Science.gov

Sample records for rapid iterative stimulation

  1. Iterative wavelet thresholding for rapid MRI reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayvanrad, Mohammad H.; McKenzie, Charles A.; Peters, Terry M.

    2011-03-01

    According to the developments in the field of compressed sampling and and sparse recovery, one might take advantage of the sparsity of an object, as an additional a priori knowledge about the object, to reconstruct it from fewer samples than that needed by the traditional sampling strategies. Since most magnetic resonance (MR) images are sparse in some domain, in this work we consider the problem of MR reconstruction and how one could apply this idea to accelerate the process of MR image/map acquisition. In particular, based on the Paupolis-Gerchgerg algorithm, an iterative thresholding algorithm for reconstruction of MR images from limited k-space observations is proposed. The proposed method takes advantage of the sparsity of most MR images in the wavelet domain. Initializing with a minimum-energy reconstruction, the object of interest is reconstructed by going through a sequence of thresholding and recovery iterations. Furthermore, MR studies often involve acquisition of multiple images in time that are highly correlated. This correlation can be used as additional knowledge on the object beside the sparsity to further reduce the reconstruction time. The performance of the proposed algorithms is experimentally evaluated and compared to other state-of-the-art methods. In particular, we show that the quality of reconstruction is increased compared to total variation (TV) regularization, and the conventional Papoulis-Gerchberg algorithm both in the absence and in the presence of noise. Also, phantom experiments show good accuracy in the reconstruction of relaxation maps from a set of highly undersampled k-space observations.

  2. Online Classrooms: Powerful Tools for Rapid-Iteration Pedagogical Improvements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horodyskyj, L.; Semken, S.; Anbar, A.; Buxner, S.

    2015-11-01

    Online education offers the opportunity to reach a variety of students including non-traditional and geographically diverse students. Research has shown that online courses modeled after traditional lecture-exam courses are ineffective. Over the past three years, Arizona State University developed and offered Habitable Worlds, an online-only astrobiology lab course featuring active learning tools. The course is offered in an intelligent tutoring system (ITS) that records a wealth of student data. In analyzing data from the Fall 2013 offering of the course, we were able to identify pre-post quiz results that were suboptimal and where in the lesson and how precisely students were missing concepts. The problem areas were redesigned, and the improved lessons were deployed a few months later. We saw significant improvements in our pre-post quiz results due to the implemented changes. This demonstrates the effectiveness of using robust ITS not only to present content online, but to provide instantaneous data for rapid iteration and improvement of existing content.

  3. Iter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iotti, Robert

    2015-04-01

    ITER is an international experimental facility being built by seven Parties to demonstrate the long term potential of fusion energy. The ITER Joint Implementation Agreement (JIA) defines the structure and governance model of such cooperation. There are a number of necessary conditions for such international projects to be successful: a complete design, strong systems engineering working with an agreed set of requirements, an experienced organization with systems and plans in place to manage the project, a cost estimate backed by industry, and someone in charge. Unfortunately for ITER many of these conditions were not present. The paper discusses the priorities in the JIA which led to setting up the project with a Central Integrating Organization (IO) in Cadarache, France as the ITER HQ, and seven Domestic Agencies (DAs) located in the countries of the Parties, responsible for delivering 90%+ of the project hardware as Contributions-in-Kind and also financial contributions to the IO, as ``Contributions-in-Cash.'' Theoretically the Director General (DG) is responsible for everything. In practice the DG does not have the power to control the work of the DAs, and there is not an effective management structure enabling the IO and the DAs to arbitrate disputes, so the project is not really managed, but is a loose collaboration of competing interests. Any DA can effectively block a decision reached by the DG. Inefficiencies in completing design while setting up a competent organization from scratch contributed to the delays and cost increases during the initial few years. So did the fact that the original estimate was not developed from industry input. Unforeseen inflation and market demand on certain commodities/materials further exacerbated the cost increases. Since then, improvements are debatable. Does this mean that the governance model of ITER is a wrong model for international scientific cooperation? I do not believe so. Had the necessary conditions for success

  4. Upper limb stroke rehabilitation: the effectiveness of Stimulation Assistance through Iterative Learning (SAIL).

    PubMed

    Meadmore, Katie L; Cai, Zhonglun; Tong, Daisy; Hughes, Ann-Marie; Freeman, Chris T; Rogers, Eric; Burridge, Jane H

    2011-01-01

    A novel system has been developed which combines robotic therapy with electrical stimulation (ES) for upper limb stroke rehabilitation. This technology, termed SAIL: Stimulation Assistance through Iterative Learning, employs advanced model-based iterative learning control (ILC) algorithms to precisely assist participant's completion of 3D tracking tasks with their impaired arm. Data is reported from a preliminary study with unimpaired participants, and also from a single hemiparetic stroke participant with reduced upper limb function who has used the system in a clinical trial. All participants completed tasks which involved moving their (impaired) arm to follow an image of a slowing moving sphere along a trajectory. The participants' arm was supported by a robot and ES was applied to the triceps brachii and anterior deltoid muscles. During each task, the same tracking trajectory was repeated 6 times and ILC was used to compute the stimulation signals to be applied on the next iteration. Unimpaired participants took part in a single, one hour training session and the stroke participant undertook 18, 1 hour treatment sessions composed of tracking tasks varying in length, orientation and speed. The results reported describe changes in tracking ability and demonstrate feasibility of the SAIL system for upper limb rehabilitation.

  5. Rapid alignment of x-ray and electron nanotomography data using joint iterative reconstruction and reprojection

    DOE PAGES

    Gürsoy, Doğa; Hong, Young Pyo; He, Kuan; ...

    2017-09-18

    As x-ray and electron tomography is pushed farther into the nanoscale, the limitations of rotation stages become more apparent leading to challenges in the alignment of the acquired projection images. Here we present an approach for rapid post-acquisition alignment of these projections to obtain high quality 3D images. Our approach is based on a joint estimation of alignment errors, and the object, using an iterative refinement procedure. We characterize convergence in simulations, and show its application in x-ray and electron nanotomography.

  6. Rapid alignment of nanotomography data using joint iterative reconstruction and reprojection

    DOE PAGES

    Gürsoy, Doğa; Hong, Young P.; He, Kuan; ...

    2017-09-18

    As x-ray and electron tomography is pushed farther into the nanoscale, the limitations of rotation stages become more apparent leading to challenges in the alignment of the acquired projection images. Here we present an approach for rapid post-acquisition alignment of these projections to obtain high quality 3D images. Our approach is based on a joint estimation of alignment errors, and the object, using an iterative refinement procedure. We characterize convergence in simulations, and show its application in x-ray and electron nanotomography.

  7. Deep brain stimulator infection by a novel rapid growing mycobacterium.

    PubMed

    Moritz, Donna C; Harrington, Amanda T; Slavin, Konstantin; Gomez, Christy; Jarrett, Olamide D

    2017-09-20

    Devise-related infections after deep brain stimulator implantation are not uncommon. However, infections due to mycobacteria have not been reported in the medical literature. We describe the first reported case of DBS infection due to a novel rapidly growing mycobacteria, most closely resembling Mycobacterium goodii, by rpoB gene sequencing.

  8. A rapid and robust iterative closest point algorithm for image guided radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbiere, Joseph; Hanley, Joseph

    2008-03-01

    Our work presents a rapid and robust process that can analytically evaluate and correct patient setup error for head and neck radiotherapy by comparing orthogonal megavoltage portal images with digitally reconstructed radiographs. For robust data Photoshop is used to interactively segment images and registering reference contours to the transformed PI. MatLab is used for matrix computations and image analysis. The closest point distance for each PI point to a DRR point forms a set of homologous points. The translation that aligns the PI to the DRR is equal to the difference in centers of mass. The original PI points are transformed and the process repeated with an Iterative Closest Point algorithm until the transformation change becomes negligible. Using a 3.00 GHz processor the calculation of the 2500x1750 CPD matrix takes about 150 sec per iteration. Standard down sampling to about 1000 DRR and 250 PI points significantly reduces that time. We introduce a local neighborhood matrix consisting of a small subset of the DRR points in the vicinity of each PI point to further reduce the CPD matrix size. Our results demonstrate the effects of down sampling on accuracy. For validation, analytical detailed results are displayed as a histogram.

  9. Electrical stimulation and ultra-rapid chilling of pork.

    PubMed

    Gigiel, A J; James, S J

    1984-01-01

    Six pigs were stimulated at 5 min post mortem and six remained unstimulated. All the pigs were split hot and one side from each pig was rapidly chilled in two stages (air at -40°C and 1 m/s for 80 min followed by 0°C and 0·5 m/s for 130 min) and the other side was conventionally chilled (air at 0°C and 1 m/s for 24 h). The weight loss from rapidly chilled sides was approximately 1% less than that from conventionally chilled controls. Cooked samples of Longissimus dorsi were tougher from unstimulated rapidly chilled sides (0·23 J) than from unstimulated conventionally chilled sides (0·18 J), whilst samples from both stimulated treatments were significantly more tender (0·15 J). These differences in toughness are thought to be due to a combination of cold shortening and lack of conditioning. The average pH in the longissimus dorsi of both rapidly and conventionally chilled stimulated sides at 50 min post mortem was 5·57 and samples from these muscles were slightly paler and more watery than the unstimulated controls. Copyright © 1984. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Rapid iterative method for electronic-structure eigenproblems using localised basis functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rayson, M. J.; Briddon, P. R.

    2008-01-01

    Eigenproblems resulting from the use of localised basis functions (typically Gaussian or Slater type orbitals) in density functional electronic-structure calculations are often solved using direct linear algebra. A full implementation is presented built around an iterative method known as 'residual minimisation—direct inversion of the iterative subspace' (RM-DIIS) to be used to solve many similar eigenproblems in a self-consistency cycle. The method is more efficient than direct methods and exhibits superior scaling on parallel supercomputers.

  11. Functional electrical stimulation mediated by iterative learning control and 3D robotics reduces motor impairment in chronic stroke.

    PubMed

    Meadmore, Katie L; Hughes, Ann-Marie; Freeman, Chris T; Cai, Zhonglun; Tong, Daisy; Burridge, Jane H; Rogers, Eric

    2012-06-07

    Novel stroke rehabilitation techniques that employ electrical stimulation (ES) and robotic technologies are effective in reducing upper limb impairments. ES is most effective when it is applied to support the patients' voluntary effort; however, current systems fail to fully exploit this connection. This study builds on previous work using advanced ES controllers, and aims to investigate the feasibility of Stimulation Assistance through Iterative Learning (SAIL), a novel upper limb stroke rehabilitation system which utilises robotic support, ES, and voluntary effort. Five hemiparetic, chronic stroke participants with impaired upper limb function attended 18, 1 hour intervention sessions. Participants completed virtual reality tracking tasks whereby they moved their impaired arm to follow a slowly moving sphere along a specified trajectory. To do this, the participants' arm was supported by a robot. ES, mediated by advanced iterative learning control (ILC) algorithms, was applied to the triceps and anterior deltoid muscles. Each movement was repeated 6 times and ILC adjusted the amount of stimulation applied on each trial to improve accuracy and maximise voluntary effort. Participants completed clinical assessments (Fugl-Meyer, Action Research Arm Test) at baseline and post-intervention, as well as unassisted tracking tasks at the beginning and end of each intervention session. Data were analysed using t-tests and linear regression. From baseline to post-intervention, Fugl-Meyer scores improved, assisted and unassisted tracking performance improved, and the amount of ES required to assist tracking reduced. The concept of minimising support from ES using ILC algorithms was demonstrated. The positive results are promising with respect to reducing upper limb impairments following stroke, however, a larger study is required to confirm this.

  12. Sparsely corrupted stimulated scattering signals recovery by iterative reweighted continuous basis pursuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kunpeng; Chai, Yi; Su, Chunxiao

    2013-08-01

    In this paper, we consider the problem of extracting the desired signals from noisy measurements. This is a classical problem of signal recovery which is of paramount importance in inertial confinement fusion. To accomplish this task, we develop a tractable algorithm based on continuous basis pursuit and reweighted ℓ1-minimization. By modeling the observed signals as superposition of scale time-shifted copies of theoretical waveform, structured noise, and unstructured noise on a finite time interval, a sparse optimization problem is obtained. We propose to solve this problem through an iterative procedure that alternates between convex optimization to estimate the amplitude, and local optimization to estimate the dictionary. The performance of the method was evaluated both numerically and experimentally. Numerically, we recovered theoretical signals embedded in increasing amounts of unstructured noise and compared the results with those obtained through popular denoising methods. We also applied the proposed method to a set of actual experimental data acquired from the Shenguang-II laser whose energy was below the detector noise-equivalent energy. Both simulation and experiments show that the proposed method improves the signal recovery performance and extends the dynamic detection range of detectors.

  13. Agile High-Fidelity Mcnp Model Development Techniques for Rapid Mechanical Design Iteration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulesza, Joel A.

    2009-08-01

    In order to finalize mechanical design details and perform the associated radiological analyses for the AP1000 pressurized water reactor integrated head package (IHP) in time to meet industrial obligations, a process was developed that allowed a radiological analyst to rapidly respond to changing design criteria. This process used several tools together, most of which were freely available, that enabled the analyst to rapidly re-model both geometrical and radiological details, perform a three-dimensional dose field analysis with MCNP5, examine the results, and present the results in an informative and easily understandable manner to other technical working groups. Thus far the author has used this process to study the radiological impacts of different sources due to various incore instrumentation thimble assembly (IITA) materials, different IITA shield alloys and geometrical configurations, different MP shroud thicknesses, and parameterized air duct wall thicknesses and complementary shielding. Model processing before execution will be discussed in detail. Techniques will also be described which allow for rapid spatial redistribution based on the modified source term. Post processing tools and methods will also be described that yield both qualitative and quantitative results.

  14. A Rapidly-Converging Alternative to Source Iteration for Solving the Discrete Ordinates Radiation Transport Equations in Slab Geometry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-03-01

    distribution iteration method because it combines a non-linear, high angular-resolution flux approximation within individual spatial cells with a...iteration converges cell coupling coefficients which depend on the angular distribution of the flux and (for EC) the spatial distribution of the...iterative scheme that converges flux distribution as opposed to scattering source in order to solve the BTE iteratively. The method is implemented

  15. Rapid lead discovery through iterative screening of one bead one compound libraries.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yu; Amar, Sabrina; Pahwa, Sonia; Fields, Gregg; Kodadek, Thomas

    2015-01-12

    Primary hits that arise from screening one bead one compound (OBOC) libraries against a target of interest rarely have high potency. However, there has been little work focused on the development of an efficient workflow for primary hit improvement. In this study, we show that by characterizing the binding constants for all of the hits that arise from a screen, structure-activity relationship (SAR) data can be obtained to inform the design of "derivative libraries" of a primary hit that can then be screened under more demanding conditions to obtain improved compounds. Here, we demonstrate the rapid improvement of a primary hit against matrix metalloproteinase-14 using this approach.

  16. Rapid enrichment of bioactive milk proteins and iterative, consolidated protein identification by multidimensional protein identification technology.

    PubMed

    Panchaud, Alexandre; Kussmann, Martin; Affolter, Michael

    2005-10-01

    Direct injection of complex protein mixtures, e.g. those derived from crude biological fluids, is often incompatible with conventional LC supports, because of column clogging and rapid deterioration of chromatographic performance. In this paper, we report the use of restricted access media to rapidly enrich and fractionate human breast milk. This resin, combining size exclusion and anion exchange functionalities, yielded a fraction enriched in soluble CD14 and showing specific sCD14-dependant activity. This fraction was split into five aliquots, which were individually characterized using multidimensional protein identification technology. Reproducibility of the results was addressed by analysing and comparing five datasets using different protein identification tools available within the Sequest software. Furthermore, a comparison of three major releases of the Ensembl human protein database was performed to examine the effect of database updates on our results. We report here the benefit of repeated analysis of aliquots of the same fraction: first to increase the confidence in peptide identification by repeated confirmation in several aliquots; and second to assess experimental reproducibility. We demonstrate furthermore the effect of database modifications on the results and the importance of constantly re-analysing data with new releases to keep them consistent and up to date with the latest protein identities and predictions available.

  17. Rapid Lead Discovery Through Iterative Screening of One Bead One Compound Libraries

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Primary hits that arise from screening one bead one compound (OBOC) libraries against a target of interest rarely have high potency. However, there has been little work focused on the development of an efficient workflow for primary hit improvement. In this study, we show that by characterizing the binding constants for all of the hits that arise from a screen, structure–activity relationship (SAR) data can be obtained to inform the design of “derivative libraries” of a primary hit that can then be screened under more demanding conditions to obtain improved compounds. Here, we demonstrate the rapid improvement of a primary hit against matrix metalloproteinase-14 using this approach. PMID:25434974

  18. Using Functional Electrical Stimulation Mediated by Iterative Learning Control and Robotics to Improve Arm Movement for People With Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Sampson, Patrica; Freeman, Chris; Coote, Susan; Demain, Sara; Feys, Peter; Meadmore, Katie; Hughes, Ann-Marie

    2016-02-01

    Few interventions address multiple sclerosis (MS) arm dysfunction but robotics and functional electrical stimulation (FES) appear promising. This paper investigates the feasibility of combining FES with passive robotic support during virtual reality (VR) training tasks to improve upper limb function in people with multiple sclerosis (pwMS). The system assists patients in following a specified trajectory path, employing an advanced model-based paradigm termed iterative learning control (ILC) to adjust the FES to improve accuracy and maximise voluntary effort. Reaching tasks were repeated six times with ILC learning the optimum control action from previous attempts. A convenience sample of five pwMS was recruited from local MS societies, and the intervention comprised 18 one-hour training sessions over 10 weeks. The accuracy of tracking performance without FES and the amount of FES delivered during training were analyzed using regression analysis. Clinical functioning of the arm was documented before and after treatment with standard tests. Statistically significant results following training included: improved accuracy of tracking performance both when assisted and unassisted by FES; reduction in maximum amount of FES needed to assist tracking; and less impairment in the proximal arm that was trained. The system was well tolerated by all participants with no increase in muscle fatigue reported. This study confirms the feasibility of FES combined with passive robot assistance as a potentially effective intervention to improve arm movement and control in pwMS and provides the basis for a follow-up study.

  19. Rapid Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Brain Without Susceptibility Artifacts: Single-Shot STEAM With Radial Undersampling and Iterative Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Merrem, Andreas; Hofer, Sabine; Voit, Dirk; Merboldt, K-Dietmar; Klosowski, Jakob; Untenberger, Markus; Fleischhammer, Julius; Frahm, Jens

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a rapid diffusion-weighted (DW) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique for whole-brain studies without susceptibility artifacts and measuring times below 3 minutes. The proposed method combines a DW spin-echo module with a single-shot stimulated echo acquisition mode MRI sequence. Previous deficiencies in image quality due to limited signal-to-noise ratio are compensated for (1) by radial undersampling to enhance the flip angle and thus the signal strength of stimulated echoes; (2) by defining the image reconstruction as a nonlinear inverse problem, which is solved by the iteratively regularized Gauss-Newton method; and (3) by denoising with use of a modified nonlocal means filter. The method was implemented on a 3 T MRI system (64-channel head coil, 80 mT · m gradients) and evaluated for 10 healthy subjects and 2 patients with an ischemic lesion and epidermoid cyst, respectively. High-quality mean DW images of the entire brain were obtained by acquiring 1 non-DW image and 6 DW images with different diffusion directions at b = 1000 s · mm. The achievable resolution for a total measuring time of 84 seconds was 1.5 mm in plane with a section thickness of 4 mm (55 sections). A measuring time of 168 seconds allowed for an in-plane resolution of 1.25 mm and a section thickness of 3 mm (54 sections). Apparent diffusion coefficient values were in agreement with literature data. The proposed method for DW MRI offers immunity against susceptibility problems, high spatial resolution, adequate signal-to-noise ratio and clinically feasible scan times of less than 3 minutes for whole-brain studies. More extended clinical trials require accelerated computation and online reconstruction.

  20. Iterative capped assembly: rapid and scalable synthesis of repeat-module DNA such as TAL effectors from individual monomers

    PubMed Central

    Briggs, Adrian W.; Rios, Xavier; Chari, Raj; Yang, Luhan; Zhang, Feng; Mali, Prashant; Church, George M.

    2012-01-01

    DNA built from modular repeats presents a challenge for gene synthesis. We present a solid surface-based sequential ligation approach, which we refer to as iterative capped assembly (ICA), that adds DNA repeat monomers individually to a growing chain while using hairpin ‘capping’ oligonucleotides to block incompletely extended chains, greatly increasing the frequency of full-length final products. Applying ICA to a model problem, construction of custom transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) for genome engineering, we demonstrate efficient synthesis of TALE DNA-binding domains up to 21 monomers long and their ligation into a nuclease-carrying backbone vector all within 3 h. We used ICA to synthesize 20 TALENs of varying DNA target site length and tested their ability to stimulate gene editing by a donor oligonucleotide in human cells. All the TALENS show activity, with the ones >15 monomers long tending to work best. Since ICA builds full-length constructs from individual monomers rather than large exhaustive libraries of pre-fabricated oligomers, it will be trivial to incorporate future modified TALE monomers with improved or expanded function or to synthesize other types of repeat-modular DNA where the diversity of possible monomers makes exhaustive oligomer libraries impractical. PMID:22740649

  1. Rapid iterative negative geotaxis (RING): a new method for assessing age-related locomotor decline in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Gargano, Julia Warner; Martin, Ian; Bhandari, Poonam; Grotewiel, Michael S

    2005-05-01

    Age-related behavioral declines are common manifestations of aging in animals. Negative geotaxis, an innate escape response during which flies ascend the wall of a cylinder after being tapped to its bottom, is one of the behaviors that senesces in Drosophila. Many laboratories, including ours, have used a variety of negative geotaxis assays based on the performance of single flies. To circumvent limitations of single-fly assays, we developed a new method for assessing negative geotaxis called rapid iterative negative geotaxis (RING). In RING assays, digital photography is used to document negative geotaxis in multiple groups of animals simultaneously. We show that performance in RING assays is not influenced by the density of flies being tested, the time of day, or repeated testing. We used the RING assay to demonstrate that negative geotaxis declines with the age of animals as previously shown in single fly studies and that senescence of negative geotaxis is sensitive to genetic background. Finally, we used RING assays to show that long-lived Indy and chico mutants exhibit delayed senescence of negative geotaxis. Our results demonstrate that RING is a powerful method for assessing negative geotaxis that should facilitate the search for manipulations that influence behavioral aging in Drosophila.

  2. An iterative LiDAR DEM-aided algorithm for GNSS positioning in obstructed/rapidly undulating environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danezis, Chris; Gikas, Vassilis

    2013-09-01

    This paper describes a new algorithm to aid stand-alone GNSS positioning in areas of bad signal reception using a Digital Elevation Model (DEM). Traditional Height-Aiding (HA) algorithms assume either a preset (fixed) value for the receiver elevation or rely on the elevation value that corresponds to the nearest available position fix. This may lead in erroneous receiver elevation estimates that, under circumstances, are inefficient to aid effectively GNSS positioning. In this study, the receiver elevation is updated at every iteration step of the navigation solution through dynamic interpolation of the elevation model. The algorithm, because of its ability to extract and fully exploit the elevation information derived from a digital model, it can prove particularly useful in forested areas with steep-sloped terrain. Extended test runs were undertaken to validate the correctness of the mathematical model and the feasibility of the algorithm and associated software. Particularly, analysis of a dataset acquired in a forested, rapidly undulating environment reveals significant average improvement in all performance metrics of positioning, namely the GNSS position availability (50%), accuracy (56%) and external reliability (86%) compared to the Standard Point Positioning (SPP) solution. Moreover, it was found that the method can cope successfully in marginal operating conditions with situations of bad satellite geometry and satellite signals affected by interference due to tree canopy.

  3. Low Frequency Electrical Stimulation Either Prior to Or after Rapid Kindling Stimulation Inhibits the Kindling-Induced Epileptogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Jalilifar, Mostafa; Moazedi, Ahmad Ali; Ghotbeddin, Zohreh

    2017-01-01

    Objective. Studies are ongoing to find appropriate low frequency stimulation (LFS) protocol for treatment of epilepsy. The present study aimed at assessing the antiepileptogenesis effects of LFS with the same protocol applied either just before or immediately after kindling stimulations. Method. This experimental animal study was conducted on adult Wistar rats (200 ± 20 g) randomly divided into kindle (n = 7), LFS + Kindle (n = 6), and Kindle + LFS groups (n = 6). All animals underwent rapid kindling procedure and four packages of LFS (1 Hz) with 5 min interval were applied either immediately before (LFS-K) or after kindling stimulation (K-LFS). The after discharge duration (ADD), daily stages of kindling, and kindling seizure stage and number of stimulations required to reach each stage were compared between the three groups using two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by Tukey post hoc and one-way ANOVA, and Kruskal-Wallis test, respectively. Results. LFS in both protocols significantly decreased the ADD (p < 0.05) and daily seizure stages (p < 0.05) and increased the number of stimulations required to achieve stage 3 and stages 4 and 5 of kindling compared with the kindle group (stage 2: p > 0.05, stages 3 to 5: p < 0.05). Conclusion. Although LFS-K showed more inhibiting effect than K-LFS, the difference was not statistically significant. PMID:28373988

  4. Electrical stimulation causes rapid changes in electrode impedance of cell-covered electrodes.

    PubMed

    Newbold, Carrie; Richardson, Rachael; Millard, Rodney; Seligman, Peter; Cowan, Robert; Shepherd, Robert

    2011-06-01

    Animal and clinical observations of a reduction in electrode impedance following electrical stimulation encouraged the development of an in vitro model of the electrode-tissue interface. This model was used previously to show an increase in impedance with cell and protein cover over electrodes. In this paper, the model was used to assess the changes in electrode impedance and cell cover following application of a charge-balanced biphasic current pulse train. Following stimulation, a large and rapid drop in total impedance (Z(t)) and access resistance (R(a)) occurred. The magnitude of this impedance change was dependent on the current amplitude used, with a linear relationship determined between R(a) and the resulting cell cover over the electrodes. The changes in impedance due to stimulation were shown to be transitory, with impedance returning to pre-stimulation levels several hours after cessation of stimulation. A loss of cells over the electrode surface was observed immediately after stimulation, suggesting that the level of stimulation applied was creating localized changes to cell adhesion. Similar changes in electrode impedance were observed for in vivo and in vitro work, thus helping to verify the in vitro model, although the underlying mechanisms may differ. A change in the porosity of the cellular layer was proposed to explain the alterations in electrode impedance in vitro. These in vitro studies provide insight into the possible mechanisms occurring at the electrode-tissue interface in association with electrical stimulation.

  5. Electrical stimulation causes rapid changes in electrode impedance of cell-covered electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Newbold, Carrie; Richardson, Rachael; Millard, Rodney; Seligman, Peter; Cowan, Robert; Shepherd, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Animal and clinical observations of a reduction in electrode impedance following electrical stimulation encouraged the development of an in vitro model of the electrode-tissue interface. This model was used previously to show an increase in impedance with cell and protein cover over electrodes. In this paper, the model was used to assess the changes in electrode impedance and cell cover following application of a charge-balanced biphasic current pulse train. Following stimulation, a large and rapid drop in total impedance (Zt) and access resistance (Ra) occurred. The magnitude of this impedance change was dependent on the current amplitude used, with a linear relationship determined between Ra and the resulting cell cover over the electrodes. The changes in impedance due to stimulation were shown to be transitory, with impedance returning to pre-stimulation levels several hours after cessation of stimulation. A loss of cells over the electrode surface was observed immediately after stimulation suggesting that the level of stimulation applied was creating localised changes to cell adhesion. Similar changes in electrode impedance were observed for in vivo and in vitro work, thus helping to verify the in vitro model, although the underlying mechanisms may differ. A change in the porosity of the cellular layer was proposed to explain the alterations in electrode impedance in vitro. These in vitro studies provide insight into the possible mechanisms occurring at the electrode-tissue interface in association with electrical stimulation. PMID:21572219

  6. ITER Plasma at Electron Cyclotron Frequency Domain: Stimulated Raman Scattering off Gould-Trivelpiece Modes and Generation of Suprathermal Electrons and Energetic Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefan, V. Alexander

    2011-04-01

    Stimulated Raman scattering in the electron cyclotron frequency range of the X-Mode and O-Mode driver with the ITER plasma leads to the ``tail heating'' via the generation of suprathermal electrons and energetic ions. The scattering off Trivelpiece-Gould (T-G) modes is studied for the gyrotron frequency of 170GHz; X-Mode and O-Mode power of 24 MW CW; on-axis B-field of 10T. The synergy between the two-plasmon decay and Raman scattering is analyzed in reference to the bulk plasma heating. Supported in part by Nikola TESLA Labs, La Jolla, CA

  7. Mechanical stimulation evokes rapid increases in extracellular adenosine concentration in the prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Ross, Ashley E; Nguyen, Michael D; Privman, Eve; Venton, B Jill

    2014-07-01

    Mechanical perturbations can release ATP, which is broken down to adenosine. In this work, we used carbon-fiber microelectrodes and fast-scan cyclic voltammetry to measure mechanically stimulated adenosine in the brain by lowering the electrode 50 μm. Mechanical stimulation evoked adenosine in vivo (average: 3.3 ± 0.6 μM) and in brain slices (average: 0.8 ± 0.1 μM) in the prefrontal cortex. The release was transient, lasting 18 ± 2 s. Lowering a 15-μm-diameter glass pipette near the carbon-fiber microelectrode produced similar results as lowering the actual microelectrode. However, applying a small puff of artificial cerebral spinal fluid was not sufficient to evoke adenosine. Multiple stimulations within a 50-μm region of a slice did not significantly change over time or damage cells. Chelating calcium with EDTA or blocking sodium channels with tetrodotoxin significantly decreased mechanically evoked adenosine, signifying that the release is activity dependent. An alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionate receptor antagonist, 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione, did not affect mechanically stimulated adenosine; however, the nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase 1,2 and 3 (NTDPase) inhibitor POM-1 significantly reduced adenosine so a portion of adenosine is dependent on extracellular ATP metabolism. Thus, mechanical perturbations from inserting a probe in the brain cause rapid, transient adenosine signaling which might be neuroprotective. We have discovered immediate changes in adenosine concentration in the prefrontal cortex following mechanical stimulation. The adenosine increase lasts only about 20 s. Mechanically stimulated adenosine was activity dependent and mostly because of extracellular ATP metabolism. This rapid, transient increase in adenosine may help protect tissue and would occur during implantation of any electrode, such as during deep brain stimulation.

  8. Zinc chloride rapidly stimulates efflux transporters in renal proximal tubules of killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus).

    PubMed

    Zaremba, Alexander; Miller, David S; Fricker, Gert

    2017-11-01

    Multidrug resistance-related protein 2 (Mrp2) is an ATP-driven efflux pump at the luminal membrane in renal proximal tubules. It acts as detoxification mechanism by transporting xenobiotics and metabolic products into urine. The trace element zinc is essential for cellular growth, differentiation and survival. It modulates immune response and is used as dietary supplement. Here, we found that 0.1-10μM ZnCl2 rapidly stimulated transport of the Mrp2 probe substrate Texas Red (TR) in isolated killifish renal proximal tubules, which provide an established model system to measure efflux transporter activity by using fluorescent probe substrates, confocal microscopy and image analysis. This stimulation was insensitive to the translation inhibitor cycloheximide (CHX), but it was quickly reversed by removing ZnCl2 from the incubation medium. ZnCl2-induced transport stimulation was abolished by inhibitors and antagonists of the endothelin receptor type B (ETB)/nitric oxide synthase (NOS)/protein kinase C (PKC) pathway. Moreover, ZnCl2-induced effects were blocked by inhibition of PKCα using Gö6976 and PKCα inhibitor peptide C2-4. Both the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor LY 294002 and the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor rapamycin abolished ZnCl2-induced transport stimulation. Furthermore, the stimulating effects of ZnCl2 were blocked by GSK650394, an inhibitor of the downstream target serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase 1 (SGK1). ZnCl2 also stimulated transport mediated by P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and Breast cancer resistance protein (Bcrp). This is the first report about zinc affecting efflux transporter activity and demonstrates that ZnCl2 triggers a suite of signaling events to evoke a rapid stimulation of ABC transporter-mediated efflux in killifish proximal tubules. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Fast-acting antidepressants rapidly stimulate ERK signaling and BDNF release in primary neuronal cultures.

    PubMed

    Lepack, Ashley E; Bang, Eunyoung; Lee, Boyoung; Dwyer, Jason M; Duman, Ronald S

    2016-12-01

    Recent preclinical and clinical studies demonstrate that three functionally different compounds, the NMDA receptor channel blocker ketamine, mGlu2/3 receptor antagonist LY341495, and NMDA receptor glycine site agent GLYX-13 produce rapid and long lasting antidepressant effects. Furthermore, these agents are reported to stimulate ERK and mTORC1 signaling in brain. Here we used rat primary cortical culture neurons to further examine the cellular actions of these agents. The results demonstrate that low concentrations of all three compounds rapidly increase levels of the phosphorylated and activated forms of ERK and a downstream target of mTORC1, p70S6 kinase, in a concentration and time dependent manner. In addition, each compound rapidly increases BDNF release into the culture media. Further studies demonstrate that induction of BDNF release, as well as stimulation of phospho-ERK is blocked by incubation with an AMPA receptor antagonist. The requirement for AMPA receptor stimulation suggests that the effects of these rapid agents are activity dependent. This possibility is supported by studies demonstrating that neuronal silencing, via incubation with the GABAA receptor agonist muscimol, completely blocks phospho-ERK and BDNF release by each agent. Finally, incubation with each drug for 24 h increases the number and length of neuronal branches. Together, the results demonstrate that these three different rapid acting antidepressant agents increase ERK signaling and BDNF release in an activity dependent manner that leads to increased neuronal complexity. Further studies will be required to determine the exact mechanisms underlying these effects in cultured neurons and in rodent models. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Rapid Remission of Conditioned Fear Expression with Extinction Training Paired with Vagus Nerve Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Peña, David F.; Engineer, Navzer D.; McIntyre, Christa K.

    2012-01-01

    Background Fearful experiences can produce long-lasting and debilitating memories. Extinction of conditioned fear requires consolidation of new memories that compete with fearful associations. In human subjects, as well as rats, posttraining stimulation of the vagus nerve enhances memory consolidation. Subjects with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) show impaired extinction of conditioned fear. The objective of this study was to determine whether vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) can enhance the consolidation of extinction of conditioned fear. Methods Male Sprague-Dawley rats were trained on an auditory fear conditioning task followed by 1–10 days of extinction training. Treatment with vagus nerve or sham stimulation was administered concurrently with exposure to the fear conditioned stimulus. Another group was given VNS and extinction training but the VNS was not paired with exposure to conditioned cues. Retention of fear conditioning was tested 24 hours after each treatment. Results VNS paired with exposure to conditioned cues enhanced the extinction of conditioned fear. After a single extinction trial, rats given VNS stimulation demonstrated a significantly lower level of freezing, compared to that of sham controls. When extinction trials were extended to 10 days, paired VNS accelerated extinction of the conditioned response. Conclusions Extinction paired with VNS is more rapid than extinction paired with sham stimulation. As it is currently approved by the Federal Food and Drug Administration for depression and seizure prevention, VNS is a readily-available and promising adjunct to exposure therapy for the treatment of severe anxiety disorders. PMID:23245749

  11. Selective processing of auditory evoked responses with iterative-randomized stimulation and averaging: A strategy for evaluating the time-invariant assumption.

    PubMed

    Valderrama, Joaquin T; de la Torre, Angel; Medina, Carlos; Segura, Jose C; Thornton, A Roger D

    2016-03-01

    The recording of auditory evoked potentials (AEPs) at fast rates allows the study of neural adaptation, improves accuracy in estimating hearing threshold and may help diagnosing certain pathologies. Stimulation sequences used to record AEPs at fast rates require to be designed with a certain jitter, i.e., not periodical. Some authors believe that stimuli from wide-jittered sequences may evoke auditory responses of different morphology, and therefore, the time-invariant assumption would not be accomplished. This paper describes a methodology that can be used to analyze the time-invariant assumption in jittered stimulation sequences. The proposed method [Split-IRSA] is based on an extended version of the iterative randomized stimulation and averaging (IRSA) technique, including selective processing of sweeps according to a predefined criterion. The fundamentals, the mathematical basis and relevant implementation guidelines of this technique are presented in this paper. The results of this study show that Split-IRSA presents an adequate performance and that both fast and slow mechanisms of adaptation influence the evoked-response morphology, thus both mechanisms should be considered when time-invariance is assumed. The significance of these findings is discussed.

  12. Lateralized effect of rapid-rate transcranial magnetic stimulation of the prefrontal cortex on mood.

    PubMed

    Pascual-Leone, A; Catalá, M D; Pascual-Leone Pascual, A

    1996-02-01

    We studied the effects of rapid-rate transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) of different scalp positions on mood. Ten normal volunteers rated themselves before and after rTMS on five analog scales labeled "Tristeza" (Sadness), "Ansiedad" (Anxiety), "Alegria" (Happiness), "Cansancio" (Tiredness), and "Dolor/Malestar" (Pain/Discomfort). rTMS was applied to the right lateral prefrontal, left prefrontal, or midline frontal cortex in trains of 5 seconds' duration at 10 Hz and 110% of the subject's motor threshold intensity. Each stimulation position received 10 trains separated by a 25-second pause. No clinically apparent mood changes were evoked by rTMS to any of the scalp positions in any subject. However, left prefrontal rTMS resulted in a significant increase in the Sadness ratings (Tristeza) and a significant decrease in the Happiness ratings ("Alegria") as compared with right prefrontal and midfrontal cortex stimulation. These results show differential effects of rTMS of left and right prefrontal cortex stimulation on mood and illustrate the lateralized control of mood in normal volunteers.

  13. ITER Plasma at Ion Cyclotron Frequency Domain: The Fusion Alpha Particles Diagnostics Based on the Stimulated Raman Scattering of Fast Magnetosonic Wave off High Harmonic Ion Bernstein Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefan, V. Alexander

    2014-10-01

    A novel method for alpha particle diagnostics is proposed. The theory of stimulated Raman scattering, SRS, of the fast wave and ion Bernstein mode, IBM, turbulence in multi-ion species plasmas, (Stefan University Press, La Jolla, CA, 2008). is utilized for the diagnostics of fast ions, (4)He (+2), in ITER plasmas. Nonlinear Landau damping of the IBM on fast ions near the plasma edge leads to the space-time changes in the turbulence level, (inverse alpha particle channeling). The space-time monitoring of the IBM turbulence via the SRS techniques may prove efficient for the real time study of the fast ion velocity distribution function, spatial distribution, and transport. Supported by Nikola Tesla Labs., La Jolla, CA 92037.

  14. Stimulation of pulmonary rapidly adapting receptors by inhaled wood smoke in rats

    PubMed Central

    Lai, C J; Kou, Y R

    1998-01-01

    The stimulation of pulmonary rapidly adapting receptors (RARs) by wood smoke was investigated. Impulses from seventy RARs were recorded in fifty-nine anaesthetized, open-chest and artificially ventilated rats; responses to delivery of 6 ml of wood smoke into the lungs were studied in sixty-one receptors whereas responses to histamine (10 or 100 μg kg−1, i.v.) were studied in the other nine. Delivery of wood smoke stimulated fifty-two of the sixty-one RARs studied. When stimulated, an intense burst of discharge was evoked within 1 or 2 s of smoke delivery. This increased activity quickly peaked in 1-3 s (Δ= 15.8 ± 1.6 impulses s−1; n = 61; mean ± s.e.m.), then declined and yet remained at a level higher than the baseline activity. The mean duration of the stimulation was 25.1 ± 2.7 s. In contrast, smoke delivery did not affect tracheal pressure. Peak responses of RARs to wood smoke were partially reduced by removal of smoke particulates and were largely attenuated by pretreatment with dimethylthiourea (DMTU, a hydroxyl radical scavenger), indomethacin (Indo, a cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor), or both DMTU and Indo (DMTU + Indo). Conversely, the peak responses of RARs were not significantly affected by pretreatment with isoprenaline (a bronchodilator) or vehicle for these chemicals. Additionally, pretreatment with DMTU, Indo, or DMTU + Indo did not significantly alter the RAR sensitivity to mechanical stimulation (constant-pressure lung inflation; 20 cmH2O). Of the nine RARs tested, six were stimulated by histamine and their sensitivity to this chemical irritant was not altered by pretreatment with DMTU + Indo. The results suggest that both the particulates and gas phases are responsible for, and both the hydroxyl radical and cyclo-oxygenase products are involved in, the stimulation of RARs by wood smoke. Furthermore, changes in lung mechanics following smoke delivery are not the cause of this afferent stimulation. PMID:9508820

  15. Selective enhancement of rapid eye movement sleep by deep brain stimulation of the human pons.

    PubMed

    Lim, Andrew S; Moro, Elena; Lozano, Andres M; Hamani, Clement; Dostrovsky, Jonathan O; Hutchison, William D; Lang, Anthony E; Wennberg, Richard A; Murray, Brian J

    2009-07-01

    Animal studies suggest that rapid eye movement (REM) sleep is governed by the interaction of REM-promoting and REM-inhibiting nuclei in the pontomesencephalic tegmentum. The pedunculopontine nucleus is proposed to be REM promoting. Using polysomnography, we studied sleep in five parkinsonian patients undergoing unilateral pedunculopontine nucleus deep brain stimulation (DBS). We demonstrated a near doubling of nocturnal REM sleep between the DBS "off" and DBS "on" states, without significant changes in other sleep states. This represents the first demonstration that DBS can selectively modulate human sleep, and it supports an important role for the pedunculopontine nucleus region in modulating human REM sleep. Ann Neurol 2009;66:110-114.

  16. The Role of ATP in Mechanically Stimulated Rapid Closure of the Venus's Flytrap.

    PubMed

    Jaffe, M J

    1973-01-01

    When the midribs of untreated traps of Dionaea muscipula are frozen in liquid nitrogen after rapid closure, they contain significantly less ATP than those frozen before closure. Exogenous ATP causes a significant increase in the rate of mechanically stimulated trap closure. Illuminated traps close faster than those kept in the dark. The traps of plants placed in 100% O(2) close much faster than do air controls, while 100% CO(2) inhibits closure. It is concluded that ATP is probably the native source of potential energy for contraction of the trap's midrib, and that if the endogenous ATP titer is increased by oxidative phosphorylation or an exogenous source, the trap will close faster.

  17. Pulmonary rapidly adapting receptor stimulation does not increase airway resistance in anesthetized rabbits.

    PubMed

    Yu, J; Zhang, J F; Roberts, A M; Collins, L C; Fletcher, E C

    1999-09-01

    In open-chest artificially ventilated rabbits, removal followed by replacement of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP maneuver) favors stimulation of airway rapidly adapting receptors (RARs). The purpose of the present study was to determine whether activation of RARs can cause bronchoconstriction. We measured airway pressure, airflow, and tidal volume, and calculated dynamic lung compliance and total lung resistance. PEEP maneuver increased airway pressure swings (16.4 +/- 4% above control; p = 0.0016) and decreased compliance (to 84.8 +/- 2.8% of control; p = 0.0002) without changing resistance (108.0 +/- 4.4% of control; p = 0.85). On the other hand, the resistance increased greatly (93 +/- 13%, p < 0.01) after intravenous injection of acetylcholine or electrical stimulation of vagal efferents, indicating that our system could detect increases in the resistance. In a separate group, we stimulated RARs by stroking the trachea with a cotton tip (tickling), tickling produced cough, manifested by increased pressure and flow without resistance changing. These changes were abolished after paralysis with succinylcholine. Because we did not detect an increase in airflow resistance during activation of RARs by the PEEP maneuver and tickling, we conclude that increase in resistance may not be an important reflex component of airway RARs.

  18. Positive AMPA receptor modulation rapidly stimulates BDNF release and increases dendritic mRNA translation.

    PubMed

    Jourdi, Hussam; Hsu, Yu-Tien; Zhou, Miou; Qin, Qingyu; Bi, Xiaoning; Baudry, Michel

    2009-07-08

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) stimulates local dendritic mRNA translation and is involved in formation and consolidation of memory. 2H,3H,6aH-pyrrolidino[2'',1''-3',2']1,3-oxazino[6',5'-5,4]-benzo[e]1,4-dioxan-10-one (CX614), one of the best-studied positive AMPA receptor modulators (also known as ampakines), increases BDNF mRNA and protein and facilitates long-term potentiation (LTP) induction. Several other ampakines also improve performance in various behavioral and learning tasks. Since local dendritic protein synthesis has been implicated in LTP stabilization and in memory consolidation, this study investigated whether CX614 could influence synaptic plasticity by upregulating dendritic protein translation. CX614 treatment of primary neuronal cultures and acute hippocampal slices rapidly activated the translation machinery and increased local dendritic protein synthesis. CX614-induced activation of translation was blocked by K252a [(9S,10R,12R)-2,3,9,10,11,12-hexahydro-10-hydroxy-9-methyl-1-oxo-9,12-epoxy-1H-diindolo[1,2,3-fg:3',2',1'-kl]pyrrolo[3,4-i][1,6]benzodiazocine-10-carboxylic acid methyl ester], CNQX, APV, and TTX, and was inhibited in the presence of an extracellular BDNF scavenger, TrkB-Fc. The acute effect of CX614 on translation was mediated by increased BDNF release as demonstrated with a BDNF scavenging assay using TrkB-Fc during CX614 treatment of cultured primary neurons and was blocked by nifedipine, ryanodine, and lack of extracellular Ca(2+) in acute hippocampal slices. Finally, CX614, like BDNF, rapidly increased dendritic translation of an exogenous translation reporter. Together, our results demonstrate that positive modulation of AMPA receptors rapidly stimulates dendritic translation, an effect mediated by BDNF secretion and TrkB receptor activation. They also suggest that increased BDNF secretion and stimulation of local protein synthesis contribute to the effects of ampakines on synaptic plasticity.

  19. Wall conditioning on ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Michiya; Pitts, Richard A.

    2011-08-01

    Like all tokamaks, ITER will require wall conditioning systems and strategies for successful operation from the point of view of plasma-facing surface preparation. Unlike today's devices however, ITER will have to manage large quantities of tritium fuel, imposing on wall conditioning a major responsibility for tritium inventory control. It will also feature the largest plasma-facing beryllium surface ever used in a tokamak and its high duty cycle and long pulse are expected to lead to the rapid formation of deposited layers in which tritium can accumulate. This paper summarises the currently planned ITER wall conditioning systems and describes the strategy for their use throughout exploitation of the device.

  20. High-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation delays rapid eye movement sleep.

    PubMed

    Cohrs, S; Tergau, F; Riech, S; Kastner, S; Paulus, W; Ziemann, U; Rüther, E; Hajak, G

    1998-10-26

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a promising new treatment for patients with major depression. However, the mechanisms underlying the antidepressive action of rTMS are widely unclear. Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep has been shown to play an important role in the pathophysiology of depression. In the present study we demonstrate that rTMS delays the first REM sleep epoch on average by 17 min (102.6 +/-22.5 min vs 85.7+/-18.8 min; p < 0.02) and prolongs the nonREM-REM cycle length (109.1+/-11.4 min vs 101.8+/-13.2min, p< 0.012). These rTMS-induced changes in REM sleep variables correspond to findings observed after pharmacological and electroconvulsive treatment of depression. Therefore, it is likely that the capability of rTMS to affect circadian and ultradian biological rhythms contributes to its antidepressive action.

  1. High-speed stimulated hyperspectral Raman imaging using rapid acousto-optic delay lines.

    PubMed

    Alshaykh, Mohammed S; Liao, Chien-Sheng; Sandoval, Oscar E; Gitzinger, Gregory; Forget, Nicolas; Leaird, Daniel E; Cheng, Ji-Xin; Weiner, Andrew M

    2017-04-15

    Stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) is a powerful, label-free imaging technique that holds significant potential for medical imaging. To allow chemical specificity and minimize spectral distortion in the imaging of live species, a high-speed multiplex SRS imaging platform is needed. By combining a spectral focusing excitation technique with a rapid acousto-optic delay line, we demonstrate a hyperspectral SRS imaging platform capable of measuring a 3-dB spectral window of ∼200  cm-1 within 12.8 μs with a scan rate of 30 KHz. We present hyperspectral images of a mixture of two different microsphere polymers as well as live fungal cells mixed with human blood.

  2. The Role of ATP in Mechanically Stimulated Rapid Closure of the Venus's Flytrap 1

    PubMed Central

    Jaffe, M. J.

    1973-01-01

    When the midribs of untreated traps of Dionaea muscipula are frozen in liquid nitrogen after rapid closure, they contain significantly less ATP than those frozen before closure. Exogenous ATP causes a significant increase in the rate of mechanically stimulated trap closure. Illuminated traps close faster than those kept in the dark. The traps of plants placed in 100% O2 close much faster than do air controls, while 100% CO2 inhibits closure. It is concluded that ATP is probably the native source of potential energy for contraction of the trap's midrib, and that if the endogenous ATP titer is increased by oxidative phosphorylation or an exogenous source, the trap will close faster. PMID:16658280

  3. Rapid auxin-induced stimulation of cell wall synthesis in pea internodes

    SciTech Connect

    Kutschera, U.; Briggs, W.R.

    1987-05-01

    The effect of auxin (indole-3-acetic acid; IAA) on growth and incorporation of myo-(2-/sup 3/H(N)) inositol ((/sup 3/H)Ins) into noncellulosic polysacchharides in the cell walls of third internode sections from red light-grown pea seedlings (Pisum sativum L. cv. Alaska) was investigated. Intact section were incubated on (/sup 3/H)Ins for 4 hr to permit uptake of the tracer and then IAA was added. Growth started after a lag phase of 15 min under these conditions. The sections were removed from the tracer and separated into epidermis and cortical cylinder (cortex plus vascular tissue). In the epidermis, IAA-induced stimulation of (/sup 3/H)Ins incorporation started after a lag of 15 min. The amount of incorporation was 15% higher after 30 min and 24% higher after 2 hr than in the control. In the cortical cylinder, IAA-induced stimulation of (/sup 3/H)Ins incorporation started only approx. = 1 hr after adding IAA. The ionophore monensin (20 ..mu..M) inhibited the IAA-induced growth by 95%. Under these conditions, the IAA-induced stimulation of (/sup 3/H)Ins incorporation and the IAA-induced increase in in vivo extensibility of the sections was almost completely inhibited, although oxygen uptake was unaffected. The authors suggest that wall synthesis (as represented by (/sup 3/H)Ins incorporation) and wall loosening (increase in in vivo extensibility) are related processes. The results support the hypothesis that IAA induces growth by rapid simulation of cell wall synthesis in the growth-limiting epidermal cell layer.

  4. Rapid systemic up-regulation of genes after heat-wounding and electrical stimulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, E.; Vian, A.; Vian, C.; Stankovic, B.

    1997-01-01

    When one leaf of a tomato plant is electrically-stimulated or heat-wounded, proteinase inhibitor genes are rapidly up-regulated in distant leaves. The identity of the systemic wound signal(s) is not yet known, but major candidates include hormones transmitted via the phloem or the xylem, the electrically-stimulated self-propagating electrical signal in the phloem (the action potential, AP), or the heat-wound-induced surge in hydraulic pressure in the xylem evoking a local change in membrane potential in adjacent living cells (the variation potential, VP). In order to discriminate between these signals we have adopted two approaches. The first approach involves applying stimuli that evoke known signals and determining whether these signals have similar effects on the "model" transcripts for proteinase inhibitors (pin) and calmodulin (cal). Here we show that a heat wound almost invariably evokes a VP, while an electrical stimulation occasionally evokes an AP, and both of these signals induce accumulation of transcripts encoding proteinase inhibitors. The second approach involves identifying the array of genes turned on by heat-wounding. To this end, we have constructed a subtractive library for heat-wounded tissue, isolated over 800 putatively up-regulated clones, and shown that all but two of the fifty that we have analyzed by Northern hybridization are, indeed, up-regulated. Here we show the early kinetics of up-regulation of three of these transcripts in the terminal (4th) leaf in response to heat-wounding the 3rd leaf, about 5 cm away. Even though these transcripts show somewhat different time courses of induction, with one peaking at 30 min, another at 15 min, and another at 5 min after flaming of a distant leaf, they all exhibit a similar pattern, i.e., a transient period of transcript accumulation preceding a period of transcript decrease, followed by a second period of transcript accumulation.

  5. Rapid systemic up-regulation of genes after heat-wounding and electrical stimulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, E.; Vian, A.; Vian, C.; Stankovic, B.

    1997-01-01

    When one leaf of a tomato plant is electrically-stimulated or heat-wounded, proteinase inhibitor genes are rapidly up-regulated in distant leaves. The identity of the systemic wound signal(s) is not yet known, but major candidates include hormones transmitted via the phloem or the xylem, the electrically-stimulated self-propagating electrical signal in the phloem (the action potential, AP), or the heat-wound-induced surge in hydraulic pressure in the xylem evoking a local change in membrane potential in adjacent living cells (the variation potential, VP). In order to discriminate between these signals we have adopted two approaches. The first approach involves applying stimuli that evoke known signals and determining whether these signals have similar effects on the "model" transcripts for proteinase inhibitors (pin) and calmodulin (cal). Here we show that a heat wound almost invariably evokes a VP, while an electrical stimulation occasionally evokes an AP, and both of these signals induce accumulation of transcripts encoding proteinase inhibitors. The second approach involves identifying the array of genes turned on by heat-wounding. To this end, we have constructed a subtractive library for heat-wounded tissue, isolated over 800 putatively up-regulated clones, and shown that all but two of the fifty that we have analyzed by Northern hybridization are, indeed, up-regulated. Here we show the early kinetics of up-regulation of three of these transcripts in the terminal (4th) leaf in response to heat-wounding the 3rd leaf, about 5 cm away. Even though these transcripts show somewhat different time courses of induction, with one peaking at 30 min, another at 15 min, and another at 5 min after flaming of a distant leaf, they all exhibit a similar pattern, i.e., a transient period of transcript accumulation preceding a period of transcript decrease, followed by a second period of transcript accumulation.

  6. A microcontroller platform for the rapid prototyping of functional electrical stimulation-based gait neuroprostheses.

    PubMed

    Luzio de Melo, Paulo; da Silva, Miguel Tavares; Martins, Jorge; Newman, Dava

    2015-05-01

    Functional electrical stimulation (FES) has been used over the last decades as a method to rehabilitate lost motor functions of individuals with spinal cord injury, multiple sclerosis, and post-stroke hemiparesis. Within this field, researchers in need of developing FES-based control solutions for specific disabilities often have to choose between either the acquisition and integration of high-performance industry-level systems, which are rather expensive and hardly portable, or develop custom-made portable solutions, which despite their lower cost, usually require expert-level electronic skills. Here, a flexible low-cost microcontroller-based platform for rapid prototyping of FES neuroprostheses is presented, designed for reduced execution complexity, development time, and production cost. For this reason, the Arduino open-source microcontroller platform was used, together with off-the-shelf components whenever possible. The developed system enables the rapid deployment of portable FES-based gait neuroprostheses, being flexible enough to allow simple open-loop strategies but also more complex closed-loop solutions. The system is based on a modular architecture that allows the development of optimized solutions depending on the desired FES applications, even though the design and testing of the platform were focused toward drop foot correction. The flexibility of the system was demonstrated using two algorithms targeting drop foot condition within different experimental setups. Successful bench testing of the device in healthy subjects demonstrated these neuroprosthesis platform capabilities to correct drop foot.

  7. Rapid, label-free detection of brain tumors with stimulated Raman scattering microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Minbiao; Orringer, Daniel A.; Freudiger, Christian W.; Ramkissoon, Shakti; Liu, Xiaohui; Lau, Darryl; Golby, Alexandra J.; Norton, Isaiah; Hayashi, Marika; Agar, Nathalie Y.R.; Young, Geoffrey S.; Spino, Cathie; Santagata, Sandro; Camelo-Piragua, Sandra; Ligon, Keith L.; Sagher, Oren; Xie, X. Sunney

    2013-01-01

    Surgery is an essential component in the treatment of brain tumors. However, delineating tumor from normal brain remains a major challenge. Here we describe the use of stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy for differentiating healthy human and mouse brain tissue from tumor-infiltrated brain based on histoarchitectural and biochemical differences. Unlike traditional histopathology, SRS is a label-free technique that can be rapidly performed in situ. SRS microscopy was able to differentiate tumor from non-neoplastic tissue in an infiltrative human glioblastoma xenograft mouse model based on their different Raman spectra. We further demonstrated a correlation between SRS and H&E microscopy for detection of glioma infiltration (κ=0.98). Finally, we applied SRS microscopy in vivo in mice during surgery to reveal tumor margins that were undetectable under standard operative conditions. By providing rapid intraoperative assessment of brain tissue, SRS microscopy may ultimately improve the safety and accuracy of surgeries where tumor boundaries are visually indistinct. PMID:24005159

  8. Rapid intracellular release of calcium in human platelets by stimulation of 5-HT2-receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Erne, P.; Pletscher, A.

    1985-01-01

    The concentration of intracellular free Ca2+ ( [Ca2+]i) in human blood platelets was measured by use of the fluorescent probe quin-2. 5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) caused a rapid increase of [Ca2+]i in the presence or absence of Ca2+ in the medium. The [Ca2+]i-rise was less marked in the absence of Ca2+ and could be antagonized by 8-(N,N-diethylamino)octyl-3,4,5-trimethoxybenzoate-hydrochloride (TMB-8), an inhibitor of calcium release from internal stores. 5-HT induced a shape change reaction in the presence or absence of extracellular Ca2+, but the pEC50 of 5-HT was slightly higher in the presence of the cation. Shape change reaction and [Ca2+]i-rise showed similar time courses. Various 5-HT-agonists caused a rise of [Ca2+]i, whereas 5-HT-antagonists, but not the 5-HT-uptake inhibitor desmethylimipramine and the alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonist yohimbine, counteracted the 5-HT-induced rise of the cation in a stereospecific manner. The antagonists were more potent than the agonists. The orders of potencies of the drugs affecting [Ca2+]i and platelet shape were similar. It is concluded that stimulation of 5-HT2-receptors of platelets causes a rapid release of intracellular calcium which, by activation of the contractile system, mediates the shape change reaction. PMID:3156650

  9. Caspase-11 stimulates rapid flagellin-independent pyroptosis in response to Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed

    Case, Christopher L; Kohler, Lara J; Lima, Jonilson B; Strowig, Till; de Zoete, Marcel R; Flavell, Richard A; Zamboni, Dario S; Roy, Craig R

    2013-01-29

    A flagellin-independent caspase-1 activation pathway that does not require NAIP5 or NRLC4 is induced by the intracellular pathogen Legionella pneumophila. Here we demonstrate that this pathway requires caspase-11. Treatment of macrophages with LPS up-regulated the host components required for this caspase-11 activation pathway. Activation by Legionella differed from caspase-11 activation using previously described agonists in that Legionella caspase-11 activation was rapid and required bacteria with a functional type IV secretion system called Dot/Icm. Legionella activation of caspase-11 induced pyroptosis by a mechanism independent of the NAIP/NLRC4 and caspase-1 axis. Legionella activation of caspase-11 stimulated activation of caspase-1 through NLRP3 and ASC. Induction of caspase-11-dependent responses occurred in macrophages deficient in the adapter proteins TRIF or MyD88 but not in macrophages deficient in both signaling factors. Although caspase-11 was produced in macrophages deficient in the type-I IFN receptor, there was a severe defect in caspase-11-dependent pyroptosis in these cells. These data indicate that macrophages respond to microbial signatures to produce proteins that mediate a capsase-11 response and that the caspase-11 system provides an alternative pathway for rapid detection of an intracellular pathogen capable of evading the canonical caspase-1 activation system that responds to bacterial flagellin.

  10. Rapid-Rate Paired Associative Stimulation over the Primary Somatosensory Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Tsang, Philemon; Bailey, Aaron Z.; Nelson, Aimee J.

    2015-01-01

    Rapid-rate paired associative stimulation (rPAS) involves repeat pairing of peripheral nerve stimulation and Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) pulses at a 5 Hz frequency. RPAS over primary motor cortex (M1) operates with spike-timing dependent plasticity such that increases in corticospinal excitability occur when the nerve and TMS pulse temporally coincide in cortex. The present study investigates the effects of rPAS over primary somatosensory cortex (SI) which has not been performed to date. In a series of experiments, rPAS was delivered over SI and M1 at varying timing intervals between the nerve and TMS pulse based on the latency of the N20 somatosensory evoked potential (SEP) component within each participant (intervals for SI-rPAS: N20, N20-2.5 ms, N20 + 2.5 ms, intervals for M1-rPAS: N20, N20+5 ms). Changes in SI physiology were measured via SEPs (N20, P25, N20-P25) and SEP paired-pulse inhibition, and changes in M1 physiology were measured with motor evoked potentials and short-latency afferent inhibition. Measures were obtained before rPAS and at 5, 25 and 45 minutes following stimulation. Results indicate that paired-pulse inhibition and short-latency afferent inhibition were reduced only when the SI-rPAS nerve-TMS timing interval was set to N20-2.5 ms. SI-rPAS over SI also led to remote effects on motor physiology over a wider range of nerve-TMS intervals (N20-2.5 ms – N20+2.5 ms) during which motor evoked potentials were increased. M1-rPAS increased motor evoked potentials and reduced short-latency afferent inhibition as previously reported. These data provide evidence that, similar to M1, rPAS over SI is spike-timing dependent and is capable of exerting changes in SI and M1 physiology. PMID:25799422

  11. Rapid-rate paired associative stimulation over the primary somatosensory cortex.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Philemon; Bailey, Aaron Z; Nelson, Aimee J

    2015-01-01

    Rapid-rate paired associative stimulation (rPAS) involves repeat pairing of peripheral nerve stimulation and Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) pulses at a 5 Hz frequency. RPAS over primary motor cortex (M1) operates with spike-timing dependent plasticity such that increases in corticospinal excitability occur when the nerve and TMS pulse temporally coincide in cortex. The present study investigates the effects of rPAS over primary somatosensory cortex (SI) which has not been performed to date. In a series of experiments, rPAS was delivered over SI and M1 at varying timing intervals between the nerve and TMS pulse based on the latency of the N20 somatosensory evoked potential (SEP) component within each participant (intervals for SI-rPAS: N20, N20-2.5 ms, N20 + 2.5 ms, intervals for M1-rPAS: N20, N20+5 ms). Changes in SI physiology were measured via SEPs (N20, P25, N20-P25) and SEP paired-pulse inhibition, and changes in M1 physiology were measured with motor evoked potentials and short-latency afferent inhibition. Measures were obtained before rPAS and at 5, 25 and 45 minutes following stimulation. Results indicate that paired-pulse inhibition and short-latency afferent inhibition were reduced only when the SI-rPAS nerve-TMS timing interval was set to N20-2.5 ms. SI-rPAS over SI also led to remote effects on motor physiology over a wider range of nerve-TMS intervals (N20-2.5 ms - N20+2.5 ms) during which motor evoked potentials were increased. M1-rPAS increased motor evoked potentials and reduced short-latency afferent inhibition as previously reported. These data provide evidence that, similar to M1, rPAS over SI is spike-timing dependent and is capable of exerting changes in SI and M1 physiology.

  12. Stimulation Induced Changes in Frog Neuromuscular Junctions: A Quantitative Ultrastructural Comparison of Rapid-Frozen and Chemically Fixed Nerve Terminals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-03-06

    nerve terminals soaked or stimulated in high calcium Ringer’s solution and preserved by rapid-freezing the reduction of the number of synaptic...from electric organs and fixed in high calcium solutions. Politoff, Rose and Pappas (1974) have shown that when frog NMJs are fixed in the presence...stimulated preparations fixed in high calcium , the electron dense deposits in the synaptic vesicles disappeared, while those in the mitochondria and in

  13. Fluid flow stimulates rapid and continuous release of nitric oxide in osteoblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, D. L.; McAllister, T. N.; Frangos, J. A.

    1996-01-01

    Interstitial fluid flow may mediate skeletal remodeling in response to mechanical loading. Because nitric oxide (NO) has been shown to be an osteoblast mitogen and inhibitor of osteoclastic resorption, we investigated and characterized the role of fluid shear on the release of NO in osteoblasts. Rat calvarial cells in a stationary culture produced undetectable levels of NO. Fluid shear stress (6 dyn/cm2) rapidly increased NO release rate to 9.8 nmol.h-1.mg protein-1 and sustained this production for 12 h of exposure to flow. Cytokine treatment also induced NO synthesis after a 12-h lag phase of zero production, followed by a production rate of 0.6 nmol.h-1.mg protein-1. Flow-induced NO production was blocked by the NO synthase (NOS) inhibitor NG-amino-L-arginine, but not by dexamethasone, which suggests that the flow stimulated a constitutive NOS isoform. This is the first time that a functional constitutively present NOS isoform has been identified in osteoblasts. Moreover, fluid flow represents the most potent stimulus of NO release in osteoblasts reported to date. Fluid flow-induced NO production may therefore play a primary role in bone maintenance and remodeling.

  14. Fluid flow stimulates rapid and continuous release of nitric oxide in osteoblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, D. L.; McAllister, T. N.; Frangos, J. A.

    1996-01-01

    Interstitial fluid flow may mediate skeletal remodeling in response to mechanical loading. Because nitric oxide (NO) has been shown to be an osteoblast mitogen and inhibitor of osteoclastic resorption, we investigated and characterized the role of fluid shear on the release of NO in osteoblasts. Rat calvarial cells in a stationary culture produced undetectable levels of NO. Fluid shear stress (6 dyn/cm2) rapidly increased NO release rate to 9.8 nmol.h-1.mg protein-1 and sustained this production for 12 h of exposure to flow. Cytokine treatment also induced NO synthesis after a 12-h lag phase of zero production, followed by a production rate of 0.6 nmol.h-1.mg protein-1. Flow-induced NO production was blocked by the NO synthase (NOS) inhibitor NG-amino-L-arginine, but not by dexamethasone, which suggests that the flow stimulated a constitutive NOS isoform. This is the first time that a functional constitutively present NOS isoform has been identified in osteoblasts. Moreover, fluid flow represents the most potent stimulus of NO release in osteoblasts reported to date. Fluid flow-induced NO production may therefore play a primary role in bone maintenance and remodeling.

  15. Luminal hydrochloric acid stimulates rapid transepithelial ion fluxes in rodent esophageal stratified squamous epithelium.

    PubMed

    Lin, B R; Hsieh, H T; Lee, J M; Lai, I R; Chen, C F; Yu, L C H

    2008-09-01

    It remains unclear whether enhanced ion fluxes occur in the esophageal stratified squamous epithelium upon acid exposure. Rat esophageal tissues devoid of submucosal glands displayed basal short-circuit current (Isc) of 5.03 +/- 1.93 microA/cm(2) and lumen-negative potential difference (PD) in association with net absorption of Na+ and Cl-, and secretion of HCO3(-). Luminal hydrochloric acid (HCl) challenge (pH = 1.6) triggered an acute rise of the Isc and increment of negative PD to seven-fold of baseline, which was diminished in HCO3(-)-free, but not Na+- free buffer. The rise of Isc was inhibited by pretreatment with di-isothiocyanatostilbene-2, 2'-disulphonic acid (DIDS) and 5-(N-ethyl-N-isopropyl)-amiloride (EIPA). Topical carbachol, capsaicin, forskolin or CFTR(inh)-172 had no effect on basal Isc.CFTR(inh)-172 did not reduce the acid-increased Isc. Functional ablation of capsaicin-sensitive nerves had no effect on the acid-induced Isc. The phenomenon of enhanced ion fluxes upon acid stimulation was confirmed in human esophageal specimens. Our results demonstrated that the mechanism of acid-induced rapid transepithelial ion fluxes is dependent on the presence of bicarbonate ions as well as functional anion transporters and Na+/H+ exchanger, but independent of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). The capsaicin-sensitive and muscarinic-dependent nerve pathways did not play roles in the mechanism.

  16. Robust iterative methods

    SciTech Connect

    Saadd, Y.

    1994-12-31

    In spite of the tremendous progress achieved in recent years in the general area of iterative solution techniques, there are still a few obstacles to the acceptance of iterative methods in a number of applications. These applications give rise to very indefinite or highly ill-conditioned non Hermitian matrices. Trying to solve these systems with the simple-minded standard preconditioned Krylov subspace methods can be a frustrating experience. With the mathematical and physical models becoming more sophisticated, the typical linear systems which we encounter today are far more difficult to solve than those of just a few years ago. This trend is likely to accentuate. This workshop will discuss (1) these applications and the types of problems that they give rise to; and (2) recent progress in solving these problems with iterative methods. The workshop will end with a hopefully stimulating panel discussion with the speakers.

  17. Rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder after bilateral subthalamic stimulation in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Eun; Jeon, Beom S; Paek, Sun-Ha; Yun, Ji Young; Yang, Hui-Jun; Kim, Han-Joon; Ehm, Gwanhee; Kim, Hee Jin; Lee, Jee-Young; Kim, Ji-Young

    2015-02-01

    The effect of subthalamic nucleus (STN) deep brain stimulation (DBS) on rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (RBD) in Parkinson's disease (PD) is not well known. We evaluated the change in the incidence of probable RBD after bilateral STN DBS in PD patients. Ninety patients with PD treated with bilateral STN DBS underwent retrospective assessment of RBD by interview before and after DBS. Forty-seven (52.2%) of the 90 patients had RBD preoperatively. RBD was resolved only in one patient and persisted in 46 patients at 1 year after DBS. RBD developed de novo in 16 patients (de novo RBD group) within 1 year after DBS, resulting in 62 (68.9%) of the 90 patients having RBD 1 year after DBS. Patients with RBD at any time within 1 year after DBS (RBD group, n = 63) were older than the patients without RBD (non-RBD group, n = 27). The sum of the Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) axial score for the "on" state was lower in the RBD group than in the non-RBD group after DBS (p = 0.029). Comparing the de novo RBD group and non-RBD group, the UPDRS Part III and total score and the levodopa equivalent daily doses for the "on" states decreased more in the de novo RBD group than in the non-RBD group (p < 0.05). The incidence of clinical RBD increased after bilateral STN DBS because de novo RBD developed and pre-existing RBD persisted after DBS. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Rapid signaling responses in Sertoli cell membranes induced by follicle stimulating hormone and testosterone: calcium inflow and electrophysiological changes.

    PubMed

    Loss, Eloísa S; Jacobus, Ana Paula; Wassermann, Guillermo F

    2011-10-10

    This minireview describes the rapid signaling actions of follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and testosterone in immature Sertoli cells mainly related to Ca(2+) inflow and the electrophysiological changes produced by hormones. The rapid membrane actions of FSH occur in a time frame of seconds to minutes, which include membrane depolarization and the stimulation of (45)Ca(2+) uptake. These effects can be prevented by pertussis toxin (PTX), suggesting that they are likely mediated by Gi-protein coupled receptor activation. Furthermore, these effects were inhibited by verapamil, a blocker of the L-type voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channel (VDCC). Finally, FSH stimulation of (45)Ca(2+) uptake was inhibited by the (phosphoinositide 3-kinase) PI3K inhibitor wortmannin. These results suggest that the rapid action of FSH on L-type Ca(2+) channel activity in Sertoli cells from pre-pubertal rats is mediated by the Gi/Gβγ/PI3Kγ pathway, independent of its effects on insulin-like growth factor type I (IGF-I). Testosterone depolarizes the membrane potential and increases the resistance and the (45)Ca(2+) uptake in Sertoli cells of the seminiferous tubules of immature rats. These actions were nullified by diazoxide (K(+)(ATP) channel opener). Testosterone actions were blocked by both PTX and the phospholipase C (PLC) inhibitor U73122, suggesting the involvement of PLC - phosphatidylinositol 4-5 bisphosphate (PIP2) hydrolysis via the Gq protein in the testosterone-mediated pathway. These results indicate that testosterone acts on the Sertoli cell membrane through the K(+)(ATP) channels and PLC-PIP2 hydrolysis, which closes the channel, depolarizes the membrane and stimulates (45)Ca(2+) uptake. These results demonstrate the existence of rapid non-classical pathways in immature Sertoli cells regulated by FSH and testosterone.

  19. Thapsigargin induces rapid, transient growth inhibition and c-fos expression followed by sustained growth stimulation in mouse keratinocyte cultures.

    PubMed

    Harmon, C S; Ducote, J; Xiong, Y

    1996-08-01

    Although the sesquiterpene lactone thapsigargin has been shown to possess hyperplastic and tumor-promoting activities when applied topically to mouse skin in vivo, the cellular mechanism(s) which underlie these effects are unclear. We show here that thapsigargin treatment of Primary mouse epidermal keratinocytes increased intracellular free Ca2+ concentration (Cai) in a concentration-dependent manner. Thapsigargin induced a rapid, transient elevation in keratinocyte Cai, in part due to the release of Ca2+ from intracellular stores. This response was followed by a sustained elevation in Ca2+, resulting entirely from calcium influx. Thapsigargin elicited a biphasic effect on keratinocyte DNA synthesis: a rapid inhibitory effect (50-60% inhibition at 4-8 h), followed by a very marked and sustained elevation. Prolonged treatment of keratinocytes with thapsigargin at relatively high concentrations resulted in cytotoxicity (inhibition of neutral red uptake). The rapid antiproliferative effect of thapsigargin was not associated with cytotoxicity, as determined by either neutral red uptake or by trypan blue exclusion, and was not blocked by pretreatment with Ro 31-7349, a selective inhibitor of protein kinase C. The rapid antiproliferative effect of thapsigargin was associated with rapid, transient activation of keratinocyte c-fos expression and rapid inhibition of total protein synthesis. Taken together, these findings raise the possibility that the hyperplastic and tumor-promoting activities of thapsigargin on epidermis in vivo result from direct keratinocyte growth stimulation as a consequence of a prolonged elevation in levels of Cai.

  20. Rapid Degradation of Host mRNAs by Stimulation of RNase E Activity by Srd of Bacteriophage T4

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Dan; Alawneh, Abdulraheem M.; Yonesaki, Tetsuro; Otsuka, Yuichi

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli messenger RNAs (mRNAs) are rapidly degraded immediately after bacteriophage T4 infection, and the host RNase E contributes to this process. Here, we found that a previously uncharacterized factor of T4 phage, Srd (Similarity with rpoD), was involved in T4-induced host mRNA degradation. The rapid decay of ompA and lpp mRNAs was partially alleviated and a decay intermediate of lpp mRNA rapidly accumulated in cells infected with T4 phage lacking srd. Exogenous expression of Srd in uninfected cells significantly accelerated the decay of these mRNAs. In addition, lpp(T) RNA, with a sequence identical to the decay intermediate of lpp mRNA and a triphosphate at 5′-end, was also destabilized by Srd. The destabilization of these RNAs by Srd was not observed in RNase E-defective cells. The initial cleavage of a primary transcript by RNase E can be either direct or dependent on the 5′-end of transcript. In the latter case, host RppH is required to convert the triphosphate at 5′-end to a monophosphate. lpp(T) RNA, but not lpp and ompA mRNAs, required RppH for Srd-stimulated degradation, indicating that Srd stimulates both 5′-end-dependent and -independent cleavage activities of RNase E. Furthermore, pull-down and immunoprecipitation analyses strongly suggested that Srd physically associates with the N-terminal half of RNase E containing the catalytic moiety and the membrane target sequence. Finally, the growth of T4 phage was significantly decreased by the disruption of srd. These results strongly suggest that the stimulation of RNase E activity by T4 Srd is required for efficient phage growth. PMID:26323881

  1. Doublet stimulation increases Ca(2+) binding to troponin C to ensure rapid force development in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Bakker, Anthony J; Cully, Tanya R; Wingate, Catherine D; Barclay, Christopher J; Launikonis, Bradley S

    2017-03-06

    Fast-twitch skeletal muscle fibers are often exposed to motor neuron double discharges (≥200 Hz), which markedly increase both the rate of contraction and the magnitude of the resulting force responses. However, the mechanism responsible for these effects is poorly understood, likely because of technical limitations in previous studies. In this study, we measured cytosolic Ca(2+) during doublet activation using the low-affinity indicator Mag-Fluo-4 at high temporal resolution and modeled the effects of doublet stimulation on sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) release, binding of Ca(2+) to cytosolic buffers, and force enhancement in fast-twitch fibers. Single isolated fibers respond to doublet pulses with two clear Ca(2+) spikes, at doublet frequencies up to 1 KHz. A 200-Hz doublet at the start of a tetanic stimulation train (70 Hz) decreases the drop in free Ca(2+) between the first three Ca(2+) spikes of the transient, maintaining a higher overall free Ca(2+) level during first 20-30 ms of the response. Doublet stimulation also increased the rate of force development in isolated fast-twitch muscles. We also modeled SR Ca(2+) release rates during doublet stimulation and showed that Ca(2+)-dependent inactivation of ryanodine receptor activity is rapid, occurring ≤1ms after initial release. Furthermore, we modeled Ca(2+) binding to the main intracellular Ca(2+) buffers of troponin C (TnC), parvalbumin, and the SR Ca(2+) pump during Ca(2+) release and found that the main effect of the second response in the doublet is to more rapidly increase the occupation of the second Ca(2+)-binding site on TnC (TnC2), resulting in earlier activation of force. We conclude that doublet stimulation maintains high cytosolic Ca(2+) levels for longer in the early phase of the Ca(2+) response, resulting in faster saturation of TnC2 with Ca(2+), faster initiation of cross-bridge cycling, and more rapid force development.

  2. Doublet stimulation increases Ca2+ binding to troponin C to ensure rapid force development in skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Cully, Tanya R.; Wingate, Catherine D.

    2017-01-01

    Fast-twitch skeletal muscle fibers are often exposed to motor neuron double discharges (≥200 Hz), which markedly increase both the rate of contraction and the magnitude of the resulting force responses. However, the mechanism responsible for these effects is poorly understood, likely because of technical limitations in previous studies. In this study, we measured cytosolic Ca2+ during doublet activation using the low-affinity indicator Mag-Fluo-4 at high temporal resolution and modeled the effects of doublet stimulation on sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ release, binding of Ca2+ to cytosolic buffers, and force enhancement in fast-twitch fibers. Single isolated fibers respond to doublet pulses with two clear Ca2+ spikes, at doublet frequencies up to 1 KHz. A 200-Hz doublet at the start of a tetanic stimulation train (70 Hz) decreases the drop in free Ca2+ between the first three Ca2+ spikes of the transient, maintaining a higher overall free Ca2+ level during first 20–30 ms of the response. Doublet stimulation also increased the rate of force development in isolated fast-twitch muscles. We also modeled SR Ca2+ release rates during doublet stimulation and showed that Ca2+-dependent inactivation of ryanodine receptor activity is rapid, occurring ≤1ms after initial release. Furthermore, we modeled Ca2+ binding to the main intracellular Ca2+ buffers of troponin C (TnC), parvalbumin, and the SR Ca2+ pump during Ca2+ release and found that the main effect of the second response in the doublet is to more rapidly increase the occupation of the second Ca2+-binding site on TnC (TnC2), resulting in earlier activation of force. We conclude that doublet stimulation maintains high cytosolic Ca2+ levels for longer in the early phase of the Ca2+ response, resulting in faster saturation of TnC2 with Ca2+, faster initiation of cross-bridge cycling, and more rapid force development. PMID:28209802

  3. Behavioral responses of deafened guinea pigs to intracochlear electrical stimulation: a new rapid psychophysical procedure.

    PubMed

    Agterberg, Martijn J H; Versnel, Huib

    2014-07-01

    In auditory research the guinea pig is often preferred above rats and mice because of the easily accessible cochlea and because the frequency range of its hearing is more comparable to that of humans. Studies of the guinea-pig auditory system primarily apply histological and electrophysiological measures. Behavioral animal paradigms, in particular in combination with these histological and electrophysiological methods, are necessary in the development of new therapeutic interventions. However, the guinea pig is not considered an attractive animal for behavioral experiments. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to develop a behavioral task suitable for guinea pigs, that can be utilized in cochlear-implant related research. Guinea pigs were trained in a modified shuttle-box in which a stream of air was used as unconditioned stimulus (UCS). A stream of air was preferred over conventionally used methods as electric foot-shocks since it produces less stress, which is a confounding factor in behavioral experiments. Hearing guinea pigs were trained to respond to acoustic stimuli. They responded correctly within only five sessions of ten minutes. The animals maintained their performance four weeks after the right cochlea was implanted with an electrode array. After systemic deafening, the animals responded in the first session immediately to intracochlear electrical stimulation. These responses were not affected by daily chronic electrical stimulation (CES). In conclusion, the present study demonstrates that guinea pigs can be trained relatively fast to respond to acoustic stimuli, and that the training has a lasting effect, which generalizes to intracochlear electrical stimulation after deafening. Furthermore, it demonstrates that bilaterally deafened guinea pigs with substantial (∼50%) loss of spiral ganglion cells (SGCs), detect intracochlear electrical stimulation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Nitric Acid and Benomyl Stimulate Rapid Height Growth of Longleaf Pine

    Treesearch

    A.G. Kais; R.C. Hare; J.P. Barnett

    1984-01-01

    Rapid height growth of longleaf pine seedlings, important to production of uniform, even-aged stands, can be promoted by controlling brown-spot needle blight and weed competition, and by increasing soil fertility. Root systems of container-grown longleaf pine seedlings were dip-treated in either benomyl/clay mix (10 percent a.i. benomyl) or clay control and planted...

  5. Rapid and transient stimulation of intracellular reactive oxygen species by melatonin in normal and tumor leukocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Radogna, Flavia; Paternoster, Laura; De Nicola, Milena; Cerella, Claudia; Ammendola, Sergio; Bedini, Annalida; Tarzia, Giorgio; Aquilano, Katia; Ciriolo, Maria; Ghibelli, Lina

    2009-08-15

    Melatonin is a modified tryptophan with potent biological activity, exerted by stimulation of specific plasma membrane (MT1/MT2) receptors, by lower affinity intracellular enzymatic targets (quinone reductase, calmodulin), or through its strong anti-oxidant ability. Scattered studies also report a perplexing pro-oxidant activity, showing that melatonin is able to stimulate production of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). Here we show that on U937 human monocytes melatonin promotes intracellular ROS in a fast (< 1 min) and transient (up to 5-6 h) way. Melatonin equally elicits its pro-radical effect on a set of normal or tumor leukocytes; intriguingly, ROS production does not lead to oxidative stress, as shown by absence of protein carbonylation, maintenance of free thiols, preservation of viability and regular proliferation rate. ROS production is independent from MT1/MT2 receptor interaction, since a) requires micromolar (as opposed to nanomolar) doses of melatonin; b) is not contrasted by the specific MT1/MT2 antagonist luzindole; c) is not mimicked by a set of MT1/MT2 high affinity melatonin analogues. Instead, chlorpromazine, the calmodulin inhibitor shown to prevent melatonin-calmodulin interaction, also prevents melatonin pro-radical effect, suggesting that the low affinity binding to calmodulin (in the micromolar range) may promote ROS production.

  6. Mechanism of rapid mucus secretion in goblet cells stimulated by acetylcholine

    PubMed Central

    1980-01-01

    The parasympathetic control of goblet cell secretion and the membrane events accompanying accelerated mucus release were studied in large intestinal mucosal biopsies maintained in an organ culture system. The secretory response of individual goblet cells to 10(-6) M acetylcholine chloride with 3 x 10(-3) M eserine sulfate (a cholinesterase inhibitor) was assessed by light microscopy and autoradiography, by scanning and transmission electron microscopy, and by freeze-fracture. Goblet cells on the mucosal surface are unaffected by acetylcholine. In crypt goblet cells acetylcholine-eserine induces rapid fusion of apical mucous granule membranes with the luminal plasma membrane (detectable by 2 min), followed by sequential, tandem fission of the pentalaminar, fused areas of adjacent mucous granule membranes. These events first involve the most central apical mucous granules, are then propagated to include peripheral granules, and finally spread toward the most basal granules. By 60 min, most crypt cells are nearly depleted. The apical membrane, although greatly amplified by these events, remains intact, and intracellular mucous granules do not coalesce with each other. During rapid secretion membrane-limited tags of cytoplasm are observed attached to the cavitated apical cell surface. These long, thin extensions of redundant apical membrane are rapidly lost, apparently by being shed into the crypt lumen. PMID:7391135

  7. Hepatitis B Virus and DNA Stimulation Trigger a Rapid Innate Immune Response through NF-κB.

    PubMed

    Yoneda, Masato; Hyun, Jinhee; Jakubski, Silvia; Saito, Satoru; Nakajima, Atsushi; Schiff, Eugene R; Thomas, Emmanuel

    2016-07-15

    Cell-intrinsic innate immunity provides a rapid first line of defense to thwart invading viral pathogens through the production of antiviral and inflammatory genes. However, the presence of many of these signaling pathways in the liver and their role in hepatitis B virus (HBV) pathogenesis is unknown. Recent identification of intracellular DNA-sensing pathways and involvement in numerous diverse disease processes including viral pathogenesis and carcinogenesis suggest a role for these processes in HBV infection. To characterize HBV-intrinsic innate immune responses and the role of DNA- and RNA-sensing pathways in the liver, we used in vivo and in vitro models including analysis of gene expression in liver biopsies from HBV-infected patients. In addition, mRNA and protein expression were measured in HBV-stimulated and DNA-treated hepatoma cell lines and primary human hepatocytes. In this article, we report that HBV and foreign DNA stimulation results in innate immune responses characterized by the production of inflammatory chemokines in hepatocytes. Analysis of liver biopsies from HBV-infected patients supported a correlation among hepatic expression of specific chemokines. In addition, HBV elicits a much broader range of gene expression alterations. The induction of chemokines, including CXCL10, is mediated by melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 and NF-κB-dependent pathways after HBV stimulation. In conclusion, HBV-stimulated pathways predominantly activate an inflammatory response that would promote the development of hepatitis. Understanding the mechanism underlying these virus-host interactions may provide new strategies to trigger noncytopathic clearance of covalently closed circular DNA to ultimately cure patients with HBV infection. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  8. Rapid post-oral stimulation of intake and flavor conditioning by glucose and fat in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Zukerman, Steven; Ackroff, Karen

    2011-01-01

    Although widely assumed to have only satiating actions, nutrients in the gut can also condition increases in intake in some cases. Here we studied the time course of post-oral nutrient stimulation of ingestion in food-restricted C57BL/6J mice. In experiment 1, mice adapted to drink a 0.8% sucralose solution 1 h/day, rapidly increased their rate of licking (within 4–6 min) when first tested with an 8% glucose solution and even more so in tests 2 and 3. Other mice decreased their licking rate when switched from sucralose to 8% fructose, a sugar that is sweet like glucose but lacks positive post-oral effects in mice. The glucose-stimulated drinking is due to the sugar's post-oral rather than taste properties, because sucralose is highly preferred to glucose and fructose in brief choice tests. A second experiment showed that the glucose-stimulated ingestion is associated with a conditioned flavor preference in both intact and capsaicin-treated mice. This indicates that the post-oral stimulatory action of glucose is not mediated by capsaicin-sensitive visceral afferents. In experiment 3, mice consumed flavored saccharin solutions as they self-infused water or glucose via an intragastric (IG) catheter. The glucose self-infusion stimulated ingestion within 13–15 min in test 1 and produced a conditioned increase in licking that was apparent in the initial minute of tests 2 and 3. Experiment 4 revealed that IG self-infusions of a fat emulsion also resulted in post-oral stimulation of licking in test 1 and conditioned increases in tests 2 and 3. These findings indicate that glucose and fat can generate stimulatory post-oral signals early in a feeding session that increase ongoing ingestion and condition increases in flavor acceptance and preference revealed in subsequent feeding sessions. The test procedures developed here can be used to investigate the peripheral and central processes involved in stimulation of intake by post-oral nutrients. PMID:21975648

  9. Mega-prizes in medicine: big cash awards may stimulate useful and rapid therapeutic innovation.

    PubMed

    Charlton, Bruce G

    2007-01-01

    Following Horrobin's suggestion of 1986, I argue that offering very large prizes (tens of millions of US dollars, or more) for solving specific therapeutic problems, would be an excellent strategy for promoting the rapid development of effective new treatments. The two mainstream ways of paying for medical research are funding the process with grants or funding the outcome via patent protection. When grants are used to fund the process of research the result tends to be 'pure' science, guided by intrinsic scientific objectives. Practical results, such as useful therapeutic advances, are a by-product. Patent-seeking research, by contrast, is more focused on technology than science. It seeks practical results; and aims to pay for itself (and make a profit) in the long term by generating a patentable product or procedure. Prize-seeking research is subject to different incentives and applicable to different situations than either process-funded or patent-seeking research. Prize seeking researchers have a strong incentive to solve the specified problem as rapidly as possible, but the problem may be solved using old ideas that are scientifically mundane or unpatentable technologies and methods. Prizes therefore seem to generate solutions which are incremental extensions, new applications or novel combinations of already-existing technologies. The main use of mega-prizes in medicine would be to accelerate therapeutic progress in stagnant fields of research and to address urgent problems. For example, medical charities focused on specific diseases should consider accumulating their resources until they can offer a mega-prize for solving a clinical problem of special concern to their patients. Prize money should be big enough to pay for the research and development, the evaluation of the new treatment in a clinical trial, and with a large profit left-over to compensate for the intrinsic risk of competing. Sufficiently large amounts of money, and the prestige and publicity

  10. Rapid touch-stimulated movement in the androgynophore of Passiflora flowers (subgen. Decaloba; Sect. Xerogona)

    PubMed Central

    Scorza, Livia CT; Dornelas, Marcelo Carnier

    2014-01-01

    Plant touch-sensitive organs have been described since Darwin’s observations and are related to a quick response to environment stimuli. Sensitive flower organs have been associated to an increase in the chances of cross pollination but there are few studies regarding this topic. Here we describe for the first time the kinetic of the androgynophore movement of 4 Passiflora species (P. sanguinolenta, P. citrina, P. capsularis, and P. rubra). For that, we collected flowers and recorded the movement after mechano-stimulating the androgynophore. From the recordings, we described the movement regarding its response and sensibility to mechanical stimulus and calculated the duration, speed, and the angle formed by the androgynophore before and after the movement. From our data we were able to propose a link to the pollination habit of these species. The movement of the androgynophore in these Passiflora is a noteworthy floral feature that might lead us to another astonishing example of a mechanism that evolved among angiosperms to assure sexual reproduction. PMID:24487079

  11. Early Development of Brain Responses to Rapidly Presented Auditory Stimulation: a Magnetoencephalographic Study

    PubMed Central

    Sheridan, Carolin; Draganova, Rossitza; Ware, Maureen; Murphy, Pamela; Govindan, Rathinaswamy; Siegel, Eric R; Eswaran, Hari; Preissl, Hubert

    2010-01-01

    Background The processing of rapidly presented stimuli has been shown to be a precursor for the perception of speech in infants, long before they learn to speak. However, the onset and early development of rapid temporal processing (RTP) skills is not yet well understood. The main goal of this study was to assess the development of RTP skills during the prenatal and early postnatal stages of life. Methodology Tone pairs were presented in two difficulties (long and short) and event-related magnetic fields were recorded using MEG. 22 pregnant women (gestational ages between 29 and 38 weeks’) participated in the fetal study and 15 returned for a neonatal follow-up study between 2 and 38 days after delivery or 38 and 44 weeks gestational age (GA). Results In the postnatal follow-up study, a trend towards two peaks with increasing chronological and gestational age was observed in the longer tone pair. However, no such trend was evident in neonatal responses to the short tone pairs or in fetal recordings. Conclusions Neonates showed a gradual trend to successful processing of the longer tone pair with increasing age. By 22 days of chronological age, the infants processed this tone pair successfully, as indicated by two-peak waveforms. Therefore, the first three weeks of life could be critical for the development of RTP. Significance This study is a first approach towards the assessment of early RTP development. The results provide promising indications for future studies, which might lead to an early detection of deficits in speech perception and therefore prevent further language impairments. PMID:19900775

  12. Dexamethasone rapidly suppresses IL-33-stimulated mast cell function by blocking transcription factor activity.

    PubMed

    Paranjape, Anuya; Chernushevich, Oksana; Qayum, Amina Abdul; Spence, Andrew J; Taruselli, Marcela T; Abebayehu, Daniel; Barnstein, Brian O; McLeod, Jamie Josephine Avila; Baker, Bianca; Bajaj, Gurjas S; Chumanevich, Alena P; Oskeritzian, Carole A; Ryan, John J

    2016-12-01

    Mast cells are critical effectors of allergic disease and can be activated by IL-33, a proinflammatory member of the IL-1 cytokine family. IL-33 worsens the pathology of mast cell-mediated diseases, but therapies to antagonize IL-33 are still forthcoming. Because steroids are the mainstay of allergic disease treatment and are well known to suppress mast cell activation by other stimuli, we examined the effects of the steroid dexamethasone on IL-33-mediated mast cell function. We found that dexamethasone potently and rapidly suppressed cytokine production elicited by IL-33 from murine bone marrow-derived and peritoneal mast cells. IL-33 enhances IgE-mediated mast cell cytokine production, an activity that was also antagonized by dexamethasone. These effects were consistent in human mast cells. We additionally observed that IL-33 augmented migration of IgE-sensitized mast cells toward antigen. This enhancing effect was similarly reversed by dexamethasone. Simultaneous addition of dexamethasone with IL-33 had no effect on the phosphorylation of MAP kinases or NFκB p65 subunit; however, dexamethasone antagonized AP-1- and NFκB-mediated transcriptional activity. Intraperitoneal administration of dexamethasone completely abrogated IL-33-mediated peritoneal neutrophil recruitment and prevented plasma IL-6 elevation. These data demonstrate that steroid therapy may be an effective means of antagonizing the effects of IL-33 on mast cells in vitro and in vivo, acting partly by suppressing IL-33-induced NFκB and AP-1 activity.

  13. The Non-Benzodiazepine Anxiolytic Drug Etifoxine Causes a Rapid, Receptor-Independent Stimulation of Neurosteroid Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    do Rego, Jean Luc; Vaudry, David; Vaudry, Hubert

    2015-01-01

    Neurosteroids can modulate the activity of the GABAA receptors, and thus affect anxiety-like behaviors. The non-benzodiazepine anxiolytic compound etifoxine has been shown to increase neurosteroid concentrations in brain tissue but the mode of action of etifoxine on neurosteroid formation has not yet been elucidated. In the present study, we have thus investigated the effect and the mechanism of action of etifoxine on neurosteroid biosynthesis using the frog hypothalamus as an experimental model. Exposure of frog hypothalamic explants to graded concentrations of etifoxine produced a dose-dependent increase in the biosynthesis of 17-hydroxypregnenolone, dehydroepiandrosterone, progesterone and tetrahydroprogesterone, associated with a decrease in the production of dihydroprogesterone. Time-course experiments revealed that a 15-min incubation of hypothalamic explants with etifoxine was sufficient to induce a robust increase in neurosteroid synthesis, suggesting that etifoxine activates steroidogenic enzymes at a post-translational level. Etifoxine-evoked neurosteroid biosynthesis was not affected by the central-type benzodiazepine (CBR) receptor antagonist flumazenil, the translocator protein (TSPO) antagonist PK11195 or the GABAA receptor antagonist bicuculline. In addition, the stimulatory effects of etifoxine and the triakontatetraneuropeptide TTN, a TSPO agonist, were additive, indicating that these two compounds act through distinct mechanisms. Etifoxine also induced a rapid stimulation of neurosteroid biosynthesis from frog hypothalamus homogenates, a preparation in which membrane receptor signalling is disrupted. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates that etifoxine stimulates neurosteroid production through a membrane receptor-independent mechanism. PMID:25785994

  14. Median nerve stimulation prevents atrial electrical remodelling and inflammation in a canine model with rapid atrial pacing.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qingyan; Zhang, Shudi; Zhao, Hongyi; Zhang, Shujuan; Dai, Zixuan; Qian, Yongsheng; Zhang, Youjing; Wang, Xi; Tang, Yanhong; Huang, Congxin

    2017-03-31

    Studies have shown that stellate ganglion nerve activity has association with atrial electrical remodelling and atrial fibrillation (AF) inducibility, while median nerve stimulation (MNS) decreases cardiac sympathetic drive. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that MNS suppresses atrial electrical remodelling and AF vulnerability. The atrial effective refractory period (AERP) and AF inducibility at baseline and after 3 h of rapid atrial pacing were determined in dogs undergoing MNS (n = 7), MNS+ application of methyllycaconitine (n = 7) or sham procedure (n = 6). Then, the levels of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-a), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and acetylcholine (Ach) in the plasma and atrial tissues were measured. The control dogs (n = 4) were assigned to measure atrial inflammation cytokines. Short-term rapid atrial pacing induced shortening of the AERP, an increase in AERP dispersion, and an increase AF vulnerability in the sham dogs, which were all suppressed by MNS. Levels of TNF-a and IL-6 were higher, and Ach levels were lower in the left and the right atrium in the sham dogs than in the MNS dogs. Methyllycaconitine blunted the effects of MNS on the AERP, AERP dispersion, the AF vulnerability, and TNF-a and IL-6 levels in the atrium, but had no impact on the levels of Ach. The effects of MNS on atrial electrical remodelling and AF inducibility might be associated with the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway.

  15. Flash-and-Freeze: Coordinating Optogenetic Stimulation with Rapid Freezing to Visualize Membrane Dynamics at Synapses with Millisecond Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Shigeki

    2016-01-01

    Electron microscopy depicts subcellular structures at synapses exquisitely but only captures static images. To visualize membrane dynamics, we have developed a novel technique, called flash-and-freeze, which induces neuronal activity with a flash of light and captures the membrane dynamics by rapid freezing. For characterizing membrane movements during synaptic transmission, a light-sensitive cation channel, channelrhodopsin, is heterologously expressed in mouse hippocampal neurons or in Caenorhabditis elegans motor neurons. A brief pulse of blue light activates channelrhodopsin and induces an action potential, leading to synaptic transmission. Following the light stimulation, neurons are frozen at different time intervals ranging from 10 ms to 20 s. Electron micrographs are then acquired from each time point to visualize the morphological changes. Using this approach, we have characterized a novel form of endocytosis, ultrafast endocytosis, which rapidly removes excess membrane added to the surface during neurotransmission. The flash-and-freeze approach can be adapted to study other cellular phenomena that can be induced by light-sensitive genetic or pharmacological tools. PMID:27594835

  16. The ITER project construction status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motojima, O.

    2015-10-01

    The pace of the ITER project in St Paul-lez-Durance, France is accelerating rapidly into its peak construction phase. With the completion of the B2 slab in August 2014, which will support about 400 000 metric tons of the tokamak complex structures and components, the construction is advancing on a daily basis. Magnet, vacuum vessel, cryostat, thermal shield, first wall and divertor structures are under construction or in prototype phase in the ITER member states of China, Europe, India, Japan, Korea, Russia, and the United States. Each of these member states has its own domestic agency (DA) to manage their procurements of components for ITER. Plant systems engineering is being transformed to fully integrate the tokamak and its auxiliary systems in preparation for the assembly and operations phase. CODAC, diagnostics, and the three main heating and current drive systems are also progressing, including the construction of the neutral beam test facility building in Padua, Italy. The conceptual design of the Chinese test blanket module system for ITER has been completed and those of the EU are well under way. Significant progress has been made addressing several outstanding physics issues including disruption load characterization, prediction, avoidance, and mitigation, first wall and divertor shaping, edge pedestal and SOL plasma stability, fuelling and plasma behaviour during confinement transients and W impurity transport. Further development of the ITER Research Plan has included a definition of the required plant configuration for 1st plasma and subsequent phases of ITER operation as well as the major plasma commissioning activities and the needs of the accompanying R&D program to ITER construction by the ITER parties.

  17. Vagal nerve stimulation rapidly activates brain-derived neurotrophic factor receptor TrkB in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Furmaga, Havan; Carreno, Flavia Regina; Frazer, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Vagal nerve stimulation (VNS) has been approved for treatment-resistant depression. Many antidepressants increase expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in brain or activate, via phosphorylation, its receptor, TrkB. There have been no studies yet of whether VNS would also cause phosphorylation of TrkB. Western blot analysis was used to evaluate the phosphorylation status of TrkB in the hippocampus of rats administered VNS either acutely or chronically. Acute effects of VNS were compared with those caused by fluoxetine or desipramine (DMI) whereas its chronic effects were compared with those of sertraline or DMI. All treatments, given either acutely or chronically, significantly elevated phosphorylation of tyrosines 705 and 816 on TrkB in the hippocampus. However, only VNS increased the phosphorylation of tyrosine 515, with both acute and chronic administration causing this effect. Pretreatment with K252a, a nonspecific tyrosine kinase inhibitor, blocked the phosphorylation caused by acute VNS at all three tyrosines. Downstream effectors of Y515, namely Akt and ERK, were also phosphorylated after acute treatment with VNS, whereas DMI did not cause this effect. VNS rapidly activates TrkB phosphorylation and this effect persists over time. VNS-induced phosphorylation of tyrosine 515 is distinct from the effect of standard antidepressant drugs.

  18. Rapid Categorization of Human and Ape Faces in 9-Month-Old Infants Revealed by Fast Periodic Visual Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Peykarjou, Stefanie; Hoehl, Stefanie; Pauen, Sabina; Rossion, Bruno

    2017-10-02

    This study investigates categorization of human and ape faces in 9-month-olds using a Fast Periodic Visual Stimulation (FPVS) paradigm while measuring EEG. Categorization responses are elicited only if infants discriminate between different categories and generalize across exemplars within each category. In study 1, human or ape faces were presented as standard and deviant stimuli in upright and inverted trials. Upright ape faces presented among humans elicited strong categorization responses, whereas responses for upright human faces and for inverted ape faces were smaller. Deviant inverted human faces did not elicit categorization. Data were best explained by a model with main effects of species and orientation. However, variance of low-level image characteristics was higher for the ape than the human category. Variance was matched to replicate this finding in an independent sample (study 2). Both human and ape faces elicited categorization in upright and inverted conditions, but upright ape faces elicited the strongest responses. Again, data were best explained by a model of two main effects. These experiments demonstrate that 9-month-olds rapidly categorize faces, and unfamiliar faces presented among human faces elicit increased categorization responses. This likely reflects habituation for the familiar standard category, and stronger release for the unfamiliar category deviants.

  19. Pressure overload stimulated cardiac hypertrophy leads to a rapid decrease in the mRNA for creatine kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Boheler, K.; Popovich, B.; Dillmann, W.H.

    1987-05-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy (CH) leads to a decrease in creatine kinase (CK) enzymatic activity. To determine if the mRNA for CK also decreases with CH, they performed the following studies. Cardiac RNA was isolated from rats subjected to either abdominal aortic stenosis (AS) or sham surgery. Through Northern blot analysis, total cardiac RNA was quantitated with a CK specific /sup 32/P-labelled cDNA clone. At 3 and 8 days post-constriction, the mRNA for CK decreases by 54.6 +/- 7% and 65.3 +/- 18% respectively, whereas the heart weight increases by 19% and 37% relative to controls. Further studies indicate that CK mRNA also decreases by 41.8% in hypothyroid rats (Tx) but decreases by a total of 68.1% in Tx rats subjected to 8 days of AS. Pressure overload stimulated CH leads to a rapid decrease in CK mRNA in normal and Tx rats. This CK mRNA decrease may account for the decreased efficiency of contraction seen in CH.

  20. Runaway electrons and ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boozer, Allen H.

    2017-05-01

    The potential for damage, the magnitude of the extrapolation, and the importance of the atypical—incidents that occur once in a thousand shots—make theory and simulation essential for ensuring that relativistic runaway electrons will not prevent ITER from achieving its mission. Most of the theoretical literature on electron runaway assumes magnetic surfaces exist. ITER planning for the avoidance of halo and runaway currents is focused on massive-gas or shattered-pellet injection of impurities. In simulations of experiments, such injections lead to a rapid large-scale magnetic-surface breakup. Surface breakup, which is a magnetic reconnection, can occur on a quasi-ideal Alfvénic time scale when the resistance is sufficiently small. Nevertheless, the removal of the bulk of the poloidal flux, as in halo-current mitigation, is on a resistive time scale. The acceleration of electrons to relativistic energies requires the confinement of some tubes of magnetic flux within the plasma and a resistive time scale. The interpretation of experiments on existing tokamaks and their extrapolation to ITER should carefully distinguish confined versus unconfined magnetic field lines and quasi-ideal versus resistive evolution. The separation of quasi-ideal from resistive evolution is extremely challenging numerically, but is greatly simplified by constraints of Maxwell’s equations, and in particular those associated with magnetic helicity. The physics of electron runaway along confined magnetic field lines is clarified by relations among the poloidal flux change required for an e-fold in the number of electrons, the energy distribution of the relativistic electrons, and the number of relativistic electron strikes that can be expected in a single disruption event.

  1. Persistent Graves' hyperthyroidism despite rapid negative conversion of thyroid-stimulating hormone-binding inhibitory immunoglobulin assay results: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ohara, Nobumasa; Kaneko, Masanori; Kitazawa, Masaru; Uemura, Yasuyuki; Minagawa, Shinichi; Miyakoshi, Masashi; Kaneko, Kenzo; Kamoi, Kyuzi

    2017-02-06

    Graves' disease is an autoimmune thyroid disorder characterized by hyperthyroidism, and patients exhibit thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor antibody. The major methods of measuring circulating thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor antibody include the thyroid-stimulating hormone-binding inhibitory immunoglobulin assays. Although the diagnostic accuracy of these assays has been improved, a minority of patients with Graves' disease test negative even on second-generation and third-generation thyroid-stimulating hormone-binding inhibitory immunoglobulins. We report a rare case of a thyroid-stimulating hormone-binding inhibitory immunoglobulin-positive patient with Graves' disease who showed rapid lowering of thyroid-stimulating hormone-binding inhibitory immunoglobulin levels following administration of the anti-thyroid drug thiamazole, but still experienced Graves' hyperthyroidism. A 45-year-old Japanese man presented with severe hyperthyroidism (serum free triiodothyronine >25.0 pg/mL; reference range 1.7 to 3.7 pg/mL) and tested weakly positive for thyroid-stimulating hormone-binding inhibitory immunoglobulins on second-generation tests (2.1 IU/L; reference range <1.0 IU/L). Within 9 months of treatment with oral thiamazole (30 mg/day), his thyroid-stimulating hormone-binding inhibitory immunoglobulin titers had normalized, but he experienced sustained hyperthyroidism for more than 8 years, requiring 15 mg/day of thiamazole to correct. During that period, he tested negative on all first-generation, second-generation, and third-generation thyroid-stimulating hormone-binding inhibitory immunoglobulin assays, but thyroid scintigraphy revealed diffuse and increased uptake, and thyroid ultrasound and color flow Doppler imaging showed typical findings of Graves' hyperthyroidism. The possible explanations for serial changes in the thyroid-stimulating hormone-binding inhibitory immunoglobulin results in our patient include the presence of thyroid-stimulating

  2. β-Adrenergic stimulation and rapid pacing mutually promote heterogeneous electrical failure and ventricular fibrillation in the globally ischemic heart.

    PubMed

    Garg, Vivek; Taylor, Tyson; Warren, Mark; Venable, Paul; Sciuto, Katie; Shibayama, Junko; Zaitsev, Alexey

    2015-05-01

    Global ischemia, catecholamine surge, and rapid heart rhythm (RHR) due to ventricular tachycardia or ventricular fibrillation (VF) are the three major factors of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA). Loss of excitability culminating in global electrical failure (asystole) is the major adverse outcome of SCA with increasing prevalence worldwide. The roles of catecholamines and RHR in the electrical failure during SCA remain unclear. We hypothesized that both β-adrenergic stimulation (βAS) and RHR accelerate electrical failure in the globally ischemic heart. We performed optical mapping of the action potential (OAP) in the right ventricular (RV) and left (LV) ventricular epicardium of isolated rabbit hearts subjected to 30-min global ischemia. Hearts were paced at a cycle length of either 300 or 200 ms, and either in the presence or in the absence of β-agonist isoproterenol (30 nM). 2,3-Butanedione monoxime (20 mM) was used to reduce motion artifact. We found that RHR and βAS synergistically accelerated the decline of the OAP upstroke velocity and the progressive expansion of inexcitable regions. Under all conditions, inexcitability developed faster in the LV than in the RV. At the same time, both RHR and βAS shortened the time to VF (TVF) during ischemia. Moreover, the time at which 10% of the mapped LV area became inexcitable strongly correlated with TVF (R(2) = 0 .72, P < 0.0001). We conclude that both βAS and RHR are major factors of electrical depression and failure in the globally ischemic heart and may contribute to adverse outcomes of SCA such as asystole and recurrent/persistent VF. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  3. Initial neighborhood biases and the quality of motion stimulation jointly influence the rapid emergence of direction preference in visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Van Hooser, Stephen D; Li, Ye; Christensson, Maria; Smith, Gordon B; White, Leonard E; Fitzpatrick, David

    2012-05-23

    Visual experience plays a critical role in the development of direction-selective responses in ferret visual cortex. In visually naive animals, presentation of a bidirectional "training" stimulus induces rapid increases in the direction-selective responses of single neurons that can be predicted by small but significant direction biases that are present in neighboring neurons at the onset of stimulation. In this study we used in vivo two-photon imaging of calcium signals to further explore the contribution of visual experience to the emergence of direction- selective responses in ferret visual cortex. The first set of experiments was designed to determine whether visual experience is required for the development of the initial neighborhood bias. In animals that were dark-reared until the time of eye opening, we found that individual neurons exhibited weak direction-selective responses accompanied by a reduced but statistically significant neighborhood bias, indicating that both features arise without the need for visual experience. The second set of experiments used a unidirectional training stimulus to assess the relative roles of the neighborhood bias and visual experience in determining the direction preference that cortical neurons acquire during direction training. We found that neurons became more responsive to the trained direction even when they were located in regions of the cortex with an initial neighborhood bias for the direction opposite the training stimulus. Together, these results suggest an adaptive developmental strategy for the elaboration of direction-selective responses, one in which experience-independent mechanisms provide a symmetry-breaking seed for the instructive effects of visual experience.

  4. β-Adrenergic stimulation and rapid pacing mutually promote heterogeneous electrical failure and ventricular fibrillation in the globally ischemic heart

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Vivek; Taylor, Tyson; Warren, Mark; Venable, Paul; Sciuto, Katie; Shibayama, Junko

    2015-01-01

    Global ischemia, catecholamine surge, and rapid heart rhythm (RHR) due to ventricular tachycardia or ventricular fibrillation (VF) are the three major factors of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA). Loss of excitability culminating in global electrical failure (asystole) is the major adverse outcome of SCA with increasing prevalence worldwide. The roles of catecholamines and RHR in the electrical failure during SCA remain unclear. We hypothesized that both β-adrenergic stimulation (βAS) and RHR accelerate electrical failure in the globally ischemic heart. We performed optical mapping of the action potential (OAP) in the right ventricular (RV) and left (LV) ventricular epicardium of isolated rabbit hearts subjected to 30-min global ischemia. Hearts were paced at a cycle length of either 300 or 200 ms, and either in the presence or in the absence of β-agonist isoproterenol (30 nM). 2,3-Butanedione monoxime (20 mM) was used to reduce motion artifact. We found that RHR and βAS synergistically accelerated the decline of the OAP upstroke velocity and the progressive expansion of inexcitable regions. Under all conditions, inexcitability developed faster in the LV than in the RV. At the same time, both RHR and βAS shortened the time to VF (TVF) during ischemia. Moreover, the time at which 10% of the mapped LV area became inexcitable strongly correlated with TVF (R2 = 0 .72, P < 0.0001). We conclude that both βAS and RHR are major factors of electrical depression and failure in the globally ischemic heart and may contribute to adverse outcomes of SCA such as asystole and recurrent/persistent VF. PMID:25713306

  5. US ITER Moving Forward

    ScienceCinema

    US ITER / ORNL

    2016-07-12

    US ITER Project Manager Ned Sauthoff, joined by Wayne Reiersen, Team Leader Magnet Systems, and Jan Berry, Team Leader Tokamak Cooling System, discuss the U.S.'s role in the ITER international collaboration.

  6. Iter and Ornl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uckan, N. A.; Milora, S. L.

    2004-11-01

    ITER (means ``the way''), a tokamak burning plasma experiment, is the next step device toward making fusion energy a reality. The programmatic objective of ITER is to demonstrate the scientific and technological feasibility of fusion energy for peaceful purposes. ITER began in 1985 as collaboration between the Russian Federation (former Soviet Union), the USA, European Union, and Japan. ITER conceptual and engineering design activities led to a detailed design in 2001. The USA opted out of the project between 1999-2003, but rejoined in 2004 for site selection and construction negotiations. China and Korea joined the project in 2003. Negotiations are continuing and a decision on the site for ITER construction [France versus Japan] is pending. The ITER international undertaking is an unprecedented scale and the six ITER parties represent 40% of the world population. By 2018, ITER will produce a fusion power of 500 million Watts for time periods up to an hour with one-tenth of the power needed to sustain it. Steady state operation is also possible at lower power levels with higher fraction of circulated power. The ITER parties invested about $1 billion into the research and development (R) and related fusion experiments to establish the ITER's feasibility. ORNL has been a key player in the ITER project and contributed to its physics and engineering design and related R since its inception. Recently, the U.S. DOE selected the PPPL/ORNL partnership to lead the U.S. project office for ITER.

  7. Rapid G0/1 transition and cell cycle progression in CD8(+) T cells compared to CD4(+) T cells following in vitro stimulation.

    PubMed

    Mishima, Takuya; Fukaya, Shotaro; Toda, Shoko; Ando, Yoshiaki; Matsunaga, Tsukasa; Inobe, Manabu

    2017-04-01

    T cell population consists of two major subsets, CD4(+) T cells and CD8(+) T cells, which can be distinguished by the expression of CD4 or CD8 molecules, respectively. Although they play quite different roles in an immune system, many of their basic cellular processes such as proliferation following stimulation are presumably common. In this study, we have carefully analyzed time course of G0/1 transition as well as cell cycle progression in the two subsets of quiescent T cell population following in vitro growth stimulation. We found that CD8(+) T cells promote G0/1 transition more rapidly and drive their cell cycle progression faster compared to CD4(+) T cells. In addition, expression of CD25 and effects of its blockade revealed that IL-2 is implicated in the rapid progression, but not the earlier G0/1 transition, of CD8(+) T cells.

  8. Iterated fractional Tikhonov regularization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchi, Davide; Buccini, Alessandro; Donatelli, Marco; Serra-Capizzano, Stefano

    2015-05-01

    Fractional Tikhonov regularization methods have been recently proposed to reduce the oversmoothing property of the Tikhonov regularization in standard form, in order to preserve the details of the approximated solution. Their regularization and convergence properties have been previously investigated showing that they are of optimal order. This paper provides saturation and converse results on their convergence rates. Using the same iterative refinement strategy of iterated Tikhonov regularization, new iterated fractional Tikhonov regularization methods are introduced. We show that these iterated methods are of optimal order and overcome the previous saturation results. Furthermore, nonstationary iterated fractional Tikhonov regularization methods are investigated, establishing their convergence rate under general conditions on the iteration parameters. Numerical results confirm the effectiveness of the proposed regularization iterations.

  9. Selective autonomic stimulation of the AV node fat pad to control rapid post-operative atrial arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Mercader, Marco A; He, Dingchao; Sharma, Aditya C; Marchitto, Mark C; Trachiotis, Gregory; Bornzin, Gene A; Jonas, Richard; Moak, Jeffrey P

    2017-01-01

    Junctional ectopic tachycardia (JET) and atrial fibrillation (AF) occur in patients recovering from open-heart surgery (OHS). Pharmacologic treatment is used for the control of post-operative atrial arrhythmias (POAA), but is associated with side effects. There is a need for a reversible, modulated solution to rate control. We propose a non-pharmacologic technique that can modulate AV nodal conduction in a selective fashion. Ten mongrel dogs underwent OHS. Stimulation of the anterior right (AR) and inferior right (IR) fat pad (FP) was done using a 7-pole electrode. The IR was more effective in slowing the ventricular rate (VR) to AF (52 +/- 20 vs. 15 +/- 10%, p = 0.003) and JET (12 +/- 7 vs. 0 +/- 0%, p = 0.02). Selective site stimulation within a FP region could augment the effect of stimulation during AF (57 +/- 20% (maximum effect) vs. 0 +/- 0% (minimum effect), p<0.001). FP stimulation at increasing stimulation voltage (SV) demonstrated a voltage-dependent effect (8 +/- 14% (low V) vs. 63 +/- 17 (high V) %, p<0.001). In summary, AV node fat pad stimulation had a selective effect on the AV node by decreasing AV nodal conduction, with little effect on atrial activity.

  10. Clinical significance of rapid ventricular tachycardia (> 270 beats per minute) provoked at programmed stimulation in patients without confirmed rapid ventricular arrhythmias.

    PubMed Central

    Brembilla-Perrot, B; Terrier de la Chaise, A; Briançon, S; Takoordial, M; Suty-Selton, C; Thiel, B; Brua, J L

    1993-01-01

    Rapid uniform ventricular tachycardia (VT) (> 270 beats/min) or ventricular flutter induced during electrophysiological studies is thought not to be clinically significant in patients without cardiac arrest or documented rapid VT. The purpose of the study was to follow up 73 patients with inducible ventricular flutter but without confirmed rapid spontaneous VT. A long follow up (mean 3.5 years) identified two groups of patients. The first group had an excellent outcome and was characterised by a normal 24 hour Holter monitoring. In the second group, however, the risk of cardiac mortality was high (35%) and spontaneous VT was < 270 beats/min (26%) and was characterised by couplets or salvos of extrasystoles on Holter monitoring. In this group the history of syncope and decreased left ejection fraction increased the risk of mortality and VT. The presence of late potentials increased the risk of spontaneous VT. Electrophysiologically guided antiarrhythmic therapy reduced the risk of VT. Ventricular flutter was a non-specific finding in patients with normal Holter monitoring. In contrast, in patients with salvos of extrasystoles, ventricular flutter was associated with a high risk of cardiac mortality and VT. PMID:8457388

  11. Stimulation and Inhibition of Anaerobic Digestion by Nickel and Cobalt: A Rapid Assessment Using the Resazurin Reduction Assay.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian Lin; Steele, Terry W J; Stuckey, David C

    2016-10-03

    Stimulation of anaerobic digestion by essential trace metals is beneficial from a practical point of view to enhance the biodegradability and degradation rate of wastes. Hence, a quick method to determine which metal species, and at what concentration, can optimize anaerobic digestion is of great interest to both researchers and operators. In this present study, we investigated the effect of nickel(II), cobalt(II), and their mixture, on the anaerobic digestion of synthetic municipal wastewater. Using a volumetric method, that is, measuring methane production over time, revealed that anaerobic digestion was stimulated by the addition of 5 mg L(-1) nickel(II), and cobalt(II), and their mixture in day(s). However, using a novel resazurin reduction assay, and based on its change in rate over time, we evaluated both inhibition at 250 mg L(-1) nickel(II) and cobalt(II), and also the stimulatory effect of 5 mg L(-1) nickel(II), and cobalt(II), and their mixture, in just 6 h. By investigating the dynamic distribution of these metals in the liquid phase of the anaerobic system and kinetics of resazurin reduction by nickel spiked anaerobic sludge, the concentration of nickel(II) on anaerobic digestion performance was profiled. Three critical concentrations were determined; stimulation starting (around 1 mg L(-1)), stimulation ending (around 100 mg L(-1)) and stimulation maximizing (around 10 mg L(-1)). Hence, we propose that the resazurin reduction assay is a novel and quick protocol for studying the stimulation of anaerobic bioprocesses by bioavailable essential trace metals.

  12. Phosphorylation of rat kidney Na-K pump at Ser938 is required for rapid angiotensin II-dependent stimulation of activity and trafficking in proximal tubule cells.

    PubMed

    Massey, Katherine J; Li, Quanwen; Rossi, Noreen F; Keezer, Susan M; Mattingly, Raymond R; Yingst, Douglas R

    2016-02-01

    How angiotensin (ANG) II acutely stimulates the Na-K pump in proximal tubules is only partially understood, limiting insight into how ANG II increases blood pressure. First, we tested whether ANG II increases the number of pumps in plasma membranes of native rat proximal tubules under conditions of rapid activation. We found that exposure to 100 pM ANG II for 2 min, which was previously shown to increase affinity of the Na-K pump for Na and stimulate activity threefold, increased the amount of the Na-K pump in plasma membranes of native tubules by 33%. Second, we tested whether previously observed increases in phosphorylation of the Na-K pump at Ser(938) were part of the stimulatory mechanism. These experiments were carried out in opossum kidney cells, cultured proximal tubules stably coexpressing the ANG type 1 (AT1) receptor, and either wild-type or a S938A mutant of rat kidney Na-K pump under conditions found by others to stimulate activity. We found that 10 min of incubation in 10 pM ANG II stimulated activity of wild-type pumps from 2.3 to 3.5 nmol K · mg protein(-1) · min(-1) and increased the amount of the pump in the plasma membrane by 80% but had no effect on cells expressing the S938A mutant. We conclude that acute stimulation of Na-K pump activity in native rat proximal tubules includes increased trafficking to the plasma membrane and that phosphorylation at Ser(938) is part of the mechanism by which ANG II directly stimulates activity and trafficking of the rat kidney Na-K pump in opossum kidney cells.

  13. Phosphorylation of rat kidney Na-K pump at Ser938 is required for rapid angiotensin II-dependent stimulation of activity and trafficking in proximal tubule cells

    PubMed Central

    Massey, Katherine J.; Li, Quanwen; Rossi, Noreen F.; Keezer, Susan M.; Mattingly, Raymond R.

    2015-01-01

    How angiotensin (ANG) II acutely stimulates the Na-K pump in proximal tubules is only partially understood, limiting insight into how ANG II increases blood pressure. First, we tested whether ANG II increases the number of pumps in plasma membranes of native rat proximal tubules under conditions of rapid activation. We found that exposure to 100 pM ANG II for 2 min, which was previously shown to increase affinity of the Na-K pump for Na and stimulate activity threefold, increased the amount of the Na-K pump in plasma membranes of native tubules by 33%. Second, we tested whether previously observed increases in phosphorylation of the Na-K pump at Ser938 were part of the stimulatory mechanism. These experiments were carried out in opossum kidney cells, cultured proximal tubules stably coexpressing the ANG type 1 (AT1) receptor, and either wild-type or a S938A mutant of rat kidney Na-K pump under conditions found by others to stimulate activity. We found that 10 min of incubation in 10 pM ANG II stimulated activity of wild-type pumps from 2.3 to 3.5 nmol K·mg protein−1·min−1 and increased the amount of the pump in the plasma membrane by 80% but had no effect on cells expressing the S938A mutant. We conclude that acute stimulation of Na-K pump activity in native rat proximal tubules includes increased trafficking to the plasma membrane and that phosphorylation at Ser938 is part of the mechanism by which ANG II directly stimulates activity and trafficking of the rat kidney Na-K pump in opossum kidney cells. PMID:26582472

  14. Rapid phosphorylation of Elk-1 transcription factor and activation of MAP kinase signal transduction pathways in response to visual stimulation.

    PubMed

    Kaminska, B; Kaczmarek, L; Zangenehpour, S; Chaudhuri, A

    1999-06-01

    The AP-1 transcription factor, which is composed of various combinations of Fos and Jun proteins, is believed to be a key participant in molecular processes that guide activity-dependent changes in gene expression. In this study, we investigated the activity of different MAP kinases that have been implicated in AP-1 activation. We examined the activities of ERK, JNK/SAPK, and p38 MAPK along with their nuclear targets (Elk-1 and c-Jun) in rat visual cortex after light stimulation. The transcription factor Elk-1 (a possible regulator of c-fos expression) was found to be transiently modified by phosphorylation when visual stimulation was applied after a period of dark rearing. In vitro kinase assay with Elk-1 as substrate showed that light stimulation activated MAPK/ERK in visual cortex but not frontal cortex. Furthermore, ERK activation was temporally matched to onset of Elk-1 phosphorylation. The activity of JNK1 (c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1) was elevated at 2-6 h after visual exposure and was also temporally correlated to increase of endogenous P-c-Jun levels and its appearance within the AP-1 DNA-binding complex. The activities of p38 MAP kinases did not change significantly. These results demonstrate the differential engagement of MAPK signaling pathways following sensory stimulation and their relative effects upon AP-1 expression in the intact brain. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  15. Iteration, Not Induction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobbs, David E.

    2009-01-01

    The main purpose of this note is to present and justify proof via iteration as an intuitive, creative and empowering method that is often available and preferable as an alternative to proofs via either mathematical induction or the well-ordering principle. The method of iteration depends only on the fact that any strictly decreasing sequence of…

  16. Iteration, Not Induction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobbs, David E.

    2009-01-01

    The main purpose of this note is to present and justify proof via iteration as an intuitive, creative and empowering method that is often available and preferable as an alternative to proofs via either mathematical induction or the well-ordering principle. The method of iteration depends only on the fact that any strictly decreasing sequence of…

  17. Rapid loss of adiponectin-stimulated fatty acid oxidation in skeletal muscle of rats fed a high fat diet is not due to altered muscle redox state.

    PubMed

    Ritchie, Ian R W; Dyck, David J

    2012-01-01

    A high fat (HF) diet rapidly impairs the ability of adiponectin (Ad) to stimulate fatty acid (FA) oxidation in oxidative soleus muscle, but the underlying mechanism remains elusive. Mere days of HF feeding also increase the muscle's production and accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and shift cellular redox to a more oxidized state. It seems plausible that this shift towards a more oxidized state might act as negative feedback to suppress the ability of Ad to stimulate FA oxidation and generate more ROS. Therefore, we sought to determine whether i) a shift towards a more oxidized redox state (reduction in GSH/2GSSG) coincided with impaired Ad-stimulated palmitate oxidation in oxidative and glycolytic rodent muscle after 5 days of HF feeding (60% kCal), and ii) if supplementation with the antioxidant, N-acetylcysteine (NAC) could prevent the HF-diet induced impairment in Ad-response. Globular Ad (gAd) increased palmitate oxidation in isolated soleus and EDL muscles by 42% and 34%, respectively (p<0.05) but this was attenuated with HF feeding in both muscles. HF feeding decreased total GSH (-26%, p<0.05) and GSH/2GSSG (-49%, p<0.05) in soleus, but not EDL. Supplementation with NAC prevented the HF diet-induced reductions in GSH and GSH/2GSSG in soleus, but did not prevent the loss of Ad response in either muscle. Furthermore, direct incubations with H(2)O(2) did not impair Ad-stimulated FA oxidation in either muscle. In conclusion, our data indicates that skeletal muscle Ad resistance is rapidly induced in both oxidative and glycolytic muscle, independently of altered cellular redox state.

  18. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor beta stimulation induces rapid cardiac growth and angiogenesis via direct activation of calcineurin.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Nicole; Jehl-Piétri, Chantal; Lopez, Pascal; Murdaca, Joseph; Giordano, Christian; Schwartz, Chantal; Gounon, Pierre; Hatem, Stéphane N; Grimaldi, Paul; Wagner, Kay-Dietrich

    2009-07-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are ligand-activated transcription factors. PPARbeta agonists were suggested as potential drugs for the treatment of metabolic syndrome, but effects of PPARbeta activation on cardiac growth and vascularization are unknown. Thus, we investigated the consequences of pharmacological PPARbeta activation on the heart and the underlying molecular mechanisms. Male C57/Bl6 mice were injected with the specific PPARbeta agonists GW0742 or GW501516, or vehicle. Cardiomyocyte size and vascularisation were determined at different time points. Expression differences were investigated by quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and western blotting. In addition, the effects of PPARbeta stimulation were compared with hearts of mice undergoing long-term voluntary exercise or pharmacological PPARalpha activation. Five hours after GW0742 injection, we detected an enhanced angiogenesis compared with vehicle-injected controls. After 24 h, the heart-to-body weight ratios were higher in mice injected with either GW0742 or GW501516 vs. controls. The increased heart size was due to cardiomyocyte enlargement. No signs of pathological cardiac hypertrophy (i.e. apoptosis, fibrosis, or deteriorated cardiac function) could be detected. The effects are mediated via calcineurin A (CnA) activation as: (i) CnA was upregulated, (ii) GW0742 administration or co-transfection of PPARbeta significantly stimulated the activity of the CnA promoter, (iii) PPARbeta protein bound directly to the CnA promoter, (iv) the CnA target genes NFATc3, Hif-1alpha, and Cdk 9 were upregulated in response to PPARbeta stimulation, and (v) the inhibition of CnA activity by cyclosporine A abolished the hypertrophic and angiogenic responses to PPARbeta stimulation. Our data suggest PPARbeta pharmacological activation as a novel approach to increase cardiac vascularization and cardiac muscle mass.

  19. A Low-Cost Multielectrode System for Data Acquisition Enabling Real-Time Closed-Loop Processing with Rapid Recovery from Stimulation Artifacts

    PubMed Central

    Rolston, John D.; Gross, Robert E.; Potter, Steve M.

    2009-01-01

    Commercially available data acquisition systems for multielectrode recording from freely moving animals are expensive, often rely on proprietary software, and do not provide detailed, modifiable circuit schematics. When used in conjunction with electrical stimulation, they are prone to prolonged, saturating stimulation artifacts that prevent the recording of short-latency evoked responses. Yet electrical stimulation is integral to many experimental designs, and critical for emerging brain-computer interfacing and neuroprosthetic applications. To address these issues, we developed an easy-to-use, modifiable, and inexpensive system for multielectrode neural recording and stimulation. Setup costs are less than US$10,000 for 64 channels, an order of magnitude lower than comparable commercial systems. Unlike commercial equipment, the system recovers rapidly from stimulation and allows short-latency action potentials (<1 ms post-stimulus) to be detected, facilitating closed-loop applications and exposing neural activity that would otherwise remain hidden. To illustrate this capability, evoked activity from microstimulation of the rodent hippocampus is presented. System noise levels are similar to existing platforms, and extracellular action potentials and local field potentials can be recorded simultaneously. The system is modular, in banks of 16 channels, and flexible in usage: while primarily designed for in vivo use, it can be combined with commercial preamplifiers to record from in vitro multielectrode arrays. The system's open-source control software, NeuroRighter, is implemented in C#, with an easy-to-use graphical interface. As C# functions in a managed code environment, which may impact performance, analysis was conducted to ensure comparable speed to C++ for this application. Hardware schematics, layout files, and software are freely available. Since maintaining wired headstage connections with freely moving animals is difficult, we describe a new method of

  20. A low-cost multielectrode system for data acquisition enabling real-time closed-loop processing with rapid recovery from stimulation artifacts.

    PubMed

    Rolston, John D; Gross, Robert E; Potter, Steve M

    2009-01-01

    Commercially available data acquisition systems for multielectrode recording from freely moving animals are expensive, often rely on proprietary software, and do not provide detailed, modifiable circuit schematics. When used in conjunction with electrical stimulation, they are prone to prolonged, saturating stimulation artifacts that prevent the recording of short-latency evoked responses. Yet electrical stimulation is integral to many experimental designs, and critical for emerging brain-computer interfacing and neuroprosthetic applications. To address these issues, we developed an easy-to-use, modifiable, and inexpensive system for multielectrode neural recording and stimulation. Setup costs are less than US$10,000 for 64 channels, an order of magnitude lower than comparable commercial systems. Unlike commercial equipment, the system recovers rapidly from stimulation and allows short-latency action potentials (<1 ms post-stimulus) to be detected, facilitating closed-loop applications and exposing neural activity that would otherwise remain hidden. To illustrate this capability, evoked activity from microstimulation of the rodent hippocampus is presented. System noise levels are similar to existing platforms, and extracellular action potentials and local field potentials can be recorded simultaneously. The system is modular, in banks of 16 channels, and flexible in usage: while primarily designed for in vivo use, it can be combined with commercial preamplifiers to record from in vitro multielectrode arrays. The system's open-source control software, NeuroRighter, is implemented in C#, with an easy-to-use graphical interface. As C# functions in a managed code environment, which may impact performance, analysis was conducted to ensure comparable speed to C++ for this application. Hardware schematics, layout files, and software are freely available. Since maintaining wired headstage connections with freely moving animals is difficult, we describe a new method of

  1. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor stimulates JAK2 signaling pathway and rapidly activates p93fes, STAT1 p91, and STAT3 p92 in polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Brizzi, M F; Aronica, M G; Rosso, A; Bagnara, G P; Yarden, Y; Pegoraro, L

    1996-02-16

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), supports proliferation, differentiation, and functional activation of hemopoietic cells by its interaction with a heterodimeric receptor. Although GM-CSF receptor is devoid of tyrosine kinase enzymatic activity, GM-CSF-induced peripheral blood polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) functional activation is mediated by the phosphorylation of a large number of intracellular signaling molecules. We have previously shown that JAK2 becomes tyrosine-phosphorylated in response to GM-CSF in PMN. In the present study we demonstrate that also the signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT) family members STAT1 p91 and STAT3 p92 and the product of the c-fps/fes protooncogene become tyrosine-phosphorylated upon GM-CSF stimulation and physically associated with both GM-CSF receptor beta common subunit and JAK2. Moreover GM-CSF was able to induce JAK2 and p93fes catalytic activity. We also demonstrate that the association of the GM-CSF receptor beta common subunit with JAK2 is ligand-dependent. Finally we demonstrate that GM-CSF induces a DNA-binding complex that contains both p91 and p92. These results identify a new signal transduction pathway activated by GM-CSF and provide a mechanism for rapid activation of gene expression in GM-CSF-stimulated PMN.

  2. The ITER design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aymar, R.; Barabaschi, P.; Shimomura, Y.

    2002-05-01

    In 1998, after six years of joint work originally foreseen under the ITER engineering design activities (EDA) agreement, a design for ITER had been developed fulfilling all objectives and the cost target adopted by the ITER parties in 1992 at the start of the EDA. While accepting this design, the ITER parties recognized the possibility that they might be unable, for financial reasons, to proceed to the construction of the then foreseen device. The focus of effort in the ITER EDA since 1998 has been the development of a new design to meet revised technical objectives and a cost reduction target of about 50% of the previously accepted cost estimate. The rationale for the choice of parameters of the design has been based largely on system analysis drawing on the design solutions already developed and using the latest physics results and outputs from technology R&D projects. In so doing the joint central team and home teams converge towards a new design which will allow the exploration of a range of burning plasma conditions. The new ITER design, whilst having reduced technical objectives from its predecessor, will nonetheless meet the programmatic objective of providing an integrated demonstration of the scientific and technological feasibility of fusion energy. Background, design features, performance, safety features, and R&D and future perspectives of the ITER design are discussed.

  3. Rapid and Localized Mechanical Stimulation and Adhesion Assay: TRPM7 Involvement in Calcium Signaling and Cell Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Nishitani, Wagner Shin; Alencar, Adriano Mesquita; Wang, Yingxiao

    2015-01-01

    A cell mechanical stimulation equipment, based on cell substrate deformation, and a more sensitive method for measuring adhesion of cells were developed. A probe, precisely positioned close to the cell, was capable of a vertical localized mechanical stimulation with a temporal frequency of 207 Hz, and strain magnitude of 50%. This setup was characterized and used to probe the response of Human Umbilical Endothelial Vein Cells (HUVECs) in terms of calcium signaling. The intracellular calcium ion concentration was measured by the genetically encoded Cameleon biosensor, with the Transient Receptor Potential cation channel, subfamily M, member 7 (TRPM7) expression inhibited. As TRPM7 expression also regulates adhesion, a relatively simple method for measuring adhesion of cells was also developed, tested and used to study the effect of adhesion alone. Three adhesion conditions of HUVECs on polyacrylamide gel dishes were compared. In the first condition, the substrate is fully treated with Sulfo-SANPAH crosslinking and fibronectin. The other two conditions had increasingly reduced adhesion: partially treated (only coated with fibronectin, with no use of Sulfo-SANPAH, at 5% of the normal amount) and non-treated polyacrylamide gels. The cells showed adhesion and calcium response to the mechanical stimulation correlated to the degree of gel treatment: highest for fully treated gels and lowest for non-treated ones. TRPM7 inhibition by siRNA on HUVECs caused an increase in adhesion relative to control (no siRNA treatment) and non-targeting siRNA, but a decrease to 80% of calcium response relative to non-targeting siRNA which confirms the important role of TRPM7 in mechanotransduction despite the increase in adhesion. PMID:25946314

  4. Rapid and Localized Mechanical Stimulation and Adhesion Assay: TRPM7 Involvement in Calcium Signaling and Cell Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Nishitani, Wagner Shin; Alencar, Adriano Mesquita; Wang, Yingxiao

    2015-01-01

    A cell mechanical stimulation equipment, based on cell substrate deformation, and a more sensitive method for measuring adhesion of cells were developed. A probe, precisely positioned close to the cell, was capable of a vertical localized mechanical stimulation with a temporal frequency of 207 Hz, and strain magnitude of 50%. This setup was characterized and used to probe the response of Human Umbilical Endothelial Vein Cells (HUVECs) in terms of calcium signaling. The intracellular calcium ion concentration was measured by the genetically encoded Cameleon biosensor, with the Transient Receptor Potential cation channel, subfamily M, member 7 (TRPM7) expression inhibited. As TRPM7 expression also regulates adhesion, a relatively simple method for measuring adhesion of cells was also developed, tested and used to study the effect of adhesion alone. Three adhesion conditions of HUVECs on polyacrylamide gel dishes were compared. In the first condition, the substrate is fully treated with Sulfo-SANPAH crosslinking and fibronectin. The other two conditions had increasingly reduced adhesion: partially treated (only coated with fibronectin, with no use of Sulfo-SANPAH, at 5% of the normal amount) and non-treated polyacrylamide gels. The cells showed adhesion and calcium response to the mechanical stimulation correlated to the degree of gel treatment: highest for fully treated gels and lowest for non-treated ones. TRPM7 inhibition by siRNA on HUVECs caused an increase in adhesion relative to control (no siRNA treatment) and non-targeting siRNA, but a decrease to 80% of calcium response relative to non-targeting siRNA which confirms the important role of TRPM7 in mechanotransduction despite the increase in adhesion.

  5. Development and test of the ITER conductor joints

    SciTech Connect

    Martovetsky, N., LLNL

    1998-05-14

    Joints for the ITER superconducting Central Solenoid should perform in rapidly varying magnetic field with low losses and low DC resistance. This paper describes the design of the ITER joint and presents its assembly process. Two joints were built and tested at the PTF facility at MIT. Test results are presented, losses in transverse and parallel field and the DC performance are discussed. The developed joint demonstrates sufficient margin for baseline ITER operating scenarios.

  6. Nerve growth factor rapidly stimulates tyrosine phosphorylation of phospholipase C-gamma 1 by a kinase activity associated with the product of the trk protooncogene.

    PubMed

    Vetter, M L; Martin-Zanca, D; Parada, L F; Bishop, J M; Kaplan, D R

    1991-07-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) promotes the survival and differentiation of specific populations of neurons. The molecular mechanisms by which cells respond to NGF are poorly understood, but two clues have emerged recently. First, NGF rapidly stimulates tyrosine phosphorylation of several unidentified proteins in the NGF-responsive pheochromocytoma cell line PC12 [Maher, P. (1988) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 85, 6788-6791]. Second, the protein-tyrosine kinase encoded by the protooncogene trk (p140trk), a member of the receptor class of tyrosine kinases, becomes activated and phosphorylated on tyrosine after NGF treatment of PC12 cells [Kaplan, D. R., Martin-Zanca, D. & Parada, L. F. (1991) Nature (London) 350, 158-160]. We now report that NGF rapidly induces tyrosine phosphorylation of phospholipase C-gamma 1 (PLC-gamma 1), and we present evidence that the responsible tyrosine kinase is either p140trk or a closely associated protein. Treatment of responsive cells with NGF elicited phosphorylation of PLC-gamma 1 on tyrosine and serine. PLC-gamma 1 immunoprecipitated from NGF-stimulated cells was phosphorylated in vitro by coprecipitating protein kinase activity, and the phosphorylations occurred principally on tyrosine. The responsible kinase could be depleted from cellular lysates by antibodies specific for p140trk. This procedure also depleted a 140-kDa protein that normally coprecipitated with PLC-gamma 1 and became phosphorylated on tyrosine in vivo in response to NGF. Analysis of tryptic peptides from PLC-gamma 1 indicated that the residues phosphorylated in vitro by p140trk-associated kinase activity were largely congruent with those phosphorylated in vivo after NGF treatment. Our findings identify PLC-gamma 1 as a likely substrate for the trk-encoded tyrosine kinase, and they provide a link between NGF-dependent activation of p140trk and the stimulation of intracellular second messenger pathways.

  7. Efficacy of rapid-rate repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in the treatment of depression: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Couturier, Jennifer L.

    2005-01-01

    Objective To systematically review the literature pertaining to rapid-rate repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) compared with sham therapy for the treatment of a major depressive episode in order to arrive at qualitative and quantitative conclusions about the efficacy of rapid-rate rTMS. Methods MEDLINE, the Cochrane Library, the metaRegister of Controlled Trials and abstracts from scientific meetings were searched for the years 1966 until July 2003. The search terms “transcranial magnetic stimulation” and “transcranial magnetic stimulation AND depression” were used. Eighty-seven randomized controlled trials investigating the efficacy of rTMS were referenced on MEDLINE. Nineteen of these involved treatment of a major depressive episode, and these were reviewed. Six met more specific inclusion criteria including the use of rapid-rate stimulation, application to the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, evaluation with the 21-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D) and use of an intent-to-treat analysis. Scores on the 21-item HAM-D after treatment and standard deviations were extracted from each article for treatment and control subjects. A random-effects model was chosen for the meta-analysis, and the weighted mean difference was used as a summary measure. Results Six studies that met the inclusion criteria were identified and included in the meta-analysis. Two of these reported a significantly greater improvement in mood symptoms in the treatment versus the sham group. When combined in the meta-analysis, the overall weighted mean difference was –1.1 (95% confidence interval –4.5 to 2.3), and the results of a test for heterogeneity were not significant (χ25 = 5.81, p = 0.33). Conclusions This meta-analysis suggests that rapid-rate rTMS is no different from sham treatment in major depression; however, the power within these studies to detect a difference was generally low. Randomized controlled trials with sufficient power to

  8. Perl Modules for Constructing Iterators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilmes, Curt

    2009-01-01

    The Iterator Perl Module provides a general-purpose framework for constructing iterator objects within Perl, and a standard API for interacting with those objects. Iterators are an object-oriented design pattern where a description of a series of values is used in a constructor. Subsequent queries can request values in that series. These Perl modules build on the standard Iterator framework and provide iterators for some other types of values. Iterator::DateTime constructs iterators from DateTime objects or Date::Parse descriptions and ICal/RFC 2445 style re-currence descriptions. It supports a variety of input parameters, including a start to the sequence, an end to the sequence, an Ical/RFC 2445 recurrence describing the frequency of the values in the series, and a format description that can refine the presentation manner of the DateTime. Iterator::String constructs iterators from string representations. This module is useful in contexts where the API consists of supplying a string and getting back an iterator where the specific iteration desired is opaque to the caller. It is of particular value to the Iterator::Hash module which provides nested iterations. Iterator::Hash constructs iterators from Perl hashes that can include multiple iterators. The constructed iterators will return all the permutations of the iterations of the hash by nested iteration of embedded iterators. A hash simply includes a set of keys mapped to values. It is a very common data structure used throughout Perl programming. The Iterator:: Hash module allows a hash to include strings defining iterators (parsed and dispatched with Iterator::String) that are used to construct an overall series of hash values.

  9. ITER Cryoplant Infrastructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fauve, E.; Monneret, E.; Voigt, T.; Vincent, G.; Forgeas, A.; Simon, M.

    2017-02-01

    The ITER Tokamak requires an average 75 kW of refrigeration power at 4.5 K and 600 kW of refrigeration Power at 80 K to maintain the nominal operation condition of the ITER thermal shields, superconducting magnets and cryopumps. This is produced by the ITER Cryoplant, a complex cluster of refrigeration systems including in particular three identical Liquid Helium Plants and two identical Liquid Nitrogen Plants. Beyond the equipment directly part of the Cryoplant, colossal infrastructures are required. These infrastructures account for a large part of the Cryoplants lay-out, budget and engineering efforts. It is ITER Organization responsibility to ensure that all infrastructures are adequately sized and designed to interface with the Cryoplant. This proceeding presents the overall architecture of the cryoplant. It provides order of magnitude related to the cryoplant building and utilities: electricity, cooling water, heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC).

  10. Diagnostics for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Donne, A. J. H.; Hellermann, M. G. von; Barnsley, R.

    2008-10-22

    After an introduction into the specific challenges in the field of diagnostics for ITER (specifically high level of nuclear radiation, long pulses, high fluxes of particles to plasma facing components, need for reliability and robustness), an overview will be given of the spectroscopic diagnostics foreseen for ITER. The paper will describe both active neutral-beam based diagnostics as well as passive spectroscopic diagnostics operating in the visible, ultra-violet and x-ray spectral regions.

  11. Rapid Iron Reduction Rates Are Stimulated by High-Amplitude Redox Fluctuations in a Tropical Forest Soil.

    PubMed

    Ginn, Brian; Meile, Christof; Wilmoth, Jared; Tang, Yuanzhi; Thompson, Aaron

    2017-03-21

    Iron oxides are important structural and biogeochemical components of soils that can be strongly altered by redox-driven processes. This study examined the influence of temporal oxygen variations on Fe speciation in soils from the Luquillo Critical Zone Observatory (Puerto Rico). We incubated soils under cycles of oxic-anoxic conditions (τoxic:τanoxic = 1:6) at three frequencies with and without phosphate addition. Fe(II) production, P availability, and Fe mineral composition were monitored using batch analytical and spectroscopic techniques. The rate of soil Fe(II) production increased from ∼3 to >45 mmol Fe(II) kg(-1) d(-1) over the experiment with a concomitant increase of an Fe(II) concentration plateau within each anoxic period. The apparent maximum in Fe(II) produced is similar in all treatments, but was hastened by P-amendment. Numerical modeling suggests the Fe(II) dynamics can be explained by the formation of a rapidly reducible Fe(III) phases derived from the progressive dissolution and re-oxidation of native Fe(III) oxides accompanied by minor increases in Fe reducer populations. The shift in Fe(III) reactivity is evident from Fe-reducibility assays using Shewanella sp., however was undetectable by chemical extractions, Mössbauer or X-ray Absorption spectroscopies. More broadly, our findings suggest Fe reduction rates are strongly coupled to redox dynamics of the recent past, and that frequent shifts in redox conditions can prime a soil for rapid Fe-reduction.

  12. Initial neighborhood biases and the quality of motion stimulation jointly influence the rapid emergence of direction preference in visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Van Hooser, Stephen D.; Li, Ye; Christensson, Maria; Smith, Gordon B.; White, Leonard E.; Fitzpatrick, David

    2012-01-01

    Visual experience plays a critical role in the development of direction selective responses in ferret visual cortex. In visually naïve animals, presentation of bidirectional `training' stimulus induces rapid increases in the direction selective responses of single neurons that can be predicted by small but significant direction biases that are present in vivo 2-photon imaging of calcium signals to further explore the contribution of visual experience to the emergence of direction selective responses in ferret visual cortex. The first set of experiments was designed to determine whether visual experience is required for the development of the initial neighborhood bias. In animals that were dark-reared until the time of eye-opening, we found that individual neurons exhibited weak direction selective responses accompanied by a reduced but statistically significant neighborhood bias, indicating that both features arise without the need for visual experience. The second set of experiments employed a unidirectional training stimulus to assess the relative roles of the neighborhood bias and visual experience in determining the direction preference that cortical neurons acquire during direction training. We found that neurons became more responsive to the trained direction even when they were located in regions of the cortex with an initial neighborhood bias for the direction opposite the training stimulus. Taken together, these results suggest an adaptive developmental strategy for the elaboration of direction selective responses, one in which experience-independent mechanisms provide a symmetry-breaking seed for the instructive effects of visual experience. PMID:22623671

  13. Rapid and long-lasting increase in galanin mRNA levels in rat adrenal medulla following insulin-induced reflex splanchnic nerve stimulation.

    PubMed

    Anouar, Y; Eiden, L E

    1995-12-01

    Expression of the neuropeptide galanin in the adrenal gland is rapidly induced by reflex stimulation of the splanchnic nerve following insulin-induced hypoglycemia. Here, we examine the cellular localization and mechanism of galanin mRNA upregulation in the adrenal gland after insulin administration, by Northern blot and in situ histochemical hybridization analysis. A 5- to 16-fold increase in galanin mRNA levels, measured by Northern blot hybridization using a rat galanin cRNA probe, was observed after insulin-induced hypoglycemia. An increase in galanin mRNA levels could be detected as early as two hours after administration of a single dose (10 U/kg) of insulin (Iletin II), consistent with the increase in galanin peptide levels in the adrenal gland within 24 h of insulin shock. Insulin-induced galanin mRNA upregulation was confined to the rat adrenal: neither hypothalamic nor pituitary levels of GAL mRNA were altered by insulin treatment. Adrenal galanin mRNA levels were maximally increased by 4 h, remained maximally elevated for at least 48 h, and had returned to baseline 6 days after insulin administration. In situ hybridization analysis localized galanin mRNA induction to scattered groups of chromaffin cells throughout the medulla. These data demonstrate that regulation of GAL biosynthesis in the adrenal medulla occurs at a pretranslational level, and in a subpopulation of chromaffin cells. Rapid and robust upregulation of galanin biosynthesis in chromaffin cells upon insulin-induced splanchnic nerve stimulation suggests a hormonal or paracrine role for galanin in the adrenomedullary response to hypoglycemic shock.

  14. Iterated multidimensional wave conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Brizard, A. J.; Tracy, E. R.; Johnston, D.; Kaufman, A. N.; Richardson, A. S.; Zobin, N.

    2011-12-23

    Mode conversion can occur repeatedly in a two-dimensional cavity (e.g., the poloidal cross section of an axisymmetric tokamak). We report on two novel concepts that allow for a complete and global visualization of the ray evolution under iterated conversions. First, iterated conversion is discussed in terms of ray-induced maps from the two-dimensional conversion surface to itself (which can be visualized in terms of three-dimensional rooms). Second, the two-dimensional conversion surface is shown to possess a symplectic structure derived from Dirac constraints associated with the two dispersion surfaces of the interacting waves.

  15. Rescheduling with iterative repair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zweben, Monte; Davis, Eugene; Daun, Brian; Deale, Michael

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents a new approach to rescheduling called constraint-based iterative repair. This approach gives our system the ability to satisfy domain constraints, address optimization concerns, minimize perturbation to the original schedule, produce modified schedules, quickly, and exhibits 'anytime' behavior. The system begins with an initial, flawed schedule and then iteratively repairs constraint violations until a conflict-free schedule is produced. In an empirical demonstration, we vary the importance of minimizing perturbation and report how fast the system is able to resolve conflicts in a given time bound. We also show the anytime characteristics of the system. These experiments were performed within the domain of Space Shuttle ground processing.

  16. Rescheduling with iterative repair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zweben, Monte; Davis, Eugene; Daun, Brian; Deale, Michael

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents a new approach to rescheduling called constraint-based iterative repair. This approach gives our system the ability to satisfy domain constraints, address optimization concerns, minimize perturbation to the original schedule, and produce modified schedules quickly. The system begins with an initial, flawed schedule and then iteratively repairs constraint violations until a conflict-free schedule is produced. In an empirical demonstration, we vary the importance of minimizing perturbation and report how fast the system is able to resolve conflicts in a given time bound. These experiments were performed within the domain of Space Shuttle ground processing.

  17. Balancing Arc synthesis, mRNA decay, and proteasomal degradation: maximal protein expression triggered by rapid eye movement sleep-like bursts of muscarinic cholinergic receptor stimulation.

    PubMed

    Soulé, Jonathan; Alme, Maria; Myrum, Craig; Schubert, Manja; Kanhema, Tambudzai; Bramham, Clive R

    2012-06-22

    Cholinergic signaling induces Arc/Arg3.1, an immediate early gene crucial for synaptic plasticity. However, the molecular mechanisms that dictate Arc mRNA and protein dynamics during and after cholinergic epochs are little understood. Using human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells, we show that muscarinic cholinergic receptor (mAchR) stimulation triggers Arc synthesis, whereas translation-dependent RNA decay and proteasomal degradation strictly limit the amount and duration of Arc expression. Chronic application of the mAchR agonist, carbachol (Cch), induces Arc transcription via ERK signaling and release of calcium from IP(3)-sensitive stores. Arc translation requires ERK activation, but not changes in intracellular calcium. Proteasomal degradation of Arc (half-life ∼37 min) was enhanced by thapsigargin, an inhibitor of the endoplasmic calcium-ATPase pump. Similar mechanisms of Arc protein regulation were observed in cultured rat hippocampal slices. Functionally, we studied the impact of cholinergic epoch duration and temporal pattern on Arc protein expression. Acute Cch treatment (as short as 2 min) induces transient, moderate Arc expression, whereas continuous treatment of more than 30 min induces maximal expression, followed by rapid decline. Cholinergic activity associated with rapid eye movement sleep may function to facilitate long term synaptic plasticity and memory. Employing a paradigm designed to mimic intermittent rapid eye movement sleep epochs, we show that application of Cch in a series of short bursts generates persistent and maximal Arc protein expression. The results demonstrate dynamic, multifaceted control of Arc synthesis during mAchR signaling, and implicate cholinergic epoch duration and repetition as critical determinants of Arc expression and function in synaptic plasticity and behavior.

  18. ITER Fusion Energy

    ScienceCinema

    Dr. Norbert Holtkamp

    2016-07-12

    ITER (in Latin “the way”) is designed to demonstrate the scientific and technological feasibility of fusion energy. Fusion is the process by which two light atomic nuclei combine to form a heavier over one and thus release energy. In the fusion process two isotopes of hydrogen – deuterium and tritium – fuse together to form a helium atom and a neutron. Thus fusion could provide large scale energy production without greenhouse effects; essentially limitless fuel would be available all over the world. The principal goals of ITER are to generate 500 megawatts of fusion power for periods of 300 to 500 seconds with a fusion power multiplication factor, Q, of at least 10. Q ? 10 (input power 50 MW / output power 500 MW). The ITER Organization was officially established in Cadarache, France, on 24 October 2007. The seven members engaged in the project – China, the European Union, India, Japan, Korea, Russia and the United States – represent more than half the world’s population. The costs for ITER are shared by the seven members. The cost for the construction will be approximately 5.5 billion Euros, a similar amount is foreseen for the twenty-year phase of operation and the subsequent decommissioning.

  19. An Iterative Angle Trisection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muench, Donald L.

    2007-01-01

    The problem of angle trisection continues to fascinate people even though it has long been known that it can't be done with straightedge and compass alone. However, for practical purposes, a good iterative procedure can get you as close as you want. In this note, we present such a procedure. Using only straightedge and compass, our procedure…

  20. Iterative software kernels

    SciTech Connect

    Duff, I.

    1994-12-31

    This workshop focuses on kernels for iterative software packages. Specifically, the three speakers discuss various aspects of sparse BLAS kernels. Their topics are: `Current status of user lever sparse BLAS`; Current status of the sparse BLAS toolkit`; and `Adding matrix-matrix and matrix-matrix-matrix multiply to the sparse BLAS toolkit`.

  1. Receptor-mediated stimulation of lipid signalling pathways in CHO cells elicits the rapid transient induction of the PDE1B isoform of Ca2+/calmodulin-stimulated cAMP phosphodiesterase.

    PubMed

    Spence, S; Rena, G; Sullivan, M; Erdogan, S; Houslay, M D

    1997-01-01

    Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO cells) do not exhibit any Ca2+/calmodulin-stimulated cAMP phosphodiesterase (PDE1) activity. Challenge of CHO cells with agonists for endogenous P2-purinoceptors, lysophosphatidic acid receptors and thrombin receptors caused a similar rapid transient induction of PDE1 activity in each instance. This was also evident on noradrenaline challenge of a cloned CHO cell line transfected so as to overexpress alpha 1B-adrenoceptors. This novel PDE1 activity appeared within about 15 min of exposure to ligands, rose to a maximum value within 30 min to 1 h and then rapidly decreased. In each case, the expression of novel PDE1 activity was blocked by the transcriptional inhibitor actinomycin D. Challenge with insulin of either native CHO cells or a CHO cell line transfected so as to overexpress the human insulin receptor failed to induce PDE1 activity. Reverse transcriptase-PCR analyses, using degenerate primers able to detect the PDE1C isoform, did not amplify any fragment from RNA preparations of CHO cells expressing PDE1 activity, although they did so from the human thyroid carcinoma FTC133 cell line. Reverse transcriptase-PCR analyses, using degenerate primers able to detect the PDE1A and PDE1B isoforms, successfully amplified a fragment of the predicted size from RNA preparations of both CHO cells expressing PDE1 activity and human Jurkat T-cells. Sequencing of the PCR products, generated using the PDE1A/B primers, yielded a novel sequence which, by analogy with sequences reported for bovine and murine PDE1B forms, suggests that the PDE1 species induced in CHO cells through protein kinase C activation and that expressed in Jurkat T-cells are PDE1B forms.

  2. Effect of Low-level Vagus Nerve Stimulation on Cardiac Remodeling in a Rapid Atrial Pacing-induced Canine Model of Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yanmei; Sun, Juan; Zhou, Xianhui; Zhang, Ling; Ma, Mei; Tang, Baopeng

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to establish a rapid atrial pacing-induced canine model of atrial fibrillation in studying the effects of low-level vagus nerve stimulation (LLVNS) on atrial fibrillation and the underlying mechanisms for those effects. Adult beagle dogs were randomly assigned to 3 groups: a sham operation group (sham group), a fast left atrial appendage 12-hour pacing group (pacing group), and a 12-hour pacing + LLVNS group (LLVNS group). All dogs underwent tests for their left and right atrial effective refractory period at various time points, after which they were killed, and samples of atrial and anterior right ganglionated plexi tissue were removed and microscopically examined. As pacing times increased, the mean effective refractory period in the pacing group became significantly shortened. The pacing group and the LLVNS group did show significant differences (P < 0.001). Three groups showed significant differences in their atrial myocardial periodic acid-Schiff-positive area staining densities. Anterior right ganglionated plexi expressions of nerve growth factor and neurturin (NRTN) in the sham group and the LLVNS group were lower than those in the pacing group (nerve growth factor in 3 groups were (36.35 ± 6.18) × 1000, (86.35 ± 5.63) × 1000, and (40.50 ± 7.24) × 1000 μm²/mm², P < 0.001; NRTN in 3 groups were (39.28 ± 7.80) × 1000, (80.24 ± 6.56) × 1000, (40.45 ± 6.97) × 1000 μm²/mm², P < 0.001). Therefore, LLVNS not only reverses the effect of fast pacing-induced atrial electrical remodeling in dogs but also exerts structural effects and stimulates remodeling of autonomic nerves.

  3. Nitric Oxide Synthase 1 Modulates Basal and β-Adrenergic-Stimulated Contractility by Rapid and Reversible Redox-Dependent S-Nitrosylation of the Heart

    PubMed Central

    Vielma, Alejandra Z.; León, Luisa; Fernández, Ignacio C.; González, Daniel R.

    2016-01-01

    S-nitrosylation of several Ca2+ regulating proteins in response to β-adrenergic stimulation was recently described in the heart; however the specific nitric oxide synthase (NOS) isoform and signaling pathways responsible for this modification have not been elucidated. NOS-1 activity increases inotropism, therefore, we tested whether β-adrenergic stimulation induces NOS-1-dependent S-nitrosylation of total proteins, the ryanodine receptor (RyR2), SERCA2 and the L-Type Ca2+ channel (LTCC). In the isolated rat heart, isoproterenol (10 nM, 3-min) increased S-nitrosylation of total cardiac proteins (+46±14%) and RyR2 (+146±77%), without affecting S-nitrosylation of SERCA2 and LTCC. Selective NOS-1 blockade with S-methyl-L-thiocitrulline (SMTC) and Nω-propyl-l-arginine decreased basal contractility and relaxation (−25–30%) and basal S-nitrosylation of total proteins (−25–60%), RyR2, SERCA2 and LTCC (−60–75%). NOS-1 inhibition reduced (−25–40%) the inotropic response and protein S-nitrosylation induced by isoproterenol, particularly that of RyR2 (−85±7%). Tempol, a superoxide scavenger, mimicked the effects of NOS-1 inhibition on inotropism and protein S-nitrosylation; whereas selective NOS-3 inhibitor L-N5-(1-Iminoethyl)ornithine had no effect. Inhibition of NOS-1 did not affect phospholamban phosphorylation, but reduced its oligomerization. Attenuation of contractility was abolished by PKA blockade and unaffected by guanylate cyclase inhibition. Additionally, in isolated mouse cardiomyocytes, NOS-1 inhibition or removal reduced the Ca2+-transient amplitude and sarcomere shortening induced by isoproterenol or by direct PKA activation. We conclude that 1) normal cardiac performance requires basal NOS-1 activity and S-nitrosylation of the calcium-cycling machinery; 2) β-adrenergic stimulation induces rapid and reversible NOS-1 dependent, PKA and ROS-dependent, S-nitrosylation of RyR2 and other proteins, accounting for about one third of its

  4. Nitric Oxide Synthase 1 Modulates Basal and β-Adrenergic-Stimulated Contractility by Rapid and Reversible Redox-Dependent S-Nitrosylation of the Heart.

    PubMed

    Vielma, Alejandra Z; León, Luisa; Fernández, Ignacio C; González, Daniel R; Boric, Mauricio P

    2016-01-01

    S-nitrosylation of several Ca2+ regulating proteins in response to β-adrenergic stimulation was recently described in the heart; however the specific nitric oxide synthase (NOS) isoform and signaling pathways responsible for this modification have not been elucidated. NOS-1 activity increases inotropism, therefore, we tested whether β-adrenergic stimulation induces NOS-1-dependent S-nitrosylation of total proteins, the ryanodine receptor (RyR2), SERCA2 and the L-Type Ca2+ channel (LTCC). In the isolated rat heart, isoproterenol (10 nM, 3-min) increased S-nitrosylation of total cardiac proteins (+46±14%) and RyR2 (+146±77%), without affecting S-nitrosylation of SERCA2 and LTCC. Selective NOS-1 blockade with S-methyl-L-thiocitrulline (SMTC) and Nω-propyl-l-arginine decreased basal contractility and relaxation (-25-30%) and basal S-nitrosylation of total proteins (-25-60%), RyR2, SERCA2 and LTCC (-60-75%). NOS-1 inhibition reduced (-25-40%) the inotropic response and protein S-nitrosylation induced by isoproterenol, particularly that of RyR2 (-85±7%). Tempol, a superoxide scavenger, mimicked the effects of NOS-1 inhibition on inotropism and protein S-nitrosylation; whereas selective NOS-3 inhibitor L-N5-(1-Iminoethyl)ornithine had no effect. Inhibition of NOS-1 did not affect phospholamban phosphorylation, but reduced its oligomerization. Attenuation of contractility was abolished by PKA blockade and unaffected by guanylate cyclase inhibition. Additionally, in isolated mouse cardiomyocytes, NOS-1 inhibition or removal reduced the Ca2+-transient amplitude and sarcomere shortening induced by isoproterenol or by direct PKA activation. We conclude that 1) normal cardiac performance requires basal NOS-1 activity and S-nitrosylation of the calcium-cycling machinery; 2) β-adrenergic stimulation induces rapid and reversible NOS-1 dependent, PKA and ROS-dependent, S-nitrosylation of RyR2 and other proteins, accounting for about one third of its inotropic effect.

  5. ICRF Review: From ERASMUS To ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Weynants, R. R.

    2009-11-26

    This is a personal account of how I saw ICRF evolve since 1974, with a presentation that is ordered according to the topics: heating, antenna coupling, impurity generation/mitigation and system technology. The nature of the main issues is each time reviewed, recent findings are incorporated, and it is shown how the ICRF community has been able to react to sometimes rapidly changing demands and is indeed resolutely preparing ITER.

  6. ITER breeding blanket design

    SciTech Connect

    Gohar, Y.; Cardella, A.; Ioki, K.; Lousteau, D.; Mohri, K.; Raffray, R.; Zolti, E.

    1995-12-31

    A breeding blanket design has been developed for ITER to provide the necessary tritium fuel to achieve the technical objectives of the Enhanced Performance Phase. It uses a ceramic breeder and water coolant for compatibility with the ITER machine design of the Basic Performance Phase. Lithium zirconate and lithium oxide am the selected ceramic breeders based on the current data base. Enriched lithium and beryllium neutron multiplier are used for both breeders. Both forms of beryllium material, blocks and pebbles are used at different blanket locations based on thermo-mechanical considerations and beryllium thickness requirements. Type 316LN austenitic steel is used as structural material similar to the shielding blanket. Design issues and required R&D data are identified during the development of the design.

  7. The Iterate Manual

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-10-01

    is probably a bad idea. A better versica would use a temporary: (defmacro sum-of-squares (expr) (let ((temp ( gensym ))) ’(lot (,temp ,expr)) (sum...val ( gensym )) (tempi ( gensym )) (temp2 ( gensym )) (winner (or var iterate::*result-var*))) ’(progn (with ,max-val - nil) (with ,winner = nil) (cond ((null...the elements of a vector (disregards fill-pointer)" (let ((vect ( gensym )) (end ( gensym )) (index ( gensym ))) ’(progn (with ,vect - v) (with ,end = (array

  8. Iterative initial condition reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmittfull, Marcel; Baldauf, Tobias; Zaldarriaga, Matias

    2017-07-01

    Motivated by recent developments in perturbative calculations of the nonlinear evolution of large-scale structure, we present an iterative algorithm to reconstruct the initial conditions in a given volume starting from the dark matter distribution in real space. In our algorithm, objects are first moved back iteratively along estimated potential gradients, with a progressively reduced smoothing scale, until a nearly uniform catalog is obtained. The linear initial density is then estimated as the divergence of the cumulative displacement, with an optional second-order correction. This algorithm should undo nonlinear effects up to one-loop order, including the higher-order infrared resummation piece. We test the method using dark matter simulations in real space. At redshift z =0 , we find that after eight iterations the reconstructed density is more than 95% correlated with the initial density at k ≤0.35 h Mpc-1 . The reconstruction also reduces the power in the difference between reconstructed and initial fields by more than 2 orders of magnitude at k ≤0.2 h Mpc-1 , and it extends the range of scales where the full broadband shape of the power spectrum matches linear theory by a factor of 2-3. As a specific application, we consider measurements of the baryonic acoustic oscillation (BAO) scale that can be improved by reducing the degradation effects of large-scale flows. In our idealized dark matter simulations, the method improves the BAO signal-to-noise ratio by a factor of 2.7 at z =0 and by a factor of 2.5 at z =0.6 , improving standard BAO reconstruction by 70% at z =0 and 30% at z =0.6 , and matching the optimal BAO signal and signal-to-noise ratio of the linear density in the same volume. For BAO, the iterative nature of the reconstruction is the most important aspect.

  9. Neutron cameras for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, L.C.; Barnes, C.W.; Batistoni, P.

    1998-12-31

    Neutron cameras with horizontal and vertical views have been designed for ITER, based on systems used on JET and TFTR. The cameras consist of fan-shaped arrays of collimated flight tubes, with suitably chosen detectors situated outside the biological shield. The sight lines view the ITER plasma through slots in the shield blanket and penetrate the vacuum vessel, cryostat, and biological shield through stainless steel windows. This paper analyzes the expected performance of several neutron camera arrangements for ITER. In addition to the reference designs, the authors examine proposed compact cameras, in which neutron fluxes are inferred from {sup 16}N decay gammas in dedicated flowing water loops, and conventional cameras with fewer sight lines and more limited fields of view than in the reference designs. It is shown that the spatial sampling provided by the reference designs is sufficient to satisfy target measurement requirements and that some reduction in field of view may be permissible. The accuracy of measurements with {sup 16}N-based compact cameras is not yet established, and they fail to satisfy requirements for parameter range and time resolution by large margins.

  10. Neutron activation for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, C.W.; Loughlin, M.J.; Nishitani, Takeo

    1996-04-29

    There are three primary goals for the Neutron Activation system for ITER: maintain a robust relative measure of fusion power with stability and high dynamic range (7 orders of magnitude); allow an absolute calibration of fusion power (energy); and provide a flexible and reliable system for materials testing. The nature of the activation technique is such that stability and high dynamic range can be intrinsic properties of the system. It has also been the technique that demonstrated (on JET and TFTR) the highest accuracy neutron measurements in DT operation. Since the gamma-ray detectors are not located on the tokamak and are therefore amenable to accurate characterization, and if material foils are placed very close to the ITER plasma with minimum scattering or attenuation, high overall accuracy in the fusion energy production (7--10%) should be achievable on ITER. In the paper, a conceptual design is presented. A system is shown to be capable of meeting these three goals, also detailed design issues remain to be solved.

  11. Development and test of the ITER SC conductor joints

    SciTech Connect

    Gung, C. Y.; Jayakumar, R.; Manahan, R.; Martovetsky, N.; Michael, P.; Minervini, J.; Randall, A.

    1998-08-05

    Joints for the ITER superconducting Central Solenoid should perform in rapidly varying magnetic field with low losses and low DC resistance. This paper describes the design of the ITER joint and presents its assembly process. Two joints were built and tested at the PTF facility at MIT. Test results are presented; losses in transverse and parallel field and the DC performance are discussed. The developed joint demonstrates sufficient margin for baseline ITRR operating scenarios.

  12. Iterative Magnetometer Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sedlak, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents an iterative method for three-axis magnetometer (TAM) calibration that makes use of three existing utilities recently incorporated into the attitude ground support system used at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. The method combines attitude-independent and attitude-dependent calibration algorithms with a new spinning spacecraft Kalman filter to solve for biases, scale factors, nonorthogonal corrections to the alignment, and the orthogonal sensor alignment. The method is particularly well-suited to spin-stabilized spacecraft, but may also be useful for three-axis stabilized missions given sufficient data to provide observability.

  13. Searching with iterated maps

    PubMed Central

    Elser, V.; Rankenburg, I.; Thibault, P.

    2007-01-01

    In many problems that require extensive searching, the solution can be described as satisfying two competing constraints, where satisfying each independently does not pose a challenge. As an alternative to tree-based and stochastic searching, for these problems we propose using an iterated map built from the projections to the two constraint sets. Algorithms of this kind have been the method of choice in a large variety of signal-processing applications; we show here that the scope of these algorithms is surprisingly broad, with applications as diverse as protein folding and Sudoku. PMID:17202267

  14. Slow oscillating transcranial direct current stimulation during non-rapid eye movement sleep improves behavioral inhibition in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder

    PubMed Central

    Munz, Manuel T.; Prehn-Kristensen, Alexander; Thielking, Frederieke; Mölle, Matthias; Göder, Robert; Baving, Lioba

    2015-01-01

    Background: Behavioral inhibition, which is a later-developing executive function (EF) and anatomically located in prefrontal areas, is impaired in attention-deficit and hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). While optimal EFs have been shown to depend on efficient sleep in healthy subjects, the impact of sleep problems, frequently reported in ADHD, remains elusive. Findings of macroscopic sleep changes in ADHD are inconsistent, but there is emerging evidence for distinct microscopic changes with a focus on prefrontal cortical regions and non-rapid eye movement (non-REM) slow-wave sleep. Recently, slow oscillations (SO) during non-REM sleep were found to be less functional and, as such, may be involved in sleep-dependent memory impairments in ADHD. Objective:By augmenting slow-wave power through bilateral, slow oscillating transcranial direct current stimulation (so-tDCS, frequency = 0.75 Hz) during non-REM sleep, we aimed to improve daytime behavioral inhibition in children with ADHD. Methods: Fourteen boys (10–14 years) diagnosed with ADHD were included. In a randomized, double-blind, cross-over design, patients received so-tDCS either in the first or in the second experimental sleep night. Inhibition control was assessed with a visuomotor go/no-go task. Intrinsic alertness was assessed with a simple stimulus response task. To control for visuomotor performance, motor memory was assessed with a finger sequence tapping task. Results: SO-power was enhanced during early non-REM sleep, accompanied by slowed reaction times and decreased standard deviations of reaction times, in the go/no-go task after so-tDCS. In contrast, intrinsic alertness, and motor memory performance were not improved by so-tDCS. Conclusion: Since behavioral inhibition but not intrinsic alertness or motor memory was improved by so-tDCS, our results suggest that lateral prefrontal slow oscillations during sleep might play a specific role for executive functioning in ADHD. PMID:26321911

  15. Dehydroepiandrosterone Activation of G-protein-coupled Estrogen Receptor Rapidly Stimulates MicroRNA-21 Transcription in Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Yun; Radde, Brandie N.; Litchfield, Lacey M.; Ivanova, Margarita M.; Prough, Russell A.; Clark, Barbara J.; Doll, Mark A.; Hein, David W.; Klinge, Carolyn M.

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the regulation of the oncomiR miR-21 in liver. Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) regulates gene expression as a ligand for a G-protein-coupled receptor and as a precursor for steroids that activate nuclear receptor signaling. We report that 10 nm DHEA increases primary miR-21 (pri-miR-21) transcription and mature miR-21 expression in HepG2 cells in a biphasic manner with an initial peak at 1 h followed by a second, sustained response from 3–12 h. DHEA also increased miR-21 in primary human hepatocytes and Hep3B cells. siRNA, antibody, and inhibitor studies suggest that the rapid DHEA-mediated increase in miR-21 involves a G-protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER/GPR30), estrogen receptor α-36 (ERα36), epidermal growth factor receptor-dependent, pertussis toxin-sensitive pathway requiring activation of c-Src, ERK1/2, and PI3K. GPER antagonist G-15 attenuated DHEA- and BSA-conjugated DHEA-stimulated pri-miR-21 transcription. Like DHEA, GPER agonists G-1 and fulvestrant increased pri-miR-21 in a GPER- and ERα36-dependent manner. DHEA, like G-1, increased GPER and ERα36 mRNA and protein levels. DHEA increased ERK1/2 and c-Src phosphorylation in a GPER-responsive manner. DHEA increased c-Jun, but not c-Fos, protein expression after 2 h. DHEA increased androgen receptor, c-Fos, and c-Jun recruitment to the miR-21 promoter. These results suggest that physiological concentrations of DHEA activate a GPER intracellular signaling cascade that increases pri-miR-21 transcription mediated at least in part by AP-1 and androgen receptor miR-21 promoter interaction. PMID:25969534

  16. Clinical Evaluation of the Immune Colloidal Gold Method for Rapid Qualitative and Quantitative Measurement of Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone as an Assay for Hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tingting; Sheng, Shiwei; Ruan, Meifang; Yan, Jing; Gu, Jianying; Jiang, Yumin; Gao, Yunchao; Lu, Hankui

    2016-11-01

    The immune colloidal gold (ICG) method of measuring thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) is a rapid and easy-to-perform test, allowing off-site measurements. This study compared the clinical utility of the first ICG-based qualitative and quantitative TSH test methods in China with the third-generation serum TSH assay used worldwide. Fingertip and venous blood was collected within 30 min from 283 patients initially suspected of hypothyroidism. TSH was measured in fingertip blood using ICG-based qualitative quantitative tests. Serum TSH in venous blood was tested using the third-generation serum TSH assay. Correlations between systems were tested by kappa or Spearman correlation coefficients. Compared with the third-generation serum TSH assay, the ICG-qualitative TSH test kit had a kappa coefficient of 0.86, a sensitivity of 85.00%, and a specificity of 99.38% in screening for hypothyroidism. The percentages of false negatives and false positives among all subjects were 6.38% and 0.35% respectively; the total consistency rate of the two methods was 93.26%. When compared with the third-generation serum TSH assay, the ICG-quantitative TSH analysis system had a Spearman correlation coefficient of 0.91, a sensitivity of 88.43%, and a specificity of 98.77%. The percentages of false negatives and false positives among all subjects were 4.95% and 0.71%, respectively; the total consistency rate of the two methods was 94.35%. Both ICG-based assays are easier and faster to perform than the third-generation, laboratory-based serum TSH assay method. The ICG-based methods showed acceptable performance in the simplified screening for hypothyroidism. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier, NCT01921452. Merck Serono Co., Ltd.

  17. Rapid-rate transcranial magnetic stimulation of animal auditory cortex impairs short-term but not long-term memory formation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong; Wang, Xu; Wetzel, Wolfram; Scheich, Henning

    2006-04-01

    Bilateral rapid-rate transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) of gerbil auditory cortex with a miniature coil device was used to study short-term and long-term effects on discrimination learning of frequency-modulated tones. We found previously that directional discrimination of frequency modulation (rising vs. falling) relies on auditory cortex processing and that formation of its memory depends on local protein synthesis. Here we show that, during training over 5 days, certain rTMS regimes contingent on training had differential effects on the time course of learning. When rTMS was applied several times per day, i.e. four blocks of 5 min rTMS each followed 5 min later by a 3-min training block and 15-min intervals between these blocks (experiment A), animals reached a high discrimination performance more slowly over 5 days than did controls. When rTMS preceded only the first two of four training blocks (experiment B), or when prolonged rTMS (20 min) preceded only the first block, or when blocks of experiment A had longer intervals (experiments C and D), no significant day-to-day effects were found. However, in experiment A, and to some extent in experiment B, rTMS reduced the within-session discrimination performance. Nevertheless the animals learned, as demonstrated by a higher performance the next day. Thus, our results indicate that rTMS treatments accumulate over a day but not strongly over successive days. We suggest that rTMS of sensory cortex, as used in our study, affects short-term memory but not long-term memory formation.

  18. Dehydroepiandrosterone Activation of G-protein-coupled Estrogen Receptor Rapidly Stimulates MicroRNA-21 Transcription in Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Teng, Yun; Radde, Brandie N; Litchfield, Lacey M; Ivanova, Margarita M; Prough, Russell A; Clark, Barbara J; Doll, Mark A; Hein, David W; Klinge, Carolyn M

    2015-06-19

    Little is known about the regulation of the oncomiR miR-21 in liver. Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) regulates gene expression as a ligand for a G-protein-coupled receptor and as a precursor for steroids that activate nuclear receptor signaling. We report that 10 nm DHEA increases primary miR-21 (pri-miR-21) transcription and mature miR-21 expression in HepG2 cells in a biphasic manner with an initial peak at 1 h followed by a second, sustained response from 3-12 h. DHEA also increased miR-21 in primary human hepatocytes and Hep3B cells. siRNA, antibody, and inhibitor studies suggest that the rapid DHEA-mediated increase in miR-21 involves a G-protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER/GPR30), estrogen receptor α-36 (ERα36), epidermal growth factor receptor-dependent, pertussis toxin-sensitive pathway requiring activation of c-Src, ERK1/2, and PI3K. GPER antagonist G-15 attenuated DHEA- and BSA-conjugated DHEA-stimulated pri-miR-21 transcription. Like DHEA, GPER agonists G-1 and fulvestrant increased pri-miR-21 in a GPER- and ERα36-dependent manner. DHEA, like G-1, increased GPER and ERα36 mRNA and protein levels. DHEA increased ERK1/2 and c-Src phosphorylation in a GPER-responsive manner. DHEA increased c-Jun, but not c-Fos, protein expression after 2 h. DHEA increased androgen receptor, c-Fos, and c-Jun recruitment to the miR-21 promoter. These results suggest that physiological concentrations of DHEA activate a GPER intracellular signaling cascade that increases pri-miR-21 transcription mediated at least in part by AP-1 and androgen receptor miR-21 promoter interaction.

  19. ITER helium ash accumulation

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, J.T.; Hillis, D.L.; Galambos, J.; Uckan, N.A. ); Dippel, K.H.; Finken, K.H. . Inst. fuer Plasmaphysik); Hulse, R.A.; Budny, R.V. . Plasma Physics Lab.)

    1990-01-01

    Many studies have shown the importance of the ratio {upsilon}{sub He}/{upsilon}{sub E} in determining the level of He ash accumulation in future reactor systems. Results of the first tokamak He removal experiments have been analysed, and a first estimate of the ratio {upsilon}{sub He}/{upsilon}{sub E} to be expected for future reactor systems has been made. The experiments were carried out for neutral beam heated plasmas in the TEXTOR tokamak, at KFA/Julich. Helium was injected both as a short puff and continuously, and subsequently extracted with the Advanced Limiter Test-II pump limiter. The rate at which the He density decays has been determined with absolutely calibrated charge exchange spectroscopy, and compared with theoretical models, using the Multiple Impurity Species Transport (MIST) code. An analysis of energy confinement has been made with PPPL TRANSP code, to distinguish beam from thermal confinement, especially for low density cases. The ALT-II pump limiter system is found to exhaust the He with maximum exhaust efficiency (8 pumps) of {approximately}8%. We find 1<{upsilon}{sub He}/{upsilon}{sub E}<3.3 for the database of cases analysed to date. Analysis with the ITER TETRA systems code shows that these values would be adequate to achieve the required He concentration with the present ITER divertor He extraction system.

  20. Runaway electrons and ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boozer, Allen

    2016-10-01

    ITER planning for avoiding runaway damage depends on magnetic surface breakup in fast relaxations. These arise in thermal quenches and in the spreading of impurities from massive gas injection or shattered pellets. Surface breakup would prevent a runaway to relativistic energies were it not for non-intercepting flux tubes, which contain magnetic field lines that do not intercept the walls. Such tubes persist near the magnetic axis and in the cores of islands but must dissipate before any confining surfaces re-form. Otherwise, a highly dangerous situation arises. Electrons that were trapped and accelerated in these flux tubes can fill a large volume of stochastic field lines and serve as a seed for the transfer of the full plasma current to runaways. If the outer confining surfaces are punctured, as by a drift into the wall, then the full runaway inventory will be lost in a short pulse along a narrow flux tube. Although not part of ITER planning, currents induced in the walls by the fast magnetic relaxation could be used to passively prevent outer surfaces re-forming. If magnetic surface breakup can be avoided during impurity injection, the plasma current could be terminated in tens of milliseconds by plasma cooling with no danger of runaway. Support by DoE Office of Fusion Energy Science Grant De-FG02-03ER54696.

  1. Microtearing instability in ITER*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, King-Lap; Mikkelsen, David; Budny, Robert; Breslau, Joshua

    2010-11-01

    Microtearing modes are found to be unstable in some regions of a simulated ITER H-mode plasma [1] with the GS2 code [2]. Modes with kρs>1 are in the interior (r/a˜0.65-0.85) while longer wavelength modes are in the pedestal region. This instability may keep the pedestal within the peeling-ballooning stability boundary [3]. Microtearing modes can produce stochastic magnetic field similar to RMP coils; they may have similar effects on ELMs by increasing the pedestal width. The possibility of using this technique for ELM mitigation in ITER is explored. We propose to use a deuterium gas jet to control the microtearing instability and the Chirikov parameter at the edge. Preliminary evaluation of its effectiveness will be presented and the limitations of the GS2 code will be discussed based on our understanding from NSTX [4]. *This work is supported by USDoE contract DE-AC02-09CH11466. [4pt] [1] R. V. Budny, Nucl. Fusion (2009)[0pt] [2] W. Dorland et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. (2000).[0pt] [3] P. B. Snyder et al.,Nucl. Fusion (2009).[0pt] [4] K. L. Wong et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. (2007).

  2. Stimulation of phosphatidylcholine breakdown by thrombin and carbachol but not by tyrosine kinase receptor ligands in cells transfected with M1 muscarinic receptors. Rapid desensitization of phosphocholine-specific (PC) phospholipase D but sustained activity of PC-phospholipase C.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, F R; Seuwen, K; Pouysségur, J

    1992-11-15

    In order to evaluate the possible contribution of phospholipase D (PLD) stimulation to the mitogenic response, a screening of a variety of different compounds, some of which are known to be potent mitogens, was performed using the well characterized Chinese hamster lung fibroblast (CCL39) cell line. In wild type CCL39 cells, or derivatives expressing high levels of either the human M1 muscarinic receptor (Hm1) or the human epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor (39M1-81 and 39ER22 clones, respectively), thrombin, a potent mitogen for all three cell types, elicited the rapid activation of PLD (t1/2 activation, 30 s). Carbachol-mediated activation of the Hm1 receptor in the 39M1-81 clone, which is not a mitogenic signal, produced a similarly rapid although greater activation of PLD. Addition of EGF to the 39ER22 clone was able to provoke both a mitogenic response and stimulate PLD, albeit a comparatively small effect. In each case, the stimulation of PLD correlated closely with the ability to stimulate inositol phospholipid breakdown and was entirely dependent on the activation of protein kinase C. Moreover, the ability of both thrombin and carbachol to stimulate PLD was found to be rapidly desensitized, with a similar time course of desensitization (t1/2 desensitization, 90 s). It has recently been reported that an increase in phospholipase C (PLC)-mediated phosphocholine (PC) hydrolysis by either addition of agonist or by extracellular addition of PC-specific PLC enzyme constitutes a mitogenic signal. In this regard, in addition to stimulation of PLD, thrombin and carbachol were both able to stimulate the activity of a phosphocholine-specific phospholipase C (PC-PLC), which did not appear to desensitize within the time course employed. By contrast, EGF was unable to elicit the stimulation of PC-PLC. Ligands such as fibroblast growth factor (FGF) and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), which bind to and activate receptors with intrinsic tyrosine kinase activity

  3. Recent ADI iteration analysis and results

    SciTech Connect

    Wachspress, E.L.

    1994-12-31

    Some recent ADI iteration analysis and results are discussed. Discovery that the Lyapunov and Sylvester matrix equations are model ADI problems stimulated much research on ADI iteration with complex spectra. The ADI rational Chebyshev analysis parallels the classical linear Chebyshev theory. Two distinct approaches have been applied to these problems. First, parameters which were optimal for real spectra were shown to be nearly optimal for certain families of complex spectra. In the linear case these were spectra bounded by ellipses in the complex plane. In the ADI rational case these were spectra bounded by {open_quotes}elliptic-function regions{close_quotes}. The logarithms of the latter appear like ellipses, and the logarithms of the optimal ADI parameters for these regions are similar to the optimal parameters for linear Chebyshev approximation over superimposed ellipses. W.B. Jordan`s bilinear transformation of real variables to reduce the two-variable problem to one variable was generalized into the complex plane. This was needed for ADI iterative solution of the Sylvester equation.

  4. ITER shielding blanket

    SciTech Connect

    Strebkov, Y.; Blinov, Y.; Avsjannikov, A.

    1994-12-31

    A version of ITER shielding blanket design is presented. Main features of this proposal are: Cu based alloy as structure material of the first wall - integrated in the blanket segment box structure and 316L SS as material of both back/side walls of the box and the shield structure elements; water of medium pressure (up to 4 MPa) as coolant with toroidal direction of flow; two variants of beryllium protection tiles joining (either permanent joints by mince of solid diffusion bonding or demountable attachment with compliant layer; for last versions designs options of tiles attachment units are given). Problems of manufacturing of such blanket segment including its assembly sequence are considered in details. Results of stress problem analysis for thermal, pressure, and electromagnetic loads will be given in this report also.

  5. Iterated crowdsourcing dilemma game

    PubMed Central

    Oishi, Koji; Cebrian, Manuel; Abeliuk, Andres; Masuda, Naoki

    2014-01-01

    The Internet has enabled the emergence of collective problem solving, also known as crowdsourcing, as a viable option for solving complex tasks. However, the openness of crowdsourcing presents a challenge because solutions obtained by it can be sabotaged, stolen, and manipulated at a low cost for the attacker. We extend a previously proposed crowdsourcing dilemma game to an iterated game to address this question. We enumerate pure evolutionarily stable strategies within the class of so-called reactive strategies, i.e., those depending on the last action of the opponent. Among the 4096 possible reactive strategies, we find 16 strategies each of which is stable in some parameter regions. Repeated encounters of the players can improve social welfare when the damage inflicted by an attack and the cost of attack are both small. Under the current framework, repeated interactions do not really ameliorate the crowdsourcing dilemma in a majority of the parameter space. PMID:24526244

  6. Iterated crowdsourcing dilemma game

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oishi, Koji; Cebrian, Manuel; Abeliuk, Andres; Masuda, Naoki

    2014-02-01

    The Internet has enabled the emergence of collective problem solving, also known as crowdsourcing, as a viable option for solving complex tasks. However, the openness of crowdsourcing presents a challenge because solutions obtained by it can be sabotaged, stolen, and manipulated at a low cost for the attacker. We extend a previously proposed crowdsourcing dilemma game to an iterated game to address this question. We enumerate pure evolutionarily stable strategies within the class of so-called reactive strategies, i.e., those depending on the last action of the opponent. Among the 4096 possible reactive strategies, we find 16 strategies each of which is stable in some parameter regions. Repeated encounters of the players can improve social welfare when the damage inflicted by an attack and the cost of attack are both small. Under the current framework, repeated interactions do not really ameliorate the crowdsourcing dilemma in a majority of the parameter space.

  7. An Overview Of The ITER In-Vessel Coil Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Heitzenroeder, P J; Chrzanowski, J H; Dahlgren, F; Hawryluk, R J; Loesser, G D; Neumeyer, C; Mansfield, C; Smith, J P; Schaffer, M; Humphreys, D; Cordier, J J; Campbell, D; Johnson, G A; Martin, A; Rebut, P H; Tao, J O; Fogarty, P J; Nelson, B E; Reed, R P

    2009-09-24

    ELM mitigation is of particular importance in ITER in order to prevent rapid erosion or melting of the divertor surface, with the consequent risk of water leaks, increased plasma impurity content and disruptivity. Exploitable "natural" small or no ELM regimes might yet be found which extrapolate to ITER but this cannot be depended upon. Resonant Magnetic Perturbation has been added to pellet pacing as a tool for ITER to mitigate ELMs. Both are required, since neither method is fully developed and much work remains to be done. In addition, in-vessel coils enable vertical stabilization and RWM control. For these reasons, in-vessel coils (IVCs) are being designed for ITER to provide control of Edge Localized Modes (ELMs) in addition to providing control of moderately unstable resistive wall modes (RWMs) and the vertical stability (VS) of the plasma.

  8. Mission of ITER and Challenges for the Young

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Kaname

    2009-02-19

    It is recognized that the ongoing effort to provide sufficient energy for the wellbeing of the globe's population and to power the world economy is of the greatest importance. ITER is a joint international research and development project that aims to demonstrate the scientific and technical feasibility of fusion power. It represents the responsible actions of governments whose countries comprise over half the world's population, to create fusion power as a source of clean, economic, carbon dioxide-free energy. This is the most important science initiative of our time.The partners in the Project--the ITER Parties--are the European Union, Japan, the People's Republic of China, India, the Republic of Korea, the Russian Federation and the USA. ITER will be constructed in Europe, at Cadarache in the South of France. The talk will illustrate the genesis of the ITER Organization, the ongoing work at the Cadarache site and the planned schedule for construction. There will also be an explanation of the unique aspects of international collaboration that have been developed for ITER.Although the present focus of the project is construction activities, ITER is also a major scientific and technological research program, for which the best of the world's intellectual resources is needed. Challenges for the young, imperative for fulfillment of the objective of ITER will be identified. It is important that young students and researchers worldwide recognize the rapid development of the project, and the fundamental issues that must be overcome in ITER.The talk will also cover the exciting career and fellowship opportunities for young people at the ITER Organization.

  9. Mission of ITER and Challenges for the Young

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Kaname

    2009-02-01

    It is recognized that the ongoing effort to provide sufficient energy for the wellbeing of the globe's population and to power the world economy is of the greatest importance. ITER is a joint international research and development project that aims to demonstrate the scientific and technical feasibility of fusion power. It represents the responsible actions of governments whose countries comprise over half the world's population, to create fusion power as a source of clean, economic, carbon dioxide-free energy. This is the most important science initiative of our time. The partners in the Project—the ITER Parties—are the European Union, Japan, the People's Republic of China, India, the Republic of Korea, the Russian Federation and the USA. ITER will be constructed in Europe, at Cadarache in the South of France. The talk will illustrate the genesis of the ITER Organization, the ongoing work at the Cadarache site and the planned schedule for construction. There will also be an explanation of the unique aspects of international collaboration that have been developed for ITER. Although the present focus of the project is construction activities, ITER is also a major scientific and technological research program, for which the best of the world's intellectual resources is needed. Challenges for the young, imperative for fulfillment of the objective of ITER will be identified. It is important that young students and researchers worldwide recognize the rapid development of the project, and the fundamental issues that must be overcome in ITER. The talk will also cover the exciting career and fellowship opportunities for young people at the ITER Organization.

  10. Mode conversion in ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeger, E. F.; Berry, L. A.; Myra, J. R.

    2006-10-01

    Fast magnetosonic waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) can convert to much shorter wavelength modes such as ion Bernstein waves (IBW) and ion cyclotron waves (ICW) [1]. These modes are potentially useful for plasma control through the generation of localized currents and sheared flows. As part of the SciDAC Center for Simulation of Wave-Plasma Interactions project, the AORSA global-wave solver [2] has been ported to the new, dual-core Cray XT-3 (Jaguar) at ORNL where it demonstrates excellent scaling with the number of processors. Preliminary calculations using 4096 processors have allowed the first full-wave simulations of mode conversion in ITER. Mode conversion from the fast wave to the ICW is observed in mixtures of deuterium, tritium and helium3 at 53 MHz. The resulting flow velocity and electric field shear will be calculated. [1] F.W. Perkins, Nucl. Fusion 17, 1197 (1977). [2] E.F. Jaeger, L.A. Berry, J.R. Myra, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 90, 195001-1 (2003).

  11. Iterative marker excision system.

    PubMed

    Myronovskyi, Maksym; Rosenkränzer, Birgit; Luzhetskyy, Andriy

    2014-05-01

    The deletions of large genomic DNA fragments and consecutive gene knockouts are prerequisites for the generation of organisms with improved properties. One of the key issues in this context is the removal of antibiotic resistance markers from engineered organisms without leaving an active recombinase recognition site. Here, we report the establishment of an iterative marker excision system (IMES) that solves this problem. Based on the phiC31 integrase and its mutant att sites, IMES can be used for highly effective deletion of DNA fragments between inversely oriented B-CC and P-GG sites. The B-CC and P-GG sites are derived from attB and attP by substitution of the central core TT dinucleotide with CC and GG, respectively. An unnatural RR site that resides in the chromosome following deletion is the joining product of the right shoulders of B-CC and P-GG. We show that the RR sites do not recombine with each other as well as the RR site recombines with B-CC. The recombination efficiencies between RR and P-GG or RR and LL are only 0.1 % and 1 %, respectively. Thus, IMES can be used for multistep genomic engineering without risking unwanted DNA recombination. The fabrication of multi-purpose antibiotic cassettes and examples of the utilisation of IMES are described.

  12. ECE Diagnostics for ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, Richard; Austin, Max; Beno, Joseph; Rowan, William; Phillips, Perry; Hubbard, Amanda; Pandya, Hitesh; Feder, Russel

    2013-10-01

    ECE on ITER will be used to measure electron temperature profiles and non thermal features of the distribution. The diagnostic has two systems, one radial, and the other viewing at a small oblique angle. Radiation will be conducted to the diagnostic area with large smooth wall waveguide. Emission will be measured with a multichannel Michelson interferometer and two microwave radiometers which cover the fundamental and second harmonic ECE (X and O mode). In-situ calibration employs a hot calibration source which has been designed, constructed, and tested. We report extensive wideband transmission measurements made on the DIII-D Michelson corrugated waveguide system. We have now completed design of the beam splitter box which separates X and O modes for both views. The box inputs are now located flush up against the vacuum windows on the port plug. We have then redesigned the Gaussian beam optics of the system to reduce the size of the calibration sources by 20% to allow a better fit with other diagnostics in the port plug. We will present the details of the entire new design.

  13. The first fusion reactor: ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, D. J.

    2016-11-01

    Established by the signature of the ITER Agreement in November 2006 and currently under construction at St Paul-lez-Durance in southern France, the ITER project [1,2] involves the European Union (including Switzerland), China, India, Japan, the Russian Federation, South Korea and the United States. ITER (`the way' in Latin) is a critical step in the development of fusion energy. Its role is to provide an integrated demonstration of the physics and technology required for a fusion power plant based on magnetic confinement.

  14. Recent progress and advances in iterative software (including parallel aspects)

    SciTech Connect

    Carey, G.; Young, D.M.; Kincaid, D.

    1994-12-31

    The purpose of the workshop is to provide a forum for discussion of the current state of iterative software packages. Of particular interest is software for large scale engineering and scientific applications, especially for distributed parallel systems. However, the authors will also review the state of software development for conventional architectures. This workshop will complement the other proposed workshops on iterative BLAS kernels and applications. The format for the workshop is as follows: To provide some structure, there will be brief presentations, each of less than five minutes duration and dealing with specific facets of the subject. These will be designed to focus the discussion and to stimulate an exchange with the participants. Issues to be covered include: The evolution of iterative packages, current state of the art, the parallel computing challenge, applications viewpoint, standards, and future directions and open problems.

  15. Ca-stimulated type 8 adenylyl cyclase is required for rapid acquisition of novel spatial information and for working/episodic-like memory

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ming; Moon, Changjong; Chan, Guy C.-K.; Yang, Lan; Zheng, Fei; Conti, Alana C.; Muglia, Lisa; Muglia, Louis J.; Storm, Daniel R.; Wang, Hongbing

    2010-01-01

    Ca-stimulated adenylyl cyclases (AC) transduce neuronal stimulation-evoked increase in calcium to the production of cyclic AMP (cAMP), which impinges on the regulation of many aspects of neuronal function. Type 1 and type 8 AC (AC1 and AC8) are the only ACs that are directly stimulated by Ca. Although AC1 function was implicated in regulating reference spatial memory, the function of AC8 in memory formation is not known. Due to the different biochemical properties of AC1 and AC8, these two enzymes may have distinct functions. For example, AC1 activity is regulated by both Ca and G proteins. In contrast, AC8 is a pure Ca sensor. It is neither stimulated by Gs, nor inhibited by Gi. Recent studies also suggested that AC1 and AC8 were differentially concentrated at different sub-cellular domains, implicating that Ca-stimulated signaling might be compartmentalized. In this study, we used AC8 knockout (KO) mice and found behavioral deficits in memory retention for temporal dissociative passive avoidance and object recognition memory. When examined by Morris water maze, AC8 KO mice showed normal reference memory. However, the acquisition of newer spatial information was defective in AC8 KO mice. Furthermore, AC8 KO mice were severely impaired in hippocampus-dependent episodic-like memory when examined by the delayed matching-to-place task. Because AC8 is preferentially localized at the presynaptic active zone, our results suggest a novel role of presynaptic cAMP signaling in memory acquisition and retention, as well as distinct mechanisms underlying reference and working/episodic-like memory. PMID:18448650

  16. ITER Central Solenoid Module Fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, John

    2016-09-23

    The fabrication of the modules for the ITER Central Solenoid (CS) has started in a dedicated production facility located in Poway, California, USA. The necessary tools have been designed, built, installed, and tested in the facility to enable the start of production. The current schedule has first module fabrication completed in 2017, followed by testing and subsequent shipment to ITER. The Central Solenoid is a key component of the ITER tokamak providing the inductive voltage to initiate and sustain the plasma current and to position and shape the plasma. The design of the CS has been a collaborative effort between the US ITER Project Office (US ITER), the international ITER Organization (IO) and General Atomics (GA). GA’s responsibility includes: completing the fabrication design, developing and qualifying the fabrication processes and tools, and then completing the fabrication of the seven 110 tonne CS modules. The modules will be shipped separately to the ITER site, and then stacked and aligned in the Assembly Hall prior to insertion in the core of the ITER tokamak. A dedicated facility in Poway, California, USA has been established by GA to complete the fabrication of the seven modules. Infrastructure improvements included thick reinforced concrete floors, a diesel generator for backup power, along with, cranes for moving the tooling within the facility. The fabrication process for a single module requires approximately 22 months followed by five months of testing, which includes preliminary electrical testing followed by high current (48.5 kA) tests at 4.7K. The production of the seven modules is completed in a parallel fashion through ten process stations. The process stations have been designed and built with most stations having completed testing and qualification for carrying out the required fabrication processes. The final qualification step for each process station is achieved by the successful production of a prototype coil. Fabrication of the first

  17. ITER safety challenges and opportunities

    SciTech Connect

    Piet, S.J.

    1991-01-01

    Results of the Conceptual Design Activity (CDA) for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) suggest challenges and opportunities. ITER is capable of meeting anticipated regulatory dose limits,'' but proof is difficult because of large radioactive inventories needing stringent radioactivity confinement. We need much research and development (R D) and design analysis to establish that ITER meets regulatory requirements. We have a further opportunity to do more to prove more of fusion's potential safety and environmental advantages and maximize the amount of ITER technology on the path toward fusion power plants. To fulfill these tasks, we need to overcome three programmatic challenges and three technical challenges. The first programmatic challenge is to fund a comprehensive safety and environmental ITER R D plan. Second is to strengthen safety and environment work and personnel in the international team. Third is to establish an external consultant group to advise the ITER Joint Team on designing ITER to meet safety requirements for siting by any of the Parties. The first of the three key technical challenges is plasma engineering -- burn control, plasma shutdown, disruptions, tritium burn fraction, and steady state operation. The second is the divertor, including tritium inventory, activation hazards, chemical reactions, and coolant disturbances. The third technical challenge is optimization of design requirements considering safety risk, technical risk, and cost. Some design requirements are now too strict; some are too lax. Fuel cycle design requirements are presently too strict, mandating inappropriate T separation from H and D. Heat sink requirements are presently too lax; they should be strengthened to ensure that maximum loss of coolant accident temperatures drop.

  18. Role of alpha and beta adrenoceptors in locus coeruleus stimulation-induced reduction in rapid eye movement sleep in freely moving rats.

    PubMed

    Mallick, Birendra N; Singh, Sangeeta; Pal, Dinesh

    2005-03-07

    Based on the results of independent studies the involvement of norepinephrine in REM sleep regulation was known. Isolated studies showed that the effect could be mediated through either one or more subtypes of adrenoceptors. Earlier we have reported that REM-OFF neurons continue firing during REM sleep deprivation and mild but continuous stimulation of locus coeruleus (LC) or picrotoxin injection into the LC, that did not allow the REM-OFF neurons in the LC to stop firing, reduced REM sleep. However, the mechanism of action and type of adrenoreceptors involved in REM sleep regulation were unknown. The possible mechanism of action has been investigated in this study. It was proposed that if LC stimulation-induced decrease in REM sleep was due to norepinephrine, adrenergic antagonist must prevent the effect. Therefore, in this study, the effects of alpha1, alpha2 and beta-antagonists, viz. prazosin, yohimbine and propranolol, respectively, and alpha2 agonist, clonidine, on LC stimulation-induced reduction in REM sleep were investigated. The results showed that stimulation of LC inhibited REM sleep by reducing the frequency of generation of REM sleep, although the duration per episode remained unaffected. This decrease in the frequency of REM sleep was blocked by beta-antagonist propranolol while the duration of REM sleep per episode was blocked by alpha1-antagonist, prazosin. Also, a critical level of norepinephrine in the system was required for the generation of REM sleep, however, a higher level may be inhibitory. Based on the results of this study and our earlier studies, an interaction between neurons, containing different neurotransmitters and their subtypes of receptors for LC-mediated regulation of REM sleep has been proposed.

  19. Rapid antidepressants stimulate the decoupling of GABA(B) receptors from GIRK/Kir3 channels through increased protein stability of 14-3-3η.

    PubMed

    Workman, E R; Haddick, P C G; Bush, K; Dilly, G A; Niere, F; Zemelman, B V; Raab-Graham, K F

    2015-03-01

    A single injection of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antagonists produces a rapid antidepressant response. Lasting changes in the synapse structure and composition underlie the effectiveness of these drugs. We recently discovered that rapid antidepressants cause a shift in the γ-aminobutyric acid receptor (GABABR) signaling pathway, such that GABABR activation shifts from opening inwardly rectifiying potassium channels (Kir/GIRK) to increasing resting dendritic calcium signal and mammalian Target of Rapamycin activity. However, little is known about the molecular and biochemical mechanisms that initiate this shift. Herein, we show that GABABR signaling to Kir3 (GIRK) channels decreases with NMDAR blockade. Blocking NMDAR signaling stabilizes the adaptor protein 14-3-3η, which decouples GABABR signaling from Kir3 and is required for the rapid antidepressant efficacy. Consistent with these results, we find that key proteins involved in GABABR signaling bidirectionally change in a depression model and with rapid antidepressants. In socially defeated rodents, a model for depression, GABABR and 14-3-3η levels decrease in the hippocampus. The NMDAR antagonists AP5 and Ro-25-6981, acting as rapid antidepressants, increase GABABR and 14-3-3η expression and decrease Kir3.2. Taken together, these data suggest that the shift in GABABR function requires a loss of GABABR-Kir3 channel activity mediated by 14-3-3η. Our findings support a central role for 14-3-3η in the efficacy of rapid antidepressants and define a critical molecular mechanism for activity-dependent alterations in GABABR signaling.

  20. Rapid-rate paired associative stimulation of the median nerve and motor cortex can produce long-lasting changes in motor cortical excitability in humans

    PubMed Central

    Quartarone, Angelo; Rizzo, Vincenzo; Bagnato, Sergio; Morgante, Francesca; Sant'Angelo, Antonino; Girlanda, Paolo; Roman Siebner, Hartwig

    2006-01-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) or repetitive electrical peripheral nerve stimulation (rENS) can induce changes in the excitability of the human motor cortex (M1) that is often short-lasting and variable, and occurs only after prolonged periods of stimulation. In 10 healthy volunteers, we used a new repetitive paired associative stimulation (rPAS) protocol to facilitate and prolong the effects of rENS and rTMS on cortical excitability. Sub-motor threshold 5 Hz rENS of the right median nerve was synchronized with submotor threshold 5 Hz rTMS of the left M1 at a constant interval for 2 min. The interstimulus interval (ISI) between the peripheral stimulus and the transcranial stimulation was set at 10 ms (5 Hz rPAS10ms) or 25 ms (5 Hz rPAS25ms). TMS was given over the hot spot of the right abductor pollicis brevis (APB) muscle. Before and after rPAS, we measured the amplitude of the unconditioned motor evoked potential (MEP), intracortical inhibition (ICI) and facilitation (ICF), short- and long-latency afferent inhibition (SAI and LAI) in the conditioned M1. The 5 Hz rPAS25ms protocol but not the 5 Hz rPAS10ms protocol caused a somatotopically specific increase in mean MEP amplitudes in the relaxed APB muscle. The 5 Hz rPAS25ms protocol also led to a loss of SAI, but there was no correlation between individual changes in SAI and corticospinal excitability. These after-effects were still present 6 h after 5 Hz rPAS25ms. There was no consistent effect on ICI, ICF and LAI. The 5 Hz rENS and 5 Hz rTMS protocols failed to induce any change in corticospinal excitability when given alone. These findings show that 2 min of 5 Hz rPAS25ms produce a long-lasting and somatotopically specific increase in corticospinal excitability, presumably by sensorimotor disinhibition. PMID:16825301

  1. Fusion Power measurement at ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Bertalot, L.; Barnsley, R.; Krasilnikov, V.; Stott, P.; Suarez, A.; Vayakis, G.; Walsh, M.

    2015-07-01

    Nuclear fusion research aims to provide energy for the future in a sustainable way and the ITER project scope is to demonstrate the feasibility of nuclear fusion energy. ITER is a nuclear experimental reactor based on a large scale fusion plasma (tokamak type) device generating Deuterium - Tritium (DT) fusion reactions with emission of 14 MeV neutrons producing up to 700 MW fusion power. The measurement of fusion power, i.e. total neutron emissivity, will play an important role for achieving ITER goals, in particular the fusion gain factor Q related to the reactor performance. Particular attention is given also to the development of the neutron calibration strategy whose main scope is to achieve the required accuracy of 10% for the measurement of fusion power. Neutron Flux Monitors located in diagnostic ports and inside the vacuum vessel will measure ITER total neutron emissivity, expected to range from 1014 n/s in Deuterium - Deuterium (DD) plasmas up to almost 10{sup 21} n/s in DT plasmas. The neutron detection systems as well all other ITER diagnostics have to withstand high nuclear radiation and electromagnetic fields as well ultrahigh vacuum and thermal loads. (authors)

  2. Pertussis toxin nullifies the depolarization of the membrane potential and the stimulation of the rapid phase of Ca entry through L-type calcium channels that are produced by follicle stimulating hormone in 10- to 12-day-old rat Sertoli cells.

    PubMed

    Jacobus, Ana Paula; Loss, Eloísa Silveira; Wassermann, Guillermo Federico

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of pertussis toxin (PTX) on the depolarizing component of the action of follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) on the membrane potential (MP) of Sertoli cells, which is linked to the rapid entry of Ca(2+) into cells and to the Ca(2+)-dependent transport of neutral amino acids by the A system. This model allowed us to analyze the involvement of Gi proteins in the action of FSH in these phenomena. In parallel, using an inactive analog of insulin-like growth factor type I (IGF-1), JB1, and an anti-IGF-I antibody we investigated the possible mediating role of IGF-I on these effects of FSH because IGF-I is produced and released by testicular cells in response to stimulation by FSH and shows depolarization effects on MP similar to those from FSH. Our results have the following implications: (a) the rapid membrane actions of FSH, which occur in a time-frame of seconds to minutes and include the depolarization of the MP, and stimulation of (45)Ca(2+) uptake and [(14)C]-methyl aminoisobutyric acid ([(14)C]-MeAIB) transport, are nullified by the action of PTX and, therefore, are probably mediated by GiPCR activation; (b) the effects of FSH were also nullified by verapamil, an L-type voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channel blocker; (c) wortmannin, an inhibitor of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), prevented FSH stimulation of (45)Ca(2+) entry and [(14)C]-MeAIB transport; and (d) these FSH actions are independent of the IGF-I effects. In conclusion, these results strongly suggest that the rapid action of FSH on L-type Ca(2+) channel activity in Sertoli cells from 10- to 12-day-old rats is mediated by the Gi/βγ/PI3Kγ pathway, independent of the effects of IGF-I.

  3. Pertussis Toxin Nullifies the Depolarization of the Membrane Potential and the Stimulation of the Rapid Phase of 45Ca2+ Entry Through L-type Calcium Channels that are Produced by Follicle Stimulating Hormone in 10- to 12-Day-Old Rat Sertoli Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jacobus, Ana Paula; Loss, Eloísa Silveira; Wassermann, Guillermo Federico

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of pertussis toxin (PTX) on the depolarizing component of the action of follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) on the membrane potential (MP) of Sertoli cells, which is linked to the rapid entry of Ca2+ into cells and to the Ca2+-dependent transport of neutral amino acids by the A system. This model allowed us to analyze the involvement of Gi proteins in the action of FSH in these phenomena. In parallel, using an inactive analog of insulin-like growth factor type I (IGF-1), JB1, and an anti-IGF-I antibody we investigated the possible mediating role of IGF-I on these effects of FSH because IGF-I is produced and released by testicular cells in response to stimulation by FSH and shows depolarization effects on MP similar to those from FSH. Our results have the following implications: (a) the rapid membrane actions of FSH, which occur in a time-frame of seconds to minutes and include the depolarization of the MP, and stimulation of 45Ca2+ uptake and [14C]-methyl aminoisobutyric acid ([14C]-MeAIB) transport, are nullified by the action of PTX and, therefore, are probably mediated by GiPCR activation; (b) the effects of FSH were also nullified by verapamil, an L-type voltage-dependent Ca2+ channel blocker; (c) wortmannin, an inhibitor of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), prevented FSH stimulation of 45Ca2+ entry and [14C]-MeAIB transport; and (d) these FSH actions are independent of the IGF-I effects. In conclusion, these results strongly suggest that the rapid action of FSH on L-type Ca2+ channel activity in Sertoli cells from 10- to 12-day-old rats is mediated by the Gi/βγ/PI3Kγ pathway, independent of the effects of IGF-I. PMID:21423378

  4. Relaxation Criteria for Iterated Traffic Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Terence; Nagel, Kai

    Iterative transportation microsimulations adjust traveler route plans by iterating between a microsimulation and a route planner. At each iteration, the route planner adjusts individuals' route choices based on the preceding microsimulations. Empirically, this process yields good results, but it is usually unclear when to stop the iterative process when modeling real-world traffic. This paper investigates several criteria to judge relaxation of the iterative process, emphasizing criteria related to traveler decision-making.

  5. ITER Construction--Plant System Integration

    SciTech Connect

    Tada, E.; Matsuda, S.

    2009-02-19

    This brief paper introduces how the ITER will be built in the international collaboration. The ITER Organization plays a central role in constructing ITER and leading it into operation. Since most of the ITER components are to be provided in-kind from the member countries, integral project management should be scoped in advance of real work. Those include design, procurement, system assembly, testing, licensing and commissioning of ITER.

  6. Error Field Correction in ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jong-kyu; Boozer, Allen H.; Menard, Jonathan E.; Schaffer, Michael J.

    2008-05-22

    A new method for correcting magnetic field errors in the ITER tokamak is developed using the Ideal Perturbed Equilibrium Code (IPEC). The dominant external magnetic field for driving islands is shown to be localized to the outboard midplane for three ITER equilibria that represent the projected range of operational scenarios. The coupling matrices between the poloidal harmonics of the external magnetic perturbations and the resonant fields on the rational surfaces that drive islands are combined for different equilibria and used to determine an ordered list of the dominant errors in the external magnetic field. It is found that efficient and robust error field correction is possible with a fixed setting of the correction currents relative to the currents in the main coils across the range of ITER operating scenarios that was considered.

  7. Construction Safety Forecast for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    cadwallader, lee charles

    2006-11-01

    The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) project is poised to begin its construction activity. This paper gives an estimate of construction safety as if the experiment was being built in the United States. This estimate of construction injuries and potential fatalities serves as a useful forecast of what can be expected for construction of such a major facility in any country. These data should be considered by the ITER International Team as it plans for safety during the construction phase. Based on average U.S. construction rates, ITER may expect a lost workday case rate of < 4.0 and a fatality count of 0.5 to 0.9 persons per year.

  8. ITER Disruption Mitigation System Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, David; Lyttle, M. S.; Baylor, L. R.; Carmichael, J. R.; Caughman, J. B. O.; Combs, S. K.; Ericson, N. M.; Bull-Ezell, N. D.; Fehling, D. T.; Fisher, P. W.; Foust, C. R.; Ha, T.; Meitner, S. J.; Nycz, A.; Shoulders, J. M.; Smith, S. F.; Warmack, R. J.; Coburn, J. D.; Gebhart, T. E.; Fisher, J. T.; Reed, J. R.; Younkin, T. R.

    2015-11-01

    The disruption mitigation system for ITER is under design and will require injection of up to 10 kPa-m3 of deuterium, helium, neon, or argon material for thermal mitigation and up to 100 kPa-m3 of material for suppression of runaway electrons. A hybrid unit compatible with the ITER nuclear, thermal and magnetic field environment is being developed. The unit incorporates a fast gas valve for massive gas injection (MGI) and a shattered pellet injector (SPI) to inject a massive spray of small particles, and can be operated as an SPI with a frozen pellet or an MGI without a pellet. Three ITER upper port locations will have three SPI/MGI units with a common delivery tube. One equatorial port location has space for sixteen similar SPI/MGI units. Supported by US DOE under DE-AC05-00OR22725.

  9. The painfulness of active, but not sham, transcranial magnetic stimulation decreases rapidly over time: results from the double-blind phase of the OPT-TMS Trial.

    PubMed

    Borckardt, Jeffrey J; Nahas, Ziad H; Teal, John; Lisanby, Sarah H; McDonald, William M; Avery, David; Durkalski, Valerie; Pavlicova, Martina; Long, James M; Sackeim, Harold A; George, Mark S

    2013-11-01

    Daily left prefrontal repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) over several weeks is an FDA approved treatment for major depression. Although rTMS is generally safe when administered using the FDA guidelines, there are a number of side effects that can make it difficult for patients to complete a course of rTMS. Many patients report that rTMS is painful, although patients appear to accommodate to the initial painfulness. The reduction in pain is hypothesized to be due to prefrontal stimulation and is not solely explained by accommodation to the stimulation. In a recent 4 site randomized controlled trial (using an active electrical sham stimulation system) investigating the antidepressant effects of daily left dorsolateral prefrontal rTMS (Optimization of TMS, or OPT-TMS), the procedural painfulness of TMS was assessed before and after each treatment session. Computerized visual analog scale ratings were gathered before and after each TMS session in the OPT-TMS trial. Stimulation was delivered with an iron core figure-8 coil (Neuronetics) with the following parameters: 10 Hz, 120% MT (EMG-defined), 4 s pulse train, 26 s inter-train interval, 3000 pulses per session, one 37.5 min session per day. After each session, procedural pain (pain at the beginning of the TMS session, pain toward the middle, and pain toward then end of the session) ratings were collected at all 4 sites. From the 199 patients randomized, we had usable data from 142 subjects for the initial 15 TMS sessions (double-blind phase) delivered over 3 weeks (142 × 2 × 15 = 4260 rating sessions). The painfulness of real TMS was initially higher than that of the active sham condition. Over the 15 treatment sessions, subjective reports of the painfulness of rTMS (during the beginning, middle and end of the session) decreased significantly 37% from baseline in those receiving active TMS, with no change in painfulness in those receiving sham. This reduction, although greatest in the

  10. Insulin rapidly stimulates phosphorylation of a 46-kDa membrane protein on tyrosine residues as well as phosphorylation of several soluble proteins in intact fat cells.

    PubMed Central

    Häring, H U; White, M F; Machicao, F; Ermel, B; Schleicher, E; Obermaier, B

    1987-01-01

    It is speculated that the transmission of an insulin signal across the plasma membrane of cells occurs through activation of the tyrosine-specific receptor kinase, autophosphorylation of the receptor, and subsequent phosphorylation of unidentified substrates in the cell. In an attempt to identify possible substrates, we labeled intact rat fat cells with [32P]orthophosphate and used an antiphosphotyrosine antibody to identify proteins that become phosphorylated on tyrosine residues in an insulin-stimulated way. In the membrane fraction of the fat cells, we found, in addition to the 95-kDa beta-subunit of the receptor, a 46-kDa phosphoprotein that is phosphorylated exclusively on tyrosine residues. This protein is not immunoprecipitated by antibodies against different regions of the insulin receptor and its HPLC tryptic peptide map is different from the tryptic peptide map of the insulin receptor, suggesting that it is not derived from the receptor beta-subunit. Insulin stimulates the tyrosine phosphorylation of the 46-kDa protein within 150 sec in the intact cell 3- to 4-fold in a dose-dependent way at insulin concentrations between 0.5 nM and 100 nM. The insulin effect starts after 30 sec, is maximal at 150 sec, and declines to almost basal values by 5 min. Furthermore, the antiphosphotyrosine antibody precipitated at least five proteins in the soluble fraction of the fat cell. Insulin (0.5 nM, 100 nM) stimulated within 2 min the 32P incorporation into a 116-kDa band, a 62-kDa band, and three bands between 45 kDa and 50 kDa 2- to 10-fold. We suggest that the 46-kDa membrane protein and possibly also the soluble proteins are endogenous substrates of the receptor tyrosine kinase in fat cells and that their phosphorylation is an early step in insulin signal transmission. Images PMID:3540953

  11. Short wavelength interferometer for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Snider, R.T.; Carlstrom, T.N.

    1992-04-01

    There is a need for a real time, reliable density measurement compatible with the restricted access and radiation environment on ITER. Due to the large plasma path length, high density and field, refraction and Faraday rotation effects makes the use of contemporary long wavelength (>50{mu}m) interferometers impractical. In this paper we consider the design of a short wavelength vibration compensated interferometer which allows operation without a prohibitively large vibration isolated structure and permits the optics to be conveniently mounted directly in or on the tokamak. A density interferometer design for ITER incorporating a 10.6 {mu}m CO{sub 2} interferometer with vibration compensation provided by a 3. 39 {mu}m HeNe laser is discussed. The proposed interferometer design requires only a small intrusion into the ITER tokamak without a large support structure, refraction and Faraday rotation problems are avoided, and it provides a density resolution of at least 0.5%. Results are presented from an interferometer installed on the DIII-D tokamak incorporating essential elements of the proposed ITER design including 10.6 and 3.39 {mu}m lasers, a retro-reflector mounted on the vacuum wall of the DIII-D tokamak and real-time density feedback control. In this paper we consider a short wavelength interferometer design that incorporates vibration compensation for use on ITER. Our primary concern is to develop a interferometer design that will produce a reliable real time density monitor. We use the ITER conceptual design activity report as the basis of the design.

  12. Is Carbon a Realistic Choice for ITER's Divertor?

    SciTech Connect

    C.H. Skinner; G. Federici

    2005-05-13

    Tritium retention by co-deposition with carbon on the divertor target plate is predicted to limit ITER's DT burning plasma operations (e.g. to about 100 pulses for the worst conditions) before the in-vessel tritium inventory limit, currently set at 350 g, is reached. At this point, ITER will only be able to continue its burning plasma program if technology is available that is capable of rapidly removing large quantities of tritium from the vessel with over 90% efficiency. The removal rate required is four orders of magnitude faster than that demonstrated in current tokamaks. Eighteen years after the observation of co-deposition on JET and TFTR, such technology is nowhere in sight. The inexorable conclusion is that either a major initiative in tritium removal should be funded or that research priorities for ITER should focus on metal alternatives.

  13. Status of research toward the ITER disruption mitigation system

    SciTech Connect

    Hollmann, E. M.; Izzo, V. A.; Aleynikov, P. B.; Lehnen, M.; Snipes, J. A.; Fülöp, T.; Humphreys, D. A.; Lukash, V. E.; Papp, G.; Pautasso, G.; Saint-Laurent, F.

    2015-02-15

    An overview of the present status of research toward the final design of the ITER disruption mitigation system (DMS) is given. The ITER DMS is based on massive injection of impurities, in order to radiate the plasma stored energy and mitigate the potentially damaging effects of disruptions. The design of this system will be extremely challenging due to many physics and engineering constraints such as limitations on port access and the amount and species of injected impurities. Additionally, many physics questions relevant to the design of the ITER disruption mitigation system remain unsolved such as the mechanisms for mixing and assimilation of injected impurities during the rapid shutdown and the mechanisms for the subsequent formation and dissipation of runaway electron current.

  14. Iterative Restoration Of Tomosynthetic Slices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruttimann, U. E.; Groenhuis, R. A.; Webber, R. L.

    1984-08-01

    Tomosynthetic reconstructions suffer from the disadvantage that blurred images of object detail lying outside the plane of interest are superimposed over the desired image of structures in the tomosynthetic plane. It is proposed to selectively reduce these undesired superimpositions by a constrained iterative restoration method. Sufficient conditions are derived ensuring the convergence of the iterations to the exact solution in the absence of noise and constraints. Although in practice the restoration process must be left incomplete because of noise and quantization artifacts, the experimental results demonstrate that for reasons of stability these convergence conditions must be satisfied.

  15. The real mission of ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Wurden, G A

    2009-01-01

    For future machines, the plasma stored energy is going up by factors of 20-40x, and plasma currents by 2-3x, while the surface to volume ratio is at the same time decreasing. Therefore the disruption forces, even for constant B, (which scale like IxB), and associated possible localized heating on machine components, are more severe. Notably, Tore Supra has demonstrated removal of more than 1 GJ of input energy, over nearly a 400 second period. However, the instantaneous stored energy in the Tore Supra system (which is most directly related to the potential for disruption damage) is quite small compared to other large tokamaks. The goal of ITER is routinely described as studying DT burning plasmas with a Q {approx} 10. In reality, ITER has a much more important first order mission. In fact, if it fails at this mission, the consequences are that ITER will never get to the eventual stated purpose of studying a burning plasma. The real mission of ITER is to study (and demonstrate successfully) plasma control with {approx}10-17 MA toroidal currents and {approx}100-400 MJ plasma stored energy levels in long-pulse scenarios. Before DT operation is ever given a go-ahead in ITER, the reality is that ITER must demonstrate routine and reliable control of high energy hydrogen (and deuterium) plasmas. The difficulty is that ITER must simultaneously deal with several technical problems: (1) heat removal at the plasma/wall interface, (2) protection of the wall components from off-normal events, and (3) generation of dust/redeposition of first wall materials. All previous tokamaks have encountered hundred's of major disruptions in the course of their operation. The consequences of a few MA of runaway electrons (at 20-50 MeV) being generated in ITER, and then being lost to the walls are simply catastrophic. They will not be deposited globally, but will drift out (up, down, whatever, depending on control system), and impact internal structures, unless 'ameliorated'. Basically, this

  16. Iterated binomial sums and their associated iterated integrals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ablinger, J.; Blümlein, J.; Raab, C. G.; Schneider, C.

    2014-11-01

    We consider finite iterated generalized harmonic sums weighted by the binomial binom{2k}{k} in numerators and denominators. A large class of these functions emerges in the calculation of massive Feynman diagrams with local operator insertions starting at 3-loop order in the coupling constant and extends the classes of the nested harmonic, generalized harmonic, and cyclotomic sums. The binomially weighted sums are associated by the Mellin transform to iterated integrals over square-root valued alphabets. The values of the sums for N → ∞ and the iterated integrals at x = 1 lead to new constants, extending the set of special numbers given by the multiple zeta values, the cyclotomic zeta values and special constants which emerge in the limit N → ∞ of generalized harmonic sums. We develop algorithms to obtain the Mellin representations of these sums in a systematic way. They are of importance for the derivation of the asymptotic expansion of these sums and their analytic continuation to N in {C}. The associated convolution relations are derived for real parameters and can therefore be used in a wider context, as, e.g., for multi-scale processes. We also derive algorithms to transform iterated integrals over root-valued alphabets into binomial sums. Using generating functions we study a few aspects of infinite (inverse) binomial sums.

  17. Specific and rapid effects of acoustic stimulation on the tonotopic distribution of Kv3.1b potassium channels in the adult rat

    PubMed Central

    Strumbos, John G.; Polley, Daniel B.; Kaczmarek, Leonard K.

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that total cellular levels of voltage-gated potassium channel subunits can change on a time scale of minutes in acute slices and cultured neurons (Raab-Graham et al., 2006), raising the possibility that rapid changes in the abundance of channel proteins contribute to experience-dependent plasticity in vivo. In order to investigate this possibility, we took advantage of the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body (MNTB) sound localization circuit, which contains neurons that precisely phase-lock their action potentials to rapid temporal fluctuations in the acoustic waveform. Previous work has demonstrated that the ability of these neurons to follow high-frequency stimuli depends critically upon whether they express adequate amounts of the potassium channel subunit Kv3.1. To test the hypothesis that net amounts of Kv3.1 protein would be rapidly upregulated when animals are exposed to sounds that require high frequency firing for accurate encoding, we briefly exposed adult rats to acoustic environments that varied according to carrier frequency and amplitude modulation (AM) rate. Using an antibody directed at the cytoplasmic C-terminus of Kv3.1b (the adult splice isoform of Kv3.1), we found that total cellular levels of Kv3.1b protein – as well as the tonotopic distribution of Kv3.1b-labeled cells – was significantly altered following 30 minutes of exposure to rapidly modulated (400 Hz) sounds relative to slowly modulated (0–40 Hz, 60 Hz) sounds. These results provide direct evidence that net amounts of Kv3.1b protein can change on a time scale of minutes in response to stimulus-driven synaptic activity, permitting auditory neurons to actively adapt their complement of ion channels to changes in the acoustic environment. PMID:20219640

  18. Specific and rapid effects of acoustic stimulation on the tonotopic distribution of Kv3.1b potassium channels in the adult rat.

    PubMed

    Strumbos, J G; Polley, D B; Kaczmarek, L K

    2010-05-19

    Recent studies have demonstrated that total cellular levels of voltage-gated potassium channel subunits can change on a time scale of minutes in acute slices and cultured neurons, raising the possibility that rapid changes in the abundance of channel proteins contribute to experience-dependent plasticity in vivo. In order to investigate this possibility, we took advantage of the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body (MNTB) sound localization circuit, which contains neurons that precisely phase-lock their action potentials to rapid temporal fluctuations in the acoustic waveform. Previous work has demonstrated that the ability of these neurons to follow high-frequency stimuli depends critically upon whether they express adequate amounts of the potassium channel subunit Kv3.1. To test the hypothesis that net amounts of Kv3.1 protein would be rapidly upregulated when animals are exposed to sounds that require high frequency firing for accurate encoding, we briefly exposed adult rats to acoustic environments that varied according to carrier frequency and amplitude modulation (AM) rate. Using an antibody directed at the cytoplasmic C-terminus of Kv3.1b (the adult splice isoform of Kv3.1), we found that total cellular levels of Kv3.1b protein-as well as the tonotopic distribution of Kv3.1b-labeled cells-was significantly altered following 30 min of exposure to rapidly modulated (400 Hz) sounds relative to slowly modulated (0-40 Hz, 60 Hz) sounds. These results provide direct evidence that net amounts of Kv3.1b protein can change on a time scale of minutes in response to stimulus-driven synaptic activity, permitting auditory neurons to actively adapt their complement of ion channels to changes in the acoustic environment.

  19. Cord Blood-Derived Macrophage-Lineage Cells Rapidly Stimulate Osteoblastic Maturation in Mesenchymal Stem Cells in a Glycoprotein-130 Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Tania J.; Hodge, Jason M.; Singh, Preetinder P.; Eeles, Damien G.; Collier, Fiona M.; Holten, Ian; Ebeling, Peter R.

    2013-01-01

    In bone, depletion of osteoclasts reduces bone formation in vivo, as does osteal macrophage depletion. How osteoclasts and macrophages promote the action of bone forming osteoblasts is, however, unclear. Since recruitment and differentiation of multi-potential stromal cells/mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) generates new active osteoblasts, we investigated whether human osteoclasts and macrophages (generated from cord blood-derived hematopoietic progenitors) induce osteoblastic maturation in adipose tissue-derived MSC. When treated with an osteogenic stimulus (ascorbate, dexamethasone and β-glycerophosphate) these MSC form matrix-mineralising, alkaline phosphatase-expressing osteoblastic cells. Cord blood-derived progenitors were treated with macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) to form immature proliferating macrophages, or with M-CSF plus receptor activator of NFκB ligand (RANKL) to form osteoclasts; culture medium was conditioned for 3 days by these cells to study their production of osteoblastic factors. Both osteoclast- and macrophage-conditioned medium (CM) greatly enhanced MSC osteoblastic differentiation in both the presence and absence of osteogenic medium, evident by increased alkaline phosphatase levels within 4 days and increased mineralisation within 14 days. These CM effects were completely ablated by antibodies blocking gp130 or oncostatin M (OSM), and OSM was detectable in both CM. Recombinant OSM very potently stimulated osteoblastic maturation of these MSC and enhanced bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) actions on MSC. To determine the influence of macrophage activation on this OSM-dependent activity, CM was collected from macrophage populations treated with M-CSF plus IL-4 (to induce alternative activation) or with GM-CSF, IFNγ and LPS to cause classical activation. CM from IL-4 treated macrophages stimulated osteoblastic maturation in MSC, while CM from classically-activated macrophages did not. Thus, macrophage-lineage cells, including

  20. Operating ITER Robustly Without Disruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphreys, D. A.; Eidietis, N. W.; Hyatt, A. W.; Leuer, J. A.; Luce, T. C.; Strait, E. J.; Walker, M. L.; Welander, A. S.; Wesley, J. C.; Lodestro, L.; Pearlstein, L. D.

    2011-10-01

    Disruptivity in ITER must be minimized to limit downtime and maximize use of the limited number of discharges. Minimizing disruptivity requires sufficient control capability, including robustness to disturbances and disruption avoidance through prediction of controllability limits. Robust control implies a balance of passively stable nominal scenarios, robust operation near or beyond open loop stability limits, and responses to off-normal events to avoid disruptive termination. Such a solution is possible because disruptions result from deterministic loss of controllability due to many proximal causes (e.g. loss of hardware resources, human error, or uncontrollable disturbances), most of which can be addressed with good physics models and known control methods. We illustrate the required approach with DIII-D experiments to assess ITER controllability and pre-qualify ITER scenarios, and with design and analysis ensuring sufficiently robust vertical control for ITER. Supported by the US DOE under DE-FC02-04ER54698 and DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  1. Networking Theories by Iterative Unpacking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koichu, Boris

    2014-01-01

    An iterative unpacking strategy consists of sequencing empirically-based theoretical developments so that at each step of theorizing one theory serves as an overarching conceptual framework, in which another theory, either existing or emerging, is embedded in order to elaborate on the chosen element(s) of the overarching theory. The strategy is…

  2. Energetic ions in ITER plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Pinches, S. D.; Chapman, I. T.; Sharapov, S. E.; Lauber, Ph. W.; Oliver, H. J. C.; Shinohara, K.; Tani, K.

    2015-02-15

    This paper discusses the behaviour and consequences of the expected populations of energetic ions in ITER plasmas. It begins with a careful analytic and numerical consideration of the stability of Alfvén Eigenmodes in the ITER 15 MA baseline scenario. The stability threshold is determined by balancing the energetic ion drive against the dominant damping mechanisms and it is found that only in the outer half of the plasma (r/a>0.5) can the fast ions overcome the thermal ion Landau damping. This is in spite of the reduced numbers of alpha-particles and beam ions in this region but means that any Alfvén Eigenmode-induced redistribution is not expected to influence the fusion burn process. The influence of energetic ions upon the main global MHD phenomena expected in ITER's primary operating scenarios, including sawteeth, neoclassical tearing modes and Resistive Wall Modes, is also reviewed. Fast ion losses due to the non-axisymmetric fields arising from the finite number of toroidal field coils, the inclusion of ferromagnetic inserts, the presence of test blanket modules containing ferromagnetic material, and the fields created by the Edge Localised Mode (ELM) control coils in ITER are discussed. The greatest losses and associated heat loads onto the plasma facing components arise due to the use of the ELM control coils and come from neutral beam ions that are ionised in the plasma edge.

  3. Iterative method for interferogram processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotlyar, Victor V.; Seraphimovich, P. G.; Zalyalov, Oleg K.

    1994-12-01

    We have developed and numerically evaluated an iterative algorithm for interferogram processing including the Fourier-transform method, the Gerchberg-Papoulis algorithm and Wiener's filter-based regularization used in combination. Using a signal-to-noise ratio not less than 1, it has been possible to reconstruct the phase of an object field with accuracy better than 5%.

  4. 3D printing of soft lithography mold for rapid production of polydimethylsiloxane-based microfluidic devices for cell stimulation with concentration gradients.

    PubMed

    Kamei, Ken-ichiro; Mashimo, Yasumasa; Koyama, Yoshie; Fockenberg, Christopher; Nakashima, Miyuki; Nakajima, Minako; Li, Junjun; Chen, Yong

    2015-04-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing is advantageous over conventional technologies for the fabrication of sophisticated structures such as 3D micro-channels for future applications in tissue engineering and drug screening. We aimed to apply this technology to cell-based assays using polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), the most commonly used material for fabrication of micro-channels used for cell culture experiments. Useful properties of PDMS include biocompatibility, gas permeability and transparency. We developed a simple and robust protocol to generate PDMS-based devices using a soft lithography mold produced by 3D printing. 3D chemical gradients were then generated to stimulate cells confined to a micro-channel. We demonstrate that concentration gradients of growth factors, important regulators of cell/tissue functions in vivo, influence the survival and growth of human embryonic stem cells. Thus, this approach for generation of 3D concentration gradients could have strong implications for tissue engineering and drug screening.

  5. Computation of high overrelaxation parameters in iterative image reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidlin, P.; Brix, G.; Bellemann, M.E.; Lorenz, W.J.

    1996-12-31

    Single-projection iterative reconstruction allows the useful of high over relaxation parameters which can be determined by postulating maximum increase of image quality during an iteration step. Further speeding is achieved if maximum increase of quality is postulated during two or more steps. This postulate leads to high initial over relaxation values which drop down during the following steps. The use of parameters obtained by optimization during two steps requires about half the number of iteration steps compared to one-step parameters. Estimates are used to find the optimum parameters rapidly. Optimization within three or more steps provides only minor convergence improvement, but it demonstrates that different combinations of parameters may achieve images of similar quality. It follows that parameters derived from one data set may be widely used for other data. However, the optimizing procedure is expected to be helpful if data from new equipment or with new characteristics have to be reconstructed. Especially in three-dimensional iterative reconstruction, rapid convergence using high initial over relaxation is important.

  6. IL-22 is rapidly induced by Pathogen Recognition Receptors Stimulation in Bone-Marrow-derived Dendritic Cells in the Absence of IL-23

    PubMed Central

    Fumagalli, Silvia; Torri, Anna; Papagna, Angela; Citterio, Stefania; Mainoldi, Federica; Foti, Maria

    2016-01-01

    In vertebrates, microorganisms are recognized by pathogen recognition receptors (PRRs). Exposure of immune cells to the ligands of these receptors activates intracellular signaling cascades that rapidly induce the expression of a variety of genes. Within these genes, the cytokines family plays a crucial function because of its role in adaptive immunity induction and in tissue-specific functional regulation, such as tissue repair and tissue homeostasis during steady state conditions. Within the myeloid compartment, dendritic cells (DCs) release a variety of inflammatory cytokines in response to microbes. In this study, we show that BMDCs release IL-22 directly upon PRRs activation without the need of IL-23 signaling as reported for other IL22-producing cells. Moreover, we demonstrate that cytokine IL-22 is rapidly released in a cell-specific manner as macrophages are not able to produce IL-22 through the same PRRs system. In addition, we characterize the intracellular signaling cascade required for IL-22 release in BMDCs. Myd88, MEK1/2, NFkb and AhR, but not p38, NFAT, and RORgt, were found to be involved in IL-22 regulation in DCs. Our study suggests that BMDCs possess a unique intracellular molecular plasticity which, once activated, directs different BMDCs functions in a cell-specific manner. PMID:27652524

  7. A screen for modulators reveals that orexin-A rapidly stimulates thyrotropin releasing hormone expression and release in hypothalamic cell culture.

    PubMed

    Cote-Vélez, Antonieta; Martínez Báez, Anabel; Lezama, Leticia; Uribe, Rosa María; Joseph-Bravo, Patricia; Charli, Jean-Louis

    2017-02-02

    In the paraventricular nucleus of the mammalian hypothalamus, hypophysiotropic thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) neurons integrate metabolic information and control the activity of the thyroid axis. Additional populations of TRH neurons reside in various hypothalamic areas, with poorly defined connections and functions, albeit there is evidence that some may be related to energy balance. To establish extracellular modulators of TRH hypothalamic neurons activity, we performed a screen of neurotransmitters effects in hypothalamic cultures. Cell culture conditions were chosen to facilitate the full differentiation of the TRH neurons; these conditions had permitted the characterization of the effects of known modulators of hypophysiotropic TRH neurons. The major end-point of the screen was Trh mRNA levels, since they are generally rapidly (0.5-3h) modified by synaptic inputs onto TRH neurons; in some experiments, TRH cell content or release was also analyzed. Various modulators, including histamine, serotonin, β-endorphin, met-enkephalin, and melanin concentrating hormone, had no effect. Glutamate, as well as ionotropic agonists (kainate and N-Methyl-d-aspartic acid), increased Trh mRNA levels. Baclofen, a GABAB receptor agonist, and dopamine enhanced Trh mRNA levels. An endocannabinoid receptor 1 inverse agonist promoted TRH release. Somatostatin increased Trh mRNA levels and TRH cell content. Orexin-A rapidly increased Trh mRNA levels, TRH cell content and release, while orexin-B decreased Trh mRNA levels. These data reveal unaccounted regulators, which exert potent effects on hypothalamic TRH neurons in vitro.

  8. IL-22 is rapidly induced by Pathogen Recognition Receptors Stimulation in Bone-Marrow-derived Dendritic Cells in the Absence of IL-23.

    PubMed

    Fumagalli, Silvia; Torri, Anna; Papagna, Angela; Citterio, Stefania; Mainoldi, Federica; Foti, Maria

    2016-09-22

    In vertebrates, microorganisms are recognized by pathogen recognition receptors (PRRs). Exposure of immune cells to the ligands of these receptors activates intracellular signaling cascades that rapidly induce the expression of a variety of genes. Within these genes, the cytokines family plays a crucial function because of its role in adaptive immunity induction and in tissue-specific functional regulation, such as tissue repair and tissue homeostasis during steady state conditions. Within the myeloid compartment, dendritic cells (DCs) release a variety of inflammatory cytokines in response to microbes. In this study, we show that BMDCs release IL-22 directly upon PRRs activation without the need of IL-23 signaling as reported for other IL22-producing cells. Moreover, we demonstrate that cytokine IL-22 is rapidly released in a cell-specific manner as macrophages are not able to produce IL-22 through the same PRRs system. In addition, we characterize the intracellular signaling cascade required for IL-22 release in BMDCs. Myd88, MEK1/2, NFkb and AhR, but not p38, NFAT, and RORgt, were found to be involved in IL-22 regulation in DCs. Our study suggests that BMDCs possess a unique intracellular molecular plasticity which, once activated, directs different BMDCs functions in a cell-specific manner.

  9. Iteration and Prototyping in Creating Technical Specifications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flynt, John P.

    1994-01-01

    Claims that the development process for computer software can be greatly aided by the writers of specifications if they employ basic iteration and prototyping techniques. Asserts that computer software configuration management practices provide ready models for iteration and prototyping. (HB)

  10. Colorado Conference on iterative methods. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-31

    The conference provided a forum on many aspects of iterative methods. Volume I topics were:Session: domain decomposition, nonlinear problems, integral equations and inverse problems, eigenvalue problems, iterative software kernels. Volume II presents nonsymmetric solvers, parallel computation, theory of iterative methods, software and programming environment, ODE solvers, multigrid and multilevel methods, applications, robust iterative methods, preconditioners, Toeplitz and circulation solvers, and saddle point problems. Individual papers are indexed separately on the EDB.

  11. Object-oriented design of preconditioned iterative methods

    SciTech Connect

    Bruaset, A.M.

    1994-12-31

    In this talk the author discusses how object-oriented programming techniques can be used to develop a flexible software package for preconditioned iterative methods. The ideas described have been used to implement the linear algebra part of Diffpack, which is a collection of C++ class libraries that provides high-level tools for the solution of partial differential equations. In particular, this software package is aimed at rapid development of PDE-based numerical simulators, primarily using finite element methods.

  12. Bioinspired iterative synthesis of polyketides

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Kuan; Xie, Changmin; Hong, Ran

    2015-01-01

    Diverse array of biopolymers and second metabolites (particularly polyketide natural products) has been manufactured in nature through an enzymatic iterative assembly of simple building blocks. Inspired by this strategy, molecules with inherent modularity can be efficiently synthesized by repeated succession of similar reaction sequences. This privileged strategy has been widely adopted in synthetic supramolecular chemistry. Its value also has been reorganized in natural product synthesis. A brief overview of this approach is given with a particular emphasis on the total synthesis of polyol-embedded polyketides, a class of vastly diverse structures and biologically significant natural products. This viewpoint also illustrates the limits of known individual modules in terms of diastereoselectivity and enantioselectivity. More efficient and practical iterative strategies are anticipated to emerge in the future development. PMID:26052510

  13. Design of ITER Relief Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, N.; Choukekar, K.; Jadon, M.; Sarkar, B.; Joshi, B.; Kanzaria, H.; Gehani, V.; Vyas, H.; Pandya, U.; Panjwani, R.; Badgujar, S.; Monneret, E.

    2017-02-01

    The ITER Cryogenic system is one of the most complex cryogenic systems in the world. It includes roughly 5 km of cryogenic transfer line (cryolines) having large number of layout singularities in terms of bends at odd angles and branches. The relief lines are particularly important cryolines as they collect the helium from outlet of all process safety valves of the cryogenic clients and transfers it back to cryoplant. The total length of ITER relief lines is around 1.6 km with process pipe size varying from DN 50 to DN 200. While some part of relief lines carries warm helium for the recovery system, most part of the relief line is vacuum jacketed cryoline which carries cold helium from the clients. The final detailed design of relief lines has been completed. The paper describes the major input data and constraints for design of relief lines, design steps, flexibility and structural analysis approach and major design outcome.

  14. Spectroscopic problems in ITER diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisitsa, V. S.; Bureyeva, L. A.; Kukushkin, A. B.; Kadomtsev, M. B.; Krupin, V. A.; Levashova, M. G.; Medvedev, A. A.; Mukhin, E. E.; Shurygin, V. A.; Tugarinov, S. N.; Vukolov, K. Yu

    2012-12-01

    Problems of spectroscopic diagnostics of ITER plasma are under consideration. Three types of diagnostics are presented: 1) Balmer lines spectroscopy in the edge and divertor plasmas; 2) Thomson scattering, 3) charge exchange recombination spectroscopy. The Zeeman-Stark structure of line shapes is discussed. The overlapping of isotopes H-D-T spectral line shapes are presented for the SOL and divertor conditions. The polarization measurements of H-alpha spectral lines for H-D mixture on T-10 tokamak are shown in order to separate Zeeman splitting in more details. The problem of plasma background radiation emission for Thomson scattering in ITER is discussed in details. The line shape of P-7 hydrogen spectral line having a wave length close to laser one is presented together with continuum radiation. The charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CXRS) is discussed in details. The data on Dα, HeII and CVI measurements in CXRS experiments on T-10 tokamak are presented.

  15. I-mode for ITER?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whyte, D. G.; Marmar, E.; Hubbard, A.; Hughes, J.; Dominguez, A.; Greenwald, M.

    2011-10-01

    I-mode is a recently explored confinement regime that features a temperature pedestal and H-mode energy confinement, yet with L-mode particle confinement and no density pedestal nor large ELMs. Experiments on Alcator C-Mod and ASDEX-Upgrade show this leads to a stationary collisionless pedestal that inherently does not require ELMs for core impurity and particle control, possibly making I-mode an attractive operating regime for ITER where ELM heat pulses are expected to surpass material limits. We speculate as to how I-mode could be obtained, maintained and exploited for the ITER burning plasma physics mission. Issues examined include I-mode topology and power threshold requirements, pedestal formation, density control, avoiding H-mode, and the response of I-mode to alpha self-heating. Key uncertainties requiring further investigation are identified. Supported by the US DOE Cooperative Agreement DE-FC02-99ER54512.

  16. US ITER limiter module design

    SciTech Connect

    Mattas, R.F.; Billone, M.; Hassanein, A.

    1996-08-01

    The recent U.S. effort on the ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) shield has been focused on the limiter module design. This is a multi-disciplinary effort that covers design layout, fabrication, thermal hydraulics, materials evaluation, thermo- mechanical response, and predicted response during off-normal events. The results of design analyses are presented. Conclusions and recommendations are also presented concerning, the capability of the limiter modules to meet performance goals and to be fabricated within design specifications using existing technology.

  17. Iterative Methods for Parameter Estimation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-12-01

    IMPULSE RESPONSE (FIR) SYSTEMS ............... 10 A. FIXED DATA ALGORITHMS .................... 10 1. Gauss- Seidel Method ....................... 10 2...potential to provide a less biased least squares solution than a correlation method formulation [Ref. 3]. A. FIXED DATA ALGORITHMS 1. Gauss- Seidel Method A...very simple and straightforward iterative algorithm is the Gauss- Seidel method [Ref. 7]. We drop the superscript M from aM for simplicity. Unless

  18. ITER Plasma Control System Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snipes, Joseph; ITER PCS Design Team

    2015-11-01

    The development of the ITER Plasma Control System (PCS) continues with the preliminary design phase for 1st plasma and early plasma operation in H/He up to Ip = 15 MA in L-mode. The design is being developed through a contract between the ITER Organization and a consortium of plasma control experts from EU and US fusion laboratories, which is expected to be completed in time for a design review at the end of 2016. This design phase concentrates on breakdown including early ECH power and magnetic control of the poloidal field null, plasma current, shape, and position. Basic kinetic control of the heating (ECH, ICH, NBI) and fueling systems is also included. Disruption prediction, mitigation, and maintaining stable operation are also included because of the high magnetic and kinetic stored energy present already for early plasma operation. Support functions for error field topology and equilibrium reconstruction are also required. All of the control functions also must be integrated into an architecture that will be capable of the required complexity of all ITER scenarios. A database is also being developed to collect and manage PCS functional requirements from operational scenarios that were defined in the Conceptual Design with links to proposed event handling strategies and control algorithms for initial basic control functions. A brief status of the PCS development will be presented together with a proposed schedule for design phases up to DT operation.

  19. The Achilles' Heel of "Ultrastable" Hyperthermophile Proteins: Submillimolar Concentrations of SDS Stimulate Rapid Conformational Change, Aggregation, and Amyloid Formation in Proteins Carrying Overall Positive Charge.

    PubMed

    Khan, Javed M; Sharma, Prerna; Arora, Kanika; Kishor, Nitin; Kaila, Pallavi; Guptasarma, Purnananda

    2016-07-19

    Low concentrations (<3.0 mM) of the anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) have been shown to induce the formation of amyloid fibers in more than 20 different mesophile-derived proteins in the cationic state. It is not known whether SDS has similar effects on hyperthermophile-derived proteins, which are otherwise thought to be "ultrastable" and inordinately resistant to structural perturbations at room temperature. Here, we show that low (<4.5 mM) concentrations of SDS rapidly induce the formation of aggregates and amyloid fibers in five different ultrastable Pyrococcus furiosus proteins in the cationic state. We also show that amyloid formation is accompanied by the development of a characteristic, negative circular dichroism band at ∼230 nm. These effects are not seen if the proteins have a net negative charge or when higher concentrations of SDS are used (which induce helix formation instead). Our results appear to reveal a potential weakness or "Achilles' heel" in ultrastable proteins from hyperthermophiles. They also provide very strong support for the view that SDS initially interacts with proteins through electrostatic interactions, and not hydrophobic interactions, eliciting similar effects entirely regardless of protein molecular weight, or structural features such as quaternary structure or tertiary structural stability.

  20. Iterative methods for mixed finite element equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakazawa, S.; Nagtegaal, J. C.; Zienkiewicz, O. C.

    1985-01-01

    Iterative strategies for the solution of indefinite system of equations arising from the mixed finite element method are investigated in this paper with application to linear and nonlinear problems in solid and structural mechanics. The augmented Hu-Washizu form is derived, which is then utilized to construct a family of iterative algorithms using the displacement method as the preconditioner. Two types of iterative algorithms are implemented. Those are: constant metric iterations which does not involve the update of preconditioner; variable metric iterations, in which the inverse of the preconditioning matrix is updated. A series of numerical experiments is conducted to evaluate the numerical performance with application to linear and nonlinear model problems.

  1. Real-time Stability Analysis for Disruption Avoidance in ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glasser, Alexander; Kolemen, Egemen; Glasser, Alan

    2015-11-01

    ITER is intended to operate at plasma parameters approaching the frontier of achievable stability limits. And yet, plasma disruptions at ITER must be kept to a bare minimum to avoid damage to its plasma-facing structures. These competing goals necessitate real-time plasma stability analysis and feedback control at ITER. This work aims to develop a mechanism for real-time analysis of a large and virulent class of disruptions driven by the rapid growth of ideal MHD unstable modes in tokamak equilibria. Such modes will be identified by a parallelized, low-latency implementation of A.H. Glasser's well-tested DCON (Direct Criterion of Newcomb) code, which measures the energetics of modes in the bulk plasma fluid, as well as M.S. Chance's VACUUM code, which measures the same in the vacuum between the plasma and tokamak chamber wall. Parallelization of these codes is intended to achieve a time-savings of 40x, thereby reducing latency to a timescale of order 100ms and making the codes viable for ideal MHD stability control at ITER. The hardware used to achieve this parallelization will be an Intel Xeon Phi server with 77 cores (308 threads). Supported by the US DOE under DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  2. Overview of Recent Developments in Pellet Injection for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Combs, Stephen Kirk; Baylor, Larry R; Meitner, Steven J; Caughman, John B; Rasmussen, David A; Maruyama, So

    2012-01-01

    Pellet injection is the primary fueling technique planned for core fueling of ITER burning plasmas. Also, the injection of relatively small pellets to purposely trigger rapid small edge localized modes (ELMs) has been proposed as a possible solution to the heat flux damage from larger natural ELMs likely to be an issue on the ITER divertor surfaces. The ITER pellet injection system is designed to inject pellets into the plasma through both inner and outer wall guide tubes. The inner wall guide tubes will provide high throughput pellet fueling while the outerwall guide tubes will be used primarily to trigger ELMs at a high frequency (>15 Hz). The pellet fueling rate ofeach injector is to be up to 120 Pa-m3/s, which will require the formation of solid D-T at a volumetric rate of ~1500 mm3/s. Two injectors are to be provided for ITER at the startup with a provision for up to six injectorsduring the D-T phase. The required throughput of each injector is greater than that of any injector built to date, and a novel twin-screw continuous extrusion system is being developed to meet the challenging design parameters. Status of the development activities will be presented, highlighting recent progress.

  3. Plasma vertical stabilisation in ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gribov, Y.; Kavin, A.; Lukash, V.; Khayrutdinov, R.; Huijsmans, G. T. A.; Loarte, A.; Snipes, J. A.; Zabeo, L.

    2015-07-01

    This paper describes the progress in analysis of the ITER plasma vertical stabilisation (VS) system since its design review in 2007-2008. Two indices characterising plasma VS were studied. These are (1) the maximum value of plasma vertical displacement due to free drift that can be stopped by the VS system and (2) the maximum root mean square value of low frequency noise in the dZ/dt measurement signal used in the VS feedback loop. The first VS index was calculated using the PET code for 15 MA plasmas with the nominal position and shape. The second VS index was studied with the DINA code in the most demanding simulations for plasma magnetic control of 15 MA scenarios with the fastest plasma current ramp-up and early X-point formation, the fastest plasma current ramp-down in a divertor configuration, and an H to L mode transition at the current flattop. The studies performed demonstrate that the VS in-vessel coils, adopted recently in the baseline design, significantly increase the range of plasma controllability in comparison with the stabilising systems VS1 and VS2, providing operating margins sufficient to achieve ITER's goals specified in the project requirements. Additionally two sets of the DINA code simulations were performed with the goal of assessment of the capability of the PF system with the VS in-vessel coils: (i) to control the position of runaway electrons generated during disruptions in 15 MA scenarios and (ii) to trigger ELMs in H-mode plasmas of 7.5 MA/2.65 T scenarios planned for the early phase of ITER operation. It was also shown that ferromagnetic structures of the vacuum vessel (ferromagnetic inserts) and test blanket modules insignificantly affect the plasma VS.

  4. Cryogenic instrumentation for ITER magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poncet, J.-M.; Manzagol, J.; Attard, A.; André, J.; Bizel-Bizellot, L.; Bonnay, P.; Ercolani, E.; Luchier, N.; Girard, A.; Clayton, N.; Devred, A.; Huygen, S.; Journeaux, J.-Y.

    2017-02-01

    Accurate measurements of the helium flowrate and of the temperature of the ITER magnets is of fundamental importance to make sure that the magnets operate under well controlled and reliable conditions, and to allow suitable helium flow distribution in the magnets through the helium piping. Therefore, the temperature and flow rate measurements shall be reliable and accurate. In this paper, we present the thermometric chains as well as the venturi flow meters installed in the ITER magnets and their helium piping. The presented thermometric block design is based on the design developed by CERN for the LHC, which has been further optimized via thermal simulations carried out by CEA. The electronic part of the thermometric chain was entirely developed by the CEA and will be presented in detail: it is based on a lock-in measurement and small signal amplification, and also provides a web interface and software to an industrial PLC. This measuring device provides a reliable, accurate, electromagnetically immune, and fast (up to 100 Hz bandwidth) system for resistive temperature sensors between a few ohms to 100 kΩ. The flowmeters (venturi type) which make up part of the helium mass flow measurement chain have been completely designed, and manufacturing is on-going. The behaviour of the helium gas has been studied in detailed thanks to ANSYS CFX software in order to obtain the same differential pressure for all types of flowmeters. Measurement uncertainties have been estimated and the influence of input parameters has been studied. Mechanical calculations have been performed to guarantee the mechanical strength of the venturis required for pressure equipment operating in nuclear environment. In order to complete the helium mass flow measurement chain, different technologies of absolute and differential pressure sensors have been tested in an applied magnetic field to identify equipment compatible with the ITER environment.

  5. Iterates of maps with symmetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chossat, Pascal; Golubitsky, Martin

    1988-01-01

    Fixed-point bifurcation, period doubling, and Hopf bifurcation (HB) for iterates of equivariant mappings are investigated analytically, with a focus on HB in the presence of symmetry. An algebraic formulation for the hypotheses of the theorem of Ruelle (1973) is derived, and the case of standing waves in a system of ordinary differential equations with O(2) symmetry is considered in detail. In this case, it is shown that HB can lead directly to motion on an invariant 3-torus, with an unexpected third frequency due to drift of standing waves along the torus.

  6. The physics role of ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Rutherford, P.H.

    1997-04-01

    Experimental research on the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) will go far beyond what is possible on present-day tokamaks to address new and challenging issues in the physics of reactor-like plasmas. First and foremost, experiments in ITER will explore the physics issues of burning plasmas--plasmas that are dominantly self-heated by alpha-particles created by the fusion reactions themselves. Such issues will include (i) new plasma-physical effects introduced by the presence within the plasma of an intense population of energetic alpha particles; (ii) the physics of magnetic confinement for a burning plasma, which will involve a complex interplay of transport, stability and an internal self-generated heat source; and (iii) the physics of very-long-pulse/steady-state burning plasmas, in which much of the plasma current is also self-generated and which will require effective control of plasma purity and plasma-wall interactions. Achieving and sustaining burning plasma regimes in a tokamak necessarily requires plasmas that are larger than those in present experiments and have higher energy content and power flow, as well as much longer pulse length. Accordingly, the experimental program on ITER will embrace the study of issues of plasma physics and plasma-materials interactions that are specific to a reactor-scale fusion experiment. Such issues will include (i) confinement physics for a tokamak in which, for the first time, the core-plasma and the edge-plasma are simultaneously in a reactor-like regime; (ii) phenomena arising during plasma transients, including so-called disruptions, in regimes of high plasma current and thermal energy; and (iii) physics of a radiative divertor designed for handling high power flow for long pulses, including novel plasma and atomic-physics effects as well as materials science of surfaces subject to intense plasma interaction. Experiments on ITER will be conducted by researchers in control rooms situated at major

  7. Iterated Stretching of Viscoelastic Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Hsueh-Chia; Demekhin, Evgeny A.; Kalaidin, Evgeny

    1999-01-01

    We examine, with asymptotic analysis and numerical simulation, the iterated stretching dynamics of FENE and Oldroyd-B jets of initial radius r(sub 0), shear viscosity nu, Weissenberg number We, retardation number S, and capillary number Ca. The usual Rayleigh instability stretches the local uniaxial extensional flow region near a minimum in jet radius into a primary filament of radius [Ca(1 - S)/ We](sup 1/2)r(sub 0) between two beads. The strain-rate within the filament remains constant while its radius (elastic stress) decreases (increases) exponentially in time with a long elastic relaxation time 3We(r(sup 2, sub 0)/nu). Instabilities convected from the bead relieve the tension at the necks during this slow elastic drainage and trigger a filament recoil. Secondary filaments then form at the necks from the resulting stretching. This iterated stretching is predicted to occur successively to generate high-generation filaments of radius r(sub n), (r(sub n)/r(sub 0)) = square root of 2[r(sub n-1)/r(sub 0)](sup 3/2) until finite-extensibility effects set in.

  8. Challenges for Cryogenics at Iter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serio, L.

    2010-04-01

    Nuclear fusion of light nuclei is a promising option to provide clean, safe and cost competitive energy in the future. The ITER experimental reactor being designed by seven partners representing more than half of the world population will be assembled at Cadarache, South of France in the next decade. It is a thermonuclear fusion Tokamak that requires high magnetic fields to confine and stabilize the plasma. Cryogenic technology is extensively employed to achieve low-temperature conditions for the magnet and vacuum pumping systems. Efficient and reliable continuous operation shall be achieved despite unprecedented dynamic heat loads due to magnetic field variations and neutron production from the fusion reaction. Constraints and requirements of the largest superconducting Tokamak machine have been analyzed. Safety and technical risks have been initially assessed and proposals to mitigate the consequences analyzed. Industrial standards and components are being investigated to anticipate the requirements of reliable and efficient large scale energy production. After describing the basic features of ITER and its cryogenic system, we shall present the key design requirements, improvements, optimizations and challenges.

  9. Status of US ITER Diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stratton, B.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Hill, K.; Johnson, D.; Pablant, N.; Barnsley, R.; Bertschinger, G.; de Bock, M. F. M.; Reichle, R.; Udintsev, V. S.; Watts, C.; Austin, M.; Phillips, P.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Biewer, T. M.; Hanson, G.; Klepper, C. C.; Carlstrom, T.; van Zeeland, M. A.; Brower, D.; Doyle, E.; Peebles, A.; Ellis, R.; Levinton, F.; Yuh, H.

    2013-10-01

    The US is providing 7 diagnostics to ITER: the Upper Visible/IR cameras, the Low Field Side Reflectometer, the Motional Stark Effect diagnostic, the Electron Cyclotron Emission diagnostic, the Toroidal Interferometer/Polarimeter, the Core Imaging X-Ray Spectrometer, and the Diagnostic Residual Gas Analyzer. The front-end components of these systems must operate with high reliability in conditions of long pulse operation, high neutron and gamma fluxes, very high neutron fluence, significant neutron heating (up to 7 MW/m3) , large radiant and charge exchange heat flux (0.35 MW/m2) , and high electromagnetic loads. Opportunities for repair and maintenance of these components will be limited. These conditions lead to significant challenges for the design of the diagnostics. Space constraints, provision of adequate radiation shielding, and development of repair and maintenance strategies are challenges for diagnostic integration into the port plugs that also affect diagnostic design. The current status of design of the US ITER diagnostics is presented and R&D needs are identified. Supported by DOE contracts DE-AC02-09CH11466 (PPPL) and DE-AC05-00OR22725 (UT-Battelle, LLC).

  10. ETR/ITER systems code

    SciTech Connect

    Barr, W.L.; Bathke, C.G.; Brooks, J.N.; Bulmer, R.H.; Busigin, A.; DuBois, P.F.; Fenstermacher, M.E.; Fink, J.; Finn, P.A.; Galambos, J.D.; Gohar, Y.; Gorker, G.E.; Haines, J.R.; Hassanein, A.M.; Hicks, D.R.; Ho, S.K.; Kalsi, S.S.; Kalyanam, K.M.; Kerns, J.A.; Lee, J.D.; Miller, J.R.; Miller, R.L.; Myall, J.O.; Peng, Y-K.M.; Perkins, L.J.; Spampinato, P.T.; Strickler, D.J.; Thomson, S.L.; Wagner, C.E.; Willms, R.S.; Reid, R.L.

    1988-04-01

    A tokamak systems code capable of modeling experimental test reactors has been developed and is described in this document. The code, named TETRA (for Tokamak Engineering Test Reactor Analysis), consists of a series of modules, each describing a tokamak system or component, controlled by an optimizer/driver. This code development was a national effort in that the modules were contributed by members of the fusion community and integrated into a code by the Fusion Engineering Design Center. The code has been checked out on the Cray computers at the National Magnetic Fusion Energy Computing Center and has satisfactorily simulated the Tokamak Ignition/Burn Experimental Reactor II (TIBER) design. A feature of this code is the ability to perform optimization studies through the use of a numerical software package, which iterates prescribed variables to satisfy a set of prescribed equations or constraints. This code will be used to perform sensitivity studies for the proposed International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). 22 figs., 29 tabs.

  11. ITER Port Interspace Pressure Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Carbajo, Juan J; Van Hove, Walter A

    2016-01-01

    The ITER Vacuum Vessel (VV) is equipped with 54 access ports. Each of these ports has an opening in the bioshield that communicates with a dedicated port cell. During Tokamak operation, the bioshield opening must be closed with a concrete plug to shield the radiation coming from the plasma. This port plug separates the port cell into a Port Interspace (between VV closure lid and Port Plug) on the inner side and the Port Cell on the outer side. This paper presents calculations of pressures and temperatures in the ITER (Ref. 1) Port Interspace after a double-ended guillotine break (DEGB) of a pipe of the Tokamak Cooling Water System (TCWS) with high temperature water. It is assumed that this DEGB occurs during the worst possible conditions, which are during water baking operation, with water at a temperature of 523 K (250 C) and at a pressure of 4.4 MPa. These conditions are more severe than during normal Tokamak operation, with the water at 398 K (125 C) and 2 MPa. Two computer codes are employed in these calculations: RELAP5-3D Version 4.2.1 (Ref. 2) to calculate the blowdown releases from the pipe break, and MELCOR, Version 1.8.6 (Ref. 3) to calculate the pressures and temperatures in the Port Interspace. A sensitivity study has been performed to optimize some flow areas.

  12. Communication-optimal iterative methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demmel, J.; Hoemmen, M.; Mohiyuddin, M.; Yelick, K.

    2009-07-01

    Data movement, both within the memory system of a single processor node and between multiple nodes in a system, limits the performance of many Krylov subspace methods that solve sparse linear systems and eigenvalue problems. Here, s iterations of algorithms such as CG, GMRES, Lanczos, and Arnoldi perform s sparse matrix-vector multiplications and Ω(s) vector reductions, resulting in a growth of Ω(s) in both single-node and network communication. By reorganizing the sparse matrix kernel to compute a set of matrix-vector products at once and reorganizing the rest of the algorithm accordingly, we can perform s iterations by sending O(log P) messages instead of Ω(s·log P) messages on a parallel machine, and reading the on-node components of the matrix A from DRAM to cache just once on a single node instead of s times. This reduces communication to the minimum possible. We discuss both algorithms and an implementation of GMRES on a single node of an 8-core Intel Clovertown. Our implementations achieve significant speedups over the conventional algorithms.

  13. Experimental Evidence on Iterated Reasoning in Games.

    PubMed

    Grehl, Sascha; Tutić, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    We present experimental evidence on two forms of iterated reasoning in games, i.e. backward induction and interactive knowledge. Besides reliable estimates of the cognitive skills of the subjects, our design allows us to disentangle two possible explanations for the observed limits in performed iterated reasoning: Restrictions in subjects' cognitive abilities and their beliefs concerning the rationality of co-players. In comparison to previous literature, our estimates regarding subjects' skills in iterated reasoning are quite pessimistic. Also, we find that beliefs concerning the rationality of co-players are completely irrelevant in explaining the observed limited amount of iterated reasoning in the dirty faces game. In addition, it is demonstrated that skills in backward induction are a solid predictor for skills in iterated knowledge, which points to some generalized ability of the subjects in iterated reasoning.

  14. Preconditioned iterations to calculate extreme eigenvalues

    SciTech Connect

    Brand, C.W.; Petrova, S.

    1994-12-31

    Common iterative algorithms to calculate a few extreme eigenvalues of a large, sparse matrix are Lanczos methods or power iterations. They converge at a rate proportional to the separation of the extreme eigenvalues from the rest of the spectrum. Appropriate preconditioning improves the separation of the eigenvalues. Davidson`s method and its generalizations exploit this fact. The authors examine a preconditioned iteration that resembles a truncated version of Davidson`s method with a different preconditioning strategy.

  15. P-SPARSLIB: A parallel sparse iterative solution package

    SciTech Connect

    Saad, Y.

    1994-12-31

    Iterative methods are gaining popularity in engineering and sciences at a time where the computational environment is changing rapidly. P-SPARSLIB is a project to build a software library for sparse matrix computations on parallel computers. The emphasis is on iterative methods and the use of distributed sparse matrices, an extension of the domain decomposition approach to general sparse matrices. One of the goals of this project is to develop a software package geared towards specific applications. For example, the author will test the performance and usefulness of P-SPARSLIB modules on linear systems arising from CFD applications. Equally important is the goal of portability. In the long run, the author wishes to ensure that this package is portable on a variety of platforms, including SIMD environments and shared memory environments.

  16. Rapid Prototyping of Mobile Learning Games

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federley, Maija; Sorsa, Timo; Paavilainen, Janne; Boissonnier, Kimo; Seisto, Anu

    2014-01-01

    This position paper presents the first results of an on-going project, in which we explore rapid prototyping method to efficiently produce digital learning solutions that are commercially viable. In this first phase, rapid game prototyping and an iterative approach was tested as a quick and efficient way to create learning games and to evaluate…

  17. Looking beyond ITER: Toroidal concept improvement

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, J.

    1993-01-01

    The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) will demonstrate ignition and undertake fusion reactor systems integration and testing. Its design will be based upon relatively conservative physics assumptions. More attractive reactor configurations than those based upon ITER physics and the ITER configuration appear possible. The Toroidal Physics Experiment (TPX) will study tokamak behavior under a variety of conditions which may allow operation of improved combinations of beta, transport, and recirculating power. However, TPX still retains a configuration similar to ITER. Two alternative approaches appear interesting, based upon recent experimental results: the very low aspect ratio tokamak, or spherical torus, and the stellarator.

  18. Looking beyond ITER: Toroidal concept improvement

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, J.

    1993-06-01

    The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) will demonstrate ignition and undertake fusion reactor systems integration and testing. Its design will be based upon relatively conservative physics assumptions. More attractive reactor configurations than those based upon ITER physics and the ITER configuration appear possible. The Toroidal Physics Experiment (TPX) will study tokamak behavior under a variety of conditions which may allow operation of improved combinations of beta, transport, and recirculating power. However, TPX still retains a configuration similar to ITER. Two alternative approaches appear interesting, based upon recent experimental results: the very low aspect ratio tokamak, or spherical torus, and the stellarator.

  19. Research at ITER towards DEMO: Specific reactor diagnostic studies to be carried out on ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Krasilnikov, A. V.; Kaschuck, Y. A.; Vershkov, V. A.; Petrov, A. A.; Petrov, V. G.; Tugarinov, S. N.

    2014-08-21

    In ITER diagnostics will operate in the very hard radiation environment of fusion reactor. Extensive technology studies are carried out during development of the ITER diagnostics and procedures of their calibration and remote handling. Results of these studies and practical application of the developed diagnostics on ITER will provide the direct input to DEMO diagnostic development. The list of DEMO measurement requirements and diagnostics will be determined during ITER experiments on the bases of ITER plasma physics results and success of particular diagnostic application in reactor-like ITER plasma. Majority of ITER diagnostic already passed the conceptual design phase and represent the state of the art in fusion plasma diagnostic development. The number of related to DEMO results of ITER diagnostic studies such as design and prototype manufacture of: neutron and γ–ray diagnostics, neutral particle analyzers, optical spectroscopy including first mirror protection and cleaning technics, reflectometry, refractometry, tritium retention measurements etc. are discussed.

  20. Divertor interferometer diagnostic for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Brower, D. L.; Deng, B. H.; Ding, W. X.

    2006-10-15

    In the harsh environment of the divertor region in ITER, plasmas spanning a huge density range from 10{sup 19} to 10{sup 22} m{sup -3} are anticipated making measurement of the electron density particularly challenging. For any reasonable wavelength choice, the total phase measured by a conventional two-color interferometer system is always >>2{pi} and therefore subject to fringe counting errors. This problem can be remedied by adding a polarimeter capability whereby the Cotton-Mouton effect is measured or by employing differential interferometry. Using either approach, the total phase is always <<2{pi}. The conceptual design of an interferometer system along with possible wavelength choices will be explored.

  1. Iterative phase retrieval without support.

    PubMed

    Wu, J S; Weierstall, U; Spence, J C H; Koch, C T

    2004-12-01

    An iterative phase retrieval method for nonperiodic objects has been developed from the charge-flipping algorithm proposed in crystallography. A combination of the hybrid input-output (HIO) algorithm and the flipping algorithm has greatly improved performance. In this combined algorithm the flipping algorithm serves to find the support (object boundary) dynamically, and the HIO part improves convergence and moves the algorithm out of local minima. It starts with a single intensity measurement in the Fourier domain and does not require a priori knowledge of the support in the image domain. This method is suitable for general image recovery from oversampled diffuse elastic x-ray and electron-diffraction intensities. The relationship between this algorithm and the output-output algorithm is elucidated.

  2. Iterative phase retrieval without support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, J. S.; Weierstall, U.; Spence, J. C. H.; Koch, C. T.

    2004-12-01

    An iterative phase retrieval method for nonperiodic objects has been developed from the charge-flipping algorithm proposed in crystallography. A combination of the hybrid input-output (HIO) algorithm and the flipping algorithm has greatly improved performance. In this combined algorithm the flipping algorithm serves to find the support (object boundary) dynamically, and the HIO part improves convergence and moves the algorithm out of local minima. It starts with a single intensity measurement in the Fourier domain and does not require a priori knowledge of the support in the image domain. This method is suitable for general image recovery from oversampled diffuse elastic x-ray and electron-diffraction intensities. The relationship between this algorithm and the output-output algorithm is elucidated.

  3. Planning as an Iterative Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, David E.

    2012-01-01

    Activity planning for missions such as the Mars Exploration Rover mission presents many technical challenges, including oversubscription, consideration of time, concurrency, resources, preferences, and uncertainty. These challenges have all been addressed by the research community to varying degrees, but significant technical hurdles still remain. In addition, the integration of these capabilities into a single planning engine remains largely unaddressed. However, I argue that there is a deeper set of issues that needs to be considered namely the integration of planning into an iterative process that begins before the goals, objectives, and preferences are fully defined. This introduces a number of technical challenges for planning, including the ability to more naturally specify and utilize constraints on the planning process, the ability to generate multiple qualitatively different plans, and the ability to provide deep explanation of plans.

  4. Benchmarking ICRF simulations for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    R. V. Budny, L. Berry, R. Bilato, P. Bonoli, M. Brambilla, R.J. Dumont, A. Fukuyama, R. Harvey, E.F. Jaeger, E. Lerche, C.K. Phillips, V. Vdovin, J. Wright, and members of the ITPA-IOS

    2010-09-28

    Abstract Benchmarking of full-wave solvers for ICRF simulations is performed using plasma profiles and equilibria obtained from integrated self-consistent modeling predictions of four ITER plasmas. One is for a high performance baseline (5.3 T, 15 MA) DT H-mode plasma. The others are for half-field, half-current plasmas of interest for the pre-activation phase with bulk plasma ion species being either hydrogen or He4. The predicted profiles are used by seven groups to predict the ICRF electromagnetic fields and heating profiles. Approximate agreement is achieved for the predicted heating power partitions for the DT and He4 cases. Profiles of the heating powers and electromagnetic fields are compared.

  5. Endothelial cell-T lymphocyte interactions: IP[corrected]-10 stimulates rapid transendothelial migration of human effector but not central memory CD4+ T cells. Requirements for shear stress and adhesion molecules.

    PubMed

    Manes, Thomas D; Pober, Jordan S; Kluger, Martin S

    2006-07-15

    The chemokine interferon (IFN)-gamma-inducible protein of 10 kDa (IP-10; CXCL10) has been implicated in recruitment of T cells into rejecting allografts yet appears ineffective at stimulating human peripheral blood CD4 T cells to transmigrate across tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-treated human endothelial cell (EC) monolayers in vitro. The same cells rapidly (within 15 min) transmigrate across TNF-treated EC monolayers overlaid with stromal cell-derived factor-1 alpha (SDF-1 alpha) and subjected to shear stress. The effector memory subset within the CD4 T cell population, defined as CD45RO, CD62L and CCR7, which constitutes less than 10% of total CD4 T cells, does respond to IP-10 but requires enrichment to be observed in this model. Central memory T cells do not respond to IP-10. Transendothelial migration of effector memory CD4 T cells requires TNF-pretreatment of the EC monolayer and application of venular shear force during the assay. TNF treatment of ECs may be effectively replaced by transduction of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 or intercellular adhesion molecule-1 but not E-selectin.

  6. Plasma-surface interaction in the context of ITER.

    PubMed

    Kleyn, A W; Lopes Cardozo, N J; Samm, U

    2006-04-21

    The decreasing availability of energy and concern about climate change necessitate the development of novel sustainable energy sources. Fusion energy is such a source. Although it will take several decades to develop it into routinely operated power sources, the ultimate potential of fusion energy is very high and badly needed. A major step forward in the development of fusion energy is the decision to construct the experimental test reactor ITER. ITER will stimulate research in many areas of science. This article serves as an introduction to some of those areas. In particular, we discuss research opportunities in the context of plasma-surface interactions. The fusion plasma, with a typical temperature of 10 keV, has to be brought into contact with a physical wall in order to remove the helium produced and drain the excess energy in the fusion plasma. The fusion plasma is far too hot to be brought into direct contact with a physical wall. It would degrade the wall and the debris from the wall would extinguish the plasma. Therefore, schemes are developed to cool down the plasma locally before it impacts on a physical surface. The resulting plasma-surface interaction in ITER is facing several challenges including surface erosion, material redeposition and tritium retention. In this article we introduce how the plasma-surface interaction relevant for ITER can be studied in small scale experiments. The various requirements for such experiments are introduced and examples of present and future experiments will be given. The emphasis in this article will be on the experimental studies of plasma-surface interactions.

  7. Iterative methods for weighted least-squares

    SciTech Connect

    Bobrovnikova, E.Y.; Vavasis, S.A.

    1996-12-31

    A weighted least-squares problem with a very ill-conditioned weight matrix arises in many applications. Because of round-off errors, the standard conjugate gradient method for solving this system does not give the correct answer even after n iterations. In this paper we propose an iterative algorithm based on a new type of reorthogonalization that converges to the solution.

  8. An accelerated subspace iteration for eigenvector derivatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, Tienko

    1991-01-01

    An accelerated subspace iteration method for calculating eigenvector derivatives has been developed. Factors affecting the effectiveness and the reliability of the subspace iteration are identified, and effective strategies concerning these factors are presented. The method has been implemented, and the results of a demonstration problem are presented.

  9. Rater Variables Associated with ITER Ratings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paget, Michael; Wu, Caren; McIlwrick, Joann; Woloschuk, Wayne; Wright, Bruce; McLaughlin, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Advocates of holistic assessment consider the ITER a more authentic way to assess performance. But this assessment format is subjective and, therefore, susceptible to rater bias. Here our objective was to study the association between rater variables and ITER ratings. In this observational study our participants were clerks at the University of…

  10. Colorado Conference on iterative methods. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-31

    The conference provided a forum for many topics in iterative methods. Volume II presents sessions on these topics: nonsymmetric solvers, parallel computation, ODE solvers, multigrid and multilevel methods, applications, robust iterative methods, preconditioners, Toeplitz and circulant matrix solvers, and saddle point problems. Individual papers are indexed separately on the EDB.

  11. New concurrent iterative methods with monotonic convergence

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, Qingchuan

    1996-12-31

    This paper proposes the new concurrent iterative methods without using any derivatives for finding all zeros of polynomials simultaneously. The new methods are of monotonic convergence for both simple and multiple real-zeros of polynomials and are quadratically convergent. The corresponding accelerated concurrent iterative methods are obtained too. The new methods are good candidates for the application in solving symmetric eigenproblems.

  12. Global ICRF system designs for ITER and TPX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goulding, R. H.; Hoffman, D. J.; Ryan, P. M.; Durodié, F.

    1996-02-01

    The design of feed networks for ICRF antenna arrays on ITER and TPX are discussed. Features which are present in one or both of the designs include distribution of power to several straps from a single generator, the capability to vary phases of the currents on antenna elements rapidly without the need to rematch, and passive elements which present a nearly constant load to the generators during ELM induced loading transients of a factor of 10 or more. The FDAC (Feedline/Decoupler/Antenna Calculator) network modeling code is described, which allows convenient modeling of the electrical performance of nearly arbitrary ICRF feed networks.

  13. Global ICRF system designs for ITER and TPX

    SciTech Connect

    Goulding, R.H.; Hoffman, D.J.; Ryan, P.M.; Durodie, F.

    1996-02-01

    The design of feed networks for ICRF antenna arrays on ITER and TPX are discussed. Features which are present in one or both of the designs include distribution of power to several straps from a single generator, the capability to vary phases of the currents on antenna elements rapidly without the need to rematch, and passive elements which present a nearly constant load to the generators during ELM induced loading transients of a factor of 10 or more. The FDAC (Feedline/Decoupler/Antenna Calculator) network modeling code is described, which allows convenient modeling of the electrical performance of nearly arbitrary ICRF feed networks. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  14. Iterative bandgap engineering at selected areas of quantum semiconductor wafers.

    PubMed

    Stanowski, Radoslaw; Martin, Matthieu; Ares, Richard; Dubowski, Jan J

    2009-10-26

    We report on the application of a laser rapid thermal annealing technique for iterative bandgap engineering at selected areas of quantum semiconductor wafers. The approach takes advantage of the quantum well intermixing (QWI) effect for achieving targeted values of the bandgap in a series of small annealing steps. Each QWI step is monitored by collecting a photoluminescence map and, consequently, choosing the annealing strategy of the next step. An array of eight sites, 280 mum in diameter, each emitting at 1480 nm, has been fabricated with a spectral accuracy of better than 2 nm in a standard InGaAs/InGaAsP QW heterostructure that originally emitted at 1550 nm.

  15. Global ICRF system designs for ITER and TPX

    SciTech Connect

    Goulding, R.H.; Hoffman, D.J.; Ryan, P.M.; Durodie, F.

    1995-09-01

    The design of feed networks for ICRF antenna arrays on ITER and TPX are discussed. Features which are present in one or both of the designs include distribution of power to several straps from a single generator, the capability to vary phases of the currents on antenna elements rapidly without the need to rematch, and passive elements which present a nearly constant load to the generators during ELM induced loading transients of a factor of I0 or more. The FDAC (Feedline/Decoupler/Antenna Calculator) network modeling code is described, which allows convenient modeling of the electrical performance of nearly arbitrary ICRF feed networks.

  16. Iterants, Fermions and Majorana Operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauffman, Louis H.

    Beginning with an elementary, oscillatory discrete dynamical system associated with the square root of minus one, we study both the foundations of mathematics and physics. Position and momentum do not commute in our discrete physics. Their commutator is related to the diffusion constant for a Brownian process and to the Heisenberg commutator in quantum mechanics. We take John Wheeler's idea of It from Bit as an essential clue and we rework the structure of that bit to a logical particle that is its own anti-particle, a logical Marjorana particle. This is our key example of the amphibian nature of mathematics and the external world. We show how the dynamical system for the square root of minus one is essentially the dynamics of a distinction whose self-reference leads to both the fusion algebra and the operator algebra for the Majorana Fermion. In the course of this, we develop an iterant algebra that supports all of matrix algebra and we end the essay with a discussion of the Dirac equation based on these principles.

  17. Magnetic fusion and project ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H.K.

    1992-09-01

    It has already been demonstrated that our economics and international relationship are impacted by an energy crisis. For the continuing prosperity of the human race, a new and viable energy source must be developed within the next century. It is evident that the cost will be high and will require a long term commitment to achieve this goal due to a high degree of technological and scientific knowledge. Energy from the controlled nuclear fusion is a safe, competitive, and environmentally attractive but has not yet been completely conquered. Magnetic fusion is one of the most difficult technological challenges. In modem magnetic fusion devices, temperatures that are significantly higher than the temperatures of the sun have been achieved routinely and the successful generation of tens of million watts as a result of scientific break-even is expected from the deuterium and tritium experiment within the next few years. For the practical future fusion reactor, we need to develop reactor relevant materials and technologies. The international project called ``International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER)`` will fulfill this need and the success of this project will provide the most attractive long-term energy source for mankind.

  18. Progress on ITER Diagnostic Integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, David; Feder, Russ; Klabacha, Jonathan; Loesser, Doug; Messineo, Mike; Stratton, Brentley; Wood, Rick; Zhai, Yuhu; Andrew, Phillip; Barnsley, Robin; Bertschinger, Guenter; Debock, Maarten; Reichle, Roger; Udintsev, Victor; Vayakis, George; Watts, Christopher; Walsh, Michael

    2013-10-01

    On ITER, front-end components must operate reliably in a hostile environment. Many will be housed in massive port plugs, which also shield the machine from radiation. Multiple diagnostics reside in a single plug, presenting new challenges for developers. Front-end components must tolerate thermally-induced stresses, disruption-induced mechanical loads, stray ECH radiation, displacement damage, and degradation due to plasma-induced coatings. The impact of failures is amplified due to the difficulty in performing robotic maintenance on these large structures. Motivated by needs to minimize disruption loads on the plugs, standardize the handling of shield modules, and decouple the parallel efforts of the many parties, the packaging strategy for diagnostics has recently focused on the use of 3 vertical shield modules inserted from the plasma side into each equatorial plug structure. At the front of each is a detachable first wall element with customized apertures. Progress on US equatorial and upper plugs will be used as examples, including the layout of components in the interspace and port cell regions. Supported by PPPL under contract DE-AC02-09CH11466 and UT-Battelle, LLC under contract DE-AC05-00OR22725 with the U.S. DOE.

  19. On the interplay between inner and outer iterations for a class of iterative methods

    SciTech Connect

    Giladi, E.

    1994-12-31

    Iterative algorithms for solving linear systems of equations often involve the solution of a subproblem at each step. This subproblem is usually another linear system of equations. For example, a preconditioned iteration involves the solution of a preconditioner at each step. In this paper, the author considers algorithms for which the subproblem is also solved iteratively. The subproblem is then said to be solved by {open_quotes}inner iterations{close_quotes} while the term {open_quotes}outer iteration{close_quotes} refers to a step of the basic algorithm. The cost of performing an outer iteration is dominated by the solution of the subproblem, and can be measured by the number of inner iterations. A good measure of the total amount of work needed to solve the original problem to some accuracy c is then, the total number of inner iterations. To lower the amount of work, one can consider solving the subproblems {open_quotes}inexactly{close_quotes} i.e. not to full accuracy. Although this diminishes the cost of solving each subproblem, it usually slows down the convergence of the outer iteration. It is therefore interesting to study the effect of solving each subproblem inexactly on the total amount of work. Specifically, the author considers strategies in which the accuracy to which the inner problem is solved, changes from one outer iteration to the other. The author seeks the `optimal strategy`, that is, the one that yields the lowest possible cost. Here, the author develops a methodology to find the optimal strategy, from the set of slowly varying strategies, for some iterative algorithms. This methodology is applied to the Chebychev iteration and it is shown that for Chebychev iteration, a strategy in which the inner-tolerance remains constant is optimal. The author also estimates this optimal constant. Then generalizations to other iterative procedures are discussed.

  20. JET helps prepare for ITER operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkins, Michael

    2005-10-01

    The main focus of the JET programme (2006-10) in preparation of ITER operation is a new ITER-like ICRH antenna (total RF power increased to ˜15MW), a new ITER-like first wall (beryllium in the main chamber, tungsten in the divertor, and possibly CFC at the strike points), upgraded NB power (to 35MW/20s or 17.5MW/10s), and an improved diagnostic and control capability. Mass flows for ITER Scenarios with the ITER-like first wall will be optimised, particularly to minimise in-vessel tritium inventory, since this must be controlled strictly in ITER and has been shown on JET with a carbon first wall to depend sensitively on plasma conditions. Higher power will allow confinement scalings to be resolved for normalised parameters closer to ITER (beta dependence of ELMy H-modes, confinement of improved H-modes at low ρ*) and offers the prospect of high beta operation at high current and density, and new fully non-inductive, high performance, ITB discharges sustained to long pulse by real time current and pressure profile control, particularly in bootstrap current dominated regimes. Together, the first wall and increased heating power place strict constraints on the optimisation of ITER scenarios for long pulse operation with low melt damage. Large ELMs (in excess of 1MJ; marginally accessible on JET at present) and disruptions could cause melt severe damage which must be studied and controlled. The testing and optimisation of techniques for ELM mitigation (impurity seeding, demonstrated on JET; use of a new high frequency pellet injector (10-60Hz) to prevent large ELMs, demonstrated on ASDEX Upgrade) and disruption mitigation (fast gas injection from a new disruption mitigation valve, demonstrated on DIII-D) will be even more relevant under the ITER-like edge plasma conditions accessible with the increased power. Acknowledgement : Contributors to EFDA-JET Workprogramme

  1. Iterative restoration algorithms for nonlinear constraint computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szu, Harold

    A general iterative-restoration principle is introduced to facilitate the implementation of nonlinear optical processors. The von Neumann convergence theorem is generalized to include nonorthogonal subspaces which can be reduced to a special orthogonal projection operator by applying an orthogonality condition. This principle is shown to permit derivation of the Jacobi algorithm, the recursive principle, the van Cittert (1931) deconvolution method, the iteration schemes of Gerchberg (1974) and Papoulis (1975), and iteration schemes using two Fourier conjugate domains (e.g., Fienup, 1981). Applications to restoring the image of a double star and division by hard and soft zeros are discussed, and sample results are presented graphically.

  2. New stopping criteria for iterative root finding

    PubMed Central

    Nikolajsen, Jorgen L.

    2014-01-01

    A set of simple stopping criteria is presented, which improve the efficiency of iterative root finding by terminating the iterations immediately when no further improvement of the roots is possible. The criteria use only the function evaluations already needed by the root finding procedure to which they are applied. The improved efficiency is achieved by formulating the stopping criteria in terms of fractional significant digits. Test results show that the new stopping criteria reduce the iteration work load by about one-third compared with the most efficient stopping criteria currently available. This is achieved without compromising the accuracy of the extracted roots. PMID:26064544

  3. ITER CS Intermodule Support Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Myatt, R.; Freudenberg, Kevin D

    2011-01-01

    With five independently driven, bi-polarity power supplies, the modules of the ITER central solenoid (CS) can be energized in aligned or opposing field directions. This sets up the possibility for repelling modules, which indeed occurs, particularly between CS2L and CS3L around the End of Burn (EOB) time point. Light interface compression between these two modules at EOB and wide variations in these coil currents throughout the pulse produce a tendency for relative motion or slip. Ideally, the slip is purely radial as the modules breathe without any accumulative translational motion. In reality, however, asymmetries such as nonuniformity in intermodule friction, lateral loads from a plasma Vertical Disruption Event (VDE), magnetic forces from manufacturing and assembly tolerances, and earthquakes can all contribute to a combination of radial and lateral module motion. This paper presents 2D and 3D, nonlinear, ANSYS models which simulate these various asymmetries and determine the lateral forces which must be carried by the intermodule structure. Summing all of these asymmetric force contributions leads to a design-basis lateral load which is used in the design of various support concepts: the CS-CDR centering rings and a variation, the 2001 FDR baseline radial keys, and interlocking castles structures. Radial key-type intermodule structure interface slip and stresses are tracked through multiple 15 MA scenario current pulses to demonstrate stable motion following the first few cycles. Detractions and benefits of each candidate intermodule structure are discussed, leading to the simplest and most robust configuration which meets the design requirements: match-drilled radial holes and pin-shaped keys.

  4. The Physics Basis of ITER Confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, F.

    2009-02-19

    ITER will be the first fusion reactor and the 50 year old dream of fusion scientists will become reality. The quality of magnetic confinement will decide about the success of ITER, directly in the form of the confinement time and indirectly because it decides about the plasma parameters and the fluxes, which cross the separatrix and have to be handled externally by technical means. This lecture portrays some of the basic principles which govern plasma confinement, uses dimensionless scaling to set the limits for the predictions for ITER, an approach which also shows the limitations of the predictions, and describes briefly the major characteristics and physics behind the H-mode--the preferred confinement regime of ITER.

  5. ITER Magnet Feeder: Design, Manufacturing and Integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    CHEN, Yonghua; ILIN, Y.; M., SU; C., NICHOLAS; BAUER, P.; JAROMIR, F.; LU, Kun; CHENG, Yong; SONG, Yuntao; LIU, Chen; HUANG, Xiongyi; ZHOU, Tingzhi; SHEN, Guang; WANG, Zhongwei; FENG, Hansheng; SHEN, Junsong

    2015-03-01

    The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) feeder procurement is now well underway. The feeder design has been improved by the feeder teams at the ITER Organization (IO) and the Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (ASIPP) in the last 2 years along with analyses and qualification activities. The feeder design is being progressively finalized. In addition, the preparation of qualification and manufacturing are well scheduled at ASIPP. This paper mainly presents the design, the overview of manufacturing and the status of integration on the ITER magnet feeders. supported by the National Special Support for R&D on Science and Technology for ITER (Ministry of Public Security of the People's Republic of China-MPS) (No. 2008GB102000)

  6. Anderson Acceleration for Fixed-Point Iterations

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Homer F.

    2015-08-31

    The purpose of this grant was to support research on acceleration methods for fixed-point iterations, with applications to computational frameworks and simulation problems that are of interest to DOE.

  7. Archimedes' Pi--An Introduction to Iteration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lotspeich, Richard

    1988-01-01

    One method (attributed to Archimedes) of approximating pi offers a simple yet interesting introduction to one of the basic ideas of numerical analysis, an iteration sequence. The method is described and elaborated. (PK)

  8. Archimedes' Pi--An Introduction to Iteration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lotspeich, Richard

    1988-01-01

    One method (attributed to Archimedes) of approximating pi offers a simple yet interesting introduction to one of the basic ideas of numerical analysis, an iteration sequence. The method is described and elaborated. (PK)

  9. On the safety of ITER accelerators.

    PubMed

    Li, Ge

    2013-01-01

    Three 1 MV/40A accelerators in heating neutral beams (HNB) are on track to be implemented in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). ITER may produce 500 MWt of power by 2026 and may serve as a green energy roadmap for the world. They will generate -1 MV 1 h long-pulse ion beams to be neutralised for plasma heating. Due to frequently occurring vacuum sparking in the accelerators, the snubbers are used to limit the fault arc current to improve ITER safety. However, recent analyses of its reference design have raised concerns. General nonlinear transformer theory is developed for the snubber to unify the former snubbers' different design models with a clear mechanism. Satisfactory agreement between theory and tests indicates that scaling up to a 1 MV voltage may be possible. These results confirm the nonlinear process behind transformer theory and map out a reliable snubber design for a safer ITER.

  10. Zonal matrix iterative method for wavefront reconstruction from gradient measurements.

    PubMed

    Panagopoulou, Sophia I; Neal, Daniel R

    2005-01-01

    To present an alternate method to Zemike decomposition (modal) of wavefront reconstruction using iterative implicit solution to the finite difference equations (zonal). Different reconstruction methods, modal and zonal, were compared and the advantages of each method were analyzed. Although the modal or Zemike method allows for quantitative interpretation of some of the aberrations, it is cumbersome for use with fine details and may lead to errors for eyes with keratoconus or other rapidly varying aberration. The zonal method produces a very high-resolution map that can be used for identifying irregular structures. The distinction between the two methods is useful to maintain, and the solution methods are generally different. In practice, both methods are useful and, with modern computers, both zonal and lower-order modal may be calculated rapidly. The difference between the wavefronts derived from the two methods may provide useful insight or interpretation of the infornation.

  11. Wedge scattering by the method of iteration

    SciTech Connect

    Holliday, D.; DeRaad, L.L. Jr.; St-Cyr, G.J.

    1993-07-01

    We have investigated scattering from the classic wedge and have shown that the method of iteration of the surface current integral equation predicts currents and backscattered fields that are good approximations to the Sommerfeld solution. The method of iteration has also been applied to truncated wedges on flat surfaces with the result that the scattering from this wedge is been to be very much different from the Sommerfeld solution. These results and their implications for ocean backscatter are reported herein.

  12. Iterative consolidation of unorganized point clouds.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shengjun; Chan, Kwan-Chung; Wang, Charlie C L

    2012-01-01

    Unorganized point clouds obtained from 3D shape acquisition devices usually present noise, outliers, and nonuniformities. The proposed framework consolidates unorganized points through an iterative procedure of interlaced downsampling and upsampling. Selection operations remove outliers while preserving geometric details. The framework improves the uniformity of points by moving the downsampled particles and refining point samples. Surface extrapolation fills missed regions. Moreover, an adaptive sampling strategy speeds up the iterations. Experimental results demonstrate the framework's effectiveness.

  13. Iterative methods for design sensitivity analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belegundu, A. D.; Yoon, B. G.

    1989-01-01

    A numerical method is presented for design sensitivity analysis, using an iterative-method reanalysis of the structure generated by a small perturbation in the design variable; a forward-difference scheme is then employed to obtain the approximate sensitivity. Algorithms are developed for displacement and stress sensitivity, as well as for eignevalues and eigenvector sensitivity, and the iterative schemes are modified so that the coefficient matrices are constant and therefore decomposed only once.

  14. Accelerated Schwarz iterations for Helmholtz equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagid, Nabila; Belhadj, Hassan; Amattouch, Mohamed Ridouan

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, the Restricted additive Schwarz (RAS) method is applied to solve Helmholtz equation. To accelerate the RAS iterations, we propose to apply the vector ɛ-algorithm. Some convergence analysis of the proposed method is presented, and applied succeffully to Helmholtz problem. The obtained results show the efficiency of the proposed approach. Moreover, the algorithm yields much faster convergence than the classical Schwarz iterations.

  15. Novel aspects of plasma control in ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphreys, D.; Ambrosino, G.; de Vries, P.; Felici, F.; Kim, S. H.; Jackson, G.; Kallenbach, A.; Kolemen, E.; Lister, J.; Moreau, D.; Pironti, A.; Raupp, G.; Sauter, O.; Schuster, E.; Snipes, J.; Treutterer, W.; Walker, M.; Welander, A.; Winter, A.; Zabeo, L.

    2015-02-01

    ITER plasma control design solutions and performance requirements are strongly driven by its nuclear mission, aggressive commissioning constraints, and limited number of operational discharges. In addition, high plasma energy content, heat fluxes, neutron fluxes, and very long pulse operation place novel demands on control performance in many areas ranging from plasma boundary and divertor regulation to plasma kinetics and stability control. Both commissioning and experimental operations schedules provide limited time for tuning of control algorithms relative to operating devices. Although many aspects of the control solutions required by ITER have been well-demonstrated in present devices and even designed satisfactorily for ITER application, many elements unique to ITER including various crucial integration issues are presently under development. We describe selected novel aspects of plasma control in ITER, identifying unique parts of the control problem and highlighting some key areas of research remaining. Novel control areas described include control physics understanding (e.g., current profile regulation, tearing mode (TM) suppression), control mathematics (e.g., algorithmic and simulation approaches to high confidence robust performance), and integration solutions (e.g., methods for management of highly subscribed control resources). We identify unique aspects of the ITER TM suppression scheme, which will pulse gyrotrons to drive current within a magnetic island, and turn the drive off following suppression in order to minimize use of auxiliary power and maximize fusion gain. The potential role of active current profile control and approaches to design in ITER are discussed. Issues and approaches to fault handling algorithms are described, along with novel aspects of actuator sharing in ITER.

  16. Novel aspects of plasma control in ITER

    DOE PAGES

    Humphreys, David; Ambrosino, G.; de Vries, Peter; ...

    2015-02-12

    ITER plasma control design solutions and performance requirements are strongly driven by its nuclear mission, aggressive commissioning constraints, and limited number of operational discharges. In addition, high plasma energy content, heat fluxes, neutron fluxes, and very long pulse operation place novel demands on control performance in many areas ranging from plasma boundary and divertor regulation to plasma kinetics and stability control. Both commissioning and experimental operations schedules provide limited time for tuning of control algorithms relative to operating devices. Although many aspects of the control solutions required by ITER have been well-demonstrated in present devices and even designed satisfactorily formore » ITER application, many elements unique to ITER including various crucial integration issues are presently under development. We describe selected novel aspects of plasma control in ITER, identifying unique parts of the control problem and highlighting some key areas of research remaining. Novel control areas described include control physics understanding (e.g. current profile regulation, tearing mode suppression (TM)), control mathematics (e.g. algorithmic and simulation approaches to high confidence robust performance), and integration solutions (e.g. methods for management of highly-subscribed control resources). We identify unique aspects of the ITER TM suppression scheme, which will pulse gyrotrons to drive current within a magnetic island, and turn the drive off following suppression in order to minimize use of auxiliary power and maximize fusion gain. The potential role of active current profile control and approaches to design in ITER are discussed. Finally, issues and approaches to fault handling algorithms are described, along with novel aspects of actuator sharing in ITER.« less

  17. Novel aspects of plasma control in ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Humphreys, David; Ambrosino, G.; Felici, Federico; Kim, Sun H.; Jackson, Gary; Kallenbach, A.; Kolemen, Egemen; Lister, J.; Moreau, D.; Pironti, A.; Sauter, O.; Schuster, E.; Snipes, J.; Treutterer, W.; Walker, M.; Welander, A.; Winter, A.; Zabeo, L.

    2015-02-12

    ITER plasma control design solutions and performance requirements are strongly driven by its nuclear mission, aggressive commissioning constraints, and limited number of operational discharges. In addition, high plasma energy content, heat fluxes, neutron fluxes, and very long pulse operation place novel demands on control performance in many areas ranging from plasma boundary and divertor regulation to plasma kinetics and stability control. Both commissioning and experimental operations schedules provide limited time for tuning of control algorithms relative to operating devices. Although many aspects of the control solutions required by ITER have been well-demonstrated in present devices and even designed satisfactorily for ITER application, many elements unique to ITER including various crucial integration issues are presently under development. We describe selected novel aspects of plasma control in ITER, identifying unique parts of the control problem and highlighting some key areas of research remaining. Novel control areas described include control physics understanding (e.g. current profile regulation, tearing mode suppression (TM)), control mathematics (e.g. algorithmic and simulation approaches to high confidence robust performance), and integration solutions (e.g. methods for management of highly-subscribed control resources). We identify unique aspects of the ITER TM suppression scheme, which will pulse gyrotrons to drive current within a magnetic island, and turn the drive off following suppression in order to minimize use of auxiliary power and maximize fusion gain. The potential role of active current profile control and approaches to design in ITER are discussed. Finally, issues and approaches to fault handling algorithms are described, along with novel aspects of actuator sharing in ITER.

  18. Iterative methods based upon residual averaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neuberger, J. W.

    1980-01-01

    Iterative methods for solving boundary value problems for systems of nonlinear partial differential equations are discussed. The methods involve subtracting an average of residuals from one approximation in order to arrive at a subsequent approximation. Two abstract methods in Hilbert space are given and application of these methods to quasilinear systems to give numerical schemes for such problems is demonstrated. Potential theoretic matters related to the iteration schemes are discussed.

  19. An Iterative Soft-Decision Decoding Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Shu; Koumoto, Takuya; Takata, Toyoo; Kasami, Tadao

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents a new minimum-weight trellis-based soft-decision iterative decoding algorithm for binary linear block codes. Simulation results for the RM(64,22), EBCH(64,24), RM(64,42) and EBCH(64,45) codes show that the proposed decoding algorithm achieves practically (or near) optimal error performance with significant reduction in decoding computational complexity. The average number of search iterations is also small even for low signal-to-noise ratio.

  20. Programmable Iterative Optical Image And Data Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Deborah J.

    1995-01-01

    Proposed method of iterative optical image and data processing overcomes limitations imposed by loss of optical power after repeated passes through many optical elements - especially, beam splitters. Involves selective, timed combination of optical wavefront phase conjugation and amplification to regenerate images in real time to compensate for losses in optical iteration loops; timing such that amplification turned on to regenerate desired image, then turned off so as not to regenerate other, undesired images or spurious light propagating through loops from unwanted reflections.

  1. Iterated sequence databank search methods.

    PubMed

    Taylor, W R; Brown, N P

    1999-06-15

    Iterated sequence databank search methods were assessed from the viewpoint of someone with the sequence of a novel gene product wishing to find distant relatives to their protein and, with the specific searches against the PDB, also hoping to find a relative of known structure. We examined three methods in detail, spanning a range from simple pattern-matching to sophisticated weighted profiles. Rather than apply these methods 'blindly' (with default parameters) to a large number of test queries, we have concentrated on the globins, so allowing a more detailed investigation of each method on different data subsets with different parameter settings. Despite their widespread use, regular-expression matching proved to be very limited-seldom extending beyond the sub-family from which the pattern was derived. To attain any generality, the patterns had to be 'stripped-down' to include only the most highly conserved parts. The QUEST program avoided these problems by introducing a more flexible (weighted) matching. On the PDB sequences this was highly effective, missing only a few globins with probes based on each sub-family or even a single representative from each sub-family. In addition, very few false-positives were encountered, and those that did match, often only did so for a few cycles before being lost again. On the larger sequence collection, however, QUEST encountered problems with maintaining (or achieving) the alignment of the full globin family. psi-BLAST also recognised almost all the globins when matching against the PDB sequences, typically, missing three or four of the most distantly related sequences while picking-up a few false-positives. In contrast to QUEST, psi-BLAST performed very well on the larger databank, getting almost a full collection of globins although still retaining the same proportion of false-positives. SAM applied to the PDB sequences performed reasonably well with the myoglobin and hemoglobin families as probes, missing, typically

  2. CORSICA modelling of ITER hybrid operation scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S. H.; Bulmer, R. H.; Campbell, D. J.; Casper, T. A.; LoDestro, L. L.; Meyer, W. H.; Pearlstein, L. D.; Snipes, J. A.

    2016-12-01

    The hybrid operating mode observed in several tokamaks is characterized by further enhancement over the high plasma confinement (H-mode) associated with reduced magneto-hydro-dynamic (MHD) instabilities linked to a stationary flat safety factor (q ) profile in the core region. The proposed ITER hybrid operation is currently aiming at operating for a long burn duration (>1000 s) with a moderate fusion power multiplication factor, Q , of at least 5. This paper presents candidate ITER hybrid operation scenarios developed using a free-boundary transport modelling code, CORSICA, taking all relevant physics and engineering constraints into account. The ITER hybrid operation scenarios have been developed by tailoring the 15 MA baseline ITER inductive H-mode scenario. Accessible operation conditions for ITER hybrid operation and achievable range of plasma parameters have been investigated considering uncertainties on the plasma confinement and transport. ITER operation capability for avoiding the poloidal field coil current, field and force limits has been examined by applying different current ramp rates, flat-top plasma currents and densities, and pre-magnetization of the poloidal field coils. Various combinations of heating and current drive (H&CD) schemes have been applied to study several physics issues, such as the plasma current density profile tailoring, enhancement of the plasma energy confinement and fusion power generation. A parameterized edge pedestal model based on EPED1 added to the CORSICA code has been applied to hybrid operation scenarios. Finally, fully self-consistent free-boundary transport simulations have been performed to provide information on the poloidal field coil voltage demands and to study the controllability with the ITER controllers. Extended from Proc. 24th Int. Conf. on Fusion Energy (San Diego, 2012) IT/P1-13.

  3. Energetic particle physics issues for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, C.Z.; Budny, R.; Fu, G.Y.

    1996-12-31

    This paper summarizes our present understanding of the following energetic/alpha particle physics issues for the 21 MA, 20 TF coil ITER Interim Design configuration and operational scenarios: (a) toroidal field ripple effects on alpha particle confinement, (b) energetic particle interaction with low frequency MHD modes, (c) energetic particle excitation of toroidal Alfven eigenmodes, and (d) energetic particle transport due to MHD modes. TF ripple effects on alpha loss in ITER under a number of different operating conditions are found to be small with a maximum loss of 1%. With careful plasma control in ITER reversed-shear operation, TF ripple induced alpha loss can be reduced to below the nominal ITER design limit of 5%. Fishbone modes are expected to be unstable for {beta}{sub {alpha}} > 1%, and sawtooth stabilization is lost if the ideal kink growth rate exceeds 10% of the deeply trapped alpha precessional drift frequency evaluated at the q = 1 surface. However, it is expected that the fishbone modes will lead only to a local flattening of the alpha profile due to small banana size. MHD modes observed during slow decrease of stored energy after fast partial electron temperature collapse in JT-60U reversed-shear experiments may be resonant type instabilities; they may have implications on the energetic particle confinement in ITER reversed-shear operation. From the results of various TAE stability code calculations, ITER equilibria appear to lie close to TAE linear stability thresholds. However, the prognosis depends strongly on q profile and profiles of alpha and other high energy particles species. If TAE modes are unstable in ITER, the stochastic diffusion is the main loss mechanism, which scales with ({delta}B{sub r}/B){sup 2}, because of the relatively small alpha particle banana orbit size. For isolated TAE modes the particle loss is very small, and TAE modes saturate via the resonant wave-particle trapping process at very small amplitude.

  4. PREFACE: Progress in the ITER Physics Basis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, K.

    2007-06-01

    I would firstly like to congratulate all who have contributed to the preparation of the `Progress in the ITER Physics Basis' (PIPB) on its publication and express my deep appreciation of the hard work and commitment of the many scientists involved. With the signing of the ITER Joint Implementing Agreement in November 2006, the ITER Members have now established the framework for construction of the project, and the ITER Organization has begun work at Cadarache. The review of recent progress in the physics basis for burning plasma experiments encompassed by the PIPB will be a valuable resource for the project and, in particular, for the current Design Review. The ITER design has been derived from a physics basis developed through experimental, modelling and theoretical work on the properties of tokamak plasmas and, in particular, on studies of burning plasma physics. The `ITER Physics Basis' (IPB), published in 1999, has been the reference for the projection methodologies for the design of ITER, but the IPB also highlighted several key issues which needed to be resolved to provide a robust basis for ITER operation. In the intervening period scientists of the ITER Participant Teams have addressed these issues intensively. The International Tokamak Physics Activity (ITPA) has provided an excellent forum for scientists involved in these studies, focusing their work on the high priority physics issues for ITER. Significant progress has been made in many of the issues identified in the IPB and this progress is discussed in depth in the PIPB. In this respect, the publication of the PIPB symbolizes the strong interest and enthusiasm of the plasma physics community for the success of the ITER project, which we all recognize as one of the great scientific challenges of the 21st century. I wish to emphasize my appreciation of the work of the ITPA Coordinating Committee members, who are listed below. Their support and encouragement for the preparation of the PIPB were

  5. Analysis of self-excited induction generators using an iterative method

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, T.F.

    1995-09-01

    This paper describes the steady-state analysis of self-excited induction generators (SEIG) using an iterative method. By considering the conductances connected across the air gap nodes, an iteration procedure is developed of the determination of the self-excited per unit frequency, which enables the equivalent circuit to be completely solved. The proposed method involves only simple algebraic calculations, but the accuracy is good an convergence is rapid. The method is subsequently extended to include core loss effects and the analysis of SEIG with series capacitance compensation. Very good agreement between experimental and computed results has been obtained on a 2-kW laboratory machine.

  6. A technique for accelerating iterative convergence in numerical integration, with application in transonic aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, E. D.

    1975-01-01

    A technique is described for the efficient numerical solution of nonlinear partial differential equations by rapid iteration. In particular, a special approach is described for applying the Aitken acceleration formula (a simple Pade approximant) for accelerating the iterative convergence. The method finds the most appropriate successive approximations, which are in a most nearly geometric sequence, for use in the Aitken formula. Simple examples are given to illustrate the use of the method. The method is then applied to the mixed elliptic-hyperbolic problem of steady, inviscid, transonic flow over an airfoil in a subsonic free stream.

  7. Comparison of Iterative and Non-Iterative Strain-Gage Balance Load Calculation Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulbrich, N.

    2010-01-01

    The accuracy of iterative and non-iterative strain-gage balance load calculation methods was compared using data from the calibration of a force balance. Two iterative and one non-iterative method were investigated. In addition, transformations were applied to balance loads in order to process the calibration data in both direct read and force balance format. NASA's regression model optimization tool BALFIT was used to generate optimized regression models of the calibration data for each of the three load calculation methods. This approach made sure that the selected regression models met strict statistical quality requirements. The comparison of the standard deviation of the load residuals showed that the first iterative method may be applied to data in both the direct read and force balance format. The second iterative method, on the other hand, implicitly assumes that the primary gage sensitivities of all balance gages exist. Therefore, the second iterative method only works if the given balance data is processed in force balance format. The calibration data set was also processed using the non-iterative method. Standard deviations of the load residuals for the three load calculation methods were compared. Overall, the standard deviations show very good agreement. The load prediction accuracies of the three methods appear to be compatible as long as regression models used to analyze the calibration data meet strict statistical quality requirements. Recent improvements of the regression model optimization tool BALFIT are also discussed in the paper.

  8. Preliminary Master Logic Diagram for ITER operation

    SciTech Connect

    Cadwallader, L.C.; Taylor, N.P.; Poucet, A.E.

    1998-04-01

    This paper describes the work performed to develop a Master Logic Diagram (MLD) for the operations phase of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). The MLD is a probabilistic risk assessment tool used to identify the broad set of potential initiating events that could lead to an offsite radioactive or toxic chemical release from the facility under study. The MLD described here is complementary to the failure modes and effects analyses (FMEAs) that have been performed for ITER`s major plant systems in the engineering evaluation of the facility design. While the FMEAs are a bottom-up or component level approach, the MLD is a top-down or facility level approach to identifying the broad spectrum of potential events. Strengths of the MLD are that it analyzes the entire plant, depicts completeness in the accident initiator process, provides an independent method for identification, and can also identify potential system interactions. MLDs have been used successfully as a hazard analysis tool. This paper describes the process used for the ITER MLD to treat the variety of radiological and toxicological source terms present in the ITER design. One subtree of the nineteen page MLD is shown to illustrate the levels of the diagram.

  9. U.S. Contributions to ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Ned R. Sauthoff

    2005-05-13

    The United States participates in the ITER project and program to enable the study of the science and technology of burning plasmas, a key programmatic element missing from the world fusion program. The 2003 U.S. decision to enter the ITER negotiations followed an extensive series of community and governmental reviews of the benefits, readiness, and approaches to the study of burning plasmas. This paper describes both the technical and the organizational preparations and plans for U.S. participation in the ITER construction activity: in-kind contributions, staff contributions, and cash contributions as well as supporting physics and technology research. Near-term technical activities focus on the completion of R&D and design and mitigation of risks in the areas of the central solenoid magnet, shield/blanket, diagnostics, ion cyclotron system, electron cyclotron system, pellet fueling system, vacuum system, tritium processing system, and conventional systems. Outside the project, the U .S. is engaged in preparations for the test blanket module program. Organizational activities focus on preparations of the project management arrangements to maximize the overall success of the ITER Project; elements include refinement of U.S. directions on the international arrangements, the establishment of the U.S. Domestic Agency, progress along the path of the U.S. Department of Energy's Project Management Order, and overall preparations for commencement of the fabrication of major items of equipment and for provision of staff and cash as specified in the upcoming ITER agreement.

  10. [The ideographic iteration mark in Senkinho].

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Takanori; Yamashita, Koichi; Murasaki, Toru

    2006-06-01

    In the 7th century, Senkinho was written by Sonshibaku in the Tang dynasty China. This book that was altered in 1066 in the north Sung dynasty China has become known in the world now. However four series of books remained intact, as they were not modified. The names of each book were Senkinho Kentoushi-syouraibon, the Shincho-sonshinjin senkinho, Stein book, and the Kozlov book. Senkinho Kentoushi-syouraibon and Shincho-sonshinjin Senkinho are in Japan, while Stein and the Kozlov books are in the United Kingdom and Russia respectively. We researched the ideographic iteration marks in these books. In Senkinho Kentoushi-syouraibon, several ideographic iteration marks were used. But in Shincho-sonshinjin senkinho and the Kozlov book, only one ideographic iteration mark was used. Furthermore, there were two types of ideographic iteration marks in the Chinese character text of Senkinho Kentoushi-syouraibon. We estimated that the ideographic iteration marks in the Katakana character were transcribed between the middle era of Kamakura Japan and the early era of Muromachi Japan.

  11. RAVE: Rapid Visualization Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klumpar, D. M.; Anderson, Kevin; Simoudis, Avangelos

    1994-01-01

    Visualization is used in the process of analyzing large, multidimensional data sets. However, the selection and creation of visualizations that are appropriate for the characteristics of a particular data set and the satisfaction of the analyst's goals is difficult. The process consists of three tasks that are performed iteratively: generate, test, and refine. The performance of these tasks requires the utilization of several types of domain knowledge that data analysts do not often have. Existing visualization systems and frameworks do not adequately support the performance of these tasks. In this paper we present the RApid Visualization Environment (RAVE), a knowledge-based system that interfaces with commercial visualization frameworks and assists a data analyst in quickly and easily generating, testing, and refining visualizations. RAVE was used for the visualization of in situ measurement data captured by spacecraft.

  12. Simulation of Hybrid Operation Modes in ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Na, Y S; Kessel, C. E.; Park, Jin Myung

    2008-01-01

    As one of the international thermonuclear experimental reactor (ITER) primary operation modes, the hybrid mode aims at establishing plasmas with significant fusion power and low loop voltage to drive an inductive current to test reactor-relevant components in extended pulse lengths at high neutron fluence. In this paper, predictive modeling of the hybrid mode is presented. The potential of hybrid modes is investigated with respect to fusion performance and the non-inductive current drive fraction in ITER. Simulations are performed with the ASTRA transport code by employing a physics-based heat transport model. Here, the particle transport is prescribed. The effect of electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) to establish a low magnetic shear in the center of the plasma is also discussed. The simulations show that fusion gains and the non-inductive current drive fractions of up to 8.4 and 49 %, respectively, can be achieved in hybrid modes at ITER.

  13. Accelerating an iterative process by explicit annihilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jespersen, D. C.; Buning, P. G.

    1983-01-01

    A slowly convergent stationary iterative process can be accelerated by explicitly annihilating (i.e., eliminating) the dominant eigenvector component of the error. The dominant eigenvalue or complex pair of eigenvalues can be estimated from the solution during the iteration. The corresponding eigenvector or complex pair of eigenvectors can then be annihilated by applying an explicit Richardson process over the basic iterative method. This can be done entirely in real arithmetic by analytically combining the complex conjugate annihilation steps. The technique is applied to an implicit algorithm for the calculation of two dimensional steady transonic flow over a circular cylinder using the equations of compressible inviscid gas dynamics. This demonstrates the use of explicit annihilation on a nonlinear problem.

  14. The ITER in-vessel system

    SciTech Connect

    Lousteau, D.C.

    1994-09-01

    The overall programmatic objective, as defined in the ITER Engineering Design Activities (EDA) Agreement, is to demonstrate the scientific and technological feasibility of fusion energy for peaceful purposes. The ITER EDA Phase, due to last until July 1998, will encompass the design of the device and its auxiliary systems and facilities, including the preparation of engineering drawings. The EDA also incorporates validating research and development (R&D) work, including the development and testing of key components. The purpose of this paper is to review the status of the design, as it has been developed so far, emphasizing the design and integration of those components contained within the vacuum vessel of the ITER device. The components included in the in-vessel systems are divertor and first wall; blanket and shield; plasma heating, fueling, and vacuum pumping equipment; and remote handling equipment.

  15. Robust iterative method for nonlinear Helmholtz equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Lijun; Lu, Ya Yan

    2017-08-01

    A new iterative method is developed for solving the two-dimensional nonlinear Helmholtz equation which governs polarized light in media with the optical Kerr nonlinearity. In the strongly nonlinear regime, the nonlinear Helmholtz equation could have multiple solutions related to phenomena such as optical bistability and symmetry breaking. The new method exhibits a much more robust convergence behavior than existing iterative methods, such as frozen-nonlinearity iteration, Newton's method and damped Newton's method, and it can be used to find solutions when good initial guesses are unavailable. Numerical results are presented for the scattering of light by a nonlinear circular cylinder based on the exact nonlocal boundary condition and a pseudospectral method in the polar coordinate system.

  16. US solid breeder blanket design for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Gohar, Y.; Attaya, H.; Billone, M.; Lin, C.; Johnson, C.; Majumdar, S.; Smith, D. ); Goranson, P.; Nelson, B.; Williamson, D.; Baker, C. ); Raffray, A.; Badawi, A.; Gorbis, Z.; Ying, A.; Abdou, M. ); Sviatoslavsky, I.; Blanchard, J.; Mogahed, E.; Sawan, M.; Kulcinski, G. )

    1990-09-01

    The US blanket design activity has focused on the developments and the analyses of a solid breeder blanket concept for ITER. The main function of this blanket is to produce the necessary tritium required for the ITER operation and the test program. Safety, power reactor relevance, low tritium inventory, and design flexibility are the main reasons for the blanket selection. The blanket is designed to operate satisfactorily in the physics and the technology phases of ITER without the need for hardware changes. Mechanical simplicity, predictability, performance, minimum cost, and minimum R D requirements are the other criteria used to guide the design process. The design aspects of the blanket are summarized in this paper. 2 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Re-starting an Arnoldi iteration

    SciTech Connect

    Lehoucq, R.B.

    1996-12-31

    The Arnoldi iteration is an efficient procedure for approximating a subset of the eigensystem of a large sparse n x n matrix A. The iteration produces a partial orthogonal reduction of A into an upper Hessenberg matrix H{sub m} of order m. The eigenvalues of this small matrix H{sub m} are used to approximate a subset of the eigenvalues of the large matrix A. The eigenvalues of H{sub m} improve as estimates to those of A as m increases. Unfortunately, so does the cost and storage of the reduction. The idea of re-starting the Arnoldi iteration is motivated by the prohibitive cost associated with building a large factorization.

  18. Rotation and neoclassical ripple transport in ITER

    DOE PAGES

    Paul, Elizabeth Joy; Landreman, Matt; Poli, Francesca M.; ...

    2017-07-13

    Neoclassical transport in the presence of non-axisymmetric magnetic fields causes a toroidal torque known as neoclassical toroidal viscosity (NTV). The toroidal symmetry of ITER will be broken by the finite number of toroidal field coils and by test blanket modules (TBMs). The addition of ferritic inserts (FIs) will decrease the magnitude of the toroidal field ripple. 3D magnetic equilibria in the presence of toroidal field ripple and ferromagnetic structures are calculated for an ITER steady-state scenario using the Variational Moments Equilibrium Code (VMEC). Furthermore, neoclassical transport quantities in the presence of these error fields are calculated using the Stellarator Fokker-Planckmore » Iterative Neoclassical Conservative Solver (SFINCS).« less

  19. The Dynamics of Some Iterative Implicit Schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, H. C.; Sweby, P. K.

    1994-01-01

    The global asymptotic nonlinear behavior of some standard iterative procedures in solving nonlinear systems of algebraic equations arising from four implicit linear multistep methods (LMMs) in discretizing 2 x 2 systems of first-order autonomous nonlinear ordinary differential equations is analyzed using the theory of dynamical systems. With the aid of parallel Connection Machines (CM-2 and CM-5), the associated bifurcation diagrams as a function of the time step, and the complex behavior of the associated 'numerical basins of attraction' of these iterative implicit schemes are revealed and compared. Studies showed that all of the four implicit LMMs exhibit a drastic distortion and segmentation but less shrinkage of the basin of attraction of the true solution than standard explicit methods. The numerical basins of attraction of a noniterative implicit procedure mimic more closely the basins of attraction of the differential equations than the iterative implicit procedures for the four implicit LMMs.

  20. Selection of plasma facing materials for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Ulrickson, M.; Barabash, V.; Chiocchio, S.

    1996-10-01

    ITER will be the first tokamak having long pulse operation using deuterium-tritium fuel. The problem of designing heat removal structures for steady state in a neutron environment is a major technical goal for the ITER Engineering Design Activity (EDA). The steady state heat flux specified for divertor components is 5 MW/m{sup 2} for normal operation with transients to 15 MW/m{sup 2} for up to 10 s. The selection of materials for plasma facing components is one of the major research activities. Three materials are being considered for the divertor; carbon fiber composites, beryllium, and tungsten. This paper discusses the relative advantages and disadvantages of these materials. The final section of plasma facing materials for the ITER divertor will not be made until the end of the EDA.

  1. Iterative Reconstruction of Coded Source Neutron Radiographs

    SciTech Connect

    Santos-Villalobos, Hector J; Bingham, Philip R; Gregor, Jens

    2013-01-01

    Use of a coded source facilitates high-resolution neutron imaging through magnifications but requires that the radiographic data be deconvolved. A comparison of direct deconvolution with two different iterative algorithms has been performed. One iterative algorithm is based on a maximum likelihood estimation (MLE)-like framework and the second is based on a geometric model of the neutron beam within a least squares formulation of the inverse imaging problem. Simulated data for both uniform and Gaussian shaped source distributions was used for testing to understand the impact of non-uniformities present in neutron beam distributions on the reconstructed images. Results indicate that the model based reconstruction method will match resolution and improve on contrast over convolution methods in the presence of non-uniform sources. Additionally, the model based iterative algorithm provides direct calculation of quantitative transmission values while the convolution based methods must be normalized base on known values.

  2. Fast iterative reconstruction method for PROPELLER MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Hongyu; Dai, Jianping; Shi, Jinquan

    2009-10-01

    Patient motion during scanning will introduce artifacts in the reconstructed image in MRI imaging. Periodically Rotated Overlapping Parallel Lines with Enhanced Reconstruction (PROPELLER) MRI is an effective technique to correct for motion artifacts. The iterative method that combine the preconditioned conjugate gradient (PCG) algorithm with nonuniform fast Fourier transformation (NUFFT) operations is applied to PROPELLER MRI in the paper. But the drawback of the method is long reconstruction time. In order to make it viable in clinical situation, parallel optimization of the iterative method on modern GPU using CUDA is proposed. The simulated data and in vivo data from PROPELLER MRI are respectively reconstructed in order to test the method. The experimental results show that image quality is improved compared with gridding method using the GPU based iterative method with compatible reconstruction time.

  3. Global Asymptotic Behavior of Iterative Implicit Schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, H. C.; Sweby, P. K.

    1994-01-01

    The global asymptotic nonlinear behavior of some standard iterative procedures in solving nonlinear systems of algebraic equations arising from four implicit linear multistep methods (LMMs) in discretizing three models of 2 x 2 systems of first-order autonomous nonlinear ordinary differential equations (ODEs) is analyzed using the theory of dynamical systems. The iterative procedures include simple iteration and full and modified Newton iterations. The results are compared with standard Runge-Kutta explicit methods, a noniterative implicit procedure, and the Newton method of solving the steady part of the ODEs. Studies showed that aside from exhibiting spurious asymptotes, all of the four implicit LMMs can change the type and stability of the steady states of the differential equations (DEs). They also exhibit a drastic distortion but less shrinkage of the basin of attraction of the true solution than standard nonLMM explicit methods. The simple iteration procedure exhibits behavior which is similar to standard nonLMM explicit methods except that spurious steady-state numerical solutions cannot occur. The numerical basins of attraction of the noniterative implicit procedure mimic more closely the basins of attraction of the DEs and are more efficient than the three iterative implicit procedures for the four implicit LMMs. Contrary to popular belief, the initial data using the Newton method of solving the steady part of the DEs may not have to be close to the exact steady state for convergence. These results can be used as an explanation for possible causes and cures of slow convergence and nonconvergence of steady-state numerical solutions when using an implicit LMM time-dependent approach in computational fluid dynamics.

  4. Iterative Vessel Segmentation of Fundus Images.

    PubMed

    Roychowdhury, Sohini; Koozekanani, Dara D; Parhi, Keshab K

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents a novel unsupervised iterative blood vessel segmentation algorithm using fundus images. First, a vessel enhanced image is generated by tophat reconstruction of the negative green plane image. An initial estimate of the segmented vasculature is extracted by global thresholding the vessel enhanced image. Next, new vessel pixels are identified iteratively by adaptive thresholding of the residual image generated by masking out the existing segmented vessel estimate from the vessel enhanced image. The new vessel pixels are, then, region grown into the existing vessel, thereby resulting in an iterative enhancement of the segmented vessel structure. As the iterations progress, the number of false edge pixels identified as new vessel pixels increases compared to the number of actual vessel pixels. A key contribution of this paper is a novel stopping criterion that terminates the iterative process leading to higher vessel segmentation accuracy. This iterative algorithm is robust to the rate of new vessel pixel addition since it achieves 93.2-95.35% vessel segmentation accuracy with 0.9577-0.9638 area under ROC curve (AUC) on abnormal retinal images from the STARE dataset. The proposed algorithm is computationally efficient and consistent in vessel segmentation performance for retinal images with variations due to pathology, uneven illumination, pigmentation, and fields of view since it achieves a vessel segmentation accuracy of about 95% in an average time of 2.45, 3.95, and 8 s on images from three public datasets DRIVE, STARE, and CHASE_DB1, respectively. Additionally, the proposed algorithm has more than 90% segmentation accuracy for segmenting peripapillary blood vessels in the images from the DRIVE and CHASE_DB1 datasets.

  5. SU-F-BRCD-09: Total Variation (TV) Based Fast Convergent Iterative CBCT Reconstruction with GPU Acceleration.

    PubMed

    Xu, Q; Yang, D; Tan, J; Anastasio, M

    2012-06-01

    To improve image quality and reduce imaging dose in CBCT for radiation therapy applications and to realize near real-time image reconstruction based on use of a fast convergence iterative algorithm and acceleration by multi-GPUs. An iterative image reconstruction that sought to minimize a weighted least squares cost function that employed total variation (TV) regularization was employed to mitigate projection data incompleteness and noise. To achieve rapid 3D image reconstruction (< 1 min), a highly optimized multiple-GPU implementation of the algorithm was developed. The convergence rate and reconstruction accuracy were evaluated using a modified 3D Shepp-Logan digital phantom and a Catphan-600 physical phantom. The reconstructed images were compared with the clinical FDK reconstruction results. Digital phantom studies showed that only 15 iterations and 60 iterations are needed to achieve algorithm convergence for 360-view and 60-view cases, respectively. The RMSE was reduced to 10-4 and 10-2, respectively, by using 15 iterations for each case. Our algorithm required 5.4s to complete one iteration for the 60-view case using one Tesla C2075 GPU. The few-view study indicated that our iterative algorithm has great potential to reduce the imaging dose and preserve good image quality. For the physical Catphan studies, the images obtained from the iterative algorithm possessed better spatial resolution and higher SNRs than those obtained from by use of a clinical FDK reconstruction algorithm. We have developed a fast convergence iterative algorithm for CBCT image reconstruction. The developed algorithm yielded images with better spatial resolution and higher SNR than those produced by a commercial FDK tool. In addition, from the few-view study, the iterative algorithm has shown great potential for significantly reducing imaging dose. We expect that the developed reconstruction approach will facilitate applications including IGART and patient daily CBCT-based treatment

  6. Accelerating the weighted histogram analysis method by direct inversion in the iterative subspace

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Cheng; Lai, Chun-Liang; Pettitt, B. Montgomery

    2016-01-01

    The weighted histogram analysis method (WHAM) for free energy calculations is a valuable tool to produce free energy differences with the minimal errors. Given multiple simulations, WHAM obtains from the distribution overlaps the optimal statistical estimator of the density of states, from which the free energy differences can be computed. The WHAM equations are often solved by an iterative procedure. In this work, we use a well-known linear algebra algorithm which allows for more rapid convergence to the solution. We find that the computational complexity of the iterative solution to WHAM and the closely-related multiple Bennett acceptance ratio (MBAR) method can be improved by using the method of direct inversion in the iterative subspace. We give examples from a lattice model, a simple liquid and an aqueous protein solution. PMID:27453632

  7. Accelerated iterative beam angle selection in IMRT

    SciTech Connect

    Bangert, Mark; Unkelbach, Jan

    2016-03-15

    Purpose: Iterative methods for beam angle selection (BAS) for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) planning sequentially construct a beneficial ensemble of beam directions. In a naïve implementation, the nth beam is selected by adding beam orientations one-by-one from a discrete set of candidates to an existing ensemble of (n − 1) beams. The best beam orientation is identified in a time consuming process by solving the fluence map optimization (FMO) problem for every candidate beam and selecting the beam that yields the largest improvement to the objective function value. This paper evaluates two alternative methods to accelerate iterative BAS based on surrogates for the FMO objective function value. Methods: We suggest to select candidate beams not based on the FMO objective function value after convergence but (1) based on the objective function value after five FMO iterations of a gradient based algorithm and (2) based on a projected gradient of the FMO problem in the first iteration. The performance of the objective function surrogates is evaluated based on the resulting objective function values and dose statistics in a treatment planning study comprising three intracranial, three pancreas, and three prostate cases. Furthermore, iterative BAS is evaluated for an application in which a small number of noncoplanar beams complement a set of coplanar beam orientations. This scenario is of practical interest as noncoplanar setups may require additional attention of the treatment personnel for every couch rotation. Results: Iterative BAS relying on objective function surrogates yields similar results compared to naïve BAS with regard to the objective function values and dose statistics. At the same time, early stopping of the FMO and using the projected gradient during the first iteration enable reductions in computation time by approximately one to two orders of magnitude. With regard to the clinical delivery of noncoplanar IMRT treatments, we could

  8. Iterative method for generating correlated binary sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usatenko, O. V.; Melnik, S. S.; Apostolov, S. S.; Makarov, N. M.; Krokhin, A. A.

    2014-11-01

    We propose an efficient iterative method for generating random correlated binary sequences with a prescribed correlation function. The method is based on consecutive linear modulations of an initially uncorrelated sequence into a correlated one. Each step of modulation increases the correlations until the desired level has been reached. The robustness and efficiency of the proposed algorithm are tested by generating sequences with inverse power-law correlations. The substantial increase in the strength of correlation in the iterative method with respect to single-step filtering generation is shown for all studied correlation functions. Our results can be used for design of disordered superlattices, waveguides, and surfaces with selective transport properties.

  9. Iterative algorithms for processing experimental data

    SciTech Connect

    Tretiak, K. K.

    2016-10-15

    The need to solve linear and nonlinear integral equations arise, e.g., in recovering plasma parameters from the data of multichannel diagnostics. The paper presents an iterative method for solving integral equations with a singularity at the upper limit of integration. The method consists in constructing successive approximations and calculating the integral by quadrature formulas in each integration interval. An example of application of the iterative algorithm to numerically solve an integral equation similar to those arising in recovering the plasma density profile from reflectometry data is presented.

  10. Scheduling and rescheduling with iterative repair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zweben, Monte; Davis, Eugene; Daun, Brian; Deale, Michael

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the GERRY scheduling and rescheduling system being applied to coordinate Space Shuttle Ground Processing. The system uses constraint-based iterative repair, a technique that starts with a complete but possibly flawed schedule and iteratively improves it by using constraint knowledge within repair heuristics. In this paper we explore the tradeoff between the informedness and the computational cost of several repair heuristics. We show empirically that some knowledge can greatly improve the convergence speed of a repair-based system, but that too much knowledge, such as the knowledge embodied within the MIN-CONFLICTS lookahead heuristic, can overwhelm a system and result in degraded performance.

  11. Iterated learning and the evolution of language.

    PubMed

    Kirby, Simon; Griffiths, Tom; Smith, Kenny

    2014-10-01

    Iterated learning describes the process whereby an individual learns their behaviour by exposure to another individual's behaviour, who themselves learnt it in the same way. It can be seen as a key mechanism of cultural evolution. We review various methods for understanding how behaviour is shaped by the iterated learning process: computational agent-based simulations; mathematical modelling; and laboratory experiments in humans and non-human animals. We show how this framework has been used to explain the origins of structure in language, and argue that cultural evolution must be considered alongside biological evolution in explanations of language origins. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Modified Iterative Extended Hueckel. 1: Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aronowitz, S.

    1980-01-01

    Iterative Extended Huekel is modified by inclusion of explicit effective internuclear and electronic interactions. The one electron energies are shown to obey a variational principle because of the form of the effective electronic interactions. The modifications permit mimicking of aspects of valence bond theory with the additional feature that the energies associated with valence bond type structures are explicitly calculated. In turn, a hybrid molecular, orbital valence, bond scheme is introduced which incorporates variant total molecular electronic density distributions similar to the way that Iterative Extended Hueckel incorporates atoms.

  13. Stimulating Curiosity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Necka, Edward

    1989-01-01

    Curiosity can be developed and nurtured through application of such educational principles as the rewarding of questioning, the use of open questions, delaying answers, accepting incompleteness in existing knowledge, etc. Teaching techniques for stimulating curiosity include brain questioning, role playing, hypothesizing, and pursuing curiosity.…

  14. An incremental-iterative method for modeling damage evolution in voxel-based microstructure models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Qi-Zhi; Yvonnet, Julien

    2015-02-01

    Numerical methods motivated by rapid advances in image processing techniques have been intensively developed during recent years and increasingly applied to simulate heterogeneous materials with complex microstructure. The present work aims at elaborating an incremental-iterative numerical method for voxel-based modeling of damage evolution in quasi-brittle microstructures. The iterative scheme based on the Lippmann-Schwinger equation in the real space domain (Yvonnet, in Int J Numer Methods Eng 92:178-205, 2012) is first cast into an incremental form so as to implement nonlinear material models efficiently. In the proposed scheme, local strain increments at material grid points are computed iteratively by a mapping operation through a transformation array, while local stresses are determined using a constitutive model that accounts for material degradation by damage. For validation, benchmark studies and numerical simulations using microtomographic data of concrete are performed. For each test, numerical predictions by the incremental-iterative scheme and the finite element method, respectively, are presented and compared for both global responses and local damage distributions. It is emphasized that the proposed incremental-iterative formulation can be straightforwardly applied in the framework of other Lippmann-Schwinger equation-based schemes, like the fast Fourier transform method.

  15. Dealing with noisy absences to optimize species distribution models: an iterative ensemble modelling approach.

    PubMed

    Lauzeral, Christine; Grenouillet, Gaël; Brosse, Sébastien

    2012-01-01

    Species distribution models (SDMs) are widespread in ecology and conservation biology, but their accuracy can be lowered by non-environmental (noisy) absences that are common in species occurrence data. Here we propose an iterative ensemble modelling (IEM) method to deal with noisy absences and hence improve the predictive reliability of ensemble modelling of species distributions. In the IEM approach, outputs of a classical ensemble model (EM) were used to update the raw occurrence data. The revised data was then used as input for a new EM run. This process was iterated until the predictions stabilized. The outputs of the iterative method were compared to those of the classical EM using virtual species. The IEM process tended to converge rapidly. It increased the consensus between predictions provided by the different methods as well as between those provided by different learning data sets. Comparing IEM and EM showed that for high levels of non-environmental absences, iterations significantly increased prediction reliability measured by the Kappa and TSS indices, as well as the percentage of well-predicted sites. Compared to EM, IEM also reduced biases in estimates of species prevalence. Compared to the classical EM method, IEM improves the reliability of species predictions. It particularly deals with noisy absences that are replaced in the data matrices by simulated presences during the iterative modelling process. IEM thus constitutes a promising way to increase the accuracy of EM predictions of difficult-to-detect species, as well as of species that are not in equilibrium with their environment.

  16. Iteration of Complex Functions and Newton's Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dwyer, Jerry; Barnard, Roger; Cook, David; Corte, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses some common iterations of complex functions. The presentation is such that similar processes can easily be implemented and understood by undergraduate students. The aim is to illustrate some of the beauty of complex dynamics in an informal setting, while providing a couple of results that are not otherwise readily available in…

  17. Iterative solution of the Helmholtz equation

    SciTech Connect

    Larsson, E.; Otto, K.

    1996-12-31

    We have shown that the numerical solution of the two-dimensional Helmholtz equation can be obtained in a very efficient way by using a preconditioned iterative method. We discretize the equation with second-order accurate finite difference operators and take special care to obtain non-reflecting boundary conditions. We solve the large, sparse system of equations that arises with the preconditioned restarted GMRES iteration. The preconditioner is of {open_quotes}fast Poisson type{close_quotes}, and is derived as a direct solver for a modified PDE problem.The arithmetic complexity for the preconditioner is O(n log{sub 2} n), where n is the number of grid points. As a test problem we use the propagation of sound waves in water in a duct with curved bottom. Numerical experiments show that the preconditioned iterative method is very efficient for this type of problem. The convergence rate does not decrease dramatically when the frequency increases. Compared to banded Gaussian elimination, which is a standard solution method for this type of problems, the iterative method shows significant gain in both storage requirement and arithmetic complexity. Furthermore, the relative gain increases when the frequency increases.

  18. On the safety of ITER accelerators

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ge

    2013-01-01

    Three 1 MV/40A accelerators in heating neutral beams (HNB) are on track to be implemented in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). ITER may produce 500 MWt of power by 2026 and may serve as a green energy roadmap for the world. They will generate −1 MV 1 h long-pulse ion beams to be neutralised for plasma heating. Due to frequently occurring vacuum sparking in the accelerators, the snubbers are used to limit the fault arc current to improve ITER safety. However, recent analyses of its reference design have raised concerns. General nonlinear transformer theory is developed for the snubber to unify the former snubbers' different design models with a clear mechanism. Satisfactory agreement between theory and tests indicates that scaling up to a 1 MV voltage may be possible. These results confirm the nonlinear process behind transformer theory and map out a reliable snubber design for a safer ITER. PMID:24008267

  19. Constructing Easily Iterated Functions with Interesting Properties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sprows, David J.

    2009-01-01

    A number of schools have recently introduced new courses dealing with various aspects of iteration theory or at least have found ways of including topics such as chaos and fractals in existing courses. In this note, we will consider a family of functions whose members are especially well suited to illustrate many of the concepts involved in these…

  20. Matched filter based iterative adaptive approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nepal, Ramesh; Zhang, Yan Rockee; Li, Zhengzheng; Blake, William

    2016-05-01

    Matched Filter sidelobes from diversified LPI waveform design and sensor resolution are two important considerations in radars and active sensors in general. Matched Filter sidelobes can potentially mask weaker targets, and low sensor resolution not only causes a high margin of error but also limits sensing in target-rich environment/ sector. The improvement in those factors, in part, concern with the transmitted waveform and consequently pulse compression techniques. An adaptive pulse compression algorithm is hence desired that can mitigate the aforementioned limitations. A new Matched Filter based Iterative Adaptive Approach, MF-IAA, as an extension to traditional Iterative Adaptive Approach, IAA, has been developed. MF-IAA takes its input as the Matched Filter output. The motivation here is to facilitate implementation of Iterative Adaptive Approach without disrupting the processing chain of traditional Matched Filter. Similar to IAA, MF-IAA is a user parameter free, iterative, weighted least square based spectral identification algorithm. This work focuses on the implementation of MF-IAA. The feasibility of MF-IAA is studied using a realistic airborne radar simulator as well as actual measured airborne radar data. The performance of MF-IAA is measured with different test waveforms, and different Signal-to-Noise (SNR) levels. In addition, Range-Doppler super-resolution using MF-IAA is investigated. Sidelobe reduction as well as super-resolution enhancement is validated. The robustness of MF-IAA with respect to different LPI waveforms and SNR levels is also demonstrated.

  1. ITER faces further five-year delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clery, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    The €14bn ITER fusion reactor currently under construction in Cadarache, France, will require an additional cash injection of €4.6bn if it is to start up in 2025 - a target date that is already five years later than currently scheduled.

  2. Solving Differential Equations Using Modified Picard Iteration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robin, W. A.

    2010-01-01

    Many classes of differential equations are shown to be open to solution through a method involving a combination of a direct integration approach with suitably modified Picard iterative procedures. The classes of differential equations considered include typical initial value, boundary value and eigenvalue problems arising in physics and…

  3. Iterated rippled noise discrimination at long durations.

    PubMed

    Yost, William A

    2009-09-01

    Iterated rippled noise (IRN) was used to study discrimination of IRN stimuli with a lower number of iterations from IRN stimuli with a higher number of iterations as a function of stimulus duration (100-2000 ms). Such IRN stimuli differ in the strength of the repetition pitch. In some cases, the gain used to generate IRN stimuli was adjusted so that both IRN stimuli in the discrimination task had the same height of the first peak in the autocorrelation function or autocorrelogram. In previous work involving short-duration IRN stimuli (<500 ms), listeners were not able to discriminate between IRN stimuli that had different numbers of iterations but the same height of the first peak in the autocorrelation function. In the current study, IRN discrimination performance improved with increases in duration, even in cases when the height of the first peak in the autocorrelation was the same for the two IRN stimuli. Thus, future studies involving discrimination of IRN stimuli may need to use longer durations (1 s or greater) than those that have been used in the past.

  4. Iteration and Anxiety in Mathematical Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capezzi, Rita; Kinsey, L. Christine

    2016-01-01

    We describe our experiences in team-teaching an honors seminar on mathematics and literature. We focus particularly on two of the texts we read: Georges Perec's "How to Ask Your Boss for a Raise" and Alain Robbe-Grillet's "Jealousy," both of which make use of iterative structures.

  5. Microtearing Instability In The ITER Pedestal

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, K. L.; Mikkelsen, D. R.; Rewoldt, G. M.; Budny, R.

    2010-12-01

    Unstable microtearing modes are discovered by the GS2 gyrokinetic siimulation code, in the pedestal region of a simulated ITER H-mode plasma with approximately 400 WM DT fusion power. Existing nonlinear theory indicates that these instabilities should produce stochastic magnetic fields and broaden the pedestal. The resulted electron thermal conductivity is estimated and the implications of these findings are discussed.

  6. Constructing Easily Iterated Functions with Interesting Properties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sprows, David J.

    2009-01-01

    A number of schools have recently introduced new courses dealing with various aspects of iteration theory or at least have found ways of including topics such as chaos and fractals in existing courses. In this note, we will consider a family of functions whose members are especially well suited to illustrate many of the concepts involved in these…

  7. Solving Differential Equations Using Modified Picard Iteration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robin, W. A.

    2010-01-01

    Many classes of differential equations are shown to be open to solution through a method involving a combination of a direct integration approach with suitably modified Picard iterative procedures. The classes of differential equations considered include typical initial value, boundary value and eigenvalue problems arising in physics and…

  8. An Iterative Item Bias Detection Method.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Der Flier, Henk; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Two strategies for assessing item bias are discussed: methods comparing item difficulties unconditional on ability and methods comparing probabilities of response conditional on ability. Results suggest that the iterative logit method is an improvement on the noniterative one and is efficient in detecting biased and unbiased items. (Author/DWH)

  9. Some Pleasures and Perils of Iteration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cannon, Lawrence O.; Elich, Joe

    1993-01-01

    Entering a value into a calculator and repeatedly performing a function f(x) on the calculator can lead to the solution of the equation f(x)=x. Explores the outcomes of performing this iterative process on the calculator. Discusses how patterns of the resulting sequences converge, diverge, become cyclic, or display chaotic behavior. (MDH)

  10. ITER Cryoplant Final Design and Construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monneret, E.; Benkheira, L.; Fauve, E.; Henry, D.; Voigt, T.; Badgujar, S.; Chang, H.-S.; Vincent, G.; Forgeas, A.; Navion-Maillot, N.

    2017-02-01

    The ITER Tokamak supraconducting magnets, thermal shields and cryopumps will require tremendous amount of cooling power. With an average need of 75 kW at 4.5 K and of 600 kW at 80 K, ITER requires a world class cryogenic complex. ITER then relies on a Cryoplant which consists in a cluster of systems dedicated to the management of all fluids required for the Tokamak operation. From storage and purification to liquefaction and refrigeration, the Cryoplant will supply to the distribution system, all fluids to be circulated in the Tokamak. It includes Liquid Helium Plants and Liquid Nitrogen Plants, which generate all of the refrigeration power, an 80 K helium loop capable to circulate large quantities of helium through thermal shields, and all the auxiliaries required for gas storage, purification, and onsite nitrogen production. From the conceptual phase, the design of the Cryoplant has evolved and is now nearing completion. This proceeding will present the final design of the Cryoplant and the organization for the construction phase. Also the latest status of the ITER Cryogenic System will be introduced.

  11. An iterative approach of protein function prediction

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Current approaches of predicting protein functions from a protein-protein interaction (PPI) dataset are based on an assumption that the available functions of the proteins (a.k.a. annotated proteins) will determine the functions of the proteins whose functions are unknown yet at the moment (a.k.a. un-annotated proteins). Therefore, the protein function prediction is a mono-directed and one-off procedure, i.e. from annotated proteins to un-annotated proteins. However, the interactions between proteins are mutual rather than static and mono-directed, although functions of some proteins are unknown for some reasons at present. That means when we use the similarity-based approach to predict functions of un-annotated proteins, the un-annotated proteins, once their functions are predicted, will affect the similarities between proteins, which in turn will affect the prediction results. In other words, the function prediction is a dynamic and mutual procedure. This dynamic feature of protein interactions, however, was not considered in the existing prediction algorithms. Results In this paper, we propose a new prediction approach that predicts protein functions iteratively. This iterative approach incorporates the dynamic and mutual features of PPI interactions, as well as the local and global semantic influence of protein functions, into the prediction. To guarantee predicting functions iteratively, we propose a new protein similarity from protein functions. We adapt new evaluation metrics to evaluate the prediction quality of our algorithm and other similar algorithms. Experiments on real PPI datasets were conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of the proposed approach in predicting unknown protein functions. Conclusions The iterative approach is more likely to reflect the real biological nature between proteins when predicting functions. A proper definition of protein similarity from protein functions is the key to predicting functions iteratively. The

  12. Brain Stimulation Therapies

    MedlinePlus

    ... Magnetic Seizure Therapy Deep Brain Stimulation Additional Resources Brain Stimulation Therapies Overview Brain stimulation therapies can play ... for a shorter recovery time than ECT Deep Brain Stimulation Deep brain stimulation (DBS) was first developed ...

  13. ELM heat flux in the ITER divertor

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, A.W.; Osborne, T.H.; Hermann, A.; Suttrop, W.; Itami, K.; Lingertat, J.; Loarte, A.

    1998-07-01

    Edge-Localized-Modes (ELMs) have the potential to produce unacceptable levels of erosion of the ITER divertor. Ablation of the carbon divertor target will occur if the surface temperature rises above about 2,500 C. Because a large number of ELMs, {ge}1000, are expected in each discharge it is important that the surface temperature rise due to an individual ELM remain below this threshold. Calculations that have been carried out for the ITER carbon divertor target indicate ablation will occur for ELM energy {ge}0.5MJ/m{sup 2} if it is deposited in 0.1 ms, or 1.2 MJ/m{sup 2} if the deposition time is 1.0 ms. Since {Delta}T{proportional_to}Q{Delta}t{sup {minus}1/2}, an ablation threshold can be estimated at Q{Delta}t{sup {minus}1/2}{approx}45 MJm{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1/2} where Q is the divertor ELM energy density in J-m{sup {minus}2} and {Delta}t is the time in seconds for that deposition. If a significant fraction of ELMs exceed this threshold then an unacceptable level of erosion may take place. The ablation parameter in ITER can be determined by scaling four factors from present experiments: the ELM energy loss from the core plasma, the fraction of ELM energy deposited on the divertor target, the area of the ELM profile onto the target, and the time for the ELM deposition. ELM data from JET, ASDEX-Upgrade, JT-60U, DIII-D and Compass-D have been assembled by the ITER Divertor Modeling and Database expert group into a database for the purpose of predicting these factors for ELMs in the ITER divertor.

  14. Analysis of iterative methods for the viscous/inviscid coupled problem via a spectral element approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Chuanju; Lin, Yumin

    2000-03-01

    Based on a new global variational formulation, a spectral element approximation of the incompressible Navier-Stokes/Euler coupled problem gives rise to a global discrete saddle problem. The classical Uzawa algorithm decouples the original saddle problem into two positive definite symmetric systems. Iterative solutions of such systems are feasible and attractive for large problems. It is shown that, provided an appropriate pre-conditioner is chosen for the pressure system, the nested conjugate gradient methods can be applied to obtain rapid convergence rates. Detailed numerical examples are given to prove the quality of the pre-conditioner. Thanks to the rapid iterative convergence, the global Uzawa algorithm takes advantage of this as compared with the classical iteration by sub-domain procedures. Furthermore, a generalization of the pre-conditioned iterative algorithm to flow simulation is carried out. Comparisons of computational complexity between the Navier-Stokes/Euler coupled solution and the full Navier-Stokes solution are made. It is shown that the gain obtained by using the Navier-Stokes/Euler coupled solution is generally considerable. Copyright

  15. Testing Short Samples of ITER Conductors and Projection of Their Performance in ITER Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Martovetsky, N N

    2007-08-20

    Qualification of the ITER conductor is absolutely necessary. Testing large scale conductors is expensive and time consuming. To test straight 3-4m long samples in a bore of a split solenoid is a relatively economical way in comparison with fabrication of a coil to be tested in a bore of a background field solenoid. However, testing short sample may give ambiguous results due to different constraints in current redistribution in the cable or other end effects which are not present in the large magnet. This paper discusses processes taking place in the ITER conductor, conditions when conductor performance could be distorted and possible signal processing to deduce behavior of ITER conductors in ITER magnets from the test data.

  16. Reducing the latency of the Fractal Iterative Method to half an iteration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Béchet, Clémentine; Tallon, Michel

    2013-12-01

    The fractal iterative method for atmospheric tomography (FRiM-3D) has been introduced to solve the wavefront reconstruction at the dimensions of an ELT with a low-computational cost. Previous studies reported the requirement of only 3 iterations of the algorithm in order to provide the best adaptive optics (AO) performance. Nevertheless, any iterative method in adaptive optics suffer from the intrinsic latency induced by the fact that one iteration can start only once the previous one is completed. Iterations hardly match the low-latency requirement of the AO real-time computer. We present here a new approach to avoid iterations in the computation of the commands with FRiM-3D, thus allowing low-latency AO response even at the scale of the European ELT (E-ELT). The method highlights the importance of "warm-start" strategy in adaptive optics. To our knowledge, this particular way to use the "warm-start" has not been reported before. Futhermore, removing the requirement of iterating to compute the commands, the computational cost of the reconstruction with FRiM-3D can be simplified and at least reduced to half the computational cost of a classical iteration. Thanks to simulations of both single-conjugate and multi-conjugate AO for the E-ELT,with FRiM-3D on Octopus ESO simulator, we demonstrate the benefit of this approach. We finally enhance the robustness of this new implementation with respect to increasing measurement noise, wind speed and even modeling errors.

  17. Overview on Experiments On ITER-like Antenna On JET And ICRF Antenna Design For ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Nightingale, M. P. S.; Blackman, T.; Edwards, D.; Fanthome, J.; Graham, M.; Hamlyn-Harris, C.; Hancock, D.; Jacquet, P.; Mayoral, M.-L.; Monakhov, I.; Nicholls, K.; Stork, D.; Whitehurst, A.; Wilson, D.; Wooldridge, E.

    2009-11-26

    Following an overview of the ITER Ion Cyclotron Resonance Frequency (ICRF) system, the JET ITER-like antenna (ILA) will be described. The ILA was designed to test the following ITER issues: (a) reliable operation at power densities of order 8 MW/m{sup 2} at voltages up to 45 kV using a close-packed array of straps; (b) powering through ELMs using an internal (in-vacuum) conjugate-T junction; (c) protection from arcing in a conjugate-T configuration, using both existing and novel systems; and (d) resilience to disruption forces. ITER-relevant results have been achieved: operation at high coupled power density; control of the antenna matching elements in the presence of high inter-strap coupling, use of four conjugate-T systems (as would be used in ITER, should a conjugate-T approach be used); operation with RF voltages on the antenna structures up to 42 kV; achievement of ELM tolerance with a conjugate-T configuration by operating at 3{omega} real impedance at the conjugate-T point; and validation of arc detection systems on conjugate-T configurations in ELMy H-mode plasmas. The impact of these results on the predicted performance and design of the ITER antenna will be reviewed. In particular, the implications of the RF coupling measured on JET will be discussed.

  18. Model Based Iterative Reconstruction for Bright Field Electron Tomography (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-01

    Reconstruction Technique ( SIRT ) are applied to the data. Model based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) provides a powerful framework for tomographic...the reconstruction when the typical algorithms such as Filtered Back Projection (FBP) and Simultaneous Iterative Reconstruction Technique ( SIRT ) are

  19. Maximal Stationary Iterative Methods for the Solution of Operator Equations,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    dimensional case, 2 < or = m < or = + infinity, the author proves that interpolatory iteration is maximal for n = 0 in the class of iterations using values of the first s derivatives at n previous points. Author)

  20. Caloric stimulation

    MedlinePlus

    ... temperature, it should cause fast, side-to-side eye movements called nystagmus. The test is done in the ... Rapid, side-to-side eye movements should occur when cold or warm water is placed into the ear. The eye movements should be similar on both ...

  1. Model-based iterative learning control of Parkinsonian state in thalamic relay neuron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chen; Wang, Jiang; Li, Huiyan; Xue, Zhiqin; Deng, Bin; Wei, Xile

    2014-09-01

    Although the beneficial effects of chronic deep brain stimulation on Parkinson's disease motor symptoms are now largely confirmed, the underlying mechanisms behind deep brain stimulation remain unclear and under debate. Hence, the selection of stimulation parameters is full of challenges. Additionally, due to the complexity of neural system, together with omnipresent noises, the accurate model of thalamic relay neuron is unknown. Thus, the iterative learning control of the thalamic relay neuron's Parkinsonian state based on various variables is presented. Combining the iterative learning control with typical proportional-integral control algorithm, a novel and efficient control strategy is proposed, which does not require any particular knowledge on the detailed physiological characteristics of cortico-basal ganglia-thalamocortical loop and can automatically adjust the stimulation parameters. Simulation results demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed control strategy to restore the fidelity of thalamic relay in the Parkinsonian condition. Furthermore, through changing the important parameter—the maximum ionic conductance densities of low-threshold calcium current, the dominant characteristic of the proposed method which is independent of the accurate model can be further verified.

  2. The Iterative Structure Analysis of Montgomery Modular Multiplication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jinbo, Wang

    2007-09-01

    Montgomery modular multiplication (MMM) plays a crucial role in the implementation of modular exponentiations of public-key cryptography. In this paper, we discuss the iterative structure and extend the iterative bound condition of MMM. It can be applied to complicated modular exponentiations. Based on the iterative condition of MMM, we can directly use non-modular additions, subtractions and even simple multiplications instead of the modular forms, which make modular exponentiation operation very efficient but more importantly iterative applicability of MMM.

  3. Iterative performance of various formulations of the SPN equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yunhuang; Ragusa, Jean C.; Morel, Jim E.

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, the Standard, Composite, and Canonical forms of the Simplified PN (SPN) equations are reviewed and their corresponding iterative properties are compared. The Gauss-Seidel (FLIP), Explicit, and preconditioned Source Iteration iterative schemes have been analyzed for both isotropic and highly anisotropic (Fokker-Planck) scattering. The iterative performance of the various SPN forms is assessed using Fourier analysis, corroborated with numerical experiments.

  4. CHINA SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE PROJECT: DESIGN ITERATIONS AND R AND D STATUS.

    SciTech Connect

    WEI,J.

    2006-09-21

    The China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS) is an accelerator based high power project currently under preparation in China. The accelerator complex is based on an H{sup -} linear accelerator and a rapid cycling proton synchrotron. During the past year, the design of most accelerator systems went through major iterations, and initial research and developments were started on the prototyping of several key components. This paper summarizes major activities of the past year.

  5. Perturbed Coulomb potentials in the Klein-Gordon equation via the asymptotic iteration method

    SciTech Connect

    Barakat, T.

    2009-03-15

    The asymptotic iteration method is used to construct the exact energy eigenvalues for a Lorentz vector or a Lorentz scalar, and an equally mixed Lorentz vector and Lorentz scalar Coulombic potentials. Highly accurate and rapidly converging ground-state energies for Lorentz vector Coulomb with a Lorentz vector or a Lorentz scalar linear potential, V(r)=-{lambda}{sub 1}/r+krandV(r)=-{lambda}{sub 1}/randW(r)=kr, respectively, are obtained.

  6. Application Of Iterative Reconstruction Techniques To Conventional Circular Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh Roy, D. N.; Kruger, R. A.; Yih, B. C.; Del Rio, S. P.; Power, R. L.

    1985-06-01

    Two "point-by-point" iteration procedures, namely, Iterative Least Square Technique (ILST) and Simultaneous Iterative Reconstructive Technique (SIRT) were applied to classical circular tomographic reconstruction. The technique of tomosynthetic DSA was used in forming the tomographic images. Reconstructions of a dog's renal and neck anatomy are presented.

  7. Convergence analysis for a modified SP iterative method.

    PubMed

    Öztürk Çeliker, Fatma

    2014-01-01

    We consider a new iterative method due to Kadioglu and Yildirim (2014) for further investigation. We study convergence analysis of this iterative method when applied to class of contraction mappings. Furthermore, we give a data dependence result for fixed point of contraction mappings with the help of the new iteration method.

  8. Eliminating unpredictable variation through iterated learning.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kenny; Wonnacott, Elizabeth

    2010-09-01

    Human languages may be shaped not only by the (individual psychological) processes of language acquisition, but also by population-level processes arising from repeated language learning and use. One prevalent feature of natural languages is that they avoid unpredictable variation. The current work explores whether linguistic predictability might result from a process of iterated learning in simple diffusion chains of adults. An iterated artificial language learning methodology was used, in which participants were organised into diffusion chains: the first individual in each chain was exposed to an artificial language which exhibited unpredictability in plural marking, and subsequent learners were exposed to the language produced by the previous learner in their chain. Diffusion chains, but not isolate learners, were found to cumulatively increase predictability of plural marking by lexicalising the choice of plural marker. This suggests that such gradual, cumulative population-level processes offer a possible explanation for regularity in language. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. ITER Shape Controller and Transport Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Casper, T A; Meyer, W H; Pearlstein, L D; Portone, A

    2007-05-31

    We currently use the CORSICA integrated modeling code for scenario studies for both the DIII-D and ITER experiments. In these simulations, free- or fixed-boundary equilibria are simultaneously converged with thermal evolution determined from transport models providing temperature and current density profiles. Using a combination of fixed boundary evolution followed by free-boundary calculation to determine the separatrix and coil currents. In the free-boundary calculation, we use the state-space controller representation with transport simulations to provide feedback modeling of shape, vertical stability and profile control. In addition to a tightly coupled calculation with simulator and controller imbedded inside CORSICA, we also use a remote procedure call interface to couple the CORSICA non-linear plasma simulations to the controller environments developed within the Mathworks Matlab/Simulink environment. We present transport simulations using full shape and vertical stability control with evolution of the temperature profiles to provide simulations of the ITER controller and plasma response.

  10. Approaches to confined alpha diagnostics on ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, R.K.

    2004-10-01

    Three approaches to obtain information on the confined fast alphas in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) are proposed. The first technique measures the energetic charge exchange (CX) neutrals that result from the alpha collision-induced knock-on fuel ion tails undergoing electron capture on the MeV D neutral beams planned for heating and current drive. The second technique measures the energetic knock-on neutron tail due to alphas using the lengths of the proton recoil tracks produced by neutron collisions in nuclear emulsions. The range of the 14 to 20 MeV recoil protons increases by {approx}140 {mu}m per MeV. The third approach would measure the CX helium neutrals resulting from confined alphas capturing two electrons in the ablation cloud surrounding a dense gas jet that has been proposed for disruption mitigation in ITER.

  11. New iterative solvers for the NAG Libraries

    SciTech Connect

    Salvini, S.; Shaw, G.

    1996-12-31

    The purpose of this paper is to introduce the work which has been carried out at NAG Ltd to update the iterative solvers for sparse systems of linear equations, both symmetric and unsymmetric, in the NAG Fortran 77 Library. Our current plans to extend this work and include it in our other numerical libraries in our range are also briefly mentioned. We have added to the Library the new Chapter F11, entirely dedicated to sparse linear algebra. At Mark 17, the F11 Chapter includes sparse iterative solvers, preconditioners, utilities and black-box routines for sparse symmetric (both positive-definite and indefinite) linear systems. Mark 18 will add solvers, preconditioners, utilities and black-boxes for sparse unsymmetric systems: the development of these has already been completed.

  12. Development of structural design criteria for ITER.

    SciTech Connect

    Majumdar, S.

    1998-06-22

    The irradiation environment experienced by the in-vessel components of fusion reactors such as HER presents structural design challenges not envisioned in the development of existing structural design criteria such as the ASME Code or RCC-MR. From the standpoint of design criteria, the most significant issues stem from the irradiation-induced changes in material properties, specifically the reduction of ductility, strain hardening capability, and fracture toughness with neutron irradiation. Recently, Draft 7 of the interim ITER structural design criteria (ISDC), which provide new rules for guarding against such problems, was released for trial use by the ITER designers. The new rules, which were derived from a simple model based on the concept of elastic follow up factor, provide primary and secondary stress limits as functions of uniform elongation and ductility. The implication of these rules on the allowable surface heat flux on typical first walls made of type 316 stainless steel and vanadium alloys are discussed.

  13. Thermomechanical analysis of the ITER breeding blanket

    SciTech Connect

    Majumdar, S.; Gruhn, H.; Gohar, Y.; Giegerich, M.

    1997-03-01

    Thermomechanical performance of the ITER breeding blanket is an important design issue because it requires first, that the thermal expansion mismatch between the blanket structure and the blankets internals (such as, beryllium multiplier and tritium breeders) can be accommodated without creating high stresses, and second, that the thermomechanical deformation of various interfaces within the blanket does not create high resistance to heat flow and consequent unacceptably high temperatures in the blanket materials. Thermomechanical analysis of a single beryllium block sandwiched between two stainless steel plates was carried out using the finite element code ABAQUS to illustrate the importance of elastic deformation on the temperature distributions. Such an analysis for the whole ITER blanket needs to be conducted in the future. Uncertainties in the thermomechanical contact analysis can be reduced by bonding the beryllium blocks to the stainless steel plates by a thin soft interfacial layer.

  14. Iterative Reconstruction of Coded Source Neutron Radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos-Villalobos, Hector J.; Bingham, Philip R.; Gregor, Jens

    2013-06-01

    A coded source facilitates high-resolution neutron imaging through magnification but requires that the radiographic data be deconvolved. A comparison of convolution-based and model-based de-blurring algorithms has been performed. Two convolution-based approaches are assessed, direct deconvolution and an iterative algorithm based on a maximum likelihood estimation (MLE)-like framework. The model-based approach specifies a geometric model of the neutron beam with a least squares formulation of the inverse imaging problem. Simulated data for both uniform and Gaussian shaped source distributions was used to study the impact of non-uniformities present in neutron beam distributions on the reconstructed images. Results indicate that the model based reconstruction method will match resolution and improve on contrast over convolution methods in the presence of non-uniform sources. Additionally, the model based iterative algorithm provides direct calculation of quantitative transmission values while the convolution based methods must be normalized based on known values.

  15. Iterative Brinkman penalization for remeshed vortex methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hejlesen, Mads Mølholm; Koumoutsakos, Petros; Leonard, Anthony; Walther, Jens Honoré

    2015-01-01

    We introduce an iterative Brinkman penalization method for the enforcement of the no-slip boundary condition in remeshed vortex methods. In the proposed method, the Brinkman penalization is applied iteratively only in the neighborhood of the body. This allows for using significantly larger time steps, than what is customary in the Brinkman penalization, thus reducing its computational cost while maintaining the capability of the method to handle complex geometries. We demonstrate the accuracy of our method by considering challenging benchmark problems such as flow past an impulsively started cylinder and normal to an impulsively started and accelerated flat plate. We find that the present method enhances significantly the accuracy of the Brinkman penalization technique for the simulations of highly unsteady flows past complex geometries.

  16. Linear iterative solvers for implicit ODE methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saylor, Paul E.; Skeel, Robert D.

    1990-01-01

    The numerical solution of stiff initial value problems, which lead to the problem of solving large systems of mildly nonlinear equations are considered. For many problems derived from engineering and science, a solution is possible only with methods derived from iterative linear equation solvers. A common approach to solving the nonlinear equations is to employ an approximate solution obtained from an explicit method. The error is examined to determine how it is distributed among the stiff and non-stiff components, which bears on the choice of an iterative method. The conclusion is that error is (roughly) uniformly distributed, a fact that suggests the Chebyshev method (and the accompanying Manteuffel adaptive parameter algorithm). This method is described, also commenting on Richardson's method and its advantages for large problems. Richardson's method and the Chebyshev method with the Mantueffel algorithm are applied to the solution of the nonlinear equations by Newton's method.

  17. Statistical properties of an iterated arithmetic mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Feix, M.R.; Rouet, J.L.

    1994-07-01

    We study the (3x = 1)/2 problem from a probabilistic viewpoint and show a forgetting mechanism for the last k binary digits of the seed after k iterations. The problem is subsequently generalized to a trifurcation process, the (lx + m)/3 problem. Finally the sequence of a set of seeds is empirically shown to be equivalent to a random walk of the variable log{sub 2}x (or log{sub 3} x) though computer simulations.

  18. Disruptions, loads, and dynamic response of ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, B.; Riemer, B.; Sayer, R.; Strickler, D.; Barabaschi, P.; Ioki, K.; Johnson, G.; Shimizu, K.; Williamson, D.

    1995-12-31

    Plasma disruptions and the resulting electromagnetic loads are critical to the design of the vacuum vessel and in-vessel components of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). This paper describes the status of plasma disruption simulations and related analysis, including the dynamic response of the vacuum vessel and in-vessel components, stresses and deflections in the vacuum vessel, and reaction loads in the support structures.

  19. Iterates of a Berezin-type transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Congwen

    2007-05-01

    Let be the open unit ball of and dV denote the Lebesgue measure on normalized so that the measure of equals 1. Suppose . The Berezin-type transform of f is defined by We prove that if then the iterates converge to the Poisson extension of the boundary values of f, as k-->[infinity]. This can be viewed as a higher dimensional generalization of a previous result obtained independently by Englis and Zhu.

  20. Iterative Reconstruction of Coded Source Neutron Radiographs

    SciTech Connect

    Santos-Villalobos, Hector J; Bingham, Philip R; Gregor, Jens

    2012-01-01

    Use of a coded source facilitates high-resolution neutron imaging but requires that the radiographic data be deconvolved. In this paper, we compare direct deconvolution with two different iterative algorithms, namely, one based on direct deconvolution embedded in an MLE-like framework and one based on a geometric model of the neutron beam and a least squares formulation of the inverse imaging problem.

  1. Iterative solution of high order compact systems

    SciTech Connect

    Spotz, W.F.; Carey, G.F.

    1996-12-31

    We have recently developed a class of finite difference methods which provide higher accuracy and greater stability than standard central or upwind difference methods, but still reside on a compact patch of grid cells. In the present study we investigate the performance of several gradient-type iterative methods for solving the associated sparse systems. Both serial and parallel performance studies have been made. Representative examples are taken from elliptic PDE`s for diffusion, convection-diffusion, and viscous flow applications.

  2. Fourier analysis of the SOR iteration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leveque, R. J.; Trefethen, L. N.

    1986-01-01

    The SOR iteration for solving linear systems of equations depends upon an overrelaxation factor omega. It is shown that for the standard model problem of Poisson's equation on a rectangle, the optimal omega and corresponding convergence rate can be rigorously obtained by Fourier analysis. The trick is to tilt the space-time grid so that the SOR stencil becomes symmetrical. The tilted grid also gives insight into the relation between convergence rates of several variants.

  3. ITER plasma safety interface models and assessments

    SciTech Connect

    Uckan, N.A.; Bartels, H-W.; Honda, T.; Putvinski, S.; Amano, T.; Boucher, D.; Post, D.; Wesley, J.

    1996-12-31

    Physics models and requirements to be used as a basis for safety analysis studies are developed and physics results motivated by safety considerations are presented for the ITER design. Physics specifications are provided for enveloping plasma dynamic events for Category I (operational event), Category II (likely event), and Category III (unlikely event). A safety analysis code SAFALY has been developed to investigate plasma anomaly events. The plasma response to ex-vessel component failure and machine response to plasma transients are considered.

  4. Iterative solution of the supereigenvalue model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plefka, Jan C.

    1995-02-01

    An integral form of the discrete superloop equations for the supereigenvalue model of Alvarez-Gaumé, Itoyama, Mañes and Zadra is given. By a change of variables from coupling constants to moments we find a compact form of the planar solution for general potentials. In this framework an iterative scheme for the calculation of higher genera contributions to the free energy and the multi-loop correlators is developed. We present explicit results for genus one.

  5. Iterative pass optimization of sequence data.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Ward C

    2003-06-01

    The problem of determining the minimum-cost hypothetical ancestral sequences for a given cladogram is known to be NP-complete. This "tree alignment" problem has motivated the considerable effort placed in multiple sequence alignment procedures. Wheeler in 1996 proposed a heuristic method, direct optimization, to calculate cladogram costs without the intervention of multiple sequence alignment. This method, though more efficient in time and more effective in cladogram length than many alignment-based procedures, greedily optimizes nodes based on descendent information only. In their proposal of an exact multiple alignment solution, Sankoff et al. in 1976 described a heuristic procedure--the iterative improvement method--to create alignments at internal nodes by solving a series of median problems. The combination of a three-sequence direct optimization with iterative improvement and a branch-length-based cladogram cost procedure, provides an algorithm that frequently results in superior (i.e., lower) cladogram costs. This iterative pass optimization is both computation and memory intensive, but economies can be made to reduce this burden. An example in arthropod systematics is discussed. c2003 The Willi Hennig Society. Published by Elsevier Science (USA). All rights reserved.

  6. Iterative Decoding of Concatenated Codes: A Tutorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regalia, Phillip A.

    2005-12-01

    The turbo decoding algorithm of a decade ago constituted a milestone in error-correction coding for digital communications, and has inspired extensions to generalized receiver topologies, including turbo equalization, turbo synchronization, and turbo CDMA, among others. Despite an accrued understanding of iterative decoding over the years, the "turbo principle" remains elusive to master analytically, thereby inciting interest from researchers outside the communications domain. In this spirit, we develop a tutorial presentation of iterative decoding for parallel and serial concatenated codes, in terms hopefully accessible to a broader audience. We motivate iterative decoding as a computationally tractable attempt to approach maximum-likelihood decoding, and characterize fixed points in terms of a "consensus" property between constituent decoders. We review how the decoding algorithm for both parallel and serial concatenated codes coincides with an alternating projection algorithm, which allows one to identify conditions under which the algorithm indeed converges to a maximum-likelihood solution, in terms of particular likelihood functions factoring into the product of their marginals. The presentation emphasizes a common framework applicable to both parallel and serial concatenated codes.

  7. Iterative pass optimization of sequence data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, Ward C.

    2003-01-01

    The problem of determining the minimum-cost hypothetical ancestral sequences for a given cladogram is known to be NP-complete. This "tree alignment" problem has motivated the considerable effort placed in multiple sequence alignment procedures. Wheeler in 1996 proposed a heuristic method, direct optimization, to calculate cladogram costs without the intervention of multiple sequence alignment. This method, though more efficient in time and more effective in cladogram length than many alignment-based procedures, greedily optimizes nodes based on descendent information only. In their proposal of an exact multiple alignment solution, Sankoff et al. in 1976 described a heuristic procedure--the iterative improvement method--to create alignments at internal nodes by solving a series of median problems. The combination of a three-sequence direct optimization with iterative improvement and a branch-length-based cladogram cost procedure, provides an algorithm that frequently results in superior (i.e., lower) cladogram costs. This iterative pass optimization is both computation and memory intensive, but economies can be made to reduce this burden. An example in arthropod systematics is discussed. c2003 The Willi Hennig Society. Published by Elsevier Science (USA). All rights reserved.

  8. Conformal mapping and convergence of Krylov iterations

    SciTech Connect

    Driscoll, T.A.; Trefethen, L.N.

    1994-12-31

    Connections between conformal mapping and matrix iterations have been known for many years. The idea underlying these connections is as follows. Suppose the spectrum of a matrix or operator A is contained in a Jordan region E in the complex plane with 0 not an element of E. Let {phi}(z) denote a conformal map of the exterior of E onto the exterior of the unit disk, with {phi}{infinity} = {infinity}. Then 1/{vert_bar}{phi}(0){vert_bar} is an upper bound for the optimal asymptotic convergence factor of any Krylov subspace iteration. This idea can be made precise in various ways, depending on the matrix iterations, on whether A is finite or infinite dimensional, and on what bounds are assumed on the non-normality of A. This paper explores these connections for a variety of matrix examples, making use of a new MATLAB Schwarz-Christoffel Mapping Toolbox developed by the first author. Unlike the earlier Fortran Schwarz-Christoffel package SCPACK, the new toolbox computes exterior as well as interior Schwarz-Christoffel maps, making it easy to experiment with spectra that are not necessarily symmetric about an axis.

  9. Iterative solution of the semiconductor device equations

    SciTech Connect

    Bova, S.W.; Carey, G.F.

    1996-12-31

    Most semiconductor device models can be described by a nonlinear Poisson equation for the electrostatic potential coupled to a system of convection-reaction-diffusion equations for the transport of charge and energy. These equations are typically solved in a decoupled fashion and e.g. Newton`s method is used to obtain the resulting sequences of linear systems. The Poisson problem leads to a symmetric, positive definite system which we solve iteratively using conjugate gradient. The transport equations lead to nonsymmetric, indefinite systems, thereby complicating the selection of an appropriate iterative method. Moreover, their solutions exhibit steep layers and are subject to numerical oscillations and instabilities if standard Galerkin-type discretization strategies are used. In the present study, we use an upwind finite element technique for the transport equations. We also evaluate the performance of different iterative methods for the transport equations and investigate various preconditioners for a few generalized gradient methods. Numerical examples are given for a representative two-dimensional depletion MOSFET.

  10. Iteration of ultrasound aberration correction methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maasoey, Svein-Erik; Angelsen, Bjoern; Varslot, Trond

    2004-05-01

    Aberration in ultrasound medical imaging is usually modeled by time-delay and amplitude variations concentrated on the transmitting/receiving array. This filter process is here denoted a TDA filter. The TDA filter is an approximation to the physical aberration process, which occurs over an extended part of the human body wall. Estimation of the TDA filter, and performing correction on transmit and receive, has proven difficult. It has yet to be shown that this method works adequately for severe aberration. Estimation of the TDA filter can be iterated by retransmitting a corrected signal and re-estimate until a convergence criterion is fulfilled (adaptive imaging). Two methods for estimating time-delay and amplitude variations in receive signals from random scatterers have been developed. One method correlates each element signal with a reference signal. The other method use eigenvalue decomposition of the receive cross-spectrum matrix, based upon a receive energy-maximizing criterion. Simulations of iterating aberration correction with a TDA filter have been investigated to study its convergence properties. A weak and strong human-body wall model generated aberration. Both emulated the human abdominal wall. Results after iteration improve aberration correction substantially, and both estimation methods converge, even for the case of strong aberration.

  11. The dynamics of iterated transportation simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Nagel, K.; Rickert, M.; Simon, P.M.

    1998-12-01

    Transportation-related decisions of people often depend on what everybody else is doing. For example, decisions about mode choice, route choice, activity scheduling, etc., can depend on congestion, caused by the aggregated behavior of others. From a conceptual viewpoint, this consistency problem causes a deadlock, since nobody can start planning because they do not know what everybody else is doing. It is the process of iterations that is examined in this paper as a method for solving the problem. In this paper, the authors concentrate on the aspect of the iterative process that is probably the most important one from a practical viewpoint, and that is the ``uniqueness`` or ``robustness`` of the results. Also, they define robustness more in terms of common sense than in terms of a mathematical formalism. For this, they do not only want a single iterative process to converge, but they want the result to be independent of any particular implementation. The authors run many computational experiments, sometimes with variations of the same code, sometimes with totally different code, in order to see if any of the results are robust against these changes.

  12. Iterative pass optimization of sequence data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, Ward C.

    2003-01-01

    The problem of determining the minimum-cost hypothetical ancestral sequences for a given cladogram is known to be NP-complete. This "tree alignment" problem has motivated the considerable effort placed in multiple sequence alignment procedures. Wheeler in 1996 proposed a heuristic method, direct optimization, to calculate cladogram costs without the intervention of multiple sequence alignment. This method, though more efficient in time and more effective in cladogram length than many alignment-based procedures, greedily optimizes nodes based on descendent information only. In their proposal of an exact multiple alignment solution, Sankoff et al. in 1976 described a heuristic procedure--the iterative improvement method--to create alignments at internal nodes by solving a series of median problems. The combination of a three-sequence direct optimization with iterative improvement and a branch-length-based cladogram cost procedure, provides an algorithm that frequently results in superior (i.e., lower) cladogram costs. This iterative pass optimization is both computation and memory intensive, but economies can be made to reduce this burden. An example in arthropod systematics is discussed. c2003 The Willi Hennig Society. Published by Elsevier Science (USA). All rights reserved.

  13. ITER Creation Safety File Expertise Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrault, D.

    2013-06-01

    In March 2010, the ITER operator delivered the facility safety file to the French "Autorité de Sûreté Nucléaire" (ASN) as part of its request for the creation decree, legally necessary before building works can begin on the site. The French "Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire" (IRSN), in support to the ASN, recently completed its expertise of the safety measures proposed for ITER, on the basis of this file and of additional technical documents from the operator. This paper presents the IRSN's main conclusions. In particular, they focus on the radioactive materials involved, the safety and radiation protection demonstration (suitability of risk management measures…), foreseeable accidents, building and safety important component design and, finally, wastes and effluents to be produced. This assessment was just the first legally-required step in on-going safety monitoring of the ITER project, which will include other complete regulatory re-evaluations.

  14. Adaptive spatial filtering for off-axis digital holographic microscopy based on region recognition approach with iterative thresholding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xuefei; Nguyen, Chuong Vinh; Pratap, Mrinalini; Zheng, Yujie; Wang, Yi; Nisbet, David R.; Rug, Melanie; Maier, Alexander G.; Lee, Woei Ming

    2016-12-01

    Here we propose a region-recognition approach with iterative thresholding, which is adaptively tailored to extract the appropriate region or shape of spatial frequency. In order to justify the method, we tested it with different samples and imaging conditions (different objectives). We demonstrate that our method provides a useful method for rapid imaging of cellular dynamics in microfluidic and cell cultures.

  15. Rapid and preferential distribution of blood-borne αCD3εAb to the liver is followed by local stimulation of T cells and natural killer T cells

    PubMed Central

    Wingender, Gerhard; Schumak, Beatrix; Schurich, Anna; Gessner, J Engelbert; Endl, Elmar; Limmer, Andreas; Knolle, Percy A

    2006-01-01

    Dissemination of soluble molecules or antigens via the blood stream is considered to lead to a uniform distribution in the various organs of the body, but organ-specific microarchitecture and vascularization may influence this. Following intravenous injection of αCD3ε antibody (αCD3εAb) we observed clear differences in antibody binding to Fcγ receptor (FcγR)+ antigen-presenting cells (APCs) or T lymphocytes in different organs. Significant binding of blood-borne αCD3εAb was only detected in the spleen and liver and not in the thymus or lymph node. In the spleen, only 10% of dendritic cells/macrophages and 40% of T-cell receptor (TCR)-β+ cells were positive for αCD3εAb, and, dependent on FcγR-mediated cross-linking of αCD3εAb, a similar percentage of splenic TCR-β+ cells were stimulated and became CD69+. Stimulation of TCR-β+ cells in the liver was at least as efficient as in the spleen, but almost all T cells and all scavenger liver sinusoidal endothelial cells bound αCD3εAb. In contrast to CD69 up-regulation, only CD4+ natural killer T (NKT) cells and CD11ahigh CD8+ T cells were activated by αCD3εAb and expressed interferon (IFN)-γ. Again, IFN-γ release from NKT/T cells was at least as efficient in the liver as in the spleen. Taken together, our results support the notion that the combination of extensive hepatic vascularization and very high scavenger activity allows the liver to fulfill its metabolic tasks and to promote stimulation of the large but widely distributed hepatic population of NKT/T cells. PMID:16423047

  16. The role of ITER in the US MFE Program Strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, A.J.

    1992-07-01

    I want to discuss the role of ITER in the US MFE Program Strategy. I should stress that any opinions I present are purely my own. I`m not speaking ex cathedra, I`m not speaking for the ITER Home Team, and I`m not speaking for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. I`m giving my own personal opinions. In discussing the role of ITER, we have to recognize that ITER plays several roles, and I want to identify how ITER influences MFE program strategy through each of its roles.

  17. The role of ITER in the US MFE Program Strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, A.J.

    1992-07-01

    I want to discuss the role of ITER in the US MFE Program Strategy. I should stress that any opinions I present are purely my own. I'm not speaking ex cathedra, I'm not speaking for the ITER Home Team, and I'm not speaking for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. I'm giving my own personal opinions. In discussing the role of ITER, we have to recognize that ITER plays several roles, and I want to identify how ITER influences MFE program strategy through each of its roles.

  18. Speeding up Newton-type iterations for stiff problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Pinto, S.; Rojas-Bello, R.

    2005-09-01

    Iterative schemes based on the Cooper and Butcher iteration [5] are considered, in order to implement highly implicit Runge-Kutta methods on stiff problems. By introducing two appropriate parameters in the scheme, a new iteration making use of the last two iterates, is proposed. Specific schemes of this type for the Gauss, Radau IA-IIA and Lobatto IIIA-B-C processes are developed. It is also shown that in many situations the new iteration presents a faster convergence than the original.

  19. Evaluation of ITER MSE Viewing Optics

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, S; Lerner, S; Morris, K; Jayakumar, J; Holcomb, C; Makowski, M; Latkowski, J; Chipman, R

    2007-03-26

    The Motional Stark Effect (MSE) diagnostic on ITER determines the local plasma current density by measuring the polarization angle of light resulting from the interaction of a high energy neutral heating beam and the tokamak plasma. This light signal has to be transmitted from the edge and core of the plasma to a polarization analyzer located in the port plug. The optical system should either preserve the polarization information, or it should be possible to reliably calibrate any changes induced by the optics. This LLNL Work for Others project for the US ITER Project Office (USIPO) is focused on the design of the viewing optics for both the edge and core MSE systems. Several design constraints were considered, including: image quality, lack of polarization aberrations, ease of construction and cost of mirrors, neutron shielding, and geometric layout in the equatorial port plugs. The edge MSE optics are located in ITER equatorial port 3 and view Heating Beam 5, and the core system is located in equatorial port 1 viewing heating beam 4. The current work is an extension of previous preliminary design work completed by the ITER central team (ITER resources were not available to complete a detailed optimization of this system, and then the MSE was assigned to the US). The optimization of the optical systems at this level was done with the ZEMAX optical ray tracing code. The final LLNL designs decreased the ''blur'' in the optical system by nearly an order of magnitude, and the polarization blur was reduced by a factor of 3. The mirror sizes were reduced with an estimated cost savings of a factor of 3. The throughput of the system was greater than or equal to the previous ITER design. It was found that optical ray tracing was necessary to accurately measure the throughput. Metal mirrors, while they can introduce polarization aberrations, were used close to the plasma because of the anticipated high heat, particle, and neutron loads. These mirrors formed an intermediate

  20. Optimal cooperation-trap strategies for the iterated rock-paper-scissors game.

    PubMed

    Bi, Zedong; Zhou, Hai-Jun

    2014-01-01

    In an iterated non-cooperative game, if all the players act to maximize their individual accumulated payoff, the system as a whole usually converges to a Nash equilibrium that poorly benefits any player. Here we show that such an undesirable destiny is avoidable in an iterated Rock-Paper-Scissors (RPS) game involving two rational players, X and Y. Player X has the option of proactively adopting a cooperation-trap strategy, which enforces complete cooperation from the rational player Y and leads to a highly beneficial and maximally fair situation to both players. That maximal degree of cooperation is achievable in such a competitive system with cyclic dominance of actions may stimulate further theoretical and empirical studies on how to resolve conflicts and enhance cooperation in human societies.

  1. Forelimb dyskinesia mediated by high-frequency stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus is linked to rapid activation of the NR2B subunit of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors.

    PubMed

    Quintana, Adrien; Melon, Christophe; Kerkerian-Le Goff, Lydia; Salin, Pascal; Savasta, Marc; Sgambato-Faure, Véronique

    2010-08-01

    Dyskinesia is a major side-effect of chronic l-DOPA administration, the reference treatment for Parkinson's disease. High-frequency stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-HFS) alleviates parkinsonian motor symptoms and indirectly improves dyskinesia by decreasing the L-DOPA requirement. However, inappropriate stimulation can also trigger dyskinetic movements, in both human and rodents. We investigated whether STN-HFS-evoked forelimb dyskinesia involved changes in glutamatergic neurotransmission as previously reported for L-DOPA-induced dyskinesias, focusing on the role of NR2B-containing N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NR2B/NMDARs). We applied STN-HFS in normal rats at intensities above and below the threshold for triggering forelimb dyskinesia. Dyskinesiogenic STN-HFS induced the activation of NR2B (as assessed by immunodetection of the phosphorylated residue Tyr(1472)) in neurons of the subthalamic nucleus, entopeduncular nucleus, motor thalamus and forelimb motor cortex. The severity of STN-HFS-induced forelimb dyskinesia was decreased in a dose-dependent manner by systemic injections of CP-101,606, a selective blocker of NR2B/NMDARs, but was either unaffected or increased by the non-selective N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist, MK-801.

  2. Simultaneous iterative reconstruction technique for diffuse optical tomography imaging: iteration criterion and image recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zong-Han; Wu, Chun-Ming; Lin, Yo-Wei; Chuang, Ming-Lung; Tsai, Jui-che; Sun, Chia-Wei

    2008-02-01

    Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) is an emerging technique for biomedical imaging. The imaging quality of the DOT strongly depends on the reconstruction algorithm. In this paper, four inhomogeneities with various shapes of absorption distributions are simulated by a continues-wave DOT system. The DOT images are obtained based on the simultaneous iterative reconstruction technique (SIRT) method. To solve the trade-off problem between time consumption of reconstruction process and accuracy of reconstructed image, the iteration process needs a optimization criterion in algorithm. In this paper, the comparison between the root mean square error (RMSE) and the convergence rate (CR) in SIRT algorithm are demonstrated. From the simulation results, the CR reveals the information of global minimum in the iteration process. Based on the CR calculation, the SIRT can offer higher efficient image reconstructing in DOT system.

  3. FASART: An iterative reconstruction algorithm with inter-iteration adaptive NAD filter.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ziying; Li, Yugang; Zhang, Fa; Wan, Xiaohua

    2015-01-01

    Electron tomography (ET) is an essential imaging technique for studying structures of large biological specimens. These structures are reconstructed from a set of projections obtained at different sample orientations by tilting the specimen. However, most of existing reconstruction methods are not appropriate when the data are extremely noisy and incomplete. A new iterative method has been proposed: adaptive simultaneous algebraic reconstruction with inter-iteration adaptive non-linear anisotropic diffusion (NAD) filter (FASART). We also adopted an adaptive parameter and discussed the step for the filter in this reconstruction method. Experimental results show that FASART can restrain the noise generated in the process of iterative reconstruction and still preserve the more details of the structure edges.

  4. Corneal topography matching by iterative registration.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junjie; Elsheikh, Ahmed; Davey, Pinakin G; Wang, Weizhuo; Bao, Fangjun; Mottershead, John E

    2014-11-01

    Videokeratography is used for the measurement of corneal topography in overlapping portions (or maps) which must later be joined together to form the overall topography of the cornea. The separate portions are measured from different viewpoints and therefore must be brought together by registration of measurement points in the regions of overlap. The central map is generally the most accurate, but all maps are measured with uncertainty that increases towards the periphery. It becomes the reference (or static) map, and the peripheral (or dynamic) maps must then be transformed by rotation and translation so that the overlapping portions are matched. The process known as registration, of determining the necessary transformation, is a well-understood procedure in image analysis and has been applied in several areas of science and engineering. In this article, direct search optimisation using the Nelder-Mead algorithm and several variants of the iterative closest/corresponding point routine are explained and applied to simulated and real clinical data. The measurement points on the static and dynamic maps are generally different so that it becomes necessary to interpolate, which is done using a truncated series of Zernike polynomials. The point-to-plane iterative closest/corresponding point variant has the advantage of releasing certain optimisation constraints that lead to persistent registration and alignment errors when other approaches are used. The point-to-plane iterative closest/corresponding point routine is found to be robust to measurement noise, insensitive to starting values of the transformation parameters and produces high-quality results when using real clinical data.

  5. Iterative repair for scheduling and rescheduling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zweben, Monte; Davis, Eugene; Deale, Michael

    1991-01-01

    An iterative repair search method is described called constraint based simulated annealing. Simulated annealing is a hill climbing search technique capable of escaping local minima. The utility of the constraint based framework is shown by comparing search performance with and without the constraint framework on a suite of randomly generated problems. Results are also shown of applying the technique to the NASA Space Shuttle ground processing problem. These experiments show that the search methods scales to complex, real world problems and reflects interesting anytime behavior.

  6. Iterative filtering procedure for the Vlasov equation

    SciTech Connect

    Chriaa, K.; Skarka, V.; Carati, D. |

    1997-01-01

    An iterative filtering scheme is used for deriving the evolution of large scales in a plasma. The information lost by filtering out the small-scale fluctuations is accounted for by the introduction of an effective propagator and vertex operators in the Vlasov equation. These renormalizing terms correspond to large-scale diffusive effects. A general expression for the fluxes of energy and particles is obtained. The transport coefficients are explicitly derived for the quasilinear limit and the guiding center approximation. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  7. Deterministic convergence in iterative phase shifting

    SciTech Connect

    Luna, Esteban; Salas, Luis; Sohn, Erika; Ruiz, Elfego; Nunez, Juan M.; Herrera, Joel

    2009-03-10

    Previous implementations of the iterative phase shifting method, in which the phase of a test object is computed from measurements using a phase shifting interferometer with unknown positions of the reference, do not provide an accurate way of knowing when convergence has been attained. We present a new approach to this method that allows us to deterministically identify convergence. The method is tested with a home-built Fizeau interferometer that measures optical surfaces polished to {lambda}/100 using the Hydra tool. The intrinsic quality of the measurements is better than 0.5 nm. Other possible applications for this technique include fringe projection or any problem where phase shifting is involved.

  8. Adaptable Iterative and Recursive Kalman Filter Schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zanetti, Renato

    2014-01-01

    Nonlinear filters are often very computationally expensive and usually not suitable for real-time applications. Real-time navigation algorithms are typically based on linear estimators, such as the extended Kalman filter (EKF) and, to a much lesser extent, the unscented Kalman filter. The Iterated Kalman filter (IKF) and the Recursive Update Filter (RUF) are two algorithms that reduce the consequences of the linearization assumption of the EKF by performing N updates for each new measurement, where N is the number of recursions, a tuning parameter. This paper introduces an adaptable RUF algorithm to calculate N on the go, a similar technique can be used for the IKF as well.

  9. Preconditioned iterative methods for fractional diffusion equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Fu-Rong; Yang, Shi-Wei; Jin, Xiao-Qing

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we are concerned with numerical methods for the solution of initial-boundary value problems of anomalous diffusion equations of order α∈(1,2). The classical Crank-Nicholson method is used to discretize the fractional diffusion equation and then the spatial extrapolation is used to obtain temporally and spatially second-order accurate numerical estimates. Two preconditioned iterative methods, namely, the preconditioned generalized minimal residual (preconditioned GMRES) method and the preconditioned conjugate gradient for normal residual (preconditioned CGNR) method, are proposed to solve relevant linear systems. Numerical experiments are given to illustrate the efficiency of the methods.

  10. Iterative least squares functional networks classifier.

    PubMed

    El-Sebakhy, Emad A; Hadi, Ali S; Faisal, Kanaan A

    2007-05-01

    This paper proposes unconstrained functional networks as a new classifier to deal with the pattern recognition problems. Both methodology and learning algorithm for this kind of computational intelligence classifier using the iterative least squares optimization criterion are derived. The performance of this new intelligent systems scheme is demonstrated and examined using real-world applications. A comparative study with the most common classification algorithms in both machine learning and statistics communities is carried out. The study was achieved with only sets of second-order linearly independent polynomial functions to approximate the neuron functions. The results show that this new framework classifier is reliable, flexible, stable, and achieves a high-quality performance.

  11. Unifying iteration rule for fractal objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kittel, A.; Parisi, J.; Peinke, J.; Baier, G.; Klein, M.; Rössler, O. E.

    1997-03-01

    We introduce an iteration rule for real numbers capable to generate attractors with dragon-, snowflake-, sponge-, or Swiss-flag-like cross sections. The idea behind it is the mapping of a torus into two (or more) shrunken and twisted tori located inside the previous one. Three distinct parameters define the symmetry, the dimension, and the connectedness or disconnectedness of the fractal object. For some selected triples of parameter values, a couple of well known fractal geometries (e.g. the Cantor set, the Sierpinski gasket, or the Swiss flag) can be gained as special cases.

  12. Design of the ITER ICRF Antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Hancock, D.; Nightingale, M.; Bamber, R.; Dalton, N.; Lister, J.; Porton, M.; Shannon, M.; Wilson, D.; Wooldridge, E.; Winkler, K.

    2011-12-23

    The CYCLE consortium has been designing the ITER ICRF antenna since March 2010, supported by an F4E grant. Following a brief introduction to the consortium, this paper: describes the present status and layout of the design; highlights the key mechanical engineering features; shows the expected impact of cooling and radiation issues on the design and outlines the need for future R and D to support the design process. A key design requirement is the need for the mechanical design and analysis to be consistent with all requirements following from the RF physics and antenna layout optimisation. As such, this paper complements that of Durodie et al.

  13. Bounds for nonlinear composites via iterated homogenization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponte Castañeda, P.

    2012-09-01

    Improved estimates of the Hashin-Shtrikman-Willis type are generated for the class of nonlinear composites consisting of two well-ordered, isotropic phases distributed randomly with prescribed two-point correlations, as determined by the H-measure of the microstructure. For this purpose, a novel strategy for generating bounds has been developed utilizing iterated homogenization. The general idea is to make use of bounds that may be available for composite materials in the limit when the concentration of one of the phases (say phase 1) is small. It then follows from the theory of iterated homogenization that it is possible, under certain conditions, to obtain bounds for more general values of the concentration, by gradually adding small amounts of phase 1 in incremental fashion, and sequentially using the available dilute-concentration estimate, up to the final (finite) value of the concentration (of phase 1). Such an approach can also be useful when available bounds are expected to be tighter for certain ranges of the phase volume fractions. This is the case, for example, for the "linear comparison" bounds for porous viscoplastic materials, which are known to be comparatively tighter for large values of the porosity. In this case, the new bounds obtained by the above-mentioned "iterated" procedure can be shown to be much improved relative to the earlier "linear comparison" bounds, especially at low values of the porosity and high triaxialities. Consistent with the way in which they have been derived, the new estimates are, strictly, bounds only for the class of multi-scale, nonlinear composites consisting of two well-ordered, isotropic phases that are distributed with prescribed H-measure at each stage in the incremental process. However, given the facts that the H-measure of the sequential microstructures is conserved (so that the final microstructures can be shown to have the same H-measure), and that H-measures are insensitive to length scales, it is conjectured

  14. Novel fractal planar electrode design for efficient neural stimulation.

    PubMed

    Xuefeng Wei; Benmassaoud, Mehdi; Meller, Miriam; Kuchibhatla, Sindhuja

    2016-08-01

    Planar electrodes are used in epidural spinal cord stimulation and cortical stimulation. Stimulation efficiency of an electrode is characterized by its ability to activate a volume of neural tissue with lower voltage and power requirements. As current density tends to increase towards the sharp edges of an electrode, we hypothesize that electrode designs involving a greater amount of sharp edges will have higher variations of current density, and therefore increase stimulation efficiency, compared to electrodes with flat or rounded edges. This study uses three Koch snowflake fractal design iterations to compare each voltage and power requirements to those of the traditional square and circular electrode designs. Electrode geometries were constructed in COMSOL Multiphysics, each with an equal surface area. Voltages obtained from the finite element models were interpolated to determine the nodal voltages of 100 axons randomly positioned around the electrode. Threshold voltage and power for activating these model axons were simulated in NEURON. Current density variation was significantly higher on the surface of the 3rd iteration Koch snowflake electrode than the traditional square electrode. This novel electrode also activated a significantly greater number of axons with a lower threshold as compared to the traditional square electrode. The computational models used in this study demonstrated the feasibility of increasing stimulation efficiency through the design of novel planar electrodes with Koch snowflake fractal iterations. Future studies could explore and optimize efficiency when more fractal additions are taken, as well as exploiting other fractal shapes.

  15. Final Report on ITER Task Agreement 81-08

    SciTech Connect

    Richard L. Moore

    2008-03-01

    As part of an ITER Implementing Task Agreement (ITA) between the ITER US Participant Team (PT) and the ITER International Team (IT), the INL Fusion Safety Program was tasked to provide the ITER IT with upgrades to the fusion version of the MELCOR 1.8.5 code including a beryllium dust oxidation model. The purpose of this model is to allow the ITER IT to investigate hydrogen production from beryllium dust layers on hot surfaces inside the ITER vacuum vessel (VV) during in-vessel loss-of-cooling accidents (LOCAs). Also included in the ITER ITA was a task to construct a RELAP5/ATHENA model of the ITER divertor cooling loop to model the draining of the loop during a large ex-vessel pipe break followed by an in-vessel divertor break and compare the results to a simular MELCOR model developed by the ITER IT. This report, which is the final report for this agreement, documents the completion of the work scope under this ITER TA, designated as TA 81-08.

  16. Averaging and Metropolis iterations for positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Szirmay-Kalos, László; Magdics, Milán; Tóth, Balázs; Bükki, Tamás

    2013-03-01

    Iterative positron emission tomography (PET) reconstruction computes projections between the voxel space and the lines of response (LOR) space, which are mathematically equivalent to the evaluation of multi-dimensional integrals. The dimension of the integration domain can be very high if scattering needs to be compensated. Monte Carlo (MC) quadrature is a straightforward method to approximate high-dimensional integrals. As the numbers of voxels and LORs can be in the order of hundred millions and the projection also depends on the measured object, the quadratures cannot be precomputed, but Monte Carlo simulation should take place on-the-fly during the iterative reconstruction process. This paper presents modifications of the maximum likelihood, expectation maximization (ML-EM) iteration scheme to reduce the reconstruction error due to the on-the-fly MC approximations of forward and back projections. If the MC sample locations are the same in every iteration step of the ML-EM scheme, then the approximation error will lead to a modified reconstruction result. However, when random estimates are statistically independent in different iteration steps, then the iteration may either diverge or fluctuate around the solution. Our goal is to increase the accuracy and the stability of the iterative solution while keeping the number of random samples and therefore the reconstruction time low. We first analyze the error behavior of ML-EM iteration with on-the-fly MC projections, then propose two solutions: averaging iteration and Metropolis iteration. Averaging iteration averages forward projection estimates during the iteration sequence. Metropolis iteration rejects those forward projection estimates that would compromise the reconstruction and also guarantees the unbiasedness of the tracer density estimate. We demonstrate that these techniques allow a significant reduction of the required number of samples and thus the reconstruction time. The proposed methods are built into

  17. Efficiency trade-offs of steady-state methods using FEM and FDM. [iterative solutions for nonlinear flow equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gartling, D. K.; Roache, P. J.

    1978-01-01

    The efficiency characteristics of finite element and finite difference approximations for the steady-state solution of the Navier-Stokes equations are examined. The finite element method discussed is a standard Galerkin formulation of the incompressible, steady-state Navier-Stokes equations. The finite difference formulation uses simple centered differences that are O(delta x-squared). Operation counts indicate that a rapidly converging Newton-Raphson-Kantorovitch iteration scheme is generally preferable over a Picard method. A split NOS Picard iterative algorithm for the finite difference method was most efficient.

  18. Label-Free Neurosurgical Pathology with Stimulated Raman Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Fa-Ke; Calligaris, David; Olubiyi, Olutayo I.; Norton, Isaiah; Yang, Wenlong; Santagata, Sandro; Xie, X. Sunney; Golby, Alexandra J.; Agar, Nathalie Y. R.

    2016-01-01

    The goal of brain tumor surgery is to maximize tumor removal without injuring critical brain structures. Achieving this goal is challenging since it can be difficult to distinguish tumor from non-tumor tissue. While standard histopathology provides information that could assist tumor delineation, it cannot be performed iteratively during surgery as freezing, sectioning, and staining of the tissue require too much time. Stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy is a powerful label-free chemical imaging technology that enables rapid mapping of lipids and proteins within a fresh specimen. This information can be rendered into pathology-like images. Although this approach has been used to assess the density of glioma cells in murine orthotopic xenografts models and human brain tumors, tissue heterogeneity in clinical brain tumors has not yet been fully evaluated with SRS imaging. Here we profile 41 specimens resected from 12 patients with a range of brain tumors. By evaluating large-scale stimulated Raman imaging data and correlating this data with current clinical gold standard of histopathology for 4,422 fields of view, we capture many essential diagnostic hallmarks for glioma classification. Notably, in fresh tumor samples we observe additional features, not seen by conventional methods, including extensive lipid droplets within glioma cells, collagen deposition in gliosarcoma, and irregularity and disruption of myelinated fibers in areas infiltrated by oligodendroglioma cells. This data is freely available in a public resource to foster diagnostic training and to permit additional interrogation. Our work establishes the methodology and provides a significant collection of reference images for label-free neurosurgical pathology. PMID:27197198

  19. Iterative blip-summed path integral for quantum dynamics in strongly dissipative environments.

    PubMed

    Makri, Nancy

    2017-04-07

    The iterative decomposition of the blip-summed path integral [N. Makri, J. Chem. Phys. 141, 134117 (2014)] is described. The starting point is the expression of the reduced density matrix for a quantum system interacting with a harmonic dissipative bath in the form of a forward-backward path sum, where the effects of the bath enter through the Feynman-Vernon influence functional. The path sum is evaluated iteratively in time by propagating an array that stores blip configurations within the memory interval. Convergence with respect to the number of blips and the memory length yields numerically exact results which are free of statistical error. In situations of strongly dissipative, sluggish baths, the algorithm leads to a dramatic reduction of computational effort in comparison with iterative path integral methods that do not implement the blip decomposition. This gain in efficiency arises from (i) the rapid convergence of the blip series and (ii) circumventing the explicit enumeration of between-blip path segments, whose number grows exponentially with the memory length. Application to an asymmetric dissipative two-level system illustrates the rapid convergence of the algorithm even when the bath memory is extremely long.

  20. Iterative blip-summed path integral for quantum dynamics in strongly dissipative environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makri, Nancy

    2017-04-01

    The iterative decomposition of the blip-summed path integral [N. Makri, J. Chem. Phys. 141, 134117 (2014)] is described. The starting point is the expression of the reduced density matrix for a quantum system interacting with a harmonic dissipative bath in the form of a forward-backward path sum, where the effects of the bath enter through the Feynman-Vernon influence functional. The path sum is evaluated iteratively in time by propagating an array that stores blip configurations within the memory interval. Convergence with respect to the number of blips and the memory length yields numerically exact results which are free of statistical error. In situations of strongly dissipative, sluggish baths, the algorithm leads to a dramatic reduction of computational effort in comparison with iterative path integral methods that do not implement the blip decomposition. This gain in efficiency arises from (i) the rapid convergence of the blip series and (ii) circumventing the explicit enumeration of between-blip path segments, whose number grows exponentially with the memory length. Application to an asymmetric dissipative two-level system illustrates the rapid convergence of the algorithm even when the bath memory is extremely long.

  1. Diverse Power Iteration Embeddings and Its Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Huang H.; Yoo S.; Yu, D.; Qin, H.

    2014-12-14

    Abstract—Spectral Embedding is one of the most effective dimension reduction algorithms in data mining. However, its computation complexity has to be mitigated in order to apply it for real-world large scale data analysis. Many researches have been focusing on developing approximate spectral embeddings which are more efficient, but meanwhile far less effective. This paper proposes Diverse Power Iteration Embeddings (DPIE), which not only retains the similar efficiency of power iteration methods but also produces a series of diverse and more effective embedding vectors. We test this novel method by applying it to various data mining applications (e.g. clustering, anomaly detection and feature selection) and evaluating their performance improvements. The experimental results show our proposed DPIE is more effective than popular spectral approximation methods, and obtains the similar quality of classic spectral embedding derived from eigen-decompositions. Moreover it is extremely fast on big data applications. For example in terms of clustering result, DPIE achieves as good as 95% of classic spectral clustering on the complex datasets but 4000+ times faster in limited memory environment.

  2. Iterative image reconstruction in spectral CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, Daniel; Michel, Eric; Kim, Hye S.; Kim, Jae G.; Han, Byung H.; Cho, Min H.; Lee, Soo Y.

    2012-03-01

    Scan time of spectral-CTs is much longer than conventional CTs due to limited number of x-ray photons detectable by photon-counting detectors. However, the spectral pixel information in spectral-CT has much richer information on physiological and pathological status of the tissues than the CT-number in conventional CT, which makes the spectral- CT one of the promising future imaging modalities. One simple way to reduce the scan time in spectral-CT imaging is to reduce the number of views in the acquisition of projection data. But, this may result in poorer SNR and strong streak artifacts which can severely compromise the image quality. In this work, spectral-CT projection data were obtained from a lab-built spectral-CT consisting of a single CdTe photon counting detector, a micro-focus x-ray tube and scan mechanics. For the image reconstruction, we used two iterative image reconstruction methods, the simultaneous iterative reconstruction technique (SIRT) and the total variation minimization based on conjugate gradient method (CG-TV), along with the filtered back-projection (FBP) to compare the image quality. From the imaging of the iodine containing phantoms, we have observed that SIRT and CG-TV are superior to the FBP method in terms of SNR and streak artifacts.

  3. Suboptimal fractal coding scheme using iterative transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Hyun-Soo; Chung, Jae-won

    2001-05-01

    This paper presents a new fractal coding scheme to find a suboptimal transformation by performing an iterative encoding process. The optimal transformation can be defined as the transformation generating the closest attractor to an original image. Unfortunately, it is impossible in practice to find the optimal transformation, due to the heavy computational burden. In this paper, however, by means of some new theorems related with contractive transformations and attractors. It is shown that for some specific cases the optimal or suboptimal transformations can be obtained. The proposed method obtains a suboptimal transformation by performing iterative processes as is done in decoding. Thus, it requires more computation than the conventional method, but it improves the image quality. For a simple case where the optimal transformation can actually be found, the proposed method is experimentally evaluated against both the optimal method and the conventional method. For a general case where the optimal transformation in unavailable due to heavy computational complexity, the proposed method is also evaluated in comparison with the conventional method.

  4. The ITER Radial Neutron Camera Detection System

    SciTech Connect

    Marocco, D.; Belli, F.; Esposito, B.; Petrizzi, L.; Riva, M.; Bonheure, G.; Kaschuck, Y.

    2008-03-12

    A multichannel neutron detection system (Radial Neutron Camera, RNC) will be installed on the ITER equatorial port plug 1 for total neutron source strength, neutron emissivity/ion temperature profiles and n{sub t}/n{sub d} ratio measurements [1]. The system is composed by two fan shaped collimating structures: an ex-vessel structure, looking at the plasma core, containing tree sets of 12 collimators (each set lying on a different toroidal plane), and an in-vessel structure, containing 9 collimators, for plasma edge coverage. The RNC detecting system will work in a harsh environment (neutron fiux up to 10{sup 8}-10{sup 9} n/cm{sup 2} s, magnetic field >0.5 T or in-vessel detectors), should provide both counting and spectrometric information and should be flexible enough to cover the high neutron flux dynamic range expected during the different ITER operation phases. ENEA has been involved in several activities related to RNC design and optimization [2,3]. In the present paper the up-to-date design and the neutron emissivity reconstruction capabilities of the RNC will be described. Different options for detectors suitable for spectrometry and counting (e.g. scintillators and diamonds) focusing on the implications in terms of overall RNC performance will be discussed. The increase of the RNC capabilities offered by the use of new digital data acquisition systems will be also addressed.

  5. Critical Assessment of Pressure Gauges for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Tabares, Francisco L.; Tafalla, David; Garcia-Cortes, Isabel

    2008-03-12

    The density and flux of molecular species in ITER, largely dominated by the molecular form of the main plasma components and the He ash, is a valuable parameter of relevance not only for operation purposes but also for validating existing neutral particle models of direct implications in divertor performance. An accurate and spatially resolved monitoring of this parameter implies the proper selection of pressure gauges able to cope with the very unique and aggressive environment to be expected in a fusion reactor. To date, there is no standard gauge fulfilling all the requirements, which encompass high neutron and gamma fluxes, together with strong magnetic field and temperature excursions and dusty environment. In the present work, a review of the challenges to face in the measurement of neutral pressure in ITER, together with existing technologies and developments to be made in some of them for their application to the task is presented. Particular attention is paid to R and D needs of existing concepts with potential use in future designs.

  6. Transport analysis of tungsten impurity in ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Y.; Amano, T.; Shimizu, K.; Shimada, M.

    2003-03-01

    The radial distribution of tungsten impurity in ITER is calculated by using the 1.5D transport code TOTAL coupled with NCLASS, which can solve the neo-classical impurity flux considering arbitrary aspect ratio and collisionality. An impurity screening effect is observed when the density profile is flat and the line radiation power is smaller than in the case without impurity transport by a factor of 2. It is shown that 90 MW of line radiation power is possible without significant degradation of plasma performance ( HH98( y,2) ˜1) when the fusion power is 700 MW (fusion gain Q=10). The allowable tungsten density is about 7×10 15/m 3, which is 0.01% of the electron density and the increase of the effective ionic charge Zeff is about 0.39. In this case, the total radiation power is more than half of the total heating power 210 MW, and power to the divertor region is less than 100 MW. This operation regime gives an opportunity for high fusion power operation in ITER with acceptable divertor conditions. Simulations for the case with an internal transport barrier (ITB) are also performed and it is found that impurity shielding by an ITB is possible with density profile control.

  7. Pedestal stability comparison and ITER pedestal prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, P. B.; Aiba, N.; Beurskens, M.; Groebner, R. J.; Horton, L. D.; Hubbard, A. E.; Hughes, J. W.; Huysmans, G. T. A.; Kamada, Y.; Kirk, A.; Konz, C.; Leonard, A. W.; Lönnroth, J.; Maggi, C. F.; Maingi, R.; Osborne, T. H.; Oyama, N.; Pankin, A.; Saarelma, S.; Saibene, G.; Terry, J. L.; Urano, H.; Wilson, H. R.

    2009-08-01

    The pressure at the top of the edge transport barrier (or 'pedestal height') strongly impacts fusion performance, while large edge localized modes (ELMs), driven by the free energy in the pedestal region, can constrain material lifetimes. Accurately predicting the pedestal height and ELM behavior in ITER is an essential element of prediction and optimization of fusion performance. Investigation of intermediate wavelength MHD modes (or 'peeling-ballooning' modes) has led to an improved understanding of important constraints on the pedestal height and the mechanism for ELMs. The combination of high-resolution pedestal diagnostics, including substantial recent improvements, and a suite of highly efficient stability codes, has made edge stability analysis routine on several major tokamaks, contributing both to understanding, and to experimental planning and performance optimization. Here we present extensive comparisons of observations to predicted edge stability boundaries on several tokamaks, both for the standard (Type I) ELM regime, and for small ELM and ELM-free regimes. We further discuss a new predictive model for the pedestal height and width (EPED1), developed by self-consistently combining a simple width model with peeling-ballooning stability calculations. This model is tested against experimental measurements, and used in initial predictions of the pedestal height for ITER.

  8. Iterative deconvolution methods for ghost imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Situ, Guohai

    2016-10-01

    Ghost imaging (GI) is an important technique in single-pixel imaging. It has been demonstrated that GI has applications in various areas such as imaging through harsh environments and optical encryption. Correlation is widely used to reconstruct the object image in GI. But it only offers the signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) of the reconstructed image linearly proportional to the number of measurements. Here, we develop a kind of iterative deconvolution methods for GI. With the known image transmission matrix in GI, the first one uses an iterative algorithm to decrease the error between the reconstructed image and the ground-truth image. Ideally, the error converges to a minimum for speckle patterns when the number of measurements is larger than the number of resolution cells. The second technique, Gerchberg-Saxton (GS) like GI, takes the advantage of the integral property of the Fourier transform, and treats the captured data as constraints for image reconstruction. According to this property, we can regard the data recorded by the bucket detector as the Fourier transform of the object image evaluated at the origin. Each of the speckle patterns randomly selects certain spectral components of the object and shift them to the origin in the Fourier space. One can use these constraints to reconstruct the image with the GS algorithm. This deconvolution method is suitable for any single pixel imaging models. Compared to conventional GI, both techniques offer a nonlinear growth of the SNR value with respect to the number of measurements.

  9. Intense diagnostic neutral beam development for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Rej, D.J.; Henins, I.; Fonck, R.J.; Kim, Y.J.

    1992-05-01

    For the next-generation, burning tokamak plasmas such as ITER, diagnostic neutral beams and beam spectroscopy will continue to be used to determine a variety of plasma parameters such as ion temperature, rotation, fluctuations, impurity content, current density profile, and confined alpha particle density and energy distribution. Present-day low-current, long-pulse beam technology will be unable to provide the required signal intensities because of higher beam attenuation and background bremsstrahlung radiation in these larger, higher-density plasmas. To address this problem, we are developing a short-pulse, intense diagnostic neutral beam. Protons or deuterons are accelerated using magnetic-insulated ion-diode technology, and neutralized in a transient gas cell. A prototype 25-kA, 100-kV, 1-{mu}s accelerator is under construction at Los Alamos. Initial experiments will focus on ITER-related issues of beam energy distribution, current density, pulse length, divergence, propagation, impurity content, reproducibility, and maintenance.

  10. Intense diagnostic neutral beam development for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Rej, D.J.; Henins, I. ); Fonck, R.J.; Kim, Y.J. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering and Engineering Physics)

    1992-01-01

    For the next-generation, burning tokamak plasmas such as ITER, diagnostic neutral beams and beam spectroscopy will continue to be used to determine a variety of plasma parameters such as ion temperature, rotation, fluctuations, impurity content, current density profile, and confined alpha particle density and energy distribution. Present-day low-current, long-pulse beam technology will be unable to provide the required signal intensities because of higher beam attenuation and background bremsstrahlung radiation in these larger, higher-density plasmas. To address this problem, we are developing a short-pulse, intense diagnostic neutral beam. Protons or deuterons are accelerated using magnetic-insulated ion-diode technology, and neutralized in a transient gas cell. A prototype 25-kA, 100-kV, 1-{mu}s accelerator is under construction at Los Alamos. Initial experiments will focus on ITER-related issues of beam energy distribution, current density, pulse length, divergence, propagation, impurity content, reproducibility, and maintenance.

  11. ITER plant layout and site services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuyanov, V. A.

    2000-03-01

    The ITER site has not yet been determined. Nevertheless, to develop a construction plan and a cost estimate, it is necessary to have a detailed layout of the buildings, structures and outdoor equipment integrated with the balance of plant service systems prototypical of large fusion power plants. These services include electrical power for magnet feeds and plasma heating systems, cryogenic and conventional cooling systems, compressed air, gas supplies, demineralized water, steam and drainage. Nuclear grade facilities are provided to handle tritium fuel and activated waste, as well as to prevent radiation exposure of workers and the public. To prevent interference between services of different types and for efficient arrangement of buildings, structures and equipment within the site area, a plan was developed which segregated different classes of services to four quadrants surrounding the tokamak building, placed at the approximate geographical centre of the site. The locations of the buildings on the generic site were selected to meet all design requirements at minimum total project cost. A similar approach was used to determine the locations of services above, at and below grade. The generic site plan can be adapted to the site selected for ITER without significant changes to the buildings or equipment. Some rearrangements may be required by site topography, resulting primarily in changes to the length of services that link the buildings and equipment.

  12. Iterative dip-steering median filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Shoudong; Zhu, Weihong; Shi, Taikun

    2017-09-01

    Seismic data are always contaminated with high noise components, which present processing challenges especially for signal preservation and its true amplitude response. This paper deals with an extension of the conventional median filter, which is widely used in random noise attenuation. It is known that the standard median filter works well with laterally aligned coherent events but cannot handle steep events, especially events with conflicting dips. In this paper, an iterative dip-steering median filter is proposed for the attenuation of random noise in the presence of multiple dips. The filter first identifies the dominant dips inside an optimized processing window by a Fourier-radial transform in the frequency-wavenumber domain. The optimum size of the processing window depends on the intensity of random noise that needs to be attenuated and the amount of signal to be preserved. It then applies median filter along the dominant dip and retains the signals. Iterations are adopted to process the residual signals along the remaining dominant dips in a descending sequence, until all signals have been retained. The method is tested by both synthetic and field data gathers and also compared with the commonly used f-k least squares de-noising and f-x deconvolution.

  13. Prediction and Optimization of the ITER Pedestal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, P. B.; Meneghini, O.; Beurskens, M. N. A.; Hughes, J. W.; Osborne, T. H.; Wilson, H. R.

    2016-10-01

    The structure of the edge transport barrier, or pedestal, plays an important role in ITER performance, with fusion power predicted to scale roughly with the square of the pedestal pressure. Understanding the physics of the pedestal is also critical to reliably suppressing or mitigating ELMs. We present tests of the EPED model, which predicts pedestal structure based on the intersection of two calculated criticality constraints, on more than 800 cases on existing tokamaks, and assess model accuracy across a range of parameters including normalized gyroradius. The EPED model is found to predict observations significantly more accurately than existing empirical pedestal models. The model is then used both independently, and coupled to core transport predictions from TGLF and NEO, using OMFIT, to predict and optimize ITER performance, including exploring possible operation in the Super H-Mode regime. Work supported by contracts DE-FG02-95ER54309, FC02-06ER54873, and DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  14. Iterative Mechanism Solutions with Scenario and ADAMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhoades, Daren

    2006-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the use of iterative solutions using Scenario for Motion (UG NX 2 Motion) to assist in designing the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL). The MSL will have very unique design requirements, and in order to meet these requirements the system must have the ability to design for static stability, simulate mechanism kinematics, simulate dynamic behaviour and be capable of reconfiguration, and iterations as designed. The legacy process used on the Mars Exploration rovers worked, but it was cumbersome using multiple tools, limited configuration control, with manual process and communication, and multiple steps. The aim is to develop a mechanism that would reduce turn around time, and make more reiterations possible, to improve the quality and quantity of data, and to enhance configuration control. Currently for NX Scenario for Motion uses are in the articulation studies, the simulations of traverse motions,and subsystem simulations. The design of the Rover landing model requires accurate results, flexible elements, such as beams, and the use of the full ADAMS solver has been used. In order to achieve this, when required, there has been a direct translation from Scenario to ADAMS, with additional data in ascii format. The process that has been designed to move from Scenario to ADAMS is reviewed.

  15. ITER Central Solenoid support structure analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Freudenberg, Kevin D; Myatt, R.

    2011-01-01

    The ITER Central Solenoid (CS) is comprised of six independent coils held together by a pre-compression support structure. This structure must provide enough preload to maintain sufficient coil-to-coil contact and interface load throughout the current pulse. End of burn (EOB) represents one of the most extreme time-points doing the reference scenario when the currents in the CS3 coils oppose those of CS1 & CS2. The CS structure is performance limited by the room temperature static yield requirements needed to support the roughly 180 MN preload to resist coil separation during operation. This preload is applied by inner and external tie plates along the length of the coil stack by mechanical fastening methods utilizing Superbolt technology. The preloading structure satisfies the magnet structural design criteria of ITER and will be verified during mockup studies. The solenoid is supported from the bottom of the toroidal field (TF) coil casing in both the vertical radial directions. The upper support of the CS coil structure maintains radial registration with the TF coil in the event of vertical disruptions (VDE) loads and earthquakes. All of these structure systems are analyzed via a global finite element analysis (FEA). The model includes a complete sector of the TF coil and the CS coil/structure in one self-consistent analysis. The corresponding results and design descriptions are described in this report.

  16. Iterative Mechanism Solutions with Scenario and ADAMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhoades, Daren

    2006-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the use of iterative solutions using Scenario for Motion (UG NX 2 Motion) to assist in designing the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL). The MSL will have very unique design requirements, and in order to meet these requirements the system must have the ability to design for static stability, simulate mechanism kinematics, simulate dynamic behaviour and be capable of reconfiguration, and iterations as designed. The legacy process used on the Mars Exploration rovers worked, but it was cumbersome using multiple tools, limited configuration control, with manual process and communication, and multiple steps. The aim is to develop a mechanism that would reduce turn around time, and make more reiterations possible, to improve the quality and quantity of data, and to enhance configuration control. Currently for NX Scenario for Motion uses are in the articulation studies, the simulations of traverse motions,and subsystem simulations. The design of the Rover landing model requires accurate results, flexible elements, such as beams, and the use of the full ADAMS solver has been used. In order to achieve this, when required, there has been a direct translation from Scenario to ADAMS, with additional data in ascii format. The process that has been designed to move from Scenario to ADAMS is reviewed.

  17. Pedestal stability comparison and ITER pedestal prediction

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, P.; Alba, N; Beurskens, M.; Horton, L D

    2009-01-01

    The pressure at the top of the edge transport barrier (or 'pedestal height') strongly impacts fusion performance, while large edge localized modes (ELMs), driven by the free energy in the pedestal region, can constrain material lifetimes. Accurately predicting the pedestal height and ELM behavior in ITER is an essential element of prediction and optimization of fusion performance. Investigation of intermediate wavelength MHD modes (or 'peeling ballooning' modes) has led to an improved understanding of important constraints on the pedestal height and the mechanism for ELMs. The combination of high-resolution pedestal diagnostics, including substantial recent improvements, and a suite of highly efficient stability codes, has made edge stability analysis routine on several major tokamaks, contributing both to understanding, and to experimental planning and performance optimization. Here we present extensive comparisons of observations to predicted edge stability boundaries on several tokamaks, both for the standard (Type I) ELM regime, and for small ELM and ELM-free regimes. We further discuss a new predictive model for the pedestal height and width (EPED1), developed by self-consistently combining a simple width model with peeling-ballooning stability calculations. This model is tested against experimental measurements, and used in initial predictions of the pedestal height for ITER.

  18. Thomson scattering diagnostic systems in ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassan, M.; Andrew, P.; Kurskiev, G.; Mukhin, E.; Hatae, T.; Vayakis, G.; Yatsuka, E.; Walsh, M.

    2016-01-01

    Thomson scattering (TS) is a proven diagnostic technique that will be implemented in ITER in three independent systems. The Edge TS will measure electron temperature Te and electron density ne profiles at high resolution in the region with r/a>0.8 (with a the minor radius). The Core TS will cover the region r/a<0.85 and shall be able to measure electron temperatures up to 40 keV . The Divertor TS will observe a segment of the divertor plasma more than 700 mm long and is designed to detect Te as low as 0.3 eV . The Edge and Core systems are primary contributors to Te and ne profiles. Both are installed in equatorial port 10 and very close together with the toroidal distance between the two laser beams of less than 600 mm at the first wall (~ 6° toroidal separation), a characteristic that should allow to reliably match the two profiles in the region 0.8ITER environment is imposing specific loads (e.g. gamma and neutron radiation, temperatures, disruption-induced stresses) and also access and reliability constraints that require new designs for many of the sub-systems. The challenges and the proposed solutions for all three TS systems are presented.

  19. Laser cleaning of ITER's diagnostic mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skinner, C. H.; Gentile, C. A.; Doerner, R.

    2012-10-01

    Practical methods to clean ITER's diagnostic mirrors and restore reflectivity will be critical to ITER's plasma operations. We report on laser cleaning of single crystal molybdenum mirrors coated with either carbon or beryllium films 150 - 420 nm thick. A 1.06 μm Nd laser system provided 220 ns pulses at 8 kHz with typical power densities of 1-2 J/cm^2. The laser beam was fiber optically coupled to a scanner suitable for tokamak applications. The efficacy of mirror cleaning was assessed with a new technique that combines microscopic imaging and reflectivity measurements [1]. The method is suitable for hazardous materials such as beryllium as the mirrors remain sealed in a vacuum chamber. Excellent restoration of reflectivity for the carbon coated Mo mirrors was observed after laser scanning under vacuum conditions. For the beryllium coated mirrors restoration of reflectivity has so far been incomplete and modeling indicates that a shorter duration laser pulse is needed. No damage of the molybdenum mirror substrates was observed.[4pt][1] C.H. Skinner et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. at press.

  20. Diverse power iteration embeddings: Theory and practice

    DOE PAGES

    Huang, Hao; Yoo, Shinjae; Yu, Dantong; ...

    2015-11-09

    Manifold learning, especially spectral embedding, is known as one of the most effective learning approaches on high dimensional data, but for real-world applications it raises a serious computational burden in constructing spectral embeddings for large datasets. To overcome this computational complexity, we propose a novel efficient embedding construction, Diverse Power Iteration Embedding (DPIE). DPIE shows almost the same effectiveness of spectral embeddings and yet is three order of magnitude faster than spectral embeddings computed from eigen-decomposition. Our DPIE is unique in that (1) it finds linearly independent embeddings and thus shows diverse aspects of dataset; (2) the proposed regularized DPIEmore » is effective if we need many embeddings; (3) we show how to efficiently orthogonalize DPIE if one needs; and (4) Diverse Power Iteration Value (DPIV) provides the importance of each DPIE like an eigen value. As a result, such various aspects of DPIE and DPIV ensure that our algorithm is easy to apply to various applications, and we also show the effectiveness and efficiency of DPIE on clustering, anomaly detection, and feature selection as our case studies.« less

  1. A unified noise analysis for iterative image estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, Jinyi

    2003-07-03

    Iterative image estimation methods have been widely used in emission tomography. Accurate estimate of the uncertainty of the reconstructed images is essential for quantitative applications. While theoretical approach has been developed to analyze the noise propagation from iteration to iteration, the current results are limited to only a few iterative algorithms that have an explicit multiplicative update equation. This paper presents a theoretical noise analysis that is applicable to a wide range of preconditioned gradient type algorithms. One advantage is that proposed method does not require an explicit expression of the preconditioner and hence it is applicable to some algorithms that involve line searches. By deriving fixed point expression from the iteration based results, we show that the iteration based noise analysis is consistent with the xed point based analysis. Examples in emission tomography and transmission tomography are shown.

  2. Convergence Results on Iteration Algorithms to Linear Systems

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhuande; Yang, Chuansheng; Yuan, Yubo

    2014-01-01

    In order to solve the large scale linear systems, backward and Jacobi iteration algorithms are employed. The convergence is the most important issue. In this paper, a unified backward iterative matrix is proposed. It shows that some well-known iterative algorithms can be deduced with it. The most important result is that the convergence results have been proved. Firstly, the spectral radius of the Jacobi iterative matrix is positive and the one of backward iterative matrix is strongly positive (lager than a positive constant). Secondly, the mentioned two iterations have the same convergence results (convergence or divergence simultaneously). Finally, some numerical experiments show that the proposed algorithms are correct and have the merit of backward methods. PMID:24991640

  3. Rapid Prototyping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Javelin, a Lone Peak Engineering Inc. Company has introduced the SteamRoller(TM) System as a commercial product. The system was designed by Javelin during a Phase II NASA funded small commercial product. The purpose of the invention was to allow automated-feed of flexible ceramic tapes to the Laminated Object Manufacturing rapid prototyping equipment. The ceramic material that Javelin was working with during the Phase II project is silicon nitride. This engineered ceramic material is of interest for space-based component.

  4. Dealing with Noisy Absences to Optimize Species Distribution Models: An Iterative Ensemble Modelling Approach

    PubMed Central

    Lauzeral, Christine; Grenouillet, Gaël; Brosse, Sébastien

    2012-01-01

    Species distribution models (SDMs) are widespread in ecology and conservation biology, but their accuracy can be lowered by non-environmental (noisy) absences that are common in species occurrence data. Here we propose an iterative ensemble modelling (IEM) method to deal with noisy absences and hence improve the predictive reliability of ensemble modelling of species distributions. In the IEM approach, outputs of a classical ensemble model (EM) were used to update the raw occurrence data. The revised data was then used as input for a new EM run. This process was iterated until the predictions stabilized. The outputs of the iterative method were compared to those of the classical EM using virtual species. The IEM process tended to converge rapidly. It increased the consensus between predictions provided by the different methods as well as between those provided by different learning data sets. Comparing IEM and EM showed that for high levels of non-environmental absences, iterations significantly increased prediction reliability measured by the Kappa and TSS indices, as well as the percentage of well-predicted sites. Compared to EM, IEM also reduced biases in estimates of species prevalence. Compared to the classical EM method, IEM improves the reliability of species predictions. It particularly deals with noisy absences that are replaced in the data matrices by simulated presences during the iterative modelling process. IEM thus constitutes a promising way to increase the accuracy of EM predictions of difficult-to-detect species, as well as of species that are not in equilibrium with their environment. PMID:23166691

  5. Electrical stimulation in exercise training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kroll, Walter

    1994-01-01

    muscle strength for over a century. Bigelow reported in 1894, for example, the use of electrical stimulation on a young man for the purpose of increasing muscle strength. Employing a rapidly alternating sinusoidal induced current and a dynamometer for strength testing, Bigelow reported that the total lifting capacity of a patient increased from 4328 pounds to 4639 pounds after only 25 minutes of stimulation. In 1965, Massey et al. reported on the use of an Isotron electrical stimulator that emitted a high frequency current. Interestingly enough, the frequencies used by Massey et al. and the frequencies used by Bigelow in 1894 were in the same range of frequencies reported by Kots as being the most effective in strength development. It would seem the Russian secret of high frequency electrical stimulation for strength development, then, is not a modern development at all.

  6. Direct demonstration of rapid insulin-like growth factor II receptor internalization and recycling in rat adipocytes. Insulin stimulates SVI-insulin-like growth factor II degradation by modulating the IGF-II receptor recycling process

    SciTech Connect

    Oka, Y.; Rozek, L.M.; Czech, M.P.

    1985-08-05

    The photoactive insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-II analogue 4-azidobenzoyl- SVI-IGF-II was synthesized and used to label specifically and covalently the Mr = 250,000 Type II IGF receptor. When rat adipocytes are irradiated after a 10-min incubation with 4-azidobenzoyl- SVI-IGF-II at 10 degrees C and immediately homogenized, most of the labeled IGF-II receptors are associated with the plasma membrane fraction, indicating that receptors accessible to the labeling reagent at low temperature are on the cell surface. However, when the photolabeled cells are incubated at 37 degrees C for various times before homogenization, labeled IGF-II receptors are rapidly internalized with a half-time of 3.5 min as evidenced by a loss from the plasma membrane fraction and a concomitant appearance in the low density microsome fraction. The steady state level of cell surface IGF-II receptors in the presence or absence of IGF-II remains constant under these conditions, demonstrating that IGF-II receptors rapidly recycle back to the cell surface at the same rate as receptor internalization. Using the above methodology, it is shown that acute insulin action: 1) increases the steady state number of cell surface IGF-II receptors; 2) increases the number of ligand-bound IGF-II receptors that are internalized per unit of time; and 3) increases the rate of cellular SVI-IGF-II degradation by a process that is blocked by anti-IGF-II receptor antibody.

  7. Simulation and Analysis of the Hybrid Operating Mode in ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Kessel, C.E.; Budny, R.V.; Indireshkumar, K.

    2005-09-22

    The hybrid operating mode in ITER is examined with 0D systems analysis, 1.5D discharge scenario simulations using TSC and TRANSP, and the ideal MHD stability is discussed. The hybrid mode has the potential to provide very long pulses and significant neutron fluence if the physics regime can be produced in ITER. This paper reports progress in establishing the physics basis and engineering limitation for the hybrid mode in ITER.

  8. Alpha-physics and measurement requirements for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Zweben, S.J.; Young, K.M.; Putvinski, S.; Petrov, M.P.; Sadler, G.; Tobita, K.

    1995-12-31

    This paper reviews alpha particle physics issues in ITER and their implications for alpha particle measurements. A comparison is made between alpha heating in ITER and NBI and ICRH heating systems in present tokamaks, and alpha particle issues in ITER are discussed in three physics areas: `single particle` alpha effects, `collective` alpha effects, and RF interactions with alpha particles. 29 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. On fast iterative mapping algorithms for stripe based coarse-grained reconfigurable architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, Gayatri; Patel, Krunalkumar; Pollard, Nancy S.

    2015-01-01

    Reconfigurable devices have potential for great flexibility/efficiency, but mapping algorithms onto these architectures is a long-standing challenge. This paper addresses this challenge for stripe based coarse-grained reconfigurable architectures (CGRAs) by drawing on insights from graph drawing. We adapt fast, iterative algorithms from hierarchical graph drawing to the problem of mapping to stripe based architectures. We find that global sifting is 98 times as fast as simulated annealing and produces very compact designs with 17% less area on average, at a cost of 5% greater wire length. Interleaving iterations of Sugiyama and global sifting is 40 times as fast as simulated annealing and achieves somewhat more compact designs with 1.8% less area on average, at a cost of only 1% greater wire length. These solutions can enable fast design space exploration, rapid performance testing, and flexible programming of CGRAs "in the field."

  10. Iterative procedure for in-situ EUV optical testing with an incoherent source

    SciTech Connect

    Miyawaka, Ryan; Naulleau, Patrick; Zakhor, Avideh

    2009-12-01

    We propose an iterative method for in-situ optical testing under partially coherent illumination that relies on the rapid computation of aerial images. In this method a known pattern is imaged with the test optic at several planes through focus. A model is created that iterates through possible aberration maps until the through-focus series of aerial images matches the experimental result. The computation time of calculating the through-focus series is significantly reduced by a-SOCS, an adapted form of the Sum Of Coherent Systems (SOCS) decomposition. In this method, the Hopkins formulation is described by an operator S which maps the space of pupil aberrations to the space of aerial images. This operator is well approximated by a truncated sum of its spectral components.

  11. Iterative reactions of transient boronic acids enable sequential C-C bond formation.

    PubMed

    Battilocchio, Claudio; Feist, Florian; Hafner, Andreas; Simon, Meike; Tran, Duc N; Allwood, Daniel M; Blakemore, David C; Ley, Steven V

    2016-04-01

    The ability to form multiple carbon-carbon bonds in a controlled sequence and thus rapidly build molecular complexity in an iterative fashion is an important goal in modern chemical synthesis. In recent times, transition-metal-catalysed coupling reactions have dominated in the development of C-C bond forming processes. A desire to reduce the reliance on precious metals and a need to obtain products with very low levels of metal impurities has brought a renewed focus on metal-free coupling processes. Here, we report the in situ preparation of reactive allylic and benzylic boronic acids, obtained by reacting flow-generated diazo compounds with boronic acids, and their application in controlled iterative C-C bond forming reactions is described. Thus far we have shown the formation of up to three C-C bonds in a sequence including the final trapping of a reactive boronic acid species with an aldehyde to generate a range of new chemical structures.

  12. The Iterated Classification Game: A New Model of the Cultural Transmission of Language

    PubMed Central

    Swarup, Samarth; Gasser, Les

    2010-01-01

    The Iterated Classification Game (ICG) combines the Classification Game with the Iterated Learning Model (ILM) to create a more realistic model of the cultural transmission of language through generations. It includes both learning from parents and learning from peers. Further, it eliminates some of the chief criticisms of the ILM: that it does not study grounded languages, that it does not include peer learning, and that it builds in a bias for compositional languages. We show that, over the span of a few generations, a stable linguistic system emerges that can be acquired very quickly by each generation, is compositional, and helps the agents to solve the classification problem with which they are faced. The ICG also leads to a different interpretation of the language acquisition process. It suggests that the role of parents is to initialize the linguistic system of the child in such a way that subsequent interaction with peers results in rapid convergence to the correct language. PMID:20190877

  13. Hybrid preconditioning for iterative diagonalization of ill-conditioned generalized eigenvalue problems in electronic structure calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Yunfeng; Bai, Zhaojun; Pask, John E.; Sukumar, N.

    2013-12-15

    The iterative diagonalization of a sequence of large ill-conditioned generalized eigenvalue problems is a computational bottleneck in quantum mechanical methods employing a nonorthogonal basis for ab initio electronic structure calculations. We propose a hybrid preconditioning scheme to effectively combine global and locally accelerated preconditioners for rapid iterative diagonalization of such eigenvalue problems. In partition-of-unity finite-element (PUFE) pseudopotential density-functional calculations, employing a nonorthogonal basis, we show that the hybrid preconditioned block steepest descent method is a cost-effective eigensolver, outperforming current state-of-the-art global preconditioning schemes, and comparably efficient for the ill-conditioned generalized eigenvalue problems produced by PUFE as the locally optimal block preconditioned conjugate-gradient method for the well-conditioned standard eigenvalue problems produced by planewave methods.

  14. Iterative refinement of a binding pocket model: active computational steering of lead optimization.

    PubMed

    Varela, Rocco; Walters, W Patrick; Goldman, Brian B; Jain, Ajay N

    2012-10-25

    Computational approaches for binding affinity prediction are most frequently demonstrated through cross-validation within a series of molecules or through performance shown on a blinded test set. Here, we show how such a system performs in an iterative, temporal lead optimization exercise. A series of gyrase inhibitors with known synthetic order formed the set of molecules that could be selected for "synthesis." Beginning with a small number of molecules, based only on structures and activities, a model was constructed. Compound selection was done computationally, each time making five selections based on confident predictions of high activity and five selections based on a quantitative measure of three-dimensional structural novelty. Compound selection was followed by model refinement using the new data. Iterative computational candidate selection produced rapid improvements in selected compound activity, and incorporation of explicitly novel compounds uncovered much more diverse active inhibitors than strategies lacking active novelty selection.

  15. Numerical evaluation of mobile robot navigation in static indoor environment via EGAOR Iteration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahalan, A. A.; Saudi, A.; Sulaiman, J.; Din, W. R. W.

    2017-09-01

    One of the key issues in mobile robot navigation is the ability for the robot to move from an arbitrary start location to a specified goal location without colliding with any obstacles while traveling, also known as mobile robot path planning problem. In this paper, however, we examined the performance of a robust searching algorithm that relies on the use of harmonic potentials of the environment to generate smooth and safe path for mobile robot navigation in a static known indoor environment. The harmonic potentials will be discretized by using Laplacian’s operator to form a system of algebraic approximation equations. This algebraic linear system will be computed via 4-Point Explicit Group Accelerated Over-Relaxation (4-EGAOR) iterative method for rapid computation. The performance of the proposed algorithm will then be compared and analyzed against the existing algorithms in terms of number of iterations and execution time. The result shows that the proposed algorithm performed better than the existing methods.

  16. ITER Cryoplant Status and Economics of the LHe plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monneret, E.; Chalifour, M.; Bonneton, M.; Fauve, E.; Voigt, T.; Badgujar, S.; Chang, H.-S.; Vincent, G.

    The ITER cryoplant is composed of helium and nitrogen refrigerators and generator combined with 80 K helium loop plants and external purification systems. Storage and recovery of the helium inventory is provided in warm and cold (80 K and 4.5 K) helium tanks.The conceptual design of the ITER cryoplant has been completed, the technical requirements defined for industrial procurement and contracts signed with industry. Each contract covers the design, manufacturing, installation and commissioning. Design is under finalization and manufacturing has started. First deliveries are scheduled by end of 2015.The various cryoplant systems are designed based on recognized codes and international standards to meet the availability, the reliability and the time between maintenance imposed by the long-term uninterrupted operation of the ITER Tokamak. In addition, ITER has to consider the constraint of a nuclear installation.ITER Organization (IO) is responsible for the liquid helium (LHe) Plants contract signed end of 2012 with industry. It is composed of three LHe Plants, working in parallel and able to provide a total average cooling capacity of 75 kW at 4.5 K. Based on concept designed developed with industries and the procurement phase, ITER has accumulated data to broaden the scaling laws for costing such systems.After describing the status of ITER cryoplant part of the cryogenic system, we shall present the economics of the ITER LHe Plants based on key design requirements, choice and challenges of this ITER Organization procurement.

  17. The explosive divergence in iterative maps of matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navickas, Zenonas; Ragulskis, Minvydas; Vainoras, Alfonsas; Smidtaite, Rasa

    2012-11-01

    The effect of explosive divergence in generalized iterative maps of matrices is defined and described using formal algebraic techniques. It is shown that the effect of explosive divergence can be observed in an iterative map of square matrices of order 2 if and only if the matrix of initial conditions is a nilpotent matrix and the Lyapunov exponent of the corresponding scalar iterative map is greater than zero. Computational experiments with the logistic map and the circle map are used to illustrate the effect of explosive divergence occurring in iterative maps of matrices.

  18. No-go theorem for iterations of unknown quantum gates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soleimanifar, Mehdi; Karimipour, Vahid

    2016-01-01

    We propose a no-go theorem by proving the impossibility of constructing a deterministic quantum circuit that iterates a unitary oracle by calling it only once. Different schemes are provided to bypass this result and to approximately realize the iteration. The optimal scheme is also studied. An interesting observation is that for a large number of iterations, a trivial strategy like using the identity channel has the optimal performance, and preprocessing, postprocessing, or using resources like entanglement does not help at all. Intriguingly, the number of iterations, when being large enough, does not affect the performance of the proposed schemes.

  19. Unsupervised iterative detection of land mines in highly cluttered environments.

    PubMed

    Batman, Sinan; Goutsias, John

    2003-01-01

    An unsupervised iterative scheme is proposed for land mine detection in heavily cluttered scenes. This scheme is based on iterating hybrid multispectral filters that consist of a decorrelating linear transform coupled with a nonlinear morphological detector. Detections extracted from the first pass are used to improve results in subsequent iterations. The procedure stops after a predetermined number of iterations. The proposed scheme addresses several weaknesses associated with previous adaptations of morphological approaches to land mine detection. Improvement in detection performance, robustness with respect to clutter inhomogeneities, a completely unsupervised operation, and computational efficiency are the main highlights of the method. Experimental results reveal excellent performance.

  20. Bounded-Angle Iterative Decoding of LDPC Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolinar, Samuel; Andrews, Kenneth; Pollara, Fabrizio; Divsalar, Dariush

    2009-01-01

    Bounded-angle iterative decoding is a modified version of conventional iterative decoding, conceived as a means of reducing undetected-error rates for short low-density parity-check (LDPC) codes. For a given code, bounded-angle iterative decoding can be implemented by means of a simple modification of the decoder algorithm, without redesigning the code. Bounded-angle iterative decoding is based on a representation of received words and code words as vectors in an n-dimensional Euclidean space (where n is an integer).

  1. A synopsis of collective alpha effects and implications for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Sigmar, D.J.

    1990-10-01

    This paper discusses the following: Alpha Interaction with Toroidal Alfven Eigenmodes; Alpha Interaction with Ballooning Modes; Alpha Interaction with Fishbone Oscillations; and Implications for ITER.

  2. A More Rapid, Rapid Response.

    PubMed

    Robison, Justin; Slamon, Nicholas B

    2016-09-01

    Critical care physicians' standard for arrival to a rapid response team activation is 10 minutes or less at this institution. This study proposes that a FaceTime (Apple, Cupertino, CA) video call between the staff at the bedside and the critical care physician will allow the implementation of potentially life-saving therapies earlier than the current average response (4.5 min). Prospective cohort study. Freestanding, tertiary-care children's hospital. Pediatric patients ages 0-17. Six units were chosen as matched pairs. In the telemedicine units, after notification of an rapid response team, the critical care intensivist established a FaceTime video call with the nurse at the bedside and gathered history, visually assessed the patient, and suggested interventions. Simultaneously, the rapid response nurse, respiratory therapist, and fellow were dispatched to respond to the bedside. After the video call, the intensivist also reported to the bedside. The control units followed the standard rapid response team protocol: the intensivist physically responded to the bedside. Differences in response time, number of interventions, Pediatric Early Warning System scores, and disposition were measured, and the PICU course of those transferred was evaluated. The telemedicine group's average time to establish FaceTime interface was 2.6 minutes and arrival at bedside was 3.7 minutes. The control group average arrival time was 3.6 minutes. The difference between FaceTime interface and physical arrival in the control group was statistically significant (p = 0.012). Physical arrival times between the telemedicine and control groups remained consistent. Fifty-eight percent of the telemedicine patients and 73% of the control patients were admitted to the PICU (p = 0.13). Of patients transferred to the PICU, there was no difference in rate of intubation, initiation of bilevel positive airway pressure, central line placement, or vasopressors. The study group averaged 1.4 interventions

  3. Superpenetration optical microscopy by iterative multiphoton adaptive compensation technique

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jianyong; Germain, Ronald N.; Cui, Meng

    2012-01-01

    Biological tissues are rarely transparent, presenting major challenges for deep tissue optical microscopy. The achievable imaging depth is fundamentally limited by wavefront distortions caused by aberration and random scattering. Here, we report an iterative wavefront compensation technique that takes advantage of the nonlinearity of multiphoton signals to determine and compensate for these distortions and to focus light inside deep tissues. Different from conventional adaptive optics methods, this technique can rapidly measure highly complicated wavefront distortions encountered in deep tissue imaging and provide compensations for not only aberration but random scattering. The technique is tested with a variety of highly heterogeneous biological samples including mouse brain tissue, skull, and lymph nodes. We show that high quality three-dimensional imaging can be realized at depths beyond the reach of conventional multiphoton microscopy and adaptive optics methods, albeit over restricted distances for a given correction. Moreover, the required laser excitation power can be greatly reduced in deep tissues, deviating from the power requirement of ballistic light excitation and thus significantly reducing photo damage to the biological tissue. PMID:22586078

  4. ITER L-mode confinement database

    SciTech Connect

    Kaye, S.M.

    1997-10-06

    This paper describes the content of an L-mode database that has been compiled with data from Alcator C-Mod, ASDEX, DIII, DIII-D, FTU, JET, JFT-2M, JT-60, PBX-M, PDX, T-10, TEXTOR, TFTR, and Tore-Supra. The database consists of a total of 2938 entries, 1881 of which are in the L-phase while 922 are ohmically heated only (OH). Each entry contains up to 95 descriptive parameters, including global and kinetic information, machine conditioning, and configuration. The paper presents a description of the database and the variables contained therein, and it also presents global and thermal scalings along with predictions for ITER.

  5. Robust tooth surface reconstruction by iterative deformation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiaotong; Dai, Ning; Cheng, Xiaosheng; Wang, Jun; Peng, Qingjin; Liu, Hao; Cheng, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Digital design technologies have been applied extensively in dental medicine, especially in the field of dental restoration. The all-ceramic crown is an important restoration type of dental CAD systems. This paper presents a robust tooth surface reconstruction algorithm for all-ceramic crown design. The algorithm involves three necessary steps: standard tooth initial positioning and division; salient feature point extraction using Morse theory; and standard tooth deformation using iterative Laplacian Surface Editing and mesh stitching. This algorithm can retain the morphological features of the tooth surface well. It is robust and suitable for almost all types of teeth, including incisor, canine, premolar, and molar. Moreover, it allows dental technicians to use their own preferred library teeth for reconstruction. The algorithm has been successfully integrated in our Dental CAD system, more than 1000 clinical cases have been tested to demonstrate the robustness and effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  6. ITER CENTRAL SOLENOID COIL INSULATION QUALIFICATION

    SciTech Connect

    Martovetsky, N N; Mann, T L; Miller, J R; Freudenberg, K D; Reed, R P; Walsh, R P; McColskey, J D; Evans, D

    2009-06-11

    An insulation system for ITER Central Solenoid must have sufficiently high electrical and structural strength. Design efforts to bring stresses in the turn and layer insulation within allowables failed. It turned out to be impossible to eliminate high local tensile stresses in the winding pack. When high local stresses can not be designed out, the qualification procedure requires verification of the acceptable structural and electrical strength by testing. We built two 4 x 4 arrays of the conductor jacket with two options of the CS insulation and subjected the arrays to 1.2 million compressive cycles at 60 MPa and at 76 K. Such conditions simulated stresses in the CS insulation. We performed voltage withstand tests and after end of cycling we measured the breakdown voltages between in the arrays. After that we dissectioned the arrays and studied micro cracks in the insulation. We report details of the specimens preparation, test procedures and test results.

  7. ITER Central Solenoid Coil Insulation Qualification

    SciTech Connect

    Martovetsky, Nicolai N; Mann Jr, Thomas Latta; Miller, John L; Freudenberg, Kevin D; Reed, Richard P; Walsh, Robert P; McColskey, J D; Evans, D

    2010-01-01

    An insulation system for ITER Central Solenoid must have sufficiently high electrical and structural strength. Design efforts to bring stresses in the turn and layer insulation within allowables failed. It turned out to be impossible to eliminate high local tensile stresses in the winding pack. When high local stresses can not be designed out, the qualification procedure requires verification of the acceptable structural and electrical strength by testing. We built two 4x4 arrays of the conductor jacket with two options of the CS insulation and subjected the arrays to 1.2 million compressive cycles at 60 MPa and at 76 K. Such conditions simulated stresses in the CS insulation. We performed voltage withstand tests and after end of cycling we measured the breakdown voltages between in the arrays. After that we dissectioned the arrays and studied micro cracks in the insulation. We report details of the specimens preparation, test procedures and test results.

  8. Electron Cyclotron Emission Diagnostics on ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, Richard; Austin, Max; Phillips, Perry; Rowan, William; Beno, Joseph; Auroua, Abelhamid; Feder, Russell; Patel, Ashish; Hubbard, Amanda; Pandya, Hitesh

    2010-11-01

    Electron cyclotron emission (ECE) will be employed on ITER to measure the radial profile of electron temperature and non thermal features of the electron distribution as well as measurements of ELMs, magnetic islands, high frequency instabilities, and turbulence. There are two quasioptical systems, designed with Gaussian beam analysis. One view is radial, primarily for temperature profile measurement, the other views at a small angle to radial for measuring non-thermal emission. Radiation is conducted to by a long corrugated waveguide to a multichannel Michelson interferometer which provides wide wavelength coverage but limited time response as well as two microwave radiometers which cover the fundamental and second harmonic ECE and provide excellent time response. Measurements will be made in both X and O mode. In-situ calibration is provided by a novel hot calibration source. We discuss spatial resolution and the implications for physics studies.

  9. Robot Calibration Using Iteration and Differential Kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, S. H.; Wang, Y.; Ren, Y. J.; Li, D. K.

    2006-10-01

    In the applications of seam laser tracking welding robot and general measuring robot station based on stereo vision, the robot calibration is the most difficult step during the whole system calibration progress. Many calibration methods were put forward, but the exact location of base frame has to be known no matter which method was employed. However, the accurate base frame location is hard to be known. In order to obtain the position of base coordinate, this paper presents a novel iterative algorithm which can also get parameters' deviations at the same time. It was a method of employing differential kinematics to solve link parameters' deviations and approaching real values step-by-step. In the end, experiment validation was provided.

  10. Iterative restoration of SPECT projection images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glick, S. J.; Xia, Weishi

    1997-04-01

    Photon attenuation and the limited nonstationary spatial resolution of the detector can reduce both qualitative and quantitative image quality in single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). In this paper, a reconstruction approach is described which can compensate for both of these degradations. The approach involves processing the projection data with Bellini's method for attenuation compensation followed by an iterative deconvolution technique which uses the frequency distance principle (FDP) to model the distance-dependent camera blur. Modeling of the camera blur with the FDP allows an efficient implementation using fast Fourier transform (FFT) methods. After processing of the projection data, reconstruction is performed using filtered backprojection. Simulation studies using two different brain phantoms show that this approach gives reconstructions with a favorable bias versus noise tradeoff, provides no visually undesirable noise artifacts, and requires a low computational load.

  11. Iterative methods for Toeplitz-like matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Huckle, T.

    1994-12-31

    In this paper the author will give a survey on iterative methods for solving linear equations with Toeplitz matrices, Block Toeplitz matrices, Toeplitz plus Hankel matrices, and matrices with low displacement rank. He will treat the following subjects: (1) optimal (w)-circulant preconditioners is a generalization of circulant preconditioners; (2) Optimal implementation of circulant-like preconditioners in the complex and real case; (3) preconditioning of near-singular matrices; what kind of preconditioners can be used in this case; (4) circulant preconditioning for more general classes of Toeplitz matrices; what can be said about matrices with coefficients that are not l{sub 1}-sequences; (5) preconditioners for Toeplitz least squares problems, for block Toeplitz matrices, and for Toeplitz plus Hankel matrices.

  12. Structural analysis of ITER magnet feeders

    SciTech Connect

    Ilyin, Yuri; Gung, Chen-Yu; Bauer, Pierre; Chen, Yonghua; Jong, Cornelis; Devred, Arnaud; Mitchell, Neil; Lorriere, Philippe; Farek, Jaromir; Nannini, Matthieu

    2012-06-15

    This paper summarizes the results of the static structural analyses, which were conducted in support of the ITER magnet feeder design with the aim of validating certain components against the structural design criteria. While almost every feeder has unique features, they all share many common constructional elements and the same functional specifications. The analysis approach to assess the load conditions and stresses that have driven the design is equivalent for all feeders, except for particularities that needed to be modeled in each case. The mechanical analysis of the feeders follows the sub-modeling approach: the results of the global mechanical model of a feeder assembly are used as input for the detailed models of the feeder' sub-assemblies or single components. Examples of such approach, including the load conditions, stress assessment criteria and solutions for the most critical components, are discussed. It has been concluded that the feeder system is safe in the referential operation scenarios. (authors)

  13. ITER L-Mode Confinement Database

    SciTech Connect

    S.M. Kaye and the ITER Confinement Database Working Group

    1997-10-01

    This paper describes the content of an L-mode database that has been compiled with data from Alcator C-Mod, ASDEX, DIII, DIII-D, FTU, JET, JFT-2M, JT-60, PBX-M, PDX, T-10, TEXTOR, TFTR, and Tore-Supra. The database consists of a total of 2938 entries, 1881 of which are in the L-phase while 922 are ohmically heated (OH) only. Each entry contains up to 95 descriptive parameters, including global and kinetic information, machine conditioning, and configuration. The paper presents a description of the database and the variables contained therein, and it also presents global and thermal scalings along with predictions for ITER. The L-mode thermal confinement time scaling was determined from a subset of 1312 entries for which the thermal confinement time scaling was provided.

  14. Orbit of an image under iterated system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, S. L.; Mishra, S. N.; Jain, Sarika

    2011-03-01

    An orbital picture depicts the path of an object under semi-group of transformations. The concept initially given by Barnsley [3] has utmost importance in image compression, biological modeling and other areas of fractal geometry. In this paper, we introduce superior iterations to study the role of linear and nonlinear transformations on the orbit of an object. Various characteristics of the computed figures have been discussed to indicate the usefulness of study in mathematical analysis. Modified algorithms are given to compute the orbital picture and V-variable orbital picture. An algorithm to calculate the distance between images makes the study motivating. A brief discussion about the proof of the Cauchy sequence of images is also given.

  15. Chaos automata: iterated function systems with memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashlock, Dan; Golden, Jim

    2003-07-01

    Transforming biological sequences into fractals in order to visualize them is a long standing technique, in the form of the traditional four-cornered chaos game. In this paper we give a generalization of the standard chaos game visualization for DNA sequences. It incorporates iterated function systems that are called under the control of a finite state automaton, yielding a DNA to fractal transformation system with memory. We term these fractal visualizers chaos automata. The use of memory enables association of widely separated sequence events in the drawing of the fractal, finessing the “forgetfulness” of other fractal visualization methods. We use a genetic algorithm to train chaos automata to distinguish introns and exons in Zea mays (corn). A substantial issue treated here is the creation of a fitness function that leads to good visual separation of distinct data types.

  16. Plasma-sprayed beryllium for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, R.G.; Stanek, P.W.; Elliott, K.E.; Youchison, D.L.; Watson, R.D.; Walsh, D.S.

    1995-12-31

    Plasma-spray technology is under investigation as a method for producing high thermal conductivity beryllium coatings for use in magnetic fusion applications. Recent investigations have focused on optimizing the plasma-spray process for depositing beryllium coatings on damaged beryllium surfaces. Of particular interest has been optimizing the processing parameters to maximize the through-thickness thermal conductivity of the beryllium coatings. Experimental results will be reported on the use of secondary H{sub 2} gas additions to improve the melting of the beryllium powder and negative transferred-arc cleaning to prepare beryllium surfaces prior to depositing beryllium. Information will also b presented on thermal fatigue tests which were performed on beryllium coated ISX-B beryllium limiter tiles using 10 sec cycle times with 60 sec cooldowns and an International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) relevant divertor heat flux slightly in excess of 5 MW/m{sup 2}.

  17. Iterated upwind schemes for gas dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolarkiewicz, Piotr K.; Szmelter, Joanna

    2009-01-01

    A class of high-resolution schemes established in integration of anelastic equations is extended to fully compressible flows, and documented for unsteady (and steady) problems through a span of Mach numbers from zero to supersonic. The schemes stem from iterated upwind technology of the multidimensional positive definite advection transport algorithm (MPDATA). The derived algorithms employ standard and modified forms of the equations of gas dynamics for conservation of mass, momentum and either total or internal energy as well as potential temperature. Numerical examples from elementary wave propagation, through computational aerodynamics benchmarks, to atmospheric small- and large-amplitude acoustics with intricate wave-flow interactions verify the approach for both structured and unstructured meshes, and demonstrate its flexibility and robustness.

  18. Iterated Gate Teleportation and Blind Quantum Computation.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Delgado, Carlos A; Fitzsimons, Joseph F

    2015-06-05

    Blind quantum computation allows a user to delegate a computation to an untrusted server while keeping the computation hidden. A number of recent works have sought to establish bounds on the communication requirements necessary to implement blind computation, and a bound based on the no-programming theorem of Nielsen and Chuang has emerged as a natural limiting factor. Here we show that this constraint only holds in limited scenarios, and show how to overcome it using a novel method of iterated gate teleportations. This technique enables drastic reductions in the communication required for distributed quantum protocols, extending beyond the blind computation setting. Applied to blind quantum computation, this technique offers significant efficiency improvements, and in some scenarios offers an exponential reduction in communication requirements.

  19. Iterated Gate Teleportation and Blind Quantum Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Delgado, Carlos A.; Fitzsimons, Joseph F.

    2015-06-01

    Blind quantum computation allows a user to delegate a computation to an untrusted server while keeping the computation hidden. A number of recent works have sought to establish bounds on the communication requirements necessary to implement blind computation, and a bound based on the no-programming theorem of Nielsen and Chuang has emerged as a natural limiting factor. Here we show that this constraint only holds in limited scenarios, and show how to overcome it using a novel method of iterated gate teleportations. This technique enables drastic reductions in the communication required for distributed quantum protocols, extending beyond the blind computation setting. Applied to blind quantum computation, this technique offers significant efficiency improvements, and in some scenarios offers an exponential reduction in communication requirements.

  20. Status of ITER Cryodistribution and Cryoline project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, B.; Vaghela, H.; Shah, N.; Bhattacharya, R.; Choukekar, K.; Patel, P.; Kapoor, H.; Srinivasa, M.; Chang, H. S.; Badgujar, S.; Monneret, E.

    2017-02-01

    The system of ITER Cryodistribution (CD) and Cryolines (CLs) is an integral interface between the Cryoplant systems and the superconducting (SC) magnets as well as Cryopumps (CPs). The project has progressed from the conceptual stage to the industrial stage. The subsystems are at various stages of design as defined by the project, namely, preliminary design, final design and formal reviews. Significant progresses have been made in the prototypes studies and design validations, such as the CL and cold circulators. While one of the prototype CL is already tested, the other one is in manufacturing phase. Performance test of two cold circulators have been completed. Design requirements are unique due the complexity arising from load specifications, layout constraints, regulatory compliance, operating conditions as well as several hundred interfaces. The present status of the project in terms of technical achievements, implications of the changes and the technical management as well as the risk assessment and its mitigation including path forward towards realization is described.

  1. Learning to improve iterative repair scheduling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zweben, Monte; Davis, Eugene

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents a general learning method for dynamically selecting between repair heuristics in an iterative repair scheduling system. The system employs a version of explanation-based learning called Plausible Explanation-Based Learning (PEBL) that uses multiple examples to confirm conjectured explanations. The basic approach is to conjecture contradictions between a heuristic and statistics that measure the quality of the heuristic. When these contradictions are confirmed, a different heuristic is selected. To motivate the utility of this approach we present an empirical evaluation of the performance of a scheduling system with respect to two different repair strategies. We show that the scheduler that learns to choose between the heuristics outperforms the same scheduler with any one of two heuristics alone.

  2. ITER fuel storage system conceptual design description

    SciTech Connect

    Nasise, J.E.; Anderson, J.L.; Bartlit, J.R.; Muller, M.E.

    1990-01-01

    Fuel, in the form of hydrogen isotopes Q{sub 2} (where Q is H, D, or T), is required to be stored and assayed in a safe manner at the proposed International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). Two subsystems are proposed for this task: Fuel Storage (FS) and Fuel Management (FM). The combined system, Fuel Storage and Management System (FSMS), will provide fuel storage, tritium inventory, gas analysis, transfer pumping, and flow measurements. Presented is a Conceptual Design Description (CDD) of only the FS portion of the FSMS. The proposed FS system permits tritium and its associated isotopes to be stored within ZrCo storage beds, as a solid metal-hydride, or as a gas stored in tanks. 10 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Error bounds from extra precise iterative refinement

    SciTech Connect

    Demmel, James; Hida, Yozo; Kahan, William; Li, Xiaoye S.; Mukherjee, Soni; Riedy, E. Jason

    2005-02-07

    We present the design and testing of an algorithm for iterative refinement of the solution of linear equations, where the residual is computed with extra precision. This algorithm was originally proposed in the 1960s [6, 22] as a means to compute very accurate solutions to all but the most ill-conditioned linear systems of equations. However two obstacles have until now prevented its adoption in standard subroutine libraries like LAPACK: (1) There was no standard way to access the higher precision arithmetic needed to compute residuals, and (2) it was unclear how to compute a reliable error bound for the computed solution. The completion of the new BLAS Technical Forum Standard [5] has recently removed the first obstacle. To overcome the second obstacle, we show how a single application of iterative refinement can be used to compute an error bound in any norm at small cost, and use this to compute both an error bound in the usual infinity norm, and a componentwise relative error bound. We report extensive test results on over 6.2 million matrices of dimension 5, 10, 100, and 1000. As long as a normwise (resp. componentwise) condition number computed by the algorithm is less than 1/max{l_brace}10,{radical}n{r_brace} {var_epsilon}{sub w}, the computed normwise (resp. componentwise) error bound is at most 2 max{l_brace}10,{radical}n{r_brace} {center_dot} {var_epsilon}{sub w}, and indeed bounds the true error. Here, n is the matrix dimension and w is single precision roundoff error. For worse conditioned problems, we get similarly small correct error bounds in over 89.4% of cases.

  4. Nuclear Forensic Inferences Using Iterative Multidimensional Statistics

    SciTech Connect

    Robel, M; Kristo, M J; Heller, M A

    2009-06-09

    Nuclear forensics involves the analysis of interdicted nuclear material for specific material characteristics (referred to as 'signatures') that imply specific geographical locations, production processes, culprit intentions, etc. Predictive signatures rely on expert knowledge of physics, chemistry, and engineering to develop inferences from these material characteristics. Comparative signatures, on the other hand, rely on comparison of the material characteristics of the interdicted sample (the 'questioned sample' in FBI parlance) with those of a set of known samples. In the ideal case, the set of known samples would be a comprehensive nuclear forensics database, a database which does not currently exist. In fact, our ability to analyze interdicted samples and produce an extensive list of precise materials characteristics far exceeds our ability to interpret the results. Therefore, as we seek to develop the extensive databases necessary for nuclear forensics, we must also develop the methods necessary to produce the necessary inferences from comparison of our analytical results with these large, multidimensional sets of data. In the work reported here, we used a large, multidimensional dataset of results from quality control analyses of uranium ore concentrate (UOC, sometimes called 'yellowcake'). We have found that traditional multidimensional techniques, such as principal components analysis (PCA), are especially useful for understanding such datasets and drawing relevant conclusions. In particular, we have developed an iterative partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) procedure that has proven especially adept at identifying the production location of unknown UOC samples. By removing classes which fell far outside the initial decision boundary, and then rebuilding the PLS-DA model, we have consistently produced better and more definitive attributions than with a single pass classification approach. Performance of the iterative PLS-DA method

  5. Vagus Nerve Stimulation

    MedlinePlus

    Vagus nerve stimulation Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Vagus nerve stimulation is a procedure that involves implantation of a device that stimulates the vagus nerve with electrical impulses. There's one vagus nerve on ...

  6. A coupled polarization-matrix inversion and iteration approach for accelerating the dipole convergence in a polarizable potential function.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wangshen; Pu, Jingzhi; Gao, Jiali

    2009-03-12

    A coupled polarization-matrix inversion and iteration (CPII) method is described to achieve and accelerate the convergence of induced dipoles for condensed phase systems employing polarizable intermolecular potential functions (PIPF). The present PIPF is based on the Thole interaction dipole model in which all atomic pair interactions are considered, including those that are directly bonded covalently. Although induced dipoles can be obtained both by inverting a 3N x 3N polarization-matrix where N is the number of polarizable sites, or by a direct iterative approach, the latter approach is more efficient computationally for large systems in molecular dynamics simulations. It was found that induced dipole moments failed to converge in the direct iterative approach if 1-2, 1-3, and 1-4 intramolecular interactions are included in the Thole model. However, it is necessary to include all intramolecular interactions in the Thole model to yield the correct molecular anisotropic polarizability tensor. To solve this numerical stability problem, we reformulated the Thole interaction dipole model in terms of molecular block matrices, which naturally leads to a coupled, preconditioning algorithm that involves a polarization-matrix inversion term to account for intramolecular interactions, and an iterative procedure to incorporate the mutual polarization effects between different molecules. The CPII method is illustrated by applying to cubic boxes of water and NMA molecules as well as an alanine pentapeptide configuration, and it was shown that the CPII method can achieve convergence for the dipole induction polarization rapidly in all cases, whereas the direct iterative approach failed to reach convergence in these cases. In addition, the CPII reduces the overall computational costs by decreasing the number of iteration steps in comparison with the direct iteration approach in which intramolecular bonded interactions are excluded to ensure that induced dipole convergence is

  7. Iterative-build OMIT maps: map improvement by iterative model building and refinement without model bias

    PubMed Central

    Terwilliger, Thomas C.; Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf W.; Afonine, Pavel V.; Moriarty, Nigel W.; Adams, Paul D.; Read, Randy J.; Zwart, Peter H.; Hung, Li-Wei

    2008-01-01

    A procedure for carrying out iterative model building, density modification and refinement is presented in which the density in an OMIT region is essentially unbiased by an atomic model. Density from a set of overlapping OMIT regions can be combined to create a composite ‘iterative-build’ OMIT map that is everywhere unbiased by an atomic model but also everywhere benefiting from the model-based information present elsewhere in the unit cell. The procedure may have applications in the validation of specific features in atomic models as well as in overall model validation. The procedure is demonstrated with a molecular-replacement structure and with an experimentally phased structure and a variation on the method is demonstrated by removing model bias from a structure from the Protein Data Bank. PMID:18453687

  8. Iterative build OMIT maps: Map improvement by iterative model-building and refinement without model bias

    SciTech Connect

    Los Alamos National Laboratory, Mailstop M888, Los Alamos, NM 87545, USA; Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, Building 64R0121, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA; Department of Haematology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 0XY, England; Terwilliger, Thomas; Terwilliger, T.C.; Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf Wilhelm; Afonine, P.V.; Moriarty, N.W.; Zwart, P.H.; Hung, L.-W.; Read, R.J.; Adams, P.D.

    2008-02-12

    A procedure for carrying out iterative model-building, density modification and refinement is presented in which the density in an OMIT region is essentially unbiased by an atomic model. Density from a set of overlapping OMIT regions can be combined to create a composite 'Iterative-Build' OMIT map that is everywhere unbiased by an atomic model but also everywhere benefiting from the model-based information present elsewhere in the unit cell. The procedure may have applications in the validation of specific features in atomic models as well as in overall model validation. The procedure is demonstrated with a molecular replacement structure and with an experimentally-phased structure, and a variation on the method is demonstrated by removing model bias from a structure from the Protein Data Bank.

  9. Summary report for ITER Task -- D4: Activation calculations for the stainless steel ITER design

    SciTech Connect

    Attaya, H.

    1995-02-01

    Detailed activation analysis for ITER has been performed as a part of ITER Task D4. The calculations have been performed for the shielding blanket (SS/water) and for the breeding blanket (LiN) options. The activation code RACC-P, which has been modified under IFER Task-D-10 for pulsed operation, has been used in this analysis. The spatial distributions of the radioactive inventory, decay heat, biological hazard potential, and the contact dose were calculated for the two designs for different operation modes and targeted fluences. A one-dimensional toroidal geometrical model has been utilized to determine the neutron fluxes in the two designs. The results are normalized for an inboard and outboard neutron wall loadings of 0.91 and 1.2 MW/M{sup 2}, respectively. The point-wise distributions of the decay gamma sources have been calculated everywhere in the reactor at several times after the shutdown of the two designs and are then used in the transport code ONEDANT to calculate the biological dose everywhere in the reactor. The point-wise distributions of all the responses have also been calculated. These calculations have been performed for neutron fluences of 3.0 MWa/M{sup 2}, which corresponds to the target fluence of ITER, and 0.1 MWa/M{sup 2}, which is anticipated to correspond to the beginning of an extended maintenance period.

  10. Magnet design technical report---ITER definition phase

    SciTech Connect

    Henning, C.

    1989-04-28

    This report contains papers on the following topics: conceptual design; radiation damage of ITER magnet systems; insulation system of the magnets; critical current density and strain sensitivity; toroidal field coil structural analysis; stress analysis for the ITER central solenoid; and volt-second capabilities and PF magnet configurations.

  11. An Iterative Method for Solving Variable Coefficient ODEs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deeba, Elias; Yoon, Jeong-Mi; Zafiris, Vasilis

    2003-01-01

    In this classroom note, the authors present a method to solve variable coefficients ordinary differential equations of the form p(x)y([squared])(x) + q(x)y([superscript 1])(x) + r(x)y(x) = 0. They propose an iterative method as an alternate method to solve the above equation. This iterative method is accessible to an undergraduate student studying…

  12. Not so Complex: Iteration in the Complex Plane

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Dell, Robin S.

    2014-01-01

    The simple process of iteration can produce complex and beautiful figures. In this article, Robin O'Dell presents a set of tasks requiring students to use the geometric interpretation of complex number multiplication to construct linear iteration rules. When the outputs are plotted in the complex plane, the graphs trace pleasing designs…

  13. Language Evolution by Iterated Learning with Bayesian Agents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffiths, Thomas L.; Kalish, Michael L.

    2007-01-01

    Languages are transmitted from person to person and generation to generation via a process of iterated learning: people learn a language from other people who once learned that language themselves. We analyze the consequences of iterated learning for learning algorithms based on the principles of Bayesian inference, assuming that learners compute…

  14. A Model and Simple Iterative Algorithm for Redundancy Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fornell, Claes; And Others

    1988-01-01

    This paper shows that redundancy maximization with J. K. Johansson's extension can be accomplished via a simple iterative algorithm based on H. Wold's Partial Least Squares. The model and the iterative algorithm for the least squares approach to redundancy maximization are presented. (TJH)

  15. Not so Complex: Iteration in the Complex Plane

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Dell, Robin S.

    2014-01-01

    The simple process of iteration can produce complex and beautiful figures. In this article, Robin O'Dell presents a set of tasks requiring students to use the geometric interpretation of complex number multiplication to construct linear iteration rules. When the outputs are plotted in the complex plane, the graphs trace pleasing designs…

  16. Language Evolution by Iterated Learning with Bayesian Agents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffiths, Thomas L.; Kalish, Michael L.

    2007-01-01

    Languages are transmitted from person to person and generation to generation via a process of iterated learning: people learn a language from other people who once learned that language themselves. We analyze the consequences of iterated learning for learning algorithms based on the principles of Bayesian inference, assuming that learners compute…

  17. Validation of 1-D transport and sawtooth models for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Connor, J.W.; Turner, M.F.; Attenberger, S.E.; Houlberg, W.A.

    1996-12-31

    In this paper the authors describe progress on validating a number of local transport models by comparing their predictions with relevant experimental data from a range of tokamaks in the ITER profile database. This database, the testing procedure and results are discussed. In addition a model for sawtooth oscillations is used to investigate their effect in an ITER plasma with alpha-particles.

  18. Preliminary consideration of CFETR ITER-like case diagnostic system

    SciTech Connect

    Li, G. S.; Liu, Y. K.; Gao, X.; Yang, Y. Wang, Y. M.; Ming, T. F.; Han, X.; Liu, S. C.; Wang, E. H.; Yang, W. J.; Li, G. Q.; Hu, Q. S.

    2016-11-15

    Chinese Fusion Engineering Test Reactor (CFETR) is a new superconducting tokamak device being designed in China, which aims at bridging the gap between ITER and DEMO, where DEMO is a tokamak demonstration fusion reactor. Two diagnostic cases, ITER-like case and towards DEMO case, have been considered for CFETR early and later operating phases, respectively. In this paper, some preliminary consideration of ITER-like case will be presented. Based on ITER diagnostic system, three versions of increased complexity and coverage of the ITER-like case diagnostic system have been developed with different goals and functions. Version A aims only machine protection and basic control. Both of version B and version C are mainly for machine protection, basic and advanced control, but version C has an increased level of redundancy necessary for improved measurements capability. The performance of these versions and needed R&D work are outlined.

  19. Preliminary consideration of CFETR ITER-like case diagnostic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, G. S.; Yang, Y.; Wang, Y. M.; Ming, T. F.; Han, X.; Liu, S. C.; Wang, E. H.; Liu, Y. K.; Yang, W. J.; Li, G. Q.; Hu, Q. S.; Gao, X.

    2016-11-01

    Chinese Fusion Engineering Test Reactor (CFETR) is a new superconducting tokamak device being designed in China, which aims at bridging the gap between ITER and DEMO, where DEMO is a tokamak demonstration fusion reactor. Two diagnostic cases, ITER-like case and towards DEMO case, have been considered for CFETR early and later operating phases, respectively. In this paper, some preliminary consideration of ITER-like case will be presented. Based on ITER diagnostic system, three versions of increased complexity and coverage of the ITER-like case diagnostic system have been developed with different goals and functions. Version A aims only machine protection and basic control. Both of version B and version C are mainly for machine protection, basic and advanced control, but version C has an increased level of redundancy necessary for improved measurements capability. The performance of these versions and needed R&D work are outlined.

  20. Final Report on ITER Task Agreement 81-10

    SciTech Connect

    Brad J. Merrill

    2009-01-01

    An International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) Implementing Task Agreement (ITA) on Magnet Safety was established between the ITER International Organization (IO) and the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Fusion Safety Program (FSP) during calendar year 2004. The objectives of this ITA were to add new capabilities to the MAGARC code and to use this updated version of MAGARC to analyze unmitigated superconductor quench events for both poloidal field (PF) and toroidal field (TF) coils of the ITER design. This report documents the completion of the work scope for this ITA. Based on the results obtained for this ITA, an unmitigated quench event in an ITER larger PF coil does not appear to be as severe an accident as in an ITER TF coil.

  1. Preliminary consideration of CFETR ITER-like case diagnostic system.

    PubMed

    Li, G S; Yang, Y; Wang, Y M; Ming, T F; Han, X; Liu, S C; Wang, E H; Liu, Y K; Yang, W J; Li, G Q; Hu, Q S; Gao, X

    2016-11-01

    Chinese Fusion Engineering Test Reactor (CFETR) is a new superconducting tokamak device being designed in China, which aims at bridging the gap between ITER and DEMO, where DEMO is a tokamak demonstration fusion reactor. Two diagnostic cases, ITER-like case and towards DEMO case, have been considered for CFETR early and later operating phases, respectively. In this paper, some preliminary consideration of ITER-like case will be presented. Based on ITER diagnostic system, three versions of increased complexity and coverage of the ITER-like case diagnostic system have been developed with different goals and functions. Version A aims only machine protection and basic control. Both of version B and version C are mainly for machine protection, basic and advanced control, but version C has an increased level of redundancy necessary for improved measurements capability. The performance of these versions and needed R&D work are outlined.

  2. An iterative matching and locating technique for borehole microseismic monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, H.; Meng, X.; Niu, F.; Tang, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Microseismic monitoring has been proven to be an effective and valuable technology to image hydraulic fracture geometry. The success of hydraulic fracturing monitoring relies on the detection and characterization (i.e., location and focal mechanism estimation) of a maximum number of induced microseismic events. All the events are important to quantify the stimulated reservior volume (SRV) and characterize the newly created fracture network. Detecting and locating low magnitude events, however, are notoriously difficult, particularly at a high noisy production environment. Here we propose an iterative matching and locating technique (iMLT) to obtain a maximum detection of small events and the best determination of their locations from continuous data recorded by a single azimuth downhole geophone array. As the downhole array is located in one azimuth, the regular M&L using the P-wave cross-correlation only is not able to resolve the location of a matched event relative to the template event. We thus introduce the polarization direction in the matching, which significantly improve the lateral resolution of the M&L method based on numerical simulations with synthetic data. Our synthetic tests further indicate that the inclusion of S-wave cross-correlation data can help better constrain the focal depth of the matched events. We apply this method to a dataset recorded during hydraulic fracturing treatment of a pilot horizontal well within the shale play in southwest China. Our approach yields a more than fourfold increase in the number of located events, compared with the original event catalog from traditional downhole processing.

  3. The Effect of Iteration on the Design Performance of Primary School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Looijenga, Annemarie; Klapwijk, Remke; de Vries, Marc J.

    2015-01-01

    Iteration during the design process is an essential element. Engineers optimize their design by iteration. Research on iteration in Primary Design Education is however scarce; possibly teachers believe they do not have enough time for iteration in daily classroom practices. Spontaneous playing behavior of children indicates that iteration fits in…

  4. The Effect of Iteration on the Design Performance of Primary School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Looijenga, Annemarie; Klapwijk, Remke; de Vries, Marc J.

    2015-01-01

    Iteration during the design process is an essential element. Engineers optimize their design by iteration. Research on iteration in Primary Design Education is however scarce; possibly teachers believe they do not have enough time for iteration in daily classroom practices. Spontaneous playing behavior of children indicates that iteration fits in…

  5. Evaluating iterative reconstruction performance in computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Baiyu Solomon, Justin; Ramirez Giraldo, Juan Carlos; Samei, Ehsan

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: Iterative reconstruction (IR) offers notable advantages in computed tomography (CT). However, its performance characterization is complicated by its potentially nonlinear behavior, impacting performance in terms of specific tasks. This study aimed to evaluate the performance of IR with both task-specific and task-generic strategies. Methods: The performance of IR in CT was mathematically assessed with an observer model that predicted the detection accuracy in terms of the detectability index (d′). d′ was calculated based on the properties of the image noise and resolution, the observer, and the detection task. The characterizations of image noise and resolution were extended to accommodate the nonlinearity of IR. A library of tasks was mathematically modeled at a range of sizes (radius 1–4 mm), contrast levels (10–100 HU), and edge profiles (sharp and soft). Unique d′ values were calculated for each task with respect to five radiation exposure levels (volume CT dose index, CTDI{sub vol}: 3.4–64.8 mGy) and four reconstruction algorithms (filtered backprojection reconstruction, FBP; iterative reconstruction in imaging space, IRIS; and sinogram affirmed iterative reconstruction with strengths of 3 and 5, SAFIRE3 and SAFIRE5; all provided by Siemens Healthcare, Forchheim, Germany). The d′ values were translated into the areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) to represent human observer performance. For each task and reconstruction algorithm, a threshold dose was derived as the minimum dose required to achieve a threshold AUC of 0.9. A task-specific dose reduction potential of IR was calculated as the difference between the threshold doses for IR and FBP. A task-generic comparison was further made between IR and FBP in terms of the percent of all tasks yielding an AUC higher than the threshold. Results: IR required less dose than FBP to achieve the threshold AUC. In general, SAFIRE5 showed the most significant dose reduction

  6. Evaluating iterative reconstruction performance in computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Chen, Baiyu; Ramirez Giraldo, Juan Carlos; Solomon, Justin; Samei, Ehsan

    2014-12-01

    Iterative reconstruction (IR) offers notable advantages in computed tomography (CT). However, its performance characterization is complicated by its potentially nonlinear behavior, impacting performance in terms of specific tasks. This study aimed to evaluate the performance of IR with both task-specific and task-generic strategies. The performance of IR in CT was mathematically assessed with an observer model that predicted the detection accuracy in terms of the detectability index (d'). d' was calculated based on the properties of the image noise and resolution, the observer, and the detection task. The characterizations of image noise and resolution were extended to accommodate the nonlinearity of IR. A library of tasks was mathematically modeled at a range of sizes (radius 1-4 mm), contrast levels (10-100 HU), and edge profiles (sharp and soft). Unique d' values were calculated for each task with respect to five radiation exposure levels (volume CT dose index, CTDIvol: 3.4-64.8 mGy) and four reconstruction algorithms (filtered backprojection reconstruction, FBP; iterative reconstruction in imaging space, IRIS; and sinogram affirmed iterative reconstruction with strengths of 3 and 5, SAFIRE3 and SAFIRE5; all provided by Siemens Healthcare, Forchheim, Germany). The d' values were translated into the areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) to represent human observer performance. For each task and reconstruction algorithm, a threshold dose was derived as the minimum dose required to achieve a threshold AUC of 0.9. A task-specific dose reduction potential of IR was calculated as the difference between the threshold doses for IR and FBP. A task-generic comparison was further made between IR and FBP in terms of the percent of all tasks yielding an AUC higher than the threshold. IR required less dose than FBP to achieve the threshold AUC. In general, SAFIRE5 showed the most significant dose reduction potentials (11-54 mGy, 77%-84%), followed by

  7. Transcranial magnetic stimulation and the human brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallett, Mark

    2000-07-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is rapidly developing as a powerful, non-invasive tool for studying the human brain. A pulsed magnetic field creates current flow in the brain and can temporarily excite or inhibit specific areas. TMS of motor cortex can produce a muscle twitch or block movement; TMS of occipital cortex can produce visual phosphenes or scotomas. TMS can also alter the functioning of the brain beyond the time of stimulation, offering potential for therapy.

  8. Accurate Design of Low Backscattering Metasurface Using Iterative Fourier Transform Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dan; Liu, Zhen Guo; Zhao, Jie; Cheng, Qiang; Cui, Tie Jun

    2017-09-12

    An accurate method is proposed to design low-backscattering metasurfaces efficiently using an iterative Fourier transform algorithm, which avoids the large amount of time-consuming numerical simulations of complicated electromagnetic problems and provides satisfactory performance to reduce the backward scattering. As an example of the application, a broadband low-backscattering metasurface is designed, fabricated, and characterized. Both full-wave simulation and measured results reveal that the proposed method offers a rapid and efficient tool to manipulate the scattering behaviors of the metasurface, and thus realizes significant scattering reductions.

  9. Comparison of starting values for iterative solutions to a universal Kepler's equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergam, M. J.; Prussing, J. E.

    1982-01-01

    General starting values for the iterative numerical solution of a universal Kepler's equation for position in a conic orbit at a specified time are investigated. Three starting values based on recent refinements of previously obtained bounds on the solution are derived and tested numerically. Of these, a simple starting value based on a cubic approximation to Kepler's equation provides the most rapid convergence using both first and second order Newton algorithms. The performance of the starting values are compared with similar studies which used the restricted case of elliptical orbits with the initial epoch at periapse.

  10. Iterative reconstruction methods in atmospheric tomography: FEWHA, Kaczmarz and Gradient-based algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramlau, R.; Saxenhuber, D.; Yudytskiy, M.

    2014-07-01

    The problem of atmospheric tomography arises in ground-based telescope imaging with adaptive optics (AO), where one aims to compensate in real-time for the rapidly changing optical distortions in the atmosphere. Many of these systems depend on a sufficient reconstruction of the turbulence profiles in order to obtain a good correction. Due to steadily growing telescope sizes, there is a strong increase in the computational load for atmospheric reconstruction with current methods, first and foremost the MVM. In this paper we present and compare three novel iterative reconstruction methods. The first iterative approach is the Finite Element- Wavelet Hybrid Algorithm (FEWHA), which combines wavelet-based techniques and conjugate gradient schemes to efficiently and accurately tackle the problem of atmospheric reconstruction. The method is extremely fast, highly flexible and yields superior quality. Another novel iterative reconstruction algorithm is the three step approach which decouples the problem in the reconstruction of the incoming wavefronts, the reconstruction of the turbulent layers (atmospheric tomography) and the computation of the best mirror correction (fitting step). For the atmospheric tomography problem within the three step approach, the Kaczmarz algorithm and the Gradient-based method have been developed. We present a detailed comparison of our reconstructors both in terms of quality and speed performance in the context of a Multi-Object Adaptive Optics (MOAO) system for the E-ELT setting on OCTOPUS, the ESO end-to-end simulation tool.

  11. ELM mitigation with pellet ELM triggering and implications for PFCs and plasma performance in ITER

    DOE PAGES

    Baylor, Larry R.; Lang, P. T.; Allen, Steve L.; ...

    2014-10-05

    The triggering of rapid small edge localized modes (ELMs) by high frequency pellet injection has been proposed as a method to prevent large naturally occurring ELMs that can erode the ITER plasma facing components. Deuterium pellet injection has been used to successfully demonstrate the on-demand triggering of edge localized modes (ELMs) at much higher rates and with much smaller intensity than natural ELMs. The proposed hypothesis for the triggering mechanism of ELMs by pellets is the local pressure perturbation resulting from reheating of the pellet cloud that can exceed the local high-n ballooning mode threshold where the pellet is injected.more » Nonlinear MHD simulations of the pellet ELM triggering show destabilization of high-n ballooning modes by such a local pressure perturbation. A review of the recent pellet ELM triggering results from ASDEX Upgrade (AUG), DIII-D, and JET reveals that a number of uncertainties about this ELM mitigation technique still remain. These include the heat flux impact pattern on the divertor and wall from pellet triggered and natural ELMs, the necessary pellet size and injection location to reliably trigger ELMs, and the level of fueling to be expected from ELM triggering pellets and synergy with larger fueling pellets. The implications of these issues for pellet ELM mitigation in ITER and its impact on the PFCs are presented along with the design features of the pellet injection system for ITER.« less

  12. ELM mitigation with pellet ELM triggering and implications for PFCs and plasma performance in ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Baylor, Larry R.; Lang, P. T.; Allen, Steve L.; Combs, S. K.; Commaux, N.; Evans, Todd E.; Fenstermacher, Max E.; Huijsmans, G.; Jernigan, T. C.; Lasnier, Charles J.; Leonard, Anthony W.; Loarte, Alberto; Maingi, Rajesh; Maruyama, S.; Meitner, S. J.; Moyer, Richard A.; Osborne, Thomas H.

    2014-10-05

    The triggering of rapid small edge localized modes (ELMs) by high frequency pellet injection has been proposed as a method to prevent large naturally occurring ELMs that can erode the ITER plasma facing components. Deuterium pellet injection has been used to successfully demonstrate the on-demand triggering of edge localized modes (ELMs) at much higher rates and with much smaller intensity than natural ELMs. The proposed hypothesis for the triggering mechanism of ELMs by pellets is the local pressure perturbation resulting from reheating of the pellet cloud that can exceed the local high-n ballooning mode threshold where the pellet is injected. Nonlinear MHD simulations of the pellet ELM triggering show destabilization of high-n ballooning modes by such a local pressure perturbation. A review of the recent pellet ELM triggering results from ASDEX Upgrade (AUG), DIII-D, and JET reveals that a number of uncertainties about this ELM mitigation technique still remain. These include the heat flux impact pattern on the divertor and wall from pellet triggered and natural ELMs, the necessary pellet size and injection location to reliably trigger ELMs, and the level of fueling to be expected from ELM triggering pellets and synergy with larger fueling pellets. The implications of these issues for pellet ELM mitigation in ITER and its impact on the PFCs are presented along with the design features of the pellet injection system for ITER.

  13. Mapping raised bogs with an iterative one-class classification approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mack, Benjamin; Roscher, Ribana; Stenzel, Stefanie; Feilhauer, Hannes; Schmidtlein, Sebastian; Waske, Björn

    2016-10-01

    Land use and land cover maps are one of the most commonly used remote sensing products. In many applications the user only requires a map of one particular class of interest, e.g. a specific vegetation type or an invasive species. One-class classifiers are appealing alternatives to common supervised classifiers because they can be trained with labeled training data of the class of interest only. However, training an accurate one-class classification (OCC) model is challenging, particularly when facing a large image, a small class and few training samples. To tackle these problems we propose an iterative OCC approach. The presented approach uses a biased Support Vector Machine as core classifier. In an iterative pre-classification step a large part of the pixels not belonging to the class of interest is classified. The remaining data is classified by a final classifier with a novel model and threshold selection approach. The specific objective of our study is the classification of raised bogs in a study site in southeast Germany, using multi-seasonal RapidEye data and a small number of training sample. Results demonstrate that the iterative OCC outperforms other state of the art one-class classifiers and approaches for model selection. The study highlights the potential of the proposed approach for an efficient and improved mapping of small classes such as raised bogs. Overall the proposed approach constitutes a feasible approach and useful modification of a regular one-class classifier.

  14. Improving Screening Efficiency through Iterative Screening Using Docking and Conformal Prediction.

    PubMed

    Svensson, Fredrik; Norinder, Ulf; Bender, Andreas

    2017-03-27

    High-throughput screening, where thousands of molecules rapidly can be assessed for activity against a protein, has been the dominating approach in drug discovery for many years. However, these methods are costly and require much time and effort. In order to suggest an improvement to this situation, in this study, we apply an iterative screening process, where an initial set of compounds are selected for screening based on molecular docking. The outcome of the initial screen is then used to classify the remaining compounds through a conformal predictor. The approach was retrospectively validated using 41 targets from the Directory of Useful Decoys, Enhanced (DUD-E), ensuring scaffold diversity among the active compounds. The results show that 57% of the remaining active compounds could be identified while only screening 9.4% of the database. The overall hit rate (7.6%) was also higher than when using docking alone (5.2%). When limiting the search to the top scored compounds from docking, 39.6% of the active compounds could be identified, compared to 13.5% when screening the same number of compounds solely based on docking. The use of conformal predictors also gives a clear indication of the number of compounds to screen in the next iteration. These results indicate that iterative screening based on molecular docking and conformal prediction can be an efficient way to find active compounds while screening only a small part of the compound collection.

  15. Iterative phase retrieval algorithms. I: optimization.

    PubMed

    Guo, Changliang; Liu, Shi; Sheridan, John T

    2015-05-20

    Two modified Gerchberg-Saxton (GS) iterative phase retrieval algorithms are proposed. The first we refer to as the spatial phase perturbation GS algorithm (SPP GSA). The second is a combined GS hybrid input-output algorithm (GS/HIOA). In this paper (Part I), it is demonstrated that the SPP GS and GS/HIO algorithms are both much better at avoiding stagnation during phase retrieval, allowing them to successfully locate superior solutions compared with either the GS or the HIO algorithms. The performances of the SPP GS and GS/HIO algorithms are also compared. Then, the error reduction (ER) algorithm is combined with the HIO algorithm (ER/HIOA) to retrieve the input object image and the phase, given only some knowledge of its extent and the amplitude in the Fourier domain. In Part II, the algorithms developed here are applied to carry out known plaintext and ciphertext attacks on amplitude encoding and phase encoding double random phase encryption systems. Significantly, ER/HIOA is then used to carry out a ciphertext-only attack on AE DRPE systems.

  16. Nuclear modules of ITER tokamak systems code

    SciTech Connect

    Gohar, Y.; Baker, C.; Brooks, J.; Finn, P.; Hassanein, A.; Willms, S.; Barr, W.; Bushigin, A.; Kalyanam, K.M.; Haines, J.

    1987-10-01

    Nuclear modules were developed to model various reactor components in the ITER systems code. Several design options and cost algorithms are included for each component. The first wall, blanket and shield modules calculate the beryllium zone thickness, the disruptions results, the nuclear responses in different components including the toroidal field coils. Tungsten shield/water coolant/steel structure and steel shield/water coolant are the shield options for the inboard and outboard sections of the reactor. Lithium nitrate dissolved in the water coolant with a variable beryllium zone thickness in the outboard section of the reactor provides the tritium breeding capability. The reactor vault module defines the thickness of the reactor wall and the roof based on the dose equivalent during operation including skyshine contribution. The impurity control module provides the design parameters for the divertor including plate design, heat load, erosion rate, tritium permeation through the plate material to the coolant, plasma contamination by sputtered impurities, and plate lifetime. Several materials: Be, C, V, Mo, and W can be used for the divertor plate to cover a range of plasma edge temperatures. The tritium module calculates tritium and deuterium flow rates for the reactor plant. The tritium inventory in the fuelers, neutral beams, vacuum pumps, impurity control, first wall, and blanket is calculated. Tritium requirements are provided for different operating conditions. The nuclear models are summarized in this paper including the different design options and key analyses of each module. 39 refs., 3 tabs.

  17. RF heating needs and plans for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Bora, Dhiraj; Beaumont, B.; Kobayashi, N.; Tanga, A.; Goulding, R.; Swain, D.; Jacquinot, J.

    2007-09-28

    RF heating systems are required to deliver more than half of the total auxiliary power to operate ITER successfully through the different levels. To achieve this goal, systems in the range of ICRF, LHF and ECRF will be implemented for different tasks in different phases of operation. Power levels proposed to be used in different ranges will vary depending on the needs. Different mixes of power will depend on the physics needs of the experimental programmes. Lower Hybrid power of 20 MW at 5.0 GHz is not planned for the startup phase and therefore no procurement scheme exists at the present time. 20 MW will be delivered into the plasma at 40 to 55 MHz as well as at 170 GHz with the help of Ion Cyclotron Heating (ICH) and Electron Cyclotron Heating (ECH) systems respectively. All the heating systems will have the capability to operate in continuous mode. A dedicated ECH 3.0 MW system at 127.6 GHz will be used for plasma breakdown and start up.

  18. Sequence analysis by iterated maps, a review.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Jonas S

    2014-05-01

    Among alignment-free methods, Iterated Maps (IMs) are on a particular extreme: they are also scale free (order free). The use of IMs for sequence analysis is also distinct from other alignment-free methodologies in being rooted in statistical mechanics instead of computational linguistics. Both of these roots go back over two decades to the use of fractal geometry in the characterization of phase-space representations. The time series analysis origin of the field is betrayed by the title of the manuscript that started this alignment-free subdomain in 1990, 'Chaos Game Representation'. The clash between the analysis of sequences as continuous series and the better established use of Markovian approaches to discrete series was almost immediate, with a defining critique published in same journal 2 years later. The rest of that decade would go by before the scale-free nature of the IM space was uncovered. The ensuing decade saw this scalability generalized for non-genomic alphabets as well as an interest in its use for graphic representation of biological sequences. Finally, in the past couple of years, in step with the emergence of BigData and MapReduce as a new computational paradigm, there is a surprising third act in the IM story. Multiple reports have described gains in computational efficiency of multiple orders of magnitude over more conventional sequence analysis methodologies. The stage appears to be now set for a recasting of IMs with a central role in processing nextgen sequencing results.

  19. Stepwise Iterative Fourier Transform: The SIFT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benignus, V. A.; Benignus, G.

    1975-01-01

    A program, designed specifically to study the respective effects of some common data problems on results obtained through stepwise iterative Fourier transformation of synthetic data with known waveform composition, was outlined. Included in this group were the problems of gaps in the data, different time-series lengths, periodic but nonsinusoidal waveforms, and noisy (low signal-to-noise) data. Results on sinusoidal data were also compared with results obtained on narrow band noise with similar characteristics. The findings showed that the analytic procedure under study can reliably reduce data in the nature of (1) sinusoids in noise, (2) asymmetric but periodic waves in noise, and (3) sinusoids in noise with substantial gaps in the data. The program was also able to analyze narrow-band noise well, but with increased interpretational problems. The procedure was shown to be a powerful technique for analysis of periodicities, in comparison with classical spectrum analysis techniques. However, informed use of the stepwise procedure nevertheless requires some background of knowledge concerning characteristics of the biological processes under study.

  20. Progress of ITER Superconducting Magnet Procurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koizumi, N.

    The ITER superconducting magnet system consists of 18 Toroidal Field (TF) coils, 1 Central Solenoid (CS), 6 Poloidal Field (PF) coils and 18 Correction coils (CC). The TF conductors will be manufactured by China (7%), EU (20%), Korea (20%), Japan (25%), Russia (20%) and US (8%), TF coils by EU (10 coils) and Japan (9 coils), in which one spare is included, all TF coil cases by Japan, all CS conductors by Japan, all CS (7 modules including a spare), PF conductor by China (65%), EU (21%) and Russia (14%), PF coils by EU (5 coils) and Russia (1 coil), all CCs by China and all feeder by China, respectively. Since the TF coil manufacture is one of long-lead items, procurement of the TF conductors have been started. More than 40 TF conductors have already been fabricated. Large-scale trials for TF coil manufacture have also been started and successful results were obtained in both EU and Japan, such as manufacture of full-scale radial plates. The trials for PF coil and CC has been done by Russia and China.

  1. Development and evaluation of iterative and direct methods for the solutin of the equations governiong recirculating flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braaten, M. E.

    1985-12-01

    Existing numerical methods were evaluated for the solution of the equations governing recirculating flows, and to develop new methods that are more reliable, rapidly convergent, and computationally efficient than the existing methods. A number of widely used finite difference methods, including SIMPLE, SIMPLEC, SIMPLEST, and SIMPLER, were carefully examined. These methods solve the flow equations in a decoupled sequential manner using standard iterative solvers. A number of new methods that employ direct sparse matrix techniques to solve the flow equations were developed. Three new direct methods, denoted as UVP, PENALTY, and NR-PENALTY, solve the momentum and continuity equations simultaneously over the full domain. The performance of the various methods was tested on some steady two dimensional recirculating flows, over a range of grid sizes and Reynolds numbers. The direct spares matrix methods were found to be much more rapidly convergent and more computationally efficient than the existing iterative procedures.

  2. A modified iterative ensemble Kalman filter data assimilation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Baoxiong; Bai, Yulong; Wang, Yizhao; Li, Zhe; Ma, Boyang

    2017-08-01

    High nonlinearity is a typical characteristic associated with data assimilation systems. Additionally, iterative ensemble based methods have attracted a large amount of research attention, which has been focused on dealing with nonlinearity problems. To solve the local convergence problem of the iterative ensemble Kalman filter, a modified iterative ensemble Kalman filter algorithm was put forward, which was based on a global convergence strategy from the perspective of a Gauss-Newton iteration. Through self-adaption, the step factor was adjusted to enable every iteration to approach expected values during the process of the data assimilation. A sensitivity experiment was carried out in a low dimensional Lorenz-63 chaotic system, as well as a Lorenz-96 model. The new method was tested via ensemble size, observation variance, and inflation factor changes, along with other aspects. Meanwhile, comparative research was conducted with both a traditional ensemble Kalman filter and an iterative ensemble Kalman filter. The results showed that the modified iterative ensemble Kalman filter algorithm was a data assimilation method that was able to effectively estimate a strongly nonlinear system state.

  3. Overview of the JET results in support to ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litaudon, X.; Abduallev, S.; Abhangi, M.; Abreu, P.; Afzal, M.; Aggarwal, K. M.; Ahlgren, T.; Ahn, J. H.; Aho-Mantila, L.; Aiba, N.; Airila, M.; Albanese, R.; Aldred, V.; Alegre, D.; Alessi, E.; Aleynikov, P.; Alfier, A.; Alkseev, A.; Allinson, M.; Alper, B.; Alves, E.; Ambrosino, G.; Ambrosino, R.; Amicucci, L.; Amosov, V.; Andersson Sundén, E.; Angelone, M.; Anghel, M.; Angioni, C.; Appel, L.; Appelbee, C.; Arena, P.; Ariola, M.; Arnichand, H.; Arshad, S.; Ash, A.; Ashikawa, N.; Aslanyan, V.; Asunta, O.; Auriemma, F.; Austin, Y.; Avotina, L.; Axton, M. D.; Ayres, C.; Bacharis, M.; Baciero, A.; Baião, D.; Bailey, S.; Baker, A.; Balboa, I.; Balden, M.; Balshaw, N.; Bament, R.; Banks, J. W.; Baranov, Y. F.; Barnard, M. A.; Barnes, D.; Barnes, M.; Barnsley, R.; Baron Wiechec, A.; Barrera Orte, L.; Baruzzo, M.; Basiuk, V.; Bassan, M.; Bastow, R.; Batista, A.; Batistoni, P.; Baughan, R.; Bauvir, B.; Baylor, L.; Bazylev, B.; Beal, J.; Beaumont, P. S.; Beckers, M.; Beckett, B.; Becoulet, A.; Bekris, N.; Beldishevski, M.; Bell, K.; Belli, F.; Bellinger, M.; Belonohy, É.; Ben Ayed, N.; Benterman, N. A.; Bergsåker, H.; Bernardo, J.; Bernert, M.; Berry, M.; Bertalot, L.; Besliu, C.; Beurskens, M.; Bieg, B.; Bielecki, J.; Biewer, T.; Bigi, M.; Bílková, P.; Binda, F.; Bisoffi, A.; Bizarro, J. P. S.; Björkas, C.; Blackburn, J.; Blackman, K.; Blackman, T. R.; Blanchard, P.; Blatchford, P.; Bobkov, V.; Boboc, A.; Bodnár, G.; Bogar, O.; Bolshakova, I.; Bolzonella, T.; Bonanomi, N.; Bonelli, F.; Boom, J.; Booth, J.; Borba, D.; Borodin, D.; Borodkina, I.; Botrugno, A.; Bottereau, C.; Boulting, P.; Bourdelle, C.; Bowden, M.; Bower, C.; Bowman, C.; Boyce, T.; Boyd, C.; Boyer, H. J.; Bradshaw, J. M. A.; Braic, V.; Bravanec, R.; Breizman, B.; Bremond, S.; Brennan, P. D.; Breton, S.; Brett, A.; Brezinsek, S.; Bright, M. D. J.; Brix, M.; Broeckx, W.; Brombin, M.; Brosławski, A.; Brown, D. P. D.; Brown, M.; Bruno, E.; Bucalossi, J.; Buch, J.; Buchanan, J.; Buckley, M. A.; Budny, R.; Bufferand, H.; Bulman, M.; Bulmer, N.; Bunting, P.; Buratti, P.; Burckhart, A.; Buscarino, A.; Busse, A.; Butler, N. K.; Bykov, I.; Byrne, J.; Cahyna, P.; Calabrò, G.; Calvo, I.; Camenen, Y.; Camp, P.; Campling, D. C.; Cane, J.; Cannas, B.; Capel, A. J.; Card, P. J.; Cardinali, A.; Carman, P.; Carr, M.; Carralero, D.; Carraro, L.; Carvalho, B. B.; Carvalho, I.; Carvalho, P.; Casson, F. J.; Castaldo, C.; Catarino, N.; Caumont, J.; Causa, F.; Cavazzana, R.; Cave-Ayland, K.; Cavinato, M.; Cecconello, M.; Ceccuzzi, S.; Cecil, E.; Cenedese, A.; Cesario, R.; Challis, C. D.; Chandler, M.; Chandra, D.; Chang, C. S.; Chankin, A.; Chapman, I. T.; Chapman, S. C.; Chernyshova, M.; Chitarin, G.; Ciraolo, G.; Ciric, D.; Citrin, J.; Clairet, F.; Clark, E.; Clark, M.; Clarkson, R.; Clatworthy, D.; Clements, C.; Cleverly, M.; Coad, J. P.; Coates, P. A.; Cobalt, A.; Coccorese, V.; Cocilovo, V.; Coda, S.; Coelho, R.; Coenen, J. W.; Coffey, I.; Colas, L.; Collins, S.; Conka, D.; Conroy, S.; Conway, N.; Coombs, D.; Cooper, D.; Cooper, S. R.; Corradino, C.; Corre, Y.; Corrigan, G.; Cortes, S.; Coster, D.; Couchman, A. S.; Cox, M. P.; Craciunescu, T.; Cramp, S.; Craven, R.; Crisanti, F.; Croci, G.; Croft, D.; Crombé, K.; Crowe, R.; Cruz, N.; Cseh, G.; Cufar, A.; Cullen, A.; Curuia, M.; Czarnecka, A.; Dabirikhah, H.; Dalgliesh, P.; Dalley, S.; Dankowski, J.; Darrow, D.; Davies, O.; Davis, W.; Day, C.; Day, I. E.; De Bock, M.; de Castro, A.; de la Cal, E.; de la Luna, E.; De Masi, G.; de Pablos, J. L.; De Temmerman, G.; De Tommasi, G.; de Vries, P.; Deakin, K.; Deane, J.; Degli Agostini, F.; Dejarnac, R.; Delabie, E.; den Harder, N.; Dendy, R. O.; Denis, J.; Denner, P.; Devaux, S.; Devynck, P.; Di Maio, F.; Di Siena, A.; Di Troia, C.; Dinca, P.; D'Inca, R.; Ding, B.; Dittmar, T.; Doerk, H.; Doerner, R. P.; Donné, T.; Dorling, S. E.; Dormido-Canto, S.; Doswon, S.; Douai, D.; Doyle, P. T.; Drenik, A.; Drewelow, P.; Drews, P.; Duckworth, Ph.; Dumont, R.; Dumortier, P.; Dunai, D.; Dunne, M.; Ďuran, I.; Durodié, F.; Dutta, P.; Duval, B. P.; Dux, R.; Dylst, K.; Dzysiuk, N.; Edappala, P. V.; Edmond, J.; Edwards, A. M.; Edwards, J.; Eich, Th.; Ekedahl, A.; El-Jorf, R.; Elsmore, C. G.; Enachescu, M.; Ericsson, G.; Eriksson, F.; Eriksson, J.; Eriksson, L. G.; Esposito, B.; Esquembri, S.; Esser, H. G.; Esteve, D.; Evans, B.; Evans, G. E.; Evison, G.; Ewart, G. D.; Fagan, D.; Faitsch, M.; Falie, D.; Fanni, A.; Fasoli, A.; Faustin, J. M.; Fawlk, N.; Fazendeiro, L.; Fedorczak, N.; Felton, R. C.; Fenton, K.; Fernades, A.; Fernandes, H.; Ferreira, J.; Fessey, J. A.; Février, O.; Ficker, O.; Field, A.; Fietz, S.; Figueiredo, A.; Figueiredo, J.; Fil, A.; Finburg, P.; Firdaouss, M.; Fischer, U.; Fittill, L.; Fitzgerald, M.; Flammini, D.; Flanagan, J.; Fleming, C.; Flinders, K.; Fonnesu, N.; Fontdecaba, J. M.; Formisano, A.; Forsythe, L.; Fortuna, L.; Fortuna-Zalesna, E.; Fortune, M.; Foster, S.; Franke, T.; Franklin, T.; Frasca, M.; Frassinetti, L.; Freisinger, M.; Fresa, R.; Frigione, D.; Fuchs, V.; Fuller, D.; Futatani, S.; Fyvie, J.; Gál, K.; Galassi, D.; Gałązka, K.; Galdon-Quiroga, J.; Gallagher, J.; Gallart, D.; Galvão, R.; Gao, X.; Gao, Y.; Garcia, J.; Garcia-Carrasco, A.; García-Muñoz, M.; Gardarein, J.-L.; Garzotti, L.; Gaudio, P.; Gauthier, E.; Gear, D. F.; Gee, S. J.; Geiger, B.; Gelfusa, M.; Gerasimov, S.; Gervasini, G.; Gethins, M.; Ghani, Z.; Ghate, M.; Gherendi, M.; Giacalone, J. C.; Giacomelli, L.; Gibson, C. S.; Giegerich, T.; Gil, C.; Gil, L.; Gilligan, S.; Gin, D.; Giovannozzi, E.; Girardo, J. B.; Giroud, C.; Giruzzi, G.; Glöggler, S.; Godwin, J.; Goff, J.; Gohil, P.; Goloborod'ko, V.; Gomes, R.; Gonçalves, B.; Goniche, M.; Goodliffe, M.; Goodyear, A.; Gorini, G.; Gosk, M.; Goulding, R.; Goussarov, A.; Gowland, R.; Graham, B.; Graham, M. E.; Graves, J. P.; Grazier, N.; Grazier, P.; Green, N. R.; Greuner, H.; Grierson, B.; Griph, F. S.; Grisolia, C.; Grist, D.; Groth, M.; Grove, R.; Grundy, C. N.; Grzonka, J.; Guard, D.; Guérard, C.; Guillemaut, C.; Guirlet, R.; Gurl, C.; Utoh, H. H.; Hackett, L. J.; Hacquin, S.; Hagar, A.; Hager, R.; Hakola, A.; Halitovs, M.; Hall, S. J.; Hallworth Cook, S. P.; Hamlyn-Harris, C.; Hammond, K.; Harrington, C.; Harrison, J.; Harting, D.; Hasenbeck, F.; Hatano, Y.; Hatch, D. R.; Haupt, T. D. V.; Hawes, J.; Hawkes, N. C.; Hawkins, J.; Hawkins, P.; Haydon, P. W.; Hayter, N.; Hazel, S.; Heesterman, P. J. L.; Heinola, K.; Hellesen, C.; Hellsten, T.; Helou, W.; Hemming, O. N.; Hender, T. C.; Henderson, M.; Henderson, S. S.; Henriques, R.; Hepple, D.; Hermon, G.; Hertout, P.; Hidalgo, C.; Highcock, E. G.; Hill, M.; Hillairet, J.; Hillesheim, J.; Hillis, D.; Hizanidis, K.; Hjalmarsson, A.; Hobirk, J.; Hodille, E.; Hogben, C. H. A.; Hogeweij, G. M. D.; Hollingsworth, A.; Hollis, S.; Homfray, D. A.; Horáček, J.; Hornung, G.; Horton, A. R.; Horton, L. D.; Horvath, L.; Hotchin, S. P.; Hough, M. R.; Howarth, P. J.; Hubbard, A.; Huber, A.; Huber, V.; Huddleston, T. M.; Hughes, M.; Huijsmans, G. T. A.; Hunter, C. L.; Huynh, P.; Hynes, A. M.; Iglesias, D.; Imazawa, N.; Imbeaux, F.; Imríšek, M.; Incelli, M.; Innocente, P.; Irishkin, M.; Ivanova-Stanik, I.; Jachmich, S.; Jacobsen, A. S.; Jacquet, P.; Jansons, J.; Jardin, A.; Järvinen, A.; Jaulmes, F.; Jednoróg, S.; Jenkins, I.; Jeong, C.; Jepu, I.; Joffrin, E.; Johnson, R.; Johnson, T.; Johnston, Jane; Joita, L.; Jones, G.; Jones, T. T. C.; Hoshino, K. K.; Kallenbach, A.; Kamiya, K.; Kaniewski, J.; Kantor, A.; Kappatou, A.; Karhunen, J.; Karkinsky, D.; Karnowska, I.; Kaufman, M.; Kaveney, G.; Kazakov, Y.; Kazantzidis, V.; Keeling, D. L.; Keenan, T.; Keep, J.; Kempenaars, M.; Kennedy, C.; Kenny, D.; Kent, J.; Kent, O. N.; Khilkevich, E.; Kim, H. T.; Kim, H. S.; Kinch, A.; king, C.; King, D.; King, R. F.; Kinna, D. J.; Kiptily, V.; Kirk, A.; Kirov, K.; Kirschner, A.; Kizane, G.; Klepper, C.; Klix, A.; Knight, P.; Knipe, S. J.; Knott, S.; Kobuchi, T.; Köchl, F.; Kocsis, G.; Kodeli, I.; Kogan, L.; Kogut, D.; Koivuranta, S.; Kominis, Y.; Köppen, M.; Kos, B.; Koskela, T.; Koslowski, H. R.; Koubiti, M.; Kovari, M.; Kowalska-Strzęciwilk, E.; Krasilnikov, A.; Krasilnikov, V.; Krawczyk, N.; Kresina, M.; Krieger, K.; Krivska, A.; Kruezi, U.; Książek, I.; Kukushkin, A.; Kundu, A.; Kurki-Suonio, T.; Kwak, S.; Kwiatkowski, R.; Kwon, O. J.; Laguardia, L.; Lahtinen, A.; Laing, A.; Lam, N.; Lambertz, H. T.; Lane, C.; Lang, P. T.; Lanthaler, S.; Lapins, J.; Lasa, A.; Last, J. R.; Łaszyńska, E.; Lawless, R.; Lawson, A.; Lawson, K. D.; Lazaros, A.; Lazzaro, E.; Leddy, J.; Lee, S.; Lefebvre, X.; Leggate, H. J.; Lehmann, J.; Lehnen, M.; Leichtle, D.; Leichuer, P.; Leipold, F.; Lengar, I.; Lennholm, M.; Lerche, E.; Lescinskis, A.; Lesnoj, S.; Letellier, E.; Leyland, M.; Leysen, W.; Li, L.; Liang, Y.; Likonen, J.; Linke, J.; Linsmeier, Ch.; Lipschultz, B.; Liu, G.; Liu, Y.; Lo Schiavo, V. P.; Loarer, T.; Loarte, A.; Lobel, R. C.; Lomanowski, B.; Lomas, P. J.; Lönnroth, J.; López, J. M.; López-Razola, J.; Lorenzini, R.; Losada, U.; Lovell, J. J.; Loving, A. B.; Lowry, C.; Luce, T.; Lucock, R. M. A.; Lukin, A.; Luna, C.; Lungaroni, M.; Lungu, C. P.; Lungu, M.; Lunniss, A.; Lupelli, I.; Lyssoivan, A.; Macdonald, N.; Macheta, P.; Maczewa, K.; Magesh, B.; Maget, P.; Maggi, C.; Maier, H.; Mailloux, J.; Makkonen, T.; Makwana, R.; Malaquias, A.; Malizia, A.; Manas, P.; Manning, A.; Manso, M. E.; Mantica, P.; Mantsinen, M.; Manzanares, A.; Maquet, Ph.; Marandet, Y.; Marcenko, N.; Marchetto, C.; Marchuk, O.; Marinelli, M.; Marinucci, M.; Markovič, T.; Marocco, D.; Marot, L.; Marren, C. A.; Marshal, R.; Martin, A.; Martin, Y.; Martín de Aguilera, A.; Martínez, F. J.; Martín-Solís, J. R.; Martynova, Y.; Maruyama, S.; Masiello, A.; Maslov, M.; Matejcik, S.; Mattei, M.; Matthews, G. F.; Maviglia, F.; Mayer, M.; Mayoral, M. L.; May-Smith, T.; Mazon, D.; Mazzotta, C.; McAdams, R.; McCarthy, P. J.; McClements, K. G.; McCormack, O.; McCullen, P. A.; McDonald, D.; McIntosh, S.; McKean, R.; McKehon, J.; Meadows, R. C.; Meakins, A.; Medina, F.; Medland, M.; Medley, S.; Meigh, S.; Meigs, A. G.; Meisl, G.; Meitner, S.; Meneses, L.; Menmuir, S.; Mergia, K.; Merrigan, I. R.; Mertens, Ph.; Meshchaninov, S.; Messiaen, A.; Meyer, H.; Mianowski, S.; Michling, R.; Middleton-Gear, D.; Miettunen, J.; Militello, F.; Militello-Asp, E.; Miloshevsky, G.; Mink, F.; Minucci, S.; Miyoshi, Y.; Mlynář, J.; Molina, D.; Monakhov, I.; Moneti, M.; Mooney, R.; Moradi, S.; Mordijck, S.; Moreira, L.; Moreno, R.; Moro, F.; Morris, A. W.; Morris, J.; Moser, L.; Mosher, S.; Moulton, D.; Murari, A.; Muraro, A.; Murphy, S.; Asakura, N. N.; Na, Y. S.; Nabais, F.; Naish, R.; Nakano, T.; Nardon, E.; Naulin, V.; Nave, M. F. F.; Nedzelski, I.; Nemtsev, G.; Nespoli, F.; Neto, A.; Neu, R.; Neverov, V. S.; Newman, M.; Nicholls, K. J.; Nicolas, T.; Nielsen, A. H.; Nielsen, P.; Nilsson, E.; Nishijima, D.; Noble, C.; Nocente, M.; Nodwell, D.; Nordlund, K.; Nordman, H.; Nouailletas, R.; Nunes, I.; Oberkofler, M.; Odupitan, T.; Ogawa, M. T.; O'Gorman, T.; Okabayashi, M.; Olney, R.; Omolayo, O.; O'Mullane, M.; Ongena, J.; Orsitto, F.; Orszagh, J.; Oswuigwe, B. I.; Otin, R.; Owen, A.; Paccagnella, R.; Pace, N.; Pacella, D.; Packer, L. W.; Page, A.; Pajuste, E.; Palazzo, S.; Pamela, S.; Panja, S.; Papp, P.; Paprok, R.; Parail, V.; Park, M.; Parra Diaz, F.; Parsons, M.; Pasqualotto, R.; Patel, A.; Pathak, S.; Paton, D.; Patten, H.; Pau, A.; Pawelec, E.; Soldan, C. Paz; Peackoc, A.; Pearson, I. J.; Pehkonen, S.-P.; Peluso, E.; Penot, C.; Pereira, A.; Pereira, R.; Pereira Puglia, P. P.; Perez von Thun, C.; Peruzzo, S.; Peschanyi, S.; Peterka, M.; Petersson, P.; Petravich, G.; Petre, A.; Petrella, N.; Petržilka, V.; Peysson, Y.; Pfefferlé, D.; Philipps, V.; Pillon, M.; Pintsuk, G.; Piovesan, P.; Pires dos Reis, A.; Piron, L.; Pironti, A.; Pisano, F.; Pitts, R.; Pizzo, F.; Plyusnin, V.; Pomaro, N.; Pompilian, O. G.; Pool, P. J.; Popovichev, S.; Porfiri, M. T.; Porosnicu, C.; Porton, M.; Possnert, G.; Potzel, S.; Powell, T.; Pozzi, J.; Prajapati, V.; Prakash, R.; Prestopino, G.; Price, D.; Price, M.; Price, R.; Prior, P.; Proudfoot, R.; Pucella, G.; Puglia, P.; Puiatti, M. E.; Pulley, D.; Purahoo, K.; Pütterich, Th.; Rachlew, E.; Rack, M.; Ragona, R.; Rainford, M. S. J.; Rakha, A.; Ramogida, G.; Ranjan, S.; Rapson, C. J.; Rasmussen, J. J.; Rathod, K.; Rattá, G.; Ratynskaia, S.; Ravera, G.; Rayner, C.; Rebai, M.; Reece, D.; Reed, A.; Réfy, D.; Regan, B.; Regaña, J.; Reich, M.; Reid, N.; Reimold, F.; Reinhart, M.; Reinke, M.; Reiser, D.; Rendell, D.; Reux, C.; Reyes Cortes, S. D. A.; Reynolds, S.; Riccardo, V.; Richardson, N.; Riddle, K.; Rigamonti, D.; Rimini, F. G.; Risner, J.; Riva, M.; Roach, C.; Robins, R. J.; Robinson, S. A.; Robinson, T.; Robson, D. W.; Roccella, R.; Rodionov, R.; Rodrigues, P.; Rodriguez, J.; Rohde, V.; Romanelli, F.; Romanelli, M.; Romanelli, S.; Romazanov, J.; Rowe, S.; Rubel, M.; Rubinacci, G.; Rubino, G.; Ruchko, L.; Ruiz, M.; Ruset, C.; Rzadkiewicz, J.; Saarelma, S.; Sabot, R.; Safi, E.; Sagar, P.; Saibene, G.; Saint-Laurent, F.; Salewski, M.; Salmi, A.; Salmon, R.; Salzedas, F.; Samaddar, D.; Samm, U.; Sandiford, D.; Santa, P.; Santala, M. I. K.; Santos, B.; Santucci, A.; Sartori, F.; Sartori, R.; Sauter, O.; Scannell, R.; Schlummer, T.; Schmid, K.; Schmidt, V.; Schmuck, S.; Schneider, M.; Schöpf, K.; Schwörer, D.; Scott, S. D.; Sergienko, G.; Sertoli, M.; Shabbir, A.; Sharapov, S. E.; Shaw, A.; Shaw, R.; Sheikh, H.; Shepherd, A.; Shevelev, A.; Shumack, A.; Sias, G.; Sibbald, M.; Sieglin, B.; Silburn, S.; Silva, A.; Silva, C.; Simmons, P. A.; Simpson, J.; Simpson-Hutchinson, J.; Sinha, A.; Sipilä, S. K.; Sips, A. C. C.; Sirén, P.; Sirinelli, A.; Sjöstrand, H.; Skiba, M.; Skilton, R.; Slabkowska, K.; Slade, B.; Smith, N.; Smith, P. G.; Smith, R.; Smith, T. J.; Smithies, M.; Snoj, L.; Soare, S.; Solano, E. R.; Somers, A.; Sommariva, C.; Sonato, P.; Sopplesa, A.; Sousa, J.; Sozzi, C.; Spagnolo, S.; Spelzini, T.; Spineanu, F.; Stables, G.; Stamatelatos, I.; Stamp, M. F.; Staniec, P.; Stankūnas, G.; Stan-Sion, C.; Stead, M. J.; Stefanikova, E.; Stepanov, I.; Stephen, A. V.; Stephen, M.; Stevens, A.; Stevens, B. D.; Strachan, J.; Strand, P.; Strauss, H. R.; Ström, P.; Stubbs, G.; Studholme, W.; Subba, F.; Summers, H. P.; Svensson, J.; Świderski, Ł.; Szabolics, T.; Szawlowski, M.; Szepesi, G.; Suzuki, T. T.; Tál, B.; Tala, T.; Talbot, A. R.; Talebzadeh, S.; Taliercio, C.; Tamain, P.; Tame, C.; Tang, W.; Tardocchi, M.; Taroni, L.; Taylor, D.; Taylor, K. A.; Tegnered, D.; Telesca, G.; Teplova, N.; Terranova, D.; Testa, D.; Tholerus, E.; Thomas, J.; Thomas, J. D.; Thomas, P.; Thompson, A.; Thompson, C.-A.; Thompson, V. K.; Thorne, L.; Thornton, A.; Thrysøe, A. S.; Tigwell, P. A.; Tipton, N.; Tiseanu, I.; Tojo, H.; Tokitani, M.; Tolias, P.; Tomeš, M.; Tonner, P.; Towndrow, M.; Trimble, P.; Tripsky, M.; Tsalas, M.; Tsavalas, P.; Tskhakaya jun, D.; Turner, I.; Turner, M. M.; Turnyanskiy, M.; Tvalashvili, G.; Tyrrell, S. G. J.; Uccello, A.; Ul-Abidin, Z.; Uljanovs, J.; Ulyatt, D.; Urano, H.; Uytdenhouwen, I.; Vadgama, A. P.; Valcarcel, D.; Valentinuzzi, M.; Valisa, M.; Vallejos Olivares, P.; Valovic, M.; Van De Mortel, M.; Van Eester, D.; Van Renterghem, W.; van Rooij, G. J.; Varje, J.; Varoutis, S.; Vartanian, S.; Vasava, K.; Vasilopoulou, T.; Vega, J.; Verdoolaege, G.; Verhoeven, R.; Verona, C.; Verona Rinati, G.; Veshchev, E.; Vianello, N.; Vicente, J.; Viezzer, E.; Villari, S.; Villone, F.; Vincenzi, P.; Vinyar, I.; Viola, B.; Vitins, A.; Vizvary, Z.; Vlad, M.; Voitsekhovitch, I.; Vondráček, P.; Vora, N.; Vu, T.; Pires de Sa, W. W.; Wakeling, B.; Waldon, C. W. F.; Walkden, N.; Walker, M.; Walker, R.; Walsh, M.; Wang, E.; Wang, N.; Warder, S.; Warren, R. J.; Waterhouse, J.; Watkins, N. W.; Watts, C.; Wauters, T.; Weckmann, A.; Weiland, J.; Weisen, H.; Weiszflog, M.; Wellstood, C.; West, A. T.; Wheatley, M. R.; Whetham, S.; Whitehead, A. M.; Whitehead, B. D.; Widdowson, A. M.; Wiesen, S.; Wilkinson, J.; Williams, J.; Williams, M.; Wilson, A. R.; Wilson, D. J.; Wilson, H. R.; Wilson, J.; Wischmeier, M.; Withenshaw, G.; Withycombe, A.; Witts, D. M.; Wood, D.; Wood, R.; Woodley, C.; Wray, S.; Wright, J.; Wright, J. C.; Wu, J.; Wukitch, S.; Wynn, A.; Xu, T.; Yadikin, D.; Yanling, W.; Yao, L.; Yavorskij, V.; Yoo, M. G.; Young, C.; Young, D.; Young, I. D.; Young, R.; Zacks, J.; Zagorski, R.; Zaitsev, F. S.; Zanino, R.; Zarins, A.; Zastrow, K. D.; Zerbini, M.; Zhang, W.; Zhou, Y.; Zilli, E.; Zoita, V.; Zoletnik, S.; Zychor, I.; JET Contributors

    2017-10-01

    The 2014-2016 JET results are reviewed in the light of their significance for optimising the ITER research plan for the active and non-active operation. More than 60 h of plasma operation with ITER first wall materials successfully took place since its installation in 2011. New multi-machine scaling of the type I-ELM divertor energy flux density to ITER is supported by first principle modelling. ITER relevant disruption experiments and first principle modelling are reported with a set of three disruption mitigation valves mimicking the ITER setup. Insights of the L-H power threshold in Deuterium and Hydrogen are given, stressing the importance of the magnetic configurations and the recent measurements of fine-scale structures in the edge radial electric. Dimensionless scans of the core and pedestal confinement provide new information to elucidate the importance of the first wall material on the fusion performance. H-mode plasmas at ITER triangularity (H  =  1 at β N ~ 1.8 and n/n GW ~ 0.6) have been sustained at 2 MA during 5 s. The ITER neutronics codes have been validated on high performance experiments. Prospects for the coming D-T campaign and 14 MeV neutron calibration strategy are reviewed.

  4. A rapid non-iterative proper orthogonal decomposition based outlier detection and correction for PIV data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higham, J. E.; Brevis, W.; Keylock, C. J.

    2016-12-01

    The present work proposes a novel method of detection and estimation of outliers in particle image velocimetry measurements by the modification of the temporal coefficients associated with a proper orthogonal decomposition of an experimental time series. Using synthetic outliers applied to two sequences of vector fields, the method is benchmarked against state-of-the-art approaches recently proposed to remove the influence of outliers. Compared with these methods, the proposed approach offers an increase in accuracy and robustness for the detection of outliers and comparable accuracy for their estimation.

  5. FRANCHFRI: the Finite-RANge Constrained Hartree-Fock Rapid Iterator

    SciTech Connect

    Younes, W; Gogny, D

    2007-01-22

    The Hartree-Fock code FRANCHFRI, which uses a finite-range nucleon-nucleon interaction, has been written and benchmarked. This code represents a new LLNL capability for realistic calculations in both nuclear-structure and nuclear-reaction physics. The use of a finite-range interaction represents a considerable improvement over other Hartree-Fock codes currently available in the public domain, which rely on zero-range forces. The finite-range force does not simply lead to a more realistic treatment of the nuclear problem, it avoids serious mathematical pathologies inherent to zero-range interactions. This brief and non-technical report introduces the code, its design philosophy, various benchmarks used to test its accuracy, and places it within its proper physics context. The current limitations and planned extensions of the code are also discussed.

  6. Rapid and Iterative Estimation of Predictions of High School Graduation and Other Milestones

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Kristin E.; Balu, Rekha; Gunton, Brad; Pestronk, Jefferson; Cohen, Allison

    2016-01-01

    With the advent of data systems that allow for frequent or even real-time student data updates, and recognition that high school students often can move from being on-track to graduation to off-track in a matter of weeks, indicator analysis alone may not provide a complete picture to guide school leaders' actions. The authors of this paper suggest…

  7. Iterative schemes for nonsymmetric and indefinite elliptic boundary value problems

    SciTech Connect

    Bramble, J.H.; Leyk, Z.; Pasciak, J.E.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is twofold. The first is to describe some simple and robust iterative schemes for nonsymmetric and indefinite elliptic boundary value problems. The schemes are based in the Sobolev space H ([Omega]) and require minimal hypotheses. The second is to develop algorithms utilizing a coarse-grid approximation. This leads to iteration matrices whose eigenvalues lie in the right half of the complex plane. In fact, for symmetric indefinite problems, the iteration is reduced to a well-conditioned symmetric positive definite system which can be solved by conjugate gradient interation. Applications of the general theory as well as numerical examples are given. 20 refs., 8 tabs.

  8. Iterative method for elliptic problems on regions partitioned into substructures

    SciTech Connect

    Bramble, J.H.; Pasciak, J.E.; Schatz, A.H.

    1986-04-01

    Some new preconditioners for discretizations of elliptic boundary problems are studied. With these preconditioners, the domain under consideration is broken into subdomains and preconditioners are defined which only require the solution of matrix problems on the subdomains. Analytic estimates are given which guarantee that under appropriate hypotheses, the preconditioned iterative procedure converges to the solution of the discrete equations with a rate per iteration that is independent of the number of unknowns. Numerical examples are presented which illustrate the theoretically predicted iterative convergence rates.

  9. Qualification tests and facilities for the ITER superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruzzone, P.; Wesche, R.; Stepanov, B.; Cau, F.; Bagnasco, M.; Calvi, M.; Herzog, R.; Vogel, M.

    2009-06-01

    All the ITER superconductors are tested as short length samples in the SULTAN test facility at CRPP. Twenty-four TF conductor samples with small layout variations were tested since February 2007 with the aim of verifying the design and qualification of the manufacturers. The sample assembly and the measurement techniques at CRPP are discussed. Starting in 2010, another test facility for ITER conductors, named EDIPO, will be operating at CRPP to share with SULTAN the load of the samples for the acceptance tests during the construction of ITER.

  10. An iterative decoupling solution method for large scale Lyapunov equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Athay, T. M.; Sandell, N. R., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    A great deal of attention has been given to the numerical solution of the Lyapunov equation. A useful classification of the variety of solution techniques are the groupings of direct, transformation, and iterative methods. The paper summarizes those methods that are at least partly favorable numerically, giving special attention to two criteria: exploitation of a general sparse system matrix structure and efficiency in resolving the governing linear matrix equation for different matrices. An iterative decoupling solution method is proposed as a promising approach for solving large-scale Lyapunov equation when the system matrix exhibits a general sparse structure. A Fortran computer program that realizes the iterative decoupling algorithm is also discussed.

  11. Conference on iterative methods for large linear systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kincaid, D.R.

    1988-12-01

    This conference is dedicated to providing an overview of the state of the art in the use of iterative methods for solving sparse linear systems with an eye to contributions of the past, present and future. The emphasis is on identifying current and future research directions in the mainstream of modern scientific computing. Recently, the use of iterative methods for solving linear systems has experienced a resurgence of activity as scientists attach extremely complicated three-dimensional problems using vector and parallel supercomputers. Many research advances in the development of iterative methods for high-speed computers over the past forty years are reviewed, as well as focusing on current research.

  12. SUMMARY REPORT-FY2006 ITER WORK ACCOMPLISHED

    SciTech Connect

    Martovetsky, N N

    2006-04-11

    Six parties (EU, Japan, Russia, US, Korea, China) will build ITER. The US proposed to deliver at least 4 out of 7 modules of the Central Solenoid. Phillip Michael (MIT) and I were tasked by DoE to assist ITER in development of the ITER CS and other magnet systems. We work to help Magnets and Structure division headed by Neil Mitchell. During this visit I worked on the selected items of the CS design and carried out other small tasks, like PF temperature margin assessment.

  13. An iterative solver for the 3D Helmholtz equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belonosov, Mikhail; Dmitriev, Maxim; Kostin, Victor; Neklyudov, Dmitry; Tcheverda, Vladimir

    2017-09-01

    We develop a frequency-domain iterative solver for numerical simulation of acoustic waves in 3D heterogeneous media. It is based on the application of a unique preconditioner to the Helmholtz equation that ensures convergence for Krylov subspace iteration methods. Effective inversion of the preconditioner involves the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) and numerical solution of a series of boundary value problems for ordinary differential equations. Matrix-by-vector multiplication for iterative inversion of the preconditioned matrix involves inversion of the preconditioner and pointwise multiplication of grid functions. Our solver has been verified by benchmarking against exact solutions and a time-domain solver.

  14. RF-driven advanced modes of ITER operation

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, J.; Artaud, J. F.; Basiuk, V.; Decker, J.; Giruzzi, G.; Hawkes, N.; Imbeaux, F.; Litaudon, X.; Mailloux, J.; Peysson, Y.; Schneider, M.; Brix, M.

    2009-11-26

    The impact of the Radio Frequency heating and current drive systems on the ITER advanced scenarios is analyzed by means of the CRONOS suite of codes for integrated tokamak modelling. As a first step, the code is applied to analyze a high power advanced scenario discharge of JET in order to validate both the heating and current drive modules and the overall simulation procedure. Then, ITER advanced scenarios, based on Radio Frequency systems, are studied on the basis of previous results. These simulations show that both hybrid and steady-state scenarios could be possible within the ITER specifications, using RF heating and current drive only.

  15. Noise propagation in iterative reconstruction algorithms with line searches

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, Jinyi

    2003-11-15

    In this paper we analyze the propagation of noise in iterative image reconstruction algorithms. We derive theoretical expressions for the general form of preconditioned gradient algorithms with line searches. The results are applicable to a wide range of iterative reconstruction problems, such as emission tomography, transmission tomography, and image restoration. A unique contribution of this paper comparing to our previous work [1] is that the line search is explicitly modeled and we do not use the approximation that the gradient of the objective function is zero. As a result, the error in the estimate of noise at early iterations is significantly reduced.

  16. Iterative cross section sequence graph for handwritten character segmentation.

    PubMed

    Dawoud, Amer

    2007-08-01

    The iterative cross section sequence graph (ICSSG) is an algorithm for handwritten character segmentation. It expands the cross section sequence graph concept by applying it iteratively at equally spaced thresholds. The iterative thresholding reduces the effect of information loss associated with image binarization. ICSSG preserves the characters' skeletal structure by preventing the interference of pixels that causes flooding of adjacent characters' segments. Improving the structural quality of the characters' skeleton facilitates better feature extraction and classification, which improves the overall performance of optical character recognition (OCR). Experimental results showed significant improvements in OCR recognition rates compared to other well-established segmentation algorithms.

  17. Stokes-Doppler coherence imaging for ITER boundary tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, J.; Kocan, M.; Lisgo, S.; Reichle, R.

    2016-11-01

    An optical coherence imaging system is presently being designed for impurity transport studies and other applications on ITER. The wide variation in magnetic field strength and pitch angle (assumed known) across the field of view generates additional Zeeman-polarization-weighting information that can improve the reliability of tomographic reconstructions. Because background reflected light will be somewhat depolarized analysis of only the polarized fraction may be enough to provide a level of background suppression. We present the principles behind these ideas and some simulations that demonstrate how the approach might work on ITER. The views and opinions expressed herein do not necessarily reflect those of the ITER Organization.

  18. Fourier mode analysis of source iteration in spatially periodic media

    SciTech Connect

    Zika, M.R.; Larsen, E.W.

    1998-12-31

    The standard Fourier mode analysis is an indispensable tool when designing acceleration techniques for transport iterations; however, it requires the assumption of a homogeneous infinite medium. For problems of practical interest, material heterogeneities may significantly impact iterative performance. Recent work has applied a Fourier analysis to the discretized two-dimensional transport operator with heterogeneous material properties. The results of these analyses may be difficult to interpret because the heterogeneity effects are inherently coupled to the discretization effects. Here, the authors describe a Fourier analysis of source iteration (SI) that allows the calculation of the eigenvalue spectrum for the one-dimensional continuous transport operator with spatially periodic heterogeneous media.

  19. RF-driven advanced modes of ITER operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, J.; Artaud, J. F.; Basiuk, V.; Brix, M.; Decker, J.; Giruzzi, G.; Hawkes, N.; Imbeaux, F.; Litaudon, X.; Mailloux, J.; Peysson, Y.; Schneider, M.

    2009-11-01

    The impact of the Radio Frequency heating and current drive systems on the ITER advanced scenarios is analyzed by means of the CRONOS suite of codes for integrated tokamak modelling. As a first step, the code is applied to analyze a high power advanced scenario discharge of JET in order to validate both the heating and current drive modules and the overall simulation procedure. Then, ITER advanced scenarios, based on Radio Frequency systems, are studied on the basis of previous results. These simulations show that both hybrid and steady-state scenarios could be possible within the ITER specifications, using RF heating and current drive only.

  20. Integrated Modelling of Iter Hybrid Scenarios with Eccd

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giruzzi, G.; Artaud, J. F.; Basiuk, V.; Garcia, J.; Imbeaux, F.; Schneider, M.

    2009-04-01

    ITER hybrid scenarios may require off-axis current drive in order to keep the safety factor above 1. In this type of applications, alignment of the current sources and self-consistency of current and temperature profiles are critical issues, which can only be addressed by integrated modelling. To this end, the CRONOS suite of codes has been applied to the simulation of these scenarios. Results of simulations of ITER hybrid scenarios assisted by ECCD, using the ITER equatorial launcher, for both co- and counter-ECCD, are presented.