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Sample records for ranque-hilsch vortex tube

  1. Wavelet Transform Of Acoustic Signal From A Ranque- Hilsch Vortex Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Istihat, Y.; Wisnoe, W.

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents the frequency analysis of flow in a Ranque-Hilsch Vortex Tube (RHVT) obtained from acoustic signal using microphones in an isolated formation setup. Data Acquisition System (DAS) that incorporates Analog to Digital Converter (ADC) with laptop computer has been used to acquire the wave data. Different inlet pressures (20, 30, 40, 50 and 60 psi) are supplied and temperature differences are recorded. Frequencies produced from a RHVT are experimentally measured and analyzed by means of Wavelet Transform (WT). Morlet Wavelet is used and relation between Pressure variation, Temperature and Frequency are studied. Acoustic data has been analyzed using Matlab® and time-frequency analysis (Scalogram) is presented. Results show that the Pressure is proportional with the Frequency inside the RHVT whereby two distinct working frequencies is pronounced in between 4-8 kHz.

  2. Ranque-Hilsch vortex tube thermocycler for fast DNA amplification and real-time optical detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebmeier, Ryan J.; Whitney, Scott E.; Sarkar, Amitabha; Nelson, Michael; Padhye, Nisha V.; Gogos, George; Viljoen, Hendrik J.

    2004-12-01

    An innovative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) thermocycler capable of performing real-time optical detection is described below. This device utilizes the Ranque-Hilsch vortex tube in a system to efficiently and rapidly cycle three 20 μL samples between the denaturation, annealing, and elongation temperatures. The reaction progress is displayed real-time by measuring the size of a fluorescent signal emitted by SYBR green/double-stranded DNA complexes. This device can produce significant reaction yields with very small amounts of initial DNA, for example, it can amplify 0.25 fg (˜5 copies) of a 96 bp bacteriophage λ-DNA fragment 2.7×1011-fold by performing 45 cycles in less than 12 min. The optical threshold (150% of the baseline intensity) was passed 8 min into the reaction at cycle 34. Besides direct applications, the speed and sensitivity of this device enables it to be used as a scientific instrument for basic studies such as PCR assembly and polymerase kinetics.

  3. CFD study on the effects of viscous shear in a hot cascade Ranque-Hilsch vortex tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bej, Nilotpala; Sinhamahapatra, K. P.

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this paper is to carry out an extensive Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) study on work transfer due to viscous shear in a hot cascade Ranque-Hilsch vortex tube. The commercial CFD code ANSYS FLUENT 14.0 has been employed to carry out the numerical analysis using RANS standard k-epsilon turbulence model. A two-dimensional axisymmetric geometrical domain has been generated with structured mesh and air has been taken as the working fluid. The CFD results reveal that work transfer due to the action of viscous shear along the tangential direction increases considerably with hot cascading. However, the work transfer due to viscous shear along the axial direction degrades the performance of the device as the heat transfer takes place from cold zone to the hot zone. The effect of radial shear stress is negligible due to low value of radial velocity gradient.

  4. Effect of Mach number, valve angle and length to diameter ratio on thermal performance in flow of air through Ranque Hilsch vortex tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devade, Kiran D.; Pise, Ashok T.

    2017-01-01

    Ranque Hilsch vortex tube is a device that can produce cold and hot air streams simultaneously from pressurized air. Performance of vortex tube is influenced by a number of geometrical and operational parameters. In this study parametric analysis of vortex tube is carried out. Air is used as the working fluid and geometrical parameters like length to diameter ratio (15, 16, 17, 18), exit valve angles (30°-90°), orifice diameters (5, 6 and 7 mm), 2 entry nozzles and tube divergence angle 4° is used for experimentation. Operational parameters like pressure (200-600 kPa), cold mass fraction (0-1) is varied and effect of Mach number at the inlet of the tube is investigated. The vortex tube is tested at sub sonic (0 < Ma < 1), sonic (Ma = 1) and supersonic (1 < Ma < 2) Mach number, and its effect on thermal performance is analysed. As a result it is observed that, higher COP and low cold end temperature is obtained at subsonic Ma. As CMF increases, COP rises and cold and temperature drops. Optimum performance of the tube is observed for CMF up to 0.5. Experimental correlations are proposed for optimum COP. Parametric correlation is developed for geometrical and operational parameters.

  5. Exergy analysis of a counter flow Ranque-Hilsch vortex tube for different cold orifice diameters, L/D ratios and exit valve angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devade, Kiran D.; Pise, Ashok T.

    2016-12-01

    An experimental investigation is made to find out the effects of the cold end orifice diameters, length to diameter ratio and exit valve angles on the heating and cooling performance of the counter flow Ranque-Hilsch vortex tube with air as a working fluid. The tube and cold end orifices used at these experiments are made of brass. Three cold end orifices (5, 6 and 7 mm) have been manufactured and are used five different L/D ratios (15 plain tube, 15-18 with 4° divergence angle) and exit valve angles (30°-90°). Inlet pressures were adjusted from 200 to 600 kPa with 100 kPa increments, and the exergy loss, exergy efficiency was determined. As a result of the experimental study, it is determined that the exergy loss between the hot and cold fluid is decreased with increasing of the cold end orifice diameter. Exergy efficiency decreases with increase in L/D ratio. It is also concluded that diverging vortex tube produces lower exergy loss as compared to plain tube. Valve angles have significant effect on hot end exergy loss of the vortex tube.

  6. Small disturbance diagnostic inside the vortex tube with a square cross-section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabardin, I. K.; Meledin, V. G.; Yavorskiy, N. I.; Pavlov, V. A.; Pravdina, M. H.; Kulikov, D. V.; Rahmanov, V. V.

    2016-10-01

    The vortex effect in Ranque-Hilch vortex tube was investigated. Being discovered by G.J. Ranque[1] in l928, the effect still has no adequate generally accepted physical explanation. One of the reasons is connected with the lack of reliable experimental data describing velocity and temperature distributions inside the vortex tube. The sensors mounted inside the vortex tube contribute conspicuous perturbation in the flow. Therefore, the new measuring methods should be searched that do not or slightly disturb the flow. For this purpose, optical techniques are the most suitable. In order to use optical methods the vortex tube with square section was applied. The flow kinematics investigation inside the Ranque-Hilsch tube was carried out using a laser Doppler anemometer (LDA) with an adaptive temporal selection of the velocity vector (LAD-056). The measurements of vector components of the swirling flow velocity were carried out in close to the hot output section of the Ranque-Hilsch tube at a working pressure of 4 bar, at which twisted spiral vortex patterns have been recorded. Also the temperature diagnostics has been carried out. It was based on the flow scanning with the small-sized special temperature sensor. The temperature distribution at several points along the vortex tube was recorded. Also the temperature distribution was measured in the swirler chamber surrounding the cold exit. The difference in temperature at cold and hot outputs was about 50 o C. For each point several series of measurements were carried out which show that the temperature distribution in the vortex tube is significantly nonstationary.

  7. Device for separation of vortex gas-dynamic energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leontiev, A. I.; Burtsev, S. A.

    2015-10-01

    A device for separation of vortex gas-dynamic energy, which combines the mechanism of separation of vortex energy used in the Ranque-Hilsch tubes and the mechanism of separation of gas-dynamic energy, is proposed for supersonic flows. A method of calculation of this device is developed. A comparison is made that showed that, when working with natural gas, the cooling depth of half of the mass flow rate proves to be 1.3 times higher than that for the vortex tube and three times higher than that for the device for separation of the gas-dynamic energy.

  8. Three-dimensional numerical investigation of the separation process in a vortex tube at different operating conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafiee, Seyed Ehsan; Sadeghiazad, M. M.

    2016-06-01

    Air separators provide safe, clean, and appropriate air flow to engines and are widely used in vehicles with large engines such as ships and submarines. In this operational study, the separation process inside a Ranque-Hilsch vortex tube cleaning (cooling) system is investigated to analyze the impact of the operating gas type on the vortex tube performance; the operating gases used are air, nitrogen, oxygen, carbon dioxide and nitrogen dioxide. The computational fluid dynamic model used is equipped with a three-dimensional structure, and the steady-state condition is applied during computations. The standard k-ɛ turbulence model is employed to resolve nonlinear flow equations, and various key parameters, such as hot and cold exhaust thermal drops, and power separation rates, are described numerically. The results show that nitrogen dioxide creates the greatest separation power out of all gases tested, and the numerical results are validated by good agreement with available experimental data. In addition, a comparison is made between the use of two different boundary conditions, the pressure-far-field and the pressure-outlet, when analyzing complex turbulent flows inside the air separators. Results present a comprehensive and practical solution for use in future numerical studies.

  9. Laboratory Applications of the Vortex Tube.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruno, Thomas J.

    1987-01-01

    Discussed are a brief explanation of the function of the vortex tube and some applications for the chemistry laboratory. It is a useful and inexpensive solution to many small-scale laboratory heating and cooling applications. (RH)

  10. Laboratory Applications of the Vortex Tube.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruno, Thomas J.

    1987-01-01

    Discussed are a brief explanation of the function of the vortex tube and some applications for the chemistry laboratory. It is a useful and inexpensive solution to many small-scale laboratory heating and cooling applications. (RH)

  11. Vortex tube reconnection at Re = 104

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Rees, Wim M.; Hussain, Fazle; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2012-07-01

    We present simulations of the long-time dynamics of two anti-parallel vortex tubes with and without initial axial flow, at Reynolds number Re = Γ/ν = 104. Simulations were performed in a periodic domain with a remeshed vortex method using 785 × 106 particles. We quantify the vortex dynamics of the primary vortex reconnection that leads to the formation of elliptical rings with axial flow and report for the first time a subsequent collision of these rings. In the absence of initial axial flow, a -5/3 slope of the energy spectrum is observed during the first reconnection of the tubes. The resulting elliptical vortex rings experience a coiling of their vortex lines imparting an axial flow inside their cores. These rings eventually collide, exhibiting a -7/3 slope of the energy spectrum. Studies of vortex reconnection with an initial axial flow exhibit also the -7/3 slope during the initial collision as well as in the subsequent collision of the ensuing elliptical vortex rings. We quantify the detailed vortex dynamics of these collisions and examine the role of axial flow in the breakup of vortex structures.

  12. Stochastic perturbations in vortex-tube dynamics.

    PubMed

    Moriconi, L; Nobre, F A S

    2004-11-01

    A dual lattice vortex formulation of homogeneous turbulence is developed, within the Martin-Siggia-Rose field theoretical approach. It consists of a generalization of the usual dipole version of the Navier-Stokes equations, known to hold in the limit of vanishing external forcing. We investigate, as a straightforward application of our formalism, the dynamics of closed vortex tubes, randomly stirred at large length scales by Gaussian stochastic forces. We find that besides the usual self-induced propagation, the vortex tube evolution may be effectively modeled through the introduction of an additional white-noise correlated velocity field background. The resulting phenomenological picture is closely related to observations previously reported from a wavelet decomposition analysis of turbulent flow configurations.

  13. Finned Tube With Vortex Generators For A Heat Exchanger.

    DOEpatents

    Sohal, Monohar S.; O'Brien, James E.

    2004-09-14

    A system for and method of manufacturing a finned tube for a heat exchanger is disclosed herein. A continuous fin strip is provided with at least one pair of vortex generators. A tube is rotated and linearly displaced while the continuous fin strip with vortex generators is spirally wrapped around the tube.

  14. Finned Tube With Vortex Generators For A Heat Exchanger.

    DOEpatents

    Sohal, Manohar S.; O'Brien, James E.

    2005-12-20

    A system for and method of manufacturing a finned tube for a heat exchanger is disclosed herein. A continuous fin strip is provided with at one pair of vortex generators. A tube is rotated and linearly displaced while the continuous fin strip with vortex generators is spirally wrapped around the tube.

  15. Cut-and-connect of two antiparallel vortex tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melander, Mogens V.; Hussain, Fazle

    1988-01-01

    Motivated by an early conjecture that vortex cut-and-connect plays a key role in mixing and production of turbulence, helicity and aerodynamic noise, the cross-linking of two antiparallel viscous vortex tubes via direct numerical simulation is studied. The Navier-Stokes equations are solved by a dealiased pseudo-spectral method with 64 cubed grid points in a periodic domain for initial Reynolds numbers Re up to 1000. The vortex tubes are given an initial sinusoidal perturbation to induce a collision and keep the two tubes pressed against each other as annihilation continues. Cross-sectional and wire plots of various properties depict three stages of evolution: (1) Inviscid induction causing vortex cores to first approach and form a contact zone with a dipole cross-section, and then to flatten and stretch; (2) Vorticity annihilation in the contact zone accompanied by bridging between the two vortices at both ends of the contact zone due to a collection of cross-linked vortex lines, now orthogonal to the initial vortex tubes. The direction of dipole advection in the contact zone reverses; and (3) Threading of the remnants of the original vortices in between the bridges as they pull apart. The crucial stage 2 is shown to be a simple consequence of vorticity annihilation in the contact zone, link-up of the un-annihilated parts of vortex lines, and stretching and advection by the vortex tube swirl of the cross-linked lines, which accumulate at stagnation points in front of the annihilating vortex dipole. It is claimed that bridging is the essence of any vorticity cross-linking and that annihilation is sustained by stretching of the dipole by the bridges. Vortex reconnection details are found to be insensitive to asymmetry. Modeling of the reconnection process is briefly examined. The 3D spatial details of scalar transport (at unity Schmidt number), enstrophy production, dissipation and helicity are also examined.

  16. The experimental investigation and thermodynamic analysis of vortex tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celik, Adem; Yilmaz, Mehmet; Kaya, Mehmet; Karagoz, Sendogan

    2017-02-01

    In the present study, it was aimed to produce a fundamental i nformation and to investigate the effects of various design parameters on tube performance characteristics by setting up vortex tube experimental system in order to study the parameters predetermined for the design of vortex tubes and by conducting thermodynamic analysis. According to the findings of experiments, as the mass flow rate of cold flow increases (yc) temperature of cold flow also increases, while the temperature of warm flow increases approximately to yc = 0.6 and then decreases. Increases in inlet pressure, inlet nozzle surface and diameter of the cold outlet orifice increased temperature differences between cold and warm flows. Tube with L/D = 10 showed better performance than with L/D = 20. The finding that irreversibility parameter is very close to critical threshold of irreversibility proved that process in vortex tube is considerably irreversible. Coefficient of performance (COP) values in vortex tube were much lower than other heating and cooling systems. This situation may show that vortex tubes are convenient in the processes where productivity is at the second rate compared to other factors.

  17. Kinematics and dynamics of vortex rings in a tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brasseur, J. G.

    1979-01-01

    Kinematic theory and flow visualization experiments were combined to examine the dynamic processes which control the evolution of vortex rings from very low to very high Reynolds numbers, and to assess the effects of the wall as a vortex ring travels up a tube. The kinematic relationships among the size, shape, speed, and strength of vortex rings in a tube were computed from the theory. Relatively simple flow visualization measurements were used to calculate the total circulation of a vortex rings at a given time. Using this method, the strength was computated and plotted as a function of time for experimentally produced vortex rings. Reynolds number relationships are established and quantitative differences among the three Reynolds number groups are discussed.

  18. Vortex tubes in turbulent flows: Identification, representation, reconstruction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, David C.; Singer, Bart A.

    1994-01-01

    In many cases the structure of a fluid flow is well-characterized by its vortices, especially for the purpose of visualization. In this paper we present a new algorithm for identifying vortices in complex flows. The algorithm produces a skeleton line along the center of a vortex by using a two-step predictor-corrector scheme. The vorticity vector field serves as the predictor and the pressure gradient (in the perpendicular plane) serves as the corrector. We describe an economical description of the vortex tube's cross-section: a 5-term truncated Fourier series is generally sufficient, and it compresses the representation of the flow by a factor of 4000 or more. We reconstruct the vortex tubes as generalized cylinders, providing a polygonal mesh suitable for display on a graphics workstation. We show how the reconstructed geometry of vortex tubes can be enhanced to help visualize helical motion in a static image.

  19. DYNAMICS OF MAGNETIZED VORTEX TUBES IN THE SOLAR CHROMOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect

    Kitiashvili, I. N.; Kosovichev, A. G.; Mansour, N. N.; Wray, A. A.

    2012-05-20

    We use three-dimensional radiative MHD simulations to investigate the formation and dynamics of small-scale (less than 0.5 Mm in diameter) vortex tubes spontaneously generated by turbulent convection in quiet-Sun regions with an initially weak (10 G) mean magnetic field. The results show that the vortex tubes penetrate into the chromosphere and substantially affect the structure and dynamics of the solar atmosphere. The vortex tubes are mostly concentrated in intergranular lanes and are characterized by strong (near sonic) downflows and swirling motions that capture and twist magnetic field lines, forming magnetic flux tubes that expand with height and attain magnetic field strengths ranging from 200 G in the chromosphere to more than 1 kG in the photosphere. We investigate in detail the physical properties of these vortex tubes, including thermodynamic properties, flow dynamics, and kinetic and current helicities, and conclude that magnetized vortex tubes provide an important path for energy and momentum transfer from the convection zone into the chromosphere.

  20. UBIQUITOUS SOLAR ERUPTIONS DRIVEN BY MAGNETIZED VORTEX TUBES

    SciTech Connect

    Kitiashvili, I. N.; Kosovichev, A. G.; Lele, S. K.; Mansour, N. N.; Wray, A. A.

    2013-06-10

    The solar surface is covered by high-speed jets transporting mass and energy into the solar corona and feeding the solar wind. The most prominent of these jets have been known as spicules. However, the mechanism initiating these eruption events is still unknown. Using realistic numerical simulations we find that small-scale eruptions are produced by ubiquitous magnetized vortex tubes generated by the Sun's turbulent convection in subsurface layers. The swirling vortex tubes (resembling tornadoes) penetrate into the solar atmosphere, capture and stretch background magnetic field, and push the surrounding material up, generating shocks. Our simulations reveal complicated high-speed flow patterns and thermodynamic and magnetic structure in the erupting vortex tubes. The main new results are: (1) the eruptions are initiated in the subsurface layers and are driven by high-pressure gradients in the subphotosphere and photosphere and by the Lorentz force in the higher atmosphere layers; (2) the fluctuations in the vortex tubes penetrating into the chromosphere are quasi-periodic with a characteristic period of 2-5 minutes; and (3) the eruptions are highly non-uniform: the flows are predominantly downward in the vortex tube cores and upward in their surroundings; the plasma density and temperature vary significantly across the eruptions.

  1. Vortex tube-assisted environmental control of hyperbaric chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Baz, A.; Gilheany, J.

    1988-12-01

    Model predictions of time histories of the temperature and humidity ratio within a hyperbaric chamber under conditions of compression and decompression are presented with and without vortex tube-assisted environmental control. The effects of ventilation and ascent and descent rates on the environment within the chamber and the power required by the environment control system, with and without vortex tube assist, are also presented. Results demonstrate that the vortex tube assist system is an effective means of more precisely controlling the environment within hyperbaric chambers with substantial savings in power. The model used incorporates a complete description of the pyschrometric properties of the humid gas mixture within the chamber, plus the sensible and latent heat loads produced by the occupants and wet porch.

  2. Close interactions of 3-D vortex tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melander, Mogens V.

    1989-01-01

    The motivation for studying close vortex interactions is briefly discussed in the light of turbulence and coherent structures. Particular attention is given to the interaction known as reconnection. Two reconnection mechanisms are discussed. One is annihilation of vorticity by cross-diffusion, the other is an inviscid head-tail formation. At intermediate Reynolds numbers both mechanisms are operating.

  3. Vortex Rings Generated by a Shrouded Hartmann-Sprenger Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLoof, Richard L. (Technical Monitor); Wilson, Jack

    2005-01-01

    The pulsed flow emitted from a shrouded Hartmann-Sprenger tube was sampled with high-frequency pressure transducers and with laser particle imaging velocimetry, and found to consist of a train of vortices. Thrust and mass flow were also monitored using a thrust plate and orifice, respectively. The tube and shroud lengths were altered to give four different operating frequencies. From the data, the radius, velocity, and circulation of the vortex rings was obtained. Each frequency corresponded to a different length to diameter ratio of the pulse of air leaving the driver shroud. Two of the frequencies had length to diameter ratios below the formation number, and two above. The formation number is the value of length to diameter ratio below which the pulse converts to a vortex ring only, and above which the pulse becomes a vortex ring plus a trailing jet. A modified version of the slug model of vortex ring formation was used to compare the observations with calculated values. Because the flow exit area is an annulus, vorticity is shed at both the inner and outer edge of the jet. This results in a reduced circulation compared with the value calculated from slug theory accounting only for the outer edge. If the value of circulation obtained from laser particle imaging velocimetry is used in the slug model calculation of vortex ring velocity, the agreement is quite good. The vortex ring radius, which does not depend on the circulation, agrees well with predictions from the slug model.

  4. Thin-tube vortex simulations for sinusoidal instability in a counter-rotating vortex pair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Z. C.

    2002-06-01

    A thin-tube vortex method is developed to investigate the intrinsic instability within a counter-rotating vortex pair system and the effects from the core size and the wavenumbers (or wavelengths). The numerical accuracy and the advantages of the scheme are theoretically estimated. A nearest-neighbour-image method is employed in this three-dimensional vortex simulation. Agreement with Crow's instability analysis has been achieved numerically for the long-wave cases. A short-wave instability for the zeroth radial mode of bending instability has also been found using the thin-tube vortex simulations. Then, the combinations of long- and short-wave instability are investigated to elucidate the non-linear effects due to the interactions of two different modes. It is shown that instability is enhanced if both long- and short-wave instabilities occur simultaneously. Although the method used in the paper is not capable of including effects such as axial flow, vortex core deformation and other complicated viscous effects, it effectively predicts and clarifies the first-order factor that dominates the sinusoidal instability behaviour in a vortex pair. Copyright

  5. Influence of Thermal Processes on the Efficiency of the Energy Separation in a Ranque Vortex Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyutyuma, V. D.

    2016-11-01

    On the basis of the model of a plane swirling flow in a Ranque vortex tube, in which this flow is represented in the form of a vortex consisting of a vortex flow at the periphery and a forced vortex in the central part, a theoretical analysis of the influence of the thermal processes in this tube on the efficiency of the energy separation in the vortex in it has been performed. The results of calculations were compared with experimental data.

  6. Complete measurement of helicity and its dynamics in vortex tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheeler, Martin W.; van Rees, Wim M.; Kedia, Hridesh; Kleckner, Dustin; Irvine, William T. M.

    2017-08-01

    Helicity, a topological measure of the intertwining of vortices in a fluid flow, is a conserved quantity in inviscid fluids but can be dissipated by viscosity in real flows. Despite its relevance across a range of flows, helicity in real fluids remains poorly understood because the entire quantity is challenging to measure. We measured the total helicity of thin-core vortex tubes in water. For helical vortices that are stretched or compressed by a second vortex, we found conservation of total helicity. For an isolated helical vortex, we observed evolution toward and maintenance of a constant helicity state after the dissipation of twist helicity by viscosity. Our results show that helicity can remain constant even in a viscous fluid and provide an improved basis for understanding and manipulating helicity in real flows.

  7. Detection of Vortex Tubes in Solar Granulation from Observations SUNRISE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiner, O.; Franz, M.; González, N. B.; Nutto, C.; Rezaei, R.; Pillet, V. M.; Bonet, J. A.; Iniesta, J. C. d. T.; Domingo, V.; Solanki, S. K.; Knölker, M.; Schmidt, W.; Barthol, P.; Gandorfer, A.

    2012-05-01

    We investigated a time series of continuum intensity maps and Dopplergrams of granulation in a very quiet solar region at the disk center, recorded with the Imaging Magnetograph eXperiment (IMaX) on board the balloon-borne solar observatory SUNRISE. We find that granules frequently show substructure in the form of lanes composed of a leading bright rim and a trailing dark edge, which move together from the boundary of a granule into the granule itself. We find strikingly similar events in synthesized intensity maps from an ab initio numerical simulation of solar surface convection. We conclude that these granular lanes are the visible signature of (horizontally oriented) vortex tubes. The characteristic optical appearance of vortex tubes at the solar surface is explained. This paper is a summary and update of the results previously presented in Steiner et al. (2010).

  8. The velocity field induced by a helical vortex tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukumoto, Y.; Okulov, V. L.

    2005-10-01

    The influence of finite-core thickness on the velocity field around a vortex tube is addressed. An asymptotic expansion of the Biot-Savart law is made to a higher order in a small parameter, the ratio of core radius to curvature radius, which consists of the velocity field due to lines of monopoles and dipoles arranged on the centerline of the tube. The former is associated with an infinitely thin core and is featured by the circulation alone. The distribution of vorticity in the core reflects on the strength of dipole. This result is applied to a helical vortex tube, and the induced velocity due to a helical filament of the dipoles is obtained in the form of the Kapteyn series, which augments Hardin's [Phys. Fluids 25, 1949 (1982)] solution for the monopoles. Using a singularity-separation technique, a substantial part of the series is represented in a closed form for both the mono- and the dipoles. It is found from numerical calculation that the smaller the helix pitch is, the larger the relative influence of the dipoles is as the cylinder wound by the helix is approached.

  9. Research on the application of vortex tube type of cooling jacket in coal mine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Xiaojie

    2017-08-01

    The problem of heat damage in high temperature mine has been attached more and more concern to. In addition, the existing solutions also have problems which are large initial investment and poor safety performance. Vortex tube type of mine cooling jacket, studied in this paper, using vortex tube refrigeration principle. It used compressed exhaust gas as the gas source, which can solve the problem of the large-scale cooling equipment which rely on electricity, and may not emit toxic gases at the same time. Thereby, by using the method of observation and questionnaire survey, the parameters of the vortex tube were optimized for optimal cooling effect. In conclusion, the features of security, reliability, energy saving and environmental protection can be realized by the vortex tube type of cooling jacket. What's more important, we had investigated the feasibility of the application of vortex tube type of mine cooling jacket.

  10. Cascade of vortex tube collisions at ReΓ = 10 000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Rees, Wim; Hussain, Fazle; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2011-11-01

    We present simulations of the collision of two anti-parallel vortex tubes, with and without axial flow in a periodic box at ReΓ = 10 000 using a remeshed vortex method. In the non-axial flow case, after the first, well-known vortex reconnection of the tubes, a quiescent period is followed by a second vortex collision of the remaining structures. The characteristics of this second collision are an increase of energy in the small scales of the flow; remnant vorticity left behind in thread-like structures; a persistent - 7 / 3 slope in the three-dimensional energy spectrum; and a significant increase in enstrophy and helicity in the flow. Characteristics of the secondary collision are also observed during the first reconnection of the vortex tubes with axial flow. The simulations indicate that vortical flows containing initially large-scale vortical structures can transfer energy from large scales to smaller scales through a cascade of vortex collisions.

  11. Progress in Air Separation with the Vortex Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balepin, V.; Rosolt, D.; Petley, D.

    1999-01-01

    The current study is characterized by two distinct phases in the development of the vortex tube (VT) technology as a primary means for in-flight air separation. The purpose of the first phase was to systematically identify parameters that influence oxygen concentration and recovery and to quantify the extent of that influence. To that end, the project team used a series of planned factorial experiments to identify statistically significant variables (factors) and their interactions. These experiments identified a best range of the operating envelope that includes nozzle diameter, orifice diameter, inlet air pressure, and liquid phase content in the inlet air. The best results observed in this envelope were an oxygen content of approximately 68% and a recovery factor of approximately 38%. The primary objectives of the second phase of the current study were to investigate the application effects of the two different air separation efficiency enhancement methods. One of these methods resulted in a concentration increase of 12% and second resulted in a concentration increase of 5%. Several aspects of these methods application are subject to optimize.

  12. Progress in Air Separation with the Vortex Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balepin, V.; Rosolt, D.; Petley, D.

    1999-01-01

    The current study is characterized by two distinct phases in the development of the vortex tube (VT) technology as a primary means for in-flight air separation. The purpose of the first phase was to systematically identify parameters that influence oxygen concentration and recovery and to quantify the extent of that influence. To that end, the project team used a series of planned factorial experiments to identify statistically significant variables (factors) and their interactions. These experiments identified a best range of the operating envelope that includes nozzle diameter, orifice diameter, inlet air pressure, and liquid phase content in the inlet air. The best results observed in this envelope were an oxygen content of approximately 68% and a recovery factor of approximately 38%. The primary objectives of the second phase of the current study were to investigate the application effects of the two different air separation efficiency enhancement methods. One of these methods resulted in a concentration increase of 12% and second resulted in a concentration increase of 5%. Several aspects of these methods application are subject to optimize.

  13. Hierarchy of antiparallel vortex tubes in spatially periodic turbulence at high Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Susumu; Saito, Yuta; Kawahara, Genta

    2017-06-01

    To draw a precise picture of the hierarchy of coherent vortices in spatially periodic turbulence at high Reynolds numbers and to understand its generation mechanism, we conduct direct numerical simulations of turbulence in a periodic cube. By objectively identifying the axes of vortex tubes at various length scales in the inertial range, we quantitatively show that the sustained turbulence consists of a hierarchy of antiparallel pairs of vortex tubes. These vortex tubes are created by being stretched in strain fields around 2-8 times larger vortices, whereas they are weakened by strain around half-scale vortices. Temporal tracking of identified vortex tubes shows that they tend to form antiparallel pairs from the moment they are created. We examine three different external forces to show that the hierarchical structure of antiparallel vortex pairs is robust and its statistical features in inertial length scales are independent of the force. The turbulence that is sustained by steady forces is quasiperiodic in time and its significant temporal fluctuations are caused by successive creation of strong vortex tubes within the hierarchy.

  14. Experimental investigation of pressure fluctuations caused by a vortex rope in a draft tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirschner, O.; Ruprecht, A.; Göde, E.; Riedelbauch, S.

    2012-11-01

    In the last years hydro power plants have taken the task of power-frequency control for the electrical grid. Therefore turbines in storage hydro power plants often operate outside their optimum. If Francis-turbines and pump-turbines operate at off-design conditions, a vortex rope in the draft tube can develop. The vortex rope can cause pressure oscillations. In addition to low frequencies caused by the rotation of the vortex rope and the harmonics of these frequencies, pressure fluctuations with higher frequencies can be observed in some operating points too. In this experimental investigation the flow structure and behavior of the vortex rope movement in the draft tube of a model pump-turbine are analyzed. The investigation focuses on the correlation of the pressure fluctuation frequency measured at the draft tube wall with the movement of the vortex rope. The movement of the vortex rope is analyzed by the velocity field in the draft tube which was measured with particle image velocimetry. Additionally, the vortex rope movement has been analyzed with the captures of high-speed-movies from the cavitating vortex rope. Besides the rotation of the vortex rope due to pressure fluctuation with low frequencies the results of the measurement also show a correlation between the rotation of the elliptical or deformed rope cross-section and the higher frequency pressure pulsation. An approximation shows that the frequencies of the pressure fluctuation and the movement of the vortex rope are also connected with the velocity of the flow. Taking into account the size and position of the cavitating vortex core as well as the velocity at the position of the surface of the cavitating vortex core the time-period of the rotation of the vortex core can be approximated. The results show that both, the low frequency pressure fluctuation and the higher frequency pressure fluctuation are correlating with the vortex rope movement. With this estimation, the period of the higher frequency

  15. Rapid and selective brain cooling method using vortex tube: A feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Bakhsheshi, Mohammad Fazel; Keenliside, Lynn; Lee, Ting-Yim

    2016-05-01

    Vortex tubes are simple mechanical devices to produce cold air from a stream of compressed air without any moving parts. The primary focus of the current study is to investigate the feasibility and efficiency of nasopharyngeal brain cooling method using a vortex tube. Experiments were conducted on 5 juvenile pigs. Nasopharygeal brain cooling was achieved by directing cooled air via a catheter in each nostril into the nasal cavities. A vortex tube was used to generate cold air using various sources of compressed air: (I) hospital medical air outlet (n = 1); (II) medical air cylinders (n = 3); and (III) scuba (diving) cylinders (n = 1). By using compressed air from a hospital medical air outlet at fixed inlet pressure of 50 PSI, maximum brain-rectal temperature gradient of -2°C was reached about 45-60 minutes by setting the flow rate of 25 L/min and temperature of -7°C at the cold air outlet. Similarly, by using medical air cylinders at fill-pressure of 2265 PSI and down regulate the inlet pressure to the vortex tube to 50 PSI, brain temperature could be reduced more rapidly by blowing -22°C ± 2°C air at a flow rate of 50 L/min; brain-body temperature gradient of -8°C was obtained about 30 minutes. Furthermore, we examined scuba cylinders as a portable source of compressed gas supply to the vortex tube. Likewise, by setting up the vortex tube to have an inlet pressure of 25 PSI and 50 L/min and -3°C at the cold air outlet, brain temperature decreased 4.5°C within 10-20 min. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Acoustic Resonance and Vortex Shedding from Tube Banks of Boiler Plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamakawa, Hiromitsu; Matsue, Hiroto; Nishida, Eiichi; Fukano, Tohru

    This paper focuses on the relationship between acoustic resonance and vortex shedding from the tube banks of a boiler plant. We have built a model similar to the actual boiler plant to clarify the characteristics of acoustic resonance phenomena and vortex shedding. The model used in-line tube banks with a small tube pitch ratio. We examined the relationship between the acoustic resonance of the actual plant and that of the model, and measured the sound pressure level, acoustic pressure mode shape, spectrum of velocity fluctuation, and gap velocity. Gap velocity was defined as the mean velocity in the smallest gaps between two neighboring tubes in the transverse direction. As a result, the resonant frequencies and mode shapes of the acoustic resonances in the actual boiler plant agreed well with those in the similar model. We found many peak frequencies in the sound pressure level spectrum when acoustic resonances occurred. The typical Strouhal numbers at the onset velocity of acoustic resonances were about 0.19, 0.26 and 0.52. Periodic velocity fluctuation caused by vortex shedding was observed inside the tube banks without acoustic resonance. The Strouhal number measured for vortex shedding was 0.15. Acoustic resonances of higher-order modes were generated in this plant.

  17. Effect of Flow Induced Acoustic Resonance on Vortex Shedding from Staggered Tube Banks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamakawa, Hiromitsu; Fukano, Tohru; Nishida, Eiichi; Ishida, Hideki

    In the present paper, attention was focused on the relation between vortex shedding phenomena and acoustic resonance in staggered tube banks. As a result, three types of vortex shedding were found with different Strouhal numbers (St), 0.29, 0.22, and 0.19, in cases without resonance. When resonance was generated at the natural frequency of the duct, 342.5Hz, at a gap velocity of 39.2m/s, two types of vortex shedding were found with different frequencies, mainly about 342.5Hz (St=0.29) and 262.5Hz (St=0.22), inside the tube banks. The velocity fluctuation and periodicity of the vortex shedding were the most intense in the wake of the second row of tube banks. A short baffle plates was effective for preventing the generation of acoustic resonance of the transverse mode if it was installed at the correct place where velocity fluctuation and periodicity of vortex shedding were most intense.

  18. DETECTION OF VORTEX TUBES IN SOLAR GRANULATION FROM OBSERVATIONS WITH SUNRISE

    SciTech Connect

    Steiner, O.; Franz, M.; Bello Gonzalez, N.; Nutto, Ch.; Rezaei, R.; Schmidt, W.; Martinez Pillet, V.; Bonet Navarro, J. A.; Del Toro Iniesta, J. C.; Domingo, V.; Solanki, S. K.; Barthol, P.; Gandorfer, A.; Knoelker, M.

    2010-11-10

    We have investigated a time series of continuum intensity maps and corresponding Dopplergrams of granulation in a very quiet solar region at the disk center, recorded with the Imaging Magnetograph eXperiment (IMaX) on board the balloon-borne solar observatory SUNRISE. We find that granules frequently show substructure in the form of lanes composed of a leading bright rim and a trailing dark edge, which move together from the boundary of a granule into the granule itself. We find strikingly similar events in synthesized intensity maps from an ab initio numerical simulation of solar surface convection. From cross sections through the computational domain of the simulation, we conclude that these granular lanes are the visible signature of (horizontally oriented) vortex tubes. The characteristic optical appearance of vortex tubes at the solar surface is explained. We propose that the observed vortex tubes may represent only the large-scale end of a hierarchy of vortex tubes existing near the solar surface.

  19. Nonlinear characteristics analysis of vortex-induced vibration for a three-dimensional flexible tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Zhipeng; Jiang, Naibin; Zang, Fenggang; Zhang, Yixiong; Huang, Xuan; Wu, Wanjun

    2016-05-01

    Vortex-induced vibration of a three-dimensional flexible tube is one of the key problems to be considered in many engineering situations. This paper aims to investigate the nonlinear dynamic behaviors and response characteristics of a three-dimensional tube under turbulent flow. The three-dimensional unsteady, viscous, incompressible Navier-Stokes equation and LES turbulence model are solved with the finite volume approach, and the dynamic equilibrium equations are discretized by the finite element theory. A three-dimensional fully coupled numerical model for vortex-induced vibration of flexible tube is proposed. The model realized the fluid-structure interaction with solving the fluid flow and the structure vibration simultaneously. Based on this model, Response regimes, trajectory, phase difference, fluid force coefficient and vortex shedding frequency are obtained. The nonlinear phenomena of lock-in, phase-switch are captured successfully. Meanwhile, the limit cycle, bifurcation of lift coefficient and displacement are analyzed using phase portrait and Poincare section. The results reveal that, a quasi-upper branch occurs in the present fluid-flexible tube coupling system with high mass-damping and low mass ratio. There is no bifurcation of lift coefficient and lateral displacement occurred in the three-dimensional flexible tube submitted to uniform turbulent flow.

  20. Numerical investigation on nonlinear effect and vortex formation of oscillatory flow throughout a short tube in a thermoacoustic Stirling engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Peng; Chen, Hui; Liu, Yingwen

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, a two-dimensional axisymmetric model of a thermoacoustic Stirling engine with a short tube where the cross section narrows has been developed. The transient streamlines and vortex formation through short tubes with different diameters in oscillatory flow have been investigated visually by computational fluid dynamics. Three dimensionless parameters, Reynolds number (Re), Keulegan-Carpenter number (KC), and Womersley number (Wo), are used to describe the flow regime and vortex characteristic throughout the short tube. High Re and Wo numbers indicate that the oscillatory flow develops into the turbulent flow through the short tube. The KC number has a direct effect on the transition of streamlines and the development of the vortex. For a small cross section where KC ≈ 1, streamlines rotate and the vortex forms at both sides of the short tube. The vortex stays in the main flow region, and intensity varies as streamlines are convected downstream. The velocity along the radius presents a Poiseuille profile within the influence of the vortex. For a large cross section where KC < 1, streamlines pass the short tube with little rotation and the vortex disappears in the main flow region and confines near the short tube. The velocity profile tends to be flat. The nonlinear effects including instantaneous pressure drop and power dissipation throughout the short tube are also discussed. It shows that the time averaged pressure drop is generated at the cost of power dissipation. Finally, the "effectiveness" is applied to evaluate the performance of the short tube. The results suggest that increasing the diameter of the short tube is in favor of reducing power dissipation, which is beneficial to improve "effectiveness."

  1. The numerical research of runner cavitation effects on spiral vortex rope in draft tube of Francis turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, J.; Zhou, L. J.; Wang, Z. W.

    2015-12-01

    The spiral cavitating vortex rope developed in the draft tube of Francis turbine under part load condition maybe causes serious pressure fluctuations and power swings, which threatens the safety and stability of the power plant operations. Many works have been performed to explore the mechanisms of it. In this paper, the runner cavitation and spiral vortex rope under part load conditions were studied to investigate the relations of runner cavitation and the spiral vortex rope. The results proved the existence of obvious interaction between them. The swirl flow at the runner outlet plays an important role in the formation of vortex rope. And the periodic procession of vortex rope in turn intensifies the uneven pressure distribution near the runner outlet and causes the asymmetric cavitation on the runner blades, which then give rise to the modification of swirl flow at the runner blades and thereby affects the characteristics of vortex rope.

  2. Heat Transfer Enhancement for Finned-Tube Heat Exchangers with Vortex Generators: Experimental and Numerical Results

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, James Edward; Sohal, Manohar Singh; Huff, George Albert

    2002-08-01

    A combined experimental and numerical investigation is under way to investigate heat transfer enhancement techniques that may be applicable to large-scale air-cooled condensers such as those used in geothermal power applications. The research is focused on whether air-side heat transfer can be improved through the use of finsurface vortex generators (winglets,) while maintaining low heat exchanger pressure drop. A transient heat transfer visualization and measurement technique has been employed in order to obtain detailed distributions of local heat transfer coefficients on model fin surfaces. Pressure drop measurements have also been acquired in a separate multiple-tube row apparatus. In addition, numerical modeling techniques have been developed to allow prediction of local and average heat transfer for these low-Reynolds-number flows with and without winglets. Representative experimental and numerical results presented in this paper reveal quantitative details of local fin-surface heat transfer in the vicinity of a circular tube with a single delta winglet pair downstream of the cylinder. The winglets were triangular (delta) with a 1:2 height/length aspect ratio and a height equal to 90% of the channel height. Overall mean fin-surface Nusselt-number results indicate a significant level of heat transfer enhancement (average enhancement ratio 35%) associated with the deployment of the winglets with oval tubes. Pressure drop measurements have also been obtained for a variety of tube and winglet configurations using a single-channel flow apparatus that includes four tube rows in a staggered array. Comparisons of heat transfer and pressure drop results for the elliptical tube versus a circular tube with and without winglets are provided. Heat transfer and pressure-drop results have been obtained for flow Reynolds numbers based on channel height and mean flow velocity ranging from 700 to 6500.

  3. Current-driven vortex domain wall motion in wire-tube nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Espejo, A. P.; Vidal-Silva, N.; López-López, J. A.; Goerlitz, D.; Nielsch, K.; Escrig, J.

    2015-03-30

    We have investigated the current-driven domain wall motion in nanostructures comprised of a pair of nanotube and nanowire segments. Under certain values of external magnetic fields, it is possible to pin a vortex domain wall in the transition zone between the wire and tube segments. We explored the behavior of this domain wall under the action of an electron flow applied in the opposite direction to the magnetic field. Thus, for a fixed magnetic field, it is possible to release a domain wall pinned simply by increasing the intensity of the current density, or conversely, for a fixed current density, it is possible to release the domain wall simply decreasing the magnetic external field. When the domain wall remains pinned due to the competition between the current density and the magnetic external field, it exhibits a oscillation frequency close to 8 GHz. The amplitude of the oscillations increases with the current density and decreases over time. On the other hand, when the domain wall is released and propagated through the tube segment, this shows the standard separation between a steady and a precessional regime. The ability to pin and release a domain wall by varying the geometric parameters, the current density, or the magnetic field transforms these wire-tube nanostructures in an interesting alternative as an on/off switch nano-transistor.

  4. The optimization of fin-tube heat exchanger with longitudinal vortex generators using response surface approximation and genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xuehong; Liu, DanDan; Zhao, Min; Lu, YanLi; Song, Xiaoyong

    2016-09-01

    Delta winglet works better than other vortex generators in improving the performance of fin-tube heat exchangers. In this paper, Response Surface Approximation is used to study the effects of the fin pitch, the ratio of the longitudinal tube pitch to transverse tube pitch, the ratio of both sides V 1 , V h of delta winglets and the attack angle of delta winglets on the performance of fin-tube heat exchanger. Firstly, Twenty-nine numerical group experiments including five times repeated experiments at the central point are conducted. Then, the analyses of variable (ANOVA) and regression are performed to verify the accuracy of the polynomial coefficients. Finally, the optimization of the fin-tube heat exchanger using the Genetic Algorithm is conducted and the best performance of j/f (1/3) is found to be 0.07945, which is consistent with the numerical result.

  5. Numerical investigation on the performance of fin and tube heat exchangers using rectangular vortex generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeeshan, Mohd; Hazarika, Saheera Azmi; Nath, Sujit; Bhanja, Dipankar

    2017-07-01

    In the present work, a 3-D numerical investigation has been performed to explore the effect of attack angles on the thermal-hydraulic performance of fin and tube heat exchanger (FTHE) using rectangular winglet pairs (RWPs). RWPs are placed adjacent to the tubes and three attack angels are considered for the study i.e. 5°, 15° and 25°. The effect of attack angles are examined on the heat transfer characteristics as well as in pressure drop penalty with airside Reynolds number Rea ranges from 500 to 900. Two performance evaluation criteria namely PEC1 i.e. area goodness factor (j/f) and PEC2 i.e. heat transfer rate per unit fan power consumption (Q/Pf) are considered for the performance evaluation. Furthermore, MOORA method is applied to obtain the performance order of FTHE configurations by taking PEC1 and PEC2 as beneficial attributes and fan power Pf as a non-beneficial attribute, keeping equal importance to each attribute. The results show that 5° attack angle provides the better performance in terms of PEC1 as heat transfer coefficient is increased by 27.70% at Rea=500 and 32.73% at Rea=900 respectively with 13.01% increased pressure drop penalty at Rea=500 and 14.26% at Rea=900 respectively. In terms of PEC2, though the 5° attack angle provides the high values of Q/Pf factor among the 15° and 25° attack angles, but it is found insignificant to replace the baseline configuration i.e. plain fin and tube heat exchanger configuration without vortex generators. Moreover, in MOORA optimization analysis also, it is found that 5° attack angle provides the better thermal-hydraulic performance.

  6. LDV survey of cavitation and resonance effect on the precessing vortex rope dynamics in the draft tube of Francis turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favrel, A.; Müller, A.; Landry, C.; Yamamoto, K.; Avellan, F.

    2016-11-01

    The large-scale penetration of the electrical grid by intermittent renewable energy sources requires a continuous operating range extension of hydropower plants. This causes the formation of unfavourable flow patterns in the draft tube of turbines and pump-turbines. At partial load operation, a precessing cavitation vortex rope is formed at the Francis turbine runner outlet, acting as an excitation source for the hydraulic system. In case of resonance, the resulting high-amplitude pressure pulsations can put at risk the stability of the machine and of the electrical grid to which it is connected. It is therefore crucial to understand and accurately simulate the underlying physical mechanisms in such conditions. However, the exact impact of cavitation and hydro-acoustic resonance on the flow velocity fluctuations in the draft tube remains to be established. The flow discharge pulsations expected to occur in the draft tube in resonance conditions have for instance never been verified experimentally. In this study, two-component Laser Doppler Velocimetry is used to investigate the axial and tangential velocity fluctuations at the runner outlet of a reduced scale physical model of a Francis turbine. The investigation is performed for a discharge equal to 64 % of the nominal value and three different pressure levels in the draft tube, including resonance and cavitation-free conditions. Based on the convective pressure fluctuations induced by the vortex precession, the periodical velocity fluctuations over one typical precession period are recovered by phase averaging. The impact of cavitation and hydro-acoustic resonance on both axial and tangential velocity fluctuations in terms of amplitude and phase shift is highlighted for the first time. It is shown that the occurrence of resonance does not have significant effects on the draft tube velocity fields, suggesting that the synchronous axial velocity fluctuations are surprisingly negligible compared to the velocity

  7. Space and time reconstruction of the precessing vortex core in Francis turbine draft tube by 2D-PIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favrel, A.; Müller, A.; Landry, C.; Yamamoto, K.; Avellan, F.

    2016-11-01

    Francis turbines operating at part load conditions experience the development of a high swirling flow at the runner outlet, giving rise to the development of a cavitation precessing vortex rope in the draft tube. The latter acts as an excitation source for the hydro-mechanical system and may jeopardize the system stability if resonance conditions are met. Although many aspects of the part load issue have been widely studied in the past, the accurate stability analysis of hydro-power plants remains challenging. A better understanding of the vortex rope dynamics in a wide range of operating conditions is an important step towards the prediction and the transposition of the pressure fluctuations from reduced to prototype scale. For this purpose, an investigation of the flow velocity fields at the outlet of a Francis turbine reduced scale physical model operating at part load conditions is performed by means of 2D-PIV in three different horizontal cross-sections of the draft tube cone. The measurements are performed in cavitation-free conditions for three values of discharge factor, comprised between 60% and 81% of the value at the Best Efficiency Point. The present article describes a detailed methodology to properly recover the evolution of the velocity fields during one precession cycle by means of phase averaging. The vortex circulation is computed and the vortex trajectory over one typical precession period is finally recovered for each operating point. It is notably shown that below a given value of the discharge factor, the vortex dynamics abruptly change and loose its periodicity and coherence.

  8. Study of the vortex-induced pressure excitation source in a Francis turbine draft tube by particle image velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favrel, A.; Müller, A.; Landry, C.; Yamamoto, K.; Avellan, F.

    2015-12-01

    Francis turbines operating at part-load experience the development of a precessing cavitation vortex rope at the runner outlet, which acts as an excitation source for the hydraulic system. In case of resonance, the resulting pressure pulsations seriously compromise the stability of the machine and of the electrical grid to which it is connected. As such off-design conditions are increasingly required for the integration of unsteady renewable energy sources into the existing power system, an accurate assessment of the hydropower plant stability is crucial. However, the physical mechanisms driving this excitation source remain largely unclear. It is for instance essential to establish the link between the draft tube flow characteristics and the intensity of the excitation source. In this study, a two-component particle image velocimetry system is used to investigate the flow field at the runner outlet of a reduced-scale physical model of a Francis turbine. The discharge value is varied from 55 to 81 % of the value at the best efficiency point. A particular set-up is designed to guarantee a proper optical access across the complex geometry of the draft tube elbow. Based on phase-averaged velocity fields, the evolution of the vortex parameters with the discharge, such as the trajectory and the circulation, is determined for the first time. It is shown that the rise in the excitation source intensity is induced by an enlargement of the vortex trajectory and a simultaneous increase in the precession frequency, as well as the vortex circulation. Below a certain value of discharge, the structure of the vortex abruptly changes and loses its coherence, leading to a drastic reduction in the intensity of the induced excitation source.

  9. Heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics of the tube bank fin heat exchanger with fin punched with flow redistributors and curved triangular vortex generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Song; Jin, Hua; Song, KeWei; Wang, LiangChen; Wu, Xiang; Wang, LiangBi

    2017-10-01

    The heat transfer performance of the tube bank fin heat exchanger is limited by the air-side thermal resistance. Thus, enhancing the air-side heat transfer is an effective method to improve the performance of the heat exchanger. A new fin pattern with flow redistributors and curved triangular vortex generators is experimentally studied in this paper. The effects of the flow redistributors located in front of the tube stagnation point and the curved vortex generators located around the tube on the characteristics of heat transfer and pressure drop are discussed in detail. A performance comparison is also carried out between the fins with and without flow redistributors. The experimental results show that the flow redistributors stamped out from the fin in front of the tube stagnation points can decrease the friction factor at the cost of decreasing the heat transfer performance. Whether the combination of the flow redistributors and the curved vortex generators will present a better heat transfer performance depends on the size of the curved vortex generators. As for the studied two sizes of vortex generators, the heat transfer performance is promoted by the flow redistributors for the fin with larger size of vortex generators and the performance is suppressed by the flow redistributors for the fin with smaller vortex generators.

  10. Heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics of the tube bank fin heat exchanger with fin punched with flow redistributors and curved triangular vortex generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Song; Jin, Hua; Song, KeWei; Wang, LiangChen; Wu, Xiang; Wang, LiangBi

    2017-04-01

    The heat transfer performance of the tube bank fin heat exchanger is limited by the air-side thermal resistance. Thus, enhancing the air-side heat transfer is an effective method to improve the performance of the heat exchanger. A new fin pattern with flow redistributors and curved triangular vortex generators is experimentally studied in this paper. The effects of the flow redistributors located in front of the tube stagnation point and the curved vortex generators located around the tube on the characteristics of heat transfer and pressure drop are discussed in detail. A performance comparison is also carried out between the fins with and without flow redistributors. The experimental results show that the flow redistributors stamped out from the fin in front of the tube stagnation points can decrease the friction factor at the cost of decreasing the heat transfer performance. Whether the combination of the flow redistributors and the curved vortex generators will present a better heat transfer performance depends on the size of the curved vortex generators. As for the studied two sizes of vortex generators, the heat transfer performance is promoted by the flow redistributors for the fin with larger size of vortex generators and the performance is suppressed by the flow redistributors for the fin with smaller vortex generators.

  11. Heat transfer and flow characteristics of fin-tube bundles with and without winglet-type vortex generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, K. M.; Torii, K.; Nishino, K.

    2002-08-01

    The objective of this research is to investigate the effect of longitudinal vortices that can be applied to the heat transfer enhancement for fin-tube heat exchangers such as air-cooled condensers. A multichannel test core was designed and fabricated for the determination of overall heat transfer and pressure loss with circular tubes and winglet vortex generators. Heat transfer results were obtained using a transient method referred to as the modified single-blow method. For a three-row tube bundle in an in-line arrangement without winglets, the heat transfer and the pressure loss were 72% and 210% higher, respectively, than for a multichannel test core without any built-in tube or winglet. These increases were caused by vortices around the tube banks. The corresponding increases for a staggered tube bundle are 95% and 310%, respectively. The triangular winglets recommended by the previous studies in a fin-tube bundle in an in-line arrangement increase the overall heat transfer 10-25% and the pressure loss 20-35% for the Reynolds numbers ranging from 300 to 2700.

  12. A Hybrid Vortex Method for Two-Dimensional Flow Over Tube Bundles

    SciTech Connect

    Strickland, J.H.; Wolfe, W.P.

    1998-11-13

    A hybrid vortex method is presented for computing flows about objects that accurately resolves the boundary layer details while keeping the number of free vortices at a reasonable level. The method uses a wall layer model close to the body surface and discrete vortex blobs in the free wake. Details of the wall layer implementation are presented, and results of sample calculations are compared with known analytical solutions and with calculations from other vortex codes. These results show that the computed boundary layer details are accurate to approximately 0.3 percent of analytical solutions while using three orders of magnitude fewer vortices than other vortex simulations.

  13. Interaction of a pulsating vortex rope with the local velocity field in a Francis turbine draft tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, A.; Bullani, A.; Dreyer, M.; Roth, S.; Favrel, A.; Landry, C.; Avellan, F.

    2012-11-01

    Acoustic resonances in Francis turbines often define undesirable limitations to their operating ranges at high load. The knowledge of the mechanisms governing the onset and the sustenance of these instabilities in the swirling flow leaving the runner is essential for the development of a reliable hydroacoustic model for the prediction of system stability. The present work seeks to study experimentally the unstable draft tube flow by conducting a series of measurements on a reduced Francis Turbine model. The key physical parameters and their interaction with the hydraulic and mechanical system are studied and quantified. In particular, the evolution of the axial and tangential velocity components in the draft tube cone is analysed by means of Laser Doppler Anemometry. Combined with the calculation of the instantaneous vortex rope volume based on flow visualization and the measurement of the pressure fluctuations, the nature of the auto-oscillation in the draft tube flow is investigated.

  14. Vortex shedding and fluidelastic instability in a normal square tube array excited by two-phase cross-flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feenstra, P. A.; Weaver, D. S.; Nakamura, T.

    2003-05-01

    Laboratory experiments were conducted to determine the flow-induced vibration (FIV) response and fluidelastic stability threshold of a model heat exchanger tube bundle subjected to a cross-flow of refrigerant 11. The tube bundle consisted of a normal square array of 12 tubes with outer tube diameters of 7.11mm and a pitch over diameter ratio of 1.485. The experiments were conducted in a flow-loop that was capable of generating single- and two-phase cross-flows over a variety of mass fluxes and void fractions. The primary intent of the research was to improve our understanding of the FIVs of heat exchanger tube arrays subjected to two-phase cross-flow. Of particular concern was the effect of array pattern geometry on fluidelastic instability. The experimental results are analysed and compared with existing data from the literature using various methods of parameter definition. Comparison of tube vibration response in liquid flow with previous results shows a similar occurrence of symmetric vortex shedding that validates the scale model approach in single-phase flow. It was found that the introduction of a small amount of bubbles in the flow disrupted the vortex shedding and thereby caused a significant reduction in streamwise vibration amplitude. The fluidelastic stability thresholds for the present array agree well with results from previous studies. Furthermore, a good collapse of the stability data from various investigations is obtained when the fluid density is defined using the slip model of Feenstra et al. and when an effective two-phase flow velocity is defined using the interfacial velocity model of Nakamura et al.

  15. The effect of shape of winglet vortex generator on the thermal-hydrodynamic performance of a circular tube bank fin heat exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Wanling; Wang, Liangbi; Guan, Yong; Hu, Wenju

    2017-09-01

    In real application, the shape of the vortex generator has great influence on the heat transfer and flow resistance characteristics of tube bank fin heat exchanger. Therefore, the effect of the shape of the vortex generator on heat transfer performance of such heat exchanger should be considered. In this paper, the effect of three different shaped vortex generators (i.e. delta winglet, rectangular winglet and trapezoid winglet) on heat transfer intensity and secondary flow intensity of a circular tube bank fin heat exchanger was numerically studied. The results show that with increasing Re, overall average Nu and the non-dimensional secondary flow intensity Se m increase however friction factor f decreases. A corresponding relationship can be found between Nu and Se m, which indicates that the secondary flow intensity determines the heat transfer intensity in the fin-side channel of circular tube bank fin heat exchanger with different shaped vortex generators on the fin surfaces. Under the identical pumping power constrain, the optimal shape of the vortex generators is the delta winglet vortex generators for the studied cases.

  16. Downstream evolution of unconfined vortices: mechanical and thermal aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Saborid, M.; Herrada, M. A.; Gómez-Barea, A.; Barrero, A.

    2002-11-01

    We present a numerical study of the downstream evolution (mechanical and thermal) of vortex-jet cores whose velocity and temperature fields far from the axis match a family of inviscid and non-conducting vortices. The far-velocity field is rotational, except for a particular case which corresponds to the well-known Long's vortex. The evolution of the vortex core depends on both the conditions at a certain upstream station, characterized by the dimensionless value of the velocity at the axis, and a dimensionless swirling parameter L defined as the ratio of the values of the azimuthal and axial velocities outside the vortex core. This numerical study, based on the quasi-cylindrical approximation (QC) of the Navier Stokes equations, determines the conditions under which the vortex evolution proceeds smoothly, eventually reaching an asymptotic self-similar behaviour as described in the literature (Fernández-Feria, Fernández de la Mora & Barrero 1995; Herrada, Pérez-Saborid & Barrero 1999), or breaks in a non-slender solution (vortex breakdown). In particular, the critical value L = Lb(a) beyond which vortex breakdown occurs downstream is a function of a dimensionless parameter a characterizing the axial momentum of the vortex jet at an initial upstream station. It is found numerically that for very large values of a this vortex breakdown criterion tends to an asymptote which is precisely the value L = L* predicted by the self-similar analysis, and beyond which a self-similar structure of the vortex core does not exist. In addition, the computation of the total temperature field provides useful information on the physical mechanisms responsible for the thermal separation phenomenon observed in Ranque Hilsch tubes and other swirling jet devices. In particular, the mechanical work of viscous forces which gives rise to an intense loss of kinetic energy during the initial stages of the evolution has been identified as the physical mechanism responsible for thermal

  17. Temperature and pressure measurements at cold exit of counter-flow vortex tube with flow visualization of reversed flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusof, Mohd Hazwan bin; Katanoda, Hiroshi; Morita, Hiromitsu

    2015-02-01

    In order to clarify the structure of the cold flow discharged from the counter-flow vortex tube (VT), the temperature and pressure of the cold flow were measured, and the existence and behavior of the reversed flow at the cold exit was studied using a simple flow visualization technique consisting of a 0.75mm-diameter needle, and an oil paint droplet. It is observed through this experiment that the Pitot pressure at the cold exit center can either be lower or higher than atmospheric pressure, depending on the inlet pressure and the cold fraction, and that a reversed flow is observed when the Pitot pressure at the cold exit center is lower than atmospheric pressure. In addition, it is observed that when reducing the cold fraction from unity at any arbitrary inlet pressure, the region of reversed and colder flow in the central part of cold exit extends in the downstream direction.

  18. Experimental investigation of the local wave speed in a draft tube with cavitation vortex rope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landry, C.; Favrel, A.; Müller, A.; Nicolet, C.; Yamamoto, K.; Avellan, F.

    2014-03-01

    Hydraulic machines operating in a wider range are subjected to cavitation developments inducing undesirable pressure pulsations which could lead to potential instability of the power plant. The occurrence of pulsating cavitation volumes in the runner and the draft tube is considered as a mass source of the system and is depending on the cavitation compliance. This dynamic parameter represents the cavitation volume variation with the respect to a variation of pressure and defines implicitly the local wave speed in the draft tube. This parameter is also decisive for an accurate prediction of system eigen frequencies. Therefore, the local wave speed in the draft tube is intrinsically linked to the eigen frequencies of the hydraulic system. Thus, if the natural frequency of a hydraulic system can be determined experimentally, it also becomes possible to estimate a local wave speed in the draft tube with a numerical model. In the present study, the reduced scale model of a Francis turbine (v=0.29) was investigated at off-design conditions. In order to measure the first eigenmode of the hydraulic test rig, an additional discharge was injected at the inlet of the hydraulic turbine at a variable frequency and amplitude to excite the system. Thus, with different pressure sensors installed on the test rig, the first eigenmode was determined. Then, a hydro-acoustic test rig model was developed with the In-house EPFL SIMSEN software and the local wave speed in the draft tube was adjusted to obtain the same first eigen frequency as that measured experimentally. Finally, this method was applied for different Thoma and Froude numbers at part load conditions.

  19. Tempest in a glass tube: A helical vortex formation in a complex plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saitou, Yoshifumi; Ishihara, Osamu; Ishihara

    2014-12-01

    A collective behavior of dust particles in a complex plasma with a magnetic field (up to 4 kG) is investigated. Dust particles form a dust disk which is rotating in a horizontal plane pushed by ions rotating with the E × B drift as a trigger force. The thickness of the disk is determined by controlling the experimental conditions. The disk rotates in a horizontal plane and forms a two-dimensional thin structure when the pressure pAr is relatively high. The dust particles are ejected from near the disk center and form a rotation in the vertical plane and, hence, forms a helical vortex when the disk is thick for relatively low pAr . The reason the dust disk has the different thickness is due to the neutral pressure. Under a higher (lower) neutral gas pressure, the disk becomes two (three) dimensional due to the influence of the neutral drag force.

  20. A numerical study of fluid flow and heat transfer over a fin and flat tube heat exchangers with complex vortex generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahel, Djamel; Ameur, Houari; Kamla, Youcef

    2017-05-01

    A numerical work is carried out to investigate the heat transfer and fluid flow behaviors in a fin-and-flat-tube heat exchanger provided with complex vortex generators (CVGs). A new design of CVGs is proposed in the present paper, it consists of CVGs formed by two portions: a flat portion with various attack angles (β = 0°, 20°, 40° and 60°) and a curved portion with various curvature angles (α = 30°, 45° and 60°). Changes in CVGs position ratio (R*) inside the tube are also investigated and three values of R* are considered, namely: R* = 1.375, 1.750 and 2.125. Computations based on the finite volume method with the SIMPLE algorithm are conducted for the air flow. The Reynolds number is ranging from 25 to 400. The obtained results show that the vortex formed near the tubes is intensified by the flat potion of CVGs, and the curved tube guide the fluid flow towards the region behind the tubes, resulting thus in improved heat transfer rates. In a comparison with tubes without CVG, the new design suggested and especially the case with β = 60°, α = 60° and R* = 2.125 improve significantly the heat transfer (an increase by about 76%) with a moderate pressure loss penalty. Contribution to the topical issue "Materials for Energy harvesting, conversion and storage II (ICOME 2016)", edited by Jean-Michel Nunzi, Rachid Bennacer and Mohammed El Ganaoui

  1. Post-glitch exponential relaxation of radio pulsars and magnetars in terms of vortex creep across flux tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gügercinoğlu, Erbil

    2017-08-01

    Timing observations of rapidly rotating neutron stars revealed a great number of glitches, observed from both canonical radio pulsars and magnetars. Among them, 76 glitches have shown exponential relaxation(s) with characteristic decay times ranging from several days to a few months, followed by a more gradual recovery. Glitches displaying exponential relaxation with single or multiple decay time constants are analysed in terms of a model based on the interaction of the vortex lines with the toroidal arrangement of flux tubes in the outer core of the neutron star. Model results agree with the observed time-scales in general. Thus, the glitch phenomenon can be used to deduce valuable information about neutron star structure, in particular on the interior magnetic field configuration which is unaccessible from surface observations. One immediate conclusion is that the magnetar glitch data are best explained with a much cooler core and therefore require that direct Urca-type fast-cooling mechanisms should be effective for magnetars.

  2. Experimental study and 3D CFD analysis on the optimization of throttle angle for a convergent vortex tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafiee, Seyed Ehsan; Sadeghiazad, M. M.

    2016-12-01

    Seven adjustments of convergent-type Vortex Tube (VT) with different throttle angles were applied. The adjustments were made to analyze the influences of such angles on cold and hot temperature drops as well as flow structures inside the VTs. An experimental setup was designed, and tests were performed on different convergent VT configurations at injection pressures ranging from 0.45 to 0.65 MPa. The angles of the throttle valve were arranged between 30° to 90°, and the numbers of injection nozzles ranged between 2 and 6. Laboratory results indicated that the maximum hot and cold temperature drops ranged from 23.24 to 35 K and from 22.87 to 32.88 K, respectively, at four injection nozzles. Results also showed that temperature drop is a function of hot throttle valve angle with the maximum hot and cold temperature drops depending on the angle applied. We used graphs to demonstrate the changes in the cold and hot temperature drops with respect to hot throttle angle values. These values were interpreted and evaluated to determine the optimum angle, which was 60°. The CFD outputs agreed very well with the laboratory results. The proposed CFD results can help future researchers gain good insights into the complicated separation process taking place inside the VTs.

  3. Variable temperature system using vortex tube cooling and fiber optic temperature measurement for low temperature magic angle spinning NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Rachel W.; Zilm, Kurt W.

    2004-06-01

    We describe the construction and operation of a variable temperature (VT) system for a high field fast magic angle spinning (MAS) probe. The probe is used in NMR investigations of biological macromolecules, where stable setting and continuous measurement of the temperature over periods of several days are required in order to prevent sample overheating and degradation. The VT system described is used at and below room temperature. A vortex tube is used to provide cooling in the temperature range of -20 to 20 °C, while a liquid nitrogen-cooled heat exchanger is used below -20 °C. Using this arrangement, the lowest temperature that is practically achievable is -140 °C. Measurement of the air temperature near the spinning rotor is accomplished using a fiber optic thermometer that utilizes the temperature dependence of the absorption edge of GaAs. The absorption edge of GaAs also has a magnetic field dependence that we have measured and corrected for. This dependence was calibrated at several field strengths using the well-known temperature dependence of the 1H chemical shift difference of the protons in methanol.

  4. Variable temperature system using vortex tube cooling and fiber optic temperature measurement for low temperature magic angle spinning NMR.

    PubMed

    Martin, Rachel W; Zilm, Kurt W

    2004-06-01

    We describe the construction and operation of a variable temperature (VT) system for a high field fast magic angle spinning (MAS) probe. The probe is used in NMR investigations of biological macromolecules, where stable setting and continuous measurement of the temperature over periods of several days are required in order to prevent sample overheating and degradation. The VT system described is used at and below room temperature. A vortex tube is used to provide cooling in the temperature range of -20 to 20 degrees C, while a liquid nitrogen-cooled heat exchanger is used below -20 degrees C. Using this arrangement, the lowest temperature that is practically achievable is -140 degrees C. Measurement of the air temperature near the spinning rotor is accomplished using a fiber optic thermometer that utilizes the temperature dependence of the absorption edge of GaAs. The absorption edge of GaAs also has a magnetic field dependence that we have measured and corrected for. This dependence was calibrated at several field strengths using the well-known temperature dependence of the (1)H chemical shift difference of the protons in methanol.

  5. The three-dimensional instability of a strained vortex tube revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukumoto, Yasuhide

    2003-10-01

    We revisit the Moore Saffman Tsai Widnall instability, a parametric resonance between left- and right-handed bending waves of infinitesimal amplitude, on the Rankine vortex strained by a weak pure shear flow. The results of Tsai & Widnall (1976) and Eloy & Le Dizès (2001), as generalized to all pairs of Kelvin waves whose azimuthal wavenumbers m are separated by 2, are simplified by providing an explicit solution of the linearized Euler equations for the disturbance flow field. Given the wavenumber k_0 and the frequency omega_0 of an intersection point of dispersion curves, the growth rate is expressible solely in terms of the modified Bessel functions, and so is the unstable wavenumber range. Every intersection leads to instability. Most of the intersections correspond to weak instability that vanishes in the short-wave limit, and dominant modes are restricted to particular intersections. For helical waves m=± 1, the growth rate of non-rotating waves is far larger than that of rotating waves. The wavenumber width of stationary instability bands broadens linearly in k_0, while that of rotating instability bands is bounded. The growth rate of the stationary instability takes, in the long-wavelength limit, the value of varepsilon/2 for the two-dimensional displacement instability, and, in the short-wavelength limit, the value of 9varepsilon/16 for the elliptical instability, being larger at large but finite values of k_0. Here varepsilon is the strength of shear near the core centre. For resonance between higher azimuthal wavenumbers m and m+2, the same limiting value is approached as k_0 {->} infty, along sequences of specific crossing points whose frequency rapidly converges to m+1, in two ways, from above for a fixed m and from below for m {->} infty. The energy of the Kelvin waves is calculated by invoking Cairns' formula. The instability result is compatible with Krein's theory for Hamiltonian spectra.

  6. Numerical investigation for finding the appropriate design parameters of a fin-and-tube heat exchanger with delta-winglet vortex generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behfard, M.; Sohankar, A.

    2016-01-01

    A numerical simulation is performed to investigate the heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics of three-row inline tube bundles as a part of a heat exchanger (Re = 1000, Pr = 4.29). To enhance heat transfer, two pairs of delta winglet-type vortex generators (VGs) installed beside the first row and between the first and second rows of the tube bundles. The diameter of the second row of the tubes is chosen smaller than those of the first and third. A comprehensive study on the effects of various geometrical parameters such as transverse and longitudinal positions of VGs, length and height of VGs and angle of attack of the delta winglets is performed to augment heat transfer. Based on this study the best values of these design parameters are determined. The results showed that the best model increases the convective heat transfer ratio and thermal performance factor about 59 and 43 %, respectively, in compare with the geometry without VG.

  7. Simulations of the vortex in the Dellenback abrupt expansion, resembling a hydro turbine draft tube operating at part-load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, H.

    2012-11-01

    This work presents an OpenFOAM case-study, based on the experimental studies of the swirling flow in the abrupt expansion by Dellenback et al.[1]. The case yields similar flow conditions as those of a helical vortex rope in a hydro turbine draft tube working at part-load. The case-study is set up similar to the ERCOFTAC Conical Diffuser and Centrifugal Pump OpenFOAM case-studies [2,3], making all the files available and the results fully reproducable using OpenSource software. The mesh generation is done using m4 scripting and the OpenFOAM built-in blockMesh mesh generator. The swirling inlet boundary condition is specified as an axi-symmetric profile. The outlet boundary condition uses the zeroGradient condition for all variables except for the pressure, which uses the fixed mean value boundary condition. The wall static pressure is probed at a number of locations during the simulations, and post-processing of the time-averaged solution is done using the OpenFOAM sample utility. Gnuplot scripts are provided for plotting the results. The computational results are compared to one of the operating conditions studied by Dellenback, and measurements for all the experimentally studied operating conditions are available in the case-study. Results from five cases are here presented, based on the kEpsilon model, the kOmegaSST model, and a filtered version of the same kOmegaSST model, named kOmegaSSTF [4,5]. Two different inlet boundary conditions are evaluated. It is shown that kEpsilon and kOmegaSST give steady solutions, while kOmegaSSTF gives a highly unsteady solution. The time-averaged solution of the kOmegaSSTF model is much more accurate than the other models. The kEpsilon and kOmegaSST models are thus unable to accurately model the effect of the large-scale unsteadiness, while kOmegaSSTF resolves those scales and models only the smaller scales. The use of two different boundary conditions shows that the boundary conditions are more important than the choice between

  8. Modeling gasodynamic vortex cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allahverdyan, A. E.; Fauve, S.

    2017-08-01

    We aim at studying gasodynamic vortex cooling in an analytically solvable, thermodynamically consistent model that can explain limitations on the cooling efficiency. To this end, we study an angular plus radial flow between two (coaxial) rotating permeable cylinders. Full account is taken of compressibility, viscosity, and heat conductivity. For a weak inward radial flow the model qualitatively describes the vortex cooling effect, in terms of both temperature and the decrease of the stagnation enthalpy, seen in short uniflow vortex (Ranque) tubes. The cooling does not result from external work and its efficiency is defined as the ratio of the lowest temperature reached adiabatically (for the given pressure gradient) to the lowest temperature actually reached. We show that for the vortex cooling the efficiency is strictly smaller than 1, but in another configuration with an outward radial flow, we find that the efficiency can be larger than 1. This is related to both the geometry and the finite heat conductivity.

  9. Vortex formation and instability in the left ventricle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Trung Bao; Sotiropoulos, Fotis; Coffey, Dane; Keefe, Daniel

    2012-09-01

    We study the formation of the mitral vortex ring during early diastolic filling in a patient-specific left ventricle (LV) using direct numerical simulation. The geometry of the left ventricle is reconstructed from Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) data of a healthy human subject. The left ventricular kinematics is modeled via a cell-based activation methodology, which is inspired by cardiac electro-physiology and yields physiologic LV wall motion. In the fluid dynamics videos, we describe in detail the three-dimensional structure of the mitral vortex ring, which is formed during early diastolic filling. The ring starts to deform as it propagates toward the apex of the heart and becomes inclined. The trailing secondary vortex tubes are formed as the result of interaction between the vortex ring and the LV wall. These vortex tubes wrap around the circumference and begin to interact with and destabilize the mitral vortex ring. At the end of diastole, the vortex ring impinges on the LV wall and the large-scale intraventricular flow rotates in clockwise direction. We show for the first time that the mitral vortex ring evolution is dominated by a number of vortex-vortex and vortex-wall interactions, including lateral straining and deformation of vortex ring, the interaction of two vortex tubes with unequal strengths, helicity polarization of vortex tubes and twisting instabilities of the vortex cores.

  10. Vortex rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shariff, Karim; Leonard, Anthony

    1992-01-01

    The vortex-ring problem in fluid mechanics is examined generally in terms of formation, the steady state, the duration of the rings, and vortex interactions. The formation is studied by examining the generation of laminar and turbulent vortex rings and their resulting structures with attention given to the three stages of laminar ring development. Inviscid dynamics is addressed to show how core dynamics affects overall ring motion, and laminar vortex structures are described in two dimensions. Viscous and inviscid structures are related in terms of 'leapfrogging', head-on collisions, and collisions with a no-slip wall. Linear instability theory is shown to successfully describe observational data, although late stages in the breakdown are not completely understood. This study of vortex rings has important implications for key aerodynamic issues including sound generation, transport and mixing, and vortex interactions.

  11. Vulcanized vortex

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Inyong; Lee, Youngone

    2009-01-15

    We investigate vortex configurations with the 'vulcanization' term inspired by the renormalization of {phi}{sub *}{sup 4} theory in the canonical {theta}-deformed noncommutativity. We focus on the classical limit of the theory described by a single parameter which is the ratio of the vulcanization and the noncommutativity parameters. We perform numerical calculations and find that nontopological vortex solutions exist as well as Q-ball type solutions, but topological vortex solutions are not admitted.

  12. Vortex bursting and tracer transport of a counter-rotating vortex pair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misaka, T.; Holzäpfel, F.; Hennemann, I.; Gerz, T.; Manhart, M.; Schwertfirm, F.

    2012-02-01

    Large-eddy simulations of a coherent counter-rotating vortex pair in different environments are performed. The environmental background is characterized by varying turbulence intensities and stable temperature stratifications. Turbulent exchange processes between the vortices, the vortex oval, and the environment, as well as the material redistribution processes along the vortex tubes are investigated employing passive tracers that are superimposed to the initial vortex flow field. It is revealed that the vortex bursting phenomenon, known from photos of aircraft contrails or smoke visualization, is caused by collisions of secondary vortical structures traveling along the vortex tube which expel material from the vortex but do not result in a sudden decay of circulation or an abrupt change of vortex core structure. In neutrally stratified and weakly turbulent conditions, vortex reconnection triggers traveling helical vorticity structures which is followed by their collision. A long-lived vortex ring links once again establishing stable double rings. Key phenomena observed in the simulations are supported by photographs of contrails. The vertical and lateral extents of the detrained passive tracer strongly depend on environmental conditions where the sensitivity of detrainment rates on initial tracer distributions appears to be low.

  13. Vortex methods and vortex statistics

    SciTech Connect

    Chorin, A.J.

    1993-05-01

    Vortex methods originated from the observation that in incompressible, inviscid, isentropic flow vorticity (or, more accurately, circulation) is a conserved quantity, as can be readily deduced from the absence of tangential stresses. Thus if the vorticity is known at time t = 0, one can deduce the flow at a later time by simply following it around. In this narrow context, a vortex method is a numerical method that makes use of this observation. Even more generally, the analysis of vortex methods leads, to problems that are closely related to problems in quantum physics and field theory, as well as in harmonic analysis. A broad enough definition of vortex methods ends up by encompassing much of science. Even the purely computational aspects of vortex methods encompass a range of ideas for which vorticity may not be the best unifying theme. The author restricts himself in these lectures to a special class of numerical vortex methods, those that are based on a Lagrangian transport of vorticity in hydrodynamics by smoothed particles (``blobs``) and those whose understanding contributes to the understanding of blob methods. Vortex methods for inviscid flow lead to systems of ordinary differential equations that can be readily clothed in Hamiltonian form, both in three and two space dimensions, and they can preserve exactly a number of invariants of the Euler equations, including topological invariants. Their viscous versions resemble Langevin equations. As a result, they provide a very useful cartoon of statistical hydrodynamics, i.e., of turbulence, one that can to some extent be analyzed analytically and more importantly, explored numerically, with important implications also for superfluids, superconductors, and even polymers. In the authors view, vortex ``blob`` methods provide the most promising path to the understanding of these phenomena.

  14. Vortex methods

    SciTech Connect

    Chorin, A.J. |

    1993-06-01

    Vortex methods originated from the observation that in incompressible inviscid flow vorticity (or, more accurately, circulation) is a conserved quantity, as can be readily deduced from the absence of tangential stresses. Thus, if the vorticity is known at time t=0, one can find the flow at a later time by simply following the vorticity. In this narrow context, a vortex method is a numerical method that follows vorticity. The author restricts himself in these lectures to a special class of numerical vortex methods, those that are based on a Lagrangian transport of vorticity in hydrodynamics by smoothed particles (blobs) and those whose analysis contributes to the understanding of blob methods. Blob methods started in the 1930`s.

  15. Three-Dimensional Vortex-Body Interaction in a Viscous Fluid

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    vortex (figure 13) exhibit bubble- or spiral -type forms that appear similar to flow visualization images of vortex breakdowns observed in other... Vortex - Jet," J. Fluid Mech., Vol. 369, 1998, 301-331. ,7. Lundgren , T.S. and Ashurst, W.T., "Area-Varying Waves on Curved Vortex Tubes with Application...Ii Three-Dimensional Vortex -Body Interaction In a Viscous Fluid FINAL PROGRESS REPORT JEFFREY S. MARSHALL July 30, 1999 U.S. ARMY RESEARCH OFFICE

  16. Numerical simulation of flow in a high head Francis turbine with prediction of efficiency, rotor stator interaction and vortex structures in the draft tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jošt, D.; Škerlavaj, A.; Morgut, M.; Mežnar, P.; Nobile, E.

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents numerical simulations of flow in a model of a high head Francis turbine and comparison of results to the measurements. Numerical simulations were done by two CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) codes, Ansys CFX and OpenFOAM. Steady-state simulations were performed by k-epsilon and SST model, while for transient simulations the SAS SST ZLES model was used. With proper grid refinement in distributor and runner and with taking into account losses in labyrinth seals very accurate prediction of torque on the shaft, head and efficiency was obtained. Calculated axial and circumferential velocity components on two planes in the draft tube matched well with experimental results.

  17. Experimental observation of the collision of three vortex rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández, R. H.; Monsalve, E.

    2015-06-01

    We investigate for the first time the motion, interaction and simultaneous collision between three initially stable vortex rings arranged symmetrically, making an angle of 120 degrees between their straight path lines. We report results with laminar vortex rings in air and water obtained through measurements of the ring velocity field with a hot-wire anemometer, both in free flight and during the entire collision. In the air experiment, our flow visualizations allowed us to identify two main collision stages. A first ring-dominated stage where the rings slowdown progressively, increasing their diameter rapidly, followed by secondary vortex structures resulting after the rings make contact. Local portions of the vortex tubes of opposite circulation are coupled together thus creating local arm-like vortex structures moving radially in outward directions, rapidly dissipating kinetic energy. From a similar water experiment, we provide detailed shadowgraph visualizations of both the ring bubble and the full size collision, showing clearly the final expanding vortex structure. It is accurately resolved that the physical contact between vortex ring tubes gives rise to three symmetric expanding vortex arms but also the vortex reconnection of the top and lower vortex tubes. The central collision zone was found to have the lowest kinetic energy during the entire collision and therefore it can be identified as a safe zone. The preserved collision symmetries leading to the weak kinematic activity in the safe zone is the first step into the development of an intermittent hydrodynamic trap for small and lightweight particles.

  18. Rotor Wake Vortex Definition Using 3C-PIV Measurements: Corrected for Vortex Orientation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burley, Casey L.; Brooks, Thomas F.; vanderWall, Berend; Richard, Hughues Richard; Raffel, Markus; Beaumier, Philippe; Delrieux, Yves; Lim, Joon W.; Yu, Yung H.; Tung, Chee

    2003-01-01

    Three-component (3-C) particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements, within the wake across a rotor disk plane, are used to determine wake vortex definitions important for BVI (Blade Vortex Interaction) and broadband noise prediction. This study is part of the HART II test program conducted using a 40 percent scale BO-105 helicopter main rotor in the German-Dutch Wind Tunnel (DNW). In this paper, measurements are presented of the wake vortex field over the advancing side of the rotor operating at a typical descent landing condition. The orientations of the vortex (tube) axes are found to have non-zero tilt angles with respect to the chosen PIV measurement cut planes, often on the order of 45 degrees. Methods for determining the orientation of the vortex axis and reorienting the measured PIV velocity maps (by rotation/projection) are presented. One method utilizes the vortex core axial velocity component, the other utilizes the swirl velocity components. Key vortex parameters such as vortex core size, strength, and core velocity distribution characteristics are determined from the reoriented PIV velocity maps. The results are compared with those determined from velocity maps that are not corrected for orientation. Knowledge of magnitudes and directions of the vortex axial and swirl velocity components as a function of streamwise location provide a basis for insight into the vortex evolution.

  19. The structure of vortex breakdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leibovich, S.

    1978-01-01

    The term 'vortex breakdown', as used in the reported investigation, refers to a disturbance characterized by the formation of an internal stagnation point on the vortex axis, followed by reversed flow in a region of limited axial extent. Two forms of vortex breakdown, which predominate, are shown in photographs. One form is called 'near-axisymmetric' (sometimes 'axisymmetric'), and the other is called 'spiral'. A survey is presented of work published since the 1972 review by Hall. Most experimental data taken since Hall's review have been in tubes, and the survey deals primarily with such cases. It is found that the assumption of axial-symmetry has produced useful results. The classification of flows as supercritical or subcritical, a step that assumes symmetry, has proved universally useful. Experiments show that vortex breakdown is always preceded by an upstream supercritical flow and followed by a subcritical wake. However, a comparison between experiments and attempts at prediction is less than encouraging. For a satisfactory understanding of the structure of vortex breakdown it is apparently necessary to take into account also aspects of asymmetry.

  20. Brownian vortexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Bo; Lin, Jiayi; Darby, Ellis; Grosberg, Alexander Y.; Grier, David G.

    2009-07-01

    Mechanical equilibrium at zero temperature does not necessarily imply thermodynamic equilibrium at finite temperature for a particle confined by a static but nonconservative force field. Instead, the diffusing particle can enter into a steady state characterized by toroidal circulation in the probability flux, which we call a Brownian vortex. The circulatory bias in the particle’s thermally driven trajectory is not simply a deterministic response to the solenoidal component of the force but rather reflects interplay between advection and diffusion in which thermal fluctuations extract work from the nonconservative force field. As an example of this previously unrecognized class of stochastic heat engines, we consider a colloidal sphere diffusing in a conventional optical tweezer. We demonstrate both theoretically and experimentally that nonconservative optical forces bias the particle’s fluctuations into toroidal vortexes whose circulation can reverse direction with temperature or laser power.

  1. Vortex transmutation.

    PubMed

    Ferrando, Albert; Zacarés, Mario; García-March, Miguel-Angel; Monsoriu, Juan A; de Córdoba, Pedro Fernández

    2005-09-16

    Using group theory arguments and numerical simulations, we demonstrate the possibility of changing the vorticity or topological charge of an individual vortex by means of the action of a system possessing a discrete rotational symmetry of finite order. We establish on theoretical grounds a "transmutation pass" determining the conditions for this phenomenon to occur and numerically analyze it in the context of two-dimensional optical lattices. An analogous approach is applicable to the problems of Bose-Einstein condensates in periodic potentials.

  2. Stirring properties of vortex rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auerbach, David

    1991-05-01

    Ring vortex evolution, from the initial roll-up phase through to the final turbulent phase, was experimentally studied to see the dependence of its stirring properties on both the initial (accelerating, constant, decelerating, slow, fast) piston motion as well as on the boundary (tube/hole geometry) conditions. Stirring between fluid initially upstream and that initially downstream of the nozzle plane is done more by convective entrainment at the beginning (roll-up and contraction phases), by diffusive entrainment during the laminar and wavy phases, and by mixed entrainment and ejection during the transition to turbulence and the turbulent phase itself. During vortex roll-up, it was found that tubes eject shorter streaklines than do holes, and that there is less Re dependence for this for tubes than for holes. During the contraction phase, entrainment ends, save for minimal entrainment due to axial inflow into the ring from along the cores of Goertler-type vortices. Generally, the rate of fluid ejected is largest during the transition from the wavy to the turbulent state. As far as the stability of the vortices is concerned, rings generated at holes are less stable than those generated at tubes. During the final turbulent phase, rings not only entrain fluid but eject it periodically into the wake: Between two and four hairpin vortices are generated and laid off in the wake during each ejection. The frequency at which such ejections takes place scales as a Strouhal number that takes on values of between 2 and 4.

  3. Helicity within the vortex filament model.

    PubMed

    Hänninen, R; Hietala, N; Salman, H

    2016-11-24

    Kinetic helicity is one of the invariants of the Euler equations that is associated with the topology of vortex lines within the fluid. In superfluids, the vorticity is concentrated along vortex filaments. In this setting, helicity would be expected to acquire its simplest form. However, the lack of a core structure for vortex filaments appears to result in a helicity that does not retain its key attribute as a quadratic invariant. By defining a spanwise vector to the vortex through the use of a Seifert framing, we are able to introduce twist and henceforth recover the key properties of helicity. We present several examples for calculating internal twist to illustrate why the centreline helicity alone will lead to ambiguous results if a twist contribution is not introduced. Our choice of the spanwise vector can be expressed in terms of the tangential component of velocity along the filament. Since the tangential velocity does not alter the configuration of the vortex at later times, we are able to recover a similar equation for the internal twist angle to that of classical vortex tubes. Our results allow us to explain how a quasi-classical limit of helicity emerges from helicity considerations for individual superfluid vortex filaments.

  4. Helicity within the vortex filament model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hänninen, R.; Hietala, N.; Salman, H.

    2016-11-01

    Kinetic helicity is one of the invariants of the Euler equations that is associated with the topology of vortex lines within the fluid. In superfluids, the vorticity is concentrated along vortex filaments. In this setting, helicity would be expected to acquire its simplest form. However, the lack of a core structure for vortex filaments appears to result in a helicity that does not retain its key attribute as a quadratic invariant. By defining a spanwise vector to the vortex through the use of a Seifert framing, we are able to introduce twist and henceforth recover the key properties of helicity. We present several examples for calculating internal twist to illustrate why the centreline helicity alone will lead to ambiguous results if a twist contribution is not introduced. Our choice of the spanwise vector can be expressed in terms of the tangential component of velocity along the filament. Since the tangential velocity does not alter the configuration of the vortex at later times, we are able to recover a similar equation for the internal twist angle to that of classical vortex tubes. Our results allow us to explain how a quasi-classical limit of helicity emerges from helicity considerations for individual superfluid vortex filaments.

  5. Helicity within the vortex filament model

    PubMed Central

    Hänninen, R.; Hietala, N.; Salman, H.

    2016-01-01

    Kinetic helicity is one of the invariants of the Euler equations that is associated with the topology of vortex lines within the fluid. In superfluids, the vorticity is concentrated along vortex filaments. In this setting, helicity would be expected to acquire its simplest form. However, the lack of a core structure for vortex filaments appears to result in a helicity that does not retain its key attribute as a quadratic invariant. By defining a spanwise vector to the vortex through the use of a Seifert framing, we are able to introduce twist and henceforth recover the key properties of helicity. We present several examples for calculating internal twist to illustrate why the centreline helicity alone will lead to ambiguous results if a twist contribution is not introduced. Our choice of the spanwise vector can be expressed in terms of the tangential component of velocity along the filament. Since the tangential velocity does not alter the configuration of the vortex at later times, we are able to recover a similar equation for the internal twist angle to that of classical vortex tubes. Our results allow us to explain how a quasi-classical limit of helicity emerges from helicity considerations for individual superfluid vortex filaments. PMID:27883029

  6. The motion of magnetic flux tube at the dayside magnetopause under the influence of solar wind flow

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Z.X.; Hu, Y.D.; Li, F. ); Pu, Z.Y. )

    1990-05-01

    The authors propose that flux transfer events (FTEs) at the dayside magnetopause are formed by fluid vortices in the flow field. According to the view of vortex-induced reconnection a FTE tube is a magnetic fluid vortex tube (MF vortex tube). The motion of a FTE tube can be represented by that of a MF vortex in the formation region located in the dayside magnetopause region. This study deals with the internal and external influences governing the motion of MF vortex tubes. The equations of motion of a vortex tube are established and solved. It is found that a FTE tube moves frm low latitude to high latitude with a certain speed. However, the motional path is not a straight line but oscillates about the northward direction for the northern hemisphere. The motional velocity, amplitude and period of the oscillation depend on the flow field and magnetic field in the magnetosheath and magnetosphere as well as the size of the FTE tube.

  7. Vortex Flow Aerodynamics, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, J. F. (Editor); Osborn, R. F. (Editor); Foughner, J. T., Jr. (Editor)

    1986-01-01

    Vortex modeling techniques and experimental studies of research configurations utilizing vortex flows are discussed. Also discussed are vortex flap investigations using generic and airplane research models and vortex flap theoretical analysis and design studies.

  8. Theoretical and Experimental Study of Vortex Tubes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1950-06-01

    sSet3)&&SSSBS£*lBä28ttSill •i«c .;-,.’. $fo» » -5 *$*?* i->! .3! °.S, • ii 𔃻.’ * -.i A’ - ’ -~^^ ..# ’$* ;--•.».’ s la...S^-.iacijeB). T$$be< •_».-.. •». »:. . . .» A SKs_ Large Si-20. (:&PS: ihcfsssi ©|fes * ,.„ * Clase >m of ^Jtel| S-i’ze. |’Ö-.l𔄁f Meii) .^übe Coa... ii f • i!h"" «•’ • - SlMBCStS - f" . Voices, feii» inside £?sa» 0v$& scj.: |r*0. SoteS: ifoiazie

  9. Numerical simulations of 3D compressible vortex ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dora, C. L.; De, A.; Das, D.

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, the evolution and instability of compressible vortex rings at the open end of shock tube are investigated. Three-dimensional Navier-stokes simulations are performed to reveal the instability of circular-compressible vortex rings at different shock Mach numbers. Three shock Mach numbers Ms=1.26, 1.5 and 1.61 each corresponding to subsonic, moderately under-expanded, and highly under-expanded jet regimes, respectively are considered for simulations. It is observed that, in all the cases, the initial stable vortex ring becomes unstable to azimuthal disturbances. The azimuthal waves are seen to develop around the circumference of the vortex core and amplify with time, similar to incompressible vortex rings. At Ms=1.61, the results indicate that a counter-rotating vortex ring forms ahead of the primary vortex ring due to the roll-up of the slipstream vortices. With the presence of counter-rotating vortex ring, the primary vortex ring is severely stretched and the azimuthal waves are seen to be amplified. Furthermore, a preliminary analysis on the number of waves (n) formed around the circumference of the vortex ring is presented. The results show that incompressible instability analysis under-predicts the value of n. However, by incorporating the compressibility correction, the value of n closely matches with the present simulation.

  10. Multi-modes processes for stretched spiral vortex formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horiuti, Kiyosi

    2004-11-01

    We studied a process for formation of the stretched spiral vortex (Lundgren 1982) in incompressible homogeneous isotropic turbulence. It was shown that multi modes exist for the configuration of alignment between the vorticity vectors along the vortex tube core and the vorticity vector along the sheet which emanates from and wraps around the tube core. A representative one is that generated via a roll-up of the vortex sheet through focusing, in which these two vorticity vectors were parallel. Alternative mechanism for formation of this parallel configuration was through the interaction of two different sheets which were initially placed perpendicular to each other. These two sheets generated a weak circulation and it gradually accumulated to form the tube core region. These two sheets were entrained by the tube core and the spiral sheets emanating from the tube core was formed. The tubes in this mode persisted for a rather long period of time. In another mode, the vorticity vectors along the sheet were in the direction transverse to those along the tube core. It was found that this mode often takes an asymmetric configuration in which the vorticity vectors along one of the sheets were parallel to those along the tube, while the vectors along another sheet were transverse to those along the tube. The configuration in which the vorticity vectors along both sheets were transverse to those along the tube core (Pullin and Lundgren 2001) was rarely found. Intense energy cascade took place with the stretching of the spiral vortex sheets. As the Reynolds number was increased, the frequency of occurrence of the spiral vortex formation increased, and the energy spectrum showed a profile close to the -5/3 law.

  11. Sadovskii vortex in strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freilich, Daniel; Llewellyn Smith, Stefan

    2014-11-01

    A Sadovskii vortex is a patch of fluid with uniform vorticity surrounded by a vortex sheet. Using a boundary element type method, we investigate the steady states of this flow in an incompressible, inviscid straining flow. Outside the vortex, the fluid is irrotational. In the limiting case where the entire circulation is due to the vortex patch, this is a patch vortex (Moore & Saffman, Aircraft wake turbulence and its detection 1971). In the other limiting case, where all the circulation is due to the vortex sheet, this is a hollow vortex (Llewellyn Smith and Crowdy, J. Fluid Mech. 691, 2012). This flow has two governing nondimensional parameters, relating the strengths of the straining field, vortex sheet, and patch vorticity. We study the relationship between these two parameters, and examine the shape of the resulting vortices. We also work towards a bifurcation diagram of the steady states of the Sadovskii vortex in an attempt to understand the connection between vortex sheet and vortex patch desingularizations of the point vortex. Support from NSF-CMMI-0970113.

  12. Tube support

    DOEpatents

    Mullinax, Jerry L.

    1988-01-01

    A tube support for supporting horizontal tubes from an inclined vertical support tube passing between the horizontal tubes. A support button is welded to the vertical support tube. Two clamping bars or plates, the lower edges of one bearing on the support button, are removably bolted to the inclined vertical tube. The clamping bars provide upper and lower surface support for the horizontal tubes.

  13. Sadovskii vortex in strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freilich, Daniel; Llewellyn Smith, Stefan

    2015-11-01

    Sadovskii vortices are patches of fluid with uniform vorticity surrounded by a vortex sheet. They were first constructed as models for wakes behind bluff objects. We investigate the Sadovskii vortex in a straining field and examine limiting cases to validate our computational method. One limit is the patch vortex in strain (Moore & Saffman, Aircraft wake turbulence and its detection 1971), where there is no vortex sheet. We solve this as a free-boundary problem, and show that a simple method using the Biot-Savart law quickly gives solutions for stable shapes. When used for the more elongated (stronger straining field) situations, the method also leads to new vortex shapes. In the hollow vortex case, where there is no vortex patch and the circulation is entirely due to the vortex sheet (Llewellyn Smith and Crowdy, J. Fluid Mech. 691 2012), we use the Birkhoff-Rott equation to calculate the velocity of the fluid on the vortex boundary. The combination of these two methods can then be used to calculate the shape and velocity field of the Sadovksii vortex in strain.

  14. Ear Tubes

    MedlinePlus

    ... ENTCareers Marketplace Find an ENT Doctor Near You Ear Tubes Ear Tubes Patient Health Information News media ... and throat specialist) may be considered. What are ear tubes? Ear tubes are tiny cylinders placed through ...

  15. Wake Vortex Transport and Decay in Ground Effect: Vortex Linking with the Ground

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proctor, Fred H.; Hamilton, David W.; Han, Jongil

    2000-01-01

    Numerical simulations are carried out with a three-dimensional Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) model to explore the sensitivity of vortex decay and transport in ground effect (IGE). The vortex decay rates are found to be strongly enhanced following maximum descent into ground effect. The nondimensional decay rate is found to be insensitive to the initial values of circulation, height, and vortex separation. The information gained from these simulations is used to construct a simple decay relationship. This relationship compares well with observed data from an IGE case study. Similarly, a relationship for lateral drift due to ground effect is constructed from the LES data. In the second part of this paper, vortex linking with the ground is investigated. Our numerical simulations of wake vortices for IGE show that a vortex may link with its image beneath the ground, if the intensity of the ambient turbulence is moderate to high. This linking with the ground (which is observed in real cases)gives the appearance of a vortex tube that bends to become vertically oriented and which terminates at the ground. From the simulations conducted, the linking time for vortices in the free atmosphere; i.e., a function of ambient turbulence intensity.

  16. Hydrodynamic Vortex on Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragazzo, Clodoaldo Grotta; de Barros Viglioni, Humberto Henrique

    2017-04-01

    The equations of motion for a system of point vortices on an oriented Riemannian surface of finite topological type are presented. The equations are obtained from a Green's function on the surface. The uniqueness of the Green's function is established under hydrodynamic conditions at the surface's boundaries and ends. The hydrodynamic force on a point vortex is computed using a new weak formulation of Euler's equation adapted to the point vortex context. An analogy between the hydrodynamic force on a massive point vortex and the electromagnetic force on a massive electric charge is presented as well as the equations of motion for massive vortices. Any noncompact Riemann surface admits a unique Riemannian metric such that a single vortex in the surface does not move ("Steady Vortex Metric"). Some examples of surfaces with steady vortex metric isometrically embedded in R^3 are presented.

  17. Propeller tip vortex interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Robert T.; Sullivan, John P.

    1990-01-01

    Propeller wakes interacting with aircraft aerodynamic surfaces are a source of noise and vibration. For this reason, flow visualization work on the motion of the helical tip vortex over a wing and through the second stage of a counterrotation propeller (CRP) has been pursued. Initially, work was done on the motion of a propeller helix as it passes over the center of a 9.0 aspect ratio wing. The propeller tip vortex experiences significant spanwise displacements when passing across a lifting wing. A stationary propeller blade or stator was installed behind the rotating propeller to model the blade vortex interaction in a CRP. The resulting vortex interaction was found to depend on the relative vortex strengths and vortex sign.

  18. Rotor blade system with reduced blade-vortex interaction noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leishman, John G. (Inventor); Han, Yong Oun (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A rotor blade system with reduced blade-vortex interaction noise includes a plurality of tube members embedded in proximity to a tip of each rotor blade. The inlets of the tube members are arrayed at the leading edge of the blade slightly above the chord plane, while the outlets are arrayed at the blade tip face. Such a design rapidly diffuses the vorticity contained within the concentrated tip vortex because of enhanced flow mixing in the inner core, which prevents the development of a laminar core region.

  19. Vortex cutting in superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlasko-Vlasov, Vitalii K.; Koshelev, Alexei E.; Glatz, Andreas; Welp, Ulrich; Kwok, Wai-K.

    2015-03-01

    Unlike illusive magnetic field lines in vacuum, magnetic vortices in superconductors are real physical strings, which interact with the sample surface, crystal structure defects, and with each other. We address the complex and poorly understood process of vortex cutting via a comprehensive set of magneto-optic experiments which allow us to visualize vortex patterns at magnetization of a nearly twin-free YBCO crystal by crossing magnetic fields of different orientations. We observe a pronounced anisotropy in the flux dynamics under crossing fields and the filamentation of induced supercurrents associated with the staircase vortex structure expected in layered cuprates, flux cutting effects, and angular vortex instabilities predicted for anisotropic superconductors. At some field angles, we find formation of the vortex domains following a type-I phase transition in the vortex state accompanied by an abrupt change in the vortex orientation. To clarify the vortex cutting scenario we performed time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau simulations, which confirmed formation of sharp vortex fronts observed in the experiment and revealed a left-handed helical instability responsible for the rotation of vortices. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Materials Sciences and Engineering Division.

  20. Topics in two-dimensional and axisymmetric vortex dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luithardt, Harry Hermann

    1997-09-01

    This work is composed of two independent parts whose common theme is the analysis of complex hydrodynamic phenomenon through the development of discrete vortex models. The first part investigates a new chaotic scattering phenomenon in two dimensions arising from the interaction of a thin vortex tube with a moving bluff body. Possible relevance to real hydrodynamic systems is established through development and implementation of a mixed finite difference-spectral algorithm applied to the direct simulation of Navier-Stokes equation around a cylindrical body for both inviscid and viscous boundary conditions. Small scale near boundary dynamics are resolved through employment of a radial stretching induced by a logarithmic coordinate transformation. Resulting simulations yielded an unexpectedly strong agreement between a point vortex model and the evolution of an initially Gaussian vortex patch. Completely new dynamics resulted only from initial conditions for large vortex patches which exhibit complex spatiotemporal dynamics. A new point vortex model was developed to explain this robustness of vortex patches. Pairs of point vortices were chosen. The guiding center of a pair corresponds to the previous single vortex, and the relative dynamics models internal degrees of freedom of a vortex patch. Resulting perturbation analysis and numerics reveals probable theoretical explanations of behavior observed in the CFD study. Further important parameters related to initial distribution of vorticity in patches are identified. Additional work done pertains to coherent structure formation in axisymmetric starting jets. A vortex sheet model for an impulsively started jet was decomposed into discrete, singular ideal vortex rings whose dynamical equations were derived from a Hamiltonian formalism. This motivated introduction of a novel symplectic integration scheme to avoid numerical stiffness. Detailed numerical studies show that simulations do not require artificial smoothing

  1. A comparison of vortex and pseudo-spectral methods at high Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, Anthony; van Rees, Wim; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2010-11-01

    We validate the hybrid particle-mesh vortex method against a pseudo-spectral method in simulations of the Taylor-Green vortex and colliding vortex tubes at Re = 1600 - 10,000. The spectral method uses the smooth filter introduced in [1]. In the case of the Taylor-Green vortex, we observe very good agreement in the evolution of the vortical structures albeit small discrepancies in the energy spectrum only for the smallest length scales. In the collision of two anti-parallel vortex tubes at Re = 10 000, there is very good agreement between the two methods in terms of the simulated vortical structures throughout the first reconnection of the tubes. The maximum error in the effective viscosity is below 2.5% and 1% for the vortex method and the pseudo-spectral method respectively. At later times the agreement between the two methods in the vortical structures deteriorates even though there is good agreement in the energy spectrum. Both methods resolve an unexpected vortex breakdown during the second reconnection of the vortex tubes.[4pt] [1] Hou, T. and Li, R., 2007. Computing nearly singular solutions using pseudo-spectral methods. J. of Comput. Phys., 226:379-397.

  2. An experimental and theoretical study of the flow phenomena within a vortex sink rate sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goglia, G. L.; Patel, D. K.

    1974-01-01

    Tests were conducted to obtain a description of the flow field within a vortex sink rate sensor and to observe the influence of viscous effects on its performance. The characteristics of the sensor are described. The method for conducting the test is reported. It was determined that for a specific mass flow rate and the geometry of the vortex chamber, the flow in the vortex chamber was only affected, locally, by the size of the sink tube diameter. Within the sink tube, all three velocity components were found to be higher for the small sink tube diameters. As the speed of rotation of the sensor was increased, the tangential velocities within the vortex chamber, as well as in the sink tube, increased in proportion to the speed of rotation.

  3. Normal Shock Vortex Interaction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-03-01

    Figure 9: Breakdown map for normal-shock vortex-interaction. References [1] O. Thomer, W. Schroder and M. Meinke , Numerical Simulation of Normal...and Oblique-Shock Vortex Interaction, ZAMM Band 80, Sub. 1, pp. 181-184, 2000. [2] O. Thomer, E. Krause, W. Schroder and M. Meinke , Computational

  4. Improved vortex reactor system

    DOEpatents

    Diebold, James P.; Scahill, John W.

    1995-01-01

    An improved vortex reactor system for affecting fast pyrolysis of biomass and Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) feed materials comprising: a vortex reactor having its axis vertically disposed in relation to a jet of a horizontally disposed steam ejector that impels feed materials from a feeder and solids from a recycle loop along with a motive gas into a top part of said reactor.

  5. Control of vortex dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Hsiao-Lung

    Discrete vortex methods are used to provide computationally efficient simulations of vortex dynamics in fluid flows. An adaptive LQG controller is applied to reduce the oscillations in the wake caused by the vortex dynamics. The controller design is based on a discrete-time input/output model rather than the nonlinear differential equations of the discrete vortex model. The control philosophy is to identify time-varying parameters in the input/output model adaptively and use the identified parameters to update the control law. For numerically stable identification, an adaptive algorithm based on inverse QR decomposition is introduced. The derivation shows that this algorithm is a square-root implementation of recursive least squares estimation. For a preliminary test of the control strategy, the adaptive LQG controller is applied to a vortex street model simulated by discrete vortices. The identification shows that the stability of the identified zeros depends on whether the sensor is upstream or downstream of the actuator. Flow past a flat plate is another important application of the discrete vortex method. A control problem is studied and simulated in which suction at the back face of the plate is used to trap vortices behind the plate. Qualitatively, the results obtained with the discrete-vortex method used here agree with earlier results for a substantially different vortex method involving a small number of differential equations.

  6. Vortex diode jet

    DOEpatents

    Houck, Edward D.

    1994-01-01

    A fluid transfer system that combines a vortex diode with a jet ejector to transfer liquid from one tank to a second tank by a gas pressurization method having no moving mechanical parts in the fluid system. The vortex diode is a device that has a high resistance to flow in one direction and a low resistance to flow in the other.

  7. Electrostatically Enhanced Vortex Separator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Earl R.

    1993-01-01

    Proposed device removes fine particles from high-pressure exhaust gas of chemical reactor. Negatively charged sectors on rotating disks in vortex generator attracts positively charged particles from main stream of exhaust gas. Electrostatic charge enhances particle-separating action of vortex. Gas without particles released to atmosphere.

  8. Scientist Examines Tornado Vortex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    In this Quick Time movie, a scientist examines what appears to be a tornado vortex (blue) coming out of a thunderstorm. The scientist uses 3D glasses to be able to see in 3 dimensions the different flows going out into the vortex. Earth science and weather studies are an important ongoing function of NASA and its affiliates.

  9. Scientist Examines Tornado Vortex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    In this Quick Time movie, a scientist examines what appears to be a tornado vortex (blue) coming out of a thunderstorm. The scientist uses 3D glasses to be able to see in 3 dimensions the different flows going out into the vortex. Earth science and weather studies are an important ongoing function of NASA and its affiliates.

  10. Vortex cutting in superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glatz, A.; Vlasko-Vlasov, V. K.; Kwok, W. K.; Crabtree, G. W.

    2016-08-01

    Vortex cutting and reconnection is an intriguing and still-unsolved problem central to many areas of classical and quantum physics, including hydrodynamics, astrophysics, and superconductivity. Here, we describe a comprehensive investigation of the crossing of magnetic vortices in superconductors using time dependent Ginsburg-Landau modeling. Within a macroscopic volume, we simulate initial magnetization of an anisotropic high temperature superconductor followed by subsequent remagnetization with perpendicular magnetic fields, creating the crossing of the initial and newly generated vortices. The time resolved evolution of vortex lines as they approach each other, contort, locally conjoin, and detach, elucidates the fine details of the vortex-crossing scenario under practical situations with many interacting vortices in the presence of weak pinning. Our simulations also reveal left-handed helical vortex instabilities that accompany the remagnetization process and participate in the vortex crossing events.

  11. Aerodynamics of vortex generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breidenthal, Robert E., Jr.; Russell, David A.

    1988-01-01

    An experimental and theoretical study was undertaken of the separation delay and dramatic boundary-layer thinning that can occur in vortex-generator installations. Wind tunnel measurements of the dynamic-pressure profile downstream of a vortex generator were found to compare under certain conditions with that downstream of a suction slit, while water-tunnel visualization studies of vortex-generator height and geometry suggested optimum configurations, and only a minor effect of base porosity. A series of progressively more complex inviscid flow models was developed to be applied to a 3-D integral boundary-layer code. This code predicted layer thinning downstream of the suction site of the vortex models, and other observed features. Thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations are now being used with the ultimate goal of clarifying the physical processes involved in vortex generator performance and developing calculational procedures capable of predicting it.

  12. Vortex cutting in superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Glatz, A.; Vlasko-Vlasov, V. K.; Kwok, W. K.; Crabtree, G. W.

    2016-08-09

    Vortex cutting and reconnection is an intriguing and still-unsolved problem central to many areas of classical and quantum physics, including hydrodynamics, astrophysics, and superconductivity. Here, in this paper, we describe a comprehensive investigation of the crossing of magnetic vortices in superconductors using time dependent Ginsburg-Landau modeling. Within a macroscopic volume, we simulate initial magnetization of an anisotropic high temperature superconductor followed by subsequent remagnetization with perpendicular magnetic fields, creating the crossing of the initial and newly generated vortices. The time resolved evolution of vortex lines as they approach each other, contort, locally conjoin, and detach, elucidates the fine details of the vortex-crossing scenario under practical situations with many interacting vortices in the presence of weak pinning. Finally, our simulations also reveal left-handed helical vortex instabilities that accompany the remagnetization process and participate in the vortex crossing events.

  13. Vortex cutting in superconductors

    DOE PAGES

    Glatz, A.; Vlasko-Vlasov, V. K.; Kwok, W. K.; ...

    2016-08-09

    Vortex cutting and reconnection is an intriguing and still-unsolved problem central to many areas of classical and quantum physics, including hydrodynamics, astrophysics, and superconductivity. Here, in this paper, we describe a comprehensive investigation of the crossing of magnetic vortices in superconductors using time dependent Ginsburg-Landau modeling. Within a macroscopic volume, we simulate initial magnetization of an anisotropic high temperature superconductor followed by subsequent remagnetization with perpendicular magnetic fields, creating the crossing of the initial and newly generated vortices. The time resolved evolution of vortex lines as they approach each other, contort, locally conjoin, and detach, elucidates the fine details ofmore » the vortex-crossing scenario under practical situations with many interacting vortices in the presence of weak pinning. Finally, our simulations also reveal left-handed helical vortex instabilities that accompany the remagnetization process and participate in the vortex crossing events.« less

  14. High Speed Vortex Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Richard M.; Wilcox, Floyd J., Jr.; Bauer, Steven X. S.; Allen, Jerry M.

    2000-01-01

    A review of the research conducted at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Langley Research Center (LaRC) into high-speed vortex flows during the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s is presented. The data reviewed is for flat plates, cavities, bodies, missiles, wings, and aircraft. These data are presented and discussed relative to the design of future vehicles. Also presented is a brief historical review of the extensive body of high-speed vortex flow research from the 1940s to the present in order to provide perspective of the NASA LaRC's high-speed research results. Data are presented which show the types of vortex structures which occur at supersonic speeds and the impact of these flow structures to vehicle performance and control is discussed. The data presented shows the presence of both small- and large scale vortex structures for a variety of vehicles, from missiles to transports. For cavities, the data show very complex multiple vortex structures exist at all combinations of cavity depth to length ratios and Mach number. The data for missiles show the existence of very strong interference effects between body and/or fin vortices and the downstream fins. It was shown that these vortex flow interference effects could be both positive and negative. Data are shown which highlights the effect that leading-edge sweep, leading-edge bluntness, wing thickness, location of maximum thickness, and camber has on the aerodynamics of and flow over delta wings. The observed flow fields for delta wings (i.e. separation bubble, classical vortex, vortex with shock, etc.) are discussed in the context of' aircraft design. And data have been shown that indicate that aerodynamic performance improvements are available by considering vortex flows as a primary design feature. Finally a discussing of a design approach for wings which utilize vortex flows for improved aerodynamic performance at supersonic speed is presented.

  15. Relativistic vortex dynamics in axisymmetric stationary perfect fluid configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, G.

    2017-06-01

    Relativistic formulation of Helmholtz's vorticity transport equation is presented on the basis of Maxwell-like version of Euler's equation of motion. Entangled characteristics associated with vorticity flux conservation in a vortex tube and in a stream tube are displayed on basis of Greenberg's theory of spacelike congruence of vortex lines and 1+1+(2) decomposition of the gradient of fluid's 4-velocity. Vorticity flux surfaces are surfaces of revolution about the rotation axis and are rotating with fluid's angular velocity due to gravitational isorotation in a stationary axisymmetric perfect fluid configuration. Fluid's angular velocity, angular momentum per baryon, injection energy, and invariant rotational potential are constant on such vorticity flux surfaces. Gravitation causes distortion of coaxial cylindrical vorticity flux surfaces in the limit of post-Newtonian approximation. The rotation of the fluid with angular velocity relative to vorticity flux surfaces generates swirl which causes the stretching of material vortex lines being wrapped on vorticity flux surfaces. Fluid helicity which is conserved in the fluid's rest frame does not remain conserved in a locally nonrotating frame because of the existence of swirl. Vortex lines are twist free in the absence of meridional circulations, but the twisting of spacetime due to dragging effect leads to the increase in vorticity flux in a vortex tube.

  16. A study of short wave instability on vortex filaments

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hong Yun

    1996-12-01

    The numerical stability and accuracy of the vortex method are studied. The effect of the ordinary differential equations (ODE) solver and of the time step on the numerical stability is analyzed. Various ODE solvers are compared and a best performer is chosen. A new constraint on the time step based on numerical stability is proposed and verified in numerical simulations. It is shown through numerical examples that empirical rules for selecting the spatial discretization obtained in simple test problems may not be extended to more general problems. The thin tube vortex filament method is applied to the problem of Widnall's instability on vortex rings. Numerical results different from previous calculations are presented and the source of the discrepancies is explained. The long time behavior of the unstable mode on thin vortex rings is simulated and analyzed. The short wave instability on vortex filaments is investigated both theoretically and numerically. It is shown that the short wave instability always occurs on co-rotating vortex filaments of fixed core structure. Furthermore when they are close to each other, vortex filaments produce short wave unstable modes which lead to wild stretching and folding. However, when the inter-filament distance is large in comparison with the core size of the filaments, unstable modes are bounded by a small fraction of the core size and the vortex filaments do not create hairpins nor wild stretching. These findings may explain the smooth behavior of the superfluid vortices. The formation of hairpin structures on numerical vortex filaments is investigated. It is shown that the formation of hairpin structures is independent of the ODE solver, of the time step and of other numerical parameters. The hairpin structures are primarily caused by short wave instability on co-rotating vortex filaments.

  17. TUBE TESTER

    DOEpatents

    Gittings, H.T. Jr.; Kalbach, J.F.

    1958-01-14

    This patent relates to tube testing, and in particular describes a tube tester for automatic testing of a number of vacuum tubes while in service and as frequently as may be desired. In it broadest aspects the tube tester compares a particular tube with a standard tube tarough a difference amplifier. An unbalanced condition in the circuit of the latter produced by excessive deviation of the tube in its characteristics from standard actuates a switch mechanism stopping the testing cycle and indicating the defective tube.

  18. Vortex breakdown simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, Y.; Leonard, A.; Spalart, P. R.

    1985-01-01

    A vortex breakdown was simulated by the vortex filament method, and detailed figures are presented based on the results. Deformations of the vortex filaments showed clear and large swelling at a particular axial station which implied the presence of a recirculation bubble at that station. The tendency for two breakdowns to occur experimentally was confirmed by the simulation, and the jet flow inside the bubble was well simulated. The particle paths spiralled with expansion, and the streamlines took spiral forms at the breakdown with expansion.

  19. Vortex crystals in fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barry, Anna M.

    It is common in geophysical flows to observe localized regions of enhanced vorticity. This observation can be used to derive model equations to describe the motion and interaction of these localized regions, or vortices, and which are simpler than the original PDEs. The best known vortex model is derived from the incompressible Euler equations, and treats vortices as points in the plane. A large part of this dissertation utilizes this particular model, but we also survey other point vortex and weakly viscous models. The main focus of this thesis is an object known as the vortex crystal. These remarkable configurations of vortices maintain their basic shapes for long times, while perhaps rotating or translating rigidly in space. We study existence and stability of families of vortex crystals in the special case where N vortices have small and equal circulation and one vortex has large circulation. As the small circulation tends to zero, the weak vortices tend to a circle centered on the strong vortex. A special potential function of this limiting problem can be used to characterize orbits and stability. Whenever a critical point of this function is nondegenerate, we prove that the orbit can be continued via the Implicit Function Theorem, and its linear stability is determined by the eigenvalues of the Hessian matrix of the potential. For general N, we find at least three distinct families of critical points, one of which continues to a linearly stable class of vortex crystals. Because the stable family is most likely to be observed in nature, we study it extensively. Continuation methods allow us to follow these critical points to nonzero weak vortex strength and investigate stability and bifurcations. In the large N limit of this family, we prove that there is a unique one parameter family of distributions which minimize a "generalized" potential. Finally, we use point vortex and weakly viscous vortex models to analyze vortex crystal configurations observed in

  20. Wake Vortex Free Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    A 10% scale B-737-100 model was tested in the vicinity of a vortex wake generated by a wing mounted on a support in the forward section of the NASA-Langley 30 x 60 ft. Wind Tunnel. The wing span, angle of attack, and generating wing location were varied to provide vortex strengths consistent with a large variety of combinations of leader-follower aircraft pairs during vortex encounters. The test, conducted as part of the AST Terminal Area Productivity Program, will provide data for validation of aerodynamic models which will be used for developing safe separate standards to apply to aircraft in terminal areas while increasing airport capacity.

  1. Vortex Lift Augmentation by Suction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, A. H.; Jackson, L. R.; Huffman, J. K.

    1983-01-01

    Lift performance is improved on a 60 degrees swept Gothic wing. Vortex lift at moderate to high angles of attack on highly swept wings used to improve takeoff performance and maneuverability. New design proposed in which suction of propulsion system augments vortex. Turbofan placed at down stream end of leading-edge vortex system induces vortex to flow into inlet which delays onset of vortex breakdown.

  2. Vortex Lift Augmentation by Suction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, A. H.; Jackson, L. R.; Huffman, J. K.

    1983-01-01

    Lift performance is improved on a 60 degrees swept Gothic wing. Vortex lift at moderate to high angles of attack on highly swept wings used to improve takeoff performance and maneuverability. New design proposed in which suction of propulsion system augments vortex. Turbofan placed at down stream end of leading-edge vortex system induces vortex to flow into inlet which delays onset of vortex breakdown.

  3. Evolution of a vortex in gas-discharge plasma with allowance for gas compressibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhomlinov, V. S.; Mustafaev, A. S.

    2016-09-01

    The dynamics of a vortex tube in a compressible medium with the Rayleigh energy release mechanism has been considered theoretically. The analytic theory of this phenomenon is constructed and various approximations have been considered. The range of applicability conditions for the vortex formation theory has been extended substantially. It has been shown based on the model of a plasma as a Rayleigh medium that, for a certain relative orientation of the vortex axis and the electric field vector at an air pressure of tens of Torr, a vortex tube in the glow discharge plasma is destroyed over time intervals on the order of hundredths of a second. It has been found that allowance for the compressibility leads to an increase in the rate of vortex destruction. For this medium, the time dependences of the tangential velocity in a vortex tube have been calculated for various initial parameters. The similarity rules for the given phenomena and the universal dependence of the vortex tube dynamics have been obtained.

  4. Tube supports

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, K.A.

    1989-01-10

    This patent describes an apparatus consisting of parallel tubes arranged in the form of a tube bundle having a first plurality of parallel tube rows with lanes between adjacent rows and a second plurality of parallel tube rows with lanes between adjacent rows and support structure for supporting the tubes. The support structure consists of at least a first baffle and a second baffle, wherein each baffle comprises an outer ring surrounding the tube bundle and at least one slat attached to the outer ring as a chord and extending through the tube bundle between adjacent rows in one of the parallel tube rows. At least one slat is characterized by corrugations or folds extending along its length for point contact with the tubes of the bundle, the slat in the first baffle extending in lanes between the first plurality of parallel tube rows, and the slat in the second baffle extending in lanes between the second plurality of parallel tube rows.

  5. Magnetic vortex oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrkac, Gino; Keatley, Paul S.; Bryan, Matthew T.; Butler, Keith

    2015-11-01

    The magnetic vortex has sparked the interest of the academic and industrial communities over the last few decades. From their discovery in the 1970s for bubble memory devices to their modern application as radio frequency oscillators, magnetic vortices have been adopted to modern telecommunication and sensor applications. Basic properties of vortex structures in the static and dynamic regime, from a theoretical and experimental point of view, are presented as well as their application in spin torque driven nano-pillar and magnetic tunnel junction devices. Single vortex excitations and phase locking phenomena of coupled oscillators are discussed with an outlook of vortex oscillators in magnetic hybrid structures with imprinted domain confinement and dynamic encryption devices.

  6. The singing vortex

    PubMed Central

    Arndt, R.; Pennings, P.; Bosschers, J.; van Terwisga, T.

    2015-01-01

    Marine propellers display several forms of cavitation. Of these, propeller-tip vortex cavitation is one of the important factors in propeller design. The dynamic behaviour of the tip vortex is responsible for hull vibration and noise. Thus, cavitation in the vortices trailing from tips of propeller blades has been studied extensively. Under certain circumstances cavitating vortices have been observed to have wave-like disturbances on the surfaces of vapour cores. Intense sound at discrete frequencies can result from a coupling between tip vortex disturbances and oscillating sheet cavitation on the surfaces of the propeller blades. This research article focuses on the dynamics of vortex cavitation and more in particular on the energy and frequency content of the radiated pressures. PMID:26442147

  7. Senkyo and Vortex

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-01-28

    NASA Cassini spacecraft simultaneously peers through the haze in Titan equatorial region down to its surface and captures the vortex of clouds hovering over its south pole just to the right of the terminator on the moon dark side.

  8. The singing vortex.

    PubMed

    Arndt, R; Pennings, P; Bosschers, J; van Terwisga, T

    2015-10-06

    Marine propellers display several forms of cavitation. Of these, propeller-tip vortex cavitation is one of the important factors in propeller design. The dynamic behaviour of the tip vortex is responsible for hull vibration and noise. Thus, cavitation in the vortices trailing from tips of propeller blades has been studied extensively. Under certain circumstances cavitating vortices have been observed to have wave-like disturbances on the surfaces of vapour cores. Intense sound at discrete frequencies can result from a coupling between tip vortex disturbances and oscillating sheet cavitation on the surfaces of the propeller blades. This research article focuses on the dynamics of vortex cavitation and more in particular on the energy and frequency content of the radiated pressures.

  9. Conformal Vortex Crystals.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Raí M; Silva, Clécio C de Souza

    2017-10-06

    We investigate theoretically globally nonuniform configurations of quantized-flux vortices in clean superconductors trapped by an external force field that induces a nonuniform vortex density profile. Using an extensive series of numerical simulations, we demonstrate that, for suitable choices of the force field, and bellow a certain transition temperature, the vortex system self-organizes into highly inhomogeneous conformal crystals in a way as to minimize the total energy. These nonuniform structures are topologically ordered and can be mathematically mapped into a triangular Abrikosov lattice via a conformal transformation. Above the crystallization temperature, the conformal vortex crystal becomes unstable and gives place to a nonuniform polycrystalline structure. We propose a simple method to engineer the potential energy profile necessary for the observation of conformal crystals of vortices, which can also be applied to other 2D particle systems, and suggest possible experiments in which conformal or quasi-conformal vortex crystals could be observed in bulk superconductors and in thin films.

  10. NASA wake vortex research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stough, H. P., III; Greene, George C.; Stewart, Eric C.; Stuever, Robert A.; Jordan, Frank L., Jr.; Rivers, Robert A.; Vicroy, Dan D.

    1993-01-01

    NASA is conducting research that will enable safe improvements in the capacity of the nation's air transportation system. The wake-vortex hazard is a factor in establishing the minimum safe spacing between aircraft during landing and takeoff operations and, thus, impacts airport capacity. The ability to accurately model the wake hazard and determine safe separation distances for a wide range of aircraft and operational scenarios may provide the basis for significant increases in airport capacity. Current and planned NASA research is described which is focused on increasing airport capacity by safely reducing wake-hazard-imposed aircraft separations through advances in a number of technologies including vortex motion and decay prediction, vortex encounter modeling, wake-vortex hazard characterization, and in situ flow sensing.

  11. Vortex flow hysteresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, A. M., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted to quantify the hysteresis associated with various vortex flow transition points and to determine the effect of planform geometry. The transition points observed consisted of the appearance (or disappearance) of trailing edge vortex burst and the transition to (or from) flat plate or totally separated flows. Flow visualization with smoke injected into the vortices was used to identify the transitions on a series of semi-span models tested in a low speed tunnel. The planforms tested included simple deltas (55 deg to 80 deg sweep), cranked wings with varying tip panel sweep and dihedral, and a straked wing. High speed movies at 1000 frames per second were made of the vortex flow visualization in order to better understand the dynamics of vortex flow, burst and transition.

  12. Ground evaluation of seeding an in-flight wingtip vortex using infrared imaging flow visualization technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akinyanju, Ted

    1989-01-01

    An experimental simulation of an in-flight wingtip vortical flow visualization technique uses infrared imaging to observe strong and concentrated vortices. This experiment is phase 1 of a two-phase infrared evaluation program. The system includes a vortex generator (model 320 Vortec Vortex Tube) which generates the required vortex. The mouth of the unit is mounted close to the free end of a half-inch diameter, sixteen and a half foot long stainless steel tubing (sized after tubing currently installed in the wings of an experimental Beechcraft Sundowner 180 aircraft). Dichloro difluoromethane (Freon-12) is entrained into the generated vortex. A breakdown of the vortices is indicated by the rapid diffusion and the resulting pattern is tracked using the infrared imager and video systems. Flow rates (volume and mass) are estimated at the laboratory and proposed flight conditions. The nominal flight altitude is expected to be 2500 feet.

  13. Improved vortex reactor system

    DOEpatents

    Diebold, J.P.; Scahill, J.W.

    1995-05-09

    An improved vortex reactor system is described for affecting fast pyrolysis of biomass and Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) feed materials comprising: a vortex reactor having its axis vertically disposed in relation to a jet of a horizontally disposed steam ejector that impels feed materials from a feeder and solids from a recycle loop along with a motive gas into a top part of said reactor. 12 figs.

  14. Wingtip vortex turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, James C., Jr. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A means for extracting rotational energy from the vortex created at aircraft wing tips which consists of a turbine with blades located in the crossflow of the vortex and attached downstream of the wingtip. The turbine has blades attached to a core. When the aircraft is in motion, rotation of a core transmits energy to a centrally attached shaft. The rotational energy thus generated may be put to use within the airfoil or aircraft fuselage.

  15. Buoyant Norbury's vortex rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blyth, Mark; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Javier; Salman, Hayder

    2014-11-01

    Norbury's vortices are a one-parameter family of axisymmetric vortex rings that are exact solutions to the Euler equations. Due to their relative simplicity, they are extensively used to model the behavior of real vortex rings found in experiments and in Nature. In this work, we extend the original formulation of the problem to include buoyancy effects for the case where the fluid that lies within the vortex has a different density to that of the ambient. In this modified formulation, buoyancy effects enter the problem through the baroclinic term of the vorticity equation. This permits an efficient numerical solution of the governing equation of motion in terms of a vortex contour method that tracks the evolution of the boundary of the vortex. Finally, we compare our numerical results with the theoretical analysis of the short-time evolution of a buoyant vortex. Funded by the Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness through grant DPI2011-28356-C03-02 and by the London Mathematical Society.

  16. Atmospheric-wake vortex interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilanin, A. J.; Hirsh, J. E.; Teske, M. E.; Hecht, A. M.

    1978-01-01

    The interactions of a vortex wake with a turbulent stratified atmosphere are investigated with the computer code WAKE. It is shown that atmospheric shear, turbulence, and stratification can provide the dominant mechanisms by which vortex wakes decay. Computations included the interaction of a vortex wake with a viscous ground plane. The observed phenomenon of vortex bounce is explained in terms of secondary vorticity produced on the ground. This vorticity is swept off the ground and advected about the vortex pair, thereby altering the classic hyperbolic trajectory. The phenomenon of the solitary vortex is explained as an interaction of a vortex with crosswind shear. Here, the vortex having the sign opposite that of the sign of the vorticity in the shear is dispersed by a convective instability. This instability results in the rapid production of turbulence which in turn disperses the smoke marking the vortex.

  17. Controlling vortex motion and vortex kinetic friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nori, Franco; Savel'ev, Sergey

    2006-05-01

    We summarize some recent results of vortex motion control and vortex kinetic friction. (1) We describe a device [J.E. Villegas, S. Savel'ev, F. Nori, E.M. Gonzalez, J.V. Anguita, R. Garcìa, J.L. Vicent, Science 302 (2003) 1188] that can easily control the motion of flux quanta in a Niobium superconducting film on an array of nanoscale triangular magnets. Even though the input ac current has zero average, the resulting net motion of the vortices can be directed along either one direction, the opposite direction, or producing zero net motion. We also consider layered strongly anisotropic superconductors, with no fixed spatial asymmetry, and show [S. Savel'ev, F. Nori, Nature Materials 1 (2002) 179] how, with asymmetric drives, the ac motion of Josephson and/or pancake vortices can provide a net dc vortex current. (2) In analogy with the standard macroscopic friction, we present [A. Maeda, Y. Inoue, H. Kitano, S. Savel'ev, S. Okayasu, I. Tsukada, F. Nori , Phys. Rev. Lett. 94 (2005) 077001] a comparative study of the friction force felt by vortices in superconductors and charge density waves.

  18. Helicity conservation in classical vortex knots and links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheeler, Martin W.; Kleckner, Dustin; Kindlmann, Gordon L.; Irvine, William T. M.

    2014-11-01

    Vortex knots and links in an ideal fluid remain knotted or linked, ensuring that the topology of the vortex field lines is conserved. For a real fluid, however, this conservation is jeopardized by the presence of reconnection events, which allow vortex tubes to reconfigure their global topology; indeed, it has recently been observed that knotted and linked vortex tubes in classical fluids unknot or untie themselves via a series of these reconnection events. Remarkably, we observe that these reconnection processes conserve a measure of the vortex line topology (helicity) and do so through a geometric mechanism that efficiently transfers this topology across scales. The geometric nature of this topology transfer, along with its recent observation in superfluid vortices, suggests that helicity conservation may be a robust and generic feature of non-ideal flows. This work was supported by the NSF MRSEC shared facilities at the University of Chicago (DMR-0820054) and an NSF CAREER award (DMR-1351506). W.T.M.I. further acknowledges support from the A.P. Sloan Foundation and the Packard Foundation.

  19. Fluid Mechanics of the ``Vortex Fluidic Device''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalziel, Stuart; Britton, Joshua; Raston, Colin

    2014-11-01

    The Vortex Fluidic Device (VFD) provides a new ``green'' alternative for many industrially important organic chemistry processes including the generation of biodiesel. Improved chemical kinetics have also been demonstrated for a number of reactions. This relatively simple device, comprising essentially of a rapidly rotating tube, provides advantages ranging from reduced energy requirements and waste streams to high flow rates and the avoidance of clogging. The VFD is effective due to the interplay between fluid mechanics and chemistry providing near optimal conditions for the required reactions. This contribution provides an insight into the rich fluid mechanics of the device.

  20. A comparison of vortex and pseudo-spectral methods for the simulation of periodic vortical flows at high Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Rees, Wim M.; Leonard, Anthony; Pullin, D. I.; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2011-04-01

    We present a validation study for the hybrid particle-mesh vortex method against a pseudo-spectral method for the Taylor-Green vortex at ReΓ = 1600 as well as in the collision of two antiparallel vortex tubes at ReΓ = 10,000. In this study we present diagnostics such as energy spectra and enstrophy as computed by both methods as well as point-wise comparisons of the vorticity field. Using a fourth order accurate kernel for interpolation between the particles and the mesh, the results of the hybrid vortex method and of the pseudo-spectral method agree well in both flow cases. For the Taylor-Green vortex, the vorticity contours computed by both methods around the time of the energy dissipation peak overlap. The energy spectrum shows that only the smallest length scales in the flow are not captured by the vortex method. In the second flow case, where we compute the collision of two anti-parallel vortex tubes at Reynolds number 10,000, the vortex method results and the pseudo-spectral method results are in very good agreement up to and including the first reconnection of the tubes. The maximum error in the effective viscosity is about 2.5% for the vortex method and about 1% for the pseudo-spectral method. At later times the flows computed with the different methods show the same qualitative features, but the quantitative agreement on vortical structures is lost.

  1. Mechanical effects in a vortex device with a rotating core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samokhvalov, V. N.

    2017-05-01

    The process of the appearance of forced rotation of an axial core mounted in a modified vortex tube in the direction opposite to the rotation of the air vortex and the precession of its axis have been studied. It has been established that dynamical bending of a metal axial core arises in the process of rotation which causes mechanical wear of its end part and fracture in the fastening area of the bearing without residual curvature of the core axis. The excitation of rotation and observed force effects are not related to the mechanical action of rotating air flow on the axial core.

  2. Vortex Characterization for Engineering Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Jankun-Kelly, M; Thompson, D S; Jiang, M; Shannahan, B; Machiraju, R

    2008-01-30

    Realistic engineering simulation data often have features that are not optimally resolved due to practical limitations on mesh resolution. To be useful to application engineers, vortex characterization techniques must be sufficiently robust to handle realistic data with complex vortex topologies. In this paper, we present enhancements to the vortex topology identification component of an existing vortex characterization algorithm. The modified techniques are demonstrated by application to three realistic data sets that illustrate the strengths and weaknesses of our approach.

  3. Aircraft vortex marking program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pompa, M. F.

    1979-01-01

    A simple, reliable device for identifying atmospheric vortices, principally as generated by in-flight aircraft and with emphasis on the use of nonpolluting aerosols for marking by injection into such vortex (-ices) is presented. The refractive index and droplet size were determined from an analysis of aerosol optical and transport properties as the most significant parameters in effecting vortex optimum light scattering (for visual sighting) and visual persistency of at least 300 sec. The analysis also showed that a steam-ejected tetraethylene glycol aerosol with droplet size near 1 micron and refractive index of approximately 1.45 could be a promising candidate for vortex marking. A marking aerosol was successfully generated with the steam-tetraethylene glycol mixture from breadboard system hardware. A compact 25 lb/f thrust (nominal) H2O2 rocket chamber was the key component of the system which produced the required steam by catalytic decomposition of the supplied H2O2.

  4. Vortex attenuation flight experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barber, M. R.; Hastings, E. C., Jr.; Champine, R. A.; Tymczyszyn, J. J.

    1977-01-01

    Flight tests evaluating the effects of altered span loading, turbulence ingestion, combinations of mass and turbulence ingestion, and combinations of altered span loading turbulance ingestion on trailed wake vortex attenuation were conducted. Span loadings were altered in flight by varying the deflections of the inboard and outboard flaps on a B-747 aircraft. Turbulence ingestion was achieved in flight by mounting splines on a C-54G aircraft. Mass and turbulence ingestion was achieved in flight by varying the thrust on the B-747 aircraft. Combinations of altered span loading and turbulence ingestion were achieved in flight by installing a spoiler on a CV-990 aircraft and by deflecting the existing spoilers on a B-747 aircraft. The characteristics of the attenuated and unattenuated vortexes were determined by probing them with smaller aircraft. Acceptable separation distances for encounters with the attenuated and unattenuated vortexes are presented.

  5. Magnetic vortex racetrack memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Liwei D.; Jin, Yongmei M.

    2017-02-01

    We report a new type of racetrack memory based on current-controlled movement of magnetic vortices in magnetic nanowires with rectangular cross-section and weak perpendicular anisotropy. Data are stored through the core polarity of vortices and each vortex carries a data bit. Besides high density, non-volatility, fast data access, and low power as offered by domain wall racetrack memory, magnetic vortex racetrack memory has additional advantages of no need for constrictions to define data bits, changeable information density, adjustable current magnitude for data propagation, and versatile means of ultrafast vortex core switching. By using micromagnetic simulations, current-controlled motion of magnetic vortices in cobalt nanowire is demonstrated for racetrack memory applications.

  6. Feeding Tubes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Feeding Tubes Health Information Sheet Q & A with Experts Patient Stories Social Security Disability Application Process For Kids ... Feeding Tubes Health Information Sheet Q & A with Experts Patient Stories Social Security Disability Application Process For Kids ...

  7. Electric vortex in MHD flow

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, M.

    1995-05-01

    An electric vortex is the circulation of electron space charge about a magnetic field line that is transported by ion momentum. In cold, or low {beta} flow the vortex diameter is the minimum length scale of charge neutrality. The distinctive feature of the vortex is its radial electric field which manifests the interplay of electrostatics, magnetism, and motion.

  8. Coupling of vortex shedding with a cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawahashi, Masaaki; Brocher, Eric; Collini, Paul

    1988-09-01

    A pulsating flow within a tube with one end sealed and the other end open, facing a low-velocity wind tunnel flow, may be generated by using a wedge trip placed upstream of the open end of the tube. However, a reasonable explanation about the generating mechanism of the pulsating flow within the resonator coupled with a tripping device has not been given yet. In order to get a better understanding of the coupling of the flow around the wedge trip and the flow oscillation within the resonator, the interaction between the wedge wake and the pulsating flow has been experimentally investigated by means of the hydraulic analogy. The results of flow visualization with shadow-graph technique have provided a good understanding of the coupling phenomena of vortex shedding on the wedge with the flow at the resonator mouth.

  9. Asymmetric Gaussian optical vortex.

    PubMed

    Kotlyar, Victor V; Kovalev, Alexey A; Porfirev, Alexey P

    2017-01-01

    We theoretically study a Gaussian optical beam with an embedded off-axis optical vortex. We also experimentally generate such an asymmetric Gaussian optical vortex by using an off-axis spiral phase plate. It is shown that depending on the shift distance the laser beam has the form of a crescent, which is rotated upon propagation. An analytical expression is obtained for the orbital angular momentum of such a beam, which appears to be fractional. When the shift increases, the greater the number of spirality of the phase plate or the "fork" hologram, the slower the momentum decreases. The experimental results are in qualitative agreement with the theory.

  10. Entangled transverse optical vortex.

    PubMed

    Chui, S T; Lin, Zhifang

    2014-10-01

    We discuss a new kind of optical vortex with the angular momentum perpendicular to the flow direction and entangled in that it is a coherent combination of different orbital angular momentum states of the same sign. This entangled state exhibits many unexpected physical properties. The transverse optical vortex can be generated from the reflection of an electromagnetic wave off an array of ferrite rods. Its vorticity can be reversed by switching the direction of the magnetization of the rods, which usually takes only a nanosecond.

  11. Vortex pairs on surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Koiller, Jair

    2009-05-06

    A pair of infinitesimally close opposite vortices moving on a curved surface moves along a geodesic, according to a conjecture by Kimura. We outline a proof. Numerical simulations are presented for a pair of opposite vortices at a close but nonzero distance on a surface of revolution, the catenoid. We conjecture that the vortex pair system on a triaxial ellipsoid is a KAM perturbation of Jacobi's geodesic problem. We outline some preliminary calculations required for this study. Finding the surfaces for which the vortex pair system is integrable is in order.

  12. Wake Vortex Minimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A status report is presented on research directed at reducing the vortex disturbances of aircraft wakes. The objective of such a reduction is to minimize the hazard to smaller aircraft that might encounter these wakes. Inviscid modeling was used to study trailing vortices and viscous effects were investigated. Laser velocimeters were utilized in the measurement of aircraft wakes. Flight and wind tunnel tests were performed on scale and full model scale aircraft of various design. Parameters investigated included the effect of wing span, wing flaps, spoilers, splines and engine thrust on vortex attenuation. Results indicate that vortives may be alleviated through aerodynamic means.

  13. Experimental study of vortex diffusers

    SciTech Connect

    Shakerin, S.; Miller, P.L.

    1995-11-01

    This report documents experimental research performed on vortex diffusers used in ventilation and air-conditioning systems. The main objectives of the research were (1) to study the flow characteristics of isothermal jets issuing from vortex diffusers, (2) to compare the vortex diffuser`s performance with that of a conventional diffuser, and (3) to prepare a report that disseminates the results to the designers of ventilation and air-conditioning systems. The researchers considered three diffusers: a conventional round ceiling diffuser and two different styles of vortex diffusers. Overall, the vortex diffusers create slightly more induction of ambient air in comparison to the conventional diffuser.

  14. Double-branched vortex generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantwell, E. R.; Westphal, R. V.; Mehta, R. D.

    1985-01-01

    In order to assess the suitability of using a double branched vortex generator in parametric studies involving vortex interactions, an experimental study of the main vortex and secondary flows produced by a double branched vortex generator was conducted in a 20-by-40 cm indraft wind tunnel. Measurements of the cross flow velocities were made with a five hole pressure probe from which vorticity contours and vortex parameters were derived. The results showed that the optimum configuration consisted of chord extensions with the absence of a centerbody.

  15. Tracheostomy tubes.

    PubMed

    Hess, Dean R; Altobelli, Neila P

    2014-06-01

    Tracheostomy tubes are used to administer positive-pressure ventilation, to provide a patent airway, and to provide access to the lower respiratory tract for airway clearance. They are available in a variety of sizes and styles from several manufacturers. The dimensions of tracheostomy tubes are given by their inner diameter, outer diameter, length, and curvature. Differences in dimensions between tubes with the same inner diameter from different manufacturers are not commonly appreciated but may have important clinical implications. Tracheostomy tubes can be cuffed or uncuffed and may be fenestrated. Some tracheostomy tubes are designed with an inner cannula. It is important for clinicians caring for patients with a tracheostomy tube to appreciate the nuances of various tracheostomy tube designs and to select a tube that appropriately fits the patient. The optimal frequency of changing a chronic tracheostomy tube is controversial. Specialized teams may be useful in managing patients with a tracheostomy. Speech can be facilitated with a speaking valve in patients with a tracheostomy tube who are breathing spontaneously. In mechanically ventilated patients with a tracheostomy, a talking tracheostomy tube, a deflated cuff technique with a speaking valve, or a deflated cuff technique without a speaking valve can be used to facilitate speech. Copyright © 2014 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  16. Vortex breakdown theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escudier, M. P.

    Instability, stagnation, and wave phenomena in vortex breakdown are reviewed. Axisymmetric disturbances; spiral disturbances; nonlinear interactions; the separation analogy; failure of slender core/quasi-cylindrical approximation; numerical failure; solitary waves; inertia waves; transition between conjugate-flow states; and the shock/hydraulic-jump analogy are discussed.

  17. Micro Vortex Generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    An in house video made to show how NASA Langley scientists have found ways to improve airplane performance. Micro Vortex Generators placed on airplane wings can reduce drag, increase lift, and reduce fuel consumption. Nice animation and real footage of planes with this technology.

  18. Behavior of Vortex Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Betz, A.

    1979-01-01

    Application of the Kutta-Joukowski theorem to the relationship between airfoil lift and circulation is described. A number of formulas concerning the conduct of vortex systems derived from the theorem are presented. The application of this line of reasoning to several problems of airfoil theory and the observed relations are discussed.

  19. Viscous vortex flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weston, R. P.; Chamberlain, J. P.; Liu, C. H.; Hartwich, Peter-Michael

    1986-01-01

    Several computational studies are currently being pursued that focus on various aspects of representing the entire lifetime of the viscous trailing vortex wakes generated by an aircraft. The formulation and subsequent near-wing development of the leading-edge vortices formed by a delta wing are being calculated at modest Reynolds numbers using a three-dimensional, time-dependent Navier-Stokes code. Another computational code was developed to focus on the roll-up, trajectory, and mutual interaction of trailing vortices further downstream from the wing using a two-dimensional, time-dependent, Navier-Stokes algorithm. To investigate the effect of a cross-wind ground shear flow on the drift and decay of the far-field trailing vortices, a code was developed that employs Euler equations along with matched asymptotic solutions for the decaying vortex filaments. And finally, to simulate the conditions far down stream after the onset of the Crow instability in the vortex wake, a full three-dimensional, time-dependent Navier-Stokes code was developed to study the behavior of interacting vortex rings.

  20. Vortex Apparatus and Demonstrations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shakerin, Said

    2010-01-01

    Vortex flow, from millimeter to kilometer in scale, is important in many scientific and technological areas. Examples are seen in water strider locomotion, from industrial pipe flow (wastewater treatment) to air traffic control (safe distance between aircrafts on a runway ready for takeoff) to atmospheric studies. In this paper, we focus on a…

  1. Vortex Apparatus and Demonstrations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shakerin, Said

    2010-01-01

    Vortex flow, from millimeter to kilometer in scale, is important in many scientific and technological areas. Examples are seen in water strider locomotion, from industrial pipe flow (wastewater treatment) to air traffic control (safe distance between aircrafts on a runway ready for takeoff) to atmospheric studies. In this paper, we focus on a…

  2. Control of submersible vortex flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bushnell, D. M.; Donaldson, C. D.

    1990-01-01

    Vortex flows produced by submersibles typically unfavorably influence key figures of merit such as acoustic and nonacoustic stealth, control effectiveness/maneuverability, and propulsor efficiency/body drag. Sources of such organized, primarily longitudinal, vorticity include the basic body (nose and sides) and appendages (both base/intersection and tip regions) such as the fairwater, dive planes, rear control surfaces, and propulsor stators/tips. Two fundamentally different vortex control approaches are available: (1) deintensification of the amplitude and/or organization of the vortex during its initiation process; and (2) downstream vortex disablement. Vortex control techniques applicable to the initiation region (deintensification approach) include transverse pressure gradient minimization via altered body cross section, appendage dillets, fillets, and sweep, and various appendage tip and spanload treatment along with the use of active controls to minimize control surface size and motions. Vortex disablement can be accomplished either via use of control vortices (which can also be used to steer the vortices off-board), direct unwinding, inducement of vortex bursting, or segmentation/tailoring for enhanced dissipation. Submersible-applicable vortex control technology is also included derived from various aeronautical applications such as mitigation of the wing wake vortex hazard and flight aircraft maneuverability at high angle of attack as well as the status of vortex effects upon, and mitigation of, nonlinear control forces on submersibles. Specific suggestions for submersible-applicable vortex control techniques are presented.

  3. Passive Wake Vortex Control

    SciTech Connect

    Ortega, J M

    2001-10-18

    The collapse of the Soviet Union and ending of the Cold War brought about many significant changes in military submarine operations. The enemies that the US Navy faces today and in the future will not likely be superpowers armed with nuclear submarines, but rather smaller, rogue nations employing cheaper diesel/electric submarines with advanced air-independent propulsion systems. Unlike Cold War submarine operations, which occurred in deep-water environments, future submarine conflicts are anticipated to occur in shallow, littoral regions that are complex and noisy. Consequently, non-acoustic signatures will become increasingly important and the submarine stealth technology designed for deep-water operations may not be effective in these environments. One such non-acoustic signature is the surface detection of a submarine's trailing vortex wake. If a submarine runs in a slightly buoyant condition, its diving planes must be inclined at a negative angle of attack to generate sufficient downforce, which keeps the submarine from rising to the surface. As a result, the diving planes produce a pair of counter-rotating trailing vortices that propagate to the water surface. In previous deep-water operations, this was not an issue since the submarines could dive deep enough so that the vortex pair became incoherent before it reached the water surface. However, in shallow, littoral environments, submarines do not have the option of diving deep and, hence, the vortex pair can rise to the surface and leave a distinct signature that might be detectable by synthetic aperture radar. Such detection would jeopardize not only the mission of the submarine, but also the lives of military personnel on board. There has been another attempt to solve this problem and reduce the intensity of trailing vortices in the wakes of military submarines. The research of Quackenbush et al. over the past few years has been directed towards an idea called ''vortex leveraging.'' This active concept

  4. Titan's Winter Polar Vortex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flasar, F.M.; Achterberg, R.K.; Schinder, P.J.

    2008-01-01

    Titan's atmosphere has provided an interesting study in contrasts and similarities with Earth's. While both have N$_2$ as the dominant constituent and comparable surface pressures $\\sim1$ bar, Titan's next most abundant molecule is CH$_4$, not O$_2$, and the dissociative breakup of CH$_4$ and N$_2$ by sunlight and electron impact leads to a suite of hydrocarbons and nitriles, and ultimately the photochemical smog that enshrouds the moon. In addition, with a 15.95-day period, Titan is a slow rotator compared to Earth. While the mean zonal terrestrial winds are geostrophic, Titan's are mostly cyclostrophic, whipping around the moon in as little as 1 day. Despite the different dynamical regime, Titan's winter stratosphere exhibits several characteristics that should be familiar to terrestrial meteorologists. The cold winter pole near the 1 -mbar level is circumscribed by strong winds (up to 190 m/s) that act as a barrier to mixing with airmasses at lower latitudes. There is evidence of enhancement of several organic species over the winter pole, indicating subsidence. The adiabatic heating associated with this subsidence gives rise to a warm anomaly at the 0.01-mbar level, raising the stratopause two scale heights above its location at equatorial latitudes. Condensate ices have been detected in Titan's lower stratosphere within the winter polar vortex from infrared spectra. Although not always unambiguously identified, their spatial distribution exhibits a sharp gradient, decreasing precipitously across the vortex away from the winter pole. The interesting question of whether there is important heterogeneous chemistry occurring within the polar vortex, analogous to that occurring in the terrestrial polar stratospheric clouds in the ozone holes, has not been addressed. The breakup of Titan's winter polar vortex has not yet been observed. On Earth, the polar vortex is nonlinearly disrupted by interaction with large-amplitude planetary waves. Large-scale waves have not

  5. An experimental and theoretical study of the flow phenomena within a vortex sink rate sensor. Ph.D. Thesis - Old Dominion Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, D. K.

    1974-01-01

    A description of the flow field within a vortex sink rate sensor was obtained, and the influence of viscous effects on its performance was observed. The sensor basically consisted of a vortex chamber and a sink tube. The vortex chamber consisted of two circular coaxial disks held apart, at their periphery, by a porous coupling. One circular disk had an opening to permit the mounting of the sink tube, in such a manner that the vortex chamber as well as the sink tube had a common axis of rotation. Air was supplied radially to the sensor through its porous coupling as the sensor was rotated at various speeds. Particular emphasis was directed toward an understanding of the flow field in the sink tube region. Thus velocity measurements at various stations along the length of the sink tube as well as along a given radius at any designated station were taken.

  6. Rotor-vortex interaction noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlinker, R. H.; Amiet, R. K.

    1983-01-01

    A theoretical and experimental study was conducted to develop a validated first principles analysis for predicting noise generated by helicopter main-rotor shed vortices interacting with the tail rotor. The generalized prediction procedure requires a knowledge of the incident vortex velocity field, rotor geometry, and rotor operating conditions. The analysis includes compressibility effects, chordwise and spanwise noncompactness, and treats oblique intersections with the blade planform. Assessment of the theory involved conducting a model rotor experiment which isolated the blade-vortex interaction noise from other rotor noise mechanisms. An isolated tip vortex, generated by an upstream semispan airfoil, was convected into the model tail rotor. Acoustic spectra, pressure signatures, and directivity were measured. Since assessment of the acoustic prediction required a knowledge of the vortex properties, blade-vortes intersection angle, intersection station, vortex stength, and vortex core radius were documented. Ingestion of the vortex by the rotor was experimentally observed to generate harmonic noise and impulsive waveforms.

  7. A spiral vortex model of homogeneous isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgins, Keith; Ooi, Andrew; Chong, Min

    2002-11-01

    The Lundgren-Townsend model of turbulent fine scales has been successful in predicting some of the properties of homogeneous isotropic turbulence. Lundgren obtained these results by averaging over an ensemble of nearly axisymmetric, unsteady, stretched spiral vortices. These vortical structures are represented in the model by a large-time asymptotic solution of the Navier-Stokes equations. Extending on the work of Pullin & Saffman [Phys. Fluids 8, 3072 (1996)], we calculate the energy spectrum and longitudinal velocity structure functions for a specific realisation of the Lundgren-Townsend model. Here the members of our ensemble are time-evolving spiral vortex structures resulting from the merging of stretched Burgers vortex tubes. The merging is computed numerically following the method of Buntine & Pullin [JFM 205, 263 (1989)]. We present results for a range of vortex Reynolds numbers.

  8. Determination of lead at trace levels in mussel and sea water samples using vortex assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction-slotted quartz tube-flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Erarpat, Sezin; Özzeybek, Gözde; Chormey, Dotse Selali; Bakırdere, Sezgin

    2017-09-17

    In this study, dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) and slotted quartz tube (SQT) were coupled to flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) to increase the sensitivity of lead. Conditions such as the formation of the lead-dithizone complex, efficiency of the DLLME method and the output of the SQT were systematically optimized to improve the detection limit for the analyte. The conventional FAAS system was improved upon by about 3.0 times with SQT-FAAS, 32 times with DLLME-FAAS and 142 times with DLLME-SQT-FAAS. The method was applicable over a wide linear range (10-500 μg L(-1)). The limit of detection (LOD) determined by DLLME-SQT-FAAS for seawater and mussel were 2.7 μg L(-1) and 270 μg kg(-1), respectively. The percent recoveries obtained for mussel and seawater samples (spiked at 20 and 50 μg L(-1)) were 95-96% and 98-110%, respectively. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The shock-vortex interaction patterns affected by vortex flow regime and vortex models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Keun-Shik; Barik, Hrushikesh; Chang, Se-Myong

    2009-08-01

    We have used a third-order essentially non-oscillatory method to obtain numerical shadowgraphs for investigation of shock-vortex interaction patterns. To search different interaction patterns, we have tested two vortex models (the composite vortex model and the Taylor vortex model) and as many as 47 parametric data sets. By shock-vortex interaction, the impinging shock is deformed to a S-shape with leading and lagging parts of the shock. The vortex flow is locally accelerated by the leading shock and locally decelerated by the lagging shock, having a severely elongated vortex core with two vertices. When the leading shock escapes the vortex, implosion effect creates a high pressure in the vertex area where the flow had been most expanded. This compressed region spreads in time with two frontal waves, an induced expansion wave and an induced compression wave. They are subsonic waves when the shock-vortex interaction is weak but become supersonic waves for strong interactions. Under a intermediate interaction, however, an induced shock wave is first developed where flow speed is supersonic but is dissipated where the incoming flow is subsonic. We have identified three different interaction patterns that depend on the vortex flow regime characterized by the shock-vortex interaction.

  10. Vortex lenses for optical micromanipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skidanov, Roman V.; Ganchevskaya, Sofiya V.

    2017-04-01

    Vortex beams are currently used in areas such as optical communication, optical measurement optical micromanipulation and many other applications. There are several prospective ways to generate vortex beams such as: by using special gratings [1,2], spiral phase plates[3], vortex zone plate [4]. Bessel and Gauss-Laguerre beams [5,6] are also considered as Vortex beams. Generation of Bessel beams by vortex axicons were considered in [6]. Possibility of combining the structures and zones topological charge of axicon in the same element was shown. Desired order of Bessel beams can be generated by a large variability of phase diffractive optical elements. In [7] method of forming a simple vortex beams by using a new type of diffractive optical elements, was presented. Diffractive optical element is a lens vortex with a topological charge zones, like the vortex in axicon [8]. In this paper, we have generated vortex beams by the method described in [7], but in addition the lens partitioned into two areas. Each area has different focal length. The proposed element structure can significantly extend focal region with the generated vortex beam that allows rotating microscopic objects in the threedimensional layer.

  11. Vortex unwinding in a turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcginley, Catherine B.; Beeler, George B.

    1987-01-01

    The vortex unwinding method is used as a tool in performing vortex cancellation in a turbulent boundary layer. Sufficient reduction in the isotach variation was achieved to verify the usefulness of this technique, for the cases of both wall turbulence control and horseshoe vortex alleviation. More detailed measurements of vortex strength and position improve the optimization process and increase the amount of vortex unwinding.

  12. Shock-vortex interactions in a soap film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, C. Y.; Wu, W. J.; Chen, H.

    2008-08-01

    This work experimentally visualizes the interaction of a quasi-one-dimensional moving shock wave with a two-dimensional vortex in a soap film for the first time. A vertical soap film shock tube was used to generate a quasi-one-dimensional moving shock wave and a NACA-0012 airfoil intruded into the soap film was towed to shed the starting vortex. The interesting interaction phenomena were then visualized using a traditional high-speed flash photography. The concentration of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) used was 0.5 CMC (critical micelle concentration) to keep the surfactant molecules behave as two-dimensional gases. A sequence of pictures shows that the shock is distorted non-symmetrically as it passes through the spiral vortex flow field and the vortex structure is compressed in the direction normal to the shock. These flow features observed in soap films are qualitatively similar to their counterparts in gases. In addition, the visualization of the interactions of a quasi-one-dimensional moving shock wave with a K árm án vortex street are presented.

  13. Segmented trapped vortex cavity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grammel, Jr., Leonard Paul (Inventor); Pennekamp, David Lance (Inventor); Winslow, Jr., Ralph Henry (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An annular trapped vortex cavity assembly segment comprising includes a cavity forward wall, a cavity aft wall, and a cavity radially outer wall there between defining a cavity segment therein. A cavity opening extends between the forward and aft walls at a radially inner end of the assembly segment. Radially spaced apart pluralities of air injection first and second holes extend through the forward and aft walls respectively. The segment may include first and second expansion joint features at distal first and second ends respectively of the segment. The segment may include a forward subcomponent including the cavity forward wall attached to an aft subcomponent including the cavity aft wall. The forward and aft subcomponents include forward and aft portions of the cavity radially outer wall respectively. A ring of the segments may be circumferentially disposed about an axis to form an annular segmented vortex cavity assembly.

  14. Slowing of Vortex Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly, Russell; Bolster, Diogo; Hershberger, Robert

    2008-11-01

    We have investigated the slowing of vortex rings in water which are created with very thin cores. We find that these rings propagate with no measurable change in diameter or core size. The drag appears to be the result of viscous forces on the core. A simple model for this drag describes experimental data in terms of a drag coefficient, which depends only on Reynolds number. Barenghi's group at Newcastle found that the translational velocity of a ring in an inviscid fluid perturbed by Kelvin waves decreases with increasing amplitude of Kelvin waves. This suggests that the velocity of vortex rings in a viscous fluid may well depend on the amplitude of Kelvin waves at the time of formation. Rings with substantial amplitude of Kelvin waves will be expected to move more slowly than rings with little or no Kelvin wave amplitude. We present experimental data confirming this suggestion.

  15. Vortex perturbation dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Criminale, W. O.; Lasseigne, D. G.; Jackson, T. L.

    1995-01-01

    An initial value approach is used to examine the dynamics of perturbations introduced into a vortex under strain. Both the basic vortex considered and the perturbations are taken as fully three-dimensional. An explicit solution for the time evolution of the vorticity perturbations is given for arbitrary initial vorticity. Analytical solutions for the resulting velocity components are found when the initial vorticity is assumed to be localized. For more general initial vorticity distributions, the velocity components are determined numerically. It is found that the variation in the radial direction of the initial vorticity disturbance is the most important factor influencing the qualitative behavior of the solutions. Transient growth in the magnitude of the velocity components is found to be directly attributable to the compactness of the initial vorticity.

  16. Two new vortex liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Philip W.

    2007-03-01

    In 1967, Reatto and Chester proposed that solid helium-4 might exhibit superfluidity, and in 1970, Leggett suggested what was thought to be a definitive experimental test: to find non-classical rotational inertia in a toroidal sample. More than three decades later, the observation by Kim and Chan of exactly that effect generated great interest and has been repeated and confirmed by a number of groups. However, many attempts to find actual superflow in truly solid samples have failed. Here, I draw an analogy with a second example of anomalous response to vorticity in a dissipative fluid, the vortex liquid phase in the pseudogap region of high-temperature superconductors, and propose that the solid helium experiments have been mischaracterized: what is observed is not supersolidity but an incompressible vortex liquid. This state is distinct from a conventional liquid in that its properties are dominated by conserved supercurrents flowing around a thermally fluctuating tangle of vortices.

  17. Vortex flow aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. H. B.; Campbell, J. F.; Young, A. D. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    The principal emphasis of the meeting was to be on the understanding and prediction of separation-induced vortex flows and their effects on vehicle performance, stability, control, and structural design loads. This report shows that a substantial amount of the papers covering this area were received from a wide range of countries, together with an attendance that was even more diverse. In itself, this testifies to the current interest in the subject and to the appropriateness of the Panel's choice of topic and approach. An attempt is made to summarize each paper delivered, and to relate the contributions made in the papers and in the discussions to some of the important aspects of vortex flow aerodynamics. This reveals significant progress and important clarifications, but also brings out remaining weaknesses in predictive capability and gaps in understanding. Where possible, conclusions are drawn and areas of continuing concern are identified.

  18. Polar vortex dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcintyre, Michael

    1988-01-01

    Recent work with high resolution, one-layer numerical models of fluid flows resembling those in the real stratosphere has suggested that: (1) the interiors of strong cyclonic vortices like the Antarctic polar vortex may be almost completely isolated laterally from their surroundings - perhaps even completely isolated, under some circumstances; (2) by contrast, material near the edge of such and isolated region can easily be eroded (or mixed one-sidedly) into the surrounding region; and (3) the erosion characteristically produces extremely steep gradients in isentropic distributions of potential vorticity (PV) and of other tracers, possibly down to horizontal length scales of a few kilometers only. Such length scales may occur both at the edge of the main polar vortex and in smaller features outside it, such as thin filamentary structures, produced by the erosion process.

  19. Vortex flow aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. H. B.; Campbell, J. F.; Young, A. D. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    The principal emphasis of the meeting was to be on the understanding and prediction of separation-induced vortex flows and their effects on vehicle performance, stability, control, and structural design loads. This report shows that a substantial amount of the papers covering this area were received from a wide range of countries, together with an attendance that was even more diverse. In itself, this testifies to the current interest in the subject and to the appropriateness of the Panel's choice of topic and approach. An attempt is made to summarize each paper delivered, and to relate the contributions made in the papers and in the discussions to some of the important aspects of vortex flow aerodynamics. This reveals significant progress and important clarifications, but also brings out remaining weaknesses in predictive capability and gaps in understanding. Where possible, conclusions are drawn and areas of continuing concern are identified.

  20. Disrupted states of vortex flow and vortex breakdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faler, J. H.; Leibovich, S.

    1977-01-01

    Flow visualization studies and laser Doppler anemometer measurements on swirling water flows reveal six distinct types of very large amplitude disturbance modes of the vortex core. Three, 'axisymmetric' and spiral vortex breakdowns, and the 'double helix,' have been described by others. A definite order of evolution in parameter space (Reynolds number and circulations) occurs, and is described. Puzzling responses of the axisymmetric and spiral vortex breakdowns to imposed flow transients reported previously are confirmed here, and are traced to the shedding of starting and stopping vortices from swirl vanes. Conclusions bearing upon the validity of some theories of vortex breakdown are possible from the data.

  1. Trailing Vortex Attenuation Devices.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-06-01

    hEEEE mhE|hElhEEEEEE EEEEEEEIIEIIEI Ell-EEllE.-lE .- EhEE//EEEEEE iEEEEEEEEEEEEE I. 1&0 Il 2-0N -v. ~MICROCOPY RESOLUTION TEST CHART NATIONAL OUREAU) OF... Panton , R.I., Cberkampf, W.L., and Soskic, N., "Flight Measurements of a Wingtip Vortex " Journal of Aircraft, vol. 17, pp. 250-259, April 1980.- 20

  2. Simulations of vortex generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koumoutsakos, P.

    1995-01-01

    We are interested in the study, via direct numerical simulations, of active vortex generators. Vortex generators may be used to modify the inner part of the boundary layer or to control separation thus enhancing the performance and maneuverability of aerodynamic configurations. We consider generators that consist of a surface cavity elongated in the stream direction and partially covered with a moving lid that at rest lies flush with the boundary. Streamwise vorticity is generated and ejected due to the oscillatory motion of the lid. The present simulations complement relevant experimental investigations of active vortex generators at NASA Ames and Stanford University (Saddoughi, 1994, and Jacobson and Reynolds, 1993). Jacobson and Reynolds (1993) used a piezoelectric device in water, allowing for small amplitude high frequency oscillations. They placed the lid asymmetrically on the cavity and observed a strong outward velocity at the small gap of the cavity. Saddoughi used a larger mechanically driven device in air to investigate this flow and he observed a jet emerging from the wide gap of the configuration, contrary to the findings of Jacobson and Reynolds. Our task is to simulate the flows generated by these devices and to conduct a parametric study that would help us elucidate the physical mechanisms present in the flow. Conventional computational schemes encounter difficulties when simulating flows around complex configurations undergoing arbitrary motions. Here we present a formulation that achieves this task on a purely Lagrangian frame by extending the formulation presented by Koumoutsakos, Leonard and Pepin (1994). The viscous effects are taken into account by modifying the strength of the particles, whereas fast multipole schemes employing hundreds of thousands of particles allow for high resolution simulations. The results of the present simulations would help us assess some of the effects of three-dimensionality in experiments and investigate the role

  3. Geostrophic Vortex Dynamics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-10-01

    been made in the study of the two-dimensional incompressible vorticity fields. Not only have new and powerful techniques been developed, but a whole new...it deserves a thorough investigation by itself. More fundamentally, however, the techniques that we intend to use are not well suited to handle such...been exposed to a great wealth of techniques and results for the vortex dynamics of the Euler equations in two dimensions, we are now confronted with

  4. Feeding tube insertion - gastrostomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... tube insertion; G-tube insertion; PEG tube insertion; Stomach tube insertion; Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube insertion ... and down the esophagus, which leads to the stomach. After the endoscopy tube is inserted, the skin ...

  5. Formation of vortex dipoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afanasyev, Y. D.

    2006-03-01

    Evolution of a two-dimensional flow induced by a jet ejected from a nozzle of finite size is studied experimentally. Vortex dipole forms at the front of the developing flow while a trailing jet establishes behind the dipole. The dynamics of the flow is discussed on the basis of detailed measurements of vorticity and velocity fields which are obtained using particle image velocimetry. It is found that dipoles do not separate (pinch-off) from the trailing jet for values of the stroke ratio up to 15, which fact can be contrasted with the behavior of vortex rings reported previously by other authors. A characteristic time scale that is defined differently from the formation time of vortex rings can be introduced. This time scale (startup time) indicates the moment when the dipole starts translating after an initial period when it mainly grows absorbing the jet from the nozzle. A simple model that considers the competing effects of expansion and translation is developed to obtain an estimate of the dimensionless startup time. The dynamics of a dipole after the formation is characterized by a reduced flux of vorticity from the jet. The dipole moves forward with constant speed such that a value of the ratio of the speed of propagation of the dipole to the mean velocity of the jet is found to be 0.5. A universality of this ratio is explained in the framework of a model based on conservation of mass and momentum for the moving dipole.

  6. Control of vortex breakdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husain, H.; Shtern, F.; Hussain, V.

    1996-11-01

    The paper develops means of vortex breakdown (VB) control with the help of Controlling Vortex Generators (CVGs). Vortex breakdown plays the crucial role in many practical swirling flows, e.g. (a) leading-edge vortices above delta wings create a strong lift and (b) trailing vortices behind large aircraft disturbances are potentially dangerous to subsequent aircraft. It is useful to prevent VB in case (a) and to stimulate VB in case (b). We have recently obtained significant theoretical and experimental results related to swirling flow prediction and control. Firstly, a theory has been developed which models jump transitions in swirling flow (e.g. jumps in VB locations) and predicts ranges of control parameters where multiple stable states occur. Secondly, our experiments have revealed that effective control (enhancement and suppression) of VB can be achieved using CVGs. In our experiments we have used a thin rotaing rod as a CVG, placed along the axis of the basic swirling flow in a sealed cylinder driven by the rotating bottom disc. The effect of the rod depends on the direction of the rotation. With increasing rod co-rotational speed, the VB 'bubble' (VBB) becomes smaller and then disappear, and a cone-shaped wake forms. Counter-rotation of the rod causes increases VBBs' diameter and makes the flow unsteady. The VBBs begin to advect downstream, undergo tearing and pairing, and, hence, enhance mixing.

  7. Vortex cores and vortex motion in superconductors with anisotropic Fermi surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galvis, J. A.; Herrera, E.; Guillamón, I.; Vieira, S.; Suderow, H.

    2017-02-01

    Explaning static and dynamic properties of the vortex lattice in anisotropic superconductors requires a careful characterization of vortex cores. The vortex core contains Andreev bound states whose spatial extension depends on the anisotropy of the electronic band-structure and superconducting gap. This might have an impact on the anisotropy of the superconducting properties and on vortex dynamics. Here we briefly summarize basic concepts to understand anisotropic vortex cores and review vortex core imaging experiments. We further discuss moving vortex lattices and the influence of vortex core shape in vortex motion. We find vortex motion in highly tilted magnetic fields. We associate vortex motion to the vortex entry barrier and the screening currents at the surface. We find preferential vortex motion along the main axis of the vortex lattice. After travelling integers of the intervortex distance, we find that vortices move more slowly due to the washboard potential of the vortex lattice.

  8. Interferometric optical vortex array generator

    SciTech Connect

    Vyas, Sunil; Senthilkumaran, P

    2007-05-20

    Two new interferometric configurations for optical vortex array generation are presented.These interferometers are different from the conventional interferometers in that they are capable of producing a large number of isolated zeros of intensity, and all of them contain optical vortices. Simulation and theory for optical vortex array generation using three-plane-wave interference is presented. The vortex dipole array produced this way is noninteracting, as there are no attraction or repulsion forces between them, leading to annihilation or creation of vortex pairs.

  9. Interferometric optical vortex array generator.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Sunil; Senthilkumaran, P

    2007-05-20

    Two new interferometric configurations for optical vortex array generation are presented. These interferometers are different from the conventional interferometers in that they are capable of producing a large number of isolated zeros of intensity, and all of them contain optical vortices. Simulation and theory for optical vortex array generation using three-plane-wave interference is presented. The vortex dipole array produced this way is noninteracting, as there are no attraction or repulsion forces between them, leading to annihilation or creation of vortex pairs.

  10. Chromoelectric flux tubes in QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Cardaci, Mario Salvatore; Cea, Paolo; Cosmai, Leonardo; Falcone, Rossella; Papa, Alessandro

    2011-01-01

    We analyze the distribution of the chromoelectric field generated by a static quark-antiquark pair in the SU(3) vacuum and revisit previous results for SU(2). We find that the transverse profile of the flux tube resembles the dual version of the Abrikosov vortex field distribution. We give an estimate of the London penetration length of the chromoelectric field in the confined vacuum. We also speculate on the value of the ratio between the penetration lengths for SU(2) and SU(3) gauge theories.

  11. Gastrostomy Tube (G-Tube)

    MedlinePlus

    ... warmth at the tube site; discharge that's yellow, green, or foul-smelling; fever) excessive bleeding or drainage from the tube site severe abdominal pain persistent vomiting or diarrhea trouble passing gas or having a bowel movement pink-red tissue (called granulation tissue) coming out ...

  12. Experimental Dynamics of a Vortex within a Vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durkin, D.; Fajans, J.

    2000-11-01

    We report the experimental dynamics of a new two-dimensional (2D) fluid phenomenon that occurs when an intense, pointlike vortex is placed within a diffuse, circular vortex. Our observations, made using strongly magnetized electron columns to model the 2D fluid, support the analysis performed by Jin and Dubin.

  13. Wingtip vortex turbine investigation for vortex energy recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abeyounis, William K.; Patterson, James C., Jr.; Stough, H. P., III; Wunschel, Alfred J.; Curran, Patrick D.

    1990-01-01

    A flight test investigation has been conducted to determine the performance of wingtip vortex turbines and their effect on aircraft performance. The turbines were designed to recover part of the large energy loss (induced drag) caused by the wingtip vortex. The turbine, driven by the vortex flow, reduces the strength of the vortex, resulting in an associated induced drag reduction. A four-blade turbine was mounted on each wingtip of a single-engine, T-tail, general aviation airplane. Two sets of turbine blades were tested, one with a 15' twist (washin) and one with no twist. Th power recovered by the turbine and the installed drag increment were measured. A trade-off between turbine power and induced drag reduction was found to be a function of turbine blade incidence angle. This test has demonstrated that the wingtip vortex turbine is an attractive alternate, as well as an emergency, power source.

  14. Numerical Investigation of the Flow Structure in a Kaplan Draft Tube at Part Load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maddahian, R.; Cervantes, M. J.; Sotoudeh, N.

    2016-11-01

    This research presents numerical simulation of the unsteady flow field inside the draft tube of a Kaplan turbine at part load condition. Due to curvature of streamlines, the ordinary two-equations turbulence models fail to predict the flow features. Therefore, a modification of the Shear Stress Transport (SST-SAS) model is utilized to approximate the turbulent stresses. A guide vane, complete runner and draft tube are considered to insure the real boundary conditions at the draft tube inlet. The outlet boundary is assumed to discharge into the atmosphere. The obtained pressure fluctuations inside the draft tube are in good agreement with available experimental data. In order to further investigate the RVR formation and its movement, the λ2 criterion, relating the position of the vortex core and strength to the second largest Eigen value of the velocity gradient tensor, is employed. The method used for vortex identification shows the flow structure and vortex motion inside the draft tube accurately.

  15. On vortex bursting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werle, H.

    1984-01-01

    Vortex bursting is studied by means of visualization. The physical behavior of the phenomenon is emphasized, and its similarity with boundary layer separation or wake bursting becomes apparent. The essential influence of an increasing pressure gradient on the initiation, the position and the type of bursting is clearly confirmed. The evolution of the phenomena as a function of several parameters is analyzed in the case of delta wings, alone or installed on aircraft models, and compared with the results of similar wind tunnel or flight tests.

  16. Vortex Flow Correlation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-01

    j . 1978. 93. Grabowski , W.J.; "Solutions of the Navier-Stokes Equations for Vortex Breakdown," NASA CR...including foreign nations. This technical report has been reviewed and is approved for publication. LAWRENCE W. ROGERS Q LOWELL C. KEEL, Major, USAF Project...or’ a w U - a LU LU U- LU C - J ’di 2 2 C LU I- 4 S Ua * - w x 2 40 20 I- 2 LU W S ~ 00 * U. 4 I- 𔃾 LU a 4 U 4 2 C C LU 4 a 4a 2 I- 4 a 3 9

  17. Wingtip vortex dissipator for aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, J. C., Jr. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A means for attenuating the vortex created at aircraft wingtips which consists of a retractable planar surface transverse to the airstream and attached downstream of the wingtip which creates a positive pressure gradient just downstream from the wing is presented. The positive pressure forces a break up of the rotational air flow of the vortex.

  18. The Acoustically Driven Vortex Cannon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Spencer B.; Gee, Kent L.

    2014-01-01

    Vortex cannons have been used by physics teachers for years, mostly to teach the continuity principle. In its simplest form, a vortex cannon is an empty coffee can with a hole cut in the bottom and the lid replaced. More elaborate models can be purchased through various scientific suppliers under names such as "Air Cannon" and…

  19. The Acoustically Driven Vortex Cannon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Spencer B.; Gee, Kent L.

    2014-01-01

    Vortex cannons have been used by physics teachers for years, mostly to teach the continuity principle. In its simplest form, a vortex cannon is an empty coffee can with a hole cut in the bottom and the lid replaced. More elaborate models can be purchased through various scientific suppliers under names such as "Air Cannon" and…

  20. Variable residence time vortex combustor

    DOEpatents

    Melconian, Jerry O.

    1987-01-01

    A variable residence time vortex combustor including a primary combustion chamber for containing a combustion vortex, and a plurality of louvres peripherally disposed about the primary combustion chamber and longitudinally distributed along its primary axis. The louvres are inclined to impel air about the primary combustion chamber to cool its interior surfaces and to impel air inwardly to assist in driving the combustion vortex in a first rotational direction and to feed combustion in the primary combustion chamber. The vortex combustor also includes a second combustion chamber having a secondary zone and a narrowed waist region in the primary combustion chamber interconnecting the output of the primary combustion chamber with the secondary zone for passing only lower density particles and trapping higher density particles in the combustion vortex in the primary combustion chamber for substantial combustion.

  1. Gas-liquid separation in vortex units

    SciTech Connect

    Dorokhov, A.R.; Lidin, V.S.

    1987-09-01

    The authors have conducted comparative tests of a number of designs of vortex separators for a gas-oil mixture having an increased content of the liquid phase. As a preliminary, tests were conducted to determine the regimes of motion of the swirled flow of the gas-oil mixture in a cylindrical duct. Diagrams are provided of the separator models. The efficiency of oil recovery for the constructions considered as a function of the rate of motion of the gas in the inlet tube is shown as is the concentration of mist as a function of air flow rate. The anticyclonic method of separating gas-oil mixtures saturated with oil is shown to ensure a higher quality of gas-liquid separation and it can be used for coarse purification in oil separators for screw-type compressors.

  2. Protective tubes for sodium heated water tubes

    DOEpatents

    Essebaggers, Jan

    1979-01-01

    A heat exchanger in which water tubes are heated by liquid sodium which minimizes the results of accidental contact between the water and the sodium caused by failure of one or more of the water tubes. A cylindrical protective tube envelopes each water tube and the sodium flows axially in the annular spaces between the protective tubes and the water tubes.

  3. Lift enhancement by trapped vortex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossow, Vernon J.

    1992-01-01

    The viewgraphs and discussion of lift enhancement by trapped vortex are provided. Efforts are continuously being made to find simple ways to convert wings of aircraft from an efficient cruise configuration to one that develops the high lift needed during landing and takeoff. The high-lift configurations studied here consist of conventional airfoils with a trapped vortex over the upper surface. The vortex is trapped by one or two vertical fences that serve as barriers to the oncoming stream and as reflection planes for the vortex and the sink that form a separation bubble on top of the airfoil. Since the full three-dimensional unsteady flow problem over the wing of an aircraft is so complicated that it is hard to get an understanding of the principles that govern the vortex trapping process, the analysis is restricted here to the flow field illustrated in the first slide. It is assumed that the flow field between the two end plates approximates a streamwise strip of the flow over a wing. The flow between the endplates and about the airfoil consists of a spanwise vortex located between the suction orifices in the endplates. The spanwise fence or spoiler located near the nose of the airfoil serves to form a separated flow region and a shear layer. The vorticity in the shear layer is concentrated into the vortex by withdrawal of fluid at the suction orifices. As the strength of the vortex increases with time, it eventually dominates the flow in the separated region so that a shear or vertical layer is no longer shed from the tip of the fence. At that point, the vortex strength is fixed and its location is such that all of the velocity contributions at its center sum to zero thereby making it an equilibrium point for the vortex. The results of a theoretical analysis of such an idealized flow field are described.

  4. A 3D analytical model for orthogonal blade-vortex interaction noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quaglia, Michael E.; Léonard, Thomas; Moreau, Stéphane; Roger, Michel

    2017-07-01

    A 3D analytical model of an Orthogonal Blade-Vortex Interaction (OBVI) for Counter-Rotating Open Rotor (CROR) tonal noise is investigated. The specific influence of two parameters taking into account the three-dimensionality of both the vortex velocity and the convection velocity within the rotor-rotor volume is addressed. The first step is to extract the vortex parameters from a recent unsteady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes computation and validate different vortex models. Lamb-Oseen and Scully vortices reproduce the behavior of the tip-vortex tangential velocity fairly well. Regarding the vortex axial velocity modeling, a Gaussian profile fits well with numerical results. On the one hand, the impact of the stream-tube contraction unbalances the lobes of the unsteady pressure with opposite phases produced by the OBVI event. This effect is larger than that of an equivalent blade sweep. On the other hand, adding the axial velocity deficit to the tangential one also unbalances the pressure lobes. Finally, from an acoustic point of view using Curle's acoustic analogy, both the stream-tube contraction and the axial velocity deficit have the same effect: they turn an acoustically-low efficient quadrupole into a strong dipole making these parameters fundamental for future CROR OBVI investigations.

  5. Dynamic Depletion of Vortex Stretching and Non-Blowup of the 3-D Incompressible Euler Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Thomas Y.; Li, Ruo

    2006-12-01

    We study the interplay between the local geometric properties and the non-blowup of the 3D incompressible Euler equations. We consider the interaction of two perturbed antiparallel vortex tubes using Kerr's initial condition [15] [Phys. Fluids 5 (1993), 1725] . We use a pseudo-spectral method with resolution up to 1536 × 1024 × 3072 to resolve the nearly singular behavior of the Euler equations. Our numerical results demonstrate that the maximum vorticity does not grow faster than doubly exponential in time, up to t = 19, beyond the singularity time t = 18.7 predicted by Kerr's computations [15] , [22] . The velocity, the enstrophy, and the enstrophy production rate remain bounded throughout the computations. As the flow evolves, the vortex tubes are flattened severely and turned into thin vortex sheets, which roll up subsequently. The vortex lines near the region of the maximum vorticity are relatively straight. This local geometric regularity of vortex lines seems to be responsible for the dynamic depletion of vortex stretching.

  6. Vortex safety in aviation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turchak, L. I.

    2012-10-01

    The objective is the general review of impact of aircraft wake vortices on the follower aircraft encountering the wake. Currently, the presence of wake vortices past aircraft limits the airspace capacity and flight safety level for aircraft of different purposes. However, wake vortex nature and evolution have not been studied in full measure. A mathematical model simulating the process of near wake generation past bodies of different shapes, as well as the wake evolution after rolling-up into wake vortices (far wake) is developed. The processes are suggested to be modeled by means of the Method of Discrete Vortices. Far wake evolution is determined by its complex interaction with the atmosphere and ground boundary layer. The main factors that are supposed to take into account are: wind and ambient turbulence 3Ddistributions, temperature stratification of the atmosphere, wind shear, as well as some others which effects will be manifested as considerable during the investigation. The ground boundary layer effects on wake vortex evolution are substantial at low flight altitudes and are determined through the boundary layer separation.

  7. Vortex-vortex control in exciton-polariton condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xuekai; Schumacher, Stefan

    2017-06-01

    Vortices are widely studied in fields ranging from nonlinear optics to magnetic systems and superconductors. A vortex carries binary information corresponding to its topological charge, "plus" or "minus", that can be used for information storage and processing. In spatially extended optical and condensed many-particle systems, achieving full control over vortex formation and its charge is particularly difficult and is not easily extended to systems of multiple vortices. Here we demonstrate the optical creation of multiplets of phase-locked vortices in polariton condensates using off-resonant excitation with ring-shaped pump beams. We find that the vorticity of one vortex can be controlled solely using the phase locking with other nearby vortices. Using this mechanism, we demonstrate how an existing vortex with a specific topological charge can be inverted to the oppositely charged state and how the charge state of one reference vortex can be copied to a neighboring vortex. This way we can optically encode any set of binary information onto a chain of vortices. We further show that this information can be modified later by using the possibility to address and manipulate each vortex in the chain individually.

  8. Large Eddy Simulation of the Vortex End in Reverse-Flow Centrifugal Separators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisarev, Gleb I.; Hoffmann, Alex C.; Peng, Weiming; Dijkstra, Henk A.

    2009-09-01

    Different CFD models of reverse-flow centrifugal separators, specifically swirl tubes, have been built in order to study and analyse in detail the phenomenon of the "end of the vortex." The present numerical work is based on—and compared with—previous experimental studies of this phenomenon. The numerical models were built in complete agreement with the geometrical configurations and operating conditions used in these earlier experimental studies [1, 2]. Two different types of swirl tubes were analyzed. One type was an in principle long tube with variable length in which the dependence on the vessel length of the behavior of the vortex core in a simple, well-defined geometry was studied. The other type was equipped with a wide "dust collection vessel" at the bottom, the depth of which was varied, to study the behaviour of the vortex core in a widely-used geometry. 3-D LES simulations were carried out using the commercial CFD package Star-CD. The bending of the vortex core to the wall of the vessel and its precessional motion, constituting the phenomenon of the end of the vortex, was seen in both types of geometries, and the obtained results are in very good agreement, both qualitatively and to an extent quantitatively, with previous experimental results [2].

  9. Multiple tube premixing device

    DOEpatents

    Uhm, Jong Ho; Naidu, Balachandar; Ziminksy, Willy Steve; Kraemer, Gilbert Otto; Yilmaz, Ertan; Lacy, Benjamin; Stevenson, Christian; Felling, David

    2013-08-13

    The present application provides a premixer for a combustor. The premixer may include a fuel plenum with a number of fuel tubes and a burner tube with a number of air tubes. The fuel tubes extend about the air tubes.

  10. Multiple tube premixing device

    DOEpatents

    Uhm, Jong Ho; Varatharajan, Balachandar; Ziminsky, Willy Steve; Kraemer, Gilbert Otto; Yilmaz, Ertan; Lacy, Benjamin; Stevenson, Christian; Felling, David

    2012-12-11

    The present application provides a premixer for a combustor. The premixer may include a fuel plenum with a number of fuel tubes and a burner tube with a number of air tubes. The fuel tubes extend about the air tubes.

  11. The VOrtex Ring Transit EXperiment (VORTEX) GAS project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilen, Sven G.; Langenderfer, Lynn S.; Jardon, Rebecca D.; Cutlip, Hansford H.; Kazerooni, Alexander C.; Thweatt, Amber L.; Lester, Joseph L.; Bernal, Luis P.

    1995-01-01

    Get Away Special (GAS) payload G-093, also called VORTEX (VOrtex Ring Transit EXperiment), is an investigation of the propagation of a vortex ring through a liquid-gas interface in microgravity. This process results in the formation of one or more liquid droplets similar to earth based liquid atomization systems. In the absence of gravity, surface tension effects dominate the drop formation process. The Shuttle's microgravity environment allows the study of the same fluid atomization processes as using a larger drop size than is possible on Earth. This enables detailed experimental studies of the complex flow processes encountered in liquid atomization systems. With VORTEX, deformations in both the vortex ring and the fluid surface will be measured closely for the first time in a parameters range that accurately resembles liquid atomization. The experimental apparatus will record images of the interactions for analysis after the payload has been returned to earth. The current design of the VORTEX payload consists of a fluid test cell with a vortex ring generator, digital imaging system, laser illumination system, computer based controller, batteries for payload power, and an array of housekeeping and payload monitoring sensors. It is a self-contained experiment and will be flown on board the Space Shuttle in a 5 cubic feet GAS canister. The VORTEX Project is entirely run by students at the University of Michigan but is overseen by a faculty advisor acting as the payload customer and the contact person with NASA. This paper summarizes both the technical and programmatic aspects of the VORTEX Project.

  12. Multimode stretched spiral vortex and nonequilibrium energy spectrum in homogeneous shear flow turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horiuti, Kiyosi; Ozawa, Tetsuya

    2011-03-01

    The stretched spiral vortex [T. S. Lundgren, "Strained spiral vortex model for turbulent structures," Phys. Fluids 25, 2193 (1982)] is identified in turbulence in homogeneous shear flow and the spectral properties of this flow are studied using direct-numerical simulation data. The effects of mean shear on the genesis, growth, and annihilation processes of the spiral vortex are elucidated, and the role of the spiral vortex in the generation of turbulence is shown. As in homogeneous isotropic turbulence [K. Horiuti and T. Fujisawa, "The multi mode stretched spiral vortex in homogeneous isotropic turbulence," J. Fluid Mech. 595, 341 (2008)], multimodes of the spiral vortex are extracted. Two symmetric modes of configurations with regard to the vorticity alignment along the vortex tube in the core region and dual vortex sheets spiraling around the tube are often educed. One of the two symmetric modes is created by a conventional rolling-up of a single spanwise shear layer. Another one is created by the convergence of the recirculating flow or streamwise roll [F. Waleffe, "Homotopy of exact coherent structures in plane shear flows," Phys. Fluids 15, 1517 (2003)] caused by the upward and downward motions associated with the streaks. The vortex tube is formed by axial straining and lowering of pressure in the recirculating region. The spanwise shear layers are entrained by the tube and they form spiral turns. The latter symmetric mode tends to be transformed into the former mode with lapse of time due to the action of the pressure Hessian term. The power law in the inertial subrange energy spectrum is studied. The base steady spectrum fits the equilibrium Kolmogorov -5/3 spectrum, to which a nonequilibrium component induced by the fluctuation of the dissipation rate ɛ is added. This component is extracted using the conditional sampling on ɛ, and it is shown that it fits the -7/3 power in accordance with the statistical theory. The correlation between these spectra and

  13. Comparison between an experimental turbulent vortex and the Lundgren vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuypers, Yannis; Maurel, Agnès; Petitjeans, Philippe

    2004-08-01

    In a recent letter (Cuypers Y et al 2003 Phys. ReV. Lett. 91 194502), the authors presented experimental results on a structure resulting from a vortex burst. The temporal evolution of this structure results in the k-5/3 Kolmogorov spectrum and some common features with the Lundgren theoretical vortex have been shown. The purpose of the present paper is to go further in the comparison with the Lundgren model by a parallel analysis of the experimental structure and of a Lundgren single spiral vortex, whose evolution is numerically obtained based on the calculations of Pullin et al (1993 Phys. Fluids A 5 126; 1994 Phys. Fluids 6 3010).

  14. All-optical discrete vortex switch

    SciTech Connect

    Desyatnikov, Anton S.; Dennis, Mark R.; Ferrando, Albert

    2011-06-15

    We introduce discrete vortex solitons and vortex breathers in circular arrays of nonlinear waveguides. The simplest vortex breather in a four-waveguide coupler is a nonlinear dynamic state changing its topological charge between +1 and -1 periodically during propagation. We find the stability domain for this solution and suggest an all-optical vortex switching scheme.

  15. On the vortex ring state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Richard; Gillies, E.; Giuni, M.; Hislop, J.; Savas, Omer

    2014-11-01

    The investigation considers the vortex ring state, a phenomenon normally associated with the collapse of a trailing, helical vortex wake into a unstable vortex ring, and is a problem encountered when a helicopter rotor descends into its own wake. A series of wind tunnel and towing tank experiments on rotor systems have been performed, and a comparison is then made with the behaviour of a specially designed open core, annular jet system that generates a mean flow velocity profile similar to that observed below a rotor. In experimentally simulated descents the jet system forms flow patterns that are topologically similar to the vortex ring state of a rotor system. Furthermore the dynamic behaviour of the flow shares many of the important characteristics of the rotor flow. This result suggests that the phenomenon of the vortex ring state of a rotor wake is decoupled from the detailed vortex dynamics of the helical vortex filaments themselves. The presentation will describe the principle behind the investigation, the details of the annular jet system and the results gained using PIV and flow visualisation of the wake and jet systems.

  16. High load vortex oscillations developed in Francis turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, D.; Rivetti, A.; Lucino, C.

    2016-11-01

    Francis turbines operating at high load conditions produce a typical flow pattern in the draft tube cone characterized by the presence of an axisymmetric central vortex. This central cavity could become unstable, generating synchronic pressure pulsations, usually called self-excited oscillations, which propagate into the whole machine. The on-set and size of the central vortex cavity depend on the geometry of the runner and draft tube and on the operating point as well. Numerical flow simulations and model tests allow for the characterization of the different flow patterns induced by each particular Francis turbine design and, when studied in combination with the hydraulic system, including the intake and penstock, could predict the prototype hydraulic behavior for the complete operation zone. The present work focuses the CFD simulation on the development and dynamic behavior of the central axisymmetric vortex for a medium-head Francis turbine operating at high load conditions. The CFD simulations are based in two-phase transient calculations. Oscillation frequencies against its cavity volume development were obtained and good correlation was found with experimental results.

  17. Precise characterization of focused vortex beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Takahiro; Takeo, Yoko; Mimura, Hidekazu

    2017-09-01

    Focused vortex beams are characterized in terms of their intensity and phase using an iterative phase retrieval method. The vortex beams generated by a vortex phase plate contain several phase singularities and vortex phase distributions. The wavefields were retrieved using many far-field diffraction profiles obtained by scanning a pinhole along the focal plane. The retrieved intensity and phase distributions agreed well with those predicted using the actual profiles of vortex phase plates, which indicates that the phase retrieval method can be used for the precise characterization of vortex beams. The information obtained is valuable for improving the performance of methods involving vortex beams, such as microscopy and laser processing.

  18. Cylindrical sound wave generated by shock-vortex interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ribner, H. S.

    1985-01-01

    The passage of a columnar vortex broadside through a shock is investigated. This has been suggested as a crude, but deterministic, model of the generation of 'shock noise' by the turbulence in supersonic jets. The vortex is decomposed by Fourier transform into plane sinusoidal shear waves disposed with radial symmetry. The plane sound waves produced by each shear wave/shock interaction are recombined in the Fourier integral. The waves possess an envelope that is essentially a growing cylindrical sound wave centered at the transmitted vortex. The pressure jump across the nominal radius R = ct attenuates with time as 1/(square root of R) and varies around the arc in an antisymmetric fashion resembling a quadrupole field. Very good agreement, except near the shock, is found with the antisymmetric component of reported interferometric measurements in a shock tube. Beyond the front r approximately equals R is a precursor of opposite sign, that decays like 1/R, generated by the 1/r potential flow around the vortex core. The present work is essentially an extension and update of an early approximate study at M = 1.25. It covers the range (R/core radius) = 10, 100, 1000, and 10,000 for M = 1.25 and (in part) for M = 1.29 and, for fixed (R/core radius) = 1000, the range M = 1.01 to infinity.

  19. Vortex methods for two- and three-dimensional flow simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, A.

    1980-01-01

    The point vortex and vortex blob methods for two dimensional flows are presented. Several results are discussed concerning the numerical analysis of the latter scheme, e.g., the preservation of globally conserved quantities and the analysis of the spatial discretization error resulting from the convection of fixed blobs of vorticity. An application to the two dimensional mixing layer is briefly described. The contour dynamics method is also discussed. The simulation of three dimensional flows with vortex methods is discussed. A natural way to represent the vorticity is in the form of closed tubes of filaments of vorticity, although other schemes are examined. Applications to aircraft trailing vortices and to a turbulent spot in a laminar boundary layer are presented. Hybrid schemes that use an Eulerian mesh to solve the Poisson equation for the velocity field are discussed. The goal of these schemes is to avoid the high cost of the Biot-Savart integration if many vortex elements are used while enjoying most of the advantages of pure Lagrangian schemes.

  20. Multiscale interactions of bubbles with free vortex flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finn, Justin; Shams, Ehsan; Apte, Sourabh

    2009-11-01

    We simulate bubble and particle interactions with several types of free vortex flows using both a Discrete Element Model (DEM) and a fully resolved approach. In the DEM approach, DNS is used with Lagrangian particle tracking to compute the motion of a subgrid scale dispersed phase. The volumetric displacement of the fluid by the dispersed phase is modeled along with interphase momentum-exchange for more realistic coupling of the dispersed phase to the flow. In the fully resolved approach, a fictitious domain technique is used with refined grids to directly compute the motion of the dispersed phase to obtain high fidelity solutions. First, both approaches are used to simulate bubble entrainment into a stationary Gaussian vortex [Oweis et al. 2005]. Next, bubble entrainment and interaction with a traveling vortex tube [Sridhar & Katz 1999] is simulated using the DEM approach. Finally, a viscous falling `blob' of particles is simulated [Walther & Koumoutsakos 2001, Mitts 1995], where the dispersed phase generates and interacts with a 3D vortex ring. The results show that the less expensive DEM approach with volumetric coupling is able to capture clustering induced flow distortion, while the fully resolved approach gives insight into dispersed phase scale interactions with the flow.

  1. Analytical study on the SGS force around an elliptic Burgers vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Hiromichi

    2016-11-01

    The subgrid-scale (SGS) force around an elliptic Burgers vortex is analytically examined. In turbulence, there are a lot of vortex-tubes whose cross sections are known to be approximated as the ellipse. In this study, the biaxial elliptic Burgers vortex is produced by adding the compressive and extensional background straining flow to the conventional Burgers vortex. By using a filtering operation, we revealed that the energy transfer by the Reynolds stress term applying the Bardina model exhibits negative correlation to that by the true SGS stress term. However, it has been recently reported that a combination of the Bardina Reynolds term and the eddy viscosity model gives good performance even for the coarse LES of turbulent channel flows. In order to understand that, we discuss some SGS forces: by the true SGS stress tensor, by the eddy viscosity model, by the modified Leonard term and by the Bardina Reynolds term. This work was supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 26420122.

  2. Josephson-vortex Cherenkov radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Mints, R.G.; Snapiro, I.B.

    1995-10-01

    We predict the Josephson-vortex Cherenkov radiation of an electromagnetic wave. We treat a long one-dimensional Josephson junction. We consider the wavelength of the radiated electromagnetic wave to be much less than the Josephson penetration depth. We use for calculations the nonlocal Josephson electrodynamics. We find the expression for the radiated power and for the radiation friction force acting on a Josephson vortex and arising due to the Cherenkov radiation. We calculate the relation between the density of the bias current and the Josephson vortex velocity.

  3. Rotating Vortex Dipoles in Ferromagnets

    SciTech Connect

    Komineas, S.

    2007-09-14

    Vortex-antivortex pairs are spontaneously created in magnetic elements. In the case of opposite vortex polarities the pair has a nonzero topological charge, and it behaves as a rotating vortex dipole. We find theoretically and confirm numerically its energy as a function of angular momentum and the associated rotation frequencies. The annihilation process of the pair changes the topological charge while the energy is monotonically decreasing. The change of topological charge affects the dynamics profoundly. We finally discuss the implications of our results for Bloch point dynamics.

  4. Rotating vortex dipoles in ferromagnets.

    PubMed

    Komineas, S

    2007-09-14

    Vortex-antivortex pairs are spontaneously created in magnetic elements. In the case of opposite vortex polarities the pair has a nonzero topological charge, and it behaves as a rotating vortex dipole. We find theoretically and confirm numerically its energy as a function of angular momentum and the associated rotation frequencies. The annihilation process of the pair changes the topological charge while the energy is monotonically decreasing. The change of topological charge affects the dynamics profoundly. We finally discuss the implications of our results for Bloch point dynamics.

  5. Dynamic signatures of driven vortex motion.

    SciTech Connect

    Crabtree, G. W.; Kwok, W. K.; Lopez, D.; Olsson, R. J.; Paulius, L. M.; Petrean, A. M.; Safar, H.

    1999-09-16

    We probe the dynamic nature of driven vortex motion in superconductors with a new type of transport experiment. An inhomogeneous Lorentz driving force is applied to the sample, inducing vortex velocity gradients that distinguish the hydrodynamic motion of the vortex liquid from the elastic and-plastic motion of the vortex solid. We observe elastic depinning of the vortex lattice at the critical current, and shear induced plastic slip of the lattice at high Lorentz force gradients.

  6. Polar Vortex [video

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-28

    1-9 January 2014. The full-disk images every 3 hours from GOES-WEST capture the sweep of a polar vortex that emerged from the arctic at the beginning of the new year, pushing a blizzard into the northeastern USA on January 3, followed by extensive bitter cold (-20 F, windchill -50 F) around the Great Lakes, and single digit temperatures as far south as Atlanta, Georgia. This western viewpoint displays the persistent flow of arctic air from northern Alaska and Yukon into North America. Credit: NOAA/NASA GOES Project NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  7. Vortex loops and Majoranas

    SciTech Connect

    Chesi, Stefano; Jaffe, Arthur; Loss, Daniel; Pedrocchi, Fabio L.

    2013-11-15

    We investigate the role that vortex loops play in characterizing eigenstates of interacting Majoranas. We give some general results and then focus on ladder Hamiltonian examples as a test of further ideas. Two methods yield exact results: (i) A mapping of certain spin Hamiltonians to quartic interactions of Majoranas shows that the spectra of these two examples coincide. (ii) In cases with reflection-symmetric Hamiltonians, we use reflection positivity for Majoranas to characterize vortices in the ground states. Two additional methods suggest wider applicability of these results: (iii) Numerical evidence suggests similar behavior for certain systems without reflection symmetry. (iv) A perturbative analysis also suggests similar behavior without the assumption of reflection symmetry.

  8. Holographic Vortex Coronagraph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palacios, David

    2010-01-01

    A holographic vortex coronagraph (HVC) has been proposed as an improvement over conventional coronagraphs for use in high-contrast astronomical imaging for detecting planets, dust disks, and other broadband light scatterers in the vicinities of stars other than the Sun. Because such light scatterers are so faint relative to their parent stars, in order to be able to detect them, it is necessary to effect ultra-high-contrast (typically by a factor of the order of 1010) suppression of broadband light from the stars. Unfortunately, the performances of conventional coronagraphs are limited by low throughput, dispersion, and difficulty of satisfying challenging manufacturing requirements. The HVC concept offers the potential to overcome these limitations.

  9. Entangled vector vortex beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Ambrosio, Vincenzo; Carvacho, Gonzalo; Graffitti, Francesco; Vitelli, Chiara; Piccirillo, Bruno; Marrucci, Lorenzo; Sciarrino, Fabio

    2016-09-01

    Light beams having a vectorial field structure, or polarization, that varies over the transverse profile and a central optical singularity are called vector vortex (VV) beams and may exhibit specific properties such as focusing into "light needles" or rotation invariance. VV beams have already found applications in areas ranging from microscopy to metrology, optical trapping, nano-optics, and quantum communication. Individual photons in such beams exhibit a form of single-particle quantum entanglement between different degrees of freedom. On the other hand, the quantum states of two photons can be also entangled with each other. Here, we combine these two concepts and demonstrate the generation of quantum entanglement between two photons that are both in VV states: a form of entanglement between two complex vectorial fields. This result may lead to quantum-enhanced applications of VV beams as well as to quantum information protocols fully exploiting the vectorial features of light.

  10. Structure of leading-edge vortex flows including vortex breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, F.M.

    1987-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the structure of leading-edge vortex flows on thin sharp-edged delta wings was carried out at low Reynolds numbers. Flow-visualization techniques were used to study the topology of the vortex and the phenomenon of vortex breakdown. Seven-hole probe-wake surveys and laser-doppler-anemometer measurements were obtained and compared. Delta wings with sweep angles of 70, 75, 80, and 85/sup 0/ were tested at angles of attack of 10, 20, 30, and 40/sup 0/. The test were conducted in a Reynolds number range of 8.5 x 10/sup 4/ to 6.4 x 10/sup 5/. Smoke-flow visualization revealed the presence of small Kelvin-Helmholtz type vortical structures in the shear layer of a leading-edge vortex. These shear-layer vortices follow a helical path and grow in the streamwise direction as they wind into the vortex core where the individual shear layers merge. The phenomenon of vortex breakdown was studied using high-speed cinema photography. The bubble and spiral types of breakdown were observed and appear to represent the extremes in a continuum of breakdown forms.

  11. Vortex dynamics in anisotropic traps

    SciTech Connect

    McEndoo, S.; Busch, Th.

    2010-07-15

    We investigate the dynamics of linear vortex lattices in anisotropic traps in two dimensions and show that the interplay between the rotation and the anisotropy leads to a rich but highly regular dynamics.

  12. Wake Vortex Sensors Requirements Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinton, David A.

    1997-01-01

    The presentation includes discussions of primary wake vortex system requirements, evolution models, sensor evolution, site specific sensor tradeoffs, wake sensor functions, deployment considerations, the operational test bed system and additional sensor requirements.

  13. Vortex rings in Bose gas

    SciTech Connect

    Belyaev, S. T.

    2016-06-15

    We consider excitations that exist, in addition to phonons, in the ideal Bose gas at zero temperature. These excitations are vortex rings whose energy spectrum is similar to the roton one in liquid helium.

  14. Instability of cyclonic convective vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhanovskii, A.; Evgrafova, A.; Popova, E.

    2017-06-01

    Localized heating in the rotating layer of fluid leads to the formation of intensive cyclonic vortex. Cyclonic vortex becomes unstable at low values of viscosity and fast rotation of the experimental model. The instability of the vortex is tightly connected with a structure of the radial inflow. For moderate values of rotational Reynolds number Re the radial flows consist of several branches which transport angular momentum to the center of the model. When Re exceeds critical value (about 23) radial inflow changes its structure and appears as one wide branch which does not reach the center. As a result of strong anisotropy of radial inflow the cyclonic vortex is formed at some distance from the center. Further increase of Re leads to chaotic state with several vortices which appears at different locations near the periphery of the heating area. The map of regimes with stable and unstable vortices is presented.

  15. Transient vortex events in the initial value problem for turbulence.

    PubMed

    Holm, D D; Kerr, Robert

    2002-06-17

    A vorticity surge event that could be a paradigm for a wide class of bursting events in turbulence is studied. The coherent mechanism is characterized by locally transverse vortex configurations that are intrinsically helical in both physical and Fourier space when there is a peak of the maximum vorticity parallel omega parallel(infinity)(t). At no time are nonhelical, antiparallel vorticity elements observed. This event precedes the appearance of the traditional signatures of an energy cascade such as strong growth of the dissipation, spectra approaching -5/3, and strongly Beltramized vortex tubes. Comparing how different large-eddy simulations reproduce these properties demonstrates the importance of properly modeling nonlinear transport of both energy and helicity.

  16. Tube Feedings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plummer, Nancy

    This module on tube feedings is intended for use in inservice or continuing education programs for persons who work in long-term care. Instructor information, including teaching suggestions and a listing of recommended audiovisual materials and their sources appear first. The module goal and objectives are then provided. A brief discussion follows…

  17. Tube Feedings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plummer, Nancy

    This module on tube feedings is intended for use in inservice or continuing education programs for persons who work in long-term care. Instructor information, including teaching suggestions and a listing of recommended audiovisual materials and their sources appear first. The module goal and objectives are then provided. A brief discussion follows…

  18. Mathematical analysis of vortex dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caflisch, Russel E.

    This review paper discusses the mathematical theory of vortex dynamics for incompressible, inviscid flow in two and three dimensions. The surveyed results include existence and uniqueness of time-dependent solutions, instability and singularity formation, convergence of numerical methods, and existence and stability of steady states. A simple integral formulation for the evolution of a three dimensional vortex sheet and a variational principle for the Batchelor flow problem are presented.

  19. The contributions of Da Rios and Levi-Civita to asymptotic potential theory and vortex filament dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricca, Renzo L.

    1996-10-01

    In this paper we present for the first time a detailed account of the work of L.S. Da Rios and T. Levi-Civita on what is believed to be one of the first major contributions to three-dimensional vortex filament dynamics. Their work spanned a period of almost 30 years, from 1906 to 1933, and despite many publications remained almost unnoticed throughout this century. After a partial re-discovery (Ricca, 1991a), new material has now been found and is presented here with a full review of their work in relation to the present state of the art in non-linear mechanics and vortex dynamics. Their results include the conception of the localized induction approximation (LIA) for the induced velocity of thin vortex filaments, the derivation of the intrinsic equations of motion, the asymptotic potential theory applied to vortex tubes, the derivation of stationary solutions in the shape of helical vortices and loop-generated vortex configurations and the stability analysis of circular vortex filaments. In the light of modern developments in non-linear fluid mechanics, their work strikes for modernity and depth of results. Even more striking is the fact that this work remained obscure for almost a century. The results of Da Rios are particularly important in the study of integrable one-dimensional systems and vortex filament motion; Levi-Civita's work on asymptotic potential for slender tubes is at the core of the mathematical formulation of potential theory and capacity theory.

  20. Formation number for vortex dipoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadri, Vahid; Krueger, Paul S.

    2016-11-01

    This investigation considers the axisymmetric formation of two opposite sign concentric vortex rings from jet ejection between concentric cylinders. This arrangement is similar to planar flow in that the vortex rings will travel together when the gap between the cylinders is small, similar to a vortex dipole, but it has the advantage that the vortex motion is less constrained than the planar case (vortex stretching and vortex line curvature is allowed). The flow was simulated numerically at a jet Reynolds number of 1,000 (based on ΔR and the jet velocity), jet pulse length-to-gap ratio (L / ΔR) in the range 10-20, and gap-to-outer radius ratio (ΔR /Ro) in the range 0.01-0.1. Small gap ratios were chosen for comparison with 2D results. In contrast with 2D results, the closely paired vortices in this study exhibited pinch-off from the generating flow and finite formation numbers. The more complex flow evolution afforded by the axisymmetric model and its influence on the pinch-off process will be discussed. This material is based on work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 1133876 and SMU. This supports are gratefully acknowledged.

  1. Instability of spiral convective vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evgrafova, Anna; Andrey, Sukhanovsky; Elena, Popova

    2014-05-01

    Formation of large-scale vortices in atmosphere is one of the interesting problems of geophysical fluid dynamics. Tropical cyclones are examples of atmospheric spiral vortices for which convection plays an important role in their formation and evolution. Our study is focused on intensive cyclonic vortex produced by heating in the central part of the rotating layer. The previous studies made by Bogatyrev et al, showed that structure of such vortex is very similar to the structure of tropical cyclones. Qualitative observations described in (Bogatyrev, 2009) showed that the evolution of large-scale vortex in extreme regimes can be very complicated. Our main goal is the study of evolution of convective cyclonic vortex at high values of Grasshof number by PIV system. Experimental setup is a rotating cylindrical tank of fluid (radius 150 mm, depth 30 mm, free upper surface). Velocity fields for different values of heat flux were obtained and temporal and spatial structure of intensive convective vortex were studied in details. With the use of PIV data vorticity fields were reconstructed in different horizontal cross-sections. Physical interpretation of mechanisms that lead to the crucial change in the vortex structure with the growth of heat rate is described. Financial support from program of UD RAS, the International Research Group Program supported by Perm region Government is gratefully acknowledged.

  2. Explosive-driven shock wave and vortex ring interaction with a propane flame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannuzzi, P. M.; Hargather, M. J.; Doig, G. C.

    2016-11-01

    Experiments were performed to analyze the interaction of an explosively driven shock wave and a propane flame. A 30 g explosive charge was detonated at one end of a 3-m-long, 0.6-m-diameter shock tube to produce a shock wave which propagated into the atmosphere. A propane flame source was positioned at various locations outside of the shock tube to investigate the effect of different strength shock waves. High-speed retroreflective shadowgraph imaging visualized the shock wave motion and flame response, while a synchronized color camera imaged the flame directly. The explosively driven shock tube was shown to produce a repeatable shock wave and vortex ring. Digital streak images show the shock wave and vortex ring propagation and expansion. The shadowgrams show that the shock wave extinguishes the propane flame by pushing it off of the fuel source. Even a weak shock wave was found to be capable of extinguishing the flame.

  3. QUANTIZING TUBE

    DOEpatents

    Jensen, A.S.; Gray, G.W.

    1958-07-01

    Beam deflection tubes are described for use in switching or pulse amplitude analysis. The salient features of the invention reside in the target arrangement whereby outputs are obtained from a plurality of collector electrodes each correspondlng with a non-overlapping range of amplitudes of the input sigmal. The tube is provded with mcans for deflecting the electron beam a1ong a line in accordance with the amplitude of an input signal. The target structure consists of a first dymode positioned in the path of the beam wlth slots spaced a1ong thc deflection line, and a second dymode posltioned behind the first dainode. When the beam strikes the solid portions along the length of the first dymode the excited electrons are multiplied and collected in separate collector electrodes spaced along the beam line. Similarly, the electrons excited when the beam strikes the second dynode are multiplied and collected in separate electrodes spaced along the length of the second dyode.

  4. Neutron tubes

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Lou, Tak Pui; Reijonen, Jani

    2008-03-11

    A neutron tube or generator is based on a RF driven plasma ion source having a quartz or other chamber surrounded by an external RF antenna. A deuterium or mixed deuterium/tritium (or even just a tritium) plasma is generated in the chamber and D or D/T (or T) ions are extracted from the plasma. A neutron generating target is positioned so that the ion beam is incident thereon and loads the target. Incident ions cause D-D or D-T (or T-T) reactions which generate neutrons. Various embodiments differ primarily in size of the chamber and position and shape of the neutron generating target. Some neutron generators are small enough for implantation in the body. The target may be at the end of a catheter-like drift tube. The target may have a tapered or conical surface to increase target surface area.

  5. Electron tube

    DOEpatents

    Suyama, Motohiro [Hamamatsu, JP; Fukasawa, Atsuhito [Hamamatsu, JP; Arisaka, Katsushi [Los Angeles, CA; Wang, Hanguo [North Hills, CA

    2011-12-20

    An electron tube of the present invention includes: a vacuum vessel including a face plate portion made of synthetic silica and having a surface on which a photoelectric surface is provided, a stem portion arranged facing the photoelectric surface and made of synthetic silica, and a side tube portion having one end connected to the face plate portion and the other end connected to the stem portion and made of synthetic silica; a projection portion arranged in the vacuum vessel, extending from the stem portion toward the photoelectric surface, and made of synthetic silica; and an electron detector arranged on the projection portion, for detecting electrons from the photoelectric surface, and made of silicon.

  6. Chest tube insertion

    MedlinePlus

    Chest drainage tube insertion; Insertion of tube into chest; Tube thoracostomy; Pericardial drain ... When your chest tube is inserted, you will lie on your side or sit partly upright, with one arm over your head. Sometimes, ...

  7. Vortex and Rings

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-07-07

    NASA Cassini spacecraft captures three magnificent sights at once: Saturn north polar vortex and hexagon along with its expansive rings. The hexagon, which is wider than two Earths, owes its appearance to the jet stream that forms its perimeter. The jet stream forms a six-lobed, stationary wave which wraps around the north polar regions at a latitude of roughly 77 degrees North. This view looks toward the sunlit side of the rings from about 37 degrees above the ringplane. The image was taken with the Cassini spacecraft wide-angle camera on April 2, 2014 using a spectral filter which preferentially admits wavelengths of near-infrared light centered at 752 nanometers. The view was obtained at a distance of approximately 1.4 million miles (2.2 million kilometers) from Saturn and at a Sun-Saturn-spacecraft, or phase, angle of 43 degrees. Image scale is 81 miles (131 kilometers) per pixel. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA18274

  8. a Search for Primordial Vortex Remnants in the SDSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Abel; Ong, Zongjin; Chan, Aik Hui

    2014-04-01

    The scalar field cosmology model proposed by Huang et al.1, 2 predicts that the early pre-inflationary universe was a superfluid. This superfluid is likely to have contained quantized vortices, and it is postulated that remnants of these vortices persist in the present-day moderate-redshift galaxy distribution. We attempt to search for remnants of these primordial vortices in the SDSS BOSS galaxy catalogue. We manage to observe hints of a few vortex tubes, which might lend weight to the credibility of the theory.

  9. Numerical simulation of vortex-wedge interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jin-Ho; Lee, Duck-Joo

    1994-06-01

    Interactions between vortical flows and a solid surface cause one of the primary sources of noise and unsteady loading. The mechanism of the interaction is studied numerically for a single Rankine vortex impinging upon a wedge. An Euler-Lagrangian method is employed to calculate the unsteady, viscous, incompressible flows in two dimensions. A random vortex method is used to describe the vorticity dominant field. A fast vortex method is used to reduce the computational time in the calculation of the convection velocity of each vortex particle. A Schwarz-Christoffel transformation is used to map the numerical domain onto the physical domain. Vortex partical plots, velocity vectors, and streamlines are presented at selected times for both inviscid and viscous interactions. It is observed that the incident rankine vortex distorts and is split by the wedge as it nears and passes the wedge, and the vortices generated from the leading edge toward the underside of the wedge form into a single vortex. The vorticity orientation of the shed vortex is opposite to that of the incident vortex. It is found that the convection velocity of the shed vortex is changed wheen it comes off the leading edge of the wedge, and the strength of the shed vortex varies with the time during the vortex-wedge interaction. This strength variation is presumed to influence the shed vortex convection velocity. The overall features for the interaction agree well with the experimental results of Ziada and Rockwell.

  10. Jejunostomy feeding tube

    MedlinePlus

    Feeding - jejunostomy tube; G-J tube; J-tube; Jejunum tube ... Q-tip to clean the skin around the J-tube 1 to 3 times a day with ... To flush the J-tube, follow the instructions your nurse gave you. You will use the syringe to slowly push warm water into ...

  11. Nasogastric feeding tube

    MedlinePlus

    Feeding - nasogastric tube; NG tube; Bolus feeding; Continuous pump feeding; Gavage tube ... If your child has an NG tube, try to keep your child from touching or pulling on the tube. After your nurse teaches you how to flush the tube ...

  12. NASA aircraft trailing vortex research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgowan, W. A.

    1971-01-01

    A brief description is given of NASA's comprehensive program to study the aircraft trailing vortex problem. Wind tunnel experiments are used to develop the detailed processes of wing tip vortex formation and explore different means to either prevent trailing vortices from forming or induce early break-up. Flight tests provide information on trailing vortex system behavior behind large transport aircraft, both near the ground, as in the vicinity of the airport, and at cruise/holding pattern altitudes. Results from some flight tests are used to show how pilots might avoid the dangerous areas when flying in the vicinity of large transport aircraft. Other flight tests will be made to verify and evaluate trailing vortex elimination schemes developed in the model tests. Laser Doppler velocimeters being developed for use in the research program and to locate and measure vortex winds in the airport area are discussed. Field tests have shown that the laser Doppler velocimeter measurements compare well with those from cup anemometers.

  13. Vortex Flows at Supersonic Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Richard M.; Wilcox, Floyd J., Jr.; Bauer, Steven X. S.; Allen, Jerry M.

    2003-01-01

    A review of research conducted at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Langley Research Center (LaRC) into high-speed vortex flows during the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s is presented. The data are for flat plates, cavities, bodies, missiles, wings, and aircraft with Mach numbers of 1.5 to 4.6. Data are presented to show the types of vortex structures that occur at supersonic speeds and the impact of these flow structures on vehicle performance and control. The data show the presence of both small- and large-scale vortex structures for a variety of vehicles, from missiles to transports. For cavities, the data show very complex multiple vortex structures exist at all combinations of cavity depth to length ratios and Mach number. The data for missiles show the existence of very strong interference effects between body and/or fin vortices. Data are shown that highlight the effect of leading-edge sweep, leading-edge bluntness, wing thickness, location of maximum thickness, and camber on the aerodynamics of and flow over delta wings. Finally, a discussion of a design approach for wings that use vortex flows for improved aerodynamic performance at supersonic speeds is presented.

  14. Green functions of vortex operators

    SciTech Connect

    Polchinski, Joseph

    1981-03-16

    In this paper, we study the euclidean Green functions of the 't Hooft vortex operator, primarily for abelian gauge theories. The operator is written in terms of elementary fields, with emphasis on a form in which it appears as the exponential of a surface integral. We explore the requirement that the Green functions depend only on the boundary of this surface. The Dirac veto problem appears in a new guise. We present a two-dimensional “solvable model” of a Dirac string, which suggests a new solution of the veto problem. The renormalization of the Green functions of the abelian Wilson loop and abelian vortex operator is studied with the aid of the operator product expansion. In each case, an overall multiplication of the operator makes all Green functions finite; a surprising cancellation of divergences occurs with the vortex operator. We present a brief discussion of the relation between the nature of the vacuum and the cluster properties of the Green functions of the Wilson and vortex operators, for a general gauge theory. Finally, the surface-like cluster property of the vortex operator in an abelian Higgs theory is explored in more detail.

  15. Quantitative vortex models of turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pullin, D. I.

    2001-11-01

    This presentation will review attempts to develop models of turbulence, based on compact vortex elements, that can be used both to obtain quantitative estimates of various statistical properties of turbulent fine scales and also to formulate subgrid-transport models for large-eddy simulation (LES). Attention will be focused on a class of stretched-vortex models. Following a brief review of prior work, recent studies of vortex-based modeling of the small-scale behavior of a passive scalar will be discussed. The large-wavenumber spectrum of a passive scalar undergoing mixing by the velocity field of a stretched-spiral vortex will be shown to consist of the sum of two classical power laws, a k-1 Batchelor spectrum for wavenumbers up to the inverse Batchelor scale, and a k-5/3 Obukov-Corrsin spectrum for wavenumbers less than the inverse Kolmogorov scale (joint work with T.S. Lundgren). We will then focus on the use of stretched vortices as the basic subgrid structure in subgrid-scale (SGS) modeling for LES of turbulent flows. An SGS stress model and a vortex-based scalar-flux model for the LES of flows with turbulent mixing will be outlined. Application of these models to the LES of decaying turbulence, channel flow, the mixing of a passive scalar by homogeneous turbulence in the presence of a mean scalar gradient, and to the LES of compressible turbulence will be described.

  16. Vortex Formation in Shallow Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rockwell, Donald

    2006-11-01

    Vortical structures having a scale much larger than the depth of the flow, which arise in bluff body wakes, jets, and mixing layers generated in shallow layers, show distinctive features due to the influence of bed friction. Cinema techniques of high-image-density particle image velocimetry are employed to characterize quasi-two-dimensional and three-dimensional aspects of the vortex development in terms of: patterns of vorticity; flow topology involving definition of critical points; and global spectral and cross-spectral analyses, based on simultaneous time records at thousands of grid points of the cinema imaging. Taken together, these representations lead to an understanding of the relationship between coherent vortex development and unsteadiness along the bed and, furthermore, provide a basis for exploration of concepts generic to separated shear layers in shallow flows. These concepts include: suppression of a primary mode of vortex formation due to bed friction and emergence of another mode; resonant coupling between a gravity wave of the shallow layer and vortex formation, leading to large-scale vortices; and passive and active (open loop) control, which can either retard or enhance the onset of vortex formation. These studies suggest opportunities for further investigation on both experimental and numerical fronts. Collaboration with Haojun Fu, Alis Ekmekci, Jung-Chang Lin, and Muammer Ozgoren is gratefully acknowledged.

  17. Recent progress in vortex coronagraphy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serabyn, G.; Mawet, D.

    The Optical Vortex Coronagraph (OVC) is a phase-based coronagraph that can enable high-contrast imaging observations very near bright stars and can make use of smaller telescope diameters than most alternative techniques. This paper first briefly describes the basic principles of operation of the vortex coronagraph, which applies an azimuthal phase spiral to the focal plane point spread function, and then turns to recent advances, both in understanding and in the needed technology development. In particular, vortex phase masks based on circularly-symmetric half-wave plates made of both liquid-crystal polymers and photonic crystals have now achieved very good contrast. Moreover, a dual-stage vortex coronagraph configuration can be used to achieve high contrast in the case of an on-axis telescope, i.e., in the presence of obscuration due to a secondary mirror and a secondary support structure. Further development of the relevant vortex techniques could potentially enable a range of high-contrast coronagraphic space missions, from an initial explorer class mission to a large flagship class exoplanet imaging mission. Of particular interest in this regard is the use of one of the two former 2.4 m National Reconnaissance Office telescopes for coronagraphic observations.

  18. Analysis and control of asymmetric vortex flows and supersonic vortex breakdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandil, Osama A.

    1991-01-01

    Topics relative to the analysis and control of asymmetric vortex flow and supersonic vortex breakdown are discussed. Specific topics include the computation of compressible, quasi-axisymmetric slender vortex flow and breakdown; supersonic quasi-axisymmetric vortex breakdown; and three-dimensional Navier-Stokes asymmetric solutions for cones and cone-cylinder configurations.

  19. Vortex chains travelling with discrete velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malishevskii, A. S.; Silin, V. P.; Uryupin, S. A.; Uspenskii, S. G.

    2008-05-01

    It has been shown that Swihart waves slowing down caused by Josephson junction spatial dispersion leads to the new field periodic nonlinear vortex states moving with discrete velocities. Swihart waves trapping by periodic vortex structures is discovered.

  20. Titan South Polar Vortex in Motion

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-07-10

    This image from a movie captured by NASAS Cassini spacecraft shows a south polar vortex, or shows a south polar vortex, or a swirling mass of gas around the pole in the atmosphere, at Saturn moon Titan.

  1. Vortex waves in sunspots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López Ariste, A.; Centeno, R.; Khomenko, E.

    2016-06-01

    Context. Waves in the magnetized solar atmosphere are one of the favourite means of transferring and depositing energy into the solar corona. The study of waves brings information not just on the dynamics of the magnetized plasma, but also on the possible ways in which the corona is heated. Aims: The identification and analysis of the phase singularities or dislocations provide us with a complementary approach to the magnetoacoustic and Aflvén waves propagating in the solar atmosphere. They allow us to identify individual wave modes, shedding light on the probability of excitation or the nature of the triggering mechanism. Methods: We use a time series of Doppler shifts measured in two spectral lines, filtered around the three-minute period region. The data show a propagating magnetoacoustic slow mode with several dislocations and, in particular, a vortex line. We study under what conditions the different wave modes propagating in the umbra can generate the observed dislocations. Results: The observed dislocations can be fully interpreted as a sequence of sausage and kink modes excited sequentially on average during 15 min. Kink and sausage modes appear to be excited independently and sequentially. The transition from one to the other lasts less than three minutes. During the transition we observe and model the appearance of superoscillations inducing large phase gradients and phase mixing. Conclusions: The analysis of the observed wave dislocations leads us to the identification of the propagating wave modes in umbrae. The identification in the data of superoscillatory regions during the transition from one mode to the other may be an important indicator of the location of wave dissipation.

  2. Tube furnace

    DOEpatents

    Foster, Kenneth G.; Frohwein, Eugene J.; Taylor, Robert W.; Bowen, David W.

    1991-01-01

    A vermiculite insulated tube furnace is heated by a helically-wound resistance wire positioned within a helical groove on the surface of a ceramic cylinder, that in turn is surroundingly disposed about a doubly slotted stainless steel cylindrical liner. For uniform heating, the pitch of the helix is of shorter length over the two end portions of the ceramic cylinder. The furnace is of large volume, provides uniform temperature, offers an extremely precise programmed heating capability, features very rapid cool-down, and has a modest electrical power requirement.

  3. Tube furnace

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, K.G.; Frohwein, E.J.; Taylor, R.W.; Bowen, D.W.

    1990-12-31

    A vermiculite insulated tube furnace is heated by a helically-wound resistance wire positioned within a helical groove on the surface of a ceramic cylinder, that in turn is surroundingly disposed about a doubly slotted stainless steel cylindrical liner. For uniform heating, the pitch of the helix is of shorter length over the two end portions of the ceramic cylinder. The furnace is of large volume, provides uniform temperature, offers an extremely precise programmed heating capability, features very rapid cool-down, and has a modest electrical power requirement.

  4. Tube furnace

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, K.G.; Frohwein, E.J.; Taylor, R.W.; Bowen, D.W.

    1990-01-01

    A vermiculite insulated tube furnace is heated by a helically-wound resistance wire positioned within a helical groove on the surface of a ceramic cylinder, that in turn is surroundingly disposed about a doubly slotted stainless steel cylindrical liner. For uniform heating, the pitch of the helix is of shorter length over the two end portions of the ceramic cylinder. The furnace is of large volume, provides uniform temperature, offers an extremely precise programmed heating capability, features very rapid cool-down, and has a modest electrical power requirement.

  5. Vortex methods for separated flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalart, Philippe R.

    1988-01-01

    The numerical solution of the Euler or Navier-Stokes equations by Lagrangian vortex methods is discussed. The mathematical background is presented and includes the relationship with traditional point-vortex studies, convergence to smooth solutions of the Euler equations, and the essential differences between two and three-dimensional cases. The difficulties in extending the method to viscous or compressible flows are explained. Two-dimensional flows around bluff bodies are emphasized. Robustness of the method and the assessment of accuracy, vortex-core profiles, time-marching schemes, numerical dissipation, and efficient programming are treated. Operation counts for unbounded and periodic flows are given, and two algorithms designed to speed up the calculations are described.

  6. Magnetic vortex based transistor operations.

    PubMed

    Kumar, D; Barman, S; Barman, A

    2014-02-17

    Transistors constitute the backbone of modern day electronics. Since their advent, researchers have been seeking ways to make smaller and more efficient transistors. Here, we demonstrate a sustained amplification of magnetic vortex core gyration in coupled two and three vortices by controlling their relative core polarities. This amplification is mediated by a cascade of antivortex solitons travelling through the dynamic stray field. We further demonstrated that the amplification can be controlled by switching the polarity of the middle vortex in a three vortex sequence and the gain can be controlled by the input signal amplitude. An attempt to show fan-out operation yielded gain for one of the symmetrically placed branches which can be reversed by switching the core polarity of all the vortices in the network. The above observations promote the magnetic vortices as suitable candidates to work as stable bipolar junction transistors (BJT).

  7. Ground vortex flow field investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, Richard E.; Delfrate, John H.; Eshleman, James E.

    1988-01-01

    Flow field investigations were conducted at the NASA Ames-Dryden Flow Visualization Facility (water tunnel) to investigate the ground effect produced by the impingement of jets from aircraft nozzles on a ground board in a STOL operation. Effects on the overall flow field with both a stationary and a moving ground board were photographed and compared with similar data found in other references. Nozzle jet impingement angles, nozzle and inlet interaction, side-by-side nozzles, nozzles in tandem, and nozzles and inlets mounted on a flat plate model were investigated. Results show that the wall jet that generates the ground effect is unsteady and the boundary between the ground vortex flow field and the free-stream flow is unsteady. Additionally, the forward projection of the ground vortex flow field with a moving ground board is one-third less than that measured over a fixed ground board. Results also showed that inlets did not alter the ground vortex flow field.

  8. Magnetic Vortex Based Transistor Operations

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, D.; Barman, S.; Barman, A.

    2014-01-01

    Transistors constitute the backbone of modern day electronics. Since their advent, researchers have been seeking ways to make smaller and more efficient transistors. Here, we demonstrate a sustained amplification of magnetic vortex core gyration in coupled two and three vortices by controlling their relative core polarities. This amplification is mediated by a cascade of antivortex solitons travelling through the dynamic stray field. We further demonstrated that the amplification can be controlled by switching the polarity of the middle vortex in a three vortex sequence and the gain can be controlled by the input signal amplitude. An attempt to show fan–out operation yielded gain for one of the symmetrically placed branches which can be reversed by switching the core polarity of all the vortices in the network. The above observations promote the magnetic vortices as suitable candidates to work as stable bipolar junction transistors (BJT). PMID:24531235

  9. Vortex breakdown incipience: Theoretical considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, Stanley A.; Erlebacher, Gordon

    1992-01-01

    The sensitivity of the onset and the location of vortex breakdowns in concentrated vortex cores, and the pronounced tendency of the breakdowns to migrate upstream have been characteristic observations of experimental investigations; they have also been features of numerical simulations and led to questions about the validity of these simulations. This behavior seems to be inconsistent with the strong time-like axial evolution of the flow, as expressed explicitly, for example, by the quasi-cylindrical approximate equations for this flow. An order-of-magnitude analysis of the equations of motion near breakdown leads to a modified set of governing equations, analysis of which demonstrates that the interplay between radial inertial, pressure, and viscous forces gives an elliptic character to these concentrated swirling flows. Analytical, asymptotic, and numerical solutions of a simplified non-linear equation are presented; these qualitatively exhibit the features of vortex onset and location noted above.

  10. The free compressible viscous vortex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colonius, Tim; Lele, Sanjiva K.; Moin, Parviz

    1991-01-01

    The present study investigates the effects of compressibility on free (unsteady) viscous heat-conducting vortices. Analytical solutions are found in the limit of large but finite Reynolds number and small but finite Mach number. It is shown that the spreading of the vortex causes a radial flow. This flow is given by the solution of an ordinary differential equation, which gives the dependence of the radial velocity on the tangential velocity, density, and temperature profiles of the vortex. Estimates of the radial velocity found by solving this equation are found to be in good agreement with numerical solutions of the full equations. The equations for the viscous evolution are expanded in powers of Mach number to obtain detailed analytical solutions. It is shown that swirling axisymmetric compressible flows generate negative radial velocities far from the vortex core owing to viscous effects, regardless of the initial distributions of vorticity, density, and entropy.

  11. Three-dimensional vortex methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greengard, C. A.

    1984-08-01

    Reformulations of the filament method and of the method of Beale and Majda show them to be very similar algorithms. The method of Anderson in which vorticity is evaluated by the exact differentiation of the approximate velocity field is discussed. It is shown that, in the inviscid version of this algorithm, each approximate vector of vorticity remains tangent to a material curve moving with the computed flow, with magnitude proportional to the stretching of this vortex line. It is explained that the expanding core vortex method converges to a system of equations different from the Navier-Stokes equations. Computations with the filament method of the inviscid interaction of two vortex rings are reported, both with single filaments in each ring and with a fully three-dimensional discretization of vorticity. The dependence on parameters is discussed, and convergence of the computed solutions is observed.

  12. Tapered pulse tube for pulse tube refrigerators

    DOEpatents

    Swift, Gregory W.; Olson, Jeffrey R.

    1999-01-01

    Thermal insulation of the pulse tube in a pulse-tube refrigerator is maintained by optimally varying the radius of the pulse tube to suppress convective heat loss from mass flux streaming in the pulse tube. A simple cone with an optimum taper angle will often provide sufficient improvement. Alternatively, the pulse tube radius r as a function of axial position x can be shaped with r(x) such that streaming is optimally suppressed at each x.

  13. Cutting of bent vortex lines

    SciTech Connect

    Wagenleithner, P.

    1982-07-01

    One of the major problems in the application of type II superconductors is the appearance of resistivity in case where a current-carrying specimen is in a longitudinal magnetic field. This is explained by the onset of flux-line cutting events, followed by cross-joining of the line parts. The calculation given here shows the amount of repulsive force and energy between two curved vortex lines and examines the general stability of the vortex-vortex system. First, the actual interaction potential between curved vortices is computed. It includes all electromagnetic and core overlap terms of interactions and self-interaction, and allows computation of the system energy under all curved vortex-line configurations. A computer program is used to find the form of lowest free energy. To do this, special trial functions are established to describe the three-dimensional form of the vortex-vortex system. In these functions parameters determine the qualitative and quantitative form. The asymptotic boundary conditions are built into the nature of the trial functions. The computer program now minimizes the free energy with respect to these parameters. The resulting repulsive energy and force are more than ten times less than the known results for straight flux lines, especially for small asymptotic cutting angles. There is no sharp maximum in the plot of repulsive force versus flux-line separation. A remarkable results is the loss of general stability below a separation distance of several London penetration depths, depending on the cutting angle and the Ginzburg-Landau parameter. The explanation lies in the local attraction of central sections of the vortices as a result of configurational adaption. This explains the onset of resistance at small currents and small magnetic fields.

  14. Optimising a vortex fluidic device for controlling chemical reactivity and selectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasmin, Lyzu; Chen, Xianjue; Stubbs, Keith A.; Raston, Colin L.

    2013-07-01

    A vortex fluidic device (VFD) involving a rapidly rotating tube open at one end forms dynamic thin films at high rotational speed for finite sub-millilitre volumes of liquid, with shear within the films depending on the speed and orientation of the tube. Continuous flow operation of the VFD where jet feeds of solutions are directed to the closed end of the tube provide additional tuneable shear from the viscous drag as the liquid whirls along the tube. The versatility of this simple, low cost microfluidic device, which can operate under confined mode or continuous flow is demonstrated in accelerating organic reactions, for model Diels-Alder dimerization of cyclopentadienes, and sequential aldol and Michael addition reactions, in accessing unusual 2,4,6-triarylpyridines. Residence times are controllable for continuous flow processing with the viscous drag dominating the shear for flow rates >0.1 mL/min in a 10 mm diameter tube rotating at >2000 rpm.

  15. Coulombic contribution and fat center vortex model

    SciTech Connect

    Rafibakhsh, Shahnoosh; Deldar, Sedigheh

    2007-02-27

    The fat (thick) center vortex model is one of the phenomenological models which is fairly successful to interpret the linear potential between static sources. However, the Coulombic part of the potential has not been investigated by the model yet. In an attempt to get the Coulombic contribution and to remove the concavity of the potentials, we are studying different vortex profiles and vortex sizes.

  16. Vortex ice in nanostructured superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Reichhardt, Charles; Reichhardt, Cynthia J; Libal, Andras J

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate using numerical simulations of nanostructured superconductors that it is possible to realize vortex ice states that are analogous to square and kagome ice. The system can be brought into a state that obeys either global or local ice rules by applying an external current according to an annealing protocol. We explore the breakdown of the ice rules due to disorder in the nanostructure array and show that in square ice, topological defects appear along grain boundaries, while in kagome ice, individual defects appear. We argue that the vortex system offers significant advantages over other artificial ice systems.

  17. Generation of Nonlinear Vortex Precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yue-Yue; Feng, Xun-Li; Liu, Chengpu

    2016-07-01

    We numerically study the propagation of a few-cycle pulse carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM) through a dense atomic system. Nonlinear precursors consisting of high-order vortex harmonics are generated in the transmitted field due to carrier effects associated with ultrafast Bloch oscillation. The nonlinear precursors survive to propagation effects and are well separated with the main pulse, which provides a straightforward way to measure precursors. By virtue of carrying high-order OAM, the obtained vortex precursors as information carriers have potential applications in optical information and communication fields where controllable loss, large information-carrying capacity, and high speed communication are required.

  18. Numerical simulation of a compressible vortex-wall interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murugan, T.; De, S.; Sreevatsa, A.; Dutta, S.

    2016-05-01

    The wall interaction of isolated compressible vortices generated from a short driver section shock tube has been simulated numerically by solving the Navier-Stokes equations in axisymmetric form. The dynamics of shock-free (incident shock Mach number M = 1.36) and shock-embedded (M = 1.57) compressible vortices near the wall has been studied in detail. The AUSM+ scheme with a fifth-order upwind interpolation formula is used for the convective fluxes. Time integration is performed using a low dissipative and dispersive fourth-order six-stage Runge-Kutta scheme. The evolution of primary and wall vortices has been shown using the velocity field, vorticity field, and numerical schlierens. The vortex impingement, shocklets, wall vortices, and their lift-off are clearly identified from the wall pressure time history. It has been observed that the maximum vorticity of the wall vortices reaches close to 30 % of the primary vortex for M = 1.36 and it reaches up to 60 % for M = 1.57. The net pressure force on the wall due to incident shock impingement is dominant compared to the compressible vortex impingement and their evolution.

  19. Vortex 'puddles' and magic vortex numbers in mesoscopic superconducting disks

    SciTech Connect

    Connolly, M. R.; Milosevic, M. V.; Bending, S. J.; Clem, J. R.; Tamegai, T.

    2009-01-01

    The magnetic properties of a superconducting disk change dramatically when its dimensions become mesoscopic. Unlike large disks, where the screening currents induced by an applied magnetic field are strong enough to force vortices to accumulate in a 'puddle' at the centre, in a mesoscopic disk the interaction between one of these vortices and the edge currents can be comparable to the intervortex repulsion, resulting in a destruction of the ordered triangular vortex lattice structure at the centre. Vortices instead form clusters which adopt polygonal and shell-like structures which exhibit magic number states similar to those of charged particles in a confining potential, and electrons in artificial atoms. We have fabricated mesoscopic high temperature superconducting Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+δ} disks and investigated their magnetic properties using magneto-optical imaging (MOI) and high resolution scanning Hall probe microscopy (SHPM). The temperature dependence of the vortex penetration field measured using MOI is in excellent agreement with models of the thermal excitation of pancake vortices over edge barriers. The growth of the central vortex puddle has been directly imaged using SHPM and magic vortex numbers showing higher stability have been correlated with abrupt jumps in the measured local magnetisation curves.

  20. Coupling between Majorana fermions and Nambu-Goldstone bosons inside a non-Abelian vortex in dense QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Chandrasekhar; Cipriani, Mattia; Nitta, Muneto

    2016-03-01

    Quark matter at high density may exhibit color superconductivity. As magnetic flux tubes in metallic superconductors, color magnetic flux tubes as non-Abelian vortices appear in the color-flavor-locked phase of high density QCD. C P2 Nambu-Goldstone bosons and Majorana fermions belonging to the triplet representation are known to be localized around a non-Abelian vortex. In this paper, we determine the coupling of these bosonic and fermionic modes by using the nonlinear realization method.

  1. Tube-in-tube thermophotovoltaic generator

    DOEpatents

    Ashcroft, John; Campbell, Brian; DePoy, David

    1998-01-01

    A thermophotovoltaic device includes at least one thermal radiator tube, a cooling tube concentrically disposed within each thermal radiator tube and an array of thermophotovoltaic cells disposed on the exterior surface of the cooling tube. A shell having a first end and a second end surrounds the thermal radiator tube. Inner and outer tubesheets, each having an aperture corresponding to each cooling tube, are located at each end of the shell. The thermal radiator tube extends within the shell between the inner tubesheets. The cooling tube extends within the shell through the corresponding apertures of the two inner tubesheets to the corresponding apertures of the two outer tubesheets. A plurality of the thermal radiator tubes can be arranged in a staggered or an in-line configuration within the shell.

  2. Tube-in-tube thermophotovoltaic generator

    DOEpatents

    Ashcroft, J.; Campbell, B.; DePoy, D.

    1998-06-30

    A thermophotovoltaic device includes at least one thermal radiator tube, a cooling tube concentrically disposed within each thermal radiator tube and an array of thermophotovoltaic cells disposed on the exterior surface of the cooling tube. A shell having a first end and a second end surrounds the thermal radiator tube. Inner and outer tubesheets, each having an aperture corresponding to each cooling tube, are located at each end of the shell. The thermal radiator tube extends within the shell between the inner tubesheets. The cooling tube extends within the shell through the corresponding apertures of the two inner tubesheets to the corresponding apertures of the two outer tubesheets. A plurality of the thermal radiator tubes can be arranged in a staggered or an in-line configuration within the shell. 8 figs.

  3. Evolution of a plasma vortex in air.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Cheng-Mu; Chu, Hong-Yu

    2016-01-01

    We report the generation of a vortex-shaped plasma in air by using a capacitively coupled dielectric barrier discharge system. We show that a vortex-shaped plasma can be produced inside a helium gas vortex and is capable of propagating for 3 cm. The fluctuation of the plasma ring shows a scaling relation with the Reynolds number of the vortex. The transient discharge reveals the property of corona discharge, where the conducting channel within the gas vortex and the blur plasma emission are observed at each half voltage cycle.

  4. Scattering of electromagnetic wave by vortex flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Jian-Ye; Liu, Jing-Yu; Mahmood, Waqas; Zhao, Qing

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, the scattering behaviour of an electromagnetic wave by vortex flow is studied in detail by solving the first-order (in v / c) Maxwell's equation in the cylindrical coordinate system (r, φ, z) and the general solutions are obtained. From these solutions, the differential cross-section of the vortex flow is calculated and the electromagnetic scattering characteristics of the vortex flow are discussed. The dependence of differential cross-section on the velocity profile and the radius of the vortex flow is investigated independently. Besides, by considering the dependence of scattering characteristics on the frequency of an incident wave we conclude that the vortex flow has frequency selectivity.

  5. A novel scenario of aperiodical impacts appearance in the turbine draft tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseenko, S. V.; Kuibin, P. A.; Shtork, S. I.; Skripkin, S. G.; Sonin, V. I.; Tsoy, M. A.; Ustimenko, A. S.

    2016-11-01

    The swirling flow in the discharge cone of hydroturbine is characterized by various self-induced instabilities and associated low frequency phenomena when the turbine is operated far from the best efficiency point. In particular, the precessing vortex rope develops at part-load regimes in the draft tube. This rope can serve a reason of the periodical low- frequency pressure oscillations in the whole hydrodynamical system. During the experimental research of flow structure in the discharge cone in a regime of free runner new interesting phenomenon was discovered. Due to instability some coils of helical vortex close to each other and reconnection appears with generation of a vortex ring. The experiments were fulfilled at the cavitational conditions when a cavity arises in the vortex core. So the phenomenon was registered with help of visualization by the high speed video recording. The vortex ring after the reconnection moves apart from the main vortex rope toward the wall and downstream. When it reaches the area with high pressure the cavity collapses with generation of pressure impact. The mechanism of cavitational vortex rings generation and their further collapse can serve as a prototype of the aperiodical pressure impacts inside the turbine draft tube.

  6. Liquid Vortex Fluid Dynamics for Fusion Energy Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardet, Philippe; Savas, Omer

    2006-11-01

    A turbulent annular swirling liquid contiguous wall jet is characterized experimentally in a ``vortex tube.'' The flow is proposed for use in a thick liquid first-wall chamber concept for inertial fusion power plants. The three components of planar velocity vector fields are measured with a single camera split-screen stereoscopic particle image velocimetry scheme. The combined use of fluorescent particles and cut-off filters effectively blocks glare reflected from the liquid-air interface. Flow field measurements in the vicinity of a free surface are thus successfully obtained in the presence of strong surface deformations. The jet is studied for Reynolds numbers ranging from 3,200 to 14,000 and between 1.5 and 11 ``vortex tube'' diameters downstream of the injection nozzle. Between 1.5 and 8 diameters, the average azimuthal velocity profile alone is non uniform away from the wall. Large vortical structures are consistently observed. Their wavelength increases with the distance from the nozzle. The turbulent kinetic energy decreases slowly with distance while the dissipation decreases rapidly. At 11 diameters, the wall effect influences strongly the average velocity profiles. The vortical structures disappear and the turbulent kinetic energy increases.

  7. Cavitation Influence in 1D Part-load Vortex Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dörfler, P. K.

    2016-11-01

    Residual swirl in the draft tube of Francis turbines may cause annoying low- frequency pulsation of pressure and power output, in particular during part-load operation. A 1D analytical model for these dynamic phenomena would enable simulation by some conventional method for computing hydraulic transients. The proper structure of such a model has implications for the prediction of prototype behaviour based on laboratory tests. The source of excitation as well as the dynamic transmission behaviour of the draft tube flow may both be described either by lumped or distributed parameters. The distributed version contains more information and, due to limited possibilities of identification, some data must be estimated. The distributed cavitation compliance is an example for this dilemma. In recent publications, the customary assumption of a constant wave speed has produced dubious results. The paper presents a more realistic model for distributed compressibility. The measured influence of the Thoma number is applied with the local cavitation factor. This concept is less sensitive to modelling errors and explains both the Thoma and Froude number influence. The possible effect of the normally unknown non-condensable gas content in the vortex cavity is shortly commented. Its measurement in future tests is recommended. It is also recommended to check the available analytical vortex models for possible dispersion effects.

  8. Particle-vortex symmetric liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulligan, Michael

    2017-01-01

    We introduce an effective theory with manifest particle-vortex symmetry for disordered thin films undergoing a magnetic field-tuned superconductor-insulator transition. The theory may enable one to access both the critical properties of the strong-disorder limit, which has recently been confirmed by Breznay et al. [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 113, 280 (2016), 10.1073/pnas.1522435113] to exhibit particle-vortex symmetric electrical response, and the nearby metallic phase discovered earlier by Mason and Kapitulnik [Phys. Rev. Lett. 82, 5341 (1999), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.82.5341] in less disordered samples. Within the effective theory, the Cooper-pair and field-induced vortex degrees of freedom are simultaneously incorporated into an electrically neutral Dirac fermion minimally coupled to a (emergent) Chern-Simons gauge field. A derivation of the theory follows upon mapping the superconductor-insulator transition to the integer quantum Hall plateau transition and the subsequent use of Son's particle-hole symmetric composite Fermi liquid. Remarkably, particle-vortex symmetric response does not require the introduction of disorder; rather, it results when the Dirac fermions exhibit vanishing Hall effect. The theory predicts approximately equal (diagonal) thermopower and Nernst signal with a deviation parameterized by the measured electrical Hall response at the symmetric point.

  9. Titan Colorful South Polar Vortex

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-07-10

    This true color image captured by NASAS Cassini spacecraft before a distant flyby of Saturn moon Titan on June 27, 2012, shows a south polar vortex, or a mass of fluid-like clouds and haze swirling around the pole in the atmosphere of the moon.

  10. Integrated optical vortex beam receivers.

    PubMed

    Cicek, Kenan; Hu, Ziyang; Zhu, Jiangbo; Meriggi, Laura; Li, Shimao; Nong, Zhichao; Gao, Shengqian; Zhang, Ning; Wang, Xuyang; Cai, Xinlun; Sorel, Marc; Yu, Siyuan

    2016-12-12

    A simple and ultra-compact integrated optical vortex beam receiver device is presented. The device is based on the coupling between the optical vortex modes and whispering gallery modes in a micro-ring resonator via embedded angular gratings, which provides the selective reception of optical vortex modes with definitive total angular momentum (summation of spin and orbital angular momentum) through the phase matching condition in the coupling process. Experimental characterization confirms the correct detection of the total angular momentum carried by the vortex beams incident on the device. In addition, photonic spin-controlled unidirectional excitation of whispering-gallery modes in the ring receiver is also observed, and utilized to differentiate between left- and right-circular polarizations and therefore unambiguously identify the orbital angular momentum of incident light. Such characteristics provide an effective mode-selective receiver for the eigen-modes in orbital angular momentum fiber transmission where the circularly polarized OAM modes can be used as data communications channels in multiplexed communications or as photonic states in quantum information applications.

  11. Perturbative theory for Brownian vortexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moyses, Henrique W.; Bauer, Ross O.; Grosberg, Alexander Y.; Grier, David G.

    2015-06-01

    Brownian vortexes are stochastic machines that use static nonconservative force fields to bias random thermal fluctuations into steadily circulating currents. The archetype for this class of systems is a colloidal sphere in an optical tweezer. Trapped near the focus of a strongly converging beam of light, the particle is displaced by random thermal kicks into the nonconservative part of the optical force field arising from radiation pressure, which then biases its diffusion. Assuming the particle remains localized within the trap, its time-averaged trajectory traces out a toroidal vortex. Unlike trivial Brownian vortexes, such as the biased Brownian pendulum, which circulate preferentially in the direction of the bias, the general Brownian vortex can change direction and even topology in response to temperature changes. Here we introduce a theory based on a perturbative expansion of the Fokker-Planck equation for weak nonconservative driving. The first-order solution takes the form of a modified Boltzmann relation and accounts for the rich phenomenology observed in experiments on micrometer-scale colloidal spheres in optical tweezers.

  12. Three-dimensional vortex methods

    SciTech Connect

    Greengard, C.A.

    1984-08-01

    Three-dimensional vortex methods for the computation of incompressible fluid flow are presented from a unified point of view. Reformulations of the filament method and of the method of Beale and Majda show them to be very similar algorithms; in both of them, the vorticity is evaluated by a discretization of the spatial derivative of the flow map. The fact that the filament method, the one which is most often used in practice, can be formulated as a version of the Beale and Majda algorithm in a curved coordinate system is used to give a convergence theorem for the filament method. The method of Anderson is also discussed, in which vorticity is evaluated by the exact differentiation of the approximate velocity field. It is shown that, in the inviscid version of this algorithm, each approximate vector of vorticity remains tangent to a material curve moving with the computed flow, with magnitude proportional to the stretching of this vortex line. This remains true even when time discretization is taken into account. It is explained that the expanding core vortex method converges to a system of equations different from the Navier-Stokes equations. Computations with the filament method of the inviscid interaction of two vortex rings are reported, both with single filaments in each ring and with a fully three-dimensional discretization of vorticity. The dependence on parameters is discussed, and convergence of the computed solutions is observed. 36 references, 4 figures.

  13. Perturbative theory for Brownian vortexes.

    PubMed

    Moyses, Henrique W; Bauer, Ross O; Grosberg, Alexander Y; Grier, David G

    2015-06-01

    Brownian vortexes are stochastic machines that use static nonconservative force fields to bias random thermal fluctuations into steadily circulating currents. The archetype for this class of systems is a colloidal sphere in an optical tweezer. Trapped near the focus of a strongly converging beam of light, the particle is displaced by random thermal kicks into the nonconservative part of the optical force field arising from radiation pressure, which then biases its diffusion. Assuming the particle remains localized within the trap, its time-averaged trajectory traces out a toroidal vortex. Unlike trivial Brownian vortexes, such as the biased Brownian pendulum, which circulate preferentially in the direction of the bias, the general Brownian vortex can change direction and even topology in response to temperature changes. Here we introduce a theory based on a perturbative expansion of the Fokker-Planck equation for weak nonconservative driving. The first-order solution takes the form of a modified Boltzmann relation and accounts for the rich phenomenology observed in experiments on micrometer-scale colloidal spheres in optical tweezers.

  14. The 1987 Ground Vortex Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margason, Richard J. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this workshop was to discuss the current understanding of the ground vortex phenomena and their effects on aircraft, and to establish directions for further research on advanced, high-performance aircraft designs, particularly those concepts utilizing powered-lift systems; e.g., V/STOL. ASTOVL, and STOL aircraft.

  15. Vortex cavitation: A progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Arndt, R.E.A.; Maines, B.H.

    1994-12-31

    Cavitation in vortical flows is a significant problem. An important aspect is the need for a better understanding of the physics of cavitation in the vortices tailing from lifting surfaces such as propellers and hydrofoils. This is a review of experimental and numerical research that has been recently carried out with a series of hydrofoils. This is a review of experimental and numerical research that has been recently carried out with a series of hydrofoils. This research was aimed at investigating the interrelated effects of vortex structure, including the details of the vortex roll-up process close to the tip, dissolved gas content, and water quality as it related to the amount of tension that can be sustained in the vortex before cavitation occurs. The experimental phase includes lift and drag measurements, oil flow visualization of the boundary layer flow on the lifting surfaces, and observation of both cavitation inception and desinence in strong and weak water. An improved photographic technique has been developed to study the complex bubble dynamics inherent in the inception process. Preliminary results indicate that the bubble growth process is strongly dependent on the size and number of nuclei in the free stream. Numerical simulations indicate that the minimum pressure in the vortex is very close to the tip of the lifting surface, in agreement with the observation that the inception process also occurs very close to the tip under most conditions.

  16. Extended applications of the vortex lattice method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miranda, L. R.

    1976-01-01

    The application of the vortex lattice method to problems not usually dealt with by this technique is considered. It is shown that if the discrete vortex lattice is considered as an approximation to surface-distributed vorticity, then the concept of the generalized principal part of an integral yields a residual term to the vortex-induced velocity that renders the vortex lattice method valid for supersonic flow. Special schemes for simulating non-zero thickness lifting surfaces and fusiform bodies with vortex lattice elements are presented. Thickness effects of wing-like components are simulated by a double vortex lattice layer, and fusiform bodies are represented by a vortex grid arranged on a series of concentric cylindrical surfaces. Numerical considerations peculiar to the application of these techniques are briefly discussed.

  17. Three-dimensional stability of vortex arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, A. C.; Saffman, P. G.

    1982-12-01

    The stability to three-dimensional disturbances of three classical steady vortex configurations in an incompressible inviscid fluid is studied in the limit of small vortex cross-sectional area and long axial disturbance wavelength. The configurations examined are the single infinite vortex row, the Karman vortex street of staggered vortices and the symmetric vortex street. It is shown that the single row is most unstable to a two-dimensional disturbance, while the Karman vortex street is most unstable to a three-dimensional disturbance over a significant range of street spacing ratios. The symmetric vortex street is found to be most unstable to three-dimensional or two-dimensional symmetric disturbances depending on the spacing ratio of the street. Short remarks are made concerning the relevance of the calculations to the observed instabilities in free shear layer, wake and boundary-layer type flows.

  18. Reduction of vortex induced forces and motion through surface roughness control

    DOEpatents

    Bernitsas, Michael M; Raghavan, Kamaldev

    2014-04-01

    Roughness is added to the surface of a bluff body in a relative motion with respect to a fluid. The amount, size, and distribution of roughness on the body surface is controlled passively or actively to modify the flow around the body and subsequently the Vortex Induced Forces and Motion (VIFM). The added roughness, when designed and implemented appropriately, affects in a predetermined way the boundary layer, the separation of the boundary layer, the level of turbulence, the wake, the drag and lift forces, and consequently the Vortex Induced Motion (VIM), and the fluid-structure interaction. The goal of surface roughness control is to decrease/suppress Vortex Induced Forces and Motion. Suppression is required when fluid-structure interaction becomes destructive as in VIM of flexible cylinders or rigid cylinders on elastic support, such as underwater pipelines, marine risers, tubes in heat exchangers, nuclear fuel rods, cooling towers, SPAR offshore platforms.

  19. Rotor blade vortex interaction noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yung H.

    2000-02-01

    Blade-vortex interaction noise-generated by helicopter main rotor blades is one of the most severe noise problems and is very important both in military applications and community acceptance of rotorcraft. Research over the decades has substantially improved physical understanding of noise-generating mechanisms, and various design concepts have been investigated to control noise radiation using advanced blade planform shapes and active blade control techniques. The important parameters to control rotor blade-vortex interaction noise and vibration have been identified: blade tip vortex structures and its trajectory, blade aeroelastic deformation, and airloads. Several blade tip design concepts have been investigated for diffusing tip vortices and also for reducing noise. However, these tip shapes have not been able to substantially reduce blade-vortex interaction noise without degradation of rotor performance. Meanwhile, blade root control techniques, such as higher-harmonic pitch control (HHC) and individual blade control (IBC) concepts, have been extensively investigated for noise and vibration reduction. The HHC technique has proved the substantial blade-vortex interaction noise reduction, up to 6 dB, while vibration and low-frequency noise have been increased. Tests with IBC techniques have shown the simultaneous reduction of rotor noise and vibratory loads with 2/rev pitch control inputs. Recently, active blade control concepts with smart structures have been investigated with the emphasis on active blade twist and trailing edge flap. Smart structures technologies are very promising, but further advancements are needed to meet all the requirements of rotorcraft applications in frequency, force, and displacement.

  20. Tracheostomy tube - eating

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000464.htm Tracheostomy tube - eating To use the sharing features on this ... you swallow foods or liquids. Eating and Tracheostomy Tubes When you get your tracheostomy tube, or trach, ...

  1. Neural Tube Defects

    MedlinePlus

    ... Birth defects & other health conditions > Neural tube defects Neural tube defects E-mail to a friend Please ... this page It's been added to your dashboard . Neural tube defects (NTDs) are birth defects of the ...

  2. Front propagation in a vortex lattice: dependence on boundary conditions and vortex depth.

    PubMed

    Beauvier, E; Bodea, S; Pocheau, A

    2016-11-04

    We experimentally address the propagation of reaction-diffusion fronts in vortex lattices by combining, in a Hele-Shaw cell and at low Reynolds number, forced electroconvective flows and an autocatalytic reaction in solution. We consider both vortex chains and vortex arrays, the former referring to mixed free/rigid boundary conditions for vortices and the latter to free boundary conditions. Varying the depth of the fluid layer, we observe no variation of the mean front velocities for vortex arrays and a noticeable variation for vortex chains. This questions the two-dimensional character of front propagation in low Reynolds number vortex lattices, as well as the mechanisms of this dependence.

  3. Preliminary study of the three-dimensional deformation of the vortex in Karman vortex street

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Guocan; Guo, Liang; Wu, Zuobin; Ma, Huiyang

    1992-03-01

    The mechanism for 3D evolution of the isolated Karman vortex and the thin-vortex filament in a circular cylinder wake is studied numerically using the LIA method. The results show that the vortex motion is unstable for small 3D disturbances in the separated wake of a circular cylinder. Karman vortex in the time-averaged wake flowfield wolves into a horseshoe-spoon-like 3D structure. The thin vortex filament deforms three-dimensionally in the braid and generates streamwise vortex structures which incline to the region maximum-deformation direction of the flowfield.

  4. Heat exchanger tube mounts

    DOEpatents

    Wolowodiuk, W.; Anelli, J.; Dawson, B.E.

    1974-01-01

    A heat exchanger in which tubes are secured to a tube sheet by internal bore welding is described. The tubes may be moved into place in preparation for welding with comparatively little trouble. A number of segmented tube support plates are provided which allow a considerable portion of each of the tubes to be moved laterally after the end thereof has been positioned in preparation for internal bore welding to the tube sheet. (auth)

  5. Tube-shape verifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, A. N.; Christ, C. R.

    1980-01-01

    Inexpensive apparatus checks accuracy of bent tubes. Assortment of slotted angles and clamps is bolted down to flat aluminum plate outlining shape of standard tube bent to desired configuration. Newly bent tubes are then checked against this outline. Because parts are bolted down, tubes can be checked very rapidly without disturbing outline. One verifier per tube-bending machine can really speed up production in tube-bending shop.

  6. Shock/vortex interaction and vortex-breakdown modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandil, Osama A.; Kandil, H. A.; Liu, C. H.

    1992-01-01

    Computational simulation and study of shock/vortex interaction and vortex-breakdown modes are considered for bound (internal) and unbound (external) flow domains. The problem is formulated using the unsteady, compressible, full Navier-Stokes (NS) equations which are solved using an implicit, flux-difference splitting, finite-volume scheme. For the bound flow domain, a supersonic swirling flow is considered in a configured circular duct and the problem is solved for quasi-axisymmetric and three-dimensional flows. For the unbound domain, a supersonic swirling flow issued from a nozzle into a uniform supersonic flow of lower Mach number is considered for quasi-axisymmetric and three-dimensional flows. The results show several modes of breakdown; e.g., no-breakdown, transient single-bubble breakdown, transient multi-bubble breakdown, periodic multi-bubble multi-frequency breakdown and helical breakdown.

  7. Two vortex-blob regularization models for vortex sheet motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, Sung-Ik

    2014-04-01

    Evolving vortex sheets generally form singularities in finite time. The vortex blob model is an approach to regularize the vortex sheet motion and evolve past singularity formation. In this paper, we thoroughly compare two such regularizations: the Krasny-type model and the Beale-Majda model. It is found from a linear stability analysis that both models have exponentially decaying growth rates for high wavenumbers, but the Beale-Majda model has a faster decaying rate than the Krasny model. The Beale-Majda model thus gives a stronger regularization to the solution. We apply the blob models to the two example problems: a periodic vortex sheet and an elliptically loaded wing. The numerical results show that the solutions of the two models are similar in large and small scales, but are fairly different in intermediate scales. The sheet of the Beale-Majda model has more spiral turns than the Krasny-type model for the same value of the regularization parameter δ. We give numerical evidences that the solutions of the two models agree for an increasing amount of spiral turns and tend to converge to the same limit as δ is decreased. The inner spiral turns of the blob models behave differently with the outer turns and satisfy a self-similar form. We also examine irregular motions of the sheet at late times and find that the irregular motions shrink as δ is decreased. This fact suggests a convergence of the blob solution to the weak solution of infinite regular spiral turns.

  8. Interaction of Vortex Ring with Cutting Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musta, Mustafa

    2015-11-01

    The interaction of a vortex ring impinging on a thin cutting plate was made experimentally using Volumetric 3-component Velocitmetry (v3v) technique. The vortex rings were generated with piston-cylinder vortex ring generator using piston stroke-to-diameter ratios and Re at 2-3 and 1500 - 3000, respectively. The cutting of vortex rings below center line leads to the formation of secondary vortices on each side of the plate which is look like two vortex rings, and a third vortex ring propagates further downstream in the direction of the initial vortex ring, which is previously showed by flow visualization study of Weigand (1993) and called ``trifurcation''. Trifurcation is very sensitive to the initial Reynolds number and the position of the plate with respect to the vortex ring generator pipe. The present work seeks more detailed investigation on the trifurcation using V3V technique. Conditions for the formation of trifurcation is analyzed and compared with Weigand (1993). The formed secondary vortex rings and the propagation of initial vortex ring in the downstream of the plate are analyzed by calculating their circulation, energy and trajectories.

  9. Optical Rankine Vortex and Anomalous Circulation of Light

    SciTech Connect

    Swartzlander, Grover A. Jr.; Hernandez-Aranda, Raul I.

    2007-10-19

    Rankine vortex characteristics of a partially coherent optical vortex are explored using classical and physical optics. Unlike a perfectly coherent vortex mode, the circulation is not quantized. Excess circulation is predicted owing to the wave nature of composite vortex fields. Based on these findings, we propose a vortex stellar interferometer.

  10. On the vortex dynamics of flow past a sphere at Re = 3700 in a uniformly stratified fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chongsiripinyo, Karu; Pal, Anikesh; Sarkar, Sutanu

    2017-02-01

    Vortex dynamics in the flow past a sphere in a linearly stratified environment is investigated numerically. Simulations are carried out for a flow with Reynolds number of Re = 3700 and for several Froude numbers ranging from the unstratified case with F r =∞ to a highly stratified wake with Fr = 0.025. Isosurface of Q criterion is used to elucidate stratification effects on vortical structures near the sphere and in the wake. Vortical structures in the unstratified case are tube-like and show no preference in their orientation. Moderate stratification alters the orientation of vortical structures to streamwise preference but does not change their tube-like form. In strongly stratified cases with F r ≤0.5 , there is strong suppression in vertical motion so that isotropically oriented vortex tubes of approximately circular cross section are replaced by flattened vortex tubes that are horizontally oriented. At Fr = 0.025, pancake eddies and surfboard-like inclined structures emerge in the near wake and have a regular streamwise spacing that is associated with the frequency of vortex shedding from the sphere. Enstrophy variance budget is used to analyze the vortical structure dynamics. Increasing stratification generally decreases enstrophy variance for F r ≥O (1 ) cases. The flow enters a new regime in strongly stratified cases with F r ≤ 0.25: increasing the stratification increases enstrophy variance, especially near the body. Stratification distorts the cross-sectional distribution of enstrophy variance from a circular isotropic shape in the unstratified wake into different shapes, depending on Fr and distance from the sphere, that include (1) elliptical distribution, (2) twin peaks suggestive of two-dimensional vortex shedding, and (3) triple-layer distribution where a relatively low enstrophy layer is sandwiched between the upper and the lower layers with high enstrophy. In the near wake, vortex stretching by fluctuating and mean strain are both

  11. Evolution of Vortex Pairs Subject to the Crow Instability in Wall Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asselin, Daniel; Williamson, C. H. K.

    2014-11-01

    In this research, we examine the effect of a solid boundary on the dynamics and instabilities of a pair of counter-rotating vortices. An isolated vortex pair is subject to both a short-wave elliptic instability and a long-wave Crow (1970) instability. Near a wall, the boundary layer that forms between the primary vortices and the wall can separate, leading to the generation of secondary vorticity. In the present study, we are examining the long-wave Crow instability as it is modified by interaction with a wall. Several key features of the flow are observed. Strong axial flows cause fluid containing vorticity to move from the ``troughs'' of the initially wavy vortex tube to the ``peaks.'' This process is associated with distinct differences in vortex concentration at the peak and the trough, which lead to the establishment of an axial pressure gradient. Furthermore, the primary and secondary vortices interact to form additional small-scale vortex rings. The exact number and orientation of these small-scale rings is highly dependent on the extent to which the Crow instability has developed prior to interaction with the ground. Finally, significant changes to the vortex dynamics, including circulation, core size, and topology, are also observed during and after interaction with the boundary. This work was supported by the Office of Naval Research under ONR Award No. N00014-12-1-0712.

  12. Extreme Vortex States and the Growth of Enstrophy in 3D Incompressible Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayala, Diego; Protas, Bartosz

    2014-11-01

    In this investigation we analyze a family of extreme vortex states which maximize the instantaneous production of enstrophy under Navier-Stokes dynamics on 3D periodic domains. They are found by numerically solving suitably constrained optimization problems and include other well-known flows, such as the Taylor-Green vortex and the ABC flow, as special cases. Initially discovered by Lu & Doering (2008), these optimal vortex states saturate an analytic upper bound on the rate of growth of enstrophy, indicating that this estimate is in fact sharp. We provide a numerical characterization of the set of initial data for which smooth solutions are guaranteed to exist for all times, thereby offering a physical interpretation of a well-known result of mathematical analysis. The results from high-resolution direct numerical simulations indicate that the flows triggered by these optimal fields produce a larger finite-time growth of enstrophy than the flows obtained from other widely-used initial conditions, such as the Taylor-Green vortex, Lamb dipoles and perturbed anti-parallel vortex tubes. Although numerical in nature, these results illustrate a systematic approach to finding a worst-case initial condition which could lead to the potential formation of a singularity in finite-time.

  13. Divergence of optical vortex beams.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Salla Gangi; Permangatt, Chithrabhanu; Prabhakar, Shashi; Anwar, Ali; Banerji, J; Singh, R P

    2015-08-01

    We show, both theoretically and experimentally, that the propagation of optical vortices in free space can be analyzed by using the width [w(z)] of the host Gaussian beam and the inner and outer radii of the vortex beam at the source plane (z=0) as defined in [Opt. Lett.39, 4364 (2014)10.1364/OL.39.004364OPLEDP0146-9592]. We also studied the divergence of vortex beams, considered as the rate of change of inner or outer radius with the propagation distance (z), and found that it varies with the order in the same way as that of the inner and outer radii at z=0. These results may be useful in designing optical fibers for orbital angular momentum modes that play a crucial role in quantum communication.

  14. Collisions of Vortex Filament Pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banica, Valeria; Faou, Erwan; Miot, Evelyne

    2014-12-01

    We consider the problem of collisions of vortex filaments for a model introduced by Klein et al. (J Fluid Mech 288:201-248, 1995) and Zakharov (Sov Phys Usp 31(7):672-674, 1988, Lect. Notes Phys 536:369-385, 1999) to describe the interaction of almost parallel vortex filaments in three-dimensional fluids. Since the results of Crow (AIAA J 8:2172-2179, 1970) examples of collisions are searched as perturbations of antiparallel translating pairs of filaments, with initial perturbations related to the unstable mode of the linearized problem; most results are numerical calculations. In this article, we first consider a related model for the evolution of pairs of filaments, and we display another type of initial perturbation leading to collision in finite time. Moreover, we give numerical evidence that it also leads to collision through the initial model. We finally study the self-similar solutions of the model.

  15. Drag of buoyant vortex rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasel-Be-Hagh, Ahmadreza; Carriveau, Rupp; Ting, David S.-K.; Turner, John Stewart

    2015-10-01

    Extending from the model proposed by Vasel-Be-Hagh et al. [J. Fluid Mech. 769, 522 (2015), 10.1017/jfm.2015.126], a perturbation analysis is performed to modify Turner's radius by taking into account the viscous effect. The modified radius includes two terms; the zeroth-order solution representing the effect of buoyancy, and the first-order perturbation correction describing the influence of viscosity. The zeroth-order solution is explicit Turner's radius; the first-order perturbation modification, however, includes the drag coefficient, which is unknown and of interest. Fitting the photographically measured radius into the modified equation yields the time history of the drag coefficient of the corresponding buoyant vortex ring. To give further clarification, the proposed model is applied to calculate the drag coefficient of a buoyant vortex ring at a Bond number of approximately 85; a similar procedure can be applied at other Bond numbers.

  16. Wake Vortex Algorithm Scoring Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robins, R. E.; Delisi, D. P.; Hinton, David (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This report compares the performance of two models of trailing vortex evolution for which interaction with the ground is not a significant factor. One model uses eddy dissipation rate (EDR) and the other uses the kinetic energy of turbulence fluctuations (TKE) to represent the effect of turbulence. In other respects, the models are nearly identical. The models are evaluated by comparing their predictions of circulation decay, vertical descent, and lateral transport to observations for over four hundred cases from Memphis and Dallas/Fort Worth International Airports. These observations were obtained during deployments in support of NASA's Aircraft Vortex Spacing System (AVOSS). The results of the comparisons show that the EDR model usually performs slightly better than the TKE model.

  17. Vortex boundary-layer interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradshaw, P.

    1986-01-01

    Parametric studies to identify a vortex generator were completed. Data acquisition in the first chosen configuration, in which a longitudinal vortex pair generated by an isolated delta wing starts to merge with a turbulent boundary layer on a flat plate fairly close to the leading edge is nearly completed. Work on a delta-wing/flat-plate combination, consisting of a flow visualization and hot wire measurements taken with a computer controlled traverse gear and data logging system were completed. Data taking and analysis have continued, and sample results for another cross stream plane are presented. Available data include all mean velocity components, second order mean products of turbulent fluctuations, and third order mean products. Implementation of a faster data logging system was accomplished.

  18. On Vortex Breakdown and Instability.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-03-01

    Hydrodynamic and Hydromagnetic Stability of Swirling flows," J. Fluid Mech., Vol. 14, 463-76, 1962. 23. Hummel, D., "Untersuchtingen uber das Aufplatzen...initiated the study of linear hydrodynamic stability concerning 30,31, an ebvc 41swirling flows. Then Leibovich Randall and Leibovich4 , Uberoi, Chow...Vortex Breakdown, Delta Wing, Richardson Number, Stability 20. RACT (Continue on reveso side If necessary end identify by block number) A literature

  19. The Helicity of Vortex Filaments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrich, Dean; Tao, Louis

    1996-03-01

    The helicity, defined by H = int dV v \\cdot nabla × v, is a conserved quantity of the three-dimensional Euler equations. Traditionally the helicity has been viewed as a measure of the topology of vortex lines, but it is shown that the helicity measures their geometry as well as their topology (J.D. Bekenstein, Physics Letters B), 282 (1992) 44-49.. The existence of helicity-preserving reconnection events is discussed.

  20. Prediction and Control of Vortex Dominated and Vortex-wake Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandil, Osama

    1996-01-01

    This report describes the activities and accomplishments under this research grant, including a list of publications and dissertations, produced in the field of prediction and control of vortex dominated and vortex wake flows.

  1. Numerical simulation of vortex breakdown by the vortex-filament method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, Y.; Leonard, A.; Spalart, P. R.

    1983-01-01

    The vortex filament method was applied to the simulation of vortex breakdown. The principal vortex region was represented by multiple filaments, and an axial velocity component was induced by a spiral winding of the filaments. First, an accuracy check was performed for a cylindrical swirling flow with simple analytical expressions for the axial and theta velocities. The result suggests that the flow field is simulated to any accuracy by increasing the number of filaments. Second, an axisymmetric type vortex breakdown was simulated, with experimental data serving as upstream conditions. The calculated axial and theta velocity contours show the breakdown of the vortex, including a rapid change in the vortex core, followed axially by a recovery zone and then a second breakdown. When three dimensional initial data are used the second breakdown appears to be of the spiral type in correspondence with experimental observations. The present method is easily used to simulate other types of vortex breakdown or other vortex flows with axial velocity.

  2. Review of Idealized Aircraft Wake Vortex Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmad, Nashat N.; Proctor, Fred H.; Duparcmeur, Fanny M. Limon; Jacob, Don

    2014-01-01

    Properties of three aircraft wake vortex models, Lamb-Oseen, Burnham-Hallock, and Proctor are reviewed. These idealized models are often used to initialize the aircraft wake vortex pair in large eddy simulations and in wake encounter hazard models, as well as to define matched filters for processing lidar observations of aircraft wake vortices. Basic parameters for each vortex model, such as peak tangential velocity and circulation strength as a function of vortex core radius size, are examined. The models are also compared using different vortex characterizations, such as the vorticity magnitude. Results of Euler and large eddy simulations are presented. The application of vortex models in the postprocessing of lidar observations is discussed.

  3. Birth and evolution of an optical vortex.

    PubMed

    Vallone, Giuseppe; Sponselli, Anna; D'Ambrosio, Vincenzo; Marrucci, Lorenzo; Sciarrino, Fabio; Villoresi, Paolo

    2016-07-25

    When a phase singularity is suddenly imprinted on the axis of an ordinary Gaussian beam, an optical vortex appears and starts to grow radially, by effect of diffraction. This radial growth and the subsequent evolution of the optical vortex under focusing or imaging can be well described in general within the recently introduced theory of circular beams, which generalize the hypergeometric-Gaussian beams and which obey novel kinds of ABCD rules. Here, we investigate experimentally these vortex propagation phenomena and test the validity of circular-beam theory. Moreover, we analyze the difference in radial structure between the newly generated optical vortex and the vortex obtained in the image plane, where perfect imaging would lead to complete closure of the vortex core.

  4. Analytical model of the optical vortex microscope.

    PubMed

    Płocinniczak, Łukasz; Popiołek-Masajada, Agnieszka; Masajada, Jan; Szatkowski, Mateusz

    2016-04-20

    This paper presents an analytical model of the optical vortex scanning microscope. In this microscope the Gaussian beam with an embedded optical vortex is focused into the sample plane. Additionally, the optical vortex can be moved inside the beam, which allows fine scanning of the sample. We provide an analytical solution of the whole path of the beam in the system (within paraxial approximation)-from the vortex lens to the observation plane situated on the CCD camera. The calculations are performed step by step from one optical element to the next. We show that at each step, the expression for light complex amplitude has the same form with only four coefficients modified. We also derive a simple expression for the vortex trajectory of small vortex displacements.

  5. Vortex rings impinging on permeable boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mujal-Colilles, Anna; Dalziel, Stuart B.; Bateman, Allen

    2015-01-01

    Experiments with vortex rings impinging permeable and solid boundaries are presented in order to investigate the influence of permeability. Utilizing Particle Image Velocimetry, we compared the behaviour of a vortex ring impinging four different reticulated foams (with permeability k ˜ 26 - 85 × 10-8 m2) and a solid boundary. Results show how permeability affects the stretching phenomena of the vortex ring and the formation and evolution of the secondary vortex ring with opposite sign. Moreover, permeability also affects the macroscopic no-slip boundary condition found on the solid boundary, turning it into an apparent slip boundary condition for the most permeable boundary. The apparent slip-boundary condition and the flux exchange between the ambient fluid and the foam are jointly responsible for both the modified formation of the secondary vortex and changes on the vortex ring diameter increase.

  6. Topology of Vortex-Wing Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenna, Chris; Rockwell, Donald

    2016-11-01

    Aircraft flying together in an echelon or V formation experience aerodynamic advantages. Impingement of the tip vortex from the leader (upstream) wing on the follower wing can yield an increase of lift to drag ratio. This enhancement is known to depend on the location of vortex impingement on the follower wing. Particle image velocimetry is employed to determine streamline topology in successive crossflow planes, which characterize the streamwise evolution of the vortex structure along the chord of the follower wing and into its wake. Different modes of vortex-follower wing interaction are created by varying both the spanwise and vertical locations of the leader wing. These modes are defined by differences in the number and locations of critical points of the flow topology, and involve bifurcation, attenuation, and mutual induction. The bifurcation and attenuation modes decrease the strength of the tip vortex from the follower wing. In contrast, the mutual induction mode increases the strength of the follower tip vortex. AFOSR.

  7. Vortex dynamics in nonrelativistic Abelian Higgs model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozhevnikov, A. A.

    2015-11-01

    The dynamics of the gauge vortex with arbitrary form of a contour is considered in the framework of the nonrelativistic Abelian Higgs model, including the possibility of the gauge field interaction with the fermion asymmetric background. The equations for the time derivatives of the curvature and the torsion of the vortex contour generalizing the Betchov-Da Rios equations in hydrodynamics, are obtained. They are applied to study the conservation of helicity of the gauge field forming the vortex, twist, and writhe numbers of the vortex contour. It is shown that the conservation of helicity is broken when both terms in the equation of the vortex motion are present, the first due to the exchange of excitations of the phase and modulus of the scalar field and the second one due to the coupling of the gauge field forming the vortex, with the fermion asymmetric background.

  8. Vortex diode jet performance and theory

    SciTech Connect

    Houck, E.D.

    1993-12-01

    Fluidics is the technology dealing with the use of a flowing liquid or gas in various devices for controls and fluid transfers. Existing fluidic technology transfers fluid at approximately the same rate as air lifts and jets. A vortex diode combined in parallel with a jet (vortex diode jet) produces significantly higher transfer rates` and retains the fluidic system advantages. This paper presents the proof of concept research and gives design parameters for the vortex diode jet. The goal of this research was to develop a vortex diode jet that would improve fluidic system transfer rates, and to develop and verify the,design equations. Proven design equations could then be used to design, and model vortex diode jet systems. This research has shown that vortex diode jets improve fluidic system transfer rate by up to 60 percent and can be modelled with the design equations.

  9. Vortex methods for separated flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalart, Philippe R.

    1988-01-01

    The numerical solution of the Euler or Navier-Stokes equations by Lagrangian vortex methods is discussed. The mathematical background is presented in an elementary fashion and includes the relationship with traditional point-vortex studies, the convergence to smooth solutions of the Euler equations, and the essential differences between two- and three-dimensional cases. The difficulties in extending the method to viscous or compressible flows are explained. The overlap with the excellent review articles available is kept to a minimum and more emphasis is placed on the area of expertise, namely two-dimensional flows around bluff bodies. When solid walls are present, complete mathematical models are not available and a more heuristic attitude must be adopted. The imposition of inviscid and viscous boundary conditions without conformal mappings or image vortices and the creation of vorticity along solid walls are examined in detail. Methods for boundary-layer treatment and the question of the Kutta condition are discussed. Practical aspects and tips helpful in creating a method that really works are explained. The topics include the robustness of the method and the assessment of accuracy, vortex-core profiles, timemarching schemes, numerical dissipation, and efficient programming. Calculations of flows past streamlined or bluff bodies are used as examples when appropriate.

  10. Modeling vortex swarming in Daphnia.

    PubMed

    Mach, Robert; Schweitzer, Frank

    2007-02-01

    Based on experimental observations in Daphnia, we introduce an agent-based model for the motion of single and swarms of animals. Each agent is described by a stochastic equation that also considers the conditions for active biological motion. An environmental potential further reflects local conditions for Daphnia, such as attraction to light sources. This model is sufficient to describe the observed cycling behavior of single Daphnia. To simulate vortex swarming of many Daphnia, i.e. the collective rotation of the swarm in one direction, we extend the model by considering avoidance of collisions. Two different ansatzes to model such a behavior are developed and compared. By means of computer simulations of a multi-agent system we show that local avoidance - as a special form of asymmetric repulsion between animals - leads to the emergence of a vortex swarm. The transition from uncorrelated rotation of single agents to the vortex swarming as a function of the swarm size is investigated. Eventually, some evidence of avoidance behavior in Daphnia is provided by comparing experimental and simulation results for two animals.

  11. Effect of Ripple Geometry on Vortex Generation, Ejection, and Strength in Oscillatory Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, H. D.

    2012-12-01

    and development of vortex tubes, along with the usual vortex cores. Swirling strength will also be used as a proxy for sediment-carrying capacity, allowing for the estimation of the location of sediment deposition as the vortex dissipates. Simulations will be evaluated with laboratory data available in the literature, and will include comparisons of the velocity, vorticity, and Reynolds stress. The simulations will then be extended into higher Reynolds and Keulegan-Carpenter number scenarios, where multiple ejection events may occur. Waves with varying degrees of skewness will also be considered to examine the effect of flow field acceleration on the vortex structures.

  12. ProFile Vortex and Vortex Blue Nickel-Titanium Rotary Instruments after Clinical Use.

    PubMed

    Shen, Ya; Zhou, Huimin; Coil, Jeffrey M; Aljazaeri, Bassim; Buttar, Rene; Wang, Zhejun; Zheng, Yu-feng; Haapasalo, Markus

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the incidence and mode of ProFile Vortex and Vortex Blue instrument defects after clinical use in a graduate endodontic program and to examine the impact of clinical use on the instruments' metallurgical properties. A total of 330 ProFile Vortex and 1136 Vortex Blue instruments from the graduate program were collected after each had been used in 3 teeth. The incidence and type of instrument defects were analyzed. The lateral surfaces and fracture surfaces of the fractured files were examined by using scanning electron microscopy. Unused and used instruments were examined by full and partial differential scanning calorimetry. No fractures were observed in the 330 ProFile Vortex instruments, whereas 20 (6.1%) revealed bent or blunt defects. Only 2 of the 1136 Vortex Blue files fractured during clinical use. The cause of fracture was shear stress. The fractures occurred at the tip end of the spirals. Only 1.8% (21 of 1136) of the Vortex Blue files had blunt tips. Austenite-finish temperatures were very similar for unused and used ProFile Vortex files and were all greater than 50°C. The austenite-finish temperatures of used and unused Vortex Blue files (38.5°C) were lower than those in ProFile Vortex instruments (P < .001). However, the transformation behavior of Vortex Blue files had an obvious 2-stage transformation, martensite-to-R phase and R-to-austenite phase. The trends of differential scanning calorimetry plots of unused Vortex Blue instruments and clinically used instruments were very similar. The risk of ProFile Vortex and Vortex Blue instrument fracture is very low when instruments are discarded after clinical use in the graduate endodontic program. The Vortex Blue files have metallurgical behavior different from ProFile Vortex instruments. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Optical vortex arrays from smectic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Son, Baeksik; Kim, Sejeong; Kim, Yun Ho; Käläntär, K; Kim, Hwi-Min; Jeong, Hyeon-Su; Choi, Siyoung Q; Shin, Jonghwa; Jung, Hee-Tae; Lee, Yong-Hee

    2014-02-24

    We demonstrate large-area, closely-packed optical vortex arrays using self-assembled defects in smectic liquid crystals. Self-assembled smectic liquid crystals in a three-dimensional torus structure are called focal conic domains. Each FCD, having a micro-scale feature size, produces an optical vortex with consistent topological charge of 2. The spiral profile in the interferometry confirms the formation of an optical vortex, which is predicted by Jones matrix calculations.

  14. Two-color interface vortex solitons

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Zhiyong

    2010-02-15

    We study the existence and properties of vortex solitons supported by an interface between two distinct optical lattices imprinted in nonlinear quadratic media. We analyze the impact of guiding parameters of lattices and phase mismatching conditions on the existence and stability of two-color interface vortex solitons. The salient point is that interface vortex solitons feature highly asymmetric profiles, and are stable throughout almost the entire existence domain.

  15. On the structure of the turbulent vortex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, L.

    1985-01-01

    The trailing vortex generated by a lifting surface, the structure of its turbulent core and the influence of axial flow within the vortex on its initial persistence and on its subsequent decay are described. Similarity solutions of the turbulent diffusion equation are given in closed form and results are expressed in sufficiently simple terms that the influence of the lifting surface parameters on the length of persistence and the rate of decay of the vortex can be evaluated.

  16. Quantum Kinematics of Bosonic Vortex Loops

    SciTech Connect

    Goldin, G.A.; Owczarek, R.; Sharp, D.H.

    1999-05-06

    Poisson structure for vortex filaments (loops and arcs) in 2D ideal incompressible fluid is analyzed in detail. Canonical coordinates and momenta on coadjoint orbits of the area-preserving diffeomorphism group, associated with such vortices, are found. The quantum space of states in the simplest case of ''bosonic'' vortex loops is built within a geometric quantization approach to the description of a quantum fluid. Fock-like structure and non-local creation and annihilation operators of quantum vortex filaments are introduced.

  17. Vortex Beams for Atomic Resolution Dichroism

    SciTech Connect

    Idrobo Tapia, Juan C; Pennycook, Stephen J

    2011-01-01

    Vortex beams carrying orbital angular momentum have been produced recently with electron microscopy by interfering an incident electron beam with a grid containing dislocations. Here, we present an analytical derivation of vortex wave functions in reciprocal and real space. We outline their mathematical and physical properties and describe the conditions under which vortex beams can be used in scanning transmission microscopy to measure magnetic properties of materials at the atomic scale.

  18. An investigation of counterrotating tip vortex interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majjigi, R. K.; Uenishi, K.; Gliebe, P. R.

    1989-01-01

    A tip vortex interaction model originally developed for compressors has been extended and adapted for use with counterrotating open rotors. Comparison of available acoustic data with predictions (made with and without the tip vortex model included) illustrate the importance of this interaction effect. This report documents the analytical modeling, a limited experimental verification, and certain key parametric studies pertaining to the tip vortex as a noise source mechanism for the unsteady loading noise of counterrotating properllers.

  19. New laser tracheal tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ungemach, Josef; Foth, Hans-Jochen; Hoermann, Karl; Preponis, E.

    1996-09-01

    The complication of a laser induced tube fire during surgery was first published in 1979. The protection of tracheal tubes against ignition is necessary to enable a safe laser surgery of the upper airway. in an experimental study a new compound tube was tested: this tube had a higher laser resistance than a pure metal tube. The damage threshold of this tube was tested against the emission of various lasers as CO2. The metal tube was damaged within seconds at CO2 laser power densities of 103 W/cm2 whereas the damage threshold of the compound tube was 3.106 W/cm2. We compared the compound laser tube to the so far used metal tube in a prospective clinical trial in our department of ENT in patients undergoing CO2-laser surgery of the upper airway. 66 patients were included into the study: 33 received the compound tube, 33 the metal tube. During endotracheal intubation the handling of the compound tube was better. During laser surgery high airway pressures occured more often with the metal tube. Whereas kinking was the problem of the compound tubes. Destruction of cuffs occured in both groups but did not cause any complications. No tube or cuff fire was noticed.

  20. EC Tube Fits

    SciTech Connect

    Kurita, C.H.; /Fermilab

    1987-03-03

    In the design of the EC, the beam tube, through which the beam line travels, can be found in the IH tube which is centrally located in the IH module. However, also between the beam tube and the IH tube lie both the vacuum and inner tubes of the vacuum and inner vessels. It is the vacuum between these vessels which provides insulation between the ambient beam tube and liquid argon in the cryostat. while the vacuum tube is supported along its length with the inner tube as best as possible, the inner tube will only be supported at the ends. The beam tube will also be end-supported, but it will be allowed to rest directly on the inner surface of the vacuum tube. It is required that the beam tube be able to slide in and out of the vacuum tube with relative ease in order that the EC's can be moved away from the CC when necessary (repair work, etc.). Although the frequency of such a move is not known, it is hoped to be low, and it would therefore be desirable, for cost reasons, to be able to use stock tubing for the vacuum and beam tubes instead of using specially machined tubing.

  1. Dynamic simulation of sphere motion in a vertical tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhaosheng; Phan-Thien, Nhan; Tanner, Roger I.

    2004-11-01

    In this paper, the sedimentation of a sphere and its radial migration in a Poiseuille flow in a vertical tube filled with a Newtonian fluid are simulated with a finite-difference-based distributed Lagrange multiplier (DLM) method. The flow features, the settling velocities, the trajectories and the angular velocities of the spheres sedimenting in a tube at different Reynolds numbers are presented. The results show that at relatively low Reynolds numbers, the sphere approaches the tube axis monotonically, whereas in a high-Reynolds-number regime where shedding of vortices takes place, the sphere takes up a spiral trajectory that is closer to the tube wall than the tube axis. The rotation motion and the lateral motion of the sphere are highly correlated through the Magnus effect, which is verified to be an important (but not the only) driving force for the lateral migration of the sphere at relatively high Reynolds numbers. The standard vortex structures in the wake of a sphere, for Reynolds number higher than 400, are composed of a loop mainly located in a plane perpendicular to the streamwise direction and two streamwise vortex pairs. When moving downstream, the legs of the hairpin vortex retract and at the same time a streamwise vortex pair with rotation opposite to that of the legs forms between the loops. For Reynolds number around 400, the wake structures shed during the impact of the sphere on the wall typically form into streamwise vortex structures or else into hairpin vortices when the sphere spirals down. The radial, angular and axial velocities of both neutrally buoyant and non-neutrally buoyant spheres in a circular Poiseuille flow are reported. The results are in remarkably good agreement with the available experimental data. It is shown that suppresion of the sphere rotation produces significant large additional lift forces pointing towards the tube axis on the spheres in the neutrally buoyant and more-dense-downflow cases, whereas it has a negligible

  2. The quasi-vortex-lattice method for wings with edge vortex separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pao, J. L.; Lan, E.

    1980-01-01

    The aerodynamic characteristics of wings with leading-edge vortex separation were predicted using a method based on a flow model with free vortex elements which are allowed to merge into a concentrated core. The calculated pressure distribution is more accurate than that predicted by methods with discrete vortex filaments alone. In addition, the computer time is reduced approximately by half.

  3. Point vortex modelling of the wake dynamics behind asymmetric vortex generator arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldacchino, D.; Ferreira, C.; Ragni, D.; van Bussel, G. J. W.

    2016-09-01

    In this work, we present a simple inviscid point vortex model to study the dynamics of asymmetric vortex rows, as might appear behind misaligned vortex generator vanes. Starting from the existing solution of the infinite vortex cascade, a numerical model of four base-vortices is chosen to represent two primary counter-rotating vortex pairs and their mirror plane images, introducing the vortex strength ratio as a free parameter. The resulting system of equations is also defined in terms of the vortex row separation and the qualitative features of the ensuing motion are mapped. A translating and orbiting regime are identified for different cascade separations. The latter occurs for all unequal strength vortex pairs. Thus, the motion is further classified by studying the cyclic behaviour of the orbiting regime and it is shown that for small mismatches in vortex strength, the orbiting length and time scales are sufficiently large as to appear, in the near wake, as translational (non-orbiting). However, for larger mismatches in vortex strength, the orbiting motion approaches the order of the starting height of the vortex. Comparisons between experimental data and the potential flow model show qualitative agreement whilst viscous effects account for the major discrepancies. Despite this, the model captures the orbital mode observed in the measurements and provides an impetus for considering the impact of these complex interactions on vortex generator designs.

  4. Numerical investigation of the vortex core precession in a model hydro turbine with the aid of hybrid methods for computation of turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sentyabov, A. V.; Gavrilov, A. A.; Dekterev, A. A.; Minakov, A. V.

    2014-12-01

    Numerical modeling of the unsteady flow in the draft tube of the test bench hydro turbine is conducted. The hybrid RANS-LES methods for modeling turbulent flows are compared. The intensity and frequency of pressure fluctuations, which are induced by the vortex core precession under the runner, and the integral characteristics are considered. An analysis of the synchronous and asynchronous parts of pressure fluctuations is done; the generating and influence of the synchronous component of fluctuations are considered. The vortex core interaction with the draft tube elbow is considered.

  5. Bender/Coiler for Tubing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoltzfus, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    Easy-to-use tool makes coils of tubing. Tubing to be bend clamped with stop post. Die positioned snugly against tubing. Operator turns handle to slide die along tubing, pushing tubing into spiral groove on mandrel.

  6. Leapfrogging of multiple coaxial viscous vortex rings

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, M. Lou, J.; Lim, T. T.

    2015-03-15

    A recent theoretical study [Borisov, Kilin, and Mamaev, “The dynamics of vortex rings: Leapfrogging, choreographies and the stability problem,” Regular Chaotic Dyn. 18, 33 (2013); Borisov et al., “The dynamics of vortex rings: Leapfrogging in an ideal and viscous fluid,” Fluid Dyn. Res. 46, 031415 (2014)] shows that when three coaxial vortex rings travel in the same direction in an incompressible ideal fluid, each of the vortex rings alternately slips through (or leapfrogs) the other two ahead. Here, we use a lattice Boltzmann method to simulate viscous vortex rings with an identical initial circulation, radius, and separation distance with the aim of studying how viscous effect influences the outcomes of the leapfrogging process. For the case of two identical vortex rings, our computation shows that leapfrogging can be achieved only under certain favorable conditions, which depend on Reynolds number, vortex core size, and initial separation distance between the two rings. For the case of three coaxial vortex rings, the result differs from the inviscid model and shows that the second vortex ring always slips through the leading ring first, followed by the third ring slipping through the other two ahead. A simple physical model is proposed to explain the observed behavior.

  7. Spin transport in tilted electron vortex beams

    SciTech Connect

    Basu, Banasri; Chowdhury, Debashree

    2014-12-10

    In this paper we have enlightened the spin related issues of tilted Electron vortex beams. We have shown that in the skyrmionic model of electron we can have the spin Hall current considering the tilted type of electron vortex beam. We have considered the monopole charge of the tilted vortex as time dependent and through the time variation of the monopole charge we can explain the spin Hall effect of electron vortex beams. Besides, with an external magnetic field we can have a spin filter configuration.

  8. ASRS Reports on Wake Vortex Encounters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, Linda J.; Taube, Elisa Ann; Drew, Charles Robert; Barclay, Tommy Earl

    2010-01-01

    ASRS is conducting a structured callback research project of wake vortex incidents reported to the ASRS at all US airports, as well as wake encounters in the enroute environment. This study has three objectives: (1) Utilize the established ASRS supplemental data collection methodology and provide ongoing analysis of wake vortex encounter reports; (2) Document event dynamics and contributing factors underlying wake vortex encounter events; and (3) Support ongoing FAA efforts to address pre-emptive wake vortex risk reduction by utilizing ASRS reporting contributions.

  9. Motion of a linear vortex singularity

    SciTech Connect

    Kiknadze, L.V.; Mamaladze, Y.G.

    1980-10-01

    A formula is obtained for the velocity of a certain element of a linear vortex in a Bose gas and in helium II in terms of the contribution made to the wave function by the remaining elements of the same wave vortex and of other perturbations of the ground state of the medium. It is shown that, besides the Magnus force, the vortex is acted upon by a force proportional to the condensate-density gradient and directed opposite to the gradient. A generalization is possible to linear vortex singularities of relativistic fields that do not describe any condensed medium at all.

  10. Leapfrogging of multiple coaxial viscous vortex rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, M.; Lou, J.; Lim, T. T.

    2015-03-01

    A recent theoretical study [Borisov, Kilin, and Mamaev, "The dynamics of vortex rings: Leapfrogging, choreographies and the stability problem," Regular Chaotic Dyn. 18, 33 (2013); Borisov et al., "The dynamics of vortex rings: Leapfrogging in an ideal and viscous fluid," Fluid Dyn. Res. 46, 031415 (2014)] shows that when three coaxial vortex rings travel in the same direction in an incompressible ideal fluid, each of the vortex rings alternately slips through (or leapfrogs) the other two ahead. Here, we use a lattice Boltzmann method to simulate viscous vortex rings with an identical initial circulation, radius, and separation distance with the aim of studying how viscous effect influences the outcomes of the leapfrogging process. For the case of two identical vortex rings, our computation shows that leapfrogging can be achieved only under certain favorable conditions, which depend on Reynolds number, vortex core size, and initial separation distance between the two rings. For the case of three coaxial vortex rings, the result differs from the inviscid model and shows that the second vortex ring always slips through the leading ring first, followed by the third ring slipping through the other two ahead. A simple physical model is proposed to explain the observed behavior.

  11. The Vortex of Burgers in Protoplanetary Disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrahamyan, M. G.

    2017-07-01

    The effect of a Burgers vortex on formation of planetesimals in a protoplanetary disc in local approach is considered. It is shown that there is not any circular orbit for rigid particles in centrifugal balance; only stable position in Burgers vortex under the influence of centrifugal, Coriolis, pressure gradient and Stokes drag forces is the center of vortex. The two-dimensional anticyclonic Burgers vortex with homogeneously rotating kernel and a converging radial stream of substance can effectively accumulate in its nuclear area the meter- sized rigid particles of total mass ˜1028g for characteristic time ˜106yr.

  12. Optical vortex phase-shifting digital holography.

    PubMed

    Guo, Cheng-Shan; Cheng, Xin; Ren, Xiu-Yun; Ding, Jian-Ping; Wang, Hui-Tian

    2004-10-18

    We report a new optical vortex phase-shifting method for digital holography, in which an optical vortex mode is taken as the reference beam for holographic recording, and the required phase shifts are directly generated by rotating the vortex mode. In digital reconstruction, the complex amplitude of the object wave can be retrieved by use of the conventional phase shifting algorithm on condition that the digital illumination beam is replaced by an vortex beam with the same topological charge as the reference used. Both the theoretical analysis and experimental results demonstrate the feasibility of this approach.

  13. Vortex dynamics investigation using an acoustic technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manneville, S.; Robres, J. H.; Maurel, A.; Petitjeans, P.; Fink, M.

    1999-11-01

    A new acoustic technique using the double time-reversal mirrors system and based on geometrical acoustics, is used to study a vortical flow. The interaction between the sound and a vortex is described in details. This technique has been applied to the study of a stretched vortex. This vortex is generated by stretching the vorticity of a boundary layer in a low velocity water channel. It is shown that the velocity field can be reconstructed from the phase distortion of an ultrasonic wave. The technique gives access to a complete characterization of the vortex dynamics, such as the temporal evolution of its size, its circulation and its position.

  14. The vortex structure of magnetic solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalev, A. S.

    2017-02-01

    Soliton excitations in the general form are considered using the classical model, in a two-dimensional easy-plane ferromagnet. Equations are derived and solved for small-amplitude two-parameter dynamic solitons. It is demonstrated that they have a vortex structure and that as their amplitude increases, the excitations turn into coupled quadrupole vortex states that are characterized by two dynamic parameters: the soliton velocity and its internal precession frequency. The limit transitions of vortex solitons in the general form into vortex dipoles, magnetic lamps, and magnon droplets, are analyzed. The obtained results are compared against the corresponding information about solitons in one-dimensional magnetic systems.

  15. Measurements of a supersonic turbulent vortex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metwally, O. M.; Settles, G. S.

    1988-01-01

    Mean-flow measurements of a supersonic turbulent streamwise vortex are presented. This vortex was produced by the injection of a swirling flow along the centerline of a supersonic airstream at Mach 3. Directional Mach number distributions, obtained via a five-hole flow-angularity probe, reveal vortex characteristics similar to those of the incompressible case, even though rotational Mach numbers up to 0.8 were obtained. This work is the first step of a study of the supersonic vortex breakdown phenomenon.

  16. Vectorial complex-source vortex beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlov, S.; Banzer, P.

    2014-08-01

    The scalar complex source vortex model is an accurate description of highly focused scalar vortices. We use it to construct a variety of vectorial solutions of Maxwell's equations describing highly focused and variously polarized vector vortex beams accurately. Three different families of optical vector vortex beams are presented and studied in detail. In this model, optical vortices derived within Cartesian symmetry correspond to circularly and linearly polarized highly focused vortex beams in the focus of a high numerical aperture focusing system. In addition, we report on vortical complex-source beams derived within cylindrical and spherical symmetries which exhibit very special and intriguing properties.

  17. Measuring vortex charge with a triangular aperture.

    PubMed

    de Araujo, Luís E E; Anderson, Matthew E

    2011-03-15

    A triangular aperture illuminated with a vortex beam creates a truncated lattice diffraction pattern that identifies the charge of the vortex. In this Letter, we demonstrate the measurement of vortex charge via this approach for vortex beams up to charge ±7. We also demonstrate the use of this technique for measuring femtosecond vortices and noninteger vortices, comparing these results with numerical modeling. It is shown that this technique is simple and reliable, but care must be taken when interpreting the results for the noninteger case.

  18. Tubing suspension system

    SciTech Connect

    Berner, P. C.; Brickman, E. L.

    1985-12-31

    A tubing suspension system for undersea well production operations employs a nonoriented tubing hanger having an inner body for supporting a tubing string and a landing collar for supporting the tubing hanger on a wellhead casing. The tubing hanger includes three co-operating concentric sleeve assemblies which are employed to lock and seal the tubing hanger to the wellhead housing. The outer sleeve assembly includes a locking actuator and a dual seal assembly and is separately retrievable from the remainder of the hanger assmebly. A nonorienting hydraulic set running tool is employed to run the tubing hanger, set the seals, lock the tubing hanger to the wellhead casing, retrieve either the outer sleeve assembly or the entire tubing hanger. The running tool includes a hydraulically controlled actuating sleeve which carries a latch dog assembly which locks with the tubing hanger.

  19. Investigation of the Vortex Tab. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffler, K. D.

    1985-01-01

    An investigation was made into the drag reduction capability of vortex tabs on delta wing vortex flaps. The vortex tab is an up-deflected leading edge portion of the vortex flap. Tab deflection augments vortex suction on the flap, thus improving its thrust, but the tab itself is drag producing. Whether a net improvement in the drag reduction can be obtained with vortex tabs, in comparison with plane vortex flaps of the same total area, was the objective of this investigation. Wind tunnel tests were conducted on two models, and analytical studies were performed on one of them using a free vortex sheet theory.

  20. Recent Laboratory and Numerical Trailing Vortex Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delisi, Donald P.; Greene, George C.; Robins, Robert E.; Singh, Raminder

    1996-01-01

    Results from two laboratory studies and two numerical studies are presented. In the first laboratory study, measurements of the strength of vortices from a three-dimensional (3-D) model wing are presented. The measurements follow the vortices as they evolve in time from a two-dimensional (2-D) line vortex pair to the development and migration of 3-D vortex rings. It is shown that the resulting vortex rings can contain up to 40 percent of the initial vortex circulation. Thus, the formation of vortex rings may not necessarily signal the end of the wake hazard to following aircraft. In the second laboratory study, we present the results of an experiment which shows how the spanwise drag distribution affects wake-vortex evolution. In this experiment, we modified the spanwise drag distribution on a model wing while keeping the total lift and drag constant. The results show that adding drag on or near the centerline of the wing has a larger effect than adding drag at or near the wingtips. These measurements complement the results of NASA studies in the 1970s. In the first numerical study, results of 3-D numerical calculations are presented which show that the vortex Reynolds number has a significant influence on the evolution and migration of wake vortices. When the Reynolds number is large, 3-D vortex rings evolve from the initially 2-D line vortex pairs. These vortex rings then migrate vertically. When the Reynolds number is lower, the transition of vorticity from 2-D to 3-D is delayed. When the Reynolds number is very low, the vortices never transition to 3-D, and the vertical migration is significantly reduced. It is suggested that this effect may have been important in previous laboratory wake-evolution studies. A second numerical study shows the influence that vertical wind shear can have on trailing vortex evolution.

  1. Rotating hot-wire investigation of the vortex responsible for blade-vortex interaction noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fontana, Richard Remo

    1988-01-01

    This distribution of the circumferential velocity of the vortex responsible for blade-vortex interaction noise was measured using a rotating hot-wire rake synchronously meshed with a model helicopter rotor at the blade passage frequency. Simultaneous far-field acoustic data and blade differential pressure measurements were obtained. Results show that the shape of the measured far-field acoustic blade-vortex interaction signature depends on the blade-vortex interaction geometry. The experimental results are compared with the Widnall-Wolf model for blade-vortex interaction noise.

  2. CFD Modelling of a Quadrupole Vortex Inside a Cylindrical Channel for Research into Advanced Hybrid Rocket Designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godfrey, B.; Majdalani, J.

    2014-11-01

    This study relies on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) tools to analyse a possible method for creating a stable quadrupole vortex within a simulated, circular-port, cylindrical rocket chamber. A model of the vortex generator is created in a SolidWorks CAD program and then the grid is generated using the Pointwise mesh generation software. The non-reactive flowfield is simulated using an open source computational program, Stanford University Unstructured (SU2). Subsequent analysis and visualization are performed using ParaView. The vortex generation approach that we employ consists of four tangentially injected monopole vortex generators that are arranged symmetrically with respect to the center of the chamber in such a way to produce a quadrupole vortex with a common downwash. The present investigation focuses on characterizing the flow dynamics so that future investigations can be undertaken with increasing levels of complexity. Our CFD simulations help to elucidate the onset of vortex filaments within the monopole tubes, and the evolution of quadrupole vortices downstream of the injection faceplate. Our results indicate that the quadrupole vortices produced using the present injection pattern can become quickly unstable to the extent of dissipating soon after being introduced into simulated rocket chamber. We conclude that a change in the geometrical configuration will be necessary to produce more stable quadrupoles.

  3. Torsion Tests of Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stang, Ambrose H; Ramberg, Walter; Back, Goldie

    1937-01-01

    This report presents the results of tests of 63 chromium-molybdenum steel tubes and 102 17st aluminum-alloy tubes of various sizes and lengths made to study the dependence of the torsional strength on both the dimensions of the tube and the physical properties of the tube material. Three types of failure are found to be important for sizes of tubes frequently used in aircraft construction: (1) failure by plastic shear, in which the tube material reached its yield strength before the critical torque was reached; (2) failure by elastic two-lobe buckling, which depended only on the elastic properties of the tube material and the dimensions of the tube; and (3) failure by a combination of (1) and (2) that is, by buckling taking place after some yielding of the tube material.

  4. Vortex generation in pulsatile flow through arterial bifurcation models including the human carotid artery.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, T; Homma, T; Harakawa, K; Sakata, N; Azuma, T

    1988-08-01

    Visualization experiments were performed to elucidate the complicated flow pattern in pulsatile flow through arterial bifurcations. Human common carotid arteries, which were made transparent, and glass-models simulating Y- and T-shaped bifurcations were used. Pulsatile flow with wave forms similar to those of arterial flow was generated with a piston pump, elastic tube, airchamber, and valves controlling the outflow resistance. Helically recirculating flow with a pattern similar to that of the horseshoe vortex produced around wall-based protuberances in circular tubes was observed in pulsatile flow through all the bifurcations used in the present study. This flow type, which we shall refer to as the horseshoe vortex, has also been demonstrated to occur at the human common carotid bifurcation in steady flow with Reynolds numbers above 100. Time-varying flows also produced the horseshoe vortex mostly during the decelerating phase. Fluid particles of dye solution approaching the bifurcation apex diverged, divided into two directions perpendicularly, and then showed helical motion representing the horseshoe vortex formation. While this helical flow was produced, the stagnation points appeared on the wall upstream of the apex. Their position was dependent upon the flow distribution ratio between the branches in the individual arteries. The region affected by the horseshoe vortex was smaller during pulsatile flow than during steady flow. Lowering the Reynolds number together with the Womersley number weakened the intensity of helical flow. A separation bubble, resulting from the divergence or wall roughness, was observed at the outer or inner wall of the branch vessels and made the flow more complicated.

  5. Experimental study of surface waves scattering by a single vortex and a vortex dipole.

    PubMed

    Vivanco, Francisco; Melo, Francisco

    2004-02-01

    Surface waves interacting with filamentary vortex offer an interesting tool to characterize static and dynamics of surface vorticity. An experimental study of the scattered wave by a single vortex as well as by a vortex dipole is reported. On a plane wave front, the vortex circulation introduces a spatial phase shift that gives rise to dislocated waves. Dislocations can be explained by the effect of the differential advection due to the vortex flow, on the propagating wave front. Both the Burgers vector of dislocations and the scattering cross section are measured in the deep water regime. The analogy between the wave-vortex interaction and the Aharonov-Bohm effect in quantum mechanics is explored by contrasting the Burgers vectors of dislocations as well as the form of the scattered wave in both cases. For the case of the hard core vortex, spiral waves are observed in agreement with theoretical works on both the Aharanov-Bohm effect and classical surface wave mechanics.

  6. The effect of tip vortex structure on helicopter noise due to blade/vortex interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, T. L.; Widnall, S. E.

    1978-01-01

    A potential cause of helicopter impulsive noise, commonly called blade slap, is the unsteady lift fluctuation on a rotor blade due to interaction with the vortex trailed from another blade. The relationship between vortex structure and the intensity of the acoustic signal is investigated. The analysis is based on a theoretical model for blade/vortex interaction. Unsteady lift on the blades due to blade/vortex interaction is calculated using linear unsteady aerodynamic theory, and expressions are derived for the directivity, frequency spectrum, and transient signal of the radiated noise. An inviscid rollup model is used to calculate the velocity profile in the trailing vortex from the spanwise distribution of blade tip loading. A few cases of tip loading are investigated, and numerical results are presented for the unsteady lift and acoustic signal due to blade/vortex interaction. The intensity of the acoustic signal is shown to be quite sensitive to changes in tip vortex structure.

  7. Pinch-off of axisymmetric vortex pairs in the limit of vanishing vortex line curvature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadri, V.; Krueger, P. S.

    2016-07-01

    Pinch-off of axisymmetric vortex pairs generated by flow between concentric cylinders with radial separation ΔR was studied numerically and compared with planar vortex dipole behavior. The axisymmetric case approaches planar vortex dipole behavior in the limit of vanishing ΔR. The flow was simulated at a jet Reynolds number of 1000 (based on ΔR and the jet velocity), jet pulse length-to-gap ratio ( /L Δ R ) in the range 10-20, and gap-to-outer radius ratio ( /Δ R R o ) in the range 0.01-0.1. Contrary to investigations of strictly planar flows, vortex pinch-off was observed for all gap sizes investigated. This difference was attributed to the less constrained geometry considered, suggesting that even very small amounts of vortex line curvature and/or vortex stretching may disrupt the absence of pinch-off observed in strictly planar vortex dipoles.

  8. Intelligent and mass vortex flowmeters

    SciTech Connect

    Ribolini, E.

    1996-02-01

    In nature, Karman vortices are quite common. For instance, they happen when an airstream flows past a mountain, house, pole, tower, or skyscraper, or, more simply, when it blows among branches of a tree. The typical spiral shape of these swirls is invisible because there is no tracing element, such as the clouds in the satellite photo. Also, the observation point is rarely above or below the plane of these classic spiral shapes. Or you can watch the alternating whirlpool train that a river or stream makes behind bridge piers. Regular Karman vortices form downstream of a bluff body along two distinct wakes: the vortices of one wake rotate clockwise, those of the other rotate counterclockwise. Close to the bluff body, the wake distance is always constant and depends on bluff body shape and dimensions. The distance between two adjacent vortices is also constant and independent of fluid parameters such as velocity, pressure, density, and temperature. Vortices interact with their surrounding space by stimulating or choking every other nearby swirl on the verge of birth and development. Two Karman vortices cannot be generated simultaneously, but only one at a time, alternately on the left and right side of the bluff body. The process works just like a fluidic flip-flop. This natural phenomenon can be created artificially by placing a trapezoidal, or similarly symmetrical, bar across the diameter of a pipe section. Parallelism of the internal walls of the pipe and the corners of the trapezoidal bar ensure stability of the separation point of the boundary layer. Consequently, the separation point of each vortex with respect to the bar remains stable and the vortex train is regular. If the fluid speed doubles, creation of swirls doubles while the small volume encompassed by each vortex remains constant. So, by counting the number of swirls passing a fixed point during a defined time interval, one can compute the total passed fluid volume. 3 figs.

  9. Simulations of Active Vortex Generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mansour, N. N.; Koumoutsakos, P.; Merriam, Marshal (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    We are interested in the study, via numerical simulations, of active vortex generators. Vortex generators may be used to modify the inner part of the boundary layer or to control separation thus enhancing the performance and maneuverability of aerodynamic configurations. we consider generators that consist of a surface cavity elongated in the streamwise direction and partially covered with a moving lid that at rest lies flush with the boundary. Streamwise vorticity is generated and ejected due to the oscillatory motion of the lid. The present simulations complement relevant experimental investigations of active vortex generators that have been conducted at NASA Ames Research Center and Stanford University used a piezoelectric device in water, allowing for small amplitude high frequency oscillations. They placed the lid asymmetrically on the cavity and observed a strong outward velocity at the small gap of the cavity. Saddoughi used a larger mechanically driven device in air to investigate this flow and observed a jet emerging from the wide gap of the configuration, contrary to the findings of Jacobson and Reynolds We are simulating the flows generated by these devices and we are conducting a parametric study that would help us elucidate the physical mechanisms present in the flow. Conventional computational schemes encounter difficulties when simulating flows around complex configurations undergoing arbitrary motions. Here we present a formulation that achieves this task on a purely Lagrangian frame by extending the formulation presented by Koumoutsakos, Leonard and Pepin (1994). The viscous effects are taken into account by modifying the strength Of the particles, whereas fast multipole schemes employing hundreds of thousands of particles allow for high resolution simulations. We shall present simulation results of an oscillating plate at various Reynolds numbers and Strouhal frequencies.

  10. Simulations of Active Vortex Generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mansour, N. N.; Koumoutsakos, P.; Merriam, Marshal (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    We are interested in the study, via numerical simulations, of active vortex generators. Vortex generators may be used to modify the inner part of the boundary layer or to control separation thus enhancing the performance and maneuverability of aerodynamic configurations. We consider generators that consist of a surface cavity elongated in the streamwise direction and partially covered with a moving lid that at rest lies flush with the boundary. Streamwise voracity is generated and ejected due to the oscillatory motion of the lid. The present simulations c Implement relevant experimental investigations of active vortex generators that have been conducted at NASA Ames Research Center and Stanford University. Jacobson and Reynolds used a piezoelectric device in water, allowing for small amplitude high frequency oscillations. They placed the lid asymmetrically on the cavity and observed a strong outward velocity at the small gap of the cavity. Saddoughi used a larger mechanically driven device in air to investigate this flow and observed a jet emerging from the wide gap of the configuration, contrary to the findings of Jacobson and Reynolds. More recently, Lachowiez and Wlezien are investigating the flow generated by an electro-mechanically driven lid to be used for assertion control in aerodynamic applications. We are simulating the flows generated by these devices and we are conducting a parametric study that would help us elucidate the physical mechanisms present in the flow. Conventional computational schemes encounter difficulties when simulating flows around complex configurations undergoing arbitrary motions. Here we present a formulation that achieves this task on a purely Lagrangian frame by extending the formulation presented by Koumoutsakos, Leonard and Pepin. The viscous effects are taken into account by modifying the strength of the particles, whereas fast multipole schemes employing hundreds of thousands ol'particle's allow for high resolution simulations

  11. Simulations of Active Vortex Generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mansour, N. N.; Koumoutsakos, P.; Merriam, Marshal (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    We are interested in the study, via numerical simulations, of active vortex generators. Vortex generators may be used to modify the inner part of the boundary layer or to control separation thus enhancing the performance and maneuverability of aerodynamic configurations. We consider generators that consist of a surface cavity elongated in the streamwise direction and partially covered with a moving lid that at rest lies flush with the boundary. Streamwise voracity is generated and ejected due to the oscillatory motion of the lid. The present simulations c Implement relevant experimental investigations of active vortex generators that have been conducted at NASA Ames Research Center and Stanford University. Jacobson and Reynolds used a piezoelectric device in water, allowing for small amplitude high frequency oscillations. They placed the lid asymmetrically on the cavity and observed a strong outward velocity at the small gap of the cavity. Saddoughi used a larger mechanically driven device in air to investigate this flow and observed a jet emerging from the wide gap of the configuration, contrary to the findings of Jacobson and Reynolds. More recently, Lachowiez and Wlezien are investigating the flow generated by an electro-mechanically driven lid to be used for assertion control in aerodynamic applications. We are simulating the flows generated by these devices and we are conducting a parametric study that would help us elucidate the physical mechanisms present in the flow. Conventional computational schemes encounter difficulties when simulating flows around complex configurations undergoing arbitrary motions. Here we present a formulation that achieves this task on a purely Lagrangian frame by extending the formulation presented by Koumoutsakos, Leonard and Pepin. The viscous effects are taken into account by modifying the strength of the particles, whereas fast multipole schemes employing hundreds of thousands ol'particle's allow for high resolution simulations

  12. Vortex metrology using Fourier analysis techniques: vortex networks correlation fringes.

    PubMed

    Angel-Toro, Luciano; Sierra-Sosa, Daniel; Tebaldi, Myrian; Bolognini, Néstor

    2012-10-20

    In this work, we introduce an alternative method of analysis in vortex metrology based on the application of the Fourier optics techniques. The first part of the procedure is conducted as is usual in vortex metrology for uniform in-plane displacement determination. On the basis of two recorded intensity speckled distributions, corresponding to two states of a diffuser coherently illuminated, we numerically generate an analytical signal from each recorded intensity pattern by using a version of the Riesz integral transform. Then, from each analytical signal, a two-dimensional pseudophase map is generated in which the vortices are located and characterized in terms of their topological charges and their core's structural properties. The second part of the procedure allows obtaining Young's interference fringes when Fourier transforming the light passing through a diffracting mask with multiple apertures at the locations of the homologous vortices. In fact, we use the Fourier transform as a mathematical operation to compute the far-field diffraction intensity pattern corresponding to the multiaperture set. Each aperture from the set is associated with a rectangular hole that coincides both in shape and size with a pixel from recorded images. We show that the fringe analysis can be conducted as in speckle photography in an extended range of displacement measurements. Effects related with speckled decorrelation are also considered. Our experimental results agree with those of speckle photography in the range in which both techniques are applicable.

  13. Low flow vortex shedding flowmeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waugaman, Charles J.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose was to continue a development project on a no moving parts vortex shedding flowmeter used for flow measurement of hypergols. The project involved the design and construction of a test loop to evaluate the meter for flow of Freon which simulates the hypergol fluids. Results were obtained on the output frequency characteristics of the flow meter as a function of flow rate. A family of flow meters for larger size lines and ranges of flow was sized based on the results of the tested meter.

  14. Investigation of Wake-Vortex Aircraft Encounters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Sonya T.

    1999-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration is addressing airport capacity enhancements during instrument meteorological conditions though the Terminal Area Productivity (TAP) program. The major goal of the TAP program is to develop the technology that will allow air traffic levels during instrument meteorological condition to approach those achieved during visual operations. The Reduced Spacing Operations (RSO) subelement of TAP at the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) will develop the Aircraft Vortex Spacing System (AVOSS). The purpose of the AVOSS is to integrate current and predicted weather conditions, wake vortex transport and decay knowledge, wake vortex sensor data, and operational definitions of acceptable strengths for vortex encounters to produce dynamic wake vortex separation criteria. The proposed research is in support of the wake vortex hazard definition component of the LaRC AVOSS development research. The research program described in the next section provided an analysis of the static test data and uses this data to evaluate the accuracy vortex/wake-encounter models. The accuracy of these models has not before been evaluated using experimental data. The research results also presented the first analysis of the forces and moments imparted on an airplane during a wake vortex encounter using actual flight test data.

  15. Photographic System Makes Path Of Vortex Visible

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Stephen B.; Szczepkowsky, Greg

    1993-01-01

    System making rapid flows visible developed to record track followed by ring vortex when encountering object near its path. Schlieren optical setup includes standard Z-configuration mirror arrangement and pulsed, synchronized source of light. System proves valuable in determining position, velocity, and acceleration of vortex as it passes over and interacts with object in its path.

  16. Vortex avalanches in a type II superconductor

    SciTech Connect

    Behnia, K.; Capan, C.; Mailly, D.; Etienne, B.

    1999-12-01

    The authors report on a study of the spatiotemporal variation of magnetic induction in a superconducting niobium sample during a slow sweep of external magnetic field. A sizable fraction of the increase in the local vortex population occurs in abrupt jumps. They compare the size distribution of these avalanches with the predictions of self-organized-criticality models for vortex dynamics.

  17. Obstacle-induced spiral vortex breakdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasche, Simon; Gallaire, François; Dreyer, Matthieu; Farhat, Mohamed

    2014-08-01

    An experimental investigation on vortex breakdown dynamics is performed. An adverse pressure gradient is created along the axis of a wing-tip vortex by introducing a sphere downstream of an elliptical hydrofoil. The instrumentation involves high-speed visualizations with air bubbles used as tracers and 2D Laser Doppler Velocimeter (LDV). Two key parameters are identified and varied to control the onset of vortex breakdown: the swirl number, defined as the maximum azimuthal velocity divided by the free-stream velocity, and the adverse pressure gradient. They were controlled through the incidence angle of the elliptical hydrofoil, the free-stream velocity and the sphere diameter. A single helical breakdown of the vortex was systematically observed over a wide range of experimental parameters. The helical breakdown coiled around the sphere in the direction opposite to the vortex but rotated along the vortex direction. We have observed that the location of vortex breakdown moved upstream as the swirl number or the sphere diameter was increased. LDV measurements were corrected using a reconstruction procedure taking into account the so-called vortex wandering and the size of the LDV measurement volume. This allows us to investigate the spatio-temporal linear stability properties of the flow and demonstrate that the flow transition from columnar to single helical shape is due to a transition from convective to absolute instability.

  18. An investigation of the vortex method

    SciTech Connect

    Pryor, Jr., Duaine Wright

    1994-05-01

    The vortex method is a numerical scheme for solving the vorticity transport equation. Chorin introduced modern vortex methods. The vortex method is a Lagrangian, grid free method which has less intrinsic diffusion than many grid schemes. It is adaptive in the sense that elements are needed only where the vorticity is non-zero. Our description of vortex methods begins with the point vortex method of Rosenhead for two dimensional inviscid flow, and builds upon it to eventually cover the case of three dimensional slightly viscous flow with boundaries. This section gives an introduction to the fundamentals of the vortex method. This is done in order to give a basic impression of the previous work and its line of development, as well as develop some notation and concepts which will be used later. The purpose here is not to give a full review of vortex methods or the contributions made by all the researchers in the field. Please refer to the excellent review papers in Sethian and Gustafson, chapters 1 Sethian, 2 Hald, 3 Sethian, 8 Chorin provide a solid introduction to vortex methods, including convergence theory, application in two dimensions and connection to statistical mechanics and polymers. Much of the information in this review is taken from those chapters, Chorin and Marsden and Batchelor, the chapters are also useful for their extensive bibliographies.

  19. Spectral stability of Taylor's vortex array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, S. P.; Tobak, M.

    1986-01-01

    In a global sense it is shown that the two-dimensional Taylor vortex array, an exact solution of the Navier-Stokes equation, is absolutely and monotonically stable with respect to infinitesimal disturbances of all discrete frequencies as long as the viscosity is positive. It is suggested that the Taylor vortex array may also be stable with respect to finite amplitude disturbances.

  20. Vortex motion on surfaces of small curvature

    SciTech Connect

    Dorigoni, Daniele Dunajski, Maciej Manton, Nicholas S.

    2013-12-15

    We consider a single Abelian Higgs vortex on a surface Σ whose Gaussian curvature K is small relative to the size of the vortex, and analyse vortex motion by using geodesics on the moduli space of static solutions. The moduli space is Σ with a modified metric, and we propose that this metric has a universal expansion, in terms of K and its derivatives, around the initial metric on Σ. Using an integral expression for the Kähler potential on the moduli space, we calculate the leading coefficients of this expansion numerically, and find some evidence for their universality. The expansion agrees to first order with the metric resulting from the Ricci flow starting from the initial metric on Σ, but differs at higher order. We compare the vortex motion with the motion of a point particle along geodesics of Σ. Relative to a particle geodesic, the vortex experiences an additional force, which to leading order is proportional to the gradient of K. This force is analogous to the self-force on bodies of finite size that occurs in gravitational motion. -- Highlights: •We study an Abelian Higgs vortex on a surface with small curvature. •A universal expansion for the moduli space metric is proposed. •We numerically check the universality at low orders. •Vortex motion differs from point particle motion because a vortex has a finite size. •Moduli space geometry has similarities with the geometry arising from Ricci flow.

  1. The modelling of symmetric airfoil vortex generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichert, B. A.; Wendt, B. J.

    1996-01-01

    An experimental study is conducted to determine the dependence of vortex generator geometry and impinging flow conditions on shed vortex circulation and crossplane peak vorticity for one type of vortex generator. The vortex generator is a symmetric airfoil having a NACA 0012 cross-sectional profile. The geometry and flow parameters varied include angle-of-attack alfa, chordlength c, span h, and Mach number M. The vortex generators are mounted either in isolation or in a symmetric counter-rotating array configuration on the inside surface of a straight pipe. The turbulent boundary layer thickness to pipe radius ratio is delta/R = 0. 17. Circulation and peak vorticity data are derived from crossplane velocity measurements conducted at or about 1 chord downstream of the vortex generator trailing edge. Shed vortex circulation is observed to be proportional to M, alfa, and h/delta. With these parameters held constant, circulation is observed to fall off in monotonic fashion with increasing airfoil aspect ratio AR. Shed vortex peak vorticity is also observed to be proportional to M, alfa, and h/delta. Unlike circulation, however, peak vorticity is observed to increase with increasing aspect ratio, reaching a peak value at AR approx. 2.0 before falling off.

  2. Spectral stability of Taylor's vortex array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, S. P.; Tobak, M.

    1986-01-01

    In a global sense it is shown that the two-dimensional Taylor vortex array, an exact solution of the Navier-Stokes equation, is absolutely and monotonically stable with respect to infinitesimal disturbances of all discrete frequencies as long as the viscosity is positive. It is suggested that the Taylor vortex array may also be stable with respect to finite amplitude disturbances.

  3. Vortex attraction and the formation of sunspots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, E. N.

    1992-01-01

    A downdraft vortex ring in a stratified atmosphere exhibits universal attraction for nearby vertical magnetic flux bundles. It is speculated that the magnetic fields emerging through the surface of the sun are individually encircled by one or more subsurface vortex rings, providing an important part of the observed clustering of magnetic fibrils to form pores and sunspots.

  4. Some aspects of streamwise vortex behavior during oblique shock wave/vortex interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smart, M. K.; Kalkhoran, I. M.; Popovic, S.

    An experimental study of the flowfield generated by the interaction of a streamwise vortex having a strong wake-type axial Mach number profile and a two-dimensional oblique shock wave was conducted in a Mach 2.49 flow. The experiments were aimed at investigating the dynamics of supersonic vortex distortion and to study downstream behavior of a streamwise vortex during a strong shock wave/vortex encounter. The experiments involved positioning an oblique shock generator in the form of a two-dimensional wedge downstream of a semi-span, vortex generator wing section so that the wing-tip vortex interacted with the otherwise planar oblique shock wave. Planar laser sheet visualizations of the flowfield indicated an expansion of the vortex core in crossing a spherically blunt-nose shock front. The maximum vortex core diameter occurred at a distance of 12.7 mm downstream of the wedge leading edge where the vortex had a core diameter of more than double its undisturbed value. At distances further downstream the vortex core diameter remained nearly constant, while it appeared to become more diffused at distances far from the wedge leading edge. Measurements of vortex trajectory revealed that the vortex convected in the freestream direction immediately downstream of the bulged-forward shock structure, while it traveled parallel to the wedge surface at distances further downstream. The turbulent distorted vortex structure which formed as a result of the interaction, was found to be sensitive to downstream disturbances in a manner consistent with incompressible vortex breakdown. Physical arguments are presented to relate behavior of streamwise vortices during oblique and normal shock wave interactions.

  5. Supersonic shock wave/vortex interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Settles, G. S.; Cattafesta, L.

    1993-01-01

    Although shock wave/vortex interaction is a basic and important fluid dynamics problem, very little research has been conducted on this topic. Therefore, a detailed experimental study of the interaction between a supersonic streamwise turbulent vortex and a shock wave was carried out at the Penn State Gas Dynamics Laboratory. A vortex is produced by replaceable swirl vanes located upstream of the throat of various converging-diverging nozzles. The supersonic vortex is then injected into either a coflowing supersonic stream or ambient air. The structure of the isolated vortex is investigated in a supersonic wind tunnel using miniature, fast-response, five-hole and total temperature probes and in a free jet using laser Doppler velocimetry. The cases tested have unit Reynolds numbers in excess of 25 million per meter, axial Mach numbers ranging from 2.5 to 4.0, and peak tangential Mach numbers from 0 (i.e., a pure jet) to about 0.7. The results show that the typical supersonic wake-like vortex consists of a non-isentropic, rotational core, where the reduced circulation distribution is self similar, and an outer isentropic, irrotational region. The vortex core is also a region of significant turbulent fluctuations. Radial profiles of turbulent kinetic energy and axial-tangential Reynolds stress are presented. The interactions between the vortex and both oblique and normal shock waves are investigated using nonintrusive optical diagnostics (i.e. schlieren, planar laser scattering, and laser Doppler velocimetry). Of the various types, two Mach 2.5 overexpanded-nozzle Mach disc interactions are examined in detail. Below a certain vortex strength, a 'weak' interaction exists in which the normal shock is perturbed locally into an unsteady 'bubble' shock near the vortex axis, but vortex breakdown (i.e., a stagnation point) does not occur. For stronger vortices, a random unsteady 'strong' interaction results that causes vortex breakdown. The vortex core reforms downstream of

  6. Origin of reversed vortex ratchet motion.

    PubMed

    Gillijns, W; Silhanek, A V; Moshchalkov, V V; Reichhardt, C J Olson; Reichhardt, C

    2007-12-14

    We experimentally demonstrate that the origin of multiply reversed rectified vortex motion in an asymmetric pinning landscape not only is a consequence of the vortex-vortex interactions but also essentially depends on the ratio between the characteristic interaction distance and the period of the asymmetric pinning potential. We study four samples with different periods d of the asymmetric potential. For large d the dc voltage V(dc) recorded under a ac excitation indicates that the average vortex drift is from bigger to smaller dots for all explored positive fields. As d is reduced, a series of sign reversals in the dc response are observed as a function of field. We show that the number of sign reversals increases as d decreases. These findings are in agreement with recent computer simulations and illustrate the relevance of the different characteristic lengths for the vortex rectification effects.

  7. Internal structure of a vortex breakdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, Y.; Leonard, A.; Spalart, P. R.

    1986-01-01

    An axisymmetric vortex breakdown was well simulated by the vortex filament method. The agreement with the experiment was qualitatively good. In particular, the structure in the interior of the vortex breakdown was ensured to a great degree by the present simulation. The second breakdown, or spiral type, which occurs downstream of the first axisymmetric breakdown, was simulated more similarly to the experiment than before. It shows a kink of the vortex filaments and strong three-dimensionality. Furthermore, a relatively low velocity region was observed near the second breakdown. It was also found that it takes some time for this physical phenomenon to attain its final stage. The comparison with the experiment is getting better as time goes on. In this paper, emphasis is placed on the comparison of the simulated results with the experiment. The present results help to make clear the mechanism of a vortex breakdown.

  8. Vortex ratchet induced by controlled edge roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerbu, D.; Gladilin, V. N.; Cuppens, J.; Fritzsche, J.; Tempere, J.; Devreese, J. T.; Moshchalkov, V. V.; Silhanek, A. V.; Van de Vondel, J.

    2013-06-01

    We demonstrate theoretically and experimentally the generation of rectified mean vortex displacement resulting from a controlled difference between the surface barriers at the opposite borders of a superconducting strip. Our investigation focuses on Al superconducting strips where, in one of the two sample borders, a saw tooth-like array of micro-indentations has been imprinted. The origin of the vortex ratchet effect is based on the fact that (i) the onset of vortex motion is mainly governed by the entrance/nucleation of vortices and (ii) the current lines bunching produced by the indentations facilitates the entrance/nucleation of vortices. Only for one current direction the indentations are positioned at the side of vortex entry and the onset of the resistive regime is lowered compared to the opposite current direction. This investigation points to the relevance of ubiquitous border effects typically neglected when interpreting vortex ratchet measurements on samples with arrays of local asymmetric pinning sites.

  9. Steady axisymmetric vortex flows with swirl and shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elcrat, Alan R.; Fornberg, Bengt; Miller, Kenneth G.

    A general procedure is presented for computing axisymmetric swirling vortices which are steady with respect to an inviscid flow that is either uniform at infinity or includes shear. We consider cases both with and without a spherical obstacle. Choices of numerical parameters are given which yield vortex rings with swirl, attached vortices with swirl analogous to spherical vortices found by Moffatt, tubes of vorticity extending to infinity and Beltrami flows. When there is a spherical obstacle we have found multiple solutions for each set of parameters. Flows are found by numerically solving the Bragg-Hawthorne equation using a non-Newton-based iterative procedure which is robust in its dependence on an initial guess.

  10. Hydroelectric System Response to Part Load Vortex Rope Excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alligné, S.; Nicolet, C.; Bégum, A.; Landry, C.; Gomes, J.; Avellan, F.

    2016-11-01

    The prediction of pressure and output power fluctuations amplitudes on Francis turbine prototype is a challenge for hydro-equipment industry since it is subjected to guarantees to ensure smooth and reliable operation of the hydro units. The European FP7 research project Hyperbole aims to setup a methodology to transpose the pressure fluctuations induced by the cavitation vortex rope on the reduced scale model to the prototype generating units. A Francis turbine unit of 444MW with a specific speed value of v = 0.29, is considered as case study. A SIMSEN model of the power station including electrical system, controllers, rotating train and hydraulic system with transposed draft tube excitation sources is setup. Based on this model, a frequency analysis of the hydroelectric system is performed to analyse potential interactions between hydraulic excitation sources and electrical components.

  11. Barotropic Vortex Evolution on a Beta Plane.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, Lloyd J.; Ooyama, Katsuyuki V.

    1990-01-01

    A barotropic, primitive equation (shallow water) model is used on the beta plane to investigate the influence of divergence, total relative angular momentum (RAM) and advective nonlinearities on the evolution of a hurricane-like vortex. The multinested numerical model is based on the spectral application of a finite element representation. The undisturbed fluid depth is taken to be 1 km. Scaling of the vorticity equation, in conjunction with a Bessel function spectral decomposition, indicates that divergence should have a very small effect on the hurricane motion. Simulations with an initially symmetric cyclonic vortex in a resting environment confirm this analysis, and contradict previous published studies on the effect of divergence in a barotropic model.During a 120 h simulation the cyclonic vortex develops asymmetries that have an influence far from the initial circulation. The total RAM within a large circle centered on the vortex decreases with time, and then oscillates about zero. For circles with radii 1000 km, the total RAM approaches, but does not reach, zero. An angular momentum budget indicates that the horizontal angular momentum flux tends to counteract the net Coriolis torque on the vortex. If the total RAM of the initial symmetric vortex is zero, the weak far-field asymmetries are essentially eliminated. The motion of the vortex is not, however, related to the RAM in any simple way.Within a few days the near-vortex asymmetries reach a near-steady state. The Asymmetric Absolute vorticity (AAV) is nearly uniform within 350 km of the vortex center. The homogenization of AAV, which occurs within the closed vortex gyre, is likely due to shearing by the symmetric wind, combined with removal of energy at the smallest scales. The homogenization effectively neutralizes the planetary beta effect, as well as the vorticity associated with an environmental wind.

  12. Terahertz circular Airy vortex beams.

    PubMed

    Liu, Changming; Liu, Jinsong; Niu, Liting; Wei, Xuli; Wang, Kejia; Yang, Zhengang

    2017-06-20

    Vortex beams have received considerable research interests both in optical and millimeter-wave domain since its potential to be utilized in the wireless communications and novel imaging systems. Many well-known optical beams have been demonstrated to carry orbital angular momentum (OAM), such as Laguerre-Gaussian beams and high-order Bessel beams. Recently, the radially symmetric Airy beams that exhibit an abruptly autofocusing feature are also demonstrated to be capable of carrying OAM in the optical domain. However, due to the lack of efficient devices to manipulate terahertz (THz) beams, it could be a challenge to demonstrate the radially symmetric Airy beams in the THz domain. Here we demonstrate the THz circular Airy vortex beams (CAVBs) with a 0.3-THz continuous wave through 3D printing technology. Assisted by the rapidly 3D-printed phase plates, individual OAM states with topological charge l ranging from l = 0 to l = 3 and a multiplexed OAM state are successfully imposed into the radially symmetric Airy beams. We both numerically and experimentally investigate the propagation dynamics of the generated THz CAVBs, and the simulations agree well with the observations.

  13. Majorana Fermions in Vortex Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Rudro R.

    2013-09-01

    We consider Majorana fermions tunneling among an array of vortices in a 2D chiral p-wave superconductor or equivalent material. The amplitude for Majorana fermions to tunnel between a pair of vortices is found to necessarily depend on the background superconducting phase profile; it is found to be proportional to the sine of half the difference between the phases at the two vortices. Using this result we study tight-binding models of Majorana fermions in vortices arranged in triangular or square lattices. In both cases we find that the aforementioned phase-tunneling relationship leads to the creation of superlattices where the Majorana fermions form macroscopically degenerate localizable flat bands at zero energy, in addition to other dispersive bands. This finding suggests that tunneling processes in these vortex arrays do not change the energies of a finite fraction of Majorana fermions, contrary to previous expectation. The presence of flat Majorana bands, and hence less-than-expected decoherence in these vortex arrays, bodes well for the prospects of topological quantum computation with large numbers of Majorana states.

  14. Majorana fermions in vortex lattices.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Rudro R

    2013-09-27

    We consider Majorana fermions tunneling among an array of vortices in a 2D chiral p-wave superconductor or equivalent material. The amplitude for Majorana fermions to tunnel between a pair of vortices is found to necessarily depend on the background superconducting phase profile; it is found to be proportional to the sine of half the difference between the phases at the two vortices. Using this result we study tight-binding models of Majorana fermions in vortices arranged in triangular or square lattices. In both cases we find that the aforementioned phase-tunneling relationship leads to the creation of superlattices where the Majorana fermions form macroscopically degenerate localizable flat bands at zero energy, in addition to other dispersive bands. This finding suggests that tunneling processes in these vortex arrays do not change the energies of a finite fraction of Majorana fermions, contrary to previous expectation. The presence of flat Majorana bands, and hence less-than-expected decoherence in these vortex arrays, bodes well for the prospects of topological quantum computation with large numbers of Majorana states.

  15. Vortex dynamics in R4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shashikanth, Banavara N.

    2012-01-01

    The vortex dynamics of Euler's equations for a constant density fluid flow in {R}^4 is studied. Most of the paper focuses on singular Dirac delta distributions of the vorticity two-form ω in {R}^4. These distributions are supported on two-dimensional surfaces termed membranes and are the analogs of vortex filaments in {R}^3 and point vortices in {R}^2. The self-induced velocity field of a membrane is shown to be unbounded and is regularized using a local induction approximation. The regularized self-induced velocity field is then shown to be proportional to the mean curvature vector field of the membrane but rotated by 90° in the plane of normals. Next, the Hamiltonian membrane model is presented. The symplectic structure for this model is derived from a general formula for vorticity distributions due to Marsden and Weinstein ["Coadjoint orbits, vortices and Clebsch variables for incompressible fluids," Physica D 7, 305-323 (1983), 10.1016/0167-2789(83)90134-3]. Finally, the dynamics of the four-form ω ∧ ω is examined. It is shown that Ertel's vorticity theorem in {R}^3, for the constant density case, can be viewed as a special case of the dynamics of this four-form.

  16. Generalized formulation of Brownian Vortexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moyses, Henrique; Bauer, Ross; Grier, David

    2013-03-01

    Brownian vortexes are stochastic noise driven machines that arise from the motion of particles subjected to static non conservative force fields. This motion is characterized by a toroidal circulation in the probability flux whose direction can be tuned by changing the temperature of the system. A discrete minimal model for Brownian Vortexes were described by previous work done by B.Sun, D.G.Grier and A.Y.Grosberg. Here we theoretically look for a continuous model in the form of a generalization of the equilibrium Boltzmann relation for the probability density in the case where the driven forces have a non conservative solenoidal component. This generalized relation features the temperature induced probability flux reversal. We further extend our theory to time dependent force fields and study the possibility of stochastic resonance in the characteristic frequency of circulation of the driven particle. This model is experimentally applied to investigate the motion of colloidal spheres in an optical trap whose intensity is oscillatory in time.

  17. The VORTEX coronagraphic test bench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolivet, A.; Piron, P.; Huby, E.; Absil, O.; Delacroix, C.; Mawet, D.; Surdej, J.; Habraken, S.

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, we present the infrared coronagraphic test bench of the University of Liège named VODCA (Vortex Optical Demonstrator for Coronagraphic Applications). The goal of the bench is to assess the performances of the Annular Groove Phase Masks (AGPMs) at near- to mid-infrared wavelengths. The AGPM is a subwavelength grating vortex coronagraph of charge two (SGVC2) made out of diamond. The bench is designed to be completely achromatic and will be composed of a super continuum laser source emitting in the near to mid-infrared, several parabolas, diaphragms and an infrared camera. This way, we will be able to test the different AGPMs in the M, L, K and H bands. Eventually, the bench will also allow the computation of the incident wavefront aberrations on the coronagraph. A reflective Lyot stop will send most of the stellar light to a second camera to perform low-order wavefront sensing. This second system coupled with a deformable mirror will allow the correction of the wavefront aberrations. We also aim to test other pre- and/or post-coronagraphic concepts such as optimal apodization.

  18. PREFACE: Special section on vortex rings Special section on vortex rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukumoto, Yasuhide

    2009-10-01

    This special section of Fluid Dynamics Research includes five articles on vortex rings in both classical and quantum fluids. The leading scientists of the field describe the trends in and the state-of-the-art development of experiments, theories and numerical simulations of vortex rings. The year 2008 was the 150th anniversary of 'vortex motion' since Hermann von Helmholtz opened up this field. In 1858, Helmholtz published a paper in Crelle's Journal which put forward the concept of 'vorticity' and made the first analysis of vortex motion. Fluid mechanics before that was limited to irrotational motion. In the absence of vorticity, the motion of an incompressible homogeneous fluid is virtually equivalent to a rigid-body motion in the sense that the fluid motion is determined once the boundary configuration is specified. Helmholtz proved, among other things, that, without viscosity, a vortex line is frozen into the fluid. This Helmholtz's law immediately implies the preservation of knots and links of vortex lines and its implication is enormous. One of the major trends of fluid mechanics since the latter half of the 20th century is to clarify the topological meaning of Helmholtz's law and to exploit it to develop theoretical and numerical methods to find the solutions of the Euler equations and to develop experimental techniques to gain an insight into fluid motion. Vortex rings are prominent coherent structures in a variety of fluid motions from the microscopic scale, through human and mesoscale to astrophysical scales, and have attracted people's interest. The late professor Philip G Saffman (1981) emphasized the significance of studies on vortex rings. One particular motion exemplifies the whole range of problems of vortex motion and is also a commonly known phenomenon, namely the vortex ring or smoke ring. Vortex rings are easily produced by dropping drops of one liquid into another, or by puffing fluid out of a hole, or by exhaling smoke if one has the skill

  19. Glass tube splitting tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, J. A.; Murray, C. D.; Stein, J. A.

    1971-01-01

    Tool accurately splits glass tubing so cuts are aligned 180 deg apart and reassembled tube forms low pressure, gastight enclosure. Device should interest industries using cylindrical closed glass containers.

  20. Eustachian tube (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... are more common in children because their eustachian tubes are shorter, narrower, and more horizontal than in ... become trapped when the tissue of the eustachian tube becomes swollen from colds or allergies. Bacteria trapped ...

  1. Neural Tube Defects

    MedlinePlus

    Neural tube defects are birth defects of the brain, spine, or spinal cord. They happen in the first month ... she is pregnant. The two most common neural tube defects are spina bifida and anencephaly. In spina ...

  2. PEG tube insertion -- discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... shower or bathe. Keeping the PEG-tube in Place If the feeding tube comes out, the stoma ... eds. Pfenninger and Fowler's Procedures for Primary Care . 3rd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; 2011:chap 100. ...

  3. Feeding tube - infants

    MedlinePlus

    ... NG - infants Images Feeding tube References Kim YS. Nasogastric and nasoenteric tube insertion. In: Pfenninger JL, Fowler GC, eds. Pfenninger and Fowler's Procedures for Primary Care . 3rd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; 2011:chap ...

  4. Eustachian tube patency

    MedlinePlus

    ... refers to how much the eustachian tube is open. The eustachian tube runs between the middle ear and the throat. It controls the pressure behind the eardrum and middle ear space. This helps keep the middle ear free of ...

  5. Fluid entrainment by isolated vortex rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabiri, John O.; Gharib, Morteza

    2004-07-01

    Of particular importance to the development of models for isolated vortex ring dynamics in a real fluid is knowledge of ambient fluid entrainment by the ring. This time-dependent process dictates changes in the volume of fluid that must share impulse delivered by the vortex ring generator. Therefore fluid entrainment is also of immediate significance to the unsteady forces that arise due to the presence of vortex rings in starting flows. Applications ranging from industrial and transportation, to animal locomotion and cardiac flows, are currently being investigated to understand the dynamical role of the observed vortex ring structures. Despite this growing interest, fully empirical measurements of fluid entrainment by isolated vortex rings have remained elusive. The primary difficulties arise in defining the unsteady boundary of the ring, as well as an inability to maintain the vortex ring in the test section sufficiently long to facilitate measurements. We present a new technique for entrainment measurement that utilizes a coaxial counter-flow to retard translation of vortex rings generated from a piston cylinder apparatus, so that their growth due to fluid entrainment can be observed. Instantaneous streamlines of the flow are used to determine the unsteady vortex ring boundary and compute ambient fluid entrainment. Measurements indicate that the entrainment process does not promote self-similar vortex ring growth, but instead consists of a rapid convection-based entrainment phase during ring formation, followed by a slower diffusive mechanism that entrains ambient fluid into the isolated vortex ring. Entrained fluid typically constitutes 30% to 40% of the total volume of fluid carried with the vortex ring. Various counter-flow protocols were used to substantially manipulate the diffusive entrainment process, producing rings with entrained fluid fractions up to 65%. Measurements of vortex ring growth rate and vorticity distribution during diffusive entrainment

  6. Vortex-induced vibrations of a sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govardhan, R. N.; Williamson, C. H. K.

    2005-05-01

    There are many studies on the vortex-induced vibrations of a cylindrical body, but almost none concerned with such vibrations for a sphere, despite the fact that tethered bodies are a common configuration. In this paper, we study the dynamics of an elastically mounted or tethered sphere in a steady flow, employing displacement, force and vorticity measurements. Within a particular range of flow speeds, where the oscillation frequency (f) is of the order of the static-body vortex shedding frequency (f_{vo}), there exist two modes of periodic large-amplitude oscillation, defined as modes I and II, separated by a transition regime exhibiting non-periodic vibration. The dominant wake structure for both modes is a chain of streamwise vortex loops on alternating sides of the wake. Further downstream, the heads of the vortex loops pinch off to form a sequence of vortex rings. We employ an analogy with the lift on an aircraft that is associated with its trailing vortex pair (of strength Gamma(*) and spacing b(*) ), and thereby compute the rate of change of impulse for the streamwise vortex pair, yielding the vortex force coefficient (cvortex): [ cvortex = {8}/{pi} {U^*_{v}}b^*( - Gamma^*). ] This calculation yields predicted forces in reasonable agreement with direct measurements on the sphere. This is significant because it indicates that the principal vorticity dynamics giving rise to vortex-induced vibration for a sphere are the motions of these streamwise vortex pairs. The Griffin plot, showing peak amplitudes as a function of the mass damping (m(*zeta) ), exhibits a good collapse of data, indicating a maximum response of around 0.9 diameters. Following recent studies of cylinder vortex-induced vibration, we deduce the existence of a critical mass ratio, m(*_{crit}) {≈} 0.6, below which large-amplitude vibrations are predicted to persist to infinite normalized velocities. An unexpected large-amplitude and highly periodic mode (mode III) is found at distinctly higher

  7. Guide tube flow diffuser

    SciTech Connect

    Berringer, R.T.; Myron, D.L.

    1980-11-04

    A nuclear reactor upper internal guide tube has a flow diffuser integral with its bottom end. The guide tube provides guidance for control rods during their ascent or descent from the reactor core. The flow diffuser serves to divert the upward flow of reactor coolant around the outside of the guide tube thereby limiting the amount of coolant flow and turbulence within the guide tube, thus enhancing the ease of movement of the control rods.

  8. Microhole Tubing Bending Report

    DOE Data Explorer

    Oglesby, Ken

    2012-01-01

    A downhole tubing bending study was made and is reported herein. IT contains a report and 2 excel spreadsheets to calculate tubing bending and to estimate contact points of the tubing to the drilled hole wall (creating a new support point).

  9. 1992 tubing tables

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    This paper is helpful to those designing oil well completions or purchasing tubing with proprietary or premium connections. Tables contain specifications and application data for over 100 different tubing joints, including those used with fiberglass pipe. The tables this year contain dimensional and performance data for coiled tubing.

  10. Vortex-Vortex Interactions for the Maintenance of Blocking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, A.; Itoh, H.

    2012-12-01

    A new eddy-feedback mechanism, the Selective Absorption Mechanism (SAM), is proposed to explain block maintenance. According to this mechanism, which is based on vortex-vortex interactions (i.e., the interactions between a blocking anticyclone and synoptic eddies with the same polarity), a blocking anticyclone actively and selectively absorbs synoptic anticyclones (strictly, air parcels with low potential vorticity). The blocking anticyclone, which is thus supplied with low potential vorticity of the synoptic anticyclones, can subsist for a prolonged period, withstanding dissipation. The SAM was verified in a case study through trajectory analysis. Ten actual cases of blocking were examined. Trajectories were calculated by tracing parcels originating from synoptic anticyclones and cyclones located upstream of the blocking. Parcels starting from anticyclones were attracted to and absorbed by the blocking anticyclone, whereas parcels from cyclones were repelled by the blocking anticyclone and attracted to the blocking cyclone, if one was present. Numerical experiments are also performed. The experiments were based on the nonlinear equivalent-barotropic potential vorticity equation, with varying conditions with respect to the shape and amplitude of blocking, the characteristics of stormtracks (displacement and strength), and the characteristics of background zonal flow, to investigate whether the SAM is adoptable to real situations. The experiments indicate that the SAM effectively maintains blocking, independently of the above conditions. By applying a channel model on a beta-plane, numerical experiments were conducted using a uniform background westerly with a jet. Results show that the presence of a jet promotes the effectiveness of the SAM. Two spherical model experiments were also performed. In an idealized model, the SAM was as effective as the beta-plane model in explaining the maintenance of blocking. Moreover, a quantitative experiment showed that the SAM

  11. Nonlinear ion acoustic waves scattered by vortexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohno, Yuji; Yoshida, Zensho

    2016-09-01

    The Kadomtsev-Petviashvili (KP) hierarchy is the archetype of infinite-dimensional integrable systems, which describes nonlinear ion acoustic waves in two-dimensional space. This remarkably ordered system resides on a singular submanifold (leaf) embedded in a larger phase space of more general ion acoustic waves (low-frequency electrostatic perturbations). The KP hierarchy is characterized not only by small amplitudes but also by irrotational (zero-vorticity) velocity fields. In fact, the KP equation is derived by eliminating vorticity at every order of the reductive perturbation. Here, we modify the scaling of the velocity field so as to introduce a vortex term. The newly derived system of equations consists of a generalized three-dimensional KP equation and a two-dimensional vortex equation. The former describes 'scattering' of vortex-free waves by ambient vortexes that are determined by the latter. We say that the vortexes are 'ambient' because they do not receive reciprocal reactions from the waves (i.e., the vortex equation is independent of the wave fields). This model describes a minimal departure from the integrable KP system. By the Painlevé test, we delineate how the vorticity term violates integrability, bringing about an essential three-dimensionality to the solutions. By numerical simulation, we show how the solitons are scattered by vortexes and become chaotic.

  12. Phenomena, dynamics and instabilities of vortex pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, C. H. K.; Leweke, T.; Asselin, D. J.; Harris, D. M.

    2014-12-01

    Our motivation for studying the dynamics of vortex pairs stems initially from an interest in the trailing wake vortices from aircraft and the dynamics of longitudinal vortices close to a vehicle surface. However, our motivation also comes from the fact that vortex-vortex interactions and vortex-wall interactions are fundamental to many turbulent flows. The intent of the paper is to present an overview of some of our recent work concerning the formation and structure of counter-rotating vortex pairs. We are interested in the long-wave and short-wave three-dimensional instabilities that evolve for an isolated vortex pair, but also we would like to know how vortex pairs interact with a wall, including both two-dimensional interactions, and also the influence of the surface on the three-dimensional instabilities. The emphasis of this presentation is on physical mechanisms by which vortices interact with each other and with surfaces, principally from an experimental approach, but also coupled with analytical studies.

  13. Vortex Ring Interaction with a Heated Screen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Jason; Krueger, Paul S.

    2008-11-01

    Previous examinations of vortex rings impinging on porous screens has shown the reformation of the vortex ring with a lower velocity after passing through the screen, the creation of secondary vortices, and mixing. A heated screen could, in principle, alter the vortex-screen interaction by changing the local liquid viscosity and density. In the present investigation, a mechanical piston-cylinder vortex ring generator was used to create vortex rings in an aqueous sucrose solution. The rings impinged on a screen of horizontal wires that were heated using electrical current. The flow was visualized with food color and video imaging. Tests with and without heat were conducted at a piston stroke-to-jet diameter ratio of 4 and a jet Reynolds number (Re) of 1000. The vortex rings slowed after passing through the screen, but in tests with heat, they maintained a higher fraction of their before-screen velocity due to reduction in fluid viscosity near the wires. In addition, small ``fingers'' that developed on the front of the vortex rings as they passed through the screen exhibited positive buoyancy effects in the heated case.

  14. Topology of vortex-wing interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenna, C.; Rockwell, D.

    2016-10-01

    A trailing vortex incident upon a wing can generate different modes of vortex-wing interaction. These modes, which may involve either enhancement or suppression of the vortex generated at the tip of the wing, are classified on the basis of the present experiments together with computations at the Air Force Research Laboratory. Occurrence of a given mode of interaction is predominantly determined by the dimensionless location of the incident vortex relative to the tip of the wing and is relatively insensitive to the Reynolds number and dimensionless circulation of the incident vortex. The genesis of the basic interaction modes is clarified using streamline topology with associated critical points that show compatibility between complex streamline patterns in the vicinity of the tip of the wing. Whereas formation of an enhanced tip vortex involves a region of large upwash in conjunction with localized flow separation, complete suppression of the tip vortex is associated with a small-scale separation-reattachment bubble bounded by downwash at the wing tip.

  15. On cooperative instabilities of parallel vortex pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bristol, R. L.; Ortega, J. M.; Marcus, P. S.; Savas, Ö.

    2004-10-01

    We present a combined analytical and numerical study of the instabilities of a pair of parallel unequal-strength vortices. We extend the analyses of a vortex in an external strain field (Crow, AIAA J. vol. 8, 1970, p. 2172; Widnall et al., J. Fluid Mech. vol. 66, 1974, p. 35) to include the orbital motion of the vortex pair. For counter-rotating pairs, the classic Crow-type periodic displacement perturbations are unstable for all vortex strength ratios, with fastest-growing wavelengths several times the vortex spacing. For co-rotating pairs, the orbital motion acts to suppress instability due to displacement perturbations. Instabilities in this case arise for elliptic perturbations at wavelengths that scale with the vortex core size. We also examine the influence of a second vortex pair by extending Crouch's (J. Fluid Mech. vol. 350, 1997, p. 311) analysis. Numerical results from a spectral initial-value code with subgrid-scale modelling agree with the growth rates from the theoretical models. Computations reveal the nonlinear evolution at late times, including wrapping and ring-rejection behaviour observed in experiments. A pair of co-rotating Gaussian vortices perturbed by noise develops elliptic instabilities, leading to the formation of vorticity bridges between the two vortices. The bridging is a prelude to vortex merger. Analytic, computational and experimental results agree well at circulation Reynolds numbers of order 10(5) .

  16. Dynamics of Isolated Tip Vortex Cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennings, Pepijn; Bosschers, Johan; van Terwisga, Tom

    2014-11-01

    Performance of ship propellers and comfort levels in the surroundings are limited by various forms of cavitation. Amongst these forms tip vortex cavitation is one of the first appearing forms and is expected to be mainly responsible for the emission of broadband pressure fluctuations typically occurring between the 4th to the 7th blade passing frequency (approx. 40--70 Hz). These radiated pressure pulses are likely to excite parts of the hull structure resulting in a design compromise between efficiency and comfort. Insight is needed in the mechanism of acoustic emission from the oscillations by a tip vortex cavity. In the current experimental study the tip vortex cavity from a blade with an elliptic planform and sections based on NACA 662 - 415 with meanline a = 0 . 8 is observed using high speed shadowgraphy in combination with blade force and acoustic measurements. An analytic model describing three main cavity deformation modes is verified and used to explain the origin of a cavity eigenfrequency or ``vortex singing'' phenomenon observed by Maines and Arndt (1997) on the tip vortex cavity originating from the same blade. As no hydrodynamic sound originating from the tip vortex cavity was observed it is posed that a tip flow instability is essential for ``vortex singing.'' This research was funded by the Lloyd's Register Foundation as part of the International Institute for Cavitation Research.

  17. Microscale vortex laser with controlled topological charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xing-Yuan; Chen, Hua-Zhou; Li, Ying; Li, Bo; Ma, Ren-Min

    2016-12-01

    A microscale vortex laser is a new type of coherent light source with small footprint that can directly generate vector vortex beams. However, a microscale laser with controlled topological charge, which is crucial for virtually any of its application, is still unrevealed. Here we present a microscale vortex laser with controlled topological charge. The vortex laser eigenmode was synthesized in a metamaterial engineered non-Hermitian micro-ring cavity system at exceptional point. We also show that the vortex laser cavity can operate at exceptional point stably to lase under optical pumping. The microscale vortex laser with controlled topological charge can serve as a unique and general building block for next-generation photonic integrated circuits and coherent vortex beam sources. The method we used here can be employed to generate lasing eigenmode with other complex functionalities. Project supported by the “Youth 1000 Talent Plan” Fund, Ministry of Education of China (Grant No. 201421) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11574012 and 61521004).

  18. Zero-Gravity Vortex Vent and PVT Gaging System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downey, M. G.; Trevathan, J. T.

    1989-01-01

    Space Station and satellite reservicing will require the ability to vent gas on orbit from liquid supply or storage tanks and to gage liquid quantity under microgravity conditions. In zero gravity, (zero-g) the vortex vent is capable of venting gas from a tank of liquid containing gas randomly distributed as bubbles. The concept uses a spinning impeller to create centrifugal force inside a vortex tube within a tank. This creates a gas pocket and forces the liquid through a venturi and back into the tank. Gas is then vented from the gas pocket through a liquid detector and then out through an exhaust port. If the liquid detector senses liquid in the vent line, the fluid is directed to the low-pressure port on the venturi and is returned to the tank. The advantages of this system is that it has no rotating seals and is compatible with most corrosive and cryogenic fluids. A prototype was designed and built at the NASA Johnson Space Center and flown on the KC-135 zero-g aircraft. During these test flights, where microgravity conditions are obtained for up to 30 sec, the prototype demonstrated that less than 0.10 percent of the volume of fluid vented was liquid when the tank was half full of liquid. The pressure volume temperature (PVT) gaging system is used in conjunction with the vortex vent to calculate the amount of liquid remaining in a tank under microgravity conditions. The PVT gaging system is used in conjunction with the vortex vent to gage liquid quantity in zero or low gravity. The system consists of a gas compressor, accumulator, and temperature and pressure instrumentation. To measure the liquid in a tank a small amount of gas is vented from the tank to the compressor and compressed into the accumulator. Pressure and temperature in the tank and accumulator are measured before and after the gas transfer occurs. Knowing the total volume of the tank, the volume of the accumulator, the volume of the intermediate lines, and initial and final pressures and

  19. Vortex model of open channel flows with gravel beds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belcher, Brian James

    visualization. Under the specific conditions of a turbulent burst the fluid domain is organized as a braided flow of vortices connected by prime knot patterns of thin-cored flux tubes embedded on an abstract vortex surface itself having topology of a Klein bottle. This model explains observed streamline patterns in the vicinity of a strong turbulent burst in a gravel-bed river as a coherent structure in the turbulent velocity field. KEY WORDS: Open channel flow, turbulence, gravel-bed rivers, coherent structures, velocity distributions

  20. Investigation of trapped vortex combustion using hydrogen-rich fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zbeeb, Khaled

    The combustion process of a fuel is a challenging subject when it comes to analyze its performance and resultant emissions. The main task of this study is to optimize the selection of a hydrogen-rich fuel based on its performance and emissions. Computational Fluid Dynamics analysis is performed to test the combustion performance and emissions from the vortex trapped combustor when natural gas fuel (methane) is replaced with renewable and alternative fuels such as hydrogen and synthesis gas. Correlation graphs for the trapped vortex combustor performance and NOx, CO, and CO2 emissions for various types of fuels with different compositions and heat of combustion values were established. Methane, Hydrogen and 10 different syngas fuels were analyzed in this study using computational fluid dynamics numerical method. The trapped vortex combustor that represents an efficient and compact combustor for flame stability was investigated. The TVC consists of a fore body and two after body disks. These components are all encircled with a Pyrex tube. The purpose of the after body disks is to create the vortex wakes that will enhance the combustion process and minimize the NOx emissions. The TVC CFD model was validated by comparing the CFD model results using propane fuel with existing experimental results that were established in Rome, Italy. The static temperature distribution and NOx, CO emissions, combustor efficiency and total pressure drop results of the three dimensional CFD model were similar to the experimental data. Effects of H2/CO and H2/CH4 ratios and the mass fraction of each constituent of syngas fuels and Hydrogen-Methane fuel mixture on the TVC performance and emissions were investigated. Moreover, the fuel injector Reynolds number and Lower heating values for Methane, Hydrogen and 10 syngas fuels on the TVC performance and emissions were also investigated. Correlation plots for the NOx, CO and CO2 emissions versus the fuel injector Reynolds number and lower

  1. Numerical simulation of precessing vortex core dumping by localized nonstationary heat source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porfiriev, Denis; Gorbunova, Anastasiya; Zavershinsky, Igor; Sugak, Semen; Molevich, Nonna

    2016-10-01

    The precessing vortex core (PVC) is a crucial structure for many technical devices with the heat release. For this purpose, we performed the 3D numerical simulations of PVC in the swirling flow created in the open tube with the paraxial nonstationary heat source. Power of the source was modulated by sinusoidal law. We showed that three turbulence models give the qualitatively similar dependences of PVC frequency and amplitude on the heat-source power. The numerical simulation demonstrated that the obtained PVC is a left-handed co-rotated bending single-vortex structure. For considered values of the swirl and mass flow rate, we obtained that, for wide range of modulation frequencies, the growth of the heat-source power leads to gradual increase in the PVC frequency and slow change in the amplitude of vortex core oscillations. However, for specific modulation frequency, which depends on the tube geometry, dependencies of the PVC frequency and the amplitudes of oscillations have distinct maximum and minimum. Which means that, under specific conditions, flow pattern changes dramatically and precession is almost dumped at the relatively low values of heat power.

  2. Vortex Clusters and Their Time Evolution in High- Reynolds-Number Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishihara, Takashi; Uno, Atsuya; Morishita, Koji; Yokokawa, Mitsuo; Kaneda, Yukio

    2016-11-01

    Time series data (with a time interval of 4τη) obtained by high-resolution direct numerical simulations (DNSs) of forced incompressible turbulence in a periodic box, with a maximum of 122883 grid points and Taylor micro-scale Reynolds numbers Rλ up to 2300, are used to study the vortex dynamics in high Reynolds number (Re) turbulent flows. Here τη is the Kolmogorov time scale. A visualization method to handle such large-scale data was developed for this study. In the high Re turbulence generated by the DNS, we observed the dynamics of tube-like vortex clusters of various sizes, which are constructed by strong micro vortices. For example, we observed the generation of the tube-like clusters of various sizes and the processes of their merging and breakdown. We also observed layer-like vortex clusters of the order of the integral length scale forming shear layers in the high Re turbulence. This research used computational resources of the K computer and other computers of the HPCI system provided by the AICS and the ITC of Nagoya University through the HPCI System Research Project (Project ID:hp150174, hp160102).

  3. Phase diagram of a lattice of pancake vortex molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Y.; Crisan, A.; Shivagan, D. D.; Iyo, A.; Shirage, P. M.; Tokiwa, K.; Watanabe, T.; Terada, N.

    2009-10-01

    On a superconducting bi-layer with thickness much smaller than the penetration depth, λ, a vortex molecule might form. A vortex molecule is composed of two fractional vortices and a soliton wall. The soliton wall can be regarded as a Josephson vortex missing magnetic flux (degenerate Josephson vortex) due to an incomplete shielding. The magnetic energy carried by fractional vortices is less than in the conventional vortex. This energy gain can pay a cost to form a degenerate Josephson vortex. The phase diagram of the vortex molecule is rich because of its rotational freedom.

  4. New scanning technique for the optical vortex microscope.

    PubMed

    Augustyniak, Ireneusz; Popiołek-Masajada, Agnieszka; Masajada, Jan; Drobczyński, Sławomir

    2012-04-01

    In the optical vortex microscopy the focused Gaussian beam with optical vortex scans a sample. An optical vortex can be introduced into a laser beam with the use of a special optical element--a vortex lens. When moving the vortex lens, the optical vortex changes its position inside the spot formed by a focused laser beam. This effect can be used as a new precise scanning technique. In this paper, we study the optical vortex behavior at the sample plane. We also estimate if the new scanning technique results in observable effects that could be used for a phase object detection.

  5. 21 CFR 868.5800 - Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff. 868.5800 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5800 Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff. (a) Identification. A tracheostomy tube and tube cuff is a device intended to be placed into...

  6. 21 CFR 868.5800 - Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff. 868.5800 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5800 Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff. (a) Identification. A tracheostomy tube and tube cuff is a device intended to be placed into...

  7. 21 CFR 868.5800 - Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff. 868.5800 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5800 Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff. (a) Identification. A tracheostomy tube and tube cuff is a device intended to be placed into...

  8. Effects of the Mach number on the evolution of vortex-surface fields in compressible Taylor-Green flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Naifu; Yang, Yue

    2016-11-01

    We investigate the evolution of vortex-surface fields (VSFs) in viscous compressible Taylor-Green flows. The VSF is applied to the direct numerical simulation of the Taylor-Green flows at a range of Mach numbers from Ma = 0 . 6 to Ma = 2 . 2 for characterizing the Mach-number effects on evolving vortical structures. We find that the dilatation and baroclinic force strongly influence the geometry of vortex surfaces and the energy dissipation rate in the transitional stage. The vortex tubes in compressible flows are less curved than those in incompressible flows, and the maximum dissipation rate occurs earlier in high-Mach-number flows perhaps owing to the conversion of kinetic energy into heat. Moreover, the relations between the evolutionary geometry of vortical structures and flow statistics are discussed. This work has been supported in part by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11522215 and 11521091), and the Thousand Young Talents Program of China.

  9. A vortex-filament and core model for wings with edge vortex separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pao, J. L.; Lan, C. E.

    1982-01-01

    A vortex filament-vortex core method for predicting aerodynamic characteristics of slender wings with edge vortex separation was developed. Semi-empirical but simple methods were used to determine the initial positions of the free sheet and vortex core. Comparison with available data indicates that: (1) the present method is generally accurate in predicting the lift and induced drag coefficients but the predicted pitching moment is too positive; (2) the spanwise lifting pressure distributions estimated by the one vortex core solution of the present method are significantly better than the results of Mehrotra's method relative to the pressure peak values for the flat delta; (3) the two vortex core system applied to the double delta and strake wings produce overall aerodynamic characteristics which have good agreement with data except for the pitching moment; and (4) the computer time for the present method is about two thirds of that of Mehrotra's method.

  10. Phase diagrams of vortex matter with multi-scale inter-vortex interactions in layered superconductors.

    PubMed

    Meng, Qingyou; Varney, Christopher N; Fangohr, Hans; Babaev, Egor

    2017-01-25

    It was recently proposed to use the stray magnetic fields of superconducting vortex lattices to trap ultracold atoms for building quantum emulators. This calls for new methods for engineering and manipulating of the vortex states. One of the possible routes utilizes type-1.5 superconducting layered systems with multi-scale inter-vortex interactions. In order to explore the possible vortex states that can be engineered, we present two phase diagrams of phenomenological vortex matter models with multi-scale inter-vortex interactions featuring several attractive and repulsive length scales. The phase diagrams exhibit a plethora of phases, including conventional 2D lattice phases, five stripe phases, dimer, trimer, and tetramer phases, void phases, and stable low-temperature disordered phases. The transitions between these states can be controlled by the value of an applied external field.

  11. On the Use of Vortex-Fitting in the Numerical Simulation of Blade-Vortex Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, G. R.; VanDalsem, William (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The usefulness of vortex-fitting in the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods to preserve the vortex strength and structure while convecting in a uniform free stream is demonstrated through the numerical simulations of two- and three-dimensional blade-vortex interactions. The fundamental premise of the formulation is the velocity and pressure field of the interacting vortex are unaltered either in the presence of an airfoil or a rotor blade or by the resulting nonlinear interactional flowfield. Although, the governing Euler and Navier-Stokes equations are nonlinear and independent solutions cannot be superposed, the interactional flowfield can be accurately captured by adding and subtracting the flowfield of the convecting vortex at each instant. The aerodynamics and aeroacoustics of two- and three-dimensional blade-vortex interactions have been calculated in Refs. 1-6 using this concept. Some of the results from these publications and similar other published material will be summarized in this paper.

  12. Contrasting vortex-gyration dispersions for different lattice bases in one-dimensional magnetic vortex arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Dong-Soo; Jeong, Han-Byeol; Kim, Sang-Koog

    2013-09-01

    We performed micromagnetic numerical and analytical calculations in studying the effects of change in the primitive unit cells of one-dimensional (1D) vortex arrays on collective vortex-gyration dispersion. As the primitive basis, we consider alternating constituent materials (NiMnSb vs. Permalloy) and alternating dimensions including constituent disk diameter and thickness. In the simplest case, that of one vortex-state disk of given dimensions and single material in the primitive cell, only a single branch of collective vortex-gyration dispersion appears. By contrast, two constituent disks' different alternating materials, thicknesses, and diameters yield characteristic two-branch dispersions, the band widths and gaps of which differ in each case. This work offers not only an efficient means of manipulating collective vortex-gyration band structures but also a foundation for the development of a rich variety of 1D or 2D magnonic crystals and their band structures based on dipolar-coupled-vortex arrays.

  13. Phase diagrams of vortex matter with multi-scale inter-vortex interactions in layered superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Qingyou; Varney, Christopher N.; Fangohr, Hans; Babaev, Egor

    2017-01-01

    It was recently proposed to use the stray magnetic fields of superconducting vortex lattices to trap ultracold atoms for building quantum emulators. This calls for new methods for engineering and manipulating of the vortex states. One of the possible routes utilizes type-1.5 superconducting layered systems with multi-scale inter-vortex interactions. In order to explore the possible vortex states that can be engineered, we present two phase diagrams of phenomenological vortex matter models with multi-scale inter-vortex interactions featuring several attractive and repulsive length scales. The phase diagrams exhibit a plethora of phases, including conventional 2D lattice phases, five stripe phases, dimer, trimer, and tetramer phases, void phases, and stable low-temperature disordered phases. The transitions between these states can be controlled by the value of an applied external field.

  14. Evaluation of travelling vortex speed by means of vortex tracking and dynamic mode decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyhlík, Tomáš

    2016-06-01

    The article deals with the analysis of unsteady periodic flow field related to synthetic jet creation. The analyses are based on the data obtained using ANSYS Fluent solver. Numerical results are validated by hot wire anemometry data measured along the jet centerline. The speed of travelling vortex ring is evaluated by using vortex tracking method and by using dynamic mode decomposition method. Vortex identification is based on residual vorticity which allows identifying regions in the flow field where fluid particles perform the rotational motion. The regime of the synthetic jet with Re = 329 and S = 19.7 is chosen. Both the vortex tracking and the dynamic mode decomposition based vortex speed evaluation indicate an increase in the vortex speed close to the orifice and then decrease with maximum reaching almost one and half of orifice centerline velocity. The article contains extended version the article presented at the conference AEaNMiFMaE 2016.

  15. Comparison of two vortex models of wind turbines using a free vortex wake scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, B. F.; Yuan, Y.; Wang, T. G.; Zhao, Z. Z.

    2016-09-01

    Developing suitably generalized models for rotor blade vortices that accurately predict their evolution continues to be a challenge for wind turbine analysts. During the past few decades, several vortex models have been developed according to the theoretical analysis and the experimental research. A comparison of two different vortex models is made for predicting wind turbine aerodynamic performance using a free vortex wake (FVW) model. The two models are the Lamb-Oseen vortex model for laminar vortices and the β-Vatistas model for turbulent vortices. A new formula that approximates parameter β, which represents the degree of turbulence in the β-Vatistas model, is proposed. The formula of parameter β is validated by comparison of simulated and measured aerodynamic performances of wind turbines of different blade tip vortex Reynolds numbers. Then, the induced velocity streamlines and the distribution of the axial velocity in the rotational plane are simulated. Also, the differences due to the vortex models are discussed.

  16. REACTOR COOLANT TUBE SEAL

    DOEpatents

    Morris, W.J.

    1958-12-01

    A plle-flattenlng control element and a fluid seal therefore to permit movement of the element into a liquld contnining region of a neutronlc reactor are described. The device consists of flattened, thin-walled aluminum tubing contalnlng a uniform mixture of thermal neutron absorbing material, and a number of soft rubber closures for the process tubes, having silts capable of passing the flattened elements therethrough, but effectively sealing the process tubes against fluld leaknge by compression of the rubber. The flattened tubing is sufficiently flexible to enable it to conform to the configuratlon of the annular spacing surrounding the fuel elements ln the process tubes.

  17. Telescoping tube assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturm, Albert J. (Inventor); Marrinan, Thomas E. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    An extensible and retractable telescoping tube positions test devices that inspect large stationary objects. The tube has three dimensional adjustment capabilities and is vertically suspended from a frame. The tube sections are independently supported with each section comprising U-shaped housing secured to a thicker support plate. Guide mechanisms preferably mounted only to the thicker plates guide each tube section parallel to a reference axis with improved accuracy so that the position of the remote end of the telescoping tube is precisely known.

  18. Pollen tube development.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Mark A; Kost, Benedikt

    2010-01-01

    Pollen tubes grow rapidly in a strictly polarized manner as they transport male reproductive cells through female flower tissues to bring about fertilization. Vegetative pollen tube cells are an excellent model system to investigate processes underlying directional cell expansion. In this chapter, we describe materials and methods required for (1) the identification of novel factors essential for polarized cell growth through the isolation and analysis of Arabidopsis mutants with defects in pollen tube growth and (2) the detailed functional characterization of pollen tube proteins based on transient transformation and microscopic analysis of cultured tobacco pollen tubes.

  19. Stable optical vortex solitons in pair plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Berezhiani, V. I.; Shatashvili, N. L.; Mahajan, S. M.

    2010-05-15

    It is shown that the pair plasmas with small temperature asymmetry can support existence of localized as well as delocalized optical vortex solitons. Coexistence of such solitons is possible due to peculiar form of saturating nonlinearity which has a focusing-defocusing nature--for weak amplitudes being focusing becoming defocusing for higher amplitudes. It is shown that delocalized vortex soliton is stable in entire region of its existence while single- and multicharged localized vortex solitons are unstable for low amplitudes and become stable for relativistic amplitudes.

  20. RANS computations of tip vortex cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decaix, Jean; Balarac, Guillaume; Dreyer, Matthieu; Farhat, Mohamed; Münch, Cécile

    2015-12-01

    The present study is related to the development of the tip vortex cavitation in Kaplan turbines. The investigation is carried out on a simplified test case consisting of a NACA0009 blade with a gap between the blade tip and the side wall. Computations with and without cavitation are performed using a R ANS modelling and a transport equation for the liquid volume fraction. Compared with experimental data, the R ANS computations turn out to be able to capture accurately the development of the tip vortex. The simulations have also highlighted the influence of cavitation on the tip vortex trajectory.

  1. Vortex motion behind a circular cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foeppl, L.

    1983-01-01

    Vortex motion behind a circular cylinder moving through water is discussed. It is shown that a pair of vortices form behind a moving cylinder and that their centers will move along a predictable curve. This curve represents an equilibrium condition which, however, is subject to perturbation. The stability of the vortex pair is investigated. Movement of the vortex pair away from the cylinder is calculated as an explanation of the resistance of the cylinder. Finally, the principles elaborated are applied to the flow around a flat plate.

  2. Improved Flow-Controlling Vortex Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Earl R., Jr.; Marner, Wilbur J.; Rohatgi, Naresh K.

    1989-01-01

    Symmetrical tangential streams control flow of radial primary streams. Vortex generator uses small secondary stream of fluid to control normally-larger primary stream. Improved version of vortex generator described in "Variable Control Port for Fluidic Control Device," (NPO-16603). Secondary, or control, flows entering tangentially through diametrically opposite ports set up swirling motion restraining primary flow. Pressure of secondary fluid in relation to primary fluid controlling factor. Like valve, vortex generator varies rate of flow of primary fluid from maximum value down to zero. When properly designed, requires low pressure differential between primary and secondary streams and expends relatively small amount of secondary fluid.

  3. All-electrical magnetic vortex array sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tannous, C.; Gieraltowski, J.

    2016-08-01

    Vortex sensing magnetometers based on arrays of soft magnetic dots are good candidates for high-resolution and accurate spatial magnetic-field estimation. When the arrays are laid out along different spatial directions they can perform tensor gradiometry allowing the measurement of field components and their spatial derivatives as a function of orientation. Detection is based on using spin-polarized currents to counteract vortex displacements or to excite vortex oscillation modes triggered by magnetic-field application. Sensor linearization, field detection range and conditions to obtain large sensitivity electronic compatibility and scalability are discussed.

  4. Vortex line in the unitary Fermi gas

    SciTech Connect

    Madeira, Lucas; Vitiello, Silvio A.; Gandolfi, Stefano; Schmidt, Kevin E.

    2016-04-06

    Here, we report diffusion Monte Carlo results for the ground state of unpolarized spin-1/2 fermions in a cylindrical container and properties of the system with a vortex-line excitation. The density profile of the system with a vortex line presents a nonzero density at the core. We also calculate the ground-state energy per particle, the superfluid pairing gap, and the excitation energy per particle. Finally, these simulations can be extended to calculate the properties of vortex excitations in other strongly interacting systems such as superfluid neutron matter using realistic nuclear Hamiltonians.

  5. Effects of disorder on the vortex charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lages, J.; Sacramento, P. D.

    2006-04-01

    We study the influence of disorder on the vortex charge, both due to random pinning of the vortices and due to scattering off nonmagnetic impurities. In the case when there are no impurities present, but the vortices are randomly distributed, the effect is very small, except when two or more vortices are close by. When impurities are present, they have a noticeable effect on the vortex charge. This, together with the effect of temperature, changes appreciably the vortex charge. In the case of an attractive impurity potential the sign of the charge naturally changes.

  6. Heat transfer, erosion and acid condensation characteristics for novel H-type finned oval tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Zhao, X.; Tang, G.

    2015-09-01

    Low efficiency of heat transfer, acid corrosion and erosion of economizers affect the economy and security in coal-fired power plants significantly. The H-type finned oval tube is proposed to alleviate these problems. Based on the H-type finned oval tube, we investigated three novel types of fins, including bleeding dimples, longitudinal vortex generators (LVGs), and compound dimple-LVG. We considered the three aspects together, and obtained the heat transfer, acid condensation rate and erosion loss. The results show that the tube bank with the new structured fins can improve the performance on the three aspects, and the compound dimple-LVG performs the highest comprehensive effect.

  7. Optical vortex converter with helical-periodically poled ferroelectric crystal.

    PubMed

    Tian, Linghao; Ye, Fangwei; Chen, Xianfeng

    2011-06-06

    A kind of optical vortex converter is proposed in helical-periodically poled ferroelectric crystal based on transverse electro-optics effect. It can be used to generate optical vortex from non-vortex beam and transform the topological charge of optical vortex. An optical vortex adder or substrator is proposed under the control of electric filed. This device will find its applications in high dimensional communication system for signal processing and optical manipulation in micro and mesoscopic scale.

  8. Interaction of a turbulent vortex with a lifting surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, D. J.; Roberts, L.

    1985-01-01

    The impulsive noise due to blade-vortex-interaction is analyzing in the time domain for the extreme case when the blade cuts through the center of the vortex core with the assumptions of no distortion of the vortex path or of the vortex core. An analytical turbulent vortex core model, described in terms of the tip aerodynamic parameters, is used and its effects on the unsteady loading and maximum acoustic pressure during the interaction are determined.

  9. Vortex Structures of Whistler Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaliznyak, Yu.; Davydova, T.; Yakimenko, A.

    Starting with two-dimensional nonlinear Scroedinger equation for a parallel electric field of spatially localized beam of whistler waves we investigate formation, evolu- tion and stability of nonlinear whistler waveguides (or ducts) which are frequently observed during heating active experiments in the ionosphere. When the generator frequency is close to the half of electron cyclotron frequency, one have take into ac- count the additional terms of the next order in the equation for the interpretation of existing experimental data. It is needed to use a full Maxwell's equation set to describe the propagation of whistlers and to account for the nonlinearity saturation at high val- ues of pump power. Nonlinear waveguides of vortex type (with topological charge 1, 2 and 3) are found and their stability properties are investigated by means of numerical simulations.

  10. Vortex generator for flow control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Jr., Earl R. (Inventor); Marner, Wilbur J. (Inventor); Rohatgi, Naresh K. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Fluidics flow control of a multiphase supply using a cylindrical chamber is achieved by introducing the supply flow radially into the chamber. The supply flow exits through a port in the center at the chamber. A control fluid is then introduced tangentially about 90.degree. upstream from the supply port. A second control fluid port may be added about 90.degree. upstream from the first control fluid port, but preferably two sets of supply and control ports are added with like ports diametrically opposite each other. The control fluid flows against the circular wall of the control chamber, which introduces a vortex in the flow of the supply flow that decays into a spiral path to the exit port in the center of the chamber. The control flow rate may thus be used to control the spiral path, and therefore the supply flow rate through the exit port.

  11. Optimal response of Batchelor vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco-Rodríguez, Francisco J.; Rodríguez-García, Jesús O.; Parras, Luis; del Pino, Carlos

    2017-06-01

    The optimal response of the Batchelor vortex is studied by considering the time-harmonically forced problem with frequency ω . High variance levels are sustained in this system under periodic forcing. The optimal response is largest when the input frequency is null in the axisymmetric case (m = 0). In addition, the axial flow does not play a relevant part in determining the optimal response. When considering helical modes |m | = 1 , perturbations are excited through a resonance mechanism at moderate and large wavelengths. At smaller wavelengths, a large response is excited by steady forcing. Regarding the axial flow, the response is largest when the axial velocity intensity is near to zero. For perturbations with larger azimuthal wavenumbers |m | > 1 , the magnitude of the response is smaller than those for helical modes. Therefore, studying the response for |m | > 1 is of no interest.

  12. Majorana fermions in vortex lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Rudro

    2013-03-01

    We consider Majorana fermions tunneling between vortices, within an array of such vortices in a 2D chiral p-wave superconductor. We calculate that the tunneling amplitude for Majorana fermions in a pair of vortices is proportional to the sine of half the difference between the global order parameter phases at the two vortices. Using this result we study tight-binding models of Majorana fermions in vortices arranged in a triangular or square lattice. In both cases we find that this phase-tunneling relationship leads to the creation of superlattices where the Majorana fermions form macroscopically degenerate `flat' bands at zero energy, in addition to other dispersive bands. This finding suggests that in vortex arrays tunneling processes do not change the energies of a finite fraction of Majorana fermions and hence brighten the prospects of topological quantum computing with a large number of Majorana states.

  13. Heat tube device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khattar, Mukesh K. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    The present invention discloses a heat tube device through which a working fluid can be circulated to transfer heat to air in a conventional air conditioning system. The heat tube device is disposable about a conventional cooling coil of the air conditioning system and includes a plurality of substantially U-shaped tubes connected to a support structure. The support structure includes members for allowing the heat tube device to be readily positioned about the cooling coil. An actuatable adjustment device is connected to the U-shaped tubes for allowing, upon actuation thereof, for the heat tubes to be simultaneously rotated relative to the cooling coil for allowing the heat transfer from the heat tube device to air in the air conditioning system to be selectively varied.

  14. Effects of draft tube on the hydraulic performance of a Francis turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, J. H.; Byeon, S. S.; Kim, Y. J.

    2013-12-01

    The draft tube is an important component of a Francis turbine which influences the hydraulic performance. It is located just under the runner and allowed to decelerate the flow velocity exiting the runner, thereby converting the excess of kinetic energy into static pressure. In this study, we have numerically investigated the hydraulic performance of a Francis turbine on the 15MW hydropower generation with various design parameters (three types of draft tube, thickness of guide vane) through a three-dimensional numerical method with the SST turbulent model. The vortex rope characteristics of the draft tube were confirmed. The results of the vortex flow fields and flow characteristics were graphically depicted with different design parameters and operating conditions.

  15. Direct numerical simulation of transitional flow in a staggered tube bundle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linton, D.; Thornber, B.

    2016-02-01

    A series of Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) of the flow through a staggered tube bundle has been performed over the range 1030 ≤ Rem ≤ 5572 to capture the flow transition that occurs at the matrix transition point of Rem ≈ 3000. The matrix transition is the point at which a second frequency becomes prominent in tube bundles. To date, this is the highest published Reynolds number at which a DNS has been performed on cross-flow over a tube bundle. This study describes the flow behaviour in terms of: the mean flow field, Strouhal numbers, vortex shedding, 3-D flow features, and turbulence properties. These results support the hypothesis that the transition in the vortex shedding behaviour at Rem ≈ 3000 is similar to that which occurs in single cylinder flow at the equivalent Reynolds number. The visualisations presented also demonstrate the nature of the shedding mechanisms before and after the matrix transition point.

  16. Vortex Dynamics in Anisotropic Superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steel, David Gordon

    Measurements of the ac screening response and resistance of superconducting Bi_2Sr _2CaCu_2O _8 (BSCCO) crystals have been used to probe the dynamics of the magnetic flux lines within the mixed state as a function of frequency, temperature, and applied dc field. For the particular range of temperature and magnetic field in which measurements were made, the systematic behavior of the observed dissipation peak in the screening response is consistent with electromagnetic skin size effects rather than a phase transition. According to microscopic theories of the interaction between the flux lines and a driving ac field, such a skin size effect is expected for the case when the vortex motion is diffusive in nature. However, diffusive motion is inconsistent with simple activation models that use a single value for the pinning energy (derived from direct measurement of the dc resistance). This contradiction suggests a distribution of pinning energies within the sample. Interlayer vortex decoupling has been directly observed as a function of temperature and applied magnetic field using electronic transport perpendicular to the layers in synthetic amorphous MoGe/Ge multilayer samples. Perpendicular transport has been shown to be a far more sensitive measure of the phase coupling between layers than in-plane properties. Below the decoupling temperature T_{D} the resistivity anisotropy collapses and striking nonlinearities appear in the perpendicular current-voltage behavior, which are not observed in parallel transport. A crossover in behavior is also observed at a field H _{x}, in accordance with theory. The data suggest the presence of a phase transition into a state with finite in-plane resistivity. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, Rm. 14-0551, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307. Ph. 617-253-5668; Fax 617-253-1690.).

  17. An eddy-covariance system with an innovative vortex intake for measuring carbon dioxide and water fluxes of ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jingyong; Zha, Tianshan; Jia, Xin; Sargent, Steve; Burgon, Rex; Bourque, Charles P.-A.; Zhou, Xinhua; Liu, Peng; Bai, Yujie; Wu, Yajuan

    2017-03-01

    Closed-path eddy-covariance (EC) systems are used to monitor exchanges of trace gases (e.g., carbon dioxide [CO2], water vapor [H2O], nitrous oxide and methane) between the atmosphere and biosphere. Traditional EC-intake systems are equipped with inline filters to prevent airborne dust particulate from contaminating the optical windows of the sample cell which causes measurement degradation. The inline filter should have a fine pore size (1 to 20 µm is common) to adequately protect the optics and a large filtration surface area to extend the time before it clogs. However, the filter must also have minimal internal volume to preserve good frequency response. This paper reports test results of the field performance of an EC system (EC155, Campbell Scientific, Inc., Logan Utah, USA) with a prototype vortex intake replacing the inline filter of a traditional EC system. The vortex-intake design is based on fluid dynamics theory. An air sample is drawn into the vortex chamber, where it spins in a vortex flow. The initially homogenous flow is separated when particle momentum forces heavier particles to the periphery of the chamber, leaving a much cleaner airstream at the center. Clean air (75 % of total flow) is drawn from the center of the vortex chamber, through a tube, to the sample cell where it is exposed to the optical windows of the gas analyzer. The remaining 25 % of the flow carries the heavier dust particles away through a separate bypass tube. An EC155 system measured CO2 and H2O fluxes in two urban-forest ecosystems in the megalopolis of Beijing, China. These sites present a challenge for EC measurements because of the generally poor air quality which has high concentrations of suspended particulate. The closed-path EC system with vortex intake significantly reduced maintenance requirements by preserving optical signal strength and sample-cell pressure within acceptable ranges for much longer periods. The system with vortex intake also maintained an excellent

  18. Scattering of a vortex pair by a single quantum vortex in a Bose-Einstein condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, L. A.; Smirnov, A. I.; Mironov, V. A.

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the scattering of vortex pairs (the particular case of 2D dark solitons) by a single quantum vortex in a Bose-Einstein condensate with repulsive interaction between atoms. For this purpose, an asymptotic theory describing the dynamics of such 2D soliton-like formations in an arbitrary smoothly nonuniform flow of a ultracold Bose gas is developed. Disregarding the radiation loss associated with acoustic wave emission, we demonstrate that vortex-antivortex pairs can be put in correspondence with quasiparticles, and their behavior can be described by canonical Hamilton equations. For these equations, we determine the integrals of motion that can be used to classify various regimes of scattering of vortex pairs by a single quantum vortex. Theoretical constructions are confirmed by numerical calculations performed directly in terms of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation. We propose a method for estimating the radiation loss in a collision of a soliton-like formation with a phase singularity. It is shown by direct numerical simulation that under certain conditions, the interaction of vortex pairs with a core of a single quantum vortex is accompanied by quite intense acoustic wave emission; as a result, the conditions for applicability of the asymptotic theory developed here are violated. In particular, it is visually demonstrated by a specific example how radiation losses lead to a transformation of a vortex-antivortex pair into a vortex-free 2D dark soliton (i.e., to the annihilation of phase singularities).

  19. Nested contour-dynamic models for axisymmetric vortex rings and vortex wakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Farrell, Clara; Dabiri, John O.

    2013-11-01

    Jetting swimmers, such as squid and jellyfish, propel themselves by forming vortex rings. It is known that vortex rings cannot grow indefinitely, but rather ``pinch off'' once they reach their physical limit, and that a decrease in efficiency of fluid transport is associated with pinch-off. Previously, the Norbury family of vortices has been used as a model for axisymmetric vortex rings, and the response of this family to shape perturbations has been characterized. We improve upon the Norbury models, using nested patches of vorticity to construct a family of models for vortex rings generated by a piston-cylinder apparatus at different stroke ratios. The perturbation response of this family is considered by the introduction of a small region of vorticity at the rear of the vortex, which mimics the addition of circulation to a growing vortex ring by a feeding shear layer. Model vortex rings are found to either accept the additional circulation or shed it into a tail, depending on the perturbation size. A change in the behavior of the model vortex rings is identified at a stroke ratio of three. We hypothesize that this change in response is analogous to pinch-off, and that pinch-off might be understood and predicted based on the perturbation responses of model vortex rings.

  20. Prediction and control of vortex-dominated and vortex-wake flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandil, Osama

    1993-01-01

    This progress report documents the accomplishments achieved in the period from December 1, 1992 until November 30, 1993. These accomplishments include publications, national and international presentations, NASA presentations, and the research group supported under this grant. Topics covered by documents incorporated into this progress report include: active control of asymmetric conical flow using spinning and rotary oscillation; supersonic vortex breakdown over a delta wing in transonic flow; shock-vortex interaction over a 65-degree delta wing in transonic flow; three dimensional supersonic vortex breakdown; numerical simulation and physical aspects of supersonic vortex breakdown; and prediction of asymmetric vortical flows around slender bodies using Navier-Stokes equations.

  1. Intercostal drainage tube or intracardiac drainage tube?

    PubMed Central

    Anitha, N.; Kamath, S. Ganesh; Khymdeit, Edison; Prabhu, Manjunath

    2016-01-01

    Although insertion of chest drain tubes is a common medical practice, there are risks associated with this procedure, especially when inexperienced physicians perform it. Wrong insertion of the tube has been known to cause morbidity and occasional mortality. We report a case where the left ventricle was accidentally punctured leading to near-exsanguination. This report is to highlight the need for experienced physicians to supervise the procedure and train the younger physician in the safe performance of the procedure. PMID:27397467

  2. Cavitating vortex generation by a submerged jet

    SciTech Connect

    Belyakov, G. V.; Filippov, A. N.

    2006-05-15

    The surface geometry of a cavitating vortex is determined in the limit of inviscid incompressible flow. The limit surface is an ovaloid of revolution with an axis ratio of 5: 3. It is shown that a cavitating vortex ring cannot develop if the cavitation number is lower than a certain critical value. Experiments conducted at various liquid pressures and several jet exit velocities confirm the existence of a critical cavitation number close to 3. At cavitation numbers higher than the critical one, the cavitating vortex ring does not develop. At substantially lower cavitation numbers (k {<=} 0.1), an elongated asymmetric cavitation bubble is generated, with an axial reentrant jet whose length can exceed the initial jet length by several times. This flow structure is called an asymmetric cavitating vortex, even though steady motion of this structure has not been observed.

  3. Drift due to viscous vortex rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrell, Thomas; Spagnolie, Saverio; Thiffeault, Jean-Luc

    2016-11-01

    Biomixing is the study of fluid mixing due to swimming organisms. While large organisms typically produce turbulent flows in their wake, small organisms produce less turbulent wakes; the main mechanism of mixing is the induced net particle displacement (drift). Several experiments have examined this drift for small jellyfish, which produce vortex rings that trap and transport a fair amount of fluid. Inviscid theory implies infinite particle displacements for the trapped fluid, so the effect of viscosity must be included to understand the damping of real vortex motion. We use a model viscous vortex ring to compute particle displacements and other relevant quantities, such as the integrated moments of the displacement. Fluid entrainment at the tail end of a growing vortex 'envelope' is found to play an important role in the total fluid transport and drift. Partially supported by NSF Grant DMS-1109315.

  4. NASA Wake Vortex Research for Aircraft Spacing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, R. Brad; Hinton, David A.; Stuever, Robert A.

    1996-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is addressing airport capacity enhancements during instrument meteorological conditions through the Terminal Area Productivity (TAP) program. Within TAP, the Reduced Spacing Operations (RSO) subelement at the NASA Langley Research Center is developing an Aircraft Vortex Spacing System (AVOSS). AVOSS will integrate the output of several inter-related areas to produce weather dependent, dynamic wake vortex spacing criteria. These areas include current and predicted weather conditions, models of wake vortex transport and decay in these weather conditions, real-time feedback of wake vortex behavior from sensors, and operationally acceptable aircraft/wake interaction criteria. In today's ATC system, the AVOSS could inform ATC controllers when a fixed reduced separation becomes safe to apply to large and heavy aircraft categories. With appropriate integration into the Center/TRACON Automation System (CTAS), AVOSS dynamic spacing could be tailored to actual generator/follower aircraft pairs rather than a few broad aircraft categories.

  5. Josephson vortex lattice in layered superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Koshelev, A. E.; Dodgson, M. J. W.

    2013-09-15

    Many superconducting materials are composed of weakly coupled conducting layers. Such a layered structure has a very strong influence on the properties of vortex matter in a magnetic field. This review focuses on the properties of the Josephson vortex lattice generated by the magnetic field applied in the direction of the layers. The theoretical description is based on the Lawrence-Doniach model in the London limit, which takes only the phase degree of freedom of the superconducting order parameter into account. In spite of its simplicity, this model leads to an amazingly rich set of phenomena. We review in detail the structure of an isolated vortex line and various properties of the vortex lattice, in both dilute and dense limits. In particular, we extensively discuss the influence of the layered structure and thermal fluctuations on the selection of lattice configurations at different magnetic fields.

  6. Titan's South Polar Vortex in Motion

    NASA Image and Video Library

    This movie captured by NASA'S Cassini spacecraft shows a south polar vortex, or a swirling mass of gas around the pole in the atmosphere, at Saturn’s moon Titan. The swirling mass appears to exec...

  7. Optical Scully vortex and its spatial evolution.

    PubMed

    Aksenov, Valerii P; Pogutsa, Cheslav E

    2012-04-01

    The structure of an optical vortex formed in a partially coherent Laguerre-Gauss laser beam was considered. The main object of study was the recorded vector field of wavefront tilts that consisted of the vortical and potential components. It was found that the vortical motion weakened as the coherence decreased. Main regularities in the behavior of the vortical component can be described by the Scully vortex model of vortical liquid flow. In the spatial evolution, the potential component of tilts may alternate the sign, thus determining the direction of energy flow to the center or to the periphery of the vortex. Energy flow lines in the beam demonstrate the pattern of decay of an optical vortex similar to the pattern of decaying vortical motion in viscous liquid.

  8. Vortex phase separation in mesoscopic superconductors

    PubMed Central

    Iaroshenko, O.; Rybalko, V.; Vinokur, V. M.; Berlyand, L.

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate that in mesoscopic type II superconductors with the lateral size commensurate with London penetration depth, the ground state of vortices pinned by homogeneously distributed columnar defects can form a hierarchical nested domain structure. Each domain is characterized by an average number of vortices trapped at a single pinning site within a given domain. Our study marks a radical departure from the current understanding of the ground state in disordered macroscopic systems and provides an insight into the interplay between disorder, vortex-vortex interaction, and confinement within finite system size. The observed vortex phase segregation implies the existence of the soliton solution for the vortex density in the finite superconductors and establishes a new class of nonlinear systems that exhibit the soliton phenomenon.

  9. Vortex Dynamics and its Characterization using Ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manneville, Sébastien; Robres, Jean-Henry; Maurel, Agnès; Petitjeans, Philippe

    1998-11-01

    We present a new method of vortex characterization using the interaction between flow and ultrasound: the Time Reversal Mirrors, developped in the Lab. Ondes et Acoustique (see Roux & Fink, Europhys. Lett., 32:25, 1997). The study concerns a stretched vortex generated in a long duct (see Petitjeans & al. Experiments in Fluids, 22:351, 1997) where we have performed static (for a stationary vortex) as well dynamic (for a vortex advected by the mean flow before breaking) measurements. The advantage of this method is to be non intrusive (the ultrasounds do not perturb the flow) and global (we obtaine the whole velocity field and can describe a 2D motion) with an acquisition frequency of 15 Hz.

  10. Vortex simulation of reacting shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghoniem, Ahmed F.

    Issues involved in the vortex simulation of reacting shear flow are discussed. It is shown that maintaining accuracy in the vortex methods requires the application of elaborate vorticity-updating schemes as vortex elements are moved along particle trajectories when shear or a strong strain field is represented. Solutions using 2D and 3D methods are discussed to illustrate some of the most common instabilities encountered in nonreacting and reacting shear flows and to reveal the mechanisms by which the maturation of these instabilities enhance mixing and hence burning in a reacting flow. The transport element method is developed and its application to compute scalar mixing in a shear layer is reviewed. The method is then combined with the vortex method to solve the problem of nonuniform-density shear flow. The results of incompressible reacting flow models are used to examine reaction extinction due to the formation of localized regions of strong strains as instabilities grow into their nonlinear range.

  11. Giant vortex state in mesoscopic superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cobacy García, Luis; Giraldo, Jairo

    2005-08-01

    Using the self-consistent solution of the nonlinear Ginzburg-Landau equations, the superconducting state of a type II mesoscopic cylinder and of an infinite thin sheet with a circular hole (antidot), in the presence of an homogeneous magnetic field is studied. Close to the third critical field, the magnetic field penetrates the sample in the form of a vortex around the axis of the cylinder or of the antidot. This result has been found previously by other authors. The vortex, called a giant vortex, can carry several flux quanta. The giant vortex is persistent when the state is metastable and evolves to the so called paramagnetic Meissner effect (PME) within the cylinder. The behaviour of this effect as a function of the Ginzburg-Landau (GL) parameter is studied and the results are discussed. Gibbs free energy, order parameter and magnetic induccion as a function of the applied field and of the GL parameter are also studied.

  12. Guiding principles for vortex flow controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, J. Z.; Wu, J. M.

    1991-01-01

    In the practice of vortex flow controls, the most important factor is that the persistency and obstinacy of a concentrated vortex depend on its stability and dissipation. In this paper, the modern nonlinear stability theory for circulation-preserving flows is summarized, and the dissipation for general viscous flows is analyzed in terms of the evolution of total enstrophy. These analyses provide a theoretical base for understanding relevant physics of vortex flows, and lead to some guiding principles and methods for their controls. Case studies taken from various theoretical and/or experimental works of vortex controls, due to the present authors as well as others, confirm the feasibility of the recommended principles and methods.

  13. Direct numerical simulations of vortex ring collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostilla Monico, Rodolfo; Pumir, Alain; Brenner, Michael

    2016-11-01

    We numerically simulate the ring vortex collision experiment of Lim and Nickels in an attempt to understand the rapid formation of very fine scale turbulence (or 'smoke') from relatively smooth initial conditions. Reynolds numbers of up to Re = Γ / ν = 7500 , where Γ is the vortex ring circulation and ν the kinematic viscosity of the fluid are reached, which coincide with the highest Reynolds number case of the experiments. Different perturbations to the ring vortex are added, and their effect on the generation and amplification of turbulence is quantified. The underlying dynamics of the vortex core is analyzed, and compared to the dynamics arising from a simple Biot-Savart filament model for the core.

  14. Development of gas pressure vortex regulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uss, A. Yu.; Chernyshyov, A. V.; Krylov, V. I.

    2017-08-01

    The present paper describes the applications of vortex regulators and the current state of the issue on the use and development of such devices. A patent review has been carried out. Automatic control systems using a vortex regulator are considered. Based on the analysis and preliminary numerical calculation of gas flow in the working cavity of the regulator, a new design of a vortex gas pressure regulator has been developed. An experimental sample of the device was made using additive technologies and a number of tests were carried out. The results of experimental studies confirmed the adequacy of the created mathematical model. Based on further numerical studies a new design of a vortex regulator with a distributed feed of the process control flow as well as with the regulated swirl of the supply and control process flows has been developed.

  15. THz Cherenkov radiation of Josephson vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malishevskii, A. S.; Silin, V. P.; Uryupin, S. A.; Uspenskii, S. G.

    2008-01-01

    It is shown that Josephson vortices travelling in sandwich embedded in dielectric media radiate electromagnetic waves with THz frequencies. This phenomenon is caused by the Cherenkov effect and takes place if vortex velocity exceeds the speed of light in dielectric.

  16. 'Optimal' vortex rings and aquatic propulsion mechanisms.

    PubMed Central

    Linden, P. F.; Turner, J. S.

    2004-01-01

    Fishes swim by flapping their tail and other fins. Other sea creatures, such as squid and salps, eject fluid intermittently as a jet. We discuss the fluid mechanics behind these propulsion mechanisms and show that these animals produce optimal vortex rings, which give the maximum thrust for a given energy input. We show that fishes optimize both their steady swimming efficiency and their ability to accelerate and turn by producing an individual optimal ring with each flap of the tail or fin. Salps produce vortex rings directly by ejecting a volume of fluid through a rear orifice, and these are also optimal. An important implication of this paper is that the repetition of vortex production is not necessary for an individual vortex to have the 'optimal' characteristics. PMID:15156924

  17. Analysis of vortex wake encounter upsets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. A.; Teper, G. L.

    1974-01-01

    The problem of an airplane being upset by encountering the vortex wake of a large transport on takeoff or landing is currently receiving considerable attention. This report describes the technique and results of a study to assess the effectiveness of automatic control systems in alleviating vortex wake upsets. A six-degree-of-freedom nonlinear digital simulation was used for this purpose. The analysis included establishing the disturbance input due to penetrating a vortex wake from an arbitrary position and angle. Simulations were computed for both a general aviation airplane and a commercial jet transport. Dynamic responses were obtained for the penetrating aircraft with no augmentation, and with various command augmentation systems, as well as with human pilot control. The results of this preliminary study indicate that attitude command augmentation systems can provide significant alleviation of vortex wake upsets; and can do it better than a human pilot.

  18. Role of vortex structures in excitation of condensed system self-oscillatory burning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samsonov, V. P.; Murunov, E. Y.; Alexeev, M. V.

    2008-08-01

    The effect of free convection and vortex structures arising near the “singing” flame of a gasoline blow torch on excitation of thermal self-oscillations in a resonator tube is studied experimentally. A technique for measuring the oscillation amplitude of the gas column is suggested. It is found that the excitation of acoustic oscillations decreases the height of the singing flame and the mass velocity of burning but raises the gasoline combustion efficiency. The variation of the temperature field of the singing flame over an oscillation cycle is studied by digital photometry. Hysteretic dependences of the acoustic oscillation amplitude on the thermal power of the gasoline diffusion flame are obtained. A mechanism explaining the influence of vortex structures on the self-oscillatory mode of burning in condensed systems is discussed.

  19. Shallow flow vortex formation and control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Haojun

    Vortical structures in shallow flow past a vertical cylinder are addressed in this investigation. A cinema technique of digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV) provided quantitative representations of the wholefield flow patterns in both instantaneous and averaged forms. Techniques for passive and active control of these vortices, and their influence on the loading of the bed, were explored. In a fully-developed, laminar shallow flow, the unstable structure in the near-wake of the cylinder correlates with the horseshoe (necklace) vortex system about the upstream surface of the cylinder. A coherent varicose mode of vortex formation is observed in the near-wake, even though the classical large-scale vortex shedding is suppressed due to bed friction effects. It is also demonstrated that when the near-wake is stable at a sufficiently low value of Reynolds number, applications of external perturbations lead to destabilization of the wake. Classes of small-scale three-dimensional structures arise in a fully-turbulent shallow flow past a surface-piercing cylinder. A prevalent feature is an upward moving jet-like flow from the bed surface, through the center of the developing quasi-two-dimensional primary vortex, at a location in the very near-wake of the cylinder. Passive control via base-bleed through a narrow streamwise slot leads to substantially delay/attenuation of vortex formation in the near-wake. The large-scale near-wake structure is recoverable through combined positive-active control, in the form of rotational perturbations in the presence of small magnitude base bleed. These alterations of the near-wake structure occur in conjunction with modifications of the streamline topology and Reynolds stress at the bed, as well as the shallow approach flow. Active control via rotational perturbations of the cylinder at the most unstable shear-layer frequency promotes well-defined vortical structures in the separating shearlayer, which contribute to the earlier

  20. Pulse Tube Refrigerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsubara, Yoichi

    The pulse tube refrigerator is one of the regenerative cycle refrigerators such as Stirling cycle or Gifford-McMahon cycle which gives the cooling temperature below 150 K down to liquid helium temperature. In 1963, W. E. Gifford invented a simple refrigeration cycle which is composed of compressor, regenerator and simple tube named as pulse tube which gives a similar function of the expander in Stirling or Gifford-McMahon cycle. The thermodynamically performance of this pulse tube refrigerator is inferior to that of other regenerative cycles. In 1984, however, Mikulin and coworkers made a significant advance in pulse tube configuration called as orifice pulse tube. After this, several modifications of the pulse tube hot end configuration have been developed. With those modifications, the thermodynamic performance of the pulse tube refrigerator became the same order to that of Stirling and Gifford-McMahon refrigerator. This article reviews the brief history of the pulse tube refrigerator development in the view point of its thermodynamically efficiency. Simplified theories of the energy flow in the pulse tube have also been described.

  1. Vortex core identification in viscous hydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Finn, Lucas I; Boghosian, Bruce M; Kottke, Christopher N

    2005-08-15

    We describe a software package designed for the investigation of topological fluid dynamics with a novel algorithm for locating and tracking vortex cores. The package is equipped with modules for generating desired vortex knots and links and evolving them according to the Navier-Stokes equations, while tracking and visualizing them. The package is parallelized using a message passing interface for a multiprocessor environment and makes use of a computational steering library for dynamic user intervention.

  2. Imaging magnetic vortex configurations in ferromagnetic nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyss, M.; Mehlin, A.; Gross, B.; Buchter, A.; Farhan, A.; Buzzi, M.; Kleibert, A.; Tütüncüoglu, G.; Heimbach, F.; Fontcuberta i Morral, A.; Grundler, D.; Poggio, M.

    2017-07-01

    We image the remnant magnetization configurations of CoFeB and permalloy nanotubes (NTs) using x-ray magnetic circular dichroism photoemission electron microscopy. The images provide direct evidence for flux-closure configurations, including a global vortex state, in which magnetization points circumferentially around the NT axis. Furthermore, micromagnetic simulations predict and measurements confirm that vortex states can be programmed as the equilibrium remnant magnetization configurations by reducing the ratio of the NT's length and diameter.

  3. Vortex interactions and decay in aircraft wakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilanin, A. J.; Teske, M. E.; Dupdonaldson, C.; Williamson, G. G.

    1977-01-01

    The dynamic interaction of aircraft wake vortices was investigated using both inviscid and viscous models. For the viscous model, a computer code was developed using a second-order closure model of turbulent transport. The phenomenon of vortex merging which results in the rapid aging of a vortex wake was examined in detail. It was shown that the redistribution of vorticity during merging results from both convective and diffusive mechanisms.

  4. Towards a string formulation of vortex dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Elsebeth Schroeder; Ola Toernkvist

    1998-01-01

    We derive an exact equation of motion for a non-relativistic vortex in two- and three-dimensional models with a complex field. The velocity is given in terms of gradients of the complex field at the vortex position. We discuss the problem of reducing the field dynamics to a closed dynamical system with non-locally interacting strings as the fundamental degrees of freedom.

  5. [Development of a "vortex bed" drying apparatus].

    PubMed

    Bibileishvili, V I; Setti, D; Peri, C

    1976-01-01

    Fundamental parameters in dimensioning a "vortex bed" drying apparatus are the pressure drop across the bed and the higher and lower limit of fluidization velocity. The analysis of the Navier-Stokes equations brings to the following functional relations between dimensionless groups: (see journal). These relations define the fluidization conditions in a "vortex bed" apparatus. Experimental tests carried out on a laboratory scale apparatus will provide us with the unknown constants for industrial scale extrapolation.

  6. Counterexamples to Moffatt's statements on vortex knots.

    PubMed

    Bogoyavlenskij, Oleg

    2017-04-01

    One of the well-known problems of hydrodynamics is studied: the problem of classification of vortex knots for ideal fluid flows. In the literature there are known Moffatt statements that all torus knots K_{m,n} for all rational numbers m/n (0vortex knots for each one of the considered axisymmetric fluid flows. We prove that actually such a uniformity does not exist because it does not correspond to the facts. Namely, we derive a complete classification of all vortex knots realized for the fluid flows studied by Moffatt and demonstrate that the real structure of vortex knots is much more rich because the sets of mutually nonisotopic vortex knots realized for different axisymmetric fluid flows are all different. An exact formula for the limit of the hydrodynamic safety factor q_{h} at a vortex axis is derived for arbitrary axisymmetric fluid equilibria. Another exact formula is obtained for the limit of the magnetohydrodynamics safety factor q at a magnetic axis for the general axisymmetric plasma equilibria.

  7. Aperiodicity Correction for Rotor Tip Vortex Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramasamy, Manikandan; Paetzel, Ryan; Bhagwat, Mahendra J.

    2011-01-01

    The initial roll-up of a tip vortex trailing from a model-scale, hovering rotor was measured using particle image velocimetry. The unique feature of the measurements was that a microscope was attached to the camera to allow much higher spatial resolution than hitherto possible. This also posed some unique challenges. In particular, the existing methodologies to correct for aperiodicity in the tip vortex locations could not be easily extended to the present measurements. The difficulty stemmed from the inability to accurately determine the vortex center, which is a prerequisite for the correction procedure. A new method is proposed for determining the vortex center, as well as the vortex core properties, using a least-squares fit approach. This approach has the obvious advantage that the properties are derived from not just a few points near the vortex core, but from a much larger area of flow measurements. Results clearly demonstrate the advantage in the form of reduced variation in the estimated core properties, and also the self-consistent results obtained using three different aperiodicity correction methods.

  8. Counterexamples to Moffatt's statements on vortex knots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogoyavlenskij, Oleg

    2017-04-01

    One of the well-known problems of hydrodynamics is studied: the problem of classification of vortex knots for ideal fluid flows. In the literature there are known Moffatt statements that all torus knots Km ,n for all rational numbers m /n (0 vortex knots for each one of the considered axisymmetric fluid flows. We prove that actually such a uniformity does not exist because it does not correspond to the facts. Namely, we derive a complete classification of all vortex knots realized for the fluid flows studied by Moffatt and demonstrate that the real structure of vortex knots is much more rich because the sets of mutually nonisotopic vortex knots realized for different axisymmetric fluid flows are all different. An exact formula for the limit of the hydrodynamic safety factor qh at a vortex axis is derived for arbitrary axisymmetric fluid equilibria. Another exact formula is obtained for the limit of the magnetohydrodynamics safety factor q at a magnetic axis for the general axisymmetric plasma equilibria.

  9. Multiple breathers on a vortex filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salman, H.

    2014-10-01

    In this paper we investigate the correspondence between the Da Rios-Betchov equation, which appears in the three-dimensional motion of a vortex filament, and the nonlinear Schrödinger equation. Using this correspondence we map a set of solutions corresponding to breathers in the nonlinear Schrödinger equation to waves propagating along a vortex filament. The work presented generalizes the recently derived family of vortex configurations associated with these breather solutions to a wider class of configurations that are associated with combination homoclinic/heteroclinic orbits of the 1D self-focussing nonlinear Schrödinger equation. We show that by considering these solutions of the governing nonlinear Schrödinger equation, highly nontrivial vortex filament configurations can be obtained that are associated with a pair of breather excitations. These configurations can lead to loop-like excitations emerging from an otherwise weakly perturbed helical vortex. The results presented further demonstrate the rich class of solutions that are supported by the Da Rios-Betchov equation that is recovered within the local induction approximation for the motion of a vortex filament.

  10. Ambient Fluid Entrainment by Vortex Ring Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olcay, Ali B.; Krueger, Paul S.

    2004-11-01

    During the formation of a vortex ring from a piston-cylinder mechanism, the roll-up of the ejected shear layer entrains ambient fluid. The resulting vortex ring convects both ejected and ambient fluid downstream. Ambient fluid entrained during the formation phase must be accelerated with the forming ring and can contribute to elevated propulsive effectiveness for pulsed-jet propulsion. In this regard it is of interest to know how much ambient fluid is entrained during vortex ring formation and if the entrainment occurs primarily during jet ejection or afterward. The present investigation evaluates ambient fluid entrainment experimentally using laser induced fluorescence of vortex ring formation from a piston-cylinder vortex ring generator. The fraction of ambient fluid in fully-developed vortex rings is evaluated directly for piston stroke-to-diameter (L/D) ratios in the range 0.25 to 4 for jet Reynolds number in the range 500 to 2000. The results indicate that the ambient fluid fraction is greater than 50% for L/D < 2.0, and the fraction tends to decrease as L/D increases. Time evolution of the entrainment during ring formation will also be presented.

  11. Asymmetric Vortex Merger in an Electron Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amoretti, M.; Durkin, D.; Fajans, J.; Pozzoli, R.; Rome, M.; Siegel, J.

    2000-10-01

    We investigate the merging of an intense, localized vortex with an extended vortex through the analysis of the hamiltonian flow associated to the electric potential, and numerical simulation with 2D contour dynamics and PIC [1] codes. The study is restricted to highly nonlinear conditions, where the perturbative approach [2] does not hold, in principle. We perform the experimental analysis of this process on a Malmberg-Penning trap with photocatode [3], already used to study the dynamics of intense vortices inside an extended vortex [4]. An excellent agreement between experimental results and simulations is obtained, showing that the dynamics is 2D inviscid. It is found that the localized vortex is wrapped around by the extended vortex, then moves towards the center (while the extended vortex ejects filaments, owing to canonical momentum conservation), eventually approaching an almost stationary state of rotation. An interpretation of the different phases of the process is given. [1] J.P. Varboncoeur, A.B.Langdon and N.T.Gladd, Comp. Phys. Comm. 87, 199 (1995) [2] I.M.Lansky, T.M.O'Neil, D.A.Schecter, Phys. Rev. Lett. 79, 1479 (1997) [3] D. Durkin and J. Fajans, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 70, 4539 (1999) [4] D. Durkin and J. Fajans, submitted to Phys. Rev. Lett. (2000)

  12. Magnetism near Vortex Cores of Cuprate Superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. C.; Prudchenko, K.; Launspach, B.; Ruiz, E. J.; Boekema, C.

    2005-03-01

    We examined muon-spin-resonance (μSR) vortex data of Bi2212, Tl2223, and YBCO to search for antiferromagnetism (AF) near the vortex cores. [1] Field distributions were obtained from μSR data using Maximum-Entropy analysis. The grainboundary and vortex signals were fitted by Gaussian and Lorentzian curves, the latter suggestive of extra AF ordering. Narrow Gaussians fit the grainboundary signals well, independent of temperature. For T < 0.4Tc, Lorentzians fit much better than Gaussians on the high-field side associated with the vortex core. Such results suggest that magnetism exists near the vortex cores. [1,2] The field dependence of the YBCO AF Lorentzian width is discussed. An AF presence near vortex cores supports theories that predict spin ordering for cuprate superconductivity. Research supported by REU-NSF, WiSE@SJSU & SJSU College of Science. [1] J. Lee et al, J Appl Phys 95 (2004) 6906, and Virtual J Appl of Superconductivity, June 2004 V6 Issue11; K Prudchenko et al, www.jyi.org/volumes/volume10/issue6/articles/prudchenko.html [2] C. Boekema et al, Int J Modern Phys B17 (2003) 3436.

  13. Model measurement based identification of Francis turbine vortex rope parameters for prototype part load pressure and power pulsation prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manderla, M.; Weber, W.; Koutnik, J.

    2016-11-01

    Pressure and power fluctuations of hydro-electric power plants in part-load operation are an important measure for the quality of the power which is delivered to the electrical grid. It is well known that the unsteadiness is driven by the flow patterns in the draft tube where a vortex rope is present. However, until today the equivalent vortex rope parameters for common numerical 1D-models are a major source of uncertainty. In this work, a new optimization-based grey box method for experimental vortex rope modelling and parameter identification is presented. The combination of analytical vortex rope and test rig modelling and the usage of dynamic measurements allow the identification of the unknown vortex rope parameters. Upscaling from model to prototype size is achieved via existing nondimensional parameters. In this work, a new experimental setup and system identification method is proposed which are suitable for the determination of the full set of part load vortex rope parameters in the lab. For the vortex rope, a symmetric model with cavity compliance, bulk viscosity and two pressure excitation sources is developed and implemented which shows the best correspondence with available measurement data. Due to the non-dimensional parameter definition, scaling is possible. This finally provides a complete method for the prediction of prototype part-load pressure and power oscillations. Since the proposed method is based on a simple limited control domain, limited modelling effort and also small modelling uncertainties are some major advantages. Due to the generality of the approach, a future application to other operating conditions such as full load will be straightforward.

  14. 2P Vortex Wake Pattern in Vortex-Induced Vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govardhan, R.; Williamson, C. H. K.

    1999-11-01

    Flow-visualization in the free vibration experiments of Khalak & Williamson (1997,1999) indicated the existence of the 2P wake vortex pattern (2 pairs of vortices per cycle; as defined in the forced vibration experiments of Williamson & Roshko, 1988), in support of Brika & Laneville (1993), although these visualization techniques are distinctly unclear at high Reynolds numbers (Re ~10^3-10^4 ). Forced vibrations [Sheridan et al. (1998), Techet et al. (1998)] show the 2P mode under some conditions. However, a large number of accurate numerical simulations, at low Re ~200, as well as 2D simulations at higher Re ~500 (Blackburn & Henderson 1999), clearly do not find the 2P mode. There has thus been some debate as to the existence of the 2P mode as a steady state pattern. Hence, DPIV measurements in the wake of the elastically-mounted cylinder have been performed to finally resolve this question. The present results show that the 2P mode is remarkably repeatable and continues indefinitely. The reason for this apparent disparity between experiments and DNS therefore seems to be either a Reynolds number effect or the fact that the computed flow is constrained to be 2D. Further, it is shown that this pattern corresponds with the splitting of a region of vorticity due to the strain rate field of neighbouring vortices. wake patterns show interesting differences. Supported by ONR Contracts N00014-94-1-1197 & N00014-95-1-0332.

  15. Formation and evolution of concentric vortex rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadri, Vahid

    The formation and interactions of concentric vortex rings are studied experimentally and computationally using a concentric piston-cylinder geometry to generate concentric vortex rings in water at a maximum jet Reynolds number of 2000. The effects of cylinder gap ratio, DeltaR/R, and jet stroke length-to-gap ratio, L/DeltaR, on the evolution of the flow were investigated. For the experimental study, the jet pulses were generated using piston stroke to gap size ratios (?R/R) in the range 0.2 to 0.05, and L/DeltaR in the range 1-20, for a trapezoidal piston velocity program. Digital Particle Image Velocimetry (DPIV) was used to measure concentric vortex ring position, vorticity, and velocity. Additional experiments were conducted using dye visualizations to reveal the spatial structure of the instability for concentric vortex rings. For the computational study, the flow was simulated at a jet Reynolds number of 1,000 (based on DeltaR and the jet velocity), L/DeltaR in the range 1-20, and DeltaR/R in the range 0.01-0.25. The large L/DeltaR and small DeltaR/R cases were included, in part, to investigate the pinch-off of axisymmetric vortex pairs generated by flow between concentric cylinders with radial separation DeltaR for comparison with planar vortex dipole behavior. Five characteristic flow evolution patterns were observed and classified based on L/DeltaR and DeltaR/R for concentric vortex ring behavior. The results showed that the relative position, relative strength, and radii of the vortex rings during and soon after formation played a prominent role in the evolution of the trajectories of their vorticity centroids at the later time. The conditions on relative strength of the vortices necessary for them to travel together as a pair following formation were studied and factors affecting differences in vortex circulation following formation were investigated. In addition to the characteristics of the primary vortices, the stopping vortices had a strong influence

  16. Lunar Lava Tube Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    York, Cheryl Lynn; Walden, Bryce; Billings, Thomas L.; Reeder, P. Douglas

    1992-01-01

    Large (greater than 300 m diameter) lava tube caverns appear to exist on the Moon and could provide substantial safety and cost benefits for lunar bases. Over 40 m of basalt and regolith constitute the lava tube roof and would protect both construction and operations. Constant temperatures of -20 C reduce thermal stress on structures and machines. Base designs need not incorporate heavy shielding, so lightweight materials can be used and construction can be expedited. Identification and characterization of lava tube caverns can be incorporated into current precursor lunar mission plans. Some searches can even be done from Earth. Specific recommendations for lunar lava tube search and exploration are (1) an Earth-based radar interferometer, (2) an Earth-penetrating radar (EPR) orbiter, (3) kinetic penetrators for lunar lava tube confirmation, (4) a 'Moon Bat' hovering rocket vehicle, and (5) the use of other proposed landers and orbiters to help find lunar lava tubes.

  17. Kaumana lava tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, R.

    1974-01-01

    The entrance to Kaumana Lava Tube is in a picnic ground next to Highway 20 (Kaumana Drive) about 6.5 km southwest of Hilo. The area is passed on the way to the Kona Coast via the Saddle Road and is identified by a Hawaii Visitors Bureau sign. Although it is not the largest lava tube in the islands, Kaumana Lava Tube is an interesting geological formation, displaying many of the features typical of lava tube interiors. It is accessible, relatively easy to walk through, and is in an excellent state of preservation. The tube developed in a historic lava flow (1881, from Mauna Loa), and many aspects of lava tube activity are observed.

  18. Ruggedized electronographic tube development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nevin, S.

    1981-01-01

    Because of their glass components and lack of far ultraviolet sensitivity, currently available Spectracons are not suited for rocket launch. Technology developed for second generation image tubes and for magnetically focused image tubes can be applied to improve the optical and mechanical properties of these magnetically focused electronographic tubes whose 40 kilovolt signal electrons exit a 4-micrometer thick mica window and penetrate a photographic recording emulsion.

  19. COAXIAL TUBE COUPLING

    DOEpatents

    Niemoth, H.R.

    1963-02-26

    BS>This patent shows a device for quickly coupling coaxial tubes in metal-to-metal fashion, so as to be suitable for use in a nuclear reactor. A threaded coliar urges a tapered metal extension on the outer coaxial tube into a tapered seat in the device and simultaneously exerts pressure through a coaxial helical spring so that a similar extension on the inner tube seats in a similar seat near the other end. (AEC)

  20. TUBE SPLITTING APPARATUS

    DOEpatents

    Frantz, C.E.; Cawley, W.E.

    1961-05-01

    A tool is described for cutting a coolant tube adapted to contain fuel elements to enable the tube to be removed from a graphite moderator mass. The tool splits the tube longitudinally into halves and curls the longitudinal edges of the halves inwardly so that they occupy less space and can be moved radially inwardly away from the walls of the hole in the graphite for easy removal from the graphite.