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Sample records for rapamycin down-regulates ldl-receptor

  1. Rapamycin down-regulates LDL-receptor expression independently of SREBP-2

    SciTech Connect

    Sharpe, Laura J.; Brown, Andrew J.

    2008-09-05

    As a key regulator of cholesterol homeostasis, sterol-regulatory element binding protein-2 (SREBP-2) up-regulates expression of genes involved in cholesterol synthesis (e.g., 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) Reductase) and uptake (the low density lipoprotein (LDL)-receptor). Previously, we showed that Akt, a critical kinase in cell growth and proliferation, contributes to SREBP-2 activation. However, the specific Akt target involved is unknown. A potential candidate is the mammalian target of rapamycin, mTOR. Rapamycin can cause hyperlipidaemia clinically, and we hypothesised that this may be mediated via an effect of mTOR on SREBP-2. Herein, we found that SREBP-2 activation and HMG-CoA Reductase gene expression were unaffected by rapamycin treatment. However, LDL-receptor gene expression was decreased by rapamycin, suggesting that this may contribute to the hyperlipidaemia observed in rapamycin-treated patients. Rapamycin did not affect mRNA stability, so the decrease in LDL-receptor gene expression is likely to be occurring at the transcriptional level, although independently of SREBP-2.

  2. Rapamycin up-regulates triglycerides in hepatocytes by down-regulating Prox1.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Sora; Jeon, Ji-Sook; Kim, Su Bin; Hong, Young-Kwon; Ahn, Curie; Sung, Jung-Suk; Choi, Inho

    2016-02-27

    Although the prolonged use of rapamycin may cause unwanted side effects such as hyperlipidemia, the underlying mechanism remains unknown. Prox1 is a transcription factor responsible for the development of several tissues including lymphatics and liver. There is growing evidences that Prox1 participates in metabolism in addition to embryogenesis. However, whether Prox1 is directly related to lipid metabolism is currently unknown. HepG2 human hepatoma cells were treated with rapamycin and total lipids were analyzed by thin layer chromatography. The effect of rapamycin on the expression of Prox1 was determined by western blotting. To investigate the role of Prox1 in triglycerides regulation, siRNA and overexpression system were employed. Rapamycin was injected into mice for 2 weeks and total lipids and proteins in liver were measured by thin layer chromatography and western blot analysis, respectively. Rapamycin up-regulated the amount of triglyceride and down-regulated the expression of Prox1 in HepG2 cells by reducing protein half-life but did not affect its transcript. The loss-of-function of Prox1 was coincident with the increase of triglycerides in HepG2 cells treated with rapamycin. The up-regulation of triglycerides by rapamycin in HepG2 cells reverted to normal levels by the compensation of Prox1 using the overexpression system. Rapamycin also down-regulated Prox1 expression but increased triglycerides in mouse liver. This study suggests that rapamycin can increase the amount of triglycerides by down-regulating Prox1 expression in hepatocytes, which means that the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling is important for the regulation of triglycerides by maintaining Prox1 expression.

  3. The p.Leu167del Mutation in APOE Gene Causes Autosomal Dominant Hypercholesterolemia by Down-regulation of LDL Receptor Expression in Hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Cenarro, Ana; Etxebarria, Aitor; de Castro-Orós, Isabel; Stef, Marianne; Bea, Ana M; Palacios, Lourdes; Mateo-Gallego, Rocío; Benito-Vicente, Asier; Ostolaza, Helena; Tejedor, Teresa; Martín, César; Civeira, Fernando

    2016-05-01

    The p.Leu167del mutation in the APOE gene has been associated with hyperlipidemia. Our objective was to determine the frequency of p.Leu167del mutation in APOE gene in subjects with autosomal dominant hypercholesterolemia (ADH) in whom LDLR, APOB, and PCSK9 mutations had been excluded and to identify the mechanisms by which this mutant apo E causes hypercholesterolemia. The APOE gene was analyzed in a case-control study. The study was conducted at a University Hospital Lipid Clinic. Two groups (ADH, 288 patients; control, 220 normolipidemic subjects) were included. We performed sequencing of APOE gene and proteomic and cellular experiments. To determine the frequency of the p.Leu167del mutation and the mechanism by which it causes hypercholesterolemia. In the ADH group, nine subjects (3.1%) were carriers of the APOE c.500_502delTCC, p.Leu167del mutation, cosegregating with hypercholesterolemia in studied families. Proteomic quantification of wild-type and mutant apo E in very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) from carrier subjects revealed that apo E3 is almost a 5-fold increase compared to mutant apo E. Cultured cell studies revealed that VLDL from mutation carriers had a significantly higher uptake by HepG2 and THP-1 cells compared to VLDL from subjects with E3/E3 or E2/E2 genotypes. Transcriptional down-regulation of LDLR was also confirmed. p.Leu167del mutation in APOE gene is the cause of hypercholesterolemia in the 3.1% of our ADH subjects without LDLR, APOB, and PCSK9 mutations. The mechanism by which this mutation is associated to ADH is that VLDL carrying the mutant apo E produces LDLR down-regulation, thereby raising plasma low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels.

  4. The LDL receptor.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Joseph L; Brown, Michael S

    2009-04-01

    In this article, the history of the LDL receptor is recounted by its codiscoverers. Their early work on the LDL receptor explained a genetic cause of heart attacks and led to new ways of thinking about cholesterol metabolism. The LDL receptor discovery also introduced three general concepts to cell biology: receptor-mediated endocytosis, receptor recycling, and feedback regulation of receptors. The latter concept provides the mechanism by which statins selectively lower plasma LDL, reducing heart attacks and prolonging life.

  5. [The LDL receptor family].

    PubMed

    Meilinger, Melinda

    2002-12-29

    The members of the LDL receptor family are structurally related endocytic receptors. Our view on these receptors has considerably changed in recent years. Not only have new members of the family been identified, but also several interesting observations have been published concerning the biological function of these molecules. The LDL receptor family members are able to bind and internalize a plethora of ligands; as a consequence, they play important roles in diverse physiological processes. These receptors are key players in the lipoprotein metabolism, vitamin homeostasis, Ca2+ homeostasis, cell migration, and embryonic development. Until recently, LDL receptor family members were thought to be classic endocytic receptors that provide cells with metabolites on one hand, while regulating the concentration of their ligands in the extracellular fluids on the other hand. However, recent findings indicate that in addition to their cargo transport function, LDL receptor family members can act as signal transducers, playing important roles in the development of the central nervous system or the skeleton. Better understanding of physiological and pathophysiological functions of these molecules may open new avenues for the treatment or prevention of many disorders.

  6. Leucine Stimulates Insulin Secretion via Down-regulation of Surface Expression of Adrenergic α2A Receptor through the mTOR (Mammalian Target of Rapamycin) Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jun; Dolinger, Michael; Ritaccio, Gabrielle; Mazurkiewicz, Joseph; Conti, David; Zhu, Xinjun; Huang, Yunfei

    2012-01-01

    The amino acid leucine is a potent secretagogue, capable of inducing insulin secretion. It also plays an important role in the regulation of mTOR activity, therefore, providing impetus to investigate if a leucine-sensing mechanism in the mTOR pathway is involved in insulin secretion. We found that leucine-induced insulin secretion was inhibited by both the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin as well as the adrenergic α2 receptor agonist clonidine. We also demonstrated that leucine down-regulated the surface expression of adrenergic α2A receptor via activation of the mTOR pathway. The leucine stimulatory effect on insulin secretion was attenuated in diabetic Goto-Kakizaki rats that overexpress adrenergic α2A receptors, confirming the role of leucine in insulin secretion. Thus, our data demonstrate that leucine regulates insulin secretion by modulating adrenergic α2 receptors through the mTOR pathway. The role of the mTOR pathway in metabolic homeostasis led us to a second important finding in this study; retrospective analysis of clinical data showed that co-administration of rapamycin and clonidine was associated with an increased incidence of new-onset diabetes in renal transplantation patients over those receiving rapamycin alone. We believe that inhibition of mTOR by rapamycin along with activation of adrenergic α2 receptors by clonidine represents a double-hit to pancreatic islets that synergistically disturbs glucose homeostasis. This new insight may have important implications for the clinical management of renal transplant patients. PMID:22645144

  7. Down-regulation of mitogen-activated protein kinases and nuclear factor-κB signaling is involved in rapamycin suppression of TLR2-induced inflammatory response in monocytic THP-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ruili; Zhang, Yi; Ma, Shijiang; Qi, Hengtian; Wang, Mingyong; Duan, Juhong; Ma, Shujun; Zhu, Xiaofei; Li, Guancheng; Wang, Hui

    2015-10-01

    Tripalmitoyl-S-glycero-Cys-(Lys) 4 (Pam3CSK4) interacted with TLR2 induces inflammatory responses through the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signal pathway. Rapamycin can suppress TLR-induced inflammatory responses; however, the detailed molecular mechanism is not fully understood. Here, the mechanism by which rapamycin suppresses TLR2-induced inflammatory responses was investigated. It was found that Pam3CSK4-induced pro-inflammatory cytokines were significantly down-regulated at both the mRNA and protein levels in THP-1 cells pre-treated with various concentrations of rapamycin. Inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/protein kinase-B (PI3K/AKT) signaling did not suppress the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, indicating that the immunosuppression mediated by rapamycin in THP1 cells is independent of the PI3K/AKT pathway. RT-PCR showed that Erk and NF-κB signal pathways are related to the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Inhibition of Erk or NF-κB signaling significantly down-regulated production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Additionally, western blot showed that pre-treatment of THP-1 cells with rapamycin down-regulates MAPKs and NF-κB signaling induced by Pam3CSK4 stimulation, suggesting that rapamycin suppresses Pam3CSK4-induced pro-inflammatory cytokines via inhibition of TLR2 signaling. It was concluded that rapamycin suppresses TLR2-induced inflammatory responses by down-regulation of Erk and NF-κB signaling.

  8. Antagonism of microRNA-99a promotes cell invasion and down-regulates E-cadherin expression in pancreatic cancer cells by regulating mammalian target of rapamycin.

    PubMed

    Li, Dan; Li, Xiaohan; Cao, Wei; Qi, Yafei; Yang, Xianghong

    2014-06-01

    MicroRNA-99a (miRNA-99a), a potential tumor suppressor, has been implicated in tumorigenesis of many human malignancies. However, the role of miRNA-99a in pancreatic cancer remains unclear. In the present study, we transfected miRNA-99a antagonism into human pancreatic cancer AsPC-1 cells to inhibit miRNA-99a expression and investigated its influence on cell migration and invasion as well as the underlying possible mechanisms. We found that miRNA-99a antagonism significantly increased proliferation, migration and invasion abilities of AsPC-1 cells, which was accompanied by increased expression of mesenchymal phenotype cell biomarkers (N-cadherin, Vimentin, and α-SMA), and decreased expression of epithelial phenotype cell biomarker (E-cadherin). Interestingly, small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) remarkably restored miRNA-99a antagonism-induced down-regulation of E-cadherin. In conclusion, our data suggest that miRNA-99a is involved in pancreatic cancer migration and invasion by regulating mTOR, and may provide a target for effective therapies against pancreatic cancer.

  9. Rapamycin, a mTOR inhibitor, induced growth inhibition in retinoblastoma Y79 cell via down-regulation of Bmi-1.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan-Dong; Su, Yong-Jing; Li, Jian-Ying; Yao, Xiang-Chao; Liang, Guang-Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Rapamycin is useful in the treatment of certain cancers by inhibiting mTOR(mammalian target of rapamycin) pathway. Here, anticancer activity and its acting mechanisms of rapamycin were investigated in human retinoblastoma Y79 cells. CCK-8 assay showed that the IC50 value of rapamycin against human retinoblastoma Y79 cells was 0.122±0.026 μmol/L. Flow cytometry analysis indicated that rapamycin induced G1 cell cycle arrest. Western blot assay demonstrated that the mTOR pathway in Y79 cells was blocked by rapamycin. Western blot and RT-PCR assay showed that Bmi-1 was downregulated in protein and mRNA level by rapamycin treatment. Further Western blot and RNA interference assays showed that rapamycin-mediated downregulation of Bmi-1 induced decreases of cyclin E1, which accounted for rapamycin-mediated G1 cell cycle arrest in human retinoblastoma cells. Together, all these results illustrated that rapamycin induced growth inhibition of human retinoblastoma cells, and inactive of mTOR pathway and downregulation of Bmi-1 was involved in its action mechanism.

  10. History of Discovery: The LDL Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Joseph L.; Brown, Michael S.

    2009-01-01

    Summary In this article, the history of the LDL receptor is recounted by its co-discoverers. Their early work on the LDL receptor explained a genetic cause of heart attacks and led to new ways of thinking about cholesterol metabolism. The LDL receptor discovery also introduced three general concepts to cell biology: receptor-mediated endocytosis, receptor recycling, and feedback regulation of receptors. The latter concept provides the mechanism by which statins selectively lower plasma LDL, reducing heart attacks and prolonging life. PMID:19299327

  11. Cholesterol metabolism, LDL, and the LDL receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Myant, N.B. )

    1990-01-01

    This book covers cholesterol and metabolism. Paper include: The LDL Receptor in Perspective, Cholesterol in Animal Tissues, HMG-CoA Reductase. acetyl-CoA: Cholesterol Acyltransferase, and LDL: Physical and Chemical Characteristics.

  12. Inhibition of mTOR down-regulates scavenger receptor, class B, type I (SR-BI) expression, reduces endothelial cell migration and impairs nitric oxide production.

    PubMed

    Fruhwürth, Stefanie; Krieger, Sigurd; Winter, Katharina; Rosner, Margit; Mikula, Mario; Weichhart, Thomas; Bittman, Robert; Hengstschläger, Markus; Stangl, Herbert

    2014-07-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibiting drug rapamycin (Sirolimus) has severe side effects in patients including hyperlipidemia, an established risk factor for atherosclerosis. Recently, it was shown that rapamycin decreases hepatic LDL receptor (LDL-R) expression, which likely contributes to hypercholesterolemia. Scavenger receptor, class B, type I (SR-BI) is the major HDL receptor and consequently regulating HDL-cholesterol levels and the athero-protective effects of HDL. By using the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin, we show that SR-BI is down-regulated in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). This reduction of SR-BI protein as well as mRNA levels by about 50% did not alter HDL particle uptake or HDL-derived lipid transfer. However, rapamycin reduced HDL-induced activation of eNOS and stimulation of endothelial cell migration. The effects on cell migration could be counteracted by SR-BI overexpression, indicating that decreased SR-BI expression is in part responsible for the rapamycin-induced effects. We demonstrate that inhibition of mTOR leads to endothelial cell dysfunction and decreased SR-BI expression, which may contribute to atherogenesis during rapamycin treatment.

  13. Ptc6 is required for proper rapamycin-induced down-regulation of the genes coding for ribosomal and rRNA processing proteins in S. cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    González, Asier; Casado, Carlos; Ariño, Joaquín; Casamayor, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Ptc6 is one of the seven components (Ptc1-Ptc7) of the protein phosphatase 2C family in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In contrast to other type 2C phosphatases, the cellular role of this isoform is poorly understood. We present here a comprehensive characterization of this gene product. Cells lacking Ptc6 are sensitive to zinc ions, and somewhat tolerant to cell-wall damaging agents and to Li(+). Ptc6 mutants are sensitive to rapamycin, albeit to lesser extent than ptc1 cells. This phenotype is not rescued by overexpression of PTC1 and mutation of ptc6 does not reproduce the characteristic genetic interactions of the ptc1 mutation with components of the TOR pathway, thus suggesting different cellular roles for both isoforms. We show here that the rapamycin-sensitive phenotype of ptc6 cells is unrelated to the reported role of Pt6 in controlling pyruvate dehydrogenase activity. Lack of Ptc6 results in substantial attenuation of the transcriptional response to rapamycin, particularly in the subset of repressed genes encoding ribosomal proteins or involved in rRNA processing. In contrast, repressed genes involved in translation are Ptc6-independent. These effects cannot be attributed to the regulation of the Sch9 kinase, but they could involve modulation of the binding of the Ifh1 co-activator to specific gene promoters.

  14. Ptc6 Is Required for Proper Rapamycin-Induced Down-Regulation of the Genes Coding for Ribosomal and rRNA Processing Proteins in S. cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    González, Asier; Casado, Carlos; Ariño, Joaquín; Casamayor, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Ptc6 is one of the seven components (Ptc1-Ptc7) of the protein phosphatase 2C family in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In contrast to other type 2C phosphatases, the cellular role of this isoform is poorly understood. We present here a comprehensive characterization of this gene product. Cells lacking Ptc6 are sensitive to zinc ions, and somewhat tolerant to cell-wall damaging agents and to Li+. Ptc6 mutants are sensitive to rapamycin, albeit to lesser extent than ptc1 cells. This phenotype is not rescued by overexpression of PTC1 and mutation of ptc6 does not reproduce the characteristic genetic interactions of the ptc1 mutation with components of the TOR pathway, thus suggesting different cellular roles for both isoforms. We show here that the rapamycin-sensitive phenotype of ptc6 cells is unrelated to the reported role of Pt6 in controlling pyruvate dehydrogenase activity. Lack of Ptc6 results in substantial attenuation of the transcriptional response to rapamycin, particularly in the subset of repressed genes encoding ribosomal proteins or involved in rRNA processing. In contrast, repressed genes involved in translation are Ptc6-independent. These effects cannot be attributed to the regulation of the Sch9 kinase, but they could involve modulation of the binding of the Ifh1 co-activator to specific gene promoters. PMID:23704987

  15. Clinically used selective oestrogen receptor modulators increase LDL receptor activity in primary human lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Cerrato, F; Fernández-Suárez, M E; Alonso, R; Alonso, M; Vázquez, C; Pastor, O; Mata, P; Lasunción, M A; Gómez-Coronado, D

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Treatment with selective oestrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) reduces low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels. We assessed the effect of tamoxifen, raloxifene and toremifene and their combinations with lovastatin on LDL receptor activity in lymphocytes from normolipidaemic and familial hypercholesterolaemic (FH) subjects, and human HepG2 hepatocytes and MOLT-4 lymphoblasts. Experimental Approach Lymphocytes were isolated from peripheral blood, treated with different compounds, and 1,1′-dioctadecyl-3,3,3,3′-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (DiI)-labelled LDL uptake was analysed by flow cytometry. Key Results Tamoxifen, toremifene and raloxifene, in this order, stimulated DiI-LDL uptake by lymphocytes by inhibiting LDL-derived cholesterol trafficking and subsequent down-regulation of LDL receptor expression. Differently to what occurred in HepG2 and MOLT-4 cells, only tamoxifen consistently displayed a potentiating effect with lovastatin in primary lymphocytes. The SERM-mediated increase in LDL receptor activity was not altered by the anti-oestrogen ICI 182 780 nor was it reproduced by 17β-oestradiol. However, the tamoxifen-active metabolite endoxifen was equally effective as tamoxifen. The SERMs produced similar effects on LDL receptor activity in heterozygous FH lymphocytes as in normal lymphocytes, although none of them had a potentiating effect with lovastatin in heterozygous FH lymphocytes. The SERMs had no effect in homozygous FH lymphocytes. Conclusions and Implications Clinically used SERMs up-regulate LDL receptors in primary human lymphocytes. There is a mild enhancement between SERMs and lovastatin of lymphocyte LDLR activity, the potentiation being greater in HepG2 and MOLT-4 cells. The effect of SERMs is independent of oestrogen receptors but is preserved in the tamoxifen-active metabolite endoxifen. This mechanism may contribute to the cholesterol-lowering action of SERMs. PMID:25395200

  16. Rapamycin causes down-regulation of CCR5 and accumulation of anti-HIV beta-chemokines: an approach to suppress R5 strains of HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Heredia, A; Amoroso, A; Davis, C; Le, N; Reardon, E; Dominique, J K; Klingebiel, E; Gallo, R C; Redfield, R R

    2003-09-02

    Propagation of R5 strains of HIV-1 on CD4 lymphocytes and macrophages requires expression of the CCR5 coreceptor on the cell surface. Individuals lacking CCR5 (CCR5 Delta 32 homozygous genotype) are phenotypically normal and resistant to infection with HIV-1. CCR5 expression on lymphocytes depends on signaling through the IL-2 receptor. By FACS analysis we demonstrate that rapamycin (RAPA), a drug that disrupts IL-2 receptor signaling, reduces CCR5 surface expression on T cells at concentrations as low as 1 nM. In addition, lower concentrations of RAPA (0.01 nM) were sufficient to reduce CCR5 surface expression on maturing monocytes. PCR analysis on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) showed that RAPA interfered with CCR5 expression at the transcriptional level. Reduced expression of CCR5 on PBMCs cultured in the presence of RAPA was associated with increased extracellular levels of macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1 alpha and MIP-1 beta. In infectivity assays, RAPA suppressed the replication of R5 strains of HIV-1 both in PBMC and macrophage cultures. In total PBMC cultures, RAPA-mediated inhibition of CCR5-using strains of HIV-1 occurred at 0.01 nM, a concentration of drug that is approximately 103 times lower than therapeutic through levels of drug in renal transplant recipients. In addition, RAPA enhanced the antiviral activity of the CCR5 antagonist TAK-779. These results suggest that low concentrations of RAPA may have a role in both the treatment and prevention of HIV-1 infection.

  17. Marked hypocholesterolemia in a case with adrenal adenoma--enhanced catabolism of low density lipoprotein (LDL) via the LDL receptors of tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, T; Ueyama, Y; Nozaki, S; Yamashita, S; Menju, M; Funahashi, T; Kameda-Takemura, K; Kubo, M; Tokunaga, K; Tanaka, T

    1995-01-01

    A 16-yr-old girl was hospitalized because of amenorrhea and virilism, and was diagnosed with an adrenal tumor on the right side. Her serum androgen levels were markedly elevated, and severe hypocholesterolemia (total cholesterol, 0.59 mmol/L) was observed. After resection of the tumor, her serum cholesterol level dramatically rose to normal, suggesting a role of this tumor in her marked hypocholesterolemia. To investigate the mechanism of hypocholesterolemia in this case, we examined the effects of dehydroepiandrosterone and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate on the low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor activity of fibroblasts. These hormones did not have any effect on LDL receptor activity. Northern blot analysis demonstrated that the LDL receptor messenger ribonucleic acid level of this tumor tissue was increased about 8-fold compared with that of normal adrenal cortex. The LDL receptor activity of the cultured cells established from this tumor was 2-fold higher than that of Hep G2 cells. Furthermore, the LDL receptor activity could not be down-regulated by an excessive dose of 25-hydroxycholesterol. These results suggest that increased LDL receptor activity and unrestricted uptake of LDL by the adrenal tumor may have caused the marked hypocholesterolemia in this patient.

  18. A longer and healthier life with TOR down-regulation: genetics and drugs.

    PubMed

    Bjedov, Ivana; Partridge, Linda

    2011-04-01

    Genetic down-regulation of a major nutrient-sensing pathway, TOR (target of rapamycin) signalling, can improve health and extend lifespan in evolutionarily distant organisms such as yeast and mammals. Recently, it has been demonstrated that treatment with a pharmacological inhibitor of the TOR pathway, rapamycin, can replicate those findings and improve aging in a variety of model organisms. The proposed underlying anti-aging mechanisms are down-regulated translation, increased autophagy, altered metabolism and increased stress resistance.

  19. Detection of large deletions in the LDL receptor gene with quantitative PCR methods

    PubMed Central

    Damgaard, Dorte; Nissen, Peter H; Jensen, Lillian G; Nielsen, Gitte G; Stenderup, Anette; Larsen, Mogens L; Faergeman, Ole

    2005-01-01

    Background Familial Hypercholesterolemia (FH) is a common genetic disease and at the molecular level most often due to mutations in the LDL receptor gene. In genetically heterogeneous populations, major structural rearrangements account for about 5% of patients with LDL receptor gene mutations. Methods In this study we tested the ability of two different quantitative PCR methods, i.e. Real-Time PCR and Multiplex Ligation-Dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA), to detect deletions in the LDL receptor gene. We also reassessed the contribution of major structural rearrangements to the mutational spectrum of the LDL receptor gene in Denmark. Results With both methods it was possible to discriminate between one and two copies of the LDL receptor gene exon 5, but the MLPA method was cheaper, and it was far more accurate and precise than Real-Time PCR. In five of 318 patients with an FH phenotype, MLPA analysis revealed five different deletions in the LDL receptor gene. Conclusion The MLPA method was accurate, precise and at the same time effective in screening a large number of FH patients for large deletions in the LDL receptor gene. PMID:15842735

  20. PCSK9-mediated degradation of the LDL receptor generates a 17 kDa C-terminal LDL receptor fragment.

    PubMed

    Tveten, Kristian; Strøm, Thea Bismo; Berge, Knut Erik; Leren, Trond P

    2013-06-01

    Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) binds to the LDL receptor (LDLR) at the cell surface and reroutes the internalized LDLR to intracellular degradation. In this study, we have shown that PCSK9-mediated degradation of the full-length 160 kDa LDLR generates a 17 kDa C-terminal LDLR fragment. This fragment was not generated from mutant LDLRs resistant to PCSK9-mediated degradation or when degradation was prevented by chemicals such as ammonium chloride or the cysteine cathepsin inhibitor E64d. The observation that the 17 kDa fragment was only detected when the cells were cultured in the presence of the γ-secretase inhibitor DAPT indicates that this 17 kDa fragment undergoes γ-secretase cleavage within the transmembrane domain. The failure to detect the complementary 143 kDa ectodomain fragment is likely to be due to its rapid degradation in the endosomal lumen. The 17 kDa C-terminal LDLR fragment was also generated from a Class 5 mutant LDLR undergoing intracellular degradation. Thus, one may speculate that an LDLR with bound PCSK9 and a Class 5 LDLR with bound LDL are degraded by a similar mechanism that could involve ectodomain cleavage in the endosome.

  1. A nonsense mutation in the LDL receptor gene leads to familial hypercholesterolemia in the Druze sect

    SciTech Connect

    Landsberger, D.; Meiner, V.; Reshef, A.; Leitersdorf, E. ); Levy, Yishai ); Westhytzen, D.R. van der; Coetzee, G.A. )

    1992-02-01

    Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is an autosomal dominant disease caused by mutations in the LDL receptor gene. Here the authors characterize and LDL receptor mutation that is associated with a distinct haplotype and causes FH in the Druze, a small Middle Eastern Islamic sect with a high degree of inbreeding. The mutation was found in FH families from two distinct Druze villages from the Golan Heights (northern Israel). It was not found either in another Druze FH family residing in a different geographical area nor in eight Arab and four Jewish FH heterozygote index cases whose hypercholesterolemia cosegregates with an identical LDL receptor gene haplotype. The mutation, a single-base substitution, results in a termination codon in exon 4 of the LDL receptor gene that encodes for the fourth repeat of the binding domain of the mature receptor. It can be diagnosed by allele-specific oligonucleotide hybridization of PCR-amplified DNA from FH patients.

  2. Effect of Genistein and L-Carnitine and Their Combination on Gene Expression of Hepatocyte HMG-COA Reductase and LDL Receptor in Experimental Nephrotic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    YOUSEFINEJAD, Abbas; SIASSI, Fereydoon; MIRSHAFIEY, Abbas; ESHRAGHIAN, Mohammad-Reza; KOOHDANI, Fariba; JAVANBAKHT, Mohammad Hassan; SEDAGHAT, Reza; RAMEZANI, Atena; ZAREI, Mahnaz; DJALALI, Mahmoud

    2015-01-01

    Background: Nephrotic syndrome is a disorder that leads to hyperlipidemia. L-carnitine and genistein can effect on lipid metabolism and the syndrome. In the present study, we have delved into the separate and the twin-effects of L-carnitine and genistein on the gene expressions of HMG-COA reductase and LDL receptor in experimental nephrotic syndrome. Methods: In this controlled experimental study, 50 male Sprague–Dawley rats were randomly divided into five groups: NC (normal-control), PC (patient-control), LC (L-carnitine), G (genistein), LCG (L-carnitine-genistein). Adriamycin was used for inducing nephrotic syndrome and the spot urine samples and urine protein-to-creatinine ratio were measured. Hepatocytic RNA was extracted and real-time PCR was used for HMG-COA Reductase and LDL receptor gene Expression measurement. Results: The final weight of the patients groups were lower than the NC group (P=0.001), and weight gain of the NC group was higher than the other groups (P<0.001). The proteinuria and urine protein-to-creatinine ratio showed significant differences between PC group and LC, G and LCG groups at week 7 (P<0.001). The expression of HMGCOA Reductase mRNA down regulated in LC, G and LCG groups in comparison with PC group (P<0.001). ΔCT of LDLr mRNA showed significant differences between the PC group and the other patient groups (P<0.001). Conclusion: This study shows a significant decreasing (P<0.001) and non-significant increasing trend in HMG-COA Reductase and LDLr gene expression, respectively, and synergistic effect of L-carnitine and genistein on these genes in experimental nephrotic syndrome. PMID:26576346

  3. Cranberries inhibit LDL oxidation and induce LDL receptor expression in hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Chu, Yi-Fang; Liu, Rui Hai

    2005-08-26

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in most industrialized countries. Cranberries were evaluated for their potential roles in dietary prevention of CVD. Cranberry extracts were found to have potent antioxidant capacity preventing in vitro LDL oxidation with increasing delay and suppression of LDL oxidation in a dose-dependent manner. The antioxidant activity of 100 g cranberries against LDL oxidation was equivalent to 1000 mg vitamin C or 3700 mg vitamin E. Cranberry extracts also significantly induced expression of hepatic LDL receptors and increased intracellular uptake of cholesterol in HepG2 cells in vitro in a dose-dependent manner. This suggests that cranberries could enhance clearance of excessive plasma cholesterol in circulation. We propose that additive or synergistic effects of phytochemicals in cranberries are responsible for the inhibition of LDL oxidation, the induced expression of LDL receptors, and the increased uptake of cholesterol in hepatocytes.

  4. Lipoprotein lipase, LDL receptors and apo-lipoproteins in human fetal membranes at term.

    PubMed

    Huter, O; Wolf, H J; Schnetzer, A; Pfaller, K

    1997-11-01

    Ultrastructurally, all cells of human fetal membranes strongly exhibit a large amount of lipid deposits throughout pregnancy. Their origin and function is still unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the localization of key components of lipid metabolism in this tissue. Using immunohistochemical techniques, the distribution of lipoprotein lipase (LPL), low density lipoprotein receptors (LDL receptors), and apo-lipoprotein B and E was investigated in 20 human fetal membranes at term. In addition, electron microscopy was used to study the intracellular localization of lipoprotein-sized particles. Amnionic epithelium and trophoblast cells reacted strongly for LPL. LDL receptors and apo-lipoproteins were present in amnionic epithelium and fibroblasts of the amnion. In none of the investigated cells were lipoprotein-sized particles identified. Similar results were obtained in all 20 cases. The findings indicate that lipoprotein from the amniotic fluid or from the maternal circulation may serve as substrate for lipids in human fetal membranes.

  5. Imaging LDL receptor oligomerization during endocytosis using a co-internalization assay

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Peng; Ting, Alice Y.

    2011-01-01

    Methods to probe receptor oligomerization are useful to understand the molecular mechanisms of receptor signaling. Here we report a fluorescence imaging method to determine receptor oligomerization state in living cells during endocytic internalization. The wild-type receptor is co-expressed with an internalization-defective mutant, and the internalization kinetics of each is independently monitored. If the receptor internalizes as an oligomer, then the wild-type and mutant isoforms will mutually influence each others' trafficking properties, causing co-internalization of the mutant, or co-retention of the wild-type at the cell surface. Using this approach, we found that the low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor internalizes as an oligomer into cells, both in the presence and absence of LDL ligand. The internalization kinetics of the wild-type receptor is not changed by LDL binding. We also found that the oligomerization domain of the LDL receptor is located in its cytoplasmic tail. PMID:21194239

  6. Having excess levels of PCSK9 is not sufficient to induce complex formation between PCSK9 and the LDL receptor.

    PubMed

    Wooten, Catherine J; Adcock, Audrey F; Agina-Obu, DaTonye I; Lopez, Dayami

    2014-03-01

    Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin-9 (PCSK9) acts mainly by forming complexes with the LDL receptor at the cell surface, which are then degraded in the lysosome. Studies were performed to determine whether excess levels of PCSK9 was sufficient to induce PCSK9/LDL receptor complex formation in human hepatocyte-like C3A cells. It was demonstrated using ELISA that instead of considering the overall levels of PCSK9 protein that is produced in response to certain treatment, what is critical is how much PCSK9 is actually capable of forming complexes. Despite the high levels, most of the PCSK9 produced as a result of incubating cells with a medium supplemented with BD™ MITO+ serum extender (MITO+ medium) appeared to be inhibited by a secreted factor. Having lower levels of PCSK9/LDL receptor complexes did not prevent an increase in the degradation rate of LDL receptors in MITO+ medium as compared to fetal bovine serum (FBS) containing medium (Regular medium), an effect that did not correlate with an increase in protein levels of the inducible degrader of LDL receptors (IDOL), as demonstrated using Western blotting analysis. Additional studies are required to determine the exact mechanism(s) for the degradation of the LDL receptor and/or to identify the secreted inhibitor of PCSK9.

  7. Reducing elevated plasma LDL cholesterol: the central role of the LDL receptor.

    PubMed

    Vincent, J

    2014-07-01

    Elevated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) is an established risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD), and reduction of elevated LDL-C reduces mortality in patients at risk. This benefit has evolved from the use of statins and knowledge of the LDL receptor (LDLR). The most potent drugs used for dyslipidemias act by mechanisms that involve this receptor. Advances in molecular genetics and understanding of the regulation of this receptor have revealed several pharmacological targets that are being explored to develop more targeted therapies for dyslipidemias.

  8. Genetically determined hypercholesterolemia in a rhesus monkey family due to a deficiency of the LDL receptor.

    PubMed

    Scanu, A M; Khalil, A; Neven, L; Tidore, M; Dawson, G; Pfaffinger, D; Jackson, E; Carey, K D; McGill, H C; Fless, G M

    1988-12-01

    A family of rhesus monkeys comprising a sire, a dam, and four male offspring were fed a cholesterol-free Purina Chow diet for several months. The sire, 431-J, and two of the offspring, B-8204 and B-8806, had persistent plasma cholesterol levels in the range of 100-130 mg/dl, whereas the dam, 766-I, and the two other offspring, B-1000 and B-7643, exhibited a marked hypercholesterolemia in the 250-300 mg/dl range associated with an elevation of plasma LDL and apoB. When fed for 12 weeks a diet containing 12.5% lard and 0.25% cholesterol, sire, dam, B-1000 and B-7643 exhibited a marked hypercholesterolemia (500-800 mg/dl range), whereas B-8204 and B-8806 developed only a modest hypercholesterolemia (200-250 mg/dl). All animals were Lp[a]+. Skin fibroblasts from each animal and from control cells were grown in 10% fetal calf serum, transferred to 10% lipoprotein-deficient serum for 48 hr, and then incubated at 4 degrees C or 37 degrees C with 125I-labeled Lp[a]-free LDL. The fibroblasts from dam and offspring B-1000 and B-7643 bound and internalized 125I-labeled LDL less efficiently than control cells. Mathematical analyses of the 4 degrees C binding data indicated that there were no significant differences in LDL binding affinity between test and control cells suggesting that cells from the animals with a spontaneous hypercholesterolemia had a decreased number of LDL receptors. This conclusion was supported by the results of ligand and immunoblot analyses carried out on cell lysates separated by gradient gel electrophoresis. We conclude that a genetically determined LDL receptor deficiency was responsible, in part, for the spontaneous hypercholesterolemia observed in three out of the six family members and that this deficiency accounted for the hyperresponsiveness to a dietary fat and cholesterol challenge by the dam and the two offspring, B-1000 and B-7643. The hyperresponsiveness noted in the sire that had no evidence for LDL-receptor deficiency illustrates that

  9. LDL Receptor-Related Protein-1 (LRP1) Regulates Cholesterol Accumulation in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Lillis, Anna P.; Muratoglu, Selen Catania; Au, Dianaly T.; Migliorini, Mary; Lee, Mi-Jeong; Fried, Susan K.; Mikhailenko, Irina; Strickland, Dudley K.

    2015-01-01

    Within the circulation, cholesterol is transported by lipoprotein particles and is taken up by cells when these particles associate with cellular receptors. In macrophages, excessive lipoprotein particle uptake leads to foam cell formation, which is an early event in the development of atherosclerosis. Currently, mechanisms responsible for foam cell formation are incompletely understood. To date, several macrophage receptors have been identified that contribute to the uptake of modified forms of lipoproteins leading to foam cell formation, but the contribution of the LDL receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) to this process is not known. To investigate the role of LRP1 in cholesterol accumulation in macrophages, we generated mice with a selective deletion of LRP1 in macrophages on an LDL receptor (LDLR)-deficient background (macLRP1-/-). After feeding mice a high fat diet for 11 weeks, peritoneal macrophages isolated from Lrp+/+ mice contained significantly higher levels of total cholesterol than those from macLRP1-/- mice. Further analysis revealed that this was due to increased levels of cholesterol esters. Interestingly, macLRP1-/- mice displayed elevated plasma cholesterol and triglyceride levels resulting from accumulation of large, triglyceride-rich lipoprotein particles in the circulation. This increase did not result from an increase in hepatic VLDL biosynthesis, but rather results from a defect in catabolism of triglyceride-rich lipoprotein particles in macLRP1-/- mice. These studies reveal an important in vivo contribution of macrophage LRP1 to cholesterol homeostasis. PMID:26061292

  10. Expression of lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1 in smooth muscle cells after vascular injury

    SciTech Connect

    Eto, Hideyuki; Miyata, Masaaki . E-mail: miyatam@m3.kufm.kagoshima-u.ac.jp; Kume, Noriaki; Minami, Manabu; Itabe, Hiroyuki; Orihara, Koji; Hamasaki, Shuichi; Biro, Sadatoshi; Otsuji, Yutaka; Kita, Toru; Tei, Chuwa

    2006-03-10

    Lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1 (LOX-1) is an oxidized LDL receptor, and its role in restenosis after angioplasty remains unknown. We used a balloon-injury model of rabbit aorta, and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction revealed that LOX-1 mRNA expression was modest in the non-injured aorta, reached a peak level 2 days after injury, and remained elevated until 24 weeks after injury. Immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization showed that LOX-1 was not detected in the media of non-injured aorta but expressed in both medial and neointimal smooth muscle cells (SMC) at 2 and 24 weeks after injury. Low concentrations of ox-LDL (10 {mu}g/mL) stimulated the cultured SMC proliferation, which was inhibited by antisense oligonucleotides of LOX-1 mRNA. Double immunofluorescense staining showed the colocalization of LOX-1 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen in human restenotic lesion. These results suggest that LOX-1 mediates ox-LDL-induced SMC proliferation and plays a role in neointimal formation after vascular injury.

  11. Striking differences of LDL receptor-related protein 1B expression in mouse and human.

    PubMed

    Li, Yonghe; Lu, Wenyan; Bu, Guojun

    2005-08-05

    The low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor-related protein 1B (LRP1B) is a member of the expanding LDL receptor family, and is closely related to LRP. It was discovered as a putative tumor suppressor, and is frequently inactivated in human malignant tissues. However, the expression pattern of LRP1B in normal human tissues was unclear. In the present study, we analyzed LRP1B expression in normal mouse and human tissues. By using RT-PCR, we found that, while mouse LRP1B expression is mostly restricted to the brain, human LRP1B expression is more widespread with highest expression levels detected in the brain, adrenal gland, salivary gland, and testis. Although mouse LRP1B expresses in the forms of both full-length receptor tail and an alternatively spliced form lacking a 33-amino acid insert, human LRP1B is expressed exclusively in the form of full-length receptor tail. Finally, we found that, unlike mouse LRP1B, human LRP1B is cleaved by furin. Taken together, these data demonstrate that there are striking differences between LRP1B expression in mouse and human tissues. The broader expression pattern of LRP1B in human tissues suggests that this putative tumor suppressor may play roles in several types of human cancer.

  12. Phenotypic characterization of a patient homozygous for the D558N LDL receptor gene mutation.

    PubMed

    Jensen, H K; Jensen, L G; Heath, F; Melsen, F; Hansen, P S; Meinertz, H; Bolund, L; Gregersen, N; Faergeman, O

    1996-11-01

    We describe the clinical, biochemical, and genetic features of a patient with true homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia due to the D558N low-density lipoprotein receptor gene mutation, previously designated FH Cincinnati-4. Functional flow-cytometric analysis of the LDL receptorR protein on upregulated EBV-transformed lymphocytes indicated reduction of the number of receptors on the cell surface by 87% and reduction of receptor activity by 89% compared to control cells. With drugs and a portacaval shunt operation, performed when the patient was 15 years old, serum cholesterol was reduced from about 28 to about 15 mmol/l. He died at the age of 32 of a myocardial infarction. The autopsy showed generalized atherosclerosis, especially in the coronary arteries, which were severely stenosed proximally. A rare finding was a large intracranial xanthoma that apparently had been asymptomatic.

  13. Magnesium fortification of drinking water suppresses atherogenesis in male LDL-receptor-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Sherer, Y; Shaish, A; Levkovitz, H; Keren, P; Janackovic, Z; Shoenfeld, Y; Harats, D

    1999-01-01

    Magnesium, an important cofactor of more than 300 enzymes, has previously been found to modulate blood lipid levels, atherogenesis and atherosclerosis in rabbits, when added to their diet. The aim of this study was to examine whether magnesium fortification of drinking water, without a change in diet content, can affect atherogenesis. The study included six groups of LDL-receptor-deficient mice. The mice received either distilled water or water containing 50 g of magnesium sulfate per liter. In the first (12 weeks) and second (6 weeks) stages of the experiment, the mice received low- and high-cholesterol diets, respectively. At the end of each stage, blood was drawn for the determination of plasma magnesium, calcium and lipid levels. In addition, the extent of atherosclerosis was determined at the aortic sinus. In both males and females, magnesium fortification was associated with higher levels of plasma magnesium (50 and 37% increase, respectively), without any differences in plasma calcium content. The extent of atherosclerosis at the aortic sinus in the male mice that received high levels of magnesium was a third of that of the male mice that received distilled water. However, these differences were not found in the female groups. Surprisingly, the female mice that received water fortified with magnesium had higher levels of cholesterol after stage 2, whereas no differences regarding plasma lipid levels were found among the male mice. These results confirm that magnesium fortification of drinking water is capable of inhibiting atherogenesis in male LDL-receptor-deficient mice. The mechanisms of action are yet to be discovered, and are probably not related to diminished lipid excretion, but possibly to the prevention of calcium influx into vascular smooth muscle cells, elevated antioxidative capacity, or other yet undetermined mechanisms.

  14. LRAD3, a Novel LDL Receptor Family Member that Modulates Amyloid Precursor Protein Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Ranganathan, Sripriya; Noyes, Nathaniel C.; Migliorini, Mary; Winkles, Jeffrey A.; Battey, Frances D.; Hyman, Bradley T.; Smith, Elizabeth; Yepes, Manuel; Mikhailenko, Irina; Strickland, Dudley K.

    2011-01-01

    We have identified a novel LDL receptor family member, termed LDL receptor class A domain containing 3 (LRAD3), which is expressed in neurons. The LRAD3 gene encodes an approximately 50 kDa type I transmembrane receptor with an ectodomain containing three LDLa repeats, a transmembrane domain and a cytoplasmic domain containing a conserved dileucine internalization motif and two polyproline motifs with potential to interact with WW domain containing proteins. Immunohistochemical analysis of mouse brain reveals LRAD3 expression in the cortex and hippocampus. In the mouse hippocampal derived cell line, HT22, LRAD3 partially co-localizes with amyloid precursor protein (APP), and interacts with APP as revealed by co-immunoprecipitation experiments. To identify the portion of APP that interacts with LRAD3, we employed solid phase binding assays which demonstrated that LRAD3 failed to bind to a soluble APP fragment (sAPPα) released following α-secretase cleavage. In contrast, C99, the β-secretase product that remains cell associated, co-precipitated with LRAD3, confirming that regions within this portion of APP are important for associating with LRAD3. The association of LRAD3 with APP increases the amyloidogenic pathway of APP processing, resulting in a decrease in sAPPα production and increased Aβ peptide production. Pulse-chase experiments confirm that LRAD3 expression significantly decreases the cellular half-live of mature APP. These results reveal that LRAD3 influences APP processing and raises the possibility that LRAD3 alters APP function in neurons including its downstream signaling. PMID:21795536

  15. Transgenic expression of CYP7A1 in LDL receptor-deficient mice blocks diet-induced hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Ratliff, Eric P; Gutierrez, Alejandra; Davis, Roger A

    2006-07-01

    Constitutive expression of a cholesterol-7alpha-hydroxylase (CYP7A1) transgene in LDL receptor-deficient mice blocked the ability of a cholesterol-enriched diet to increase plasma levels of apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins. LDL receptor-deficient mice expressing the CYP7A1 transgene exhibited complete resistance to diet-induced hypercholesterolemia and to the accumulation of cholesterol in the liver. Hepatic mRNA expression of liver X receptor-inducible ABCG5 and ABCG8 was decreased in CYP7A1 transgenic, LDL receptor-deficient mice fed a cholesterol-enriched diet. Thus, increased biliary cholesterol excretion could not account for the maintenance of cholesterol homeostasis. CYP7A1 transgenic, LDL receptor-deficient mice fed the cholesterol-enriched diet exhibited decreased jejunal Niemann-Pick C1-Like 1 protein (NPC1L1) mRNA expression, an important mediator of intestinal cholesterol absorption. A taurocholate-enriched diet also decreased NPC1L1 mRNA expression in a farnesoid X receptor-independent manner. Reduced expression of NPC1L1 mRNA was associated with decreased cholesterol absorption ( approximately 20%; P < 0.05) exhibited by CYP7A1 transgenic LDL receptor-deficient mice fed the cholesterol-enriched diet. The combined data show that enhanced expression of CYP7A1 is an effective means to prevent the accumulation of cholesterol in the liver and of atherogenic apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins in plasma.

  16. The IDOL–UBE2D complex mediates sterol-dependent degradation of the LDL receptor

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li; Fairall, Louise; Goult, Benjamin T.; Calkin, Anna C.; Hong, Cynthia; Millard, Christopher J.; Tontonoz, Peter; Schwabe, John W.R.

    2011-01-01

    We previously identified the E3 ubiquitin ligase IDOL as a sterol-dependent regulator of the LDL receptor (LDLR). The molecular pathway underlying IDOL action, however, remains to be determined. Here we report the identification and biochemical and structural characterization of an E2–E3 ubiquitin ligase complex for LDLR degradation. We identified the UBE2D family (UBE2D1–4) as E2 partners for IDOL that support both autoubiquitination and IDOL-dependent ubiquitination of the LDLR in a cell-free system. NMR chemical shift mapping and a 2.1 Å crystal structure of the IDOL RING domain–UBE2D1 complex revealed key interactions between the dimeric IDOL protein and the E2 enzyme. Analysis of the IDOL–UBE2D1 interface also defined the stereochemical basis for the selectivity of IDOL for UBE2Ds over other E2 ligases. Structure-based mutations that inhibit IDOL dimerization or IDOL–UBE2D interaction block IDOL-dependent LDLR ubiquitination and degradation. Furthermore, expression of a dominant-negative UBE2D enzyme inhibits the ability of IDOL to degrade the LDLR in cells. These results identify the IDOL–UBE2D complex as an important determinant of LDLR activity, and provide insight into molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of cholesterol uptake. PMID:21685362

  17. Soy milk versus simvastatin for preventing atherosclerosis and left ventricle remodeling in LDL receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Santos, L; Davel, A P; Almeida, T I R; Almeida, M R; Soares, E A; Fernandes, G J M; Magalhães, S F; Barauna, V G; Garcia, J A D

    2017-02-20

    Functional food intake has been highlighted as a strategy for the prevention of cardiovascular diseases by reducing risk factors. In this study, we compared the effects of oral treatment with soy milk and simvastatin on dyslipidemia, left ventricle remodeling and atherosclerotic lesion of LDL receptor knockout mice (LDLr-/-) fed a hyperlipidic diet. Forty 3-month old male LDLr-/- mice were distributed into four groups: control group (C), in which animals received standard diet; HL group, in which animals were fed a hyperlipidic diet; HL+SM or HL+S groups, in which animals were submitted to a hyperlipidic diet plus soy milk or simvastatin, respectively. After 60 days, both soy milk and simvastatin treatment prevented dyslipidemia, atherosclerotic lesion progression and left ventricle hypertrophy in LDLr-/- mice. These beneficial effects of soy milk and simvastatin were associated with reduced oxidative stress and inflammatory state in the heart and aorta caused by the hyperlipidic diet. Treatment with soy milk was more effective in preventing HDLc reduction and triacylglycerol and VLDLc increase. On the other hand, simvastatin was more effective in preventing an increase in total cholesterol, LDLc and superoxide production in aorta, as well as CD40L both in aorta and left ventricle of LDLr-/-. In conclusion, our results suggest a cardioprotective effect of soy milk in LDLr-/- mice comparable to the well-known effects of simvastatin.

  18. Protein Interactions between Fe65, the LDL receptor-related protein and the amyloid precursor protein

    PubMed Central

    Mulvihill, Melinda; Guttman, Miklos; Komives, Elizabeth A.

    2011-01-01

    The adapter protein, Fe65 has been proposed to be the link between the intracellular domains of the amyloid precursor protein, APP (AICD) and the LDL receptor-related protein (LRP-CT). Functional linkage between these two proteins has been established and mutations within LRP-CT affect the amount of Aβ produced from APP. Previous work showed that the AICD binds to the protein interaction domain 2 (PID2) of Fe65. Although the structure of PID1 was solved recently all attempts to demonstrate LRP-CT binding to this domain failed. We used biophysical experiments and binding studies to investigate the binding between these three proteins. Full-length Fe65 bound more weakly to AICD than did N-terminally truncated forms, however the intramolecular domain-domain interactions that had been proposed to inhibit binding could not be observed using amide H/D exchange. Surprisingly, when the LRP-CT is phosphorylated at Tyr4507, it bound to Fe65-PID1 despite the fact that this domain belongs to the Dab-like subclass of PIDs that is not supposed to be phosphorylation dependent. Mutation of a critical arginine abolished binding providing further proof of the phosphorylation-dependence. The Fe65-PID1 domain thus provides a link between the Dab-like class and the IRS-like class of PID domains and is the first Dab-like family member to show phosphorylation-dependent binding. PMID:21650223

  19. Soy milk versus simvastatin for preventing atherosclerosis and left ventricle remodeling in LDL receptor knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Santos, L.; Davel, A.P.; Almeida, T.I.R.; Almeida, M.R.; Soares, E.A.; Fernandes, G.J.M.; Magalhães, S.F.; Barauna, V.G.; Garcia, J.A.D.

    2017-01-01

    Functional food intake has been highlighted as a strategy for the prevention of cardiovascular diseases by reducing risk factors. In this study, we compared the effects of oral treatment with soy milk and simvastatin on dyslipidemia, left ventricle remodeling and atherosclerotic lesion of LDL receptor knockout mice (LDLr-/-) fed a hyperlipidic diet. Forty 3-month old male LDLr-/- mice were distributed into four groups: control group (C), in which animals received standard diet; HL group, in which animals were fed a hyperlipidic diet; HL+SM or HL+S groups, in which animals were submitted to a hyperlipidic diet plus soy milk or simvastatin, respectively. After 60 days, both soy milk and simvastatin treatment prevented dyslipidemia, atherosclerotic lesion progression and left ventricle hypertrophy in LDLr-/- mice. These beneficial effects of soy milk and simvastatin were associated with reduced oxidative stress and inflammatory state in the heart and aorta caused by the hyperlipidic diet. Treatment with soy milk was more effective in preventing HDLc reduction and triacylglycerol and VLDLc increase. On the other hand, simvastatin was more effective in preventing an increase in total cholesterol, LDLc and superoxide production in aorta, as well as CD40L both in aorta and left ventricle of LDLr-/-. In conclusion, our results suggest a cardioprotective effect of soy milk in LDLr-/- mice comparable to the well-known effects of simvastatin. PMID:28225891

  20. Citrullus lanatus `Sentinel' (Watermelon) Extract Reduces Atherosclerosis in LDL Receptor Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Poduri, Aruna; Rateri, Debra L.; Saha, Shubin K.; Saha, Sibu; Daugherty, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Watermelon (Citrullus lanatus or C. lanatus) has many potentially bioactive compounds including citrulline, which may influence atherosclerosis. In this study, we determined the effects of C. lanatus, provided as an extract of the cultivar `sentinel', on hypercholesterolemia-induced atherosclerosis in mice. Male LDL receptor deficient mice at 8 weeks old were given either C. lanatus `sentinel' extract (2% vol/vol; n=10) or a mixture of matching carbohydrates (2% vol/vol; n=8) as the control in drinking water, while fed a saturated fat-enriched diet for 12 weeks ad libitum. Mice consuming C. lanatus `sentinel' extract had significantly increased plasma citrulline concentrations. Systolic blood pressure was comparable between the two groups. Consumption of C. lanatus `sentinel' extract led to lower body weight and fat mass without influencing lean mass. There were no differences in food and water intake, and urine output between the two groups. C. lanatus `sentinel' extract administration decreased plasma cholesterol concentrations that were attributed to reductions of intermediate/low density lipoprotein cholesterol. Plasma concentrations of MCP-1 and IFN-γ were decreased and IL-10 increased in mice consuming C. lanatus `sentinel' extract. Intake of C. lanatus `sentinel' extract resulted in reductions of atherosclerosis in both aortic arch and thoracic regions. In conclusion, consumption of C. lanatus `sentinel' extract led to reduced body weight gain, decreased plasma cholesterol concentrations, improved homeostasis of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, and attenuated development of atherosclerosis without affecting systolic blood pressure in hypercholesterolemic mice. PMID:22902326

  1. Macrophage-specific overexpression of interleukin-5 attenuates atherosclerosis in LDL receptor-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Zhao, W; Lei, T; Li, H; Sun, D; Mo, X; Wang, Z; Zhang, K; Ou, H

    2015-08-01

    Interleukin-5 (IL-5) increases the secretion of natural T15/EO6 IgM antibodies that inhibit the uptake of oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL) by macrophages. This study aimed to determine whether macrophage-specific expression of IL-5 in LDL receptor-deficient mice (Ldlr(-/-)) could improve cholesterol metabolism and reduce atherosclerosis. To induce macrophage-specific IL-5 expression, the pLVCD68-IL5 lentivirus was delivered into Ldlr(-/-) mice via bone marrow transplantation. The recipient mice were fed a Western-type diet for 12 weeks to induce lesion formation. We found that IL-5 was efficiently and specifically overexpressed in macrophages in recipients of pLVCD68-IL5-transduced bone marrow cells (BMC). Plasma titers of T15/EO6 IgM antibodies were significantly elevated by 58% compared with control mice transplanted with pLVCD68 lacking the IL-5 coding sequence. Plaque areas of aortas in IL-5-overexpressing mice were reduced by 43% and associated with a 2.4-fold decrease in lesion size at the aortic roots when compared with mice receiving pLVCD68-transduced BMCs. The study showed that macrophage-specific overexpression of IL-5 inhibited the progression of atherosclerotic lesions. These findings suggest that modulation of IL-5 cytokine expression represents a potential strategy for intervention of familial hypercholesterolemia and other cardiovascular diseases.

  2. [Study of LDL receptors and response to lovastatin therapy in familial homozygotic hypercholesterolemia].

    PubMed

    Ausina Gómez, A; Gilsanz Peral, A; Montero Brens, C; Dalmau Serra, J

    1991-11-01

    This study shows the results obtained with lovastatin as a combined therapy with probucol and cholestyramine on the lipid profile of two patients with homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia. Both have been diagnosed according to the clinical and biochemical criteria (tipe IIa hypercholesterolemia) as well as by the cholesterol or low density lipoprotein (LDL-C) receptor analysis. After the initial probucol and cholestyramine treatment we observed a drop of total cholesterol (T-C) of 41.7% and 46% as well as LDL-C of 51.6% and 49.3% in both patients. Respectively when lovastatin were associated an additional drop of T-C of 23.7%, LDL-C of 23.2%, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) of 22.4% and the apoprotein B (Apo B) of 37% were obtained in one patient (receptor-defective) but no change in the lipid profile were obtained in the other patient (receptor-negative). No adverse effects were observed with this drug. This drug could be of help as a combined therapy in the treatment of homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia, even though the treatment of choice is the LDL-plasma feresis and/or liver transplantation. We expound the difficulties relate to LDL receptor study in homocygous receptor-negative patients.

  3. Versatility in ligand recognition by LDL receptor family proteins: advances and frontiers.

    PubMed

    Blacklow, Stephen C

    2007-08-01

    Proteins of the low-density lipoprotein receptor family transport cholesterol-carrying particles into cells, clear protease-inhibitor complexes from the circulation, participate in biological signaling cascades, and even serve as viral receptors. These receptors utilize clusters of cysteine-rich LDL receptor type-A (LA) modules to bind many of their ligands. Recent structures show that these modules typically exhibit a characteristic binding mode to recognize their partners, relying primarily on electrostatic complementarity and avidity effects. The dominant contribution of electrostatic interactions with small interface areas in these complexes allows binding to be regulated by changes in pH via at least two distinct mechanisms. The structure of the subtilisin/kexin family protease PCSK9, a newly identified molecular partner of the LDLR also implicated in LDL-cholesterol homeostasis, also raises the possibility that the LDLR and its related family members may employ other strategies for pH-sensitive binding that have yet to be uncovered.

  4. Hematopoietic Sphingosine 1-Phosphate Lyase Deficiency Decreases Atherosclerotic Lesion Development in LDL-Receptor Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bot, Martine; Van Veldhoven, Paul P.; de Jager, Saskia C. A.; Johnson, Jason; Nijstad, Niels; Van Santbrink, Peter J.; Westra, Marijke M.; Van Der Hoeven, Gerd; Gijbels, Marion J.; Müller-Tidow, Carsten; Varga, Georg; Tietge, Uwe J. F.; Kuiper, Johan; Van Berkel, Theo J. C.; Nofer, Jerzy-Roch

    2013-01-01

    Aims Altered sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) homeostasis and signaling is implicated in various inflammatory diseases including atherosclerosis. As S1P levels are tightly controlled by S1P lyase, we investigated the impact of hematopoietic S1P lyase (Sgpl1−/−) deficiency on leukocyte subsets relevant to atherosclerosis. Methods and Results LDL receptor deficient mice that were transplanted with Sgpl1−/− bone marrow showed disrupted S1P gradients translating into lymphopenia and abrogated lymphocyte mitogenic and cytokine response as compared to controls. Remarkably however, Sgpl1−/− chimeras displayed mild monocytosis, due to impeded stromal retention and myelopoiesis, and plasma cytokine and macrophage expression patterns, that were largely compatible with classical macrophage activation. Collectively these two phenotypic features of Sgpl1 deficiency culminated in diminished atherogenic response. Conclusions Here we not only firmly establish the critical role of hematopoietic S1P lyase in controlling S1P levels and T cell trafficking in blood and lymphoid tissue, but also identify leukocyte Sgpl1 as critical factor in monocyte macrophage differentiation and function. Its, partly counterbalancing, pro- and anti-inflammatory activity spectrum imply that intervention in S1P lyase function in inflammatory disorders such as atherosclerosis should be considered with caution. PMID:23700419

  5. NDRG1 functions in LDL receptor trafficking by regulating endosomal recycling and degradation.

    PubMed

    Pietiäinen, Vilja; Vassilev, Boris; Blom, Tomas; Wang, Wei; Nelson, Jessica; Bittman, Robert; Bäck, Nils; Zelcer, Noam; Ikonen, Elina

    2013-09-01

    N-myc downstream-regulated gene 1 (NDRG1) mutations cause Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 4D (CMT4D). However, the cellular function of NDRG1 and how it causes CMT4D are poorly understood. We report that NDRG1 silencing in epithelial cells results in decreased uptake of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) due to reduced LDL receptor (LDLR) abundance at the plasma membrane. This is accompanied by the accumulation of LDLR in enlarged EEA1-positive endosomes that contain numerous intraluminal vesicles and sequester ceramide. Concomitantly, LDLR ubiquitylation is increased but its degradation is reduced and ESCRT (endosomal sorting complex required for transport) proteins are downregulated. Co-depletion of IDOL (inducible degrader of the LDLR), which ubiquitylates the LDLR and promotes its degradation, rescues plasma membrane LDLR levels and LDL uptake. In murine oligodendrocytes, Ndrg1 silencing not only results in reduced LDL uptake but also in downregulation of the oligodendrocyte differentiation factor Olig2. Both phenotypes are rescued by co-silencing of Idol, suggesting that ligand uptake through LDLR family members controls oligodendrocyte differentiation. These findings identify NDRG1 as a novel regulator of multivesicular body formation and endosomal LDLR trafficking. The deficiency of functional NDRG1 in CMT4D might impair lipid processing and differentiation of myelinating cells.

  6. A novel posttranscriptional mechanism for dietary cholesterol-mediated suppression of liver LDL receptor expression.

    PubMed

    Singh, Amar Bahadur; Kan, Chin Fung Kelvin; Shende, Vikram; Dong, Bin; Liu, Jingwen

    2014-07-01

    It is well-established that over-accumulation of dietary cholesterol in the liver inhibits sterol-regulatory element binding protein (SREBP)-mediated LDL receptor (LDLR) gene transcription leading to a reduced hepatic LDLR mRNA level in hypercholesterolemic animals. However, it is unknown whether elevated cholesterol levels can elicit a cellular response to increase LDLR mRNA turnover to further repress LDLR expression in liver tissue. In the current study, we examined the effect of a high cholesterol diet on the hepatic expression of LDLR mRNA binding proteins in three different animal models and in cultured hepatic cells. Our results demonstrate that high cholesterol feeding specifically elevates the hepatic expression of LDLR mRNA decay promoting factor heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (HNRNP)D without affecting expressions of other LDLR mRNA binding proteins in vivo and in vitro. Employing the approach of adenovirus-mediated gene knockdown, we further show that depletion of HNRNPD in the liver results in a marked reduction of serum LDL-cholesterol and a substantial increase in liver LDLR expression in hyperlipidemic mice. Additional studies of gene knockdown in albumin-luciferase-untranslated region (UTR) transgenic mice provide strong evidence supporting the essential role of 3'UTR in HNRNPD-mediated LDLR mRNA degradation in liver tissue. Altogether, this work identifies a novel posttranscriptional regulatory mechanism by which dietary cholesterol inhibits liver LDLR expression via inducing HNRNPD to accelerate LDLR mRNA degradation.

  7. Rapamycin additively extends lifespan in short- and long-lived lines of the nematode Caenorhabditis remanei.

    PubMed

    Lind, Martin I; Chen, Hwei-Yen; Cortazar-Chinarro, Maria; Maklakov, Alexei A

    2017-04-01

    Despite tremendous progress in finding genes that, when manipulated, affects lifespan, little is known about the genetics underlying natural variation in lifespan. While segregating genetic variants for lifespan has been notoriously difficult to find in genome-wide association studies (GWAS), a complementary approach is to manipulate key genetic pathways in lines that differ in lifespan. If these candidate pathways are down regulated in long-lived lines, these lines can be predicted to respond less to pharmaceutical down-regulation of these pathways than short-lived lines. Experimental studies have identified the nutrient-sensing pathway TOR as a key regulator of lifespan in model organisms, and this pathway can effectively be down regulated using the drug rapamycin, which extends lifespan in all tested species. We expose short- and long-lived lines of the nematode Caenorhabditis remanei to rapamycin, and investigate if long-lived lines, which are hypothesized to already have down-regulated TOR signaling, respond less to rapamycin. We found no interaction between line and rapamycin treatment, since rapamycin extended lifespan independent of the intrinsic lifespan of the lines. This shows that rapamycin is equally effective on long and short-lived lines, and suggests that the evolution of long life may involve more factors that down-regulation of TOR. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Phaleria macrocarpa (Scheff.) Boerl fruit aqueous extract enhances LDL receptor and PCSK9 expression in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Chong, Soo Ching; Dollah, Mohamad Aziz; Chong, Pei Pei; Maha, Abdullah

    2011-09-01

    Phaleria macrocarpa (Scheff.) Boerl (Pm) has been shown to reduce cholesterol level in vitro and in vivo experiment. This study investigated the effects of Pm fruit on weight control and mechanistic basis of its anti-hypercholesterolemic effect in both in vivo and in vitro. In the in vivo study, thirty six male Sprague Dawley were randomized to six groups. Five groups were induced into hypercholesterolemia by giving 3% cholesterol enriched-diet for 52 days while one group acted as control. The rats were then treated with Pm extract (0, 20, 30 and 40 mg/ml) or simvastatin for 84 days. The following parameters were determined: (1) body weight, (2) blood lipid profile (total cholesterol, triglyceride, HDL and LDL) and (3) hepatic LDL receptor (160 kDa and 120 kDa) and PCSK9 proteins. In the in vitro study, HepG2 cells were cultured in serum-free RPMI supplemented with 0.2% BSA with or without LDL and in the presence of Pm extract (0, 0.1, 2, 40 and 1,000 μg/ml) or simvastatin (4.60 μg/ml) for 24h. The abundance of both LDL receptor and PCSK9 proteins and mRNA were investigated. Pm extract significantly (P<0.05) reduced body weight gain, total cholesterol, triglycerides, HDL LDL levels and upregulated hepatic LDL receptor as well as PCSK9 proteins of hypercholesterolemic rats. These results were supported by studies in HepG2 cells whereby Pm extract also significantly upregulated both LDL receptor and PCSK9 at protein and mRNA levels. This study enhances the potential usage of Pm fruit for controlling the body weight of obese people and for treating hypercholesterolemia. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Intradomain Confinement of Disulfides in the Folding of Two Consecutive Modules of the LDL Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Oliván, Juan; Fraga, Hugo; Arias-Moreno, Xabier; Ventura, Salvador; Sancho, Javier

    2015-01-01

    The LDL receptor internalizes circulating LDL and VLDL particles for degradation. Its extracellular binding domain contains ten (seven LA and three EGF) cysteine-rich modules, each bearing three disulfide bonds. Despite the enormous number of disulfide combinations possible, LDLR oxidative folding leads to a single native species with 30 unique intradomain disulfides. Previous folding studies of the LDLR have shown that non native disulfides are initially formed that lead to compact species. Accordingly, the folding of the LDLR has been described as a "coordinated nonvectorial” reaction, and it has been proposed that early compaction funnels the reaction toward the native structure. Here we analyze the oxidative folding of LA4 and LA5, the modules critical for ApoE binding, isolated and in the LA45 tandem. Compared to LA5, LA4 folding is slow and inefficient, resembling that of LA5 disease-linked mutants. Without Ca++, it leads to a mixture of many two-disulfide scrambled species and, with Ca++, to the native form plus two three-disulfide intermediates. The folding of the LA45 tandem seems to recapitulate that of the individual repeats. Importantly, although the folding of the LA45 tandem takes place through formation of scrambled isomers, no interdomain disulfides are detected, i.e. the two adjacent modules fold independently without the assistance of interdomain covalent interactions. Reduction of incredibly large disulfide combinatorial spaces, such as that in the LDLR, by intradomain confinement of disulfide bond formation might be also essential for the efficient folding of other homologous disulfide-rich receptors. PMID:26168158

  10. The lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1: a new potential molecular target in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Murdocca, Michela; Mango, Ruggiero; Pucci, Sabina; Biocca, Silvia; Testa, Barbara; Capuano, Rosamaria; Paolesse, Roberto; Sanchez, Massimo; Orlandi, Augusto; di Natale, Corrado; Novelli, Giuseppe; Sangiuolo, Federica

    2016-01-01

    The identification of new biomarkers and targets for tailored therapy in human colorectal cancer (CRC) onset and progression is an interesting challenge. CRC tissue produces an excess of ox-LDL, suggesting a close correlation between lipid dysfunction and malignant transformation. Lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1 (LOX-1) is involved in several mechanisms closely linked to tumorigenesis. Here we report a tumor specific LOX-1 overexpression in human colon cancers: LOX-1 results strongly increased in the 72% of carcinomas (P<0.001), and strongly overexpressed in 90% of highly aggressive and metastatic tumours (P<0.001), as compared to normal mucosa. Moreover LOX-1 results modulated since the early stage of the disease (adenomas vs normal mucosa; P<0.001) suggesting an involvement in tumor insurgence and progression. The in vitro knockdown of LOX-1 in DLD-1 and HCT-8 colon cancer cells by siRNA and anti-LOX-1 antibody triggers to an impaired proliferation rate and affects the maintenance of cell growth and tumorigenicity. The wound-healing assay reveals an evident impairment in closing the scratch. Lastly knockdown of LOX-1 delineates a specific pattern of volatile compounds characterized by the presence of a butyrate derivative, suggesting a potential role of LOX-1 in tumor-specific epigenetic regulation in neoplastic cells. The role of LOX-1 as a novel biomarker and molecular target represents a concrete opportunity to improve current therapeutic strategies for CRC. In addition, the innovative application of a technology focused to the identification of LOX-1 driven volatiles specific to colorectal cancer provides a promising diagnostic tool for CRC screening and for monitoring the response to therapy. PMID:26895376

  11. Oats (Avena sativa) reduce atherogenesis in LDL-receptor-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Andersson, K E; Svedberg, K A; Lindholm, M W; Oste, R; Hellstrand, P

    2010-09-01

    The cholesterol-lowering properties of oats, largely ascribed to its contents of soluble fibers, beta-glucans, are well established, whereas effects on atherogenesis are less well elucidated. Oats also contains components with reported antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects that may affect atherogenesis. In this work we examined effects of oat bran on plasma cholesterol, markers of inflammation, eNOS expression and development of atherosclerosis in LDL-receptor-deficient (LDLr(-/-)) mice. Female LDLr(-/-) mice were fed Western diet+/-oat bran. Two concentrations of oat bran (40 and 27%) were compared regarding effects on plasma lipids. There was a dose-dependent reduction of plasma cholesterol by 42 and 20% with 40 and 27% oat bran, respectively. Both concentrations also lowered plasma triglycerides (by 45 and 33%) and relative levels of plasma LDL+VLDL. The reduction of plasma lipids was accompanied by increased faecal excretion of cholesterol and bile acids. Oat bran (40%) efficiently reduced atherosclerotic lesion area in the descending aorta (-77%) and aortic root (-33%). Plasma levels of fibrinogen and soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) were significantly lower, and immunofluorescence of aortic sections revealed a 75% lower expression of VCAM-1 in oat-fed mice. The expression of eNOS protein in the aortic wall was increased in mice fed oat bran. Oat bran supplemented to a Western diet lowers plasma cholesterol, reduces levels of some inflammatory markers, increases eNOS expression and inhibits atherosclerotic lesion development in LDLr(-/-) mice. It remains to be investigated which components in oats contribute to these effects. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Chronic insulin therapy reduces adipose tissue macrophage content in LDL-receptor-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Yoon, J; Subramanian, S; Ding, Y; Wang, S; Goodspeed, L; Sullivan, B; Kim, J; O'Brien, K D; Chait, A

    2011-05-01

    Insulin has anti-inflammatory effects in short-term experiments. However, the effects of chronic insulin administration on inflammation are unknown. We hypothesised that chronic insulin administration would beneficially alter adipose tissue inflammation and several circulating inflammatory markers. We administered two forms of long-acting insulin, insulin glargine (A21Gly,B31Arg,B32Arg human insulin) and insulin detemir (B29Lys[ε-tetradecanoyl],desB30 human insulin), to LDL-receptor-deficient mice. After 8 weeks on a diet that causes obesity, hyperglycaemia, adipose tissue macrophage accumulation and atherosclerosis, the mice received subcutaneous glargine, detemir or NaCl (control) for 12 weeks. Serum amyloid A (SAA) and serum amyloid P (SAP), metabolic variables, adipose tissue macrophages and aortic atherosclerosis were evaluated. Weight gain was equivalent in all groups. The glycated haemoglobin level fell equivalently in both insulin-treated groups. Plasma cholesterol and triacylglycerol levels, and hepatic triacylglycerol level significantly improved in the glargine compared with the detemir or control groups. Levels of mRNA expression for monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and F4/80, a macrophage marker, in adipose tissue were decreased only in the glargine group (p < 0.05). Visceral adipose tissue macrophage content decreased in both insulin groups (p < 0.05), whereas atherosclerosis decreased only in the glargine group. Circulating SAA and SAP did not decrease in either insulin-treated group, but IL-6 levels fell in the glargine-treated mice. While chronic insulin administration did not decrease SAA and SAP, administration of glargine but not detemir insulin improved dyslipidaemia, IL-6 levels and atherosclerosis, and both insulins reduced macrophage accumulation in visceral adipose tissue. Thus, chronic insulin therapy has beneficial tissue effects independent of circulating inflammatory markers in this murine model of diet-induced obesity and

  13. Effect of mutations in the PCSK9 gene on the cell surface LDL receptors.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Jamie; Holla, Øystein L; Ranheim, Trine; Kulseth, Mari Ann; Berge, Knut Erik; Leren, Trond P

    2006-05-01

    The proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) gene is involved in the post-transcriptional regulation of the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptors (LDLR). Mutations in the PCSK9 gene have been associated with both hypocholesterolemia and hypercholesterolemia through 'loss-of-function' and 'gain-of-function' mechanisms, respectively. We have studied the effect of the four loss-of-function mutations R46L, G106R, N157K and R237W and the two gain-of-function mutations S127R and D374Y on the autocatalytic activity of PCSK9, as well as on the amount of the cell surface LDLR and internalization of LDL in transiently transfected HepG2 cells. The two groups of mutations did not differ with respect to autocatalytic activity of PCSK9, but they did differ with respect to the amount of cell surface LDLR and internalization of LDL. The four loss-of-function mutations had a 16% increased level of cell surface LDLR and a 35% increased level of internalization of LDL as compared with WT-PCSK9. The two gain-of-function mutations had a 23% decreased level of cell surface LDLR and a 38% decreased level of internalization of LDL as compared with WT-PCSK9. Our studies have also shown that transfer of media from transiently transfected HepG2 cells to untransfected HepG2 cells, reduces the amount of cell surface LDLR and internalization of LDL in the untransfected cells within 20 min of media transfer. Thus, PCSK9 or a factor acted upon by PCSK9, is secreted from the transfected cells and degrades LDLR both in transfected and untransfected cells.

  14. Optimization and in Vivo Validation of Peptide Vectors Targeting the LDL Receptor.

    PubMed

    Jacquot, Guillaume; Lécorché, Pascaline; Malcor, Jean-Daniel; Laurencin, Mathieu; Smirnova, Maria; Varini, Karine; Malicet, Cédric; Gassiot, Fanny; Abouzid, Karima; Faucon, Aude; David, Marion; Gaudin, Nicolas; Masse, Maxime; Ferracci, Géraldine; Dive, Vincent; Cisternino, Salvatore; Khrestchatisky, Michel

    2016-12-05

    Active targeting and delivery to pathophysiological organs of interest is of paramount importance to increase specific accumulation of therapeutic drugs or imaging agents while avoiding systemic side effects. We recently developed a family of new peptide ligands of the human and rodent LDL receptor (LDLR), an attractive cell-surface receptor with high uptake activity and local enrichment in several normal or pathological tissues (Malcor et al., J. Med. Chem. 2012, 55 (5), 2227). Initial chemical optimization of the 15-mer, all natural amino acid compound 1/VH411 (DSGL[CMPRLRGC]cDPR) and structure-activity relationship (SAR) investigation led to the cyclic 8 amino acid analogue compound 22/VH445 ([cMPRLRGC]c) which specifically binds hLDLR with a KD of 76 nM and has an in vitro blood half-life of ∼3 h. Further introduction of non-natural amino acids led to the identification of compound 60/VH4106 ([(d)-"Pen"M"Thz"RLRGC]c), which showed the highest KD value of 9 nM. However, this latter analogue displayed the lowest in vitro blood half-life (∼1.9 h). In the present study, we designed a new set of peptide analogues, namely, VH4127 to VH4131, with further improved biological properties. Detailed analysis of the hLDLR-binding kinetics of previous and new analogues showed that the latter all displayed very high on-rates, in the 10(6) s(-1.)M(-1) range, and off-rates varying from the low 10(-2) s(-1) to the 10(-1) s(-1) range. Furthermore, all these new analogues showed increased blood half-lives in vitro, reaching ∼7 and 10 h for VH4129 and VH4131, respectively. Interestingly, we demonstrate in cell-based assays using both VH445 and the most balanced optimized analogue VH4127 ([cM"Thz"RLRG"Pen"]c), showing a KD of 18 nM and a blood half-life of ∼4.3 h, that its higher on-rate correlated with a significant increase in both the extent of cell-surface binding to hLDLR and the endocytosis potential. Finally, intravenous injection of tritium-radiolabeled (3)H-VH4127

  15. Endothelium dysfunction in LDL receptor knockout mice: a role for H2O2

    PubMed Central

    Rabelo, Luíza A; Cortes, Steyner F; Alvarez-Leite, Jacqueline I; Lemos, Virgínia S

    2003-01-01

    In this study, the role of endogenous H2O2 as an endothelium-dependent relaxant factor was characterised in aortas from C57BL/6J and LDL receptor-deficient mice (LDLR−/−). Aortic rings from LDLR−/− mice showed impaired endothelium-dependent relaxation to acetylcholine (ACh; 0.001–100 μM) and to the Ca2+ ionophore A23187 (0.001–3 μM) compared with aortic rings from control mice. Endothelium-independent relaxation produced by the NO donor, 3-morpholino-sydnonimine (SIN-1) was not different between strains. Pretreatment of vessels with L-NNA (100 μM) or L-NNA (100 μM) plus L-NAME (300 μM) plus haemoglobin (10 μM) markedly decreased, but did not abolish the relaxation to ACh in control mice. In the aortas from LDLR−/− mice treated with L-NNA (100 μM), ACh induced a contractile effect. Catalase (800 and 2400 U ml−1) shifted to the right the endothelium-dependent relaxation to ACh in aortas from control but not from LDLR−/− mice. Aminotriazole (50 mM), which inhibits catalase, abolished its effect on control mice. Treatment of vessels with L-NNA and catalase abolished vasorelaxation induced by ACh. Indomethacin (10 μM) did not modify the concentration–response curve to ACh. Superoxide dismutase (300 U ml−1) did not change ACh-induced relaxation in both strains. Exogenous H2O2 produced a concentration-dependent relaxation in endothelium-denuded aortic rings, which was not different between strains. It is concluded that H2O2 greatly contributes to relaxation to ACh in aorta from control mice. Endothelial-dependent relaxation to ACh is impaired in LDLR−/− mice. Reduced biosynthesis or increased inactivation of H2O2 is the possible mechanism responsible for endothelial dysfunction in aortas of atherosclerosis-susceptible LDLR−/− mice. PMID:12711621

  16. The plasma concentration of HDL-associated apoM is influenced by LDL receptor-mediated clearance of apoB-containing particles.

    PubMed

    Christoffersen, Christina; Benn, Marianne; Christensen, Pernille M; Gordts, Philip L S M; Roebroek, Anton J M; Frikke-Schmidt, Ruth; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne; Dahlbäck, Björn; Nielsen, Lars B

    2012-10-01

    ApoM is mainly associated with HDL. Nevertheless, we have consistently observed positive correlations of apoM with plasma LDL cholesterol in humans. Moreover, LDL receptor deficiency is associated with increased plasma apoM in mice. Here, we tested the idea that plasma apoM concentrations are affected by the rate of LDL receptor-mediated clearance of apoB-containing particles. We measured apoM in humans each carrying one of three different LDL receptor mutations (n = 9) or the apoB3500 mutation (n = 12). These carriers had increased plasma apoM (1.34 ± 0.13 µM, P = 0.003, and 1.23 ± 0.10 µM, P = 0.02, respectively) as compared with noncarriers (0.93 ± 0.04 µM). When we injected human apoM-containing HDL into Wt (n = 6) or LDL receptor-deficient mice (n = 6), the removal of HDL-associated human apoM was delayed in the LDL receptor-deficient mice. After 2 h, 54 ± 5% versus 90 ± 8% (P < 0.005) of the initial amounts of human apoM remained in the plasma of Wt and LDL receptor-deficient mice, respectively. Finally, we compared the turnover of radio-iodinated LDL and plasma apoM concentrations in 45 normocholesterolemic humans. There was a negative correlation between plasma apoM and the fractional catabolic rate of LDL (r = -0.38, P = 0.009). These data suggest that the plasma clearance of apoM, despite apoM primarily being associated with HDL, is influenced by LDL receptor-mediated clearance of apoB-containing particles.

  17. Rapamycin inhibits poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation in intact cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fahrer, Joerg; Wagner, Silvia; Buerkle, Alexander; Koenigsrainer, Alfred

    2009-08-14

    Rapamycin is an immunosuppressive drug, which inhibits the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) kinase activity inducing changes in cell proliferation. Synthesis of poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) is an immediate cellular response to genotoxic stress catalyzed mostly by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1), which is also controlled by signaling pathways. Therefore, we investigated whether rapamycin affects PAR production. Strikingly, rapamycin inhibited PAR synthesis in living fibroblasts in a dose-dependent manner as monitored by immunofluorescence. PARP-1 activity was then assayed in vitro, revealing that down-regulation of cellular PAR production by rapamycin was apparently not due to competitive PARP-1 inhibition. Further studies showed that rapamycin did not influence the cellular NAD pool and the activation of PARP-1 in extracts of pretreated fibroblasts. Collectively, our data suggest that inhibition of cellular PAR synthesis by rapamycin is mediated by formation of a detergent-sensitive complex in living cells, and that rapamycin may have a potential as therapeutic PARP inhibitor.

  18. Liver heparan sulfate proteoglycans mediate clearance of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins independently of LDL receptor family members

    PubMed Central

    MacArthur, Jennifer M.; Bishop, Joseph R.; Stanford, Kristin I.; Wang, Lianchun; Bensadoun, André; Witztum, Joseph L.; Esko, Jeffrey D.

    2007-01-01

    We examined the role of hepatic heparan sulfate in triglyceride-rich lipoprotein metabolism by inactivating the biosynthetic gene GlcNAc N-deacetylase/N-sulfotransferase 1 (Ndst1) in hepatocytes using the Cre-loxP system, which resulted in an approximately 50% reduction in sulfation of liver heparan sulfate. Mice were viable and healthy, but they accumulated triglyceride-rich lipoprotein particles containing apoB-100, apoB-48, apoE, and apoCI-IV. Compounding the mutation with LDL receptor deficiency caused enhanced accumulation of both cholesterol- and triglyceride-rich particles compared with mice lacking only LDL receptors, suggesting that heparan sulfate participates in the clearance of cholesterol-rich lipoproteins as well. Mutant mice synthesized VLDL normally but showed reduced plasma clearance of human VLDL and a corresponding reduction in hepatic VLDL uptake. Retinyl ester excursion studies revealed that clearance of intestinally derived lipoproteins also depended on hepatocyte heparan sulfate. These findings show that under normal physiological conditions, hepatic heparan sulfate proteoglycans play a crucial role in the clearance of both intestinally derived and hepatic lipoprotein particles. PMID:17200715

  19. Regulation of hepatic LDL receptors by mTORC1 and PCSK9 in mice

    PubMed Central

    Ai, Ding; Chen, Chiyuan; Han, Seongah; Ganda, Anjali; Murphy, Andrew J.; Haeusler, Rebecca; Thorp, Edward; Accili, Domenico; Horton, Jay D.; Tall, Alan R.

    2012-01-01

    Individuals with type 2 diabetes have an increased risk of atherosclerosis. One factor underlying this is dyslipidemia, which in hyperinsulinemic subjects with early type 2 diabetes is typically characterized by increased VLDL secretion but normal LDL cholesterol levels, possibly reflecting enhanced catabolism of LDL via hepatic LDLRs. Recent studies have also suggested that hepatic insulin signaling sustains LDLR levels. We therefore sought to elucidate the mechanisms linking hepatic insulin signaling to regulation of LDLR levels. In WT mice, insulin receptor knockdown by shRNA resulted in decreased hepatic mTORC1 signaling and LDLR protein levels. It also led to increased expression of PCSK9, a known post-transcriptional regulator of LDLR expression. Administration of the mTORC1 inhibitor rapamycin caused increased expression of PCSK9, decreased levels of hepatic LDLR protein, and increased levels of VLDL/LDL cholesterol in WT but not Pcsk9–/– mice. Conversely, mice with increased hepatic mTORC1 activity exhibited decreased expression of PCSK9 and increased levels of hepatic LDLR protein levels. Pcsk9 is regulated by the transcription factor HNF1α, and our further detailed analyses suggest that increased mTORC1 activity leads to activation of PKCδ, reduced activity of HNF4α and HNF1α, decreased PCSK9 expression, and ultimately increased hepatic LDLR protein levels, which result in decreased circulating LDL levels. We therefore suggest that PCSK9 inhibition could be an effective way to reduce the adverse side effect of increased LDL levels that is observed in transplant patients taking rapamycin as immunosuppressive therapy. PMID:22426206

  20. Familial ligand-defective apolipoprotein B. Identification of a new mutation that decreases LDL receptor binding affinity.

    PubMed Central

    Pullinger, C R; Hennessy, L K; Chatterton, J E; Liu, W; Love, J A; Mendel, C M; Frost, P H; Malloy, M J; Schumaker, V N; Kane, J P

    1995-01-01

    Detection of new ligand-defective mutations of apolipoprotein B (apoB) will enable identification of sequences involved in binding to the LDL receptor. Genomic DNA from patients attending a lipid clinic was screened by single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis for novel mutations in the putative LDL receptor-binding domain of apoB-100. A 46-yr-old woman of Celtic and Native American ancestry with primary hypercholesterolemia (total cholesterol [TC] 343 mg/dl; LDL cholesterol [LDL-C] 241 mg/dl) and pronounced peripheral vascular disease was found to be heterozygous for a novel Arg3531-->Cys mutation, caused by a C-->T transition at nucleotide 10800. One unrelated 59-yr-old man of Italian ancestry was found with the same mutation after screening 1,560 individuals. He had coronary heart disease, a TC of 310 mg/dl, and an LDL-C of 212 mg/dl. A total of eight individuals were found with the defect in the families of the two patients. They had an age- and sex-adjusted TC of 240 +/- 14 mg/dl and LDL-C of 169 +/- 10 mg/dl. This compares with eight unaffected family members with age- and sex-adjusted TC of 185 +/- 12 mg/dl and LDL-C of 124 +/- 12 mg/dl. In a dual-label fibroblast binding assay, LDL from the eight subjects with the mutation had an affinity for the LDL receptor that was 63% that of control LDL. LDL from eight unaffected family members had an affinity of 91%. By way of comparison, LDL from six patients heterozygous for the Arg3500-->Gln mutation had an affinity of 36%. The percentage mass ratio of the defective Cys3531 LDL to normal LDL was 59:41, as determined using the mAb MB19 and dynamic laser light scattering. Thus, the defective LDL had accumulated in the plasma of these patients. Using this mass ratio, it was calculated that the defective Cys3531 LDL particles bound with 27% of normal affinity. Deduced haplotypes using 10 apoB gene markers showed the Arg3531-->Cys alleles to be different in the two kindreds and indicates that the mutations arose

  1. Down-regulated genes in mouse dental papillae and pulp.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, H; Muramatsu, T; Kwon, H-J; Yamamoto, H; Hashimoto, S; Jung, H-S; Shimono, M

    2010-07-01

    Important factors involved in odontogenesis in mouse dental papillae disappear between the pre- and post-natal stages of development. Therefore, we hypothesized that certain genes involved in odontogenesis in dental papillae were subject to pre-/post-natal down-regulation. Our goal was to identify, by microarray analysis, which genes were down-regulated. Dental papillae were isolated from embryonic 16-day-, 18-day- (E16, E18), and post-natal 3-day-old (P3) murine first mandibular molar germs and analyzed by microarray. The number of down-regulated genes was 2269 between E16 and E18, and 3130 between E18 and P3. Drastic down-regulation (fold change > 10.0) of Adamts4, Aldha1a2, and Lef1 was observed at both E16 and E18, and quantitative RT-PCR revealed a post-natal reduction in their expression (Adamts4, 1/3; Aldh1a2, 1/13; and Lef1, 1/37). These results suggest that down-regulation of these three genes is an important factor in normal odontogenesis in dental papillae.

  2. Surface aggregation patterns of LDL receptors near coated pits. I. The radially convective diffusion and generalized insertion mechanism.

    PubMed

    Solana-Arellano, E; Echaverría-Heras, H; Leal-Ramírez, C

    1998-12-01

    In this paper we formulate a mathematical model for the receptor mediated endocytotic cycle under the influence of diffusion, radial convection, and generalized receptor reinsertion. The steady state radial concentration function of unbound receptors admits an explicit representation. This can be expressed as a functional of the insertion rate, the diffusion coefficient, and the flow strength. Using the referred functional we study the influence of the aforementioned mechanisms on the surface aggregation pattern of low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptors near coated pits. We perform that analysis on both a theoretical level and by means of simulated receptor aggregation patterns obtained by computer graphics techniques. We conclude that radially convective diffusion in combination with suitable characterizations of the insertion mode are consistent with reported cell surface aggregation patterns.

  3. Novel mechanism by which probucol lowers low density lipoprotein levels demonstrated in the LDL receptor-deficient rabbit

    SciTech Connect

    Naruszewicz, M.; Carew, T.E.; Pittman, R.C.; Witztum, J.L.; Steinberg, D.

    1984-11-01

    Treatment of low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor-deficient rabbits (WHHL rabbits) with probucol (1% w/w in a chow diet) lowered their LDL-cholesterol levels by 36%, consonant with the reported effectiveness of the drug in patients deficient in the LDL receptor. Initial studies of LDL fractional catabolic rate (FCR) using /sup 125/I-labeled LDL prepared from the serum of untreated WHHL rabbits showed no difference between probucol-treated WHHL rabbits and untreated WHHL rabbits. When, however, /sup 125/I-labeled LDL was prepared from donor WHHL rabbits under treatment with probucol and injected back into them, the FCR was found to be increased by about 50% above that measured simultaneously using /sup 131/I-labeled LDL prepared from untreated WHHL donors. The labeled LDL from probucol-treated donors was also metabolized more rapidly than that from untreated donors when injected into untreated WHHL rabbits or into untreated wild-type New Zealand White rabbits. Finally, it was shown that rabbit skin fibroblasts in culture degraded labeled LDL prepared from probucol-treated WHHL rabbits more rapidly than that prepared from untreated WHHL donors. This was true both for normal rabbit fibroblasts and also for WHHL skin fibroblasts, although the absolute degradation rates in the latter were, of course, much lower for both forms of LDL. The data indicate that a major mechanism by which probucol lowers LDL levels relates not to changes in the cellular mechanisms for LDL uptake or to changes in LDL production but rather to intrinsic changes in the structure and metabolism of the plasma LDL of the probucol-treated animal.

  4. Hematopoietic G-protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 deficiency decreases atherosclerotic lesion formation in LDL receptor-knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Otten, Jeroen J. T.; de Jager, Saskia C. A.; Kavelaars, Annemieke; Seijkens, Tom; Bot, Ilze; Wijnands, Erwin; Beckers, Linda; Westra, Marijke M.; Bot, Martine; Busch, Matthias; Bermudez, Beatriz; van Berkel, Theo J. C.; Heijnen, Cobi J.; Biessen, Erik A. L.

    2013-01-01

    Leukocyte chemotaxis is deemed instrumental in initiation and progression of atherosclerosis. It is mediated by G-protein-coupled receptors (e.g., CCR2 and CCR5), the activity of which is controlled by G-protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs). In this study, we analyzed the effect of hematopoietic deficiency of a potent regulator kinase of chemotaxis (GRK2) on atherogenesis. LDL receptor-deficient (LDLr−/−) mice with heterozygous hematopoietic GRK2 deficiency, generated by bone marrow transplantation (n=15), displayed a dramatic attenuation of plaque development, with 79% reduction in necrotic core and increased macrophage content. Circulating monocytes decreased and granulocytes increased in GRK2+/− chimeras, which could be attributed to diminished granulocyte colony-forming units in bone marrow. Collectively, these data pointed to myeloid cells as major mediators of the impaired atherogenic response in GRK2+/− chimeras. LDLr−/− mice with macrophage/granulocyte-specific GRK2 deficiency (LysM-Cre GRK2flox/flox; n=8) failed to mimic the aforementioned phenotype, acquitting these cells as major responsible subsets for GRK2 deficiency-associated atheroprotection. To conclude, even partial hematopoietic GRK2 deficiency prevents atherosclerotic lesion progression beyond the fatty streak stage, identifying hematopoietic GRK2 as a potential target for intervention in atherosclerosis.—Otten, J. J. T., de Jager, S. C. A., Kavelaars, A., Seijkens, T., Bot, I., Wijnands, E., Beckers, L., Westra, M. M., Bot, M., Busch, M., Bermudez, B., van Berkel, T. J. C., Heijnen, C. J., Biessen, E. A. L. Hematopoietic G-protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 deficiency decreases atherosclerotic lesion formation in LDL receptor-knockout mice. PMID:23047899

  5. Down-regulation of PERK enhances resistance to ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Oommen, Deepu Prise, Kevin M.

    2013-11-08

    Highlights: •PERK enhances the sensitivity of cancer cells to ionizing radiation. •Down-regulation of PERK results in enhanced DNA repair. •Ionizing radiation-induced apoptosis is inhibited in PERK-down regulated cancer cells. -- Abstract: Although, ionizing radiation (IR) has been implicated to cause stress in endoplasmic reticulum (ER), how ER stress signaling and major ER stress sensors modulate cellular response to IR is unclear. Protein kinase RNA-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK) is an ER transmembrane protein which initiates unfolded protein response (UPR) or ER stress signaling when ER homeostasis is disturbed. Here, we report that down-regulation of PERK resulted in increased clonogenic survival, enhanced DNA repair and reduced apoptosis in irradiated cancer cells. Our study demonstrated that PERK has a role in sensitizing cancer cells to IR.

  6. Genetic variation at the LDL receptor and HMG-CoA reductase gene loci, lipid levels, statin response, and cardiovascular disease incidence in PROSPER

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Our purpose was to evaluate associations of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at the low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor (LDLRC44857T, minor allele frequency (MAF) 0.26, and A44964G, MAF 0.25, both in the untranslated region) and HMG-CoA reductase (HMGCRi18 T >G, MAF 0.019) gene loci with ba...

  7. A common W556S mutation in the LDL receptor gene of Danish patients with familial hypercholesterolemia encodes a transport-defective protein.

    PubMed

    Jensen, H K; Holst, H; Jensen, L G; Jørgensen, M M; Andreasen, P H; Jensen, T G; Andresen, B S; Heath, F; Hansen, P S; Neve, S; Kristiansen, K; Faergeman, O; Kølvraa, S; Bolund, L; Gregersen, N

    1997-05-01

    In a group of unrelated Danish patients with familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) we recently reported two common low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor mutations, W23X and W66G, accounting for 30% of the cases. In this study, we describe another common LDL receptor mutation, a G to C transition at cDNA position 1730 in exon 12, causing a tryptophan to serine substitution in amino acid position 556 (W556S). In the Danish patients, the W556S mutation was present in 12% of 65 possible mutant alleles. The pathogenicity of the W556S mutation, which is located in one of the five conserved motifs Tyr-Trp-Thr-Asp in the epidermal growth factor homology region, was studied in transfected COS-7 cells expressing normal and mutant LDL receptor cDNAs. Results obtained by immunofluorescence flow cytometry and confocal microscopy, as well as by immunoprecipitation, were compatible with complete retention of the mutant protein in the endoplasmic reticulum. The transport-defective W556S mutation and the W23X and W66G mutations seem to account for about 40% of the LDL receptor defects in Danish families with FH.

  8. The inhibitory effect of soy protein isolate on atherosclerosis in mice does not require the presence of LDL receptors or alteration of plasma lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Adams, Michael R; Golden, Deborah L; Anthony, Mary S; Register, Thomas C; Williams, J Koudy

    2002-01-01

    The mechanisms by which dietary soy favorably influences lipoprotein metabolism and inhibits atherosclerosis are uncertain. Studies of blood mononuclear cells and cultured hepatocytes have indicated that certain soy peptides (i.e., 7S globulins) stimulate expression of LDL receptors. This pathway represents a hypothetical mechanism by which soy's hypocholesterolemic and antiatherosclerotic effects may be mediated. However, direct evidence supporting this hypothesis is lacking. To address this, we compared effects of dietary soy protein isolate in two genetically engineered mouse models of atherosclerosis. One mouse [LDL receptor -/- + apolipoprotein (apo) B transgenic] is devoid of LDL receptors and overproduces apolipoprotein B, whereas the other (apoE -/-) has a normal complement of LDL receptors but does not produce apolipoprotein E. Male (n = 10-12/group) and ovariectomized female (n = 10-12/group) mice were studied. There were three treatment groups, which differed principally by the source of the protein component of the diet: 1) casein/lactalbumin (no isoflavones), 2) alcohol-washed soy protein isolate (total isoflavones = 0.04 mg/g), and 3) intact soy protein isolate (total isoflavones = 1.72 mg/g). Atherosclerosis was assessed by quantifying the aortic content of esterified cholesterol. Atherosclerosis was inhibited (relative to the casein/lactalbumin group) by both alcohol-washed (45 and 31%) (P < 0.05) and intact (65 and 41%) (P < 0.05) soy protein isolate in LDL receptor -/- and apoE -/- mice, respectively. There was no sex difference. In a two-way analysis, there were significant effects of type of soy isolate and type of mouse. The antiatherosclerosis effect was enhanced in LDL receptor -/- mice (P < 0.001) and diminished in mice fed alcohol-washed soy protein isolate (P < 0.001). Furthermore, inhibitory effects of soy on atherosclerosis were unrelated to plasma LDL, VLDL or HDL cholesterol concentrations. The results represent direct evidence for the

  9. Optimal Down Regulation of mRNA Translation

    PubMed Central

    Zarai, Yoram; Margaliot, Michael; Tuller, Tamir

    2017-01-01

    Down regulation of mRNA translation is an important problem in various bio-medical domains ranging from developing effective medicines for tumors and for viral diseases to developing attenuated virus strains that can be used for vaccination. Here, we study the problem of down regulation of mRNA translation using a mathematical model called the ribosome flow model (RFM). In the RFM, the mRNA molecule is modeled as a chain of n sites. The flow of ribosomes between consecutive sites is regulated by n + 1 transition rates. Given a set of feasible transition rates, that models the outcome of all possible mutations, we consider the problem of maximally down regulating protein production by altering the rates within this set of feasible rates. Under certain conditions on the feasible set, we show that an optimal solution can be determined efficiently. We also rigorously analyze two special cases of the down regulation optimization problem. Our results suggest that one must focus on the position along the mRNA molecule where the transition rate has the strongest effect on the protein production rate. However, this rate is not necessarily the slowest transition rate along the mRNA molecule. We discuss some of the biological implications of these results. PMID:28120903

  10. Optimal Down Regulation of mRNA Translation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarai, Yoram; Margaliot, Michael; Tuller, Tamir

    2017-01-01

    Down regulation of mRNA translation is an important problem in various bio-medical domains ranging from developing effective medicines for tumors and for viral diseases to developing attenuated virus strains that can be used for vaccination. Here, we study the problem of down regulation of mRNA translation using a mathematical model called the ribosome flow model (RFM). In the RFM, the mRNA molecule is modeled as a chain of n sites. The flow of ribosomes between consecutive sites is regulated by n + 1 transition rates. Given a set of feasible transition rates, that models the outcome of all possible mutations, we consider the problem of maximally down regulating protein production by altering the rates within this set of feasible rates. Under certain conditions on the feasible set, we show that an optimal solution can be determined efficiently. We also rigorously analyze two special cases of the down regulation optimization problem. Our results suggest that one must focus on the position along the mRNA molecule where the transition rate has the strongest effect on the protein production rate. However, this rate is not necessarily the slowest transition rate along the mRNA molecule. We discuss some of the biological implications of these results.

  11. Biotic Stress Globally Down-Regulates Photosynthesis Genes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Upon herbivore and pathogen attacks, plants switch from processes supporting growth and reproduction to defense by inducing a set of defense genes and down-regulating most of the nuclear encoded photosynthetic genes. To determine if this transcriptional response is universal we used transcriptome da...

  12. Group 1B phospholipase A₂ inactivation suppresses atherosclerosis and metabolic diseases in LDL receptor-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Hollie, Norris I; Konaniah, Eddy S; Goodin, Colleen; Hui, David Y

    2014-06-01

    Previous studies have shown that inactivation of the group 1B phospholipase A2 (Pla2g1b) suppresses diet-induced obesity, hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, and hyperlipidemia in C57BL/6 mice. A possible influence of Pla2g1b inactivation on atherosclerosis has not been addressed previously. The current study utilized LDL receptor-deficient (Ldlr(-/-)) mice with plasma lipid levels and distribution similar to hyperlipidemic human subjects as a preclinical animal model to test the effectiveness of Pla2g1b inactivation on atherosclerosis. The Pla2g1b(+/+)Ldlr(-/-) and Pla2g1b(-/-)Ldlr(-/-) mice were fed a low fat chow diet or a hypercaloric diet with 58.5 kcal% fat and 25 kcal% sucrose for 10 weeks. Minimal differences were observed between Pla2g1b(+/+)Ldlr(-/-) and Pla2g1b(-/-)Ldlr(-/-) mice when the animals were maintained on the low fat chow diet. However, when the animals were maintained on the hypercaloric diet, the Pla2g1(+/+)Ldlr(-/-) mice showed the expected body weight gain but the Pla2g1b(-/-)Ldlr(-/-) mice were resistant to diet-induced body weight gain. The Pla2g1b(-/-)Ldlr(-/-) mice also displayed lower fasting glucose, insulin, and plasma lipid levels compared to the Pla2g1b(+/+)Ldlr(-/-) mice, which displayed robust hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, and hyperlipidemia in response to the hypercaloric diet. Importantly, atherosclerotic lesions in the aortic roots were also reduced 7-fold in the Pla2g1b(-/-)Ldlr(-/-) mice. The effectiveness of Pla2g1b inactivation to suppress diet-induced body weight gain and reduce diabetes and atherosclerosis in LDL receptor-deficient mice suggests that pharmacological inhibition of Pla2g1b may be a viable strategy to decrease diet-induced obesity and the risk of diabetes and atherosclerosis in humans. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The N342S MYLIP polymorphism is associated with high total cholesterol and increased LDL receptor degradation in humans

    PubMed Central

    Weissglas-Volkov, Daphna; Calkin, Anna C.; Tusie-Luna, Teresa; Sinsheimer, Janet S.; Zelcer, Noam; Riba, Laura; Tino, Ana Maria Vargas; Ordoñez-Sánchez, Maria Luisa; Cruz-Bautista, Ivette; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos A.; Tontonoz, Peter; Pajukanta, Päivi

    2011-01-01

    Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) affects more than 1 in 3 American adults. Hypercholesterolemia is a major treatable risk factor for ASCVD, yet many individuals fail to reach target levels of LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C) through the use of statins and lifestyle changes. The E3 ubiquitin ligase myosin regulatory light chain–interacting protein (MYLIP; also known as IDOL) is a recently identified regulator of the LDL receptor (LDLR) pathway. Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) in populations of mixed European descent have identified noncoding variants in the MYLIP region as being associated with LDL-C levels, but no underlying functional variants were pinpointed. In order to fine-map actual susceptibility variants, we studied a population demographically distinct from the discovery population to ensure a different pattern of linkage disequilibrium. Our analysis revealed that in a Mexican population, the nonsynonymous SNP rs9370867, which encodes the N342S amino acid substitution, is an underlying functional variant that was associated with high total cholesterol and accounted for one of the previous significant GWAS signals. Functional characterization showed that the Asn-encoding allele was associated with more potent LDLR degradation and decreased LDL uptake. Mutagenesis of residue 342 failed to affect intrinsic MYLIP E3 ligase activity, but it was critical for LDLR targeting. Our findings suggest that modulation of MYLIP activity can affect LDL-C levels and that pharmacologic inhibition of MYLIP activity might be a useful strategy in the treatment of dyslipidemia and ASCVD. PMID:21765216

  14. Immunization with cationized BSA inhibits progression of disease in ApoBec-1/LDL receptor deficient mice with manifest atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Kolbus, Daniel; Wigren, Maria; Ljungcrantz, Irena; Söderberg, Ingrid; Alm, Ragnar; Björkbacka, Harry; Nilsson, Jan; Fredrikson, Gunilla N

    2011-06-01

    Immune responses against modified self-antigens generated by hypercholesterolemia play an important role in atherosclerosis identifying the immune system as a possible novel target for prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disease. It has recently been shown that these immune responses can be modulated by subcutaneous injection of adjuvant. In the present study we immunized 25-week old ApoBec-1/LDL receptor deficient mice with manifest atherosclerosis with adjuvant and two different concentrations of the carrier molecule cationized BSA (cBSA). Plasma levels of Th2-induced apolipoprotein B (apoB)/IgG1 immune complexes were increased in the cBSA immunized groups verifying induction of immunity against a self-antigen. Mice were sacrificed at 36 weeks of age and atherosclerosis was monitored by en face Oil red O staining of the aorta. Immunization with 100 μg cBSA inhibited plaque progression, whereas the lower dose (50 μg) did not. In addition, the higher dose induced a more stable plaque phenotype, indicated by a higher content of collagen and less macrophages and T cells in the plaques. Moreover, there was an increased ratio of Foxp3+/Foxp3⁻ T cells in the circulation suggesting activation of a regulatory T cell response. In conclusion, we show that immunization with cBSA induces an immune response against apoB as well as an activation of Treg cells. This was associated with development of a more stable plaque phenotype and reduced atherosclerosis progression.

  15. A lipidomics study reveals hepatic lipid signatures associating with deficiency of the LDL receptor in a rat model

    PubMed Central

    Quan, Chao; Hu, Chunxiu; Xie, Bingxian; Du, Yinan; Chen, Liang; Yang, Wei; Yang, Liu; Chen, Qiaoli; Shen, Bin; Hu, Bian; Zheng, Zhihong; Zhu, Haibo; Huang, Xingxu; Xu, Guowang; Chen, Shuai

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) plays a critical role in the liver for the clearance of plasma low-density lipoprotein (LDL). Its deficiency causes hypercholesterolemia in many models. To facilitate the usage of rats as animal models for the discovery of cholesterol-lowering drugs, we took a genetic approach to delete the LDLR in rats aiming to increase plasma LDL cholesterol (LDL-C). An LDLR knockout rat was generated via zinc-finger nuclease technology, which harbors a 19-basepair deletion in the seventh exon of the ldlr gene. As expected, deletion of the LDLR elevated total cholesterol and total triglyceride in the plasma, and caused a tenfold increase of plasma LDL-C and a fourfold increase of plasma very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL-C). A lipidomics analysis revealed that deletion of the LDLR affected hepatic lipid metabolism, particularly lysophosphatidylcholines, free fatty acids and sphingolipids in the liver. Cholesterol ester (CE) 20:4 also displayed a significant increase in the LDLR knockout rats. Taken together, the LDLR knockout rat offers a new model of hypercholesterolemia, and the lipidomics analysis reveals hepatic lipid signatures associating with deficiency of the LDL receptor. PMID:27378433

  16. A novel posttranscriptional mechanism for dietary cholesterol-mediated suppression of liver LDL receptor expression[S

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Amar Bahadur; Kan, Chin Fung Kelvin; Shende, Vikram; Dong, Bin; Liu, Jingwen

    2014-01-01

    It is well-established that over-accumulation of dietary cholesterol in the liver inhibits sterol-regulatory element binding protein (SREBP)-mediated LDL receptor (LDLR) gene transcription leading to a reduced hepatic LDLR mRNA level in hypercholesterolemic animals. However, it is unknown whether elevated cholesterol levels can elicit a cellular response to increase LDLR mRNA turnover to further repress LDLR expression in liver tissue. In the current study, we examined the effect of a high cholesterol diet on the hepatic expression of LDLR mRNA binding proteins in three different animal models and in cultured hepatic cells. Our results demonstrate that high cholesterol feeding specifically elevates the hepatic expression of LDLR mRNA decay promoting factor heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (HNRNP)D without affecting expressions of other LDLR mRNA binding proteins in vivo and in vitro. Employing the approach of adenovirus-mediated gene knockdown, we further show that depletion of HNRNPD in the liver results in a marked reduction of serum LDL-cholesterol and a substantial increase in liver LDLR expression in hyperlipidemic mice. Additional studies of gene knockdown in albumin-luciferase-untranslated region (UTR) transgenic mice provide strong evidence supporting the essential role of 3′UTR in HNRNPD-mediated LDLR mRNA degradation in liver tissue. Altogether, this work identifies a novel posttranscriptional regulatory mechanism by which dietary cholesterol inhibits liver LDLR expression via inducing HNRNPD to accelerate LDLR mRNA degradation. PMID:24792925

  17. A nanoformulation containing a scFv reactive to electronegative LDL inhibits atherosclerosis in LDL receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Cavalcante, Marcela Frota; Kazuma, Soraya Megumi; Bender, Eduardo André; Adorne, Márcia Duarte; Ullian, Mayara; Veras, Mariana Matera; Saldiva, Paulo Hilário Nascimento; Maranhão, Andrea Queiroz; Guterres, Silvia Stanisçuaski; Pohlmann, Adriana Raffin; Abdalla, Dulcineia Saes Parra

    2016-10-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease responsible for the majority of cases of myocardial infarction and ischemic stroke. The electronegative low-density lipoprotein, a modified subfraction of native LDL, is pro-inflammatory and plays an important role in atherogenesis. To investigate the effects of a nanoformulation (scFv anti-LDL(-)-MCMN-Zn) containing a scFv reactive to LDL(-) on the inhibition of atherosclerosis, its toxicity was evaluated in vitro and in vivo and further it was also administered weekly to LDL receptor knockout mice. The scFv anti-LDL(-)-MCMN-Zn nanoformulation did not induce cell death in RAW 264.7 macrophages and HUVECs. The 5mg/kg dose of scFv anti-LDL(-)-MCMN-Zn did not cause any typical signs of toxicity and it was chosen for the evaluation of its atheroprotective effect in Ldlr(-/-) mice. This nanoformulation significantly decreased the atherosclerotic lesion area at the aortic sinus, compared with that in untreated mice. In addition, the Il1b mRNA expression and CD14 protein expression were downregulated in the atherosclerotic lesions at the aortic arch of Ldlr(-/-) mice treated with scFv anti-LDL(-)-MCMN-Zn. Thus, the scFv anti-LDL(-)-MCMN-Zn nanoformulation inhibited the progression of atherosclerotic lesions, indicating its potential use in a future therapeutic strategy for atherosclerosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Influence of fatty acids in maternal diet on atherogenesis in offspring of LDL receptor-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira Cipriano Torres, Dilênia; Santos, Ana Célia Oliveira Dos; Silva, Amanda Karolina Soares E; de Moura, Patrícia Muniz Mendes Freire; Beltrão, Eduardo Isidoro Carneiro; Peixoto, Christina Alves

    2012-01-01

    Aims The present study investigated the effect of a maternal diet rich in omega-6 (E6D) or omega-9 (E9D) on atherogenesis in the offspring of mice. Main methods LDL receptor-deficient mice were fed a diet rich in either omega-6 (E6D) or omega-9 (E9D) for 45 days prior to mating and until the birth of the offspring, evaluating the effect on the offspring aorta in comparison to a standard diet (STD), by immunohistochemical analysis, morphometric analysis and electron microscopy. Key findings Hypercholesterolemic female mice fed E6D generated offspring with high levels of total cholesterol, triglycerides (TG) and CC-chemokine ligand 2/monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (CCL2/ MCP-1) as well as a reduction in high-density lipoprotein. The ascending aorta of these animals exhibited an increase in arterial wall thickness as well as increased expression of CCL2/MCP-1 and vascular cell adhesion molecule 1. The ultrastructural analysis revealed severe alterations in endothelial cells. The offspring from mothers fed E9D exhibited a reduction in TG and an increase in low-density lipoprotein. The ultrastructural analysis revealed a well-preserved aortic endothelium in these animals. Significance The results suggest that hypercholesterolemic mothers feed a diet rich in omega-6 predispose their offspring to endothelial dysfunction. PMID:22328949

  19. Lectin-like ox-LDL receptor-1 (LOX-1)-Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) interaction and autophagy in CATH.a differentiated cells exposed to angiotensin II.

    PubMed

    Ding, Zufeng; Liu, Shijie; Wang, Xianwei; Khaidakov, Magomed; Dai, Yao; Deng, Xiaoyan; Fan, Yubo; Xiang, David; Mehta, Jawahar L

    2015-04-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play an essential role in innate immune response. Expression of TLRs has also been linked to autophagy. As the main receptor for oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) on the cell surface, lectin-like ox-LDL receptor-1 (LOX-1) is upregulated by proinflammatory cytokines and has been linked to the development of autophagy. However, the relationship between LOX-1, autophagy, and TLR4 in neurons has not been defined. Here, we show that Angiotensin II (Ang II) treatment of CATH.a differentiated neuronal cells resulted in the expression of TLR4 (and associated signals MyD88 and Toll/interleukin-1 receptor domain-containing adapter-inducing interferon (TRIF)), LOX-1 autophagy. LOX-1 knockdown (transfection with specific small interfering RNA (siRNA)) resulted in reduced expression of TLR4 (and associated signals MyD88 and TRIF) and P-P38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and autophagy. TLR4 knockdown with siRNA resulted in reduced LOX-1 expression and autophagy, indicating a positive feedback between LOX-1 and TLR4. Knockdown of TRIF as well as MyD88 or inhibition of P38 MAPK also inhibited the expression of LOX-1 and TLR4 and autophagy. Importantly, pretreatment with 3-methyladenine (autophagy inhibitor) enhanced while rapamycin (autophagy inducer) decreased the expression of LOX-1, TLR4, and P-P38 MAPK. These studies suggest the presence of a bidirectional link between LOX-1and TLR4 in cultured CATH.a differentiated cells exposed to Ang II with an important role for autophagy in this link.

  20. Delineation of molecular pathways that regulate hepatic PCSK9 and LDL receptor expression during fasting in normolipidemic hamsters

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Minhao; Dong, Bin; Cao, Aiqin; Li, Hai; Liu, Jingwen

    2015-01-01

    Background PCSK9 has emerged as a key regulator of serum LDL-C metabolism by promoting the degradation of hepatic LDL receptor (LDLR). In this study, we investigated the effect of fasting on serum PCSK9, LDL-C, and hepatic LDLR expression in hamsters and further delineated the molecular pathways involved in fasting-induced repression of PCSK9 transcription. Results Fasting had insignificant effects on serum total cholesterol and HDL-C levels, but reduced LDL-C, triglyceride and insulin levels. The decrease in serum LDL-C was accompanied by marked reductions of hepatic PCSK9 mRNA and serum PCSK9 protein levels with concomitant increases of hepatic LDLR protein amounts. Fasting produced a profound impact on SREBP1 expression and its transactivating activity, while having modest effects on mRNA expressions of SREBP2 target genes in hamster liver. Although PPARα mRNA levels in hamster liver were elevated by fasting, ligand-induced activation of PPARα with WY14643 compound in hamster primary hepatocytes did not affect PCSK9 mRNA or protein expressions. Further investigation on HNF1α, a critical transactivator of PCSK9, revealed that fasting did not alter its mRNA expression, however, the protein abundance of HNF1α in nuclear extracts of hamster liver was markedly reduced by prolonged fasting. Conclusion Fasting lowered serum LDL-C in hamsters by increasing hepatic LDLR protein amounts via reductions of serum PCSK9 levels. Importantly, our results suggest that attenuation of SREBP1 transactivating activity owing to decreased insulin levels during fasting is primarily responsible for compromised PCSK9 gene transcription, which was further suppressed after prolonged fasting by a reduction of nuclear HNF1α protein abundance. PMID:22954675

  1. Molecular Imaging of Atherosclerotic Plaques Targeted to Oxidized LDL Receptor LOX-1 Using SPECT/CT and Magnetic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dayuan; Patel, Amit; Klibanov, Alexander L.; Kramer, Christopher M.; Ruiz, Mirta; Kang, Bum-Yong; Mehta, Jawahar L.; Beller, George A.; Glover, David K.; Meyer, Craig H

    2010-01-01

    Background The oxidized-LDL receptor LOX-1 plays a crucial role in atherosclerosis. We sought to detect and assess atherosclerotic plaque in vivo using SPECT/CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using a molecular probe targeted at LOX-1. Methods & Results Apo E−/− mice on Western diet and LDLR−/− and LDLR−/−/LOX-1−/− mice on atherogenic diet were used. Imaging probes consisted of liposomes decorated with LOX-1 antibodies (LOX-1) or nonspecific IgG (nIgG), 111In or gadolinium (Gd), and DiI fluorescence markers. In vivo imaging was performed 24 hrs after intravenous injection (150 µl) of LOX-1 (or nIgG) probes labeled with either 111In (600 µCi) or Gd (0.075 mmol/kg) followed by aortic excision for phosphor imaging and Sudan IV staining or fluorescence imaging and H&E staining. The LOX-1 probe was also co-localized with specific cell types, apoptosis, and MMP9 expression using frozen aortic sections. SPECT/CT imaging of the LOX-1 probe showed aortic arch hotspots in Apo E−/− mice (n=8), confirmed by phosphor imaging. MRI showed significant Gd enhancement in atherosclerotic plaques in LDLR−/− mice with the LOX-1 (n=7), but not nIgG, probe (n=5). No signal enhancement was observed in LDLR−/−/LOX-1−/− mice injected with LOX-1 probe (n=5). These results were confirmed by ex-vivo fluorescence imaging. The LOX-1 probe bound preferentially to the plaque shoulder, a region with vulnerable plaque features including extensive LOX-1 expression, macrophage accumulation, apoptosis and MMP9 expression. Conclusions LOX-1 can be used as a target for molecular imaging of atherosclerotic plaque in vivo. Furthermore, LOX-1 imaging may identify rupture-prone atherosclerotic plaque. PMID:20442371

  2. Shedding of membrane-associated LDL receptor-related protein-1 from microglia amplifies and sustains neuro-inflammation.

    PubMed

    Brifault, Coralie; Gilder, Andrew S; Laudati, Emilia; Banki, Michael; Gonias, Steven L

    2017-09-28

    In the CNS, microglia are activated in response to injury or infection and in neurodegenerative diseases. The endocytic and cell-signaling receptor, LDL receptor-related protein-1 (LRP1), is reported to suppress innate immunity in macrophages and oppose microglial activation. The goal of this study was to identify novel mechanisms by which LRP1 may regulate microglial activation. Using primary cultures of microglia isolated from mouse brains, we demonstrated that LRP1 gene-silencing increases expression of pro-inflammatory mediators; however, the observed response was modest. By contrast, the LRP1 ligand, receptor-associated protein (RAP), robustly activated microglia and its activity was attenuated in LRP1-deficient cells. An important element of the mechanism by which RAP activated microglia was its ability to cause LRP1 shedding from the plasma membrane. This process eliminated cellular LRP1, which is anti-inflammatory, and generated a soluble product, shed LRP1 (sLRP1), which is potently pro-inflammatory. Purified sLRP1 induced expression of multiple pro-inflammatory cytokines and the mRNA encoding inducible nitric oxide synthase in both LRP1- expressing and -deficient microglia. LPS also stimulated LRP1 shedding, as did the heat shock protein and LRP1 ligand, calreticulin. Other LRP1 ligands, including α2-macroglobulin and tissue-type plasminogen activator, failed to cause LRP1 shedding. Treatment of microglia with a metalloproteinase inhibitor inhibited LRP1 shedding and significantly attenuated RAP-induced cytokine expression. RAP and sLRP1 both caused neuro-inflammation in vivo when administered by stereotaxic injection into mouse spinal cords. Collectively, these results suggest that LRP1 shedding from microglia may amplify and sustain neuro-inflammation in response to pro-inflammatory stimuli. Copyright © 2017, The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  3. Point mutations at the catalytic site of PCSK9 inhibit folding, autoprocessing, and interaction with the LDL receptor.

    PubMed

    Garvie, Colin W; Fraley, Cara V; Elowe, Nadine H; Culyba, Elizabeth K; Lemke, Christopher T; Hubbard, Brian K; Kaushik, Virendar K; Daniels, Douglas S

    2016-11-01

    Circulating low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDLc) is regulated by membrane-bound LDL receptor (LDLr). Upon LDLc and LDLr interaction the complex is internalized by the cell, leading to LDLc degradation and LDLr recycling back to the cell surface. The proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) protein regulates this cycling. PCSK9 is secreted from the cell and binds LDLr. When the complex is internalized, PCSK9 prevents LDLr from shuttling back to the surface and instead targets it for degradation. PCSK9 is a serine protease expressed as a zymogen that undergoes autoproteolysis, though the two resulting protein domains remain stably associated as a heterodimer. This PCSK9 autoprocessing is required for the protein to be secreted from the cell. To date, direct analysis of PCSK9 autoprocessing has proven challenging, as no catalytically active zymogen has been isolated. A PCSK9 loss-of-function point mutation (Q152H) that reduces LDLc levels two-fold was identified in a patient population. LDLc reduction was attributed to a lack of PCSK9(Q152H) autoprocessing preventing secretion of the protein. We have isolated a zymogen form of PCSK9, PCSK9(Q152H), and a related mutation (Q152N), that can undergo slow autoproteolysis. We show that the point mutation prevents the formation of the mature form of PCSK9 by hindering folding, reducing the rate of autoproteolysis, and destabilizing the heterodimeric form of the protein. In addition, we show that the zymogen form of PCSK9 adopts a structure that is distinct from the processed form and is unable to bind a mimetic peptide based on the EGF-A domain of the LDLr.

  4. Lipopolysaccharide augments the uptake of oxidized LDL by up-regulating lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1 in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Ekhtear; Ota, Akinobu; Karnan, Sivasundaram; Takahashi, Miyuki; Mannan, Shahnewaj B; Konishi, Hiroyuki; Hosokawa, Yoshitaka

    2015-02-01

    There is a growing body of evidence supporting an intimate association of immune activation with the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases, including atherosclerosis. Uptake of oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) through scavenging receptors promotes the formation of mature lipid-laden macrophages, which subsequently leads to exacerbation of regional inflammation and atherosclerotic plaque formation. In this study, we first examined changes in the mRNA level of the lectin-like oxLDL receptor-1 (LOX-1) in the mouse macrophage cell line RAW264.7 and the human PMA-induced macrophage cell line THP-1 after LPS stimulation. LPS significantly up-regulated LOX-1 mRNA in RAW264.7 cells; LOX-1 cell-surface protein expression was also increased. Flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy analyses showed that cellular uptake of fluorescence (Dil)-labeled oxLDL was significantly augmented with LPS stimulation. The augmented uptake of Dil-oxLDL was almost completely abrogated by treatment with an anti-LOX-1 antibody. Of note, knockdown of Erk1/2 resulted in a significant reduction of LPS-induced LOX-1 up-regulation. Treatment with U0126, a specific inhibitor of MEK, significantly suppressed LPS-induced expression of LOX-1 at both the mRNA and protein levels. Furthermore, LOX-1 promoter activity was significantly augmented by LPS stimulation; this augmentation was prevented by U0126 treatment. Similar results were also observed in human PMA-induced THP-1 macrophages. Taken together, our results indicate that LPS up-regulates LOX-1, at least in part through activation of the Erk1/2 signaling pathway, followed by augmented cellular oxLDL uptake, thus highlighting a critical role of TLR4-mediated aberrant LOX-1 signaling in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis.

  5. Surface aggregation patterns of LDL receptors near coated pits III: potential effects of combined retrograde membrane flow-diffusion and a polarized-insertion mechanism

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Although the process of endocytosis of the low density lipoprotein (LDL) macromolecule and its receptor have been the subject of intense experimental research and modeling, there are still conflicting hypotheses and even conflicting data regarding the way receptors are transported to coated pits, the manner by which receptors are inserted before they aggregate in coated pits, and the display of receptors on the cell surface. At first it was considered that LDL receptors in human fibroblasts are inserted at random locations and then transported by diffusion toward coated pits. But experiments have not ruled out the possibility that the true rate of accumulation of LDL receptors in coated pits might be faster than predicted on the basis of pure diffusion and uniform reinsertion over the entire cell surface. It has been claimed that recycled LDL receptors are inserted preferentially in regions where coated pits form, with display occurring predominantly as groups of loosely associated units. Another mechanism that has been proposed by experimental cell biologists which might affect the accumulation of receptors in coated pits is a retrograde membrane flow. This is essentially linked to a polarized receptor insertion mode and also to the capping phenomenon, characterized by the formation of large patches of proteins that passively flow away from the regions of membrane exocytosis. In this contribution we calculate the mean travel time of LDL receptors to coated pits as determined by the ratio of flow strength to diffusion-coefficient, as well as by polarized-receptor insertion. We also project the resulting display of unbound receptors on the cell membrane. We found forms of polarized insertion that could potentially reduce the mean capture time of LDL receptors by coated pits which is controlled by diffusion and uniform insertion. Our results show that, in spite of its efficiency as a possible device for enhancement of the rate of receptor trapping, polarized

  6. Surface aggregation patterns of LDL receptors near coated pits III: potential effects of combined retrograde membrane flow-diffusion and a polarized-insertion mechanism.

    PubMed

    Echavarria-Heras, Héctor; Leal-Ramirez, Cecilia; Castillo, Oscar

    2014-05-22

    Although the process of endocytosis of the low density lipoprotein (LDL) macromolecule and its receptor have been the subject of intense experimental research and modeling, there are still conflicting hypotheses and even conflicting data regarding the way receptors are transported to coated pits, the manner by which receptors are inserted before they aggregate in coated pits, and the display of receptors on the cell surface. At first it was considered that LDL receptors in human fibroblasts are inserted at random locations and then transported by diffusion toward coated pits. But experiments have not ruled out the possibility that the true rate of accumulation of LDL receptors in coated pits might be faster than predicted on the basis of pure diffusion and uniform reinsertion over the entire cell surface. It has been claimed that recycled LDL receptors are inserted preferentially in regions where coated pits form, with display occurring predominantly as groups of loosely associated units. Another mechanism that has been proposed by experimental cell biologists which might affect the accumulation of receptors in coated pits is a retrograde membrane flow. This is essentially linked to a polarized receptor insertion mode and also to the capping phenomenon, characterized by the formation of large patches of proteins that passively flow away from the regions of membrane exocytosis. In this contribution we calculate the mean travel time of LDL receptors to coated pits as determined by the ratio of flow strength to diffusion-coefficient, as well as by polarized-receptor insertion. We also project the resulting display of unbound receptors on the cell membrane. We found forms of polarized insertion that could potentially reduce the mean capture time of LDL receptors by coated pits which is controlled by diffusion and uniform insertion. Our results show that, in spite of its efficiency as a possible device for enhancement of the rate of receptor trapping, polarized

  7. Emotion down-regulation diminishes cognitive control: a neurophysiological investigation.

    PubMed

    Hobson, Nicholas M; Saunders, Blair; Al-Khindi, Timour; Inzlicht, Michael

    2014-12-01

    Traditional models of cognitive control have explained performance monitoring as a "cold" cognitive process, devoid of emotion. In contrast to this dominant view, a growing body of clinical and experimental research indicates that cognitive control and its neural substrates, in particular the error-related negativity (ERN), are moderated by affective and motivational factors, reflecting the aversive experience of response conflict and errors. To add to this growing line of research, here we use the classic emotion regulation paradigm-a manipulation that promotes the cognitive reappraisal of emotion during task performance-to test the extent to which affective variation in the ERN is subject to emotion reappraisal, and also to explore how emotional regulation of the ERN might influence behavioral performance. In a within-subjects design, 41 university students completed 3 identical rounds of a go/no-go task while electroencephalography was recorded. Reappraisal instructions were manipulated so that participants either down-regulated or up-regulated emotional involvement, or completed the task normally, without engaging any reappraisal strategy (control). Results showed attenuated ERN amplitudes when participants down-regulated their emotional experience. In addition, a mediation analysis revealed that the association between reappraisal style and attenuated ERN was mediated by changes in reported emotion ratings. An indirect effects model also revealed that down-regulation predicted sensitivity of error-monitoring processes (difference ERN), which, in turn, predicted poorer task performance. Taken together, these results suggest that the ERN appears to have a strong affective component that is associated with indices of cognitive control and behavioral monitoring.

  8. Down-regulation of CEACAM1 in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Changcheng; He, Pingqing; Liu, Yiwen; He, Yiqing; Yang, Cuixia; Du, Yan; Zhou, Muqing; Wang, Wenjuan; Zhang, Guoliang; Wu, Man; Gao, Feng

    2015-10-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen-related adhesion molecule 1 (CEACAM1) is a type 1 transmembrane glycoprotein belonging to the CEA family, which has been found to exist as either soluble forms in body fluids or membrane-bound forms on the cell surface. Aberrant CEACAM1 expression is associated with tumor progression and has been found in a variety of human malignancies. Increasing interest has been devoted to the expression of CEACAM1 in breast cancer, but most of these findings are contradictory. The aim of this study was to investigate CEACAM1 expression in breast cancer in greater detail. Using immunohistochemical staining, we found that CEACAM1 expression was reduced or lost in breast cancer tissues compared with noncancerous breast tissues. In addition, soluble CEACAM1 levels in the culture medium of breast cancer cell lines were significantly lower than those in a nontumorigenic breast epithelial cell line. Immunofluorescence analysis consistently showed that breast cancer cell lines have relatively low expression of membrane-bound CEACAM1. Furthermore, CEACAM1 mRNA and protein expression levels were down-regulated in breast cancer cell lines as measured using real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis, respectively. Taken together, our results demonstrate a systematic down-regulation of CEACAM1 in breast cancer and suggest that a strategy to restore CEACAM1 expression may be helpful for the treatment of breast cancer.

  9. Association of 3'-UTR polymorphisms of the oxidised LDL receptor 1 (OLR1) gene with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Lambert, J-C; Luedecking-Zimmer, E; Merrot, S; Hayes, A; Thaker, U; Desai, P; Houzet, A; Hermant, X; Cottel, D; Pritchard, A; Iwatsubo, T; Pasquier, F; Frigard, B; Conneally, P M; Chartier-Harlin, M-C; DeKosky, S T; Lendon, C; Mann, D; Kamboh, M I; Amouyel, P

    2003-06-01

    Although possession of the epsilon 4 allele of the apolipoprotein E gene appears to be an important biological marker for Alzheimer's disease (AD) susceptibility, strong evidence indicates that at least one additional risk gene exists on chromosome 12. Here, we describe an association of the 3'-UTR +1073 C/T polymorphism of the OLR1 (oxidised LDL receptor 1) on chromosome 12 with AD in French sporadic (589 cases and 663 controls) and American familial (230 affected sibs and 143 unaffected sibs) populations. The age and sex adjusted odds ratio between the CC+CT genotypes versus the TT genotypes was 1.56 (p=0.001) in the French sample and 1.92 (p=0.02) in the American sample. Furthermore, we have discovered a new T/A polymorphism two bases upstream of the +1073 C/T polymorphism. This +1071 T/A polymorphism was not associated with the disease, although it may weakly modulate the impact of the +1073 C/T polymorphism. Using 3'-UTR sequence probes, we have observed specific DNA protein binding with nuclear proteins from lymphocyte, astrocytoma, and neuroblastoma cell lines, but not from the microglia cell line. This binding was modified by both the +1071 T/A and +1073 C/T polymorphisms. In addition, a trend was observed between the presence or absence of the +1073 C allele and the level of astrocytic activation in the brain of AD cases. However, Abeta(40), Abeta(42), Abeta total, and Tau loads or the level of microglial cell activation were not modulated by the 3'-UTR OLR1 polymorphisms. Finally, we assessed the impact of these polymorphisms on the level of OLR1 expression in lymphocytes from AD cases compared with controls. The OLR1 expression was significantly lower in AD cases bearing the CC and CT genotypes compared with controls with the same genotypes. In conclusion, our data suggest that genetic variation in the OLR1 gene may modify the risk of AD.

  10. Hypnosis and top-down regulation of consciousness.

    PubMed

    Terhune, Devin B; Cleeremans, Axel; Raz, Amir; Lynn, Steven Jay

    2017-02-04

    Hypnosis is a unique form of top-down regulation in which verbal suggestions are capable of eliciting pronounced changes in a multitude of psychological phenomena. Hypnotic suggestion has been widely used both as a technique for studying basic science questions regarding human consciousness but also as a method for targeting a range of symptoms within a therapeutic context. Here we provide a synthesis of current knowledge regarding the characteristics and neurocognitive mechanisms of hypnosis. We review evidence from cognitive neuroscience, experimental psychopathology, and clinical psychology regarding the utility of hypnosis as an experimental method for modulating consciousness, as a model for studying healthy and pathological cognition, and as a therapeutic vehicle. We also highlight the relations between hypnosis and other psychological phenomena, including the broader domain of suggestion and suggestibility, and conclude by identifying the most salient challenges confronting the nascent cognitive neuroscience of hypnosis and outlining future directions for research on hypnosis and suggestion.

  11. Onconase Mediated NFKβ Down-Regulation in Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma

    PubMed Central

    Goparaju, Chandra M.; Blasberg, Justin D.; Volinia, Stefano; Palatini, Jeff; Ivanov, Sergey; Donington, Jessica S.; Croce, Carlo; Carbone, Michele; Yang, Haining; Pass, Harvey I.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Treatment of malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) with Ranpirnase (Onconase) results in disruption of protein translation and cell apoptosis. We hypothesize that Onconase acts via down regulation of nuclear factor kappa B (NFKβ) by specific microRNAs (miRNA) and that interference of this pathway could have implications for MPM resistance to chemotherapy. Experimental Design Three immortalized MPM cell lines (H2959, H2373, and H2591) were exposed to Onconase at 0–20 µg/mL. Cell counts were measured at 48 and 72 hours. Gene expression in miRNA-enriched RNA was validated by RT-PCR. The functional implications of miRNA expression were evaluated by transfecting miRNA mimics or inhibitors into MPM cell lines, and performing Matrigel™ invasion, cell proliferation, soft agar colony formation, and scratch closure assays. Effects on NFKβ expression and downstream targets including ABC transporters, BCL-xl, and IAP were assessed by RT-PCR and Western Blotting. Results Treatment with 20µg/mL of Onconase significantly decreased cell count and invasion. Hsa-miR-17* was significantly upregulated and hsa-miR-30c significantly down-regulated by Onconase treatment in all cell lines. Forced expression of hsa-miR-17* mimic and hsa-miR-30c inhibitor each significantly decreased functional activity of Onconase in all assays. NFKB1(p50) expression and downstream targets were also decreased with Onconase treatment as well as with forced expression miRNA mimic and inhibitors. Conclusions Onconase treatment caused a significant decrease in cell proliferation, invasion, and in expression of certain miRNAs. Recapitulation of the resultant miRNA expression pattern with hsa-miR-17* mimic and hsa-miR-30c inhibitor resulted in downregulation of NFKB1 and reduced malignant behavior in functional assays. Thus, Onconase likely exerts its anti-tumor effect through these miRNAs. PMID:21317924

  12. DMBT1 expression is down-regulated in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Braidotti, P; Nuciforo, PG; Mollenhauer, J; Poustka, A; Pellegrini, C; Moro, A; Bulfamante, G; Coggi, G; Bosari, S; Pietra, GG

    2004-01-01

    Background We studied the expression of DMBT1 (deleted in malignant brain tumor 1), a putative tumor suppressor gene, in normal, proliferative, and malignant breast epithelium and its possible relation to cell cycle. Methods Sections from 17 benign lesions and 55 carcinomas were immunostained with anti DMBT1 antibody (DMBTh12) and sections from 36 samples, were double-stained also with anti MCM5, one of the 6 pre-replicative complex proteins with cell proliferation-licensing functions. DMBT1 gene expression at mRNA level was assessed by RT-PCR in frozen tissues samples from 39 patients. Results Normal glands and hyperplastic epithelium in benign lesions displayed a luminal polarized DMBTh12 immunoreactivity. Normal and hyperplastic epithelium adjacent to carcinomas showed a loss of polarization, with immunostaining present in basal and perinuclear cytoplasmic compartments. DMBT1 protein expression was down-regulated in the cancerous lesions compared to the normal and/or hyperplastic epithelium adjacent to carcinomas (3/55 positive carcinomas versus 33/42 positive normal/hyperplastic epithelia; p = 0.0001). In 72% of cases RT-PCR confirmed immunohistochemical results. Most of normal and hyperplastic mammary cells positive with DMBTh12 were also MCM5-positive. Conclusions The redistribution and up-regulation of DMBT1 in normal and hyperplastic tissues flanking malignant tumours and its down-regulation in carcinomas suggests a potential role in breast cancer. Moreover, the concomitant expression of DMTB1 and MCM5 suggests its possible association with the cell-cycle regulation. PMID:15301691

  13. The frontal cortex IGF system is down regulated in the term, intrauterine growth restricted fetal baboon.

    PubMed

    Xie, L; Antonow-Schlorke, I; Schwab, M; McDonald, T J; Nathanielsz, P W; Li, C

    2013-10-01

    The IGF system exerts systemic and local actions during development. We previously demonstrated that fetal cerebral cortical IGF1 is reduced at 0.5 gestation in our IUGR baboon nonhuman primate model. We hypothesized that by term protein expression of several key IGF system stimulatory peptide pathway components and downstream nutrient signaling effectors of IGF, mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and S6, would decrease, indicating reduced cellular nutrient uptake and protein synthesis. We fed 7 control baboons ad libitum while 6 baboons ate a globally reduced diet (70% of feed eaten by controls) from 0.16 gestation through pregnancy that produces IUGR. Fetuses were removed at Cesarean section at 0.9 gestation. Frontal cortex sections were stained for IGFI, IGFII, IGFRI, IGFR2, IGFBP2, 3, 5 and 6, and mTOR and ribosomal protein S6 and double stained with NeuN a neuron-specific nuclear antigen. All proteins stained neuronal cytoplasm except IGFRI which showed only glial cell cytoplasmic and blood vessel staining. IUGR fetuses showed decreased frontal cortical immunoreactive IGFI, IGFII, IGFRI, IGFBP2, 5 and 6, and mTOR and S6 (p < 0.05). IGFBP3 increased (p < 0.05) and IGFR2 was unchanged (p > 0.05). There were no differences between male and female fetal brains. When fetal nutrient availability is decreased, IUGR down regulates the IGF system and its mTOR signaling pathway in the fetal frontal cortex coincident with slowed growth. These findings emphasize the importance of the local tissue IGF system in fetal primate brain development. © 2013.

  14. Toll-like Receptor 4 Deficiency Decreases Atherosclerosis but Does Not Protect against Inflammation in Obese LDL Receptor-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yilei; Subramanian, Savitha; Montes, Vince N.; Goodspeed, Leela; Wang, Shari; Han, Chang Yeop; Teresa, Antonio Sta.; Kim, Jinkyu; O’Brien, Kevin D.; Chait, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Objective Obesity is associated with insulin resistance, chronic low-grade inflammation and atherosclerosis. Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) participates in the cross-talk between inflammation and insulin resistance, being activated by both lipopolysaccharide and saturated fatty acids. This study was undertaken to determine whether TLR4 deficiency has a protective role in inflammation, insulin resistance and atherosclerosis induced by a diabetogenic diet. Methods and Results TLR4 and LDL receptor double knockout (Tlr4−/−Ldlr−/−) mice and Ldlr−/− mice were fed either a normal chow or a diabetogenic diet for 24 weeks. Tlr4−/−Ldlr−/− mice fed a diabetogenic diet showed improved plasma cholesterol and triglyceride levels but developed obesity, hyperinsulinemia and glucose intolerance equivalent to obese Ldlr−/− mice. Adipocyte hypertrophy, macrophage accumulation and local inflammation were not attenuated in intra-abdominal adipose tissue in Tlr4−/−Ldlr−/− mice. However, TLR4 deficiency led to markedly decreased atherosclerosis in obese Tlr4−/−Ldlr−/− mice. Compensatory up-regulation of TLR2 expression was observed both in obese TLR4 deficient mice and in palmitate-treated TLR4-silenced 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Conclusions TLR4 deficiency decreases atherosclerosis without affecting obesity-induced inflammation and insulin resistance in LDL receptor deficient mice. Alternative pathways may be responsible for adipose tissue macrophage infiltration and insulin resistance that occurs in obesity. PMID:22580897

  15. Proteomic plasma membrane profiling reveals an essential role for gp96 in the cell surface expression of LDLR family members, including the LDL receptor and LRP6.

    PubMed

    Weekes, Michael P; Antrobus, Robin; Talbot, Suzanne; Hör, Simon; Simecek, Nikol; Smith, Duncan L; Bloor, Stuart; Randow, Felix; Lehner, Paul J

    2012-03-02

    The endoplasmic reticulum chaperone gp96 is required for the cell surface expression of a narrow range of proteins, including toll-like receptors (TLRs) and integrins. To identify a more comprehensive repertoire of proteins whose cell surface expression is dependent on gp96, we developed plasma membrane profiling (PMP), a technique that combines SILAC labeling with selective cell surface aminooxy-biotinylation. This approach allowed us to compare the relative abundance of plasma membrane (PM) proteins on gp96-deficient versus gp96-reconstituted murine pre-B cells. Analysis of unfractionated tryptic peptides initially identified 113 PM proteins, which extended to 706 PM proteins using peptide prefractionation. We confirmed a requirement for gp96 in the cell surface expression of certain TLRs and integrins and found a marked decrease in cell surface expression of four members of the extended LDL receptor family (LDLR, LRP6, Sorl1 and LRP8) in the absence of gp96. Other novel gp96 client proteins included CD180/Ly86, important in the B-cell response to lipopolysaccharide. We highlight common structural motifs in these client proteins that may be recognized by gp96, including the beta-propeller and leucine-rich repeat. This study therefore identifies the extended LDL receptor family as an important new family of proteins whose cell surface expression is regulated by gp96.

  16. Proteomic Plasma Membrane Profiling Reveals an Essential Role for gp96 in the Cell Surface Expression of LDLR Family Members, Including the LDL Receptor and LRP6

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum chaperone gp96 is required for the cell surface expression of a narrow range of proteins, including toll-like receptors (TLRs) and integrins. To identify a more comprehensive repertoire of proteins whose cell surface expression is dependent on gp96, we developed plasma membrane profiling (PMP), a technique that combines SILAC labeling with selective cell surface aminooxy-biotinylation. This approach allowed us to compare the relative abundance of plasma membrane (PM) proteins on gp96-deficient versus gp96-reconstituted murine pre-B cells. Analysis of unfractionated tryptic peptides initially identified 113 PM proteins, which extended to 706 PM proteins using peptide prefractionation. We confirmed a requirement for gp96 in the cell surface expression of certain TLRs and integrins and found a marked decrease in cell surface expression of four members of the extended LDL receptor family (LDLR, LRP6, Sorl1 and LRP8) in the absence of gp96. Other novel gp96 client proteins included CD180/Ly86, important in the B-cell response to lipopolysaccharide. We highlight common structural motifs in these client proteins that may be recognized by gp96, including the beta-propeller and leucine-rich repeat. This study therefore identifies the extended LDL receptor family as an important new family of proteins whose cell surface expression is regulated by gp96. PMID:22292497

  17. Fibroblast growth factor 2 induces E-cadherin down-regulation via PI3K/Akt/mTOR and MAPK/ERK signaling in ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lau, Man-Tat; So, Wai-Kin; Leung, Peter C K

    2013-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) is produced by ovarian cancer cells and it has been suggested to play an important role in tumor progression. In this study, we report that FGF2 treatment down-regulated E-cadherin by up-regulating its transcriptional repressors, Slug and ZEB1, in human ovarian cancer cells. The pharmacological inhibition of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K), mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), and MEK suggests that both PI3K/Akt/mTOR and MAPK/ERK signaling are required for FGF2-induced E-cadherin down-regulation. Moreover, FGF2 up-regulated Slug and ZEB1 expression via the PI3K/Akt/mTOR and MAPK/ERK signaling pathways, respectively. Finally, FGF2-induced cell invasion was abolished by the inhibition of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR and MAPK/ERK pathways, and the forced expression of E-cadherin diminished the intrinsic invasiveness of ovarian cancer cells as well as the FGF2-induced cell invasion. This study demonstrates a novel mechanism in which FGF2 down-regulates E-cadherin expression through the activation of PI3K/Akt/mTOR and MAPK/ERK signaling, and the up-regulation of Slug and ZEB1 in human ovarian cancer cells.

  18. 15-Hydroxyprostaglandin Dehydrogenase Is Down-regulated in Colorectal Cancer*

    PubMed Central

    Backlund, Michael G.; Mann, Jason R.; Holla, Vijaykumar R.; Buchanan, F. Gregory; Tai, Hsin-Hsiung; Musiek, Erik S.; Milne, Ginger L.; Katkuri, Sharada; DuBois, Raymond N.

    2007-01-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) can stimulate tumor progression by modulating several proneoplastic pathways, including proliferation, angiogenesis, cell migration, invasion, and apoptosis. Although steady-state tissue levels of PGE2 stem from relative rates of biosynthesis and breakdown, most reports examining PGE2 have focused solely on the cyclooxygenase-dependent formation of this bioactive lipid. Enzymatic degradation of PGE2 involves the NAD+-dependent 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (15-PGDH). The present study examined a range of normal tissues in the human and mouse and found high levels of 15-PGDH in the large intestine. By contrast, the expression of 15-PGDH is decreased in several colorectal carcinoma cell lines and in other human malignancies such as breast and lung carcinomas. Consistent with these findings, we observe diminished 15-Pgdh expression in ApcMin+/− mouse adenomas. Enzymatic activity of 15-PGDH correlates with expression levels and the genetic disruption of 15-Pgdh completely blocks production of the urinary PGE2 metabolite. Finally, 15-PGDH expression and activity are significantly down-regulated in human colorectal carcinomas relative to matched normal tissue. In summary, these results suggest a novel tumor suppressive role for 15-PGDH due to loss of expression during colorectal tumor progression. PMID:15542609

  19. Rapamycin regulates biochemical metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Tucci, Paola; Porta, Giovanni; Agostini, Massimiliano; Antonov, Alexey; Garabadgiu, Alexander Vasilievich; Melino, Gerry; Willis, Anne E

    2013-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) kinase is a master regulator of protein synthesis that couples nutrient sensing to cell growth, and deregulation of this pathway is associated with tumorigenesis. p53, and its less investigated family member p73, have been shown to interact closely with mTOR pathways through the transcriptional regulation of different target genes. To investigate the metabolic changes that occur upon inhibition of the mTOR pathway and the role of p73 in this response primary mouse embryonic fibroblast from control and TAp73−/− were treated with the macrocyclic lactone rapamycin. Extensive gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) analysis were used to obtain a rapamycin-dependent global metabolome profile from control or TAp73−/− cells. In total 289 metabolites involved in selective pathways were identified; 39 biochemical metabolites were found to be significantly altered, many of which are known to be associated with the cellular stress response. PMID:23839040

  20. Echium oil reduces plasma lipids and hepatic lipogenic gene expression in apoB100-only LDL receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ping; Boudyguina, Elena; Wilson, Martha D; Gebre, Abraham K; Parks, John S

    2008-10-01

    We tested the hypothesis that dietary supplementation with echium oil (EO), which is enriched in stearidonic acid (SDA; 18:4 n-3), the product of Delta-6 desaturation of 18:3 n-3, will decrease plasma triglyceride (TG) concentrations and result in conversion of SDA to eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) in the liver. Mildly hypertriglyceridemic mice (apoB100-only LDLrKO) were fed a basal diet containing 10% calories as palm oil (PO) and 0.2% cholesterol for 4 weeks, after which they were randomly assigned to experimental diets consisting of the basal diet plus supplementation of 10% of calories as PO, EO or fish oil (FO) for 8 weeks. The EO and FO experimental diets decreased plasma TG and VLDL lipid concentration, and hepatic TG content compared to PO, and there was a significant correlation between hepatic TG content and plasma TG concentration among diet groups. EO fed mice had plasma and liver lipid EPA enrichment that was greater than PO-fed mice but less than FO-fed mice. Down-regulation of several genes involved in hepatic TG biosynthesis was similar for mice fed EO and FO and significantly lower compared to those fed PO. In conclusion, EO may provide a botanical alternative to FO for reduction of plasma TG concentrations.

  1. RTP801 immunoreactivity in retinal ganglion cells and its down-regulation in cultured cells protect them from light and cobalt chloride.

    PubMed

    del Olmo-Aguado, Susana; Núñez-Álvarez, Claudia; Ji, Dan; Manso, Alberto García; Osborne, Neville N

    2013-09-01

    RTP801, a stress-related protein, is activated by adverse environmental conditions and inhibits the activity of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in promoting oxidative stress-dependent cell death. RTP801 exists both in the mammalian retina and the lens of the eye. Here, we observed RTP801 immunoreactivity in some retinal ganglion cells. Intravitreal injection of cobalt chloride (CoCl2) to mimick hypoxia influenced retinal GFAP (glial fibrillary acidic protein) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) levels, but did not affect RTP801 immunoreactivity or mRNA content relative to GAPDH. However, RTP801 mRNA was elevated when compared with Brn3a mRNA, suggesting that RTP801 is activated in stressed Brn3a retinal ganglion cells. In cultures of RGC-5 cells, RTP801 immunoreactivity was located in the cytoplasm and partly present in the mitochondria. An insult of blue light or CoCl2 increased RTP801 expression, which was accompanied by cell death. However, in cultures where RTP801 mRNA was down-regulated, the negative influence of blue light and CoCl2 was blunted. Rapamycin nullified the CoCl2-induced up-regulation of RTP801 and attenuated cell death. Moreover, rapamycin was non-toxic to RGC-5 cells, even at a high concentration (10μM). The protective effect of rapamycin on RGC-5 cells caused by the inhibition of RTP801 suggests that rapamycin might attenuate retinal ganglion cell death in situ, as in glaucoma.

  2. The Enigma of Rapamycin Dosage.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, Suman; Frias, Maria A; Chatterjee, Amrita; Yellen, Paige; Foster, David A

    2016-03-01

    The mTOR pathway is a critical regulator of cell growth, proliferation, metabolism, and survival. Dysregulation of mTOR signaling has been observed in most cancers and, thus, the mTOR pathway has been extensively studied for therapeutic intervention. Rapamycin is a natural product that inhibits mTOR with high specificity. However, its efficacy varies by dose in several contexts. First, different doses of rapamycin are needed to suppress mTOR in different cell lines; second, different doses of rapamycin are needed to suppress the phosphorylation of different mTOR substrates; and third, there is a differential sensitivity of the two mTOR complexes mTORC1 and mTORC2 to rapamycin. Intriguingly, the enigmatic properties of rapamycin dosage can be explained in large part by the competition between rapamycin and phosphatidic acid (PA) for mTOR. Rapamycin and PA have opposite effects on mTOR whereby rapamycin destabilizes and PA stabilizes both mTOR complexes. In this review, we discuss the properties of rapamycin dosage in the context of anticancer therapeutics.

  3. Rapamycin protects against paraquat-induced pulmonary fibrosis: Activation of Nrf2 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yiheng; Tai, Wenlin; Qu, Xiaoyuan; Wu, Wenjuan; Li, ZhenKun; Deng, Shuhao; Vongphouttha, Chanthasone; Dong, Zhaoxing

    2017-08-19

    Paraquat (PQ) is a widely used herbicide indeveloping countries worldwide, and pulmonary fibrosis is one of the most typical features of PQ poisoning. The molecular mechanism of PQ toxicity especially how to treat PQ-induced pulmonary fibrosis is still largely unknown. In animal model of pulmonary fibrosis, we used HE staining, western blotting assay and Real-time PCR assay to analyze the effects of rapamycin on the PQ-induced epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT). We found that PQ induced the pulmonary fibrosis using HE staining and Masson's staining, and up-regulated the activity of HYP and the mRNA expressions of Collagen I and III (COL-1and COL-3) in pulmonary tissues. We also found that rapamycin down-regulated the mesenchymal cell marker Vimentin and up-regulated the epithelial cell marker E-cadherin both in mRNA and protein levels compared with PQ group. And the EMT associated transcription factor Snail was decreased by rapamycin treatment compared with PQ group. And PQ decreased the Nrf2 expression both in mRNA and protein levels, and rapamycin inhibited these effects of PQ. SFN, a activator of Nrf2, could inhibit the EMT and the expression of Snail. And knockdowon of Nrf2 could abolish the inhibitory effects of rapamycin of PQ-induced EMT. In conclusion, rapamycin protects against paraquat-induced pulmonary fibrosis by activation of Nrf2 signaling pathway. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Chronic rapamycin treatment on the nutrient utilization and metabolism of juvenile turbot (Psetta maxima)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qingchao; He, Gen; Mai, Kangsen; Xu, Wei; Zhou, Huihui; Wang, Xuan; Mei, Lin

    2016-01-01

    High dietary protein inclusion is necessary in fish feeds and also represents a major cost in the aquaculture industry, which demands improved dietary conversion into body proteins in fish. In mammals, the target of rapamycin (TOR) is a key nutritionally responsive molecule governing postprandial anabolism. However, its physiological significance in teleosts has not been fully examined. In the present study, we examined the nutritional physiology of turbot after chronic rapamycin inhibition. Our results showed that a 6-week inhibition of TOR using dietary rapamycin inclusion (30 mg/kg diet) reduced growth performance and feed utilization. The rapamycin treatment inhibited TOR signaling and reduced expression of key enzymes in glycolysis, lipogenesis, cholesterol biosynthesis, while increasing the expression of enzymes involved in gluconeogenesis. Furthermore, rapamycin treatment increased intestinal goblet cell number in turbot, while the expressions of Notch and Hes1 were down regulated. It was possible that stimulated goblet cell differentiation by rapamycin was mediated through Notch-Hes1 pathway. Therefore, our results demonstrate the important role of TOR signaling in fish nutritional physiology. PMID:27305975

  5. Potential use of rapamycin in HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Donia, Marco; McCubrey, James A; Bendtzen, Klaus; Nicoletti, Ferdinando

    2010-01-01

    The strong need for the development of alternative anti-HIV agents is primarily due to the emergence of strain-resistant viruses, the need for sustained adherence to complex treatment regimens and the toxicity of currently used antiviral drugs. This review analyzes proof of concept studies indicating that the immunomodulatory drug rapamycin (RAPA) possesses anti-HIV properties both in vitro and in vivo that qualifies it as a potential new anti-HIV drug. It represents a literature review of published studies that evaluated the in vitro and in vivo activity of RAPA in HIV. RAPA represses HIV-1 replication in vitro through different mechanisms including, but not limited, to down regulation of CCR5. In addition RAPA synergistically enhances the anti-HIV activity of entry inhibitors such as vicriviroc, aplaviroc and enfuvirtide in vitro. RAPA also inhibits HIV-1 infection in human peripheral blood leucocytes-SCID reconstituted mice. In addition, a prospective nonrandomized trial of HIV patient series receiving RAPA monotherapy after liver transplantation indicated significantly better control of HIV and hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication among patients taking RAPA monotherapy. Taken together, the evidence presented in this review suggests that RAPA may be a useful drug that should be evaluated for the prevention and treatment of HIV-1 infection. PMID:21175433

  6. The closed conformation of the LDL receptor is destabilized by the low Ca(++) concentration but favored by the high Mg(++) concentration in the endosome.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Oliván, Juan; Arias-Moreno, Xabier; Hurtado-Guerrero, Ramón; Carrodeguas, José Alberto; Miguel-Romero, Laura; Marina, Alberto; Bruscolini, Pierpaolo; Sancho, Javier

    2015-11-30

    The LDL receptor (LDLR) internalizes LDL and VLDL particles. In the endosomes, it adopts a closed conformation important for recycling, by interaction of two modules of the ligand binding domain (LR4-5) and a β-propeller motif. Here, we investigate by SPR the interactions between those two modules and the β-propeller. Our results indicate that the two modules cooperate to bind the β-propeller. The binding is favored by low pH and by high [Ca(++)]. Our data show that Mg(++), at high concentration in the endosome, favors the formation of the closed conformation by replacing the structuring effect of Ca(++) in LR5. We propose a sequential model of LDL release where formation of the close conformation follows LDL release. Copyright © 2015 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Identification of roles for H264, H306, H439, and H635 in acid-dependent lipoprotein release by the LDL receptor.

    PubMed

    Dong, Hongyun; Zhao, Zhenze; LeBrun, Drake G; Michaely, Peter

    2017-02-01

    Lipoproteins internalized by the LDL receptor (LDLR) are released from this receptor in endosomes through a process that involves acid-dependent conformational changes in the receptor ectodomain. How acidic pH promotes this release process is not well understood. Here, we assessed roles for six histidine residues for which either genetic or structural data suggested a possible role in the acid-responsiveness of the LDLR. Using assays that measured conformational change, acid-dependent lipoprotein release, LDLR recycling, and net lipoprotein uptake, we show that H635 plays important roles in acid-dependent conformational change and lipoprotein release, while H264, H306, and H439 play ancillary roles in the response of the LDLR to acidic pH. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. Polymorphic haplotypes and recombination rates at the LDL receptor gene locus in subjects with and without familial hypercholesterolemia who are from different populations.

    PubMed

    Miserez, A R; Schuster, H; Chiodetti, N; Keller, U

    1993-04-01

    RFLPs at the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor locus for TaqI, StuI, HincII, AvaII, ApaLI (5' and 3'), PvuII, and NcoI were studied in Swiss and German families with familial hypercholesterolemia (FH). A total of 1,104 LDL receptor alleles were analyzed using Southern blotting and new PCR-based techniques for detection of the TaqI, StuI, HincII, AvaII, NcoI RFLPs. Two hundred fifty-six independent haplotypes from 368 individuals of 61 unrelated Swiss families, as well as 114 independent haplotypes from 184 subjects of 25 unrelated German families, were constructed. In 76 families, clinical diagnosis of FH was confirmed by cosegregation analysis. Of the 43 unique haplotypes consisting of seven RFLPs detected in the Swiss and Germans, only 9 were common in both population samples. Analysis of linkage disequilibrium revealed nonrandom associations between several of the investigated RFLPs. ApaLI (5'), NcoI, PvuII, TaqI, and AvaII or HincII were particularly informative (cumulative informativeness .85). Relative frequencies, heterozygosity indexes, and PICs of the RFLPs from the Swiss and Germans were compared with values calculated from reported haplotype data for Italians, Icelanders, North American Caucasians, South African Caucasians, and Japanese. Pairwise comparisons of population samples by common RFLPs demonstrated unexpected differences even between geographically adjacent populations (e.g., the Swiss and Germans). Furthermore, genetic distances from the Germans to the other Caucasians were larger than to the Japanese. An unexpected lack of correlation between linkage disequilibria and physical distances was detected for the German and Japanese data, possibly because of nonuniform recombination with excessively high rates between exon 13 and intron 15. Hence, the present study revealed a striking variety of polymorphic haplotypes and heterogeneity of RFLP frequencies and recombination rates among the seven population samples.

  9. Polymorphic haplotypes and recombination rates at the LDL receptor gene locus in subjects with and without familial hypercholesterolemia who are from different populations.

    PubMed Central

    Miserez, A R; Schuster, H; Chiodetti, N; Keller, U

    1993-01-01

    RFLPs at the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor locus for TaqI, StuI, HincII, AvaII, ApaLI (5' and 3'), PvuII, and NcoI were studied in Swiss and German families with familial hypercholesterolemia (FH). A total of 1,104 LDL receptor alleles were analyzed using Southern blotting and new PCR-based techniques for detection of the TaqI, StuI, HincII, AvaII, NcoI RFLPs. Two hundred fifty-six independent haplotypes from 368 individuals of 61 unrelated Swiss families, as well as 114 independent haplotypes from 184 subjects of 25 unrelated German families, were constructed. In 76 families, clinical diagnosis of FH was confirmed by cosegregation analysis. Of the 43 unique haplotypes consisting of seven RFLPs detected in the Swiss and Germans, only 9 were common in both population samples. Analysis of linkage disequilibrium revealed nonrandom associations between several of the investigated RFLPs. ApaLI (5'), NcoI, PvuII, TaqI, and AvaII or HincII were particularly informative (cumulative informativeness .85). Relative frequencies, heterozygosity indexes, and PICs of the RFLPs from the Swiss and Germans were compared with values calculated from reported haplotype data for Italians, Icelanders, North American Caucasians, South African Caucasians, and Japanese. Pairwise comparisons of population samples by common RFLPs demonstrated unexpected differences even between geographically adjacent populations (e.g., the Swiss and Germans). Furthermore, genetic distances from the Germans to the other Caucasians were larger than to the Japanese. An unexpected lack of correlation between linkage disequilibria and physical distances was detected for the German and Japanese data, possibly because of nonuniform recombination with excessively high rates between exon 13 and intron 15. Hence, the present study revealed a striking variety of polymorphic haplotypes and heterogeneity of RFLP frequencies and recombination rates among the seven population samples. PMID:8096361

  10. The association of statins plus LDL receptor-targeted liposome-encapsulated doxorubicin increases in vitro drug delivery across blood–brain barrier cells

    PubMed Central

    Pinzón-Daza, ML; Garzón, R; Couraud, PO; Romero, IA; Weksler, B; Ghigo, D; Bosia, A; Riganti, C

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE The passage of drugs across the blood–brain barrier (BBB) limits the efficacy of chemotherapy in brain tumours. For instance, the anticancer drug doxorubicin, which is effective against glioblastoma in vitro, has poor efficacy in vivo, because it is extruded by P-glycoprotein (Pgp/ABCB1), multidrug resistance-related proteins and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2) in BBB cells. The aim of this study was to convert poorly permeant drugs like doxorubicin into drugs able to cross the BBB. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Experiments were performed on primary human cerebral microvascular endothelial hCMEC/D3 cells, alone and co-cultured with human brain and epithelial tumour cells. KEY RESULTS Statins reduced the efflux activity of Pgp/ABCB1 and BCRP/ABCG2 in hCMEC/D3 cells by increasing the synthesis of NO, which elicits the nitration of critical tyrosine residues on these transporters. Statins also increased the number of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptors exposed on the surface of BBB cells, as well as on tumour cells like human glioblastoma. We showed that the association of statins plus drug-loaded nanoparticles engineered as LDLs was effective as a vehicle for non-permeant drugs like doxorubicin to cross the BBB, allowing its delivery into primary and metastatic brain tumour cells and to achieve significant anti-tumour cytotoxicity. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS We suggest that our ‘Trojan horse’ approach, based on the administration of statins plus a LDL receptor-targeted liposomal drug, might have potential applications in the pharmacological therapy of different brain diseases for which the BBB represents an obstacle. PMID:22788770

  11. Red wine polyphenolics increase LDL receptor expression and activity and suppress the secretion of ApoB100 from human HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Pal, Sebely; Ho, Nerissa; Santos, Carlos; Dubois, Paul; Mamo, John; Croft, Kevin; Allister, Emma

    2003-03-01

    Epidemiologic studies suggest that the consumption of red wine may lower the risk of cardiovascular disease. The cardioprotective effect of red wine has been attributed to the polyphenols present in red wine, particularly resveratrol (a stilbene, with estrogen-like activity), and the flavonoids, catechin, epicatechin, quercetin and phenolic acids such as gallic acid. At present, very little is known about the mechanisms by which red wine phenolic compounds benefit the cardiovascular system. Therefore, the aim of this study was to elucidate whether red wine polyphenolics reduce lipoprotein production and clearance by the liver. Cultured HepG2 cells were incubated in the presence of dealcoholized red wine, alcohol-containing red wine and atorvastatin for 24 h. The apolipoprotien B100 (apoB100) protein (marker of hepatic lipoproteins) was quantified on Western blots with an anti-apoB100 antibody and the enhanced chemiluminescence detection system. Apolipoprotein B100 levels in the cells and that secreted into the media were significantly reduced by 50% in liver cells incubated with alcohol-stripped red wine compared with control cells. This effect of dealcoholized red wine on apoB100 production in HepG2 cells was similar to the effect of atorvastatin. Apo B100 production was significantly attenuated by 30% in cells incubated with alcoholized red wine, suggesting that the alcohol was masking the effect of red wine polyphenolics. Apo B100 production was significantly attenuated by 45% with the polyphenolic compounds resveratrol and quercertin. In addition, dealcoholized and alcoholized red wine and atorvastatin significantly increased 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase mRNA and LDL receptor binding activity relative to controls. Dealcoholized red wine also increased LDL receptor gene expression. Collectively, this study suggests that red wine polyphenolics regulate major pathways involved in lipoprotein metabolism.

  12. Fission yeast TOR signaling is essential for the down-regulation of a hyperactivated stress-response MAP kinase under salt stress.

    PubMed

    Ishiguro, Junpei; Shibahara, Kenta; Ueda, Yumi; Nakamura, Kei

    2013-02-01

    TOR (target of rapamycin) signaling regulates cell growth and division in response to environmental stimuli such as the availability of nutrients and various forms of stress. The vegetative growth of fission yeast cells, unlike other eukaryotic cells, is not inhibited by treatment with rapamycin. We found that certain mutations including pmc1Δ (Ca(2+)-ATPase), cps9-193 (small GTPase, Ryh1) and cps1-12 (1,3-β-D-glucan synthase, Bgs1) confer a rapamycin-sensitive phenotype to cells under salt stress with potassium chloride (>0.5 M). Cytometric analysis revealed that the mutant cells were unable to enter the mitotic cell cycle when treated with the drug under salt stress. Gene cloning and overexpression experiments revealed that the sensitivity to rapamycin was suppressed by the ectopic expression of tyrosine phosphatases, Pyp1 and Pyp2, which are negative regulators of Spc1/Sty1 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). The level of tyrosine phosphorylation on Spc1 was higher and sustained substantially longer in these mutants than in the wild type under salt stress. The hyperphosphorylation was significantly suppressed by overexpression of pyp1 (+) with concomitant resumption of the mutant cells' growth. In fission yeast, TOR signaling has been thought to stimulate the stress-response pathway, because mutations of TORC2 components such as Tor1, Sin1 and Ste20 result in similar sensitive phenotypes to environmental stress. The present study, however, strongly suggests that TOR signaling is required for the down-regulation of a hyperactivated Spc1 for reentry into the mitotic cell cycle. This finding may shed light on our understanding of a new stress-responsive mechanism in TOR signaling in higher organisms.

  13. Amphiregulin induces human ovarian cancer cell invasion by down-regulating E-cadherin expression.

    PubMed

    So, Wai-Kin; Fan, Qianlan; Lau, Man-Tat; Qiu, Xin; Cheng, Jung-Chien; Leung, Peter C K

    2014-11-03

    Aberrant epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activation is associated with ovarian cancer progression. In this study, we report that the EGFR ligand amphiregulin (AREG) stimulates cell invasion and down-regulates E-cadherin expression in two human ovarian cancer cell lines, SKOV3 and OVCAR5. In addition, AREG increases the expression of transcriptional repressors of E-cadherin including SNAIL, SLUG and ZEB1. siRNA targeting SNAIL or SLUG abolishes AREG-induced cell invasion. Moreover, ERK1/2 and AKT pathways are involved in AREG-induced E-cadherin down-regulation and cell invasion. Finally, we show that three EGFR ligands, AREG, epidermal growth factor (EGF) and transforming growth factor-α (TGF-α), exhibit comparable effects in down-regulating E-cadherin and promoting cell invasion. This study demonstrates that AREG induces ovarian cancer cell invasion by down-regulating E-cadherin expression.

  14. Pharmacologic down-regulation of EZH2 suppresses bladder cancer in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Shou-Hung; Huang, Hsu-Shan; Wu, Hong-Ui; Tsai, Yi-Ta; Chuang, Mei-Jen; Yu, Cheng-Ping; Huang, Shih-Ming; Sun, Guang-Huan; Chang, Sun-Yran; Hsiao, Pei-Wen; Yu, Dah-Shyong; Cha, Tai-Lung

    2014-01-01

    The polycomb group gene, EZH2, is highly expressed in advanced bladder cancer. Here we demonstrated that down-regulation of EZH2 in tumor tissues after neo-adjuvant chemotherapy correlated with good therapeutic response in advanced bladder cancer. We next developed a small molecule, NSC745885, derived from natural anthraquinone emodin, which down-regulated EZH2 via proteasome-mediated degradation. NSC745885 showed potent selective toxicity against multiple cancer cell lines but not normal cells. NSC745885 treatment overcame multiple-drug resistance and inhibited growth of resistant cancer cells. Over-expression of EZH2 in cancer cells attenuated effects of NSC745885, suggesting that down-regulation of EZH2 was responsible for growth inhibition of NSC745885. NSC745885 also suppressed tumor growth and down-regulated EZH2 in vivo. These results indicate that NSC7455889 suppresses bladder cancer by targeting EZH2. PMID:25431950

  15. Effects of coumarate 3-hydroxylase down-regulation on lignin structure

    Treesearch

    John Ralph; Takuya Akiyama; Hoon Kim; Fachuang Lu; Paul F. Schatz; Jane M. Marita; Sally A. Ralph; M.S. Srinivasa Reddy; Fang Chen; Richard A. Dixon

    2006-01-01

    Down-regulation of the gene encoding 4-coumarate 3-hydroxylase (C3H) in alfalfa massively but predictably increased the proportion of p-hydroxyphenyl (P) units relative to thenormally dominant guaiacyl (G) and syringyl (S) units Stem levels of up to ~65% P (from wild-type levels of ~1%) resulting from down-regulation of C3H were measured by traditional degradative...

  16. Down-regulation of placental mTOR, insulin/IGF-I signaling, and nutrient transporters in response to maternal nutrient restriction in the baboon

    PubMed Central

    Kavitha, Jovita V.; Rosario, Fredrick J.; Nijland, Mark J.; McDonald, Thomas J.; Wu, Guoyao; Kanai, Yoshikatsu; Powell, Theresa L.; Nathanielsz, Peter W.; Jansson, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms by which maternal nutrient restriction (MNR) causes reduced fetal growth are poorly understood. We hypothesized that MNR inhibits placental mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) and insulin/IGF-I signaling, down-regulates placental nutrient transporters, and decreases fetal amino acid levels. Pregnant baboons were fed control (ad libitum, n=11) or an MNR diet (70% of controls, n=11) from gestational day (GD) 30. Placenta and umbilical blood were collected at GD 165. Western blot was used to determine the phosphorylation of proteins in the mTOR, insulin/IGF-I, ERK1/2, and GSK-3 signaling pathways in placental homogenates and expression of glucose transporter 1 (GLUT-1), taurine transporter (TAUT), sodium-dependent neutral amino acid transporter (SNAT), and large neutral amino acid transporter (LAT) isoforms in syncytiotrophoblast microvillous membranes (MVMs). MNR reduced fetal weights by 13%, lowered fetal plasma concentrations of essential amino acids, and decreased the phosphorylation of placental S6K, S6 ribosomal protein, 4E-BP1, IRS-1, Akt, ERK-1/2, and GSK-3. MVM protein expression of GLUT-1, TAUT, SNAT-2 and LAT-1/2 was reduced in MNR. This is the first study in primates exploring placental responses to maternal undernutrition. Inhibition of placental mTOR and insulin/IGF-I signaling resulting in down-regulation of placental nutrient transporters may link maternal undernutrition to restricted fetal growth.—Kavitha, J. V., Rosario, F. J., Nijland, M. J., McDonald, T. J., Wu, G., Kanai, Y., Powell, T. L., Nathanielsz, P. W., Jansson, T. Down-regulation of placental mTOR, insulin/IGF-I signaling, and nutrient transporters in response to maternal nutrient restriction in the baboon. PMID:24334703

  17. PCI-24781 down-regulates EZH2 expression and then promotes glioma apoptosis by suppressing the PIK3K/Akt/mTOR pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Lv, Shengqing; Liu, Jun; Zang, Zhenle; Yin, Junyi; An, Ning; Yang, Hui; Song, Yechun

    2014-01-01

    PCI-24781 is a novel histone deacetylase inhibitor that inhibits tumor proliferation and promotes cell apoptosis. However, it is unclear whether PCI-24781 inhibits Enhancer of Zeste 2 (EZH2) expression in malignant gliomas. In this work, three glioma cell lines were incubated with various concentrations of PCI-24781 (0, 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2.5 and 5 μM) and analyzed for cell proliferation by the MTS [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium] assay and colony formation, and cell cycle and apoptosis were assessed by flow cytometry. The expression of EZH2 and apoptosis-related proteins was assessed by western blotting. Malignant glioma cells were also transfected with EZH2 siRNA to examine how PCI-24781 suppresses tumor cells. EZH2 was highly expressed in the three glioma cell lines. Incubation with PCI-24781 reduced cell proliferation and increased cell apoptosis by down-regulating EZH2 in a concentration-dependent manner. These effects were simulated by EZH2 siRNA. In addition, PCI-24781 or EZH2 siRNA accelerated cell apoptosis by down-regulating the expression of AKT, mTOR, p70 ribosomal protein S6 kinase (p70s6k), glycogen synthase kinase 3A and B (GSK3a/b) and eukaryotic initiation factor 4E binding protein 1 (4E-BP1). These data suggest that PCI-24781 may be a promising therapeutic agent for treating gliomas by down-regulating EZH2 which promotes cell apoptosis by suppressing the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt/mammalian target of the rapamycin (mTOR) pathway. PMID:25505847

  18. Premature Ligand-Receptor Interaction during Biosynthesis Limits the Production of Growth Factor Midkine and Its Receptor LDL Receptor-related Protein 1*

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Kazuma; Bu, Guojun; Chen, Sen; Takei, Yoshifumi; Hibi, Kenji; Kodera, Yasuhiro; McCormick, Lynn M.; Nakao, Akimasa; Noda, Masaharu; Muramatsu, Takashi; Kadomatsu, Kenji

    2011-01-01

    Protein production within the secretory pathway is accomplished by complex but organized processes. Here, we demonstrate that the growth factor midkine interacts with LDL receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) at high affinity (Kd value, 2.7 nm) not only at the cell surface but also within the secretory pathway during biosynthesis. The latter premature ligand-receptor interaction resulted in aggregate formation and consequently suppressed midkine secretion and LRP1 maturation. We utilized an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) retrieval signal and an LRP1 fragment, which strongly bound to midkine and the LRP1-specialized chaperone receptor-associated protein (RAP), to construct an ER trapper. The ER trapper efficiently trapped midkine and RAP and mimicked the premature ligand-receptor interaction, i.e. suppressed maturation of the ligand and receptor. The ER trapper also diminished the inhibitory function of LRP1 on platelet-derived growth factor-mediated cell migration. Complementary to these results, an increased expression of RAP was closely associated with midkine expression in human colorectal carcinomas (33 of 39 cases examined). Our results suggest that the premature ligand-receptor interaction plays a role in protein production within the secretory pathway. PMID:21212259

  19. The protective effect of bergamot oil extract on lecitine-like oxyLDL receptor-1 expression in balloon injury-related neointima formation.

    PubMed

    Mollace, Vincenzo; Ragusa, Salvatore; Sacco, Iolanda; Muscoli, Carolina; Sculco, Francesca; Visalli, Valeria; Palma, Ernesto; Muscoli, Saverio; Mondello, Luigi; Dugo, Paola; Rotiroti, Domenicantonio; Romeo, Francesco

    2008-06-01

    Lectin-like oxyLDL receptor-1 (LOX-1) has recently been suggested to be involved in smooth muscle cell (SMC) proliferation and neointima formation in injured blood vessels. This study evaluates the effect of the nonvolatile fraction (NVF), the antioxidant component of bergamot essential oil (BEO), on LOX-1 expression and free radical generation in a model of rat angioplasty. Common carotid arteries injured by balloon angioplasty were removed after 14 days for histopathological, biochemical, and immunohistochemical studies. Balloon injury led to a significant restenosis with SMC proliferation and neointima formation, accompanied by increased expression of LOX-1 receptor, malondialdehyde and superoxide formation, and nitrotyrosine staining. Pretreatment of rats with BEO-NVF reduced the neointima proliferation together with free radical formation and LOX-1 expression in a dose-dependent manner. These results suggest that natural antioxidants may be relevant in the treatment of vascular disorders in which proliferation of SMCs and oxyLDL-related endothelial cell dysfunction are involved.

  20. Variation in the Lectin-like Oxidized LDL Receptor 1 (LOX-1) Gene Is Associated With Plasma Soluble LOX-1 Levels

    PubMed Central

    Brinkley, Tina E.; Kume, Noriaki; Mitsuoka, Hirokazu; Brown, Michael D.; Phares, Dana A.; Ferrell, Robert. E.; Kita, Toru; Hagberg, James M.

    2009-01-01

    The lectin-like ox-LDL receptor 1 (LOX-1) expressed on vascular cells plays a major role in atherogenesis by internalizing and degrading oxidized LDL. LOX-1 can be cleaved from the cell surface and released as soluble LOX-1 (sLOX-1), and elevated sLOX-1 levels may be indicative of atherosclerotic plaque instability. We examined associations between the LOX-1 3′UTR-C/T and G501C polymorphisms and plasma sLOX-1 levels in 97 healthy older men and women. The frequencies for the 3′UTR-T and 501C alleles were 46% and 10%, respectively. Plasma sLOX-1 levels were significantly higher in the 3′UTR CC genotype group compared to both the CT (p=0.02) and TT (p=0.002) genotype groups. Plasma sLOX-1 were also significantly higher in the 501GC genotype group compared to the GG genotype group (p=0.004). In univariate analyses, sLOX-1 levels were significantly associated with both the 3′UTR-C/T and G501 C polymorphisms. These associations remained significant after adjusting for age, gender, race, and BMI. In conclusion, variation in the LOX-1 gene is associated with plasma sLOX-1 levels in older men and women. PMID:18469066

  1. Inducible Apoe Gene Repair in Hypomorphic ApoE Mice Deficient in the LDL Receptor Promotes Atheroma Stabilization with a Human-like Lipoprotein Profile

    PubMed Central

    Eberlé, Delphine; Luk, Fu Sang; Kim, Roy Y.; Olivas, Victor R.; Kumar, Nikit; Posada, Jessica M.; Li, Kang; Gaudreault, Nathalie; Rapp, Joseph H.; Raffai, Robert L.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To study atherosclerosis regression in mice following plasma lipid reduction to moderately elevated apolipoprotein B (apoB)-lipoprotein levels. Approach and Results Chow-fed hypomorphic Apoe mice deficient in LDL receptor expression (Apoeh/hLdlr−/−Mx1-cre mice) develop hyperlipidemia and atherosclerosis. These mice were studied before and after inducible cre-mediated Apoe gene repair. By 1 week, induced mice displayed a 2-fold reduction in plasma cholesterol and triglyceride levels and a decrease in the non-HDL:HDL-cholesterol ratio from 87%:13% to 60%:40%. This halted atherosclerotic lesion growth and promoted macrophage loss and accumulation of thick collagen fibers for up to 8 weeks. Concomitantly, blood Ly-6Chi monocytes were decreased by 2-fold but lesional macrophage apoptosis was unchanged. The expression of several genes involved in extra-cellular matrix remodeling and cell migration were changed in lesional macrophages 1 week after Apoe gene repair. However, mRNA levels of numerous genes involved in cholesterol efflux and inflammation were not significantly changed at this time point. Conclusions Restoring apoE expression in Apoeh/hLdlr−/−Mx1-cre mice resulted in lesion stabilization in the context of a human-like ratio of non-HDL:HDL-cholesterol. Our data suggest that macrophage loss derived in part from reduced blood Ly-6Chi monocytes levels and genetic reprogramming of lesional macrophages. PMID:23788760

  2. Effects of High Fat Feeding and Diabetes on Regression of Atherosclerosis Induced by Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor Gene Therapy in LDL Receptor-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Willecke, Florian; Yuan, Chujun; Oka, Kazuhiro; Chan, Lawrence; Hu, Yunying; Barnhart, Shelley; Bornfeldt, Karin E.; Goldberg, Ira J.; Fisher, Edward A.

    2015-01-01

    We tested whether a high fat diet (HFD) containing the inflammatory dietary fatty acid palmitate or insulin deficient diabetes altered the remodeling of atherosclerotic plaques in LDL receptor knockout (Ldlr-/-) mice. Cholesterol reduction was achieved by using a helper-dependent adenovirus (HDAd) carrying the gene for the low-density lipoprotein receptor (Ldlr; HDAd-LDLR). After injection of the HDAd-LDLR, mice consuming either HFD, which led to insulin resistance but not hyperglycemia, or low fat diet (LFD), showed regression compared to baseline. However there was no difference between the two groups in terms of atherosclerotic lesion size, or CD68+ cell and lipid content. Because of the lack of effects of these two diets, we then tested whether viral-mediated cholesterol reduction would lead to defective regression in mice with greater hyperglycemia. In both normoglycemic and streptozotocin (STZ)-treated hyperglycemic mice, HDAd-LDLR significantly reduced plasma cholesterol levels, decreased atherosclerotic lesion size, reduced macrophage area and lipid content, and increased collagen content of plaque in the aortic sinus. However, reductions in anti-inflammatory and ER stress-related genes were less pronounced in STZ-diabetic mice compared to non-diabetic mice. In conclusion, HDAd-mediated Ldlr gene therapy is an effective and simple method to induce atherosclerosis regression in Ldlr-/- mice in different metabolic states. PMID:26046657

  3. Impact of chromosome 2 obesity loci on cardiovascular complications of insulin resistance in LDL receptor-deficient C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Estrada-Smith, Daria; Collins, Alan R; Wang, Xuping; Crockett, Craig; Castellani, Lawrence; Lusis, Aldons J; Davis, Richard C

    2006-08-01

    Previous characterization of mouse chromosome 2 identified genomic intervals that influence obesity, insulin resistance, and dyslipidemia. For this, resistant CAST/Ei (CAST) alleles were introgressed onto a susceptible C57BL/6J background to generate congenic strains with CAST alleles encompassing 67-162 Mb (multigenic obesity 6 [MOB6]) and 84-180 Mb (MOB5) from mouse chromosome 2. To examine the effects of each congenic locus on atherosclerosis and glucose disposal, we bred each strain onto a sensitizing LDL receptor-null (LDLR(-/-)) C57BL/6J background to predispose them to hypercholesterolemia and insulin resistance. LDLR(-/-) congenics and controls were characterized for measures of atherogenesis, insulin sensitivity, and obesity. We identified a genomic interval unique to the MOB6 congenic (72-84 Mb) that dramatically decreased atherosclerosis by approximately threefold and decreased insulin resistance. This region also reduced adiposity twofold. Conversely, the congenic region unique to MOB5 (162-180 Mb) increased insulin resistance but had little effect on atherosclerosis and adiposity. The MOB congenic intervals are concordant to human and rat quantitative trait loci influencing diabetes and atherosclerosis traits. Thus, our results define a strategy for studying the poorly understood interactions between diabetes and atherosclerosis and for identifying genes underlying the cardiovascular complications of insulin resistance.

  4. OxLDL receptor chromatography from live human U937 cells identifies SYK(L) that regulates phagocytosis of oxLDL.

    PubMed

    Howard, Jeffrey C; Florentinus-Mefailoski, Angelique; Bowden, Peter; Trimble, William; Grinstein, Sergio; Marshall, John G

    2016-11-15

    The binding and activation of macrophages by microscopic aggregates of oxLDL in the intima of the arteries may be an important step towards atherosclerosis leading to heart attack and stroke. Microbeads coated with oxLDL were used to activate, capture and isolate the oxLDL receptor complex from the surface of live cells. Analysis of the resulting tryptic peptides by liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry revealed the Spleen Tyrosine Kinase (SYK), and many of SYK's known interaction network including Fc receptors (FCGR2A, FCER1G and FCGR1A) Toll receptor 4 (TLR4), receptor kinases like EGFRs, as well as RNA binding and metabolism proteins. High-intensity precursor ions (∼9*E3 to 2*E5 counts) were correlated to peptides and specific phosphopeptides from long isoform of SYK (SYK-L) by the SEQUEST, OMSSA and X!TANDEM algorithms. Peptides or phosphopeptides from SYK were observed with the oxLDL-microbeads. Pharmacological inhibitors of SYK activity significantly reduced the engulfment of oxLDL microbeads in the presence of serum factors, but had little effect on IgG phagocytosis. Anti SYK siRNA regulated oxLD engulfment in the context of serum factors and or SYK-L siRNA significantly inhibited engulfment of oxLDL microbeads, but not IgG microbeads. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. A randomized trial and novel SPR technique identifies altered lipoprotein-LDL receptor binding as a mechanism underlying elevated LDL-cholesterol in APOE4s

    PubMed Central

    Calabuig-Navarro, M. V.; Jackson, K. G.; Kemp, C. F.; Leake, D. S.; Walden, C. M.; Lovegrove, J. A.; Minihane, A. M.

    2017-01-01

    At a population level APOE4 carriers (~25% Caucasians) are at higher risk of cardiovascular diseases. The penetrance of genotype is however variable and influenced by dietary fat composition, with the APOE4 allele associated with greater LDL-cholesterol elevation in response to saturated fatty acids (SFA). The etiology of this greater responsiveness is unknown. Here a novel surface plasmon resonance technique (SPR) is developed and used, along with hepatocyte (with the liver being the main organ modulating lipoprotein metabolism and plasma lipid levels) uptake studies to establish the impact of dietary fatty acid composition on, lipoprotein-LDL receptor (LDLR) binding, and hepatocyte uptake, according to APOE genotype status. In men prospectively recruited according to APOE genotype (APOE3/3 common genotype, or APOE3/E4), triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRLs) were isolated at fasting and 4–6 h following test meals rich in SFA, unsaturated fat and SFA with fish oil. In APOE4s a greater LDLR binding affinity of postprandial TRL after SFA, and lower LDL binding and hepatocyte internalization, provide mechanisms for the greater LDL-cholesterol raising effect. The SPR technique developed may be used for the future study of the impact of genotype, and physiological and behavioral variables on lipoprotein metabolism. Trial registration number NCT01522482. PMID:28276521

  6. Differential expression of CD14, CD36 and the LDL receptor on human monocyte-derived macrophages. A novel cell culture system to study macrophage differentiation and heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Wintergerst, E S; Jelk, J; Asmis, R

    1998-09-01

    Macrophages are key players in many aspects of human physiology and disease. It has been hypothesized that in a given microenvironment monocytes differentiate into specific subpopulations with distinct functions. In order to study the role of macrophage heterogeneity in atherogenesis, we established a novel isolation and culture technique for human monocyte-derived macrophages. The present technique does not select for monocyte subpopulations prior to the onset of differentiation. Monocytes were cultured for 2 weeks in the presence of autologous lymphocytes before being plated quantitatively. They differentiated into mature macrophages in terms of morphology, lipid composition, and biological activity. Based on phagocytic activity as well as on the expression of CD14, CD36, and the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor, we have identified macrophage subpopulations that may play distinct roles in atherogenesis. While virtually all adherence-purified monocytes expressed CD14, CD36, and the LDL-R, we characterized three subpopulations of macrophages based on the expression of these antigens: CD36+CD14-LDL-R-(58+/-12%), CD36+CD14+LDL-R+(18+/-5%), the remaining cells being CD36-CD14- LDL-R-. The first two subsets decreased in size during further differentiation (51+/-12% and 8+/-3%, respectively). Our culture technique may also serve as a good model for studying the implications of macrophage heterogeneity in diseases other than atherosclerosis.

  7. Surface aggregation patterns of LDL receptors near coated pits II. The retrograde membrane flow-diffusion and generalized plaque-form insertion mechanism.

    PubMed

    Echavarria-Heras, Hector; Solana-Arellano, Elena; Leal-Ramirez, Cecilia

    2012-06-01

    This study presents a theoretical exploration of the effects of mechanisms that, in addition to diffusion, may influence the surface dynamics and display of unbound receptors in the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) endocytic cycle in human fibroblasts. The factors considered here are a transverse membrane flow and a generalized plaque-form insertion mode. The proposed model permits estimations of aggregation rates of unbound receptors in coated pits as well as pictorial representations of their expected steady-state display on the cell surface. Our findings show that this display is determined in a fundamental way by the ratio of the strength of the flow to the diffusion coefficient. For measured values of the diffusion coefficient and the estimated value of the flow rate strength (and independent of the receptor insertion mode), the display predicted by our model is consistent with the capping phenomenon, i.e., a gradated clustering in the direction of flow streamlines. There could be suitable characterizations of the receptor reinsertion mode that would produce a substantial reduction in the mean capture time of LDL receptors by coated pits. In any event, our results show that the existence of a transverse membrane flow precludes the display of steady-state plaque-form surface clusters.

  8. LDL receptor/lipoprotein recognition: endosomal weakening of ApoB and ApoE binding to the convex face of the LR5 repeat.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Oliván, Juan; Arias-Moreno, Xabier; Velazquez-Campoy, Adrián; Millet, Oscar; Sancho, Javier

    2014-03-01

    The molecular mechanism of lipoprotein binding by the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor (LDLR) is poorly understood, one reason being that structures of lipoprotein-receptor complexes are not available. LDLR uses calcium-binding repeats (LRs) to interact with apolipoprotein B and apolipoprotein E (ApoB and ApoE). We have used NMR and SPR to characterize the complexes formed by LR5 and three peptides encompassing the putative binding regions of ApoB (site A and site B) and ApoE. The three peptides bind at the hydrophilic convex face of LR5, forming complexes that are weakened at low [Ca(2+) ] and low pH. Thus, endosomal conditions favour dissociation of LDLR/lipoprotein complexes regardless of whether active displacement of bound lipoproteins by the β-propeller in LDLR takes place. The multiple ApoE copies in β very low density lipoproteins (β-VLDLs), and the presence of two competent binding sites (A and B) in LDLs, suggest that LDLR chelates lipoproteins and enhances complex affinity by using more than one LR.

  9. F(ab')2 fragments of anti-oxidized LDL IgG attenuate vascular inflammation and atherogenesis in diabetic LDL receptor-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanchun; Lu, Zhongyang; Huang, Yan; Lopes-Virella, Maria F; Virella, Gabriel

    2016-12-01

    Considerable evidence is available supporting the atherogenic role of immune complexes (IC) formed by modified forms of LDL and their corresponding antibodies in humans and other species. In this study, we assessed the effect of IgG F(ab')2 fragments of murine anti-mouse oxLDL, which binds oxLDL forming IC that cannot interact with Fcγ receptors, on the development of atherosclerosis in diabetic LDL receptor-deficient (LDLR-/-) mice. Immunohistochemical study showed that treatment with the F(ab')2 fragments for 8weeks significantly reduced the content of macrophages and interleukin 6 expression in atherosclerotic lesions. Furthermore, histological study showed that treatment with the same F(ab')2 fragments significantly reduced atherosclerotic lesions in diabetic LDLR-/- mice. Taken together, this study demonstrated for the first time that F(ab')2 fragments of anti-oxLDL IgG inhibited vascular inflammation and atherogenesis in diabetic LDLR-/- mice and uncovered a possible new avenue for therapy in patients at high risk to progress to cardiovascular complications. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. A randomized trial and novel SPR technique identifies altered lipoprotein-LDL receptor binding as a mechanism underlying elevated LDL-cholesterol in APOE4s.

    PubMed

    Calabuig-Navarro, M V; Jackson, K G; Kemp, C F; Leake, D S; Walden, C M; Lovegrove, J A; Minihane, A M

    2017-03-09

    At a population level APOE4 carriers (~25% Caucasians) are at higher risk of cardiovascular diseases. The penetrance of genotype is however variable and influenced by dietary fat composition, with the APOE4 allele associated with greater LDL-cholesterol elevation in response to saturated fatty acids (SFA). The etiology of this greater responsiveness is unknown. Here a novel surface plasmon resonance technique (SPR) is developed and used, along with hepatocyte (with the liver being the main organ modulating lipoprotein metabolism and plasma lipid levels) uptake studies to establish the impact of dietary fatty acid composition on, lipoprotein-LDL receptor (LDLR) binding, and hepatocyte uptake, according to APOE genotype status. In men prospectively recruited according to APOE genotype (APOE3/3 common genotype, or APOE3/E4), triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRLs) were isolated at fasting and 4-6 h following test meals rich in SFA, unsaturated fat and SFA with fish oil. In APOE4s a greater LDLR binding affinity of postprandial TRL after SFA, and lower LDL binding and hepatocyte internalization, provide mechanisms for the greater LDL-cholesterol raising effect. The SPR technique developed may be used for the future study of the impact of genotype, and physiological and behavioral variables on lipoprotein metabolism. Trial registration number NCT01522482.

  11. Enhanced cellular uptake and in vivo pharmacokinetics of rapamycin-loaded cubic phase nanoparticles for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Parhi, Priyambada; Mohanty, Chandana; Sahoo, Sanjeeb Kumar

    2011-10-01

    To date cancer is considered as one of the most devastating diseases due to its high rate of mortality. Preclinical studies have demonstrated that the Akt/mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) pathway is activated in cancers and inhibition of this pathway has great potential in anti-cancer therapy. Rapamycin, one of the most potent anti-cancer drugs, blocks Akt/mTOR function and has anti-proliferative activity in several cancers. To circumvent problems associated with rapamycin due to its poor water solubility, poor oral bioavailability, low accessibility to cancer tissues and systemic toxicity, rapamycin-loaded cubic nanoparticles (NP) were formulated with vitamin E d-α-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate (TPGS) as an emulsifier for oral delivery. Cubic NP were characterised and these particles demonstrated better cytotoxicity and apoptosis compared with native rapamycin under in vitro conditions due to their enhanced cellular uptake. The molecular impact of particulate systems on the Akt/mTOR pathway were elucidated by immunoblotting. Down-regulation of different anti-apoptotic genes of this pathway indicates activation of apoptotic signals leading to MIA PaCa cell death. An in vivo study demonstrated enhanced bioavailability of rapamycin in cubic NP in comparison with native rapamycin in a mouse model with no toxicity and good biocompatibility of void cubic NP at a higher dose of oral administration. Thus, rapamycin-loaded cubic NP can be used as an effective drug delivery system to produce better rapamycin therapeutics for the treatment of cancers. Copyright © 2011 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Topical rapamycin (sirolimus) for facial angiofibromas.

    PubMed

    Madke, Bhushan

    2013-01-01

    Rapamycin (sirolimus) is a fungal fermentation product that inhibits the proper functioning of a serine/threonine protein kinase in mammalian cells eponymously named mammalian target of rapamycin, or mTOR. Rapamycin is a novel class of anticancer and immunosuppressant drugs targeting the proteins at molecular level. Rapamycin (sirolimus) is routinely incorporated in drug-eluting stents used for cardiac angioplasty. In recent years, rapamycin was found to be efficacious in managing the symptom complex of tuberous sclerosis, i.e. renal angiomyolipoma, giant cell astrocytoma and pulmonary lymphangiomyomatosis. Various investigators have also proved that topically applied rapamycin causes regression of facial angiofibromas, giving better cosmetic results.

  13. CDK14 expression is down-regulated by cigarette smoke in vivo and in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Pollack, Daniel; Xiao, Yuxuan; Shrivasatava, Vibha; Levy, Avi; Andrusier, Miriam; D’Armiento, Jeanine; Holz, Marina K.; Vigodner, Margarita

    2016-01-01

    In this study, DNA arrays have been employed to monitor gene expression patterns in testis of mice exposed to tobacco smoke for 24 weeks and compared to control animals. The results of the analysis revealed significant changes in expression of several genes that may have a role in spermatogenesis. Cdk14 was chosen for further characterization because of a suggested role in the testis and in regulation of Wnt signaling. RT-PCR analysis confirmed down regulation of Cdk14 in mice exposed to cigarette smoke (CS). Cdk14 is expressed in all testicular cells; spermatogonia- and Sertoli-derived cell lines treated with cigarette smoke extract (CSE) in vitro showed down-regulation of CDK14 mRNA and protein levels as well as down-regulation of β-catenin levels. CS-induced down-regulation of CDK14 mRNA and protein levels was also observed in several lung epithelium-derived cell lines including primary normal human bronchial epithelial cells (NHBE), suggesting that the effect is not restricted to the testis. Similar to testicular cells, CS-induced down-regulation of CDK14 in lung cells correlated with decreased levels of β-catenin, a finding suggesting impaired Wnt signaling. In the lungs, CDK14 was localized to the alveolar and bronchial epithelium. PMID:25680692

  14. Low Dose Rapamycin Exacerbates Autoimmune Experimental Uveitis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zili; Wu, Xiumei; Duan, Jie; Hinrichs, David; Wegmann, Keith; Zhang, Gary L.; Hall, Mark; Rosenbaum, James T.

    2012-01-01

    Background Rapamycin, a potent immune modulator, is used to treat transplant rejection and some autoimmune diseases. Uveitis is a potentially severe inflammatory eye disease, and 2 clinical trials of treating uveitis with rapamycin are under way. Unexpectedly, recent research has demonstrated that low dose rapamycin enhances the memory T cell population and function. However, it is unclear how low dose rapamycin influences the immune response in the setting of uveitis. Design and Methods B10.RIII mice were immunized to induce experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU). Ocular inflammation of control and rapamycin-treated mice was compared based on histological change. ELISPOT and T cell proliferation assays were performed to assess splenocyte response to ocular antigen. In addition, we examined the effect of rapamycin on activation-induced cell death (AICD) using the MitoCapture assay and Annexin V staining. Results Administration of low dose rapamycin exacerbated EAU, whereas treating mice with high dose rapamycin attenuated ocular inflammation. The progression of EAU by low dose rapamycin coincided with the increased frequency of antigen-reactive lymphocytes. Lastly, fewer rapamycin-treated T cells underwent AICD, which might contribute to exaggerated ocular inflammation and the uveitogenic immune response. Conclusion These data reveal a paradoxical role for rapamycin in uveitis in a dose-dependent manner. This study has a potentially important clinical implication as rapamycin might cause unwanted consequences dependent on dosing and pharmacokinetics. Thus, more research is needed to further define the mechanism by which low dose rapamycin augments the immune response. PMID:22574188

  15. Effect of long-term ingestion of weakly oxidised flaxseed oil on biomarkers of oxidative stress in LDL-receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, M S; Kessuane, M C; Lobo Ladd, A A B; Lobo Ladd, F V; Cogliati, B; Castro, I A

    2016-07-01

    The effect of oxidised fatty acids on atherosclerosis progression is controversial. Thus, our objective was to evaluate the effect of long-term consumption of weakly oxidised PUFA from flaxseed oil on oxidative stress biomarkers of LDL-receptor(-/-) mice. To test our hypothesis, mice were separated into three groups. The first group received a high-fat diet containing fresh flaxseed oil (CONT-), the second was fed the same diet prepared using heated flaxseed oil (OXID), and the third group received the same diet containing fresh flaxseed oil and had diabetes induced by streptozotocin (CONT+). Oxidative stress, aortic parameters and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease were assessed. After 3 months, plasma lipid profile, glucose levels, body weight, energy intake and dietary intake did not differ among groups. Likewise, oxidative stress, plasma malondialdehyde (MDA), hepatic MDA expressed as nmol/mg portion (ptn) and antioxidant enzymes did not differ among the groups. Hepatic linoleic acid, α-linolenic acid, arachidonic acid and EPA acid declined in the OXID and CONT+ groups. Aortic wall thickness, lumen and diameter increased only in the OXID group. OXID and CONT+ groups exhibited higher concentrations of MDA, expressed as μmol/mg ptn per %PUFA, when compared with the CONT- group. Our results suggest that ingestion of oxidised flaxseed oil increases hepatic MDA concentration and is potentially pro-atherogenic. In addition, the mean MDA value observed in all groups was similar to those reported in other studies that used xenobiotics as oxidative stress inducers. Thus, the diet applied in this study represents an interesting model for further research involving antioxidants.

  16. Sequence analysis of the non-recurring C-terminal domains shows that insect lipoprotein receptors constitute a distinct group of LDL receptor family members.

    PubMed

    Rodenburg, Kees W; Smolenaars, Marcel M W; Van Hoof, Dennis; Van der Horst, Dick J

    2006-04-01

    Lipoprotein-mediated delivery of lipids in mammals involves endocytic receptors of the low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor (LDLR) family. In contrast, in insects, the lipoprotein, lipophorin (Lp), functions as a reusable lipid shuttle in lipid delivery, and these animals, therefore, were not supposed to use endocytic receptors. However, recent data indicate additional endocytic uptake of Lp, mediated by a Lp receptor (LpR) of the LDLR family. The two N-terminal domains of LDLR family members are involved in ligand binding and dissociation, respectively, and are composed of a mosaic of multiple repeats. The three C-terminal domains, viz., the optional O-linked glycosylation domain, the transmembrane domain, and the intracellular domain, are of a non-repetitive sequence. The present classification of newly discovered LDLR family members, including the LpRs, bears no relevance to physiological function. Therefore, as a novel approach, the C-terminal domains of LDLR family members across the entire animal kingdom were used to perform a sequence comparison analysis in combination with a phylogenetic tree analysis. The LpRs appeared to segregate into a specific group distinct from the groups encompassing the other family members, and each of the three C-terminal domains of the insect receptors is composed of unique set of sequence motifs. Based on conservation of sequence motifs and organization of these motifs in the domains, LpR resembles most the groups of the LDLRs, very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) receptors, and vitellogenin receptors. However, in sequence aspects in which LpR deviates from these three receptor groups, it most notably resembles LDLR-related protein-2, or megalin. These features might explain the functional differences disclosed between insect and mammalian lipoprotein receptors.

  17. LDL receptor-related protein-1 regulates NFκB and microRNA-155 in macrophages to control the inflammatory response

    PubMed Central

    Mantuano, Elisabetta; Brifault, Coralie; Lam, Michael S.; Azmoon, Pardis; Gilder, Andrew S.; Gonias, Steven L.

    2016-01-01

    LDL receptor-related protein-1 (LRP1) is an endocytic and cell-signaling receptor. In mice in which LRP1 is deleted in myeloid cells, the response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was greatly exacerbated. LRP1 deletion in macrophages in vitro, under the control of tamoxifen-activated Cre-ERT fusion protein, robustly increased expression of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. In LRP1-expressing macrophages, proinflammatory mediator expression was regulated by LRP1 ligands in a ligand-specific manner. The LRP1 agonists, α2-macroglobulin and tissue-type plasminogen activator, attenuated expression of inflammatory mediators, even in the presence of LPS. The antagonists, receptor-associated protein (RAP) and lactoferrin (LF), and LRP1-specific antibody had the entirely opposite effect, promoting inflammatory mediator expression and mimicking LRP1 deletion. NFκB was rapidly activated in response to RAP and LF and responsible for the initial increase in expression of proinflammatory mediators. RAP and LF also significantly increased expression of microRNA-155 (miR-155) after a lag phase of about 4 h. miR-155 expression reflected, at least in part, activation of secondary cell-signaling pathways downstream of TNFα. Although miR-155 was not involved in the initial induction of cytokine expression in response to LRP1 antagonists, miR-155 was essential for sustaining the proinflammatory response. We conclude that LRP1, NFκB, and miR-155 function as members of a previously unidentified system that has the potential to inhibit or sustain inflammation, depending on the continuum of LRP1 ligands present in the macrophage microenvironment. PMID:26787872

  18. The influence of apoE-deficiency and LDL-receptor-deficiency on the HDL subpopulation profile in mice and in humans.

    PubMed

    Tani, Mariko; Matera, Robert; Horvath, Katalin V; Hasan, Tahira S; Schaefer, Ernst J; Asztalos, Bela F

    2014-03-01

    As apoE(-/-) and LDL-Receptor(-/-) mice are commonly used in atherosclerosis research; our objective was to point out the differences in HDL metabolism between mice and humans regarding the roles of apoE and LDLR. We examined HDL particles obtained from wild type (WT), LDLR(-/-), and apoE(-/-) mice, as well as from normal, homozygous familial hypercholesterolemic (FH), and apoE-deficient human subjects by 2-dimensional non-denaturing PAGE followed by immunoblot and image analysis. In WT mice, the majority of apoA-I was in large (9.0-12.0 nm), α-mobility HDL with trace amounts of apoA-I in small, preβ-1 HDL. In LDL(-/-) mice, both apoA-I- and apoE-containing HDL looked normal. About one-third of apoE was associated with large apoA-I-containing HDL (LpA-I:E) and two-thirds formed large HDL without apoA-I (LpE). In apoE(-/-) mice, apoA-I was detected in multiple, β-preβ-mobility, tightly-packed bands (7.0-13.0 nm) indicating that apoA-I in these animals was present only in poorly-lipidated, discoidal particles. Neither FH nor apoE-deficient humans showed significant alterations in apoA-I-containing HDL particles as compared to non-carriers. Our data indicate that apoE is necessary for the formation of spherical, lipidated HDL particles in mice, but not in humans, probably because mice lack CETP. Based on our data, we hypothesize that apoE(-/-) mice have little or no functional HDL, therefore results from apoE(-/-) mice cannot be extrapolated to humans without taking this significant difference into consideration. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. LDL-receptor mRNA expression in men is downregulated within an hour of an acute fat load and is influenced by genetic polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Pocathikorn, Anothai; Taylor, Roger R; James, Ian; Mamotte, Cyril D S

    2007-09-01

    Little is known about the immediate effects of dietary fat on the expression of genes involved in cholesterol metabolism in humans. We investigated the effects of a high-fat meal on circulating mononuclear cell messenger RNA (mRNA) for the LDL receptor (LDLR), LDLR-related protein (LRP), and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGCR) over 10 h. Selection of 12 C and 7 T homozygotes for the LRP exon 22 C200T polymorphism for the study also enabled us to examine the influence of this polymorphism on postprandial mRNA expression and lipoproteins, of relevance because of LRP's role in postprandial lipoprotein metabolism and association of the polymorphism with coronary artery disease. We found a postprandial decrease in LDLR mRNA abundance relative to the reference beta-actin (BA) mRNA. The decreased LDLR/BA mRNA value was apparent at 1 h (P < 0.005) and decreased to 25% of baseline at 6 h (P < 0.005). The LRP/BA mRNA value was also lower at 6 h (16% decrease, P < 0.05). HMGCR mRNA expression was unchanged. C homozygotes for the C200T polymorphism had higher LDLR/BA values than T homozygotes (P = 0.01) and although plasma LDL cholesterol (LDL-C) concentrations decreased in the postprandial period (P < 0.002), the decrease was less in C than in T homozygotes (P < 0.05). This study constitutes the first observation, to our knowledge, of postprandial changes in LDLR and LRP mRNA expression. It documents immediate effects of a fatty meal on these mRNA as well as an LRP genotype effect on LDLR mRNA and LDL-C.

  20. Tempol improves lipid profile and prevents left ventricular hypertrophy in LDL receptor gene knockout (LDLr-/-) mice on a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Viana Gonçalves, Igor Cândido; Cerdeira, Cláudio Daniel; Poletti Camara, Eduardo; Dias Garcia, José Antônio; Ribeiro Pereira Lima Brigagão, Maísa; Bessa Veloso Silva, Roberta; Bitencourt Dos Santos, Gérsika

    2017-09-01

    Dyslipidemia is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease and atherosclerosis, and hence with high morbidity and mortality. This study investigated the effects of the nitroxide 4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine 1-oxyl (Tempol) on lipid profile and cardiac morphology in low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor gene knockout (LDLr-/-) mice. Male LDLr-/- mice (three months old, approximately 22 g weight) were divided into the following groups: controls, including (1) standard chow (SC, n=8) and (2) high-fat diet (HFD, n=8); and treatment, including (3) standard chow + Tempol (SC+T, n=8) (30 mg/kg administered by gavage, once daily) and (4) high-fat diet + Tempol (HFD+T, n=8) (30 mg/kg). After 30 days of the diet/treatment, whole blood was collected for analysis of biochemical parameters (total cholesterol, triglycerides [TG], high-density lipoprotein [HDL], LDL, and very low-density lipoprotein [VLDL]). The heart was removed through thoracotomy and histological analysis of the left ventricle was performed. A significant increase in TG, LDL, and VLDL and marked left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) were demonstrated in the HFD group relative to the SC group (p<0.05), while Tempol treatment (HFD+T group) significantly (p<0.05) prevented increases in the levels of these lipid profile markers and attenuated LVH compared with the HFD group. In this study, Tempol showed potential for the prevention of events related to serious diseases of the cardiovascular system. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. High Fat High Cholesterol Diet (Western Diet) Aggravates Atherosclerosis, Hyperglycemia and Renal Failure in Nephrectomized LDL Receptor Knockout Mice: Role of Intestine Derived Lipopolysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Siddhartha S.; Righi, Samuel; Krieg, Richard; Kang, Le; Carl, Daniel; Wang, Jing; Massey, H. Davis; Sica, Domenic A.; Gehr, Todd W. B.; Ghosh, Shobha

    2015-01-01

    A high fat meal, frequently known as western diet (WD), exacerbates atherosclerosis and diabetes. Both these diseases are frequently associated with renal failure. Recent studies have shown that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) leaks into the circulation from the intestine in the setting of renal failure and after WD. However, it is not clear how renal function and associated disorders are affected by LPS. This study demonstrates that circulatory LPS exacerbates renal insufficiency, atherosclerosis and glucose intolerance. Renal insufficiency was induced by 2/3 nephrectomy in LDL receptor knockout mice. Nx animals were given normal diet (Nx) or WD (Nx+WD). The controls were sham operated animals on normal diet (control) and WD (WD). To verify if LPS plays a role in exaggerating renal insufficiency, polymyxin (PM), a known LPS antagonist, and curcumin (CU), a compound known to ameliorate chronic kidney disease (CKD), was given to Nx animals on western diet (Nx+WD+PM and Nx+WD+CU, respectively). Compared to control, all other groups displayed increased circulatory LPS. The Nx+WD cohort had the highest levels of LPS. Nx group had significant renal insufficiency and glucose intolerance but not atherosclerosis. WD had intense atherosclerosis and glucose intolerance but it did not show signs of renal insufficiency. Compared to other groups, Nx+WD had significantly higher cytokine expression, macrophage infiltration in the kidney, renal insufficiency, glucose intolerance and atherosclerosis. PM treatment blunted the expression of cytokines, deterioration of renal function and associated disorders, albeit not to the levels of Nx, and was significantly inferior to CU. PM is a non-absorbable antibiotic with LPS binding properties, hence its beneficial effect can only be due to its effect within the GI tract. We conclude that LPS may not cause renal insufficiency but can exaggerate kidney failure and associated disorders following renal insufficiency. PMID:26580567

  2. Arsenic augments the uptake of oxidized LDL by upregulating the expression of lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor in mouse aortic endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hossain, Ekhtear; Ota, Akinobu; Karnan, Sivasundaram; Damdindorj, Lkhagvasuren; Takahashi, Miyuki; Konishi, Yuko; Konishi, Hiroyuki; Hosokawa, Yoshitaka

    2013-12-15

    Although chronic arsenic exposure is a well-known risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, including atherosclerosis, the molecular mechanism underlying arsenic-induced atherosclerosis remains obscure. Therefore, this study aimed to elucidate this molecular mechanism. We examined changes in the mRNA level of the lectin-like oxidized LDL (oxLDL) receptor (LOX-1) in a mouse aortic endothelial cell line, END-D, after sodium arsenite (SA) treatment. SA treatment significantly upregulated LOX-1 mRNA expression; this finding was also verified at the protein expression level. Flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy analyses showed that the cellular uptake of fluorescence (Dil)-labeled oxLDL was significantly augmented with SA treatment. In addition, an anti-LOX-1 antibody completely abrogated the augmented uptake of Dil-oxLDL. We observed that SA increased the levels of the phosphorylated forms of nuclear factor of kappa light polypeptide gene enhancer in B cells (NF-κB)/p65. SA-induced upregulation of LOX-1 protein expression was clearly prevented by treatment with an antioxidant, N-acetylcysteine (NAC), or an NF-κB inhibitor, caffeic acid phenethylester (CAPE). Furthermore, SA-augmented uptake of Dil-oxLDL was also prevented by treatment with NAC or CAPE. Taken together, our results indicate that arsenic upregulates LOX-1 expression through the reactive oxygen species-mediated NF-κB signaling pathway, followed by augmented cellular oxLDL uptake, thus highlighting a critical role of the aberrant LOX-1 signaling pathway in the pathogenesis of arsenic-induced atherosclerosis. - Highlights: • Sodium arsenite (SA) increases LOX-1 expression in mouse aortic endothelial cells. • SA enhances cellular uptake of oxidized LDL in dose-dependent manner. • SA-induced ROS generation enhances phosphorylation of NF-κB. • SA upregulates LOX-1 expression through ROS-activated NF-κB signaling pathway.

  3. A PCSK9-binding antibody that structurally mimics the EGF(A) domain of LDL-receptor reduces LDL cholesterol in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ni, Yan G; Di Marco, Stefania; Condra, Jon H; Peterson, Laurence B; Wang, Weirong; Wang, Fubao; Pandit, Shilpa; Hammond, Holly A; Rosa, Ray; Cummings, Richard T; Wood, Dana D; Liu, Xiaomei; Bottomley, Matthew J; Shen, Xun; Cubbon, Rose M; Wang, Sheng-ping; Johns, Douglas G; Volpari, Cinzia; Hamuro, Lora; Chin, Jayne; Huang, Lingyi; Zhao, Jing Zhang; Vitelli, Salvatore; Haytko, Peter; Wisniewski, Douglas; Mitnaul, Lyndon J; Sparrow, Carl P; Hubbard, Brian; Carfí, Andrea; Sitlani, Ayesha

    2011-01-01

    Proprotein convertase subtilisin-like/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) regulates LDL cholesterol levels by inhibiting LDL receptor (LDLr)-mediated cellular LDL uptake. We have identified a fragment antigen-binding (Fab) 1D05 which binds PCSK9 with nanomolar affinity. The fully human antibody 1D05-IgG2 completely blocks the inhibitory effects of wild-type PCSK9 and two gain-of-function human PCSK9 mutants, S127R and D374Y. The crystal structure of 1D05-Fab bound to PCSK9 reveals that 1D05-Fab binds to an epitope on the PCSK9 catalytic domain which includes the entire LDLr EGF(A) binding site. Notably, the 1D05-Fab CDR-H3 and CDR-H2 loops structurally mimic the EGF(A) domain of LDLr. In a transgenic mouse model (CETP/LDLr-hemi), in which plasma lipid and PCSK9 profiles are comparable to those of humans, 1D05-IgG2 reduces plasma LDL cholesterol to 40% and raises hepatic LDLr protein levels approximately fivefold. Similarly, in healthy rhesus monkeys, 1D05-IgG2 effectively reduced LDL cholesterol 20%-50% for over 2 weeks, despite its relatively short terminal half-life (t(1/2) = 3.2 days). Importantly, the decrease in circulating LDL cholesterol corresponds closely to the reduction in free PCSK9 levels. Together these results clearly demonstrate that the LDL-lowering effect of the neutralizing anti-PCSK9 1D05-IgG2 antibody is mediated by reducing the amount of PCSK9 that can bind to the LDLr.

  4. NARC-1/PCSK9 and its natural mutants: zymogen cleavage and effects on the low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor and LDL cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Benjannet, Suzanne; Rhainds, David; Essalmani, Rachid; Mayne, Janice; Wickham, Louise; Jin, Weijun; Asselin, Marie-Claude; Hamelin, Josée; Varret, Mathilde; Allard, Delphine; Trillard, Mélanie; Abifadel, Marianne; Tebon, Angie; Attie, Alan D; Rader, Daniel J; Boileau, Catherine; Brissette, Louise; Chrétien, Michel; Prat, Annik; Seidah, Nabil G

    2004-11-19

    The discovery of autosomal dominant hypercholesterolemic patients with mutations in the PCSK9 gene, encoding the proprotein convertase NARC-1, resulting in the missense mutations suggested a role in low density lipoprotein (LDL) metabolism. We show that the endoplasmic reticulum-localized proNARC-1 to NARC-1 zymogen conversion is Ca2+-independent and that within the zymogen autocatalytic processing site SSVFAQ [downward arrow]SIP Val at P4 and Pro at P3' are critical. The S127R and D374Y mutations result in approximately 50-60% and > or =98% decrease in zymogen processing, respectively. In contrast, the double [D374Y + N157K], F216L, and R218S natural mutants resulted in normal zymogen processing. The cell surface LDL receptor (LDLR) levels are reduced by 35% in lymphoblasts of S127R patients. The LDLR levels are also reduced in stable HepG2 cells overexpressing NARC-1 or its natural mutant S127R, and this reduction is abrogated in the presence of 5 mm ammonium chloride, suggesting that overexpression of NARC-1 increases the turnover rate of the LDLR. Adenoviral expression of wild type human NARC-1 in mice resulted in a maximal approximately 9-fold increase in circulating LDL cholesterol, while in LDLR-/- mice a delayed approximately 2-fold increase in LDL cholesterol was observed. In conclusion, NARC-1 seems to affect both the level of LDLR and that of circulating apoB-containing lipoproteins in an LDLR-dependent and -independent fashion.

  5. Six Novel Missense Mutations in the LDL Receptor-Related Protein 5 (LRP5) Gene in Different Conditions with an Increased Bone Density

    PubMed Central

    Van Wesenbeeck, Liesbeth; Cleiren, Erna; Gram, Jeppe; Beals, Rodney K.; Bénichou, Olivier; Scopelliti, Domenico; Key, Lyndon; Renton, Tara; Bartels, Cindy; Gong, Yaoqin; Warman, Matthew L.; de Vernejoul, Marie-Christine; Bollerslev, Jens; Van Hul, Wim

    2003-01-01

    Bone is a dynamic tissue that is subject to the balanced processes of bone formation and bone resorption. Imbalance can give rise to skeletal pathologies with increased bone density. In recent years, several genes underlying such sclerosing bone disorders have been identified. The LDL receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5) gene has been shown to be involved in both osteoporosis-pseudoglioma syndrome and the high–bone-mass phenotype and turned out to be an important regulator of peak bone mass in vertebrates. We performed mutation analysis of the LRP5 gene in 10 families or isolated patients with different conditions with an increased bone density, including endosteal hyperostosis, Van Buchem disease, autosomal dominant osteosclerosis, and osteopetrosis type I. Direct sequencing of the LRP5 gene revealed 19 sequence variants. Thirteen of these were confirmed as polymorphisms, but six novel missense mutations (D111Y, G171R, A214T, A214V, A242T, and T253I) are most likely disease causing. Like the previously reported mutation (G171V) that causes the high–bone-mass phenotype, all mutations are located in the aminoterminal part of the gene, before the first epidermal growth factor–like domain. These results indicate that, despite the different diagnoses that can be made, conditions with an increased bone density affecting mainly the cortices of the long bones and the skull are often caused by mutations in the LRP5 gene. Functional analysis of the effects of the various mutations will be of interest, to evaluate whether all the mutations give rise to the same pathogenic mechanism. PMID:12579474

  6. High-fructose feeding promotes accelerated degradation of hepatic LDL receptor and hypercholesterolemia in hamsters via elevated circulating PCSK9 levels.

    PubMed

    Dong, Bin; Singh, Amar Bahadur; Azhar, Salman; Seidah, Nabil G; Liu, Jingwen

    2015-04-01

    High fructose diet (HFD) induces dyslipidemia and insulin resistance in experimental animals and humans with incomplete mechanistic understanding. By utilizing mice and hamsters as in vivo models, we investigated whether high fructose consumption affects serum PCSK9 and liver LDL receptor (LDLR) protein levels. Feeding mice with an HFD increased serum cholesterol and reduced serum PCSK9 levels as compared with the mice fed a normal chow diet (NCD). In contrast to the inverse relationship in mice, serum PCSK9 and cholesterol levels were co-elevated in HFD-fed hamsters. Liver tissue analysis revealed that PCSK9 mRNA and protein levels were both reduced in mice and hamsters by HFD feeding, however, liver LDLR protein levels were markedly reduced by HFD in hamsters but not in mice. We further showed that circulating PCSK9 clearance rates were significantly lower in hamsters fed an HFD as compared with the hamsters fed NCD, providing additional evidence for the reduced hepatic LDLR function by HFD consumption. The majority of PCSK9 in hamster serum was detected as a 53 kDa N-terminus cleaved protein. By conducting in vitro studies, we demonstrate that this 53 kDa truncated hamster PCSK9 is functionally active in promoting hepatic LDLR degradation. Our studies for the first time demonstrate that high fructose consumption increases serum PCSK9 concentrations and reduces liver LDLR protein levels in hyperlipidemic hamsters. The positive correlation between circulating cholesterol and PCSK9 and the reduction of liver LDLR protein in HFD-fed hamsters suggest that hamster is a better animal model than mouse to study the modulation of PCSK9/LDLR pathway by atherogenic diets. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  7. Depletion of Endothelial or Smooth Muscle Cell-Specific Angiotensin II Type 1a Receptors Does Not Influence Aortic Aneurysms or Atherosclerosis in LDL Receptor Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Rateri, Debra L.; Moorleghen, Jessica J.; Knight, Victoria; Balakrishnan, Anju; Howatt, Deborah A.; Cassis, Lisa A.; Daugherty, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Background Whole body genetic deletion of AT1a receptors in mice uniformly reduces hypercholesterolemia and angiotensin II-(AngII) induced atherosclerosis and abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs). However, the role of AT1a receptor stimulation of principal cell types resident in the arterial wall remains undefined. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine whether deletion of AT1a receptors in either endothelial cells or smooth muscle cells influences the development of atherosclerosis and AAAs. Methodology/Principal Findings AT1a receptor floxed mice were developed in an LDL receptor −/− background. To generate endothelial or smooth muscle cell specific deficiency, AT1a receptor floxed mice were bred with mice expressing Cre under the control of either Tie2 or SM22, respectively. Groups of males and females were fed a saturated fat-enriched diet for 3 months to determine effects on atherosclerosis. Deletion of AT1a receptors in either endothelial or smooth muscle cells had no discernible effect on the size of atherosclerotic lesions. We also determined the effect of cell-specific AT1a receptor deficiency on atherosclerosis and AAAs using male mice fed a saturated fat-enriched diet and infused with AngII (1,000 ng/kg/min). Again, deletion of AT1a receptors in either endothelial or smooth muscle cells had no discernible effects on either AngII-induced atherosclerotic lesions or AAAs. Conclusions Although previous studies have demonstrated whole body AT1a receptor deficiency diminishes atherosclerosis and AAAs, depletion of AT1a receptors in either endothelial or smooth muscle cells did not affect either of these vascular pathologies. PMID:23236507

  8. Developmental programming of lipid metabolism and aortic vascular function in C57BL/6 mice: a novel study suggesting an involvement of LDL-receptor.

    PubMed

    Chechi, Kanta; McGuire, John J; Cheema, Sukhinder K

    2009-04-01

    We have previously shown that a maternal high-fat diet, rich in saturated fatty acids (SFA), alters the lipid metabolism of their adult offspring. The present study was designed to investigate 1) whether alterations in hepatic LDL-receptor (LDL-r) expression may serve as a potential mechanism of developmental programming behind the altered lipid metabolism of the offspring, 2) whether altered lipid metabolism leads to aortic vascular dysfunction in the offspring, 3) whether deleterious effects of SFA exposure preweaning are influenced by postweaning diet, and 4) whether gender-specific programming effects are observed. Female C57Bl/6 mice were fed a high-SFA diet or regular chow during gestation and lactation while their pups, both male and female, received either SFA or a chow diet after weaning. Male offspring obtained from mothers fed an SFA diet and those who continued on chow postweaning had higher plasma triglycerides and total cholesterol, whereas female offspring had higher plasma total and LDL cholesterol levels, lower hepatic LDL-r mRNA expression, and reduced aortic contractile responses compared with the offspring that were fed chow throughout the study. A comparison of the postweaning diet revealed significantly lower hepatic LDL-r expression along with significantly higher plasma LDL-cholesterol concentration in the female offspring that were obtained from mothers fed an SFA diet and who continued on an SFA diet postweaning, compared with the female offspring that were obtained from mothers fed an SFA diet but who continued on chow postweaning. In conclusion, we report a novel observation of hepatic LDL-r-mediated programming of altered lipid metabolism, along with aortic vascular dysfunction, in the female offspring of mothers fed a high-SFA diet. Male offspring only exhibited dyslipidemia, suggesting gender-mediated programming. This study further highlighted the role of postweaning diets in overriding the effects of maternal programming.

  9. Thiol Oxidative Stress Induced by Metabolic Disorders Amplifies Macrophage Chemotactic Responses and Accelerates Atherogenesis and Kidney Injury in LDL Receptor-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Mu; Zhao, Qingwei; Lee, Chi Fung; Tannock, Lisa R.; Smart, Eric J.; LeBaron, Richard G.; Phelix, Clyde F.; Rangel, Yolanda; Asmis, Reto

    2009-01-01

    Background Strengthening the macrophage glutathione redox buffer reduces macrophage content and decreases the severity of atherosclerotic lesions in LDL receptor-deficient (LDLR−/−) mice, but the underlying mechanisms were not clear. This study examined the effect of metabolic stress on the thiol redox state, chemotactic activity in vivo and the recruitment of macrophages into atherosclerotic lesions and kidneys of LDL-R−/− mice in response to mild, moderate and severe metabolic stress. Methods and Results Reduced glutathione (GSH) and glutathione disulfide (GSSG) levels in peritoneal macrophages isolated from mildly, moderately and severe metabolically-stressed LDL-R−/− mice were measured by HPLC, and the glutathione reduction potential (Eh) was calculated. Macrophage Eh correlated with the macrophage content in both atherosclerotic (r2=0.346, P=0.004) and renal lesions (r2=0.480, P=0.001) in these mice as well as the extent of both atherosclerosis (r2=0.414, P=0.001) and kidney injury (r2=0.480, P=0.001). Compared to LDL-R−/− mice exposed to mild metabolic stress, macrophage recruitment into MCP-1-loaded Matrigel plugs injected into LDL-R−/− mice increased 2.6–fold in moderately metabolically-stressed mice and 9.8–fold in severely metabolically-stressed mice. The macrophage Eh was a strong predictor of macrophage chemotaxis (r2=0.554, P<0.001). Conclusion Thiol oxidative stress enhances macrophage recruitment into vascular and renal lesions by increasing the responsiveness of macrophages to chemoattractants. This novel mechanism contributes at least in part to accelerated atherosclerosis and kidney injury associated with dyslipidemia and diabetes in mice. PMID:19592463

  10. Immunization with malondialdehyde-modified low-density lipoprotein (LDL) reduces atherosclerosis in LDL receptor-deficient mice challenged with Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    PubMed

    Turunen, S Pauliina; Kummu, Outi; Wang, Chunguang; Harila, Kirsi; Mattila, Riikka; Sahlman, Marjo; Pussinen, Pirkko J; Hörkkö, Sohvi

    2015-05-01

    Periodontal infections increase the risk of atherosclerotic vascular disease via partly unresolved mechanisms. Of the natural IgM Abs that recognize molecular mimicry on bacterial epitopes and modified lipid and protein structures, IgM directed against oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL) is associated with atheroprotective properties. Here, the effect of natural immune responses to malondialdehyde-modified LDL (MDA-LDL) in conferring protection against atherosclerosis, which was accelerated by the major periodontopathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis, was investigated. LDL receptor-deficient (LDLR(-/-)) mice were immunized with mouse MDA-LDL without adjuvant before topical application challenge with live P. gingivalis. Atherosclerosis was analyzed after a high-fat diet, and plasma IgG and IgM Ab levels were measured throughout the study, and the secretion of IL-5, IL-10 and IFN-γ in splenocytes stimulated with MDA-LDL was determined. LDLR(-/-) mice immunized with MDA-LDL had elevated IgM and IgG levels to MDA-LDL compared with saline-treated controls. MDA-LDL immunization diminished aortic lipid depositions after challenge with P. gingivalis compared with mice receiving only P. gingivalis challenge. Immunization of LDLR(-/-) mice with homologous MDA-LDL stimulated the production of IL-5, implicating general activation of B-1 cells. Immune responses to MDA-LDL protected from the P. gingivalis-accelerated atherosclerosis. Thus, the linkage between bacterial infectious burden and atherogenesis is suggested to be modulated via natural IgM directed against cross-reactive epitopes on bacteria and modified LDL. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  11. Effect of maternal diet rich in omega-6 and omega-9 fatty acids on the liver of LDL receptor-deficient mouse offspring.

    PubMed

    Torres, Dilênia De Oliveira Cipriano; Dos Santos, Ana Célia Oliveira; Silva, Amanda Karolina Soares E; Leite, Jacqueline Isaura Alvarez; De Souza, José Roberto Botelho; Beltrão, Eduardo Isidoro Carneiro; Peixoto, Christina Alves

    2010-04-01

    Omega-6 fatty acids are important to fetal development. However, during gestation/lactation, these fatty acids may contribute toward the development of fat tissue. Omega-9 fatty acids are associated with a reduction in serum lipids and protection from liver disease. The present study investigated the effect of the maternal intake of omega-6 and omega-9 in hypercholesterolemic mothers on the liver of the offspring. LDL receptor-deficient mice were fed a diet rich in either omega-6 (E6D) or omega-9 (E9D) for 45 days prior to mating and until the birth of the offspring, evaluating the effect on the offspring liver in comparison to a standard diet (STD). Mothers fed with the E6D experienced an increase in total cholesterol (TC) and the offspring exhibited an increase in TC, hepatic triglycerides (TG), and CC-chemokine ligand (CCL)2/monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1 as well as a reduction in HDL. Histological analysis on this group revealed steatosis, leukocyte infiltrate, and increased CCL2/MCP-1 expression. The ultrastructural analysis revealed hepatocytes with lipid droplets and myofibroblasts. The offspring of mothers fed the standard diet exhibited low serum TC, but microvesicular steatosis was observed. The offspring of mothers fed the E9D exhibited lower serum and hepatic TG as well as higher LDL in comparison to the other diets. The histological analyses revealed lower steatosis and leukocyte infiltrate. The findings suggest that hypercholesterolemic mothers with a diet rich in omega-6 fatty acids predispose their offspring to steatohepatitis, whereas a diet rich in omega-9 has a protective effect. 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. The PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway mediates insulin-like growth factor 1-induced E-cadherin down-regulation and cell proliferation in ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lau, Man-Tat; Leung, Peter C K

    2012-12-30

    Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) is produced by ovarian cancer cells and it has been suggested that it plays an important role in tumor progression. In this study, we report that IGF1 treatment down-regulated E-cadherin by up-regulating E-cadherin transcriptional repressors, Snail and Slug, in human ovarian cancer cells. The pharmacological inhibition of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) suggests that PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling is required for IGF1-induced E-cadherin down-regulation. Moreover, IGF1 up-regulated Snail and Slug expression via the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway. Finally, IGF1-induced cell proliferation was abolished by inhibiting PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling. This study demonstrates a novel mechanism in which IGF1 down-regulates E-cadherin expression through the activation of PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling and the up-regulation of Snail and Slug in human ovarian cancer cells.

  13. The immunosuppressive agents rapamycin, cyclosporin A and tacrolimus increase lipolysis, inhibit lipid storage and alter expression of genes involved in lipid metabolism in human adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Maria J; Palming, Jenny; Rizell, Magnus; Aureliano, Manuel; Carvalho, Eugénia; Svensson, Maria K; Eriksson, Jan W

    2013-01-30

    Cyclosporin A (CsA), tacrolimus and rapamycin are immunosuppressive agents (IAs) associated with insulin resistance and dyslipidemia, although their molecular effects on lipid metabolism in adipose tissue are unknown. We explored IAs effects on lipolysis, lipid storage and expression of genes involved on lipid metabolism in isolated human adipocytes and/or adipose tissue obtained via subcutaneous and omental fat biopsies. CsA, tacrolimus and rapamycin increased isoproterenol-stimulated lipolysis and inhibited lipid storage by 20-35% and enhanced isoproterenol-stimulated hormone-sensitive lipase Ser552 phosphorylation. Rapamycin also increased basal lipolysis (~20%) and impaired insulin's antilipolytic effect. Rapamycin, down-regulated the gene expression of perilipin, sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1 (SREBP1) and lipin 1, while tacrolimus down-regulated CD36 and aP2 gene expression. All three IAs increased IL-6 gene expression and secretion, but not expression and secretion of TNF-α or adiponectin. These findings suggest that CsA, tacrolimus and rapamycin enhance lipolysis, inhibit lipid storage and expression of lipogenic genes in adipose tissue, which may contribute to the development of dyslipidemia and insulin resistance associated with immunosuppressive therapy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Serendipity in splendid isolation: rapamycin.

    PubMed

    Rao, V Koneti

    2016-01-07

    In this issue of Blood, Bride et al report results of the first prospective multi-institutional trial of a long-term single-agent therapy for refractory cytopenias using rapamycin in 30 patients and show remarkable efficacy in children with autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS).

  15. Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species mediate hypoxic down-regulation of hERG channel protein.

    PubMed

    Nanduri, Jayasri; Wang, Ning; Bergson, Pamela; Yuan, Guoxiang; Ficker, Eckhard; Prabhakar, Nanduri R

    2008-08-22

    Previous studies suggest that reactive oxygen species (ROS) play an important role in physiological responses to hypoxia. In the present study, we examined the effects of hypoxia on human ether-a-go-go related gene (hERG) channel protein expression and assessed the role of ROS. Hypoxia, in a stimulus- and time-dependent manner, decreased hERG protein with marked reduction in hERG K+ conductance in human embryonic kidney cells stably expressing the hERG alpha subunit. Down-regulation of hERG by hypoxia was not due to increased proteasomal degradation or decreased transcription but due to decreased synthesis of the protein. Hypoxia increased ROS in a time-dependent manner. Antioxidants prevented hypoxia-evoked down-regulation of hERG protein and exogenous oxidants mimicked the effects of hypoxia. Hypoxia-evoked down-regulation of hERG protein and elevation in ROS were absent in p(O) cells, which are devoid of mitochondrial DNA. Inhibitors of NADPH oxidase failed to prevent the effects of hypoxia. These results demonstrate that hypoxia enhances the production of ROS in the mitochondria, resulting in down-regulation of hERG translation and decreased hERG-mediated K+ conductance.

  16. A Herbivorous Mite Down-Regulates Plant Defence and Produces Web to Exclude Competitors

    PubMed Central

    Sarmento, Renato A.; Lemos, Felipe; Dias, Cleide R.; Kikuchi, Wagner T.; Rodrigues, Jean C. P.; Pallini, Angelo; Sabelis, Maurice W.; Janssen, Arne

    2011-01-01

    Herbivores may interact with each other through resource competition, but also through their impact on plant defence. We recently found that the spider mite Tetranychus evansi down-regulates plant defences in tomato plants, resulting in higher rates of oviposition and population growth on previously attacked than on unattacked leaves. The danger of such down-regulation is that attacked plants could become a more profitable resource for heterospecific competitors, such as the two-spotted spider mite Tetranychus urticae. Indeed, T. urticae had an almost 2-fold higher rate of oviposition on leaf discs on which T. evansi had fed previously. In contrast, induction of direct plant defences by T. urticae resulted in decreased oviposition by T. evansi. Hence, both herbivores affect each other through induced plant responses. However, when populations of T. evansi and T. urticae competed on the same plants, populations of the latter invariably went extinct, whereas T. evansi was not significantly affected by the presence of its competitor. This suggests that T. evansi can somehow prevent its competitor from benefiting from the down-regulated plant defence, perhaps by covering it with a profuse web. Indeed, we found that T. urticae had difficulties reaching the leaf surface to feed when the leaf was covered with web produced by T. evansi. Furthermore, T. evansi produced more web when exposed to damage or other cues associated with T. urticae. We suggest that the silken web produced by T. evansi serves to prevent competitors from profiting from down-regulated plant defences. PMID:21887311

  17. The prelimbic cortex contributes to the down-regulation of attention toward redundant cues.

    PubMed

    Sharpe, Melissa J; Killcross, Simon

    2014-04-01

    Previous research suggests disruption of activity in the prelimbic (PL) cortex produces deficits in tasks requiring preferential attention toward cues that are good predictors of an event. By manipulating cue predictive power, we clarify this role using Pavlovian conditioning. Experiment 1a showed pretraining excitotoxic lesions of the PL cortex disrupted the ability of animals to distribute attention across stimuli conditioned in compound. Experiment 1b demonstrated that these lesions did not affect the ability to block learning about a stimulus when it was presented simultaneously with another stimulus that was previously paired with the outcome. However, in a subsequent test, PL-lesioned animals learnt about this blocked cue faster than sham-lesioned animals when this stimulus alone was paired with reinforcement, suggesting these animals did not down-regulate attention toward the redundant cue during blocking. Experiment 2 tested this hypothesis using an unblocking procedure designed to explicitly reveal a down-regulation of attention during blocking. In this, sham-lesioned animals were shown to down-regulate attention during blocking. PL-lesioned animals did not exhibit this effect. We propose that observed deficits are the result of a specific deficit in down-regulating attention toward redundant cues, indicating the disruption of an attentional process described in Mackintosh's (Mackintosh NJ. 1975. Psychol Review. 82:276) attentional theory.

  18. Oral Administration of N-Acetyl-D-Glucosamine Polymer Particles Down-Regulates Airway Allergic Responses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: DAMD17-03-1-0004 TITLE: Oral Administration of N- Acetyl -D...Oral Administration of N- Acetyl -D-Glucosamine Polymer Particles Down-Regulates 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Airway Allergic Responses...TERMS Childhood asthma, N- acetyl -D-glucosamine polymer, IL-12, GATA-3, T-bet, macrophages, airway hyperreactivity 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF

  19. Rapid male-specific regulatory divergence and down regulation of spermatogenesis genes in Drosophila species hybrids.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Jennifer; Gomes, Suzanne; Civetta, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    In most crosses between closely related species of Drosophila, the male hybrids are sterile and show postmeiotic abnormalities. A series of gene expression studies using genomic approaches have found significant down regulation of postmeiotic spermatogenesis genes in sterile male hybrids. These results have led some to suggest a direct relationship between down regulation in gene expression and hybrid sterility. An alternative explanation to a cause-and-effect relationship between misregulation of gene expression and male sterility is rapid divergence of male sex regulatory elements leading to incompatible interactions in an interspecies hybrid genome. To test the effect of regulatory divergence in spermatogenesis gene expression, we isolated 35 fertile D. simulans strains with D. mauritiana introgressions in either the X, second or third chromosome. We analyzed gene expression in these fertile hybrid strains for a subset of spermatogenesis genes previously reported as significantly under expressed in sterile hybrids relative to D. simulans. We found that fertile autosomal introgressions can cause levels of gene down regulation similar to that of sterile hybrids. We also found that X chromosome heterospecific introgressions cause significantly less gene down regulation than autosomal introgressions. Our results provide evidence that rapid male sex gene regulatory divergence can explain misexpression of spermatogenesis genes in hybrids.

  20. Rapid Male-Specific Regulatory Divergence and Down Regulation of Spermatogenesis Genes in Drosophila Species Hybrids

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Jennifer; Gomes, Suzanne; Civetta, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    In most crosses between closely related species of Drosophila, the male hybrids are sterile and show postmeiotic abnormalities. A series of gene expression studies using genomic approaches have found significant down regulation of postmeiotic spermatogenesis genes in sterile male hybrids. These results have led some to suggest a direct relationship between down regulation in gene expression and hybrid sterility. An alternative explanation to a cause-and-effect relationship between misregulation of gene expression and male sterility is rapid divergence of male sex regulatory elements leading to incompatible interactions in an interspecies hybrid genome. To test the effect of regulatory divergence in spermatogenesis gene expression, we isolated 35 fertile D. simulans strains with D. mauritiana introgressions in either the X, second or third chromosome. We analyzed gene expression in these fertile hybrid strains for a subset of spermatogenesis genes previously reported as significantly under expressed in sterile hybrids relative to D. simulans. We found that fertile autosomal introgressions can cause levels of gene down regulation similar to that of sterile hybrids. We also found that X chromosome heterospecific introgressions cause significantly less gene down regulation than autosomal introgressions. Our results provide evidence that rapid male sex gene regulatory divergence can explain misexpression of spermatogenesis genes in hybrids. PMID:23593487

  1. Down Regulation of CLDND1 Induces Apoptosis in Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Achari, Chandrani; Winslow, Sofia; Larsson, Christer

    2015-01-01

    Identification of targets for apoptosis induction is important to provide novel therapeutic approaches in breast cancer. Our earlier studies showed that down regulation of protein kinase C δ (PKCδ) induces death in breast cancer cells. In this study we set out to identify previously unrecognized apoptosis regulators in breast cancer cells. To identify candidates, global expression analysis with microarray was performed after down regulation of PKCδ in the basal-like breast cancer cell lines MDA-MB-231, MDA-MB-468 and BT-549. Genes that were down regulated in all cell lines were further studied for survival-supporting effects. The claudin-like CLDND1 was singled out since several independent siRNAs targeting CLDND1 induced cell death in several cell lines. The cell death induced by CLDND1 knockdown was caspase-dependent, suggesting induction of apoptosis. Nuclear fragmentation, cleavage of caspase-3 and PARP and release of cytochrome C from the mitochondria upon CLDND1 depletion demonstrated involvement of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. Inhibition of MEK1/2 and JNK further potentiated the cell death induction by CLDND1 knockdown. However, CLDND1 down regulation augmented ERK1/2 phosphorylation, which thereby may protect against the apoptosis inducing effects of CLDND1 down regulation. A concomitant inhibition of MEK1/2 suppresses the ERK1/2 phosphorylation and markedly potentiates the cell death following CLDND1 siRNA treatment. There is today little information on the function of CLDND1. These data provide novel information on CLDND1 and highlight it as a novel survival factor in basal-like breast cancer cell lines. PMID:26083392

  2. Two novel mutations in exon 3 and 4 of low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor gene in patients with heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Khan, Samia Perwaiz; Ghani, Rubina; Ahmed, Khwaja Zafar; Yaqoob, Zia

    2011-07-01

    To determine the common mutation of low density lipoprotein receptor in hypercholesterolemia patients requiring screening for heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (HeFH) in Karachi. Case-series. Dr. Ziauddin Hospital Laboratory and Dr. Rubina Ghani's Pathological and Molecular Laboratories, Karachi, for the PCR bench work from June 2008 to October 2009. All the patients selected for this study were from Dr. Ziauddin Hospital and National Institute of Cardiovascular Diseases. All the patients having high total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol were included in this study with premature coronary artery diseases or a family history of hypercholesterolemia. Exclusion criteria included Diabetes mellitus, hypertension, renal disease, hypothyroidism and steroid therapy. After lipid profile with overnight fasting, DNA was extracted from whole blood collected in EDTA (ethylenediamine tetra acetic acid) tube and multiplex PCR (polymerase chain reaction) using forward and reverse primers of exons 3, 4, 9 and 14 of base pairs 162, 431, 550 and 496 respectively. Out of total of 120 hypercholesterolemia cases, 42 patients were classical cases of HeFH (heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia) with xanthomas, xanthelasmas and LDL-C > 160 mg/dl. The total cholesterol (260± 57 mg/dL) and LDL-C (192 ± 39 mg/dL ) of cases was significantly high as compared to, controls having total cholesterol (184 ± 27 mg/dL) and LDL-C (105 ± 22 mg/dL), p > 0.001. Two novel point mutations were noted in exon 3 and exon 4. The other 78 cases were probable with raised LDL-C (low density lipoprotein cholesterol) and family history of premature coronary heart diseases. The frequency of HeFH was 35% classical and 65% probable cases out of total 120 hypercholesterolemia patients from two tertiary care hospitals in Karachi. The point mutation on exon 3 and exon 4 of LDLR gene was the most common. PCR is useful for the detection of large re-arrangements in the LDL-receptor gene and is a rapid and

  3. Specific deletion of LDL receptor-related protein on macrophages has skewed in vivo effects on cytokine production by invariant natural killer T cells.

    PubMed

    Covarrubias, Roman; Wilhelm, Ashley J; Major, Amy S

    2014-01-01

    Expression of molecules involved in lipid homeostasis such as the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLr) on antigen presenting cells (APCs) has been shown to enhance invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cell function. However, the contribution to iNKT cell activation by other lipoprotein receptors with shared structural and ligand binding properties to the LDLr has not been described. In this study, we investigated whether a structurally related receptor to the LDLr, known as LDL receptor-related protein (LRP), plays a role in iNKT cell activation. We found that, unlike the LDLr which is highly expressed on all immune cells, the LRP was preferentially expressed at high levels on F4/80+ macrophages (MΦ). We also show that CD169+ MΦs, known to present antigen to iNKT cells, exhibited increased expression of LRP compared to CD169- MΦs. To test the contribution of MΦ LRP to iNKT cell activation we used a mouse model of MΦ LRP conditional knockout (LRP-cKO). LRP-cKO MΦs pulsed with glycolipid alpha-galactosylceramide (αGC) elicited normal IL-2 secretion by iNKT hybridoma and in vivo challenge of LRP-cKO mice led to normal IFN-γ, but blunted IL-4 response in both serum and intracellular expression by iNKT cells. Flow cytometric analyses show similar levels of MHC class-I like molecule CD1d on LRP-cKO MΦs and normal glycolipid uptake. Survey of the iNKT cell compartment in LRP-cKO mice revealed intact numbers and percentages and no homeostatic disruption as evidenced by the absence of programmed death-1 and Ly-49 surface receptors. Mixed bone marrow chimeras showed that the inability iNKT cells to make IL-4 is cell extrinsic and can be rescued in the presence of wild type APCs. Collectively, these data demonstrate that, although MΦ LRP may not be necessary for IFN-γ responses, it can contribute to iNKT cell activation by enhancing early IL-4 secretion.

  4. Induction of fatal inflammation in LDL receptor and ApoA-I double-knockout mice fed dietary fat and cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Zabalawi, Manal; Bhat, Shaila; Loughlin, Tara; Thomas, Michael J; Alexander, Eric; Cline, Mark; Bullock, Bill; Willingham, Mark; Sorci-Thomas, Mary G

    2003-09-01

    Atherogenic response to dietary fat and cholesterol challenge was evaluated in mice lacking both the LDL receptor (LDLr(-/-)) and apoA-I (apoA-I(-/-)) gene, LDLr(-/-)/apoA-I(-/-) or double-knockout mice. Gender- and age-matched LDLr(-/-)/apoA-I(-/-) mice were fed a diet consisting of 0.1% cholesterol and 10% palm oil for 16 weeks and compared to LDLr(-/-) mice or single-knockout mice. The LDLr(-/-) mice showed a 6- to 7-fold increase in total plasma cholesterol (TPC) compared to their chow-fed mice counterparts, while LDLr(-/-)/apoA-I(-/-) mice showed only a 2- to 3-fold increase in TPC compared to their chow-fed controls. This differential response to the atherogenic diet was unanticipated, since chow-fed LDLr(-/-) and LDLr(-/-)/apoA-I(-/-) mice began the study with similar LDL levels and differed primarily in their HDL concentration. The 6-fold diet-induced increase in TPC observed in the LDLr(-/-) mice occurred mainly in VLDL/LDL and not in HDL. Mid-study plasma samples taken after 8 weeks of diet feeding showed that LDLr(-/-) mice had TPC concentrations approximately 60% of their 16-week level, while the LDLr(-/-)/apoA-I(-/-) mice had reached 100% of their 16-week TPC concentration after only 8 weeks of diet. Male LDLr(-/-) mice showed similar aortic cholesterol levels to male LDLr(-/-)/apoA-I(-/-) mice despite a 4-fold higher VLDL/LDL concentration in the LDLr(-/-) mice. A direct comparison of the severity of aortic atherosclerosis between female LDLr(-/-) and LDLr(-/-)/apoA-I(-/-) mice was compromised due to the loss of female LDLr(-/-)/apoA-I(-/-) mice between 10 and 14 weeks into the study. Diet-fed female and, with time, male LDLr(-/-)/apoA-I(-/-) mice suffered from severe ulcerated cutaneous xanthomatosis. This condition, combined with a complete depletion of adrenal cholesterol, manifested in fatal wasting of the affected mice. In conclusion, LDLr(-/-) and LDLr(-/-)/apoA-I(-/-) mice showed dramatic TPC differences in response to dietary fat and

  5. Silicon-Enriched Restructured Pork Affects the Lipoprotein Profile, VLDL Oxidation, and LDL Receptor Gene Expression in Aged Rats Fed an Atherogenic Diet.

    PubMed

    Garcimartín, Alba; Santos-López, Jorge A; Bastida, Sara; Benedí, Juana; Sánchez-Muniz, Francisco J

    2015-09-01

    Research has shown that silicon can play an important role in protecting against degenerative diseases. Restructuring pork by partially disassembling meat permits the incorporation of active components with potential functional effects. However, there has been no research to date on the impact that silicon, as a functional ingredient in restructured pork (RP), has on lipoprotein composition, metabolism, and oxidation. This study was designed to evaluate the effect of silicon-enriched RP on lipemia, lipoprotein profile, and oxidation markers of aged rats fed high-fat, high-energy, cholesterol-enriched diets. RP samples similar to commercial sausages (16% protein and 22% fat, wt:wt) were prepared by mixing lean pork and lard alone or with silicon (1.3 g Si/kg fresh matter) under controlled conditions and then freeze-dried. Saturated fat-rich diets were designed by mixing 78.3% purified diet with 21.7% freeze-dried RP. Three groups composed of 8 aged male Wistar rats (1 y old) were fed for 8 wk a control RP (C) diet, a cholesterol-enriched RP (Chol-C) diet [C diet enriched with 1.26% cholesterol plus 0.25% cholic acid, or a cholesterol and silicon-enriched RP (Chol-Si) diet (same as the Chol-C diet but containing silicon)]. Plasma lipid concentrations, lipoprotein profile, the degree of VLDL oxidation, and LDL receptor gene (Ldlr) expression were tested. Compared with the C diet, the Chol-C diet did not modify food intake or body weight but significantly increased (P < 0.05) plasma cholesterol (32%) and total lipids (19%), VLDL and intermediate density lipoprotein + LDL cholesterol (both >600%), total lipids and proteins (both >300%), and the degree of VLDL oxidation [conjugated dienes >250%; thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance (TBARS), 900%] and reduced Ldlr expression (64%) and liver arylesterase activity (54%). The Chol-Si diet partially normalized changes induced by the Chol-C diet. Compared with the Chol-C group, Chol-Si rats had lower VLDL compound

  6. Novel role of the nutraceutical bioactive compound berberine in lectin-like OxLDL receptor 1-mediated endothelial dysfunction in comparison to lovastatin.

    PubMed

    Caliceti, C; Rizzo, P; Ferrari, R; Fortini, F; Aquila, G; Leoncini, E; Zambonin, L; Rizzo, B; Calabria, D; Simoni, P; Mirasoli, M; Guardigli, M; Hrelia, S; Roda, A; Cicero, A F G

    2017-06-01

    Oxidized LDL (oxLDL) or pro-inflammatory stimuli lead to increased oxidative stress linked to endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis. The oxLDL receptor-1 (LOX1) is elevated within atheromas and cholesterol-lowering statins inhibit LOX1 expression. Berberine (BBR), an alkaloid extracted from plants of gender Berberis, has lipid-lowering and anti-inflammatory activity. However, its role in regulating LOX1-mediated signaling is still unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of BBR on oxLDL- and TNFα-induced endothelial dysfunction in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and to compare it with that of lovastatin (LOVA). Cytotoxicity was determined by lactate dehydrogenase assay. Antioxidant capacity was measured with chemiluminescent and fluorescent method and intracellular ROS levels through a fluorescent dye. Gene and protein expression levels were assayed by qRT-PCR and western blot, respectively. HUVECs exposure to oxLDL (30 μg/ml) or TNFα (10 ng/ml) for 24 h led to a significant increase in LOX1 expression, effect abrogated by BBR (5 μM) and LOVA (5 μM). BBR but not LOVA treatment abolished the TNFα-induced cytotoxicity and restored the activation of Akt signaling. In spite of a low direct antioxidant capacity, both compounds reduced intracellular ROS levels generated by treatment of TNFα but only BBR inhibited NOX2 expression, MAPK/Erk1/2 signaling and subsequent NF-κB target genes VCAM and ICAM expression, induced by TNFα. These findings demonstrated for the first time that BBR could prevent the oxLDL and TNFα - induced LOX1 expression and oxidative stress, key events that lead to NOX, MAPK/Erk1/2 and NF-κB activation linked to endothelial dysfunction. Berberine (PubChem CID: 2353); Lovastatin (PubChem CID: 53232). Copyright © 2017 The Italian Society of Diabetology, the Italian Society for the Study of Atherosclerosis, the Italian Society of Human Nutrition, and the Department of Clinical Medicine and

  7. Dietary vitamin D inadequacy accelerates calcification and osteoblast-like cell formation in the vascular system of LDL receptor knockout and wild-type mice.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Nadine; Brandsch, Corinna; Schutkowski, Alexandra; Hirche, Frank; Stangl, Gabriele I

    2014-05-01

    Vitamin D insufficiency is highly associated with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. We have demonstrated enhanced vascular calcification in LDL receptor knockout (LDLR(-/-)) mice fed a diet low in vitamin D. This study aimed to investigate the impact of a diet low in vitamin D on vascular calcification in wild-type (WT) mice lacking atherosclerotic plaques and the effects of a persistent and discontinuous vitamin D insufficiency on atherosclerotic plaque composition in LDLR(-/-) mice. The study was performed with 4-wk-old male WT and LDLR(-/-) mice that were fed a normal calcium/phosphate Western diet (210 g/kg fat, 1.5 g/kg cholesterol) containing either adequate (+D; 1000 IU/kg) or low (-D; 50 IU/kg) amounts of vitamin D-3 for 16 wk. Four groups of LDLR(-/-) mice received 1 of the 2 diets for additional 16 wk (total 32 wk) and were compared with mice fed the diets for only 16 wk. WT and LDLR(-/-) mice that were fed the -D diet for 16 wk tended to develop more calcified spots in the aortic valve than mice fed the +D diet (+50% and +56%, respectively; P < 0.10). In LDLR(-/-) mice, the extent of calcification increased from week 16 to week 32 and was higher in the -D than in the +D group (P < 0.05). The calcification, owing to the -D diet, was accompanied by highly expressed osteoblast differentiation factors, indicating a transdifferentiation of vascular cells to osteoblast-like cells. Feeding the +D diet subsequent to the -D diet reduced the vascular calcification (P < 0.05). LDLR(-/-) mice fed the -D diet for 32 wk had higher plaque lipid depositions (+48%, P < 0.05) and a higher expression of cluster of differentiation 68 (+31%, P < 0.05) and tumor necrosis factor α (+134%, P < 0.001) than the +D group. Collectively, the findings imply low vitamin D status as a causal factor for vascular calcification and atherosclerosis.

  8. Pregnancy-associated osteoporosis with a heterozygous deactivating LDL receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5) mutation and a homozygous methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Cook, Fiona J; Mumm, Steven; Whyte, Michael P; Wenkert, Deborah

    2014-04-01

    Pregnancy-associated osteoporosis (PAO) is a rare, idiopathic disorder that usually presents with vertebral compression fractures (VCFs) within 6 months of a first pregnancy and delivery. Spontaneous improvement is typical. There is no known genetic basis for PAO. A 26-year-old primagravida with a neonatal history of unilateral blindness attributable to hyperplastic primary vitreous sustained postpartum VCFs consistent with PAO. Her low bone mineral density (BMD) seemed to respond to vitamin D and calcium therapy, with no fractures after her next successful pregnancy. Investigation of subsequent fetal losses revealed homozygosity for the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T polymorphism associated both with fetal loss and with osteoporosis (OP). Because her neonatal unilateral blindness and OP were suggestive of loss-of-function mutation(s) in the gene that encodes LDL receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5), LRP5 exon and splice site sequencing was also performed. This revealed a unique heterozygous 12-bp deletion in exon 21 (c.4454_4465del, p.1485_1488del SSSS) in the patient, her mother and sons, but not her father or brother. Her mother had a normal BMD, no history of fractures, PAO, ophthalmopathy, or fetal loss. Her two sons had no ophthalmopathy and no skeletal issues. Her osteoporotic father (with a family history of blindness) and brother had low BMDs first documented at ages ∼40 and 32 years, respectively. Serum biochemical and bone turnover studies were unremarkable in all subjects. We postulate that our patient's heterozygous LRP5 mutation together with her homozygous MTHFR polymorphism likely predisposed her to low peak BMD. However, OP did not cosegregate in her family with the LRP5 mutation, the homozygous MTHFR polymorphism, or even the combination of the two, implicating additional genetic or nongenetic factors in her PAO. Nevertheless, exploration for potential genetic contributions to PAO may explain part of the pathogenesis of this

  9. Down-regulation of lipoprotein lipase increases glucose uptake in L6 muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, Veronica; Saraff, Kumuda; Medh, Jheem D.

    2009-11-06

    Thiazolidinediones (TZDs) are synthetic hypoglycemic agents used to treat type 2 diabetes. TZDs target the peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-gamma (PPAR-{gamma}) and improve systemic insulin sensitivity. The contributions of specific tissues to TZD action, or the downstream effects of PPAR-{gamma} activation, are not very clear. We have used a rat skeletal muscle cell line (L6 cells) to demonstrate that TZDs directly target PPAR-{gamma} in muscle cells. TZD treatment resulted in a significant repression of lipoprotein lipase (LPL) expression in L6 cells. This repression correlated with an increase in glucose uptake. Down-regulation of LPL message and protein levels using siRNA resulted in a similar increase in insulin-dependent glucose uptake. Thus, LPL down-regulation improved insulin sensitivity independent of TZDs. This finding provides a novel method for the management of insulin resistance.

  10. TEL2 suppresses metastasis by down-regulating SERPINE1 in nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sang, Yi; Chen, Ming-Yuan; Luo, Donghua; Zhang, Ru-Hua; Wang, Li; Li, Mei; Luo, Rongzhen; Qian, Chao-Nan; Shao, Jian-Yong; Zeng, Yi-Xin; Kang, Tiebang

    2015-10-06

    Metastasis is the major cause of treatment failure in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). However, the molecular mechanisms of NPC metastasis are poorly understood. Here, using our customized gene microarray containing all of the known human transcription factors and the current markers for epithelial-mesenchymal transition, we report that TEL2 was down-regulated in highly metastatic NPC cells and the metastatic tissues in lymph node. Mechanistically, TEL2 inhibits the cell migration and invasion in vitro and metastasis in vivo by directly suppressing the SERPINE1 promoter in NPC. Consistently, an inverse correlation was observed between the protein levels of TEL2 and SERPINE1 using clinical NPC samples. Collectively, we have provided the first evidence that TEL2 plays a key role in NPC metastasis by directly down-regulating SERPINE1, and that this novel axis of TEL2 / SERPINE1 may be valuable to develop new strategies for treating NPC patients with metastasis.

  11. Clobetasol down-regulates SLPI expression in U937 monocytoid cells.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Naoko; Yoshida, Hitomi; Kitagishi, Yasuko; Nishimura, Yuri; Matsuda, Satoru

    2012-02-01

    In order to investigate how glucocorticoids affect the expression of secretory leukocyte peptidase inhibitor (SLPI), which is overexpressed in a variety of cancers, clobetasol was added to cell culture medium of U937 cells and the SLPI mRNA levels were examined. The in vitro effect of the treatment on SLPI expression was detected by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Clobetasol treatment of U937 cells induced an up- and down-regulation of SLPI expression in a dose-dependent manner. Western blotting confirmed the down-regulation of SLPI protein expression. We hypothesized a loop formation in the SLPI genome domain, in which the glucocorticoid receptor regulates bi-directional transcriptional activity.

  12. SAMHD1 is down regulated in lung cancer by methylation and inhibits tumor cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jia-lei; Lu, Fan-zhen; Shen, Xiao-Yong; Wu, Yun; Zhao, Li-ting

    2014-12-12

    Highlights: • SAMHD1 expression level is down regulated in lung adenocarcinoma. • The promoter of SAMHD1 is methylated in lung adenocarcinoma. • Over expression of SAMHD1 inhibits the proliferation of lung cancer cells. - Abstract: The function of dNTP hydrolase SAMHD1 as a viral restriction factor to inhibit the replication of several viruses in human immune cells was well established. However, its regulation and function in lung cancer have been elusive. Here, we report that SAMHD1 is down regulated both on protein and mRNA levels in lung adenocarcinoma compared to adjacent normal tissue. We also found that SAMHD1 promoter is highly methylated in lung adenocarcinoma, which may inhibit its gene expression. Furthermore, over expression of the SAMHD1 reduces dNTP level and inhibits the proliferation of lung tumor cells. These results reveal the regulation and function of SAMHD1 in lung cancer, which is important for the proliferation of lung tumor cells.

  13. Dipeptides Inhibit Melanin Synthesis in Mel-Ab Cells through Down-Regulation of Tyrosinase

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun-e; Kim, Eun-Hyun; Choi, Hye-Ryung; Sohn, Uy Dong; Yun, Hye-Young; Baek, Kwang Jin; Kwon, Nyoun Soo; Park, Kyoung-Chan

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of proline-serine (PS) and valine-serine (VS) dipeptides on melanogenesis in Mel-Ab cells. Proline-serine and VS significantly inhibited melanin synthesis in a concentration-dependent manner, though neither dipeptide directly inhibited tyrosinase activity in a cell-free system. Both PS and VS down-regulated the expression of microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) and tyrosinase. In a follow-up study also described here, the effects of these dipeptides on melanogenesis-related signal transduction were quantified. Specifically, PS and VS induced ERK phosphorylation, though they had no effect on phosphorylation of the cAMP response element binding protein (CREB). These data suggest that PS and VS inhibit melanogenesis through ERK phosphorylation and subsequent down-regulation of MITF and tyrosinase. Properties of these dipeptides are compatible with application as skin-whitening agents. PMID:22915995

  14. Down regulation of lncSCIR1 after spinal cord contusion injury in rat.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Hu, Bo; Cao, Fei; Sun, Shenggang; Zhang, Yunjian; Zhu, Qing

    2015-10-22

    Extensive changes occur at transcriptional level after traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI). In this study, we performed a large scale screening of expression changes of long (>200 nt) RNA transcripts including both coding and non-coding RNA species in a rat contusion SCI model. We validated significant down-regulation of one long non-coding RNA (lncSCIR1) at 1, 4, and 7 days postinjury. lncSCIR1 knockdown promoted astrocyte proliferation and migration in vitro. We further validated the strong association between lncSCIR1 knock down and the expression changes of four mRNAs after injury. Our data indicated that lncSCIR1 down-regulation might play a detrimental role in the pathophysiology of traumatic SCI and thereby provided new insights into the studies of potential therapeutic targets for traumatic central nervous system (CNS) injuries.

  15. Optimal experimental design in an epidermal growth factor receptor signalling and down-regulation model.

    PubMed

    Casey, F P; Baird, D; Feng, Q; Gutenkunst, R N; Waterfall, J J; Myers, C R; Brown, K S; Cerione, R A; Sethna, J P

    2007-05-01

    We apply the methods of optimal experimental design to a differential equation model for epidermal growth factor receptor signalling, trafficking and down-regulation. The model incorporates the role of a recently discovered protein complex made up of the E3 ubiquitin ligase, Cbl, the guanine exchange factor (GEF), Cool-1 (beta -Pix) and the Rho family G protein Cdc42. The complex has been suggested to be important in disrupting receptor down-regulation. We demonstrate that the model interactions can accurately reproduce the experimental observations, that they can be used to make predictions with accompanying uncertainties, and that we can apply ideas of optimal experimental design to suggest new experiments that reduce the uncertainty on unmeasurable components of the system.

  16. Prodigiosin down-regulates survivin to facilitate paclitaxel sensitization in human breast carcinoma cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, T.-F.; Peng, Y.-T.; Chuang, S.-M.; Lin, S.-C.; Feng, B.-L.; Lu, C.-H.; Yu, W.-J.; Chang, J.-S. Chang, C.-C.

    2009-03-01

    Prodigiosin is a bacterial metabolite with potent anticancer activity, which is attributed to its proapoptotic effect selectively active in malignant cells. Still, the molecular mechanisms whereby prodigiosin induces apoptosis remain largely unknown. In particular, the role of survivin, a vital inhibitor of apoptosis, in prodigiosin-induced apoptosis has never been addressed before and hence was the primary goal of this study. Our results showed that prodigiosin dose-dependently induced down-regulation of survivin in multiple breast carcinoma cell lines, including MCF-7, T-47D and MDA-MB-231. This down-regulation is mainly regulated at the level of transcription, as prodigiosin reduced the levels of both survivin mRNA and survivin promoter activity but failed to rescue survivin expression when proteasome-mediated degradation is abolished. Importantly, overexpression of survivin rendered cells more resistant to prodigiosin, indicating an essential role of survivin down-regulation in prodigiosin-induced apoptosis. In addition, we found that prodigiosin synergistically enhanced cell death induced by paclitaxel, a chemotherapy drug known to up-regulate survivin that in turn confers its own resistance. This paclitaxel sensitization effect of prodigiosin is ascribed to the lowering of survivin expression, because prodigiosin was shown to counteract survivin induction by paclitaxel and, notably, the sensitization effect was severely abrogated in cells that overexpress survivin. Taken together, our results argue that down-regulation of survivin is an integral component mediating prodigiosin-induced apoptosis in human breast cancer cells, and further suggest the potential of prodigiosin to sensitize anticancer drugs, including paclitaxel, in the treatment of breast cancer.

  17. Selective Androgen Receptor Down-Regulators (SARDs): A New Prostate Cancer Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-01

    PCa (9). Thus far, the techniques that have been used to down-regulate the AR include antisense oligonucleotides (10, 11), ribozyme treatments (12...Our findings suggest that ICI may present a useful treatment option for patients with AR-dependent PCa. Unlike the ribozyme , antisense, siRNA, or...Catalytic cleavage of the androgen receptor messenger RNA and functional inhibition of androgen receptor activity by a hammerhead ribozyme . Mol Endocrinol

  18. Down-regulation of microRNA-144 in air pollution-related lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Hong-Li; Wen, Zhe-Sheng; Huang, Yun-Chao; Cheng, Xin; Wang, Gui-Zhen; Zhou, Yong-Chun; Wang, Zai-Yong; Guo, Yong-Qing; Cao, Yi; Zhou, Guang-Biao

    2015-01-01

    Air pollution has been classified as a group 1 carcinogen in humans, but the underlying tumourigenic mechanisms remain unclear. In Xuanwei city of Yunnan Province, the lung cancer incidence is among the highest in China, owing to severe air pollution generated by the combustion of smoky coal, providing a unique opportunity to dissect lung carcinogenesis. To identify abnormal miRNAs critical for air pollution-related tumourigenesis, we performed microRNA microarray analysis in 6 Xuanwei non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs) and 4 NSCLCs from control regions where smoky coal was not used. We found 13 down-regulated and 2 up-regulated miRNAs in Xuanwei NSCLCs. Among them, miR-144 was one of the most significantly down-regulated miRNAs. The expanded experiments showed that miR-144 was down-regulated in 45/51 (88.2%) Xuanwei NSCLCs and 34/54 (63%) control region NSCLCs (p = 0.016). MiR-144 interacted with the oncogene Zeb1 at 2 sites in its 3′ untranslated region, and a decrease in miR-144 resulted in increased Zeb1 expression and an epithelial mesenchymal transition phenotype. Ectopic expression of miR-144 suppressed NSCLCs in vitro and in vivo by targeting Zeb1. These results indicate that down-regulation of miR-144 is critical for air pollution-related lung cancer, and the miR-144-Zeb1 signalling pathway could represent a potential therapeutic target. PMID:26395400

  19. Photosynthesis down-regulation precedes carbohydrate accumulation under sink limitation in Citrus.

    PubMed

    Nebauer, Sergio G; Renau-Morata, Begoña; Guardiola, José Luis; Molina, Rosa-Victoria

    2011-02-01

    Photosynthesis down-regulation due to an imbalance between sources and sinks in Citrus leaves could be mediated by excessive accumulation of carbohydrates. However, there is limited understanding of the physiological role of soluble and insoluble carbohydrates in photosynthesis regulation and the elements triggering the down-regulation process. In this work, the role of non-structural carbohydrates in the regulation of photosynthesis under a broad spectrum of source-sink relationships has been investigated in the Salustiana sweet orange. Soluble sugar and starch accumulation in leaves, induced by girdling experiments, did not induce down-regulation of the photosynthetic rate in the presence of sinks (fruits). The leaf-to-fruit ratio did not modulate photosynthesis but allocation of photoassimilates to the fruits. The lack of strong sink activity led to a decrease in the photosynthetic rate and starch accumulation in leaves. However, photosynthesis down-regulation due to an excess of total soluble sugars or starch was discarded because photosynthesis and stomatal conductance reduction occurred prior to any significant accumulation of these carbohydrates. Gas exchange and fluorescence parameters suggested biochemical limitations to photosynthesis. In addition, the expression of carbon metabolism-related genes was altered within 24 h when strong sinks were removed. Sucrose synthesis and export genes were inhibited, whereas the expression of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase was increased to cope with the excess of assimilates. In conclusion, changes in starch and soluble sugar turnover, but not sugar content per se, could provide the signal for photosynthesis regulation. In these conditions, non-stomatal limitations strongly inhibited the photosynthetic rate prior to any significant increase in carbohydrate levels.

  20. Down-regulation of microRNA-144 in air pollution-related lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Pan, Hong-Li; Wen, Zhe-Sheng; Huang, Yun-Chao; Cheng, Xin; Wang, Gui-Zhen; Zhou, Yong-Chun; Wang, Zai-Yong; Guo, Yong-Qing; Cao, Yi; Zhou, Guang-Biao

    2015-09-23

    Air pollution has been classified as a group 1 carcinogen in humans, but the underlying tumourigenic mechanisms remain unclear. In Xuanwei city of Yunnan Province, the lung cancer incidence is among the highest in China, owing to severe air pollution generated by the combustion of smoky coal, providing a unique opportunity to dissect lung carcinogenesis. To identify abnormal miRNAs critical for air pollution-related tumourigenesis, we performed microRNA microarray analysis in 6 Xuanwei non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs) and 4 NSCLCs from control regions where smoky coal was not used. We found 13 down-regulated and 2 up-regulated miRNAs in Xuanwei NSCLCs. Among them, miR-144 was one of the most significantly down-regulated miRNAs. The expanded experiments showed that miR-144 was down-regulated in 45/51 (88.2%) Xuanwei NSCLCs and 34/54 (63%) control region NSCLCs (p = 0.016). MiR-144 interacted with the oncogene Zeb1 at 2 sites in its 3' untranslated region, and a decrease in miR-144 resulted in increased Zeb1 expression and an epithelial mesenchymal transition phenotype. Ectopic expression of miR-144 suppressed NSCLCs in vitro and in vivo by targeting Zeb1. These results indicate that down-regulation of miR-144 is critical for air pollution-related lung cancer, and the miR-144-Zeb1 signalling pathway could represent a potential therapeutic target.

  1. Apoptosis regulators Fau and Bcl-G are down-regulated in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Pickard, Mark R; Edwards, Sandra E; Cooper, Colin S; Williams, Gwyn T

    2010-10-01

    The molecular control of cell death through apoptosis is compromised in prostate cancer cells, resulting in inappropriate cell survival and resistance to cytotoxic therapy. Reduced expression of the functionally connected apoptosis-regulators and candidate tumor suppressors Fau and Bcl-G has recently been implicated in oncogenesis in other tissues. The present study examines the hypothesis that reduced expression of these genes may be involved in prostate cancer. Fau and Bcl-G mRNA levels were determined by real time RT-PCR in two independent prostate tissue collections. In experiments in vitro, Fau and Bcl-G levels in prostate cancer cell lines were reduced using RNA interference and the effects on sensitivity to UVC irradiation were determined. Fau and Bcl-G mRNA levels were both lower in prostate cancer tissue than in normal prostate and Benign Prostate Hyperplasia. Active down-regulation of Fau and Bcl-G expression in vitro resulted in decreased sensitivity to UVC-induced cytotoxicity. Simultaneous down-regulation of Fau and Bcl-G produced a decrease in sensitivity which was similar to either gene alone. Fau and Bcl-G mRNA levels are both decreased in prostate cancer. In prostate cancer cell lines in vitro such down-regulation results in reduced sensitivity to UVC-induced cytotoxicity, consistent with the putative roles of these genes as candidate prostate tumor suppressors. The absence of an additive effect when Fau and Bcl-G were down-regulated simultaneously is consistent with the two genes acting in the same apoptosis pathway, for example, with the pro-apoptotic effects of Fau being mediated through modulation of Bcl-G. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Down-regulation of caveolin-1 in glioma vasculature: modulation by radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Régina, Anthony; Jodoin, Julie; Khoueir, Paul; Rolland, Yannève; Berthelet, France; Moumdjian, Robert; Fenart, Laurence; Cecchelli, Romeo; Demeule, Michel; Béliveau, Richard

    2004-01-15

    Primary brain tumors, particularly glioblastomas (GB), remain a challenge for oncology. An element of the malignant brain tumors' aggressive behavior is the fact that GB are among the most densely vascularized tumors. To determine some of the molecular regulations occuring at the brain tumor endothelium level during tumoral progression would be an asset in understanding brain tumor biology. Caveolin-1 is an essential structural constituent of caveolae that has been implicated in mitogenic signaling, oncogenesis, and angiogenesis. In this work we investigated regulation of caveolin-1 expression in brain endothelial cells (ECs) under angiogenic conditions. In vitro, brain EC caveolin-1 is down-regulated by angiogenic factors treament and by hypoxia. Coculture of brain ECs with tumoral cells induced a similar down-regulation. In addition, activation of the p42/44 MAP kinase is demonstrated. By using an in vivo brain tumor model, we purified ECs from gliomas as well as from normal brain to investigate possible regulation of caveolin-1 expression in tumoral brain vasculature. We show that caveolin-1 expression is strikingly down-regulated in glioma ECs, whereas an increase of phosphorylated caveolin-1 is observed. Whole-brain radiation treatment, a classical way in which GB is currently being treated, resulted in increased caveolin-1 expression in tumor isolated ECs. The level of tumor cells spreading around newly formed blood vessels was also elevated. The regulation of caveolin-1 expression in tumoral ECs may reflect the tumoral vasculature state and correlates with angiogenesis kinetics.

  3. Pu-erh Tea Inhibits Tumor Cell Growth by Down-Regulating Mutant p53

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Lanjun; Jia, Shuting; Tang, Wenru; Sheng, Jun; Luo, Ying

    2011-01-01

    Pu-erh tea is a kind of fermented tea with the incorporation of microorganisms’ metabolites. Unlike green tea, the chemical characteristics and bioactivities of Pu-erh tea are still not well understood. Using water extracts of Pu-erh tea, we analyzed the tumor cell growth inhibition activities on several genetically engineered mouse tumor cell lines. We found that at the concentration that did not affect wild type mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) growth, Pu-erh tea extracts could inhibit tumor cell growth by down-regulated S phase and cause G1 or G2 arrest. Further study showed that Pu-erh tea extracts down-regulated the expression of mutant p53 in tumor cells at the protein level as well as mRNA level. The same concentration of Pu-erh tea solution did not cause p53 stabilization or activation of its downstream pathways in wild type cells. We also found that Pu-erh tea treatment could slightly down-regulate both HSP70 and HSP90 protein levels in tumor cells. These data revealed the action of Pu-erh tea on tumor cells and provided the possible mechanism for Pu-erh tea action, which explained its selectivity in inhibiting tumor cells without affecting wild type cells. Our data sheds light on the application of Pu-erh tea as an anti-tumor agent with low side effects. PMID:22174618

  4. Pu-erh tea inhibits tumor cell growth by down-regulating mutant p53.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lanjun; Jia, Shuting; Tang, Wenru; Sheng, Jun; Luo, Ying

    2011-01-01

    Pu-erh tea is a kind of fermented tea with the incorporation of microorganisms' metabolites. Unlike green tea, the chemical characteristics and bioactivities of Pu-erh tea are still not well understood. Using water extracts of Pu-erh tea, we analyzed the tumor cell growth inhibition activities on several genetically engineered mouse tumor cell lines. We found that at the concentration that did not affect wild type mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) growth, Pu-erh tea extracts could inhibit tumor cell growth by down-regulated S phase and cause G1 or G2 arrest. Further study showed that Pu-erh tea extracts down-regulated the expression of mutant p53 in tumor cells at the protein level as well as mRNA level. The same concentration of Pu-erh tea solution did not cause p53 stabilization or activation of its downstream pathways in wild type cells. We also found that Pu-erh tea treatment could slightly down-regulate both HSP70 and HSP90 protein levels in tumor cells. These data revealed the action of Pu-erh tea on tumor cells and provided the possible mechanism for Pu-erh tea action, which explained its selectivity in inhibiting tumor cells without affecting wild type cells. Our data sheds light on the application of Pu-erh tea as an anti-tumor agent with low side effects.

  5. Down-regulation of G-protein-mediated Ca2+ sensitization in smooth muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Gong, M C; Fujihara, H; Walker, L A; Somlyo, A V; Somlyo, A P

    1997-01-01

    Prolonged treatment with guanosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate (GTP gamma S; 5-16 h, 50 microM) of smooth muscle permeabilized with Staphylococcus aureus alpha-toxin down-regulated (abolished) the acute Ca2+ sensitization of force by GTP gamma S, AIF-4, phenylephrine, and endothelin, but not the response to phorbol dibutyrate or a phosphatase inhibitor, tautomycin. Down-regulation also abolished the GTP gamma S-induced increase in myosin light chain phosphorylation at constant [Ca2+] and was associated with extensive translocation of p21rhoA to the particulate fraction, prevented its immunoprecipitation, and inhibited its ADP ribosylation without affecting the immunodetectable content of G-proteins (p21rhoA, p21ras, G alpha q/11, G alpha i3, and G beta) or protein kinase C (types alpha, beta 1, beta 2, delta, epsilon, eta, theta, and zeta). We conclude that the loss of GTP gamma S- and agonist-induced Ca2+ sensitization through prolonged treatment with GTP gamma S is not due to a decrease in the total content of either trimeric (G alpha q/11, G alpha i3, and G beta) or monomeric (p21rhoA and p21ras) G-protein or protein kinase C but may be related to a structural change of p21rhoA and/or to down-regulation of its (yet to be identified) effector. Images PMID:9190207

  6. Pathological implications of Cx43 down-regulation in human colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Rehana; Rashid, Rabiya; Andrabi, Khurshid; Parray, Fazl Q; Besina, Syed; Shah, Mohd Amin; Ul Hussain, Mahboob

    2014-01-01

    Connexin 43 is an important gap junction protein in vertebrates and is known for its tumor suppressive properties. Cx43 is abundantly expressed in the human intestinal epithelial cells and muscularis mucosae. To explore the role of Cx43 in the genesis of human colon cancer, we performed the expression analysis of Cx43 in 80 cases of histopathologically confirmed and clinically diagnosed human colon cancer samples and adjacent control tissue and assessed correlations with clinicopathological variables. Western blotting using anti-Cx43 antibody indicated that the expression of Cx43 was significantly down regulated (75%) in the cancer samples as compared to the adjacent control samples. Moreover, immunohistochemical analysis of the tissue samples confirmed the down regulation of the Cx43 in the intestinal epithelial cells. Cx43 down regulation showed significant association (p<0.05) with the histological type and tumor invasion properties of the cancer. Our data demonstrated that loss of Cx43 may be an important event in colon carcinogenesis and tumor progression, providing significant insights about the tumor suppressive properties of the Cx43 and its potential as a diagnostic marker for colon cancer.

  7. CHIP mediates down-regulation of nucleobindin-1 in preosteoblast cell line models.

    PubMed

    Xue, Fuying; Wu, Yanping; Zhao, Xinghui; Zhao, Taoran; Meng, Ying; Zhao, Zhanzhong; Guo, Junwei; Chen, Wei

    2016-08-01

    Nucleobindin-1 (NUCB1), also known as Calnuc, is a highly conserved, multifunctional protein widely expressed in tissues and cells. It contains two EF-hand motifs which have been shown to play a crucial role in binding Ca(2+) ions. In this study, we applied comparative two-dimensional gel electrophoresis to characterize differentially expressed proteins in HA-CHIP over-expressed and endogenous CHIP depleted MC3T3-E1 stable cell lines, identifying NUCB1 as a novel CHIP/Stub1 targeted protein. NUCB1 interacts with and is down-regulated by CHIP by both proteasomal dependent and independent pathways, suggesting that CHIP-mediated down-regulation of nucleobindin-1 might play a role in osteoblast differentiation. The chaperone protein Hsp70 was found to be important for CHIP and NUCB1 interaction as well as CHIP-mediated NUCB1 down-regulation. Our findings provide new insights into understanding the stability regulation of NUCB1. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Agonist-induced Down-regulation of Endogenous Protein Kinase C α through an Endolysosomal Mechanism*

    PubMed Central

    Lum, Michelle A.; Pundt, Krista E.; Paluch, Benjamin E.; Black, Adrian R.; Black, Jennifer D.

    2013-01-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) isozymes undergo down-regulation upon sustained stimulation. Previous studies have pointed to the existence of both proteasome-dependent and -independent pathways of PKCα processing. Here we demonstrate that these down-regulation pathways are engaged in different subcellular compartments; proteasomal degradation occurs mainly at the plasma membrane, whereas non-proteasomal processing occurs in the perinuclear region. Using cholesterol depletion, pharmacological inhibitors, RNA interference, and dominant-negative mutants, we define the mechanisms involved in perinuclear accumulation of PKCα and identify the non-proteasomal mechanism mediating its degradation. We show that intracellular accumulation of PKCα involves at least two clathrin-independent, cholesterol/lipid raft-mediated pathways that do not require ubiquitination of the protein; one is dynamin-dependent and likely involves caveolae, whereas the other is dynamin- and small GTPase-independent. Internalized PKCα traffics through endosomes and is delivered to the lysosome for degradation. Supportive evidence includes (a) detection of the enzyme in EEA1-positive early endosomes, Rab7-positive late endosomes/multivesicular bodies, and LAMP1-positive lysosomes and (b) inhibition of its down-regulation by lysosome-disrupting agents and leupeptin. Only limited dephosphorylation of PKCα occurs during trafficking, with fully mature enzyme being the main target for lysosomal degradation. These studies define a novel and widespread mechanism of desensitization of PKCα signaling that involves endocytic trafficking and lysosome-mediated degradation of the mature, fully phosphorylated protein. PMID:23508961

  9. Down-regulation of lignin biosynthesis in transgenic Leucaena leucocephala harboring O-methyltransferase gene.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Smita; Dwivedi, Upendra Nath

    2006-01-01

    In the present study, a 0.47 kb OMT gene construct from aspen, encoding for an enzyme O-methyltransferase (OMT, EC 2.1.1.6), in antisense orientation was used to down-regulate lignin biosynthesis in Leucaena leucocephala. The plants were transformed with Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain harboring the antisense gene, and the transformation was confirmed by PCR amplification of the npt II gene. The integration of a heterologous antisense OMT gene construct in transformed plants led to a maximum of 60% reduction in OMT activity relative to control. The evaluation of total lignin content by the Klason method revealed a maximum of 28% reduction. Histochemical analyses of stem sections depicted a reduction in lignin content and normal xylem development. The results also suggested a probable increase in aldehyde levels and a decrease in syringyl units. Lignin down-regulation was accompanied by an increase in methanol soluble phenolics to an extent that had no impact on wood discoloration, and the plants displayed a normal phenotype. Concomitantly, an increase of up to 9% in cellulose content was also observed. Upon alkali extraction, modified lignin was more extractable as evident from reduced Klason lignin in saponified residue and increased alkali soluble phenolics. The results together suggested that the extent of down-regulation of OMT activity achieved may lead to quality amelioration of Leucaena with respect to its applicability in pulp and paper manufacture as well as nutritive and easily digestible forage production.

  10. PDGF-D expression is down-regulated by TGFβ in fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Charni Chaabane, Saima; Coomans de Brachène, Alexandra; Essaghir, Ahmed; Velghe, Amélie; Lo Re, Sandra; Stockis, Julie; Lucas, Sophie; Khachigian, Levon M; Huaux, François; Demoulin, Jean-Baptiste

    2014-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ) is a key mediator of fibrogenesis. TGFβ is overexpressed and activated in fibrotic diseases, regulates fibroblast differentiation into myofibroblasts and induces extracellular matrix deposition. Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) is also a regulator of fibrogenesis. Some studies showed a link between TGFβ and PDGF in certain fibrotic diseases. TGFβ induces PDGF receptor alpha expression in scleroderma fibroblasts. PDGF-C and -D are the most recently discovered ligands and also play a role in fibrosis. In this study, we report the first link between TGFβ and PDGF-D and -C ligands. In normal fibroblasts, TGFβ down-regulated PDGF-D expression and up-regulated PDGF-C expression at the mRNA and protein levels. This phenomenon is not limited to TGFβ since other growth factors implicated in fibrosis, such as FGF, EGF and PDGF-B, also regulated PDGF-D and PDGF-C expression. Among different kinase inhibitors, only TGFβ receptor inhibitors and the IκB kinase (IKK) inhibitor BMS-345541 blocked the effect of TGFβ. However, activation of the classical NF-κB pathway was not involved. Interestingly, in a model of lung fibrosis induced by either bleomycin or silica, PDGF-D was down-regulated, which correlates with the production of TGFβ and other fibrotic growth factors. In conclusion, the down-regulation of PDGF-D by TGFβ and other growth factors may serve as a negative feedback in the network of cytokines that control fibrosis.

  11. Hepatitis B virus down-regulates expressions of MHC class I molecules on hepatoplastoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yongyan; Cheng, Min; Tian, Zhigang

    2006-10-01

    Chronic HBV infection is associated with a 100-fold high risk of developing hepatocellular carcinoma. Tumor recognition is of the most importance during the immune surveillance process that prevents cancer development in humans. In the present study, the expressions of MHC class I molecules on hepatoplastoma cell line HepG2.2.15 were investigated to indicate the possible effects of HBV on the immune recognition during HBV-associated hepatocellular carcinoma. It was found that the expressions of MHC class I molecules HLA-ABC, HLA-E and MICA were much lower in HepG2.2.15 cells compared with HepG2 cells. The expressing HBV in human hepatoplastoma cell line significantly down-regulated the expressions of MHC class I molecules. Additionally, it was observed that in murine chronic HBsAg carriers the expression of classical MHC-I molecule on hepatocytes was down-regulated. These results demonstrated that HBV might affect the immune recognition during HBV-associated hepatocellular carcinoma such as the recognition of CD8+ T, NK-CTL and NK cells and prevent the immune surveillance against tumors. However, the effects of HBV down-regulation of MHC class I molecules on the target cells in vivo should be further studied.

  12. Executive functions and the down-regulation and up-regulation of emotion

    PubMed Central

    Gyurak, Anett; Goodkind, Madeleine S.; Kramer, Joel H.; Miller, Bruce L.; Levenson, Robert W.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between individual differences in executive functions (EF; assessed by measures of working memory, Stroop, trail making, and verbal fluency) and ability to down-regulate and up-regulate responses to emotionally evocative film clips. To ensure a wide range of EF, 48 participants with diverse neurodegenerative disorders and 21 older neurologically normal aging participants were included. Participants were exposed to three different movie clips that were designed to elicit a mix of disgust and amusement. While watching the films they were either instructed to watch, down-regulate, and up-regulate their visible emotional responses. Heart-rate and facial behaviors were monitored throughout. Emotion regulatory ability was operationalized as changes in heart-rate and facial behavior in the down- and up-regulation conditions, controlling for responses in the watch condition. Results indicated that higher verbal fluency scores were related to greater ability to regulate emotion in both the down-regulation and up-regulation conditions. This finding remained significant even after controlling for age and general cognitive functioning. No relationships were found between emotion regulation and the other EF measures. We believe these results derive from differences among EF measures, with verbal fluency performance best capturing the complex sequence of controlled planning, activation, and monitoring required for successful emotion regulation. These findings contribute to our understanding of emotion-cognition interaction, suggesting a link between emotion-regulatory abilities and individual differences in complex executive functions. PMID:21432634

  13. Down-regulation of rat kidney calcitonin receptors by salmon calcitonin infusion evidence by autoradiography

    SciTech Connect

    Bouizar, Z.; Rostene, W.H.; Milhaud, G.

    1987-08-01

    In treating age-related osteoporosis and Paget disease of bone, it is of major importance to avoid an escape phenomenon that would reduce effectiveness of the treatment. The factors involved in the loss of therapeutic efficacy with administration of large pharmacological doses of the hormone require special consideration. Down-regulation of the hormone receptors could account for the escape phenomenon. Specific binding sites for salmon calcitonin (sCT) were characterized and localized by autoradiography on rat kidney sections incubated with /sup 125/I-labeled sCT. Autoradiograms demonstrated a heterogeneous distribution of /sup 125/I-labeled sCT binding sites in the kidney, with high densities in both the superficial layer of the cortex and the outer medulla. Infusion of different doses of unlabeled sCT by means of Alzet minipumps for 7 days produced rapid changes in plasma calcium, phosphate, and magnesium levels, which were no longer observed after 2 or 6 days of treatment. Besides, infusion of high doses of sCT induced down-regulation of renal sCT binding sites located mainly in the medulla, where calcitonin (CT) has been shown to exert it physiological effects on water and ion reabsorption. These data suggest that the resistance to high doses of sCT often observed during long-term treatment of patients may be the consequence of not only bone-cell desensitization but also down-regulation of CT-sensitive kidney receptor sites.

  14. Progeria, rapamycin and normal aging: recent breakthrough.

    PubMed

    Blagosklonny, Mikhail V

    2011-07-01

    A recent discovery that rapamycin suppresses a pro-senescent phenotype in progeric cells not only suggests a non-toxic therapy for progeria but also implies its similarity with normal aging. For one, rapamycin is also known to suppress aging of regular human cells. Here I discuss four potential scenarios, comparing progeria with both normal and accelerated aging. This reveals further indications of rapamycin both for accelerated aging in obese and for progeria.

  15. MicroRNAs Targeting Oncogenes Are Down-Regulated in Pancreatic Malignant Transformation from Benign Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Long R.; Frampton, Adam E.; Jacob, Jimmy; Pellegrino, Loredana; Krell, Jonathan; Giamas, Georgios; Tsim, Nicole; Vlavianos, Panagiotis; Cohen, Patrizia; Ahmad, Raida; Keller, Andreas; Habib, Nagy A.; Stebbing, Justin; Castellano, Leandro

    2012-01-01

    Background MicroRNA (miRNA) expression profiles have been described in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), but these have not been compared with pre-malignant pancreatic tumors. We wished to compare the miRNA expression signatures in pancreatic benign cystic tumors (BCT) of low and high malignant potential with PDAC, in order to identify miRNAs deregulated during PDAC development. The mechanistic consequences of miRNA dysregulation were further evaluated. Methods Tissue samples were obtained at a tertiary pancreatic unit from individuals with BCT and PDAC. MiRNA profiling was performed using a custom microarray and results were validated using RT-qPCR prior to evaluation of miRNA targets. Results Widespread miRNA down-regulation was observed in PDAC compared to low malignant potential BCT. We show that amongst those miRNAs down-regulated, miR-16, miR-126 and let-7d regulate known PDAC oncogenes (targeting BCL2, CRK and KRAS respectively). Notably, miR-126 also directly targets the KRAS transcript at a “seedless” binding site within its 3′UTR. In clinical specimens, miR-126 was strongly down-regulated in PDAC tissues, with an associated elevation in KRAS and CRK proteins. Furthermore, miR-21, a known oncogenic miRNA in pancreatic and other cancers, was not elevated in PDAC compared to serous microcystic adenoma (SMCA), but in both groups it was up-regulated compared to normal pancreas, implicating early up-regulation during malignant change. Conclusions Expression profiling revealed 21 miRNAs down-regulated in PDAC compared to SMCA, the most benign lesion that rarely progresses to invasive carcinoma. It appears that miR-21 up-regulation is an early event in the transformation from normal pancreatic tissue. MiRNA expression has the potential to distinguish PDAC from normal pancreas and BCT. Mechanistically the down-regulation of miR-16, miR-126 and let-7d promotes PDAC transformation by post-transcriptional up-regulation of crucial PDAC oncogenes. We show

  16. Adipose Genes Down-Regulated During Experimental Endotoxemia Are Also Suppressed in Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Hinkle, Christine C.; Haris, Lalarukh; Shah, Rhia; Mehta, Nehal N.; Putt, Mary E.; Reilly, Muredach P.

    2012-01-01

    Context: Adipose inflammation is a crucial link between obesity and its metabolic complications. Human experimental endotoxemia is a controlled model for the study of inflammatory cardiometabolic responses in vivo. Objective: We hypothesized that adipose genes down-regulated during endotoxemia would approximate changes observed with obesity-related inflammation and reveal novel candidates in cardiometabolic disease. Design, Subjects, and Intervention: Healthy volunteers (n = 14) underwent a 3 ng/kg endotoxin challenge; adipose biopsies were taken at 0, 4, 12, and 24 h for mRNA microarray. A priority list of highly down-regulated and biologically relevant genes was validated by RT-PCR in an independent sample of adipose from healthy subjects (n = 7) undergoing a subclinical 0.6 ng/kg endotoxemia protocol. Expression of validated genes was screened in adipose of lean and severely obese individuals (n = 11 per group), and cellular source was probed in cultured adipocytes and macrophages. Results: Endotoxemia (3 ng/kg) suppressed expression of 353 genes (to <67% of baseline; P < 1 × 10−5) of which 68 candidates were prioritized for validation. In low-dose (0.6 ng/kg) endotoxin validation, 22 (32%) of these 68 genes were confirmed. Functional classification revealed that many of these genes are involved in cell development and differentiation. Of validated genes, 59% (13 of 22) were down-regulated more than 1.5-fold in primary human adipocytes after treatment with endotoxin. In human macrophages, 59% (13 of 22) were up-regulated during differentiation to inflammatory M1 macrophages whereas 64% (14 of 22) were down-regulated during transition to homeostatic M2 macrophages. Finally, in obese vs. lean adipose, 91% (20 of 22) tended to have reduced expression (χ2 = 10.72, P < 0.01) with 50% (11 of 22) reaching P < 0.05 (χ2 = 9.28, P < 0.01). Conclusions: Exploration of down-regulated mRNA in adipose during human endotoxemia revealed suppression of genes involved in

  17. Modulation of nonsense mediated decay by rapamycin

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Andrew; Coyne, Doyle; Jansson, Linnea; Rush, Miles; Ennajdaoui, Hanane; Katzman, Sol; Bailey, Joanne; Deinhardt, Katrin; Sanchez-Elsner, Tilman

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rapamycin is a naturally occurring macrolide whose target is at the core of nutrient and stress regulation in a wide range of species. Despite well-established roles as an inhibitor of cap-dependent mRNA translation, relatively little is known about its effects on other modes of RNA processing. Here, we characterize the landscape of rapamycin-induced post-transcriptional gene regulation. Transcriptome analysis of rapamycin-treated cells reveals genome-wide changes in alternative mRNA splicing and pronounced changes in NMD-sensitive isoforms. We demonstrate that despite well-documented attenuation of cap-dependent mRNA translation, rapamycin can augment NMD of certain transcripts. Rapamycin-treatment significantly reduces the levels of both endogenous and exogenous Premature Termination Codon (PTC)-containing mRNA isoforms and its effects are dose-, UPF1- and 4EBP-dependent. The PTC-containing SRSF6 transcript exhibits a shorter half-life upon rapamycin-treatment as compared to the non-PTC isoform. Rapamycin-treatment also causes depletion of PTC-containing mRNA isoforms from polyribosomes, underscoring the functional relationship between translation and NMD. Enhanced NMD activity also correlates with an enrichment of the nuclear Cap Binding Complex (CBC) in rapamycin-treated cells. Our data demonstrate that rapamycin modulates global RNA homeostasis by NMD. PMID:27899591

  18. Autophagy down regulates pro-inflammatory mediators in BV2 microglial cells and rescues both LPS and alpha-synuclein induced neuronal cell death

    PubMed Central

    Bussi, Claudio; Ramos, Javier Maria Peralta; Arroyo, Daniela S.; Gaviglio, Emilia A.; Gallea, Jose Ignacio; Wang, Ji Ming; Celej, Maria Soledad; Iribarren, Pablo

    2017-01-01

    Autophagy is a fundamental cellular homeostatic mechanism, whereby cells autodigest parts of their cytoplasm for removal or turnover. Neurodegenerative disorders are associated with autophagy dysregulation, and drugs modulating autophagy have been successful in several animal models. Microglial cells are phagocytes in the central nervous system (CNS) that become activated in pathological conditions and determine the fate of other neural cells. Here, we studied the effects of autophagy on the production of pro-inflammatory molecules in microglial cells and their effects on neuronal cells. We observed that both trehalose and rapamycin activate autophagy in BV2 microglial cells and down-regulate the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and nitric oxide (NO), in response to LPS and alpha-synuclein. Autophagy also modulated the phosphorylation of p38 and ERK1/2 MAPKs in BV2 cells, which was required for NO production. These actions of autophagy modified the impact of microglial activation on neuronal cells, leading to suppression of neurotoxicity. Our results demonstrate a novel role for autophagy in the regulation of microglial cell activation and pro-inflammatory molecule secretion, which may be important for the control of inflammatory responses in the CNS and neurotoxicity. PMID:28256519

  19. Autophagy down regulates pro-inflammatory mediators in BV2 microglial cells and rescues both LPS and alpha-synuclein induced neuronal cell death.

    PubMed

    Bussi, Claudio; Ramos, Javier Maria Peralta; Arroyo, Daniela S; Gaviglio, Emilia A; Gallea, Jose Ignacio; Wang, Ji Ming; Celej, Maria Soledad; Iribarren, Pablo

    2017-03-03

    Autophagy is a fundamental cellular homeostatic mechanism, whereby cells autodigest parts of their cytoplasm for removal or turnover. Neurodegenerative disorders are associated with autophagy dysregulation, and drugs modulating autophagy have been successful in several animal models. Microglial cells are phagocytes in the central nervous system (CNS) that become activated in pathological conditions and determine the fate of other neural cells. Here, we studied the effects of autophagy on the production of pro-inflammatory molecules in microglial cells and their effects on neuronal cells. We observed that both trehalose and rapamycin activate autophagy in BV2 microglial cells and down-regulate the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and nitric oxide (NO), in response to LPS and alpha-synuclein. Autophagy also modulated the phosphorylation of p38 and ERK1/2 MAPKs in BV2 cells, which was required for NO production. These actions of autophagy modified the impact of microglial activation on neuronal cells, leading to suppression of neurotoxicity. Our results demonstrate a novel role for autophagy in the regulation of microglial cell activation and pro-inflammatory molecule secretion, which may be important for the control of inflammatory responses in the CNS and neurotoxicity.

  20. Nerve growth factor (NGF) and pro-NGF increase low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptors in neuronal cells partly by different mechanisms: role of LDL in neurite outgrowth.

    PubMed

    Do, Hai Thi; Bruelle, Céline; Pham, Dan Duc; Jauhiainen, Matti; Eriksson, Ove; Korhonen, Laura T; Lindholm, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Low-density lipoprotein receptors (LDLRs) mediate the uptake of lipoprotein particles into cells, as studied mainly in peripheral tissues. Here, we show that nerve growth factor (NGF) increases LDLR levels in PC6.3 cells and in cultured septal neurons from embryonic rat brain. Study of the mechanisms showed that NGF enhanced transcription of the LDLR gene, acting mainly via Tropomyosin receptor kinase A receptors. Simvastatin, a cholesterol-lowering drug, also increased the LDLR expression in PC6.3 cells. In addition, pro-NGF and pro-brain-derived neurotrophic factor, acting via the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR) also increased LDLRs. We further observed that Myosin Regulatory Light Chain-Interacting Protein/Inducible Degrader of the LDLR (Mylip/Idol) was down-regulated by pro-NGF, whereas the other LDLR regulator, proprotein convertase subtilisin kexin 9 (PCSK9) was not significantly changed. On the functional side, NGF and pro-NGF increased lipoprotein uptake by neuronal cells as shown using diacetyl-labeled LDL. The addition of serum-derived lipoprotein particles in conjunction with NGF or simvastatin enhanced neurite outgrowth. Collectively, these results show that NGF and simvastatin are able to stimulate lipoprotein uptake by neurons with a positive effect on neurite outgrowth. Increases in LDLRs and lipoprotein particles in neurons could play a functional role during brain development, in neuroregeneration and after brain injuries. Nerve growth factor (NGF) and pro-NGF induce the expression of low-density lipoprotein receptors (LDLRs) in neuronal cells leading to increased LDLR levels. Pro-NGF also down-regulated myosin regulatory light chain-interacting protein/inducible degrader of the LDLR (Mylip/Idol) that is involved in the degradation of LDLRs. NGF acts mainly via Tropomyosin receptor kinase A (TrkA) receptors, whereas pro-NGF stimulates p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR). Elevated LDLRs upon NGF and pro-NGF treatments enhanced lipoprotein uptake

  1. Alternative rapamycin treatment regimens mitigate the impact of rapamycin on glucose homeostasis and the immune system.

    PubMed

    Arriola Apelo, Sebastian I; Neuman, Joshua C; Baar, Emma L; Syed, Faizan A; Cummings, Nicole E; Brar, Harpreet K; Pumper, Cassidy P; Kimple, Michelle E; Lamming, Dudley W

    2016-02-01

    Inhibition of the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway by the FDA-approved drug rapamycin has been shown to promote lifespan and delay age-related diseases in model organisms including mice. Unfortunately, rapamycin has potentially serious side effects in humans, including glucose intolerance and immunosuppression, which may preclude the long-term prophylactic use of rapamycin as a therapy for age-related diseases. While the beneficial effects of rapamycin are largely mediated by the inhibition of mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1), which is acutely sensitive to rapamycin, many of the negative side effects are mediated by the inhibition of a second mTOR-containing complex, mTORC2, which is much less sensitive to rapamycin. We hypothesized that different rapamycin dosing schedules or the use of FDA-approved rapamycin analogs with different pharmacokinetics might expand the therapeutic window of rapamycin by more specifically targeting mTORC1. Here, we identified an intermittent rapamycin dosing schedule with minimal effects on glucose tolerance, and we find that this schedule has a reduced impact on pyruvate tolerance, fasting glucose and insulin levels, beta cell function, and the immune system compared to daily rapamycin treatment. Further, we find that the FDA-approved rapamycin analogs everolimus and temsirolimus efficiently inhibit mTORC1 while having a reduced impact on glucose and pyruvate tolerance. Our results suggest that many of the negative side effects of rapamycin treatment can be mitigated through intermittent dosing or the use of rapamycin analogs.

  2. Echium oil reduces plasma lipids and hepatic lipogenic gene expression in apoB100-only LDL receptor knockout mice1,2

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ping; Boudyguina, Elena; Wilson, Martha D.; Gebre, Abraham K.; Parks, John S.

    2008-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that dietary supplementation with Echium oil (EO), which is enriched in stearidonic acid (SDA; 18:4 n-3), the product of Δ-6 desaturation of 18:3 n-3, will decrease plasma triglyceride (TG) concentrations and result in conversion of SDA to eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) in the liver. Mildly hypertriglyceridemic mice (apoB100-only LDLr KO) were fed a basal diet containing 10% calories as palm oil (PO) and 0.2% cholesterol for 4 wks, after which they were randomly assigned to experimental diets consisting of the basal diet plus supplementation of 10% of calories as PO, EO, or fish oil (FO) for 8 wks. The EO and FO experimental diets decreased plasma TG and VLDL lipid concentration, and hepatic TG content compared to PO and there was a significant correlation between hepatic TG content and plasma TG concentration among diet groups. EO fed mice had plasma and liver lipid EPA enrichment that was greater than PO fed mice but less than FO fed mice. Down regulation of several genes involved in hepatic TG bio-synthesis was similar for mice fed EO and FO and significantly lower compared to those fed PO. In conclusion, EO may provide a botanical alternative to FO for reduction of plasma TG concentrations. PMID:18155507

  3. Down-regulation of lipoxygenase gene reduces degradation of carotenoids of golden rice during storage.

    PubMed

    Gayen, Dipak; Ali, Nusrat; Sarkar, Sailendra Nath; Datta, Swapan K; Datta, Karabi

    2015-07-01

    Down-regulation of lipoxygenase enzyme activity reduces degradation of carotenoids of bio-fortified rice seeds which would be an effective tool to reduce huge post-harvest and economic losses of bio-fortified rice seeds during storage. Bio-fortified provitamin A-enriched rice line (golden rice) expressing higher amounts of β-carotene in the rice endosperm provides vitamin A for human health. However, it is already reported that degradation of carotenoids during storage is a major problem. The gene responsible for degradation of carotenoids during storage has remained largely unexplored till now. In our previous study, it has been shown that r9-LOX1 gene is responsible for rice seed quality deterioration. In the present study, we attempted to investigate if r9-LOX1 gene has any role in degradation of carotenoids in rice seeds during storage. To establish our hypothesis, the endogenous lipoxygenase (LOX) activity of high-carotenoid golden indica rice seed was silenced by RNAi technology using aleurone layer and embryo-specific Oleosin-18 promoter. To check the storage stability, LOX enzyme down-regulated high-carotenoid T3 transgenic rice seeds were subjected to artificial aging treatment. The results obtained from biochemical assays (MDA, ROS) also indicated that after artificial aging, the deterioration of LOX-RNAi lines was considerably lower compared to β-carotene-enriched transgenic rice which had higher LOX activity in comparison to LOX-RNAi lines. Furthermore, it was also observed by HPLC analysis that down-regulation of LOX gene activity decreases co-oxidation of β-carotene in LOX-RNAi golden rice seeds as compared to the β-carotene-enriched transgenic rice, after artificial aging treatment. Therefore, our study substantially establishes and verifies that LOX is a key enzyme for catalyzing co-oxidation of β-carotene and has a significant role in deterioration of β-carotene levels in the carotenoid-enriched golden rice.

  4. Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors Induce Down-Regulation of c-Kit by Targeting the ATP Pocket

    PubMed Central

    Descarpentries, Clotilde; Frisan, Emilie; Adam, Kevin; Verdier, Frederique; Floquet, Célia; Dubreuil, Patrice; Lacombe, Catherine; Fontenay, Michaela; Mayeux, Patrick; Kosmider, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    The stem cell factor receptor (SCF) c-Kit plays a pivotal role in regulating cell proliferation and survival in many cell types. In particular, c-Kit is required for early amplification of erythroid progenitors, while it must disappear from cell surface for the cell entering the final steps of maturation in an erythropoietin-dependent manner. We initially observed that imatinib (IM), an inhibitor targeting the tyrosine kinase activity of c-Kit concomitantly down-regulated the expression of c-Kit and accelerated the Epo-driven differentiation of erythroblasts in the absence of SCF. We investigated the mechanism by which IM or related masitinib (MA) induce c-Kit down-regulation in the human UT-7/Epo cell line. We found that the down-regulation of c-Kit in the presence of IM or MA was inhibited by a pre-incubation with methyl-β-cyclodextrin suggesting that c-Kit was internalized in the absence of ligand. By contrast to SCF, the internalization induced by TKI was independent of the E3 ubiquitin ligase c-Cbl. Furthermore, c-Kit was degraded through lysosomal, but not proteasomal pathway. In pulse-chase experiments, IM did not modulate c-Kit synthesis or maturation. Analysis of phosphotyrosine peptides in UT-7/Epo cells treated or not with IM show that IM did not modify overall tyrosine phosphorylation in these cells. Furthermore, we showed that a T670I mutation preventing the full access of IM to the ATP binding pocket, did not allow the internalization process in the presence of IM. Altogether these data show that TKI-induced internalization of c-Kit is linked to a modification of the integrity of ATP binding pocket. PMID:23637779

  5. Baicalin Down-Regulates IL-1β-Stimulated Extracellular Matrix Production in Nasal Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jae-Min; Kang, Ju-Hyung; Lee, Seoung-Ae; Park, Il-Ho; Lee, Heung-Man

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Baicalin, a Chinese herbal medicine, has anti-fibrotic and anti-inflammatory effects. The aims of present study were to investigate the effects of baicalin on the myofibroblast differentiation, extracellular matrix production, migration, and collagen contraction of interleukin (IL)-1β-stimulated nasal fibroblasts and to determine the molecular mechanism of baicalin in nasal fibroblasts. Methods Nasal fibroblasts were isolated from the inferior turbinate of patients. Baicalin was used to treat IL-1β-stimulated nasal fibroblasts. To evaluate cytotoxicity, a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide assay was used. The expression levels of α-smooth muscle actin (SMA), fibronectin, phospho-mitogen-activated protein kinase (p-MAPK), p-Akt, p-p50, p-p65, and p-IκBα were measured by western blotting, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT—PCR),or immunofluorescence staining. Fibroblast migration was analyzed with scratch assays and transwell migration assays. Total collagen was evaluated with the Sircol collagen assay. Contractile activity was measured with a collagen gel contraction assay. Results Baicalin (0–50 μM) had no significant cytotoxic effects in nasal fibroblasts. The expression of α–SMA and fibronectin were significantly down-regulated in baicalin-treated nasal fibroblasts. Migration, collagen production, and contraction of IL-1β-stimulated nasal fibroblasts were significantly inhibited by baicalin treatment. Baicalin also significantly down-regulated p-MAPK, p-Akt, p-p50, p-p65, and p-IκBα in IL-1β-stimulated nasal fibroblasts. Conclusions We showed that baicalin down-regulated myofibroblast differentiation, extracellular matrix production, migration, and collagen contraction via the MAPK and Akt/ NF-κB pathways in IL-1β-stimulated nasal fibroblasts. PMID:28002421

  6. Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) inhibits breast cancer metastasis by down-regulating fibronectin.

    PubMed

    Hong, Honghai; Zhou, Ti; Fang, Shuhuan; Jia, Minghan; Xu, Zumin; Dai, Zhiyu; Li, Cen; Li, Shuai; Li, Lei; Zhang, Ting; Qi, Weiwei; Bardeesi, Adham Sameer A; Yang, Zhonghan; Cai, Weibin; Yang, Xia; Gao, Guoquan

    2014-11-01

    Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) plays an important role in the tumor growth and metastasis inhibition. It has been reported that PEDF expression is significantly reduced in breast cancer, and associated with disease progression and poor patient outcome. However, the exact mechanism of PEDF on breast cancer metastasis including liver and lung metastasis remains unclear. The present study aims to reveal the impact of PEDF on breast cancer. The orthotopic tumor mice model inoculated by MDA-MB-231 cells stably expressing PEDF or control cells was used to assess liver and lung metastasis of breast cancer. In vitro, migration and invasion experiments were used to detect the metastatic abilities of MDA-MB-231 and SKBR3 breast cancer cells with or without overexpression of PEDF. The metastatic-related molecules including EMT makers, fibronectin, and p-AKT and p-ERK were detected by qRT-PCR, Western blot, and Fluorescent immunocytochemistry. PEDF significantly inhibited breast cancer growth and metastasis in vivo and in vitro. Mechanically, PEDF inhibited breast cancer cell migration and invasion by down-regulating fibronectin and subsequent MMP2/MMP9 reduction via p-ERK and p-AKT signaling pathways. However, PEDF had no effect on EMT conversion in the breast cancer cells which was usually involved in cancer metastasis. Furthermore, the study showed that laminin receptor mediated the down-regulation of fibronectin by PEDF. These results reported for the first time that PEDF inhibited breast cancer metastasis by down-regulating fibronectin via laminin receptor/AKT/ERK pathway. Our findings demonstrated PEDF as a dual effector in limiting breast cancer growth and metastasis and highlighted a new avenue to block breast cancer progression.

  7. Requirements for cell rounding and surface protein down-regulation by Ebola virus glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Francica, Joseph R; Matukonis, Meghan K; Bates, Paul

    2009-01-20

    Ebola virus causes an acute hemorrhagic fever that is associated with high morbidity and mortality. The viral glycoprotein is thought to contribute to pathogenesis, though precise mechanisms are unknown. Cellular pathogenesis can be modeled in vitro by expression of the Ebola viral glycoprotein (GP) in cells, which causes dramatic morphological changes, including cell rounding and surface protein down-regulation. These effects are known to be dependent on the presence of a highly glycosylated region of the glycoprotein, the mucin domain. Here we show that the mucin domain from the highly pathogenic Zaire subtype of Ebola virus is sufficient to cause characteristic cytopathology when expressed in the context of a foreign glycoprotein. Similarly to full length Ebola GP, expression of the mucin domain causes rounding, detachment from the extracellular matrix, and the down-regulation of cell surface levels of beta1 integrin and major histocompatibility complex class 1. These effects were not seen when the mucin domain was expressed in the context of a glycophosphatidylinositol-anchored isoform of the foreign glycoprotein. In contrast to earlier analysis of full length Ebola glycoproteins, chimeras carrying the mucin domains from the Zaire and Reston strains appear to cause similar levels of down-modulation and cell detachment. Cytopathology associated with Ebola glycoprotein expression does not occur when GP expression is restricted to the endoplasmic reticulum. In contrast to a previously published report, our results demonstrate that GP-induced surface protein down-regulation is not mediated through a dynamin-dependent pathway. Overall, these results support a model in which the mucin domain of Ebola GP acts at the cell surface to induce protein down modulation and cytopathic effects.

  8. [BMMSC from blastic phase CML down-regulate leukemia cell apoptosis].

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Han, Yu-Xiang; Niu, Zhi-Yun; Wang, Xing-Zhe; Hua, Huan; Shang, Yin-Tao; Wang, Fu-Xu; Zhang, Xue-Jun; Luo, Jian-Min

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSC) from patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) in blastic phase (Bp) on K562 cells and the primary CML-Bp cells, and to explore its potential mechanisms. K562 cells and primary CML-Bp cells were co-cultured with BMMSC of different groups; the cell proliferation was detected by MTT method, the cell apoptosis rate and mitochondrial membrane potential were measured by flow cytometry, the expression levels of Caspase-8, Caspase-9, and activated Caspase-3 in cells were measured by Western blot. The results showed that the CML-Bp BMMSC could enhance the survival rate of K562 cells treated with adviamycin (ADM) and display protective effect on K562 cells and primary CML-Bp mononuctear cells, inhibited ADM-induced leukimia cell apoptosis (P < 0.05); as compared with CML-chronic phase (CML-Cp) BMMSC and normal BMMSC, the CML-Bp BMMSC showed the highest protective effect on leukemic cells, the mitochondrial membrane potential of co-cultured cells slightly droped (P < 0.05). In the CML-Bp BMMSC cultured with K562 cells, the expression level of caspase-3 was more down-regulated than that in K562 alone plus ADM group, while the expression of caspase-9 significantly increased (P < 0.05). It is concluded that the CML-Bp BMMSC down-regulates ADM-induced leukemia cell appoptosis, its mechanism may relate with the inhibition of mitochondrial membrane potential drop, the stabilization of unactive expression of caspase-9 and down-regulation of caspase-3 expression.

  9. Down-regulation of Wnt10a affects odontogenesis and proliferation in mesenchymal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yang Han, Dong Wang, Lei Feng, Hailan

    2013-05-17

    Highlights: •Down-regulation of Wnt10a in dental mesenchymal cells impairs odontogenesis of reassociated tooth germs. •Dspp is down- and up-regulated after Wnt10a-knockdown and overexpression in dental mesenchymal cells. •Down-regulation of Wnt10a inhibits proliferation of dental mesenchymal cells. -- Abstract: The WNT10a mutation has been found in patients with abnormal odontogenesis. In mice, Wnt10a expression is found in the tooth germ, but its role has not yet been elucidated. We aimed to investigate the role of Wnt10a in odontogenesis. Mesenchymal cells of the first mandibular molar germ at the bell stage were isolated, transfected with Wnt10a SiRNA or plasmid, and reassociated with epithelial part of the molar germ. Scrambled SiRNA or empty vector was used in the control group. The reassociated tooth germs were transplanted into mice subrenal capsules. After gene modification, dental mesenchymal cells cultured in vitro were checked for cell proliferation and the expression of Dspp was examined. All 12 reassociated tooth germs in the control group resumed odontogenesis, while only 5 of 12 in the Wnt10a knockdown group developed into teeth. After Wnt10a knockdown, the mesenchymal cells cultured in vitro presented repressed proliferation. Wnt10a knockdown and overexpression led to both down- and up-regulation of Dspp. We conclude that the down-regulation of Wnt10a impairs odontogensis and cell proliferation, and that Wnt10a regulates Dspp expression in mesenchymal cells. These findings help to elucidate the mechanism of abnormal tooth development in patients with the WNT10A mutation.

  10. Protein kinase B/Akt1 inhibits autophagy by down-regulating UVRAG expression

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Wonseok; Ju, Ji-hyun; Lee, Kyung-min; Nam, KeeSoo; Oh, Sunhwa; Shin, Incheol

    2013-02-01

    Autophagy, or autophagocytosis, is a selective intracellular degradative process involving the cell's own lysosomal apparatus. An essential component in cell development, homeostasis, repair and resistance to stress, autophagy may result in either cell death or survival. The targeted region of the cell is sequestered within a membrane structure, the autophagosome, for regulation of the catabolic process. A key factor in both autophagosome formation and autophagosome maturation is a protein encoded by the ultraviolet irradiation resistance-associated gene (UVRAG). Conversely, the serine/threonine-specific protein kinase B (PKB, also known as Akt), which regulates survival in various cancers, inhibits autophagy through mTOR activation. We found that Akt1 may also directly inhibit autophagy by down-regulating UVRAG both in a 293T transient transfection system and breast cancer cells stably expressing Akt1. The UVRAG with mutations at putative Akt1-phosphorylation sites were still inhibited by Akt1, and dominant-negative Akt1 also inhibited UVRAG expression, suggesting that Akt1 down-regulates UVRAG by a kinase activity-independent mechanism. We showed that Akt1 overexpression in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells down-regulated UVRAG transcription. Cells over-expressing Akt1 were more resistant than control cells to ultraviolet light-induced autophagy and exhibited the associated reduction in cell viability. Levels of the autophagosome indicator protein LC3B-II and mRFP-GFP-LC3 were reduced in cells that over-expressing Akt1. Inhibiting Akt1 by siRNA or reintroducing UVRAG gene rescued the level of LC3B-II in UV-irradiation. Altogether, these data suggest that Akt1 may inhibit autophagy by decreasing UVRAG expression, which also sensitizes cancer cells to UV irradiation.

  11. Ultrafine carbon particles down-regulate CYP1B1 expression in human monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Eder, Christiane; Frankenberger, Marion; Stanzel, Franz; Seidel, Albrecht; Schramm, Karl-Werner; Ziegler-Heitbrock, Loems; Hofer, Thomas PJ

    2009-01-01

    Background Cytochrome P450 monoxygenases play an important role in the defence against inhaled toxic compounds and in metabolizing a wide range of xenobiotics and environmental contaminants. In ambient aerosol the ultrafine particle fraction which penetrates deeply into the lungs is considered to be a major factor for adverse health effects. The cells mainly affected by inhaled particles are lung epithelial cells and cells of the monocyte/macrophage lineage. Results In this study we have analyzed the effect of a mixture of fine TiO2 and ultrafine carbon black Printex 90 particles (P90) on the expression of cytochrome P450 1B1 (CYP1B1) in human monocytes, macrophages, bronchial epithelial cells and epithelial cell lines. CYP1B1 expression is strongly down-regulated by P90 in monocytes with a maximum after P90 treatment for 3 h while fine and ultrafine TiO2 had no effect. CYP1B1 was down-regulated up to 130-fold and in addition CYP1A1 mRNA was decreased 13-fold. In vitro generated monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM), epithelial cell lines, and primary bronchial epithelial cells also showed reduced CYP1B1 mRNA levels. Benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) is inducing CYB1B1 but ultrafine P90 can still down-regulate gene expression at 0.1 μM of BaP. The P90-induced reduction of CYP1B1 was also demonstrated at the protein level using Western blot analysis. Conclusion These data suggest that the P90-induced reduction of CYP gene expression may interfere with the activation and/or detoxification capabilities of inhaled toxic compounds. PMID:19835593

  12. Prolonged administration of pyridostigmine impairs neuromuscular function with and without down-regulation of acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Richtsfeld, Martina; Yasuhara, Shingo; Fink, Heidrun; Blobner, Manfred; Martyn, J A Jeevendra

    2013-08-01

    The acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, pyridostigmine, is prophylactically administered to mitigate the toxic effects of nerve gas poisoning. The authors tested the hypothesis that prolonged pyridostigmine administration can lead to neuromuscular dysfunction and even down-regulation of acetylcholine receptors. Pyridostigmine (5 or 25 mg·kg·day) or saline was continuously administered via osmotic pumps to rats, and infused for either 14 or 28 days until the day of neuromuscular assessment (at day 14 or 28), or discontinued 24 h before neuromuscular assessment. Neurotransmission and muscle function were examined by single-twitch, train-of-four stimulation and 100-Hz tetanic stimulation. Sensitivity to atracurium and acetylcholine receptor number (quantitated by I-α-bungarotoxin) provided additional measures of neuromuscular integrity. Specific tetanic tensions (Newton [N]/muscle weight [g]) were significantly (P < 0.05) decreased at 14 (10.3 N/g) and 28 (11.1 N/g) days of 25 mg·kg·day pyridostigmine compared with controls (13.1-13.6 N/g). Decreased effective dose (0.81-1.05 vs. 0.16-0.45 mg/kg; P < 0.05) and decreased plasma concentration (3.02-3.27 vs. 0.45-1.37 μg/ml; P < 0.05) of atracurium for 50% paralysis (controls vs. 25 mg·kg·day pyridostigmine, respectively), irrespective of discontinuation of pyridostigmine, confirmed the pyridostigmine-induced altered neurotransmission. Pyridostigmine (25 mg·kg·day) down-regulated acetylcholine receptors at 28 days. Prolonged administration of pyridostigmine (25 mg·kg·day) leads to neuromuscular impairment, which can persist even when pyridostigmine is discontinued 24 h before assessment of neuromuscular function. Pyridostigmine has the potential to down-regulate acetylcholine receptors, but induces neuromuscular dysfunction even in the absence of receptor changes.

  13. Curcumin and Emodin Down-Regulate TGF-β Signaling Pathway in Human Cervical Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Thacker, Pooja Chandrakant; Karunagaran, Devarajan

    2015-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the major cause of cancer related deaths in women, especially in developing countries and Human Papilloma Virus infection in conjunction with multiple deregulated signaling pathways leads to cervical carcinogenesis. TGF-β signaling in later stages of cancer is known to induce epithelial to mesenchymal transition promoting tumor growth. Phytochemicals, curcumin and emodin, are effective as chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic compounds against several cancers including cervical cancer. The main objective of this work was to study the effect of curcumin and emodin on TGF-β signaling pathway and its functional relevance to growth, migration and invasion in two cervical cancer cell lines, SiHa and HeLa. Since TGF-β and Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathways are known to cross talk having common downstream targets, we analyzed the effect of TGF-β on β-catenin (an important player in Wnt/β-catenin signaling) and also studied whether curcumin and emodin modulate them. We observed that curcumin and emodin effectively down regulate TGF-β signaling pathway by decreasing the expression of TGF-β Receptor II, P-Smad3 and Smad4, and also counterbalance the tumorigenic effects of TGF-β by inhibiting the TGF-β-induced migration and invasion. Expression of downstream effectors of TGF-β signaling pathway, cyclinD1, p21 and Pin1, was inhibited along with the down regulation of key mesenchymal markers (Snail and Slug) upon curcumin and emodin treatment. Curcumin and emodin were also found to synergistically inhibit cell population and migration in SiHa and HeLa cells. Moreover, we found that TGF-β activates Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway in HeLa cells, and curcumin and emodin down regulate the pathway by inhibiting β-catenin. Taken together our data provide a mechanistic basis for the use of curcumin and emodin in the treatment of cervical cancer. PMID:25786122

  14. Down regulation of sodium channels in the central nervous system of hibernating snails.

    PubMed

    Kiss, T; Battonyai, I; Pirger, Z

    2014-05-28

    Hibernation, as behavior, is an evolutionary mode of adaptation of animal species to unfavorable environmental conditions. It is generally characterized by suppressed metabolism, which also includes down regulation of the energy consuming ion-channel functioning. Experimental data regarding decreased ion-channel function are scarce. Therefore, our goal was to study the possible down regulation of voltage-gated sodium channel (NaV) subtypes in the neurons of hibernating snails. Our immunohistochemical experiments revealed that the expression of NaV1.8-like channels in the central nervous system was substantially down regulated in hibernating animals. In contrast to NaV1.8-like, the NaV1.9-like channels were present in neurons independently from hibernating and non-hibernating states. Our western blot data supported the immunohistochemical results according to which the band of the NaV1.8-like channel protein was less intensively labeled in the homogenate of the hibernating snails. The NaV1.9-like immunoreactivity was equally present both in hibernating and active snails. Micro-electrophysiological experiments show that in hibernating snails both NaV1.8- and NaV1.9-like currents are substantially decreased compared to that of the active snails. The contradictory electrophysiological and immunohistochemical or western blot data suggest that the molecular mechanisms of the "channel arrest" could be different in diverse NaV channel subtypes. Climate changes will affect temperature extremes and a question is how different species beyond their physiological tolerance will or able to adapt to changing environment. Hibernation is an important mode of adaptation to extreme climatic variations, and pursuant to this the present results may contribute to the study of the behavioral ecology. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Mechanisms of allele-selective down-regulation of HLA class I in Burkitt's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Imreh, M P; Zhang, Q J; de Campos-Lima, P O; Imreh, S; Krausa, P; Browning, M; Klein, G; Masucci, M G

    1995-07-04

    Burkitt lymphomas (BL) that arise in HLA-AII-positive individuals are characterized by selective loss/down-regulation of the HLA AII polypeptide. We have investigated the molecular basis of such down-regulation by comparing 5 pairs of BL lines and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCL) derived from the normal B cells of the same individuals. The presence of apparently intact HLA AII genes was confirmed in all 5 BL/LCL pairs by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) typing and by Southern-blot hybridization with HLA A locus-specific probes. Northern-blot analysis with locus- and allele-specific probes revealed a significantly lower expression or absence of AII-specific mRNA in all 5 BL lines compared to the corresponding LCLs. Up-regulation of AII-specific mRNA was achieved by IFN alpha treatment of 2 BL lines with low HLA AII expression (BL-28 and BL-72) while the treatment had no effect in 3 BL lines (WWI-BL, WW2-BL and BL41) that did not express the endogenous gene. HLA AII expression was restored by transfection of the gene in WWI-BL whereas transfectants of BL-41 remained AII-negative. An HLA-AII-promoter-driven chloramphenicol acetyl transferase reporter gene (pAIICAT) was active in WWI-BL but not in BL-41. HLA-AII was expressed in hybrids of BL-41 with an AII-positive LCL, while expression of the endogenous HLA AII gene could not be restored by fusion of BL-41 with an AII-negative LCL, although an adequate set of transcription factors was present in the hybrid. Our results suggest that genetic defects and lack of transcription factors may contribute to the selective down-regulation of HLA AII in BL cells.

  16. Frequent down-regulation of ABC transporter genes in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Demidenko, Rita; Razanauskas, Deividas; Daniunaite, Kristina; Lazutka, Juozas Rimantas; Jankevicius, Feliksas; Jarmalaite, Sonata

    2015-10-12

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are transmembrane proteins responsible for the efflux of a wide variety of substrates, including steroid metabolites, through the cellular membranes. For better characterization of the role of ABC transporters in prostate cancer (PCa) development, the profile of ABC transporter gene expression was analyzed in PCa and noncancerous prostate tissues (NPT). TaqMan Low Density Array (TLDA) human ABC transporter plates were used for the gene expression profiling in 10 PCa and 6 NPT specimens. ABCB1 transcript level was evaluated in a larger set of PCa cases (N = 78) and NPT (N = 15) by real-time PCR, the same PCa cases were assessed for the gene promoter hypermethylation by methylation-specific PCR. Expression of eight ABC transporter genes (ABCA8, ABCB1, ABCC6, ABCC9, ABCC10, ABCD2, ABCG2, and ABCG4) was significantly down-regulated in PCa as compared to NPT, and only two genes (ABCC4 and ABCG1) were up-regulated. Down-regulation of ABC transporter genes was prevalent in the TMPRSS2-ERG-negative cases. A detailed analysis of ABCB1 expression confirmed TLDA results: a reduced level of the transcript was identified in PCa in comparison to NPT (p = 0.048). Moreover, the TMPRSS2-ERG-negative PCa cases showed significantly lower expression of ABCB1 in comparison to NPT (p = 0.003) or the fusion-positive tumors (p = 0.002). Promoter methylation of ABCB1 predominantly occurred in PCa and was rarely detected in NPT (p < 0.001). The study suggests frequent down-regulation of the ABC transporter genes in PCa, especially in the TMPRSS2-ERG-negative tumors.

  17. Selective down-regulation of the alpha6-integrin subunit in melanocytes by UVB light.

    PubMed

    Krengel, Sven; Stark, Imke; Geuchen, Christian; Knoppe, Bettina; Scheel, Gabriele; Schlenke, Peter; Gebert, Andreas; Wünsch, Lutz; Brinckmann, Jürgen; Tronnier, Michael

    2005-06-01

    In vivo, melanocytes bind to laminin (LM) molecules of the basement membrane (BM) via the integrins alpha3beta1 and alpha6beta1, and they adhere to neighbouring keratinocytes via E-cadherin. Only few studies have addressed the impact of ultraviolet (UV) light on the interaction of melanocytes with their microenvironment. In this report, we examined the influence of UVB irradiation on the expression of the most important melanocyte-adhesion molecules (E-, N-cadherin, alpha2-, alpha3-, alpha5-, alpha6-, alphaV-, beta1-, beta3-integrins and ICAM-1) in vitro by flow cytometry. We were able to demonstrate that the alpha6-integrin subunit is selectively and reversibly down-regulated by UVB in a dwzm 150ose-dependent manner. In comparison, keratinocytes lacked UVB-inducible alterations in the expression of alpha6-integrin. In the presence of LM-1, the UVB-induced down-regulation of alpha6-integrin in melanocytes was significantly reduced. Moreover, LM-1 increased the resistance of melanocytes to UVB-induced cell death, as measured by annexinV-binding analysis. This effect was reversed by preincubation with an alpha6-integrin-blocking antibody. By immunofluorescence, we could demonstrate that UVB leads to a dose-dependent internalization of alpha6-integrin, providing an obvious explanation for the down-regulation on the outer cell surface observed by flow cytometry. We suggest that adhesion to LM-1 through alpha6-integrin represents a protective mechanism for melanocytes to withstand UVB damage. Through alpha6-integrin internalization, sunburns might alter the interaction between melanocytes and the BM, resulting in apoptosis induced by loss of anchorage (anoikis). Repeated sunburns may then lead to the selection of a population of melanocytes which are capable of anchorage-independent survival, culminating in solar nevogenesis and melanoma development.

  18. Baicalin Down-Regulates IL-1β-Stimulated Extracellular Matrix Production in Nasal Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jae-Min; Kang, Ju-Hyung; Lee, Seoung-Ae; Park, Il-Ho; Lee, Heung-Man

    2016-01-01

    Baicalin, a Chinese herbal medicine, has anti-fibrotic and anti-inflammatory effects. The aims of present study were to investigate the effects of baicalin on the myofibroblast differentiation, extracellular matrix production, migration, and collagen contraction of interleukin (IL)-1β-stimulated nasal fibroblasts and to determine the molecular mechanism of baicalin in nasal fibroblasts. Nasal fibroblasts were isolated from the inferior turbinate of patients. Baicalin was used to treat IL-1β-stimulated nasal fibroblasts. To evaluate cytotoxicity, a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide assay was used. The expression levels of α-smooth muscle actin (SMA), fibronectin, phospho-mitogen-activated protein kinase (p-MAPK), p-Akt, p-p50, p-p65, and p-IκBα were measured by western blotting, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR),or immunofluorescence staining. Fibroblast migration was analyzed with scratch assays and transwell migration assays. Total collagen was evaluated with the Sircol collagen assay. Contractile activity was measured with a collagen gel contraction assay. Baicalin (0-50 μM) had no significant cytotoxic effects in nasal fibroblasts. The expression of α-SMA and fibronectin were significantly down-regulated in baicalin-treated nasal fibroblasts. Migration, collagen production, and contraction of IL-1β-stimulated nasal fibroblasts were significantly inhibited by baicalin treatment. Baicalin also significantly down-regulated p-MAPK, p-Akt, p-p50, p-p65, and p-IκBα in IL-1β-stimulated nasal fibroblasts. We showed that baicalin down-regulated myofibroblast differentiation, extracellular matrix production, migration, and collagen contraction via the MAPK and Akt/ NF-κB pathways in IL-1β-stimulated nasal fibroblasts.

  19. Male sex interspecies divergence and down regulation of expression of spermatogenesis genes in Drosophila sterile hybrids.

    PubMed

    Sundararajan, Vignesh; Civetta, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    Male sex genes have shown a pattern of rapid interspecies divergence at both the coding and gene expression level. A common outcome from crosses between closely-related species is hybrid male sterility. Phenotypic and genetic studies in Drosophila sterile hybrid males have shown that spermatogenesis arrest is postmeiotic with few exceptions, and that most misregulated genes are involved in late stages of spermatogenesis. Comparative studies of gene regulation in sterile hybrids and parental species have mainly used microarrays providing a whole genome representation of regulatory problems in sterile hybrids. Real-time PCR studies can reject or reveal differences not observed in microarray assays. Moreover, differences in gene expression between samples can be dependant on the source of RNA (e.g., whole body vs. tissue). Here we survey expression in D. simulans, D. mauritiana and both intra and interspecies hybrids using a real-time PCR approach for eight genes expressed at the four main stages of sperm development. We find that all genes show a trend toward under expression in the testes of sterile hybrids relative to parental species with only the two proliferation genes (bam and bgcn) and the two meiotic class genes (can and sa) showing significant down regulation. The observed pattern of down regulation for the genes tested can not fully explain hybrid male sterility. We discuss the down regulation of spermatogenesis genes in hybrids between closely-related species within the contest of rapid divergence experienced by the male genome, hybrid sterility and possible allometric changes due to subtle testes-specific developmental abnormalities.

  20. Intestinal multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 is down-regulated in fructose-fed rats.

    PubMed

    Londero, Ana Sofía; Arana, Maite Rocío; Perdomo, Virginia Gabriela; Tocchetti, Guillermo Nicolás; Zecchinati, Felipe; Ghanem, Carolina Inés; Ruiz, María Laura; Rigalli, Juan Pablo; Mottino, Aldo Domingo; García, Fabiana; Villanueva, Silvina Stella Maris

    2017-02-01

    Expression and activity of jejunal multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (Mrp2) and glutathione-S-transferase (GST) were examined in fructose fed Wistar rats, an experimental model of metabolic syndrome. Animals were fed on (a) control diet or (b) control diet plus 10% w/vol fructose in the drinking water. Mrp2 and the α class of GST proteins as well as their corresponding mRNAs were decreased, suggesting a transcriptional regulation by fructose. Confocal microscopy studies reaffirmed down-regulation of Mrp2. Everted intestinal sacs were incubated with 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene in the mucosal compartment, and the glutathione-conjugated derivative, dinitrophenyl- S-glutathione (DNP-SG; model Mrp2 substrate), was measured in the same compartment to estimate Mrp2 activity. Excretion of DNP-SG was substantially decreased by fructose treatment, consistent with simultaneous down-regulation of Mrp2 and GST. In addition, the effect of fructose on intestinal barrier function exerted by Mrp2 was evaluated in vivo using valsartan, a recognized Mrp2 substrate of therapeutic use. After intraduodenal administration as a bolus, intestinal absorption of valsartan was increased in fructose-drinking animals. Fructose administration also induced oxidative stress in intestinal tissue as demonstrated by significant increases of intestinal lipid peroxidation end products and activity of the antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase, by a decreased GSH/GSSG ratio. Moreover, fructose treatment conduced to increased intestinal levels of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-β1 and IL-6. Collectively, our results demonstrate that metabolic syndrome-like conditions, induced by a fructose-rich diet, result in down-regulation of intestinal Mrp2 expression and activity and consequently in an impairment of its barrier function.

  1. Down-regulation of BK channel expression in the pilocarpine model of temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Pacheco Otalora, Luis F; Hernandez, Eder F; Arshadmansab, Massoud F; Francisco, Sebastian; Willis, Michael; Ermolinsky, Boris; Zarei, Masoud; Knaus, Hans-Guenther; Garrido-Sanabria, Emilio R

    2008-03-20

    In the hippocampus, BK channels are preferentially localized in presynaptic glutamatergic terminals including mossy fibers where they are thought to play an important role regulating excessive glutamate release during hyperactive states. Large conductance calcium-activated potassium channels (BK, MaxiK, Slo) have recently been implicated in the pathogenesis of genetic epilepsy. However, the role of BK channels in acquired mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) remains unknown. Here we used immunohistochemistry, laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM), Western immunoblotting and RT-PCR to investigate the expression pattern of the alpha-pore-forming subunit of BK channels in the hippocampus and cortex of chronically epileptic rats obtained by the pilocarpine model of MTLE. All epileptic rats experiencing recurrent spontaneous seizures exhibited a significant down-regulation of BK channel immunostaining in the mossy fibers at the hilus and stratum lucidum of the CA3 area. Quantitative analysis of immunofluorescence signals by LSCM revealed a significant 47% reduction in BK channel immunofluorescent signals in epileptic rats when compared to age-matched non-epileptic control rats. These data correlate with a similar reduction in BK channel protein levels and transcripts in the cortex and hippocampus. Our data indicate a seizure-related down-regulation of BK channels in chronically epileptic rats. Further functional assays are necessary to determine whether altered BK channel expression is an acquired channelopathy or a compensatory mechanism affecting the network excitability in MTLE. Moreover, seizure-mediated BK down-regulation may disturb neuronal excitability and presynaptic control at glutamatergic terminals triggering exaggerated glutamate release and seizures.

  2. Inhibition of the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) - Rapamycin and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Lamming, Dudley W.

    2016-01-01

    Rapamycin is an FDA-approved immunosuppressant and anti-cancer agent discovered in the soil of Easter Island in the early 1970s. Rapamycin is a potent and selective inhibitor of the mTOR (mechanistic Target Of Rapamycin) protein kinase, which acts as a central integrator of nutrient signaling pathways. During the last decade, genetic and pharmaceutical inhibition of mTOR pathway signaling has been found to promote longevity in yeast, worms, flies and mice. In this chapter, we will discuss the molecular biology underlying the effects of rapamycin and its physiological effects; evidence for rapamycin as an anti-aging compound; mechanisms by which rapamycin may extend lifespan; and the potential limitations of rapamycin as an anti-aging molecule. Finally, we will discuss possible strategies that may allow us to inhibit mTOR signaling safely while minimizing side effects, and reap the health, social and economic benefits from slowing the aging process. PMID:27048303

  3. Do we live in a largely top-down regulated world?

    PubMed

    Banse, Karl

    2007-06-01

    Based on a review of mostly recent literature for a public lecture, the question is discussed whether we live in a largely "top-down" regulated world rather than one formed "bottom-up" by the resources for plant and animal growth. Of course, the top-down mechanism is predicated by bottom-up production, especially by the plants. Examples for the effects of grazing and predation for the land and the open sea, but including coral reefs, are discussed. The answer to the question posed by the title is affirmative. Ecosystems altered by man and urgent needs for marine conservation are briefly treated.

  4. Atrial fibrillation down-regulates renal neutral endopeptidase expression and induces profibrotic pathways in the kidney.

    PubMed

    Bukowska, Alicja; Lendeckel, Uwe; Krohn, Alexander; Keilhoff, Gerburg; ten Have, Sara; Neumann, Klaus Hinrich; Goette, Andreas

    2008-10-01

    Recent studies suggest that atrial fibrillation (AF) substantially influences microvascular flow in ventricular myocardium. This process may contribute to the occurrence of heart failure in AF. In general, development of heart failure and renal dysfunction go hand-in-hand causing systemic fluid overload and oedema. So far, it is unknown whether AF itself influences renal function. The aim of the present study was to determine the impact of AF on renal gene expression in a closed chest rapid atrial pacing model. A total of 14 pigs were studied. In five pigs, rapid atrial pacing (AT) was performed for 7 h (600 bpm); in five additional animals, rapid atrial pacing was performed in the presence of irbesartan infusion (irbesartan group). Four pigs were instrumented without interventions (sham). After the pacing period, renal expression of collagen I alpha 1 and I alpha 3, transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta), neutral endopeptidase (NEP; the main enzyme involved in natriuretic protein metabolism), and atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) were determined by RT-PCR and immunoblot analysis. Functional in vitro experiments were performed using HEK-293 kidney cells. Renal mRNA expression of NEP was substantially down-regulated during AT (AT: 12.7 +/- 9.3% vs. sham: 100 +/- 43.4%; P < 0.01). Results at the mRNA level were confirmed at the protein level. Irbesartan therapy did not prevent down-regulation of NEP. In contrast, TGF-beta1 mRNA expression was up-regulated (AT: 208.5 +/- 79.3% vs. sham: 100 +/- 34.6% P< 0.05). Collagen and angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) expression were not significantly altered by AT. HEK-293 cells were used to determine the potential humoral factors involved in down-regulation of NEP. Application of aldosterone, ANP, asymmetric dimethylarginine, and angiotensin peptides failed to cause down-regulation of renal NEP expression in vitro. AT reduces NEP expression and stimulates TGF-beta1 signalling in the kidneys. Thus, even brief episodes of

  5. Down-regulation of protein kinase Ceta by antisense oligonucleotides sensitises A549 lung cancer cells to vincristine and paclitaxel.

    PubMed

    Sonnemann, Jürgen; Gekeler, Volker; Ahlbrecht, Katrin; Brischwein, Klaus; Liu, Chao; Bader, Peter; Müller, Cornelia; Niethammer, Dietrich; Beck, James F

    2004-06-25

    Previous studies point to protein kinase C (PKC) isozyme eta as a resistance factor in cancer cells. Therefore, we investigated whether down-regulation of PKCeta with second generation antisense oligonucleotides (ODNs) would sensitise A549 human lung carcinoma cells to cytostatics. The effects were compared to the outcome of Bcl-xL down-regulation. Upon treatment with antisense ODNs, PKCeta and Bcl-xL were both significantly reduced on mRNA and protein level. Down-regulation of either PKCeta or Bcl-xL in combination with vincristine or paclitaxel resulted in a significant increase in caspase-3 activity compared to that in the control oligonucleotide treated cells. In addition, PKCeta down-regulation augmented vincristine-induced dissipation of mitochondrial transmembrane potential. In conclusion, these results confirm that PKCeta might represent a considerable resistance factor and an interesting target to improve anticancer chemotherapy.

  6. Superiority of dietary safflower oil over olive oil in lowering serum cholesterol and increasing hepatic mRnas for the LDL receptor and cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase in exogenously hypercholesterolemic (exHC) rats.

    PubMed

    Sato, M; Yoshida, S; Nagao, K; Imaizumi, K

    2000-06-01

    The exogenously hypercholesterolemic (ExHC) rat is a strain segregated from SD rats with a high response to dietary cholesterol. To understand the underlying mechanism(s) for this hypercholesterolemia, the interactive effects of dietary fatty acid and the susceptibility of rats to dietary cholesterol on the serum cholesterol concentration and hepatic mRNA abundance of the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor, cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase (7alpha-hydroxylase) and 3-hydroxyl-3methylglutaryl (HMG) CoA reductase were examined. Both strains were fed on a diet supplemented with 10% each of olive, safflower or coconut oil with or without the addition of 1% cholesterol for one week. The ExHC rats fed on olive, safflower and coconut oil in combination with cholesterol respectively resulted in a 3.5-, 2.0- and 2.1-fold higher serum cholesterol concentration than that in the animals fed on the corresponding dietary fats without any supplementation of cholesterol (p < 0.01 by dietary cholesterol or type of fat). The dietary cholesterol dependent-elevation of serum cholesterol in the SD rats was less than 1.5-fold (p<0.01) and there was no dietary fat effect. The ExHC rats fed on the safflower oil-containing diet supplemented with cholesterol resulted in a higher mRNA abundance of the LDL receptor and 7alpha-hydroxylase than in the corresponding fat-fed rats without cholesterol (p<0.05). There was no dietary cholesterol-dependent change of mRNA abundance in either strain fed on olive or coconut oil, except for a decreased abundance of HMG CoA reductase mRNA in the olive oil-fed ExHC rats and coconut oil-fed Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats (p<0.05). These results indicate that the hepatic mRNA abundance of the LDL receptor and of 7alpha-hydroxylase depended on the dietary combination of cholesterol and a fatty acid and suggest that a linoleic acid-rich diet may alleviate exogenous hypercholesterolemia by activating the process involved in the hepatic uptake and biliary excretion of

  7. Computational evaluation of new homologous down regulators of Translationally Controlled Tumor Protein (TCTP) targeted for tumor reversion.

    PubMed

    Nayarisseri, Anuraj; Yadav, Mukesh; Wishard, Rohan

    2013-12-01

    The Translationally Controlled Tumor Protein (TCTP) has been investigated for tumor reversion and is a target of cancer therapy. Down regulators which suppress the expression of TCTP can trigger the process of tumor reversion leading to the transformation of tumor cells into revertant cells. The present investigation is a novel protein-protein docking approach to target TCTP by a set of proteins similar to the protein: sorting nexin 6 (SNX6) which is an established down regulator of TCTP. The established down regulator along with its set of most similar proteins were modeled using the PYTHON based software - MODELLER v9.9, followed by structure validation using the Procheck Package. Further TCTP was docked with its established and prospective down regulators using the flexible docking protocol suite HADDOCK. The results were evaluated and ranked according to the RMSD values of the complex and the HADDOCK score, which is a weighted sum of van der Waal's energy, electrostatic energy, restraints violation energy and desolvation energy. Results concluded the protein sorting nexin 6 of Mus musculus to be a better down regulator of TCTP, as compared to the suggested down regulator (Homo sapiens snx6).

  8. Diabetic HDL is dysfunctional in stimulating endothelial cell migration and proliferation due to down regulation of SR-BI expression.

    PubMed

    Pan, Bing; Ma, Yijing; Ren, Hui; He, Yubin; Wang, Yongyu; Lv, Xiaofeng; Liu, Donghui; Ji, Liang; Yu, Baoqi; Wang, Yuhui; Chen, Y Eugene; Pennathur, Subramaniam; Smith, Jonathan D; Liu, George; Zheng, Lemin

    2012-01-01

    Diabetic HDL had diminished capacity to stimulate endothelial cell (EC) proliferation, migration, and adhesion to extracellular matrix. The mechanism of such dysfunction is poorly understood and we therefore sought to determine the mechanistic features of diabetic HDL dysfunction. We found that the dysfunction of diabetic HDL on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) was associated with the down regulation of the HDL receptor protein, SR-BI. Akt-phosphorylation in HUVECs was induced in a biphasic manner by normal HDL. While diabetic HDL induced Akt phosphorylation normally after 20 minutes, the phosphorylation observed 24 hours after diabetic HDL treatment was reduced. To determine the role of SR-BI down regulation on diminished EC responses of diabetic HDL, Mouse aortic endothelial cells (MAECs) were isolated from wild type and SR-BI (-/-) mice, and treated with normal and diabetic HDL. The proliferative and migratory effects of normal HDL on wild type MAECs were greatly diminished in SR-BI (-/-) cells. In contrast, response to diabetic HDL was impaired in both types suggesting diminished effectiveness of diabetic HDL on EC proliferation and migration might be due to the down regulation of SR-BI. Additionally, SR-BI down regulation diminishes diabetic HDL's capacity to activate Akt chronically. Diabetic HDL was dysfunctional in promoting EC proliferation, migration, and adhesion to matrix which was associated with the down-regulation of SR-BI. Additionally, SR-BI down regulation diminishes diabetic HDL's capacity to activate Akt chronically.

  9. Down-regulation of miR-21 biogenesis by estrogen action contributes to osteoclastic apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Sugatani, Toshifumi; Hruska, Keith A

    2013-06-01

    Estrogen inhibits osteoclastogenesis and induces osteoclastic apoptosis; however, the molecular mechanisms remain controversial. Recently, a group has demonstrated that osteoclasts are a direct target for estrogen because estrogen stimulates transcription of the Fas Ligand (FasL) gene in osteoclasts, which in turn causes cell death through an autocrine mechanism. In contrast, other groups have shown that the cells are an indirect target for estrogen because estrogen fails to stimulate the transcription of that in osteoclasts. Thus, two quite different molecular mechanisms have been suggested to explain the effects of estrogen in osteoclastic apoptosis. Here we show that the proapoptotic effect of estrogen during osteoclastogenesis is regulated by a posttranscriptional increase in FasL production by down-regulated microRNA-21 (miR-21) biogenesis. Previously, we reported that miR-21 is highly expressed in osteoclastogenesis. We found that estrogen down-regulates miR-21 biogenesis so that FasL, the targets of miR-21, protein levels are posttranscriptionally increased that induce osteoclastic apoptosis. Moreover, the gain-of-function of miR-21 rescued the apoptosis. In addition, we failed to detect estrogen-enhanced FasL levels at mRNA levels. Thus, osteoclastic survival is controlled by autocrine actions of FasL regulated by estrogen and miR-21 plays a central role during estrogen-controlled osteoclastogenesis. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Down-Regulation of the Met Receptor Tyrosine Kinase by Presenilin-dependent Regulated Intramembrane Proteolysis

    PubMed Central

    Foveau, Bénédicte; Ancot, Frédéric; Leroy, Catherine; Petrelli, Annalisa; Reiss, Karina; Vingtdeux, Valérie; Giordano, Silvia; Fafeur, Véronique

    2009-01-01

    Hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor (HGF/SF) acts through the membrane-anchored Met receptor tyrosine kinase to induce invasive growth. Deregulation of this signaling is associated with tumorigenesis and involves, in most cases, overexpression of the receptor. We demonstrate that Met is processed in epithelial cells by presenilin-dependent regulated intramembrane proteolysis (PS-RIP) independently of ligand stimulation. The proteolytic process involves sequential cleavage by metalloproteases and the γ-secretase complex, leading to generation of labile fragments. In normal epithelial cells, although expression of cleavable Met by PS-RIP is down-regulated, uncleavable Met displayed membrane accumulation and induced ligand-independent motility and morphogenesis. Inversely, in transformed cells, the Met inhibitory antibody DN30 is able to promote Met PS-RIP, resulting in down-regulation of the receptor and inhibition of the Met-dependent invasive growth. This demonstrates the original involvement of a proteolytic process in degradation of the Met receptor implicated in negative regulation of invasive growth. PMID:19297528

  11. Down-regulation of tissue N:P ratios in terrestrial plants by elevated CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Q.; Hui, D.; Luo, Y.; Elser, J. J.; Wang, Y.; Loladze, I.; Zhang, Q.; Dennis, S.

    2015-12-01

    Increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations generally alter element stoichiometry in plants. However, a comprehensive evaluation of the elevated CO2 impact on plant nitrogen:phosphorus (N:P) ratios and the underlying mechanism has not been conducted. We synthesized the results from 112 previously published studies using meta-analysis to evaluate the effects of elevated CO2 on the N:P ratio of terrestrial plants and to explore the underlying mechanism based on plant growth and soil P dynamics. Our results show that terrestrial plants grown under elevated CO2 had lower N:P ratios in both above- and below-ground biomass across different ecosystem types. The response ratio for plant N:P was negatively correlated with the response ratio for plant growth in croplands and grasslands, and showed a stronger relationship for P than for N. In addition, the CO2-induced down-regulation of plant N:P was accompanied by 19.3% and 4.2% increases in soil phosphatase activity and labile P, respectively, and a 10.1% decrease in total soil P. Our results show that down-regulation of plant N:P under elevated CO2 corresponds with accelerated soil P cycling. These findings should be useful for better understanding of terrestrial plant stoichiometry in response to elevated CO2 and of the underlying mechanisms affecting nutrient dynamics under climate change.

  12. Down-regulation of Rab5 decreases characteristics associated with maintenance of cell transformation

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, Patricio; Soto, Nicolás; Díaz, Jorge; Mendoza, Pablo; Díaz, Natalia; Quest, Andrew F.G.; Torres, Vicente A.

    2015-08-21

    The early endosomal protein Rab5 is highly expressed in tumor samples, although a causal relationship between Rab5 expression and cell transformation has not been established. Here, we report the functional effects of targeting endogenous Rab5 with specific shRNA sequences in different tumor cell lines. Rab5 down-regulation in B16-F10 cells decreased tumor formation by subcutaneous injection into C57/BL6 mice. Accordingly, Rab5 targeting in B16-F10 and A549, but not MDA-MB-231 cells was followed by decreased cell proliferation, increased apoptosis and decreased anchorage-independent growth. These findings suggest that Rab5 expression is required to maintain characteristics associated with cell transformation. - Highlights: • Rab5 is important to the maintenance of cell transformation characteristics. • Down-regulation of Rab5 decreases cell proliferation and increases apoptosis in different cancer cells. • Rab5 is required for anchorage-independent growth and tumorigenicity in-vivo.

  13. Down-regulation of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) by cannabidiolic acid in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Shuso; Okazaki, Hiroyuki; Ikeda, Eriko; Abe, Satomi; Yoshioka, Yasushi; Watanabe, Kazuhito; Aramaki, Hironori

    2014-01-01

    Metastases are known to be responsible for approximately 90% of breast cancer-related deaths. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is involved not only in inflammatory processes, but also in the metastasis of cancer cells; it is expressed in 40% of human invasive breast cancers. To comprehensively analyze the effects of cannabidiolic acid (CBDA), a selective COX-2 inhibitor found in the fiber-type cannabis plant (Takeda et al., 2008), on COX-2 expression and the genes involved in metastasis, we performed a DNA microarray analysis of human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells, which are invasive breast cancer cells that express high levels of COX-2, treated with CBDA for 48 hr at 25 µM. The results obtained revealed that COX-2 and Id-1, a positive regulator of breast cancer metastasis, were down-regulated (0.19-fold and 0.52-fold, respectively), while SHARP1 (or BHLHE41), a suppressor of breast cancer metastasis, was up-regulated (1.72-fold) and CHIP (or STUB1) was unaffected (1.03-fold). These changes were confirmed by real-time RT-PCR analyses. Taken together, the results obtained here demonstrated that i) CBDA had dual inhibitory effects on COX-2 through down-regulation and enzyme inhibition, and ii) CBDA may possess the ability to suppress genes that are positively involved in the metastasis of cancer cells in vitro.

  14. Cryptotanshinone targets tumor-initiating cells through down-regulation of stemness genes expression

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, YING; CABARCAS, STEPHANIE M.; ZHENG, JI; SUN, LEI; MATHEWS, LESLEY A.; ZHANG, XIAOHU; LIN, HONGSHENG; FARRAR, WILLIAM L.

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence indicates that tumor-initiating cells (TICs), also called cancer stem cells (CSCs), are responsible for tumor initiation and progression, therefore representing an important cell population that may be used as a target for the development of future anticancer therapies. In the present study, Cryptotanshinone (CT), a traditional Chinese herbal medicine, was demonstrated to regulate the behaviors of LNCaP prostate cells and prostate LNCaP TICs. The results demonstrate that treatment with CT alters cellular proliferation, cell cycle status, migration, viability, colony formation and notably, sphere formation and down-regulation of stemness genes (Nanog, OCT4, SOX2, β-catenin, CXCR4) in TICs. The present study demonstrates that CT targets the LNCaP CD44+CD24- population that is representative of prostate TICs and also affects total LNCaP cells as well via down-regulation of stemness genes. The strong effect with which CT has on prostate TICs suggests that CT may potentially function as a novel natural anticancer agent that specifically targets TICs. PMID:27313698

  15. Down-regulation of tissue N:P ratios in terrestrial plants by elevated CO2.

    PubMed

    Deng, Qi; Hui, Dafeng; Luo, Yiqi; Elser, James; Wang, Ying-ping; Loladze, Irakli; Zhang, Quanfa; Dennis, Sam

    2015-12-01

    Increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations generally alter element stoichiometry in plants. However, a comprehensive evaluation of the elevated CO2 impact on plant nitrogen: phosphorus (N:P) ratios and the underlying mechanism has not been conducted. We synthesized the results from 112 previously published studies using meta-analysis to evaluate the effects of elevated CO2 on the N:P ratio of terrestrial plants and to explore the underlying mechanism based on plant growth and soil P dynamics. Our results show that terrestrial plants grown under elevated CO2 had lower N:P ratios in both above- and belowground biomass across different ecosystem types. The response ratio for plant N:P was negatively correlated with the response ratio for plant growth in croplands and grasslands, and showed a stronger relationship for P than for N. In addition, the CO2-induced down-regulation of plant N:P was accompanied by 19.3% and 4.2% increases in soil phosphatase activity and labile P, respectively, and a 10.1% decrease in total soil P. Our results show that down-regulation of plant N:P under elevated CO2 corresponds with accelerated soil P cycling. These findings should be useful for better understanding of terrestrial plant stoichiometry in response to elevated CO2 and of the underlying mechanisms affecting nutrient dynamics under climate change.

  16. Down-regulation of β3-integrin inhibits bone metastasis of small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Na; Zhang, Jian-ping; Guo, Shan; Min, Jie; Liu, Li-li; Su, Hai-chuan; Feng, Ying-ming; Zhang, He-long

    2012-03-01

    Bone is one of the most frequent targets of small cell lung cancer (SCLC) metastasis, but the molecular mechanism remains unclear. β3-integrin plays an important role in invasion of various kinds of tumors. Yet, its role in bone-metastasis of SCLC is still unknown. In this study, we first examined the expression of β3-integrin in SBC-5 and SBC-3 cells by real-time PCR, western blot and immunofluorescence. We found that, compared to none bone-metastatic SBC-3 cells, β3-integrin was highly expressed in SBC-5 cells, a specific bone-metastatic SCLC cells line characterized in our previous study. We next constructed β3-integrin siRNA and transfected SBC-5 cell line, and found that β3-integrin siRNA significantly down-regulated the β3-integrin mRNA level and protein expression in SBC-5 cell line. We further found that inhibition of β3-integrin significantly reduced tumor cell proliferation and induced apoptosis. In addition, the β3-integrin down-regulated cells presented significant decrease in cell adhesion, migration and invasion activity. Our results suggest the β3-integrin has an essential effect on tumor cell proliferation and progression, and may be a potential therapeutic target for the prevention of skeletal metastases of lung cancer.

  17. Terpene down-regulation triggers defense responses in transgenic orange leading to resistance against fungal pathogens.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Ana; Shimada, Takehiko; Cervera, Magdalena; Alquézar, Berta; Gadea, José; Gómez-Cadenas, Aurelio; De Ollas, Carlos José; Rodrigo, María Jesús; Zacarías, Lorenzo; Peña, Leandro

    2014-01-01

    Terpenoid volatiles are isoprene compounds that are emitted by plants to communicate with the environment. In addition to their function in repelling herbivores and attracting carnivorous predators in green tissues, the presumed primary function of terpenoid volatiles released from mature fruits is the attraction of seed-dispersing animals. Mature oranges (Citrus sinensis) primarily accumulate terpenes in peel oil glands, with d-limonene accounting for approximately 97% of the total volatile terpenes. In a previous report, we showed that down-regulation of a d-limonene synthase gene alters monoterpene levels in orange antisense (AS) fruits, leading to resistance against Penicillium digitatum infection. A global gene expression analysis of AS versus empty vector (EV) transgenic fruits revealed that the down-regulation of d-limonene up-regulated genes involved in the innate immune response. Basal levels of jasmonic acid were substantially higher in the EV compared with AS oranges. Upon fungal challenge, salicylic acid levels were triggered in EV samples, while jasmonic acid metabolism and signaling were drastically increased in AS orange peels. In nature, d-limonene levels increase in orange fruit once the seeds are fully viable. The inverse correlation between the increase in d-limonene content and the decrease in the defense response suggests that d-limonene promotes infection by microorganisms that are likely involved in facilitating access to the pulp for seed-dispersing frugivores.

  18. EGFRvIII escapes down-regulation due to impaired internalization and sorting to lysosomes.

    PubMed

    Grandal, Michael V; Zandi, Roza; Pedersen, Mikkel W; Willumsen, Berthe M; van Deurs, Bo; Poulsen, Hans S

    2007-07-01

    EGFRvIII is a mutant variant of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) found exclusively in various cancer types. EGFRvIII lacks a large part of the extracellular domain and is unable to bind ligands; however, the receptor is constitutively phosphorylated and able to activate downstream signaling pathways. Failure to attenuate signaling by receptor down-regulation could be one of the major mechanisms by which EGFRvIII becomes oncogenic. Using a cell system expressing either EGFR or EGFRvIII with no expression of other EGFR family members and with endogenous levels of key degradation proteins, we have investigated the down-regulation of EGFRvIII and compared it to that of EGFR. We show that, in contrast to EGFR, EGFRvIII is inefficiently degraded. EGFRvIII is internalized, but the internalization rate of the mutated receptor is significantly less than that of unstimulated EGFR. Moreover, internalized EGFRvIII is recycled rather than delivered to lysosomes. EGFRvIII binds the ubiquitin ligase c-Cbl via Grb2, whereas binding via phosphorylated tyrosine residue 1045 seems to be limited. Despite c-Cbl binding, the receptor fails to become effectively ubiquitinylated. Thus, our results suggest that the long lifetime of EGFRvIII is caused by inefficient internalization and impaired sorting to lysosomes due to lack of effective ubiquitinylation.

  19. TNF-alpha down-regulates CXCR4 expression in primary murine astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Han, Y; Wang, J; He, T; Ransohoff, R M

    2001-01-05

    CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) is a co-receptor for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and is believed to be involved in the pathogenesis of AIDS-associated neurologic disorders and brain tumors. The physiological roles of CXCR4 in developmental patterning of the nervous and hematopoietic system; gastrointestinal angiogenesis; and cardiac organogenesis were established by studies in gene-targeted mice. Studies on CXCR4 expression and regulation in neuroepithelial cells are fundamental for understanding its physiopathologic roles in the central nervous system (CNS). We show here that CXCR4 expression by primary mouse astrocytes is suppressed by exposure to tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). TNF-alpha caused a pronounced down-regulation of CXCR4 mRNA in a dose- and time-dependent manner. TNF-alpha-mediated decrease of CXCR4 mRNA accumulation resulted in decreased CXCR4 protein expression. As a result, the ability of stromal cell-derived factor-1alpha (SDF-1alpha) to induce activation of MAP kinases, Erk1/2 was impaired. The half life of CXCR4 mRNA in the presence and absence of TNF-alpha stimulation was comparable, suggesting that TNF-alpha down-regulated CXCR4 mRNA at the transcriptional level. These results suggest that TNF-alpha could modulate HIV and brain tumor pathogenesis and immune-mediated inflammation in the central nervous system (CNS) by regulation of CXCR4 expression.

  20. Cyclin D1 down-regulation is essential for DBC2's tumor suppressor function

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshihara, Takashi; Collado, Denise; Hamaguchi, Masaaki . E-mail: hamaguchi@fordham.edu

    2007-07-13

    The expression of tumor suppressor gene DBC2 causes certain breast cancer cells to stop growing [M. Hamaguchi, J.L. Meth, C. Von Klitzing, W. Wei, D. Esposito, L. Rodgers, T. Walsh, P. Welcsh, M.C. King, M.H. Wigler, DBC2, a candidate for a tumor suppressor gene involved in breast cancer, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 99 (2002) 13647-13652]. Recently, DBC2 was found to participate in diverse cellular functions such as protein transport, cytoskeleton regulation, apoptosis, and cell cycle control [V. Siripurapu, J.L. Meth, N. Kobayashi, M. Hamaguchi, DBC2 significantly influences cell cycle, apoptosis, cytoskeleton, and membrane trafficking pathways. J. Mol. Biol. 346 (2005) 83-89]. Its tumor suppression mechanism, however, remains unclear. In this paper, we demonstrate that DBC2 suppresses breast cancer proliferation through down-regulation of Cyclin D1 (CCND1). Additionally, the constitutional overexpression of CCND1 prevented the negative impact of DBC2 expression on their growth. Under a CCND1 promoter, the expression of CCNE1 exhibited the same protective effect. Our results indicate that the down-regulation of CCND1 is an essential step for DBC2's growth suppression of cancer cells. We believe that this discovery contributes to a better understanding of DBC2's tumor suppressor function.

  1. Rottlerin inhibits cell growth and invasion via down-regulation of Cdc20 in glioma cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lixia; Hou, Yingying; Yin, Xuyuan; Su, Jingna; Zhao, Zhe; Ye, Xiantao; Zhou, Xiuxia; Zhou, Li; Wang, Zhiwei

    2016-01-01

    Rottlerin, isolated from a medicinal plant Mallotus phillippinensis, has been demonstrated to inhibit cellular growth and induce cytoxicity in glioblastoma cell lines through inhibition of calmodulin-dependent protein kinase III. Emerging evidence suggests that rottlerin exerts its antitumor activity as a protein kinase C inhibitor. Although further studies revealed that rottlerin regulated multiple signaling pathways to suppress tumor cell growth, the exact molecular insight on rottlerin-mediated tumor inhibition is not fully elucidated. In the current study, we determine the function of rottlerin on glioma cell growth, apoptosis, cell cycle, migration and invasion. We found that rottlerin inhibited cell growth, migration, invasion, but induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. Mechanistically, the expression of Cdc20 oncoprotein was measured by the RT-PCR and Western blot analysis in glioma cells treated with rottlerin. We observed that rottlerin significantly inhibited the expression of Cdc20 in glioma cells, implying that Cdc20 could be a novel target of rottlerin. In line with this, over-expression of Cdc20 decreased rottlerin-induced cell growth inhibition and apoptosis, whereas down-regulation of Cdc20 by its shRNA promotes rottlerin-induced anti-tumor activity. Our findings indicted that rottlerin could exert its tumor suppressive function by inhibiting Cdc20 pathway which is constitutively active in glioma cells. Therefore, down-regulation of Cdc20 by rottlerin could be a promising therapeutic strategy for the treatment of glioma. PMID:27626499

  2. Glucose Shortens the Lifespan of Caenorhabditis elegans by Down-Regulating Aquaporin Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung-Jae; Murphy, Coleen T.; Kenyon, Cynthia

    2010-01-01

    Summary Many studies have addressed the effect of dietary glycemic index on obesity and diabetes, but little is known about its effect on lifespan itself. We found that adding a small amount of glucose to the medium (0.1-2%) shortened the lifespan of C. elegans. Glucose shortened lifespan by inhibiting the activities of lifespan-extending transcription factors that are also inhibited by insulin signaling: the FOXO family member DAF-16 and the heat shock factor HSF-1. This effect involved the down-regulation of an aquaporin glycerol channel, aqp-1. We show that changes in glycerol metabolism are likely to underlie the lifespan-shortening effect of glucose, and that aqp-1 may act cell non-autonomously as a feedback regulator in the insulin/IGF-1 signaling pathway. Insulin down-regulates similar glycerol channels in mammals, suggesting that this glucose-responsive pathway might be conserved evolutionarily. Together these findings raise the possibility that a low-sugar diet might have beneficial effects on lifespan in higher organisms. PMID:19883616

  3. Down-regulation of endogenous KLHL1 decreases voltage-gated calcium current density.

    PubMed

    Perissinotti, Paula P; Ethington, Elizabeth G; Cribbs, Leanne; Koob, Michael D; Martin, Jody; Piedras-Rentería, Erika S

    2014-05-01

    The actin-binding protein Kelch-like 1 (KLHL1) can modulate voltage-gated calcium channels in vitro. KLHL1 interacts with actin and with the pore-forming subunits of Cav2.1 and CaV3.2 calcium channels, resulting in up-regulation of P/Q and T-type current density. Here we tested whether endogenous KLHL1 modulates voltage gated calcium currents in cultured hippocampal neurons by down-regulating the expression of KLHL1 via adenoviral delivery of shRNA targeted against KLHL1 (shKLHL1). Control adenoviruses did not affect any of the neuronal properties measured, yet down-regulation of KLHL1 resulted in HVA current densities ~68% smaller and LVA current densities 44% smaller than uninfected controls, with a concomitant reduction in α(1A) and α(1H) protein levels. Biophysical analysis and western blot experiments suggest Ca(V)3.1 and 3.3 currents are also present in shKLHL1-infected neurons. Synapsin I levels, miniature postsynaptic current frequency, and excitatory and inhibitory synapse number were reduced in KLHL1 knockdown. This study corroborates the physiological role of KLHL1 as a calcium channel modulator and demonstrates a novel, presynaptic role.

  4. Down-regulation of Cdc6, a cell cycle regulatory gene, in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Robles, Liza D; Frost, Andra R; Davila, Monica; Hutson, Alan D; Grizzle, William E; Chakrabarti, Ratna

    2002-07-12

    CDC6 plays a critical role in regulation of the onset of DNA replication in eukaryotic cells. We have found that Cdc6 expression is down-regulated in prostate cancer as detected by semiquantitative reverse transcriptase-PCR of prostate cell lines and laser-captured microdissected prostate tissues. This result was substantiated by immunohistochemical analysis of paraffin-embedded tissue sections and immunoblot analysis of benign (BPH-1) and adenocarcinomatous prostatic cells. Furthermore, a 100-fold reduction in the transcription efficiency of the Cdc6 promoter-luciferase construct was noted in the metastatic PC3 cells compared with that in BPH-1 cells. Concentration of the E2F and Oct1 transcription factors that have putative binding sites in the Cdc6 promoter was substantially low in PC3 cells compared with BPH cells. Mutagenesis of the two E2F binding sites on the Cdc6 promoter resulted in increased promoter activity in PC3 cells owing to elimination of the negative regulation by pRb.E2F complex but not to the level of that obtained in BPH cells. We conclude that an altered interaction of transcription factors may be responsible for the down-regulation of Cdc6 transcription in PC3 cells. Our study suggests a potential use of the lack of CDC6 expression as an index of prostate cancer development.

  5. Hypoxic Stress Facilitates Acute Activation and Chronic Down-Regulation of Fanconi Anemia Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Scanlon, Susan E.; Glazer, Peter M.

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxia induces genomic instability through replication stress and dysregulation of vital DNA repair pathways. The Fanconi anemia (FA) proteins, FANCD2 and FANCI, are key members of a DNA repair pathway that responds to replicative stress, suggesting that they undergo regulation by hypoxic conditions. Here acute hypoxic stress activates the FA pathway via ubiquitination of FANCD2 and FANCI in an ATR-dependent manner. In addition, the presence of an intact FA pathway is required for preventing hypoxia-induced DNA damage measurable by the comet assay, limiting the accumulation of γH2AX (a marker of DNA damage or stalled replication), and protecting cells from hypoxia-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, prolonged hypoxia induces transcriptional repression of FANCD2 in a manner analogous to the hypoxic down-regulation of BRCA1 and RAD51. Thus, hypoxia-induced FA pathway activation plays a key role in maintaining genome integrity and cell survival, while FA protein down-regulation with prolonged hypoxia contributes to genomic instability. PMID:24688021

  6. Down-regulation of tumor necrosis factor receptors by blockade of mitochondrial respiration.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Alcázar, J A; Hernández, I; De la Torre, M P; García, I; Santiago, E; Muñoz-Yagüe, M T; Solís-Herruzo, J A

    1995-10-13

    We have studied the effect of blockade of mitochondrial respiration on the binding of human 125I-TNF alpha to L929 cell receptors. Specific TNF alpha binding was decreased to about 20-40% of controls by blocking mitochondrial respiration. This effect was dose- and time-related and was observed independently of the level at which the respiration was blocked (respiratory chain, proton backflow, ATPase, anaerobiosis). This blockade had no effect on the half-life of the specific TNF alpha binding, the internalization or degradation of TNF alpha-receptor complexes, or the number of TNF alpha-binding sites. Scatchard analysis of TNF alpha binding data indicated a 2-4-fold decrease in the affinity of these binding sites. These effects did not appear to be related to the protein kinase C activity or to reactive oxygen radicals, since they were not antagonized by pretreatment of cells with oxygen radical scavengers, deferoxamine, or inhibitors of protein kinase C. Decrease in TNF alpha binding capacity correlated significantly with cellular ATP content (r = 0.94; p < 0.01) and with the cytocidal activity of TNF alpha against L929 cells. These findings suggest that blockade of mitochondrial respiration down-regulates the binding of TNF alpha to cells, most likely by changing the affinity of receptors for this cytokine. This down-regulation may increase the resistance of cells to TNF alpha cytotoxicity.

  7. Glucosamine Modulates T Cell Differentiation through Down-regulating N-Linked Glycosylation of CD25*

    PubMed Central

    Chien, Ming-Wei; Lin, Ming-Hong; Huang, Shing-Hwa; Fu, Shin-Huei; Hsu, Chao-Yuan; Yen, B. Lin-Ju; Chen, Jiann-Torng; Chang, Deh-Ming; Sytwu, Huey-Kang

    2015-01-01

    Glucosamine has immunomodulatory effects on autoimmune diseases. However, the mechanism(s) through which glucosamine modulates different T cell subsets and diseases remain unclear. We demonstrate that glucosamine impedes Th1, Th2, and iTreg but promotes Th17 differentiation through down-regulating N-linked glycosylation of CD25 and subsequently inhibiting its downstream Stat5 signaling in a dose-dependent manner. The effect of glucosamine on T helper cell differentiation was similar to that induced by anti-IL-2 treatment, further supporting an IL-2 signaling-dependent modulation. Interestingly, excess glucose rescued this glucosamine-mediated regulation, suggesting a functional competition between glucose and glucosamine. High-dose glucosamine significantly decreased Glut1 N-glycosylation in Th1-polarized cells. This finding suggests that both down-regulated IL-2 signaling and Glut1-dependent glycolytic metabolism contribute to the inhibition of Th1 differentiation by glucosamine. Finally, glucosamine treatment inhibited Th1 cells in vivo, prolonged the survival of islet grafts in diabetic recipients, and exacerbated the severity of EAE. Taken together, our results indicate that glucosamine interferes with N-glycosylation of CD25, and thereby attenuates IL-2 downstream signaling. These effects suggest that glucosamine may be an important modulator of T cell differentiation and immune homeostasis. PMID:26468284

  8. Low temperature enhances photosynthetic down-regulation in French bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) plants.

    PubMed

    Tsonev, Tsonko; Velikova, Violeta; Georgieva, Katya; Hyde, Paul F; Jones, Hamlyn G

    2003-02-01

    The mechanisms of photosynthetic adaptation to different combinations of temperature and irradiance during growth, and especially the consequences of exposure to high light (2000 micro mol m(-2) s(-1) PPFD) for 5 min, simulating natural sunflecks, was studied in bean plants (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). A protocol using only short (3 min) dark pre-treatment was introduced to maximize the amount of replication possible in studies of chlorophyll fluorescence. High light at low temperature (10 degrees C) significantly down-regulated photosynthetic electron transport capacity [as measured by the efficiency of photosystem II (PSII)], with the protective acclimation allowing the simulated sunflecks to be used more effectively for photosynthesis by plants grown in low light. The greater energy dissipation by thermal processes (lower F(v)'/F(m)' ratio) at low temperature was related to increased xanthophyll de-epoxidation and to the fact that photosynthetic carbon fixation was more limiting at low than at high temperatures. A key objective was to investigate the role of photorespiration in acclimation to irradiance and temperature by comparing the effect of normal (21 kPa) and low (1.5 kPa) O(2) concentrations. Low [O(2)] decreased F(v)/F(m) and the efficiency of PSII (Phi(PSII)), related to greater PSII down-regulation in cold pre-treated plants, but minimized further inhibition by the mild 'sunfleck' treatment used. Results support the hypothesis that photorespiration provides a 'safety-valve' for excess energy.

  9. Suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS) 1 is down-regulated in renal transplant recipients with rejection.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tsai-Hung; Lee, Hui-Ting; Lai, Chien-Chih; Yang, An-Hang; Loong, Che-Chuan; Wang, Hsin-Kai; Yu, Chia-Li; Tsai, Chang-Youh

    2016-09-01

    The role of suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS) in maintaining the immunotolerance of renal allograft is unknown. To clarify this, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from renal transplant patients with or without rejection were analyzed for the expression of SOCS family proteins by cell culture, immunoblot, flowcytometry and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Patients with renal graft rejection expressed lower levels of SOCS1 while those without rejection showed a higher SOCS1 expression in the PBMC either on stimulation or not. In addition, SOCS1 was constitutively expressed in normal individuals as well as renal transplant patients with graft tolerance while patients with rejection exhibited down-regulation of the SOCS1 but not SOCS3. The qPCR tests and flowcytometric measurements have also showed that the reduction of SOCS1 expression in rejection could be quantitatively evaluated. These results have suggested that down-regulation of SOCS1 may be regarded as a biomarker for early detection of renal allograft rejection.

  10. Bacterial lipopolysaccharide down-regulates expression of GTP cyclohydrolase I feedback regulatory protein.

    PubMed

    Werner, Ernst R; Bahrami, Soheyl; Heller, Regine; Werner-Felmayer, Gabriele

    2002-03-22

    GTP cyclohydrolase I feedback regulatory protein (GFRP) is a 9.7-kDa protein regulating GTP cyclohydrolase I activity in dependence of tetrahydrobiopterin and phenylalanine concentrations, thus enabling stimulation of tetrahydrobiopterin biosynthesis by phenylalanine to ensure its efficient metabolism by phenylalanine hydroxylase. Here, we were interested in regulation of GFRP expression by proinflammatory cytokines and stimuli, which are known to induce GTP cyclohydrolase I expression. Recombinant human GFRP stimulated recombinant human GTP cyclohydrolase I in the presence of phenylalanine and mediated feedback inhibition by tetrahydrobiopterin. Levels of GFRP mRNA in human myelomonocytoma (THP-1) cells remained unaltered by treatment of cells with interferon-gamma or interleukin-1beta, but were significantly down-regulated by bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 1 microg/ml), without or with cotreatment by interferon-gamma, which strongly up-regulated GTP cyclohydrolase I expression and activity. GFRP expression was also suppressed in human umbilical vein endothelial cells treated with 1 microg/ml LPS, as well as in rat tissues 7 h post intraperitoneal injection of 10 mg/kg LPS. THP-1 cells stimulated with interferon-gamma alone showed increased pteridine synthesis by addition of phenylalanine to the culture medium. Cells stimulated with interferon-gamma plus LPS, in contrast, showed phenylalanine-independent pteridine synthesis. These results demonstrate that LPS down-regulates expression of GFRP, thus rendering pteridine synthesis independent of metabolic control by phenylalanine.

  11. Down-regulation of pancreatic transcription factors and incretin receptors in type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Kaneto, Hideaki; Matsuoka, Taka-aki

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is one of the most prevalent and serious metabolic diseases. Under diabetic conditions, chronic hyperglycemia and subsequent induction of oxidative stress deteriorate pancreatic β-cell function, which leads to the aggravation of type 2 diabetes. Although such phenomena are well known as glucose toxicity, its molecular mechanism remains unclear. In this review article, we describe the possible molecular mechanism for β-cell dysfunction found in type 2 diabetes, focusing on (1) oxidative stress, (2) pancreatic transcription factors (PDX-1 and MafA) and (3) incretin receptors (GLP-1 and GIP receptors). Under such conditions, nuclear expression levels of PDX-1 and MafA are decreased, which leads to suppression of insulin biosynthesis and secretion. In addition, expression levels of GLP-1 and GIP receptors are decreased, which likely contributes to the impaired incretin effects found in diabetes. Taken together, it is likely that down-regulation of pancreatic transcription factors (PDX-1 and MafA) and down-regulation of incretin receptors (GLP-1 and GIP receptors) explain, at least in part, the molecular mechanism for β-cell dysfunction found in type 2 diabetes. PMID:24379916

  12. Xanthines Down-Regulate the Drug Transporter ABCG2 and Reverse Multidrug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Rui; Shi, Jia; Pabon, Kirk

    2012-01-01

    ABCG2 is an ATP-binding-cassette (ABC) transporter that confers multidrug resistance (MDR) to tumor cells by extruding a broad variety of chemotherapeutic agents, ultimately leading to failure of cancer therapy. Thus, the down-regulation of ABCG2 expression and/or function has been proposed as part of a regimen to improve cancer therapeutic efficacy. In this study, we found that a group of xanthines including caffeine, theophylline, and dyphylline can dramatically decrease ABCG2 protein in cells that have either moderate (BeWo, a placental choriocarcinoma cell line) or high (MCF-7/MX100, a breast cancer drug-resistant cell subline) levels of ABCG2 expression. This down-regulation is time-dependent, dose-dependent, and reversible. Using lysosomal inhibitors, we found that xanthines decreased ABCG2 by inducing its rapid internalization and lysosome-mediated degradation. As a consequence, caffeine treatment significantly increased the retention of an established ABCG2 substrate in MCF-7/MX100 cells but not in parental MCF-7 cells and sensitized the MDR cells to the chemotherapeutic agent mitoxantrone (MX); combination treatment with MX and caffeine decreased the IC50 of MX ∼10-fold and induced a greater degree of apoptotic cell death than MX treatment alone. Taken together, our results describe a novel function for this large class of therapeutically relevant compounds and suggest that a subset of xanthines could be developed as combination therapy to improve the efficacy of anticancer drugs that are ABCG2 substrates. PMID:22113078

  13. Actinomycin D Down-regulates SOX2 Expression and Induces Death in Breast Cancer Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Das, Tuhin; Nair, Rajesh R; Green, Ryan; Padhee, Shruti; Howell, Mark; Banerjee, Jit; Mohapatra, Shyam S; Mohapatra, Subhra

    2017-04-01

    One of the major hurdles in the treatment of breast cancers is the inability of anti-cancer drugs to eliminate the breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) population, which leads to disease relapse. The dearth in anti-cancer drugs that target BCSCs can be attributed to the absence of in vitro screening models that can not only recapitulate the tumor microenvironment consisting of BCSCs but also preserve the 3-dimensional (3D) architecture of in vivo tumors. In our present study, we have developed a 3D cell culture system that shows: (i) enrichment of BCSCs, (ii) increased drug resistance, and (iii) generation of hypoxic conditions similar to tumors. Using this model, we were able to screen a FDA-approved diversity set and identify as well as validate actinomycin D as a potential anti-breast cancer agent. Interestingly, we show that actinomycin D specifically targets and down-regulates the expression of the stem cell transcription factor, Sox-2. Additionally, down-regulation of Sox-2 leads to depletion of the stem-cell population resulting in the inability of breast cancer cells to initiate tumor progression. This study demonstrates the utility of an in vivo-like 3D cell culture system for the identification and validation of anti-cancer agents that will have a better probability of success in the clinic. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  14. Surfactant prevents quartz induced down-regulation of complement receptor 1 in human granulocytes.

    PubMed

    Zetterberg, G; Lundahl, J; Curstedt, T; Eklund, A

    1997-02-01

    Quartz is known to induce an inflammatory response in the alveolar space by recruitment of different effector cells. We investigated the interaction between granulocytes and quartz with respect to expression of complement receptor type 1 (CR1) and CR3, with and without the presence of surfactant. Granulocytes from hemolyzed blood were stimulated by N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP), which mobilize the intracellular pool of CR1 to the surface, and the mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) measured by cytofluorometry was 47.4 (46-63.6) (median; interquartile range). Quartz exposure reduced the CR1 expression to 23.2 (22.8-30.6) MFI units (P < 0.01), a porcine surfactant preparation added during quartz exposure abolished the down-regulation completely, 47.7 (43.2-62.3) MFI units (P < 0.001). Similar results were obtained after preincubation of the cells with surfactant followed by quartz exposure. No significant influence on CR1 expression was found by a synthetic lipid mixture, nor was the CR3 expression affected. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that the presence of surfactant inhibits quartz induced down-regulation of CR1 on activated granulocytes.

  15. Salicylic acid mediates the reduced growth of lignin down-regulated plants

    PubMed Central

    Gallego-Giraldo, Lina; Escamilla-Trevino, Luis; Jackson, Lisa A.; Dixon, Richard A.

    2011-01-01

    Down-regulation of the enzyme hydroxycinnamoyl CoA: shikimate hydroxycinnamoyl transferase (HCT) in thale cress (Arabidopsis thaliana) and alfalfa (Medicago sativa) leads to strongly reduced lignin levels, reduced recalcitrance of cell walls to sugar release, but severe stunting of the plants. Levels of the stress hormone salicylic acid (SA) are inversely proportional to lignin levels and growth in a series of transgenic alfalfa plants in which lignin biosynthesis has been perturbed at different biosynthetic steps. Reduction of SA levels by genetically blocking its formation or causing its removal restores growth in HCT–down-regulated Arabidopsis, although the plants maintain reduced lignin levels. SA-mediated growth inhibition may occur via interference with gibberellic acid signaling or responsiveness. Our data place SA as a central component in growth signaling pathways that either sense flux into the monolignol pathway or respond to secondary cell-wall integrity, and indicate that it is possible to engineer plants with highly reduced cell-wall recalcitrance without negatively impacting growth. PMID:22123972

  16. Dysregulation of Ack1 inhibits down-regulation of the EGF receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Grovdal, Lene Melsaether; Johannessen, Lene E.; Rodland, Marianne Skeie; Madshus, Inger Helene; Stang, Espen

    2008-04-01

    The protein tyrosine kinase Ack1 has been linked to cancer when over-expressed. Ack1 has also been suggested to function in clathrin-mediated endocytosis and in down-regulation of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor (EGFR). We have studied the intracellular localization of over-expressed Ack1 and found that Ack1 co-localizes with the EGFR upon EGF-induced endocytosis in cells with moderate over-expression of Ack. This co-localization is mainly observed in early endosomes. Furthermore, we found that over-expression of Ack1 retained the EGFR at the limiting membrane of early endosomes, inhibiting sorting to inner vesicles of multivesicular bodies. Down-regulation of Ack1 in HeLa cells resulted in reduced rate of {sup 125}I-EGF internalization, whereas internalization of {sup 125}I-transferrin was not affected. In cells where Ack1 had been knocked down by siRNA, recycling of internalized {sup 125}I-EGF was increased, while degradation of {sup 125}I-EGF was inhibited. Together, these data suggest that Ack1 is involved in an early step of EGFR desensitization.

  17. Effects of p21 Gene Down-Regulation through RNAi on Antler Stem Cells In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Qianqian; Wang, Datao; Liu, Zhen; Li, Chunyi

    2015-01-01

    Cell cycle is an integral part of cell proliferation, and consists mainly of four phases, G1, S, G2 and M. The p21 protein, a cyclin dependent kinase inhibitor, plays a key role in regulating cell cyclevia G1 phase control. Cells capable of epimorphic regeneration have G2/M accumulation as their distinctive feature, whilst the majority of somatic cells rest at G1 phase. To investigate the role played byp21 in antler regeneration, we studied the cell cycle distribution of antler stem cells (ASCs), via down-regulation of p21 in vitro using RNAi. The results showed that ASCs had high levels of p21 mRNA expression and rested at G1 phase, which was comparable to the control somatic cells. Down-regulation of p21 did not result in ASC cell cycle re-distribution toward G2/M accumulation, but DNA damage and apoptosis of the ASCs significantly increased and the process of cell aging was slowed. These findings suggest that the ASCs may have evolved to use an alternative, p21-independent cell cycle regulation mechanism. Also a unique p21-dependent inhibitory effect may control DNA damage as a protective mechanism to ensure the fast proliferating ASCs do not become dysplastic/cancerous. Understanding of the mechanism underlying the role played by p21 in the ASCs could give insight into a mammalian system where epimorphic regeneration is initiated whilst the genome stability is effectively maintained. PMID:26308075

  18. Amino acid limitation induces down-regulation of WNT5a at transcriptional level

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Zuguang; Chen Hong

    2009-01-23

    An aberrant WNT signaling contributes to the development and progression of multiple cancers. WNT5a is one of the WNT signaling molecules. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that amino acid deprivation induces changes in the WNT signaling pathway in colon cancer cells. Results showed that targets of the amino acid response pathway, ATF3 and p21, were induced in the human colon cancer cell line SW480 during amino acid limitation. There was a significant decrease in the WNT5a mRNA level following amino acid deprivation. The down-regulation of WNT5a mRNA by amino acid deprivation is not due to mRNA destabilization. There is a reduction of nuclear {beta}-catenin protein level by amino acid limitation. Under amino acid limitation, phosphorylation of ERK1/2 was increased and the blockage of ERK1/2 by the inhibitor U0126 partially restored WNT5a mRNA level. In conclusion, amino acid limitation in colon cancer cells induces phosphorylation of ERK1/2, which then down-regulates WNT5a expression.

  19. Leishmania donovani: proteasome-mediated down-regulation of methionine adenosyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Pertejo, Yolanda; Alvarez-Velilla, Raquel; Estrada, Carlos García; Balaña-Fouce, Rafael; Reguera, Rosa M

    2011-08-01

    Methionine adenosyltransferase (MAT) is an important enzyme for metabolic processes, to the extent that its product, S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet), plays a key role in trans-methylation, trans-sulphuration and polyamine synthesis. Previous studies have shown that a MAT-overexpressing strain of Leishmania donovani controls AdoMet production, keeping the intracellular AdoMet concentration at levels that are compatible with cell survival. This unexpected result, together with the fact that MAT activity and abundance changed with time in culture, suggests that different regulatory mechanisms acting beyond the post-transcriptional level are controlling this protein. In order to gain an insight into these mechanisms, several experiments were carried out to explain the MAT abundance during promastigote cell growth. Determination of MAT turnover in cycloheximide (CHX)-treated cultures resulted in a surprising 5-fold increase in MAT turnover compared to CHX-untreated cultures. This increase agrees with a stabilization of the MAT protein, whose integrity was maintained during culture. The presence of proteasome inhibitors, namely MG-132, MG-115, epoxomycin and lactacystin in the culture medium prevented MAT degradation in both MAT-overexpressing and 'mock-transfected' leishmanial strains. The role of the ubiquitin (Ub) pathway in MAT down-regulation was supported using immunoprecipitation experiments. Immunoprecipitated MAT cross-reacted with anti-Ub antibodies, which provides evidence of a proteasome-mediated down-regulation of the leishmanial MAT abundance.

  20. High glucose induces dysfunction of airway epithelial barrier through down-regulation of connexin 43.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hongmei; Yang, Juan; Zhou, Xiangdong; Xiao, Qian; Lü, Yang; Xia, Li

    2016-03-01

    The airway epithelium is a barrier to the inhaled antigens and pathogens. Connexin 43 (Cx43) has been found to play critical role in maintaining the function of airway epithelial barrier and be involved in the pathogenesis of the diabetic retinal vasculature, diabetes nephropathy and diabetes skin. Hyperglycemia has been shown to be an independent risk factor for respiratory infections. We hypothesize that the down-regulation of Cx43 induced by HG alters the expression of tight junctions (zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) and occludin) and contributes to dysfunction of airway epithelial barrier, and Cx43 plays a critical role in the process in human airway epithelial cells (16 HBE). We show that high glucose (HG) decreased the expression of ZO-1 and occludin, disassociated interaction between Cx43 and tight junctions, and then increased airway epithelial transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) and permeability by down-regulation of Cx43 in human airway epithelial cells. These observations demonstrate an important role for Cx43 in regulating HG-induced dysfunction of airway epithelial barrier. These findings may bring new insights into the molecular pathogenesis of pulmonary infection related to diabetes mellitus and lead to novel therapeutic intervention for the dysfunction of airway epithelial barrier in chronic inflammatory airway diseases.

  1. Cell wall modifications triggered by the down-regulation of Coumarate 3-hydroxylase-1 in maize.

    PubMed

    Fornalé, Silvia; Rencoret, Jorge; Garcia-Calvo, Laura; Capellades, Montserrat; Encina, Antonio; Santiago, Rogelio; Rigau, Joan; Gutiérrez, Ana; Del Río, José-Carlos; Caparros-Ruiz, David

    2015-07-01

    Coumarate 3-hydroxylase (C3H) catalyzes a key step of the synthesis of the two main lignin subunits, guaiacyl (G) and syringyl (S) in dicotyledonous species. As no functional data are available in regards to this enzyme in monocotyledonous species, we generated C3H1 knock-down maize plants. The results obtained indicate that C3H1 participates in lignin biosynthesis as its down-regulation redirects the phenylpropanoid flux: as a result, increased amounts of p-hydroxyphenyl (H) units, lignin-associated ferulates and the flavone tricin were detected in transgenic stems cell walls. Altogether, these changes make stem cell walls more degradable in the most C3H1-repressed plants, despite their unaltered polysaccharide content. The increase in H monomers is moderate compared to C3H deficient Arabidopsis and alfalfa plants. This could be due to the existence of a second maize C3H protein (C3H2) that can compensate the reduced levels of C3H1 in these C3H1-RNAi maize plants. The reduced expression of C3H1 alters the macroscopic phenotype of the plants, whose growth is inhibited proportionally to the extent of C3H1 repression. Finally, the down-regulation of C3H1 also increases the synthesis of flavonoids, leading to the accumulation of anthocyanins in transgenic leaves. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Phosphorylation-dependent down-regulation of apolipoprotein A5 by insulin

    SciTech Connect

    Nowak, Maxine; Helleboid-Chapman, Audrey; Jakel, Heidelinde; Rommens, Corinne; Martin, Genevieve; Duran-Sandoval, Daniel; Staels, Bart; Rubin, Edward M.; Pennacchio, Len A.; Taskinen, Marja-Riitta; Fruchart-Najib, Jamila; Fruchart, Jean-Charles

    2004-02-15

    The apolipoprotein A5 (APOA5) gene has been shown to be important in lowering plasma triglyceride levels. Since several studies have shown that hyperinsulinemia is associated with hypertriglyceridemia, we sought to determine whether APOA5 gene is regulated by insulin. We show here that cell and mouse treatments with insulin down-regulated APOA5 expression in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, we determined that insulin decreases APOA5 promoter activity and subsequent deletion analyses revealed an E-box-containing fragment. We showed that Upstream Stimulatory Factors, USF1/USF2, bind to the identified E-box in the APOA5 promoter. Moreover, in cotransfection studies, USF1 stimulates APOA5 promoter activity. The treatment with insulin reduces the binding of USF1/USF2 to APOA5 promoter. The inhibition of PI3K pathway with wortmannin abolished the insulin s effect on APOA5 gene transcription. Using oligoprecipitation method of USF from nuclear extracts, we demonstrated that phosphorylated USF1 failed to bind to APOA5 promoter. This indicates that the APOA5 gene transrepression by insulin involves a phosphorylation of USF through PI3K, that modulate their binding to APOA5 promoter and results in APOA5 down-regulation. The effect of exogenous hyperinsulinemia in healthy men shows a decrease of the plasma ApoAV level. These data suggest a potential mechanism involving APOA5 gene in hypertriglyceridemia associated with hyperinsulinemia.

  3. Accumulation of "small dense" low density lipoproteins (LDL) in a homozygous patients with familial defective apolipoprotein B-100 results from heterogenous interaction of LDL subfractions with the LDL receptor.

    PubMed Central

    März, W; Baumstark, M W; Scharnagl, H; Ruzicka, V; Buxbaum, S; Herwig, J; Pohl, T; Russ, A; Schaaf, L; Berg, A

    1993-01-01

    The interaction of LDL and LDL subfractions from a patient homozygous for familial defective apoB-100 (FDB) has been studied. His LDL cholesterol ranged from 2.65 to 3.34 g/liter. In cultured fibroblasts, binding, internalization, and degradation of the patient's LDL was diminished, but not completely abolished. The patient's apolipoprotein E concentration was low, and the amount of apolipoprotein E associated with LDL was not elevated over normal. LDL were separated into six subfractions: LDL-1 (1.019-1.031 kg/liter), LDL-2 (1.031-1.034 kg/liter), LDL-3 (1.034-1.037 kg/liter), LDL-4 (1.037-1.040 kg/liter), LDL-5 (1.040-1.044 kg/liter), and LDL-6 (> 1.044 kg/liter). LDL-5 and LDL-6 selectively accumulated in the patient's plasma. Concentrations of LDL-1 to 3 were normal. The LDL receptor-mediated uptake of LDL-1 and LDL-2 could not be distinguished from normal LDL. LDL-3 and LDL-4 displayed reduced uptake; LDL-5 and LDL-6 were completely defective in binding. When apolipoprotein E-containing particles were removed by immunoabsorption before preparing subfractions, LDL-3 and LDL-4, but not LDL-1 and LDL-2, retained some receptor binding activity. We conclude that in FDB, LDL-1 and LDL-2 contain sufficient apolipoprotein E to warrant normal cellular uptake. In LDL-3 and LDL-4, the defective apoB-100 itself displays some receptor binding; LDL-5 and LDL-6 are inable to interact with LDL receptors and accumulate in plasma. Images PMID:8254047

  4. Interleukin-1 as an Injury Signal Mobilizes Retinyl Esters in Hepatic Stellate Cells through Down Regulation of Lecithin Retinol Acyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Kida, Yujiro; Xia, Zanxian; Zheng, Sujun; Mordwinkin, Nicholas M.; Louie, Stan G.; Zheng, Song Guo; Feng, Min; Shi, Hongbo; Duan, Zhongping; Han, Yuan-Ping

    2011-01-01

    Retinoids are mostly stored as retinyl esters in hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) through esterification of retinol and fatty acid, catalyzed by lecithin-retinol acyltransferase (LRAT). This study is designated to address how retinyl esters are mobilized in liver injury for tissue repair and wound healing. Initially, we speculated that acute inflammatory cytokines may act as injury signal to mobilize retinyl esters by down-regulation of LRAT in HSCs. By examining a panel of cytokines we found interleukin-1 (IL-1) can potently down-regulate mRNA and protein levels of LRAT, resulting in mobilization of retinyl esters in primary rat HSCs. To simulate the microenvironment in the space of Disse, HSCs were embedded in three-dimensional extracellular matrix, by which HSCs retaine quiescent phenotypes, indicated by up-regulation of LRAT and accumulation of lipid droplets. Upon IL-1 stimulation, LRAT expression went down together with mobilization of lipid droplets. Secreted factors from Kupffer cells were able to suppress LRAT expression in HSCs, which was neutralized by IL-1 receptor antagonist. To explore the underlying mechanism we noted that the stability of LRAT protein is not significantly regulated by IL-1, indicating the regulation is likely at transcriptional level. Indeed, we found that IL-1 failed to down-regulate recombinant LRAT protein expressed in HSCs by adenovirus, while transcription of endogenous LRAT was promptly decreased. Following liver damage, IL-1 was promptly elevated in a close pace with down-regulation of LRAT transcription, implying their causative relationship. After administration of IL-1, retinyl ester levels in the liver, as measured by LC/MS/MS, decreased in association with down-regulation of LRAT. Likewise, IL-1 receptor knockout mice were protected from injury-induced down-regulation of LRAT. In summary, we identified IL-1 as an injury signal to mobilize retinyl ester in HSCs through down-regulation of LRAT, implying a mechanism governing

  5. Rapamycin inhibits BAFF-stimulated cell proliferation and survival by suppressing mTOR-mediated PP2A-Erk1/2 signaling pathway in normal and neoplastic B-lymphoid cells.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Qingyu; Zhang, Hai; Qin, Jiamin; Xu, Zhigang; Gui, Lin; Liu, Beibei; Liu, Chunxiao; Xu, Chong; Liu, Wen; Zhang, Shuangquan; Huang, Shile; Chen, Long

    2015-12-01

    B-cell activating factor (BAFF) is involved in not only physiology of normal B cells, but also pathophysiology of aggressive B cells related to malignant and autoimmune diseases. Rapamycin, a lipophilic macrolide antibiotic, has recently shown to be effective in the treatment of human lupus erythematosus. However, how rapamycin inhibits BAFF-stimulated B-cell proliferation and survival has not been fully elucidated. Here, we show that rapamycin inhibited human soluble BAFF (hsBAFF)-induced cell proliferation and survival in normal and B-lymphoid (Raji and Daudi) cells by activation of PP2A and inactivation of Erk1/2. Pretreatment with PD98059, down-regulation of Erk1/2, expression of dominant negative MKK1, or overexpression of wild-type PP2A potentiated rapamycin's suppression of hsBAFF-activated Erk1/2 and B-cell proliferation/viability, whereas expression of constitutively active MKK1, inhibition of PP2A by okadaic acid, or expression of dominant negative PP2A attenuated the inhibitory effects of rapamycin. Furthermore, expression of a rapamycin-resistant and kinase-active mTOR (mTOR-T), but not a rapamycin-resistant and kinase-dead mTOR-T (mTOR-TE), conferred resistance to rapamycin's effects on PP2A, Erk1/2 and B-cell proliferation/viability, implying mTOR-dependent mechanism involved. The findings indicate that rapamycin inhibits BAFF-stimulated cell proliferation/survival by targeting mTOR-mediated PP2A-Erk1/2 signaling pathway in normal and neoplastic B-lymphoid cells. Our data highlight that rapamycin may be exploited for preventing excessive BAFF-induced aggressive B-cell malignancies and autoimmune diseases.

  6. Study of traits and recalcitrance reduction of field-grown COMT down-regulated switchgrass

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Mi; Pu, Yunqiao; Yoo, Chang Geun; ...

    2017-01-03

    The native recalcitrance of plants hinders the biomass conversion process using current biorefinery techniques. Down-regulation of the caffeic acid O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene in the lignin biosynthesis pathway of switchgrass reduced the thermochemical and biochemical conversion recalcitrance of biomass. Due to potential environmental influences on lignin biosynthesis and deposition, studying the consequences of physicochemical changes in field-grown plants without pretreatment is essential to evaluate the performance of lignin-altered plants. In this study, we determined the chemical composition, cellulose crystallinity and the degree of its polymerization, molecular weight of hemicellulose, and cellulose accessibility of cell walls in order to better understand themore » fundamental features of why biomass is recalcitrant to conversion without pretreatment. The most important is to investigate whether traits and features are stable in the dynamics of field environmental effects over multiple years.« less

  7. Royal jelly reduces melanin synthesis through down-regulation of tyrosinase expression.

    PubMed

    Han, Sang Mi; Yeo, Joo Hong; Cho, Yoon Hee; Pak, Sok Cheon

    2011-01-01

    For cosmetic reasons, the demand for effective and safe skin-whitening agents is high. Since the key enzyme in the melanin synthetic pathway is tyrosinase, many depigmenting agents in the treatment of hyperpigmentation act as tyrosinase inhibitors. In this study, we have investigated the hypo-pigmentary mechanism of royal jelly in a mouse melanocyte cell line, B16F1. Treatment of B16F1 cells with royal jelly markedly inhibited melanin biosynthesis in a dose-dependent manner. Decreased melanin content occurred through the decrease of tyrosinase activity. The mRNA levels of tyrosinase were also reduced by royal jelly. These results suggest that royal jelly reduces melanin synthesis by down-regulation of tyrosinase mRNA transcription and serves as a new candidate in the design of new skin-whitening or therapeutic agents.

  8. Genes down-regulated in spaceflight are involved in the control of longevity in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Honda, Yoko; Higashibata, Akira; Matsunaga, Yohei; Yonezawa, Yukiko; Kawano, Tsuyoshi; Higashitani, Atsushi; Kuriyama, Kana; Shimazu, Toru; Tanaka, Masashi; Szewczyk, Nathaniel J; Ishioka, Noriaki; Honda, Shuji

    2012-01-01

    How microgravitational space environments affect aging is not well understood. We observed that, in Caenorhabditis elegans, spaceflight suppressed the formation of transgenically expressed polyglutamine aggregates, which normally accumulate with increasing age. Moreover, the inactivation of each of seven genes that were down-regulated in space extended lifespan on the ground. These genes encode proteins that are likely related to neuronal or endocrine signaling: acetylcholine receptor, acetylcholine transporter, choline acetyltransferase, rhodopsin-like receptor, glutamate-gated chloride channel, shaker family of potassium channel, and insulin-like peptide. Most of them mediated lifespan control through the key longevity-regulating transcription factors DAF-16 or SKN-1 or through dietary-restriction signaling, singly or in combination. These results suggest that aging in C. elegans is slowed through neuronal and endocrine response to space environmental cues.

  9. Down-regulation of telomerase activity in DLD-1 human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells by tocotrienol

    SciTech Connect

    Eitsuka, Takahiro; Nakagawa, Kiyotaka; Miyazawa, Teruo . E-mail: miyazawa@biochem.tohoku.ac.jp

    2006-09-15

    As high telomerase activity is detected in most cancer cells, inhibition of telomerase by drug or dietary food components is a new strategy for cancer prevention. Here, we investigated the inhibitory effect of vitamin E, with particular emphasis on tocotrienol (unsaturated vitamin E), on human telomerase in cell-culture study. As results, tocotrienol inhibited telomerase activity of DLD-1 human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells in time- and dose-dependent manner, interestingly, with {delta}-tocotrienol exhibiting the highest inhibitory activity. Tocotrienol inhibited protein kinase C activity, resulting in down-regulation of c-myc and human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) expression, thereby reducing telomerase activity. In contrast to tocotrienol, tocopherol showed very weak telomerase inhibition. These results provide novel evidence for First time indicating that tocotrienol acts as a potent candidate regulator of telomerase and supporting the anti-proliferative function of tocotrienol.

  10. Matrix Rigidity Activates Wnt Signaling through Down-regulation of Dickkopf-1 Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Barbolina, Maria V.; Liu, Yiuying; Gurler, Hilal; Kim, Mijung; Kajdacsy-Balla, Andre A.; Rooper, Lisa; Shepard, Jaclyn; Weiss, Michael; Shea, Lonnie D.; Penzes, Peter; Ravosa, Matthew J.; Stack, M. Sharon

    2013-01-01

    Cells respond to changes in the physical properties of the extracellular matrix with altered behavior and gene expression, highlighting the important role of the microenvironment in the regulation of cell function. In the current study, culture of epithelial ovarian cancer cells on three-dimensional collagen I gels led to a dramatic down-regulation of the Wnt signaling inhibitor dickkopf-1 with a concomitant increase in nuclear β-catenin and enhanced β-catenin/Tcf/Lef transcriptional activity. Increased three-dimensional collagen gel invasion was accompanied by transcriptional up-regulation of the membrane-tethered collagenase membrane type 1 matrix metalloproteinase, and an inverse relationship between dickkopf-1 and membrane type 1 matrix metalloproteinase was observed in human epithelial ovarian cancer specimens. Similar results were obtained in other tissue-invasive cells such as vascular endothelial cells, suggesting a novel mechanism for functional coupling of matrix adhesion with Wnt signaling. PMID:23152495

  11. Matrix rigidity activates Wnt signaling through down-regulation of Dickkopf-1 protein.

    PubMed

    Barbolina, Maria V; Liu, Yiuying; Gurler, Hilal; Kim, Mijung; Kajdacsy-Balla, Andre A; Rooper, Lisa; Shepard, Jaclyn; Weiss, Michael; Shea, Lonnie D; Penzes, Peter; Ravosa, Matthew J; Stack, M Sharon

    2013-01-04

    Cells respond to changes in the physical properties of the extracellular matrix with altered behavior and gene expression, highlighting the important role of the microenvironment in the regulation of cell function. In the current study, culture of epithelial ovarian cancer cells on three-dimensional collagen I gels led to a dramatic down-regulation of the Wnt signaling inhibitor dickkopf-1 with a concomitant increase in nuclear β-catenin and enhanced β-catenin/Tcf/Lef transcriptional activity. Increased three-dimensional collagen gel invasion was accompanied by transcriptional up-regulation of the membrane-tethered collagenase membrane type 1 matrix metalloproteinase, and an inverse relationship between dickkopf-1 and membrane type 1 matrix metalloproteinase was observed in human epithelial ovarian cancer specimens. Similar results were obtained in other tissue-invasive cells such as vascular endothelial cells, suggesting a novel mechanism for functional coupling of matrix adhesion with Wnt signaling.

  12. Lithium Down-regulates Histone Deacetylase 1 (HDAC1) and Induces Degradation of Mutant Huntingtin*

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shuai; Zheng, Shui-Di; Huang, Hong-Ling; Yan, Li-Chong; Yin, Xiao-Fei; Xu, Hai-Neng; Zhang, Kang-Jian; Gui, Jing-Hua; Chu, Liang; Liu, Xin-Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Lithium is an effective mood stabilizer that has been clinically used to treat bipolar disorder for several decades. Recent studies have suggested that lithium possesses robust neuroprotective and anti-tumor properties. Thus far, a large number of lithium targets have been discovered. Here, we report for the first time that HDAC1 is a target of lithium. Lithium significantly down-regulated HDAC1 at the translational level by targeting HDAC1 mRNA. We also showed that depletion of HDAC1 is essential for the neuroprotective effects of lithium and for the lithium-mediated degradation of mutant huntingtin through the autophagic pathway. Our studies explain the multiple functions of lithium and reveal a novel mechanism for the function of lithium in neurodegeneration. PMID:24165128

  13. Study of traits and recalcitrance reduction of field-grown COMT down-regulated switchgrass.

    PubMed

    Li, Mi; Pu, Yunqiao; Yoo, Chang Geun; Gjersing, Erica; Decker, Stephen R; Doeppke, Crissa; Shollenberger, Todd; Tschaplinski, Timothy J; Engle, Nancy L; Sykes, Robert W; Davis, Mark F; Baxter, Holly L; Mazarei, Mitra; Fu, Chunxiang; Dixon, Richard A; Wang, Zeng-Yu; Neal Stewart, C; Ragauskas, Arthur J

    2017-01-01

    The native recalcitrance of plants hinders the biomass conversion process using current biorefinery techniques. Down-regulation of the caffeic acid O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene in the lignin biosynthesis pathway of switchgrass reduced the thermochemical and biochemical conversion recalcitrance of biomass. Due to potential environmental influences on lignin biosynthesis and deposition, studying the consequences of physicochemical changes in field-grown plants without pretreatment is essential to evaluate the performance of lignin-altered plants. We determined the chemical composition, cellulose crystallinity and the degree of its polymerization, molecular weight of hemicellulose, and cellulose accessibility of cell walls in order to better understand the fundamental features of why biomass is recalcitrant to conversion without pretreatment. The most important is to investigate whether traits and features are stable in the dynamics of field environmental effects over multiple years. Field-grown COMT down-regulated plants maintained both reduced cell wall recalcitrance and lignin content compared with the non-transgenic controls for at least 3 seasons. The transgenic switchgrass yielded 35-84% higher total sugar release (enzymatic digestibility or saccharification) from a 72-h enzymatic hydrolysis without pretreatment and also had a 25-32% increase in enzymatic sugar release after hydrothermal pretreatment. The COMT-silenced switchgrass lines had consistently lower lignin content, e.g., 12 and 14% reduction for year 2 and year 3 growing season, respectively, than the control plants. By contrast, the transgenic lines had 7-8% more xylan and galactan contents than the wild-type controls. Gel permeation chromatographic results revealed that the weight-average molecular weights of hemicellulose were 7-11% lower in the transgenic than in the control lines. In addition, we found that silencing of COMT in switchgrass led to 20-22% increased cellulose accessibility as

  14. Down-regulation of the rat serotonin transporter upon exposure to a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Horschitz, S; Hummerich, R; Schloss, P

    2001-07-20

    The serotonin transporter (SERT) terminates serotonergic neurotransmission by rapid reuptake of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) into the nerve terminal or axonal varicosities. SERT represents the target of various antidepressants which inhibit 5-HT transport and are widely used for the pharmacotherapy of depression. Here, we have analyzed the function of SERT stably expressed in HEK 293 cells upon exposure to citalopram, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), with respect to 5-HT transport activity and protein expression as estimated by ligand binding experiments. Our results show that long-term exposure to an SSRI causes a down-regulation of transport activity as revealed by a reduction of the maximal transport rate, without affecting substrate affinity, accompanied by a decrease in ligand binding sites.

  15. Natural polyphenols down-regulate universal stress protein in Mycobacterium tuberculosis: An in-silico approach

    PubMed Central

    Aanandhi, M. Vijey; Bhattacherjee, Debojit; George, P. Samuel Gideon; Ray, Anirban

    2014-01-01

    Universal stress protein (USP) is a novel target to overcome the tuberculosis resistance. Our present study enlightens the possibilities of some natural polyphenols as an antioxidant for USP. The study has shown some molecular simulations of some selected natural antioxidants with USP. We have considered USP (Rv1636) strain for homology modeling and the selected template was taken for the docking study. Curcumin, catechin, reservetrol has shown ARG 136 (1.8Å) hydrogen bonding and two ionic bonding with carboxyl group of curcumin with LEU 130 (3.3Å) and ASN 144 (3.4Å) respectively. INH was taken for the standard molecule to perform molecular simulation. It showed poor binding interaction with the target, that is, −5.18 kcal, and two hydrogen bonding with SER 140 (1.887Å), ARG 147 (2.064Å) respectively. The study indicates possible new generation curcumin analogue for future therapy to down-regulate USP. PMID:25364695

  16. Genes down-regulated in spaceflight are involved in the control of longevity in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Honda, Yoko; Higashibata, Akira; Matsunaga, Yohei; Yonezawa, Yukiko; Kawano, Tsuyoshi; Higashitani, Atsushi; Kuriyama, Kana; Shimazu, Toru; Tanaka, Masashi; Szewczyk, Nathaniel J.; Ishioka, Noriaki; Honda, Shuji

    2012-01-01

    How microgravitational space environments affect aging is not well understood. We observed that, in Caenorhabditis elegans, spaceflight suppressed the formation of transgenically expressed polyglutamine aggregates, which normally accumulate with increasing age. Moreover, the inactivation of each of seven genes that were down-regulated in space extended lifespan on the ground. These genes encode proteins that are likely related to neuronal or endocrine signaling: acetylcholine receptor, acetylcholine transporter, choline acetyltransferase, rhodopsin-like receptor, glutamate-gated chloride channel, shaker family of potassium channel, and insulin-like peptide. Most of them mediated lifespan control through the key longevity-regulating transcription factors DAF-16 or SKN-1 or through dietary-restriction signaling, singly or in combination. These results suggest that aging in C. elegans is slowed through neuronal and endocrine response to space environmental cues. PMID:22768380

  17. Mechanism of pentoxifylline mediated down-regulation of killer lineage cell functions

    PubMed Central

    Ernst, P.; Sheth, K.; Einspenner, M.; Al-Sedairy, S.

    1993-01-01

    The authors reported recently that endotoxaemia mediated elevated levels of tumour necrosis factor (TNF-α) and interleukin-1α (IL-1α) were involved in the pathophysiology of acute heat stroke patients. Pentoxifylline (PTX) is known to modulate neutrophil functions. In the present study the effects of PTX on lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and cytokine induced T-cell and macrophage (ΦM) activation, and on natural killer (NK) cell and lymphokine activated killer (LAK) cell mediated cytotoxicity were examined. Finally, the effect of PTX on the expression of adhesion molecules (LFA-1, Mac-1 and ICAM-1), and cytokine (IL-1α, IL-2, TNF-α, IL-6 and IFN-γ) production and their surface receptor expression in response to LPS activation was investigated. PTX free cultures served as a control. Results revealed that PTX can down-regulate all the above-mentioned immunological parameters in a dosedependent manner. These findings might have far reaching clinical implications. PMID:18475549

  18. Inhibition of target of rapamycin signaling by rapamycin in the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Crespo, José L; Díaz-Troya, Sandra; Florencio, Francisco J

    2005-12-01

    The macrolide rapamycin specifically binds the 12-kD FK506-binding protein (FKBP12), and this complex potently inhibits the target of rapamycin (TOR) kinase. The identification of TOR in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) revealed that TOR is conserved in photosynthetic eukaryotes. However, research on TOR signaling in plants has been hampered by the natural resistance of plants to rapamycin. Here, we report TOR inactivation by rapamycin treatment in a photosynthetic organism. We identified and characterized TOR and FKBP12 homologs in the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Whereas growth of wild-type Chlamydomonas cells is sensitive to rapamycin, cells lacking FKBP12 are fully resistant to the drug, indicating that this protein mediates rapamycin action to inhibit cell growth. Unlike its plant homolog, Chlamydomonas FKBP12 exhibits high affinity to rapamycin in vivo, which was increased by mutation of conserved residues in the drug-binding pocket. Furthermore, pull-down assays demonstrated that TOR binds FKBP12 in the presence of rapamycin. Finally, rapamycin treatment resulted in a pronounced increase of vacuole size that resembled autophagic-like processes. Thus, our findings suggest that Chlamydomonas cell growth is positively controlled by a conserved TOR kinase and establish this unicellular alga as a useful model system for studying TOR signaling in photosynthetic eukaryotes.

  19. p53 and rapamycin are additive

    PubMed Central

    Campisi, Judith; Huang, Jing; Jones, Diane; Dodds, Sherry G.; Williams, Charnae; Hubbard, Gene; Livi, Carolina B.; Gao, Xiaoli; Weintraub, Susan; Curiel, Tyler; Sharp, Z. Dave; Hasty, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a kinase found in a complex (mTORC1) that enables macromolecular synthesis and cell growth and is implicated in cancer etiology. The rapamycin-FK506 binding protein 12 (FKBP12) complex allosterically inhibits mTORC1. In response to stress, p53 inhibits mTORC1 through a separate pathway involving cell signaling and amino acid sensing. Thus, these different mechanisms could be additive. Here we show that p53 improved the ability of rapamycin to: 1) extend mouse life span, 2) suppress ionizing radiation (IR)-induced senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) and 3) increase the levels of amino acids and citric acid in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells. This additive effect could have implications for cancer treatment since rapamycin and p53 are anti-oncogenic. PMID:26158292

  20. Down-regulation of MIF by NFκB under hypoxia accelerated neuronal loss during stroke.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Si; Zis, Odysseus; Ly, Philip T T; Wu, Yili; Zhang, Shuting; Zhang, Mingming; Cai, Fang; Bucala, Richard; Shyu, Woei-Cherng; Song, Weihong

    2014-10-01

    Neuronal apoptosis is one of the major causes of poststroke neurological deficits. Inflammation during the acute phase of stroke results in nuclear translocation of NFκB in affected cells in the infarct area. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) promotes cardiomyocyte survival in mice following heart ischemia. However, the role of MIF during stroke remains limited. In this study, we showed that MIF expression is down-regulated by 0.75 ± 0.10-fold of the control in the infarct area in the mouse brains. Two functional cis-acing NFκB response elements were identified in the human MIF promoter. Dual activation of hypoxia and NFκB signaling resulted in significant reduction of MIF promoter activity to 0.86 ± 0.01-fold of the control. Furthermore, MIF reduced caspase-3 activation and protected neurons from oxidative stress- and in vitro ischemia/reperfusion-induced apoptosis. H2O2 significantly induced cell death with 12.81 ± 0.58-fold increase of TUNEL-positive cells, and overexpression of MIF blocked the H2O2-induced cell death. Disruption of the MIF gene in MIF-knockout mice resulted in caspase-3 activation, neuronal loss, and increased infarct development during stroke in vivo. The infarct volume was increased from 6.51 ± 0.74% in the wild-type mice to 9.07 ± 0.66% in the MIF-knockout mice. Our study demonstrates that MIF exerts a neuronal protective effect and that down-regulation of MIF by NFκB-mediated signaling under hypoxia accelerates neuronal loss during stroke. Our results suggest that MIF is an important molecule for preserving a longer time window for stroke treatment, and strategies to maintain MIF expression at physiological level could have beneficial effects for stroke patients.

  1. Remote ischaemic preconditioning down-regulates kinin receptor expression in neutrophils of patients undergoing heart surgery

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Pankaj; Aggarwal, Shashi; Misso, Neil L.; Passage, Jurgen; Newman, Mark A. J.; Thompson, Philip J.; d'Udekem, Yves; Praporski, Slavica; Konstantinov, Igor E.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Remote ischaemic preconditioning (RIPC) may protect distant organs against ischaemia-reperfusion injury. We investigated the impact of RIPC on kinin receptor expression in neutrophils following RIPC in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). METHODS Patients undergoing elective CABG with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) were randomized to RIPC (n = 15) or control (n = 15) groups. The study group underwent RIPC by inflation of a blood pressure cuff on the arm. Expression of kinin receptors, plasma concentrations of IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, TNF-α and neutrophil elastase were determined at baseline (before RIPC/sham), immediately before surgery (after RIPC/sham) and 30 min and 24 h after surgery. Plasma bradykinin levels were assessed before and after RIPC/sham, and at 30 min, 6, 12 and 24 h after surgery. Serum creatine kinase (CK), troponin I, C-reactive protein (CRP) and lactate levels were measured immediately prior to surgery and 30 min, 6, 12, 24 and 48 h after surgery. RESULTS Kinin B2 receptor expression did not differ between the groups at baseline (pre-RIPC), but was significantly lower in the RIPC group than in the control group after RIPC/sham (P < 0.05). Expressions of both kinin B1 and B2 receptors were significantly down-regulated in the RIPC group, and this persisted to 24 h after surgery (P < 0.001). Neutrophil elastase levels were significantly increased after surgery. There were no differences in CK, CRP, cytokine, lactate or troponin I levels between the groups. CONCLUSIONS RIPC down-regulated the expression of kinin B1 and B2 receptors in neutrophils of patients undergoing CABG. PMID:23814135

  2. Estrogen-mediated down-regulation of CD24 in breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Kaipparettu, Benny Abraham; Malik, Simeen; Konduri, Santhi D.; Liu, Wensheng; Rokavec, Matjaž; van der Kuip, Heiko; Hoppe, Reiner; Hammerich-Hille, Stephanie; Fritz, Peter; Schroth, Werner; Abele, Ina; Das, Gokul M.; Oesterreich, Steffi; Brauch, Hiltrud

    2008-01-01

    We have previously reported on the relevance of the prevalence of CD44+/CD24−/low cells in primary breast tumors. To study regulation of CD24, we queried a number of publicly available expression array studies in breast cancer cells, and found that CD24 was down-regulated upon estrogen treatment. We confirmed this estrogen-mediated repression of CD24 mRNA by qPCR in MCF7, T47D, and ZR75-1 cells. Repression was also seen at the protein level as measured by flow cytometry. CD24 was not down-regulated in the ERα negative MDA-MB-231 cells suggesting that ERα was necessary. This was further confirmed by ERα silencing in MCF7 cells resulting in increased CD24 levels, and by reintroduction of ERα into C4-12 cells resulting in decreased CD24 levels. Estrogen treatment did not alter half-life of CD24 mRNA, and new protein synthesis was not essential for repression, suggesting a primary transcriptional effect. HDAC inhibition by Trichostatin A completely abolished the repression, but decrease of the ERα corepressors NCoR, LCoR, RIP140, SMRT, SAFB1, and SAFB2 by siRNA or overexpression of SAFB2, NCoR, and SMRT had no effect. In silico promoter analyses led to the identification of two EREs in the CD24 promoter, one of which was able to bind ERα as shown by electrophoretic mobility shift assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. Together, our results show that CD24 is repressed by estrogen, and that this repression is a direct transcriptional effect depending on ERα and HDACs. PMID:18404683

  3. Parasite-mediated down-regulation of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in DA rats.

    PubMed

    Mattsson, L; Larsson, P; Erlandsson-Harris, H; Klareskog, L; Harris, R A

    2000-12-01

    Microbial infection can impact on the course of autoimmune disease, both in disease-inducing and disease-protecting capacities. Here we investigated if infection with Trypanosoma brucei brucei (Tbb), the protozoan causative agent of African Sleeping Sickness, could ameliorate the course of CIA in the Dark Agouti rat, an experimental model which shares many features with human rheumatoid arthritis. Infection of animals with living, but not inoculation with dead Tbb resulted in complete or significant reduction of clinical arthritic symptoms. Infection prior to collagen immunization was more effective than a later treatment, and this effect was related to the level of parasitaemia. Using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction we detected an increase in interferon-gamma mRNA in the draining lymph nodes of Tbb-treated animals relative to controls at day 28 after disease induction. Transforming growth factor-beta could be detected in the lymph nodes in four out of six animals that had received Tbb. In the joints, immunohistochemistry revealed reduced production of tumour necrosis factor-alpha in Tbb-treated animals relative to controls. The most striking difference between Tbb-infected and control groups, as measured by ELISA, was the down-regulation of anti-collagen II IgG antibody responses in parasite-infected animals. We conclude that live parasites can exert an immunomodulatory and protective effect in CIA in which several mechanisms may work in parallel, although the almost complete down-regulation of the anti-collagen antibody response may alone explain the protective effect in CIA. The described model may be useful in further attempts to use the mechanisms involved in parasite immune defence to prevent and treat certain autoimmune conditions.

  4. Epstein-Barr virus down-regulates tumor suppressor DOK1 expression.

    PubMed

    Siouda, Maha; Frecha, Cecilia; Accardi, Rosita; Yue, Jiping; Cuenin, Cyrille; Gruffat, Henri; Manet, Evelyne; Herceg, Zdenko; Sylla, Bakary S; Tommasino, Massimo

    2014-05-01

    The DOK1 tumor suppressor gene encodes an adapter protein that acts as a negative regulator of several signaling pathways. We have previously reported that DOK1 expression is up-regulated upon cellular stress, via the transcription factor E2F1, and down-regulated in a variety of human malignancies due to aberrant hypermethylation of its promoter. Here we show that Epstein Barr virus (EBV) infection of primary human B-cells leads to the down-regulation of DOK1 gene expression via the viral oncoprotein LMP1. LMP1 alone induces recruitment to the DOK1 promoter of at least two independent inhibitory complexes, one containing E2F1/pRB/DNMT1 and another containing at least EZH2. These events result in tri-methylation of histone H3 at lysine 27 (H3K27me3) of the DOK1 promoter and gene expression silencing. We also present evidence that the presence of additional EBV proteins leads to further repression of DOK1 expression with an additional mechanism. Indeed, EBV infection of B-cells induces DNA methylation at the DOK1 promoter region including the E2F1 responsive elements that, in turn, lose the ability to interact with E2F complexes. Treatment of EBV-infected B-cell-lines with the methyl-transferase inhibitor 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine rescues DOK1 expression. In summary, our data show the deregulation of DOK1 gene expression by EBV and provide novel insights into the regulation of the DOK1 tumor suppressor in viral-related carcinogenesis.

  5. Epstein-Barr Virus Down-Regulates Tumor Suppressor DOK1 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Siouda, Maha; Frecha, Cecilia; Accardi, Rosita; Yue, Jiping; Cuenin, Cyrille; Gruffat, Henri; Manet, Evelyne; Herceg, Zdenko; Sylla, Bakary S.; Tommasino, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    The DOK1 tumor suppressor gene encodes an adapter protein that acts as a negative regulator of several signaling pathways. We have previously reported that DOK1 expression is up-regulated upon cellular stress, via the transcription factor E2F1, and down-regulated in a variety of human malignancies due to aberrant hypermethylation of its promoter. Here we show that Epstein Barr virus (EBV) infection of primary human B-cells leads to the down-regulation of DOK1 gene expression via the viral oncoprotein LMP1. LMP1 alone induces recruitment to the DOK1 promoter of at least two independent inhibitory complexes, one containing E2F1/pRB/DNMT1 and another containing at least EZH2. These events result in tri-methylation of histone H3 at lysine 27 (H3K27me3) of the DOK1 promoter and gene expression silencing. We also present evidence that the presence of additional EBV proteins leads to further repression of DOK1 expression with an additional mechanism. Indeed, EBV infection of B-cells induces DNA methylation at the DOK1 promoter region including the E2F1 responsive elements that, in turn, lose the ability to interact with E2F complexes. Treatment of EBV-infected B-cell-lines with the methyl-transferase inhibitor 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine rescues DOK1 expression. In summary, our data show the deregulation of DOK1 gene expression by EBV and provide novel insights into the regulation of the DOK1 tumor suppressor in viral-related carcinogenesis. PMID:24809689

  6. Additional nitrogen fertilization at heading time of rice down-regulates cellulose synthesis in seed endosperm.

    PubMed

    Midorikawa, Keiko; Kuroda, Masaharu; Terauchi, Kaede; Hoshi, Masako; Ikenaga, Sachiko; Ishimaru, Yoshiro; Abe, Keiko; Asakura, Tomiko

    2014-01-01

    The balance between carbon and nitrogen is a key determinant of seed storage components, and thus, is of great importance to rice and other seed-based food crops. To clarify the influence of the rhizosphere carbon/nitrogen balance during the maturation stage of several seed components, transcriptome analysis was performed on the seeds from rice plants that were provided additional nitrogen fertilization at heading time. As a result, it was assessed that genes associated with molecular processes such as photosynthesis, trehalose metabolism, carbon fixation, amino acid metabolism, and cell wall metabolism were differentially expressed. Moreover, cellulose and sucrose synthases, which are involved in cellulose synthesis, were down-regulated. Therefore, we compared cellulose content of mature seeds that were treated with additional nitrogen fertilization with those from control plants using calcofluor staining. In these experiments, cellulose content in endosperm from plants receiving additional nitrogen fertilization was less than that in control endosperm. Other starch synthesis-related genes such as starch synthase 1, starch phosphorylase 2, and branching enzyme 3 were also down-regulated, whereas some α-amylase and β-amylase genes were up-regulated. On the other hand, mRNA expression of amino acid biosynthesis-related molecules was up-regulated. Moreover, additional nitrogen fertilization caused accumulation of storage proteins and up-regulated Cys-poor prolamin mRNA expression. These data suggest that additional nitrogen fertilization at heading time changes the expression of some storage substance-related genes and reduces cellulose levels in endosperm.

  7. Lignin down-regulation of Zea mays via dsRNAi and klason lignin analysis.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang-Hyuck; Ong, Rebecca Garlock; Mei, Chuansheng; Sticklen, Mariam

    2014-07-23

    To facilitate the use of lignocellulosic biomass as an alternative bioenergy resource, during biological conversion processes, a pretreatment step is needed to open up the structure of the plant cell wall, increasing the accessibility of the cell wall carbohydrates. Lignin, a polyphenolic material present in many cell wall types, is known to be a significant hindrance to enzyme access. Reduction in lignin content to a level that does not interfere with the structural integrity and defense system of the plant might be a valuable step to reduce the costs of bioethanol production. In this study, we have genetically down-regulated one of the lignin biosynthesis-related genes, cinnamoyl-CoA reductase (ZmCCR1) via a double stranded RNA interference technique. The ZmCCR1_RNAi construct was integrated into the maize genome using the particle bombardment method. Transgenic maize plants grew normally as compared to the wild-type control plants without interfering with biomass growth or defense mechanisms, with the exception of displaying of brown-coloration in transgenic plants leaf mid-ribs, husks, and stems. The microscopic analyses, in conjunction with the histological assay, revealed that the leaf sclerenchyma fibers were thinned but the structure and size of other major vascular system components was not altered. The lignin content in the transgenic maize was reduced by 7-8.7%, the crystalline cellulose content was increased in response to lignin reduction, and hemicelluloses remained unchanged. The analyses may indicate that carbon flow might have been shifted from lignin biosynthesis to cellulose biosynthesis. This article delineates the procedures used to down-regulate the lignin content in maize via RNAi technology, and the cell wall compositional analyses used to verify the effect of the modifications on the cell wall structure.

  8. Down-regulation of intestinal epithelial innate response by probiotic yeasts isolated from kefir.

    PubMed

    Romanin, David; Serradell, María; González Maciel, Dolores; Lausada, Natalia; Garrote, Graciela L; Rumbo, Martín

    2010-06-15

    Kefir is obtained by milk fermentation with a complex microbial population included in a matrix of polysaccharide and proteins. Several health-promoting activities has been attributed to kefir consumption. The aim of this study was to select microorganisms from kefir able to down-regulate intestinal epithelial innate response and further characterize this activity. Caco-2 cells stably transfected with a human CCL20 promoter luciferase reporter were used to screen a collection of 24 yeast and 23 bacterial strains isolated from kefir. The Toll-like receptor 5 agonist, flagellin was used to activate the reporter cells, while pre-incubation with the selected strains was tested to identify strains with the capacity to inhibit cell activation. In this system, 21 yeast strains from the genera Saccharomyces, Kluyveromyces and Issatchenkia inhibited almost 100% of the flagellin-dependent activation, whereas only some lactobacilli strains showed a partial effect. K. marxianus CIDCA 8154 was selected for further characterization. Inhibitory activity was confirmed at transcriptional level on Caco-2/TC-7 and HT-29 cells upon flagellin stimulation. A similar effect was observed using other pro-inflammatory stimulation such as IL-1beta and TNF-alpha. Pre-incubation with yeasts induced a down-regulation of NF-kappaB signalling in epithelial cells in vitro, as well as expression of other pro-inflammatory chemokines such as CXCL8 and CXCL2. Furthermore, modulation of CCL20 mRNA expression upon flagellin stimulation was evidenced in vivo, in a mouse ligated intestinal loop model. Results indicate kefir contains microorganisms able to abolish the intestinal epithelial inflammatory response that could explain some of the properties attributed to this fermented milk. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Down-Regulated Drebrin Aggravates Cognitive Impairments in a Mouse Model of Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yan; Xu, Yanfeng; Zhang, Ling; Huang, Lan; Yu, Pin; Zhu, Hua; Deng, Wei; Qin, Chuan

    2017-01-01

    The developmentally regulated brain protein drebrin (Dbn) is a functional protein involved with long-term memory formation and is widely distributed in brain neurons, especially in the dendritic spines. A noticeable decline of this protein has been found in the hippocampus and cortex of patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD), yet the relationship between Dbn and AD has not been fully understood. In the present study, we examined how down-regulation of Dbn impacts the progression of AD in experimental animals. Accordingly, we injected Dbn interference vector (rAAV-mDbn1 ShRNA) into the hippocampus of three-month old APP(swe)/PS1(ΔE9) mice (APP/PS1 mice) and then successfully down-regulated Dbn expression in this brain region. Behavioral tests, including the Morris water maze test, the open field test, and the novel object test were conducted when the animals were nine months old. Subsequently, MicroPET/CT imaging to monitor glucose metabolism was done. We then investigated Aβ, GFAP, PSD-95, MAP2, vimentin, Cox43, and Syn1 expressions in the brain of the experimental animals via immunohistochemical or immunofluorescence methods. We found that AD mice with a low expression of Dbn performed poorly in the behavioral tests and showed decreased glucose utilization. In the brains of these animals, we detected a slight increase of Aβ, GFAP and vimentin and a significant decline of PSD-95. Altogether our data warrant further studies to elucidate the effect of Dbn on the development and progression of AD. PMID:28398234

  10. Lignin Down-regulation of Zea mays via dsRNAi and Klason Lignin Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sang-Hyuck; Ong, Rebecca Garlock; Mei, Chuansheng; Sticklen, Mariam

    2014-01-01

    To facilitate the use of lignocellulosic biomass as an alternative bioenergy resource, during biological conversion processes, a pretreatment step is needed to open up the structure of the plant cell wall, increasing the accessibility of the cell wall carbohydrates. Lignin, a polyphenolic material present in many cell wall types, is known to be a significant hindrance to enzyme access. Reduction in lignin content to a level that does not interfere with the structural integrity and defense system of the plant might be a valuable step to reduce the costs of bioethanol production. In this study, we have genetically down-regulated one of the lignin biosynthesis-related genes, cinnamoyl-CoA reductase (ZmCCR1) via a double stranded RNA interference technique. The ZmCCR1_RNAi construct was integrated into the maize genome using the particle bombardment method. Transgenic maize plants grew normally as compared to the wild-type control plants without interfering with biomass growth or defense mechanisms, with the exception of displaying of brown-coloration in transgenic plants leaf mid-ribs, husks, and stems. The microscopic analyses, in conjunction with the histological assay, revealed that the leaf sclerenchyma fibers were thinned but the structure and size of other major vascular system components was not altered. The lignin content in the transgenic maize was reduced by 7-8.7%, the crystalline cellulose content was increased in response to lignin reduction, and hemicelluloses remained unchanged. The analyses may indicate that carbon flow might have been shifted from lignin biosynthesis to cellulose biosynthesis. This article delineates the procedures used to down-regulate the lignin content in maize via RNAi technology, and the cell wall compositional analyses used to verify the effect of the modifications on the cell wall structure. PMID:25080235

  11. Expression of thyroid hormone receptor isoforms down-regulated by thyroid hormone in human medulloblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Monden, Tsuyoshi; Nakajima, Yasuyo; Hashida, Tetsu; Ishii, Sumiyasu; Tomaru, Takuya; Shibusawa, Nobuyuki; Hashimoto, Koshi; Satoh, Teturou; Yamada, Masanobu; Mori, Masatomo; Kasai, Kikuo

    2006-04-01

    The role of thyroid hormone (T3) in the regulation of growth and development of the central nervous system including the cerebellum has been well established. However, the effects of thyroid hormone on malignant tumors derived from the cerebellum remain poorly understood. Our analysis mainly focused on expression levels of TR isoforms and the effects of thyroid hormone in human medulloblastoma HTB-185 cells. Northern blot analysis revealed TRalpha2 mRNA but not TRalpha1, beta1 or beta2 mRNA in the cell. The TRalpha1 and TRbeta1 mRNAs were detected only by RT-PCR method and TRbeta2 was not expressed. Incubation of T3 for 24 h decreased TRalpha1, TRalpha2 and TRbeta1 mRNA. Addition of actinomycin D caused an acute increase in the basal TR mRNA levels and the rate of decrease of all kinds of TR isoform mRNA was accelerated in the T3-treated groups compared to controls, indicating that the stability of TR mRNA was affected by T3. Incubation with cycloheximide also blocked a decrease in TR mRNA levels in the T3-treated HTB-185 cells suggesting that down-regulation of TR mRNA required the synthesis of new protein. Our data provide novel evidence for the expression of TRs down-regulated by T3 in HTB-185 cells, suggesting that TR expression is post-transcriptionally regulated by T3 at the level of RNA stability.

  12. In Vitro Ischemia Triggers a Transcriptional Response to Down-Regulate Synaptic Proteins in Hippocampal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Joana; Vieira, Marta; Carreto, Laura; Santos, Manuel A. S.; Duarte, Carlos B.; Carvalho, Ana Luísa; Santos, Armanda E.

    2014-01-01

    Transient global cerebral ischemia induces profound changes in the transcriptome of brain cells, which is partially associated with the induction or repression of genes that influence the ischemic response. However, the mechanisms responsible for the selective vulnerability of hippocampal neurons to global ischemia remain to be clarified. To identify molecular changes elicited by ischemic insults, we subjected hippocampal primary cultures to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD), an in vitro model for global ischemia that resulted in delayed neuronal death with an excitotoxic component. To investigate changes in the transcriptome of hippocampal neurons submitted to OGD, total RNA was extracted at early (7 h) and delayed (24 h) time points after OGD and used in a whole-genome RNA microarray. We observed that at 7 h after OGD there was a general repression of genes, whereas at 24 h there was a general induction of gene expression. Genes related with functions such as transcription and RNA biosynthesis were highly regulated at both periods of incubation after OGD, confirming that the response to ischemia is a dynamic and coordinated process. Our analysis showed that genes for synaptic proteins, such as those encoding for PICK1, GRIP1, TARPγ3, calsyntenin-2/3, SAPAP2 and SNAP-25, were down-regulated after OGD. Additionally, OGD decreased the mRNA and protein expression levels of the GluA1 AMPA receptor subunit as well as the GluN2A and GluN2B subunits of NMDA receptors, but increased the mRNA expression of the GluN3A subunit, thus altering the composition of ionotropic glutamate receptors in hippocampal neurons. Together, our results present the expression profile elicited by in vitro ischemia in hippocampal neurons, and indicate that OGD activates a transcriptional program leading to down-regulation in the expression of genes coding for synaptic proteins, suggesting that the synaptic proteome may change after ischemia. PMID:24960035

  13. Cholesterol Down-Regulates BK Channels Stably Expressed in HEK 293 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Xiu-Ling; Sun, Hai-Ying; Li, Gui-Rong

    2013-01-01

    Cholesterol is one of the major lipid components of the plasma membrane in mammalian cells and is involved in the regulation of a number of ion channels. The present study investigates how large conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (BK) channels are regulated by membrane cholesterol in BK-HEK 293 cells expressing both the α-subunit hKCa1.1 and the auxiliary β1-subunit or in hKCa1.1-HEK 293 cells expressing only the α-subunit hKCa1.1 using approaches of electrophysiology, molecular biology, and immunocytochemistry. Membrane cholesterol was depleted in these cells with methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD), and enriched with cholesterol-saturated MβCD (MβCD-cholesterol) or low-density lipoprotein (LDL). We found that BK current density was decreased by cholesterol enrichment in BK-HEK 293 cells, with a reduced expression of KCa1.1 protein, but not the β1-subunit protein. This effect was fully countered by the proteasome inhibitor lactacystin or the lysosome function inhibitor bafilomycin A1. Interestingly, in hKCa1.1-HEK 293 cells, the current density was not affected by cholesterol enrichment, but directly decreased by MβCD, suggesting that the down-regulation of BK channels by cholesterol depends on the auxiliary β1-subunit. The reduced KCa1.1 channel protein expression was also observed in cultured human coronary artery smooth muscle cells with cholesterol enrichment using MβCD-cholesterol or LDL. These results demonstrate the novel information that cholesterol down-regulates BK channels by reducing KCa1.1 protein expression via increasing the channel protein degradation, and the effect is dependent on the auxiliary β1-subunit. PMID:24260325

  14. Down-regulation of NDRG1 promotes migration of cancer cells during reoxygenation.

    PubMed

    Lai, Liang-Chuan; Su, Yi-Yu; Chen, Kuo-Chih; Tsai, Mong-Hsun; Sher, Yuh-Pyng; Lu, Tzu-Pin; Lee, Chien-Yueh; Chuang, Eric Y

    2011-01-01

    One characteristic of tumor microenvironment is oxygen fluctuation, which results from hyper-proliferation and abnormal metabolism of tumor cells as well as disorganized neo-vasculature. Reoxygenation of tumors can induce oxidative stress, which leads to DNA damage and genomic instability. Although the cellular responses to hypoxia are well known, little is known about the dynamic response upon reoxygenation. In order to investigate the transcriptional responses of tumor adaptation to reoxygenation, breast cancer MCF-7 cells were cultured under 0.5% oxygen for 24 h followed by 24 h of reoxygenation in normoxia. Cells were harvested at 0, 1, 4, 8, 12, and 24 h during reoxygenation. The transcriptional profile of MCF-7 cells upon reoxygenation was examined using Illumina Human-6 v3 BeadChips. We identified 127 differentially expressed genes, of which 53.1% were up-regulated and 46.9% were down-regulated upon reoxygenation. Pathway analysis revealed that the HIF-1-alpha transcription factor network and validated targets of C-MYC transcriptional activation were significantly enriched in these differentially expressed genes. Among these genes, a subset of interest genes was further validated by quantitative reverse-transcription PCR. In particular, human N-MYC down-regulated gene 1 (NDRG1) was highly suppressed upon reoxygenation. NDRG1 is associated with a variety of stress and cell growth-regulatory conditions. To determine whether NDRG1 plays a role in reoxygenation, NDRG1 protein was overexpressed in MCF-7 cells. Upon reoxygenation, overexpression of NDRG1 significantly inhibited cell migration. Our results revealed the dynamic nature of gene expression in MCF-7 cells upon reoxygenation and demonstrated that NDRG1 is involved in tumor adaptation to reoxygenation.

  15. High calcium diet down-regulates kidney angiotensin-converting enzyme in experimental renal failure.

    PubMed

    Pörsti, Ilkka; Fan, Meng; Kööbi, Peeter; Jolma, Pasi; Kalliovalkama, Jarkko; Vehmas, Tuija I; Helin, Heikki; Holthöfer, Harry; Mervaala, Eero; Nyman, Tuulikki; Tikkanen, Ilkka

    2004-12-01

    Calcium salts are used as phosphate binders in renal failure, while high calcium diet also improves vasorelaxation and enhances natriuresis. The influences of calcium intake on renal renin-angiotensin system (RAS) are largely unknown. Four weeks after NTX, rats were put on 3.0% or 0.3% calcium diet for 8 weeks (12-week study). In additional experiments, 15 weeks after NTX, rats were put on similar diets for 12 weeks (27-week study). Appropriate blood, urine, and kidney samples were taken. Renal angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) and angiotensin II receptors (AT1, AT2) were examined using autoradiography, ACE also using Western blotting, and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) using immunohistochemistry. In the 12-week study, albuminuria increased 5-fold in NTX rats, but only 2-fold in calcium NTX rats on 3.0% calcium. In the 27-week study, high calcium intake decreased blood pressure, retarded progression of renal failure, reduced glomerulosclerosis, interstitial damage, and aortic calcifications, and improved survival from 50% to 92% in NTX rats. In both experiments plasma parathyroid hormone and phosphate were elevated after NTX, and suppressed by high calcium diet, while kidney ACE was down-regulated by 40% or more after increased calcium intake. In the 27-week study renal CTGF was decreased and cortical AT1 receptor density reduced after high calcium diet. High calcium diet down-regulated kidney ACE, reduced albuminuria and blood pressure, and favorably influenced kidney morphology in experimental renal failure. These findings suggest a link between calcium metabolism and kidney ACE expression, which may play a role in the progression of renal damage.

  16. Dorsal Raphe Nucleus Down-Regulates Medial Prefrontal Cortex during Experience of Flow

    PubMed Central

    Ulrich, Martin; Keller, Johannes; Grön, Georg

    2016-01-01

    Previous neuroimaging studies have suggested that the experience of flow aligns with a relative increase in activation of the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN), and relative activation decreases of the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) and of the amygdala (AMY). In the present study, Dynamic Causal Modeling (DCM) was used to explore effective connectivity between those brain regions. To test our hypothesis that the DRN causally down-regulates activity of the MPFC and/or of the AMY, 23 healthy male students solved mental arithmetic tasks of varying difficulty during functional magnetic resonance imaging. A “flow” condition, with task demands automatically balanced with participants’ skill level, was compared with conditions of “boredom” and “overload”. DCM models were constructed modeling full reciprocal endogenous connections between the DRN, the MPFC, the AMY, and the calcarine. The calcarine was included to allow sensory input to enter the system. Experimental conditions were modeled as exerting modulatory effects on various possible connections between the DRN, the MPFC, and the AMY, but not on self-inhibitory connections, yielding a total of 64 alternative DCM models. Model space was partitioned into eight families based on commonalities in the arrangement of the modulatory effects. Random effects Bayesian Model Selection (BMS) was applied to identify a possible winning family (and model). Although BMS revealed a clear winning family, an outstanding winning model could not be identified. Therefore, Bayesian Model Averaging was performed over models within the winning family to obtain representative DCM parameters for subsequent analyses to test our hypothesis. In line with our expectations, Bayesian averaged parameters revealed stronger down-regulatory influence of the DRN on the MPFC when participants experienced flow relative to control conditions. In addition, these condition-dependent modulatory effects significantly predicted participants

  17. PGC-1alpha Down-Regulation Affects the Antioxidant Response in Friedreich's Ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Marmolino, Daniele; Manto, Mario; Acquaviva, Fabio; Vergara, Paola; Ravella, Ajay; Monticelli, Antonella; Pandolfo, Massimo

    2010-01-01

    Background Cells from individuals with Friedreich's ataxia (FRDA) show reduced activities of antioxidant enzymes and cannot up-regulate their expression when exposed to oxidative stress. This blunted antioxidant response may play a central role in the pathogenesis. We previously reported that Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptor Gamma (PPARγ) Coactivator 1-alpha (PGC-1α), a transcriptional master regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis and antioxidant responses, is down-regulated in most cell types from FRDA patients and animal models. Methodology/Principal Findings We used primary fibroblasts from FRDA patients and the knock in-knock out animal model for the disease (KIKO mouse) to determine basal superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2) levels and the response to oxidative stress induced by the addition of hydrogen peroxide. We measured the same parameters after pharmacological stimulation of PGC-1α. Compared to control cells, PGC-1α and SOD2 levels were decreased in FRDA cells and did not change after addition of hydrogen peroxide. PGC-1α direct silencing with siRNA in control fibroblasts led to a similar loss of SOD2 response to oxidative stress as observed in FRDA fibroblasts. PGC-1α activation with the PPARγ agonist (Pioglitazone) or with a cAMP-dependent protein kinase (AMPK) agonist (AICAR) restored normal SOD2 induction. Treatment of the KIKO mice with Pioglitazone significantly up-regulates SOD2 in cerebellum and spinal cord. Conclusions/Significance PGC-1α down-regulation is likely to contribute to the blunted antioxidant response observed in cells from FRDA patients. This response can be restored by AMPK and PPARγ agonists, suggesting a potential therapeutic approach for FRDA. PMID:20383327

  18. Dorsal Raphe Nucleus Down-Regulates Medial Prefrontal Cortex during Experience of Flow.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Martin; Keller, Johannes; Grön, Georg

    2016-01-01

    Previous neuroimaging studies have suggested that the experience of flow aligns with a relative increase in activation of the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN), and relative activation decreases of the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) and of the amygdala (AMY). In the present study, Dynamic Causal Modeling (DCM) was used to explore effective connectivity between those brain regions. To test our hypothesis that the DRN causally down-regulates activity of the MPFC and/or of the AMY, 23 healthy male students solved mental arithmetic tasks of varying difficulty during functional magnetic resonance imaging. A "flow" condition, with task demands automatically balanced with participants' skill level, was compared with conditions of "boredom" and "overload". DCM models were constructed modeling full reciprocal endogenous connections between the DRN, the MPFC, the AMY, and the calcarine. The calcarine was included to allow sensory input to enter the system. Experimental conditions were modeled as exerting modulatory effects on various possible connections between the DRN, the MPFC, and the AMY, but not on self-inhibitory connections, yielding a total of 64 alternative DCM models. Model space was partitioned into eight families based on commonalities in the arrangement of the modulatory effects. Random effects Bayesian Model Selection (BMS) was applied to identify a possible winning family (and model). Although BMS revealed a clear winning family, an outstanding winning model could not be identified. Therefore, Bayesian Model Averaging was performed over models within the winning family to obtain representative DCM parameters for subsequent analyses to test our hypothesis. In line with our expectations, Bayesian averaged parameters revealed stronger down-regulatory influence of the DRN on the MPFC when participants experienced flow relative to control conditions. In addition, these condition-dependent modulatory effects significantly predicted participants' experienced degree of

  19. Psoriasis in humans is associated with down-regulation of galectins in dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    de la Fuente, H; Perez-Gala, Silvia; Bonay, Pedro; Cruz-Adalia, Aranzazu; Cibrian, Danay; Sanchez-Cuellar, Silvia; Dauden, Esteban; Fresno, Manuel; García-Diez, Amaro; Sanchez-Madrid, Francisco

    2012-10-01

    We have investigated the expression and role of galectin-1 and other galectins in psoriasis and in the Th1/Th17 effector and dendritic cell responses associated with this chronic inflammatory skin condition. To determine differences between psoriasis patients and healthy donors, expression of galectins was analysed by RT-PCR in skin samples and on epidermal and peripheral blood dendritic cells by immunofluorescence and flow cytometry. In the skin of healthy donors, galectin-1, -3 and -9 were expressed in a high proportion of Langerhans cells. Also, galectins were differentially expressed in peripheral blood dendritic cell subsets; galectin-1 and galectin-9 were highly expressed in peripheral myeloid dendritic cells compared with plasmacytoid dendritic cells. We found that non-lesional as well as lesional skin samples from psoriasis patients had low levels of galectin-1 at the mRNA and protein levels, in parallel with low levels of IL-10 mRNA compared with skin from healthy patients. However, only lesional skin samples expressed high levels of Th1/Th17 cytokines. The analysis of galectin-1 expression showed that this protein was down-regulated in Langerhans cells and dermal dendritic cells as well as in peripheral blood CD11c(+) DCs from psoriasis patients. Expression of galectin-1 correlated with IL-17 and IL-10 expression and with the psoriasis area and index activity. Addition of galectin-1 to co-cultures of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells with autologous T lymphocytes from psoriasis patients attenuated the Th1 response. Conversely, blockade of galectin binding increased IFNγ production and inhibited IL-10 secretion in co-cultures of monocyte-derived dendritic cells with CD4(+) T cells. Our results suggest a model in which galectin-1 down-regulation contributes to the exacerbation of the Th1/Th17 effector response in psoriasis patients. Copyright © 2012 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Down-regulation of Fibulin-5 is associated with aortic dilation: role of inflammation and epigenetics.

    PubMed

    Orriols, Mar; Varona, Saray; Martí-Pàmies, Ingrid; Galán, María; Guadall, Anna; Escudero, José Román; Martín-Ventura, José Luis; Camacho, Mercedes; Vila, Luis; Martínez-González, José; Rodríguez, Cristina

    2016-06-01

    Destructive remodelling of extracellular matrix (ECM) and inflammation lead to dilation and ultimately abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Fibulin-5 (FBLN5) mediates cell-ECM interactions and elastic fibre assembly and is critical for ECM remodelling. We aimed to characterize FBLN5 regulation in human AAA and analyse the underlying mechanisms. FBLN5 expression was significantly decreased in human aneurysmatic aortas compared with healthy vessels. Local FBLN5 knockdown promoted aortic dilation and enhanced vascular expression of inflammatory markers in Ang II-infused C57BL/6J mice. Inflammatory stimuli down-regulated FBLN5 expression and transcriptional activity in human aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). Further, aortic FBLN5 expression was reduced in LPS-challenged mice. A SOX response element was critical for FBLN5 promoter activity. The SOX9 expression pattern in human AAA parallels that of FBLN5, and like FBLN5, it was reduced in TNFα-stimulated VSMC. Interestingly, SOX9 over-expression prevented the cytokine-mediated reduction of FBLN5 expression and transcription. The inhibition of Class I histone deacetylases (HDACs) by MS-275 or gene silencing attenuated the inflammation-mediated decrease of FBLN5 expression in VSMC and in the vascular wall. Consistently, HDAC inhibition counteracted the reduction of SOX9 expression induced by inflammatory stimuli and prevented the TNFα-mediated decrease in the binding of SOX9 to FBLN5 promoter normalizing FBLN5 expression. We evidence the deregulation of FBLN5 in human AAA and identify a SOX9/HDAC-dependent mechanism involved in the down-regulation of FBLN5 by inflammation. HDAC inhibitors or pharmacological approaches that aimed to preserve FBLN5 could be useful to prevent the disorganization of ECM induced by inflammation in AAA. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2016. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Hydrogen peroxide down-regulates inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor content through proteasome activation.

    PubMed

    Martín-Garrido, A; Boyano-Adánez, M C; Alique, M; Calleros, L; Serrano, I; Griera, M; Rodríguez-Puyol, D; Griendling, K K; Rodríguez-Puyol, M

    2009-11-15

    Hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) is implicated in the regulation of signaling pathways leading to changes in vascular smooth muscle function. Contractile effects produced by H(2)O(2) are due to the phosphorylation of myosin light chain kinase triggered by increases in intracellular calcium (Ca(2+)) from intracellular stores or influx of extracellular Ca(2+). One mechanism for mobilizing such stores involves the phosphoinositide pathway. Inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP(3)) mobilizes intracellular Ca(2+) by binding to a family of receptors (IP(3)Rs) on the endoplasmic-sarcoplasmic reticulum that act as ligand-gated Ca(2+) channels. IP(3)Rs can be rapidly ubiquitinated and degraded by the proteasome, causing a decrease in cellular IP(3)R content. In this study we show that IP(3)R(1) and IP(3)R(3) are down-regulated when vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) are stimulated by H(2)O(2), through an increase in proteasome activity. Moreover, we demonstrate that the decrease in IP(3)R by H(2)O(2) is accompanied by a reduction in calcium efflux induced by IP(3) in VSMC. Also, we observed that angiotensin II (ANGII) induces a decrease in IP(3)R by activation of NADPH oxidase and that preincubation with H(2)O(2) decreases ANGII-mediated calcium efflux and planar cell surface area in VSMC. The decreased IP(3) receptor content observed in cells was also found in aortic rings, which exhibited a decreased ANGII-dependent contraction after treatment with H(2)O(2). Altogether, these results suggest that H(2)O(2) mediates IP(3)R down-regulation via proteasome activity.

  2. Simvastatin induces NFκB/p65 down-regulation and JNK1/c-Jun/ATF-2 activation, leading to matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) but not MMP-2 down-regulation in human leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying-Jung; Chang, Long-Sen

    2014-12-15

    The aim of the present study was to explore the signaling pathways associated with the effect of simvastatin on matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2)/MMP-9 expression in human leukemia K562 cells. In sharp contrast to its insignificant effect on MMP-2, simvastatin down-regulated MMP-9 protein expression and mRNA levels in K562 cells. Simvastatin-induced Pin1 down-regulation evoked NFκB/p65 degradation. Meanwhile, simvastatin induced JNK-mediated c-Jun and ATF-2 activation. Over-expression of Pin1 suppressed simvastatin-induced MMP-9 down-regulation. Treatment with SP600125 (a JNK inhibitor) or knock-down of JNK1 reduced MMP-2 expression in simvastatin-treated cells. Simvastatin enhanced the binding of c-Jun/ATF-2 with the MMP-2 promoter. Down-regulation of c-Jun or ATF-2 by siRNA revealed that c-Jun/ATF-2 activation was crucial for MMP-2 expression. Suppression of p65 activation or knock-down of Pin1 by shRNA reduced MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression in K562 cells. Over-expression of constitutively active JNK1 rescued MMP-2 expression in Pin1 shRNA-transfected cells. Simvastatin treatment also suppressed MMP-9 but not MMP-2 expression in human leukemia U937 and KU812 cells. Taken together, our data indicate that simvastatin-induced p65 instability leads to MMP-9 down-regulation in leukemia cells, while simvastatin-induced JNK1/c-Jun/ATF-2 activation maintains the MMP-2 expression underlying p65 down-regulation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Dystroglycan down-regulation links EGF receptor signaling and anterior–posterior polarity formation in the Drosophila oocyte

    PubMed Central

    Poulton, John S.; Deng, Wu-Min

    2006-01-01

    Anterior–posterior axis formation in the Drosophila oocyte requires activation of the EGF receptor (EGFR) pathway in the posterior follicle cells (PFC), where it also redirects them from the default anterior to the posterior cell fate. The relationship between EGFR activity in the PFC and oocyte polarity is unclear, because no EGFR-induced changes in the PFC have been observed that subsequently affect oocyte polarity. Here, we show that an extracellular matrix receptor, Dystroglycan, is down-regulated in the PFC by EGFR signaling, and this down-regulation is necessary for proper localization of posterior polarity determinants in the oocyte. Failure to down-regulate Dystroglycan disrupts apicobasal polarity in the PFC, which includes mislocalization of the extracellular matrix component Laminin. Our data indicate that Dystroglycan links EGFR-induced repression of the anterior follicle cell fate and anterior–posterior polarity formation in the oocyte. PMID:16908845

  4. miR-191 regulates mouse erythroblast enucleation by down-regulating Riok3 and Mxi1.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lingbo; Flygare, Johan; Wong, Piu; Lim, Bing; Lodish, Harvey F

    2011-01-15

    Using RNA-seq technology, we found that the majority of microRNAs (miRNAs) present in CFU-E erythroid progenitors are down-regulated during terminal erythroid differentiation. Of the developmentally down-regulated miRNAs, ectopic overexpression of miR-191 blocks erythroid enucleation but has minor effects on proliferation and differentiation. We identified two erythroid-enriched and developmentally up-regulated genes, Riok3 and Mxi1, as direct targets of miR-191. Knockdown of either Riok3 or Mxi1 blocks enucleation, and either physiological overexpression of miR-191 or knockdown of Riok3 or Mxi1 blocks chromatin condensation. Thus, down-regulation of miR-191 is essential for erythroid chromatin condensation and enucleation by allowing up-regulation of Riok3 and Mxi1.

  5. Labor inhibits placental mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 signaling.

    PubMed

    Lager, S; Aye, I L M H; Gaccioli, F; Ramirez, V I; Jansson, T; Powell, T L

    2014-12-01

    Labor induces a myriad of changes in placental gene expression. These changes may represent a physiological adaptation inhibiting placental cellular processes associated with a high demand for oxygen and energy (e.g., protein synthesis and active transport) thereby promoting oxygen and glucose transfer to the fetus. We hypothesized that mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling, a positive regulator of trophoblast protein synthesis and amino acid transport, is inhibited by labor. Placental tissue was collected from healthy, term pregnancies (n = 15 no-labor; n = 12 labor). Activation of Caspase-1, IRS1/Akt, STAT, mTOR, and inflammatory signaling pathways was determined by Western blot. NFĸB p65 and PPARγ DNA binding activity was measured in isolated nuclei. Labor increased Caspase-1 activation and mTOR complex 2 signaling, as measured by phosphorylation of Akt (S473). However, mTORC1 signaling was inhibited in response to labor as evidenced by decreased phosphorylation of mTOR (S2448) and 4EBP1 (T37/46 and T70). Labor also decreased NFĸB and PPARγ DNA binding activity, while having no effect on IRS1 or STAT signaling pathway. Several placental signaling pathways are affected by labor, which has implications for experimental design in studies of placental signaling. Inhibition of placental mTORC1 signaling in response to labor may serve to down-regulate protein synthesis and amino acid transport, processes that account for a large share of placental oxygen and glucose consumption. We speculate that this response preserves glucose and oxygen for transfer to the fetus during the stressful events of labor. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Labor Inhibits Placental Mechanistic Target of Rapamycin Complex 1 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    LAGER, Susanne; AYE, Irving L.M.H.; GACCIOLI, Francesca; RAMIREZ, Vanessa I.; JANSSON, Thomas; POWELL, Theresa L.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Labor induces a myriad of changes in placental gene expression. These changes may represent a physiological adaptation inhibiting placental cellular processes associated with a high demand for oxygen and energy (e.g., protein synthesis and active transport) thereby promoting oxygen and glucose transfer to the fetus. We hypothesized that mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling, a positive regulator of trophoblast protein synthesis and amino acid transport, is inhibited by labor. Methods Placental tissue was collected from healthy, term pregnancies (n=15 no-labor; n=12 labor). Activation of Caspase-1, IRS1/Akt, STAT, mTOR, and inflammatory signaling pathways was determined by Western blot. NFκB p65 and PPARγ DNA binding activity was measured in isolated nuclei. Results Labor increased Caspase-1 activation and mTOR complex 2 signaling, as measured by phosphorylation of Akt (S473). However, mTORC1 signaling was inhibited in response to labor as evidenced by decreased phosphorylation of mTOR (S2448) and 4EBP1 (T37/46 and T70). Labor also decreased NFκB and PPARγ DNA binding activity, while having no effect on IRS1 or STAT signaling pathway. Discussion and conclusion Several placental signaling pathways are affected by labor, which has implications for experimental design in studies of placental signaling. Inhibition of placental mTORC1 signaling in response to labor may serve to down-regulate protein synthesis and amino acid transport, processes that account for a large share of placental oxygen and glucose consumption. We speculate that this response preserves glucose and oxygen for transfer to the fetus during the stressful events of labor. PMID:25454472

  7. Protein Kinase C-{delta} mediates down-regulation of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K protein: involvement in apoptosis induction

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Feng-Hou; Wu, Ying-Li; Zhao, Meng; Chen, Guo-Qiang

    2009-11-15

    We reported previously that NSC606985, a camptothecin analogue, induces apoptosis of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells through proteolytic activation of protein kinase C delta ({Delta}PKC-{delta}). By subcellular proteome analysis, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) was identified as being significantly down-regulated in NSC606985-treated leukemic NB4 cells. HnRNP K, a docking protein for DNA, RNA, and transcriptional or translational molecules, is implicated in a host of processes involving the regulation of gene expression. However, the molecular mechanisms of hnRNP K reduction and its roles during apoptosis are still not understood. In the present study, we found that, following the appearance of the {Delta}PKC-{delta}, hnRNP K protein was significantly down-regulated in NSC606985, doxorubicin, arsenic trioxide and ultraviolet-induced apoptosis. We further provided evidence that {Delta}PKC-{delta} mediated the down-regulation of hnRNP K protein during apoptosis: PKC-{delta} inhibitor could rescue the reduction of hnRNP K; hnRNP K failed to be decreased in PKC-{delta}-deficient apoptotic KG1a cells; conditional induction of {Delta}PKC-{delta} in U937T cells directly down-regulated hnRNP K protein. Moreover, the proteasome inhibitor also inhibited the down-regulation of hnRNP K protein by apoptosis inducer and the conditional expression of {Delta}PKC-{delta}. More intriguingly, the suppression of hnRNP K with siRNA transfection significantly induced apoptosis. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration that proteolytically activated PKC-{delta} down-regulates hnRNP K protein in a proteasome-dependent manner, which plays an important role in apoptosis induction.

  8. Down-regulation of gibberellic acid in poplar has negligible effects on host-plant suitability and insect pest response

    SciTech Connect

    Buhl, Christine; Strauss, Steven H.; Lindroth, Richard L.

    2015-01-06

    Abstract Endogenous levels and signaling of gibberellin plant hormones such as gibberellic acid (GA) have been genetically down-regulated to create semi-dwarf varieties of poplar. The potential benefits of semi-dwarf stature include reduced risk of wind damage, improved stress tolerance, and improved wood quality. Despite these benefits, modification of growth traits may have consequences for non-target traits that confer defense against insect herbivores. According to the growth-differentiation balance hypothesis, reductions in growth may shift allocation of carbon from growth to chemical resistance traits, thereby altering plant defense. To date, host-plant suitability and pest response have not been comprehensively evaluated in GA down-regulated plants. We quantified chemical resistance and nitrogen (an index of protein) in GA down-regulated and wild-type poplar (Populus alba × P. tremula) genotypes. We also evaluated performance of both generalist (Lymantria dispar) and specialist (Chrysomela scripta) insect pests reared on these genotypes. Our evaluation of resistance traits in four GA down-regulated genotypes revealed increased phenolic glycosides in one modified genotype and reduced lignin in two modified genotypes relative to the non-transgenic wild type. Nitrogen levels did not vary significantly among the experimental genotypes. Generalists reared on the four GA down-regulated genotypes exhibited reduced performance on only one modified genotype relative to the wild type. Specialists, however, performed similarly across all genotypes. Results from this study indicate that although some non-target traits varied among GA down-regulated genotypes, the differences in poplar pest susceptibility were modest and highly genotype-specific.

  9. Down-regulation of gibberellic acid in poplar has negligible effects on host-plant suitability and insect pest response

    DOE PAGES

    Buhl, Christine; Strauss, Steven H.; Lindroth, Richard L.

    2015-01-06

    Abstract Endogenous levels and signaling of gibberellin plant hormones such as gibberellic acid (GA) have been genetically down-regulated to create semi-dwarf varieties of poplar. The potential benefits of semi-dwarf stature include reduced risk of wind damage, improved stress tolerance, and improved wood quality. Despite these benefits, modification of growth traits may have consequences for non-target traits that confer defense against insect herbivores. According to the growth-differentiation balance hypothesis, reductions in growth may shift allocation of carbon from growth to chemical resistance traits, thereby altering plant defense. To date, host-plant suitability and pest response have not been comprehensively evaluated in GAmore » down-regulated plants. We quantified chemical resistance and nitrogen (an index of protein) in GA down-regulated and wild-type poplar (Populus alba × P. tremula) genotypes. We also evaluated performance of both generalist (Lymantria dispar) and specialist (Chrysomela scripta) insect pests reared on these genotypes. Our evaluation of resistance traits in four GA down-regulated genotypes revealed increased phenolic glycosides in one modified genotype and reduced lignin in two modified genotypes relative to the non-transgenic wild type. Nitrogen levels did not vary significantly among the experimental genotypes. Generalists reared on the four GA down-regulated genotypes exhibited reduced performance on only one modified genotype relative to the wild type. Specialists, however, performed similarly across all genotypes. Results from this study indicate that although some non-target traits varied among GA down-regulated genotypes, the differences in poplar pest susceptibility were modest and highly genotype-specific.« less

  10. CDK Inhibitors Roscovitine and CR8 Trigger Mcl-1 Down-Regulation and Apoptotic Cell Death in Neuroblastoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Bettayeb, Karima; Baunbæk, Dianne; Delehouze, Claire; Loaëc, Nadège; Hole, Alison J; Baumli, Sonja; Endicott, Jane A; Douc-Rasy, Setha; Bénard, Jean; Oumata, Nassima; Galons, Hervé; Meijer, Laurent

    2010-04-01

    Neuroblastoma (NB), the most frequent extracranial solid tumor of children accounting for nearly 15% of all childhood cancer mortality, displays overexpression of antiapoptotic Bcl-2 and Mcl-1 in aggressive forms of the disease. The clinical phase 2 drug roscovitine (CYC202, seliciclib), a relatively selective inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs), and CR8, a recently developed and more potent analog, induce concentration-dependent apoptotic cell death of NB cells (average IC(50) values: 24.2 µM and 0.4 µM for roscovitine and CR8, respectively). Both roscovitine and CR8 trigger rapid down-regulation of the short-lived survival factor Mcl-1 in the 9 investigated human NB cell lines. This effect was further analyzed in the human SH-SY5Y NB cell line. Down-regulation of Mcl-1 appears to depend on inhibition of CDKs rather than on interaction of roscovitine and CR8 with their secondary targets. CR8 is an adenosine triphosphate-competitive inhibitor of CDK9, and the structure of a CDK9/cyclin T/CR8 complex is described. Mcl-1 down-regulation occurs both at the mRNA and protein levels. This effect can be accounted for by a reduction in Mcl-1 protein synthesis, under stable Mcl-1 degradation conditions. Mcl-1 down-regulation is accompanied by a transient increase in free Noxa, a proapoptotic factor. Mcl-1 down-regulation occurs independently of the presence or up-regulation of p53 and of the MYCN status. Taken together, these results suggest that the clinical drug roscovitine and its novel analog CR8 induce apoptotic tumor cell death by down-regulating Mcl-1, a key survival factor expressed in all NB cell lines. CDK inhibition may thus constitute a new approach to treat refractory high-risk NB.

  11. Diabetic HDL Is Dysfunctional in Stimulating Endothelial Cell Migration and Proliferation Due to Down Regulation of SR-BI Expression

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Bing; Ma, Yijing; Ren, Hui; He, Yubin; Wang, Yongyu; Lv, Xiaofeng; Liu, Donghui; Ji, Liang; Yu, Baoqi; Wang, Yuhui; Chen, Y. Eugene; Pennathur, Subramaniam; Smith, Jonathan D.; Liu, George; Zheng, Lemin

    2012-01-01

    Background Diabetic HDL had diminished capacity to stimulate endothelial cell (EC) proliferation, migration, and adhesion to extracellular matrix. The mechanism of such dysfunction is poorly understood and we therefore sought to determine the mechanistic features of diabetic HDL dysfunction. Methodology/Principal Findings We found that the dysfunction of diabetic HDL on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) was associated with the down regulation of the HDL receptor protein, SR-BI. Akt-phosphorylation in HUVECs was induced in a biphasic manner by normal HDL. While diabetic HDL induced Akt phosphorylation normally after 20 minutes, the phosphorylation observed 24 hours after diabetic HDL treatment was reduced. To determine the role of SR-BI down regulation on diminished EC responses of diabetic HDL, Mouse aortic endothelial cells (MAECs) were isolated from wild type and SR-BI (−/−) mice, and treated with normal and diabetic HDL. The proliferative and migratory effects of normal HDL on wild type MAECs were greatly diminished in SR-BI (−/−) cells. In contrast, response to diabetic HDL was impaired in both types suggesting diminished effectiveness of diabetic HDL on EC proliferation and migration might be due to the down regulation of SR-BI. Additionally, SR-BI down regulation diminishes diabetic HDL’s capacity to activate Akt chronically. Conclusions/Significance Diabetic HDL was dysfunctional in promoting EC proliferation, migration, and adhesion to matrix which was associated with the down-regulation of SR-BI. Additionally, SR-BI down regulation diminishes diabetic HDL’s capacity to activate Akt chronically. PMID:23133640

  12. RNAi mediated down regulation of myo-inositol-3-phosphate synthase to generate low phytate rice.

    PubMed

    Ali, Nusrat; Paul, Soumitra; Gayen, Dipak; Sarkar, Sailendra Nath; Datta, Swapan K; Datta, Karabi

    2013-05-15

    Phytic acid (InsP6) is considered as the major source of phosphorus and inositol phosphates in cereal grains. Reduction of phytic acid level in cereal grains is desirable in view of its antinutrient properties to maximize mineral bioavailability and minimize the load of phosphorus waste management. We report here RNAi mediated seed-specific silencing of myo-inositol-3-phosphate synthase (MIPS) gene catalyzing the first step of phytic acid biosynthesis in rice. Moreover, we also studied the possible implications of MIPS silencing on myo-inositol and related metabolism, since, first step of phytic acid biosynthesis is also the rate limiting step of myo-inositol synthesis, catalyzed by MIPS. The resulting transgenic rice plants (T3) showed a 4.59 fold down regulation in MIPS gene expression, which corresponds to a significant decrease in phytate levels and a simultaneous increment in the amount of inorganic phosphate in the seeds. A diminution in the myo-inositol content of transgenic plants was also observed due to disruption of the first step of phytic acid biosynthetic pathway, which further reduced the level of ascorbate and altered abscisic acid (ABA) sensitivity of the transgenic plants. In addition, our results shows that in the transgenic plants, the lower phytate levels has led to an increment of divalent cations, of which a 1.6 fold increase in the iron concentration in milled rice seeds was noteworthy. This increase could be attributed to reduced chelation of divalent metal (iron) cations, which may correlate to higher iron bioavailability in the endosperm of rice grains. The present study evidently suggests that seed-specific silencing of MIPS in transgenic rice plants can yield substantial reduction in levels of phytic acid along with an increase in inorganic phosphate content. However, it was also demonstrated that the low phytate seeds had an undesirable diminution in levels of myo-inositol and ascorbate, which probably led to sensitiveness of seeds to

  13. Cholecystokinin down-regulation by RNA interference impairs Ewing tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Carrillo, Jaime; García-Aragoncillo, Eva; Azorín, Daniel; Agra, Noelia; Sastre, Ana; González-Mediero, Imelda; García-Miguel, Purificación; Pestaña, Angel; Gallego, Soledad; Segura, Dolores; Alonso, Javier

    2007-04-15

    Tumors of the Ewing family are characterized by chromosomal translocations that yield chimeric transcription factors, such as EWS/FLI1, which regulate the expression of specific genes that contribute to the malignant phenotype. In the present study, we show that cholecystokinin (CCK) is a new target of the EWS/FLI1 oncoprotein and assess its functional role in Ewing tumor pathogenesis. Relevant EWS/FLI1 targets were identified using a combination of cell systems with inducible EWS/FLI1 expression, Ewing tumors and cell lines, microarrays, and RNA interference with doxycycline-inducible small hairpin RNA (shRNA) vectors. A doxycycline-inducible CCK-shRNA vector was stably transfected in A673 and SK-PN-DW Ewing cell lines to assess the role of CCK in cell proliferation and tumor growth. Microarray analysis revealed that CCK was up-regulated by EWS/FLI1 in HeLa cells. CCK was overexpressed in Ewing tumors as compared with other pediatric malignancies such as rhabdomyosarcoma and neuroblastoma, with levels close to those detected in normal tissues expressing the highest levels of CCK. Furthermore, EWS/FLI1 knockdown in A673 and SK-PN-DW Ewing cells using two different doxycycline-inducible EWS/FLI1-specific shRNA vectors down-regulated CCK mRNA expression and diminished the levels of secreted CCK, showing that CCK is a EWS/FLI1 specific target gene in Ewing cells. A doxycycline-inducible CCK-specific shRNA vector successfully down-regulated CCK expression, reduced the levels of secreted CCK in Ewing cell lines, and inhibited cell growth and proliferation in vitro and in vivo. Finally, we show that Ewing cell lines and tumors express CCK receptors and that the growth inhibition produced by CCK silencing can be rescued by culturing the cells with medium containing CCK. Our data support the hypothesis that CCK acts as an autocrine growth factor stimulating the proliferation of Ewing cells and suggest that therapies targeting CCK could be promising in the treatment of

  14. Rapamycin and Glucose-Target of Rapamycin (TOR) Protein Signaling in Plants*

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Yan; Sheen, Jen

    2012-01-01

    Target of rapamycin (TOR) kinase is an evolutionarily conserved master regulator that integrates energy, nutrients, growth factors, and stress signals to promote survival and growth in all eukaryotes. The reported land plant resistance to rapamycin and the embryo lethality of the Arabidopsis tor mutants have hindered functional dissection of TOR signaling in plants. We developed sensitive cellular and seedling assays to monitor endogenous Arabidopsis TOR activity based on its conserved S6 kinase (S6K) phosphorylation. Surprisingly, rapamycin effectively inhibits Arabidopsis TOR-S6K1 signaling and retards glucose-mediated root and leaf growth, mimicking estradiol-inducible tor mutants. Rapamycin inhibition is relieved in transgenic plants deficient in Arabidopsis FK506-binding protein 12 (FKP12), whereas FKP12 overexpression dramatically enhances rapamycin sensitivity. The role of Arabidopsis FKP12 is highly specific as overexpression of seven closely related FKP proteins fails to increase rapamycin sensitivity. Rapamycin exerts TOR inhibition by inducing direct interaction between the TOR-FRB (FKP-rapamycin binding) domain and FKP12 in plant cells. We suggest that variable endogenous FKP12 protein levels may underlie the molecular explanation for longstanding enigmatic observations on inconsistent rapamycin resistance in plants and in various mammalian cell lines or diverse animal cell types. Integrative analyses with rapamycin and conditional tor and fkp12 mutants also reveal a central role of glucose-TOR signaling in root hair formation. Our studies demonstrate the power of chemical genetic approaches in the discovery of previously unknown and pivotal functions of glucose-TOR signaling in governing the growth of cotyledons, true leaves, petioles, and primary and secondary roots and root hairs. PMID:22134914

  15. Rapamycin and glucose-target of rapamycin (TOR) protein signaling in plants.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Yan; Sheen, Jen

    2012-01-20

    Target of rapamycin (TOR) kinase is an evolutionarily conserved master regulator that integrates energy, nutrients, growth factors, and stress signals to promote survival and growth in all eukaryotes. The reported land plant resistance to rapamycin and the embryo lethality of the Arabidopsis tor mutants have hindered functional dissection of TOR signaling in plants. We developed sensitive cellular and seedling assays to monitor endogenous Arabidopsis TOR activity based on its conserved S6 kinase (S6K) phosphorylation. Surprisingly, rapamycin effectively inhibits Arabidopsis TOR-S6K1 signaling and retards glucose-mediated root and leaf growth, mimicking estradiol-inducible tor mutants. Rapamycin inhibition is relieved in transgenic plants deficient in Arabidopsis FK506-binding protein 12 (FKP12), whereas FKP12 overexpression dramatically enhances rapamycin sensitivity. The role of Arabidopsis FKP12 is highly specific as overexpression of seven closely related FKP proteins fails to increase rapamycin sensitivity. Rapamycin exerts TOR inhibition by inducing direct interaction between the TOR-FRB (FKP-rapamycin binding) domain and FKP12 in plant cells. We suggest that variable endogenous FKP12 protein levels may underlie the molecular explanation for longstanding enigmatic observations on inconsistent rapamycin resistance in plants and in various mammalian cell lines or diverse animal cell types. Integrative analyses with rapamycin and conditional tor and fkp12 mutants also reveal a central role of glucose-TOR signaling in root hair formation. Our studies demonstrate the power of chemical genetic approaches in the discovery of previously unknown and pivotal functions of glucose-TOR signaling in governing the growth of cotyledons, true leaves, petioles, and primary and secondary roots and root hairs.

  16. Down-regulation of osteoprotegerin expression as a novel biomarker for colorectal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun-Soo; Yoon, Gun; Do, Sung-Im; Kim, Sung-Joo; Kim, Youn-Wha

    2016-01-01

    A better understanding of tumor biology is important in the identification of molecules that are down-regulated in malignancy and in determining their role in tumor suppression. The aim of this study was to analyze osteoprotegerin (OPG) expression in colorectal carcinoma (CRC) and to investigate the underlying mechanism for changes in the expression of OPG. OPG expression was assessed in CRC tissue samples and cell lines. The methylation status of the OPG promoter region was determined, and the effects of demethylation on OPG expression were analyzed. The effects of recombinant OPG (rOPG) administration on cellular functions were also investigated. Clinical and prognostic implications of OPG protein expression in CRC patients were analyzed. The CRC tissues and cells showed significantly lower OPG expression. Pyrosequencing of OPG-silenced CRC cells revealed that the OPG gene promoter was highly methylated. Treatment with demethylating agent significantly elevated OPG mRNA and protein expression. rOPG significantly decreased cell viability and MMP-2 and VEGF-A production in CRC cells. Reduced OPG immunoreactivity was associated with aggressive oncogenic behavior in CRC. Also, OPG expression was found to be an independent predictor of recurrent hepatic metastasis and independent prognostic factor for worse survival rates. We demonstrated that OPG silencing in CRC occurs through epigenetic repression, and is involved in the development and progression of CRC. Our data suggest that OPG is a novel prognostic biomarker and a new therapeutic target for the treatment of patients with CRC. PMID:26942563

  17. Amitriptyline down-regulates coenzyme Q10 biosynthesis in lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Tamara; Villanueva-Paz, Marina; Díaz-Parrado, Eduardo; Illanes, Matilde; Fernández-Rodríguez, Ana; Sánchez-Alcázar, José A; de Miguel, Manuel

    2017-02-15

    Amitriptyline, a tricyclic antidepressant, has been proposed as an antitumoral drug in oxidative therapy. Its pro-apoptotic effects, mediated by high reactive oxygen species generation, have been already described. In this study we analysed the effect of amitriptyline on the biosynthesis of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ), an essential component for electron transport and a potent membrane antioxidant involved in redox signaling. We treated H460 cells, a non-small-cell lung cancer cell line, with amitriptyline and we analysed CoQ levels by HPLC and CoQ biosynthesis rate, as well as the enzymes involved in CoQ biosynthesis by real-time PCR and Western blot. Amitriptyline treatment induced a dose-dependent decrease in CoQ levels in tumor cells. CoQ decreased levels were associated with down-regulation of the expression of COQ4 gene, as well as decreased Coq4 and Coq6 protein levels. Our findings suggest that the effect of amitriptyline on CoQ biosynthesis highlights the potential of this drug for antitumoral oxidative therapy.

  18. Urocortin and Adrenomedullin Prevent Lethal Endotoxemia by Down-Regulating the Inflammatory Response

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Rey, Elena; Chorny, Alejo; Varela, Nieves; Robledo, Gema; Delgado, Mario

    2006-01-01

    Urocortin 1 (UCN) and adrenomedullin (AM) are two neuropeptides that have emerged as potential endogenous anti-inflammatory factors based on their production by and binding to immune cells. Because human septic shock involves excessive inflammatory cytokine production, we investigated the effect of UCN and AM in the production of inflammatory mediators and their therapeutic actions in two models of septic shock. Both peptides down-regulated the production of inflammatory mediators by endotoxin-activated macrophages. The administration of UCN or AM protected against lethality after cecal ligation and puncture or after injection of bacterial endotoxin and prevented septic shock-associated histopathology, such as infiltration of inflammatory cells and intravascularly disseminated coagulation in various target organs. The therapeutic effect of UCN and AM was mediated by decreasing the local and systemic levels of a wide spectrum of inflammatory mediators, including cytokines, chemokines, and the acute phase protein serum amyloid A. Importantly, UCN or AM treatment was therapeutically effective in established endotoxemia. In conclusion, UCN and AM could represent two multistep therapeutic agents for human septic shock to be used in combination with other immunomodulatory agents or complementary as anti-inflammatory factors to other therapies. PMID:16723707

  19. Down regulation of macrophage IFNGR1 exacerbates systemic L. monocytogenes infection

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Rachel S.

    2017-01-01

    Interferons (IFNs) target macrophages to regulate inflammation and resistance to microbial infections. The type II IFN (IFNγ) acts on a cell surface receptor (IFNGR) to promote gene expression that enhance macrophage inflammatory and anti-microbial activity. Type I IFNs can dampen macrophage responsiveness to IFNγ and are associated with increased susceptibility to numerous bacterial infections. The precise mechanisms responsible for these effects remain unclear. Type I IFNs silence macrophage ifngr1 transcription and thus reduce cell surface expression of IFNGR1. To test how these events might impact macrophage activation and host resistance during bacterial infection, we developed transgenic mice that express a functional FLAG-tagged IFNGR1 (fGR1) driven by a macrophage-specific promoter. Macrophages from fGR1 mice expressed physiologic levels of cell surface IFNGR1 at steady state and responded equivalently to WT C57Bl/6 macrophages when treated with IFNγ alone. However, fGR1 macrophages retained cell surface IFNGR1 and showed enhanced responsiveness to IFNγ in the presence of type I IFNs. When fGR1 mice were infected with the bacterium Listeria monocytogenes their resistance was significantly increased, despite normal type I and II IFN production. Enhanced resistance was dependent on IFNγ and associated with increased macrophage activation and antimicrobial function. These results argue that down regulation of myeloid cell IFNGR1 is an important mechanism by which type I IFNs suppress inflammatory and anti-bacterial functions of macrophages. PMID:28542482

  20. Down-regulation of a calmodulin-related gene during transformation of human mammary epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yaswen, P.; Smoll, A.; Stampfer, M.R. ); Peehl, D.M. ); Trask, D.K.; Sager, R. )

    1990-10-01

    A human cDNA library obtained from cultured normal mammary epithelial cells (HMECs) was searched by subtractive hybridization for genes whose decrease in expression might be relevant to epithelial transformation. One clone identified by this procedure corresponded to a 1.4 kilobase mRNA, designated NB-1, whose expression was decreased >50-fold in HMECs tumorigenically transformed in vitro after exposure to benzo({alpha})pyrene and Kirsten sarcoma virus. Sequence analysis of NB-1 cDNA revealed an open reading frame with a high degree of homology to calmodulin. NB-1 expression could be demonstrated by polymerase chain reaction amplification in normal breast, prostate, cervix, and epidermal tissues. The presence of NB-1 transcripts was variable in primary breast carcinoma tissues and undetectable in tumor-derived cell lines of breast, prostate, or other origins. NB-1 mRNA expression could be down-regulated in cultured HMECs by exposure to reconstituted extracellular matrix material, while exposure to transforming growth factor type {beta} increased its relative abundance. The protein encoded by NB-1 may have Ca{sup 2{sup plus}} binding properties and perform functions similar to those of authentic calmodulin. Its possible roles in differentiation and/or suppression of tumorigenicity in epithelial tissues remain to be examined.

  1. Down-regulation of negative emotional processing by transcranial direct current stimulation: effects of personality characteristics.

    PubMed

    Peña-Gómez, Cleofé; Vidal-Piñeiro, Dídac; Clemente, Immaculada C; Pascual-Leone, Álvaro; Bartrés-Faz, David

    2011-01-01

    Evidence from neuroimaging and electrophysiological studies indicates that the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) is a core region in emotional processing, particularly during down-regulation of negative emotional conditions. However, emotional regulation is a process subject to major inter-individual differences, some of which may be explained by personality traits. In the present study we used transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) over the left DLPFC to investigate whether transiently increasing the activity of this region resulted in changes in the ratings of positive, neutral and negative emotional pictures. Results revealed that anodal, but not cathodal, tDCS reduced the perceived degree of emotional valence for negative stimuli, possibly due to an enhancement of cognitive control of emotional expression. We also aimed to determine whether personality traits (extraversion and neuroticism) might condition the impact of tDCS. We found that individuals with higher scores on the introversion personality dimension were more permeable than extraverts to the modulatory effects of the stimulation. The present study underlines the role of the left DLPFC in emotional regulation, and stresses the importance of considering individual personality characteristics as a relevant variable, although replication is needed given the limited sample size of our study.

  2. A Human Bone Morphogenetic Protein Antagonist Is Down-Regulated in Renal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Blish, Kimberly Rose; Wang, Wei; Willingham, Mark C.; Du, Wei; Birse, Charles E.; Krishnan, Surekha R.; Brown, Julie C.; Hawkins, Gregory A.; Garvin, A. Julian; D'Agostino, Ralph B.; Torti, Frank M.

    2008-01-01

    We analyzed expression of candidate genes encoding cell surface or secreted proteins in normal kidney and kidney cancer. This screen identified a bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) antagonist, SOSTDC1 (sclerostin domain–containing-1) as down-regulated in kidney tumors. To confirm screening results, we probed cDNA dot blots with SOSTDC1. The SOSTDC1 message was decreased in 20/20 kidney tumors compared with normal kidney tissue. Immunohistochemistry confirmed significant decrease of SOSTDC1 protein in clear cell renal carcinomas relative to normal proximal renal tubule cells (p < 0.001). Expression of SOSTDC1 was not decreased in papillary and chromophobe kidney tumors. SOSTDC1 was abundantly expressed in podocytes, distal tubules, and transitional epithelia of the normal kidney. Transfection experiments demonstrated that SOSTDC1 is secreted and binds to neighboring cells and/or the extracellular matrix. SOSTDC1 suppresses both BMP-7–induced phosphorylation of R-Smads-1, -5, and -8 and Wnt-3a signaling. Restoration of SOSTDC1 in renal clear carcinoma cells profoundly suppresses proliferation. Collectively, these results demonstrate that SOSTDC1 is expressed in the human kidney and decreased in renal clear cell carcinoma. Because SOSTDC1 suppresses proliferation of renal carcinoma cells, restoration of SOSTDC1 signaling may represent a novel target in treatment of renal clear cell carcinoma. PMID:18032587

  3. Down-regulation of a manganese transporter in the face of metal toxicity.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Laran T; Carroll, Mark C; Hall, Matthew D; Harvey, Christopher J; Beese, Sara E; Culotta, Valeria C

    2009-06-01

    The yeast Smf1p Nramp manganese transporter is posttranslationally regulated by environmental manganese. Smf1p is stabilized at the cell surface with manganese starvation, but is largely degraded in the vacuole with physiological manganese through a mechanism involving the Rsp5p adaptor complex Bsd2p/Tre1p/Tre2p. We now describe an additional level of Smf1p regulation that occurs with toxicity from manganese, but not other essential metals. This regulation is largely Smf1p-specific. As with physiological manganese, toxic manganese triggers vacuolar degradation of Smf1p by trafficking through the multivesicular body. However, regulation by toxic manganese does not involve Bsd2p/Tre1p/Tre2p. Toxic manganese triggers both endocytosis of cell surface Smf1p and vacuolar targeting of intracellular Smf1p through the exocytic pathway. Notably, the kinetics of vacuolar targeting for Smf1p are relatively slow with toxic manganese and require prolonged exposures to the metal. Down-regulation of Smf1p by toxic manganese does not require transport activity of Smf1p, whereas such transport activity is needed for Smf1p regulation by manganese starvation. Furthermore, the responses to manganese starvation and manganese toxicity involve separate cellular compartments. We provide evidence that manganese starvation is sensed within the lumen of the secretory pathway, whereas manganese toxicity is sensed within an extra-Golgi/cytosolic compartment of the cell.

  4. Dioscin enhances methotrexate absorption by down-regulating MDR1 in vitro and in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lijuan; Wang, Changyuan; Peng, Jinyong; Liu, Qi; Meng, Qiang; Sun, Huijun; Huo, Xiaokui; and others

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the enhancing effect of dioscin on the absorption of methotrexate (MTX) and clarify the molecular mechanism involved in vivo and in vitro. Dioscin increased MTX chemosensitivity and transepithelial flux in the absorptive direction, significantly inhibiting multidrug resistance 1 (MDR1) mRNA and protein expression and MDR1 promoter and nuclear factor κ-B (NF-κB) activities in Caco-2 cells. Moreover, inhibitor κB-α (IκB-α) degradation was inhibited by dioscin. Dioscin enhanced the intracellular concentration of MTX by down-regulating MDR1 expression through a mechanism that involves NF-κB signaling pathway inhibition in Caco-2 cells. Dioscin strengthened MTX absorption by inhibiting MDR1 expression in rat intestine. In addition, even though MTX is absorbed into the enterocytes, there was no increase in toxicity observed, and that, in fact, decreased toxicity was seen. - Highlights: • Dioscin raised MTX concentration by inhibiting MDR1 in Caco-2 cells. • Dioscin suppresses MDR1 by inhibiting NF-κB signaling pathway in Caco-2 cells. • Dioscin can enhance MTX absorption via inhibiting MDR1 in vivo and in vitro. • Dioscin did not increase MTX-induced gastrointestinal mucosal toxicity.

  5. microRNA172 down-regulates glossy15 to promote vegetative phase change in maize

    PubMed Central

    Lauter, Nick; Kampani, Archana; Carlson, Shawn; Goebel, Mark; Moose, Stephen P.

    2005-01-01

    Shoot development in many higher plant species is characterized by phase change, where meristems and organs transition from one set of identities to another. The transition from a juvenile to adult leaf identity in maize is regulated by the APETALA2-like gene glossy15 (gl15). We demonstrate here that increasing gl15 activity in transgenic maize not only increases the number of leaves expressing juvenile traits, but also delays the onset of reproductive development, indicating that gl15 plays a primary role in the maintenance of the juvenile phase. We also show that the accumulation of a maize microRNA homologous to miR172 increases during shoot development and mediates gl15 mRNA degradation. These data indicate that vegetative phase change in maize is regulated by the opposing actions of gl15 and miR172, with gl15 maintaining the juvenile phase and miR172 promoting the transition to the adult phase by down-regulation of gl15. Our results also suggest that the balance of activities between APETALA2-like genes and miR172 may be a general mechanism for regulating vegetative phase change in higher plants. PMID:15958531

  6. Ribozyme minigene-mediated RAD51 down-regulation increases radiosensitivity of human prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Collis, S J; Tighe, A; Scott, S D; Roberts, S A; Hendry, J H; Margison, G P

    2001-04-01

    The strand transferase RAD51 is a component of the homologous recombination repair pathway. To examine the contribution of RAD51 to the genotoxic effects of ionising radiation, we have used a novel ribozyme strategy. A reporter gene vector was constructed so that expression of an inserted synthetic double-stranded ribozyme-encoding oligonucleotide would be under the control of the cytomegalovirus immediate-early gene enhancer/promoter system. The prostate tumour cell line LNCaP was transfected with this vector or a control vector, and a neomycin resistance gene on the vector was used to create geneticin-resistant stable cell lines. Three stable cell lines were shown by western blot analysis to have significant down-regulation of RAD51 to 20-50% of the levels expressed in control cell lines. All three cell lines had a similar increased sensitivity to gamma-irradiation by 70 and 40%, respectively, compared to normal and empty vector-transfected cells, corresponding to dose-modifying factors of approximately 2.0 and 1.5 in the mid-range of the dose-response curves. The amount of RAD51 protein in transfected cell lines was shown to strongly correlate with the alpha parameter obtained from fitted survival curves. These results highlight the importance of RAD51 in cellular responses to radiation and are the first to indicate the potential use of RAD51-targeted ribozyme minigenes in tumour radiosensitisation.

  7. Down-regulation of GhADF1 gene expression affects cotton fibre properties.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hai-Yun; Wang, Juan; Gao, Peng; Jiao, Gai-Li; Zhao, Pi-Ming; Li, Yan; Wang, Gui-Ling; Xia, Gui-Xian

    2009-01-01

    Cotton fibre is the most important natural fibres for textile industry. To date, the mechanism that governs the development of fibre traits is largely unknown. In this study, we have characterized the function of a member of the actin depolymerizing factor (ADF) family in Gossypium hirsutum by down-regulation of the gene (designated as GhADF1) expression in the transgenic cotton plants. We observed that both the fibre length and strength of the GhADF1-underexpressing plants increased as compared to the wild-type fibre, and transgenic fibres contained more abundant F-actin filaments in the cortical region of the cells. Moreover, the secondary cell wall of the transgenic fibre appeared thicker and the cellulose content was higher than that of the control fibre. Our results suggest that organization of actin cytoskeleton regulated by actin-associated proteins such as GhADF1 plays a critical role in the processes of elongation and secondary cell wall formation during fibre development. Additionally, our study provided a candidate intrinsic gene for the improvement of fibre traits via genetic engineering.

  8. Top-down regulation of default mode activity in spatial visual attention

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Xiaotong; Liu, Yijun; Yao, Li; Ding, Mingzhou

    2013-01-01

    Dorsal anterior cingulate and bilateral anterior insula form a task control network (TCN) whose primary function includes initiating and maintaining task-level cognitive set and exerting top-down regulation of sensorimotor processing. The default mode network (DMN), comprising an anatomically distinct set of cortical areas, mediates introspection and self-referential processes. Resting-state data show that TCN and DMN interact. The functional ramifications of their interaction remain elusive. Recording fMRI data from human subjects performing a visual spatial attention task and correlating Granger causal influences with behavioral performance and blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) activity we report three main findings. First, causal influences from TCN to DMN, i.e., TCN→DMN, are positively correlated with behavioral performance. Second, causal influences from DMN to TCN, i.e., DMN→TCN, are negatively correlated with behavioral performance. Third, stronger DMN→TCN are associated with less elevated BOLD activity in TCN, whereas the relationship between TCN→DMN and DMN BOLD activity is unsystematic. These results suggest that during visual spatial attention, top-down signals from TCN to DMN regulate the activity in DMN to enhance behavioral performance, whereas signals from DMN to TCN, acting possibly as internal noise, interfere with task control, leading to degraded behavioral performance. PMID:23575842

  9. Down-regulated Lotus japonicus GCR1 plants exhibit nodulation signalling pathways alteration.

    PubMed

    Rogato, Alessandra; Valkov, Vladimir Totev; Alves, Ludovico Martins; Apone, Fabio; Colucci, Gabriella; Chiurazzi, Maurizio

    2016-06-01

    G Protein Coupled Receptor (GPCRs) are integral membrane proteins involved in various signalling pathways by perceiving many extracellular signals and transducing them to heterotrimeric G proteins, which further transduce these signals to intracellular downstream effectors. GCR1 is the only reliable plant candidate as a member of the GPCRs superfamily. In the legume/rhizobia symbiotic interaction, G proteins are involved in signalling pathways controlling different steps of the nodulation program. In order to investigate the putative hierarchic role played by GCR1 in these symbiotic pathways we identified and characterized the Lotus japonicus gene encoding the seven transmembrane GCR1 protein. The detailed molecular and topological analyses of LjGCR1 expression patterns that are presented suggest a possible involvement in the early steps of nodule organogenesis. Furthermore, phenotypic analyses of independent transgenic RNAi lines, showing a significant LjGCR1 expression down regulation, suggest an epistatic action in the control of molecular markers of nodulation pathways, although no macroscopic symbiotic phenotypes could be revealed.

  10. Dehydroepiandrosterone down-regulates the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma in adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Kajita, Kazuo; Ishizuka, Tatsuo; Mune, Tomoatsu; Miura, Atsushi; Ishizawa, Masayoshi; Kanoh, Yoshinori; Kawai, Yasunori; Natsume, Yoshiyuki; Yasuda, Keigo

    2003-01-01

    Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) is expected to have a weight-reducing effect. In this study, we evaluated the effect of DHEA on genetically obese Otsuka Long Evans Fatty rats (OLETF) compared with Long-Evans Tokushima rats (LETO) as control. Feeding with 0.4% DHEA-containing food for 2 wk reduced the weight of sc, epididymal, and perirenal adipose tissue in association with decreased plasma leptin levels in OLETF. Adipose tissue from OLETF showed increased expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) protein, which was prevented by DHEA treatment. Further, we examined the effect of DHEA on PPARgamma in primary cultured adipocytes and monolayer adipocytes differentiated from rat preadipocytes. PPARgamma protein level was decreased in a time- and concentration-dependent manner, and DHEA significantly reduced mRNA levels of PPARgamma, adipocyte lipid-binding protein, and sterol regulatory element-binding protein, but not CCAAT/enhancer binding protein alpha. DHEA-sulfate also reduced the PPARgamma protein, but dexamethasone, testosterone, or androstenedione did not alter its expression. In addition, treatment with DHEA for 5 d reduced the triglyceride content in monolayer adipocytes. These results suggest that DHEA down-regulates adiposity through the reduction of PPARgamma in adipocytes.

  11. Chronic lithium administration down regulates transthyretin mRNA expression in rat choroid plexus

    PubMed Central

    Pulford, David J; Adams, Fiona; Henry, Brian; Mallinson, David J; Reid, Ian C; Stewart, Caroline A

    2006-01-01

    Transthyretin (TTR) accounts for a quarter of the protein content of ventricular cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) yet its exact role in the brain remains unknown. Patients with a diagnosis of depression have reduced CSF levels of TTR and the locus encoding the TTR gene has been implicated in a Danish pedigree of bipolar patients. Lithium, the major treatment for bipolar disorder in the UK, was subcutaneously infused into rats for 28 days in the form of lithium chloride using osmotic minipumps. In situ hybridizations using oligonucleotide probes targeted against the TTR transcript were performed on coronal brain sections. Lithium significantly reduced the level of transthyretin mRNA in the rat choroid plexus within the lateral and third ventricle. The down-regulation was confirmed using semi-quantitative reverse transcription PCR on dissected brain tissue. Recent studies in mice suggest that the TTR gene is implicated in depression-like behavior therefore this effect of lithium may be relevant to its use as a mood stabilizer or an adjuvant to antidepressant drugs. PMID:19412503

  12. Nifedipine inhibits hypoxia induced transvascular leakage through down regulation of NFkB.

    PubMed

    S K S, Sarada; Veeramohan; P, Himadri; Mathew, Titto; S, Saumya; M, Chitharanjan

    2012-07-31

    We have studied the prophylactic administration of nifedipine and its molecular mechanism involved in reducing the transvascular leakage and inflammation in rats under hypoxia. Rats exposed to an altitude of 7620m for 6h resulted into significant increase in transvascular leakage, oxidative stress with increased NFkB expression in lungs followed by significant increase in pro inflammatory cytokines (IL-1, TNF-α) with up regulation of cell adhesion molecules (ICAM-I, VCAM-I, E-selectin, and P-selectin) in the lungs over control. Prophylactic administration of nifedipine significantly reduced the transvascular leakage, oxidative stress, inhibited the up regulation of NFkB in lungs of rats compared to control. In addition, nifedipine significantly suppressed the levels of proinflammatory cytokines and cell adhesion molecules and stabilized the HIF1-α accumulation in the lungs of rats compared to control. These results indicate that, nifedipine has an inhibitory effect on initial leaking and showed reduction in progression of inflammation through down regulation of NFkB activity in lungs of rats under hypoxia. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Down-regulation of GPR137 expression inhibits proliferation of colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kai; Shen, Zhen; Liang, Xianjun; Liu, Tongjun; Wang, Tiejun; Jiang, Yang

    2014-11-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPRs) are highly related to oncogenesis and cancer metastasis. G protein-coupled receptor 137 (GPR137) was initially reported as a novel orphan GPR about 10 years ago. Some orphan GPRs have been implicated in human cancers. The aim of this study is to investigate the role of GPR137 in human colon cancer. Expression levels of GRP137 were analyzed in different colon cancer cell lines by quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis. Lentivirus-mediated short hairpin RNA was specifically designed to knock down GPR137 expression in colon cancer cells. Cell viability was measured by methylthiazoletetrazolium and colony formation assays. In addition, cell cycle characteristic was investigated by flow cytometry. GRP137 expression was observed in all seven colon cancer cell lines at different levels. The mRNA and protein levels of GPR137 were down-regulated in both HCT116 and RKO cells after lentivirus infection. Lentivirus-mediated silencing of GPR137 reduced the proliferation rate and colonies numbers. Knockdown of GPR137 in both cell lines led to cell cycle arrest in the G0/G1 phase. These results indicated that GPR137 plays an important role in colon cancer cell proliferation. A better understanding of GPR137's effects on signal transduction pathways in colon cancer cells may provide insights into the novel gene therapy of colon cancer.

  14. Down-Regulation of Negative Emotional Processing by Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation: Effects of Personality Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Peña-Gómez, Cleofé; Vidal-Piñeiro, Dídac; Clemente, Immaculada C.; Pascual-Leone, Álvaro; Bartrés-Faz, David

    2011-01-01

    Evidence from neuroimaging and electrophysiological studies indicates that the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) is a core region in emotional processing, particularly during down-regulation of negative emotional conditions. However, emotional regulation is a process subject to major inter-individual differences, some of which may be explained by personality traits. In the present study we used transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) over the left DLPFC to investigate whether transiently increasing the activity of this region resulted in changes in the ratings of positive, neutral and negative emotional pictures. Results revealed that anodal, but not cathodal, tDCS reduced the perceived degree of emotional valence for negative stimuli, possibly due to an enhancement of cognitive control of emotional expression. We also aimed to determine whether personality traits (extraversion and neuroticism) might condition the impact of tDCS. We found that individuals with higher scores on the introversion personality dimension were more permeable than extraverts to the modulatory effects of the stimulation. The present study underlines the role of the left DLPFC in emotional regulation, and stresses the importance of considering individual personality characteristics as a relevant variable, although replication is needed given the limited sample size of our study. PMID:21829522

  15. Nutlin-3 down-regulates retinoblastoma protein expression and inhibits muscle cell differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, Erica M.; Niu, MengMeng; Bergholz, Johann; Jim Xiao, Zhi-Xiong

    2015-05-29

    The p53 tumor suppressor gene plays a critical role in regulation of proliferation, cell death and differentiation. The MDM2 oncoprotein is a major negative regulator for p53 by binding to and targeting p53 for proteasome-mediated degradation. The small molecule inhibitor, nutlin-3, disrupts MDM2-p53 interaction resulting in stabilization and activation of p53 protein. We have previously shown that nutlin-3 activates p53, leading to MDM2 accumulation as concomitant of reduced retinoblastoma (Rb) protein stability. It is well known that Rb is important in muscle development and myoblast differentiation and that rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS), or cancer of the skeletal muscle, typically harbors MDM2 amplification. In this study, we show that nutlin-3 inhibited myoblast proliferation and effectively prevented myoblast differentiation, as evidenced by lack of expression of muscle differentiation markers including myogenin and myosin heavy chain (MyHC), as well as a failure to form multinucleated myotubes, which were associated with dramatic increases in MDM2 expression and decrease in Rb protein levels. These results indicate that nutlin-3 can effectively inhibit muscle cell differentiation. - Highlights: • Nutlin-3 inhibits myoblast proliferation and prevents differentiation into myotubes. • Nutlin-3 increases MDM2 expression and down-regulates Rb protein levels. • This study has implication in nutlin-3 treatment of rhabdomyosarcomas.

  16. Down-Regulation of Gene Expression by RNA-Induced Gene Silencing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Travella, Silvia; Keller, Beat

    Down-regulation of endogenous genes via post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS) is a key to the characterization of gene function in plants. Many RNA-based silencing mechanisms such as post-transcriptional gene silencing, co-suppression, quelling, and RNA interference (RNAi) have been discovered among species of different kingdoms (plants, fungi, and animals). One of the most interesting discoveries was RNAi, a sequence-specific gene-silencing mechanism initiated by the introduction of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), homologous in sequence to the silenced gene, which triggers degradation of mRNA. Infection of plants with modified viruses can also induce RNA silencing and is referred to as virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS). In contrast to insertional mutagenesis, these emerging new reverse genetic approaches represent a powerful tool for exploring gene function and for manipulating gene expression experimentally in cereal species such as barley and wheat. We examined how RNAi and VIGS have been used to assess gene function in barley and wheat, including molecular mechanisms involved in the process and available methodological elements, such as vectors, inoculation procedures, and analysis of silenced phenotypes.

  17. Overexpression of hsa-miR-939 follows by NGFR down-regulation and apoptosis reduction.

    PubMed

    Aghdaei, Fahimeh Hosseini; Soltani, Bahram M; Dokanehiifard, Sadat; Mowla, Seyed Javad; Soleimani, Masoud

    2017-03-01

    Neurotrophin receptors play a crucial role in neuronal survival, differentiation and regeneration. Nerve growth factor receptor (NGFR) or P75(NTR) is a neurotrophin receptor that is involved in many pathological conditions including cancers. Genetic factors that are involved in regulation of neurotrophin receptors are under intense investigation. MiRNAs are novel regulators of signalling pathways that are candidates for regulation of neurotrophin receptors. Computational programs predicted that NGFR gene is a bona fide target for hsa-miR- 939. RT-qPCR, Western analysis and dual luciferase assay evidences indicated that NGFR transcript is targeted by hsa-miR-939. Also, hsa-miR-939 overexpression brought about down-regulation of NGFR expression in U87 cell line, followed by cell death rate reduction, detected by flow cytometry. Taken together, here for the first time, hsa-miR-939 is introduced as a novel key regulator of NGFR expression and its involvement in cell death/survival processes is suggested.

  18. miR-203, a Tumor Suppressor Frequently Down-regulated by Promoter Hypermethylation in Rhabdomyosarcoma*

    PubMed Central

    Diao, Yarui; Guo, Xing; Jiang, Lei; Wang, Gang; Zhang, Chao; Wan, Jun; Jin, Yan; Wu, Zhenguo

    2014-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is the most common soft tissue sarcoma found in children and young adults. It is characterized by the expression of a number of skeletal muscle-specific proteins, including MyoD and muscle α-actin. However, unlike normal myoblasts, RMS cells differentiate poorly both in vivo and in culture. As microRNAs are known to regulate tumorigenesis, intensive efforts have been made to identify microRNAs that are involved in RMS development. In this work, we found that miR-203 was frequently down-regulated by promoter hypermethylation in both RMS cell lines and RMS biopsies and could be reactivated by DNA-demethylating agents. Re-expression of miR-203 in RMS cells inhibited their migration and proliferation and promoted terminal myogenic differentiation. Mechanistically, miR-203 exerts its tumor-suppressive effect by directly targeting p63 and leukemia inhibitory factor receptor in RMS cells, which promotes myogenic differentiation by inhibiting the Notch and the JAK1/STAT1/STAT3 pathways, respectively. Our work reveals that miR-203 functions as a tumor suppressor in RMS development. PMID:24247238

  19. The down-regulated ING5 expression in lung cancer: A potential target of gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Shuang; Yang, Xue-feng; Shen, Dao-fu; Gao, Yang; Shi, Shuai; Wu, Ji-cheng; Liu, Hong-xu; Sun, Hong-zhi; Su, Rong-jian; Zheng, Hua-chuan

    2016-01-01

    ING5 can interact with p53, thereby inhibiting cell growth and inducing apoptosis. We found that ING5 overexpression not only inhibited proliferation, migration, and invasion, but also induced G2 arrest, differentiation, autophagy, apoptosis, glycolysis and mitochondrial respiration in lung cancer cells. ING5 transfection up-regulated the expression of Cdc2, ATG13, ATG14, Beclin-1, LC-3B, AIF, cytochrome c, Akt1/2/3, ADFP, PFK-1 and PDPc, while down-regulated the expression of Bcl-2, XIAP, survivin,β-catenin and HXK1. ING5 transfection desensitized cells to the chemotherapy of MG132, paclitaxel, and SAHA, which paralleled with apoptotic alteration. ING5 overexpression suppressed the xenograft tumor growth by inhibiting proliferation and inducing apoptosis. ING5 expression level was significantly higher in normal tissue than that in lung cancer at both protein and mRNA levels. Nuclear ING5 expression was positively correlated with ki-67 expression and cytoplasmic ING5 expression. Cytoplasmic ING5 expression was positively associated with lymph node metastasis, and negatively with age, lymphatic invasion or CPP32 expression. ING5 expression was different in histological classification: squamous cell carcinoma > adenocarcinoma > large cell carcinoma > small cell carcinoma. Taken together, our data suggested that ING5 downregulation might involved in carcinogenesis, growth, and invasion of lung cancer and could be considered as a promising marker to gauge the aggressiveness of lung cancer. It might be employed as a potential target for gene therapy of lung cancer. PMID:27409347

  20. Treatment of CIA Mice with FGF21 Down-regulates TH17-IL-17 Axis.

    PubMed

    Li, Si-ming; Yu, Yin-hang; Li, Lu; Wang, Wen-fei; Li, De-shan

    2016-02-01

    Recently, FGF21 was reported to play an important role in anti-inflammation. The aim of the study is to explore the mechanism for FGF21 alleviating inflammation of CIA. CIA mice were injected with FGF21 once a day for 28 days after first booster immunization. The results showed that FGF21 alleviates arthritis severity and decreases serum anti-CII antibodies levels in CIA mice. Compared with CIA model, the number of the splenic TH17 cells was significantly decreased in FGF21-treated mice. FGF21 treatment reduced the mRNA expression of IL-17, TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, and MMP3 and increased level of IL-10 in the spleen tissue. The expression of STAT3 and phosphorylated STAT3 was suppressed in FGF21-treated group. The mRNA expression of RORγt and IL-23 also decreased. In conclusion, these findings suggest that the beneficial effects of FGF21 on CIA mice were achieved by down-regulating Th17-IL-17 axis through STAT3/RORγt pathway. Modulating of Th17-mediated inflammatory response may be one of the mechanisms for FGF21 attenuating inflammation in CIA.

  1. Artonin E mediates MCL1 down-regulation and sensitizes lung cancer cells to anoikis.

    PubMed

    Wongpankam, Ekkarat; Chunhacha, Preedakorn; Pongrakhananon, Varisa; Sritularak, Boonchoo; Chanvorachote, Pithi

    2012-12-01

    Anoikis, or detachment-induced apoptosis, is recognized as a key inhibitory process of cancer metastasis. Since lung cancer cells possess an ability to resist anoikis, resulting in a high rate of metastasis and death, the present study aimed to investigate the possible anoikis-sensitizing effect of artonin E (AE). AE was extracted from bark of Artocarpus gomezianus. Anoikis sensitization of AE was investigated in H460, A549 and H292 human lung cancer cells. The level of anoikis-related proteins was determined by western blot analysis and viable cells were measured by the 2,3-bis-(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide (XTT) method. AE was shown to enhance anoikis of H460 cells in a dose-dependent manner. We investigated the underlying mechanisms of AE on anoikis sensitization and found that AE sensitized the cells by down-regulating the anti-apoptotic myeloid leukemia cell sequence-1 (MCL1) protein but had no significant effect on other proteins of the B-cell lymphoma-2 (BCL2) family, including BCL2 and BCL2-associated X protein (BAX). Anoikis sensitization of AE was consistently observed in A549 and H292 lung cancer cells. The present study demonstrates a novel activity of AE on lung cancer cell anoikis for the first time which might lead to the development of a new strategy for lung cancer therapy.

  2. [Inhibition of NHE1 down-regulates IL-8 expression and enhances p38 phosphorylation].

    PubMed

    Gao, Wei; Zhang, Yu-Juan; Zhang, Hai-Rui; Jin, Wei-Na; Chang, Guo-Qiang; Zhang, Hong-Ju; Ma, Li; Lin, Ya-Ni; Li, Qing-Hua; Ru, Rong-Xin; Pang, Tian-Xiang

    2013-02-01

    This study was purposed to explore the changes of possible angiogenetic factors other than VEGF after inhibition of NHE1 and their related mechanisms. The K562 cells were treated by NHE1 specific inhibitor cariporide, the angiogenesis factors after inhibition of NHE1 were screened by using protein chip, the IL-8 expression level after cariporide treatment was detected by real-time quantitative PCR; the K562 cells with stable interference of NHE1 were constructed, the IL-8 expression level after interference of NHE1 was detected by real-time quantitative PCR; the p38 phosphorylation level in K562 cells treated with cariporide was detected by Western blot. After treatment of K562 cells with p38 inhibitor SB203580, the IL-8 expression level was decreased by real-time quantitative PCR. The results of protein chip showed that IL-8 expression decreased after cariporide treatment. Real-time quantitative PCR confirmed this inhibitory effect. The p38 phosphorylation level increased after cariporide treatment. The down-regulation of IL-8 expression induced by cariporide treatment was partially restored after K562 cells were treated with p38 inhibitor SB203580. It is concluded that the inhibition of NHE1 can inhibit IL-8 expression through up-regulation of p38 phosphorylation.

  3. Classical swine fever virus down-regulates endothelial connexin 43 gap junctions.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Hsiang-Jung; Liu, Pei-An; Yeh, Hung-I; Wang, Chi-Young

    2010-07-01

    Classical swine fever is a contagious disease of pigs characterized by fatal hemorrhagic fever. Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) induces the expression of pro-inflammatory and pro-coagulant factors of vascular endothelial cells and establishes a long-term infection. This study aimed to understand the effect of CSFV on endothelial connexin 43 (Cx43) expression and gap junctional intercellular coupling (GJIC). Porcine aortic endothelial cells were infected with CSFV at different multiplicity of infection for 48 h. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR, immunoconfocal microscopy, and Western blotting showed that the transcription and translation of Cx43 were reduced, and this was associated with an attenuation of GJIC. This decrease occurred in a time-dependent manner. An ERK inhibitor (PD98059), a JNK inhibitor (SP600125), and proteasome/lysosome inhibitors all significantly reversed the reduction in Cx43 protein levels without any influence on the titer of progeny virus. In addition, CSFV activated ERK and JNK in a time-dependent manner and down-regulated Cx43 promoter activity, mainly through decreased AP2 binding. This effect was primarily caused by the replication of CSFV rather than a consequence of cytokines being induced by CSFV infection of endothelial cells.

  4. Down-regulation of linear and activation of cyclic electron transport during drought.

    PubMed

    Golding, Alison J; Johnson, Giles N

    2003-11-01

    The effects of short-term drought on the regulation of electron transport through photosystems I and II (PSI and PSII) have been studied in Hordeum vulgare L. cv. Chariot. Fluorescence measurements demonstrated that electron flow through PSII decreased in response to both drought and CO2 limitation. This was due to regulation, as opposed to photoinhibition. We demonstrate that this regulation occurs between the two photosystems--in contrast to PSII, PSI became more oxidised and the rate constant for P700 re-reduction decreased under these conditions. Thus, when carbon fixation is inhibited, electron transport is down-regulated to match the reduced requirement for electrons and minimise reactive oxygen production. At the same time non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) increases, alleviating the excitation pressure placed on PSII. We observe an increase in the proportion of PSI centres that are 'active' (i.e. can be oxidised with a saturating flash and then rapidly re-reduced) under the conditions when NPQ is increased. We suggest that these additional centres are primarily involved in cyclic electron transport, which generates the DeltapH to support NPQ and protect PSII.

  5. Down-regulation of Stathmin Is Required for the Phenotypic Changes and Classical Activation of Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Xu, Kewei; Harrison, Rene E

    2015-07-31

    Macrophages are important cells of innate immunity with specialized capacity for recognition and elimination of pathogens and presentation of antigens to lymphocytes for adaptive immunity. Macrophages become activated upon exposure to pro-inflammatory cytokines and pathogenic stimuli. Classical activation of macrophages with interferon-γ (IFNγ) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) triggers a wide range of signaling events and morphological changes to induce the immune response. Our previous microtubule (MT) proteomic work revealed that the stathmin association with MTs is considerably reduced in activated macrophages, which contain significantly more stabilized MTs. Here, we show that there is a global decrease in stathmin levels, an MT catastrophe protein, in activated macrophages using both immunoblotting and immunofluorescent microscopy. This is an LPS-specific response that induces proteasome-mediated degradation of stathmin. We explored the functions of stathmin down-regulation in activated macrophages by generating a stable cell line overexpressing stathmin-GFP. We show that stathmin-GFP overexpression impacts MT stability, impairs cell spreading, and reduces activation-associated phenotypes. Furthermore, overexpressing stathmin reduces complement receptor 3-mediated phagocytosis and cellular activation, implicating a pivotal inhibitory role for stathmin in classically activated macrophages.

  6. Carnosine reverses the aging-induced down regulation of brain regional serotonergic system.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Soumyabrata; Ghosh, Tushar K; Poddar, Mrinal K

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to study the role of carnosine, an endogenous dipeptide biomolecule, on brain regional (cerebral cortex, hippocampus, hypothalamus and pons-medulla) serotonergic system during aging. Results showed an aging-induced brain region specific significant (a) increase in Trp (except cerebral cortex) and their 5-HIAA steady state level with an increase in their 5-HIAA accumulation and declination, (b) decrease in their both 5-HT steady state level and 5-HT accumulation (except cerebral cortex). A significant decrease in brain regional 5-HT/Trp ratio (except cerebral cortex) and increase in 5-HIAA/5-HT ratio were also observed during aging. Carnosine at lower dosages (0.5-1.0μg/Kg/day, i.t. for 21 consecutive days) didn't produce any significant response in any of the brain regions, but higher dosages (2.0-2.5μg/Kg/day, i.t. for 21 consecutive days) showed a significant response on those aging-induced brain regional serotonergic parameters. The treatment with carnosine (2.0μg/Kg/day, i.t. for 21 consecutive days), attenuated these brain regional aging-induced serotonergic parameters and restored towards their basal levels that observed in 4 months young control rats. These results suggest that carnosine attenuates and restores the aging-induced brain regional down regulation of serotonergic system towards that observed in young rats' brain regions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. CCR5 down-regulates osteoclast function in orthodontic tooth movement.

    PubMed

    Andrade, I; Taddei, S R A; Garlet, G P; Garlet, T P; Teixeira, A L; Silva, T A; Teixeira, M M

    2009-11-01

    During orthodontic tooth movement, there is local production of chemokines and an influx of leukocytes into the periodontium. CCL5 plays an important role in osteoclast recruitment and activation. This study aimed to investigate whether the CCR5-receptor influences these events and, consequently, orthodontic tooth movement. An orthodontic appliance was placed in wild-type mice (WT) and CCR5-deficient mice (CCR5(-/-)). The expression of mediators involved in bone remodeling was evaluated in periodontal tissues by Real-time PCR. The number of TRAP-positive osteoclasts and the expression of cathepsin K, RANKL, and MMP13 were significantly higher in CCR5(-/-). Meanwhile, the expression of two osteoblastic differentiation markers, RUNX2 and osteocalcin, and that of bone resorption regulators, IL-10 and OPG, were lower in CCR5(-/-). Analysis of the data also showed that CCR5(-/-) exhibited a greater amount of tooth movement after 7 days of mechanical loading. The results suggested that CCR5 might be a down-regulator of alveolar bone resorption during orthodontic movement.

  8. Social isolation stress down-regulates cortical early growth response 1 (Egr-1) expression in mice.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Kinzo; Ono, Kazuya; Ouchi, Hirofumi; Tsushima, Ryohei; Murakami, Yukihisa

    2012-07-01

    Social isolation stress induces behavioral disturbances such as aggression, cognitive impairments, and deficits in prepulse inhibition in mice. Social isolation mice have, therefore, been studied as an animal model of neuropsychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia. Recently, the decrease in early growth response (Egr) gene expression levels were reported in the post-mortem brains of schizophrenia patients. In this study, we investigate the effects of social isolation stress on the expression levels of Egr mRNA and protein in the frontal cortex. Social isolation stress exposure significantly down-regulated the expression of Egr-1 protein and Egr-1 gene transcript in nucleus of cortical neurons in a manner dependent on a social isolation period. This stress had no effect on the expression level of Egr-1 in the striatum or the expression levels of other Egr family members (Egr-2, -3, and -4) in the frontal cortex. These results suggest that the decrease in Egr-1 expression in the frontal cortex may be involved in social isolation stress-induced behavioral abnormalities.

  9. Down-regulation of microRNA-338-3p promoted angiogenesis in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tong; Liu, Wei; Zeng, Xian-Cheng; Jiang, Nan; Fu, Bin-Sheng; Guo, Y; Yi, Hui-Ming; Li, Hua; Zhang, Qi; Chen, Wen-Jie; Chen, Gui-Hua

    2016-12-01

    miRNAs are involved in substantial biological passways, including tumorigenesis, cancer development and progression. Angiogenesis plays a vital role in the progression of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and VEGF is closely associated with the angiogenesis. However, the molecular mechanism of miRNAs in regulation tumorigenesis of HCC remains to be investigated. In the present research, we confirmed that miR-338-3p was suppressed both in HCC tissues and HCC cell lines. Then the tube formation, transwell and Chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay were carried out, such indicated that down-regulation of miR-338-3p can sharply increased, while up-regulation drastically suppressed angiogenesis of HCC cells in vitro. Moreover, MACC1 is predicted to be a target of miR-338-3p and we checked the prediction through luciferase assay. And then, our research showed that negative correlation existed between miR-338-3p and MACC1, β-catenin and VEGF that has been reported participated in cancer behavior in HCC cell lines. Subsequently, our assays illustrated that suppression miR-338-3p can up-regulate MACC1, β-catenin and VEGF expression of HCC cells. In conclusion, our research discovered that miR-338-3p can contribute to HCC angiogenesis by targeting MACC1, β-catenin and VEGF. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  10. Leucine zipper, down regulated in cancer-1 gene expression in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Salemi, Michele; Barone, Nunziata; La Vignera, Sandro; Condorelli, Rosita A.; Recupero, Domenico; Galia, Antonio; Fraggetta, Filippo; Aiello, Anna Maria; Pepe, Pietro; Castiglione, Roberto; Vicari, Enzo; Calogero, Aldo E.

    2016-01-01

    Numerous genetic alterations have been implicated in the development of prostate cancer (PCa). DNA and protein microarrays have enabled the identification of genes associated with apoptosis, which is important in PCa development. Despite the molecular mechanisms are not entirely understood, inhibition of apoptosis is a critical pathophysiological factor that contributes to the onset and progression of PCa. Leucine zipper, down-regulated in cancer 1 (LDOC-1) is a known regulator of the nuclear factor (NF)-mediated pathway of apoptosis through the inhibition of NF-κB. The present study investigated the expression of the LDOC-1 gene in LNCaP, PC-3, PNT1A and PNT2 prostate cell lines by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. In addition LDOC-1 protein expression in normal prostate tissues and PCa was studied by immunohistochemistry. LDOC-1 messenger RNA resulted overexpressed in LNCaP and PC-3 PCa cell lines compared with the two normal prostate cell lines PNT1A and PNT2. The results of immunohistochemistry demonstrated a positive cytoplasmic LDOC-1 staining in all PCa and normal prostate samples, whereas no nuclear staining was observed in any sample. Furthermore, a more intense signal was evidenced in PCa samples. LDOC-1 gene overexpression in PCa suggests an activity of LDOC-1 in PCa cell lines. PMID:27698860

  11. Ribozyme minigene-mediated RAD51 down-regulation increases radiosensitivity of human prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Collis, S. J.; Tighe, A.; Scott, S. D.; Roberts, S. A.; Hendry, J. H.; Margison, G. P.

    2001-01-01

    The strand transferase RAD51 is a component of the homologous recombination repair pathway. To examine the contribution of RAD51 to the genotoxic effects of ionising radiation, we have used a novel ribozyme strategy. A reporter gene vector was constructed so that expression of an inserted synthetic double-stranded ribozyme-encoding oligonucleotide would be under the control of the cytomegalovirus immediate-early gene enhancer/promoter system. The prostate tumour cell line LNCaP was transfected with this vector or a control vector, and a neomycin resistance gene on the vector was used to create geneticin-resistant stable cell lines. Three stable cell lines were shown by western blot analysis to have significant down-regulation of RAD51 to 20–50% of the levels expressed in control cell lines. All three cell lines had a similar increased sensitivity to γ-irradiation by 70 and 40%, respectively, compared to normal and empty vector-transfected cells, corresponding to dose-modifying factors of ∼2.0 and 1.5 in the mid-range of the dose-response curves. The amount of RAD51 protein in transfected cell lines was shown to strongly correlate with the α parameter obtained from fitted survival curves. These results highlight the importance of RAD51 in cellular responses to radiation and are the first to indicate the potential use of RAD51-targeted ribozyme minigenes in tumour radiosensitisation. PMID:11266555

  12. Capsaicin protects cortical neurons against ischemia/reperfusion injury via down-regulating NMDA receptors.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ming; Cheng, Gen; Tan, Han; Qin, Rui; Zou, Yimin; Wang, Yun; Zhang, Ying

    2017-09-01

    Capsaicin, the ingredient responsible for the pungent taste of hot chili peppers, is widely used in the study and management of pain. Recently, its neuroprotective effect has been described in multiple studies. Herein, we investigated the underlying mechanisms for the neuroprotective effect of capsaicin. Direct injection of capsaicin (1 or 3nmol) into the peri-infarct area reduced the infarct volume and improved neurological behavioral scoring and motor coordination function in the middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO)/reperfusion model in rats. The time window of the protective effect of capsaicin was within 1h after reperfusion, when excitotoxicity is the main reason of cell death. In cultured cortical neurons, administration of capsaicin attenuated glutamate-induced excitotoxic injury. With respect to the mechanisms of the neuroprotective effect of capsaicin, reduced calcium influx after glutamate stimulation was observed following capsaicin pretreatment in cortical neurons. Trpv1 knock-out abolished the inhibitory effect of capsaicin on glutamate-induced calcium influx and subsequent neuronal death. Reduced expression of GluN1 and GluN2B, subunits of NMDA receptor, was examined after capsaicin treatment in cortical neurons. In summary, our studies reveal that the neuroprotective effect of capsaicin in cortical neurons is TRPV1-dependent and down-regulation of the expression and function of NMDA receptors contributes to the protection afforded by capsaicin. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Down-Regulation of FXYD3 Expression in Human Lung Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Okudela, Koji; Yazawa, Takuya; Ishii, Jun; Woo, Tetsukan; Mitsui, Hideaki; Bunai, Tomoyasu; Sakaeda, Masashi; Shimoyamada, Hiroaki; Sato, Hanako; Tajiri, Michihiko; Ogawa, Nobuo; Masuda, Munetaka; Sugimura, Haruhiko; Kitamura, Hitoshi

    2009-01-01

    FXYD3 is a FXYD-containing Na,K-ATPase ion channel regulator first identified as a protein overexpressed in murine breast tumors initiated by oncogenic ras or neu. However, our preliminary study revealed that FXYD3 expression was down-regulated in oncogenic KRAS-transduced airway epithelial cells. This contradiction led us to investigate the role of FXYD3 in carcinogenesis of the lung. FXYD3 mRNA and protein levels were lower in most of the lung cancer cell lines than in either the noncancerous lung tissue or airway epithelial cells. Protein levels were also lower in a considerable proportion of primary lung cancers than in nontumoral airway epithelia; FXYD3 expression levels decreased in parallel with the dedifferentiation process. Also, a somatic point mutation, g55c (D19H), was found in one cell line. Forced expression of the wild-type FXYD3, but not the mutant, restored the well-demarcated distribution of cortical actin in cancer cells that had lost FXYD3 expression, suggesting FXYD3 plays a role in the maintenance of cytoskeletal integrity. However, no association between FXYD3 expression and its promoter’s methylation status was observed. Therefore, inactivation of FXYD3 through a gene mutation or unknown mechanism could be one cause of the atypical shapes of cancer cells and play a potential role in the progression of lung cancer. PMID:19893046

  14. Down-regulation of Stathmin Is Required for the Phenotypic Changes and Classical Activation of Macrophages*

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Kewei; Harrison, Rene E.

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages are important cells of innate immunity with specialized capacity for recognition and elimination of pathogens and presentation of antigens to lymphocytes for adaptive immunity. Macrophages become activated upon exposure to pro-inflammatory cytokines and pathogenic stimuli. Classical activation of macrophages with interferon-γ (IFNγ) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) triggers a wide range of signaling events and morphological changes to induce the immune response. Our previous microtubule (MT) proteomic work revealed that the stathmin association with MTs is considerably reduced in activated macrophages, which contain significantly more stabilized MTs. Here, we show that there is a global decrease in stathmin levels, an MT catastrophe protein, in activated macrophages using both immunoblotting and immunofluorescent microscopy. This is an LPS-specific response that induces proteasome-mediated degradation of stathmin. We explored the functions of stathmin down-regulation in activated macrophages by generating a stable cell line overexpressing stathmin-GFP. We show that stathmin-GFP overexpression impacts MT stability, impairs cell spreading, and reduces activation-associated phenotypes. Furthermore, overexpressing stathmin reduces complement receptor 3-mediated phagocytosis and cellular activation, implicating a pivotal inhibitory role for stathmin in classically activated macrophages. PMID:26082487

  15. Cholesterol modulates ion channels via down-regulation of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Yoon Sun; Shin, Sora; Kim, Yonjung; Cho, Hana; Park, Myoung Kyu; Kim, Tae-Wan; Voronov, Sergey V.; Paolo, Gilbert Di; Suh, Byung-Chang; Chung, Sungkwon

    2010-01-01

    Ubiquitously expressed Mg2+-inhibitory cation (MIC) channels are permeable to Ca2+ and Mg2+ and are essential for cell viability. When membrane cholesterol level was increased by pre-incubating cells with a water-soluble form of cholesterol, the endogenous MIC current in HEK293 cells was negatively regulated. The application of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) recovered MIC current from cholesterol effect. As PIP2 is the direct modulator for MIC channels, high cholesterol content may cause down-regulation of PIP2. To test this possibility, we examined the effect of cholesterol on two exogenously expressed PIP2-sensitive K+ channels: human Ether-a-go-go related gene (HERG) and KCNQ. Enrichment with cholesterol inhibited HERG currents, while inclusion of PIP2 in the pipette solution blocked the cholesterol effect. KCNQ channel was also inhibited by cholesterol. The effects of cholesterol on these channels were blocked by pre-incubating cells with inhibitors for phospholipase C, which may indicate that cholesterol enrichment induces the depletion of PIP2 via phospholipase C activation. Lipid analysis showed that cholesterol enrichment reduced γ-32P incorporation into PIP2 by approximately 35%. Our results suggest that cholesterol may modulate ion channels by changing the levels of PIP2. Thus, an important cross-talk exists among two plasma membrane-enriched lipids, cholesterol and PIP2. PMID:20015154

  16. Down-regulation of Risa improves insulin sensitivity by enhancing autophagy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuangao; Hu, Yanan; Sun, Chenxia; Zhuo, Shu; He, Zhishui; Wang, Hui; Yan, Menghong; Liu, Jun; Luan, Yi; Dai, Changgui; Yang, Yonggang; Huang, Rui; Zhou, Ben; Zhang, Fang; Zhai, Qiwei

    2016-09-01

    It has been reported that some small noncoding RNAs are involved in the regulation of insulin sensitivity. However, whether long noncoding RNAs also participate in the regulation of insulin sensitivity is still largely unknown. We identified and characterized a long noncoding RNA, regulator of insulin sensitivity and autophagy (Risa), which is a poly(A)(+) cytoplasmic RNA. Overexpression of Risa in mouse primary hepatocytes or C2C12 myotubes attenuated insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of insulin receptor, Akt, and Gsk3β, and knockdown of Risa alleviated insulin resistance. Further studies showed that overexpression of Risa in hepatocytes or myotubes decreased autophagy, and knockdown of Risa up-regulated autophagy. Moreover, knockdown of Atg7 or -5 significantly inhibited the effect of knockdown of Risa on insulin resistance, suggesting that knockdown of Risa alleviated insulin resistance via enhancing autophagy. In addition, tail vein injection of adenovirus to knock down Risa enhanced insulin sensitivity and hepatic autophagy in both C57BL/6 and ob/ob mice. Taken together, the data demonstrate that Risa regulates insulin sensitivity by affecting autophagy and suggest that Risa is a potential target for treating insulin-resistance-related diseases.-Wang, Y., Hu, Y., Sun, C., Zhuo, S., He, Z., Wang, H., Yan, M., Liu, J., Luan, Y., Dai, C., Yang, Y., Huang, R., Zhou, B., Zhang, F., Zhai, Q. Down-regulation of Risa improves insulin sensitivity by enhancing autophagy. © FASEB.

  17. Znhit1 causes cell cycle arrest and down-regulates CDK6 expression

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Zhengmin; Cao, Yonghao; Zhu, Xiaoyan; Huang, Ying; Ding, Yuqiang; Liu, Xiaolong

    2009-08-14

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 6 (CDK6) is the key element of the D-type cyclin holoenzymes which has been found to function in the regulation of G1-phase of the cell cycle and is presumed to play important roles in T cell function. In this study, Znhit1, a member of a new zinc finger protein family defined by a conserved Zf-HIT domain, induced arrest in the G1-phase of the cell cycle in NIH/3T3 cells. Of the G1 cell cycle factors examined, the expression of CDK6 was found to be strongly down-regulated by Znhit1 via transcriptional repression. This effect may have correlations with the decreased acetylation level of histone H4 in the CDK6 promoter region. In addition, considering that CDK6 expression predominates in T cells, the negative regulatory role of Znhit1 in TCR-induced T cell proliferation was validated using transgenic mice. These findings identified Znhit1 as a CDK6 regulator that plays an important role in cell proliferation.

  18. Down-regulation of Wnt10a affects odontogenesis and proliferation in mesenchymal cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Han, Dong; Wang, Lei; Feng, Hailan

    2013-05-17

    The WNT10a mutation has been found in patients with abnormal odontogenesis. In mice, Wnt10a expression is found in the tooth germ, but its role has not yet been elucidated. We aimed to investigate the role of Wnt10a in odontogenesis. Mesenchymal cells of the first mandibular molar germ at the bell stage were isolated, transfected with Wnt10a SiRNA or plasmid, and reassociated with epithelial part of the molar germ. Scrambled SiRNA or empty vector was used in the control group. The reassociated tooth germs were transplanted into mice subrenal capsules. After gene modification, dental mesenchymal cells cultured in vitro were checked for cell proliferation and the expression of Dspp was examined. All 12 reassociated tooth germs in the control group resumed odontogenesis, while only 5 of 12 in the Wnt10a knockdown group developed into teeth. After Wnt10a knockdown, the mesenchymal cells cultured in vitro presented repressed proliferation. Wnt10a knockdown and overexpression led to both down- and up-regulation of Dspp. We conclude that the down-regulation of Wnt10a impairs odontogensis and cell proliferation, and that Wnt10a regulates Dspp expression in mesenchymal cells. These findings help to elucidate the mechanism of abnormal tooth development in patients with the WNT10A mutation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Protein Phosphatase 1 Down Regulates ZYG-1 Levels to Limit Centriole Duplication

    PubMed Central

    Naik, Anar; Decker, Markus; O’Connell, Kevin F.

    2017-01-01

    In humans perturbations of centriole number are associated with tumorigenesis and microcephaly, therefore appropriate regulation of centriole duplication is critical. The C. elegans homolog of Plk4, ZYG-1, is required for centriole duplication, but our understanding of how ZYG-1 levels are regulated remains incomplete. We have identified the two PP1 orthologs, GSP-1 and GSP-2, and their regulators I-2SZY-2 and SDS-22 as key regulators of ZYG-1 protein levels. We find that down-regulation of PP1 activity either directly, or by mutation of szy-2 or sds-22 can rescue the loss of centriole duplication associated with a zyg-1 hypomorphic allele. Suppression is achieved through an increase in ZYG-1 levels, and our data indicate that PP1 normally regulates ZYG-1 through a post-translational mechanism. While moderate inhibition of PP1 activity can restore centriole duplication to a zyg-1 mutant, strong inhibition of PP1 in a wild-type background leads to centriole amplification via the production of more than one daughter centriole. Our results thus define a new pathway that limits the number of daughter centrioles produced each cycle. PMID:28103229

  20. Down-regulation of ABCG2, a urate exporter, by parathyroid hormone enhances urate accumulation in secondary hyperparathyroidism.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Ryusei; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Ikegami, Komei; Enoki, Yuki; Imafuku, Tadashi; Sakaguchi, Yoshiaki; Murata, Michiya; Nishida, Kento; Miyamura, Shigeyuki; Ishima, Yu; Tanaka, Motoko; Matsushita, Kazutaka; Komaba, Hirotaka; Fukagawa, Masafumi; Otagiri, Masaki; Maruyama, Toru

    2017-03-01

    Hyperuricemia occurs with increasing frequency among patients with hyperparathyroidism. However, the molecular mechanism by which the serum parathyroid hormone (PTH) affects serum urate levels remains unknown. This was studied in uremic rats with secondary hyperparathyroidism where serum urate levels were found to be increased and urate excretion in the intestine and kidney decreased, presumably due to down-regulation of the expression of the urate exporter ABCG2 in intestinal and renal epithelial membranes. These effects were prevented by administration of the calcimimetic cinacalcet, a PTH suppressor, suggesting that PTH may down-regulate ABCG2 expression. This was directly tested in intestinal Caco-2 cells where the expression of ABCG2 on the plasma membrane was down-regulated by PTH (1-34) while its mRNA level remained unchanged. Interestingly, an inactive PTH derivative (13-34) had no effect, suggesting that a posttranscriptional regulatory system acts through the PTH receptor to regulate ABCG2 plasma membrane expression. As found in an animal study, additional clinical investigations showed that treatment with cinacalcet resulted in significant reductions in serum urate levels together with decreases in PTH levels in patients with secondary hyperparathyroidism undergoing dialysis. Thus, PTH down-regulates ABCG2 expression on the plasma membrane to suppress intestinal and renal urate excretion, and the effects of PTH can be prevented by cinacalcet treatment.

  1. Fucoidan induces apoptosis of HepG2 cells by down-regulating p-Stat3.

    PubMed

    Roshan, Sadia; Liu, Yun-yi; Banafa, Amal; Chen, Hui-jie; Li, Ke-xiu; Yang, Guang-xiao; He, Guang-yuan; Chen, Ming-jie

    2014-06-01

    Fucoidan is one of the main bioactive components of polysaccharides. The current study was focused on the anti-tumor effects of fucoidan on human heptoma cell line HepG2 and the possible mechanisms. Fucoidan treatment resulted in cell cycle arrest and apoptosis of HepG2 cells in a dose-dependent manner detected by MTT assay, flow cytometry and fluorescent microscopy. The results of flow cytometric analysis revealed that fucoidan induced G2/M arrest in the cell cycle progression. Hoechst 33258 and Annexin V/PI staining results showed that the apoptotic cell number was increased, which was associated with a dose-dependent up-regulation of Bax and down-regulation of Bcl-2 and p-Stat3. In parallel, the up-regulation of p53 and the increase in reactive oxygen species were also observed, which may play important roles in the inhibition of HepG2 growth by fucoidan. In the meantime, Cyclin B1 and CDK1 were down-regulated by fucoidan treatment. Down-regulation of p-Stat3 by fucoidan resulted in apoptosis and an increase in ROS in response to fucoidan exposure. We therefore concluded that fucoidan induces apoptosis through the down-regulation of p-Stat3. These results suggest that fucoidan may be used as a novel anti-cancer agent for hepatocarcinoma.

  2. Down-regulation of apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1) in spinal motor neurones under oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Chu, Tak-Ho; Guo, Anchen; Wu, Wutian

    2014-06-01

    Apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1) is an intermediate enzyme in base excision repair which is important for removing damaged nucleotides under normal and pathological conditions. Accumulation of damaged bases causes genome instability and jeopardizes cell survival. Our study is to examine APE1 regulation under oxidative stress in spinal motor neurones which are vulnerable to oxidative insult. We challenged the motor neurone-like cell line NSC-34 with hydrogen peroxide and delineated APE1 function by applying various inhibitors. We also examined the expression of APE1 in spinal motor neurones after spinal root avulsion in adult rats. We showed that hydrogen peroxide induced APE1 down-regulation and cell death in a differentiated motor neurone-like cell line. Inhibiting the two functional domains of APE1, namely, DNA repair and redox domains potentiated hydrogen peroxide induced cell death. We further showed that p53 phosphorylation early after hydrogen peroxide treatment might contribute to the down-regulation of APE1. Our in vivo results similarly showed that APE1 was down-regulated after root avulsion injury in spinal motor neurones. Delay of motor neurone death suggested that APE1 might not cause immediate cell death but render motor neurones vulnerable to further oxidative insults. We conclude that spinal motor neurones down-regulate APE1 upon oxidative stress. This property renders motor neurones susceptible to continuous challenge of oxidative stress in pathological conditions. © 2013 British Neuropathological Society.

  3. Antisense down-regulation of 4CL expression alters lignification, tree growth, and saccharification potential of field-grown poplar

    Treesearch

    Steven L. Voelker; Barbara Lachenbruch; Frederick C. Meinzer; Michael Jourdes; Chanyoung Ki; Ann M. Patten; Laurence B. Davin; Norman G. Lewis; Gerald A. Tuskan; Lee Gunter; Stephen R. Decker; Michael J. Selig; Robert Sykes; Michael E. Himmel; Peter Kitin; Olga Shevchenko; Steven H. Strauss

    2010-01-01

    Transgenic down-regulation of the Pt4CL1 gene family encoding 4-coumarate:coenzyme A ligase (4CL) has been reported as a means for reducing lignin content in cell walls and increasing overall growth rates, thereby improving feedstock quality for paper and bioethanol production. Using hybrid poplar (Populus tremula...

  4. Investigation of (E)-3-[4-(2-Oxo-3-aryl-chromen-4-yl)oxyphenyl]acrylic Acids as Oral Selective Estrogen Receptor Down-Regulators.

    PubMed

    Degorce, Sébastien L; Bailey, Andrew; Callis, Rowena; De Savi, Chris; Ducray, Richard; Lamont, Gillian; MacFaul, Philip; Maudet, Mickael; Martin, Scott; Morgentin, Rémy; Norman, Richard A; Peru, Aurélien; Pink, Jennifer H; Plé, Patrick A; Roberts, Bryan; Scott, James S

    2015-04-23

    A novel estrogen receptor down-regulator, 7-hydroxycoumarin (5, SS5020), has been reported with antitumor effects against chemically induced mammary tumors. Here, we report on our own investigation of 7-hydroxycoumarins as potential selective estrogen receptor down-regulators, which led us to the discovery of potent down-regulating antagonists, such as 33. Subsequent optimization and removal of the 7-hydroxy group led to coumarin 59, which had increased potency and improved rat bioavailability relative to SS5020.

  5. Epigenetic down-regulated DDX10 promotes cell proliferation through Akt/NF-κB pathway in ovarian cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Gai, Muhuizi; Bo, Qifang; Qi, Lixia

    2016-01-22

    Ovarian cancer contributes to the majority of ovarian cancer, while the molecular mechanisms remain elusive. Recently, some DEAD box protein 1 has been reported play a tumor suppressor role in ovarian cancer progression. However, the functions of DEAD box protein (DDX) members in ovarian cancer development remain largely unknown. In current study, we retrieved GEO databases and surprisingly found that DDX10 is significantly down-regulated in ovarian cancer tissues compared with normal ovary. These findings suggest that DDX10 might also play a suppressive role in ovarian cancer. We then validated the down-regulated expression pattern of DDX10 in fresh ovarian cancer tissues. Furthermore, both loss- and gain-functions assays reveal that the down-regulated DDX10 could promote ovarian cancer proliferation in vitro and the xenograft subcutaneous tumor formation assays confirmed these findings in vivo. In addition, we found that DDX10 is epigenetic silenced by miR-155-5p in ovarian cancer. Moreover, we further preliminary illustrated that down-regulated DDX10 promotes ovarian cancer cell proliferation through Akt/NF-κB pathway. Taken together, in current study, we found a novel tumor suppressor, DDX10, is epigenetic silenced by miR-155-5p in ovarian cancer, and the down-regulated expression pattern of DDX10 promotes ovarian cancer proliferation through Akt/NF-κB pathway. Our findings shed the light that DDX families might be a novel for ovarian cancer treatment. - Highlights: • A novel DEAD box protein, DDX10 is significantly down-regulated in ovarian cancer tissues. • Down-regulated DDX10 promotes ovarian cancer cell proliferation and growth both in vitro and in vivo. • miR-155-5p is highly expressed in ovarian cancer tissues and epigenetically targets DDX10. • DDX10 and miR-155-5p regulates Akt/p65 axis in ovarian cancer cells.

  6. HER2 mediates epidermal growth factor-induced down-regulation of E-cadherin in human ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jung-Chien; Qiu, Xin; Chang, Hsun-Ming; Leung, Peter C K

    2013-04-26

    Overexpression of HER2 is correlated with a poor prognosis in many types of human cancers. Due to the interaction between HER2 and other ErbB receptors, HER2 is implicated in the EGF family of ligands-regulated tumor progression. In ovarian cancer, although the relationships between HER2 amplification and patient prognosis remain controversial, the underlying molecular mechanisms of HER2-mediated tumor progression are not fully understood. Our previous studies demonstrated that EGF induces ovarian cancer cell invasion by down-regulating E-cadherin expression through the up-regulation of its transcriptional repressors, Snail and Slug. It has been shown that overexpression of HER2 down-regulates E-cadherin expression in human mammary epithelial cells. However, whether HER2 mediates EGF-induced down-regulation of E-cadherin remains unknown. In this study, we examined the potential role of HER2 in EGF-induced down-regulation of E-cadherin and increased cell invasion. We show that EGF treatment induces the interaction of EGFR with HER2 and increases the activation of HER2 in human ovarian cancer cells; we also show that these effects are diminished by knockdown of EGFR. Importantly, treatment with HER2-specific tyrosine kinase inhibitor, AG825, and HER2 siRNA diminished the up-regulation of Snail and Slug as well as the down-regulation of E-cadherin by EGF. Finally, we also show that EGF-induced cell invasion was attenuated by treatment with HER2 siRNA. This study demonstrates an important role for HER2 in mediating the effects of EGF on Snail, Slug and E-cadherin expression as well as invasiveness in human ovarian cancer cells.

  7. Prostaglandin E2 mediates growth arrest in NFS-60 cells by down-regulating interleukin-6 receptor expression.

    PubMed Central

    de Silva, Kumudika I; Daud, Asif N; Deng, JiangPing; Jones, Stephen B; Gamelli, Richard L; Shankar, Ravi

    2003-01-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6), a potent myeloid mitogen, and the immunosuppressive prostanoid prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) are elevated following thermal injury and sepsis. We have previously demonstrated that bone marrow myeloid commitment shifts toward monocytopoiesis and away from granulocytopoiesis during thermal injury and sepsis and that PGE2 plays a central role in this alteration. Here we investigated whether PGE2 can modulate IL-6-stimulated growth in the promyelocytic cell line, NFS-60, by down-regulating IL-6 receptor (IL-6r) expression. Exposure of NFS-60 cells to PGE2 suppressed IL-6-stimulated proliferation as well as IL-6r expression. Receptor down-regulation is functionally significant since IL-6-induced signal transduction through activators of transcription (STAT)-3 is also decreased. Down-regulation of IL-6r correlated with the ability of PGE2 to arrest cells in the G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle. PGE2 appears to signal through EP2 receptors. Butaprost (EP2 agonist) but not sulprostone (EP3 agonist) inhibited IL-6-stimulated proliferation. In addition, an EP2 antagonist (AH6809) alleviated the anti-proliferative effects of PGE2. NFS-60 cells express predominantly EP2 and EP4 receptors. While PGE2 down-regulated both the IL-6r protein and mRNA expression, it had no influence on EP2 or EP4 mRNA expression. The present study demonstrates that PGE2 is a potent down-regulator of IL-6r expression and thus may provide a mechanistic explanation for the granulocytopenia seen in thermal injury and sepsis. PMID:12429018

  8. Myc down-regulation sensitizes melanoma cells to radiotherapy by inhibiting MLH1 and MSH2 mismatch repair proteins.

    PubMed

    Bucci, Barbara; D'Agnano, Igea; Amendola, Donatella; Citti, Arianna; Raza, Giorgio H; Miceli, Roberto; De Paula, Ugo; Marchese, Rodolfo; Albini, Sonia; Felsani, Armando; Brunetti, Ercole; Vecchione, Aldo

    2005-04-01

    Melanoma patients have a very poor prognosis with a response rate of <1% due to advanced diagnosis. This type of tumor is particularly resistant to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy, and the surgery remains the principal treatment for patients with localized melanoma. For this reason, there is particular interest in the melanoma biological therapy. Using two p53 mutant melanoma models stably expressing an inducible c-myc antisense RNA, we have investigated whether Myc protein down-regulation could render melanoma cells more susceptible to radiotherapy, reestablishing apoptotic p53-independent pathway. In addition to address the role of p53 in the activation of apoptosis, we studied the effect of Myc down-regulation on radiotherapy sensitivity also in a p53 wild-type melanoma cell line. Myc down-regulation is able per se to induce apoptosis in a fraction of the cell population (approximately 40% at 72 hours) and in combination with gamma radiation efficiently enhances the death process. In fact, approximately 80% of apoptotic cells are evident in Myc down-regulated cells exposed to gamma radiation for 72 hours compared with approximately 13% observed after only gamma radiation treatment. Consistent with the enhanced apoptosis is the inhibition of the MLH1 and MSH2 mismatch repair proteins, which, preventing the correction of ionizing radiation mismatches occurring during DNA replication, renders the cells more prone to radiation-induced apoptosis. Data herein reported show that Myc down-regulation lowers the apoptotic threshold in melanoma cells by inhibiting MLH1 and MSH2 proteins, thus increasing cell sensitivity to gamma radiation in a p53-independent fashion. Our results indicate the basis for developing new antitumoral therapeutic strategy, improving the management of melanoma patients.

  9. Dihydrotanshinone I Attenuates Atherosclerosis in ApoE-Deficient Mice: Role of NOX4/NF-κB Mediated Lectin-Like Oxidized LDL Receptor-1 (LOX-1) of the Endothelium.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wenwen; Li, Chunxia; Gao, Hongwei; Wu, Qin; Shi, Jingshan; Chen, Xiuping

    2016-01-01

    Dihydrotanshinone I (DHT) is a natural compound extracted from Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge which has been widely used for treating cardiovascular diseases. However, its role in atherosclerosis remains unclear. In this study, the effect of DHT on atherosclerosis were investigated using apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE(-/-)) mice and endothelial cells. In lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), DHT (10 nM) decreased lectin-like ox-LDL receptor-1 (LOX-1) and NADPH oxidase 4 (NOX4) expression, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, NF-κB nuclear translocation, ox-LDL endocytosis and monocytes adhesion. Silence NOX4 inhibited LPS-induced LOX-1 expression, NF-κB nuclear translocation, ox-LDL endocytosis and monocytes adhesion. In ApoE(-/-) mice fed with an atherogenic diet, DHT (10 and 25 mg kg(-1)) significantly attenuated atherosclerotic plaque formation, altered serum lipid profile, decreased oxidative stress and shrunk necrotic core areas. The enhanced expression of LOX-1, NOX4, and NF-κB in aorta was also dramatically inhibited by DHT. In conclusion, these results suggested that DHT showed anti-atherosclerotic activity through inhibition of LOX-1 mediated by NOX4/NF-κB signaling pathways both in vitro and in vivo. This finding suggested that DHT might be used as a potential vascular protective candidate for the treatment of atherosclerosis.

  10. Recombinant Expression of the Full-length Ectodomain of LDL Receptor-related Protein 1 (LRP1) Unravels pH-dependent Conformational Changes and the Stoichiometry of Binding with Receptor-associated Protein (RAP).

    PubMed

    De Nardis, Camilla; Lössl, Philip; van den Biggelaar, Maartje; Madoori, Pramod K; Leloup, Nadia; Mertens, Koen; Heck, Albert J R; Gros, Piet

    2017-01-20

    LDL receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) is a highly modular protein and the largest known mammalian endocytic receptor. LRP1 binds and internalizes many plasma components, playing multiple crucial roles as a scavenger and signaling molecule. One major challenge to studying LRP1 has been that it is difficult to express such a large, highly glycosylated, and cysteine-rich protein, limiting structural studies to LRP1 fragments. Here, we report the first recombinant expression of the complete 61 domains of the full-length LRP1 ectodomain. This advance was achieved with a multistep cloning approach and by using DNA dilutions to improve protein yields. We investigated the binding properties of LRP1 using receptor-associated protein (RAP) as a model ligand due to its tight binding interaction. The LRP1 conformation was studied in its bound and unbound state using mass spectrometry, small-angle X-ray scattering, and negative-stain electron microscopy at neutral and acidic pH. Our findings revealed a pH-dependent release of the ligand associated with a conformational change of the receptor. In summary, this investigation of the complete LRP1 ectodomain significantly advances our understanding of this important receptor and provides the basis for further elucidating the mechanism of action of LRP1 in a whole and integrated system. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. Dihydrotanshinone I Attenuates Atherosclerosis in ApoE-Deficient Mice: Role of NOX4/NF-κB Mediated Lectin-Like Oxidized LDL Receptor-1 (LOX-1) of the Endothelium

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Wenwen; Li, Chunxia; Gao, Hongwei; Wu, Qin; Shi, Jingshan; Chen, Xiuping

    2016-01-01

    Dihydrotanshinone I (DHT) is a natural compound extracted from Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge which has been widely used for treating cardiovascular diseases. However, its role in atherosclerosis remains unclear. In this study, the effect of DHT on atherosclerosis were investigated using apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE-/-) mice and endothelial cells. In lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), DHT (10 nM) decreased lectin-like ox-LDL receptor-1 (LOX-1) and NADPH oxidase 4 (NOX4) expression, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, NF-κB nuclear translocation, ox-LDL endocytosis and monocytes adhesion. Silence NOX4 inhibited LPS-induced LOX-1 expression, NF-κB nuclear translocation, ox-LDL endocytosis and monocytes adhesion. In ApoE-/- mice fed with an atherogenic diet, DHT (10 and 25 mg kg-1) significantly attenuated atherosclerotic plaque formation, altered serum lipid profile, decreased oxidative stress and shrunk necrotic core areas. The enhanced expression of LOX-1, NOX4, and NF-κB in aorta was also dramatically inhibited by DHT. In conclusion, these results suggested that DHT showed anti-atherosclerotic activity through inhibition of LOX-1 mediated by NOX4/NF-κB signaling pathways both in vitro and in vivo. This finding suggested that DHT might be used as a potential vascular protective candidate for the treatment of atherosclerosis. PMID:27891092

  12. MicroRNA-21 Down-regulates Rb1 Expression by Targeting PDCD4 in Retinoblastoma.

    PubMed

    Shen, Fengmei; Mo, Meng-Hsuan; Chen, Liang; An, Shejuan; Tan, Xiaohui; Fu, Yebo; Rezaei, Katayoon; Wang, Zuoren; Zhang, Lin; Fu, Sidney W

    2014-01-01

    Retinoblastoma (RB) is a children's ocular cancer caused by mutated retinoblastoma 1 (Rb1) gene on both alleles. Rb1 and other related genes could be regulated by microRNAs (miRNA) via complementarily pairing with their target sites. MicroRNA-21 (miR-21) possesses the oncogenic potential to target several tumor suppressor genes, including PDCD4, and regulates tumor progression and metastasis. However, the mechanism of how miR-21 regulates PDCD4 is poorly understood in RB. We investigated the expression of miRNAs in RB cell lines and identified that miR-21 is one of the most deregulated miRNAs in RB. Using qRT-PCR, we verified the expression level of several miRNAs identified by independent microarray assays, and analyzed miRNA expression patterns in three RB cell lines, including Weri-Rb1, Y79 and RB355. We found that miR-19b, -21, -26a, -195 and -222 were highly expressed in all three cell lines, suggesting their potential role in RB tumorigenesis. Using the TargetScan program, we identified a list of potential target genes of these miRNAs, of which PDCD4 is one the targets of miR-21. In this study, we focused on the regulatory mechanism of miR-21 on PDCD4 in RB. We demonstrated an inverse correlation between miR-21 and PDCD4 expression in Weri-Rb1 and Y79 cells. These data suggest that miR-21 down-regulates Rb1 by targeting PDCD4 tumor suppressor. Therefore, miR-21 could serve as a therapeutic target for retinoblastoma.

  13. FOXL2 down-regulates vitellogenin expression at mature stage in Eriocheir sinensis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qing; Xie, Jing; He, Lin; Wang, Yuanli; Yang, Hongdan; Duan, Zelin; Wang, Qun

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian development in crustaceans is characterized by rapid production of egg yolk protein in a process called vitellogenesis. In the present study, we investigated the involvement of a DEAD (Asp-Glu-Ala-Asp) box RNA helicase 20 (DDX20), forkhead transcription factor (FOXL)2 and fushi tarazu factor (FTZ-F)1 in the regulation of vitellogenesis. Based on ESTs from the testis and accessory gland of Eriocheir sinensis, we cloned the full-length cDNAs of foxl2 and fushitarazu factor 1 (ftz-f1), which include the conserved structural features of the forkhead family and nuclear receptor 5A (NR5A) family respectively. The expression of foxl2 mRNA surged at the mature stage of the ovary, when vtg mRNA swooped, suggesting that foxl2 negatively affects the vitellogenin (VTG) synthesis at this developmental stage. Etoposide (inducing germ cell apoptosis) treatment up-regulated FOXL2 and DDX20 at both the mRNA and the protein levels, primarily in the follicular cells as shown by immunofluorescence analysis. Furthermore, foxl2, ddx20 and ftz-f1 mRNA levels increased significantly with right-eyestalk ablation. Interactions between FOXL2 and DDX20 or FTZ-F1 were confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation and the forkhead domain of FOXL2 was identified as the specific structure interacting with FTZ-F1. In conclusion, FOXL2 down-regulates VTG expression by binding with DDX20 in regulation of follicular cell apoptosis and with FTZ-F1 to repress the synthesis of VTG at the mature stage. This report is the first to describe the molecular mechanism of VTG synthesis in E. sinensis and may shed new light on the regulation of cytochrome P450 enzyme by FOXL2 and FTZ-F1 in vitellogenesis. PMID:26430246

  14. FOXL2 down-regulates vitellogenin expression at mature stage in Eriocheir sinensis.

    PubMed

    Li, Qing; Xie, Jing; He, Lin; Wang, Yuanli; Yang, Hongdan; Duan, Zelin; Wang, Qun

    2015-10-01

    Ovarian development in crustaceans is characterized by rapid production of egg yolk protein in a process called vitellogenesis. In the present study, we investigated the involvement of a DEAD (Asp-Glu-Ala-Asp) box RNA helicase 20 (DDX20), forkhead transcription factor (FOXL)2 and fushi tarazu factor (FTZ-F)1 in the regulation of vitellogenesis. Based on ESTs from the testis and accessory gland of Eriocheir sinensis, we cloned the full-length cDNAs of foxl2 and fushitarazu factor 1 (ftz-f1), which include the conserved structural features of the forkhead family and nuclear receptor 5A (NR5A) family respectively. The expression of foxl2 mRNA surged at the mature stage of the ovary, when vtg mRNA swooped, suggesting that foxl2 negatively affects the vitellogenin (VTG) synthesis at this developmental stage. Etoposide (inducing germ cell apoptosis) treatment up-regulated FOXL2 and DDX20 at both the mRNA and the protein levels, primarily in the follicular cells as shown by immunofluorescence analysis. Furthermore, foxl2, ddx20 and ftz-f1 mRNA levels increased significantly with right-eyestalk ablation. Interactions between FOXL2 and DDX20 or FTZ-F1 were confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation and the forkhead domain of FOXL2 was identified as the specific structure interacting with FTZ-F1. In conclusion, FOXL2 down-regulates VTG expression by binding with DDX20 in regulation of follicular cell apoptosis and with FTZ-F1 to repress the synthesis of VTG at the mature stage. This report is the first to describe the molecular mechanism of VTG synthesis in E. sinensis and may shed new light on the regulation of cytochrome P450 enzyme by FOXL2 and FTZ-F1 in vitellogenesis. © 2015 Authors.

  15. Rapid down-regulation of mammalian Period genes during behavioral resetting of the circadian clock

    PubMed Central

    Maywood, E. S.; Mrosovsky, N.; Field, M. D.; Hastings, M. H.

    1999-01-01

    The pervasive role of circadian clocks in regulating physiology and behavior is widely recognized. Their adaptive value is their ability to be entrained by environmental cues such that the internal circadian phase is a reliable predictor of solar time. In mammals, both light and nonphotic behavioral cues can entrain the principal oscillator of the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN). However, although light can advance or delay the clock during circadian night, behavioral events trigger phase advances during the subjective day, when the clock is insensitive to light. The recent identification of Period (Per) genes in mammals, homologues of dperiod, which encodes a core element of the circadian clockwork in Drosophila, now provides the opportunity to explain circadian timing and entrainment at a molecular level. In mice, expression of mPer1 and mPer2 in the SCN is rhythmic and acutely up-regulated by light. Moreover, the temporal relations between mRNA and protein cycles are consistent with a clock based on a transcriptional/translational feedback loop. Here we describe circadian oscillations of Per1 and Per2 in the SCN of the Syrian hamster, showing that PER1 protein and mRNA cycles again behave in a manner consistent with a negative-feedback oscillator. Furthermore, we demonstrate that nonphotic resetting has the opposite effect to light: acutely down-regulating these genes. Their sensitivity to nonphotic resetting cues supports their proposed role as core elements of the circadian oscillator. Moreover, this study provides an explanation at the molecular level for the contrasting but convergent effects of photic and nonphotic cues on the clock. PMID:10611364

  16. HMGB1 down-regulation mediates terameprocol vascular anti-proliferative effect in experimental pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Nogueira-Ferreira, Rita; Ferreira-Pinto, Manuel J; Silva, Ana Filipa; Vitorino, Rui; Justino, Joana; Costa, Raquel; Moreira-Gonçalves, Daniel; Quignard, Jean-François; Ducret, Thomas; Savineau, Jean-Pierre; Leite-Moreira, Adelino F; Ferreira, Rita; Henriques-Coelho, Tiago

    2017-11-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a progressive disease with a poor prognosis. Pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) play a crucial role in PAH pathophysiology, displaying a hyperproliferative, and apoptotic-resistant phenotype. In the present study, we evaluated the potential therapeutic role of terameprocol (TMP), an inhibitor of cellular proliferation and promoter of apoptosis, in a well-established pre-clinical model of PAH induced by monocrotaline (MCT) and studied the biological pathways modulated by TMP in PASMCs. Wistar rats injected with MCT or saline (SHAM group) were treated with TMP or vehicle. On day 21 after injection, we assessed bi-ventricular hemodynamics and cardiac and pulmonary morphometry. The effects of TMP on PASMCs were studied in a primary culture isolated from SHAM and MCT-treated rats, using an iTRAQ-based proteomic approach to investigate the molecular pathways modulated by this drug. In vivo, TMP significantly reduced pulmonary and cardiac remodeling and improved cardiac function in PAH. In vitro, TMP inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis of PASMCs. A total of 65 proteins were differentially expressed in PASMCs from MCT rats treated with TMP, some of which involved in the modulation of transforming growth factor beta pathway and DNA transcription. Anti-proliferative effect of TMP seems to be explained, at least in part, by the down-regulation of the transcription factor HMGB1. Our findings support the beneficial role of TMP in PAH and suggest that it may be an effective therapeutic option to be considered in the clinical management of PAH. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Down-regulating alpha-galactosidase enhances freezing tolerance in transgenic petunia.

    PubMed

    Pennycooke, Joyce C; Jones, Michelle L; Stushnoff, Cecil

    2003-10-01

    Alpha-galactosidase (alpha-Gal; EC 3.2.1.22) is involved in many aspects of plant metabolism, including hydrolysis of the alpha-1,6 linkage of raffinose oligosaccharides during deacclimation. To examine the relationship between endogenous sugars and freezing stress, the expression of alpha-Gal was modified in transgenic petunia (Petunia x hybrida cv Mitchell). The tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) Lea-Gal gene under the control of the Figwort Mosaic Virus promoter was introduced into petunia in the sense and antisense orientations using Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. RNA gel blots confirmed that alpha-Gal transcripts were reduced in antisense lines compared with wild type, whereas sense plants had increased accumulation of alpha-Gal mRNAs. alpha-Gal activity followed a similar trend, with reduced activity in antisense lines and increased activity in all sense lines evaluated. Raffinose content of nonacclimated antisense plants increased 12- to 22-fold compared with wild type, and 22- to 53-fold after cold acclimation. Based upon electrolyte leakage tests, freezing tolerance of the antisense lines increased from -4 degrees C for cold-acclimated wild-type plants to -8 degrees C for the most tolerant antisense line. Down-regulating alpha-Gal in petunia results in an increase in freezing tolerance at the whole-plant level in nonacclimated and cold-acclimated plants, whereas overexpression of the alpha-Gal gene caused a decrease in endogenous raffinose and impaired freezing tolerance. These results suggest that engineering raffinose metabolism by transformation with alpha-Gal provides an additional method for improving the freezing tolerance of plants.

  18. Down-Regulating α-Galactosidase Enhances Freezing Tolerance in Transgenic Petunia1

    PubMed Central

    Pennycooke, Joyce C.; Jones, Michelle L.; Stushnoff, Cecil

    2003-01-01

    α-Galactosidase (α-Gal; EC 3.2.1.22) is involved in many aspects of plant metabolism, including hydrolysis of the α-1,6 linkage of raffinose oligosaccharides during deacclimation. To examine the relationship between endogenous sugars and freezing stress, the expression of α-Gal was modified in transgenic petunia (Petunia × hybrida cv Mitchell). The tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) Lea-Gal gene under the control of the Figwort Mosaic Virus promoter was introduced into petunia in the sense and antisense orientations using Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. RNA gel blots confirmed that α-Gal transcripts were reduced in antisense lines compared with wild type, whereas sense plants had increased accumulation of α-Gal mRNAs. α-Gal activity followed a similar trend, with reduced activity in antisense lines and increased activity in all sense lines evaluated. Raffinose content of nonacclimated antisense plants increased 12- to 22-fold compared with wild type, and 22- to 53-fold after cold acclimation. Based upon electrolyte leakage tests, freezing tolerance of the antisense lines increased from –4°C for cold-acclimated wild-type plants to –8°C for the most tolerant antisense line. Down-regulating α-Gal in petunia results in an increase in freezing tolerance at the whole-plant level in nonacclimated and cold-acclimated plants, whereas overexpression of the α-Gal gene caused a decrease in endogenous raffinose and impaired freezing tolerance. These results suggest that engineering raffinose metabolism by transformation with α-Gal provides an additional method for improving the freezing tolerance of plants. PMID:14500789

  19. Simvastatin down-regulates differential genetic profiles produced by organochlorine mixtures in primary breast cell (HMEC).

    PubMed

    Rivero, Javier; Henríquez-Hernández, Luis Alberto; D Boada, Luis; Pestano, Jose; P Luzardo, Octavio; Camacho, María; Zumbado, Manuel; F Valerón, Pilar

    2017-04-25

    Women all over the world are exposed to an unavoidable contamination by organochlorine pesticides and other chemical pollutants. Many of them are considered as xenoestrogens and have been associated with the development and progression of breast cancer. We have demonstrated that the most prevalent pesticide mixtures found in healthy women and in women diagnosed with breast cancer modulates the gene expression in human epithelial mammary cells. Statins are well-known cholesterol-depleting agents acting as inhibitors of cholesterol synthesis. Since the early 1990s, it has been known that statins could be successfully used in cancer therapy, including breast cancer, but the exact mechanism behind anti-tumor activity of the statins remains unclear. In the present study we evaluated the effect of simvastatin in the gene expression pattern induced by realistic organochlorine mixtures found in breast cancer patients. The gene expression of 94 genes related with the cell signaling pathways were assessed. Our results indicate that simvastatin exerts a global down regulating effect on successfully determined genes (78.7%), thus attenuating the effects induced by organochlorine mixtures on the gene profile of human mammary epithelial cells. This effect was more evident on genes whose function is the ATP-binding process (that also were particularly up-regulated by pesticide mixtures). We also found that MERTK (a proto-oncogene which is overexpressed in several malignancies) and PDGFRB (a member of the platelet-derived growth factor family whose expression is high in breast-cancer cells that have become resistant to endocrine therapy) were among the genes with a higher differential regulation by simvastatin. Since resistance to treatment with tyrosine kinase inhibitors is closely related to MERKT, our findings would enhance the possible utility of statins in breast cancer treatment, i.e. improving therapeutic results combining statins with tyrosine Kinase inhibitors.

  20. Down-regulation of Zac1 gene expression in rat white adipose tissue by androgens.

    PubMed

    Mirowska, Agnieszka; Sledzinski, Tomasz; Smolenski, Ryszard T; Swierczynski, Julian

    2014-03-01

    ZAC1 is a zinc-finger protein transcription factor, a transcriptional cofactor for nuclear receptors, and a co-activator of nuclear receptors, which interacts with multiple signaling pathways affecting apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, and metabolism. Some data suggest that ZAC1 regulates the expression of genes associated with function of adipose tissue. Since there is no information about the levels of Zac1 gene expression in white adipose tissue (WAT), and the expression of several genes associated with metabolic function of WAT is significantly lower in male than female animals, we have examined: (a) the relative ZAC1 mRNA levels in some organs/tissues, including three main depots of WAT, in 3-month-old male rats; (b) the relative ZAC1 mRNA levels in WAT of male and female rats; (c) the effect of orchidectomy and orchidectomy with concomitant testosterone treatment on ZAC1 mRNA and protein levels; (d) the effect of ovariectomy and ovariectomy with concomitant 17β-estradiol treatment on ZAC1 mRNA levels; (e) the effect of dihydrotestosterone on ZAC1 mRNA levels in isolated adipocytes. Our results indicate that: (a) ZAC1 mRNA levels are relatively high in WAT in comparison with other organs/tissues; (b) ZAC1 mRNA levels in subcutaneous WAT are approximately 2-fold lower than in epididymal and retroperitoneal adipose tissue; (c) ZAC1 mRNA levels in WAT of adult female rats are approximately 2-fold higher than in male rats; (d) testosterone is inversely related to ZAC1 mRNA and protein levels in WAT of male rats; and (e) dihydrotestosterone decreases the ZAC1 mRNA levels in adipocytes in dose dependent manner. In conclusion, Zac1 gene is highly expressed in white adipose tissue of adult rats. Androgens could play an important role in down-regulation of the ZAC1 mRNA and protein levels in rats.

  1. Down-regulated resistin level in consequence of decreased neutrophil counts in untreated Grave's disease

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Fengjiao; Chen, Xinxin; Zhou, Yulin; Ye, Lei; Wang, Weiqing; Ning, Guang; Wang, Shu

    2016-01-01

    Resistin, belongs to cysteine-rich secretory protein, is mainly produced by circulating leukocytes, such as neutrophils monocytes and macrophages in humans. To date, few but controversial studies have reported about resistin concentrations in hyperthyroid patients, especially in Graves' disease (GD). We undertaked a controlled, prospective study to explore the serum resistin concentration in GD patients before and after -MMI treatment. In addition, we also investigated the main influencing factor on serum resistin level and discuessed the potential role of serum resistin plays in GD patients. 39 untreated GD (uGD) patients, including 8 males and 31 females, were enrolled in our investigation. All of these patients were prescribed with MMI treatment, in addition to 25 healthy controls. Anthropometric parameters and hormone assessment were measured. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to detect serum resistin concentration in different stages of GD patients. Furthermore, neutrophil cell line NB4 with or without T3 treatment to detect the effect of thyroid hormones on resistin expression. The serum resistin level and neutrophil counts in untreated GD patients were significantly declined. And all of these parameters were recovered to normal after MMI treatment in ethyroid GD (eGD) and TRAb-negative conversion (nGD) patients. Resistin concentration exhibited a negative correlation with FT3 and FT4, but a positive correlation with absolute number of neutrophiles in uGD patients, whereas did not correlate with thyroid autoimmune antibodies and BMI. Neutrophile cell line, NB4, produced decreased expression of resistin when stimulated with T3. Our study showed a decrease of serum resistin level in GD patients and we suggested that the serum resistin might primarily secreted from circulating neutrophils and down-regulated by excessive thyroid hormones in GD patients. PMID:27637079

  2. Exposure to Fluorescent Light Triggers Down Regulation of Genes Involved with Mitotic Progression in Xiphophorus Skin

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Ronald B.; Walter, Dylan J.; Boswell, William T.; Caballero, Kaela L.; Boswell, Mikki; Lu, Yuan; Chang, Jordan; Savage, Markita G.

    2015-01-01

    We report RNA-Seq results from skin of X. maculatus Jp 163 B after exposure to various doses of “cool white” fluorescent light (FL). We show that FL exposure incites a genetic transcriptional response in skin nearly as great as observed for UVB exposure; however, the gene sets modulated due to exposure to the two light sources are quite different. Known light responsive genes involved in maintaining circadian cycling (e.g., clock, cry2a, cry1b, per1b, per2, per3, arntl1a, etc.) exhibited expected shifts in transcriptional expression upon FL exposure. Exposure to FL also resulted in down-regulated transcription of many genes involved with cell cycle progression (e.g., cdc20, cdc45, cdca7b, plk1, cdk1, ccnb-3, cdca7a, etc.) and chromosome segregation (e.g., cenpe, cenpf, cenpi, cenpk, cenpo, cenpp, and cenpu; cep70; knstrm, kntc, mcm2, mcm5; smc2, etc.). In addition, several DNA replication and recombination repair genes (e.g., pola1, pole, rec52, rad54l, rpa1, parpbp, etc.) exhibit reduced expression in FL exposed X. maculatus skin. Some genes down modulated by FL are known to be associated with DNA repair and human diseases (e.g., atm2, brip1, fanc1, fancl, xrcc4, etc.). The overall suppression of genes involved with mitotic progression in the skin of adult fish is consistent with entry into the light phase of the circadian cycle. Current efforts are aimed at determining specific wavelengths that may lead to differential expression among the many genes affected by fluorescent light exposure. PMID:26334372

  3. Testicular apoptosis is down-regulated during spontaneous recrudescence in white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus).

    PubMed

    Young, K A; Zirkin, B R; Nelson, R J

    2001-10-01

    Among individuals of many nontropical species, seasonal breeding is timed by tracking changes in the daily photoperiod. Transfer of rodents to short (< 12 h of light/day) day lengths for 6 to 14 weeks can induce regression of the testes mediated by apoptosis. After 16 to 20 weeks of short day exposure, reproductive function is "spontaneously" initiated, and testicular recrudescence is observed. The gonadal mechanisms that underlie testicular recrudescence are not fully understood. If the onset of testicular regrowth that occurs during spontaneous recrudescence reflects a down-regulation of apoptotic signals, then a decline in apoptosis should be noted concurrent with increased testis mass. This experiment sought to assess the role of apoptosis in the restoration of reproductive capacity to photoperiod-inhibited white-footed mice. Males were assigned to long (16:8 LD) or short (8:16 LD) photoperiods for 0, 14, 18, 22, 26, or 30 weeks. At each of these time points, testis mass and testosterone concentrations were assessed. In addition, apoptotic activity was measured using both in situ terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dNTP end labeling (TUNEL) and DNA laddering. Short photoperiod exposure induced maximal decreases in testicular parameters after 14 weeks (p < 0.05). After 26 weeks of short days, testis mass was no longer different between males housed in long days and those housed in short days. In contrast, the high incidence of apoptotic TUNEL labeling and DNA laddering observed at 14 weeks was reduced to long day values after 22 weeks of short day exposure. Together, our results establish that a decrease in testicular apoptosis coincides with testicular recrudescence in white-footed mice. The current study demonstrates a decline in the incidence of testicular cell death concomitant with changes in testis mass or length, elucidating a timeline of changes at the cellular level related to the onset of recrudescence.

  4. CCoAOMT Down-Regulation Activates Anthocyanin Biosynthesis in Petunia1

    PubMed Central

    Shaipulah, Nur Fariza M.; Muhlemann, Joëlle K.; Woodworth, Benjamin D.; Van Moerkercke, Alex; Ramirez, Aldana A.; Haring, Michel A.; Schuurink, Robert C.

    2016-01-01

    Anthocyanins and volatile phenylpropenes (isoeugenol and eugenol) in petunia (Petunia hybrida) flowers have the precursor 4-coumaryl coenzyme A (CoA) in common. These phenolics are produced at different stages during flower development. Anthocyanins are synthesized during early stages of flower development and sequestered in vacuoles during the lifespan of the flowers. The production of isoeugenol and eugenol starts when flowers open and peaks after anthesis. To elucidate additional biochemical steps toward (iso)eugenol production, we cloned and characterized a caffeoyl-coenzyme A O-methyltransferase (PhCCoAOMT1) from the petals of the fragrant petunia ‘Mitchell’. Recombinant PhCCoAOMT1 indeed catalyzed the methylation of caffeoyl-CoA to produce feruloyl CoA. Silencing of PhCCoAOMT1 resulted in a reduction of eugenol production but not of isoeugenol. Unexpectedly, the transgenic plants had purple-colored leaves and pink flowers, despite the fact that cv Mitchell lacks the functional R2R3-MYB master regulator ANTHOCYANIN2 and has normally white flowers. Our results indicate that down-regulation of PhCCoAOMT1 activated the anthocyanin pathway through the R2R3-MYBs PURPLE HAZE (PHZ) and DEEP PURPLE, with predominantly petunidin accumulating. Feeding cv Mitchell flowers with caffeic acid induced PHZ expression, suggesting that the metabolic perturbation of the phenylpropanoid pathway underlies the activation of the anthocyanin pathway. Our results demonstrate a role for PhCCoAOMT1 in phenylpropene production and reveal a link between PhCCoAOMT1 and anthocyanin production. PMID:26620524

  5. Insulin receptor activation and down-regulation by cationic lipid transfection reagents.

    PubMed

    Pramfalk, Camilla; Lanner, Johanna; Andersson, Monica; Danielsson, Eva; Kaiser, Christina; Renström, Ing-Marie; Warolén, Malin; James, Stephen R

    2004-01-26

    Transfection agents comprised of cationic lipid preparations are widely used to transfect cell lines in culture with specific recombinant complementary DNA molecules. We have found that cells in culture are often resistant to stimulation with insulin subsequent to treatment with transfection agents such as LipofectAMINE 2000 and FuGENE-6. This is seen with a variety of different readouts, including insulin receptor signalling, glucose uptake into muscle cells, phosphorylation of protein kinase B and reporter gene activity in a variety of different cell types We now show that this is due in part to the fact that cationic lipid agents activate the insulin receptor fully during typical transfection experiments, which is then down-regulated. In attempts to circumvent this problem, we investigated the effects of increasing concentrations of LipofectAMINE 2000 on insulin receptor phosphorylation in Chinese hamster ovary cells expressing the human insulin receptor. In addition, the efficiency of transfection that is supported by the same concentrations of transfection reagent was studied by using a green fluorescent protein construct. Our data indicate that considerably lower concentrations of LipofectAMINE 2000 can be used than are recommended by the manufacturers. This is without sacrificing transfection efficiency markedly and avoids the problem of reducing insulin receptor expression in the cells. Widely-used cationic lipid transfection reagents cause a state of insulin unresponsiveness in cells in culture due to fully activating and subsequently reducing the expression of the receptor in cells. This phenomenon can be avoided by reducing the concentration of reagent used in the transfection process.

  6. Mutant IDH1 expression is associated with down-regulation of monocarboxylate transporters

    PubMed Central

    Viswanath, Pavithra; Najac, Chloe; Izquierdo, Jose L.; Pankov, Aleksandr; Hong, Chibo; Eriksson, Pia; Costello, Joseph F.; Pieper, Russell O.; Ronen, Sabrina M.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) are characteristic of low-grade gliomas. We recently showed that mutant IDH1 cells reprogram cellular metabolism by down-regulating pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) activity. Reduced pyruvate metabolism via PDH could lead to increased pyruvate conversion to lactate. The goal of this study was therefore to investigate the impact of the IDH1 mutation on the pyruvate-to-lactate flux. We used 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy and compared the conversion of hyperpolarized [1-13C]-pyruvate to [1-13C]-lactate in immortalized normal human astrocytes expressing mutant or wild-type IDH1 (NHAIDHmut and NHAIDHwt). Our results indicate that hyperpolarized lactate production is reduced in NHAIDHmut cells compared to NHAIDHwt. This reduction was associated with lower expression of the monocarboxylate transporters MCT1 and MCT4 in NHAIDHmut cells. Furthermore, hyperpolarized lactate production was comparable in lysates of NHAIDHmut and NHAIDHwt cells, wherein MCTs do not impact hyperpolarized pyruvate delivery and lactate production. Collectively, our findings indicated that lower MCT expression was a key contributor to lower hyperpolarized lactate production in NHAIDHmut cells. The SLC16A3 (MCT4) promoter but not SLC16A1 (MCT1) promoter was hypermethylated in NHAIDHmut cells, pointing to possibly different mechanisms mediating reduced MCT expression. Finally analysis of low-grade glioma patient biopsy data from The Cancer Genome Atlas revealed that MCT1 and MCT4 expression was significantly reduced in mutant IDH1 tumors compared to wild-type. Taken together, our study shows that reduced MCT expression is part of the metabolic reprogramming of mutant IDH1 gliomas. This finding could impact treatment and has important implications for metabolic imaging of mutant IDH1 gliomas. PMID:27144334

  7. [Enhanced chemosensitivity of Hep-2 through down-regulating expression of SOX2 by RNAi].

    PubMed

    Yang, Ning; Hui, Lian; Yang, Huijun; Jiang, Xuejun

    2014-08-01

    To investigate the effect of SOX2 on chemotherapy sensitivity of human laryngeal epithelial cells Hep-2. We designed and synthesized RNAis for silencing the expression of SOX2 in Hep-2 cells and selected the most effective RNAi by Western blot analysis. Then the recombinant plasmids of pGCsi-H1-SOX2 and pGCsi-H1-NC were constructed and transfected into Hep-2 cells to build cell lines of psiSOX2-Hep-2 and psiNC-Hep-2. CCK-8 assay had been used to test the sensitivity of Hep-2 cells to 5-FU and PTX after silencing SOX2 expression. Hoechst staining had been used to exam the changes of Hep-2 cells apoptosis treatment by 5-FU and PTX after silencing SOX2 expression. Furthermore, the changes of apoptosis-related genes expressions were detected by Western blotting. The cell lines of psiSOX2-Hep-2 and psiNC-Hep-2 were successfully established, and the expression of SOX2 protein was decreased 78% in psiSOX2-Hep-2 cells compared with psiNC-Hep-2 cells. After reducing SOX2 expression, the sensitivity of Hep-2 cells to 5-FU and PTX were increased and the IC50 values for 48 h were decreased to 8.12 μg/ml and 5.16 μg/ml. Meanwhile, the apoptosis rate and the expression of apoptotic gene Bax and cleaved caspase-3 expression were dramatically increased and anti-apoptotic genes survivin and Bcl-2 were significantly decreased in psiSOX2-Hep-2 cells compared with psiNC-Hep-2 cells. Down-regulating the protein expression of SOX2 by RNAi will significantly enhance the sensitivity of human laryngeal epithelial cells Hep-2 to 5-FU and PTX.

  8. Delta-Like Ligand 4 Modulates Liver Damage by Down-Regulating Chemokine Expression.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zhe; Liu, Yan; Dewidar, Bedair; Hu, Junhao; Park, Ogyi; Feng, Teng; Xu, Chengfu; Yu, Chaohui; Li, Qi; Meyer, Christoph; Ilkavets, Iryna; Müller, Alexandra; Stump-Guthier, Carolin; Munker, Stefan; Liebe, Roman; Zimmer, Vincent; Lammert, Frank; Mertens, Peter R; Li, Hai; Ten Dijke, Peter; Augustin, Hellmut G; Li, Jun; Gao, Bin; Ebert, Matthias P; Dooley, Steven; Li, Youming; Weng, Hong-Lei

    2016-07-01

    Disrupting Notch signaling ameliorates experimental liver fibrosis. However, the role of individual Notch ligands in liver damage is unknown. We investigated the effects of Delta-like ligand 4 (Dll4) in liver disease. DLL4 expression was measured in 31 human liver tissues by immunohistochemistry. Dll4 function was examined in carbon tetrachloride- and bile duct ligation-challenged mouse models in vivo and evaluated in hepatic stellate cells, hepatocytes, and Kupffer cells in vitro. DLL4 was expressed in patients' Kupffer and liver sinusoidal endothelial cells. Recombinant Dll4 protein (rDll4) ameliorated hepatocyte apoptosis, inflammation, and fibrosis in mice after carbon tetrachloride challenge. In vitro, rDll4 significantly decreased lipopolysaccharide-dependent chemokine expression in both Kupffer and hepatic stellate cells. In bile duct ligation mice, rDll4 induced massive hepatic necrosis, resulting in the death of all animals within 1 week. Inflammatory cell infiltration and chemokine ligand 2 (Ccl2) expression were significantly reduced in rDll4-receiving bile duct ligation mice. Recombinant Ccl2 rescued bile duct ligation mice from rDll4-mediated death. In patients with acute-on-chronic liver failure, DLL4 expression was inversely associated with CCL2 abundance. Mechanistically, Dll4 regulated Ccl2 expression via NF-κB. Taken together, Dll4 modulates liver inflammatory response by down-regulating chemokine expression. rDll4 application results in opposing outcomes in two models of liver damage. Loss of DLL4 may be associated with CCL2-mediated cytokine storm in patients with acute-on-chronic liver failure.

  9. Inhibition of in vivo leishmanicidal mechanisms by tempol: nitric oxide down-regulation and oxidant scavenging.

    PubMed

    Linares, Edlaine; Giorgio, Selma; Augusto, Ohara

    2008-04-15

    Tempol (4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperidinyloxy) has long been known to protect experimental animals from the injury associated with oxidative and inflammatory conditions. In the latter case, a parallel decrease in tissue protein nitration levels has been observed. Protein nitration represents a shift in nitric oxide actions from physiological to pathophysiological and potentially damaging pathways involving its derived oxidants such as nitrogen dioxide and peroxynitrite. In infectious diseases, protein tyrosine nitration of tissues and cells has been taken as evidence for the involvement of nitric oxide-derived oxidants in microbicidal mechanisms. To examine whether tempol inhibits the microbicidal action of macrophages, we investigated its effects on Leishmania amazonensis infection in vitro (RAW 264.7 murine macrophages) and in vivo (C57Bl/6 mice). Tempol was administered in the drinking water at 2 mM throughout the experiments and shown to reach infected footpads as the nitroxide plus the hydroxylamine derivative by EPR analysis. At the time of maximum infection (6 weeks), tempol increased footpad lesion size (120%) and parasite burden (150%). In lesion extracts, tempol decreased overall nitric oxide products and expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase to about 80% of the levels in control animals. Nitric oxide-derived products produced by radical mechanisms, such as 3-nitrotyrosine and nitrosothiol, decreased to about 40% of the levels in control mice. The results indicate that tempol worsened L. amazonensis infection by a dual mechanism involving down-regulation of iNOS expression and scavenging of nitric oxide-derived oxidants. Thus, the development of therapeutic strategies based on nitroxides should take into account the potential risk of altering host resistance to parasite infection.

  10. Impacts on the metabolome of down-regulating polyphenol oxidase in potato tubers.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, Louise Vida Traill; Alexander, Colin James; Hackett, Christine Anne; McRae, Diane; Sungurtas, Julia Anne; Verrall, Susan Ramsay; Morris, Jennifer Anne; Hedley, Peter Edward; Rockhold, David; Belknap, William; Davies, Howard Vivian

    2015-06-01

    Tubers of potato (Solanum tuberosum L. cv. Estima) genetically modified to reduce polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activity and enzymatic discolouration were assessed for changes in the metabolome using Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (LC-MS) and Gas Chromatography (GC)-MS. Metabolome changes induced over a 48 hour (h) period by tuber wounding (sliced transverse sections) were also assessed using two PPO antisense lines (asPPO) and a wild-type (WT) control. Data were analysed using Principal Components Analysis and Analysis of Variance to assess differences between genotypes and temporal changes post-tuber wounding (by slicing). The levels of 15 metabolites (out of a total of 134 that were detected) differed between the WT and asPPO lines in mature tubers at harvest. A considerably higher number (63) of these metabolites changed significantly over a 48 h period following tuber wounding. For individual metabolites the magnitude of the differences between the WT and asPPO lines at harvest were small compared with the impacts of tuber wounding on metabolite levels. Some of the observed metabolite changes are explicable in terms of pathways known to be affected by wound responses. Whilst some statistically significant interactions (11 metabolites) were observed between line and time after wounding, very few profiles were consistent when comparing the WT with both asPPO lines, and the underlying metabolites appeared to be random in terms of the pathways they occupy. Overall, mechanical damage to tubers has a considerably greater impact on the metabolite profile than any potential unintended effects resulting from the down-regulation of PPO gene expression.

  11. Down-regulation of USP13 mediates phenotype transformation of fibroblasts in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Geng, Jing; Huang, Xiaoxi; Li, Ying; Xu, Xuefeng; Li, Shuhong; Jiang, Dingyuan; Liang, Jiurong; Jiang, Dianhua; Wang, Chen; Dai, Huaping

    2015-10-09

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a fatal disease characterized by fibroblastic foci and progressive scarring of the pulmonary parenchyma. IPF fibroblasts display increased proliferation and enhanced migration and invasion, analogous to cancer cells. This transformation-like phenotype of fibroblasts plays an important role in the development of pulmonary fibrosis, but the mechanism for this is not well understood. In this study, we compared gene expression profiles in fibrotic lung tissues from IPF patients and normal lung tissues from patients with primary spontaneous pneumothorax using a cDNA microarray to examine the mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of IPF. In a cDNA microarray, we found that USP13 was decreased in lung tissues from patients with IPF, which was further confirmed by results from immunohistochemistry and western blot assays. Then, we used RNA interference in MRC-5 cells to inhibit USP13 and evaluated its effects by western blot, real-time RT-PCR, bromodeoxyuridine incorporation, and transwell assays. We also used co-immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence staining to identify the correlation between USP13 and PTEN in IPF. USP13 expression levels were markedly reduced in fibroblastic foci and primary IPF fibroblast lines. The depletion of USP13 resulted in the transformation of fibroblasts into an aggressive phenotype with enhanced proliferative, migratory, and invasive capacities. Additionally, USP13 interacted with PTEN and mediated PTEN ubiquitination and degradation in lung fibroblasts. Down-regulation of USP13 mediates PTEN protein loss and fibroblast phenotypic change, and thereby plays a crucial role in IPF pathogenesis.

  12. Ectodermal-neural cortex 1 down-regulates Nrf2 at the translational level.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Jun; Zhang, Donna D

    2009-01-01

    The transcription factor Nrf2 is the master regulator of a cellular defense mechanism against environmental insults. The Nrf2-mediated antioxidant response is accomplished by the transcription of a battery of genes that encode phase II detoxifying enzymes, xenobiotic transporters, and antioxidants. Coordinated expression of these genes is critical in protecting cells from toxic and carcinogenic insults and in maintaining cellular redox homeostasis. Activation of the Nrf2 pathway is primarily controlled by Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1), which is a molecular switch that turns on or off the Nrf2 signaling pathway according to intracellular redox conditions. Here we report our finding of a novel Nrf2 suppressor ectodermal-neural cortex 1 (ENC1), which is a BTB-Kelch protein and belongs to the same family as Keap1. Transient expression of ENC1 reduced steady-state levels of Nrf2 and its downstream gene expression. Although ENC1 interacted with Keap1 indirectly, the ENC1-mediated down-regulation of Nrf2 was independent of Keap1. The negative effect of ENC1 on Nrf2 was not due to a change in the stability of Nrf2 because neither proteasomal nor lysosomal inhibitors had any effects. Overexpression of ENC1 did not result in a change in the level of Nrf2 mRNA, rather, it caused a decrease in the rate of Nrf2 protein synthesis. These results demonstrate that ENC1 functions as a negative regulator of Nrf2 through suppressing Nrf2 protein translation, which adds another level of complexity in controlling the Nrf2 signaling pathway.

  13. CCoAOMT Down-Regulation Activates Anthocyanin Biosynthesis in Petunia.

    PubMed

    Shaipulah, Nur Fariza M; Muhlemann, Joëlle K; Woodworth, Benjamin D; Van Moerkercke, Alex; Verdonk, Julian C; Ramirez, Aldana A; Haring, Michel A; Dudareva, Natalia; Schuurink, Robert C

    2016-02-01

    Anthocyanins and volatile phenylpropenes (isoeugenol and eugenol) in petunia (Petunia hybrida) flowers have the precursor 4-coumaryl coenzyme A (CoA) in common. These phenolics are produced at different stages during flower development. Anthocyanins are synthesized during early stages of flower development and sequestered in vacuoles during the lifespan of the flowers. The production of isoeugenol and eugenol starts when flowers open and peaks after anthesis. To elucidate additional biochemical steps toward (iso)eugenol production, we cloned and characterized a caffeoyl-coenzyme A O-methyltransferase (PhCCoAOMT1) from the petals of the fragrant petunia 'Mitchell'. Recombinant PhCCoAOMT1 indeed catalyzed the methylation of caffeoyl-CoA to produce feruloyl CoA. Silencing of PhCCoAOMT1 resulted in a reduction of eugenol production but not of isoeugenol. Unexpectedly, the transgenic plants had purple-colored leaves and pink flowers, despite the fact that cv Mitchell lacks the functional R2R3-MYB master regulator ANTHOCYANIN2 and has normally white flowers. Our results indicate that down-regulation of PhCCoAOMT1 activated the anthocyanin pathway through the R2R3-MYBs PURPLE HAZE (PHZ) and DEEP PURPLE, with predominantly petunidin accumulating. Feeding cv Mitchell flowers with caffeic acid induced PHZ expression, suggesting that the metabolic perturbation of the phenylpropanoid pathway underlies the activation of the anthocyanin pathway. Our results demonstrate a role for PhCCoAOMT1 in phenylpropene production and reveal a link between PhCCoAOMT1 and anthocyanin production.

  14. Resveratrol down-regulates the growth and telomerase activity of breast cancer cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lanzilli, Giulia; Fuggetta, Maria Pia; Tricarico, Maria; Cottarelli, Andrea; Serafino, Annalucia; Falchetti, Roberto; Ravagnan, Giampietro; Turriziani, Mario; Adamo, Riccardo; Franzese, Ornella; Bonmassar, Enzo

    2006-03-01

    A number of previous studies investigated the in vitro effects of resveratrol on malignant human breast epithelial cell replication. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the activity of resveratrol on human metastatic breast cancer cells. The study was performed on the MCF-7 tumor cell line. Cell growth, cell cycle perturbation and apoptosis were evaluated by trypan blue dye exclusion assay, flow cytometric analysis and confocal fluorescence microscopy. TRAP assay and Western blot analysis respectively detected levels of telomerase activity and levels of hTERT in intracellular compartments of MCF-7 cells treated with resveratrol. Resveratrol has a direct inhibitory effect on cell proliferation. The results demonstrate that the drug induces apoptosis in MCF-7 cells, in a time- and concentration-related manner. Our results also show that the growth-inhibitory effect of resveratrol on malignant cells is mainly due to its ability to induce S-phase arrest and apoptosis in association with reduced levels of telomerase activity. In particular, TRAP assay and Western blot analysis respectively showed that resveratrol treatment down-regulates the telomerase activity of target cells and the nuclear levels of hTERT, the reverse transcriptase subunit of the telomerase complex. In our experimental model of breast cancer, resveratrol shows direct antiproliferative and pro-apoptotic effects. Studies on telomerase function and intracellular hTERT distribution point out that this agent is endowed with additional suppressive functions on critical tumor biological properties. These results speak in favor of a potential role of resveratrol in chemoprevention/chemotherapy of breast cancer.

  15. Down-regulated expression of Tim-3 promotes invasion and metastasis of colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Q Y; Qu, C H; Liu, J Q; Zhang, P; Yao, J

    2017-01-01

    To explore how Tim-3 is expressed and how its expression influences invasion and metastasis of colorectal cancer (CRC) cells. A total of 188 CRC patients were prospectively collected for this study. Meanwhile, 135 normal controls were incorporated during the same period. Intestinal samples of the CRC radical cancerous tissues, paracancerous tissues ( 5.0 cm beyond the cancer tissue) were collected for the following experiment. Furthermore, peripheral venous blood samples (10 ml) were collected from each subject. Immunohistochemical analysis, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) and western blot were performed for the detection of Tim-3 in different tissues. The immunohistochemical staining results showed that a positive Tim-3 signal was localized in the cytoplasm and nucleus, observed as yellow or brown granules. Tim-3 was largely expressed in colon carcinoma tissues and normal colon mucosa tissues but was rarely expressed in the cell membrane. RT-qPCR results indicated that Tim-3 mRNA levels were significantly lower in CRC tissues than in paracancerous tissues and normal colon mucosa tissues. A trend of decreased Tim-3 mRNA levels was also found in the paracancerous tissues compared with the normal colon mucosa tissues (all P < 0.05). Western blot results revealed reduced Tim-3 protein expression in CRC tissues compared with normal colon mucosa tissues and paracancerous tissues, and Tim-3 protein expression was much lower in the paracancerous tissues than in the normal colon mucosa tissues (all P < 0.05). Furthermore, obviously lower Tim-3 mRNA levels were found in the poorly differentiated CRC patients and in those with lymph node metastasis and distant metastasis (all P < 0.05). Collectively, Tim-3 expression was mainly located in the cytoplasm and nucleus, showing down-regulated expression in colon carcinoma tissues compared with normal and paracancerous tissues. Reduced Tim-3 expression may promote CRC invasion and metastasis providing a

  16. Irradiation of protoporphyric mice induces down-regulation of epidermal eicosanoid metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    He, D.; Lim, H.W. )

    1991-09-01

    This study investigated the effect of radiation on clinical and histologic changes, and on cutaneous eicosanoid metabolism, in Skh:HR-1 hairless albino mice rendered protoporphyric by the administration of collidine. At 0.1-18 h after exposure to 12 kJ/m2 of 396-406 nm irradiation, thicknesses of back skin and ears were measured, and histologic changes were evaluated by using hematoxylin and eosin (H-E) and Giemsa's stains. Activities of eicosanoid-metabolizing enzymes in epidermal and dermal homogenates were assessed by incubating the tissue homogenates with 3H-AA, followed by quantitation of the eicosanoids generated by radio-TLC. In irradiated protoporphyric mice, an increase of back-skin thickness was noted at 0.1 h, reaching a peak at 18 h, whereas maximal increase in ear thickness was observed at 12 h. Histologic changes included dermal edema, increased mast cell degranulation, and mononuclear cells in the dermis. In these irradiated protoporphyric animals, generations of 6 keto-PGF1a, PGF2a, PGE2, PGD2, and HETE by epidermal eicosanoid-metabolizing enzymes were markedly suppressed at all the timepoints studied. Dermal eicosanoid-metabolizing enzymes of irradiated protoporphyric mice generated increased amounts of PGE2 and HETE at 18 h, probably reflecting the presence of dermal cellular infiltrates. The suppression of the activities of epidermal eicosanoid-metabolizing enzymes was prevented by intraperitoneal injection of WR-2721, a sulfhydryl group generator, prior to irradiation, suggesting that the suppression was secondary to photo-oxidative damage of the enzymes during the in vivo phototoxic response. These results suggest that the effect of protoporphyrin and radiation on cutaneous eicosanoid metabolism in this animal model in vivo is that of a down regulation of the activities of epidermal eicosanoid-metabolizing enzymes.

  17. Down-regulation of voltage-dependent sodium channels initiated by sodium influx in developing neurons.

    PubMed Central

    Dargent, B; Couraud, F

    1990-01-01

    To address the issue of whether regulatory feedback exists between the electrical activity of a neuron and ion-channel density, we investigated the effect of Na(+)-channel activators (scorpion alpha toxin, batrachotoxin, and veratridine) on the density of Na+ channels in fetal rat brain neurons in vitro. A partial but rapid (t1/2, 15 min) disappearance of surface Na+ channels was observed as measured by a decrease in the specific binding of [3H]saxitoxin and 125I-labeled scorpion beta toxin and a decrease in specific 22Na+ uptake. Moreover, the increase in the number of Na+ channels that normally occurs during neuronal maturation in vitro was inhibited by chronic channel activator treatment. The induced disappearance of Na+ channels was abolished by tetrodotoxin, was found to be dependent on the external Na+ concentration, and was prevented when either choline (a nonpermeant ion) or Li+ (a permeant ion) was substituted for Na+. Amphotericin B, a Na+ ionophore, and monensin were able to mimick the effect of Na(+)-channel activators, while a KCl depolarization failed to do this. This feedback regulation seems to be a neuronal property since Na(+)-channel density in cultured astrocytes was not affected by channel activator treatment or by amphotericin B. The present evidence suggests that an increase in intracellular Na+ concentration, whether elicited by Na(+)-channel activators or mediated by a Na+ ionophore, can induce a decrease in surface Na+ channels and therefore is involved in down-regulation of Na(+)-channel density in fetal rat brain neurons in vitro. PMID:2165609

  18. Down-regulation of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase alpha(2) isoform in denervated rat vas deferens.

    PubMed

    Quintas, L E; Caricati-Neto, A; Lafayette, S S; Jurkiewicz, A; Noël, F

    2000-09-15

    In the rat vas deferens, an organ richly innervated by peripheral sympathetic neurons, we have demonstrated recently the expression of alpha(1) and alpha(2), but not alpha(3) isoforms of the alpha subunit of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase (EC 3.6.1.37), a membrane-bound enzyme of vital function for living cells (Noël et al., Biochem Pharmacol 55: 1531-1535, 1998). In the present work, we characterized, qualitatively and quantitatively, Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase alpha isoforms in denervated rat vasa deferentia. [(3)H]Ouabain binding at concentrations defined for high-affinity isoforms (alpha(2) and/or alpha(3)) detected only one class of specific binding sites in control (C) and denervated (D) vas deferens. Although the dissociation constant was similar for both groups [K(d) = 138 +/- 14 nM (C) and 125 +/- 8 nM (D)], a marked decrease in density was observed after denervation [716 +/- 81 fmol.mg protein(-1) (C) and 445 +/- 34 fmol.mg protein(-1) (D), P < 0.05]. In addition, western blotting revealed that denervated vasa deferentia produce the alpha(1) and alpha(2) isoforms but not alpha(3), just as we reported for the controls previously (Noël et al., Biochem Pharmacol 55: 1531-1535, 1998). Densitometric analysis showed a decrease of the alpha(2) isoform by about 40% in denervated organs, in very good agreement with what was shown with the [(3)H]ouabain binding technique, but no significant change in alpha(1) isoform density. Truncated alpha(1) (alpha(1)T), an isoform suggested to exist in the guinea pig vas deferens, was not detected. Altogether, our results demonstrated that Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase alpha(2) is down-regulated after sympathetic denervation of the rat vas deferens.

  19. microRNA-7 down-regulation mediates excessive collagen expression in localized scleroderma.

    PubMed

    Etoh, Mitsuhiko; Jinnin, Masatoshi; Makino, Katsunari; Yamane, Keitaro; Nakayama, Wakana; Aoi, Jun; Honda, Noritoshi; Kajihara, Ikko; Makino, Takamitsu; Fukushima, Satoshi; Ihn, Hironobu

    2013-01-01

    Localized scleroderma (LSc), a connective tissue disorder restricted to the skin and subcutaneous tissue, is characterized by skin fibrosis due to an excessive deposition of types I collagen. The mechanism of such fibrosis is still unknown, but epigenetics may play some roles in the excessive collagen expression. In the present study, we investigated the mechanism of fibrosis seen in LSc, focusing on microRNA (miRNA). miRNA expression was determined by PCR array, real-time PCR, and in situ hybridization. The function of miRNA was evaluated using specific inhibitor. Immunoblotting was performed to detect α2(I) collagen protein. PCR array analysis using tissue miRNA demonstrated miR-7 level was significantly decreased in LSc skin as well as keloid tissue compared to normal skin in vivo. In situ hybridization also showed miR-7 expression in dermal fibroblasts was decreased in LSc dermis. The transfection of specific inhibitor for miR-7 into cultured normal dermal fibroblasts resulted in the up-regulation of α2(I) collagen protein in vitro. Also, the serum levels of miR-7 were significantly decreased in LSc patients compared with healthy controls, but serum miR-29a levels not. Systemic or local down-regulation of miR-7 may contribute to the pathogenesis of LSc via the overexpression of α2(I) collagen, and serum miR-7 may be useful as a disease marker. Investigation of the regulatory mechanisms of LSc by miRNA may lead to new treatments by the transfection into the lesional skin of this disease.

  20. Na+ and Ca2+ cooperatively down regulate the A-type potassium currents in Helix neurons.

    PubMed

    Erdélyi, L

    1995-01-01

    Modulatory actions of Na+, Tris+, Li+ and Ca2+ on A-type potassium currents were investigated in identified neurons of the snail, Helix pomatia L. A-currents were isolated under spike threshold voltages by use of the double pulse method in combination with computer techniques. To estimate the action of Na+ on A-type potassium currents the normal physiological solution was changed to Na-free (mannitol) medium which increased the amplitude of the A-currents at -30 mV membrane potential by 20.5% without significant modulation of the time-dependent inactivation. When Tris-HCl or LiCl substituted for NaCl, the amplitude of the A-currents decreased by 27.5 or 32.5%, respectively. Li+ did not modify the time constant of decay of the A-currents, but Tris+ decreased it by 15.8%. There was an increase of the amplitude of the A-currents in the Na-, Ca-free (Tris) medium relative to the Na-free (Tris) solution by 27.7% and a decrease of the time constant of decay by 25.3%. It is concluded that A-currents are down regulated by Na+ and Ca2+ under physiological circumstances, but the modulatory action of Ca2+ is more complex and influences the amplitude, time-dependent inactivation and potential-dependent inactivation characteristics of IA. Among monovalent cations, the A-current attenuation increases in the sequence of Na+ < Tris+ < Li+. All identified neurons react in a similar way but with different sensitivities.

  1. alpha-Synuclein stimulates differentiation of osteosarcoma cells: relevance to down-regulation of proteasome activity.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Masayo; Sugama, Shuei; Nakai, Masaaki; Takenouchi, Takato; Wei, Jianshe; Urano, Tomohiko; Inoue, Satoshi; Hashimoto, Makoto

    2007-02-23

    Because a limited study previously showed that alpha-synuclein (alpha-syn), the major pathogenic protein for Parkinson disease, was expressed in differentiating brain tumors as well as various peripheral cancers, the main objective of the present study was to determine whether alpha-syn might be involved in the regulation of tumor differentiation. For this purpose, alpha-syn and its non-amyloidogenic homologue beta-syn were stably transfected to human osteosarcoma MG63 cell line. Compared with beta-syn-overexpressing and vector-transfected cells, alpha-syn-overexpressing cells exhibited distinct features of differentiated osteoblastic phenotype, as shown by up-regulation of alkaline phosphatase and osteocalcin as well as inductive matrix mineralization. Further studies revealed that proteasome activity was significantly decreased in alpha-syn-overexpressing cells compared with other cell types, consistent with the fact that proteasome inhibitors stimulate differentiation of various osteoblastic cells. In alpha-syn-overexpressing cells, protein kinase C (PKC) activity was significantly decreased, and reactivation of PKC by phorbol ester significantly restored the proteasome activity and abrogated cellular differentiation. Moreover, activity of lysosome was up-regulated in alpha-syn-overexpressing cells, and treatment of these cells with autophagy-lysosomal inhibitors resulted in a decrease of proteasome activity associated with up-regulation of alpha-syn expression, leading to enhance cellular differentiation. Taken together, these results suggest that the stimulatory effect of alpha-syn on tumor differentiation may be attributed to down-regulation of proteasome, which is further modulated by alterations of various factors, such as protein kinase C signaling pathway and a autophagy-lysosomal degradation system. Thus, the mechanism of alpha-syn regulation of tumor differentiation and neuropathological effects of alpha-syn may considerably overlap with each other.

  2. sgs1: a neomorphic nac52 allele impairing PTGS through SGS3 down-regulation.

    PubMed

    Butel, Nicolas; Le Masson, Ivan; Bouteiller, Nathalie; Vaucheret, Hervé; Elmayan, Taline

    2017-02-16

    Post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS) is a defense mechanism that targets invading nucleic acids from endogenous (transposons) or exogenous (pathogens, transgenes) origins. Genetic screens based on the reactivation of silenced transgenes have long been used to identify cellular PTGS components and regulators. Here we show that the first isolated PTGS-deficient mutant, sgs1, is impaired in the transcription factor NAC52. This mutant exhibits striking similarities with a mutant impaired in the H3K4me3 demethylase JMJ14 isolated from the same genetic screen. These similarities including increased transgene promoter DNA methylation, reduced H3K4me3 and H3K36me3 levels, reduced PolII occupancy and reduced transgene mRNA accumulation. Likely, increased DNA methylation is the cause of reduced transcription because the effect of jmj14 and sgs1 on transgene transcription is suppressed by drm2, a mutation that compromises de novo DNA methylation, suggesting that the JMJ14-NAC52 module promotes transgene transcription by preventing DNA methylation. Remarkably, sgs1 has a stronger effect than jmj14 and nac52 null alleles on PTGS systems requiring siRNA amplification, and this is due to reduced SGS3 mRNA levels in sgs1. Given that the sgs1 mutation changes a conserved aminoacid of the NAC proteins involved in homodimerization, we propose that sgs1 corresponds to a neomorphic nac52 allele encoding a mutant protein that lacks wild-type NAC52 activity but promotes SGS3 down-regulation. Together, these results indicate that PTGS impairment in sgs1 is due to its dual effect on transgene transcription and SGS3 transcription, thus compromising siRNA amplification. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  3. Down-regulation of voltage-dependent sodium channels initiated by sodium influx in developing neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Dargent, B.; Couraud, F. )

    1990-08-01

    To address the issue of whether regulatory feedback exists between the electrical activity of a neuron and ion-channel density, the authors investigated the effect of Na{sup +}-channel activators (scorpion {alpha} toxin, batrachotoxin, and veratridine) on the density of Na{sup +} channels in fetal rat brain neurons in vitro. A partial but rapid (t{sub 1/2}, 15 min) disappearance of surface Na{sup +} channels was observed as measured by a decrease in the specific binding of ({sup 3}H)saxitoxin and {sup 125}I-labeled scorpion {beta} toxin and a decrease in specific {sup 22}Na{sup +} uptake. Moreover, the increase in the number of Na{sup +} channels that normally occurs during neuronal maturation in vitro was inhibited by chronic channel activator treatment. The induced disappearance of Na{sup +} channels was abolished by tetrodotoxin, was found to be dependent on the external Na{sup +} concentration, and was prevented when either choline (a nonpermeant ion) or Li{sup +} (a permeant ion) was substituted for Na{sup +}. Amphotericin B, a Na{sup +} ionophore, and monensin were able to mimick the effect of Na{sup +}-channel activators, while a KCl depolarization failed to do this. This feedback regulation seems to be a neuronal property since Na{sup +}-channel density in cultured astrocytes was not affected by channel activator treatment or by amphotericin B. The present evidence suggests that an increase in intracellular Na{sup +} concentration, whether elicited by Na{sup +}-channel activators or mediated by a Na{sup +} ionophore, can induce a decrease in surface Na{sup +} channels and therefore is involved in down-regulation of Na{sup +}-channel density in fetal rat brain neurons in vitro.

  4. GATA-3 is down-regulated in patients with clear cell renal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yang, F Q; Liu, M; Xu, Y F; Che, J P; Wang, G C; Zheng, J H; Li, X

    2013-09-01

    GATA-3 is a transcription factor involved in human growth and development. Recent studies found its association with breast cancer, however, its expression profile in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has not been investigated. The study included 35 patients submitted to radical nephrectomy with confirmed pathological diagnosis of RCC. Normal control kidney tissues were obtained from 25 living kidney donors and tissues were biopsied before implantation. The majority of RCC samples were diagnosed as clear cell renal cell carcinoma (94.3%) except for 1 case of papillary RCC and 1 case of collecting duct carcinoma. GATA-3 expression was evaluated by quantitative PCR and Western blotting (WB) in RCC samples and normal kidneys respectively, immunohistochemical staining was performed as well. Meanwhile, the GATA-3 expression in two cancer cell lines (786-O, ACHN) and normal kidney epithelial cells (HK-2) was detected by PCR and WB. In addition, renal cancer cells and HK-2 cells were cultivated and detected by confocal microscopy for the exact intra-cellular localization of GATA-3. Data showed a significant down-regulation of GATA-3 expression present in neoplastic tissues compared with normal tissues; similarly, GATA-3 was significantly attenuated in all renal cancer cell lines compared with normal HK-2 cells. Confocal displayed a strong cytoplasmic immno-fluorescence activity of GATA-3 with peri-nuclear zone in HK-2, whereas the intensity in cancer cells was markedly weaker than that of HK-2. In summary, our present study clarifies that the aberrant expression profile of GATA-3 in human RCC is possibly involved with tumorigenesis, and the complicated mechanism is worthy of further investigation. Copyright © 2012 AEU. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  5. Chronic rapamycin treatment causes diabetes in male mice.

    PubMed

    Schindler, Christine E; Partap, Uttara; Patchen, Bonnie K; Swoap, Steven J

    2014-08-15

    Current evidence indicates that the mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor rapamycin both increases longevity and, seemingly contradictorily, impairs glucose homeostasis. Most studies exploring the dimensions of this paradox have been based on rapamycin treatment in mice for up to 20 wk. We sought to better understand the metabolic effects of oral rapamycin over a substantially longer period of time in HET3 mice. We observed that treatment with rapamycin for 52 wk induced diabetes in male mice, characterized by hyperglycemia, significant urine glucose levels, and severe glucose and pyruvate intolerance. Glucose intolerance occurred in male mice by 4 wk on rapamycin and could be only partially reversed with cessation of rapamycin treatment. Female mice developed moderate glucose intolerance over 1 yr of rapamycin treatment, but not diabetes. The role of sex hormones in the differential development of diabetic symptoms in male and female mice was further explored. HET3 mice treated with rapamycin for 52 wk were gonadectomized and monitored over 10 wk. Castrated male mice remained glucose intolerant, while ovariectomized females developed significant glucose intolerance over the same time period. Subsequent replacement of 17β-estradiol (E2) in ovariectomized females promoted a recovery of glucose tolerance over a 4-wk period, suggesting the protective role of E2 against rapamycin-induced diabetes. These results indicate that 1) oral rapamycin treatment causes diabetes in male mice, 2) the diabetes is partially reversible with cessation of treatment, and 3) E2 plays a protective role against the development of rapamycin-induced diabetes.

  6. Cannabidiolic acid-mediated selective down-regulation of c-fos in highly aggressive breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells: possible involvement of its down-regulation in the abrogation of aggressiveness.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Shuso; Himeno, Taichi; Kakizoe, Kazuhiro; Okazaki, Hiroyuki; Okada, Tomoko; Watanabe, Kazuhito; Aramaki, Hironori

    2017-01-01

    The physiological activities of cannabidiolic acid (CBDA), a component of fiber-type cannabis plants, have been demonstrated and include its function as a protector against external invasion by inducing cannabinoid-mediated necrosis (Shoyama et al., Plant Signal Behav 3:1111-1112, 2008). The biological activities of CBDA have been attracting increasing attention. We previously identified CBDA as an inhibitor of the migration of MDA-MB-231 cells, a widely used human breast cancer cell line in cancer biology, due to its highly aggressive nature. The chemical inhibition and down-regulation of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), the expression of which has been detected in ~40 % of human invasive breast cancers, are suggested to be involved in the CBDA-mediated abrogation of cell migration. However, the molecular mechanism(s) responsible for the CBDA-induced down-regulation of COX-2 in MDA-MB-231 cells have not yet been elucidated. In the present study, we describe a possible mechanism by which CBDA abrogates the expression of COX-2 via the selective down-regulation of c-fos, one component of the activator protein-1 (AP-1) dimer complex, a transcription factor for the positive regulation of the COX-2 gene.

  7. YM155 sensitizes TRAIL-induced apoptosis through cathepsin S-dependent down-regulation of Mcl-1 and NF-κB-mediated down-regulation of c-FLIP expression in human renal carcinoma Caki cells

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Bo Ram; Kwon, Taeg Kyu

    2016-01-01

    YM155, a small-molecule survivin inhibitor, has been reported for its anti-cancer activity in various cancer cells. In this study, we investigated the effect of YM155 to enhance TRAIL-mediated apoptosis in human renal carcinoma cells. We found that YM155 alone had no effect on apoptosis, however, combined treatment with YM155 and TRAIL markedly induced apoptosis in human renal carcinoma cells (Caki, ACHN, and A498), breast cancer cells (MDA-MB231), and glioma cells (U251MG), but not normal cells [mesangial cell (MC) and human skin fibroblast (HSF)]. YM155 induced down-regulation of Mcl-1 expression at the post-translational levels, and the overexpression of Mcl-1 markedly inhibited YM155 plus TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, YM155 induced down-regulation of c-FLIP mRNA expression through inhibition of NF-κB transcriptional activity. Ectopic expression of c-FLIP markedly blocked YM155-induced TRAIL sensitization. Taken together, our results suggested that YM155 sensitizes TRAIL-mediated apoptosis via down-regulation of Mcl-1 and c-FLIP expression in renal carcinoma Caki cells. PMID:27528031

  8. SLX4-SLX1 Protein-independent Down-regulation of MUS81-EME1 Protein by HIV-1 Viral Protein R (Vpr).

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaohong; DeLucia, Maria; Ahn, Jinwoo

    2016-08-12

    Evolutionarily conserved structure-selective endonuclease MUS81 forms a complex with EME1 and further associates with another endonuclease SLX4-SLX1 to form a four-subunit complex of MUS81-EME1-SLX4-SLX1, coordinating distinctive biochemical activities of both endonucleases in DNA repair. Viral protein R (Vpr), a highly conserved accessory protein in primate lentiviruses, was previously reported to bind SLX4 to mediate down-regulation of MUS81. However, the detailed mechanism underlying MUS81 down-regulation is unclear. Here, we report that HIV-1 Vpr down-regulates both MUS81 and its cofactor EME1 by hijacking the host CRL4-DCAF1 E3 ubiquitin ligase. Multiple Vpr variants, from HIV-1 and SIV, down-regulate both MUS81 and EME1. Furthermore, a C-terminally truncated Vpr mutant and point mutants R80A and Q65R, all of which lack G2 arrest activity, are able to down-regulate MUS81-EME1, suggesting that Vpr-induced G2 arrest is not correlated with MUS81-EME1 down-regulation. We also show that neither the interaction of MUS81-EME1 with Vpr nor their down-regulation is dependent on SLX4-SLX1. Together, these data provide new insight on a conserved function of Vpr in a host endonuclease down-regulation.

  9. The role of sink strength and nitrogen availability in the down-regulation of photosynthetic capacity in field-grown Nicotiana tabacum at elevated CO2 concentration

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Down-regulation of photosynthesis is one of the most frequent responses observed in C3 plants grown under elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration ([CO2]). Down-regulation is often attributed to an insufficient capacity of sink organs to use or store the increase in carbohydrate production in leaves t...

  10. Inhibition of N-Myc down regulated gene 1 in in vitro cultured human glioblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Said, Harun M; Polat, Buelent; Stein, Susanne; Guckenberger, Mathias; Hagemann, Carsten; Staab, Adrian; Katzer, Astrid; Anacker, Jelena; Flentje, Michael; Vordermark, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To study short dsRNA oligonucleotides (siRNA) as a potent tool for artificially modulating gene expression of N-Myc down regulated gene 1 (NDRG1) gene induced under different physiological conditions (Normoxia and hypoxia) modulating NDRG1 transcription, mRNA stability and translation. METHODS: A cell line established from a patient with glioblastoma multiforme. Plasmid DNA for transfections was prepared with the Endofree Plasmid Maxi kit. From plates containing 5 × 107 cells, nuclear extracts were prepared according to previous protocols. The pSUPER-NDRG1 vectors were designed, two sequences were selected from the human NDRG1 cDNA (5’-GCATTATTGGCATGGGAAC-3’ and 5’-ATGCAGAGTAACGTGGAAG-3’. reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction was performed using primers designed using published information on β-actin and hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α mRNA sequences in GenBank. NDRG1 mRNA and protein level expression results under different conditions of hypoxia or reoxygenation were compared to aerobic control conditions using the Mann-Whitney U test. Reoxygenation values were also compared to the NDRG1 levels after 24 h of hypoxia (P < 0.05 was considered significant). RESULTS: siRNA- and iodoacetate (IAA)-mediated downregulation of NDRG1 mRNA and protein expression in vitro in human glioblastoma cell lines showed a nearly complete inhibition of NDRG1 expression when compared to the results obtained due to the inhibitory role of glycolysis inhibitor IAA. Hypoxia responsive elements bound by nuclear HIF-1 in human glioblastoma cells in vitro under different oxygenation conditions and the clearly enhanced binding of nuclear extracts from glioblastoma cell samples exposed to extreme hypoxic conditions confirmed the HIF-1 Western blotting results. CONCLUSION: NDRG1 represents an additional diagnostic marker for brain tumor detection, due to the role of hypoxia in regulating this gene, and it can represent a potential target for tumor treatment in human

  11. Monoamine oxidase A down-regulation contributes to high metanephrine concentration in pheochromocytoma.

    PubMed

    Grouzmann, Eric; Matter, Maurice; Bilz, Stefan; Herren, Adeline; Triponez, Frédéric; Henzen, Christophe; Kim, Kwang-Soo; Zulewski, Henryk; Buclin, Thierry; Brakch, Noureddine; Abid, Karim

    2012-08-01

    The high diagnostic performance of plasma-free metanephrines (metanephrine and normetanephrine) (MN) for pheochromocytoma (PHEO) results from the tumoral expression of catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT), the enzyme involved in O-methylation of catecholamines (CAT). Intriguingly, metanephrine, in contrast to epinephrine, is not remarkably secreted during a stress in hypertensive or normotensive subjects, whereas in PHEO patients CAT and MN are both raised to high levels. Because epinephrine and metanephrine are almost exclusively produced by the adrenal medulla, this suggests distinct CAT metabolism in chromaffin cells and pheochromocytes. The objective of the study was to compare CAT metabolism between adrenal medulla and PHEO tissue regarding related enzyme expression including monoamine oxidases (MAO) and COMT. A multicenter comparative study was conducted. The study included 21 patients with a histologically confirmed PHEO and eight adrenal glands as control. CAT, dihydroxyphenol-glycol, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, and MN were measured in adrenal medulla and PHEO tissue. Western blot, quantitative RT-PCR and immunofluorescence studies for MAOA, MAOB, tyrosine hydroxylase, dopamine β-hydroxylase, L-amino acid decarboxylase, and COMT were applied on tissue homogenates and cell preparations. At both the protein and mRNA levels, MAOA and COMT are detected less often in PHEO compared with adrenal medulla, conversely to tyrosine hydroxylase, L-amino acid decarboxylase, and dopamine β-hydroxylase, much more expressed in tumor tissue. MAOB protein is detected less often in tumor but not differently expressed at the mRNA level. Dihydroxyphenol-glycol is virtually absent from tumor, whereas MN, produced by COMT, rises to 4.6-fold compared with adrenal medulla tissue. MAOA down-regulation was observed in 100% of tumors studied, irrespectively of genetic alteration identified; on the other hand, MAOA was strongly expressed in all adrenal medulla collected

  12. Adenovirus core protein VII down-regulates the DNA damage response on the host genome.

    PubMed

    Avgousti, Daphne C; Della Fera, Ashley N; Otter, Clayton J; Herrmann, Christin; Pancholi, Neha J; Weitzman, Matthew D

    2017-08-09

    multitude of diseases such as respiratory infections and conjunctivitis. Here we describe how a small adenovirus core protein that localizes to host chromatin during infection can globally down-regulate the DDR. Our study focuses on key players in the damage signaling pathway and highlights how viral manipulation of chromatin may influence access of DDR proteins to the host genome. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  13. N-Cadherin Mediates Neuronal Cell Survival through Bim Down-Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Boscher, Cécile; Wolff, Emeline; Mège, René-Marc; Birbes, Hélène

    2012-01-01

    results show that N-cadherin engagement mediates neuronal cell survival by enhancing the MAP kinase pathway and down-regulating the pro-apoptotic protein Bim-EL. PMID:22427990

  14. Influence of protein histidine phosphatase overexpression and down-regulation on human umbilical-vein endothelial cell viability.

    PubMed

    Seeger, Anna; Rose, Karsten; Ma, Nien Tze; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Klumpp, Susanne; Krieglstein, Josef

    2012-03-01

    PHP (protein histidine phosphatase) is expressed by mammalian tissues, particularly in blood vessel walls. We investigated whether PHP plays a significant role in endothelial cells. By Western blot and immunofluorescence analysis PHP was found in HUVEC (human umbilical-vein endothelial cells). Overexpression of PHP by the use of a plasmid vector, pIRES2-AcGFP1-PHP, induced apoptosis in HUVEC. To exclude the possibility that increased cellular protein alone unspecifically caused cell damage, the inactive H53A mutant of PHP was also overexpressed as a control; it did not lead to apoptosis. Down-regulation of PHP by the RNAi (RNA interference) technique did not affect cell viability. In conclusion, HUVEC are damaged by overexpression, but not down-regulation, of PHP, suggesting a pronounced impact of the enzyme on the cells when its activity is increased.

  15. Neuropeptidase activity is down-regulated by estradiol in steroid-sensitive regions of the hypothalamus in female mice

    PubMed Central

    Bruce, Lisa A.; Cyr, Nicole E.; Qiao, Jana W.; DeFries, Christa C.; Tetel, Marc J.; Wolfson, Adele J.

    2012-01-01

    Thimet oligopeptidase (TOP) and prolyl endopeptidase (PEP) are neuropeptidases involved in the hydrolysis of gonadotropin-releasing hormone, a key component of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. GnRH is regulated in part by feedback from steroid hormones such as estradiol. Previously, we demonstrated that TOP levels are down-regulated by estradiol in reproductively-relevant regions of the female rodent brain. The present study supports these findings by showing that TOP enzyme activity, as well as protein levels, in the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus of female mice are controlled estradiol. We further demonstrate that PEP levels in this same brain region are down-regulated by estradiol in parallel with those of TOP. These findings provide evidence that these neuropeptidases are part of the fine control of hormone levels in the HPG axis. PMID:22672888

  16. Down-regulation of adipogenesis of mesenchymal stem cells by oscillating high-gradient magnetic fields and mechanical vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zablotskii, V.; Lunov, O.; Novotná, B.; Churpita, O.; Trošan, P.; HoláÅ, V.; Syková, E.; Dejneka, A.; Kubinová, Š.

    2014-09-01

    Nowadays, the focus in medicine on molecular genetics has resulted in a disregard for the physical basis of treatment even though many diseases originate from changes in cellular mechanics. Perturbations of the cellular nanomechanics promote pathologies, including cardiovascular disease and cancer. Furthermore, whilst the biological and therapeutic effects of magnetic fields are a well-established fact, to date the underlying mechanisms remain obscure. Here, we show that oscillating high-gradient magnetic field (HGMF) and mechanical vibration affect adipogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells by the transmission of mechanical stress to the cell cytoskeleton, resulting in F-actin remodelling and subsequent down-regulation of adipogenic genes adiponectin, PPARγ, and AP2. Our findings propose an insight into the regulation of cellular nanomechanics, and provide a basis for better controlled down-regulation of stem cell adipogenesis by HGMF, which may facilitate the development of challenging therapeutic strategies suitable for the remote control of biological systems.

  17. Down-Regulation of EPAS1 Transcription and Genetic Adaptation of Tibetans to High-Altitude Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Yi; Cui, Chaoying; He, Yaoxi; Ouzhuluobu; Zhang, Hui; Yang, Deying; Zhang, Qu; Bianbazhuoma; Yang, Lixin; He, Yibo; Xiang, Kun; Zhang, Xiaoming; Bhandari, Sushil; Shi, Peng; Yangla; Dejiquzong; Baimakangzhuo; Duojizhuoma; Pan, Yongyue; Cirenyangji; Baimayangji; Gonggalanzi; Bai, Caijuan; Bianba; Basang; Ciwangsangbu; Xu, Shuhua; Chen, Hua; Liu, Shiming; Wu, Tianyi; Qi, Xuebin

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Tibetans are well adapted to the hypoxic environments at high altitude, yet the molecular mechanism of this adaptation remains elusive. We reported comprehensive genetic and functional analyses of EPAS1, a gene encoding hypoxia inducible factor 2α (HIF-2α) with the strongest signal of selection in previous genome-wide scans of Tibetans. We showed that the Tibetan-enriched EPAS1 variants down-regulate expression in human umbilical endothelial cells and placentas. Heterozygous EPAS1 knockout mice display blunted physiological responses to chronic hypoxia, mirroring the situation in Tibetans. Furthermore, we found that the Tibetan version of EPAS1 is not only associated with the relatively low hemoglobin level as a polycythemia protectant, but also is associated with a low pulmonary vasoconstriction response in Tibetans. We propose that the down-regulation of EPAS1 contributes to the molecular basis of Tibetans’ adaption to high-altitude hypoxia. PMID:28096303

  18. Novel MHC Class II Breast Cancer Vaccine Using RNA Interference (RNAi) to Down Regulate Invariant Chain (li)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-01

    patients, and may provide a powerful tool for activation of the immune system against primary tumor and metastatic disease . Body: Statement of...cells with IL-12 reduces established metastatic disease and stimulates immune effectors and monokine-induced by interferon-gamma. Canc. Immunol...concomitant down-regulation of Ii via RNAi may further improve vaccine efficacy and protect and/or treat tumor recurrence and/ or metastatic disease

  19. Quercetin induces tumor-selective apoptosis through down-regulation of Mcl-1 and activation of Bax

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Senping; Gao, Ning; Zhang, Zhuo; Chen, Gang; Budhraja, Amit; Ke, Zunji; Son, Young-ok; Wang, Xin; Luo, Jia; Shi, Xianglin

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the in vivo antitumor efficacy of querctin in U937 xenografts and the functional role of Mcl-1 and Bax in quercetin-induced apoptosis in human leukemia cells. Experimental Design Leukemia cells were treated with quercetin, after which apoptosis, Mcl-1 expression, and Bax activation and translocation were evaluated. The efficacy of quercein, as well as Mcl-1 expression and Bax activation were investigated in xenografts of leukemia cells. Results Administration of quercetin caused pronounced apoptosis in both transformed and primary leukemia cells, but not in normal blood peripheral mononuclear cells. Quercetin-induced apoptosis was accompanied by Mcl-1 down-regulation and Bax conformational change and mitochondrial translocation which triggered cytochrome c release. Knockdown of Bax by siRNA reversed querctin-induced apoptosis. Knockout of Bax abrogated the activation of caspase and apoptosis. Ectopic expression of Mcl-1 attenuated quercetin-mediated Bax activation, translocation and cell death. Conversely, interruption of Mcl-1 by siRNA enhanced Bax activation and translocation, as well as lethality induced by quercetin. However, the absence of Bax had no effect on quercetin-mediated Mcl-1 down-regulation. Furthermore, in vivo administration of quercetin attenuated tumor growth in U937 xenografts. The TUNEL positive apoptotic cells in tumor sections increased in quercetin-treated mice as compared with controls. Mcl-1 down-regulation and Bax activation were observed in xenografts. Conclusions These data suggest that quercetin may be useful for the treatment of leukemia by preferentially inducing apoptosis in leukemia versus normal hematopoietic cells, through a process involving Mcl-1 down-regulation, which in turn potentiates Bax activation and mitochondrial translocation, culminating in apoptosis. PMID:21138867

  20. Up regulation of Bax and down regulation of Bcl2 during 3-NC mediated apoptosis in human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Naseri, Mohammad Hassan; Mahdavi, Majid; Davoodi, Jamshid; Tackallou, Saeed Hesami; Goudarzvand, Mahdi; Neishabouri, Shima Hallaj

    2015-01-01

    Recently, we have reported the induction of apoptosis by 2-amino-4-(3-nitrophenyl)-3-cyano-7-(dimethylamino)-4H-chromene (3-NC) in HepG2, T47D and HCT116 cells with low nano molar IC50 values. In this study, anti-proliferative effects of modified 4-aryle-4H-chromenes derivatives; 2-amino-4-(3-bromophenyl)-3-cyano-7-(dimethylamino)-4H-chromene (3-BC), 2-amino-4-(3-trifluoromethylphenyl)-3-cyano-7-(dimethylamino)-4H-chromene (3-TFC) and 2-amino-4-(4,5-methylenedioxyphenyl)-3-cyano-7-(dimethylamino)-4H-chromene (4, 5-MC) were investigated in three human cancer cell lines. Compared to 3-NC none of the compounds displayed better anti-proliferative effect, although 3-BC appeared somewhat similar. Therefore 3-NC was selected for further studies. Treatment of HepG2, T47D and HCT116 cells with this compound induced apoptosis as visualized by fluorescence microscopic study of Hoechst 33258 stained cells. Induction of apoptosis was quantified by Annexin V/PI staining using flow cytometry. Western blot analysis also revealed that 3-NC down-regulated the expression of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl2 and up-regulated pro-apoptotic protein Bax, in all of the cell lines. Nonetheless, HepG2 cell line was the most responsive to 3-NC as Bax and Bcl2 showed the most dramatic up and down regulation. Our previous finding that 3-NC down regulates Inhibitor of Apoptosis Proteins (IAPs) and the present observation that Bax is upregulated and Bcl2 is down regulated upon 3-NC treatment, this chromene derivative has the potential to overcome chemotherapy resistance caused by up regulation of these proteins.

  1. Sulforaphane down-regulates SKP2 to stabilize p27(KIP1) for inducing antiproliferation in human colon adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Chung, Yuan-Kai; Chi-Hung Or, Richard; Lu, Chien-Hsing; Ouyang, Wei-Ting; Yang, Shu-Yi; Chang, Chia-Che

    2015-01-01

    Sulforaphane is a cruciferous vegetable-derived isothiocyanate with promising chemopreventive and therapeutic activities. Induction of proliferation arrest and apoptosis principally contribute to sulforaphane's anticancer activity, but the precise molecular mechanisms remain elusive. The oncoprotein SKP2 is a key component of the SKP1-CULLIN1-F-box (SCF) E3 ligase complex and is responsible for directing SCF-mediated degradation of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27(KIP1) to promote cell proliferation. We herein provide the first evidence supporting the critical involvement of the SKP2-p27(KIP1) axis in sulforaphane-induced antiproliferation in various human colon adenocarcinoma cell lines. Specifically, sulforaphane markedly suppressed the levels of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation and clonogenicity in all tested cell lines, illustrating the antiproliferative effect of sulforaphane. Of note, sulforaphane-induced antiproliferation was accompanied with down-regulation of SKP2, leading to the stabilization and thus up-regulation of p27(KIP1). Additionally, sulforaphane was found to down-regulate SKP2 mainly through transcriptional repression, as sulforaphane lowered SKP2 mRNA expression and the SKP2 promoter activity. Furthermore, sulforaphane treatment led to the activation of both AKT and ERK, thus ruling out the possibility that sulforaphane down-regulates SKP2 by inhibiting AKT or ERK. Notably, sulforaphane-elicited suppression of BrdU incorporation and clonogenicity were significantly rescued in the context of SKP2 overexpression or p27(KIP1) depletion, therefore highlighting the important role of SKP2 down-regulation and the ensuing stabilization of p27(KIP1) in sulforaphane-induced antiproliferation. Collectively, these data expand our molecular understanding about how sulforaphane elicits proliferation arrest, but also implicate the application of sulforaphane in therapeutic modalities targeting SKP2. Copyright © 2014 The Society for Biotechnology

  2. Oncogenic MicroRNA-155 Down-regulates Tumor Suppressor CDC73 and Promotes Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Rather, Mohammad Iqbal; Nagashri, Mathighatta N.; Swamy, Shivananda S.; Gopinath, Kodaganur S.; Kumar, Arun

    2013-01-01

    The CDC73 gene is mutationally inactivated in hereditary and sporadic parathyroid tumors. It negatively regulates β-catenin, cyclin D1, and c-MYC. Down-regulation of CDC73 has been reported in breast, renal, and gastric carcinomas. However, the reports regarding the role of CDC73 in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) are lacking. In this study we show that CDC73 is down-regulated in a majority of OSCC samples. We further show that oncogenic microRNA-155 (miR-155) negatively regulates CDC73 expression. Our experiments show that the dramatic up-regulation of miR-155 is an exclusive mechanism for down-regulation of CDC73 in a panel of human cell lines and a subset of OSCC patient samples in the absence of loss of heterozygosity, mutations, and promoter methylation. Ectopic expression of miR-155 in HEK293 cells dramatically reduced CDC73 levels, enhanced cell viability, and decreased apoptosis. Conversely, the delivery of a miR-155 antagonist (antagomir-155) to KB cells overexpressing miR-155 resulted in increased CDC73 levels, decreased cell viability, increased apoptosis, and marked regression of xenografts in nude mice. Cotransfection of miR-155 with CDC73 in HEK293 cells abrogated its pro-oncogenic effect. Reduced cell proliferation and increased apoptosis of KB cells were dependent on the presence or absence of the 3′-UTR in CDC73. In summary, knockdown of CDC73 expression due to overexpression of miR-155 not only adds a novelty to the list of mechanisms responsible for its down-regulation in different tumors, but the restoration of CDC73 levels by the use of antagomir-155 may also have an important role in therapeutic intervention of cancers, including OSCC. PMID:23166327

  3. Natriuretic peptide-sensitive guanylyl cyclase expression is down-regulated in human melanoma cells at simulated weightlessness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanova, Krassimira; Eiermann, Peter; Tsiockas, Wasiliki; Hauslage, Jens; Hemmersbach, Ruth; Gerzer, Rupert

    2011-04-01

    The membrane-bound guanylyl cyclases A and B (GC-A/B), which are receptors for natriuretic peptides, are expressed in cancer cells including melanomas and may represent new anticancer targets. Here, we report down-regulation of GC-A/B expression in human metastatic melanoma cells at simulated weightlessness in comparison to 1 g conditions, suggesting attenuation of metastatic potential in weightlessness.

  4. Down regulation of the long non-coding RNA PCAT-1 induced growth arrest and apoptosis of colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Lei; Liu, Xiangyu; Tang, Yichao; Zhao, Zheng; Zhang, Jilong; Feng, Yong

    2017-11-01

    The long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) was reported to be involved in the progress of various cancers, however, its effect in colorectal cancer (CRC) remains unknown. The goal of the present study is to investigate the function role of lncRNA PCAT-1 in colorectal cancer. The expression of lncRNA PCAT-1 in four CRC cell lines was measured by real-time PCR, and two lncRNA PCAT-1 high expression cell lines were selected. LncRNA PCAT-1 in these two CRC cell lines was down-regulated by shRNA, and the stable transfected cells were established. Functional involvement of lncRNA PCAT-1 in proliferation and apoptosis of the two CRC cells were evaluated in vitro. Mover, the effect of lncRNA PCAT-1 in tumor proliferation was also evaluated in CRC cell xenograft. The results showed that down-regulation of lncRNA PCAT-1 in CRC cells inhibited proliferation, blocked cell cycle transition, and suppressed the expression of cyclins and c-myc. The apoptosis cell proportion was elevated with increased expression of pro-apoptotic proteins and decreased anti-apoptotic proteins in lncRNA PCAT-1 knock down cells. Forced over-expression of c-myc in PCAT-1 down-regulated CRC cells increased the level of cyclins. The xenograft growth in lncRNA PCAT-1 down-regulated cells was significantly inhibited along with the reduced proliferative cells. Our study revealed a tumorigenic effect of lncRNA PCAT-1 in CRC cells, and this effect is partly dependent on the inhibition of c-myc. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The sesquiterpene lactone eupatolide sensitizes breast cancer cells to TRAIL through down-regulation of c-FLIP expression.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jongkyu; Hwangbo, Cheol; Lee, Jung Joon; Seo, Juhee; Lee, Jeong-Hyung

    2010-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a promising candidate for cancer therapeutics due to its ability to induce apoptosis selectively in cancer cells. However, sensitivity of cancer cells for induction of apoptosis by TRAIL varies considerably. Therefore, it is important to develop agents that overcome this resistance. We show, for the first time, that eupatolide, the sesquiterpene lactone isolated from the medicinal plant Inula britannica, sensitizes human breast cancer cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Treatment with TRAIL in combination with subtoxic concentrations of eupatolide enhanced the TRAIL-induced cytotoxicity in MCF-7, MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-453 breast cancer cells, whereas each reagent alone slightly induced cell death. The combination induced sub-G1 phase DNA content and annexin V-staining in MCF-7 cells, which are major features of apoptosis. Apoptotic characteristics induced by the combined treatment were significantly inhibited by a pan-caspase inhibitor. The sensitization to TRAIL-induced apoptosis was accompanied by the activation of caspase-8 and was concomitant with Bid and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage. Treatment of eupatolide alone significantly down-regulated the expression of cellular FLICE inhibitory protein (c-FLIP) in MCF-7 cells. Furthermore, enforced expression of c-FLIP significantly attenuated the apoptosis induced by this combination in MCF-7 cells, suggesting a key role for c-FLIP down-regulation in these events. We also observed that euaptolide inhibited AKT phosphorylation in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Moreover, inhibition of Akt by LY294002, a specific PI3K inhibitor, down-regulated c-FLIP expression in MCF-7 cells. Taken together, these results indicate that eupatolide could augment TRAIL-induced apoptosis in human breast cancer cells by down-regulating c-FLIP expression through the inhibition of AKT phosphorylation and be a valuable compound to overcome TRAIL resistance in

  6. Rapamycin promotes Schwann cell migration and nerve growth factor secretion

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fang; Zhang, Haiwei; Zhang, Kaiming; Wang, Xinyu; Li, Shipu; Yin, Yixia

    2014-01-01

    Rapamycin, similar to FK506, can promote neural regeneration in vitro. We assumed that the mechanisms of action of rapamycin and FK506 in promoting peripheral nerve regeneration were similar. This study compared the effects of different concentrations of rapamycin and FK506 on Schwann cells and investigated effects and mechanisms of rapamycin on improving peripheral nerve regeneration. Results demonstrated that the lowest rapamycin concentration (1.53 nmol/L) more significantly promoted Schwann cell migration than the highest FK506 concentration (100μmol/L). Rapamycin promoted the secretion of nerve growth factors and upregulated growth-associated protein 43 expression in Schwann cells, but did not significantly affect Schwann cell proliferation. Therefore, rapamycin has potential application in peripheral nerve regeneration therapy. PMID:25206862

  7. Down-regulation of flavin reductase and alcohol dehydrogenase-1 (ADH1) in metronidazole-resistant isolates of Trichomonas vaginalis

    PubMed Central

    Leitsch, David; Drinić, Mirjana; Kolarich, Daniel; Duchêne, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The microaerophilic parasite Trichomonas vaginalis is a causative agent of painful vaginitis or urethritis, termed trichomoniasis, and can also cause preterm delivery or stillbirth. Treatment of trichomoniasis is almost exclusively based on the nitroimidazole drugs metronidazole and tinidazole. Metronidazole resistance in T. vaginalis does occur and is often associated with treatment failure. In most cases, metronidazole-resistant isolates remain susceptible to tinidazole, but cross resistance between the two closely related drugs can be a problem. In this study we measured activities of thioredoxin reductase and flavin reductase in four metronidazole-susceptible and five metronidazole-resistant isolates. These enzyme activities had been previously found to be downregulated in T. vaginalis with high-level metronidazole resistance induced in the laboratory. Further, we aimed at identifying factors causing metronidazole resistance and compared the protein expression profiles of all nine isolates by application of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE). Thioredoxin reductase activity was nearly equal in all strains assayed but flavin reductase activity was clearly down-regulated, or even absent, in metronidazole-resistant strains. Since flavin reductase has been shown to reduce oxygen to hydrogen peroxide, its down-regulation could significantly contribute to the impairment of oxygen scavenging as reported by others for metronidazole-resistant strains. Analysis by 2DE revealed down-regulation of alcohol dehydrogenase 1 (ADH1) in strains with reduced sensitivity to metronidazole, an enzyme that could be involved in detoxification of intracellular acetaldehyde. PMID:22449940

  8. Calreticulin down-regulation inhibits the cell growth, invasion and cell cycle progression of human hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Feng, Ruo; Ye, Jianwen; Zhou, Chuang; Qi, Lei; Fu, Zhe; Yan, Bing; Liang, Zhiwei; Li, Renfeng; Zhai, Wenlong

    2015-08-27

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most frequent cancers in the world. Calreticulin(CRT) is aberrantly overexpressed in many human cancer cells. The function of CRT in HCC cells remains unclear. We attempted to investigate the effects and the underlying mechanisms of CRT down-regulation on HCC cell growth, apoptosis, cell cycle progression and invasion. To investigate the function of CRT in HCC cells, small interfering RNA (siRNA) was used to knock down the expression of CRT in SMMC7721 and HepG2 HCC cells. CRT expression was examined by Western blot and immunofluorescence. Cell proliferation was detected by CCK-8 assay. Cell cycle and apoptosis were measured by the flow cytometry. The invasion capability was assessed by transwell assay. The phosphorylation level of Akt was evaluated by Western blot. Compared with human hepatic cells L02, CRT was apparently up-regulated in SMMC7721, HepG2 and Huh7 HCC cells. Down-regulation of CRT expression effectively inhibited HCC cell growth and invasion. CRT knockdown induced cell cycle arrest and the apoptosis in SMMC7721 and HepG2 cells. Furthermore, down-regulation of CRT expression significantly decreased the Akt phosphorylation. CRT was aberrantly over-expressed in HCC cell lines. CRT over-expression contributes greatly to HCC malignant behavior, likely via PI3K/Akt pathway. CRT could serve as a potential biomarker and therapeutic target for hepatocellular carcinoma.

  9. CD32 expression and signaling is down-regulated by transforming growth factor-beta 1 on human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Reterink, T J; Klar-Mohamad, N; Nibbering, P H; van Es, L A; Daha, M R

    1996-08-01

    CD32 (Fc gamma RII) is the most abundantly distributed class of IgG Fc receptors in the human body. In this study, we analyzed the effect of transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta 1, a cytokine with strong immunosuppressive function, on the expression and function of CD32 on freshly isolated peripheral blood monocytes and three human monocytic cell lines, U937, THP-1 and Mono mac-6. We found that TGF-beta 1 down-regulates CD32 expression on monocytes and all monocytic cell lines in a dose- and time-dependent fashion. A mean down-regulation of CD32 expression on THP-1 cells of 54 +/- 3.2% after 24 h was found at a concentration of 1 ng/ml TGF-beta 1. At the mRNA level, TGF-beta 1 induced a twofold down-regulation of CD32. Cross-linking of CD32 induced an increase in the concentration of intracellular Ca2+, which was reduced by 50% by TGF-beta 1, suggesting a decreased downstream signaling mediated by the receptor.

  10. Reversal of islet GIP receptor down-regulation and resistance to GIP by reducing hyperglycemia in the Zucker rat

    SciTech Connect

    Piteau, Shalea; Olver, Amy; Kim, Su-Jin; Winter, Kyle; Pospisilik, John Andrew; Lynn, Francis; Manhart, Susanne; Demuth, Hans-Ulrich; Speck, Madeleine; Pederson, Raymond A.; McIntosh, Christopher H.S.

    2007-11-03

    In type 2 diabetes (T2DM) {beta}-cell responsiveness to glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) is reduced. In a model of T2DM, the VDF Zucker rat, GIP receptor mRNA and protein levels were shown to be down-regulated. Possible restoration of responsiveness to GIP in Zucker rats by reducing hyperglycemia has been examined. ZDF rats with extreme hyperglycemia demonstrated greater islet GIP receptor mRNA down-regulation (94.3 {+-} 3.8%) than ZF rats (48.8 {+-} 22.8%). GIP receptor mRNA levels in ZDF rats returned to 83.0 {+-} 17.9% of lean following normalization of hyperglycemia by phlorizin treatment and pancreas perfusions demonstrated markedly improved GIP responsiveness. Treatment of VDF rats with a DP IV inhibitor (P32/98) resulted in improved glucose tolerance and restored sensitivity to GIP in isolated pancreata. These findings support the proposal that GIP receptor down-regulation in rodent T2DM is secondary to chronic hyperglycemia and that normalization of glycemia can restore GIP sensitivity.

  11. Fasting Induces CART Down-Regulation in the Zebrafish Nervous System in a Cannabinoid Receptor 1-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Nishio, Shin-Ichi; Gibert, Yann; Berekelya, Liubov; Bernard, Laure; Brunet, Frédéric; Guillot, Etienne; Le Bail, Jean-Christophe; Sánchez, Juan Antonio; Galzin, Anne Marie; Triqueneaux, Gerard

    2012-01-01

    Central and peripheral mechanisms modulate food intake and energy balance in mammals and the precise role of the type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1) in these processes is still being explored. Using the zebrafish, Danio rerio, we show that rimonabant, a CB1-specific antagonist with an EC50 of 5.15 × 10−8 m, decreases embryonic yolk sac reserve use. We reveal a developmental overlap between CART genes and CB1 expression in the hypothalamus and medulla oblongata, two brain structures that play crucial roles in appetite regulation in mammals. We show that morpholino knockdown of CB1 or fasting decreases cocaine- and amphetamine-related transcript (CART)-3 expression. Strikingly, this down-regulation occurs only in regions coexpressing CB1 and CART3, reinforcing the link between CB1, CART, and appetite regulation. We show that rimonabant treatment impairs the fasting-induced down-regulation of CART expression in specific brain regions, whereas vehicle alone-treated embryos do not display this rescue of CART expression. Our data reveal that CB1 lies upstream of CART and signals the appetite through the down-regulation of CART expression. Thus, our results establish the zebrafish as a promising system to study appetite regulation. PMID:22700585

  12. Interferons alpha and beta down-regulate the expression of basic fibroblast growth factor in human carcinomas.

    PubMed Central

    Singh, R K; Gutman, M; Bucana, C D; Sanchez, R; Llansa, N; Fidler, I J

    1995-01-01

    We investigated the influence of interferons alpha, beta, and gamma (IFN-alpha, -beta, and -gamma) on the production of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) by human renal carcinoma cells. The human renal carcinoma cell metastatic line SN12PM6 was established in culture from a lung metastasis and SN12PM6-resistant cells were selected in vitro for resistance to the antiproliferative effects of IFN-alpha or IFN-beta. IFN-alpha and IFN-beta, but not IFN-gamma, down-regulated the expression of bFGF at the mRNA and protein levels by a mechanism independent of their antiproliferative effects. Down-regulation of bFGF required a long exposure (> 4 days) of cells to low concentrations (> 10 units/ml) of IFN-alpha or IFN-beta. The withdrawal of IFN-alpha or IFN-beta from the medium permitted SN12PM6-resistant cells to resume production of bFGF. The incubation of human bladder, prostate, colon, and breast carcinoma cells with noncytostatic concentrations of IFN-alpha or IFN-beta also produced down-regulation of bFGF production. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7753843

  13. An ethanol extract of Piper betle Linn. mediates its anti-inflammatory activity via down-regulation of nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Sudipto; Mula, Soumyaditya; Chattopadhyay, Subrata; Chatterjee, Mitali

    2007-05-01

    The leaves of Piper betle (locally known as Paan) have long been in use in the Indian indigenous system of medicine for the relief of pain; however, the underlying molecular mechanisms of this effect have not been elucidated. The anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects of an ethanolic extract of the leaves of P. betle (100 mg kg(-1); PB) were demonstrated in a complete Freund's adjuvant-induced model of arthritis in rats with dexamethasone (0.1 mg kg(-1)) as the positive control. At non-toxic concentrations of PB (5-25 microg mL(-1)), a dose-dependent decrease in extracellular production of nitric oxide in murine peritoneal macrophages was measured by the Griess assay and corroborated by flow cytometry using the nitric oxide specific probe, 4,5-diaminofluorescein-2 diacetate. This decreased generation of reactive nitrogen species was mediated by PB progressively down-regulating transcription of inducible nitric oxide synthase in macrophages, and concomitantly causing a dose-dependent decrease in the expression of interleukin-12 p40, indicating the ability of PB to down-regulate T-helper 1 pro-inflammatory responses. Taken together, the anti-inflammatory and anti-arthrotic activity of PB is attributable to its ability to down-regulate the generation of reactive nitrogen species, thus meriting further pharmacological investigation.

  14. Silencing Id-1 inhibits lymphangiogenesis through down-regulation of VEGF-C in oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Dong, Zuoqing; Wei, Fengcai; Zhou, Chengjun; Sumida, Tomoki; Hamakawa, Hiroyuki; Hu, Yingwei; Liu, Shaohua

    2011-01-01

    Our previous study demonstrated that overexpression of Id-1 (inhibitor of differentiation/DNA binding) was associated with lymphatic metastasis in human oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). In this study, we further unveiled the association of Id-1 with vascular endothelial growth factor-C (VEGF-C) and peritumoral lymphatic vessel density (PLVD), and the effect of silencing Id-1 on inhibiting lymphangiogenesis in OSCC. We found that Id-1 was associated with VEGF-C (r=0.569, p<0.001) and PLVD (r=0.240, p<0.001) in OSCC. Lentivirus-mediated RNA interference targeting Id-1 in an OSCC cell line Tca8113 resulted in down-regulation of VEGF-C (p=0.003, 0.007). Moreover, when Id-1 was suppressed by injecting Id-1-siRNA-lentivirus into the transplanted tumors in nude mice, VEGF-C was down-regulated (p=0.018) and the PLVD decreased (p=0.001). Our results suggest that Id-1 was correlated with lymphangiogenesis in OSCC. Silencing Id-1 could inhibit lymphangiogenesis through down-regulation of VEGF-C and it might be a promising treatment modality for the lymphatic metastasis of OSCC.

  15. Down-Regulation of Desmosomes in Cultured Cells: The Roles of PKC, Microtubules and Lysosomal/Proteasomal Degradation

    PubMed Central

    McHarg, Selina; Hopkins, Gemma; Lim, Lusiana; Garrod, David

    2014-01-01

    Desmosomes are intercellular adhesive junctions of major importance for tissue integrity. To allow cell motility and migration they are down-regulated in epidermal wound healing. Electron microscopy indicates that whole desmosomes are internalised by cells in tissues, but the mechanism of down-regulation is unclear. In this paper we provide an overview of the internalisation of half-desmosomes by cultured cells induced by calcium chelation. Our results show that: (i) half desmosome internalisation is dependent on conventional PKC isoforms; (ii) microtubules transport internalised half desmosomes to the region of the centrosome by a kinesin-dependent mechanism; (iii) desmosomal proteins remain colocalised after internalisation and are not recycled to the cell surface; (iv) internalised desmosomes are degraded by the combined action of lysosomes and proteasomes. We also confirm that half desmosome internalisation is dependent upon the actin cytoskeleton. These results suggest that half desmosomes are not disassembled and recycled during or after internalisation but instead are transported to the centrosomal region where they are degraded. These findings may have significance for the down-regulation of desmosomes in wounds. PMID:25291180

  16. Down-regulation of genes related to the adrenergic system may contribute to splanchnic vasodilation in rat portal hypertension.

    PubMed

    Coll, Mar; Genescà, Joan; Raurell, Imma; Rodríguez-Vilarrupla, Aina; Mejías, Marc; Otero, Teresa; Oria, Marc; Esteban, Rafael; Guardia, Jaime; Bosch, Jaime; Martell, María

    2008-07-01

    Splanchnic vasodilation initiates the hyperdynamic syndrome in portal hypertension. We aimed to explore molecular mechanisms involved in the development of mesenteric vasodilation in portal hypertension. Superior mesenteric artery (SMA) samples from portal vein ligated (PVL) and sham rats were compared in a time course experiment using DNA microarrays. Selected genes were quantified by qRT-PCR in PVL and cirrhotic rats. Inmunohistochemistry of tyrosine hydroxylase (Th) and norepinephrine was assessed in SMA sections of PVL and sham rats. Western blot analysis of Th, dopamine beta-hydroxylase (Dbh) and synaptosome-associated protein (Snap-25) was performed in SMA and jejunum samples from the animal models. Fifty differentially expressed genes implicated in neurotransmission, especially adrenergic, were detected in SMA samples from PVL rats. Sequential analysis showed a profound down-regulation at 14 days in PVL rats. These down-regulated genes were confirmed by RT-PCR in SMA from PVL and cirrhotic rats. Th and NE detection by immunohistochemistry was reduced in PVL compared to sham. Th, Dbh and Snap-25 expression was lower in SMA from 14-day PVL and cirrhotic rats compared to sham and control rats, respectively. Genetic down-regulation of genes related to the adrenergic system might have a role in splanchnic vasodilation of portal hypertension.

  17. MiR-217 is down-regulated in psoriasis and promotes keratinocyte differentiation via targeting GRHL2

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Haigang; Hou, Liyue; Liu, Jingjing; Li, Zhiming

    2016-02-26

    MiR-217 is a well-known tumor suppressor, and its down-regulation has been shown in a wide range of solid and leukaemic cancers. However, the biological role of miR-217 in psoriasis pathogenesis, especially in keratinocyte hyperproliferation and differentiation, is not clearly understood. In this study, we found the expression of miR-217 was markedly down-regulated in psoriasis keratinocytes of psoriatic patients. In addition, overexpression of miR-217 inhibited the proliferation and promoted the differentiation of primary human keratinocytes. On the contrary, inhibition of endogenous miR-217 increased cell proliferation and delayed differentiation. Furthermore, Grainyhead-like 2 (GRHL2) was identified as a direct target of miR-217 by luciferase reporter assay. The expression of miR-217 and GRHL2 was inversely correlated in both transfected keratinocytes and in psoriasis lesional skin. Moreover, knocking down GRHL2 expression by siRNA enhanced keratinocyte differentiation. Taken together, our results demonstrate a role for miR-217 in the regulation of keratinocyte differentiation, partially through the regulation of GRHL2. - Highlights: • miR-217 is down-regulated in psoriasis skin lesions. • miR-217 inhibits the proliferation and promotes differentiation of keratinocytes. • GRHL2 is a novel target of miR-217 in keratinocytes. • GRHL2 is up-regulated and inversely correlated with miR-217 in psoriasis skin lesions.

  18. Ginsenoside Rg3 inhibits epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and invasion of lung cancer by down-regulating FUT4.

    PubMed

    Tian, Lili; Shen, Dachuan; Li, Xiaodong; Shan, Xiu; Wang, Xiaoqi; Yan, Qiu; Liu, Jiwei

    2016-01-12

    The epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is an important factor in lung cancer metastasis, and targeting EMT is a potential therapeutic strategy. Fucosyltransferase IV (FUT4) and its synthetic cancer sugar antigen Lewis Y (LeY) was abnormally elevated in many cancers. In this study, a traditional Chinese medicine ginsenoside Rg3 was used to investigate whether its inhibition to EMT and invasion of lung cancer is by the glycobiology mechanism. We found that Rg3 treatment (25, 50, 100 μg/ml) inhibited cell migration and invasion by wound-healing and transwell assays. Rg3 could significantly alter EMT marker proteins with increased E-cadherin, but decreased Snail, N-cadherin and Vimentin expression. Rg3 also down-regulated FUT4 gene and protein expression in lung cancer cells by qPCR, Western blot and immunofluorescence. After FUT4 down-regulated with shFUT4, EMT was obviously inhibited. Furthermore, the activation of EGFR through decreased LeY biosynthesis was inhibited, which blocked the downstream MAPK and NF-κB signal pathways. In addition, Rg3 reduced tumor volume and weight in xenograft mouse model, and significantly decreased tumor metastasis nodules in lung tissues by tail vein injection. In conclusion, Rg3 inhibits EMT and invasion of lung cancer by down-regulating FUT4 mediated EGFR inactivation and blocking MAPK and NF-κB signal pathways. Rg3 may be a potentially effective agent for the treatment of lung cancer.

  19. miR-340 predicts glioblastoma survival and modulates key cancer hallmarks through down-regulation of NRAS

    PubMed Central

    Fiore, Danilo; Donnarumma, Elvira; Roscigno, Giuseppina; Iaboni, Margherita; Russo, Valentina; Affinito, Alessandra; Adamo, Assunta; De Martino, Fabio; Quintavalle, Cristina; Romano, Giulia; Greco, Adelaide; Soini, Ylermi; Brunetti, Arturo; Croce, Carlo M.; Condorelli, Gerolama

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma is the most common primary brain tumor in adults; with a survival rate of 12 months from diagnosis. However, a small subgroup of patients, termed long-term survivors (LTS), has a survival rate longer then 12–14 months. There is thus increasing interest in the identification of molecular signatures predicting glioblastoma prognosis and in how to improve the therapeutic approach. Here, we report miR-340 as prognostic tumor-suppressor microRNA for glioblastoma. We analyzed microRNA expression in > 500 glioblastoma patients and found that although miR-340 is strongly down-regulated in glioblastoma overall, it is up-regulated in LTS patients compared to short-term survivors (STS). Indeed, miR-340 expression predicted better prognosis in glioblastoma patients. Coherently, overexpression of miR-340 in glioblastoma cells was found to produce a tumor-suppressive activity. We identified NRAS mRNA as a critical, direct target of miR-340: in fact, miR-340 negatively influenced multiple aspects of glioblastoma tumorigenesis by down-regulating NRAS and downstream AKT and ERK pathways. Thus, we demonstrate that expression of miR-340 in glioblastoma is responsible for a strong tumor-suppressive effect in LTS patients by down-regulating NRAS. miR-340 may thus represent a novel marker for glioblastoma diagnosis and prognosis, and may be developed into a tool to improve treatment of glioblastoma. PMID:26799668

  20. Ginsenoside Rg3 inhibits epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and invasion of lung cancer by down-regulating FUT4

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaodong; Shan, Xiu; Wang, Xiaoqi; Yan, Qiu; Liu, Jiwei

    2016-01-01

    The epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is an important factor in lung cancer metastasis, and targeting EMT is a potential therapeutic strategy. Fucosyltransferase IV (FUT4) and its synthetic cancer sugar antigen Lewis Y (LeY) was abnormally elevated in many cancers. In this study, a traditional Chinese medicine ginsenoside Rg3 was used to investigate whether its inhibition to EMT and invasion of lung cancer is by the glycobiology mechanism. We found that Rg3 treatment (25, 50, 100 μg/ml) inhibited cell migration and invasion by wound-healing and transwell assays. Rg3 could significantly alter EMT marker proteins with increased E-cadherin, but decreased Snail, N-cadherin and Vimentin expression. Rg3 also down-regulated FUT4 gene and protein expression in lung cancer cells by qPCR, Western blot and immunofluorescence. After FUT4 down-regulated with shFUT4, EMT was obviously inhibited. Furthermore, the activation of EGFR through decreased LeY biosynthesis was inhibited, which blocked the downstream MAPK and NF-κB signal pathways. In addition, Rg3 reduced tumor volume and weight in xenograft mouse model, and significantly decreased tumor metastasis nodules in lung tissues by tail vein injection. In conclusion, Rg3 inhibits EMT and invasion of lung cancer by down-regulating FUT4 mediated EGFR inactivation and blocking MAPK and NF-κB signal pathways. Rg3 may be a potentially effective agent for the treatment of lung cancer. PMID:26636541

  1. Fasting induces CART down-regulation in the zebrafish nervous system in a cannabinoid receptor 1-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Nishio, Shin-Ichi; Gibert, Yann; Berekelya, Liubov; Bernard, Laure; Brunet, Frédéric; Guillot, Etienne; Le Bail, Jean-Christophe; Sánchez, Juan Antonio; Galzin, Anne Marie; Triqueneaux, Gerard; Laudet, Vincent

    2012-08-01

    Central and peripheral mechanisms modulate food intake and energy balance in mammals and the precise role of the type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1) in these processes is still being explored. Using the zebrafish, Danio rerio, we show that rimonabant, a CB1-specific antagonist with an EC(50) of 5.15 × 10(-8) m, decreases embryonic yolk sac reserve use. We reveal a developmental overlap between CART genes and CB1 expression in the hypothalamus and medulla oblongata, two brain structures that play crucial roles in appetite regulation in mammals. We show that morpholino knockdown of CB1 or fasting decreases cocaine- and amphetamine-related transcript (CART)-3 expression. Strikingly, this down-regulation occurs only in regions coexpressing CB1 and CART3, reinforcing the link between CB1, CART, and appetite regulation. We show that rimonabant treatment impairs the fasting-induced down-regulation of CART expression in specific brain regions, whereas vehicle alone-treated embryos do not display this rescue of CART expression. Our data reveal that CB1 lies upstream of CART and signals the appetite through the down-regulation of CART expression. Thus, our results establish the zebrafish as a promising system to study appetite regulation.

  2. Down-Regulation of Type I Runx2 Mediated by Dexamethasone Is Required for 3T3-L1 Adipogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, You-you; Li, Xi; Qian, Shu-wen; Guo, Liang; Huang, Hai-yan; He, Qun; Liu, Yuan; Ma, Chun-gu

    2012-01-01

    Runx2, a runt-related transcriptional factor family member, is involved in the regulation of osteoblast differentiation. Interestingly, it is abundant in growth-arrested 3T3-L1 preadipocytes and was dramatically down-regulated during adipocyte differentiation. Knockdown of Runx2 expression promoted 3T3-L1 adipocyte differentiation, whereas overexpression inhibited adipocyte differentiation and promoted the trans-differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes to bone cells. Runx2 was down-regulated specifically by dexamethasone (DEX). Only type I Runx2 was expressed in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. Using luciferase assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation-quantitative PCR analysis, it was found that DEX repressed this type of Runx2 at the transcriptional level through direct binding of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) to a GR-binding