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Sample records for rapid cellular identification

  1. Functional recognition imaging using artificial neural networks: applications to rapid cellular identification via broadband electromechanical response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikiforov, M. P.; Reukov, V. V.; Thompson, G. L.; Vertegel, A. A.; Guo, S.; Kalinin, S. V.; Jesse, S.

    2009-10-01

    Functional recognition imaging in scanning probe microscopy (SPM) using artificial neural network identification is demonstrated. This approach utilizes statistical analysis of complex SPM responses at a single spatial location to identify the target behavior, which is reminiscent of associative thinking in the human brain, obviating the need for analytical models. We demonstrate, as an example of recognition imaging, rapid identification of cellular organisms using the difference in electromechanical activity over a broad frequency range. Single-pixel identification of model Micrococcus lysodeikticus and Pseudomonas fluorescens bacteria is achieved, demonstrating the viability of the method.

  2. Rapid Aquaporin Translocation Regulates Cellular Water Flow

    PubMed Central

    Conner, Matthew T.; Conner, Alex C.; Bland, Charlotte E.; Taylor, Luke H. J.; Brown, James E. P.; Parri, H. Rheinallt; Bill, Roslyn M.

    2012-01-01

    The control of cellular water flow is mediated by the aquaporin (AQP) family of membrane proteins. The structural features of the family and the mechanism of selective water passage through the AQP pore are established, but there remains a gap in our knowledge of how water transport is regulated. Two broad possibilities exist. One is controlling the passage of water through the AQP pore, but this only has been observed as a phenomenon in some plant and microbial AQPs. An alternative is controlling the number of AQPs in the cell membrane. Here, we describe a novel pathway in mammalian cells whereby a hypotonic stimulus directly induces intracellular calcium elevations through transient receptor potential channels, which trigger AQP1 translocation. This translocation, which has a direct role in cell volume regulation, occurs within 30 s and is dependent on calmodulin activation and phosphorylation of AQP1 at two threonine residues by protein kinase C. This direct mechanism provides a rationale for the changes in water transport that are required in response to constantly changing local cellular water availability. Moreover, because calcium is a pluripotent and ubiquitous second messenger in biological systems, the discovery of its role in the regulation of AQP translocation has ramifications for diverse physiological and pathophysiological processes, as well as providing an explanation for the rapid regulation of water flow that is necessary for cell homeostasis. PMID:22334691

  3. Rapid detection of biothreat agents based on cellular machinery.

    SciTech Connect

    Lane, Todd W.; Gantt, Richard W.

    2004-12-01

    This research addresses rapid and sensitive identification of biological agents in a complex background. We attempted to devise a method by which the specificity of the cellular transcriptional machinery could be used to detect and identify bacterial bio-terror agents in a background of other organisms. Bacterial cells contain RNA polymerases and transcription factors that transcribe genes into mRNA for translation into proteins. RNA polymerases in conjunction with transcription factors recognize regulatory elements (promoters) upstream of the gene. These promoters are, in many cases, recognized by the polymerase and transcription factor combinations of one species only. We have engineered a plasmid, for Escherichia coli, containing the virA promoter from the target species Shigella flexneri. This promoter was fused to a reporter gene Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP). In theory the indicator strain (carrying the plasmid) is mixed with the target strain and the two are lysed. The cellular machinery from both cells mixes and the GFP is produced. This report details the results of testing this system.

  4. Rapid detection and identification of infectious agents

    SciTech Connect

    Kingsbury, D.T.; Falkow, S.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains papers divided among five sections. Some of the paper titles are: Aspects of Using Nucleic Acid Filter Hybridization to Characterize and Detect Enteroviral RNAs; Rapid Identification of Lesihmania Species using Specific Hybridization of Kinetoplast DNA Sequences; Selection of DNA Probes for use in the Diagnosis of Infectious Disease; and Summary of DNA Probes.

  5. [Rapid identification of mycobacteria using laser fluorescence].

    PubMed

    Ivanova, M A; Makarova, M V; Vasil'ev, E; Aleksandrov, M T; Pashkov, E P

    2009-01-01

    To develop rapid method of identification of mycobacteria based on laser fluorescence. Characteristics of laser-induced fluorescence of 19 bacteria species, including 17 species of mycobacteria, were studied. Identification of microorganisms was performed using measurement of spectral-fluorescent characteristics. Library of spectral-fluorescent characteristics of mycobacteria in different concentrations ratios and associations was created, which formed the basis of database for identification of mycobacteria by laser-fluorescent method. Principles of diagnostic algorithm of indication and differentiation of mycobacteria using this method were developed. Effect of myramistin for increasing the intensity of mycobacteria fluorescence, account of the diffracting characteristics of medium for adjustment of spectral characteristics of mycobacteria and processing of data by factor analysis are needed. Efficacy of the method was 80 - 90%. Principles of rapid identification of mycobacteria and their associations developed on the basis of laser-fluorescent method are experimentally founded and tested on unknown cultures of mycobacteria and objectively prove the possibility to apply this method for express identification of mycobacteria belonging to M. tuberculosis complex as well as non-tuberculous mycobacteria.

  6. Blind identification of cellular phone cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çeliktutan, Oya; Avcibas, Ismail; Sankur, Bülent

    2007-02-01

    In this paper, we focus on blind source cell-phone identification problem. It is known various artifacts in the image processing pipeline, such as pixel defects or unevenness of the responses in the CCD sensor, black current noise, proprietary interpolation algorithms involved in color filter array [CFA] leave telltale footprints. These artifacts, although often imperceptible, are statistically stable and can be considered as a signature of the camera type or even of the individual device. For this purpose, we explore a set of forensic features, such as binary similarity measures, image quality measures and higher order wavelet statistics in conjunction SVM classifier to identify the originating cell-phone type. We provide identification results among 9 different brand cell-phone cameras. In addition to our initial results, we applied a set of geometrical operations to original images in order to investigate how much our proposed method is robust under these manipulations.

  7. Rapid Adenovirus typing method for species identification.

    PubMed

    Rayne, Fabienne; Wittkop, Linda; Bader, Clément; Kassab, Somar; Tumiotto, Camille; Berciaud, Sylvie; Wodrich, Harald; Lafon, Marie-Edith

    2017-11-01

    Adenoviruses are characterized by a large variability, reflected by their classification in species A to G. Certain species, eg A and C, could be associated with increased clinical severity, both in immunocompetent and immunocompromised hosts suggesting that in some instances species identification provides clinically relevant information. Here we designed a novel "pVI rapid typing method" to obtain quick, simple and cost effective species assignment for Adenoviruses, thanks to combined fusion temperature (Tm) and amplicon size analysis. Rapid typing results were compared to Sanger sequencing in the hexon gene for 140 Adenovirus-positive clinical samples included in the Typadeno study. Species A and C could be identified with a 100% positive predictive value, thus confirming the value of this simple typing method. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Rapid identification of microorganisms by intrinsic fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatta, Hemant; Goldys, Ewa M.; Learmonth, Robert

    2005-03-01

    Microbial contamination has serious consequences for the industries that use fermentation processes. Common contaminants such as faster growing lactic acid bacteria or wild yeast can rapidly outnumber inoculated culture yeast and produce undesirable end products. Our study focuses on a rapid method of identification of such contaminants based on autofluorescence spectroscopy of bacterial and yeast species. Lactic acid bacteria (Lac-tobacillus casei), and yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) were cultured under controlled conditions and studied for variations in their autofluorescence. We observed spectral differences in the spectral range representative of tryptophan residues of proteins, with excitation at 290 nm and emission scanned in the 300 nm - 440 nm range. Excitation scans between 240 nm and 310 nm were also performed for the emission at 340 nm. Moreover, we observed clearly pronounced differences in the excitation and emission in the visible range, with 410 nm excitation. These results demonstrate that bacterial and yeast species can be differentiated using their intrinsic fluorescence both in UV and in the visible region. The comparative spectroscopic study of selected strains of Saccharomyces yeast showed clear differences between strains. Spectrally-resolved laser scanning microscopy was carried out to link the results obtained using ensembles of cells with spectral properties of individual cells. Strongly fluorescent subpopulation were observed for all yeast strains with excitation at 405 nm. The fluorescence spectra showed variations correlated with cell brightness. The presented results demonstrate that using autofluorescence, it is possible to differentiate between yeast and lactic acid bacteria and between different yeast species.

  9. Rapid identification of emerging pathogens: coronavirus.

    PubMed

    Sampath, Rangarajan; Hofstadler, Steven A; Blyn, Lawrence B; Eshoo, Mark W; Hall, Thomas A; Massire, Christian; Levene, Harold M; Hannis, James C; Harrell, Patina M; Neuman, Benjamin; Buchmeier, Michael J; Jiang, Yun; Ranken, Raymond; Drader, Jared J; Samant, Vivek; Griffey, Richard H; McNeil, John A; Crooke, Stanley T; Ecker, David J

    2005-03-01

    We describe a new approach for infectious disease surveillance that facilitates rapid identification of known and emerging pathogens. The process uses broad-range polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to amplify nucleic acid targets from large groupings of organisms, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry for accurate mass measurements of PCR products, and base composition signature analysis to identify organisms in a sample. We demonstrate this principle by using 14 isolates of 9 diverse Coronavirus spp., including the severe acute respiratory syndrome-associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV). We show that this method could identify and distinguish between SARS and other known CoV, including the human CoV 229E and OC43, individually and in a mixture of all 3 human viruses. The sensitivity of detection, measured by using titered SARS-CoV spiked into human serum, was approximate, equals1 PFU/mL. This approach, applicable to the surveillance of bacterial, viral, fungal, or protozoal pathogens, is capable of automated analysis of >900 PCR reactions per day.

  10. Rapid Identification of Emerging Pathogens: Coronavirus

    PubMed Central

    Hofstadler, Steven A.; Blyn, Lawrence B.; Eshoo, Mark W.; Hall, Thomas A.; Massire, Christian; Levene, Harold M.; Hannis, James C.; Harrell, Patina M.; Neuman, Benjamin; Buchmeier, Michael J.; Jiang, Yun; Ranken, Raymond; Drader, Jared J.; Samant, Vivek; Griffey, Richard H.; McNeil, John A.; Crooke, Stanley T.; Ecker, David J.

    2005-01-01

    We describe a new approach for infectious disease surveillance that facilitates rapid identification of known and emerging pathogens. The process uses broad-range polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to amplify nucleic acid targets from large groupings of organisms, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry for accurate mass measurements of PCR products, and base composition signature analysis to identify organisms in a sample. We demonstrate this principle by using 14 isolates of 9 diverse Coronavirus spp., including the severe acute respiratory syndrome–associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV). We show that this method could identify and distinguish between SARS and other known CoV, including the human CoV 229E and OC43, individually and in a mixture of all 3 human viruses. The sensitivity of detection, measured by using titered SARS-CoV spiked into human serum, was ≈1 PFU/mL. This approach, applicable to the surveillance of bacterial, viral, fungal, or protozoal pathogens, is capable of automated analysis of >900 PCR reactions per day. PMID:15757550

  11. Rapid identification of Candida dubliniensis with commercial yeast identification systems.

    PubMed

    Pincus, D H; Coleman, D C; Pruitt, W R; Padhye, A A; Salkin, I F; Geimer, M; Bassel, A; Sullivan, D J; Clarke, M; Hearn, V

    1999-11-01

    Candida dubliniensis is a newly described species that is closely related phylogenetically to Candida albicans and that is commonly associated with oral candidiasis in human immunodeficiency virus-positive patients. Several recent studies have attempted to elucidate phenotypic and genotypic characteristics of use in separating the two species. However, results obtained with simple phenotypic tests were too variable and tests that provided more definitive data were too complex for routine use in the clinical laboratory setting. The objective of this study was to determine if reproducible identification of C. dubliniensis could be obtained with commercial identification kits. The substrate reactivity profiles of 80 C. dubliniensis isolates were obtained by using the API 20C AUX, ID 32 C, RapID Yeast Plus, VITEK YBC, and VITEK 2 ID-YST systems. The percentages of C. dubliniensis isolates capable of assimilating or hydrolyzing each substrate were compared with the percentages from the C. albicans profiles in each kit's database, and the results were expressed as percent C. dubliniensis and percent C. albicans. Any substrate that showed >50% difference in reactivity was considered useful in differentiating the species. In addition, assimilation of methyl-alpha-D-glucoside (MDG), D-trehalose (TRE), and D-xylose (XYL) by the same isolates was investigated by the traditional procedure of Wickerham and Burton (L. J. Wickerham and K. A. Burton, J. Bacteriol. 56:363-371, 1948). At 48 h (the time recommended by the manufacturer for its new database), we found that the assimilation of four carbohydrates in the API 20C AUX system could be used to distinguish the species, i.e., glycerol (GLY; 88 and 14%), XYL (0 and 88%), MDG (0 and 85%), and TRE (15 and 97%). Similarly, results with the ID 32 C system at 48 h showed that XYL (0 and 98%), MDG (0 and 98%), lactate (LAT; 0 and 96%), and TRE (30 and 96%) could be used to separate the two species. Phosphatase (PHS; 9 and 76%) and

  12. Rapid identification of Listeria spp.: an AOAC performance test of the MIT 1000 rapid microbial identification system

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Methods that rapidly confirm the identification of foodborne pathogens are highly desired. The Micro Imaging Technology (MIT) 1000 Rapid Microbial Identification (RMID) System is a benchtop instrument that detects laser light scattered from individual bacterial cells in solution with an array of 35 ...

  13. Automated identification of stratifying signatures in cellular subpopulations

    PubMed Central

    Bruggner, Robert V.; Bodenmiller, Bernd; Dill, David L.; Tibshirani, Robert J.; Nolan, Garry P.

    2014-01-01

    Elucidation and examination of cellular subpopulations that display condition-specific behavior can play a critical contributory role in understanding disease mechanism, as well as provide a focal point for development of diagnostic criteria linking such a mechanism to clinical prognosis. Despite recent advancements in single-cell measurement technologies, the identification of relevant cell subsets through manual efforts remains standard practice. As new technologies such as mass cytometry increase the parameterization of single-cell measurements, the scalability and subjectivity inherent in manual analyses slows both analysis and progress. We therefore developed Citrus (cluster identification, characterization, and regression), a data-driven approach for the identification of stratifying subpopulations in multidimensional cytometry datasets. The methodology of Citrus is demonstrated through the identification of known and unexpected pathway responses in a dataset of stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells measured by mass cytometry. Additionally, the performance of Citrus is compared with that of existing methods through the analysis of several publicly available datasets. As the complexity of flow cytometry datasets continues to increase, methods such as Citrus will be needed to aid investigators in the performance of unbiased—and potentially more thorough—correlation-based mining and inspection of cell subsets nested within high-dimensional datasets. PMID:24979804

  14. Rapid Assay of Cellular Immunity in Q Fever.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-10-01

    requirement for expensive equipment or in time and manipulations. 5. Q Fever and the role of cellular immunity. Q fever is a zoonosis caused by the...812-818 Liang, S., et. al. (1994) Heterosubtypic Immunity to Influenza type A virus: effector mechanisms. J. Immunol.;152:1653. Liew, F.Y., O’Donnell

  15. Rapid Methods for the Laboratory Identification of Pathogenic Microorganisms.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-09-01

    reveree aide If neceeeary and Identify by block number) Lectins: Rapid Identification, Bacillus anthracisjCryptococcus " neoformans. Neisseria...field-type kit for the rapid identification of Bacillus anthracis. We have shown that certain lectins will selectively interact with B. anthracis...but not with other species of the Bacillus genus. This finding provides the basis for devising more sensitive assays, such as an enzyme-linked

  16. Quality Controls in Cellular Immunotherapies: Rapid Assessment of Clinical Grade Dendritic Cells by Gene Expression Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Castiello, Luciano; Sabatino, Marianna; Zhao, Yingdong; Tumaini, Barbara; Ren, Jiaqiang; Ping, Jin; Wang, Ena; Wood, Lauren V; Marincola, Francesco M; Puri, Raj K; Stroncek, David F

    2013-01-01

    Cell-based immunotherapies are among the most promising approaches for developing effective and targeted immune response. However, their clinical usefulness and the evaluation of their efficacy rely heavily on complex quality control assessment. Therefore, rapid systematic methods are urgently needed for the in-depth characterization of relevant factors affecting newly developed cell product consistency and the identification of reliable markers for quality control. Using dendritic cells (DCs) as a model, we present a strategy to comprehensively characterize manufactured cellular products in order to define factors affecting their variability, quality and function. After generating clinical grade human monocyte-derived mature DCs (mDCs), we tested by gene expression profiling the degrees of product consistency related to the manufacturing process and variability due to intra- and interdonor factors, and how each factor affects single gene variation. Then, by calculating for each gene an index of variation we selected candidate markers for identity testing, and defined a set of genes that may be useful comparability and potency markers. Subsequently, we confirmed the observed gene index of variation in a larger clinical data set. In conclusion, using high-throughput technology we developed a method for the characterization of cellular therapies and the discovery of novel candidate quality assurance markers. PMID:23147403

  17. [Study of Rapid Species Identification of Bacteria in Water].

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiu-yue; Zhao, Nan-jing; Duan, Jing-bo; Fang, Li; Meng, De-shuo; Yang, Rui-fang; Xiao, Xue; Liu, Jian-guo; Liu, Wen-qing

    2015-09-01

    Multi-wavelength ultraviolet visible (UV-Vis) transmission spectra of bacteria combined the forward scattering and absorption properties of microbes, contains substantial information on size, shape, and the other chemical, physiological character of bacterial cells, has the bacterial species specificity, which can be applied to rapid species identification of bacterial microbes. Four different kinds of bacteria including Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella typhimurium and Klebsiella pneumonia which were commonly existed in water were researched in this paper. Their multi-wavelength UV-Vis transmission spectra were measured and analyzed. The rapid identification method and model of bacteria were built which were based on support vector machine (SVM) and multi-wavelength UV-Vis transmission spectra of the bacteria. Using the internal cross validation based on grid search method of the training set for obtaining the best penalty factor C and the kernel parameter g, which the model needed. Established the bacteria fast identification model according to the optimal parameters and one-against-one classification method included in LibSVM. Using different experimental bacteria strains of transmission spectra as a test set of classification accuracy verification of the model, the analysis results showed that the bacterial rapid identification model built in this paper can identification the four kinds bacterial which chosen in this paper as the accuracy was 100%, and the model also can identified different subspecies of E. coli test set as the accuracy was 100%, proved the model had a good stability in identification bacterial species. In this paper, the research results of this study not only can provide a method for rapid identification and early warning of bacterial microbial in drinking water sources, but also can be used as the microbes identified in biomedical a simple, rapid and accurate means.

  18. Evaluation of the enhanced rapid identification method for Gardnerella vaginalis.

    PubMed Central

    Lien, E A; Hillier, S L

    1989-01-01

    The enhanced rapid identification method (RIM; Austin Biological Laboratories), a micromethod for the identification of Gardnerella vaginalis, is based on starch and raffinose fermentation and hippurate hydrolysis. We tested 105 clinical isolates of G. vaginalis with both the RIM and standard biochemical tests. The RIM agreed with the standard biochemical methods for 96 (91.4%) of the strains; nine isolates which were hippurate hydrolysis positive by standard biochemical tests were hippurate hydrolysis negative in the RIM. RIM may serve as a useful adjunct to Gram stain and colony morphology for the identification of G. vaginalis. PMID:2785533

  19. Rapid presumptive identification of Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Muchmore, H G; Felton, F G; Scott, E N

    1978-08-01

    Carbohydrate-containing extracts were prepared from mature yeast colonies grown on Sabouraud dextrose agar by mixing a 0.001-ml loopful of yeast cells for 30 s in phenolized saline and removing the cells by centrifugation. Extracts were prepared from 54 Cryptococcus neoformans isolates, 29 isolates of other Cryptococcus species, 16 isolates of Candida species, 2 Rhodotorula, 2 Torulopsis, and 1 Saccharomyces species. Initially the carbohydrate content of each extract was estimated (Molisch method) and adjusted to 1, 5, and 10 microgram/ml. Twofold dilutions of each extract were tested for reactivity with the cryptococcal latex agglutination reagent of Bloomfield et al. (N. Bloomfield, M.A. Gordon, and D.F. Elmendorf, Jr., Proc. Soc. Exp. Biol. Med. 114:64-67, 1963). All 54 C. neoformans extracts gave strong agglutinations (3+ to 4+) in dilutions of 1:4 or greater. None of the other yeasts produced any agglutination, except for 1 of 15 C. laurentii isolates, which showed a 1+ reaction that disappeared at a dilution of 1:4 and above. Subsequent testing established that a single extract made from 0.001 ml of yeast cells in 6 ml of phenolized saline contained less than 5 microgram of carbohydrate per ml, was suitable for a single rapid screening dilution, and eliminated any cross-reaction from the C. laurentii isolates. In our hands this method has provided a reliable differentiation of C. neoformans from other unknown yeast colonies in less than 20 min exclusive of a Molisch determination.

  20. Rapid presumptive identification of Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed Central

    Muchmore, H G; Felton, F G; Scott, E N

    1978-01-01

    Carbohydrate-containing extracts were prepared from mature yeast colonies grown on Sabouraud dextrose agar by mixing a 0.001-ml loopful of yeast cells for 30 s in phenolized saline and removing the cells by centrifugation. Extracts were prepared from 54 Cryptococcus neoformans isolates, 29 isolates of other Cryptococcus species, 16 isolates of Candida species, 2 Rhodotorula, 2 Torulopsis, and 1 Saccharomyces species. Initially the carbohydrate content of each extract was estimated (Molisch method) and adjusted to 1, 5, and 10 microgram/ml. Twofold dilutions of each extract were tested for reactivity with the cryptococcal latex agglutination reagent of Bloomfield et al. (N. Bloomfield, M.A. Gordon, and D.F. Elmendorf, Jr., Proc. Soc. Exp. Biol. Med. 114:64-67, 1963). All 54 C. neoformans extracts gave strong agglutinations (3+ to 4+) in dilutions of 1:4 or greater. None of the other yeasts produced any agglutination, except for 1 of 15 C. laurentii isolates, which showed a 1+ reaction that disappeared at a dilution of 1:4 and above. Subsequent testing established that a single extract made from 0.001 ml of yeast cells in 6 ml of phenolized saline contained less than 5 microgram of carbohydrate per ml, was suitable for a single rapid screening dilution, and eliminated any cross-reaction from the C. laurentii isolates. In our hands this method has provided a reliable differentiation of C. neoformans from other unknown yeast colonies in less than 20 min exclusive of a Molisch determination. PMID:359587

  1. Portable Raman instrument for rapid biological agent detection and identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesaicherre, Marie L.; Paxon, Tracy L.; Mondello, Frank J.; Burrell, Michael C.; Linsebigler, Amy

    2009-05-01

    The rapid and sensitive identification of biological species is a critical need for the 1st responder and military communities. Raman spectroscopy is a powerful tool for substance identification that has gained popularity with the respective communities due to the increasing availability of portable Raman spectrometers. Attempts to use Raman spectroscopy for the direct identification of biological pathogens has been hindered by the complexity of the generated Raman spectrum. We report here the use of a sandwich immunoassay containing antibody modified magnetic beads to capture and concentrate target analytes in solution and Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) tags conjugated with these same antibodies for specific detection. Using this approach, the biological complexity of a microorganism can be translated into chemical simplicity and Raman can be used for the identification of biological pathogens. The developed assay has a low limit of detection due to the SERS effect, robust to commonly found white powders interferants, and stable at room temperature over extended period of time. This assay is being implemented into a user-friendly interface to be used in conjunction with the GE Homeland Protection StreetLab MobileTM Raman instrument for rapid, field deployable chemical and biological identification.

  2. Continuous-Flow Detector for Rapid Pathogen Identification

    SciTech Connect

    Barrett, Louise M.; Skulan, Andrew J.; Singh, Anup K.; Cummings, Eric B.; Fiechtner, Gregory J.

    2006-09-01

    This report describes the continued development of a low-power, portable detector for the rapid identification of pathogens such as B. anthracis and smallpox. Based on our successful demonstration of the continuous filter/concentrator inlet, we believe strongly that the inlet section will enable differentiation between viable and non-viable populations, between types of cells, and between pathogens and background contamination. Selective, continuous focusing of particles in a microstream enables highly selective and sensitive identification using fluorescently labeled antibodies and other receptors such as peptides, aptamers, or small ligands to minimize false positives. Processes such as mixing and lysing will also benefit from the highly localized particle streams. The concentrator is based on faceted prisms to contract microfluidic flows while maintaining uniform flowfields. The resulting interfaces, capable of high throughput, serve as high-, low-, and band-pass filters to direct selected bioparticles to a rapid, affinity-based detection system. The proposed device is superior to existing array-based detectors as antibody-pathogen binding can be accomplished in seconds rather than tens of minutes or even hours. The system is being designed to interface with aerosol collectors under development by the National Laboratories or commercial systems. The focused stream is designed to be interrogated using diode lasers to differentiate pathogens by light scattering. Identification of particles is done using fluorescently labeled antibodies to tag the particles, followed by multiplexed laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) detection (achieved by labeling each antibody with a different dye).

  3. [A rapid quantificational identification model of minerals and its applications].

    PubMed

    Li, Shuai; Lin, Qi-Zhong; Liu, Qing-Jie; Wang, Meng-Fei; Wang, Qin-Jun; Wei, Yong-Ming

    2010-05-01

    Rapid identification of minerals is the key point for enhancing the efficiency of mineral exploration by remote sensing, mineral mapping by remote sensing and many geological investigations. Because of the limitation of technology and other aspects, the amount of models and software concerning rapid identification of minerals is very small. Since 1990s the development in spectrometers and computers has made it possible to apply near infrared spectrum technology to identify minerals. Two models have emerged. Model I is based on analyzing the position of absorption bands, while Model II is founded on waveform matching. In the present paper, characteristic spectrum linear inversion modeling was built. Validated by the data gained from end-members of USGS mineral spectrum library by mixing randomly, this model with the accuracy being approximately 100% is much better than Model I and II. Used to analyze the 23 samples selected in Baogutu area in Xinjiang, the model we built with the accuracy of 64.6% is superior to Model I (the accuracy is 33.8%) and Model II (the accuracy is 8.1%). Though the accuracy of our model is not as high as that of identification by microscope at present, using our model is much more effective and convenient, and there also will be less artificial error and smaller workload. The good performance of our model in the mineral exploration work by remote sensing in Baogutu area in Xinjiang shows wide popularizing prospects.

  4. Pyrosequencing assay for rapid identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex species

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Identification of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex organisms to the species level is important for diagnostic, therapeutic and epidemiologic perspectives. Indeed, isolates are routinely identified as belonging to the M. tuberculosis complex without further discrimination in agreement with the high genomic similarity of the M. tuberculosis complex members and the resulting complex available identification tools. Findings We herein develop a pyrosequencing assay analyzing polymorphisms within glpK, pykA and gyrB genes to identify members of the M. tuberculosis complex at the species level. The assay was evaluated with 22 M. tuberculosis, 21 M. bovis, 3 M. caprae, 3 M. microti, 2 M. bovis BCG, 2 M. pinnipedii, 1 M. canettii and 1 M. africanum type I isolates. The resulted pyrograms were consistent with conventional DNA sequencing data and successfully identified all isolates. Additionally, 127 clinical M. tuberculosis complex isolates were analyzed and were unambiguously identified as M. tuberculosis. Conclusion We proposed a pyrosequencing-based scheme for the rapid identification of M. tuberculosis complex isolates at the species level. The assay is robust, specific, rapid and can be easily introduced in the routine activity. PMID:22011383

  5. Rapidly Retargetable Approaches to De-identification in Medical Records

    PubMed Central

    Wellner, Ben; Huyck, Matt; Mardis, Scott; Aberdeen, John; Morgan, Alex; Peshkin, Leonid; Yeh, Alex; Hitzeman, Janet; Hirschman, Lynette

    2007-01-01

    Objective This paper describes a successful approach to de-identification that was developed to participate in a recent AMIA-sponsored challenge evaluation. Method Our approach focused on rapid adaptation of existing toolkits for named entity recognition using two existing toolkits, Carafe and LingPipe. Results The “out of the box” Carafe system achieved a very good score (phrase F-measure of 0.9664) with only four hours of work to adapt it to the de-identification task. With further tuning, we were able to reduce the token-level error term by over 36% through task-specific feature engineering and the introduction of a lexicon, achieving a phrase F-measure of 0.9736. Conclusions We were able to achieve good performance on the de-identification task by the rapid retargeting of existing toolkits. For the Carafe system, we developed a method for tuning the balance of recall vs. precision, as well as a confidence score that correlated well with the measured F-score. PMID:17600096

  6. Divergent synthesis and identification of the cellular targets of deoxyelephantopins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagoutte, Roman; Serba, Christelle; Abegg, Daniel; Hoch, Dominic G.; Adibekian, Alexander; Winssinger, Nicolas

    2016-08-01

    Herbal extracts containing sesquiterpene lactones have been extensively used in traditional medicine and are known to be rich in α,β-unsaturated functionalities that can covalently engage target proteins. Here we report synthetic methodologies to access analogues of deoxyelephantopin, a sesquiterpene lactone with anticancer properties. Using alkyne-tagged cellular probes and quantitative proteomics analysis, we identified several cellular targets of deoxyelephantopin. We further demonstrate that deoxyelephantopin antagonizes PPARγ activity in situ via covalent engagement of a cysteine residue in the zinc-finger motif of this nuclear receptor.

  7. Divergent synthesis and identification of the cellular targets of deoxyelephantopins

    PubMed Central

    Lagoutte, Roman; Serba, Christelle; Abegg, Daniel; Hoch, Dominic G.; Adibekian, Alexander; Winssinger, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Herbal extracts containing sesquiterpene lactones have been extensively used in traditional medicine and are known to be rich in α,β-unsaturated functionalities that can covalently engage target proteins. Here we report synthetic methodologies to access analogues of deoxyelephantopin, a sesquiterpene lactone with anticancer properties. Using alkyne-tagged cellular probes and quantitative proteomics analysis, we identified several cellular targets of deoxyelephantopin. We further demonstrate that deoxyelephantopin antagonizes PPARγ activity in situ via covalent engagement of a cysteine residue in the zinc-finger motif of this nuclear receptor. PMID:27539788

  8. Rapid molecular identification of human taeniid cestodes by pyrosequencing approach.

    PubMed

    Thanchomnang, Tongjit; Tantrawatpan, Chairat; Intapan, Pewpan M; Sanpool, Oranuch; Janwan, Penchom; Lulitanond, Viraphong; Tourtip, Somjintana; Yamasaki, Hiroshi; Maleewong, Wanchai

    2014-01-01

    Taenia saginata, T. solium, and T. asiatica are causative agents of taeniasis in humans. The difficulty of morphological identification of human taeniids can lead to misdiagnosis or confusion. To overcome this problem, several molecular methods have been developed, but use of these tends to be time-consuming. Here, a rapid and high-throughput pyrosequencing approach was developed for the identification of three human taeniids originating from various countries. Primers targeting the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) gene of the three Taenia species were designed. Variations in a 26-nucleotide target region were used for identification. The reproducibility and accuracy of the pyrosequencing technology was confirmed by Sanger sequencing. This technique will be a valuable tool to distinguish between sympatric human taeniids that occur in Thailand, Asia and Pacific countries. This method could potentially be used for the molecular identification of the taeniid species that might be associated with suspicious cysts and lesions, or cyst residues in humans or livestock at the slaughterhouse.

  9. Rapid Identification of Biotherapeutics with Label-Free Raman Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Paidi, Santosh Kumar; Siddhanta, Soumik; Strouse, Robert; McGivney, James B; Larkin, Christopher; Barman, Ishan

    2016-04-19

    Product identification is a critical and required analysis for biotheraputics. In addition to regulatory requirements for identity testing on final drug products, in-process identity testing is implemented to reduce business risks associated with fill operations and can also be used as a tool against counterfeiting. Biotherapeutics, in particular monoclonal antibodies, represent a challenging cohort for identity determination because of their similarity in chemical structure. Traditional methods used for product identification can be time and labor intensive, creating a need for quick, inexpensive and reliable methods of drug identification. Here, driven by its molecular-specific and nonperturbative nature, we present Raman spectroscopy as an alternate analytical tool for identity testing. By exploiting subtle differences in vibrational modes of the biologics, we have developed partial least-squares-discriminant analysis derived decision algorithms that offer excellent differentiation capability using spontaneous Raman spectra as well as label-free plasmon-enhanced Raman spectra. Coupled with the robustness to spurious correlations due to its high information content, our results highlight the potential of Raman spectroscopy as a powerful method for rapid, on-site biotherapeutic product identification.

  10. Rapid Molecular Identification of Human Taeniid Cestodes by Pyrosequencing Approach

    PubMed Central

    Thanchomnang, Tongjit; Tantrawatpan, Chairat; Intapan, Pewpan M.; Sanpool, Oranuch; Janwan, Penchom; Lulitanond, Viraphong; Tourtip, Somjintana; Yamasaki, Hiroshi; Maleewong, Wanchai

    2014-01-01

    Taenia saginata, T. solium, and T. asiatica are causative agents of taeniasis in humans. The difficulty of morphological identification of human taeniids can lead to misdiagnosis or confusion. To overcome this problem, several molecular methods have been developed, but use of these tends to be time-consuming. Here, a rapid and high-throughput pyrosequencing approach was developed for the identification of three human taeniids originating from various countries. Primers targeting the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) gene of the three Taenia species were designed. Variations in a 26-nucleotide target region were used for identification. The reproducibility and accuracy of the pyrosequencing technology was confirmed by Sanger sequencing. This technique will be a valuable tool to distinguish between sympatric human taeniids that occur in Thailand, Asia and Pacific countries. This method could potentially be used for the molecular identification of the taeniid species that might be associated with suspicious cysts and lesions, or cyst residues in humans or livestock at the slaughterhouse. PMID:24945530

  11. Identification of intrinsic in vitro cellular mechanisms for glioma invasion.

    PubMed

    Tektonidis, Marco; Hatzikirou, Haralambos; Chauvière, Arnaud; Simon, Matthias; Schaller, Karl; Deutsch, Andreas

    2011-10-21

    Invasion of malignant glioma is a highly complex phenomenon involving molecular and cellular processes at various spatio-temporal scales, whose precise interplay is still not fully understood. In order to identify the intrinsic cellular mechanisms of glioma invasion, we study an in vitro culture of glioma cells. By means of a computational approach, based on a cellular automaton model, we compare simulation results to the experimental data and deduce cellular mechanisms from microscopic and macroscopic observables (experimental data). For the first time, it is shown that the migration/proliferation dichotomy plays a central role in the invasion of glioma cells. Interestingly, we conclude that a diverging invasive zone is a consequence of this dichotomy. Additionally, we observe that radial persistence of glioma cells in the vicinity of dense areas accelerates the invasion process. We argue that this persistence results from a cell-cell repulsion mechanism. If glioma cell behavior is regulated through a migration/proliferation dichotomy and a self-repellent mechanism, our simulations faithfully reproduce all the experimental observations. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Autonomous Metabolomics for Rapid Metabolite Identification in Global Profiling

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    An autonomous metabolomic workflow combining mass spectrometry analysis with tandem mass spectrometry data acquisition was designed to allow for simultaneous data processing and metabolite characterization. Although previously tandem mass spectrometry data have been generated on the fly, the experiments described herein combine this technology with the bioinformatic resources of XCMS and METLIN. As a result of this unique integration, we can analyze large profiling datasets and simultaneously obtain structural identifications. Validation of the workflow on bacterial samples allowed the profiling on the order of a thousand metabolite features with simultaneous tandem mass spectra data acquisition. The tandem mass spectrometry data acquisition enabled automatic search and matching against the METLIN tandem mass spectrometry database, shortening the current workflow from days to hours. Overall, the autonomous approach to untargeted metabolomics provides an efficient means of metabolomic profiling, and will ultimately allow the more rapid integration of comparative analyses, metabolite identification, and data analysis at a systems biology level. PMID:25496351

  13. Autonomous Metabolomics for Rapid Metabolite Identification in Global Profiling

    SciTech Connect

    Benton, H. Paul; Ivanisevic, Julijana; Mahieu, Nathaniel G.; Kurczy, Michael E.; Johnson, Caroline H.; Franco, Lauren; Rinehart, Duane; Valentine, Elizabeth; Gowda, Harsha; Ubhi, Baljit K.; Tautenhahn, Ralf; Gieschen, Andrew; Fields, Matthew W.; Patti, Gary J.; Siuzdak, Gary

    2014-12-12

    An autonomous metabolomic workflow combining mass spectrometry analysis with tandem mass spectrometry data acquisition was designed to allow for simultaneous data processing and metabolite characterization. Although previously tandem mass spectrometry data have been generated on the fly, the experiments described herein combine this technology with the bioinformatic resources of XCMS and METLIN. We can analyze large profiling datasets and simultaneously obtain structural identifications, as a result of this unique integration. Furthermore, validation of the workflow on bacterial samples allowed the profiling on the order of a thousand metabolite features with simultaneous tandem mass spectra data acquisition. The tandem mass spectrometry data acquisition enabled automatic search and matching against the METLIN tandem mass spectrometry database, shortening the current workflow from days to hours. Overall, the autonomous approach to untargeted metabolomics provides an efficient means of metabolomic profiling, and will ultimately allow the more rapid integration of comparative analyses, metabolite identification, and data analysis at a systems biology level.

  14. Rapid method for identification of gram-negative, nonfermentative bacilli.

    PubMed Central

    Otto, L A; Pickett, M J

    1976-01-01

    A rapid system (OA), based on oxidative attack of substrates, was developed for identification of gram-negative, nonfermentative bacillia (NFB). One hundred and twelve strains of NFB from 25 species (representing the genera Pseudomonas, Alcaligenes, Acinetobacter, Bordetella, Flavobacterium, Moraxella, and Xanthomonas) were assayed by OA, buffered single substrate, and oxidative/fermentative methods. The 38 substrates consisted of salts of organic acids, nitrogen-containing compounds, alcohols, and carbohydrates. Ninety-four percent of the test strains were identified by the OA method in 24 h, and 99% were identifiable in 48 h. Reproducibility was 99%. Correlation with buffered single substrate was 98% (all substrates) and 90% with the oxidative/fermentative method (carbohydrates only). Biochemical profiles of all strains are presented, as well as tables showing the most useful tests for identification. PMID:780371

  15. Rapid Detection and Identification of Biogenic Aerosol Releases and Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, J.; Macher, J.; Ghosal, S.; Ahmed, K.; Hemati, K.; Wall, S.; Kumagai, K.

    2011-12-01

    Biogenic aerosols can be important contributors to aerosol chemistry, cloud droplet and ice nucleation, absorption and scattering of radiation, human health and comfort, and plant, animal, and microbial ecology. Many types of bioaerosols, e.g., fungal spores, are released into the atmosphere in response to specific climatological and meteorological conditions. The rapid identification of bioaerosol releases is thus important for better characterization of the above phenomena, as well as enabling public officials to respond quickly and appropriately to releases of infectious agents or biological toxins. One approach to rapid and accurate bioaerosol detection is to employ sequential, automated samples that can be fed directly into an image acquisition and data analysis device. Raman spectroscopy-based identification of bioaerosols, automated analysis of microscopy images, and automated detection of near-monodisperse peaks in aerosol size-distribution data were investigated as complementary approaches to traditional, manual methods for the identification and counting of fungal and actinomycete spores. Manual light microscopy is a widely used analytical technique that is compatible with a number of air sample formats and requires minimal sample preparation. However, a major drawback is its dependence on a human analyst's ability to distinguish particles and accurately count, size, and identify them. Therefore, automated methods, such as those evaluated in this study, have the potential to provide cost-effective and rapid alternatives if demonstrated to be accurate and reliable. An exploratory examination of individual spores for several macro- and microfungi (those with and without large fruiting bodies) by Raman microspectroscopy found unique spectral features that were used to identify fungi to the genus level. Automated analyses of digital spore images accurately recognized and counted single fungal spores and clusters. An automated procedure to discriminate near

  16. Sensitive and Rapid Identification of Biological Threat Agents

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-12-01

    suitcase, complete with reagents and HIGGINS et al.: RAPID IDENTIFICATION OF BIOLOGICAL THREAT AGENTS 135 1 U z X o Q UJ O O Q OQ U m < u...BIOLOGICAL THREAT AGENTS 137 MW MW 1 ABCDEFGHIPCNC2 WB *~ 1 PL SRM Z FIGURE 3. Comparison of IsoCode® paper for preparing vegetative cells...FRIEDLANDER, D.J. MCCLAIN, D.L. HOOVER, W.R. BRYNE , J.A. PAVLIN, G.W. CHRISTOPHER & E.M. EITZEN, JR. 1997. Clinical recogni- tion and management of

  17. Rapid Accurate Identification of Bacterial and Viral Pathogens

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, John

    2007-03-09

    The goals of this program were to develop two assays for rapid, accurate identification of pathogenic organisms at the strain level. The first assay "Quantitative Genome Profiling or QGP" is a real time PCR assay with a restriction enzyme-based component. Its underlying concept is that certain enzymes should cleave genomic DNA at many sites and that in some cases these cuts will interrupt the connection on the genomic DNA between flanking PCR primer pairs thereby eliminating selected PCR amplifications. When this occurs the appearance of the real-time PCR threshold (Ct) signal during DNA amplification is totally eliminated or, if cutting is incomplete, greatly delayed compared to an uncut control. This temporal difference in appearance of the Ct signal relative to undigested control DNA provides a rapid, high-throughput approach for DNA-based identification of different but closely related pathogens depending upon the nucleotide sequence of the target region. The second assay we developed uses the nucleotide sequence of pairs of shmi identifier tags (-21 bp) to identify DNA molecules. Subtle differences in linked tag pair combinations can also be used to distinguish between closely related isolates..

  18. Experimental design for dynamics identification of cellular processes.

    PubMed

    Dinh, Vu; Rundell, Ann E; Buzzard, Gregery T

    2014-03-01

    We address the problem of using nonlinear models to design experiments to characterize the dynamics of cellular processes by using the approach of the Maximally Informative Next Experiment (MINE), which was introduced in W. Dong et al. (PLoS ONE 3(8):e3105, 2008) and independently in M.M. Donahue et al. (IET Syst. Biol. 4:249-262, 2010). In this approach, existing data is used to define a probability distribution on the parameters; the next measurement point is the one that yields the largest model output variance with this distribution. Building upon this approach, we introduce the Expected Dynamics Estimator (EDE), which is the expected value using this distribution of the output as a function of time. We prove the consistency of this estimator (uniform convergence to true dynamics) even when the chosen experiments cluster in a finite set of points. We extend this proof of consistency to various practical assumptions on noisy data and moderate levels of model mismatch. Through the derivation and proof, we develop a relaxed version of MINE that is more computationally tractable and robust than the original formulation. The results are illustrated with numerical examples on two nonlinear ordinary differential equation models of biomolecular and cellular processes.

  19. Identification of the cellular receptor for anthrax toxin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, Kenneth A.; Mogridge, Jeremy; Mourez, Michael; Collier, R. John; Young, John A. T.

    2001-11-01

    The tripartite toxin secreted by Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax, helps the bacterium evade the immune system and can kill the host during a systemic infection. Two components of the toxin enzymatically modify substrates within the cytosol of mammalian cells: oedema factor (OF) is an adenylate cyclase that impairs host defences through a variety of mechanisms including inhibiting phagocytosis; lethal factor (LF) is a zinc-dependent protease that cleaves mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase and causes lysis of macrophages. Protective antigen (PA), the third component, binds to a cellular receptor and mediates delivery of the enzymatic components to the cytosol. Here we describe the cloning of the human PA receptor using a genetic complementation approach. The receptor, termed ATR (anthrax toxin receptor), is a type I membrane protein with an extracellular von Willebrand factor A domain that binds directly to PA. In addition, a soluble version of this domain can protect cells from the action of the toxin.

  20. Passive IFF: Autonomous Nonintrusive Rapid Identification of Friendly Assets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moynihan, Philip; Steenburg, Robert Van; Chao, Tien-Hsin

    2004-01-01

    A proposed optoelectronic instrument would identify targets rapidly, without need to radiate an interrogating signal, apply identifying marks to the targets, or equip the targets with transponders. The instrument was conceived as an identification, friend or foe (IFF) system in a battlefield setting, where it would be part of a targeting system for weapons, by providing rapid identification for aimed weapons to help in deciding whether and when to trigger them. The instrument could also be adapted to law-enforcement and industrial applications in which it is necessary to rapidly identify objects in view. The instrument would comprise mainly an optical correlator and a neural processor (see figure). The inherent parallel-processing speed and capability of the optical correlator would be exploited to obtain rapid identification of a set of probable targets within a scene of interest and to define regions within the scene for the neural processor to analyze. The neural processor would then concentrate on each region selected by the optical correlator in an effort to identify the target. Depending on whether or not a target was recognized by comparison of its image data with data in an internal database on which the neural processor was trained, the processor would generate an identifying signal (typically, friend or foe ). The time taken for this identification process would be less than the time needed by a human or robotic gunner to acquire a view of, and aim at, a target. An optical correlator that has been under development for several years and that has been demonstrated to be capable of tracking a cruise missile might be considered a prototype of the optical correlator in the proposed IFF instrument. This optical correlator features a 512-by-512-pixel input image frame and operates at an input frame rate of 60 Hz. It includes a spatial light modulator (SLM) for video-to-optical image conversion, a pair of precise lenses to effect Fourier transforms, a filter SLM

  1. Antigenic relationships and rapid identification of Peptostreptococcus species.

    PubMed Central

    Wong, M; Catena, A; Hadley, W K

    1980-01-01

    Antisera against whole cells of each Peptostreptococcus species (P. anaerobius, P. micros, P. parvulus, and P. productus) were produced in rabbits. When these antisera were reacted against sonically disrupted cells and culture supernatant fluids in Ouchterlony tests, lines of identity were obtained among the antigens from all the species and uninoculated culture medium. When the antisera were subsequently absorbed with the dehydrated culture medium used to grow the peptostreptococci, all cross-reactions in heterologous antigen-antibody combinations were eliminated, leaving only species-specific precipitin arcs. These absorbed antisera, specific for each Peptostreptococcus species by Ouchterlony tests, were used for rapid identification studies. Staphylococcus aureus-bearing protein A was sensitized with each absorbed antiserum. These reagents produced specific coagglutination reactions with suspensions of each Peptostreptococcus reference strain and with 16 clinical isolates. No cross-reactions occurred with the Streptococcus intermedius, Peptococcus magnus, or Peptococcus asaccharolyticus strains tested. Images PMID:6769956

  2. Microwave-assisted specific chemical digestion for rapid protein identification.

    PubMed

    Hua, Lin; Low, Teck Yew; Sze, Siu Kwan

    2006-01-01

    We have developed a rapid microwave-assisted protein digestion technique based on classic acid hydrolysis reaction with 2% formic acid solution. In this mild chemical environment, proteins are hydrolyzed to peptides, which can be directly analyzed by MALDI-MS or ESI-MS without prior sample purification. Dilute formic acid cleaves proteins specifically at the C-terminal of aspartyl (Asp) residues within 10 min of exposure to microwave irradiation. By adjusting the irradiation time, we found that the extent of protein fragmentation can be controlled, as shown by the single fragmentation of myoglobin at the C-terminal of any of the Asp residues. The efficacy and simplicity of this technique for protein identification are demonstrated by the peptide mass maps of in-gel digested myoglobin and BSA, as well as proteins isolated from Escherichia coli K12 cells.

  3. Rapid identification of Zygosaccharomyces with genus-specific primers.

    PubMed

    Hulin, Michelle; Wheals, Alan

    2014-03-03

    There has been a recent and rapid increase in the number of species of the genus Zygosaccharomyces which now comprises Z. bailii, Z. bisporus, Z. gambellarensis, Z. kombuchaensis, Z. lentus, Z. machadoi, Z. mellis, Z. parabaillii, Z. pseudobailii, Z. pseudorouxii, Z. rouxii, Z. sapae, and Z. siamensis. Z. pseudorouxii is an unofficial name given to isolates closely related to the newly-described species Z. sapae. The Zygosaccharomyces genus contains species that are important as food and beverage spoilage organisms and others are associated with fermentations and sweet foodstuffs, such as honey. Their economic significance means that the ability to identify them rapidly is of significant importance. Although Z. rouxii and Z. bailii have been genome-sequenced the extent of sequence data for the others, especially the newly-discovered species, is sometimes extremely limited which makes identification slow. However, parts of the ITS1/5.8S/ITS2 rDNA region contain sequences of sufficient similarity within the genus and of sufficient difference with outgroups, to be potential regions for the design of genus-wide specific primers. We report here the development of genus-specific primers that can detect all the major Zygosaccharomyces species including all those associated with foods; the rare and localised species Z. machadoi and Z. gambellarensis are not detected. The size of the single amplicon produced varies between species and in some cases is sufficiently different to assign provisional species identification. Sequence data from rDNA regions are available for virtually all described yeast species in all genera, thus, prior to having sufficient sequence data from structural genes, rDNA regions may provide more generally suitable candidates for both genus-specific and species-specific primer design.

  4. Rapid identification of bacteria with miniaturized pyrolysis/GC analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Catherine H.; Mowry, Curtis; Manginell, Ronald P.; Frye-Mason, Gregory C.; Kottenstette, Richard J.; Lewis, Patrick

    2001-02-01

    Identification of bacteria and other biological moieties finds a broad range of applications in the environmental, biomedical, agricultural, industrial, and military arenas. Linking these applications are biological markers such as fatty acids, whose mass spectral profiles can be used to characterize biological samples and to distinguish bacteria at the gram-type, genera, and even species level. Common methods of sample analysis require sample preparation that is both lengthy and labor intensive, especially for whole cell bacteria. The background technique relied on here utilizes chemical derivatization of fatty acids to the more volatile fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs), which can be separated on a gas chromatograph column or input directly into a mass spectrometer. More recent publications demonstrate improved sample preparation time with in situ derivatization of whole bacterial samples using pyrolysis at the inlet; although much faster than traditional techniques, these systems still rely on bench-top analytical equipment and individual sample preparation. Development of a miniaturized pyrolysis/GC instrument by this group is intended to realize the benefits of FAME identification of bacteria and other biological samples while further facilitating sample handling and instrument portability. The technologies being fabricated and tested have the potential of achieving pyrolysis and FAME separation on a very small scale, with rapid detection time (1-10 min from introduction to result), and with a modular sample inlet. Performance results and sensor characterization will be presented for the first phase of instrument development, encompassing the microfabricated pyrolysis and gas chromatograph elements.

  5. Intraoperative tissue identification using rapid evaporative ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Balog, Júlia; Sasi-Szabó, László; Kinross, James; Lewis, Matthew R; Muirhead, Laura J; Veselkov, Kirill; Mirnezami, Reza; Dezső, Balázs; Damjanovich, László; Darzi, Ara; Nicholson, Jeremy K; Takáts, Zoltán

    2013-07-17

    Rapid evaporative ionization mass spectrometry (REIMS) is an emerging technique that allows near-real-time characterization of human tissue in vivo by analysis of the aerosol ("smoke") released during electrosurgical dissection. The coupling of REIMS technology with electrosurgery for tissue diagnostics is known as the intelligent knife (iKnife). This study aimed to validate the technique by applying it to the analysis of fresh human tissue samples ex vivo and to demonstrate the translation to real-time use in vivo in a surgical environment. A variety of tissue samples from 302 patients were analyzed in the laboratory, resulting in 1624 cancerous and 1309 noncancerous database entries. The technology was then transferred to the operating theater, where the device was coupled to existing electrosurgical equipment to collect data during a total of 81 resections. Mass spectrometric data were analyzed using multivariate statistical methods, including principal components analysis (PCA) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA), and a spectral identification algorithm using a similar approach was implemented. The REIMS approach differentiated accurately between distinct histological and histopathological tissue types, with malignant tissues yielding chemical characteristics specific to their histopathological subtypes. Tissue identification via intraoperative REIMS matched the postoperative histological diagnosis in 100% (all 81) of the cases studied. The mass spectra reflected lipidomic profiles that varied between distinct histological tumor types and also between primary and metastatic tumors. Thus, in addition to real-time diagnostic information, the spectra provided additional information on divergent tumor biochemistry that may have mechanistic importance in cancer.

  6. Autonomous Metabolomics for Rapid Metabolite Identification in Global Profiling

    DOE PAGES

    Benton, H. Paul; Ivanisevic, Julijana; Mahieu, Nathaniel G.; ...

    2014-12-12

    An autonomous metabolomic workflow combining mass spectrometry analysis with tandem mass spectrometry data acquisition was designed to allow for simultaneous data processing and metabolite characterization. Although previously tandem mass spectrometry data have been generated on the fly, the experiments described herein combine this technology with the bioinformatic resources of XCMS and METLIN. We can analyze large profiling datasets and simultaneously obtain structural identifications, as a result of this unique integration. Furthermore, validation of the workflow on bacterial samples allowed the profiling on the order of a thousand metabolite features with simultaneous tandem mass spectra data acquisition. The tandem mass spectrometrymore » data acquisition enabled automatic search and matching against the METLIN tandem mass spectrometry database, shortening the current workflow from days to hours. Overall, the autonomous approach to untargeted metabolomics provides an efficient means of metabolomic profiling, and will ultimately allow the more rapid integration of comparative analyses, metabolite identification, and data analysis at a systems biology level.« less

  7. Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms of Rapid-Acting Antidepressants Ketamine and Scopolamine

    PubMed Central

    Wohleb, Eric S.; Gerhard, Danielle; Thomas, Alex; Duman, Ronald S.

    2017-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a prevalent neuropsychiatric disease that causes profound social and economic burdens. The impact of MDD is compounded by the limited therapeutic efficacy and delay of weeks to months of currently available medications. These issues highlight the need for more efficacious and faster-acting treatments to alleviate the burdens of MDD. Recent breakthroughs demonstrate that certain drugs, including ketamine and scopolamine, produce rapid and long-lasting antidepressant effects in MDD patients. Moreover, preclinical work has shown that the antidepressant actions of ketamine and scopolamine in rodent models are caused by an increase of extracellular glutamate, elevated BDNF, activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) cascade, and increased number and function of spine synapses in the prefrontal cortex (PFC). Here we review studies showing that both ketamine and scopolamine elicit rapid antidepressant effects through converging molecular and cellular mechanisms in the PFC. In addition, we discuss evidence that selective antagonists of NMDA and muscarinic acetylcholine (mACh) receptor subtypes (i.e., NR2B and M1-AChR) in the PFC produce comparable antidepressant responses. Furthermore, we discuss evidence that ketamine and scopolamine antagonize inhibitory interneurons in the PFC leading to disinhibition of pyramidal neurons and increased extracellular glutamate that promotes the rapid antidepressant responses to these agents. Collectively, these studies indicate that specific NMDA and mACh receptor subtypes on GABAergic interneurons are promising targets for novel rapid-acting antidepressant therapies. PMID:26955968

  8. Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms of Rapid-Acting Antidepressants Ketamine and Scopolamine.

    PubMed

    Wohleb, Eric S; Gerhard, Danielle; Thomas, Alex; Duman, Ronald S

    2017-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a prevalent neuropsychiatric disease that causes profound social and economic burdens. The impact of MDD is compounded by the limited therapeutic efficacy and delay of weeks to months of currently available medications. These issues highlight the need for more efficacious and faster-acting treatments to alleviate the burdens of MDD. Recent breakthroughs demonstrate that certain drugs, including ketamine and scopolamine, produce rapid and long-lasting antidepressant effects in MDD patients. Moreover, preclinical work has shown that the antidepressant actions of ketamine and scopolamine in rodent models are caused by an increase of extracellular glutamate, elevated BDNF, activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) cascade, and increased number and function of spine synapses in the prefrontal cortex (PFC). Here we review studies showing that both ketamine and scopolamine elicit rapid antidepressant effects through converging molecular and cellular mechanisms in the PFC. In addition, we discuss evidence that selective antagonists of NMDA and muscarinic acetylcholine (mACh) receptor subtypes (i.e., NR2B and M1-AChR) in the PFC produce comparable antidepressant responses. Furthermore, we discuss evidence that ketamine and scopolamine antagonize inhibitory interneurons in the PFC leading to disinhibition of pyramidal neurons and increased extracellular glutamate that promotes the rapid antidepressant responses to these agents. Collectively, these studies indicate that specific NMDA and mACh receptor subtypes on GABAergic interneurons are promising targets for novel rapid-acting antidepressant therapies.

  9. A Rapid Method for Quantifying Viable Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Cellular Infection Assays

    PubMed Central

    Pooley, Hannah B.; de Silva, Kumudika; Purdie, Auriol C.; Begg, Douglas J.; Whittington, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Determining the viability of bacteria is a key outcome of in vitro cellular infection assays. Currently, this is done by culture, which is problematic for fastidious slow-growing bacteria such as Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, where it can take up to 4 months to confirm growth. This study aimed to identify an assay that can rapidly quantify the number of viable M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis cells in a cellular sample. Three commercially available bacterial viability assays along with a modified liquid culture method coupled with high-throughput quantitative PCR growth detection were assessed. Criteria for assessment included the ability of each assay to differentiate live and dead M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis organisms and their accuracy at low bacterial concentrations. Using the culture-based method, M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis growth was reliably detected and quantified within 2 weeks. There was a strong linear association between the 2-week growth rate and the initial inoculum concentration. The number of viable M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis cells in an unknown sample was quantified based on the growth rate, by using growth standards. In contrast, none of the commercially available viability assays were suitable for use with samples from in vitro cellular infection assays. IMPORTANCE Rapid quantification of the viability of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in samples from in vitro cellular infection assays is important, as it allows these assays to be carried out on a large scale. In vitro cellular infection assays can function as a preliminary screening tool, for vaccine development or antimicrobial screening, and also to extend findings derived from experimental animal trials. Currently, by using culture, it takes up to 4 months to obtain quantifiable results regarding M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis viability after an in vitro infection assay; however, with the quantitative PCR and liquid culture method

  10. Identification and Molecular Mechanisms of the Rapid Tonicity-induced Relocalization of the Aquaporin 4 Channel.

    PubMed

    Kitchen, Philip; Day, Rebecca E; Taylor, Luke H J; Salman, Mootaz M; Bill, Roslyn M; Conner, Matthew T; Conner, Alex C

    2015-07-03

    The aquaporin family of integral membrane proteins is composed of channels that mediate cellular water flow. Aquaporin 4 (AQP4) is highly expressed in the glial cells of the central nervous system and facilitates the osmotically driven pathological brain swelling associated with stroke and traumatic brain injury. Here we show that AQP4 cell surface expression can be rapidly and reversibly regulated in response to changes of tonicity in primary cortical rat astrocytes and in transfected HEK293 cells. The translocation mechanism involves PKA activation, influx of extracellular calcium, and activation of calmodulin. We identify five putative PKA phosphorylation sites and use site-directed mutagenesis to show that only phosphorylation at one of these sites, serine 276, is necessary for the translocation response. We discuss our findings in the context of the identification of new therapeutic approaches to treating brain edema. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. Identification and Molecular Mechanisms of the Rapid Tonicity-induced Relocalization of the Aquaporin 4 Channel*

    PubMed Central

    Kitchen, Philip; Day, Rebecca E.; Taylor, Luke H. J.; Salman, Mootaz M.; Bill, Roslyn M.; Conner, Matthew T.; Conner, Alex C.

    2015-01-01

    The aquaporin family of integral membrane proteins is composed of channels that mediate cellular water flow. Aquaporin 4 (AQP4) is highly expressed in the glial cells of the central nervous system and facilitates the osmotically driven pathological brain swelling associated with stroke and traumatic brain injury. Here we show that AQP4 cell surface expression can be rapidly and reversibly regulated in response to changes of tonicity in primary cortical rat astrocytes and in transfected HEK293 cells. The translocation mechanism involves PKA activation, influx of extracellular calcium, and activation of calmodulin. We identify five putative PKA phosphorylation sites and use site-directed mutagenesis to show that only phosphorylation at one of these sites, serine 276, is necessary for the translocation response. We discuss our findings in the context of the identification of new therapeutic approaches to treating brain edema. PMID:26013827

  12. Rapid enrichment of bioactive milk proteins and iterative, consolidated protein identification by multidimensional protein identification technology.

    PubMed

    Panchaud, Alexandre; Kussmann, Martin; Affolter, Michael

    2005-10-01

    Direct injection of complex protein mixtures, e.g. those derived from crude biological fluids, is often incompatible with conventional LC supports, because of column clogging and rapid deterioration of chromatographic performance. In this paper, we report the use of restricted access media to rapidly enrich and fractionate human breast milk. This resin, combining size exclusion and anion exchange functionalities, yielded a fraction enriched in soluble CD14 and showing specific sCD14-dependant activity. This fraction was split into five aliquots, which were individually characterized using multidimensional protein identification technology. Reproducibility of the results was addressed by analysing and comparing five datasets using different protein identification tools available within the Sequest software. Furthermore, a comparison of three major releases of the Ensembl human protein database was performed to examine the effect of database updates on our results. We report here the benefit of repeated analysis of aliquots of the same fraction: first to increase the confidence in peptide identification by repeated confirmation in several aliquots; and second to assess experimental reproducibility. We demonstrate furthermore the effect of database modifications on the results and the importance of constantly re-analysing data with new releases to keep them consistent and up to date with the latest protein identities and predictions available.

  13. [Rapid identification of microorganisms using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Sogawa, Kazuyuki; Watanabe, Masaharu; Nomura, Fumio

    2013-01-01

    In a clinical diagnostic microbiology laboratory, the current method of identifying bacterial isolates is based mainly on phenotypic characteristics, such as the growth pattern on different media, colony morphology, Gram stain, and various biochemical reactions. These techniques collectively allow high-level accuracy in identifying most bacterial isolates, but they are costly and time-consuming. In our clinical microbiology laboratory, we prospectively assessed the ability of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) to identify bacterial strains that were routinely isolated from clinical samples. Bacterial colonies obtained from a total of 468 strains of 92 bacterial species isolated at the Department of Clinical Laboratory at Chiba University were directly placed on target MALDI plates, followed by the addition of CHCA matrix solution. The plates were then subjected to MALDI-TOF MS measurement, and the microorganisms were identified by pattern matching by the libraries in the BioTyper 2.0 software. The identification rates at species and genus levels were 91.7% (429/468) and 97.0% (454/468), respectively. MALDI-TOF MS is a rapid, simple, and high-throughput proteomic technique for the identification of a variety of bacterial species. Since colony to colony differences and the effects of culture duration on the results are minimal, it can be implemented in a conventional laboratory setting. Although for some pathogens, the preanalytic processes should be refined and current database should be improved to obtain more accurate results, the MALDI-TOF MS-based method generally performs as well as the conventional methods and is a promising technology in clinical laboratories.

  14. Rapid identification of chemical genetic interactions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Dilworth, David; Nelson, Christopher J

    2015-04-05

    Determining the mode of action of bioactive chemicals is of interest to a broad range of academic, pharmaceutical, and industrial scientists. Saccharomyces cerevisiae, or budding yeast, is a model eukaryote for which a complete collection of ~6,000 gene deletion mutants and hypomorphic essential gene mutants are commercially available. These collections of mutants can be used to systematically detect chemical-gene interactions, i.e. genes necessary to tolerate a chemical. This information, in turn, reports on the likely mode of action of the compound. Here we describe a protocol for the rapid identification of chemical-genetic interactions in budding yeast. We demonstrate the method using the chemotherapeutic agent 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), which has a well-defined mechanism of action. Our results show that the nuclear TRAMP RNA exosome and DNA repair enzymes are needed for proliferation in the presence of 5-FU, which is consistent with previous microarray based bar-coding chemical genetic approaches and the knowledge that 5-FU adversely affects both RNA and DNA metabolism. The required validation protocols of these high-throughput screens are also described.

  15. Rapid Identification and Verification of Indirubin-Containing Medicinal Plants

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhigang; Tu, Yuan; Xia, Ye; Cheng, Peipei; Sun, Wei; Shi, Yuhua; Guo, Licheng; He, Haibo; Xiong, Chao; Chen, Shilin; Zhang, Xiuqiao

    2015-01-01

    Indirubin, one of the key components of medicinal plants including Isatis tinctoria, Polygonum tinctorium, and Strobilanthes cusia, possesses great medicinal efficacy in the treatment of chronic myelocytic leukemia (CML). Due to misidentification and similar name, materials containing indirubin and their close relatives frequently fall prey to adulteration. In this study, we selected an internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) for distinguishing these indirubin-containing species from five of their usual adulterants, after assessing identification efficiency of matK, rbcL, psbA-trnH, and ITS2 among these species. The results of genetic distances and neighbor-joining (NJ) phylogenetic tree indicated that ITS2 region is a powerful DNA barcode to accurately identify these indirubin-containing species and discriminate them from their adulterants. Additionally, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was used to verify indirubin in different organs of the above species. The results showed that indirubin had been detected in the leaves of Is. tinctoria, P. tinctorium, S. cusia, and Indigo Naturalis (made from their mixture), but not in their roots, or in the leaves of their adulterants. Therefore, this study provides a novel and rapid method to identify and verify indirubin-containing medicinal plants for effective natural treatment of CML. PMID:26089942

  16. Rapid Identification of Chemical Genetic Interactions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Dilworth, David; Nelson, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    Determining the mode of action of bioactive chemicals is of interest to a broad range of academic, pharmaceutical, and industrial scientists. Saccharomyces cerevisiae, or budding yeast, is a model eukaryote for which a complete collection of ~6,000 gene deletion mutants and hypomorphic essential gene mutants are commercially available. These collections of mutants can be used to systematically detect chemical-gene interactions, i.e. genes necessary to tolerate a chemical. This information, in turn, reports on the likely mode of action of the compound. Here we describe a protocol for the rapid identification of chemical-genetic interactions in budding yeast. We demonstrate the method using the chemotherapeutic agent 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), which has a well-defined mechanism of action. Our results show that the nuclear TRAMP RNA exosome and DNA repair enzymes are needed for proliferation in the presence of 5-FU, which is consistent with previous microarray based bar-coding chemical genetic approaches and the knowledge that 5-FU adversely affects both RNA and DNA metabolism. The required validation protocols of these high-throughput screens are also described. PMID:25867090

  17. Cellular and Viral Requirements for Rapid Endocytic Entry of Herpes Simplex Virus

    PubMed Central

    Nicola, Anthony V.; Straus, Stephen E.

    2004-01-01

    It was recently demonstrated that herpes simplex virus (HSV) successfully infects Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells expressing glycoprotein D (gD) receptors and HeLa cells by an endocytic mechanism (A. V. Nicola, A. M. McEvoy, and S. E. Straus, J. Virol. 77:5324-5332, 2003). Here we define cellular and viral requirements of this pathway. Uptake of intact, enveloped HSV from the cell surface into endocytic vesicles was rapid (t1/2 of 8 to 9 min) and independent of the known cell surface gD receptors. Following uptake from the surface, recovery of intracellular, infectious virions increased steadily up to 20 min postinfection (p.i.), which corresponds to accumulation of enveloped virus in intracellular compartments. There was a sharp decline in recovery by 30 min p.i., suggesting loss of the virus envelope as a result of capsid penetration from endocytic organelles into the cytosol. In the absence of gD receptors, endocytosed virions did not successfully penetrate into the cytosol but were instead transported to lysosomes for degradation. Inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinase, such as wortmannin, blocked transport of incoming HSV to the nuclear periphery and virus-induced gene expression but had no effect on virus binding or uptake. This suggests a role for PI 3-kinase activity in trafficking of HSV through the cytosol. Viruses that lack viral glycoproteins gB, gD, or gH-gL were defective in transport to the nucleus and had reduced infectivity. Thus, similar to entry via direct penetration at the cell surface, HSV entry into cells by wortmannin-sensitive endocytosis is efficient, involves rapid cellular uptake of viral particles, and requires gB, gD, and gH-gL. PMID:15220424

  18. Rapid directed evolution of stabilized proteins with cellular high-throughput encapsulation solubilization and screening (CHESS).

    PubMed

    Yong, K J; Scott, D J

    2015-03-01

    Directed evolution is a powerful method for engineering proteins towards user-defined goals and has been used to generate novel proteins for industrial processes, biological research and drug discovery. Typical directed evolution techniques include cellular display, phage display, ribosome display and water-in-oil compartmentalization, all of which physically link individual members of diverse gene libraries to their translated proteins. This allows the screening or selection for a desired protein function and subsequent isolation of the encoding gene from diverse populations. For biotechnological and industrial applications there is a need to engineer proteins that are functional under conditions that are not compatible with these techniques, such as high temperatures and harsh detergents. Cellular High-throughput Encapsulation Solubilization and Screening (CHESS), is a directed evolution method originally developed to engineer detergent-stable G proteins-coupled receptors (GPCRs) for structural biology. With CHESS, library-transformed bacterial cells are encapsulated in detergent-resistant polymers to form capsules, which serve to contain mutant genes and their encoded proteins upon detergent mediated solubilization of cell membranes. Populations of capsules can be screened like single cells to enable rapid isolation of genes encoding detergent-stable protein mutants. To demonstrate the general applicability of CHESS to other proteins, we have characterized the stability and permeability of CHESS microcapsules and employed CHESS to generate thermostable, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) resistant green fluorescent protein (GFP) mutants, the first soluble proteins to be engineered using CHESS.

  19. Identification of potential cellular targets of aloisine A by affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Corbel, Caroline; Haddoub, Rose; Guiffant, Damien; Lozach, Olivier; Gueyrard, David; Lemoine, Jérôme; Ratin, Morgane; Meijer, Laurent; Bach, Stéphane; Goekjian, Peter

    2009-08-01

    Affinity chromatography was used to identify potential cellular targets of aloisine A (7-n-butyl-6-(4'-hydroxyphenyl)-5H-pyrrolo[2,3b]pyrazine), a potent inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinases. This technique is based on the immobilization of the drug on a solid matrix, followed by identification of specifically bound proteins. To this end, both aloisine A and the protein-kinase inactive control N-methyl aloisine, bearing extended linker chains have been synthesized. We present the preparation of such analogues having the triethylene glycol chain at different positions of the molecule, as well as their immobilization on an agarose-based matrix. Affinity chromatography of various biological extracts on the aloisine matrices allowed the identification of both protein kinases and non-kinase proteins as potential cellular targets of aloisine.

  20. Rapid Identification of Airborne Biological Particles by Flow Cytometry, Gas Chromatography, and Genetic Probes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-09-01

    isolated culture of Heterobasidion annosum. The yeast and bacterial specimens have not been identified, since their identifications require biochemical...RZ-SZAACH. DEVELOPMENr & E-NONEERINO CENTER U.S. AR..!f CHR ICAL AND SIOLOGIC-NL DEFENSE COMNMA1D RAPID IDENTIFICATION OF AIRBORNE BIOLOGICAL...Ground, Maryland 21010-5423 ERRATUM SHEET 30 October 1997 REPORT NO. ERDEC-TR-443 TITLE RAPID IDENTIFICATION OF AIRBORNE BIOLOGICAL PARTICLES BY FLOW

  1. The anatomical, cellular and synaptic basis of motor atonia during rapid eye movement sleep

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Michael C.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep is a recurring part of the sleep–wake cycle characterized by fast, desynchronized rhythms in the electroencephalogram (EEG), hippocampal theta activity, rapid eye movements, autonomic activation and loss of postural muscle tone (atonia). The brain circuitry governing REM sleep is located in the pontine and medullary brainstem and includes ascending and descending projections that regulate the EEG and motor components of REM sleep. The descending signal for postural muscle atonia during REM sleep is thought to originate from glutamatergic neurons of the sublaterodorsal nucleus (SLD), which in turn activate glycinergic pre‐motor neurons in the spinal cord and/or ventromedial medulla to inhibit motor neurons. Despite work over the past two decades on many neurotransmitter systems that regulate the SLD, gaps remain in our knowledge of the synaptic basis by which SLD REM neurons are regulated and in turn produce REM sleep atonia. Elucidating the anatomical, cellular and synaptic basis of REM sleep atonia control is a critical step for treating many sleep‐related disorders including obstructive sleep apnoea (apnea), REM sleep behaviour disorder (RBD) and narcolepsy with cataplexy. PMID:27060683

  2. The anatomical, cellular and synaptic basis of motor atonia during rapid eye movement sleep.

    PubMed

    Arrigoni, Elda; Chen, Michael C; Fuller, Patrick M

    2016-10-01

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep is a recurring part of the sleep-wake cycle characterized by fast, desynchronized rhythms in the electroencephalogram (EEG), hippocampal theta activity, rapid eye movements, autonomic activation and loss of postural muscle tone (atonia). The brain circuitry governing REM sleep is located in the pontine and medullary brainstem and includes ascending and descending projections that regulate the EEG and motor components of REM sleep. The descending signal for postural muscle atonia during REM sleep is thought to originate from glutamatergic neurons of the sublaterodorsal nucleus (SLD), which in turn activate glycinergic pre-motor neurons in the spinal cord and/or ventromedial medulla to inhibit motor neurons. Despite work over the past two decades on many neurotransmitter systems that regulate the SLD, gaps remain in our knowledge of the synaptic basis by which SLD REM neurons are regulated and in turn produce REM sleep atonia. Elucidating the anatomical, cellular and synaptic basis of REM sleep atonia control is a critical step for treating many sleep-related disorders including obstructive sleep apnoea (apnea), REM sleep behaviour disorder (RBD) and narcolepsy with cataplexy.

  3. Kinetic cellular phenotypic profiling: prediction, identification, and analysis of bioactive natural products.

    PubMed

    Fu, Huiying; Fu, Wenqing; Sun, Mingjiao; Shou, Qiyang; Zhai, Yunyan; Cheng, Hongqiang; Teng, Li; Mou, Xiaozhou; Li, Yanwei; Wan, Shuying; Zhang, Shanshan; Xu, Qinqin; Zhang, Xue; Wang, Jiucun; Zhu, Jenny; Wang, Xiaobo; Xu, Xiao; Lv, Guiyuan; Jin, Li; Guo, Wensheng; Ke, Yuehai

    2011-09-01

    Natural products have always been a major source of therapeutic agents; however, the development of traditional herbal products has been currently hampered by the lack of analytic methods suitable for both high-throughput screening and evaluating the mechanism of action. Cellular processes such as proliferation, apoptosis, and toxicity are well-orchestrated in real time. Monitoring these events and their perturbation by natural products can provide high-rich information about cell physiological relevancies being involved. Here, we report a novel cell-based phenotypic profiling strategy that uses electronic impedance readouts for real-time monitoring of cellular responses to traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs). The utility of this approach was used to screen natural herbs that have been historically documented to cure human diseases and that have been classified into seven clusters based on their mechanisms of action. The results suggest that herbal medicines with similar cellular mechanisms produce similar time/dose-dependent cell response profiles (TCRPs). By comparing the TCRPs produced by the Chinese medicinal Cordyceps sinensis with similar TCRPs of chemical compounds, we explored the potential use of herbal TCRPs for predicting cellular mechanisms of action, herbal authentications, and bioactive identification. Additionally, we further compared this novel TCRP technology with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-based methods for herbal origin-tracing authentication and identification of bioactive ingredients. Together, our findings suggest that using TCRP as an alternative to existing spectroscopic techniques can allow us to analyze natural products in a more convenient and physiologically relevant manner.

  4. Rapid Identification of Pathogens from Pediatric Blood Cultures by Use of the FilmArray Blood Culture Identification Panel

    PubMed Central

    Polanco, Wanda; Carter, Donna; Shulman, Stanford

    2014-01-01

    The performance of the FilmArray blood culture identification (BCID) panel has been studied in adult patients. We describe here an evaluation of this assay for the rapid identification of pathogens in Bactec Peds Plus/F and Bactec standard anaerobic/F bottles that contained blood samples from pediatric patients at a tertiary care children's hospital. PMID:25274998

  5. Identification of long-lived proteins reveals exceptional stability of essential cellular structures

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sung Kyu; Harris, Michael S.; Ingolia, Nicholas T.; Yates, John R.; Hetzer, Martin W.

    2013-01-01

    Intracellular proteins with long lifespans have recently been linked to age-dependent defects, ranging from decreased fertility to the functional decline of neurons. Why long-lived proteins exist in metabolically active cellular environments and how they are maintained over time remains poorly understood. Here we provide a system-wide identification of proteins with exceptional lifespans in the rat brain. These proteins are inefficiently replenished despite being translated robustly throughout adulthood. Using nucleoporins as a paradigm for long-term protein persistence, we found that nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) are maintained over a cell’s life through slow but finite exchange of even its most stable subcomplexes. This maintenance is limited, however, as some nucleoporin levels decrease during aging, providing a rationale for the previously observed age-dependent deterioration of NPC function. Our identification of a long-lived proteome reveals cellular components that are at increased risk for damage accumulation, linking long-term protein persistence to the cellular aging process. PMID:23993091

  6. Identification of cellular targets of a series of boron heterocycles using TIPA II-A sensitive target identification platform.

    PubMed

    Ward, Matthew S; Silva, Isba; Martinez, Walfre; Jefferson, Jameka; Rahman, Shakila; Garcia, Jeanie M; Kanichar, Divya; Roppiyakuda, Lance; Kosmowska, Ewa; Faust, Michelle A; Tran, Kim P; Chow, Felicia; Buglo, Elena; Zhou, Feimeng; Groziak, Michael P; Xu, H Howard

    2016-08-01

    One of the hurdles in the discovery of antibiotics is the difficulty of linking antibacterial compounds to their cellular targets. Our laboratory has employed a genome-wide approach of over-expressing essential genes in order to identify cellular targets of antibacterial inhibitors. Our objective in this project was to develop and validate a more sensitive disk diffusion based platform of target identification (Target Identification Platform for Antibacterials version 2; TIPA II) using a collection of cell clones in an Escherichia coli mutant (AS19) host with increased outer membrane permeability. Five known antibiotics/inhibitors and 28 boron heterocycles were tested by TIPA II assay, in conjunction with the original assay TIPA. The TIPA II was more sensitive than TIPA because eight boron heterocycles previously found to be inactive to AG1 cells in TIPA assays exhibited activity to AS19 cells. For 15 boron heterocycles, resistant colonies were observed within the zones of inhibition only on the inducing plates in TIPA II assays. DNA sequencing confirmed that resistant clones harbor plasmids with fabI gene as insert, indicating that these boron heterocycles all target enoyl ACP reductase. Additionally, cell-based assays and dose response curved obtained indicated that for two boron heterocycle inhibitors, the fabI cell clone in AG1 (wild-type) host cells exhibited at least 11 fold more resistance under induced conditions than under non-induced conditions. Moreover, TIPA II also identified cellular targets of known antibacterial inhibitors triclosan, phosphomycin, trimethoprim, diazaborine and thiolactomycin, further validating the utility of the new system.

  7. Rapid identification of single microbes by various Raman spectroscopic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rösch, Petra; Harz, Michaela; Schmitt, Michael; Peschke, Klaus-Dieter; Ronneberger, Olaf; Burkhardt, Hans; Motzkus, Hans-Walter; Lankers, Markus; Hofer, Stefan; Thiele, Hans; Popp, Jürgen

    2006-02-01

    A fast and unambiguous identification of microorganisms is necessary not only for medical purposes but also in technical processes such as the production of pharmaceuticals. Conventional microbiological identification methods are based on the morphology and the ability of microbes to grow under different conditions on various cultivation media depending on their biochemical properties. These methods require pure cultures which need cultivation of at least 6 h but normally much longer. Recently also additional methods to identify bacteria are established e.g. mass spectroscopy, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), flow cytometry or fluorescence spectroscopy. Alternative approaches for the identification of microorganisms are vibrational spectroscopic techniques. With Raman spectroscopy a spectroscopic fingerprint of the microorganisms can be achieved. Using UV-resonance Raman spectroscopy (UVRR) macromolecules like DNA/RNA and proteins are resonantly enhanced. With an excitation wavelength of e.g. 244 nm it is possible to determine the ratio of guanine/cytosine to all DNA bases which allows a genotypic identification of microorganisms. The application of UVRR requires a large amount of microorganisms (> 10 6 cells) e.g. at least a micro colony. For the analysis of single cells micro-Raman spectroscopy with an excitation wavelength of 532 nm can be used. Here, the obtained information is from all type of molecules inside the cells which lead to a chemotaxonomic identification. In this contribution we show how wavelength dependent Raman spectroscopy yields significant molecular information applicable for the identification of microorganisms on a single cell level.

  8. Evaluation of a new system for the rapid identification of clinically important yeasts.

    PubMed Central

    Segal, E; Ajello, L

    1976-01-01

    The rapid system developed by Huppert et al. (1975) for the identification of yeasts based on assimilation and fermentation patterns and on germ tube and pseudohyphal production was evaluated in a comparative study with conventional procedures. The 95 test cultures were members of the genera Candida, Cryptococcus, Rhodotorula, Saccharomyces, Torulopsis, and Trichosporon. The study revealed that approximately 94% of the isolates were correctly identified by the rapid method in comparison with the standard method. With the rapid method identification was accomplished in 72h, and with the conventional procedures identification was completed in 2 weeks. Although it was difficult with some isolates to obtain definitive speciation by the rapid method, this method promises to be especially useful in clinical laboratories for the identification of yeasts of medical importance. Modifications were made in the procedure of Huppert et al. (1975) to improve the reading of reactions. Commercial media and a disk dispenser to make the method more useful were also investigated. PMID:965478

  9. Cellular fatty acids in Fusobacterium species as a tool for identification.

    PubMed Central

    Tunér, K; Baron, E J; Summanen, P; Finegold, S M

    1992-01-01

    Identification of fusobacteria from clinical specimens currently requires analysis of metabolic end products by gas-liquid chromatography in addition to certain biochemical and enzymatic tests because of the relative biochemical inactivity of these bacteria. Even the finding of pointed, thin gram-negative cells on Gram-stained slides can no longer be relied on for identification of Fusobacterium nucleatum, since at least four other species of fusobacteria have been seen to exhibit similar morphology. We examined 46 clinical isolates and six American Type Culture Collection type strains of fusobacteria by conventional methods and by the Microbial ID Systems MIDI software package for analyzing cellular fatty acid patterns measured by capillary column gas-liquid chromatography. Distinctive patterns of major fatty acids could be used to reliably identify most clinical isolates to the species level. The MIDI system identified 89% of the isolates correctly and provides an alternative to conventional methods. PMID:1452706

  10. Current status and perspectives in atomic force microscopy-based identification of cellular transformation

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Chenbo; Hu, Xiao; Dinu, Cerasela Zoica

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the complex interplay between cells and their biomechanics and how the interplay is influenced by the extracellular microenvironment, as well as how the transforming potential of a tissue from a benign to a cancerous one is related to the dynamics of both the cell and its surroundings, holds promise for the development of targeted translational therapies. This review provides a comprehensive overview of atomic force microscopy-based technology and its applications for identification of cellular progression to a cancerous phenotype. The review also offers insights into the advancements that are required for the next user-controlled tool to allow for the identification of early cell transformation and thus potentially lead to improved therapeutic outcomes. PMID:27274238

  11. Rapid identification of nine species of diphyllobothriidean tapeworms by pyrosequencing

    PubMed Central

    Thanchomnang, Tongjit; Tantrawatpan, Chairat; Intapan, Pewpan M.; Sanpool, Oranuch; Lulitanond, Viraphong; Tourtip, Somjintana; Yamasaki, Hiroshi; Maleewong, Wanchai

    2016-01-01

    The identification of diphyllobothriidean tapeworms (Cestoda: Diphyllobothriidea) that infect humans and intermediate/paratenic hosts is extremely difficult due to their morphological similarities, particularly in the case of Diphyllobothrium and Spirometra species. A pyrosequencing method for the molecular identification of pathogenic agents has recently been developed, but as of yet there have been no reports of pyrosequencing approaches that are able to discriminate among diphyllobothriidean species. This study, therefore, set out to establish a pyrosequencing method for differentiating among nine diphyllobothriidean species, Diphyllobothrium dendriticum, Diphyllobothrium ditremum, Diphyllobothrium latum, Diphyllobothrium nihonkaiense, Diphyllobothrium stemmacephalum, Diplogonoporus balaenopterae, Adenocephalus pacificus, Spirometra decipiens and Sparganum proliferum, based on the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) gene as a molecular marker. A region of 41 nucleotides in the cox1 gene served as a target, and variations in this region were used for identification using PCR plus pyrosequencing. This region contains nucleotide variations at 12 positions, which is enough for the identification of the selected nine species of diphyllobothriidean tapeworms. This method was found to be a reliable tool not only for species identification of diphyllobothriids, but also for epidemiological studies of cestodiasis caused by diphyllobothriidean tapeworms at public health units in endemic areas. PMID:27853295

  12. Rapid identification of nine species of diphyllobothriidean tapeworms by pyrosequencing.

    PubMed

    Thanchomnang, Tongjit; Tantrawatpan, Chairat; Intapan, Pewpan M; Sanpool, Oranuch; Lulitanond, Viraphong; Tourtip, Somjintana; Yamasaki, Hiroshi; Maleewong, Wanchai

    2016-11-17

    The identification of diphyllobothriidean tapeworms (Cestoda: Diphyllobothriidea) that infect humans and intermediate/paratenic hosts is extremely difficult due to their morphological similarities, particularly in the case of Diphyllobothrium and Spirometra species. A pyrosequencing method for the molecular identification of pathogenic agents has recently been developed, but as of yet there have been no reports of pyrosequencing approaches that are able to discriminate among diphyllobothriidean species. This study, therefore, set out to establish a pyrosequencing method for differentiating among nine diphyllobothriidean species, Diphyllobothrium dendriticum, Diphyllobothrium ditremum, Diphyllobothrium latum, Diphyllobothrium nihonkaiense, Diphyllobothrium stemmacephalum, Diplogonoporus balaenopterae, Adenocephalus pacificus, Spirometra decipiens and Sparganum proliferum, based on the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) gene as a molecular marker. A region of 41 nucleotides in the cox1 gene served as a target, and variations in this region were used for identification using PCR plus pyrosequencing. This region contains nucleotide variations at 12 positions, which is enough for the identification of the selected nine species of diphyllobothriidean tapeworms. This method was found to be a reliable tool not only for species identification of diphyllobothriids, but also for epidemiological studies of cestodiasis caused by diphyllobothriidean tapeworms at public health units in endemic areas.

  13. Rapid Confirmation of Listeria spp. with the MIT 1000 Microbial Identification System

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Methods that can rapidly confirm the identification of foodborne pathogens are highly desired. The USDA has recently entered into a collaborative research agreement with Micro Imaging Technology to evaluate their MIT 1000 microbial identification system for its ability to identify Listeria species ...

  14. Rapid and Accurate Identification of Candida albicans Isolates by Use of PNA FISHFlow▿

    PubMed Central

    Trnovsky, Jan; Merz, William; Della-Latta, Phyllis; Wu, Fann; Arendrup, Maiken Cavling; Stender, Henrik

    2008-01-01

    We developed the simple, rapid (1 h), and accurate PNA FISHFlow method for the identification of Candida albicans. The method exploits unique in solution in situ hybridization conditions under which the cells are simultaneously fixed and hybridized. This method facilitates the accurate identification of clinical yeast isolates using two scoring techniques: flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. PMID:18287325

  15. Selective Isolation and Rapid Identification of Members of the Genus Micromonospora▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Danheng; Ruan, Jisheng; Huang, Ying

    2008-01-01

    Improved methods for selective isolation of diverse actinomycetes of the genus Micromonospora and a genus-specific nested PCR for rapid identification of putative Micromonospora isolates were developed. The robustness of both the isolation and the identification approach was underpinned by phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences. PMID:18621873

  16. Rapid identification of Vibrio vulnificus on nonselective media with an alkaline phosphatase-labeled oligonucleotide probe.

    PubMed Central

    Wright, A C; Miceli, G A; Landry, W L; Christy, J B; Watkins, W D; Morris, J G

    1993-01-01

    An oligonucleotide DNA probe (VVAP) was constructed from a portion of the Vibrio vulnificus cytolysin gene (hylA) sequence and labeled with alkaline phosphatase covalently linked to the DNA. Control and environmental isolates probed with VVAP showed an exact correlation with results obtained with a plasmid DNA probe (derived from pCVD702) previously described as having 100% specificity and sensitivity for this organism. Identification of V. vulnificus strains was confirmed independently by analysis of the cellular fatty acid composition and by API 20E. Naturally occurring V. vulnificus bacteria were detected without enrichment or selective media by VVAP in unseeded oyster homogenates and seawater collected from a single site in Chesapeake Bay during June at concentrations of 6 x 10(2) and 2 x 10(1) bacteria per ml, respectively. V. vulnificus bacteria were also enumerated by VVAP in oysters seeded with known concentrations of bacteria and plated on nonselective medium. The VVAP method provides a rapid, accurate means of identifying and enumerating V. vulnificus in seawater and oysters without the use of selective media or additional biochemical tests. Images PMID:8434919

  17. Molecular identification of the turf grass rapid blight pathogen.

    PubMed

    Craven, K D; Peterson, P D; Windham, D E; Mitchell, T K; Martin, S B

    2005-01-01

    Rapid blight is a newly described disease on turf grasses, primarily found on golf courses using suboptimal water for irrigation purposes. On the basis of shared morphological characteristics, it has been proposed that the rapid blight pathogen belongs to a genus of stramenopiles, Labyrinthula, which had been known to cause disease of marine plants only. We have collected 10 isolates from four species of turf grass in five states and sequenced portions of the SSU (18S) rDNA gene from each to provide a definitive taxonomic placement for rapid blight pathogens. We also included sequences from Labyrinthuloides yorkensis, Schizochytrium aggregatum, Aplanochytrium sp., Thraustochytrium striatum, Achlya bisexualis and several nonturf-grass isolates of Labyrinthula. We found that rapid blight isolates indeed are placed firmly within the genus Labyrinthula and that they lack detectable genetic diversity in the 18S rDNA region. We propose that the rapid blight pathogens share a recent common ancestor and might have originated from a single, infected population.

  18. Identification of driving network of cellular differentiation from single sample time course gene expression data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ye; Wolanyk, Nathaniel; Ilker, Tunc; Gao, Shouguo; Wang, Xujing

    Methods developed based on bifurcation theory have demonstrated their potential in driving network identification for complex human diseases, including the work by Chen, et al. Recently bifurcation theory has been successfully applied to model cellular differentiation. However, there one often faces a technical challenge in driving network prediction: time course cellular differentiation study often only contains one sample at each time point, while driving network prediction typically require multiple samples at each time point to infer the variation and interaction structures of candidate genes for the driving network. In this study, we investigate several methods to identify both the critical time point and the driving network through examination of how each time point affects the autocorrelation and phase locking. We apply these methods to a high-throughput sequencing (RNA-Seq) dataset of 42 subsets of thymocytes and mature peripheral T cells at multiple time points during their differentiation (GSE48138 from GEO). We compare the predicted driving genes with known transcription regulators of cellular differentiation. We will discuss the advantages and limitations of our proposed methods, as well as potential further improvements of our methods.

  19. Development of a novel, simple and rapid molecular identification system for clinical Candida species.

    PubMed

    Deák, R; Bodai, L; Aarts, H J M; Maráz, A

    2004-08-01

    Identification of clinical yeast isolates causing candidiasis is routinely performed by commercial yeast identification systems based on biochemical, morphological and physiological tests. These systems require 3-5 days and the proportion of identifications that are incorrect is high. Our novel and rapid molecular identification system for clinical Candida species is based on the analysis of restriction patterns obtained from PCR-generated ribosomal DNA sequences using five restriction enzymes. A software package (CandID) was designed to include a database of restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) patterns for 29 Candida species. For 'in-house' validation, 122 clinical isolates that had previously identified in clinical laboratories were typed by this system. These clinical isolates were also independently re-identified by the API 20C AUX system. The ribosomal DNA RFLP database in the context of supporting analytical software allowed simple and rapid (1 work day) identification.

  20. Rapid microbiochemical method for presumptive identification of gastroenteritis-associated members of the family Enterobacteriaceae.

    PubMed

    Yong, D C; Thompson, J S; Prytula, A

    1985-06-01

    A method for rapid screening of isolates of pathogenic members of the family Enterobacteriaceae is described. Flow charts are used in conjunction with triple sugar iron agar, o-nitrophenyl-beta-D-galactopyranoside-phenylalanine-motility sulfate screening media, oxidase test, and six rapid biochemical tests, namely, lysine decarboxylase, urease, indole, esculin hydrolysis, malonate, and xylose. This scheme is used to provide an inexpensive but rapid presumptive identification of Salmonella, Shigella, Edwardsiella, Aeromonas, Plesiomonas, Vibrio, and Yersinia isolates from stool cultures.

  1. Rapid Identification of Vector-Borne Flaviviruses by Mass Spectrometry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    replicates of 10. All six mosquito-borne primer sets (VIR2215, VIR2217, VIR2211, VIR2216, VIR1026, VIR1028) had 100% sensitivity (10/10 reactions were...borne Flavivirus RT-PCR primer pairs. From a known West Nile virus (WNV) titer, the RNA was serially diluted ten-fold. Ten replicates were performed...mass spectrometry, Molecular and Cellular Probes (2010), doi:10.1016/j.mcp.2010.04.003 alphaviruses (assuming that 30 genome equivalents is approxi

  2. Progress towards rapid identification of phytochemicals in plant extracts

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    New mass spectrometry equipment is bringing closer to reality the rapid accurate assessment of chemical composition of extracts from a variety of plant materials. Using a variety of plant sources, we are using HPLC separation, UV-VIS spectrometry, ion trap mass fragmentation and accurate mass deter...

  3. Web-based software for rapid "top-down" proteomic identification of protein biomarkers with implications for bacterial identification

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We have developed web-based software for the rapid identification of protein biomarkers of bacterial microorganisms. Proteins from bacterial cell lysates were ionized by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI), mass-isolated and fragmented using a time-of-flight/time-of-flight (TOF-TOF)...

  4. New Technologies for Rapid Bacterial Identification and Antibiotic Resistance Profiling.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Shana O

    2017-04-01

    Conventional approaches to bacterial identification and drug susceptibility testing typically rely on culture-based approaches that take 2 to 7 days to return results. The long turnaround times contribute to the spread of infectious disease, negative patient outcomes, and the misuse of antibiotics that can contribute to antibiotic resistance. To provide new solutions enabling faster bacterial analysis, a variety of approaches are under development that leverage single-cell analysis, microfluidic concentration and detection strategies, and ultrasensitive readout mechanisms. This review discusses recent advances in this area and the potential of new technologies to enable more effective management of infectious disease.

  5. A rapid, one step molecular identification of Trichoderma citrinoviride and Trichoderma reesei.

    PubMed

    Saroj, Dina B; Dengeti, Shrinivas N; Aher, Supriya; Gupta, Anil K

    2015-06-01

    Trichoderma species are widely used as production hosts for industrial enzymes. Identification of Trichoderma species requires a complex molecular biology based identification involving amplification and sequencing of multiple genes. Industrial laboratories are required to run identification tests repeatedly in cell banking procedures and also to prove absence of production host in the product. Such demands can be fulfilled by a brief method which enables confirmation of strain identity. This communication describes one step identification method for two common Trichoderma species; T. citrinoviride and T. reesei, based on identification of polymorphic region in the nucleotide sequence of translation elongation factor 1 alpha. A unique forward primer and common reverse primer resulted in 153 and 139 bp amplicon for T. citrinoviride and T. reesei, respectively. Simplification was further introduced by using mycelium as template for PCR amplification. Method described in this communication allows rapid, one step identification of two Trichoderma species.

  6. Rapid Methods for the Laboratory Identification of Pathogenic Microorganisms.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-01

    Extracts Prepared in our Lab Mimosa seed 4+ 0 + 0 + Mango seed 0 0 1+ 3+ + Sunflower seed 2+ 0 0 + 0 Avocado seed 1+ 3+ 3+ 1+ NT Persimmon seed 4...M. indica extract was prepared from the dried seeds of commercially purchased mangoes. The seeds were pulverized in a CRC micromill and extracted ...panel of 14 lectins and extracts demonstrating lectin-like activity led to the development of a rapid agglu- tination slide test for the

  7. Identification of calcium-transporting ATPases of Entamoeba histolytica and cellular localization of the putative SERCA.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Higuera, Aarón; Salas-Casas, Andrés; Calixto-Gálvez, Mercedes; Chávez-Munguía, Bibiana; Pérez-Ishiwara, D Guillermo; Ximénez, Cecilia; Rodríguez, Mario A

    2013-09-01

    Calcium has an important role on signaling of different cellular processes in the protozoa parasite Entamoeba histolytica, including development and pathogenesis. However, the systems that control calcium responses in this parasite are incompletely understood. Calcium-ATPases (Ca(2+)-ATPases) are proteins that play an important role in calcium homeostasis by catalyzing the active efflux of this ion from cytoplasm and are essential to the correct functioning of the cell machinery. Here, we reported the identification of five E. histolytica genes encoding putative Ca(2+)-ATPases, three related to PMCA, and two related to organellar ATPases. RT-PCR assays showed that all those genes are expressed in trophozoites and specific antibodies against the SERCA-like member located this protein in a continuous cytoplasmic network, supporting the hypothesis that it corresponds to the Ca(2+)-ATPase responsible to sequester calcium in the endoplasmic reticulum of this parasite.

  8. Transition from a planar interface to cellular and dendritic structures during rapid solidification processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laxmanan, V.

    1986-01-01

    The development of theoretical models which characterize the planar-cellular and cell-dendrite transitions is described. The transitions are analyzed in terms of the Chalmers number, the solute Peclet number, and the tip stability parameter, which correlate microstructural features and processing conditions. The planar-cellular transition is examined using the constitutional supercooling theory of Chalmers et al., (1953) and it is observed that the Chalmers number is between 0 and 1 during dendritic and cellular growth. Analysis of cell-dendrite transition data reveal that the transition occurs when the solute Peclet number goes through a minimum, the primary arm spacings go through a maximum, and the Chalmers number is equal to 1/2. The relation between the tip stability parameter and the solute Peclet number is investigated and it is noted that the tip stability parameter is useful for studying dendritic growth in alloys.

  9. Transition from a planar interface to cellular and dendritic structures during rapid solidification processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laxmanan, V.

    1986-01-01

    The development of theoretical models which characterize the planar-cellular and cell-dendrite transitions is described. The transitions are analyzed in terms of the Chalmers number, the solute Peclet number, and the tip stability parameter, which correlate microstructural features and processing conditions. The planar-cellular transition is examined using the constitutional supercooling theory of Chalmers et al., (1953) and it is observed that the Chalmers number is between 0 and 1 during dendritic and cellular growth. Analysis of cell-dendrite transition data reveal that the transition occurs when the solute Peclet number goes through a minimum, the primary arm spacings go through a maximum, and the Chalmers number is equal to 1/2. The relation between the tip stability parameter and the solute Peclet number is investigated and it is noted that the tip stability parameter is useful for studying dendritic growth in alloys.

  10. Identification of Bacteria Using Phylogenetic Relationships, Revealed by MS/MS Sequencing of Tryptic Peptides Derived from Cellular Proteins

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-11-17

    Universal Phylogenetic Tree of Bacteria Based on SSU rRNA Sequences Aquificae Termotogae Planctomycetes Actinobacteria Firmicutes Cyanobacteria...Identification of Bacteria Using Phylogenetic Relationships Revealed by MS/MS Sequencing of Tryptic Peptides Derived from Cellular Proteins Jacek P...Bacteria Using Phylogenetic Relationships Revealed by MS/MS Sequencing of Tryptic Peptides Derived from Cellular Proteins 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT

  11. Small acid soluble proteins for rapid spore identification.

    SciTech Connect

    Branda, Steven S.; Lane, Todd W.; VanderNoot, Victoria A.; Jokerst, Amanda S.

    2006-12-01

    This one year LDRD addressed the problem of rapid characterization of bacterial spores such as those from the genus Bacillus, the group that contains pathogenic spores such as B. anthracis. In this effort we addressed the feasibility of using a proteomics based approach to spore characterization using a subset of conserved spore proteins known as the small acid soluble proteins or SASPs. We proposed developing techniques that built on our previous expertise in microseparations to rapidly characterize or identify spores. An alternative SASP extraction method was developed that was amenable to both the subsequent fluorescent labeling required for laser-induced fluorescence detection and the low ionic strength requirements for isoelectric focusing. For the microseparations, both capillary isoelectric focusing and chip gel electrophoresis were employed. A variety of methods were evaluated to improve the molecular weight resolution for the SASPs, which are in a molecular weight range that is not well resolved by the current methods. Isoelectric focusing was optimized and employed to resolve the SASPs using UV absorbance detection. Proteomic signatures of native wild type Bacillus spores and clones genetically engineered to produce altered SASP patterns were assessed by slab gel electrophoresis, capillary isoelectric focusing with absorbance detection as well as microchip based gel electrophoresis employing sensitive laser-induced fluorescence detection.

  12. A novel microbead-based microfluidic device for rapid bacterial identification and antibiotic susceptibility testing.

    PubMed

    He, J; Mu, X; Guo, Z; Hao, H; Zhang, C; Zhao, Z; Wang, Q

    2014-12-01

    Effective treatment of infectious diseases depends on the ability to rapidly identify the infecting bacteria and the use of sensitive antibiotics. The currently used identification assays usually take more than 72 h to perform and have a low sensitivity. Herein, we present a microbead-based microfluidic platform that is highly sensitive and rapid for bacterial detection and antibiotic sensitivity testing. The platform includes four units, one of which is used for bacterial identification and the other three are used for susceptibility testing. Our results showed that Escherichia coli O157 at a cell density range of 10(1)-10(5) CFU/μL could be detected within 30 min. Additionally, the effects of three antibiotics on E. coli O157 were evaluated within 4-8 h. Overall, this integrated microbead-based microdevice provides a sensitive, rapid, reliable, and highly effective platform for the identification of bacteria, as well as antibiotic sensitivity testing.

  13. Evaluation of an immunochromatographic assay for rapid identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex in clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Marzouk, Manel; Kahla, Imen Ben; Hannachi, Naila; Ferjeni, Asma; Salma, Walid Ben; Ghezal, Samira; Boukadida, Jalel

    2011-04-01

    Identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC) remains slow. Over the years, several new technologies have been proposed to accelerate and simplify the detection of MTC. In this context, we evaluated an immunochromatographic assay (ICA) (BIO-LINE SD Ag MPT64 TB) for rapid identification of MTC, based on detection of a specific MPT64 antigen of MTC. We have tested it on i) mycobacterial cultures: 210 MTC strains and 28 nontuberculous mycobacteria; ii) M. bovis bacille Calmette-Guérin strain SSI (Statens Serum Institut, Denmark); and iii) 22 microorganisms other than mycobacteria, isolated from cultures. We concluded that this kit has an excellent specificity (100%) and sensitivity (99%) from isolated cultures. The ICA (BIO-LINE SD Ag MPT64 TB) allows excellent MTC identification from clinical isolates. It is a rapid, simple, and inexpensive test, and has a definite contribution in the rapid laboratory diagnosis of tuberculosis.

  14. Preparation of a blood culture pellet for rapid bacterial identification and antibiotic susceptibility testing.

    PubMed

    Croxatto, Antony; Prod'hom, Guy; Durussel, Christian; Greub, Gilbert

    2014-10-15

    Bloodstream infections and sepsis are a major cause of morbidity and mortality. The successful outcome of patients suffering from bacteremia depends on a rapid identification of the infectious agent to guide optimal antibiotic treatment. The analysis of Gram stains from positive blood culture can be rapidly conducted and already significantly impact the antibiotic regimen. However, the accurate identification of the infectious agent is still required to establish the optimal targeted treatment. We present here a simple and fast bacterial pellet preparation from a positive blood culture that can be used as a sample for several essential downstream applications such as identification by MALDI-TOF MS, antibiotic susceptibility testing (AST) by disc diffusion assay or automated AST systems and by automated PCR-based diagnostic testing. The performance of these different identification and AST systems applied directly on the blood culture bacterial pellets is very similar to the performance normally obtained from isolated colonies grown on agar plates. Compared to conventional approaches, the rapid acquisition of a bacterial pellet significantly reduces the time to report both identification and AST. Thus, following blood culture positivity, identification by MALDI-TOF can be reported within less than 1 hr whereas results of AST by automated AST systems or disc diffusion assays within 8 to 18 hr, respectively. Similarly, the results of a rapid PCR-based assay can be communicated to the clinicians less than 2 hr following the report of a bacteremia. Together, these results demonstrate that the rapid preparation of a blood culture bacterial pellet has a significant impact on the identification and AST turnaround time and thus on the successful outcome of patients suffering from bloodstream infections.

  15. Preparation of a Blood Culture Pellet for Rapid Bacterial Identification and Antibiotic Susceptibility Testing

    PubMed Central

    Croxatto, Antony; Prod'hom, Guy; Durussel, Christian; Greub, Gilbert

    2014-01-01

    Bloodstream infections and sepsis are a major cause of morbidity and mortality. The successful outcome of patients suffering from bacteremia depends on a rapid identification of the infectious agent to guide optimal antibiotic treatment. The analysis of Gram stains from positive blood culture can be rapidly conducted and already significantly impact the antibiotic regimen. However, the accurate identification of the infectious agent is still required to establish the optimal targeted treatment. We present here a simple and fast bacterial pellet preparation from a positive blood culture that can be used as a sample for several essential downstream applications such as identification by MALDI-TOF MS, antibiotic susceptibility testing (AST) by disc diffusion assay or automated AST systems and by automated PCR-based diagnostic testing. The performance of these different identification and AST systems applied directly on the blood culture bacterial pellets is very similar to the performance normally obtained from isolated colonies grown on agar plates. Compared to conventional approaches, the rapid acquisition of a bacterial pellet significantly reduces the time to report both identification and AST. Thus, following blood culture positivity, identification by MALDI-TOF can be reported within less than 1 hr whereas results of AST by automated AST systems or disc diffusion assays within 8 to 18 hr, respectively. Similarly, the results of a rapid PCR-based assay can be communicated to the clinicians less than 2 hr following the report of a bacteremia. Together, these results demonstrate that the rapid preparation of a blood culture bacterial pellet has a significant impact on the identification and AST turnaround time and thus on the successful outcome of patients suffering from bloodstream infections. PMID:25350577

  16. Use of Microelectronic Array Technology for Rapid Identification of Clinically Relevant Mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Novarese, Linda; Posteraro, Brunella; Ranno, Stefania; De Carolis, Elena; Pecorini, Giovanni; Lucignano, Barbara; Ardito, Fausta; Fadda, Giovanni

    2005-01-01

    We developed a new method based on the Nanochip microelectronic array technology for identification of various clinically relevant mycobacterial species. PCR-amplified rRNA genes obtained from 270 positive Mycobacteria Growth Indicator Tube cultures were successfully tested by hybridizing them with species-selective probes, and the results agreed with those of conventional identification methods. The system is rapid and accurate and opens new perspectives in clinical diagnostics. PMID:16333127

  17. Use of microelectronic array technology for rapid identification of clinically relevant mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Novarese, Linda; Posteraro, Brunella; Ranno, Stefania; De Carolis, Elena; Pecorini, Giovanni; Lucignano, Barbara; Ardito, Fausta; Fadda, Giovanni

    2005-12-01

    We developed a new method based on the Nanochip microelectronic array technology for identification of various clinically relevant mycobacterial species. PCR-amplified rRNA genes obtained from 270 positive Mycobacteria Growth Indicator Tube cultures were successfully tested by hybridizing them with species-selective probes, and the results agreed with those of conventional identification methods. The system is rapid and accurate and opens new perspectives in clinical diagnostics.

  18. Rapid identification of mycobacteria and rapid detection of drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis in cultured isolates and in respiratory specimens.

    PubMed

    Yam, Wing-Cheong; Siu, Kit-Hang Gilman

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in molecular biology and better understanding of the genetic basis of drug resistance have allowed rapid identification of mycobacteria and rapid detection of drug resistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis present in cultured isolates or in respiratory specimens. In this chapter, several simple nucleic acid amplification-based techniques are introduced as molecular approach for clinical diagnosis of tuberculosis. A one-tube nested IS6110-based polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is used for M. tuberculosis complex identification; the use of a multiplex allele-specific PCR is demonstrated to detect the isoniazid resistance; PCR-sequencing assays are applied for rifampicin and ofloxacin resistance detection and 16S rDNA sequencing is utilized for identification of mycobacterial species from cultures of acid fast bacilli (AFB). Despite the high specificity and sensitivity of the molecular techniques, mycobacterial culture remains the "Gold Standard" for tuberculosis diagnosis. Negative results of molecular tests never preclude the infection or the presence of drug resistance. These technological advancements are, therefore, not intended to replace the conventional tests, but rather have major complementary roles in tuberculosis diagnosis.

  19. A rapid and reliable procedure for extraction of cellular polyamines and inorganic ions from plant tissues

    Treesearch

    Rakesh Minocha; Walter C. Shortle; Stephanie L. Long; Subhash C. Minocha

    1994-01-01

    A fast and reliable method for the extraction of cellular polyamines and major inorganic ions (Ca, Mg, Mn, K, and P) from several plant tissues is described. The method involves repeated freezing and thawing of samples instead of homogenization. The efficiency of extraction of both the polyamines and inorganic ions by these two methods was compared for 10 different...

  20. Modelling chronotaxicity of cellular energy metabolism to facilitate the identification of altered metabolic states

    PubMed Central

    Lancaster, Gemma; Suprunenko, Yevhen F.; Jenkins, Kirsten; Stefanovska, Aneta

    2016-01-01

    Altered cellular energy metabolism is a hallmark of many diseases, one notable example being cancer. Here, we focus on the identification of the transition from healthy to abnormal metabolic states. To do this, we study the dynamics of energy production in a cell. Due to the thermodynamic openness of a living cell, the inability to instantaneously match fluctuating supply and demand in energy metabolism results in nonautonomous time-varying oscillatory dynamics. However, such oscillatory dynamics is often neglected and treated as stochastic. Based on experimental evidence of metabolic oscillations, we show that changes in metabolic state can be described robustly by alterations in the chronotaxicity of the corresponding metabolic oscillations, i.e. the ability of an oscillator to resist external perturbations. We also present a method for the identification of chronotaxicity, applicable to general oscillatory signals and, importantly, apply this to real experimental data. Evidence of chronotaxicity was found in glycolytic oscillations in real yeast cells, verifying that chronotaxicity could be used to study transitions between metabolic states. PMID:27483987

  1. Modelling chronotaxicity of cellular energy metabolism to facilitate the identification of altered metabolic states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lancaster, Gemma; Suprunenko, Yevhen F.; Jenkins, Kirsten; Stefanovska, Aneta

    2016-08-01

    Altered cellular energy metabolism is a hallmark of many diseases, one notable example being cancer. Here, we focus on the identification of the transition from healthy to abnormal metabolic states. To do this, we study the dynamics of energy production in a cell. Due to the thermodynamic openness of a living cell, the inability to instantaneously match fluctuating supply and demand in energy metabolism results in nonautonomous time-varying oscillatory dynamics. However, such oscillatory dynamics is often neglected and treated as stochastic. Based on experimental evidence of metabolic oscillations, we show that changes in metabolic state can be described robustly by alterations in the chronotaxicity of the corresponding metabolic oscillations, i.e. the ability of an oscillator to resist external perturbations. We also present a method for the identification of chronotaxicity, applicable to general oscillatory signals and, importantly, apply this to real experimental data. Evidence of chronotaxicity was found in glycolytic oscillations in real yeast cells, verifying that chronotaxicity could be used to study transitions between metabolic states.

  2. Rapid biological agent identification by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farquharson, Stuart; Smith, Wayne W.; Elliott, Susan; Sperry, Jay F.

    1999-11-01

    The Chemical Weapons Convention prohibits the development, production, stockpiling, and use of warfare agents (chemical and biological), and requires their destruction. Yet their use persists and has been included in the terrorist's arsenal. Currently, a number of analytical methods are being developed to perform rapid measurements of trace agents to ensure treaty compliance, as well as safe environments for military personal and the public at large. We have been investigating the ability of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy to detect bacterial nucleic acid-base pairs with sufficient sensitivity and selectivity to eliminate the need for enumeration used in polymerase chain reactions and culture growth, required by other measurement techniques. The design of a small volume, fiber optic coupled, electrolytic sample cell is presented along with analysis of DNA and RNA separated from non-toxic bacteria.

  3. Rapid Identification of GRB Afterglows with Swift/UVOT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, F. E.

    2006-01-01

    As part of the automated response to a new gamma-ray burst (GRB), the Ultraviolet and Optical Telescope (UVOT) instrument on Swift starts a 200-second exposure with the V filter within approximately 100 seconds of the BAT burst trigger. The instrument searches for sources in a 8' x 8' region, and sends the list of sources and a 160" x 160" sub-image centered on the burst position to the ground via Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS). These raw products and additional products calculated on the ground are then distributed through the GCN within a few minutes of the trigger. We describe the sensitivity of these data for detecting afterglows, summarize current results, and outline plans for rapidly distributing future detections.

  4. [Utility of Fluoroplate Candida for the rapid identification of Candida albicans].

    PubMed

    Quindós, G; San Millan, R; Bikandi, J; Pontón, J

    1996-12-01

    Candida albicans infections are frequent in immunocompromised patients and a prompt diagnosis could favor an early and proper antifungal treatment. The rapid identification of clinical yeast isolates facilitate this diagnosis. The utility of Fluoroplate Candida ready-to-use plates for Candida albicans rapid identification was evaluated with 653 clinical isolates from 23 yeast species, including 307 C. albicans plated onto Fluoroplate Candida agar (Merck, Germany). Rapid identification of C. albicans was based on the hydrolysis of 4-methylumbelliferyl-N-acetyl-beta-D-galactosaminide by the galactosaminidase activity of C. albicans producing white fluorescent colonies under ultraviolet light. Identification on Fluoroplate Candida was confirmed by germ tube, chlamydoconidia formation and API-ATB ID 32C assays. Three hundred and five of 306 isolates showing fluorescent colonies were C. albicans and one was Candida glabrata (false positive). The rest of the isolates showed colonies without fluorescence and with the exception of two false negatives, these isolates were identified as non-C. albicans by other methods. Fluoroplate Candida allows a rapid and excellent identification of C. albicans showing a sensitivity and specificity of 99.3 and 99.7%, respectively.

  5. Rapid identification of chromosomal rearrangements by PRINS technique

    SciTech Connect

    Pellestor, F.; Giradet, A.; Andreo, B.

    1994-09-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements contribute significantly to human reproductive failure, malformation/mental retardation syndromes and carcinogenesis. The variety of structural rearrangements is almost infinite and an identification by conventional cytogenetics is often labor intensive and may remain doubtful. Recent advances in molecular cytogenetics have provided new tools for detecting chromosomal abnormalities. The fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) procedure is actually the most employed technique and has led to numerous clinical applications. However, techniques required to produce suitable probes are time consuming and not accessible to all cytogenetics laboratories. The PRimed In Situ labeling (PRINS) method provides an alternate way for in situ chromosome screening. In this procedure, the chromosomal detection is performed by in situ annealing of a specific primer and subsequent primer extension by a Taq DNA polymerase in the presence of labeled nucleotides. Application of PRINS in clinical diagnosis is still limited. We have developed a semi-automatic PRINS protocol and used it to identify the origin of several chromosomal abnormalities. We report here the results of studies of three structural rearrangements: a translocation t(21;21), a supernumerary ring marker chromosome 18 and a complex chromosome 13 mosaicism involving a 13;13 Robertsonian translocation and a ring chromosome 13.

  6. Rapidly Learned Identification of Epileptic Seizures from Sonified EEG

    PubMed Central

    Loui, Psyche; Koplin-Green, Matan; Frick, Mark; Massone, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Sonification refers to a process by which data are converted into sound, providing an auditory alternative to visual display. Currently, the prevalent method for diagnosing seizures in epilepsy is by visually reading a patient’s electroencephalogram (EEG). However, sonification of the EEG data provides certain advantages due to the nature of human auditory perception. We hypothesized that human listeners will be able to identify seizures from EEGs using the auditory modality alone, and that accuracy of seizure identification will increase after a short training session. Here, we describe an algorithm that we have used to sonify EEGs of both seizure and non-seizure activity, followed by a training study in which subjects listened to short clips of sonified EEGs and determined whether each clip was of seizure or normal activity, both before and after a short training session. Results show that before training subjects performed at chance level in differentiating seizures from non-seizures, but there was a significant improvement of accuracy after the training session. After training, subjects successfully distinguished seizures from non-seizures using the auditory modality alone. Further analyses using signal detection theory demonstrated improvement in sensitivity and reduction in response bias as a result of training. This study demonstrates the potential of sonified EEGs to be used for the detection of seizures. Future studies will attempt to increase accuracy using novel training and sonification modifications, with the goals of managing, predicting, and ultimately controlling seizures using sonification as a possible biofeedback-based intervention for epilepsy. PMID:25352802

  7. Rapid Identification of Aldose Reductase Inhibitory Compounds from Perilla frutescens

    PubMed Central

    Paek, Ji Hun; Shin, Kuk Hyun; Kang, Young-Hee; Lee, Jae-Yong; Lim, Soon Sung

    2013-01-01

    The ethyl acetate (EtOAc) soluble fraction of methanol extracts of Perilla frutescens (P. frutescens) inhibits aldose reductase (AR), the key enzyme in the polyol pathway. Our investigation of inhibitory compounds from the EtOAc soluble fraction of P. frutescens was followed by identification of the inhibitory compounds by a combination of HPLC microfractionation and a 96-well enzyme assay. This allowed the biological activities to be efficiently matched with selected HPLC peaks. Structural analyses of the active compounds were performed by LC-MSn. The main AR inhibiting compounds were tentatively identified as chlorogenic acid and rosmarinic acid by LC-MSn. A two-step high speed counter current chromatography (HSCCC) isolation method was developed with a solvent system of n-hexane-ethyl acetate-methanol-water at 1.5 : 5 : 1 : 5, v/v and 3 : 7 : 5 : 5, v/v. The chemical structures of the isolated compounds were determined by 1H- and 13C-nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry (NMR). The main compounds inhibiting AR in the EtOAc fraction of methanol extracts of P. frutescens were identified as chlorogenic acid (2) (IC50 = 3.16 μM), rosmarinic acid (4) (IC50 = 2.77 μM), luteolin (5) (IC50 = 6.34 μM), and methyl rosmarinic acid (6) (IC50 = 4.03 μM). PMID:24308003

  8. Growth medium for the rapid isolation and identification of anthrax

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiel, Johnathan L.; Parker, Jill E.; Grubbs, Teri R.; Alls, John L.

    2000-07-01

    Anthrax has been recognized as a highly likely biological warfare or terrorist agent. The purpose of this work was to design a culture technique to rapidly isolate and identify `live' anthrax. In liquid or solid media form, 3AT medium (3-amino-L-tyrosine, the main ingredient) accelerated germination and growth of anthrax spores in 5 to 6 hours to a point expected at 18 to 24 hours with ordinary medium. During accelerated growth, standard definitive diagnostic tests such as sensitivity to lysis by penicillin or bacteriophage can be run. During this time, the bacteria synthesized a fluorescent and thermochemiluminescent polymer. Bacteria captured by specific antibody are, therefore, already labeled. Because living bacteria are required to generate the polymer, the test converts immunoassays for anthrax into viability assays. Furthermore, the polymer formation leads to the death of the vegetative form and non-viability of the spores produced in the medium. By altering the formulation of the medium, other microbes and even animal and human cells can be grown in it and labeled (including viruses grown in the animal or human cells).

  9. Rapid identification of antibiotic resistance using droplet microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Keays, Marie C.; O'Brien, Mark; Hussain, Anam; Kiely, Patrick A.; Dalton, Tara

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Culturing bacteria and monitoring bacterial cell growth is a critical issue when dealing with patients who present with bacterial infections. One of the main challenges that arises is the time taken to identify the particular strain of bacteria and consequently, decide the correct treatment. In the majority of cases, broad spectrum antibiotics are used to target infections when a narrow spectrum drug would be more appropriate. The efficient monitoring of bacterial growth and potential antibiotic resistance is necessary to identify the best treatment options for patients. Minturising the reactions into microfluidic droplets offers a novel method to rapidy analyze bacteria. Microfluidics facilitates low volume reactions that provide a unique system where each droplet reaction acts as an individual bioreactor. Here, we designed and built a novel platform that allowed us to create and monitor E.coli microfluidic droplet cultures. Optical capacity was built in and measurements of bacterial cultures were captured facilitating the continuous monitoring of individual reactions. The capacity of the instrument was demonstrated by the application of treatments to both bacteria and drug resistant strains of bacteria. We were able to detect responses within one hour in the droplet cultures, demonstrating the capacity of this workflow to the culture and rapid characterization of bacterial strains. PMID:26942773

  10. Rapid Detection and Identification of Respiratory Viruses by Direct Immunofluorescence

    PubMed Central

    D'Alessio, Donn; Williams, Stanley; Dick, Elliot C.

    1970-01-01

    The use of fluorescein-conjugated antiserum against respiratory syncytial (RS) and parainfluenza 1 and 3 viruses was compared with conventional techniques in the rapid detection of virus in tissue cultures inoculated with pharyngeal specimens known to contain these viruses. Twenty-three specimens were tested: 9 RS, 8 parainfluenza 1, and 6 parainfluenza 3. The fluorescent-antibody technique (FA) detected virus in 52% of the tissue cultures in 24 hr, and, by 72 hr, 22 of the 23 cultures were FA-positive whereas only 5 were positive by conventional techniques. Additionally, conjugated antisera were prepared against herpes simplex, influenza A2, and adenovirus type 5. All conjugates stained only the homologous virus and were 100- to 10,000-fold more sensitive than conventional techniques in detecting descending dilutions of virus inocula by 24 hr. With the procedures described, several antisera could be conjugated and ready for use within 24 hr. Serum fractionation was by ammonium sulfate precipitation, and with the procedure outlined virtually complete recovery of the globulin fraction and elimination of all of the albumin were accomplished. Images PMID:4098101

  11. Rapid identification of antibiotic resistance using droplet microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Keays, Marie C; O'Brien, Mark; Hussain, Anam; Kiely, Patrick A; Dalton, Tara

    2016-04-02

    Culturing bacteria and monitoring bacterial cell growth is a critical issue when dealing with patients who present with bacterial infections. One of the main challenges that arises is the time taken to identify the particular strain of bacteria and consequently, decide the correct treatment. In the majority of cases, broad spectrum antibiotics are used to target infections when a narrow spectrum drug would be more appropriate. The efficient monitoring of bacterial growth and potential antibiotic resistance is necessary to identify the best treatment options for patients. Minturising the reactions into microfluidic droplets offers a novel method to rapidy analyze bacteria. Microfluidics facilitates low volume reactions that provide a unique system where each droplet reaction acts as an individual bioreactor. Here, we designed and built a novel platform that allowed us to create and monitor E.coli microfluidic droplet cultures. Optical capacity was built in and measurements of bacterial cultures were captured facilitating the continuous monitoring of individual reactions. The capacity of the instrument was demonstrated by the application of treatments to both bacteria and drug resistant strains of bacteria. We were able to detect responses within one hour in the droplet cultures, demonstrating the capacity of this workflow to the culture and rapid characterization of bacterial strains.

  12. [Identification of fungi in tissues and cultures: the importance of argirophilic substances on its cellular walls].

    PubMed

    Piva, J R; Ortega, H H; Canal, A M; Piva, C E; Reus, V; Seib, E P

    2001-01-01

    An experimental development based on the combination of microwaves action with one of the methods of silver staining by Del Río Hortega is presented. Material from pathological tissues and culture of fungi were studied. Besides morphological studies, were considered the causes of reduction from ionic to metalic silver, some characteristics of the silver reagent and its relationship with histochemical constitution of cellular walls. It is pointed the rapidity in fungi demonstration, the satisfactory definition of affected tissues, the advantages of working with a stable reagent, the omission of carcinogenetic substances, the possibility of stain fungical structures in previously stained materials with anilinic techniques, and the extent of the method to cultured materials without necessity of previous formaldehidic fixation.

  13. Rapid induction and persistence of paracrine-induced cellular antiviral states arrest viral infection spread in A549 cells

    PubMed Central

    Voigt, Emily A; Swick, Adam; Yin, John

    2016-01-01

    The virus/host interaction is a complex interplay between pro- and anti-viral factors that ultimately determines the spread or halt of virus infections in tissues. This interplay develops over multiple rounds of infection. The purpose of this study was to determine how cellular-level processes combine to impact the spatial spread of infection. We measured the kinetics of virus replication (VSV), antiviral paracrine signal upregulation and secretion, spatial spread of virus and paracrine antiviral signaling, and inhibition of virus production in antiviral-exposed A549 human lung epithelial cells. We found that initially infected cells released antiviral signals 4-to-7 hours following production of virus. However, the subsequent rapid dissemination of signal and fast induction of a robust and persistent antiviral state ultimately led to a suppression of infection spread. This work shows how cellular responses to infection and activation of antiviral responses can integrate to ultimately control infection spread across host cell populations. PMID:27254596

  14. Rapid PCR of STR markers: Applications to human identification.

    PubMed

    Romsos, Erica L; Vallone, Peter M

    2015-09-01

    Multiplex PCR with fluorescently labeled primers has been an essential method for the amplification of short tandem repeats used in human identify testing. Within the STR workflow of extraction, quantitation, amplification, separation, and detection, multiplex PCR is commonly identified as the bottleneck in the process. The time requirement of up to three hours to complete 28-30 cycles of multiplex PCR for STR genotyping is the greatest amount of time required for a single step within the process. The historical use of commercially available thermal cyclers and heat stable polymerases may have given the impression that large multiplex will always require long PCR cycling times to ensure that all of the varying sized targets (typically 100-400bp) can be amplified in a balanced manner throughout the multiplex. However, with the advent of improved polymerases and faster thermal cyclers the time required for the amplification of large STR multiplexes is no longer on the order of three hours, but as little as 14min. Faster amplification times can be performed while retaining the balance and integrity of large multiplex PCRs by implementation of alternate polymerases and thermal cyclers. With the reduction in PCR cycling times there has also been an impact on the development of integrated and microfluidics devices which employ the use of reduced or rapid thermal cycling protocols as part of their integration. Similarly, PCR inhibitor resistant polymerases can also reduce overall STR processing times for reference samples by eliminating the need for DNA extraction and purification that is additionally implemented within the development of integrated DNA typing devices.

  15. Identification of a Bacteria Using Phylogenetic Relationships Revealed by MS/MS Sequencing of Tryptic Peptides Derived From Cellular Proteins

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-12-01

    phylogenetic relationships between bacterial species as a part of a hierarchical decision tree process. 1. INTRODUCTION The detection and...1 IDENTIFICATION OF BACTERIA USING PHYLOGENETIC RELATIONSHIPS REVEALED BY MS/MS SEQUENCING OF TRYPTIC PEPTIDES DERIVED FROM CELLULAR PROTEINS...based on analysis of an electrospray ionization (ESI)-MS/MS data for the fast classification of analyzed bacteria, using phylogenetic relationships

  16. Rapid determination of the molecular weight distribution of total cellular fatty acids using chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Schwarzenbach, R P; Fisher, N S

    1978-01-01

    A new method for the qualitative and quantitative determination of the molecular weight distribution of total cellular fatty acids is described. The method includes a simple extraction-saponification followed by chemical ionization-mass spectrometric analysis of the saponifiable matter. This technique requires small quantities of cell material which, combined with the rapidity and precision of the analysis, makes it attractive to the biologist interested in changes in the fatty acid composition of growing cells. As an example, an application of this method to the fatty acid determination of marine diatoms at different growth stages is presented.

  17. Monoclonal surface display SELEX for simple, rapid, efficient, and cost-effective aptamer enrichment and identification.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhi; Song, Yanling; Li, Cong; Zou, Yuan; Zhu, Ling; An, Yuan; Yang, Chaoyong James

    2014-06-17

    A novel method, monoclonal surface display SELEX (MSD-SELEX), has been designed for simple, rapid, efficient, and cost-effective enrichment and identification of aptamers from a library of monoclonal DNA-displaying beads produced via highly parallel single-molecule emulsion PCR. The approach was successfully applied for the identification of high-affinity aptamers that bind specifically to different types of targets, including cancer biomarker protein EpCAM and small toxin molecule aflatoxin B1. Compared to the conventional sequencing-chemical synthesis-screening work flow, MSD-SELEX avoids large-scale DNA sequencing, expensive and time-consuming DNA synthesis, and labor-intensive screening of large populations of candidates, thus offering a new approach for simple, rapid, efficient, and cost-effective aptamer identification for a wide variety of applications.

  18. Rapid detection and identification of Stachybotrys and Chaetomium species using tissue PCR analysis.

    PubMed

    Lewińska, Anna M; Peuhkuri, Ruut H; Rode, Carsten; Andersen, Birgitte; Hoof, Jakob B

    2016-11-01

    Indoor fungi are a worldwide problem causing negative health effects for infected building's occupants and even deterioration of building structures. Different fungal species affect buildings and their inhabitants differently. Therefore, rapid and accurate identification of fungi to the species level is essential for health risk assessment and building remediation. This study focuses on molecular identification of two common indoor fungal genera: Stachybotrys and Chaetomium. This study proposes two new DNA barcode candidates for Stachybotrys and Chaetomium: the gene encoding mitogen activated protein kinase (hogA) and the intergenic region between histone 3 and histone 4 (h3-h4) as well as it introduces a rapid - 3.5h - protocol for direct Stachybotrys and Chaetomium species identification, which bypasses culture cultivation, DNA extraction and DNA sequencing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Evaluation of the rapid NFT system for identification of gram-negative, nonfermenting rods.

    PubMed Central

    Appelbaum, P C; Leathers, D J

    1984-01-01

    This study evaluated the ability of the Rapid NFT system (API System SA, Montalieu-Vercieu, France) to accurately identify 262 clinically isolated, gram-negative, nonfermentative rods without additional tests. Identifications were classified as correct; low discrimination, with a spectrum of two or more possibilities (additional tests necessary for accurate identification); and incorrect. Correct identification rates were analyzed in two categories: (i) correct to species or biotype for all organism groups except Alcaligenes faecalis-odorans, Moraxella, Pseudomonas testosteroni-alcaligenes-pseudoalcaligenes, and Acinetobacter calcoaceticus biotype haemolyticus-alcaligenes (in this category, the latter four genus-biotype group identifications were taken as correct) and (ii) correct to species or biotype in all cases, including the above four groups. In category i, 87.4% of the strains were correctly identified, with 4.2% low discrimination and 8.4% incorrect. When the criteria of category ii were used, 71.8% of the strains were correctly identified, with 19.9% low discrimination. The Rapid NFT system provided excellent species identification of Pseudomonas and Flavobacterium spp., Bordetella bronchiseptica, and Achromobacter xylosoxidans strains. Within Acinetobacter calcoaceticus, differentiation between biotypes anitratus and lwoffi was satisfactory, but the system did not differentiate between biotypes haemolyticus and alcaligenes. Species resolution within the genera Moraxella and Alcaligenes was incomplete. All Alcaligenes faecalis strains were misidentified and accounted for 50% of misidentifications with the Rapid NFT system; however, these results may reflect taxonomic differences rather than true misidentifications. The Rapid NFT system is easy to inoculate and interpret and represents a worthwhile advance in the identification of gram-negative, nonfermentative rods. PMID:6490857

  20. A novel cellular stress response characterised by a rapid reorganisation of membranes of the endoplasmic reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Varadarajan, S; Bampton, E T W; Smalley, J L; Tanaka, K; Caves, R E; Butterworth, M; Wei, J; Pellecchia, M; Mitcheson, J; Gant, T W; Dinsdale, D; Cohen, G M

    2012-01-01

    Canonical endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, which occurs in many physiological and disease processes, results in activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR). We now describe a new, evolutionarily conserved cellular stress response characterised by a striking, but reversible, reorganisation of ER membranes that occurs independently of the UPR, resulting in impaired ER transport and function. This reorganisation is characterised by a dramatic redistribution and clustering of ER membrane proteins. ER membrane aggregation is regulated, in part, by anti-apoptotic BCL-2 family members, particularly MCL-1. Using connectivity mapping, we report the widespread occurrence of this stress response by identifying several structurally diverse chemicals from different pharmacological classes, including antihistamines, antimalarials and antipsychotics, which induce ER membrane reorganisation. Furthermore, we demonstrate the potential of ER membrane aggregation to result in pathological consequences, such as the long-QT syndrome, a cardiac arrhythmic abnormality, arising because of a novel trafficking defect of the human ether-a-go-go-related channel protein from the ER to the plasma membrane. Thus, ER membrane reorganisation is a feature of a new cellular stress pathway, clearly distinct from the UPR, with important consequences affecting the normal functioning of the ER. PMID:22955944

  1. Rapid Identification of Candida Species and Other Clinically Important Yeast Species by Flow Cytometry†

    PubMed Central

    Page, Brent T.; Kurtzman, Cletus P.

    2005-01-01

    Two rapid diagnostic assays, utilizing two different Luminex flow cytometry methods, were developed for identification of clinically important ascomycetous yeast species. Direct hybridization and allele-specific primer extension methods were both successful in establishing a DNA-based assay that can rapidly and accurately identify Candida albicans, Candida krusei, Candida parapsilosis, Candida glabrata, and Candida tropicalis as well as other clinical species. The direct hybridization assay was designed to identify a total of 19 ascomycetous yeast species, and the allele-specific primer extension assay was designed to identify a total of 34 species. Probes were validated against 438 strains representing 303 species. From culture to identification, the allele-specific primer extension method takes 8 h and the direct hybridization method takes less than 5 h to complete. These assays represent comprehensive, rapid tests that are well suited for the clinical laboratory. PMID:16145099

  2. Pyrosequencing as a tool for rapid fish species identification and commercial fraud detection.

    PubMed

    De Battisti, Cristian; Marciano, Sabrina; Magnabosco, Cristian; Busato, Sara; Arcangeli, Giuseppe; Cattoli, Giovanni

    2014-01-08

    The increased consumption of fish products, as well as the occurrence of exotic fish species in the Mediterranean Sea and in the fish market, has increased the risk of commercial fraud. Furthermore, the great amount of processed seafood products has greatly limited the application of classic identification systems. DNA-based identification allows a clear and unambiguous detection of polymorphisms between species, permitting differentiation and identification of both commercial fraud and introduction of species with potential toxic effects on humans. In this study, a novel DNA-based approach for differentiation of fish species based on pyrosequencing technology has been developed. Raw and processed fish products were tested, and up to 25 species of fish belonging to Clupeiformes and Pleuronectiformes groups were uniquely and rapidly identified. The proper identification based on short and unique genetic sequence signatures demonstrates that this approach is promising and cost-effective for large-scale surveys.

  3. Multilaboratory Validation of Rapid Spot Tests for Identification of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    York, Mary K.; Baron, Ellen Jo; Clarridge, Jill E.; Thomson, Richard B.; Weinstein, Melvin P.

    2000-01-01

    To validate the accuracy of rapid tests for identification of Escherichia coli, five laboratories sequentially collected 1,064 fresh, clinically significant strains with core criteria of indole-positive, oxidase-negative, nonspreading organisms on sheep blood agar plates (BAP), having typical gram-negative rod plate morphology, defined as good growth on gram-negative rod-selective media. An algorithm using beta-hemolysis on BAP, lactose reaction on eosin-methylene blue or MacConkey agar, l-pyrrolidonyl-β-naphthylamide (PYR), and 4-methylumbelliferyl-β-d-glucuronide (MUG) was evaluated. Identifications using the algorithm were compared to those obtained using commercial kit system identifications. One thousand strains were E. coli and 64 were not E. coli by kit identifications, which were supplemented with conventional biochemical testing of low probability profiles. Of the 1,064 isolates meeting the core criteria, 294 were beta-hemolytic and did not require further testing to be identified as E. coli. None of the 64 non-E. coli strains were hemolytic, although other indole-positive, lactose-negative species were found to be hemolytic when further strains were examined in a follow-up study. Of the remaining strains, 628 were identified as E. coli by a lactose-positive and PYR-negative reaction. For nonhemolytic, lactose-negative E. coli, PYR was not helpful, but a positive MUG reaction identified 65 of 78 isolates as E. coli. The remaining 13 E. coli strains required kit identifications. This scheme for E. coli identification misidentified three non-E. coli strains as E. coli, for an error rate of 0.3%. A total of 13 kit identifications, 657 PYR tests, and 113 MUG tests were needed to identify 1,000 E. coli strains with the algorithm. The use of this rapid system saves laboratory resources, provides timely identifications, and yields rare misidentifications. PMID:10970389

  4. Identification of Parvalbumin Interneurons as Cellular Substrate of Fear Memory Persistence

    PubMed Central

    Çalışkan, Gürsel; Müller, Iris; Semtner, Marcus; Winkelmann, Aline; Raza, Ahsan S.; Hollnagel, Jan O.; Rösler, Anton; Heinemann, Uwe; Stork, Oliver; Meier, Jochen C.

    2016-01-01

    Parvalbumin-positive (PV) basket cells provide perisomatic inhibition in the cortex and hippocampus and control generation of memory-related network activity patterns, such as sharp wave ripples (SPW-R). Deterioration of this class of fast-spiking interneurons has been observed in neuropsychiatric disorders and evidence from animal models suggests their involvement in the acquisition and extinction of fear memories. Here, we used mice with neuron type-targeted expression of the presynaptic gain-of-function glycine receptor RNA variant GlyR α3L185L to genetically enhance the network activity of PV interneurons. These mice showed reduced extinction of contextual fear memory but normal auditory cued fear memory. They furthermore displayed increase of SPW-R activity in area CA3 and CA1 and facilitated propagation of this particular network activity pattern, as determined in ventral hippocampal slice preparations. Individual freezing levels during extinction and SPW-R propagation were correlated across genotypes. The same was true for parvalbumin immunoreactivity in the ventral hippocampus, which was generally augmented in the GlyR mutant mice and correlated with individual freezing levels. Together, these results identify PV interneurons as critical cellular substrate of fear memory persistence and associated SPW-R activity in the hippocampus. Our findings may be relevant for the identification and characterization of physiological correlates for posttraumatic stress and anxiety disorders. PMID:26908632

  5. Identification of Parvalbumin Interneurons as Cellular Substrate of Fear Memory Persistence.

    PubMed

    Çaliskan, Gürsel; Müller, Iris; Semtner, Marcus; Winkelmann, Aline; Raza, Ahsan S; Hollnagel, Jan O; Rösler, Anton; Heinemann, Uwe; Stork, Oliver; Meier, Jochen C

    2016-05-01

    Parvalbumin-positive (PV) basket cells provide perisomatic inhibition in the cortex and hippocampus and control generation of memory-related network activity patterns, such as sharp wave ripples (SPW-R). Deterioration of this class of fast-spiking interneurons has been observed in neuropsychiatric disorders and evidence from animal models suggests their involvement in the acquisition and extinction of fear memories. Here, we used mice with neuron type-targeted expression of the presynaptic gain-of-function glycine receptor RNA variant GlyR α3L(185L)to genetically enhance the network activity of PV interneurons. These mice showed reduced extinction of contextual fear memory but normal auditory cued fear memory. They furthermore displayed increase of SPW-R activity in area CA3 and CA1 and facilitated propagation of this particular network activity pattern, as determined in ventral hippocampal slice preparations. Individual freezing levels during extinction and SPW-R propagation were correlated across genotypes. The same was true for parvalbumin immunoreactivity in the ventral hippocampus, which was generally augmented in the GlyR mutant mice and correlated with individual freezing levels. Together, these results identify PV interneurons as critical cellular substrate of fear memory persistence and associated SPW-R activity in the hippocampus. Our findings may be relevant for the identification and characterization of physiological correlates for posttraumatic stress and anxiety disorders. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  6. Rapid species specific identification and subtyping of Yersinia enterocolitica by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Stephan, Roger; Cernela, Nicole; Ziegler, Dominik; Pflüger, Valentin; Tonolla, Mauro; Ravasi, Damiana; Fredriksson-Ahomaa, Maria; Hächler, Herbert

    2011-11-01

    Yersinia enterocolitica are Gram-negative pathogens and known as important causes of foodborne infections. Rapid and reliable identification of strains of the species Y. enterocolitica within the genus Yersinia and the differentiation of the pathogenic from the non-pathogenic biotypes has become increasingly important. We evaluated here the application of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) for rapid species identification and subtyping of Y. enterocolitica. To this end, we developed a reference MS database library including 19 Y. enterocolitica (non-pathogenic biotype 1A and pathogenic biotypes 2 and 4) as well as 24 non-Y. enterocolitica strains, belonging to eleven different other Yersinia spp. The strains provided reproducible and unique mass spectra profiles covering a wide molecular mass range (2000 to 30,000 Da). Species-specific and biotype-specific biomarker protein mass patterns were determined for Y. enterocolitica. The defined biomarker mass patterns (SARAMIS SuperSpectrum™) were validated using 117 strains from various Y. enterocolitica bioserotypes in a blind-test. All strains were correctly identified and for all strains the mass spectrometry-based identification scheme yielded identical results compared to a characterization by a combination of biotyping and serotyping. Our study demonstrates that MALDI-TOF-MS is a reliable and powerful tool for the rapid identification of Y. enterocolitica strains to the species level and allows subtyping of strains to the biotype level. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. [Evaluation of a rapid trehalase test for the identification of Candida glabrata].

    PubMed

    Kirdar, Sevin; Gültekin, Berna; Evcil, Gonca; Ozkütük, Aydan; Sener, Asli Gamze; Aydin, Neriman

    2009-04-01

    Candida species which cause local infections, may also lead to fatal systemic infections. The increasing incidence of non-albicans Candida, especially fluconazole susceptible or resistant dose-dependent C. glabrata, increased the importance of rapid and accurate species level identification for Candida. Rapid and correct identification of C. glabrata is essential for the initiation of the appropriate antifungal therapy. This study was conducted to evaluate the performance of the rapid trehalase test in the diagnosis of C. glabrata isolates. A total of 173 Candida strains isolated from various clinical specimens and identified according to germ tube test, growth on cornmeal Tween 80 agar and the colony morphologies on Mast-CHROMagar Candida medium (Mast Diagnostics, UK), were included to the study. The identification of non-albicans Candida species were also confirmed by API 20CAUX (BioMerieux, France) system. Accordingly 86 (50%) of the isolates were identified as C. glabrata, 48 (28%) C. albicans, 17 (10%) C. krusei, 13 (8%) C. tropicalis, 5 (3%) C. parapsilosis, 3 (2%) C. kefyr and 1 (1%) Cutilis. In order to detect the presence of trehalase enzyme in Condida strains, all isolates were grown on Sabouraud dextrose agar containing 4% glucose and then one yeast colony was emulsified in 50 microl of citrate buffer containing 4% (wt/vol) trehalose for 3 h at 37 degrees C. Presence of glucose which emerged after the action of trehalase on trehalose, was detected by a commercial "urinary glucose detection dipstick" (Spinreacta, Spain). All C. glabrata strains yielded positive result by trehalase test. None C. glabrata isolates were found negative by trehalase test except for one strain of C. tropicalis. In this study, the trehalase test allowed identification of C. globrata with 100% sensitivity and 98.9% specificity. It was concluded that trehalase test is a rapid, cost-effective and simple test that can be used for the accurate identification of C. glabrata.

  8. Inhalation of chrysotile asbestos induces rapid cellular proliferation in small pulmonary vessels of mice and rats

    SciTech Connect

    McGavran, P.D.; Moore, L.B.; Brody, A.R. )

    1990-03-01

    Asbestos inhalation in mice and rats causes a rapid proliferative response in epithelial and interstitial cells, followed by the development of an interstitial lesion at the first alveolar duct bifurcations where fiber deposition and alveolar macrophage accumulation occur. Here we report that endothelial and smooth muscle cells of arterioles and venules near the bifurcations incorporated significantly increased levels of 3H-TdR 19 to 72 hours after chrysotile exposure. As many as 28% of the vessels had labeled cells 31 hours after exposure. No labeled cells were observed in vessels from sham-exposed or iron-exposed controls. This proliferative response resulted in a doubling of both the number of smooth muscle cells and the thickness of the smooth muscle cell layer, determined by ultrastructural morphometry 1 month after exposure. The fact that a variety of cell types incorporates 3H-TdR so rapidly after asbestos inhalation leads us to speculate that the response involves the release of diffusible growth factors.

  9. Cellular Midpalatal Suture Changes after Rapid Maxillary Expansion in Growing Subjects: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Caprioglio, Alberto; Fastuca, Rosamaria; Zecca, Piero Antonio; Beretta, Matteo; Mangano, Carlo; Piattelli, Adriano; Macchi, Aldo; Iezzi, Giovanna

    2017-01-01

    The present case report aimed to investigate immediate histologic changes in midpalatal suture in humans following rapid maxillary expansion compared to control. Three patients (mean age 8.3 ± 0.9 years) were enrolled in the case report and underwent midpalatal suture biopsy. Two patients underwent treatment before biopsy. The third patient did not show transversal maxillary deficiency and was enrolled as a control. Biopsy samples of midpalatal suture at 7 (subject 1) and 30 days (subject 2) after maxillary expansion as well as of one control (subject 3) were collected and processed for histology. In the control (subject 3) inter-digitations at the palatal suture gap were observed. At 7 days (subject 1) mature bone with small marrow spaces and trabecular bone with the peculiar storiform appearance inside the soft tissue and collagen fibers running parallel only in the central part were present. At 30 days (subject 2), a greater number of newly-formed bone trabeculae with a perpendicular orientation to the long axis of the suture could be seen. At 30 days the fibrous component of bone tissue was less represented compared to the sample at 7 days. Data from the preliminary histological results showed that bone formation was observed in the gap after rapid maxillary expansion, although the healing process was still ongoing. PMID:28287481

  10. Evaluation of latex reagents for rapid identification of Candida albicans and C. krusei colonies.

    PubMed Central

    Freydiere, A M; Buchaille, L; Guinet, R; Gille, Y

    1997-01-01

    A total of 322 yeast strains and yeastlike organisms belonging to the genera Candida, Cryptococcus, Geotrichum, Saccharomyces, and Trichosporon were tested with the new monoclonal antibody-based Bichro-latex albicans and Krusei color latex tests. Comparison of results with those obtained by conventional identification methods showed 100% sensitivity for both latex tests and 100% and 95% specificity for the Bichro-latex albicans and Krusei color tests, respectively. Because the test is easy to read and quick to perform, the Bichro-latex albicans test may be useful for rapid identification of Candida albicans colonies in the clinical laboratory. PMID:9157146

  11. Rapid identification of Yersinia pestis and Brucella melitensis by chip-based continuous flow PCR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietzsch, Michael; Hlawatsch, Nadine; Melzer, Falk; Tomaso, Herbert; Gärtner, Claudia; Neubauer, Heinrich

    2012-06-01

    To combat the threat of biological agents like Yersinia pestis and Brucella melitensis in bioterroristic scenarios requires fast, easy-to-use and safe identification systems. In this study we describe a system for rapid amplification of specific genetic markers for the identification of Yersinia pestis and Brucella melitensis. Using chip based PCR and continuous flow technology we were able to amplify the targets simultaneously with a 2-step reaction profile within 20 minutes. The subsequent analysis of amplified fragments by standard gel electrophoresis requires another 45 minutes. We were able to detect both pathogens within 75 minutes being much faster than most other nucleic acid amplification technologies.

  12. Lack of impact of rapid identification of rotavirus-infected patients on nosocomial rotavirus infections.

    PubMed

    Dennehy, P H; Tente, W E; Fisher, D J; Veloudis, B A; Peter, G

    1989-05-01

    The efficacy of rapid identification of rotavirus-infected patients in the control of nosocomial rotavirus infections on an infant and young toddler ward by use of a rotavirus antigen detection test on stool from patients with diarrhea was evaluated by comparing the rate of nosocomial rotavirus infection in children during two separate 5-week periods in the winters of 1984 and 1986. In contrast to 1984 rapid rotavirus antigen testing by latex agglutination of stool from patients with diarrhea was instituted in 1986, in addition to testing for rotavirus by enzyme immunoassay, to determine whether use of rapid antigen testing resulted in an increased incidence of appropriate isolation and a decrease in nosocomial infections. In 1986 rapid identification of rotavirus resulted in an increase in hospitalization of rotavirus-infected patients in single bed rooms from 68% to 100% (P = 0.02, chi square test) but no significant increase in the use of enteric precautions for these patients. The total number of cases of nosocomial rotavirus infection in the two periods did not differ. In both periods 11 cases occurred; the nosocomial infection rate in 1984 was 18.9 cases/1000 days of exposure whereas in 1986 it was 20.2 cases/1000 days. These findings indicate that the use of rapid rotavirus antigen testing of patients with diarrhea is not of appreciable benefit in preventing the nosocomial spread of rotavirus to infants on the ward.

  13. Rapid identification of sequences for orphan enzymes to power accurate protein annotation.

    PubMed

    Ramkissoon, Kevin R; Miller, Jennifer K; Ojha, Sunil; Watson, Douglas S; Bomar, Martha G; Galande, Amit K; Shearer, Alexander G

    2013-01-01

    The power of genome sequencing depends on the ability to understand what those genes and their proteins products actually do. The automated methods used to assign functions to putative proteins in newly sequenced organisms are limited by the size of our library of proteins with both known function and sequence. Unfortunately this library grows slowly, lagging well behind the rapid increase in novel protein sequences produced by modern genome sequencing methods. One potential source for rapidly expanding this functional library is the "back catalog" of enzymology--"orphan enzymes," those enzymes that have been characterized and yet lack any associated sequence. There are hundreds of orphan enzymes in the Enzyme Commission (EC) database alone. In this study, we demonstrate how this orphan enzyme "back catalog" is a fertile source for rapidly advancing the state of protein annotation. Starting from three orphan enzyme samples, we applied mass-spectrometry based analysis and computational methods (including sequence similarity networks, sequence and structural alignments, and operon context analysis) to rapidly identify the specific sequence for each orphan while avoiding the most time- and labor-intensive aspects of typical sequence identifications. We then used these three new sequences to more accurately predict the catalytic function of 385 previously uncharacterized or misannotated proteins. We expect that this kind of rapid sequence identification could be efficiently applied on a larger scale to make enzymology's "back catalog" another powerful tool to drive accurate genome annotation.

  14. Rapid Identification of Sequences for Orphan Enzymes to Power Accurate Protein Annotation

    PubMed Central

    Ojha, Sunil; Watson, Douglas S.; Bomar, Martha G.; Galande, Amit K.; Shearer, Alexander G.

    2013-01-01

    The power of genome sequencing depends on the ability to understand what those genes and their proteins products actually do. The automated methods used to assign functions to putative proteins in newly sequenced organisms are limited by the size of our library of proteins with both known function and sequence. Unfortunately this library grows slowly, lagging well behind the rapid increase in novel protein sequences produced by modern genome sequencing methods. One potential source for rapidly expanding this functional library is the “back catalog” of enzymology – “orphan enzymes,” those enzymes that have been characterized and yet lack any associated sequence. There are hundreds of orphan enzymes in the Enzyme Commission (EC) database alone. In this study, we demonstrate how this orphan enzyme “back catalog” is a fertile source for rapidly advancing the state of protein annotation. Starting from three orphan enzyme samples, we applied mass-spectrometry based analysis and computational methods (including sequence similarity networks, sequence and structural alignments, and operon context analysis) to rapidly identify the specific sequence for each orphan while avoiding the most time- and labor-intensive aspects of typical sequence identifications. We then used these three new sequences to more accurately predict the catalytic function of 385 previously uncharacterized or misannotated proteins. We expect that this kind of rapid sequence identification could be efficiently applied on a larger scale to make enzymology’s “back catalog” another powerful tool to drive accurate genome annotation. PMID:24386392

  15. Rapid genotyping assays for the identification and differentiation of Yersinia ruckeri biotype 2 strains.

    PubMed

    Welch, T J

    2011-09-01

    To establish PCR-based assays for the rapid identification and differentiation of each of four known biotype 2 (BT2) phenotype-causing alleles in Yersinia ruckeri strains currently circulating in Europe and the United States. Novel assays were developed relying on detection of mutant allele-specific changes in restriction enzyme cleavage sites within targeted PCR products. The developed assays were validated against isolates previously genotyped by DNA sequencing. The described methods were specific, rapid and simple to perform and interpret. The developed genotyping assays provide a valuable tool for identification and differentiation of specific BT2 strains of Y. ruckeri. These assays will be critical for the design and validation of new vaccines or other measures meant to control BT2 strains. © No claim to US Government works. Letters in Applied Microbiology © 2011 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  16. Rapid identification and antibiotic susceptibility testing of Yersinia pestis using bioluminescent reporter phage.

    PubMed

    Schofield, David A; Molineux, Ian J; Westwater, Caroline

    2012-08-01

    The rapid identification and antibiotic susceptibility testing of Yersinia pestis is paramount for a positive prognosis. We previously engineered a Y. pestis-specific 'bioluminescent' reporter phage for the identification of Y. pestis. In this study, we generated an improved reporter phage and evaluated the ability of this phage to provide direct and rapid susceptibility testing. Compared to the first generation reporter, the second generation reporter exhibited a 100-fold increase in signal strength, leading to a 10-fold increase in assay sensitivity. Y. pestis antimicrobial testing in the presence of the reporter elicited bioluminescent signals that were drug concentration-dependent, and produced susceptibility profiles that mirrored the standard CLSI method. The phage-generated susceptibility profiles, however, were obtained within hours in contrast to days with the conventional method.

  17. Rapid identification and antibiotic susceptibility testing of Yersinia pestis using bioluminescent reporter phage

    PubMed Central

    Schofield, David A.; Molineux, Ian J.; Westwater, Caroline

    2012-01-01

    The rapid identification and antibiotic susceptibility testing of Yersinia pestis is paramount for a positive prognosis. We previously engineered a Y. pestis-specific ‘bioluminescent’ reporter phage for the identification of Y. pestis. In this study, we generated an improved reporter phage and evaluated the ability of this phage to provide direct and rapid susceptibility testing. Compared to the first generation reporter, the second generation reporter exhibited a 100-fold increase in signal strength, leading to a 10-fold increase in assay sensitivity. Y. pestis antimicrobial testing in the presence of the reporter elicited bioluminescent signals that were drug concentration-dependent, and produced susceptibility profiles that mirrored the standard CLSI method. The phage-generated susceptibility profiles, however, were obtained within hours in contrast to days with the conventional method. PMID:22579583

  18. Rapid identification of black grain eumycetoma causative agents using rolling circle amplification.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Sarah A; van den Ende, Bert H G Gerrits; Fahal, Ahmed H; van de Sande, Wendy W J; de Hoog, G S

    2014-12-01

    Accurate identification of mycetoma causative agent is a priority for treatment. However, current identification tools are far from being satisfactory for both reliable diagnosis and epidemiological investigations. A rapid, simple, and highly efficient molecular based method for identification of agents of black grain eumycetoma is introduced, aiming to improve diagnostic in endemic areas. Rolling Circle Amplification (RCA) uses species-specific padlock probes and isothermal DNA amplification. The tests were based on ITS sequences and developed for Falciformispora senegalensis, F. tompkinsii, Madurella fahalii, M. mycetomatis, M. pseudomycetomatis, M. tropicana, Medicopsis romeroi, and Trematosphaeria grisea. With the isothermal RCA assay, 62 isolates were successfully identified with 100% specificity and no cross reactivity or false results. The main advantage of this technique is the low-cost, high specificity, and simplicity. In addition, it is highly reproducible and can be performed within a single day.

  19. Rapid Identification of Black Grain Eumycetoma Causative Agents Using Rolling Circle Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Sarah A.; van den Ende, Bert H. G. Gerrits; Fahal, Ahmed H.; van de Sande, Wendy W. J.; de Hoog, G. S.

    2014-01-01

    Accurate identification of mycetoma causative agent is a priority for treatment. However, current identification tools are far from being satisfactory for both reliable diagnosis and epidemiological investigations. A rapid, simple, and highly efficient molecular based method for identification of agents of black grain eumycetoma is introduced, aiming to improve diagnostic in endemic areas. Rolling Circle Amplification (RCA) uses species-specific padlock probes and isothermal DNA amplification. The tests were based on ITS sequences and developed for Falciformispora senegalensis, F. tompkinsii, Madurella fahalii, M. mycetomatis, M. pseudomycetomatis, M. tropicana, Medicopsis romeroi, and Trematosphaeria grisea. With the isothermal RCA assay, 62 isolates were successfully identified with 100% specificity and no cross reactivity or false results. The main advantage of this technique is the low-cost, high specificity, and simplicity. In addition, it is highly reproducible and can be performed within a single day. PMID:25474355

  20. Rapid Bacterial Identification, Resistance, Virulence and Type Profiling using Selected Reaction Monitoring Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Charretier, Yannick; Dauwalder, Olivier; Franceschi, Christine; Degout-Charmette, Elodie; Zambardi, Gilles; Cecchini, Tiphaine; Bardet, Chloe; Lacoux, Xavier; Dufour, Philippe; Veron, Laurent; Rostaing, Hervé; Lanet, Veronique; Fortin, Tanguy; Beaulieu, Corinne; Perrot, Nadine; Dechaume, Dominique; Pons, Sylvie; Girard, Victoria; Salvador, Arnaud; Durand, Géraldine; Mallard, Frédéric; Theretz, Alain; Broyer, Patrick; Chatellier, Sonia; Gervasi, Gaspard; Van Nuenen, Marc; Ann Roitsch, Carolyn; Van Belkum, Alex; Lemoine, Jérôme; Vandenesch, François; Charrier, Jean-Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) in Selected Reaction Monitoring (SRM) mode is proposed for in-depth characterisation of microorganisms in a multiplexed analysis. Within 60–80 minutes, the SRM method performs microbial identification (I), antibiotic-resistance detection (R), virulence assessment (V) and it provides epidemiological typing information (T). This SRM application is illustrated by the analysis of the human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus, demonstrating its promise for rapid characterisation of bacteria from positive blood cultures of sepsis patients. PMID:26350205

  1. Two-Component Direct Fluorescent-Antibody Assay for Rapid Identification of Bacillus Anthracis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-10-01

    Bacillus spp. (n=56) Five closely related Bacillus species—B. cereus (n=23), B. megaterium (n=11), B. subtilis (n=9), B. thuringiensis (n=12), and B...Rapid Identification of Bacillus anthracis Barun K. De,* Sandra L. Bragg,* Gary N. Sanden,* Kathy E. Wilson,* Lois A. Diem,* Chung K. Marston...antibody (DFA) assay, using fluorescein-labeled monoclonal antibodies specific to the Bacillus anthracis cell wall (CW-DFA) and capsule (CAP-DFA

  2. Evaluation of the VITEK 2 System for Rapid Identification of Medically Relevant Gram-Negative Rods

    PubMed Central

    Funke, Guido; Monnet, Dominique; deBernardis, Chiara; von Graevenitz, Alexander; Freney, Jean

    1998-01-01

    The new VITEK 2 system (bioMérieux) was evaluated at two independent sites with the identification card for gram-negative bacilli (ID-GNB card). Of the 845 strains tested, which represented 70 different taxa belonging to either the family Enterobacteriaceae or the nonenteric bacilli, 716 (84.7%) were correctly identified at the species level. Thirty-two (3.8%) additional strains were identified to the species level after the performance of simple, rapid manual tests (oxidase, hemolysis, indole reaction, motility, and pigmentation). For 80 (9.5%) strains, these additional tests did not lead to an identification at the species level but the correct species identification was given among the organisms listed. Only 7 (0.8%) strains were misidentified, and 10 (1.2%) were not identified. Mistakes were randomly distributed over different taxa. Due to the new, more sensitive fluorescence-based technology of the VITEK 2 system, final results were available after 3 h. Since our evaluation was mainly a stress test, it is predicted that the VITEK 2 system in conjunction with the ID-GNB card would perform well under conditions of a routine clinical laboratory in identifying members of the family Enterobacteriaceae and selected species of nonenteric bacteria. This system is a promising, highly automated new tool for the rapid identification of gram-negative bacilli from human clinical specimens. PMID:9650942

  3. An integral strategy toward the rapid identification of analogous nontarget compounds from complex mixtures.

    PubMed

    Wu, Liang; Gong, Ping; Wu, Yuzheng; Liao, Ke; Shen, Hanyuan; Qi, Qu; Liu, Huiying; Wang, Guangji; Hao, Haiping

    2013-08-16

    Identification of nontarget compounds in complex mixtures is of significant importance in various scientific fields. On the basis of the universal property that the compounds in complex mixtures can be classified to various analogous families, this study presents a general strategy for the rapid identification of nontarget compounds from complex matrixes using herbal medicine as an example. The proposed strategy consists of three sequential steps. First, a blank control sample is prepared for the purpose of removing interferences in the complex matrixes via automatic chromatographic and mass spectrometric data comparisons. Second, the diagnostic ions guided bridging network strategy is developed for the rapid classification of analogous compounds and structural characterizations. Finally, a quantitative structure retention relationship (QSRR) is built to validate the identifications and to differentiate isomers. Using this strategy, we have successfully identified a total of 45 organic acids from Mai-Luo-Ning and Flos Lonicerae injection, and 46 ginsenosides from Shen-Mai injection samples. The QSRR approach enabled a successful differentiation of most isomers. The proposed strategy will be expected to be applicable to the identification of nontarget compounds in complex mixtures. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Evaluation of rapid phenotypic identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing in a pediatric oncology center.

    PubMed

    Brazelton de Cárdenas, J N; Su, Y; Rodriguez, A; Hewitt, C; Tang, L; Garner, C D; Hayden, R T

    2017-09-01

    Identification (ID) and antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) remain rate limiting steps in producing actionable data for clinical care of bloodstream infections. Rapid, automated phenotypic ID and AST by fluorescent in situ hybridization and automated microscopy were used to characterize blood stream infections in a predominantly pediatric oncology patient population. Results were compared to standard of care (SOC) phenotypic methods. The Accelerate Pheno System (AXDX) had a sensitivity of 91.2% and an accuracy of 100% to the genus level for identification, and an overall categorical agreement 91.2-91.8% for susceptibility, depending on the breakpoints used. The AXDX required a mean time of 1.4hours for identification and 6.6hours for susceptibility testing compared to SOC, requiring 32.5 and 46.7hours, respectively. Identification and susceptibility by rapid phenotypic methods shows a high degree of accuracy; the marked reduction in time to results may have significant implications for patient care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Variables Affecting Results of Sodium Chloride Tolerance Test for Identification of Rapidly Growing Mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Conville, Patricia S.; Witebsky, Frank G.

    1998-01-01

    The sodium chloride tolerance test is often used in the identification of rapidly growing mycobacteria, particularly for distinguishing between Mycobacterium abscessus and Mycobacterium chelonae. This test, however, is frequently unreliable for the identification of some species. In this study we examined the following variables: medium manufacturer, inoculum concentration, and atmosphere and temperature of incubation. Results show that reliability is improved if the test and control slants are inoculated with an organism suspension spectrophotometrically equal to a 1 McFarland standard. Slants should be incubated at 35°C in ambient air and checked weekly for 4 weeks. Growth on control slants should be critically evaluated to determine the adequacy of the inoculum; colonies should number greater than 50. Salt-containing media should be examined carefully to detect pinpoint or tiny colonies, and colonies should number greater than 50 for a positive reaction. Concurrent use of a citrate slant may be helpful for distinguishing between M. abscessus and M. chelonae. Molecular methodologies are probably the most reliable means for the identification of rapidly growing mycobacteria and should be used, if possible, when unequivocal species identification is of particular importance. PMID:9620376

  6. Use of immunochromatographic assay for rapid identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex from liquid culture

    PubMed Central

    Považan, Anika; Vukelić, Anka; Savković, Tijana; Kurucin, Tatjana

    2012-01-01

    A new, simple immunochromatographic assay for rapid identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex in liquid cultures has been developed. The principle of the assay is binding of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex specific antigen to the monoclonal antibody conjugated on the test strip. The aim of this study is evaluation of the performance of immunochromatographic assay in identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex in primary positive liquid cultures of BacT/Alert automated system. A total of 159 primary positive liquid cultures were tested using the immunochromatographic assay (BD MGIT TBc ID) and the conventional subculture, followed by identification using biochemical tests. Of 159 positive liquid cultures, using the conventional method, Mycobacterium tuberculos is was identified in 119 (74.8%), nontuberculous mycobacteria were found in 4 (2.5%), 14 (8.8%) cultures were contaminated and 22 (13.8%) cultures were found to be negative. Using the immunochromatographic assay, Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex was detected in 118 (74.2%) liquid cultures, and 41 (25.8%) tests were negative. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of the test were 98.3%; 97.5%; 99.15%; 95.12%, respectively. The value of kappa test was 0.950, and McNemar test was 1.00. The immunochromatographic assay is a simple and rapid test which represents a suitable alternative to the conventional subculture method for the primary identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex in liquid cultures of BacT/Alert automated system. PMID:22364301

  7. Development of a rapid and simplified protocol for direct bacterial identification from positive blood cultures by using matrix assisted laser desorption ionization time-of- flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jakovljev, Aleksandra; Bergh, Kåre

    2015-11-06

    Bloodstream infections represent serious conditions carrying a high mortality and morbidity rate. Rapid identification of microorganisms and prompt institution of adequate antimicrobial therapy is of utmost importance for a successful outcome. Aiming at the development of a rapid, simplified and efficient protocol, we developed and compared two in-house preparatory methods for the direct identification of bacteria from positive blood culture flasks (BD BACTEC FX system) by using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI TOF MS). Both methods employed saponin and distilled water for erythrocyte lysis. In method A the cellular pellet was overlaid with formic acid on the MALDI TOF target plate for protein extraction, whereas in method B the pellet was exposed to formic acid followed by acetonitrile prior to placing on the target plate. Best results were obtained by method A. Direct identification was achieved for 81.9 % and 65.8 % (50.3 % and 26.2 % with scores >2.0) of organisms by method A and method B, respectively. Overall concordance with final identification was 100 % to genus and 97.9 % to species level. By applying a lower cut-off score value, the levels of identification obtained by method A and method B increased to 89.3 % and 77.8 % of organisms (81.9 % and 65.8 % identified with scores >1.7), respectively. Using the lowered score criteria, concordance with final results was obtained for 99.3 % of genus and 96.6 % of species identifications. The reliability of results, rapid performance (approximately 25 min) and applicability of in-house method A have contributed to implementation of this robust and cost-effective method in our laboratory.

  8. Use of hybrid discrete cellular models for identification of macroscopic nutrient loss in reaction-diffusion models of tissues.

    PubMed

    Aristotelous, Andreas C; Haider, Mansoor A

    2014-08-01

    Macroscopic models accounting for cellular effects in natural or engineered tissues may involve unknown constitutive terms that are highly dependent on interactions at the scale of individual cells. Hybrid discrete models, which represent cells individually, were used to develop and apply techniques for modeling diffusive nutrient transport and cellular uptake to identify a nonlinear nutrient loss term in a macroscopic reaction-diffusion model of the system. Flexible and robust numerical methods were used, based on discontinuous Galerkin finite elements in space and a Crank-Nicolson temporal discretization. Scales were bridged via averaging operations over a complete set of subdomains yielding data for identification of a macroscopic nutrient loss term that was accurately captured via a fifth-order polynomial. Accuracy of the identified macroscopic model was demonstrated by direct, quantitative comparisons of the tissue and cellular scale models in terms of three error norms computed on a mesoscale mesh.

  9. Rapid aquaporin translocation regulates cellular water flow: mechanism of hypotonicity-induced subcellular localization of aquaporin 1 water channel.

    PubMed

    Conner, Matthew T; Conner, Alex C; Bland, Charlotte E; Taylor, Luke H J; Brown, James E P; Parri, H Rheinallt; Bill, Roslyn M

    2012-03-30

    The control of cellular water flow is mediated by the aquaporin (AQP) family of membrane proteins. The structural features of the family and the mechanism of selective water passage through the AQP pore are established, but there remains a gap in our knowledge of how water transport is regulated. Two broad possibilities exist. One is controlling the passage of water through the AQP pore, but this only has been observed as a phenomenon in some plant and microbial AQPs. An alternative is controlling the number of AQPs in the cell membrane. Here, we describe a novel pathway in mammalian cells whereby a hypotonic stimulus directly induces intracellular calcium elevations through transient receptor potential channels, which trigger AQP1 translocation. This translocation, which has a direct role in cell volume regulation, occurs within 30 s and is dependent on calmodulin activation and phosphorylation of AQP1 at two threonine residues by protein kinase C. This direct mechanism provides a rationale for the changes in water transport that are required in response to constantly changing local cellular water availability. Moreover, because calcium is a pluripotent and ubiquitous second messenger in biological systems, the discovery of its role in the regulation of AQP translocation has ramifications for diverse physiological and pathophysiological processes, as well as providing an explanation for the rapid regulation of water flow that is necessary for cell homeostasis.

  10. Identification of ABO alleles on forensic-type specimens using rapid-ABO genotyping.

    PubMed

    Crouse, C; Vincek, V

    1995-03-01

    Historically, forensic and clinical laboratories utilize serological techniques to identify ABO blood types. These techniques rely on the detection of ABO-associated proteins and are sensitive with very accurate results. This laboratory has simplified the identification of ABO types by taking advantage of previously reported ABO DNA sequence differences. The Rapid-ABO technique involves a two-step process: (i) amplification of DNA samples using primer sets specific for the ABO alleles and (ii) electrophoresis and visualization of amplified ABO fragments on a 3% MetaPhor agarose gel. The major advantage of the Rapid-ABO technique is the identification of ABO genotypes compared to serological tests for ABO phenotypes. This two-step process identifies six possible ABO genotypes including AB, AA, BB, AO, BO and OO. The Rapid-ABO protocol works well with DNA extracted organically or using Chelex 100. Results can be obtained in less than a day utilizing 2 ng of DNA in the amplification reaction. Analysis of 23 animal species shows the Rapid-ABO primers amplify ABO alleles from only human, chimpanzee and gorilla DNA.

  11. Rapid identification of intact bacterial resistance plasmids via optical mapping of single DNA molecules.

    PubMed

    Nyberg, Lena K; Quaderi, Saair; Emilsson, Gustav; Karami, Nahid; Lagerstedt, Erik; Müller, Vilhelm; Noble, Charleston; Hammarberg, Susanna; Nilsson, Adam N; Sjöberg, Fei; Fritzsche, Joachim; Kristiansson, Erik; Sandegren, Linus; Ambjörnsson, Tobias; Westerlund, Fredrik

    2016-07-27

    The rapid spread of antibiotic resistance - currently one of the greatest threats to human health according to WHO - is to a large extent enabled by plasmid-mediated horizontal transfer of resistance genes. Rapid identification and characterization of plasmids is thus important both for individual clinical outcomes and for epidemiological monitoring of antibiotic resistance. Toward this aim, we have developed an optical DNA mapping procedure where individual intact plasmids are elongated within nanofluidic channels and visualized through fluorescence microscopy, yielding barcodes that reflect the underlying sequence. The assay rapidly identifies plasmids through statistical comparisons with barcodes based on publicly available sequence repositories and also enables detection of structural variations. Since the assay yields holistic sequence information for individual intact plasmids, it is an ideal complement to next generation sequencing efforts which involve reassembly of sequence reads from fragmented DNA molecules. The assay should be applicable in microbiology labs around the world in applications ranging from fundamental plasmid biology to clinical epidemiology and diagnostics.

  12. Identification of micro-organisms after milliflex rapid detection--a possibility to identify nonsterile findings in the milliflex rapid sterility test.

    PubMed

    Gray, Jennifer C; Morandell, Dieter; Gapp, Günther; Le Goff, Nathalie; Neuhaus, Gunther; Staerk, Alexandra

    2011-01-01

    The Milliflex Rapid System is used as a rapid microbiological method based on adenosine triphosphate (ATP) bioluminescence in the pharmaceutical industry to quantify the amount of micro-organisms present in water and in bioburden samples. The system can also be used for qualitative analyses, for example, to perform a rapid sterility test. This rapid sterility test has been successfully validated and implemented at Novartis and Sandoz. As the reagents used for the ATP bioluminescence reaction, which are directly sprayed on a micro-colony, disrupt the walls/membranes of the present cells to release ATP and therefore no intact cells for subsequent identification were believed to be present, the identification was supposed to be impossible until now. During development and validation of a rapid sterility test with the Milliflex Rapid System, a possibility to identify contaminants was found. A method based on regrowth of the Milliflex Rapid-treated microbial cells and consecutive genotypic identification reproduced feasible and robust results. The data presented here show that sufficient recovery of the micro-colonies detected with the Milliflex Rapid System was reached with the test strains, except with Penicillium spec. The chosen micro-organisms represent the full spectrum of environmental isolates and ATCC strains, and it was shown that they are not destroyed after application of the reagents for the ATP bioluminescence reaction. Overall, 22 stressed microbial strains were examined during the study. After Milliflex Rapid System detection, it was supposed that a subsequent identification of the contaminant is not possible. In this paper it is shown how contaminants can be identified in the rapid sterility test application.

  13. Toward Automating HIV Identification: Machine Learning for Rapid Identification of HIV-Related Social Media Data.

    PubMed

    Young, Sean D; Yu, Wenchao; Wang, Wei

    2017-02-01

    "Social big data" from technologies such as social media, wearable devices, and online searches continue to grow and can be used as tools for HIV research. Although researchers can uncover patterns and insights associated with HIV trends and transmission, the review process is time consuming and resource intensive. Machine learning methods derived from computer science might be used to assist HIV domain experts by learning how to rapidly and accurately identify patterns associated with HIV from a large set of social data. Using an existing social media data set that was associated with HIV and coded by an HIV domain expert, we tested whether 4 commonly used machine learning methods could learn the patterns associated with HIV risk behavior. We used the 10-fold cross-validation method to examine the speed and accuracy of these models in applying that knowledge to detect HIV content in social media data. Logistic regression and random forest resulted in the highest accuracy in detecting HIV-related social data (85.3%), whereas the Ridge Regression Classifier resulted in the lowest accuracy. Logistic regression yielded the fastest processing time (16.98 seconds). Machine learning can enable social big data to become a new and important tool in HIV research, helping to create a new field of "digital HIV epidemiology." If a domain expert can identify patterns in social data associated with HIV risk or HIV transmission, machine learning models could quickly and accurately learn those associations and identify potential HIV patterns in large social data sets.

  14. Rapid identification of bacteria associated with Acute Oak Decline by high-resolution melt analysis.

    PubMed

    Brady, C; Allainguillaume, J; Denman, S; Arnold, D

    2016-08-01

    Two Gram-negative Enterobacteriaceae, Gibbsiella quercinecans and Brenneria goodwinii, are frequently isolated from oak suffering from Acute Oak Decline. These two species are difficult to identify based on colony morphology, carbohydrate utilization or 16S rRNA gene sequence, and identification using gyrB gene sequencing is time-consuming and laborious. A rapid identification technique, based on high-resolution melt analysis of the atpD gene, was designed to efficiently process numerous isolates from an increasing number of affected woodlands and parks. Principal component analysis of the resulting melt curves from strains of G. quercinecans, B. goodwinii and their close phylogenetic relatives allowed differentiation into distinct clusters based on species or subspecies identity. Acute Oak Decline is an increasing threat to Britain's native oak population. Two novel bacterial species both belonging to the family Enterobacteriaceae, Gibbsiella quercinecans and Brenneria goodwinii, are thought to play an important role in symptom development. Here, we describe a rapid identification technique using high-resolution melt analysis of the atpD gene able to assign isolates to either G. quercinecans or B. goodwinii in a single assay, greatly reducing the time taken to identify if either or both of these species are present in symptomatic oak. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  15. Rapid Multi-Damage Identification for Health Monitoring of Laminated Composites Using Piezoelectric Wafer Sensor Arrays.

    PubMed

    Si, Liang; Wang, Qian

    2016-05-04

    Through the use of the wave reflection from any damage in a structure, a Hilbert spectral analysis-based rapid multi-damage identification (HSA-RMDI) technique with piezoelectric wafer sensor arrays (PWSA) is developed to monitor and identify the presence, location and severity of damage in carbon fiber composite structures. The capability of the rapid multi-damage identification technique to extract and estimate hidden significant information from the collected data and to provide a high-resolution energy-time spectrum can be employed to successfully interpret the Lamb waves interactions with single/multiple damage. Nevertheless, to accomplish the precise positioning and effective quantification of multiple damage in a composite structure, two functional metrics from the RMDI technique are proposed and used in damage identification, which are the energy density metric and the energy time-phase shift metric. In the designed damage experimental tests, invisible damage to the naked eyes, especially delaminations, were detected in the leftward propagating waves as well as in the selected sensor responses, where the time-phase shift spectra could locate the multiple damage whereas the energy density spectra were used to quantify the multiple damage. The increasing damage was shown to follow a linear trend calculated by the RMDI technique. All damage cases considered showed completely the developed RMDI technique potential as an effective online damage inspection and assessment tool.

  16. A novel multiplex isothermal amplification method for rapid detection and identification of viruses

    PubMed Central

    Nyan, Dougbeh-Chris; Swinson, Kevin L.

    2015-01-01

    A rapid multiplex isothermal amplification assay has been developed for detection and identification of multiple blood-borne viruses that infect millions of people world-wide. These infections may lead to chronic diseases or death if not diagnosed and treated in a timely manner. Sets of virus-specific oligonucleotides and oligofluorophores were designed and used in a reverse-transcription loop-mediated multiplexed isothermal amplification reaction for detection and gel electrophoretic identification of human Immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis-B virus (HBV), hepatitis-C virus (HCV), hepatitis-E virus (HEV), dengue virus (DENV), and West Nile (WNV) virus infection in blood plasma. Amplification was catalyzed with two thermostable enzymes for 30–60 minutes under isothermal condition, utilizing a simple digital heat source. Electrophoretic analysis of amplified products demonstrated simultaneous detection of 6 viruses that were distinctly identified by unique ladder-like banding patterns. Naked-eye fluorescent visualization of amplicons revealed intensely fluorescing products that indicated positive detection. The test demonstrated a 97% sensitivity and a 100% specificity, with no cross-reaction with other viruses observed. This portable detection tool may have clinical and field utility in the developing and developed world settings. This may enable rapid diagnosis and identification of viruses for targeted therapeutic intervention and prevention of disease transmission. PMID:26643761

  17. A novel multiplex isothermal amplification method for rapid detection and identification of viruses.

    PubMed

    Nyan, Dougbeh-Chris; Swinson, Kevin L

    2015-12-08

    A rapid multiplex isothermal amplification assay has been developed for detection and identification of multiple blood-borne viruses that infect millions of people world-wide. These infections may lead to chronic diseases or death if not diagnosed and treated in a timely manner. Sets of virus-specific oligonucleotides and oligofluorophores were designed and used in a reverse-transcription loop-mediated multiplexed isothermal amplification reaction for detection and gel electrophoretic identification of human Immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis-B virus (HBV), hepatitis-C virus (HCV), hepatitis-E virus (HEV), dengue virus (DENV), and West Nile (WNV) virus infection in blood plasma. Amplification was catalyzed with two thermostable enzymes for 30-60 minutes under isothermal condition, utilizing a simple digital heat source. Electrophoretic analysis of amplified products demonstrated simultaneous detection of 6 viruses that were distinctly identified by unique ladder-like banding patterns. Naked-eye fluorescent visualization of amplicons revealed intensely fluorescing products that indicated positive detection. The test demonstrated a 97% sensitivity and a 100% specificity, with no cross-reaction with other viruses observed. This portable detection tool may have clinical and field utility in the developing and developed world settings. This may enable rapid diagnosis and identification of viruses for targeted therapeutic intervention and prevention of disease transmission.

  18. Rapid identification of Enterobacter hormaechei and Enterobacter cloacae genetic cluster III.

    PubMed

    Ohad, S; Block, C; Kravitz, V; Farber, A; Pilo, S; Breuer, R; Rorman, E

    2014-05-01

    Enterobacter cloacae complex bacteria are of both clinical and environmental importance. Phenotypic methods are unable to distinguish between some of the species in this complex, which often renders their identification incomplete. The goal of this study was to develop molecular assays to identify Enterobacter hormaechei and Ent. cloacae genetic cluster III which are relatively frequently encountered in clinical material. The molecular assays developed in this study are qPCR technology based and served to identify both Ent. hormaechei and Ent. cloacae genetic cluster III. qPCR results were compared to hsp60 sequence analysis. Most clinical isolates were assigned to Ent. hormaechei subsp. steigerwaltii and Ent. cloacae genetic cluster III. The latter was proportionately more frequently isolated from bloodstream infections than from other material (P < 0·05). The qPCR assays detecting Ent. hormaechei and Ent. cloacae genetic cluster III demonstrated high sensitivity and specificity. The presented qPCR assays allow accurate and rapid identification of clinical isolates of the Ent. cloacae complex. The improved identifications obtained can specifically assist analysis of Ent. hormaechei and Ent. cloacae genetic cluster III in nosocomial outbreaks and can promote rapid environmental monitoring. An association was observed between Ent. cloacae cluster III and systemic infection that deserves further attention. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  19. Rapid Multi-Damage Identification for Health Monitoring of Laminated Composites Using Piezoelectric Wafer Sensor Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Si, Liang; Wang, Qian

    2016-01-01

    Through the use of the wave reflection from any damage in a structure, a Hilbert spectral analysis-based rapid multi-damage identification (HSA-RMDI) technique with piezoelectric wafer sensor arrays (PWSA) is developed to monitor and identify the presence, location and severity of damage in carbon fiber composite structures. The capability of the rapid multi-damage identification technique to extract and estimate hidden significant information from the collected data and to provide a high-resolution energy-time spectrum can be employed to successfully interpret the Lamb waves interactions with single/multiple damage. Nevertheless, to accomplish the precise positioning and effective quantification of multiple damage in a composite structure, two functional metrics from the RMDI technique are proposed and used in damage identification, which are the energy density metric and the energy time-phase shift metric. In the designed damage experimental tests, invisible damage to the naked eyes, especially delaminations, were detected in the leftward propagating waves as well as in the selected sensor responses, where the time-phase shift spectra could locate the multiple damage whereas the energy density spectra were used to quantify the multiple damage. The increasing damage was shown to follow a linear trend calculated by the RMDI technique. All damage cases considered showed completely the developed RMDI technique potential as an effective online damage inspection and assessment tool. PMID:27153070

  20. FlexPlex27-highly multiplexed rapid DNA identification for law enforcement, kinship, and military applications.

    PubMed

    Grover, Ranjana; Jiang, Hua; Turingan, Rosemary S; French, Julie L; Tan, Eugene; Selden, Richard F

    2017-03-03

    Rapid DNA identification is the use of a rugged, field-deployable system to generate short tandem repeat (STR) profiles in law enforcement, military, immigration, and homeland security applications. A performance verification study was conducted on the ANDE Rapid DNA identification system using FlexPlex27, a highly multiplexed, 27 locus assay that generates data for the expanded CODIS core loci and all additional STR loci required for international databasing. The assay contains 23 autosomal loci (D1S1656, D2S1338, D2S441, D3S1358, D5S81, D6S1043, D7S820, D8S1179, D10S1248, D12S391, D13S317, D16S539, D18S51, D19S433, D21S11, D22S1045, FGA, CSF1PO, Penta E, TH01, vWA, TPOX, and SE33), three Y-chromosomal loci (DYS391, DYS576, and DYS570), and Amelogenin. Study results demonstrate that the instrument is reliable, reproducible, accurate, robust, and ready for a large scale, comprehensive developmental validation by NDIS-participating laboratories. The additional loci in the FlexPlex assay allow for improved STR profile sharing globally, increase the power of discrimination for identification matches, and improve the effectiveness of kinship analyses.

  1. Separating Fluid Shear Stress from Acceleration during Vibrations in Vitro: Identification of Mechanical Signals Modulating the Cellular Response

    PubMed Central

    Uzer, Gunes; Manske, Sarah L; Chan, M Ete; Chiang, Fu-Pen; Rubin, Clinton T; Frame, Mary D; Judex, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    The identification of the physical mechanism(s) by which cells can sense vibrations requires the determination of the cellular mechanical environment. Here, we quantified vibration-induced fluid shear stresses in vitro and tested whether this system allows for the separation of two mechanical parameters previously proposed to drive the cellular response to vibration – fluid shear and peak accelerations. When peak accelerations of the oscillatory horizontal motions were set at 1g and 60Hz, peak fluid shear stresses acting on the cell layer reached 0.5Pa. A 3.5-fold increase in fluid viscosity increased peak fluid shear stresses 2.6-fold while doubling fluid volume in the well caused a 2-fold decrease in fluid shear. Fluid shear was positively related to peak acceleration magnitude and inversely related to vibration frequency. These data demonstrated that peak shear stress can be effectively separated from peak acceleration by controlling specific levels of vibration frequency, acceleration, and/or fluid viscosity. As an example for exploiting these relations, we tested the relevance of shear stress in promoting COX-2 expression in osteoblast like cells. Across different vibration frequencies and fluid viscosities, neither the level of generated fluid shear nor the frequency of the signal were able to consistently account for differences in the relative increase in COX-2 expression between groups, emphasizing that the eventual identification of the physical mechanism(s) requires a detailed quantification of the cellular mechanical environment. PMID:23074384

  2. [Rapid identification of softwood and hardwood by near infrared spectroscopy of cross-sectional surfaces].

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhong; Lü, Bin; Huang, An-Min; Liu, Ya-Na; Xie, Xu-Qin

    2012-07-01

    The feasibility of wood identification of softwood and hardwood by near infrared spectroscopy (NIR) coupled with partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) was investigated in the present paper. The near infrared spectra (780 - 2 500 nm) were collected from wood cross-section from one softwood species (Chinese fir) and one hardwood species (eucalyptus). The results show that: (1) The identification accuracy of the calibration samples predicted by the model based on NIR coupled the PLS-DA was 100%. The correlation coefficient between the NIR predicted category variable value and the true value was 0.990, and the SEC was 0.071; (2) The identification accuracy by the model based on the spectra with 780-1 100 nm wavelengths also was 100%, and the correlation coefficient and SEC were 0. 990 and 0. 070, respectively; (3) The identification accuracy for the test samples was 100%. It was suggested that NIR can be used to rapidly and accurately identify softwood and hardwood samples. It also provides a new approach to identifying wood species.

  3. Evaluation of Verigene Blood Culture Test Systems for Rapid Identification of Positive Blood Cultures.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Seok; Kang, Go-Eun; Kim, Han-Sung; Kim, Hyun Soo; Song, Wonkeun; Lee, Kyu Man

    2016-01-01

    The performance of molecular tests using the Verigene Gram-Positive and Gram-Negative Blood Culture nucleic acid tests (BC-GP and BC-GN, resp.; Naosphere, Northbrook, IL, USA) was evaluated for the identification of microorganisms detected from blood cultures. Ninety-nine blood cultures containing Gram-positive bacteria and 150 containing Gram-negative bacteria were analyzed using the BC-GP and BC-GN assays, respectively. Blood cultures were performed using the Bactec blood culture system (BD Diagnostic Systems, Franklin Lakes, NJ, USA) and conventional identification and antibiotic-susceptibility tests were performed using a MicroScan system (Siemens, West Sacramento, CA, USA). When a single strain of bacteria was isolated from the blood culture, Verigene assays correctly identified 97.9% (94/96) of Gram-positive bacteria and 93.8% (137/146) of Gram-negative bacteria. Resistance genes mecA and vanA were correctly detected by the BC-GP assay, while the extended-spectrum β-lactamase CTX-M and the carbapenemase OXA resistance gene were detected from 30 cases cultures by the BC-GN assay. The BC-GP and BC-GN assays showed high agreement with conventional identification and susceptibility tests. These tests are useful for rapid identification of microorganisms and the detection of clinically important resistance genes from positive Bactec blood cultures.

  4. Final Progress Report: Isotope Identification Algorithm for Rapid and Accurate Determination of Radioisotopes Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Rawool-Sullivan, Mohini; Bounds, John Alan; Brumby, Steven P.; Prasad, Lakshman; Sullivan, John P.

    2012-04-30

    This is the final report of the project titled, 'Isotope Identification Algorithm for Rapid and Accurate Determination of Radioisotopes,' PMIS project number LA10-HUMANID-PD03. The goal of the work was to demonstrate principles of emulating a human analysis approach towards the data collected using radiation isotope identification devices (RIIDs). It summarizes work performed over the FY10 time period. The goal of the work was to demonstrate principles of emulating a human analysis approach towards the data collected using radiation isotope identification devices (RIIDs). Human analysts begin analyzing a spectrum based on features in the spectrum - lines and shapes that are present in a given spectrum. The proposed work was to carry out a feasibility study that will pick out all gamma ray peaks and other features such as Compton edges, bremsstrahlung, presence/absence of shielding and presence of neutrons and escape peaks. Ultimately success of this feasibility study will allow us to collectively explain identified features and form a realistic scenario that produced a given spectrum in the future. We wanted to develop and demonstrate machine learning algorithms that will qualitatively enhance the automated identification capabilities of portable radiological sensors that are currently being used in the field.

  5. Characterization and identification of clinically relevant microorganisms using rapid evaporative ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Strittmatter, Nicole; Rebec, Monica; Jones, Emrys A; Golf, Ottmar; Abdolrasouli, Alireza; Balog, Julia; Behrends, Volker; Veselkov, Kirill A; Takats, Zoltan

    2014-07-01

    Rapid evaporative ionization mass spectrometry (REIMS) was investigated for its suitability as a general identification system for bacteria and fungi. Strains of 28 clinically relevant bacterial species were analyzed in negative ion mode, and corresponding data was subjected to unsupervised and supervised multivariate statistical analyses. The created supervised model yielded correct cross-validation results of 95.9%, 97.8%, and 100% on species, genus, and Gram-stain level, respectively. These results were not affected by the resolution of the mass spectral data. Blind identification tests were performed for strains cultured on different culture media and analyzed using different instrumental platforms which led to 97.8-100% correct identification. Seven different Escherichia coli strains were subjected to different culture conditions and were distinguishable with 88% accuracy. In addition, the technique proved suitable to distinguish five pathogenic Candida species with 98.8% accuracy without any further modification to the experimental workflow. These results prove that REIMS is sufficiently specific to serve as a culture condition-independent tool for the identification and characterization of microorganisms.

  6. Identification of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia strains isolated from environmental and clinical samples: a rapid and efficient procedure.

    PubMed

    Pinot, C; Deredjian, A; Nazaret, S; Brothier, E; Cournoyer, B; Segonds, C; Favre-Bonté, S

    2011-11-01

    Aim of the study is to identify accurately Stenotrophomonas maltophilia isolates recovered from environmental and clinical samples. Recovery of Sten. maltophilia-like isolates from soil samples using the vancomycin, imipenem, amphotericin B (VIA) selective agar medium enabled distinction of various morphotype colonies. A set of soil and clinical isolates was tested for species identification using different methods. 16S rDNA analyses showed the dark green with a blue halo morphotype to be typical Sten. maltophilia strains. The API-20NE, Vitek-2 and Biolog phenotypic analyses typically used for the identification of clinical isolates did not perform well on these soil isolates. The species-specific PCR screening targeting Sten. maltophilia 23S rDNA and the multiplex smeD/ggpS PCR, differentiating Sten. maltophilia from Stenotrophomonas rhizophila, were tested for improvement of these identification schemes. The latter multiplex PCR identified all isolates tested in this study, whatever be their origin. Isolation on VIA medium and confirmation of Sten. maltophilia species membership by smeD PCR is proposed to identify environmental and clinical isolates of Sten. maltophilia. The proposed approach enables isolation and identification of Sten. maltophilia from different environments in an easy and rapid way. This approach will be useful to accurately manage studies on the abundance and distribution of Sten. maltophilia in hospital and nonhospital environments. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Applied Microbiology © 2011 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  7. Molecular and cellular alterations in Down syndrome: toward the identification of targets for therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Créau, Nicole

    2012-01-01

    Down syndrome is a complex disease that has challenged molecular and cellular research for more than 50 years. Understanding the molecular bases of morphological, cellular, and functional alterations resulting from the presence of an additional complete chromosome 21 would aid in targeting specific genes and pathways for rescuing some phenotypes. Recently, progress has been made by characterization of brain alterations in mouse models of Down syndrome. This review will highlight the main molecular and cellular findings recently described for these models, particularly with respect to their relationship to Down syndrome phenotypes.

  8. Rapid experimental SAD phasing and hot-spot identification with halogenated fragments

    SciTech Connect

    Bauman, Joseph D.; Harrison, Jerry Joe E. K.; Arnold, Eddy

    2016-01-01

    Through X-ray crystallographic fragment screening, 4-bromopyrazole was discovered to be a `magic bullet' that is capable of binding at many of the ligand `hot spots' found in HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT). The binding locations can be in pockets that are `hidden' in the unliganded crystal form, allowing rapid identification of these sites forin silicoscreening. In addition to hot-spot identification, this ubiquitous yet specific binding provides an avenue for X-ray crystallographic phase determination, which can be a significant bottleneck in the determination of the structures of novel proteins. The anomalous signal from 4-bromopyrazole or 4-iodopyrazole was sufficient to determine the structures of three proteins (HIV-1 RT, influenza A endonuclease and proteinase K) by single-wavelength anomalous dispersion (SAD) from single crystals. Both compounds are inexpensive, readily available, safe and very soluble in DMSO or water, allowing efficient soaking into crystals.

  9. Fluorescence in situ hybridization for rapid identification of Achromobacter xylosoxidans and Alcaligenes faecalis recovered from cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Wellinghausen, Nele; Wirths, Beate; Poppert, Sven

    2006-09-01

    Achromobacter xylosoxidans is frequently isolated from the respiratory secretions of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, but identification with biochemical tests is unreliable. We describe fluorescence in situ hybridization assays for the rapid identification of Achromobacter xylosoxidans and Alcaligenes faecalis. Both assays showed high sensitivities and high specificities with a collection of 155 nonfermenters from CF patients.

  10. Rapid and accurate bacterial identification in probiotics and yoghurts by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Angelakis, Emmanouil; Million, Matthieu; Henry, Mireille; Raoult, Didier

    2011-10-01

    Probiotic food is manufactured by adding probiotic strains simultaneously with starter cultures in fermentation tanks. Here, we investigate the accuracy and feasibility of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) for bacterial identification at the species level in probiotic food and yoghurts. Probiotic food and yoghurts were cultured in Columbia and Lactobacillus specific agar and tested by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) for the detection and quantification of Lactobacillus sp. Bacterial identification was performed by MALDI-TOF analysis and by amplification and sequencing of tuf and 16S rDNA genes. We tested 13 probiotic food and yoghurts and we identified by qPCR that they presented 10(6) to 10(7) copies of Lactobacillus spp. DNA/g. All products contained very large numbers of living bacteria varying from 10(6) to 10(9) colony forming units/g. These bacteria were identified as Lactobacillus casei, Lactococcus lactis, Bifidobacterium animalis, Lactobacillus delbrueckii, and Streptococcus thermophilus. MALDI-TOF MS presented 92% specificity compared to the molecular assays. In one product we found L. lactis, instead of Bifidus spp. which was mentioned on the label and for another L. delbrueckii and S. thermophilus instead of Bifidus spp. MALDI-TOF MS allows a rapid and accurate bacterial identification at the species level in probiotic food and yoghurts. Although the safety and functionality of probiotics are species and strain dependent, we found a discrepancy between the bacterial strain announced on the label and the strain identified. Practical Application:  MALDI-TOF MS is rapid and specific for the identification of bacteria in probiotic food and yoghurts. Although the safety and functionality of probiotics are species and strain dependent, we found a discrepancy between the bacterial strain announced on the label and the strain identified. © 2011 Institute of Food Technologists®

  11. Can the rapid identification of mature spermatozoa during microdissection testicular sperm extraction guide operative planning?

    PubMed

    Alrabeeah, K; Doucet, R; Boulet, E; Phillips, S; Al-Hathal, N; Bissonnette, F; Kadoch, I J; Zini, A

    2015-05-01

    The minimum sperm count and quality that must be identified during microdissection testicular sperm extraction (micro-TESE) to deem the procedure successful remains to be established. We conducted a retrospective study of 81 consecutive men with non-obstructive azoospermia who underwent a primary (first) micro-TESE between March 2007 and October 2013. Final assessment of sperm recovery [reported on the day of (intracytoplasmic sperm injection) ICSI] was recorded as (i) successful (available spermatozoa for ICSI) or (ii) unsuccessful (no spermatozoa for ICSI). The decision to perform a unilateral (with limited or complete microdissection) or bilateral micro-TESE was guided by the intra-operative identification of sperm recovery (≥5 motile or non-motile sperm) from the first testicle. Overall, sperm recovery was successful in 56% (45/81) of the men. A unilateral micro-TESE was performed in 47% (38/81) of the men (based on intra-operative identification of sperm) and in 100% (38/38) of these men, spermatozoa was found on final assessment. In 42% (16/38) of the unilateral cases, a limited microdissection was performed (owing to the rapid intra-operative identification of sperm). The remaining 43 men underwent a bilateral micro-TESE and 16% (7/43) of these men had sperm identified on final assessment. The cumulative ICSI pregnancy rates (per cycle started and per embryo transfer) were 47% (21/45) and 60% (21/35), respectively, with a mean (±SD) of 1.9 ± 1.0 embryos transferred. The data demonstrate that intra-operative assessment of sperm recovery can correctly identify those men that require a unilateral micro-TESE. Moreover, the rapid identification of sperm recovery can allow some men to undergo a limited unilateral micro-TESE and avoid the need for complete testicular microdissection.

  12. [Rapid identification of potato cultivars using NIR-excited fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Dai, Fen; Bergholt, Mads Sylvest; Benjamin, Arnold Julian Vinoj; Hong, Tian-Sheng; Zhiwei, Huang

    2014-03-01

    Potato is one of the most important food in the world. Rapid and noninvasive identification of potato cultivars plays a important role in the better use of varieties. In this study, The identification ability of optical spectroscopy techniques, including near-infrared (NIR) Raman spectroscopy and NIR fluorescence spectroscopy, for invasive detection of potato cultivars was evaluated. A rapid NIR Raman spectroscopy system was applied to measure the composite Raman and NIR fluorescence spectroscopy of 3 different species of potatoes (98 samples in total) under 785 nm laser light excitation. Then pure Raman and NIR fluorescence spectroscopy were abstracted from the composite spectroscopy, respectively. At last, the partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) was utilized to analyze and classify Raman spectra of 3 different types of potatoes. All the samples were divided into two sets at random: the calibration set (74samples) and prediction set (24 samples), the model was validated using a leave-one-out, cross-validation method. The results showed that both the NIR-excited fluorescence spectra and pure Raman spectra could be used to identify three cultivars of potatoes. The fluorescence spectrum could distinguish the Favorita variety well (sensitivity: 1, specificity: 0.86 and accuracy: 0.92), but the result for Diamant (sensitivity: 0.75, specificity: 0.75 and accuracy: 0. 75) and Granola (sensitivity: 0.16, specificity: 0.89 and accuracy: 0.71) cultivars identification were a bit poorer. We demonstrated that Raman spectroscopy uncovered the main biochemical compositions contained in potato species, and provided a better classification sensitivity, specificity and accuracy (sensitivity: 1, specificity: 1 and accuracy: 1 for all 3 potato cultivars identification) among the three types of potatoes as compared to fluorescence spectroscopy.

  13. Rapid Identification and Characterization of Francisella by Molecular Biology and Other Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Xin-He; Zhao, Long-Fei; Chen, Xiao-Ming; Ren, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is the causative pathogen of tularemia and a Tier 1 bioterror agent on the CDC list. Considering the fact that some subpopulation of the F. tularensis strains is more virulent, more significantly associated with mortality, and therefore poses more threat to humans, rapid identification and characterization of this subpopulation strains is of invaluable importance. This review summarizes the up-to-date developments of assays for mainly detecting and characterizing F. tularensis and a touch of caveats of some of the assays. PMID:27335619

  14. Seed oil polyphenols: rapid and sensitive extraction method and high resolution-mass spectrometry identification.

    PubMed

    Koubaa, Mohamed; Mhemdi, Houcine; Vorobiev, Eugène

    2015-05-01

    Phenolic content is a primary parameter for vegetables oil quality evaluation, and directly involved in the prevention of oxidation and oil preservation. Several methods have been reported in the literature for polyphenols extraction from seed oil but the approaches commonly used remain manually handled. In this work, we propose a rapid and sensitive method for seed oil polyphenols extraction and identification. For this purpose, polyphenols were extracted from Opuntia stricta Haw seed oil, using high frequency agitation, separated, and then identified using a liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry method. Our results showed good sensitivity and reproducibility of the developed methods.

  15. Identification and Characterization of Human Endometrial Mesenchymal Stem/Stromal Cells and Their Potential for Cellular Therapy.

    PubMed

    Darzi, Saeedeh; Werkmeister, Jerome A; Deane, James A; Gargett, Caroline E

    2016-09-01

    SummaryHuman endometrium is a highly regenerative tissue, undergoing more than 400 cycles of proliferation, differentiation, and shedding during a woman's reproductive life. Adult stem cells, including mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs), are likely responsible for the immense cellular turnover in human endometrium. The unique properties of MSCs, including high proliferative ability, self-renewal, differentiation to mesodermal lineages, secretion of angiogenic factors, and many other growth-promoting factors make them useful candidates for cellular therapy and tissue engineering. In this review, we summarize the identification and characterization of newly discovered MSCs from the human endometrium: their properties, the surface markers used for their prospective isolation, their perivascular location in the endometrium, and their potential application in cellular therapies. The endometrium, or the lining of uterus, has recently been identified as a new and accessible source of mesenchymal stem cells, which can be obtained without anesthesia. Endometrial mesenchymal stem cells have comparable properties to bone marrow and adipose tissue mesenchymal stem cells. Endometrial mesenchymal stem cells are purified with known and novel perivascular surface markers and are currently under investigation for their potential use in cellular therapy for several clinical conditions with significant burden of disease. ©AlphaMed Press.

  16. Identification of GI cancers utilising rapid mid-infrared spectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nallala, Jayakrupakar; Lloyd, Gavin R.; Kendall, Catherine; Barr, Hugh; Shepherd, Neil; Stone, Nick

    2016-03-01

    Pathologists find it notoriously difficult to provide both inter- and intra-observer agreement on a diagnosis of early gastrointestinal cancers. Vibrational spectroscopic approaches have shown their value in providing molecular compositional data from tissue samples and therefore enabling the identification of disease specific changes, when combined with multivariate techniques. Mid-infrared microscopic imaging is undergoing rapid developments in sources, detectors and spectrometers. Here we explore the use of high magnification FTIR for GI cancers and consider how the MINERVA (MId- to NEaR infrared spectroscopy for improVed medical diAgnostics) project, which is developing discrete frequency IR imaging tools will enable histopathologists to obtain rapid molecular images form unstained tissue sections.

  17. Rapid on-membrane proteolytic cleavage for Edman sequencing and mass spectrometric identification of proteins.

    PubMed

    Pham, Victoria C; Henzel, William J; Lill, Jennie R

    2005-11-01

    A method for the rapid limited enzymatic cleavage of PVDF membrane-immobilized proteins is described. This method allows the fast characterization of PVDF blotted proteins by peptide mass fingerprinting (Henzel, W. J., Billeci, T. M., Stults, J. T., Wong, S. C., Grimley, C., Wantanabe, C., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 1993, 90, 5011-5015), LC-MS/MS, or N-terminal sequencing and has been demonstrated on a range of proteins using a full complement of proteolytic enzymes. This technique allows the generation of proteolytic fragments between 5 and 60 min (depending on the enzyme employed), which is significantly faster than previously reported on-membrane digestion methods. To date, this on-membrane rapid digestion protocol has aided in the identification and confirmation of mutation sites in over 200 recombinant proteins.

  18. Identification of the Species of Origin for Meat Products by Rapid Evaporative Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Balog, Julia; Perenyi, Dora; Guallar-Hoyas, Cristina; Egri, Attila; Pringle, Steven D; Stead, Sara; Chevallier, Olivier P; Elliott, Chris T; Takats, Zoltan

    2016-06-15

    Increasingly abundant food fraud cases have brought food authenticity and safety into major focus. This study presents a fast and effective way to identify meat products using rapid evaporative ionization mass spectrometry (REIMS). The experimental setup was demonstrated to be able to record a mass spectrometric profile of meat specimens in a time frame of <5 s. A multivariate statistical algorithm was developed and successfully tested for the identification of animal tissue with different anatomical origin, breed, and species with 100% accuracy at species and 97% accuracy at breed level. Detection of the presence of meat originating from a different species (horse, cattle, and venison) has also been demonstrated with high accuracy using mixed patties with a 5% detection limit. REIMS technology was found to be a promising tool in food safety applications providing a reliable and simple method for the rapid characterization of food products.

  19. [Rapid Identification of Chemical Components in Polygonum multiflorum Formula Granules by UPLC/Q-TOF MS].

    PubMed

    Xu, Ai-li; Dong, Yu-juan; Chen, Zhao; Jiang, Jie-yi; Li, Su-mei; Li, Yang-xue

    2015-06-01

    To establish a simple and reliable method for rapid separation and identification of chemical components in Polygonum multiflorum Formula Granules. An ultra-performance liquid chromatography tandem quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometric method( UPLC/Q-TOF MS) was used. The separation was performed on an Agilent Eclipse Plus C18 RRHD(100 mm x 2.1 mm, 1.8 μm) column with a mobile phase of water and acetonitrile in a gradient elution mode. The flow rate was 0.4 mL/min and the column temperature was maintained at 25 degrees C. TOF MS was applied for qualitative analysis under positive ion mode. Five compounds were identified by the time of flight mass spectrometry and literature data. This method is accurate, rapid and sensitive, it can provide reference for the quality control of Polygonum multiflorum Formula Granules.

  20. Evaluation of the VITEK 2 System for Rapid Identification of Yeasts and Yeast-Like Organisms

    PubMed Central

    Graf, Barbara; Adam, Thomas; Zill, Edith; Göbel, Ulf B.

    2000-01-01

    The new VITEK 2 system is a fully automated system dedicated to the identification and susceptibility testing of microorganisms. In conjunction with the VITEK ID-YST card the VITEK 2 system allows the identification of clinically important yeasts and yeast-like organisms in 15 h due to a sensitive fluorescence-based technology. The ID-YST card consists of 47 biochemical reactions. The database comprises 51 taxa, including newly described species. In this study we evaluated the reliability of the VITEK ID-YST card for the identification of yeasts and yeast-like organisms encountered in a clinical microbiology laboratory. A total of 241 strains representing 21 species were studied. The strains were isolated from clinical samples within a period of 60 days prior to the identification. The tests were performed using 24-h to 55-h subcultures on Sabouraud-gentamicin-chloramphenicol agar. Each strain was tested in parallel using the ID 32C strip as a comparison method combined with microscopic morphology and an agglutination test for C. krusei. Overall, 222 strains (92.1%) were unequivocally identified including 11 isolates (4.6%) identified with low discrimination resolved by simple additional tests. Ten strains (4.1%) for which results were given with low discrimination could not be unequivocally identified with supplemental tests, 4 strains (1.7%) were misidentified and 5 strains (2.1%) could not be identified. In conclusion, we found that the VITEK 2 system is a rapid and accurate method for the identification of medically important yeasts and yeast-like organisms. PMID:10790099

  1. Rapid identification of Campylobacter spp. by melting peak analysis of biprobes in real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Logan, J M; Edwards, K J; Saunders, N A; Stanley, J

    2001-06-01

    We describe rapid PCR-biprobe identification of Campylobacter spp. This is based on real-time PCR with product analysis in the same system. The assay identifies enteropathogenic campylobacters to the species level on the basis of their degree of hybridization to three 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) biprobes. First-round symmetric PCR is performed with genus-specific primers which selectively target and amplify a portion of the 16S rRNA gene common to all Campylobacter species. Second-round asymmetric PCR is performed in a LightCycler in the presence of one of three biprobes; the identity of an amplified DNA-biprobe duplex is established after determination of the species-specific melting peak temperature. The biprobe specificities were determined by testing 37 reference strains of Campylobacter, Helicobacter, and Arcobacter spp. and 59 Penner serotype reference strains of Campylobacter jejuni and C. coli. From the combination of melting peak profiles for each probe, an identification scheme was devised which accurately detected the five taxa pathogenic for humans (C. jejuni/C. coli, C. lari, C. upsaliensis, C. hyointestinalis, and C. fetus), as well as C. helveticus and C. lanienae. The assay was evaluated with 110 blind-tested field isolates; when the code was broken their previous phenotypic species identification was confirmed in every case. The PCR-biprobe assay also identified campylobacters directly from fecal DNA. PCR-biprobe testing of stools from 38 diarrheic subjects was 100% concordant with PCR-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay identification (13, 20) and thus more sensitive than phenotypic identification following microaerobic culture.

  2. Rapid Identification of Campylobacter spp. by Melting Peak Analysis of Biprobes in Real-Time PCR

    PubMed Central

    Logan, J. M. J.; Edwards, K. J.; Saunders, N. A.; Stanley, J.

    2001-01-01

    We describe rapid PCR-biprobe identification of Campylobacter spp.. This is based on real-time PCR with product analysis in the same system. The assay identifies enteropathogenic campylobacters to the species level on the basis of their degree of hybridization to three 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) biprobes. First-round symmetric PCR is performed with genus-specific primers which selectively target and amplify a portion of the 16S rRNA gene common to all Campylobacter species. Second-round asymmetric PCR is performed in a LightCycler in the presence of one of three biprobes; the identity of an amplified DNA-biprobe duplex is established after determination of the species-specific melting peak temperature. The biprobe specificities were determined by testing 37 reference strains of Campylobacter, Helicobacter, and Arcobacter spp. and 59 Penner serotype reference strains of Campylobacter jejuni and C. coli. From the combination of melting peak profiles for each probe, an identification scheme was devised which accurately detected the five taxa pathogenic for humans (C. jejuni/C. coli, C. lari, C. upsaliensis, C. hyointestinalis, and C. fetus), as well as C. helveticus and C. lanienae. The assay was evaluated with 110 blind-tested field isolates; when the code was broken their previous phenotypic species identification was confirmed in every case. The PCR-biprobe assay also identified campylobacters directly from fecal DNA. PCR-biprobe testing of stools from 38 diarrheic subjects was 100% concordant with PCR–enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay identification (13, 20) and thus more sensitive than phenotypic identification following microaerobic culture. PMID:11376061

  3. Rapid Detection and Identification of Yersinia pestis from Food Using Immunomagnetic Separation and Pyrosequencing.

    PubMed

    Amoako, Kingsley K; Shields, Michael J; Goji, Noriko; Paquet, Chantal; Thomas, Matthew C; Janzen, Timothy W; Bin Kingombe, Cesar I; Kell, Arnold J; Hahn, Kristen R

    2012-01-01

    Interest has recently been renewed in the possible use of Y. pestis, the causative agent of plague, as a biological weapon by terrorists. The vulnerability of food to intentional contamination coupled with reports of humans having acquired plague through eating infected animals that were not adequately cooked or handling of meat from infected animals makes the possible use of Y. pestis in a foodborne bioterrorism attack a reality. Rapid, efficient food sample preparation and detection systems that will help overcome the problem associated with the complexity of the different matrices and also remove any ambiguity in results will enable rapid informed decisions to be made regarding contamination of food with biothreat agents. We have developed a rapid detection assay that combines the use of immunomagnetic separation and pyrosequencing in generating results for the unambiguous identification of Y. pestis from milk (0.9 CFU/mL), bagged salad (1.6 CFU/g), and processed meat (10 CFU/g). The low detection limits demonstrated in this assay provide a novel tool for the rapid detection and confirmation of Y. pestis in food without the need for enrichment. The combined use of the iCropTheBug system and pyrosequencing for efficient capture and detection of Y. pestis is novel and has potential applications in food biodefence.

  4. Rapid Detection and Identification of Yersinia pestis from Food Using Immunomagnetic Separation and Pyrosequencing

    PubMed Central

    Amoako, Kingsley K.; Shields, Michael J.; Goji, Noriko; Paquet, Chantal; Thomas, Matthew C.; Janzen, Timothy W.; Bin Kingombe, Cesar I.; Kell, Arnold J.; Hahn, Kristen R.

    2012-01-01

    Interest has recently been renewed in the possible use of Y. pestis, the causative agent of plague, as a biological weapon by terrorists. The vulnerability of food to intentional contamination coupled with reports of humans having acquired plague through eating infected animals that were not adequately cooked or handling of meat from infected animals makes the possible use of Y. pestis in a foodborne bioterrorism attack a reality. Rapid, efficient food sample preparation and detection systems that will help overcome the problem associated with the complexity of the different matrices and also remove any ambiguity in results will enable rapid informed decisions to be made regarding contamination of food with biothreat agents. We have developed a rapid detection assay that combines the use of immunomagnetic separation and pyrosequencing in generating results for the unambiguous identification of Y. pestis from milk (0.9 CFU/mL), bagged salad (1.6 CFU/g), and processed meat (10 CFU/g). The low detection limits demonstrated in this assay provide a novel tool for the rapid detection and confirmation of Y. pestis in food without the need for enrichment. The combined use of the iCropTheBug system and pyrosequencing for efficient capture and detection of Y. pestis is novel and has potential applications in food biodefence. PMID:23091729

  5. SIMULTANEOUS AND RAPID IDENTIFICATION OF ESCHERICHIA COLI, LISTERIA MONOCYTOGENES, AND SALMONELLA TYPHIMONIUM BY SURFACE-ENHANCED RAMAN SCATTERING SPECTROSCOPY

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The development of rapid and routine identification methods for foodborne bacteria is of considerable importance due to concerns regarding bio-/agro-terrorism, public health, and economic loss. The traditional techniques are time consuming and are not sufficiently rapid to assure the safety of ready...

  6. Rapid identification of regulatory microRNAs by miTRAP (miRNA trapping by RNA in vitro affinity purification).

    PubMed

    Braun, Juliane; Misiak, Danny; Busch, Bianca; Krohn, Knut; Hüttelmaier, Stefan

    2014-04-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) control gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. However, the identification of miRNAs regulating the fate of a specific messenger RNA remains limited due to the imperfect complementarity of miRNAs and targeted transcripts. Here, we describe miTRAP (miRNA trapping by RNA in vitro affinity purification), an advanced protocol of previously reported MS2-tethering approaches. MiTRAP allows the rapid identification of miRNAs targeting an in vitro transcribed RNA in cell lysates. Selective co-purification of regulatory miRNAs was confirmed for the MYC- as well as ZEB2-3'UTR, two well-established miRNA targets in vivo. Combined with miRNA-sequencing, miTRAP identified in addition to miRNAs reported to control MYC expression, 18 novel candidates including not in silico predictable miRNAs. The evaluation of 10 novel candidate miRNAs confirmed 3'UTR-dependent regulation of MYC expression as well as putative non-canonical targeting sites for the not in silico predictable candidates. In conclusion, miTRAP provides a rapid, cost-effective and easy-to-handle protocol allowing the identification of regulatory miRNAs for RNAs of choice in a cellular context of interest. Most notably, miTRAP not only identifies in silico predictable but also unpredictable miRNAs regulating the expression of a specific target RNA.

  7. Rapid identification of ubiquitination and SUMOylation target sites by microfluidic peptide array

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Bing; Farris, Tierra R.; Milligan, Sarah L.; Chen, Haosi; Zhu, Ruijuan; Hong, Aailing; Zhou, Xiaochuan; Gao, Xiaolian; McBride, Jere W.

    2016-01-01

    SUMOylation and ubiquitination are two essential post translational modifications (PTMs) involved in the regulation of important biological processes in eukaryotic cells. Identification of ubiquitin (Ub) and small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO)-conjugated lysine residues in proteins is critical for understanding the role of ubiquitination and SUMOylation, but remains experimentally challenging. We have developed a powerful in vitro Ub/SUMO assay using a novel high density peptide array incorporated within a microfluidic device that allows rapid identification of ubiquitination and SUMOylation sites on target proteins. We performed the assay with a panel of human proteins and a microbial effector with known target sites for Ub or SUMO modifications, and determined that 80% of these proteins were modified by Ub or specific SUMO isoforms at the sites previously determined using conventional methods. Our results confirm the specificity for both SUMO isoform and individual target proteins at the peptide level. In summary, this microfluidic high density peptide array approach is a rapid screening assay to determine sites of Ub and SUMO modification of target substrates, which will provide new insights into the composition, selectivity and specificity of these PTM target sites. PMID:27047992

  8. LAMP technology: Rapid identification of Brucella and Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Trangoni, Marcos D.; Gioffré, Andrea K.; Cerón Cucchi, María E.; Caimi, Karina C.; Ruybal, Paula; Zumárraga, Martín J.; Cravero, Silvio L.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we developed new sets of primers to detect Brucella spp. and M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) through isothermal amplification. We selected a previously well-characterized target gene, bscp31, specific for Brucella spp. and IS900 for MAP. The limits of detection using the loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) protocols described herein were similar to those of conventional PCR targeting the same sequences. Hydroxynaphtol blue and SYBR GreenTM allowed direct naked-eye detection with identical sensitivity as agarose gel electrophoresis. We included the LAMP-based protocol in a rapid identification scheme of the respective pathogens, and all tested isolates were correctly identified within 2 to 3 h. In addition, both protocols were suitable for specifically identifying the respective pathogens; in the case of Brucella, it also allowed the identification of all the biovars tested. We conclude that LAMP is a suitable rapid molecular typing tool that could help to shorten the time required to identify insidious bacteria in low-complexity laboratories, mainly in developing countries. PMID:26273282

  9. [Rapid identification of microorganisms by mass spectrometry in a blood culture system. Comparison of two procedures].

    PubMed

    Cattani, María E; Posse, Tamara; Hermes, Ricardo L; Kaufman, Sara C

    2015-01-01

    Rapid identification of microorganisms is critical in hospitalized infected patients. Blood culture is currently the gold standard for detecting and identifying microorganisms causing bacteremia or sepsis. The introduction of mass spectrometry by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF MS) in microbiology laboratories, especially in microorganisms growing in blood culture bottles, provides rapid identification. This study evaluates the performance of the Maldi Sepsityper Biotyper procedure (hereinafter, MS) compared to that of an in-home method (hereinafter, HF). Eight hundred and forty (840) positive blood culture bottles were processed using the HF procedure, 542 of which were also processed using MS. The organisms were identified in 670 (79.76%) and 391 (72.14%) bottles respectively (p = 0,0013). This study demonstrates the effectiveness of both procedures for identifying microorganisms directly from positive blood culture bottles. However, the HF procedure proved to be more effective than MS, especially in the presence of Gram positive organisms.

  10. Rapid identification of Streptococcus intermedius by PCR with the ily gene as a species marker gene.

    PubMed

    Goto, Takatsugu; Nagamune, Hideaki; Miyazaki, Aiko; Kawamura, Yoshiaki; Ohnishi, Ooki; Hattori, Kanako; Ohkura, Kazuto; Miyamoto, Kazuaki; Akimoto, Shigeru; Ezaki, Takayuki; Hirota, Katsuhiko; Miyake, Yoichiro; Maeda, Takuya; Kourai, Hiroki

    2002-02-01

    Streptococcus intermedius belongs to the anginosus group of streptococci (AGS) and is associated with endogenous infections leading to abscesses in the oral cavity and at deepseated sites, such as the brain and liver. Two other species, S. anginosus and S. constellatus, and some presently unnamed taxa, are also classified as AGS. Recently, S. constellatus subsp. pharyngis, a new subspecies with biochemical characteristics similar to S. intermedius, was described with the potential for causing confusion when trying to identify isolates of these two species routinely with commercial identification kits, such as Rapid ID32 Strep and Fluo-Card Milleri. To correctly identify S. intermedius, this study attempted to develop an accurate PCR identification system with the ily gene as a species marker. This approach relies on amplification of an 819-bp fragment of the ily gene and its 3'-flanking region and is shown here to be specific for S. intermedius strains among all other streptococcal species. Moreover, this PCR system was applicable in direct rapid PCR with whole bacterial cells and TaKaRa Z-Taq (TaKaRa), a highly efficient DNA polymerase, as the template and DNA amplification enzyme, respectively.

  11. Microscopic-observation drug susceptibility assay provides rapid and reliable identification of MDR-TB.

    PubMed

    Ejigu, G S; Woldeamanuel, Y; Shah, N S; Gebyehu, M; Selassie, A; Lemma, E

    2008-03-01

    Liquid culture systems are more rapid and sensitive for both the detection and drug susceptibility testing (DST) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. St Peter's TB Specialised Hospital and public health laboratory, Addis Ababa. To compare the microscopic-observation drug susceptibility (MODS) assay with the BACTEC-MGIT 960 system for isoniazid and rifampicin DST (i.e., multidrug-resistant tuberculosis [MDR-TB] identification) of M. tuberculosis. The evaluation was based on 58 smear- and culture-positive sputum samples from patients diagnosed in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. BACTEC-MGIT was used as the reference standard. For the detection of MDR-TB, MODS has a sensitivity, specificity and accuracy rate of respectively 95%, 100% and 98.3% (kappa 0.981, concordance 98.3%). Concurrent culture detection and DST results are obtained in a median of 9 days with MODS, while indirect DST results with BACTEC-MGIT are obtained in a median of 8 days (this does not include time to primary isolate). MODS is an accurate, rapid and relatively inexpensive method for the identification of MDR-TB.

  12. LAMP technology: Rapid identification of Brucella and Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Trangoni, Marcos D; Gioffré, Andrea K; Cerón Cucchi, María E; Caimi, Karina C; Ruybal, Paula; Zumárraga, Martín J; Cravero, Silvio L

    2015-06-01

    In this study, we developed new sets of primers to detect Brucella spp. and M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) through isothermal amplification. We selected a previously well-characterized target gene, bscp31, specific for Brucella spp. and IS900 for MAP. The limits of detection using the loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) protocols described herein were similar to those of conventional PCR targeting the same sequences. Hydroxynaphtol blue and SYBR Green(TM) allowed direct naked-eye detection with identical sensitivity as agarose gel electrophoresis. We included the LAMP-based protocol in a rapid identification scheme of the respective pathogens, and all tested isolates were correctly identified within 2 to 3 h. In addition, both protocols were suitable for specifically identifying the respective pathogens; in the case of Brucella, it also allowed the identification of all the biovars tested. We conclude that LAMP is a suitable rapid molecular typing tool that could help to shorten the time required to identify insidious bacteria in low-complexity laboratories, mainly in developing countries.

  13. Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization Allows Rapid Identification of Microorganisms in Blood Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Kempf, Volkhard A. J.; Trebesius, Karlheinz; Autenrieth, Ingo B.

    2000-01-01

    Using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with rRNA-targeted fluorescently labelled oligonucleotide probes, pathogens were rapidly detected and identified in positive blood culture bottles without cultivation and biotyping. In this study, 115 blood cultures with a positive growth index as determined by a continuous-reading automated blood culture system were examined by both conventional laboratory methods and FISH. For this purpose, oligonucleotide probes that allowed identification of approximately 95% of those pathogens typically associated with bacteremia were produced. The sensitivity and specificity of these probes were 100%. From all 115 blood cultures, microorganisms were grown after 1 day and identification to the family, genus, or species level was achieved after 1 to 3 days while 111 samples (96.5%) were similarly identified by FISH within 2.5 h. Staphylococci were identified in 62 of 62 samples, streptococci and enterococci were identified in 19 of 20 samples, gram-negative rods were identified in 28 of 30 samples, and fungi were identified in two of two samples. Thus, FISH is an appropriate method for identification of pathogens grown in blood cultures from septicemic patients. PMID:10655393

  14. Identification of Leptospira biflexa by real-time homogeneous detection of rapid cycle PCR product.

    PubMed

    Woo, T H; Patel, B K; Cinco, M; Smythe, L D; Norris, M A; Symonds, M L; Dohnt, M F; Piispanen, J

    1999-02-01

    Sequence analysis of 16S rRNA genes extracted from nucleic acids databases enabled the identification of a Leptospira biflexa (L. biflexa) signature sequence, against which a reverse primer designated L613, was designed. This primer, when used in conjunction with a universal bacterial specific forward primer designated Fd1, enabled the development of a LightCycler-based PCR protocol in which fluorescence emission due to binding of SYBR Green I dye to amplified products could be detected and monitored. A melting temperature (Tm), determined from the melting curve of the amplified product immediately following the termination of thermal cycling, confirmed that the product was that of L. biflexa. Agarose gel electrophoresis therefore was not necessary for identification of PCR products. The PCR protocol was very rapid, and consisted of 30 cycles with a duration of 20 s for each cycle with the monitoring of the melting curve requiring an additional 3 min. The whole protocol was completed in less than 20 min. The PCR protocol was also specific and enabled the identification of 18 strains of L. biflexa, whilst excluding 14 strains of L. interrogans and Leptonema illini. Two examples of its utility in improving work flow of a Leptospira reference laboratory are presented in this article. The use of a simple boiling method for extraction of DNA from all the members of the Leptospiraceae family DNA further simplifies the procedure and makes its use conducive to diagnostic laboratories.

  15. Rapid identification of 2009 H1N1 influenza A virus using fluorescent antibody methods.

    PubMed

    Leonardi, Gary P

    2010-12-01

    Identification of the 2009 H1N1 influenza A virus requires emergency use authorized (EUA) molecular reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Laboratories lacking molecular capabilities outsource testing, which is costly and may delay result reporting. A fluorescent antibody (FA; D(3) Ultra 2009 H1N1 influenza A virus ID Kit, Diagnostic Hybrids, Athens, OH) recently received Food and Drug Administration EUA status for 2009 H1N1 virus identification. The performance of this FA reagent was evaluated in this study. Influenza A-positive nasopharyngeal specimens (seasonal H1, H3, and 2009 H1N1) were prepared for culture and FA testing and were stained using influenza A antibodies and the 2009 H1N1 reagent. Other respiratory viruses were also evaluated. The FA reagent demonstrated 100% sensitivity and specificity. Bright, apple-green fluorescence was effortlessly identified in culture-positive cells, particularly around cell membrane perimeters. Laboratory-prepared slides were preferred over bedside-prepared specimens because background fluorescence obscured identification in the latter. The new FA reagent provides an accurate, rapid, and inexpensive assay for identifying the 2009 H1N1 virus in nonmolecular diagnostic laboratories.

  16. Rapid and Reliable Identification of Food-Borne Yeasts by Fourier-Transform Infrared Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kümmerle, Michael; Scherer, Siegfried; Seiler, Herbert

    1998-01-01

    Computer-based Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) was used to identify food-borne, predominantly fermentative yeasts. Dried yeast suspensions provided the films suitable for FT-IR measurement. Informative windows in the spectrum were selected and combined to achieve optimal results. A reference spectrum library was assembled, based on 332 defined yeast strains from international yeast collections and our own isolates. All strains were identified with conventional methods using physiological and morphological characteristics. In order to assess identification quality, another 722 unknown yeast isolates not included in the reference spectrum library were identified both by classical methods and by comparison of their FT-IR spectra with those of the reference spectrum library. Ninety-seven and one-half percent of these isolates were identified correctly by FT-IR. Easy handling, rapid identification within 24 h when starting from a single colony, and a high differentiation capacity thus render FT-IR technology clearly superior to other routine methods for the identification of yeasts. PMID:9603836

  17. Development of a PCR Method for Rapid Identification of New Streptococcus mutans Serotype k Strains

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Kazuhiko; Nomura, Ryota; Shimizu, Noriko; Nakagawa, Ichiro; Hamada, Shigeyuki; Ooshima, Takashi

    2004-01-01

    In a previous study, we isolated and characterized a new serotype k of Streptococcus mutans from human blood and oral cavities. Analysis of the genes involved in biosynthesis of the serotype-specific polysaccharide of serotype k strains revealed that the serotype k-specific nucleotide alignment was commonly present in the 5′ region of the rgpF gene (350 bp from the initial sequence) compared to the reference strains, and then a method for rapid identification of serotype k strains was developed by use of PCR with primers designed on the basis of the sequence of the variable region. PCR assays with primers specific for amplification of serotype k strains showed a negative reaction with serotype c, e, and f strains and a positive reaction with serotype k strains, with the sensitivity for identification of the serotype k strains shown to range from 5 to 50 cells. Next, the frequency of positive reactions for serotype k-specific primers was surveyed with DNA taken from saliva samples from 200 subjects (2 to 18 years of age), and 10 of those showed a positive reaction, which was higher than the frequency in our previous survey with a serological method. In addition, all saliva samples from subjects with serotype k strains in our previous study were shown to be positive with the serotype k-specific primers. These results indicate that this new PCR method is effective for identification of subjects with S. mutans serotype k. PMID:15528675

  18. Novelty detection technique with SLV for identification of core properties in honeycombs and cellular solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarpa, Fabrizio; Manson, Graeme; Ruzzene, M.

    2003-08-01

    This paper presents a Novelty-based detection technique to identify core material properties of honeycombs and cellular structures. A numerical model (FE) representing full scale and/or reduced size of the cellular solid is used to generate transmissibilities between topological points at cells in different locations, with a statistical Gaussian distribution of the core material property target variable. The numerical set of transmissibilities is then used in a Novelty detection framework to find Euclidean and Mahalanobis distances from analogous data from a point excitation experimental test carried out with SLV.

  19. Rapid Electrochemical Detection and Identification of Microbiological and Chemical Contaminants for Manned Spaceflight Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, Duane; Botkin, Douglas; Gazda, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Microbial control in the spacecraft environment is a daunting task, especially in the presence of human crew members. Currently, assessing the potential crew health risk associated with a microbial contamination event requires return of representative environmental samples that are analyzed in a ground-based laboratory. It is therefore not currently possible to quickly identify microbes during spaceflight. This project addresses the unmet need for spaceflight-compatible microbial identification technology. The electrochemical detection and identification platform is expected to provide a sensitive, specific, and rapid sample-to-answer capability for in-flight microbial monitoring that can distinguish between related microorganisms (pathogens and non-pathogens) as well as chemical contaminants. This will dramatically enhance our ability to monitor the spacecraft environment and the health risk to the crew. Further, the project is expected to eliminate the need for sample return while significantly reducing crew time required for detection of multiple targets. Initial work will focus on the optimization of bacterial detection and identification. The platform is designed to release nucleic acids (DNA and RNA) from microorganisms without the use of harmful chemicals. Bacterial DNA or RNA is captured by bacteria-specific probe molecules that are bound to a microelectrode, and that capture event can generate a small change in the electrical current (Lam, et al. 2012. Anal. Chem. 84(1): 21-5.). This current is measured, and a determination is made whether a given microbe is present in the sample analyzed. Chemical detection can be accomplished by directly applying a sample to the microelectrode and measuring the resulting current change. This rapid microbial and chemical detection device is designed to be a low-cost, low-power platform anticipated to be operated independently of an external power source, characteristics optimal for manned spaceflight and areas where power

  20. Identification of cellular changes associated with increased production of human growth hormone in a recombinant Chinese hamster ovary cell line.

    PubMed

    Van Dyk, Derek D; Misztal, David R; Wilkins, Marc R; Mackintosh, James A; Poljak, Anne; Varnai, Jodie C; Teber, Erdahl; Walsh, Bradley J; Gray, Peter P

    2003-02-01

    A proteomics approach was used to identify the proteins potentially implicated in the cellular response concomitant with elevated production levels of human growth hormone in a recombinant Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell line following exposure to 0.5 mM butyrate and 80 microM zinc sulphate in the production media. This involved incorporation of two-dimensional (2-D) gel electrophoresis and protein identification by a combination of N-terminal sequencing, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation-time of flight mass spectrometry, amino acid analysis and cross species database matching. From these identifications a CHO 2-D reference map and annotated database have been established. Metabolic labelling and subsequent autoradiography showed the induction of a number of cellular proteins in response to the media additives butyrate and zinc sulphate. These were identified as GRP75, enolase and thioredoxin. The chaperone proteins GRP78, HSP90, GRP94 and HSP70 were not up-regulated under these conditions.

  1. Rapid identification of closely related muscle foods by vibrational spectroscopy and machine learning.

    PubMed

    Ellis, David I; Broadhurst, David; Clarke, Sarah J; Goodacre, Royston

    2005-12-01

    Muscle foods are an integral part of the human diet and during the last few decades consumption of poultry products in particular has increased significantly. It is important for consumers, retailers and food regulatory bodies that these products are of a consistently high quality, authentic, and have not been subjected to adulteration by any lower-grade material either by accident or for economic gain. A variety of methods have been developed for the identification and authentication of muscle foods. However, none of these are rapid or non-invasive, all are time-consuming and difficulties have been encountered in discriminating between the commercially important avian species. Whilst previous attempts have been made to discriminate between muscle foods using infrared spectroscopy, these have had limited success, in particular regarding the closely related poultry species, chicken and turkey. Moreover, this study includes novel data since no attempts have been made to discriminate between both the species and the distinct muscle groups within these species, and this is the first application of Raman spectroscopy to the study of muscle foods. Samples of pre-packed meat and poultry were acquired and FT-IR and Raman measurements taken directly from the meat surface. Qualitative interpretation of FT-IR and Raman spectra at the species and muscle group levels were possible using discriminant function analysis. Genetic algorithms were used to elucidate meaningful interpretation of FT-IR results in (bio)chemical terms and we show that specific wavenumbers, and therefore chemical species, were discriminatory for each type (species and muscle) of poultry sample. We believe that this approach would aid food regulatory bodies in the rapid identification of meat and poultry products and shows particular potential for rapid assessment of food adulteration.

  2. A Simple and Rapid Identification Method for Mycobacterium bovis BCG with Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Kouzaki, Yuji; Maeda, Takuya; Sasaki, Hiroaki; Tamura, Shinsuke; Hamamoto, Takaaki; Yuki, Atsushi; Sato, Akinori; Miyahira, Yasushi; Kawana, Akihiko

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) is widely used as a live attenuated vaccine against Mycobacterium tuberculosis and is an agent for standard prophylaxis against the recurrence of bladder cancer. Unfortunately, it can cause severe infectious diseases, especially in immunocompromised patients, and the ability to immediately distinguish BCG from other M. tuberculosis complexes is therefore important. In this study, we developed a simple and easy-to-perform identification procedure using loop-mediated amplification (LAMP) to detect deletions within the region of difference, which is deleted specifically in all M. bovis BCG strains. Reactions were performed at 64°C for 30 min and successful targeted gene amplifications were detected by real-time turbidity using a turbidimeter and visual inspection of color change. The assay had an equivalent detection limit of 1.0 pg of genomic DNA using a turbidimeter whereas it was 10 pg with visual inspection, and it showed specificity against 49 strains of 44 pathogens, including M. tuberculosis complex. The expected LAMP products were confirmed through identical melting curves in real-time LAMP procedures. We employed the Procedure for Ultra Rapid Extraction (PURE) kit to isolate mycobacterial DNA and found that the highest sensitivity limit with a minimum total cell count of mycobacterium (including DNA purification with PURE) was up to 1 × 103 cells/reaction, based on color changes under natural light with FDA reagents. The detection limit of this procedure when applied to artificial serum, urine, cerebrospinal fluid, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid samples was also about 1 × 103 cells/reaction. Therefore, this substitute method using conventional culture or clinical specimens followed by LAMP combined with PURE could be a powerful tool to enable the rapid identification of M. bovis BCG as point-of-care testing. It is suitable for practical use not only in resource-limited situations, but also in any clinical situation

  3. Rapid Detection and Identification of Human Hookworm Infections through High Resolution Melting (HRM) Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ngui, Romano; Lim, Yvonne A. L.; Chua, Kek Heng

    2012-01-01

    Background Hookworm infections are still endemic in low and middle income tropical countries with greater impact on the socioeconomic and public health of the bottom billion of the world's poorest people. In this study, a real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) coupled with high resolution melting-curve (HRM) analysis was evaluated for an accurate, rapid and sensitive tool for species identification focusing on the five human hookworm species. Methods Real-time PCR coupled with HRM analysis targeting the second internal transcribed spacer (ITS-2) of nuclear ribosomal DNA as the genetic marker was used to identify and distinguish hookworm species in human samples. Unique and distinct characteristics of HRM patterns were produced for each of the five hookworm species. The melting curves were characterized by peaks of 79.24±0.05°C and 83.00±0.04°C for Necator americanus, 79.12±0.10°C for Ancylostoma duodenale, 79.40±0.10°C for Ancylostoma ceylanicum, 79.63±0.05°C for Ancylostoma caninum and 79.70±0.14°C for Ancylostoma braziliense. An evaluation of the method's sensitivity and specificity revealed that this assay was able to detect as low as 0.01 ng/µl hookworm DNA and amplification was only recorded for hookworm positive samples. Conclusion The HRM assay developed in this study is a rapid and straightforward method for the diagnosis, identification and discrimination of five human hookworms. This assay is simple compared to other probe-based genotyping methods as it does not require multiplexing, DNA sequencing or post-PCR processing. Therefore, this method offers a new alternative for rapid detection of human hookworm species. PMID:22844538

  4. Rapid detection and identification of human hookworm infections through high resolution melting (HRM) analysis.

    PubMed

    Ngui, Romano; Lim, Yvonne A L; Chua, Kek Heng

    2012-01-01

    Hookworm infections are still endemic in low and middle income tropical countries with greater impact on the socioeconomic and public health of the bottom billion of the world's poorest people. In this study, a real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) coupled with high resolution melting-curve (HRM) analysis was evaluated for an accurate, rapid and sensitive tool for species identification focusing on the five human hookworm species. Real-time PCR coupled with HRM analysis targeting the second internal transcribed spacer (ITS-2) of nuclear ribosomal DNA as the genetic marker was used to identify and distinguish hookworm species in human samples. Unique and distinct characteristics of HRM patterns were produced for each of the five hookworm species. The melting curves were characterized by peaks of 79.24±0.05°C and 83.00±0.04°C for Necator americanus, 79.12±0.10°C for Ancylostoma duodenale, 79.40±0.10°C for Ancylostoma ceylanicum, 79.63±0.05°C for Ancylostoma caninum and 79.70±0.14°C for Ancylostoma braziliense. An evaluation of the method's sensitivity and specificity revealed that this assay was able to detect as low as 0.01 ng/µl hookworm DNA and amplification was only recorded for hookworm positive samples. The HRM assay developed in this study is a rapid and straightforward method for the diagnosis, identification and discrimination of five human hookworms. This assay is simple compared to other probe-based genotyping methods as it does not require multiplexing, DNA sequencing or post-PCR processing. Therefore, this method offers a new alternative for rapid detection of human hookworm species.

  5. Rapid Context-based Identification of Target Sounds in an Auditory Scene.

    PubMed

    Gamble, Marissa L; Woldorff, Marty G

    2015-09-01

    To make sense of our dynamic and complex auditory environment, we must be able to parse the sensory input into usable parts and pick out relevant sounds from all the potentially distracting auditory information. Although it is unclear exactly how we accomplish this difficult task, Gamble and Woldorff [Gamble, M. L., & Woldorff, M. G. The temporal cascade of neural processes underlying target detection and attentional processing during auditory search. Cerebral Cortex (New York, N.Y.: 1991), 2014] recently reported an ERP study of an auditory target-search task in a temporally and spatially distributed, rapidly presented, auditory scene. They reported an early, differential, bilateral activation (beginning at 60 msec) between feature-deviating target stimuli and physically equivalent feature-deviating nontargets, reflecting a rapid target detection process. This was followed shortly later (at 130 msec) by the lateralized N2ac ERP activation, that reflects the focusing of auditory spatial attention toward the target sound and parallels the attentional-shifting processes widely studied in vision. Here we directly examined the early, bilateral, target-selective effect to better understand its nature and functional role. Participants listened to midline-presented sounds that included target and nontarget stimuli that were randomly either embedded in a brief rapid stream or presented alone. The results indicate that this early bilateral effect results from a template for the target that utilizes its feature deviancy within a stream to enable rapid identification. Moreover, individual-differences analysis showed that the size of this effect was larger for participants with faster RTs. The findings support the hypothesis that our auditory attentional systems can implement and utilize a context-based relational template for a target sound, making use of additional auditory information in the environment when needing to rapidly detect a relevant sound.

  6. A multiplex PCR for rapid identification of Brassica species in the triangle of U.

    PubMed

    Koh, Joshua C O; Barbulescu, Denise M; Norton, Sally; Redden, Bob; Salisbury, Phil A; Kaur, Sukhjiwan; Cogan, Noel; Slater, Anthony T

    2017-01-01

    Within the Brassicaceae, six species from the genus Brassica are widely cultivated throughout the world as oilseed, condiment, fodder or vegetable crops. The genetic relationships among the six Brassica species are described by U's triangle model. Extensive shared traits and diverse morphotypes among Brassica species make identification and classification based on phenotypic data alone challenging and unreliable, especially when dealing with large germplasm collections. Consequently, a major issue for genebank collections is ensuring the correct identification of species. Molecular genotyping based on simple sequence repeat (SSR) marker sequencing or the Illumina Infinium Brassica napus 60K single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array has been used to identify species and assess genetic diversity of Brassica collections. However, these methods are technically challenging, expensive and time-consuming, making them unsuitable for routine or rapid screening of Brassica accessions for germplasm management. A cheaper, faster and simpler method for Brassica species identification is described here. A multiplex polymerase chain reaction (MPCR) consisting of new and existing primers specific to the Brassica A, B and C genomes was able to reliably distinguish all six Brassica species in the triangle of U with 16 control samples of known species identity. Further validation against 120 Brassica accessions previously genotyped showed that the MPCR is highly accurate and comparable to more advanced techniques such as SSR marker sequencing or the Illumina Infinium B. napus 60K SNP array. In addition, the MPCR was sensitive enough to detect seed contaminations in pooled seed samples of Brassica accessions. A cheap and fast multiplex PCR assay for identification of Brassica species in the triangle of U was developed and validated in this study. The MPCR assay can be readily implemented in any basic molecular laboratory and should prove useful for the management of Brassica

  7. Enzyme capture assay for rapid identification of Escherichia coli in blood cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, S W; Wu, J J; Chang, T C

    1994-01-01

    An enzyme capture assay (ECA) for rapid identification of Escherichia coli in blood cultures by using beta-D-glucuronidase as a marker was developed. Microdilution plates coated with antiglucuronidase were used to capture this enzyme from the cell lysates of blood cultures which showed growth of gram-negative bacteria. The assay, using 4-methylumbelliferyl-beta-D-glucuronide as a fluorogenic substrate, had a detection limit of 0.1 ng/ml (3 x 10(-13) M) for the enzyme; this was approximately equal to a cell concentration of 10(6) CFU of E. coli per ml. Among 212 blood cultures showing growth of gram-negative bacteria, 77 specimens were found to contain E. coli by conventional culture procedures and 73 samples were positive by ECA. Among the 135 blood cultures from which E. coli was not isolated, ECA gave one false-positive (Salmonella enteritidis) reaction. Thus, the sensitivity and specificity for the identification of E. coli in blood cultures by ECA were 94.8% (73/77) and 99.3% (134/135), respectively. From the finding of positive growth in the culture bottle, the assay can be completed within 4 h. In view of the high rate of isolation of E. coli from bacteremic patients, the test can be performed in parallel with conventional culture protocols; this may shorten the identification time for E. coli, and proper antimicrobial treatments may be started 24 h earlier than when results of conventional identification systems are used. PMID:8077387

  8. Rapid Identification of Emerging Human-Pathogenic Sporothrix Species with Rolling Circle Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Anderson M.; Najafzadeh, Mohammad J.; de Hoog, G. Sybren; de Camargo, Zoilo P.

    2015-01-01

    Sporothrix infections are emerging as an important human and animal threat among otherwise healthy patients, especially in Brazil and China. Correct identification of sporotrichosis agents is beneficial for epidemiological surveillance, enabling implementation of adequate public-health policies and guiding antifungal therapy. In areas of limited resources where sporotrichosis is endemic, high-throughput detection methods that are specific and sensitive are preferred over phenotypic methods that usually result in misidentification of closely related Sporothrix species. We sought to establish rolling circle amplification (RCA) as a low-cost screening tool for species-specific identification of human-pathogenic Sporothrix. We developed six species-specific padlock probes targeting polymorphisms in the gene encoding calmodulin. BLAST-searches revealed candidate probes that were conserved intraspecifically; no significant homology with sequences from humans, mice, plants or microorganisms outside members of Sporothrix were found. The accuracy of our RCA-based assay was demonstrated through the specificity of probe-template binding to 25 S. brasiliensis, 58 S. schenckii, 5 S. globosa, 1 S. luriei, 4 S. mexicana, and 3 S. pallida samples. No cross reactivity between closely related species was evident in vitro, and padlock probes yielded 100% specificity and sensitivity down to 3 × 106 copies of the target sequence. RCA-based speciation matched identifications via phylogenetic analysis of the gene encoding calmodulin and the rDNA operon (kappa 1.0; 95% confidence interval 1.0-1.0), supporting its use as a reliable alternative to DNA sequencing. This method is a powerful tool for rapid identification and specific detection of medically relevant Sporothrix, and due to its robustness has potential for ecological studies. PMID:26696992

  9. Rapid Identification of Microorganisms by FilmArray Blood Culture Identification Panel Improves Clinical Management in Children.

    PubMed

    Ray, Stephen T J; Drew, Richard J; Hardiman, Fiona; Pizer, Barry; Riordan, Andrew

    2016-05-01

    Blood cultures are a common investigation for children admitted to hospital. In routine practice, it takes at least 24 hours to identify an organism as a contaminant or clinically significant. FilmArray Blood Culture Identification Panel (FA-BCIP) is a multiplex polymerase chain reaction that can detect 24 pathogens within 1 hour. We assessed whether results from FA-BCIP lead to changes in clinical management in a tertiary referral paediatric hospital. We prospectively studied children having blood cultures taken at our tertiary children's hospital. Blood cultures were monitored and organisms identified using standard methods. FA-BCIP was performed when growth was initially detected in first positive blood cultures per episode, between January 1 and June 30, 2014. Assessment of whether the FA-BCIP result altered clinical management was made, specifically focused on antimicrobial stewardship and length of stay. FA-BCIP was done on 117 positive blood cultures; 74 (63%) grew clinically significant organisms, 43 (37%) grew contaminants. FA-BCIP results were judged to alter clinical management in 63 of the 117 episodes (54%). Antimicrobials were started/altered in 23 (19%) episodes and de-escalated/withheld/stopped in 29 (25%) episodes. Ten children were discharged from hospital earlier, which saved a cumulative total of 14 bed days. Rapid identification of microorganisms in pediatric blood cultures by FA-BCIP, led to changes in clinical management for half of the episodes. This improved antimicrobial stewardship and allowed early discharge from hospital for 10% of children. Future studies should focus on how best to use this technology in a cost-effective manner.

  10. G-actin regulates rapid induction of actin nucleation by mDia1 to restore cellular actin polymers.

    PubMed

    Higashida, Chiharu; Suetsugu, Shiro; Tsuji, Takahiro; Monypenny, James; Narumiya, Shuh; Watanabe, Naoki

    2008-10-15

    mDia1 belongs to the formin family of proteins that share FH1 and FH2 domains. Although formins play a critical role in the formation of many actin-based cellular structures, the physiological regulation of formin-mediated actin assembly within the cell is still unknown. Here we show that cells possess an acute actin polymer restoration mechanism involving mDia1. By using single-molecule live-cell imaging, we found that several treatments including low-dose G-actin-sequestering drugs and unpolymerizable actin mutants activate mDia1 to initiate fast directional movement. The FH2 region, the core domain for actin nucleation, is sufficient to respond to latrunculin B (LatB) to increase its actin nucleation frequency. Simulation analysis revealed an unexpected paradoxical effect of LatB that leads to a several fold increase in free G-actin along with an increase in total G-actin. These results indicate that in cells, the actin nucleation frequency of mDia1 is enhanced not only by Rho, but also strongly through increased catalytic efficiency of the FH2 domain. Consistently, frequent actin nucleation by mDia1 was found around sites of vigorous actin disassembly. Another major actin nucleator, the Arp2/3 complex, was not affected by the G-actin increase induced by LatB. Taken together, we propose that transient accumulation of G-actin works as a cue to promote mDia1-catalyzed actin nucleation to execute rapid reassembly of actin filaments.

  11. Rapid identification of HPV 16 and 18 by multiplex nested PCR-immunochromatographic test.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Yung-Bin; Li, Yi-Shuan; Chan, Err-Cheng

    2015-02-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) types 16 and 18 are known to be high-risk viruses that cause cervical cancer. An HPV rapid testing kit that could help physicians to make early and more informed decisions regarding patient care is needed urgently but not yet available. This study aimed to develop a multiplex nested polymerase chain reaction-immunochromatographic test (PCR-ICT) for the rapid identification of HPV 16 and 18. A multiplex nested PCR was constructed to amplify the HPV 16 and 18 genotype-specific L1 gene fragments and followed by ICT which coated with antibodies to identify rapidly the different PCR products. The type-specific gene regions of high-risk HPV 16 and 18 could be amplified successfully by multiplex nested PCR at molecular sizes of approximately 99 and 101bp, respectively. The capture antibodies raised specifically against the moleculars labeled on the PCR products could be detected simultaneously both HPV 16 and 18 in one strip. Under optimal conditions, this PCR-ICT assay had the capability to detect HPV in a sample with as low as 100 copies of HPV viral DNA. The PCR-ICT system has the advantage of direct and simultaneous detection of two high-risk HPV 16 and 18 DNA targets in one sample, which suggested a significant potential of this assay for clinical application.

  12. Age-Related Declines in Early Sensory Memory: Identification of Rapid Auditory and Visual Stimulus Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Fogerty, Daniel; Humes, Larry E.; Busey, Thomas A.

    2016-01-01

    Age-related temporal-processing declines of rapidly presented sequences may involve contributions of sensory memory. This study investigated recall for rapidly presented auditory (vowel) and visual (letter) sequences presented at six different stimulus onset asynchronies (SOA) that spanned threshold SOAs for sequence identification. Younger, middle-aged, and older adults participated in all tasks. Results were investigated at both equivalent performance levels (i.e., SOA threshold) and at identical physical stimulus values (i.e., SOAs). For four-item sequences, results demonstrated best performance for the first and last items in the auditory sequences, but only the first item for visual sequences. For two-item sequences, adults identified the second vowel or letter significantly better than the first. Overall, when temporal-order performance was equated for each individual by testing at SOA thresholds, recall accuracy for each position across the age groups was highly similar. These results suggest that modality-specific processing declines of older adults primarily determine temporal-order performance for rapid sequences. However, there is some evidence for a second amodal processing decline in older adults related to early sensory memory for final items in a sequence. This selective deficit was observed particularly for longer sequence lengths and was not accounted for by temporal masking. PMID:27199737

  13. Rapid identification of intact bacterial resistance plasmids via optical mapping of single DNA molecules

    PubMed Central

    Nyberg, Lena K.; Quaderi, Saair; Emilsson, Gustav; Karami, Nahid; Lagerstedt, Erik; Müller, Vilhelm; Noble, Charleston; Hammarberg, Susanna; Nilsson, Adam N.; Sjöberg, Fei; Fritzsche, Joachim; Kristiansson, Erik; Sandegren, Linus; Ambjörnsson, Tobias; Westerlund, Fredrik

    2016-01-01

    The rapid spread of antibiotic resistance – currently one of the greatest threats to human health according to WHO – is to a large extent enabled by plasmid-mediated horizontal transfer of resistance genes. Rapid identification and characterization of plasmids is thus important both for individual clinical outcomes and for epidemiological monitoring of antibiotic resistance. Toward this aim, we have developed an optical DNA mapping procedure where individual intact plasmids are elongated within nanofluidic channels and visualized through fluorescence microscopy, yielding barcodes that reflect the underlying sequence. The assay rapidly identifies plasmids through statistical comparisons with barcodes based on publicly available sequence repositories and also enables detection of structural variations. Since the assay yields holistic sequence information for individual intact plasmids, it is an ideal complement to next generation sequencing efforts which involve reassembly of sequence reads from fragmented DNA molecules. The assay should be applicable in microbiology labs around the world in applications ranging from fundamental plasmid biology to clinical epidemiology and diagnostics. PMID:27460437

  14. Identification of a cellular receptor for subgroup E avian leukosis virus

    PubMed Central

    Adkins, Heather B.; Brojatsch, Jürgen; Naughton, John; Rolls, Melissa M.; Pesola, Jean M.; Young, John A. T.

    1997-01-01

    Genetic studies in chickens and receptor interference experiments have indicated that avian leukosis virus (ALV)-E may utilize a cellular receptor related to the receptor for ALV-B and ALV-D. Recently, we cloned CAR1, a tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR)-related protein, that serves as a cellular receptor for ALV-B and ALV-D. To determine whether the cellular receptor for ALV-E is a CAR1-like protein, a cDNA library was made from turkey embryo fibroblasts (TEFs), which are susceptible to ALV-E infection, but not to infection by ALV-B and ALV-D. The cDNA library was screened with a radioactively labeled CAR1 cDNA probe, and clones that hybridized with the probe were isolated. A 2.3-kb cDNA clone was identified that conferred susceptibility to ALV-E infection, but not to ALV-B infection, when expressed in transfected human 293 cells. The functional cDNA clone is predicted to encode a 368 amino acid protein with significant amino acid similarity to CAR1. Like CAR1, the TEF protein is predicted to have two extracellular TNFR-like cysteine-rich domains and a putative death domain similar to those of TNFR I and Fas. Flow cytometric analysis and immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated specific binding between the TEF CAR1-related protein and an immunoadhesin composed of the surface (SU) envelope protein of subgroup E (RAV-0) virus fused to the constant region of a rabbit immunoglobulin. These two activities of the TEF CAR1-related protein, specific binding to ALV-E SU and permitting entry only of ALV-E, have unambiguously identified this protein as a cellular receptor specific for subgroup E ALV. PMID:9326659

  15. Multi-primer target PCR for rapid identification of bovine DRB3 alleles.

    PubMed

    Ledwidge, S A; Mallard, B A; Gibson, J P; Jansen, G B; Jiang, Z H

    2001-08-01

    Multi-primer target polymerase chain reaction (MPT-PCR) is a rapid method for the identification of specific BoLA-DRB3 alleles. In a single PCR reaction, the presence of two alleles associated with increased risk, DRB3.2*23 (DRB3*2701-2703, 2705-2707) and decreased risk, DRB3.2*16 (DRB3*1501, 1502), of mastitis in Canadian Holstein can be detected. Two outer primers amplify exon 2 of DRB3. Simultaneously, two inner, allele-specific primers amplify individual alleles. Initially, 40 cows previously typed by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) were genotyped using the multi-primer approach. An additional 30 cows were first genotyped by multi-primer target PCR, then by PCR-RFLP. All animals were correctly identified and there were no false positives. This technique can readily be modified to identify other BoLA alleles of interest.

  16. Rapid identification of pathogenic streptococci isolated from moribund red tilapia (Oreochromis spp.).

    PubMed

    Abdelsalam, Mohamed; Elgendy, Mamdouh Y; Shaalan, Mohamed; Moustafa, Mohamed; Fujino, Masayuki

    2017-03-01

    Accurate and rapid identification of bacterial pathogens of fish is essential for the effective treatment and speedy control of infections. Massive mortalities in market-sized red tilapia (Oreochromis spp.) were noticed in mariculture concrete ponds in northern Egypt. Histopathological examination revealed marked congestion in the central vein of the liver with the presence of bacterial aggregates inside the lumen and in the vicinity of the central vein. A total of 12 isolates of streptococci were obtained from the moribund fish. This study documented the ability of the MicroSeq 500 16S bacterial sequencing method to accurately identify Streptococcus agalactiae and S. dysgalactiae mixed infections from moribund red tilapia that were difficult to be recognised by the commercial biochemical systems. The continuously decreasing cost of the sequencing technique should encourage its application in routine diagnostic procedures.

  17. A PCR Detection Method for Rapid Identification of Melissococcus pluton in Honeybee Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Govan, V. A.; Brözel, V.; Allsopp, M. H.; Davison, S.

    1998-01-01

    Melissococcus pluton is the causative agent of European foulbrood, a disease of honeybee larvae. This bacterium is particularly difficult to isolate because of its stringent growth requirements and competition from other bacteria. PCR was used selectively to amplify specific rRNA gene sequences of M. pluton from pure culture, from crude cell lysates, and directly from infected bee larvae. The PCR primers were designed from M. pluton 16S rRNA sequence data. The PCR products were visualized by agarose gel electrophoresis and confirmed as originating from M. pluton by sequencing in both directions. Detection was highly specific, and the probes did not hybridize with DNA from other bacterial species tested. This method enabled the rapid and specific detection and identification of M. pluton from pure cultures and infected bee larvae. PMID:9572987

  18. Evaluation of a multitest system for rapid identification of Salmonella and Shigella.

    PubMed

    Gooch, W M

    1980-04-01

    The ability of Micro-ID, a multitest system for rapid (four hour) identification of Enterobacteriaceae, to identify Salmonella and Shigella was evaluated. Micro-ID, API 20E and a battery of tubed media consisting of triple sugar-iron agar, Christensen's urea agar, and Moeller's lysine decarboxylase medium were used to study 516 lactose nonfermenting strains of Enterobacteriaceae isolated from 500 consecutive pediatric stool specimens. Fifty-six of the isolates were Salmonella, and 21 were Shigella. Micro-ID correctly identified all isolates of Shigella and all but one isolate of Salmonella, whereas the conventional screening media failed to detect seven isolates of Salmonella and two isolates of Shigella. The false-positive rates were 1% and 20% for Micro-ID and the conventional battery, respectively. Use of Micro-ID as a substitute for conventional screening media for lactose nonfermenting stool isolates provides reliable presumptive idenfication of Salmonella and Shigella within four hours.

  19. Rapid word identification in pure alexia is lexical but not semantic.

    PubMed

    Friedman, R B; Lott, S N

    2000-05-01

    Following the notion that patients with pure alexia have access to two distinct reading strategies-letter-by-letter reading and semantic reading-a training program was devised to facilitate reading via semantics in a patient with pure alexia. Training utilized brief stimulus presentations and required category judgments rather than explicit word identification. The training was successful for trained words, but generalized poorly to untrained words. Additional studies involving oral reading of nouns and of functors also resulted in improved reading of trained words. Pseudowords could not be trained to criterion. The results suggest that improved reading can be achieved in pure alexia by pairing rapidly presented words with feedback. Focusing on semantic processing is not essential to this process. It is proposed that the training strengthens connections between the output of visual processing and preexisting orthographic representations.

  20. Rapid identification of mycobacteria to the species level by polymerase chain reaction and restriction enzyme analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Telenti, A; Marchesi, F; Balz, M; Bally, F; Böttger, E C; Bodmer, T

    1993-01-01

    A method for the rapid identification of mycobacteria to the species level was developed on the basis of evaluation by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of the gene encoding for the 65-kDa protein. The method involves restriction enzyme analysis of PCR products obtained with primers common to all mycobacteria. Using two restriction enzymes, BstEII and HaeIII, medically relevant and other frequent laboratory isolates were differentiated to the species or subspecies level by PCR-restriction enzyme pattern analysis. PCR-restriction enzyme pattern analysis was performed on isolates (n = 330) from solid and fluid culture media, including BACTEC, or from frozen and lyophilized stocks. The procedure does not involve hybridization steps or the use of radioactivity and can be completed within 1 working day. Images PMID:8381805

  1. Rapid identification of Escherichia coli from urine by using Fluorocult media.

    PubMed

    Mori, T; Takahashi, H; Maehata, E; Naka, H

    1991-01-01

    For rapid identification of Escherichia coli, we evaluated Fluorocult MacConkey Agar, Fluorocult Laurylsulfate Broth and Bactident E. coli, which are incorporating fluorogenic substrate, MUG (4-methylumbeliferyl-beta-D-Glucuronide) that specifically reacts with E. coli. To assess the specificity and sensitivity of Fluorocult MacConkey Agar and Laurylsulfate Broth, beta-D-glucuronidase; beta-GUR activities of 264 strains from urine including 72 of E. coli were investigated. For both media, sensitivity was 92% and specificity was 100%. When there was 10(8) c.f.u./ml of E. coli in urine specimen, incubation times required for positive fluorescence by Fluorocult MacConkey Agar, Laurylsulfate Broth, and Bactident E. coli were 8 h, 4 h and 15 min, respectively. Influence of drugs in urine to fluorescence reaction was not observed.

  2. Rapid Identification of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) by the Vitek MS Saramis system.

    PubMed

    Shan, Weiguang; Li, Jiaping; Fang, Ying; Wang, Xuan; Gu, Danxia; Zhang, Rong

    2016-01-01

    A rapid, sensitive, and accurate Vitek MS assay was developed to distinguish clinical isolates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) from clinical isolates of methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) by developing an in-house knowledgebase of SuperSpectra. Three unique peaks, including peaks at 2305.6 and 3007.3 Da specific to MRSA, and 6816.7 Da specific to MSSA, were selected for differentiating MRSA and MSSA. This assay accurately identified 84 and 91% of clinical MRSA and MSSA strains out of the total 142 clinically acquired S. aureus strains that were tested. This method will greatly improve the efficiency of single clinical sample identification of MRSA, thereby facilitating a reduction in the transmission of MRSA in clinical settings.

  3. Catheter-related Mycobacterium fortuitum bloodstream infection: rapid identification using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Artacho-Reinoso, M J; Olbrich, P; Solano-Paéz, P; Ybot-Gonzalez, P; Lepe, J A; Neth, O; Aznar, J

    2014-04-01

    We present the case of a 6-year-old boy diagnosed with stage III mediastinal Non Hodgkin Lymphoblastic T cell Lymphoma who suffered from catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBI) due to Mycobacterium fortuitum whilst receiving chemotherapy. Isolation of this rare pathogen was done directly from blood culture and identification was made rapidly within 48 h using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectro-metry as well as specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-reverse hybridization method. This allowed prompt directed antibiotic therapy apart from central venous catheter removal and resulted in an excellent clinical response. This case highlights the potential benefit of using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, a fast, cost-effective and precise methodology, in the diagnosis and subsequent management of invasive bacterial infection.

  4. Rapid Detection and Identification of a Pathogen's DNA Using Phi29 DNA Polymerase

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Y.; Dunn, J.; Gao, S.; Bruno, J. F.; Luft, B. J.

    2008-10-31

    Zoonotic pathogens including those transmitted by insect vectors are some of the most deadly of all infectious diseases known to mankind. A number of these agents have been further weaponized and are widely recognized as being potentially significant biothreat agents. We describe a novel method based on multiply-primed rolling circle in vitro amplification for profiling genomic DNAs to permit rapid, cultivation-free differential detection and identification of circular plasmids in infectious agents. Using Phi29 DNA polymerase and a two-step priming reaction we could reproducibly detect and characterize by DNA sequencing circular DNA from Borrelia burgdorferi B31 in DNA samples containing as little as 25 pg of Borrelia DNA amongst a vast excess of human DNA. This simple technology can ultimately be adapted as a sensitive method to detect specific DNA from both known and unknown pathogens in a wide variety of complex environments.

  5. [Rapid Identification of Fresh-cut and Sulphur Fumigation Processed Fritillaria thunbergii Bulb Slices Based on Near-infrared Spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Du, Wei-feng; Zhang, Yan-xin; Zhang, Hao; Jiang, Dong-jing; Ge, Wei-hong; Liu, Zhong-da

    2014-12-01

    A rapid identification model of the fresh-cut and sulphur fumigation processed Fritillaria thunbergii bulb slices was developed by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIR) with chemometrics method. 186 batches of Fritillaria thunbergii bulb slices were collected from the two main producing areas Ningbo and Pan'an in Zhejiang Province, and the near-infrared spectrums were gathered to establish the qualitative identification model by discriminant analysis. The identification model was developed by choosing the spectrum of 9,881.46-4,119.20 cm(-1) and "MSC + spectrum + Ns" to the original spectral preprocessing, and then was verified by prediction set, with 100% identify accuracy. The rapid identification model of the fresh-cut and sulphur fumigation processed Fritillaria thunbergii bulb slices by NIR is feasible and efficient.

  6. Evaluation of three rapid diagnostic methods for direct identification of microorganisms in positive blood cultures.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Raquel M; Bauerle, Elizabeth R; Fang, Ferric C; Butler-Wu, Susan M

    2014-07-01

    The identification of organisms from positive blood cultures generally takes several days. However, recently developed rapid diagnostic methods offer the potential for organism identification within only a few hours of blood culture positivity. In this study, we evaluated the performance of three commercial methods to rapidly identify organisms directly from positive blood cultures: QuickFISH (AdvanDx, Wolburn, MA), Verigene Gram-Positive Blood Culture (BC-GP; Nanosphere, Northbrook, IL), and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) with Sepsityper processing (Bruker Daltonics, Billerica, MA). A total of 159 blood cultures (VersaTREK Trek Diagnostic Systems, Cleveland, OH) positive for Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria as well as yeast were analyzed with QuickFISH and MALDI-TOF MS. In all, 102 blood cultures were analyzed using the BC-GP assay. For monomicrobial cultures, we observed 98.0% concordance with routine methods for both QuickFISH (143/146) and the BC-GP assay (93/95). MALDI-TOF MS demonstrated 80.1% (117/146) and 87.7% (128/146) concordance with routine methods to the genus and species levels, respectively. None of the methods tested were capable of consistently identifying polymicrobial cultures in their entirety or reliably differentiating Streptococcus pneumoniae from viridans streptococci. Nevertheless, the methods evaluated in this study are convenient and accurate for the most commonly encountered pathogens and have the potential to dramatically reduce turnaround time for the provision of results to the treating physician.

  7. Rapid direct identification of Cryptococcus neoformans from pigeon droppings by nested PCR using CNLAC1 gene.

    PubMed

    Chae, H S; Park, G N; Kim, S H; Jo, H J; Kim, J T; Jeoung, H Y; An, D J; Kim, N H; Shin, B W; Kang, Y I; Chang, K S

    2012-08-01

    Isolation and identification of Cryptococcus neoformans and pathogenic yeast-like fungi from pigeon droppings has been taken for a long time and requires various nutrients for its growth. In this study, we attempted to establish a rapid direct identification method of Cr. neoformans from pigeon dropping samples by nested-PCR using internal transcribed spacer (ITS) CAP64 and CNLAC1 genes, polysaccharide capsule gene and laccase-associated gene to produce melanin pigment, respectively, which are common genes of yeasts. The ITS and CAP64 genes were amplified in all pathogenic yeasts, but CNLAC1 was amplified only in Cr. neoformans. The ITS gene was useful for yeast genotyping depending on nucleotide sequence. Homology of CAP64 genes among the yeasts were very high. The specificity of PCR using CNLAC1 was demonstrated in Cr. neoformans environmental strains but not in other yeast-like fungi. The CNLAC1 gene was detected in 5 serotypes of Cr. neoformans. The nested-PCR amplified up to 10(-11) μg of the genomic DNA and showed high sensitivity. All pigeon droppings among 31 Cr. neoformans-positive samples were positive and all pigeon droppings among 348 Cr. neoformans-negative samples were negative by the direct nested-PCR. In addition, after primary enrichment of pigeon droppings in Sabouraud dextrose broth, all Cr. neoformans-negative samples were negative by the nested-PCR, which showed high specificity. The nested-PCR showed high sensitivity without culture of pigeon droppings. Nested-PCR using CNLAC1 provides a rapid and reliable molecular diagnostic method to overcome weak points such as long culture time of many conventional methods.

  8. Application of a multiplex suspension array for rapid and simultaneous identification of clinically important mold pathogens.

    PubMed

    Liao, Mei-Hui; Lin, Jeng-Fong; Li, Shu-Ying

    2012-10-01

    We have developed a microsphere-based suspension array (MSA) for the identification of 23 medically important mold pathogens including Aspergillus spp., Fusarium spp., Mucor spp., Rhizopus spp., Rhizomucor pusillus, Penicillium marneffei, Saksenaea vasiformis, Apophysomyces elegans, Lichtheimia corymbifer, and Syncephalastrum racemosum. Twenty-one oligonucleotide probes were designed based on the internal transcribed spacer (ITS2) region for species level identification of molds. Among the 21 probes, 2 probes are shared by more than one species due to low or absence of sequence variability, i.e. Rpam for Rhizopus azygosporus/Rhizopus microsporus and Fumop for Fusarium moniliforme/Fusarium oxysporum/Fusarium pallidoroseum. No cross reactivity was identified except for probes of Mucor racemosus (Murac) which cross react with Mucor hiemalis and Mucor ramosissimus. The sensitivity of MSA is 100 fg-1 ng. The whole procedure including DNA extraction and PCR amplification can be finished within 5 h. The MSA is simple, rapid, specific, high-throughput and capable of multiple-species detection in one reaction tube. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Rapid Intrinsic Fluorescence Method for Direct Identification of Pathogens in Blood Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, John D.; Hyman, Jay M.; Borzhemskaya, Larisa; Bowen, Ann; McKellar, Caroline; Ullery, Michael; Mathias, Erin; Ronsick, Christopher; Link, John; Wilson, Mark; Clay, Bradford; Robinson, Ron; Thorpe, Thurman; van Belkum, Alex; Dunne, W. Michael

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT A positive blood culture is a critical result that requires prompt identification of the causative agent. This article describes a simple method to identify microorganisms from positive blood culture broth within the time taken to perform a Gram stain (<20 min). The method is based on intrinsic fluorescence spectroscopy (IFS) of whole cells and required development of a selective lysis buffer, aqueous density cushion, optical microcentrifuge tube, and reference database. A total of 1,121 monomicrobial-positive broth samples from 751 strains were analyzed to build a database representing 37 of the most commonly encountered species in bloodstream infections or present as contaminants. A multistage algorithm correctly classified 99.6% of unknown samples to the Gram level, 99.3% to the family level, and 96.5% to the species level. There were no incorrect results given at the Gram or family classification levels, while 0.8% of results were discordant at the species level. In 8/9 incorrect species results, the misidentified isolate was assigned to a species of the same genus. This unique combination of selective lysis, density centrifugation, and IFS can rapidly identify the most common microbial species present in positive blood cultures. Faster identification of the etiologic agent may benefit the clinical management of sepsis. Further evaluation is now warranted to determine the performance of the method using clinical blood culture specimens. PMID:24255123

  10. Performance of chromogenic media for Candida in rapid presumptive identification of Candida species from clinical materials

    PubMed Central

    Pravin Charles, M. V.; Kali, Arunava; Joseph, Noyal Mariya

    2015-01-01

    Background: In perspective of the worldwide increase in a number of immunocompromised patients, the need for identification of Candida species has become a major concern. The development of chromogenic differential media, introduced recently, facilitate rapid speciation. However, it can be employed for routine mycology workup only after an exhaustive evaluation of its benefit and cost effectiveness. This study was undertaken to evaluate the benefit and cost effectiveness of chromogenic media for speciation of Candida clinical isolates. Materials and Methods: Sputum samples of 382 patients were screened for the presence of Candida spp. by Gram stain and culture on sabouraud dextrose agar. Candida species were identified using Gram stain morphology, germ tube formation, cornmeal agar with Tween-80, sugar fermentation tests and morphology on HiCrome Candida differential agar. All the Candida isolates were inoculated on HiCrome Candida agar (HiMedia, Mumbai, India). Results: The sensitivity and specificity of HiCrome agar for identification of Candida albicans were 90% and 96.42%, respectively whereas sensitivity and specificity of carbohydrate fermentation test were 86.67% and 74.07%, respectively. Sensitivity and specificity values of HiCrome agar for detection of C. albicans, Candida parapsilosis and Candida glabrata were above 90%. Conclusions: We found HiCrome agar has high sensitivity and specificity comparable to that of the conventional method. In addition, use of this differential media could significantly cut down the turnaround time as well as cost of sample processing. PMID:26109791

  11. Evaluation of Fluorescent Capillary Electrophoresis for Rapid Identification of Candida Fungal Infections

    PubMed Central

    Obručová, Hana; Tihelková, Radka; Kotásková, Iva; Růžička, Filip; Holá, Veronika; Němcová, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Early diagnosis of fungal infection is critical for initiating antifungal therapy and reducing the high mortality rate in immunocompromised patients. In this study, we focused on rapid and sensitive identification of clinically important Candida species, utilizing the variability in the length of the ITS2 rRNA gene and fluorescent capillary electrophoresis (f-ITS2-PCR-CE). The method was developed and optimized on 29 various Candida reference strains from which 26 Candida species were clearly identified, while Candida guilliermondii, C. fermentati, and C. carpophila, which are closely related, could not be distinguished. The method was subsequently validated on 143 blinded monofungal clinical isolates (comprising 26 species) and was able to identify 88% of species unambiguously. This indicated a higher resolution power than the classical phenotypic approach which correctly identified 73%. Finally, the culture-independent potential of this technique was addressed by the analysis of 55 retrospective DNA samples extracted directly from clinical material. The method showed 100% sensitivity and specificity compared to those of the combined results of cultivation and panfungal PCR followed by sequencing used as a gold standard. In conclusion, this newly developed f-ITS2-PCR-CE analytical approach was shown to be a fast, sensitive, and highly reproducible tool for both culture-dependent and culture-independent identification of clinically important Candida strains, including species of the “psilosis” complex. PMID:26935732

  12. Evaluation of Fluorescent Capillary Electrophoresis for Rapid Identification of Candida Fungal Infections.

    PubMed

    Obručová, Hana; Tihelková, Radka; Kotásková, Iva; Růžička, Filip; Holá, Veronika; Němcová, Eva; Freiberger, Tomáš

    2016-05-01

    Early diagnosis of fungal infection is critical for initiating antifungal therapy and reducing the high mortality rate in immunocompromised patients. In this study, we focused on rapid and sensitive identification of clinically important Candida species, utilizing the variability in the length of the ITS2 rRNA gene and fluorescent capillary electrophoresis (f-ITS2-PCR-CE). The method was developed and optimized on 29 various Candida reference strains from which 26 Candida species were clearly identified, while Candida guilliermondii, C. fermentati, and C. carpophila, which are closely related, could not be distinguished. The method was subsequently validated on 143 blinded monofungal clinical isolates (comprising 26 species) and was able to identify 88% of species unambiguously. This indicated a higher resolution power than the classical phenotypic approach which correctly identified 73%. Finally, the culture-independent potential of this technique was addressed by the analysis of 55 retrospective DNA samples extracted directly from clinical material. The method showed 100% sensitivity and specificity compared to those of the combined results of cultivation and panfungal PCR followed by sequencing used as a gold standard. In conclusion, this newly developed f-ITS2-PCR-CE analytical approach was shown to be a fast, sensitive, and highly reproducible tool for both culture-dependent and culture-independent identification of clinically important Candida strains, including species of the "psilosis" complex. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  13. Development of species-specific primers for rapid identification of Debaryomyces hansenii.

    PubMed

    Wrent, Petra; Rivas, Eva-María; Gil de Prado, Elena; Peinado, José M; de Silóniz, María-Isabel

    2015-01-16

    In this work, we developed a specific PCR assay for Debaryomyces hansenii strains that uses a putative homologous PAD1 region (729 bp) present in this yeast species as a target. The amplification of this sequence with the D. hansenii specific primer pair (DhPADF/DhPADR) was found to be a rapid, specific and an affordable method enabling identification of D. hansenii from other yeast strains. Primers were tested in almost 100 strains, 49 strains from Type Culture Collection belonging to the genus Debaryomyces and to other yeast species commonly found in foods or related genera. These primers were able to discriminate between closely related species of Debaryomyces, such as Debaryomyces fabryi and Debaryomyces subglobosus, with a 100% detection rate for D. hansenii. Also, the method was tested in 45 strains from different foods. Results confirmed the specificity of the PCR method and detected two earlier misidentifications of D. hansenii strains obtained by RFLP analysis of the 5.8S ITS rDNA region. Subsequently we confirmed by sequencing the D1/D2 domain of 26S rDNA that these strains belonged to D. fabryi. We call attention in this work to the fact that the RFLPs of the 5.8S ITS rDNA profiles of D. hansenii, D. fabryi and D. subglobosus are the same and this technique will thus lead to incorrect identifications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Development of a rapid identification method for potato cytoplasm and its use for evaluating Japanese collections.

    PubMed

    Hosaka, Kazuyoshi; Sanetomo, Rena

    2012-10-01

    The cytoplasm of potatoes, characterized by the presence of T-type chloroplast DNA and β-type mitochondrial DNA, is sensitive to nuclear chromosomal genes that contribute to various types of male sterility. Past breeding efforts with various potato varieties have resulted in several different cytoplasms other than T/β. Varieties with Solanum stoloniferum-derived cytoplasm (W/γ) show complete male sterility, while those with S. demissum-derived cytoplasm (W/α) produce abundant, but non-functional pollen. Thus, identification of cytoplasmic types is important for designing efficient mating combinations. To date, only T-type chloroplast DNA can be accurately identified by a PCR marker. Here, we report a rapid identification technique by multiplex PCR, followed by restriction digestion with BamHI in one reaction tube, and propose a new nomenclature for potato cytoplasm types (T, D, P, A, M, and W). Using this new technique, our collections of 748 genotypes, including 84 Japanese named varieties, 378 breeding lines and 26 landraces, and 260 foreign varieties and breeding lines, were grouped into cytoplasm types: T (73.9 %), D (17.4 %), P (4.5 %), A (1.5 %), M (0.3 %), and W (2.4 %). The utility of this marker system for breeding is discussed.

  15. A SCAR-based method for rapid identification of four major lepidopterous stored-product pests.

    PubMed

    Yao, Me-Chi; Chang, Shu-Chen; Lee, Chi-Yang; Lu, Kuang-Hui

    2012-06-01

    Since Taiwan became a World Trade Organization member in 2002, large quantities of grain have been imported from different countries, and insect pests are frequently intercepted from these imported commodities in quarantine inspection. Because most insects are intercepted as immature forms, morphological identification is problematic; therefore, we developed a DNA identification method based on a sequence-characterized amplified region- polymerase chain reaction (SCAR-PCR). Three sets of multiplex SCAR-PCR mixtures, namely SCAR-I, -II, and -III, were developed with each set composed of four species-specific primer pairs derived from the genomic DNA of four major lepidopterous stored-product pests: Corcyra cephalonica (Stainton), Cadra cautella (Walker), Sitotroga cerealella Oliver, and Plodia interpunctella (Hübner). The SCAR-I amplicons of C. cephalonica, C. cautella, S. cerealella, and P. interpunctella were 205, 550, 324, 382 bp, respectively, while those of SCAR-II were 341, 565, 261, and 170 bp, and those of SCAR-III were 514, 555, 445, and 299 bp. These multiplex PCR mixtures could sensitively and unambiguously detect and identify in approximately 5 h individuals among the four lepidopterous pests intercepted in imported stored-products. In summary, the SCAR-PCR method we developed represents a rapid, sensitive and accurate technique for identifying insect species of stored products in plant quarantine operation.

  16. Beacon-based (bbFISH®) technology for rapid pathogens identification in blood cultures.

    PubMed

    Sakarikou, Christina; Parisato, Martina; Lo Cascio, Giuliana; Fontana, Carla

    2014-04-22

    Diagnosis and treatment of bloodstream infections (BSI) are often hampered by the delay in obtaining the final results of blood cultures. Rapid identification of pathogens involved in BSI is of great importance in order to improve survival of septic patients. Beacon-based fluorescent in situ hybridization (hemoFISH® Gram positive and hemoFISH® Gram negative test kits, miacom diagnostics GmbH Düsseldorf, Germany) accelerates the identification of most frequent bacterial pathogens of sepsis. In this study a total of 558 blood culture (377 blood culture positive and 181 negative) were tested with the hemoFISH® method and the results were evaluated in comparison with the traditional culture based methods. The overall sensitivity and specificity of the hemoFISH® tests were 94.16% and 100%, while, the PPV and NPV were 100 and 89.16%, respectively. As the hemoFISH® results were obtained within 45 mins, the time difference between the final results of the traditional culture method and the hemoFISH® assay was about two days. Considering the good sensitivity and specificity of the hemoFISH® assays as well as the significant time saving in obtaining the final results (p-value 0.0001), the introduction of the system could be rialable in the microbiology laboratories, even alongside the traditional systems.

  17. Rapid and high throughput molecular identification of diverse mosquito species by high resolution melting analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ajamma, Yvonne Ukamaka; Mararo, Enock; Omondi, David; Onchuru, Thomas; Muigai, Anne W. T.; Masiga, Daniel; Villinger, Jandouwe

    2016-01-01

    -species. This approach can be employed for rapid identification of mosquitoes. PMID:27703667

  18. Rapid and high throughput molecular identification of diverse mosquito species by high resolution melting analysis.

    PubMed

    Ajamma, Yvonne Ukamaka; Mararo, Enock; Omondi, David; Onchuru, Thomas; Muigai, Anne W T; Masiga, Daniel; Villinger, Jandouwe

    2016-01-01

    -species. This approach can be employed for rapid identification of mosquitoes.

  19. Improved protocol for rapid identification of certain spa types using high resolution melting curve analysis.

    PubMed

    Mayerhofer, Benjamin; Stöger, Anna; Pietzka, Ariane T; Fernandez, Haizpea Lasa; Prewein, Bernhard; Sorschag, Sieglinde; Kunert, Renate; Allerberger, Franz; Ruppitsch, Werner

    2015-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most significant pathogens associated with health care. For efficient surveillance, control and outbreak investigation, S. aureus typing is essential. A high resolution melting curve analysis was developed and evaluated for rapid identification of the most frequent spa types found in an Austrian hospital consortium covering 2,435 beds. Among 557 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates 38 different spa types were identified by sequence analysis of the hypervariable region X of the protein A gene (spa). Identification of spa types through their characteristic high resolution melting curve profiles was considerably improved by double spiking with genomic DNA from spa type t030 and spa type t003 and allowed unambiguous and fast identification of the ten most frequent spa types t001 (58%), t003 (12%), t190 (9%), t041 (5%), t022 (2%), t032 (2%), t008 (2%), t002 (1%), t5712 (1%) and t2203 (1%), representing 93% of all isolates within this hospital consortium. The performance of the assay was evaluated by testing samples with unknown spa types from the daily routine and by testing three different high resolution melting curve analysis real-time PCR instruments. The ten most frequent spa types were identified from all samples and on all instruments with 100% specificity and 100% sensitivity. Compared to classical spa typing by sequence analysis, this gene scanning assay is faster, cheaper and can be performed in a single closed tube assay format. Therefore it is an optimal screening tool to detect the most frequent endemic spa types and to exclude non-endemic spa types within a hospital.

  20. Improved Protocol for Rapid Identification of Certain Spa Types Using High Resolution Melting Curve Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mayerhofer, Benjamin; Stöger, Anna; Pietzka, Ariane T.; Fernandez, Haizpea Lasa; Prewein, Bernhard; Sorschag, Sieglinde; Kunert, Renate; Allerberger, Franz; Ruppitsch, Werner

    2015-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most significant pathogens associated with health care. For efficient surveillance, control and outbreak investigation, S. aureus typing is essential. A high resolution melting curve analysis was developed and evaluated for rapid identification of the most frequent spa types found in an Austrian hospital consortium covering 2,435 beds. Among 557 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates 38 different spa types were identified by sequence analysis of the hypervariable region X of the protein A gene (spa). Identification of spa types through their characteristic high resolution melting curve profiles was considerably improved by double spiking with genomic DNA from spa type t030 and spa type t003 and allowed unambiguous and fast identification of the ten most frequent spa types t001 (58%), t003 (12%), t190 (9%), t041 (5%), t022 (2%), t032 (2%), t008 (2%), t002 (1%), t5712 (1%) and t2203 (1%), representing 93% of all isolates within this hospital consortium. The performance of the assay was evaluated by testing samples with unknown spa types from the daily routine and by testing three different high resolution melting curve analysis real-time PCR instruments. The ten most frequent spa types were identified from all samples and on all instruments with 100% specificity and 100% sensitivity. Compared to classical spa typing by sequence analysis, this gene scanning assay is faster, cheaper and can be performed in a single closed tube assay format. Therefore it is an optimal screening tool to detect the most frequent endemic spa types and to exclude non-endemic spa types within a hospital. PMID:25768007

  1. Identification of GBF1 as a Cellular Factor Required for Hepatitis C Virus RNA Replication▿

    PubMed Central

    Goueslain, Lucie; Alsaleh, Khaled; Horellou, Pauline; Roingeard, Philippe; Descamps, Véronique; Duverlie, Gilles; Ciczora, Yann; Wychowski, Czeslaw; Dubuisson, Jean; Rouillé, Yves

    2010-01-01

    In infected cells, hepatitis C virus (HCV) induces the formation of membrane alterations referred to as membranous webs, which are sites of RNA replication. In addition, HCV RNA replication also occurs in smaller membrane structures that are associated with the endoplasmic reticulum. However, cellular mechanisms involved in the formation of HCV replication complexes remain largely unknown. Here, we used brefeldin A (BFA) to investigate cellular mechanisms involved in HCV infection. BFA acts on cell membranes by interfering with the activation of several members of the family of ADP-ribosylation factors (ARF), which can lead to a wide range of inhibitory actions on membrane-associated mechanisms of the secretory and endocytic pathways. Our data show that HCV RNA replication is highly sensitive to BFA. Individual knockdown of the cellular targets of BFA using RNA interference and the use of a specific pharmacological inhibitor identified GBF1, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for small GTPases of the ARF family, as a host factor critically involved in HCV replication. Furthermore, overexpression of a BFA-resistant GBF1 mutant rescued HCV replication in BFA-treated cells, indicating that GBF1 is the BFA-sensitive factor required for HCV replication. Finally, immunofluorescence and electron microscopy analyses indicated that BFA does not block the formation of membranous web-like structures induced by expression of HCV proteins in a nonreplicative context, suggesting that GBF1 is probably involved not in the formation of HCV replication complexes but, rather, in their activity. Altogether, our results highlight a functional connection between the early secretory pathway and HCV RNA replication. PMID:19906930

  2. Rapid identification and source-tracking of Listeria monocytogenes using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jadhav, Snehal; Gulati, Vandana; Fox, Edward M; Karpe, Avinash; Beale, David J; Sevior, Danielle; Bhave, Mrinal; Palombo, Enzo A

    2015-06-02

    Listeria monocytogenes is an important foodborne pathogen responsible for the sometimes fatal disease listeriosis. Public health concerns and stringent regulations associated with the presence of this pathogen in food and food processing environments underline the need for rapid and reliable detection and subtyping techniques. In the current study, the application of matrix assisted laser desorption/ionisation-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) as a single identification and source-tracking tool for a collection of L. monocytogenes isolates, obtained predominantly from dairy sources within Australia, was explored. The isolates were cultured on different growth media and analysed using MALDI-TOF MS at two incubation times (24 and 48 h). Whilst reliable genus-level identification was achieved from most media, identification at the species level was found to be dependent on culture conditions. Successful speciation was highest for isolates cultured on the chromogenic Agar Listeria Ottaviani Agosti agar (ALOA, 91% of isolates) and non-selective horse blood agar (HBA, 89%) for 24h. Chemometric statistical analysis of the MALDI-TOF MS data enabled source-tracking of L. monocytogenes isolates obtained from four different dairy sources. Strain-level discrimination was also observed to be influenced by culture conditions. In addition, t-test/analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to identify potential biomarker peaks that differentiated the isolates according to their source of isolation. Source-tracking using MALDI-TOF MS was compared and correlated with the gold standard pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) technique. The discriminatory index and the congruence between both techniques were compared using the Simpsons Diversity Index and adjusted Rand and Wallace coefficients. Overall, MALDI-TOF MS based source-tracking (using data obtained by culturing the isolates on HBA) and PFGE demonstrated good congruence with a Wallace coefficient of 0.71 and

  3. Species-specific PCR primers for the rapid identification of yeasts of the genus Zygosaccharomyces.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Elizabeth; Muir, Alastair; Stratford, Malcolm; Wheals, Alan

    2011-06-01

    Species-specific primer pairs that produce a single band of known product size have been developed for members of the Zygosaccharomyces clade including Zygosaccharomyces bailii, Zygosaccharomyces bisporus, Zygosaccharomyces kombuchaensis, Zygosaccharomyces lentus, Zygosaccharomyces machadoi, Zygosaccharomyces mellis and Zygosaccharomyces rouxii. An existing primer pair for the provisional new species Zygosaccharomyces pseudorouxii has been confirmed as specific. The HIS3 gene, encoding imidazole-glycerolphosphate dehydratase, was used as the target gene. This housekeeping gene evolves slowly and is thus well conserved among different isolates, but shows a significant number of base pair changes between even closely related species, sufficient for species-specific primer design. The primers were tested on type and wild strains of the genus Zygosaccharomyces and on members of the Saccharomycetaceae. Sequencing of the D1/D2 region of rDNA was used to confirm the identification of all nonculture collection isolates. This approach used extracted genomic DNA, but in practice, it can be used efficiently with a rapid colony PCR protocol. The method also successfully detected known and new hybrid strains of Z. rouxii and Z. pseudorouxii. The method is rapid, robust and inexpensive. It requires little expertise by the user and is thus useful for preliminary, large-scale screens.

  4. Rapid and field-deployable biological and chemical Raman-based identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botonjic-Sehic, Edita; Paxon, Tracy L.; Boudries, Hacene

    2011-06-01

    Pathogen detection using Raman spectroscopy is achieved through the use of a sandwich immunoassay. Antibody-modified magnetic beads are used to capture and concentrate target analytes in solution and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) tags are conjugated with antibodies and act as labels to enable specific detection of biological pathogens. The rapid detection of biological pathogens is critical to first responders, thus assays to detect E.Coli and Anthrax have been developed and will be reported. The problems associated with pathogen detection resulting from the spectral complexity and variability of microorganisms are overcome through the use of SERS tags, which provide an intense, easily recognizable, and spectrally consistent Raman signal. The developed E. coli assay has been tested with 5 strains of E. coli and shows a low limit of detection, on the order of 10 and 100 c.f.u. per assay. Additionally, the SERS assay utilizes magnetic beads to collect the labeled pathogens into the focal point of the detection laser beam, making the assay robust to commonly encountered white powder interferants such as flour, baking powder, and corn starch. The reagents were also found to be stable at room temperature over extended periods of time with testing conducted over a one year period. Finally, through a specialized software algorithm, the assays are interfaced to the Raman instrument, StreetLab Mobile, for rapid-field-deployable biological identification.

  5. Rapid detection and identification of four major Schistosoma species by high-resolution melt (HRM) analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Juan; Zhao, Guang-Hui; Lin, RuiQing; Blair, David; Sugiyama, Hiromu; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2015-11-01

    Schistosomiasis, caused by blood flukes belonging to several species of the genus Schistosoma, is a serious and widespread parasitic disease. Accurate and rapid differentiation of these etiological agents of animal and human schistosomiasis to species level can be difficult. We report a real-time PCR assay coupled with a high-resolution melt (HRM) assay targeting a portion of the nuclear 18S rDNA to detect, identify, and distinguish between four major blood fluke species (Schistosoma japonicum, Schistosoma mansoni, Schistosoma haematobium, and Schistosoma mekongi). Using this system, the Schistosoma spp. was accurately identified and could also be distinguished from all other trematode species with which they were compared. As little as 10(-5) ng genomic DNA from a Schistosoma sp. could be detected. This process is inexpensive, easy, and can be completed within 3 h. Examination of 21 representative Schistosoma samples from 15 geographical localities in seven endemic countries validated the value of the HRM detection assay and proved its reliability. The melting curves were characterized by peaks of 83.65 °C for S. japonicum and S. mekongi, 85.65 °C for S. mansoni, and 85.85 °C for S. haematobium. The present study developed a real-time PCR coupled with HRM analysis assay for detection and differential identification of S. mansoni, S. haematobium, S. japonicum, and S. mekongi. This method is rapid, sensitive, and inexpensive. It has important implications for epidemiological studies of Schistosoma.

  6. Rapid and reliable detection and identification of GM events using multiplex PCR coupled with oligonucleotide microarray.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaodan; Li, Yingcong; Zhao, Heng; Wen, Si-yuan; Wang, Sheng-qi; Huang, Jian; Huang, Kun-lun; Luo, Yun-bo

    2005-05-18

    To devise a rapid and reliable method for the detection and identification of genetically modified (GM) events, we developed a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) coupled with a DNA microarray system simultaneously aiming at many targets in a single reaction. The system included probes for screening gene, species reference gene, specific gene, construct-specific gene, event-specific gene, and internal and negative control genes. 18S rRNA was combined with species reference genes as internal controls to assess the efficiency of all reactions and to eliminate false negatives. Two sets of the multiplex PCR system were used to amplify four and five targets, respectively. Eight different structure genes could be detected and identified simultaneously for Roundup Ready soybean in a single microarray. The microarray specificity was validated by its ability to discriminate two GM maizes Bt176 and Bt11. The advantages of this method are its high specificity and greatly reduced false-positives and -negatives. The multiplex PCR coupled with microarray technology presented here is a rapid and reliable tool for the simultaneous detection of GM organism ingredients.

  7. Phylogeny-Based Rapid Identification of Mycoplasmas and Ureaplasmas from Urethritis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Takashi; Maeda, Shin-Ichi; Deguchi, Takashi; Ishiko, Hiroaki

    2002-01-01

    Some strains of mycoplasmas and ureaplasmas (family Mycoplasmataceae) are associated with nongonococcal urethritis (NGU) or other genitourinary infections. We have developed a rapid and reliable method of identifying the presence and prevalence of mycoplasmas and ureaplasmas in men with NGU. This method is based on the amplification of a part of the 16S rRNA gene by PCR and phylogenetic analysis. A portion of the 16S rRNA gene from 15 prototype strains was amplified with a set of common primers, and their nucleotides were sequenced. The nucleotide sequence of the V4 and V5 regions was analyzed by the neighbor-joining method. The 15 prototype strains were grouped into three distinct clusters, allowing us to clearly segregate the strains into distinct lineages. To determine the prevalence of these pathogens among patients with NGU, this protocol was tested with 148 urine samples. Amplifications were observed for 42 samples, and their nucleotide sequences were analyzed along with those of the 15 prototype strains. The phylogenetic tree thus constructed indicated that 15 of the 42 formed a cluster with Mycoplasma genitalium. Among the remaining specimens, 2 formed a cluster with Mycoplasma hominis, 19 with Ureaplasma urealyticum, and 5 with Ureaplasma parvum; the remaining sample contained both M. genitalium and U. urealyticum. This phylogeny-based identification of mycoplasmas and ureaplasmas provides not only a powerful tool for rapid diagnosis but also the basis for etiological studies of these pathogens. PMID:11773101

  8. [Evaluation of Prolex for the rapid identification of streptococci isolated in medical microbiology].

    PubMed

    Loubinoux, J; Mihaila-Amrouche, L; Bouvet, A

    2004-10-01

    The need to rapidly identify streptococci responsible for acute infectious diseases has led to the development of agglutination techniques that are able to identify streptococcal group antigens (A, B, C, D, F, and G) directly from primoculture colonies on blood agar. The Prolex agglutination tests (Pro-Lab Diagnostics, Richmond Hill, Ontario, Canada), distributed in France by i2a, have been used for the determination of group antigens of 166 isolates of streptococci and enterococci previously identified in the National Reference Center for Streptococci. The results obtained with the Prolex reagents have permitted to correctly identify all pyogenic beta-hemolytic streptococci (23 Streptococcus pyogenes, 21 Streptococcus agalactiae, 33 Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis including 6 group C and 27 group G, and 5 Streptococcus porcinus including 4 group B). Four differences between unexpected agglutinations (A or F) and species identifications have been obtained. These differences were observed for four non-hemolytic isolates of Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus gordonii, Streptococcus infantarius, and Streptococcus suis. The anti-D reagent has been of value as a marker for isolates of enterococci. Thus, these results confirm the abilities of these agglutination tests for the grouping of beta-hemolytic streptococci. Moreover, the use of Prolex has the advantage to be rapid because of the non-enzymatic but chemical extraction of streptococcal antigens.

  9. Rapid identification of marine bioluminescent bacteria by amplified 16S ribosomal RNA gene restriction analysis.

    PubMed

    Kita-Tsukamoto, Kumiko; Wada, Minoru; Yao, Katomi; Kamiya, Akiko; Yoshizawa, Susumu; Uchiyama, Nami; Kogure, Kazuhiro

    2006-03-01

    To rapidly identify natural isolates of marine bioluminescent bacteria, we developed amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA) methods. ARDRA, which is based on the restriction patterns of 16S rRNA gene digested with five enzymes (EcoRI, DdeI, HhaI, HinfI, RsaI), clearly distinguished the 14 species of marine bioluminescent bacteria currently known, which belong to the genera Vibrio, Photobacterium, and Shewanella. When we applied ARDRA to 129 natural isolates from two cruises in Sagami Bay, Japan, 127 were grouped into six ARDRA types with distinctive restriction patterns; these isolates represented the bioluminescent species, P. angustum, P. leiognathi, P. phosphoreum, S. woodyi, V. fischeri, and V. harveyi. The other two isolates showing unexpected ARDRA patterns turned out to have 16S rRNA gene sequences similar to P. leiognathi and P. phosphoreum. Nevertheless, ARDRA provides a simple and fairly robust means for rapid identification of the natural isolates of marine bioluminescent bacteria, and is therefore useful in studying their diversity.

  10. Rapid Identification of Antifungal Compounds against Exserohilum rostratum Using High Throughput Drug Repurposing Screens

    PubMed Central

    Sugui, Janyce A.; Fothergill, Annette; Southall, Noel; Shinn, Paul; McKew, John C.; Kwon-Chung, Kyung J.; Zheng, Wei; Williamson, Peter R.

    2013-01-01

    A recent large outbreak of fungal infections by Exserohilum rostratum from contaminated compounding solutions has highlighted the need to rapidly screen available pharmaceuticals that could be useful in therapy. The present study utilized two newly-developed high throughput assays to screen approved drugs and pharmaceutically active compounds for identification of potential antifungal agents. Several known drugs were found that have potent effects against E. rostratum including the triazole antifungal posaconazole. Posaconazole is likely to be effective against infections involving septic joints and may provide an alternative for refractory central nervous system infections. The anti-E. rostratum activities of several other drugs including bithionol (an anti-parasitic drug), tacrolimus (an immunosuppressive agent) and floxuridine (an antimetabolite) were also identified from the drug repurposing screens. In addition, activities of other potential antifungal agents against E. rostratum were excluded, which may avoid unnecessary therapeutic trials and reveals the limited therapeutic alternatives for this outbreak. In summary, this study has demonstrated that drug repurposing screens can be quickly conducted within a useful time-frame. This would allow clinical implementation of identified alternative therapeutics and should be considered as part of the initial public health response to new outbreaks or rapidly-emerging microbial pathogens. PMID:23990907

  11. Rapid identification of Candida dubliniensis using a species-specific molecular beacon.

    PubMed

    Park, S; Wong, M; Marras, S A; Cross, E W; Kiehn, T E; Chaturvedi, V; Tyagi, S; Perlin, D S

    2000-08-01

    Candida dubliniensis is an opportunistic fungal pathogen that has been linked to oral candidiasis in AIDS patients, although it has recently been isolated from other body sites. DNA sequence analysis of the internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) region of rRNA genes from reference Candida strains was used to develop molecular beacon probes for rapid, high-fidelity identification of C. dubliniensis as well as C. albicans. Molecular beacons are small nucleic acid hairpin probes that brightly fluoresce when they are bound to their targets and have a significant advantage over conventional nucleic acid probes because they exhibit a higher degree of specificity with better signal-to-noise ratios. When applied to an unknown collection of 23 strains that largely contained C. albicans and a smaller amount of C. dubliniensis, the species-specific probes were 100% accurate in identifying both species following PCR amplification of the ITS2 region. The results obtained with the molecular beacons were independently verified by random amplified polymorphic DNA analysis-based genotyping and by restriction enzyme analysis with enzymes BsmAI and NspBII, which cleave recognition sequences within the ITS2 regions of C. dubliniensis and C. albicans, respectively. Molecular beacons are promising new probes for the rapid detection of Candida species.

  12. [Study on application of rep-PCR fingerprint in rapid identification of beer-spoilager].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lin-Jiang; Zheng, Fei-Yun; Zhao, Ya-Zhou; Xing, Xiang-Nan; Li, Qi; Gu, Guo-Xian

    2006-11-01

    The application potential of rep-PCR in typing beer-spoilage isolates was studied. The effects of different factors, including DNA templates and primers, on the quality and reproducibility of fingerprints were investigated. The CTAB protocol was shown to be the feasible method for DNA extraction. Primers BOXA1R and (GTG)5 were used in rep-PCR, and the PCR products were sequenced to identify strains isolated from two breweries. Rep-PCR fingerprint profiles were obtained by using GelCompar II software. Cluster analysis showed that the isolates belonging to Lactobacillus brevis, L. buchneri, L. casei/paracasei, L. plantarum are divided into 2 or 3 subgroups. In addition, the two rep-PCR fingerprint profiles complemented with each other in typing these isolates. Combining the similarity coefficient cut-off (SCC) of species, 9 unknown isolates were identified rapidly by using both fingerprint databases. The results indicate that rep-PCR is a simple, reliable and promising method for rapid identification of beer-spoilager.

  13. FT-IR microspectroscopy in rapid identification of bacteria in pure and mixed culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontoura, Inglid; Belo, Ricardo; Sakane, Kumiko; Cardoso, Maria Angélica Gargione; Khouri, Sônia; Uehara, Mituo; Raniero, Leandro; Martin, Airton A.

    2010-02-01

    In recent years FT-IR microspectroscopy has been developed for microbiology analysis and applied successfully in pure cultures of microorganisms to rapidly identify strains of bacteria, yeasts and fungi. The investigation and characterization of microorganism mixed cultures is also of growing importance, especially in hospitals where it is common to poly-microbial infections. In this work, the rapid identification of bacteria in pure and mixed cultures was studied. The bacteria were obtained from the Institute Oswaldo Cruz culture collection at Brazil. Escherichia coli ATCC 10799 and Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 14456 were analyzed, 3 inoculations were examined in triplicate: Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and a mixed culture of them. The inoculations were prepared according to McFarland 0.5, incubated at 37 ° C for 6 hours, diluted in saline, placed in the CaF2 window and store for one hour at 50°C to obtain thin film. The measurement was performed by Spectrum Spotlight 400 (Perkin-Elmer) equipment in the range of 4000-900 cm-1, with 32 scans using a transmittance technique with point and image modes. The data were processed (baseline, normalization, calculation of first derivate followed by smoothing with 9 point using a Savitzky-Golay algorithm) and a cluster analysis were done by Ward's algorithm and an excellent discrimination between pure and mixed culture was obtained. Our preliminary results indicate that the FT-IR microspectroscopy associated with cluster analysis can be used to discriminate between pure and mixed culture.

  14. Identification of Cellular Proteins Required for Replication of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Dziuba, Natallia; Ferguson, Monique R.; O'Brien, William A.; Sanchez, Anthony; Prussia, Andrew J.; McDonald, Natalie J.; Friedrich, Brian M.; Li, Guangyu; Shaw, Michael W.; Sheng, Jinsong; Hodge, Thomas W.; Rubin, Donald H.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Cellular proteins are essential for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication and may serve as viable new targets for treating infection. Using gene trap insertional mutagenesis, a high-throughput approach based on random inactivation of cellular genes, candidate genes were found that limit virus replication when mutated. Disrupted genes (N=87) conferring resistance to lytic infection with several viruses were queried for an affect on HIV-1 replication by utilizing small interfering RNA (siRNA) screens in TZM-bl cells. Several genes regulating diverse pathways were found to be required for HIV-1 replication, including DHX8, DNAJA1, GTF2E1, GTF2E2, HAP1, KALRN, UBA3, UBE2E3, and VMP1. Candidate genes were independently tested in primary human macrophages, toxicity assays, and/or Tat-dependent β-galactosidase reporter assays. Bioinformatics analyses indicated that several host factors present in this study participate in canonical pathways and functional processes implicated in prior genome-wide studies. However, the genes presented in this study did not share identity with those found previously. Novel antiviral targets identified in this study should open new avenues for mechanistic investigation. PMID:22404213

  15. Identification of novel vascular projections with cellular trafficking abilities on the microvasculature of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Saiyin, Hexige; Ardito-Abraham, Christine M; Wu, Yanhua; Wei, Youheng; Fang, Yuan; Han, Xu; Li, Jianang; Zhou, Ping; Yi, Qing; Maitra, Anirban; Liu, Jun O; Tuveson, David A; Lou, Wenhui; Yu, Long

    2015-06-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a nearly lethal neoplasm. It is a remarkably stroma-rich, vascular-poor and hypo-perfused tumour, which prevents efficient drug delivery. Paradoxically, the neoplastic cells have robust glucose uptake, suggesting that the microvasculature has adopted an alternative method for nutrient uptake and cellular trafficking. Using adapted thick tumour section immunostaining and three-dimensional (3D) construction imaging in human tissue samples, we identified an undiscovered feature of the mature microvasculature in advanced PDAC tumours; long, hair-like projections on the basal surface of microvessels that we refer to as 'basal microvilli'. Functionally, these basal microvilli have an actin-rich cytoskeleton and endocytic and exocytic properties, and contain glucose transporter-1 (GLUT-1)-positive vesicles. Clinically, as demonstrated by PET-CT, the tumour microvasculature with the longest and most abundant basal microvilli correlated with high glucose uptake of the PDAC tumour itself. In addition, these basal microvilli were found in regions of the tumour with low GLUT-1 expression, suggesting that their presence could be dependent upon the glucose concentration in the tumour milieu. Similar microvasculature features were also observed in a K-Ras-driven model of murine PDAC. Altogether, these basal microvilli mark a novel pathological feature of PDAC microvasculature. Because basal microvilli are pathological features with endo- and exocytic properties, they may provide a non-conventional method for cellular trafficking in PDAC tumours.

  16. Elucidation of the Cellular Interactome of Ebola Virus Nucleoprotein and Identification of Therapeutic Targets.

    PubMed

    García-Dorival, Isabel; Wu, Weining; Armstrong, Stuart D; Barr, John N; Carroll, Miles W; Hewson, Roger; Hiscox, Julian A

    2016-12-02

    Ebola virus (EBOV) infection results in severe disease and in some cases lethal hemorrhagic fever. The infection is directed by seven viral genes that encode nine viral proteins. By definition, viruses are obligate intracellular parasites and require aspects of host cell biology in order to replicate their genetic material, assemble new virus particles, and subvert host cell antiviral responses. Currently licensed antivirals are targeted against viral proteins to inhibit their function. However, experience with treating HIV and influenza virus demonstrates that resistant viruses are soon selected. An emerging area in virology is to transiently target host cell proteins that play critical proviral roles in virus biology, especially for acute infections. This has the advantage that the protein being targeted is evolutionary removed from the genome of the virus. Proteomics can aid in discovery biology and identify cellular proteins that may be utilized by the virus to facilitate infection. This work focused on defining the interactome of the EBOV nucleoprotein and identified that cellular chaperones, including HSP70, associate with this protein to promote stability. Utilization of a mini-genome replication system based on a recent Makona isolate demonstrated that disrupting the stability of NP had an adverse effect on viral RNA synthesis.

  17. Identification of novel cellular clusters define a specialized area in the cerebellar periventricular zone

    PubMed Central

    González-González, María Alejandra; Gómez-González, Gabriela B.; Becerra-González, Marymar; Martínez-Torres, Ataúlfo

    2017-01-01

    The periventricular zone of cerebellum is a germinative niche during the embryonic development, nevertheless its structural organization and functional implications in adult have not been widely studied. Here we disclose the presence of two novel clusters of cells in that area. The first one was named the subventricular cellular cluster (SVCC) and is composed of cells that express glial and neuronal markers. The second was named the ventromedial cord (VMC) and appears as a streak of biciliated cells with microvillosities facing the ventricle, that includes GFAP+ and nestin+ cells organized along the periventricular vasculature. The dorsal limit of the SVCC is associated with myelinated axons of neurons of unknown origin. This paper describes the characteristics and organization of these groups of cells. They can be observed from late embryonic development in the transgenic mouse line GFAP-GFP. The SVCC and VMC expand during early postnatal development but are restricted to the central area of the ventricle in adulthood. We did not find evidence of cell proliferation, cell migration or the presence of fenestrated blood vessels. These findings provide new insights into the knowledge of the cellular composition and structural organization of the periventricular zone of cerebellum. PMID:28106069

  18. [Automated RNA amplification for the rapid identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex in respiratory specimens].

    PubMed

    Drouillon, V; Houriez, F; Buze, M; Lagrange, P; Herrmann, J-L

    2006-01-01

    Rapid and sensitive detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTB) directly on clinical respiratory specimens is essential for a correct management of patients suspected of tuberculosis. For this purpose PCR-based kits are available to detect MTB in respiratory specimen but most of them need at least 4 hours to be completed. New methods, based on TRC method (TRC: Transcription Reverse transcription Concerted--TRCRapid M. Tuberculosis--Tosoh Bioscience, Tokyo, Japon) and dedicated monitor have been developed. A new kit (TRC Rapid M. tuberculosis and Real-time monitor TRCRapid-160, Tosoh Corporation, Japan) enabling one step amplification and real-time detection of MTB 16S rRNA by a combination of intercalative dye oxazole yellow-linked DNA probe and isothermal RNA amplification directly on respiratory specimens has been tested in our laboratory. 319 respiratory specimens were tested in this preliminary study and results were compared to smear and culture. Fourteen had a positive culture for MTB. Among theses samples, smear was positive in 11 cases (78.6%) and TRC process was positive in 8 cases (57.1%). Overall sensitivity of TRC compared to smear positive samples is 73%. Theses first results demonstrated that a rapid identification of MTB was possible (less than 2 processing hours for 14 specimens and about 1 hour for 1 specimen) in most cases of smear positive samples using ready to use reagents for real time detection of MTB rRNA in clinical samples. New pretreatment and extraction reagents kits to increase the stability of the sputum RNA and the extraction efficiency are now tested in our laboratory.

  19. An Innovative Method for Rapid Identification and Detection of Vibrio alginolyticus in Different Infection Models

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Kaifei; Li, Jun; Wang, Yuxiao; Liu, Jianfei; Yan, He; Shi, Lei; Zhou, Lijun

    2016-01-01

    Vibrio alginolyticus is one of the most common pathogenic marine Vibrio species, and has been found to cause serious seafood-poisoning or fatal extra-intestinal infections in humans, such as necrotizing soft-tissue infections, bacteremia, septic shock, and multiple organ failures. Delayed accurate diagnosis and treatment of most Vibrio infections usually result to high mortality rates. The objective of this study was to establish a rapid diagnostic method to detect and identify the presence of V. alginolyticus in different samples, so as to facilitate timely treatment. The widely employed conventional methods for detection of V. alginolyticus include biochemical identification and a variety of PCR methods. The former is of low specificity and time-consuming (2–3 days), while the latter has improved accuracy and processing time. Despite such advancements, these methods are still complicated, time-consuming, expensive, require expertise and advanced laboratory systems, and are not optimal for field use. With the goal of providing a simple and efficient way to detect V. alginolyticus, we established a rapid diagnostic method based on loop-mediated Isothermal amplification (LAMP) technology that is feasible to use in both experimental and field environments. Three primer pairs targeting the toxR gene of V. alginolyticus were designed, and amplification was carried out in an ESE tube scanner and Real-Time PCR device. We successfully identified 93 V. alginolyticus strains from a total of 105 different bacterial isolates and confirmed their identity by 16s rDNA sequencing. We also applied this method on infected mouse blood and contaminated scallop samples, and accurate results were both easily and rapidly (20–60 min) obtained. Therefore, the RT-LAMP assay we developed can be conveniently used to detect the presence of V. alginolyticus in different samples. Furthermore, this method will also fulfill the gap for real-time screening of V. alginolyticus infections

  20. Confocal fluorescence microscopy for rapid evaluation of invasive tumor cellularity of inflammatory breast carcinoma core needle biopsies.

    PubMed

    Dobbs, Jessica; Krishnamurthy, Savitri; Kyrish, Matthew; Benveniste, Ana Paula; Yang, Wei; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Tissue sampling is a problematic issue for inflammatory breast carcinoma, and immediate evaluation following core needle biopsy is needed to evaluate specimen adequacy. We sought to determine if confocal fluorescence microscopy provides sufficient resolution to evaluate specimen adequacy by comparing invasive tumor cellularity estimated from standard histologic images to invasive tumor cellularity estimated from confocal images of breast core needle biopsy specimens. Grayscale confocal fluorescence images of breast core needle biopsy specimens were acquired following proflavine application. A breast-dedicated pathologist evaluated invasive tumor cellularity in histologic images with hematoxylin and eosin staining and in grayscale and false-colored confocal images of cores. Agreement between cellularity estimates was quantified using a kappa coefficient. 23 cores from 23 patients with suspected inflammatory breast carcinoma were imaged. Confocal images were acquired in an average of less than 2 min per core. Invasive tumor cellularity estimated from histologic and grayscale confocal images showed moderate agreement by kappa coefficient: κ = 0.48 ± 0.09 (p < 0.001). Grayscale confocal images require less than 2 min for acquisition and allow for evaluation of invasive tumor cellularity in breast core needle biopsy specimens with moderate agreement to histologic images. We show that confocal fluorescence microscopy can be performed immediately following specimen acquisition and could indicate the need for additional biopsies at the initial visit.

  1. Rapid Identification of Mycobacteria and Drug-Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis by Use of a Single Multiplex PCR and DNA Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Osorio, Ailyn C.; Boyle, David S.; Ingham, Zachary K.; Ostash, Alla; Gautom, Romesh K.; Colombel, Craig; Houze, Yolanda

    2012-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a significant global health problem for which rapid diagnosis is critical to both treatment and control. This report describes a multiplex PCR method, the Mycobacterial IDentification and Drug Resistance Screen (MID-DRS) assay, which allows identification of members of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) and the simultaneous amplification of targets for sequencing-based drug resistance screening of rifampin-resistant (rifampinr), isoniazidr, and pyrazinamider TB. Additionally, the same multiplex reaction amplifies a specific 16S rRNA gene target for rapid identification of M. avium complex (MAC) and a region of the heat shock protein 65 gene (hsp65) for further DNA sequencing-based confirmation or identification of other mycobacterial species. Comparison of preliminary results generated with MID-DRS versus culture-based methods for a total of 188 bacterial isolates demonstrated MID-DRS sensitivity and specificity as 100% and 96.8% for MTBC identification; 100% and 98.3% for MAC identification; 97.4% and 98.7% for rifampinr TB identification; 60.6% and 100% for isoniazidr TB identification; and 75.0% and 98.1% for pyrazinamider TB identification. The performance of the MID-DRS was also tested on acid-fast-bacterium (AFB)-positive clinical specimens, resulting in sensitivity and specificity of 100% and 78.6% for detection of MTBC and 100% and 97.8% for detection of MAC. In conclusion, use of the MID-DRS reduces the time necessary for initial identification and drug resistance screening of TB specimens to as little as 2 days. Since all targets needed for completing the assay are included in a single PCR amplification step, assay costs, preparation time, and risks due to user errors are also reduced. PMID:22162548

  2. Identification of cellular factors required for the budding of koala retrovirus.

    PubMed

    Shimode, Sayumi; Nakaoka, Rie; Hoshino, Shigeki; Abe, Masumi; Shogen, Hiroko; Yasuda, Jiro; Miyazawa, Takayuki

    2013-07-01

    Koala retrovirus (KoRV) is a unique gammaretrovirus that is currently endogenizing into its host and considered to be associated with leukemia, lymphoma and immunosuppression in koalas (Phascolactos cinereus). In this study, it was demonstrated that WWP2 or WWP2-like E3 ubiquitin ligases possessing the WW domain closely related to WWP2 and Vps4A/B are involved in KoRV budding. These data suggest that KoRV Gag recruits the cellular endosomal sorting complex required for transport machinery through interaction of the PPPY L-domain with the WW domain(s) of WWP2 and that progeny virions are released from cells by utilizing the multivesicular body sorting pathway.

  3. Identification of Delta5-fatty acid desaturase from the cellular slime mold dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Saito, T; Ochiai, H

    1999-10-01

    cDNA fragments putatively encoding amino acid sequences characteristic of the fatty acid desaturase were obtained using expressed sequence tag (EST) information of the Dictyostelium cDNA project. Using this sequence, we have determined the cDNA sequence and genomic sequence of a desaturase. The cloned cDNA is 1489 nucleotides long and the deduced amino acid sequence comprised 464 amino acid residues containing an N-terminal cytochrome b5 domain. The whole sequence was 38.6% identical to the initially identified Delta5-desaturase of Mortierella alpina. We have confirmed its function as Delta5-desaturase by over expression mutation in D. discoideum and also the gain of function mutation in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Analysis of the lipids from transformed D. discoideum and yeast demonstrated the accumulation of Delta5-desaturated products. This is the first report concering fatty acid desaturase in cellular slime molds.

  4. Identification of the heparan sulfate binding sites in the cellular prion protein.

    PubMed

    Warner, Richard G; Hundt, Christoph; Weiss, Stefan; Turnbull, Jeremy E

    2002-05-24

    Data from cell culture and animal models of prion disease support the separate involvement of both heparan sulfate proteoglycans and copper (II) ions in prion (PrP) metabolism. Though direct interactions between prion protein and heparin have been recorded, little is known of the structural features implicit in this interaction or of the involvement of copper (II) ions. Using biosensor and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay methodology we report direct heparin and heparan sulfate-binding activity in recombinant cellular prion protein (PrP(c)). We also demonstrate that the interaction of recombinant PrP(c) with heparin is weakened in the presence of Cu(II) ions and is particularly sensitive to competition with dextran sulfate. Competitive inhibition experiments with chemically modified heparins also indicate that 2-O-sulfate groups (but not 6-O-sulfate groups) are essential for heparin recognition. We have also identified three regions of the prion protein capable of independent binding to heparin and heparan sulfate: residues 23-52, 53-93, and 110-128. Interestingly, the interaction of an octapeptide-spanning peptide motif amino acids 53-93 with heparin is enhanced by Cu(II) ions. Significantly, a peptide of this sequence is able to inhibit the binding of full-length prion molecule to heparin, suggesting a direct role in heparin recognition within the intact protein. The collective data suggest a complex interaction between prion protein and heparin/heparan sulfate and has implications for the cellular and pathological functions of prion proteins.

  5. Identification, cellular distribution and potential function of the metalloprotease-disintegrin MDC9 in the kidney.

    PubMed

    Mahimkar, R M; Baricos, W H; Visaya, O; Pollock, A S; Lovett, D H

    2000-04-01

    The complex interactions of glomerular and tubular epithelial cells with the basal laminae play a critical role in renal function. Disruption of these interactions has been widely implicated in glomerular diseases and acute renal failure. MDC are a large family of membrane-bound proteins containing metalloprotease, disintegrin (integrin interaction sites), and cysteine-rich domains. Little information is available concerning the presence of MDC in the kidney or their role in renal pathophysiology. Using degenerate PCR primers for the conserved metalloprotease and disintegrin domains of this protein family, cDNA templates from tubules, whole glomeruli, and glomerular epithelial cells (GEC) yielded a single, 195-bp product, which on sequence analysis corresponded to a region in the disintegrin domain of MDC9. Northern analysis of poly(A)+ RNA from tubules, whole glomeruli, and GEC revealed a 3.9-kb transcript, identical to that of mouse MDC9. Using antibodies generated against a 21-amino acid peptide present in the metalloprotease domain of MDC9, Western analysis of concanavalin A-enriched glomerular microsomal extracts demonstrated both processed (76 kD) and unprocessed (116 kD) forms of MDC9, which upon reduction changed to the corresponding 84- and 124-kD forms. Histochemical studies revealed a basolateral localization of intrinsic MDC9 protein in renal cortical tubule cells and glomerular visceral epithelial cells, which colocalized with the beta1 integrin chain. Expression of green fluorescence protein MDC9 chimeric constructs in GEC or polarized Madin-Darby canine kidney epithelial cells revealed a similar punctate basolateral surface localization. Transient overexpression of the soluble disintegrin domain-green fluorescence protein chimera in GEC led to dramatic changes in cellular morphology with rounding and detachment from cell monolayers. These studies document the presence of MDC9 in renal epithelial cells and suggest an important role for MDC9 in renal

  6. Identification of pivotal cellular factors involved in HPV-induced dysplastic and neoplastic cervical pathologies.

    PubMed

    Mattarocci, Stefano; Abbruzzese, Claudia; Mileo, Anna M; Carosi, Mariantonia; Pescarmona, Edoardo; Vico, Carmen; Federico, Antonio; Vizza, Enrico; Corrado, Giacomo; Arisi, Ivan; Felsani, Armando; Paggi, Marco G

    2014-04-01

    Cervical carcinoma represents the paradigm of virus-induced cancers, where virtually all cervical cancers come from previous "high-risk" HPV infection. The persistent expression of the HPV viral oncoproteins E6 and E7 is responsible for the reprogramming of fundamental cellular functions in the host cell, thus generating a noticeable, yet only partially explored, imbalance in protein molecular networks and cell signaling pathways. Eighty-eight cellular factors, identified as HPV direct or surrogate targets, were chosen and monitored in a retrospective analysis for their mRNA expression in HPV-induced cervical lesions, from dysplasia to cancer. Real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) was performed by using formalin-fixed, paraffin embedded archival samples. Gene expression analysis identified 40 genes significantly modulated in LSIL, HSIL, and squamous cervical carcinoma. Interestingly, among these, the expression level of a panel of four genes, TOP2A, CTNNB1, PFKM, and GSN, was able to distinguish between normal tissues and cervical carcinomas. Immunohistochemistry was also done to assess protein expression of two genes among those up-regulated during the transition between dysplasia and carcinoma, namely E2F1 and CDC25A, and their correlation with clinical parameters. Besides the possibility of significantly enhancing the use of some of these factors in diagnostic or prognostic procedures, these data clearly outline specific pathways, and thus key biological processes, altered in cervical dysplasia and carcinoma. Deeper insight on how these molecular mechanisms work may help widen the spectrum of novel innovative approaches to these virus-induced cell pathologies. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Identification of the cellular sensor that stimulates the inflammatory response to sterile cell death

    PubMed Central

    Kono, Hajime; Karmarkar, Dipti; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Rock, Kenneth L.

    2011-01-01

    Cell death provokes a robust inflammatory response. We have previously shown that this response is dependent on IL-α. Here we investigate the cellular mechanism used by a host to sense cell death, produce IL-α and also the role of IL-β in this response. In almost all cases examined, the IL-1 that stimulated the death-induced inflammatory response came from the host rather than the cell that was dying. In these situations, host bone marrow-derived cells were the key source of the IL-α that was required for the inflammatory response. Conditional cellular depletion and reconstitution in CD11b promoter- driven diphtheria toxin receptor transgenic mice revealed that host macrophages played an essential role in the generation of the inflammatory response and were the source of the required IL-α. In addition, we found a role for IL-β in the death-induced inflammatory response and that this cytokine was generated by both bone marrow-derived and radioresistant host cells. The one exception to these findings was that when dendritic cells were injected into mice, they provided a portion of the IL-1 that stimulated inflammation, and this was observed whether the dendritic cells were live or necrotic. Together, these findings demonstrate that macrophages play a key role as the primary sentinels that are required to sense and report cell death in ways that initiate the inflammatory response. One key way they accomplish this important task is by producing IL-α that is needed to initiate the inflammatory response. PMID:20220089

  8. Identification of microRNAs dysregulated in cellular senescence driven by endogenous genotoxic stress

    PubMed Central

    Nidadavolu, Lolita S.; Niedernhofer, Laura J.; Khan, Saleem A.

    2013-01-01

    XFE progeroid syndrome, a disease of accelerated aging caused by deficiency in the DNA repair endonuclease XPF-ERCC1, is modeled by Ercc1 knockout and hypomorphic mice. Tissues and primary cells from these mice senesce prematurely, offering a unique opportunity to identify factors that regulate senescence and aging. We compared microRNA (miRNA) expression in Ercc1−/− primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) and wild-type (WT) MEFs in different growth conditions to identify miRNAs that drive cellular senescence. Microarray analysis showed three differentially expressed miRNAs in passage 7 (P7) Ercc1−/− MEFs grown at 20% O2 compared to Ercc1−/− MEFs grown at 3% O2. Thirty-six differentially expressed miRNAs were identified in Ercc1−/− MEFs at P7 compared to early passage (P3) in 3% O2. Eight of these miRNAs (miR-449a, miR-455*, miR-128, miR-497, miR-543, miR-450b-3p, miR-872 and miR-10b) were similarly downregulated in the liver of progeroid Ercc1−/Δ and old WT mice compared to adult WT mice, a tissue that senesces with aging. Three miRNAs (miR-449a, miR-455* and miR-128) were also downregulated in Ercc1−/Δ and WT old mice kidneys compared to young WT mice. We also discovered that the miRNA expression regulator Dicer is significantly downregulated in tissues of old mice and late passage cells compared to young controls. Collectively these results support the conclusion that the miRNAs identified may play an important role in staving off cellular senescence and their altered expression could be indicative of aging. PMID:23852002

  9. Identification of Small Molecule-binding Proteins in a Native Cellular Environment by Live-cell Photoaffinity Labeling.

    PubMed

    Head, Sarah A; Liu, Jun O

    2016-09-20

    Identifying the molecular target(s) of small molecules is a challenging but necessary step towards understanding their mechanism of action. While several target identification methods have been developed and used to successfully elucidate the binding proteins of a variety of small molecules, these techniques have drawbacks that make them unsuitable for detecting certain types of small molecule-target interactions. In particular, non-covalent interactions that depend on native cellular conditions, such as those of membrane proteins whose structures may be perturbed upon cell lysis, are often not amenable to affinity-based target identification methods. Here, we demonstrate a method wherein a probe containing a photolabile group is used to covalently crosslink to the small molecule binding protein within the environment of the live cell, allowing the detection and isolation of the target protein without the need for maintenance of the interaction after cell lysis. This technique is a valuable tool for studying biologically interesting small molecules with unknown mechanisms, both in the context of basic biology as well as drug discovery.

  10. A Benchmark for Evaluation of Algorithms for Identification of Cellular Correlates of Clinical Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Aghaeepour, Nima; Chattopadhyay, Pratip; Chikina, Maria; Dhaene, Tom; Van Gassen, Sofie; Kursa, Miron; Lambrecht, Bart N.; Malek, Mehrnoush; Qian, Yu; Qiu, Peng; Saeys, Yvan; Stanton, Rick; Tong, Dong; Vens, Celine; Walkowiak, Sławomir; Wang, Kui; Finak, Greg; Gottardo, Raphael; Mosmann, Tim; Nolan, Garry; Scheuermann, Richard H.; Brinkman, Ryan R.

    2016-01-01

    The Flow Cytometry: Critical Assessment of Population Identification Methods (FlowCAP) challenges were established to compare the performance of computational methods for identifying cell populations in multidimensional flow cytometry data. Here we report the results of FlowCAP-IV where algorithms from seven different research groups predicted the time to progression to AIDS among a cohort of 384 HIV+ subjects, using antigen-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) samples analyzed with a 14-color staining panel. Two approaches (FlowReMi.1 and flowDensity-flowType-RchyOptimyx) provided statistically significant predictive value in the blinded test set. Manual validation of submitted results indicated that unbiased analysis of single cell phenotypes could reveal unexpected cell types that correlated with outcomes of interest in high dimensional flow cytometry datasets. PMID:26447924

  11. Triplex PCR assay for the rapid identification of 3 major Vibrio species, Vibrio cholerae, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, and Vibrio fluvialis.

    PubMed

    Vinothkumar, Kittappa; Bhardwaj, Ashima Kushwaha; Ramamurthy, Thandavarayan; Niyogi, Swapan Kumar

    2013-08-01

    A triplex PCR assay was developed for the identification of 3 major Vibrio spp., Vibrio cholerae, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, and Vibrio fluvialis by targeting their haemolysin, haem-utilizing, and central regulatory genes, respectively. This simple, rapid, sensitive, and specific assay using cell lysates from 227 samples established its usefulness in research and epidemiology. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Rapid identification of Helicoverpa armigera and Helicoverpa zea (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) using ribosomal RNA internal transcribed spacer 1

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rapid identification of invasive species is crucial for deploying management strategies to prevent establishment. Recent Helicoverpa armigera (Hübner) invasions and subsequent establishment in some countries of South America has increased the risk of this species invading North America. Differentiat...

  13. DEVELOPMENT OF SERS SPECTROSCOPY FOR ROUTINE AND RAPID IDENTIFICATION OF ESCHERICHIA COLI AND LISTERIA MONOCYTOGENES ON SILVER COLLOIDAL NANOPARTICLES

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    SERS spectra were collected to explore its potential for rapid and routine identification of E. coli and L. monocytogenes cultures. Ratios of SERS peaks from K3PO4 were used to evaluate the reproducibility, stability, and binding effectiveness of citrate-reduced silver colloids over batch and storag...

  14. An integrated high resolution mass spectrometric and informatics approach for the rapid identification of phenolics in plant extract

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    An integrated approach based on high resolution MS analysis (orbitrap), database (db) searching and MS/MS fragmentation prediction for the rapid identification of plant phenols is reported. The approach was firstly validated by using a mixture of phenolic standards (phenolic acids, flavones, flavono...

  15. An integrated sample-in-answer-out microfluidic chip for rapid human identification by STR analysis.

    PubMed

    Le Roux, Delphine; Root, Brian E; Hickey, Jeffrey A; Scott, Orion N; Tsuei, Anchi; Li, Jingyi; Saul, David J; Chassagne, Luc; Landers, James P; de Mazancourt, Philippe

    2014-11-21

    A fully integrated microfluidic chip for human identification by short tandem repeat (STR) analysis that includes a unique enzymatic liquid preparation of the DNA, microliter non-contact PCR, and a polymer that allows a high-resolution separation within a compact microchip footprint has been developed. A heat-activated enzyme that digests biological materials is employed to generate the target yield of DNA from a buccal swab or FTA paper. The microfluidic architecture meters an aliquot of the liberated DNA and mixes it with the PCR reagents prior to non-contact IR-mediated PCR amplification. The products of PCR amplification are mixed with a sizing standard (ladder) and the 18-plex STR amplicons are separated in an effective length (Leff) of just 7 cm. The development, optimization and integration of each of these processes within the microfluidic chip are described. The device is able to generate genetic profiles in approximately 2 hours that match the profiles from the conventional processes performed using separate conventional instruments. Analysis is performed on a single plastic microchip with a size similar to that of a 96-well plate and only a few mm thick with no pretreatment of any of the functional domains. This is significant advancement in terms of ease of fabrication over glass microdevices or polymeric systems assembled from multiple components. Consequently, this fully integrated sample-in-answer-out microchip is an important step toward generation of a rapid micro-total analysis system for point-of-collection human identification based on genetic analysis.

  16. VIP Barcoding: composition vector-based software for rapid species identification based on DNA barcoding.

    PubMed

    Fan, Long; Hui, Jerome H L; Yu, Zu Guo; Chu, Ka Hou

    2014-07-01

    Species identification based on short sequences of DNA markers, that is, DNA barcoding, has emerged as an integral part of modern taxonomy. However, software for the analysis of large and multilocus barcoding data sets is scarce. The Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST) is currently the fastest tool capable of handling large databases (e.g. >5000 sequences), but its accuracy is a concern and has been criticized for its local optimization. However, current more accurate software requires sequence alignment or complex calculations, which are time-consuming when dealing with large data sets during data preprocessing or during the search stage. Therefore, it is imperative to develop a practical program for both accurate and scalable species identification for DNA barcoding. In this context, we present VIP Barcoding: a user-friendly software in graphical user interface for rapid DNA barcoding. It adopts a hybrid, two-stage algorithm. First, an alignment-free composition vector (CV) method is utilized to reduce searching space by screening a reference database. The alignment-based K2P distance nearest-neighbour method is then employed to analyse the smaller data set generated in the first stage. In comparison with other software, we demonstrate that VIP Barcoding has (i) higher accuracy than Blastn and several alignment-free methods and (ii) higher scalability than alignment-based distance methods and character-based methods. These results suggest that this platform is able to deal with both large-scale and multilocus barcoding data with accuracy and can contribute to DNA barcoding for modern taxonomy. VIP Barcoding is free and available at http://msl.sls.cuhk.edu.hk/vipbarcoding/.

  17. Phylogenetic Species Identification in Rattus Highlights Rapid Radiation and Morphological Similarity of New Guinean Species

    PubMed Central

    Robins, Judith H.; Tintinger, Vernon; Aplin, Ken P.; Hingston, Melanie; Matisoo-Smith, Elizabeth; Penny, David; Lavery, Shane D.

    2014-01-01

    The genus Rattus is highly speciose, the taxonomy is complex, and individuals are often difficult to identify to the species level. Previous studies have demonstrated the usefulness of phylogenetic approaches to identification in Rattus but some species, especially among the endemics of the New Guinean region, showed poor resolution. Possible reasons for this are simple misidentification, incomplete gene lineage sorting, hybridization, and phylogenetically distinct lineages that are unrecognised taxonomically. To assess these explanations we analysed 217 samples, representing nominally 25 Rattus species, collected in New Guinea, Asia, Australia and the Pacific. To reduce misidentification problems we sequenced museum specimens from earlier morphological studies and recently collected tissues from samples with associated voucher specimens. We also reassessed vouchers from previously sequenced specimens. We inferred combined and separate phylogenies from two mitochondrial DNA regions comprising 550 base pair D-loop sequences and both long (655 base pair) and short (150 base pair) cytochrome oxidase I sequences. Our phylogenetic species identification for 17 species was consistent with morphological designations and current taxonomy thus reinforcing the usefulness of this approach. We reduced misidentifications and consequently the number of polyphyletic species in our phylogenies but the New Guinean Rattus clades still exhibited considerable complexity. Only three of our eight New Guinean species were monophyletic. We found good evidence for either incomplete mitochondrial lineage sorting or hybridization between species within two pairs, R. leucopus/R. cf. verecundus and R. steini/R. praetor. Additionally, our results showed that R. praetor, R. niobe and R. verecundus each likely encompass more than one species. Our study clearly points to the need for a revised taxonomy of the rats of New Guinea, based on broader sampling and informed by both morphology and

  18. Filter-based PNA in situ hybridization for rapid detection, identification and enumeration of specific micro-organisms.

    PubMed

    Perry-O'Keefe, H; Stender, H; Broomer, A; Oliveira, K; Coull, J; Hyldig-Nielsen, J J

    2001-02-01

    A method for rapid and simultaneous detection, identification and enumeration of specific micro-organisms using Peptide Nucleic Acid (PNA) probes is presented. The method is based on a membrane filtration technique. The membrane filter was incubated for a short period of time. The microcolonies were analysed by in situ hybridization, using peroxidase-labelled PNA probes targeting a species-specific rRNA sequence, and visualized by a chemiluminescent reaction. Microcolonies were observed as small spots of light on film, thereby providing simultaneous detection, identification and enumeration. The method showed 95-100% correlation to standard plate counts along with definitive identification due to the specificity of the probe. Using the same protocol, results were generated approximately three times faster than culture methods for Gram-positive and -negative bacterial species and yeast species. The method is an improvement on the current membrane filtration technique, providing rapid determination of the level of specific pathogens, spoilage or indicator micro-organisms.

  19. A rapid sex-identification test for the forest musk deer (Moschus berezovskii) based on the ZFX/ZFY gene.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Yanyun; Zou, Fangdong; Wei, Kun; Yue, Bisong

    2007-05-01

    We describe a rapid sex-identification method for the forest musk deer (Moschus berezovskii) using PCR based on zinc-finger protein-encoding genes (ZFX/ZFY) located on the X and Y chromosomes. Fragments of the ZFX and ZFY genes were amplified and sequenced. The ZFX and ZFY fragments were identical in length and 94% similar in nucleotide sequence. Specific primers for forest musk deer sex identification were designed on the basis of sequence differences between ZFX and ZFY. All the primers were multiplexed in single-tube PCR. Both male and female forest musk deer showed amplification bands of 447 bp and 212 bp separated in agarose gels. A sex-specific 278-bp band was amplified only from males. These results show that testing by PCR for the presence of the 278-bp sequence is a rapid and reliable method for sex identification.

  20. Identification of Dynamic Changes in Proteins Associated with the Cellular Cytoskeleton after Exposure to Okadaic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Opsahl, Jill A.; Ljostveit, Sonja; Solstad, Therese; Risa, Kristin; Roepstorff, Peter; Fladmark, Kari E.

    2013-01-01

    Exposure of cells to the diarrhetic shellfish poison, okadaic acid, leads to a dramatic reorganization of cytoskeletal architecture and loss of cell-cell contact. When cells are exposed to high concentrations of okadaic acid (100–500 nM), the morphological rearrangement is followed by apoptotic cell death. Okadaic acid inhibits the broad acting Ser/Thr protein phosphatases 1 and 2A, which results in hyperphosphorylation of a large number of proteins. Some of these hyperphosphorylated proteins are most likely key players in the reorganization of the cell morphology induced by okadaic acid. We wanted to identify these phosphoproteins and searched for them in the cellular lipid rafts, which have been found to contain proteins that regulate cytoskeletal dynamics and cell adhesion. By using stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture cells treated with okadaic acid (400 nM) could be combined with control cells before the isolation of lipid rafts. Protein phosphorylation events and translocations induced by okadaic acid were identified by mass spectrometry. Okadaic acid was shown to regulate the phosphorylation status and location of proteins associated with the actin cytoskeleton, microtubules and cell adhesion structures. A large number of these okadaic acid-regulated proteins have previously also been shown to be similarly regulated prior to cell proliferation and migration. Our results suggest that okadaic acid activates general cell signaling pathways that induce breakdown of the cortical actin cytoskeleton and cell detachment. PMID:23708184

  1. Identification of dynamic changes in proteins associated with the cellular cytoskeleton after exposure to okadaic acid.

    PubMed

    Opsahl, Jill A; Ljostveit, Sonja; Solstad, Therese; Risa, Kristin; Roepstorff, Peter; Fladmark, Kari E

    2013-05-24

    Exposure of cells to the diarrhetic shellfish poison, okadaic acid, leads to a dramatic reorganization of cytoskeletal architecture and loss of cell-cell contact. When cells are exposed to high concentrations of okadaic acid (100-500 nM), the morphological rearrangement is followed by apoptotic cell death. Okadaic acid inhibits the broad acting Ser/Thr protein phosphatases 1 and 2A, which results in hyperphosphorylation of a large number of proteins. Some of these hyperphosphorylated proteins are most likely key players in the reorganization of the cell morphology induced by okadaic acid. We wanted to identify these phosphoproteins and searched for them in the cellular lipid rafts, which have been found to contain proteins that regulate cytoskeletal dynamics and cell adhesion. By using stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture cells treated with okadaic acid (400 nM) could be combined with control cells before the isolation of lipid rafts. Protein phosphorylation events and translocations induced by okadaic acid were identified by mass spectrometry. Okadaic acid was shown to regulate the phosphorylation status and location of proteins associated with the actin cytoskeleton, microtubules and cell adhesion structures. A large number of these okadaic acid-regulated proteins have previously also been shown to be similarly regulated prior to cell proliferation and migration. Our results suggest that okadaic acid activates general cell signaling pathways that induce breakdown of the cortical actin cytoskeleton and cell detachment.

  2. Acoustic-resonance spectrometry as a process analytical technology for rapid and accurate tablet identification.

    PubMed

    Medendorp, Joseph; Lodder, Robert A

    2006-03-01

    This research was performed to test the hypothesis that acoustic-resonance spectrometry (ARS) is able to rapidly and accurately differentiate tablets of similar size and shape. The US Food and Drug Administration frequently orders recalls of tablets because of labeling problems (eg, the wrong tablet appears in a bottle). A high-throughput, nondestructive method of online analysis and label comparison before shipping could obviate the need for recall or disposal of a batch of mislabeled drugs, thus saving a company considerable expense and preventing a major safety risk. ARS is accurate and precise as well as inexpensive and nondestructive, and the sensor, is constructed from readily available parts, suggesting utility as a process analytical technology (PAT). To test the classification ability of ARS, 5 common household tablets of similar size and shape were chosen for analysis (aspirin, ibuprofen, acetaminophen, vitamin C, and vitamin B12). The measures of successful tablet identification were intertablet distances in nonparametric multidimensional standard deviations (MSDs) greater than, 3 and intratablet MSDs less than 3, as calculated from an extended bootstrap erroradjusted single sample technique. The average intertablet MSD was 65.64, while the average intratablet MSD from cross-validation was 1.91. Tablet mass (r(2)=0.977), thickness (r(2)=0.977), and density (r(2)=0.900) were measured very accurately from the AR spectra, each with less than 10% error. Tablets were identified correctly with only 250 ms data collection time. These results demonstrate that ARS effectively identified and characterized the 5 types of tablets and could potentially serve as a rapid high-throughput online pharmaceutical sensor.

  3. Rapid detection and identification of Bacillus anthracis in food using pyrosequencing technology.

    PubMed

    Amoako, Kingsley K; Janzen, Timothy W; Shields, Michael J; Hahn, Kristen R; Thomas, Matthew C; Goji, Noriko

    2013-08-01

    The development of advanced methodologies for the detection of Bacillus anthracis has been evolving rapidly since the release of the anthrax spores in the mail in 2001. Recent advances in detection and identification techniques could prove to be an essential component in the defense against biological attacks. Sequence based such as pyrosequencing, which has the capability to determine short DNA stretches in real-time using biotinylated PCR amplicons, has potential biodefense applications. Using markers from the virulence plasmids (pXO1 and pXO2) and chromosomal regions, we have demonstrated the power of this technology in the rapid, specific and sensitive detection of B. anthracis spores in food matrices including milk, juice, bottled water, and processed meat. The combined use of immunomagnetic separation and pyrosequencing showed positive detection when liquid foods (bottled water, milk, juice), and processed meat were experimentally inoculated with 6CFU/mL and 6CFU/g, respectively, without an enrichment step. Pyrosequencing is completed in about 60min (following PCR amplification) and yields accurate and reliable results with an added layer of confidence. The entire assay (from sample preparation to sequencing information) can be completed in about 7.5h. A typical run on food samples yielded 67-80bp reads with 94-100% identity to the expected sequence. This sequence based approach is a novel application for the detection of anthrax spores in food with potential application in foodborne bioterrorism response and biodefense involving the use of anthrax spores. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Rapid detection and identification of beer-spoilage lactic acid bacteria by microcolony method.

    PubMed

    Asano, Shizuka; Iijima, Kazumaru; Suzuki, Koji; Motoyama, Yasuo; Ogata, Tomoo; Kitagawa, Yasushi

    2009-08-01

    We evaluated a microcolony method for the detection and identification of beer-spoilage lactic acid bacteria (LAB). In this approach, bacterial cells were trapped on a polycarbonate membrane filter and cultured on ABD medium, a medium that allows highly specific detection of beer-spoilage LAB strains. After short-time incubation, viable cells forming microcolonies were stained with carboxyfluorescein diacetate (CFDA) and counted with muFinder Inspection System. In our study, we first investigated the growth behavior of various beer-spoilage LAB by traditional culture method, and Lactobacillus lindneri and several L. paracollinoides strains were selected as slow growers on ABD medium. Then the detection speeds were evaluated by microcolony method, using these slowly growing strains. As a result, all of the slowly growing beer-spoilage LAB strains were detected within 3 days of incubation. The specificity of this method was found to be exceptionally high and even discriminated intra-species differences in beer-spoilage ability of LAB strains upon detection. These results indicate that our microcolony approach allows rapid and specific detection of beer-spoilage LAB strains with inexpensive CFDA staining. For further confirmation of species status of detected strains, subsequent treatment with species-specific fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) probes was shown as effective for identifying the CFDA-detected microcolonies to the species level. In addition, no false-positive results arising from noise signals were recognized for CFDA staining and FISH methods. Taken together, the developed microcolony method was demonstrated as a rapid and highly specific countermeasure against beer-spoilage LAB, and compared favorably with the conventional culture methods.

  5. A simple and rapid assay for specific identification of bovine derived products in biocomplex materials.

    PubMed

    Khairalla, Khairalla M S; Aradaib, Imadeldin E; Bakhiet, Amel O; Hassan, Tigani; Hago, Badr E; Saeed, Abdel-Rahman

    2007-04-15

    A simple and rapid method for specific identification of beef or bovine-derived products in processed food and in animal feed concentrates was developed and evaluated using Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR). The mitochondrial cytochrome-b (mtcyt-b) gene was used as a target DNA for PCR amplification. Three primers derived from a highly conserved region of bovine mtcyt-b gene were used. The outer pair of primers (RSL1 and CSR2) produced a 365 base pair (bp) PCR ampilicon from bovine DNA, while the internal semi-nested pair of primers (CSL1 and CSR2) were used to amplify a 284 bp PCR ampilicon, internal to the annealing sites of primers (RSL1 and CSR2). Both ampilicons were identified easily after visualization on agarose gel stained with ethidium bromide. The specificity studies indicated that the primary or the semi-nested PCR products were not amplified from DNA extracted from different ruminant species including, sheep, goat and ghazals; or from non-ruminant animals including camels, horses and pigs. Also was found very sensitive because could detect 0.001% (W/V) of bovine mtcyt-b gene. The semi-nested amplification was necessary to increase the sensitivity of the PCR assay and to confirm the identity of the primary PCR ampilicons. The described PCR assay detected the primary and the semi-nested PCR ampilicons from different animal feed concentrates containing bovine-derived product including, canned food, poultry and dairy feed concentrates. The described PCR assay should facilitate rapid detection of beef and bovine-derived products in processed food and in animal feed concentrates.

  6. Functional classification of cellular proteome profiles support the identification of drug resistance signatures in melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Paulitschke, Verena; Haudek-Prinz, Verena; Griss, Johannes; Berger, Walter; Mohr, Thomas; Pehamberger, Hubert; Kunstfeld, Rainer; Gerner, Christopher

    2013-07-05

    Drug resistance is a major obstacle in melanoma treatment. Recognition of specific resistance patterns, the understanding of the patho-physiology of drug resistance, and identification of remaining options for individual melanoma treatment would greatly improve therapeutic success. We performed mass spectrometry-based proteome profiling of A375 melanoma cells and HeLa cells characterized as sensitive to cisplatin in comparison to cisplatin resistant M24met and TMFI melanoma cells. Cells were fractionated into cytoplasm, nuclei and secretome and the proteome profiles classified according to Gene Ontology. The cisplatin resistant cells displayed increased expression of lysosomal as well as Ca²⁺ ion binding and cell adherence proteins. These findings were confirmed using Lysotracker Red staining and cell adhesion assays with a panel of extracellular matrix proteins. To discriminate specific survival proteins, we selected constitutively expressed proteins of resistant M24met cells which were found expressed upon challenging the sensitive A375 cells. Using the CPL/MUW proteome database, the selected lysosomal, cell adherence and survival proteins apparently specifying resistant cells were narrowed down to 47 proteins representing a potential resistance signature. These were tested against our proteomics database comprising more than 200 different cell types/cell states for its predictive power. We provide evidence that this signature enables the automated assignment of resistance features as readout from proteome profiles of any human cell type. Proteome profiling and bioinformatic processing may thus support the understanding of drug resistance mechanism, eventually guiding patient tailored therapy.

  7. A trans-well-based cellular model for the rapid pre-evaluation of tympanic membrane repair materials.

    PubMed

    Hung, Shih-Han; Su, Chin-Hui; Tseng, How

    2016-08-01

    It is important to have a standardized tympanic membrane (TM) perforation platform to evaluate the various myringoplasty materials that have been studied and developed extensively during recent years. However, currently there are no cellular models specifically designed for this purpose, and animal models remain unsatisfactory. The purpose of this study is to propose an inexpensive, readily available, well-controlled, and easy-to-create cellular model as a substitute for use in the evaluation of TM repairing materials. A trans-well model was created using a cell culture insert with a round hole created at the center of the polycarbonate membrane. HaCaT cells were cultured on the fenestrated culture insert, and the desired myringoplasty graft was placed at the center of the window for one week and observed by fluorescent microscopy under vital staining. Under this cellular model, there was notable migration of HaCaT cells onto the positive control graft (rabbit fascia), while only a few cell clusters were observed on the negative control graft (paper). Model validation showed that the cell migration ratio for the PLLA + 1% hyaluronic acid (HA) graft is significantly higher than using myringoplasty paper, poly L-lactide (PLLA), or PLLA + 0.5% HA (p < 0.05). This trans-well-based cellular model might be a useful pre-evaluation platform for the evaluation of TM repairing materials. The model is inexpensive, readily available, easy to create, and standardized for use.

  8. Identification of Clostridium botulinum, Clostridium argentinense, and related organisms by cellular fatty acid analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Ghanem, F M; Ridpath, A C; Moore, W E; Moore, L V

    1991-01-01

    On the basis of 686 analyses of 285 strains of Clostridium botulinum, Clostridium argentinense (formerly C. botulinum type G), and phenotypically related organisms, 14 cellular fatty acid (CFA) groups of toxic organisms and 6 CFA groups of nontoxic organisms were delineated. The CFA groups of toxic strains included two of type A, three of proteolytic strains of type B, two of proteolytic strains of type F, one each of nonproteolytic strains of types B, E, and F, and one each of types C alpha, C beta, and D and C. argentinense. The groups of phenotypically similar nontoxic strains included Clostridium sporogenes, Clostridium putrificum, nontoxic strains with phenotypic characteristics similar to those of nonproteolytic strains of C. botulinum types B, E, and F (BEF-like), two groups of nontoxigenic organisms with phenotypic characteristics similar to those of C. botulinum types C and D and Clostridium novyi (CDN-like), and Clostridium subterminale, which has phenotypic characteristics similar to those of C. argentinense. Within the toxin types, 89 to 100% of the strains were correctly identified by CFA analysis, and 74 to 100% of the analyses were correct. Of 36 strains of C. sporogenes, 30 (83%) were correctly identified; 17% of the strains of C. sporogenes were incorrectly identified as C. botulinum type A or B. All analyses of C. putrificum and C. subterminale were correctly identified. There was no significant level of similarity between strains of C. botulinum and phenotypically similar organisms and 85 other species of clostridia or 407 other taxa of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. Additionally, the one strain each of Clostridium baratii and Clostridium butyricum previously reported to produce C. botulinum toxin could be differentiated from C.botulinum types as well as from strains of C. baratii and C. butyricum that did not produce neurotoxin. PMID:1864927

  9. Identification of Novel and Noninvasive Biomarkers of Acute Cellular Rejection After Liver Transplantation by Protein Microarray

    PubMed Central

    Okubo, Keita; Wada, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Atsushi; Eguchi, Hidetoshi; Hamaguchi, Masahide; Tomokuni, Akira; Tomimaru, Yoshito; Asaoka, Tadafumi; Hama, Naoki; Kawamoto, Koichi; Kobayashi, Shogo; Marubashi, Shigeru; Nagano, Hiroaki; Sakaguchi, Noriko; Nishikawa, Hiroyoshi; Doki, Yuichiro; Mori, Masaki; Sakaguchi, Shimon

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute cellular rejection (ACR) is one of the main factors in transplanted organ failure in liver transplantation. A precise marker for diagnosing or predicting rejection is not currently available; therefore, invasive liver biopsy is standard procedure. To develop a noninvasive method for precise diagnosis of ACR, we evaluated autoantibodies from patient sera as potential biomarkers using protein microarrays (seromics). Methods Sera from hepatitis C virus–positive ACR patients were compared to three hepatitis C virus cirrhosis control groups and healthy volunteers. The control groups consisted of 2 no-ACR groups obtained on postoperative day 28 and 1 year after transplantation and a preoperative group obtained 1 day before transplantation. For validation, we evaluated whether the candidate antibodies can distinguish ACR from other types of liver dysfunction after liver transplantation using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results Seromic analysis by weighted average difference (WAD) ranking and Mann-Whitney U test revealed a significant increase of 57 autoantibodies in the sera of ACR patients with liver dysfunction. Among the 57 candidates, autoantibodies to charged multivesicular body protein 2B, potassium channel tetramerization domain containing 14, voltage gated subfamily A regulatory beta subunit 3, and triosephosphate isomerase 1 were regarded as potential biomarkers of ACR after liver transplantation. Using 20 ACR patients with variable backgrounds for validation, the autoantibodies to charged multivesicular body protein 2B and triosephosphate isomerase 1 were significantly increased in ACR patients compared to other control groups. Conclusions A panel of autoantibodies identified by seromics as potential noninvasive biomarkers was clinically useful for diagnosing ACR after liver transplantation. PMID:27990483

  10. Screening and Identification of Cryopreservative Agents for Human Cellular Biotechnology Experiments in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Love,J.; Elliott, T.; Das, G. C.; Hammond, D. K.; Schwarzkopf, R. J.; Jones, L. B.; Baker, T. L.

    2006-01-01

    Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) has been used as a standard cryopreservative agent for mammalian cell culture; however, prolonged exposure of thawed cells to DMSO can alter cell growth. While DMSO is easily eliminated in ground-based experiments, removal of DMSO in flight-based experiments is more difficult due to various on-orbit constraints. Failure of cryopreservation is due to a number of factors, including intracellular ice formation, solute effect, and apoptotic cell death following thawing. One objective of this study is to identify and characterize an alternative cryopreservative that could be used on the International Space Station (ISS). We systematically screened for potential permeating and non-permeating agents using a human colorectal carcinoma cell line, MIP-101. Cells were suspended in cryopreservation solution and frozen either following a two-step procedure involving initial cooling at -1 C/min overnight followed by storage in liquid nitrogen (LN2) vapor, or by freezing cells directly in the LN2 vapor phase at -10 C/min. Ability to preserve cellular function after one cycle of freeze-thawing was assessed by the recovery of viable cells in short and long-term cell culture experiments. Results showed that permeating preservatives glycerol (G) and ethylene glycol (EG) had an efficacy (80-110%) comparable to, if not better than, 7.5% DMSO; but, propylene glycol (PG) had a somewhat lesser efficacy. Among the non-permeating preservatives, trehalose, raffinose, and dextran exhibited significant protective effect (50-80%) relative to that offered by 7.5% DMSO, but at -10 C and not at -1 C/min cooling rate. Preliminary data thus suggest that a combination of permeating and non-permeating agents may have improved efficacy as a cryoprotectant and serve as an alternate to DMSO for experimentation on ISS.

  11. Screening and Identification of Cryopreservative Agents for Human Cellular Biotechnology Experiments in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Love,J.; Elliott, T.; Das, G. C.; Hammond, D. K.; Schwarzkopf, R. J.; Jones, L. B.; Baker, T. L.

    2006-01-01

    Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) has been used as a standard cryopreservative agent for mammalian cell culture; however, prolonged exposure of thawed cells to DMSO can alter cell growth. While DMSO is easily eliminated in ground-based experiments, removal of DMSO in flight-based experiments is more difficult due to various on-orbit constraints. Failure of cryopreservation is due to a number of factors, including intracellular ice formation, solute effect, and apoptotic cell death following thawing. One objective of this study is to identify and characterize an alternative cryopreservative that could be used on the International Space Station (ISS). We systematically screened for potential permeating and non-permeating agents using a human colorectal carcinoma cell line, MIP-101. Cells were suspended in cryopreservation solution and frozen either following a two-step procedure involving initial cooling at -1 C/min overnight followed by storage in liquid nitrogen (LN2) vapor, or by freezing cells directly in the LN2 vapor phase at -10 C/min. Ability to preserve cellular function after one cycle of freeze-thawing was assessed by the recovery of viable cells in short and long-term cell culture experiments. Results showed that permeating preservatives glycerol (G) and ethylene glycol (EG) had an efficacy (80-110%) comparable to, if not better than, 7.5% DMSO; but, propylene glycol (PG) had a somewhat lesser efficacy. Among the non-permeating preservatives, trehalose, raffinose, and dextran exhibited significant protective effect (50-80%) relative to that offered by 7.5% DMSO, but at -10 C and not at -1 C/min cooling rate. Preliminary data thus suggest that a combination of permeating and non-permeating agents may have improved efficacy as a cryoprotectant and serve as an alternate to DMSO for experimentation on ISS.

  12. Identification of Cellular Genes Targeted by KSHV-Encoded MicroRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Samols, Mark A; Skalsky, Rebecca L; Maldonado, Ann M; Riva, Alberto; Lopez, M. Cecilia; Baker, Henry V; Renne, Rolf

    2007-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are 19 to 23 nucleotide–long RNAs that post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression. Human cells express several hundred miRNAs which regulate important biological pathways such as development, proliferation, and apoptosis. Recently, 12 miRNA genes have been identified within the genome of Kaposi sarcoma–associated herpesvirus; however, their functions are still unknown. To identify host cellular genes that may be targeted by these novel viral regulators, we performed gene expression profiling in cells stably expressing KSHV-encoded miRNAs. Data analysis revealed a set of 81 genes whose expression was significantly changed in the presence of miRNAs. While the majority of changes were below 2-fold, eight genes were down-regulated between 4- and 20-fold. We confirmed miRNA-dependent regulation for three of these genes and found that protein levels of thrombospondin 1 (THBS1) were decreased >10-fold. THBS1 has previously been reported to be down-regulated in Kaposi sarcoma lesions and has known activity as a strong tumor suppressor and anti-angiogenic factor, exerting its anti-angiogenic effect in part by activating the latent form of TGF-β. We show that reduced THBS1 expression in the presence of viral miRNAs translates into decreased TGF-β activity. These data suggest that KSHV-encoded miRNAs may contribute directly to pathogenesis by down-regulation of THBS1, a major regulator of cell adhesion, migration, and angiogenesis. PMID:17500590

  13. Identification of citrullinated cellular fibronectin in synovial fluid from patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Eri; Kanzaki, Takeyuki; Tahara, Koichiro; Hayashi, Haeru; Hashimoto, Shiori; Suzuki, Akari; Yamada, Ryo; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Sawada, Tetsuji

    2014-09-01

    Cellular fibronectin (cFn) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and we previously demonstrated the presence of citrullinated cFn in rheumatoid synovial tissues. The present study aimed to investigate whether citrullinated cFn can be detected in the plasma or synovial fluid of RA patients. Twenty-five rheumatoid arthritis synovial fluid (RASF), seven osteoarthritis synovial fluid (OASF) and 12 plasma samples from RA patients were examined. Citrullination of cFn was determined by immunoprecipitation (IP), western blotting and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), in which peptidyl-citrulline within cFn was detected using a specific anti-cFn monoclonal antibody in combination with anti-modified citrulline antibody after chemical modification. Levels of citrullination associated with cFn, as determined by ELISA, were significantly higher in RASF than in OASF samples. IP and western blotting detected citrullinated cFn in RASF but not in plasma samples from RA patients. Levels of total cFn were elevated in RASF compared with OASF, and 24 out of 25 RASF samples were positive for anti-CCP antibody. However, no correlation was observed between levels of citrullinated cFn and those of total cFn or anti-CCP antibody in RASF. On the other hand, a significant positive correlation was observed between the levels of matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3) and cFn citrullination in RASF. Citrullinated cFn appears to be produced within the affected joint and might be involved in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid synovitis.

  14. Rapid and non-destructive identification of water-injected beef samples using multispectral imaging analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinxia; Cao, Yue; Wang, Qiu; Pan, Wenjuan; Ma, Fei; Liu, Changhong; Chen, Wei; Yang, Jianbo; Zheng, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Water-injected beef has aroused public concern as a major food-safety issue in meat products. In the study, the potential of multispectral imaging analysis in the visible and near-infrared (405-970 nm) regions was evaluated for identifying water-injected beef. A multispectral vision system was used to acquire images of beef injected with up to 21% content of water, and partial least squares regression (PLSR) algorithm was employed to establish prediction model, leading to quantitative estimations of actual water increase with a correlation coefficient (r) of 0.923. Subsequently, an optimized model was achieved by integrating spectral data with feature information extracted from ordinary RGB data, yielding better predictions (r = 0.946). Moreover, the prediction equation was transferred to each pixel within the images for visualizing the distribution of actual water increase. These results demonstrate the capability of multispectral imaging technology as a rapid and non-destructive tool for the identification of water-injected beef.

  15. Prediction System for Rapid Identification of Salmonella Serotypes Based on Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis Fingerprints

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wei-Jiun; Hise, Kelley B.; Chen, Hung-Chia; Keys, Christine; Chen, James J.

    2012-01-01

    A classification model is presented for rapid identification of Salmonella serotypes based on pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) fingerprints. The classification model was developed using random forest and support vector machine algorithms and was then applied to a database of 45,923 PFGE patterns, randomly selected from all submissions to CDC PulseNet from 2005 to 2010. The patterns selected included the top 20 most frequent serotypes and 12 less frequent serotypes from various sources. The prediction accuracies for the 32 serotypes ranged from 68.8% to 99.9%, with an overall accuracy of 96.0% for the random forest classification, and ranged from 67.8% to 100.0%, with an overall accuracy of 96.1% for the support vector machine classification. The prediction system improves reliability and accuracy and provides a new tool for early and fast screening and source tracking of outbreak isolates. It is especially useful to get serotype information before the conventional methods are done. Additionally, this system also works well for isolates that are serotyped as “unknown” by conventional methods, and it is useful for a laboratory where standard serotyping is not available. PMID:22378901

  16. An integrated lab-on-chip for rapid identification and simultaneous differentiation of tropical pathogens.

    PubMed

    Tan, Jeslin J L; Capozzoli, Monica; Sato, Mitsuharu; Watthanaworawit, Wanitda; Ling, Clare L; Mauduit, Marjorie; Malleret, Benoît; Grüner, Anne-Charlotte; Tan, Rosemary; Nosten, François H; Snounou, Georges; Rénia, Laurent; Ng, Lisa F P

    2014-01-01

    Tropical pathogens often cause febrile illnesses in humans and are responsible for considerable morbidity and mortality. The similarities in clinical symptoms provoked by these pathogens make diagnosis difficult. Thus, early, rapid and accurate diagnosis will be crucial in patient management and in the control of these diseases. In this study, a microfluidic lab-on-chip integrating multiplex molecular amplification and DNA microarray hybridization was developed for simultaneous detection and species differentiation of 26 globally important tropical pathogens. The analytical performance of the lab-on-chip for each pathogen ranged from 102 to 103 DNA or RNA copies. Assay performance was further verified with human whole blood spiked with Plasmodium falciparum and Chikungunya virus that yielded a range of detection from 200 to 4×105 parasites, and from 250 to 4×107 PFU respectively. This lab-on-chip was subsequently assessed and evaluated using 170 retrospective patient specimens in Singapore and Thailand. The lab-on-chip had a detection sensitivity of 83.1% and a specificity of 100% for P. falciparum; a sensitivity of 91.3% and a specificity of 99.3% for P. vivax; a positive 90.0% agreement and a specificity of 100% for Chikungunya virus; and a positive 85.0% agreement and a specificity of 100% for Dengue virus serotype 3 with reference methods conducted on the samples. Results suggested the practicality of an amplification microarray-based approach in a field setting for high-throughput detection and identification of tropical pathogens.

  17. Rapid identification of Candida glabrata by using a dipstick to detect trehalase-generated glucose.

    PubMed

    Peltroche-Llacsahuanga, H; Schnitzler, N; Lütticken, R; Haase, G

    1999-01-01

    Candida glabrata is a yeast frequently isolated from human specimens. Based upon its well-known ability to rapidly hydrolyze trehalose, we have developed a novel and cost-effective test incubating one yeast colony emulsified in 50 microl of citrate buffer (0.1 M [pH 5. 0]) containing 4% (wt/vol) trehalose for 3 h at 37 degrees C. Trehalase-generated glucose is detected with a commercially available dipstick (range, 1.0 to 50 g/liter). For evaluation, consecutive clinical isolates and several reference strains of C. glabrata (n = 160), C. albicans (n = 120), and other yeast species with potential ability for utilization of trehalose (C. dubliniensis, n = 11; C. famata, n = 15; C. guilliermondii, n = 5; C. lusitaniae, n = 16; C. parapsilosis, n = 20; C. tropicalis, n = 34; C. viswanathii, n = 5; Pichia angusta, n = 2; C. zeylanoides, n = 2; Saccharomyces cerevisiae, n = 16; C. neoformans, n = 7) were tested. Identification of C. glabrata is achieved within 3 h, with a specificity of 99.1% and a sensitivity of 98.8% when grown on Sabouraud dextrose agar supplemented with 4% glucose.

  18. Ultrasensitive detection and rapid identification of multiple foodborne pathogens with the naked eyes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Heng; Zhang, Yali; Lin, Yankui; Liang, Tongwen; Chen, Zhihua; Li, Jinfeng; Yue, Zhenfeng; Lv, Jingzhang; Jiang, Qing; Yi, Changqing

    2015-09-15

    In this study, a novel approach for ultrasensitive detection and rapid high-throughput identification of a panel of common foodborne pathogens with the naked eyes is presented. As a proof-of-concept application, a multiple pathogen analysis array is fabricated through immobilizing three specific polyT-capture probes which can respectively recognize rfbE gene (Escherichia coli O157:H7), invA gene (Salmonella enterica), inlA gene (Listeria monocytogenes) on the plastic substrates. PCR has been developed for amplification and labeling target genes of rfbE, invA, inlA with biotin. The biotinated target DNA is then captured onto the surface of plastic strips through specific DNA hybridization. The succeeding staining of biotinated DNA duplexes with avidin-horseradish peroxidise (AV-HRP) and biotinated anti-HRP antibody greatly amplifies the detectable signal through the multiple cycle signal amplification strategy, and thus realizing ultrasensitive and specific detection of the above three pathogens in food samples with the naked eyes. Results showed approximately 5 copies target pathogenic DNA could be detected with the naked eyes. This simple but very efficient colorimetric assay also show excellent anti-interference capability and good stability, and can be readily applied to point-of-care diagnosis.

  19. Rapid identification of heterozygous mutations in Drosophila melanogaster using genomic capture sequencing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Chattopadhyay, Abanti; Li, Zhe; Daines, Bryce; Li, Yumei; Gao, Chunxu; Gibbs, Richard; Zhang, Kun; Chen, Rui

    2010-07-01

    One of the key advantages of using Drosophila melanogaster as a genetic model organism is the ability to conduct saturation mutagenesis screens to identify genes and pathways underlying a given phenotype. Despite the large number of genetic tools developed to facilitate downstream cloning of mutations obtained from such screens, the current procedure remains labor intensive, time consuming, and costly. To address this issue, we designed an efficient strategy for rapid identification of heterozygous mutations in the fly genome by combining rough genetic mapping, targeted DNA capture, and second generation sequencing technology. We first tested this method on heterozygous flies carrying either a previously characterized dac(5) or sens(E2) mutation. Targeted amplification of genomic regions near these two loci was used to enrich DNA for sequencing, and both point mutations were successfully identified. When this method was applied to uncharacterized twr mutant flies, the underlying mutation was identified as a single-base mutation in the gene Spase18-21. This targeted-genome-sequencing method reduces time and effort required for mutation cloning by up to 80% compared with the current approach and lowers the cost to <$1000 for each mutant. Introduction of this and other sequencing-based methods for mutation cloning will enable broader usage of forward genetics screens and have significant impacts in the field of model organisms such as Drosophila.

  20. Evaluation of INNO-LiPA mycobacteria v2 assay for identification of rapidly growing mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    García-Agudo, Lidia; Jesús, Iría; Rodríguez-Iglesias, Manuel; García-Martos, Pedro

    2011-07-01

    A total of 54 rapidly growing mycobacteria (RGM) isolated from patients attended in the two hospitals of Cádiz Bay (Spain) were selected during a seven-year-period (2000-2006) in order to evaluate the INNO-LiPA Mycobacteria v2 assay for mycobacterial identification, based on the reverse hybridization principle. The strains were cultured in Löwenstein-Jensen and Middlebrook 7H9 media and identified to the species level by sequencing of the 16S rRNA, PCR-restriction enzyme analysis of the hsp65 gene, conventional tests and INNO-LiPA Mycobacteria v2 assay. By the molecular methods we identified a total of 12 different species: 23 Mycobacterium fortuitum, 11 M. chelonae, 10 M. abscessus, 2 M. senegalense, 1 M. alvei, 1 M. brumae, 1 M. mageritense, 1 M. mucogenicum, 1 M. neoaurum, 1 M. peregrinum, 1 M. septicum and 1 M. smegmatis. Fifty two strains (96.3%) were correctly identified by conventional techniques and 47 strains (87.0%) by INNO-LiPA Mycobacteria v2 assay. We find INNO-LiPA Mycobacteria v2 assay simple to perform but it provides few advantages in comparison with conventional methods and sometimes needs complementary tests to identify Mycobacterium fortuitum complex, M. chelonae complex and specific species due to the great heterogeneity in the RGM group.

  1. Evaluation of INNO-LiPA mycobacteria v2 assay for identification of rapidly growing mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    García-Agudo, Lidia; Jesús, Iría; Rodríguez-Iglesias, Manuel; García-Martos, Pedro

    2011-01-01

    A total of 54 rapidly growing mycobacteria (RGM) isolated from patients attended in the two hospitals of Cádiz Bay (Spain) were selected during a seven-year-period (2000–2006) in order to evaluate the INNO-LiPA Mycobacteria v2 assay for mycobacterial identification, based on the reverse hybridization principle. The strains were cultured in Löwenstein-Jensen and Middlebrook 7H9 media and identified to the species level by sequencing of the 16S rRNA, PCR-restriction enzyme analysis of the hsp65 gene, conventional tests and INNO-LiPA Mycobacteria v2 assay. By the molecular methods we identified a total of 12 different species: 23 Mycobacterium fortuitum, 11 M. chelonae, 10 M. abscessus, 2 M. senegalense, 1 M. alvei, 1 M. brumae, 1 M. mageritense, 1 M. mucogenicum, 1 M. neoaurum, 1 M. peregrinum, 1 M. septicum and 1 M. smegmatis. Fifty two strains (96.3%) were correctly identified by conventional techniques and 47 strains (87.0%) by INNO-LiPA Mycobacteria v2 assay. We find INNO-LiPA Mycobacteria v2 assay simple to perform but it provides few advantages in comparison with conventional methods and sometimes needs complementary tests to identify Mycobacterium fortuitum complex, M. chelonae complex and specific species due to the great heterogeneity in the RGM group. PMID:24031745

  2. Rapid and accurate identification of Xanthomonas citri subspecies citri by fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Waite, D W; Griffin, R; Taylor, R; George, S

    2016-11-01

    Citrus canker is an economically important disease caused by the bacterial pathogen Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri (Xcc). This organism targets a wide range of citrus plants, including sweet orange, grapefruit, lemon and lime. As Xcc is spread by environmental factors such as wind and rain, it is difficult to control its movement once the disease has established. In order to facilitate monitoring of citrus canker we sought to design a novel diagnostic protocol based on fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for identification of bacterial cells directly from canker pustules without cultivation or DNA extraction. This method was validated for specificity against a range of Xanthomonas species and strains. We show that our assay is extremely rapid (typically requiring between 2 and 3 h), and possesses a similar specificity to existing PCR diagnostic tools. The sensitivity of the assay is comparable to that of an existing PCR-based technique and sufficient for identifying Xcc in symptomatic plant material. The method is easily transferable to diagnosticians without prior experience using FISH.

  3. Network understanding of herb medicine via rapid identification of ingredient-target interactions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hai-Ping; Pan, Jian-Bo; Zhang, Chi; Ji, Nan; Wang, Hao; Ji, Zhi-Liang

    2014-01-16

    Today, herb medicines have become the major source for discovery of novel agents in countermining diseases. However, many of them are largely under-explored in pharmacology due to the limitation of current experimental approaches. Therefore, we proposed a computational framework in this study for network understanding of herb pharmacology via rapid identification of putative ingredient-target interactions in human structural proteome level. A marketing anti-cancer herb medicine in China, Yadanzi (Brucea javanica), was chosen for mechanistic study. Total 7,119 ingredient-target interactions were identified for thirteen Yadanzi active ingredients. Among them, about 29.5% were estimated to have better binding affinity than their corresponding marketing drug-target interactions. Further Bioinformatics analyses suggest that simultaneous manipulation of multiple proteins in the MAPK signaling pathway and the phosphorylation process of anti-apoptosis may largely answer for Yadanzi against non-small cell lung cancers. In summary, our strategy provides an efficient however economic solution for systematic understanding of herbs' power.

  4. Extensible multiplex real-time PCR for rapid bacterial identification with carbon nanotube composite microparticles.

    PubMed

    Jung, Seungwon; Kim, Jungmin; Kim, Junsun; Yang, Sang Hwa; Kim, Sang Kyung

    2017-03-01

    The early diagnosis of pathogenic bacteria is significant for bacterial identification and antibiotic resistance. Implementing rapid, sensitive, and specific detection, molecular diagnosis has been considered complementary to the conventional bacterial culture. Composite microparticles of a primer-immobilized network (cPIN) are developed for multiplex detection of pathogenic bacteria with real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). A pair of specific primers are incorporated and stably conserved in a cPIN particle. One primer is crosslinked to the polymer network, and the other is bound to carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in the particle. At the initiation of qPCR, the latter primer is released from the CNTs and participates in the amplification. The amplification efficiency of this cPIN qPCR is estimated at more than 90% with suppressed non-specific signals from complex samples. In multiplexing, four infective pathogens are successfully discriminated using this cPIN qPCR. Multiplex qPCR conforms with the corresponding singleplex assays, proving independent amplification in each particle. Four bacterial targets from clinical samples are differentially analyzed in 30min of a single qPCR trial with multiple cPIN particles.

  5. Rapid identification of Borrelia by high resolution melting analysis of the groEL gene.

    PubMed

    Koś, Władysław; Wodecka, Beata; Anklewicz, Marek; Skotarczak, Bogumiła

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the possibility of applying a new diagnostic method, high resolution analysis of DNA denaturation curve (high resolution melting - HRM), for identification of Borrelia species. DNA samples were obtained from Ixodes ricinus ticks collected from vegetation and removed from hunted roe deer. For differentiation of Borrelia species, the HRM protocol based on the analysis of the groEL gene was applied. A product characteristic for Borrelia was obtained in 19/123 samples (15.4%). The studied isolates were classified as four species: B. garinii, B. valaisiana, B. afzelii and B. miyamotoi. Two separate groups of isolates within the B. afzelii species were also found. The results show that the groEL gene is useful for rapid differentiation of B. burgdorferi sensu lato with the HRM method from different extracts of DNA and it also allows precise differentiation of Borrelia species and strains. The HRM method shortened and simplified detection and differentiation of Borrelia species from different biological sources.

  6. RAPHIDOPHYCEAE [CHADEFAUD EX SILVA] SYSTEMATICS AND RAPID IDENTIFICATION: SEQUENCE ANALYSES AND REAL-TIME PCR ASSAYS

    PubMed Central

    Bowers, Holly A.; Tomas, Carmelo; Tengs, Torstein; Kempton, Jason W.; Lewitus, Alan J.; Oldach, David W.

    2010-01-01

    Species within the class Raphidophyceae were associated with fish kill events in Japanese, European, Canadian, and U.S. coastal waters. Fish mortality was attributable to gill damage with exposure to reactive oxygen species (peroxide, superoxide, and hydroxide radicals), neurotoxins, physical clogging, and hemolytic substances. Morphological identification of these organisms in environmental water samples is difficult, particularly when fixatives are used. Because of this difficulty and the continued global emergence of these species in coastal estuarine waters, we initiated the development and validation of a suite of real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays. Sequencing was used to generate complete data sets for nuclear encoded small-subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA; 18S); internal transcribed spacers 1 and 2, 5.8S; and plastid encoded SSU rRNA (16S) for confirmed raphidophyte cultures from various geographic locations. Sequences for several Chattonella species (C. antiqua, C. marina, C. ovata, C. subsalsa, and C. verruculosa), Heterosigma akashiwo, and Fibrocapsa japonica were generated and used to design rapid and specific PCR assays for several species including C. verruculosa Hara et Chihara, C. subsalsa Biecheler, the complex comprised of C. marina Hara et Chihara, C. antiqua Ono and C. ovata, H. akashiwo Ono, and F. japonica Toriumi et Takano using appropriate loci. With this comprehensive data set, we were also able to perform phylogenetic analyses to determine the relationship between these species. PMID:20411032

  7. Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification (LAMP) for Rapid Identification of Anopheles gambiae and Anopheles arabiensis Mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Bonizzoni, Mariangela; Afrane, Yaw; Yan, Guiyun

    2013-01-01

    The main malaria vectors of sub-Saharan Africa, Anopheles gambiae sensu stricto and Anopheles arabiensis are morphologically indistinguishable, but often occur in sympatry and differ in feeding preference and vector competence. It is important to assess vector species identity for understanding the vectorial system and establishing appropriate vector control measures. The currently available species diagnosis methods for An. gambiae sensu latu require equipment to which public health practitioners in many African countries may not have access. This report describes a loop-mediated isothermal amplification technique (LAMP) for An. gambiae species diagnosis. The LAMP method was tested in single mosquito legs and whole body. The sensitivity and specificity of the LAMP method, in reference to the conventional rDNA-polymerse chain reaction (PCR) method, ranged from 0.93 to 1.00. The LAMP-based species identification method can be performed in a water bath and completed within 65 minutes, representing an alternative method for rapid and field applicable vector species diagnosis. PMID:19996433

  8. Rapid detection and identification of infectious pathogens based on high-throughput sequencing.

    PubMed

    Ni, Pei-Xiang; Ding, Xin; Zhang, Yin-Xin; Yao, Xue; Sun, Rui-Xue; Wang, Peng; Gong, Yan-Ping; Zhou, Jia-Li; Li, Dong-Fang; Wu, Hong-Long; Yi, Xin; Yang, Ling; Long, Yun

    2015-04-05

    The dilemma of pathogens identification in patients with unidentified clinical symptoms such as fever of unknown origin exists, which not only poses a challenge to both the diagnostic and therapeutic process by itself, but also to expert physicians. In this report, we have attempted to increase the awareness of unidentified pathogens by developing a method to investigate hitherto unidentified infectious pathogens based on unbiased high-throughput sequencing. Our observations show that this method supplements current diagnostic technology that predominantly relies on information derived five cases from the intensive care unit. This methodological approach detects viruses and corrects the incidence of false positive detection rates of pathogens in a much shorter period. Through our method is followed by polymerase chain reaction validation, we could identify infection with Epstein-Barr virus, and in another case, we could identify infection with Streptococcus viridians based on the culture, which was false positive. This technology is a promising approach to revolutionize rapid diagnosis of infectious pathogens and to guide therapy that might result in the improvement of personalized medicine.

  9. Network Understanding of Herb Medicine via Rapid Identification of Ingredient-Target Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hai-Ping; Pan, Jian-Bo; Zhang, Chi; Ji, Nan; Wang, Hao; Ji, Zhi-Liang

    2014-01-01

    Today, herb medicines have become the major source for discovery of novel agents in countermining diseases. However, many of them are largely under-explored in pharmacology due to the limitation of current experimental approaches. Therefore, we proposed a computational framework in this study for network understanding of herb pharmacology via rapid identification of putative ingredient-target interactions in human structural proteome level. A marketing anti-cancer herb medicine in China, Yadanzi (Brucea javanica), was chosen for mechanistic study. Total 7,119 ingredient-target interactions were identified for thirteen Yadanzi active ingredients. Among them, about 29.5% were estimated to have better binding affinity than their corresponding marketing drug-target interactions. Further Bioinformatics analyses suggest that simultaneous manipulation of multiple proteins in the MAPK signaling pathway and the phosphorylation process of anti-apoptosis may largely answer for Yadanzi against non-small cell lung cancers. In summary, our strategy provides an efficient however economic solution for systematic understanding of herbs' power.

  10. Method for rapid detection and identification of chaetomium and evaluation of resistance to peracetic acid.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Motokazu; Hosoya, Kouichi; Tomiyama, Daisuke; Tsugukuni, Takashi; Matsuzawa, Tetsuhiro; Imanishi, Yumi; Yaguchi, Takashi

    2013-06-01

    In the beverage industry, peracetic acid has been increasingly used as a disinfectant for the filling machinery and environment due to merits of leaving no residue, it is safe for humans, and its antiseptic effect against fungi and endospores of bacteria. Recently, Chaetomium globosum and Chaetomium funicola were reported resistant to peracetic acid; however, little is known concerning the detail of peracetic acid resistance. Therefore, we assessed the peracetic acid resistance of the species of Chaetomium and related genera under identical conditions and made a thorough observation of the microstructure of their ascospores by transmission electron microscopy. The results of analyses revealed that C. globosum and C. funicola showed the high resistance to peracetic acid (a 1-D antiseptic effect after 900 s and 3-D antiseptic effect after 900 s) and had thick cell walls of ascospores that can impede the action mechanism of peracetic acid. We also developed specific primers to detect the C. globosum clade and identify C. funicola by using PCR to amplify the β-tubulin gene. PCR with the primer sets designed for C. globosum (Chae 4F/4R) and C. funicola (Cfu 2F/2R) amplified PCR products specific for the C. globosum clade and C. funicola, respectively. PCR with these two primer sets did not detect other fungi involved in food spoilage and environmental contamination. This detection and identification method is rapid and simple, with extremely high specificity.

  11. Potential of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for the rapid identification of carious teeth.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vivek K; Rai, Awadhesh K

    2011-05-01

    The importance of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for the rapid identification of teeth affected by caries has been demonstrated. The major and minor elemental constituents of teeth samples were analyzed using the prominent transitions of the atomic lines present in the sample. The elements detected in the tooth sample were: calcium, magnesium, copper, zinc, strontium, titanium, carbon, phosphorous, hydrogen, oxygen, sodium, and potassium. The results revealed that the caries-affected part contained a less amount of calcium and phosphorous in comparison to the healthy part of the tooth sample, whereas higher content of magnesium, copper, zinc, strontium, carbon, sodium, and potassium were present in the caries-affected part. For the first time, we have observed that hydrogen and oxygen were less in healthy parts compared to the caries-affected part of the tooth sample. The density of calcium and phosphorous, which are the main matrix of teeth, was less in the caries-affected part than in the healthy part. The variation in densities of the trace constituents like magnesium and carbon, etc., in caries and healthy parts of the tooth sample are also discussed. The presence of different metal elements in healthy and caries-affected parts of the tooth samples and the possible role of different metal elements in the formation of caries have been discussed.

  12. Identification of the Bacterial Cellular Lipid Fraction by Using Fast GC × GC-MS and Innovative MS Libraries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondello, Luigi; Tranchida, Peter Quinto; Purcaro, Giorgia; Fanali, Chiara; Dugo, Paola; La Camera, Erminia; Bisignano, Carlo

    The bacteria fatty acid (FA) profile has been extensively studied for taxonomic classification purposes, since bacteria, in general, contain particular and rare fatty acids, compared to animal and plant tissues. In the last few years, the concern about pathogenic microorganisms used as bioterrorist agents has increased; therefore, rapid methods for the characterization of bacteria are necessary. In the present research, a half-an-hour procedure, to analyze bacteria, was developed: a 2-min one-step sample preparation step, was followed by a relatively fast comprehensive 2D GC-MS separation (25 min). Furthermore, dedicated mass spectrometry libraries were constructed for bacteria and FA identification. Finally, data-processing was carried out with the support of novel comprehensive 2D GC software.

  13. Supplementation of coconut oil from different sources to the diet induces cellular damage and rapid changes in fatty acid composition of chick liver and hepatic mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Gil-Villarino, A; Torres, M I; Zafra, M F; García-Peregrín, E

    1997-07-01

    Supplementation of 20% coconut oil from two commercial sources pharmaceutical ("Pharmacy") and cooking ("Pastry") use, to the chick diet for 14 days produced a clear damage to the hepatic mitochondria, accompanied by an accumulation of glycogen and lipid droplets in the hepatocyte cytoplasm. These effects may be accounted for the high proportion of fat supplemented to the diets (20%). Pharmacy coconut oil induced a high percentage of cellular death when administered for 14 days. Fatty acid profiles in liver and hepatic mitochondria rapidly changed (24 hr) after both coconut oils supplementation to the diet. The accumulation of shorter chain fatty acids (12:0 and 14:0) was always higher after Pharmacy than after Pastry diet feeding. This fact may contribute, at least in part, to the cellular damage mentioned above especially after Pharmacy diet feeding. Mitochondrial ratios of saturated/unsaturated and saturated/polyunsaturated fatty acids rapidly changed in parallel to these ratios in both diets. Most of the mitochondrial parameters measured tend to recuperate the control values when diets were supplied for 5-14 days. Nevertheless, the maintenance of the mentioned ratios after 14-days Pharmacy diet feeding at significantly higher levels than those observed in control, seems to suggest the lack of the homeostatic mechanism in these membranes and could be also related with the high percentage of cellular death observed after this dietary manipulation.

  14. Identification and molecular characterization of cellular factors required for glucocorticoid receptor-mediated mRNA decay

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ok Hyun; Park, Joori; Yu, Mira; An, Hyoung-Tae; Ko, Jesang; Kim, Yoon Ki

    2016-01-01

    Glucocorticoid (GC) receptor (GR) has been shown recently to bind a subset of mRNAs and elicit rapid mRNA degradation. However, the molecular details of GR-mediated mRNA decay (GMD) remain unclear. Here, we demonstrate that GMD triggers rapid degradation of target mRNAs in a translation-independent and exon junction complex-independent manner, confirming that GMD is mechanistically distinct from nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD). Efficient GMD requires PNRC2 (proline-rich nuclear receptor coregulatory protein 2) binding, helicase ability, and ATM-mediated phosphorylation of UPF1 (upstream frameshift 1). We also identify two GMD-specific factors: an RNA-binding protein, YBX1 (Y-box-binding protein 1), and an endoribonuclease, HRSP12 (heat-responsive protein 12). In particular, using HRSP12 variants, which are known to disrupt trimerization of HRSP12, we show that HRSP12 plays an essential role in the formation of a functionally active GMD complex. Moreover, we determine the hierarchical recruitment of GMD factors to target mRNAs. Finally, our genome-wide analysis shows that GMD targets a variety of transcripts, implicating roles in a wide range of cellular processes, including immune responses. PMID:27798850

  15. Development and validation of a real-time quantitative PCR assay for rapid identification of Bacillus anthracis in environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Irenge, Léonid M; Durant, Jean-François; Tomaso, Herbert; Pilo, Paola; Olsen, Jaran S; Ramisse, Vincent; Mahillon, Jacques; Gala, Jean-Luc

    2010-11-01

    A real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was developed for rapid identification of Bacillus anthracis in environmental samples. These samples often harbor Bacillus cereus bacteria closely related to B. anthracis, which may hinder its specific identification by resulting in false positive signals. The assay consists of two duplex real-time PCR: the first PCR allows amplification of a sequence specific of the B. cereus group (B. anthracis, B. cereus, Bacillus thuringiensis, Bacillus weihenstephanensis, Bacillus pseudomycoides, and Bacillus mycoides) within the phosphoenolpyruvate/sugar phosphotransferase system I gene and a B. anthracis specific single nucleotide polymorphism within the adenylosuccinate synthetase gene. The second real-time PCR assay targets the lethal factor gene from virulence plasmid pXO1 and the capsule synthesis gene from virulence plasmid pXO2. Specificity of the assay is enhanced by the use of minor groove binding probes and/or locked nucleic acids probes. The assay was validated on 304 bacterial strains including 37 B. anthracis, 67 B. cereus group, 54 strains of non-cereus group Bacillus, and 146 Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria strains. The assay was performed on various environmental samples spiked with B. anthracis or B. cereus spores. The assay allowed an accurate identification of B. anthracis in environmental samples. This study provides a rapid and reliable method for improving rapid identification of B. anthracis in field operational conditions.

  16. Rapid enrichment of rare-earth metals by carboxymethyl cellulose-based open-cellular hydrogel adsorbent from HIPEs template.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yongfeng; Wang, Wenbo; Zheng, Yian; Wang, Feng; Wang, Aiqin

    2016-04-20

    A series of monolithic open-cellular hydrogel adsorbents based on carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) were prepared through high internal phase emulsions (HIPEs) and used to enrich the rare-earth metals La(3+) and Ce(3+). The changes of pore structure, and the effects of pH, contact time, initial concentration on the adsorption performance were systematically studied. The results show that the as-prepared monolithic hydrogel adsorbents possess good open-cellular framework structure and have fast adsorption kinetics and high adsorption capacity for La(3+) and Ce(3+). The involved adsorption system can reach equilibrium within 30min and the maximal adsorption capacity is determined to be 384.62mg/g for La(3+) and 333.33mg/g for Ce(3+). Moreover, these porous hydrogel adsorbents show an excellent adsorptive reusability for La(3+) and Ce(3+) through five adsorption-desorption cycles. Such a pore hierarchy structure makes this monolithic open-cellular hydrogel adsorbent be an effective adsorbent for effective enrichment of La(3+) and Ce(3+) from aqueous solution.

  17. Application of MALDI-TOF MS Systems in the Rapid Identification of Campylobacter spp. of Public Health Importance.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Ying-Hsin; Wang, Yun F; Moura, Hercules; Miranda, Nancy; Simpson, Steven; Gowrishankar, Ramnath; Barr, John; Kerdahi, Khalil; Sulaiman, Irshad M

    2017-09-12

    Campylobacteriosis is an infectious gastrointestinal disease caused by Campylobacter spp.In most cases, it is either underdiagnosed or underreported due to poor diagnostics and limited databases. Several DNA-based molecular diagnostic techniques, including 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) sequence typing, have been widely used in the species identification of Campylobacter. Nevertheless, these assays are time-consuming and require a high quality of bacterial DNA. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) time-of-flight (TOF) MS is an emerging diagnostic technology that can provide the rapid identification of microorganisms by using their intact cells without extraction or purification. In this study, we analyzed 24 American Type Culture Collection reference isolates of 16 Campylobacter spp. and five unknown clinical bacterial isolates for rapid identification utilizing two commercially available MADI-TOF MS platforms, namely the bioMérieux VITEK(®) MS and Bruker Biotyper systems. In addition, 16S rRNA sequencing was performed to confirm the species-level identification of the unknown clinical isolates. Both MALDI-TOF MS systems identified the isolates of C. jejuni, C. coli, C. lari, and C. fetus. The results of this study suggest that the MALDI-TOF MS technique can be used in the identification of Campylobacter spp. of public health importance.

  18. Identification of "Streptococcus milleri" group isolates to the species level with a commercially available rapid test system.

    PubMed

    Flynn, C E; Ruoff, K L

    1995-10-01

    Clinical isolates of the "Streptococcus milleri" species group were examined by conventional methods and a rapid, commercially available method for the identification of these strains to the species level. The levels of agreement between the identifications obtained with the commercially available system (Fluo-Card Milleri; KEY Scientific, Round Rock, Tex.) and conventional methods were 98% for 50 Streptococcus anginosus strains, 97% for 31 Streptococcus constellatus strains, and 88% for 17 isolates identified as Streptococcus intermedius. Patient records were also studied in order to gain information on the frequency and sites of isolation of each of the three "S. milleri" group species.

  19. A combination of low-resolution Raman spectroscopy (LRRS) and rapid acquisition of mean Raman spectra for the identification of cells (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schie, Iwan W.; Krafft, Christoph; Popp, Jürgen

    2017-02-01

    It has been shown that Raman spectroscopy provides superb ability to differentiate individual cell types, and can also be used to detect circulating tumor cells (CTCs).1 CTCs have been recently identified as a main culprit for the development of cancer metastasis in cancer patients.2 It is also well known that the presence of CTCs is negatively associated with the development of metastasis and the progression of cancer. Hence, a reliable method for CTC identification will have a major impact on cancer diagnostic, monitoring of cancer progression, and cancer therapy. There are, however, two general problems of using Raman spectroscopy for the identification of cells. On the one hand, it is not clear from which cellular location a Raman spectrum that reliably represents the given cell should be acquired. On the other hand, the Raman signal intensity is weak, so that acquisition times of several seconds are required, prohibiting a high-throughput cell sampling. In this work we firstly show that by rapidly scanning a diffraction-limited spot over the cell and continuously acquiring a Raman spectrum it is possible to overcome the intracellular heterogeneity of a cell. And the resulting chemometric models provide a better and more robust cell classification. Secondly, we can show that the spectral resolution of a Raman spectrum is not as crucial to distinguish between different cell types. By reducing the spectral resolution 6-fold, we can achieve a signal gain 5-fold and still reliably identify single cells.

  20. The Continuing Evolution of HIV-1 Therapy: Identification and Development of Novel Antiretroviral Agents Targeting Viral and Cellular Targets.

    PubMed

    Hartman, Tracy L; Buckheit, Robert W

    2012-01-01

    During the past three decades, over thirty-five anti-HIV-1 therapies have been developed for use in humans and the progression from monotherapeutic treatment regimens to today's highly active combination antiretroviral therapies has had a dramatic impact on disease progression in HIV-1-infected individuals. In spite of the success of AIDS therapies and the existence of inhibitors of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase, protease, entry and fusion, and integrase, HIV-1 therapies still have a variety of problems which require continued development efforts to improve efficacy and reduce toxicity, while making drugs that can be used throughout both the developed and developing world, in pediatric populations, and in pregnant women. Highly active antiretroviral therapies (HAARTs) have significantly delayed the progression to AIDS, and in the developed world HIV-1-infected individuals might be expected to live normal life spans while on lifelong therapies. However, the difficult treatment regimens, the presence of class-specific drug toxicities, and the emergence of drug-resistant virus isolates highlight the fact that improvements in our therapeutic regimens and the identification of new and novel viral and cellular targets for therapy are still necessary. Antiretroviral therapeutic strategies and targets continue to be explored, and the development of increasingly potent molecules within existing classes of drugs and the development of novel strategies are ongoing.

  1. The Continuing Evolution of HIV-1 Therapy: Identification and Development of Novel Antiretroviral Agents Targeting Viral and Cellular Targets

    PubMed Central

    Hartman, Tracy L.; Buckheit, Robert W.

    2012-01-01

    During the past three decades, over thirty-five anti-HIV-1 therapies have been developed for use in humans and the progression from monotherapeutic treatment regimens to today's highly active combination antiretroviral therapies has had a dramatic impact on disease progression in HIV-1-infected individuals. In spite of the success of AIDS therapies and the existence of inhibitors of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase, protease, entry and fusion, and integrase, HIV-1 therapies still have a variety of problems which require continued development efforts to improve efficacy and reduce toxicity, while making drugs that can be used throughout both the developed and developing world, in pediatric populations, and in pregnant women. Highly active antiretroviral therapies (HAARTs) have significantly delayed the progression to AIDS, and in the developed world HIV-1-infected individuals might be expected to live normal life spans while on lifelong therapies. However, the difficult treatment regimens, the presence of class-specific drug toxicities, and the emergence of drug-resistant virus isolates highlight the fact that improvements in our therapeutic regimens and the identification of new and novel viral and cellular targets for therapy are still necessary. Antiretroviral therapeutic strategies and targets continue to be explored, and the development of increasingly potent molecules within existing classes of drugs and the development of novel strategies are ongoing. PMID:22848825

  2. Genomes to Life''Center for Molecular and Cellular Systems'': A research program for identification and characterization of protein complexes.

    SciTech Connect

    Buchanan, M V.; Larimer, Frank; Wiley, H S.; Kennel, S J.; Squier, Thomas C.; Ramsey, John M.; Rodland, Karin D.; Hurst, G B.; Smith, Richard D.; Xu, Ying; Dixon, David A.; Doktycz, M J.; Colson, Steve D.; Gesteland, R; Giometti, Carol S.; Young, Mark E.; Giddings, Ralph M.

    2002-02-01

    Goal 1 of Department of Energy's Genomes to Life (GTL) program seeks to identify and characterize the complete set of protein complexes within a cell. Goal 1 forms the foundation necessary to accomplish the other objectives of the GTL program, which focus on gene regulatory networks and molecular level characterization of interactions in microbial communities. Together this information would allow cells and their components to be understood in sufficient detail to predict, test, and understand the responses of a biological system to its environment. The Center for Molecular and Cellular Systems has been established to identify and characterize protein complexes using high through-put analytical technologies. A dynamic research program is being developed that supports the goals of the Center by focusing on the development of new capabilities for sample preparation and complex separations, molecular level identification of the protein complexes by mass spectrometry, characterization of the complexes in living cells by imaging techniques, and bioinformatics and computational tools for the collection and interpretation of data and formation of databases and tools to allow the data to be shared by the biological community.

  3. Randomized Trial of Rapid Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction–Based Blood Culture Identification and Susceptibility Testing

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Ritu; Teng, Christine B.; Cunningham, Scott A.; Ihde, Sherry M.; Steckelberg, James M.; Moriarty, James P.; Shah, Nilay D.; Mandrekar, Jayawant N.; Patel, Robin

    2015-01-01

    Background. The value of rapid, panel-based molecular diagnostics for positive blood culture bottles (BCBs) has not been rigorously assessed. We performed a prospective randomized controlled trial evaluating outcomes associated with rapid multiplex PCR (rmPCR) detection of bacteria, fungi, and resistance genes directly from positive BCBs. Methods. A total of 617 patients with positive BCBs underwent stratified randomization into 3 arms: standard BCB processing (control, n = 207), rmPCR reported with templated comments (rmPCR, n = 198), or rmPCR reported with templated comments and real-time audit and feedback of antimicrobial orders by an antimicrobial stewardship team (rmPCR/AS, n = 212). The primary outcome was antimicrobial therapy duration. Secondary outcomes were time to antimicrobial de-escalation or escalation, length of stay (LOS), mortality, and cost. Results. Time from BCB Gram stain to microorganism identification was shorter in the intervention group (1.3 hours) vs control (22.3 hours) (P < .001). Compared to the control group, both intervention groups had decreased broad-spectrum piperacillin-tazobactam (control 56 hours, rmPCR 44 hours, rmPCR/AS 45 hours; P = .01) and increased narrow-spectrum β-lactam (control 42 hours, rmPCR 71 hours, rmPCR/AS 85 hours; P = .04) use, and less treatment of contaminants (control 25%, rmPCR 11%, rmPCR/AS 8%; P = .015). Time from Gram stain to appropriate antimicrobial de-escalation or escalation was shortest in the rmPCR/AS group (de-escalation: rmPCR/AS 21 hours, control 34 hours, rmPCR 38 hours, P < .001; escalation: rmPCR/AS 5 hours, control 24 hours, rmPCR 6 hours, P = .04). Groups did not differ in mortality, LOS, or cost. Conclusions. rmPCR reported with templated comments reduced treatment of contaminants and use of broad-spectrum antimicrobials. Addition of antimicrobial stewardship enhanced antimicrobial de-escalation. Clinical Trials Registration. NCT01898208. PMID:26197846

  4. Rapid identification of Pterocarpus santalinus and Dalbergia louvelii by FTIR and 2D correlation IR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fang-Da; Xu, Chang-Hua; Li, Ming-Yu; Huang, An-Min; Sun, Su-Qin

    2014-07-01

    Since Pterocarpus santalinus and Dalbergia louvelii, which are of precious Rosewood, are very similar in their appearance and anatomy characteristics, cheaper Hongmu D. louvelii is often illegally used to impersonate valuable P. santalinus, especially in Chinese furniture manufacture. In order to develop a rapid and effective method for easy confused wood furniture differentiation, we applied tri-step identification method, i.e., conventional infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), second derivative infrared (SD-IR) spectroscopy and two-dimensional correlation infrared (2DCOS-IR) spectroscopy to investigate P. santalinus and D. louvelii furniture. According to FT-IR and SD-IR spectra, it has been found two unconditional stable difference at 848 cm-1 and 700 cm-1 and relative stable differences at 1735 cm-1, 1623 cm-1, 1614 cm-1, 1602 cm-1, 1509 cm-1, 1456 cm-1, 1200 cm-1, 1158 cm-1, 1055 cm-1, 1034 cm-1 and 895 cm-1 between D. louvelii and P. santalinus IR spectra. The stable discrepancy indicates that the category of extractives is different between the two species. Besides, the relative stable differences imply that the content of holocellulose in P. santalinus is more than that of D. louvelii, whereas the quantity of extractives in D. louvelii is higher. Furthermore, evident differences have been observed in their 2DCOS-IR spectra of 1550-1415 cm-1 and 1325-1030 cm-1. P. santalinus has two strong auto-peaks at 1459 cm-1 and 1467 cm-1, three mid-strong auto-peaks at 1518 cm-1, 1089 cm-1 and 1100 cm-1 and five weak auto-peaks at 1432 cm-1, 1437 cm-1, 1046 cm-1, 1056 cm-1 and 1307 cm-1 while D. louvelii has four strong auto-peaks at 1465 cm-1, 1523 cm-1, 1084 cm-1 and 1100 cm-1, four mid-strong auto-peaks at 1430 cm-1, 1499 cm-1, 1505 cm-1 and 1056 cm-1 and two auto-peaks at 1540 cm-1 and 1284 cm-1. This study has proved that FT-IR integrated with 2DCOS-IR could be applicable for precious wood furniture authentication in a direct, rapid and holistic manner.

  5. Rapid identification of Cryptococcus neoformans var. grubii, C. neoformans var. neoformans, and C. gattii by use of rapid biochemical tests, differential media, and DNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    McTaggart, Lisa; Richardson, Susan E; Seah, Christine; Hoang, Linda; Fothergill, Annette; Zhang, Sean X

    2011-07-01

    Rapid identification of Cryptococcus neoformans var. grubii, Cryptococcus neoformans var. neoformans, and Cryptococcus gattii is imperative for facilitation of prompt treatment of cryptococcosis and for understanding the epidemiology of the disease. Our purpose was to evaluate a test algorithm incorporating commercial rapid biochemical tests, differential media, and DNA sequence analysis that will allow us to differentiate these taxa rapidly and accurately. We assessed 147 type, reference, and clinical isolates, including 6 other Cryptococcus spp. (10 isolates) and 14 other yeast species (24 isolates), using a 4-hour urea broth test (Remel), a 24-hour urea broth test (Becton Dickinson), a 4-hour caffeic acid disk test (Hardy Diagnostics and Remel), 40- to 44-hour growth assessment on l-canavanine glycine bromothymol blue (CGB) agar, and intergenic spacer (IGS) sequence analysis. All 123 Cryptococcus isolates hydrolyzed urea, along with 7 isolates of Rhodotorula and Trichosporon. Eighty-five of 86 C. neoformans (99%) and 26 of 27 C. gattii (96%) isolates had positive caffeic acid results, unlike the other cryptococci (0/10) and yeast species (0/24). Together, these two tests positively identified virtually all C. neoformans/C. gattii isolates (98%) within 4 h. CGB agar or IGS sequencing further differentiated these isolates within 48 h. On CGB, 25 of 27 (93%) C. gattii strains induced a blue color change, in contrast to 0 of 86 C. neoformans isolates. Neighbor-joining cluster analysis of IGS sequences differentiated C. neoformans var. grubii, C. neoformans var. neoformans, and C. gattii. Based on these results, we describe a rapid identification algorithm for use in a microbiology laboratory to distinguish clinically relevant Cryptococcus spp.

  6. An Integrated Lab-on-Chip for Rapid Identification and Simultaneous Differentiation of Tropical Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Mitsuharu; Watthanaworawit, Wanitda; Ling, Clare L.; Mauduit, Marjorie; Malleret, Benoît; Grüner, Anne-Charlotte; Tan, Rosemary; Nosten, François H.; Snounou, Georges; Rénia, Laurent; Ng, Lisa F. P.

    2014-01-01

    Tropical pathogens often cause febrile illnesses in humans and are responsible for considerable morbidity and mortality. The similarities in clinical symptoms provoked by these pathogens make diagnosis difficult. Thus, early, rapid and accurate diagnosis will be crucial in patient management and in the control of these diseases. In this study, a microfluidic lab-on-chip integrating multiplex molecular amplification and DNA microarray hybridization was developed for simultaneous detection and species differentiation of 26 globally important tropical pathogens. The analytical performance of the lab-on-chip for each pathogen ranged from 102 to 103 DNA or RNA copies. Assay performance was further verified with human whole blood spiked with Plasmodium falciparum and Chikungunya virus that yielded a range of detection from 200 to 4×105 parasites, and from 250 to 4×107 PFU respectively. This lab-on-chip was subsequently assessed and evaluated using 170 retrospective patient specimens in Singapore and Thailand. The lab-on-chip had a detection sensitivity of 83.1% and a specificity of 100% for P. falciparum; a sensitivity of 91.3% and a specificity of 99.3% for P. vivax; a positive 90.0% agreement and a specificity of 100% for Chikungunya virus; and a positive 85.0% agreement and a specificity of 100% for Dengue virus serotype 3 with reference methods conducted on the samples. Results suggested the practicality of an amplification microarray-based approach in a field setting for high-throughput detection and identification of tropical pathogens. PMID:25078474

  7. Potential of mid IR spectroscopy in the rapid label free identification of skin malignancies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kastl, Lena; Kemper, Björn; Lloyd, Gavin R.; Nallala, Jayakrupakar; Stone, Nick; Naranjo, Valery; Penaranda, Francisco; Schnekenburger, Jürgen

    2016-03-01

    The rapid inspection of suspicious skin lesions for pathological cell types is the objective of optical point of care diagnostics technologies. A marker free fast diagnosis of skin malignancies would overcome the limitations of the current gold standard surgical biopsy. The time consuming and costly biopsy procedure requires the inspection of each sample by a trained pathologist, which limits the analysis of potentially malignant lesions. Optical technologies like RAMAN or infrared spectroscopy, which provide both, localization and chemical information, can be used to differentiate malignant from healthy tissue by the analysis of multi cell structures and cell type specific spectra. We here report the application of midIR spectroscopy towards fast and reliable skin diagnostics. Within the European research project MINERVA we developed standardized in vitro skin systems with increasing complexity, from single skin cell types as fibroblasts, keratinocytes and melanoma cells, to mixtures of these and finally three dimensional human skin equivalents. The standards were characterized in the established midIR range and also with newly developed systems for fast imaging up to 12 μm. The analysis of the spectra by novel data processing algorithms demonstrated the clear separation of all cell types, especially the tumor cells. The signals from single cell layers were sufficient for cell type differentiation. We have compared different midIR systems and found all of them suitable for specific cell type identification. Our data demonstrate the potential of midIR spectroscopy for fast image acquisition and an improved data processing as sensitive and specific optical biopsy technology.

  8. Evaluation of a rapid immunochromatographic assay for identification of Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis.

    PubMed

    Marot-Leblond, Agnes; Grimaud, Linda; David, Sandrine; Sullivan, Derek J; Coleman, David C; Ponton, Jose; Robert, Raymond

    2004-11-01

    Candida dubliniensis was first established as a novel yeast species in 1995. It is particularly associated with recurrent episodes of oral candidosis in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients, but it has also been detected at other anatomical sites and at a low incidence level in non-HIV-infected patients. It shares so many phenotypic characteristics with C. albicans that it is easily misidentified as such. No rapid, simple, and commercial test that allows differentiation between C. dubliniensis and C. albicans has been developed, until now. Accurate species identification requires the use of genotype-based techniques that are not routinely available in most clinical microbiology diagnostic laboratories. The present study was designed to evaluate the efficiency of a new test (the immunochromatographic membrane [ICM] albi-dubli test; SR2B, Avrille, France) to differentiate between C. albicans and C. dubliniensis. The organisms evaluated were strains whose identities had previously been confirmed by PCR tests and freshly isolated clinical strains and included 58 C. albicans isolates, 60 C. dubliniensis isolates, and 82 isolates belonging to other species of yeast. The ICM albi-dubli test is based on the principle of immunochromatographic analysis and involves the use of two distinct monoclonal antibodies that recognize two unrelated epitopes expressed by both species or specific to only one species. The assay requires no complex instrumentation for analysis and can be recommended for routine use in clinical microbiology laboratories. Results are obtained within 2 h and 30 min and are easy to interpret. This evaluation demonstrated the good performance of this immunochromatographic test for C. albicans and C. dubliniensis isolated on Sabouraud dextrose agar, CHOROMagar Candida, and CandidaSelect, with sensitivities and specificities ranging from 93.1 to 100%. These parameters decreased, however, to 91.4% when the test was performed with yeast isolated

  9. Use of Electrochemical DNA Biosensors for Rapid Molecular Identification of Uropathogens in Clinical Urine Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Joseph C.; Mastali, Mitra; Gau, Vincent; Suchard, Marc A.; Møller, Annette K.; Bruckner, David A.; Babbitt, Jane T.; Li, Yang; Gornbein, Jeffrey; Landaw, Elliot M.; McCabe, Edward R. B.; Churchill, Bernard M.; Haake, David A.

    2006-01-01

    We describe the first species-specific detection of bacterial pathogens in human clinical fluid samples using a microfabricated electrochemical sensor array. Each of the 16 sensors in the array consisted of three single-layer gold electrodes—working, reference, and auxiliary. Each of the working electrodes contained one representative from a library of capture probes, each specific for a clinically relevant bacterial urinary pathogen. The library included probes for Escherichia coli, Proteus mirabilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterocococcus spp., and the Klebsiella-Enterobacter group. A bacterial 16S rRNA target derived from single-step bacterial lysis was hybridized both to the biotin-modified capture probe on the sensor surface and to a second, fluorescein-modified detector probe. Detection of the target-probe hybrids was achieved through binding of a horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-conjugated anti-fluorescein antibody to the detector probe. Amperometric measurement of the catalyzed HRP reaction was obtained at a fixed potential of −200 mV between the working and reference electrodes. Species-specific detection of as few as 2,600 uropathogenic bacteria in culture, inoculated urine, and clinical urine samples was achieved within 45 min from the beginning of sample processing. In a feasibility study of this amperometric detection system using blinded clinical urine specimens, the sensor array had 100% sensitivity for direct detection of gram-negative bacteria without nucleic acid purification or amplification. Identification was demonstrated for 98% of gram-negative bacteria for which species-specific probes were available. When combined with a microfluidics-based sample preparation module, the integrated system could serve as a point-of-care device for rapid diagnosis of urinary tract infections. PMID:16455913

  10. Rapid identification of novel immunodominant proteins and characterization of a specific linear epitope of Campylobacter jejuni.

    PubMed

    Hoppe, Sebastian; Bier, Frank F; von Nickisch-Rosenegk, Markus; Nickisch-Rosenegk, Markus V

    2013-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni remains one of the major gut pathogens of our time. Its zoonotic nature and wide-spread distribution in industrialized countries calls for a quick and reliable diagnostic tool. Antibody-based detection presents a suitable means to identify pathogenic bacteria. However, the knowledge about immunodominant targets is limited. Thus, an approach is presented, which allows for the rapid screening of numerous cDNA derived expression clones to identify novel antigens. The deeper understanding of immunodominant proteins assists in the design of diagnostic tools and furthers the insight into the bacterium's pathogenicity as well as revealing potential candidates for vaccination. We have successfully screened 1536 clones of an expression library to identify 22 proteins that have not been described as immunodominant before. After subcloning the corresponding 22 genes and expression of full-length proteins, we investigated the immunodominant character by microarrays and ELISA. Subsequently, seven proteins were selected for epitope mapping. For cj0669 and cj0920c linear epitopes were identified. For cj0669, specificity assays revealed a specific linear epitope site. Consequently, an eleven amino acid residue sequence TLIKELKRLGI was analyzed via alanine scan, which revealed the glycine residue to be significant for binding of the antibody. The innovative approach presented herein of generating cDNAs of prokaryotes in combination with a microarray platform rendering time-consuming purification steps obsolete has helped to illuminate novel immunodominant proteins of C.jejuni. The findings of a specific linear epitope pave the way for a plethora of future research and the potential use in diagnostic applications such as serological screenings. Moreover, the current approach is easily adaptable to other highly relevant bacteria making it a formidable tool for the future discovery of antigens and potential biomarkers. Consequently, it is desirable to simplify the

  11. Rapid detection and identification of bacterial pathogens by using an ATP bioluminescence immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Dawn M; Lim, Daniel V

    2010-04-01

    Rapid identification of viable bacterial contaminants in food products is important because of their potential to cause disease. This study examined a method for microbial detection by using a combined ATP bioluminescence immunoassay. Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium were selected as target organisms because of their implication in foodborne illness. Various matrices containing the target cells were examined, including ground beef homogenate, apple juice, milk, and phosphate-buffered saline. Specific antibodies were immobilized on the surface of 96-well plates, and then the sample matrices containing target cells in the wells were incubated. Sample matrix (no cells) was used to establish background. The plates were washed, and the wells were incubated with BacTiter-Glo reagent in Mueller-Hinton II broth. Bioluminescent output was measured with the GloMax 96 luminometer. Signal-to-noise ratios were calculated, resulting in a limit of detection of 10(4) CFU/ml for both E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Typhimurium. The limit of detection for both species was not affected by the presence of nontarget cells. The various sample matrices did not affect signal-to-noise ratios when E. coli O157:H7 was the target. A weak matrix effect was observed when Salmonella Typhimurium was the target. A strong linear correlation was observed between the number of cells and luminescent output over 4 orders of magnitude for both species. This method provides a means of simultaneously detecting and identifying viable pathogens in complex matrices, and could have wider application in food microbiology.

  12. Identification of multiple cellular uptake pathways of polystyrene nanoparticles and factors affecting the uptake: relevance for drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Firdessa, Rebuma; Oelschlaeger, Tobias A; Moll, Heidrun

    2014-01-01

    Nanoparticles may address challenges by human diseases through improving diagnosis, vaccination and treatment. The uptake mechanism regulates the type of threat a particle poses on the host cells and how a cell responds to it. Hence, understanding the uptake mechanisms and cellular interactions of nanoparticles at the cellular and subcellular level is a prerequisite for their effective biomedical applications. The present study shows the uptake mechanisms of polystyrene nanoparticles and factors affecting their uptake in bone marrow-derived macrophages, 293T kidney epithelial cells and L929 fibroblasts. Labeling with the endocytic marker FM4-64 and transmission electron microscopy studies show that the nanoparticles were internalized rapidly via endocytosis and accumulated in intracellular vesicles. Soon after their internalizations, nanoparticles trafficked to organelles with acidic pH. Analysis of the ultrastructural morphology of the plasma membrane invaginations or extravasations provides clear evidence for the involvement of several uptake routes in parallel to internalize a given type of nanoparticles by mammalian cells, highlighting the complexity of the nanoparticle-cell interactions. Blocking the specific endocytic pathways by different pharmacological inhibitors shows similar outcomes. The potential to take up nanoparticles varies highly among different cell types in a particle sizes-, time- and energy-dependent manner. Furthermore, infection and the activation status of bone marrow-derived macrophages significantly affect the uptake potential of the cells, indicating the need to understand the diseases' pathogenesis to establish effective and rational drug-delivery systems. This study enhances our understanding of the application of nanotechnology in biomedical sciences.

  13. Rapid Detection of Antibiotic Resistance in Gram-Negative Bacteria Through Assessment of Changes in Cellular Morphology.

    PubMed

    Otero, Fátima; Santiso, Rebeca; Tamayo, Maria; Fernández, José Luis; Bou, Germán; Lepe, José Antonio; McConnell, Michael J; Gosálvez, Jaime; Cisneros, José Miguel

    2017-03-01

    Rapid antimicrobial susceptibility testing has the potential to improve patient outcomes and reduce healthcare-associated costs. In this study, a novel assay based on bacterial cell elongation after exposure to an antibiotic (ceftazidime) was evaluated for its ability to rapidly detect resistance in Gram-negative bacteria. The assay was used to detect resistance in a large collection of strains containing 320 clinical isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii, 171 clinical isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae, and 212 clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and the results were compared to those obtained using standard antimicrobial susceptibility testing methods. The assay identified ceftazidime-resistant strains with 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity for A. baumannii, 100% sensitivity and 97.2% specificity for K. pneumoniae, and with 82.3% sensitivity and 100% specificity for P. aeruginosa. Importantly, results were obtained in 1 hour 15 minutes from exponentially growing cultures. This study demonstrates that changes in cell length are highly correlated with phenotypic antibiotic susceptibility determined using standard susceptibility testing methods. This study therefore provides proof-of-concept that changes in cell morphology can be used as the basis for rapid detection of antibiotic resistance and provides the basis for the development of novel rapid diagnostics for the detection of antibiotic resistance.

  14. Cord Formation in BACTEC Medium Is a Reliable, Rapid Method for Presumptive Identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex

    PubMed Central

    McCarter, Yvette S.; Ratkiewicz, Irene N.; Robinson, Ann

    1998-01-01

    Serpentine cord formation in BACTEC 12B medium was evaluated as a rapid method for the presumptive identification of M. tuberculosis complex. Kinyoun acid-fast stained smears were prepared from 666 positive BACTEC 12B bottles and examined for the presence or absence of serpentine cording. Cord formation had a sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of 89.2, 99.2, 98.5, and 94.2%, respectively. The evaluation of the presence of cord formation in BACTEC 12B medium is reliable and permits the rapid presumptive reporting of M. tuberculosis. PMID:9705435

  15. Cord formation in BACTEC medium is a reliable, rapid method for presumptive identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex.

    PubMed

    McCarter, Y S; Ratkiewicz, I N; Robinson, A

    1998-09-01

    Serpentine cord formation in BACTEC 12B medium was evaluated as a rapid method for the presumptive identification of M. tuberculosis complex. Kinyoun acid-fast stained smears were prepared from 666 positive BACTEC 12B bottles and examined for the presence or absence of serpentine cording. Cord formation had a sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of 89.2, 99.2, 98.5, and 94.2%, respectively. The evaluation of the presence of cord formation in BACTEC 12B medium is reliable and permits the rapid presumptive reporting of M. tuberculosis.

  16. Duplex DNA-Invading γ-Modified Peptide Nucleic Acids Enable Rapid Identification of Bloodstream Infections in Whole Blood

    PubMed Central

    Nölling, Jörk; Rapireddy, Srinivas; Amburg, Joel I.; Crawford, Elizabeth M.; Prakash, Ranjit A.; Rabson, Arthur R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bloodstream infections are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. Early and targeted antimicrobial intervention is lifesaving, yet current diagnostic approaches fail to provide actionable information within a clinically viable time frame due to their reliance on blood culturing. Here, we present a novel pathogen identification (PID) platform that features the use of duplex DNA-invading γ-modified peptide nucleic acids (γPNAs) for the rapid identification of bacterial and fungal pathogens directly from blood, without culturing. The PID platform provides species-level information in under 2.5 hours while reaching single-CFU-per-milliliter sensitivity across the entire 21-pathogen panel. The clinical utility of the PID platform was demonstrated through assessment of 61 clinical specimens, which showed >95% sensitivity and >90% overall correlation to blood culture findings. This rapid γPNA-based platform promises to improve patient care by enabling the administration of a targeted first-line antimicrobial intervention. PMID:27094328

  17. Rapid Identification of Pathogens from Positive Blood Cultures by Multiplex PCR using the FilmArray System

    PubMed Central

    Blaschke, Anne J.; Heyrend, Caroline; Byington, Carrie L.; Fisher, Mark A.; Barker, Elizabeth; Garrone, Nicholas F.; Thatcher, Stephanie A.; Pavia, Andrew T.; Barney, Trenda; Alger, Garrison D.; Daly, Judy A.; Ririe, Kirk M.; Ota, Irene; Poritz, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    Sepsis is a leading cause of death. Rapid and accurate identification of pathogens and antimicrobial resistance directly from blood culture could improve patient outcomes. The FilmArray® (FA; Idaho Technology, Inc., Salt Lake City, UT) Blood Culture (BC) panel can identify > 25 pathogens and 4 antibiotic resistance genes from positive blood cultures in 1 hour. We compared a development version of the panel to conventional culture and susceptibility testing on 102 archived blood cultures from adults and children with bacteremia. Of 109 pathogens identified by culture, 95% were identified by FA. Among 111 prospectively collected blood cultures, the FA identified 84 of 92 pathogens (91%) covered by the panel. Among 25 Staphylococcus aureus and 21 Enterococcus species detected, FA identified all culture-proven MRSA and VRE. The FA BC panel is an accurate method for the rapid identification of pathogens and resistance genes from blood culture. PMID:22999332

  18. Rapid Molecular Identification of Pathogenic Yeasts by Pyrosequencing Analysis of 35 Nucleotides of Internal Transcribed Spacer 2 ▿

    PubMed Central

    Borman, Andrew M.; Linton, Christopher J.; Oliver, Debra; Palmer, Michael D.; Szekely, Adrien; Johnson, Elizabeth M.

    2010-01-01

    Rapid identification of yeast species isolates from clinical samples is particularly important given their innately variable antifungal susceptibility profiles. Here, we have evaluated the utility of pyrosequencing analysis of a portion of the internal transcribed spacer 2 region (ITS2) for identification of pathogenic yeasts. A total of 477 clinical isolates encompassing 43 different fungal species were subjected to pyrosequencing analysis in a strictly blinded study. The molecular identifications produced by pyrosequencing were compared with those obtained using conventional biochemical tests (AUXACOLOR2) and following PCR amplification and sequencing of the D1-D2 portion of the nuclear 28S large rRNA gene. More than 98% (469/477) of isolates encompassing 40 of the 43 fungal species tested were correctly identified by pyrosequencing of only 35 bp of ITS2. Moreover, BLAST searches of the public synchronized databases with the ITS2 pyrosequencing signature sequences revealed that there was only minimal sequence redundancy in the ITS2 under analysis. In all cases, the pyrosequencing signature sequences were unique to the yeast species (or species complex) under investigation. Finally, when pyrosequencing was combined with the Whatman FTA paper technology for the rapid extraction of fungal genomic DNA, molecular identification could be accomplished within 6 h from the time of starting from pure cultures. PMID:20702674

  19. Rapid identification of ascomycetous yeasts from clinical specimens by a molecular method based on flow cytometry and comparison with identifications from phenotypic assays.

    PubMed

    Page, Brent T; Shields, Christine E; Merz, William G; Kurtzman, Cletus P

    2006-09-01

    This study was designed to compare the identification of ascomycetous yeasts recovered from clinical specimens by using phenotypic assays (PA) and a molecular flow cytometric (FC) method. Large-subunit rRNA domains 1 and 2 (D1/D2) gene sequence analysis was also performed and served as the reference for correct strain identification. A panel of 88 clinical isolates was tested that included representatives of nine commonly encountered species and six infrequently encountered species. The PA included germ tube production, fermentation of seven carbohydrates, morphology on corn meal agar, urease and phenoloxidase activities, and carbohydrate assimilation tests when needed. The FC method (Luminex) employed species-specific oligonucleotides attached to polystyrene beads, which were hybridized with D1/D2 amplicons from the unidentified isolates. The PA identified 81 of 88 strains correctly but misidentified 4 of Candida dubliniensis, 1 of C. bovina, 1 of C. palmioleophila, and 1 of C. bracarensis. The FC method correctly identified 79 of 88 strains and did not misidentify any isolate but did not identify nine isolates because oligonucleotide probes were not available in the current library. The FC assay takes approximately 5 h, whereas the PA takes from 2 h to 5 days for identification. In conclusion, PA did well with the commonly encountered species, was not accurate for uncommon species, and takes significantly longer than the FC method. These data strongly support the potential of FC technology for rapid and accurate identification of medically important yeasts. With the introduction of new antifungals, rapid, accurate identification of pathogenic yeasts is more important than ever for guiding antifungal chemotherapy.

  20. Supplementation of CHROMagar Candida medium with Pal's medium for rapid identification of Candida dubliniensis.

    PubMed

    Sahand, Ismail H; Moragues, María D; Eraso, Elena; Villar-Vidal, María; Quindós, Guillermo; Pontón, José

    2005-11-01

    CHROMagar Candida medium is used for the isolation and identification of Candida species, but it does not differentiate Candida albicans from Candida dubliniensis. This differentiation can be achieved by using Pal's agar, which cannot be used in primary isolation. We have combined both media to obtain a new medium that can be used for the isolation and identification of C. dubliniensis in primary cultures.

  1. Rapid species identification of cooked poisonous mushrooms by using real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Maeta, Kazuhiko; Ochi, Tomoya; Tokimoto, Keisuke; Shimomura, Norihiro; Maekawa, Nitaro; Kawaguchi, Nobuhisa; Nakaya, Makoto; Kitamoto, Yutaka; Aimi, Tadanori

    2008-05-01

    Species-specific identification of the major cooked and fresh poisonous mushrooms in Japan was performed using a real-time PCR system. Specific fluorescence signals were detected, and no nonspecific signals were detected. Therefore, we succeeded in developing a species-specific test for the identification of poisonous mushrooms within 1.5 h.

  2. Rapid detection and identification of viral and bacterial fish pathogens using a DNA array-based multiplex assay.

    PubMed

    Lievens, B; Frans, I; Heusdens, C; Justé, A; Jonstrup, S P; Lieffrig, F; Willems, K A

    2011-11-01

    Fish diseases can be caused by a variety of diverse organisms, including bacteria, fungi, viruses and protozoa, and pose a universal threat to the ornamental fish industry and aquaculture. The lack of rapid, accurate and reliable means by which fish pathogens can be detected and identified has been one of the main limitations in fish pathogen diagnosis and fish disease management and has consequently stimulated the search for alternative diagnostic techniques. Here, we describe a method based on multiplex and broad-range PCR amplification combined with DNA array hybridization for the simultaneous detection and identification of all cyprinid herpesviruses (CyHV-1, CyHV-2 and CyHV-3) and some of the most important fish pathogenic Flavobacterium species, including F. branchiophilum, F. columnare and F. psychrophilum. For virus identification, the DNA polymerase and helicase genes were targeted. For bacterial identification, the ribosomal RNA gene was used. The developed methodology permitted 100% specificity for the identification of the target species. Detection sensitivity was equivalent to 10 viral genomes or less than a picogram of bacterial DNA. The utility and power of the array for sensitive pathogen detection and identification in complex samples such as infected tissue is demonstrated in this study. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  3. Rapid Evaporative Ionisation Mass Spectrometry (REIMS) Provides Accurate Direct from Culture Species Identification within the Genus Candida

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Simon J. S.; Bolt, Frances; Perdones-Montero, Alvaro; Rickards, Tony; Hardiman, Kate; Abdolrasouli, Alireza; Burke, Adam; Bodai, Zsolt; Karancsi, Tamas; Simon, Daniel; Schaffer, Richard; Rebec, Monica; Balog, Julia; Takáts, Zoltan

    2016-01-01

    Members of the genus Candida, such as C. albicans and C. parapsilosis, are important human pathogens. Other members of this genus, previously believed to carry minimal disease risk, are increasingly recognised as important human pathogens, particularly because of variations in susceptibilities to widely used anti-fungal agents. Thus, rapid and accurate identification of clinical Candida isolates is fundamental in ensuring timely and effective treatments are delivered. Rapid Evaporative Ionisation Mass Spectrometry (REIMS) has previously been shown to provide a high-throughput platform for the rapid and accurate identification of bacterial and fungal isolates. In comparison to commercially available matrix assisted laser desorption ionisation time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-ToF), REIMS based methods require no preparative steps nor time-consuming cell extractions. Here, we report on the ability of REIMS-based analysis to rapidly and accurately identify 153 clinical Candida isolates to species level. Both handheld bipolar REIMS and high-throughput REIMS platforms showed high levels of species classification accuracy, with 96% and 100% of isolates classified correctly to species level respectively. In addition, significantly different (FDR corrected P value < 0.05) lipids within the 600 to 1000 m/z mass range were identified, which could act as species-specific biomarkers in complex microbial communities. PMID:27841356

  4. Rapid Evaporative Ionisation Mass Spectrometry (REIMS) Provides Accurate Direct from Culture Species Identification within the Genus Candida.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Simon J S; Bolt, Frances; Perdones-Montero, Alvaro; Rickards, Tony; Hardiman, Kate; Abdolrasouli, Alireza; Burke, Adam; Bodai, Zsolt; Karancsi, Tamas; Simon, Daniel; Schaffer, Richard; Rebec, Monica; Balog, Julia; Takáts, Zoltan

    2016-11-14

    Members of the genus Candida, such as C. albicans and C. parapsilosis, are important human pathogens. Other members of this genus, previously believed to carry minimal disease risk, are increasingly recognised as important human pathogens, particularly because of variations in susceptibilities to widely used anti-fungal agents. Thus, rapid and accurate identification of clinical Candida isolates is fundamental in ensuring timely and effective treatments are delivered. Rapid Evaporative Ionisation Mass Spectrometry (REIMS) has previously been shown to provide a high-throughput platform for the rapid and accurate identification of bacterial and fungal isolates. In comparison to commercially available matrix assisted laser desorption ionisation time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-ToF), REIMS based methods require no preparative steps nor time-consuming cell extractions. Here, we report on the ability of REIMS-based analysis to rapidly and accurately identify 153 clinical Candida isolates to species level. Both handheld bipolar REIMS and high-throughput REIMS platforms showed high levels of species classification accuracy, with 96% and 100% of isolates classified correctly to species level respectively. In addition, significantly different (FDR corrected P value < 0.05) lipids within the 600 to 1000 m/z mass range were identified, which could act as species-specific biomarkers in complex microbial communities.

  5. SNP Identification through Transcriptome Analysis of the European Brown Hare (Lepus europaeus): Cellular Energetics and Mother’s Curse

    PubMed Central

    Moutou, Katerina A.; Psarra, Anna-Maria G.; Stamatis, Costas; Tsipourlianos, Andreas; Mamuris, Zissis

    2016-01-01

    The European brown hare (Lepus europaeus, Pallas 1778) is an important small game species in Europe. Due to its size and position in the food chain, as well as its life history, phenotypic variation and the relatively recent speciation events, brown hare plays an important role in the structure of various ecosystems and has emerged as an important species for population management and evolutionary studies. In order to identify informative SNPs for such studies, heart and liver tissues of three samples from the European lineage and a three-sample pool from the Anatolian lineage were subjected to RNA-Sequencing analysis. This effort resulted in 9496 well-assembled protein-coding sequences with close homology to human. After applying very stringent filtering criteria, 66185 polymorphic sites were identified in 7665 genes/cds and 2050 of those polymorphic sites are potentially capable of distinguishing the European from the Anatolian lineage. From these distinguishing mutations we focused on those in genes that are involved in cellular energy production, namely the glycolysis, Krebs cycle and the OXPHOS machinery. A selected set of SNPs was also validated by Sanger sequencing. By simulating the three European individuals as one pool, no substantial informative-SNP identification was lost, making it a cost-efficient approach. To our knowledge this is the first attempt to correlate the differentiation in both nuclear and mitochondrial genome between the two different lineages of L. europaeus with the observed spatial partitioning of the lineages of the species, proposing a possible mechanism that is maintaining the reproductive isolation of the lineages. PMID:27459096

  6. SNP Identification through Transcriptome Analysis of the European Brown Hare (Lepus europaeus): Cellular Energetics and Mother's Curse.

    PubMed

    Amoutzias, Grigoris D; Giannoulis, Themistoklis; Moutou, Katerina A; Psarra, Anna-Maria G; Stamatis, Costas; Tsipourlianos, Andreas; Mamuris, Zissis

    2016-01-01

    The European brown hare (Lepus europaeus, Pallas 1778) is an important small game species in Europe. Due to its size and position in the food chain, as well as its life history, phenotypic variation and the relatively recent speciation events, brown hare plays an important role in the structure of various ecosystems and has emerged as an important species for population management and evolutionary studies. In order to identify informative SNPs for such studies, heart and liver tissues of three samples from the European lineage and a three-sample pool from the Anatolian lineage were subjected to RNA-Sequencing analysis. This effort resulted in 9496 well-assembled protein-coding sequences with close homology to human. After applying very stringent filtering criteria, 66185 polymorphic sites were identified in 7665 genes/cds and 2050 of those polymorphic sites are potentially capable of distinguishing the European from the Anatolian lineage. From these distinguishing mutations we focused on those in genes that are involved in cellular energy production, namely the glycolysis, Krebs cycle and the OXPHOS machinery. A selected set of SNPs was also validated by Sanger sequencing. By simulating the three European individuals as one pool, no substantial informative-SNP identification was lost, making it a cost-efficient approach. To our knowledge this is the first attempt to correlate the differentiation in both nuclear and mitochondrial genome between the two different lineages of L. europaeus with the observed spatial partitioning of the lineages of the species, proposing a possible mechanism that is maintaining the reproductive isolation of the lineages.

  7. Effect of the internal microstructure in rapid-prototyped polycaprolactone scaffolds on physical and cellular properties for bone tissue regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Hojun; Kim, Geun Hyung

    2012-09-01

    Biomedical scaffolds should be designed to optimize their inter-microstructure to enable cell infiltration and nutrient/waste transport. To acquire these properties, several structural parameters, such as pore size, pore shape, porosity, pore interconnectivity, permeability, and tortuosity are required. In this study, we explored the effect of tortuosity on the viable cell proliferation and mineralization of osteoblast-like-cells (MG63) in polycaprolactone scaffolds. For analysis, we designed four different scaffolds of various tortuosities ranging from 1.0 to 1.3 under the same porosity (56 %) and 100 % pore interconnectivity. The pore size of the scaffolds was set as 150 and 300 µm, and a mixture of these sizes. We found that despite the porosity being same, the elastic modulus was dependent on the pore size of the scaffolds due to the distributed stress concentration. In addition, the relative water movement within scaffolds was also related to the internal microstructure. Cell viability and Ca2+ deposition of the cell-seeded scaffolds showed that the proliferation of viable cells and mineralization in the scaffolds with appropriate tortuosity (1.2) was relatively high compared to those of the scaffolds displaying low (1.05 and 1.1) or high (1.3) tortuosity. Our findings indicated that the internal microstructure of the scaffolds may influence not only the physical properties, but in addition the cellular behavior.

  8. Benefits of Adding a Rapid PCR-Based Blood Culture Identification Panel to an Established Antimicrobial Stewardship Program

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Studies have demonstrated that the combination of antimicrobial stewardship programs (ASP) and rapid organism identification improves outcomes in bloodstream infections (BSI) but have not controlled for the incremental contribution of the individual components. Hospitalized adult patients with blood culture pathogens on a rapid, multiplex PCR-based blood culture identification panel (BCID) that included 19 bacterial species, 5 Candida spp., and 4 antimicrobial resistance genes were studied over sequential time periods in a pre-post quasiexperimental study in 3 groups in the following categories: conventional organism identification (controls), conventional organism identification with ASP (AS), and BCID with ASP (BCID). Clinical and economic outcomes were compared between groups. There were 783 patients with positive blood cultures; of those patients, 364 (115 control, 104 AS, and 145 BCID) met inclusion criteria. The time from blood culture collection to organism identification was shorter in the BCID group (17 h; P < 0.001) than in the control group (57 h) or the AS group (54 h). The BCID group had a shorter time to effective therapy (5 h; P < 0.001) than the control group (15 h) or AS group (13 h). The AS (57%) and BCID (52%) groups had higher rates of antimicrobial de-escalation than the control group (34%), with de-escalation occurring sooner in the BCID group (48 h; P = 0.034) than in the AS group (61 h) or the control group (63 h). No difference between the control group, AS group, and BCID group was seen with respect to mortality, 30-day readmission, intensive care unit length of stay (LOS), postculture LOS, or costs. In patients with BSI, ASP alone improved antimicrobial utilization. Addition of BCID to an established ASP shortened the time to effective therapy and further improved antimicrobial use compared to ASP alone, even in a setting of low antimicrobial resistance rates. PMID:27487951

  9. A NOVEL TECHNIQUE FOR THE RAPID IDENTIFICATION OF ALPHA EMITTERS RELEASED DURING A RADIOLOGICAL INCIDENT.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Currently there are no standard radioanalytical methods applicable to the initial phase of a radiological emergency, for the early identification and quantification of alpha emitting radionuclides. Of particular interest are determinations of the presence and concentration of is...

  10. A NOVEL TECHNIQUE FOR THE RAPID IDENTIFICATION OF ALPHA EMITTERS RELEASED DURING A RADIOLOGICAL INCIDENT.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Currently there are no standard radioanalytical methods applicable to the initial phase of a radiological emergency, for the early identification and quantification of alpha emitting radionuclides. Of particular interest are determinations of the presence and concentration of is...

  11. Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy for the Rapid Detection and Identification of Microbial Pathogens in Human Serum

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-11

    identification of leukemia cells [12], diagnosis of dysplasia in Barrett’s esophagus [13], and identification of prostate cancer [14]. The...USE ONLY 26 respect to properties such as pathogenesis, antibiotic resistance, biofilm production, and generation of toxins. Many SERS...Percival, S.L., et al., Microbiology of the skin and the role of biofilms in infection. International wound journal, 2012. 9(1): p. 14-32. 2. Geffers

  12. Supplementation of CHROMagar Candida Medium with Pal's Medium for Rapid Identification of Candida dubliniensis

    PubMed Central

    Sahand, Ismail H.; Moragues, María D.; Eraso, Elena; Villar-Vidal, María; Quindós, Guillermo; Pontón, José

    2005-01-01

    CHROMagar Candida medium is used for the isolation and identification of Candida species, but it does not differentiate Candida albicans from Candida dubliniensis. This differentiation can be achieved by using Pal's agar, which cannot be used in primary isolation. We have combined both media to obtain a new medium that can be used for the isolation and identification of C. dubliniensis in primary cultures. PMID:16272515

  13. Development of a new protocol for rapid bacterial identification and susceptibility testing directly from urine samples.

    PubMed

    Zboromyrska, Y; Rubio, E; Alejo, I; Vergara, A; Mons, A; Campo, I; Bosch, J; Marco, F; Vila, J

    2016-06-01

    The current gold standard method for the diagnosis of urinary tract infections (UTI) is urine culture that requires 18-48 h for the identification of the causative microorganisms and an additional 24 h until the results of antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) are available. The aim of this study was to shorten the time of urine sample processing by a combination of flow cytometry for screening and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) for bacterial identification followed by AST directly from urine. The study was divided into two parts. During the first part, 675 urine samples were processed by a flow cytometry device and a cut-off value of bacterial count was determined to select samples for direct identification by MALDI-TOF-MS at ≥5 × 10(6) bacteria/mL. During the second part, 163 of 1029 processed samples reached the cut-off value. The sample preparation protocol for direct identification included two centrifugation and two washing steps. Direct AST was performed by the disc diffusion method if a reliable direct identification was obtained. Direct MALDI-TOF-MS identification was performed in 140 urine samples; 125 of the samples were positive by urine culture, 12 were contaminated and 3 were negative. Reliable direct identification was obtained in 108 (86.4%) of the 125 positive samples. AST was performed in 102 identified samples, and the results were fully concordant with the routine method among 83 monomicrobial infections. In conclusion, the turnaround time of the protocol described to diagnose UTI was about 1 h for microbial identification and 18-24 h for AST.

  14. Rapid Detection & Identification of Bacillus Species using MALDI-TOF/TOF and Biomarker Database

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-01

    Identification of Selected Bacillus Species (excerpt from [42]) S0 0 00 two IL - ZZO al 0 > W Z 0 . 0j~ COLN SPECIESIL B. megaterium v + + + v + + - v...identification for genus (eg. Bacillus vs. Escherichia) and species ( Bacillus anthracis vs. Bacillus megaterium ), but not strains (B. anthracis Ames... Bacillus Species using MALDI-TOF/TOF and Biomarker Database A Strategic Plan Nora W.C. Chan and William E. Lee Defence R&D Canada - Suffield Zoltan Mester

  15. Rapid identification, by use of the LTQ Orbitrap hybrid FT mass spectrometer, of antifungal compounds produced by lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Brosnan, Brid; Coffey, Aidan; Arendt, Elke K; Furey, Ambrose

    2012-07-01

    Fungal contamination of food causes health and economic concerns. Several species of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have antifungal activity which may inhibit food spoilage fungi. LAB have GRAS (generally recognised as safe) status, allowing them to be safely integrated into food systems as natural food preservatives. A method is described herein that enables rapid screening of LAB cultures for 25 known antifungal compounds associated with LAB. This is the first chromatographic method developed which enables the rapid identification of a wide range of antifungal compounds by a single method with a short analysis time (23 min). Chromatographic separation was achieved on a Phenomenex Gemini C18 100A column (150 mm × 2.0 mm; 5 μm) by use of a mobile-phase gradient prepared from (A) water containing acetic acid (0.1%) and (B) acetonitrile containing acetic acid (0.1%), at a flow rate of 0.3 µL min(-1). The gradient involved a progressive ramp from 10-95% acetonitrile over 13 min. The LC was coupled to a hybrid LTQ Orbitrap XL fourier-transform mass spectrometer (FTMS) operated in negative ionisation mode. High mass accuracy data (<3 ppm) obtained by use of high resolution (30,000 K) enabled unequivocal identification of the target compounds. This method allows comprehensive profiling and comparison of different LAB strains and is also capable of the identification of additional compounds produced by these bacteria.

  16. Melting Temperature Mapping Method: A Novel Method for Rapid Identification of Unknown Pathogenic Microorganisms within Three Hours of Sample Collection.

    PubMed

    Niimi, Hideki; Ueno, Tomohiro; Hayashi, Shirou; Abe, Akihito; Tsurue, Takahiro; Mori, Masashi; Tabata, Homare; Minami, Hiroshi; Goto, Michihiko; Akiyama, Makoto; Yamamoto, Yoshihiro; Saito, Shigeru; Kitajima, Isao

    2015-07-28

    Acquiring the earliest possible identification of pathogenic microorganisms is critical for selecting the appropriate antimicrobial therapy in infected patients. We herein report the novel "melting temperature (Tm) mapping method" for rapidly identifying the dominant bacteria in a clinical sample from sterile sites. Employing only seven primer sets, more than 100 bacterial species can be identified. In particular, using the Difference Value, it is possible to identify samples suitable for Tm mapping identification. Moreover, this method can be used to rapidly diagnose the absence of bacteria in clinical samples. We tested the Tm mapping method using 200 whole blood samples obtained from patients with suspected sepsis, 85% (171/200) of which matched the culture results based on the detection level. A total of 130 samples were negative according to the Tm mapping method, 98% (128/130) of which were also negative based on the culture method. Meanwhile, 70 samples were positive according to the Tm mapping method, and of the 59 suitable for identification, 100% (59/59) exhibited a "match" or "broad match" with the culture or sequencing results. These findings were obtained within three hours of whole blood collection. The Tm mapping method is therefore useful for identifying infectious diseases requiring prompt treatment.

  17. Rapid identification and antimicrobial susceptibility profiling of Gram-positive cocci in blood cultures with the Vitek 2 system.

    PubMed

    Lupetti, A; Barnini, S; Castagna, B; Capria, A-L; Nibbering, P H

    2010-01-01

    Rapid identification and antimicrobial susceptibility profiling of the bacteria in blood cultures can result in clinical and financial benefits. Addition of saponin to the fluid from blood culture bottles promotes the recovery of the bacteria and thus may shorten the turnaround time of the microbiological analyses. In this study we compared the identification and susceptibility profiles of saponin-treated and untreated (standard method) blood cultures monomicrobial for Gram-positive cocci using Vitek 2. We concordantly identified 49 (89%) of 55 monobacterial cultures using the results with the standard method as reference. Complete categorical agreement between the susceptibility profiles with the new and the standard method was found for 26 (53%) of 49 isolates, while discrepancies were seen for 23 (47%) cultures. E-tests indicated that the new method resulted in a correct susceptibility profile for 8 (35%) of these 23 blood cultures. Therefore, 34 (69%) of 49 cultures showed a concordant/correct susceptibility profile for all antimicrobials with an overall error rate of 2.3%. Thus, addition of saponin to the fluid from blood culture bottles of the Bactec 9240 leads to the rapid (results available >or=12 hours earlier) and reliable identification and susceptibility profiling of Gram-positive cocci in blood cultures with Vitek 2.

  18. Lncident: A Tool for Rapid Identification of Long Noncoding RNAs Utilizing Sequence Intrinsic Composition and Open Reading Frame Information

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Yanchun

    2016-01-01

    More and more studies have demonstrated that long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) play critical roles in diversity of biological process and are also associated with various types of disease. How to rapidly identify lncRNAs and messenger RNA is the fundamental step to uncover the function of lncRNAs identification. Here, we present a novel method for rapid identification of lncRNAs utilizing sequence intrinsic composition features and open reading frame information based on support vector machine model, named as Lncident (LncRNAs identification). The 10-fold cross-validation and ROC curve are used to evaluate the performance of Lncident. The main advantage of Lncident is high speed without the loss of accuracy. Compared with the exiting popular tools, Lncident outperforms Coding-Potential Calculator, Coding-Potential Assessment Tool, Coding-Noncoding Index, and PLEK. Lncident is also much faster than Coding-Potential Calculator and Coding-Noncoding Index. Lncident presents an outstanding performance on microorganism, which offers a great application prospect to the analysis of microorganism. In addition, Lncident can be trained by users' own collected data. Furthermore, R package and web server are simultaneously developed in order to maximize the convenience for the users. The R package “Lncident” can be easily installed on multiple operating system platforms, as long as R is supported. PMID:28116287

  19. Melting Temperature Mapping Method: A Novel Method for Rapid Identification of Unknown Pathogenic Microorganisms within Three Hours of Sample Collection

    PubMed Central

    Niimi, Hideki; Ueno, Tomohiro; Hayashi, Shirou; Abe, Akihito; Tsurue, Takahiro; Mori, Masashi; Tabata, Homare; Minami, Hiroshi; Goto, Michihiko; Akiyama, Makoto; Yamamoto, Yoshihiro; Saito, Shigeru; Kitajima, Isao

    2015-01-01

    Acquiring the earliest possible identification of pathogenic microorganisms is critical for selecting the appropriate antimicrobial therapy in infected patients. We herein report the novel “melting temperature (Tm) mapping method” for rapidly identifying the dominant bacteria in a clinical sample from sterile sites. Employing only seven primer sets, more than 100 bacterial species can be identified. In particular, using the Difference Value, it is possible to identify samples suitable for Tm mapping identification. Moreover, this method can be used to rapidly diagnose the absence of bacteria in clinical samples. We tested the Tm mapping method using 200 whole blood samples obtained from patients with suspected sepsis, 85% (171/200) of which matched the culture results based on the detection level. A total of 130 samples were negative according to the Tm mapping method, 98% (128/130) of which were also negative based on the culture method. Meanwhile, 70 samples were positive according to the Tm mapping method, and of the 59 suitable for identification, 100% (59/59) exhibited a “match” or “broad match” with the culture or sequencing results. These findings were obtained within three hours of whole blood collection. The Tm mapping method is therefore useful for identifying infectious diseases requiring prompt treatment. PMID:26218169

  20. Comparison of rapid NFT and API 20E with conventional methods for identification of gram-negative nonfermentative bacilli from pharmaceuticals and cosmetics.

    PubMed Central

    Palmieri, M J; Carito, S L; Meyer, R F

    1988-01-01

    The accuracy of the Rapid NFT and the API 20E identification systems was evaluated by comparing them with conventional biochemical methods for the identification of gram-negative, nonfermentative bacilli. The organisms were recovered from preserved, nonsterile pharmaceutical and cosmetic products. A total of 123 test isolates that are commonly encountered in these products were used. By using the criteria of accurate and reliable identification without employing additional tests, Rapid NFT was found to be more accurate after 48 h of incubation than API 20E for characterizing isolates to the species level. Therefore, close agreement between NFT and conventional methods for identification of industrial gram-negative isolates provides evidence that the Rapid NFT system is an improved and rapid method for identifying these organisms to the species level with minimal use of supplementary tests. PMID:3214161

  1. Microbial Protein-Antigenome Determination (MAD) Technology: A Proteomics-Based Strategy for Rapid Identification of Microbial Targets of Host Humoral Immune Responses

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Immunogenic, pathogen-specific proteins have excellent potential for development of novel management modalities. Here, we describe an innovative application of proteomics called Microbial protein-Antigenome Determination (MAD) Technology for rapid identification of native microbial proteins that eli...

  2. Microbial Protein-Antigenome Determination (MAD) Technology: A Proteomics-Based Strategy for Rapid Identification of Microbial Targets of Host Humoral Immune Responses

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Immunogenic, pathogen-specific proteins have excellent potential for development of novel management modalities. Here, we describe an innovative application of proteomics called Microbial protein-Antigenome Determination (MAD) Technology for rapid identification of native microbial proteins that el...

  3. St. Croix sheep produce a rapid and greater cellular immune response contributing to reduced establishment of Haemonchus contortus.

    PubMed

    Bowdridge, Scott A; Zajac, Anne M; Notter, David R

    2015-03-15

    The objective of this study was to determine breed differences in immune response shortly following Haemonchus contortus infection. Peripheral and local cellular and humoral immune responses were evaluated in 24 St. Croix hair lambs and 24 Dorset×(Finn-Rambouillet) wool lambs at 0, 3, 5 and 7 days after infection with 10,000 L3 H. contortus larvae. Blood samples taken immediately before harvest revealed no differences in circulating effector cell populations, yet there were significant differences in levels of circulating neutrophils. Across all time points, hair lambs had a higher average circulating neutrophil concentration (3018 cells/μl) than wool lambs (1818 cells/μl; P<0.05). Infected hair lambs also had greater serum total-IgA compared to wool lambs (1.8 vs 0.9 mg/ml; P=0.006). Breeds did not differ in eosinophil or globule leukocyte (GL) counts in abomasal tissue, but infiltration of these cell populations increased with time. Globule leukocyte counts peaked at day 3 after infection whereas eosinophil numbers continued to increase to day 7 after infection. When averaged across all time points, abomasal neutrophil counts were higher in hair lambs (831 cells/mm(2)), than wool lambs (561 cells/mm(2); P<0.0001). Total abomasal lymph node (ALN) weight increased exponentially from 2.60 g at day 0 to 6.57 g by day 7 in hair lambs whereas ALN weight only marginally increased in wool lambs and was significantly lower than hair lambs by day 7 (P=0.0003). This result suggests a greater expansion of lymphocytes in the ALN promoting early development of antigen-specific acquired immune responses in hair lambs. Greater IgA production and infiltration of immune cells to the abomasal mucosa at an earlier stage of infection may limit establishment of adult parasites and thereby shorten the duration and severity of infection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Soluble Aβ oligomers are rapidly sequestered from brain ISF in vivo and bind GM1 ganglioside on cellular membranes

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Soyon; Ostaszewski, Beth L.; Yang, Ting; O'Malley, Tiernan T.; Jin, Ming; Yanagisawa, Katsuhiko; Li, Shaomin; Bartels, Tim; Selkoe, Dennis J.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Soluble Aβ oligomers contribute importantly to synaptotoxicity in Alzheimer's disease, but their dynamics in vivo remain unclear. Here, we found that soluble Aβ oligomers were sequestered from brain interstitial fluid onto brain membranes much more rapidly than non-toxic monomers and were recovered in part as bound to GM1 ganglioside on membranes. Aβ oligomers bound strongly to GM1 ganglioside, and blocking the sialic acid residue on GM1 decreased oligomer-mediated LTP impairment in mouse hippocampal slices. In a hAPP transgenic mouse model, substantial levels of GM1-bound Aβ42 were recovered from brain membrane fractions. We also detected GM1-bound Aβ in human CSF, and its levels correlated with Aβ42, suggesting its potential as a biomarker of Aβ-related membrane dysfunction. Together, these findings highlight a novel mechanism whereby hydrophobic Aβ oligomers become sequestered onto GM1 ganglioside and presumably other lipids on neuronal membranes, where they may induce progressive functional and structural changes. PMID:24685176

  5. Rapid Qualitative Urinary Tract Infection Pathogen Identification by SeptiFast® Real-Time PCR

    PubMed Central

    Malinka, Thomas; Klaschik, Sven; Weber, Stefan U.; Schewe, Jens-Christian; Stüber, Frank; Book, Malte

    2011-01-01

    Background Urinary tract infections (UTI) are frequent in outpatients. Fast pathogen identification is mandatory for shortening the time of discomfort and preventing serious complications. Urine culture needs up to 48 hours until pathogen identification. Consequently, the initial antibiotic regimen is empirical. Aim To evaluate the feasibility of qualitative urine pathogen identification by a commercially available real-time PCR blood pathogen test (SeptiFast®) and to compare the results with dipslide and microbiological culture. Design of study Pilot study with prospectively collected urine samples. Setting University hospital. Methods 82 prospectively collected urine samples from 81 patients with suspected UTI were included. Dipslide urine culture was followed by microbiological pathogen identification in dipslide positive samples. In parallel, qualitative DNA based pathogen identification (SeptiFast®) was performed in all samples. Results 61 samples were SeptiFast® positive, whereas 67 samples were dipslide culture positive. The inter-methodological concordance of positive and negative findings in the gram+, gram- and fungi sector was 371/410 (90%), 477/492 (97%) and 238/246 (97%), respectively. Sensitivity and specificity of the SeptiFast® test for the detection of an infection was 0.82 and 0.60, respectively. SeptiFast® pathogen identifications were available at least 43 hours prior to culture results. Conclusion The SeptiFast® platform identified bacterial DNA in urine specimens considerably faster compared to conventional culture. For UTI diagnosis sensitivity and specificity is limited by its present qualitative setup which does not allow pathogen quantification. Future quantitative assays may hold promise for PCR based UTI pathogen identification as a supplementation of conventional culture methods. PMID:21359187

  6. Changes in Sensory Evoked Responses Coincide with Rapid Improvement in Speech Identification Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alain, Claude; Campeanu, Sandra; Tremblay, Kelly

    2010-01-01

    Perceptual learning is sometimes characterized by rapid improvements in performance within the first hour of training (fast perceptual learning), which may be accompanied by changes in sensory and/or response pathways. Here, we report rapid physiological changes in the human auditory system that coincide with learning during a 1-hour test session…

  7. Rapid and label-free identification of normal spermatozoa based on image analysis and micro-Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zufang; Chen, Guannan; Chen, Xiwen; Wang, Jing; Chen, Jinhua; Lu, Peng; Chen, Rong

    2014-09-01

    Semen analysis is performed for evaluation of fertility disorders, however it is susceptible to subjectivity of investigators, and lacking of objective criterion for sperm cell quality remains a problem. There is an ongoing debate on which criteria should be employed to define normal spermatozoa. Here, the aim of our study is to evaluate the possibility of label-free and rapid identification of normal sperm cell through the use of image analysis combined with micro-Raman spectroscopy. By using a smooth-surfaced and hydrophobic substrate, spermatozoa smear was rapidly prepared for microscopic imaging and acrosome area can be clearly visualized without any extra stains; then a self-written image analysis program was utilized to segment sperm head and acrosome area and automatically calculates morphological indices. Most important, intensity ratio of 1055 cm(-1) to 1095 cm(-1) from the obtained Raman spectra is found to indicate a potential biomarker for assessing the sperm DNA integrity. Our preliminary study demonstrates that micro-Raman spectroscopy combined with image analysis can be a potentially useful tool for rapid and label-free identification of normal sperm cell by providing both morphological and biochemical information. Copyright © 2014 WILEY‐VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. On-site identification of meat species in processed foods by a rapid real-time polymerase chain reaction system.

    PubMed

    Furutani, Shunsuke; Hagihara, Yoshihisa; Nagai, Hidenori

    2017-09-01

    Correct labeling of foods is critical for consumers who wish to avoid a specific meat species for religious or cultural reasons. Therefore, gene-based point-of-care food analysis by real-time Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) is expected to contribute to the quality control in the food industry. In this study, we perform rapid identification of meat species by our portable rapid real-time PCR system, following a very simple DNA extraction method. Applying these techniques, we correctly identified beef, pork, chicken, rabbit, horse, and mutton in processed foods in 20min. Our system was sensitive enough to detect the interfusion of about 0.1% chicken egg-derived DNA in a processed food sample. Our rapid real-time PCR system is expected to contribute to the quality control in food industries because it can be applied for the identification of meat species, and future applications can expand its functionality to the detection of genetically modified organisms or mutations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. MALDI-TOF MS is more accurate than VITEK II ANC card and API Rapid ID 32 A system for the identification of Clostridium species.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Jin; Kim, Si Hyun; Park, Hyun-Jung; Park, Hae-Geun; Park, Dongchul; Song, Sae Am; Lee, Hee Joo; Yong, Dongeun; Choi, Jun Yong; Kook, Joong-Ki; Kim, Hye Ran; Shin, Jeong Hwan

    2016-08-01

    All 50 Clostridium difficile strains were definitely identified by Vitek2 system, Rapid ID 32A system, and MALDI-TOF. For 18 non-difficile Clostridium strains, the identification results were correct in 0, 2, and 17 strains by Vitek2, Rapid ID 32A, and MALDI-TOF, respectively. MALDI-TOF could be used as the primary tool for identification of Clostridium species.

  10. Rapid screening of guar gum using portable Raman spectral identification methods.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Hirsch K; Wolfgang, Steven; Rodriguez, Jason D

    2016-01-25

    Guar gum is a well-known inactive ingredient (excipient) used in a variety of oral pharmaceutical dosage forms as a thickener and stabilizer of suspensions and as a binder of powders. It is also widely used as a food ingredient in which case alternatives with similar properties, including chemically similar gums, are readily available. Recent supply shortages and price fluctuations have caused guar gum to come under increasing scrutiny for possible adulteration by substitution of cheaper alternatives. One way that the U.S. FDA is attempting to screen pharmaceutical ingredients at risk for adulteration or substitution is through field-deployable spectroscopic screening. Here we report a comprehensive approach to evaluate two field-deployable Raman methods--spectral correlation and principal component analysis--to differentiate guar gum from other gums. We report a comparison of the sensitivity of the spectroscopic screening methods with current compendial identification tests. The ability of the spectroscopic methods to perform unambiguous identification of guar gum compared to other gums makes them an enhanced surveillance alternative to the current compendial identification tests, which are largely subjective in nature. Our findings indicate that Raman spectral identification methods perform better than compendial identification methods and are able to distinguish guar gum from other gums with 100% accuracy for samples tested by spectral correlation and principal component analysis. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Rapid identification and discrimination of bacterial strains by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy and neural networks.

    PubMed

    Manzoor, S; Moncayo, S; Navarro-Villoslada, F; Ayala, J A; Izquierdo-Hornillos, R; de Villena, F J Manuel; Caceres, J O

    2014-04-01

    Identification and discrimination of bacterial strains of same species exhibiting resistance to antibiotics using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and neural networks (NN) algorithm is reported. The method has been applied to identify 40 bacterial strains causing hospital acquired infections (HAI), i.e. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Salmonella typhimurium, Salmonella pullurum and Salmonella salamae. The strains analyzed included both isolated from clinical samples and constructed in laboratory that differ in mutations as a result of their resistance to one or more antibiotics. Small changes in the atomic composition of the bacterial strains, as a result of their mutations and genetic variations, were detected by the LIBS-NN methodology and led to their identification and classification. This is of utmost importance because solely identification of bacterial species is not sufficient for disease diagnosis and identification of the actual strain is also required. The proposed method was successfully able to discriminate strains of the same bacterial species. The optimized NN models provided reliable bacterial strain identification with an index of spectral correlation higher than 95% for the samples analyzed, showing the potential and effectiveness of the method to address the safety and social-cost HAI-related issue. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. An Emerging Method for Rapid Characterization of Feed Structures and Feed Component Matrix at a Cellular Level and Relation to Feed Quality and Nutritive Value

    SciTech Connect

    Yu,P.

    2006-01-01

    Feed quality, feed characteristics, nutrient utilization and digestive behavior are closely related to: (i) total feed composition, (ii) feed intrinsic structures, and (iii) biological component matrix (such as protein to starch matrix, protein to carbohydrate matrix). Conventional 'wet' chemical analysis can determine total chemical composition, but fails to detect the feed intrinsic structures and biological component matrix due to destruction of feed samples during the processing for chemical analysis and the 'wet' chemical analysis cannot link structural information to chemical information within intact feed tissue. Recently, advanced synchrotron-based Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) microspectroscopy has been developed as a non-destructive and non-invasive structural-chemical analytical technique. This technique can link chemical information to structural information of biological samples within intact tissue within cellular dimensions. It can provide four kinds of information simultaneously: tissue composition, tissue structure, tissue chemistry and tissue environment. However, this novel technique has been found mainly for medical science research, extremely rare for feed science and nutrition research. The objective of this review article was to illustrate synchrotron-based FTIR microspectroscopy as a novel research tool for rapid characterization of feed structures at a cellular level and for detection of chemical features and molecular chemical make-up of feed biological component matrix and nutrient interaction. The emphasis of this article was to show that feed structural-chemical features at a cellular level are closely related to feed characteristics, feed quality and nutritive value in animals. The synchrotron-based technology will provide us with a greater understanding of the plant-animal interface.

  13. Rapid and Accurate Identification of Animal Species in Natural Leather Goods by Liquid Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Izuchi, Yukari; Takashima, Tsuneo; Hatano, Naoya

    2016-01-01

    The demand for leather goods has grown globally in recent years. Industry revenue is forecast to reach $91.2 billion by 2018. There is an ongoing labelling problem in the leather items market, in that it is currently impossible to identify the species that a given piece of leather is derived from. To address this issue, we developed a rapid and simple method for the specific identification of leather derived from cattle, horses, pigs, sheep, goats, and deer by analysing peptides produced by the trypsin-digestion of proteins contained in leather goods using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. We determined species-specific amino acid sequences by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry analysis using the Mascot software program and demonstrated that collagen α-1(I), collagen α-2(I), and collagen α-1(III) from the dermal layer of the skin are particularly useful in species identification.

  14. Rapid and Accurate Identification of Animal Species in Natural Leather Goods by Liquid Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Izuchi, Yukari; Takashima, Tsuneo; Hatano, Naoya

    2016-01-01

    The demand for leather goods has grown globally in recent years. Industry revenue is forecast to reach $91.2 billion by 2018. There is an ongoing labelling problem in the leather items market, in that it is currently impossible to identify the species that a given piece of leather is derived from. To address this issue, we developed a rapid and simple method for the specific identification of leather derived from cattle, horses, pigs, sheep, goats, and deer by analysing peptides produced by the trypsin-digestion of proteins contained in leather goods using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. We determined species-specific amino acid sequences by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry analysis using the Mascot software program and demonstrated that collagen α-1(I), collagen α-2(I), and collagen α-1(III) from the dermal layer of the skin are particularly useful in species identification. PMID:27313979

  15. Rapid identification of biothreat and other clinically relevant bacterial species by use of universal PCR coupled with high-resolution melting analysis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Samuel; Ramachandran, Padmini; Rothman, Richard; Hsieh, Yu-Hsiang; Hardick, Andrew; Won, Helen; Kecojevic, Aleksandar; Jackman, Joany; Gaydos, Charlotte

    2009-07-01

    A rapid assay for eubacterial species identification is described using high-resolution melt analysis to characterize PCR products. Unique melt profiles generated from multiple hypervariable regions of the 16S rRNA gene for 100 clinically relevant bacterial pathogens, including category A and B biothreat agents and their surrogates, allowed highly specific species identification.

  16. A rapid and accurate quantification method for real-time dynamic analysis of cellular lipids during microalgal fermentation processes in Chlorella protothecoides with low field nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Liu, Tingting; Wang, Zejian; Tian, Xiwei; Yang, Yi; Guo, Meijin; Chu, Ju; Zhuang, Yingping

    2016-05-01

    The rapid and real-time lipid determination can provide valuable information on process regulation and optimization in the algal lipid mass production. In this study, a rapid, accurate and precise quantification method of in vivo cellular lipids of Chlorella protothecoides using low field nuclear magnetic resonance (LF-NMR) was newly developed. LF-NMR was extremely sensitive to the algal lipids with the limits of the detection (LOD) of 0.0026g and 0.32g/L in dry lipid samples and algal broth, respectively, as well as limits of quantification (LOQ) of 0.0093g and 1.18g/L. Moreover, the LF-NMR signal was specifically proportional to the cellular lipids of C. protothecoides, thus the superior regression curves existing in a wide detection range from 0.02 to 0.42g for dry lipids and from 1.12 to 8.97gL(-1) of lipid concentration for in vivo lipid quantification were obtained with all R(2) higher than 0.99, irrespective of the lipid content and fatty acids profile variations. The accuracy of this novel method was further verified to be reliable by comparing lipid quantification results to those obtained by GC-MS. And the relative standard deviation (RSD) of LF-NMR results were smaller than 2%, suggesting the precision of this method. Finally, this method was successfully used in the on-line lipid monitoring during the algal lipid fermentation processes, making it possible for better understanding of the lipid accumulation mechanism and dynamic bioprocess control.

  17. Rapid solid-phase microwave synthesis of highly photoluminescent nitrogen-doped carbon dots for Fe3+ detection and cellular bioimaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Guili; Xu, Minghan; Shu, Mengjun; Li, Xiaolin; Yang, Zhi; Zhang, Liling; Su, Yanjie; Hu, Nantao; Zhang, Yafei

    2016-09-01

    Recently, carbon dots (CDs) have been playing an increasingly important role in industrial production and biomedical field because of their excellent properties. As such, finding an efficient method to quickly synthesize a large scale of relatively high purity CDs is of great interest. Herein, a facile and novel microwave method has been applied to prepare nitrogen doped CDs (N-doped CDs) within 8 min using L-glutamic acid as the sole reaction precursor in the solid phase condition. The as-prepared N-doped CDs with an average size of 1.64 nm are well dispersed in aqueous solution. The photoluminescence of N-doped CDs is pH-sensitive and excitation-dependent. The N-doped CDs show a strong blue fluorescence with relatively high fluorescent quantum yield of 41.2%, which remains stable even under high ionic strength. Since the surface is rich in oxygen-containing functional groups, N-doped CDs can be applied to selectively detect Fe3+ with the limit of detection of 10-5 M. In addition, they are also used for cellular bioimaging because of their high fluorescent intensity and nearly zero cytotoxicity. The solid-phase microwave method seems to be an effective strategy to rapidly obtain high quality N-doped CDs and expands their applications in ion detection and cellular bioimaging.

  18. Identification of SNPs in Cellular Retinol Binding Protein 1 and Cellular Retinol Binding Protein 3 Genes and Their Associations with Laying Performance Traits in Erlang Mountainous Chicken

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Xiao, Li-Hua; Zhao, Xiao-Ling; Liu, Yi-Ping; Zhu, Qing

    2014-01-01

    CRBP1 (cellular retinol binding protein 1) and CRBP3 (cellular retinol binding protein 3), are important components of the retinoid signaling pathway and take part in vitamin A absorption, transport and metabolism. Based on the role of vitamin A in chicken laying performance, we investigated the polymorphism of CRBP1 and CRBP3 genes in 349 chickens using single strand conformation polymorphism and DNA sequencing methods. Only one polymorphism was identified in the third intron of CRBP1, two polymorphisms were detected in CRBP3; they were located in the second intron and the third intron respectively. The association studies between these three SNPs and laying performance traits were performed in Erlang mountainous chicken. Notably, the SNP g.14604G>T of CRBP1 was shown to be significantly associated with body weight at first egg (BWFE), age at first egg (AFE), weight at first egg (WFE) and total number of eggs with 300 age (EN). The CRBP3 polymorphism g.934C>G was associated with AFE, and the g.1324A>G was associated with AFE and BWFE, but none of these polymorphisms were associated with egg quality traits. Haplotype combinations constructed on these two SNPs of CRBP3 gene were associated with BWFE and AFE. In particular, diplotype H2H2 had positive effect on AFE, BWFE, EN, and average egg-laying interval. We herein describe for the first time basic research on the polymorphism of chicken CRBP1 and CRBP3 genes that is predictive of genetic potential for laying performance in chicken. PMID:25083100

  19. Comparison of Enzymatic Method Rapid Yeast Plus System with RFLP-PCR for Identification of Isolated Yeast from Vulvovaginal Candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Hossein, Moallaei; Mirhendi, Seied Hossein; Brandão, João; Mirdashti, Reza; Rosado, Laura

    2011-01-01

    Objective(s) To compare two identification methods, i.e., restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP)-PCR analysis and enzymatic method Rapid TM Yeast Plus System to identify different species causing vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC). Materials and Methods Vaginal discharges of women who had attended the gynecology outpatient clinic of Mobini Hospital in Sabzevar, Iran were collected using cotton swabs and were cultured on Sabouraud dextrose agar. Isolated yeasts were identified by germ-tube testing and Rapid TM Yeast Plus System (Remel USA). For molecular identification, the isolated DNA was amplified with ITS1 and ITS4 universal primers and PCR products digested with the enzyme HpaІІ followed by agarose gel electrophoresis. Epidemiological and clinical features of women with respect to identified species were also evaluated. Results Out of 231 subjects enrolled, 62 VVC cases were detected. The isolated species were identified as follows: Candida albicans, 24 (38.7%), C. glabrata, 15 (24.2%), C. kefyr, 13 (21.0%) C. krusei, 9 (14.5%), and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, 1 (1.6%) by RFLP-PCR method; whereas findings by Rapid TM Yeast Plus System were C. albicans, 24 (38.7%), C. glabrata, 5 (8%), C. kefyr, 11 (17.7%) C. krusei, 2 (3.2%), S. cerevisiae, 9 (14.5%), and C. tropicalis, 6 (9.6%) as well as other nonpathogenic yeasts, 4 (6.9%). Conclusion Statistical comparison showed that there is no significant difference in identification of C. albicans by the two methods; although, in this study, it was not true about other species of yeasts. A correlation between clinical and laboratory findings is important as it enables us to administer an appropriate treatment on time. PMID:23493663

  20. A rapid (less than 10 minute) electrophoresis method for identification of wheat varieties.

    PubMed

    Wrigley, C W; Gore, P J; Manusu, H P

    1991-05-01

    Conventional procedures for electrophoretic identification of grain samples according to variety are too slow to permit checking at the time of delivery. The method described permits electrophoretic identification within an hour. It involves extraction of gliadin proteins from crushed grain with 6% urea solution or ethylene glycol, cathodic electrophoresis for 9 min at 300 V in a Micrograd gel (MG 315 from Gradipore Ltd, Sydney, Australia) using sodium lactate buffer (pH 3.1), and staining in Gradipore (at about 50 degrees C). Distinction between a set of Australian varieties was similar to that obtainable with the Australian Standard Procedure.

  1. Rapid identification of bacterial biofilms and biofilm wound models using a multichannel nanosensor.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoning; Kong, Hao; Mout, Rubul; Saha, Krishnendu; Moyano, Daniel F; Robinson, Sandra M; Rana, Subinoy; Zhang, Xinrong; Riley, Margaret A; Rotello, Vincent M

    2014-12-23

    Identification of infectious bacteria responsible for biofilm-associated infections is challenging due to the complex and heterogeneous biofilm matrix. To address this issue and minimize the impact of heterogeneity on biofilm identification, we developed a gold nanoparticle (AuNP)-based multichannel sensor to detect and identify biofilms based on their physicochemical properties. Our results showed that the sensor can discriminate six bacterial biofilms including two composed of uropathogenic bacteria. The capability of the sensor was further demonstrated through discrimination of biofilms in a mixed bacteria/mammalian cell in vitro wound model.

  2. Use of Peptide Nucleic Acid-Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization for Definitive, Rapid Identification of Five Common Candida Species▿

    PubMed Central

    Reller, Megan E.; Mallonee, Amanda B.; Kwiatkowski, Nicole P.; Merz, William G.

    2007-01-01

    We investigated a 2.5-h peptide nucleic acid-fluorescence in situ hybridization (PNA-FISH) assay with five Candida species-specific probes to identify Candida colonies and compared it to standard 2-h to 5-day phenotypic identification methods. Suspensions were made and slides were prepared and read for fluorescence per the manufacturer's instructions. Sensitivity was 99% (109/110), and specificity was 99% (129/130). PNA-FISH can rapidly identify those Candida species isolated most frequently. PMID:17804657

  3. Innovative applications of bacteriophages in rapid detection and identification of foodborne pathogens

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Relative to traditional microbiological approaches, biosensors are a rapid method for foodborne bacterial pathogen detection. Biosensors function by detecting the interaction of the target pathogen, or pathogen derived molecule, with a biological recognition component which must have sufficient aff...

  4. Rapid and Reliable Identification of Streptococcus pneumoniae Isolates by Pneumolysin-Mediated Agglutination

    PubMed Central

    Cima-Cabal, M. D.; Vázquez, F.; de los Toyos, J. R.; Méndez, F. J.

    1999-01-01

    A pneumolysin-based agglutination test which allows an easy, rapid, cost-effective, and accurate (100% specific and 95% sensitive) discrimination between pneumococci and other related human and animal pathogenic bacterial strains has been assayed. PMID:10325355

  5. Rapid genotyping assays for the identification and differentiation of Yersinia ruckeri biotype 2 strains

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Novel assays for the identification and differentiation of biotype 2 phenotype-causing alleles among emerging strains of Yersinia ruckeri are presented. Assays were validated against isolates previously genotyped by DNA sequencing. The methods employed are simple to perform and interpret and thus co...

  6. Development of Conductive Polymer Analysis for the Rapid Detection and Identification of Phytopathogenic Microbes

    Treesearch

    A. Dan Wilson; D.G. Lester; C.S. Oberle

    2004-01-01

    Conductive polymer analysis, a type of electronic aroma detection technology, was evaluated for its efficacy in the detection, identification, and discrimination of plant-pathogenic microorganisms on standardized media and in diseased plant tissues. The method is based on the acquisition of a diagnostic electronic fingerprint derived from multisensor responses to...

  7. Rapid identification of bacteria, mecA and van genes from blood cultures.

    PubMed

    Prère, M-F; Baron, O; Fayet, O

    2007-11-01

    The Genotype technology, a quick molecular genetic assay based on DNA multiplex amplification with biotinylated primers followed by hybridization to membrane bound probes, complies with the requirements for a fast diagnosis of sepsis. We evaluated the new Genotype BC Gram-negative and Gram-positive test kits (Hain Life Science, Germany) which respectively allow for the identification of 15 species of Gram-negative (GN) rods, and the identification of 17 Gram-positive (GP) bacteria species together with the determination of methicillin and vancomycin resistance (mecA and van genes). The study was performed on 60 positive blood cultures from BacT/ALERT bottles (aerobic, anaerobic and pediatric bottles). First, a Gram stain was carried out to select between Genotype BC GP or GN test, then identification were performed by the Genotype BC tests and by biochemical conventional tests after subculture and phenotypic susceptibility determination. The operating procedure was very easy to carry out and required a small amount of starting material (5 to 10 microL of blood culture). The results were available within 4.5 hours. For all the blood cultures, the Genotype BC results correlated with the biochemical identification and phenotypic antibiotics susceptibility. According to our results, this DNA strip technology based assay can easily be incorporated into routine diagnosis.

  8. Rapid and inexpensive body fluid identification by RNA profiling-based multiplex High Resolution Melt (HRM) analysis.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Erin K; Ballantyne, Jack

    2013-01-01

    Positive identification of the nature of biological material present on evidentiary items can be crucial for understanding the circumstances surrounding a crime. However, traditional protein-based methods do not permit the identification of all body fluids and tissues, and thus molecular based strategies for the conclusive identification of all forensically relevant biological fluids and tissues need to be developed. Messenger RNA (mRNA) profiling is an example of such a molecular-based approach. Current mRNA body fluid identification assays involve capillary electrophoresis (CE) or quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) platforms, each with its own limitations. Both platforms require the use of expensive fluorescently labeled primers or probes. CE-based assays require separate amplification and detection steps thus increasing the analysis time. For qRT-PCR assays, only 3-4 markers can be included in a single reaction since each requires a different fluorescent dye. To simplify mRNA profiling assays, and reduce the time and cost of analysis, we have developed single- and multiplex body fluid High Resolution Melt (HRM) assays for the identification of common forensically relevant biological fluids and tissues. The incorporated biomarkers include IL19 (vaginal secretions), IL1F7 (skin), ALAS2 (blood), MMP10 (menstrual blood), HTN3 (saliva) and TGM4 (semen).  The HRM assays require only unlabeled PCR primers and a single saturating intercalating fluorescent dye (Eva Green). Each body-fluid-specific marker can easily be identified by the presence of a distinct melt peak. Usually, HRM assays are used to detect variants or isoforms for a single gene target. However, we have uniquely developed duplex and triplex HRM assays to permit the simultaneous detection of multiple targets per reaction. Here we describe the development and initial performance evaluation of the developed HRM assays. The results demonstrate the potential use of HRM assays for rapid, and relatively inexpensive

  9. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry for rapid identification of fungal rhinosinusitis pathogens.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yanfei; Wang, Jinglin; Zhang, Mingxin; Zhu, Min; Wang, Mei; Sun, Yufeng; Gu, Haitong; Cao, Jingjing; Li, Xue; Zhang, Shaoya; Lu, Xinxin

    2017-03-01

    Filamentous fungi are among the most important pathogens, causing fungal rhinosinusitis (FRS). Current laboratory diagnosis of FRS pathogens mainly relies on phenotypic identification by culture and microscopic examination, which is time consuming and expertise dependent. Although matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) MS has been employed to identify various fungi, its efficacy in the identification of FRS fungi is less clear. A total of 153 FRS isolates obtained from patients were analysed at the Clinical Laboratory at the Beijing Tongren Hospital affiliated to the Capital Medical University, between January 2014 and December 2015. They were identified by traditional phenotypic methods and Bruker MALDI-TOF MS (Bruker, Biotyper version 3.1), respectively. Discrepancies between the two methods were further validated by sequencing. Among the 153 isolates, 151 had correct species identification using MALDI-TOF MS (Bruker, Biot 3.1, score ≥2.0 or 2.3). MALDI-TOF MS enabled identification of some very closely related species that were indistinguishable by conventional phenotypic methods, including 1/10 Aspergillus versicolor, 3/20 Aspergillus flavus, 2/30 Aspergillus fumigatus and 1/20 Aspergillus terreus, which were misidentified by conventional phenotypic methods as Aspergillus nidulans, Aspergillus oryzae, Aspergillus japonicus and Aspergillus nidulans, respectively. In addition, 2/2 Rhizopus oryzae and 1/1 Rhizopus stolonifer that were identified only to the genus level by the phenotypic method were correctly identified by MALDI-TOF MS. MALDI-TOF MS is a rapid and accurate technique, and could replace the conventional phenotypic method for routine identification of FRS fungi in clinical microbiology laboratories.

  10. Rapid and inexpensive body fluid identification by RNA profiling-based multiplex High Resolution Melt (HRM) analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, Erin K.; Ballantyne, Jack

    2014-01-01

    Positive identification of the nature of biological material present on evidentiary items can be crucial for understanding the circumstances surrounding a crime. However, traditional protein-based methods do not permit the identification of all body fluids and tissues, and thus molecular based strategies for the conclusive identification of all forensically relevant biological fluids and tissues need to be developed. Messenger RNA (mRNA) profiling is an example of such a molecular-based approach. Current mRNA body fluid identification assays involve capillary electrophoresis (CE) or quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) platforms, each with its own limitations. Both platforms require the use of expensive fluorescently labeled primers or probes. CE-based assays require separate amplification and detection steps thus increasing the analysis time. For qRT-PCR assays, only 3-4 markers can be included in a single reaction since each requires a different fluorescent dye. To simplify mRNA profiling assays, and reduce the time and cost of analysis, we have developed single- and multiplex body fluid High Resolution Melt (HRM) assays for the identification of common forensically relevant biological fluids and tissues. The incorporated biomarkers include IL19 (vaginal secretions), IL1F7 (skin), ALAS2 (blood), MMP10 (menstrual blood), HTN3 (saliva) and TGM4 (semen).  The HRM assays require only unlabeled PCR primers and a single saturating intercalating fluorescent dye (Eva Green). Each body-fluid-specific marker can easily be identified by the presence of a distinct melt peak. Usually, HRM assays are used to detect variants or isoforms for a single gene target. However, we have uniquely developed duplex and triplex HRM assays to permit the simultaneous detection of multiple targets per reaction. Here we describe the development and initial performance evaluation of the developed HRM assays. The results demonstrate the potential use of HRM assays for rapid, and relatively inexpensive

  11. Reliable and Rapid Identification of Listeria monocytogenes and Listeria Species by Artificial Neural Network-Based Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy†

    PubMed Central

    Rebuffo, Cecilia A.; Schmitt, Jürgen; Wenning, Mareike; von Stetten, Felix; Scherer, Siegfried

    2006-01-01

    Differentiation of the species within the genus Listeria is important for the food industry but only a few reliable methods are available so far. While a number of studies have used Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy to identify bacteria, the extraction of complex pattern information from the infrared spectra remains difficult. Here, we apply artificial neural network technology (ANN), which is an advanced multivariate data-processing method of pattern analysis, to identify Listeria infrared spectra at the species level. A hierarchical classification system based on ANN analysis for Listeria FTIR spectra was created, based on a comprehensive reference spectral database including 243 well-defined reference strains of Listeria monocytogenes, L. innocua, L. ivanovii, L. seeligeri, and L. welshimeri. In parallel, a univariate FTIR identification model was developed. To evaluate the potentials of these models, a set of 277 isolates of diverse geographical origins, but not included in the reference database, were assembled and used as an independent external validation for species discrimination. Univariate FTIR analysis allowed the correct identification of 85.2% of all strains and of 93% of the L. monocytogenes strains. ANN-based analysis enhanced differentiation success to 96% for all Listeria species, including a success rate of 99.2% for correct L. monocytogenes identification. The identity of the 277-strain test set was also determined with the standard phenotypical API Listeria system. This kit was able to identify 88% of the test isolates and 93% of L. monocytogenes strains. These results demonstrate the high reliability and strong potential of ANN-based FTIR spectrum analysis for identification of the five Listeria species under investigation. Starting from a pure culture, this technique allows the cost-efficient and rapid identification of Listeria species within 25 h and is suitable for use in a routine food microbiological laboratory. PMID

  12. Identification of Staphylococcus species and subspecies with the MicroScan Pos ID and Rapid Pos ID panel systems.

    PubMed Central

    Kloos, W E; George, C G

    1991-01-01

    The accuracies of the MicroScan Pos ID and Rapid Pos ID panel systems (Baxter Diagnostic Inc., MicroScan Division, West Sacramento, Calif.) were compared with each other and with the accuracies of conventional methods for the identification of 25 Staphylococcus species and 4 subspecies. Conventional methods included those used in the original descriptions of species and subspecies and DNA-DNA hybridization. The Pos ID panel uses a battery of 18 tests, and the Rapid Pos ID panel uses a battery of 42 tests for the identification of Staphylococcus species. The Pos ID panel has modified conventional and chromogenic tests that can be read after 15 to 48 h of incubation; the Rapid Pos ID panel has tests that use fluorogenic substrates or fluorometric indicators, and test results can be read after 2 h of incubation in the autoSCAN-W/A. Results indicated that both MicroScan systems had a high degree of congruence (greater than or equal to 90%) with conventional methods for the species S. capitis, S. aureus, S. auricularis, S. saprophyticus, S. cohnii, S. arlettae, S. carnosus, S. lentus, and S. sciuri and, in particular, the subspecies S. capitis subsp. capitis and S. cohnii subsp. cohnii. The Rapid Pos ID panel system also had greater than or equal to 90% congruence with conventional methods for S. epidermidis, S. caprae, S. warneri subsp. 2, S. xylosus, S. kloosii, and S. caseolyticus. For both MicroScan systems, congruence with conventional methods was 80 to 90% for S. haemolyticus subsp. 1, S. equorum, S. intermedius, and S. hyicus; and in addition, with the Rapid Pos ID panel system congruence was 80 to 89% for S. capitis subsp. ureolyticus, S. warneri subsp. 1, S. hominis, S. cohnii subsp. urealyticum, and S. simulans. The MicroScan systems identified a lower percentage (50 to 75%) of strains of S. lugdunensis, S. gallinarum, S. schleiferi, and S. chromogenes, although the addition of specific tests to the systems might increase the accuracy of identification

  13. Identification of Staphylococcus species and subspecies with the MicroScan Pos ID and Rapid Pos ID panel systems.

    PubMed

    Kloos, W E; George, C G

    1991-04-01

    The accuracies of the MicroScan Pos ID and Rapid Pos ID panel systems (Baxter Diagnostic Inc., MicroScan Division, West Sacramento, Calif.) were compared with each other and with the accuracies of conventional methods for the identification of 25 Staphylococcus species and 4 subspecies. Conventional methods included those used in the original descriptions of species and subspecies and DNA-DNA hybridization. The Pos ID panel uses a battery of 18 tests, and the Rapid Pos ID panel uses a battery of 42 tests for the identification of Staphylococcus species. The Pos ID panel has modified conventional and chromogenic tests that can be read after 15 to 48 h of incubation; the Rapid Pos ID panel has tests that use fluorogenic substrates or fluorometric indicators, and test results can be read after 2 h of incubation in the autoSCAN-W/A. Results indicated that both MicroScan systems had a high degree of congruence (greater than or equal to 90%) with conventional methods for the species S. capitis, S. aureus, S. auricularis, S. saprophyticus, S. cohnii, S. arlettae, S. carnosus, S. lentus, and S. sciuri and, in particular, the subspecies S. capitis subsp. capitis and S. cohnii subsp. cohnii. The Rapid Pos ID panel system also had greater than or equal to 90% congruence with conventional methods for S. epidermidis, S. caprae, S. warneri subsp. 2, S. xylosus, S. kloosii, and S. caseolyticus. For both MicroScan systems, congruence with conventional methods was 80 to 90% for S. haemolyticus subsp. 1, S. equorum, S. intermedius, and S. hyicus; and in addition, with the Rapid Pos ID panel system congruence was 80 to 89% for S. capitis subsp. ureolyticus, S. warneri subsp. 1, S. hominis, S. cohnii subsp. urealyticum, and S. simulans. The MicroScan systems identified a lower percentage (50 to 75%) of strains of S. lugdunensis, S. gallinarum, S. schleiferi, and S. chromogenes, although the addition of specific tests to the systems might increase the accuracy of identification

  14. Near Infrared Spectroscopy Facilitates Rapid Identification of Both Young and Mature Amazonian Tree Species

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Carla; Costa, Flávia Regina Capellotto; Camargo, José Luís Campana; Durgante, Flávia Machado; Vicentini, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Precise identification of plant species requires a high level of knowledge by taxonomists and presence of reproductive material. This represents a major limitation for those working with seedlings and juveniles, which differ morphologically from adults and do not bear reproductive structures. Near-infrared spectroscopy (FT-NIR) has previously been shown to be effective in species discrimination of adult plants, so if young and adults have a similar spectral signature, discriminant functions based on FT-NIR spectra of adults can be used to identify leaves from young plants. We tested this with a sample of 419 plants in 13 Amazonian species from the genera Protium and Crepidospermum (Burseraceae). We obtained 12 spectral readings per plant, from adaxial and abaxial surfaces of dried leaves, and compared the rate of correct predictions of species with discriminant functions for different combinations of readings. We showed that the best models for predicting species in early developmental stages are those containing spectral data from both young and adult plants (98% correct predictions of external samples), but even using only adult spectra it is still possible to attain good levels of identification of young. We obtained an average of 75% correct identifications of young plants by discriminant equations based only on adults, when the most informative wavelengths were selected. Most species were accurately predicted (75–100% correct identifications), and only three had poor predictions (27–60%). These results were obtained despite the fact that spectra of young individuals were distinct from those of adults when species were analyzed individually. We concluded that FT-NIR has a high potential in the identification of species even at different ontogenetic stages, and that young plants can be identified based on spectra of adults with reasonable confidence. PMID:26312996

  15. Clinical chorioamnionitis at term VIII: a rapid MMP-8 test for the identification of intra-amniotic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Chaiyasit, Noppadol; Romero, Roberto; Chaemsaithong, Piya; Docheva, Nikolina; Bhatti, Gaurav; Kusanovic, Juan Pedro; Dong, Zhong; Yeo, Lami; Pacora, Percy; Hassan, Sonia S; Erez, Offer

    2017-07-26

    Clinical chorioamnionitis is the most common infection/inflammatory process diagnosed in labor and delivery units worldwide. The condition is a syndrome that can be caused by (1) intra-amniotic infection, (2) intra-amniotic inflammation without demonstrable microorganisms (i.e. sterile intra-amniotic inflammation), and (3) maternal systemic inflammation that is not associated with intra-amniotic inflammation. The presence of intra-amniotic inflammation is a risk factor for adverse maternal and neonatal outcomes in a broad range of obstetrical syndromes that includes clinical chorioamnionitis at term. Although the diagnosis of intra-amniotic infection has relied on culture results, such information is not immediately available for patient management. Therefore, the diagnosis of intra-amniotic inflammation could be helpful as a proxy for intra-amniotic infection, while results of microbiologic studies are pending. A rapid test is now available for the diagnosis of intra-amniotic inflammation, based on the determination of neutrophil collagenase or matrix metalloproteinase-8 (MMP-8). The objectives of this study were (1) to evaluate the diagnostic indices of a rapid MMP-8 test for the identification of intra-amniotic inflammation/infection in patients with the diagnosis of clinical chorioamnionitis at term, and (2) to compare the diagnostic performance of a rapid MMP-8 test to that of a conventional enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) interleukin (IL)-6 test for patients with clinical chorioamnionitis at term. A retrospective cohort study was conducted. A transabdominal amniocentesis was performed in patients with clinical chorioamnionitis at term (n=44). Amniotic fluid was analyzed using cultivation techniques (for aerobic and anaerobic bacteria as well as genital Mycoplasmas) and broad-range polymerase chain reaction (PCR) coupled with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (PCR/ESI-MS). Amniotic fluid IL-6 concentrations were determined by ELISA, and rapid

  16. Clinical chorioamnionitis at term VIII: a rapid MMP-8 test for the identification of intra-amniotic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Chaiyasit, Noppadol; Romero, Roberto; Chaemsaithong, Piya; Docheva, Nikolina; Bhatti, Gaurav; Kusanovic, Juan Pedro; Dong, Zhong; Yeo, Lami; Pacora, Percy; Hassan, Sonia S; Erez, Offer

    2017-06-24

    Clinical chorioamnionitis is the most common infection/inflammatory process diagnosed in labor and delivery units worldwide. The condition is a syndrome that can be caused by (1) intra-amniotic infection, (2) intra-amniotic inflammation without demonstrable microorganisms (i.e. sterile intra-amniotic inflammation), and (3) maternal systemic inflammation that is not associated with intra-amniotic inflammation. The presence of intra-amniotic inflammation is a risk factor for adverse maternal and neonatal outcomes in a broad range of obstetrical syndromes that includes clinical chorioamnionitis at term. Although the diagnosis of intra-amniotic infection has relied on culture results, such information is not immediately available for patient management. Therefore, the diagnosis of intra-amniotic inflammation could be helpful as a proxy for intra-amniotic infection, while results of microbiologic studies are pending. A rapid test is now available for the diagnosis of intra-amniotic inflammation, based on the determination of neutrophil collagenase or matrix metalloproteinase-8 (MMP-8). The objectives of this study were (1) to evaluate the diagnostic indices of a rapid MMP-8 test for the identification of intra-amniotic inflammation/infection in patients with the diagnosis of clinical chorioamnionitis at term, and (2) to compare the diagnostic performance of a rapid MMP-8 test to that of a conventional enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) interleukin (IL)-6 test for patients with clinical chorioamnionitis at term. A retrospective cohort study was conducted. A transabdominal amniocentesis was performed in patients with clinical chorioamnionitis at term (n=44). Amniotic fluid was analyzed using cultivation techniques (for aerobic and anaerobic bacteria as well as genital Mycoplasmas) and broad-range polymerase chain reaction (PCR) coupled with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (PCR/ESI-MS). Amniotic fluid IL-6 concentrations were determined by ELISA, and rapid

  17. Cellular clot formation in a sipunculan worm: entrapment of foreign particles, cell death and identification of a PGRP-related protein.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Guillermo A; Malchiodi, Emilio L; De Marzi, Mauricio C

    2008-10-01

    Clotting in animals having open or closed circulatory system comprises humoral and cellular mechanisms. Sipunculans are a small phylum of non-segmented marine worms that do not have a true circulatory system. These worms can form a cellular clot without transforming cell-free coelomic fluid into an insoluble mass. The clot may also contribute to immune response by entrapping foreign particles. We evaluated the formation of a cellular clot ex vivo in the sipunculan Themiste petricola after activation through glass contact and sea water, the ability to entrap magnetic beads and non-pathogen cyanobacteria particles within the clot, and the presence of a peptidoglycan recognition protein S (PGRP-S) antigen in cells forming the clot. Our results showed that the clot was formed by homotypic aggregation of large granular leukocytes (LGLs), a subtype of cells found in the coelomic fluid. Aggregated LGLs served to entrap magnetic beads and non-pathogen cyanobacteria particles, and PGRP-S antigen was detected both in non-activated LGLs and in activated homotypic aggregates through immunofluorescence, Western blot and flow cytometry. Cellular clots were found to be positive to Annexin V-FITC labelling. Complete disintegration of cytoplasm with shedding of microparticles, nuclear isolation and degradation were also observed by light microscopy and flow cytometry. In conclusion, cellular clot formation in Themiste petricola may serve both haemostatic and immune functions entailing rapid activation changes in LGLs, entrapment of foreign particles within a homotypic aggregate, and further cell death.

  18. Identification of Cellular Targets of MicroRNA-181a in HepG2 Cells: A New Approach for Functional Analysis of MicroRNAs.

    PubMed

    Tan, Jane Yi Lin; Habib, Nagy A; Chuah, York Wieo; Yau, Yin Hoe; Geifman-Shochat, Susana; Chen, Wei Ning

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are known to play a part in regulating important cellular processes. They generally perform their regulatory function through their binding with mRNAs, ultimately leading to a repression of target protein expression levels. However, their roles in cellular processes are poorly understood due to the limited understanding of their specific cellular targets. Aberrant levels of miRNAs have been found in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) including miR-181a. Using bioinformatics analysis, cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1B (CDKN1β) and transcriptional factor E2F7 were identified as potential targets of miR-181a. Validation analysis using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) showed a positive binding between miR-181a and the 3'UTRs of these two potential mRNA targets. In vivo luciferase assay further confirmed the positive miR-181a:mRNA bindings, where a significant decrease in luciferase activity was detected when HepG2 cells were co-transfected with the 3'UTR-containing reporter plasmids and miR-181a. The potential impact of miR-181a binding to its specific targets on the general cellular behavior was further investigated. Results showed that miR-181a significantly activated the MAPK/JNK pathway which regulates cell proliferation, supporting our recently reported findings. Inhibition of miR-181a, on the other hand, abolished the observed activation. Our findings open up a new approach in designing targeted functional analysis of miRNAs in cellular processes, through the identification of their cellular targets.

  19. Identification of Cellular Targets of MicroRNA-181a in HepG2 Cells: A New Approach for Functional Analysis of MicroRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Jane Yi Lin; Habib, Nagy A.; Chuah, York Wieo; Yau, Yin Hoe; Geifman-Shochat, Susana; Chen, Wei Ning

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are known to play a part in regulating important cellular processes. They generally perform their regulatory function through their binding with mRNAs, ultimately leading to a repression of target protein expression levels. However, their roles in cellular processes are poorly understood due to the limited understanding of their specific cellular targets. Aberrant levels of miRNAs have been found in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) including miR-181a. Using bioinformatics analysis, cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1B (CDKN1β) and transcriptional factor E2F7 were identified as potential targets of miR-181a. Validation analysis using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) showed a positive binding between miR-181a and the 3’UTRs of these two potential mRNA targets. In vivo luciferase assay further confirmed the positive miR-181a:mRNA bindings, where a significant decrease in luciferase activity was detected when HepG2 cells were co-transfected with the 3’UTR-containing reporter plasmids and miR-181a. The potential impact of miR-181a binding to its specific targets on the general cellular behavior was further investigated. Results showed that miR-181a significantly activated the MAPK/JNK pathway which regulates cell proliferation, supporting our recently reported findings. Inhibition of miR-181a, on the other hand, abolished the observed activation. Our findings open up a new approach in designing targeted functional analysis of miRNAs in cellular processes, through the identification of their cellular targets. PMID:25901570

  20. [Rapid identification 15 effective components of anti common cold medicine with MRM by LC-MS/MS].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jian-Guo; Zhang, Xi-Ru; Zhang, Yi-Hua; Song, Geng-Shen

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports the establishment of a method for rapid identification 15 effective components of anti common cold medicine (paracetamol, aminophenazone, pseudoephedrine hydrochloride, methylephedrine hydrochloride, caffeine, amantadine hydrochloride, phenazone, guaifenesin, chlorphenamine maleate, dextromethorphen hydrobromide, diphenhydramine hydrochloride, promethazine hydrochloride, propyphenazone, benorilate and diclofenac sodium) with MRM by LC-MS/MS. The samples were extracted by methanol and were separated from a Altantis T3 column within 15 min with a gradient of acetonitrile-ammonium acetate (containing 0.25% glacial acetic acid), a tandem quadrupole mass spectrometer equipped with electrospray ionization source (ESI) was used in positive ion mode, and multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) was performed for qualitative analysis of these compounds. The minimum detectable quantity were 0.33-2.5 microg x kg(-1) of the 15 compounds. The method is simple, accurate and with good reproducibility for rapid identification many components in the same chromatographic condition, and provides a reference for qualitative analysis illegally added chemicals in anti common cold medicine.

  1. Rapid, on-site identification of explosives in nanoliter droplets using a UV reflected fiber optic sensor.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Li, Qiang; Zhou, Hong; Hao, Hongxia; Wang, Tongzhou; Zhao, Songmin; Lu, Ying; Huang, Guoliang

    2012-11-02

    A portable UV (190-400 nm) spectrophotometric based reflected fiber optic sensor system is presented for the on-site detection and identification of explosives. A reflected fiber optic sensor for explosives analysis was developed, with low sample consumption (20-100 nL) and a wide concentration quantification range (1.1-250 mg L(-1)). Seven common explosives [pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), trinitrophenylmethylnitramine (CE), trinitrotoluene (TNT), dinitrotoluene (DNT), picric acid (PA), cyclotetramethylenetetranitramine (HMX), cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine (RDX)] and a PETN-RDX mixture (to simulate the Semtex used in many terrorist bombings) were quantitatively analyzed and identified by the proposed system in less than 3s per test, with limits of detection (LOD) of 0.3 mg L(-1). Due to chemical interference problems in the UV wavelengths range, a novel feature matching algorithm (FMA) was proposed for explosive identification, which was proved to have higher specificity and better anti-interference ability. Real post-blast debris samples were analyzed by the proposed method, and the results were validated against an LC/MS/MS method. The rapid, cost-effective detection with low sample consumption and wide applicability achieved by this system is highly suitable for homeland security on-site applications, such as rapid sample screening in post-blast debris. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Rapid in situ identification of bioactive compounds in plants by in vivo nanospray high-resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chang, Qing; Peng, Yue'e; Dan, Conghui; Shuai, Qin; Hu, Shenghong

    2015-03-25

    A method for the rapid in situ identification of bioactive compounds in fresh plants has been developed using in vivo nanospray coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry (HR-MS). Using a homemade in vivo nanospray ion source, the plant liquid was drawn out from a target region and ionized in situ. The ionized bioactive compounds were then identified using Q-Orbitrap HR-MS. The accurate mass measurements of these bioactive compounds were performed by full-scan or selected ion monitoring (SIM), and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) was used in the structural elucidation. Without sample pretreatment, 12 bioactive compounds in 7 different plant species were identified, namely, isoalliin in onion; butylphthalide in celery; N-methylpelletierine, pelletierine, and pseudopelletierine in pomegranate; chlorogenic acid in crabapple; solamargine, solasonine, and solasodine in nightshade; aloin and aloe-emodin in aloe; and menthone in mint. This work demonstrates that in vivo nanospray HR-MS is a good method for rapid in situ identification of bioactive compounds in plants.

  3. An efficient and rapid thin-layer chromatography method for the identification of 32 dye substances in hair dye products.

    PubMed

    Zhu, H J; Yang, Y W; Zhu, Y

    2014-08-01

    The use of dye substances in hair dye products has led to controversial public and scientific discussions about their impact on human health. This study aimed to explore a rapid method for identification of dye substances in hair dye products. Thin layer chromatography (TLC) method was conducted in this study. We developed basic data of 32 dye substances by 4 developing solvents and 2 indicator sprays. The dye substances were identified by comparing the Rf values and colors between samples and reference substances. Thirty samples were identified by the established method. 22 hair dye substances were detected in 16 formula known samples, 15 hair dye substances were detected in 14 formula unknown samples. Four laboratories participated in the validation and the results showed good interlaboratory reproducibility. The developed TLC method is simple, rapid, reliable and can be finely used for identification of dye substances in hair dye products. © 2014 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  4. Development of loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay for rapid and sensitive identification of ostrich meat.

    PubMed

    Abdulmawjood, Amir; Grabowski, Nils; Fohler, Svenja; Kittler, Sophie; Nagengast, Helga; Klein, Guenter

    2014-01-01

    Animal species identification is one of the primary duties of official food control. Since ostrich meat is difficult to be differentiated macroscopically from beef, therefore new analytical methods are needed. To enforce labeling regulations for the authentication of ostrich meat, it might be of importance to develop and evaluate a rapid and reliable assay. In the present study, a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay based on the cytochrome b gene of the mitochondrial DNA of the species Struthio camelus was developed. The LAMP assay was used in combination with a real-time fluorometer. The developed system allowed the detection of 0.01% ostrich meat products. In parallel, a direct swab method without nucleic acid extraction using the HYPLEX LPTV buffer was also evaluated. This rapid processing method allowed detection of ostrich meat without major incubation steps. In summary, the LAMP assay had excellent sensitivity and specificity for detecting ostrich meat and could provide a sampling-to-result identification-time of 15 to 20 minutes.

  5. Rapid sex identification method of spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) in the vegetative stage using loop-mediated isothermal amplification.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Naoko; Ayukawa, Yu; Fuke, Mitsutoshi; Teraoka, Tohru; Watanabe, Kyoko; Arie, Tsutomu; Komatsu, Ken

    2017-01-01

    A LAMP-mediated, simple and rapid method for sex identification in spinach was developed. Nutrient compositional analysis showed a higher iron content in male than female plants. Spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) is a dioecious plant with its sex determined by the XY system. Male and female floral organs differ morphologically, but plants do not differ in the vegetative stage before flowering. PCR with Y chromosome markers has been used to determine the sex of dioecious plants before flowering. In this study, we developed a genotype-specific loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) for sex identification of individual vegetative-stage spinach plants, using primers designed for the genomic region flanked by male-specific markers. LAMP could specifically detect spinach males. The method was further modified to omit DNA purification and use just an aliquot of crude leaf extract homogenized in water. We compared the nutrient composition of males and females, finding higher amounts of iron in the males. Our method could therefore be used for rapidly discriminating male plants in the field, which is useful for efficient hybrid breeding.

  6. Development of Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification (LAMP) Assay for Rapid and Sensitive Identification of Ostrich Meat

    PubMed Central

    Abdulmawjood, Amir; Grabowski, Nils; Fohler, Svenja; Kittler, Sophie; Nagengast, Helga; Klein, Guenter

    2014-01-01

    Animal species identification is one of the primary duties of official food control. Since ostrich meat is difficult to be differentiated macroscopically from beef, therefore new analytical methods are needed. To enforce labeling regulations for the authentication of ostrich meat, it might be of importance to develop and evaluate a rapid and reliable assay. In the present study, a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay based on the cytochrome b gene of the mitochondrial DNA of the species Struthio camelus was developed. The LAMP assay was used in combination with a real-time fluorometer. The developed system allowed the detection of 0.01% ostrich meat products. In parallel, a direct swab method without nucleic acid extraction using the HYPLEX LPTV buffer was also evaluated. This rapid processing method allowed detection of ostrich meat without major incubation steps. In summary, the LAMP assay had excellent sensitivity and specificity for detecting ostrich meat and could provide a sampling-to-result identification-time of 15 to 20 minutes. PMID:24963709

  7. Rapid molecular identification of Listeria species by use of real-time PCR and high-resolution melting analysis.

    PubMed

    Jin, Dazhi; Luo, Yun; Zhang, Zheng; Fang, Weijia; Ye, Julian; Wu, Fang; Ding, Gangqiang

    2012-05-01

    Identification of Listeria species via a molecular method is critical for food safety and clinical diagnosis. In this study, an assay integrating real-time quantitative PCR (Q-PCR) with high-resolution melting (HRM) curve analysis was developed and assessed for rapid identification of six Listeria species. The ssrA gene, which encodes a transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA) is conserved and common to all bacterial phyla, contains a variable domain in Listeria spp. Therefore, Q-PCR and a HRM profile were applied to characterize this gene. Fifty-three Listeria species and 45 non-Listeria species were detected using one primer set, with an accuracy of 100% in reference to conventional methods. There was a 93.3% correction rate to 30 artificially contaminated samples. Thus, Q-PCR with melting profiling analysis proved able to identify Listeria species accurately. Consequently, this study demonstrates that the assay we developed is a functional tool for rapidly identifying six Listeria species, and has the potential for discriminating novel species food safety and epidemiological research.

  8. Rapid and Accurate Identification of Human-Associated Staphylococci by Use of Multiplex PCR▿

    PubMed Central

    Hirotaki, Shintaro; Sasaki, Takashi; Kuwahara-Arai, Kyoko; Hiramatsu, Keiichi

    2011-01-01

    Although staphylococci are identified by phenotypic analysis in many clinical laboratories, these results are often incorrect because of phenotypic variation. Genetic analysis is necessary for definitive species identification. In the present study, we developed a simple multiplex-PCR (M-PCR) for species identification of human-associated staphylococci, which were as follows: Staphylococcus aureus, S. capitis, S. caprae, S. epidermidis, S. haemolyticus, S. hominis, S. lugdunensis, S. saprophyticus, and S. warneri. This method was designed on the basis of nucleotide sequences of the thermonuclease (nuc) genes that were universally conserved in staphylococci except the S. sciuri group and showed moderate sequence diversity. In order to validate this assay, 361 staphylococcal strains were studied, which had been identified at the species levels by sequence analysis of the hsp60 genes. In consequence, M-PCR demonstrated a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 100%. By virtue of simplicity and accuracy, this method will be useful in clinical research. PMID:21832022

  9. Evaluation of the API ATB 32C system for the rapid identification of foodborne yeasts.

    PubMed

    Rohm, H; Lechner, F; Lehner, M

    1990-12-01

    The commercial API ATB 32C identification kit was compared with a standard method for identifying 11 reference strains and 53 yeast strains isolated from fermented milk products. Approx. 50% of the species considered in the API ATB 32C database were identified on a level of good, very good, and excellent identification. The numerical profile of 25 strains was not found in the API ATB 32C index. Low discrimination or misidentification was observed in seven strains. The low reliability of the API ATB 32C system may be ascribed to the incomplete nature of the profile index. A majority (91%) of the strains, however, were identified correctly by the API ATB 32C strip test results in combination with the commercial computer program of Barnett et al. (1985). This combined procedure offers the possibility to identify any out of 497 species considered by Barnett et al. (1985).

  10. Rapid and Accurate Molecular Identification of the Emerging Multidrug-Resistant Pathogen Candida auris.

    PubMed

    Kordalewska, Milena; Zhao, Yanan; Lockhart, Shawn R; Chowdhary, Anuradha; Berrio, Indira; Perlin, David S

    2017-08-01

    Candida auris is an emerging multidrug-resistant fungal pathogen causing nosocomial and invasive infections associated with high mortality. C. auris is commonly misidentified as several different yeast species by commercially available phenotypic identification platforms. Thus, there is an urgent need for a reliable diagnostic method. In this paper, we present fast, robust, easy-to-perform and interpret PCR and real-time PCR assays to identify C. auris and related species: Candida duobushaemulonii, Candida haemulonii, and Candida lusitaniae Targeting rDNA region nucleotide sequences, primers specific for C. auris only or C. auris and related species were designed. A panel of 140 clinical fungal isolates was used in both PCR and real-time PCR assays followed by electrophoresis or melting temperature analysis, respectively. The identification results from the assays were 100% concordant with DNA sequencing results. These molecular assays overcome the deficiencies of existing phenotypic tests to identify C. auris and related species. Copyright © 2017 Kordalewska et al.

  11. Comparison of BBL Crystal ANR ID Kit and API rapid ID 32 A for identification of anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Moll, W M; Ungerechts, J; Marklein, G; Schaal, K P

    1996-07-01

    BBL Crystal ANR ID Kit and the API System rapid ID 32 A are miniaturized identification systems for anaerobes using enzymatic tests. The incubation period of both systems is 4 hours. A comparative evaluation of the BBL Crystal Identification System Anaerobe ID Kit (Becton Dickinson Microbiology Systems, Cockeysville, USA) with anaerobes grown on Columbia and Schaedler agar plates (Becton Dickinson Microbiology Systems, Cockeysville, USA) and the API System rapid ID 32 A (BioMérieux SA, Lyon, France) with bacteria grown on Columbia agar (Becton Dickinson Microbiology Systems, Cockeysville, USA) which is recommended by the manufacturer as cultivation medium, was performed with 207 mostly fresh clinical anaerobe isolates, including 104 gram-negative bacilli, 12 gram-negative cocci, 15 gram-positive cocci, 14 gram-positive sporeforming bacilli and 62 representatives of gram-positive non-sporeforming bacilli. With supplemental testing the Crystal system with inocula from Columbia and Schaedler agar and API inoculates from Columbia agar identified to genus level 144 (69.6%), 152 (73.4%) and 109 (52.7%) isolates, respectively. Misidentification to genus level was found by Crystal from Columbia and Schaedler agar and by API from Columbia agar in 17 (8.2%), 15 (7.3%) and 12 (5.8%) isolates, respectively. 36 isolates were not determined to species level by classical anaerobic methods or the systems only identified to genus level. 26 anaerobes were not included in the database of the Crystal or API system. From the remaining 145 clinical isolates with supplemental testing, Crystal from Columbia and Schaedler agar plates correctly identified 91 (62.8%) and 102 (70.3%), respectively, and API, 69 (47.6%) isolates. For the correct identification to genus and species level of the 207 clinical isolates tested, the Crystal system from Columbia and Schaedler agar and API system from Columbia agar required supplemental testing, as specified by the manufacturer, for 39 (27.1%), 34 (22

  12. Implementation of an FTIR spectral library of 486 filamentous fungi strains for rapid identification of molds.

    PubMed

    Lecellier, A; Gaydou, V; Mounier, J; Hermet, A; Castrec, L; Barbier, G; Ablain, W; Manfait, M; Toubas, D; Sockalingum, G D

    2015-02-01

    Filamentous fungi may cause food and feed spoilage and produce harmful metabolites to human and animal health such as mycotoxins. Identification of fungi using conventional phenotypic methods is time-consuming and molecular methods are still quite expensive and require specific laboratory skills. In the last two decades, it has been shown that Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was an efficient tool for microorganism identification. The aims of this study were to use a simple protocol for the identification of filamentous fungi using FTIR spectroscopy coupled with a partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA), to implement a procedure to validate the obtained results, and to assess the transferability of the method and database. FTIR spectra of 486 strains (43 genera and 140 species) were recorded. An IR spectral database built with 288 strains was used to identify 105 different strains. It was found that 99.17% and 92.3% of spectra derived from these strains were correctly assigned at the genus and species levels, respectively. The establishment of a score and a threshold permitted to validate 80.79% of the results obtained. A standardization function (SF) was also implemented and tested on FTIR data from another instrument on a different site and permitted to increase the percentage of well predicted spectra for this set from 72.15% to 89.13%. This study confirms the good performance of high throughput FTIR spectroscopy for fungal identification using a spectral library of molds of industrial relevance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Rapid identification of Escherichia coli by Fluorocult media and positive indole reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Heizmann, W; Döller, P C; Gutbrod, B; Werner, H

    1988-01-01

    To assess the specificity and sensitivity of Fluorocult media for the identification of Escherichia coli, the beta-glucuronidase activities of 1,258 bacterial strains, as well as 20 strains of Candida spp., were investigated. Fluorescence of colonies combined with positive indole reaction resulted in specificities of 99.6 to 99.8%. Sensitivities were 59.1% (MacConkey agar), 69.9% (brolacin agar), 85.5% (Columbia agar), and 85.8% (ECD agar). PMID:3068257

  14. Rapid identification of Escherichia coli by Fluorocult media and positive indole reaction.

    PubMed

    Heizmann, W; Döller, P C; Gutbrod, B; Werner, H

    1988-12-01

    To assess the specificity and sensitivity of Fluorocult media for the identification of Escherichia coli, the beta-glucuronidase activities of 1,258 bacterial strains, as well as 20 strains of Candida spp., were investigated. Fluorescence of colonies combined with positive indole reaction resulted in specificities of 99.6 to 99.8%. Sensitivities were 59.1% (MacConkey agar), 69.9% (brolacin agar), 85.5% (Columbia agar), and 85.8% (ECD agar).

  15. Vibrational spectroscopy--a powerful tool for the rapid identification of microbial cells at the single-cell level.

    PubMed

    Harz, M; Rösch, P; Popp, J

    2009-02-01

    Rapid microbial detection and identification with a high grade of sensitivity and selectivity is a great and challenging issue in many fields, primarily in clinical diagnosis, pharmaceutical, or food processing technology. The tedious and time-consuming processes of current microbiological approaches call for faster ideally on-line identification techniques. The vibrational spectroscopic techniques IR absorption and Raman spectroscopy are noninvasive methods yielding molecular fingerprint information; thus, allowing for a fast and reliable analysis of complex biological systems such as bacterial or yeast cells. In this short review, we discuss recent vibrational spectroscopic advances in microbial identification of yeast and bacterial cells for bulk environment and single-cell analysis. IR absorption spectroscopy enables a bulk analysis whereas micro-Raman-spectroscopy with excitation in the near infrared or visible range has the potential for the analysis of single bacterial and yeast cells. The inherently weak Raman signal can be increased up to several orders of magnitude by applying Raman signal enhancement methods such as UV-resonance Raman spectroscopy with excitation in the deep UV region, surface enhanced Raman scattering, or tip-enhanced Raman scattering. Copyright 2008 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry

  16. Rapid simultaneous identification and quantitation of Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa directly from bronchoalveolar lavage specimens using automated microscopy.

    PubMed

    Metzger, Steven; Frobel, Rachel A; Dunne, W Michael

    2014-06-01

    Diagnosis of ventilator-assisted pneumonia (VAP) requires pathogen quantitation of respiratory samples. Current quantitative culture methods require overnight growth, and pathogen identification requires an additional step. Automated microscopy can perform rapid simultaneous identification and quantitation of live, surface-immobilized bacteria extracted directly from patient specimens using image data collected over 3 h. Automated microscopy was compared to 1 μL loop culture and standard identification methods for Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas spp. in 53 remnant bronchoalveolar lavage specimens. Microscopy identified 9/9 S. aureus and 7/7 P. aeruginosa in all specimens with content above the VAP diagnostic threshold. Concordance for specimens containing targets above the diagnostic threshold was 13/16, with concordance for sub-diagnostic content of 86/90. Results demonstrated that automated microscopy had higher precision than 1 μL loop culture (range ~0.55 log versus ≥1 log), with a dynamic range of ~4 logs (~10(3) to 10(6) CFU/mL).

  17. Rapid identification of moulds and arthroconidial yeasts from positive blood cultures by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, João N; Sztajnbok, Jaques; da Silva, Afonso Rafael; Vieira, Vinicius Adriano; Galastri, Anne Layze; Bissoli, Leandro; Litvinov, Nadia; Del Negro, Gilda Maria Barbaro; Motta, Adriana Lopes; Rossi, Flávia; Benard, Gil

    2016-11-01

    Moulds and arthroconidial yeasts are potential life-threatening agents of fungemia in immunocompromised patients. Fast and accurate identification (ID) of these pathogens hastens initiation of targeted antifungal therapy, thereby improving the patients' prognosis. We describe a new strategy that enabled the identification of moulds and arthroconidial yeasts directly from positive blood cultures by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry (MS). Positive blood cultures (BCs) with Gram staining showing hyphae and/or arthroconidia were prospectively selected and submitted to an in-house protein extraction protocol. Mass spectra were obtained by Vitek MS™ system, and identifications were carried out with in the research use only (RUO) mode with an extended database (SARAMIS™ [v.4.12] plus in-house database). Fusarium solani, Fusarium verticillioides, Exophiala dermatitidis, Saprochaete clavata, and Trichosporon asahii had correct species ID by MALDI-TOF MS analysis of positive BCs. All cases were related to critically ill patients with high mortality fungemia and direct ID from positive BCs was helpful for rapid administration of targeted antifungal therapy.

  18. Rapid and Accurate Identification by Real-Time PCR of Biotoxin-Producing Dinoflagellates from the Family Gymnodiniaceae

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Kirsty F.; de Salas, Miguel; Adamson, Janet; Rhodes, Lesley L.

    2014-01-01

    The identification of toxin-producing dinoflagellates for monitoring programmes and bio-compound discovery requires considerable taxonomic expertise. It can also be difficult to morphologically differentiate toxic and non-toxic species or strains. Various molecular methods have been used for dinoflagellate identification and detection, and this study describes the development of eight real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays targeting the large subunit ribosomal RNA (LSU rRNA) gene of species from the genera Gymnodinium, Karenia, Karlodinium, and Takayama. Assays proved to be highly specific and sensitive, and the assay for G. catenatum was further developed for quantification in response to a bloom in Manukau Harbour, New Zealand. The assay estimated cell densities from environmental samples as low as 0.07 cells per PCR reaction, which equated to three cells per litre. This assay not only enabled conclusive species identification but also detected the presence of cells below the limit of detection for light microscopy. This study demonstrates the usefulness of real-time PCR as a sensitive and rapid molecular technique for the detection and quantification of micro-algae from environmental samples. PMID:24608972

  19. Single-step PCR using (GACA)4 primer: utility for rapid identification of dermatophyte species and strains.

    PubMed

    Shehata, Atef S; Mukherjee, Pranab K; Aboulatta, Hassan N; el-Akhras, Atef I; Abbadi, Said H; Ghannoum, Mahmoud A

    2008-08-01

    Dermatophytes are fungi that belong to three genera: Epidermophyton, Microsporum, and Trichophyton. Identification of dermatophyte species is essential for appropriate diagnosis and treatment of dermatophytosis. Routine identification depends on macroscopic and microscopic morphology, which is time-consuming and does not identify dermatophyte strains. In this study, two PCR-based methods were compared for their abilities to identify 21 dermatophyte isolates obtained from Egyptian patients to the species and strain levels. The first method employed a two-step method: PCR amplification, using ITS1 and ITS4 as primers, followed by restriction enzyme digestion using the endonuclease MvaI. The second method employed a one-step approach employing the repetitive oligonucleotide (GACA)(4) as a primer. Dermatophyte strains were also identified using a conventional culture method. Our results showed that the conventional culture method identified four species: Microsporum canis, Trichophyton mentagrophytes, Trichophyton rubrum, and Trichophyton violaceum. Moreover, both PCR methods agreed with the diagnosis made using the conventional approach. Furthermore, ITS1/ITS4-based PCR provided no strain differentiation, while (GACA)(4)-based PCR identified different varieties among the T. mentagrophytes isolates. Taken together, our results suggest that (GACA)(4)-based PCR has utility as a simple and rapid method for identification of dermatophyte species as well as utility for differentiation of T. mentagrophytes variants.

  20. Shell thickness-dependent Raman enhancement for rapid identification and detection of pesticide residues at fruit peels.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bianhua; Han, Guangmei; Zhang, Zhongping; Liu, Renyong; Jiang, Changlong; Wang, Suhua; Han, Ming-Yong

    2012-01-03

    Here, we report the shell thickness-dependent Raman enhancement of silver-coated gold nanoparticles (Au@Ag NPs) for the identification and detection of pesticide residues at various fruit peels. The Raman enhancement of Au@Ag NPs to a large family of sulfur-containing pesticides is ~2 orders of magnitude stronger than those of bare Au and Ag NPs, and there is a strong dependence of the Raman enhancement on the Ag shell thickness. It has been shown for the first time that the huge Raman enhancement is contributed by individual Au@Ag NPs rather than aggregated Au@Ag NPs with "hot spots" among the neighboring NPs. Therefore, the Au@Ag NPs with excellent individual-particle enhancement can be exploited as stand-alone-particle Raman amplifiers for the surface identification and detection of pesticide residues at various peels of fruits, such as apple, grape, mango, pear, and peach. By casting the particle sensors onto fruit peels, several types of pesticide residues (e.g., thiocarbamate and organophosphorous compounds) have been reliably/rapidly detected, for example, 1.5 nanograms of thiram per square centimeter at apple peel under the current unoptimized condition. The surface-lifting spectroscopic technique offers great practical potentials for the on-site assessment and identification of pesticide residues in agricultural products.

  1. Rapid Plant Identification Using Species- and Group-Specific Primers Targeting Chloroplast DNA

    PubMed Central

    Staudacher, Karin; Schallhart, Nikolaus; Mitterrutzner, Evi; Steiner, Eva-Maria; Thalinger, Bettina; Traugott, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Plant identification is challenging when no morphologically assignable parts are available. There is a lack of broadly applicable methods for identifying plants in this situation, for example when roots grow in mixture and for decayed or semi-digested plant material. These difficulties have also impeded the progress made in ecological disciplines such as soil- and trophic ecology. Here, a PCR-based approach is presented which allows identifying a variety of plant taxa commonly occurring in Central European agricultural land. Based on the trnT-F cpDNA region, PCR assays were developed to identify two plant families (Poaceae and Apiaceae), the genera Trifolium and Plantago, and nine plant species: Achillea millefolium, Fagopyrum esculentum, Lolium perenne, Lupinus angustifolius, Phaseolus coccineus, Sinapis alba, Taraxacum officinale, Triticum aestivum, and Zea mays. These assays allowed identification of plants based on size-specific amplicons ranging from 116 bp to 381 bp. Their specificity and sensitivity was consistently high, enabling the detection of small amounts of plant DNA, for example, in decaying plant material and in the intestine or faeces of herbivores. To increase the efficacy of identifying plant species from large number of samples, specific primers were combined in multiplex PCRs, allowing screening for multiple species within a single reaction. The molecular assays outlined here will be applicable manifold, such as for root- and leaf litter identification, botanical trace evidence, and the analysis of herbivory. PMID:22253728

  2. Rapid and efficient glycoprotein identification through microwave-assisted enzymatic digestion.

    PubMed

    Segu, Zaneer M; Hammad, Loubna A; Mechref, Yehia

    2010-12-15

    Identification of protein glycosylation sites is analytically challenging due to the diverse glycan structures associated with a glycoprotein. Mass spectrometry (MS)-based identification and characterization of glycoproteins has been achieved predominantly with the bottom-up approach, which typically involves the enzymatic cleavage of proteins to peptides prior to LC/MS or LC/MS/MS analysis. However, the process can be challenging due to the structural variations and steric hindrance imposed by the attached glycans. Alternatives to conventional heating protocols, that increase the rate of enzymatic cleavage of glycoproteins, may aid in addressing these challenges. An enzymatic digestion of a glycoprotein can be accelerated and made more efficient through microwave-assisted digestion. In this paper, a systematic study was conducted to explore the efficiency of microwave-assisted enzymatic (trypsin) digestion (MAED) of glycoproteins as compared with the conventional method. In addition, the optimum experimental parameters for the digestion such as temperature, reaction time, and microwave radiation power were investigated. It was determined that efficient tryptic digestion of glycoproteins was attained in 15 min, allowing comparable if not better sequence coverage through LC/MS/MS analysis. Optimum tryptic cleavage was achieved at 45°C irrespective of the size and complexity of the glycoprotein. Moreover, MAED allowed the detection and identification of more peptides and subsequently higher sequence coverage for all model glycoprotein. MAED also did not appear to prompt a loss or partial cleavage of the glycan moieties attached to the peptide backbones.

  3. Rapid plant identification using species- and group-specific primers targeting chloroplast DNA.

    PubMed

    Wallinger, Corinna; Juen, Anita; Staudacher, Karin; Schallhart, Nikolaus; Mitterrutzner, Evi; Steiner, Eva-Maria; Thalinger, Bettina; Traugott, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Plant identification is challenging when no morphologically assignable parts are available. There is a lack of broadly applicable methods for identifying plants in this situation, for example when roots grow in mixture and for decayed or semi-digested plant material. These difficulties have also impeded the progress made in ecological disciplines such as soil- and trophic ecology. Here, a PCR-based approach is presented which allows identifying a variety of plant taxa commonly occurring in Central European agricultural land. Based on the trnT-F cpDNA region, PCR assays were developed to identify two plant families (Poaceae and Apiaceae), the genera Trifolium and Plantago, and nine plant species: Achillea millefolium, Fagopyrum esculentum, Lolium perenne, Lupinus angustifolius, Phaseolus coccineus, Sinapis alba, Taraxacum officinale, Triticum aestivum, and Zea mays. These assays allowed identification of plants based on size-specific amplicons ranging from 116 bp to 381 bp. Their specificity and sensitivity was consistently high, enabling the detection of small amounts of plant DNA, for example, in decaying plant material and in the intestine or faeces of herbivores. To increase the efficacy of identifying plant species from large number of samples, specific primers were combined in multiplex PCRs, allowing screening for multiple species within a single reaction. The molecular assays outlined here will be applicable manifold, such as for root- and leaf litter identification, botanical trace evidence, and the analysis of herbivory.

  4. [Study on nondestructive rapid identification method of foods containing trans-fatty acids using diffuse near infrared spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    An, Xue-Song; Song, Chun-Feng; Yuan, Hong-Fu; Xie, Jin-Chun; Li, Xiao-Yu

    2013-11-01

    A rapid nondestructive method for identifying intact foods containing trans fatty acids (TFA) using diffuse near infrared spectroscopy (NIR) was proposed in the present paper. The diffuse Fourier transform near infrared (FT-NIR) spectra of intact samples were collected by fiber probe, and the reference data of TFA content were determined by Chinese standard method GB/T 22110-2008 (gas chromatography (GC) method). In this work, all the samples were classified into two categories: foods with TFA and foods without TFA according to the TFA content of the foods. The identification models were established by different supervised pattern recognition algorithms including partial least square discriminant analysis (PLSDA), support vector machine (SVM), soft independent modeling of class analogy (SIMCA) and K-nearest neighbor method (KNN) etc. The performances of the established models employing different algorithms, data pretreatments and wavelength bands were compared. The results show that PLSDA and SVM algorithms have the ability of identifying intact foods with TFA, and the performance of identification models established by PLSDA is better than that of SVM. The PLSDA models established by the wavelength bands of 4 138-4 428, 5 507-5 963 and 7 794-8 960 cm(-1) which were pretreated with pretreatment methods of auto scaling and second derivative have the best performance. The correct classification percentages of its calibration and validation set are 96.4% and 88%, respectively, which indicates that this method is feasible for the identification of foods with TFA. This NIR method above mentioned has the characteristics of rapidness, non-destruction and easy operation due to the elimination of sample pretreatment such as oil extraction and grinding, therefore it is very suitable for on-line and in-site detection application.

  5. Automatic and rapid identification of glycopeptides by nano-UPLC-LTQ-FT-MS and proteomic search engine.

    PubMed

    Giménez, Estela; Gay, Marina; Vilaseca, Marta

    2017-01-30

    Here we demonstrate the potential of nano-UPLC-LTQ-FT-MS and the Byonic™ proteomic search engine for the separation, detection, and identification of N- and O-glycopeptide glycoforms in standard glycoproteins. The use of a BEH C18 nanoACQUITY column allowed the separation of the glycopeptides present in the glycoprotein digest and a baseline-resolution of the glycoforms of the same glycopeptide on the basis of the number of sialic acids. Moreover, we evaluated several acquisition strategies in order to improve the detection and characterization of glycopeptide glycoforms with the maximum number of identification percentages. The proposed strategy is simple to set up with the technology platforms commonly used in proteomic labs. The method allows the straightforward and rapid obtention of a general glycosylated map of a given protein, including glycosites and their corresponding glycosylated structures. The MS strategy selected in this work, based on a gas phase fractionation approach, led to 136 unique peptides from four standard proteins, which represented 78% of the total number of peptides identified. Moreover, the method does not require an extra glycopeptide enrichment step, thus preventing the bias that this step could cause towards certain glycopeptide species. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD003578. We propose a simple and high-throughput glycoproteomics-based methodology that allows the separation of glycopeptide glycoforms on the basis of the number of sialic acids, and their automatic and rapid identification without prior knowledge of protein glycosites or type and structure of the glycans. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Rapid identification and classification of Staphylococcus aureus by attenuated total reflectance fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important bacterium that can cause serious infections in humans such as pneumonia and bacteremia. Rapid detection of this pathogen is crucial in food industries and clinical laboratories to control S. aureus food poisoning and human infections. In this study, fourier tran...

  7. Rapid identification of salmonella serotypes with stereo and hyperspectral microscope imaging Methods

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The hyperspectral microscope imaging (HMI) method can reduce detection time within 8 hours including incubation process. The early and rapid detection with this method in conjunction with the high throughput capabilities makes HMI method a prime candidate for implementation for the food industry. Th...

  8. Rapid Identification of Salmonella Serotypes with Stereo and Hyperspectral Microscope Imaging Methods

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The hyperspectral microscope imaging (HMI) method can reduce detection time within 8 hours including incubation process. The early and rapid detection with this method in conjunction with the high throughput capabilities makes HMI method a prime candidate for implementation for the food industry. Th...

  9. Rapid Screening and Species Identification of E. Coli, Listeria, and Salmonella by SERS Technique

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Techniques for routine and rapid screening of the presence of foodborne bacteria are needed, and this study reports the feasibility of citrate-reduced silver colloidal SERS for identifying E. coli, Listeria, and Salmonella. Relative standard deviation (RSD) of SERS spectra from silver colloidal susp...

  10. Rapid identification of Candida albicans by using Albicans ID and fluoroplate agar plates.

    PubMed Central

    Rousselle, P; Freydiere, A M; Couillerot, P J; de Montclos, H; Gille, Y

    1994-01-01

    Two commercially available agar media, Albicans ID and Fluoroplate, that use a chromogenic or a fluorogenic substrate for the detection and identification of Candida albicans were evaluated. From 1,006 clinical samples containing 723 yeast strains, 352 C. albicans strains were detected with either of the two media. The sensitivity of each of the two media was 93.8% and the specificity was 98.6%, with five false-positive reactions for Candida tropicalis and no false-negative reactions. PMID:7883894

  11. Development of a simple method for the rapid identification of organisms causing anthrax by coagglutination test.

    PubMed

    Sumithra, T G; Chaturvedi, V K; Gupta, P K; Siju, S J; Susan, C; Bincy, J; Laxmi, U; Sunita, S C; Rai, A K

    2014-11-01

    A protective antigen (PA) based coagglutination test was optimized in the present study for the specific and sensitive identification of bacteria causing anthrax in a cost effective and less risky manner. The test showed 100% specificity and sensitivity up to 9 × 10(3) formalinized vegetative cells or 11 ng of PA. The optimized test also detected anthrax toxin directly from the serum as well as blood of anthrax infected animals indicating the potential application for direct diagnosis of anthrax under field conditions. Copyright © 2014 The International Alliance for Biological Standardization. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Rapid identification of health care–associated infections with an integrated fluorescence anisotropy system

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ki Soo; Huang, Chen-Han; Lee, Kyungheon; Yoo, Yeong-Eun; Castro, Cesar M.; Weissleder, Ralph; Lee, Hakho

    2016-01-01

    Health care–associated infections (HAIs) and drug-resistant pathogens have become a major health care issue with millions of reported cases every year. Advanced diagnostics would allow clinicians to more quickly determine the most effective treatment, reduce the nonspecific use of broad-spectrum antimicrobials, and facilitate enrollment in new antibiotic treatments. We present a new integrated system, polarization anisotropy diagnostics (PAD), for rapid detection of HAI pathogens. The PAD uses changes of fluorescence anisotropy when detection probes recognize target bacterial nucleic acids. The technology is inherently robust against environmental noise and economically scalable for parallel measurements. The assay is fast (2 hours) and performed on-site in a single-tube format. When applied to clinical samples obtained from interventional procedures, the PAD determined the overall bacterial burden, differentiated HAI bacterial species, and identified drug resistance and virulence status. The PAD system holds promise as a powerful tool for near-patient, rapid HAI testing. PMID:28861468

  13. Chromosome-specific DNA repeats: rapid identification in silico and validation using fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Joanne H; Zeng, Hui; Lemke, Kalistyn H; Polyzos, Aris A; Weier, Jingly F; Wang, Mei; Lawin-O'Brien, Anna R; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G; O'Brien, Benjamin

    2012-12-20

    Chromosome enumeration in interphase and metaphase cells using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is an established procedure for the rapid and accurate cytogenetic analysis of cell nuclei and polar bodies, the unambiguous gender determination, as well as the definition of tumor-specific signatures. Present bottlenecks in the procedure are a limited number of commercial, non-isotopically labeled probes that can be combined in multiplex FISH assays and the relatively high price and effort to develop additional probes. We describe a streamlined approach for rapid probe definition, synthesis and validation, which is based on the analysis of publicly available DNA sequence information, also known as "database mining". Examples of probe preparation for the human gonosomes and chromosome 16 as a selected autosome outline the probe selection strategy, define a timeline for expedited probe production and compare this novel selection strategy to more conventional probe cloning protocols.

  14. Chromosome-Specific DNA Repeats: Rapid Identification in Silico and Validation Using Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Joanne H.; Zeng, Hui; Lemke, Kalistyn H.; Polyzos, Aris A.; Weier, Jingly F.; Wang, Mei; Lawin-O’Brien, Anna R.; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.; O’Brien, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    Chromosome enumeration in interphase and metaphase cells using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is an established procedure for the rapid and accurate cytogenetic analysis of cell nuclei and polar bodies, the unambiguous gender determination, as well as the definition of tumor-specific signatures. Present bottlenecks in the procedure are a limited number of commercial, non-isotopically labeled probes that can be combined in multiplex FISH assays and the relatively high price and effort to develop additional probes. We describe a streamlined approach for rapid probe definition, synthesis and validation, which is based on the analysis of publicly available DNA sequence information, also known as “database mining”. Examples of probe preparation for the human gonosomes and chromosome 16 as a selected autosome outline the probe selection strategy, define a timeline for expedited probe production and compare this novel selection strategy to more conventional probe cloning protocols. PMID:23344021

  15. Identification of alternative transcripts using rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE).

    PubMed

    Yeku, Oladapo; Scotto-Lavino, Elizabeth; Frohman, Michael A

    2009-01-01

    Many organisms, including humans, have many more proteins than are actually coded for by their genes. This discrepancy is partially explained by the existence of alternative transcripts produced by the same gene. Multiple isoforms of the same gene sometimes perform completely different functions, and as such, knowing the sequence of one of the transcripts is not enough. Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends (RACE) provides an inexpensive and powerful tool to quickly identify alternative transcripts of a gene when the partial or complete sequence of only one transcript is known. In the following sections, we outline details for rapid amplification of 5' and 3' cDNA ends using the "New Race" technique.

  16. Rapid dereplication and identification of the bioactive constituents from the fungus, Leucocoprinus birnbaumii.

    PubMed

    Brkljača, Robert; Urban, Sylvia

    2015-01-01

    A series of fatty acids were rapidly dereplicated and partially identified from the flowerpot fungus, Leucocoprinus birnbaumii using HPLC-NMR and HPLC-MS. Subsequent off-line isolation unequivocally established the structures, and anti-microbial testing concluded that the fatty acids displayed moderate but selective anti-microbial activity. This represents the first report of these compounds occurring in this particular terrestrial fungus.

  17. T2Candida Provides Rapid and Accurate Species Identification in Pediatric Cases of Candidemia.

    PubMed

    Hamula, Camille L; Hughes, Kenneth; Fisher, Brian T; Zaoutis, Theoklis E; Singh, Ila R; Velegraki, Aristea

    2016-06-01

    The goal of this study is to assess the ability of the T2Candida platform (T2 Biosystems, Lexington, MA) to accurately identify Candida species from pediatric blood specimens with low volumes. Whole blood from 15 children with candidemia was collected immediately following blood culture draw. The amount of blood required by the system was reduced by pipetting whole blood directly onto the T2Candida cartridge. Specimens were subsequently run on the T2Dx Instrument (T2 Biosystems). The T2Candida panel provided the appropriate result for each specimen compared with blood culture-based species identification and correctly identified 15 positive and nine negative results in 3 to 5 hours. While the time to species identification for blood culture was not reported, the T2Candida results include species data. T2Candida can be used to efficiently diagnose or rule out candidemia using low-volume blood specimens from pediatric patients. This could result in improved time to appropriate antifungal therapy or reduction in unnecessary empirical antifungal therapy. © American Society for Clinical Pathology, 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Rapid identification of a narcotic plant Papaver bracteatum using flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Aragane, Masako; Watanabe, Daisuke; Nakajima, Jun'ichi; Yoshida, Masao; Yoshizawa, Masao; Abe, Tomohiro; Nishiyama, Rei; Suzuki, Jin; Moriyasu, Takako; Nakae, Dai; Sudo, Hiroshi; Sato, Hiroyuki; Hishida, Atuyuki; Kawahara, Nobuo; Makabe, So; Nakamura, Ikuo; Mii, Masahiro

    2014-10-01

    In May 2011, numerous poppy plants closely resembling Papaver bracteatum Lindl., a type of narcotic plant that is illegal in Japan, were distributed directly from several large flower shops or through online shopping throughout Japan, including the Tokyo Metropolitan area. In order to better identify the narcotic plants, the relative nuclear DNA content at the vegetative stage was measured by flow cytometric (FCM) analysis in 3 closely-related species of the genus Papaver section Oxytona, namely P. orientale, P. pseudo-orientale, and P. bracteatum, based on the difference between the chromosome numbers of these species. The results showed that the nuclear DNA content differed between these 3 species, and that most of the commercially distributed plants examined in this study could be identified as P. bracteatum. The remaining plants were P. pseudo-orientale, a non-narcotic plant. In addition, the FCM results for the identification of P. bracteatum completely agreed with the results obtained by the morphological analysis, the inter-genic spacer sequence of rpl16-rpl14 (PS-ID sequence) of chloroplast DNA, and the presence of thebaine. These results clearly indicate the usefulness of FCM analysis for the identification of P. bracteatum plants, including when they are in their vegetative stage.

  19. Rapid Identification of Ginseng Cultivars (Panax ginseng Meyer) Using Novel SNP-Based Probes

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Ick-Hyun; Bang, Kyong Hwan; Kim, Young-Chang; Lee, Jei-Wan; Seo, A-Yeon; Seong, Bong-Jae; Kim, Hyun-Ho; Kim, Dong-Hwi; Cha, Seon-Woo; Cho, Yong-Gu; Kim, Hong-Sig

    2011-01-01

    In order to develop a novel system for the discrimination of five ginseng cultivars (Panax ginseng Meyer), single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping assays with real-time polymerase chain reaction were conducted. Nucleotide substitution in gDNA library clones of P. ginseng cv. Yunpoong was targeted for the SNP genotyping assay. From these SNP sites, a set of modified SNP specific fluorescence probes (PGP74, PGP110, and PGP130) and novel primer sets have been developed to distinguish among five ginseng cultivars. The combination of the SNP type of the five cultivars, Chungpoong, Yunpoong, Gopoong, Kumpoong, and Sunpoong, was identified as ‘ATA’, ‘GCC’, ‘GTA’, ‘GCA’, and ‘ACC’, respectively. This study represents the first report of the identification of ginseng cultivars by fluorescence probes. An SNP genotyping assay using fluorescence probes could prove useful for the identification of ginseng cultivars and ginseng seed management systems and guarantee the purity of ginseng seed. PMID:23717098

  20. Challenges to the rapid identification of children who have been trafficked for commercial sexual exploitation.

    PubMed

    Rafferty, Yvonne

    2016-02-01

    Child trafficking for commercial sexual exploitation (CSE) is a complex phenomenon, requiring multifaceted programs and policies by various stakeholders. A number of publications have focused on preventing this heinous crime. Less attention, however, has been paid to the recovery and rehabilitation of children who have been traumatized as a result of being trafficked for CSE. This article focuses on the first step in the protection and recovery process, which is to ensure that procedures are in place for their identification, so that they might access timely and appropriate assistance. It highlights three situational and two child-related challenges to identification. In addition, it describes the additional victimization experienced by children who are wrongly arrested for crimes associated with prostitution or illegal border crossings, rather than being identified as victims. An extensive literature review was conducted, and included academic publications, as well as governmental and non-governmental reports. In addition, field-based qualitative research was undertaken in South and Southeast Asia, and involved interviews with representatives from United Nations and governmental agencies, non-governmental organizations (NGOs), and aftercare recovery programs.

  1. Rapid Identification of Yeast Isolates from Clinical Specimens in Critically Ill Trauma ICU Patients

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Neetu; Mathur, Purva; Misra, Mahesh Chandra; Behera, Bijayini; Xess, Immaculata; Sharma, Satya Priya

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose was to evaluate the performance of a commercially available chromogenic Candida speciation media and the Vitek 2 ID system for the identification of medically important yeasts and yeast-like organisms in a routine clinical microbiology laboratory. Materials and Methods: A total of 429 non duplicate, consecutive yeast strains were included during the 3.5-year study period. The performance of the Vitek 2 ID system and a chromogenic agar medium was evaluated against the gold standard conventional phenotypic and biochemical identification method for speciation of yeast isolates from trauma patients. Results: Candida tropicalis (64%) was the most common Candida species, followed by Candida albicans (14%), Candida rugosa (7%), and Candida parapsilosis (6.5%). Of the 429 isolates, 183 could be identified to species level by all the three methods. Agreement between the chromogenic agar method and conventional methods was 80% for Candida tropicalis, 100% for Candida rugosa, 89% for Candida albicans, and 77% for Candida parapsilosis. Vitek 2 had lower sensitivity, with agreement of 49% for Candida tropicalis, 100% for Candida rugosa, 39% for Candida albicans, and 31% for Candida parapsilosis. Conclusion: Thus, in long-term ICU patients, an increasing trend of isolating nonalbicans Candida spp. continues. The chromogenic agar medium is a convenient and economic method to identify commonly isolated species in busy clinical microbiology laboratories. PMID:22923919

  2. Identification of the direction of the neural network activation with a cellular resolution by fast two-photon imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiuli; Quan, Tingwei; Zeng, Shaoqun; Lv, Xiaohua

    2011-08-01

    Spatiotemporal activity patterns in local neural networks are fundamental to understanding how information is processed and stored in brain microcircuits. Currently, imaging techniques are able to map the directional activation of macronetworks across brain areas; however, these strategies still fail to resolve the activation direction for fine microcircuits with cellular spatial resolution. Here, we show the capability to identify the activation direction of a multicell network with a cellular resolution and millisecond precision by using fast two-photon microscopy and cross correlation procedures. As an example, we characterized a directional neuronal network in an epilepsy brain slice to provide different initiation delay among multiple neurons defined at a millisecond scale.

  3. Identification of microbes from the surfaces of food-processing lines based on the flow cytometric evaluation of cellular metabolic activity combined with cell sorting.

    PubMed

    Juzwa, W; Duber, A; Myszka, K; Białas, W; Czaczyk, K

    2016-09-01

    In this study the design of a flow cytometry-based procedure to facilitate the detection of adherent bacteria from food-processing surfaces was evaluated. The measurement of the cellular redox potential (CRP) of microbial cells was combined with cell sorting for the identification of microorganisms. The procedure enhanced live/dead cell discrimination owing to the measurement of the cell physiology. The microbial contamination of the surface of a stainless steel conveyor used to process button mushrooms was evaluated in three independent experiments. The flow cytometry procedure provided a step towards monitoring of contamination and enabled the assessment of microbial food safety hazards by the discrimination of active, mid-active and non-active bacterial sub-populations based on determination of their cellular vitality and subsequently single cell sorting to isolate microbial strains from discriminated sub-populations. There was a significant correlation (r = 0.97; p < 0.05) between the bacterial cell count estimated by the pour plate method and flow cytometry, despite there being differences in the absolute number of cells detected. The combined approach of flow cytometric CRP measurement and cell sorting allowed an in situ analysis of microbial cell vitality and the identification of species from defined sub-populations, although the identified microbes were limited to culturable cells.

  4. Rapid detection and identification of Clostridium chauvoei by PCR based on flagellin gene sequence.

    PubMed

    Kojima, A; Uchida, I; Sekizaki, T; Sasaki, Y; Ogikubo, Y; Tamura, Y

    2001-02-26

    We developed a one-step polymerase chain reaction (PCR) system that specifically detects Clostridium chauvoei. Oligonucleotide primers were designed to amplify a 516-bp fragment of the structural flagellin gene. The specificity of the PCR was investigated by analyzing 59 strains of clostridia, and seven strain of other genera. A 516-bp fragment could be amplified from all the C. chauvoei strains tested, and no amplification was observed by using DNAs from the other strains tested, including Clostridium septicum. Similarly, this PCR-based method specifically detected C. chauvoei DNA sequences in samples of muscle and exudate of obtained from mice within 12h of inoculation. In tests using samples of muscle or liver, the limit of detection was about 200 organisms per reaction. These results suggest that the one-step PCR system may be useful for direct detection and identification of C. chauvoei in clinical specimens.

  5. Identification and manipulation of the pleuromutilin gene cluster from Clitopilus passeckerianus for increased rapid antibiotic production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Andy M.; Alberti, Fabrizio; Kilaru, Sreedhar; Collins, Catherine M.; de Mattos-Shipley, Kate; Hartley, Amanda J.; Hayes, Patrick; Griffin, Alison; Lazarus, Colin M.; Cox, Russell J.; Willis, Christine L.; O’Dwyer, Karen; Spence, David W.; Foster, Gary D.

    2016-05-01

    Semi-synthetic derivatives of the tricyclic diterpene antibiotic pleuromutilin from the basidiomycete Clitopilus passeckerianus are important in combatting bacterial infections in human and veterinary medicine. These compounds belong to the only new class of antibiotics for human applications, with novel mode of action and lack of cross-resistance, representing a class with great potential. Basidiomycete fungi, being dikaryotic, are not generally amenable to strain improvement. We report identification of the seven-gene pleuromutilin gene cluster and verify that using various targeted approaches aimed at increasing antibiotic production in C. passeckerianus, no improvement in yield was achieved. The seven-gene pleuromutilin cluster was reconstructed within Aspergillus oryzae giving production of pleuromutilin in an ascomycete, with a significant increase (2106%) in production. This is the first gene cluster from a basidiomycete to be successfully expressed in an ascomycete, and paves the way for the exploitation of a metabolically rich but traditionally overlooked group of fungi.

  6. Rapid identification of color additives, using the C18 cartridge: collaborative study.

    PubMed

    Young, M L

    1988-01-01

    Nine laboratories collaboratively studied a method for the separation and identification of the 7 permitted FD&C color additives (Red Nos. 3 and 40; Blue Nos. 1 and 2; Yellow Nos. 5 and 6; Green No. 3) and the banned FD&C Red No. 2 in foods. The method is based on use of a commercial C18 cartridge and spectrophotometry or thin layer chromatography. Collaborators analyzed 5 commercial products (noodles, candy, carbonated soda, flavored gelatin, and powdered drink) and 2 dye mixtures (one containing FD&C Red Nos. 2, 3, and 40; the other containing FD&C Green No. 3 and Red No. 3). All of the colors were identified with little or no difficulty by 8 collaborators. The method has been adopted official first action.

  7. Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP)-based method for rapid mushroom species identification.

    PubMed

    Vaagt, Franziska; Haase, Ilka; Fischer, Markus

    2013-02-27

    Toxic mushroom species, such as the death cap ( Amanita phalloides ), are responsible for most mushroom poisonings. In the present work, novel loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assays were used for the differentiation of even closely related edible and toxic mushroom species. The applicability of these methods was tested by cross-reaction studies and analysis of spiked mushroom samples (raw and fried material). Contaminations at the level of 2% (w/w) could be detected in different mushroom blends. Three detection methods were used: agarose gel analysis, fluorimetric real-time detection, and visual detection by lateral flow dipsticks (LFD). The LAMP assay combined with LFD detection allows the identification of A. phalloides in about 2 h (including DNA extraction) at a very low level of technical equipment (micropestle, water bath, and mobile centrifuge), which makes this technique perfectly suited for on-site applications.

  8. Identification and manipulation of the pleuromutilin gene cluster from Clitopilus passeckerianus for increased rapid antibiotic production.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Andy M; Alberti, Fabrizio; Kilaru, Sreedhar; Collins, Catherine M; de Mattos-Shipley, Kate; Hartley, Amanda J; Hayes, Patrick; Griffin, Alison; Lazarus, Colin M; Cox, Russell J; Willis, Christine L; O'Dwyer, Karen; Spence, David W; Foster, Gary D

    2016-05-04

    Semi-synthetic derivatives of the tricyclic diterpene antibiotic pleuromutilin from the basidiomycete Clitopilus passeckerianus are important in combatting bacterial infections in human and veterinary medicine. These compounds belong to the only new class of antibiotics for human applications, with novel mode of action and lack of cross-resistance, representing a class with great potential. Basidiomycete fungi, being dikaryotic, are not generally amenable to strain improvement. We report identification of the seven-gene pleuromutilin gene cluster and verify that using various targeted approaches aimed at increasing antibiotic production in C. passeckerianus, no improvement in yield was achieved. The seven-gene pleuromutilin cluster was reconstructed within Aspergillus oryzae giving production of pleuromutilin in an ascomycete, with a significant increase (2106%) in production. This is the first gene cluster from a basidiomycete to be successfully expressed in an ascomycete, and paves the way for the exploitation of a metabolically rich but traditionally overlooked group of fungi.

  9. Identification and manipulation of the pleuromutilin gene cluster from Clitopilus passeckerianus for increased rapid antibiotic production

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Andy M.; Alberti, Fabrizio; Kilaru, Sreedhar; Collins, Catherine M.; de Mattos-Shipley, Kate; Hartley, Amanda J.; Hayes, Patrick; Griffin, Alison; Lazarus, Colin M.; Cox, Russell J.; Willis, Christine L.; O’Dwyer, Karen; Spence, David W.; Foster, Gary D.

    2016-01-01

    Semi-synthetic derivatives of the tricyclic diterpene antibiotic pleuromutilin from the basidiomycete Clitopilus passeckerianus are important in combatting bacterial infections in human and veterinary medicine. These compounds belong to the only new class of antibiotics for human applications, with novel mode of action and lack of cross-resistance, representing a class with great potential. Basidiomycete fungi, being dikaryotic, are not generally amenable to strain improvement. We report identification of the seven-gene pleuromutilin gene cluster and verify that using various targeted approaches aimed at increasing antibiotic production in C. passeckerianus, no improvement in yield was achieved. The seven-gene pleuromutilin cluster was reconstructed within Aspergillus oryzae giving production of pleuromutilin in an ascomycete, with a significant increase (2106%) in production. This is the first gene cluster from a basidiomycete to be successfully expressed in an ascomycete, and paves the way for the exploitation of a metabolically rich but traditionally overlooked group of fungi. PMID:27143514

  10. Rapid method for identification of macrophages in suspension by acid alpha-naphthyl acetate esterase activity.

    PubMed

    Ennist, D L; Jones, K H

    1983-07-01

    A supravital staining procedure for the identification of macrophages in cell suspension using a modification of a standard cytochemical assay for alpha-naphthyl acetate esterase (ANAE) activity is described. Macrophages are stained an intense red-brown after 5 min incubation in a buffer using ANAE as the substrate and hexazonium pararosaniline as the coupler for the azo dye. There is close agreement in the number of ANAE-positive cells found and the number of macrophages identified in smears by morphological criteria, by phagocytosis, and by the presence of Fc receptors. Therefore, this stain provides a quick, inexpensive method to estimate the number of macrophages present in suspensions of lymphocytic tissues from rats and mice.

  11. Whole chromosomal DNA probes for rapid identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium avium complex.

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, M C; McMillan, C; Coyle, M B

    1987-01-01

    Whole chromosomal DNA probes were used to identify clinical isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Mycobacterium avium complex, and Mycobacterium gordonae. The probe for M. tuberculosis was prepared from Mycobacterium bovis BCG, which has been shown to be closely related to M. tuberculosis. A probe for the M. avium complex was prepared from three strains representing each of the three DNA homology groups in the M. avium complex. The probes were used in dot blot assays to identify clinical isolates of mycobacteria. The dot blot test correctly identified 57 of the 61 (93%) cultures grown on solid media, and 100% of antibiotic-treated broth-grown cells were correctly identified. Identification by dot blot required a maximum of 48 h. When the probes were tested against 63 positive BACTEC (Johnston Laboratories, Inc., Towson, Md.) cultures of clinical specimens, 59% were correctly identified. However, of the 14 BACTEC cultures that had been treated with antibiotics before being lysed, 13 (93%) were correctly identified. PMID:3112180

  12. Rapid Identification of Helicoverpa armigera and Helicoverpa zea (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) Using Ribosomal RNA Internal Transcribed Spacer 1

    PubMed Central

    Perera, Omaththage P.; Allen, Kerry C.; Jain, Devendra; Purcell, Matthew; Little, Nathan S.; Luttrell, Randall G.

    2015-01-01

    Rapid identification of invasive species is crucial for deploying management strategies to prevent establishment. Recent Helicoverpa armigera (Hübner) invasions and subsequent establishment in South America has increased the risk of this species invading North America. Morphological similarities make differentiation of H. armigera from the native Helicoverpa zea (Boddie) difficult. Characteristics of adult male genitalia and nucleotide sequence differences in mitochondrial DNA are two of the currently available methods to differentiate these two species. However, current methods are likely too slow to be employed as rapid detection methods. In this study, conserved differences in the internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) of the ribosomal RNA genes were used to develop species-specific oligonucleotide primers that amplified ITS1 fragments of 147 and 334 bp from H. armigera and H. zea, respectively. An amplicon (83 bp) from a conserved region of 18S ribosomal RNA subunit served as a positive control. Melting temperature differences in ITS1 amplicons yielded species-specific dissociation curves that could be used in high resolution melt analysis to differentiate the two Helicoverpa species. In addition, a rapid and inexpensive procedure for obtaining amplifiable genomic DNA from a small amount of tissue was identified. Under optimal conditions, the process was able to detect DNA from one H. armigera leg in a pool of 25 legs. The high resolution melt analysis combined with rapid DNA extraction could be used as an inexpensive method to genetically differentiate large numbers of H. armigera and H. zea using readily available reagents. PMID:26516166

  13. Rapid identification and antibiotic susceptibility testing of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi isolated from blood: implications for therapy.

    PubMed

    Saha, S K; Darmstadt, G L; Baqui, A H; Hanif, M; Ruhulamin, M; Santosham, M; Nagatake, T; Black, R E

    2001-10-01

    The turnaround time (TAT) for Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi identification and reporting of the antibiotic susceptibility profile was determined for 391 cases of typhoid fever, using the lysis direct plating or lysis centrifugation method of blood culture along with rapid antimicrobial susceptibility testing. The TAT was more rapid (TAT for 90% of the patients [TAT(90)] = 30 h; TAT(100) rapid antimicrobial susceptibility testing method, of randomly selected 60 S. enterica serovar Typhi isolates were identical to those determined by overnight conventional testing. Preliminary assessment of the impact of the reduced TAT on physician practices revealed that initial empirical therapy was prescribed at the time of presentation in most cases (87 of 108 [81%]) despite awareness that the final report would be available on the following day. Patients treated empirically with first-line antibiotics and shown subsequently to be infected with a multidrug-resistant strain benefited most (8 cases), since therapy was changed appropriately on the following day. In an additional 21 cases, therapy with an appropriate antibiotic was initiated after culture results were available. Thus, in approximately one-fourth (29 of 108 [27%]) of the cases, a change in management to an agent active for treatment of the isolate was made after receipt of the test results. However, in no case was therapy changed from a second-line to a first-line agent, even if the isolate was reported on the day after presentation to be sensitive to first-line therapy (33 cases). Ways in which to utilize rapid-TAT result reporting in order to positively influence physicians' prescribing in Bangladesh are the subject of ongoing research.

  14. Rapid identification of Helicoverpa armigera and Helicoverpa zea (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) using ribosomal RNA internal transcribed spacer 1.

    PubMed

    Perera, Omaththage P; Allen, Kerry C; Jain, Devendra; Purcell, Matthew; Little, Nathan S; Luttrell, Randall G

    2015-01-01

    Rapid identification of invasive species is crucial for deploying management strategies to prevent establishment. Recent Helicoverpa armigera (Hübner) invasions and subsequent establishment in South America has increased the risk of this species invading North America. Morphological similarities make differentiation of H. armigera from the native Helicoverpa zea (Boddie) difficult. Characteristics of adult male genitalia and nucleotide sequence differences in mitochondrial DNA are two of the currently available methods to differentiate these two species. However, current methods are likely too slow to be employed as rapid detection methods. In this study, conserved differences in the internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) of the ribosomal RNA genes were used to develop species-specific oligonucleotide primers that amplified ITS1 fragments of 147 and 334 bp from H. armigera and H. zea, respectively. An amplicon (83 bp) from a conserved region of 18S ribosomal RNA subunit served as a positive control. Melting temperature differences in ITS1 amplicons yielded species-specific dissociation curves that could be used in high resolution melt analysis to differentiate the two Helicoverpa species. In addition, a rapid and inexpensive procedure for obtaining amplifiable genomic DNA from a small amount of tissue was identified. Under optimal conditions, the process was able to detect DNA from one H. armigera leg in a pool of 25 legs. The high resolution melt analysis combined with rapid DNA extraction could be used as an inexpensive method to genetically differentiate large numbers of H. armigera and H. zea using readily available reagents.

  15. Identification of pollutant sources in a rapidly developing urban river catchment in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jingshui; Yin, Hailong; Jomma, Seifeddine; Rode, Michael; Zhou, Qi

    2016-04-01

    Rapid economic development and urbanization worldwide cause serious ecological and environmental problems. A typical region that is in transition and requires systemic research for effective intervention is the rapidly developing city of Hefei in central P. R. China. In order to investigate the sources of pollutants over a one-year period in Nanfei River catchment that drains the city of Hefei, discharges were measured and water samples were taken and measured along the 14km river section at 10 sites for 4 times from 2013 to 2014. Overflow concentrations of combined sewer and separate storm drains were also measured by selecting 15 rain events in 4 typical drainage systems. Loads and budgets of water and different pollutant sources i.e., wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluent, urban drainage overflow, unknown wastewater were calculated. The water balance demonstrated that >70% of the discharge originated from WWTP effluent. Lack of clean upstream inflow thereby is threatening ecological safety and water quality. Furthermore, mass fluxes calculations revealed that >40% of the COD (Chemical Oxygen Demand) loads were from urban drainage overflow because of a large amount of discharge of untreated wastewater in pumping stations during rain events. WWTP effluent was the predominant source of the total nitrogen loads (>60%) and ammonia loads (>45%). However, the total phosphorous loads from three different sources are similar (˜1/3). Thus, our research provided a basis for appropriate and prior mitigation strategies (state-of-art of WWTP upgrade, sewer systems modification, storm water regulation and storage capacity improvement, etc.) for different precedence-controlled pollutants with the limited infrastructure investments in these rapidly developing urban regions.

  16. Rapid identification of Helicobacter pylori and assessment of clarithromycin susceptibility from clinical specimens using FISH.

    PubMed

    Demiray-Gürbüz, Ebru; Yılmaz, Özlem; Olivares, Asalia Z; Gönen, Can; Sarıoğlu, Sülen; Soytürk, Müjde; Tümer, Sait; Altungöz, Oğuz; Şimşek, İlkay; Perez Perez, Guillermo I

    2017-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori remains one of the most common bacterial infections worldwide. Clarithromycin resistance is the most important cause of H. pylori eradication failures. Effective antibiotic therapies in H. pylori infection must be rapidly adapted to local resistance patterns. We investigated the prevalence of clarithromycin resistance due to mutations in positions 2142 and 2143 of 23SrRNA gene of H. pylori by fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH), and compared with culture and antimicrobial susceptibility testing in 234 adult patients with dyspepsia who were enrolled. Antrum and corpus biopsy specimens were obtained for rapid urease test, histopathology and culture. Epsilometer test was used to assess clarithromycin susceptibility. H. pylori presence and clarithromycin susceptibility were determined by FISH in paraffin-embedded biopsy specimens. We found that 164 (70.1%) patients were positive for H. pylori based on clinical criteria, 114 (69.5% CI 62.5-76.6%) were culture positive, and 137 (83.5% CI 77.8-89.2%) were FISH positive. Thus the sensitivity of FISH was significantly superior to that of culture. However specificity was not significantly different (91.4 versus 100.0%, respectively). The resistance rate to clarithromycin for both antrum and corpus was detected in H. pylori-positive patients; 20.2% by FISH and 28.0% by E-test.The concordance between E-test and FISH was only 89.5% due to the presence of point mutations different from A2143G, A2142G or A2142C. We conclude that FISH is significantly more sensitive than culture and the E-test for the detection of H. pylori and for rapid determinination of claritromycin susceptibility. The superior hybridisation efficiency of FISH is becoming an emerging molecular tool as a reliable, rapid and sensitive method for the detection and visualisation of H. pylori, especially when the management of H. pylori eradication therapy is necessary. This is particularly important for the treatment of patients with H

  17. Rapid identification of Helicobacter pylori and assessment of clarithromycin susceptibility from clinical specimens using FISH

    PubMed Central

    Demiray‐Gürbüz, Ebru; Yılmaz, Özlem; Olivares, Asalia Z; Gönen, Can; Sarıoğlu, Sülen; Soytürk, Müjde; Tümer, Sait; Altungöz, Oğuz; Şimşek, İlkay

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Helicobacter pylori remains one of the most common bacterial infections worldwide. Clarithromycin resistance is the most important cause of H. pylori eradication failures. Effective antibiotic therapies in H. pylori infection must be rapidly adapted to local resistance patterns. We investigated the prevalence of clarithromycin resistance due to mutations in positions 2142 and 2143 of 23SrRNA gene of H. pylori by fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH), and compared with culture and antimicrobial susceptibility testing in 234 adult patients with dyspepsia who were enrolled. Antrum and corpus biopsy specimens were obtained for rapid urease test, histopathology and culture. Epsilometer test was used to assess clarithromycin susceptibility. H. pylori presence and clarithromycin susceptibility were determined by FISH in paraffin‐embedded biopsy specimens. We found that 164 (70.1%) patients were positive for H. pylori based on clinical criteria, 114 (69.5% CI 62.5–76.6%) were culture positive, and 137 (83.5% CI 77.8–89.2%) were FISH positive. Thus the sensitivity of FISH was significantly superior to that of culture. However specificity was not significantly different (91.4 versus 100.0%, respectively). The resistance rate to clarithromycin for both antrum and corpus was detected in H. pylori‐positive patients; 20.2% by FISH and 28.0% by E‐test.The concordance between E‐test and FISH was only 89.5% due to the presence of point mutations different from A2143G, A2142G or A2142C. We conclude that FISH is significantly more sensitive than culture and the E‐test for the detection of H. pylori and for rapid determinination of claritromycin susceptibility. The superior hybridisation efficiency of FISH is becoming an emerging molecular tool as a reliable, rapid and sensitive method for the detection and visualisation of H. pylori, especially when the management of H. pylori eradication therapy is necessary. This is particularly important for the

  18. Rapid identification of bacterial resistance to Ciprofloxacin using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kastanos, Evdokia; Hadjigeorgiou, Katerina; Pitris, Costas

    2014-02-01

    Due to its effectiveness and broad coverage, Ciprofloxacin is the fifth most prescribed antibiotic in the US. As current methods of infection diagnosis and antibiotic sensitivity testing (i.e. an antibiogram) are very time consuming, physicians prescribe ciprofloxacin before obtaining antibiogram results. In order to avoid increasing resistance to the antibiotic, a method was developed to provide both a rapid diagnosis and the sensitivity to the antibiotic. Using Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy, an antibiogram was obtained after exposing the bacteria to Ciprofloxacin for just two hours. Spectral analysis revealed clear separation between sensitive and resistant bacteria and could also offer some inside into the mechanisms of resistance.

  19. Rapid Method for Detection, Identification, and Susceptibility Testing of Enteric Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Stager, Charles E.; Erikson, Eric; Davis, James R.

    1983-01-01

    Three hundred and seven colonies believed to be enteric pathogens were selected from primary plates of MacConkey, xylose desoxycholate, or salmonella-shigella agar for inoculation to lactose-sucrose broth, urea-41 motility medium, modified Andrade glucose broth with inverted Durham tube, pregrowth broth, triple sugar iron agar, lysine iron agar (LIA), and Christensen urea agar. The rapid screen consisted of interpreting the lactose-sucrose, urea-41 motility, and modified Andrade glucose broth gas reactions after 4 to 6 h at 35°C. These rapid screening biochemicals plus LIA were incubated for 24 h if further interpretation was required. Reference biochemicals (triple sugar iron, LIA, and Christensen urea agars) were interpreted at 24 h. Of 307 isolates, 49 (16%) were reported as negative for enteric pathogens after 4 to 6 h because their biochemical profiles were not compatible with those for enteric pathogens. A total of 87 (28.3%) isolates produced biochemical profiles at 4 to 6 h that were presumptive for enteric pathogens. The 87 presumptive pathogens were inoculated into the AutoMicrobic system Gram-Negative General Susceptibility Card and the AutoMicrobic system Enterobacteriaceae-Plus Biochemical Card (AMS-EBC+) after 4 to 6 h of growth in pregrowth broth. Of these isolates, 63 were confirmed to be enteric pathogens, of which 61 (96.8%) were correctly identified by the AMS-EBC+. One isolate was identified as Shigella dysenteriae by AMS-EBC+ but confirmed as Shigella flexneri biotype 6 by a reference laboratory. The other isolate was identified as Arizona hinshawii by AMS-EBC+ but was confirmed as Salmonella enteritidis. Of the 307 isolates, 166 (54.1%) required further interpretation of the rapid screening biochemicals plus LIA at 24 h; 5 of these were detected as enteric pathogens. The same 68 enteric pathogens were detected by both the rapid method and the reference method. The results from the general susceptibility card agreed with agar diffusion results

  20. Rapid method for detection, identification, and susceptibility testing of enteric pathogens.

    PubMed

    Stager, C E; Erikson, E; Davis, J R

    1983-01-01

    Three hundred and seven colonies believed to be enteric pathogens were selected from primary plates of MacConkey, xylose desoxycholate, or salmonella-shigella agar for inoculation to lactose-sucrose broth, urea-41 motility medium, modified Andrade glucose broth with inverted Durham tube, pregrowth broth, triple sugar iron agar, lysine iron agar (LIA), and Christensen urea agar. The rapid screen consisted of interpreting the lactose-sucrose, urea-41 motility, and modified Andrade glucose broth gas reactions after 4 to 6 h at 35 degrees C. These rapid screening biochemicals plus LIA were incubated for 24 h if further interpretation was required. Reference biochemicals (triple sugar iron, LIA, and Christensen urea agars) were interpreted at 24 h. Of 307 isolates, 49 (16%) were reported as negative for enteric pathogens after 4 to 6 h because their biochemical profiles were not compatible with those for enteric pathogens. A total of 87 (28.3%) isolates produced biochemical profiles at 4 to 6 h that were presumptive for enteric pathogens. The 87 presumptive pathogens were inoculated into the AutoMicrobic system Gram-Negative General Susceptibility Card and the AutoMicrobic system Enterobacteriaceae-Plus Biochemical Card (AMS-EBC+) after 4 to 6 h of growth in pregrowth broth. Of these isolates, 63 were confirmed to be enteric pathogens, of which 61 (96.8%) were correctly identified by the AMS-EBC+. One isolate was identified as Shigella dysenteriae by AMS-EBC+ but confirmed as Shigella flexneri biotype 6 by a reference laboratory. The other isolate was identified as Arizona hinshawii by AMS-EBC+ but was confirmed as Salmonella enteritidis. Of the 307 isolates, 166 (54.1%) required further interpretation of the rapid screening biochemicals plus LIA at 24 h; 5 of these were detected as enteric pathogens. The same 68 enteric pathogens were detected by both the rapid method and the reference method. The results from the general susceptibility card agreed with agar diffusion

  1. Sodium chloride-esculin hydrolysis test for rapid identification of enterococci.

    PubMed

    Qadri, S M; Flournoy, D J; Qadri, S G

    1987-06-01

    The ability of enterococci to cause severe disease in humans and their relative resistance to chemotherapeutic agents make it desirable to rapidly differentiate these organisms from other streptococci. We developed and evaluated a test that within 2 h distinguishes enterococci from other alpha-, beta-, or nonhemolytic streptococci in a buffered solution containing 0.2% esculin and 5% sodium chloride. All 239 strains of enterococci tested gave a positive reaction within 2 h, whereas 95 of 96 isolates of other streptococci remained negative at 4 h.

  2. Rapid identification of triterpenoid sulfates and hydroxy fatty acids including two new constituents from Tydemania expeditionis by LC-MS

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jian-Long; Kubanek, Julia; Hay, Mark E.; Aalbersberg, William; Ye, Wen-Cai; Jiang, Ren-Wang

    2011-01-01

    Tydemania expeditionis Weber-van Bosse (Udoteaceae) is a weakly calcified green alga. In the present paper, liquid chromatography coupled with photodiode array detection and electrospray mass spectrometry was developed to identify the fingerprint components. A total of four triterpenoid sulfates and three hydroxy fatty acids in the ethyl acetate fraction of the crude extract were structurally characterized on the basis of retention time, online UV spectrum and mass fragmentation pattern. Furthermore, detailed LC-MS analysis revealed two new hydroxy fatty acids, which were then prepared and characterized by extensive NMR analyses. The proposed method provides a scientific and technical platform for the rapid identification of triterpenoid sulfates and hydroxy fatty acids in similar marine algae and terrestrial plants. PMID:21915955

  3. Rapid Identification of Clinically Relevant Nocardia Species to Genus Level by 16S rRNA Gene PCR

    PubMed Central

    Laurent, Frederic J.; Provost, Frederique; Boiron, Patrick

    1999-01-01

    Two regions of the gene coding for 16S rRNA in Nocardia species were selected as genus-specific primer sequences for a PCR assay. The PCR protocol was tested with 60 strains of clinically relevant Nocardia isolates and type strains. It gave positive results for all strains tested. Conversely, the PCR assay was negative for all tested species belonging to the most closely related genera, including Dietzia, Gordona, Mycobacterium, Rhodococcus, Streptomyces, and Tsukamurella. Besides, unlike the latter group of isolates, all Nocardia strains exhibited one MlnI recognition site but no SacI restriction site. This assay offers a specific and rapid alternative to chemotaxonomic methods for the identification of Nocardia spp. isolated from pathogenic samples. PMID:9854071

  4. Evaluation and Verification of the Global Rapid Identification of Threats System for Infectious Diseases in Textual Data Sources

    PubMed Central

    Breit, Nathan

    2016-01-01

    The Global Rapid Identification of Threats System (GRITS) is a biosurveillance application that enables infectious disease analysts to monitor nontraditional information sources (e.g., social media, online news outlets, ProMED-mail reports, and blogs) for infectious disease threats. GRITS analyzes these textual data sources by identifying, extracting, and succinctly visualizing epidemiologic information and suggests potentially associated infectious diseases. This manuscript evaluates and verifies the diagnoses that GRITS performs and discusses novel aspects of the software package. Via GRITS' web interface, infectious disease analysts can examine dynamic visualizations of GRITS' analyses and explore historical infectious disease emergence events. The GRITS API can be used to continuously analyze information feeds, and the API enables GRITS technology to be easily incorporated into other biosurveillance systems. GRITS is a flexible tool that can be modified to conduct sophisticated medical report triaging, expanded to include customized alert systems, and tailored to address other biosurveillance needs. PMID:27698665

  5. Novel intein-containing DNA specific primers for rapid identification of Candida glabrata using Real-Time PCR assays.

    PubMed

    Kumar, R Satish; Ramesh, S

    2014-12-01

    Candida glabrata is an opportunistic human pathogen known to cause systemic and vaginal candidiasis. Rapid detection of Candida glabrata is indispensable for appropriate selection of antifungal drugs for chemotherapy. The study describes a unique intein-containing DNA fragment for specific detection of C. glabrata. The designed oligonucleotides detected C. glabrata (Ct mean: 24.75 ± 1.1 and Tm: 70.08 ± 0.23°C) in Real-Time PCR assays. The fluorescent signals were negative when the primers were tested for cross-species and cross-genera amplifications. In conclusion, our study recommends a novel primer set for developing a quick identification system which does not require laborious and time-consuming experimentations.

  6. Rapid Identification of Rhizobia by Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism Analysis of PCR-Amplified 16S rRNA Genes

    PubMed Central

    Laguerre, Gisèle; Allard, Marie-Reine; Revoy, Françoise; Amarger, Noelle

    1994-01-01

    Forty-eight strains representing the eight recognized Rhizobium species, two new Phaseolus bean Rhizobium genomic species, Bradyrhizobium spp., Agrobacterium spp., and unclassified rhizobia from various host plants were examined by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of 16S rRNA genes amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Twenty-one composite genotypes were obtained from the combined data of the RFLP analysis with nine endonucleases. Species assignments were in full agreement with the established taxonomic classification. Estimation from these data of genetic relationships between and within genera and species correlated well with previously published data based on DNA-rRNA hybridizations and sequence analysis of 16S rRNA genes. This PCR-RFLP method provides a rapid tool for the identification of root nodule isolates and the detection of new taxa. Images PMID:16349165

  7. Rapid Identification and Classification of Listeria spp. and Serotype Assignment of Listeria monocytogenes Using Fourier Transform-Infrared Spectroscopy and Artificial Neural Network Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Romanolo, K. F.; Gorski, L.; Wang, S.; Lauzon, C. R.

    2015-01-01

    The use of Fourier Transform-Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR) in conjunction with Artificial Neural Network software NeuroDeveloper™ was examined for the rapid identification and classification of Listeria species and serotyping of Listeria monocytogenes. A spectral library was created for 245 strains of Listeria spp. to give a biochemical fingerprint from which identification of unknown samples were made. This technology was able to accurately distinguish the Listeria species with 99.03% accuracy. Eleven serotypes of Listeria monocytogenes including 1/2a, 1/2b, and 4b were identified with 96.58% accuracy. In addition, motile and non-motile forms of Listeria were used to create a more robust model for identification. FT-IR coupled with NeuroDeveloper™ appear to be a more accurate and economic choice for rapid identification of pathogenic Listeria spp. than current methods. PMID:26600423

  8. Rapid microwave-assisted synthesis of polydextrose and identification of structure and function.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haisong; Shi, Yonghui; Le, Guowei

    2014-11-26

    Microwave irradiation is a rapid and efficient method to synthesize oligomers and can be employed in polysaccharides production. As an artificial polysaccharide, polydextrose is known for its solid performance in food processing and its additional health benefits. This study was aimed at producing polydextrose by microwave irradiation using glucose and sorbitol as substrates; water and phosphoric acid as initiator and catalyst. The actual maximum yield was 99%. Synthetic polydextrose were purified by ethanol elution and Sepherdex G-25 column chromatography. Its purity was demonstrated by the high-performance gel-permeation chromatography as a single symmetrical sharp peak, additionally the average molecular weight was calculated to be 2.131 kDa. FT-IR spectra showed that the synthesized polydextrose has the structural feature similar to Polydextrose-Litesse(®). In vitro fermentation revealed that polydextrose possesses the biological function similar to Polydextrose-Litesse(®) in increasing the concentration of short chain fatty acid and decreasing pH. This research demonstrated the feasibility of a rapid and efficient microwave mediated method to synthesize polydextrose and potentially other value added carbohydrate polymers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Rapid identification of illegal synthetic adulterants in herbal anti-diabetic medicines using near infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yanchun; Lei, Deqing; Hu, Changqin

    2014-05-05

    We created a rapid detection procedure for identifying herbal medicines illegally adulterated with synthetic drugs using near infrared spectroscopy. This procedure includes a reverse correlation coefficient method (RCCM) and comparison of characteristic peaks. Moreover, we made improvements to the RCCM based on new strategies for threshold settings. Any tested herbal medicine must meet two criteria to be identified with our procedure as adulterated. First, the correlation coefficient between the tested sample and the reference must be greater than the RCCM threshold. Next, the NIR spectrum of the tested sample must contain the same characteristic peaks as the reference. In this study, four pure synthetic anti-diabetic drugs (i.e., metformin, gliclazide, glibenclamide and glimepiride), 174 batches of laboratory samples and 127 batches of herbal anti-diabetic medicines were used to construct and validate the procedure. The accuracy of this procedure was greater than 80%. Our data suggest that this protocol is a rapid screening tool to identify synthetic drug adulterants in herbal medicines on the market.

  10. FAST CARS: Engineering a laser spectroscopic technique for rapid identification of bacterial spores

    PubMed Central

    Scully, M. O.; Kattawar, G. W.; Lucht, R. P.; Opatrný, T.; Pilloff, H.; Rebane, A.; Sokolov, A. V.; Zubairy, M. S.

    2002-01-01

    Airborne contaminants, e.g., bacterial spores, are usually analyzed by time-consuming microscopic, chemical, and biological assays. Current research into real-time laser spectroscopic detectors of such contaminants is based on e.g., resonance fluorescence. The present approach derives from recent experiments in which atoms and molecules are prepared by one (or more) coherent laser(s) and probed by another set of lasers. However, generating and using maximally coherent oscillation in macromolecules having an enormous number of degrees of freedom is challenging. In particular, the short dephasing times and rapid internal conversion rates are major obstacles. However, adiabatic fast passage techniques and the ability to generate combs of phase-coherent femtosecond pulses provide tools for the generation and utilization of maximal quantum coherence in large molecules and biopolymers. We call this technique FAST CARS (femtosecond adaptive spectroscopic techniques for coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy), and the present article proposes and analyses ways in which it could be used to rapidly identify preselected molecules in real time. PMID:12177405

  11. Sequencing of 16S rRNA Gene: A Rapid Tool for Identification of Bacillus anthracis

    PubMed Central

    Whitney, Anne M.; Mayer, Leonard W.; Morey, Roger; Steigerwalt, Arnold; Boras, Ariana; Weyant, Robin S.; Popovic, Tanja

    2002-01-01

    In a bioterrorism event, a tool is needed to rapidly differentiate Bacillus anthracis from other closely related spore-forming Bacillus species. During the recent outbreak of bioterrorism-associated anthrax, we sequenced the 16S rRNA generom these species to evaluate the potential of 16S rRNA gene sequencing as a diagnostic tool. We found eight distinct 16S types among all 107 16S rRNA gene seqs fuences that differed from each other at 1 to 8 positions (0.06% to 0.5%). All 86 B. anthracis had an identical 16S gene sequence, designated type 6; 16S type 10 was seen in all B. thuringiensis strains; six other 16S types were found among the 10 B. cereus strains. This report describes the first demonstration of an exclusive association of a distinct 16S sequence with B. anthracis. Consequently, we were able to rapidly identify suspected isolates and to detect the B. anthracis 16S rRNA gene directly from culture-negative clinical specimens from seven patients with laboratory-confirmed anthrax. PMID:12396926

  12. Rapid screening and species identification of E. coli, Listeria, and Salmonella by SERS technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yongliang; Chao, Kuanglin; Kim, Moon S.; Nou, Xiangwu

    2008-04-01

    Techniques for routine and rapid screening of the presence of foodborne bacteria are needed, and this study reports the feasibility of citrate-reduced silver colloidal SERS for identifying E. coli, Listeria, and Salmonella. Relative standard deviation (RSD) of SERS spectra from silver colloidal suspensions and ratios of P-O SERS peaks from small molecule (K3PO4) were used to assess the reproducibility, stability, and binding effectiveness of citrate-reduced silver colloids over batch and storage process. The results suggested the reproducibility of silver colloids over batch process and also stability and consistent binding effectiveness over 60-day storage period. Notably, although silver colloidal nanoparticles were stable for at least 90 days, their binding effectiveness began to decrease slightly after 60-day storage, with a binding reduction of about 12% at 90th day. Colloidal silver SERS, as demonstrated here, could be an important alternative technique in the rapid and simultaneous screening of the presence of three most outbreak bacteria due to the exclusive biomarkers, label-free and easy sampling attribute.

  13. Simple and rapid molecular techniques for identification of amylose levels in rice varieties.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Acga; Ismail, Ismanizan; Osman, Mohamad; Hashim, Habibuddin

    2012-01-01

    The polymorphisms of Waxy (Wx) microsatellite and G-T single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the Wx gene region were analyzed using simplified techniques in fifteen rice varieties. A rapid and reliable electrophoresis method, MetaPhor agarose gel electrophoresis (MAGE), was effectively employed as an alternative to polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) for separating Wx microsatellite alleles. The amplified products containing the Wx microsatellite ranged from 100 to 130 bp in length. Five Wx microsatellite alleles, namely (CT)(10), (CT)(11), (CT)(16), (CT)(17), and (CT)(18) were identified. Of these, (CT)(11) and (CT)(17) were the predominant classes among the tested varieties. All varieties with an apparent amylose content higher than 24% were associated with the shorter repeat alleles; (CT)(10) and (CT)(11), while varieties with 24% or less amylose were associated with the longer repeat alleles. All varieties with intermediate and high amylose content had the sequence AGGTATA at the 5'-leader intron splice site, while varieties with low amylose content had the sequence AGTTATA. The G-T polymorphism was further verified by the PCR-AccI cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence (CAPS) method, in which only genotypes containing the AGGTATA sequence were cleaved by AccI. Hence, varieties with desirable amylose levels can be developed rapidly using the Wx microsatellite and G-T SNP, along with MAGE.

  14. PSP: rapid identification of orthologous coding genes under positive selection across multiple closely related prokaryotic genomes.

    PubMed

    Su, Fei; Ou, Hong-Yu; Tao, Fei; Tang, Hongzhi; Xu, Ping

    2013-12-27

    With genomic sequences of many closely related bacterial strains made available by deep sequencing, it is now possible to investigate trends in prokaryotic microevolution. Positive selection is a sub-process of microevolution, in which a particular mutation is favored, causing the allele frequency to continuously shift in one direction. Wide scanning of prokaryotic genomes has shown that positive selection at the molecular level is much more frequent than expected. Genes with significant positive selection may play key roles in bacterial adaption to different environmental pressures. However, selection pressure analyses are computationally intensive and awkward to configure. Here we describe an open access web server, which is designated as PSP (Positive Selection analysis for Prokaryotic genomes) for performing evolutionary analysis on orthologous coding genes, specially designed for rapid comparison of dozens of closely related prokaryotic genomes. Remarkably, PSP facilitates functional exploration at the multiple levels by assignments and enrichments of KO, GO or COG terms. To illustrate this user-friendly tool, we analyzed Escherichia coli and Bacillus cereus genomes and found that several genes, which play key roles in human infection and antibiotic resistance, show significant evidence of positive selection. PSP is freely available to all users without any login requirement at: http://db-mml.sjtu.edu.cn/PSP/. PSP ultimately allows researchers to do genome-scale analysis for evolutionary selection across multiple prokaryotic genomes rapidly and easily, and identify the genes undergoing positive selection, which may play key roles in the interactions of host-pathogen and/or environmental adaptation.

  15. Rapid and specific identification of Brucella abortus using the loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay.

    PubMed

    Kang, Sung-Il; Her, Moon; Kim, Ji-Yeon; Lee, Jin Ju; Lee, Kichan; Sung, So-Ra; Jung, Suk Chan

    2015-06-01

    A rapid and accurate diagnosis of brucellosis is required to reduce and prevent the spread of disease among animals and the risk of transfer to humans. In this study, a Brucella abortus-specific (Ba) LAMP assay was developed, that had six primers designed from the BruAb2_0168 region of chromosome I. The specificity of this LAMP assay was confirmed with Brucella reference strains, B. abortus vaccine strains, B. abortus isolates and phylogenetically or serologically related strains. The detection limit of target DNA was up to 20 fg/μl within 60 min. The sensitivity of the new LAMP assay was equal to or slightly higher than other PCR based assays. Moreover, this Ba-LAMP assay could specifically amplify all B. abortus biovars compared to previous PCR assays. To our knowledge, this is the first report of specific detection of B. abortus using a LAMP assay. The Ba-LAMP assay can offer a rapid, sensitive and accurate diagnosis of bovine brucellosis in the field.

  16. Rapid identification and quantitation for oral bacteria based on short-end capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jin; Ni, Yi; Liu, Chenchen; Yamaguchi, Yoshinori; Chen, Qinmiao; Sekine, Shinichi; Zhu, Xifang; Dou, Xiaoming

    2016-11-01

    High-speed capillary electrophoresis (HSCE) is a promising technology applied in ultra-rapid and high-performance analysis of biomolecules (such as nucleic acids, protein). In present study, the short-end capillary electrophoresis coupled with one novel space domain internal standard method (SDIS) was employed for the rapid and simultaneous analysis of specific genes from three oral bacteria (Porphyromonas gingivalis (P.g), Treponema denticola (T.d) and Tannerela forsythia (T.f)). The reliability, reproducibility and accuracy properties of above mentioned SDIS method were investigated in detail. The results showed the target gene fragments of P.g, T.d and T.f could be precisely, fast identified and quantitated within 95s via present short-end CE system. The analyte concentration and the ratio of space domain signals (between target sample and internal standard sample) featured a well linear relationship calculated via SDIS method. And the correlation coefficients R(2) and detection limits for P.g, T.d, T.f genes were 0.9855, 0.9896, 0.9969 and 0.077, 0.114 and 0.098ng/μl, respectively.

  17. Rapid cultivar identification of barley seeds through disjoint principal component modeling.

    PubMed

    Whitehead, Iain; Munoz, Alicia; Becker, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Classification of barley varieties is a crucial part of the control and assessment of barley seeds especially for the malting and brewing industry. The correct classification of barley is essential in that a majority of decisions made regarding process specifications, economic considerations, and the type of product produced with the cereal are made based on the barley variety itself. This fact combined with the need to promptly assess the cereal as it is delivered to a malt house or production facility creates the need for a technique to quickly identify a barley variety based on a sample. This work explores the feasibility of differentiating between barley varieties based on the protein spectrum of barley seeds. In order to produce a rapid analysis of the protein composition of the barley seeds, lab-on-a-chip micro fluid technology is used to analyze the protein composition. Classification of the barley variety is then made using disjoint principle component models. This work included 19 different barley varieties. The varieties consisted of both winter and summer barley types. In this work, it is demonstrated that this system can identify the most likely barley variety with an accuracy of 95.9% based on cross validation and can screen summer barley with an accuracy of 95.2% and a false positive rate of 0.0% based on cross validation. This demonstrates the feasibility of the method to provide a rapid and relatively inexpensive method to verify the heritage of barley seeds.

  18. Rapid identification of illegal synthetic adulterants in herbal anti-diabetic medicines using near infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Yanchun; Lei, Deqing; Hu, Changqin

    We created a rapid detection procedure for identifying herbal medicines illegally adulterated with synthetic drugs using near infrared spectroscopy. This procedure includes a reverse correlation coefficient method (RCCM) and comparison of characteristic peaks. Moreover, we made improvements to the RCCM based on new strategies for threshold settings. Any tested herbal medicine must meet two criteria to be identified with our procedure as adulterated. First, the correlation coefficient between the tested sample and the reference must be greater than the RCCM threshold. Next, the NIR spectrum of the tested sample must contain the same characteristic peaks as the reference. In this study, four pure synthetic anti-diabetic drugs (i.e., metformin, gliclazide, glibenclamide and glimepiride), 174 batches of laboratory samples and 127 batches of herbal anti-diabetic medicines were used to construct and validate the procedure. The accuracy of this procedure was greater than 80%. Our data suggest that this protocol is a rapid screening tool to identify synthetic drug adulterants in herbal medicines on the market.

  19. Rapid identification of Penicillium marneffei by PCR-based detection of specific sequences on the rRNA gene.

    PubMed

    Vanittanakom, Nongnuch; Vanittanakom, Pramote; Hay, Roderick J

    2002-05-01

    An emerging pathogenic dimorphic fungus, Penicillium marneffei, is one of the major causes of morbidity in patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection in Southeast Asia. A PCR-hybridization assay has been developed to identify this pathogen. This study describes the use of single and nested PCR methods for the rapid identification of P. marneffei. Two sets of oligonucleotide primers were derived from the sequence of 18S rRNA genes of P. marneffei. The outer primers (RRF1 and RRH1) were fungus specific. The inner primers (Pm1 and Pm2) were specific for P. marneffei and were used in nested or single PCR. The specific fragment of approximately 400-bp was amplified from both mold and yeast forms of 13 P. marneffei human isolates, 12 bamboo rat isolates, and 1 soil isolate, but not from other fungi, bacteria, and human DNA. The amplified products were analyzed by agarose gel electrophoresis followed by ethidium bromide staining. The sensitivities of the single PCR and nested PCR were 1.0 pg/microl and 1.8 fg/microl, respectively. The assay is useful for rapid identification of P. marneffei cultures. Very young culture of P. marneffei (2-day-old filamentous colony, 2 mm in diameter) could be performed by this assay. The species was identified within 7 h (single PCR) or 10 h (nested PCR), compared to 4 to 7 days for confirmation of dimorphism. The application of these PCR methods for early diagnosis of the disease needs to be studied further.

  20. [Rapid Identification of Epicarpium Citri Grandis via Infrared Spectroscopy and Fluorescence Spectrum Imaging Technology Combined with Neural Network].

    PubMed

    Pan, Sha-sha; Huang, Fu-rong; Xiao, Chi; Xian, Rui-yi; Ma, Zhi-guo

    2015-10-01

    To explore rapid reliable methods for detection of Epicarpium citri grandis (ECG), the experiment using Fourier Transform Attenuated Total Reflection Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR/ATR) and Fluorescence Spectrum Imaging Technology combined with Multilayer Perceptron (MLP) Neural Network pattern recognition, for the identification of ECG, and the two methods are compared. Infrared spectra and fluorescence spectral images of 118 samples, 81 ECG and 37 other kinds of ECG, are collected. According to the differences in tspectrum, the spectra data in the 550-1 800 cm(-1) wavenumber range and 400-720 nm wavelength are regarded as the study objects of discriminant analysis. Then principal component analysis (PCA) is applied to reduce the dimension of spectroscopic data of ECG and MLP Neural Network is used in combination to classify them. During the experiment were compared the effects of different methods of data preprocessing on the model: multiplicative scatter correction (MSC), standard normal variable correction (SNV), first-order derivative(FD), second-order derivative(SD) and Savitzky-Golay (SG). The results showed that: after the infrared spectra data via the Savitzky-Golay (SG) pretreatment through the MLP Neural Network with the hidden layer function as sigmoid, we can get the best discrimination of ECG, the correct percent of training set and testing set are both 100%. Using fluorescence spectral imaging technology, corrected by the multiple scattering (MSC) results in the pretreatment is the most ideal. After data preprocessing, the three layers of the MLP Neural Network of the hidden layer function as sigmoid function can get 100% correct percent of training set and 96.7% correct percent of testing set. It was shown that the FTIR/ATR and fluorescent spectral imaging technology combined with MLP Neural Network can be used for the identification study of ECG and has the advantages of rapid, reliable effect.

  1. [THE RAPID TEST METHOD OF IDENTIFICATION OF THE TYPE OF GROWTH OF THE JAW BONE ON THE ORTHOPANTOMOGRAM].

    PubMed

    Kuroedova, V; Vyzhenko, E; Stasyk, A

    2016-07-01

    The roentgenological methods of research take the lead in the diacrisis of dentofacial anomalies, they are of the utmost importance as for the identification of the jaws' growth character, so too for the generation of the treatment planning and of the expected response to the treatment. The type of the jaw growth is identified by the means of a basal angle on the teleroentgenography (TRG). The objective of the research was to develop a rapid test method of identification of the type of growth by means of a basal angle on the orthopantomogram (OPTG). The comparison of 0,05) during the comparison of angles' indexes on the TRG and OPTG. The proposed rapid test method allows to identify the type of growth of the mandibular bones by the means of basal angle

  2. Selection and identification of autochthonous yeasts in Slovakian wine samples using a rapid and reliable three-step approach.

    PubMed

    Chovanová, K; Kraková, L; Zenišová, K; Turcovská, V; Brežná, B; Kuchta, T; Pangallo, D

    2011-08-01

    The investigation of yeast microflora during the must fermentation of two wine varieties (Frankovka modra - Blaufränkisch and Veltlinske zelene - Grüner Veltliner) from two consecutive vintages was performed using a three-step approach. The investigation strategy consisted of the combination of yeast cultivation, selection of the isolated yeasts based on the amplification of internal transcribed spacer 2 using a fluorescence-labelled primer (f-ITS-PCR) and a final identification step based on amplification and sequencing of the ITS1-5.8S rDNA-ITS2 region of the selected yeasts. By this three-step approach, it was possible to screen 433 yeasts isolates that belonged to 13 different species. The f-ITS-PCR allowed the unambiguous differentiation of all isolated yeast species that produced their typical f-ITS-PCR profile. This is one of few reports that treat the yeast diversity in Slovakian wines and in two varieties largely cultivated in Central Europe. The three-step approach permitted the rapid and reliable identification of isolated yeasts. The f-ITS-PCR with its good discrimination power can represent a suitable molecular tool for the selection of yeast members recovered from food or other environments. © 2011 The Authors. Letters in Applied Microbiology © 2011 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  3. Testing human hair for Cannabis. III. rapid screening procedure for the simultaneous identification of delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol, cannabinol, and cannabidiol.

    PubMed

    Cirimele, V; Sachs, H; Kintz, P; Mangin, P

    1996-01-01

    delta 9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), cannabidiol (CBD), and cannabinol (CBN) are three constituents of the 16 that can be currently isolated from some Cannabis spp plants. Their identification in decontaminated hair can indicate exposure to cannabis. In this study, we propose a rapid, simple, and direct (without derivatization) screening procedure for the simultaneous identification and quantitation of CBD, CBN, and THC in hair of chronic cannabis abusers. Hair samples were washed with methylene chloride, hydrolyzed with sodium hydroxide, extracted with n-hexane-ethyl acetate (9:1, v/v), evaporated to dryness, and injected directly on a gas chromatogr