between bacterial cells and small goethite particles (approximately 0.2 by 2 microm) protected Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas putida from UV inactivation. The protection increased with the particle concentration in the turbidity range of 1 to 50 nephelometric turbidity units and with the bacterium-particle attachment time prior to UV irradiation. The lower degree of bacterial inactivation at longer attachment time was mostly attributed to the particle aggregation surrounding bacteria that provided shielding from UV radiation.

  7. Association of Sand Dust Particles with Pulmonary Function and Respiratory Symptoms in Adult Patients with Asthma in Western Japan Using Light Detection and Ranging: A Panel Study.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Masanari; Noma, Hisashi; Kurai, Jun; Shimizu, Atsushi; Sano, Hiroyuki; Kato, Kazuhiro; Mikami, Masaaki; Ueda, Yasuto; Tatsukawa, Toshiyuki; Ohga, Hideki; Yamasaki, Akira; Igishi, Tadashi; Kitano, Hiroya; Shimizu, Eiji

    2015-10-16

    Light detection and ranging (LIDAR) can estimate daily volumes of sand dust particles from the East Asian desert to Japan. The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between sand dust particles and pulmonary function, and respiratory symptoms in adult patients with asthma. One hundred thirty-seven patients were included in the study. From March 2013 to May 2013, the patients measured their morning peak expiratory flow (PEF) and kept daily lower respiratory symptom diaries. A linear mixed model was used to estimate the correlation of the median daily levels of sand dust particles, symptoms scores, and PEF. A heavy sand dust day was defined as an hourly concentration of sand dust particles of >0.1 km(-1). By this criterion, there were 8 heavy sand dust days during the study period. Elevated sand dust particles levels were significantly associated with the symptom score (0.04; 95% confidence interval (CI); 0.03, 0.05), and this increase persisted for 5 days. There was no significant association between PEF and heavy dust exposure (0.01 L/min; 95% CI, -0.62, 0.11). The present study found that sand dust particles were significantly associated with worsened lower respiratory tract symptoms in adult patients with asthma, but not with pulmonary function.

  8. Association of Sand Dust Particles with Pulmonary Function and Respiratory Symptoms in Adult Patients with Asthma in Western Japan Using Light Detection and Ranging: A Panel Study

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Masanari; Noma, Hisashi; Kurai, Jun; Shimizu, Atsushi; Sano, Hiroyuki; Kato, Kazuhiro; Mikami, Masaaki; Ueda, Yasuto; Tatsukawa, Toshiyuki; Ohga, Hideki; Yamasaki, Akira; Igishi, Tadashi; Kitano, Hiroya; Shimizu, Eiji

    2015-01-01

    Light detection and ranging (LIDAR) can estimate daily volumes of sand dust particles from the East Asian desert to Japan. The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between sand dust particles and pulmonary function, and respiratory symptoms in adult patients with asthma. One hundred thirty-seven patients were included in the study. From March 2013 to May 2013, the patients measured their morning peak expiratory flow (PEF) and kept daily lower respiratory symptom diaries. A linear mixed model was used to estimate the correlation of the median daily levels of sand dust particles, symptoms scores, and PEF. A heavy sand dust day was defined as an hourly concentration of sand dust particles of >0.1 km−1. By this criterion, there were 8 heavy sand dust days during the study period. Elevated sand dust particles levels were significantly associated with the symptom score (0.04; 95% confidence interval (CI); 0.03, 0.05), and this increase persisted for 5 days. There was no significant association between PEF and heavy dust exposure (0.01 L/min; 95% CI, −0.62, 0.11). The present study found that sand dust particles were significantly associated with worsened lower respiratory tract symptoms in adult patients with asthma, but not with pulmonary function. PMID:26501307

  9. Conformational Transformations of Hemoglobin Molecules During in vivo Blood Irradiation by Low-Intensity Laser Radiation in the Red and Near IR Ranges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalesskaya, G. A.

    2014-07-01

    The effect of in vivo blood irradiation by low-intensity laser radiation on electronic-conformational interactions in hemoglobin molecules has been studied experimentally. The changes in the electronic and IR absorption spectra were followed for blood samples drawn at specific times during intravenous and supravascular irradiation, and also after dark reactions have occurred. The nature of the spectral changes observed is discussed. It is shown that the reversible photodissociation of hemoglobin-ligand complexes, initiated by blood irradiation, changes the oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin levels, which leads to changes in the electronic absorption spectra of the blood and erythrocytes, and all the conformational transitions in the hemoglobin macromolecules accompanying ligand detachment and addition are responsible for the changes in their IR spectra.

  10. Irradiated interplanetary dust particles as a possible solution for the deuterium/hydrogen paradox of Earth's oceans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pavlov, A. A.; Pavlov, A. K.; Kasting, J. F.

    1999-01-01

    Determining the source of Earth's oceans is a longstanding problem in planetary science. Possible sources of water include water ice or water of hydration of silicate minerals in the original material from which the bulk Earth accreted and water brought in by late-arriving planetesimals during the heavy bombardment period (4.5-3.8 Gyr ago) [Chyba, 1989, 1991]. Comets are an attractive source of water because their origin in the outer solar system is consistent with the long timescale for heavy bombardment. However, the high deuterium/hydrogen (D/H) ratio of the three comets that have been studied, Halley, Hyakutake, and Hale-Bopp, indicates that Earth must have had a source with a low-D/H ratio as well. Here we suggest that solar wind-implanted hydrogen on interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) provided the necessary low-D/H component of Earth's water inventory.

  11. Particle Size of CO2 Condensates in Mars Atmosphere Revealed by Climate Sounder and Laser Ranging Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Renyu

    Current-generation Mars Climate Sounder (MCS) onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) offers extensive coverage of the latitudinal and seasonal distribution of CO_2 condensation in Mars’s atmosphere. The atmospheric temperature profiles measured by MCS reveal that the thickness of CO_2 condensation layer reaches a maximum of 10-15 km (north) or ˜20 km (south) during the middle of winter. There is a shrinking of the CO_2 condensation layer from L_S ˜270(°) to ˜300(°) in 2007, probably related to a planet-encircling dust storm. We integrate the condensation area and the condensation occurrence rate synthesized from the MCS observations to estimate cumulative masses of CO2 condensates deposited onto the northern and southern seasonal polar caps. The mass loading of CO_2 condensate particles, when condensation occurs, can be independently inferred from the detections of reflective clouds by the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimetry (MOLA) onboard the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS). Therefore, we approximate the precipitation flux by the particle settling flux, which is estimated using the impulse responses of MOLA filter channels. With our approach, the total atmospheric condensation mass can be estimated from these observational data sets, with average particle size as the only free parameter. By comparison with the seasonal polar cap masses inferred from the time-varying gravity of Mars, our estimates indicate that the average condensate particle radius is 8 - 22 mum in the northern hemisphere and 4 - 13 mum in the southern hemisphere. This multi-instrument data analysis provides new constraints on modeling the microphysics of CO_2 clouds on Mars.

  12. Macrophage reactivity to different polymers demonstrates particle size- and material-specific reactivity: PEEK-OPTIMA(®) particles versus UHMWPE particles in the submicron, micron, and 10 micron size ranges.

    PubMed

    Hallab, Nadim James; McAllister, Kyron; Brady, Mark; Jarman-Smith, Marcus

    2012-02-01

    Biologic reactivity to orthopedic implant debris is generally the main determinant of long-term clinical performance where released polymeric particles of Ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) remain the most prevalent debris generated from metal-on-polymer bearing total joint arthroplasties. Polymeric alternatives to UHMWPE such as polyetherether-ketone (PEEK) may have increased wear resistance but the bioreactivity of PEEK-OPTIMA particles on peri-implant inflammation remains largely uncharacterized. We evaluated human monocyte/macrophage responses (THP-1s and primary human) when challenged by PEEK-OPTIMA, UHMWPE, and X-UHMWPE particles of three particle sizes (0.7 um, 2 um, and 10 um) at a dose of 20 particles-per-cell at 24- and 48-h time points. Macrophage responses were measured using cytotoxicity assays, viability assays, proliferation assays and cytokine analysis (IL-1b, IL-6, IL-8, MCP-1, and TNF-α). In general, there were no significant differences between PEEK-OPTIMA, UHMWPE, and X-UHMWPE particles on macrophage viability or proliferation. However, macrophages demonstrated greater cytotoxicity responses to UHMWPE and X-UHMWPE than to PEEK-OPTIMA at 24 and 48 h, where 0.7 μm-UHMWPE particles produced the highest amount of cytotoxicity. Particles of X-UHMWPE more than PEEK-OPTIMA and UHMWPE induced IL-1β, IL-6, MCP-1, and TNF-α at 24 h, p < 0.05 (no significant differences at 48 h). On average, cytokine production was more adversely affected by larger 10 μm particles than by 0.7 and 2 μm sized particles. While limitations of in vitro analysis apply to this study, PEEK-OPTIMA particles were more biocompatible than UHMWPE particles, in that they induced less inflammatory cytokine responses and thus, in part, demonstrates that PEEK-OPTIMA implant debris does not represent an increased inflammatory risk over that of UHMWPE.

  13. A low-noise wide-dynamic-range event-driven detector using SOI pixel technology for high-energy particle imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, Sumeet; Kamehama, Hiroki; Kawahito, Shoji; Yasutomi, Keita; Kagawa, Keiichiro; Takeda, Ayaki; Tsuru, Takeshi Go; Arai, Yasuo

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents a low-noise wide-dynamic-range pixel design for a high-energy particle detector in astronomical applications. A silicon on insulator (SOI) based detector is used for the detection of wide energy range of high energy particles (mainly for X-ray). The sensor has a thin layer of SOI CMOS readout circuitry and a thick layer of high-resistivity detector vertically stacked in a single chip. Pixel circuits are divided into two parts; signal sensing circuit and event detection circuit. The event detection circuit consisting of a comparator and logic circuits which detect the incidence of high energy particle categorizes the incident photon it into two energy groups using an appropriate energy threshold and generate a two-bit code for an event and energy level. The code for energy level is then used for selection of the gain of the in-pixel amplifier for the detected signal, providing a function of high-dynamic-range signal measurement. The two-bit code for the event and energy level is scanned in the event scanning block and the signals from the hit pixels only are read out. The variable-gain in-pixel amplifier uses a continuous integrator and integration-time control for the variable gain. The proposed design allows the small signal detection and wide dynamic range due to the adaptive gain technique and capability of correlated double sampling (CDS) technique of kTC noise canceling of the charge detector.

  14. Microdosimetry of rat alveolar type II cells irradiated with alpha particles from 239PuO2

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Z.Y.; Ye, C.Q.; Wu, D.C. )

    1989-11-01

    The alveolar type II cell is one of the critical cells for radiation damage in the lungs after inhalation of radioactive aerosols. With the aid of a Quantimet-970 image analyzer and a VAX-11/780 computer, we calculated the radiation dose to rat alveolar type II cells from alpha particles emitted by {sup 239}PuO{sub 2}. A series of dosimetric parameters for type II cells, including track length distribution, linear energy transfer (LET), values of the specific energy for a single hit of a spherical target (z1), cellular dose, hit number, and their spatial distributions were calculated. By comparing the volume density of type II cells and lung tissue with energy deposited in alveolar type II cells, we found that the energy deposited per unit volume of type II cells was larger than that of lung tissue excluding type II cells. The z1 for spherical targets and the LET across type II cells were less than those in lung tissue excluding type II cells. The age of the rat and damage to lung by inhalation may significantly influence some of the parameters. The neoplastic transformation probability for type II cells is also discussed. The results suggest that the type II cell is an important target cell in the rat lung for exposure to inhaled {sup 239}PuO{sub 2}.

  15. Microdosimetry of rat alveolar type II cells irradiated with alpha particles from 239PuO2.

    PubMed

    Shen, Z Y; Ye, C Q; Wu, D C

    1989-11-01

    The alveolar type II cell is one of the critical cells for radiation damage in the lungs after inhalation of radioactive aerosols. With the aid of a Quantimet-970 image analyzer and a VAX-11/780 computer, we calculated the radiation dose to rat alveolar type II cells from alpha particles emitted by 239PuO2. A series of dosimetric parameters for type II cells, including track length distribution, linear energy transfer (LET), values of the specific energy for a single hit of a spherical target (z1), cellular dose, hit number, and their spatial distributions were calculated. By comparing the volume density of type II cells and lung tissue with energy deposited in alveolar type II cells, we found that the energy deposited per unit volume of type II cells was larger than that of lung tissue excluding type II cells. The z1 for spherical targets and the LET across type II cells were less than those in lung tissue excluding type II cells. The age of the rat and damage to lung by inhalation may significantly influence some of the parameters. The neoplastic transformation probability for type II cells is also discussed. The results suggest that the type II cell is an important target cell in the rat lung for exposure to inhaled 239PuO2.

  16. Pseudorapidity dependence of long-range two-particle correlations in p Pb collisions at √{sNN}=5.02 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Asilar, E.; Bergauer, T.; Brandstetter, J.; Brondolin, E.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Flechl, M.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Knünz, V.; König, A.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Matsushita, T.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rad, N.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schieck, J.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Lauwers, J.; Luyckx, S.; Van De Klundert, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Abu Zeid, S.; Blekman, F.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; De Bruyn, I.; Deroover, K.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Moreels, L.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Van Parijs, I.; Barria, P.; Brun, H.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Fasanella, G.; Favart, L.; Goldouzian, R.; Grebenyuk, A.; Karapostoli, G.; Lenzi, T.; Léonard, A.; Maerschalk, T.; Marinov, A.; Pernié, L.; Randle-conde, A.; Seva, T.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Yonamine, R.; Zenoni, F.; Zhang, F.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Crucy, S.; Dobur, D.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Gul, M.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Poyraz, D.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva, S.; Sigamani, M.; Tytgat, M.; Van Driessche, W.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bondu, O.; Brochet, S.; Bruno, G.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; Delaere, C.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Mertens, A.; Musich, M.; Nuttens, C.; Perrini, L.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Beliy, N.; Hammad, G. H.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, F. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Hamer, M.; Hensel, C.; Moraes, A.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Huertas Guativa, L. M.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mora Herrera, C.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Ahuja, S.; Bernardes, C. A.; De Souza Santos, A.; Dogra, S.; Tomei, T. R. Fernandez Perez; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Moon, C. S.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Romero Abad, D.; Ruiz Vargas, J. C.; Aleksandrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Ahmad, M.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Leggat, D.; Plestina, R.; Romeo, F.; Shaheen, S. M.; Spiezia, A.; Tao, J.; Wang, C.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, H.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Puljak, I.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Micanovic, S.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Bodlak, M.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Awad, A.; Mahrous, A.; Radi, A.; Calpas, B.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Veelken, C.; Eerola, P.; Pekkanen, J.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Peltola, T.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Machet, M.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Zghiche, A.; Antropov, I.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Cadamuro, L.; Chapon, E.; Charlot, C.; Davignon, O.; Filipovic, N.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Jo, M.; Lisniak, S.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Miné, P.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Ortona, G.; Paganini, P.; Pigard, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J. B.; Sirois, Y.; Strebler, T.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Buttignol, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Chanon, N.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Coubez, X.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Merlin, J. A.; Skovpen, K.; Van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.; Beauceron, S.; Bernet, C.; Boudoul, G.; Bouvier, E.; Carrillo Montoya, C. A.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Courbon, B.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fan, J.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Lagarde, F.; Laktineh, I. B.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Pequegnot, A. L.; Perries, S.; Ruiz Alvarez, J. D.; Sabes, D.; Sgandurra, L.; Sordini, V.; Vander Donckt, M.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Toriashvili, T.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Autermann, C.; Beranek, S.; Feld, L.; Heister, A.; Kiesel, M. K.; Klein, K.; Lipinski, M.; Ostapchuk, A.; Preuten, M.; Raupach, F.; Schael, S.; Schulte, J. F.; Verlage, T.; Weber, H.; Zhukov, V.; Ata, M.; Brodski, M.; Dietz-Laursonn, E.; Duchardt, D.; Endres, M.; Erdmann, M.; Erdweg, S.; Esch, T.; Fischer, R.; Güth, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heidemann, C.; Hoepfner, K.; Knutzen, S.; Kreuzer, P.; Merschmeyer, M.; Meyer, A.; Millet, P.; Mukherjee, S.; Olschewski, M.; Padeken, K.; Papacz, P.; Pook, T.; Radziej, M.; Reithler, H.; Rieger, M.; Scheuch, F.; Sonnenschein, L.; Teyssier, D.; Thüer, S.; Cherepanov, V.; Erdogan, Y.; Flügge, G.; Geenen, H.; Geisler, M.; Hoehle, F.; Kargoll, B.; Kress, T.; Künsken, A.; Lingemann, J.; Nehrkorn, A.; Nowack, A.; Nugent, I. M.; Pistone, C.; Pooth, O.; Stahl, A.; Aldaya Martin, M.; Asin, I.; Bartosik, N.; Behnke, O.; Behrens, U.; Borras, K.; Burgmeier, A.; Campbell, A.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Costanza, F.; Diez Pardos, C.; Dolinska, G.; Dooling, S.; Dorland, T.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Eichhorn, T.; Flucke, G.; Gallo, E.; Garay Garcia, J.; Geiser, A.; Gizhko, A.; Gunnellini, P.; Hauk, J.; Hempel, M.; Jung, H.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Karacheban, O.; Kasemann, M.; Katsas, P.; Kieseler, J.; Kleinwort, C.; Korol, I.; Lange, W.; Leonard, J.; Lipka, K.; Lobanov, A.; Lohmann, W.; Mankel, R.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Meyer, A. B.; Mittag, G.; Mnich, J.; Mussgiller, A.; Naumann-Emme, S.; Nayak, A.; Ntomari, E.; Perrey, H.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Raspereza, A.; Roland, B.; Sahin, M. Ö.; Saxena, P.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Seitz, C.; Spannagel, S.; Trippkewitz, K. D.; Walsh, R.; Wissing, C.; Blobel, V.; Centis Vignali, M.; Draeger, A. R.; Erfle, J.; Garutti, E.; Goebel, K.; Gonzalez, D.; Görner, M.; Haller, J.; Hoffmann, M.; Höing, R. S.; Junkes, A.; Klanner, R.; Kogler, R.; Kovalchuk, N.; Lapsien, T.; Lenz, T.; Marchesini, I.; Marconi, D.; Meyer, M.; Nowatschin, D.; Ott, J.; Pantaleo, F.; Peiffer, T.; Perieanu, A.; Pietsch, N.; Poehlsen, J.; Rathjens, D.; Sander, C.; Scharf, C.; Schleper, P.; Schlieckau, E.; Schmidt, A.; Schumann, S.; Schwandt, J.; Sola, V.; Stadie, H.; Steinbrück, G.; Stober, F. M.; Tholen, H.; Troendle, D.; Usai, E.; Vanelderen, L.; Vanhoefer, A.; Vormwald, B.; Barth, C.; Baus, C.; Berger, J.; Böser, C.; Butz, E.; Chwalek, T.; Colombo, F.; De Boer, W.; Descroix, A.; Dierlamm, A.; Fink, S.; Frensch, F.; Friese, R.; Giffels, M.; Gilbert, A.; Haitz, D.; Hartmann, F.; Heindl, S. M.; Husemann, U.; Katkov, I.; Kornmayer, A.; Lobelle Pardo, P.; Maier, B.; Mildner, H.; Mozer, M. U.; Müller, T.; Müller, Th.; Plagge, M.; Quast, G.; Rabbertz, K.; Röcker, S.; Roscher, F.; Schröder, M.; Sieber, G.; Simonis, H. J.; Ulrich, R.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wayand, S.; Weber, M.; Weiler, T.; Williamson, S.; Wöhrmann, C.; Wolf, R.; Anagnostou, G.; Daskalakis, G.; Geralis, T.; Giakoumopoulou, V. A.; Kyriakis, A.; Loukas, D.; Psallidas, A.; Topsis-Giotis, I.; Agapitos, A.; Kesisoglou, S.; Panagiotou, A.; Saoulidou, N.; Tziaferi, E.; Evangelou, I.; Flouris, G.; Foudas, C.; Kokkas, P.; Loukas, N.; Manthos, N.; Papadopoulos, I.; Paradas, E.; Strologas, J.; Bencze, G.; Hajdu, C.; Hazi, A.; Hidas, P.; Horvath, D.; Sikler, F.; Veszpremi, V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Zsigmond, A. J.; Beni, N.; Czellar, S.; Karancsi, J.; Molnar, J.; Szillasi, Z.; Bartók, M.; Makovec, A.; Raics, P.; Trocsanyi, Z. L.; Ujvari, B.; Choudhury, S.; Mal, P.; Mandal, K.; Sahoo, D. K.; Sahoo, N.; Swain, S. K.; Bansal, S.; Beri, S. B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Chawla, R.; Gupta, R.; Bhawandeep, U.; Kalsi, A. K.; Kaur, A.; Kaur, M.; Kumar, R.; Mehta, A.; Mittal, M.; Singh, J. B.; Walia, G.; Kumar, Ashok; Bhardwaj, A.; Choudhary, B. C.; Garg, R. B.; Malhotra, S.; Naimuddin, M.; Nishu, N.; Ranjan, K.; Sharma, R.; Sharma, V.; Bhattacharya, S.; Chatterjee, K.; Dey, S.; Dutta, S.; Majumdar, N.; Modak, A.; Mondal, K.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Roy, A.; Roy, D.; Roy Chowdhury, S.; Sarkar, S.; Sharan, M.; Abdulsalam, A.; Chudasama, R.; Dutta, D.; Jha, V.; Kumar, V.; Mohanty, A. K.; Pant, L. M.; Shukla, P.; Topkar, A.; Aziz, T.; Banerjee, S.; Bhowmik, S.; Chatterjee, R. M.; Dewanjee, R. K.; Dugad, S.; Ganguly, S.; Ghosh, S.; Guchait, M.; Gurtu, A.; Jain, Sa.; Kole, G.; Kumar, S.; Mahakud, B.; Maity, M.; Majumder, G.; Mazumdar, K.; Mitra, S.; Mohanty, G. B.; Parida, B.; Sarkar, T.; Sur, N.; Sutar, B.; Wickramage, N.; Chauhan, S.; Dube, S.; Kapoor, A.; Kothekar, K.; Sharma, S.; Bakhshiansohi, H.; Behnamian, H.; Etesami, S. M.; Fahim, A.; Khakzad, M.; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M.; Naseri, M.; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S.; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, F.; Safarzadeh, B.; Zeinali, M.; Felcini, M.; Grunewald, M.; Abbrescia, M.; Calabria, C.; Caputo, C.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; Cristella, L.; De Filippis, N.; De Palma, M.; Fiore, L.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Miniello, G.; My, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Pompili, A.; Pugliese, G.; Radogna, R.; Ranieri, A.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Venditti, R.; Abbiendi, G.; Battilana, C.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Bonacorsi, D.; Braibant-Giacomelli, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Campanini, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Castro, A.; Cavallo, F. R.; Chhibra, S. S.; Codispoti, G.; Cuffiani, M.; Dallavalle, G. M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fasanella, D.; Giacomelli, P.; Grandi, C.; Guiducci, L.; Marcellini, S.; Masetti, G.; Montanari, A.; Navarria, F. L.; Perrotta, A.; Rossi, A. M.; Rovelli, T.; Siroli, G. P.; Tosi, N.; Cappello, G.; Chiorboli, M.; Costa, S.; Di Mattia, A.; Giordano, F.; Potenza, R.; Tricomi, A.; Tuve, C.; Barbagli, G.; Ciulli, V.; Civinini, C.; D'Alessandro, R.; Focardi, E.; Gori, V.; Lenzi, P.; Meschini, M.; Paoletti, S.; Sguazzoni, G.; Viliani, L.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Fabbri, F.; Piccolo, D.; Primavera, F.; Calvelli, V.; Ferro, F.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Robutti, E.; Tosi, S.; Brianza, L.; Dinardo, M. E.; Fiorendi, S.; Gennai, S.; Gerosa, R.; Ghezzi, A.; Govoni, P.; Malvezzi, S.; Manzoni, R. A.; Marzocchi, B.; Menasce, D.; Moroni, L.; Paganoni, M.; Pedrini, D.; Ragazzi, S.; Redaelli, N.; Tabarelli de Fatis, T.; Buontempo, S.; Cavallo, N.; Di Guida, S.; Esposito, M.; Fabozzi, F.; Iorio, A. O. M.; Lanza, G.; Lista, L.; Meola, S.; Merola, M.; Paolucci, P.; Sciacca, C.; Thyssen, F.; Azzi, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Bellato, M.; Benato, L.; Boletti, A.; Branca, A.; Dall'Osso, M.; Dorigo, T.; Fantinel, S.; Fanzago, F.; Gonella, F.; Gozzelino, A.; Kanishchev, K.; Lacaprara, S.; Margoni, M.; Meneguzzo, A. T.; Montecassiano, F.; Passaseo, M.; Pazzini, J.; Pegoraro, M.; Pozzobon, N.; Ronchese, P.; Simonetto, F.; Torassa, E.; Tosi, M.; Ventura, S.; Zanetti, M.; Zotto, P.; Zucchetta, A.; Braghieri, A.; Magnani, A.; Montagna, P.; Ratti, S. P.; Re, V.; Riccardi, C.; Salvini, P.; Vai, I.; Vitulo, P.; Alunni Solestizi, L.; Bilei, G. M.; Ciangottini, D.; Fanò, L.; Lariccia, P.; Mantovani, G.; Menichelli, M.; Saha, A.; Santocchia, A.; Androsov, K.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bernardini, J.; Boccali, T.; Castaldi, R.; Ciocci, M. A.; Dell'Orso, R.; Donato, S.; Fedi, G.; Foà, L.; Giassi, A.; Grippo, M. T.; Ligabue, F.; Lomtadze, T.; Martini, L.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzi, A.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Serban, A. T.; Spagnolo, P.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Barone, L.; Cavallari, F.; D'imperio, G.; Del Re, D.; Diemoz, M.; Gelli, S.; Jorda, C.; Longo, E.; Margaroli, F.; Meridiani, P.; Organtini, G.; Paramatti, R.; Preiato, F.; Rahatlou, S.; Rovelli, C.; Santanastasio, F.; Traczyk, P.; Amapane, N.; Arcidiacono, R.; Argiro, S.; Arneodo, M.; Bellan, R.; Biino, C.; Cartiglia, N.; Costa, M.; Covarelli, R.; Degano, A.; Demaria, N.; Finco, L.; Kiani, B.; Mariotti, C.; Maselli, S.; Migliore, E.; Monaco, V.; Monteil, E.; Obertino, M. M.; Pacher, L.; Pastrone, N.; Pelliccioni, M.; Pinna Angioni, G. L.; Ravera, F.; Romero, A.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Belforte, S.; Candelise, V.; Casarsa, M.; Cossutti, F.; Della Ricca, G.; Gobbo, B.; La Licata, C.; Marone, M.; Schizzi, A.; Zanetti, A.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Nam, S. K.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, G. N.; Kim, M. S.; Kong, D. J.; Lee, S.; Oh, Y. D.; Sakharov, A.; Son, D. C.; Brochero Cifuentes, J. A.; Kim, H.; Kim, T. J.; Song, S.; Cho, S.; Choi, S.; Go, Y.; Gyun, D.; Hong, B.; Kim, H.; Kim, Y.; Lee, B.; Lee, K.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, S.; Park, S. K.; Roh, Y.; Yoo, H. D.; Choi, M.; Kim, H.; Kim, J. H.; Lee, J. S. H.; Park, I. C.; Ryu, G.; Ryu, M. S.; Choi, Y.; Goh, J.; Kim, D.; Kwon, E.; Lee, J.; Yu, I.; Dudenas, V.; Juodagalvis, A.; Vaitkus, J.; Ahmed, I.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Komaragiri, J. R.; Md Ali, M. A. B.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Yusli, M. N.; Zolkapli, Z.; Casimiro Linares, E.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Hernandez-Almada, A.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A.; Carrillo Moreno, S.; Vazquez Valencia, F.; Pedraza, I.; Salazar Ibarguen, H. A.; Morelos Pineda, A.; Krofcheck, D.; Butler, P. H.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmad, M.; Hassan, Q.; Hoorani, H. R.; Khan, W. A.; Khurshid, T.; Shoaib, M.; Bialkowska, H.; Bluj, M.; Boimska, B.; Frueboes, T.; Górski, M.; Kazana, M.; Nawrocki, K.; Romanowska-Rybinska, K.; Szleper, M.; Zalewski, P.; Brona, G.; Bunkowski, K.; Byszuk, A.; Doroba, K.; Kalinowski, A.; Konecki, M.; Krolikowski, J.; Misiura, M.; Olszewski, M.; Walczak, M.; Bargassa, P.; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, C.; Di Francesco, A.; Faccioli, P.; Ferreira Parracho, P. G.; Gallinaro, M.; Hollar, J.; Leonardo, N.; Lloret Iglesias, L.; Nguyen, F.; Rodrigues Antunes, J.; Seixas, J.; Toldaiev, O.; Vadruccio, D.; Varela, J.; Vischia, P.; Afanasiev, S.; Bunin, P.; Gavrilenko, M.; Golutvin, I.; Gorbunov, I.; Kamenev, A.; Karjavin, V.; Lanev, A.; Malakhov, A.; Matveev, V.; Moisenz, P.; Palichik, V.; Perelygin, V.; Shmatov, S.; Shulha, S.; Skatchkov, N.; Smirnov, V.; Zarubin, A.; Golovtsov, V.; Ivanov, Y.; Kim, V.; Kuznetsova, E.; Levchenko, P.; Murzin, V.; Oreshkin, V.; Smirnov, I.; Sulimov, V.; Uvarov, L.; Vavilov, S.; Vorobyev, A.; Andreev, Yu.; Dermenev, A.; Gninenko, S.; Golubev, N.; Karneyeu, A.; Kirsanov, M.; Krasnikov, N.; Pashenkov, A.; Tlisov, D.; Toropin, A.; Epshteyn, V.; Gavrilov, V.; Lychkovskaya, N.; Popov, V.; Pozdnyakov, I.; Safronov, G.; Spiridonov, A.; Vlasov, E.; Zhokin, A.; Bylinkin, A.; Chadeeva, M.; Danilov, M.; Andreev, V.; Azarkin, M.; Dremin, I.; Kirakosyan, M.; Leonidov, A.; Mesyats, G.; Rusakov, S. V.; Baskakov, A.; Belyaev, A.; Boos, E.; Ershov, A.; Gribushin, A.; Kaminskiy, A.; Kodolova, O.; Korotkikh, V.; Lokhtin, I.; Miagkov, I.; Obraztsov, S.; Petrushanko, S.; Savrin, V.; Snigirev, A.; Vardanyan, I.; Azhgirey, I.; Bayshev, I.; Bitioukov, S.; Kachanov, V.; Kalinin, A.; Konstantinov, D.; Krychkine, V.; Petrov, V.; Ryutin, R.; Sobol, A.; Tourtchanovitch, L.; Troshin, S.; Tyurin, N.; Uzunian, A.; Volkov, A.; Adzic, P.; Cirkovic, P.; Milosevic, J.; Rekovic, V.; Alcaraz Maestre, J.; Calvo, E.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo Llatas, M.; Colino, N.; De La Cruz, B.; Delgado Peris, A.; Escalante Del Valle, A.; Fernandez Bedoya, C.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Flix, J.; Fouz, M. C.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Gonzalez Lopez, O.; Goy Lopez, S.; Hernandez, J. M.; Josa, M. I.; Navarro De Martino, E.; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A.; Puerta Pelayo, J.; Quintario Olmeda, A.; Redondo, I.; Romero, L.; Santaolalla, J.; Soares, M. S.; Albajar, C.; de Trocóniz, J. F.; Missiroli, M.; Moran, D.; Cuevas, J.; Fernandez Menendez, J.; Folgueras, S.; Gonzalez Caballero, I.; Palencia Cortezon, E.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Cabrillo, I. J.; Calderon, A.; Castiñeiras De Saa, J. R.; De Castro Manzano, P.; Fernandez, M.; Garcia-Ferrero, J.; Gomez, G.; Lopez Virto, A.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Martinez Rivero, C.; Matorras, F.; Piedra Gomez, J.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodríguez-Marrero, A. Y.; Ruiz-Jimeno, A.; Scodellaro, L.; Trevisani, N.; Vila, I.; Vilar Cortabitarte, R.; Abbaneo, D.; Auffray, E.; Auzinger, G.; Bachtis, M.; Baillon, P.; Ball, A. H.; Barney, D.; Benaglia, A.; Bendavid, J.; Benhabib, L.; Berruti, G. M.; Bloch, P.; Bocci, A.; Bonato, A.; Botta, C.; Breuker, H.; Camporesi, T.; Castello, R.; Cerminara, G.; D'Alfonso, M.; d'Enterria, D.; Dabrowski, A.; Daponte, V.; David, A.; De Gruttola, M.; De Guio, F.; De Roeck, A.; De Visscher, S.; Di Marco, E.; Dobson, M.; Dordevic, M.; Dorney, B.; du Pree, T.; Duggan, D.; Dünser, M.; Dupont, N.; Elliott-Peisert, A.; Franzoni, G.; Fulcher, J.; Funk, W.; Gigi, D.; Gill, K.; Giordano, D.; Girone, M.; Glege, F.; Guida, R.; Gundacker, S.; Guthoff, M.; Hammer, J.; Harris, P.; Hegeman, J.; Innocente, V.; Janot, P.; Kirschenmann, H.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Kousouris, K.; Krajczar, K.; Lecoq, P.; Lourenço, C.; Lucchini, M. T.; Magini, N.; Malgeri, L.; Mannelli, M.; Martelli, A.; Masetti, L.; Meijers, F.; Mersi, S.; Meschi, E.; Moortgat, F.; Morovic, S.; Mulders, M.; Nemallapudi, M. V.; Neugebauer, H.; Orfanelli, S.; Orsini, L.; Pape, L.; Perez, E.; Peruzzi, M.; Petrilli, A.; Petruccian