Science.gov

Sample records for rapid kinetic investigation

  1. Experimental investigation and kinetic-theory-based model of a rapid granular shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wildman, R. D.; Martin, T. W.; Huntley, J. M.; Jenkins, J. T.; Viswanathan, H.; Fen, X.; Parker, D. J.

    An experimental investigation of an idealized rapidly sheared granular flow was performed to test the predictions of a model based on the kinetic theory of dry granular media. Glass ballotini beads were placed in an annular shear cell and the lower boundary rotated to induce a shearing motion in the bed. A single particle was tracked using the positron emission particle tracking (PEPT) technique, a method that determines the location of a particle through the triangulation of gamma photons emitted by a radioactive tracer particle. The packing fraction and velocity fields within the three-dimensional flow were measured and compared to the predictions of a model developed using the conservation and balance equations applicable to dissipative systems, and solved incorporating constitutive relations derived from kinetic theory. The comparison showed that kinetic theory is able to capture the general features of a rapid shear flow reasonably well over a wide range of shear rates and confining pressures.

  2. Kinetics of rapid covalent bond formation of aniline with humic acid: ESR investigations with nitroxide spin labels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glinka, Kevin; Matthies, Michael; Theiling, Marius; Hideg, Kalman; Steinhoff, Heinz-Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    Sulfonamide antibiotics used in livestock farming are distributed to farmland by application of slurry as fertilizer. Previous work suggests rapid covalent binding of the aniline moiety to humic acids found in soil. In the current work, kinetics of this binding were measured in X-band EPR spectroscopy by incubating Leonardite humic acid (LHA) with a paramagnetic aniline spin label (anilino-NO (2,5,5-Trimethyl-2-(3-aminophenyl)pyrrolidin-1-oxyl)). Binding was detected by a pronounced broadening of the spectral lines after incubation of LHA with anilino-NO. The time evolution of the amplitude of this feature was used for determining the reaction kinetics. Single- and double-exponential models were fitted to the data obtained for modelling one or two first-order reactions. Reaction rates of 0.16 min-1 and 0.012 min-1, were found respectively. Addition of laccase peroxidase did not change the kinetics but significantly enhanced the reacting fraction of anilino-NO. This EPR-based method provides a technically simple and effective method for following rapid binding processes of a xenobiotic substance to humic acids.

  3. Rapid-Equilibrium Enzyme Kinetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberty, Robert A.

    2008-01-01

    Rapid-equilibrium rate equations for enzyme-catalyzed reactions are especially useful because if experimental data can be fit by these simpler rate equations, the Michaelis constants can be interpreted as equilibrium constants. However, for some reactions it is necessary to use the more complicated steady-state rate equations. Thermodynamics is…

  4. Rapid lithography: Photopolymerization characterizations and initiation kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stocker, Michael Paul

    In order to improve upon the resolution of photolithography, a technique that is used to produce features for today's micro and nanodevices, techniques must move beyond e-beam and deep-UV sources. Multiphoton absorption polymerization (MAP) uses near-infrared light for the creation of complex, three-dimensional features on the sub-100 nm scale. The resolution of MAP can be enhanced further using a two-beam technique called resolution augmentation through photo-induced deactivation (RAPID) to the reach feature sizes as small as 40 nm. The mechanism and kinetics of photo-induced deactivation are not well understood. To better understand these processes, studies of different photoinitiators have been performed. We find that some photoinitiators are so efficient at deactivation that they are capable of undergoing self-deactivation by addition of another photon from the excitation source. This phenomenon is manifested in a polymerization trend in which feature size has a proportional velocity (PROVE) dependence, the opposite of the conventional velocity dependence. We also demonstrate that the velocity dependence can also be tuned between PROVE and conventional dependences. Kinetic models have been formulated to account for the observed deactivation. By reconciling experimental data for some sample photoinitiators with the kinetic model through the use of simulations, kinetic rate constants are determined. The self-deactivation efficiency of each photoinitiator was determined. The lifetimes of intermediates in the radical photopolymerization process were also determined. The kinetic rate constants associated with photoinitiators should allow for the customization of photoinitiators for specific applications and make RAPID a more efficient process capable of reaching resolution on the level of 30 nm and below.

  5. Kinetic investigation of wood pyrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Thurner, F.; Mann, U.; Beck, S. R.

    1980-06-01

    The objective of this investigation was to determine the kinetics of the primary reactions of wood pyrolysis. A new experimental method was developed which enabled us to measure the rate of gas, tar, and char production while taking into account the temperature variations during the wood heating up. The experimental method developed did not require any sophisticated instruments. It facilitated the collection of gas, tar and residue (unreacted wood and char) as well as accurate measurement of the temperature inside the wood sample. Expressions relating the kinetic parameters to the measured variables were derived. The pyrolysis kinetics was investigated in the range of 300 to 400/sup 0/C at atmospheric pressure and under nitrogen atmosphere. Reaction temperature and mass fractions of gas, tar, and residue were measured as a function of time. Assuming first-order reactions, the kinetic parameters were determined using differential method. The measured activation energies of wood pyrolysis to gas, tar, and char were 88.6, 112.7, and 106.5 kJ/mole, respectively. These kinetic data were then used to predict the yield of the various pyrolysis products. It was found that the best prediction was obtained when an integral-mean temperature obtained from the temperature-time curve was used as reaction temperature. The pyrolysis products were analyzed to investigate the influence of the pyrolysis conditions on the composition. The gas consisted mainly of carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, oxygen, and C/sub 3//sup +/-compounds. The gas composition depended on reaction time as well as reactor temperature. The tar analysis indicated that the tar consisted of about seven compounds. Its major compound was believed to be levoglucosan. Elemental analysis for the char showed that the carbon content increased with increasing temperature.

  6. An Introductory Level Kinetics Investigation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGarvey, J. E. B.; Knipe, A. C.

    1980-01-01

    Provides a list of the reactions commonly used for introductory kinetics studies. These reactions illustrate the kinetics concepts of rate law, rate constant, and reaction order. Describes a kinetic study of the hydrolysis of 3-bromo-3-phenylpropanoic acid which offers many educational advantages. (CS)

  7. Portable centrifugal analyzer for the determination of rapid reaction kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Bostick, W.D.; Bauer, M.L.; McCracken, R.; Mrochek, J.E.

    1980-02-01

    A portable centrifugal analyzer prototype is capable of rapidly initiating reactions and monitoring 17 optical channels as they rotate past a stationary photodetector. An advanced rotor drive permits transfer of discretely loaded sample and reagent into a cuvette within 60 ms. Various rotor designs have been employed to ensure effieicnt mixing concurrent with solution transfer, thus permitting absorbance or luminescence measurements to be made almost immediately after solution contract. Dye-dillution studies have been used to investigate transfer and mixing efficiencies. Rotor designs with parallel access for sample and reagent into the cuvette were found to promote efficient mixing during liquid transfer. The hypochlorite-luminol chemiluminescent reaction served to demonstrate the utility of the system for performing rapid kinetic analyses. Appropriate adjustment of reaction conditions allows first-order reaction half-lives as short as 0.04 s to be measured. 13 figures, 3 tables.

  8. Rapid biocatalytic polytransesterification: Reaction kinetics in an exothermic reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Chaudhary, A.K.; Beckman, E.J.; Russell, A.J.

    1998-08-20

    Biocatalytic polytransesterification at high concentrations of monomers proceeds rapidly and is accompanied by an increase in the temperature of the reaction mixture due to liberation of heat of reaction during the initial phase. The authors have used principles of reaction calorimetry to monitor the kinetics of polymerization during this initial phase, thus relating the temperature to the extent of polymerization. Rate of polymerization increases with the concentration of monomers. This is also reflected by the increase in the temperature of the reaction mixture. Using time-temperature-conversion contours, a differential method of kinetic analysis was used to calculate the energy of activation ({approximately} 15.1 Kcal/mol).

  9. Determination of rapid chlorination rate constants by a stopped-flow spectrophotometric competition kinetics method.

    PubMed

    Song, Dean; Liu, Huijuan; Qiang, Zhimin; Qu, Jiuhui

    2014-05-15

    Free chlorine is extensively used for water and wastewater disinfection nowadays. However, it still remains a big challenge to determine the rate constants of rapid chlorination reactions although competition kinetics and stopped-flow spectrophotometric (SFS) methods have been employed individually to investigate fast reaction kinetics. In this work, we proposed an SFS competition kinetics method to determine the rapid chlorination rate constants by using a common colorimetric reagent, N,N-diethyl-p-phenylenediamine (DPD), as a reference probe. A kinetic equation was first derived to estimate the reaction rate constant of DPD towards chlorine under a given pH and temperature condition. Then, on that basis, an SFS competition kinetics method was proposed to determine directly the chlorination rate constants of several representative compounds including tetracycline, ammonia, and four α-amino acids. Although Cl2O is more reactive than HOCl, its contribution to the overall chlorination kinetics of the test compounds could be neglected in this study. Finally, the developed method was validated through comparing the experimentally measured chlorination rate constants of the selected compounds with those obtained or calculated from literature and analyzing with Taft's correlation as well. This study demonstrates that the SFS competition kinetics method can measure the chlorination rate constants of a test compound rapidly and accurately.

  10. Biochemical thermodynamics and rapid-equilibrium enzyme kinetics.

    PubMed

    Alberty, Robert A

    2010-12-30

    Biochemical thermodynamics is based on the chemical thermodynamics of aqueous solutions, but it is quite different because pH is used as an independent variable. A transformed Gibbs energy G' is used, and that leads to transformed enthalpies H' and transformed entropies S'. Equilibrium constants for enzyme-catalyzed reactions are referred to as apparent equilibrium constants K' to indicate that they are functions of pH in addition to temperature and ionic strength. Despite this, the most useful way to store basic thermodynamic data on enzyme-catalyzed reactions is to give standard Gibbs energies of formation, standard enthalpies of formation, electric charges, and numbers of hydrogen atoms in species of biochemical reactants like ATP. This makes it possible to calculate standard transformed Gibbs energies of formation, standard transformed enthalpies of formation of reactants (sums of species), and apparent equilibrium constants at desired temperatures, pHs, and ionic strengths. These calculations are complicated, and therefore, a mathematical application in a computer is needed. Rapid-equilibrium enzyme kinetics is based on biochemical thermodynamics because all reactions in the mechanism prior to the rate-determining reaction are at equilibrium. The expression for the equilibrium concentration of the enzyme-substrate complex that yields products can be derived by applying Solve in a computer to the expressions for the equilibrium constants in the mechanism and the conservation equation for enzymatic sites. In 1979, Duggleby pointed out that the minimum number of velocities of enzyme-catalyzed reactions required to estimate the values of the kinetic parameters is equal to the number of kinetic parameters. Solve can be used to do this with steady-state rate equations as well as rapid-equilibrium rate equations, provided that the rate equation is a polynomial. Rapid-equilibrium rate equations can be derived for complicated mechanisms that involve several reactants

  11. Investigation of the kinetic model equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Sha; Zhong, Chengwen

    2014-03-01

    Currently the Boltzmann equation and its model equations are widely used in numerical predictions for dilute gas flows. The nonlinear integro-differential Boltzmann equation is the fundamental equation in the kinetic theory of dilute monatomic gases. By replacing the nonlinear fivefold collision integral term by a nonlinear relaxation term, its model equations such as the famous Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook (BGK) equation are mathematically simple. Since the computational cost of solving model equations is much less than that of solving the full Boltzmann equation, the model equations are widely used in predicting rarefied flows, multiphase flows, chemical flows, and turbulent flows although their predictions are only qualitatively right for highly nonequilibrium flows in transitional regime. In this paper the differences between the Boltzmann equation and its model equations are investigated aiming at giving guidelines for the further development of kinetic models. By comparing the Boltzmann equation and its model equations using test cases with different nonequilibrium types, two factors (the information held by nonequilibrium moments and the different relaxation rates of high- and low-speed molecules) are found useful for adjusting the behaviors of modeled collision terms in kinetic regime. The usefulness of these two factors are confirmed by a generalized model collision term derived from a mathematical relation between the Boltzmann equation and BGK equation that is also derived in this paper. After the analysis of the difference between the Boltzmann equation and the BGK equation, an attempt at approximating the collision term is proposed.

  12. An experimental investigation of rapid boiling of

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosse, S.; Vaagsaether, K.; Bjerketvedt, D.

    2015-05-01

    Storage of pressurized liquified gases is a growing safety concern in many industries. Knowledge of the thermodynamics and kinetics involved in the rapid depressurization and evaporation of such substances is key to the design and implementation of effective safety measures in storage and transportation situations. In the present study, experiments on the rapid depressurization of liquid are conducted in a vertical transparent shock tube which enables the observation of evaporation waves and other structures. The depressurization was initiated by puncturing a membrane in one end of the tube. The thermodynamic mechanisms that govern the evaporation process are not unique to , and the same principles can be applied to any liquified gas. The experiments were photographed by a high-speed camera. Evaporation waves propagating into the liquid were observed, traveling at a near constant velocity on the order of 20-30 m/s. A contact surface between the vapor and the liquid-vapor mixture was also observed, accelerating out of the tube. Pressure readings in the tube suggest that the evaporation wave could be similar to a spinodal decomposition wave, but further experiments are needed to confirm this. When the membrane was in direct contact with the liquified , some indications of homogeneous nucleation were observed.

  13. A kinetic model of rapidly reversible nonphotochemical quenching

    PubMed Central

    Zaks, Julia; Amarnath, Kapil; Kramer, David M.; Niyogi, Krishna K.; Fleming, Graham R.

    2012-01-01

    Oxygen-evolving photosynthetic organisms possess nonphotochemical quenching (NPQ) pathways that protect against photo-induced damage. The majority of NPQ in plants is regulated on a rapid timescale by changes in the pH of the thylakoid lumen. In order to quantify the rapidly reversible component of NPQ, called qE, we developed a mathematical model of pH-dependent quenching of chlorophyll excitations in Photosystem II. Our expression for qE depends on the protonation of PsbS and the deepoxidation of violaxanthin by violaxanthin deepoxidase. The model is able to simulate the kinetics of qE at low and high light intensities. The simulations suggest that the pH of the lumen, which activates qE, is not itself affected by qE. Our model provides a framework for testing hypothesized qE mechanisms and for assessing the role of qE in improving plant fitness in variable light intensity. PMID:22891305

  14. The nonextensive gas: a kinetic approach [rapid communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, J. A. S.; Silva, R.

    2005-05-01

    We discuss a kinetic nonextensive generalization of the Maxwellian ideal gas. The analysis rests on two basic assumptions: (i) instead of the standard Gaussian form, the q-gas is described by a power-law velocity distribution as suggested in the nonextensive Tsallis' framework (ii) the q-nonextensive generalization of the Boltzmann entropy formula governs the behavior of the q-gas. In this context, we show that the pressure and the internal energy are kinetically modified, but the general equation of state, PV=2U/3, remains valid. The adiabatic index is now a function of the nonextensive parameter, γ=Cp/CV=5/3q. However, the standard expression relating the specific heats (at constant pressure and volume) with the coefficient of expansion and the isothermal compressibility, CP-CV=TVα2/κT, is not modified.

  15. Thermodynamic and kinetic investigation of agomelatine polymorph transformation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qi; Jiang, Linglei; Mei, Xuefeng

    2016-03-01

    Thermodynamic properties of polymorphic forms I and II of Agomelatine were investigated and the bimorphism was determined to be monotropically related. The phase transition kinetics from metastable form I to thermodynamically stable form II was studied and a quantification method was developed based on X-ray powder diffraction technique. Various solid-state kinetic models were examined and the results were fit to the experimental data. The nucleation kinetic models were found to be the best fit to describe the experimental data across the temperature range. The activation energy of the form transformation was calculated in the range of 116-122 kJ mol(-1), irrespective of which kinetic model selected.

  16. Austenite Formation Kinetics During Rapid Heating in a Microalloyed Steel

    SciTech Connect

    BURNETT,M.E.; DYKHUIZEN,RONALD C.; KELLEY,J. BRUCE; PUSKAR,JOSEPH D.; ROBINO,CHARLES V.

    1999-09-07

    The model parameters for the normalized 1054V1 material were compared to parameters previously generated for 1026 steel, and the transformation behavior was relatively consistent. Validation of the model predictions by heating into the austenite plus undissolved ferrite phase field and rapidly quenching resulted in reasonable predictions when compared to the measured volume fractions from optical metallography. The hot rolled 1054V1 material, which had a much coarser grain size and a non-equilibrium volume fraction of pearlite, had significantly different model parameters and the on heating transformation behavior of this material was less predictable with the established model. The differences in behavior is consistent with conventional wisdom that normalized micro-structure produce a more consistent response to processing, and it reinforces the need for additional work in this area.

  17. Kinetic Controls on Formation of Textures in Rapidly Cooled Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lofgren, Gary E.

    2006-01-01

    The crystallization of silicate melts is a complex process involving melts usually produced by partial melting and cooling environments that are rapid in volcanic lavas or so slow as to be auto-metamorphic in plutonic regimes. The volcanic lavas are amenable to laboratory study as are chondrules that comprise the bulk of chondritic meteorites. Dynamic crystallization studies of basalt and chondrule melts have shown that nucleation has a more profound effect on the final texture than the cooling or crystal growth rates. The sequence of crystal shapes grown at increasing degrees of supercooling (DELTA T) or cooling rate demonstrates the effect of increasing growth rate. Equant or euhedral crystals become skeletal, then dendritic and ultimately spherulitic indicating the nucleation temperature and the DELTA T when growth began. Because crystals cannot grow until they nucleate, cooling rate does not always correlate with crystal growth rate and thus crystal shape. Silicate melts cooled at the same rate can have drastically different textures depending on the temperature of nucleation. A dynamic crystallization study of basaltic rocks shows that basaltic lavas must erupt with sufficient crystals present in the melt to act as nuclei and foster growth. With nuclei present, growth will begin when the temperature drops below the liquidus temperature and typical basaltic textures such as intersertal, intergranular or subophitic will form. If nuclei are not present, crystallization will not begin immediately and the DELTA T will increase until embryos in the melts become nuclei. The DELTA T present when grow begins dictates the growth rate and the crystal shapes and thus the rock texture. If nucleation is delayed, growth will take place at high DELTA T and the crystals will favor skeletal or dendritic shapes. Chondrules are usually considered crystallized melt droplets and clearly some are, but most are not. Most chondrules have porphyritic textures that cannot develop from

  18. Kinetic evidence for rapid oxidation of (-)-epicatechin by human myeloperoxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Spalteholz, Holger; Furtmueller, Paul Georg; Jakopitsch, Christa; Obinger, Christian; Schewe, Tankred; Sies, Helmut; Arnhold, Juergen

    2008-07-11

    Apocynin has been reported to require dimerization by myeloperoxidase (MPO) to inhibit leukocyte NADPH oxidase. (-)-Epicatechin, a dietary flavan-3-ol, has been identified as a 'prodrug' of apocynin-like metabolites that inhibit endothelial NADPH oxidase activity and elevate the cellular level of nitric oxide. Since (-)-epicatechin has tentatively been identified as substrate of MPO, we studied the one-electron oxidation of (-)-epicatechin by MPO. By using multi-mixing stopped-flow technique, we demonstrate that (-)-epicatechin is one of the most efficient electron donors for heme peroxidases investigated so far. Second order rate constants for the (-)-epicatechin-mediated conversion of MPO-compound I to compound II and compound II to resting enzyme were estimated to be 1.9 x 10{sup 7} and 4.5 x 10{sup 6} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}, respectively (pH 7, 25 deg. C). The data indicate that (-)-epicatechin is capable of undergoing fast MPO-mediated one-electron oxidation.

  19. Flow-Based Systems for Rapid and High-Precision Enzyme Kinetics Studies

    PubMed Central

    Hartwell, Supaporn Kradtap; Grudpan, Kate

    2012-01-01

    Enzyme kinetics studies normally focus on the initial rate of enzymatic reaction. However, the manual operation of steps of the conventional enzyme kinetics method has some drawbacks. Errors can result from the imprecise time control and time necessary for manual changing the reaction cuvettes into and out of the detector. By using the automatic flow-based analytical systems, enzyme kinetics studies can be carried out at real-time initial rate avoiding the potential errors inherent in manual operation. Flow-based systems have been developed to provide rapid, low-volume, and high-precision analyses that effectively replace the many tedious and high volume requirements of conventional wet chemistry analyses. This article presents various arrangements of flow-based techniques and their potential use in future enzyme kinetics applications. PMID:22577614

  20. H-Atom Reaction Kinetics in Solid Parahydrogen Followed by Rapid Scan FTIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, David T.

    2014-06-01

    Reactions of migrating H-atoms in parahydrogen (pH2) matrices with trapped molecular species provide a relatively unexplored yet well-established experimental method to study the kinetics and mechanisms of atom tunneling reactions in the 1.5 to 5 K temperature range. My group has now completed a series of experimental studies on the kinetics of reactions of H-atoms with HCOOH, CH3OH, and N2O which all show a pronounced inverse temperature dependence over this small temperature range. Conversely, the analogous H-atom reaction with NO displays a more standard Arrhenius behavior. In this talk, I will present a brief summary of these results with the objective of developing a predictive understanding of the kinetics of these H-atom tunneling reactions. I will also emphasize the advantages of following the kinetics using rapid scan FTIR. Fredrick M. Mutunga, Shelby E. Follett, and David T. Anderson, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 151104 (2013).

  1. Construction of an antimyoglobin single-chain variable fragment with rapid reaction kinetics.

    PubMed

    Jang, Jun-Hyuck; Kim, Dong-Hyung; Paek, Se-Hwan; Woo, Eui-Jeon; Kim, Young-Wan

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies with rapid reaction kinetics (high association and dissociation rates), named reversible antibodies, are used to perform continuous monitoring of sensitive disease biomarkers. In cases of acute myocardial infarction (AMI), continuous monitoring and early diagnosis are important. Human myoglobin (Myo) is a useful biomarker for AMI during the early stage after the onset of symptoms. In this study, a single-chain variable fragment (scFv) specific to Myo was derived from an IgG antibody that has rapid reaction kinetics. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay revealed that recombinant scFv exhibited 3.8-fold reduced affinity compared with the parent IgG antibody based on the antibody concentration necessary for 50% of the maximum signal. The scFv retained the rapid reaction kinetic mode with average kon and koff of 2.63 × 10(5) M(-1) Sec(-1) and 3.25 × 10(-3) Sec(-1) , respectively, which were reduced to 10- and 2.3-fold compared with those of the parent antibody. The equilibrium constant for the association of the scFv (KA = 8.09 × 10(7) M(-1) ) was 4.6-fold lower than that of its parent IgG antibody. This scFv may be a starting point for further mutagenesis/kinetic and structural analyses providing valuable insight into the mechanism of reversible antibodies.

  2. Purification and characterization of Fab fragments with rapid reaction kinetics against myoglobin.

    PubMed

    Song, Hyung-Nam; Kim, Dong-Hyung; Park, Sung-Goo; Lee, Myung Kyu; Paek, Se-Hwan; Woo, Eui-Jeon

    2015-01-01

    Myoglobin is an early biomarker for acute myocardial infarction. Recently, we isolated the antibody IgG-Myo2-7ds, which exhibits unique rapid reaction kinetics toward human myoglobin antigen. Antibodies with rapid dissociation kinetics are thought to be premature IgG forms that are produced during the early stage of in vivo immunization. In the present study, we identified the epitope region of the IgG-Myo2-7ds antibody to be the C-terminal region of myoglobin, which corresponds to 144-154 aa. The Fab fragment was directly purified by papain cleavage and protein G affinity chromatography and demonstrated kinetics of an association constant of 4.02 × 10(4) M(-1) s(-1) and a dissociation constant of 2.28 × 10(-2) s(-1), which retained the unique reaction kinetics of intact IgG-Myo2-7ds antibodies. Because a rapid dissociation antibody can be utilized for antibody recycling, the results from this study would provide a platform for the development of antibody engineering in potential diagnostic areas such as a continuous monitoring system for heart disease.

  3. Kinetic investigation and mathematical modeling of methanogenesis of glucose

    SciTech Connect

    Kalyuzhnyy, S.V.; Sklyar, V.I.; Varfolomeyev, S.D.; Gachok, V.P.

    1991-12-31

    The kinetic regularities of anaerobic conversion of glucose, and intermediates of its decomposition (ethanol, butyrate, and acetate) by a microbial methanogenic association from anaerobic digester were investigated. Kinetic scheme for conversion of glucose is suggested, and the mathematical model based on the scheme is evolved. The model includes growth and metabolism of three kinds of microorganisms-acid producents, and acetate- and hydrogen-utilizing methane producents; of cell lysis with consequent fermentation of {open_quotes}died biomass{close_quotes} to acetate, hydrogen, and carbon dioxide; of induction and repression of the enzyme responsible for decomposition of butyrate, and for a number of regulations depending on the concentrations of intermediates in glucose metabolism. The values of parameters of the model have been calculated, sufficiently describing the experimental regularities. The numerical experiments have enabled us to reveal and describe the principal regulating factors of glucose methanogenesis.

  4. Investigation of biokinetics of radioiodine with a population kinetics approach.

    PubMed

    Janzen, T; Giussani, A; Canzi, C; Gerundini, P; Oeh, U; Hoeschen, C

    2010-01-01

    The dosimetric studies required for planning individually tailored radioiodine therapy of benign thyroid pathologies may be too complex and time-demanding for many ordinary nuclear medicine departments. In this work, a preliminary population kinetics approach was applied to a model structure for iodine biokinetics in order to identify those model features that actually need to be individually investigated, in order to simplify the protocol for data collection in patients. Data from 29 patients undergoing radioiodine therapy for the treatment of the autonomous nodule syndrome were used in the analysis. The greatest inter-individual variations were observed in the parameters describing the transformation of iodide into organic iodine in the thyroid and in the kinetics of the organic form.

  5. Refolded scFv Antibody Fragment against Myoglobin Shows Rapid Reaction Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Song, Hyung-Nam; Jang, Jun-Hyuck; Kim, Young-Wan; Kim, Dong-Hyung; Park, Sung-Goo; Lee, Myung Kyu; Paek, Se-Hwan; Woo, Eui-Jeon

    2014-01-01

    Myoglobin is one of the early biomarkers for acute myocardial infarction. Recently, we have screened an antibody with unique rapid reaction kinetics toward human myoglobin antigen. Antibodies with rapid reaction kinetics are thought to be an early IgG form produced during early stage of in vivo immunization. We produced a recombinant scFv fragment for the premature antibody from Escherichia coli using refolding technology. The scFv gene was constructed by connection of the VH–VL sequence with a (Gly4Ser)3 linker. The scFv fragment without the pelB leader sequence was expressed at a high level, but the solubility was extremely low. A high concentration of 8 M urea was used for denaturation. The dilution refolding process in the presence of arginine and the redox reagents GSH and GSSH successfully produced a soluble scFv protein. The resultant refolded scFv protein showed association and dissociation values of 9.32 × 10−4 M−1·s−1 and 6.29 × 10−3 s−1, respectively, with an affinity value exceeding 107 M−1 (kon/koff), maintaining the original rapid reaction kinetics of the premature antibody. The refolded scFv could provide a platform for protein engineering for the clinical application for diagnosis of heart disease and the development of a continuous biosensor. PMID:25530617

  6. Kinetic investigation of indium-palladium alloy electrodeposition

    SciTech Connect

    Vinogradov, S.N.; Perelygin, Yu.P.; Efimov, E.A.

    1988-01-01

    The kinetics of alloy deposition of ammonium-citrate electrolyte used to produce alloys with indium content were studied. The electrolytes were composed of palladium, indium, ammonium sulfate, monosodium citrate, ammonium chloride, and saccharin at pH 9.5. Stationary and rotating disk electrodes and a potentiostat were used for the investigation. Spectrophotometry determined the mixed formation of citrate-ammonia palladium complexes. It was found that the considerable depolarization of indium ion discharge into the alloy occurred when saccharin was present in the electrolyte, and its direct electroreduction occurs from hydroxide compounds.

  7. Kinetic investigation of human 5-lipoxygenase with arachidonic acid.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Monica; Kumar, Ramakrishnan B; Balagunaseelan, Navisraj; Hamberg, Mats; Jegerschöld, Caroline; Rådmark, Olof; Haeggström, Jesper Z; Rinaldo-Matthis, Agnes

    2016-08-01

    Human 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) is responsible for the formation of leukotriene (LT)A4, a pivotal intermediate in the biosynthesis of the leukotrienes, a family of proinflammatory lipid mediators. 5-LOX has thus gained attention as a potential drug target. However, details of the kinetic mechanism of 5-LOX are still obscure. In this Letter, we investigated the kinetic isotope effect (KIE) of 5-LOX with its physiological substrate, arachidonic acid (AA). The observed KIE is 20±4 on kcat and 17±2 on kcat/KM at 25°C indicating a non-classical reaction mechanism. The observed rates show slight temperature dependence at ambient temperatures ranging from 4 to 35°C. Also, we observed low Arrhenius prefactor ratio (AH/AD=0.21) and a small change in activation energy (Ea(D)-Ea(H)=3.6J/mol) which suggests that 5-LOX catalysis involves tunneling as a mechanism of H-transfer. The measured KIE for 5-LOX involves a change in regioselectivity in response to deuteration at position C7, resulting in H-abstraction form C10 and formation of 8-HETE. The viscosity experiments influence the (H)kcat, but not (D)kcat. However the overall kcat/KM is not affected for labeled or unlabeled AA, suggesting that either the product release or conformational rearrangement might be involved in dictating kinetics of 5-LOX at saturating conditions. Investigation of available crystal structures suggests the role of active site residues (F421, Q363 and L368) in regulating the donor-acceptor distances, thus affecting H-transfer as well as regiospecificity. In summary, our study shows that that the H-abstraction is the rate limiting step for 5-LOX and that the observed KIE of 5-LOX is masked by a change in regioselectivity. PMID:27363940

  8. Experimental investigation of kinetics and rheology during diagenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Liou, J.G.; Hacker, B.R.

    1998-09-01

    Two processes of enormous economic consequence occur within the upper to middle crust: the formation, migration, entrapment, and degradation of hydrocarbons, and hazardous seismicity. Substantial scientific evidence suggests that both these processes are influenced by devolatilization reactions during diagenesis. However, surprisingly few laboratory studies have been conducted on materials actively undergoing low-grade metamorphism or diagenesis. Because of this, there exists no suitable basis for understanding the rates at which devolatilization occurs, and what effects this process has on deformation at shallow to moderate depths in the crust. The authors are conducting a coordinated deformation and kinetic study of an important devolatilization reaction: the breakdown of laumontite. Laumontite is a common zeolite whose equilibrium phase relations and room-temperature frictional behavior are well understood. Besides serving as a model system for more complicated rocks, laumontite is an important mineral in its own right, particularly for hydrocarbon fields in sandstones and for fault zones in the crust. Hydrostatic experiments are being conducted to investigate the kinetics and mechanism of laumontite dehydration, and triaxial deformation experiments will enable characterization of the effect of differential stress on the reaction and the effect of synkinematic dehydration on the mechanical behavior of rock. The authors anticipate results of significant import for hydrocarbon exploration and recovery and for understanding the strength and seismic potential of crustal fault zones.

  9. Investigation of kinetic friction using an iPhone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldock, Clive; Johnson, Roger

    2016-11-01

    The iPhone is particularly suitable for mechanics experiments using the in-built acceleration sensor or accelerometer in-conjunction with the on-board data collection facility and a downloadable so-called ‘app’. In this work the iPhone has been used to investigate the acceleration due to gravity and determine the coefficient of kinetic friction, μ k of the iPhone as an object sliding down an inclined plane. This method is more accurate than that usually employed in the laboratory where the ‘fits and starts’ of the block sliding down the inclined plane potentially invalidate the required assumption that the velocity is constant. In its simplest form the measurement of acceleration is required to be undertaken for only 2 angles.

  10. Kinetic investigation of erucamide synthesis using fatty acid and urea.

    PubMed

    Awasthi, Neeraj Praphulla; Upadhayay, Santosh K; Singh, R P

    2008-01-01

    Fatty acid amides like erucamide are mainly used for lubrication and as slip agent to decrease friction in polymer and plastic industry. Erucamide is normally synthesized by ammonolysis of triglycerides or fatty acids at 200 degrees C and at high pressure (345-690 kPa.). However using urea in place of ammonia the economic synthesis of erucamide is possible at atmospheric pressure at approx 190 degrees C. In present investigation, the kinetics of synthesis of erucamide by ammonolysis of erucic acid has been investigated. The optimum conditions for the synthesis of erucamide have also been determined. 1:4 molar ratio of erucic acid to urea, 190 degrees C temperature and catalyst [P2O5 with (NH4)2H PO4, {(1:1) w/w }] concentration 3% (by wt. of erucic acid) were the optimum condition for synthesis of erucamide from erucic acid and can obtain a maximum yield of 92% of pure erucamide. Some other catalysts as titanium-iso -propoxide, phosphorus pent oxide were also tried but these catalysts were not economical. PMID:18685229

  11. A Tracer Bolus Method for Investigating Glutamine Kinetics in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Maiko; Smedberg, Marie; Klaude, Maria; Tjäder, Inga; Norberg, Åke; Rooyackers, Olav; Wernerman, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Glutamine transport between tissues is important for the outcome of critically ill patients. Investigation of glutamine kinetics is, therefore, necessary to understand glutamine metabolism in these patients in order to improve future intervention studies. Endogenous glutamine production can be measured by continuous infusion of a glutamine tracer, which necessitates a minimum measurement time period. In order to reduce this problem, we used and validated a tracer bolus injection method. Furthermore, this method was used to measure the glutamine production in healthy volunteers in the post-absorptive state, with extra alanine and with glutamine supplementation and parenteral nutrition. Healthy volunteers received a bolus injection of [1-13C] glutamine, and blood was collected from the radial artery to measure tracer enrichment over 90 minutes. Endogenous rate of appearance (endoRa) of glutamine was calculated from the enrichment decay curve and corrected for the extra glutamine supplementation. The glutamine endoRa of healthy volunteers was 6.1±0.9 µmol/kg/min in the post-absorptive state, 6.9±1.0 µmol/kg/min with extra alanyl-glutamine (p = 0.29 versus control), 6.1±0.4 µmol/kg/min with extra alanine only (p = 0.32 versus control), and 7.5±0.9 µmol/kg/min with extra alanyl-glutamine and parenteral nutrition (p = 0.049 versus control). In conclusion, a tracer bolus injection method to measure glutamine endoRa showed good reproducibility and small variation at baseline as well as during parenteral nutrition. Additionally, we showed that parenteral nutrition including alanyl-glutamine increased glutamine endoRa in healthy volunteers, which was not attributable to the alanine part of the dipeptide. PMID:24810895

  12. Arsenate Adsorption On Ruthenium Oxides: A Spectroscopic And Kinetic Investigation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenate adsorption on amorphous (RuO2•1.1H2O) and crystalline (RuO2) ruthenium oxides was evaluated using spectroscopic and kinetic methods to elucidate the adsorption mechanism. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) was ...

  13. Rapid kinetics of liver microsomal glucose-6-phosphatase. Evidence for tight-coupling between glucose-6-phosphate transport and phosphohydrolase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Berteloot, A.; Vidal, H.; van de Werve, G. )

    1991-03-25

    Rapid kinetics of both glucose-6-P uptake and hydrolysis in fasted rat liver microsomes were investigated with a recently developed fast-sampling, rapid-filtration apparatus. Experiments were confronted with both the substrate transport and conformational models currently proposed for the glucose-6-phosphatase system. Accumulation in microsomes of 14C products from (U-14C)glucose-6-P followed biexponential kinetics. From the inside to outside product concentrations, it could be inferred that mostly glucose should accumulate inside the vesicles. While biexponential kinetics are compatible with the mathematical predictions of a simplified substrate transport model, the latter fails in explaining the burst in total glucose production over a similar time scale to that used for the uptake measurements. Since the initial rate of the burst phase in untreated microsomes exactly matched the steady-state rate of glucose production in detergent-treated vesicles, it can be definitely concluded that the substrate transport model does not describe adequately our results. While the conformational model accounts for both the burst of glucose production and the kinetics of glucose accumulation into the vesicles, it cannot explain the burst in 32Pi production from (32P)glucose-6-P measured under the same conditions. Since the amplitude of the observed bursts is not compatible with a presteady state in enzyme activity, we propose that a hysteretic transition best explains our results in both untreated and permeabilized microsomes, thus providing a new rationale to understand the molecular mechanism of the glucose-6-phosphatase system.

  14. Detailed Chemical Kinetic Reaction Mechanisms for Autoignition of Isomers of Heptane Under Rapid Compression

    SciTech Connect

    Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Boercker, J E; Curran, H J; Griffiths, J F; Mohamed, C; Ribaucour, M

    2001-12-17

    Detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanisms are developed for combustion of all nine isomers of heptane (C{sub 7}H{sub 16}), and these mechanisms are tested by simulating autoignition of each isomer under rapid compression machine conditions. The reaction mechanisms focus on the manner in which the molecular structure of each isomer determines the rates and product distributions of possible classes of reactions. The reaction pathways emphasize the importance of alkylperoxy radical isomerizations and addition reactions of molecular oxygen to alkyl and hydroperoxyalkyl radicals. A new reaction group has been added to past models, in which hydroperoxyalkyl radicals that originated with abstraction of an H atom from a tertiary site in the parent heptane molecule are assigned new reaction sequences involving additional internal H atom abstractions not previously allowed. This process accelerates autoignition in fuels with tertiary C-H bonds in the parent fuel. In addition, the rates of hydroperoxyalkylperoxy radical isomerization reactions have all been reduced so that they are now equal to rates of analogous alkylperoxy radical isomerizations, significantly improving agreement between computed and experimental ignition delay times in the rapid compression machine. Computed ignition delay times agree well with experimental results in the few cases where experiments have been carried out for specific heptane isomers, and predictive model calculations are reported for the remaining isomers. The computed results fall into three general groups; the first consists of the most reactive isomers, including n-heptane, 2-methyl hexane and 3-methyl hexane. The second group consists of the least reactive isomers, including 2,2-dimethyl pentane, 3,3-dimethyl pentane, 2,3-dimethyl pentane, 2,4-dimethyl pentane and 2,2,3-trimethyl butane. The remaining isomer, 3-ethyl pentane, was observed computationally to have an intermediate level of reactivity. These observations are generally

  15. Rapid kinetics of dehalogenation promoted by iodotyrosine deiodinase from human thyroid.

    PubMed

    Bobyk, Kostyantyn D; Ballou, David P; Rokita, Steven E

    2015-07-28

    Reductive dehalogenation such as that catalyzed by iodotyrosine deiodinase (IYD) is highly unusual in aerobic organisms but necessary for iodide salvage from iodotyrosine generated during thyroxine biosynthesis. Equally unusual is the dependence of this process on flavin. Rapid kinetics have now been used to define the basic processes involved in IYD catalysis. Time-dependent quenching of flavin fluorescence was used to monitor halotyrosine association to IYD. The substrates chloro-, bromo-, and iodotyrosine bound with similar rate constants (kon) ranging from 1.3 × 10(6) to 1.9 × 10(6) M(-1) s(-1). Only the inert substrate analogue fluorotyrosine exhibited a significantly (5-fold) slower kon (0.3 × 10(6) M(-1) s(-1)). All data fit a standard two-state model and indicated that no intermediate complex accumulated during closure of the active site lid induced by substrate. Subsequent halide elimination does not appear to limit reactions of bromo- and iodotyrosine since both fully oxidized the reduced enzyme with nearly equivalent second-order rate constants (7.3 × 10(3) and 8.6 × 10(3) M(-1) s(-1), respectively) despite the differing strength of their carbon-halogen bonds. In contrast to these substrates, chlorotyrosine reacted with the reduced enzyme approximately 20-fold more slowly and revealed a spectral intermediate that formed at approximately the same rate as the bromo- and iodotyrosine reactions. PMID:26151430

  16. Rapid Kinetics of Dehalogenation Promoted by Iodotyrosine Deiodinase from Human Thyroid

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Reductive dehalogenation such as that catalyzed by iodotyrosine deiodinase (IYD) is highly unusual in aerobic organisms but necessary for iodide salvage from iodotyrosine generated during thyroxine biosynthesis. Equally unusual is the dependence of this process on flavin. Rapid kinetics have now been used to define the basic processes involved in IYD catalysis. Time-dependent quenching of flavin fluorescence was used to monitor halotyrosine association to IYD. The substrates chloro-, bromo-, and iodotyrosine bound with similar rate constants (kon) ranging from 1.3 × 106 to 1.9 × 106 M–1 s–1. Only the inert substrate analogue fluorotyrosine exhibited a significantly (5-fold) slower kon (0.3 × 106 M–1 s–1). All data fit a standard two-state model and indicated that no intermediate complex accumulated during closure of the active site lid induced by substrate. Subsequent halide elimination does not appear to limit reactions of bromo- and iodotyrosine since both fully oxidized the reduced enzyme with nearly equivalent second-order rate constants (7.3 × 103 and 8.6 × 103 M–1 s–1, respectively) despite the differing strength of their carbon–halogen bonds. In contrast to these substrates, chlorotyrosine reacted with the reduced enzyme approximately 20-fold more slowly and revealed a spectral intermediate that formed at approximately the same rate as the bromo- and iodotyrosine reactions. PMID:26151430

  17. Analyzing complicated protein folding kinetics rapidly by analytical Laplace inversion using a Tikhonov regularization variant.

    PubMed

    Mulligan, Vikram Khipple; Hadley, Kevin Charles; Chakrabartty, Avijit

    2012-02-01

    Kinetic experiments provide much information about protein folding mechanisms. Time-resolved signals are often best described by expressions with many exponential terms, but this hinders the extraction of rate constants by nonlinear least squares (NLS) fitting. Numerical inverse Laplace transformation, which converts a time-resolved dataset into a spectrum of amplitudes as a function of rate constant, allows easy estimation of the rate constants, amplitudes, and number of processes underlying the data. Here, we present a Tikhonov regularization-based method that converts a dataset into a rate spectrum, subject to regularization constraints, without requiring an iterative search of parameter space. This allows more rapid generation of rate spectra as well as analysis of datasets too noisy to process by existing iterative search algorithms. This method's simplicity also permits highly objective, largely automatic analysis with minimal human guidance. We show that this regularization method reproduces results previously obtained by NLS fitting and that it is effective for analyzing datasets too complex for traditional fitting methods. This method's reliability and speed, as well as its potential for objective, model-free analysis, make it extremely useful as a first step in analysis of complicated noisy datasets and an excellent guide for subsequent NLS analysis.

  18. Pulsed ion beam investigation of the kinetics of surface reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horton, C. C.; Eck, T. G.; Hoffman, R. W.

    1989-01-01

    Pulsed ion beam measurements of the kinetics of surface reactions are discussed for the case where the width of the ion pulse is comparable to the measured reaction time, but short compared to the time between successive pulses. Theoretical expressions are derived for the time dependence of the ion-induced signals for linear surface reactions. Results are presented for CO emission from surface carbon and CF emission from Teflon induced by oxygen ion bombardment. The strengths and limitations of this technique are described.

  19. Microsecond Microfluidic Mixing for Investigation of Protein Folding Kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Hertzog, D E; Santiago, J G; Bakajin, O

    2003-06-25

    We have developed and characterized a mixer to study the reaction kinetics of protein folding on a microsecond timescale. The mixer uses hydrodynamic focusing of pressure-driven flow in a microfluidic channel to reduce diffusion times as first demonstrated by Knight et al.[1]. Features of the mixer include 1 {micro}s mixing times, sample consumptions of order 1 nl/s, loading sample volumes on the order of microliters, and the ability to manufacture in fused silica for compatibility with most spectroscopic methods.

  20. Microsecond Microfluidic Mixing for Investigation of Protein Folding Kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Hertzog, D E; Santiago, J G; Bakajin, O

    2005-02-10

    We have developed and characterized a mixer to study the reaction kinetics of protein folding on a microsecond timescale. The mixer uses hydrodynamic focusing of pressure-driven flow in a microfluidic channel to reduce diffusion times as first demonstrated by Knight et al.[1]. Features of the mixer include 1 {micro}s mixing times, sample consumptions of order 1 nl/s, loading sample volumes on the order of microliters, and the ability to manufacture in fused silica for compatibility with most spectroscopic methods.

  1. A kinetics investigation of several reactions involving chlorine containing compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, D. D.

    1978-01-01

    The technique of flash photolysis-resonance fluorescence was utilized to study nine reactions of stratospheric importance. The tropospheric degradation reactions of seven halogenated hydrocarbons were studied to assess their possible influx into the stratosphere. There are reactions of either Cl, OH, or O(3P) species with hydrogenated species, O3 or chlorinated compounds. Apart from the kinetic measurements, the quantum yield for the production of O(1D) from O3 in the crucial wavelength region of 293 to 316.5 nm was studied by utilizing a narrow wavelength laser as the photolysis source. The product formation was monitored by measuring the fluorescence of NO2 formed through O(1D) reaction with N2O followed by NO reaction with O3 to give NO2.

  2. Phase-field investigation on the non-equilibrium interface dynamics of rapid alloy solidification

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Jeong

    2011-01-01

    The research program reported here is focused on critical issues that represent conspicuous gaps in current understanding of rapid solidification, limiting our ability to predict and control microstructural evolution (i.e. morphological dynamics and microsegregation) at high undercooling, where conditions depart significantly from local equilibrium. More specifically, through careful application of phase-field modeling, using appropriate thin-interface and anti-trapping corrections and addressing important details such as transient effects and a velocity-dependent (i.e. adaptive) numerics, the current analysis provides a reasonable simulation-based picture of non-equilibrium solute partitioning and the corresponding oscillatory dynamics associated with single-phase rapid solidification and show that this method is a suitable means for a self-consistent simulation of transient behavior and operating point selection under rapid growth conditions. Moving beyond the limitations of conventional theoretical/analytical treatments of non-equilibrium solute partitioning, these results serve to substantiate recent experimental findings and analytical treatments for single-phase rapid solidification. The departure from the equilibrium solid concentration at the solid-liquid interface was often observed during rapid solidification, and the energetic associated non-equilibrium solute partitioning has been treated in detail, providing possible ranges of interface concentrations for a given growth condition. Use of these treatments for analytical description of specific single-phase dendritic and cellular operating point selection, however, requires a model for solute partitioning under a given set of growth conditions. Therefore, analytical solute trapping models which describe the chemical partitioning as a function of steady state interface velocities have been developed and widely utilized in most of the theoretical investigations of rapid solidification. However, these

  3. Thermal Decomposition of 3-Bromopropene. A Theoretical Kinetic Investigation.

    PubMed

    Tucceri, María E; Badenes, María P; Bracco, Larisa L B; Cobos, Carlos J

    2016-04-21

    A detailed kinetic study of the gas-phase thermal decomposition of 3-bromopropene over wide temperature and pressure ranges was performed. Quantum chemical calculations employing the density functional theory methods B3LYP, BMK, and M06-2X and the CBS-QB3 and G4 ab initio composite models provide the relevant part of the potential energy surfaces and the molecular properties of the species involved in the CH2═CH-CH2Br → CH2═C═CH2 + HBr (1) and CH2═CH-CH2Br → CH2═CH-CH2 + Br (2) reaction channels. Transition-state theory and unimolecular reaction rate theory calculations show that the simple bond fission reaction ( 2 ) is the predominant decomposition channel and that all reported experimental studies are very close to the high-pressure limit of this process. Over the 500-1400 K range a rate constant for the primary dissociation of k2,∞ = 4.8 × 10(14) exp(-55.0 kcal mol(-1)/RT) s(-1) is predicted at the G4 level. The calculated k1,∞ values lie between 50 to 260 times smaller. A value of 10.6 ± 1.5 kcal mol(-1) for the standard enthalpy of formation of 3-bromopropene at 298 K was estimated from G4 thermochemical calculations. PMID:27023718

  4. Investigation of Cu coatings deposited by kinetic metallization

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Y.K.; Birbilis, N.; Spencer, K.; Zhang, M.-X.; Muddle, B.C.

    2010-11-15

    Interfacial characterisation of Kinetic Metallization (KM) sprayed Cu coatings applied on metal substrates was performed using optical and electron microscopy, as well as microindentation hardness testing and microchemical analysis. The interfacial characterisation of KM coatings remains scarce to date. Cross sectional observations of KM coatings on light metal substrates revealed an undulating, patelliform profile with thin-lipped cusps at the interface. Pure Al and Mg substrates exhibited a mechanically impinged zone <{approx}5 {mu}m on the substrate material, approximately the size of deformed Cu powder particles. Examination of the Cu side of the interface indicated there was no long range interaction in the coating. On the substrate side of the interface, the KM process induced phase transformations (i.e. recrystallisation and an alloyed zone) in thin layers contiguous to the interface on pure Al and Mg substrates. Zones of elemental interdiffusion were identified at the interface upon Al and Mg substrates using scanning TEM. The width of intermixing zones was in the vicinity of < 1 {mu}m. This metallurgical interaction at the interface occurred on the length scales involving the initial single layer of Cu particles bonded on the substrate.

  5. Investigating Molecular Kinetics by Variationally Optimized Diffusion Maps.

    PubMed

    Boninsegna, Lorenzo; Gobbo, Gianpaolo; Noé, Frank; Clementi, Cecilia

    2015-12-01

    Identification of the collective coordinates that describe rare events in complex molecular transitions such as protein folding has been a key challenge in the theoretical molecular sciences. In the Diffusion Map approach, one assumes that the molecular configurations sampled have been generated by a diffusion process, and one uses the eigenfunctions of the corresponding diffusion operator as reaction coordinates. While diffusion coordinates (DCs) appear to provide a good approximation to the true dynamical reaction coordinates, they are not parametrized using dynamical information. Thus, their approximation quality could not, as yet, be validated, nor could the diffusion map eigenvalues be used to compute relaxation rate constants of the system. Here we combine the Diffusion Map approach with the recently proposed Variational Approach for Conformation Dynamics (VAC). Diffusion Map coordinates are used as a basis set, and their optimal linear combination is sought using the VAC, which employs time-correlation information on the molecular dynamics (MD) trajectories. We have applied this approach to ultra-long MD simulations of the Fip35 WW domain and found that the first DCs are indeed a good approximation to the true reaction coordinates of the system, but they could be further improved using the VAC. Using the Diffusion Map basis, excellent approximations to the relaxation rates of the system are obtained. Finally, we evaluate the quality of different metric spaces and find that pairwise minimal root-mean-square deviation performs poorly, while operating in the recently introduced kinetic maps based on the time-lagged independent component analysis gives the best performance.

  6. The interaction of FBPase with aldolase: a kinetic and fluorescence investigation on chicken muscle enzymes.

    PubMed

    Dziewulska-Szwajkowska, Daria; Zmojdzian, Monika; Dobryszycki, Piotr; Kochman, Marian; Dzugaj, Andrzej

    2004-01-01

    Fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (FBPase; EC 3.1.3.11) is strongly inhibited by AMP in vitro and, therefore, at physiological concentrations of substrate and AMP, FBPase should be completely inhibited. Desensitization of rabbit muscle FBPase against AMP inhibition was previously observed in the presence of rabbit muscle aldolase. In this study, we analysed the kinetics of an FBPase catalyzed reaction and interaction between chicken muscle FBPase and chicken muscle aldolase. The initial rate of FBPase reaction vs. substrate concentration shows a maximum activity at a concentration of 20 microM Fru-1,6P2 and then decreases. Assuming rapid equilibrium kinetics, the enzyme-catalyzed reaction was described by the substrate inhibition model, with Ks approximately 5 microM and Ksi approximately 39 microM and factor beta approximately 0.2, describing change in the rate constant (k) of product formation from the ES and ESSi complexes. Based on ultracentrifugation studies, aldolase and FBPase form a hetero-complex with approximately 1:1 stoichiometry with a dissociation constant (Kd) of 3.8 microM. The FBPase-aldolase interaction was confirmed via fluorescence investigation. The aldolase-FBPase interaction results in aldolase fluorescence quenching and its maximum emission spectrum shifting from 344 to 356 nm. The Kd of the FBPase-aldolase complex, determined on the basis of fluorescence changes, is 0.4 microM at 25 degrees C with almost 1:1 stoichiometry. This interaction increases the I(0.5) for the AMP inhibition of FBPase threefold, and slightly affects FBPase affinity to magnesium ions, increasing the Ka and Hill coefficient (n). No effect of aldolase on the FBPase pH optimum was observed. Thus, the decrease in FBPase sensitivity to AMP inhibition enables FBPase to function in vivo thanks to aldolase.

  7. Investigations of non-hydrostatic, stably stratified and rapidly rotating flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieves, David; Grooms, Ian; Julien, Keith; Weiss, Jeffrey B.

    2016-08-01

    We present an investigation of rapidly rotating (small Rossby number $Ro\\ll 1$) and stratified turbulence where the stratification strength is varied from weak (large Froude number $Fr\\gg1$) to strong ($Fr\\ll1$). The investigation is set in the context of a reduced model derived from the Boussinesq equations that efficiently retains anisotropic inertia-gravity waves with order-one frequencies and highlights a regime of wave-eddy interactions. Numerical simulations of the reduced model are performed where energy is injected by a stochastic forcing of vertical velocity, which forces wave modes only. The simulations reveal two regimes characterized by the presence of well-formed, persistent and thin turbulent layers of locally-weakened stratification at small Froude numbers, and by the absence of layers at large Froude numbers. Both regimes are characterized by a large-scale barotropic dipole enclosed by small-scale turbulence. When the Reynolds number is not too large a direct cascade of barotropic kinetic energy is observed, leading to total energy equilibration. We examine net energy exchanges that occur through vortex stretching and vertical buoyancy flux and diagnose the horizontal scales active in these exchanges. We find that the baroclinic motions inject energy directly to the largest scales of the barotropic mode, implying that the large-scale barotropic dipole is not the end result of an inverse cascade within the barotropic mode.

  8. Investigation of rapid freeze prototyping and investment casting with ice patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qingbin

    Rapid Freeze Prototyping (RFP) can generate three-dimensional ice patterns from CAD models by depositing and solidifying water droplets layer by layer. The waiting time between two successive layers is a critical factor. Finite Element Analysis (FEA) is employed to predict the solidification time of a newly deposited water layer in order to develop a better understanding of heat transfer during the RFP process. The result is used to investigate the effects of various process parameters on the solidification time of an ice column and a vertical ice wall. Experiments are conducted and the measured results are shown to agree well with simulation results. Investment casting with ice patterns is similar to that with wax patterns but with significant process differences. An interface agent can be coated around the ice pattern to protect it from damage during the process. To compensate for the thickness of the interface agent, analytical models have been constructed to predict the thickness of the interface agent for a large ice cylinder and for a small ice part. The dimensional accuracy of the generated metal castings for small parts can be much improved by compensating the interface layer thickness. Due to the use of ice, canned models must be made at sub-freezing temperatures. Success of this process depends significantly on curing kinetics of the slurries and the fracture toughness of mold materials. The curing kinetics of the slurries and mold material fracture toughness from different compositions are examined and the effects of various processing parameters on the results are examined and discussed.

  9. Phenomenological Investigation of Rapid Projectile Penetration in Granular Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omidvar, Mehdi

    There has been a recent flurry of research in rapid penetration into granular media, motivated by military and civilian applications including underground target penetration, design of fortifications, drilling for resource extraction, offshore foundations and anchors, probing of in situ mechanical properties, and study of high strain rate response of granular media, among others. The present study contributes to the state of the art in rapid penetration into granular media, by producing data at the macro and meso scales. In-house projectile accelerators are used to launch projectiles into laboratory scale physical models. The experimental program is divided into two sections. In the first section, penetration tests are performed at impact velocities in the range of 60-300 m/s. High-speed imaging and photonic Doppler velocimetry are used to record time history of penetration. In the second section, low velocity penetration tests are performed in refractive index matched transparent soils. Images are acquired form a mid plane within the sample. Digital image correlation is employed to describe granular kinematics. Macro scale test results point to the existence of at least two transition regimes in penetration resistance. The first, occurring at penetration velocities of approximately 60- 80 m/s, may be due the role of particle crushing, while the second is linked to frictional resistance dominating over inertial resistance at penetration velocities below approximately 15 m/s. It is also found that the role of nose shape is related to particle crushing. An attached false cone forms ahead of the projectile due to significant particle crushing, rendering nose shape effects less significant. Packing density and saturation are also found to affect penetration characteristics. Penetration tests in transparent soils reveal significant differences between quasi-static and dynamic penetration. Greater vertical displacements occur ahead of the projectile in dynamic

  10. The Rapid Acquisition Imaging Spectrograph Experiment (RAISE) Sounding Rocket Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurent, Glenn T.; Hassler, Donald M.; Deforest, Craig; Slater, David D.; Thomas, Roger J.; Ayres, Thomas; Davis, Michael; de Pontieu, Bart; Diller, Jed; Graham, Roy; Michaelis, Harald; Schuele, Udo; Warren, Harry

    2016-03-01

    We present a summary of the solar observing Rapid Acquisition Imaging Spectrograph Experiment (RAISE) sounding rocket program including an overview of the design and calibration of the instrument, flight performance, and preliminary chromospheric results from the successful November 2014 launch of the RAISE instrument. The RAISE sounding rocket payload is the fastest scanning-slit solar ultraviolet imaging spectrograph flown to date. RAISE is designed to observe the dynamics and heating of the solar chromosphere and corona on time scales as short as 100-200ms, with arcsecond spatial resolution and a velocity sensitivity of 1-2km/s. Two full spectral passbands over the same one-dimensional spatial field are recorded simultaneously with no scanning of the detectors or grating. The two different spectral bands (first-order 1205-1251Å and 1524-1569Å) are imaged onto two intensified Active Pixel Sensor (APS) detectors whose focal planes are individually adjusted for optimized performance. RAISE reads out the full field of both detectors at 5-10Hz, recording up to 1800 complete spectra (per detector) in a single 6-min rocket flight. This opens up a new domain of high time resolution spectral imaging and spectroscopy. RAISE is designed to observe small-scale multithermal dynamics in Active Region (AR) and quiet Sun loops, identify the strength, spectrum and location of high frequency waves in the solar atmosphere, and determine the nature of energy release in the chromospheric network.

  11. A hybrid computer program for rapidly solving flowing or static chemical kinetic problems involving many chemical species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclain, A. G.; Rao, C. S. R.

    1976-01-01

    A hybrid chemical kinetic computer program was assembled which provides a rapid solution to problems involving flowing or static, chemically reacting, gas mixtures. The computer program uses existing subroutines for problem setup, initialization, and preliminary calculations and incorporates a stiff ordinary differential equation solution technique. A number of check cases were recomputed with the hybrid program and the results were almost identical to those previously obtained. The computational time saving was demonstrated with a propane-oxygen-argon shock tube combustion problem involving 31 chemical species and 64 reactions. Information is presented to enable potential users to prepare an input data deck for the calculation of a problem.

  12. Rapid reaction kinetics of proline dehydrogenase in the multifunctional proline utilization A protein.

    PubMed

    Moxley, Michael A; Becker, Donald F

    2012-01-10

    The multifunctional proline utilization A (PutA) flavoenzyme from Escherichia coli catalyzes the oxidation of proline to glutamate in two reaction steps using separate proline dehydrogenase (PRODH) and Δ(1)-pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C) dehydrogenase domains. Here, the kinetic mechanism of PRODH in PutA is studied by stopped-flow kinetics to determine microscopic rate constants for the proline:ubiquinone oxidoreductase mechanism. Stopped-flow data for proline reduction of the flavin cofactor (reductive half-reaction) and oxidation of reduced flavin by CoQ(1) (oxidative half-reaction) were best-fit by a double exponential from which maximum observable rate constants and apparent equilibrium dissociation constants were determined. Flavin semiquinone was not observed in the reductive or oxidative reactions. Microscopic rate constants for steps in the reductive and oxidative half-reactions were obtained by globally fitting the stopped-flow data to a simulated mechanism that includes a chemical step followed by an isomerization event. A microscopic rate constant of 27.5 s(-1) was determined for proline reduction of the flavin cofactor followed by an isomerization step of 2.2 s(-1). The isomerization step is proposed to report on a previously identified flavin-dependent conformational change [Zhang, W. et al. (2007) Biochemistry 46, 483-491] that is important for PutA functional switching but is not kinetically relevant to the in vitro mechanism. Using CoQ(1), a soluble analogue of ubiquinone, a rate constant of 5.4 s(-1) was obtained for the oxidation of flavin, thus indicating that this oxidative step is rate-limiting for k(cat) during catalytic turnover. Steady-state kinetic constants calculated from the microscopic rate constants agree with the experimental k(cat) and k(cat)/K(m) parameters.

  13. An investigation of the structure and function of antistaphylococcal endolysins using kinetic methods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Peculiarities of the structures and functions of phage phi11 and phi80a antistaphylococcal endolysins were investigated by kinetic measurements. In spite of the high level of homology in their primary structures, both enzymes possess some differences in their optimal conditions for functioning. As...

  14. Rapid kinetics of endocytosis at rod photoreceptor synapses depends upon endocytic load and calcium.

    PubMed

    Cork, Karlene M; Thoreson, Wallace B

    2014-05-01

    Release from rods is triggered by the opening of L-type Ca2+ channels that lie beneath synaptic ribbons. After exocytosis, vesicles are retrieved by compensatory endocytosis. Previous work showed that endocytosis is dynamin-dependent in rods but dynamin-independent in cones. We hypothesized that fast endocytosis in rods may also differ from cones in its dependence upon the amount of Ca2+ influx and/or endocytic load. We measured exocytosis and endocytosis from membrane capacitance (C m) changes evoked by depolarizing steps in voltage clamped rods from tiger salamander retinal slices. Similar to cones, the time constant for endocytosis in rods was quite fast, averaging <200 ms. We manipulated Ca2+ influx and the amount of vesicle release by altering the duration and voltage of depolarizing steps. Unlike cones, endocytosis kinetics in rods slowed after increasing Ca2+ channel activation with longer step durations or more strongly depolarized voltage steps. Endocytosis kinetics also slowed as Ca2+ buffering was decreased by replacing BAPTA (10 or 1 mM) with the slower Ca2+ buffer EGTA (5 or 0.5 mM) in the pipette solution. These data provide further evidence that endocytosis mechanisms differ in rods and cones and suggest that endocytosis in rods is regulated by both endocytic load and local Ca2+ levels.

  15. Temperature Gradient Approach for Rapidly Assessing Sensor Binding Kinetics and Thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Caleb E; Macedo, Lucyano J A; Opdahl, Aric

    2015-08-01

    We report a highly resolved approach for quantitatively measuring the temperature dependence of molecular binding in a sensor format. The method is based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) imaging measurements made across a spatial temperature gradient. Simultaneous recording of sensor response over the range of temperatures spanned by the gradient avoids many of the complications that arise in the analysis of SPR measurements where temperature is varied. In addition to simplifying quantitative analysis of binding interactions, the method allows the temperature dependence of binding to be monitored as a function of time, and provides a straightforward route for calibrating how temperature varies across the gradient. Using DNA hybridization as an example, we show how the gradient approach can be used to measure the temperature dependence of binding kinetics and thermodynamics (e.g., melt/denaturation profile) in a single experiment.

  16. Kinetic modeling of hydrocarbon autoignition at low and intermediate temperatures in a rapid compression machine

    SciTech Connect

    Curran, H J; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Griffiths, J F; Mohamed, C

    2000-11-01

    A computer model is used to examine oxidation of hydrocarbon fuels in a rapid compression machine. For one of the fuels studied, n-heptane, significant fuel consumption is computed to take place during the compression stroke under some operating conditions, while for the less reactive n-pentane, no appreciable fuel consumption occurs until after the end of compression. The third fuel studied, a 60 PRF mixture of iso-octane and n-heptane, exhibits behavior that is intermediate between that of n-heptane and n-pentane. The model results indicate that computational studies of rapid compression machine ignition must consider fuel reaction during compression in order to achieve satisfactory agreement between computed and experimental results.

  17. Microwave gallium-68 radiochemistry for kinetically stable bis(thiosemicarbazone) complexes: structural investigations and cellular uptake under hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Alam, Israt S; Arrowsmith, Rory L; Cortezon-Tamarit, Fernando; Twyman, Frazer; Kociok-Köhn, Gabriele; Botchway, Stanley W; Dilworth, Jonathan R; Carroll, Laurence; Aboagye, Eric O; Pascu, Sofia I

    2016-01-01

    We report the microwave synthesis of several bis(thiosemicarbazones) and the rapid gallium-68 incorporation to give the corresponding metal complexes. These proved kinetically stable under 'cold' and 'hot' biological assays and were investigated using laser scanning confocal microscopy, flow cytometry and radioactive cell retention studies under normoxia and hypoxia. (68)Ga complex retention was found to be 34% higher in hypoxic cells than in normoxic cells over 30 min, further increasing to 53% at 120 min. Our data suggests that this class of gallium complexes show hypoxia selectivity suitable for imaging in living cells and in vivo tests by microPET in nude athymic mice showed that they are excreted within 1 h of their administration.

  18. RAPID ARSENITE OXIDATION BY THERMUS AQUATICUS AND THERMUS THERMOPHILUS: FIELD AND LABORATORY INVESTIGATIONS. (R826189)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thermus aquaticus and Thermus thermophilus, common inhabitants of terrestrial hot springs and thermally polluted domestic and industrial waters, have been found to rapidly oxidize arsenite to arsenate. Field investigations at a hot spring in Yellowstone National Park revealed ...

  19. Kinetics of killing Listeria monocytogenes by macrophages: rapid killing accompanying phagocytosis

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, W.A.

    1983-08-01

    The kinetics of bactericidal activity of activated macrophages can be precisely described by a mathematical model in which phagocytosis, killing, digestion, and release of degraded bacterial material are considered to occur continuously. To gain a better understanding of these events, I have determined the period of time between first contact of bacteria with macrophages and the onset of killing. Activated rat peritoneal macrophages were incubated for various times up to 15 min with Listeria monocytogenes previously labeled with /sup 3/H-thymidine and the unassociated bacteria removed by two centrifugations through a density interface. Both cell-associated radioactivity and cell-associated viable bacteria, determined as colony forming units after sonication of the cell pellet, increased with time of incubation. However, the specific viability of these bacteria, expressed as the ratio of number of viable bacteria per unit radioactivity declined with time, as an approximate inverse exponential, after a lag period of 2.9 +/- 0.8 min. Evidence is given that other possible causes for this decline in specific viability, other than death of the bacteria, such as preferential ingestion of dead Listeria, clumping of bacteria, variations in autolytic activity, or release of Listericidins are unlikely. I conclude therefore that activated macrophages kill Listeria approximately 3 min after the cell and the bacterium first make contact.

  20. New channelrhodopsin with a red-shifted spectrum and rapid kinetics from Mesostigma viride.

    PubMed

    Govorunova, Elena G; Spudich, Elena N; Lane, C Elizabeth; Sineshchekov, Oleg A; Spudich, John L

    2011-01-01

    Light control of motility behavior (phototaxis and photophobic responses) in green flagellate algae is mediated by sensory rhodopsins homologous to phototaxis receptors and light-driven ion transporters in prokaryotic organisms. In the phototaxis process, excitation of the algal sensory rhodopsins leads to generation of transmembrane photoreceptor currents. When expressed in animal cells, the algal phototaxis receptors function as light-gated cation channels, which has earned them the name "channelrhodopsins." Channelrhodopsins have become useful molecular tools for light control of cellular activity. Only four channelrhodopsins, identified in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Volvox carteri, have been reported so far. By screening light-induced currents among algal species, we identified that the phylogenetically distant flagellate Mesostigma viride showed photoelectrical responses in vivo with properties suggesting a channelrhodopsin especially promising for optogenetic use. We cloned an M. viride channelrhodopsin, MChR1, and studied its channel activity upon heterologous expression. Action spectra in HEK293 cells match those of the photocurrents observed in M. viride cells. Comparison of the more divergent MChR1 sequence to the previously studied phylogenetically clustered homologs and study of several MChR1 mutants refine our understanding of the sequence determinants of channelrhodopsin function. We found that MChR1 has the most red-shifted and pH-independent spectral sensitivity so far reported, matches or surpasses known channelrhodopsins' channel kinetics features, and undergoes minimal inactivation upon sustained illumination. This combination of properties makes MChR1 a promising candidate for optogenetic applications. PMID:21693637

  1. FLYCHK: generalized population kinetics and spectral model for rapid spectroscopic analysis for all elements

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H; Chen, M; Morgan, W L; Ralchenko, Y; Lee, R W

    2005-06-17

    FLYCHK is a straightforward, rapid tool to provide ionization and population distributions of plasmas in zero dimension with accuracy sufficient for most initial estimates and in many cases applicable for more sophisticated analysis. FLYCHK solves rate equations for level population distributions by considering collisional and radiative atomic processes. The code is designed to be straightforward to use and yet is general enough to apply for most laboratory plasmas. Further, it can be applied for low-to-high Z ions and in either steady-state or time-dependent situations. Plasmas with arbitrary electron energy distributions, single or multiple electron temperatures can be studied as well as radiation-driven plasmas. To achieve this versatility and accuracy in a code that provides rapid response we employ schematic atomic structures, scaled hydrogenic cross-sections and read-in tables. It also employs the jj configuration averaged atomic states and oscillator strengths calculated using the Dirac-Hartree-Slater model for spectrum synthesis. Numerous experimental and calculational comparisons performed in recent years show that FLYCHK provides meaningful estimates of ionization distributions, well within a charge state for most laboratory applications.

  2. Heat acclimation memory: do the kinetics of the deacclimated transcriptome predispose to rapid reacclimation and cytoprotection?

    PubMed

    Tetievsky, Anna; Assayag, Miri; Ben-Hamo, Rotem; Efroni, Sol; Cohen, Gal; Abbas, Atallah; Horowitz, Michal

    2014-12-01

    Faster reinduction of heat acclimation (AC) after its decline indicates "AC memory." Our previous results revealed involvement of epigenetic mechanisms of transcriptional regulation. We hypothesized that the decline of AC (DeAC) is a period of "dormant memory" during which many processes are alerted to enable rapid reacclimation (ReAC). Using a genomewide approach we studied the AC, DeAC, and ReAC transcriptomes, to uncover hallmark pathways linked to "molecular memory" in the cardioacclimatome. Fifty rats subjected to heat acclimation [34°C for 2d (AC2d) or 30d (AC30)], DeAC (24°C, 30 days), ReAC (34°C, 2 days), and untreated controls were used. The GeneChip Rat Gene 1.0 ST Array was employed for left ventricular (cardiac) mRNA hybridization. Three independent bioinformatic analyses showed that 1) during AC2d enrichment of DNA impair/repair-linked genes is seen, and this is the molecular on-switch of acclimation; 2) genes activated in AC30 underlie the qualitative physiological adaptations of cardiac performance; 3) particular molecular programs encompassing constitutive upregulation of p38 MAPK, Jak/Stat, and Akt pathways and targets are specifically activated during DeAC and ReAC; and 4) epigenetic markers such as linker histones (histones H1 cluster), associated with nucleosome spacing, transcriptional chromatin modifiers, poly-(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP1) linked to chromatin compaction, and microRNAs are only altered during DeAC/ReAC. The latter are newcomers to the AC/DeAC puzzle. We suggest that these transcriptional responses maintain euchromatin and proteostasis and enable faster physiological recovery upon ReAC by rapidly reestablishing the protected acclimated cardiophenotype. We propose that the cardiac AC model can be applied to acclimation processes in general. PMID:25237184

  3. Heat acclimation memory: do the kinetics of the deacclimated transcriptome predispose to rapid reacclimation and cytoprotection?

    PubMed

    Tetievsky, Anna; Assayag, Miri; Ben-Hamo, Rotem; Efroni, Sol; Cohen, Gal; Abbas, Atallah; Horowitz, Michal

    2014-12-01

    Faster reinduction of heat acclimation (AC) after its decline indicates "AC memory." Our previous results revealed involvement of epigenetic mechanisms of transcriptional regulation. We hypothesized that the decline of AC (DeAC) is a period of "dormant memory" during which many processes are alerted to enable rapid reacclimation (ReAC). Using a genomewide approach we studied the AC, DeAC, and ReAC transcriptomes, to uncover hallmark pathways linked to "molecular memory" in the cardioacclimatome. Fifty rats subjected to heat acclimation [34°C for 2d (AC2d) or 30d (AC30)], DeAC (24°C, 30 days), ReAC (34°C, 2 days), and untreated controls were used. The GeneChip Rat Gene 1.0 ST Array was employed for left ventricular (cardiac) mRNA hybridization. Three independent bioinformatic analyses showed that 1) during AC2d enrichment of DNA impair/repair-linked genes is seen, and this is the molecular on-switch of acclimation; 2) genes activated in AC30 underlie the qualitative physiological adaptations of cardiac performance; 3) particular molecular programs encompassing constitutive upregulation of p38 MAPK, Jak/Stat, and Akt pathways and targets are specifically activated during DeAC and ReAC; and 4) epigenetic markers such as linker histones (histones H1 cluster), associated with nucleosome spacing, transcriptional chromatin modifiers, poly-(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP1) linked to chromatin compaction, and microRNAs are only altered during DeAC/ReAC. The latter are newcomers to the AC/DeAC puzzle. We suggest that these transcriptional responses maintain euchromatin and proteostasis and enable faster physiological recovery upon ReAC by rapidly reestablishing the protected acclimated cardiophenotype. We propose that the cardiac AC model can be applied to acclimation processes in general.

  4. RAPID BIOCATALYTIC POLYTRANSESTERIFICATION: REACTION KINETICS IN AN EXOTHERMIC REACTION. (R825338)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  5. Toxicant Induced Changes on Delayed Fluorescence Decay Kinetics of Cyanobacteria and Green Algae: A Rapid and Sensitive Biotest

    PubMed Central

    Leunert, Franziska; Grossart, Hans-Peter; Gerhardt, Volkmar; Eckert, Werner

    2013-01-01

    Algal tests have developed into routine tools for testing toxicity of pollutants in aquatic environments. Meanwhile, in addition to algal growth rates, an increasing number of fluorescence based methods are used for rapid and sensitive toxicity measures. The present study stresses the suitability of delayed fluorescence (DF) as a promising parameter for biotests. DF is based on the recombination fluorescence at the reaction centre of photosystem II, which is emitted only by photosynthetically active cells. We analyzed the effects of three chemicals (3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU), 3,5 Dichlorophenol (3,5 DCP) and copper) on the shape of the DF decay kinetics for potential use in phytoplankton toxicity tests. The short incubation tests were done with four phytoplankton species, with special emphasis on the cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa. All species exhibited a high sensitivity to DCMU, but cyanobacteria were more affected by copper and less by 3,5 DCP than the tested green algae. Analyses of changes in the DF decay curve in response to the added chemicals indicated the feasibility of the DF decay approach as a rapid and sensitive testing tool. PMID:23646185

  6. [The accuracy of rapid equilibrium assumption in steady-state enzyme kinetics is the function of equilibrium segment structure and properties].

    PubMed

    Vrzheshch, P V

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative evaluation of the accuracy of the rapid equilibrium assumption in the steady-state enzyme kinetics was obtained for an arbitrary mechanism of an enzyme-catalyzed reaction. This evaluation depends only on the structure and properties of the equilibrium segment, but doesn't depend on the structure and properties of the rest (stationary part) of the kinetic scheme. The smaller the values of the edges leaving equilibrium segment in relation to values of the edges within the equilibrium segment, the higher the accuracy of determination of intermediate concentrations and reaction velocity in a case of the rapid equilibrium assumption.

  7. Molecular-Level Investigations of Nucleation Mechanisms and Kinetics of Formation of Environmental Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Young-Shin Jun; Glenn A. Waychunas

    2007-04-19

    Environmental nanoparticles are often poorly-crystalline or metastable structures, whose kinetics of formation and growth are poorly understood. Further, the sorption or growth of nanoparticles on mineral surfaces may control the mineral surface's reactivity and modify its ability to influence contaminant transport. Due to the characteristic length scale, a holistic understanding of the nucleation mechanisms and kinetics of nanoparticle formation on mineral surfaces is difficult to achieve with traditional methodology. In this work, our intent is to determine the molecular nature of nucleation on surfaces, the kinetics of surface nucleation and growth, and the effect of crystal surface topology using new synchrotron-based techniques. We have approached these objectives by: (1) combining state-of-the-art crystal-truncation rod diffraction (CTR) and grazing incidence x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (GIXAS) techniques to investigate the three-dimensional molecular-scale geometry of silicate monomer sorption on the r-plane of hematite; and (2) developing a new grazing-incidence small angle x-ray scattering (GISAXS) setup at SSRL (0.08 nm{sup -1} < q < 8 nm{sup -1}) to explore the initial development of environmental nanoparticles on various mineral surfaces. This study also includes complementary techniques such as atomic force microscopy (AFM), bulk SAXS, dynamic light scattering (DLS), XRD, and TEM.

  8. Investigation of Leaching Kinetics of Copper from Malachite Ore in Ammonium Nitrate Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekmekyapar, Ahmet; Aktaş, Evrim; Künkül, Asim; Demirkiran, Nizamettin

    2012-08-01

    The production of metallic copper from low-grade copper ores is generally carried out by hydrometallurgical methods. Leaching is the first prerequisite of any hydrometallurgical process. Solutions containing ammonia may allow for selective leaching of the copper from the ore. In this study, the leaching kinetics of malachite, which is an oxidized copper ore, in ammonium nitrate solutions was examined. The effects of some experimental parameters on the leaching process were investigated, and a kinetic model to represent the effects of these parameters on the leaching rate was developed. It was determined that the leaching rate increased with increasing solution concentration, temperature, and agitation speed, as well as decreasing particle size. It was found that the leaching reaction followed the mixed kinetic controlled model, which includes two different leaching processes including the surface chemical reaction (303 K to 323 K [30 °C to 50 °C]) and diffusion through a porous product layer (323 K to 343 K [50 °C to 70 °C]). The activation energies of these sequential steps were determined to be 95.10 and 29.50 kJ/mol, respectively.

  9. Curing kinetics of visible light curing dental resin composites investigated by dielectric analysis (DEA).

    PubMed

    Steinhaus, Johannes; Hausnerova, Berenika; Haenel, Thomas; Großgarten, Mandy; Möginger, Bernhard

    2014-03-01

    During the curing process of light curing dental composites the mobility of molecules and molecule segments is reduced leading to a significant increase of the viscosity as well as the ion viscosity. Thus, the kinetics of the curing behavior of 6 different composites was derived from dielectric analysis (DEA) using especially redesigned flat sensors with interdigit comb electrodes allowing for irradiation at the top side and measuring the ion viscosity at the bottom side. As the ion viscosities of dental composites change 1-3 orders of magnitude during the curing process, DEA provides a sensitive approach to evaluate their curing behavior, especially in the phase of undisturbed chain growth. In order to determine quantitative kinetic parameters a kinetic model is presented and examined for the evaluation of the ion viscosity curves. From the obtained results it is seen that DEA might be employed in the investigation of the primary curing process, the quality assurance of ingredients as well as the control of processing stability of the light curing dental composites.

  10. Investigation of reaction kinetics and interfacial phase formation in Ti3Al + Nb composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wawner, F. E.; Gundel, D. B.

    1992-01-01

    Titanium aluminide metal matrix composites are prominent materials systems being considered for high temperature aerospace applications. One of the major problems with this material is the reactivity between existing reinforcements and the matrix after prolonged thermal exposure. This paper presents results from an investigation of reaction kinetics between Ti-14Al-21Nb (wt pct) and SCS-6 fibers and SiC fibers with surface coatings of TiB2, TiC, TiN, W, and Si. Microstructural evaluation of the reaction layers as well as matrix regions around the fibers is presented.

  11. Single-Site Palladium(II) Catalyst for Oxidative Heck Reaction: Catalytic Performance and Kinetic Investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Duan, Hui; Li, Mengyang; Zhang, Guanghui; Gallagher, James R.; Huang, Zhiliang; Sun, Yu; Luo, Zhong; Chen, Hongzhong; Miller, Jeffrey T.; Zou, Ruqiang; Lei, Aiwen; Zhao, Yanli

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT: The development of organometallic single-site catalysts (SSCs) has inspired the designs of new heterogeneous catalysts with high efficiency. Nevertheless, the application of SSCs in certain modern organic reactions, such as C-C bond formation reactions, has still been less investigated. In this study, a single-site Pd(II) catalyst was developed, where 2,2'-bipyridine-grafted periodic mesoporous organosilica (PMO) was employed as the support of a Pd(II) complex. The overall performance of the single-site Pd(II) catalyst in the oxidative Heck reaction was then investigated. The investigation results show that the catalyst displays over 99% selectivity for the product formation with high reaction yield. Kinetic profiles further confirm its high catalytic efficiency, showing that the rate constant is nearly 40 times higher than that for the free Pd(II) salt. X-ray absorption spectroscopy reveals that the catalyst has remarkable lifetime and recyclability.

  12. Numerical simulation on the opto-electro-kinetic patterning for rapid concentration of particles in a microchannel.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong; Shim, Jaesool; Chuang, Han-Sheng; Kim, Kyung Chun

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents a mathematical model for laser-induced rapid electro-kinetic patterning (REP) to elucidate the mechanism for concentrating particles in a microchannel non-destructively and non-invasively. COMSOL(®)(v4.2a) multiphysics software was used to examine the effect of a variety of parameters on the focusing performance of the REP. A mathematical model of the REP was developed based on the AC electrothermal flow (ACET) equations, the dielectrophoresis (DEP) equation, the energy balance equation, the Navier-Stokes equation, and the concentration-distribution equation. The medium was assumed to be a diluted solute, and different electric potentials and laser illumination were applied to the desired place. Gold (Au) electrodes were used at the top and bottom of a microchannel. For model validation, the simulation results were compared with the experimental data. The results revealed the formation of a toroidal microvortex via the ACET effect, which was generated due to laser illumination and joule-heating in the area of interest. In addition, under some conditions, such as the frequency of AC, the DEP velocity, and the particle size, the ACET force enhances and compresses resulting in the concentration of particles. The conditions of the DEP velocity and the ACET velocity are presented in detail with a comparison of the experimental results. PMID:26015839

  13. Numerical simulation on the opto-electro-kinetic patterning for rapid concentration of particles in a microchannel

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong; Shim, Jaesool; Chuang, Han-Sheng; Kim, Kyung Chun

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a mathematical model for laser-induced rapid electro-kinetic patterning (REP) to elucidate the mechanism for concentrating particles in a microchannel non-destructively and non-invasively. COMSOL®(v4.2a) multiphysics software was used to examine the effect of a variety of parameters on the focusing performance of the REP. A mathematical model of the REP was developed based on the AC electrothermal flow (ACET) equations, the dielectrophoresis (DEP) equation, the energy balance equation, the Navier-Stokes equation, and the concentration-distribution equation. The medium was assumed to be a diluted solute, and different electric potentials and laser illumination were applied to the desired place. Gold (Au) electrodes were used at the top and bottom of a microchannel. For model validation, the simulation results were compared with the experimental data. The results revealed the formation of a toroidal microvortex via the ACET effect, which was generated due to laser illumination and joule-heating in the area of interest. In addition, under some conditions, such as the frequency of AC, the DEP velocity, and the particle size, the ACET force enhances and compresses resulting in the concentration of particles. The conditions of the DEP velocity and the ACET velocity are presented in detail with a comparison of the experimental results. PMID:26015839

  14. Rapid in vivo measurement of β-amyloid reveals biphasic clearance kinetics in an Alzheimer’s mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyo; Restivo, Jessica L.; Davis, Todd A.; Hettinger, Jane C.; Wallace, Clare E.; Young, Katherine L.; Hayne, Margaret R.; Bu, Guojun; Li, Chen-zhong

    2016-01-01

    Findings from genetic, animal model, and human studies support the observation that accumulation of the β-amyloid (Aβ) peptide in the brain plays a central role in the pathogenic cascade of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Human studies suggest that one key factor leading to accumulation is a defect in brain Aβ clearance. We have developed a novel microimmunoelectrode (MIE) to study the kinetics of Aβ clearance using an electrochemical approach. This is the first study using MIEs in vivo to measure rapid changes in Aβ levels in the brains of living mice. Extracellular, interstitial fluid (ISF) Aβ levels were measured in the hippocampus of APP/PS1 mice. Baseline levels of Aβ40 in the ISF are relatively stable and begin to decline within minutes of blocking Aβ production with a γ-secretase inhibitor. Pretreatment with a P-glycoprotein inhibitor, which blocks blood–brain barrier transport of Aβ, resulted in significant prolongation of Aβ40 half-life, but only in the latter phase of Aβ clearance from the ISF. PMID:27069115

  15. Modeling and Experimental Investigation of Methylcyclohexane Ignition in a Rapid Compression Machine

    SciTech Connect

    Pitz, W J; Naik, C V; Mhaold?in, T N; Curran, H J; Orme, J P; Simmie, J M; Westbrook, C K

    2005-10-13

    A new mechanism for the oxidation of methylcyclohexane has been developed. The mechanism combined a newly-developed low temperature mechanism with a previously developed high temperature mechanism. Predictions from the chemical kinetic model have been compared to experimentally measured ignition delay times from a rapid compression machine. Predicted ignition delay times using the initial estimates of the methylcyclohexyl peroxy radical isomerization rate constants were much longer than those measured at low temperatures. The initial estimates of isomerization rate constants were modified based on the experimental findings of Gulati and Walker that indicate a much slower rate of isomerization. Predictions using the modified rate constants for isomerizations yielded faster ignition at lower temperatures that greatly improved the agreement between model predictions and the experimental data. These findings point to much slower isomerization rates for methylcyclohexyl peroxy radicals than previously expected.

  16. The investigation of kinetic and isotherm of fluoride adsorption onto functionalize pumice stone.

    PubMed

    Asgari, Ghorban; Roshani, Babak; Ghanizadeh, Ghader

    2012-05-30

    In this research work, pumice that is functionalized by the cationic surfactant, hexadecyltrimethyl ammonium (HDTMA), is used as an adsorbent for the removal of fluoride from drinking water. This work was carried out in two parts. The effects of HDTMA loading, pH (3-10), reaction time (5-60 min) and the adsorbent dosage (0.15-2.5 g L(-1)) were investigated on the removal of fluoride as a target contaminate from water through the design of different experimental sets in the first part. The results from this first part revealed that surfactant-modified pumice (SMP) exhibited the best performance at dose 0.5 g L(-1), pH 6, and it adsorbs over 96% of fluoride from a solution containing 10 mg L(-1) fluoride after 30 min of mixing time. The four linear forms of the Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin and Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherms model were applied to determine the best fit of equilibrium expressions. Apart from the regression coefficient (R(2)), four error functions were used to validate the isotherm and kinetics data. The experimental adsorption isotherm complies with Langmuir equation model type 1. The maximum amount of adsorption (Q(max)) was 41 mg g(-1). The kinetic studies indicated that the adsorption of fluoride best fitted with the pseudo-second-order kinetic type 1. Thermodynamic parameters evaluation of fluoride adsorption on SMP showed that the adsorption process under the selected conditions was spontaneous and endothermic. The suitability of SMP in defluoridation at field condition was investigated with natural groundwater samples collected from a nearby fluoride endemic area in the second part of this study. Based on this study's results, SMP was shown to be an affordable and a promising option for the removal of fluoride in drinking water.

  17. Investigation of the kinetics of water uptake into partially saturated shales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roshan, H.; Andersen, M. S.; Rutlidge, H.; Marjo, C. E.; Acworth, R. I.

    2016-04-01

    Several processes have been proposed to describe the low recovery of hydraulic fracturing fluid in unconventional shale reservoirs which has caused both technical and environmental concerns. This study describes novel hydraulic experiments to quantitatively investigate the kinetics of water uptake into partially saturated shale through investigating the pressure response of injecting fluids (NaCl, KCl, MgCl2, and CaCl2 with different ionic concentrations) into crushed and sieved shale fragments. The results of the study indicate that the cumulative water uptake under pressure is likely to be controlled by three processes: surface hydration, capillary hydration including advective flow, and osmotic hydration. Each of these processes is a function of the differences between the in situ pore fluid and the injection fluid (solution chemistry and concentration) and the shale physicochemical properties, in particular the contact surface area, pore diameter, and the Cation Exchange Capacity (CEC). The uptake is not instantaneous, but is diffusion limited, with the rate governed by a number of kinetic processes. Uptake proceeds in three stages, each associated with a different process: (1) predominantly surface hydration, (2) predominantly capillary hydration and finally, (3) predominantly osmotic hydration. It was also shown that shale can take up a significant amount of water compared to its available solid volume. However, contrary to the conventional understanding, the increase in salinity of the injection fluid does not necessarily lead to reduced water uptake into shales, but is dependent on the type and concentration of cations within the shale and injecting fluid.

  18. Experimental Investigation of the Kinetics of a Ruthenium-Catalyzed Deconstruction of Lignin Model Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Bu, L.; Nimlos, M. R.; Shirts, M. R.; Himmel, M. E.; Crowley, M. F.; Beckham, G. T.

    2012-01-01

    Lignin is a major component of plant cell walls that is typically underutilized in selective conversion strategies for renewable fuels and chemicals. The mechanisms by which thermal and catalytic treatments deconstruct lignin remain elusive. In this work, we have investigated the kinetics of the catalytic deconstruction of lignin model compounds using a ruthenium catalyst reported by Bergman et al. in 2010. A series of investigations using NMR spectroscopy and GC/MS will be presented. In addition, we propose detailed mechanisms for lignin depolymerization with ruthenium catalysts. We have also used DFT to compute transition state geometries of catalytic cycle intermediates and compare the values determined computationally with those observed experimentally. Ultimately, our objective is to apply our methods to the design of new homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysts for the effective deconstruction and valorization of lignin.

  19. Numerical and experimental investigation of molten metal droplet deposition applied to rapid prototyping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, SuLi; Wei, ZhengYing; Du, Jun; Zhao, Guangxi; Wang, Xin; Lu, BingHeng

    2016-08-01

    Rapid prototyping based on molten metal droplets deposition is an additive process in which parts are produced from molten materials in a single operation without the use of any mold or other tooling. Near-net shaped parts are fabricated by sequentially depositing molten droplets layer by layer. This paper presents a systematic numerical and experimental investigation of the transient transport phenomenon during the droplets impinging onto a substrate surface. The 3D models based on a volume of fluid (VOF) method were developed to investigate the deposition of molten metal droplets on a horizontally aluminum substrate surface. Based on the above research, a semiquantitative relationship between external morphology and internal microstructure was proposed, which was further certified by investigating the piled vertical columns and the three-dimensional parts. The works should be helpful for the process optimization and non-destructive detection of drop-based rapid prototyping techniques.

  20. Investigating the conformational stability of prion strains through a kinetic replication model.

    PubMed

    Zampieri, Mattia; Legname, Giuseppe; Altafini, Claudio

    2009-07-01

    Prion proteins are known to misfold into a range of different aggregated forms, showing different phenotypic and pathological states. Understanding strain specificities is an important problem in the field of prion disease. Little is known about which PrP(Sc) structural properties and molecular mechanisms determine prion replication, disease progression and strain phenotype. The aim of this work is to investigate, through a mathematical model, how the structural stability of different aggregated forms can influence the kinetics of prion replication. The model-based results suggest that prion strains with different conformational stability undergoing in vivo replication are characterizable in primis by means of different rates of breakage. A further role seems to be played by the aggregation rate (i.e. the rate at which a prion fibril grows). The kinetic variability introduced in the model by these two parameters allows us to reproduce the different characteristic features of the various strains (e.g., fibrils' mean length) and is coherent with all experimental observations concerning strain-specific behavior.

  1. Investigation of kinetic interactions between approved oximes and human acetylcholinesterase inhibited by pesticide carbamates.

    PubMed

    Wille, Timo; Kaltenbach, Lisa; Thiermann, Horst; Worek, Franz

    2013-12-01

    Carbamates are widely used for pest control and act primarily by inhibition of insect and mammalian acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Accidental or intentional uptake of carbamates may result in typical signs and symptoms of cholinergic overstimulation which cannot be discriminated from those of organophosphorus pesticide poisoning. There is an ongoing debate whether standard treatment with atropine and oximes should be recommended for human carbamate poisoning as well, since in vitro and in vivo animal data indicate a deleterious effect of oximes when used in combination with the N-methyl carbamate carbaryl. Therefore, we performed an in vitro kinetic study to investigate the effect of clinically used oximes on carbamoylation and decarbamoylation of human AChE. It became evident that pralidoxime and obidoxime in therapeutic concentrations aggravate the inhibition of AChE by carbaryl and propoxur, with obidoxime being substantially more potent compared to 2-PAM. However, obidoxime had no impact on the decarbamoylation kinetics. Hence, the administration of 2-PAM and especially of obidoxime to severely propoxur and carbaryl poisoned humans cannot be recommended.

  2. Numerical investigation of kinetic energy dynamics during autoignition of n-heptane/air mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucena Kreppel Paes, Paulo; Brasseur, James; Xuan, Yuan

    2015-11-01

    Many engineering applications involve complex turbulent reacting flows, where nonlinear, multi-scale turbulence-combustion couplings are important. Direct representation of turbulent reacting flow dynamics is associated with prohibitive computational costs, which makes it necessary to employ turbulent combustion models to account for the effects of unresolved scales on resolved scales. Classical turbulence models are extensively employed in reacting flow simulations. However, they rely on assumptions about the energy cascade, which are valid for incompressible, isothermal homogeneous isotropic turbulence. A better understanding of the turbulence-combustion interactions is required for the development of more accurate, physics-based sub-grid-scale models for turbulent reacting flows. In order to investigate the effects of reaction-induced density, viscosity, and pressure variations on the turbulent kinetic energy, Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of autoignition of partially-premixed, lean n-heptane/air mixture in three-dimensional homogeneous isotropic turbulence has been performed. This configuration represents standard operating conditions of Homogeneous-Charge Compression-Ignition (HCCI) engines. The differences in the turbulent kinetic energy balance between the present turbulent reacting flow and incompressible, isothermal homogeneous isotropic turbulence are highlighted at different stages during the autoignition process.

  3. Investigation on silicon alloying kinetics during lithiation by galvanostatic impedance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Younghoon; Hwang, Chihyun; Song, Hyun-Kon

    2016-05-01

    The parameters characterizing lithiation processes in silicon anodes of lithium ion batteries (LIBs) are compared between μm- and nm-sized silicon particles. Galvanostatic electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (GS-EIS) is used to investigate the silicon-lithium alloying reaction in a practical charging operation (galvanostatic lithiation). Effective kinetic parameters depending on lithiation C-rates are obtained along lithiation progress from a large body of impedance data. Nanosizing benefits of nanoparticles over micro-particles are confirmed such as lower polarization resistance (Rp) and thinner solid-electrolyte interphase layer (SEI layer) over the whole lithiation range. Based on the kinetic information obtained from the non-stationary conditions, a lithiation strategy consisting of multiple galvanostatic steps is designed to lithiate silicon anodes in a faster way. 75% of full capacity is lithiated by a galvanostatic sequence of 4C-2C-1C-0.5C within 20 min. However, only 43% and 21% are achieved by a single-rate galvanostatic lithiation at 1 C and 0.5 C, respectively.

  4. Nonisothermal gravimetric investigation on kinetics of reduction of magnesia by aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, L.; Okumura, Keiji; Sano, Masamichi

    1999-12-01

    An investigation of the reduction of magnesia by aluminum was carried out using a nonisothermal gravimetric technique under an argon atmosphere, in the temperature range from 1,273 to 1,873 K. The mixture of magnesia and aluminum powders was formed into a pellet under various isostatic pressures. It was found that magnesia is reduced by aluminum to form magnesium and spinel at first, and then the excess aluminum reacts with spinel slowly. The temperature at which the reaction starts increases with an increasing heating rate. The reaction rate is also affected by pellet-forming conditions. A kinetic model is proposed to explain the experimental results. The activation energy of the reduction of magnesia by aluminum is 151.2 kJ/mol. Good agreement between calculated and experimental results is obtained.

  5. Investigation of thermal decomposition of ascorbic acid by TG-FTIR and thermal kinetics analysis.

    PubMed

    Jingyan, Shi; Yuwen, Liu; Zhiyong, Wang; Cunxin, Wang

    2013-04-15

    The thermal behavior of dry solid ascorbic acid in nitrogen atmosphere in the temperature range of 25-800°C was investigated by TG-FTIR. During the thermal decomposition process, five evolved gaseous species, including H2O, CO2, CO, CH4 and HCOOH, were identified and monitored, in which HCOOH was detected for the first time. The results indicated that ascorbic acid began to decompose at 191°C. Its decomposition process consisted of three stages, and dehydration and decarboxylation to form furfural were the possible principal mechanism. The kinetic analysis for the first decomposition stage was also carried out by the isoconversional method and the master plots method. The results indicated that this process can be described by the model of 1st order reaction.

  6. Incubation behavior of silicon nanowire growth investigated by laser-assisted rapid heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Sang-gil; Kim, Eunpa; Allen, Frances I.; Hwang, David J.; Minor, Andrew M.; Grigoropoulos, Costas P.

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the early stage of silicon nanowire growth by the vapor-liquid-solid mechanism using laser-localized heating combined with ex-situ chemical mapping analysis by energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy. By achieving fast heating and cooling times, we can precisely determine the nucleation times for nanowire growth. We find that the silicon nanowire nucleation process occurs on a time scale of ˜10 ms, i.e., orders of magnitude faster than the times reported in investigations using furnace processes. The rate-limiting step for silicon nanowire growth at temperatures in the vicinity of the eutectic temperature is found to be the gas reaction and/or the silicon crystal growth process, whereas at higher temperatures it is the rate of silicon diffusion through the molten catalyst that dictates the nucleation kinetics.

  7. Comment on "Single-point kinetic energy density functionals: A pointwise kinetic energy density analysis and numerical convergence investigation"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trickey, S. B.; Karasiev, Valentin V.; Chakraborty, Debajit

    2015-09-01

    We suggest a more nuanced view of the merit and utility of generalized gradient approximations (GGAs) for the noninteracting kinetic energy (KE) than the critique of Xia and Carter (XC) [Phys. Rev. B 91, 045124 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevB.91.045124]. Specifically, the multiple valuedness of the Pauli term enhancement factor (denoted G [n ] by XC) with respect to the inhomogeneity variable s can be excluded by enforcement of a bound on the Kohn-Sham KE to achieve universality of the functional along with enforcement of proper large-s behavior. This is physically sensible in that the excluded G values occur for s values that correspond to low densities. The behavior is exacerbated by peculiarities of pseudodensities. The VT84F KE GGA, constructed with these constraints, does not have the numerical instability in our older PBE2 functional analyzed by XC.

  8. Laboratory investigation of the role of desorption kinetics on americium transport associated with bentonite colloids.

    PubMed

    Dittrich, Timothy Mark; Boukhalfa, Hakim; Ware, Stuart Douglas; Reimus, Paul William

    2015-10-01

    Understanding the parameters that control colloid-mediated transport of radionuclides is important for the safe disposal of used nuclear fuel. We report an experimental and reactive transport modeling examination of americium transport in a groundwater-bentonite-fracture fill material system. A series of batch sorption and column transport experiments were conducted to determine the role of desorption kinetics from bentonite colloids in the transport of americium through fracture materials. We used fracture fill material from a shear zone in altered granodiorite collected from the Grimsel Test Site (GTS) in Switzerland and colloidal suspensions generated from FEBEX bentonite, a potential repository backfill material. The colloidal suspension (100 mg L(-1)) was prepared in synthetic groundwater that matched the natural water chemistry at GTS and was spiked with 5.5 × 10(-10) M (241)Am. Batch characterizations indicated that 97% of the americium in the stock suspension was adsorbed to the colloids. Breakthrough experiments conducted by injecting the americium colloidal suspension through three identical columns in series, each with mean residence times of 6 h, show that more than 95% of the bentonite colloids were transported through each of the columns, with modeled colloid filtration rates (k(f)) of 0.01-0.02 h(-1). Am recoveries in each column were 55-60%, and Am desorption rate constants from the colloids, determined from 1-D transport modeling, were 0.96, 0.98, and 0.91 h(-1) in the three columns, respectively. The consistency in Am recoveries and desorption rate constants in each column indicates that the Am was not associated with binding sites of widely-varying strengths on the colloids, as one binding site with fast kinetics represented the system accurately for all three sequential columns. Our data suggest that colloid-mediated transport of Am in a bentonite-fracture fill material system is unlikely to result in transport over long distance scales because

  9. Laboratory investigation of the role of desorption kinetics on americium transport associated with bentonite colloids.

    PubMed

    Dittrich, Timothy Mark; Boukhalfa, Hakim; Ware, Stuart Douglas; Reimus, Paul William

    2015-10-01

    Understanding the parameters that control colloid-mediated transport of radionuclides is important for the safe disposal of used nuclear fuel. We report an experimental and reactive transport modeling examination of americium transport in a groundwater-bentonite-fracture fill material system. A series of batch sorption and column transport experiments were conducted to determine the role of desorption kinetics from bentonite colloids in the transport of americium through fracture materials. We used fracture fill material from a shear zone in altered granodiorite collected from the Grimsel Test Site (GTS) in Switzerland and colloidal suspensions generated from FEBEX bentonite, a potential repository backfill material. The colloidal suspension (100 mg L(-1)) was prepared in synthetic groundwater that matched the natural water chemistry at GTS and was spiked with 5.5 × 10(-10) M (241)Am. Batch characterizations indicated that 97% of the americium in the stock suspension was adsorbed to the colloids. Breakthrough experiments conducted by injecting the americium colloidal suspension through three identical columns in series, each with mean residence times of 6 h, show that more than 95% of the bentonite colloids were transported through each of the columns, with modeled colloid filtration rates (k(f)) of 0.01-0.02 h(-1). Am recoveries in each column were 55-60%, and Am desorption rate constants from the colloids, determined from 1-D transport modeling, were 0.96, 0.98, and 0.91 h(-1) in the three columns, respectively. The consistency in Am recoveries and desorption rate constants in each column indicates that the Am was not associated with binding sites of widely-varying strengths on the colloids, as one binding site with fast kinetics represented the system accurately for all three sequential columns. Our data suggest that colloid-mediated transport of Am in a bentonite-fracture fill material system is unlikely to result in transport over long distance scales because

  10. Laboratory investigation of the role of desorption kinetics on americium transport associated with bentonite colloids

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dittrich, Timothy Mark; Boukhalfa, Hakim; Ware, Stuart Douglas; Reimus, Paul William

    2015-07-13

    Understanding the parameters that control colloid-mediated transport of radionuclides is important for the safe disposal of used nuclear fuel. We report an experimental and reactive transport modeling examination of americium transport in a groundwater–bentonite–fracture fill material system. A series of batch sorption and column transport experiments were conducted to determine the role of desorption kinetics from bentonite colloids in the transport of americium through fracture materials. We used fracture fill material from a shear zone in altered granodiorite collected from the Grimsel Test Site (GTS) in Switzerland and colloidal suspensions generated from FEBEX bentonite, a potential repository backfill material. Themore » colloidal suspension (100 mg L–1) was prepared in synthetic groundwater that matched the natural water chemistry at GTS and was spiked with 5.5 × 10–10 M241Am. Batch characterizations indicated that 97% of the americium in the stock suspension was adsorbed to the colloids. Breakthrough experiments conducted by injecting the americium colloidal suspension through three identical columns in series, each with mean residence times of 6 h, show that more than 95% of the bentonite colloids were transported through each of the columns, with modeled colloid filtration rates (kf) of 0.01–0.02 h–1. Am recoveries in each column were 55–60%, and Am desorption rate constants from the colloids, determined from 1-D transport modeling, were 0.96, 0.98, and 0.91 h–1 in the three columns, respectively. The consistency in Am recoveries and desorption rate constants in each column indicates that the Am was not associated with binding sites of widely-varying strengths on the colloids, as one binding site with fast kinetics represented the system accurately for all three sequential columns. As a result, our data suggest that colloid-mediated transport of Am in a bentonite-fracture fill material system is unlikely to result in transport over long

  11. Laboratory investigation of the role of desorption kinetics on americium transport associated with bentonite colloids

    SciTech Connect

    Dittrich, Timothy Mark; Boukhalfa, Hakim; Ware, Stuart Douglas; Reimus, Paul William

    2015-07-13

    Understanding the parameters that control colloid-mediated transport of radionuclides is important for the safe disposal of used nuclear fuel. We report an experimental and reactive transport modeling examination of americium transport in a groundwater–bentonite–fracture fill material system. A series of batch sorption and column transport experiments were conducted to determine the role of desorption kinetics from bentonite colloids in the transport of americium through fracture materials. We used fracture fill material from a shear zone in altered granodiorite collected from the Grimsel Test Site (GTS) in Switzerland and colloidal suspensions generated from FEBEX bentonite, a potential repository backfill material. The colloidal suspension (100 mg L–1) was prepared in synthetic groundwater that matched the natural water chemistry at GTS and was spiked with 5.5 × 10–10 M241Am. Batch characterizations indicated that 97% of the americium in the stock suspension was adsorbed to the colloids. Breakthrough experiments conducted by injecting the americium colloidal suspension through three identical columns in series, each with mean residence times of 6 h, show that more than 95% of the bentonite colloids were transported through each of the columns, with modeled colloid filtration rates (kf) of 0.01–0.02 h–1. Am recoveries in each column were 55–60%, and Am desorption rate constants from the colloids, determined from 1-D transport modeling, were 0.96, 0.98, and 0.91 h–1 in the three columns, respectively. The consistency in Am recoveries and desorption rate constants in each column indicates that the Am was not associated with binding sites of widely-varying strengths on the colloids, as one binding site with fast kinetics represented the system accurately for all three sequential columns. As a result, our data suggest that colloid-mediated transport of Am in a bentonite-fracture fill

  12. The BioFilm Ring Test: a Rapid Method for Routine Analysis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm Formation Kinetics.

    PubMed

    Olivares, Elodie; Badel-Berchoux, Stéphanie; Provot, Christian; Jaulhac, Benoît; Prévost, Gilles; Bernardi, Thierry; Jehl, François

    2016-03-01

    Currently, few techniques are available for the evaluation of bacterial biofilm adhesion. These detection tools generally require time for culture and/or arduous handling steps. In this work, the BioFilm Ring Test (BRT), a new technology, was used to estimate the biofilm formation kinetics of 25 strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, isolated from the sputum of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. The principle of the new assay is based on the mobility measurement of magnetic microbeads mixed with a bacterial suspension in a polystyrene microplate. If free to move under the magnetic action, particles gather to a visible central spot in the well bottom. Therefore, the absence of spot formation in the plate reflects the bead immobilization by a biofilm in formation. The BRT device allowed us to classify the bacterial strains into three general adhesion profiles. Group 1 consists of bacteria, which are able to form a solid biofilm in <2 h. Group 2 comprises the strains that progressively set up a biofilm during 24 h. Lastly, group 3 includes the strains that stay in a planktonic form. The grouping of our strains did not differ according to culture conditions, i.e., the use of different sets of beads or culture media. The BRT is shown to be an informative tool for the characterization of biofilm-forming bacteria. Various application perspectives may be investigated for this device, such as the addition of antibiotics to the bacterial suspension to select which would have the ability to inhibit the biofilm formation. PMID:26719437

  13. Investigation of the kinetics of oil-suspended particulate matter aggregation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Juan; Zhao, Dongfeng; Zhao, Chaocheng; Liu, Fang; Zheng, Xilai

    2013-11-15

    The process of oil-suspended particulate matter aggregation (OSA) has been recognized by the oil spill remediation community to enhance the natural cleansing of oiled shorelines. A laboratory study was conducted to investigate the kinetics of OSA formation under various mixing intensities using the standard reference material 1941b and Arabian heavy crude oil. The results showed that formation of OSAs increased exponentially with mixing time and reached a maximum within 5h. The maximum oil trapping efficiency increased from 24% to 47%, and the required shaking time decreased from 4.5 to 1.2h as the sediment concentration and mixing energy increased. The maximum oil-to-sediment ratio reached 0.24-0.68 g oil/g sediment within 5h. Most of the formed OSAs were solid OSAs and single droplet OSAs with low mixing energies, and multi-droplet OSAs with high mixing energies. The sizes of the dispersed oil droplets and OSAs were also investigated.

  14. CO{sub 2} adsorption: Experimental investigation with kinetics verification and CFD reactor model validation

    SciTech Connect

    Breault, Ronald W,; Huckaby, Ernest D.; Shadle, Lawrence J; Spenik, James L.

    2013-01-01

    The National Energy Technology Laboratory is investigating a new process for CO{sub 2} capture from large sources such as utility power generation facilities as an alternative to liquid amine based absorption processes. Many, but not all of these advanced dry processes are based upon sorbents composed of supported polyamines. In this analysis, experiments have been conducted in a small facility at different temperatures and compared to CFD reactor predictions using kinetics obtained from TGA tests. This particular investigation compares the predicted performance and the experimental performance of one of these new class of sorbents in a fluidized bed reactor. In the experiment, the sorbent absorbs CO{sub 2} from simulated flue gas in a riser reactor, separates the carbonated particles from the de-carbonated flue gas in a cyclone and then regenerates the sorbent, creating a concentrated stream of pure CO{sub 2} for sequestration. In this work, experimental measurements of adsorption are compared to predictions from a 3-dimensional non-isothermal reacting multiphase flow model. The effects of the gas flow rate and reactor temperature are explored. It is shown that the time duration for CO{sub 2} adsorption decreased for an increase in the gas flow. The details of the experimental facility and the model as well as the comparative analysis between the data and the simulation results are discussed.

  15. Rapid arsenite oxidation by Thermus aquaticus and Thermus thermophilus: Field and laboratory investigations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gihring, T.M.; Druschel, G.K.; McCleskey, R.B.; Hamers, R.J.; Banfield, J.F.

    2001-01-01

    Thermus aquaticus and Thermus thermophilus, common inhabitants of terrestrial hot springs and thermally polluted domestic and industrial waters, have been found to rapidly oxidize arsenite to arsenate. Field investigations at a hot spring in Yellowstone National Park revealed conserved total arsenic transport and rapid arsenite oxidation occurring within the drainage channel. This environment was heavily colonized by Thermus aquaticus. In laboratory experiments, arsenite oxidation by cultures of Thermus aquaticus YT1 (previously isolated from Yellowstone National Park) and Thermus thermophilus HB8 was accelerated by a factor of over 100 relative to abiotic controls. Thermus aquaticus and Thermus thermophilus may therefore play a large and previously unrecognized role in determining arsenic speciation and bioavailability in thermal environments.

  16. Kinetic investigation of the action of hyaluronidase on hyaluronan using the Morgan-Elson and neocuproine assays.

    PubMed

    Vercruysse, K P; Lauwers, A R; Demeester, J M

    1995-08-15

    In this paper we describe kinetic investigations of the action of testicular hyaluronidase on hyaluronan. We have compared the use of two spectrophotometric assays, the first based on the Morgan-Elson reaction and the second on the neocuproine reaction. With the neocuproine reaction Km was found to be 0.46 mg/ml and Vmax to be 126 nmol l-1 s-1. Because of a low sensitivity and the production of interfering precipitates, the Morgan-Elson assay cannot be used for kinetic investigation of the enzyme. Furthermore this assay is prone to interference from compounds such as disodium cromoglycate, (+)-catechine, penicillamine, CaCl2 and acetate buffer.

  17. A kinetic investigation on the gas-phase reaction of ozone with four sesquiterpenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richters, Stefanie; Herrmann, Hartmut; Berndt, Torsten

    2014-05-01

    Sesquiterpenes (C15H24, SQT) are emitted by plants with a global emission rate of about 15 Tg per year (Seinfeld and Pankow, 2003). They are possibly an important source of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) but their oxidation processes are scarcely examined. This study focusses on the kinetics of the reaction of ozone with four atmospherically relevant SQT: β-caryophyllene, α-humulene, α-cedrene and isolongifolene. Up to now there are only two studies available in the literature describing kinetic measurements of the ozonolysis of a series of SQT, (Shu and Atkinson, 1994; Ghalaieny et al., 2012). As a result of these studies the rate coefficients of the ozone reaction with β-caryophyllene and α-humulene differ by three orders of magnitude making a reinvestigation necessary. Both literature studies were carried out in a reaction chamber with long reaction times. Shu and Atkinson (1994) used high concentrations of [SQT] = 2.4 • 1013 molecules cm-3 and [O3] = 2.5 • 1012 molecules cm-3 making particle formation and consecutive reactions relevant. The latter study of Ghalaieny et al. (2012) investigated the reaction at even higher concentrations ([SQT] = (2.1 - 3.5) • 1014 molecules cm-3, [O3] > 2.1 • 1015 molecules cm-3) at elevated temperatures (366 K) to avoid particle formation. Our study was carried out with very low SQT concentrations ((1 - 2) • 1010 molecules cm-3), [O3] = (1 - 15) • 1011 molecules cm-3, in a flow tube at atmospheric pressure and room temperature. The relative rate coefficients were investigated by means of an online GC-MS technique allowing measuring SQT concentrations down to 109 molecules cm-3. Particle formation was detected using an ultrafine condensed particle counter (TSI-3025 with a 50% cut-off size of 2.5 - 3 nm) and was found to be negligible under the chosen reaction conditions. Our study supports the rate coefficients as given by Shu and Atkinson (1994). References: J. H. Seinfeld and J. F. Pankow, Annu. Rev. Phys

  18. Investigation of False Positive Results with an Oral Fluid Rapid HIV-1/2 Antibody Test

    PubMed Central

    Jafa, Krishna; Patel, Pragna; MacKellar, Duncan A.; Sullivan, Patrick S.; Delaney, Kevin P.; Sides, Tracy L.; Newman, Alexandra P.; Paul, Sindy M.; Cadoff, Evan M.; Martin, Eugene G.; Keenan, Patrick A.; Branson, Bernard M.

    2007-01-01

    Background In March 2004, the OraQuick® rapid HIV antibody test became the first rapid HIV test approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for use on oral fluid specimens. Test results are available in 20 minutes, and the oral fluid test is non-invasive. From August 2004–June 2005, we investigated a sudden increase in false-positive results occurring in a performance study of OraQuick® oral-fluid rapid HIV tests in Minnesota. Methodology/Principal Findings In a field investigation, we reviewed performance study data on oral-fluid and whole-blood OraQuick® rapid HIV test device lots and expiration dates and assessed test performance and interpretation with oral-fluid and whole-blood specimens by operators who reported false-positive results. We used multivariate logistic regression to evaluate client demographic and risk characteristics associated with false-positive results. Next, we conducted an incidence study of false-positive OraQuick rapid HIV tests in nine US cities and tested both oral-fluid and finger-stick whole-blood specimens from clients; reactive tests were confirmed with Western blot. Sixteen (4.1%) false-positive oral-fluid results occurred in the performance study from April 15, 2004 through August 31, 2004 with unexpired devices from six test lots among 388 HIV-uninfected clients (specificity, 95.9%; 95% CI: 93.4–97.6). Three test operators who had reported false-positive results performed and interpreted the test according to package-insert instructions. In multivariate analysis, only older age was significantly associated with false-positive results (adjusted odds ratio = 4.5, 95% CI: 1.2–25.7). In the incidence study, all valid oral-fluid and whole-blood results from 2,268 clients were concordant and no false-positive results occurred (100% specificity). Conclusions/Significance The field investigation did not identify a cause for the increase in false-positive oral-fluid results, and the incidence study detected no false

  19. In-depth investigation on the pyrolysis kinetics of raw biomass. Part I: kinetic analysis for the drying and devolatilization stages.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dengyu; Zheng, Yan; Zhu, Xifeng

    2013-03-01

    An in-depth investigation was conducted on the kinetic analysis of raw biomass using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), from which the activation energy distribution of the whole pyrolysis process was obtained. Two different stages, namely, drying stage (Stage I) and devolatilization stage (Stage II), were shown in the pyrolysis process in which the activation energy values changed with conversion. The activation energy at low conversions (below 0.15) in the drying stage ranged from 10 to 30 kJ/mol. Such energy was calculated using the nonisothermal Page model, known as the best model to describe the drying kinetics. Kinetic analysis was performed using the distributed activation energy model in a wide range of conversions (0.15-0.95) in the devolatilization stage. The activation energy first ranged from 178.23 to 245.58 kJ/mol and from 159.66 to 210.76 kJ/mol for corn straw and wheat straw, respectively, then increasing remarkably with an irregular trend.

  20. Kinetic investigation and lifetime prediction of Cs-NIPAM-MBA-based thermo-responsive hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Othman, Muhammad Bisyrul Hafi; Khan, Abbas; Ahmad, Zulkifli; Zakaria, Muhammad Razlan; Ullah, Faheem; Akil, Hazizan Md

    2016-01-20

    This study attempted to clarify the influence of a cross-linker, N,N-methylenebisacrylamide (MBA), and N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM) on the non-isothermal kinetic degradation, solid state and lifetime of hydrogels using the Flynn-Wall-Ozawa (F-W-O), Kissinger, and Coats-Redfern (C-Red) methods. The series of dual-responsive Cs-PNIPAM-MBA microgels were synthesized by soapless-emulsion free radical copolymerization in an aqueous medium at 70 °C. The thermal properties were investigated using thermogravimetric analysis (TG) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) under nitrogen atmosphere. The apparent activation energy using the chosen Flynn-Wall-Ozawa and Kissinger methods showed that they fitted each other. Meanwhile, the type of solid state mechanism was determined using the Coats-Redfern method proposed for F1 (pure Cs) and F2 (Cs-PNIPAM-MBA hydrogel series) types, which comprise random nucleation with one nucleus reacting on individual particles, and random nucleation with two nuclei reacting on individual particles, respectively. On average, a higher Ea was attributed to the greater cross-linking density of the Cs hydrogel.

  1. Investigation of the combustion kinetics and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emissions from polycaprolactone combustion.

    PubMed

    Chien, Y C; Yang, S H

    2013-01-01

    Polycaprolactone (PCL) is one of the most attractive biodegradable plastics that has been widely used in medicine and agriculture fields. Because of the large increase in biodegradable plastics usage, the production of waste biodegradable plastics will be increasing dramatically, producing a growing environmental problem. Generally, waste PCL is collected along with municipal solid wastes and then incinerated. This study investigates the combustion kinetics and emission factors of 16 US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) priority polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the PCL combustion. Experimentally, two reactions are involved in the PCL combustion process, possibly resulting in the emission of carbon dioxide, propanal, protonated caprolactone and very small amounts of PAH produced by incomplete combustion. The intermediate products may continuously be oxidized to form CO2. The emission factors for 16 US EPA priority PAHs are n.d. -2.95 microg/g, which are much lower than those of poly lactic acid and other plastics combustion. The conversion of PCL is 100%. Results from this work suggest that combustion is a good choice for the waste PCL disposal.

  2. Micromodel Investigation of Transport Effect on the Kinetics of Reductive Dissolution of Hematite

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Changyong; Liu, Chongxuan; Shi, Zhi

    2013-03-13

    Reductive dissolution of hematite in porous media was investigated using a micromodel with realistic pore network structures that include distinctive advection domain, macro-pores and micro-pores created in silicon substrate. The micromodel pore surface was sputter deposited with a thin layer (230 nm) of hematite. The hematite in the micromodel was reduced by injecting pH-varying solutions containing a reduced form of flavin mononucleotide (FMNH2), a biogenic soluble electron transfer mediator produced by Shewanella species. The reduction kinetics was determined by measuring effluent Fe(II) concentration and by spectroscopically monitoring the hematite dissolution front in the micromodel. Batch experiment was also performed to estimate the hematite reduction rate under the well-mixed condition. The results showed a significant spatial variation in local redox reaction rate that was controlled by the coupled diffusion and reaction. The overall rate of the redox reaction in the micromodel required a three-domain numerical model to effectively describe with distinctive rate parameters in different pore domains. Results from this study demonstrated the important scaling effect when extrapolating geochemical or biogeochemical reaction rate from batch reactor to porous media and indicated a significant control of physical transport mechanisms on the reaction rate scaling.

  3. Further investigation of the mechanism of Doxorubicin release from P105 micelles using kinetic models

    PubMed Central

    Stevenson-Abouelnasr, Dana; Husseini, Ghaleb A.; Pitt, William G.

    2007-01-01

    The kinetics of the release of Doxorubicin from Pluronic P105 micelles during ultrasonication and its subsequent re-encapsulation upon cessation of insonation were investigated. Four mechanisms are proposed to explain the acoustically-triggered Doxorubicin (Dox) release and re-encapsulation from Pluronic P105 micelles. The four mechanisms are: micelle destruction; destruction of cavitating nuclei; reassembly of micelles, and the re-encapsulation of Dox. The first mechanism, the destruction of micelles during insonation, causes the release of Dox into solution. The micelles are destroyed because of cavitation events produced by collapsing nuclei, or bubbles in the insonated solution. The second mechanism, the slow destruction of cavitating nuclei, results in a slow partial recovery phase, when a small amount of Dox is re-encapsulated. The third and fourth mechanisms, the reassembly of micelles and the re-encapsulatin of Dox, are independent of ultrasound. These two mechanism are responsible for maintaining the drug release at a partial level, and for recovery after insonation ceases. A normal distribution was used to describe micellar size. Parameters for the model were determined based upon the best observed fit to experimental data. The resulting model provides a good approximation to experimental data for the release of Dox from Pluronic P105 micelles. PMID:17207611

  4. Survey of high-enthalpy shock facilities in the perspective of radiation and chemical kinetics investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynier, Philippe

    2016-08-01

    This contribution is a survey of the capabilities of the main facilities, shock-tubes, shock-tunnels, expansion tubes and hot-shots that allow the experimental investigation of chemical kinetics and radiation of hypersonic flows encountered during atmospheric entry. At first, the capabilities of the main facilities available in Australia, Asia, Europe, and United States, have been surveyed using the available literature, and the specific use of each facility identified. The second step of the study consists in an analysis of each type of shock facility to identify their advantages and drawbacks. The main objective of this analysis is to support a trade-off for the selection of the type of facility to be developed in order to give Europe a ground test with the capabilities to support future exploration and sample return missions. The last point of the study has been to identify the experimental datasets related to the targeted application, and to select the most attractive for the validation of the future facility.

  5. A kinetic Monte Carlo approach to investigate antibiotic translocation through bacterial porins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceccarelli, Matteo; Vargiu, Attilio V.; Ruggerone, Paolo

    2012-03-01

    Many relevant biological processes take place on time scales not reachable by standard all-atom computer simulations. The translocation of antibiotics through non-specific bacterial porins is an example. Microscopic effects compete to determine penetration routes and, consequently, free energy barriers to be overcome. Since bacteria can develop resistance to treatment also by reducing their antibiotic permeability, to understand the microscopic aspects of antibiotic translocation is an important step to rationalize drug design. Here, to investigate the translocation we propose a complete numerical model that combines the diffusion-controlled rate theory and a kinetic Monte Carlo scheme based on both experimental data and microscopically well-founded all-atom simulations. Within our model, an antibiotic translocating through an hour-glass-shaped channel can be described as a molecule moving on a potential of mean force featuring several affinity sites and a high central barrier. The implications of our results for the characterization of antibiotic translocation at in vivo concentrations are discussed. The presence of an affinity site close to the mouth of the channel seems to favor the translocation of antibiotics, the affinity site acting as a particle reservoir. Possible connections between results and the appearance of mutations in clinical strains are also outlined.

  6. Kinetic and mechanistic investigations of the degradation of sulfamethazine in heat-activated persulfate oxidation process.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yan; Ji, Yuefei; Kong, Deyang; Lu, Junhe; Zhou, Quansuo

    2015-12-30

    Sulfamethazine (SMZ) is widely used in livestock feeding and aquaculture as an antibiotic agent and growth promoter. Widespread occurrence of SMZ in surface water, groundwater, soil and sediment has been reported. In this study, degradation of SMZ by heat-activated persulfate (PS) oxidation was investigated in aqueous solution. Experimental results demonstrated that SMZ degradation followed pseudo-first-order reaction kinetics. The pseudo-first-order rate constant (kobs) was increased markedly with increasing concentration of PS and temperature. Radical scavenging tests revealed that the predominant oxidizing species was SO4·(-) with HO playing a less important role. Aniline moiety in SMZ molecule was confirmed to be the reactive site for SO4·(-) attack by comparison with substructural analogs. Nontarget natural water constituents affected SMZ removal significantly, e.g., Cl(-) and HCO3(-) improved the degradation while fulvic acid reduced it. Reaction products were enriched by solid phase extraction (SPE) and analyzed by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS). 6 products derived from sulfonamide S--N bond cleavage, aniline moiety oxidation and Smiles-type rearrangement were identified, and transformation pathways of SMZ oxidation were proposed. Results reveal that heat-activated PS oxidation could be an efficient approach for remediation of water contaminated by SMZ and related sulfonamides.

  7. In situ biospectroscopic investigation of rapid ischemic and postmortem induced biochemical alterations in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Hackett, Mark J; Britz, Carter J; Paterson, Phyllis G; Nichol, Helen; Pickering, Ingrid J; George, Graham N

    2015-02-18

    Rapid advances in imaging technologies have pushed novel spectroscopic modalities such as Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) at the sulfur K-edge to the forefront of direct in situ investigation of brain biochemistry. However, few studies have examined the extent to which sample preparation artifacts confound results. Previous investigations using traditional analyses, such as tissue dissection, homogenization, and biochemical assay, conducted extensive research to identify biochemical alterations that occur ex vivo during sample preparation. In particular, altered metabolism and oxidative stress may be caused by animal death. These processes were a concern for studies using biochemical assays, and protocols were developed to minimize their occurrence. In this investigation, a similar approach was taken to identify the biochemical alterations that are detectable by two in situ spectroscopic methods (FTIR, XAS) that occur as a consequence of ischemic conditions created during humane animal killing. FTIR and XAS are well suited to study markers of altered metabolism such as lactate and creatine (FTIR) and markers of oxidative stress such as aggregated proteins (FTIR) and altered thiol redox (XAS). The results are in accordance with previous investigations using biochemical assays and demonstrate that the time between animal death and tissue dissection results in ischemic conditions that alter brain metabolism and initiate oxidative stress. Therefore, future in situ biospectroscopic investigations utilizing FTIR and XAS must take into consideration that brain tissue dissected from a healthy animal does not truly reflect the in vivo condition, but rather reflects a state of mild ischemia. If studies require the levels of metabolites (lactate, creatine) and markers of oxidative stress (thiol redox) to be preserved as close as possible to the in vivo condition, then rapid freezing of brain tissue via decapitation into

  8. A Preliminary Investigation of Rapid Depressurization Phenomena Following a Sudden DLOFC in a VHTR

    SciTech Connect

    Richard C. Martineau; Ray A. Berry

    2010-05-01

    Air ingress has been identified as a potential threat for Very High Temperature gas-cooled Reactors (VHTR). Reactor components constructed of graphite will, at high temperatures, produce exothermic reactions in the presence of oxygen. The danger lies in the possibility of fuel element damage and core structural failure. Previous investigations of air ingress mechanisms have focused on thermal and molecular diffusion, density-driven stratified flow due to hydrodynamic instability, and natural convection. Here, we investigate the possibility of a rapid flow reversal of helium coolant due to a Taylor (rarefaction) wave expansion after a hypothetical sudden Depressurized Loss of Forced Cooling (DLOFC) scenario in a VHTR. Conceivably, flow reversal of the helium coolant could entrain significant quantities of air into the reactor vessel. Our analysis starts with a one-dimensional shock tube simulation to simply illustrate the development of a Taylor wave with resulting reentrant flow. Then, a simulation is performed of an idealized two-dimensional axisymmetric representation of the lower plenum of General Atomics GT-MHR subjected to a hypothetical catastrophic break of the hot duct. Analysis shows the potential for significant and rapid air ingress into the reactor vessel in the case of a large break in the cooling system.

  9. A Preliminary Investigation of Rapid Depressurization Phenomena Following a Sudden DLOFC in a VHTR

    SciTech Connect

    Richard C. Martineau; Ray A. Berry; Dana A. Knoll

    2009-03-01

    Air ingress has been identified as a potential threat for Very High Temperature gas-cooled Reactors (VHTR). Reactor components constructed of graphite will, at high temperatures, produce exothermic reactions in the presence of oxygen. The danger lies in the possibility of fuel element damage and core structural failure. Previous investigations of air ingress mechanisms have focused on thermal and molecular diffusion, density-driven stratified flow, and natural convection. Here, we investigate the possibility of a rapid ingress of air due to a Taylor wave expansion after a hypothetical sudden loss of coolant accident (LOCA) scenario in a VHTR. Our analysis starts with a one-dimensional shock tube simulation to simply illustrate the development of a Taylor wave with resulting reentrant flow. Then, a simulation is performed of an idealized two-dimensional axisymmetric representation of the lower plenum of General Atomics GT-MHR subjected to a hypothetical catastrophic break of the hot duct. Analysis shows the potential for significant and rapid air ingress into the reactor vessel in the case of a large break in the cooling system.

  10. [Investigation of "reading" with FFT analysis of the beta waves in EEG during "rapid-reading"].

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, S

    1992-06-01

    The beta waves in electroencephalograms (EEGs) during "reading" were investigated by means of the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) analysis method. The subjects who had mastered a "rapid-reading" method, were classified into two groups according to their rapid-reading achievement level: the "under-trained readers" (male 5, female 2) had already acquired the ability of smooth eye movement, but continued to use the mental phonetic process while reading. The "well-trained readers" (male 6, female 2) could understand the contents of the text without resorting to such phonetic process. All subjects were righthanded. The tasks were designed to eliminate the artifact of the eye movement and the electromyogram as much as possible. The EEGs were recorded with twelve channels of the international standard 10-20 electrode system. The relative power value (R.P.V.) was calculated as follows: RPV(%) = [(X-C)/N] x 100(%) where X is the beta 1 or beta 2 power value by FFT analysis while doing tasks, C is the power value while doing control tasks, and N is the value in the resting state with the eyes open. The results were statistically analyzed by paired t-test. The following results were obtained: In both groups; (a) the left angular gyrus was usually activate during the rapid-reading; (b) the Wernicke's center was activated only during reading with the phonetic process; (c) in the well-trained readers the activation of the right visual cortex was associated with some visual imaging during the rapid-reading; (d) in the under-trained readers, the association between the activation of the central frontal area and the rapid-reading was observed. Thus, the following model for "reading" was obtained: Two parallel pathways seem important in the processing of the verbal information presented visually; one relates only to the left angular gyrus where the visual-verbal information is processed directly, and the other relates to the interactive pathway between the left angular gyrus and the

  11. Very rapid virologic response and early HCV response kinetics, as quick measures to compare efficacy and guide a personalized response-guided therapy

    PubMed Central

    Yakoot, Mostafa; Abdo, Alaa M; Yousry, Ahmed; Helmy, Sherine

    2016-01-01

    Background This is the second and final report for our study designed to compare two generic sofosbuvir products for the degree and speed of virologic response to a dual anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV) treatment protocol. We aimed to test the applicability of the early virus response kinetics and the very rapid virologic response (vRVR) rate as quick outcome measures for accelerated comparative efficacy studies and as a foundation for a personalized response-guided therapy. Methods Fifty eligible chronic HCV patients were randomized to either one of two generic sofosbuvir products (Gratisovir or Grateziano) at a daily dose of one 400 mg tablet plus a weight-based ribavirin dose. Data were compared between the groups for early virus response kinetics and vRVR rates in relation to the rates of final sustained virologic response at week 12 posttreatment (SVR12). Results The Log10 transformed virus load (Log polymerase chain reaction) curves showed fairly similar rapid decline during the first 2 weeks, with no significant difference between the groups at four analysis points throughout the study by repeated-measures factorial analysis of variance test (P=0.48). The SVR12 rates were 96% (95% confidence interval, 79.6%–99.9%) in Gratisovir group (24/25) and 95.7% (95% confidence interval, 78%–99.9%) in Grateziano group (22/23). There was no statistically significant difference found by exact test (P>0.999). There was a significant association between the vRVR and the SVR12, with 100% positive predictive value (38/38 of those who had vRVR, achieved a final SVR12) and 82.6% sensitivity (among the total 46 with SVR12, 38 were having vRVR). Conclusion We can conclude from our study that the early HCV response kinetics and the vRVR rates could be used as sensitive quick markers for efficacy (with a very high positive predictive value for SVR12), based on our accelerated comparative efficacy research model. This might open the way for new models of accelerated equivalence

  12. Very rapid virologic response and early HCV response kinetics, as quick measures to compare efficacy and guide a personalized response-guided therapy

    PubMed Central

    Yakoot, Mostafa; Abdo, Alaa M; Yousry, Ahmed; Helmy, Sherine

    2016-01-01

    Background This is the second and final report for our study designed to compare two generic sofosbuvir products for the degree and speed of virologic response to a dual anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV) treatment protocol. We aimed to test the applicability of the early virus response kinetics and the very rapid virologic response (vRVR) rate as quick outcome measures for accelerated comparative efficacy studies and as a foundation for a personalized response-guided therapy. Methods Fifty eligible chronic HCV patients were randomized to either one of two generic sofosbuvir products (Gratisovir or Grateziano) at a daily dose of one 400 mg tablet plus a weight-based ribavirin dose. Data were compared between the groups for early virus response kinetics and vRVR rates in relation to the rates of final sustained virologic response at week 12 posttreatment (SVR12). Results The Log10 transformed virus load (Log polymerase chain reaction) curves showed fairly similar rapid decline during the first 2 weeks, with no significant difference between the groups at four analysis points throughout the study by repeated-measures factorial analysis of variance test (P=0.48). The SVR12 rates were 96% (95% confidence interval, 79.6%–99.9%) in Gratisovir group (24/25) and 95.7% (95% confidence interval, 78%–99.9%) in Grateziano group (22/23). There was no statistically significant difference found by exact test (P>0.999). There was a significant association between the vRVR and the SVR12, with 100% positive predictive value (38/38 of those who had vRVR, achieved a final SVR12) and 82.6% sensitivity (among the total 46 with SVR12, 38 were having vRVR). Conclusion We can conclude from our study that the early HCV response kinetics and the vRVR rates could be used as sensitive quick markers for efficacy (with a very high positive predictive value for SVR12), based on our accelerated comparative efficacy research model. This might open the way for new models of accelerated equivalence

  13. Investigation of thermoluminescence and kinetic parameters of CaMgB2O5: Dy3+ nanophosphor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manhas, M.; Kumar, Vinay; Ntwaeaborwa, O. M.; Swart, H. C.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, thermoluminescence (TL) properties of Dy3+ (1.5 mol %) doped CaMgB2O5 nanophosphor after being exposed to ultraviolet (UV) radiations (λ=254nm) were investigated. In UV exposed samples, the thermoluminescence glow curve consists of a broad glow peak located at 380 K with a small shoulder at 507 K. A shift in glow peak temperature from 367 K to 380 K after the UV exposure for 80 min was observed, which clearly shows that glow peaks follow the second order kinetics. The TL intensity of the peaks increases with an increase in the exposure time of UV rays (10-180 min). The TL Anal program was used to analyze the glow curve. The kinetic parameters such as activation energy (E), the frequency factor (s) and the order of kinetics (b) were calculated for CaMgB2O5: Dy3+ nanophosphors.

  14. Ex-Situ Kinetic Investigations of the Formation of the Poly-Oxo Cluster U38.

    PubMed

    Falaise, Clément; Volkringer, Christophe; Hennig, Christoph; Loiseau, Thierry

    2015-11-01

    The ex-situ qualitative study of the kinetic formation of the poly-oxo cluster U38 , has been investigated after the solvothermal reaction. The resulting products have been characterized by means of powder XRD and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) for the solid phase and UV/Vis, X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES), extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), and NMR spectroscopies for the supernatant liquid phase. The analysis of the different synthesis batches, stopped at different reaction times, revealed the formation of spherical crystallites of UO2 from t=3 h, after the formation of unknown solid phases at an early stage. The crystallization of U38 occurred from t=4 h at the expense of UO2 , and is completed after t=8 h. Starting from pure uranium(IV) species in solution (t=0-1 h), oxidation reactions are observed with a U(IV) /U(VI) ratio of 70:30 for t=1-3 h. Then, the ratio is inversed with a U(IV) /U(VI) ratio of 25/75, when the precipitation of UO2 occurs. Thorough SEM observations of the U38 crystallites showed that the UO2 aggregates are embedded within. This may indicate that UO2 acts as reservoir of uranium(IV), for the formation of U38 , stabilized by benzoate and THF ligands. During the early stages of the U38 crystallization, a transient crystallized phase appeared at t=4 h. Its crystal structure revealed a new dodecanuclear moiety (U12 ), based on the inner hexanuclear core of {U6 O8 } type, decorated by three additional pairs of dinuclear U2 units. The U12 motif is stabilized by benzoate, oxalates, and glycolate ligands. PMID:26418869

  15. Purification of 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase from parsley (Petroselinum hortense) leaves and investigation of some kinetic properties.

    PubMed

    Demir, Hülya; Ciftçi, Mehmet; Küfrevioğlu, O Irfan

    2003-02-01

    In this study, 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (E.C.1.1.44; 6PGD) was purified from parsley (Petroselinum hortense) leaves, and analysis of the kinetic behavior and some properties of the enzyme were investigated. The purification consisted of three steps that are preparation of homogenate ammonium sulfate fractionation and on DEAE-Sephadex A50 ion exchange. The enzyme was obtained with a yield of 49% and had a specific activity of 18.3 U (mg proteins)(-1) (Lehninger, A.L.; Nelson, D.L.; Cox, M.M. Principles of Biochemistry, 2nd Ed.; Worth Publishers Inc.: N.Y., 2000, 558-560). The overall purification was about 339-fold. A temperature of +4 degrees C was maintained during the purification process. Enzyme activity was spectrophotometrically measured according to the Beutler method at 340 mn. In order to control the purification of the enzyme, SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was carried out in 4% and 10% acrylamide for stacking and running gel, respectively. SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed a single band for enzyme. The molecular weight was found to be 97.5 kDa by Sephadex G-150 gel filtration chromatography. A protein band corresponding to a subunit molecular weight of 24.1 kDa was obtained on SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. For the enzymes, the stable pH, optimum pH, and optimum temperature were found as 8.0, 8.0, and 50 degrees C, respectively. In addition, KM and Vmax values for NADP+ and G6-P at optimum pH and 25 degrees C were determined by means of Lineweaver-Burk plots.

  16. Investigation of Copper Ammonia Leaching from Smelter Slags: Characterization, Leaching and Kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bidari, Ehsan; Aghazadeh, Valeh

    2015-10-01

    Although ammonia leaching of copper from slags has been reported generally as a part of copper slag utilization methods, but no detailed studies have been reported in the literature. In this research, we tried to investigate the effect of different parameters on ammonia leaching of copper from copper smelting slag by identifying different copper-bearing phases and following them during leaching time. Mineralogical characterization of the smelting slag (1.7 pct Cu) was done using X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffraction, optical microscopy, diagnostic leaching tests, and scanning electron microscopy. The characterization studies indicated that main copper-bearing species are soluble copper oxides and chalcocite along with minor amount of covellite, bornite, blister copper particles, and chalcopyrite. It was also found that only approximately 0.2 pct Cu was present in the insoluble bulk silicate phases. These results suggest that approximately 88 pct of the total copper of slag could be extracted by ammonia sulfide leaching. Leaching tests were carried out and the effects of various parameters, namely pH, ammonia concentration, temperature, presence of oxygen, stirring speed, and pulp density were examined on copper leaching. The temperature and stirring speed had the most pronounced effect on the copper leaching, whereas ammonia affected the leaching yield at low concentrations of ammonia. It was found that 78 pct of Cu could be extracted within 4 hours and under optimum conditions: T = 343 K (70 °C), 2M ammonia, pH 10.5, stirring speed = 900 rpm, pulp density = 10 pct ( w s/ v). The kinetic data were analyzed with the shrinking core models, and it was found that the leaching process is controlled by both the interfacial transfer and diffusion across the product layer and the activation energy is calculated to be 49.4 kJ mol-1.

  17. Thermal stability investigation and the kinetic study of Folnak degradation process under nonisothermal conditions.

    PubMed

    Jankovi, Bojan

    2010-03-01

    The nonisothermal degradation process of Folnak drug samples was investigated by simultaneous thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis in the temperature range from an ambient one up to 810 degrees C. It was established that the degradation proceeds through the five degradation stages (designated as I, II, III, IV, and V), which include: the dehydration (I), the melting process of excipients (II), as well as the decomposition of folic acid (III), corn starch (IV), and saccharose (V), respectively. It was established that the presented excipients show a different behavior from that of the pure materials. During degradation, all excipients increase their thermal stability, and some kind of solid-solid and/or solid-gas interaction occurs. The kinetic parameters and reaction mechanism for the folic acid decomposition were established using different calculation procedures. It was concluded that the folic acid decomposition mechanism cannot be explained by the simple reaction order (ROn) model (n = 1) but with the complex reaction mechanism which includes the higher reaction orders (RO, n > 1), with average value of = 1.91. The isothermal predictions of the third (III) degradation stage of Folnak sample, at four different temperatures (T (iso) = 180 degrees C, 200 degrees C, 220 degrees C, and 260 degrees C), were established. It was concluded that the shapes of the isothermal conversion curves at lower temperatures (180-200 degrees C) were similar, whereas became more complex with further temperature increase due to the pterin and p-amino benzoic acid decomposition behavior, which brings the additional complexity in the overall folic acid decomposition process. PMID:20063077

  18. Rapid turnover of a component required for photosynthesis explains temperature dependence and kinetics of photoinhibition in a cyanobacterium, Synechococcus 6301.

    PubMed

    Wünschmann, G; Brand, J J

    1992-02-01

    Illumination of a liquid culture of Synechococcus 6301 at high photon flux density (PFD) elicits a time-dependent first-order exponential decline in relative quantum yield of photosynthetic O2 evolution to some steady-state value. Full photosynthetic activity is restored, also as a time-dependent first-order process, when the photoinhibited culture is transferred to lower PFD. Temperature and irradiation dependence of photoinhibition were measured under conditions which precluded simultaneous recovery from photoinhibition. Also the temperature and irradiation dependence of recovery from photoinhibition were determined under conditions which precluded simultaneous photoinhibition. Kinetics of photoinhibition were sensitive to PFD but relatively independent of temperature. Kinetics of recovery saturated at low PFD but were very temperature dependent at all PFDs. A general equation can be written to predict the change in photosynthetic activity versus time when a cell culture is placed at photoinhibitory PFD, assuming that first-order exponential photoinhibition and first-order exponential recovery from photoinhibition occur simultaneously. The equation can be made specific if the values of the kinetic constant for photoinhibition and for recovery from photoinhibition are known for the particular environmental conditions to which the cells are exposed. These values can be obtained by independently measuring the kinetics of photoinhibition without simultaneous recovery and the kinetics of recovery without simultaneous photoinhibition. The curve of photosynthetic activity versus time for cells placed at high PFD, which is predicted by this equation, precisely fits the experimentally determined kinetics of photoinhibition. This correlation remains valid over a wide range of temperatures and PFDs. Identical results were obtained with the marine cyanobacterium Synechococcus 7002. We conclude that the extent of net photoinhibition over a broad range of conditions represents

  19. Investigation of rapidly solidified aluminum by using diamond turning and a magnetorheological finishing process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yuan-Chieh; Hsu, Wei-Yao; Kuo, Ching-Hsiang; Abou-El-Hossein, Khaled; Otieno, Timothy

    2015-08-01

    The metal mirror has been widely used in optical application for a longtime. Especially the aluminum 6061 is often considered the preferred material for manufacturing optical components for ground-based astronomical applications. One reason for using this material is its high specific stiffness and excellent thermal properties. However, a large amount of data exists for this material and commercially available aluminum 6061 using single point diamond turning (SPDT) and polishing process can achieve surface roughness values of approximately 2 to 4 nm, which is adequate for applications that involve the infrared spectral range, but not for the shorter spectral range. A novel aluminum material, fabricated using a rapid solidification process that is equivalent to the conventional aluminum 6061 alloy grade has been used in optical applications in recent years because of its smaller grain size. In this study, the surface quality of the rapid solidification aluminum after single point diamond turning and followed by magnetorheological finish (MRF) process is investigated and compared with conventional aluminum 6061. Both the surface roughness Ra was evaluated using white light interferometers. Finally, indicators such as optimal fabrication parameter combination and optical performance are discussed.

  20. Using the Deepwater Horizon Disaster to Investigate Natural Biogeochemical Cycling Associated with Rapid Methane Emissions (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessler, J. D.; Valentine, D. L.; Yvon-Lewis, S. A.; Heintz, M. B.; Hu, L.; Garcia Tigreros, F.; Du, M.; Chan, E. W.

    2010-12-01

    On April 20, a violent methane discharge severed the Deepwater Horizon rig from its well and oil and gas began spilling into the deep Gulf of Mexico at depths of ca. 1.5 km simulating a natural, rapid, and short-term methane release in deepwater. Given the estimated rates of emission of total material as well as the fraction methane by weight, one can estimate that a total of 0.1 to 0.3 Tg (10^12 g) of methane were emitted from a localized area in only 83 days. Measurements of methane oxidation and sea-air methane flux were measured in June indicating that at that time, oxidation rates were slow and sea-air fluxes were relatively insignificant. A deepwater methane plume was identified and in June 2010, the depth of the methane plume was on average from 950 - 1150 m with the maximum methane concentration measured being 183 μM. Analyses of diffusion, advective mixing, and methane oxidation were used to estimate that this plume has a lifetime of years to decades with the main controlling factor being the rate of methane oxidation. The persistent nature of this deepwater methane plume allows it to be used as a natural laboratory to investigate key hypotheses concerning the biogeochemical cycling of methane and oxygen associated with rapid, short-term methane discharges.

  1. The development of an experimental facility and investigation of rapidly maneuvering Micro-Air-Vehicle wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Lee Alexander

    Vertical Takeoff-and-Landing (VTOL) Micro Air Vehicles (MAVs) provide a versatile operational platform which combines the capabilities of fixed wing and rotary wing MAVs. In order to improve performance of these vehicles, a better understanding of the rapid transition between horizontal and vertical flight is required. This study examines the flow structures around the Mini-Vertigo VTOL MAV using flow visualization techniques. This will gives an understanding of the flow structures which dominate the flight dynamics of rapid pitching maneuvers. This study consists of three objectives: develop an experimental facility, use flow visualization to investigate the flow around the experimental subject during pitching, and analyze the results. The flow around the Mini-Vertigo VTOL MAV is dominated by the slipstream from its propellers. The slipstream delays LE separation and causes drastic deflection in the flow. While the frequency of the vortices shed from the LE and TE varies with flow speed, the non-dimensional frequency does not. It does, however, vary slightly with the pitching rate. These results are applicable across a wide range of flight conditions. The results correlate to previous research done to examine the aerodynamic forces on the MAV.

  2. An investigation of the kinetics for hydrogen chemisorption on iron metal surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shanabarger, M. R.

    1980-01-01

    A quasi-isothermal approach was used to study the kinetics of hydrogen and hydrogen sulfide chemisorption onto iron film in an effort to understand the environmental degradation of steels. The coverage of chemisorbed hydrogen or chemisorbed sulfur was observed as a function of time for fixed conditions of substrate temperature. Auger electron spectroscopy was used to observe the sulfur and chemisorption-induced resistance change was employed to monitor hydrogen coverage. To compare the results obtained from studying the kinetics by two different techniques, the kinetics of oxygen chemisorption onto iron films was also studied. A reaction model utilized to interpret the H2/Fe2 chemisorption kinetics was applied to data from an earlier study on the desorption kinetics for H2 chemisorbed onto nicket films in the vicinity of the Curie temperature of the film. This analysis permitted a separation of the gross desorption process into individual components so that the influence of the magnetic phase transition on the rate constants could be determined.

  3. An investigation into the kinetic (sliding) friction of some tablets and capsules.

    PubMed

    Hancock, Bruno C; Mojica, Nestor; St John-Green, Kimberley; Elliott, James A; Bharadwaj, Rahul

    2010-01-15

    The kinetic (or sliding) friction of pharmaceutical tablets and capsules influences how they will behave during the conveying, coating, and packaging operations that are used for drug product manufacturing. In order to logically design equipment for manufacturing and packaging operations, and to simulate manufacturing and packaging performance (for example, using discrete or finite element modeling approaches), it is necessary to quantify the magnitude of the kinetic friction. In this work, the coefficient of kinetic friction of a range of pharmaceutical tablets and capsules has been measured for the first time using a pin-on-disk tribometer. Binary tablet-tablet contacts and the contacts between tablets or capsules and common equipment surfaces were studied. The range of the friction coefficients was large (between 0.00 and 0.74), and the values depended strongly on the identity of both contacting materials. Tablet-tablet contacts generally exhibited lower friction coefficients than tablet-polymer or tablet-metal contacts. Polymeric surfaces were generally less frictional than metal surfaces, even those that were highly polished. Tablet coatings appeared to have a marked effect on the kinetic friction coefficient between tablets and equipment surfaces, with the hardest coatings tending to be the least frictional. The surface roughness of the tablets and contacting surfaces did not contribute to the coefficient of kinetic friction in a consistent manner. The implications of the results for the design of conveying, processing and packaging operations are discussed.

  4. An investigation on the modelling of kinetics of thermal decomposition of hazardous mercury wastes.

    PubMed

    Busto, Yailen; M G Tack, Filip; Peralta, Luis M; Cabrera, Xiomara; Arteaga-Pérez, Luis E

    2013-09-15

    The kinetics of mercury removal from solid wastes generated by chlor-alkali plants were studied. The reaction order and model-free method with an isoconversional approach were used to estimate the kinetic parameters and reaction mechanism that apply to the thermal decomposition of hazardous mercury wastes. As a first approach to the understanding of thermal decomposition for this type of systems (poly-disperse and multi-component), a novel scheme of six reactions was proposed to represent the behaviour of mercury compounds in the solid matrix during the treatment. An integration-optimization algorithm was used in the screening of nine mechanistic models to develop kinetic expressions that best describe the process. The kinetic parameters were calculated by fitting each of these models to the experimental data. It was demonstrated that the D₁-diffusion mechanism appeared to govern the process at 250°C and high residence times, whereas at 450°C a combination of the diffusion mechanism (D₁) and the third order reaction mechanism (F3) fitted the kinetics of the conversions. The developed models can be applied in engineering calculations to dimension the installations and determine the optimal conditions to treat a mercury containing sludge.

  5. Kinetic study for phenol degradation by ZVI-assisted Fenton reaction and related iron corrosion investigated by X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yoon, In-Ho; Yoo, Gursong; Hong, Hye-Jin; Kim, Jungmin; Kim, Min Gyu; Choi, Wang-Kyu; Yang, Ji-Won

    2016-02-01

    In this study, we investigated phenol degradation via zero-valent iron (ZVI)-assisted Fenton reaction through kinetic and spectroscopic analysis. In batch experiments, 100 mg/L of phenol was completely degraded, and 75% of TOC was removed within 3 min under an optimal hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) concentration (50 mM) via the Fenton reaction. In the absence of H2O2, oxygen (O2) was dissolved into the solution and produced H2O2, which resulted in phenol degradation. However, phenol removal efficiency was not very high compared to external H2O2 input. The Fenton reaction rapidly occurred at the surface of ZVI, and then phenol mobility from the solution to the ZVI surface was the rate determining step of the whole reaction. The pseudo-second order adsorption kinetic model well describes phenol removal, and its rate increased according to the H2O2 concentration. X-ray absorption spectroscopic analysis revealed that iron oxide (Fe-O bonding) was formed on ZVI with [H2O2] > 50 mM. A high concentration of H2O2 led to rapid degradation of phenol and caused corrosion on the ZVI surface, indicating that Fe(2+) ions were rapidly oxidized to Fe(3+) ions due to the Fenton reaction and that Fe(3+) was precipitated as iron oxide on the ZVI surface. However, ZVI did not show corroded characteristics in the absence of H2O2 due to the insufficient ZVI-assisted Fenton reaction and oxidation of Fe(2+) to Fe(3+).

  6. Kinetic study for phenol degradation by ZVI-assisted Fenton reaction and related iron corrosion investigated by X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yoon, In-Ho; Yoo, Gursong; Hong, Hye-Jin; Kim, Jungmin; Kim, Min Gyu; Choi, Wang-Kyu; Yang, Ji-Won

    2016-02-01

    In this study, we investigated phenol degradation via zero-valent iron (ZVI)-assisted Fenton reaction through kinetic and spectroscopic analysis. In batch experiments, 100 mg/L of phenol was completely degraded, and 75% of TOC was removed within 3 min under an optimal hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) concentration (50 mM) via the Fenton reaction. In the absence of H2O2, oxygen (O2) was dissolved into the solution and produced H2O2, which resulted in phenol degradation. However, phenol removal efficiency was not very high compared to external H2O2 input. The Fenton reaction rapidly occurred at the surface of ZVI, and then phenol mobility from the solution to the ZVI surface was the rate determining step of the whole reaction. The pseudo-second order adsorption kinetic model well describes phenol removal, and its rate increased according to the H2O2 concentration. X-ray absorption spectroscopic analysis revealed that iron oxide (Fe-O bonding) was formed on ZVI with [H2O2] > 50 mM. A high concentration of H2O2 led to rapid degradation of phenol and caused corrosion on the ZVI surface, indicating that Fe(2+) ions were rapidly oxidized to Fe(3+) ions due to the Fenton reaction and that Fe(3+) was precipitated as iron oxide on the ZVI surface. However, ZVI did not show corroded characteristics in the absence of H2O2 due to the insufficient ZVI-assisted Fenton reaction and oxidation of Fe(2+) to Fe(3+). PMID:26692518

  7. An Experimental Approach Using Vesicle Size Distribution (VSD) to Investigate the Kinetics of Vesiculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholis, M. G.; Kilinc, A. I.

    2001-05-01

    The exsolution of volatiles in magma initiates the formation of gas bubbles as a result of the development of a state of supersaturation from either magma ascending in the conduit, decrease in temperature, or the crystallization of anhydrous solid phases. In this analysis bubble-free rhyolitic glasses were isothermally decompressed in a series of controlled nucleation experiments to investigate the kinetics of bubble nucleation and growth. A two-fold approach was used to synthetically saturate the high silica melt. The first method is based on using blocks of solid obsidian placed in gold capsules with > 10 wt.% H2O and saturated for 72 hours. The second technique uses powdered obsidian that was saturated with H2O at a given pressure and temperature for 48 hours, quenched, reground, and then repeated one more time. The use of powdered obsidian in the second method evenly saturates the melt by minimizing the volume to surface area ratio, hence the diffusion distance. In all experiments glass charges were saturated with H2O at 100 MPa and 850\\deg C, and than isothermally decompressed at a rate of approximately 0.26 MPa/sec to a final confining pressure of 30, 50, and 70 MPa. Samples were held at the final pressure for a period ranging from 5 to 300 seconds (residence time) to allow for nucleation to take place. Bubble-bearing glass charges were cut, polished, imaged under SEM and Nikon petrographic microscopes, and digitally analyzed with "Scion Image". All glass charges produced by the block method contained either no bubbles or only a few bubbles. The only indication of bubble nucleation was limited in a zone on the outer periphery of the glass charges. This leads us to believe that in the block method the time given for hydration was insufficient for homogeneous saturation of the melt. We directed our attention to the bubble-bearing glasses generated by the powder experiments. Vesicle Size Distribution (VSD) was used to determine the kinetic behavior of bubbles

  8. CP: AN INVESTIGATION OF COEFFICIENT OF THERMAL EXPANSION, DECOMPOSITION KINETICS, AND REACTION TO VARIOUS STIMULI

    SciTech Connect

    Weese, R K; Burnham, A K; Fontes, A T

    2005-03-23

    The properties of pentaamine (5-cyano-2H-tetrazolato-N2) cobalt (III) perchlorate (CP), which was first synthesized in 1968, continues to be of interest for predicting behavior in handling, shipping, aging, and thermal cook-off situations. We report coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) values over four specific temperature ranges, decomposition kinetics using linear heating rates, and the reaction to three different types of stimuli: impact, spark, and friction. The CTE was measured using a Thermal Mechanical Analyzer (TMA) for samples that were uniaxially compressed at 10,000 psi and analyzed over a dynamic temperature range of -20 C to 70 C. Using differential scanning calorimetry, DSC, CP was decomposed at linear heating rates of 1, 3, and 7 C/min and the kinetic triplet calculated using the LLNL code Kinetics05. Values are also reported for spark, friction, and impact sensitivity.

  9. Rapid three-dimensional microfluidic mixer for high viscosity solutions to unravel earlier folding kinetics of G-quadruplex under molecular crowding conditions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chao; Li, Ying; Li, Yiwei; Chen, Peng; Feng, Xiaojun; Du, Wei; Liu, Bi-Feng

    2016-03-01

    Rapid mixing of highly viscous solutions is a great challenge, which helps to analyze the reaction kinetics in viscous liquid phase, particularly to discover the folding kinetics of macromolecules under molecular crowding conditions mimicking the conditions inside cells. Here, we demonstrated a novel microfluidic mixer based on Dean flows with three-dimensional (3D) microchannel configuration for fast mixing of high-viscosity fluids. The main structure contained three consecutive subunits, each consisting of a "U"-type channel followed by a chamber with different width and height. Thus, the two solutions injected from the two inlets would undergo a mixing in the first "U"-type channel due to the Dean flow effect, and simultaneous vortices expansions in both horizontal and vertical directions in the following chamber. Numerical simulations and experimental characterizations confirmed that the micromixer could achieve a mixing time of 122.4μs for solutions with viscosities about 33.6 times that of pure water. It was the fastest micromixer for high viscosity solutions compared with previous reports. With this highly efficient 3D microfluidic mixer, we further characterized the early folding kinetics of human telomere G-quadruplex under molecular crowding conditions, and unravelled a new folding process within 550μs. PMID:26717836

  10. Rapid three-dimensional microfluidic mixer for high viscosity solutions to unravel earlier folding kinetics of G-quadruplex under molecular crowding conditions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chao; Li, Ying; Li, Yiwei; Chen, Peng; Feng, Xiaojun; Du, Wei; Liu, Bi-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Rapid mixing of highly viscous solutions is a great challenge, which helps to analyze the reaction kinetics in viscous liquid phase, particularly to discover the folding kinetics of macromolecules under molecular crowding conditions mimicking the conditions inside cells. Here, we demonstrated a novel microfluidic mixer based on Dean flows with three-dimensional (3D) microchannel configuration for fast mixing of high-viscosity fluids. The main structure contained three consecutive subunits, each consisting of a "U"-type channel followed by a chamber with different width and height. Thus, the two solutions injected from the two inlets would undergo a mixing in the first "U"-type channel due to the Dean flow effect, and simultaneous vortices expansions in both horizontal and vertical directions in the following chamber. Numerical simulations and experimental characterizations confirmed that the micromixer could achieve a mixing time of 122.4μs for solutions with viscosities about 33.6 times that of pure water. It was the fastest micromixer for high viscosity solutions compared with previous reports. With this highly efficient 3D microfluidic mixer, we further characterized the early folding kinetics of human telomere G-quadruplex under molecular crowding conditions, and unravelled a new folding process within 550μs.

  11. 75 FR 11938 - Meridian Automotive Systems, Grand Rapids, MI; Notice of Termination of Investigation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration Meridian Automotive Systems, Grand Rapids, MI; Notice of Termination... Meridian Automotive Systems, Grand Rapids, Michigan (Meridian Automotive). The petitioning group of...

  12. Investigation of ion kinetic effects in direct-drive exploding-pusher implosions at the NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, M. J. Zylstra, A. B.; Séguin, F. H.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Sio, H.; Waugh, C. J.; Sinenian, N.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.; McKenty, P. W.; Hohenberger, M.; Radha, P. B.; Delettrez, J. A.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Betti, R.; Goncharov, V. N.; Knauer, J. P.; Sangster, T. C.; and others

    2014-12-15

    Measurements of yield, ion temperature, areal density (ρR), shell convergence, and bang time have been obtained in shock-driven, D{sub 2} and D{sup 3}He gas-filled “exploding-pusher” inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions at the National Ignition Facility to assess the impact of ion kinetic effects. These measurements probed the shock convergence phase of ICF implosions, a critical stage in hot-spot ignition experiments. The data complement previous studies of kinetic effects in shock-driven implosions. Ion temperature and fuel ρR inferred from fusion-product spectroscopy are used to estimate the ion-ion mean free path in the gas. A trend of decreasing yields relative to the predictions of 2D DRACO hydrodynamics simulations with increasing Knudsen number (the ratio of ion-ion mean free path to minimum shell radius) suggests that ion kinetic effects are increasingly impacting the hot fuel region, in general agreement with previous results. The long mean free path conditions giving rise to ion kinetic effects in the gas are often prevalent during the shock phase of both exploding pushers and ablatively driven implosions, including ignition-relevant implosions.

  13. Investigation of Coal-biomass Catalytic Gasification using Experiments, Reaction Kinetics and Computational Fluid Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Battaglia, Francine; Agblevor, Foster; Klein, Michael; Sheikhi, Reza

    2015-12-31

    A collaborative effort involving experiments, kinetic modeling, and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) was used to understand co-gasification of coal-biomass mixtures. The overall goal of the work was to determine the key reactive properties for coal-biomass mixed fuels. Sub-bituminous coal was mixed with biomass feedstocks to determine the fluidization and gasification characteristics of hybrid poplar wood, switchgrass and corn stover. It was found that corn stover and poplar wood were the best feedstocks to use with coal. The novel approach of this project was the use of a red mud catalyst to improve gasification and lower gasification temperatures. An important results was the reduction of agglomeration of the biomass using the catalyst. An outcome of this work was the characterization of the chemical kinetics and reaction mechanisms of the co-gasification fuels, and the development of a set of models that can be integrated into other modeling environments. The multiphase flow code, MFIX, was used to simulate and predict the hydrodynamics and co-gasification, and results were validated with the experiments. The reaction kinetics modeling was used to develop a smaller set of reactions for tractable CFD calculations that represented the experiments. Finally, an efficient tool was developed, MCHARS, and coupled with MFIX to efficiently simulate the complex reaction kinetics.

  14. An investigation of the kinetics of hydrogen chemisorption on iron metal surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shanabarger, M. R.

    1982-01-01

    The isothermal kinetics of H2, H2S, and O2 chemisorption onto epitaxially grown (III) oriented Fe films were studied. The measurements were made using the techniques of chemisorption induced resistance change and Auger electron spectroscopy (for adsorbed sulfur and oxygen). Also the origin of the chemisorption induced resistance change for these systems and its applicability to kinetic measurements were established. The chemisorption kinetics were interpreted as dissociative chemisorption via an adsorbed molecular species. The applicable rate constants were established. In none of the studies were the rate constants observed to be coverage dependent. By comparing the temperature dependence of the rate constants with absolute rate theory, the binding energies and activation energies of all the kinetic processes were obtained for the H2/Fe system. The initial sticking coefficient was pressure dependent for both the H2/Fe and H2S/Fe systems. This results from the step between the adsorbed molecular state and the dissociated chemisorbed state being the rate limiting step for absorption at certain pressures and temperatures. Estimates were obtained for the temperature dependence of the rate constants for the O2/Fe system.

  15. Investigation of ion kinetic effects in direct-drive exploding-pusher implosions at the NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, M. J.; Zylstra, A. B.; Séguin, F. H.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Sio, H.; Waugh, C. J.; Sinenian, N.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.; McKenty, P. W.; Hohenberger, M.; Radha, P. B.; Delettrez, J. A.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Betti, R.; Goncharov, V. N.; Knauer, J. P.; Sangster, T. C.; LePape, S.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Pino, J.; McNaney, J. M.; Rygg, J. R.; Amendt, P. A.; Bellei, C.; Benedetti, L. R.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Bionta, R. M.; Casey, D. T.; Divol, L.; Edwards, M. J.; Glenn, S.; Glenzer, S. H.; Hicks, D. G.; Kimbrough, J. R.; Landen, O. L.; Lindl, J. D.; Ma, T.; MacPhee, A.; Meezan, N. B.; Moody, J. D.; Moran, M. J.; Park, H.-S.; Remington, B. A.; Robey, H.; Rosen, M. D.; Wilks, S. C.; Zacharias, R. A.; Herrmann, H. W.; Hoffman, N. M.; Kyrala, G. A.; Leeper, R. J.; Olson, R. E.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Nikroo, A.

    2014-12-01

    Measurements of yield, ion temperature, areal density (ρR), shell convergence, and bang time have been obtained in shock-driven, D2 and D3He gas-filled "exploding-pusher" inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions at the National Ignition Facility to assess the impact of ion kinetic effects. These measurements probed the shock convergence phase of ICF implosions, a critical stage in hot-spot ignition experiments. The data complement previous studies of kinetic effects in shock-driven implosions. Ion temperature and fuel ρR inferred from fusion-product spectroscopy are used to estimate the ion-ion mean free path in the gas. A trend of decreasing yields relative to the predictions of 2D draco hydrodynamics simulations with increasing Knudsen number (the ratio of ion-ion mean free path to minimum shell radius) suggests that ion kinetic effects are increasingly impacting the hot fuel region, in general agreement with previous results. The long mean free path conditions giving rise to ion kinetic effects in the gas are often prevalent during the shock phase of both exploding pushers and ablatively driven implosions, including ignition-relevant implosions.

  16. Role of prohormone convertases in pro-neuropeptide Y processing: coexpression and in vitro kinetic investigations.

    PubMed

    Brakch, N; Rist, B; Beck-Sickinger, A G; Goenaga, J; Wittek, R; Bürger, E; Brunner, H R; Grouzmann, E

    1997-12-23

    Proneuropeptide Y (ProNPY) undergoes cleavage at a single dibasic site Lys38-Arg39 resulting in the formation of 1-39 amino acid NPY which is further processed successively by carboxypeptidase-like and peptidylglycine alpha-amidating monooxygenase enzymes. To investigate whether prohormone convertases are involved in ProNPY processing, a vaccinia virus derived expression system was used to coexpress recombinant ProNPY with each of the prohormone convertases PC1/3, PC2, furin, and PACE4 in Neuro2A and NIH 3T3 cell lines as regulated neuroendocrine and constitutive prototype cell lines, respectively. The analysis of processed products shows that only PC1/3 generates NPY in NIH 3T3 cells while both PC1/3 and PC2 are able to generate NPY in Neuro2A cells. The convertases furin and PACE4 are unable to process ProNPY in either cell line. Moreover, comparative in vitro cleavage of recombinant NPY precursor by the enzymes PC1/3, PC2 and furin shows that only PC1/3 and PC2 are involved in specific cleavage of the dibasic site. Kinetic studies demonstrate that PC1/3 cleaves ProNPY more efficiently than PC2. The main difference between the cleavage efficiency is observed in the Vmax values whereas no major difference is observed in Km values. In addition the cleavage by PC1/3 and PC2 of two peptides reproducing the dibasic cleavage site with different amino acid sequence lengths namely (20-49)-ProNPY and (28-43)-ProNPY was studied. These shortened ProNPY substrates, when recognized by the enzymes, are more efficiently cleaved than ProNPY itself. The shortest peptide is not cleaved by PC2 while it is by PC1/3. On the basis of these observations it is proposed, first, that the constitutive secreted NPY does not result from the cleavage carried out by ubiquitously expressed enzymes furin and PACE4; second, that PC1/3 and PC2 are not equipotent in the cleavage of ProNPY; and third, substrate peptide length might discriminate PC1/3 and PC2 processing activity.

  17. Three-stage autoignition of gasoline in an HCCI engine: An experimental and chemical kinetic modeling investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Machrafi, Hatim; Cavadias, Simeon

    2008-12-15

    The alternative HCCI combustion mode presents a possible means for decreasing the pollution with respect to conventional gasoline or diesel engines, while maintaining the efficiency of a diesel engine or even increasing it. This paper investigates the possibility of using gasoline in an HCCI engine and analyzes the autoignition of gasoline in such an engine. The compression ratio that has been used is 13.5, keeping the inlet temperature at 70 C, varying the equivalence ratio from 0.3 to 0.54, and the EGR (represented by N{sub 2}) ratio from 0 to 37 vol%. For comparison, a PRF95 and a surrogate containing 11 vol% n-heptane, 59 vol% iso-octane, and 30 vol% toluene are used. A previously validated kinetic surrogate mechanism is used to analyze the experiments and to yield possible explanations to kinetic phenomena. From this work, it seems quite possible to use the high octane-rated gasoline for autoignition purposes, even under lean inlet conditions. Furthermore, it appeared that gasoline and its surrogate, unlike PRF95, show a three-stage autoignition. Since the PRF95 does not contain toluene, it is suggested by the kinetic mechanism that the benzyl radical, issued from toluene, causes this so-defined ''obstructed preignition'' and delaying thereby the final ignition for gasoline and its surrogate. The results of the kinetic mechanism supporting this explanation are shown in this paper. (author)

  18. Study on biodegradation of Mazut by newly isolated strain Enterobacter cloacae BBRC10061: improving and kinetic investigation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Mazut as a source content of various hydrocarbons is hard to be degraded and its cracking could turn mazut into useful materials. Nevertheless degradation of mazut by routine methods is too expensive but application of indigenous microorganisms as biocatalysts could be effective and important to lower the costs and expand its consumption. Mazut biodegradation can be improved using various strategies; Therefore in this study newly isolated strain Enterobacter cloacae BBRC 10061 was used in a method of gradual addition of mazut into medium and its results were compared with simple addition method. To investigate degradation of mazut by BBRC 10061, influence of increase of mazut concentration was assayed based on gradual addition method. Also different kinetic models were used to evaluate kinetics of the process. Results showed that gradual addition method has been a beneficial technique for improvement of mazut degradation because bacterial induction to produce biosurfactant and essential enzymes for cracking mazut was higher during process. Although addition of more mazut increased the rate of biodegradation but percentage of degradation decreased. pH of medium decreased during biodegradation period while electric potential increased. Also the biodegradation kinetics was not fitted with the biokinetic models; therefore kinetics of biodegradation of mazut has to be studied by new models. PMID:23369455

  19. Kinetics and activation energy of recrystallization of intracellular ice in mouse oocytes subjected to interrupted rapid cooling.

    PubMed

    Seki, Shinsuke; Mazur, Peter

    2008-06-01

    Intracellular ice formation (IIF) is almost invariably lethal. In most cases, it results from the too rapid cooling of cells to below -40 degrees C, but in some cases it is manifested, not during cooling, but during warming when cell water that vitrified during cooling first devitrifies and then recrystallizes during warming. Recently, Mazur et al. [P. Mazur, I.L. Pinn, F.W. Kleinhans, Intracellular ice formation in mouse oocytes subjected to interrupted rapid cooling, Cryobiology 55 (2007) 158-166] dealt with one such case in mouse oocytes. It involved rapidly cooling the oocytes to -25 degrees C, holding them 10 min, rapidly cooling them to -70 degrees C, and warming them slowly until thawed. No IIF occurred during cooling but intracellular freezing, as evidenced by blackening of the cells, became detectable at -56 degrees C during warming and was complete by -46 degrees C. The present study differs in that the oocytes were warmed rapidly from -70 degrees C to temperatures between -65 and -50 degrees C and held for 3-60 min. This permitted us to determine the rate of blackening as function of temperature. That in turn allowed us to calculate the activation energy (E(a)) for the blackening process; namely, 27.5 kcal/mol. This translates to about a quadrupling of the blackening rate for every 5 degrees C rise in temperature. These data then allowed us to compute the degree of blackening as a function of temperature for oocytes warmed at rates ranging from 10 to 10,000 degrees C/min. A 10-fold increase in warming rate increased the temperature at which a given degree of blackening occurred by 8 degrees C. These findings have significant implications both for cryobiology and cryo-electron microscopy.

  20. Kinetic investigation of the extrinsic spin Hall effect induced by skew scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, J. L.; Wu, M. W.

    2008-02-01

    A study of the kinetics of the extrinsic spin Hall conductivity induced by skew scattering is performed using the fully microscopic kinetic spin Bloch equation approach to the (001) GaAs symmetric quantum well. In the steady state, the extrinsic spin Hall current/conductivity vanishes for the linear k dependent spin-orbit coupling and is very small for the cubic k dependent spin-orbit coupling. The spin precession induced by the Dresselhaus/Rashba spin-orbit coupling plays a very important role in the vanishing of the extrinsic spin Hall conductivity in the steady state. An in-plane spin polarization is induced by the skew scattering, with the help of the spin-orbit coupling. This spin polarization is very different from the current-induced spin polarization.

  1. Kinetic investigation of the rate-limiting step of manganese- and iron-lipoxygenases.

    PubMed

    Wennman, Anneli; Karkehabadi, Saeid; Oliw, Ernst H

    2014-08-01

    Lipoxygenases (LOX) oxidize polyunsaturated fatty acids to hydroperoxides, which are generated by proton coupled electron transfer to the metal center with FeIIIOH- or MnIIIOH-. Hydrogen abstraction by FeIIIOH- of soybean LOX-1 (sLOX-1) is associated with a large deuterium kinetic isotope effect (D-KIE). Our goal was to compare the D-KIE and other kinetic parameters at different temperatures of sLOX-1 with 13R-LOX with catalytic manganese (13R-MnLOX). The reaction rate and the D-KIE of sLOX-1 with unlabeled and [11-2H2]18:2n-6 were almost temperature independent with an apparent D-KIE of ∼56 at 30°C, which is in agreement with previous studies. In contrast, the reaction rate of 13R-MnLOX increased 7-fold with temperature (8-50°C), and the apparent D-KIE decreased linearly from ∼38 at 8°C to ∼20 at 50°C. The kinetic lag phase of 13R-MnLOX was consistently extended at low temperatures. The Phe337Ile mutant of 13R-MnLOX, which catalyzes antarafacial hydrogen abstraction and oxygenation in analogy with sLOX-1, retained the large D-KIE and its temperature-dependent reaction rate. The kinetic differences between 13R-MnLOX and sLOX-1 may be due to protein dynamics, hydrogen donor-acceptor distances, and to the metal ligands, which may not equalize the 0.7V-gap between the redox potentials of the free metals.

  2. Wide-dynamic-range kinetic investigations of deep proton tunnelling in proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salna, Bridget; Benabbas, Abdelkrim; Sage, J. Timothy; van Thor, Jasper; Champion, Paul M.

    2016-09-01

    Directional proton transport along ‘wires’ that feed biochemical reactions in proteins is poorly understood. Amino-acid residues with high pKa are seldom considered as active transport elements in such wires because of their large classical barrier for proton dissociation. Here, we use the light-triggered proton wire of the green fluorescent protein to study its ground-electronic-state proton-transport kinetics, revealing a large temperature-dependent kinetic isotope effect. We show that ‘deep’ proton tunnelling between hydrogen-bonded oxygen atoms with a typical donor–acceptor distance of 2.7–2.8 Å fully accounts for the rates at all temperatures, including the unexpectedly large value (2.5 × 109 s‑1) found at room temperature. The rate-limiting step in green fluorescent protein is assigned to tunnelling of the ionization-resistant serine hydroxyl proton. This suggests how high-pKa residues within a proton wire can act as a ‘tunnel diode’ to kinetically trap protons and control the direction of proton flow.

  3. In situ investigation of mesoporous silicon oxidation kinetics using infrared emittance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bardet, Benjamin; De Sousa Meneses, Domingos; Defforge, Thomas; Billoué, Jérôme; Gautier, Gaël

    2016-07-21

    In this paper, we study the thermal oxidation kinetics of mesoporous silicon layers, synthesized by electrochemical anodization, from 260 °C up to 1100 °C. A specific apparatus is employed to heat the mesoporous samples in air and to record at the same time their infrared emittance. Based on Bruggeman effective medium approximation, an optical model is set up to realistically approximate the dielectric function of the porous material with an emphasis on the surface chemistry and oxide content. A transition temperature of 600 °C is evidenced from data processing which gives evidence of two oxidation mechanisms with distinct kinetics. Between 260-600 °C, the oxidation is surface-limited with kinetics dependent on the hydrogen desorption rate. However, above 600 °C, the oxide growth is limited by oxygen diffusion through the existing oxide layer. A parabolic law is employed to fit the oxidation rate and to extract the high-temperature activation energy (EA = 1.5 eV). A precise control of the oxide growth can thus be achieved.

  4. In situ investigation of mesoporous silicon oxidation kinetics using infrared emittance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bardet, Benjamin; De Sousa Meneses, Domingos; Defforge, Thomas; Billoué, Jérôme; Gautier, Gaël

    2016-07-21

    In this paper, we study the thermal oxidation kinetics of mesoporous silicon layers, synthesized by electrochemical anodization, from 260 °C up to 1100 °C. A specific apparatus is employed to heat the mesoporous samples in air and to record at the same time their infrared emittance. Based on Bruggeman effective medium approximation, an optical model is set up to realistically approximate the dielectric function of the porous material with an emphasis on the surface chemistry and oxide content. A transition temperature of 600 °C is evidenced from data processing which gives evidence of two oxidation mechanisms with distinct kinetics. Between 260-600 °C, the oxidation is surface-limited with kinetics dependent on the hydrogen desorption rate. However, above 600 °C, the oxide growth is limited by oxygen diffusion through the existing oxide layer. A parabolic law is employed to fit the oxidation rate and to extract the high-temperature activation energy (EA = 1.5 eV). A precise control of the oxide growth can thus be achieved. PMID:27333267

  5. Wide-dynamic-range kinetic investigations of deep proton tunnelling in proteins.

    PubMed

    Salna, Bridget; Benabbas, Abdelkrim; Sage, J Timothy; van Thor, Jasper; Champion, Paul M

    2016-09-01

    Directional proton transport along 'wires' that feed biochemical reactions in proteins is poorly understood. Amino-acid residues with high pKa are seldom considered as active transport elements in such wires because of their large classical barrier for proton dissociation. Here, we use the light-triggered proton wire of the green fluorescent protein to study its ground-electronic-state proton-transport kinetics, revealing a large temperature-dependent kinetic isotope effect. We show that 'deep' proton tunnelling between hydrogen-bonded oxygen atoms with a typical donor-acceptor distance of 2.7-2.8 Å fully accounts for the rates at all temperatures, including the unexpectedly large value (2.5 × 10(9) s(-1)) found at room temperature. The rate-limiting step in green fluorescent protein is assigned to tunnelling of the ionization-resistant serine hydroxyl proton. This suggests how high-pKa residues within a proton wire can act as a 'tunnel diode' to kinetically trap protons and control the direction of proton flow. PMID:27554414

  6. Wide-dynamic-range kinetic investigations of deep proton tunnelling in proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salna, Bridget; Benabbas, Abdelkrim; Sage, J. Timothy; van Thor, Jasper; Champion, Paul M.

    2016-09-01

    Directional proton transport along ‘wires’ that feed biochemical reactions in proteins is poorly understood. Amino-acid residues with high pKa are seldom considered as active transport elements in such wires because of their large classical barrier for proton dissociation. Here, we use the light-triggered proton wire of the green fluorescent protein to study its ground-electronic-state proton-transport kinetics, revealing a large temperature-dependent kinetic isotope effect. We show that ‘deep’ proton tunnelling between hydrogen-bonded oxygen atoms with a typical donor-acceptor distance of 2.7-2.8 Å fully accounts for the rates at all temperatures, including the unexpectedly large value (2.5 × 109 s-1) found at room temperature. The rate-limiting step in green fluorescent protein is assigned to tunnelling of the ionization-resistant serine hydroxyl proton. This suggests how high-pKa residues within a proton wire can act as a ‘tunnel diode’ to kinetically trap protons and control the direction of proton flow.

  7. Rapid and selective nitroxyl (HNO) trapping by phosphines: kinetics and new aqueous ligations for HNO detection and quantitation

    PubMed Central

    Reisz, Julie A.; Zink, Charles N.; King, S. Bruce

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies distinguish the biological and pharmacological effects of nitroxyl (HNO) from its oxidized/deprotonated product nitric oxide (NO), but lack of HNO detection methods limits understanding its in vivo mechanisms and the identification of endogenous sources. We previously demonstrated that reaction of HNO with triarylphosphines provides aza-ylides and HNO-derived amides, which may serve as stable HNO biomarkers. We now report a kinetic analysis for the trapping of HNO by phosphines, ligations of enzyme-generated HNO, and compatibility studies illustrating the selectivity of phosphines for HNO over other physiologically relevant nitrogen oxides. Quantification of HNO using phosphines is demonstrated using an HPLC-based assay and ligations of phosphine carbamates generate HNO-derived ureas. These results further demonstrate the potential of phosphine probes for reliable biological detection and quantification of HNO. PMID:21699183

  8. Ozone-surface interactions: Investigations of mechanisms, kinetics, mass transport, and implications for indoor air quality

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, Glenn C.

    1999-12-01

    In this dissertation, results are presented of laboratory investigations and mathematical modeling efforts designed to better understand the interactions of ozone with surfaces. In the laboratory, carpet and duct materials were exposed to ozone and measured ozone uptake kinetics and the ozone induced emissions of volatile organic compounds. To understand the results of the experiments, mathematical methods were developed to describe dynamic indoor aldehyde concentrations, mass transport of reactive species to smooth surfaces, the equivalent reaction probability of whole carpet due to the surface reactivity of fibers and carpet backing, and ozone aging of surfaces. Carpets, separated carpet fibers, and separated carpet backing all tended to release aldehydes when exposed to ozone. Secondary emissions were mostly n-nonanal and several other smaller aldehydes. The pattern of emissions suggested that vegetable oils may be precursors for these oxidized emissions. Several possible precursors and experiments in which linseed and tung oils were tested for their secondary emission potential were discussed. Dynamic emission rates of 2-nonenal from a residential carpet may indicate that intermediate species in the oxidation of conjugated olefins can significantly delay aldehyde emissions and act as reservoir for these compounds. The ozone induced emission rate of 2-nonenal, a very odorous compound, can result in odorous indoor concentrations for several years. Surface ozone reactivity is a key parameter in determining the flux of ozone to a surface, is parameterized by the reaction probability, which is simply the probability that an ozone molecule will be irreversibly consumed when it strikes a surface. In laboratory studies of two residential and two commercial carpets, the ozone reaction probability for carpet fibers, carpet backing and the equivalent reaction probability for whole carpet were determined. Typically reaction probability values for these materials were 10

  9. Dosimetric and kinetic investigations of γ-irradiated sodium tartrate dihydrate.

    PubMed

    Tuner, H; Kayikçi, M A

    2012-03-01

    Effects of gamma radiation on solid sodium tartrate dihydrate (NaTA) were studied using electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. One main singlet located at g = 2.0034 and many weak lines located at low and high magnetic field sides were found in the irradiated samples. Dosimetric and kinetic features of the radical species responsible for the experimental ESR spectra were explored through the variations in the signal intensities with respect to applied microwave power, temperature and storage time. Activation energies of the involved radical species were also determined using data derived from annealing studies.

  10. Rapid and direct spectrophotometric method for kinetics studies and routine assay of peroxidase based on aniline diazo substrates.

    PubMed

    Mirazizi, Fatemeh; Bahrami, Azita; Haghbeen, Kamahldin; Shahbani Zahiri, Hossein; Bakavoli, Mehdi; Legge, Raymond L

    2016-12-01

    Peroxidases are ubiquitous enzymes that play an important role in living organisms. Current spectrophotometrically based peroxidase assay methods are based on the production of chromophoric substances at the end of the enzymatic reaction. The ambiguity regarding the formation and identity of the final chromophoric product and its possible reactions with other molecules have raised concerns about the accuracy of these methods. This can be of serious concern in inhibition studies. A novel spectrophotometric assay for peroxidase, based on direct measurement of a soluble aniline diazo substrate, is introduced. In addition to the routine assays, this method can be used in comprehensive kinetics studies. 4-[(4-Sulfophenyl)azo]aniline (λmax = 390 nm, ɛ = 32 880 M(-1) cm(-1) at pH 4.5 to 9) was introduced for routine assay of peroxidase. This compound is commercially available and is indexed as a food dye. Using this method, a detection limit of 0.05 nmol mL(-1) was achieved for peroxidase.

  11. Rapid hydrolysis of model phosphate diesters by alkaline-earth cations in aqueous DMSO: speciation and kinetics.

    PubMed

    Taran, Olga; Medrano, Felipe; Yatsimirsky, Anatoly K

    2008-12-14

    Kinetics of the cleavage of two phosphate diesters, bis(4-nitrophenyl) phosphate and 2-hydroxypropyl 4-nitrophenyl phosphate and a triester, 4-nitrophenyl diphenyl phosphate, in the presence of Mg(II), Ca(II) and Sr(II) were studied in 90% vol. DMSO at 37 degrees C. The alkaline hydrolysis of the triester was inhibited by all cations, but with both phosphodiesters strong catalytic effects were observed. Potentiometric titrations of metal perchlorates by Bu4N(OH) revealed formation of M2(OH)3+, M(OH)+, M(OH)2 and M2(OH)5- species. Rate constants for phosphodiester cleavage by individual species were obtained from analysis of rate-concentration profiles. Observed first-order rate constants in the presence of 1-2 mM Mg(II) or Ca(II) in neutral and weakly basic solutions were 10(8)-10(11) times higher than those for background hydrolysis at the same pH while in water additions of up to 50 mM metal produced <100-fold accelerations. Possible structures of DMSO solvated catalyst-substrate complexes were modeled by DFT calculations with Mg(II). The increased catalytic activity in 90% DMSO is attributed to stronger association of hydroxide ions and anionic phosphodiesters with metal ions and to preferable solvation of cations by DMSO, which creates favorable for reaction anhydrous microenvironment in the coordination sphere of the catalyst.

  12. Kinetic investigation of catalytic disproportionation of superoxide ions in the non-aqueous electrolyte used in Li–air batteries

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, Qiang; Zheng, Dong; McKinnon, Meaghan E.; Yang, Xiao -Qing; Qu, Deyang

    2014-10-28

    Superoxide reacts with carbonate solvents in Li–air batteries. Tris(pentafluorophenyl)borane is found to catalyze a more rapid superoxide (O2-) disproportionation reaction than the reaction between superoxide and propylene carbonate (PC). With this catalysis, the negative impact of the reaction between the electrolyte and O2-produced by the O2 reduction can be minimized. A simple kinetic study using ESR spectroscopy was reported to determine reaction orders and rate constants for the reaction between PC and superoxide, and the disproportionation of superoxide catalyzed by Tris(pentafluorophenyl)borane and Li ions. As a result, the reactions are found to be first order and the rate constants aremore » 0.033 s-1 M-1, 0.020 s-1 M-1and 0.67 s-1M-1 for reactions with PC, Li ion and Tris(pentafluorophenyl)borane, respectively.« less

  13. Kinetic and Thermodynamic Investigation of Hydrogen Release from Ethane 1,2-di-amineborane

    SciTech Connect

    Neiner, Doinita; Karkamkar, Abhijeet J.; Bowden, Mark; Choi, Young Joon; Luedtke, Avery T.; Holladay, Jamelyn D.; Fisher, Allison M.; Szymczak, Nathaniel; Autrey, Thomas

    2011-07-18

    The thermodynamics and kinetics of hydrogen (H2) release from ethane 1,2-di-amineborane (EDAB, BH3NH2CH2CH2NH2BH3) were measured using Calvet and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), pressure-composition isotherms, and volumetric gas-burette experiments. The results presented here indicate that EDAB releases ~ 9 wt.% H2 at temperatures ranging from 100 °C to 200 °C in two moderately exothermic steps, approximately -10±1 kJ/mol H2 and -3.8±1 kJ/mol H2. Isothermal kinetic analysis shows that EDAB is more stable than ammonia borane (AB) at temperatures lower than 100°C; however, the rates of hydrogen release are faster for EDAB than for AB at temperatures higher than 120°C. In addition, no volatile impurities in the H2 released by EDAB were detected by mass spectrometry upon heating with 1°C/min to 200°C in a calorimeter.

  14. Kinetic Roughening and Energetics of Tetragonal Lysozyme Crystal Growth: A Preliminary Atomic Force Microscopy Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorti, Sridhar; Forsythe, Elizabeth L.; Pusey, Marc L.

    2004-01-01

    We examined particulars of crystal growth from measurements obtained at both microscopic and molecular levels. The crystal growth measurements performed at the microscopic level are well characterized by a model that balances the flux of macromolecules towards the crystal surface with the flux of the crystal surface. Numerical evaluation of model with measurements of crystal growth, in time, provided accurate estimates for the average growth velocities. Growth velocities thus obtained were also interpreted using well-established phenomenological theories. Moreover, we find that microscopic measurements of growth velocity measurements obtained as a function of temperature best characterizes changes in crystal growth modes, when present. We also examined the possibility of detecting a change in crystal growth modes at the molecular level using atomic force microscopy, AFM. From preliminary AFM measurements performed at various supersaturations, we find that magnitude of surface height fluctuations, h(x), increases with supersaturation. Further examination of surface height fluctuations using methods established for fluctuation spectroscopy also enabled the discovery of the existence of a characteristic length, c, which may possibly determine the mode of crystal growth. Although the results are preliminary, we establish the non- critical divergence of 5 and the root-mean-square (rms) magnitude of height-height fluctuations as the kinetic roughening transition temperatures are approached. Moreover, we also examine approximate models for interpreting the non-critical behavior of both 6 and rms magnitude of height-height fluctuations, as the solution supersaturation is increased towards the kinetic roughening supersaturation.

  15. An exchange method to investigate the kinetics of Cd complexation in soil solutions.

    PubMed

    Schneider, André

    2008-06-01

    Knowledge of the dynamic speciation of metals in soil solution is necessary for soil-plant transfer models. The lability of a metal in a given context partly depends on the kinetics of interconversion between the free ion (M) and one complex (ML), governed by the association (c(k)a) and dissociation (c(k)d) rate constants of the reaction of formation of ML If only one single complex is assumed to be present in solution, a single kinetic experiment will enable estimation of ckd and cka', that is, the product of cka by the concentration of free ligand in solution. The method consists of the measurements over time of the radioactive metal remaining in solution after the labeling of a Ca resin--solution system in balanceforthe nonlabeled metal initially present. The method is described for Cd and was applied on four soil solution extracts. The order of magnitude of the estimated c(k)a'- and c(k)d-values was about 10(-3) s(-1). The advantages and drawbacks of the method are discussed.

  16. The degradation products of aniline in the solutions with ozone and kinetic investigations.

    PubMed

    Turhan, Kadir; Uzman, Suheyla

    2007-10-01

    Aromatic compounds are extensively used in several industries and can cause pollution in water sources. This work aims at examining the degradability of aniline in aqueous solutions by ozone-induced cleavage, and at determining the kinetics of the cited cleavage reactions. Aniline was prepared in four different concentrations and the flow rate of ozone supplied to each solution was selected. Aniline solutions were ozonated at low and high pH, so as to compare both molecular and hydroxyl free radical mechanisms, respectively. The main identified aromatic by-products were nitrobenzene and azobenzene when the experiment was carried out at acidic pH. Formation of nitrobenzene, azobenzene, azoxybenzene and 2-pyridine carboxylic acid (picolinic acid) was observed when the ozonization was carried out at basic pH. All the aromatic by-products found were less toxic than the raw materials. The pseudo-first-order constants in aniline concentrations were calculated.

  17. NO binding kinetics in myoglobin investigated by picosecond Fe K-edge absorption spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Silatani, Mahsa; Lima, Frederico A.; Penfold, Thomas J.; Rittmann, Jochen; Reinhard, Marco E.; Rittmann-Frank, Hannelore M.; Borca, Camelia; Grolimund, Daniel; Milne, Christopher J.; Chergui, Majed

    2015-01-01

    Diatomic ligands in hemoproteins and the way they bind to the active center are central to the protein’s function. Using picosecond Fe K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy, we probe the NO-heme recombination kinetics with direct sensitivity to the Fe-NO binding after 532-nm photoexcitation of nitrosylmyoglobin (MbNO) in physiological solutions. The transients at 70 and 300 ps are identical, but they deviate from the difference between the static spectra of deoxymyoglobin and MbNO, showing the formation of an intermediate species. We propose the latter to be a six-coordinated domed species that is populated on a timescale of ∼200 ps by recombination with NO ligands. This work shows the feasibility of ultrafast pump–probe X-ray spectroscopic studies of proteins in physiological media, delivering insight into the electronic and geometric structure of the active center. PMID:26438842

  18. An investigation into the butyrylcholinesterase-catalyzed hydrolysis of formylthiocholine using heavy atom kinetic isotope effects.

    PubMed

    Fogle, Emily J; Marlier, John F; Stillman, Anthony; Gao, Xin; Rao, Yashas; Robins, Lori I

    2016-04-01

    Heavy atom kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) were determined for the butyrylcholinesterase-catalyzed hydrolysis of formylthiocholine (FTC). The leaving-S, carbonyl-C, and carbonyl-O KIEs are (34)k=0.994±0.004, (13)k=1.0148±0.0007, and (18)k=0.999±0.002, respectively. The observed KIEs support a mechanism for both acylation and deacylation where the steps up to and including the formation of the tetrahedral intermediate are at least partially rate determining. These results, in contrast to previous studies with acetylthiocholine, suggest that the decomposition of a tetrahedral intermediate is not rate-determining for FTC hydrolysis. Structural differences between the two substrates are likely responsible for the observed mechanism change with FTC.

  19. Wetting of biopolymer coatings: contact angle kinetics and image analysis investigation.

    PubMed

    Farris, Stefano; Introzzi, Laura; Biagioni, Paolo; Holz, Torsten; Schiraldi, Alberto; Piergiovanni, Luciano

    2011-06-21

    The surface wetting of five biopolymers, used as coating materials for a plastic film, was monitored over a span of 8 min by means of the optical contact angle technique. Because most of the total variation was observed to occur during the first 60 s, we decided to focus on this curtailed temporal window. Initial contact angle values (θ(0)) ranged from ∼91° for chitosan to ∼30° for pullulan. However, the water drop profile began to change immediately following drop deposition for all biocoatings, confirming that the concept of water contact angle equilibrium is not applicable to most biopolymers. First, a three-parameter decay equation [θ(t) = θ(0) exp(kt(n))] was fit to the experimental contact angle data to describe the kinetics of the contact angle change for each biocoating. Interestingly, the k constant correlated well with the contact angle evolution rate and the n exponent seemed to be somehow linked to the physicochemical phenomena underlying the overall kinetics process. Second, to achieve a reliable description of droplet evolution, the contact angle (CA) analysis was coupled with image analysis (IA) through a combined geometric/trigonometric approach. Absorption and spreading were the key factors governing the overall mechanism of surface wetting during the 60 s analysis, although the individual quantification of both phenomena demonstrated that spreading provided the largest contribution for all biopolymers, with the only exception of gelatin, which showed two quasi-equivalent and counterbalancing effects. The possible correlation between these two phenomena and the topography of the biopolymer surfaces are then discussed on the basis of atomic force microscopy analyses. PMID:21619017

  20. Investigation on microstructure characterization and property of rapidly solidified Mg-Zn-Ca-Ce-La alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Tao; Chen Zhenhua; Yang Mingbo; Hu Jianjun; Xia Hua

    2012-01-15

    Rapidly solidified (RS) Mg-Zn-Ca-Ce-La (wt.%) alloys have been produced via atomizing the alloy melt and subsequent splat-quenching on the water-cooled copper twin-rollers in the form of flakes. Microstructure characterization, phase compositions and thermal stability of the alloys have been systematically investigated. The results showed that with addition of RE (Ce and La) to the Mg-6Zn-5Ca alloy, the stable intermetallic compounds i.e. the Mg{sub x}Zn{sub y}RE{sub z} phase with a few Ca (about 3 at.%), shortened as the T Prime phase, were formed at the expense of the binary Mg-Zn and Ca{sub 2}Mg{sub 6}Zn{sub 3} phases, which was possibly beneficial to the enhanced thermal stability of the alloy. In the Mg-6Zn-5Ca-3Ce-0.5La alloy, the composition of the T Prime phase in the grain interior was different from that at the grain boundaries, in which the segregation of the La elements was found, and the atomic percentage ratio of Zn to Ce in the T Prime phase within the grains was close to 2. Moreover, the stable Mg{sub 2}Ca phases were detected around the T Prime phases at the grain boundaries in the alloy. - Research Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The phase constitution of RS Mg-6Zn-5Ca alloy can be improved by RE additions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In the Mg-Zn-Ca-Ce-La alloys, the Mg{sub x}Zn{sub y}RE{sub z} phase with a few Ca (T Prime phase) is formed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The formation of the T Prime phase leads to the loss of the Mg-Zn and Ca{sub 2}Mg{sub 6}Zn{sub 3} phases. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The composition of the T Prime phase differs from the grain interior to the grain boundary.

  1. Structural investigation of oxovanadium(IV) Schiff base complexes: X-ray crystallography, electrochemistry and kinetic of thermal decomposition.

    PubMed

    Asadi, Mozaffar; Asadi, Zahra; Savaripoor, Nooshin; Dusek, Michal; Eigner, Vaclav; Shorkaei, Mohammad Ranjkesh; Sedaghat, Moslem

    2015-02-01

    A series of new VO(IV) complexes of tetradentate N2O2 Schiff base ligands (L(1)-L(4)), were synthesized and characterized by FT-IR, UV-vis and elemental analysis. The structure of the complex VOL(1)⋅DMF was also investigated by X-ray crystallography which revealed a vanadyl center with distorted octahedral coordination where the 2-aza and 2-oxo coordinating sites of the ligand were perpendicular to the "-yl" oxygen. The electrochemical properties of the vanadyl complexes were investigated by cyclic voltammetry. A good correlation was observed between the oxidation potentials and the electron withdrawing character of the substituents on the Schiff base ligands, showing the following trend: MeOkinetic aspects of their thermal decomposition. The formation constants with various substituents on the aldehyde ring follow the trend 5-OMe>5-H>5-Br>5-Cl. Furthermore, the kinetic parameters of thermal decomposition were calculated by using the Coats-Redfern equation. According to the Coats-Redfern plots the kinetics of thermal decomposition of studied complexes is of the first-order in all stages, the free energy of activation for each following stage is larger than the previous one and the complexes have good thermal stability. The preparation of VOL(1)⋅DMF yielded also another compound, one kind of vanadium oxide [VO]X, with different habitus of crystals, (platelet instead of prisma) and without L(1) ligand, consisting of a V10O28 cage, diaminium moiety and dimethylamonium as a counter ions. Because its crystal structure was also new, we reported it along with the targeted complex.

  2. Structural investigation of oxovanadium(IV) Schiff base complexes: X-ray crystallography, electrochemistry and kinetic of thermal decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asadi, Mozaffar; Asadi, Zahra; Savaripoor, Nooshin; Dusek, Michal; Eigner, Vaclav; Shorkaei, Mohammad Ranjkesh; Sedaghat, Moslem

    2015-02-01

    A series of new VO(IV) complexes of tetradentate N2O2 Schiff base ligands (L1-L4), were synthesized and characterized by FT-IR, UV-vis and elemental analysis. The structure of the complex VOL1ṡDMF was also investigated by X-ray crystallography which revealed a vanadyl center with distorted octahedral coordination where the 2-aza and 2-oxo coordinating sites of the ligand were perpendicular to the "-yl" oxygen. The electrochemical properties of the vanadyl complexes were investigated by cyclic voltammetry. A good correlation was observed between the oxidation potentials and the electron withdrawing character of the substituents on the Schiff base ligands, showing the following trend: MeO < H < Br < Cl. We also studied the thermodynamics of formation of the complexes and kinetic aspects of their thermal decomposition. The formation constants with various substituents on the aldehyde ring follow the trend 5-OMe > 5-H > 5-Br > 5-Cl. Furthermore, the kinetic parameters of thermal decomposition were calculated by using the Coats-Redfern equation. According to the Coats-Redfern plots the kinetics of thermal decomposition of studied complexes is of the first-order in all stages, the free energy of activation for each following stage is larger than the previous one and the complexes have good thermal stability. The preparation of VOL1ṡDMF yielded also another compound, one kind of vanadium oxide [VO]X, with different habitus of crystals, (platelet instead of prisma) and without L1 ligand, consisting of a V10O28 cage, diaminium moiety and dimethylamonium as a counter ions. Because its crystal structure was also new, we reported it along with the targeted complex.

  3. Long-Term Follow-up Investigation of Isolated Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Without Atonia Without Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Behavior Disorder: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Stefani, Ambra; Gabelia, David; Högl, Birgit; Mitterling, Thomas; Mahlknecht, Philipp; Stockner, Heike; Poewe, Werner; Frauscher, Birgit

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: Idiopathic rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is a harbinger of synuclein-mediated neurodegenerative diseases. It is unknown if this also applies to isolated REM sleep without atonia (RWA). We performed a long-term follow-up investigation of subjects with isolated RWA. Methods: Participants were recruited from 50 subjects with isolated RWA who were identified at the sleep laboratory of the Department of Neurology at the Medical University of Innsbruck between 2003 and 2005. Eligible subjects underwent follow-up clinical examination, polysomnography, and assessment of neurodegenerative biomarkers (cognitive impairment, finger speed deficit, impaired color vision, olfactory dysfunction, orthostatic hypotension, and substantia nigra hyperechogenicity). Results: After a mean of 8.6 ± 0.9 y, 1 of 14 participating subjects (7.3%) progressed to RBD. Ten of 14 RWA subjects (71.4%) were positive for at least one neurodegenerative biomarker. Substantia nigra hyperechogenicity and presence of mild cognitive impairment were both present in 4 of 14 subjects with isolated RWA. Electromyographic activity measures increased significantly from baseline to follow-up polysomnography (“any” mentalis and both anterior tibialis muscles: 32.5 ± 9.4 versus 52.2 ± 16.6%; p = 0.004). Conclusion: This study provides first evidence that isolated RWA is an early biomarker of synuclein-mediated neurodegeneration. These results will have to be replicated in larger studies with longer observational periods. If confirmed, these disease findings have implications for defining at-risk cohorts for Parkinson disease. Citation: Stefani A, Gabelia D, Högl B, Mitterling T, Mahlknecht P, Stockner H, Poewe W, Frauscher B. Long-term follow-up investigation of isolated rapid eye movement sleep without atonia without rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder: a pilot study. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(11):1273–1279. PMID:26156949

  4. Mechanisms and Kinetics of Amyloid Aggregation Investigated by a Phenomenological Coarse-Grained Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magno, Andrea; Pellarin, Riccardo; Caflisch, Amedeo

    Amyloid fibrils are ordered polypeptide aggregates that have been implicated in several neurodegenerative pathologies, such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, Huntington's, and prion diseases, [1, 2] and, more recently, also in biological functionalities. [3, 4, 5] These findings have paved the way for a wide range of experimental and computational studies aimed at understanding the details of the fibril-formation mechanism. Computer simulations using low-resolution models, which employ a simplified representation of protein geometry and energetics, have provided insights into the basic physical principles underlying protein aggregation in general [6, 7, 8] and ordered amyloid aggregation. [9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15] For example, Dokholyan and coworkers have used the Discrete Molecular Dynamics method [16, 17] to shed light on the mechanisms of protein oligomerization [18] and the conformational changes that take place in proteins before the aggregation onset. [19, 20] One challenging observation, which is difficult to observe by computer simulations, is the wide range of aggregation scenarios emerging from a variety of biophysical measurements. [21, 22] Atomistic models have been employed to study the conformational space of amyloidogenic polypeptides in the monomeric state, [23, 24, 25] the very initial steps of amyloid formation, [26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32] and the structural stability of fibril models. [33, 34, 35) However, all-atom simulations of the kinetics of fibril formation are beyond what can be done with modern computers.

  5. Investigation of multiple roots of the resistive wall mode dispersion relation, including kinetic effects

    SciTech Connect

    Berkery, J. W.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Betti, R.

    2011-07-15

    The resistive wall mode instability in tokamak plasmas has a complex frequency which can be determined by a dispersion relation that is cubic, in general, leading to three distinct roots. A simplified model of the dispersion relation, including kinetic effects, is presented and used to explore the behavior of these roots. By changing the plasma rotation frequency, it is shown that one root has a slow mode rotation frequency (less than the inverse wall time) while the other two rotate more quickly, one leading and one lagging the plasma rotation frequency. When realistic experimental parameters from the National Spherical Torus Experiment [M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000)] are used, however, only one slow rotating, near-marginal stability root is found, consistent with present experiments and more detailed calculations with the MISK code [B. Hu et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 057301 (2005)]. Electron collisionality acts to stabilize one of the rotating roots, while ion collisionality can stabilize the other. In devices with low rotation and low collisionality, these two rotating roots may manifest themselves, but they are likely to remain stable.

  6. Towards in situ fluorescence spectroscopy and microscopy investigations of asphaltene precipitation kinetics.

    PubMed

    Franco, Juliana C; Gonçalves, Grasiele; Souza, Monique S; Rosa, Samantha B C; Thiegue, Larissa M; Atvars, Teresa D Z; Rosa, Paulo T V; Nome, René A

    2013-12-16

    We perform a spectroscopic analysis of asphaltene in solution and in crude oil with the goal of designing an optical probe of asphaltene precipitation inside high-pressure cells. Quantitative analysis of steady-state spectroscopic data is employed to identify fluorescence and Raman contributions to the observed signals. Time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy indicates that fluorescence lifetime can be used as a spectroscopic probe of asphaltene in crude oil. Quantitative confocal laser-scanning microscopy studies of asphaltene in n-heptane are used to calculate particle-size distributions as a function of time, both at the sample surface and asphaltene interior. The resulting precipitation kinetics is well described by stochastic numerical simulations of diffusion-limited aggregation. Based on these results, we present the design and construction of an apparatus to optically probe the in situ precipitation of asphaltene suitable for studies inside high pressure cells. Design considerations include the use of a spatial light modulator for aberration correction in microscopy measurements, together with the design of epi-fluorescence spectrometer, both fiber-based and for remote sensing fluorescence spectroscopy. PMID:24514660

  7. Human enteropeptidase light chain: Bioengineering of recombinants and kinetic investigations of structure and function

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Eliot T; Johnson, David A

    2013-01-01

    The serine protease enteropeptidase exhibits a high level of substrate specificity for the cleavage sequence DDDDK∼ X, making this enzyme a useful tool for the separation of recombinant protein fusion domains. In an effort to improve the utility of enteropeptidase for processing fusion proteins and to better understand its structure and function, two substitution variants of human enteropeptidase, designated R96Q and Y174R, were created and produced as active (>92%) enzymes secreted by Pichia pastoris with yields in excess of 1.7 mg/Liter. The Y174R variant showed improved specificities for substrates containing the sequences DDDDK (kcat/KM = 6.83 × 106M−1sec−1) and DDDDR (kcat/KM = 1.89 × 107M−1 sec−1) relative to all other enteropeptidase variants reported to date. BPTI inhibition of Y174R was significantly decreased. Kinetic data demonstrate the important contribution of the positively charged residue 96 to extended substrate specificity in human enteropeptidase. Modeling shows the importance of the charge–charge interactions in the extended substrate binding pocket. PMID:23436726

  8. Cobalt-mediated radical polymerization of acrylonitrile: kinetics investigations and DFT calculations.

    PubMed

    Debuigne, Antoine; Michaux, Catherine; Jérôme, Christine; Jérôme, Robert; Poli, Rinaldo; Detrembleur, Christophe

    2008-01-01

    The successful controlled homopolymerization of acrylonitrile (AN) by cobalt-mediated radical polymerization (CMRP) is reported for the first time. As a rule, initiation of the polymerization was carried out starting from a conventional azo-initiator (V-70) in the presence of bis(acetylacetonato)cobalt(II) ([Co(acac)(2)]) but also by using organocobalt(III) adducts. Molar concentration ratios of the reactants, the temperature, and the solvent were tuned, and the effect of these parameters on the course of the polymerization is discussed in detail. The best level of control was observed when the AN polymerization was initiated by an organocobalt(III) adduct at 0 degrees C in dimethyl sulfoxide. Under these conditions, poly(acrylonitrile) with a predictable molar mass and molar mass distribution as low as 1.1 was prepared. A combination of kinetic data, X-ray analyses, and DFT calculations were used to rationalize the results and to draw conclusions on the key role played by the solvent molecules in the process. These important mechanistic insights also permit an explanation of the unexpected "solvent effect" that allows the preparation of well-defined poly(vinyl acetate)-b-poly(acrylonitrile) by CMRP.

  9. Removal of Anionic Dyes from Water by Potash Alum Doped Polyaniline: Investigation of Kinetics and Thermodynamic Parameters of Adsorption.

    PubMed

    Patra, Braja N; Majhi, Deola

    2015-06-25

    Polyaniline was synthesized by the oxidative polymerization method by using ammonium persulfate as an oxidant. The positive charge in the backbone of the polymer was generated by using Potash alum as a dopant. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), X-ray fluorescence (XRF), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques were used for characterization of doped polyaniline. The doped polyaniline can be used for selective adsorption of various dyes (selectively sulfonated dyes) from aqueous solution. Adsorption studies regarding the effect of contact time, initial dye concentration, pH, doses of adsorbent, and temperature on adsorption kinetics were investigated. The influence of other anions like Cl(-), NO3(-), and SO4(2-) on the adsorption density of dyes onto doped polyaniline was also explored. Langmuir isotherm and pseudo-second-order kinetics were found to be the most appropriate models to describe the removal of anionic dyes from water through adsorption. Thermodynamic parameters such as free energy (ΔG(0)), enthalpy (ΔH(0)), and entropy (ΔS(0)) changes were also evaluated. The interaction of dyes with doped polyaniline was also investigated by FTIR and UV spectroscopy. PMID:26079693

  10. Curing behavior and reaction kinetics of binder resins for 3D-printing investigated by dielectric analysis (DEA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möginger, B.; Kehret, L.; Hausnerova, B.; Steinhaus, J.

    2016-05-01

    3D-Printing is an efficient method in the field of additive manufacturing. In order to optimize the properties of manufactured parts it is essential to adapt the curing behavior of the resin systems with respect to the requirements. Thus, effects of resin composition, e.g. due to different additives such as thickener and curing agents, on the curing behavior have to be known. As the resin transfers from a liquid to a solid glass the time dependent ion viscosity was measured using DEA with flat IDEX sensors. This allows for a sensitive measurement of resin changes as the ion viscosity changes two to four decades. The investigated resin systems are based on the monomers styrene and HEMA. To account for the effects of copolymerization in the calculation of the reaction kinetics it was assumed that the reaction can be considered as a homo-polymerization having a reaction order n≠1. Then the measured ion viscosity curves are fitted with the solution of the reactions kinetics - the time dependent degree of conversion (DC-function) - for times exceeding the initiation phase representing the primary curing. The measured ion viscosity curves can nicely be fitted with the DC-function and the determined fit parameters distinguish distinctly between the investigated resin compositions.

  11. Removal of Anionic Dyes from Water by Potash Alum Doped Polyaniline: Investigation of Kinetics and Thermodynamic Parameters of Adsorption.

    PubMed

    Patra, Braja N; Majhi, Deola

    2015-06-25

    Polyaniline was synthesized by the oxidative polymerization method by using ammonium persulfate as an oxidant. The positive charge in the backbone of the polymer was generated by using Potash alum as a dopant. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), X-ray fluorescence (XRF), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques were used for characterization of doped polyaniline. The doped polyaniline can be used for selective adsorption of various dyes (selectively sulfonated dyes) from aqueous solution. Adsorption studies regarding the effect of contact time, initial dye concentration, pH, doses of adsorbent, and temperature on adsorption kinetics were investigated. The influence of other anions like Cl(-), NO3(-), and SO4(2-) on the adsorption density of dyes onto doped polyaniline was also explored. Langmuir isotherm and pseudo-second-order kinetics were found to be the most appropriate models to describe the removal of anionic dyes from water through adsorption. Thermodynamic parameters such as free energy (ΔG(0)), enthalpy (ΔH(0)), and entropy (ΔS(0)) changes were also evaluated. The interaction of dyes with doped polyaniline was also investigated by FTIR and UV spectroscopy.

  12. Nitrite dismutase reaction mechanism: kinetic and spectroscopic investigation of the interaction between nitrophorin and nitrite.

    PubMed

    He, Chunmao; Howes, Barry D; Smulevich, Giulietta; Rumpel, Sigrun; Reijerse, Edward J; Lubitz, Wolfgang; Cox, Nicholas; Knipp, Markus

    2015-04-01

    Nitrite is an important metabolite in the physiological pathways of NO and other nitrogen oxides in both enzymatic and nonenzymatic reactions. The ferric heme b protein nitrophorin 4 (NP4) is capable of catalyzing nitrite disproportionation at neutral pH, producing NO. Here we attempt to resolve its disproportionation mechanism. Isothermal titration calorimetry of a gallium(III) derivative of NP4 demonstrates that the heme iron coordinates the first substrate nitrite. Contrary to previous low-temperature EPR measurements, which assigned the NP4-nitrite complex electronic configuration solely to a low-spin (S = 1/2) species, electronic absorption and resonance Raman spectroscopy presented here demonstrate that the NP4-NO2(-) cofactor exists in a high-spin/low-spin equilibrium of 7:3 which is in fast exchange in solution. Spin-state interchange is taken as evidence for dynamic NO2(-) coordination, with the high-spin configuration (S = 5/2) representing the reactive species. Subsequent kinetic measurements reveal that the dismutation reaction proceeds in two discrete steps and identify an {FeNO}(7) intermediate species. The first reaction step, generating the {FeNO}(7) intermediate, represents an oxygen atom transfer from the iron bound nitrite to a second nitrite molecule in the protein pocket. In the second step this intermediate reduces a third nitrite substrate yielding two NO molecules. A nearby aspartic acid residue side-chain transiently stores protons required for the reaction, which is crucial for NPs' function as nitrite dismutase. PMID:25751738

  13. Purification of lactoperoxidase from creek-water buffalo milk and investigation of kinetic and antibacterial properties.

    PubMed

    Ozdemir, Hasan; Hacibeyoglu, H Ibrahim; Uslu, Hakan

    2002-05-01

    Water buffalo lactoperoxidase (WBLP) was purified with Amberlite CG 50 H+ resin, CM Sephadex C-50 ion-exchange chromatography, and Sephadex G-100 gel filtration chromatography from skim milk. All purification steps of the WBLP were shown with SDS-PAGE and Rz (A412/A280) controlled the purification degree of the enzyme. Rz value for the purified WBLP was 0.8. To determine purification steps and kinetic properties, the activity of enzyme was measured by using 2,2-azino-bis-(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6 sulfonic acid) diammonium salt (ABTS) as a choromogenic substrate at pH=6. Km, Vmax, optimum pH, and optimum temperature for the WBLP were found by means of graphics for ABTS as substrates. Optimum pH and optimum temperature of the WBLP were 6 and 60 degrees C, respectively. Km value at optimum pH and optimum temperature for the WBLP was 0.82 mM. Vmax value at optimum pH and optimum temperature was 13.7 micromol/mL x min. Km value at optimum pH and 25 degrees C for the WBLP was 0.77 mM. Vmax value at optimum pH and 25 degrees C was 4.83 micromol/mL x min. The purified WBLP was found to have high antibacterial activity in a thiocynate-H2O2 medium for some pathogenic bacteria, such as Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginose, Shigella sonnei, Staphylococcus saphrophyticus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Shigella dysenteriae and compared with well known antibacterial substances such as tetracycline, penicillin, and netilmicine.

  14. Kinetic Investigations of the Role of Factor Inhibiting Hypoxia-inducible Factor (FIH) as an Oxygen Sensor*

    PubMed Central

    Tarhonskaya, Hanna; Hardy, Adam P.; Howe, Emily A.; Loik, Nikita D.; Kramer, Holger B.; McCullagh, James S. O.; Schofield, Christopher J.; Flashman, Emily

    2015-01-01

    The hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) hydroxylases regulate hypoxia sensing in animals. In humans, they comprise three prolyl hydroxylases (PHD1–3 or EGLN1–3) and factor inhibiting HIF (FIH). FIH is an asparaginyl hydroxylase catalyzing post-translational modification of HIF-α, resulting in reduction of HIF-mediated transcription. Like the PHDs, FIH is proposed to have a hypoxia-sensing role in cells, enabling responses to changes in cellular O2 availability. PHD2, the most important human PHD isoform, is proposed to be biochemically/kinetically suited as a hypoxia sensor due to its relatively high sensitivity to changes in O2 concentration and slow reaction with O2. To ascertain whether these parameters are conserved among the HIF hydroxylases, we compared the reactions of FIH and PHD2 with O2. Consistent with previous reports, we found lower Kmapp(O2) values for FIH than for PHD2 with all HIF-derived substrates. Under pre-steady-state conditions, the O2-initiated FIH reaction is significantly faster than that of PHD2. We then investigated the kinetics with respect to O2 of the FIH reaction with ankyrin repeat domain (ARD) substrates. FIH has lower Kmapp(O2) values for the tested ARDs than HIF-α substrates, and pre-steady-state O2-initiated reactions were faster with ARDs than with HIF-α substrates. The results correlate with cellular studies showing that FIH is active at lower O2 concentrations than the PHDs and suggest that competition between HIF-α and ARDs for FIH is likely to be biologically relevant, particularly in hypoxic conditions. The overall results are consistent with the proposal that the kinetic properties of individual oxygenases reflect their biological capacity to act as hypoxia sensors. PMID:26112411

  15. Kinetic Investigations of the Role of Factor Inhibiting Hypoxia-inducible Factor (FIH) as an Oxygen Sensor.

    PubMed

    Tarhonskaya, Hanna; Hardy, Adam P; Howe, Emily A; Loik, Nikita D; Kramer, Holger B; McCullagh, James S O; Schofield, Christopher J; Flashman, Emily

    2015-08-01

    The hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) hydroxylases regulate hypoxia sensing in animals. In humans, they comprise three prolyl hydroxylases (PHD1-3 or EGLN1-3) and factor inhibiting HIF (FIH). FIH is an asparaginyl hydroxylase catalyzing post-translational modification of HIF-α, resulting in reduction of HIF-mediated transcription. Like the PHDs, FIH is proposed to have a hypoxia-sensing role in cells, enabling responses to changes in cellular O2 availability. PHD2, the most important human PHD isoform, is proposed to be biochemically/kinetically suited as a hypoxia sensor due to its relatively high sensitivity to changes in O2 concentration and slow reaction with O2. To ascertain whether these parameters are conserved among the HIF hydroxylases, we compared the reactions of FIH and PHD2 with O2. Consistent with previous reports, we found lower Km(app)(O2) values for FIH than for PHD2 with all HIF-derived substrates. Under pre-steady-state conditions, the O2-initiated FIH reaction is significantly faster than that of PHD2. We then investigated the kinetics with respect to O2 of the FIH reaction with ankyrin repeat domain (ARD) substrates. FIH has lower Km(app)(O2) values for the tested ARDs than HIF-α substrates, and pre-steady-state O2-initiated reactions were faster with ARDs than with HIF-α substrates. The results correlate with cellular studies showing that FIH is active at lower O2 concentrations than the PHDs and suggest that competition between HIF-α and ARDs for FIH is likely to be biologically relevant, particularly in hypoxic conditions. The overall results are consistent with the proposal that the kinetic properties of individual oxygenases reflect their biological capacity to act as hypoxia sensors. PMID:26112411

  16. Investigating Rapid Uplift and Subsidence Near Norris, Yellowstone, During 2013-2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stovall, W. K.; Cervelli, P. F.; Shelly, D. R.

    2014-12-01

    Although Yellowstone's last magmatic eruption occurred about 70,000 years ago, hydrothermal explosions, earthquakes, and ground deformation still occur as testament to ongoing volcanic and tectonic processes. Since the late 1990s, a network of continuously recording Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers has recorded uplift and subsidence of the caldera and northwest caldera margin near Norris Geyser Basin. Previous deformation episodes have shown opposing vertical motion at the two sites, which has been attributed to temporal variations in magmatic fluid flux from the caldera laterally through the Norris-Mammoth fault corridor that intersects the caldera's northwest margin (Dzurisin et al., 2012; Wicks et al., 2006). These episodes have exhibited gradual changes, transitioning from uplift to subsidence (and vice versa) over weeks to months. Large earthquake swarms accompanied transitions from caldera uplift to subsidence in 1985 and 2010. Recent deformation in Yellowstone differs from previously observed episodes. In the latter half of 2013, uplift began around Norris, and by January of 2014 it reached rates of over 15 cm/yr. Also at the start of 2014, caldera deformation shifted from approximately 4 years of slow subsidence to slow uplift. On March 30, 2014, a M4.8 earthquake, the largest in Yellowstone since 1980, occurred northwest of Norris Geyser Basin near the center of uplift. Shortly after the event, deformation near Norris abruptly reversed to rapid subsidence (over 20 cm/yr). Caldera uplift began to accelerate around the same time. Thus, uplift can occur simultaneously in both the caldera and the Norris area, and dramatic reversals from rapid uplift to rapid subsidence can occur within a matter of days. While the complexity of the deformation defies a simple explanation, we hypothesize that the rapid transition from uplift to subsidence at Norris may indicate that the M4.8 earthquake opened a pathway for fluid migration away from Norris and allowed an

  17. Irradiation deformation near different atomic grain boundaries in α-Zr: An investigation of thermodynamics and kinetics of point defects

    PubMed Central

    Arjhangmehr, A.; Feghhi, S. A. H.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding radiation performance of nanocrystalline Zr-based alloys is essential to develop internal components and external cladding materials with self-healing capabilities for longer and safer life cycles in harsh reactor environments. However, the precise role of interfaces in modifying defect production and evolution in α-Zr is not yet determined. Using atomistic simulation methods, we investigate the influence of different atomic grain boundaries (GBs) in thermodynamic and kinetic properties of defects on short timescales. We observe that the sink efficiency and sink strength of interfaces vary significantly with the boundary structures, with a preference to absorb interstitials (vacancies) when the GBs are semi-parallel (semi-perpendicular) relative to the basal planes. Further, we identify three distinct primary cascade geometries, and find that the residual defect clustering in grain interiors depends on how the atomic GBs modify the spatial distribution of defects within the crystal structure. Finally, we explain and discuss the dynamic results in terms of energetic and kinetic behaviors of defects near the pristine and damaged boundaries. Eventually, these will provide a microscopic reference for further improving the radiation response of Zr by using fine grains or by introducing a high density of dispersoids in material metallurgy. PMID:27004606

  18. BRET-based β-arrestin2 recruitment to the histamine H1 receptor for investigating antihistamine binding kinetics.

    PubMed

    Bosma, Reggie; Moritani, Ryo; Leurs, Rob; Vischer, Henry F

    2016-09-01

    Ligand residence time is thought to be a critical parameter for optimizing the in vivo efficacy of drug candidates. For the histamine H1 receptor (H1R) and other G protein-coupled receptors, the kinetics of ligand binding are typically measured by low throughput radioligand binding experiments using homogenized cell membranes expressing the target receptor. In this study, a real-time proximity assay between H1R and β-arrestin2 in living cells was established to investigate the dynamics of antihistamine binding to the H1R. No receptor reserve was found for the histamine-induced recruitment of β-arrestin2 to the H1R and the transiently recruited β-arrestin2 therefore reflected occupancy of the receptor by histamine. Antihistamines displayed similar kinetic signatures on antagonizing histamine-induced β-arrestin2 recruitment as compared to displacing radioligand binding from the H1R. This homogeneous functional method unambiguously determined the fifty-fold difference in the dissociation rate constant between mepyramine and the long residence time antihistamines levocetirizine and desloratadine. PMID:27468652

  19. Irradiation deformation near different atomic grain boundaries in α-Zr: An investigation of thermodynamics and kinetics of point defects.

    PubMed

    Arjhangmehr, A; Feghhi, S A H

    2016-01-01

    Understanding radiation performance of nanocrystalline Zr-based alloys is essential to develop internal components and external cladding materials with self-healing capabilities for longer and safer life cycles in harsh reactor environments. However, the precise role of interfaces in modifying defect production and evolution in α-Zr is not yet determined. Using atomistic simulation methods, we investigate the influence of different atomic grain boundaries (GBs) in thermodynamic and kinetic properties of defects on short timescales. We observe that the sink efficiency and sink strength of interfaces vary significantly with the boundary structures, with a preference to absorb interstitials (vacancies) when the GBs are semi-parallel (semi-perpendicular) relative to the basal planes. Further, we identify three distinct primary cascade geometries, and find that the residual defect clustering in grain interiors depends on how the atomic GBs modify the spatial distribution of defects within the crystal structure. Finally, we explain and discuss the dynamic results in terms of energetic and kinetic behaviors of defects near the pristine and damaged boundaries. Eventually, these will provide a microscopic reference for further improving the radiation response of Zr by using fine grains or by introducing a high density of dispersoids in material metallurgy. PMID:27004606

  20. Using electrochemical surface plasmon resonance for in-situ kinetic investigations of solid electrolyte interphase formation in lithium ion battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradanawati, Sylvia Ayu; Wang, Fu-Ming; Su, Chia-Hung

    2016-10-01

    The solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) significantly affects the energy density and safety performance of lithium ion batteries. Previous studies have shown that conventional analyses cannot characterize the real-time molecule interactions of SEI formation on the surface of an electrode. In this study, a novel in situ electrochemical-surface plasmon resonance (EC-SPR) was developed for evaluating the kinetic changes of ionic dissociation, SEI formation, and Li-Au alloying reaction. The novel EC-SPR not only indicates the rates of each reaction stage but also reveals the characteristics of the passivated layers. This research demonstrates that the dissociation rates of ionic clusters are affected by several reactions on the surface of an electrode. The rate and mass of the SEI formation from the reduction of ethylene carbonate (EC) are calculated at 0.004 ngs-1 and 5.858 ng, respectively. The EC-SPR is a powerful tool for further in situ kinetic investigations of different electrolyte and electrode systems.

  1. Investigation of the first-order phase transition kinetics using the method of pulsed photothermal surface deformation: radial measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vintzentz, S. V.; Sandomirsky, V. B.

    1992-09-01

    An extension of the photothermal surface deformation (PTSD) method to study the macroscopic kinetics of the first-order phase transition (PTr) is given. The movement of the phase interface (PI) over a surface with a PTr locally induced in the subsurface volume by a focused laser pulse is investigated for the first time using radial measurements of the PTSD kinetics. For the known metal-to-semiconductor PTr in VO 2 (a good model system) a procedure is suggested for measuring the maximum size rsm of the "hot" (metal) phase on the surface (a parameter most difficult to determine) as well as for estimating the velocity of the PI movement over the surface, vs, and in the bulk, vb. Besides, it is shown that the PTSD method may be used to determine the "local" threshold energy E0 needed for the laser-induced PTr and the "local" latent heat L of the PTr. This demonstrates the feasibility of scanning surface E0- and L-microscopy.

  2. A numerical investigation of the scale-up effects on flow, heat transfer, and kinetics processes of FCC units.

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, S. L.

    1998-08-25

    Fluid Catalytic Cracking (FCC) technology is the most important process used by the refinery industry to convert crude oil to valuable lighter products such as gasoline. Process development is generally very time consuming especially when a small pilot unit is being scaled-up to a large commercial unit because of the lack of information to aide in the design of scaled-up units. Such information can now be obtained by analysis based on the pilot scale measurements and computer simulation that includes controlling physics of the FCC system. A Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) code, ICRKFLO, has been developed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and has been successfully applied to the simulation of catalytic petroleum cracking risers. It employs hybrid hydrodynamic-chemical kinetic coupling techniques, enabling the analysis of an FCC unit with complex chemical reaction sets containing tens or hundreds of subspecies. The code has been continuously validated based on pilot-scale experimental data. It is now being used to investigate the effects of scaled-up FCC units. Among FCC operating conditions, the feed injection conditions are found to have a strong impact on the product yields of scaled-up FCC units. The feed injection conditions appear to affect flow and heat transfer patterns and the interaction of hydrodynamics and cracking kinetics causes the product yields to change accordingly.

  3. Irradiation deformation near different atomic grain boundaries in α-Zr: An investigation of thermodynamics and kinetics of point defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arjhangmehr, A.; Feghhi, S. A. H.

    2016-03-01

    Understanding radiation performance of nanocrystalline Zr-based alloys is essential to develop internal components and external cladding materials with self-healing capabilities for longer and safer life cycles in harsh reactor environments. However, the precise role of interfaces in modifying defect production and evolution in α-Zr is not yet determined. Using atomistic simulation methods, we investigate the influence of different atomic grain boundaries (GBs) in thermodynamic and kinetic properties of defects on short timescales. We observe that the sink efficiency and sink strength of interfaces vary significantly with the boundary structures, with a preference to absorb interstitials (vacancies) when the GBs are semi-parallel (semi-perpendicular) relative to the basal planes. Further, we identify three distinct primary cascade geometries, and find that the residual defect clustering in grain interiors depends on how the atomic GBs modify the spatial distribution of defects within the crystal structure. Finally, we explain and discuss the dynamic results in terms of energetic and kinetic behaviors of defects near the pristine and damaged boundaries. Eventually, these will provide a microscopic reference for further improving the radiation response of Zr by using fine grains or by introducing a high density of dispersoids in material metallurgy.

  4. Spin-label oximetry: kinetic study of cell respiration using a rapid-passage T1-sensitive electron spin resonance display.

    PubMed Central

    Froncisz, W; Lai, C S; Hyde, J S

    1985-01-01

    An unusual ESR display has been developed that exhibits sensitivity to bimolecular collisions of dissolved oxygen in water with nitroxide radical spin probes at oxygen concentrations as low as 0.1 microM, requiring only 1 microliter of sample. The method involves observation of the ESR rapid-passage signal when tuned to the dispersion using a loop-gap resonator. The bimolecular collision rate determines the phase of the signal. The method has been used in a closed-chamber geometry to study respiration of asynchronous populations of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. An integral of the Michaelis-Menten equation permits direct comparison with experiment and is shown to be incompatible with the data. The theory of diffusion limitation also is developed and shown to be inconsistent with experiment. The average oxygen concentration is found to decrease as Vmaxt, where t is the time after sealing the chamber, to a critical oxygen concentration of 5.2 microM. Below 5.2 microM, the concentration can be fitted to an exponential form, exp(-t/tau), where tau = 15 sec for 4000 cells per microliter. It is believed that this experimental behavior is determined by complex enzyme kinetics. PMID:2982155

  5. Kinetic investigation of catalytic disproportionation of superoxide ions in the non-aqueous electrolyte used in Li–air batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Qiang; Zheng, Dong; McKinnon, Meaghan E.; Yang, Xiao -Qing; Qu, Deyang

    2014-10-28

    Superoxide reacts with carbonate solvents in Li–air batteries. Tris(pentafluorophenyl)borane is found to catalyze a more rapid superoxide (O2-) disproportionation reaction than the reaction between superoxide and propylene carbonate (PC). With this catalysis, the negative impact of the reaction between the electrolyte and O2-produced by the O2 reduction can be minimized. A simple kinetic study using ESR spectroscopy was reported to determine reaction orders and rate constants for the reaction between PC and superoxide, and the disproportionation of superoxide catalyzed by Tris(pentafluorophenyl)borane and Li ions. As a result, the reactions are found to be first order and the rate constants are 0.033 s-1 M-1, 0.020 s-1 M-1and 0.67 s-1M-1 for reactions with PC, Li ion and Tris(pentafluorophenyl)borane, respectively.

  6. Frijolito Watershed: Integrated investigations of a rapidly eroding pinyon-juniper hillslope

    SciTech Connect

    Wilcox, B.P.; Pitlick, J.; Allen, C.D.

    1995-12-31

    The dramatic acceleration of erosion associated with the expansion of pinyon-juniper woodlands over the past 100 years has been widely recognized, but few process-based studies of this phenomenon have been undertaken. In an attempt to identify the underlying causes, and the factors that affect erosion processes, we have initiated an interdisciplinary study of a rapidly eroding pinyon-juniper woodland in northern New Mexico. Since July 1993, we have collected data on runoff, erosion, and weather conditions from a 1-ha catchment study area and have conducted surveys of topography, soils, and vegetation. Our preliminary results indicate that although runoff makes up less than 10% of the annual water budget, runoff events - which are frequent in the summer - are capable of moving large amounts of sediment. We estimate that between July 1993 and October 1994, between 25,000 and 50,000 kg of sediment has eroded and been transported from the catchment. The information gained from such studies is essential to our ability to formulate effective strategies for managing these rapidly eroding woodlands.

  7. Stability study of the antihistamine drug azelastine HCl along with a kinetic investigation and the identification of new degradation products.

    PubMed

    El-Shaheny, Rania N; Yamada, Koji

    2014-01-01

    The first stability-indicating HPLC method was developed and validated for azelastine HCl (AZL). The separation of AZL from its degradation products was achieved on a C18 column using acetonitrile-0.04 M phosphate buffer of pH 3.5 (32:68, v/v) as a mobile phase with UV-detection at 210 nm and naftazone as an internal standard. The method was rectilinear over the range of 0.2-20.0 μg mL(-1) with a detection limit of 7.05 ng mL(-1). The degradation behavior of AZL was studied under different ICH-recommended stress conditions along with a kinetic investigation; also, degradation products were identified by mass spectrometry. The method was applied for the quality control and stability assessment of AZL in eye drops and nasal spray. The obtained results were favorably compared with those obtained by a comparison method. PMID:24919676

  8. Investigation of a passenger car's dynamic response due to a flywheel-based kinetic energy recovery system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bischof, Günter; Reisinger, Karl; Singraber, Thomas; Summer, Andreas

    2014-02-01

    With the advent of flywheel-based kinetic energy recovery systems in automotive applications new safety issues arise as a consequence of the flywheel's high rotational speed. While the special structural safety requirements of the components are well discussed in the literature, there is still little research on the influence of gyroscopic effects on vehicle dynamics. The aim of this paper is to investigate the influence of a typical high-speed flywheel on the driving dynamics of an average passenger car. To this end the equations of motion of a gyroscope are derived, which relate the vehicle's roll, pitch and yaw rate with the transverse torque acting on the flywheel. These equations are implemented in a commercial vehicle dynamics simulation program in order to determine the reaction torques acting on the vehicle within a representative range of driving situations. Numerical simulations indicate that the gyroscopic effect can be considered insignificant in standard driving situations.

  9. An Investigation of the Effect of Surface Impurities on the Adsorption Kinetics of Hydrogen Chemisorbed onto Iron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shanabarger, M. R.

    1997-01-01

    The original goal of this program was to investigate the effect surface impurities have on the heterogeneous kinetic processes of those molecular species which produce gaseous hydrogen degradation of the mechanical properties of metallic structural materials. However, shortly after the initiation of the original program, the program's NASA Technical Monitor, Dr. Howard Nelson, requested that the effort supported by this Co-operative Agreement be redirected to study more pressing materials issues associated to the development of the National Aero-Space Plane (NASP). The results of these efforts are outlined in this report. Detailed discussions of specific work, including experimental techniques and procedures, will be found in the publications listed with the subsection discussing that specific work as well and in Section 5. No inventions were generated or disclosed within this Agreement.

  10. Pharmaceutical solid-state kinetic stability investigation by using moisture-modified Arrhenius equation and JMP statistical software.

    PubMed

    Fu, Mingkun; Perlman, Michael; Lu, Qing; Varga, Csanad

    2015-03-25

    An accelerated stress approach utilizing the moisture-modified Arrhenius equation and JMP statistical software was utilized to quantitatively assess the solid state stability of an investigational oncology drug MLNA under the influence of temperature (1/T) and humidity (%RH). Physical stability of MLNA under stress conditions was evaluated by using XRPD, DSC, TGA, and DVS, while chemical stability was evaluated by using HPLC. The major chemical degradation product was identified as a hydrolysis product of MLNA drug substance, and was subsequently subjected to an investigation of kinetics based on the isoconversion concept. A mathematical model (ln k=-11,991×(1/T)+0.0298×(%RH)+29.8823) based on the initial linear kinetics observed for the formation of this degradant at all seven stress conditions was built by using the moisture-modified Arrhenius equation and JMP statistical software. Comparison of the predicted versus experimental lnk values gave a mean deviation value of 5.8%, an R(2) value of 0.94, a p-value of 0.0038, and a coefficient of variation of the root mean square error CV(RMSE) of 7.9%. These statistics all indicated a good fit to the model for the stress data of MLNA. Both temperature and humidity were shown to have a statistically significant impact on stability by using effect leverage plots (p-value<0.05 for both 1/T and %RH). Inclusion of a term representing the interaction of relative humidity and temperature (%RH×1/T) was shown not to be justified by using Analysis of Covariance (ANCOVA), which supported the use of the moisture-corrected Arrhenius equation modeling theory. The model was found to be of value to aid setting of specifications and retest period, and storage condition selection. A model was also generated using only four conditions, as an example from a resource saving perspective, which was found to provide a good fit to the entire set of data.

  11. Investigation of VO2 kinetics in humans with pseudorandom binary sequence work rate change.

    PubMed

    Hughson, R L; Winter, D A; Patla, A E; Swanson, G D; Cuervo, L A

    1990-02-01

    The dynamic response of oxygen uptake (VO2) was investigated with two different cycle ergometer tests in which the work rate changed as a pseudorandom binary sequence (PRBS). One sequence had 15 units, each of 30-s duration for a total of 450 s (PRBS1). The second had 63 units, each of 5-s duration for a total of 315 s (PRBS2). The useful range of frequencies available for investigation of the dynamic characteristics of the VO2 response as described by their bandwidth were 0.002-0.013 Hz for PRBS1 and 0.003-0.089 Hz for PRBS2. Eight subjects each completed both PRBS tests. Data from four or five consecutive sequences were ensemble averaged to reduce the biological noise. A Fourier analysis was then conducted, with the range of frequencies investigated spanning those of the bandwidth for PRBS2. This was up to the 28th harmonic. For PRBS1, the VO2 response could be adequately reconstructed by including Fourier coefficients only up to the 5th harmonic. In contrast, for PRBS2, there was still a clear pattern in the residuals at the 5th harmonic. The data were not adequately reconstructed until higher-frequency components up to the 28th harmonic were included. Evidence for this came from analysis of the mean square error. The mean square error at the 28th harmonic was reduced to 83 +/- 8% of the mean square error at the 5th harmonic for PRBS1 and to 31 +/- 3% for PRBS2 (P less than 0.0001). These data obtained by Fourier analysis and reconstructed for comparison with the original VO2 response indicate the presence of a high-frequency component that was not apparent when a test with a smaller bandwidth was used as the work rate forcing.

  12. An experimental and kinetic investigation of premixed furan/oxygen/argon flames

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Zhenyu; Yuan, Tao; Fournet, Rene; Glaude, Pierre-Alexandre; Sirjean, Baptiste; Battin-Leclerc, Frédérique; Zhang, Kuiwen; Qi, Fei

    2013-01-01

    The detailed chemical structures of three low-pressure (35 Torr) premixed laminar furan/oxygen/argon flames with equivalence ratios of 1.4, 1.8 and 2.2 have been investigated by using tunable synchrotron vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization and molecular-beam mass spectrometry. About 40 combustion species including hydrocarbons and oxygenated intermediates have been identified by measurements of photoionization efficiency spectra. Mole fraction profiles of the flame species including reactants, intermediates and products have been determined by scanning burner position with some selected photon energies near ionization thresholds. Flame temperatures have been measured by a Pt-6%Rh/Pt-30%Rh thermocouple. A new mechanism involving 206 species and 1368 reactions has been proposed whose predictions are in reasonable agreement with measured species profiles for the three investigated flames. Rate-of-production and sensitivity analyses have been performed to track the key reaction paths governing furan consumption for different equivalence ratios. Both experimental and modeling results indicate that few aromatics could be formed in these flames. Furthermore, the current model has been validated against previous pyrolysis results of the literature obtained behind shock waves and the agreement is reasonable as well. PMID:23814311

  13. UDP-Glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) 1A9-Overexpressing HeLa Cells Is an Appropriate Tool to Delineate the Kinetic Interplay between Breast Cancer Resistance Protein (BRCP) and UGT and to Rapidly Identify the Glucuronide Substrates of BCRP

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Wen; Xu, Beibei; Wu, Baojian; Yu, Rong

    2012-01-01

    The interplay between phase II enzymes and efflux transporters leads to extensive metabolism and low bioavailability for flavonoids. To investigate the simplest interplay between one UDP-glucuronosyltransferase isoform and one efflux transporter in flavonoid disposition, engineered HeLa cells stably overexpressing UGT1A9 were developed, characterized, and further applied to investigate the metabolism of two model flavonoids (genistein and apigenin) and excretion of their glucuronides. The results indicated that the engineered HeLa cells overexpressing UGT1A9 rapidly excreted the glucuronides of genistein and apigenin. The kinetic characteristics of genistein or apigenin glucuronidation were similar with the use of UGT1A9 overexpressed in HeLa cells or the commercially available UGT1A9. Small interfering (siRNA)-mediated UGT1A9 silencing resulted in a substantial decrease in glucuronide excretion (>75%, p < 0.01). Furthermore, a potent inhibitor of breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), 3-(6-isobutyl-9-methoxy-1,4-dioxo-1,2,3,4,6,7,12,12a-octahydropyrazino[1′,2′:1,6]pyrido[3,4-b]indol-3-yl)-propionic acid tert-butyl ester (Ko143), caused, in a dose-dependent manner, a substantial and marked reduction of the clearance (74–94%, p < 0.01), and a substantial increase in the intracellular glucuronide levels (4–8-fold, p < 0.01), resulting in a moderate decrease in glucuronide excretion (19–59%, p < 0.01). In addition, a significant, albeit moderate, reduction in the fraction of genistein metabolized (fmet) in the presence of Ko143 was observed. In contrast, leukotriene C4 and siRNA against multidrug resistance protein (MRP) 2 and MRP3 did not affect excretion of flavonoid glucuronides. In conclusion, the engineered HeLa cells overexpressing UGT1A9 is an appropriate model to study the kinetic interplay between UGT1A9 and BCRP in the phase II disposition of flavonoids. This simple cell model should also be very useful to rapidly identify whether a phase II

  14. Experimental and Theoretical Investigations on the Nanoscale Kinetic Friction in Ambient Environmental Conditions.

    PubMed

    Gueye, Birahima; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Yujuan; Chen, Yunfei

    2015-07-01

    The liquid lubrication, thermolubricity and dynamic lubricity due to mechanical oscillations are investigated with an atomic force microscope in ambient environmental conditions with different relative humidity (RH) levels. Experimental results demonstrate that high humidity at low-temperature regime enhances the liquid lubricity while at high-temperature regime it hinders the effect of the thermolubricity due to the formation of liquid bridges. Friction response to the dynamic lubricity in both high- and low-temperature regimes keeps the same trends, namely the friction force decreases with increasing the amplitude of the applied vibration on the tip regardless of the RH levels. An interesting finding is that for the dynamic lubricity at high temperature, high-humidity condition leads to the friction forces higher than that at low-humidity condition while at low temperature the opposite trend is observed. An extended two-dimensional dynamic model accounting for the RH is proposed to interpret the frictional mechanism in ambient conditions.

  15. Investigating synergies of data fusion and image segmentation in earth observation based rapid mapping workflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witharana, C.

    2013-12-01

    In humanitarian emergencies, the timeliness of data provision and the short time-window available for dispatching value-added information pose major challenges to the mapping community. We have been engaged with a continuous research effort to explore novel ways to catalyze the EO-based humanitarian crisis information retrieval chain. This paper is an exploratory study, which aimed to discover the synergies of data fusion and image segmentation in the context of EO-based rapid mapping workflows. Our approach pillared on the geographic object-based image analysis (GEOBIA) focusing on multiscale, internally-displaced persons' (IDP) camp information extraction from very high spatial resolution (VHSR) images. We applied twelve pansharpening algorithms to two subsets of a GeoEye-1 image scene that was taken over a former war-induced ephemeral settlement in Sri Lanka. A multidimensional assessment was employed to benchmark pansharpening algorithms with respect to their spectral and spatial fidelity. The multiresolution segmentation (MRS) algorithm of the eCognition Developer software served as the key algorithm in the segmentation process. The first study site was used for comparing segmentation results produced from the twelve fused products at a series of scale, shape, and compactness settings of the MRS algorithm. The segmentation quality and optimum parameter settings of the MRS algorithm were estimated by using empirical discrepancy measures. Non-parametric statistical tests were used to compare the quality of image object candidates, which were derived from the twelve pansharpened products. A wall-to-wall classification was performed based on a support vector machine (SVM) classifier to classify image objects candidates of the fused images. The second site simulated a more realistic crisis information extraction scenario where the domain expertise is crucial in segmentation and classification. We compared segmentation and classification results of the original

  16. Theoretical Investigation on Mechanistic and Kinetic Transformation of 2,2',4,4',5-Pentabromodiphenyl Ether.

    PubMed

    Cao, Haijie; Han, Dandan; Li, Mingyue; Li, Xin; He, Maoxia; Wang, Wenxing

    2015-06-18

    This study investigates the decomposition of 2,2',4,4',5-pentabrominated diphenyl ether (BDE99), a commonly detected pollutant in the environment. Debromination channels yielding tetrabrominated diphenyl ethers and hydrogen abstracting aromatic bromine atom formations play significant roles in the reaction of BDE99 + H, in which the former absolutely predominates bimolecular reactions. Polybrominated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PBDDs) and polybrominated dibenzofurans (PBDFs) can be produced during BDE99 pyrolysis, especially for PBDFs under inert conditions. The expected dominant pathways in a closed system are debromination products and PBDF formations. The bimolecular reaction with hydroxyl radical mainly leads to hydroxylated BDE99s rather than hydroxylated tetrabrominated diphenyl ethers. PBDDs are then generated from ortho-hydroxylated PBDEs. HO2 radical reactions rarely proceed. The total rate constants for the BDE99 reaction with hydrogen atoms and hydroxyl radicals exhibit positive dependence on temperature with values of 1.86 × 10(-14) and 5.24 × 10(-14) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) at 298.15 K, respectively.

  17. Is rapid growth in Internet usage environmentally sustainable for Australia? An empirical investigation.

    PubMed

    Salahuddin, Mohammad; Alam, Khorshed; Ozturk, Ilhan

    2016-03-01

    This study estimates the short- and long-run effects of Internet usage and economic growth on carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions using annual time series macro data for Australia for the period 1985-2012. Autoregressive distributive lag (ARDL) bounds and Gregory-Hansen structural break cointegration tests are applied. ARDL estimates indicate no significant long-run relationship between Internet usage and CO2 emissions, which implies that the rapid growth in Internet usage is still not an environmental threat for Australia. The study further indicates that higher level of economic growth is associated with lower level of CO2 emissions; however, Internet usage and economic growth have no significant short-run relationship with CO2 emissions. Financial development has both short-run and long-run significant positive association with CO2 emissions. The findings offer support in favor of energy efficiency gains and a reduction in energy intensity in Australia. However, impulse response and variance decomposition analysis suggest that Internet usage, economic growth and financial development will continue to impact CO2 emissions in the future, and as such, this study recommends that in addition to the existing measures to combat CO2 emissions, Australia needs to exploit the potential of the Internet not only to reduce its own carbon footprint but also to utilize information and communication technology (ICT)-enabled emissions abatement potential to reduce emissions in various other sectors across the economy, such as, power, renewable energy especially in solar and wind energy, agriculture, transport and service.

  18. Investigating the fluid dynamics of rapid processes within microfluidic devices using bright-field microscopy.

    PubMed

    Pirbodaghi, Tohid; Vigolo, Daniele; Akbari, Samin; deMello, Andrew

    2015-05-01

    The widespread application of microfluidic devices in the biological and chemical sciences requires the implementation of complex designs and geometries, which in turn leads to atypical fluid dynamic phenomena. Accordingly, a complete understanding of fluid dynamics in such systems is key in the facile engineering of novel and efficient analytical tools. Herein, we present an accurate approach for studying the fluid dynamics of rapid processes within microfluidic devices using bright-field microscopy with white light illumination and a standard high-speed camera. Specifically, we combine Ghost Particle Velocimetry and the detection of moving objects in automated video surveillance to track submicron size tracing particles via cross correlation between the speckle patterns of successive images. The efficacy of the presented technique is demonstrated by measuring the flow field over a square pillar (80 μm × 80 μm) in a 200 μm wide microchannel at high volumetric flow rates. Experimental results are in excellent agreement with those obtained via computational fluid dynamics simulations. The method is subsequently used to study the dynamics of droplet generation at a flow focusing microfluidic geometry. A unique feature of the presented technique is the ability to perform velocimetry analysis of high-speed phenomena, which is not possible using micron-resolution particle image velocimetry (μPIV) approaches based on confocal or fluorescence microscopy. PMID:25812165

  19. Effect of morin on pharmacokinetics of piracetam in rats, in vitro enzyme kinetics and metabolic stability assay using rapid UPLC method.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Kapendra; Shaharyar, Mohammad; Siddiqui, Anees A

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of Morin on the pharmacokinetics of Piracetam in rats, in vitro enzyme kinetics and metabolic stability (high throughput) studies using human liver microsomes in UPLC. For pharmacokinetics studies, male Wistar rats were pretreated with Morin (10 mg/kg) for one week and on the last day, a single dose of Piracetam (50 mg/kg) was given orally. In another group, both Morin and Piracetam were co-administered to evaluate the acute effect of Morin on Piracetam. The control group received oral distilled water for one week and administered with Piracetam on the last day. As Morin is an inhibitor of P- Glycoprotein (P-gp) and CYP 3A, it was anticipated to improve the bioavailability of Piracetam. Amazingly, relative to control, the areas under the concentration time curve and peak plasma concentration of Piracetam were 1.50- and 1.45-fold, respectively, greater in the Morin-pretreated group. However, co-administration of Morin had no significant effect on these parameters. Apart from the aforementioned merits, the results of this study are further confirmed by clinical trials; Piracetam dosages should be adjusted to avoid potential drug interaction when Piracetam is used clinically in combination with Morin and Morin-containing dietary supplements. The in vitro enzyme kinetics were performed to determined km, Vmax & CLins . The in vitro metabolic stability executed for the estimation of metabolic rate constant and half-life of Piracetam. These studies also extrapolate to in vivo intrinsic hepatic clearance (Clint, in vivo ) from in vitro intrinsic hepatic clearance (CLint, in vitro ).

  20. Investigation of CaO-CO₂ reaction kinetics by in-situ XRD using synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Biasin, A.; Segre, C. U.; Salviulo, G.; Zorzi, F.; Strumendo, M.

    2015-02-05

    In this work, in-situ synchrotron radiation x-ray powder diffraction (SR-XRPD), performed at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) facilities of the Argonne National Laboratory, was applied to investigate the CaO–CO2 reaction. A set of CO2 absorption experiments were conducted in a high temperature reaction capillary with a controlled atmosphere (CO2 partial pressure of 1 bar), in the temperature range between 450 °C and 750 °C using CaO based sorbents obtained by calcination of commercial calcium carbonate. The evolution of the crystalline phases during CO2 uptake by the CaO solid sorbents was monitored for a carbonation time of 20 min as a function of the carbonation temperature and of the calcination conditions. The Rietveld refinement method was applied to estimate the calcium oxide conversion during the reaction progress and the average size of the initial (at the beginning of carbonation) calcium oxide crystallites. The measured average initial carbonation rate (in terms of conversion time derivative) of 0.280 s-1 (±13.2% standard deviation) is significantly higher than the values obtained by thermo-gravimetric analysis and reported thus far in the literature. Additionally, a dependence of the conversion versus time curves on the initial calcium oxide crystallite size was observed and a linear relationship between the initial CaO crystallite size and the calcium oxide final conversion was identified.

  1. Investigation of H2 Concentration and Combustion Instability Effects on the Kinetics of Strained Syngas Flames

    SciTech Connect

    Ahsan R. Choudhuri

    2006-08-07

    The flame extinction limits of syngas (H{sub 2}-CO) flames were measured using a twin-flame-counter-flow burner. Plots of Extinction limits vs. global stretch rates were generated at different mixture compositions and an extrapolation method was used to calculate the flame extinction limit corresponding to an experimentally unattainable zero-stretch condition. The zero-stretch extinction limit of H{sub 2}-CO mixtures decreases (from rich to lean) with the increase in H{sub 2} concentration in the mixture. The average difference between the measured flame extinction limit and the Le Chatelier's calculation is around {approx} 7%. The measured OH{sup -} chemiluminescent data indicates that regardless of mixture compositions the OH radical concentration reduces (within the experimental uncertainties) to an extinction value prior to the flame extinction. Flame extinction limits of H{sub 2}-CO mixtures measured in a flat-flame burner configuration also show a similar relation. Additionally, the measured laminar flame velocity close to the extinction indicates that regardless of fuel composition the premixed flame of hydrogen fuel blends extinguishes when the mixture laminar flame velocity falls below a critical value. The critical laminar flame velocity at extinction for H{sub 2}-CO premixed flames (measured in the flat flame burner configuration) is found to be 3.77({+-}0.38) cm/s. An externally perturbed H{sub 2}-CO twin flame was not experimentally achievable for the mixture conditions used in the present investigation. A slightest perturbation in the flow-field distorts the H{sub 2}-CO twin-flame. The flame becomes highly unstable with the introduction of an externally excited flow oscillation.

  2. Application of SPECT/CT imaging system and radiochemical analysis for investigation of blood kinetics and tissue distribution of radiolabeled plumbagin in healthy and Plasmodium berghei-infected mice.

    PubMed

    Sumsakul, W; Karbwang, J; Na-Bangchang, K

    2016-02-01

    Plumbagin is a derivative of napthoquinone which is isolated from the roots of plants in several families. These compound exhibits a wide range of biological and pharmacological activities including antimalarial, antibacterial, antifungal, and anticancer activities. The aim of the study was to investigate blood kinetics and tissue distribution of plumbagin in healthy and Plasmodium berghei-infected mice using Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography/Computed Tomography (SPECT/CT) and radiochemical analysis by gamma counter. Plumbagin was labeled with (99m)technetium and the reducing agent stannous chloride dihydrate (50 μg/ml) at pH 6.5. Blood kinetics and tissue distribution of the radiolabeled plumbagin were investigated in healthy and P. berghei-infected mice (2 males and 2 females for each experimental group). In vitro and in vivo stability of plumbagin complex suggested satisfactory stability profiles of (99m)Tc-plumbagin complex in plasma and normal saline (92.21-95.47%) within 24 h. Significant difference in blood kinetics parameters (Cmax, AUC, t1/2, MRT, Vd, and CL) were observed between P. berghei-infected and healthy mice. The labeled complex distributed to all organs of both healthy and infected mice but with high intensity in liver, followed by lung, stomach, large intestine and kidney. Accumulation in spleen was markedly noticeable in the infected mice. Plumbagin-labeled complex was rapidly cleared from blood and major routes of excretion were hepatobiliary and pulmonary routes. In P. berghei-infected mice, t1/2 was significantly decreased, while Vd and CL were increased compared with healthy mice. Result suggests that malaria disease state influenced the pharmacokinetics and disposition of plumbagin. SPECT/CT imaging with radiolabeled (99m)Tc is a viable non-invasive technique that can be applied for investigation of kinetics and biodistribution of plumbagin in animal models. PMID:26713669

  3. Is rapid growth in Internet usage environmentally sustainable for Australia? An empirical investigation.

    PubMed

    Salahuddin, Mohammad; Alam, Khorshed; Ozturk, Ilhan

    2016-03-01

    This study estimates the short- and long-run effects of Internet usage and economic growth on carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions using annual time series macro data for Australia for the period 1985-2012. Autoregressive distributive lag (ARDL) bounds and Gregory-Hansen structural break cointegration tests are applied. ARDL estimates indicate no significant long-run relationship between Internet usage and CO2 emissions, which implies that the rapid growth in Internet usage is still not an environmental threat for Australia. The study further indicates that higher level of economic growth is associated with lower level of CO2 emissions; however, Internet usage and economic growth have no significant short-run relationship with CO2 emissions. Financial development has both short-run and long-run significant positive association with CO2 emissions. The findings offer support in favor of energy efficiency gains and a reduction in energy intensity in Australia. However, impulse response and variance decomposition analysis suggest that Internet usage, economic growth and financial development will continue to impact CO2 emissions in the future, and as such, this study recommends that in addition to the existing measures to combat CO2 emissions, Australia needs to exploit the potential of the Internet not only to reduce its own carbon footprint but also to utilize information and communication technology (ICT)-enabled emissions abatement potential to reduce emissions in various other sectors across the economy, such as, power, renewable energy especially in solar and wind energy, agriculture, transport and service. PMID:26527347

  4. Effect of low-level laser therapy after rapid maxillary expansion: a clinical investigation.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Valentin Javier; Arnabat, J; Comesaña, Rafael; Kasem, Khaled; Ustrell, Josep Maria; Pasetto, Stefano; Segura, Oscar Pozuelo; ManzanaresCéspedes, Maria Cristina; Carvalho-Lobato, Patricia

    2016-08-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on the repair of the mid palatal suture, after rapid maxillary expansion (RME). A single-operator, randomized single-blind placebo-controlled study was performed at the Orthodontic Department at the Dental Hospital of Bellvitge. Barcelona University, Hospitalet de Llobregat, Spain. Thirty-nine children (range 6-12 years old), completed RME and were randomized to receive active LLLT (n = 20) or placebo (n = 19). The laser parameters and dose were 660 nm, 100 mW, CW, InGaAlP laser, illuminated area 0.26 cm(2), 332 mW/cm(2), 60 s to four points along midpalatal suture, and 30 s to a point each side of the suture. A total of seven applications were made on days 1, 7, 14, 28, 42, 56, and 70 of the retention phase RME. A cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scan was carried out on the day of the first laser treatment, and at day 75, a second CBCT scan was performed. Two radiologists synchronized the slices of two scans to be assessed. P = 0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. At day 75 of the suture, the irradiated patients presented a greater percentage of approximate zones in the anterior (p = 0.008) and posterior (p = 0.001) superior suture-and less approximation in the posterior superior suture (p = 0.040)-than the placebo group. LLLT appears to stimulate the repair process during retention phase after RME. PMID:27236292

  5. Design and performance of a rapid piston expansion tube for the investigation of droplet condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, F.; Rodemann, T.

    A piston expansion tube (pex-tube) is described which has been developed for the investigation of homogeneous nucleation in a supersaturated vapor and subsequent droplet growth. The design of the tube with periphery is discussed as well as the underlying gasdynamics. Examples for the measurement of nucleation and growth rates in a binary mixture of n-propanol/water carried in nitrogen demonstrate performance and range. The focus of the paper is on the determination of the nucleation state. It is shown that this state may not be based on an adiabatic expansion when helium is used as carrier gas instead of argon or nitrogen.

  6. Results of paleoflood investigations for Spring, Rapid, Boxedler, and Elk Creeks, Black Hills, western South Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Driscoll, Daniel G.; O'Connor, James E.; Harden, Tessa M.

    2012-01-01

    Flood-frequency analyses for the Black Hills area are especially important because of severe flooding of June 9–10, 1972, that was caused by a large mesoscale convective system and resulted in at least 238 deaths. This paper summarizes results of paleoflood investigations for six study reaches in the central Black Hills. Stratigraphic records and resulting long-term flood chronologies, locally extending more than 2,000 years, were combined with observed and historical flood information to derive flood-frequency estimates. Results indicate that floods as large as and even substantially larger than 1972 have affected most of the study reaches. Results of the paleoflood investigations provide better physically based information on low-probability floods than has been previously available, substantially improving estimates of the magnitude and frequency of large floods in the central Black Hills and reducing associated uncertainties. Collectively, the results provide insights regarding regional flood-generation processes and their spatial controls, enable approaches for extrapolation of results for hazard assessment beyond specific study reaches, and provide a millennial-scale perspective on the 1972 flooding.

  7. Adsorption of di-l-alanine on Cu(110) investigated with scanning tunneling microscopy [rapid communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stensgaard, I.

    2003-11-01

    Sub-monolayer growth of a small chiral peptide, di- L-alanine, on Cu(1 1 0) was investigated by variable temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). At low coverage and for temperatures above ≈-220 K the molecules nucleate along the [ 3¯ 3 2] direction to form short, mainly one-dimensional islands. An increase in coverage leads to the formation of [ 3¯ 3 2]-directed, elongated islands. Images with sub-molecular resolution reveal that the orientation of the molecules within one particular island depends on the deposition temperature. At higher coverage, up to one monolayer, the islands coalesce, giving rise to phase boundaries between domains of opposite orientation. An atomic-scale model for di- L-alanine on Cu(1 1 0) is presented.

  8. Performance of the OraQuick HCV Rapid Antibody Test for Screening Exposed Patients in a Hepatitis C Outbreak Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Fengxiang; Talbot, Elizabeth A.; Loring, Carol H.; Power, Jill J.; Dionne-Odom, Jodie; Alroy-Preis, Sharon; Jackson, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    During a nosocomial hepatitis C outbreak, emergency public clinics employed the OraQuick HCV rapid antibody test on site, and all results were verified by a standard enzyme immunoassay (EIA). Of 1,157 persons, 1,149 (99.3%) exhibited concordant results between the two tests (16 positive, 1,133 negative). The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were 94.1%, 99.5%, 72.7%, and 99.9%, respectively. OraQuick performed well as a screening test during an outbreak investigation and could be integrated into future hepatitis C virus (HCV) outbreak testing algorithms. PMID:24789176

  9. Investigating Satellite Formation Around the Rapidly Rotating, Oblong Asteroid 216 Kleopatra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laipert, Frank; Minton, D. A.

    2013-05-01

    Abstract (2,250 Maximum Characters): Located in the asteroid belt, Kleopatra is an approximately 200 km long object shaped much like a dog bone. Recent observations have determined that two moons are in orbit about Kleopatra. Currently, it is not known how these moons, designated S/2008 ((216)) 1 and S/2008 ((216)) 2, came to orbit the asteroid, or how long these satellites have existed. Owing to the gravitational dynamics that result from Kleopatra's unusual shape and high spin rate, several equilibrium points exist near the asteroid, similar to the Lagrange points that result from the three-body dynamics in the Earth-Moon system. Using an ellipsoidal approximation for Kleopatra's gravity field, we show that a special class of trajectories pass through these equilibrium points and result in orbits very similar to the observed satellites. We use the unusual gravitational environment around Kleopatra to investigate a novel satellite formation mechanism. We combine simulations of particles moving in Kleopatra's gravity field with models of the collisional history of Kleopatra in the main belt to determine whether it is feasible for a satellite to form out of the material ejected from collisions over the lifetime of Kleopatra.

  10. Rapid Adsorption of Copper(II) and Lead(II) by Rice Straw/Fe3O4 Nanocomposite: Optimization, Equilibrium Isotherms, and Adsorption Kinetics Study

    PubMed Central

    Khandanlou, Roshanak; Ahmad, Mansor B.; Fard Masoumi, Hamid Reza; Shameli, Kamyar; Basri, Mahiran; Kalantari, Katayoon

    2015-01-01

    Rice straw/magnetic nanocomposites (RS/Fe3O4-NCs) were prepared via co-precipitation method for removal of Pb(II) and Cu(II) from aqueous solutions. Response surface methodology (RSM) was utilized to find the optimum conditions for removal of ions. The effects of three independent variables including initial ion concentration, removal time, and adsorbent dosage were investigated on the maximum adsorption of Pb (II) and Cu (II). The optimum conditions for the adsorption of Pb(II) and Cu(II) were obtained (100 and 60 mg/L) of initial ion concentration, (41.96 and 59.35 s) of removal time and 0.13 g of adsorbent for both ions, respectively. The maximum removal efficiencies of Pb(II) and Cu(II) were obtained 96.25% and 75.54%, respectively. In the equilibrium isotherm study, the adsorption data fitted well with the Langmuir isotherm model. The adsorption kinetics was best depicted by the pseudo-second order model. Desorption experiments showed adsorbent can be reused successfully for three adsorption-desorption cycles. PMID:25815470

  11. Rapid adsorption of copper(II) and lead(II) by rice straw/Fe₃O₄ nanocomposite: optimization, equilibrium isotherms, and adsorption kinetics study.

    PubMed

    Khandanlou, Roshanak; Ahmad, Mansor B; Fard Masoumi, Hamid Reza; Shameli, Kamyar; Basri, Mahiran; Kalantari, Katayoon

    2015-01-01

    Rice straw/magnetic nanocomposites (RS/Fe3O4-NCs) were prepared via co-precipitation method for removal of Pb(II) and Cu(II) from aqueous solutions. Response surface methodology (RSM) was utilized to find the optimum conditions for removal of ions. The effects of three independent variables including initial ion concentration, removal time, and adsorbent dosage were investigated on the maximum adsorption of Pb (II) and Cu (II). The optimum conditions for the adsorption of Pb(II) and Cu(II) were obtained (100 and 60 mg/L) of initial ion concentration, (41.96 and 59.35 s) of removal time and 0.13 g of adsorbent for both ions, respectively. The maximum removal efficiencies of Pb(II) and Cu(II) were obtained 96.25% and 75.54%, respectively. In the equilibrium isotherm study, the adsorption data fitted well with the Langmuir isotherm model. The adsorption kinetics was best depicted by the pseudo-second order model. Desorption experiments showed adsorbent can be reused successfully for three adsorption-desorption cycles.

  12. Kinetics, equilibrium, and thermodynamics investigation on the adsorption of lead(II) by coal-based activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Yi, Zhengji; Yao, Jun; Zhu, Mijia; Chen, Huilun; Wang, Fei; Liu, Xing

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this research is to investigate the feasibility of using activated coal-based activated carbon (CBAC) to adsorb Pb(II) from aqueous solutions through batch tests. Effects of contact time, pH, temperature and initial Pb(II) concentration on the Pb(II) adsorption were examined. The Pb(II) adsorption is strongly dependent on pH, but insensitive to temperature. The best pH for Pb(II) removal is in the range of 5.0-5.5 with more than 90 % of Pb(II) removed. The equilibrium time was found to be 60 min and the adsorption data followed the pseudo-second-order kinetics. Isotherm data followed Langmuir isotherm model with a maximum adsorption capacity of 162.33 mg/g. The adsorption was exothermic and spontaneous in nature. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy analysis suggested that CBAC possessed a porous structure and was rich in carboxyl and hydroxyl groups on its surface, which might play a major role in Pb(II) adsorption. These findings indicated that CBAC has great potential as an alternative adsorbent for Pb(II) removal. PMID:27504258

  13. Analytical chemical kinetic investigation of the effects of oxygen, hydrogen, and hydroxyl radicals on hydrogen-air combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carson, G. T., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Quantitative values were computed which show the effects of the presence of small amounts of oxygen, hydrogen, and hydroxyl radicals on the finite-rate chemical kinetics of premixed hydrogen-air mixtures undergoing isobaric autoignition and combustion. The free radicals were considered to be initially present in hydrogen-air mixtures at equivalence ratios of 0.2, 0.6, 1.0, and 1.2. Initial mixture temperatures were 1100 K, 1200 K, and 1500 K, and pressures were 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, and 4.0 atm. Of the radicals investigated, atomic oxygen was found to be the most effective for reducing induction time, defined as the time to 5 percent of the total combustion temperature rise. The reaction time, the time between 5 percent and 95 percent of the temperature rise, is not decreased by the presence of free radicals in the initial hydrogen-air mixture. Fuel additives which yield free radicals might be used to effect a compact supersonic combustor design for efficient operation in an otherwise reaction-limited combustion regime.

  14. Investigation into solar drying of potato: effect of sample geometry on drying kinetics and CO2 emissions mitigation.

    PubMed

    Tripathy, P P

    2015-03-01

    Drying experiments have been performed with potato cylinders and slices using a laboratory scale designed natural convection mixed-mode solar dryer. The drying data were fitted to eight different mathematical models to predict the drying kinetics, and the validity of these models were evaluated statistically through coefficient of determination (R(2)), root mean square error (RMSE) and reduced chi-square (χ (2)). The present investigation showed that amongst all the mathematical models studied, the Modified Page model was in good agreement with the experimental drying data for both potato cylinders and slices. A mathematical framework has been proposed to estimate the performance of the food dryer in terms of net CO2 emissions mitigation potential along with unit cost of CO2 mitigation arising because of replacement of different fossil fuels by renewable solar energy. For each fossil fuel replaced, the gross annual amount of CO2 as well as net amount of annual CO2 emissions mitigation potential considering CO2 emissions embodied in the manufacture of mixed-mode solar dryer has been estimated. The CO2 mitigation potential and amount of fossil fuels saved while drying potato samples were found to be the maximum for coal followed by light diesel oil and natural gas. It was inferred from the present study that by the year 2020, 23 % of CO2 emissions can be mitigated by the use of mixed-mode solar dryer for drying of agricultural products.

  15. A new real-time method for investigation of affinity properties and binding kinetics of magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlov, Alexey V.; Nikitin, Maxim P.; Bragina, Vera A.; Znoyko, Sergey L.; Zaikina, Marina N.; Ksenevich, Tatiana I.; Gorshkov, Boris G.; Nikitin, Petr I.

    2015-04-01

    A method for quantitative investigation of affinity constants of receptors immobilized on magnetic nanoparticles (MP) is developed based on spectral correlation interferometry (SCI). The SCI records with a picometer resolution the thickness changes of a layer of molecules or nanoparticles due to a biochemical reaction on a cover slip, averaged over the sensing area. The method is compatible with other types of sensing surfaces employed in biosensing. The measured values of kinetic association constants of magnetic nanoparticles are 4 orders of magnitude higher than those of molecular antibody association with antigen. The developed method also suggests highly sensitive detection of antigens in a wide dynamic range. The limit of detection of 92 pg/ml has been demonstrated for prostate-specific antigen (PSA) with 50-nm MP employed as labels, which produce 3-order amplification of the SCI signals. The calibration curve features high sensitivity (slope) of 3-fold signal raise per 10-fold increase of PSA concentration within 4-order dynamic range, which is an attractive compromise for precise quantitative and highly sensitive immunoassay. The proposed biosensing technique offers inexpensive disposable sensor chips of cover slips and represents an economically sound alternative to traditional immunoassays for disease diagnostics, detection of pathogens in food and environmental monitoring.

  16. Investigation into solar drying of potato: effect of sample geometry on drying kinetics and CO2 emissions mitigation.

    PubMed

    Tripathy, P P

    2015-03-01

    Drying experiments have been performed with potato cylinders and slices using a laboratory scale designed natural convection mixed-mode solar dryer. The drying data were fitted to eight different mathematical models to predict the drying kinetics, and the validity of these models were evaluated statistically through coefficient of determination (R(2)), root mean square error (RMSE) and reduced chi-square (χ (2)). The present investigation showed that amongst all the mathematical models studied, the Modified Page model was in good agreement with the experimental drying data for both potato cylinders and slices. A mathematical framework has been proposed to estimate the performance of the food dryer in terms of net CO2 emissions mitigation potential along with unit cost of CO2 mitigation arising because of replacement of different fossil fuels by renewable solar energy. For each fossil fuel replaced, the gross annual amount of CO2 as well as net amount of annual CO2 emissions mitigation potential considering CO2 emissions embodied in the manufacture of mixed-mode solar dryer has been estimated. The CO2 mitigation potential and amount of fossil fuels saved while drying potato samples were found to be the maximum for coal followed by light diesel oil and natural gas. It was inferred from the present study that by the year 2020, 23 % of CO2 emissions can be mitigated by the use of mixed-mode solar dryer for drying of agricultural products. PMID:25745206

  17. The solution, solid state stability and kinetic investigation in degradation studies of lercanidipine: study of excipients compatibility of lercanidipine.

    PubMed

    Parmar, Nitin; Amin, Saima; Singla, Neelam; Kohli, Kanchan

    2012-01-01

    The objectives of this research were to evaluate the stability of lercanidipine in solution state and solid state and explore the compatibility of drug with oils, surfactants and cosurfactants as excipients. The effect of pH on the degradation in solution state was studied through pH-rate profile of lercanidipine in constant ionic strength buffer solutions in pH range 1-8 which gives the pH of maximum stability. Powdered lercanidipine was stored under 40°C/0%~75% relative humidities (RH) or 0% RH/5~50°C to study the influence of RH and temperature on the stability of lercanidipine in solid state. Binary mixtures of lercanidipine and different excipients were stored at 40°C/75% RH, 40°C and at room temperature for excipient compatibility evaluation. The degradation of lercanidipine at different pH appears to fit a typical first-order reaction, but in solid state, it does not fit any obvious reaction model. Moisture content and temperature both play important roles affecting the degradation rate. Lercanidipine exhibits good compatibility with surfactants, cosurfactants and oils as excipients under stressed conditions of different storage temperature in a 3-week screening study. Moreover, the proposed high-performance liquid chromatography method was utilized to investigate the kinetics of the acidic and alkaline degradation processes of lercanidipine at different temperatures.

  18. The effect of pressure on the kinetics of γ-anhydrite crystallization investigated by diamond anvil cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chuanjiang; Zheng, Haifei; Du, Jianguo; Wang, Duojun

    2015-01-01

    The crystallization kinetics of γ-anhydrite was investigated in the temperature and pressure ranges of 373-473 K and 1094-1903 MPa using a hydrothermal diamond anvil cell (HDAC) and Raman spectroscopy. A calcium sulfate solution was formed by dissolving gypsum in water at high pressure, and γ-anhydrite crystallized due to the increasing temperature. The relationship among the reaction rate, k, the temperature, T, and the pressure, P was established as k=-1.75×10-3+1.83×10-6P+3.57×10-7T, with an R2 value of 0.943, of which the applicable range is 373 K≤T≤473 K and 1196 MPa≤P≤1903 MPa. An elevation of T or P will accelerate the crystallization rate of γ-anhydrite. The time exponent n obtained between 0.96 and 1.29 indicates that the process of crystallization should be controlled by instant nucleation on the grain boundary and diffusion controlled growth. In the process of crystallization, the volume is reduced because of the decrease of pressure, and the volume change ΔV is equal to -6.05×10-6 m3/mol. The calculated activation energy Ea is 10.7 kJ/mol, and the pre-exponential factor A is 2.27×10-2 s-1.

  19. Mechanistic investigations of the hydrolysis of amides, oxoesters and thioesters via kinetic isotope effects and positional isotope exchange.

    PubMed

    Robins, Lori I; Fogle, Emily J; Marlier, John F

    2015-11-01

    The hydrolysis of amides, oxoesters and thioesters is an important reaction in both organic chemistry and biochemistry. Kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) are one of the most important physical organic methods for determining the most likely transition state structure and rate-determining step of these reaction mechanisms. This method induces a very small change in reaction rates, which, in turn, results in a minimum disturbance of the natural mechanism. KIE studies were carried out on both the non-enzymatic and the enzyme-catalyzed reactions in an effort to compare both types of mechanisms. In these studies the amides and esters of formic acid were chosen because this molecular structure allowed development of methodology to determine heavy-atom solvent (nucleophile) KIEs. This type of isotope effect is difficult to measure, but is rich in mechanistic information. Results of these investigations point to transition states with varying degrees of tetrahedral character that fit a classical stepwise mechanism. This article is part of a special issue entitled: Enzyme Transition States from Theory and Experiment.

  20. Purification and investigation of some kinetic properties of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase from parsley (Petroselinum hortense) leaves.

    PubMed

    Coban, T Abdül Kadir; Ciftçi, Mehmet; Küfrevioğlu, O Irfan

    2002-05-01

    In this study, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (D-glucose-6-phosphate: NADP+ oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.49; G6PD) was purified from parsley (Petroselinum hortense) leaves, and analysis of the kinetic behavior and some properties of the enzyme were investigated. The purification consisted of three steps: preparation of homogenate, ammonium sulfate fractionation, and DEAE-Sephadex A50 ion exchange chromatography. The enzyme was obtained with a yield of 8.79% and had a specific activity of 2.146 U (mg protein)(-1). The overall purification was about 58-fold. Temperature of +4 degrees C was maintained during the purification process. Enzyme activity was spectrophotometrically measured according to the Beutler method, at 340 nm. In order to control the purification of enzyme, SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was carried out in 4% and 10% acrylamide for stacking and running gel, respectively. SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed a single band for enzyme. The molecular weight was found to be 77.6 kDa by Sephadex G-150 gel filtration chromatography. A protein band corresponding to a molecular weight of 79.3 kDa was obtained on SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. For the enzymes, the stable pH, optimum pH, and optimum temperature were found to be 6.0, 8.0, and 60 degrees C, respectively. Moreover, KM and Vmax values for NADP+ and G6-P at optimum pH and 25 degrees C were determined by means of Lineweaver-Burk graphs. Additionally, effects of streptomycin sulfate and tetracycline antibiotics were investigated for the enzyme activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in vitro.

  1. In situ real-time investigation of kinetics of nucleation and growth of sol-gel-derived functional oxide thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Tao; Hu, Hao; Pan, Zixiao; Li, Xuefa; Wang, Jin; Dravid, Vinayak P.

    2008-05-01

    Early-stage nucleation and growth kinetics of sol-gel-derived multiferroic BiFeO3 thin films were investigated in situ and in real time by combining transmission electron microscopy and grazing-incidence small-angle x-ray scattering (GISAXS). While the initial phase of the nuclei was identified to be Bi2O2CO3 , the quantitative GISAXS analysis unambiguously revealed that the early-stage kinetic nucleation growth in the thin films was dominated by an oriented-attachment mechanism as opposed to the conventional Ostwald ripening in metallic and ceramic systems.

  2. Investigating chemical changes during shelf-life of thermal and high-pressure high-temperature sterilised carrot purees: A 'fingerprinting kinetics' approach.

    PubMed

    Kebede, Biniam T; Grauwet, Tara; Palmers, Stijn; Michiels, Chris; Hendrickx, Marc; Van Loey, Ann

    2015-10-15

    This work investigates chemical changes during shelf-life of thermally and high pressure high temperature (HPHT) sterilised carrot purees using a 'fingerprinting kinetics' approach. Fingerprinting enabled selection of Strecker aldehydes, terpenes, phenylpropanoids, fatty acid derivatives and carotenoid degradation products as volatiles clearly changing during shelf-life. Next, kinetic modelling of these volatiles was performed to compare their reaction kinetics during storage in differently sterilised samples. Immediately after processing, the Strecker aldehydes were detected at higher levels in thermally sterilised samples. During storage, the compounds increased at a comparable rate in thermally and HPHT processed samples. In contrast, immediately after processing, most of the naturally occurring terpenes and phenylpropanoids were better preserved in HPHT treated samples. Nevertheless, by the end of storage, the concentration of these compounds decreased to almost the same level in both thermal and HPHT samples (with a higher degradation rate in HPHT samples). PMID:25952849

  3. Investigating chemical changes during shelf-life of thermal and high-pressure high-temperature sterilised carrot purees: A 'fingerprinting kinetics' approach.

    PubMed

    Kebede, Biniam T; Grauwet, Tara; Palmers, Stijn; Michiels, Chris; Hendrickx, Marc; Van Loey, Ann

    2015-10-15

    This work investigates chemical changes during shelf-life of thermally and high pressure high temperature (HPHT) sterilised carrot purees using a 'fingerprinting kinetics' approach. Fingerprinting enabled selection of Strecker aldehydes, terpenes, phenylpropanoids, fatty acid derivatives and carotenoid degradation products as volatiles clearly changing during shelf-life. Next, kinetic modelling of these volatiles was performed to compare their reaction kinetics during storage in differently sterilised samples. Immediately after processing, the Strecker aldehydes were detected at higher levels in thermally sterilised samples. During storage, the compounds increased at a comparable rate in thermally and HPHT processed samples. In contrast, immediately after processing, most of the naturally occurring terpenes and phenylpropanoids were better preserved in HPHT treated samples. Nevertheless, by the end of storage, the concentration of these compounds decreased to almost the same level in both thermal and HPHT samples (with a higher degradation rate in HPHT samples).

  4. Glutathione reductase: Comparison of steady-state and rapid reaction primary kinetic isotope effects exhibited by the yeast, spinach, and Escherichia coli enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Vanoni, M.A.; Wong, K.K.; Ballou, D.P.; Blanchard, J.S. )

    1990-06-19

    Kinetic parameters for NADPH and NADH have been determined at pH 8.1 for spinach, yeast, and E. coli glutathione reductases. NADPH exhibited low Km values for all enzymes (3-6 microM), while the Km values for NADH were 100 times higher (approximately 400 microM). Under our experimental conditions, the percentage of maximal velocities with NADH versus those measured with NADPH were 18.4, 3.7, and 0.13% for the spinach, yeast, and E. coli enzymes, respectively. Primary deuterium kinetic isotope effects were independent of GSSG concentration between Km and 15Km levels, supporting a ping-pong kinetic mechanism. For each of the three enzymes, NADPH yielded primary deuterium kinetic isotope effects on Vmax only, while NADH exhibited primary deuterium kinetic isotope effects on both V and V/K. The magnitude of DV/KNADH at pH 8.1 is 4.3 for the spinach enzyme, 2.7 for the yeast enzyme, and 1.6 for the E. coli glutathione reductase. The experimentally determined values of TV/KNADH of 7.4, 4.2, and 2.2 for the spinach, yeast, and E. coli glutathione reductases agree well with those calculated from the corresponding DV/KNADH using the Swain-Schaad expression. This suggests that the intrinsic primary kinetic isotope effect on NADH oxidation is fully expressed. In order to confirm this conclusion, single-turnover experiments have been performed. The measured primary deuterium kinetic isotope effects on the enzyme reduction half-reaction using NADH match those measured in the steady state for each of the three glutathione reductases.

  5. Role of protons in the pump cycle of KdpFABC investigated by time-resolved kinetic experiments.

    PubMed

    Damnjanovic, Bojana; Apell, Hans-Jürgen

    2014-05-20

    The time-resolved kinetics of the KdpFABC complex solubilized in Aminoxide WS-35 was investigated by ATP concentration jump experiments. ATP was photoreleased from its inactive precursor, caged ATP, and charge movements in the membrane domain of the KdpFABC were detected by the electrochromic dye RH421. At low ATP concentrations, the ATP binding step became rate-limiting with an apparent, pH-independent ATP binding affinity of ~70 μM. At saturating ATP concentrations, the rate-limiting step is the conformational transition (E1-P → P-E2) with a rate constant of ~1.7 s(-1) at 20 °C that was independent of K(+) concentration. This observation together with the detected fluorescence decrease indicates that K(+) (or another positive ion) is bound in the membrane domain after enzyme phosphorylation and the conformational transition to the P-E2 state. pH dependence experiments revealed different roles of H(+) in the transport mechanism. Two different functions of protons for the ion pump must be distinguished. On one hand, there are electrogenically bound "functional" protons, which are not transported but prerequisite for the performance of the ATP-driven half-cycle. On the other hand, protons bind to the transport sites, acting as weak congeners of K(+). There possibly are noncompetitively bound protons, affecting the enzyme activity and/or coupling between KdpA and KdpB subunits. Finally, the recently proposed Post-Albers model for the KdpFABC complex was supplemented with stoichiometry factors of 2 for K(+) and 3 for H(+), and additional inhibitory side reactions controlled by H(+) were introduced, which are relevant at pH <6.5 and/or in the absence of K(+).

  6. An investigation into the crystallization tendency/kinetics of amorphous active pharmaceutical ingredients: A case study with dipyridamole and cinnarizine.

    PubMed

    Baghel, Shrawan; Cathcart, Helen; Redington, Wynette; O'Reilly, Niall J

    2016-07-01

    Amorphous drug formulations have great potential to enhance solubility and thus bioavailability of BCS class II drugs. However, the higher free energy and molecular mobility of the amorphous form drive them towards the crystalline state which makes them unstable. Accurate determination of the crystallization tendency/kinetics is the key to the successful design and development of such systems. In this study, dipyridamole (DPM) and cinnarizine (CNZ) have been selected as model compounds. Thermodynamic fragility (mT) was measured from the heat capacity change at the glass transition temperature (Tg) whereas dynamic fragility (mD) was evaluated using methods based on extrapolation of configurational entropy to zero [Formula: see text] , and heating rate dependence of Tg [Formula: see text] . The mean relaxation time of amorphous drugs was calculated from the Vogel-Tammann-Fulcher (VTF) equation. Furthermore, the correlation between fragility and glass forming ability (GFA) of the model drugs has been established and the relevance of these parameters to crystallization of amorphous drugs is also assessed. Moreover, the crystallization kinetics of model drugs under isothermal conditions has been studied using Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (JMA) approach to determine the Avrami constant 'n' which provides an insight into the mechanism of crystallization. To further probe into the crystallization mechanism, the non-isothermal crystallization kinetics of model systems were also analysed by statistically fitting the crystallization data to 15 different kinetic models and the relevance of model-free kinetic approach has been established. The crystallization mechanism for DPM and CNZ at each extent of transformation has been predicted. The calculated fragility, glass forming ability (GFA) and crystallization kinetics are found to be in good correlation with the stability prediction of amorphous solid dispersions. Thus, this research work involves a multidisciplinary approach to

  7. Decoding the Formation of New Semantics: MVPA Investigation of Rapid Neocortical Plasticity during Associative Encoding through Fast Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Atir-Sharon, Tali; Gilboa, Asaf; Hazan, Hananel; Koilis, Ester; Manevitz, Larry M.

    2015-01-01

    Neocortical structures typically only support slow acquisition of declarative memory; however, learning through fast mapping may facilitate rapid learning-induced cortical plasticity and hippocampal-independent integration of novel associations into existing semantic networks. During fast mapping the meaning of new words and concepts is inferred, and durable novel associations are incidentally formed, a process thought to support early childhood's exuberant learning. The anterior temporal lobe, a cortical semantic memory hub, may critically support such learning. We investigated encoding of semantic associations through fast mapping using fMRI and multivoxel pattern analysis. Subsequent memory performance following fast mapping was more efficiently predicted using anterior temporal lobe than hippocampal voxels, while standard explicit encoding was best predicted by hippocampal activity. Searchlight algorithms revealed additional activity patterns that predicted successful fast mapping semantic learning located in lateral occipitotemporal and parietotemporal neocortex and ventrolateral prefrontal cortex. By contrast, successful explicit encoding could be classified by activity in medial and dorsolateral prefrontal and parahippocampal cortices. We propose that fast mapping promotes incidental rapid integration of new associations into existing neocortical semantic networks by activating related, nonoverlapping conceptual knowledge. In healthy adults, this is better captured by unique anterior and lateral temporal lobe activity patterns, while hippocampal involvement is less predictive of this kind of learning. PMID:26257961

  8. Rapid prototyping for in vitro knee rig investigations of prosthetized knee biomechanics: comparison with cobalt-chromium alloy implant material.

    PubMed

    Schröder, Christian; Steinbrück, Arnd; Müller, Tatjana; Woiczinski, Matthias; Chevalier, Yan; Weber, Patrick; Müller, Peter E; Jansson, Volkmar

    2015-01-01

    Retropatellar complications after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) such as anterior knee pain and subluxations might be related to altered patellofemoral biomechanics, in particular to trochlear design and femorotibial joint positioning. A method was developed to test femorotibial and patellofemoral joint modifications separately with 3D-rapid prototyped components for in vitro tests, but material differences may further influence results. This pilot study aims at validating the use of prostheses made of photopolymerized rapid prototype material (RPM) by measuring the sliding friction with a ring-on-disc setup as well as knee kinematics and retropatellar pressure on a knee rig. Cobalt-chromium alloy (standard prosthesis material, SPM) prostheses served as validation standard. Friction coefficients between these materials and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) were additionally tested as this latter material is commonly used to protect pressure sensors in experiments. No statistical differences were found between friction coefficients of both materials to PTFE. UHMWPE shows higher friction coefficient at low axial loads for RPM, a difference that disappears at higher load. No measurable statistical differences were found in knee kinematics and retropatellar pressure distribution. This suggests that using polymer prototypes may be a valid alternative to original components for in vitro TKA studies and future investigations on knee biomechanics. PMID:25879019

  9. Rapid Prototyping for In Vitro Knee Rig Investigations of Prosthetized Knee Biomechanics: Comparison with Cobalt-Chromium Alloy Implant Material

    PubMed Central

    Schröder, Christian; Steinbrück, Arnd; Müller, Tatjana; Woiczinski, Matthias; Chevalier, Yan; Müller, Peter E.; Jansson, Volkmar

    2015-01-01

    Retropatellar complications after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) such as anterior knee pain and subluxations might be related to altered patellofemoral biomechanics, in particular to trochlear design and femorotibial joint positioning. A method was developed to test femorotibial and patellofemoral joint modifications separately with 3D-rapid prototyped components for in vitro tests, but material differences may further influence results. This pilot study aims at validating the use of prostheses made of photopolymerized rapid prototype material (RPM) by measuring the sliding friction with a ring-on-disc setup as well as knee kinematics and retropatellar pressure on a knee rig. Cobalt-chromium alloy (standard prosthesis material, SPM) prostheses served as validation standard. Friction coefficients between these materials and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) were additionally tested as this latter material is commonly used to protect pressure sensors in experiments. No statistical differences were found between friction coefficients of both materials to PTFE. UHMWPE shows higher friction coefficient at low axial loads for RPM, a difference that disappears at higher load. No measurable statistical differences were found in knee kinematics and retropatellar pressure distribution. This suggests that using polymer prototypes may be a valid alternative to original components for in vitro TKA studies and future investigations on knee biomechanics. PMID:25879019

  10. [Investigation of metabolic kinetics and reaction phenotyping of ligustrazin by using liver microsomes and recombinant human enzymes].

    PubMed

    Tan, Yan; Zhuang, Xiao-Mei; Shen, Guo-Lin; Li, Hua; Gao, Yue

    2014-03-01

    The metabolic characteristics of ligustrazin (TMPz) in liver microsomes were investigated in the present study. The reaction phenotyping of TMPz metabolism was also identified by in vitro assessment using recombinant human cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYP) and UDP glucuronosyltransferases (UGT). TMPz was incubated at 37 degrees C with human (HLM) and rat liver microsomes (RLM) in the presence of different co-factors. The metabolic stability and enzyme kinetics of TMPz were studied by determining its remaining concentrations with a LC-MS/MS method. TMPz was only metabolically eliminated in the microsomes with NADPH or NADPH+UDPGA. In the HLM and RLM with NADPH+UDPGA, t1/2, K(m) and V(max) of TMPz were 94.24 +/- 4.53 and 105.07 +/- 9.44 min, 22.74 +/- 1.89 and 33.09 +/- 2.74 micromol x L(-1), 253.50 +/- 10.06 and 190.40 +/- 8.35 nmol x min(-1) x mg(-1) (protein), respectively. TMPz showed a slightly higher metabolic rate in HLM than that in RLM. Its primary oxidative metabolites, 2-hydroxymethyl-3, 5, 6-trimethylpyrazine (HTMP), could undergo glucuronide conjugation. The CYP reaction phenotyping of TMPz metabolism was identified using a panel of recombinant CYP isoforms (rCYP) and specific CYP inhibitors in HLM. CYP1A2, 2C9 and 3A4 were found to be the major CYP isoforms involved in TMPz metabolism. Their individual contributions were assessed b) using the method of the total normalized rate to be 19.32%, 27.79% and 52.90%, respectively. It was observed that these CYP isoforms mediated the formation of HTMP in rCYP incubation. The UGT reaction phenotyping of HTMP glucuronidation was also investigated preliminarily by using a panel of 6 UGT isoforms (rUGT). UGT1A1, 1A4 and 1A6 were the predominant isoforms mediated the HTMP glucuronidation. The results above indicate that the metabolism of TMPz involves multiple enzymes mediated phase I and phase II reactions.

  11. An investigation of the effect of surface impurities on the adsorption kinetics of hydrogen chemisorbed onto iron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shanabarger, Mickey R.

    1993-01-01

    The goal of this program was to develop an understanding of heterogeneous kinetic processes for those molecular species which produce gaseous hydrogen degradation of the mechanical properties of metallic structural materials. Although hydrogen degradation of metallic materials is believed to result from dissolved protonic hydrogen, the heterogeneous hydrogen interface transport processes often dominate the kinetics of degradation. The initial step in the interface transport process is the dissociative chemisorption of the molecular species at the metal surface followed by hydrogen absorption into and transport through the bulk. The interaction of hydrogen with the surfaces of alpha-2(Ti3Al) titanium aluminide, gamma(TiAl) titanium aluminide, and beryllium were studied.

  12. Investigating the Mechanism of Heteroaromatic Decarboxylation Using Solvent Kinetic Isotope Effects and Eyring Transition-State Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mundle, Scott O. C.; Opinska, Liliana Guevara; Kluger, Ronald; Dicks, Andrew P.

    2011-01-01

    An upper-level mechanistic organic experiment is outlined where undergraduates measure kinetic rate constants for decarboxylation of pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid by the initial-rates method. UV spectroscopy is used to monitor reactant disappearance in both hydrochloric acid and deuterium chloride at different temperatures. Individual data are pooled…

  13. Effects of growth and tissue type on the kinetics of 13C and 15N incorporation in a rapidly growing ectotherm.

    PubMed

    Reich, Kimberly J; Bjorndal, Karen A; Martínez Del Rio, Carlos

    2008-04-01

    The use of stable isotopes to investigate animal diets, habitat use, and trophic level requires understanding the rate at which animals incorporate the 13C and 15N from their diets and the factors that determine the magnitude of the difference in isotopic composition between the animal's diet and that of its tissues. We determined the contribution of growth and catabolic turnover to the rate of 13C and 15N incorporation into several tissues that can be sampled non-invasively (skin, scute, whole blood, red blood cells, and plasma solutes) in two age classes of a rapidly growing ectotherm (loggerhead turtles, Caretta caretta). We found significant differences in C and N incorporation rates and isotopic discrimination factors (Delta 13C = delta 13Ctissues - delta 13Cdiet and Delta 15N = delta 15Ntissues - delta 15Ndiet) among tissues and between age classes. Growth explained from 26 to 100% of the total rate of incorporation in hatchling turtles and from 15 to 52% of the total rate of incorporation in juvenile turtles. Because growth contributed significantly to the rate of isotopic incorporation, variation in rates among tissues was lower than reported in previous studies. The contribution of growth can homogenize the rate of isotopic incorporation and limit the application of stable isotopes to identify dietary changes at contrasting time scales and to determine the timing of diet shifts. The isotopic discrimination factor of nitrogen ranged from -0.64 to 1.77 per thousand in the turtles' tissues. These values are lower than the commonly assumed average 3.4 per thousand discrimination factors reported for whole body and muscle isotopic analyses. The increasing reliance on non-invasive and non-destructive sampling in animal isotopic ecology requires that we recognize and understand why different tissues differ in isotopic discrimination factors.

  14. A novel photochemical system of ferrous sulfite complex: kinetics and mechanisms of rapid decolorization of Acid Orange 7 in aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Danna; Chen, Long; Zhang, Changbo; Yu, Yingtan; Zhang, Li; Wu, Feng

    2014-06-15

    We previously reported the decolorization of the azo dye Acid Orange 7 (AO7) by sulfate radical (SO4(-)) in the presence of iron(II) sulfite complex and oxygen under UV-vis irradiation (photo-iron(II) sulfite system). This system, however, achieves very limited mineralization of AO7 (in terms of total organic carbon (TOC) removal), which is not in accordance with literature reports on the oxidation of organic contaminants by SO4(-). In the present work, kinetics and products under irradiation of xenon lamp (350 W) were analyzed to reveal the reaction pathway of decolorization of AO7. Steady-state approximation (SSA) of SO4(-) radicals and apparent kinetics of AO7 were examined. The reaction between AO7 and SO4(-) was found to proceed in two steps, namely, electron transfer and SO4(-) addition. The second-order rate constant for the reaction between AO7 and SO4(-) was found to be 8.07 ± 1.07 × 10(9) M(-1) s(-1) by SSA and 6.80 ± 0.68 × 10(9) M(-1) s(-1) by competition kinetics method. The apparent kinetics of the decolorization of AO7 under irradiation closely fits the mechanism of radical chain reactions of various reactive sulfur species. By liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry, we identified the sulfate adduct AO7-SO4 and confirmed the two-step reaction between AO7 and SO4(-). This stable sulfate adduct provides a good explanation of the poor TOC removal during decolorization of AO7 by the photo-iron(II) sulfite system.

  15. Physiological Role of Kv1.3 Channel in T Lymphocyte Cell Investigated Quantitatively by Kinetic Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Jing; Wang, Wei; Wu, Yingliang; Ding, Jiuping

    2014-01-01

    Kv1.3 channel is a delayed rectifier channel abundant in human T lymphocytes. Chronic inflammatory and autoimmune disorders lead to the over-expression of Kv1.3 in T cells. To quantitatively study the regulatory mechanism and physiological function of Kv1.3 in T cells, it is necessary to have a precise kinetic model of Kv1.3. In this study, we firstly established a kinetic model capable to precisely replicate all the kinetic features for Kv1.3 channels, and then constructed a T-cell model composed of ion channels including Ca2+-release activated calcium (CRAC) channel, intermediate K+ (IK) channel, TASK channel and Kv1.3 channel for quantitatively simulating the changes in membrane potentials and local Ca2+ signaling messengers during activation of T cells. Based on the experimental data from current-clamp recordings, we successfully demonstrated that Kv1.3 dominated the membrane potential of T cells to manipulate the Ca2+ influx via CRAC channel. Our results revealed that the deficient expression of Kv1.3 channel would cause the less Ca2+ signal, leading to the less efficiency in secretion. This was the first successful attempt to simulate membrane potential in non-excitable cells, which laid a solid basis for quantitatively studying the regulatory mechanism and physiological role of channels in non-excitable cells. PMID:24594979

  16. Investigations of rapid thermal annealing induced structural evolution of ZnO: Ge nanocomposite thin films via GISAXS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceylan, Abdullah; Ozcan, Yusuf; Orujalipoor, Ilghar; Huang, Yen-Chih; Jeng, U.-Ser; Ide, Semra

    2016-06-01

    In this work, we present in depth structural investigations of nanocomposite ZnO: Ge thin films by utilizing a state of the art grazing incidence small angle x-ray spectroscopy (GISAXS) technique. The samples have been deposited by sequential r.f. and d.c. sputtering of ZnO and Ge thin film layers, respectively, on single crystal Si(100) substrates. Transformation of Ge layers into Ge nanoparticles (Ge-np) has been initiated by ex-situ rapid thermal annealing of asprepared thin film samples at 600 °C for 30, 60, and 90 s under forming gas atmosphere. A special attention has been paid on the effects of reactive and nonreactive growth of ZnO layers on the structural evolution of Ge-np. GISAXS analyses have been performed via cylindrical and spherical form factor calculations for different nanostructure types. Variations of the size, shape, and distributions of both ZnO and Ge nanostructures have been determined. It has been realized that GISAXS results are not only remarkably consistent with the electron microscopy observations but also provide additional information on the large scale size and shape distribution of the nanostructured components.

  17. Depth investigation of rapid sand filters for drinking water production reveals strong stratification in nitrification biokinetic behavior.

    PubMed

    Tatari, K; Smets, B F; Albrechtsen, H-J

    2016-09-15

    The biokinetic behavior of NH4(+) removal was investigated at different depths of a rapid sand filter treating groundwater for drinking water preparation. Filter materials from the top, middle and bottom layers of a full-scale filter were exposed to various controlled NH4(+) loadings in a continuous-flow lab-scale assay. NH4(+) removal capacity, estimated from short term loading up-shifts, was at least 10 times higher in the top than in the middle and bottom filter layers, consistent with the stratification of Ammonium Oxidizing Bacteria (AOB). AOB density increased consistently with the NH4(+) removal rate, indicating their primarily role in nitrification under the imposed experimental conditions. The maximum AOB cell specific NH4(+) removal rate observed at the bottom was at least 3 times lower compared to the top and middle layers. Additionally, a significant up-shift capacity (4.6 and 3.5 times) was displayed from the top and middle layers, but not from the bottom layer at increased loading conditions. Hence, AOB with different physiological responses were active at the different depths. The biokinetic analysis predicted that despite the low NH4(+) removal capacity at the bottom layer, the entire filter is able to cope with a 4-fold instantaneous loading increase without compromising the effluent NH4(+). Ultimately, this filter up-shift capacity was limited by the density of AOB and their biokinetic behavior, both of which were strongly stratified.

  18. Depth investigation of rapid sand filters for drinking water production reveals strong stratification in nitrification biokinetic behavior.

    PubMed

    Tatari, K; Smets, B F; Albrechtsen, H-J

    2016-09-15

    The biokinetic behavior of NH4(+) removal was investigated at different depths of a rapid sand filter treating groundwater for drinking water preparation. Filter materials from the top, middle and bottom layers of a full-scale filter were exposed to various controlled NH4(+) loadings in a continuous-flow lab-scale assay. NH4(+) removal capacity, estimated from short term loading up-shifts, was at least 10 times higher in the top than in the middle and bottom filter layers, consistent with the stratification of Ammonium Oxidizing Bacteria (AOB). AOB density increased consistently with the NH4(+) removal rate, indicating their primarily role in nitrification under the imposed experimental conditions. The maximum AOB cell specific NH4(+) removal rate observed at the bottom was at least 3 times lower compared to the top and middle layers. Additionally, a significant up-shift capacity (4.6 and 3.5 times) was displayed from the top and middle layers, but not from the bottom layer at increased loading conditions. Hence, AOB with different physiological responses were active at the different depths. The biokinetic analysis predicted that despite the low NH4(+) removal capacity at the bottom layer, the entire filter is able to cope with a 4-fold instantaneous loading increase without compromising the effluent NH4(+). Ultimately, this filter up-shift capacity was limited by the density of AOB and their biokinetic behavior, both of which were strongly stratified. PMID:27295615

  19. Flood-frequency analyses from paleoflood investigations for Spring, Rapid, Boxelder, and Elk Creeks, Black Hills, western South Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harden, Tessa M.; O'Connor, Jim E.; Driscoll, Daniel G.; Stamm, John F.

    2011-01-01

    Flood-frequency analyses for the Black Hills area are important because of severe flooding of June 9-10, 1972, that was caused by a large mesoscale convective system and caused at least 238 deaths. Many 1972 peak flows are high outliers (by factors of 10 or more) in observed records that date to the early 1900s. An efficient means of reducing uncertainties for flood recurrence is to augment gaged records by using paleohydrologic techniques to determine ages and magnitudes of prior large floods (paleofloods). This report summarizes results of paleoflood investigations for Spring Creek, Rapid Creek (two reaches), Boxelder Creek (two subreaches), and Elk Creek. Stratigraphic records and resulting long-term flood chronologies, locally extending more than 2,000 years, were combined with observed and adjusted peak-flow values (gaged records) and historical flood information to derive flood-frequency estimates for the six study reaches. Results indicate that (1) floods as large as and even substantially larger than 1972 have affected most of the study reaches, and (2) incorporation of the paleohydrologic information substantially reduced uncertainties in estimating flood recurrence. Canyons within outcrops of Paleozoic rocks along the eastern flanks of the Black Hills provided excellent environments for (1) deposition and preservation of stratigraphic sequences of late-Holocene flood deposits, primarily in protected slack-water settings flanking the streams; and (2) hydraulic analyses for determination of associated flow magnitudes. The bedrock canyons ensure long-term stability of channel and valley geometry, thereby increasing confidence in hydraulic computations of ancient floods from modern channel geometry. Stratigraphic records of flood sequences, in combination with deposit dating by radiocarbon, optically stimulated luminescence, and cesium-137, provided paleoflood chronologies for 29 individual study sites. Flow magnitudes were estimated from elevations of flood

  20. Experimental investigations of the kinetic processes involved in a rubidium (Rb) Optically Pumped Alkali metal vapor Laser (OPAL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zameroski, Nathan D.

    Diode or Optically Pumped Alkali metal vapor Lasers (DPALs or OPALs) are candidates for high power laser systems. These gas-phase three-level lasers are pumped on the alkali's D2 transition, 2S1/2 → 2P3/2, and support lasing on the D1 transition, 2P1/2 → 2S1/2. Collisional mixing using several hundred Torr of an additive gas such as methane or ethane transfers population from the 2P3/2 state to the 2P1/2 state. These gases are selected because of their large mixing rates (cross sections) and small quenching rates (cross sections) of the 2P states. Pressure broadening of the D1 and D2 transitions is a direct consequence of using several hundred Torr of buffer gas required for collisional mixing. The quenching kinetics (non radiative decay of excited states) of Rb 2P states by methane and ethane are reexamined with time resolved fluorescence techniques. A detailed analysis of the interplay between radiation trapping, the absorption and re-emission of resonant radiation in an atomic vapor, and quenching is carried out. Experimental results supported by theoretical simulations (calculations) bound the quenching cross sections (sigma) of methane and ethane at 40°C to sigma ≤ 0.02 A2 and sigma ≤ 0.03 A2, respectively. These values are about two orders of magnitude smaller than previously reported. The pressure broadening and collisional shift rates of the Rb D2 absorption line by methane, ethane, propane, butane, and helium are measured by using linear absorption spectroscopy at 40°C. The rates of ethane, propane, and butane are measured for the first time. The broadening rates in (MHz/Torr) for C2H6, C3H8, and n-C4H10, are 28.1 +/- 0.4, 30.5 +/- 0.6, and 31.3 +/- 0.6. The corresponding shift rates in (MHz/Torr) are -8.8 +/- 0.2, -9.7 +/- 0.2, and -10.0 +/- 0.2. A pulsed Rb-methane OPAL is demonstrated. Slope efficiencies of 72 to 76 % are obtained. A one dimensional (1D) rate equation model that includes the spectral overlap of the pump and the Rb D2

  1. Modeling and investigation of the diffusion kinetics of combustion of carbon during the firing of fuel-containing ceramic under industrial conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Kulbekov, M.K.

    1992-07-10

    Physicochemical processes of the firing of fuel-containing ceramic materials primarily take place in the diffusion region. In this case the limiting process of firing of a fuel-containing ceramic is the burning of carbon (residues of coal) present in the greenware (the unfired intermediate; after firing - the product) in the form of finely ground particles. Some results of a study of the diffusion kinetics of the burning of carbon in ceramic samples (plate, cylinder, ball) using a model analogous to the process of solid-phase reactions limited by the rate of diffusion of a moving reactant through a layer of reaction product are given. The authors have made an attempt to model to some degree the industrial temperature regime of firing and to investigate under these conditions the diffusion kinetics of the physico-chemical conversions that occur in fuel-containing construction ceramic materials (ceramic brick, blocks, tiles, etc.). 4 refs., 3 figs.

  2. Probing the reaction mechanism of the D-ala-D-ala dipeptidase, VanX, by using stopped-flow kinetic and rapid-freeze quench EPR studies on the Co(II)-substituted enzyme.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Megan L; Periyannan, Gopalraj; Hajdin, Christine; Sidgel, Tara K; Bennett, Brian; Crowder, Michael W

    2006-10-11

    In an effort to probe the reaction mechanism of VanX, the d-ala-d-ala dipeptidase required for high-level vancomycin resistance in bacteria, stopped-flow kinetic and rapid-freeze quench EPR studies were conducted on the Co(II)-substituted enzyme when reacted with d-ala-d-ala. The intensity of the Co(II) ligand field band at 550 nm decreased (epsilon550 = 140 to 18 M-1 cm-1) when VanX was reacted with substrate, suggesting that the coordination number of the metal increases from 5 to 6 upon substrate binding. The stopped-flow trace was fitted to a kinetic mechanism that suggests the presence of an intermediate whose breakdown is rate-limiting. Rapid-freeze quench EPR studies verified the presence of a reaction intermediate that exhibits an unusually low hyperfine constant (33 G), which suggests a bidentate coordination of the intermediate to the metal center. The EPR studies also identified a distinct enzyme product complex. The results were used to offer a detailed reaction mechanism for VanX that can be used to guide future inhibitor design efforts.

  3. An automated image-based method of 3D subject-specific body segment parameter estimation for kinetic analyses of rapid movements.

    PubMed

    Sheets, Alison L; Corazza, Stefano; Andriacchi, Thomas P

    2010-01-01

    Accurate subject-specific body segment parameters (BSPs) are necessary to perform kinetic analyses of human movements with large accelerations, or no external contact forces or moments. A new automated topographical image-based method of estimating segment mass, center of mass (CM) position, and moments of inertia is presented. Body geometry and volume were measured using a laser scanner, then an automated pose and shape registration algorithm segmented the scanned body surface, and identified joint center (JC) positions. Assuming the constant segment densities of Dempster, thigh and shank masses, CM locations, and moments of inertia were estimated for four male subjects with body mass indexes (BMIs) of 19.7-38.2. The subject-specific BSP were compared with those determined using Dempster and Clauser regression equations. The influence of BSP and BMI differences on knee and hip net forces and moments during a running swing phase were quantified for the subjects with the smallest and largest BMIs. Subject-specific BSP for 15 body segments were quickly calculated using the image-based method, and total subject masses were overestimated by 1.7-2.9%.When compared with the Dempster and Clauser methods, image-based and regression estimated thigh BSP varied more than the shank parameters. Thigh masses and hip JC to thigh CM distances were consistently larger, and each transverse moment of inertia was smaller using the image-based method. Because the shank had larger linear and angular accelerations than the thigh during the running swing phase, shank BSP differences had a larger effect on calculated intersegmental forces and moments at the knee joint than thigh BSP differences did at the hip. It was the net knee kinetic differences caused by the shank BSP differences that were the largest contributors to the hip variations. Finally, BSP differences produced larger kinetic differences for the subject with larger segment masses, suggesting that parameter accuracy is more

  4. An automated image-based method of 3D subject-specific body segment parameter estimation for kinetic analyses of rapid movements.

    PubMed

    Sheets, Alison L; Corazza, Stefano; Andriacchi, Thomas P

    2010-01-01

    Accurate subject-specific body segment parameters (BSPs) are necessary to perform kinetic analyses of human movements with large accelerations, or no external contact forces or moments. A new automated topographical image-based method of estimating segment mass, center of mass (CM) position, and moments of inertia is presented. Body geometry and volume were measured using a laser scanner, then an automated pose and shape registration algorithm segmented the scanned body surface, and identified joint center (JC) positions. Assuming the constant segment densities of Dempster, thigh and shank masses, CM locations, and moments of inertia were estimated for four male subjects with body mass indexes (BMIs) of 19.7-38.2. The subject-specific BSP were compared with those determined using Dempster and Clauser regression equations. The influence of BSP and BMI differences on knee and hip net forces and moments during a running swing phase were quantified for the subjects with the smallest and largest BMIs. Subject-specific BSP for 15 body segments were quickly calculated using the image-based method, and total subject masses were overestimated by 1.7-2.9%.When compared with the Dempster and Clauser methods, image-based and regression estimated thigh BSP varied more than the shank parameters. Thigh masses and hip JC to thigh CM distances were consistently larger, and each transverse moment of inertia was smaller using the image-based method. Because the shank had larger linear and angular accelerations than the thigh during the running swing phase, shank BSP differences had a larger effect on calculated intersegmental forces and moments at the knee joint than thigh BSP differences did at the hip. It was the net knee kinetic differences caused by the shank BSP differences that were the largest contributors to the hip variations. Finally, BSP differences produced larger kinetic differences for the subject with larger segment masses, suggesting that parameter accuracy is more

  5. Cesium removal and kinetics equilibrium: Precipitation kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, M.J.

    1999-12-17

    This task consisted of both non-radioactive and radioactive (tracer) tests examining the influence of potentially significant variables on cesium tetraphenylborate precipitation kinetics. The work investigated the time required to reach cesium decontamination and the conditions that affect the cesium precipitation kinetics.

  6. Flood-frequency analyses from paleoflood investigations for Spring, Rapid, Boxelder, and Elk Creeks, Black Hills, western South Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harden, Tessa M.; O'Connor, Jim E.; Driscoll, Daniel G.; Stamm, John F.

    2011-01-01

    Flood-frequency analyses for the Black Hills area are important because of severe flooding of June 9-10, 1972, that was caused by a large mesoscale convective system and caused at least 238 deaths. Many 1972 peak flows are high outliers (by factors of 10 or more) in observed records that date to the early 1900s. An efficient means of reducing uncertainties for flood recurrence is to augment gaged records by using paleohydrologic techniques to determine ages and magnitudes of prior large floods (paleofloods). This report summarizes results of paleoflood investigations for Spring Creek, Rapid Creek (two reaches), Boxelder Creek (two subreaches), and Elk Creek. Stratigraphic records and resulting long-term flood chronologies, locally extending more than 2,000 years, were combined with observed and adjusted peak-flow values (gaged records) and historical flood information to derive flood-frequency estimates for the six study reaches. Results indicate that (1) floods as large as and even substantially larger than 1972 have affected most of the study reaches, and (2) incorporation of the paleohydrologic information substantially reduced uncertainties in estimating flood recurrence. Canyons within outcrops of Paleozoic rocks along the eastern flanks of the Black Hills provided excellent environments for (1) deposition and preservation of stratigraphic sequences of late-Holocene flood deposits, primarily in protected slack-water settings flanking the streams; and (2) hydraulic analyses for determination of associated flow magnitudes. The bedrock canyons ensure long-term stability of channel and valley geometry, thereby increasing confidence in hydraulic computations of ancient floods from modern channel geometry. Stratigraphic records of flood sequences, in combination with deposit dating by radiocarbon, optically stimulated luminescence, and cesium-137, provided paleoflood chronologies for 29 individual study sites. Flow magnitudes were estimated from elevations of flood

  7. Condensed-phase kinetic deuterium isotope effects in high-energy phenomena: Mechanistic investigations and relationships. Technical report, January 1975-December 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Shackelford, S.A.

    1989-12-01

    The rate-controlling mechanistic step of an energetic material's condensed phase thermochemical decomposition process is determined directly using the kinetic deuterium isotope effect (KDIE) approach. The KDIE is used with isothermal DSC and isothermal TGA analyses of TNT, HNBB, TATB, RDX, HMX, and their deuterium labeled analogs. The decomposition processes' rate-controlling step possibly can change as the energetic material physical state varies. The condensed phase KDIE approach that determines the rate-controlling mechanistic step in a slow thermochemical decomposition process, can be extended into the progressively more drastic high energy regimes encountered with the rapid pyrolytic decomposition/deflagration process, plus the higher temperature/pressure combustion, thermal explosion, and detonation events. The KDIE determined mechanistic relationships between the slow thermochemical decomposition process and more hostile high energy events are individually described for HMX, RDX, TATB, and TNT.

  8. μ-Rainbow: CdSe Nanocrystal Photoluminescence Gradients via Laser Spike Annealing for Kinetic Investigations and Tunable Device Design.

    PubMed

    Treml, Benjamin E; Jacobs, Alan G; Bell, Robert T; Thompson, Michael O; Hanrath, Tobias

    2016-02-10

    Much of the promise of nanomaterials derives from their size-dependent, and hence tunable, properties. Impressive advances have been made in the synthesis of nanoscale building blocks with precisely tailored size, shape and composition. Significant attention is now turning toward creating thin film structures in which size-dependent properties can be spatially programmed with high fidelity. Nonequilibrium processing techniques present exciting opportunities to create nanostructured thin films with unprecedented spatial control over their optical and electronic properties. Here, we demonstrate single scan laser spike annealing (ssLSA) on CdSe nanocrystal (NC) thin films as an experimental test bed to illustrate how the size-dependent photoluminescence (PL) emission can be tuned throughout the visible range and in spatially defined profiles during a single annealing step. Through control of the annealing temperature and time, we discovered that NC fusion is a kinetically limited process with a constant activation energy in over 2 orders of magnitude of NC growth rate. To underscore the broader technological implications of this work, we demonstrate the scalability of LSA to process large area NC films with periodically modulated PL emission, resulting in tunable emission properties of a large area film. New insights into the processing-structure-property relationships presented here offer significant advances in our fundamental understanding of kinetics of nanomaterials as well as technological implications for the production of nanomaterial films. PMID:26536402

  9. Reaction condition optimization and kinetic investigation of roasting zinc oxide ore using (NH4)2SO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Hong-mei; Shen, Xiao-yi; Sun, Yi; Liu, Yan; Zhai, Yu-chun

    2016-10-01

    An orthogonal test was used to optimize the reaction conditions of roasting zinc oxide ore using (NH4)2SO4. The optimized reaction conditions are defined as an (NH4)2SO4/zinc molar ratio of 1.4:1, a roasting temperature of 440°C, and a thermostatic time of 60 min. The molar ratio of (NH4)2SO4/zinc is the most predominant factor and the roasting temperature is the second significant factor that governs the zinc extraction. Thermogravimetric-differential thermal analysis was used for (NH4)2SO4 and zinc mixed in a molar ratio of 1.4:1 at the heating rates of 5, 10, 15, and 20 K·min-1. Two strong endothermic peaks indicate that the complex chemical reactions occur at approximately 290°C and 400°C. XRD analysis was employed to examine the transformations of mineral phases during roasting process. Kinetic parameters, including reaction apparent activation energy, reaction order, and frequency factor, were calculated by the Doyle-Ozawa and Kissinger methods. Corresponding to the two endothermic peaks, the kinetic equations were obtained.

  10. A joint experimental and theoretical investigation of kinetics and mechanistic study in a synthesis reaction between triphenylphosphine and dialkyl acetylenedicarboxylates in the presence of benzhydrazide.

    PubMed

    Kazemian, Mohammad Amin; Habibi-Khorassani, Sayyed Mostafa; Ebrahimi, Ali; Maghsoodlou, Malek Taher; Jahani, Peyman Mohammadzadeh; Ghahramaninezhad, Mahbobeh

    2012-12-01

    Stable crystalline phosphorus ylides were obtained in excellent yields from the 1:1:1 addition reaction between triphenylphosphine (TPP) and dialkyl acetylenedicarboxylates, in the presence of NH-acids, such as benzhydrazide. To determine the kinetic parameters of the reactions, they were monitored by UV spectrophotometery. The second order fits were automatically drawn and the values of the second order rate constant (k(2)) were calculated using standard equations within the program. At the temperature range studied the dependence of the second order rate constant (Ln k(2)) on reciprocal temperature was compatible with Arrhenius equation. This provided the relevant plots to calculate the activation energy of all reactions. Furthermore, useful information were obtained from studies of the effect of solvent, structure of reactants (different alkyl groups within the dialkyl acetylenedicarboxylates) and also concentration of reactants on the rate of reactions. On the basis of experimental data the proposed mechanism was confirmed according to the obtained results and a steady state approximation and the first step (k(2)) and third (k(3)) steps of the reactions were recognized as the rate determining steps, respectively. In addition, three speculative proposed mechanisms were theoretically investigated using quantum mechanical calculation. The results, arising from the second and third speculative mechanisms, were far from the experimental data. Nevertheless, there was a good agreement between the theoretical kinetic data, emerge from the first speculative mechanism, and experimental kinetic data of proposed mechanism.

  11. Numerical investigation of non-perturbative kinetic effects of energetic particles on toroidicity-induced Alfvén eigenmodes in tokamaks and stellarators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slaby, Christoph; Könies, Axel; Kleiber, Ralf

    2016-09-01

    The resonant interaction of shear Alfvén waves with energetic particles is investigated numerically in tokamak and stellarator geometry using a non-perturbative MHD-kinetic hybrid approach. The focus lies on toroidicity-induced Alfvén eigenmodes (TAEs), which are most easily destabilized by a fast-particle population in fusion plasmas. While the background plasma is treated within the framework of an ideal-MHD theory, the drive of the fast particles, as well as Landau damping of the background plasma, is modelled using the drift-kinetic Vlasov equation without collisions. Building on analytical theory, a fast numerical tool, STAE-K, has been developed to solve the resulting eigenvalue problem using a Riccati shooting method. The code, which can be used for parameter scans, is applied to tokamaks and the stellarator Wendelstein 7-X. High energetic-ion pressure leads to large growth rates of the TAEs and to their conversion into kinetically modified TAEs and kinetic Alfvén waves via continuum interaction. To better understand the physics of this conversion mechanism, the connections between TAEs and the shear Alfvén wave continuum are examined. It is shown that, when energetic particles are present, the continuum deforms substantially and the TAE frequency can leave the continuum gap. The interaction of the TAE with the continuum leads to singularities in the eigenfunctions. To further advance the physical model and also to eliminate the MHD continuum together with the singularities in the eigenfunctions, a fourth-order term connected to radiative damping has been included. The radiative damping term is connected to non-ideal effects of the bulk plasma and introduces higher-order derivatives to the model. Thus, it has the potential to substantially change the nature of the solution. For the first time, the fast-particle drive, Landau damping, continuum damping, and radiative damping have been modelled together in tokamak- as well as in stellarator geometry.

  12. Investigation of the maximum accessible kinetic energy of fragments in the neutron-induced fission of {sup 238}U nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Khryachkov, V. A. Bondarenko, I. P.; Ivanova, T. A.; Kuzminov, B. D.; Semenova, N. N.; Sergachev, A. I.

    2013-03-15

    The masses, total kinetic energies (TKE), and emission angles of fragments originating from the fission of {sup 238}U nuclei that was induced by 5- and 6.5-MeV neutrons were measured by using digital methods for processing signals. A detailed analysis of the shape of digital signals made it possible to reduce substantially the contribution of fragments whose TKE values were distorted because of a superimposition of signals from recoil protons and from alpha particles produced in the spontaneous decay of uranium. The total statistics exceeded two million events for either neutron energy, and this permitted performing a detailed analysis of fission-fragment yields in the region of the highest attainable TKE values. An analysis of fragment yields made it possible to draw specific conclusions on the structure of the potential surface of fissile nuclei.

  13. Investigating Uranium Concentrations in Groundwaters in the State of Idaho Using Kinetic Phosphorescence Analysis and Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tkavadze, Levan; Dunker, Roy E; Brey, Richard R; Dudgeon, John

    2016-11-01

    The determination of uranium concentrations in natural water samples is of great interest due to the environmental consequences of this radionuclide. In this study, 380 groundwater samples from various locations within the state of Idaho were analyzed using two different techniques. The first method was Kinetic Phosphorescence Analysis (KPA), which gives the total uranium concentrations in water samples. The second analysis method was inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP- MS). This method determines the total uranium concentration as well as the separate isotope concentrations of uranium. The U/U isotopic ratio was also measured for each sample to confirm that there was no depleted or enriched uranium present. The results were compared and mapped separately from each other. The study also found that in some areas of the state, natural uranium concentrations are relatively high. PMID:27682901

  14. Investigation of the kinetics of the isothermal peritectoid formation of Zr 3Al and U 3Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang-Kyu, Rhee; Su-Il, Pyun

    1991-12-01

    In the present work the kinetics of the isothermal peritectoid transformation have been critically evaluated in the zirconium/Zr 2Al partial system reported previously. In addition, the isothermal peritectoid reaction has been experimentally studied as a function of time from the coarsened U 3Si 2 precipitate/uranium matrix system using optical microscopy. The plots of the Austin-Rickett equation indicated that the time exponents are 2.5 and 1.5 in the early and in the later stage of the isothermal peritectoid reaction, respectively. Also, the impingement exponent was found to be 2. The experimental results indicated that the peritectoid transformation proceeds by nucleation and diffusion-controlled growth in the early stage and by diffusion-controlled growth without nucleation in the later stage, from which formulae describing the isothermal peritectoid transformation are derived.

  15. Temperature dependence of the electrode kinetics of oxygen reduction at the platinum/Nafion interface - A microelectrode investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parthasarathy, Arvind; Srinivasan, Supramanian; Appleby, A. J.; Martin, Charles R.

    1992-01-01

    Results of a study of the temperature dependence of the oxygen reduction kinetics at the Pt/Nafion interface are presented. This study was carried out in the temperature range of 30-80 C and at 5 atm of oxygen pressure. The results showed a linear increase of the Tafel slope with temperature in the low current density region, but the Tafel slope was found to be independent of temperature in the high current density region. The values of the activation energy for oxygen reduction at the platinum/Nafion interface are nearly the same as those obtained at the platinum/trifluoromethane sulfonic acid interface but less than values obtained at the Pt/H3PO4 and Pt/HClO4 interfaces. The diffusion coefficient of oxygen in Nafion increases with temperature while its solubility decreases with temperature. These temperatures also depend on the water content of the membrane.

  16. Experimental and Numerical Investigation of Guest Molecule Exchange Kinetics based on the 2012 Ignik Sikumi Gas Hydrate Field Trial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruprecht Yonkofski, C. M.; Horner, J.; White, M. D.

    2015-12-01

    In 2012 the U.S. DOE/NETL, ConocoPhillips Company, and Japan Oil, Gas and Metals National Corporation jointly sponsored the first field trial of injecting a mixture of N2-CO2 into a CH4-hydrate bearing formation beneath the permafrost on the Alaska North Slope. Known as the Ignik Sikumi #1 Gas Hydrate Field Trial, this experiment involved three stages: 1) the injection of a N2-CO2 mixture into a targeted hydrate-bearing layer, 2) a 4-day pressurized soaking period, and 3) a sustained depressurization and fluid production period. Data collected during the three stages of the field trial were made available after a thorough quality check. The Ignik Sikumi #1 data set is extensive, but contains no direct evidence of the guest-molecule exchange process. This study uses numerical simulation to provide an interpretation of the CH4/CO2/N2 guest molecule exchange process that occurred at Ignik Sikumi #1. Simulations were further informed by experimental observations. The goal of the scoping experiments was to understand kinetic exchange rates and develop parameters for use in Iġnik Sikumi history match simulations. The experimental procedure involves two main stages: 1) the formation of CH4 hydrate in a consolidated sand column at 750 psi and 2°C and 2) flow-through of a 77.5/22.5 N2/CO2 molar ratio gas mixture across the column. Experiments were run both above and below the hydrate stability zone in order to observe exchange behavior across varying conditions. The numerical simulator, STOMP-HYDT-KE, was then used to match experimental results, specifically fitting kinetic behavior. Once this behavior is understood, it can be applied to field scale models based on Ignik Sikumi #1.

  17. An investigation of the effect of surface impurities on the adsorption kinetics of hydrogen chemisorbed onto iron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shanabarger, Mickey R.

    1991-01-01

    The goal was to develop an understanding of heterogeneous kinetic processes for those molecular species which produce gaseous hydrogen degradation of the mechanical properties of metallic structural materials. Although hydrogen degradation of metallic materials is believed to result from dissolved protonic hydrogen, the heterogeneous hydrogen interface transport processes often dominate the kinetics of the degradation process. The initial step in the interface transport process is the dissociative chemisorption of the molecular species at the metal surface followed by hydrogen absorption into and transport through the bulk. Modern advanced aerospace applications often require the use of structural materials in high pressure hydrogen environments at temperatures which range from low cryogenic temperatures to very high temperatures (1300 K and greater). Materials proposed for these applications, such as the titanium aluminides, beta-titanium alloys, nickel- and cobalt-based superalloys, molybdenum-rhenium alloys, beryllium, and various beryllides, need to possess a high degree of immunity from hydrogen induced degradation of mechanical properties. In the present program, the interaction of hydrogen with the surfaces of alpha-2 (Ti3Al) titanium aluminide, gamma (TiAl) titanium aluminide, and beryllium were studied. The interaction of low pressure hydrogen with gamma titanium aluminide and beryllium was found to be relatively weak, in the sense that adsorption leads to a low surface concentration of dissociated hydrogen, i.e., the chemisorption process is reversible at room temperature (300 K) for gamma titanium aluminide and the sticking coefficient for chemisorption is extremely small for beryllium. Hydrogen was found to interact readily with alpha-2 titanium aluminide to form a stable surface hydride at 300 K. These results correlate well with other recent studies which show that the mechanical properties for alpha-2 titanium aluminide are readily degraded in

  18. In-situ neutron investigation of hydrogen absorption kinetics in La(FexSi1-x)13 magnetocaloric alloys for room-temperature refrigeration application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hai, Xueying; Mayer, Charlotte; Colin, Claire V.; Miraglia, Salvatore

    2016-02-01

    Promising magnetocaloric material La(Fe,Si)13 with a first-order magnetic transition has been widely investigated. The observed instability of hydrogen in the material is detrimental for its industrial upscale and a better control of the hydrogen absorption/desorption is necessary to optimize its application potential. In this article, the hydrogen absorption kinetics is studied through an in-situ neutron diffraction experiment. The results allow us to have an inside look at the structure "breathing" to accommodate the interstitial atoms and compare the effect of hydrides with carbohydrides.

  19. A Microstructural and Kinetic Investigation of the KCl-Induced Corrosion of an FeCrAl Alloy at 600 °C

    SciTech Connect

    Israelsson, Niklas; Unocic, Kinga A.; Hellström, K.; Jonsson, T.; Norell, M.; Svensson, J. -E.; Johansson, L. -G.

    2015-03-18

    In this paper, the corrosion behaviour of a FeCrAl alloy was investigated at 600 °C in O2 + H2O with solid KCl applied. A kinetics and microstructural investigation showed that KCl accelerates corrosion and that potassium chromate formation depletes the protective scale in Cr, thus triggering the formation of a fast-growing iron-rich scale. Iron oxide was found to grow both inward and outward, on either side of the initial oxide. A chromia layer is formed with time underneath the iron oxide. Finally, it was found that although the alloy does not form a continuous pure alumina scale at the investigated temperature, aluminium is, however, always enriched at the oxide/alloy interface.

  20. Horseradish peroxidase compound I as a tool to investigate reactive protein-cysteine residues: from quantification to kinetics.

    PubMed

    Toledo, José Carlos; Audi, Renata; Ogusucu, Renata; Monteiro, Gisele; Netto, Luis Eduardo Soares; Augusto, Ohara

    2011-05-01

    Proteins containing reactive cysteine residues (protein-Cys) are receiving increased attention as mediators of hydrogen peroxide signaling. These proteins are mainly identified by mining the thiol proteomes of oxidized protein-Cys in cells and tissues. However, it is difficult to determine if oxidation occurs through a direct reaction with hydrogen peroxide or by thiol-disulfide exchange reactions. Kinetic studies with purified proteins provide invaluable information about the reactivity of protein-Cys residues with hydrogen peroxide. Previously, we showed that the characteristic UV-Vis spectrum of horseradish peroxidase compound I, produced from the oxidation of horseradish peroxidase by hydrogen peroxide, is a simple, reliable, and useful tool to determine the second-order rate constant of the reaction of reactive protein-Cys with hydrogen peroxide and peroxynitrite. Here, the method is fully described and extended to quantify reactive protein-Cys residues and micromolar concentrations of hydrogen peroxide. Members of the peroxiredoxin family were selected for the demonstration and validation of this methodology. In particular, we determined the pK(a) of the peroxidatic thiol of rPrx6 (5.2) and the second-order rate constant of its reactions with hydrogen peroxide ((3.4 ± 0.2) × 10⁷M⁻¹ s⁻¹) and peroxynitrite ((3.7 ± 0.4) × 10⁵ M⁻¹ s⁻¹) at pH 7.4 and 25°C.

  1. An Investigation Of Photodynamic Therapy In The Treatment Of Pancreatic Carcinoma: Dihematoporphyrin Ether Uptake And Photobleaching Kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mang, Thomas S.; Wieman, Thomas J.

    1988-02-01

    Results of dihematoporphyrin ether (DHE) uptake and fluorescence kinetics show that the concentration in the pancreas is on the order of 40-60 μg DHE/g of tissue at an injected dose of 40 mg/kg. Previously concentrations on this order have only been found in organs of the reticuloendothelial system. Two intrapancreatic carcinoma models, one of acinar origin (rat) and one of ductal orgin (hamster), were studied. Both showed equal or higher concentrations of DHE as compared to normal pancreas when fluorescence measurements and chemical extraction procedures were performed. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) treatment of the normal pancreas and pancreatic tumors yielded atypical results. When the normal pancreas with DHE present is exposed to 630 nm light from a dye laser (75 mW/cm2, 30 min), the normal photobleaching measurable by fluorescence decay does not occur. Yet, the pancreatic tumor responds with a relatively normal fluorescence decay pattern, with hemorrhaging and a resultant loss of measurable DHE concentration. These results represent the emergence of an entirely new modality, with substantial potential for the treatment of cancer of the pancreas.

  2. Kinetic Monte Carlo Investigation of the Effects of Vacancy Pairing on Oxygen Diffusivity in Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Good, Brian S.

    2011-01-01

    Yttria-stabilized zirconia s high oxygen diffusivity and corresponding high ionic conductivity, and its structural stability over a broad range of temperatures, have made the material of interest for use in a number of applications, for example, as solid electrolytes in fuel cells. At low concentrations, the stabilizing yttria also serves to increase the oxygen diffusivity through the presence of corresponding oxygen vacancies, needed to maintain charge neutrality. At higher yttria concentration, however, diffusivity is impeded by the larger number of relatively high energy migration barriers associated with yttrium cations. In addition, there is evidence that oxygen vacancies preferentially occupy nearest-neighbor sites around either dopant or Zr cations, further affecting vacancy diffusion. We present the results of ab initio calculations that indicate that it is energetically favorable for oxygen vacancies to occupy nearest-neighbor sites adjacent to Y ions, and that the presence of vacancies near either species of cation lowers the migration barriers. Kinetic Monte Carlo results from simulations incorporating this effect are presented and compared with results from simulations in which the effect is not present.

  3. An Investigation into the Kinetics and Mechanism of the Removal of Cyanobacteria by Extract of Ephedra equisetina Root

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Rong; Ji, Hongli; Wu, Yonghong; Kerr, Philip G.; Fang, Yanming; Yang, Linzhang

    2012-01-01

    An aqueous extract of Ephedra equisetina root was found to induce cyanobacterial cell death. The extract displayed no negative effects on the fish populations but instead, improved the habitat conditions for the growth of macrophytes, zooplankton and bacteria because the inhibiting effects of the extracts on cyanobacteria helped clear up the water column. The removal kinetics of cyanobacteria by E. equisetina extract appears to be a first order process with the rate constant being extract-dose-dependent. Compounds including the flavonoids found in E. equisetina root kill the cyanobacteria in vitro at a dose of 5.0 µg extract per 100 mL water or above. The extract constituents act to disrupt the thylakoid membrane, interrupt the electronic transport, decrease the effective quantum yield, and eventually lead to the failure of photosynthesis in Microcystis aeruginosa. This study presents an easily-deployed, natural and promising approach for controlling cyanobacterial blooms as an emergency measure, and also provides insight into the dynamics and mechanism of the extract consisting of multiple compounds synergistically removing algae. PMID:22870313

  4. An investigation of the effect of surface impurities on the adsorption kinetics of hydrogen chemisorbed onto iron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shanabarger, Mickey R.

    1994-01-01

    The goal of this program has been to develop an understanding of heterogeneous kinetic processes for those molecular species which produce gaseous hydrogen degradation of the mechanical properties of metallic structural materials. During the present program, the interaction of hydrogen with the surfaces of alpha-2 (Ti3Al) titanium aluminide, gamma (TiAl) titanium aluminide, and beryllium were studied. The interaction of low pressure hydrogen with gamma titanium aluminide and beryllium was found to be relatively weak. Weak in the sense that adsorption leads to a low surface concentration of dissociated hydrogen, i.e., the chemisorption process is reversible at room temperature (300 K) for gamma titanium aluminide and the sticking coefficient for chemisorption is extremely small for beryllium. Hydrogen was found to interact readily with alpha-2 titanium aluminide to form a stable surface hydride at 300 K. These results correlate well with other recent studies which show that the mechanical properties for alpha-2 titanium aluminide are readily degraded in hydrogen while gamma titanium aluminide exhibits less degradation and beryllium essentially no degradation. The interaction of oxygen with the surface of several of these materials was studied. More recently, preliminary hydrogen permeation studies were completed for three high temperature alloys, Incoloy 909, Mo-47.5Re (wt. %), and this past year, Haynes 188.

  5. Investigating the chemical and isotopic kinetics of aerobic methane oxidation in the Northern US Atlantic Margin, Hudson Canyon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, E. W.; Kessler, J. D.; Shiller, A. M.; Redmond, M. C.; Arrington, E. C.; Valentine, D. L.

    2015-12-01

    Recent discoveries of methane seepage along the US Atlantic margin have led to speculation on the fate of the released methane. Here we examine the kinetics of aerobic methane oxidation to gain a fundamental understanding of this methane sink. In order to look at this process in its entirety, a unique mesocosm incubation system was developed with a Dissolved Gas Analyzer System (DGAS) to monitor in real time the chemical and isotopic changes involved with aerobic methane oxidation. This system measures changes in methane, carbon dioxide, and oxygen concentrations as well as the stable carbon isotopes of methane and carbon dioxide with time. In addition samples are strategically removed to characterize trace metals, nutrients, cell counts, and microbial community genetics. This presentation will detail the results obtained from samples collected inside the Hudson Canyon at the edge of the methane clathrate stability zone and outside the Hudson Canyon, not influenced by the methane seepage. These results show that in both environments along the Atlantic margin, methane was consumed aggressively but the timing of consumption varied based on location. In addition, these results are leading to insights into the chemical requirements needed for aerobic methane oxidation and the resulting isotopic fractionation.

  6. Kinetic, isotherm and thermodynamic investigations of phosphate adsorption onto core-shell Fe₃O₄@LDHs composites with easy magnetic separation assistance.

    PubMed

    Yan, Liang-guo; Yang, Kun; Shan, Ran-ran; Yan, Tao; Wei, Jing; Yu, Shu-jun; Yu, Hai-qin; Du, Bin

    2015-06-15

    In this study, three different magnetic core-shell Fe3O4@LDHs composites, Fe3O4@Zn-Al-, Fe3O4@Mg-Al-, and Fe3O4@Ni-Al-LDH were prepared via a rapid coprecipitation method for phosphate adsorptive removal. The composites were characterized by XRD, FTIR, TEM, VSM and BET analyses. Characterization results proved the successful synthesis of core-shell Fe3O4@LDHs composites with good superparamagnetisms. Batch experiments were conducted to study the adsorption efficiency of phosphate. Optimal conditions for the phosphate adsorption were obtained: 0.05 g of adsorbent, solution pH of 3, and contact time of 60 min. Proposed mechanisms for the removal of phosphate species onto Fe3O4@LDHs composites at different initial solution pH were showed. The kinetic data were described better by the pseudo-second-order kinetic equation and KASRA model. The adsorption isotherm curves showed a three-region behavior in the ARIAN model. It had a good fit with Langmuir model and the maximum adsorption capacity followed the order of Fe3O4@Zn-Al-LDH>Fe3O4@Mg-Al-LDH>Fe3O4@Ni-Al-LDH. Thermodynamic analyses indicated that the phosphate adsorption process was endothermic and spontaneous in nature. The three Fe3O4@LDHs composites could be easily separated from aqueous solution by the external magnetic field in 10s. These novel magnetic core-shell Fe3O4@LDHs adsorbents may offer a simple single step adsorption treatment option to remove phosphate from water without the requirement of pre-/post-treatment for current industrial practice.

  7. A Microstructural and Kinetic Investigation of the KCl-Induced Corrosion of an FeCrAl Alloy at 600 °C

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Israelsson, Niklas; Unocic, Kinga A.; Hellström, K.; Jonsson, T.; Norell, M.; Svensson, J. -E.; Johansson, L. -G.

    2015-03-18

    In this paper, the corrosion behaviour of a FeCrAl alloy was investigated at 600 °C in O2 + H2O with solid KCl applied. A kinetics and microstructural investigation showed that KCl accelerates corrosion and that potassium chromate formation depletes the protective scale in Cr, thus triggering the formation of a fast-growing iron-rich scale. Iron oxide was found to grow both inward and outward, on either side of the initial oxide. A chromia layer is formed with time underneath the iron oxide. Finally, it was found that although the alloy does not form a continuous pure alumina scale at the investigatedmore » temperature, aluminium is, however, always enriched at the oxide/alloy interface.« less

  8. Reaction kinetics of acetone peroxide formation and structure investigations using Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction.

    PubMed

    Jensen, L; Mortensen, P M; Trane, R; Harris, P; Berg, R W

    2009-01-01

    Triacetone triperoxide (TATP) has been prepared in order to study the effect of pH and temperature on the reaction kinetics. Raman spectra of liquid mixtures of acetone and hydrogen peroxide were recorded versus time throughout the experiments. The spectral data of the liquid phases indicate that at 25 degrees C the reaction between acetone and hydrogen peroxide proceeds to form intermediates within one day. Based on the assumption that a likely reaction path involves a sequence of reaction steps between acetone and hydrogen peroxide, calculations of Raman spectra were performed using a density functional theory (DFT)/Hartree-Fock approach. It was not possible from this to assess with certainty which intermediate products formed most extensively in an acetone/hydrogen peroxide mixture. However, it was concluded that the most likely reaction mixture is a mixture of the different intermediate products and that the rate determining step is the ring closure. The reaction rate of TATP formation was found to increase with temperature and with sulfuric acid additions to the acetone/hydrogen peroxide mixture. By correlation of the induction time of TATP crystallization against pH it was shown that the reaction rate is first order with respect to the H+ concentration. Raman spectra of the precipitates from mixtures were in agreement with previous studies done for TATP, except in one case in which a crystal crystallized at 343 K had a distinctly different Raman spectrum. Comparison with calculated spectra revealed that the crystal produced could be diacetone diperoxide (DADP) or tetraacetone tetraperoxide (TrATrP). Single crystal X-ray diffraction analyses revealed that the crystal crystallized at 343 K was DADP.

  9. Thermodynamic and kinetic investigations of the release of oxidized phospholipids from lipid membranes and its effect on vascular integrity

    PubMed Central

    Heffern, Charles T.R.; Pocivavsek, Luka; Birukova, Anna A.; Moldobaeva, Nurgul; Bochkov, Valery N.; Lee, Ka Yee C.; Birukov, Konstantin G.

    2013-01-01

    The lipid membrane not only provides a rich interface with an array of receptor signaling complexes with which a cell communicates, but it also serves as a source of lipid derived bioactive molecules. In pathologic conditions of acute lung injury (ALI) associated with activation of oxidative stress, unsaturated phosphatidyl cholines overlooking a luminal space undergo oxidation leading to generation of fragmented phospholipids such as 1-palmitoyl-2-hydroxy-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (lysoPC), or 1-palmitoyl-2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (PAPC) full length oxygenation products (oxPAPC). Using Langmuir monolayers as models of the lipid bilayer, we evaluated the propensity of these phospholipids to solubilize from the cell membrane. The results suggest that lysoPC is rapidly released as it is produced, while oxPAPC has a longer membrane bound lifetime. After being released from cell membranes, these oxidized phospholipids exhibit potent agonist-like effects on neighboring cells. Therefore, we correlate the presence of the two phospholipid groups with the onset and resolution of increased vascular leakiness associated with ALI through testing their effect on vascular endothelial barrier integrity. Our work shows that cells respond differently to these two groups of products of phosphatidyl choline oxidation. LysoPC disrupts cell–cell junctions and increases endothelial permeability while oxPAPC enhances endothelial barrier. These data suggest a model whereby rapid release of lysoPC results in onset of ALI associated vascular leak, and the release of a reserve of oxPAPC as oxidative stress subsides restores the vascular barrier properties. PMID:23911706

  10. Rapid purification and reconstitution of a plant vacuolar ATPase using Triton X-114 fractionation: subunit composition and substrate kinetics of the H(+)-ATPase from the tonoplast of Kalanchoë daigremontiana.

    PubMed

    Warren, M; Smith, J A; Apps, D K

    1992-04-29

    A rapid procedure for the purification and reconstitution into proteoliposomes of the H(+)-translocating ATPase of plant vacuolar membranes is reported. It involves fractionation of the tonoplast with Triton X-114, resolubilization of the ATPase with octyl glucoside in the presence of a mixture of phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylserine and cholesterol (27:53:20, by weight), and removal of the detergent by gel-filtration. Starting with partially purified vacuolar membranes, the procedure can be accomplished in about 2 hours. It has been applied to the H(+)-ATPase from the crassulacean plant Kalanchoë daigremontiana, from which it yields vesicles with a specific ATPase activity of about 3 mumol/min per mg protein. The purified enzyme contains polypeptides of apparent molecular mass 72, 57, 48, 42, 39, 33 and 16 kDa; these polypeptides also co-sediment on centrifugation of the solubilized ATPase through glycerol gradients. The 16-kDa subunit is labelled with [14C]dicyclohexylcarbodiimide. There is no evidence for a larger ATPase subunit in this preparation. The reconstituted ATPase proteoliposomes undergo ATP-dependent acidification, which can be measured by quenching of the fluorescence of 9-aminoacridine. The initial rate of fluorescence quenching is a measure of the rate of H+ translocation, and is directly proportional to the vesicle protein concentration, so the preparation is suitable for studying the kinetics of the tonoplast H(+)-ATPase. The dependence of the rate of fluorescence quenching on the concentration of MgATP is well fitted by the Michaelis equation, with a Km value about 30 microM. ATP can be replaced by dATP, ITP, GTP, UTP or CTP, and Mg2+ by Mn2+ or Ca2+; kinetic parameters for these substrates are reported. In contrast, hydrolysis of MgATP shows complex kinetics, suggestive either of negative cooperativity between nucleotide-binding sites, or of two non-interacting catalytic sites. Both the hydrolytic and the H(+)-translocating activities of

  11. An ultrasonic investigation into the kinetics of the precipitation hardening process of aluminum-lithium alloys. Ph.D. Thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Elkind, B.J.

    1994-01-01

    Aluminum-lithium (Al-Li) alloys have recently generated a prominent amount of interest among the automotive, aerospace, and construction industries. Principally through introduction of solute lithium, the lightest metallic species, considerable reductions in density have been achieved simultaneously with significant increases in elastic modulus. In these alloys, precipitation hardening gives rise to delta` (Al3Li) or T1 (Al2CuLi) strengthening phases. Nondestructive techniques (NDE) were employed to analyze effects of isothermal aging on 2090 and 8090 Al-Li alloys at 165 deg C, 175 deg C, and 185 C. Ultrasonic time-of-flight and attenuation measurements were conducted at regular intervals during 24 hour aging processes for room temperature and elevated temperature (e.g. real time) conditions. Rockwell hardness confirmed increases in mechanical strength during room temperature analysis. Results for the 2090 alloy yielded an average 0.8% increase in longitudinal velocity, accompanied by a 35-556 increase in Rockwell hardness and a maximum RB = 81. From velocity data, the shear (G), bulk (k), Young`s (E) moduli, and Poisson`s ratio (v), were calculated. After aging, the 2090 alloy demonstrated an average Young`s modulus (E) of 75.1 GPa, which was about 5.2% higher than E values for conventional Al alloys and was consistent with other studies. The 8090 alloy yielded similar results. Ultrasonic data confirmed the presence of minima-like anomalies that occurred at faster rates with increased isothermal aging temperature. These minima are thought to be associated with formation of the T1 (Al2CuLi) phase and not delta` (Al3Li), more commonly associated with Al-Li strength. Kinetic calculations provided an activation energy of approximately 3.83 kcal/mole associated with these minima. The Avrami expression yielded a transformation mode parameter (n) of 0.55-0.58 at 165 deg C, consistent with coarsening of thin platelets, e.g. T1 precipitates.

  12. Kinetic investigation on the oxidation of tris(1,10-phenanthroline)iron(II) by oxone: the effect of BSA-SDS interaction.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Harasit Kumar; Kundu, Arjama; Balti, Subrata; Mahapatra, Ambikesh

    2012-07-15

    The kinetic investigations of oxidation of tris(1,10-phenanthroline)iron(II) by oxone have been studied spectrophotometrically in phosphate buffer medium of pH 6.8, temperature 308 K, and ionic strength 0.25 mol L(-1). The reactions were also carried out in presence of globular transport protein, bovine serum albumin (BSA) having isoelectric point 4.9, anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), and their mixtures. The critical aggregation concentration (CAC) and critical micelle concentration (CMC) of SDS in presence of BSA have been determined using conductivity and kinetic measurement techniques. The secondary structure of BSA was examined by Circular Dichroism (CD) measurement at 308 K. The helix nature of BSA decreases with increase of SDS concentration. The effect of pH on rate in presence of BSA is opposite to its absence, and the effect of urea on rate in presence of BSA indicates the denaturation of BSA. The results depict that amphiphile SDS interacts with BSA and different molecular events, for example, specific binding, cooperative binding, protein unfolding, and micelle formation act. Activation parameters of the reaction in different environments have been determined.

  13. Comparative investigation on non-isothermal kinetics for thermo-degradation of lignocellulosic substrate and its chlorinated derivative in atmospheres with CO2 participation.

    PubMed

    He, Yao; Ma, Xiaoqian

    2015-01-01

    Investigations were launched under atmospheres of different N2/CO2 ratios for thermo-degradation of lignocellulosic biomass and its chlorinated derivative that typically contains 10 wt.% poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) over thermogravimetric analysis. Two degradation stages were found where CO2 was inert in stage one but changed to be reactive in stage two. Lignocellulosics were less reactive than their chlorinated derivatives. Non-isothermal thermogravimetric data were used for evaluating kinetics using Ozawa-Flynn-Wall and Vyazovkin methods. The values of apparent activation energy in stage one were 200-250 kJ/mol with less variance but varied greatly in stage two for different scenarios concerning CO2 proportion and PVC presence. These values were used to determine the reaction mechanism of each stage by master-plots method. Most processes were kinetically characterized by diffusion and reaction order models. The results afford a theoretical groundwork for the resourceful utilization of lignocellulosics derived from municipal activities and the development of their thermochemical conversion systems.

  14. In situ transmission electron microscopy investigation of the interfacial reaction between Ni and Al during rapid heating in a nanocalorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Grapes, Michael D. E-mail: david.lavan@nist.gov; LaGrange, Thomas; Reed, Bryan W.; Campbell, Geoffrey H.; Woll, Karsten; LaVan, David A. E-mail: david.lavan@nist.gov; Weihs, Timothy P. E-mail: david.lavan@nist.gov

    2014-11-01

    The Al/Ni formation reaction is highly exothermic and of both scientific and technological significance. In this report, we study the evolution of intermetallic phases in this reaction at a heating rate of 830 K/s. 100-nm-thick Al/Ni bilayers were deposited onto nanocalorimeter sensors that enable the measurement of temperature and heat flow during rapid heating. Time-resolved transmission electron diffraction patterns captured simultaneously with thermal measurements allow us to identify the intermetallic phases present and reconstruct the phase transformation sequence as a function of time and temperature. The results show a mostly unaltered phase transformation sequence compared to lower heating rates.

  15. Investigation of analytical performance for rapidly synergistic cloud point extraction of trace amounts of copper combined with spectrophotometric determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Xiaodong; Ye, Liqing; Deng, Qingwen; Peng, Li

    2011-12-01

    In this work, an improved preconcentration method named as rapidly synergistic cloud point extraction (RS-CPE) was established for copper preconcentration and determination. Non-ionic surfactant Triton X-100 (TX-100) was used as extractant. Octanol worked as cloud point revulsant and synergic reagent, which successfully decreased the cloud point temperature (CPT) of TX-100 to realize the room temperature (about 20 °C) CPE without heating. The established RS-CPE pretreatment was simple, rapid and effective. Compared with traditional CPE (about 40 min for heating, incubation and cooling), the extraction time of the proposed method was very short (1 min). The improved extraction technique RS-CPE was combined with traditional spectrophotometer to improve the analytical performance and expand the application of spectrophotometric determination. The influence factors relevant to RS-CPE, such as concentrations of TX-100 and octanol, concentration of chelating agent, pH, conditions of phase separation, salt effect, environmental temperature and instrumental conditions, were studied in detail. Under the optimal conditions, the limit of detection (LOD) for copper was 0.4 μg L -1, with sensitivity enhancement factor (EF) of 18. The proposed method was applied to the determination of trace copper in real samples and certified samples with satisfactory analytical results.

  16. In Situ Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance (LSPR) Spectroscopy to Investigate Kinetics of Chemical Bath Deposition of CdS Thin Films

    SciTech Connect

    Kalyanaraman, Ramki; Taz, Humaira; Ruther, Rose E.; Nanda, Jagjit

    2015-02-11

    Techniques that can characterize the early stages of thin film deposition from liquid phase processes can aid greatly in our understanding of mechanistic aspects of chemical bath deposition (CBD). Here we have used localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) spectroscopy to monitor in-situ the kinetics of early-stage growth of cadmium sulfide (CdS) thin films on Ag nanoparticle on quartz substrates. Real-time shift during CdS deposition showed that the LSPR wavelength red shifted rapidly due to random deposition of CdS on the substrate, but saturated at longer times. LSPR modeling showed that these features could be interpreted as an initial deposition of CdS islands followed by preferential deposition onto itself. The CdS also showed significantly enhanced Raman signals up to 170 times due to surface enhanced raman scattering (SERS) from the CdS/Ag NP regions. The ex-situ SERS effect supported the LSPR shift suggesting that these techniques could be used to understand nucleation and growth phenomena from the liquid phase.

  17. In Situ Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance (LSPR) Spectroscopy to Investigate Kinetics of Chemical Bath Deposition of CdS Thin Films

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kalyanaraman, Ramki; Taz, Humaira; Ruther, Rose E.; Nanda, Jagjit

    2015-02-11

    Techniques that can characterize the early stages of thin film deposition from liquid phase processes can aid greatly in our understanding of mechanistic aspects of chemical bath deposition (CBD). Here we have used localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) spectroscopy to monitor in-situ the kinetics of early-stage growth of cadmium sulfide (CdS) thin films on Ag nanoparticle on quartz substrates. Real-time shift during CdS deposition showed that the LSPR wavelength red shifted rapidly due to random deposition of CdS on the substrate, but saturated at longer times. LSPR modeling showed that these features could be interpreted as an initial deposition ofmore » CdS islands followed by preferential deposition onto itself. The CdS also showed significantly enhanced Raman signals up to 170 times due to surface enhanced raman scattering (SERS) from the CdS/Ag NP regions. The ex-situ SERS effect supported the LSPR shift suggesting that these techniques could be used to understand nucleation and growth phenomena from the liquid phase.« less

  18. Rapid Ti(III) reduction of perchlorate in the presence of beta-alanine: kinetics, pH effect, complex formation, and beta-alanine effect.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Huang, Zhengdao; Lippincott, Lee; Meng, Xiaoguang

    2010-03-15

    Ti(III) reduction of perchlorate might be a useful method for the treatment of highly perchlorate-contaminated water. Though the reaction rate was usually low, we observed that beta-alanine (HOOCCH(2)CH(2)NH(2)) could significantly promote the reaction. A complete (>99.9%) perchlorate removal was obtained in a solution containing [ClO(4)(-)]=1.0mM, [Ti(III)]=40 mM, and [beta-alanine]=120 mM after 2.5h of reaction under 50 degrees C. The effects of both pH and complex formation on the reaction were then studied. The results showed that without beta-alanine the optimal pH was 2.3. When pH increased from 1.6 to 2.3, the reduction rate increased remarkably. In the pH range >2.3, however, the reduction was significantly inhibited, attributed to the formation of Ti(III) precipitate. The presence of beta-alanine at a molar ratio of [beta-alanine]:[Ti(III)]=3:1 significantly increased the reduction rate of perchlorate even at near neutral pH. This is because beta-alanine formed complexes with Ti(III), which greatly improved the total soluble [Ti(III)] in the pH range between 3.5 and 6. The findings may lead to the development of rapid treatment methods for intermittent and small stream of highly perchlorate-contaminated water, which are resulted from the manufacturing, storage, handling, use and/or disposal of large quantities of perchlorate salts. PMID:19864064

  19. Toward mechanistic understanding of nuclear reprocessing chemistries by quantifying lanthanide solvent extraction kinetics via microfluidics with constant interfacial area and rapid mixing.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Kevin P; Pompano, Rebecca R; Li, Liang; Gelis, Artem V; Ismagilov, Rustem F

    2011-10-01

    The closing of the nuclear fuel cycle is an unsolved problem of great importance. Separating radionuclides produced in a nuclear reactor is useful both for the storage of nuclear waste and for recycling of nuclear fuel. These separations can be performed by designing appropriate chelation chemistries and liquid-liquid extraction schemes, such as in the TALSPEAK process (Trivalent Actinide-Lanthanide Separation by Phosphorus reagent Extraction from Aqueous Komplexes). However, there are no approved methods for the industrial scale reprocessing of civilian nuclear fuel in the United States. One bottleneck in the design of next-generation solvent extraction-based nuclear fuel reprocessing schemes is a lack of interfacial mass transfer rate constants obtained under well-controlled conditions for lanthanide and actinide ligand complexes; such rate constants are a prerequisite for mechanistic understanding of the extraction chemistries involved and are of great assistance in the design of new chemistries. In addition, rate constants obtained under conditions of known interfacial area have immediate, practical utility in models required for the scaling-up of laboratory-scale demonstrations to industrial-scale solutions. Existing experimental techniques for determining these rate constants suffer from two key drawbacks: either slow mixing or unknown interfacial area. The volume of waste produced by traditional methods is an additional, practical concern in experiments involving radioactive elements, both from disposal cost and experimenter safety standpoints. In this paper, we test a plug-based microfluidic system that uses flowing plugs (droplets) in microfluidic channels to determine absolute interfacial mass transfer rate constants under conditions of both rapid mixing and controlled interfacial area. We utilize this system to determine, for the first time, the rate constants for interfacial transfer of all lanthanides, minus promethium, plus yttrium, under TALSPEAK

  20. Toward mechanistic understanding of nuclear reprocessing chemistries by quantifying lanthanide solvent extraction kinetics via microfluidics with constant interfacial area and rapid mixing.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Kevin P; Pompano, Rebecca R; Li, Liang; Gelis, Artem V; Ismagilov, Rustem F

    2011-10-01

    The closing of the nuclear fuel cycle is an unsolved problem of great importance. Separating radionuclides produced in a nuclear reactor is useful both for the storage of nuclear waste and for recycling of nuclear fuel. These separations can be performed by designing appropriate chelation chemistries and liquid-liquid extraction schemes, such as in the TALSPEAK process (Trivalent Actinide-Lanthanide Separation by Phosphorus reagent Extraction from Aqueous Komplexes). However, there are no approved methods for the industrial scale reprocessing of civilian nuclear fuel in the United States. One bottleneck in the design of next-generation solvent extraction-based nuclear fuel reprocessing schemes is a lack of interfacial mass transfer rate constants obtained under well-controlled conditions for lanthanide and actinide ligand complexes; such rate constants are a prerequisite for mechanistic understanding of the extraction chemistries involved and are of great assistance in the design of new chemistries. In addition, rate constants obtained under conditions of known interfacial area have immediate, practical utility in models required for the scaling-up of laboratory-scale demonstrations to industrial-scale solutions. Existing experimental techniques for determining these rate constants suffer from two key drawbacks: either slow mixing or unknown interfacial area. The volume of waste produced by traditional methods is an additional, practical concern in experiments involving radioactive elements, both from disposal cost and experimenter safety standpoints. In this paper, we test a plug-based microfluidic system that uses flowing plugs (droplets) in microfluidic channels to determine absolute interfacial mass transfer rate constants under conditions of both rapid mixing and controlled interfacial area. We utilize this system to determine, for the first time, the rate constants for interfacial transfer of all lanthanides, minus promethium, plus yttrium, under TALSPEAK

  1. Rapid Ti(III) reduction of perchlorate in the presence of beta-alanine: kinetics, pH effect, complex formation, and beta-alanine effect.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Huang, Zhengdao; Lippincott, Lee; Meng, Xiaoguang

    2010-03-15

    Ti(III) reduction of perchlorate might be a useful method for the treatment of highly perchlorate-contaminated water. Though the reaction rate was usually low, we observed that beta-alanine (HOOCCH(2)CH(2)NH(2)) could significantly promote the reaction. A complete (>99.9%) perchlorate removal was obtained in a solution containing [ClO(4)(-)]=1.0mM, [Ti(III)]=40 mM, and [beta-alanine]=120 mM after 2.5h of reaction under 50 degrees C. The effects of both pH and complex formation on the reaction were then studied. The results showed that without beta-alanine the optimal pH was 2.3. When pH increased from 1.6 to 2.3, the reduction rate increased remarkably. In the pH range >2.3, however, the reduction was significantly inhibited, attributed to the formation of Ti(III) precipitate. The presence of beta-alanine at a molar ratio of [beta-alanine]:[Ti(III)]=3:1 significantly increased the reduction rate of perchlorate even at near neutral pH. This is because beta-alanine formed complexes with Ti(III), which greatly improved the total soluble [Ti(III)] in the pH range between 3.5 and 6. The findings may lead to the development of rapid treatment methods for intermittent and small stream of highly perchlorate-contaminated water, which are resulted from the manufacturing, storage, handling, use and/or disposal of large quantities of perchlorate salts.

  2. Kinetic Atom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, David B.

    1981-01-01

    Surveys the research of scientists like Joule, Kelvin, Maxwell, Clausius, and Boltzmann as it comments on the basic conceptual issues involved in the development of a more precise kinetic theory and the idea of a kinetic atom. (Author/SK)

  3. Initial oxidation kinetics and energetics of Cu 0.5Au 0.5 (0 0 1) film investigated by in situ ultrahigh vacuum transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Liang; Zhou, Guang-Wen; Eastman, Jeffrey A.; Yang, Judith C.

    2006-06-01

    The initial oxidation behavior of Cu 0.5Au 0.5 (0 0 1) thin film was investigated by in situ ultrahigh vacuum transmission electron microscopy to model nano-oxidation of alloys with one active component and one noble component. The formation of irregular-shaped octahedron Cu 2O islands with cube-on-cube crystallographic orientation to the substrate film was observed at all temperature studied. The energetics of Cu 2O nucleation for Cu and Cu 0.5Au 0.5 oxidation was compared. Cu 0.5Au 0.5 oxidation has lower nucleation activation energy due to the reduced mismatch strain between Cu 2O and Cu 0.5Au 0.5 films. On the other hand, the reaction kinetics for Cu 0.5Au 0.5 alloy oxidation is slower due to the higher diffusion activation energy of Cu.

  4. A novel fast and flexible technique of radical kinetic behaviour investigation based on pallet for plasma evaluation structure and numerical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinowski, Arkadiusz; Takeuchi, Takuya; Chen, Shang; Suzuki, Toshiya; Ishikawa, Kenji; Sekine, Makoto; Hori, Masaru; Lukasiak, Lidia; Jakubowski, Andrzej

    2013-07-01

    This paper describes a new, fast, and case-independent technique for sticking coefficient (SC) estimation based on pallet for plasma evaluation (PAPE) structure and numerical analysis. Our approach does not require complicated structure, apparatus, or time-consuming measurements but offers high reliability of data and high flexibility. Thermal analysis is also possible. This technique has been successfully applied to estimation of very low value of SC of hydrogen radicals on chemically amplified ArF 193 nm photoresist (the main goal of this study). Upper bound of our technique has been determined by investigation of SC of fluorine radical on polysilicon (in elevated temperature). Sources of estimation error and ways of its reduction have been also discussed. Results of this study give an insight into the process kinetics, and not only they are helpful in better process understanding but additionally they may serve as parameters in a phenomenological model development for predictive modelling of etching for ultimate CMOS topography simulation.

  5. Steam explosion pretreatment of wheat straw to improve methane yields: investigation of the degradation kinetics of structural compounds during anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Theuretzbacher, Franz; Lizasoain, Javier; Lefever, Christopher; Saylor, Molly K; Enguidanos, Ramon; Weran, Nikolaus; Gronauer, Andreas; Bauer, Alexander

    2015-03-01

    Wheat straw can serve as a low-cost substrate for energy production without competing with food or feed production. This study investigated the effect of steam explosion pretreatment on the biological methane potential and the degradation kinetics of wheat straw during anaerobic digestion. It was observed that the biological methane potential of the non steam exploded, ground wheat straw (276 l(N) kg VS(-1)) did not significantly differ from the best steam explosion treated sample (286 l(N) kg VS(-1)) which was achieved at a pretreatment temperature of 140°C and a retention time of 60 min. Nevertheless degradation speed was improved by the pretreatment. Furthermore it was observed that compounds resulting from chemical reactions during the pretreatment and classified as pseudo-lignin were also degraded during the anaerobic batch experiments. Based on the rumen simulation technique, a model was developed to characterise the degradation process.

  6. Reliability investigation of high-k/metal gate in nMOSFETs by three-dimensional kinetic Monte-Carlo simulation with multiple trap interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yun; Jiang, Hai; Lun, Zhiyuan; Wang, Yijiao; Huang, Peng; Hao, Hao; Du, Gang; Zhang, Xing; Liu, Xiaoyan

    2016-04-01

    Degradation behaviors in the high-k/metal gate stacks of nMOSFETs are investigated by three-dimensional (3D) kinetic Monte-Carlo (KMC) simulation with multiple trap coupling. Novel microscopic mechanisms are simultaneously considered in a compound system: (1) trapping/detrapping from/to substrate/gate; (2) trapping/detrapping to other traps; (3) trap generation and recombination. Interacting traps can contribute to random telegraph noise (RTN), bias temperature instability (BTI), and trap-assisted tunneling (TAT). Simulation results show that trap interaction induces higher probability and greater complexity in trapping/detrapping processes and greatly affects the characteristics of RTN and BTI. Different types of trap distribution cause largely different behaviors of RTN, BTI, and TAT. TAT currents caused by multiple trap coupling are sensitive to the gate voltage. Moreover, trap generation and recombination have great effects on the degradation of HfO2-based nMOSFETs under a large stress.

  7. Analytical and experimental investigation of the dispersion process during rapid transients for the aluminum-based nuclear fuel plates

    SciTech Connect

    Georgevich, V.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Kim, S.H.; Fuketa, T.; Soyama, K.; Ishijima, K.

    1995-06-01

    A thermally induced fuel-plate dispersion model was developed to analyze for dispersive potential and determine the onset of fuel plate dispersion for aluminum-based research and test reactor fuels. The effect of rapid energy deposition in a fuel plate was simulated. Several data types for aluminum-based fuels tested in the Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR) facility in Japan and in the Transient Reactor Test (TREAT) facility in Idaho, US, were reviewed. Analyses of experiments show that the onset of fuel dispersion is clearly linked to a sharp rise in the predicted strain rate, which further coincides with the onset of aluminum vaporization. Analysis also shows that aluminum oxidation and exothermal chemical reaction between the fuel and aluminum can significantly affect: the energy deposition characteristics and, therefore dispersion onset connected with aluminum vaporization, and the onset of aluminum vaporization.

  8. In-situ investigation of grain boundary and triple junction kinetics in aluminium-10 p.p.m. magnesium.

    PubMed

    Mattissen, D; Waerø, A; Molodov, D A; Shvindlerman, L S; Gottstein, G

    2004-03-01

    A special technique for in-situ observation and recording of triple junction motion is introduced. The described method makes it possible to study the motion of connected grain boundaries, i.e. triple junctions and their geometry. The results of an investigation of the steady-state motion of grain boundary systems with triple junctions in aluminium-magnesium are presented. The analysed triple junctions show a distinctive deviation of contact angle from the equilibrium value 120 degrees as assumed for the deviation of the Von Neumann-Mullins relation. The type of triple junction can have an essential influence on grain boundary motion and thus on grain growth.

  9. Enzyme Kinetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moe, Owen; Cornelius, Richard

    1988-01-01

    Conveys an appreciation of enzyme kinetic analysis by using a practical and intuitive approach. Discusses enzyme assays, kinetic models and rate laws, the kinetic constants (V, velocity, and Km, Michaels constant), evaluation of V and Km from experimental data, and enzyme inhibition. (CW)

  10. Long tail kinetics in biophysics?

    PubMed Central

    Nagle, J F

    1992-01-01

    Long tail kinetics describe a variety of data from complex, disordered materials that cannot be described by conventional kinetics. It is suggested that the kinetics of diffusive motion in complex biological media, such as cytoplasm or biomembranes, might also have long tails. The effects of long tail kinetics are investigated for two standard biophysical measurements, fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP), and dynamic light scattering (DLS). It is shown that long tail kinetic data would yield significantly distorted and misleading results when analyzed assuming conventional kinetics. PMID:1420883

  11. Kinetics and Thermodynamics of the Reaction between the (•)OH Radical and Adenine: A Theoretical Investigation.

    PubMed

    Milhøj, Birgitte O; Sauer, Stephan P A

    2015-06-18

    The accessibility of all possible reaction paths for the reaction between the nucleobase adenine and the (•)OH radical is investigated through quantum chemical calculations of barrier heights and rate constants at the ωB97X-D/6-311++G(2df,2pd) level with Eckart tunneling corrections. First the computational method is validated by considering the hydrogen abstraction from the heterocyclic N9 nitrogen in adenine as a test system. Geometries for all molecules in the reaction are optimized with four different DFT exchange-correlation functionals (B3LYP, BHandHLYP, M06-2X, and ωB97X-D), in combination with Pople and Dunning basis sets, all of which have been employed in similar investigations in the literature. Improved energies are obtained through single point calculations with CCSD(T) and the same basis sets, and reaction rate constants are calculated for all methods both without tunneling corrections and with the Wigner, Bell, and Eckart corrections. In comparison to CCSD(T)//BHandHLYP/aug-cc-pVTZ reference results, the ωB97X-D/6-311++G(2df,2pd) method combined with Eckart tunneling corrections provides a sensible compromise between accuracy and time. Using this method, all subreactions of the reaction between adenine and the (•)OH radical are investigated. The total rate constants for hydrogen abstraction and addition for adenine are predicted with this method to be 1.06 × 10(-12) and 1.10 × 10(-12) cm(3) molecules(-1) s(-1), respectively. Abstractions of H61 and H62 contribute the most, while only addition to the C8 carbon is found to be of any significance, in contrast to previous claims that addition is the dominant reaction pathway. The overall rate constant for the complete reaction is found to be 2.17 × 10(-12) cm(3) molecules(-1) s(-1), which agrees exceptionally well with experimental results.

  12. X-ray crystallographic and kinetic investigations of 6-sulfamoyl-saccharin as a carbonic anhydrase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Alterio, V; Tanc, M; Ivanova, J; Zalubovskis, R; Vozny, I; Monti, S M; Di Fiore, A; De Simone, G; Supuran, C T

    2015-04-01

    6-Sulfamoyl-saccharin was investigated as an inhibitor of 11 α-carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) isoforms of human (h) origin, hCA I-XIV, and X-ray crystallographic data were obtained for its adduct with hCA II, the physiologically dominant isoform. This compound possesses two potential zinc-binding groups, the primary sulfamoyl one and the secondary, acylatedsulfonamide. Saccharin itself binds to the Zn(II) ion from the CA active site coordinating with this last group, in deprotonated (SO2N(-)CO) form. Here we explain why 6-sulfamoyl-saccharin, unlike saccharin, binds to the metal ion from the hCA II active site by its primary sulfonamide moiety and not the secondary one as saccharin itself. Our study is useful for shedding new light to the structure-based drug design of isoform-selective CA inhibitors of the sulfonamide type.

  13. COMBINED THEORETICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF MECHANISMS AND KINETICS OF VAPOR-PHASE MERCURY UPTAKE BY CARBONACOUES SURFACES

    SciTech Connect

    Radisav D. Vidic

    2002-05-01

    The first part of this study evaluated the application of a versatile optical technique to study the adsorption and desorption of model adsorbates representative of volatile polar (acetone) and non-polar (propane) organic compounds on a model carbonaceous surface under ultra high vacuum (UHV) conditions. The results showed the strong correlation between optical differential reflectance (ODR) and adsorbate coverage determined by temperature programmed desorption (TPD). ODR technique was proved to be a powerful tool to investigate surface adsorption and desorption from UHV to high pressure conditions. The effects of chemical functionality and surface morphology on the adsorption/desorption behavior of acetone, propane and mercury were investigated for two model carbonaceous surfaces, namely air-cleaved highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) and plasma-oxidized HOPG. They can be removed by thermal treatment (> 500 K). The presence of these groups almost completely suppresses propane adsorption at 90K and removal of these groups leads to dramatic increase in adsorption capacity. The amount of acetone adsorbed is independent of surface heat treatment and depends only on total exposure. The effects of morphological heterogeneity is evident for plasma-oxidized HOPG as this substrate provides greater surface area, as well as higher energy binding sites. Mercury adsorption at 100 K on HOPG surfaces with and without chemical functionalities and topological heterogeneity created by plasma oxidation occurs through physisorption. The removal of chemical functionalities from HOPG surface enhances mercury physisorption. Plasma oxidation of HOPG provides additional surface area for mercury adsorption. Mercury adsorption by activated carbon at atmospheric pressure occurs through two distinct mechanisms, physisorption below 348 K and chemisorption above 348 K. No significant impact of oxygen functionalities was observed in the chemisorption region. The key findings of this study

  14. [Investigation on internal energy transfer and relaxation kinetics of NO2 by photoacoustic and fluorescence emission spectra].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Gui-yin; Ma, Jin-ying; Jin, Yi-dong

    2011-03-01

    With 532 nm laser as excitation source, the excitation and relaxation process of NO2 molecule was investigated by the technique of photoacoustic and fluorescence emission spectra. The results show that NO2 molecules will be pumped to the first excited electronic state by laser photon. When the sample pressure is lower, some of the excited molecules relax to the ground state by radiation process directly; the other parts are redistributed to a few of the excited rovibronic energy levels by the process of fast internal energy transfer. With the increase in the sample pressure, continual collisions dominate the relaxation process gradually. This makes the excited molecules to be redistributed to many excited rovibronic energy levels. Emission from these excited levels forms a continuous spectrum. Just then, the efficiency of fluorescence emission from laser excited level decreases and the fluorescence intensity on the long wavelength side increases. The intensity of PA signals increases also. These phenomena indicate that besides the relaxation process of radiation, there is a strong relaxation process of continual collision under the condition of higher sample pressure. It converts vibration energy of the excited molecules into translation one. This induces the increase in gas temperature and a sound wave is produced.

  15. Investigation of the Gas-Phase Photolysis and Temperature-Dependent OH Reaction Kinetics of 4-Hydroxy-2-butanone.

    PubMed

    Bouzidi, Hichem; Aslan, Lina; El Dib, Gisèle; Coddeville, Patrice; Fittschen, Christa; Tomas, Alexandre

    2015-10-20

    Hydroxyketones are key secondary reaction products in the atmospheric oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The fate of these oxygenated VOCs is however poorly understood and scarcely taken into account in atmospheric chemistry modeling. In this work, a combined investigation of the photolysis and temperature-dependent OH radical reaction of 4-hydroxy-2-butanone (4H2B) is presented. The objective was to evaluate the importance of the photolysis process relative to OH oxidation in the atmospheric degradation of 4H2B. A photolysis lifetime of about 26 days was estimated with an effective quantum yield of 0.08. For the first time, the occurrence of a Norrish II mechanism was hypothesized following the observation of acetone among photolysis products. The OH reaction rate coefficient follows the Arrhenius trend (280-358 K) and could be modeled through the following expression: k4H2B(T) = (1.26 ± 0.40) × 10(-12) × exp((398 ± 87)/T) in cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1). An atmospheric lifetime of 2.4 days regarding the OH + 4H2B reaction was evaluated, indicating that OH oxidation is by far the major degradation channel. The present work underlines the need for further studies on the atmospheric fate of oxygenated VOCs.

  16. Analytical, toxicological and kinetic investigation of decomposition of the drug diclofenac in waters and wastes using gamma radiation.

    PubMed

    Bojanowska-Czajka, A; Kciuk, G; Gumiela, M; Borowiecka, S; Nałęcz-Jawecki, G; Koc, A; Garcia-Reyes, J F; Ozbay, D Solpan; Trojanowicz, M

    2015-12-01

    The radiolytic decomposition of the drug diclofenac (DCF), and in limited extent, also two other widely used drugs, ibuprofen and carbamazepine, was examined using liquid chromatography (LC) methods. The efficiency of DCF decomposition was examined in function of the absorbed dose of gamma radiation, and also in the presence of selected scavengers of radicals, which are commonly present in natural waters and wastes. Three different tests were employed for the monitoring of toxicity changes in the irradiated DCF solutions. The LC/mass spectrometry (MS) was used for the determination of products of DCF radiolysis. Using pulse-radiolysis method with the spectrophotometric detection, the rate constant values were determined for reactions of DCF with the main products of water radiolysis: hydroxyl radicals (1.24 ± 0.02) × 10(10) M(-1) s(-1) and hydrated electrons (3.1 ± 0.2) × 10(9) M(-1) s(-1). Their values indicate that both oxidative and reductive processes in radiolytic decomposition of DCF can take place in irradiated diluted aqueous solutions of DCF. The possibility of decomposition of all examined analytes was investigated in samples of river water and hospital waste. Compared to the previous studies, the conducted measurements in real samples were carried out at the concentration levels, which are close to those reported earlier in environmental samples. Graphical abstract ᅟ.

  17. Using 13C-labeled benzene and Raman gas spectroscopy to investigate respiration and biodegradation kinetics following soil contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jochum, Tobias; Popp, Juergen; Frosch, Torsten

    2016-04-01

    Soil and groundwater contamination with benzene can cause serious environmental damages. However, many soil microorganisms are capable to adapt and known to strongly control the fate of organic contamination. Cavity enhanced Raman gas spectroscopy (CERS) was applied to investigate the short-term response of indigenous soil bacteria to a sudden surface contamination with benzene regarding the temporal variations of gas products and their exchange rates with the adjacent atmosphere. 13C-labeled benzene was spiked on a silty-loamy soil column (sampled from Hainich National Park, Germany) in order to track and separate the changes in heterotrophic soil respiration - involving 12CO2 and O2 - from the microbial process of benzene degradation, which ultimately forms 13CO2.1 The respiratory quotient (RQ) of 0.98 decreased significantly after the spiking and increased again within 33 hours to a value of 0.72. This coincided with maximum 13CO2 concentration rates (0.63 μ mol m-2 s-1), indicating highest benzene degradation at 33 hours after the spiking event. The diffusion of benzene in the headspace and the biodegradation into 13CO2 were simultaneously monitored and 12 days after the benzene spiking no measurable degradation was detected anymore.1 The RQ finally returned to a value of 0.96 demonstrating the reestablished aerobic respiration. In summary, this study shows the potential of combining Raman gas spectroscopy and stable isotopes to follow soil microbial biodegradation dynamics while simultaneously monitoring the underlying respiration behavior. Support by the Collaborative Research Center 1076 Aqua Diva is kindly acknowledged. We thank Beate Michalzik for soil analysis and discussion. 1. T. Jochum, B. Michalzik, A. Bachmann, J. Popp and T. Frosch, Analyst, 2015, 140, 3143-3149.

  18. Kinetics of actinide complexation reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, K.L.; Sullivan, J.C.

    1997-09-01

    Though the literature records extensive compilations of the thermodynamics of actinide complexation reactions, the kinetics of complex formation and dissociation reactions of actinide ions in aqueous solutions have not been extensively investigated. In light of the central role played by such reactions in actinide process and environmental chemistry, this situation is somewhat surprising. The authors report herein a summary of what is known about actinide complexation kinetics. The systems include actinide ions in the four principal oxidation states (III, IV, V, and VI) and complex formation and dissociation rates with both simple and complex ligands. Most of the work reported was conducted in acidic media, but a few address reactions in neutral and alkaline solutions. Complex formation reactions tend in general to be rapid, accessible only to rapid-scan and equilibrium perturbation techniques. Complex dissociation reactions exhibit a wider range of rates and are generally more accessible using standard analytical methods. Literature results are described and correlated with the known properties of the individual ions.

  19. A rapid dissolution procedure to aid initial nuclear forensics investigations of chemically refractory compounds and particles prior to gamma spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Reading, David G; Croudace, Ian W; Warwick, Phillip E; Britton, Richard

    2015-11-01

    A rapid and effective preparative procedure has been evaluated for the accurate determination of low-energy (40-200 keV) gamma-emitting radionuclides ((210)Pb, (234)Th, (226)Ra, (235)U) in uranium ores and uranium ore concentrates (UOCs) using high-resolution gamma ray spectrometry. The measurement of low-energy gamma photons is complicated in heterogeneous samples containing high-density mineral phases and in such situations activity concentrations will be underestimated. This is because attenuation corrections, calculated based on sample mean density, do not properly correct where dense grains are dispersed within a less dense matrix (analogous to a nugget effect). The current method overcomes these problems using a lithium tetraborate fusion that readily dissolves all components including high-density, self-attenuating minerals/compounds. This is the ideal method for dissolving complex, non-volatile components in soils, rocks, mineral concentrates, and other materials where density reduction is required. Lithium borate fusion avoids the need for theoretical efficiency corrections or measurement of matrix matched calibration standards. The resulting homogeneous quenched glass produced can be quickly dissolved in nitric acid producing low-density solutions that can be counted by gamma spectrometry. The effectiveness of the technique is demonstrated using uranium-bearing Certified Reference Materials and provides accurate activity concentration determinations compared to the underestimated activity concentrations derived from direct measurements of a bulk sample. The procedure offers an effective solution for initial nuclear forensic studies where complex refractory minerals or matrices exist. It is also significantly faster, safer and simpler than alternative approaches. PMID:26572834

  20. Supramolecular polymer transformation: a kinetic study.

    PubMed

    Baram, Jonathan; Weissman, Haim; Rybtchinski, Boris

    2014-10-16

    Investigation of supramolecular kinetics is essential for elucidating self-assembly mechanisms. Recently, we reported on a noncovalent system involving a bolaamphiphilic perylene diimide dimer that is kinetically trapped in water but can rearrange into a different, more ordered assembly in water/THF mixtures ( Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2014 , 53 , 4123 ). Here we present a kinetic mechanistic study of this process by employing UV-vis spectroscopy. The transformation exhibits a rapid decrease in the red-shifted absorption band, which is monitored in order to track the kinetics at different temperatures (15-50 °C) and concentrations. Fitting the data with the 1D KJMA (Kolmogorov-Johnson-Mehl-Avrami) model affords the activation parameters. The latter as well as seeding experiments indicates that the transformation occurs without the detachment of covalent units, and that hydration dynamics plays a significant role in nucleation, with entropic factors being dominant. Switching off the transformation, and the formation of off-pathway intermediates were observed upon heating to temperatures above 55 °C. These insights into kinetically controlled supramolecular polymer transformations provide mechanistic information that is needed for a fundamental understanding of noncovalent processes, and the rational design of noncovalent materials. PMID:25238603

  1. Investigation of the photochemical reactivity of soot particles derived from biofuels toward NO2. A kinetic and product study.

    PubMed

    Romanías, Manolis N; Dagaut, Philippe; Bedjanian, Yuri; Andrade-Eiroa, Auréa; Shahla, Roya; Emmanouil, Karafas S; Papadimitriou, Vassileios C; Spyros, Apostolos

    2015-03-12

    In the current study, the heterogeneous reaction of NO2 with soot and biosoot surfaces was investigated in the dark and under illumination relevant to atmospheric conditions (J(NO2) = 0.012 s(-1)). A flat-flame burner was used for preparation and collection of soot samples from premixed flames of liquid fuels. The biofuels were prepared by mixing 20% v/v of (i) 1-butanol (CH3(CH2)3OH), (ii) methyl octanoate (CH3(CH2)6COOCH3), (iii) anhydrous diethyl carbonate (C2H5O)2CO and (iv) 2,5 dimethyl furan (CH3)2C4H2O additive compounds in conventional kerosene fuel (JetA-1). Experiments were performed at 293 K using a low-pressure flow tube reactor (P = 9 Torr) coupled to a quadrupole mass spectrometer. The initial and steady-state uptake coefficients, γ0 and γ(ss), respectively, as well as the surface coverage, N(s), were measured under dry and humid conditions. Furthermore, the branching ratios of the gas-phase products NO (∼80-100%) and HONO (<20%) were determined. Soot from JetA-1/2,5-dimethyl furan was the most reactive [γ0 = (29.1 ± 5.8) × 10(-6), γ(ss)(dry) = (9.09 ± 1.82) × 10(-7) and γ(ss)(5.5%RH) = (14.0 ± 2.8)(-7)] while soot from JetA-1/1-butanol [γ0 = (2.72 ± 0.544) × 10(-6), γ(ss)(dry) = (4.57 ± 0.914) × 10(-7), and γ(ss)(5.5%RH) = (3.64 ± 0.728) × 10(-7)] and JetA-1/diethyl carbonate [γ0 = (2.99 ± 0.598) × 10(-6), γ(ss)(dry) = (3.99 ± 0.798) × 10(-7), and γ(ss)(5.5%RH) = (4.80 ± 0.960) × 10(-7)] were less reactive. To correlate the chemical reactivity with the physicochemical properties of the soot samples, their chemical composition was analyzed employing Raman spectroscopy, NMR, and high-performance liquid chromatography. In addition, the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller adsorption isotherms and the particle size distributions were determined employing a Quantachrome Nova 2200e gas sorption analyzer. The analysis of the results showed that factors such as (i) soot mass collection rate, (ii) porosity of the particles formed, (iii

  2. Investigation of the photochemical reactivity of soot particles derived from biofuels toward NO2. A kinetic and product study.

    PubMed

    Romanías, Manolis N; Dagaut, Philippe; Bedjanian, Yuri; Andrade-Eiroa, Auréa; Shahla, Roya; Emmanouil, Karafas S; Papadimitriou, Vassileios C; Spyros, Apostolos

    2015-03-12

    In the current study, the heterogeneous reaction of NO2 with soot and biosoot surfaces was investigated in the dark and under illumination relevant to atmospheric conditions (J(NO2) = 0.012 s(-1)). A flat-flame burner was used for preparation and collection of soot samples from premixed flames of liquid fuels. The biofuels were prepared by mixing 20% v/v of (i) 1-butanol (CH3(CH2)3OH), (ii) methyl octanoate (CH3(CH2)6COOCH3), (iii) anhydrous diethyl carbonate (C2H5O)2CO and (iv) 2,5 dimethyl furan (CH3)2C4H2O additive compounds in conventional kerosene fuel (JetA-1). Experiments were performed at 293 K using a low-pressure flow tube reactor (P = 9 Torr) coupled to a quadrupole mass spectrometer. The initial and steady-state uptake coefficients, γ0 and γ(ss), respectively, as well as the surface coverage, N(s), were measured under dry and humid conditions. Furthermore, the branching ratios of the gas-phase products NO (∼80-100%) and HONO (<20%) were determined. Soot from JetA-1/2,5-dimethyl furan was the most reactive [γ0 = (29.1 ± 5.8) × 10(-6), γ(ss)(dry) = (9.09 ± 1.82) × 10(-7) and γ(ss)(5.5%RH) = (14.0 ± 2.8)(-7)] while soot from JetA-1/1-butanol [γ0 = (2.72 ± 0.544) × 10(-6), γ(ss)(dry) = (4.57 ± 0.914) × 10(-7), and γ(ss)(5.5%RH) = (3.64 ± 0.728) × 10(-7)] and JetA-1/diethyl carbonate [γ0 = (2.99 ± 0.598) × 10(-6), γ(ss)(dry) = (3.99 ± 0.798) × 10(-7), and γ(ss)(5.5%RH) = (4.80 ± 0.960) × 10(-7)] were less reactive. To correlate the chemical reactivity with the physicochemical properties of the soot samples, their chemical composition was analyzed employing Raman spectroscopy, NMR, and high-performance liquid chromatography. In addition, the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller adsorption isotherms and the particle size distributions were determined employing a Quantachrome Nova 2200e gas sorption analyzer. The analysis of the results showed that factors such as (i) soot mass collection rate, (ii) porosity of the particles formed, (iii

  3. Rapid assessment of morphological change caused by catastrophic tsunamis: Integrated geological remote sensing and field investigation of the March 2011 Tohoku-oki Tsunami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, H. M.; Tappin, D. R.; Jordan, C. J.

    2012-12-01

    Rapid assessment of tsunami impact is key to hazard characterisation and disaster mitigation in the aftermath of catastrophic tsunamis. Investigation of landscape changes caused by tsunamis is also vital to better understand their process of operation and prepare for the effects of future events. However, as many of these geomorphological and geological features are ephemeral, being easily destroyed by natural and anthropogenic activity after the event, timely investigation is essential. The increasing availability of remotely-sensed data provides a means of rapidly assessing landscape changes caused by tsunamis and when integrated with targeted field investigation acts as a crucial tool in tsunami characterisation. Following the catastrophic Tohoku-oki tsunami of March 2011, the British Geological Survey obtained high resolution satellite imagery (Ikonos, Quickbird, WorldView), aerial photography and LiDAR through the International Charter on Space and Major Disasters. Comparison of pre- and post-event data allowed the identification of inundated areas; debris source and deposition sites and flow direction indicators- building a picture of tsunami flow characteristics and resultant landscape impacts. Field investigation of selected sites within the Sendai area was undertaken in June 2011 in order to validate the interpretation of remotely-sensed data and gather additional information on flow depth and sedimentological characteristics. Ruggedized laptops equipped with the BGS.SIGMAmobile digital mapping system and loaded with the pre-interpreted geological remote sensing data aided the integration of pre-field data interpretation and field-investigation. The combination of pre-fieldwork interpretation of remotely-sensed data and field investigation revealed inundation limits up to 4.5km inland, flow depths of 11m and wide-ranging transport of debris. Crucially, timely and targeted investigation of landscape changes caused by the Tohoku-oki event was possible.

  4. An in-situ Study of Kinetics of Rapid Self- assembly in Lamellar Forming Poly (styrene-b- lactic acid) (PS-b-PLA) Block Copolymer during Microwave Annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokarian-Tabari, Parvaneh; Cummins, Cian; Morris, Michael A.

    2014-03-01

    This work exploits the effect of microwave annealing on kinetics of pattern formation for lamellar PS- b-PLA film. A well-ordered pattern lamellar PS- b-PLA is formed on UV/ozone treated Si in less than one minute upon exposure to microwave energy in presence of THF. To understand the interaction of polymers with microwave radiation, we carried out an in-situtemperature measurement of the Si substrate during the annealing. Our in-situ experiment shows neither Si nor PS- b-PLA go through dramatic temperature rise during exposure to microwave energy. We suggest the dopant level in our Si is not high enough to activate the microwave absorption. Also, the high frequency of the electromagnetic field does not allow polar substances like PLA enough time to oscillate. We believe THF which is a polar liquid contribute significantly to the rapid self-assembly of the film. The vapor pressure of THF rises from 19.8 kPa to 70 kPa (at 55 °C) within few seconds. The high pressure plasticizes the polymers. The highly mobilized chains phase separate quickly due to high- χ parameter. The results are compared with conventional thermal annealing method.

  5. [Investigations on the physiology of the glands of carnivorous plants : IV. The kinetics of chloride secretion by the gland tissue of Nepenthes].

    PubMed

    Lüttge, U

    1966-03-01

    The transport of chloride in isolated tissue from Nepenthes pitchers was investigated using (36)Cl(-), an Aminco-Cotlove chloride-titrator for the determinations of Cl(-) concentrations, and KCN and AsO 4 (-) -as metabolic inhibitors.The tissue was brought in contact with different experimental solutions (=medium). The surface corresponding to the outside of the pitchers was cut with a razor blade to remove the cutinized epidermal layer. At this surface the Cl(-) uptake from the medium is a metabolic process which depends on the Cl(-)-concentration of the medium in a manner that corresponds to the MICHAELIS-MENTEN kinetics. The Michaelis-constant of this transport step was 3×10(-2)M. The Cl(-)-efflux into the medium, however, is a passive process.The opposite surface of the tissue slices (corresponding to the inside of the pitchers) carries the glands. The chloride secretion taking place here is also dependent on metabolism. In vitro it occurs even when a high gradient of chloride concentration has been set up between the medium and the solution which is in contact with the glands. In vivo the Cl(-)-concentration of the pitcher fluid and the amount of Cl(-) per gram of tissue water are almost equal.The rôle of chloride in the physiology of Nepenthes is still under investigation, A correlation between the chloride content of the pitcher fluid and its enzymatic activity (Casein-test), however, could already be demonstrated. PMID:24557721

  6. Crystallization kinetics and spectroscopic investigations on Tb{sup 3+} and Yb{sup 3+} codoped glass ceramics containing CaF{sub 2} nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Lihui; Qin Guanshi; Arai, Yusuke; Jose, Rajan; Suzuki, Takenobu; Ohishi, Yasutake; Yamashita, Tatsuya; Akimoto, Yusuke

    2007-11-01

    Transparent Tb{sup 3+} and Yb{sup 3+} codoped oxyfluoride glass ceramics containing CaF{sub 2} nanocrystals were prepared by melt quenching and subsequent heat treatment. Crystallization kinetics of CaF{sub 2} nanocrystals was investigated by differential scanning calorimetric method. The average apparent activation energy E{sub a} of the crystallization was {approx}498 kJ/mol. Moreover, the value of the Avrami exponent n was 1.01. These results suggest that the crystallization mechanism of CaF{sub 2} is a diffusion controlled growth process of needles and plates of finite long dimensions. X-ray diffraction patterns and transmission electron microscopy image confirmed the CaF{sub 2} nanocrystals in the glass ceramic. Ultraviolet (UV) and visible emission spectra of the as-made glass and the glass ceramic with an excitation of a 974 nm laser diode were recorded at room temperature. An intense UV emission at 381 nm was observed in the glass ceramic. The origin of the enhancement of the emission at 381 nm was investigated using spectroscopic technique and Judd-Ofelt analysis. The enhancement of the emission at 381 nm could be attributed to the change of the ligand field of Tb{sup 3+} ions due to the incorporation of some Tb{sup 3+} and Yb{sup 3+} ions into CaF{sub 2} nanocrystals in the glass ceramic.

  7. Investigation of kinetics and thermodynamics of DNA hybridization by means of 2-D fluorescence spectroscopy and soft/hard modeling techniques.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimi, Sara; Kompany-Zareh, Mohsen

    2016-02-01

    Reversible hybridization reaction plays a key role in fundamental biological processes, in many laboratory techniques, and also in DNA based sensing devices. Comprehensive investigation of this process is, therefore, essential for the development of more sophisticated applications. Kinetics and thermodynamics of the hybridization reaction, as a second order process, are systematically investigated with the aid of the soft and hard chemometric methods. Labeling two complementary 21 mer DNA single strands with FAM and Texas red fluorophores, enabled recording of the florescence excitation-emission matrices during the experiments which led to three-way data sets. The presence of fluorescence resonance energy transfer in excitation and emission modes and the closure in concentration mode, made the three-way data arrays rank deficient. To acquire primary chemical information, restricted Tucker3 as a soft method was employed. Herein a model-based method, hard restricted trilinear decomposition, is introduced for in depth analysis of rank deficient three-way data sets. By employing proposed hard method, the nonlinear model parameters as well as the correct profiles could be estimated. In addition, a simple constraint is presented to extract chemically reasonable output profiles regarding the core elements of restricted Tucker3 model.

  8. Investigating and managing the rapid emergence of white-nose syndrome, a novel, fatal, infectious disease of hibernating bats

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foley, Janet; Clifford, Deana; Castle, Kevin; Cryan, Paul M.; Ostfeld, Richard S.

    2011-01-01

    White-nose syndrome (WNS) is a fatal disease of bats that hibernate. The etiologic agent of WNS is the fungus Geomyces destructans, which infects the skin and wing membranes. Over 1 million bats in six species in eastern North America have died from WNS since 2006, and as a result several species of bats may become endangered or extinct. Information is lacking on the pathogenesis of G. destructans and WNS, WNS transmission and maintenance, individual and site factors that contribute to the probability of an outbreak of WNS, and spatial dynamics of WNS spread in North America. We considered how descriptive and analytical epidemiology could be used to fill these information gaps, including a four-step (modified) outbreak investigation, application of a set of criteria (Hill's) for assessing causation, compartment models of disease dynamics, and spatial modeling. We cataloged and critiqued adaptive-management options that have been either previously proposed for WNS or were helpful in addressing other emerging diseases of wild animals. These include an ongoing program of prospective surveillance of bats and hibernacula for WNS, treatment of individual bats, increasing population resistance to WNS (through vaccines, immunomodulators, or other methods), improving probability of survival from starvation and dehydration associated with WNS, modifying hibernacula environments to eliminate G. destructans, culling individuals or populations, controlling anthropogenic spread of WNS, conserving genetic diversity of bats, and educating the public about bats and bat conservation issues associated with WNS.

  9. Investigation of storage-phosphor autoradiography for the rapid quantitative screening of air filters for emergency response purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallardo, Athena Marie

    Past nuclear accidents, such as Chernobyl, resulted in a large release of radionuclides into the atmosphere. Radiological assessment of the vicinity of the site of the incident is vital to assess the exposure levels and dose received by the population and workers. Therefore, it is critical to thoroughly understand the situation and risks associated with a particular event in a timely manner in order to properly manage the event. Current atmospheric radiological assessments of alpha emitting radioisotopes include acquiring large quantities of air samples, chemical separation of radionuclides, sample mounting, counting through alpha spectrometry, and analysis of the data. The existing methodology is effective, but time consuming and labor intensive. Autoradiography, and the properties of phosphor imaging films, may be used as an additional technique to facilitate and expedite the alpha analysis process in these types of situations. Although autoradiography is not as sensitive to alpha radiation as alpha spectrometry, autoradiography may benefit alpha analysis by providing information about the activity as well as the spatial distribution of radioactivity in the sample under investigation. The objective for this research was to develop an efficient method for quantification and visualization of air filter samples taken in the aftermath of a nuclear emergency through autoradiography using 241Am and 239Pu tracers. Samples containing varying activities of either 241Am or 239Pu tracers were produced through microprecipitation and assayed by alpha spectroscopy. The samples were subsequently imaged and an activity calibration curve was produced by comparing the digital light units recorded from the image to the known activity of the source. The usefulness of different phosphor screens was examined by exposing each type of film to the same standard nuclide for varying quantities of time. Unknown activity samples created through microprecipiation containing activities of

  10. Kinetic investigation of the oxidation of naval excess hazardous materials in supercritical water for the design of a transpiration-wall reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, S.F.; Hanush, R.G.; Hunter, T.B.

    1997-01-01

    Experiments were conducted in Sandia`s supercritical fluids reactor (SFR) to generate data for the design of a transpiration-wall supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) reactor. The reactor is intended for the disposal of hazardous material generated on naval vessels. The design parameters for the system require an accurate knowledge of destruction efficiency vs. time and temperature. Three candidate materials were selected for testing. The experiments consisted of oxidizing these materials in the SFR at isothermal conditions over the temperature range of 400-550C at 24.1 MPa. A small extrapolation of the results shows that these materials can be adequately destroyed (to 99.9% destruction removal efficiency, DRE, based on total organic carbon (TOC) in the effluent) in approximately 5 seconds at 600C. The results vary smoothly and predictably with temperature such that extrapolation to higher temperatures beyond the experimental capabilities of the SFR can be made with reasonable confidence. The preliminary design of the transpiration-wall reactor has a rapid heat-up section within the reactor vessel that requires the addition of a fuel capable of quickly reacting with oxygen at temperatures below 500C. Candidate alcohols and JP-5 jet fuel were evaluated in this context. Oxidation rates for the alcohols were examined using in situ Raman spectroscopy. In addition, the potential utility of supplying the oxidizer line with hydrogen peroxide as an additive to enhance rapid initiation of the feed at unusually low temperatures was investigated. Experiments were conducted in the Supercritical Constant Volume Reactor (SCVR) using hydrogen peroxide as the initial oxidizing species. The results show that this concept as a method of enhancing low temperature reactivity appears to fail because thermal decomposition of the hydrogen peroxide is more rapid than the fuel oxidation rate at low temperatures. 8 refs., 16 figs., 5 tabs.

  11. Non-isothermal crystallization kinetics and glass-forming ability of Ti41Zr25Be28Fe6 bulk metallic glass investigated by differential scanning calorimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Pan; Zhao, Shaofan; Wang, Xin; Yao, Kefu

    2015-07-01

    The non-isothermal crystallization kinetics and glass-forming ability of Ti41Zr25Be28Fe6 glassy alloy were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry. The activation energies corresponding to the characteristic temperatures have been calculated by Kissinger and Ozawa equations. Based on Kissinger-Akahira-Sunose and Ozawa-Flynn-Wall models, it has been found that the local activation energy is higher at the beginning of the crystallization process for the first exothermic peak. The local Avrami exponent indicates that the first-step crystallization is mainly a high-dimensional nucleation and growth with an increasing nucleation rate. According to the calculated fragility index, Ti41Zr25Be28Fe6 alloy can be classified as "strong glass former." The studied alloy also possesses a critical size up to centimeter order, and the high glass-forming ability is probably related to the relatively low Gibbs energy difference between the liquid and crystalline states. The critical cooling rate of Ti41Zr25Be28Fe6 glassy alloy has also been determined using Barandiaran-Colmenero's method.

  12. A heavy-atom isotope effect and kinetic investigation of the hydrolysis of semicarbazide by urease from jack bean (Canavalia ensiformis).

    PubMed

    Marlier, John F; Fogle, Emily J; Cleland, W W

    2008-10-21

    A kinetic investigation of the hydrolysis of semicarbazide by urease gives a relatively flat log V/ K versus pH plot between pH 5 and 8. A log V m versus pH plot shows a shift of the optimum V m toward lower pH when compared to urea. These results are explained in terms of the binding of the outer N of the NHNH 2 group in semicarbazide to an active site residue with a relatively low p K a ( approximately 6). Heavy-atom isotope effects for both leaving groups have been determined. For the NHNH 2 side, (15) k obs = 1.0045, whereas for the NH 2 side, (15) k obs = 1.0010. This is evidence that the NHNH 2 group leaves prior to the NH 2 group. Using previously published data from the urease-catalyzed hydrolysis of formamide, the commitment factors for semicarbazide and urea hydrolysis are estimated to be 2.7 and 1.2, respectively. The carbonyl-C isotope effect ( (13) k obs) equals 1.0357, which is consistent with the transition state occurring during either formation or breakdown of the tetrahedral intermediate.

  13. Theoretical investigation on the kinetics and mechanisms of hydroxyl radical-induced transformation of parabens and its consequences for toxicity: Influence of alkyl-chain length.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yanpeng; Ji, Yuemeng; Li, Guiying; An, Taicheng

    2016-03-15

    As emerging organic contaminants (EOCs), the ubiquitous presence of preservative parabens in water causes a serious environmental concern. Hydroxyl radical ((•)OH) is a strong oxidant that can degrade EOCs through photochemistry in surface water environments as well as in advanced oxidation processes (AOPs). To better understand the degradation mechanisms, kinetics, and products toxicity of the preservative parabens in aquatic environments and AOPs, the (•)OH-initiated degradation reactions of the four parabens were investigated systematically using a computational approach. The four studied parabens with increase of alkyl-chain length were methylparaben (MPB), ethylparaben (EPB), propylparaben (PPB), and dibutylparaben (BPB). Results showed that the four parabens can be initially attacked by (•)OH through (•)OH-addition and H-abstraction routes. The (•)OH-addition route was more important for the degradation of shorter alkyl-chain parabens like MPB and EPB, while the H-abstraction route was predominant for the degradation of parabens with longer alkyl-chain for example PPB and BPB. In assessing the aquatic toxicity of parabens and their degradation products using the model calculations, the products of the (•)OH-addition route were found to be more toxic to green algae than original parabens. Although all degradation products were less toxic to daphnia and fish than corresponding parental parabens, they could be still harmful to these aquatic organisms. Furthermore, as alkyl-chain length increased, the ecotoxicity of parabens and their degradation products was found to be also increased. PMID:26773489

  14. Investigating the effect of potential additives and temperature on the dissolution kinetics of olivine (Mg2SiO4) in carbonation reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sissmann, O.; Daval, D.; Martinez, I.; Brunet, F.; Findling, N.; Guyot, F. J.

    2010-12-01

    A recent issue in geologic CO2 sequestration in basic rocks has been the slow dissolution kinetics of Mg-rich silicates. Previous batch carbonation studies on olivine [1] (close to forsteritic composition) performed in CO2 saturated water at relevant P,T conditions have focused on the role of secondary phases - such as amorphous silica layers - on the transport of reactants from and to the reactive surfaces. The fluid composition remained roughly constant for the duration of the 45-days experiment, close to saturation with respect to amorphous silica and with a [Mg2+]/[SiO2 (aq)] ratio close to 2, suggesting stoechiometric release. It therefore appears that the silica layer passivates the dissolution step of the reaction, in agreement with its non-porous nature observed by TEM. In order to accelerate this process, various organic ligands were added to the fluids and tested at different concentrations in similar batch experiments. An intrinsic increase of the dissolution rate of olivine was expected [2], [3] prior to the formation of a passivating silica layer. Preliminary results confirm this idea, as Mg was released in non-stoechimoetric proportions with respect to SiO2 (aq) (found to be in equilibrium with amorphous silica observed at the end of the experiments). Similarly, a slight increase of temperature (from 90°C to 120°C) seems to accelerate the reaction kinetics as well, possibly impacting the textural properties of the silica. In additon, since carbonate minerals have a retrograde solubility, thermodynamical modelling suggests this temperature increase should allow the fluid to reach saturation with respect to carbonates before reaching saturation with respect to silica. Enough Mg can therefore be released to initiate the formation of carbonates before the silica precipitates and passivates the olivine surface. Undergoing TEM investigations will allow to characterize this silica layer, and in particular its porosity, in order to better constrain the

  15. Myocardial thallium-201 kinetics and regional flow alterations with 3 hours of coronary occlusion and either rapid reperfusion through a totally patent vessel or slow reperfusion through a critical stenosis

    SciTech Connect

    Granato, J.E.; Watson, D.D.; Flanagan, T.L.; Beller, G.A.

    1987-01-01

    Myocardial thallium-201 kinetics and regional blood flow alterations were examined in a canine model using 3 hours of coronary occlusion and different methods of reperfusion. Group I comprised 10 dogs undergoing a 3 hour left anterior descending artery occlusion and no reperfusion. Group II comprised seven dogs undergoing 3 hours of left anterior descending artery occlusion and rapid reperfusion through a totally patent vessel. Group III comprised 10 dogs undergoing 3 hours of left anterior descending artery occlusion and slow reperfusion through a residual stenosis. All dogs received 1.5 mCi of thallium-201 after 40 minutes of coronary occlusion. During occlusion and 2 hours of reperfusion, serial hemodynamic, blood flow and myocardial thallium-201 activity measurements were made. The relative thallium-201 gradient (normal zone minus ischemic zone activity when initial normal activity is expressed as 100%) during left anterior descending coronary occlusion was similar in all groups. Group I, 87 +/- 3%; Group II, 78 +/- 6%; Group III, 83 +/- 6% (p = NS). After 2 hours of either method of reperfusion, the final relative gradient had decreased to a similar level (Group II, 51 +/- 9%; Group III, 42 +/- 6%). These values were not significantly different from the final relative thallium-201 gradient seen in dogs undergoing a sustained 3 hour occlusion (Group I, 55 +/- 5%). After 2 hours of reperfusion, both methods of reflow were associated with similar degrees of ''no reflow.'' Transmural flows in the central ischemic zone were 89 +/- 10% of normal in Group II and 71 +/- 6% of normal in Group III after reperfusion, with both flows substantially higher than the relative thallium-201 activities in these dogs.

  16. Kinetic features of an intraresin reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, B.; Kirszensztejn, P.; Bolikal, D.; Regen, S.L.

    1983-03-23

    The kinetic features of the intraresin displacement by pendant ammonium acetate groups on chloromethylated polystrene have been investigated as a function of temperature, swelling solvent, and cross-link density. In all cases, intraresin displacement proceeds with a rapid initial rate followed by a very slow stage; the latter represents that fraction of reactants which become ''kinetically isolated''. The free energy of activation for the first stage, under the various swelling conditions used, lies in the range 24.4-26.8 kcal mol/sup -1/, which is similar to that found for analogous homogeneous reactions. The absolute rates measured for the homogeneous and the initial intraresin displacement in dioxane were similar; with n-hexane and toluene as solvents, polymeric rates were considerably slower than those of their homogeneous counterparts. Intraresin displacement was rapid even when a poor swelling solvent (n-hexane) was used. As the rate of intrapolymeric reaction decreased (through a decrease in temperature, increase in cross-link density, or change in solvent), the percent of ''kinetical isolated'' sites increased.

  17. Removal of organic matter from surface water during coagulation with sludge flotation and rapid filtration - a full-scale technological investigation.

    PubMed

    Pruss, Alina

    2015-01-01

    Coagulation with sludge flotation and rapid filtration was selected as a surface water treatment technology to be optimised with a full-scale investigation, which was carried out in Poland between August and October 2013. The river water treated was characterized by low alkalinity, high-temperature variability and a high organic matter content. In the course of technological studies, the processes of coagulation with sludge flotation and rapid filtration were analysed. The studies were performed in the most adverse conditions for the applied technology i.e. during the period of algal bloom and subsequent decomposition of dead plankton. Throughout the study, the river water contained mainly dissolved organic matter, with occasional increases in the concentration of the undissolved fraction during algal bloom. The undissolved total organic carbon (TOC) fraction was effectively removed through coagulation while small doses of ClO₂added prior to coagulation enhanced the process. The process of coagulation using high-coagulant doses at pH = 6.5 did not provide a reduction in the TOC value below the level of 4 mg C/L required for treated water. The effect was achieved by adding powdered activated carbon (PAC) before the filters. The coagulation products were characterised by low-hydraulic resistance which should be taken into account at the stage of water delivery to the filters, after flotation. PMID:25746659

  18. Investigating the chemical mechanisms of the functionalization and fragmentation of hydrocarbons in the heterogeneous oxidation by OH using a stochastic kinetics model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiegel, A. A.; Wilson, K. R.; Hinsberg, B.; Houle, F. A.

    2014-12-01

    While the heterogeneous oxidation of atmospheric organic aerosols influences their effects on climate, air quality, and visibility, a more detailed understanding of the chemical mechanisms in heterogeneous oxidation is crucial for improving models of their chemical evolution in the atmosphere. Previous experimental work in our lab has shown two general reaction pathways for organic aerosol upon oxidation: functionalization, which adds additional oxygen functional groups to the carbon skeleton, and fragmentation, which leads to C-C bond scission and lower molecular weight oxidized products. Furthermore, these pathways were also found to be dependent on molecular structure, with more branched or oxidized hydrocarbons undergoing more fragmentation than less branched or oxidized hydrocarbons. However, while the mechanisms of hydrocarbon oxidation have been studied extensively in the gas phase, to what extent the gas phase mechanisms of hydrocarbon oxidation can be reliably applied to heterogeneous or bulk oxidation in aerosol remains unclear. To investigate the role of the condensed phase and molecular structure in the mechanism of heterogeneous organic aerosol oxidation, stochastic kinetics models are developed and compared to measurements of the products in the oxidation of hydrocarbons. Within the aerosol bulk, condensed phase rate coefficients and product branching ratios for peroxy reactions lead to different product distributions than those expected from gas phase peroxy reactions due to the presence of the liquid radical cage at the reaction site. As a result, tertiary alcohols and ketones were found to be the predominate products in the oxidation of squalane as observed in experiments. As the aerosol becomes further oxidized, β-scission of alkoxy radicals with neighboring functional groups is the primary fragmentation pathway leading to lower volatility products. In conjunction with this fragmentation mechanism, elimination of CO2 from acyloxy radicals was

  19. Kinetic and Modeling Investigation to Provide Design Guidelines for the NREL Dilute-Acid Process Aimed at Total Hydrolysis/Fractionation of Lignocellulosic Biomass: July 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y. Y.; Iyer, P.; Xiang, Q.; Hayes, J.

    2004-08-01

    Following up on previous work, subcontractor investigated three aspects of using NREL ''pretreatment'' technology for total hydrolysis (cellulose as well as hemicellulose) of biomass. Whereas historic hydrolysis of biomass used either dilute acid or concentrated acid technology for hydrolysis of both hemicellulose and cellulose, NREL has been pursuing very dilute acid hydrolysis of hemicellulose followed by enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose. NREL's countercurrent shrinking-bed reactor design for hemicellulose hydrolysis (pretreatment) has, however, shown promise for total hydrolysis. For the first task, subcontractor developed a mathematical model of the countercurrent shrinking bed reactor operation and, using yellow poplar sawdust as a feedstock, analyzed the effect of: initial solid feeding rate, temperature, acid concentration, acid flow rate, Peclet number (a measure of backmixing in liquid flow), and bed shrinking. For the second task, subcontractor used laboratory trials, with yellow poplar sawdust and 0.07 wt% sulfuric acid at various temperatures, to verify the hydrolysis of cellulose to glucose (desired) and decomposition of glucose (undesired) and determine appropriate parameters for use in kinetic models. Unlike cellulose and hemicellulose, lignins, the third major component of biomass, are not carbohydrates that can be broken down into component sugars. They are, however, aromatic complex amorphous phenolic polymers that can likely be converted into low-molecular weight compounds suitable for production of fuels and chemicals. Oxidative degradation is one pathway for such conversion and hydrogen peroxide would be an attractive reagent for this, as it would leave no residuals. For the third task, subcontractor reacted lignin with hydrogen peroxide under various conditions and analyzed the resulting product mix.

  20. Inverse Kinetics

    2000-03-20

    Given the space-independent, one energy group reactor kinetics equations and the initial conditions, this prgram determines the time variation of reactivity required to produce the given input of flux-time data.

  1. Characterization of hot hydrogen-atom reactions by kinetic spectrography.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomalesky, R. E.; Sturm, J. E.

    1971-01-01

    The flash photolysis of hydrogen iodide in the presence of nitrous oxide, carbon dioxide, and water has been investigated by kinetic spectroscopy. Although the fraction of hydrogen iodide dissociated was very large, the only observable intermediate was imidogen. It was demonstrated that the rapid removal of imidogen and the apparent absence of hydroxyl radicals in each case is a result of the following two reactions, respectively: (1) NH + HI yields NH2 + I; and (2) OH + HI yields H2O + I.

  2. Rapid Evaporation of microbubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautam, Jitendra; Esmaeeli, Asghar

    2008-11-01

    When a liquid is heated to a temperature far above its boiling point, it evaporates abruptly. Boiling of liquid at high temperatures can be explosive and destructive, and poses a potential hazard for a host of industrial processes. Explosive boiling may occur if a cold and volatile liquid is brought into contact with a hot and non-volatile liquid, or if a liquid is superheated or depressurized rapidly. Such possibilities are realized, for example, in the depressurization of low boiling point liquefied natural gas (LNG) in the pipelines or storage tanks as a result of a leak. While boiling of highly heated liquids can be destructive at macroscale, the (nearly) instantaneous pace of the process and the release of large amount of kinetic energy make the phenomena extremely attractive at microscale where it is possible to utilize the released energy to derive micromechanical systems. For instance, there is currently a growing interest in micro-explosion of liquid for generation of micro bubbles for actuation purposes. The aim of the current study is to gain a fundamental understanding of the subject using direct numerical simulations. In particular, we seek to investigate the boundary between stable and unstable nucleus growth in terms of the degree of liquid superheat and to compare the dynamics of unstable and stable growth.

  3. Synthesis of a highly substituted N(6)-linked immobilized NAD(+) derivative using a rapid solid-phase modular approach: suitability for use with the kinetic locking-on tactic for bioaffinity purification of NAD(+)-dependent dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Tynan, J; Forde, J; McMahon, M; Mulcahy, P

    2000-12-01

    This study is concerned with further development of the kinetic locking-on strategy for bioaffinity purification of NAD(+)-dependent dehydrogenases. Specifically, the synthesis of highly substituted N(6)-linked immobilized NAD(+) derivatives is described using a rapid solid-phase modular approach. Other modifications of the N(6)-linked immobilized NAD(+) derivative include substitution of the hydrophobic diaminohexane spacer arm with polar spacer arms (9 and 19.5 A) in an attempt to minimize nonbiospecific interactions. Analysis of the N(6)-linked NAD(+) derivatives confirm (i) retention of cofactor activity upon immobilization (up to 97%); (ii) high total substitution levels and high percentage accessibility levels when compared to S(6)-linked immobilized NAD(+) derivatives (also synthesized with polar spacer arms); (iii) short production times when compared to the preassembly approach to synthesis. Model locking-on bioaffinity chromatographic studies were carried out with bovine heart l-lactate dehydrogenase (l-LDH, EC 1.1.1.27), bakers yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH, EC 1.1.1.1) and Sporosarcinia sp. l-phenylalanine dehydrogenase (l-PheDH, EC 1.4.1.20), using oxalate, hydroxylamine, and d-phenylalanine, respectively, as locking-on ligands. Surprisingly, two of these test NAD(+)-dependent dehydrogenases (lactate and alcohol dehydrogenase) were found to have a greater affinity for the more lowly substituted S(6)-linked immobilized cofactor derivatives than for the new N(6)-linked derivatives. In contrast, the NAD(+)-dependent phenylalanine dehydrogenase showed no affinity for the S(6)-linked immobilized NAD(+) derivative, but was locked-on strongly to the N(6)-linked immobilized derivative. That this locking-on is biospecific is confirmed by the observation that the enzyme failed to lock-on to an analogous N(6)-linked immobilized NADP(+) derivative in the presence of d-phenylalanine. This differential locking-on of NAD(+)-dependent dehydrogenases to N(6)-linked

  4. Microwave gallium-68 radiochemistry for kinetically stable bis(thiosemicarbazone) complexes: structural investigations and cellular uptake under hypoxia† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. CCDC 1001632–1001634. For ESI and crystallographic data in CIF or other electronic format see DOI: 10.1039/c5dt02537k Click here for additional data file. Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Israt S.; Arrowsmith, Rory L.; Cortezon-Tamarit, Fernando; Twyman, Frazer; Kociok-Köhn, Gabriele; Botchway, Stanley W.; Dilworth, Jonathan R.

    2016-01-01

    We report the microwave synthesis of several bis(thiosemicarbazones) and the rapid gallium-68 incorporation to give the corresponding metal complexes. These proved kinetically stable under ‘cold’ and ‘hot’ biological assays and were investigated using laser scanning confocal microscopy, flow cytometry and radioactive cell retention studies under normoxia and hypoxia. 68Ga complex retention was found to be 34% higher in hypoxic cells than in normoxic cells over 30 min, further increasing to 53% at 120 min. Our data suggests that this class of gallium complexes show hypoxia selectivity suitable for imaging in living cells and in vivo tests by microPET in nude athymic mice showed that they are excreted within 1 h of their administration. PMID:26583314

  5. Comprehensive investigations of kinetics of alkaline hydrolysis of TNT (2,4,6-trinitrotoluene), DNT (2,4-dinitrotoluene), and DNAN (2,4-dinitroanisole).

    PubMed

    Sviatenko, Liudmyla; Kinney, Chad; Gorb, Leonid; Hill, Frances C; Bednar, Anthony J; Okovytyy, Sergiy; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2014-09-01

    Combined experimental and computational techniques were used to analyze multistep chemical reactions in the alkaline hydrolysis of three nitroaromatic compounds: 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), 2,4-dinitrotoluene (DNT), and 2,4-dinitroanisole (DNAN). The study reveals common features and differences in the kinetic behavior of these compounds. The analysis of the predicted pathways includes modeling of the reactions, along with simulation of UV-vis spectra, experimental monitoring of reactions using LC/MS techniques, development of the kinetic model by designing and solving the system of differential equations, and obtaining computationally predicted kinetics for decay and accumulation of reactants and products. Obtained results suggest that DNT and DNAN are more resistant to alkaline hydrolysis than TNT. The direct substitution of a nitro group by a hydroxide represents the most favorable pathway for all considered compounds. The formation of Meisenheimer complexes leads to the kinetic first-step intermediates in the hydrolysis of TNT. Janovsky complexes can also be formed during hydrolysis of TNT and DNT but in small quantities. Methyl group abstraction is one of the suggested pathways of DNAN transformation during alkaline hydrolysis.

  6. Kinetic and thermodynamic investigation of rhodamine B adsorption at solid/solvent interfaces by use of evanescent-wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ming-Shiang; Fan, Hsiu-Fang; Lin, King-Chuen

    2010-02-01

    Evanescent-wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy is applied to investigate the adsorption behavior of rhodamine B at three different interfaces. The adsorption equilibrium constant (K(ads)) and adsorption free energy of rhodamine B at the silica/methanol interface are determined to be (1.5 +/- 0.2) x 10(4) M(-1) and -23.8 +/- 0.4 kJ/mol by use of a Langmuir isotherm model. A Langmuir-based kinetic model is also developed to determine the corresponding adsorption and desorption rate constants of (1.02 +/- 0.03) x 10(2) M(-1) s(-1) and (7.1 +/- 0.2) x 10(-3) s(-1), from which K(ads) is obtained to be (1.45 +/- 0.09) x 10(4) M(-1), in agreement with the value determined under equilibrium conditions. Similarly, when rhodamine B is at the chlorotrimethylsilane-immobilized silica/methanol interface, the adsorption and desorption rate constants are determined to be (1.7 +/- 0.2) x 10(2) M(-1) s(-1) and (5.0 +/- 1.0) x 10(-3) s(-1). The subsequent K(ads) is (3.6 +/- 0.4) x 10(4) M(-1), which is larger than that at the silica/methanol interface. The former adsorption is dominated by hydrophobic interaction, while the latter is subject to electrostatic attraction. When rhodamine B is at the silica/water interface, there exist three chemical forms, including zwitterion (R(+)B(-)), cation (RBH(+)), and lactone (RBL). A combination of double-layer and Langmuir competitive models is used to fit the adsorption isotherm as a function of solution pH, yielding K(ads) of (2.5 +/- 0.2) x 10(4) M(-1) and (1.1 +/- 0.2) x 10(5) M(-1) for R(+)B(-) and RBH(+), respectively. RBL is considered to have the same K(ads) value as R(+)B(-).

  7. Rapid estimation of readily leachable triazine residues in soils using automatic kinetic bioaccessibility assays followed by on-line sorptive clean-up as a front-end to liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Vida, Ana C F; Cocovi-Solberg, David J; Zagatto, Elias A G; Miró, Manuel

    2016-08-15

    An automatic batchwise bioaccessibility test was proposed for on-line monitoring of readily mobile pools of ametryn and atrazine residues in agricultural soils with different physicochemical properties. A 0.01molL(-1) CaCl2 solution mimicking rainwater percolation through the soil profiles was used for the herbicide extractions. The extract aliquots were successively sampled at regular time intervals in order to investigate the extraction kinetics. For extract clean-up and retention of freely dissolved target species, 30mg of restricted-access like copolymer were used as in-line sorptive material followed by elution with methanol and on-line heart-cut injection towards a C18 silica reversed-phase monolithic column (100×4.6mm) in a liquid chromatographic system. A mathematical model emphasized that the readily available pools vs time can be in most instances described by a first-order exponential equation, thus an asymptotical value is approached. Consequently, the leaching assays can be performed without attaining chemical equilibrium. Enhancement factors and detection limits were 10.2 and 18.8, and 0.40 and 0.37mgkg(-1) for ametryn and atrazine, respectively. The automatic method features good repeatability for leaching tests (r.s.d.: 11.8-10.2% for sandy and 3.7-6.2% for clayey soil). Reliable data, demonstrated with relative recoveries in the soil leachates ranging from 86 to 104%, were achieved in less than 35min, thus avoiding the need for up to 24h as recommended by standard leaching methods. PMID:27260437

  8. Rapid estimation of readily leachable triazine residues in soils using automatic kinetic bioaccessibility assays followed by on-line sorptive clean-up as a front-end to liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Vida, Ana C F; Cocovi-Solberg, David J; Zagatto, Elias A G; Miró, Manuel

    2016-08-15

    An automatic batchwise bioaccessibility test was proposed for on-line monitoring of readily mobile pools of ametryn and atrazine residues in agricultural soils with different physicochemical properties. A 0.01molL(-1) CaCl2 solution mimicking rainwater percolation through the soil profiles was used for the herbicide extractions. The extract aliquots were successively sampled at regular time intervals in order to investigate the extraction kinetics. For extract clean-up and retention of freely dissolved target species, 30mg of restricted-access like copolymer were used as in-line sorptive material followed by elution with methanol and on-line heart-cut injection towards a C18 silica reversed-phase monolithic column (100×4.6mm) in a liquid chromatographic system. A mathematical model emphasized that the readily available pools vs time can be in most instances described by a first-order exponential equation, thus an asymptotical value is approached. Consequently, the leaching assays can be performed without attaining chemical equilibrium. Enhancement factors and detection limits were 10.2 and 18.8, and 0.40 and 0.37mgkg(-1) for ametryn and atrazine, respectively. The automatic method features good repeatability for leaching tests (r.s.d.: 11.8-10.2% for sandy and 3.7-6.2% for clayey soil). Reliable data, demonstrated with relative recoveries in the soil leachates ranging from 86 to 104%, were achieved in less than 35min, thus avoiding the need for up to 24h as recommended by standard leaching methods.

  9. Effects of oral temazepam on slow waves during non-rapid eye movement sleep in healthy young adults: A high-density EEG investigation.

    PubMed

    Plante, D T; Goldstein, M R; Cook, J D; Smith, R; Riedner, B A; Rumble, M E; Jelenchick, L; Roth, A; Tononi, G; Benca, R M; Peterson, M J

    2016-03-01

    Slow waves are characteristic waveforms that occur during non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep that play an integral role in sleep quality and brain plasticity. Benzodiazepines are commonly used medications that alter slow waves, however, their effects may depend on the time of night and measure used to characterize slow waves. Prior investigations have utilized minimal scalp derivations to evaluate the effects of benzodiazepines on slow waves, and thus the topography of changes to slow waves induced by benzodiazepines has yet to be fully elucidated. This study used high-density electroencephalography (hdEEG) to evaluate the effects of oral temazepam on slow wave activity, incidence, and morphology during NREM sleep in 18 healthy adults relative to placebo. Temazepam was associated with significant decreases in slow wave activity and incidence, which were most prominent in the latter portions of the sleep period. However, temazepam was also associated with a decrease in the magnitude of high-amplitude slow waves and their slopes in the first NREM sleep episode, which was most prominent in frontal derivations. These findings suggest that benzodiazepines produce changes in slow waves throughout the night that vary depending on cortical topography and measures used to characterize slow waves. Further research that explores the relationships between benzodiazepine-induced changes to slow waves and the functional effects of these waveforms is indicated.

  10. Computational investigation of structure, dynamics and nucleation kinetics of a family of modified Stillinger-Weber model fluids in bulk and free-standing thin films.

    PubMed

    Gianetti, Melisa M; Haji-Akbari, Amir; Paula Longinotti, M; Debenedetti, Pablo G

    2016-02-01

    In recent years, computer simulations have found increasingly widespread use as powerful tools for studying phase transitions in wide variety of systems. In the particular and very important case of aqueous systems, the commonly used force-fields tend to offer quite different predictions with respect to a wide range of thermodynamic and kinetic properties, including the ease of ice nucleation, the propensity to freeze at a vapor-liquid interface, and the existence of a liquid-liquid phase transition. It is thus of fundamental and practical interest to understand how different features of a given water model affect its thermodynamic and kinetic properties. In this work, we use the forward-flux sampling technique to study the crystallization kinetics of a family of modified Stillinger-Weber (SW) potentials with energy (ε) and length (σ) scales taken from the monoatomic water (mW) model, but with different tetrahedrality parameters (λ). By increasing λ from 21 to 24, we observe the nucleation rate increases by 48 orders of magnitude at a supercooling of ζ = T/Tm = 0.845. Using classical nucleation theory, we are able to demonstrate that this change can largely be accounted for by the increase in |Δμ|, the thermodynamic driving force. We also perform rate calculations in freestanding thin films of the supercooled liquid, and observe a crossover from surface-enhanced crystallization at λ = 21 to bulk-dominated crystallization for λ ≥ 22. PMID:26778494

  11. Dilute-sulfuric acid pretreatment of corn stover in pilot-scale reactor: investigation of yields, kinetics, and enzymatic digestibilities of solids.

    PubMed

    Schell, Daniel J; Farmer, Jody; Newman, Millie; McMillan, James D

    2003-01-01

    Corn stover is a domestic feedstock that has potential to produce significant quantities of fuel ethanol and other bioenergy and biobased products. However, comprehensive yield and carbon mass balance information and validated kinetic models for dilute-sulfuric acid (H2SO4) pretreatment of corn stover have not been available. This has hindered the estimation of process economics and also limited the ability to perform technoeconomic modeling to guide research. To better characterize pretreatment and assess its kinetics, we pretreated corn stover in a continuous 1 t/d reactor. Corn stover was pretreated at 20% (w/w) solids concentration over a range of conditions encompassing residence times of 3-12 min, temperatures of 165- 195 degrees C, and H2SO4 concentrations of 0.5-1.4% (w/w). Xylan conversion yield and carbon mass balance data were collected at each run condition. Performance results were used to estimate kinetic model parameters assuming biphasic hemicellulose hydrolysis and a hydrolysis mechanism incorporating formation of intermediate xylo-oligomers. In addition, some of the pretreated solids were tested in a simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) process to measure the reactivity of their cellulose component to enzymatic digestion by cellulase enzymes. Monomeric xylose yields of 69-71% and total xylose yields (monomers and oligomers) of 70-77% were achieved with performance level depending on pretreatment severity. Cellulose conversion yields in SSF of 80-87% were obtained for some of the most digestible pretreated solids.

  12. A kinetic and stereochemical investigation of the role of lysine-32 in the phenylpyruvate tautomerase activity catalyzed by macrophage migration inhibitory factor.

    PubMed

    Johnson, W H; Czerwinski, R M; Stamps, S L; Whitman, C P

    1999-11-30

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), an immunoregulatory protein, exhibits a phenylpyruvate tautomerase (PPT) activity. The catalytic mechanism of this activity has recently attracted attention in an effort to determine whether there is a relationship between the PPT activity and the role of MIF in various immune and inflammatory processes. One of the active site residues is lysine-32, which is postulated to play two roles: it assists in substrate binding through an interaction with a carboxylate oxygen at C-1 of phenylpyruvate, and it may be partially responsible for lowering the pK(a) of the catalytic base, Pro-1. The role of Lys-32 has been investigated by changing it to an alanine and an arginine and determining the kinetic parameters, the stereoselectivity, the competitive inhibition, and the pH dependence of the resulting K32A- and K32R-catalyzed reactions. For the K32R mutant, these properties are mostly comparable to those determined for the wild type with two exceptions. There is a modest decrease in the stereoselectivity of the reaction and in the binding affinity of the competitive inhibitor, (E)-2-fluoro-p-hydroxycinnamate. These differences are likely due to the increased steric bulk of arginine. For the K32A mutant, there are 11- and 12-fold decreases in k(cat) and k(cat)/K(m), respectively, using phenylenolpyruvate. Part of the decrease in activity can be attributed to the observed increase of 1. 3 units in the pK(a) of Pro-1. It was also found that the loss of the electrostatic interaction did not significantly affect the stereoselectivity of the K32A-catalyzed reaction, although it did result in a decrease in the binding affinity of the competitive inhibitor. The combination of these results indicates that the primary function of Lys-32 in the PPT activity of MIF is to lower the pK(a) of Pro-1. The interactions responsible for the stereoselectivity of the PPT activity were further delineated by examining the wild type- and K32A

  13. Kinetic and thermodynamic investigations of Pb(II) and Cd(II) adsorption on nanoscale organo-functionalized SiO₂-Al₂O₃.

    PubMed

    Jazi, M Boroumand; Arshadi, M; Amiri, M J; Gil, A

    2014-05-15

    This paper reports the preparation of three new Schiff base ligands modified SiO2-Al2O3 mixed oxide adsorbents, and their use for removal of Pb(II) and Cd(II) from aqueous solutions. Equilibrium and kinetic models for Pb(II) and Cd(II) sorption were applied by considering the effect of the contact time, initial Pb(II) and Cd(II) concentrations, effect of temperature, and initial pH. The contact time to attain equilibrium for maximum adsorption was 120 min. These heterogeneous Schiff base ligands were found to be effective adsorbents for the removal of heavy metal ions from solution, with Si/Al-pr-NH-et-N=pyridine-2-carbaldehyde having a high adsorption capacity for Pb(II) and Cd(II) ions from aqueous solution. The adsorption of heavy metal ions has been studied in terms of pseudo-first- and -second-order kinetics, and the Freundlich, Langmuir and Langmuir-Freundlich isotherms models have also been used to the equilibrium adsorption data. The adsorption kinetics followed the mechanism of the pseudo-second-order equation for all systems studied, confirming chemical sorption as the rate-limiting step of adsorption mechanisms and not involving mass transfer in solution, which were confirmed by techniques of DS UV-vis and FT-IR. The thermodynamic parameters (ΔG, ΔH and ΔS) indicated that the adsorption of Pb(II) and Cd(II) ions were feasible, spontaneous and endothermic between 25 and 80°C. PMID:24655823

  14. Kinetic and X-ray crystallographic investigations of substituted 2-thio-6-oxo-1,6-dihydropyrimidine-benzenesulfonamides acting as carbonic anhydrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Vullo, Daniela; Supuran, Claudiu T; Scozzafava, Andrea; De Simone, Giuseppina; Monti, Simona Maria; Alterio, Vincenzo; Carta, Fabrizio

    2016-08-15

    Herein we report an in vitro kinetic evaluation against the most relevant human carbonic anhydrase (hCA, EC 4.2.1.1) isoforms (I, II, IX and XII) of a small series of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, EC 1.1.1.27) inhibitors. All compounds contain a primary sulfonamide zinc-binding group (ZBG) substituted with the 2-thio-6-oxo-1,6-dihydropyrimidine scaffold. By means of X-ray crystallographic experiments we explored the ligand-enzyme binding modes, thus highlighting the contribution of the 2-thio-6-oxo-1,6-dihydropyrimidine moiety to the stabilization of the complex. PMID:27316543

  15. Theoretical and Experimental Investigation of Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Thiol-Michael Addition Reactions: A Case Study of Reversible Fluorescent Probes for Glutathione Imaging in Single Cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jianwei; Jiang, Xiqian; Carroll, Shaina L; Huang, Jia; Wang, Jin

    2015-12-18

    Density functional theory (DFT) was applied to study the thermodynamics and kinetics of reversible thiol-Michael addition reactions. M06-2X/6-31G(d) with the SMD solvation model can reliably predict the Gibbs free energy changes (ΔG) of thiol-Michael addition reactions with an error of less than 1 kcal·mol(-1) compared with the experimental benchmarks. Taking advantage of this computational model, the first reversible reaction-based fluorescent probe was developed that can monitor the changes in glutathione levels in single living cells.

  16. Probing the electrostatics and pharmacologic modulation of sequence-specific binding by the DNA-binding domain of the ETS-family transcription factor PU.1: a binding affinity and kinetics investigation

    PubMed Central

    Munde, Manoj; Poon, Gregory M. K.; Wilson, W. David

    2013-01-01

    Members of the ETS family of transcription factors regulate a functionally diverse array of genes. All ETS proteins share a structurally-conserved but sequence-divergent DNA-binding domain, known as the ETS domain. Although the structure and thermodynamics of the ETS-DNA complexes are well known, little is known about the kinetics of sequence recognition, a facet that offers potential insight into its molecular mechanism. We have characterized DNA binding by the ETS domain of PU.1 by biosensor-surface plasmon resonance (SPR). SPR analysis revealed a striking kinetic profile for DNA binding by the PU.1 ETS domain. At low salt concentrations, it binds high-affinity cognate DNA with a very slow association rate constant (≤105 M−1 s−1), compensated by a correspondingly small dissociation rate constant. The kinetics are strongly salt-dependent but mutually balance to produce a relatively weak dependence in the equilibrium constant. This profile contrasts sharply with reported data for other ETS domains (e.g., Ets-1, TEL) for which high-affinity binding is driven by rapid association (>107 M−1 s−1). We interpret this difference in terms of the hydration properties of ETS-DNA binding and propose that at least two mechanisms of sequence recognition are employed by this family of DNA-binding domain. Additionally, we use SPR to demonstrate the potential for pharmacological inhibition of sequence-specific ETS-DNA binding, using the minor groove-binding distamycin as a model compound. Our work establishes SPR as a valuable technique for extending our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of ETS-DNA interactions as well as developing potential small-molecule agents for biotechnological and therapeutic purposes. PMID:23416556

  17. Investigation of the reaction kinetics between SiC fibers and selectively alloyed titanium matrix composites and determination of their mechanical properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gundel, Douglas B.; Wawner, Franklin E., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    During high temperature exposure, an interfacial reaction occurs between SiC fiber reinforcement and titanium matrices which can be detrimental to the mechanical properties of the composite. The reaction kinetics between SCS-6 fibers and Ti-1100 were determined at 800 to 1000 C and found to be slower than those of other currently used titanium alloys (Ti-15-3, Ti-6-4). The experimentally determined reaction kinetics for Ti-1100 were extrapolated to 700 C and found to accurately predict reaction zone size after 1000 hours of exposure. Predictions of the time to consume the surface layer on the SCS-6 and SCS-9 fibers were made in an effort to estimate the time that the fiber will retain its strength in Ti-1100 during isothermal exposure at high temperatures. Using this approach, the strength of an SCS-6 fiber in Ti-1100 should be retained for over 20,000 hours at isothermal exposures less than 800 C. Strength predictions using the rule of mixtures for a unidirectional Ti-1100/SCS-6 composite are presented for short term exposures up to 700 C. Room temperature tests of an as-fabricated 20 volume percent fiber/Ti-1100 composite yielded a UTS of 226 ksi (1490 MPa) which is close to that predicted by the ROM.

  18. Prediction of kinematic and kinetic performance in a drop vertical jump with individual anthropometric factors in adolescent female athletes: implications for cadaveric investigations.

    PubMed

    Bates, Nathaniel A; Myer, Gregory D; Hewett, Timothy E

    2015-04-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament injuries are common, expensive to repair, and often debilitate athletic careers. Robotic manipulators have evaluated knee ligament biomechanics in cadaveric specimens, but face limitations such as accounting for variation in bony geometry between specimens that may influence dynamic motion pathways. This study examined individual anthropometric measures for significant linear relationships with in vivo kinematic and kinetic performance and determined their implications for robotic studies. Anthropometrics and 3D motion during a 31 cm drop vertical jump task were collected in high school female basketball players. Anthropometric measures demonstrated differential statistical significance in linear regression models relative to kinematic variables (p-range <0.01-0.95). However, none of the anthropometric relationships accounted for clinical variance or provided substantive univariate accuracy needed for clinical prediction algorithms (r(2) < 0.20). Mass and BMI demonstrated models that were significant (p < 0.05) and predictive (r(2) > 0.20) relative to peak flexion moment, peak adduction moment, flexion moment range, abduction moment range, and internal rotation moment range. The current findings indicate that anthropometric measures are less associated with kinematics than with kinetics. Relative to the robotic manipulation of cadaveric limbs, the results do not support the need to normalize kinematic rotations relative to specimen dimensions.

  19. A joint structural, kinetic, and thermodynamic investigation of substituent effects on host-guest complexation of bicyclic azoalkanes by beta-cyclodextrin.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiangyang; Gramlich, Gabriela; Wang, Xiaojuan; Nau, Werner M

    2002-01-16

    Derivatives of the azoalkane 2,3-diazabicyclo[2,2,2]oct-2-ene (1a) with bridgehead 1,4-dialkyl (1b), 1,4-dichloro (1c), 1-hydroxymethyl (1d), 1-aminomethyl (1e), and 1-ammoniummethyl (1f) substituents form host-guest inclusion complexes with beta-cyclodextrin. They were employed as probes to assess substituent effects on the kinetics and thermodynamics of this complexation by using time-resolved and steady-state fluorimetry, UV spectrophotometry, induced circular dichroism (ICD) measurements, and (1)H NMR spectroscopy. The kinetic analysis based on quenching of the long-lived fluorescence of the azoalkanes by addition of host provided excited-state association rate constants between 2.6 x 10(8) and 7.0 x 10(8) M(-)(1) s(-)(1). The binding constants for 1a (1100 M(-1)), 1b (900 M(-1)), 1c (1900 M(-1)), 1d (180 M(-1)), 1e (250 M(-1)), and 1f (ca. 20 M(-1)) were obtained by UV, NMR, and ICD titrations. A positive ICD signal of the azo absorption around 370 nm was observed for the beta-cyclodextrin complexes of 1a, 1d, and 1f with the intensity order 1a > 1d approximately 1f, and a negative signal was measured for those of 1b, 1c, and 1e with the intensity order 1c < 1b approximately 1e. The ICD was employed for the assignment of the solution structures of the complexes, in particular the relative orientation of the guest in the host (co-conformation).

  20. Effect of Clay Nanoparticle Transport, Desorption Kinetics and Redox Equilibrium on Radionuclide Mobility in Fractured Rock investigated at the Grimsel Test Site (Switzerland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, T.; Huber, F. M.; Lagos, M.; Quinto, F.; Heck, S.; Martin, A. J.; Blechschmidt, I.; Lanyon, G. W.; Reiche, T.; Noseck, U.

    2015-12-01

    Transport of contaminants in crystalline environments might occur through dissolved species or attached to colloidal or nanoparticulate phases being mobile in water conducting features of the host rock. In this presentation we will discuss the mobility of clay nanoparticles as detected by laser-induced breakdown detection (LIBD) as a function of fracture surface roughness and groundwater chemistry. The on site observed Tc-99, U-233, Np-237, Pu-242 and Am-243 sorption/desorption kinetics with and without natural or synthetic clay minerals (smectites) are compared to laboratory studies under similar groundwater conditions. The desorption or redox kinetics were monitored over a duration of up to 426 days using natural fracture filling material as a concurrence ligand and monitoring the colloid attachment via detection of Al, Si, Ni and Zn as smectite structural elements. For trivalent actinides smectite desorption rates in the range of 1.2-3.7E-3 per hour could be determined and significantly lower desorption rates for tetravalent actinides were found. This results will be compared with field data of migration experiments performed at the Grimsel Test Site (GTS, Switzerland) using the same radionuclides and clay colloidal phases varying the fracture residence time by flow rate adjustment. Furthermore, the long-term actinide mobility will be addressed by presenting AMS/RIMS measurements of (a) samples collected several months into the tailing of the breakthrough curves not any longer detectable by HR-ICP-MS and (b) background samples of different GTS ground waters showing fallout U-236, whereas fallout Pu could not be detected indicating a much lower mobility under the given conditions.

  1. Theoretical investigations into the nucleation of silica growth in basic solution part II--derivation and benchmarking of a first principles kinetic model of solution chemistry.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, Grant J

    2013-10-28

    A kinetic model of silicate oligomerization in water, up to and including tetramer formation, has been compiled exclusively from rate constants derived from transition state theory based on either quantum chemical data (derived under a hybrid solvation framework) for all bond breaking-forming reactions, or using empirically-based approximated pKa's and diffusion coefficients for rate constants of pH-based and bimolecular steps. The rate constants, based on an exhaustive search of all relevant elementary steps, form the basis of our kinetic model; numerical solution of the resulting rate equations allows the simulation of the reaction system, given a set of initial conditions and with almost no restriction on concentrations, pH, or reaction time, in a matter of only minutes. The model, which we believe contains all possible isomers of both neutral and singly anionic clusters, has been extensively benchmarked and reproduces a number of important experimental observations in the range pH ≈ 4-10. In particular, it provides a good description of the dominant products; product yields and reaction times (also as a function of pH) are in agreement with experiment; the linear relationship between the log of the rate of silica dissolution and pH is well reproduced; the origin of silica scaling naturally arises; and we can also simulate the observed fourth order dependence of the rate of monomer consumption on H4SiO4 concentration. This should be a general approach to exploring solution phase chemistry, and could be a useful complement to more conventional molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo modelling approaches in understanding complex reaction networks in solution.

  2. Rapid Suppression of Growth by Blue Light

    PubMed Central

    Cosgrove, Daniel J.

    1981-01-01

    The inhibition of stem elongation in dark-grown seedlings by blue light was studied with marking techniques and with a high-resolution, growth-measuring apparatus. Blue light rapidly suppresses growth in a variety of cultivated species. In some species, the inhibition persists only during the period of irradiation, after which time growth quickly returns to the high dark rate, whereas, in other species, the light response has an additional long-term component which lasts for at least several hours in the dark. The long-term inhibition may be mediated by phytochrome, whereas the rapid, short-term component is specific to a blue-light receptor. The rapid inhibition of growth in cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) requires high-energy blue irradiation, which is perceived directly by the growing region of the hypocotyl and inhibits all regions below the hook to the same extent. Detailed investigation of the kinetics of the inhibition in cucumber and in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) shows that, after a short lag period (20 to 30 seconds in cucumber, 60 to 70 seconds in sunflower), the growth rate declines in an exponential fashion to a lower rate, with a half-time of 15 to 25 seconds in cucumber and 90 to 150 seconds in sunflower. Excision of the hypocotyl greatly reduces the sensitivity of the growth rate to blue-light inhibition. Because of the rapid kinetics, the blue-light photoreceptor cannot affect cell enlargement by altering the supply of growth hormone or the sensitivity to hormones but probably operates more directly either on the biochemical process which loosens cell walls or on cell turgor. PMID:16661718

  3. Rapid Formation of Molecular Bromine from Deliquesced NaBr Aerosol in the Presence of Ozone and UV Light

    EPA Science Inventory

    The formation of gas-phase bromine from aqueous sodium bromide aerosols is investigated through a combination of chamber experiments and chemical kinetics modeling. Experiments show that Br2(g) is produced rapidly from deliquesced NaBr aerosols in the presence of OH radicals prod...

  4. Functional expression of a fragment of human dihydroorotate dehydrogenase by means of the baculovirus expression vector system, and kinetic investigation of the purified recombinant enzyme.

    PubMed

    Knecht, W; Bergjohann, U; Gonski, S; Kirschbaum, B; Löffler, M

    1996-08-15

    Human mitochondrial dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (the fourth enzyme of pyrimidine de novo synthesis) has been overproduced by means of a recombinant baculovirus that contained the human cDNA fragment for this protein. After virus infection and protein expression in Trichoplusia ni cells (BTI-Tn-5B1-4), the subcellular distribution of the recombinant dihydroorotate dehydrogenase was determined by two distinct enzyme-activity assays and by Western blot analysis with anti-(dihydroorotate dehydrogenase) Ig. The targeting of the recombinant protein to the mitochondria of the insect cells was verified. The activity of the recombinant enzyme in the mitochondria of infected cells was about 740-fold above the level of dihydroorotate dehydrogenase in human liver mitochondria. In a three-step procedure, dihydroorotate dehydrogenase was purified to a specific activity of greater than 50 U/mg. Size-exclusion chromatography showed a molecular mass of 42 kDa and confirmed the existence of the fully active enzyme as a monomeric species. Fluorimetric cofactor analysis revealed the presence of FMN in recombinant dihydroorotate dehydrogenase. By kinetics analysis, Km values for dihydroorotate and ubiquinone-50 were found to be 4 microM and 9.9 microM, respectively, while Km values for dihydroorotate and decylubiquinone were 9.4 microM and 13.7 microM, respectively. The applied expression system will allow preparation of large quantities of the enzyme for structure and function studies. Purified recombinant human dihytdroorotate dehydrogenase was tested for its sensitivity to a reported inhibitor A77 1726 (2-hydroxyethyliden-cyanoacetic acid 4-trifluoromethyl anilide), which is the active metabolite of the isoxazole derivative leflunomide [5-methyl-N-(4-trifluoromethyl-phenyl)-4-isoxazole carboximide]. An IC50 value of 1 microM was determined for A77 1726. Detailed kinetics experiments revealed uncompetitive inhibition with respect to dihydroorotate (Kiu = 0.94 microM) and non

  5. Kinetic buffers.

    PubMed

    Alibrandi, Giuseppe; Fabbrizzi, Luigi; Licchelli, Maurizio; Puglisi, Antonio

    2015-01-12

    This paper proposes a new type of molecular device that is able to act as an inverse proton sponge to slowly decrease the pH inside a reaction vessel. This makes the automatic monitoring of the concentration of pH-sensitive systems possible. The device is a composite formed of an alkyl chloride, which kinetically produces acidity, and a buffer that thermodynamically modulates the variation in pH value. Profiles of pH versus time (pH-t plots) have been generated under various experimental conditions by computer simulation, and the device has been tested by carrying out automatic spectrophotometric titrations, without using an autoburette. To underline the wide variety of possible applications, this new system has been used to realize and monitor HCl uptake by a di-copper(II) bistren complex in a single run, in a completely automatic experiment.

  6. Synthesis of no carrier added F-18 16-fluorohexadecanoic acid (FHDA) and investigation of its labeled metabolites and its kinetics in the heart

    SciTech Connect

    DeGrado, T.R.; Bernstein, D.R.; Gatley, S.J.; Ng, C.K.; Holden, J.E.

    1984-01-01

    No carrier added FHDA was prepared via saponification of the product of silver oxide assisted reaction of near-anhydrous tetraethylammonium fluoride with methyl 16-iodohexadecanoate. The labeled fatty acid was injected into isolated perfused rat hearts. Coronary perfusate was collected for 4-9 minutes, when hearts were chilled and homogenized. F-18 in perfusate was analysed by HPLC (NH column; 50mM amm. acetate in 50% acetonitrile). Material with the same retention time as F-18 fluoroacetate (prepared by F-for-I exchange with ethyl iodoacetate) was found. Some F-18 stuck permanently to the column and was assigned as fluoride since the same fraction of label in perfusate was retained on alumina columns eluted with water. Anion exchange HPLC (SAX column; 20mM pot. phosphate, pH 7) of homogenates gave peaks corresponding to fluoroacetate plus fluoride and minor peaks which could be fluoroacetylCoA and fluorocitrate. The authors interpret their data as follows. Beta-oxidation of FHDA results in fluoroacetylCoA which either undergoes ''lethal synthesis'' to fluorocitrate or is hydrolysed to fluoroacetate which diffuses out of the heart. The source of the fluoride is not yet clear, but could complicate interpretation of FHDA kinetics measured in vivo with positron tomography. Clearance of label from FHDA in isolated perfused hearts was faster than for labeled 16-iodohexadecanoic acid, indicating that the F-18 tracer may be a more sensitive probe of myocardial fatty acid metabolism.

  7. Investigation of the Kinetics of the Ferrite/Austenite Phase Transformation in the HAZ of a 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel Weldment

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, T A; Elmer, J W; Wong, J; Babu, S S; Vitek, J M

    2002-03-14

    A semi-quantitative map based on a series of spatially resolved X-ray diffraction (SRXRD) scans shows the progression of the ferrite ({delta})/austenite ({gamma}) phase balance throughout the HAZ during GTA welding of a 2205 duplex stainless steel (DSS). This map shows an unexpected decrease in the ferrite fraction on heating, followed by a recovery to the original ferrite fraction on cooling at locations within the HAZ. Even though such behavior is supported by thermodynamic calculations, it has not been confirmed by either experimental methods or have the kinetics been evaluated. Both Gleeble thermal simulations and time resolved x-ray diffraction measurements on spot welds in the 2205 DSS provide further evidence for this rather low-temperature transformation. On the other hand, calculations of the diffusion of alloying elements across the 6/y interface under a variety of conditions shed no further light on the driving force for this transformation. Further work on the mechanisms and driving forces for this transformation is on-going.

  8. Kinetic and spectrophotometric investigation of the diels-alder reaction between maleic anhydride derivatives and substituted anthracenes in the presence of gallium and aluminum chlorides

    SciTech Connect

    Kiselev, V.D.; Konovalov, A.I.; Shakirov, I.M.

    1986-10-01

    A comparison was made of the kinetic data for the normal Diels-Alder reaction of para-substituted N-arylmaleimides and substituted maleic anhydrides with meso-substituted anthracenes and of the reaction catalyzed by gallium and aluminum chlorides. The largely constant effects of gallium chloride (10/sup 4/) and aluminum chloride (10/sup 5/) in the acceleration of the reactions between the various pairs were demonstrated. The energies of charge transfer in the complexes between hexamethylbenzene and the dienophiles in the presence and absence of Lewis acids were determined by spectrophotometry. A significant decrease (to 1.2 eV) of the charge-transfer energy was found in the ..pi.., ..pi..-complexes and was attributed to the stabilization of the LUMO of the dienophile. From analysis of the obtained data it was concluded that the observed catalytic effect in the presence of Lewis acids can be explained by the approach of the frontier orbital levels and by a favorable change in the coefficients at the atomic orbitals responsible for the reaction.

  9. Enantiomeric separation of volatile organics by gas chromatography for the in situ analysis of extraterrestrial materials: kinetics and thermodynamics investigation of various chiral stationary phases.

    PubMed

    Freissinet, C; Buch, A; Szopa, C; Sternberg, R

    2013-09-01

    The performances of several commercial chiral capillary columns have been evaluated with the aim of determining the one most suitable for enantiomeric separation in a gas chromatograph onboard a space probe. We compared the GC-MS response of three capillary columns coated with different chiral stationary phases (CSP) using volatile chiral organic molecules which are potential markers of a prebiotic organic chemistry. The three different chiral capillary columns are Chirasil-Val, with an amino acid derivative CSP, ChiralDex-β-PM, with a CSP composed of dissolved permethylated β-cyclodextrins in polysiloxane, and Chirasil-Dex, with a CSP made of modified cyclodextrins chemically bonded to the polysiloxane backbone. Both kinetics and thermodynamics studies have been carried out to evaluate the chiral recognition potential in these different types of columns. The thermodynamic parameters also allow a better understanding of the driving forces affecting the retention and separation of the enantiomers. The Chirasil-Dex-CSP displays the best characteristics for an optimal resolution of the chiral compounds, without preliminary derivatization. This CSP had been chosen to be the only chiral column in the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) experiment onboard the current Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission, and is also part of the Mars Organic Molecules Analyzer (MOMA) gas chromatograph onboard the next Martian mission ExoMars. The use of this column could also be extended to all space missions aimed at studying chirality in space. PMID:23921265

  10. An investigation of the effect of surface impurities on the adsorption kinetics of hydrogen chemisorbed onto iron. Annual status report, 1 January-31 December 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Shanabarger, M.R.

    1994-12-01

    The goal of this program has been to develop an understanding of heterogeneous kinetic processes for those molecular species which produce gaseous hydrogen degradation of the mechanical properties of metallic structural materials. During the present program, the interaction of hydrogen with the surfaces of alpha-2 (Ti3Al) titanium aluminide, gamma (TiAl) titanium aluminide, and beryllium were studied. The interaction of low pressure hydrogen with gamma titanium aluminide and beryllium was found to be relatively weak. Weak in the sense that adsorption leads to a low surface concentration of dissociated hydrogen, i.e., the chemisorption process is reversible at room temperature (300 K) for gamma titanium aluminide and the sticking coefficient for chemisorption is extremely small for beryllium. Hydrogen was found to interact readily with alpha-2 titanium aluminide to form a stable surface hydride at 300 K. These results correlate well with other recent studies which show that the mechanical properties for alpha-2 titanium aluminide are readily degraded in hydrogen while gamma titanium aluminide exhibits less degradation and beryllium essentially no degradation. The interaction of oxygen with the surface of several of these materials was studied. More recently, preliminary hydrogen permeation studies were completed for three high temperature alloys, Incoloy 909, Mo-47.5Re (wt. %), and this past year, Haynes 188.

  11. Enantiomeric separation of volatile organics by gas chromatography for the in situ analysis of extraterrestrial materials: kinetics and thermodynamics investigation of various chiral stationary phases.

    PubMed

    Freissinet, C; Buch, A; Szopa, C; Sternberg, R

    2013-09-01

    The performances of several commercial chiral capillary columns have been evaluated with the aim of determining the one most suitable for enantiomeric separation in a gas chromatograph onboard a space probe. We compared the GC-MS response of three capillary columns coated with different chiral stationary phases (CSP) using volatile chiral organic molecules which are potential markers of a prebiotic organic chemistry. The three different chiral capillary columns are Chirasil-Val, with an amino acid derivative CSP, ChiralDex-β-PM, with a CSP composed of dissolved permethylated β-cyclodextrins in polysiloxane, and Chirasil-Dex, with a CSP made of modified cyclodextrins chemically bonded to the polysiloxane backbone. Both kinetics and thermodynamics studies have been carried out to evaluate the chiral recognition potential in these different types of columns. The thermodynamic parameters also allow a better understanding of the driving forces affecting the retention and separation of the enantiomers. The Chirasil-Dex-CSP displays the best characteristics for an optimal resolution of the chiral compounds, without preliminary derivatization. This CSP had been chosen to be the only chiral column in the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) experiment onboard the current Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission, and is also part of the Mars Organic Molecules Analyzer (MOMA) gas chromatograph onboard the next Martian mission ExoMars. The use of this column could also be extended to all space missions aimed at studying chirality in space.

  12. Hydrogen kinetics in a-Si:H and a-SiC:H thin films investigated by real-time ERD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halindintwali, S.; Khoele, J.; Nemroaui, O.; Comrie, C. M.; Theron, C. C.

    2015-04-01

    Hydrogen effusion from hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) and amorphous silicon carbide (a-Si1-xCx:H) thin films during a temperature ramp between RT and 600 °C was studied by in situ real-time elastic recoil detection analysis. Point to point contour maps show the hydrogen depth profile and its evolution with the ramped temperature. This paper proposes a diffusion limited evolution model to study H kinetic properties from total retained H contents recorded in a single ramp. In a compact a-Si:H layer where H predominantly effuses at high temperatures between 500 and 600 °C, an activation energy value of ∼1.50 eV and a diffusion pre-factor of 0.41 × 10-4 cm2/s were obtained. Applied to an non-stoichiometric a-Si1-xCx:H film in the same range of temperature, the model led to reduced values of activation energy and diffusion prefactor of ∼0.33 eV and 0.59 × 10-11 cm2/s, respectively.

  13. Oxygen uptake kinetics: Why are they so slow? And what do they tell us?

    PubMed

    Grassi, B

    2006-11-01

    VO(2) kinetics and O(2) deficit are important determinants of exercise tolerance. In "normal" conditions convective and diffusive O(2) delivery to skeletal muscle fibers do not represent important determinants of VO(2) kinetics, whose limiting factors seem mainly located within muscle fibers. Whereas a limiting role by PDH has not been confirmed, the role of inhibition of mitochondrial respiration by NO needs further investigations. Important determinants of skeletal muscle VO(2) kinetics likely reside in the interplay between bioenergetic mechanisms at exercise onset. By acting as high-capacitance energy buffers, PCr hydrolysis and anaerobic glycolysis would delay or attenuate the increase in [ADP] within muscle fibers following rapid increases in ATP demand, preventing a more rapid activation of oxidative phosphorylation. The different "localization" of the main limiting factors for VO(2) kinetics and VO(2)max offers the opportunity to perform a functional evaluation of oxidative metabolism at two different levels of the pathway for O(2), from ambient air to mitochondria. Whereas VO(2)max is mainly limited by the capacity of the cardiovascular system to deliver O(2) to exercising muscles, by analysis of VO(2) kinetics the functional evaluation is mainly related to skeletal muscle. In pathological conditions the situation may be less clear, and warrants further investigations.

  14. Real-time investigation of human topoisomerase I reaction kinetics using an optical sensor: a fast method for drug screening and determination of active enzyme concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristoffersen, Emil L.; Jørgensen, Line A.; Franch, Oskar; Etzerodt, Michael; Frøhlich, Rikke; Bjergbæk, Lotte; Stougaard, Magnus; Ho, Yi-Ping; Knudsen, Birgitta R.

    2015-05-01

    Human DNA topoisomerase I (hTopI) is a nuclear enzyme that catalyzes relaxation of super helical tension that arises in the genome during essential DNA metabolic processes. This is accomplished through a common reaction mechanism shared among the type IB topoisomerase enzymes, including eukaryotic and poxvirus topoisomerase I. The mechanism of hTopI is specifically targeted in cancer treatment using camptothecin derivatives. These drugs convert the hTopI activity into a cellular poison, and hence the cytotoxic effects of camptothecin derivatives correlate with the hTopI activity. Therefore, fast and reliable techniques for high throughput measurements of hTopI activity are of high clinical interest. Here we demonstrate potential applications of a fluorophore-quencher based DNA sensor designed for measurement of hTopI cleavage-ligation activities, which are the catalytic steps affected by camptothecin. The kinetic analysis of the hTopI reaction with the DNA sensor exhibits a characteristic burst profile. This is the result of a two-step ping-pong reaction mechanism, where a fast first reaction, the one creating the signal, is followed by a slower second reaction necessary for completion of the catalytic cycle. Hence, the burst profile holds information about two reactions in the enzymatic mechanism. Moreover, it allows the amount of active enzyme in the reaction to be determined. The presented results pave the way for future high throughput drug screening and the potential of measuring active hTopI concentrations in clinical samples for individualized treatment.Human DNA topoisomerase I (hTopI) is a nuclear enzyme that catalyzes relaxation of super helical tension that arises in the genome during essential DNA metabolic processes. This is accomplished through a common reaction mechanism shared among the type IB topoisomerase enzymes, including eukaryotic and poxvirus topoisomerase I. The mechanism of hTopI is specifically targeted in cancer treatment using

  15. Real-time investigation of human topoisomerase I reaction kinetics using an optical sensor: a fast method for drug screening and determination of active enzyme concentrations.

    PubMed

    Kristoffersen, Emil L; Jørgensen, Line A; Franch, Oskar; Etzerodt, Michael; Frøhlich, Rikke; Bjergbæk, Lotte; Stougaard, Magnus; Ho, Yi-Ping; Knudsen, Birgitta R

    2015-06-01

    Human DNA topoisomerase I (hTopI) is a nuclear enzyme that catalyzes relaxation of super helical tension that arises in the genome during essential DNA metabolic processes. This is accomplished through a common reaction mechanism shared among the type IB topoisomerase enzymes, including eukaryotic and poxvirus topoisomerase I. The mechanism of hTopI is specifically targeted in cancer treatment using camptothecin derivatives. These drugs convert the hTopI activity into a cellular poison, and hence the cytotoxic effects of camptothecin derivatives correlate with the hTopI activity. Therefore, fast and reliable techniques for high throughput measurements of hTopI activity are of high clinical interest. Here we demonstrate potential applications of a fluorophore-quencher based DNA sensor designed for measurement of hTopI cleavage-ligation activities, which are the catalytic steps affected by camptothecin. The kinetic analysis of the hTopI reaction with the DNA sensor exhibits a characteristic burst profile. This is the result of a two-step ping-pong reaction mechanism, where a fast first reaction, the one creating the signal, is followed by a slower second reaction necessary for completion of the catalytic cycle. Hence, the burst profile holds information about two reactions in the enzymatic mechanism. Moreover, it allows the amount of active enzyme in the reaction to be determined. The presented results pave the way for future high throughput drug screening and the potential of measuring active hTopI concentrations in clinical samples for individualized treatment.

  16. Regulation of photosynthesis during heterocyst differentiation in Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 investigated in vivo at single-cell level by chlorophyll fluorescence kinetic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ferimazova, Naila; Felcmanová, Kristina; Setlíková, Eva; Küpper, Hendrik; Maldener, Iris; Hauska, Günther; Sedivá, Barbora; Prášil, Ondřej

    2013-09-01

    Changes of photosynthetic activity in vivo of individual heterocysts and vegetative cells in the diazotrophic cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 during the course of diazotrophic acclimation were determined using fluorescence kinetic microscopy (FKM). Distinct phases of stress and acclimation following nitrogen step-down were observed. The first was a period of perception, in which the cells used their internally stored nitrogen without detectable loss of PS II activity or pigments. In the second, the stress phase of nitrogen limitation, the cell differentiation occurred and an abrupt decline of fluorescence yield was observed. This decline in fluorescence was not paralleled by a corresponding decline in photosynthetic pigment content and PS II activity. Both maximal quantum yield and sustained electron flow were not altered in vegetative cells, only in the forming heterocysts. The third, acclimation phase started first in the differentiating heterocysts with a recovery of PS II photochemical yields [Formula: see text] Afterwards, the onset of nitrogenase activity was observed, followed by the restoration of antenna pigments in the vegetative cells, but not in the heterocysts. Surprisingly, mature heterocysts were found to have an intact PS II as judged by photochemical yields, but a strongly reduced PS II-associated antenna as judged by decreased F 0. The possible importance of the functional PS II in heterocysts is discussed. Also, the FKM approach allowed to follow in vivo and evaluate the heterogeneity in photosynthetic performance among individual vegetative cells as well as heterocysts in the course of diazotrophic acclimation. Some cells along the filament (so-called "superbright cells") were observed to display transiently increased fluorescence yield, which apparently proceeded by apoptosis. PMID:23918299

  17. Kinetic and X-ray crystallographic investigations on carbonic anhydrase isoforms I, II, IX and XII of a thioureido analog of SLC-0111.

    PubMed

    Lomelino, Carrie L; Mahon, Brian P; McKenna, Robert; Carta, Fabrizio; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2016-03-01

    SLC-0111 (4-(4-fluorophenylureido)-benzenesulfonamide) is the first carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) IX inhibitor to reach phase I clinical trials as an antitumor/antimetastatic agent. Here we report a kinetic and X-ray crystallographic study of a congener of SLC-0111 which incorporates a thioureido instead of ureido linker between the two aromatic rings as inhibitor of four physiologically relevant CA isoforms. Similar to SLC-0111, the thioureido derivative was a weak hCA I and II inhibitor and a potent one against hCA IX and XII. X-ray crystallography of its adduct with hCA II and comparison of the structure with that of other five hCA II-sulfonamide adducts belonging to the SLC-0111 series, afforded us to understand the particular inhibition profile of the new sulfonamide. Similar to SLC-0111, the thioureido sulfonamide primarily interacted with the hydrophobic side of the hCA II active site, with the tail participating in van der Waals interactions with Phe131 and Pro202, in addition to the coordination of the deprotonated sulfonamide to the active site metal ion. On the contrary, the tail of other sulfonamides belonging to the SLC-0111 series (2-isopropyl-phenyl; 3-nitrophenyl) were orientated towards the hydrophilic half of the active site, which was correlated with orders of magnitude better inhibitory activity against hCA II, and a loss of selectivity for the inhibition of the tumor-associated CAs.

  18. Investigation of structure and composition control over active dissolution of Fe-Tc binary metallic waste forms by off-lattice kinetic Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Christopher D.; Liu, Xiang-Yang

    2013-03-01

    In this paper we develop and apply an atomistic framework for predicting the corrosion tendencies of metallic waste forms that are based on the iron-technetium (Fe-Tc) binary system. These elements were selected due to their importance for the development of metal alloy waste forms for fission product disposition. A kinetic Monte Carlo model based on an off-lattice, modified embedded atom method (MEAM) representation of the Fe-Tc binary system was applied to understand and predict the corrosion behavior of Fe-Tc alloys, as a function of structure (phase and surface-orientation) and composition. During active dissolution, metal atoms are in the free-corrosion state, in which there is a bare metal surface exposed to the environment. The Brønsted-Evans-Polanyi relationship was applied to link atomic cohesive energies, as evaluated using the parameterized MEAM potential, to activation barriers for dissolution. The active dissolution scenario may occur in situations where the passive film has either not formed, is electrochemically unstable, or has been damaged due to the application of stress or pitting attack. Our simulations of the active dissolution process suggest that the corrosion of candidate alloy waste forms will be highly sensitive to Tc loading, as well as phase selection. Hexagonally close-packed alloys are predicted to have lower corrosion rates compared to body-centered cubic. Similarly, ordered structures appear to have a stronger corrosion resistance than randomly dispersed alloys. Finally, our results indicate an optimal loading of Tc in the alloy, which is consistent with electrochemical corrosion experiments.

  19. Kinetic Monte Carlo investigation of pit formation at the CaCO 3(101¯4) surface-water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCoy, J. M.; LaFemina, John P.

    1997-03-01

    On the basis of quantitative information derived from atomic-force microscopy (AFM) studies of shallow pit formation at the CaCO 3(101¯4) surface-water interface in the surface-reaction regime, we have developed a kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) model which reproduces quantitatively the experimental behaviour of the time-evolution of the pits. This allows the rates of all the important elementary atomistic processes involved in the dissolution to be obtained, rates not readily obtainable directly from AFM data. The KMC model also provides important insight into the evolution of very small pits, which in principle can be resolved using AFM, but which in practice are very difficult to observe because of the low probability of their occurrence in the microscope scan area. The KMC simulations show that the growing pits exhibit two different growth regimes, in agreement with the predictions of a simple terrace-ledge-kink (TLK) model. For very small pits the linear pit size increases exponentially with time and the pit edges accelerate (double-kink self-annihilation regime). Having attained a certain pit size (˜25 nm for a temperature of 300 K), thereafter the pit sizes increase linearly with time, the pit edges maintaining a constant velocity (kink-kink annihilation regime). A comparison of the quantitative predictions of the TLK model with KMC simulations shows that, in spite of its simplicity, the TLK model provides a satisfactory semi-quantitative description of the pit evolution. The KMC model presented provides the starting point for the development of a more comprehensive model of the calcite-water interface which will include the effects of adsorbates and other variations in interface conditions. Published by Elsevier Science B.V.

  20. Definition of the interaction domain for cytochrome c on cytochrome c oxidase. Ii. Rapid kinetic analysis of electron transfer from cytochrome c to Rhodobacter sphaeroides cytochrome oxidase surface mutants.

    PubMed

    Wang, K; Zhen, Y; Sadoski, R; Grinnell, S; Geren, L; Ferguson-Miller, S; Durham, B; Millett, F

    1999-12-31

    The reaction between cytochrome c (Cc) and Rhodobacter sphaeroides cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) was studied using a cytochrome c derivative labeled with ruthenium trisbipyridine at lysine 55 (Ru-55-Cc). Flash photolysis of a 1:1 complex between Ru-55-Cc and CcO at low ionic strength results in electron transfer from photoreduced heme c to Cu(A) with an intracomplex rate constant of k(a) = 4 x 10(4) s(-1), followed by electron transfer from Cu(A) to heme a with a rate constant of k(b) = 9 x 10(4) s(-1). The effects of CcO surface mutations on the kinetics follow the order D214N > E157Q > E148Q > D195N > D151N/E152Q approximately D188N/E189Q approximately wild type, indicating that the acidic residues Asp(214), Glu(157), Glu(148), and Asp(195) on subunit II interact electrostatically with the lysines surrounding the heme crevice of Cc. Mutating the highly conserved tryptophan residue, Trp(143), to Phe or Ala decreased the intracomplex electron transfer rate constant k(a) by 450- and 1200-fold, respectively, without affecting the dissociation constant K(D). It therefore appears that the indole ring of Trp(143) mediates electron transfer from the heme group of Cc to Cu(A). These results are consistent with steady-state kinetic results (Zhen, Y., Hoganson, C. W., Babcock, G. T., and Ferguson-Miller, S. (1999) J. Biol. Chem. 274, 38032-38041) and a computational docking analysis (Roberts, V. A., and Pique, M. E. (1999) J. Biol. Chem. 274, 38051-38060).

  1. Investigation of magnetic nanoparticles for the rapid extraction and assay of alpha-emitting radionuclides from urine: demonstration of a novel radiobioassay method.

    PubMed

    O'Hara, Matthew J; Carter, Jennifer C; MacLellan, Jay A; Warner, Cynthia L; Warner, Marvin G; Addleman, R Shane

    2011-08-01

    In the event of an accidental or intentional release of radionuclides into a populated area, massive numbers of people may require radiobioassay screening as triage for dose-reduction therapy or identification for longer-term follow-up. If the event released significant levels of beta- or alpha-emitting radionuclides, in vivo assays would be ineffective. Therefore, highly efficient and rapid analytical methods for radionuclide detection from submitted spot urine samples (≤50 mL) would be required. At present, the quantitative determination of alpha-emitting radionuclides from urine samples is highly labor intensive and requires significant time to prepare and analyze samples. Sorbent materials that provide effective collection and enable rapid assay could significantly streamline the radioanalytical process. The authors have demonstrated the use of magnetic nanoparticles as a novel method of extracting media for four alpha-emitting radionuclides of concern (polonium, radium, uranium and americium) from chemically-unmodified and pH-2 human urine. Herein, the initial experimental sorption results are presented along with a novel method that uses magnetic nanoparticles to extract radionuclides from unmodified human urine and then collect the magnetic field-induced particles for subsequent alpha-counting-source preparation. Additionally, a versatile human dose model is constructed that determines the detector count times required to estimate dose at specific protective-action thresholds. The model provides a means to assess a method's detection capabilities and uses fundamental health physics parameters and actual experimental data as core variables. The modeling shows that, with effective sorbent materials, rapid screening for alpha-emitters is possible with a 50-mL urine sample collected within 1 wk of exposure/intake. PMID:21709509

  2. Potassium kinetics during hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Agar, Baris U; Culleton, Bruce F; Fluck, Richard; Leypoldt, John K

    2015-01-01

    Hyperkalemia in hemodialysis patients is associated with high mortality, but prescription of low dialysate potassium concentrations to decrease serum potassium levels is associated with a high incidence of sudden cardiac arrest or sudden death. Improved clinical outcomes for these patients may be possible if rapid and substantial intradialysis decreases in serum potassium concentration can be avoided while maintaining adequate potassium removal. Data from kinetic modeling sessions during the HEMO Study of the dependence of serum potassium concentration on time during hemodialysis treatments and 30 minutes postdialysis were evaluated using a pseudo one-compartment model. Kinetic estimates of potassium mobilization clearance (K(M)) and predialysis central distribution volume (V(pre)) were determined in 551 hemodialysis patients. The studied patients were 58.8 ± 14.4 years of age with predialysis body weight of 72.1 ± 15.1 kg; 306 (55.4%) of the patients were female and 337 (61.2%) were black. K(M) and V(pre) for all patients were non-normally distributed with values of 158 (111, 235) (median [interquartile range]) mL/min and 15.6 (11.4, 22.8) L, respectively. K(M) was independent of dialysate potassium concentration (P > 0.2), but V(pre) was lower at higher dialysate potassium concentration (R = -0.188, P < 0.001). For patients with dialysate potassium concentration between 1.6 and 2.5 mEq/L (N = 437), multiple linear regression of K(M) and V(pre) demonstrated positive association with predialysis body weight and negative association with predialysis serum potassium concentration. Potassium kinetics during hemodialysis can be described using a pseudo one-compartment model.

  3. Investigation of Lower Hybrid Drift Instability turbulence in the terrestrial magnetotail with fully kinetic, realistic mass ratio Multi-Level Multi-Domain simulations and comparison with observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Innocenti, M. E.; Jiang, W.; Newman, D. L.; Goldman, M. V.; Markidis, S.; Lapenta, G.; Norgren, C.

    2015-12-01

    The kinetic, semi-implicit, adaptive Multi-Level Multi-Domain (MLMD) method is used to simulate, at realistic mass ratio, the development of turbulence generated by the Lower Hybrid Drift Instability (LHDI) in the terrestrial magnetotail over a large range of wavenumbers. The MLMD method reduces the cost of Particle in Cell (PIC) simulations by using higher temporal and spatial resolution only in a small part of the entire domain [Innocenti13, Beck14, Innocenti15]. This reduction in computational cost allows to increase the range of wavenumber simulated with respect to "traditional" PIC simulations and makes the MLMD method a useful approach to explore the multi scale nature of turbulent processes. The power spectra of the fluctuations of the perpendicular electric field and of the magnetic field are studied at wavenumbers and times that allow to appreciate the onset of the electrostatic and electromagnetic LHDI branches and of the ion-ion kink instability. The coupling between electric and magnetic field fluctuations observed in Norgren [2012] for high wavenumber LHDI waves in the terrestrial magnetotail is verified. A break in the magnetic field fluctuation spectra at kdi ˜ 30, with di the ion skin depth and k the perpendicular wavenumber, is observed at early simulated times, Ωcit < 6, with Ωci the ion cyclotron frequency. It is explained with the initial decoupling of electric and magnetic field fluctuations at intermediate and low wavenumbers prior to the development of the electromagnetic LHDI branch. It is observed that the coupling is mediated by the electron current in the electrostatic and electromagnetic LHDI wavenumber range and by the ion current in the kink instability wavenumber range. M. Innocenti, G. Lapenta, S. Markidis, A. Beck, and A. Vapirev, JCP 238, 115 - 140 (2013). A. Beck, M. Innocenti, G. Lapenta, and S. Markidis, JCP 271, 430 - 443 (2014). M. Innocenti, A. Beck, T. Ponweiser, S. Markidis, and G. Lapenta, CPC 189, 47 - 59 (2015

  4. Adsorption and desorption kinetics of carbofuran in acid soils.

    PubMed

    Bermúdez-Couso, Alipio; Fernández-Calviño, David; Pateiro-Moure, Miriam; Nóvoa-Muñoz, Juan Carlos; Simal-Gándara, Jesús; Arias-Estévez, Manuel

    2011-06-15

    Carbofuran adsorption and desorption were investigated in batch and stirred flow chamber (SFC) tests. The carbofuran adsorption capacity of the soils was found to be low and strongly dependent on their clay and organic carbon contents. Carbofuran sorption was due mainly (>80%) to fast adsorption processes governed by intraparticle diffusion. The adsorption kinetic constant for the pesticide ranged from 0.047 to 0.195 min(-1) and was highly correlated with constant n in the Freundlich equation (r=0.965, P<0.05). Batch tests showed carbofuran desorption to be highly variable and negatively correlated with eCEC and the clay content. The SFC tests showed that soil organic carbon (C) plays a key role in the irreversibility of carbofuran adsorption. Carbofuran desorption increased rapidly at C contents below 4%. The desorption kinetic constant for the compound (0.086-0.195 min(-1)) was generally higher than its adsorption kinetic constant; therefore, carbofuran is more rapidly desorbed than it is adsorbed in soil.

  5. Rapid Determination of Ractopamine Residues in Edible Animal Products by Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay: Development and Investigation of Matrix Effects

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; Wang, FengXia; Fang, Li; Wang, Shuo; Fang, GuoZhen

    2009-01-01

    To determine ractopamine residues in animal food products (chicken muscle, pettitoes, pig muscle, and pig liver), we established a rapid direct competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using a polyclonal antibody generated from ractopamine-linker-BSA. The antibody showed high sensitivity and specificity in phosphate buffer, with an IC50 of 0.6 ng/mL, and the limit of detection was 0.04 ng/mL. The matrix effect of the samples was easily eliminated by one-step extraction with PBS, without any organic solution or clean-up procedure such as SPE or liquid-liquid extraction, making it a much more simple and rapid method than previously reported ones. The detection limit in blank samples was 0.2 μg/kg. To validate this new RAC (ractopamine hydrochloride) ELISA, a RAC-free pig liver sample spiked at three different concentrations was prepared and analyzed by HPLC and ELISA. The results showed a good correlation between the data of ELISA and HPLC (R2 > 0.95), which proves that the established ELISA is accurate enough to quantify the residue of RAC in the animal derived foods. PMID:19826637

  6. Investigation of novel rapidly synergistic cloud point extraction pattern for bismuth in water and geological samples coupling with flame atomic absorption spectrometry determination.

    PubMed

    Wen, Xiaodong; Zhao, Yu; Deng, Qingwen; Ji, Shoulian; Zhao, Xia; Guo, Jie

    2012-04-01

    Rapidly synergistic cloud point extraction (RS-CPE) greatly simplified and accelerated the procedure of traditional cloud point extraction (CPE). In order to expand the application of RS-CPE, this work was carried out after the establishment of the improved extraction technique. The new established extraction method was firstly applied for bismuth extraction and determination coupled with flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) in this work. The improved RS-CPE was accomplished in the room temperature in 1 min. Non-ionic surfactant Triton X-100 (TX-100) was used as extractant. Octanol worked as cloud point revulsant and synergic reagent. TX-100 has a relatively high cloud point temperature (CPT), which limited its application in CPE. In this work, TX-100 accomplished the RS-CPE procedure in room temperature successfully. The factors influencing RS-CPE, such as concentrations of reagents, pH, conditions of phase separation, effect of environmental temperatures, salt effect and instrumental conditions, were studied systematically. Under the optimal conditions, the limit of detection (LOD) for bismuth was 4.0 μg L(-1), with sensitivity enhancement factor (EF) of 43. The proposed method greatly improved the sensitivity of FAAS for the determination of bismuth and was applied to the determination of trace bismuth in real and certified samples with satisfactory analytical results. The proposed method was rapid, simple, and sensitive.

  7. Investigation of novel rapidly synergistic cloud point extraction pattern for bismuth in water and geological samples coupling with flame atomic absorption spectrometry determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Xiaodong; Zhao, Yu; Deng, Qingwen; Ji, Shoulian; Zhao, Xia; Guo, Jie

    2012-04-01

    Rapidly synergistic cloud point extraction (RS-CPE) greatly simplified and accelerated the procedure of traditional cloud point extraction (CPE). In order to expand the application of RS-CPE, this work was carried out after the establishment of the improved extraction technique. The new established extraction method was firstly applied for bismuth extraction and determination coupled with flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) in this work. The improved RS-CPE was accomplished in the room temperature in 1 min. Non-ionic surfactant Triton X-100 (TX-100) was used as extractant. Octanol worked as cloud point revulsant and synergic reagent. TX-100 has a relatively high cloud point temperature (CPT), which limited its application in CPE. In this work, TX-100 accomplished the RS-CPE procedure in room temperature successfully. The factors influencing RS-CPE, such as concentrations of reagents, pH, conditions of phase separation, effect of environmental temperatures, salt effect and instrumental conditions, were studied systematically. Under the optimal conditions, the limit of detection (LOD) for bismuth was 4.0 μg L-1, with sensitivity enhancement factor (EF) of 43. The proposed method greatly improved the sensitivity of FAAS for the determination of bismuth and was applied to the determination of trace bismuth in real and certified samples with satisfactory analytical results. The proposed method was rapid, simple, and sensitive.

  8. A uranium (VI) complex: Synthesis, structural and thermal kinetic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goel, Nidhi

    2016-08-01

    A new complex [UO2(2,6-DNP)2phen] (1) (2,6-DNP = 2,6-dinitrophenol, phen = 1,10-phenanthroline) was synthesized, and identified by elemental analysis, IR, Powder XRD and single crystal X-ray crystallography. Crystal structure provides the abundant information's about the bonding and geometry around the U(VI) metal center. The thermal decomposition was studied by TG-DSC, and the kinetics of thermolysis was investigated by applying model fitting as well as isoconversional methods. Explosion delay measurement (De) was also evaluated to determine the response of this complex under the condition of rapid heating.

  9. KINETICS OF THE ACTION OF AMPICILLIN ON ESCHERICHIA COLI.

    PubMed

    SELIGMAN, S J; HEWITT, W L

    1963-05-01

    Seligman, Stephen J. (University of California, Los Angeles) and William L. Hewitt. Kinetics of the action of ampicillin on Escherichia coli. J. Bacteriol. 85:1160-1164. 1963.-The curve of the number of viable Escherichia coli after exposure to ampicillin can be divided into three phases: a lag phase, a rapid bactericidal phase, and a slow bactericidal phase. Some of the variables affecting the magnitude of the first two of these phases were investigated. Progressive lowering of drug concentration resulted in prolongation of the lag phase and decrease in slope and extent of the rapid bactericidal phase. The production of elongated gram-negative forms and the emergence of a mutant with increased penicillinase activity complicated interpretation of the lower dose curves. With sufficient drug concentration, the length of the lag phase and the slope of the rapid bactericidal curve were independent of the size of inoculum up to 10(8) organisms. Varying pH revealed that maximal activity, as measured by the shortest lag phase and steepest slope of the rapid bactericidal phase, was present at slightly acid pH levels. Increasing pH resulted principally in prolongation of lag phase. With greater acidity, decrease in slope of the rapid bactericidal phase was more prominent. Cultures studied under conditions of lessened metabolic activity exhibited prolonged lag phase and decreased slope and extent of rapid bactericidal phase. PMID:14044010

  10. Investigation of magnetic nanoparticles for the rapid extraction and assay of alpha-emitting radionuclides from urine: Demonstration of a novel radiobioassay method

    SciTech Connect

    O'Hara, Matthew J.; Carter, Jennifer C.; Maclellan, Jay A.; Warner, Cynthia L.; Warner, Marvin G.; Addleman, Raymond S.

    2011-08-01

    In the event of an accidental or intentional release of radionuclides into a populated area, three things must occur in a timely manner: food and drinking water supplies must be determined to be safe to eat / drink, civilians and/or military personnel must be surveyed to ensure that they do not have external contamination, and they must be screened to ensure that significant ingestion or inhalation of radionuclides has not occurred (this paper is concerned with the latter). In the event of such a disaster, the volume of radiobioassays to be performed would be tremendous. If the event released significant levels of β- or α-emitting radionuclides, in vivo assays would be ineffective. Therefore, highly efficient and rapid analytical methods for radionuclide detection from submitted spot urine samples (≤ 50 mL) would be required. At present, the quantitative determination of α-emitting radionuclides from urine samples is highly labor intensive, and requires significant sample preparation and analysis time. Sorbent materials that provide effective collection and enable rapid assay could significantly streamline the radioanalytical process. We have demonstrated the use of paramagnetic nanoparticles as a novel class of extracting media for four α-emitting radionuclides of concern (Po, Ra, Am, and U) from chemically unmodified and pH 2 human urine. Herein the initial experimental sorption results are presented along with a novel method that utilizes paramagnetic nanoparticles for the extraction of radionuclides from unmodified human urine followed by the magnetic field-induced collection of the particles for subsequent α-counting-source preparation. Additionally, we construct a versatile human dose model that determines the detector count times required to estimate internal human dose at specific protective action thresholds. The model provides a means to assess a method’s detection capabilities and use fundamental health physics parameters and actual experimental

  11. Basic residue at position 14 is not required for fast assembly and disassembly kinetics in neural cadherin.

    PubMed

    Vunnam, Nagamani; Hammer, Nathan I; Pedigo, Susan

    2015-01-27

    In spite of their structural similarities, epithelial (E-) and neural (N-) cadherin are expressed at different types of synapses and differ significantly in their dimerization kinetics. Recent studies proposed a transient intermediate in E-cadherin as the key requirement for rapid disassembly kinetics of the adhesive dimer. This E-cadherin intermediate comprises four intermolecular ionic and H-bonding interactions between adhesive partners. These interactions are not preserved in N-cadherin except for a basic residue at the 14th position, which could stabilize the intermediate through either H-bonding or ionic interactions with the partner protomer. To investigate the origin of the rapid dimerization kinetics of N-cadherin in the presence of calcium, studies reported here systematically test the role of ionic and H-bonding interactions in dimerization kinetics using R14S, R14A, and R14E mutants of N-cadherin. Analytical size-exclusion chromatographic and bead aggregation studies showed two primary results. First, N-cadherin/R14S and N-cadherin/R14A mutants showed fast assembly and disassembly kinetics in the calcium-saturated state similar to that of wild-type N-cadherin. These results indicate that the fast disassembly of the calcium-saturated dimer of N-cadherin does not require a basic residue at the 14th position. Second, the dimerization kinetics of N-cadherin/R14E were slow in the calcium-saturated state, indicating that negative charge destabilizes the intermediate state. Taken together, these results indicate that the basic residue at the 14th position does not promote rapid dimerization kinetics but that an acidic amino acid in that position significantly impairs dimerization kinetics.

  12. A small angle neutron scattering investigation of the kinetics of phase separation in an Fe-27. 5 at. % Cr-5. 6 at. % Ni alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Epperson, J.E. ); Rainey, V.S.; Windsor, C.G. . Materials Physics and Metallurgy Div.); Hawick, K.A. . Dept. of Physics); Chen, H. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1990-10-01

    The small angle neutron scattering has been investigated in situ at 450{degree} and 500{degree}C for a polycrystalline, duplex Fe-27.5 at. % Cr-5.6 at. % Ni steel. A broad diffuse maximum in the scattering function is the signature of the {alpha}{prime}-phase formation, and this maximum is superimposed on a strong, temperature-dependent component due to critical magnetic scattering. The time dependence of the shift in the peak intensity position to lower scattering vectors and the increase in peak intensity obey power law scaling behavior. Furthermore, the structure function exhibits dynamical scaling, after about three hours annealing. It is suggested that this behavior could be utilized to predict the microstructure, and hence some of the properties, after significantly longer annealing times. 21 refs., 3 figs.

  13. The Heliopause Electrostatic Rapid Transit System (HERTS) Design, Trades, and Analyses Performed in the First Year of a Two Year Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiegmann, Bruce M.

    2016-01-01

    The Heliopause Electrostatic Rapid Transit System (HERTS)1 was one of the seven total Phase II NASA Innovative Advanced Concepts (NIAC) that was down-selected in 2015 for continued funding and research. In Phase I we learned that a spacecraft propelled by an Electric Sail (E-Sail) can travel great astronomical distances, such as to the Heliopause region of the solar system (approx.100 to 120 AU) in approximately one quarter of the time (10 years) versus the time it took the Voyager spacecraft launched in 1977 (36 years). The current work within the Phase II NIAC effort builds upon the work that was done in the Phase I NIAC and is focused on: 1) Testing of plasma interaction with a charged wire in a unique MSFC test chamber, 2) Development of a Particle-in-Cell (PIC) models that are validated in the plasma testing and used to extrapolate to the E-Sail propulsion system design. 3) Further down select of a wire deployment and control approach from those narrowed down in the Phase I effort. This paper will document the findings to date (June, 2016) of the above focused areas.

  14. Optically investigating Nd3+-Yb3+ cascade sensitized upconversion nanoparticles for high resolution, rapid scanning, deep and damage-free bio-imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yuxiang; Zhan, Qiuqiang; Liu, Jing; He, Sailing

    2015-01-01

    The rapid development of upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) has been facing with a great challenge: intense emission, fast scanning, and deep imaging require high-power light irradiation with minimized heating effect (the intrinsic 975-nm excitation of Yb3+-sensitized UCNPs have overheating problem). By shifting the excitation peak from 975 nm to 795 nm, Nd3+-Yb3+ cascade sensitized upconversion nanoparticles (Nd-UCNPs) with minimized heating effect were reported as the new generation UCNPs. For the first time, within two optically modeled applications in vitro and in vivo, the damage outcomes under long time high power laser excitation were solidly calculated, complementing the damage-free study of Nd-UCNPs. The higher resolution (20% improvement) and five times faster scanning microscopy were successfully performed using Nd-UCNPs under safety laser power level. The computational results showed the Nd3+-Yb3+ energy transfer efficiency would not compromise the deep imaging ability, and the red (650-nm) emission is worth to be enhanced for deep tissue imaging. PMID:25798308

  15. Electrochemical Kinetics and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopic Investigations of Oxygen Reduction on Chalcogen-Modified Ruthenium Catalysts in Alkaline Media

    SciTech Connect

    N Ramaswamy; R Allen; S Mukerjee; Y

    2011-12-31

    The oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in alkaline media has been investigated on chalcogen-modified ruthenium nanoparticles (Ru/C, Se/Ru/C, Se/RuMo/C, S/Ru/C, S/RuMo/C) synthesized in-house via aqueous routes. In acidic medium, it is well known that modification by a chalcogen prevents the oxidation of the underlying transition-metal (Ru) surface, thereby promoting direct molecular O{sub 2} adsorption on the Ru metal. On an unmodified Ru catalyst in alkaline media, the surface oxides on Ru mediate the 2e{sup -} reduction of molecular O{sub 2} to a stable peroxide anion (HO{sub 2}{sup -}) intermediate via an outer-sphere electron-transfer mechanism. This increases the activity of HO{sub 2}{sup -} near the electrode surface and decreases the overpotential for ORR by effectively carrying out the reduction of HO{sub 2}{sup -} to OH{sup -} at the oxide-free ruthenium metal site. An increase in ORR activity of Ru is observed by modification with a chalcogen; however, the increase is not as significant as observed in acidic media. Ternary additives, such as Mo, were found to significantly improve the stability of the chalcogen-modified catalysts. Detailed investigations of the ORR activity of this class of catalyst have been carried out in alkaline media along with comparisons to acidic media wherever necessary. A combination of electrochemical and X-ray absorption spectroscopic (EXAFS, XANES, {Delta}{mu}) studies has been performed in order to understand the structure/property relationships of these catalysts within the context of ORR in alkaline electrolytes.

  16. The investigation of substrate-induced changes in subunit interactions in glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenases by measurement of the kinetics and thermodynamics of subunit exchange.

    PubMed Central

    Osborne, H H; Hollaway, M R

    1975-01-01

    An investigation was made of changes in subunit interactions in glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase on binding NAD+, NADH and other substrates by using the previously developed method of measurement of rates and extent of subunit exchange between the rabbit enzyme (R4), yeast enzyme (Y4) and rabbit-yeast hybrid (R2Y2) [Osborne & Hollaway (1974) Biochem. J. 143, 651-662]. The free energy of activation for the conversion of tetramer into dimer for the rabbit enzyme (R4 leads to 2R2) is increased by at least 12kJ/mol in the presence of NAD+. This increase is interpreted in terms of an NAD+-induced 'tightening' of the tetrameric structure probably involving increased interaction at the subunit interfaces across the QR plane of the molecule [see Buehner et al. (1974) J. Mol. Biol. 82, 563-585]. This tightening of the structure only occurs on binding the third NAD+ molecule to a given enzyme molecule. Conversely, binding of NADH causes a decrease in the free energy of activation for the R4 leads to 2R2 and Y4 leads to 2Y2 conversions by at least 10kJ/mol. This is interpreted as a NADH-induced 'loosening' of the structures arising from decreased interactions across the subunit interfaces involving the QR dissociation plane. In the presence of NADH the increase in the rate of subunit exchange is such that it is not possible to separate the hybrid from the other species if electrophoresis is carried out with NADH in the separation media. In the presence of a mixture of NADH and NAD+ the effect of NAD+ on subunit exchange is dominant. The results are discussed in terms of the known co-operativty between binding sites in glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenases. Images PLATE 1(a) PLATE 1(b) PLATE 2(a) PLATE 2(b) PLATE 2(c) PMID:174555

  17. Kinetic and spectroscopic investigation of Co{sup II}, Ni{sup II}, and N-oxalylglycine inhibition of the Fe{sup II}/{alpha}-ketoglutarate dioxygenase, TauD

    SciTech Connect

    Kalliri, Efthalia; Grzyska, Piotr K.; Hausinger, Robert P. . E-mail: hausinge@msu.edu

    2005-12-09

    Co{sup II}, Ni{sup II}, and N-oxalylglycine (NOG) are well-known inhibitors of Fe{sup II}/{alpha}-ketoglutarate ({alpha}KG)-dependent hydroxylases, but few studies describe their kinetics and no spectroscopic investigations have been reported. Using taurine/{alpha}KG dioxygenase (TauD) as a paradigm for this enzyme family, time-dependent inhibition assays showed that Co{sup II} and Ni{sup II} follow slow-binding inhibition kinetics. Whereas Ni{sup II}-substituted TauD was non-chromophoric, spectroscopic studies of the Co{sup II}-substituted enzyme revealed a six-coordinate site (protein alone or with {alpha}KG) that became five-coordinate upon taurine addition. The Co{sup II} spectrum was not perturbed by a series of anions or oxidants, suggesting the Co{sup II} is inaccessible and could be used to stabilize the protein. NOG competed weakly (K {sub i} {approx} 290 {mu}M) with {alpha}KG for binding to TauD, with the increased electron density of NOG yielding electronic transitions for NOG-Fe{sup II}-TauD and taurine-NOG-Fe{sup II}-TauD at 380 nm ({epsilon} {sub 38} 90-105 M{sup -1} cm{sup -1}). The spectra of the NOG-bound TauD species did not change significantly upon oxygen exposure, arguing against the formation of an oxygen-bound state mimicking an early intermediate in catalysis.

  18. Kinetic controls on early karst aquifer porosity development

    SciTech Connect

    Groves, C.G. ); Howard, A.D. . Dept. of Environmental Sciences)

    1992-01-01

    A series of simulations using the newly developed model KARST has been performed to investigate limiting kinetic controls on limestone dissolution during the earliest stages of karst aquifer porosity development. This FORTRAN model couples fluid flow within and dissolution of circular cross section conduits, and considers surface reaction rates (both far from and close to thermodynamic equilibrium), mass transfer rates of reaction products to the bulk fluid, and rates of homogeneous reactions associated with dissolution of CO[sub 2] gas in water. Mass transfer theory for both laminar and turbulent flow cases is included. Runs were made with a wide variety of initial conditions of passage geometry, head gradient, and initial PCO[sub 2]. Results show a consistent pattern of kinetic control that varies as functions of time as well as position along the conduit. Slow, higher order surface reaction rates (close to equilibrium), diffusion rates, and rapid, lower order reaction rates (far from equilibrium) are found to be limiting steps at various times and location. Under no conditions in the simulations did the rate of CO[sub 2] hydration limit dissolution. Thresholds between the various kinetic regimes were found to be associated with a critical distance from equilibrium, as well as the transition from laminar to turbulent flow. As a result of interactions between flow and chemical conditions, passage growth (measure by fluid discharge rates) can be divided into an initial, slow period initiation and a more rapid one (enlargement). The onset of the enlargement phase was not found to coincide with any single kinetic event.

  19. Kinetics of coal pyrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Seery, D.J.; Freihaut, J.D.; Proscia, W.M. ); Howard, J.B.; Peters, W.; Hsu, J.; Hajaligol, M.; Sarofim, A. ); Jenkins, R.; Mallin, J.; Espindola-Merin, B. ); Essenhigh, R.; Misra, M.K. )

    1989-07-01

    This report contains results of a coordinated, multi-laboratory investigation of coal devolatilization. Data is reported pertaining to the devolatilization for bituminous coals over three orders of magnitude in apparent heating rate (100 to 100,000 + {degree}C/sec), over two orders of magnitude in particle size (20 to 700 microns), final particle temperatures from 400 to 1600{degree}C, heat transfer modes ranging from convection to radiative, ambient pressure ranging from near vacuum to one atmosphere pressure. The heat transfer characteristics of the reactors are reported in detail. It is assumed the experimental results are to form the basis of a devolatilization data base. Empirical rate expressions are developed for each phase of devolatilization which, when coupled to an awareness of the heat transfer rate potential of a particular devolatilization reactor, indicate the kinetics emphasized by a particular system reactor plus coal sample. The analysis indicates the particular phase of devolatilization that will be emphasized by a particular reactor type and, thereby, the kinetic expressions appropriate to that devolatilization system. Engineering rate expressions are developed from the empirical rate expressions in the context of a fundamental understanding of coal devolatilization developed in the course of the investigation. 164 refs., 223 figs., 44 tabs.

  20. Spectral method for a kinetic swarming model

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gamba, Irene M.; Haack, Jeffrey R.; Motsch, Sebastien

    2015-04-28

    Here we present the first numerical method for a kinetic description of the Vicsek swarming model. The kinetic model poses a unique challenge, as there is a distribution dependent collision invariant to satisfy when computing the interaction term. We use a spectral representation linked with a discrete constrained optimization to compute these interactions. To test the numerical scheme we investigate the kinetic model at different scales and compare the solution with the microscopic and macroscopic descriptions of the Vicsek model. Lastly, we observe that the kinetic model captures key features such as vortex formation and traveling waves.

  1. Chemical and Biological Kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emanuel', N. M.

    1981-10-01

    Examples of the application of the methods and ideas of chemical kinetics in various branches of chemistry and biology are considered and the results of studies on the kinetics and mechanisms of autoxidation and inhibited and catalysed oxidation of organic substances in the liquid phase are surveyed. Problems of the kinetics of the ageing of polymers and the principles of their stabilisation are discussed and certain trends in biological kinetics (kinetics of tumour growth, kinetic criteria of the effectiveness of chemotherapy, problems of gerontology, etc.) are considered. The bibliography includes 281 references.

  2. Kinetic analysis of mechanochemical chain scission of linear poly(phthalaldehyde).

    PubMed

    Peterson, Gregory I; Boydston, Andrew J

    2014-09-01

    The kinetics of mechanochemical chain scission of poly(phthalaldehyde) (PPA) are investigated. Ultrasound-induced cavitation is capable of causing chain scission in the PPA backbone that ultimately leads to rapid depolymerization of each resulting polymer fragment when above the polymer's ceiling temperature (Tc ). An interesting feature of the mechanochemical breakdown of PPA is that "half-chain" daughter fragments are not observed, since the depolymerization is rapid following chain scission. These features facilitate the determination of rate constants of activation for multiple molecular weights from a single sonication experiment. Additionally, the degradation kinetics are modified with chain-end trapping agents through variation of the nature and amount of small molecule nucleophile or electrophile.

  3. Kinetics of coal pyrolysis and devolatilization

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    Research continued on coal devolatilization. Results are presented for rapid devolatilization experiments performed with the 20 -- 30 micron size cut of the reference coal - PSOC 1451D - a high volatile bituminous, Appalachian Province coal. In agreement with behavior observed in rapid, radiant transient heating experiments -flash lamp - and moderate heating rate - heated grid - experiments for the same coal, the devolatilization process is observed to occur in four distinct phases: intraparticle heavy hydrocarbon detachment and transport; heavy hydrocarbon desorption; low temperature reformation reactions producing light gases; high temperature secondary reactions of tars and char degassing. Mass fraction yields light fast yields and tar and char characteristics are presented for a range of reactor temperatures which support the phenomenological picture. A phenomenological model is presented which indicates the distinct phases of devolatilization and the importance of heat transfer conditions on both the overall rate of particle mass loss and the observable volatiles product distribution. The approach taken to model heat transfer conditions in each of the devolatilization reactors employed in the overall investigation is outlined. Predicted weight loss results are shown for three different sets of overall devolatilization kinetic parameters given heat transfer conditions in the UTRC Hot Wall - Hot Gas reactor. 47 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Practical steady-state enzyme kinetics.

    PubMed

    Lorsch, Jon R

    2014-01-01

    Enzymes are key components of most biological processes. Characterization of enzymes is therefore frequently required during the study of biological systems. Steady-state kinetics provides a simple and rapid means of assessing the substrate specificity of an enzyme. When combined with site-directed mutagenesis (see Site-Directed Mutagenesis), it can be used to probe the roles of particular amino acids in the enzyme in substrate recognition and catalysis. Effects of interaction partners and posttranslational modifications can also be assessed using steady-state kinetics. This overview explains the general principles of steady-state enzyme kinetics experiments in a practical, rather than theoretical, way. Any biochemistry textbook will have a section on the theory of Michaelis-Menten kinetics, including derivations of the relevant equations. No specific enzymatic assay is described here, although a method for monitoring product formation or substrate consumption over time (an assay) is required to perform the experiments described.

  5. Sustaining protein synthesis in the absence of rapid cell division: an investigation of plasmid-encoded protein expression in Escherichia coli during very slow growth.

    PubMed

    Flickinger, M C; Rouse, M P

    1993-01-01

    The minimum growth rate capable of supporting plasmid-encoded gene expression is determined using continuous cultures of Escherichia coli MZ9387 at dilution rates (D) as low as 5% of the maximum specific growth rate. Expression from a low copy number plasmid, pMPR166, encoding cyanase under the control of P(lac) is investigated in order to study plasmid-encoded gene expression under conditions approaching starvation. Plasmid copy number was stabilized by selection in the presence of 500 micrograms/mL chloramphenicol by constitutive expression of chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT). Plasmid retention was determined by dot-blot hybridization and chloramphenicol resistance. The contribution of plasmid maintenance and cyanase expression to the maximum cell yield (Y'x/s) and the maintenance coefficient (ms) was determined for MZ9387 and MZ9387:pMPR166 under uninduced and IPTG-induced conditions. The values of Y'x/s and ms for non-plasmid-bearing cultures were 0.56 g of cell dry mass (DCM)/g of glucose and 0.26 g of glucose/g of DCM.h, respectively. The cell yield for plasmid-bearing cultures under uninduced conditions (Y 0'x/s) was 0.28 g of DCM/g of glucose, with m0s = 0.08 g of glucose/g of DCM.h. These values decreased following induction of cyanase expression. Glucose consumption in the presence of IPTG was linearly related to the growth rate at D < 0.28 h-1 but nonlinear at dilution rates greater than 50% of the maximum specific growth rate, indicating that cyanase expression alters metabolism and glucose consumption. The fraction of plasmid-free cells decreased with decreasing Damköhler number (Da). These data confirm the usefulness of Da for predicting the relationship between plasmid-free and plasmid-bearing cells where plasmids are stabilized by concentrations of antibiotic greater than the minimum plasmid-free host cell growth inhibitory concentration. Specific cyanase expression increased as the dilution rate decreased to D = 0.15 h-1. Between D = 0

  6. Non isothermal effects on phase transformation kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sista, Vivekanand

    Cyclic thermal processing has been shown to accelerate the kinetics of several phase transformations, with a significant beneficial impact on productivity and energy consumption of the energy intensive operations like cyclic grain growth kinetics, recrystallization kinetics and austempering. Austempering is an important thermal processing operation, where strong and tough bainitic steel is produced in a single heat treatment. A new process called cyclic austempering was developed where the steel is first austenized and then cooled rapidly to just above the martensite start temperature where the bainitic transformation is carried out in a controlled fluctuating temperature profile, by continuous heating and cooling segments between two temperature limits. Both isothermal and cyclic austempering experiments were performed on 1080 steel. The powerful dilatometry technique was used to measure the diametrical change as a function of transformation time and temperature. The time taken for the complete bainitic transformation in both isothermal and cyclic austempering processes were calculated to see whether the bainitic kinetics are accelerated or not. Asymmetric cyclic austempering was also performed to determine the heating and cooling rate effects on the transformation. Cyclic austempering resulted in accelerating kinetics to about an 80% reduction in time compared to that of conventional isothermal austempering. Incubation times were calculated to propose a possible mechanism for the accelerated kinetics. Microstructure analysis and hardness analysis was used to establish the cyclic transformation kinetics.

  7. Kinetic properties of cyanase.

    PubMed

    Anderson, P M; Little, R M

    1986-04-01

    Cyanase is an inducible enzyme in Escherichia coli that catalyzes the hydrolysis of cyanate. Bicarbonate is required for activity, perhaps as a substrate, and the initial product of the reaction is carbamate, which spontaneously breaks down to ammonia and bicarbonate [Anderson, P. M. (1980) Biochemistry 19, 2882]. The purpose of this study was to characterize the kinetic properties of cyanase. Initial velocity studies showed that both cyanate and bicarbonate act as competitive substrate inhibitors. A number of monovalent anions act as inhibitors. Azide and acetate appear to act as competitive inhibitors with respect to cyanate and bicarbonate, respectively. Chloride, bromide, nitrate, nitrite, and formate also inhibit, apparently as the result of binding at either substrate site. Malonate and several other dicarboxylic dianions at very low concentrations display "slow-binding", reversible inhibition which can be prevented by saturating concentrations of either substrate. The results are consistent with a rapid equilibrium random mechanism in which bicarbonate acts as a substrate, bicarbonate and cyanate bind at adjacent anion-binding sites, and both substrates can bind at the other substrate anion binding site to give a dead-end complex.

  8. Investigation of the efficiency of a tubular continuous-flow photoreactor with supported titanium dioxide nanoparticles in the removal of 4-nitrophenol: operational parameters, kinetics analysis and mineralization studies.

    PubMed

    Behnajady, Mohammad A; Amirmohammadi-Sorkhabi, Sadegh; Modirshahla, Nasser; Shokri, Mohammad

    2011-01-01

    In this study, to investigate the application of heterogeneous photocatalysis in the removal of organic contaminants from aqueous media a novel tubular continuous-flow photoreactor with supported TiO2-P25 on glass plates was designed and constructed. The photoreactor comprises six quartz tubes and a UV lamp which was placed in the center of the quartz tubes. 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) as a most refractory pollutant was chosen as a probe pollutant to examine the photoreactor efficiency for environmental cleaning applications. Results of experiments show that the removal efficiency of 4-NP in this photoreactor is a function of photoreactor length, gas and liquid flow rates and 4-NP initial concentration. Kinetics analysis indicates that degradation of 4-NP in continuous-mode can be modeled with the Langmuir-Hinshelwood (L-H) model (k(L-H) = 1.5 mg L(-1) min(-1), K(ads) = 0.11 mg(-1) L). A design equation was obtained with a combination of L-H modified equation and tubular reactor design equation. This equation can be used for estimation of 4-NP concentration in different photoreactor lengths under various operational parameters. Mineralization study was followed through total organic carbon (TOC) analysis and measurement of nitrite and nitrate as final degradation products. PMID:22053458

  9. Adsorption kinetics of pesticide in soil assessed by optofluidics-based biosensing platform.

    PubMed

    Long, Feng; Zhu, Anna; Shi, Hanchang; Sheng, Jianwu; Zhao, Zhen

    2015-02-01

    The adsorption of pesticides in soil is a key process that affects transport, degradation, mobility, and bioaccumulation of these substances. To obtain extensive knowledge regarding the adsorption processes of pesticides in the environment, the new green assay technologies for the rapid, sensitive, field-deployable, and accurate quantification of pesticides are required. In the present study, an evanescent wave-based optofluidics biosensing platform (EWOB) was developed by combining advanced photonics and microfluidics technology for the rapid sensitive immunodetection and adsorption kinetics assay of pesticides. The robustness, reusability, and accuracy of the EWOB allow an enhanced prediction of pesticide adsorption kinetics in soil. Using atrazine (ATZ) as the target model, we found that the adsorption kinetics in soil followed a pseudo-second-order kinetic model. EWOB was compared with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method and yielded a good correlation coefficient (r(2)=0.9968). The underestimated results of LC-MS/MS resulted in a higher adsorption constant of ATZ in soil derived from LC-MS/MS than that of a biosensor. The proposed EWOB system provides a simple, green, and powerful tool to investigate the transport mechanism and fate of pesticide residues.

  10. Investigation of Health Risks and Their Prevention in the Rapid Climate Changes and the Rise of Pollution of the Atmosphere in the Mountain Region of the North Caucasus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babyakin, Alexander; Polozkov, Igor; Golitsyn, Georgy; Efimenko, Natalia; Zherlitsina, Liubov; Povolotskaya, Nina; Senik, Irina; Chalaya, Elena; Artamonova, Maria; Pogarski, Fedor

    2010-05-01

    monitoring of blood pressure and ECG. For children with respiratory diseases PSRIC developed a number of effective methods to increase organism resistance to the effects of environmental factors through the use of artificial microclimate chambers and methods of climatic treatment. Thus, a comprehensive study has expanded our understanding of the impact of the environment on human health, to refine the criteria of selected biotropic situations related to the influence of atmospheric pollution, to improve the efficiency of the MWF system in mountain resorts of the North Caucasus, to develop ways to prevent meteopathies of patients with cardio-vascular and respiratory systems. The investigation was fulfilled in the frames of Program of Presidium of the Russian Academy of Sciences "Basic Sciences - for Medicine" and RFBR grant No. 07-05-12069-ofi_a.

  11. A kinetic investigation of the effects of adrenaline on 45Ca2+ exchange in isolated hepatocytes at different Ca2+ concentrations, at 20 degrees C and in the presence of inhibitors of mitochondrial Ca2+ transport.

    PubMed Central

    Parker, J C; Barritt, G J; Wadsworth, J C

    1983-01-01

    The effects of adrenaline on 45Ca2+-exchange curves for isolated hepatocytes incubated under various steady-state conditions were investigated. Kinetic analysis showed that the simplest compartment configuration consistent with each set of data was a series configuration of a three-compartment closed system comprising compartment 1 (C1), the extracellular medium, and two kinetically distinct compartments of cellular exchangeable Ca2+, C2 and C3 (C1 = C2 = C3). Subcellular fractionation of hepatocytes labelled with 45Ca2+ at 0.1 mM-Ca2+ indicated that C3 includes exchangeable Ca2+ in the mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum. The following results were obtained from experiments conducted at 37 degrees C at five different extracellular Ca2+ concentrations. For both untreated and adrenaline-treated cells, plots of the flux from C1 to C2 as a function of the extracellular Ca2+ concentration were best described by straight lines consistent with Ca2+ influx across the plasma membrane being a diffusion process. Adrenaline increased the value of the permeability constant for Ca2+ influx by 40%. For untreated cells, plots of the flux between C2 and C3 as a function of the concentrations of Ca2+ in these compartments approached a plateau at high Ca2+ concentrations. Adrenaline caused a 3-fold increase in the concentration of Ca2+ that gives half-maximal rate of Ca2+ transport from C2 to C3. At 1.3 mM extracellular Ca2+, a decrease in incubation temperature from 37 degrees C to 20 degrees C decreased the quantity of Ca2+ in C3 and the flux and fractional transfer rates for the transport of Ca2+ between C2 and C3. At 20 degrees C adrenaline increased the quantity of Ca2+ in C3 and the fractional transfer rates for the transfer of Ca2+ from C1 to C2, and from C2 to C3. At 37 degrees C and 2.4 mM extracellular Ca2+, antimycin A plus oligomycin decreased the quantity of Ca2+ in C3 and increased the fractional transfer rate for the transport of Ca2+ from C3 to C2. In the presence

  12. Labile Cu(I) catalyst/spectator Cu(II) species in copper-catalyzed C-C coupling reaction: operando IR, in situ XANES/EXAFS evidence and kinetic investigations.

    PubMed

    He, Chuan; Zhang, Guanghui; Ke, Jie; Zhang, Heng; Miller, Jeffrey T; Kropf, Arthur J; Lei, Aiwen

    2013-01-01

    Insights toward the Cu-catalyzed C-C coupling reaction were investigated through operando IR and in situ X-ray absorption near-edge structure/extended X-ray absorption fine structure. It was found that the Cu(I) complex formed from the reaction of CuI with β-diketone nucleophile was liable under the cross-coupling conditions, which is usually considered as active catalytic species. This labile Cu(I) complex could rapidly disproportionate to the spectator Cu(II) and Cu(0) species under the reaction conditions, which was an off-cycle process. In this copper-catalyzed C-C coupling reaction, β-diketone might act both as the substrate and the ligand. PMID:23214954

  13. Rapid climate change

    SciTech Connect

    Morantine, M.C.

    1995-12-31

    Interactions between insolation changes due to orbital parameter variations, carbon dioxide concentration variations, the rate of deep water formation in the North Atlantic and the evolution of the northern hemisphere ice sheets during the most recent glacial cycle will be investigated. In order to investigate this period, a climate model is being developed to evaluate the physical mechanisms thought to be most significant during this period. The description of the model sub-components will be presented. The more one knows about the interactions between the sub-components of the climate system during periods of documented rapid climate change, the better equipped one will be to make rational decisions on issues related to impacts on the environment. This will be an effort to gauge the feedback processes thought to be instrumental in rapid climate shifts documented in the past, and their potential to influence the current climate. 53 refs.

  14. Equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic study of cesium adsorption onto nanocrystalline mordenite from high-salt solution.

    PubMed

    Lee, Keun-Young; Park, Minsung; Kim, Jimin; Oh, Maengkyo; Lee, Eil-Hee; Kim, Kwang-Wook; Chung, Dong-Yong; Moon, Jei-Kwon

    2016-05-01

    In this study, the equilibrium, kinetics and thermodynamics of cesium adsorption by nanocrystalline mordenite were investigated under cesium contamination with high-salt solution, simulating the case of an operation and decommissioning of nuclear facilities or an accident during the processes. The adsorption rate constants were determined using a pseudo second-order kinetic model. The kinetic results strongly demonstrated that the cesium adsorption rate of nano mordenite is extremely fast, even in a high-salt solution, and much faster than that of micro mordenite. In the equilibrium study, the Langmuir isotherm model fit the cesium adsorption data of nano mordenite better than the Freundlich model, which suggests that cesium adsorption onto nano mordenite is a monolayer homogeneous adsorption process. The obtained thermodynamic parameters indicated that the adsorption involved a very stable chemical reaction. In particular, the combination of rapid particle dispersion and rapid cesium adsorption of the nano mordenite in the solution resulted in a rapid and effective process for cesium removal without stirring, which may offer great advantages for low energy consumption and simple operation.

  15. Equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic study of cesium adsorption onto nanocrystalline mordenite from high-salt solution.

    PubMed

    Lee, Keun-Young; Park, Minsung; Kim, Jimin; Oh, Maengkyo; Lee, Eil-Hee; Kim, Kwang-Wook; Chung, Dong-Yong; Moon, Jei-Kwon

    2016-05-01

    In this study, the equilibrium, kinetics and thermodynamics of cesium adsorption by nanocrystalline mordenite were investigated under cesium contamination with high-salt solution, simulating the case of an operation and decommissioning of nuclear facilities or an accident during the processes. The adsorption rate constants were determined using a pseudo second-order kinetic model. The kinetic results strongly demonstrated that the cesium adsorption rate of nano mordenite is extremely fast, even in a high-salt solution, and much faster than that of micro mordenite. In the equilibrium study, the Langmuir isotherm model fit the cesium adsorption data of nano mordenite better than the Freundlich model, which suggests that cesium adsorption onto nano mordenite is a monolayer homogeneous adsorption process. The obtained thermodynamic parameters indicated that the adsorption involved a very stable chemical reaction. In particular, the combination of rapid particle dispersion and rapid cesium adsorption of the nano mordenite in the solution resulted in a rapid and effective process for cesium removal without stirring, which may offer great advantages for low energy consumption and simple operation. PMID:26683820

  16. Effect of kinetic energy on the doping efficiency of cesium cations into superfluid helium droplets

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Lei; Zhang, Jie; Freund, William M.; Kong, Wei

    2015-07-28

    We present an experimental investigation of the effect of kinetic energy on the ion doping efficiency of superfluid helium droplets using cesium cations from a thermionic emission source. The kinetic energy of Cs{sup +} is controlled by the bias voltage of a collection grid collinearly arranged with the droplet beam. Efficient doping from ions with kinetic energies from 20 eV up to 480 V has been observed in different sized helium droplets. The relative ion doping efficiency is determined by both the kinetic energy of the ions and the average size of the droplet beam. At a fixed source temperature, the number of doped droplets increases with increasing grid voltage, while the relative ion doping efficiency decreases. This result implies that not all ions are captured upon encountering with a sufficiently large droplet, a deviation from the near unity doping efficiency for closed shell neutral molecules. We propose that this drop in ion doping efficiency with kinetic energy is related to the limited deceleration rate inside a helium droplet. When the source temperature changes from 14 K to 17 K, the relative ion doping efficiency decreases rapidly, perhaps due to the lack of viable sized droplets. The size distribution of the Cs{sup +}-doped droplet beam can be measured by deflection and by energy filtering. The observed doped droplet size is about 5 × 10{sup 6} helium atoms when the source temperature is between 14 K and 17 K.

  17. Effect of kinetic energy on the doping efficiency of cesium cations into superfluid helium droplets.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Zhang, Jie; Freund, William M; Kong, Wei

    2015-07-28

    We present an experimental investigation of the effect of kinetic energy on the ion doping efficiency of superfluid helium droplets using cesium cations from a thermionic emission source. The kinetic energy of Cs(+) is controlled by the bias voltage of a collection grid collinearly arranged with the droplet beam. Efficient doping from ions with kinetic energies from 20 eV up to 480 V has been observed in different sized helium droplets. The relative ion doping efficiency is determined by both the kinetic energy of the ions and the average size of the droplet beam. At a fixed source temperature, the number of doped droplets increases with increasing grid voltage, while the relative ion doping efficiency decreases. This result implies that not all ions are captured upon encountering with a sufficiently large droplet, a deviation from the near unity doping efficiency for closed shell neutral molecules. We propose that this drop in ion doping efficiency with kinetic energy is related to the limited deceleration rate inside a helium droplet. When the source temperature changes from 14 K to 17 K, the relative ion doping efficiency decreases rapidly, perhaps due to the lack of viable sized droplets. The size distribution of the Cs(+)-doped droplet beam can be measured by deflection and by energy filtering. The observed doped droplet size is about 5 × 10(6) helium atoms when the source temperature is between 14 K and 17 K.

  18. Effect of kinetic energy on the doping efficiency of cesium cations into superfluid helium droplets

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lei; Zhang, Jie; Freund, William M.; Kong, Wei

    2015-01-01

    We present an experimental investigation of the effect of kinetic energy on the ion doping efficiency of superfluid helium droplets using cesium cations from a thermionic emission source. The kinetic energy of Cs+ is controlled by the bias voltage of a collection grid collinearly arranged with the droplet beam. Efficient doping from ions with kinetic energies from 20 eV up to 480 V has been observed in different sized helium droplets. The relative ion doping efficiency is determined by both the kinetic energy of the ions and the average size of the droplet beam. At a fixed source temperature, the number of doped droplets increases with increasing grid voltage, while the relative ion doping efficiency decreases. This result implies that not all ions are captured upon encountering with a sufficiently large droplet, a deviation from the near unity doping efficiency for closed shell neutral molecules. We propose that this drop in ion doping efficiency with kinetic energy is related to the limited deceleration rate inside a helium droplet. When the source temperature changes from 14 K to 17 K, the relative ion doping efficiency decreases rapidly, perhaps due to the lack of viable sized droplets. The size distribution of the Cs+-doped droplet beam can be measured by deflection and by energy filtering. The observed doped droplet size is about 5 × 106 helium atoms when the source temperature is between 14 K and 17 K. PMID:26233132

  19. Surface Area, and Oxidation Effects on Nitridation Kinetics of Silicon Powder Compacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatt, R. T.; Palczer, A. R.

    1998-01-01

    Commercially available silicon powders were wet-attrition-milled from 2 to 48 hr to achieve surface areas (SA's) ranging from 1.3 to 70 sq m/g. The surface area effects on the nitridation kinetics of silicon powder compacts were determined at 1250 or 1350 C for 4 hr. In addition, the influence of nitridation environment, and preoxidation on nitridation kinetics of a silicon powder of high surface area (approximately equals 63 sq m/g) was investigated. As the surface area increased, so did the percentage nitridation after 4 hr in N2 at 1250 or 1350 C. Silicon powders of high surface area (greater than 40 sq m/g) can be nitrided to greater than 70% at 1250 C in 4 hr. The nitridation kinetics of the high-surface-area powder compacts were significantly delayed by preoxidation treatment. Conversely, the nitridation environment had no significant influence on the nitridation kinetics of the same powder. Impurities present in the starting powder, and those accumulated during attrition milling, appeared to react with the silica layer on the surface of silicon particles to form a molten silicate layer, which provided a path for rapid diffusion of nitrogen and enhanced the nitridation kinetics of high surface area silicon powder.

  20. Different repair kinetics for short and long DNA double-strand gaps in Saccharomyces cervisiae.

    PubMed

    Glasunov, A V; Frankenberg-Schwager, M; Frankenberg, D

    1995-10-01

    The kinetics of recombinational repair of plasmid DNA double-strand breaks (dsb) and gaps (dsg) of different sizes and ends were studied. For this purpose we used the mutant rad54-3 of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which is temperature dependent with respect to genetic recombination and rejoining of dsb/dsg, allowing us to stop these processes by shifting cells to the restrictive temperature. We found that the kinetics of repair of cohesive-ended dsb and small gaps (up to 400 bp) are similar and characterized by two phases separated by a plateau. In contrast, large gap (1.4 kbp) repair proceeds with different kinetics exhibiting only the second phase. We also investigated the repair kinetics of 400 bp gaps introduced into plasmid DNA with and without homology to chromosomal DNA allowing recombinational repair and non-recombinational repair (ligation), respectively. We found that gaps introduced in plasmid sequences homologous to chromosomal DNA are rapidly repaired by recombination. In contrast, recircularization of the gapped plasmid by ligation is as slow and inefficient as ligation of a cohesive-ended dsb. The kinetics of repair of gapped plasmids may be explained by assuming a constitutive level of enzymes responsible for the first phase of recombinational repair, while inducible enzymes, which become available at the end of the plateau, carry out the second phase of repair. PMID:7594968

  1. Generalized Langmuir Waves in Magnetized Kinetic Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willes, A. J.; Cairns, Iver H.

    2000-01-01

    The properties of unmagnetized Langmuir waves and cold plasma magnetoionic waves (x, o, z and whistler) are well known. However, the connections between these modes in a magnetized kinetic plasma have not been explored in detail. Here, wave properties are investigated by numerically solving the dispersion equation derived from the Vlasov equations both with and without a beam instability present. For omega(sub p)>Omega(sub e), it is shown that the generalized Langmuir mode at oblique propagation angles has magnetic z-mode characteristics at low wave numbers and thermal Langmuir mode characteristics at high wave numbers. For omega(sub p)rapid. In addition, the effects on wave dispersion and polarization after adding a beam are investigated. Applications of this theory to magnetized Langmuir waves in Earth's foreshock and the solar wind, to waves observed near the plasma frequency in the auroral regions, and to solar type III bursts are discussed.

  2. Zomepirac kinetics in healthy males.

    PubMed

    Nayak, R K; Ng, K T; Gottlieb, S; Plostnieks, J

    1980-03-01

    Kinetics of zomepirac, an oral, nonnarcotic analgesic, were studied in healthy males in 3 clinical experiments. In study A, zomepirac 100 mg was taken as tablet, capsule, and solution. Bioavailability of zomepirac from the 3 dosage forms was much the same. Zomepirac absorption was rapid, peak plasma concentrations being reached within 1 to 1 hr. Plasma concentration profile could be described by the 2-compartmentoral absorption model with an absorption rate constant (Ka) of 7.66 hr-1 t 1/2 = 0.09 hr), a rapid disposition rate constant (alpha) of 0.75 hr-1 (t 1/2 = 0.94 hr), and a slow disposition rate constant (beta) of 0.16 hr-1 (t 1/2 = 4.3 hr). In study B, safety and acceptability were established with 100 mg 4 times a day for 14 days followed by 150 mg 4 times a day for 14 days. Zomepirac plasma levels indicated attainment of steady state within less than 3 days of treatment. There was little drug accumulation on the regimens studied. There was no change in plasma kinetics after 14 days on either regimen. In study C, dose/bioavailability response was followed at 50-, 100-, and 200-mg dose levels. There were linear correlations between dose and peak plasma concentration, area under the plasma concentration-time curve, and urinary excretion of intact and total (intact + glucuronide conjugate) zomepirac during the 12 hr following drug administration.

  3. A Sensitive and Robust Enzyme Kinetic Experiment Using Microplates and Fluorogenic Ester Substrates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, R. Jeremy; Hoops, Geoffrey C.; Savas, Christopher J.; Kartje, Zachary; Lavis, Luke D.

    2015-01-01

    Enzyme kinetics measurements are a standard component of undergraduate biochemistry laboratories. The combination of serine hydrolases and fluorogenic enzyme substrates provides a rapid, sensitive, and general method for measuring enzyme kinetics in an undergraduate biochemistry laboratory. In this method, the kinetic activity of multiple protein…

  4. The initial value problem in Lagrangian drift kinetic theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burby, J. W.

    2016-06-01

    > Existing high-order variational drift kinetic theories contain unphysical rapidly varying modes that are not seen at low orders. These unphysical modes, which may be rapidly oscillating, damped or growing, are ushered in by a failure of conventional high-order drift kinetic theory to preserve the structure of its parent model's initial value problem. In short, the (infinite dimensional) system phase space is unphysically enlarged in conventional high-order variational drift kinetic theory. I present an alternative, `renormalized' variational approach to drift kinetic theory that manifestly respects the parent model's initial value problem. The basic philosophy underlying this alternate approach is that high-order drift kinetic theory ought to be derived by truncating the all-orders system phase-space Lagrangian instead of the usual `field particle' Lagrangian. For the sake of clarity, this story is told first through the lens of a finite-dimensional toy model of high-order variational drift kinetics; the analogous full-on drift kinetic story is discussed subsequently. The renormalized drift kinetic system, while variational and just as formally accurate as conventional formulations, does not support the troublesome rapidly varying modes.

  5. Kinetic studies of ICF implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagan, Grigory; Herrmann, H. W.; Kim, Y.-H.; Schmitt, M. J.; Hakel, P.; Hsu, S. C.; Hoffman, N. M.; Svyatsky, D.; Baalrud, S. D.; Daligault, J. O.; Sio, H.; Zylstra, A. B.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Frenje, J. A.; Séguin, F. H.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.; Albright, B. J.; Taitano, W.; Kyrala, G. A.; Bradley, P. A.; Huang, C.-K.; McDevitt, C. J.; Chacon, L.; Srinivasan, B.; McEvoy, A. M.; Joshi, T. R.; Adams, C. S.

    2016-05-01

    Kinetic effects on inertial confinement fusion have been investigated. In particular, inter-ion-species diffusion and suprathermal ion distribution have been analyzed. The former drives separation of the fuel constituents in the hot reacting core and governs mix at the shell/fuel interface. The latter underlie measurements obtained with nuclear diagnostics, including the fusion yield and inferred ion burn temperatures. Basic mechanisms behind and practical consequences from these effects are discussed.

  6. Kinetic studies of ICF implosions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kagan, Grigory; Herrmann, H. W.; Kim, Y. -H.; Schmitt, M. J.; Hakel, P.; Hsu, S. C.; Hoffman, N. M.; Svyatsky, D.; Baalrud, S. D.; Daligault, J. O.; et al

    2016-01-01

    Here, kinetic effects on inertial confinement fusion have been investigated. In particular, inter-ion-species diffusion and suprathermal ion distribution have been analyzed. The former drives separation of the fuel constituents in the hot reacting core and governs mix at the shell/fuel interface. The latter underlie measurements obtained with nuclear diagnostics, including the fusion yield and inferred ion burn temperatures. Basic mechanisms behind and practical consequences from these effects are discussed.

  7. Liquefaction chemistry and kinetics: Hydrogen utilization studies

    SciTech Connect

    Rothenberger, K.S.; Warzinski, R.P.; Cugini, A.V.

    1995-12-31

    The objectives of this project are to investigate the chemistry and kinetics that occur in the initial stages of coal liquefaction and to determine the effects of hydrogen pressure, catalyst activity, and solvent type on the quantity and quality of the products produced. The project comprises three tasks: (1) preconversion chemistry and kinetics, (2) hydrogen utilization studies, and (3) assessment of kinetic models for liquefaction. The hydrogen utilization studies work will be the main topic of this report. However, the other tasks are briefly described.

  8. Beyond kinetic relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truskinovsky, Lev; Vainchtein, Anna

    2010-09-01

    We introduce the concept of kinetic or rate equations for moving defects representing a natural extension of the more conventional notion of a kinetic relation. Algebraic kinetic relations, widely used to model dynamics of dislocations, cracks and phase boundaries, link the instantaneous value of the velocity of a defect with an instantaneous value of the driving force. The new approach generalizes kinetic relations by implying a relation between the velocity and the driving force which is nonlocal in time. To make this relation explicit one may need to integrate a system of kinetic equations. We illustrate the difference between kinetic relation and kinetic equations by working out in full detail a prototypical model of an overdamped defect in a one-dimensional discrete lattice. We show that the minimal nonlocal kinetic description, containing now an internal time scale, is furnished by a system of two ordinary differential equations coupling the spatial location of defect with another internal parameter that describes configuration of the core region.

  9. Rapid flow cytometry analysis of antimicrobial properties of nettle powder and cranberry powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hattuniemi, Maarit; Korhonen, Johanna; Jaakkola, Mari; Räty, Jarkko; Virtanen, Vesa

    2010-11-01

    Both nettle (Urtica dioica) and cranberry (Vaccinium oxycoccus) are widely known to have good influence on health. The aim of this study was to investigate antimicrobial properties of nettle powder and cranberry powder against Escherichia coli (E. coli) and monitor the growth of the bacteria by a rapid flow cytometry (FCM) method. For FCM measurements samples were stained with fluorescent dyes. The inhibitory effects of plant material on growth of E. coli were estimated by comparing the results of control sample (E. coli) to E. coli samples with plant material. FCM offers both a brilliant tool to investigate the kinetics of the growth of bacterium, since subsamples can be taken from the same liquid medium during the growing period and with fluorescent dyes a rapid method to investigate viability of the bacterium.

  10. Modeling Ignition of a Heptane Isomer: Improved Thermodynamics, Reaction Pathways, Kinetics, and Rate Rule Optimizations for 2-Methylhexane.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Samah Y; Cai, Liming; Khaled, Fethi; Banyon, Colin; Wang, Zhandong; Al Rashidi, Mariam J; Pitsch, Heinz; Curran, Henry J; Farooq, Aamir; Sarathy, S Mani

    2016-04-14

    Accurate chemical kinetic combustion models of lightly branched alkanes (e.g., 2-methylalkanes) are important to investigate the combustion behavior of real fuels. Improving the fidelity of existing kinetic models is a necessity, as new experiments and advanced theories show inaccuracies in certain portions of the models. This study focuses on updating thermodynamic data and the kinetic reaction mechanism for a gasoline surrogate component, 2-methylhexane, based on recently published thermodynamic group values and rate rules derived from quantum calculations and experiments. Alternative pathways for the isomerization of peroxy-alkylhydroperoxide (OOQOOH) radicals are also investigated. The effects of these updates are compared against new high-pressure shock tube and rapid compression machine ignition delay measurements. It is shown that rate constant modifications are required to improve agreement between kinetic modeling simulations and experimental data. We further demonstrate the ability to optimize the kinetic model using both manual and automated techniques for rate parameter tunings to improve agreement with the measured ignition delay time data. Finally, additional low temperature chain branching reaction pathways are shown to improve the model's performance. The present approach to model development provides better performance across extended operating conditions while also strengthening the fundamental basis of the model.

  11. Wetting kinetics in surface capillary grooves

    SciTech Connect

    Rye, R.R.; Yost, F.G.; Mann, J.A. Jr.

    1996-10-02

    For V-shaped surface grooves in copper, we have obtained the capillary driven flow kinetics for two liquids: unreactive 1-heptanol and eutectic Sn/Pb solder, which is known to react with copper. We show experimentally that the flow of both liquids in these grooves follows the classical Washburn kinetics, i.e., a Poiseuille flow process, modified to include a dynamic contact angle. Because no subsidiary processes are necessary to fit our data, we propose that in this geometry capillary driven solder flow is too rapid for reaction to provide an appreciable effect. Thus, to observe the effects of Sn/Cu reaction kinetics, the flow rate must be decreased, which the present experiments allow through redesign of the groove geometry and size. 16 refs., 4 figs.

  12. Nanoscale microstructure effects on hydrogen behavior in rapidly solidified aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Tashlykova-Bushkevich, Iya I.

    2015-12-31

    The present work summarizes recent progress in the investigation of nanoscale microstructure effects on hydrogen behavior in rapidly solidified aluminum alloys foils produced at exceptionally high cooling rates. We focus here on the potential of modification of hydrogen desorption kinetics in respect to weak and strong trapping sites that could serve as hydrogen sinks in Al materials. It is shown that it is important to elucidate the surface microstructure of the Al alloy foils at the submicrometer scale because rapidly solidified microstructural features affect hydrogen trapping at nanostructured defects. We discuss the profound influence of solute atoms on hydrogen−lattice defect interactions in the alloys. with emphasis on role of vacancies in hydrogen evolution; both rapidly solidified pure Al and conventionally processed aluminum samples are considered.

  13. Rapid prototype and test

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory, D.L.; Hansche, B.D.

    1996-06-01

    In order to support advanced manufacturing, Sandia has acquired the capability to produce plastic prototypes using stereolithography. Currently, these prototypes are used mainly to verify part geometry and ``fit and form`` checks. This project investigates methods for rapidly testing these plastic prototypes, and inferring from prototype test data actual metal part performance and behavior. Performances examined include static load/stress response, and structural dynamic (modal) and vibration behavior. The integration of advanced non-contacting measurement techniques including scanning laser velocimetry, laser holography, and thermoelasticity into testing of these prototypes is described. Photoelastic properties of the epoxy prototypes to reveal full field stress/strain fields are also explored.

  14. Biphasic Thermal Inactivation Kinetics in Salmonella enteritidis PT4

    PubMed Central

    Humpheson, L.; Adams, M. R.; Anderson, W. A.; Cole, M. B.

    1998-01-01

    The thermal inactivation kinetics of Salmonella enteritidis PT4 between 49 and 60°C were investigated. Using procedures designed to eliminate methodological artifacts, we found that the death kinetics deviated from the accepted model of first-order inactivation. When we used high-density stationary-phase populations and sensitive enumeration, the survivor curves at 60°C were reproducibly biphasic. The decimal reduction time at 60°C (D60°C) of the tail subpopulation was more than four times that of the majority population. This difference decreased with decreasing temperature; i.e., the survivor curves became more linear, but the proportion of tail cells remained a constant proportion of the initial population, about 1 in 104 to 105. Z plots (log D versus temperature) for the two populations showed that the D values coincided at 51°C, indicating that the survivor curves should be linear at this temperature, and this was confirmed experimentally. Investigations into the nature of the tails ruled out genotypic differences between the populations and protection due to leakage from early heat casualties. Heating of cells at 59°C in the presence of 5 or 100 μg of chloramphenicol per ml resulted in reductions in the levels of tailing. These reductions were greatest at the higher chloramphenicol concentration. Our results indicate that de novo protein synthesis of heat shock proteins is responsible for the observed tailing. Chemostat-cultured cells heated at 60°C also produced biphasic survivor curves in all but one instance. Cells with higher growth rates were more heat sensitive, but tailing was comparable with batch cultures. Starved cells (no dilution input) displayed linear inactivation kinetics, suggesting that during starvation a rapid heat shock response cannot be initiated. PMID:9464380

  15. Calorimetric Study of Kinetic Glass Transition in Metallic Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Hiki, Y.; Takahashi, H.

    2008-02-21

    Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) experiments were carried out for a bulk metallic glass (BMG), Zr{sub 41.2}Ti{sub 13.8}Cu{sub 12.5}Ni{sub 10.0}Be{sub 22.5}, below and above the glass transition temperature T{sub g}. The T{sub g} values were determined from the DSC curves. A wide range of heating rate, q = dT/dt = 0.1-100 K/min, was adopted for the experiment, and the q dependence of the apparent T{sub g} was investigated. As q was decreased, the value of T{sub g} decreased rapidly, then more slowly, and seemed to approach a constant value at low q. The experimental result of this kinetic glass transition phenomenon was analyzed on the basis of the relaxation process occurring in the transition temperature range.

  16. Inclusion Kinetics of Polyrotaxanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, Hideaki; Takahashi, Shoko; Ito, Kohzo; Yamada, Norifumi

    Inclusion complex (IC) formation of α-cyclodextrin (α-CD) and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) brush in water was investigated by Surface Plasmon Resonance Spectroscopy(SPR), neutron reflectometry(NR) and grazing incident wide angle X-ray scattering(GISANS). Spontaneous IC formation of α-CD with PEG (polyrotaxanes) is believed to be due to hydrophobic interaction between the hydrophobic interior of α-CD and PEG; however, the detail of the IC formation kinetics has not been observed because IC formation results in aggregation and precipitation of the complex. SPR revealed that IC formation occurs after induction period, which often appears in crystallization. When concentration of α-CD solution is 10%, IC consisting randomly oriented α-CD polycrystal appeared. In contrast, when the concentration of α-CD solution is 5%, a uniform 10-nm-thick IC layer with α-CD stacked perpendicular to the substrate appeared. 10-nm-thick IC was also found in the diluted PEG brush in contact with a 10% α-CD solution. The characteristic 10-nm-thick layer is related to the folded crystalline structure of α-CD on PEG brush. Such crystallization was proved to be the main driving force for IC formation.

  17. Rapid wall relaxation in elongating tissues. [Glycine max (L. ); Pisum sativum L

    SciTech Connect

    Matyssek, R.; Maruyama, S.; Boyer, J.S. )

    1988-01-01

    Reported differences in the relaxation of cell walls in enlarging stem tissues of soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) and pea (Pisum sativum L.) cause measurements of the yield threshold turgor, an important growth parameter, to be in doubt. Using the pressure probe and guillotine psychrometer, the authors investigated wall relaxation in these species by excising the elongating tissue in air to remove the water supply. The authors found that the rapid kinetics usually exhibited by soybean could be delayed and made similar to the slow kinetics previously reported for pea if slowly growing or mature tissue was left attached to the rapidly growing tissue when relaxation was initiated. The greater the amount of attached tissue, the slower the relaxation, suggesting that slowly growing tissue acted as a water source. Consistent with this concept was a lower water potential in the rapidly elongating tissue than in the slowly growing tissue. If this tissue was removed from pea, relaxation became as rapid as usually exhibited by soybean. It is concluded that the true relaxation of cell walls to the yield threshold requires only a few minutes and that the yield threshold in the intact plant before excision. Under these conditions, the yield threshold was close to the turgor in the intact plant regardless of the species.

  18. Transient state kinetics tutorial using the kinetics simulation program, KINSIM.

    PubMed Central

    Wachsstock, D H; Pollard, T D

    1994-01-01

    This article provides an introduction to a computer tutorial on transient state kinetics. The tutorial uses our Macintosh version of the computer program, KINSIM, that calculates the time course of reactions. KINSIM is also available for other popular computers. This program allows even those investigators not mathematically inclined to evaluate the rate constants for the transitions between the intermediates in any reaction mechanism. These rate constants are one of the insights that are essential for understanding how biochemical processes work at the molecular level. The approach is applicable not only to enzyme reactions but also to any other type of process of interest to biophysicists, cell biologists, and molecular biologists in which concentrations change with time. In principle, the same methods could be used to characterize time-dependent, large-scale processes in ecology and evolution. Completion of the tutorial takes students 6-10 h. This investment is rewarded by a deep understanding of the principles of chemical kinetics and familiarity with the tools of kinetics simulation as an approach to solve everyday problems in the laboratory. PMID:7811941

  19. Kinetics of the Reaction of O((sup 3)P) with CF3NO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorn, R. P.; Nicovich, J. M.; Cronkhite, J. M.; Wine, P. H.

    1997-01-01

    A laser flash photolysis-resonance fluorescence technique has been employed to study the kinetics of the reaction of O((sup 3)P) with CF3NO (k(2)) as a function of temperature. Our results are described by the Arrhenius expression k(2)(T) = (4.54 +/- 0.70) x 10(exp -l2)exp[(-560 +/- 46)/T] cu cm/molecule.s (243 K is less than or equal to T is less than or equal to 424 K); errors are 2 sigma and represent precision only. The O((sup 3)P) + CF3NO reaction is sufficiently rapid that CF3NO cannot be employed as a selective quencher for O2(alpha(1) Delta-g) in laboratory systems where O((sup 3)P) and O2(alpha 1 Delta g) coexist, and where O((sup 3)P) kinetics are being investigated.

  20. Kinetically guided colloidal structure formation

    PubMed Central

    Hecht, Fabian M.; Bausch, Andreas R.

    2016-01-01

    The self-organization of colloidal particles is a promising approach to create novel structures and materials, with applications spanning from smart materials to optoelectronics to quantum computation. However, designing and producing mesoscale-sized structures remains a major challenge because at length scales of 10–100 μm equilibration times already become prohibitively long. Here, we extend the principle of rapid diffusion-limited cluster aggregation (DLCA) to a multicomponent system of spherical colloidal particles to enable the rational design and production of finite-sized anisotropic structures on the mesoscale. In stark contrast to equilibrium self-assembly techniques, kinetic traps are not avoided but exploited to control and guide mesoscopic structure formation. To this end the affinities, size, and stoichiometry of up to five different types of DNA-coated microspheres are adjusted to kinetically control a higher-order hierarchical aggregation process in time. We show that the aggregation process can be fully rationalized by considering an extended analytical DLCA model, allowing us to produce mesoscopic structures of up to 26 µm in diameter. This scale-free approach can easily be extended to any multicomponent system that allows for multiple orthogonal interactions, thus yielding a high potential of facilitating novel materials with tailored plasmonic excitation bands, scattering, biochemical, or mechanical behavior. PMID:27444018

  1. Weightlifting performance is related to kinematic and kinetic patterns of the hip and knee joints.

    PubMed

    Kipp, Kristof; Redden, Josh; Sabick, Michelle B; Harris, Chad

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the correlations between biomechanical outcome measures and weightlifting performance. Joint kinematics and kinetics of the hip, knee, and ankle were calculated while 10 subjects performed a clean at 85% of 1 repetition maximum (1RM). Kinematic and kinetic time-series patterns were extracted with principal components analysis. Discrete scores for each time-series pattern were calculated and used to determine how each pattern was related to body mass-normalized 1RM. Two hip kinematic and 2 knee kinetic patterns were significantly correlated with relative 1RM. The kinematic patterns captured hip and trunk motions during the first pull and hip joint motion during the movement transition between the first and second pulls. The first kinetic pattern captured a peak in the knee extension moment during the second pull. The second kinetic pattern captured a spatiotemporal shift in the timing and amplitude of the peak knee extension moment. The kinematic results suggest that greater lift mass was associated with steady trunk position during the first pull and less hip extension motion during the second-knee bend transition. Further, the kinetic results suggest that greater lift mass was associated with a smaller knee extensor moments during the first pull, but greater knee extension moments during the second pull, and an earlier temporal transition between knee flexion-extension moments at the beginning of the second pull. Collectively, these results highlight the importance of controlled trunk and hip motions during the first pull and rapid employment of the knee extensor muscles during the second pull in relation to weightlifting performance.

  2. Kinetic inhibition of natural gas hydrates in offshore drilling, production, and processing operations. Annual report, January 1--December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    1992-12-31

    Natural gas hydrates are solid crystalline compounds which form when molecules smaller than n-butane contact molecules of water at elevated pressures and reduced temperatures, both above and below the ice point. Because these crystalline compounds plug flow channels, they are undesirable. In this project the authors proposed an alternate approach of controlling hydrate formation by preventing hydrate growth into a sizeable mass which could block a flow channel. The authors call this new technique kinetic inhibition, because while it allows the system to exist in the hydrate domain, it prevents the kinetic agglomeration of small hydrate crystals to the point of pluggage of a flow channel. In order to investigate the kinetic means of inhibiting hydrate formation, they held two consortium meetings, on June 1, 1990 and on August 31, 1990. At subsequent meetings, the authors determined the following four stages of the project, necessary to reach the goal of determining a new hydrate field inhibitor: (1) a rapid screening method was to be determined for testing the hydrate kinetic formation period of many surfactants and polymer candidates (both individually and combined), the present report presents the success of two screening apparatuses: a multi-reactor apparatus which is capable of rapid, high volume screening, and the backup screening method--a viscometer for testing with gas at high pressure; (2) the construction of two high, constant pressure cells were to experimentally confirm the success of the chemicals in the rapid screening apparatus; (3) in the third phase of the work, Exxon volunteered to evaluate the performance of the best chemicals from the previous two stages in their 4 inch I.D. Multiphase flow loop in Houston; (4) in the final phase of the work, the intention was to take the successful kinetic inhibition chemicals from the previous three stages and then test them in the field in gathering lines and wells from member companies.

  3. Plasma kinetics of sup 125 I beta endorphin turnover in lean and obese Zucker rats

    SciTech Connect

    Rodd, D.; Caston, A.L.; Green M.H.; Farrell, P.A. )

    1990-02-26

    Plasma clearance kinetics for Beta Endorphin (BEP) are not well-defined and no definitive data exist for lean versus obese animals. To determine such kinetic parameters, a bolus of {sup 125}I BEP (1{mu}Ci/kg) was infused into awake lean(L) and obese(O) Zucker rats. Arterial blood samples were withdrawn initially at 20 seconds intervals and less frequently as a 3-hour experimental period progressed. Donor rat blood was infused (venous catheter) to replace withdrawn blood. At 180 minutes approximately 10% of the initial dose remained in the plasma. Clearance kinetics for {sup 125}I BEP were analyzed by compartmental analysis. A 3-component equation (i.e., 3 compartment model) provided the best fit for both L and O groups. Plasma transit times were very rapid; however, plasma fractional catabolic rate was low. Plasma mean residence time was similar for both groups (50 minutes) as was recycle time. These data suggest that BEP kinetics are similar in L and O rats, and that this peptide may undergo extensive recycling into and out of the plasma compartment. The identity of the other two compartments requires further investigation.

  4. Chemical Kinetics Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 17 NIST Chemical Kinetics Database (Web, free access)   The NIST Chemical Kinetics Database includes essentially all reported kinetics results for thermal gas-phase chemical reactions. The database is designed to be searched for kinetics data based on the specific reactants involved, for reactions resulting in specified products, for all the reactions of a particular species, or for various combinations of these. In addition, the bibliography can be searched by author name or combination of names. The database contains in excess of 38,000 separate reaction records for over 11,700 distinct reactant pairs. These data have been abstracted from over 12,000 papers with literature coverage through early 2000.

  5. A "Stationery" Kinetics Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, L.; Goberdhansingh, A.

    1988-01-01

    Describes a simple redox reaction that occurs between potassium permanganate and oxalic acid that can be used to prepare an interesting disappearing ink for demonstrating kinetics for introductory chemistry. Discusses laboratory procedures and factors that influence disappearance times. (CW)

  6. Quantitative Connection between Ensemble Thermodynamics and Single-Molecule Kinetics: A Case Study Using Cryogenic Electron Microscopy and Single-Molecule Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer Investigations of the Ribosome.

    PubMed

    Kinz-Thompson, Colin D; Sharma, Ajeet K; Frank, Joachim; Gonzalez, Ruben L; Chowdhury, Debashish

    2015-08-27

    At equilibrium, thermodynamic and kinetic information can be extracted from biomolecular energy landscapes by many techniques. However, while static, ensemble techniques yield thermodynamic data, often only dynamic, single-molecule techniques can yield the kinetic data that describe transition-state energy barriers. Here we present a generalized framework based upon dwell-time distributions that can be used to connect such static, ensemble techniques with dynamic, single-molecule techniques, and thus characterize energy landscapes to greater resolutions. We demonstrate the utility of this framework by applying it to cryogenic electron microscopy (cryo-EM) and single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET) studies of the bacterial ribosomal pre-translocation complex. Among other benefits, application of this framework to these data explains why two transient, intermediate conformations of the pre-translocation complex, which are observed in a cryo-EM study, may not be observed in several smFRET studies.

  7. Kinetics of coal combustion: Seventh quarterly report

    SciTech Connect

    Gat, N.; Petach, M.; Gavalas, G.R.; Flagan, R.C.; Essenhigh, R.H.

    1986-10-01

    The objective of this investigation is to develop an improved comprehensive understanding of the kinetics of coal combustion relevant to suspension firing of powdered coal. The program is being carreid out by investigators from several institutions: TRW (prime contractor), Ohio State University (OSU), and California Institute of Technology (CIT), (both subcontractors). The investigation of fundamentals of coal combustion kinetics addresses several topics of major importance relative to improved understanding of pulverized coal combustion and includes both homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions. The principal topics include: (1) combustion of volatiles; and (2) heterogeneous combustion of coal/char. Research activities include small-scale experimentation, interpretation of experimental results in terms of mechanistic understanding, and the development of validation of kinetic models of fundamental processes. 9 refs., 20 figs., 4 tabs.

  8. Kinetic Description of the Impedance Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberrath, Jens; Lapke, Martin; Mussenbrock, Thomas; Brinkmann, Ralf

    2011-10-01

    Active plasma resonance spectroscopy is a well known diagnostic method. Many concepts of this method are theoretically investigated and realized as a diagnostic tool, one of which is the impedance probe (IP). The application of such a probe in plasmas with pressures of a few Pa raises the question whether kinetic effects have to be taken into account or not. To address this question a kinetic model is necessary. A general kinetic model for an electrostatic concept of active plasma spectroscopy was presented by R.P. Brinkmann and can be used to describe the multipole resonance probe (MRP). In principle the IP is interpretable as a special case of the MRP in lower order. Thus, we are able to describe the IP by the kinetic model of the MRP. Based on this model we derive a solution to investigate the influence of kinetic effects to the resonance behavior of the IP. Active plasma resonance spectroscopy is a well known diagnostic method. Many concepts of this method are theoretically investigated and realized as a diagnostic tool, one of which is the impedance probe (IP). The application of such a probe in plasmas with pressures of a few Pa raises the question whether kinetic effects have to be taken into account or not. To address this question a kinetic model is necessary. A general kinetic model for an electrostatic concept of active plasma spectroscopy was presented by R.P. Brinkmann and can be used to describe the multipole resonance probe (MRP). In principle the IP is interpretable as a special case of the MRP in lower order. Thus, we are able to describe the IP by the kinetic model of the MRP. Based on this model we derive a solution to investigate the influence of kinetic effects to the resonance behavior of the IP. The authors acknowledge the support by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) via the Ruhr University Research School and the Federal Ministry of Education and Research in frame of the PluTO project.

  9. Application of impediometry to rapid assessment of liquid culture media.

    PubMed

    Strassburger, J; Hossbach, J; Seidel, R

    1991-01-01

    The impedance method provides as unique opportunity to determine microbial activity and kinetics. Since the metabolic processes depend on the nature and quality of the culture medium, impediometry allows the assessment of liquid culture media. Impedance microbiology represents an approach to quantitative microbiology. We investigated the influence of pH, composition and variation of the amounts of industrially made dry media, overheating during the dissolving or sterilisation processes, and qualitative differences between batches of the same culture medium. Using glucose broth as an example, we showed that impediometry allows quantitative, microbial assessment of culture media. Inaccurate preparation of the culture medium could be detected quickly by the use of impediometry. The method is very simple to perform, requires no sample preparation, allows rapid assessment of liquid culture media, and interprets results automatically with the aid of a microcomputer. PMID:1863317

  10. Reaction kinetics of cellulose hydrolysis in subcritical and supercritical water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olanrewaju, Kazeem Bode

    The uncertainties in the continuous supply of fossil fuels from the crisis-ridden oil-rich region of the world is fast shifting focus on the need to utilize cellulosic biomass and develop more efficient technologies for its conversion to fuels and chemicals. One such technology is the rapid degradation of cellulose in supercritical water without the need for an enzyme or inorganic catalyst such as acid. This project focused on the study of reaction kinetics of cellulose hydrolysis in subcritical and supercritical water. Cellulose reactions at hydrothermal conditions can proceed via the homogeneous route involving dissolution and hydrolysis or the heterogeneous path of surface hydrolysis. The work is divided into three main parts. First, the detailed kinetic analysis of cellulose reactions in micro- and tubular reactors was conducted. Reaction kinetics models were applied, and kinetics parameters at both subcritical and supercritical conditions were evaluated. The second major task was the evaluation of yields of water soluble hydrolysates obtained from the hydrolysis of cellulose and starch in hydrothermal reactors. Lastly, changes in molecular weight distribution due to hydrothermolytic degradation of cellulose were investigated. These changes were also simulated based on different modes of scission, and the pattern generated from simulation was compared with the distribution pattern from experiments. For a better understanding of the reaction kinetics of cellulose in subcritical and supercritical water, a series of reactions was conducted in the microreactor. Hydrolysis of cellulose was performed at subcritical temperatures ranging from 270 to 340 °C (tau = 0.40--0.88 s). For the dissolution of cellulose, the reaction was conducted at supercritical temperatures ranging from 375 to 395 °C (tau = 0.27--0.44 s). The operating pressure for the reactions at both subcritical and supercritical conditions was 5000 psig. The results show that the rate-limiting step in

  11. Thermodynamic, Kinetic, and Equilibrium Parameters for the Removal of Lead and Cadmium from Aqueous Solutions with Calcium Alginate Beads

    PubMed Central

    Alfaro-Cuevas-Villanueva, Ruth; Hidalgo-Vázquez, Aura Roxana; Cortés Penagos, Consuelo de Jesús; Cortés-Martínez, Raúl

    2014-01-01

    The sorption of cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb) by calcium alginate beads (CAB) from aqueous solutions in batch systems was investigated. The kinetic and thermodynamic parameters, as well as the sorption capacities of CAB in each system at different temperatures, were evaluated. The rate of sorption for both metals was rapid in the first 10 minutes and reached a maximum in 50 minutes. Sorption kinetic data were fitted to Lagergren, pseudo-second-order and Elovich models and it was found that the second-order kinetic model describes these data for the two metals; comparing kinetic parameters for Cd and Pb sorption a higher kinetic rate (K2) for Pb was observed, indicating that the interaction between lead cations and alginate beads was faster than for cadmium. Similarly, isotherm data were fitted to different models reported in literature and it was found that the Langmuir-Freundlich (L-F) and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) models describe the isotherms in all cases. CAB sorption capacity for cadmium was 27.4 mg/g and 150.4 mg/g for lead, at 25°C. Sorption capacities of Cd and Pb increase as temperature rises. According to the thermodynamic parameters, the cadmium and lead adsorption process was spontaneous and endothermic. It was also found that pH has an important effect on the adsorption of these metals by CAB, as more were removed at pH values between 6 and 7. PMID:24587740

  12. Kinetic modeling and design of colloidal lock and key assembly.

    PubMed

    Beltran-Villegas, Daniel J; Colón-Meléndez, Laura; Solomon, Michael J; Larson, Ronald G

    2016-02-01

    We investigate the kinetics of colloidal lock and key particle assembly by modeling transitions between free, non-specifically and specifically (dumbbells) bound pairs to enable the rapid formation of specific pairs. We expand on a model introduced in a previous publication (Colón-Meléndez et al., 2015) to account for the shape complementarity between the lock and the key particle. Specifically we develop a theory to predict free energy differences between specific and non-specific states based on the interaction potential between arbitrary surfaces and apply this to the interaction of a spherical key particle with the concave dimple surface. Our results show that a lock particle dimple slightly wider than the key particle radius results in optimal binding, but also show escape rates much smaller than those observed in experimental measurements described in the paper cited above. We assess the possible sources of error in experiments and in analysis, including spatial and temporal resolution of the confocal microscopy method used to measure kinetic coefficients, the polydispersity of the lock dimple size, and the sedimentation of the particles in a quasi-two-dimensional layer. We find that the largest sources of variation are in the limited temporal resolution of the experiments, which we account for in our theory, and in the quasi-two-dimensional nature of the experiment that leads to misidentification of non-specific pairs as specific ones. Accounting for these sources of variation results in very good quantitative agreement with experimental data.

  13. Kinetics of Uranium Extraction from Uranium Tailings by Oxidative Leaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Biao; Li, Mi; Zhang, Xiaowen; Huang, Jing

    2016-07-01

    Extraction of uranium from uranium tailings by oxidative leaching with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was studied. The effects of various extraction factors were investigated to optimize the dissolution conditions, as well as to determine the leaching kinetic parameters. The behavior of H2O2 in the leaching process was determined through scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX) and x-ray diffraction analysis of leaching residues. Results suggest that H2O2 can significantly improve uranium extraction by decomposing the complex gangue structures in uranium tailings and by enhancing the reaction rate between uranium phases and the leaching agent. The extraction kinetics expression was changed from 1 - 3(1 - α)2/3 + 2(1 - α) = K 0(H2SO4)-0.14903(S/L)-1.80435( R o)0.20023 e -1670.93/T t ( t ≥ 5) to 1 - 3(1 - α)2/3 + 2(1 - α) = K 0(H2SO4)0.01382(S/L)-1.83275( R o)0.25763 e -1654.59/T t ( t ≥ 5) by the addition of H2O2 in the leaching process. The use of H2O2 in uranium leaching may help in extracting uranium more efficiently and rapidly from low-uranium-containing ores or tailings.

  14. Alterations in glucose kinetics induced by pentobarbital anesthesia

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, C.H.; Bagby, G.J.; Hargrove, D.M.; Hyde, P.M.; Spitzer, J.J. )

    1987-12-01

    Because pentobarbital is often used in investigations related to carbohydrate metabolism, the in vivo effect of this drug on glucose homeostasis was studied. Glucose kinetics assessed by the constant intravenous infusion of (6-{sup 3}H)- and (U-{sup 14}C)glucose, were determined in three groups of catheterized fasted rats: conscious, anesthetized and body temperature maintained, and anesthetized but body temperature not maintained. After induction of anesthesia, marked hypothermia developed in rats not provided with external heat. Anesthetized rats that developed hypothermia showed a decrease in mean arterial blood pressure (25%) and heart rate (40%). Likewise, the plasma lactate concentration and the rates of glucose appearance, recycling, and metabolic clearance were reduced by 30-50% in the hypothermic anesthetized rats. Changes in whole-body carbohydrate metabolism were prevented when body temperature was maintained. Because plasma pentobarbital levels were similar between the euthermic and hypothermic rats during the first 2 h of the experiment, the rapid reduction in glucose metabolism in this latter group appears related to the decrease in body temperature. The continuous infusion of epinephrine produced alterations in glucose kinetics that were not different between conscious animals and anesthetized rats with body temperature maintained. Thus pentobarbital-anesthetized rats became hypothermic when kept at room temperature and exhibited marked decreases in glucose metabolism. Such changes were absent when body temperature was maintained during anesthesia.

  15. Kinetics of coal liquefaction at very short reaction times

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, H.; Wang, K.; Wang, S.

    1995-12-31

    Kinetics of direct liquefaction of Illinois No. 6 Bituminous coal in tetralin has been investigated at three temperatures (309-424{degrees}C) during the first few seconds of the reaction and up to an hour. Conversion was followed by the ash content of the coal residue as determined by TGA, and changes in the reaction were followed by changes in the TGA parameters, such as Volatile Matter (VM) and Fixed Carbon (FC). The effects of temperature on the reaction kinetics were in both catalyzed and uncatalyzed liquefaction with a large excess of tetralin, there is an initial very rapid extraction of the soluble matter by the tetralin. After extraction there is an induction period followed by a slower rate of conversion of the coal structure itself. At higher temperatures, the amount of extraction increases and the induction period becomes shorter. At least two conflicting processes are occurring in the last stage: (1) breakdown of the coal structure to liquid products, and (2) formation of retrograde material (precursor of tar and coke). Catalysts such as sulfided molybdenum naphthenate in the presence of hydrogen greatly reduce the formation of retrograde products.

  16. Ice-Crystallization Kinetics during Fuel-Cell Cold-Start

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dursch, Thomas James, Jr.

    Proton-exchange-membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) show promise in automotive applications because of their high efficiency, high power density, and potentially low emissions. To be successful in automobiles, PEMFCs must permit rapid startup with minimal energy from subfreezing temperatures, known as cold-start. In a PEMFC, reduction of oxygen to water occurs in the cathode catalyst layer (CL). Under subfreezing conditions, water generated during startup solidifies and hinders access of gaseous oxygen to the catalytic sites in the cathode CL, severely inhibiting cell performance and potentially causing cell failure. Achieving cold-start is difficult in practice, due to potential flooding, sluggish reaction kinetics, durability loss, and rapid ice crystallization. Currently, however, few studies focus on the fundamentals of ice crystallization during cold-start. Elucidation of the mechanisms and kinetics of ice formation within PEMFC porous media is, therefore, critical to successful cell startup and high performance at low temperatures. First, an experimental method is presented for obtaining isothermal ice-crystallization kinetics in water-saturated gas-diffusion layers (GDLs). Ice formation is initially studied in the GDL because this layer retains a significant amount of product water during cold-start. Isothermal ice-crystallization and ice-nucleation rates are obtained in commercial Toray GDLs as functions of subcooling using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). A nonlinear ice-crystallization rate expression is developed using Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorov (JMAK) theory, in which the heat-transfer-limited growth rate is determined from the moving-boundary Stefan problem. Predicted ice-crystallization rates are in excellent agreement with experiment. A validated rate expression is thus available for predicting ice-crystallization kinetics in GDLs. Ice-crystallization kinetics is also considered under experimental settings similar to real PEMFC operating

  17. Quaternary selenostannates Na 2- xGa 2- xSn 1+ xSe 6 and AGaSnSe 4 ( A=K, Rb, and Cs) through rapid cooling of melts. Kinetics versus thermodynamics in the polymorphism of AGaSnSe 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Seong-Ju; Iyer, Ratnasabapathy G.; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G.

    2004-10-01

    The quaternary alkali-metal gallium selenostannates, Na2-xGa2-xSn1+xSe6 and AGaSnSe4 (A=K, Rb, and Cs), were synthesized by reacting alkali-metal selenide, Ga, Sn, and Se with a flame melting-rapid cooling method. Na2-xGa2-xSn1+xSe6 crystallizes in the non-centrosymmetric space group C2 with cell constants a=13.308(3) Å, b=7.594(2) Å, c=13.842(3) Å, β=118.730(4)°, V=1226.7(5) Å3. α-KGaSnSe4 crystallizes in the tetragonal space group I4/mcm with a=8.186(5) Å and c=6.403(5) Å, V=429.1(5) Å3. β-KGaSnSe4 crystallizes in the space group P21/c with cell constants a=7.490(2) Å, b=12.578(3) Å, c=18.306(5) Å, β=98.653(5)°, V=1705.0(8) Å3. The unit cell of isostructural RbGaSnSe4 is a=7.567(2) Å, b=12.656(3) Å, c=18.277(4) Å, β=95.924(4)°, V=1741.1(7) Å3. CsGaSnSe4 crystallizes in the orthorhombic space group Pmcn with a=7.679(2) Å, b=12.655(3) Å, c=18.278(5) Å, V=1776.1(8) Å3. The structure of Na2-xGa2-xSn1+xSe6 consists of a polar three-dimensional network of trimeric (Sn,Ga)3Se9 units with Na atoms located in tunnels. The AGaSnSe4 possess layered structures. The compounds show nearly the same Raman spectral features, except for Na2-xGa2-xSn1+xSe6. Optical band gaps, determined from UV-Vis spectroscopy, range from 1.50 eV in Na2-xGa2-xSn1+xSe6 to 1.97 eV in CsGaSnSe4. Cooling of the melts of KGaSnSe4 and RbGaSnSe4 produces only kinetically stable products. The thermodynamically stable product is accessible under extended annealing, which leads to the so-called γ-form (BaGa2S4-type) of these compounds.

  18. Spatial redistribution of turbulent and mean kinetic energy

    SciTech Connect

    Manz, P.; Xu, M.; Fedorczak, N.; Thakur, S. C.; Tynan, G. R.

    2012-01-15

    The turbulent spatial redistribution of turbulent and mean kinetic energy and its exchange is investigated in the framework of an K-{epsilon} model in a magnetized plasma column. The kinetic energy is transferred from the turbulence into the zonal flow around the shear layer. The Reynolds stress profile adjusts to the shear layer, which results in a transport of mean kinetic energy from the region around the shear layer into the shear layer.

  19. A cluster of central line-associated bloodstream infections due to rapidly growing nontuberculous mycobacteria in patients with hematologic disorders at a Japanese tertiary care center: an outbreak investigation and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Tagashira, Yasuaki; Kozai, Yasuji; Yamasa, Hitomi; Sakurada, Masako; Kashiyama, Tetsuya; Honda, Hitoshi

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Rapidly growing nontuberculous mycobacteria (RGM) are considered rare pathogens, causing central line-associated bloodstream infection. We identified an outbreak of central line-associated bloodstream infection due to RGM at a hematology-oncology ward during a 5-month period. DESIGN Outbreak investigation and literature review. SETTING A Japanese tertiary care center. PATIENTS Adults who were hospitalized at the hematology-oncology ward from October 15, 2011, through February 17, 2012. RESULTS A total of 5 patients with a bloodstream infection due to RGM (4 cases of Mycobacterium mucogenicum and 1 case of Mycobacterium canariasense infection) were identified; of these, 3 patients had acute myeloid leukemia, 1 had acute lymphocytic leukemia, and 1 had aplastic anemia. Four of the 5 patients received cord blood transplantation prior to developing the bloodstream infection. All central venous catheters in patients with a bloodstream infection were removed. These patients promptly defervesced after catheter removal and their care was successfully managed without antimicrobial therapy. Surveillance cultures from the environment and water detected M. mucogenicum and M. canariasense in the water supply of the hematology-oncology ward. The isolates from the bloodstream infection and water sources were identical on the basis of 16S-rRNA gene sequencing. CONCLUSIONS The source of RGM in the outbreak of bloodstream infections likely was the ward tap water supply. Awareness of catheter-related bloodstream infections due to nontuberculous mycobacteria should be emphasized, especially where immunocompromised patients are at risk. Also, using antimicrobials after catheter removal to treat central line-associated bloodstream infection due to RGM may not be necessary. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2015;36(1): 76-80. PMID:25627764

  20. Förster resonance energy transfer structural kinetic studies of cardiac thin filament deactivation.

    PubMed

    Xing, Jun; Jayasundar, Jayant J; Ouyang, Yexin; Dong, Wen-Ji

    2009-06-12

    Cardiac thin filament deactivation is initiated by Ca2+ dissociation from troponin C (cTnC), followed by multiple structural changes of thin filament proteins. These structural transitions are the molecular basis underlying the thin filament regulation of cardiac relaxation, but the detailed mechanism remains elusive. In this study Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) was used to investigate the dynamics and kinetics of the Ca2+-induced conformational changes of the cardiac thin filaments, specifically the closing of the cTnC N-domain, the cTnC-cTnI (troponin I) interaction, and the cTnI-actin interaction. The cTnC N-domain conformational change was examined by monitoring FRET between a donor (AEDANS) attached to one cysteine residue and an acceptor (DDPM) attached the other cysteine of the mutant cTnC(L13C/N51C). The cTnC-cTnI interaction was investigated by monitoring the distance changes from residue 89 of cTnC to residues 151 and 167 of cTnI, respectively. The cTnI-actin interaction was investigated by monitoring the distance changes from residues 151 and 167 of cTnI to residue 374 of actin. FRET Ca2+ titrations and stopped-flow kinetic measurements show that different thin filament structural transitions have different Ca2+ sensitivities and Ca2+ dissociation-induced kinetics. The observed structural transitions involving the regulatory region and the mobile domain of cTnI occurred at fast kinetic rates, whereas the kinetics of the structural transitions involving the cTnI inhibitory region was slow. Our results suggest that the thin filament deactivation upon Ca2+ dissociation is a two-step process. One step involves rapid binding of the mobile domain of cTnI to actin, which is kinetically coupled with the conformational change of the N-domain of cTnC and the dissociation of the regulatory region of cTnI from cTnC. The other step involves switching the inhibitory region of cTnI from interacting with cTnC to interacting with actin. The latter processes

  1. Förster Resonance Energy Transfer Structural Kinetic Studies of Cardiac Thin Filament Deactivation*

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Jun; Jayasundar, Jayant J.; Ouyang, Yexin; Dong, Wen-Ji

    2009-01-01

    Cardiac thin filament deactivation is initiated by Ca2+ dissociation from troponin C (cTnC), followed by multiple structural changes of thin filament proteins. These structural transitions are the molecular basis underlying the thin filament regulation of cardiac relaxation, but the detailed mechanism remains elusive. In this study Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) was used to investigate the dynamics and kinetics of the Ca2+-induced conformational changes of the cardiac thin filaments, specifically the closing of the cTnC N-domain, the cTnC-cTnI (troponin I) interaction, and the cTnI-actin interaction. The cTnC N-domain conformational change was examined by monitoring FRET between a donor (AEDANS) attached to one cysteine residue and an acceptor (DDPM) attached the other cysteine of the mutant cTnC(L13C/N51C). The cTnC-cTnI interaction was investigated by monitoring the distance changes from residue 89 of cTnC to residues 151 and 167 of cTnI, respectively. The cTnI-actin interaction was investigated by monitoring the distance changes from residues 151 and 167 of cTnI to residue 374 of actin. FRET Ca2+ titrations and stopped-flow kinetic measurements show that different thin filament structural transitions have different Ca2+ sensitivities and Ca2+ dissociation-induced kinetics. The observed structural transitions involving the regulatory region and the mobile domain of cTnI occurred at fast kinetic rates, whereas the kinetics of the structural transitions involving the cTnI inhibitory region was slow. Our results suggest that the thin filament deactivation upon Ca2+ dissociation is a two-step process. One step involves rapid binding of the mobile domain of cTnI to actin, which is kinetically coupled with the conformational change of the N-domain of cTnC and the dissociation of the regulatory region of cTnI from cTnC. The other step involves switching the inhibitory region of cTnI from interacting with cTnC to interacting with actin. The latter processes

  2. Rapid Decisions From Experience

    PubMed Central

    Zeigenfuse, Matthew D.; Pleskac, Timothy J.; Liu, Taosheng

    2014-01-01

    In many everyday decisions, people quickly integrate noisy samples of information to form a preference among alternatives that offer uncertain rewards. Here, we investigated this decision process using the Flash Gambling Task (FGT), in which participants made a series of choices between a certain payoff and an uncertain alternative that produced a normal distribution of payoffs. For each choice, participants experienced the distribution of payoffs via rapid samples updated every 50 ms. We show that people can make these rapid decisions from experience and that the decision process is consistent with a sequential sampling process. Results also reveal a dissociation between these preferential decisions and equivalent perceptual decisions where participants had to determine which alternatives contained more dots on average. To account for this dissociation, we developed a sequential sampling rank-dependent utility model, which showed that participants in the FGT attended more to larger potential payoffs than participants in the perceptual task despite being given equivalent information. We discuss the implications of these findings in terms of computational models of preferential choice and a more complete understanding of experience-based decision making. PMID:24549141

  3. Multiple alternative substrate kinetics.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Vernon E

    2015-11-01

    The specificity of enzymes for their respective substrates has been a focal point of enzyme kinetics since the initial characterization of metabolic chemistry. Various processes to quantify an enzyme's specificity using kinetics have been utilized over the decades. Fersht's definition of the ratio kcat/Km for two different substrates as the "specificity constant" (ref [7]), based on the premise that the important specificity existed when the substrates were competing in the same reaction, has become a consensus standard for enzymes obeying Michaelis-Menten kinetics. The expansion of the theory for the determination of the relative specificity constants for a very large number of competing substrates, e.g. those present in a combinatorial library, in a single reaction mixture has been developed in this contribution. The ratio of kcat/Km for isotopologs has also become a standard in mechanistic enzymology where kinetic isotope effects have been measured by the development of internal competition experiments with extreme precision. This contribution extends the theory of kinetic isotope effects to internal competition between three isotopologs present at non-tracer concentrations in the same reaction mix. This article is part of a special issue titled: Enzyme Transition States from Theory and Experiment. PMID:26051088

  4. Multiple alternative substrate kinetics.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Vernon E

    2015-11-01

    The specificity of enzymes for their respective substrates has been a focal point of enzyme kinetics since the initial characterization of metabolic chemistry. Various processes to quantify an enzyme's specificity using kinetics have been utilized over the decades. Fersht's definition of the ratio kcat/Km for two different substrates as the "specificity constant" (ref [7]), based on the premise that the important specificity existed when the substrates were competing in the same reaction, has become a consensus standard for enzymes obeying Michaelis-Menten kinetics. The expansion of the theory for the determination of the relative specificity constants for a very large number of competing substrates, e.g. those present in a combinatorial library, in a single reaction mixture has been developed in this contribution. The ratio of kcat/Km for isotopologs has also become a standard in mechanistic enzymology where kinetic isotope effects have been measured by the development of internal competition experiments with extreme precision. This contribution extends the theory of kinetic isotope effects to internal competition between three isotopologs present at non-tracer concentrations in the same reaction mix. This article is part of a special issue titled: Enzyme Transition States from Theory and Experiment.

  5. Rapid shallow breathing index

    PubMed Central

    Karthika, Manjush; Al Enezi, Farhan A.; Pillai, Lalitha V.; Arabi, Yaseen M.

    2016-01-01

    Predicting successful liberation of patients from mechanical ventilation has been a focus of interest to clinicians practicing in intensive care. Various weaning indices have been investigated to identify an optimal weaning window. Among them, the rapid shallow breathing index (RSBI) has gained wide use due to its simple technique and avoidance of calculation of complex pulmonary mechanics. Since its first description, several modifications have been suggested, such as the serial measurements and the rate of change of RSBI, to further improve its predictive value. The objective of this paper is to review the utility of RSBI in predicting weaning success. In addition, the use of RSBI in specific patient populations and the reported modifications of RSBI technique that attempt to improve the utility of RSBI are also reviewed. PMID:27512505

  6. Rapid shallow breathing index.

    PubMed

    Karthika, Manjush; Al Enezi, Farhan A; Pillai, Lalitha V; Arabi, Yaseen M

    2016-01-01

    Predicting successful liberation of patients from mechanical ventilation has been a focus of interest to clinicians practicing in intensive care. Various weaning indices have been investigated to identify an optimal weaning window. Among them, the rapid shallow breathing index (RSBI) has gained wide use due to its simple technique and avoidance of calculation of complex pulmonary mechanics. Since its first description, several modifications have been suggested, such as the serial measurements and the rate of change of RSBI, to further improve its predictive value. The objective of this paper is to review the utility of RSBI in predicting weaning success. In addition, the use of RSBI in specific patient populations and the reported modifications of RSBI technique that attempt to improve the utility of RSBI are also reviewed. PMID:27512505

  7. Fractal reaction kinetics.

    PubMed

    Kopelman, R

    1988-09-23

    Classical reaction kinetics has been found to be unsatisfactory when the reactants are spatially constrained on the microscopic level by either walls, phase boundaries, or force fields. Recently discovered theories of heterogeneous reaction kinetics have dramatic consequences, such as fractal orders for elementary reactions, self-ordering and self-unmixing of reactants, and rate coefficients with temporal "memories." The new theories were needed to explain the results of experiments and supercomputer simulations of reactions that were confined to low dimensions or fractal dimensions or both. Among the practical examples of "fractal-like kinetics" are chemical reactions in pores of membranes, excitation trapping in molecular aggregates, exciton fusion in composite materials, and charge recombination in colloids and clouds.

  8. Erbium hydride decomposition kinetics.

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrizz, Robert Matthew

    2006-11-01

    Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) is used to study the decomposition kinetics of erbium hydride thin films. The TDS results presented in this report are analyzed quantitatively using Redhead's method to yield kinetic parameters (E{sub A} {approx} 54.2 kcal/mol), which are then utilized to predict hydrogen outgassing in vacuum for a variety of thermal treatments. Interestingly, it was found that the activation energy for desorption can vary by more than 7 kcal/mol (0.30 eV) for seemingly similar samples. In addition, small amounts of less-stable hydrogen were observed for all erbium dihydride films. A detailed explanation of several approaches for analyzing thermal desorption spectra to obtain kinetic information is included as an appendix.

  9. CO and O2 Binding to Pseudo-Tetradentate Ligand-Copper(I)-Complexes with a Variable N-Donor Moiety: Kinetic/Thermodynamic Investigation Reveals Ligand Induced Changes in Reaction Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, Heather R.; Meyer, Gerald J.; Karlin, Kenneth D.

    2010-01-01

    The kinetics, thermodynamics, and coordination dynamics for O2 and CO 1:1 binding to a series of pseudo-tetradentate ligand-copper(I)-complexes (DLCuI) to give CuI/O2 and CuI/CO product species are reported. The DLCuI series possess an identical tridentate core structure where the cuprous ion binds to the bispicolylamine (L) fragment. DL also contains a fourth variable N-donor moiety {D = benzyl (Bz); pyridyl (Py); imidazolyl (Im); dimethylamino (NMe2-); tert-butylphenyl pyridyl (TBP); quinolyl (Q)}. The structural characteristics of DLCuI-CO and DLCuI are detailed, with X-ray crystal structures reported for TBPLCuI-CO, BzLCuI-CO, and QLCuI. Infrared studies (solution and solid-state) confirm that DLCuI-CO possess the same four-coordinate core structure in solution with the variable D moiety ‘dangling’, i.e. not coordinated to the copper(I) ion. Other trends observed for the present series appear to derive from the degree to which the D-group interacts with the cuprous ion center. Electrochemical studies reveal close similarities of behavior for ImLCuI and NMe2LCuI (as well as for TBPLCuI and QLCuI), which relate to the O2-binding kinetics and thermodynamics. Equilibrium CO binding data (KCO, ΔH°, ΔS°) were obtained by conducting UV-visible spectrophotometric CO titrations, while CO binding kinetics and thermodynamics (kCO ; ΔH‡, ΔS‡) were measured through variable temperature (193 K – 293 K) transient absorbance laser flash photolysis experiments, λex = 355 nm. Carbon monoxide dissociation rate constants (k−CO) and corresponding activation parameters (ΔH‡, ΔS‡) have also been obtained. CO binding to DLCuI follows an associative mechanism with the increased donation from D leading to higher kCO values. Unlike that seen in previous work, the KCO values increased as the kCO and k−CO values declines; the latter decreased at a faster rate. By using the ‘flash-and-trap’ method (λex = 355 nm ; 188 K – 218 K), the kinetics and

  10. Kinetic theory viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, C. J.; Pringle, J. E.

    2004-07-01

    We show how the viscous evolution of Keplerian accretion discs can be understood in terms of simple kinetic theory. Although standard physics texts give a simple derivation of momentum transfer in a linear shear flow using kinetic theory, many authors, as detailed by Hayashi & Matsuda, have had difficulties applying the same considerations to a circular shear flow. We show here how this may be done, and note that the essential ingredients are to take proper account of, first, isotropy locally in the frame of the fluid and, secondly, the geometry of the mean flow.

  11. Effect of Temperature and Sheet Temper on Isothermal Solidification Kinetics in Clad Aluminum Brazing Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benoit, Michael J.; Whitney, Mark A.; Wells, Mary A.; Winkler, Sooky

    2016-09-01

    Isothermal solidification (IS) is a phenomenon observed in clad aluminum brazing sheets, wherein the amount of liquid clad metal is reduced by penetration of the liquid clad into the core. The objective of the current investigation is to quantify the rate of IS through the use of a previously derived parameter, the Interface Rate Constant (IRC). The effect of peak temperature and initial sheet temper on IS kinetics were investigated. The results demonstrated that IS is due to the diffusion of silicon (Si) from the liquid clad layer into the solid core. Reduced amounts of liquid clad at long liquid duration times, a roughened sheet surface, and differences in resolidified clad layer morphology between sheet tempers were observed. Increased IS kinetics were predicted at higher temperatures by an IRC model as well as by experimentally determined IRC values; however, the magnitudes of these values are not in good agreement due to deficiencies in the model when applied to alloys. IS kinetics were found to be higher for sheets in the fully annealed condition when compared with work-hardened sheets, due to the influence of core grain boundaries providing high diffusivity pathways for Si diffusion, resulting in more rapid liquid clad penetration.

  12. Ammonium removal from aqueous solutions by clinoptilolite: determination of isotherm and thermodynamic parameters and comparison of kinetics by the double exponential model and conventional kinetic models.

    PubMed

    Tosun, Ismail

    2012-03-01

    The adsorption isotherm, the adsorption kinetics, and the thermodynamic parameters of ammonium removal from aqueous solution by using clinoptilolite in aqueous solution was investigated in this study. Experimental data obtained from batch equilibrium tests have been analyzed by four two-parameter (Freundlich, Langmuir, Tempkin and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R)) and four three-parameter (Redlich-Peterson (R-P), Sips, Toth and Khan) isotherm models. D-R and R-P isotherms were the models that best fitted to experimental data over the other two- and three-parameter models applied. The adsorption energy (E) from the D-R isotherm was found to be approximately 7 kJ/mol for the ammonium-clinoptilolite system, thereby indicating that ammonium is adsorbed on clinoptilolite by physisorption. Kinetic parameters were determined by analyzing the nth-order kinetic model, the modified second-order model and the double exponential model, and each model resulted in a coefficient of determination (R(2)) of above 0.989 with an average relative error lower than 5%. A Double Exponential Model (DEM) showed that the adsorption process develops in two stages as rapid and slow phase. Changes in standard free energy (∆G°), enthalpy (∆H°) and entropy (∆S°) of ammonium-clinoptilolite system were estimated by using the thermodynamic equilibrium coefficients.

  13. Ammonium Removal from Aqueous Solutions by Clinoptilolite: Determination of Isotherm and Thermodynamic Parameters and Comparison of Kinetics by the Double Exponential Model and Conventional Kinetic Models

    PubMed Central

    Tosun, İsmail

    2012-01-01

    The adsorption isotherm, the adsorption kinetics, and the thermodynamic parameters of ammonium removal from aqueous solution by using clinoptilolite in aqueous solution was investigated in this study. Experimental data obtained from batch equilibrium tests have been analyzed by four two-parameter (Freundlich, Langmuir, Tempkin and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R)) and four three-parameter (Redlich-Peterson (R-P), Sips, Toth and Khan) isotherm models. D-R and R-P isotherms were the models that best fitted to experimental data over the other two- and three-parameter models applied. The adsorption energy (E) from the D-R isotherm was found to be approximately 7 kJ/mol for the ammonium-clinoptilolite system, thereby indicating that ammonium is adsorbed on clinoptilolite by physisorption. Kinetic parameters were determined by analyzing the nth-order kinetic model, the modified second-order model and the double exponential model, and each model resulted in a coefficient of determination (R2) of above 0.989 with an average relative error lower than 5%. A Double Exponential Model (DEM) showed that the adsorption process develops in two stages as rapid and slow phase. Changes in standard free energy (∆G°), enthalpy (∆H°) and entropy (∆S°) of ammonium-clinoptilolite system were estimated by using the thermodynamic equilibrium coefficients. PMID:22690177

  14. Rapidly-Deposited Polydopamine Coating via High Temperature and Vigorous Stirring: Formation, Characterization and Biofunctional Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ping; Deng, Yi; Lyu, Beier; Zhang, Ranran; Zhang, Hai; Ma, Hongwei; Lyu, Yalin; Wei, Shicheng

    2014-01-01

    Polydopamine (PDA) coating provides a promising approach for immobilization of biomolecules onto almost all kinds of solid substrates. However, the deposition kinetics of PDA coating as a function of temperature and reaction method is not well elucidated. Since dopamine self-polymerization usually takes a long time, therefore, rapid-formation of PDA film becomes imperative for surface modification of biomaterials and medical devices. In the present study, a practical method for preparation of rapidly-deposited PDA coating was developed using a uniquely designed device, and the kinetics of dopamine self-polymerization was investigated by QCM sensor system. It was found that high temperature and vigorous stirring could dramatically speed up the formation of PDA film on QCM chip surface. Surface characterization, BSA binding study, cell viability assay and antibacterial test demonstrates that the polydopamine coating after polymerization for 30 min by our approach exhibits similar properties to those of 24 h counterpart. The method has a great potential for rapid-deposition of polydopamine films to modify biomaterial surfaces. PMID:25415328

  15. The Kinetics of Phase Transformation in Welds

    SciTech Connect

    Elmer, J W; Wong, J; Palmer, T

    2002-02-06

    that existed in the HAZ during welding. The TRXRD technique uses an x-ray beam positioned at one location, where XRD patterns are collected as a stationary ''spot'' weld rapidly heats and cools the base metal. Data can be collected from either the HAZ to observe solid-state phase transformations or from the FZ to observe solidification and subsequent solid-state phase transformations. Higher heating and cooling rates are produced in the spot welds than in the moving welds, requiring time resolution in the milli-second regime for TRXRD to record the rapid microstructural changes that occur. Numerical weld modeling is being performed to: (1) extract the important phase transformation kinetic information from the experimental data, (2) investigate mechanisms of phase transformations under non-isothermal welding conditions, and (3) develop models for predicting weld microstructural evolution. The core of our numerical weld modeling program is a 3-dimensional coupled heat and fluid flow code developed by the Penn State University. Additional modeling is being performed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory where Thermocalc is being used to understand phase equilibria in complex alloy systems, and where a diffusion-based model considering paraequilibrium is being developed to predict phase transformations in steels.

  16. Anthocyanin kinetics are dependent on anthocyanin structure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The kinetics of anthocyanin metabolism was investigated in a human feeding trial. Volunteers (n=12) consumed purple carrots containing five different anthocyanin forms: cyanidin-3-(2”-xylose-6”-glucose-galactoside), cyanidin-3-(2”-xylose-galactoside), cyanidin-3-(2”-xylose-6”-sinapoyl-glucose-galac...

  17. Adsorption Kinetics in Nanoscale Porous Coordination Polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Nune, Satish K.; Thallapally, Praveen K.; McGrail, Benard Peter; Annapureddy, Harsha V. R.; Dang, Liem X.; Mei, Donghai; Karri, Naveen; Alvine, Kyle J.; Olszta, Matthew J.; Arey, Bruce W.; Dohnalkova, Alice

    2015-10-07

    Nanoscale porous coordination polymers were synthesized using simple wet chemical method. The effect of various polymer surfactants on colloidal stability and shape selectivity was investigated. Our results suggest that the nanoparticles exhibited significantly improved adsorption kinetics compared to bulk crystals due to decreased diffusion path lengths and preferred crystal plane interaction.

  18. Kinetic investigation of human dipeptidyl peptidase II (DPPII)-mediated hydrolysis of dipeptide derivatives and its identification as quiescent cell proline dipeptidase (QPP)/dipeptidyl peptidase 7 (DPP7).

    PubMed

    Maes, Marie-Berthe; Lambeir, Anne-Marie; Gilany, Kambiz; Senten, Kristel; Van der Veken, Pieter; Leiting, Barbara; Augustyns, Koen; Scharpé, Simon; De Meester, Ingrid

    2005-03-01

    The presence of DPPII (dipeptidyl peptidase II; E.C. 3.4.14.2) has been demonstrated in various mammalian tissues. However, a profound molecular and catalytic characterization, including substrate selectivity, kinetics and pH-dependence, has not been conducted. In the present study, DPPII was purified from human seminal plasma to apparent homogeneity with a high yield (40%) purification scheme, including an inhibitor-based affinity chromatographic step. The inhibitor lysyl-piperidide (K(i) approximately 0.9 microM at pH 5.5) was chosen, as it provided a favourable affinity/recovery ratio. The human enzyme appeared as a 120 kDa homodimer. Mass spectrometric analysis after tryptic digestion together with a kinetic comparison indicate strongly its identity with QPP (quiescent cell proline dipeptidase), also called dipeptidyl peptidase 7. pH profiles of both kcat and kcat/K(m) clearly demonstrated that DPPII/QPP possesses an acidic and not a neutral optimum as was reported for QPP. Kinetic parameters of the human natural DPPII for dipeptide-derived chromogenic [pNA (p-nitroanilide)] and fluorogenic [4Me2NA (4-methoxy-2-naphthylamide)] substrates were determined under different assay conditions. DPPII preferred the chromogenic pNA-derived substrates over the fluorogenic 4Me2NA-derived substrates. Natural human DPPII showed high efficiency towards synthetic substrates containing proline at the P1 position and lysine at P2. The importance of the P1' group for P2 and P1 selectivity was revealed, explaining many discrepancies in the literature. Furthermore, substrate preferences of human DPPII and dipeptidyl peptidase IV were compared based on their selectivity constants (kcat/K(m)). Lys-Pro-pNA (k(cat)/K(m) 4.1x10(6) s(-1) x M(-1)) and Ala-Pro-pNA (kcat/K(m) 2.6x10(6) s(-1) x M(-1)) were found to be the most sensitive chromogenic substrates for human DPPII, but were less selective than Lys-Ala-pNA (kcat/K(m) 0.4x10(6) s(-1) x M(-1)).

  19. Rapid Reading, Yes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frommer, Harvey

    1971-01-01

    Recommends instruction in rapid reading fo high school and college students and asserts that flexibility of speed and reasoning provide the foundation for effective rapid reading. Describes the components of rapid reading as orientation, selection, clarification, arrangement, review, and study. (RW)

  20. MICROFLUIDIC MIXERS FOR THE INVESTIGATION OF PROTEIN FOLDING USING SYNCHROTRON RADIATION CIRCULAR DICHROISM SPECTROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, A; Hertzog, D; Baumgartel, P; Lengefeld, J; Horsley, D; Schuler, B; Bakajin, O

    2006-03-20

    The purpose of this study is to design, fabricate and optimize microfluidic mixers to investigate the kinetics of protein secondary structure formation with Synchrotron Radiation Circular Dichroism (SRCD) spectroscopy. The mixers are designed to rapidly initiate protein folding reaction through the dilution of denaturant. The devices are fabricated out of fused silica, so that they are transparent in the UV. We present characterization of mixing in the fabricated devices, as well as the initial SRCD data on proteins inside the mixers.

  1. Kinetic studies of the infrared-induced reaction between atomic chlorine and solid parahydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raston, Paul L.; Kettwich, Sharon C.; Anderson, David T.

    2015-04-01

    We present Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic studies of the IR-induced Cl + H2(v = 1) → HCl + H reaction in a parahydrogen (pH2) matrix aimed at distinguishing between two proposed reactions mechanisms; direct-IR and vibron-mediated. The Cl atom reactants are produced via 355 nm in situ photolysis of a Cl2 doped pH2 matrix. After photolysis is complete, a long-pass IR filter in the FTIR beam is removed and we measure the ensuing IR-induced reaction kinetics using rapid scan FTIR spectroscopy. We follow both the decay of the Cl atom reactant and growth of the HCl product using the Cl spin-orbit (SO) + Q1(0) and HCl R1(0) transitions, respectively. We show the IR-induced reaction mechanism depends on the spectral profile of the IR radiation; for IR spectral profiles that have significant IR intensities between 4000 and 5000 cm-1 we observe first-order kinetics that are assigned to a vibron-mediated mechanism and for spectral profiles that have significant IR intensities that include the Cl SO + Q1(0) transition near 5094 cm-1 we observe bi-exponential kinetics that are dominated by the direct-IR mechanism at early reaction times. We can distinguish between the two mechanisms using the observed kinetics. We investigate the reaction kinetics for different FTIR optical setups, for a range of sample conditions, and start and stop the IR-induced reaction to investigate the importance of secondary H atom reactions. We also study the IR-induced reaction in Br/Cl co-doped pH2 samples and show the presence of the Br atom quenches the vibron-mediated reaction kinetics presumably because the Br-atoms serve as efficient vibron traps. This paper indicates that in a highly enriched pH2 matrix the H atoms that are produced by the IR-induced Cl atom reaction likely do not play a significant role in the measured reaction kinetics which implies these secondary H atom reactions are highly selective.

  2. Equilibrium and kinetics in metamorphism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pattison, D. R.

    2012-12-01

    The equilibrium model for metamorphism is founded on the metamorphic facies principle, the repeated association of the same mineral assemblages in rocks of different bulk composition that have been metamorphosed together. Yet, for any metamorphic process to occur, there must be some degree of reaction overstepping (disequilibrium) to initiate reaction. The magnitude and variability of overstepping, and the degree to which it is either a relatively minor wrinkle or a more substantive challenge to the interpretation of metamorphic rocks using the equilibrium model, is an active area of current research. Kinetic barriers to reaction generally diminish with rising temperature due to the Arrhenius relation. In contrast, the rate of build-up of the macroscopic energetic driving force needed to overcome kinetic barriers to reaction, reaction affinity, does not vary uniformly with temperature, instead varying from reaction to reaction. High-entropy reactions that release large quantities of H2O build up reaction affinity more rapidly than low-entropy reactions that release little or no H2O, such that the former are expected to be overstepped less than the latter. Some consequences include: (1) metamorphic reaction intervals may be discrete rather than continuous, initiating at the point that sufficient reaction affinity has built up to overcome kinetic barriers; (2) metamorphic reaction intervals may not correspond in a simple way to reaction boundaries in an equilibrium phase diagram; (3) metamorphic reactions may involve metastable reactions; (4) metamorphic 'cascades' are possible, in which stable and metastable reactions involving the same reactant phases may proceed simultaneously; and (5) fluid generation, and possibly fluid presence in general, may be episodic rather than continuous, corresponding to discrete intervals of reaction. These considerations bear on the interpretation of P-T-t paths from metamorphic mineral assemblages and textures. The success of the

  3. Kinetics and Catalysis Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falconer, John L.; Britten, Jerald A.

    1984-01-01

    Eleven videotaped kinetics and catalysis demonstrations are described. Demonstrations include the clock reaction, oscillating reaction, hydrogen oxidation in air, hydrogen-oxygen explosion, acid-base properties of solids, high- and low-temperature zeolite reactivity, copper catalysis of ammonia oxidation and sodium peroxide decomposition, ammonia…

  4. Oxidative desulfurization: kinetic modelling.

    PubMed

    Dhir, S; Uppaluri, R; Purkait, M K

    2009-01-30

    Increasing environmental legislations coupled with enhanced production of petroleum products demand, the deployment of novel technologies to remove organic sulfur efficiently. This work represents the kinetic modeling of ODS using H(2)O(2) over tungsten-containing layered double hydroxide (LDH) using the experimental data provided by Hulea et al. [V. Hulea, A.L. Maciuca, F. Fajula, E. Dumitriu, Catalytic oxidation of thiophenes and thioethers with hydrogen peroxide in the presence of W-containing layered double hydroxides, Appl. Catal. A: Gen. 313 (2) (2006) 200-207]. The kinetic modeling approach in this work initially targets the scope of the generation of a superstructure of micro-kinetic reaction schemes and models assuming Langmuir-Hinshelwood (LH) and Eley-Rideal (ER) mechanisms. Subsequently, the screening and selection of above models is initially based on profile-based elimination of incompetent schemes followed by non-linear regression search performed using the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm (LMA) for the chosen models. The above analysis inferred that Eley-Rideal mechanism describes the kinetic behavior of ODS process using tungsten-containing LDH, with adsorption of reactant and intermediate product only taking place on the catalyst surface. Finally, an economic index is presented that scopes the economic aspects of the novel catalytic technology with the parameters obtained during regression analysis to conclude that the cost factor for the catalyst is 0.0062-0.04759 US $ per barrel. PMID:18541367

  5. Kinetic tetrazolium microtiter assay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, Duane L. (Inventor); Stowe, Raymond P. (Inventor); Koeing, David W. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A method for conducting an in vitro cell assay using a tetrazolium indicator is disclosed. The indicator includes a nonionic detergent which solubilizes a tetrazolium reduction product in vitro and has low toxicity for the cells. The incubation of test cells in the presence of zolium bromide and octoxynol (TRITON X-100) permits kinetics of the cell metabolism to be determined.

  6. Rapid self-healing hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Phadke, Ameya; Zhang, Chao; Arman, Bedri; Hsu, Cheng-Chih; Mashelkar, Raghunath A.; Lele, Ashish K.; Tauber, Michael J.; Arya, Gaurav; Varghese, Shyni

    2012-01-01

    Synthetic materials that are capable of autonomous healing upon damage are being developed at a rapid pace because of their many potential applications. Despite these advancements, achieving self-healing in permanently cross-linked hydrogels has remained elusive because of the presence of water and irreversible cross-links. Here, we demonstrate that permanently cross-linked hydrogels can be engineered to exhibit self-healing in an aqueous environment. We achieve this feature by arming the hydrogel network with flexible-pendant side chains carrying an optimal balance of hydrophilic and hydrophobic moieties that allows the side chains to mediate hydrogen bonds across the hydrogel interfaces with minimal steric hindrance and hydrophobic collapse. The self-healing reported here is rapid, occurring within seconds of the insertion of a crack into the hydrogel or juxtaposition of two separate hydrogel pieces. The healing is reversible and can be switched on and off via changes in pH, allowing external control over the healing process. Moreover, the hydrogels can sustain multiple cycles of healing and separation without compromising their mechanical properties and healing kinetics. Beyond revealing how secondary interactions could be harnessed to introduce new functions to chemically cross-linked polymeric systems, we also demonstrate various potential applications of such easy-to-synthesize, smart, self-healing hydrogels. PMID:22392977

  7. Barrierless growth of precursor-free, ultrafast laser-fragmented noble metal nanoparticles by colloidal atom clusters - A kinetic in situ study.

    PubMed

    Jendrzej, Sandra; Gökce, Bilal; Amendola, Vincenzo; Barcikowski, Stephan

    2016-02-01

    Unintended post-synthesis growth of noble metal colloids caused by excess amounts of reactants or highly reactive atom clusters represents a fundamental problem in colloidal chemistry, affecting product stability or purity. Hence, quantified kinetics could allow defining nanoparticle size determination in dependence of the time. Here, we investigate in situ the growth kinetics of ps pulsed laser-fragmented platinum nanoparticles in presence of naked atom clusters in water without any influence of reducing agents or surfactants. The nanoparticle growth is investigated for platinum covering a time scale of minutes to 50days after nanoparticle generation, it is also supplemented by results obtained from gold and palladium. Since a minimum atom cluster concentration is exceeded, a significant growth is determined by time resolved UV/Vis spectroscopy, analytical disc centrifugation, zeta potential measurement and transmission electron microscopy. We suggest a decrease of atom cluster concentration over time, since nanoparticles grow at the expense of atom clusters. The growth mechanism during early phase (<1day) of laser-synthesized colloid is kinetically modeled by rapid barrierless coalescence. The prolonged slow nanoparticle growth is kinetically modeled by a combination of coalescence and Lifshitz-Slyozov-Wagner kinetic for Ostwald ripening, validated experimentally by the temperature dependence of Pt nanoparticle size and growth quenching by Iodide anions.

  8. An investigation of the effect of surface impurities on the adsorption kinetics of hydrogen chemisorbed onto iron. Annual Status Report, 1 Jan. - 31 Dec. 1991. [titanium aluminides and beryllium

    SciTech Connect

    Shanabarger, M.R.

    1991-12-01

    The goal was to develop an understanding of heterogeneous kinetic processes for those molecular species which produce gaseous hydrogen degradation of the mechanical properties of metallic structural materials. Although hydrogen degradation of metallic materials is believed to result from dissolved protonic hydrogen, the heterogeneous hydrogen interface transport processes often dominate the kinetics of the degradation process. The initial step in the interface transport process is the dissociative chemisorption of the molecular species at the metal surface followed by hydrogen absorption into and transport through the bulk. Modern advanced aerospace applications often require the use of structural materials in high pressure hydrogen environments at temperatures which range from low cryogenic temperatures to very high temperatures (1300 K and greater). Materials proposed for these applications, such as the titanium aluminides, beta-titanium alloys, nickel- and cobalt-based superalloys, molybdenum-rhenium alloys, beryllium, and various beryllides, need to possess a high degree of immunity from hydrogen induced degradation of mechanical properties. In the present program, the interaction of hydrogen with the surfaces of alpha-2 (Ti3Al) titanium aluminide, gamma (TiAl) titanium aluminide, and beryllium were studied. The interaction of low pressure hydrogen with gamma titanium aluminide and beryllium was found to be relatively weak, in the sense that adsorption leads to a low surface concentration of dissociated hydrogen, i.e., the chemisorption process is reversible at room temperature (300 K) for gamma titanium aluminide and the sticking coefficient for chemisorption is extremely small for beryllium. Hydrogen was found to interact readily with alpha-2 titanium aluminide to form a stable surface hydride at 300 K.

  9. Electron-transfer reactions of cobalt(III) complexes. 1. The kinetic investigation of the reduction of various surfactant cobalt(III) complexes by iron(II) in surface active ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Nagaraj, Karuppiah; Senthil Murugan, Krishnan; Thangamuniyandi, Pilavadi; Sakthinathan, Subramanian

    2015-05-15

    The kinetics of outer sphere electron transfer reaction of surfactant cobalt(III) complex ions, cis-[Co(en)2(C12H25NH2)2](3+) (1), cis-[Co(dp)2(C12H25NH2)2](3+) (2), cis-[Co(trien)(C12H25NH2)2](3+) (3), cis-[Co(bpy)2(C12H25NH2)2](3+) (4) and cis-[Co(phen)2(C12H25NH2)2](3+) (5) (en: ethylenediamine, dp: diaminopropane, trien : triethylenetetramine, bpy: 2,2'-bipyridyl, phen: 1,10-phenanthroline and C12H25NH2 : dodecylamine) have been interrogated by Fe(2+) ion in ionic liquid (1-butyl-3-methylimidazoliumbromide) medium at different temperatures (298, 303, 308, 313, 318 and 323K) by the spectrophotometry method under pseudo first order conditions using an excess of the reductant. Experimentally the reactions were found to be of second order and the electron transfer as outer sphere. The second order rate constant for the electron transfer reaction in ionic liquids was found to increase with increase in the concentration of all these surfactant cobalt(III) complexes. Among these complexes (from en to phen ligand), complex containing the phenanthroline ligand rate is higher compared to other complexes. By assuming the outer sphere mechanism, the results have been explained based on the presence of aggregated structures containing cobalt(III) complexes at the surface of ionic liquids formed by the surfactant cobalt(III) complexes in the reaction medium. The activation parameters (enthalpy of activation ΔH(‡) and entropy of activation ΔS(‡)) of the reaction have been calculated which substantiate the kinetics of the reaction.

  10. Electron-transfer reactions of cobalt(III) complexes. 1. The kinetic investigation of the reduction of various surfactant cobalt(III) complexes by iron(II) in surface active ionic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaraj, Karuppiah; Senthil Murugan, Krishnan; Thangamuniyandi, Pilavadi; Sakthinathan, Subramanian

    2015-05-01

    The kinetics of outer sphere electron transfer reaction of surfactant cobalt(III) complex ions, cis-[Co(en)2(C12H25NH2)2]3+ (1), cis-[Co(dp)2(C12H25NH2)2]3+ (2), cis-[Co(trien)(C12H25NH2)2]3+ (3), cis-[Co(bpy)2(C12H25NH2)2]3+ (4) and cis-[Co(phen)2(C12H25NH2)2]3+ (5) (en: ethylenediamine, dp: diaminopropane, trien : triethylenetetramine, bpy: 2,2‧-bipyridyl, phen: 1,10-phenanthroline and C12H25NH2 : dodecylamine) have been interrogated by Fe2+ ion in ionic liquid (1-butyl-3-methylimidazoliumbromide) medium at different temperatures (298, 303, 308, 313, 318 and 323 K) by the spectrophotometry method under pseudo first order conditions using an excess of the reductant. Experimentally the reactions were found to be of second order and the electron transfer as outer sphere. The second order rate constant for the electron transfer reaction in ionic liquids was found to increase with increase in the concentration of all these surfactant cobalt(III) complexes. Among these complexes (from en to phen ligand), complex containing the phenanthroline ligand rate is higher compared to other complexes. By assuming the outer sphere mechanism, the results have been explained based on the presence of aggregated structures containing cobalt(III) complexes at the surface of ionic liquids formed by the surfactant cobalt(III) complexes in the reaction medium. The activation parameters (enthalpy of activation ΔH‡ and entropy of activation ΔS‡) of the reaction have been calculated which substantiate the kinetics of the reaction.

  11. Investigating Inner Sphere Reorganization via Secondary Kinetic Isotope Effects in the C–H Cleavage Reaction Catalyzed by Soybean Lipoxygenase: Tunneling in the Substrate Backbone as well as the Transferred Hydrogen

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Matthew P.; Klinman, Judith P.

    2011-01-01

    This work describes the application of NMR to the measurement of secondary deuterium (2° 2H) and carbon-13 (13C) kinetic isotope effects (KIES) at positions 9 to 13 within the substrate linoleic acid (LA) of soybean lipoxygenase-1. The KIEs have been measured using linoleic acid labeled with either protium (11,11-h2-LA) or deuterium (11,11-d2-LA) at the reactive C11 position, which has been previously shown to yield a primary deuterium isotope effect of ca. 80. The conditions of measurement yield the intrinsic 2° 2H and 13C KIEs on kcat/Km directly for 11,11-d2-LA, whereas the values for the 2° 2H KIEs for 11,11-h2-LA are obtained after correction for a kinetic commitment. The pattern of the resulting 2° 2H and 13C isotope effects reveals values that lie far above those predicted from changes in local force constants. Additionally, many of the experimental values cannot be modeled by electronic effects, torsional strain, or the simple inclusion of a tunneling correction to the rate. Although previous studies have shown the importance of extensive tunneling for cleavage of the primary hydrogen at C11 of LA, the present findings can only be interpreted by extending the conclusion of non-classical behavior to the secondary hydrogens and carbons that flank the position undergoing C-H bond cleavage. A quantum mechanical method introduced by Buhks et al. [J. Phys. Chem. 85, 3763 (1981)] to model the inner sphere reorganization that accompanies electron transfer has been shown to be able to reproduce the scale of the 2° 2H KIEs. PMID:21192631

  12. Electron-transfer reactions of cobalt(III) complexes. 1. The kinetic investigation of the reduction of various surfactant cobalt(III) complexes by iron(II) in surface active ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Nagaraj, Karuppiah; Senthil Murugan, Krishnan; Thangamuniyandi, Pilavadi; Sakthinathan, Subramanian

    2015-05-15

    The kinetics of outer sphere electron transfer reaction of surfactant cobalt(III) complex ions, cis-[Co(en)2(C12H25NH2)2](3+) (1), cis-[Co(dp)2(C12H25NH2)2](3+) (2), cis-[Co(trien)(C12H25NH2)2](3+) (3), cis-[Co(bpy)2(C12H25NH2)2](3+) (4) and cis-[Co(phen)2(C12H25NH2)2](3+) (5) (en: ethylenediamine, dp: diaminopropane, trien : triethylenetetramine, bpy: 2,2'-bipyridyl, phen: 1,10-phenanthroline and C12H25NH2 : dodecylamine) have been interrogated by Fe(2+) ion in ionic liquid (1-butyl-3-methylimidazoliumbromide) medium at different temperatures (298, 303, 308, 313, 318 and 323K) by the spectrophotometry method under pseudo first order conditions using an excess of the reductant. Experimentally the reactions were found to be of second order and the electron transfer as outer sphere. The second order rate constant for the electron transfer reaction in ionic liquids was found to increase with increase in the concentration of all these surfactant cobalt(III) complexes. Among these complexes (from en to phen ligand), complex containing the phenanthroline ligand rate is higher compared to other complexes. By assuming the outer sphere mechanism, the results have been explained based on the presence of aggregated structures containing cobalt(III) complexes at the surface of ionic liquids formed by the surfactant cobalt(III) complexes in the reaction medium. The activation parameters (enthalpy of activation ΔH(‡) and entropy of activation ΔS(‡)) of the reaction have been calculated which substantiate the kinetics of the reaction. PMID:25721780

  13. Kinetics of coal combustion: Eighth quarterly report

    SciTech Connect

    Gat, N.; Petach, M.; Gavalas, G.R.; Flagan, R.C.

    1987-02-01

    The investigation of fundamentals of coal combustion kinetics addresses several topics of major importance relative to improved understanding of pulverized coal combustion and includes both homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions. The principal topics include: (1) combustion of volatiles, and (2) heterogeneous combustion of coal/char. Research activities include small-scale experimentation, interpretation of experimental results in terms of mechanistic understanding, and the development of validation of kinetic models of fundamental processes. The project is divided into three major tasks, the details of which are provided. 20 figs., 1 tab.

  14. A Conserved Residue Cluster That Governs Kinetics of ATP-dependent Gating of Kir6.2 Potassium Channels*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Roger S.; Wright, Jordan D.; Pless, Stephan A.; Nunez, John-Jose; Kim, Robin Y.; Li, Jenny B. W.; Yang, Runying; Ahern, Christopher A.; Kurata, Harley T.

    2015-01-01

    ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels are heteromultimeric complexes of an inwardly rectifying Kir channel (Kir6.x) and sulfonylurea receptors. Their regulation by intracellular ATP and ADP generates electrical signals in response to changes in cellular metabolism. We investigated channel elements that control the kinetics of ATP-dependent regulation of KATP (Kir6.2 + SUR1) channels using rapid concentration jumps. WT Kir6.2 channels re-open after rapid washout of ATP with a time constant of ∼60 ms. Extending similar kinetic measurements to numerous mutants revealed fairly modest effects on gating kinetics despite significant changes in ATP sensitivity and open probability. However, we identified a pair of highly conserved neighboring amino acids (Trp-68 and Lys-170) that control the rate of channel opening and inhibition in response to ATP. Paradoxically, mutations of Trp-68 or Lys-170 markedly slow the kinetics of channel opening (500 and 700 ms for W68L and K170N, respectively), while increasing channel open probability. Examining the functional effects of these residues using φ value analysis revealed a steep negative slope. This finding implies that these residues play a role in lowering the transition state energy barrier between open and closed channel states. Using unnatural amino acid incorporation, we demonstrate the requirement for a planar amino acid at Kir6.2 position 68 for normal channel gating, which is potentially necessary to localize the ϵ-amine of Lys-170 in the phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate-binding site. Overall, our findings identify a discrete pair of highly conserved residues with an essential role for controlling gating kinetics of Kir channels. PMID:25934393

  15. A Conserved Residue Cluster That Governs Kinetics of ATP-dependent Gating of Kir6.2 Potassium Channels.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Roger S; Wright, Jordan D; Pless, Stephan A; Nunez, John-Jose; Kim, Robin Y; Li, Jenny B W; Yang, Runying; Ahern, Christopher A; Kurata, Harley T

    2015-06-19

    ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels are heteromultimeric complexes of an inwardly rectifying Kir channel (Kir6.x) and sulfonylurea receptors. Their regulation by intracellular ATP and ADP generates electrical signals in response to changes in cellular metabolism. We investigated channel elements that control the kinetics of ATP-dependent regulation of KATP (Kir6.2 + SUR1) channels using rapid concentration jumps. WT Kir6.2 channels re-open after rapid washout of ATP with a time constant of ∼60 ms. Extending similar kinetic measurements to numerous mutants revealed fairly modest effects on gating kinetics despite significant changes in ATP sensitivity and open probability. However, we identified a pair of highly conserved neighboring amino acids (Trp-68 and Lys-170) that control the rate of channel opening and inhibition in response to ATP. Paradoxically, mutations of Trp-68 or Lys-170 markedly slow the kinetics of channel opening (500 and 700 ms for W68L and K170N, respectively), while increasing channel open probability. Examining the functional effects of these residues using φ value analysis revealed a steep negative slope. This finding implies that these residues play a role in lowering the transition state energy barrier between open and closed channel states. Using unnatural amino acid incorporation, we demonstrate the requirement for a planar amino acid at Kir6.2 position 68 for normal channel gating, which is potentially necessary to localize the ϵ-amine of Lys-170 in the phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate-binding site. Overall, our findings identify a discrete pair of highly conserved residues with an essential role for controlling gating kinetics of Kir channels.

  16. Kinetics of Bubble Generation in Mafic Enclaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, B. A.; Gardner, J. E.

    2014-12-01

    Volcanically erupted mafic enclaves are typically vesicular, with the bubbles forming when the mafic magma cools after it is injected and disaggregated into a cooler silicic magma. This study uses hydrothermal experiments to investigate the kinetics of pre-eruptive bubble nucleation and growth within mafic magmas, focused on the efficiency of nucleation on different minerals, and to quantify the growth rate of bubbles with varying cooling rates. Starting materials are natural mafic enclaves from Southwest Trident, Alaska. Experiments were initially equilibrated with H2O at 85 MPa and 1065 °C for 2 hours, producing a melt with blocky crystals of plagioclase and pyroxene, and spherical bubbles with a mean 30 μm diameter and number density (Nv) of 7.2x104 cm-3. Upon cooling to 1015 °C at 2 °C/h, the mineralogy and Nv did not change (although total crystallinity increased), while the mean bubble diameter increased to 90 μm. Cooling further to 985 °C at 2 °C/h, resulted in the crystallization of Fe-Ti oxides, along with an abrupt Nv increase (3.0x105 cm-3) of bubbles with a mean diameter of 60 μm. This abrupt bubble nucleation event, coinciding with the formation of Fe-Ti oxides, suggests that plagioclase and pyroxene are poor bubble nucleation sites in mafic melts, and that Fe-Ti oxides are good bubble nucleation sites, similar to previous results using rhyolite melts. Additionally, the occurrence of this nucleation event suggests that cooling related diffusive growth of bubbles in mafic enclaves, under magma chamber conditions, is too slow to keep up with increasing volatile saturation in the melt, and that the melt may become supersaturated until nucleation sites for new bubbles become available. Rapid cooling (1065-985 °C at 110 °C/h) produced abundant acicular plagioclase and pyroxene crystals (no Fe-Ti oxides), and bubbles with a nearly identical mean diameter and Nv to experiments equilibrated at 1065 °C. It is therefore likely that bubbles will not

  17. Rapid CE-UV binding tests of environmentally hazardous compounds with polymer-modified magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Zafar; Alsudir, Samar; Miah, Musharraf; Lai, Edward P C

    2011-08-01

    Hazardous compounds and bacteria in water have an adverse impact on human health and environmental ecology. Polydopamine (or polypyrrole)-coated magnetic nanoparticles and polymethacrylic acid-co-ethylene glycol dimethacrylate submicron particles were investigated for their fast binding kinetics with bisphenol A, proflavine, naphthalene acetic acid, and Escherichia coli. A new method was developed for the rapid determination of % binding by sequential injection of particles first and compounds (or E. coli) next into a fused-silica capillary for overlap binding during electrophoretic migration. Only nanolitre volumes of compounds and particles were sufficient to complete a rapid binding test. After heterogeneous binding, separation of the compounds from the particles was afforded by capillary electrophoresis. % binding was influenced by applied voltage but not current flow. In-capillary coating of particles affected the % binding of compounds. PMID:21766478

  18. A Stopped-Flow Kinetics Experiment for the Physical Chemistry Laboratory Using Noncorrosive Reagents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prigodich, Richard V.

    2014-01-01

    Stopped-flow kinetics techniques are important to the study of rapid chemical and biochemical reactions. Incorporation of a stopped-flow kinetics experiment into the physical chemistry laboratory curriculum would therefore be an instructive addition. However, the usual reactions studied in such exercises employ a corrosive reagent that can over…

  19. Switching kinetics of electrochemical metallization memory cells.

    PubMed

    Menzel, Stephan; Tappertzhofen, Stefan; Waser, Rainer; Valov, Ilia

    2013-05-14

    The strongly nonlinear switching kinetics of electrochemical metallization memory (ECM) cells are investigated using an advanced 1D simulation model. It is based on the electrochemical growth and dissolution of a Ag or Cu filament within a solid thin film and accounts for nucleation effects, charge transfer, and cation drift. The model predictions are consistent with experimental switching results of a time range of 12 orders of magnitude obtained from silver iodide (AgI) based ECM cells. By analyzing the simulation results the electrochemical processes limiting the switching kinetics are revealed. This study provides new insights into the understanding of the limiting electrochemical processes determining the switching kinetics of ECM cells. PMID:23549450

  20. LLNL Chemical Kinetics Modeling Group

    SciTech Connect

    Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Mehl, M; Herbinet, O; Curran, H J; Silke, E J

    2008-09-24

    The LLNL chemical kinetics modeling group has been responsible for much progress in the development of chemical kinetic models for practical fuels. The group began its work in the early 1970s, developing chemical kinetic models for methane, ethane, ethanol and halogenated inhibitors. Most recently, it has been developing chemical kinetic models for large n-alkanes, cycloalkanes, hexenes, and large methyl esters. These component models are needed to represent gasoline, diesel, jet, and oil-sand-derived fuels.

  1. Kinetics of phosphate limited algal growth.

    PubMed

    Nyholm, N

    1977-04-01

    The kinetics of phosphate limited growth of two green algae Chlorella pyrenoidosa and Selenastrum capricornutum have been studied in chemostats. Several kinetic models which express the specific growth rate as a function of the intracellular phosphorus content have been examined, and one of the models was found to be significantly better than the other models. The principles of this model were described in a recent paper by Nyholm. The kinetics of phosphate uptake have been investigated by adding pulses of phosphate to the chemostats, The uptake by phosphorus deficient cells could be described by Michaelis-Menten kinetics for phosphate concentrations below approximately 500 microng P/liter. Further, with the assumption of a discontinuous adjustment of the uptake rate at the onset of phosphorus deficiency, a complete kinetic model for growth and phosphate removal is proposed. The mean cell size and the contents of chlorophyll a and RNA per unit dry weight have been measured for C. pyrenoidosa as a function of the dilution rate. PMID:856323

  2. Solder wetting kinetics in narrow V-grooves

    SciTech Connect

    Yost, F.G.; Rye, R.R.; Mann, J.A. Jr.

    1997-12-01

    Experiments are performed to observe capillary flow in grooves cut into copper surfaces. Flow kinetics of two liquids, 1-heptanol and eutectic Sn-Pb solder, are modeled with modified Washburn kinetics and compared to flow data. It is shown that both liquids flow parabolically in narrow V-grooves, and the data scale as predicted by the modified Washburn model. The early portions of the flow kinetics are characterized by curvature in the length vs time relationship which is not accounted for in the modified Washburn model. This effect is interpreted in terms of a dynamic contact angle. It is concluded that under conditions of rapid flow, solder spreading can be understood as a simple fluid flow process. Slower kinetics, e.g. solder droplet spreading on flat surfaces, may be affected by subsidiary chemical processes such as reaction.

  3. Infrared Absorption Spectroscopy and Chemical Kinetics of Free Radicals. Final Performance Report, August 1, 1985--July 31, 1994

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Curl, R. F.; Glass, G. P.

    1995-06-01

    This research was directed at the detection, monitoring, and study (by infrared absorption spectroscopy) of the chemical kinetic behavior of small free radical species thought to be important intermediates in combustion. The work typically progressed from the detection and analysis of the infrared spectrum of combustion radical to the utilization of the infrared spectrum thus obtained in the investigation of chemical kinetics of the radical species. The methodology employed was infrared kinetic spectroscopy. In this technique the radical is produced by UV flash photolysis using an excimer laser and then its transient infrared absorption is observed using a single frequency cw laser as the source of the infrared probe light. When the probe laser frequency is near the center of an absorption line of the radical produced by the flash, the transient infrared absorption rises rapidly and then decays as the radical reacts with the precursor or with substances introduced for the purpose of studying the reaction kinetics or with itself. The decay times observed in these studies varied from less than one microsecond to more than one millisecond. By choosing appropriate time windows after the flash and the average infrared detector signal in a window as data channels, the infrared spectrum of the radical may be obtained. By locking the infrared probe laser to the center of the absorption line and measuring the rate of decay of the transient infrared absorption signal as the chemical composition of the gas mixture is varied, the chemical kinetics of the radical may be investigated. In what follows the systems investigated and the results obtained are outlined.

  4. Kinetics of oil shale char gasification

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, W.J.; Gerber, M.A.; Hatter, M.A.; Oakes, D.G.

    1981-01-01

    The kinetics of oil shale char gasification have been studied for Colorado oil shale from the Parachute Creek member. Reaction rate expressions similar to those previously reported for coal char were obtained for the H/sub 2/O-char, CO/sub 2/-char, and water gas shift reactions. Evidence is presented to suggest that CaO, a product of mineral decomposition, catalyzes the H/sub 2/O-char reaction and that indigenous iron catalyzes the water gas shift reaction. The latter reaction proceeds rapidly so that the make-gas consists primarily of H/sub 2/ and CO/sub 2/. 12 references.

  5. Kinetic Tetrazolium Microtiter Assay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, Duane L.; Stowe, Raymond; Koenig, David

    1993-01-01

    Kinetic tetrazolium microtiter assay (KTMA) involves use of tetrazolium salts and Triton X-100 (or equivalent), nontoxic, in vitro color developer solubilizing colored metabolite formazan without injuring or killing metabolizing cells. Provides for continuous measurement of metabolism and makes possible to determine rate of action of antimicrobial agent in real time as well as determines effective inhibitory concentrations. Used to monitor growth after addition of stimulatory compounds. Provides for kinetic determination of efficacy of biocide, greatly increasing reliability and precision of results. Also used to determine relative effectiveness of antimicrobial agent as function of time. Capability of generating results on day of test extremely important in treatment of water and waste, disinfection of hospital rooms, and in pharmaceutical, agricultural, and food-processing industries. Assay also used in many aspects of cell biology.

  6. Kinetic Theory of Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    The theory, developed in the nineteenth century, notably by Rudolf Clausius (1822-88) and James Clerk Maxwell (1831-79), that the properties of a gas (temperature, pressure, etc) could be described in terms of the motions (and kinetic energy) of the molecules comprising the gases. The theory has wide implications in astrophysics. In particular, the perfect gas law, which relates the pressure, vol...

  7. An experimental model of COD abatement in MBBR based on biofilm growth dynamic and on substrates' removal kinetics.

    PubMed

    Siciliano, Alessio; De Rosa, Salvatore

    2016-08-01

    In this study, the performance of a lab-scale Moving Bed Biofilm Reactor (MBBR) under different operating conditions was analysed. Moreover, the dependence of the reaction rates both from the concentration and biodegradability of substrates and from the biofilm surface density, by means of several batch kinetic tests, was investigated. The reactor controls exhibited an increasing COD (Chemical Oxygen Demand) removal, reaching maximum yields (close to 90%) for influent loadings of up to12.5 gCOD/m(2)d. From this value, the pilot plant performance decreased to yields of only about 55% for influent loadings greater than 16 gCOD/m(2)d. In response to the influent loading increase, the biofilm surface density exhibited a logistic growing trend until reaching a maximum amount of total attached solids of about 9.5 g/m(2). The kinetic test results indicated that the COD removal rates for rapidly biodegradable, rapidly hydrolysable and slowly biodegradable substrates were not affected by the organic matter concentrations. Instead, first-order kinetics were detected with respect to biofilm surface density. The experimental results permitted the formulation of a mathematical model to predict the MBBR organic matter removal efficiency. The validity of the model was successfully tested in the lab-scale plant.

  8. Enzymic phosphoryl transfer to carbon and oxygen acceptors: An investigation of the biosynthesis of 2-aminoethylphosphonic acid in Tetrahymena pyriformis W. and the kinetic mechanism and cofactor controlled substrate specificity of yeast inorganic pyrophosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Barry, R.J.

    1987-01-01

    This research is concerned with the study of two enzymatic systems which catalyze phosphoryl transfer reactions to carbon and oxygen acceptors. The first portion of this study is concerned with the elucidation of the T. pyriformis 2-aminoethylphosphonate (AEP) biosynthetic pathway. The de novo formation of AEP from exogenously added precursors in Tetrahymena cell-free preparations was evaluated by using radioisotopic techniques and NMR spectral analysis. Incubation of ({sup 32}P)-phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) with cell-free preparations yielded ({sup 32}P)-labelled material that was chromatographically identical to authentic phosphonopyruvate (p-pry). A reexamination of AEP biosynthesis was initiated. In the second portion of this study the kinetic mechanism of yeast inorganic pyrophosphatase (PPase) was examined by carrying-out initial velocity studies. Ca{sup 2+} and Rh(H{sub 2}O){sub 4} (methylenediphosphonate) (Rh(H{sub 2}O){sub 4}PCP) were used as dead-end inhibitors to study the order of binding of Cr(H{sub 2}O){sub 4}PP to the substrate site and Mg{sup 2+} to the low affinity activator site on the enzyme.

  9. Investigation of reaction mechanisms of drug degradation in the solid state: a kinetic study implementing ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography and high-resolution mass spectrometry for thermally stressed thyroxine.

    PubMed

    Neu, Volker; Bielow, Chris; Schneider, Peter; Reinert, Knut; Stuppner, Hermann; Huber, Christian G

    2013-02-19

    A reaction scheme was derived for the thermal degradation of thyroxine in the solid state, using data obtained from ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography and high-resolution mass spectrometry (UHPLC-HRMS). To study the reaction mechanism and kinetics of the thermal degradation of the pharmaceutical in the solid state, a workflow was developed by generating compound-specific, time-dependent degradation or formation curves of at least 13 different degradation products. Such curves allowed one to distinguish between first- and second-generation degradation products, as well as impurities resulting from chemical synthesis. The structures of the degradation products were derived from accurate molecular masses and multistage mass spectrometry. Deiodination and oxidative side chain degradation were found to be the major degradation reactions, resulting in the formation of deiodinated thyroxines, as well as acetic acid, benzoic acid, formaldehyde, acetamide, hydroxyacetic acid, oxoacetic acid, hydroxyacetamide, or oxoacetamide derivatives of thyroxine or deiodinated thyroxine. Upon additional structural verification of mass spectrometric data using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, this comprehensive body of data sheds light on an elaborate, radical-driven reaction scheme, explaining the presence or formation of impurities in thermally stressed thyroxine.

  10. PLASMA TURBULENCE AND KINETIC INSTABILITIES AT ION SCALES IN THE EXPANDING SOLAR WIND

    SciTech Connect

    Hellinger, Petr; Trávnícek, Pavel M.; Landi, Simone; Verdini, Andrea; Franci, Luca

    2015-10-01

    The relationship between a decaying strong turbulence and kinetic instabilities in a slowly expanding plasma is investigated using two-dimensional (2D) hybrid expanding box simulations. We impose an initial ambient magnetic field perpendicular to the simulation box, and we start with a spectrum of large-scale, linearly polarized, random-phase Alfvénic fluctuations that have energy equipartition between kinetic and magnetic fluctuations and vanishing correlation between the two fields. A turbulent cascade rapidly develops; magnetic field fluctuations exhibit a power-law spectrum at large scales and a steeper spectrum at ion scales. The turbulent cascade leads to an overall anisotropic proton heating, protons are heated in the perpendicular direction, and, initially, also in the parallel direction. The imposed expansion leads to generation of a large parallel proton temperature anisotropy which is at later stages partly reduced by turbulence. The turbulent heating is not sufficient to overcome the expansion-driven perpendicular cooling and the system eventually drives the oblique firehose instability in a form of localized nonlinear wave packets which efficiently reduce the parallel temperature anisotropy. This work demonstrates that kinetic instabilities may coexist with strong plasma turbulence even in a constrained 2D regime.

  11. Kinetics of model high molecular weight organic compounds biodegradation in soil aquifer treatment.

    PubMed

    Fox, Peter; Makam, Roshan

    2011-10-01

    Soil Aquifer Treatment (SAT) is a process where treated wastewater is purified during transport through unsaturated and saturated zones. Easily biodegradable compounds are rapidly removed in the unsaturated zone and the residual organic carbon is comprised of primarily high molecular weight compounds. This research focuses on flow in the saturated zone where flow conditions are predictable and high molecular weight compounds are degraded. Flow through the saturated zone was investigated with 4 reactors packed with 2 different particle sizes and operated at 4 different flow rates. The objective was to evaluate the kinetics of transformation for high molecular weight organics during SAT. Dextran was used as a model compound to eliminate the complexity associated with studying a mixture of high molecular weight organics. The hydrolysis products of dextran are easily degradable sugars. Batch experiments with media taken from the reactors were used to determine the distribution of microbial activity in the reactors. Zero-order kinetics were observed for the removal of dextran in batch experiments which is consistent with hydrolysis of high molecular weight organics where extracellular enzymes limit the substrate utilization rate. Biomass and microbial activity measurements demonstrated that the biomass was independent of position in the reactors. A Monod based substrate/biomass growth kinetic model predicted the performance of dextran removal in the reactors. The rate limiting step appears to be hydrolysis and the overall rate was not affected by surface area even though greater biomass accumulation occurred as the surface area decreased. PMID:21723581

  12. Kinetics of model high molecular weight organic compounds biodegradation in soil aquifer treatment.

    PubMed

    Fox, Peter; Makam, Roshan

    2011-10-01

    Soil Aquifer Treatment (SAT) is a process where treated wastewater is purified during transport through unsaturated and saturated zones. Easily biodegradable compounds are rapidly removed in the unsaturated zone and the residual organic carbon is comprised of primarily high molecular weight compounds. This research focuses on flow in the saturated zone where flow conditions are predictable and high molecular weight compounds are degraded. Flow through the saturated zone was investigated with 4 reactors packed with 2 different particle sizes and operated at 4 different flow rates. The objective was to evaluate the kinetics of transformation for high molecular weight organics during SAT. Dextran was used as a model compound to eliminate the complexity associated with studying a mixture of high molecular weight organics. The hydrolysis products of dextran are easily degradable sugars. Batch experiments with media taken from the reactors were used to determine the distribution of microbial activity in the reactors. Zero-order kinetics were observed for the removal of dextran in batch experiments which is consistent with hydrolysis of high molecular weight organics where extracellular enzymes limit the substrate utilization rate. Biomass and microbial activity measurements demonstrated that the biomass was independent of position in the reactors. A Monod based substrate/biomass growth kinetic model predicted the performance of dextran removal in the reactors. The rate limiting step appears to be hydrolysis and the overall rate was not affected by surface area even though greater biomass accumulation occurred as the surface area decreased.

  13. Plasma Turbulence and Kinetic Instabilities at Ion Scales in the Expanding Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellinger, Petr; Matteini, Lorenzo; Landi, Simone; Verdini, Andrea; Franci, Luca; Trávníček, Pavel M.

    2015-10-01

    The relationship between a decaying strong turbulence and kinetic instabilities in a slowly expanding plasma is investigated using two-dimensional (2D) hybrid expanding box simulations. We impose an initial ambient magnetic field perpendicular to the simulation box, and we start with a spectrum of large-scale, linearly polarized, random-phase Alfvénic fluctuations that have energy equipartition between kinetic and magnetic fluctuations and vanishing correlation between the two fields. A turbulent cascade rapidly develops; magnetic field fluctuations exhibit a power-law spectrum at large scales and a steeper spectrum at ion scales. The turbulent cascade leads to an overall anisotropic proton heating, protons are heated in the perpendicular direction, and, initially, also in the parallel direction. The imposed expansion leads to generation of a large parallel proton temperature anisotropy which is at later stages partly reduced by turbulence. The turbulent heating is not sufficient to overcome the expansion-driven perpendicular cooling and the system eventually drives the oblique firehose instability in a form of localized nonlinear wave packets which efficiently reduce the parallel temperature anisotropy. This work demonstrates that kinetic instabilities may coexist with strong plasma turbulence even in a constrained 2D regime.

  14. Dissipation kinetics and residue of LH-2010A in cucumber and soil under greenhouse condition.

    PubMed

    Li, Ruijuan; Liu, Tongjin; Song, Guochun; Li, Rumei; Yu, Jianlei

    2015-12-01

    LH-2010A is a newly developed fungicide with novel mode of action in the treatment of cucurbit downy mildew. Dissipation kinetics and residue levels of LH-2010A in cucumber were investigated using a QuEChERS method with GC-ECD. Field trials were constructed at three different sites in China in 2013 and 2014. The average recoveries of LH-2010A in fortified samples were between 94.0 and 106.2% for cucumber and between 84.4% and 98.7% for soil, with relative standard deviations within 3%. The dissipation rate of LH-2010A residue was evaluated assuming a pseudo first-order kinetics. The half-lives of LH-2010A were 2.8-4.2 days and 6.3-9.4 days in cucumber and soil samples, respectively. The terminal residues in cucumber were 0.077-0.207 mg/kg and 0.109-0.307 mg/kg on the first day after spray at the recommended dosage and 1.5 times of the recommended dosage, respectively. Using this rapid and sensitive method, we determined the dissipation kinetics and residue level of HL-2010A in cucumber. The suggested MRL value of HL-2010A in cucumber is 0.5 mg/kg. The research would provide guidance for proper and safe use of this newly developed fungicide in cucumber in greenhouse ecosystems.

  15. Kinetic limitations in gas-particle reactions arising from slow diffusion in secondary organic aerosol.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shouming; Shiraiwa, Manabu; McWhinney, Robert D; Pöschl, Ulrich; Abbatt, Jonathan P D

    2013-01-01

    The potential for aerosol physical properties, such as phase, morphology and viscosity/ diffusivity, to affect particle reactivity remains highly uncertain. We report here a study of the effect of bulk diffusivity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in secondary organic aerosol (SOA) on the kinetics of the heterogeneous reaction of particle-borne benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) with ozone. The experiments were performed by coating BaP-ammonium sulfate particles