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Sample records for rapid meta ii

  1. The 9-methyl group of retinal is essential for rapid Meta II decay and phototransduction quenching in red cones.

    PubMed

    Estevez, Maureen E; Kolesnikov, Alexander V; Ala-Laurila, Petri; Crouch, Rosalie K; Govardovskii, Victor I; Cornwall, M Carter

    2009-08-01

    Cone photoreceptors of the vertebrate retina terminate their response to light much faster than rod photoreceptors. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this rapid response termination in cones are poorly understood. The experiments presented here tested two related hypotheses: first, that the rapid decay rate of metarhodopsin (Meta) II in red-sensitive cones depends on interactions between the 9-methyl group of retinal and the opsin part of the pigment molecule, and second, that rapid Meta II decay is critical for rapid recovery from saturation of red-sensitive cones after exposure to bright light. Microspectrophotometric measurements of pigment photolysis, microfluorometric measurements of retinol production, and single-cell electrophysiological recordings of flash responses of salamander cones were performed to test these hypotheses. In all cases, cones were bleached and their visual pigment was regenerated with either 11-cis retinal or with 11-cis 9-demethyl retinal, an analogue of retinal lacking the 9-methyl group. Meta II decay was four to five times slower and subsequent retinol production was three to four times slower in red-sensitive cones lacking the 9-methyl group of retinal. This was accompanied by a significant slowing of the recovery from saturation in cones lacking the 9-methyl group after exposure to bright (>0.1% visual pigment photoactivated) but not dim light. A mathematical model of the turn-off process of phototransduction revealed that the slower recovery of photoresponse can be explained by slower Meta decay of 9-demethyl visual pigment. These results demonstrate that the 9-methyl group of retinal is required for steric chromophore-opsin interactions that favor both the rapid decay of Meta II and the rapid response recovery after exposure to bright light in red-sensitive cones.

  2. Rapid Automatized Naming and Reading Performance: A Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Araújo, Susana; Reis, Alexandra; Petersson, Karl Magnus; Faísca, Luís

    2015-01-01

    Evidence that rapid naming skill is associated with reading ability has become increasingly prevalent in recent years. However, there is considerable variation in the literature concerning the magnitude of this relationship. The objective of the present study was to provide a comprehensive analysis of the evidence on the relationship between rapid…

  3. Rapid maxillary expansion and obstructive sleep apnea: A review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zancanella, Edilson; Crespo, Agrício-Nubiato

    2016-01-01

    Background OSAS during childhood leads to significant physical and neuropsychomotor impairment. Thus, it needs to be recognized and treated early in order to avoid or attenuate the chronic problems associated with OSAS, which are deleterious to a child’s development. Adenotonsillectomy and, in select cases, continuous positive airwaypressure (CPAP) have been the preferred treatments for OSAS in children, and yet they are ineffective at fully ameliorating the disease. Minimally invasive treatments have recently been proposed, comprising intra-oral and extra-oral devices as well as speech therapy. Objetive: to conduct a meta-analysis on studies from around the world that used rapid maxillary expansion (RME) to treat OSAS in children. Material and Methods We performed a meta-analysis of studies using RME for OSA treatment in children. A literature survey was conductedusing PubMed and Medline for English articles published up to December 2014 with the following descriptors: Sleep Apnea, Obstructive, Children, Treatment, Orthodontic, Othopaedic, Maxillaryexpansion. Studies were included in the meta-analysisif they were case-controlled studies, randomized, and involved non-syndromic children aged 0 to 12years old diagnosed with OSA by the polysomnography apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) before and after the intervention, submitted RME only. Results In all, 10 articles conformed to the inclusion criteria and were included in this meta-analysis. The total sample size across all these articles was 215 children, having a mean age of 6.7 years,of whom58.6%were male. The mean AHI during the follow-up was -6.86 (p <0.0001). Conclusions We concluded that rapid maxillary expansion (RME) in children with OSAS appears to be an effective treatment for this syndrome. Further randomized clinical studies are needed to determine the effectiveness of RME in adults. Key words:Rapid maxillary expansión, obstructive sleep apnea, meta-analysis. PMID:27031063

  4. Rapid increase in Japanese life expectancy after World War II.

    PubMed

    Sugiura, Yasuo; Ju, Young-Su; Yasuoka, Junko; Jimba, Masamine

    2010-02-01

    Japanese life expectancy increased by about 13.7 years during the first decade after World War II, despite the country's post-war poverty. Although it is known that medical progress explains part of this increase, roles of non-medical factors have not been systematically studied. This study hypothesizes that non-medical factors, in addition to medical factors, are associated with the rapid increase in life expectancy in Japan. We analyzed the time trends of potential explanatory factors and used regression analysis with historical data from the Ministry of Internal Affairs and Communications' Historical Statistics of Japan during the period between 1946 and 1983. Time trends analysis revealed that the rapid increase in life expectancy preceded the dramatic growth of per capita Gross Domestic Product (GDP) by 10 years. In education, the nearly universal enrollment in elementary schools and increased advancement to upper secondary schools for both sexes were associated with better health. Regarding legislation, 32 health laws were passed in the first decade after the war and these laws were associated with improved health. Using regression analysis, we found that the enrollment rate in elementary schools, the number of health laws, and expansion of community-based activity staff were significantly associated with the increased life expectancy during the first decade after World War II. To conclude, in addition to medical factors, non-medical factors applied across the country, particularly education, community-based activities and legislation were associated with the rapid increase in Japanese life expectancy after World War II.

  5. On the nature of rapidly fading Type II supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriya, Takashi J.; Pruzhinskaya, Maria V.; Ergon, Mattias; Blinnikov, Sergei I.

    2016-01-01

    It has been suggested that Type II supernovae with rapidly fading light curves (a.k.a. Type IIL supernovae) are explosions of progenitors with low-mass hydrogen-rich envelopes which are of the order of 1 M⊙. We investigate light-curve properties of supernovae from such progenitors. We confirm that such progenitors lead to rapidly fading Type II supernovae. We find that the luminosity of supernovae from such progenitors with the canonical explosion energy of 1051 erg and 56Ni mass of 0.05 M⊙ can increase temporarily shortly before all the hydrogen in the envelope recombines. As a result, a bump appears in their light curves. The bump appears because the heating from the nuclear decay of 56Ni can keep the bottom of hydrogen-rich layers in the ejecta ionized, and thus the photosphere can stay there for a while. We find that the light-curve bump becomes less significant when we make explosion energy larger (≳2 × 1051 erg), 56Ni mass smaller (≲0.01 M⊙), 56Ni mixed in the ejecta, or the progenitor radius larger. Helium mixing in hydrogen-rich layers makes the light-curve decline rates large but does not help reducing the light-curve bump. Because the light-curve bump we found in our light-curve models has not been observed in rapidly fading Type II supernovae, they may be characterized by not only low-mass hydrogen-rich envelopes but also higher explosion energy, larger degrees of 56Ni mixing, and/or larger progenitor radii than slowly fading Type II supernovae, so that the light-curve bump does not become significant.

  6. TOPAZ II Anti-Criticality Device Rapid Prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Donald R.; Otting, William D.

    1994-07-01

    The Ballistic Missile Defense Organization (BMDO) has been working on a Nuclear Electric Propulsion Space Test Project (NEPSTP) using an existing Russian Topaz II reactor system to power the NEPSTP satellite. Safety investigations have shown that it will be possible to safely launch the Topaz II system in the United States with some modification to preclude water flooded criticality. A ``fuel-out'' water subcriticality concept was selected by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) as the baseline concept. A fuel-out anti-criticality device (ACD) conceptual design was developed by Rockwell. The concept functions to hold the fuel from the four centermost thermionic fuel elements (TFEs) outside the reactor during launch and reliably inserts the fuel into the reactor once the operational orbit is achieved. A four-tenths scale ACD rapid prototype model, fabricated from the CATIA solids design model, clearly shows in three dimensions the relative size and spatial relationship of the ACD components.

  7. How well Do Phonological Awareness and Rapid Automatized Naming Correlate with Chinese Reading Accuracy and Fluency? A Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Song, Shuang; Georgiou, George K.; Su, Mengmeng; Hua, Shu

    2016-01-01

    Previous meta-analyses on the relationship between phonological awareness, rapid automatized naming (RAN), and reading have been conducted primarily in English, an atypical alphabetic orthography. Here, we aimed to examine the association between phonological awareness, RAN, and word reading in a nonalphabetic language (Chinese). A random-effects…

  8. Rapid Palatal Expansion to Treat Nocturnal Enuretic Children: a Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Poorsattar-Bejeh Mir, Karim; Poorsattar-Bejeh Mir, Arash; Poorsattar-Bejeh Mir, Morvarid; Moradi-Lakeh, Maziar; Balmeh, Pouya; Nosrati, Kamran

    2015-01-01

    Statement of the Problem Refractory nocturnal enuresis possesses a heavy psychosocial burden for the affected child. Only a 15% spontaneous annual cure rate is reported. Purpose This patient-level meta-analysis aimed to evaluate the efficacy of rapid palatal expansion to treat nocturnal enuresis among children. Materials and Method A sensitive search of electronic databases of PubMed (since 1966), SCOPUS (containing EMBASE, since 1980), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, CINAHL and EBSCO till Jan 2014 was performed. A set of regular terms was used for searching in data banks except for PubMed, for which medical subject headings (MeSH) keywords were used. Children aged at least six years old at the time of recruitment of either gender who underwent rapid palatal expansion and had attempted any type of pharmacotherapy prior to orthodontic intervention were included. Results Six non-randomized clinical trials were found relevant, of which five studies had no control group. Eighty children were investigated with the mean age of 118 (28.12) months ranged from 74 to 185 months. The median time to become completely dry was 2.87 months [confidence interval (CI) 95% 2.07-2.93 months]. After one year, the average rate of becoming complete dry was 31%. The presence of posterior cross bite [relative risk (RR): 0.31, CI 95%: 0.12-0.79] and signs of upper respiratory obstruction during sleep (RR: 5.1, CI 95%: 1.44-18.04) significantly decreased and increased the chance of improvement, respectively. Meanwhile, the other predictors did not significantly predict the outcome after simultaneous adjustment in Cox regression model. Conclusion Rapid palatal expansion may be considered when other treatment modalities have failed. The 31% rate of cure is promising when compared to the spontaneous cure rate. Though, high-level evidence from the rigorous randomized controlled trials is scarce (Level of evidence: C). PMID:26331141

  9. Rapid and sensitive colorimetric determination of cobalt(II).

    PubMed

    Eldawy, M A; Tawfik, A S; Elshabouri, S R

    1976-05-01

    A highly selective and sensitive spectrophotometric determination of cobalt (II) was developed. 7-Nitroso-8-hydroxyquinoline-5-sulfonic acid sodium salt was used as the chromogenic reagent for color development. Although other metals form colored chelates with the ligand, it was possible to develop a selective method using McIlvaine's pH 8 citric acid-phosphate buffer. Under these conditions, iron(II), iron (III), copper (II), zinc (II), and manganese (II), minerals likely to be compounded with cobalt (II) in geriatric formulations, do not interfere with the precision of the method or the color development. Calcium (II) and magnesium (II) do not form colored chelates with the used ligand. Hormones, vitamins, and additives likely to be present along with the cobalt ion in pharmaceutical formulations do not interfere. The sensitivity is 0.37 mug of cobalt (II)/ml of sample solution.

  10. Estrogen receptor α gene PvuII polymorphism and coronary artery disease: a meta-analysis of 21 studies*

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Jie; Xu, Hui; Yin, Xiang; Zhang, Fu-rong; Pan, Xiao-ping; Gu, Yi-an; Chen, Jun-zhu; Guo, Xiao-gang

    2014-01-01

    The association between the estrogen receptor α gene (ESR1) PvuII polymorphism (c.454-397T>C) and coronary artery disease (CAD) is controversial. Thus, we conducted a meta-analysis to evaluate the relationship. Data were collected from 21 studies encompassing 9926 CAD patients and 16 710 controls. Odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to assess the relationship between PvuII polymorphism and CAD. The polymorphism in control populations in all studies followed Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. We found a significant association between ESR1 PvuII polymorphism and CAD risk in all subjects. When the data were stratified by region, a significant association between ESR1 PvuII polymorphism and CAD risk was observed in Asian populations but not in Western populations. The current study suggests that ESR1 PvuII polymorphism has an important role in CAD susceptibility. PMID:24599688

  11. The relationships between HLA class II alleles and antigens with gestational diabetes mellitus: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Cong-cong; Jin, Yi-mei; Lee, Kenneth Ka Ho; Yang, Guang; Jing, Chun-xia; Yang, Xuesong

    2016-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is defined as glucose intolerance with onset or first recognition during pregnancy. It is associated with an increased risk of pregnancy complications. Susceptibility to GDM is partly determined by genetics and linked with type 1 diabetes-associated high risk HLA class II genes. However, the evidence for this relationship is still highly controversial. In this study, we assessed the relationship between HLA class II variants and GDM. We performed meta-analysis on all of literatures available in PubMed, Embase, Web of Science and China National Knowledge Infrastructure databases. The odds ratio and 95% confidence interval of each variant were estimated. All statistical analyses were conducted using the Comprehensive Meta Analysis 2.2.064 software. At the allelic analysis, DQB1*02, DQB1*0203, DQB1*0402, DQB1*0602, DRB1*03, DRB1*0301 and DRB1*1302 reached a nominal level of significance, and only DQB1*02, DQB1*0602 and DRB1*1302 were statistically significant after Bonferroni correction. At the serological analysis, none of DQ2, DQ6, DR13 and DR17 was statistically significant following Bonferroni correction although they reached a nominal level of significance. In sum, our meta-analysis demonstrated that there were the associations between HLA class II variants and GDM but more studies are required to elucidate how these variants contribute to GDM susceptibility. PMID:27721507

  12. Three-dimensional model for meta-II rhodopsin, an activated G-protein-coupled receptor.

    PubMed

    Nikiforovich, Gregory V; Marshall, Garland R

    2003-08-01

    A novel approach that iteratively combined the results of energy calculations and experimental data was used to generate a three-dimensional (3D) model of the photoactivated state (R*) of bovine rhodopsin (Rh). The approach started with simplified energy calculations in an effort to find a set of sterically and energetically reasonable options for transmembrane (TM) helix arrangements with all-trans-retinal. Various 3D models of TM helix packing found by computations were then compared to limited site-directed spin-label experimental data regarding the transition of the TM helices of Rh in the inactive state (R) to those in the R* state to identify the most plausible model of the TM helical bundle. At the next step, all non-TM structural elements, such as the non-TM helix 8, the N- and C-terminal fragments, and the loops connecting TM helices, were reconstructed, and after the entire R* structure had been relaxed, all other currently available additional experimental data, both mutational and spectroscopic, on the structure of the meta-II state of rhodopsin were used to validate the resulting 3D model.

  13. GenoType MTBDRplus Assay for Rapid Detection of Multidrug Resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Yuanyuan; Wang, Yueling; Shao, Chunhong; Hao, Yingying; Jin, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Background There is an urgent demand for rapid and accurate drug-susceptibility testing for the detection of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. The GenoType MTBDRplus assay is a promising molecular kit designed for rapid identification of resistance to first-line anti-tuberculosis drugs, isoniazid and rifampicin. The aim of this meta-analysis was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of GenoType MTBDRplus in detecting drug resistance to isoniazid and rifampicin in comparison with the conventional drug susceptibility tests. Methods We searched PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library databases to identify studies according to predetermined criteria. A total of 40 studies were included in the meta-analysis. QUADAS-2 was used to assess the quality of included studies with RevMan 5.2. STATA 13.0 software was used to analyze the tests for sensitivity, specificity, positive likelihood ratio, negative likelihood ratio, diagnostic odds ratio, and area under the summary receiver operating characteristic curves. Heterogeneity in accuracy measures was tested with Spearman correlation coefficient and Chi-square. Results Patient selection bias was observed in most studies. The pooled sensitivity (95% confidence intervals were 0.91 (0.88–0.94) for isoniazid, 0.96 (0.95–0.97) for rifampicin, and 0.91(0.86–0.94) for multidrug-resistance. The pooled specificity (95% CI) was 0.99 (0.98–0.99) for isoniazid, 0.98 (0.97–0.99) for rifampicin and 0.99 (0.99–1.00) for multidrug-resistance, respectively. The area under the summary receiver operating characteristic curves ranged from 0.99 to 1.00. Conclusion This meta-analysis determined that GenoType MTBDRplus had good accuracy for rapid detection of drug resistance to isoniazid and/or rifampicin of M. tuberculosis. MTBDRplus method might be a good alternative to conventional drug susceptibility tests in clinical practice. PMID:26934724

  14. MetaQuery: a web server for rapid annotation and quantitative analysis of specific genes in the human gut microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Nayfach, Stephen; Fischbach, Michael A.; Pollard, Katherine S.

    2015-01-01

    Summary: Microbiome researchers frequently want to know how abundant a particular microbial gene or pathway is across different human hosts, including its association with disease and its co-occurrence with other genes or microbial taxa. With thousands of publicly available metagenomes, these questions should be easy to answer. However, computational barriers prevent most researchers from conducting such analyses. We address this problem with MetaQuery, a web application for rapid and quantitative analysis of specific genes in the human gut microbiome. The user inputs one or more query genes, and our software returns the estimated abundance of these genes across 1267 publicly available fecal metagenomes from American, European and Chinese individuals. In addition, our application performs downstream statistical analyses to identify features that are associated with gene variation, including other query genes (i.e. gene co-variation), taxa, clinical variables (e.g. inflammatory bowel disease and diabetes) and average genome size. The speed and accessibility of MetaQuery are a step toward democratizing metagenomics research, which should allow many researchers to query the abundance and variation of specific genes in the human gut microbiome. Availability and implementation: http://metaquery.docpollard.org. Contact: snayfach@gmail.com Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:26104745

  15. Angiotensin II Receptor Blockers Improve Peripheral Endothelial Function: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shuang; Wu, Yan; Yu, Ge; Xia, Qing; Xu, Yawei

    2014-01-01

    Objective(s) Several studies have assessed the effect of angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) on peripheral endothelial dysfunction as measured by flow-mediated vasodilatation (FMD), a widely-used indicator for endothelial function. We conducted a meta-analysis to investigate the effect in comparison to placebo or no treatment and other antihypertensives. Methods MEDLINE, Cochrane library and EMBASE were searched to September 2013 for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that assessed the effect of ARBs versus placebo or no treatment and other antihypertensives (angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs), calcium channel blockers (CCBs), β-blockers, diuretics) by forearm FMD. Furthermore, we also use meta-regression to analyze the relationship between the endothelial function and the duration of ARBs treatments. Results In 11 trials including 590 patients, ARBs (n = 315) significantly improved FMD (1.36%, 95% confidence internal [CI]:1.28 to 1.44) versus placebo or no treatment (n = 275). In 16 trials that included 1028 patients, ARBs (n = 486) had a significant effect (0.59%, 95% CI: 0.25 to 0.94) on FMD when compared with other antihypertensives (n = 542). In 8 trials, ARBs (n = 174) had no significant effect (−0.14%, 95% CI: −0.32 to 0.03) compared with ACEI (n = 173). Compared with others, the benefits of ARBs, respectively, were 1.67% (95% CI: 0.65 to 0.93) in 7 trials with CCBs, 0.79% (95% CI: 0.42 to 1.01) with β-blockers in 3 trials and 0.9% (95% CI: 0.77 to 1.03) with diuretics in 3 trials. Importantly, we found ARBs were less effective in a long time span (95% CI: −1.990 to −0.622) than the first 6 months (95% CI: −0.484 to 0.360). Conclusions This study shows that ARBs improve peripheral endothelial function and are superior to CCBs, β-blockers and diuretics. However, the effect couldn't be maintained for a long time. In addition, there was no significant difference between ARBs and ACEI. PMID:24595033

  16. Quantitative analysis of topoisomerase II{alpha} to rapidly evaluate cell proliferation in brain tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Oda, Masashi; Arakawa, Yoshiki; Kano, Hideyuki; Kawabata, Yasuhiro; Katsuki, Takahisa; Shirahata, Mitsuaki; Ono, Makoto; Yamana, Norikazu; Hashimoto, Nobuo; Takahashi, Jun A. . E-mail: jat@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2005-06-17

    Immunohistochemical cell proliferation analyses have come into wide use for evaluation of tumor malignancy. Topoisomerase II{alpha} (topo II{alpha}), an essential nuclear enzyme, has been known to have cell cycle coupled expression. We here show the usefulness of quantitative analysis of topo II{alpha} mRNA to rapidly evaluate cell proliferation in brain tumors. A protocol to quantify topo II{alpha} mRNA was developed with a real-time RT-PCR. It took only 3 h to quantify from a specimen. A total of 28 brain tumors were analyzed, and the level of topo II{alpha} mRNA was significantly correlated with its immuno-staining index (p < 0.0001, r = 0.9077). Furthermore, it sharply detected that topo II{alpha} mRNA decreased in growth-inhibited glioma cell. These results support that topo II{alpha} mRNA may be a good and rapid indicator to evaluate cell proliferate potential in brain tumors.

  17. Pd(II)-catalysed meta-C–H functionalizations of benzoic acid derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shangda; Cai, Lei; Ji, Huafang; Yang, Long; Li, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Benzoic acids are highly important structural motifs in drug molecules and natural products. Selective C–H bond functionalization of benzoic acids will provide synthetically useful tools for step-economical organic synthesis. Although direct ortho-C–H functionalizations of benzoic acids or their derivatives have been intensely studied, the ability to activate meta-C–H bond of benzoic acids or their derivatives in a general manner via transition-metal catalysis has been largely unsuccessful. Although chelation-assisted meta-C–H functionalization of electron-rich arenes was reported, chelation-assisted meta-C–H activation of electron-poor arenes such as benzoic acid derivatives remains a formidable challenge. Herein, we report a general protocol for meta-C–H olefination of benzoic acid derivatives using a nitrile-based sulfonamide template. A broad range of benzoic acid derivatives are meta-selectively olefinated using molecular oxygen as the terminal oxidant. The meta-C–H acetoxylation, product of which is further transformed at the meta-position, is also reported. PMID:26813919

  18. Shared HLA Class II in Six Autoimmune Diseases in Latin America: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cruz-Tapias, Paola; Pérez-Fernández, Oscar M.; Rojas-Villarraga, Adriana; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Alberto; Arango, María-Teresa; Anaya, Juan-Manuel

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence and genetic susceptibility of autoimmune diseases (ADs) may vary depending on latitudinal gradient and ethnicity. The aims of this study were to identify common human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II alleles that contribute to susceptibility to six ADs in Latin Americans through a meta-analysis and to review additional clinical, immunological, and genetic characteristics of those ADs sharing HLA alleles. DRB1∗03:01 (OR: 4.04; 95%CI: 1.41–11.53) was found to be a risk factor for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), Sjögren's syndrome (SS), and type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D). DRB1∗04:05 (OR: 4.64; 95%CI: 2.14–10.05) influences autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and T1D; DRB1∗04:01 (OR: 3.86; 95%CI: 2.32–6.42) is a susceptibility factor for RA and T1D. Opposite associations were found between multiple sclerosis (MS) and T1D. DQB1∗06:02 and DRB1∗15 alleles were risk factors for MS but protective factors for T1D. Likewise, DQB1∗06:03 allele was a risk factor for AIH but a protective one for T1D. Several common autoantibodies and clinical associations as well as additional shared genes have been reported in these ADs, which are reviewed herein. These results indicate that in Latin Americans ADs share major loci and immune characteristics. PMID:22577522

  19. Rapid Photodegradation of Methyl Orange (MO) Assisted with Cu(II) and Tartaric Acid.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jing; Chen, Xue; Shi, Ying; Lan, Yeqing; Qin, Chao

    2015-01-01

    Cu(II) and organic carboxylic acids, existing extensively in soil and aquatic environments, can form complexes that may play an important role in the photodegradation of organic contaminants. In this paper, the catalytic role of Cu(II) in the removal of methyl orange (MO) in the presence of tartaric acid with light was investigated through batch experiments. The results demonstrate that the introduction of Cu(II) could markedly enhance the photodegradation of MO. In addition, high initial concentrations of Cu(II) and tartaric acid benefited the decomposition of MO. The most rapid removal of MO assisted by Cu(II) was achieved at pH 3. The formation of Cu(II)-tartaric acid complexes was assumed to be the key factor, generating hydroxyl radicals (•OH) and other oxidizing free radicals under irradiation through a ligand-to-metal charge-transfer pathway that was responsible for the efficient degradation of MO. Some intermediates in the reaction system were also detected to support this reaction mechanism.

  20. Rapid Photodegradation of Methyl Orange (MO) Assisted with Cu(II) and Tartaric Acid

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jing; Chen, Xue; Shi, Ying; Lan, Yeqing; Qin, Chao

    2015-01-01

    Cu(II) and organic carboxylic acids, existing extensively in soil and aquatic environments, can form complexes that may play an important role in the photodegradation of organic contaminants. In this paper, the catalytic role of Cu(II) in the removal of methyl orange (MO) in the presence of tartaric acid with light was investigated through batch experiments. The results demonstrate that the introduction of Cu(II) could markedly enhance the photodegradation of MO. In addition, high initial concentrations of Cu(II) and tartaric acid benefited the decomposition of MO. The most rapid removal of MO assisted by Cu(II) was achieved at pH 3. The formation of Cu(II)-tartaric acid complexes was assumed to be the key factor, generating hydroxyl radicals (•OH) and other oxidizing free radicals under irradiation through a ligand-to-metal charge-transfer pathway that was responsible for the efficient degradation of MO. Some intermediates in the reaction system were also detected to support this reaction mechanism. PMID:26241043

  1. A Meta-Analysis Summarizing the Effects of Pornography II: Aggression after Exposure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Mike; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Examines by meta-analysis the effect that exposure to pornography produces on aggressive behavior under laboratory conditions considering a variety of possible moderating conditions. Demonstrates a homogeneous set of results showing that pictorial nudity reduces subsequent violent behavior, but that depictions of nonviolent sexual behavior and…

  2. Advances in the meta-analysis of heterogeneous clinical trials II: The quality effects model.

    PubMed

    Doi, Suhail A R; Barendregt, Jan J; Khan, Shahjahan; Thalib, Lukman; Williams, Gail M

    2015-11-01

    This article examines the performance of the updated quality effects (QE) estimator for meta-analysis of heterogeneous studies. It is shown that this approach leads to a decreased mean squared error (MSE) of the estimator while maintaining the nominal level of coverage probability of the confidence interval. Extensive simulation studies confirm that this approach leads to the maintenance of the correct coverage probability of the confidence interval, regardless of the level of heterogeneity, as well as a lower observed variance compared to the random effects (RE) model. The QE model is robust to subjectivity in quality assessment down to completely random entry, in which case its MSE equals that of the RE estimator. When the proposed QE method is applied to a meta-analysis of magnesium for myocardial infarction data, the pooled mortality odds ratio (OR) becomes 0.81 (95% CI 0.61-1.08) which favors the larger studies but also reflects the increased uncertainty around the pooled estimate. In comparison, under the RE model, the pooled mortality OR is 0.71 (95% CI 0.57-0.89) which is less conservative than that of the QE results. The new estimation method has been implemented into the free meta-analysis software MetaXL which allows comparison of alternative estimators and can be downloaded from www.epigear.com.

  3. Rapid molecular evolution across amniotes of the IIS/TOR network.

    PubMed

    McGaugh, Suzanne E; Bronikowski, Anne M; Kuo, Chih-Horng; Reding, Dawn M; Addis, Elizabeth A; Flagel, Lex E; Janzen, Fredric J; Schwartz, Tonia S

    2015-06-01

    The insulin/insulin-like signaling and target of rapamycin (IIS/TOR) network regulates lifespan and reproduction, as well as metabolic diseases, cancer, and aging. Despite its vital role in health, comparative analyses of IIS/TOR have been limited to invertebrates and mammals. We conducted an extensive evolutionary analysis of the IIS/TOR network across 66 amniotes with 18 newly generated transcriptomes from nonavian reptiles and additional available genomes/transcriptomes. We uncovered rapid and extensive molecular evolution between reptiles (including birds) and mammals: (i) the IIS/TOR network, including the critical nodes insulin receptor substrate (IRS) and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), exhibit divergent evolutionary rates between reptiles and mammals; (ii) compared with a proxy for the rest of the genome, genes of the IIS/TOR extracellular network exhibit exceptionally fast evolutionary rates; and (iii) signatures of positive selection and coevolution of the extracellular network suggest reptile- and mammal-specific interactions between members of the network. In reptiles, positively selected sites cluster on the binding surfaces of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1), IGF1 receptor (IGF1R), and insulin receptor (INSR); whereas in mammals, positively selected sites clustered on the IGF2 binding surface, suggesting that these hormone-receptor binding affinities are targets of positive selection. Further, contrary to reports that IGF2R binds IGF2 only in marsupial and placental mammals, we found positively selected sites clustered on the hormone binding surface of reptile IGF2R that suggest that IGF2R binds to IGF hormones in diverse taxa and may have evolved in reptiles. These data suggest that key IIS/TOR paralogs have sub- or neofunctionalized between mammals and reptiles and that this network may underlie fundamental life history and physiological differences between these amniote sister clades. PMID:25991861

  4. Rapid molecular evolution across amniotes of the IIS/TOR network.

    PubMed

    McGaugh, Suzanne E; Bronikowski, Anne M; Kuo, Chih-Horng; Reding, Dawn M; Addis, Elizabeth A; Flagel, Lex E; Janzen, Fredric J; Schwartz, Tonia S

    2015-06-01

    The insulin/insulin-like signaling and target of rapamycin (IIS/TOR) network regulates lifespan and reproduction, as well as metabolic diseases, cancer, and aging. Despite its vital role in health, comparative analyses of IIS/TOR have been limited to invertebrates and mammals. We conducted an extensive evolutionary analysis of the IIS/TOR network across 66 amniotes with 18 newly generated transcriptomes from nonavian reptiles and additional available genomes/transcriptomes. We uncovered rapid and extensive molecular evolution between reptiles (including birds) and mammals: (i) the IIS/TOR network, including the critical nodes insulin receptor substrate (IRS) and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), exhibit divergent evolutionary rates between reptiles and mammals; (ii) compared with a proxy for the rest of the genome, genes of the IIS/TOR extracellular network exhibit exceptionally fast evolutionary rates; and (iii) signatures of positive selection and coevolution of the extracellular network suggest reptile- and mammal-specific interactions between members of the network. In reptiles, positively selected sites cluster on the binding surfaces of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1), IGF1 receptor (IGF1R), and insulin receptor (INSR); whereas in mammals, positively selected sites clustered on the IGF2 binding surface, suggesting that these hormone-receptor binding affinities are targets of positive selection. Further, contrary to reports that IGF2R binds IGF2 only in marsupial and placental mammals, we found positively selected sites clustered on the hormone binding surface of reptile IGF2R that suggest that IGF2R binds to IGF hormones in diverse taxa and may have evolved in reptiles. These data suggest that key IIS/TOR paralogs have sub- or neofunctionalized between mammals and reptiles and that this network may underlie fundamental life history and physiological differences between these amniote sister clades.

  5. Rapid molecular evolution across amniotes of the IIS/TOR network

    PubMed Central

    McGaugh, Suzanne E.; Bronikowski, Anne M.; Kuo, Chih-Horng; Reding, Dawn M.; Addis, Elizabeth A.; Flagel, Lex E.; Janzen, Fredric J.

    2015-01-01

    The insulin/insulin-like signaling and target of rapamycin (IIS/TOR) network regulates lifespan and reproduction, as well as metabolic diseases, cancer, and aging. Despite its vital role in health, comparative analyses of IIS/TOR have been limited to invertebrates and mammals. We conducted an extensive evolutionary analysis of the IIS/TOR network across 66 amniotes with 18 newly generated transcriptomes from nonavian reptiles and additional available genomes/transcriptomes. We uncovered rapid and extensive molecular evolution between reptiles (including birds) and mammals: (i) the IIS/TOR network, including the critical nodes insulin receptor substrate (IRS) and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), exhibit divergent evolutionary rates between reptiles and mammals; (ii) compared with a proxy for the rest of the genome, genes of the IIS/TOR extracellular network exhibit exceptionally fast evolutionary rates; and (iii) signatures of positive selection and coevolution of the extracellular network suggest reptile- and mammal-specific interactions between members of the network. In reptiles, positively selected sites cluster on the binding surfaces of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1), IGF1 receptor (IGF1R), and insulin receptor (INSR); whereas in mammals, positively selected sites clustered on the IGF2 binding surface, suggesting that these hormone-receptor binding affinities are targets of positive selection. Further, contrary to reports that IGF2R binds IGF2 only in marsupial and placental mammals, we found positively selected sites clustered on the hormone binding surface of reptile IGF2R that suggest that IGF2R binds to IGF hormones in diverse taxa and may have evolved in reptiles. These data suggest that key IIS/TOR paralogs have sub- or neofunctionalized between mammals and reptiles and that this network may underlie fundamental life history and physiological differences between these amniote sister clades. PMID:25991861

  6. Modifications and adaptations of the Charm II rapid antibody assay for chloramphenicol in honey.

    PubMed

    McMullen, Sarah E; Lansden, John A; Schenck, Frank J

    2004-07-01

    The Charm II screening method for the presence of chloramphenicol in honey has a sensitivity of 0.3 ppb. This screening method is a simple, rapid antibody assay using [3H]chloramphenicol and a binding reagent. Analysis of different types of honey revealed considerable differences in results. Honey can be liquid, crystallized (creamed), or partially crystallized and is classified by the U.S. Department of Agriculture into seven color categories: water white, extra white, white, extra light amber, light amber, amber, and dark amber. Fortified and nonfortified liquid amber honey tested appropriately with the Charm II unit and the negative control provided with the unit after slight modifications were made. However, approximately 70% of creamed honey samples fortified at 0.6 ppb did not test positive for the presence of chloramphenicol using the provided negative control. Matrix quenching effects were evaluated, and these effects were accounted for by establishing different assay conditions for different honey types.

  7. Nitrate Reductase Assay for Rapid Detection of Isoniazid, Rifampin, Ethambutol, and Streptomycin Resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis: a Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Deveci, Aydin; Sunter, Ahmet Tevfik; Martin, Anandi

    2014-01-01

    Colorimetric phenotypic tests recently gained interest because traditional primary drug susceptibility testing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates takes a long time. We used meta-analysis techniques to review the reliability and accuracy of the nitrate reductase assay (NRA), which is one of the most popular colorimetric methods to detect resistance to first-line drugs. Medline, PubMed, ISI Web, Web of Science, and Google Scholar were used to search for studies enrolled in the meta-analysis. The analysis included 35 studies for isoniazid (INH), 38 for rifampin (RIF), and 22 for ethambutol (EMB) and streptomycin (STR). Summary receiver operating characteristic (SROC) curves were applied to summarize diagnostic accuracy. The meta-analyses were performed by the use of Meta-DiSc software (version 1.4) and were focused on sensitivity and specificity values for measurements of accuracy. The pooled sensitivities were 96% for INH, 97% for RIF, 90% for EMB, and 82% for STR. The pooled specificities for INH, RIF, EMB, and STR were 99%, 100%, 98%, and 96%, respectively. The times required to obtain results were between 5 and 28 days by the direct NRA and between 5 and 14 days by the indirect test. In conclusion, the present meta-analysis showed that the NRA is a reliable low-cost rapid colorimetric susceptibility test that can be used for the detection of multidrug-resistant (MDR) tuberculosis, including detection of EMB resistance. However, the test appears to have a relatively low sensitivity for STR and needs further improvement. PMID:24131684

  8. A Simple Paper-Based Colorimetric Device for Rapid Mercury(II) Assay.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weiwei; Fang, Xueen; Li, Hua; Cao, Hongmei; Kong, Jilie

    2016-01-01

    Contamination of the environment by mercury(II) ions (Hg(2+)) poses a serious threat to human health and ecosystems. Up to now, many reported Hg(2+) sensors require complex procedures, long measurement times and sophisticated instrumentation. We have developed a simple, rapid, low cost and naked-eye quantitative method for Hg(2+) environmental analysis using a paper-based colorimetric device (PCD). The sample solution to which platinum nanoparticles (PtNPs) have been added is dispensed to the detection zone on the PCD, where the 3,3,5,5-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) substrate has been pre-loaded. The PtNPs effect a rapid oxidization of TMB, inducing blue colorization on the PCD. However, Hg(2+) in the solution rapidly interact with the PtNPs, suppressing the oxidation capacity and hence causing a decrease in blue intensity, which can be observed directly by the naked eye. Moreover, Hg(2+) at concentrations as low as 0.01 uM, can be successfully monitored using a fiber optic device, which gives a digital readout proportional to the intensity of the blue color change. This paper-based colorimetric device (PCD) shows great potential for field measurement of Hg(2+). PMID:27554633

  9. Rapid Degradation of the Tetrameric Mn Cluster in Illuminated, PsbO-Depleted Photosystem II Preparations

    SciTech Connect

    Semin, B. K.; Davletshina, L. N.; Ivanov, I. I.; Seibert, M.; Rubin, A. B.

    2012-01-01

    A 'decoupling effect' (light-induced electron transport without O{sub 2} evolution) was observed in Ca-depleted photosystem II (PSII(-Ca)) membranes, which lack PsbP and PsbQ (Semin et al. (2008) Photosynth. Res., 98, 235-249). Here PsbO-depleted PSII (PSII(-PsbO)) membranes (which also lack PsbP and PsbQ) were used to examine effects of PsbO on the decoupling. PSII(-PsbO) membranes do not reduce the acceptor 2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol (DCIP), in contrast to PSII(-Ca) membranes. To understand why DCIP reduction is lost, we studied light effects on the Mn content of PSII(-PsbO) samples and found that when they are first illuminated, Mn cations are rapidly released from the Mn cluster. Addition of an electron acceptor to PSII(-PsbO) samples accelerates the process. No effect of light was found on the Mn cluster in PSII(-Ca) membranes. Our results demonstrate that: (a) the oxidant, which directly oxidizes an as yet undefined substrate in PSII(-Ca) membranes, is the Mn cluster (not the Y{sub Z} radical or P680{sup +}); (b) light causes rapid release of Mn cations from the Mn cluster in PSII(-PsbO) membranes, and the mechanism is discussed; and (c) rapid degradation of the Mn cluster under illumination is significant for understanding the lack of functional activity in some PSII(-PsbO) samples reported by others.

  10. A Simple Paper-Based Colorimetric Device for Rapid Mercury(II) Assay

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Weiwei; Fang, Xueen; Li, Hua; Cao, Hongmei; Kong, Jilie

    2016-01-01

    Contamination of the environment by mercury(II) ions (Hg2+) poses a serious threat to human health and ecosystems. Up to now, many reported Hg2+ sensors require complex procedures, long measurement times and sophisticated instrumentation. We have developed a simple, rapid, low cost and naked-eye quantitative method for Hg2+ environmental analysis using a paper-based colorimetric device (PCD). The sample solution to which platinum nanoparticles (PtNPs) have been added is dispensed to the detection zone on the PCD, where the 3,3,5,5-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) substrate has been pre-loaded. The PtNPs effect a rapid oxidization of TMB, inducing blue colorization on the PCD. However, Hg2+ in the solution rapidly interact with the PtNPs, suppressing the oxidation capacity and hence causing a decrease in blue intensity, which can be observed directly by the naked eye. Moreover, Hg2+ at concentrations as low as 0.01 uM, can be successfully monitored using a fiber optic device, which gives a digital readout proportional to the intensity of the blue color change. This paper-based colorimetric device (PCD) shows great potential for field measurement of Hg2+. PMID:27554633

  11. Use of meta-analysis to combine candidate gene association studies: application to study the relationship between the ESR PvuII polymorphism and sow litter size.

    PubMed

    Alfonso, Leopoldo

    2005-01-01

    This article investigates the application of meta-analysis on livestock candidate gene effects. The PvuII polymorphism of the ESR gene is used as an example. The association among ESR PvuII alleles with the number of piglets born alive and total born in the first (NBA1, TNB1) and later parities (NBA, TNB) is reviewed by conducting a meta-analysis of 15 published studies including 9329 sows. Under a fixed effects model, litter size values were significantly lower in the "AA" genotype groups when compared with "AB" and "BB" homozygotes. Under the random effects model, the results were similar although differences between "AA" and "AB" genotype groups were not clearly significant for NBA and TNB. Nevertheless, the most noticeable result was the high and significant heterogeneity estimated among studies. This heterogeneity could be assigned to error sampling, genotype by environment interaction, linkage or epistasis, as referred to in the literature, but also to the hypothesis of population admixture/stratification. It is concluded that meta-analysis can be considered as a helpful analytical tool to synthesise and discuss livestock candidate gene effects. The main difficulty found was the insufficient information on the standard errors of the estimated genotype effects in several publications. Consequently, the convenience of publishing the standard errors or the concrete P-values instead of the test significance level should be recommended to guarantee the quality of candidate gene effect meta-analyses.

  12. Ginga observations of quasi-periodic oscillations in type II bursts from the Rapid Burster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dotani, T.; Mitsuda, K.; Inoue, H.; Tanaka, Y.; Kawai, N.

    1990-01-01

    During Ginga observations of the 'Rapid Burster' in August 1988, strong quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) were detected in its X-ray intensity. The QPOs had centroid frequencies of 5 and 2 Hz during type II X-ray bursts which lasted for 10 and 30 s, respectively. The presence of the QPOs is correlated with the time scale-invariant burst profile. They are very strong during the initial peak in the burst, absent in the second peak, and strong again at the onset of the third peak. From an analysis of the X-ray spectrum as observed during the maxima and minima of the oscillations, it is found that the oscillations can be described by changes of the temperature of a blackbody emitter of constant apparent area.

  13. Remember the future II: meta-analyses and functional overlap of working memory and delay discounting.

    PubMed

    Wesley, Michael J; Bickel, Warren K

    2014-03-15

    Previously we showed that working memory training decreased the discounting of future rewards in stimulant addicts without affecting a go/no-go task. While a relationship between delay discounting and working memory is consistent with other studies, the unique brain regions of plausible causality between these two abilities have yet to be determined. Activation likelihood estimation meta-analyses were performed on foci from studies of delay discounting (DD = 449), working memory (WM = 452), finger tapping (finger tapping = 450), and response inhibition (RI = 450). Activity maps from relatively less (finger tapping) and more (RI) demanding executive tasks were contrasted with maps of DD and WM. Overlap analysis identified unique functional coincidence between DD and WM. The anterior cingulate cortex was engaged by all tasks. Finger tapping largely engaged motor-related brain areas. In addition to motor-related areas, RI engaged frontal brain regions. The right lateral prefrontal cortex was engaged by RI, DD, and WM and was contrasted out of overlap maps. A functional cluster in the posterior portion of the left lateral prefrontal cortex emerged as the largest location of unique overlap between DD and WM. A portion of the left lateral prefrontal cortex is a unique location where delay discounting and working memory processes overlap in the brain. This area, therefore, represents a therapeutic target for improving behaviors that rely on the integration of the recent past with the foreseeable future.

  14. N-Acyl Amino Acid Ligands for Ruthenium(II)-Catalyzed meta-C-H tert-Alkylation with Removable Auxiliaries.

    PubMed

    Li, Jie; Warratz, Svenja; Zell, Daniel; De Sarkar, Suman; Ishikawa, Eloisa Eriko; Ackermann, Lutz

    2015-11-01

    Acylated amino acid ligands enabled ruthenium(II)-catalyzed C-H functionalizations with excellent levels of meta-selectivity. The outstanding catalytic activity of the ruthenium(II) complexes derived from monoprotected amino acids (MPAA) set the stage for the first ruthenium-catalyzed meta-functionalizations with removable directing groups. Thereby, meta-alkylated anilines could be accessed, which are difficult to prepare by other means of direct aniline functionalizations. The robust nature of the versatile ruthenium(II)-MPAA was reflected by challenging remote C-H transformations with tertiary alkyl halides on aniline derivatives as well as on pyridyl-, pyrimidyl-, and pyrazolyl-substituted arenes. Detailed mechanistic studies provided strong support for an initial reversible C-H ruthenation, followed by a SET-type C-Hal activation through homolytic bond cleavage. Kinetic analyses confirmed this hypothesis through an unusual second-order dependence of the reaction rate on the ruthenium catalyst concentration. Overall, this report highlights the exceptional catalytic activity of ruthenium complexes derived from acylated amino acids, which should prove instrumental for C-H activation chemistry beyond remote functionalization.

  15. Genome scan meta-analysis of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, part II: Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Cathryn M; Levinson, Douglas F; Wise, Lesley H; DeLisi, Lynn E; Straub, Richard E; Hovatta, Iiris; Williams, Nigel M; Schwab, Sibylle G; Pulver, Ann E; Faraone, Stephen V; Brzustowicz, Linda M; Kaufmann, Charles A; Garver, David L; Gurling, Hugh M D; Lindholm, Eva; Coon, Hilary; Moises, Hans W; Byerley, William; Shaw, Sarah H; Mesen, Andrea; Sherrington, Robin; O'Neill, F Anthony; Walsh, Dermot; Kendler, Kenneth S; Ekelund, Jesper; Paunio, Tiina; Lönnqvist, Jouko; Peltonen, Leena; O'Donovan, Michael C; Owen, Michael J; Wildenauer, Dieter B; Maier, Wolfgang; Nestadt, Gerald; Blouin, Jean-Louis; Antonarakis, Stylianos E; Mowry, Bryan J; Silverman, Jeremy M; Crowe, Raymond R; Cloninger, C Robert; Tsuang, Ming T; Malaspina, Dolores; Harkavy-Friedman, Jill M; Svrakic, Dragan M; Bassett, Anne S; Holcomb, Jennifer; Kalsi, Gursharan; McQuillin, Andrew; Brynjolfson, Jon; Sigmundsson, Thordur; Petursson, Hannes; Jazin, Elena; Zoëga, Tomas; Helgason, Tomas

    2003-07-01

    Schizophrenia is a common disorder with high heritability and a 10-fold increase in risk to siblings of probands. Replication has been inconsistent for reports of significant genetic linkage. To assess evidence for linkage across studies, rank-based genome scan meta-analysis (GSMA) was applied to data from 20 schizophrenia genome scans. Each marker for each scan was assigned to 1 of 120 30-cM bins, with the bins ranked by linkage scores (1 = most significant) and the ranks averaged across studies (R(avg)) and then weighted for sample size (N(sqrt)[affected casess]). A permutation test was used to compute the probability of observing, by chance, each bin's average rank (P(AvgRnk)) or of observing it for a bin with the same place (first, second, etc.) in the order of average ranks in each permutation (P(ord)). The GSMA produced significant genomewide evidence for linkage on chromosome 2q (PAvgRnk<.000417). Two aggregate criteria for linkage were also met (clusters of nominally significant P values that did not occur in 1,000 replicates of the entire data set with no linkage present): 12 consecutive bins with both P(AvgRnk) and P(ord)<.05, including regions of chromosomes 5q, 3p, 11q, 6p, 1q, 22q, 8p, 20q, and 14p, and 19 consecutive bins with P(ord)<.05, additionally including regions of chromosomes 16q, 18q, 10p, 15q, 6q, and 17q. There is greater consistency of linkage results across studies than has been previously recognized. The results suggest that some or all of these regions contain loci that increase susceptibility to schizophrenia in diverse populations.

  16. Genome Scan Meta-Analysis of Schizophrenia and Bipolar Disorder, Part II: Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Cathryn M.; Levinson, Douglas F.; Wise, Lesley H.; DeLisi, Lynn E.; Straub, Richard E.; Hovatta, Iiris; Williams, Nigel M.; Schwab, Sibylle G.; Pulver, Ann E.; Faraone, Stephen V.; Brzustowicz, Linda M.; Kaufmann, Charles A.; Garver, David L.; Gurling, Hugh M. D.; Lindholm, Eva; Coon, Hilary; Moises, Hans W.; Byerley, William; Shaw, Sarah H.; Mesen, Andrea; Sherrington, Robin; O’Neill, F. Anthony; Walsh, Dermot; Kendler, Kenneth S.; Ekelund, Jesper; Paunio, Tiina; Lönnqvist, Jouko; Peltonen, Leena; O’Donovan, Michael C.; Owen, Michael J.; Wildenauer, Dieter B.; Maier, Wolfgang; Nestadt, Gerald; Blouin, Jean-Louis; Antonarakis, Stylianos E.; Mowry, Bryan J.; Silverman, Jeremy M.; Crowe, Raymond R.; Cloninger, C. Robert; Tsuang, Ming T.; Malaspina, Dolores; Harkavy-Friedman, Jill M.; Svrakic, Dragan M.; Bassett, Anne S.; Holcomb, Jennifer; Kalsi, Gursharan; McQuillin, Andrew; Brynjolfson, Jon; Sigmundsson, Thordur; Petursson, Hannes; Jazin, Elena; Zoëga, Tomas; Helgason, Tomas

    2003-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a common disorder with high heritability and a 10-fold increase in risk to siblings of probands. Replication has been inconsistent for reports of significant genetic linkage. To assess evidence for linkage across studies, rank-based genome scan meta-analysis (GSMA) was applied to data from 20 schizophrenia genome scans. Each marker for each scan was assigned to 1 of 120 30-cM bins, with the bins ranked by linkage scores (1 = most significant) and the ranks averaged across studies (Ravg) and then weighted for sample size (\\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}\\sqrt{N[affected cases]}\\end{equation*}\\end{document}). A permutation test was used to compute the probability of observing, by chance, each bin’s average rank (PAvgRnk) or of observing it for a bin with the same place (first, second, etc.) in the order of average ranks in each permutation (Pord). The GSMA produced significant genomewide evidence for linkage on chromosome 2q (PAvgRnk<.000417). Two aggregate criteria for linkage were also met (clusters of nominally significant P values that did not occur in 1,000 replicates of the entire data set with no linkage present): 12 consecutive bins with both PAvgRnk and Pord<.05, including regions of chromosomes 5q, 3p, 11q, 6p, 1q, 22q, 8p, 20q, and 14p, and 19 consecutive bins with Pord<.05, additionally including regions of chromosomes 16q, 18q, 10p, 15q, 6q, and 17q. There is greater consistency of linkage results across studies than has been previously recognized. The results suggest that some or all of these regions contain loci that increase susceptibility to schizophrenia in diverse populations. PMID:12802786

  17. Rapid and effective diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis with novel and sensitive loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay in clinical samples: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Le-yong; Li, Yan; Wang, Ming; Ke, Zun-qiong; Xu, Wan-zhou

    2014-02-01

    In recent years, Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay has been introduced for the diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis (TB). We performed the meta-analysis to establish the overall accuracy of LAMP assay for diagnosing pulmonary TB. Based on comprehensive searches of the pubmed, embase and cochrane databases, we identified outcome datas from all articles estimating diagnostic accuracy with LAMP assay until 1 October 2012. A summary estimation for sensitivity, specificity, diagnostic odds ratios (DOR) and the area under the summary ROC curve (AUC) was calculated by using the bivariate random-effects approach. The meta-analysis included 10 studies (1920 suspected specimens). The summary estimate was 80.0% (95%CI, 78.0%-83.0%) for sensitivity, 96.0% (95%CI, 95.0%-97.0%) for specificity and 119.85/0.9633 for DOR/AUC in pulmonary TB. The findings in subgroup analysis were as follows: the accuracy of LAMP assay is higher in high quality level studies than moderate and low quality level studies. The pooled sensitivity for the diagnosis of pulmonary TB was 90.0% (95%CI, 86.0-93.0%) and 75.0% (95%CI, 71.0-78.0%) for high quality level studies and moderate combined low quality level studies, respectively, while the specificity was 99.0% (95%CI, 98.0-100.0%) and 91.0% (95%CI, 88.0-94.0%). Pulmonary TB can be rapidly and accurately diagnosed with LAMP assay.

  18. VaxCelerate II: rapid development of a self-assembling vaccine for Lassa fever.

    PubMed

    Leblanc, Pierre; Moise, Leonard; Luza, Cybelle; Chantaralawan, Kanawat; Lezeau, Lynchy; Yuan, Jianping; Field, Mary; Richer, Daniel; Boyle, Christine; Martin, William D; Fishman, Jordan B; Berg, Eric A; Baker, David; Zeigler, Brandon; Mais, Dale E; Taylor, William; Coleman, Russell; Warren, H Shaw; Gelfand, Jeffrey A; De Groot, Anne S; Brauns, Timothy; Poznansky, Mark C

    2014-01-01

    Development of effective vaccines against emerging infectious diseases (EID) can take as much or more than a decade to progress from pathogen isolation/identification to clinical approval. As a result, conventional approaches fail to produce field-ready vaccines before the EID has spread extensively. Lassa is a prototypical emerging infectious disease endemic to West Africa for which no successful vaccine is available. We established the VaxCelerate Consortium to address the need for more rapid vaccine development by creating a platform capable of generating and pre-clinically testing a new vaccine against specific pathogen targets in less than 120 d A self-assembling vaccine is at the core of the approach. It consists of a fusion protein composed of the immunostimulatory Mycobacterium tuberculosis heat shock protein 70 (MtbHSP70) and the biotin binding protein, avidin. Mixing the resulting protein (MAV) with biotinylated pathogen-specific immunogenic peptides yields a self-assembled vaccine (SAV). To meet the time constraint imposed on this project, we used a distributed R&D model involving experts in the fields of protein engineering and production, bioinformatics, peptide synthesis/design and GMP/GLP manufacturing and testing standards. SAV immunogenicity was first tested using H1N1 influenza specific peptides and the entire VaxCelerate process was then tested in a mock live-fire exercise targeting Lassa fever virus. We demonstrated that the Lassa fever vaccine induced significantly increased class II peptide specific interferon-γ CD4(+) T cell responses in HLA-DR3 transgenic mice compared to peptide or MAV alone controls. We thereby demonstrated that our SAV in combination with a distributed development model may facilitate accelerated regulatory review by using an identical design for each vaccine and by applying safety and efficacy assessment tools that are more relevant to human vaccine responses than current animal models.

  19. Association between Estrogen Receptor-α Gene XbaI and PvuII Polymorphisms and Periodontitis Susceptibility: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Hong; Zhang, Chao; Hu, Yuan-Yuan; Yuan, Rui-Xia; Zuo, Hong-Xia; Yan, Jin-Zhu; Niu, Yu-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Background. Certain studies have previously explored the association between the estrogen receptor-α (ER-α) gene polymorphisms and periodontitis susceptibility, although the current results are controversial. The present study, using meta-analysis, aimed to investigate the nature of the genetic susceptibility of the ER-α for developing periodontitis. Methods. A comprehensive literature search of PubMed, Embase, CNKI, and Wanfang databases was conducted up to January 8, 2015. Statistical manipulation was performed using Stata version 13.0 software. Odds ratios (ORs) and corresponding 95% confident intervals (CIs) were calculated to estimate the association in five genetic models. Results. A total of 17 eligible case-control studies from seven identified publications consisting of nine studies for the XbaI polymorphism and eight studies for the PvuII polymorphism were included in the meta-analysis. We found elevated risk of periodontitis in XbaI XX genotype carriers. Moreover, subgroup analyses demonstrated increased risk for chronic periodontitis of XbaI XX genotype carriers, specifically in the Chinese Han female population. No significant association was observed between PvuII polymorphism and periodontitis. Conclusion. Current evidence indicated that the homozygote (XX) genotype of ER-α gene XbaI polymorphism, but not PvuII mutation, may increase the risk of chronic periodontitis, specifically in the Chinese Han female population. PMID:26688601

  20. Rapid reaction of nanomolar Mn(II) with superoxide radical in seawater and simulated freshwater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hansard, S.P.; Easter, H.D.; Voelker, B.M.

    2011-01-01

    Superoxide radical (O2-) has been proposed to be an important participant in oxidation-reduction reactions of metal ions in natural waters. Here, we studied the reaction of nanomolar Mn(II) with O 2- in seawater and simulated freshwater, using chemiluminescence detection of O2- to quantify the effect of Mn(II) on the decay kinetics of O2-. With 3-24 nM added [Mn(II)] and <0.7 nM [O2-], we observed effective second-order rate constants for the reaction of Mn(II) with O2- of 6 ?? 106 to 1 ?? 107 M -1???s-1 in various seawater samples. In simulated freshwater (pH 8.6), the effective rate constant of Mn(II) reaction with O 2- was somewhat lower, 1.6 ?? 106 M -1???s-1. With higher initial [O2-], in excess of added [Mn(II)], catalytic decay of O 2- by Mn was observed, implying that a Mn(II/III) redox cycle occurred. Our results show that reactions with nanomolar Mn(II) could be an important sink of O2- in natural waters. In addition, reaction of Mn(II) with superoxide could maintain a significant fraction of dissolved Mn in the +III oxidation state. ?? 2011 American Chemical Society.

  1. Postoperative radiotherapy and tumor recurrence after complete resection of stage II/III thymic tumor: a meta-analysis of cohort studies

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jietao; Sun, Xin; Huang, Letian; Xiong, Zhicheng; Yuan, Meng; Zhang, Shuling; Han, Cheng-Bo

    2016-01-01

    Background Whether postoperative radiotherapy (PORT) is effective for reducing the recurrence risk in patients who received complete resection of the stage II or III thymic tumors has not been determined. A meta-analysis was performed by combining the results of all available controlled trials. Methods PubMed, Cochrane’s Library, and the Embase databases were searched for studies which compared the recurrence data for patients with complete resection of the stage II or III thymic tumors assigned to an observing group, or a PORT group. A random effect model was applied to combine the results. Results Nineteen studies, all designed as retrospective cohort studies were included. These studies included 663 patients of PORT group and 617 patients of observing group. The recurrence rate for the patients in PORT group and observing group were 12.4% and 11.5%, respectively. Results of our study indicated that PORT has no significant influence on recurrent risk in patients with stage II or III thymic tumor after complete resection (odds ratio 1.02, 95% confidence interval 0.55–1.90, P=0.96). When stratified by stages, our meta-analyses did not indicate any significant effects of PORT on recurrent outcomes in either the stage II or the stage III patients. Moreover, subsequent analysis limited to studies only including patients with thymoma or thymic carcinoma also did not support the benefits of PORT on recurrent outcomes. Conclusion Although derived from retrospective cohort studies, current evidence did not support any benefit of PORT on recurrent risk in patients with complete resection of the stage II or III thymic tumors. PMID:27524907

  2. Rapid On-Site Evaluation Does Not Improve Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Fine Needle Aspiration Adequacy in Pancreatic Masses: A Meta-Analysis and Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Tao; Deng, Xuan; Du, Yiqi; Li, Zhaoshen

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Rapid on-site evaluation (ROSE) during endoscopic ultrasonography-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS–FNA) of pancreatic masses has been reported to be associated with improved adequacy and diagnostic yield. However, recent observational data on the impact of ROSE have reported conflicting results. A meta-analysis and systematic review was therefore conducted to evaluate the contribution of ROSE during EUS-FNA of pancreatic masses. Method A systematic search was conducted in MEDLINE/Pubmed and EMBASE databases for studies comparing the efficacy of ROSE between patients in two cohorts. Outcomes considered included diagnostic adequate rate, diagnostic yield, number of needle passes, pooled sensitivity and specificity. Findings from a random-effects model were expressed as pooled risk difference (RD) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results A total of 7 studies (1299 patients) was finally included and further analyzed in the current meta-analysis. EUS-FNA with ROSE could not improve diagnostic adequacy (RD = 0.05, 95% CI: -0.01–0.11) and diagnostic yield (RD = 0.04 95%CI: -0.05, 0.13). The number of needle passes showed no statistically significant difference with and without ROSE (RD = -0.68 95%CI: -2.35, 0.98). The pooled sensitivity and specificity of ROSE group were 0.91 (95%CI: 0.87, 0.94) and 1 (95%CI: 0.94, 1.00). The pooled sensitivity and specificity of non-ROSE group were 0.85 (95%CI: 0.80, 0.89) and 1 (95%CI: 0.95, 1.00). ROSE group and non-ROSE group showed comparable sensitivity and specificity. Conclusion Compared to historical reports of its clinical efficacy in patients with pancreatic lesions, ROSE may be not associated with an improvement of diagnostic yield, adequate rate, pooled sensitivity and specificity. PMID:27657529

  3. A rapid, semiempirical method of calculating the stability margins of superconductors cooled with subcooled He-II: (Final report)

    SciTech Connect

    Dresner, L.

    1986-01-01

    A rapid, semiempirical method is presented for calculating the stability margins of superconductors cooled with subcooled He-II. Based on a model of Seyfert, the method takes into account both time-dependent Gorter-Mellink heat transport and the effects of interfacial Kapitza resistance. The method has been compared favorably with heat transfer data of Seyfert, stability data of Meuris, and stability data of Pfotenhauer and van Sciver. 4 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Trazodone, meta-chlorophenylpiperazine (an hallucinogenic drug and trazodone metabolite), and the hallucinogen trifluoromethylphenylpiperazine cross-react with the EMIT®II ecstasy immunoassay in urine.

    PubMed

    Logan, Barry K; Costantino, Anthony G; Rieders, Eric F; Sanders, David

    2010-11-01

    A series of patients whose urine screened positive for 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) using a commercial enzyme immunoassay test (Ecstasy EMIT II assay), failed to confirm by substance-specific liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry tests for MDMA. Further evaluation of these urine specimens indicates that they were positive for trazodone and its metabolite meta-chlorophenylpiperazine (m-CPP). Independent tests of standards showed significant crossreactivity on the Ecstasy EMIT II assay with trazodone, m-CPP, and the related recreational drug trifluoromethylphenylpiperazine (TFMPP). This is of further forensic significance because m-CPP is emerging as an illicit recreational drug in its own right or as an adulterant in illicit cocaine and MDMA. The hallucinogen benzylpiperazine was also assessed but found not to cross-react significantly with this assay. Patients taking trazodone may get false-positive results on the urine EMIT test for MDMA.

  5. Variable primary coordination environments of Cd(II) binding to three helix bundles provide a pathway for rapid metal exchange.

    PubMed

    Tebo, Alison G; Hemmingsen, Lars; Pecoraro, Vincent L

    2015-12-01

    Members of the ArsR/SmtB family of transcriptional repressors, such as CadC, regulate the intracellular levels of heavy metals like Cd(II), Hg(II), and Pb(II). These metal sensing proteins bind their target metals with high specificity and affinity, however, a lack of structural information about these proteins makes defining the coordination sphere of the target metal difficult. Lingering questions as to the identity of Cd(II) coordination in CadC are addressed via protein design techniques. Two designed peptides with tetrathiolate metal binding sites were prepared and characterized, revealing fast exchange between CdS3O and CdS4 coordination spheres. Correlation of (111m)Cd PAC spectroscopy and (113)Cd NMR spectroscopy suggests that Cd(II) coordinated to CadC is in fast exchange between CdS3O and CdS4 forms, which may provide a mechanism for rapid sensing of heavy metal contaminants by this regulatory protein.

  6. Association between estrogen receptor-alpha gene PvuII and XbaI polymorphisms and osteoarthritis risk: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Wei; Shuang, Feng; Zou, Hong-Xing; Yang, Huai-He

    2015-01-01

    Estrogen receptor-alpha (ER-α) gene PvuII (T/C) and XbaI (A/G) polymorphisms have been hypothesized to be associated with osteoarthritis (OA) risk by several epidemiological studies, however, the available results were inconclusive and conflicting. We conducted a meta-analysis of 10 case-control studies that included 3328 osteoarthritis cases and 6390 case-free controls. We assessed the strength of the association, using odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). This meta-analysis showed that the ER-α PvuII and XbaI polymorphisms were not associated with OA risk in overall population. For the PvuII (T/C) polymorphism, however, in the subgroup analysis by country, a significantly reduced risk was observed among Chinese (TC vs. CC: OR = 0.73, 95% CI 0.54-0.99, I 2 = 0%, P heterogeneity = 0.498; dominant model, OR = 0.73, 95% CI = 0.55-0.98, I 2 = 0%, P heterogeneity = 0.555). For the XbaI (A/G) polymorphism, when stratifying by sample size, a significantly elevated risk was found in sample size ≤ 500 (AA vs. GG: OR = 2.60, 95% CI 1.10-6.18, I 2 = 42.9%, P heterogeneity = 0.135; dominant model: OR = 2.04, 95% CI 1.12-3.71, I 2 = 11.4%, P heterogeneity = 0.341; and recessive model: OR = 1.69, 95% CI 1.12-2.55, I 2 = 40.2%, P heterogeneity = 0.154). No publication bias was found in the present study. This meta-analysis suggests that ER-α PvuII (T/C) polymorphism may be associated with a reduced OA risk among Chinese and the XbaI (A/G) polymorphism may not be associated with OA risk, while the observed increase in OA risk for XbaI polymorphism may be due to small-study bias. PMID:25932124

  7. Effects of rapid versus standard HIV voluntary counselling and testing on receipt rate of HIV test results: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuan; Guo, Jian; Lu, Wenli

    2015-03-01

    Rapid HIV voluntary counselling and testing (RVCT) is an alternative method of standard HIV voluntary counselling and testing (SVCT). Less is known about whether RVCT improves the receipt rate of HIV test results among clients who seek HIV counselling and testing. We aimed to evaluate effectiveness of RVCT on result receipt rate. We conducted a comprehensive search of databases containing Medline, EBSCO, Web of science, and Cochrane library to identify studies published up to August 2012. Reviewers extracted information independently. Risk of bias was evaluated with Cochrane Collaboration's tool for assessing study quality. Five randomised controlled trials were included and analysed for the result receipt rate using a random-effects model. The pooled receipt rate of HIV test results in the RVCT was significantly higher than in the SVCT (RR = 1.74, 95% CI = 1.47-2.07). Our results suggest RVCT as a favourable method to increase the receipt of HIV test results. Only two included studies assessed the modification of risk behaviour after HIV-CT in a different manner; also, the sample size was small in the current meta-analysis. In future research, it is necessary to confirm the effect of RVCT on disinhibition of post-test risk behaviour.

  8. The Effects of Maxillary Protraction with or without Rapid Maxillary Expansion and Age Factors in Treating Class III Malocclusion: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Qu, Hong-Chen; Yu, Mo; Zhang, Yang

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a comprehensive meta-analysis of 12 studies to examine whether maxillary protraction face mask associated with rapid maxillary expansion (FM/RME) could be an effective treatment for Class III malocclusion and to evaluate the effect of timing on treatment response. Patients with a maxillary deficiency who were treated with FM with or without RME were compared with those who had an untreated Class III malocclusion. In both treatment groups, forward displacement of the maxilla and skeletal changes were found to be statistically significant. In addition, posterior rotation of the mandible and increased facial height were more evident in the FM group compared with the control group. However, no significant differences were observed between the early treatment groups and late treatment groups. The results indicated that both FM/RME and FM therapy produced favorable skeletal changes for correcting anterior crossbite, and the curative time was not affected by the presence of deciduous teeth, early mixed dentition or late mixed dentition in the patient. PMID:26068221

  9. Systematic review and meta-analysis of phase I/II targeted therapy combined with radiotherapy in patients with glioblastoma multiforme: quality of report, toxicity, and survival.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Marcos A; Pignon, Jean-Pierre; Blanchard, Pierre; Lefeuvre, Delphine; Levy, Antonin; Touat, Mehdi; Louvel, Guillaume; Dhermain, Frédéric; Soria, Jean-Charles; Deutsch, Eric; Le Teuff, Gwénaël

    2015-06-01

    To perform a systematic review and meta-analysis of severe adverse events (SAE) reported in early trials combining molecularly targeted therapies (MTT) with radiotherapy (RT), and to compare them to standard therapy. A summary data meta-analysis was performed and compared to the historical standard. Inclusion criteria were phase I and/or II trials published between 2000 and 2011, with glioblastoma multiforme patients treated with RT and MTT. Pooled incidence rates (IR) of SAE were estimated as well as the pooled median progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Nineteen prospective trials (9 phase I, 1 phase I/II and 9 phase II) out of 29 initially selected were included (n = 755 patients). The exact number of patients who had experienced SAE was mentioned in 37 % of the trials, concerning only 17 % of the patients. Information such as the period during which adverse events were monitored, the planned treatment duration, and late toxicity were not reported in the trials. The pooled IR of overall SAE was 131.2 (95 % CI 88.8-193.7) per 1000 person-months compared to 74.7 (63.6-87.8) for standard therapy (p < 0.01). Significant differences were observed for gastrointestinal events (p = 0.05) and treatment-related deaths (p = 0.02), in favour of standard therapy. No significant difference was observed in PFS and OS. Reporting a summary of toxicity data in early clinical trials should be stringently standardized. The use of MTT with RT compared to standard therapy increased SAE while yielded comparable survival in glioblastoma multiforme patients.

  10. Association Between ESR1 PvuII, XbaI, and P325P Polymorphisms and Breast Cancer Susceptibility: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yiming; Zhang, Ming; Yuan, Xiaosong; Zhang, Zhichen; Zhang, Ping; Chao, Haojie; Jiang, Lixia; Jiang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Background Breast cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths for women. Numerous studies have shown that single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on the ESR1 gene are associated to this disease. However, data and conclusions are inconsistent and controversial. Material/Methods To investigate the association between PvuII (rs2234693), XbaI (rs9340799) and P325P (rs1801132) polymorphisms of ESR1 gene with the risk of breast cancer under different population categorizations, we searched multiple databases for data collection, and performed the meta-analysis on a total of 25 case-control studies. Three different comparison models – dominant model, recessive model, and homozygote comparison model – were applied to evaluate the association. Results Our results indicated that people with TT+TC or TT genotype were at a greater risk of developing breast cancer than those with CC genotype in the PvuII polymorphism. While for XbaI and P325P polymorphisms, no significance was found using any of the 3 models. Furthermore, the data were also stratified into different subgroups according to the ethnicity (white or Asian) and source of controls (hospital-based or population-based), and separate analyses were conducted to assess the association. The ethnicity subgroup assessment showed that the higher risk of breast cancer for TT genotype of PvuII polymorphism than CC genotype only occurred in Asian people, but not in white populations. For the source-stratified subgroup analysis, significant association suggested that people with TT + TC genotype were at a greater risk of developing breast cancer than those with CC genotype in the hospital-based subgroup. Conclusions Thus, this meta-analysis clarified the inconsistent conclusions from previous studies, conducted analyses for the entire population as well as for different subgroups using diverse population categorization strategies, and has the potential to help provide a personalized risk estimate for breast

  11. Unsolved problems in observational astronomy. II. Focus on rapid response - mining the sky with ``thinking" telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vestrand, W. T.; Theiler, J.; Woznia, P. R.

    2004-10-01

    The existence of rapidly slewing robotic telescopes and fast alert distribution via the Internet is revolutionizing our capability to study the physics of fast astrophysical transients. But the salient challenge that optical time domain surveys must conquer is mining the torrent of data to recognize important transients in a scene full of normal variations. Humans simply do not have the attention span, memory, or reaction time required to recognize fast transients and rapidly respond. Autonomous robotic instrumentation with the ability to extract pertinent information from the data stream in real time will therefore be essential for recognizing transients and commanding rapid follow-up observations while the ephemeral behavior is still present. Here we discuss how the development and integration of three technologies: (1) robotic telescope networks; (2) machine learning; and (3) advanced database technology, can enable the construction of smart robotic telescopes, which we loosely call ``thinking'' telescopes, capable of mining the sky in real time.

  12. Viscous effects in rapidly rotating stars with application to white-dwarf models. I, II.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durisen, R. H.

    1973-01-01

    A general approximate numerical technique is proposed for constructing evolutionary sequences of rapidly rotating axisymmetric barytropic equilibrium configurations, with allowance for angular momentum transfer by a nonconstant isotropic viscosity. The principal physical assumption involved is the constancy of the angular momentum per unit mass on cylinders about the axis of rotation. Rapidly rotating nonmagnetic white-dwarf models with a zero-temperature degenerate-electron equation of state are considered as a particular application. The viscosity used in the analysis is that of the degenerate electrons.

  13. Effects of Lifestyle Interventions That Include a Physical Activity Component in Class II and III Obese Individuals: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Baillot, Aurélie; Romain, Ahmed J.; Boisvert-Vigneault, Katherine; Audet, Mélisa; Baillargeon, Jean Patrice; Dionne, Isabelle J.; Valiquette, Louis; Chakra, Claire Nour Abou; Avignon, Antoine; Langlois, Marie-France

    2015-01-01

    Background In class II and III obese individuals, lifestyle intervention is the first step to achieve weight loss and treat obesity-related comorbidities before considering bariatric surgery. A systematic review, meta-analysis, and meta-regression were performed to assess the impact of lifestyle interventions incorporating a physical activity (PA) component on health outcomes of class II and III obese individuals. Methods An electronic search was conducted in 4 databases (Medline, Scopus, CINAHL and Sportdiscus). Two independent investigators selected original studies assessing the impact of lifestyle interventions with PA components on anthropometric parameters, cardiometabolic risk factors (fat mass, blood pressure, lipid and glucose metabolism), behaviour modification (PA and nutritional changes), and quality of life in adults with body mass index (BMI) ≥ 35 kg/m2. Estimates were pooled using a random-effect model (DerSimonian and Laird method). Heterogeneity between studies was assessed by the Cochran’s chi-square test and quantified through an estimation of the I². Results Of the 3,170 identified articles, 56 met our eligibility criteria, with a large majority of uncontrolled studies (80%). The meta-analysis based on uncontrolled studies showed significant heterogeneity among all included studies. The pooled mean difference in weight loss was 8.9 kg (95% CI, 10.2–7.7; p < 0.01) and 2.8 kg/m² in BMI loss (95% CI, 3.4–2.2; p < 0.01). Long-term interventions produced superior weight loss (11.3 kg) compared to short-term (7.2 kg) and intermediate-term (8.0 kg) interventions. A significant global effect of lifestyle intervention on fat mass, waist circumference, blood pressure, total cholesterol, LDL-C, triglycerides and fasting insulin was found (p<0.01), without significant effect on HDL-C and fasting blood glucose. Conclusions Lifestyle interventions incorporating a PA component can improve weight and various cardiometabolic risk factors in class II

  14. Rapid and direct electrochemical determination of Ni(II) in industrial discharge water.

    PubMed

    Ferancová, Adriana; Hattuniemi, Maarit K; Sesay, Adama M; Räty, Jarkko P; Virtanen, Vesa T

    2016-04-01

    Industrial water contains a number of contaminants, such as organic pollutants and heavy metals, which can significantly affect the quality of soil, ground and environmental waters. We have successfully optimized and tested an electrochemical method and sensor modified with dimethylglyoxime for monitoring of nickel(II). The detection limit was 0.03mg/L and determination limit was 0.09mg/L. Linear concentration range was observed from 0.06 to 0.5mg/L Ni(II) and it is suitable for the analysis of environmental waters. The effect of all parameters important for on-site measurements (such as interferences, presence of dissolved oxygen, temperature) was investigated and considered in the analysis of mine discharge water. Water samples were analyzed without any pretreatment or filtration. A low level of error (5.6%) was observed for analysis demonstrating the usability of the optimized sensor and method for on-site measurements.

  15. Rapid and direct electrochemical determination of Ni(II) in industrial discharge water.

    PubMed

    Ferancová, Adriana; Hattuniemi, Maarit K; Sesay, Adama M; Räty, Jarkko P; Virtanen, Vesa T

    2016-04-01

    Industrial water contains a number of contaminants, such as organic pollutants and heavy metals, which can significantly affect the quality of soil, ground and environmental waters. We have successfully optimized and tested an electrochemical method and sensor modified with dimethylglyoxime for monitoring of nickel(II). The detection limit was 0.03mg/L and determination limit was 0.09mg/L. Linear concentration range was observed from 0.06 to 0.5mg/L Ni(II) and it is suitable for the analysis of environmental waters. The effect of all parameters important for on-site measurements (such as interferences, presence of dissolved oxygen, temperature) was investigated and considered in the analysis of mine discharge water. Water samples were analyzed without any pretreatment or filtration. A low level of error (5.6%) was observed for analysis demonstrating the usability of the optimized sensor and method for on-site measurements. PMID:26686524

  16. Reactivity of a Nickel(II) Bis(amidate) Complex with meta-Chloroperbenzoic Acid: Formation of a Potent Oxidizing Species.

    PubMed

    Corona, Teresa; Pfaff, Florian F; Acuña-Parés, Ferran; Draksharapu, Apparao; Whiteoak, Christopher J; Martin-Diaconescu, Vlad; Lloret-Fillol, Julio; Browne, Wesley R; Ray, Kallol; Company, Anna

    2015-10-12

    Herein, we report the formation of a highly reactive nickel-oxygen species that has been trapped following reaction of a Ni(II) precursor bearing a macrocyclic bis(amidate) ligand with meta-chloroperbenzoic acid (HmCPBA). This compound is only detectable at temperatures below 250 K and is much more reactive toward organic substrates (i.e., C-H bonds, C=C bonds, and sulfides) than previously reported well-defined nickel-oxygen species. Remarkably, this species is formed by heterolytic O-O bond cleavage of a Ni-HmCPBA precursor, which is concluded from experimental and computational data. On the basis of spectroscopy and DFT calculations, this reactive species is proposed to be a Ni(III) -oxyl compound.

  17. Reactivity of a Nickel(II) Bis(amidate) Complex with meta-Chloroperbenzoic Acid: Formation of a Potent Oxidizing Species.

    PubMed

    Corona, Teresa; Pfaff, Florian F; Acuña-Parés, Ferran; Draksharapu, Apparao; Whiteoak, Christopher J; Martin-Diaconescu, Vlad; Lloret-Fillol, Julio; Browne, Wesley R; Ray, Kallol; Company, Anna

    2015-10-12

    Herein, we report the formation of a highly reactive nickel-oxygen species that has been trapped following reaction of a Ni(II) precursor bearing a macrocyclic bis(amidate) ligand with meta-chloroperbenzoic acid (HmCPBA). This compound is only detectable at temperatures below 250 K and is much more reactive toward organic substrates (i.e., C-H bonds, C=C bonds, and sulfides) than previously reported well-defined nickel-oxygen species. Remarkably, this species is formed by heterolytic O-O bond cleavage of a Ni-HmCPBA precursor, which is concluded from experimental and computational data. On the basis of spectroscopy and DFT calculations, this reactive species is proposed to be a Ni(III) -oxyl compound. PMID:26311073

  18. Systematic review and meta-analysis: rapid diagnostic tests versus placental histology, microscopy and PCR for malaria in pregnant women

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background During pregnancy, malaria infection with Plasmodium falciparum or Plasmodium vivax is related to adverse maternal health and poor birth outcomes. Diagnosis of malaria, during pregnancy, is complicated by the absence or low parasite densities in peripheral blood. Diagnostic methods, other than microscopy, are needed for detection of placental malaria. Therefore, the diagnostic accuracy of rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs), detecting antigen, and molecular techniques (PCR), detecting DNA, for the diagnosis of Plasmodium infections in pregnancy was systematically reviewed. Methods MEDLINE, EMBASE and Web of Science were searched for studies assessing the diagnostic accuracy of RDTs, PCR, microscopy of peripheral and placental blood and placental histology for the detection of malaria infection (all species) in pregnant women. Results The results of 49 studies were analysed in metandi (Stata), of which the majority described P. falciparum infections. Although both placental and peripheral blood microscopy cannot reliably replace histology as a reference standard for placental P. falciparum infection, many studies compared RDTs and PCR to these tests. The proportion of microscopy positives in placental blood (sensitivity) detected by peripheral blood microscopy, RDTs and PCR are respectively 72% [95% CI 62-80], 81% [95% CI 55-93] and 94% [95% CI 86-98]. The proportion of placental blood microscopy negative women that were negative in peripheral blood microscopy, RDTs and PCR (specificity) are 98% [95% CI 95-99], 94% [95% CI 76-99] and 77% [95% CI 71-82]. Based on the current data, it was not possible to determine if the false positives in RDTs and PCR are caused by sequestered parasites in the placenta that are not detected by placental microscopy. Conclusion The findings suggest that RDTs and PCR may have good performance characteristics to serve as alternatives for the diagnosis of malaria in pregnancy, besides any other limitations and practical considerations

  19. Correction of a skeletal Class II malocclusion with severe crowding by a specially designed rapid maxillary expander.

    PubMed

    Wang, Honghong; Feng, Jing; Lu, Peijun; Shen, Gang

    2015-02-01

    To correct an Angle Class II malocclusion or to create spaces in the maxillary arch by nonextraction treatment, distal movement of the maxillary molars is required. Various modalities for distalizing the buccal segment have been reported. Conventional extraoral appliances can be used to obtain maximum anchorage. However, many patients reject headgear wear because of social and esthetic concerns, and the success of this treatment depends on patient compliance. Intraoral appliances, such as repelling magnets, nickel-titanium coils, pendulum appliance, Jones jig appliance, distal jet appliance, and modified Nance appliance, have been introduced to distalize the molars with little or no patient cooperation. However, intraoral appliances can result in anchorage loss of the anterior teeth and distal tipping of the maxillary molars. In this case report, we introduce a diversified rapid maxillary expansion appliance that was custom designed and fabricated for the treatment of a growing girl with a skeletal Class II malocclusion and severe crowding from a totally lingually positioned lateral incisor. The appliance concomitantly expanded the maxilla transversely and retracted the buccal segment sagittally, distalizing the maxillary molars to reach a Class I relationship and creating the spaces to displace the malpositioned lateral incisor. The uniqueness of this special diversified rapid maxillary expansion appliance was highlighted by a series of reconstructions and modifications at different stages of the treatment to reinforce the anchorage. PMID:25636559

  20. Rapid evolution in response to introduced predators II: the contribution of adaptive plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Latta, Leigh C; Bakelar, Jeremy W; Knapp, Roland A; Pfrender, Michael E

    2007-01-01

    Background Introductions of non-native species can significantly alter the selective environment for populations of native species, which can respond through phenotypic plasticity or genetic adaptation. We examined phenotypic and genetic responses of Daphnia populations to recent introductions of non-native fish to assess the relative roles of phenotypic plasticity versus genetic change in causing the observed patterns. The Daphnia community in alpine lakes throughout the Sierra Nevada of California (USA) is ideally suited for investigation of rapid adaptive evolution because there are multiple lakes with and without introduced fish predators. We conducted common-garden experiments involving presence or absence of chemical cues produced by fish and measured morphological and life-history traits in Daphnia melanica populations collected from lakes with contrasting fish stocking histories. The experiment allowed us to assess the degree of population differentiation due to fish predation and examine the contribution of adaptive plasticity in the response to predator introduction. Results Our results show reductions in egg number and body size of D. melanica in response to introduced fish. These phenotypic changes have a genetic basis but are partly due to a direct response to chemical cues from fish via adaptive phenotypic plasticity. Body size showed the largest phenotypic change, on the order of nine phenotypic standard deviations, with approximately 11% of the change explained by adaptive plasticity. Both evolutionary and plastic changes in body size and egg number occurred but no changes in the timing of reproduction were observed. Conclusion Native Daphnia populations exposed to chemical cues produced by salmonid fish predators display adaptive plasticity for body size and fecundity. The magnitude of adaptive plasticity was insufficient to explain the total phenotypic change, so the realized change in phenotypic means in populations exposed to introduced fish may

  1. Rapid analysis of hay attributes using NIRS. Final report, Task II alfalfa supply system

    SciTech Connect

    1997-10-24

    This final report provides technical information on the development of a near infrared reflectance spectroscopy (NIRS) system for the analysis of alfalfa hay. The purpose of the system is to provide consistent quality for processing alfalfa stems for fuel and alfalfa leaf meal products for livestock feed. Project tasks were to: (1) develop an NIRS driven analytical system for analysis of alfalfa hay and processed alfalfa products; (2) assist in hiring a qualified NIRS technician and recommend changes in testing equipment necessary to provide accurate analysis; (3) calibrate the NIRS instrument for accurate analyses; and (4) develop prototype equipment and sampling procedures as a first step towards development of a totally automated sampling system that would rapidly sample and record incoming feedstock and outbound product. An accurate hay testing program was developed, along with calibration equations for analyzing alfalfa hay and sun-cured alfalfa pellets. A preliminary leaf steam calibration protocol was also developed. 7 refs., 11 figs., 10 tabs.

  2. Rapid coal analysis. Part II: Slurry atomization DCP emission analysis of NBS coal

    SciTech Connect

    McCurdy, D.L.; Wichman, M.D.; Fry, R.C.

    1985-11-01

    A McCrone Micronising Mills is used to wet grind NBS bituminous coal to a median particle diameter of 5.7 m within 10 min. The finely divided coal slurry is immediately nebulized without sieving into a three-electrode DCP for accurate trace element determinations within 15 min overall lapsed time. Three important parameters contribute to near-quantitative elemental recovery without the use of wet or dry ashing, matrix matching, standard additions, as correction factors. These parameters are: (1) extremely small coal particle size, (2) spray chamber conditions favoring unusually efficient characteristic of the hot DCP. Near-unity response factors are observed for the rapid DCP emission determination of trace metals in finely divided coal slurry. Calibration may therefore be performed simply with aqueous standards. The slurry method gives near quantitative agreement between experimental and certified values for Cr, Cu, Mg, Mn, Ni, and Pb in NBS bituminous coal.

  3. Rapid and selective lead (II) colorimetric sensor based on azacrown ether-functionalized gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alizadeh, A.; Khodaei, M. M.; Karami, Ch; Workentin, M. S.; Shamsipur, M.; Sadeghi, M.

    2010-08-01

    A gold nanoparticle (AuNPs)-based simple and fast colorimetric sensor for selective detecting of Pb(II) in aqueous solution has been developed. Monodisperse AuNPs (approx. 2.0 nm diameter) has been prepared facilely and further modified with an alkanethiol-bearing monoazacrown ether terminus. These AuNPs are shown to selectively sense Pb2 + through color change, which is visually discernible by an appearance of the surface plasmon band (SPB) at 520 nm. The recognition mechanism is attributed to the unique structure of the monoazacrown ether attached to AuNPs and metal sandwich coordination between two azacrown ether moieties that are attached to separate nanoparticles. This inter-particle cross-linking results in an aggregation and apparent color change from brown to purple. Additionally, TEM experiments support the optical absorption data proving the aggregation between azacrown ether-capped gold nanoparticles. This AuNP-based colorimetric assay is a facile and robust method and allows fast detection of Pb2 + at ambient temperatures. More importantly, the developed technique does not utilize enzymatic reactions, light-sensitive dye molecules, lengthy protocols or sophisticated instrumentation.

  4. Rapid decolorization of acid orange II aqueous solution by amorphous zero-valent iron.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Changqin; Zhu, Zhengwang; Zhang, Haifeng; Hu, Zhuangqi

    2012-01-01

    Some problems including low treatment capacity, agglomeration and clogging phenomena, and short working life, limit the application of pre-treatment methods involving zero-valent iron (ZVI). In this article, ZVI was frozen in an amorphous state through a melt-spinning technique, and the decolorization effect of amorphous ZVI on Acid Orange II solution was investigated under varied conditions of experimental variables such as reaction temperature, ribbon dosage, and initial pH. Batch experiments suggested that the decolorization rate was enhanced with the increase of reaction temperature and ribbon dosage, but decreased with increasing initial solution pH. Kinetic analyses indicated that the decolorization process followed a first order exponential kinetic model, and the surface-normalized decolorization rate could reach 2.09 L/(m2 x min) at room temperature, which was about ten times larger than any previously reported under similar conditions. Recycling experiments also proved that the ribbons could be reused at least four times without obvious decay of decolorization rate and efficiency. This study suggests a tremendous application potential for amorphous ZVI in remediation of groundwater or wastewater contaminated with azo dyes.

  5. Moving difference (MDIFF) non-adiabatic rapid sweep (NARS) EPR of copper(II).

    PubMed

    Hyde, James S; Bennett, Brian; Kittell, Aaron W; Kowalski, Jason M; Sidabras, Jason W

    2013-11-01

    Non-adiabatic rapid sweep (NARS) EPR spectroscopy has been introduced for application to nitroxide-labeled biological samples (Kittell et al., 2011). Displays are pure absorption, and are built up by acquiring data in spectral segments that are concatenated. In this paper we extend the method to frozen solutions of copper-imidazole, a square planar copper complex with four in-plane nitrogen ligands. Pure absorption spectra are created from concatenation of 170 5-gauss segments spanning 850 G at 1.9 GHz. These spectra, however, are not directly useful since nitrogen superhyperfine couplings are barely visible. Application of the moving difference (MDIFF) algorithm to the digitized NARS pure absorption spectrum is used to produce spectra that are analogous to the first harmonic EPR. The signal intensity is about four times higher than when using conventional 100 kHz field modulation, depending on line shape. MDIFF not only filters the spectrum, but also the noise, resulting in further improvement of the SNR for the same signal acquisition time. The MDIFF amplitude can be optimized retrospectively, different spectral regions can be examined at different amplitudes, and an amplitude can be used that is substantially greater than the upper limit of the field modulation amplitude of a conventional EPR spectrometer, which improves the signal-to-noise ratio of broad lines.

  6. Accretion and canal impacts in a rapidly subsiding wetland II: Feldspar marker horizon technique

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cahoon, D.R.; Turner, R.E.

    1989-01-01

    Recent (6-12 months) marsh sediment accretion and accumulation rates were measured with feldspar marker horizons in the vicinity of natural waterways and man-made canals with spoil banks in the rapidly subsiding environment of coastal Louisiana. Annual accretion rates in a Spartina alterniflora salt marsh in the Mississippi deltaic plain averaged 6 mm in marsh adjacent to canals compared to 10 mm in marsh adjacent to natural waterways. The rates, however, were not statistically significantly different. The average rate of sediment accretion in the same salt marsh region for a transect perpendicular to a canal (13 mm yr-1) was significantly greater than the rate measured for a transect perpendicular to a natural waterway (7 mm yr-1). Measurements of soil bulk density and organic matter content from the two transects were also different. This spatial variability in accretion rates is probably related to (1) spoil bank influences on local hydrology; and (2) a locally high rate of sediment input from lateral erosion associated with pond enlargement. In a brackish Spatina patens marsh on Louisiana's chenier plain, vertical accretion rates were the same along natural and canal waterways (3-4 mm yr-1) in a hydrologically restricted marsh region. However, the accretion rates for both waterways were significantly lower than the rates along a nonhydrologically restricted natural waterway nearby (11 mm yr-1). The vertical accretion of matter displayed semi-annual differences in the brackish marsh environment.

  7. Postural adjustments associated with rapid voluntary arm movements. II. Biomechanical analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Friedli, W G; Cohen, L; Hallett, M; Stanhope, S; Simon, S R

    1988-01-01

    Normal subjects performed bilaterally symmetric rapid elbow flexions or extensions ("focal movements") while standing. Specific patterns of electromyographic activity in leg and trunk muscles ("associated postural adjustments") were seen for each type of movement. The biomechanical significance of these postural adjustments was analysed by means of the ground reaction forces and motion of the various body segments. Experimental data were compared with that from a theoretical model of the body consisting of a six segment kinetic chain with rigid links. Distinct patterns of the ground reaction forces with elbow flexion were opposite in direction to those seen with elbow extension. Movements of the various body segments were small and specific for a certain focal movement. Dynamic perturbations arising from the arm movement in an anteroposterior direction were found to be compensated by postural adjustments, whereas vertical perturbations were not compensated. The muscular activity acting about different joints in the different movements was found to correlate with the predictions of activity needed to compensate for net joint reaction moments arising from the focal movement. Motion of the various body segments could be understood as resulting from the interplay of the net reaction moments and the net muscular moments at the different joints. Dynamic postural requirements are accomplished by a precise active compensation initiated before the focal movement. PMID:3346688

  8. Pulsations of rapidly rotating stars. II. Realistic modelling for intermediate-mass stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouazzani, R.-M.; Roxburgh, I. W.; Dupret, M.-A.

    2015-07-01

    Context. Very high precision seismic space missions such as CoRoT and Kepler provide the means for testing the modelling of transport processes in stellar interiors. For some stars, such as δ Scuti, γ Doradus, and Be stars, the observed pulsation spectra are modified by rotation to such an extent that it prevents any fruitful interpretation. Aims: Our aim is to characterise acoustic pulsation spectra of realistic stellar models in order to be able to interpret asteroseismic data from such stars. Methods: The 2D oscillation code ACOR, which treats rotation in a non-perturbative manner, is used to study pulsation spectra of highly distorted evolved models of stars. Two-dimensional models of stars are obtained by a self-consistent method that distorts spherically averaged stellar models a posteriori, at any stage of evolution, and for any type of rotation law. Results: Four types of modes are calculated in a very dense frequency spectrum, among which are island modes. The regularity of the island modes spectrum is confirmed and yields a new set of quantum numbers, with which an échelle diagram can be built. Mixed gravito-acoustic modes are calculated in rapidly rotating models for the first time.

  9. Insulated Isothermal Reverse Transcriptase PCR (iiRT-PCR) for Rapid and Sensitive Detection of Classical Swine Fever Virus.

    PubMed

    Lung, O; Pasick, J; Fisher, M; Buchanan, C; Erickson, A; Ambagala, A

    2016-10-01

    Classical swine fever (CSF) is an OIE-listed disease that can have a severe impact on the swine industry. User-friendly, sensitive, rapid diagnostic tests that utilize low-cost field-deployable instruments for CSF diagnosis can be useful for disease surveillance and outbreak monitoring. In this study, we describe validation of a new probe-based insulated isothermal reverse transcriptase PCR (iiRT-PCR) assay for rapid detection of classical swine fever virus (CSFV) on a compact, user-friendly device (POCKIT(™) Nucleic Acid Analyzer) that does not need data interpretation by the user. The assay accurately detected CSFV RNA from a diverse panel of 33 CSFV strains representing all three genotypes plus an additional in vitro-transcribed RNA from cloned sequences representing a vaccine strain. No cross-reactivity was observed with a panel of 18 viruses associated with livestock including eight other pestivirus strains (bovine viral diarrhoea virus type 1 and type 2, border disease virus, HoBi atypical pestivirus), African swine fever virus, swine vesicular disease virus, swine influenza virus, porcine respiratory and reproductive syndrome virus, porcine circovirus 1, porcine circovirus 2, porcine respiratory coronavirus, vesicular exanthema of swine virus, bovine herpes virus type 1 and vesicular stomatitis virus. The iiRT-PCR assay accurately detected CSFV as early as 2 days post-inoculation in RNA extracted from serum samples of experimentally infected pigs, before appearance of clinical signs. The limit of detection (LOD95% ) calculated by probit regression analysis was 23 copies per reaction. The assay has a sample to answer turnaround time of less than an hour using extracted RNA or diluted or low volume of neat serum. The user-friendly, compact device that automatically analyses and displays results could potentially be a useful tool for surveillance and monitoring of CSF in a disease outbreak. PMID:25644051

  10. The rapidly pulsating subdwarf B star PG 1325+101. II. Structural parameters from asteroseismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charpinet, S.; Silvotti, R.; Bonanno, A.; Fontaine, G.; Brassard, P.; Chayer, P.; Green, E. M.; Bergeron, P.; Bernabei, S.; Leccia, S.; Kjeldsen, H.; Janulis, R.; Frasca, A.; Østensen, R.; Kim, S.-L.; Park, B.-G.; Jiang, X.; Reed, M. D.; Patterson, R. S.; Gietzen, K. M.; Clark, P. J.; Wolf, G. W.; Lipkin, Y.; Formiggini, L.; Leibowitz, E.; Oswalt, T. D.; Rudkin, M.; Johnston, K.

    2006-11-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the rapidly pulsating subdwarf B star (or EC14026 star) PG 1325+101. This analysis exploits the outcome of dedicated multisite observations using time-series photometry that revealed the presence of (at least) 15 periodicities in the luminosity modulation of this star (Silvotti et al. 2006, A&A, 459, 557, Paper I). Based on high-S/N, medium-resolution spectra obtained at the Steward Observatory's 2.3 m Telescope and at the 6.5 m MMT Telescope, new NLTE spectroscopic derivations of the atmospheric parameters of PG 1325+101 are presented. The mean values of T_eff = 35 050 ± 220 K, log g=5.81 ± 0.04, and log N(He)/N(H) = -1.70± 0.02 are in agreement with previous determinations, but are significantly more accurate. These improved spectroscopic parameters are essential for isolating a unique asteroseismic model solution for the observed pulsation spectrum of PG 1325+101. Using the "forward modeling" approach, our combined spectroscopic and asteroseismic analysis leads objectively to the identification of the (k, ℓ) indices of the 12 independent modes observed in this star, and to the determination of its structural parameters. The periods correspond to low-order acoustic modes with adjacent values of k and having degrees ℓ=0-4. They define a band of unstable modes, in agreement with nonadiabatic pulsation theory. The average dispersion achieved between the observed periods and the periods of the corresponding theoretical modes of the optimal model is only 0.46% (˜ 0.54 s), comparable to the results from similar analyses of other EC14026 stars analysed to date. The inferred structural parameters of PG 1325+101 are Teff= 35 050 ± 220 K, log g=5.811±0.004, log M{env}/M*=-4.18±0.10, M*=0.50±0.01 M⊙ (i.e., close to the canonical mass of extreme horizontal branch stars), R/R⊙=0.145±0.002, and L/L⊙=28.3±1.5. In addition, by combining detailed model atmosphere calculations with V=14.019±0.012, we estimate that this star

  11. The Prognostic Role of Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Autoantibody in Non-Gravid Hypertension and Pre-eclampsia: A Meta-analysis and Our Studies.

    PubMed

    Lei, Jinghui; Li, Yafeng; Zhang, Suli; Wu, Ye; Wang, Pengli; Liu, Huirong

    2016-04-01

    Angiotensin II type 1 receptor autoantibody (AT1-AA) is found in patients with non-gravid hypertension or pre-eclampsia, but the relationship is uncertain.The aim of the present study was to assess the association between AT1-AA and high blood pressure using meta-analysis, and to evaluate the prognosis value of AT1-AA for hypertensive diseases.Literature search from PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane databases were conducted using keywords "hypertension" or "pre-eclampsia," "angiotensin II receptor type 1 autoantibody," and its aliases from April 1999 to December 2015.Studies evaluating the association between AT1-AA and non-gravid hypertension or pre-eclampsia were included in this analysis. The quality of the eligible studies was assessed based on the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale with some modifications.Two researchers then independently reviewed all included studies and extracted all relevant data. Association between AT1-AA and hypertension was tested with pooled odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Finally, we evaluated whether AT1-AA predicted the prognosis of hypertension by using a summary receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve and sensitivity analysis.Ten studies were finally included in this meta-analysis. AT1-AA showed more significant association with pre-eclampsia than that with non-gravid hypertension (pooled OR 32.84, 95% CI 17.19-62.74; and pooled OR 4.18, 95% CI 2.20-7.98, respectively). Heterogeneity among studies was also detected probably due to different hypertensive subtypes and AT1-AA measuring methods. Area under summary ROC curve (AUC) of pre-eclampsia was 0.92 (sensitivity 0.76; specificity 0.86). Area under the ROC curve of overall hypertensive diseases or non-gravid hypertension was lower than that of pre-eclampsia (0.86 and 0.72, respectively) with lower sensitivities (0.46 and 0.26, respectively).The major limitation of this analysis was the publication bias due to lack of unpublished data and the language limitation during

  12. Vibrational study of new Pt(II) and Pd(II) complexes with functionalized nitrogen-containing tertiary phosphine oxides. Ab initio study of ortho-, meta- and para-dimethylphosphinylmethyleneoxyaniline.

    PubMed

    Trendafilova, N; Bauer, G; Georgieva, I; Tosheva, T; Varbanov, S

    2003-01-01

    Vibrational study of new Pt(II) and Pd(II) complexes of functionalized nitrogen-containing tertiary phosphine oxides, namely ortho-, meta- and para-dimethylphosphinylmethyleneoxyaniline (o-, m- and p-dpmoa), (CH3)2P(O)CH2OC6H4NH2, have been presented. Geometry optimization of the ligands was performed at HF/6-31G* and B3LYP/6-31G* levels of the theory. Harmonic frequencies were calculated at HF/6-31G* optimized geometries. Relative gas-phase and solution-phase (H2O and CH3CN) basicities of o-, m- and p-dpmoa ligands have been determined by ab initio calculations at STO-3G level with the Onsager reaction field model. On the basis of the vibrational study, physical and analytical data it was suggested that the ligands in the complexes studied coordinate through the amino group and form square-planar platinum and palladium complexes of the general formula ML2Cl2 (M = Pt, Pd, L = o-, m- and p-dpmoa).

  13. Mechanical Testing of PMCs under Simulated Rapid Heat-Up Propulsion Environments. II; In-Plane Compressive Behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stokes, Eric H.; Shin, E. Eugene; Sutter, James K.

    2003-01-01

    Carbon fiber thermoset polymer matrix composites (PMC) with high temperature polyimide based in-situ polymerized monomer reactant (PMR) resin has been used for some time in applications which can see temperatures up to 550 F. Currently, graphite fiber PMR based composites are used in several aircraft engine components including the outer bypass duct for the GE F-404, exit flaps for the P&W F-100-229, and the core cowl for the GE/Snecma CF6-80A3. Newer formulations, including PMR-II-50 are being investigated as potential weight reduction replacements of various metallic components in next generation high performance propulsion rocket engines that can see temperatures which exceed 550 F. Extensive FEM thermal modeling indicates that these components are exposed to rapid heat-up rates (up to -200 F/sec) and to a maximum temperature of around 600 F. Even though the predicted maximum part temperatures were within the capability of PW-II-50, the rapid heat-up causes significant through-thickness thermal gradients in the composite part and even more unstable states when combined with moisture. Designing composite parts for such extreme service environments will require accurate measurement of intrinsic and transient mechanical properties and the hygrothermal performance of these materials under more realistic use conditions. The mechanical properties of polymers degrade when exposed to elevated temperatures even in the absence of gaseous oxygen. Accurate mechanical characterization of the material is necessary in order to reduce system weight while providing sufficient factors of safety. Historically, the testing of PMCs at elevated temperatures has been plagued by the antagonism between two factors. First, moisture has been shown to profoundly affect the mechanical response of these materials at temperatures above their glass transition temperature while concurrently lowering the material's Tg. Moisture phenomena is due to one or a combination of three effects, i

  14. Reorganization of photosystem II is involved in the rapid photosynthetic recovery of desert moss Syntrichia caninervis upon rehydration.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Wang, Zhaobao; Xu, Tianhua; Tu, Wenfeng; Liu, Cheng; Zhang, Yuanming; Yang, Chunhong

    2010-11-01

    The moss Syntrichia caninervis (S. caninervis) is one of the dominant species in biological soil crusts of deserts. It has long been the focus of scientific research because of its ecological value. Moreover, S. caninervis has a special significance in biogenesis research because it is characterized by its fast restoration of photosynthesis upon onset of rehydration of the desiccated organism. In order to study the mechanisms of rapid photosynthetic recovery in mosses upon rewatering, we investigated the kinetics of the recovery process of photosynthetic activity in photosystem (PS) II, with an indirect assessment of the photochemical processes based on chlorophyll (Chl) fluorescence measurements. Our results showed that recovery can be divided into two phases. The fast initial phase, completed within 3 min, was characterized by a quick increase in maximal quantum efficiency of PSII (F(v)/F(m)). Over 50% of the PSII activities, including excitation energy transfer, oxygen evolution, charge separation, and electron transport, recovered within 0.5 min after rehydration. The second, slow phase was dominated by the increase of plastoquinone (PQ) reduction and the equilibrium of the energy transport from the inner antenna to the reaction center (RC) of PSII. Analysis of the recovery process in the presence of 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethyl urea (DCMU) revealed that blocking the electron transport from Q(A) to Q(B) did not hamper Chl synthesis or Chl organization in thylakoid membranes under light conditions. A de novo chloroplast protein synthesis was not necessary for the initial recovery of photochemical activity in PSII. In conclusion, the moss's ability for rapid recovery upon rehydration is related to Chl synthesis, quick structural reorganization of PSII, and fast restoration of PSII activity without de novo chloroplast protein synthesis.

  15. Rapid chlorophyll a fluorescence transient of Lemna gibba leaf as an indication of light and hydroxylamine effect on photosystem II activity.

    PubMed

    Dewez, David; Ali, Nadia Ait; Perreault, François; Popovic, Radovan

    2007-05-01

    Rapid chlorophyll fluorescence transient induced by saturating flash (3000 micromol of photons m-2 s-1) was investigated when Lemna gibba had been exposed to light (100 micromol of photons m-2 s-1) causing the Kautsky effect or in low light intensity unable to trigger PSII photochemistry. Measurements were made by using, simultaneously, a pulse amplitude modulated fluorometer and plant efficiency analyzer system, either on non-treated L. gibba leaf or those treated with different concentrations of hydroxylamine (1-50 mM) causing gradual inhibition of the water splitting system. When any leaf was exposed to continuous light during the Kautsky effect, a rapid fluorescence transient may reflect current activity of photosystem II within the photosystem II complex. Under those conditions, a variation of transition steps appearing over time was related to a drastic change to the photosystem II functional properties. This value indicated that the energy dissipation through non-photochemical pathways was undergoing extreme change. The change of rapid fluorescence transient, induced under continuous light, when compared to those obtained under very low light intensity, confirmed the ability of photosystem II to be capable to undergo rapid adaptation lasting about two minutes. When the water splitting system was inhibited and electron donation partially substituted by hydroxylamine, the adaptation ability of photosystem II to different light conditions was lost. In this study, the change of rapid fluorescence kinetic and transient appearing over time was shown to be a good indication for the change of the functional properties of photosystem II induced either by light or by hydroxylamine. PMID:17487305

  16. In silico study of the human rhodopsin and meta rhodopsin II/S-arrestin complexes: impact of single point mutations related to retina degenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Mokarzel-Falcón, Leonardo; Padrón-García, Juan Alexander; Carrasco-Velar, Ramón; Berry, Colin; Montero-Cabrera, Luis A

    2008-03-01

    We propose two models of the human S-arrestin/rhodopsin complex in the inactive dark adapted rhodopsin and meta rhodopsin II form, obtained by homology modeling and knowledge based docking. First, a homology model for the human S-arrestin was built and validated by molecular dynamics, showing an average root mean square deviation difference from the pattern behavior of 0.76 A. Then, combining the human S-arrestin model and the modeled structure of the two human rhodopsin forms, we propose two models of interaction for the human S-arrestin/rhodopsin complex. The models involve two S-arrestin regions related to the N domain (residues 68-78; 170-182) and a third constituent of the C domain (248-253), with the rhodopsin C terminus (330-348). Of the 22 single point mutations related to retinitis pigmentosa and congenital night blindness located in the cytoplasmatic portion of rhodopsin or in S-arrestin, our models locate 16 in the interaction region and relate two others to possible dimer formation. Our calculations also predict that the light activated complex is more stable than the dark adapted rhodopsin and, therefore, of higher affinity to S-arrestin.

  17. Use of Strep-tag II for rapid detection and purification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis recombinant antigens secreted by Streptomyces lividans.

    PubMed

    Ayala, Julio C; Pimienta, Elsa; Rodríguez, Caridad; Anné, Jozef; Vallín, Carlos; Milanés, María T; King-Batsios, Emmanuel; Huygen, Kris; Van Mellaert, Lieve

    2013-09-01

    Recent results with respect to the secretory production of bio-active Mycobacterium tuberculosis proteins in Streptomyces have stimulated the further exploitation of this host as a bacterial cell factory. However, the rapid isolation of a recombinant protein by conventional procedures can be a restrictive step. A previous attempt to isolate recombinant antigens fused to the widely used 6His-tag was found to be relatively incompatible with secretory production in the Streptomyces host. As an alternative, the eight-residue Strep-tag® II (WSHPQFEK), displaying intrinsic binding affinity towards streptavidin, was evaluated for the secretory production of two M. tuberculosis immunodominant antigens in Streptomyces lividans and their subsequent downstream processing. Therefore, the genes ag85A (Rv3804c, encoding the mycolyl-transferase Ag85A) and Rv2626c (encoding hypoxic response protein 1), were equipped with a 3'-Strep-tag® II-encoding sequence and placed under control of the Streptomyces venezuelae CBS762.70 subtilisin inhibitor (vsi) transcriptional, translational and signal sequences. Strep-tagged Ag85A and Rv2626c proteins were detected in the spent medium of recombinant S. lividans cultures at 48h of growth, and purified using a Strep-Tactin Superflow® matrix. Recombinant Ag85A appeared as a 30-kDa protein of which the N-terminal amino acid sequence was identical to the expected one. Rv2626c was produced in two forms of 17 and 37kDa respectively, both with the same predicted N-terminal sequence, suggesting that the 37-kDa product is an Rv2626c dimer. The obtained results indicate that the Strep-tagII is proteolytically stable in Streptomyces and does not interfere with the membrane translocation of Ag85A and Rv2626c. A comparison of reactivity of serum from tuberculosis patients versus healthy persons by ELISA showed that both S. lividans-derived antigens were recognized by sera of individuals infected with M. tuberculosis, indicating that they remained

  18. Rapid detection of S. mutans surface antigen I/II using a sensitive monoclonal anti-Ag I/II antibody by ELISA.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi-Ah; Jeon, Hyun-Soon; Shin, Se-Young; Baik, Byeong-Ju; Yang, Yeon-Mi; Lee, Kyung-Yeol; Kim, Jae-Gon

    2013-10-01

    The cell-surface protein antigen I/II (Ag I/II) is expressed in oral streptococci, which are known as the causative agent of a number of diseases including dental caries, endocarditis, gingivitis, and periodontal disease. Consequently, monoclonal antibodies (MAb) capable of recognizing the streptococcal Ag I/II protein could be a useful tool for the diagnosis and cure of these diseases. In this study, a previously generated monoclonal anti-Ag I/II antibody, ckAg I/II, was used to detect a small amount of Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) surface antigen Ag I/II. The ckAg I/II was proved to be very sensitive and able to detect as little as 1 ng of recombinant Ag I/II protein within 5 min and Ag I/II in saliva within 10 min, as well as native Ag I/II in 20 μL of culture supernatant by ELISA. These results suggest that ckAg I/II can be used as a fast and efficient diagnostic tool to detect Ag I/II. PMID:24111865

  19. Role of yoga for patients with type II diabetes mellitus: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vinod; Jagannathan, Aarti; Philip, Mariamma; Thulasi, Arun; Angadi, Praveen; Raghuram, Nagarathna

    2016-04-01

    To understand the role and efficacy of yoga in the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus, this meta-analysis was conducted. Electronic data bases searched were PubMed/Medline, ProQuest, PsycINFO, IndMED, CENTRAL, Cochrane library, CamQuest and CamBase till December 17, 2014. Eligible outcomes were fasting blood sugar (FBS), post prandial blood sugar (PPBS) and glycosylated haemoglobin (HBA1C). Randomized controlled trials and controlled trials were eligible. Studies focussing only on relaxation or meditation or multimodal intervention were not included. A total of 17 RCTs were included for review. Data from research articles on patients, methods, interventions- control and results were extracted. Mean and standard deviations were utilized for calculating standardized mean difference with 95% confidence interval. Heterogeneity was assessed with the help of I(2) statistics. χ(2) was used to rule out the effects of heterogeneity due to chance alone. Beneficial effects of yoga as an add-on intervention to standard treatment in comparison to standard treatment were observed for FBS [Standardized Mean Difference (SMD) -1.40, 95%CI -1.90 to -0.90, p˂0.00001]; PPBS [SMD -0.91, 95%CI -1.34 to -0.48, p˂0.0001] as well as HBA1C [SMD -0.64, 95%CI -0.97 to -0.30, p˂0.0002]. But risk of bias was overall high for included studies. With this available evidence, yoga can be considered as add-on intervention for management of diabetes. PMID:27062957

  20. A Multifunctional Mn(II) Phosphonate for Rapid Separation of Methyl Orange and Electron-Transfer Photochromism.

    PubMed

    Gao, Chao-Ying; Yang, Yang; Ai, Jing; Tian, Hong-Rui; Li, Lei-Jiao; Yang, Weiting; Dang, Song; Sun, Zhong-Ming

    2016-08-01

    A Mn(II) phosphonate of the general formula [Mn(H2 L)2 (H2 O)2 (H2 bibp)] adopts a layered motif with protonated H2 bibp(2+) cations embedded in the channels (H4 L=thiophene-2-phosphonic acid; bibp=4,4'-bis(1-imidazolyl)biphenyl). The title compound exhibits excellent adsorptive removal of methyl orange (MO) dye from aqueous solution. Its advantageous features include fast adsorption, high uptake capacity, selective removal, and reusability, which are of great significance for practical application in wastewater treatment. Meanwhile, the compound displays rapid photochromism upon irradiation with visible light at room temperature. Extensive research has demonstrated that such behavior is based on a ligand-to-ligand charge-transfer (LLCT) mechanism. The irradiated sample possesses an ultra-long-lived charge-separated state. Moreover, not only is the compound the first Mn-based photochromic MOF, but it is also one of the very few examples showing LLCT with non-photochromic components. PMID:27374008

  1. Comparison of the accuracy of Hybrid Capture II and polymerase chain reaction in detecting clinically important cervical dysplasia: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Luu, Hung N; Dahlstrom, Kristina R; Mullen, Patricia Dolan; VonVille, Helena M; Scheurer, Michael E

    2013-06-01

    The effectiveness of screening programs for cervical cancer has benefited from the inclusion of Human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA assays; which assay to choose, however, is not clear based on previous reviews. Our review addressed test accuracy of Hybrid Capture II (HCII) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays based on studies with stronger designs and with more clinically relevant outcomes. We searched OvidMedline, PubMed, and the Cochrane Library for English language studies comparing both tests, published 1985-2012, with cervical dysplasia defined by the Bethesda classification. Meta-analysis provided pooled sensitivity, specificity, and 95% confidence intervals (CIs); meta-regression identified sources of heterogeneity. From 29 reports, we found that the pooled sensitivity and specificity to detect high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HSIL) was higher for HCII than PCR (0.89 [CI: 0.89-0.90] and 0.85 [CI: 0.84-0.86] vs. 0.73 [CI: 0.73-0.74] and 0.62 [CI: 0.62-0.64]). Both assays had higher accuracy to detect cervical dysplasia in Europe than in Asia-Pacific or North America (diagnostic odd ratio - dOR = 4.08 [CI: 1.39-11.91] and 4.56 [CI: 1.86-11.17] for HCII vs. 2.66 [CI: 1.16-6.53] and 3.78 [CI: 1.50-9.51] for PCR) and accuracy to detect HSIL than atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASCUS)/ low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LSIL) (HCII-dOR = 9.04 [CI: 4.12-19.86] and PCR-dOR = 5.60 [CI: 2.87-10.94]). For HCII, using histology as a gold standard results in higher accuracy than using cytology (dOR = 2.87 [CI: 1.31-6.29]). Based on higher test accuracy, our results support the use of HCII in cervical cancer screening programs. The role of HPV type distribution should be explored to determine the worldwide comparability of HPV test accuracy.

  2. Treatment Effects of Removable Functional Appliances in Pre-Pubertal and Pubertal Class II Patients: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Controlled Studies

    PubMed Central

    Perinetti, Giuseppe; Primožič, Jasmina; Franchi, Lorenzo; Contardo, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Background Treatment effects of removable functional appliances in Class II malocclusion patients according to the pre-pubertal or pubertal growth phase has yet to be clarified. Objectives To assess and compare skeletal and dentoalveolar effects of removable functional appliances in Class II malocclusion treatment between pre-pubertal and pubertal patients. Search methods Literature survey using the Medline, SCOPUS, LILACS and SciELO databases, the Cochrane Library from inception to May 31, 2015. A manual search was also performed. Selection criteria Randomised (RCTs) or controlled clinical trials with a matched untreated control group. No restrictions were set regarding the type of removable appliance whenever used alone. Data collection and analysis For the meta-analysis, cephalometric parameters on the supplementary mandibular growth were the main outcomes, with other cephalometric parameters considered as secondary outcomes. Risk of bias in individual and across studies were evaluated along with sensitivity analysis for low quality studies. Mean differences and 95% confidence intervals for annualised changes were computed according to a random model. Differences between pre-pubertal and pubertal patients were assessed by subgroup analyses. GRADE assessment was performed for the main outcomes. Results Twelve articles (but only 3 RCTs) were included accounting for 8 pre-pubertal and 7 pubertal groups. Overall supplementary total mandibular length and mandibular ramus height were 0.95 mm (0.38, 1.51) and 0.00 mm (-0.52, 0.53) for pre-pubertal patients and 2.91 mm (2.04, 3.79) and 2.18 mm (1.51, 2.86) for pubertal patients, respectively. The subgroup difference was significant for both parameters (p<0.001). No maxillary growth restrain or increase in facial divergence was seen in either subgroup. The GRADE assessment was low for the pre-pubertal patients, and generally moderate for the pubertal patients. Conclusions Taking into account the limited quality and

  3. The Effectiveness of Conservative Management for Acute Whiplash Associated Disorder (WAD) II: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomised Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Wiangkham, Taweewat; Duda, Joan; Haque, Sayeed; Madi, Mohammad; Rushton, Alison

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of conservative management (except drug therapy) for acute Whiplash Associated Disorder (WAD) II. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis of Randomised Controlled Trials (RCTs) using a pre-defined protocol. Two independent reviewers searched information sources, decided eligibility of studies, and assessed risk of bias (RoB) of included trials. Data were extracted by one reviewer and checked by the other. A third reviewer mediated any disagreements throughout. Qualitative trial and RoB data were summarised descriptively. Quantitative syntheses were conducted across trials for comparable interventions, outcome measures and assessment points. Meta-analyses compared effect sizes with random effects, using STATA version 12. Data Sources PEDro, Medline, Embase, AMED, CINAHL, PsycINFO, and Cochrane Library with manual searching in key journals, reference lists, British National Bibliography for Report Literature, Center for International Rehabilitation Research Information & Exchange, and National Technical Information Service were searched from inception to 15th April 2015. Active researchers in the field were contacted to determine relevant studies. Eligibility Criteria for Selecting Studies RCTs evaluating acute (<4 weeks) WADII, any conservative intervention, with outcome measures important to the International Classification of Function, Disability and Health. Results Fifteen RCTs all assessed as high RoB (n=1676 participants) across 9 countries were included. Meta-analyses enabled 4 intervention comparisons: conservative versus standard/control, active versus passive, behavioural versus standard/control, and early versus late. Conservative intervention was more effective for pain reduction at 6 months (95%CI: -20.14 to -3.38) and 1-3 years (-25.44 to -3.19), and improvement in cervical mobility in the horizontal plane at <3 months (0.43 to 5.60) compared with standard/control intervention. Active intervention was effective

  4. Rapid Adsorption of Copper(II) and Lead(II) by Rice Straw/Fe3O4 Nanocomposite: Optimization, Equilibrium Isotherms, and Adsorption Kinetics Study

    PubMed Central

    Khandanlou, Roshanak; Ahmad, Mansor B.; Fard Masoumi, Hamid Reza; Shameli, Kamyar; Basri, Mahiran; Kalantari, Katayoon

    2015-01-01

    Rice straw/magnetic nanocomposites (RS/Fe3O4-NCs) were prepared via co-precipitation method for removal of Pb(II) and Cu(II) from aqueous solutions. Response surface methodology (RSM) was utilized to find the optimum conditions for removal of ions. The effects of three independent variables including initial ion concentration, removal time, and adsorbent dosage were investigated on the maximum adsorption of Pb (II) and Cu (II). The optimum conditions for the adsorption of Pb(II) and Cu(II) were obtained (100 and 60 mg/L) of initial ion concentration, (41.96 and 59.35 s) of removal time and 0.13 g of adsorbent for both ions, respectively. The maximum removal efficiencies of Pb(II) and Cu(II) were obtained 96.25% and 75.54%, respectively. In the equilibrium isotherm study, the adsorption data fitted well with the Langmuir isotherm model. The adsorption kinetics was best depicted by the pseudo-second order model. Desorption experiments showed adsorbent can be reused successfully for three adsorption-desorption cycles. PMID:25815470

  5. Rapid adsorption of copper(II) and lead(II) by rice straw/Fe₃O₄ nanocomposite: optimization, equilibrium isotherms, and adsorption kinetics study.

    PubMed

    Khandanlou, Roshanak; Ahmad, Mansor B; Fard Masoumi, Hamid Reza; Shameli, Kamyar; Basri, Mahiran; Kalantari, Katayoon

    2015-01-01

    Rice straw/magnetic nanocomposites (RS/Fe3O4-NCs) were prepared via co-precipitation method for removal of Pb(II) and Cu(II) from aqueous solutions. Response surface methodology (RSM) was utilized to find the optimum conditions for removal of ions. The effects of three independent variables including initial ion concentration, removal time, and adsorbent dosage were investigated on the maximum adsorption of Pb (II) and Cu (II). The optimum conditions for the adsorption of Pb(II) and Cu(II) were obtained (100 and 60 mg/L) of initial ion concentration, (41.96 and 59.35 s) of removal time and 0.13 g of adsorbent for both ions, respectively. The maximum removal efficiencies of Pb(II) and Cu(II) were obtained 96.25% and 75.54%, respectively. In the equilibrium isotherm study, the adsorption data fitted well with the Langmuir isotherm model. The adsorption kinetics was best depicted by the pseudo-second order model. Desorption experiments showed adsorbent can be reused successfully for three adsorption-desorption cycles.

  6. Ni(II)NTA AuNPs as a low-resource malarial diagnostic platform for the rapid colorimetric detection of Plasmodium falciparum Histidine-Rich Protein-2.

    PubMed

    Gulka, Christopher P; Swartz, Joshua D; Wright, David W

    2015-04-01

    Diagnosing infectious diseases remains a challenge in the developing world where there is a lack of dependable electricity, running water, and skilled technicians. Although rapid immunochromatographic tests (RDTs) have been deployed to diagnose diseases such as malaria, the extreme climate conditions encountered in these regions compounded with the discrepancies in test manufacturing have yielded varying results, so that more innovative and robust technologies are sought. Devoid of antibodies and thermally sensitive materials, we present a robust, colorimetric diagnostic platform for the detection of a malarial biomarker, Plasmodium falciparum Histidine-Rich Protein 2 (PfHRP-II). The assay exploits the optical properties of gold nanoparticles, covalently coupling them to a Ni(II)NTA recognition element specific for PfHRP-II. In the presence of the recombinant malarial biomarker (rcHRP-II), the Ni(II)NTA AuNPs begin to crosslink and aggregate in as little as one minute, triggering a red-to-purple color change in solution. To increase assay sensitivity and platform stability suitable for low-resource regions, the Ni(II)NTA AuNPs were assembled with varying spacer ligands in a mixed monolayer presentation. When assembled with a negatively charged Peg4-thiol ligand, the Ni(II)NTA AuNPs demonstrate low nanomolar limits of rcHRP-II detection in physiological concentrations of human serum albumin and maintain excellent stability at 37°C when stored for four weeks. Detection of the malaria biomarker is also measured by capturing and processing images of aggregated gold nanoparticles with a smartphone camera. By utilizing a smartphone camera and image processing application, there is no significant difference in assay sensitivity and rcHRP-II limit of detection in comparison to a spectrophotometer, further making this diagnostic platform applicable for use in low-resource regions.

  7. Effects of selective and non-selective glucocorticoid receptor II antagonists on rapid-onset diabetes in young rats.

    PubMed

    Beaudry, Jacqueline L; Dunford, Emily C; Teich, Trevor; Zaharieva, Dessi; Hunt, Hazel; Belanoff, Joseph K; Riddell, Michael C

    2014-01-01

    The blockade of glucocorticoid (GC) action through antagonism of the glucocorticoid receptor II (GRII) has been used to minimize the undesirable effects of chronically elevated GC levels. Mifepristone (RU486) is known to competitively block GRII action, but not exclusively, as it antagonizes the progesterone receptor. A number of new selective GRII antagonists have been developed, but limited testing has been completed in animal models of overt type 2 diabetes mellitus. Therefore, two selective GRII antagonists (C113176 and C108297) were tested to determine their effects in our model of GC-induced rapid-onset diabetes (ROD). Male Sprague-Dawley rats (∼ six weeks of age) were placed on a high-fat diet (60%), surgically implanted with pellets containing corticosterone (CORT) or wax (control) and divided into five treatment groups. Each group was treated with either a GRII antagonist or vehicle for 14 days after surgery: CORT pellets (400 mg/rat) + antagonists (80 mg/kg/day); CORT pellets + drug vehicle; and wax pellets (control) + drug vehicle. After 10 days of CORT treatment, body mass gain was increased with RU486 (by ∼20% from baseline) and maintained with C113176 administration, whereas rats given C108297 had similar body mass loss (∼15%) to ROD animals. Fasting glycemia was elevated in the ROD animals (>20 mM), normalized completely in animals treated with RU486 (6.2±0.1 mM, p<0.05) and improved in animals treated with C108297 and C113176 (14.0±1.6 and 8.8±1.6 mM, p<0.05 respectively). Glucose intolerance was normalized with RU486 treatment, whereas acute insulin response was improved with RU486 and C113176 treatment. Also, peripheral insulin resistance was attenuated with C113176 treatment along with improved levels of β-cell function while C108297 antagonism only provided modest improvements. In summary, C113176 is an effective agent that minimized some GC-induced detrimental metabolic effects and may provide an alternative to the effective, but non

  8. Effects of Selective and Non-Selective Glucocorticoid Receptor II Antagonists on Rapid-Onset Diabetes in Young Rats

    PubMed Central

    Beaudry, Jacqueline L.; Dunford, Emily C.; Teich, Trevor; Zaharieva, Dessi; Hunt, Hazel; Belanoff, Joseph K.; Riddell, Michael C.

    2014-01-01

    The blockade of glucocorticoid (GC) action through antagonism of the glucocorticoid receptor II (GRII) has been used to minimize the undesirable effects of chronically elevated GC levels. Mifepristone (RU486) is known to competitively block GRII action, but not exclusively, as it antagonizes the progesterone receptor. A number of new selective GRII antagonists have been developed, but limited testing has been completed in animal models of overt type 2 diabetes mellitus. Therefore, two selective GRII antagonists (C113176 and C108297) were tested to determine their effects in our model of GC-induced rapid-onset diabetes (ROD). Male Sprague-Dawley rats (∼ six weeks of age) were placed on a high-fat diet (60%), surgically implanted with pellets containing corticosterone (CORT) or wax (control) and divided into five treatment groups. Each group was treated with either a GRII antagonist or vehicle for 14 days after surgery: CORT pellets (400 mg/rat) + antagonists (80 mg/kg/day); CORT pellets + drug vehicle; and wax pellets (control) + drug vehicle. After 10 days of CORT treatment, body mass gain was increased with RU486 (by ∼20% from baseline) and maintained with C113176 administration, whereas rats given C108297 had similar body mass loss (∼15%) to ROD animals. Fasting glycemia was elevated in the ROD animals (>20 mM), normalized completely in animals treated with RU486 (6.2±0.1 mM, p<0.05) and improved in animals treated with C108297 and C113176 (14.0±1.6 and 8.8±1.6 mM, p<0.05 respectively). Glucose intolerance was normalized with RU486 treatment, whereas acute insulin response was improved with RU486 and C113176 treatment. Also, peripheral insulin resistance was attenuated with C113176 treatment along with improved levels of β-cell function while C108297 antagonism only provided modest improvements. In summary, C113176 is an effective agent that minimized some GC-induced detrimental metabolic effects and may provide an alternative to the effective, but non

  9. A critical appraisal of the evidence for using cardiotocography plus ECG ST interval analysis for fetal surveillance in labor. Part II: the meta-analyses.

    PubMed

    Olofsson, Per; Ayres-de-Campos, Diogo; Kessler, Jörg; Tendal, Britta; Yli, Branka M; Devoe, Lawrence

    2014-06-01

    We appraised the methodology, execution and quality of the five published meta-analyses that are based on the five randomized controlled trials which compared cardiotocography (CTG)+ST analysis to cardiotocography. The meta-analyses contained errors, either created de novo in handling of original data or from a failure to recognize essential differences among the randomized controlled trials, particularly in their inclusion criteria and outcome parameters. No meta-analysis contained complete and relevant data from all five randomized controlled trials. We believe that one randomized controlled trial excluded in two of the meta-analyses should have been included, whereas one randomized controlled trial that was included in all meta-analyses, should have been excluded. After correction of the uncovered errors and exclusion of the randomized controlled trial that we deemed inappropriate, our new meta-analysis showed that CTG+ST monitoring significantly reduces the fetal scalp blood sampling usage (risk ratio 0.64; 95% confidence interval 0.47-0.88), total operative delivery rate (0.93; 0.88-0.99) and metabolic acidosis rate (0.61; 0.41-0.91).

  10. Rapid Discrimination of Malignant Breast Lesions from Normal Tissues Utilizing Raman Spectroscopy System: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of In Vitro Studies

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Hongyuan; Wei, Zhigong; Xiao, Yue; Xu, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study is to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of Raman spectroscopy system in the detection of malignant breast lesions through a systemic review and meta-analysis of published studies. Methods We conducted a comprehensive literature search of PubMed and Embase from 2000 to June 2015. Published studies that evaluated the diagnostic performance of Raman spectroscopy in distinguishing malignant breast lesions from benign lesions and normal tissues were included in our study. The pooled sensitivity, specificity, diagnostic odds ratio, and the area under the curve of summary receiver-operating characteristic curves was derived. A Revised Tool for the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies guidelines was used to assess the quality of included studies. Results The initial search produced a total of 157 articles after removing duplicates. Nine studies (8 in vitro and 1 in vivo) were eligible in this meta-analysis. We analyzed the eight in vitro studies with 1756 lesions, the pooled sensitivity and specificity of Raman spectroscopy system for the diagnosis of malignant breast lesions were 0.92 (95% CI 0.86–0.96) and 0.97 (97% CI 0.93–0.98), respectively. Diagnostic odds ratio was 266.70 (95% CI 89.38–795.79), and the area under the curve of summary receiver-operating characteristic curves was 0.98 (95% CI 0.97–0.99). Significant heterogeneity was found between studies. There was no evidence of considerable publication bias. Conclusions Raman spectroscopy system is an optical diagnostic technology with great value for detecting malignant breast lesions. At the same time, it has advantages of being non-invasive, real-time, and easy to use. Thus it deserves to be further explored for intra-operatory breast tumor margin detection. PMID:27459193

  11. Association between Estrogen Receptor α Gene (ESR1) PvuII (C/T) and XbaI (A/G) Polymorphisms and Hip Fracture Risk: Evidence from a Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Li; Cheng, Guo-Lin; Xu, Zhong-Hua

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objective Genetic factors are important in the pathogenesis of fractures. Notably, estrogen receptor α (ESR1) has been suggested as a possible candidate gene for hip fractures; however, published studies of ESR1 gene polymorphisms have been hampered by small sample sizes and inconclusive or ambiguous results. The aim of this meta-analysis is to investigate the associations between two novel common ESR1 polymorphisms (intron 1 polymorphisms PvuII-rs2234693: C>T and XbaI-rs9340799: A>G) and hip fracture. Methods Crude odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to evaluate the strength of the association. Results Five case-control and three cohort studies were assessed, including a total of 1,838 hip fracture cases and 14,972 healthy controls. This meta-analysis revealed that the PvuII T allele is a highly significant risk factor for hip fracture susceptibility, with an effect magnitude similar in male and pre-menopausal and post-menopausal female patients. In stratified analysis based on ethnicity, the PvuII T allele remained significantly correlated with increased risk of hip fracture in Caucasian populations; this correlation, however, was not found in Asian populations. Unlike the PvuII polymorphism, we did not find significant differences in the XbaI (A>G) polymorphism allele or genotype distributions of hip fracture patients and controls. We also found no obvious association between the XbaI polymorphism and hip fracture in any of the racial or gender subgroups. Conclusion Our findings show that the ESR1 PvuII T allele may increase the risk of hip fracture and that the XbaI polymorphism is not associated with hip fracture. PMID:24482673

  12. Clinical Evaluation of the ZstatFlu-II Test: a Chemiluminescent Rapid Diagnostic Test for Influenza Virus

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Marilyn S.; Abel, David M.; Ballam, Yolanda J.; Otto, Mary K.; Nickell, Angela F.; Pence, Lisa M.; Appleman, James R.; Shimasaki, Craig D.; Achyuthan, Komandoor E.

    2002-01-01

    Exploiting the high sensitivity of the chemiluminescence phenomenon, an accurate and sensitive point-of-care test, called the ZstatFlu-II test (ZymeTx, Inc., Oklahoma City, Okla.), was developed to detect influenza virus infections. The ZstatFlu-II test takes 20 min and requires approximately 2 min of “hands-on” time for operational steps. The ZstatFlu-II test does not distinguish between infections with influenza virus types A and B. ZstatFlu-II test results are printed on Polaroid High-Speed Detector Film, allowing test results to be archived. A prototype version of the ZstatFlu-II test was evaluated during the 2000-to-2001 flu season with 300 nasal aspirate specimens from children at a pediatric hospital. Compared to culture, the ZstatFlu-II test had 88% sensitivity and 92% specificity. The Directigen test had a sensitivity of 75% and a specificity of 93%. The sensitivity of the ZstatFlu-II test was significantly higher than that of the Directigen test (P < 0.0574). PMID:12089243

  13. Minimally invasive repair of meta-bones.

    PubMed

    Piras, Alessandro; Guerrero, Tomás G

    2012-09-01

    Metacarpal and metatarsal fractures are common injuries in small animals and, in most of the cases, can be treated by minimally invasive techniques. Bone plates applied through epi-periosteal tunnels can stabilize meta-bones. Meta-bones III and IV are stabilized by dorsally applied plates. Meta-bones II and V are stabilized using plates applied medially and laterally. The scarcity of soft tissue coverage and the simple anatomy of meta-bones make these fractures amenable to fixation by using minimally invasive techniques. This practice should reduce morbidity and enhance healing time.

  14. Oxidized or acetylated low density lipoproteins are rapidly cleared by the liver in mice with disruption of the scavenger receptor class A type I/II gene.

    PubMed Central

    Ling, W; Lougheed, M; Suzuki, H; Buchan, A; Kodama, T; Steinbrecher, U P

    1997-01-01

    Oxidized low density lipoprotein (LDL) and acetyl LDL are recognized by the scavenger receptor class A type I/II (SR-AI/II) on macrophages and liver endothelial cells. Several investigators have suggested that there are additional receptors specific for oxidized LDL, but characterization of these alternate receptors for oxidized LDL and evaluation of their quantitative importance in uptake of oxidized LDL has been difficult because of overlapping ligand specificity with SR-AI/II. The purpose of this study was to determine the importance of SR-AI/II in the removal of modified LDL from the bloodstream in vivo. The clearance rate of oxidized LDL from plasma in normal mice was very rapid, and > 90% of injected dose was removed from the blood within 5 min. Clearance rates of oxidized LDL were equally high in SR-AI/II knockout mice, indicating that this receptor is not required for removal of oxidized LDL from plasma. Surprisingly, there was no difference in the clearance rate of acetyl LDL in wild-type and SR-AI/II knockout animals. The plasma clearance of radioiodinated acetyl LDL was almost fully blocked by a 50-fold excess of unlabeled acetyl LDL, but the latter only inhibited oxidized LDL clearance by approximately 5%. Both modified LDLs were cleared mostly by the liver, and there was no difference in the tissue distribution of modified LDL in control and knockout mice. Studies in isolated nonparenchymal liver cells showed that Kupffer cells accounted for most of the uptake of oxidized LDL. Extensively oxidized LDL and LDL modified by exposure to fatty acid peroxidation products were efficient competitors for the uptake of labeled oxidized LDL by SR-AI/II-deficient Kupffer cells, while acetyl LDL and malondialdehyde-modified LDL were relatively poor competitors. PMID:9218499

  15. Rapid, synergistic extractive spectrophotometric determination of copper(II) by using sensitive chromogenic reagent N″,N″'-bis[(E)-(4-fluorophenyl) methylidene]thiocarbonohydrazide.

    PubMed

    Nalawade, Rekha A; Nalawade, Avinash M; Kamble, Ganesh S; Anuse, Mansing A

    2015-07-01

    A rapid and simple spectrophotometric method was developed for the determination of copper(II) by using newly synthesized chromogenic reagent, N″,N″'-bis[(E)-(4-fluorophenyl)methylidene]thiocarbonohydrazide [bis(4-fluoroPM)TCH]. The reagent is highly sensitive and it forms yellow colored ternary complex with copper(II) in presence pyridine having composition 1:1:2 (M:L:Py) in the acidic pH range. Absorption of colored complex in amyl acetate is measured with reagent as a blank at λmax 375 nm. The synergistic effect is observed due to pyridine forming adduct with reagent in the organic phase. Beer's law was obeyed in the concentration range from 2.0 to 14 μg mL(-1) for copper(II)-[bis(4-fluoroPM)TCH]-Py complex. Molar absorptivity and Sandell's sensitivity values for Cu(II)-bis(4-fluoroPM)TCH]-Py complex are 0.42545×10(5) and 0.0014 μg/cm(2), respectively. The selectivity of the developed method was checked in the presence of various foreign ions. The developed method showed relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) of 0.13% for n=10. The composition of Cu(II)-[bis(4-fluoroPM)TCH]-Py complex was determined by known methods such as Job's method of continuous variation, mole ratio method and slope ratio method. It is found that the ternary complex is stable for more than 24h. Various factors influencing on the degree of complexation, such as, effect of pH, reagent concentration, synergent concentration, solvent etc. were studied. The accuracy and reliability of method was verified by AAS. This method is found to be simple, rapid and reproducible.

  16. Rapid, synergistic extractive spectrophotometric determination of copper(II) by using sensitive chromogenic reagent N″,N″‧-bis[(E)-(4-fluorophenyl) methylidene]thiocarbonohydrazide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nalawade, Rekha A.; Nalawade, Avinash M.; Kamble, Ganesh S.; Anuse, Mansing A.

    2015-07-01

    A rapid and simple spectrophotometric method was developed for the determination of copper(II) by using newly synthesized chromogenic reagent, N″,N″‧-bis[(E)-(4-fluorophenyl)methylidene]thiocarbonohydrazide [bis(4-fluoroPM)TCH]. The reagent is highly sensitive and it forms yellow colored ternary complex with copper(II) in presence pyridine having composition 1:1:2 (M:L:Py) in the acidic pH range. Absorption of colored complex in amyl acetate is measured with reagent as a blank at λmax 375 nm. The synergistic effect is observed due to pyridine forming adduct with reagent in the organic phase. Beer's law was obeyed in the concentration range from 2.0 to 14 μg mL-1 for copper(II)-[bis(4-fluoroPM)TCH]-Py complex. Molar absorptivity and Sandell's sensitivity values for Cu(II)-bis(4-fluoroPM)TCH]-Py complex are 0.42545 × 105 and 0.0014 μg/cm2, respectively. The selectivity of the developed method was checked in the presence of various foreign ions. The developed method showed relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) of 0.13% for n = 10. The composition of Cu(II)-[bis(4-fluoroPM)TCH]-Py complex was determined by known methods such as Job's method of continuous variation, mole ratio method and slope ratio method. It is found that the ternary complex is stable for more than 24 h. Various factors influencing on the degree of complexation, such as, effect of pH, reagent concentration, synergent concentration, solvent etc. were studied. The accuracy and reliability of method was verified by AAS. This method is found to be simple, rapid and reproducible.

  17. A Quantitative Review and Meta-models of the Variability and Factors Affecting Oral Drug Absorption-Part II: Gastrointestinal Transit Time.

    PubMed

    Abuhelwa, Ahmad Y; Foster, David J R; Upton, Richard N

    2016-09-01

    This study aimed to conduct a quantitative meta-analysis for the values of, and variability in, gastrointestinal (GI) transit times of non-disintegrating single-unit ("tablet") and multiple-unit ("pellets/multi-unit tablet") solid dosage forms, characterize the effect of food on the values and variability in these parameters and present quantitative meta-models of the distributions of GI transit times in the respective GI regions to help inform models of oral drug absorption. The literature was systemically reviewed for the values of, and the variability in, gastric, small intestinal and colonic transit times under fed and fasted conditions. Meta-analysis used the "metafor" package of the R language. Meta-models of GI transit were assumed to be log-normally distributed between the studied populations. Twenty-nine studies including 125 reported means and standard deviations were used in the meta-analysis. Caloric content of administered food increased variability and delayed the gastric transit of both pellets and tablets. Conversely, food caloric content reduced the variability but had no significant influence on the mean small intestinal transit time (SITT). Food had no significant effect on the transit time through the colon. The transit of pellets through the colon was significantly slower than that of single-unit tablets which is most likely related to their smaller size. GI transit times may influence the dissolution and absorption of oral drugs. The meta-models of GI transit times may be used as part of semi-physiological absorption models to characterize the influence of transit time on the dissolution, absorption and in vivo pharmacokinetic profiles of oral drugs.

  18. A Quantitative Review and Meta-models of the Variability and Factors Affecting Oral Drug Absorption-Part II: Gastrointestinal Transit Time.

    PubMed

    Abuhelwa, Ahmad Y; Foster, David J R; Upton, Richard N

    2016-09-01

    This study aimed to conduct a quantitative meta-analysis for the values of, and variability in, gastrointestinal (GI) transit times of non-disintegrating single-unit ("tablet") and multiple-unit ("pellets/multi-unit tablet") solid dosage forms, characterize the effect of food on the values and variability in these parameters and present quantitative meta-models of the distributions of GI transit times in the respective GI regions to help inform models of oral drug absorption. The literature was systemically reviewed for the values of, and the variability in, gastric, small intestinal and colonic transit times under fed and fasted conditions. Meta-analysis used the "metafor" package of the R language. Meta-models of GI transit were assumed to be log-normally distributed between the studied populations. Twenty-nine studies including 125 reported means and standard deviations were used in the meta-analysis. Caloric content of administered food increased variability and delayed the gastric transit of both pellets and tablets. Conversely, food caloric content reduced the variability but had no significant influence on the mean small intestinal transit time (SITT). Food had no significant effect on the transit time through the colon. The transit of pellets through the colon was significantly slower than that of single-unit tablets which is most likely related to their smaller size. GI transit times may influence the dissolution and absorption of oral drugs. The meta-models of GI transit times may be used as part of semi-physiological absorption models to characterize the influence of transit time on the dissolution, absorption and in vivo pharmacokinetic profiles of oral drugs. PMID:27439620

  19. DNA Vaccine that Targets Hemagglutinin to MHC Class II Molecules Rapidly Induces Antibody-Mediated Protection against Influenza

    PubMed Central

    Mjaaland, Siri; Roux, Kenneth H.; Fredriksen, Agnete Brunsvik

    2013-01-01

    New influenza A viruses with pandemic potential periodically emerge due to viral genomic reassortment. In the face of pandemic threats, production of conventional egg-based vaccines is time consuming and of limited capacity. We have developed in this study a novel DNA vaccine in which viral hemagglutinin (HA) is bivalently targeted to MHC class II (MHC II) molecules on APCs. Following DNA vaccination, transfected cells secreted vaccine proteins that bound MHC II on APCs and initiated adaptive immune responses. A single DNA immunization induced within 8 d protective levels of strain-specific Abs and also cross-reactive T cells. During the Mexican flu pandemic, a targeted DNA vaccine (HA from A/California/07/2009) was generated within 3 wk after the HA sequences were published online. These results suggest that MHC II–targeted DNA vaccines could play a role in situations of pandemic threats. The vaccine principle should be extendable to other infectious diseases. PMID:23956431

  20. Lipids and apolipoproteins A-I, B and C-II and different rapid weight loss programs (weight lifters, wrestlers, boxers and judokas).

    PubMed

    Jauhiainen, M; Laitinen, M; Penttilä, I; Nousiainen, U; Ahonen, E

    1985-01-01

    Apolipoproteins A-I, B, C-II and lipids were studied before and after rapid weight loss schedules. The compared groups were all athletic. Apolipoproteins were determined by electroimmunoassay methods using apoproteins purified by chromatofocusing column method. Dextran T10 was shown to increase rocket height in ApoB assay. Over 1% Dextran concentrations gave poor response. The linearity during calibration was from 0.3 to 3.0 g ApoB/l. Baseline values of ApoA-I in wrestlers, weightlifters, boxers and judokas were slightly higher as compared to "normal" population; ApoB was clearly reduced (mean value of 690 mg/l). Weight-loss was significant in each experimental group; mean value of 4.1% in active exercise, sauna and diuretic groups together. Compared as the whole sportsmen group in passive weight loss (or sauna) and diuretic groups the most pronounced changes were seen to be elevated apoprotein concentrations, whereas weight-loss by active rapid exercise resulted no apoprotein changes, but instead an increment in HDL cholesterol and decrement in triglycerides, respectively. The present study was the first to evaluate baseline values of apoproteins A-I, B and C-II in first class athletes and also the possible changes in these and lipid values in rapid weight-loss practices.

  1. Phosphorylation of rat kidney Na-K pump at Ser938 is required for rapid angiotensin II-dependent stimulation of activity and trafficking in proximal tubule cells.

    PubMed

    Massey, Katherine J; Li, Quanwen; Rossi, Noreen F; Keezer, Susan M; Mattingly, Raymond R; Yingst, Douglas R

    2016-02-01

    How angiotensin (ANG) II acutely stimulates the Na-K pump in proximal tubules is only partially understood, limiting insight into how ANG II increases blood pressure. First, we tested whether ANG II increases the number of pumps in plasma membranes of native rat proximal tubules under conditions of rapid activation. We found that exposure to 100 pM ANG II for 2 min, which was previously shown to increase affinity of the Na-K pump for Na and stimulate activity threefold, increased the amount of the Na-K pump in plasma membranes of native tubules by 33%. Second, we tested whether previously observed increases in phosphorylation of the Na-K pump at Ser(938) were part of the stimulatory mechanism. These experiments were carried out in opossum kidney cells, cultured proximal tubules stably coexpressing the ANG type 1 (AT1) receptor, and either wild-type or a S938A mutant of rat kidney Na-K pump under conditions found by others to stimulate activity. We found that 10 min of incubation in 10 pM ANG II stimulated activity of wild-type pumps from 2.3 to 3.5 nmol K · mg protein(-1) · min(-1) and increased the amount of the pump in the plasma membrane by 80% but had no effect on cells expressing the S938A mutant. We conclude that acute stimulation of Na-K pump activity in native rat proximal tubules includes increased trafficking to the plasma membrane and that phosphorylation at Ser(938) is part of the mechanism by which ANG II directly stimulates activity and trafficking of the rat kidney Na-K pump in opossum kidney cells. PMID:26582472

  2. Phosphorylation of rat kidney Na-K pump at Ser938 is required for rapid angiotensin II-dependent stimulation of activity and trafficking in proximal tubule cells.

    PubMed

    Massey, Katherine J; Li, Quanwen; Rossi, Noreen F; Keezer, Susan M; Mattingly, Raymond R; Yingst, Douglas R

    2016-02-01

    How angiotensin (ANG) II acutely stimulates the Na-K pump in proximal tubules is only partially understood, limiting insight into how ANG II increases blood pressure. First, we tested whether ANG II increases the number of pumps in plasma membranes of native rat proximal tubules under conditions of rapid activation. We found that exposure to 100 pM ANG II for 2 min, which was previously shown to increase affinity of the Na-K pump for Na and stimulate activity threefold, increased the amount of the Na-K pump in plasma membranes of native tubules by 33%. Second, we tested whether previously observed increases in phosphorylation of the Na-K pump at Ser(938) were part of the stimulatory mechanism. These experiments were carried out in opossum kidney cells, cultured proximal tubules stably coexpressing the ANG type 1 (AT1) receptor, and either wild-type or a S938A mutant of rat kidney Na-K pump under conditions found by others to stimulate activity. We found that 10 min of incubation in 10 pM ANG II stimulated activity of wild-type pumps from 2.3 to 3.5 nmol K · mg protein(-1) · min(-1) and increased the amount of the pump in the plasma membrane by 80% but had no effect on cells expressing the S938A mutant. We conclude that acute stimulation of Na-K pump activity in native rat proximal tubules includes increased trafficking to the plasma membrane and that phosphorylation at Ser(938) is part of the mechanism by which ANG II directly stimulates activity and trafficking of the rat kidney Na-K pump in opossum kidney cells.

  3. Rapid removal of Hg(II) from aqueous solutions using thiol-functionalized Zn-doped biomagnetite particles.

    PubMed

    He, Feng; Wang, Wei; Moon, Ji-Won; Howe, Jane; Pierce, Eric M; Liang, Liyuan

    2012-08-01

    The surfaces of Zn-doped biomagnetite nanostructured particles were functionalized with (3-mercaptopropyl)trimethoxysilane (MPTMS) and used as a high-capacity and collectable adsorbent for the removal of Hg(II) from water. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) confirmed the attachment of MPTMS on the particle surface. The crystallite size of the Zn-doped biomagnetite was ∼17 nm, and the thickness of the MPTMS coating was ∼5 nm. Scanning transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering analyses revealed that the particles formed aggregates in aqueous solution with an average hydrodynamic size of 826 ± 32 nm. Elemental analyses indicate that the chemical composition of the biomagnetite is Zn(0.46)Fe(2.54)O(4), and the loading of sulfur is 3.6 mmol/g. The MPTMS-modified biomagnetite has a calculated saturation magnetization of 37.9 emu/g and can be separated from water within a minute using a magnet. Sorption of Hg(II) to the nanostructured particles was much faster than other commercial sorbents, and the Hg(II) sorption isotherm in an industrial wastewater follows the Langmuir model with a maximum capacity of ∼416 mg/g, indicating two -SH groups bonded to one Hg. This new Hg(II) sorbent was stable in a range of solutions, from contaminated water to 0.5 M acid solutions, with low leaching of Fe, Zn, Si, and S (<10%).

  4. Rapid Assessment of Human Amylin Aggregation and Its Inhibition by Copper(II) Ions by Laser Ablation Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry with Ion Mobility Separation

    PubMed Central

    Donaldson, Robert P.; Jeremic, Aleksandar M.; Vertes, Akos

    2015-01-01

    Native electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry (MS) is often used to monitor noncovalent complex formation between peptides and ligands. The relatively low throughput of this technique, however, is not compatible with extensive screening. Laser ablation electrospray ionization (LAESI) MS combined with ion mobility separation (IMS) can analyze complex formation and provide conformation information within a matter of seconds. Islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) or amylin, a 37-amino acid residue peptide, is produced in pancreatic beta-cells through proteolytic cleavage of its prohormone. Both amylin and its precursor can aggregate and produce toxic oligomers and fibrils leading to cell death in the pancreas that can eventually contribute to the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus. The inhibitory effect of the copper(II) ion on amylin aggregation has been recently discovered, but details of the interaction remain unknown. Finding other more physiologically tolerated approaches requires large scale screening of potential inhibitors. Here, we demonstrate that LAESI-IMS-MS can reveal the binding stoichiometry, copper oxidation state, and the dissociation constant of human amylin–copper(II) complex. The conformations of hIAPP in the presence of copper(II) ions were also analyzed by IMS, and preferential association between the β-hairpin amylin monomer and the metal ion was found. The copper(II) ion exhibited strong association with the –HSSNN– residues of the amylin. In the absence of copper(II), amylin dimers were detected with collision cross sections consistent with monomers of β-hairpin conformation. When copper(II) was present in the solution, no dimers were detected. Thus, the copper(II) ions disrupt the association pathway to the formation of β-sheet rich amylin fibrils. Using LAESI-IMS-MS for the assessment of amylin–copper(II) interactions demonstrates the utility of this technique for the high-throughput screening of potential inhibitors of

  5. A Powerful Procedure for Pathway-Based Meta-analysis Using Summary Statistics Identifies 43 Pathways Associated with Type II Diabetes in European Populations

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Han; Wheeler, William; Hyland, Paula L.; Yang, Yifan; Shi, Jianxin; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Yu, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Meta-analysis of multiple genome-wide association studies (GWAS) has become an effective approach for detecting single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) associations with complex traits. However, it is difficult to integrate the readily accessible SNP-level summary statistics from a meta-analysis into more powerful multi-marker testing procedures, which generally require individual-level genetic data. We developed a general procedure called Summary based Adaptive Rank Truncated Product (sARTP) for conducting gene and pathway meta-analysis that uses only SNP-level summary statistics in combination with genotype correlation estimated from a panel of individual-level genetic data. We demonstrated the validity and power advantage of sARTP through empirical and simulated data. We conducted a comprehensive pathway-based meta-analysis with sARTP on type 2 diabetes (T2D) by integrating SNP-level summary statistics from two large studies consisting of 19,809 T2D cases and 111,181 controls with European ancestry. Among 4,713 candidate pathways from which genes in neighborhoods of 170 GWAS established T2D loci were excluded, we detected 43 T2D globally significant pathways (with Bonferroni corrected p-values < 0.05), which included the insulin signaling pathway and T2D pathway defined by KEGG, as well as the pathways defined according to specific gene expression patterns on pancreatic adenocarcinoma, hepatocellular carcinoma, and bladder carcinoma. Using summary data from 8 eastern Asian T2D GWAS with 6,952 cases and 11,865 controls, we showed 7 out of the 43 pathways identified in European populations remained to be significant in eastern Asians at the false discovery rate of 0.1. We created an R package and a web-based tool for sARTP with the capability to analyze pathways with thousands of genes and tens of thousands of SNPs. PMID:27362418

  6. A Powerful Procedure for Pathway-Based Meta-analysis Using Summary Statistics Identifies 43 Pathways Associated with Type II Diabetes in European Populations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Han; Wheeler, William; Hyland, Paula L; Yang, Yifan; Shi, Jianxin; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Yu, Kai

    2016-06-01

    Meta-analysis of multiple genome-wide association studies (GWAS) has become an effective approach for detecting single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) associations with complex traits. However, it is difficult to integrate the readily accessible SNP-level summary statistics from a meta-analysis into more powerful multi-marker testing procedures, which generally require individual-level genetic data. We developed a general procedure called Summary based Adaptive Rank Truncated Product (sARTP) for conducting gene and pathway meta-analysis that uses only SNP-level summary statistics in combination with genotype correlation estimated from a panel of individual-level genetic data. We demonstrated the validity and power advantage of sARTP through empirical and simulated data. We conducted a comprehensive pathway-based meta-analysis with sARTP on type 2 diabetes (T2D) by integrating SNP-level summary statistics from two large studies consisting of 19,809 T2D cases and 111,181 controls with European ancestry. Among 4,713 candidate pathways from which genes in neighborhoods of 170 GWAS established T2D loci were excluded, we detected 43 T2D globally significant pathways (with Bonferroni corrected p-values < 0.05), which included the insulin signaling pathway and T2D pathway defined by KEGG, as well as the pathways defined according to specific gene expression patterns on pancreatic adenocarcinoma, hepatocellular carcinoma, and bladder carcinoma. Using summary data from 8 eastern Asian T2D GWAS with 6,952 cases and 11,865 controls, we showed 7 out of the 43 pathways identified in European populations remained to be significant in eastern Asians at the false discovery rate of 0.1. We created an R package and a web-based tool for sARTP with the capability to analyze pathways with thousands of genes and tens of thousands of SNPs.

  7. Ultrasensitive and rapid screening of mercury(II) ions by dual labeling colorimetric method in aqueous samples and applications in mercury-poisoned animal tissues.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yi; Wang, Xin; Xue, Feng; Zheng, Lei; Liu, Jian; Yan, Feng; Xia, Fan; Chen, Wei

    2015-04-01

    Rapid and ultrasensitive detection of trace heavy metal mercury(II) ions (Hg(2+)) are of significant importance due to the induced serious risks for environment and human health. This presented article reports the gold nanoparticle-based dual labeling colorimetric method (Dual-COLO) for ultrasensitive and rapid detection of Hg(2+) using the specific thymine-Hg(2+)-thymine (T-Hg(2+)-T) as recognition system and the dual labeling strategy for signal amplification. Both qualitative and quantitative detections of Hg(2+) are achieved successfully in aqueous samples. More importantly, the achieved detection limit of 0.005 ng mL(-1) (0.025 nM) without any instruments is very competitive to other rapid detection methods even ICP-MS based methods. This Dual-COLO method is also applied directly for real water sample monitoring and, more importantly, applied in analysis of mercury poisoned animal tissues and body fluidic samples, indicating a potentially powerful and promising tool for environmental monitoring and food safety control.

  8. Gold nanoparticle-sensitized quartz crystal microbalance sensor for rapid and highly selective determination of Cu(II) ions.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yulong; Huang, Yanyan; Liu, Guoquan; Zhao, Rui

    2013-09-21

    A novel quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) sensor for rapid, highly selective and sensitive detection of copper ions was developed. As a signal amplifier, gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) were self-assembled onto the surface of the sensor. A simple dip-and-dry method enabled the whole detection procedure to be accomplished within 20 min. High selectivity of the sensor towards copper ions is demonstrated by both individual and coexisting assays with interference ions. This gold nanoparticle mediated amplification allowed a detection limit down to 3.1 μM. Together with good repeatability and regeneration, the QCM sensor was also applied to the analysis of copper contamination in drinking water. This work provides a flexible method for fabricating QCM sensors for the analysis of important small molecules in environmental and biological samples. PMID:23888301

  9. Diverse mechanisms for photoprotection in photosynthesis. Dynamic regulation of photosystem II excitation in response to rapid environmental change.

    PubMed

    Derks, Allen; Schaven, Kristin; Bruce, Doug

    2015-01-01

    Photosystem II (PSII) of photosynthesis catalyzes one of the most challenging reactions in nature, the light driven oxidation of water and release of molecular oxygen. PSII couples the sequential four step oxidation of water and two step reduction of plastoquinone to single photon photochemistry with charge accumulation centers on both its electron donor and acceptor sides. Photon capture, excitation energy transfer, and trapping occur on a much faster time scale than the subsequent electron transfer and charge accumulation steps. A balance between excitation of PSII and the use of the absorbed energy to drive electron transport is essential. If the absorption of light energy increases and/or the sink capacity for photosynthetically derived electrons decreases, potentially deleterious side reactions may occur, including the production of reactive oxygen species. In response, a myriad of fast (second to minutes timescale) and reversible photoprotective mechanisms are observed to regulate PSII excitation when the environment changes more quickly than can be acclimated to by gene expression. This review compares the diverse photoprotective mechanisms that are used to dissipate (quench) PSII excitation within the antenna systems of higher land plants, green algae, diatoms, and cyanobacteria. The molecular bases of how PSII excitation pressure is sensed by the antenna system and how the antenna then reconfigures itself from a light harvesting to an energy dissipative mode are discussed.

  10. Analysis of peripheral thermal damage during the rapid ablation of dentin and bone using a λ= 9.3-μm TEA CO II laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Paul W.; Fan, Kenneth; Jones, Robert S.; Fried, Daniel

    2006-02-01

    TEA CO II lasers tuned to the strong mineral absorption of hydroxyapatite at λ =9-μm are ideally suited for the efficient ablation of dental hard tissues if the laser-pulse duration is stretched to greater than 10-μs to avoid plasma formation. CO II lasers are capable of operating at high repetition rates for the rapid removal of dentin and bone. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that stretched λ =9.3-μm TEA CO II laser pulses can produce lateral incisions in dentin and bone for dental restorations and implants at repetition rates as high as 400-Hz without peripheral thermal damage. A high repetition rate, 0-500-Hz, λ =9.3-μm TEA CO II laser with pulse durations of 10-20-μs was used to make incisions in human dentin and porcine alveolar bone with a computer controlled scanning stage and water spray at varying irradiation intensities. The single pulse ablation rates were determined for incident fluence ranging from 1-150-J/cm2. Lateral incisions 2-3-mm in length were produced in the 2-mm thick sections. Following irradiation, transverse cross-sections were examined using polarized light microscopy (PLM) and Fourier transform infrared spectro-microscopy (SR-FTIR) at the Advanced Light Source at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The single-pulse ablation rates approached 40-μm per pulse for the stretched TEA laser pulses in dentin and bone. All incisions with and without water spray yielded thermal damage zones of less than 22-μm. Thermal damage zones with water spray were less than 14-μm, even at repetition rates of 400-Hz and SR-FTIR showed no spectral changes around the periphery of the incisions. CO II laser pulses at λ =9.3-μm of 10-20-μs duration are well suited for the precise removal of dentin and bone for dental restorations and implants at high repetition rates without peripheral thermal damage.

  11. Rational design of a novel azoimine appended maleonitrile-based Salen chemosensor for rapid naked-eye detection of copper(II) ion in aqueous media.

    PubMed

    Rezaeian, Khatereh; Khanmohammadi, Hamid; Arab, Vajihe

    2015-12-01

    Achieving specific selectivity and high sensitivity for the colorimetric recognition of copper(II) ions in aqueous media over a complex background of potentially competing metal ions is inherently challenging in sensor development. Thus, a novel azo-azomethine receptor (L) based on the combination of 2-amino-3-(5-bromo-2-hydroxybenzylamino)maleonitrile and azo-coupled salicylaldehyde scaffold has been designed and synthesized for the naked-eye and rapid detection of Cu(2+) ion at trace level in a wide pH range. Accordingly, the devised chemosensor distinguished Cu(2+) from other metal ions by distinct color change from light yellow to light brown without any expensive equipment. The binding stoichiometry between Cu(2+) and L has been investigated using Job's plot and MALDI-TOF mass analysis. Remarkably, the current sensor can detect Cu(2+) ions even at 1.07 μM level, which is lower than the World Health Organization (WHO) permissible level (30 μM) in drinking water. Furthermore, sensor L was successfully utilized in the preparation of test strips for the detection of copper(II) ions from aqueous environment. PMID:26184468

  12. REAL-TIME DETECTION AND RAPID MULTIWAVELENGTH FOLLOW-UP OBSERVATIONS OF A HIGHLY SUBLUMINOUS TYPE II-P SUPERNOVA FROM THE PALOMAR TRANSIENT FACTORY SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Gal-Yam, Avishay; Arcavi, Iair; Green, Yoav; Yaron, Ofer; Ben-Ami, Sagi; Xu Dong; Sternberg, Assaf; Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Quimby, Robert M.; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Ofek, Eran O.; Walters, Richard; Nugent, Peter E.; Poznanski, Dovi; Bloom, Joshua S.; Cenko, S. Bradley; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Li Weidong; Silverman, Jeffrey M.; Walker, Emma S.

    2011-08-01

    The Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) is an optical wide-field variability survey carried out using a camera with a 7.8 deg{sup 2} field of view mounted on the 48 inch Oschin Schmidt telescope at Palomar Observatory. One of the key goals of this survey is to conduct high-cadence monitoring of the sky in order to detect optical transient sources shortly after they occur. Here, we describe the real-time capabilities of the PTF and our related rapid multiwavelength follow-up programs, extending from the radio to the {gamma}-ray bands. We present as a case study observations of the optical transient PTF10vdl (SN 2010id), revealed to be a very young core-collapse (Type II-P) supernova having a remarkably low luminosity. Our results demonstrate that the PTF now provides for optical transients the real-time discovery and rapid-response follow-up capabilities previously reserved only for high-energy transients like gamma-ray bursts.

  13. The Impact of Massage Therapy on Function in Pain Populations—A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials: Part II, Cancer Pain Populations

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, Cindy; Paat, Charmagne F.; Price, Ashley; Xenakis, Lea; Zhang, Weimin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Pain is multi-dimensional and may be better addressed through a holistic, biopsychosocial approach. Massage therapy is commonly practiced among patients seeking pain management; however, its efficacy is unclear. This systematic review and meta-analysis is the first to rigorously assess the quality of massage therapy research and evidence for its efficacy in treating pain, function-related and health-related quality of life in cancer populations. Methods. Key databases were searched from inception through February 2014. Eligible randomized controlled trials were assessed for methodological quality using the SIGN 50 Checklist. Meta-analysis was applied at the outcome level. A diverse steering committee interpreted the results to develop recommendations. Results. Twelve high quality and four low quality studies were subsequently included in the review. Results demonstrate massage therapy is effective for treating pain compared to no treatment [standardized mean difference (SMD)  = −.20] and active (SMD = −0.55) comparators. Compared to active comparators, massage therapy was also found to be beneficial for treating fatigue (SMD = −1.06) and anxiety (SMD = −1.24). Conclusion. Based on the evidence, weak recommendations are suggested for massage therapy, compared to an active comparator, for the treatment of pain, fatigue, and anxiety. No recommendations were suggested for massage therapy compared to no treatment or sham control based on the available literature to date. This review addresses massage therapy safety, research challenges, how to address identified research gaps, and necessary next steps for implementing massage therapy as a viable pain management option for cancer pain populations. PMID:27165967

  14. The development and features of the Spanish prehospital advanced triage method (META) for mass casualty incidents.

    PubMed

    Arcos González, Pedro; Castro Delgado, Rafael; Cuartas Alvarez, Tatiana; Garijo Gonzalo, Gracia; Martinez Monzon, Carlos; Pelaez Corres, Nieves; Rodriguez Soler, Alberto; Turegano Fuentes, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    This text describes the process of development of the new Spanish Prehospital Advanced Triage Method (META) and explain its main features and contribution to prehospital triage systems in mass casualty incidents. The triage META is based in the Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) protocols, patient's anatomical injuries and mechanism of injury. It is a triage method with four stages including early identification of patients with severe trauma that would benefit from a rapid evacuation to a surgical facility and introduces a new patient flow by-passing the advanced medical post to improve evacuation. The stages of triage META are: I) Stabilization triage that classifies patients according to severity to set priorities for initial emergency treatment; II) Identifying patients requiring urgent surgical treatment, this is done at the same time than stage I and creates a new flow of patients with high priority for evacuation; III) Implementation of Advanced Trauma Life Support protocols to patients previously classified according to stablished priority; and IV) Evacuation triage, stablishing evacuation priorities in case of lacks of appropriate transport resources. The triage META is to be applied only by prehospital providers with advanced knowledge and training in advanced trauma life support care and has been designed to be implemented as prehospital procedure in mass casualty incidents (MCI). PMID:27130042

  15. Characterization of a rapid climate shift at the MIS 8/7 transition in central Spain (Valdocarros II, Autonomous Region of Madrid) by means of the herpetological assemblages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blain, Hugues-Alexandre; Panera, Joaquin; Uribelarrea, David; Rubio-Jara, Susana; Pérez-González, Alfredo

    2012-07-01

    Climate instability with high-amplitude and rapid shifts during the Middle Pleistocene is well known from pollen records and deep-ocean sediment cores. Although poorly correlatable with such long climate/environment records, the successive fossil amphibian and reptile assemblages from the Middle Pleistocene site of Valdocarros II (Autonomous Region of Madrid, central Spain) provide a unique opportunity to characterize the climatic and environmental features of such rapid (certainly less than 1000 years) shifts from cold to warm conditions in a terrestrial sequence. As the amphibians and reptiles do not differ at species level from the extant herpetofauna of the Iberian Peninsula, they can contribute to the reconstruction of the landscape and climate. In this paper, the mutual climatic range and habitat weighting methods are applied to the herpetofaunistic assemblages in order to estimate quantitative data. The difference in mean annual temperature between "cold" and "warm" periods is estimated at 3.2 °C, with a greater increase in temperature during winter (+3 °C) than during summer (+1 °C). During "cold" periods the climate was more Oceanic (although preserving some dryness during the summers), whereas during "warm" periods the climate became Mediterranean (with mild winters and a long period of dryness in the summer and early autumn). Though higher during cold periods, the continentality (or atmospheric temperature range) remained roughly similar, in accordance with the geographical location of the site in the centre of the Iberian Peninsula. A greater amount of open landscape occurred during "cold" periods, whereas during "warm" periods the wooded areas expanded from 20% to 40% of the landscape surface. Such climatic/environmental changes, together with the numeric datings of the site, suggest that this shift may correspond to the transition from MIS 8 to MIS 7, also called Termination III.

  16. Trifunctional molecular beacon-mediated quadratic amplification for highly sensitive and rapid detection of mercury(II) ion with tunable dynamic range.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yue; Liu, Huaqing; Chen, Feng; Bai, Min; Zhao, Junwu; Zhao, Yongxi

    2016-12-15

    Analyses of target with low abundance or concentration varying over many orders of magnitude are severe challenges faced by numerous assay methods due to their modest sensitivity and limited dynamic range. Here, we introduce a homogeneous and rapid quadratic polynomial amplification strategy through rational design of a trifunctional molecular beacon, which serves as not only a reporter molecule but also a bridge to couple two stage amplification modules without adding any reaction components or process other than basic linear amplification. As a test bed for our studies, we took mercury(II) ion as an example and obtained a high sensitivity with detection limit down to 200 pM within 30min. In order to create a tunable dynamic range, homotropic allostery is employed to modulate the target specific binding. When the number of metal binding site varies from 1 to 3, signal response is programmed accordingly with useful dynamic range spanning 50, 25 and 10 folds, respectively. Furthermore, the applicability of the proposed method in river water and biological samples are successfully verified with good recovery and reproducibility, indicating considerable potential for its practicality in complex real samples. PMID:27497195

  17. Trifunctional molecular beacon-mediated quadratic amplification for highly sensitive and rapid detection of mercury(II) ion with tunable dynamic range.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yue; Liu, Huaqing; Chen, Feng; Bai, Min; Zhao, Junwu; Zhao, Yongxi

    2016-12-15

    Analyses of target with low abundance or concentration varying over many orders of magnitude are severe challenges faced by numerous assay methods due to their modest sensitivity and limited dynamic range. Here, we introduce a homogeneous and rapid quadratic polynomial amplification strategy through rational design of a trifunctional molecular beacon, which serves as not only a reporter molecule but also a bridge to couple two stage amplification modules without adding any reaction components or process other than basic linear amplification. As a test bed for our studies, we took mercury(II) ion as an example and obtained a high sensitivity with detection limit down to 200 pM within 30min. In order to create a tunable dynamic range, homotropic allostery is employed to modulate the target specific binding. When the number of metal binding site varies from 1 to 3, signal response is programmed accordingly with useful dynamic range spanning 50, 25 and 10 folds, respectively. Furthermore, the applicability of the proposed method in river water and biological samples are successfully verified with good recovery and reproducibility, indicating considerable potential for its practicality in complex real samples.

  18. In search of meta-knowledge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopez, Antonio M., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Development of an Intelligent Information System (IIS) involves application of numerous artificial intelligence (AI) paradigms and advanced technologies. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is interested in an IIS that can automatically collect, classify, store and retrieve data, as well as develop, manipulate and restructure knowledge regarding the data and its application (Campbell et al., 1987, p.3). This interest stems in part from a NASA initiative in support of the interagency Global Change Research program. NASA's space data problems are so large and varied that scientific researchers will find it almost impossible to access the most suitable information from a software system if meta-information (metadata and meta-knowledge) is not embedded in that system. Even if more, faster, larger hardware is used, new innovative software systems will be required to organize, link, maintain, and properly archive the Earth Observing System (EOS) data that is to be stored and distributed by the EOS Data and Information System (EOSDIS) (Dozier, 1990). Although efforts are being made to specify the metadata that will be used in EOSDIS, meta-knowledge specification issues are not clear. With the expectation that EOSDIS might evolve into an IIS, this paper presents certain ideas on the concept of meta-knowledge and demonstrates how meta-knowledge might be represented in a pixel classification problem.

  19. A unique restriction site in the flaA gene allows rapid differentiation of group I and group II Clostridium botulinum strains by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis.

    PubMed

    Paul, Catherine J; Tran, Shulin; Tam, Kevin J; Austin, John W

    2007-09-01

    Clostridium botulinum produces the potent botulinum neurotoxin, the causative agent of botulism. Based on distinctive physiological traits, strains of C. botulinum can be divided into four groups: however, only groups I and II are associated with human illness. Alignment of the flaA gene sequences from 40 group I and 40 group II strains identified a single BsrG1 restriction cut site that was present at base pair 283 in all group II flaA sequences and was not found in any group I sequence. The flaA gene was amplified by rapid colony PCR from 22 group I strains and 18 group II strains and digested with BsrGI restriction enzyme. Standard agarose gel electrophoresis with ethidium bromide staining showed two fragments, following restriction digestion of group II flaA gene amplicons with BsrGI, but only a single band of uncut flaA from group I strains. Combining rapid colony PCR with BsrGI restriction digest of the flaA gene at 60 degrees C is a significant improvement over current methods, such as meat digestion or amplified fragment length polymorphism, as a strain can be identified as either group I or group II in under 5 h when starting with a visible plated C. botulinum colony.

  20. MetaMHCpan, A Meta Approach for Pan-Specific MHC Peptide Binding Prediction.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yichang; Luo, Cheng; Mamitsuka, Hiroshi; Zhu, Shanfeng

    2016-01-01

    Recent computational approaches in bioinformatics can achieve high performance, by which they can be a powerful support for performing real biological experiments, making biologists pay more attention to bioinformatics than before. In immunology, predicting peptides which can bind to MHC alleles is an important task, being tackled by many computational approaches. However, this situation causes a serious problem for immunologists to select the appropriate method to be used in bioinformatics. To overcome this problem, we develop an ensemble prediction-based Web server, which we call MetaMHCpan, consisting of two parts: MetaMHCIpan and MetaMHCIIpan, for predicting peptides which can bind MHC-I and MHC-II, respectively. MetaMHCIpan and MetaMHCIIpan use two (MHC2SKpan and LApan) and four (TEPITOPEpan, MHC2SKpan, LApan, and MHC2MIL) existing predictors, respectively. MetaMHCpan is available at http://datamining-iip.fudan.edu.cn/MetaMHCpan/index.php/pages/view/info . PMID:27076335

  1. A high repetition rate TEA CO II laser operating at λ=9.3-μm for the rapid and conservative ablation and modification of dental hard tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Kenneth; Fried, Daniel

    2006-02-01

    TEA CO II lasers tuned to the strong mineral absorption of hydroxyapatite near λ=9-μm are ideally suited for the efficient ablation of dental hard tissues if the laser-pulse is stretched to greater than 5-10-μs to avoid plasma shielding phenomena. Such CO II lasers are capable of operating at high repetition rates for the rapid removal of dental hard tissues. An Impact 2500 TEA CO II laser system from GSI Lumonics (Rugby, UK) custom modified by LightMachinery (Ottawa, Canada) with a repetition rate of 0-500 Hz was used for rapid tissue removal. The single pulse ablation rates through enamel were determined for incident fluence ranging from (1-160 J/cm2). Lateral incisions using a computer controlled scanning stage and water spray were produced and the crater morphology and chemical composition were measured using optical microscopy and high-resolution synchrotron radiation infrared spectromicroscopy. The transmission through 2-meter length 300, 500, 750 and 1000-μm silica hollow waveguides was measured and 80% transmission was achieved with 40-mJ per pulse. The λ=9.3-μm laser pulses efficiently removed dental enamel at rates exceeding 15-μm per pulses with minimal heat accumulation. The residual energy remaining in tooth samples was measured to be 30-40% without water cooling, significantly lower than for longer CO II laser pulses. These results suggest that high repetition rate TEA CO II laser systems operating at λ=9.3-μm with pulse durations of 10-20-μs are ideally suited for dental application.

  2. The Pore Size of Non-Graminaceous Plant Cell Walls Is Rapidly Decreased by Borate Ester Cross-Linking of the Pectic Polysaccharide Rhamnogalacturonan II1

    PubMed Central

    Fleischer, Axel; O'Neill, Malcolm A.; Ehwald, Rudolf

    1999-01-01

    The walls of suspension-cultured Chenopodium album L. cells grown continually for more than 1 year on B-deficient medium contained monomeric rhamnogalacturonan II (mRG-II) but not the borate ester cross-linked RG II dimer (dRG-II-B). The walls of these cells had an increased size limit for dextran permeation, which is a measure of wall pore size. Adding boric acid to growing B-deficient cells resulted in B binding to the wall, the formation of dRG-II-B from mRG-II, and a reduction in wall pore size within 10 min. The wall pore size of denatured B-grown cells was increased by treatment at pH ≤ 2.0 or by treatment with Ca2+-chelating agents. The acid-mediated increase in wall pore size was prevented by boric acid alone at pH 2.0 and by boric acid together with Ca2+, but not by Na+ or Mg2+ ions at pH 1.5. The Ca2+-chelator-mediated increase in pore size was partially reduced by boric acid. Our results suggest that B-mediated cross-linking of RG-II in the walls of living plant cells generates a pectin network with a decreased size exclusion limit for polymers. The formation, stability, and possible functions of a borate ester cross-linked pectic network in the primary walls of nongraminaceous plant cells are discussed. PMID:10557231

  3. MALDI-TOF MS is more accurate than VITEK II ANC card and API Rapid ID 32 A system for the identification of Clostridium species.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Jin; Kim, Si Hyun; Park, Hyun-Jung; Park, Hae-Geun; Park, Dongchul; Song, Sae Am; Lee, Hee Joo; Yong, Dongeun; Choi, Jun Yong; Kook, Joong-Ki; Kim, Hye Ran; Shin, Jeong Hwan

    2016-08-01

    All 50 Clostridium difficile strains were definitely identified by Vitek2 system, Rapid ID 32A system, and MALDI-TOF. For 18 non-difficile Clostridium strains, the identification results were correct in 0, 2, and 17 strains by Vitek2, Rapid ID 32A, and MALDI-TOF, respectively. MALDI-TOF could be used as the primary tool for identification of Clostridium species.

  4. MALDI-TOF MS is more accurate than VITEK II ANC card and API Rapid ID 32 A system for the identification of Clostridium species.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Jin; Kim, Si Hyun; Park, Hyun-Jung; Park, Hae-Geun; Park, Dongchul; Song, Sae Am; Lee, Hee Joo; Yong, Dongeun; Choi, Jun Yong; Kook, Joong-Ki; Kim, Hye Ran; Shin, Jeong Hwan

    2016-08-01

    All 50 Clostridium difficile strains were definitely identified by Vitek2 system, Rapid ID 32A system, and MALDI-TOF. For 18 non-difficile Clostridium strains, the identification results were correct in 0, 2, and 17 strains by Vitek2, Rapid ID 32A, and MALDI-TOF, respectively. MALDI-TOF could be used as the primary tool for identification of Clostridium species. PMID:27296834

  5. A sensitive, selective and rapid determination of lead(II) ions in real-life samples using an electrochemically reduced graphene oxide-graphite reinforced carbon electrode.

    PubMed

    Hamsawahini, Kunashegaran; Sathishkumar, Palanivel; Ahamad, Rahmalan; Yusoff, Abdull Rahim Mohd

    2015-11-01

    In this study, a sensitive and cost-effective electrochemically reduced graphene oxide (ErGO) on graphite reinforced carbon (GRC) was developed for the detection of lead (Pb(II)) ions present in the real-life samples. A film of graphene oxide (GO) was drop-casted on GRC and their electrochemical properties were investigated using cyclic voltammetry (CV), amperometry and square wave voltammetry (SWV). Factors influencing the detection of Pb(II) ions, such as grades of GRC, constant applied cathodic potential (CACP), concentration of hydrochloric acid and drop-casting drying time were optimised. GO is irreversibly reduced in the range of -0.7 V to -1.6 V vs Ag/AgCl (3 M) in acidic condition. The results showed that the reduction behaviour of GO contributed to the high sensitivity of Pb(II) ions detection even at nanomolar level. The ErGO-GRC showed the detection limit of 0.5 nM and linear range of 3-15 nM in HCl (1 M). The developed electrode has potential to be a good candidate for the determination of Pb(II) ions in different aqueous system. The proposed method gives a good recovery rate of Pb(II) ions in real-life water samples such as tap water and river water.

  6. The pore size of non-graminaceous plant cell walls is rapidly decreased by borate ester cross-linking of the pectic polysaccharide rhamnogalacturonan II

    SciTech Connect

    Fleischer, A.; O'Neill, M.A.; Ehwald, R.

    1999-11-01

    The walls of suspension-cultured Chenopodium album L. cells grown continually for more than 1 year on B-deficient medium contained monomeric rhamnogalacturonan (mRG-II) but not the borate ester cross-linked RG II dimer (dRG-II-B). The walls of these cells had an increased size limit for dextran permeation, which is a measure of wall pore size. Adding boric acid to growing B-deficient cells resulted in B binding to the wall, the formation of dRG-II-B from mRG-II, and a reduction in wall pore size within 10 min. The wall pore size of denatured B-grown cells was increased by treatment at pH {le} 2.0 or by treatment with Ca{sup 2+}-chelating agents. The acid-mediated increase in wall pore size was prevented by boric acid alone at pH 2.0 and by boric acid together with Ca{sup 2+}, but not by Na{sup +} or Mg{sup 2+} ions at pH 1.5. The Ca{sup 2+}-chelator-mediated increase in pore size was partially reduced by boric acid. Their results suggest that B-mediated cross-linking of RG-II in the walls of living plant cells generates a pectin network with a decreased size exclusion limit for polymers. The formation, stability, and possible functions of a borate ester cross-linked pectic network in the primary walls of nongraminaceous plant cells are discussed.

  7. Rapid adsorption of toxic Pb(II) ions from aqueous solution using multiwall carbon nanotubes synthesized by microwave chemical vapor deposition technique.

    PubMed

    Mubarak, Nabisab Mujawar; Sahu, Jaya Narayan; Abdullah, Ezzat Chan; Jayakumar, Natesan Subramanian

    2016-07-01

    Multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were synthesized using a tubular microwave chemical vapor deposition technique, using acetylene and hydrogen as the precursor gases and ferrocene as catalyst. The novel MWCNT samples were tested for their performance in terms of Pb(II) binding. The synthesized MWCNT samples were characterized using Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR), Brunauer, Emmett and Teller (BET), Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) analysis, and the adsorption of Pb(II) was studied as a function of pH, initial Pb(II) concentration, MWCNT dosage, agitation speed, and adsorption time, and process parameters were optimized. The adsorption data followed both Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms. On the basis of the Langmuir model, Qmax was calculated to be 104.2mg/g for the microwave-synthesized MWCNTs. In order to investigate the dynamic behavior of MWCNTs as an adsorbent, the kinetic data were modeled using pseudo first-order and pseudo second-order equations. Different thermodynamic parameters, viz., ∆H(0), ∆S(0) and ∆G(0) were evaluated and it was found that the adsorption was feasible, spontaneous and endothermic in nature. The statistical analysis revealed that the optimum conditions for the highest removal (99.9%) of Pb(II) are at pH5, MWCNT dosage 0.1g, agitation speed 160r/min and time of 22.5min with the initial concentration of 10mg/L. Our results proved that microwave-synthesized MWCNTs can be used as an effective Pb(II) adsorbent due to their high adsorption capacity as well as the short adsorption time needed to achieve equilibrium. PMID:27372128

  8. BIOLOGICAL CONTROL OF WHEAT TAKE-ALL DISEASE: IIRAPID SELECTION OF BACTERIA SUPPRESSIVE TO GAEUMANNOMYCES GRAMINIS VAR. TRITICI IN LABORATORY WITH GREENHOUSE AND FIELD CONFIRMATION TRIALS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Screening large collections of bacteria for potential biological control activity on economically important diseases is often difficult. A quick test tube assay was developed to rapidly screen selected bacterial isolates for their ability to suppress take-all disease of wheat, caused by Gaeumannomyc...

  9. Rapid Enhancement of Chick Intestinal DNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase II Activity by 1α,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3, In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Zerwekh, Joseph E.; Haussler, Mark R.; Lindell, Thomas J.

    1974-01-01

    1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 was examined for its ability to affect the DNA-dependent RNA polymerases (nucleosidetriphosphate:RNA nucleotidyltransferase, EC 2.7.7.6) of rachitic chick intestinal cell nuclei in vivo. Nucleoplasmic (form II) RNA polymerase activity was stimulated 2-fold (P < 0.05) within 2-3 hr after an oral dose of 0.27 μg (0.65 nmol) of 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 to rachitic chicks. The form II polymerase activity returned to control values by 5-9 hr after dosing with the sterol. In contrast, the nucleolar (form I) RNA polymerase was not increased within this period. Solubilization of nuclear protein and resolution of the two RNA polymerases on DEAE-Sephadex also revealed that there was an increase in polymerase II activity when assayed on exogenous DNA template. This evidence suggests that 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 acts at the level of the enzymology of intestinal cell transcription and that increased mRNA synthesis after administration of this hormone cannot be due solely to a change in chromatin template activity. PMID:4526209

  10. Probing the reaction mechanism of the D-ala-D-ala dipeptidase, VanX, by using stopped-flow kinetic and rapid-freeze quench EPR studies on the Co(II)-substituted enzyme.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Megan L; Periyannan, Gopalraj; Hajdin, Christine; Sidgel, Tara K; Bennett, Brian; Crowder, Michael W

    2006-10-11

    In an effort to probe the reaction mechanism of VanX, the d-ala-d-ala dipeptidase required for high-level vancomycin resistance in bacteria, stopped-flow kinetic and rapid-freeze quench EPR studies were conducted on the Co(II)-substituted enzyme when reacted with d-ala-d-ala. The intensity of the Co(II) ligand field band at 550 nm decreased (epsilon550 = 140 to 18 M-1 cm-1) when VanX was reacted with substrate, suggesting that the coordination number of the metal increases from 5 to 6 upon substrate binding. The stopped-flow trace was fitted to a kinetic mechanism that suggests the presence of an intermediate whose breakdown is rate-limiting. Rapid-freeze quench EPR studies verified the presence of a reaction intermediate that exhibits an unusually low hyperfine constant (33 G), which suggests a bidentate coordination of the intermediate to the metal center. The EPR studies also identified a distinct enzyme product complex. The results were used to offer a detailed reaction mechanism for VanX that can be used to guide future inhibitor design efforts.

  11. Electrophysiological correlates of rapid escape reflexes in intact earthworms, Eisenia foetida. II. Effects of food deprivation on the functional development of giant nerve fibers.

    PubMed

    Vining, E P; O'Gara, B; Drewes, C D

    1982-07-01

    Noninvasive electrophysiological recording methods were used to study the effects of prolonged food deprivation on the postembryonic patterns of giant fiber growth, as indicated by age-dependent changes in giant fiber conduction velocity and diameter, in the earthworm, Eisenia foetida. In addition, giant fiber growth was compared to patterns of somatic growth, as indicated by increases in body weight. Within a wide range of food deprivation levels, normal age-dependent increases in conduction velocity and diameter occurred in spite of marked stunting of somatic growth. Stunting of giant fiber velocity and diameter occurred only during severe food deprivation, but giant fiber spikes and associated rapid escape responses were still readily evoked. The stunting effects of prolonged and severe food deprivation upon giant fiber conduction velocity and diameter were readily reversed by replenishing food. The results demonstrate the persistence of rapid escape reflex functioning, as well as the priority of giant fiber growth relative to somatic growth, during severe and prolonged food deprivation. As a consequence of the priority of giant fiber growth during limited food availability, giant fiber conduction velocity appears to be a more reliable predictor of animal age then body size. PMID:7108517

  12. A rapid and efficient method for cloning genes of type II restriction-modification systems by use of a killer plasmid.

    PubMed

    Mruk, Iwona; Kaczorowski, Tadeusz

    2007-07-01

    We present a method for cloning restriction-modification (R-M) systems that is based on the use of a lethal plasmid (pKILLER). The plasmid carries a functional gene for a restriction endonuclease having the same DNA specificity as the R-M system of interest. The first step is the standard preparation of a representative, plasmid-borne genomic library. Then this library is transformed with the killer plasmid. The only surviving bacteria are those which carry the gene specifying a protective DNA methyltransferase. Conceptually, this in vivo selection approach resembles earlier methods in which a plasmid library was selected in vitro by digestion with a suitable restriction endonuclease, but it is much more efficient than those methods. The new method was successfully used to clone two R-M systems, BstZ1II from Bacillus stearothermophilus 14P and Csp231I from Citrobacter sp. strain RFL231, both isospecific to the prototype HindIII R-M system. PMID:17468281

  13. Single skin exposure to visible polarized light induces rapid modification of entire circulating blood: II. Appearance of soluble factors restoring proliferation and chromosome structure in X-damag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samoilova, Kira A.; Zubanova, O. I.; Snopov, S. A.; Mukhuradze, N. A.; Mikhelson, V. M.

    1998-12-01

    Exposure of a small skin area (400 cm2) of volunteers to visible incoherent polarized (VIP) light (400 - 2000 nm) in therapeutic doses is accompanied by rapid appearance in the circulating blood of soluble factors able to restore proliferation of X-ray-damaged autologous lymphocytes and to decrease frequency of chromosome breaks. The appearance of a such activity in blood can also be induced without skin irradiation, by in vitro modeling of mixing in the circulation of a small amount of transcutaneously VIP- irradiated blood with the intact blood (one volume of the directly VIP-irradiated blood was added to 10 volumes of the intact blood). Hence, the blood (not the skin) is a major source of the active factors. The data obtained indicate a possibility of release of them from photomodified platelets; moreover, the activity restoring chromosome structure in X- damaged cells has been found in the platelet-derived growth factor and epidermal growth factor (which are known to be associated with platelets) when they were added to physiological concentrations to the culture medium. We assume that activation of cell proliferation based on the effective repair of DNA damaged in situ by endogenous and exogenous factors could be one of the mechanisms of photostimulation of wound healing.

  14. Rapid induction of single donor chimerism after double umbilical cord blood transplantation preceded by reduced intensity conditioning: results of the HOVON 106 phase II study

    PubMed Central

    Somers, Judith A.E.; Braakman, Eric; van der Holt, Bronno; Petersen, Eefke J.; Marijt, Erik W.A.; Huisman, Cynthia; Sintnicolaas, Kees; Oudshoorn, Machteld; Groenendijk-Sijnke, Marlies E.; Brand, Anneke; Cornelissen, Jan J.

    2014-01-01

    Double umbilical cord blood transplantation is increasingly applied in the treatment of adult patients with high-risk hematological malignancies and has been associated with improved engraftment as compared to that provided by single unit cord blood transplantation. The mechanism of improved engraftment is, however, still incompletely understood as only one unit survives. In this multicenter phase II study we evaluated engraftment, early chimerism, recovery of different cell lineages and transplant outcome in 53 patients who underwent double cord blood transplantation preceded by a reduced intensity conditioning regimen. Primary graft failure occurred in one patient. Engraftment was observed in 92% of patients with a median time to neutrophil recovery of 36 days (range, 15–102). Ultimate single donor chimerism was established in 94% of patients. Unit predominance occurred by day 11 after transplantation and early CD4+ T-cell chimerism predicted for unit survival. Total nucleated cell viability was also associated with unit survival. With a median follow up of 35 months (range, 10–51), the cumulative incidence of relapse and non-relapse mortality rate at 2 years were 39% and 19%, respectively. Progressionfree survival and overall survival rates at 2 years were 42% (95% confidence interval, 28–56) and 57% (95% confidence interval, 43–70), respectively. Double umbilical cord blood transplantation preceded by a reduced intensity conditioning regimen using cyclophosphamide/fludarabine/4 Gy total body irradiation results in a high engraftment rate with low non-relapse mortality. Moreover, prediction of unit survival by early CD4+ lymphocyte chimerism might suggest a role for CD4+ lymphocyte mediated unit-versus-unit alloreactivity. www.trialregister.nl NTR1573. PMID:25107890

  15. Evasion of the Innate Immune Response: the Old World Alphavirus nsP2 Protein Induces Rapid Degradation of Rpb1, a Catalytic Subunit of RNA Polymerase II

    PubMed Central

    Akhrymuk, Ivan; Kulemzin, Sergey V.

    2012-01-01

    The Old World alphaviruses are emerging human pathogens with an ability to cause widespread epidemics. The latest epidemic of Chikungunya virus, from 2005 to 2007, affected over 40 countries in Africa, Asia, and Europe. The Old World alphaviruses are highly cytopathic and known to evade the cellular antiviral response by inducing global inhibition of transcription in vertebrate cells. This function was shown to be mediated by their nonstructural nsP2 protein; however, the detailed mechanism of this phenomenon has remained unknown. Here, we report that nsP2 proteins of Sindbis, Semliki Forest, and Chikungunya viruses inhibit cellular transcription by inducing rapid degradation of Rpb1, a catalytic subunit of the RNAPII complex. This degradation of Rpb1 is independent of the nsP2-associated protease activity, but, instead, it proceeds through nsP2-mediated Rpb1 ubiquitination. This function of nsP2 depends on the integrity of the helicase and S-adenosylmethionine (SAM)-dependent methyltransferase-like domains, and point mutations in either of these domains abolish Rpb1 degradation. We go on to show that complete degradation of Rpb1 in alphavirus-infected cells occurs within 6 h postinfection, before other previously described virus-induced changes in cell physiology, such as apoptosis, autophagy, and inhibition of STAT1 phosphorylation, are detected. Since Rpb1 is a subunit that catalyzes the polymerase reaction during RNA transcription, degradation of Rpb1 plays an indispensable role in blocking the activation of cellular genes and downregulating cellular antiviral response. This indicates that the nsP2-induced degradation of Rpb1 is a critical mechanism utilized by the Old World alphaviruses to subvert the cellular antiviral response. PMID:22514352

  16. Bacterially enhanced dissolution of meta-autunite

    SciTech Connect

    Smeaton, C.M.; Weisener, C.G.; Burns, P.C.; Fryer, B.J.; Fowle, D.A.

    2008-12-15

    The release of U from the mineral meta-autunite {l_brace}Ca[(UO{sub 2})(PO{sub 2})](H{sub 2}O){sub 6}{r_brace} was evaluated using spectroscopy, aqueous geochemistry, and electron microscopy in a minimal media with the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella putrefaciens 200R. The onset of anaerobic conditions resulted in the rapid release of U and phosphate to solution followed by the reprecipitation of meta-autinite. Spectroscopy measurements (XANES) indicated that the U was not released via reduction during the bacterial incubations, but instead dissolution was promoted by uptake and immobilization of P by the bacterial cells. Our results suggest that U(VI) in 'refractory' P mineral phases may be mobilized from U mill tailings and/or U disposal sites and that the nutrient status (P) of the geologic setting may be a predictor for the lability of U in these environments.

  17. MetaBAT

    2014-04-01

    Assembling individual genomes from shotgun metagenomic sequences derived from complex microbial communities is so far one of the most challenging problems in bioinformatics. As it is impractical to directly assemble full-length genomes, a first step that groups contigs from the same organisms, called metagenome binning, has been developed to provide insights of individual organisms. However, current binning methods perform poorly in the context of large complex community, and as a result they fail to recovermore » many novel genomes. To overcome this limitation, we developed integrated software, called MetaBAT, which automatically forms hundreds of individual genome bins from metagenome contigs. Probabilistic models of abundance and tetranucleotide frequency were trained by extensive empirical studies and integrated to decide the membership of contigs iteratively. To test the performance of MetaBAT, we applied MetaBAT to both synthetic and several large-scale real world metagenome datasets. By using two independent metrics, we demonstrate that in all the data sets tested MetaBAT achieves good sensitivity (16~87%) and very high specificity (56~99%) in forming genome bins. Further analyses of the novel genomes recovered from the human gut microbiome suggest a subset of these genomes are potentially associated with pathological conditions. In conclusion, we believe MetaBAT is a powerful tool« less

  18. MetaBAT

    SciTech Connect

    2014-04-01

    Assembling individual genomes from shotgun metagenomic sequences derived from complex microbial communities is so far one of the most challenging problems in bioinformatics. As it is impractical to directly assemble full-length genomes, a first step that groups contigs from the same organisms, called metagenome binning, has been developed to provide insights of individual organisms. However, current binning methods perform poorly in the context of large complex community, and as a result they fail to recover many novel genomes. To overcome this limitation, we developed integrated software, called MetaBAT, which automatically forms hundreds of individual genome bins from metagenome contigs. Probabilistic models of abundance and tetranucleotide frequency were trained by extensive empirical studies and integrated to decide the membership of contigs iteratively. To test the performance of MetaBAT, we applied MetaBAT to both synthetic and several large-scale real world metagenome datasets. By using two independent metrics, we demonstrate that in all the data sets tested MetaBAT achieves good sensitivity (16~87%) and very high specificity (56~99%) in forming genome bins. Further analyses of the novel genomes recovered from the human gut microbiome suggest a subset of these genomes are potentially associated with pathological conditions. In conclusion, we believe MetaBAT is a powerful tool

  19. Meta-Creativity: Being Creative about Creativity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Runco, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    The concept of meta-creativity is defined and explored, with examples drawn from the long and productive career of Arthur Cropley. "Meta-creativity" may sound like jargon, but then again, given how meta is used in the sciences (e.g., "meta-analysis," "meta-cognition"), it is a perfectly apt term. It is the best label…

  20. Meta-Analytic Derivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snell, Joel C.; Marsh, Mitchell

    2011-01-01

    The authors have over the years tried to revise meta-analysis because it's basic premise is to add apples and oranges together and analyze. In other words, various data on the same subject are chosen using different samples, research strategies, and number properties. The findings are then homogenized and a statistical analysis is used (Snell, J.…

  1. What's the Meta?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schamiloglu, Edl; Fuks, Mikhail

    2010-11-01

    The term ``Metamaterial'' was first coined in 1999 by Rodger Walser, University of Texas [B. Munk, Metamaterials: Critique and Alternatives/ (John Wiley & Sons, New York, NY, 2009)]. His definition is as follows: Metamaterials are macroscopic composites having man-made, three-dimensional, periodic cellular architecture designed to produce an optimized combination, not available in nature, of two or more responses to specific excitation./ He chose ``meta'' as the prefix from the Greek work meta meaning beyond. The taxonomy of meta-materials is a problem. It seems that there is no one satisfactory definition that does not restrict a class of worthy meta-materials. This presentation reviews past work on the interaction of high power electromagnetic radiation with 1-D photonic crystals. The purpose of this work was to demonstrate the use of a dielectric to focus the microwave wavebeam and to reflect it quasi-optically. In these experiments using a short pulse SINUS-6 accelerator-driven backward-wave oscillator (BWO) no deleterious effects of the high power electromagnetic fields were observed on the photonic crystal. In addition, planned experiments for an overmoded BWO whose slow wave structure is made from individual wires will be described. This latter has novel mode selection features, in addition to high power handling capability.

  2. metaTIGER: a metabolic evolution resource.

    PubMed

    Whitaker, John W; Letunic, Ivica; McConkey, Glenn A; Westhead, David R

    2009-01-01

    Metabolic networks are a subject that has received much attention, but existing web resources do not include extensive phylogenetic information. Phylogenomic approaches (phylogenetics on a genomic scale) have been shown to be effective in the study of evolution and processes like horizontal gene transfer (HGT). To address the lack of phylogenomic information relating to eukaryotic metabolism, metaTIGER (www.bioinformatics.leeds.ac.uk/metatiger) has been created, using genomic information from 121 eukaryotes and 404 prokaryotes and sensitive sequence search techniques to predict the presence of metabolic enzymes. These enzyme sequences were used to create a comprehensive database of 2257 maximum-likelihood phylogenetic trees, some containing over 500 organisms. The trees can be viewed using iTOL, an advanced interactive tree viewer, enabling straightforward interpretation of large trees. Complex high-throughput tree analysis is also available through user-defined queries, allowing the rapid identification of trees of interest, e.g. containing putative HGT events. metaTIGER also provides novel and easy-to-use facilities for viewing and comparing the metabolic networks in different organisms via highlighted pathway images and tables. metaTIGER is demonstrated through evolutionary analysis of Plasmodium, including identification of genes horizontally transferred from chlamydia.

  3. Rapid detection of mutations by conformation sensitive gel electrophoresis: Application to the identification of three new mutations in the type II procollagen gene and a fourth family with the Arg{sub 519}{yields}Cys base substitution

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, C.J.; Rock, M.; McCarron, S.

    1994-09-01

    Conformation sensitive gel electrophoresis (CSGE) detects differences as small as a single base mismatch in DNA heteroduplexes of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products. The altered migration of heteroduplexes versus homoduplexes is resolved in a polyacrylamide-based gel electrophoresis system. The technique was used here to detect conformational changes in the type II procollagen gene (COL2A1) in patients with growth plate defects. PCR products which displayed heteroduplex species were directly sequenced and all revealed either base substitutions or base deletions. Three of the base substitutions resulted in the identification of new mutations. These include a Gly{sub 691}{yields}Arg substitution in a proband with hypochondrogenesis, a Gly{sub 975}{yields}Ser base substitution in a family with late-onset spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia (SEDT) and precocious osteoarthritis (POA), and a Gly{sub 988}{yields}Arg mutation in another patient with hypochondrogenesis. A fourth substitution was found to be the fourth example of an Arg{sub 519}{yields}Cys point mutation in a family with SEDT and POA. All mutations were confirmed by restriction site analysis. These results illustrate the utility of the CSGE method for the rapid detection of mutations in PCR products without the need for special equipment, primers or sample preparation.

  4. [Meta-analysis in medicine].

    PubMed

    Hendl, J

    2002-04-26

    Systematic reviews are widely used in medicine as a method of decision making based on evidences. The systematic review is a method of locating and evaluation of a synthesising evidence. Meta-analysis refers to quantitative synthesis of the results of clinical trials or other primary studies. Simple introductory account about meta-analysis is given. We describe two examples of meta-analysis application and strengths and weaknesses of this research method. PMID:12038071

  5. ISIS and META projects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birman, Kenneth; Cooper, Robert; Marzullo, Keith

    1990-01-01

    The ISIS project has developed a new methodology, virtual synchony, for writing robust distributed software. High performance multicast, large scale applications, and wide area networks are the focus of interest. Several interesting applications that exploit the strengths of ISIS, including an NFS-compatible replicated file system, are being developed. The META project is distributed control in a soft real-time environment incorporating feedback. This domain encompasses examples as diverse as monitoring inventory and consumption on a factory floor, and performing load-balancing on a distributed computing system. One of the first uses of META is for distributed application management: the tasks of configuring a distributed program, dynamically adapting to failures, and monitoring its performance. Recent progress and current plans are reported.

  6. ISIS and META projects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birman, Kenneth; Cooper, Robert; Marzullo, Keith

    1990-01-01

    ISIS and META are two distributed systems projects at Cornell University. The ISIS project, has developed a new methodology, virtual synchrony, for writing robust distributed software. This approach is directly supported by the ISIS Toolkit, a programming system that is distributed to over 300 academic and industrial sites. Several interesting applications that exploit the strengths of ISIS, including an NFS-compatible replicated file system, are being developed. The META project, is about distributed control in a soft real time environment incorporating feedback. This domain encompasses examples as diverse as monitoring inventory and consumption on a factory floor and performing load-balancing on a distributed computing system. One of the first uses of META is for distributed application management: the tasks of configuring a distributed program, dynamically adapting to failures, and monitoring its performance. Recent progress and current plans are presented. This approach to distributed computing, a philosophy that is believed to significantly distinguish the work from that of others in the field, is explained.

  7. Instructional authoring by direct manipulation of simulations: Exploratory applications of RAPIDS. RAPIDS 2 authoring manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    RAPIDS II is a simulation-based intelligent tutoring system environment. It is a system for producing computer-based training courses that are built on the foundation of graphical simulations. RAPIDS II simulations can be animated and they can have continuously updating elements.

  8. Importance of systematic reviews and meta-analyses in pediatric nutrition.

    PubMed

    Szajewska, Hania

    2013-01-01

    To address information overload, systematic methods have been developed to identify, assess, and synthesize information. This chapter provides an overview of the basic principles of systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials, which are considered to be the best study design for answering questions about the effectiveness of an intervention. It also discusses the problems and limitations of using a meta-analytical approach. As the number of systematic reviews and meta-analyses is increasing rapidly, also in the field of pediatric nutrition, it is essential that the strengths as well as the limitations and caveats of this approach are well understood. PMID:24029781

  9. TH-C-12A-02: Comparison of Two RapidArc Delivery Strategies in Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy of Stage I and II Peripheral Lung Tumors with Unflattened Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, B; Lu, J; Chen, J; Chen, C; Lin, P; Kuang, Y

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The full arcs strategy used in SBRT with RapidArc and unflattened (FFF) beams in large and heterogeneous peripheral non-smallcell lung cancer (NSCLC) appears to be suboptimal as it increases the disadvantageous dose to the contralateral lung, which potentially increases the toxicity to surrounding tissues. In this study, we investigated, for the first time, the dose delivery strategies using partial arcs (PA) and the fully rotational arcs with avoidance sectors (FAAS) for SBRT with FFF beams in peripheral NSCLC patients. Methods: Eighteen patients with NSCLC (stage I and II) were selected for this study. Nine patients with a GTV <= 10cc were designated as the small tumor group. The remaining nine patients with a GTV between 10 cc and 44 cc were assigned to the large tumor group. The treatment plans were generated in eighteen patients using PA and FAAS, respectively, and delivered with a Varian TrueBeam Linac. Dosimetry of the target and organs at risk (OAR), total MU, out-of-field dose, and delivery time were analyzed. Delta4 and Portal dosimetry were employed to evaluate the delivery accuracy. Results: or the small tumor group, the FAAS plans significantly achieved a better conformity index, the lower total MU and out-of-field dose, a shorter treatment time, and the reduced doses to cord, heart, and lung (p < 0.05). But the target doses were slightly higher than that delivered by PA plans. For the large tumor group, the PA plans significantly attained a better conformity index and a shorter treatment time (p < 0.05). Furthermore, all plans achieved a high pass rate, with all the gamma indices greater than 97% at the Γ{sub 3mm,} {sub 3%} threshold. Conclusion: This study suggests that FAAS strategy is more beneficial for small tumor patients undergoing lung SBRT with FFF beams. However, for large tumor patients, PA strategy is recommended. NIH/NIGMS grant U54 GM104944, Lincy Endowed Assistant Professorship.

  10. The Tragedy of Meta Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havlik, Denis; Schimak, Gerald

    2010-05-01

    Ten years after the Murrays' announcement, the sensors are indeed inexpensive and ubiquitous. Nevertheless, the vision of "electronic skin" is still a remote dream. Indeed, an operational world-wide Sensor Web is more than just a sum of its parts: all information has to be available in easily discoverable, retrievable, and understandable form. In reality, only a few observations are readily available on the web, and even fewer provide meta-information required for its discovery, understanding and automatic processing. The "tragedy" of meta information, as already identified by ORCHESTRA, an FP6-Integrated Project, is that the "appropriate" meta information depends on the intended use, which in turn can never be known in advance. For example, the set of meta-information required by a scientist interested in climate change may be very different from the meta-information required for automatic report generation in the context of "Clean Air For Europe" (CAFE) directive. The recently started FP7 "TaToo" project proposes an alternative to a fruitless quest for defining and maintaining an all-encompassing meta-information model. In this talk, we will present TaToo's approach for distributed generation and maintaining of multiple, semantically linked meta-information sets based on community input, and discuss the challenges, potential benefits and advantages (e.g. long-term sustainability) of a community-driven meta information generation.

  11. Tunable Meta-Liquid Crystals.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mingkai; Fan, Kebin; Padilla, Willie; Powell, David A; Zhang, Xin; Shadrivov, Ilya V

    2016-02-24

    Meta-liquid crystals, a novel form of tunable 3D metamaterials, are proposed and experimentally demonstrated in the terahertz frequency regime. A morphology change under a bias electric field and a strong modulation of the transmission are observed. In comparison to conventional liquid crystals, there is considerable freedom to prescribe the electromagnetic properties through the judicious design of the meta-atom geometry.

  12. Improving Learning through Meta Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Betty

    2010-01-01

    Meta assessment goes beyond assessment in that it examines not only the elements of assessment but also the necessary and sufficient conditions as well as the needs of the assessment. Meta assessment in education tends to be the domain of course designers, planners and policy makers but rarely that of students. This article examines the role of…

  13. A Teacher's Guide to Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banda, Devender R.; Therrien, William J.

    2008-01-01

    Technical terms such as "meta-analysis," research synthesis," and "effect size" may sound alien to practitioners in the field of education. Due to limited knowledge on meta-analysis among educators, the results of meta-analyses seldom translate from research to classroom practice--even though meta-analyses may provide valuable information on how…

  14. Meta-Games in Information Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huvila, Isto

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Meta-games and meta-gaming refer to various second-order conceptions of games and gaming. The present article discusses the applicability of the notions of meta-game and meta-gaming in understanding the patterns of how people use, misuse, work and work-around information and information infrastructures. Method: Twenty-two qualitative…

  15. The Meta Sketch Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nóbrega, Leonel; Nunes, Nuno Jardim; Coelho, Helder

    The Model Driven Development has its foundations on metamodeling and new tools are required in order to support users on the definition and customization of their modeling languages. The MetaSketch Editor takes advantage of the current OMG technology to provide the metamodeling mechanisms required to support the integration of some widely used human-computer interaction (HCI) notation into the UML, through precise and semantically sound metamodeling extensions. With this integration, HCI field could contribute to leverage the model-driven development paradigm and support automatic generation of interactive applications

  16. Direct Observation by Rapid-Scan FT-IR Spectroscopy of Two-Electron-Reduced Intermediate of Tetraaza Catalyst [Co(II)N4H(MeCN)](2+) Converting CO2 to CO.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Hua; Frei, Heinz

    2016-08-10

    In the search for the two-electron-reduced intermediate of the tetraaza catalyst [Co(II)N4H(MeCN)](2+) (N4H = 2,12-dimethyl-3,7,11,17-tetraazabicyclo[11.3.1]heptadeca-1(17),2,11,13,15-pentaene) for CO2 reduction and elementary steps that result in the formation of CO product, rapid-scan FT-IR spectroscopy of the visible-light-sensitized catalysis, using Ir(ppy)3 in wet acetonitrile (CD3CN) solution, led to the observation of two sequential intermediates. The initially formed one-electron-reduced [Co(I)N4H](+)-CO2 adduct was converted by the second electron to a transient [Co(I)N4H](+)-CO2(-) complex that spontaneously converted CO2 to CO in a rate-limiting step on the second time scale in the dark under regeneration of the catalyst (room temperature). The macrocycle IR spectra of the [Co(I)N4H](+)-CO2(-) complex and the preceding one-electron [Co(I)N4H](+)-CO2 intermediate show close similarity but distinct differences in the carboxylate modes, indicating that the second electron resides mainly on the CO2 ligand. Vibrational assignments are corroborated by (13)C isotopic labeling. The structure and stability of the two-electron-reduced intermediate derived from the time-resolved IR study are in good agreement with recent predictions by DFT electronic structure calculations. This is the first observation of an intermediate of a molecular catalyst for CO2 reduction during the bond-breaking step producing CO. The reaction pathway for the Co tetraaza catalyst uncovered here suggests that the competition between CO2 reduction and proton reduction of a macrocyclic multi-electron catalyst is steered toward CO2 activation if the second electron is directly captured by an adduct of CO2 and the one-electron-reduced catalyst intermediate. PMID:27420191

  17. Direct Observation by Rapid-Scan FT-IR Spectroscopy of Two-Electron-Reduced Intermediate of Tetraaza Catalyst [Co(II)N4H(MeCN)](2+) Converting CO2 to CO.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Hua; Frei, Heinz

    2016-08-10

    In the search for the two-electron-reduced intermediate of the tetraaza catalyst [Co(II)N4H(MeCN)](2+) (N4H = 2,12-dimethyl-3,7,11,17-tetraazabicyclo[11.3.1]heptadeca-1(17),2,11,13,15-pentaene) for CO2 reduction and elementary steps that result in the formation of CO product, rapid-scan FT-IR spectroscopy of the visible-light-sensitized catalysis, using Ir(ppy)3 in wet acetonitrile (CD3CN) solution, led to the observation of two sequential intermediates. The initially formed one-electron-reduced [Co(I)N4H](+)-CO2 adduct was converted by the second electron to a transient [Co(I)N4H](+)-CO2(-) complex that spontaneously converted CO2 to CO in a rate-limiting step on the second time scale in the dark under regeneration of the catalyst (room temperature). The macrocycle IR spectra of the [Co(I)N4H](+)-CO2(-) complex and the preceding one-electron [Co(I)N4H](+)-CO2 intermediate show close similarity but distinct differences in the carboxylate modes, indicating that the second electron resides mainly on the CO2 ligand. Vibrational assignments are corroborated by (13)C isotopic labeling. The structure and stability of the two-electron-reduced intermediate derived from the time-resolved IR study are in good agreement with recent predictions by DFT electronic structure calculations. This is the first observation of an intermediate of a molecular catalyst for CO2 reduction during the bond-breaking step producing CO. The reaction pathway for the Co tetraaza catalyst uncovered here suggests that the competition between CO2 reduction and proton reduction of a macrocyclic multi-electron catalyst is steered toward CO2 activation if the second electron is directly captured by an adduct of CO2 and the one-electron-reduced catalyst intermediate.

  18. Quality control and conduct of genome-wide association meta-analyses.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Thomas W; Day, Felix R; Croteau-Chonka, Damien C; Wood, Andrew R; Locke, Adam E; Mägi, Reedik; Ferreira, Teresa; Fall, Tove; Graff, Mariaelisa; Justice, Anne E; Luan, Jian'an; Gustafsson, Stefan; Randall, Joshua C; Vedantam, Sailaja; Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie; Kilpeläinen, Tuomas O; Scherag, André; Esko, Tonu; Kutalik, Zoltán; Heid, Iris M; Loos, Ruth J F

    2014-05-01

    Rigorous organization and quality control (QC) are necessary to facilitate successful genome-wide association meta-analyses (GWAMAs) of statistics aggregated across multiple genome-wide association studies. This protocol provides guidelines for (i) organizational aspects of GWAMAs, and for (ii) QC at the study file level, the meta-level across studies and the meta-analysis output level. Real-world examples highlight issues experienced and solutions developed by the GIANT Consortium that has conducted meta-analyses including data from 125 studies comprising more than 330,000 individuals. We provide a general protocol for conducting GWAMAs and carrying out QC to minimize errors and to guarantee maximum use of the data. We also include details for the use of a powerful and flexible software package called EasyQC. Precise timings will be greatly influenced by consortium size. For consortia of comparable size to the GIANT Consortium, this protocol takes a minimum of about 10 months to complete.

  19. CoMeta: Classification of Metagenomes Using k-mers

    PubMed Central

    Kawulok, Jolanta; Deorowicz, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, the study of environmental samples has been developing rapidly. Characterization of the environment composition broadens the knowledge about the relationship between species composition and environmental conditions. An important element of extracting the knowledge of the sample composition is to compare the extracted fragments of DNA with sequences derived from known organisms. In the presented paper, we introduce an algorithm called CoMeta (Classification of metagenomes), which assigns a query read (a DNA fragment) into one of the groups previously prepared by the user. Typically, this is one of the taxonomic rank (e.g., phylum, genus), however prepared groups may contain sequences having various functions. In CoMeta, we used the exact method for read classification using short subsequences (k-mers) and fast program for indexing large set of k-mers. In contrast to the most popular methods based on BLAST, where the query is compared with each reference sequence, we begin the classification from the top of the taxonomy tree to reduce the number of comparisons. The presented experimental study confirms that CoMeta outperforms other programs used in this context. CoMeta is available at https://github.com/jkawulok/cometa under a free GNU GPL 2 license. PMID:25884504

  20. Measuring coral reef decline through meta-analyses

    PubMed Central

    Côté, I.M; Gill, J.A; Gardner, T.A; Watkinson, A.R

    2005-01-01

    Coral reef ecosystems are in decline worldwide, owing to a variety of anthropogenic and natural causes. One of the most obvious signals of reef degradation is a reduction in live coral cover. Past and current rates of loss of coral are known for many individual reefs; however, until recently, no large-scale estimate was available. In this paper, we show how meta-analysis can be used to integrate existing small-scale estimates of change in coral and macroalgal cover, derived from in situ surveys of reefs, to generate a robust assessment of long-term patterns of large-scale ecological change. Using a large dataset from Caribbean reefs, we examine the possible biases inherent in meta-analytical studies and the sensitivity of the method to patchiness in data availability. Despite the fact that our meta-analysis included studies that used a variety of sampling methods, the regional estimate of change in coral cover we obtained is similar to that generated by a standardized survey programme that was implemented in 1991 in the Caribbean. We argue that for habitat types that are regularly and reasonably well surveyed in the course of ecological or conservation research, meta-analysis offers a cost-effective and rapid method for generating robust estimates of past and current states. PMID:15814352

  1. Meta-learning in reinforcement learning.

    PubMed

    Schweighofer, Nicolas; Doya, Kenji

    2003-01-01

    Meta-parameters in reinforcement learning should be tuned to the environmental dynamics and the animal performance. Here, we propose a biologically plausible meta-reinforcement learning algorithm for tuning these meta-parameters in a dynamic, adaptive manner. We tested our algorithm in both a simulation of a Markov decision task and in a non-linear control task. Our results show that the algorithm robustly finds appropriate meta-parameter values, and controls the meta-parameter time course, in both static and dynamic environments. We suggest that the phasic and tonic components of dopamine neuron firing can encode the signal required for meta-learning of reinforcement learning.

  2. Surfactant-free green synthesis of Fe3O4 nanoparticles capped with 3,4-dihydroxyphenethylcarbamodithioate: stable recyclable magnetic nanoparticles for the rapid and efficient removal of Hg(II) ions from water.

    PubMed

    Venkateswarlu, Sada; Yoon, Minyoung

    2015-11-14

    Mercury is considered one of the most notorious global pollutants due to its high toxicity and widespread use in industry. Although many materials have been developed for the removal of mercury for water purification, most of these materials are difficult to reuse, which may lead to an increase in the mercury handling expense. Therefore, new sustainable materials that can be easily recycled and are highly efficient for the removal of mercury are required. Herein, we report the surfactant-free green synthesis of Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) using a watermelon (Citrullus lanatus) rind extract. The Fe3O4 MNPs were further functionalized with 3,4-dihydroxyphenethylcarbamodithioate (DHPCT) and applied to the removal of Hg(ii). Evaluation of the mercury removal efficiency and the amount adsorbed by DHPCT@Fe3O4 MNPs demonstrated a high Hg(ii) removal efficiency (98%) with a maximum Hg(ii) adsorption capacity of 52.1 mg g(-1). Systematic studies of the adsorption mechanism and selectivity suggest that the soft ligand (DHPCT) can preferentially coordinate with the soft metal ion (Hg(ii)) resulting in selective mercury removal. The developed DHPCT@Fe3O4 MNPs were readily recycled several times using an external magnet by exploiting their ferromagnetic character, without a significant decline in the Hg(ii) removal efficiency. This study provides a new insight into the preparation of a highly efficient adsorbent for Hg(ii) removal by an eco-friendly method. PMID:26436867

  3. Cinnamon intake lowers fasting blood glucose: an updated meta-analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    OBJECTIVE – To determine if meta-analysis of recent clinical studies of cinnamon intake by people with Type II diabetes and/or prediabetes resulted in significant changes in fasting blood glucose. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS -- Published clinical studies were identified using a literature search (P...

  4. Medicare's Cooperative Cardiovascular Project: can we trust our MetaStar report cards? Cardiovascular Care Committee of Wausau Hospital.

    PubMed

    Murdock, D K; Engelmeier, R S; Logemann, T; Schlund, A; Haehlke, R

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of Medicare's Cooperative Cardiovascular Project (CCP) is to improve the care of Medicare patients presenting with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). MetaStar is Wisconsin's Medicare peer review organization that administers Phase II of the CCP. A major Phase II objective is to increase the use of reperfusion strategies (thrombolysis and angioplasty) and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors (when the ejection fractions is < 40%) in patients presenting with AMI. After MetaStar presented Wausau Hospital's baseline Phase II data to us, we were asked to define a plan to improve the use of reperfusion therapy and ACE inhibitors. To verify the accuracy of the data presented to us, we reviewed the patient records used by MetaStar to calculate our baseline data for these 2 quality-of-care indicators. Our MetaStar reported reperfusion rate (48.4%) and ACE inhibitor rate (20.9%) were significantly different from that which we calculated (100% and 97%). Causes for the discrepancy included MetaStar abstractor's failure to exclude two patients who did not have an AMI, failure to correctly count patients who received the targeted treatment, and an inability of the abstractors to identify important CCP exclusion criteria. Thus, numerous patients who should have been excluded were inappropriately classified as "ideal" candidates for the targeted therapy. WE CONCLUDE: There are major flaws in the data collection techniques used by MetaStar in Phase II of the CCP. These flaws produced erroneous conclusions concerning our use of reperfusion strategies and ACE inhibitors. Since these quality-of-care indicators are major targeted goals of Phase II, the errors are of special concern. We believe better-designed abstract forms, due diligence, and more thorough training could have prevented the errors. In presenting our concerns, we hope to foster a response by MetaStar to improve the quality of the peer review process. PMID:10605356

  5. Meta assembler enhancements and generalized linkage editor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    A meta Assembler for NASA was developed. The initial development of the Meta Assembler for the SUMC was performed. The capabilities included assembly for both main and micro level programs. A period of checkout and utilization to verify the performance of the Meta Assembler was undertaken. Additional enhancements were made to the Meta Assembler which expanded the target computer family to include architectures represented by the PDP-11, MODCOMP 2, and Raytheon 706 computers.

  6. Uses and Misuses of Meta-Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kulik, James A.

    Meta-analysis does not solve all the problems encountered in qualitative research reviews, but it holds out some hope for increasing the reliability and dependability of a reviewer's conclusions. Several developments in meta-analysis are cause for optimism. First, different meta-analysts are doing work in the same areas, leading to increased…

  7. Concurrent Meta-Evaluation: A Critique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanssen, Carl E.; Lawrenz, Frances; Dunet, Diane O.

    2008-01-01

    Meta-evaluations reported in the literature, although rare, often have focused on retrospective assessment of completed evaluations. Conducting a meta-evaluation concurrently with the evaluation modifies this approach. This method provides the opportunity for the meta-evaluators to advise the evaluators and provides the basis for a summative…

  8. Meta-Analysis: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briggs, Derek C.

    2005-01-01

    This article raises some questions about the usefulness of meta-analysis as a means of reviewing quantitative research in the social sciences. When a meta-analytic model for SAT coaching is used to predict results from future studies, the amount of prediction error is quite large. Interpretations of meta-analytic regressions and quantifications of…

  9. Meta-Teaching: Meaning and Strategy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Xiaoduan

    2013-01-01

    Meta-teaching is the knowledge and reflection on teaching based on meta-ideas. It is the teaching about teaching, a teaching process with practice consciously guided by thinking, inspiring teachers to teach more effectively. Meta-teaching is related to the knowledge, inspection and amendment of teaching activities in terms of their design,…

  10. Meta-analysis: an update.

    PubMed

    Sacks, H S; Reitman, D; Pagano, D; Kupelnick, B

    1996-01-01

    A fairly new type of research, termed meta-analysis, attempts to analyze and combine the results of previous reports. In 1992 we updated our 1987 survey of 86 meta-analyses of randomized control trial reports in the english language literature with an additional 78. We evaluated the quality of these meta-analyses using a scoring method that lists 23 items in six major areas: study design, combinability, control of bias, statistical analysis, sensitivity analysis, and application of results. Of the 23 individual items, the mean number satisfactorily addressed was 7.63 +/- 2.84 (mean +/- S.D.) for 40 papers published from 1955 through 1982, 6.80 +/- 3.86 for 66 papers published from 1983 through 1986, and 11.91 +/- 4.79 for 58 papers published from 1987 through 1990 (F = 31.3, p < .001). We noted that methodology has definitely improved since our first survey of meta-analyses, but an urgent need still exists for a better search of the literature, quality evaluation of trials, and a synthesis of the results. Recently, meta-analysis has expanded to cover non-randomized studies, including evaluation of diagnostic tests and pooling of epidemiologic studies. There is growing concern for standards, and several methodologic issues remain unresolved.

  11. Effects of climate-induced increases in summer drought on riparian plant species: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Garssen, Annemarie G; Verhoeven, Jos T A; Soons, Merel B

    2014-01-01

    1. Frequency and duration of summer droughts are predicted to increase in the near future in many parts of the world, with considerable anticipated effects on riparian plant community composition and species richness. Riparian plant communities along lowland streams are characterised by high species richness due to their system-specific environmental gradients. As these streams and their hydrological gradients are mainly rain-fed, they are sensitive to precipitation changes. 2. We conducted a literature survey and meta-analysis to examine the effects of an increase in summer drought on: (i) riparian plant biomass; (ii) riparian seedling survival and (iii) riparian plant species composition and richness. We also aimed to determine whether hydrological thresholds related to drought tolerance can be distinguished for riparian plant species. 3. ISI Web of Knowledge was searched for relevant peer-reviewed studies, and 23 papers were found that met our criteria and contained quantitative study results. To detect overall responses of biomass and seedling survival, a random-effects model was applied using Comprehensive Meta-analysis™ software. Regression curves were then fitted to response ratio data relating the effects on drought-impacted groups to those on control groups. 4. Our results showed that a drought duration of approximately >30 days strongly reduces riparian plant biomass and that a duration of approximately >30–35 days and high drought intensities (starting from 3 to 4 cm water table decline per day) can be detrimental for riparian seedling survival. Especially Populus and Salix seedlings showed a reduced survival in response to drought, in contrast to Tamarix seedlings, which have the ability to rapidly and expansively elongate their roots. The data also revealed that an increase in drought conditions rapidly leads to a decline of riparian species richness and an increased presence of species adjusted to drier conditions. 5. Riparian groundwater level

  12. Meta-Transcriptomic Analysis of a Chromate-Reducing Aquifer Microbial Community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beller, H. R.; Brodie, E. L.; Han, R.; Karaoz, U.

    2010-12-01

    A major challenge for microbial ecology that has become more tractable in the advent of new molecular techniques is characterizing gene expression in complex microbial communities. We are using meta-transcriptomic analysis to characterize functional changes in an aquifer-derived, chromate-reducing microbial community as it transitions through various electron-accepting conditions. We inoculated anaerobic microcosms with groundwater from the Cr-contaminated Hanford 100H site and supplemented them with lactate and electron acceptors present at the site, namely, nitrate, sulfate, and Fe(III). The microcosms progressed successively through various electron-accepting conditions (e.g., denitrifying, sulfate-reducing, and ferric iron-reducing conditions, as well as nitrate-dependent, chemolithotrophic Fe(II)-oxidizing conditions). Cr(VI) was rapidly reduced initially and again upon further Cr(VI) amendments. Extensive geochemical sampling and analysis (e.g., lactate, acetate, chloride, nitrate, nitrite, sulfate, dissolved Cr(VI), total Fe(II)), RNA/DNA harvesting, and PhyloChip analyses were conducted. Methods were developed for removal of rRNA from total RNA in preparation for meta-transcriptome sequencing. To date, samples representing denitrifying and fermentative/sulfate-reducing conditions have been sequenced using 454 Titanium technology. Of the non-rRNA related reads for the denitrifying sample (which was also actively reducing chromate), ca. 8% were associated with denitrification and ca. 0.9% were associated with chromate resistance/transport, in contrast to the fermentative/sulfate-reducing sample (in which chromate had already been reduced), which had zero reads associated with either of these categories but many predicted proteins associated with sulfate-reducing bacteria. We observed sequences for key functional transcripts that were unique at the nucleotide level compared to the GenBank non-redundant database [such as L-lactate dehydrogenase (iron

  13. Emotional Meta-Memories: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Fairfield, Beth; Mammarella, Nicola; Palumbo, Rocco; Di Domenico, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Emotional meta-memory can be defined as the knowledge people have about the strategies and monitoring processes that they can use to remember their emotionally charged memories. Although meta-memory per se has been studied in many cognitive laboratories for many years, fewer studies have explicitly focused on meta-memory for emotionally charged or valenced information. In this brief review, we analyzed a series of behavioral and neuroimaging studies that used different meta-memory tasks with valenced information in order to foster new research in this direction, especially in terms of commonalities/peculiarities of the emotion and meta-memory interaction. In addition, results further support meta-cognitive models that take emotional factors into account when defining meta-memory per se. PMID:26569320

  14. Program Logics for Homogeneous Meta-programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Martin; Tratt, Laurence

    A meta-program is a program that generates or manipulates another program; in homogeneous meta-programming, a program may generate new parts of, or manipulate, itself. Meta-programming has been used extensively since macros were introduced to Lisp, yet we have little idea how formally to reason about meta-programs. This paper provides the first program logics for homogeneous meta-programming - using a variant of MiniML_e^{square} by Davies and Pfenning as underlying meta-programming language. We show the applicability of our approach by reasoning about example meta-programs from the literature. We also demonstrate that our logics are relatively complete in the sense of Cook, enable the inductive derivation of characteristic formulae, and exactly capture the observational properties induced by the operational semantics.

  15. Emotional Meta-Memories: A Review.

    PubMed

    Fairfield, Beth; Mammarella, Nicola; Palumbo, Rocco; Di Domenico, Alberto

    2015-11-09

    Emotional meta-memory can be defined as the knowledge people have about the strategies and monitoring processes that they can use to remember their emotionally charged memories. Although meta-memory per se has been studied in many cognitive laboratories for many years, fewer studies have explicitly focused on meta-memory for emotionally charged or valenced information. In this brief review, we analyzed a series of behavioral and neuroimaging studies that used different meta-memory tasks with valenced information in order to foster new research in this direction, especially in terms of commonalities/peculiarities of the emotion and meta-memory interaction. In addition, results further support meta-cognitive models that take emotional factors into account when defining meta-memory per se.

  16. Meta-case based realization of design rationale management systems

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, G.

    1996-12-31

    System design is an iterative, creative, and cooperative process where informal ideas are transformed into a detailed definition of how a system can be implemented. Design rationale aims at capturing and preserving the why underlying the what, the argument behind the artifact in the design process. Recording deliberations of the design process therefore promises benefits for the overall system engineering life cycle. Providing adequate computer support for design rationale is an interesting issue and a real need for effective application. A design rationale management system (DRMS) supports the capturing, storing and retrieval of interaction rationale in a shared corporate knowledge base and allows organizational learning through long-term and inter-project reuse. The intent of meta-CASE systems is to capture the specification of a required CASE tool and then generate the tool for actual production from the specification. In this paper we identify the requirements for a DRMS and investigate the applicability of meta-CASE tools for the implementation of DRMS`s. Furthermore we describe the experiences gained in the development of two DRMS`s adopting the meta CASE tools MaestroII GED/TCI and Hardy.

  17. (Meta)Search like Google

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rochkind, Jonathan

    2007-01-01

    The ability to search and receive results in more than one database through a single interface--or metasearch--is something many users want. Google Scholar--the search engine of specifically scholarly content--and library metasearch products like Ex Libris's MetaLib, Serials Solution's Central Search, WebFeat, and products based on MuseGlobal used…

  18. Genomewide meta-analysis identifies novel multiple sclerosis susceptibility loci

    PubMed Central

    Patsopoulos, Nikolaos A.; de Bakker, Paul I.W.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To perform a one-stage meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of multiple sclerosis (MS) susceptibility and explore functional consequences of new susceptibility loci. Methods We synthesized 7 MS GWAS. Each dataset was imputed using HapMap phase II and a per-SNP meta-analysis was performed across the 7 datasets. We explored RNA expression data using a quantitative trait analysis in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of 228 subjects with demyelinating disease. Results We meta-analyzed 2,529,394 unique SNPs in 5,545 cases and 12,153 controls. We identified three novel susceptibility alleles: rs170934T at 3p24.1 (OR=1.17, P = 1.6 × 10−8) near EOMES, rs2150702G in the second intron of MLANA on chromosome 9p24.1 (OR = 1.16, P = 3.3 × 10−8), and rs6718520A in an intergenic region on chromosome 2p21, with THADA as the nearest flanking gene (OR = 1.17, P = 3.4 × 10−8). The three new loci do not have a strong “cis” effect on RNA expression in PBMCs. Ten other susceptibility loci had a suggestive P<1×10−6, some of which have evidence of association in other inflammatory diseases, i.e. IL12B, TAGAP, PLEK, and ZMIZ1. Interpretation We have performed a meta-analysis of GWAS in MS that more than doubles the size of previous gene discovery efforts and highlights three novel MS susceptibility loci. These and additional loci with suggestive evidence of association are excellent candidates for further investigations to refine and validate their role in the genetic architecture of MS. PMID:22190364

  19. The use of rapidly synergistic cloud point extraction for the separation and preconcentration of trace amounts of Ni (II) ions from food and water samples coupling with flame atomic absorption spectrometry determination.

    PubMed

    Rahnama, Reyhaneh; Najafi, Marzieh

    2016-03-01

    A novel improved preconcentration method known as rapidly synergistic cloud point extraction (RS-CPE) was established for nickel preconcentration and determination prior to its determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. In this work, the traditional CPE pattern was changed and greatly simplified in order to be applicable in metal extraction and detection. This method was accomplished in room temperature in 1 min. Non-ionic surfactant Triton X-114 was used as extractant. Octanol worked as cloud point revulsant and synergic reagent. The various parameters affecting the extraction and preconcentration of nickel such as sample pH, 2,2'-Furildioxime concentration, amounts of octanol, amounts of Triton X-114, type of diluting solvent, extraction time, and ionic strength were investigated and optimized. Under optimal conditions, the calibration curve showed an excellent linearity in the concentration range of 2-200 μg L(-1), and the limit of detection was 0.6 μg L(-1) for nickel. The developed method was successfully applied for the determination of nickel in food and water samples. The results showed that, the proposed method can be used as a cheap, rapid, and efficient method for the extraction and preconcentration of nickel from real samples.

  20. MetaSpider: Meta-Searching and Categorization on the Web.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Hsinchun; Fan, Haiyan; Chau, Michael; Zeng, Daniel

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the difficulty of locating relevant information on the Web and studies two approaches to addressing the low precision and poor presentation of search results: meta-search and document categorization. Introduces MetaSpider, a meta-search engine, and presents results of a user evaluation study that compared three search engines.…

  1. MPEG-7 meta-data enhanced encoder system for embedded systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asai, Kohtaro; Nishikawa, Hirofumi; Kudo, Daiki; Divakaran, Ajay

    2004-01-01

    We describe a MPEG-7 Meta-Data enhanced Audio-Visual Encoder system that targets DVD recorders. We extract features in the compressed domain with both video and audio, which allows us to add the meta-data extraction without altering the hardware architecture of the encoder core. Our feature extraction algorithms are simple, and thus implementable through a simple combination of software and hardware on the integrated DVD chip. The primary application of the meta-data is video summarization, which enables rapid browsing of stored video by the end user. The simplicity of our summarization and feature extraction algorithms enables incorporation of the powerful functionality of smart content navigation through content summarization, into the DVD recorder at a low cost.

  2. The Meta-Analytic Big Bang

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shadish, William R.; Lecy, Jesse D.

    2015-01-01

    This article looks at the impact of meta-analysis and then explores why meta-analysis was developed at the time and by the scholars it did in the social sciences in the 1970s. For the first problem, impact, it examines the impact of meta-analysis using citation network analysis. The impact is seen in the sciences, arts and humanities, and on such…

  3. How to do a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Field, Andy P; Gillett, Raphael

    2010-11-01

    Meta-analysis is a statistical tool for estimating the mean and variance of underlying population effects from a collection of empirical studies addressing ostensibly the same research question. Meta-analysis has become an increasing popular and valuable tool in psychological research, and major review articles typically employ these methods. This article describes the process of conducting meta-analysis: selecting articles, developing inclusion criteria, calculating effect sizes, conducting the actual analysis (including information on how to do the analysis on popular computer packages such as IBM SPSS and R) and estimating the effects of publication bias. Guidance is also given on how to write up a meta-analysis.

  4. Meta-analysis and its problems.

    PubMed Central

    Eysenck, H. J.

    1994-01-01

    Including all relevant material--good, bad, and indifferent--in meta-analysis admits the subjective judgments that meta-analysis was designed to avoid. Several problems arise in meta-analysis: regressions are often non-linear; effects are often multivariate rather than univariate; coverage can be restricted; bad studies may be included; the data summarised may not be homogeneous; grouping different causal factors may lead to meaningless estimates of effects; and the theory-directed approach may obscure discrepancies. Meta-analysis may not be the one best method for studying the diversity of fields for which it has been used. Images p790-a PMID:7950571

  5. Mesothelioma and lung cancer among motor vehicle mechanics: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Michael; Teta, M Jane; Hessel, Patrick A; Garabrant, David H; Craven, Valerie A; Scrafford, Carolyn G; Kelsh, Michael A

    2004-06-01

    We conducted a systematic review and analysis of the epidemiological literature that examines the risk of lung cancer and mesothelioma among motor vehicle mechanics who may have been engaged in brake repair and, thus, were potentially exposed to asbestos. All relevant studies were classified into three tiers according to their quality. Tier III (lowest quality) studies were cited for completeness, but were not included in the meta-analysis. Meta relative risks (meta-RRs) were calculated for mesothelioma and lung cancer using both fixed and random effects models for Tiers I and II, separately, followed by stratified analyses based on study design or exposure characterization (garage workers versus brake workers) and, for lung cancer studies, based on adequate adjustment for smoking. The meta-analysis for Tier I (higher quality) and Tier II (lower quality) studies of mesothelioma yielded RR estimates of 0.92 (95% CI 0.55-1.56) and 0.81 (95% CI 0.52-1.28), respectively. Further stratification according to exposure characterization did not affect the results. The meta-analysis for lung cancer produced RR estimates of 1.07 (95% CI 0.88-1.31) for Tier I and 1.17 (95% CI 1.01-1.36) for Tier II. When the lung cancer analysis was limited to studies that used adequate control for smoking, the resulting RR estimate was 1.09 (95% CI 0.92-1.28). Based on these findings, we conclude that employment as a motor vehicle mechanic does not increase the risk of developing mesothelioma. Although some studies showed a small increase in risk of lung cancer among motor vehicle mechanics, the data on balance do not support a conclusion that lung cancer risk in this occupational group is related to asbestos exposure.

  6. Bayesian meta-analysis of diagnostic tests allowing for imperfect reference standards.

    PubMed

    Menten, J; Boelaert, M; Lesaffre, E

    2013-12-30

    There is an increasing interest in meta-analyses of rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) for infectious diseases. To avoid spectrum bias, these meta-analyses should focus on phase IV studies performed in the target population. For many infectious diseases, these target populations attend primary health care centers in resource-constrained settings where it is difficult to perform gold standard diagnostic tests. As a consequence, phase IV diagnostic studies often use imperfect reference standards, which may result in biased meta-analyses of the diagnostic accuracy of novel RDTs. We extend the standard bivariate model for the meta-analysis of diagnostic studies to correct for differing and imperfect reference standards in the primary studies and to accommodate data from studies that try to overcome the absence of a true gold standard through the use of latent class analysis. Using Bayesian methods, improved estimates of sensitivity and specificity are possible, especially when prior information is available on the diagnostic accuracy of the reference test. In this analysis, the deviance information criterion can be used to detect conflicts between the prior information and observed data. When applying the model to a dataset of the diagnostic accuracy of an RDT for visceral leishmaniasis, the standard meta-analytic methods appeared to underestimate the specificity of the RDT. PMID:24003003

  7. Bayesian meta-analysis of diagnostic tests allowing for imperfect reference standards.

    PubMed

    Menten, J; Boelaert, M; Lesaffre, E

    2013-12-30

    There is an increasing interest in meta-analyses of rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) for infectious diseases. To avoid spectrum bias, these meta-analyses should focus on phase IV studies performed in the target population. For many infectious diseases, these target populations attend primary health care centers in resource-constrained settings where it is difficult to perform gold standard diagnostic tests. As a consequence, phase IV diagnostic studies often use imperfect reference standards, which may result in biased meta-analyses of the diagnostic accuracy of novel RDTs. We extend the standard bivariate model for the meta-analysis of diagnostic studies to correct for differing and imperfect reference standards in the primary studies and to accommodate data from studies that try to overcome the absence of a true gold standard through the use of latent class analysis. Using Bayesian methods, improved estimates of sensitivity and specificity are possible, especially when prior information is available on the diagnostic accuracy of the reference test. In this analysis, the deviance information criterion can be used to detect conflicts between the prior information and observed data. When applying the model to a dataset of the diagnostic accuracy of an RDT for visceral leishmaniasis, the standard meta-analytic methods appeared to underestimate the specificity of the RDT.

  8. Tyrosinaemia II.

    PubMed

    Colditz, P B; Yu, J S; Billson, F A; Rogers, M; Molloy, H F; O'Halloran, M; Wilcken, B

    1984-08-18

    Four cases of tyrosinaemia type II (Richner-Hanhart syndrome) are reported. This syndrome consists of corneal erosions, palmar and plantar hyperkeratoses, and sometimes mental retardation. Presentation with photophobia and dendritic corneal ulceration or circumscribed palmoplantar keratoderma should alert the physician to the possible diagnosis of tyrosinaemia II. Early diagnosis is important, as the clinical picture can be modified by dietary restriction.

  9. A Molecular Rotor Possessing an H-M-H "Spoke" on a P-M-P "Axle": A Platinum(II) trans-Dihydride Spins Rapidly Even at 75 K.

    PubMed

    Prack, Ernest; O'Keefe, Christopher A; Moore, Jeremy K; Lai, Angel; Lough, Alan J; Macdonald, Peter M; Conradi, Mark S; Schurko, Robert W; Fekl, Ulrich

    2015-10-28

    A new class of low-barrier molecular rotors, metal trans-dihydrides, is suggested here. To test whether rapid rotation can be achieved, the known complex trans-H2Pt(P(t)Bu3)2 was experimentally studied by (2)H and (195)Pt solid-state NMR spectroscopy (powder pattern changes with temperature) and computationally modeled as a (t)Bu3P-Pt-P(t)Bu3 stator with a spinning H-Pt-H rotator. Whereas the related chloro-hydride complex, trans-H(Cl)Pt(P(t)Bu3)2, does not show rotational behavior at room temperature, the dihydride trans-H2Pt(P(t)Bu3)2 rotates fast on the NMR time scale, even at low temperatures down to at least 75 K. The highest barrier to rotation is estimated to be ∼3 kcal mol(-1), for the roughly 3 Å long rotator in trans-H2Pt(P(t)Bu3)2.

  10. Selective removal of ATP degradation products from food matrices II: Rapid screening of hypoxanthine and inosine by molecularly imprinted matrix solid-phase dispersion for evaluation of fish freshness.

    PubMed

    Cela-Pérez, M C; Barbosa-Pereira, L; Vecino, X; Pérez-Ameneiro, M; Lasagabaster Latorre, Aurora; López-Vilariño, J M; González Rodríguez, M V; Moldes, A B; Cruz, J M

    2015-04-01

    A water compatible molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP), synthesized using theophylline (TPH) as dummy-template and acrylamide (AM) as functional monomer, has been employed as supporting material in matrix solid-phase dispersion combined with ultra performance liquid chromatography-photodiode array detection (MSPD-UPLC-PDA) for selective determination of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) derivatives in fish samples. ATP degradation products are used as freshness index for assessment of fish quality. The solid sample was directly blended with MIP in MSPD procedure resulting in sample disruption and subsequent adsorption of the compounds on the MIP. By using n-hexane and ammonium hydroxide aqueous solution at pH 9 as the washing and elution solvent, respectively, satisfactory recoveries and clean chromatograms have been obtained. Good linearity for hypoxanthine (HYP) and inosine (INO) has been observed with correlation coefficients (R(2)) of 0.9987 and 0.9986, respectively. The recoveries of the two ATP derivatives at three different spiked levels ranged from 106.5% to 113.4% for HYP and from 103.1% to 111.2% for INO, with average relative standard deviations lower than 4.2% in both cases. This new method, which is rapid, simple and sensitive, can be used as an alternative tool to conventional tedious methods. PMID:25640126

  11. Summary of Meta-Analyses Dealing with Single-Row versus Double-Row Repair Techniques for Rotator Cuff Tears

    PubMed Central

    Spiegl, U.J.; Euler, S.A.; Millett, P.J.; Hepp, P.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Several meta-analyses of randomized clinical trials have been performed to analyze whether double-row (DR) rotator cuff repair (RCR) provides superior clinical outcomes and structural healing compared to single-row (SR) repair. The purpose of this study was to sum up the results of meta-analysis comparing SR and DR repair with respect on clinical outcomes and re-tear rates. Methods: A literature search was undertaken to identify all meta-analyses dealing with randomized controlled trials comparing clinical und structural outcomes after SR versus DR RCR. Results: Eight meta-analyses met the eligibility criteria: two including Level I studies only, five including both Level I and Level II studies, and one including additional Level III studies. Four meta-analyses found no differences between SR and DR RCR for patient outcomes, whereas four favored DR RCR for tears greater than 3 cm. Two meta-analyses found no structural healing differences between SR and DR RCR, whereas six found DR repair to be superior for tears greater than 3 cm tears. Conclusion: No clinical differences are seen between single-row and double-row repair for small and medium rotator cuff tears after a short-term follow-up period with a higher re-tear rate following single-row repairs. There seems to be a trend to superior results with double-row repair in large to massive tear sizes. PMID:27708735

  12. Definition of the interaction domain for cytochrome c on cytochrome c oxidase. Ii. Rapid kinetic analysis of electron transfer from cytochrome c to Rhodobacter sphaeroides cytochrome oxidase surface mutants.

    PubMed

    Wang, K; Zhen, Y; Sadoski, R; Grinnell, S; Geren, L; Ferguson-Miller, S; Durham, B; Millett, F

    1999-12-31

    The reaction between cytochrome c (Cc) and Rhodobacter sphaeroides cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) was studied using a cytochrome c derivative labeled with ruthenium trisbipyridine at lysine 55 (Ru-55-Cc). Flash photolysis of a 1:1 complex between Ru-55-Cc and CcO at low ionic strength results in electron transfer from photoreduced heme c to Cu(A) with an intracomplex rate constant of k(a) = 4 x 10(4) s(-1), followed by electron transfer from Cu(A) to heme a with a rate constant of k(b) = 9 x 10(4) s(-1). The effects of CcO surface mutations on the kinetics follow the order D214N > E157Q > E148Q > D195N > D151N/E152Q approximately D188N/E189Q approximately wild type, indicating that the acidic residues Asp(214), Glu(157), Glu(148), and Asp(195) on subunit II interact electrostatically with the lysines surrounding the heme crevice of Cc. Mutating the highly conserved tryptophan residue, Trp(143), to Phe or Ala decreased the intracomplex electron transfer rate constant k(a) by 450- and 1200-fold, respectively, without affecting the dissociation constant K(D). It therefore appears that the indole ring of Trp(143) mediates electron transfer from the heme group of Cc to Cu(A). These results are consistent with steady-state kinetic results (Zhen, Y., Hoganson, C. W., Babcock, G. T., and Ferguson-Miller, S. (1999) J. Biol. Chem. 274, 38032-38041) and a computational docking analysis (Roberts, V. A., and Pique, M. E. (1999) J. Biol. Chem. 274, 38051-38060).

  13. Statistical Power in Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Statistical power is important in a meta-analysis study, although few studies have examined the performance of simulated power in meta-analysis. The purpose of this study is to inform researchers about statistical power estimation on two sample mean difference test under different situations: (1) the discrepancy between the analytical power and…

  14. Trial Sequential Methods for Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kulinskaya, Elena; Wood, John

    2014-01-01

    Statistical methods for sequential meta-analysis have applications also for the design of new trials. Existing methods are based on group sequential methods developed for single trials and start with the calculation of a required information size. This works satisfactorily within the framework of fixed effects meta-analysis, but conceptual…

  15. Hierarchical Dependence in Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, John R.; Taylor, Alan M.

    2009-01-01

    Meta-analysis is a frequent tool among education and behavioral researchers to combine results from multiple experiments to arrive at a clear understanding of some effect of interest. One of the traditional assumptions in a meta-analysis is the independence of the effect sizes from the studies under consideration. This article presents a…

  16. Model and Interoperability using Meta Data Annotations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, O.

    2011-12-01

    Software frameworks and architectures are in need for meta data to efficiently support model integration. Modelers have to know the context of a model, often stepping into modeling semantics and auxiliary information usually not provided in a concise structure and universal format, consumable by a range of (modeling) tools. XML often seems the obvious solution for capturing meta data, but its wide adoption to facilitate model interoperability is limited by XML schema fragmentation, complexity, and verbosity outside of a data-automation process. Ontologies seem to overcome those shortcomings, however the practical significance of their use remains to be demonstrated. OMS version 3 took a different approach for meta data representation. The fundamental building block of a modular model in OMS is a software component representing a single physical process, calibration method, or data access approach. Here, programing language features known as Annotations or Attributes were adopted. Within other (non-modeling) frameworks it has been observed that annotations lead to cleaner and leaner application code. Framework-supported model integration, traditionally accomplished using Application Programming Interfaces (API) calls is now achieved using descriptive code annotations. Fully annotated components for various hydrological and Ag-system models now provide information directly for (i) model assembly and building, (ii) data flow analysis for implicit multi-threading or visualization, (iii) automated and comprehensive model documentation of component dependencies, physical data properties, (iv) automated model and component testing, calibration, and optimization, and (v) automated audit-traceability to account for all model resources leading to a particular simulation result. Such a non-invasive methodology leads to models and modeling components with only minimal dependencies on the modeling framework but a strong reference to its originating code. Since models and

  17. Rapid Reading, Yes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frommer, Harvey

    1971-01-01

    Recommends instruction in rapid reading fo high school and college students and asserts that flexibility of speed and reasoning provide the foundation for effective rapid reading. Describes the components of rapid reading as orientation, selection, clarification, arrangement, review, and study. (RW)

  18. Meta-Analysis at Middle Age: A Personal History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glass, Gene V.

    2015-01-01

    The 40-year history of meta-analysis is traced from the vantage point of one of its originators. Research syntheses leading to the first examples of meta-analysis are identified. Early meta-analyses of the literature on psychotherapy outcomes and school class size are recounted. The influence on the development of meta-analysis of several…

  19. Class Size Reduction or Rapid Formative Assessment?: A Comparison of Cost-Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeh, Stuart S.

    2009-01-01

    The cost-effectiveness of class size reduction (CSR) was compared with the cost-effectiveness of rapid formative assessment, a promising alternative for raising student achievement. Drawing upon existing meta-analyses of the effects of student-teacher ratio, evaluations of CSR in Tennessee, California, and Wisconsin, and RAND cost estimates, CSR…

  20. Bayesian Sequential Meta-analysis Design in Evaluating Cardiovascular Risk in a New Antidiabetic Drug Development Program

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ming-Hui; Ibrahim, Joseph G.; Xia, H. Amy; Liu, Thomas; Hennessey, Violeta

    2014-01-01

    Recently, the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research at the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) released a guidance that makes recommendations about how to demonstrate that a new antidiabetic therapy to treat Type 2 diabetes is not associated with an unacceptable increase in cardiovascular risk. One of the recommendations from the guidance is that Phase II and III trials should be appropriately designed and conducted so that a meta-analysis can be performed. In addition, the guidance implies that a sequential meta-analysis strategy could be adopted. That is, the initial meta-analysis could aim at demonstrating the upper bound of a 95% confidence interval (CI) for the estimated hazard ratio to be < 1.8 for the purpose of enabling a new drug application (NDA) or a biologics license application (BLA). Subsequently after the marketing authorization, a final meta-analysis would need to show the upper bound to be < 1.3. In this context, we develop a new Bayesian sequential meta-analysis approach using survival regression models to assess whether the size of a clinical development program is adequate to evaluate a particular safety endpoint. We propose a Bayesian sample size determination methodology for sequential meta-analysis clinical trial design with a focus on controlling the familywise Type I error rate and power. The partial borrowing power prior is used to incorporate the historical survival meta-data into the Bayesian design. Various properties of the proposed methodology are examined and simulation-based computational algorithms are developed to generate predictive data at various interim analyses, sample from the posterior distributions, and compute various quantities such as the power and the Type I error in the Bayesian sequential meta-analysis trial design. The proposed methodology is applied to the design of a hypothetical antidiabetic drug development program for evaluating cardiovascular risk. PMID:24343859

  1. Photosystem II

    ScienceCinema

    James Barber

    2016-07-12

    James Barber, Ernst Chain Professor of Biochemistry at Imperial College, London, gives a BSA Distinguished Lecture titled, "The Structure and Function of Photosystem II: The Water-Splitting Enzyme of Photosynthesis."

  2. Adiabatic Betatron deceleration of ionospheric charged particles: a new explanation for (i) the rapid outflow of ionospheric O ions, and for (ii) the increase of plasma mass density observed in magnetospheric flux tubes during main phases of geomagnetic s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemaire, Joseph; Pierrard, Viviane; Darrouzet, Fabien

    2013-04-01

    Using European arrays of magnetometers and the cross-phase analysis to determine magnetic field line resonance frequencies, it has been found by Kale et al. (2009) that the plasma mass density within plasmaspheric flux tubes increased rapidly after the SSC of the Hallowe'en 2003 geomagnetic storms. These observations tend to confirm other independent experimental results, suggesting that heavy ion up-flow from the ionosphere is responsible for the observed plasma density increases during main phases of geomagnetic storms. The aim of our contribution is to point out that, during main phases, reversible Betatron effect induced by the increase of the southward Dst-magnetic field component (|Δ Bz|), diminishes slightly the perpendicular kinetic energy (W?) of charged particles spiraling along field lines. Furthermore, due to the conservation of the first adiabatic invariant (μ = Wm/ Bm) the mirror points of all ionospheric ions and electrons are lifted up to higher altitudes i.e. where the mirror point magnetic field (Bm) is slightly smaller. Note that the change of the mirror point altitude is given by: Δ hm = -1/3 (RE + hm) Δ Bm / Bm. It is independent of the ion species and it does not depend of their kinetic energy. The change of kinetic energy is determined by: Δ Wm = Wm Δ Bm / Bm. Both of these equations have been verified numerically by Lemaire et al. (2005; doi: 10.1016/S0273-1177(03)00099-1) using trajectory calculations in a simple time-dependant B-field model: i.e. the Earth's magnetic dipole, plus an increasing southward B-field component: i.e. the Dst magnetic field whose intensity becomes more and more negative during the main phase of magnetic storms. They showed that a variation of Bz (or Dst) by more than - 50 nT significantly increases the mirror point altitudes by more than 100 km which is about equal to scale height of the plasma density in the topside ionosphere where particles are almost collisionless (see Fig. 2 in Lemaire et al., 2005

  3. Knowledge Exchange Within the Rapid Climate Change Program (RAPID)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, C.; Srokosz, M.

    2008-12-01

    The Rapid Climate Change Program (RAPID) is a major UK-led science program investigating the susceptibility to and risk of abrupt change in the climate system, with a particular focus on the role of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC). RAPID commenced in 2001, with initial funding to 2008 and has just entered its second phase - RAPID-WATCH - extending some aspects of the program until 2014. Scientifically, a key focus of the program has concerned the development and deployment of a continuous AMOC observing system, although the program has also supported research into a number of other aspects of rapid climate change, including paleo studies of past rapid changes, modeling of the past and future climate, and the development of methods with which to aid the quantification of future risks. Given the societal implications that abrupt climate change associated with the AMOC may have for the North Atlantic region, a major focus within the program has been the implementation of a Knowledge Exchange strategy with which to engage key decision and policy makers within the UK political and industrial sectors. This interaction is especially pertinent for those decision makers involved in the development of adaptive capacities that must incorporate resilience to so-called high-impact, low-probability class threats. We will summarize here the main aspects of our approach, outlining activities/methods used both to satisfy the obvious need to transfer key scientific findings from the program to users, but also in facilitating a return flow of knowledge which can be used by scientists to refine the impact and utility of scientific output. We will draw on particular experience gained from the program's involvement in i: personnel exchanges with central government departments; ii: interaction and co-operation with third party stakeholder organizations (e.g. the UK Climate Impacts Program); and iii: provision of written and oral briefings. Throughout, techniques

  4. Introducing CAML II

    SciTech Connect

    Pelaia II, Tom; Boyes, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    Channel Access Markup Language (CAML) is a XML based markup language and implementation for displaying EPICS channel access controls within a web browser. The CAML II project expanded upon the work of CAML I adding more features and greater integration with other web technologies. The most dramatic new feature introduced in CAML II is the introduction of a namespace so CAML controls can be embedded within XHTML documents. A repetition template with macro substitution allows for rapid coding of arbitrary XHTML repetitions. Enhancements have been made to several controls including more powerful plotting options. Advanced formatting options were introduced for text controls. Virtual process variables allow for custom calculations. An EDL to CAML translator eases the transition from EDM screens to CAML pages.

  5. Syntheses of Arnottin I and Arnottin II

    PubMed Central

    Moschitto, Matthew J.; Anthony, David R.; Lewis, Chad A.

    2015-01-01

    Short total syntheses of arnottin I and II were accomplished in 5 and 6 steps, respectively. A sesamol-benzyne cycloaddition with a 3-furyl-benzoate followed by regiospecific lactonization provided rapid, large-scale access to the core of arnottin I. Saponification of arnottin I and hypervalent iodide mediated spirocyclization provided an efficient and direct preparation of racemic arnottin II. PMID:25748275

  6. Decidability problems for meta-R-functions

    SciTech Connect

    Losovik, L.P.; Drobyshev, P.V.

    1995-09-01

    In this article we consider classes of functions defined by R-transformers, which are machines that sequentially process real numbers represented in the binary number system. The class of real functions defined by R-transformers includes all continuous and some discontinuous functions. The closure of this class under superposition produces the wider class of real meta-R-functions. Such functions are defined by finite sequences of R-transformers. Here we examine the class of meta-R-meta-R-functions. Such functions are defined by finite sequences of R-transformers. Here we examine the class of meta-R-functions and specifically the class of finite meta-R-functions. The latter are defined by finite sequences of finite R-transformers. Decidability of the equivalent problem in the class of functions defined by finite R-transformers, i.e., the class of finite R-functions, is proved elsewhere. Here we generalize this result to the class of finite meta-R-functions. We investigate not only the equivalence problem, but also the monotonicity and continuity problems. The proof is by reduction to the decidable nonemptiness problem for nondeterministic bounded-mode finite transformers with finite-turnaround counters on labeled trees. We also consider the general properties of the class of meta-R-functions.

  7. The Influence of Judgment Calls on Meta-Analytic Findings.

    PubMed

    Tarrahi, Farid; Eisend, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Previous research has suggested that judgment calls (i.e., methodological choices made in the process of conducting a meta-analysis) have a strong influence on meta-analytic findings and question their robustness. However, prior research applies case study comparison or reanalysis of a few meta-analyses with a focus on a few selected judgment calls. These studies neglect the fact that different judgment calls are related to each other and simultaneously influence the outcomes of a meta-analysis, and that meta-analytic findings can vary due to non-judgment call differences between meta-analyses (e.g., variations of effects over time). The current study analyzes the influence of 13 judgment calls in 176 meta-analyses in marketing research by applying a multivariate, multilevel meta-meta-analysis. The analysis considers simultaneous influences from different judgment calls on meta-analytic effect sizes and controls for alternative explanations based on non-judgment call differences between meta-analyses. The findings suggest that judgment calls have only a minor influence on meta-analytic findings, whereas non-judgment call differences between meta-analyses are more likely to explain differences in meta-analytic findings. The findings support the robustness of meta-analytic results and conclusions.

  8. Meta-STEPP: subpopulation treatment effect pattern plot for individual patient data meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin Victoria; Cole, Bernard; Bonetti, Marco; Gelber, Richard D

    2016-09-20

    We have developed a method, called Meta-STEPP (subpopulation treatment effect pattern plot for meta-analysis), to explore treatment effect heterogeneity across covariate values in the meta-analysis setting for time-to-event data when the covariate of interest is continuous. Meta-STEPP forms overlapping subpopulations from individual patient data containing similar numbers of events with increasing covariate values, estimates subpopulation treatment effects using standard fixed-effects meta-analysis methodology, displays the estimated subpopulation treatment effect as a function of the covariate values, and provides a statistical test to detect possibly complex treatment-covariate interactions. Simulation studies show that this test has adequate type-I error rate recovery as well as power when reasonable window sizes are chosen. When applied to eight breast cancer trials, Meta-STEPP suggests that chemotherapy is less effective for tumors with high estrogen receptor expression compared with those with low expression. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. AGEX II: Technical quarterly, Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Ekdahl, C.

    1995-03-01

    The AGEX II Technical Quarterly publishes short technical contributions on above ground experiments that use pulsed power and laser drivers. The Quarterly is intended to provide rapid exposure of timely technical ideas and results as well as a means for documenting AGEX II progress and scientific quality for the AGEX II community. Suitable topics include experimental results, diagnostic apparatus, theoretical design, and scaling, among others.

  10. MetaMetaDB: a database and analytic system for investigating microbial habitability.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ching-chia; Iwasaki, Wataru

    2014-01-01

    MetaMetaDB (http://mmdb.aori.u-tokyo.ac.jp/) is a database and analytic system for investigating microbial habitability, i.e., how a prokaryotic group can inhabit different environments. The interaction between prokaryotes and the environment is a key issue in microbiology because distinct prokaryotic communities maintain distinct ecosystems. Because 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) sequences play pivotal roles in identifying prokaryotic species, a system that comprehensively links diverse environments to 16S rRNA sequences of the inhabitant prokaryotes is necessary for the systematic understanding of the microbial habitability. However, existing databases are biased to culturable prokaryotes and exhibit limitations in the comprehensiveness of the data because most prokaryotes are unculturable. Recently, metagenomic and 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing approaches have generated abundant 16S rRNA sequence data that encompass unculturable prokaryotes across diverse environments; however, these data are usually buried in large databases and are difficult to access. In this study, we developed MetaMetaDB (Meta-Metagenomic DataBase), which comprehensively and compactly covers 16S rRNA sequences retrieved from public datasets. Using MetaMetaDB, users can quickly generate hypotheses regarding the types of environments a prokaryotic group may be adapted to. We anticipate that MetaMetaDB will improve our understanding of the diversity and evolution of prokaryotes.

  11. Associations between Homocysteine, Folic Acid, Vitamin B12 and Alzheimer's Disease: Insights from Meta-Analyses.

    PubMed

    Shen, Liang; Ji, Hong-Fang

    2015-01-01

    The associations between homocysteine (Hcy), folic acid, and vitamin B12 and Alzheimer's disease (AD) have gained much interest, while remaining controversial. We aim to perform meta-analyses to evaluate comprehensively: i) Hcy, folic acid, and vitamin B12 levels in AD patients in comparison with controls; and ii) the association between Hcy, folic acid, and vitamin B12 levels and risk of AD. A literature search was performed using Medline and Scopus databases. A total of 68 studies were identified and included in the meta-analyses. Stata 12.0 statistical software was used to perform the meta-analyses. First, AD patients may have higher level of Hcy, and lower levels of folate and vitamin B12 in plasma than controls. Further age-subgroup analysis showed no age effect for Hcy levels in plasma between AD patients and matched controls, while the differences in folate and vitamin B12 levels further enlarged with increased age. Second, data suggests that high Hcy and low folate levels may correlate with increased risk of AD occurrence. The comprehensive meta-analyses not only confirmed higher Hcy, lower folic acid, and vitamin B12 levels in AD patients than controls, but also implicated that high Hcy and low folic acid levels may be risk factors of AD. Further studies are encouraged to elucidate mechanisms linking these conditions.

  12. MetaNeuron: A Free Neuron Simulation Program for Teaching Cellular Neurophysiology.

    PubMed

    Newman, Mark H; Newman, Eric A

    2013-01-01

    MetaNeuron, a neuron simulation program, is an effective interactive tool for teaching cellular neurophysiology. The computer program simulates a wide range of neuronal behavior in its six lessons: i) Resting Membrane Potential, ii) Membrane Time Constant, iii) Membrane Length Constant, iv) Axon Action Potential, v) Axon Voltage Clamp, and vi) Synaptic Potential. The program is designed foremost as a platform for conducting neurophysiology experiments in silico. Neuronal parameters are easily modified and a virtual stimulator injects single or double current pulses into the neuron. Phenomena such as temporal summation of synaptic potentials, passive spread of a synaptic potential from the dendrite to the soma, the refractory period, families of voltage-clamp traces, and the reversal potential of synaptic responses, are easily illustrated in MetaNeuron. Responses are displayed graphically and can be measured with a cursor. Families of traces can be generated and viewed in rotatable 3D plots. Mac and Windows versions of the program can be downloaded, free of charge, onto individual student computers from the website www.MetaNeuron.org. A manual containing operating instructions, a description of the lessons, and exercises conducted on MetaNeuron, can also be downloaded for free.

  13. Quality control and conduct of genome-wide association meta-analyses.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Thomas W; Day, Felix R; Croteau-Chonka, Damien C; Wood, Andrew R; Locke, Adam E; Mägi, Reedik; Ferreira, Teresa; Fall, Tove; Graff, Mariaelisa; Justice, Anne E; Luan, Jian'an; Gustafsson, Stefan; Randall, Joshua C; Vedantam, Sailaja; Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie; Kilpeläinen, Tuomas O; Scherag, André; Esko, Tonu; Kutalik, Zoltán; Heid, Iris M; Loos, Ruth J F

    2014-05-01

    Rigorous organization and quality control (QC) are necessary to facilitate successful genome-wide association meta-analyses (GWAMAs) of statistics aggregated across multiple genome-wide association studies. This protocol provides guidelines for (i) organizational aspects of GWAMAs, and for (ii) QC at the study file level, the meta-level across studies and the meta-analysis output level. Real-world examples highlight issues experienced and solutions developed by the GIANT Consortium that has conducted meta-analyses including data from 125 studies comprising more than 330,000 individuals. We provide a general protocol for conducting GWAMAs and carrying out QC to minimize errors and to guarantee maximum use of the data. We also include details for the use of a powerful and flexible software package called EasyQC. Precise timings will be greatly influenced by consortium size. For consortia of comparable size to the GIANT Consortium, this protocol takes a minimum of about 10 months to complete. PMID:24762786

  14. Meta-analysis and meta-modelling for diagnostic problems

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background A proportional hazards measure is suggested in the context of analyzing SROC curves that arise in the meta–analysis of diagnostic studies. The measure can be motivated as a special model: the Lehmann model for ROC curves. The Lehmann model involves study–specific sensitivities and specificities and a diagnostic accuracy parameter which connects the two. Methods A study–specific model is estimated for each study, and the resulting study-specific estimate of diagnostic accuracy is taken as an outcome measure for a mixed model with a random study effect and other study-level covariates as fixed effects. The variance component model becomes estimable by deriving within-study variances, depending on the outcome measure of choice. In contrast to existing approaches – usually of bivariate nature for the outcome measures – the suggested approach is univariate and, hence, allows easily the application of conventional mixed modelling. Results Some simple modifications in the SAS procedure proc mixed allow the fitting of mixed models for meta-analytic data from diagnostic studies. The methodology is illustrated with several meta–analytic diagnostic data sets, including a meta–analysis of the Mini–Mental State Examination as a diagnostic device for dementia and mild cognitive impairment. Conclusions The proposed methodology allows us to embed the meta-analysis of diagnostic studies into the well–developed area of mixed modelling. Different outcome measures, specifically from the perspective of whether a local or a global measure of diagnostic accuracy should be applied, are discussed as well. In particular, variation in cut-off value is discussed together with recommendations on choosing the best cut-off value. We also show how this problem can be addressed with the proposed methodology. PMID:24758534

  15. Multicenter comparative study of a new ELISA, PLATELIA RABIES II, for the detection and titration of anti-rabies glycoprotein antibodies and comparison with the rapid fluorescent focus inhibition test (RFFIT) on human samples from vaccinated and non-vaccinated people.

    PubMed

    Feyssaguet, M; Dacheux, L; Audry, L; Compoint, A; Morize, J L; Blanchard, I; Bourhy, H

    2007-03-01

    The envelope glycoprotein G of rabies virus induces the production of neutralising antibodies, which are important in protection against rabies. Therefore, titration of anti-envelope glycoprotein antibodies is a good indicator of the degree of immunity in people during anti-rabies treatment or after vaccination. According to the World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines, a booster vaccine dose should be given if the rabies antibody titre falls below 0.5 IU/ml. Titration of anti-rabies antibodies is also useful for plasma centers in the preparation and standardization of human anti-rabies gamma-globulins for therapeutic use and to a lesser extent for the diagnosis of rabies in human sera and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). This paper presents a new enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), PLATELIA RABIES II, developed for rabies envelope glycoprotein antibody detection or titration and its comparison to the current reference method (RFFIT). The data collected during validation of the test in a multicenter study are analysed to give a sound overall knowledge of the capabilities of the PLATELIA RABIES II, for instance specificity, linearity, accuracy, precision, detection limit and quantitation limit. To this aim, human serum samples from a total of 1348 vaccinated or non-vaccinated people were tested in parallel using the new ELISA and the RFFIT for the presence of anti-rabies antibodies. Data generated indicate a linear relationship across the range of titration between the two methods. The sensitivity reaches 98.6% and the specificity 99.4%. This study indicates that this new ELISA test is as sensitive and specific as the current standardized reference method. The method is simple, safe, rapid and can be considered as a useful alternative to the neutralisation test.

  16. Meta-analyses of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Sacks, H S; Berrier, J; Reitman, D; Ancona-Berk, V A; Chalmers, T C

    1987-02-19

    A new type of research, termed meta-analysis, attempts to analyze and combine the results of previous reports. We found 86 meta-analyses of reports of randomized controlled trials in the English-language literature. We evaluated the quality of these meta-analyses, using a scoring method that considered 23 items in six major areas--study design, combinability, control of bias, statistical analysis, sensitivity analysis, and application of results. Only 24 meta-analyses (28 percent) addressed all six areas, 31 (36 percent) addressed five, 25 (29 percent) addressed four, 5 (6 percent) addressed three, and 1 (1 percent) addressed two. Of the 23 individual items, between 1 and 14 were addressed satisfactorily (mean +/- SD, 7.7 +/- 2.7). We conclude that an urgent need exists for improved methods in literature searching, quality evaluation of trials, and synthesizing of the results.

  17. Interpreting and evaluating meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Hall, J A; Rosenthal, R

    1995-12-01

    This article offers some guidelines for interpreting and evaluating meta-analytic reviews of research. The fundamental goals of meta-analysis are to combine results across studies to yield an overall estimate of effect and to compare effects between studies in order to understand moderating factors. Suggestions are made for what readers should look for in a meta-analysis, and a discussion is provided of several issues that are not often explicitly addressed: choice of unit of analysis, fixed versus random effects, the meaning of heterogeneity, determination of when contrasts are appropriate, and the choice of measure of central tendency. We recommend that readers adopt a skeptical attitude about the results of meta-analysis, particularly when only complex analyses are reported. PMID:10153164

  18. Modeling rapidly rotating stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieutord, M.

    2006-06-01

    We review the quest of modeling rapidly rotating stars during the past 40 years and detail the challenges to be taken up by models facing new data from interferometry, seismology, spectroscopy... We then present the progress of the ESTER project aimed at giving a physically self-consistent model for the structure and evolution of rapidly rotating stars.

  19. SAGE II

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-02-16

    ... of stratospheric aerosols, ozone, nitrogen dioxide, water vapor and cloud occurrence by mapping vertical profiles and calculating ... (i.e. MLS and SAGE III versus HALOE) Fixed various bugs Details are in the  SAGE II V7.00 Release Notes .   ...

  20. Optical fiber meta-tips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Principe, Maria; Micco, Alberto; Crescitelli, Alessio; Castaldi, Giuseppe; Consales, Marco; Esposito, Emanuela; La Ferrara, Vera; Galdi, Vincenzo; Cusano, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    We report on the first example of a "meta-tip" configuration that integrates a metasurface on the tip of an optical fiber. Our proposed design is based on an inverted-Babinet plasmonic metasurface obtained by patterning (via focused ion beam) a thin gold film deposited on the tip of an optical fiber, so as to realize an array of rectangular aperture nanoantennas with spatially modulated sizes. By properly tuning the resonances of the aperture nanoantennas, abrupt variations can be impressed in the field wavefront and polarization. We fabricated and characterized several proof-of-principle prototypes operating an near-infrared wavelengths, and implementing the beam-steering (with various angles) of the cross-polarized component, as well as the excitation of surface waves. Our results pave the way to the integration of the exceptional field-manipulation capabilities enabled by metasurfaces with the versatility and ubiquity of fiber-optics technological platforms.

  1. Pro: Meta-analysis: the case for.

    PubMed

    Mudge, David W; Webster, Angela C; Johnson, David W

    2016-06-01

    With ever-accumulating medical evidence for treatment benefits and harms, it is vital that clinicians are able to access and use up-to-date, best evidence in specific clinical scenarios involving individual patients-the primary goal of evidence-based medicine. In this article, we propose that meta-analysis, when properly conducted and reported in the context of a rigorous systematic review, is an indispensable tool for synthesis and interpretation of clinical evidence for the purpose of informing clinical decision-making by clinicians, patients and health care policy makers. Meta-analysis provides many benefits, including enhanced precision and statistical power, greater transparency, identification of bias, exploration of heterogeneity of effects, enhanced generalizability, efficient integration of clinical knowledge, identification of evidence gaps, better informed future trial design and avoidance of unnecessary research duplication and potential patient harm. The overall standard, clinical value and reach of meta-analysis has been further enhanced by the development of standards for registration, conduct and reporting, as well as advanced meta-analytic techniques, such as network meta-analysis. Of course, meta-analysis can at times be limited by poor quality studies, trial heterogeneity, publication bias and non-rigorous review and analysis, although through appraisal these issues are often able to be identified and explored, such that valuable clinical information can still be obtained. Consequently, meta-analysis is now the most highly cited form of research and is considered by many leading organizations to represent the highest level of clinical evidence. However, to maximize their considerable value, it is essential that all clinicians have the skills to critically appraise, carefully interpret and judiciously apply meta-analyses in their practice.

  2. The meta-analytic big bang.

    PubMed

    Shadish, William R; Lecy, Jesse D

    2015-09-01

    This article looks at the impact of meta-analysis and then explores why meta-analysis was developed at the time and by the scholars it did in the social sciences in the 1970s. For the first problem, impact, it examines the impact of meta-analysis using citation network analysis. The impact is seen in the sciences, arts and humanities, and on such contemporaneous developments as multilevel modeling, medical statistics, qualitative methods, program evaluation, and single-case design. Using a constrained snowball sample of citations, we highlight key articles that are either most highly cited or most central to the systematic review network. Then, the article examines why meta-analysis came to be in the 1970s in the social sciences through the work of Gene Glass, Robert Rosenthal, and Frank Schmidt, each of whom developed similar theories of meta-analysis at about the same time. The article ends by explaining how Simonton's chance configuration theory and Campbell's evolutionary epistemology can illuminate why meta-analysis occurred with these scholars when it did and not in medical sciences.

  3. The meta-analytic big bang.

    PubMed

    Shadish, William R; Lecy, Jesse D

    2015-09-01

    This article looks at the impact of meta-analysis and then explores why meta-analysis was developed at the time and by the scholars it did in the social sciences in the 1970s. For the first problem, impact, it examines the impact of meta-analysis using citation network analysis. The impact is seen in the sciences, arts and humanities, and on such contemporaneous developments as multilevel modeling, medical statistics, qualitative methods, program evaluation, and single-case design. Using a constrained snowball sample of citations, we highlight key articles that are either most highly cited or most central to the systematic review network. Then, the article examines why meta-analysis came to be in the 1970s in the social sciences through the work of Gene Glass, Robert Rosenthal, and Frank Schmidt, each of whom developed similar theories of meta-analysis at about the same time. The article ends by explaining how Simonton's chance configuration theory and Campbell's evolutionary epistemology can illuminate why meta-analysis occurred with these scholars when it did and not in medical sciences. PMID:26212600

  4. Meta-transport library user`s guide

    SciTech Connect

    Strayer, W.T.

    1996-07-01

    Developing new transport protocols or protocol algorithms suffer from the complexity of the environment in which they are intended to run. Modeling techniques attempt to relieve this by simulating the environment. Our approach to promoting rapid prototyping of protocols and protocol algorithms is to provide a pre-built infrastructure that is common to all transport protocols, so that the focus is placed on the protocol-specific aspects. The Meta-Transport Library is a library of base classes that implement or abstract out the mundane functions of a protocol; new protocol implementations are derived from the base classes. The result is a fully viable transport protocol implementation, with emphasis on modularity. The collection of base classes form a {open_quotes}class-chest{close_quotes} of tools from which protocols can be developed and studied with as little change to a normal mix environment as possible. In addition to supporting protocol designers, this approach has pedagogical uses.

  5. Structural studies on acetophenone- and benzophenone-derived thiosemicarbazones and their zinc(II) complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraz, Karina S. O.; Silva, Nayane F.; Da Silva, Jeferson G.; Speziali, Nivaldo L.; Mendes, Isolda C.; Beraldo, Heloisa

    2012-01-01

    In the present work N(3)- meta-chlorophenyl-(HAc3 mCl, 1) and N(3)- meta-fluorphenyl-(HAc3 mF, 2) acetophenone thiosemicarbazone, and N(3)- meta-chlorophenyl-(HBz3 mCl, 3) and N(3)- meta-fluorphenyl-(HBz3 mF, 4) benzophenone thiosemicarbazone were obtained, as well as their zinc(II) complexes [Zn(Ac3 mCl) 2] ( 5), [Zn(Ac3 mF) 2] ( 6), [Zn(Bz3 mCl) 2] ( 7) and [Zn(Bz3 mF) 2] ( 8). Upon re-crystallization in DMSO:acetone conversion of 8 into [Zn(Bz3 mF) 2]·(DMSO) ( 8a) occurred. The crystal structures of 2, 5 and 8a were determined.

  6. Systematic reviews and meta-analyses in spine surgery, neurosurgery and orthopedics: guidelines for the surgeon scientist

    PubMed Central

    Mobbs, Ralph J.

    2015-01-01

    The research evidence in the realm of surgery is expanding at a rapid pace, and thus corresponds with an increasing need to critically appraise and synthesize the available literature. Particularly in fields such as spine surgery, neurosurgery and orthopedics which traditionally have little Class I randomized clinical data, reviews are important to pool the available evidence on clinical questions which are otherwise difficult to answer. Whilst systematic reviews and meta-analyses have the potential to provide critical and updated surgical evidence to guide clinical decisions, poorly performed analyses and misinterpretation of such reviews may have a detrimental effect on patient care and outcomes. We present a summary of the critical steps in performing a systematic review and meta-analysis, allowing the surgeon scientist to better interpret and perform their own systematic reviews and meta-analyses. PMID:27683675

  7. Systematic reviews and meta-analyses in spine surgery, neurosurgery and orthopedics: guidelines for the surgeon scientist.

    PubMed

    Phan, Kevin; Mobbs, Ralph J

    2015-12-01

    The research evidence in the realm of surgery is expanding at a rapid pace, and thus corresponds with an increasing need to critically appraise and synthesize the available literature. Particularly in fields such as spine surgery, neurosurgery and orthopedics which traditionally have little Class I randomized clinical data, reviews are important to pool the available evidence on clinical questions which are otherwise difficult to answer. Whilst systematic reviews and meta-analyses have the potential to provide critical and updated surgical evidence to guide clinical decisions, poorly performed analyses and misinterpretation of such reviews may have a detrimental effect on patient care and outcomes. We present a summary of the critical steps in performing a systematic review and meta-analysis, allowing the surgeon scientist to better interpret and perform their own systematic reviews and meta-analyses. PMID:27683675

  8. Rapid Airplane Parametric Input Design (RAPID)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Robert E.

    1995-01-01

    RAPID is a methodology and software system to define a class of airplane configurations and directly evaluate surface grids, volume grids, and grid sensitivity on and about the configurations. A distinguishing characteristic which separates RAPID from other airplane surface modellers is that the output grids and grid sensitivity are directly applicable in CFD analysis. A small set of design parameters and grid control parameters govern the process which is incorporated into interactive software for 'real time' visual analysis and into batch software for the application of optimization technology. The computed surface grids and volume grids are suitable for a wide range of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation. The general airplane configuration has wing, fuselage, horizontal tail, and vertical tail components. The double-delta wing and tail components are manifested by solving a fourth order partial differential equation (PDE) subject to Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions. The design parameters are incorporated into the boundary conditions and therefore govern the shapes of the surfaces. The PDE solution yields a smooth transition between boundaries. Surface grids suitable for CFD calculation are created by establishing an H-type topology about the configuration and incorporating grid spacing functions in the PDE equation for the lifting components and the fuselage definition equations. User specified grid parameters govern the location and degree of grid concentration. A two-block volume grid about a configuration is calculated using the Control Point Form (CPF) technique. The interactive software, which runs on Silicon Graphics IRIS workstations, allows design parameters to be continuously varied and the resulting surface grid to be observed in real time. The batch software computes both the surface and volume grids and also computes the sensitivity of the output grid with respect to the input design parameters by applying the precompiler tool

  9. Rapidly Progressive Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Geschwind, Michael D.; Shu, Huidy; Haman, Aissa; Sejvar, James J.; Miller, Bruce L.

    2009-01-01

    In contrast with more common dementing conditions that typically develop over years, rapidly progressive dementias can develop subacutely over months, weeks, or even days and be quickly fatal. Because many rapidly progressive dementias are treatable, it is paramount to evaluate and diagnose these patients quickly. This review summarizes recent advances in the understanding of the major categories of RPD and outlines efficient approaches to the diagnosis of the various neurodegenerative, toxic-metabolic, infectious, autoimmune, neoplastic, and other conditions that may progress rapidly. PMID:18668637

  10. RISTA II trials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, John R.

    1998-11-01

    Northrop Grumman Corporation has developed an advanced 2nd generation IR sensor system under the guidance of the US Army's Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate (NVESD) as part of an Advanced Concept Technology Demonstration (ACTD) called Counter Mobile Rocket Launcher (CMRL). Designed to support rapid counter fire against mobile targets from an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV), the sensor system, called reconnaissance IR surveillance target acquisition (RISTA II), consists of a 2nd generation FLIR/line scanner, a digital data link, a ground processing facility, and an aided target recognizer (AiTF). The concept of operation together with component details was reported at the passive sensors IRIS in March, 1996. The performance testing of the RISTA II System was reported at the National IRIS in November, 1997. The RISTA II sensor has subsequently undergone performance testing on a Royal Netherlands Air Force F-16 for a manned reconnaissance application in August and October, 1997, at Volkel Airbase, Netherlands. That testing showed performance compatible with the medium altitude IR sensor performance. The results of that testing, together with flight test imagery, will be presented.

  11. metaSEM: an R package for meta-analysis using structural equation modeling

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Mike W.-L.

    2015-01-01

    The metaSEM package provides functions to conduct univariate, multivariate, and three-level meta-analyses using a structural equation modeling (SEM) approach via the OpenMx package in the R statistical platform. It also implements the two-stage SEM approach to conducting fixed- and random-effects meta-analytic SEM on correlation or covariance matrices. This paper briefly outlines the theories and their implementations. It provides a summary on how meta-analyses can be formulated as structural equation models. The paper closes with a conclusion on several relevant topics to this SEM-based meta-analysis. Several examples are used to illustrate the procedures in the supplementary material. PMID:25601849

  12. PORT II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muniz, Beau

    2009-01-01

    One unique project that the Prototype lab worked on was PORT I (Post-landing Orion Recovery Test). PORT is designed to test and develop the system and components needed to recover the Orion capsule once it splashes down in the ocean. PORT II is designated as a follow up to PORT I that will utilize a mock up pressure vessel that is spatially compar able to the final Orion capsule.

  13. BORE II

    2015-08-01

    Bore II, co-developed by Berkeley Lab researchers Frank Hale, Chin-Fu Tsang, and Christine Doughty, provides vital information for solving water quality and supply problems and for improving remediation of contaminated sites. Termed "hydrophysical logging," this technology is based on the concept of measuring repeated depth profiles of fluid electric conductivity in a borehole that is pumping. As fluid enters the wellbore, its distinct electric conductivity causes peaks in the conductivity log that grow and migratemore » upward with time. Analysis of the evolution of the peaks enables characterization of groundwater flow distribution more quickly, more cost effectively, and with higher resolution than ever before. Combining the unique interpretation software Bore II with advanced downhole instrumentation (the hydrophysical logging tool), the method quantifies inflow and outflow locations, their associated flow rates, and the basic water quality parameters of the associated formation waters (e.g., pH, oxidation-reduction potential, temperature). In addition, when applied in conjunction with downhole fluid sampling, Bore II makes possible a complete assessment of contaminant concentration within groundwater.« less

  14. BORE II

    SciTech Connect

    2015-08-01

    Bore II, co-developed by Berkeley Lab researchers Frank Hale, Chin-Fu Tsang, and Christine Doughty, provides vital information for solving water quality and supply problems and for improving remediation of contaminated sites. Termed "hydrophysical logging," this technology is based on the concept of measuring repeated depth profiles of fluid electric conductivity in a borehole that is pumping. As fluid enters the wellbore, its distinct electric conductivity causes peaks in the conductivity log that grow and migrate upward with time. Analysis of the evolution of the peaks enables characterization of groundwater flow distribution more quickly, more cost effectively, and with higher resolution than ever before. Combining the unique interpretation software Bore II with advanced downhole instrumentation (the hydrophysical logging tool), the method quantifies inflow and outflow locations, their associated flow rates, and the basic water quality parameters of the associated formation waters (e.g., pH, oxidation-reduction potential, temperature). In addition, when applied in conjunction with downhole fluid sampling, Bore II makes possible a complete assessment of contaminant concentration within groundwater.

  15. RAPID and DDS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Utz, Hans Heinrich

    2011-01-01

    This talk gives an overview of the the Robot Applications Programmers Interface Delegate (RAPID) as well as the distributed systems middleware Data Distribution Service (DDS). DDS is an open software standard, RAPID is cleared for open-source release under NOSA. RAPID specifies data-structures and semantics for high-level telemetry published by NASA robotic software. These data-structures are supported by multiple robotic platforms at Johnson Space Center (JSC), Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and Ames Research Center (ARC), providing high-level interoperability between those platforms. DDS is used as the middleware for data transfer. The feature set of the middleware heavily influences the design decision made in the RAPID specification. So it is appropriate to discuss both in this introductory talk.

  16. Meta-Analyses and Orthodontic Evidence-Based Clinical Practice in the 21st Century

    PubMed Central

    Papadopoulos, Moschos A.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Aim of this systematic review was to assess the orthodontic related issues which currently provide the best evidence as documented by meta-analyses, by critically evaluating and discussing the methodology used in these studies. Material and Methods: Several electronic databases were searched and handsearching was also performed in order to identify the corresponding meta-analyses investigating orthodontic related subjects. In total, 197 studies were retrieved initially. After applying specific inclusion and exclusion criteria, 27 articles were identified as meta-analyses treating orthodontic-related subjects. Results: Many of these 27 papers presented sufficient quality and followed appropriate meta-analytic approaches to quantitatively synthesize data and presented adequately supported evidence. However, the methodology used in some of them presented weaknesses, limitations or deficiencies. Consequently, the topics in orthodontics which currently provide the best evidence, include some issues related to Class II or Class III treatment, treatment of transverse problems, external apical root resorption, dental anomalies, such as congenital missing teeth and tooth transposition, frequency of severe occlusal problems, nickel hypersensitivity, obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, and computer-assisted learning in orthodontic education. Conclusions: Only a few orthodontic related issues have been so far investigated by means of MAs. In addition, for some of these issues investigated in the corresponding MAs no definite conclusions could be drawn, due to significant methodological deficiencies of these studies. According to this investigation, it can be concluded that at the begin of the 21st century there is evidence for only a few orthodontic related issues as documented by meta-analyses, and more well-conducted high quality research studies are needed to produce strong evidence in order to support evidence-based clinical practice in orthodontics. PMID

  17. Healthcare workers' willingness to work during an influenza pandemic: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Aoyagi, Yumiko; Beck, Charles R; Dingwall, Robert; Nguyen-Van-Tam, Jonathan S

    2015-05-01

    To estimate the proportion of healthcare workers (HCWs) willing to work during an influenza pandemic and identify associated risk factors, we undertook a systematic review and meta-analysis compliant with PRISMA guidance. Databases and grey literature were searched to April 2013, and records were screened against protocol eligibility criteria. Data extraction and risk of bias assessments were undertaken using a piloted form. Random-effects meta-analyses estimated (i) pooled proportion of HCWs willing to work and (ii) pooled odds ratios of risk factors associated with willingness to work. Heterogeneity was quantified using the I(2) statistic, and publication bias was assessed using funnel plots and Egger's test. Data were synthesized narratively where meta-analyses were not possible. Forty-three studies met our inclusion criteria. Meta-analysis of the proportion of HCWs willing to work was abandoned due to excessive heterogeneity (I(2) = 99.2%). Narrative synthesis showed study estimates ranged from 23.1% to 95.8% willingness to work, depending on context. Meta-analyses of specific factors showed that male HCWs, physicians and nurses, full-time employment, perceived personal safety, awareness of pandemic risk and clinical knowledge of influenza pandemics, role-specific knowledge, pandemic response training, and confidence in personal skills were statistically significantly associated with increased willingness. Childcare obligations were significantly associated with decreased willingness. HCWs' willingness to work during an influenza pandemic was moderately high, albeit highly variable. Numerous risk factors showed a statistically significant association with willingness to work despite significant heterogeneity between studies. None of the included studies were based on appropriate theoretical constructs of population behaviour.

  18. Healthcare workers' willingness to work during an influenza pandemic: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Aoyagi, Yumiko; Beck, Charles R; Dingwall, Robert; Nguyen-Van-Tam, Jonathan S

    2015-01-01

    To estimate the proportion of healthcare workers (HCWs) willing to work during an influenza pandemic and identify associated risk factors, we undertook a systematic review and meta-analysis compliant with PRISMA guidance. Databases and grey literature were searched to April 2013, and records were screened against protocol eligibility criteria. Data extraction and risk of bias assessments were undertaken using a piloted form. Random-effects meta-analyses estimated (i) pooled proportion of HCWs willing to work and (ii) pooled odds ratios of risk factors associated with willingness to work. Heterogeneity was quantified using the I2 statistic, and publication bias was assessed using funnel plots and Egger's test. Data were synthesized narratively where meta-analyses were not possible. Forty-three studies met our inclusion criteria. Meta-analysis of the proportion of HCWs willing to work was abandoned due to excessive heterogeneity (I2 = 99·2%). Narrative synthesis showed study estimates ranged from 23·1% to 95·8% willingness to work, depending on context. Meta-analyses of specific factors showed that male HCWs, physicians and nurses, full-time employment, perceived personal safety, awareness of pandemic risk and clinical knowledge of influenza pandemics, role-specific knowledge, pandemic response training, and confidence in personal skills were statistically significantly associated with increased willingness. Childcare obligations were significantly associated with decreased willingness. HCWs' willingness to work during an influenza pandemic was moderately high, albeit highly variable. Numerous risk factors showed a statistically significant association with willingness to work despite significant heterogeneity between studies. None of the included studies were based on appropriate theoretical constructs of population behaviour. PMID:25807865

  19. Exploration of Protein Conformational Change with PELE and Meta-Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Cossins, Benjamin P; Hosseini, Ali; Guallar, Victor

    2012-03-13

    Atomistic molecular simulation methods are now able to explore complex protein or protein-ligand dynamical space in a tractable way with methods such as meta-dynamics or adaptive biasing force. However, many of these methods either require a careful selection of reaction coordinates or the knowledge of an initial pathway of some kind. Thus, it is important that effective methods are developed to produce this pathway data in an efficient fashion. PELE, a proven protein-ligand sampling code, has been developed to provide rapid protein sampling in highly flexible cases, using a reduced network model eigen problem approach. The resulting method is able to rapidly sample configuration space with very general driving information. When applied to ubiquitin, PELE was able to reproduce RMSD and average force data found in molecular dynamics simulations. PELE was also applied to explore the opening/closing transition of T4 lysozyme. A meta-dynamics exploration using a low energy pathway validated that the configurations explored by PELE represent the most populated regions of phase space. PELE and meta-dynamics explorations also discovered a low free energy region where a large cross-domain helix of T4 lysozyme is broken in two. There is previous NMR evidence for the validity of this unfolded helix region.

  20. A Guide to Conducting a Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Mike W-L; Vijayakumar, Ranjith

    2016-06-01

    Meta-analysis is widely accepted as the preferred method to synthesize research findings in various disciplines. This paper provides an introduction to when and how to conduct a meta-analysis. Several practical questions, such as advantages of meta-analysis over conventional narrative review and the number of studies required for a meta-analysis, are addressed. Common meta-analytic models are then introduced. An artificial dataset is used to illustrate how a meta-analysis is conducted in several software packages. The paper concludes with some common pitfalls of meta-analysis and their solutions. The primary goal of this paper is to provide a summary background to readers who would like to conduct their first meta-analytic study.

  1. Formalizing the definition of meta-analysis in Molecular Ecology.

    PubMed

    ArchMiller, Althea A; Bauer, Eric F; Koch, Rebecca E; Wijayawardena, Bhagya K; Anil, Ammu; Kottwitz, Jack J; Munsterman, Amelia S; Wilson, Alan E

    2015-08-01

    Meta-analysis, the statistical synthesis of pertinent literature to develop evidence-based conclusions, is relatively new to the field of molecular ecology, with the first meta-analysis published in the journal Molecular Ecology in 2003 (Slate & Phua 2003). The goal of this article is to formalize the definition of meta-analysis for the authors, editors, reviewers and readers of Molecular Ecology by completing a review of the meta-analyses previously published in this journal. We also provide a brief overview of the many components required for meta-analysis with a more specific discussion of the issues related to the field of molecular ecology, including the use and statistical considerations of Wright's FST and its related analogues as effect sizes in meta-analysis. We performed a literature review to identify articles published as 'meta-analyses' in Molecular Ecology, which were then evaluated by at least two reviewers. We specifically targeted Molecular Ecology publications because as a flagship journal in this field, meta-analyses published in Molecular Ecology have the potential to set the standard for meta-analyses in other journals. We found that while many of these reviewed articles were strong meta-analyses, others failed to follow standard meta-analytical techniques. One of these unsatisfactory meta-analyses was in fact a secondary analysis. Other studies attempted meta-analyses but lacked the fundamental statistics that are considered necessary for an effective and powerful meta-analysis. By drawing attention to the inconsistency of studies labelled as meta-analyses, we emphasize the importance of understanding the components of traditional meta-analyses to fully embrace the strengths of quantitative data synthesis in the field of molecular ecology.

  2. Development of a combined database for meta-epidemiological research.

    PubMed

    Savović, Jelena; Harris, Ross J; Wood, Lesley; Beynon, Rebecca; Altman, Doug; Als-Nielsen, Bodil; Balk, Ethan M; Deeks, Jonathan; Gluud, Lise Lotte; Gluud, Christian; Ioannidis, John P A; Jűni, Peter; Moher, David; Pildal, Julie; Schulz, Kenneth F; Sterne, Jonathan A C

    2010-07-01

    Collections of meta-analyses assembled in meta-epidemiological studies are used to study associations of trial characteristics with intervention effect estimates. However, methods and findings are not consistent across studies. To combine data from 10 meta-epidemiological studies into a single database, and derive a harmonized dataset without overlap between meta-analyses. The database design allowed trials to be contained in different meta-analyses, multiple meta-analyses in systematic reviews, overlapping meta-analyses between systematic reviews, and multiple references to the same trial or review. Unique identifiers were assigned to each reference and used to identify duplicate trials. Sets of meta-analyses with overlapping trials were identified and duplicates removed. Overlapping trials were used to examine agreement between assessments of trial characteristics. The combined database contained 427 reviews, 454 meta-analyses and 4874 trial results. Of these, 258 meta-analyses were unique, while for 196 at least one trial overlapped with another meta-analysis. Median kappa statistics for reliability of assessments were 0.60 for sequence generation, 0.58 for allocation concealment and 0.87 for blinding. Based on inspection of sets of overlapping meta-analyses, 91 meta-analyses containing 1344 trial results were removed. Additionally, 24 duplicated trial results were removed from 16 meta-analyses, to derive a final database containing 363 meta-analyses and 3477 unique trial results. The final database will be used to examine the combined evidence on sources of bias in randomized controlled trials. The strategy used to remove overlap between meta-analyses may be of use for future empirical research. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. A meta-analysis of human-system interfaces in unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) swarm management.

    PubMed

    Hocraffer, Amy; Nam, Chang S

    2017-01-01

    A meta-analysis was conducted to systematically evaluate the current state of research on human-system interfaces for users controlling semi-autonomous swarms composed of groups of drones or unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). UAV swarms pose several human factors challenges, such as high cognitive demands, non-intuitive behavior, and serious consequences for errors. This article presents findings from a meta-analysis of 27 UAV swarm management papers focused on the human-system interface and human factors concerns, providing an overview of the advantages, challenges, and limitations of current UAV management interfaces, as well as information on how these interfaces are currently evaluated. In general allowing user and mission-specific customization to user interfaces and raising the swarm's level of autonomy to reduce operator cognitive workload are beneficial and improve situation awareness (SA). It is clear more research is needed in this rapidly evolving field.

  4. A meta-analysis of human-system interfaces in unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) swarm management.

    PubMed

    Hocraffer, Amy; Nam, Chang S

    2017-01-01

    A meta-analysis was conducted to systematically evaluate the current state of research on human-system interfaces for users controlling semi-autonomous swarms composed of groups of drones or unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). UAV swarms pose several human factors challenges, such as high cognitive demands, non-intuitive behavior, and serious consequences for errors. This article presents findings from a meta-analysis of 27 UAV swarm management papers focused on the human-system interface and human factors concerns, providing an overview of the advantages, challenges, and limitations of current UAV management interfaces, as well as information on how these interfaces are currently evaluated. In general allowing user and mission-specific customization to user interfaces and raising the swarm's level of autonomy to reduce operator cognitive workload are beneficial and improve situation awareness (SA). It is clear more research is needed in this rapidly evolving field. PMID:27633199

  5. Guidelines for Meta-Analyses of Counseling Psychology Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quintana, Stephen M.; Minami, Takuya

    2006-01-01

    This article conceptually describes the steps in conducting quantitative meta-analyses of counseling psychology research with minimal reliance on statistical formulas. The authors identify sources that describe necessary statistical formula for various meta-analytic calculations and describe recent developments in meta-analytic techniques. The…

  6. Multivariate meta-analysis: potential and promise.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Dan; Riley, Richard; White, Ian R

    2011-09-10

    The multivariate random effects model is a generalization of the standard univariate model. Multivariate meta-analysis is becoming more commonly used and the techniques and related computer software, although continually under development, are now in place. In order to raise awareness of the multivariate methods, and discuss their advantages and disadvantages, we organized a one day 'Multivariate meta-analysis' event at the Royal Statistical Society. In addition to disseminating the most recent developments, we also received an abundance of comments, concerns, insights, critiques and encouragement. This article provides a balanced account of the day's discourse. By giving others the opportunity to respond to our assessment, we hope to ensure that the various view points and opinions are aired before multivariate meta-analysis simply becomes another widely used de facto method without any proper consideration of it by the medical statistics community. We describe the areas of application that multivariate meta-analysis has found, the methods available, the difficulties typically encountered and the arguments for and against the multivariate methods, using four representative but contrasting examples. We conclude that the multivariate methods can be useful, and in particular can provide estimates with better statistical properties, but also that these benefits come at the price of making more assumptions which do not result in better inference in every case. Although there is evidence that multivariate meta-analysis has considerable potential, it must be even more carefully applied than its univariate counterpart in practice.

  7. Meta-analysis in Stata using gllamm.

    PubMed

    Bagos, Pantelis G

    2015-12-01

    There are several user-written programs for performing meta-analysis in Stata (Stata Statistical Software: College Station, TX: Stata Corp LP). These include metan, metareg, mvmeta, and glst. However, there are several cases for which these programs do not suffice. For instance, there is no software for performing univariate meta-analysis with correlated estimates, for multilevel or hierarchical meta-analysis, or for meta-analysis of longitudinal data. In this work, we show with practical applications that many disparate models, including but not limited to the ones mentioned earlier, can be fitted using gllamm. The software is very versatile and can handle a wide variety of models with applications in a wide range of disciplines. The method presented here takes advantage of these modeling capabilities and makes use of appropriate transformations, based on the Cholesky decomposition of the inverse of the covariance matrix, known as generalized least squares, in order to handle correlated data. The models described earlier can be thought of as special instances of a general linear mixed-model formulation, but to the author's knowledge, a general exposition in order to incorporate all the available models for meta-analysis as special cases and the instructions to fit them in Stata has not been presented so far. Source code is available at http:www.compgen.org/tools/gllamm.

  8. The Effect of Mindfulness-Based Therapy on Symptoms of Anxiety and Depression in Adult Cancer Patients and Survivors: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piet, Jacob; Wurtzen, Hanne; Zachariae, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The use of mindfulness-based therapy (MBT) in oncology settings has become increasingly popular, and research in the field has rapidly expanded. The objective was by means of a systematic review and meta-analysis to evaluate the current evidence for the effect of MBT on symptoms of anxiety and depression in adult cancer patients and…

  9. Rapid microbiology - raising awareness.

    PubMed

    Bailie, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    A 'high-level overview' of some of the emerging rapid microbiology technologies designed to help healthcare engineering and infection control teams working in hospitals and other healthcare facilities more rapidly identify potentially hazardous levels of waterborne microorganisms in their water systems, enabling them to take prompt remedial action, and a look at the some of the 'pros and cons' of such testing techniques, was given by Nalco technical director, Howard Barnes, the vice-chair of the Legionella Control Association (LCA), at a recent LCA open day. HEJ editor, Jonathan Bailie, reports.

  10. Rapid road repair vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    Mara, L.M.

    1999-09-07

    Disclosed are improvements to a rapid road repair vehicle comprising an improved cleaning device arrangement, two dispensing arrays for filling defects more rapidly and efficiently, an array of pre-heaters to heat the road way surface in order to help the repair material better bond to the repaired surface, a means for detecting, measuring, and computing the number, location and volume of each of the detected surface imperfection, and a computer means schema for controlling the operation of the plurality of vehicle subsystems. The improved vehicle is, therefore, better able to perform its intended function of filling surface imperfections while moving over those surfaces at near normal traffic speeds.

  11. Rapid road repair vehicle

    DOEpatents

    Mara, Leo M.

    1999-01-01

    Disclosed are improvments to a rapid road repair vehicle comprising an improved cleaning device arrangement, two dispensing arrays for filling defects more rapidly and efficiently, an array of pre-heaters to heat the road way surface in order to help the repair material better bond to the repaired surface, a means for detecting, measuring, and computing the number, location and volume of each of the detected surface imperfection, and a computer means schema for controlling the operation of the plurality of vehicle subsystems. The improved vehicle is, therefore, better able to perform its intended function of filling surface imperfections while moving over those surfaces at near normal traffic speeds.

  12. Rapid small lot manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Harrigan, R.W.

    1998-05-09

    The direct connection of information, captured in forms such as CAD databases, to the factory floor is enabling a revolution in manufacturing. Rapid response to very dynamic market conditions is becoming the norm rather than the exception. In order to provide economical rapid fabrication of small numbers of variable products, one must design with manufacturing constraints in mind. In addition, flexible manufacturing systems must be programmed automatically to reduce the time for product change over in the factory and eliminate human errors. Sensor based machine control is needed to adapt idealized, model based machine programs to uncontrolled variables such as the condition of raw materials and fabrication tolerances.

  13. Discovering Rules by Meta-level Abduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Katsumi; Furukawa, Koichi; Kobayashi, Ikuo; Nabeshima, Hidetomo

    This paper addresses discovery of unknown relations from incomplete network data by abduction. Given a network information such as causal relations and metabolic pathways, we want to infer missing links and nodes in the network to account for observations. To this end, we introduce a framework of meta-level abduction, which performs abduction in the meta level. This is implemented in SOLAR, an automated deduction system for consequence finding, using a first-order representation for algebraic properties of causality and the full-clausal form of network information and constraints. Meta-level abduction by SOLAR is powerful enough to infer missing rules, missing facts, and unknown causes that involve predicate invention in the form of existentially quantified hypotheses. We also show an application of rule abduction to discover certain physical techniques and related integrity constraints within the subject area of Skill Science.

  14. A Bayesian nonparametric meta-analysis model.

    PubMed

    Karabatsos, George; Talbott, Elizabeth; Walker, Stephen G

    2015-03-01

    In a meta-analysis, it is important to specify a model that adequately describes the effect-size distribution of the underlying population of studies. The conventional normal fixed-effect and normal random-effects models assume a normal effect-size population distribution, conditionally on parameters and covariates. For estimating the mean overall effect size, such models may be adequate, but for prediction, they surely are not if the effect-size distribution exhibits non-normal behavior. To address this issue, we propose a Bayesian nonparametric meta-analysis model, which can describe a wider range of effect-size distributions, including unimodal symmetric distributions, as well as skewed and more multimodal distributions. We demonstrate our model through the analysis of real meta-analytic data arising from behavioral-genetic research. We compare the predictive performance of the Bayesian nonparametric model against various conventional and more modern normal fixed-effects and random-effects models.

  15. Effects of Mg II and Ca II ionization on ab-initio solar chromosphere models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rammacher, W.; Cuntz, M.

    1991-01-01

    Acoustically heated solar chromosphere models are computed considering radiation damping by (non-LTE) emission from H(-) and by Mg II and Ca II emission lines. The radiative transfer equations for the Mg II k and Ca II K emission lines are solved using the core-saturation method with complete redistribution. The Mg II k and Ca II K cooling rates are compared with the VAL model C. Several substantial improvements over the work of Ulmschneider et al. (1987) are included. It is found that the rapid temperature rises caused by the ionization of Mg II are not formed in the middle chromosphere, but occur at larger atmospheric heights. These models represent the temperature structure of the 'real' solar chromosphere much better. This result is a major precondition for the study of ab-initio models for solar flux tubes based on MHD wave propagation and also for ab-initio models for the solar transition layer.

  16. Rapid Cycling and Its Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... may be rapid, ultra-rapid or ultradian cycling. Biological rhythm disturbances: This theory proposes that people with rapid cycling have daily biological rhythms that are out of sync with typical “ ...

  17. Cortisol levels and suicidal behavior: A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Daryl B; Ferguson, Eamonn; Green, Jessica A; O'Carroll, Ronan E; O'Connor, Rory C

    2016-01-01

    Suicide is a major cause of death worldwide, responsible for 1.5% of all mortality. The causes of suicidal behavior are not fully understood. Dysregulated hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity, as measured by cortisol levels, is one potential risk factor. This meta-analytic review aimed (i) to estimate the strength and variability of the association between naturally fluctuating cortisol levels and suicidal behavior and (ii) to identify moderators of this relationship. A systematic literature search identified 27 studies (N=2226; 779 suicide attempters and 1447 non-attempters) that met the study eligibility criteria from a total of 417 unique records initially examined. Estimates of effect sizes (r) obtained from these studies were analysed using Comprehensive Meta-Analysis. In these analyses, we compared participants identified as having a past history of suicide attempt(s) to those with no such history. Study quality, mean age of sample and percentage of male participants were examined as potential moderators. Overall, there was no significant effect of suicide group on cortisol. However, significant associations between cortisol and suicide attempts were observed as a function of age. In studies where the mean age of the sample was below 40 years the association was positive (i.e., higher cortisol was associated with suicide attempts; r=.234, p<.001), and where the mean age was 40 or above the association was negative (i.e., lower cortisol was associated with suicide attempts; r=-.129, p<.001). These findings confirm that HPA axis activity, as indicated by age-dependent variations in cortisol levels, is associated with suicidal behavior. The challenge for theory and clinical practice is to explain the complete reversal of the association with age and to identify its clinical implications.

  18. Rapid Prototyping Reconsidered

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Desrosier, James

    2011-01-01

    Continuing educators need additional strategies for developing new programming that can both reduce the time to market and lower the cost of development. Rapid prototyping, a time-compression technique adapted from the high technology industry, represents one such strategy that merits renewed evaluation. Although in higher education rapid…

  19. Rapid Prototyping in PVS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munoz, Cesar A.; Butler, Ricky (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    PVSio is a conservative extension to the PVS prelude library that provides basic input/output capabilities to the PVS ground evaluator. It supports rapid prototyping in PVS by enhancing the specification language with built-in constructs for string manipulation, floating point arithmetic, and input/output operations.

  20. AFRPL Rapid Indexing System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beltran, Alfred A.

    A modified Keyword Out of Context (KWOC) system was developed to gain rapid control over more than 8,000 scattered, unindexed documents. This was the first step in providing the technical information support required by Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory scientists and engineers. Implementation of the KWOC system, computer routines, and…

  1. An epigenome-wide association meta-analysis of prenatal maternal stress in neonates: A model approach for replication.

    PubMed

    Rijlaarsdam, Jolien; Pappa, Irene; Walton, Esther; Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J; Mileva-Seitz, Viara R; Rippe, Ralph C A; Roza, Sabine J; Jaddoe, Vincent W V; Verhulst, Frank C; Felix, Janine F; Cecil, Charlotte A M; Relton, Caroline L; Gaunt, Tom R; McArdle, Wendy; Mill, Jonathan; Barker, Edward D; Tiemeier, Henning; van IJzendoorn, Marinus H

    2016-01-01

    Prenatal maternal stress exposure has been associated with neonatal differential DNA methylation. However, the available evidence in humans is largely based on candidate gene methylation studies, where only a few CpG sites were evaluated. The aim of this study was to examine the association between prenatal exposure to maternal stress and offspring genome-wide cord blood methylation using different methods. First, we conducted a meta-analysis and follow-up pathway analyses. Second, we used novel region discovery methods [i.e., differentially methylated regions (DMRs) analyses]. To this end, we used data from two independent population-based studies, the Generation R Study (n = 912) and the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC, n = 828), to (i) measure genome-wide DNA methylation in cord blood and (ii) extract a prenatal maternal stress composite. The meta-analysis (ntotal = 1,740) revealed no epigenome-wide (meta P <1.00e-07) associations of prenatal maternal stress exposure with neonatal differential DNA methylation. Follow-up analyses of the top hits derived from our epigenome-wide meta-analysis (meta P <1.00e-04) indicated an over-representation of the methyltransferase activity pathway. We identified no Bonferroni-corrected (P <1.00e-06) DMRs associated with prenatal maternal stress exposure. Combining data from two independent population-based samples in an epigenome-wide meta-analysis, the current study indicates that there are no large effects of prenatal maternal stress exposure on neonatal DNA methylation. Such replication efforts are essential in the search for robust associations, whether derived from candidate gene methylation or epigenome-wide studies.

  2. Substituted benzeneseleninic acids as bidentate ligands. Synthesis and spectroscopic studies of manganese(II) and iron(II) complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candrini, Giovanni; Malavasi, Wanda; Preti, Carlo; Tosi, Giuseppe; Zannini, Paolo

    The para- and meta-substituted seleninato anion, XC 6H 4SeO -2, forms complexes with manganese(II) and iron(II) of the type [M(XC 6H 4SeO 2) 2(H 2O) 2], which have been shown to contain the bidentate ligand in seleninato- O, O' derivatives, the water molecules being coordinated to the metals. From the electronic absorption spectra and from the magnetic susceptibility data we have proposed for all the complexes a distorted octahedral D4 h symmetry. The structure of the anhydrous para- and meta-substituted benzeneseleninato complexes of manganese(II) and iron(II) have been investigated by means of electrical conductance measurements, spectral (electronic and i.r.) studies and magnetic susceptibility measurements. The anhydrous complexes are always of the seleninato- O, O' type with the ligands tetrahedrally coordinated to the central atom. The wavelengths of the principal absorption peaks have been accounted for quantitatively in terms of the crystal field theory for manganese(II) derivatives. The nephelauxetic parameters are all indicative of an appreciable metal-ligand covalency.

  3. Assessing Predictive Validity of Pressure Ulcer Risk Scales- A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    PARK, Seong-Hi; LEE, Hea Shoon

    2016-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to present a scientific reason for pressure ulcer risk scales: Cubbin& Jackson modified Braden, Norton, and Waterlow, as a nursing diagnosis tool by utilizing predictive validity of pressure sores. Methods: Articles published between 1966 and 2013 from periodicals indexed in the Ovid Medline, Embase, CINAHL, KoreaMed, NDSL, and other databases were selected using the key word “pressure ulcer”. QUADAS-II was applied for assessment for internal validity of the diagnostic studies. Selected studies were analyzed using meta-analysis with MetaDisc 1.4. Results: Seventeen diagnostic studies with high methodological quality, involving 5,185 patients, were included. In the results of the meta-analysis, sROC AUC of Braden, Norton, and Waterflow scale was over 0.7, showing moderate predictive validity, but they have limited interpretation due to significant differences between studies. In addition, Waterlow scale is insufficient as a screening tool owing to low sensitivity compared with other scales. Conclusion: The contemporary pressure ulcer risk scale is not suitable for uninform practice on patients under standardized criteria. Therefore, in order to provide more effective nursing care for bedsores, a new or modified pressure ulcer risk scale should be developed upon strength and weaknesses of existing tools. PMID:27114977

  4. Confidence intervals for a random-effects meta-analysis based on Bartlett-type corrections.

    PubMed

    Noma, Hisashi

    2011-12-10

    In medical meta-analysis, the DerSimonian-Laird confidence interval for the average treatment effect has been widely adopted in practice. However, it is well known that its coverage probability (the probability that the interval actually includes the true value) can be substantially below the target level. One particular reason is that the validity of the confidence interval depends on the assumption that the number of synthesized studies is sufficiently large. In typical medical meta-analyses, the number of studies is fewer than 20. In this article, we developed three confidence intervals for improving coverage properties, based on (i) the Bartlett corrected likelihood ratio statistic, (ii) the efficient score statistic, and (iii) the Bartlett-type adjusted efficient score statistic. The Bartlett and Bartlett-type corrections improve the large sample approximations for the likelihood ratio and efficient score statistics. Through numerical evaluations by simulations, these confidence intervals demonstrated better coverage properties than the existing methods. In particular, with a moderate number of synthesized studies, the Bartlett and Bartlett-type corrected confidence intervals performed well. An application to a meta-analysis of the treatment for myocardial infarction with intravenous magnesium is presented.

  5. Bariatric surgery for obese children and adolescents: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Black, J A; White, B; Viner, R M; Simmons, R K

    2013-08-01

    The number of obese young people continues to rise, with a corresponding increase in extreme obesity and paediatric-adolescent bariatric surgery. We aimed to (i) systematically review the literature on bariatric surgery in children and adolescents; (ii) meta-analyse change in body mass index (BMI) 1-year post-surgery and (iii) report complications, co-morbidity resolution and health-related quality of life (HRQoL). A systematic literature search (1955-2013) was performed to examine adjustable gastric band, sleeve gastrectomy, Roux-en-Y gastric bypass or biliopancreatic diversions operations among obese children and adolescents. Change in BMI a year after surgery was meta-analysed using a random effects model. In total, 637 patients from 23 studies were included in the meta-analysis. There were significant decreases in BMI at 1 year (average weighted mean BMI difference: -13.5 kg m(-2) ; 95% confidence interval [CI] -14.1 to -11.9). Complications were inconsistently reported. There was some evidence of co-morbidity resolution and improvements in HRQol post-surgery. Bariatric surgery leads to significant short-term weight loss in obese children and adolescents. However, the risks of complications are not well defined in the literature. Long-term, prospectively designed studies, with clear reporting of complications and co-morbidity resolution, alongside measures of HRQol, are needed to firmly establish the harms and benefits of bariatric surgery in children and adolescents.

  6. Rapid road repair vehicle

    DOEpatents

    Mara, L.M.

    1998-05-05

    Disclosed is a rapid road repair vehicle capable of moving over a surface to be repaired at near normal posted traffic speeds to scan for and find at the high rate of speed, imperfections in the pavement surface, prepare the surface imperfection for repair by air pressure and vacuum cleaning, applying a correct amount of the correct patching material to effect the repair, smooth the resulting repaired surface, and catalog the location and quality of the repairs for maintenance records of the road surface. The rapid road repair vehicle can repair surface imperfections at lower cost, improved quality, at a higher rate of speed than was not heretofor possible, with significantly reduced exposure to safety and health hazards associated with this kind of road repair activities in the past. 2 figs.

  7. Rapid road repair vehicle

    DOEpatents

    Mara, Leo M.

    1998-01-01

    Disclosed is a rapid road repair vehicle capable of moving over a surface to be repaired at near normal posted traffic speeds to scan for and find an the high rate of speed, imperfections in the pavement surface, prepare the surface imperfection for repair by air pressure and vacuum cleaning, applying a correct amount of the correct patching material to effect the repair, smooth the resulting repaired surface, and catalog the location and quality of the repairs for maintenance records of the road surface. The rapid road repair vehicle can repair surface imperfections at lower cost, improved quality, at a higher rate of speed than was was heretofor possible, with significantly reduced exposure to safety and health hazards associated with this kind of road repair activities in the past.

  8. Rapid climate change

    SciTech Connect

    Morantine, M.C.

    1995-12-31

    Interactions between insolation changes due to orbital parameter variations, carbon dioxide concentration variations, the rate of deep water formation in the North Atlantic and the evolution of the northern hemisphere ice sheets during the most recent glacial cycle will be investigated. In order to investigate this period, a climate model is being developed to evaluate the physical mechanisms thought to be most significant during this period. The description of the model sub-components will be presented. The more one knows about the interactions between the sub-components of the climate system during periods of documented rapid climate change, the better equipped one will be to make rational decisions on issues related to impacts on the environment. This will be an effort to gauge the feedback processes thought to be instrumental in rapid climate shifts documented in the past, and their potential to influence the current climate. 53 refs.

  9. High School Students' Meta-Modeling Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortus, David; Shwartz, Yael; Rosenfeld, Sherman

    2016-01-01

    Modeling is a core scientific practice. This study probed the meta-modeling knowledge (MMK) of high school students who study science but had not had any explicit prior exposure to modeling as part of their formal schooling. Our goals were to (A) evaluate the degree to which MMK is dependent on content knowledge and (B) assess whether the upper…

  10. Unemployment Impairs Mental Health: Meta-Analyses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paul, Karsten I.; Moser, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    The effect of unemployment on mental health was examined with meta-analytic methods across 237 cross-sectional and 87 longitudinal studies. The average overall effect size was d = 0.51 with unemployed persons showing more distress than employed persons. A significant difference was found for several indicator variables of mental health (mixed…

  11. Incorporating Quality Scores in Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahn, Soyeon; Becker, Betsy Jane

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the impact of quality-score weights in meta-analysis. A simulation examines the roles of study characteristics such as population effect size (ES) and its variance on the bias and mean square errors (MSEs) of the estimators for several patterns of relationship between quality and ES, and for specific patterns of systematic…

  12. A Bayesian Nonparametric Meta-Analysis Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karabatsos, George; Talbott, Elizabeth; Walker, Stephen G.

    2015-01-01

    In a meta-analysis, it is important to specify a model that adequately describes the effect-size distribution of the underlying population of studies. The conventional normal fixed-effect and normal random-effects models assume a normal effect-size population distribution, conditionally on parameters and covariates. For estimating the mean overall…

  13. [Meta-analysis and its synonyms].

    PubMed

    Meissner, Anne

    2008-02-01

    The purpose of meta-interpretive literature reviews is to combine the individual findings of different studies into a single, coherent analysis (here: meta-studies). The positions on how to handle that differ enormously. This is reflected in the variety of terms and definitions for synonym circumstances, e.g. "meta-analysis", "systematic review", "narrative review", "meta-syntheses". Also ambiguous is why in some cases the systematic is highlighted due to prefix the term "systematic", in others not. This article is part of a master thesis at the Institute of Nursing Science (University Witten/Herdecke, Germany). The aim of this article is to constitute the different opinions and put the terms in order. Illustrative examples of the synonymously used terms will therefore be identified and embedded in the underlying philosophies. It is assumed that the different positions result from the underlying philosophies. Further on there is evidence that "narrative" often wrongly is interpreted as the opposite to "systematic". The article concludes with options of how to put the terms in order. PMID:18478684

  14. Meta-Analysis of the Modality Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ginns, Paul

    2005-01-01

    This article reviews research on the modality effect, the educational practice of presenting to-be-learned graphical information visually, and related textual information through an auditory mode. Meta-analytic methods were applied to 43 independent effects (39 between-subjects designs, 4 within-subjects designs). Major hypotheses regarding the…

  15. Resilience: A Meta-Analytic Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Ji Hee; Nam, Suk Kyung; Kim, A-Reum; Kim, Boram; Lee, Min Young; Lee, Sang Min

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between psychological resilience and its relevant variables by using a meta-analytic method. The results indicated that the largest effect on resilience was found to stem from the protective factors, a medium effect from risk factors, and the smallest effect from demographic factors. (Contains 4 tables.)

  16. Organizational Identification: A Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riketta, Michael

    2005-01-01

    The last two decades have witnessed a surge in interest in research on organizational identification (OI). This paper presents a comprehensive meta-analysis of this research (k=96). Results indicate that (a) OI is correlated with a wide range of work-related attitudes, behaviors, and context variables, (b) OI is empirically distinct from its…

  17. Rapid Detection of Pathogens

    SciTech Connect

    David Perlin

    2005-08-14

    Pathogen identification is a crucial first defense against bioterrorism. A major emphasis of our national biodefense strategy is to establish fast, accurate and sensitive assays for diagnosis of infectious diseases agents. Such assays will ensure early and appropriate treatment of infected patients. Rapid diagnostics can also support infection control measures, which monitor and limit the spread of infectious diseases agents. Many select agents are highly transmissible in the early stages of disease, and it is critical to identify infected patients and limit the risk to the remainder of the population and to stem potential panic in the general population. Nucleic acid-based molecular approaches for identification overcome many of the deficiencies associated with conventional culture methods by exploiting both large- and small-scale genomic differences between organisms. PCR-based amplification of highly conserved ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes, intergenic sequences, and specific toxin genes is currently the most reliable approach for bacterial, fungal and many viral pathogenic agents. When combined with fluorescence-based oligonucleotide detection systems, this approach provides real-time, quantitative, high fidelity analysis capable of single nucleotide allelic discrimination (4). These probe systems offer rapid turn around time (<2 h) and are suitable for high throughput, automated multiplex operations that are critical for clinical diagnostic laboratories. In this pilot program, we have used molecular beacon technology invented at the Public health Research Institute to develop a new generation of molecular probes to rapidly detect important agents of infectious diseases. We have also developed protocols to rapidly extract nucleic acids from a variety of clinical specimen including and blood and tissue to for detection in the molecular assays. This work represented a cooperative research development program between the Kramer-Tyagi/Perlin labs on probe development

  18. Rapidly refuelable fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Joy, Richard W.

    1985-01-01

    A rapidly refuelable dual cell of an electrochemical type wherein a single anode cooperates with two cathodes and wherein the anode has a fixed position and the cathodes are urged toward opposite faces of the anodes at constant and uniform force. The associated cathodes are automatically retractable to permit the consumed anode remains to be removed from the housing and a new anode inserted between the two cathodes.

  19. New Rapid Spore Assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kminek, Gerhard; Conley, Catharine

    2012-07-01

    The presentation will detail approved Planetary Protection specifications for the Rapid Spore Assay for spacecraft components and subsystems. Outlined will be the research and studies on which the specifications were based. The research, funded by ESA and NASA/JPL, was conducted over a period of two years and was followed by limited cleanroom studies to assess the feasibility of this assay during spacecraft assembly.

  20. Rapidly refuelable fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Joy, R.W.

    1982-09-20

    A rapidly refuelable dual cell of an electrochemical type is described wherein a single anode cooperates with two cathodes and wherein the anode has a fixed position and the cathodes are urged toward opposite faces of the anodes at constant and uniform force. The associated cathodes are automatically retractable to permit the consumed anode remains to be removed from the housing and a new anode inserted between the two cathodes.

  1. Rapidly Progressive Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Geschwind, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of Review This article presents a practical and informative approach to the evaluation of a patient with a rapidly progressive dementia (RPD). Recent Findings Prion diseases are the prototypical causes of RPD, but reversible causes of RPD might mimic prion disease and should always be considered in a differential diagnosis. Aside from prion diseases, the most common causes of RPD are atypical presentations of other neurodegenerative disorders, curable disorders including autoimmune encephalopathies, as well as some infections, and neoplasms. Numerous recent case reports suggest dural arterial venous fistulas sometimes cause RPDs. Summary RPDs, in which patients typically develop dementia over weeks to months, require an alternative differential than the slowly progressive dementias that occur over a few years. Because of their rapid decline, patients with RPDs necessitate urgent evaluation and often require an extensive workup, typically with multiple tests being sent or performed concurrently. Jakob-Creutzfeldt disease, perhaps the prototypical RPD, is often the first diagnosis many neurologists consider when treating a patient with rapid cognitive decline. Many conditions other than prion disease, however, including numerous reversible or curable conditions, can present as an RPD. This chapter discusses some of the major etiologies for RPDs and offers an algorithm for diagnosis. PMID:27042906

  2. Rapid adhesive bonding concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, B. A.; Tyeryar, J. R.; Hodges, W. T.

    1984-01-01

    Adhesive bonding in the aerospace industry typically utilizes autoclaves or presses which have considerable thermal mass. As a consequence, the rates of heatup and cooldown of the bonded parts are limited and the total time and cost of the bonding process is often relatively high. Many of the adhesives themselves do not inherently require long processing times. Bonding could be performed rapidly if the heat was concentrated in the bond lines or at least in the adherends. Rapid adhesive bonding concepts were developed to utilize induction heating techniques to provide heat directly to the bond line and/or adherends without heating the entire structure, supports, and fixtures of a bonding assembly. Bonding times for specimens are cut by a factor of 10 to 100 compared to standard press bonding. The development of rapid adhesive bonding for lap shear specimens (per ASTM D1003 and D3163), for aerospace panel bonding, and for field repair needs of metallic and advanced fiber reinforced polymeric matrix composite structures are reviewed.

  3. Chemotherapy for Stage II Colon Cancer.

    PubMed

    Varghese, Anna

    2015-12-01

    The adjuvant treatment of patients with stage II colon cancer is an area of controversy in medical oncology. Adjuvant chemotherapy aims to eradicate micrometastatic disease present at the time of surgery, preventing the development of distant metastatic disease and thereby curing those patients of their cancer. National and international guidelines for the adjuvant treatment of stage II colon cancer recommend a range of treatment options from observation to chemotherapy with single-agent or combination regimens, depending on the presence or absence of high-risk features (poorly differentiated histology, presence of lymphovascular invasion, presence of perineural invasion, report of < 12 lymph nodes, bowel obstruction, localized perforation, or positive margins). In the one prospective study designed to address the role of adjuvant chemotherapy in stage II colon cancer, a small but statistically significant benefit in overall survival was seen for those patients who received adjuvant chemotherapy; however, multiple meta-analyses and retrospective subgroup analyses have called these findings into question. Though there may be a role for adjuvant chemotherapy in the treatment of patients with stage II colon cancer, its incremental benefit is small, at best, and comes with the risks of real and rarely fatal complications of chemotherapy. PMID:26648796

  4. MDMS: Molecular Dynamics Meta-Simulator for evaluating exchange type sampling methods.

    PubMed

    Smith, Daniel B; Okur, Asim; Brooks, Bernard

    2012-08-30

    Replica exchange methods have become popular tools to explore conformational space for small proteins. For larger biological systems, even with enhanced sampling methods, exploring the free energy landscape remains computationally challenging. This problem has led to the development of many improved replica exchange methods. Unfortunately, testing these methods remains expensive. We propose a Molecular Dynamics Meta-Simulator (MDMS) based on transition state theory to simulate a replica exchange simulation, eliminating the need to run explicit dynamics between exchange attempts. MDMS simulations allow for rapid testing of new replica exchange based methods, greatly reducing the amount of time needed for new method development.

  5. Prevalence of Frailty in Latin America and the Caribbean: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Priscilla Perez da Silva; de Andrade, Keitty Regina Cordeiro; Figueiredo, Ana Claudia Morais Godoy

    2016-01-01

    Background Countries in Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) have experienced a rapid increase in their proportion of older people. This region is marked by a high prevalence of chronic diseases and disabilities among aging adults. Frailty appears in the context of LAC negatively affecting quality of life among many older people. Aim To investigate the prevalence of frailty among community-dwelling older people in LAC through a systematic review and meta-analysis. Methods A literature search was performed in indexed databases and in the grey literature. Studies investigating the prevalence of frailty with representative samples of community-dwelling older people in Latin America and the Caribbean were retrieved. Independent investigators carried out the study selection process and the data extraction. A meta-analysis and meta-regression were performed using STATA 11 software. The systematic review was registered at the International Prospective Register of Systematic Reviews under the number CRD42014015203. Results A total of 29 studies and 43,083 individuals were included in the systematic review. The prevalence of frailty was 19.6% (95% CI: 15.4–24.3%) in the investigated region, with a range of 7.7% to 42.6% in the studies reviewed. The year of data collection influenced the heterogeneity between the studies. Conclusion Frailty is very common among older people in LAC. As a result, countries in the region need to adapt their health and social care systems to demands of an older population. PMID:27500953

  6. A Meta-Analysis of the Impacts of Genetically Modified Crops

    PubMed Central

    Klümper, Wilhelm; Qaim, Matin

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite the rapid adoption of genetically modified (GM) crops by farmers in many countries, controversies about this technology continue. Uncertainty about GM crop impacts is one reason for widespread public suspicion. Objective We carry out a meta-analysis of the agronomic and economic impacts of GM crops to consolidate the evidence. Data Sources Original studies for inclusion were identified through keyword searches in ISI Web of Knowledge, Google Scholar, EconLit, and AgEcon Search. Study Eligibility Criteria Studies were included when they build on primary data from farm surveys or field trials anywhere in the world, and when they report impacts of GM soybean, maize, or cotton on crop yields, pesticide use, and/or farmer profits. In total, 147 original studies were included. Synthesis Methods Analysis of mean impacts and meta-regressions to examine factors that influence outcomes. Results On average, GM technology adoption has reduced chemical pesticide use by 37%, increased crop yields by 22%, and increased farmer profits by 68%. Yield gains and pesticide reductions are larger for insect-resistant crops than for herbicide-tolerant crops. Yield and profit gains are higher in developing countries than in developed countries. Limitations Several of the original studies did not report sample sizes and measures of variance. Conclusion The meta-analysis reveals robust evidence of GM crop benefits for farmers in developed and developing countries. Such evidence may help to gradually increase public trust in this technology. PMID:25365303

  7. Effects of exercise intervention in breast cancer survivors: a meta-analysis of 33 randomized controlled trails

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Guoqing; Zhang, Xiao; Wang, Yulan; Xiong, Huizi; Zhao, Yinghui; Sun, Fenyong

    2016-01-01

    Background Exercise is associated with favorable outcomes in cancer survivors. The purpose of this meta-analysis is to comprehensively summarize the effects of exercise intervention in breast cancer survivors. Methods A systematic search of PubMed, Elsevier, and Google scholar was conducted up to March 2015. References from relevant meta-analyses and reviews were also checked. Results Thirty-three randomized controlled trials were included in this meta-analysis, including 2,659 breast cancer survivors. Compared with the control group, quality of life was significantly improved in exercise intervention group, especially in mental health and general health subscales of short form 36 questionnaire, as well as emotion well-being and social well-being subscales of the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy. Besides, exercise alleviated the symptoms of depression and anxiety in the exercise group. Furthermore, exercise was also associated with positive outcomes in body mass index, lean mass, and muscle strength. In addition, the serum concentration of insulin, insulin-like growth factor-II, and insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1 was significantly reduced in exercise intervention group. However, based on the current data of this meta-analysis, there were no significant differences in sleep dysfunction or fatigue between groups. Conclusion Our study suggested that exercise intervention was beneficial to breast cancer survivors. Therefore, exercise should be recommended to this patient group. PMID:27110131

  8. A meta-analysis on pain sensitivity in self-injury.

    PubMed

    Koenig, J; Thayer, J F; Kaess, M

    2016-06-01

    Individuals engaging in self-injurious behavior (SIB) frequently report absence of pain during acts of SIB. While altered pain sensitivity is discussed as a risk factor for the engagement in SIB, results have been mixed with considerable variance across reported effect sizes, in particular with respect to the effect of co-morbid psychopathology. The present meta-analysis aimed to summarize the current evidence on pain sensitivity in individuals engaging in SIB and to identify covariates of altered pain processing. Three databases were searched without restrictions. Additionally a hand search was performed and reference lists of included studies were checked for potential studies eligible for inclusion. Thirty-two studies were identified after screening 720 abstracts by two independent reviewers. Studies were included if they reported (i) an empirical investigation, in (ii) humans, including a sample of individuals engaging in (iii) SIB and a group of (iv) healthy controls, (v) receiving painful stimulation. Random-effects meta-analysis was performed on three pain-related outcomes (pain threshold, pain tolerance, pain intensity) and several population- and study-level covariates (i.e. age, sex, clinical etiology) were subjected to meta-regression. Meta-analysis revealed significant main effects associated with medium to large effect sizes for all included outcomes. Individuals engaging in SIB show greater pain threshold and tolerance and report less pain intensity compared to healthy controls. Clinical etiology and age are significant covariates of pain sensitivity in individuals engaging in SIB, such that pain threshold is further increased in borderline personality disorder compared to non-suicidal self-injury. Mechanisms underlying altered pain sensitivity are discussed.

  9. MetaSee: An Interactive and Extendable Visualization Toolbox for Metagenomic Sample Analysis and Comparison

    PubMed Central

    Song, Baoxing; Su, Xiaoquan; Xu, Jian; Ning, Kang

    2012-01-01

    The NGS (next generation sequencing)-based metagenomic data analysis is becoming the mainstream for the study of microbial communities. Faced with a large amount of data in metagenomic research, effective data visualization is important for scientists to effectively explore, interpret and manipulate such rich information. The visualization of the metagenomic data, especially multi-sample data, is one of the most critical challenges. The different data sample sources, sequencing approaches and heterogeneous data formats make robust and seamless data visualization difficult. Moreover, researchers have different focuses on metagenomic studies: taxonomical or functional, sample-centric or genome-centric, single sample or multiple samples, etc. However, current efforts in metagenomic data visualization cannot fulfill all of these needs, and it is extremely hard to organize all of these visualization effects in a systematic manner. An extendable, interactive visualization tool would be the method of choice to fulfill all of these visualization needs. In this paper, we have present MetaSee, an extendable toolbox that facilitates the interactive visualization of metagenomic samples of interests. The main components of MetaSee include: (I) a core visualization engine that is composed of different views for comparison of multiple samples: Global view, Phylogenetic view, Sample view and Taxa view, as well as link-out for more in-depth analysis; (II) front-end user interface with real metagenomic models that connect to the above core visualization engine and (III) open-source portal for the development of plug-ins for MetaSee. This integrative visualization tool not only provides the visualization effects, but also enables researchers to perform in-depth analysis of the metagenomic samples of interests. Moreover, its open-source portal allows for the design of plug-ins for MetaSee, which would facilitate the development of any additional visualization effects. PMID:23145044

  10. A meta-analysis on pain sensitivity in self-injury.

    PubMed

    Koenig, J; Thayer, J F; Kaess, M

    2016-06-01

    Individuals engaging in self-injurious behavior (SIB) frequently report absence of pain during acts of SIB. While altered pain sensitivity is discussed as a risk factor for the engagement in SIB, results have been mixed with considerable variance across reported effect sizes, in particular with respect to the effect of co-morbid psychopathology. The present meta-analysis aimed to summarize the current evidence on pain sensitivity in individuals engaging in SIB and to identify covariates of altered pain processing. Three databases were searched without restrictions. Additionally a hand search was performed and reference lists of included studies were checked for potential studies eligible for inclusion. Thirty-two studies were identified after screening 720 abstracts by two independent reviewers. Studies were included if they reported (i) an empirical investigation, in (ii) humans, including a sample of individuals engaging in (iii) SIB and a group of (iv) healthy controls, (v) receiving painful stimulation. Random-effects meta-analysis was performed on three pain-related outcomes (pain threshold, pain tolerance, pain intensity) and several population- and study-level covariates (i.e. age, sex, clinical etiology) were subjected to meta-regression. Meta-analysis revealed significant main effects associated with medium to large effect sizes for all included outcomes. Individuals engaging in SIB show greater pain threshold and tolerance and report less pain intensity compared to healthy controls. Clinical etiology and age are significant covariates of pain sensitivity in individuals engaging in SIB, such that pain threshold is further increased in borderline personality disorder compared to non-suicidal self-injury. Mechanisms underlying altered pain sensitivity are discussed. PMID:26964517

  11. Right-Rapid-Rough

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawrence, Craig

    2003-01-01

    IDEO (pronounced 'eye-dee-oh') is an international design, engineering, and innovation firm that has developed thousands of products and services for clients across a wide range of industries. Its process and culture attracted the attention of academics, businesses, and journalists around the world, and are the subject of a bestselling book, The Art of Innovation by Tom Kelley. One of the keys to IDEO's success is its use of prototyping as a tool for rapid innovation. This story covers some of IDEO's projects, and gives reasons for why they were successful.

  12. Rapid and Quiet Drill

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherrit, Stewart; Badescu, Mircea; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Chang, Zensheu; Bao, Xiaoqi

    2007-01-01

    This describes aspects of the rapid and quiet drill (RAQD), which is a prototype apparatus for drilling concrete or bricks. The design and basic principle of operation of the RAQD overlap, in several respects, with those of ultrasonic/ sonic drilling and coring apparatuses described in a number of previous NASA Tech Briefs articles. The main difference is that whereas the actuation scheme of the prior apparatuses is partly ultrasonic and partly sonic, the actuation scheme of the RAQD is purely ultrasonic. Hence, even though the RAQD generates considerable sound, it is characterized as quiet because most or all of the sound is above the frequency range of human hearing.

  13. Rapid prototype and test

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory, D.L.; Hansche, B.D.

    1996-06-01

    In order to support advanced manufacturing, Sandia has acquired the capability to produce plastic prototypes using stereolithography. Currently, these prototypes are used mainly to verify part geometry and ``fit and form`` checks. This project investigates methods for rapidly testing these plastic prototypes, and inferring from prototype test data actual metal part performance and behavior. Performances examined include static load/stress response, and structural dynamic (modal) and vibration behavior. The integration of advanced non-contacting measurement techniques including scanning laser velocimetry, laser holography, and thermoelasticity into testing of these prototypes is described. Photoelastic properties of the epoxy prototypes to reveal full field stress/strain fields are also explored.

  14. Association between individual differences in non-symbolic number acuity and math performance: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qixuan; Li, Jingguang

    2014-05-01

    Many recent studies have examined the association between number acuity, which is the ability to rapidly and non-symbolically estimate the quantity of items appearing in a scene, and symbolic math performance. However, various contradictory results have been reported. To comprehensively evaluate the association between number acuity and symbolic math performance, we conduct a meta-analysis to synthesize the results observed in previous studies. First, a meta-analysis of cross-sectional studies (36 samples, N = 4705) revealed a significant positive correlation between these skills (r = 0.20, 95% CI = [0.14, 0.26]); the association remained after considering other potential moderators (e.g., whether general cognitive abilities were controlled). Moreover, a meta-analysis of longitudinal studies revealed 1) that number acuity may prospectively predict later math performance (r = 0.24, 95% CI = [0.11, 0.37]; 6 samples) and 2) that number acuity is retrospectively correlated to early math performance as well (r = 0.17, 95% CI = [0.07, 0.26]; 5 samples). In summary, these pieces of evidence demonstrate a moderate but statistically significant association between number acuity and math performance. Based on the estimated effect sizes, power analyses were conducted, which suggested that many previous studies were underpowered due to small sample sizes. This may account for the disparity between findings in the literature, at least in part. Finally, the theoretical and practical implications of our meta-analytic findings are presented, and future research questions are discussed.

  15. Extinction, reintroduction, and restoration of a lizard meta-population equilibrium in the Missouri Ozarks.

    PubMed

    Sites, Jack W

    2013-07-01

    In this issue of Molecular Ecology, Neuwald & Templeton (2013) report on a 22-year study of natural populations of Collared Lizards (Crotaphytus collaris) that evolved on isolated on rock outcrops (‘glades’) in the Ozark Mountains in eastern Missouri. This ecosystem was originally maintained by frequent fires that kept the forest understory open, but fire-suppression was adopted as official policy in about 1945, which led to a loss of native biodiversity, including local extinctions of some lizard populations. Policies aimed at restoring biodiversity included controlled burns and re-introductions of lizards to some glades, which began in 1984. Populations were monitored from 1984–2006, and demographic and genetic data collected from 1 679 lizards were used to documents shifts in meta-population dynamics over four distinct phases of lizard recovery: 1–an initial translocation of lizards drawn from the same source populations onto three glades that were likely part of one metapopulation; 2–a period of isolation and genetic drift associated with the absence of fires; 3–a period of rapid colonization and population increase following restoration of fire; and 4–stabilization of the meta-population under regular prescribed burning. This study system thus provides a rare opportunity to characterize the dynamics of a landscape-scale management strategy on the restoration of the meta-population of a reintroduced species; long-term case studies of the extinction, founding, increase, and stabilization of a well-defined meta-population, based on both demographic and population genetic data, are rare in the conservation, ecological, and evolutionary literature.

  16. A Meta-Meta-Analysis: Empirical Review of Statistical Power, Type I Error Rates, Effect Sizes, and Model Selection of Meta-Analyses Published in Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cafri, Guy; Kromrey, Jeffrey D.; Brannick, Michael T.

    2010-01-01

    This article uses meta-analyses published in "Psychological Bulletin" from 1995 to 2005 to describe meta-analyses in psychology, including examination of statistical power, Type I errors resulting from multiple comparisons, and model choice. Retrospective power estimates indicated that univariate categorical and continuous moderators, individual…

  17. Rapid Decisions From Experience

    PubMed Central

    Zeigenfuse, Matthew D.; Pleskac, Timothy J.; Liu, Taosheng

    2014-01-01

    In many everyday decisions, people quickly integrate noisy samples of information to form a preference among alternatives that offer uncertain rewards. Here, we investigated this decision process using the Flash Gambling Task (FGT), in which participants made a series of choices between a certain payoff and an uncertain alternative that produced a normal distribution of payoffs. For each choice, participants experienced the distribution of payoffs via rapid samples updated every 50 ms. We show that people can make these rapid decisions from experience and that the decision process is consistent with a sequential sampling process. Results also reveal a dissociation between these preferential decisions and equivalent perceptual decisions where participants had to determine which alternatives contained more dots on average. To account for this dissociation, we developed a sequential sampling rank-dependent utility model, which showed that participants in the FGT attended more to larger potential payoffs than participants in the perceptual task despite being given equivalent information. We discuss the implications of these findings in terms of computational models of preferential choice and a more complete understanding of experience-based decision making. PMID:24549141

  18. "Meta Elimination," a Diagnostic Fragmentation in Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attygalle, Athula B.; Nishshanka, Upul; Weisbecker, Carl S.

    2011-09-01

    The diagnostic value of the "ortho effect" for unknown identification by mass spectrometry is well known. Here, we report the existence of a novel "meta effect," which adds to the repertoire of useful mass spectrometric fragmentation mechanisms. For example, the meta-specific elimination pathway described in this report enables unequivocal identification of meta isomers from ortho and para isomers of carboxyanilides. The reaction follows a specific path to eliminate a molecule of meta-benzyne, from the anion produced after the initial decarboxylation of the precursor. Consequently, in the CID spectra of carboxyanilides, a peak for the (R-CO-NH)- anion is observed only for the meta isomers. For example, the peaks observed at m/z 58, 86, 120, 128, and 170 from acetamido-, butamido-, benzamido, heptamido-, and decanamido-benzoates, respectively, were specific only to the spectra of meta isomers.

  19. Finding meta data in speech and handwriting biometrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vielhauer, Claus; Basu, T. K.; Dittmann, Jana; Dutta, Pranab K.

    2005-03-01

    The goal of this paper is to present our work on the analysis of speech and handwriting biometrics related to meta data, which are based on one side on system hardware specifics (technical meta data) and on the other side to personal attributes (non-technical meta data). System related meta data represent physical characteristics of biometric sensors and are essential for ensuring comparable quality of the biometric raw signals. Previous work in personal related meta data has shown that it is possible to estimate some meta data like script language, dialect, origin, gender and age by statistically analyzing human handwriting and voice data. On one hand, by knowing both kinds of such meta data, it appears to be possible to adapt the recognition or authentication algorithms in order to enhance their recognition accuracy and to analyze the sensor dependency of biometric algorithms with respect to hardware properties such as sampling resolution. On the other hand, interesting aspects are to evaluate, if cultural characteristics (such as native language, or ethnicity) can be derived by statistical or analytical means from voice or handwriting dynamics and to which degree grouping of users by persons with identical or similar meta data may result in better biometric recognition accuracy. All these aspects have been widely neglected by research until today. This article will discuss approaches to model such meta data and strategies for finding features by introducing a new meta data taxonomy, from which we derive those personal and system attributes related to the cultural background, which are employed in our experimental evaluation. Further, we describe the test methodology used for our experimental evaluation in different cultural regions of India and Europe and present first results for sensor hardware related meta data in handwriting biometrics as well as language related meta data in speaker recognition.

  20. Aggravated phosphorus limitation on biomass production under increasing nitrogen loading: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Yong; Niu, Shuli; Yu, Guirui

    2016-02-01

    Nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P), either individually or in combination, have been demonstrated to limit biomass production in terrestrial ecosystems. Field studies have been extensively synthesized to assess global patterns of N impacts on terrestrial ecosystem processes. However, to our knowledge, no synthesis has been done so far to reveal global patterns of P impacts on terrestrial ecosystems, especially under different nitrogen (N) levels. Here, we conducted a meta-analysis of impacts of P addition, either alone or with N addition, on aboveground (AGB) and belowground biomass production (BGB), plant and soil P concentrations, and N : P ratio in terrestrial ecosystems. Overall, our meta-analysis quantitatively confirmed existing notions: (i) colimitation of N and P on biomass production and (ii) more P limitation in tropical forest than other ecosystems. More importantly, our analysis revealed new findings: (i) P limitation on biomass production was aggravated by N enrichment and (ii) plant P concentration was a better indicator of P limitation than soil P availability. Specifically, P addition increased AGB and BGB by 34% and 13%, respectively. The effect size of P addition on biomass production was larger in tropical forest than grassland, wetland, and tundra and varied with P fertilizer forms, P addition rates, or experimental durations. The P-induced increase in biomass production and plant P concentration was larger under elevated than ambient N. Our findings suggest that the global limitation of P on biomass production will become severer under increasing N fertilizer and deposition in the future.

  1. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder

    PubMed Central

    Neale, Benjamin M; Medland, Sarah E.; Ripke, Stephan; Asherson, Philip; Franke, Barbara; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Faraone, Stephen V.; Nguyen, Thuy Trang; Schäfer, Helmut; Holmans, Peter; Daly, Mark; Steinhausen, Hans-Christoph; Freitag, Christine; Reif, Andreas; Renner, Tobias J.; Romanos, Marcel; Romanos, Jasmin; Walitza, Susanne; Warnke, Andreas; Meyer, Jobst; Palmason, Haukur; Buitelaar, Jan; Vasquez, Alejandro Arias; Lambregts-Rommelse, Nanda; Gill, Michael; Anney, Richard J.L.; Langely, Kate; O’Donovan, Michael; Williams, Nigel; Owen, Michael; Thapar, Anita; Kent, Lindsey; Sergeant, Joseph; Roeyers, Herbert; Mick, Eric; Biederman, Joseph; Doyle, Alysa; Smalley, Susan; Loo, Sandra; Hakonarson, Hakon; Elia, Josephine; Todorov, Alexandre; Miranda, Ana; Mulas, Fernando; Ebstein, Richard P.; Rothenberger, Aribert; Banaschewski, Tobias; Oades, Robert D.; Sonuga-Barke, Edmund; McGough, James; Nisenbaum, Laura; Middleton, Frank; Hu, Xiaolan; Nelson, Stan

    2010-01-01

    Objective Although twin and family studies have shown Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) to be highly heritable, genetic variants influencing the trait at a genome-wide significant level have yet to be identified. As prior genome-wide association scans (GWAS) have not yielded significant results, we conducted a meta-analysis of existing studies to boost statistical power. Method We used data from four projects: a) the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP), b) phase I of the International Multicenter ADHD Genetics project (IMAGE), c) phase II of IMAGE (IMAGE II), and d) the Pfizer funded study from the University of California, Los Angeles, Washington University and the Massachusetts General Hospital (PUWMa). The final sample size consisted of 2,064 trios, 896 cases and 2,455 controls. For each study, we imputed HapMap SNPs, computed association test statistics and transformed them to Z-scores, and then combined weighted Z-scores in a meta-analysis. Results No genome-wide significant associations were found, although an analysis of candidate genes suggests they may be involved in the disorder. Conclusions Given that ADHD is a highly heritable disorder, our negative results suggest that the effects of common ADHD risk variants must, individually, be very small or that other types of variants, e.g. rare ones, account for much of the disorder’s heritability. PMID:20732625

  2. Options for a Health System Researcher to Choose in Meta Review (MR) Approaches-Meta Narrative (MN) and Meta Triangulation (MT).

    PubMed

    Davey, Sanjeev; Davey, Anuradha; Singh, Jai Vir

    2015-01-01

    Two new approaches in systematic reviewing i.e. Meta-narrative review(MNR) (which a health researcher can use for topics which are differently conceptualized and studied by different types of researchers for policy decisions) and Meta-triangulation review(MTR) (done to build theory for studying multifaceted phenomena characterized by expansive and contested research domains) are ready for penetration in an arena of health system research. So critical look at which approach in Meta-review is better i.e. Meta-narrative review or Meta-triangulation review, can give new insights to a health system researcher. A systematic review on 2 key words-"meta-narrative review" and "meta-triangulation review" in health system research, were searched from key search engines, such as Pubmed, Cochrane library, Bio-med Central and Google Scholar etc till 21st March 2014 since last 20 years. Studies from both developed and developing world were included in any form and scope to draw final conclusions. However unpublished data from thesis was not included in systematic review. Meta-narrative review is a type of systematic review which can be used for a wide range of topics and questions involving making judgments and inferences in public health. On the other hand Meta-triangulation review is a three-phased, qualitative meta-analysis process which can be used to explore variations in the assumptions of alternative paradigms, gain insights into these multiple paradigms at one point of time and addresses emerging themes and the resulting theories.

  3. Options for a Health System Researcher to Choose in Meta Review (MR) Approaches-Meta Narrative (MN) and Meta Triangulation (MT)

    PubMed Central

    Davey, Sanjeev; Davey, Anuradha; Singh, Jai Vir

    2015-01-01

    Two new approaches in systematic reviewing i.e. Meta-narrative review(MNR) (which a health researcher can use for topics which are differently conceptualized and studied by different types of researchers for policy decisions) and Meta-triangulation review(MTR) (done to build theory for studying multifaceted phenomena characterized by expansive and contested research domains) are ready for penetration in an arena of health system research. So critical look at which approach in Meta-review is better i.e. Meta-narrative review or Meta-triangulation review, can give new insights to a health system researcher. A systematic review on 2 key words-“meta-narrative review” and “meta-triangulation review” in health system research, were searched from key search engines, such as Pubmed, Cochrane library, Bio-med Central and Google Scholar etc till 21st March 2014 since last 20 years. Studies from both developed and developing world were included in any form and scope to draw final conclusions. However unpublished data from thesis was not included in systematic review. Meta-narrative review is a type of systematic review which can be used for a wide range of topics and questions involving making judgments and inferences in public health. On the other hand Meta-triangulation review is a three-phased, qualitative meta-analysis process which can be used to explore variations in the assumptions of alternative paradigms, gain insights into these multiple paradigms at one point of time and addresses emerging themes and the resulting theories. PMID:26170537

  4. Ruthenium-Catalyzed meta-Selective C—H Bromination

    PubMed Central

    Teskey, Christopher J; Lui, Andrew Y W; Greaney, Michael F

    2015-01-01

    The first example of a transition-metal-catalyzed, meta-selective C–H bromination procedure is reported. In the presence of catalytic [{Ru(p-cymene)Cl2}2], tetrabutylammonium tribromide can be used to functionalize the meta C–H bond of 2-phenylpyridine derivatives, thus affording difficult to access products which are highly predisposed to further derivatization. We demonstrate this utility with one-pot bromination/arylation and bromination/alkenylation procedures to deliver meta-arylated and meta-alkenylated products, respectively, in a single step. PMID:26288217

  5. Sample size calculation for meta-epidemiological studies.

    PubMed

    Giraudeau, Bruno; Higgins, Julian P T; Tavernier, Elsa; Trinquart, Ludovic

    2016-01-30

    Meta-epidemiological studies are used to compare treatment effect estimates between randomized clinical trials with and without a characteristic of interest. To our knowledge, there is presently nothing to help researchers to a priori specify the required number of meta-analyses to be included in a meta-epidemiological study. We derived a theoretical power function and sample size formula in the framework of a hierarchical model that allows for variation in the impact of the characteristic between trials within a meta-analysis and between meta-analyses. A simulation study revealed that the theoretical function overestimated power (because of the assumption of equal weights for each trial within and between meta-analyses). We also propose a simulation approach that allows for relaxing the constraints used in the theoretical approach and is more accurate. We illustrate that the two variables that mostly influence power are the number of trials per meta-analysis and the proportion of trials with the characteristic of interest. We derived a closed-form power function and sample size formula for estimating the impact of trial characteristics in meta-epidemiological studies. Our analytical results can be used as a 'rule of thumb' for sample size calculation for a meta-epidemiologic study. A more accurate sample size can be derived with a simulation study.

  6. Risk assessment meta tool LDRD final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Bouchard, Ann Marie; Osbourn, Gordon Cecil

    2006-12-01

    The goal of this project was to develop a risk analysis meta tool--a tool that enables security analysts both to combine and analyze data from multiple other risk assessment tools on demand. Our approach was based on the innovative self-assembling software technology under development by the project team. This technology provides a mechanism for the user to specify his intentions at a very high level (e.g., equations or English-like text), and then the code self-assembles itself, taking care of the implementation details. The first version of the meta tool focused specifically in importing and analyzing data from Joint Conflict and Tactical Simulation (JCATS) force-on-force simulation. We discuss the problem, our approach, technical risk, and accomplishments on this project, and outline next steps to be addressed with follow-on funding.

  7. Distributed job scheduling in MetaCentrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tóth, Šimon; Ruda, Miroslav

    2015-05-01

    MetaCentrum - The Czech National Grid provides access to various resources across the Czech Republic. The utilized resource management and scheduling system is based on a heavily modified version of the Torque Batch System. This open source resource manager is maintained in a local fork and was extended to facilitate the requirements of such a large installation. This paper provides an overview of unique features deployed in MetaCentrum. Notably, we describe our distributed setup that encompasses several standalone independent servers while still maintaining full cooperative scheduling across the grid. We also present the benefits of our virtualized infrastructure that enables our schedulers to dynamically request ondemand virtual machines, that are then used to facilitate the varied requirements of users in our system, as well as enabling support for user requested virtual clusters that can be further interconnected using a private VLAN.

  8. Chiral meta-atoms rotated by light

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Mingkai; Powell, David A.; Shadrivov, Ilya V.

    2012-07-16

    We study the opto-mechanical properties of coupled chiral meta-atoms based on a pair of twisted split-ring resonators. By using a simple analytical model in conjunction with the Maxwell stress tensor, we capture insight into the mechanism and find that this structure can be used as a general prototype of subwavelength light-driven actuators over a wide range of frequencies. This coupled structure can provide a strong and tunable torque, and can support different opto-mechanical modes, including uniform rotation, periodically variable rotation and damped oscillations. Our results suggest that chiral meta-atoms are good candidates for creating sub-wavelength motors or wrenches controlled by light.

  9. Topological mechanics of gyroscopic meta-materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irvine, William

    Topological mechanical meta-materials are artificial structures whose unusual properties are protected very much like their electronic and optical counterparts. I will present an experimental and theoretical study of a new kind of active meta-material comprised of coupled gyroscopes on a lattice that breaks time-reversal symmetry. The vibrational spectrum displays a sonic gap populated by topologically protected edge modes which propagate in only one direction and are unaffected by disorder. We observe these edge modes in experiment and verify their robustness to disorder and the insertion of obstacles. Controlled distortions of the underlying lattice can induce a topological phase transition that switches the edge mode chirality. This effect allows the direction of the edge current to be determined on demand.

  10. Multiplicative interaction in network meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Piepho, Hans-Peter; Madden, Laurence V; Williams, Emlyn R

    2015-02-20

    Meta-analysis of a set of clinical trials is usually conducted using a linear predictor with additive effects representing treatments and trials. Additivity is a strong assumption. In this paper, we consider models for two or more treatments that involve multiplicative terms for interaction between treatment and trial. Multiplicative models provide information on the sensitivity of each treatment effect relative to the trial effect. In developing these models, we make use of a two-way analysis-of-variance approach to meta-analysis and consider fixed or random trial effects. It is shown using two examples that models with multiplicative terms may fit better than purely additive models and provide insight into the nature of the trial effect. We also show how to model inconsistency using multiplicative terms.

  11. RAVE: Rapid Visualization Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klumpar, D. M.; Anderson, Kevin; Simoudis, Avangelos

    1994-01-01

    Visualization is used in the process of analyzing large, multidimensional data sets. However, the selection and creation of visualizations that are appropriate for the characteristics of a particular data set and the satisfaction of the analyst's goals is difficult. The process consists of three tasks that are performed iteratively: generate, test, and refine. The performance of these tasks requires the utilization of several types of domain knowledge that data analysts do not often have. Existing visualization systems and frameworks do not adequately support the performance of these tasks. In this paper we present the RApid Visualization Environment (RAVE), a knowledge-based system that interfaces with commercial visualization frameworks and assists a data analyst in quickly and easily generating, testing, and refining visualizations. RAVE was used for the visualization of in situ measurement data captured by spacecraft.

  12. Rapid shallow breathing index

    PubMed Central

    Karthika, Manjush; Al Enezi, Farhan A.; Pillai, Lalitha V.; Arabi, Yaseen M.

    2016-01-01

    Predicting successful liberation of patients from mechanical ventilation has been a focus of interest to clinicians practicing in intensive care. Various weaning indices have been investigated to identify an optimal weaning window. Among them, the rapid shallow breathing index (RSBI) has gained wide use due to its simple technique and avoidance of calculation of complex pulmonary mechanics. Since its first description, several modifications have been suggested, such as the serial measurements and the rate of change of RSBI, to further improve its predictive value. The objective of this paper is to review the utility of RSBI in predicting weaning success. In addition, the use of RSBI in specific patient populations and the reported modifications of RSBI technique that attempt to improve the utility of RSBI are also reviewed. PMID:27512505

  13. Rapid Polymer Sequencer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stolc, Viktor (Inventor); Brock, Mathew W. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Method and system for rapid and accurate determination of each of a sequence of unknown polymer components, such as nucleic acid components. A self-assembling monolayer of a selected substance is optionally provided on an interior surface of a pipette tip, and the interior surface is immersed in a selected liquid. A selected electrical field is impressed in a longitudinal or transverse direction at the tip, a polymer sequence is passed through the tip, and a change in an electrical current signal is measured as each polymer component passes through the tip. Each measured change in electrical current signals is compared with a database of reference signals, with each reference signal identified with a polymer component, to identify the unknown polymer component. The tip preferably has a pore inner diameter of no more than about 40 nm and is prepared by heating and pulling a very small section of a glass tubing.

  14. rapidMCR

    2011-11-04

    rapidMCR is a user friendly software package that includes automatic preprocessing, analysis, and viewing of hyperspectral image data sets. Currently, this software package specifically preprocesses and analyzes hyperspectral fluorescence image data sets that have been created on Sandia hyperspectral imaging microscopes; however, this software can be modified to include spectroscopic image data sets from other (non-Sandia developed) instruments as well. This software relies on using prior information about the spectroscopic image data sets by conductingmore » a rigorous characterization of the instrument. By characterizing the instrument for noise and artifacts, we can implement our algorithms to account for the effects specific to a particular instrument. This allows us to automate the data preprocessing while improving the analysis results.« less

  15. rapidMCR

    SciTech Connect

    2011-11-04

    rapidMCR is a user friendly software package that includes automatic preprocessing, analysis, and viewing of hyperspectral image data sets. Currently, this software package specifically preprocesses and analyzes hyperspectral fluorescence image data sets that have been created on Sandia hyperspectral imaging microscopes; however, this software can be modified to include spectroscopic image data sets from other (non-Sandia developed) instruments as well. This software relies on using prior information about the spectroscopic image data sets by conducting a rigorous characterization of the instrument. By characterizing the instrument for noise and artifacts, we can implement our algorithms to account for the effects specific to a particular instrument. This allows us to automate the data preprocessing while improving the analysis results.

  16. Rapid shallow breathing index.

    PubMed

    Karthika, Manjush; Al Enezi, Farhan A; Pillai, Lalitha V; Arabi, Yaseen M

    2016-01-01

    Predicting successful liberation of patients from mechanical ventilation has been a focus of interest to clinicians practicing in intensive care. Various weaning indices have been investigated to identify an optimal weaning window. Among them, the rapid shallow breathing index (RSBI) has gained wide use due to its simple technique and avoidance of calculation of complex pulmonary mechanics. Since its first description, several modifications have been suggested, such as the serial measurements and the rate of change of RSBI, to further improve its predictive value. The objective of this paper is to review the utility of RSBI in predicting weaning success. In addition, the use of RSBI in specific patient populations and the reported modifications of RSBI technique that attempt to improve the utility of RSBI are also reviewed. PMID:27512505

  17. Rapidly progressive silicon nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Bolton, W K; Suratt, P M; Strugill, B C

    1981-11-01

    Rapidly progressive renal failure developed in four patients with silica exposure. Three presented with manifestations of a connective tissue disorders. All had abnormal proteinuria, hypoalbuminemia and active urinary sediments. Histologically, a distinct constellation of findings was present, consisting of glomerular hypercellularity and sclerosis, crescents, interstitial cellular infiltrates and tubular necrosis with red cell casts as seen on light microscopy. On electron microscopy there was foot process obliteration, characteristic cytoplasmic dense lysosomes, microtubules and dense deposits. Despite vigorous treatment, two patients died of the systemic illness and one is on hemodialysis. The fourth is improved after pulse methylprednisolone therapy. We propose that silica induced this multisystem disease through activation of the immune system and a direct tissue toxic effect.

  18. Solid state rapid thermocycling

    SciTech Connect

    Beer, Neil Reginald; Spadaccini, Christopher

    2014-05-13

    The rapid thermal cycling of a material is targeted. A solid state heat exchanger with a first well and second well is coupled to a power module. A thermoelectric element is coupled to the first well, the second well, and the power module, is configured to transfer thermal energy from the first well to the second well when current from the power module flows through the thermoelectric element in a first direction, and is configured to transfer thermal energy from the second well to the first well when current from the power module flows through the thermoelectric element in a second direction. A controller may be coupled to the thermoelectric elements, and may switch the direction of current flowing through the thermoelectric element in response to a determination by sensors coupled to the wells that the amount of thermal energy in the wells falls below or exceeds a pre-determined threshold.

  19. Diet for rapid weight loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... diet; VLCD; Low-calorie diet; LCD; Very low energy diet; Weight loss - rapid weight loss; Overweight - rapid ... AM, Aveyard P. Clinical effectiveness of very-low-energy diets in the management of weight loss: a ...

  20. Influence of different mineral and Organic pesticide treatments on Cd(II), Cu(II), Pb(II), and Zn(II) contents determined by derivative potentiometric stripping analysis in Italian white and red wines.

    PubMed

    Salvo, Francesco; La Pera, Lara; Di Bella, Giuseppa; Nicotina, Mariano; Dugo, Giacomo

    2003-02-12

    This paper deals with the use of derivative potentiometric stripping analysis (dPSA) as a rapid and precise method to determine Cd(II), Cu(II), Pb(II), and Zn(II) levels in red and white wine samples from Sicily, Campania, and Tuscany and to investigate the possible connection between the content of these metals and the pesticide treatments used in vine-growing to control plant diseases and pests. dPSA allowed direct quantitation of heavy metals in acidified wines without any sample pretreatment. Mean recoveries of Cd(II), Cu(II), Pb(II), and Zn(II) ranged from 95.5 to 99.2% for white wine samples and from 96.1 to 100.0% for red wine samples. The obtained results showed that Cd(II) was not found in any sample and that Cu(II), Pb(II), and Zn(II) levels were always lower than the toxicity limits in both fungicide- and water-treated wines. Nevertheless, the contents of metals were increased in samples from organic and inorganic pesticides treatment with respect to the water-treated samples. In particular, quinoxyfen, dinocap-penconazole, and dinocap applications considerably increased Cu(II) and Zn(II) contents in white and red wines. The levels of lead were significantly raised by azoxystrobin and sulfur treatments.

  1. Rapid geophysical surveyor

    SciTech Connect

    Roybal, L.G.; Carpenter, G.S.; Josten, N.E.

    1993-01-01

    The Rapid Geophysical Surveyor (RGS) is a system designed to rapidly and economically collect closely-spaced geophysical data used for characterization of Department of Energy (DOE) waste sites. Geophysical surveys of waste sites are an important first step in the remediation and closure of these sites; especially older sties where historical records are inaccurate and survey benchmarks have changed due to refinements in coordinate controls and datum changes. Closely-spaced data are required to adequately differentiate pits, trenches, and soil vault rows whose edges may be only a few feet from each other. A prototype vehicle designed to collect magnetic field data was built at the Idaho national Engineering Laboratory (INEL) during the summer of 1992. The RGS was one of several projects funded by the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) program. This vehicle was demonstrated at the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) within the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) on the INEL in September of 1992. Magnetic data were collected over two areas in the SDA, with a total survey area of about 1.7 acres. Data were collected at a nominal density of 2 1/2 inches along survey lines spaced 1 foot apart. Over 350,000 data points were collected over a 6 day period corresponding to about 185 man-days using conventional ground survey techniques. This report documents the design and demonstration of the RGS concept including the presentation of magnetic data collected at the SDA. The surveys were able to show pit and trench boundaries and determine details of their spatial orientation never before achieved.

  2. Rapid geophysical surveyor

    SciTech Connect

    Roybal, L.G.; Carpenter, G.S.; Josten, N.E.

    1993-07-01

    The Rapid Geophysical Surveyor (RGS) is a system designed to rapidly and economically collect closely-spaced geophysical data used for characterization of Department of Energy (DOE) waste sites. Geophysical surveys of waste sites are an important first step in the remediation and closure of these sites; especially older sties where historical records are inaccurate and survey benchmarks have changed due to refinements in coordinate controls and datum changes. Closely-spaced data are required to adequately differentiate pits, trenches, and soil vault rows whose edges may be only a few feet from each other. A prototype vehicle designed to collect magnetic field data was built at the Idaho national Engineering Laboratory (INEL) during the summer of 1992. The RGS was one of several projects funded by the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) program. This vehicle was demonstrated at the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) within the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) on the INEL in September of 1992. Magnetic data were collected over two areas in the SDA, with a total survey area of about 1.7 acres. Data were collected at a nominal density of 2 1/2 inches along survey lines spaced 1 foot apart. Over 350,000 data points were collected over a 6 day period corresponding to about 185 man-days using conventional ground survey techniques. This report documents the design and demonstration of the RGS concept including the presentation of magnetic data collected at the SDA. The surveys were able to show pit and trench boundaries and determine details of their spatial orientation never before achieved.

  3. Rapid population growth.

    PubMed

    1972-01-01

    At the current rate of population growth, world population by 2000 is expected to reach 7 billion or more, with developing countries accounting for some 5.4 billion, and economically advanced nations accounting for 1.6 billion. 'Population explosion' is the result of falling mortality rates and continuing high birth rates. Many European countries, and Japan, have already completed what is termed as demographic transition, that is, birth rates have fallen to below 20 births per 1000 population, death rates to 10/1000 population, and annual growth rates are 1% or less; annual growth rates for less developed countries ranged from 2 to 3.5%. Less developed countries can be divided into 3 groups: 1) countries with both high birth and death rates; 2) countries with high birth rates and low death rates; and 3) countries with intermediate and declining birth rates and low death rates. Rapid population growth has serious economic consequences. It encourages inequities in income distribution; it limits rate of growth of gross national product by holding down level of savings and capital investments; it exerts pressure on agricultural production and land; and it creates unemployment problems. In addition, the quality of education for increasing number of chidren is adversely affected, as high proportions of children reduce the amount that can be spent for the education of each child out of the educational budget; the cost and adequacy of health and welfare services are affected in a similar way. Other serious consequences of rapid population growth are maternal death and illness, and physical and mental retardation of children of very poor families. It is very urgent that over a billion births be prevented in the next 30 years to reduce annual population growth rate from the current 2% to 1% per year. PMID:12261450

  4. Advances in rapid prototyping

    SciTech Connect

    Atwood, C.L.; McCarty, G.D.; Pardo, B.T.; Bryce, E.A.

    1993-12-31

    Recent advances in stereolithography and selective laser sintering have had a significant impact on the overall quality of parts produced using these rapid prototyping processes. The development and implementation of 3D System`s QuickCast{trademark} resin and software for building investment casting patterns have proven to be major steps toward fabricating highly accurate patterns with very good surface finishes. Sandia uses patterns generated from rapid prototyping processes to reduce the cycle time and cost of fabricating prototype parts in support of a Sandia National Laboratories managed program called FASTCAST. As participants in the Beta test program for QuickCast{trademark} resin and software, they experienced a steep learning curve and were able to build accurate parts in a short period of time. It is now possible, using this technology, to produce highly accurate prototype parts as well as acceptable firs article and small lots size production parts. They use the Selective Laser Sintering (SLS) process to fabricate prototype wax patterns for investment casting. DTM Corporation recently introduced the use of their polycarbonate material for fabricating investment casting patterns. The polycarbonate material is processed significantly faster, with improved strength, dimensional stability, and without a support structure during the build process. Sandia is currently changing from investment casting wax to polycarbonate for the fabrication of investment casting patterns using the SLS process. This presentation will focus on the successes with these new materials from the standpoints of application, accuracy, surface finish, and post processing. Also presented will be examples of parts manufactured by these processes.

  5. Hallucination proneness, schizotypy and meta-cognition.

    PubMed

    Stirling, John; Barkus, Emma; Lewis, Shon

    2007-06-01

    Disordered or maladaptive meta-cognitive processing appears to be a prominent feature for some individuals with a diagnosis of schizophrenia. We sought to establish whether healthy individuals distinguished either in terms hallucination proneness (HP) or level of schizotypy could also be differentiated on the sub-scales of the Meta-cognitions Questionnaire (MCQ), or a modified version of it in which items about worry were replaced with items specifically related to thinking. A total of 106 healthy volunteers completed the Oxford and Liverpool Inventory of Feelings and Experiences and Launay-Slade hallucination scale, the Schizotypal Personality Questionnaire and two versions of the MCQ: the original which assesses five domains of meta-cognition and an adapted version in which items relating to worry had been replaced by items relating to thinking or reflecting on thinking (MCQ-th). ANOVA indicated highly significant differences between three groups of individuals differentiated in terms of high, medium and low proneness to hallucinations on four of the five MCQ sub-scales, and three of the four MCQ-th factors. Regression analyses indicated that the MCQ factors encompassing (1) a sense of uncontrollability of thinking (and the perceived attendant dangers of this) and (2) negative beliefs about thinking related to suspicion and punishment were the strongest predictors of high schizotypy. Individuals who score higher on a measure of HP are more likely to display patterns of meta-cognitive processing that resemble, in certain respects, those reported in individuals with a diagnosis of schizophrenia. High schizotypy predicts a negative appraisal about both the controllability and consequences of thinking. PMID:16934218

  6. eXtended MetaData Registry

    2006-10-25

    The purpose of the eXtended MetaData Registry (XMDR) prototype is to demonstrate the feasibility and utility of constructing an extended metadata registry, i.e., one which encompasses richer classification support, facilities for including terminologies, and better support for formal specification of semantics. The prototype registry will also serve as a reference implementation for the revised versions of ISO 11179, Parts 2 and 3 to help guide production implementations.

  7. [Basic concepts for network meta-analysis].

    PubMed

    Catalá-López, Ferrán; Tobías, Aurelio; Roqué, Marta

    2014-12-01

    Systematic reviews and meta-analyses have long been fundamental tools for evidence-based clinical practice. Initially, meta-analyses were proposed as a technique that could improve the accuracy and the statistical power of previous research from individual studies with small sample size. However, one of its main limitations has been the fact of being able to compare no more than two treatments in an analysis, even when the clinical research question necessitates that we compare multiple interventions. Network meta-analysis (NMA) uses novel statistical methods that incorporate information from both direct and indirect treatment comparisons in a network of studies examining the effects of various competing treatments, estimating comparisons between many treatments in a single analysis. Despite its potential limitations, NMA applications in clinical epidemiology can be of great value in situations where there are several treatments that have been compared against a common comparator. Also, NMA can be relevant to a research or clinical question when many treatments must be considered or when there is a mix of both direct and indirect information in the body of evidence.

  8. Managing riverine landscapes as meta-ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tockner, K.

    2014-12-01

    Aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems are tightly linked through energy, material, information, and organism flows. At the landscape scale, these reciprocal flows are controlled by the composition, configuration, boundary conditions and linkage of individual ecosystem types, thereby forming so-called meta-ecosystems. The relative importance of individual ecosystem types depends on the intrinsic properties (so-called "ecosystem traits"), the setting within the landscape, and the characteristics of interfaces that control cross-system fluxes. For example, the juxtaposition of particular ecosystem types (i.e. their composition and configuration) may alter the magnitude of landscape processes as well as the directions of flow among ecosystem types. Therefore, the meta-ecosystem concept provides a framework to quantify ecosystem diversity, a neglected component of biodiversity, and to test its effects on genetic and species diversity as well as the functional performance in coupled ecosystems. Given their topographic position at the lowest point in the landscape, aquatic ecosystems are particularly susceptible to influences exerted by their surrounding terrestrial environment, both the immediately adjacent riparian zones and the entire catchment that they drain. Questions that need to be tackled may include: What are the consequences of exchange pulses between aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems on the functional performance of individual ecosystems? What are the mechanisms and processes underlying structural and functional biodiversity at aquatic-terrestrial interfaces? In this respect, the meta-ecosystem concept might be very helpful in landscape management and in ecosystem design and engineering.

  9. Detonation of Meta-stable Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhl, Allen; Kuhl, Allen L.; Fried, Laurence E.; Howard, W. Michael; Seizew, Michael R.; Bell, John B.; Beckner, Vincent; Grcar, Joseph F.

    2008-05-31

    We consider the energy accumulation in meta-stable clusters. This energy can be much larger than the typical chemical bond energy (~;;1 ev/atom). For example, polymeric nitrogen can accumulate 4 ev/atom in the N8 (fcc) structure, while helium can accumulate 9 ev/atom in the excited triplet state He2* . They release their energy by cluster fission: N8 -> 4N2 and He2* -> 2He. We study the locus of states in thermodynamic state space for the detonation of such meta-stable clusters. In particular, the equilibrium isentrope, starting at the Chapman-Jouguet state, and expanding down to 1 atmosphere was calculated with the Cheetah code. Large detonation pressures (3 and 16 Mbar), temperatures (12 and 34 kilo-K) and velocities (20 and 43 km/s) are a consequence of the large heats of detonation (6.6 and 50 kilo-cal/g) for nitrogen and helium clusters respectively. If such meta-stable clusters could be synthesized, they offer the potential for large increases in the energy density of materials.

  10. Meta-classification for Variable Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pichara, Karim; Protopapas, Pavlos; León, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    The need for the development of automatic tools to explore astronomical databases has been recognized since the inception of CCDs and modern computers. Astronomers already have developed solutions to tackle several science problems, such as automatic classification of stellar objects, outlier detection, and globular clusters identification, among others. New scientific problems emerge, and it is critical to be able to reuse the models learned before, without rebuilding everything from the beginning when the sciencientific problem changes. In this paper, we propose a new meta-model that automatically integrates existing classification models of variable stars. The proposed meta-model incorporates existing models that are trained in a different context, answering different questions and using different representations of data. A conventional mixture of expert algorithms in machine learning literature cannot be used since each expert (model) uses different inputs. We also consider the computational complexity of the model by using the most expensive models only when it is necessary. We test our model with EROS-2 and MACHO data sets, and we show that we solve most of the classification challenges only by training a meta-model to learn how to integrate the previous experts.

  11. Review of the Reporting of Survival Analyses within Randomised Controlled Trials and the Implications for Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Batson, Sarah; Greenall, Gemma; Hudson, Pollyanna

    2016-01-01

    Background Meta-analysis is a growing approach to evidence synthesis and network meta-analysis in particular represents an important and developing method within Health Technology Assessment (HTA). Meta-analysis of survival data is usually performed using the individual summary statistic—the hazard ratio (HR) from each randomised controlled trial (RCT). Objectives The objectives of this study are to: (i) review the methods and reporting of survival analyses in oncology RCTs; and (ii) assess the suitability and relevance of survival data reported in RCTs for inclusion into meta-analysis. Methods Five oncology journals were searched to identify Phase III RCTs published between April and July 2015. Eligible studies included those that analysed a survival outcome. Results Thirty-two RCTs reporting survival outcomes in cancer populations were identified. None of the publications reported details relating to a strategy for statistical model building, the goodness of fit of the final model, or final model validation for the analysis of survival outcomes. The majority of studies (88%) reported the use of Cox proportional hazards (PH) regression to analyse survival endpoints. However, most publications failed to report the validation of the statistical models in terms of the PH assumption. Conclusions This review highlights deficiencies in terms of reporting the methods and validity of survival analyses within oncology RCTs. We support previous recommendations to encourage authors to improve the reporting of survival analyses in journal publications. We also recommend that the final choice of a statistical model for survival should be informed by goodness of model fit to a given dataset, and that model assumptions are validated. The failure of trial investigators and statisticians to investigate the PH for RCT survival data is likely to result in clinical decisions based on inappropriate methods. The development of alternative approaches for the meta-analysis of survival

  12. Population model of longitudinal FEV1 data in asthmatics: meta-analysis and predictability of placebo response.

    PubMed

    Marostica, Eleonora; Russu, Alberto; Yang, Shuying; De Nicolao, Giuseppe; Zamuner, Stefano; Beerahee, Misba

    2014-12-01

    Asthma is an obstructive lung disease where the mechanism of disease progression is not fully understood hence motivating the use of empirical models to describe the evolution of the patient's health state. With reference to placebo response, measured in terms of FEV1 (Forced Expiratory Volume in 1 s), a range of empirical models taken from the literature were compared at a single trial level. In particular, eleven GSK trials lasting 12 weeks in mild-to-moderate asthma were used for the modelling of longitudinal placebo responses. Then, the chosen exponential model was used to carry out an individual participant data meta-analysis on eleven trials. A covariate analysis was also performed to find relevant covariates in asthma to be accounted for in the meta-analysis model. Age, gender, and height were found statistically significant (e.g. the taller the patients the higher the FEV1, the older the patients the lower the FEV1, and females have lower FEV1). By truncating each trial at week 4, the predictive properties of the meta-analysis model were also investigated, showing its ability to predict long-term FEV1 response from truncated trials. Summarizing, the study suggests that: (i) the exponential model effectively describes the placebo response; (ii) the meta-analysis approach may prove helpful to simulate new trials as well as to reduce trial duration in view of its predictive properties; (iii) the inclusion of available covariates within the meta-analysis model provides a reduction of the inter-individual variability.

  13. Conformational studies of γ-turn in pseudopeptides containing α-amino acid and conformationally constrained meta amino benzoic acid/meta nitro aniline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutt Konar, Anita

    2013-03-01

    Reverse turns (commonly β-turns and γ-turns), a common motif in proteins and peptides, have attracted attention due to their relevance in a wide variety of biological processes. In an attempt to artificially imitate and stabilize these turns in short acyclic peptides, a series of N-terminally protected pseudopeptides comprising of an α-amino acid and conformationally constrained meta amino benzoic acid (mABA)/meta nitro aniline (mNA) (peptides I-VI) have been synthesized. The molecules were well characterized by various spectroscopic techniques and subjected to a systematic conformational analysis. Our experimental results reveal that only pseudopeptides I and II with methyl as the sidechain, tertiary butyloxy carbonyl as the N-terminal protecting group and (mABA)/(mNA) at the C-terminus adopt γ-turn conformations in solid state as well as in solution. Even slight modification of any of the stated conditions donot support the formation of this γ-turn architecture in the solid state. Interestingly, the peptides III-V which displays extended conformation in solid state forms γ-turn structure in solution. Thus this result reflects the importance of co-operative steric interactions amongst various amino acid residues in stabilizing a particular conformation in peptides in different phases (solid and solution). This report may open a new avenue in introducing γ-turn motifs within the bioactive conformation of selected peptides.

  14. Genetic Biomarkers of Barrett's Esophagus Susceptibility and Progression to Dysplasia and Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Findlay, John M; Middleton, Mark R; Tomlinson, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Barrett's esophagus (BE) is a common and important precursor lesion of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC). A third of patients with BE are asymptomatic, and our ability to predict the risk of progression of metaplasia to dysplasia and EAC (and therefore guide management) is limited. There is an urgent need for clinically useful biomarkers of susceptibility to both BE and risk of subsequent progression. This study aims to systematically identify, review, and meta-analyze genetic biomarkers reported to predict both. A systematic review of the PubMed and EMBASE databases was performed in May 2014. Study and evidence quality were appraised using the revised American Society of Clinical Oncology guidelines, and modified Recommendations for Tumor Marker Scores. Meta-analysis was performed for all markers assessed by more than one study. A total of 251 full-text articles were reviewed; 52 were included. A total of 33 germline markers of susceptibility were identified (level of evidence II-III); 17 were included. Five somatic markers of progression were identified; meta-analysis demonstrated significant associations for chromosomal instability (level of evidence II). One somatic marker of progression/relapse following photodynamic therapy was identified. However, a number of failings of methodology and reporting were identified. This is the first systematic review and meta-analysis to evaluate genetic biomarkers of BE susceptibility and risk of progression. While a number of limitations of study quality temper the utility of those markers identified, some-in particular, those identified by genome-wide association studies, and chromosomal instability for progression-appear plausible, although robust validation is required.

  15. The Rapid Transient Surveyor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranec, Christoph; Tonry, John; Wright, Shelley; Tully, R. Brent; Lu, Jessica R.; Takamiya, Marianne Y.; Hunter, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    The next decade of astronomy will be dominated by large area surveys (see the detailed discussion in the Astro-2010 Decadal survey and NRC's recent OIR System Report). Ground-based optical transient surveys, e.g., LSST, ZTF and ATLAS and space-based exoplanet, supernova, and lensing surveys such as TESS and WFIRST will join the Gaia all-sky astrometric survey in producing a flood of data that will enable leaps in our understanding of the universe. There is a critical need for further characterization of these discoveries through high angular resolution images, deeper images, spectra, or observations at different cadences or periods than the main surveys. Such follow-up characterization must be well matched to the particular surveys, and requires sufficient additional observing resources and time to cover the extensive number of targets.We describe plans for the Rapid Transient Surveyor (RTS), a permanently mounted, rapid-response, high-cadence facility for follow-up characterization of transient objects on the U. of Hawai'i 2.2-m telescope on Maunakea. RTS will comprise an improved robotic laser adaptive optics system, based on the prototype Robo-AO system (formerly at the Palomar 1.5-m and now at the Kitt Peak 2.2-m telescope), with simultaneous visible and near-infrared imagers as well as a near-infrared integral field spectrograph (R~100, λ = 850 - 1830 nm, 0.15″ spaxels, 8.7″×6.0″ FoV). RTS will achieve an acuity of ~0.07″ in visible wavelengths and < 0.16″ in the near infrared leading to an increase of the infrared point-source sensitivity against the sky background by a factor of ~9, crucial for efficient near-infrared spectroscopy.RTS will allow us to map the dark matter distribution in the z < 0.1 local universe with ten times better accuracy and precision than previous experiments. ATLAS will discover several thousand SNIae per year, measuring SNIa peak brightness, and decline rates, while RTS will measure reddening by dust, confirm SN type and

  16. Rapid Progression of Coronary Atherosclerosis: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Priyank; Bajaj, Sharad; Virk, Hartaj; Bikkina, Mahesh; Shamoon, Fayez

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is chronic disease, the prevalence of which has increased steadily as the population ages. Vascular injury is believed to be critical initiating event in pathogenesis of spontaneous atherosclerosis. Syndrome of accelerated atherosclerosis has been classically described in patients undergoing heart transplantation, coronary artery bypass graft, and percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty. In contrast to spontaneous atherosclerosis, denuding endothelial injury followed by thrombus formation and initial predominant smooth muscle cell proliferation is believed to be playing a significant role in accelerated atherosclerosis. There is no universal definition of rapid progression of atherosclerosis. However most studies describing the phenomenon have used the following definition: (i) > or = 10% diameter reduction of at least one preexisting stenosis > or = 50%, (ii) > or = 30% diameter reduction of a preexisting stenosis <50%, and (iii) progression of a lesion to total occlusion within few months. Recent studies have described the role of coronary vasospasm, human immunodeficiency virus, various inflammatory markers, and some genetic mutations as predictors of rapid progression of atherosclerosis. As research in the field of vascular biology continues, more factors are likely to be implicated in the pathogenesis of rapid progression of atherosclerosis. PMID:26823982

  17. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy for acute cholecystitis: early or delayed?: Evidence from a systematic review of discordant meta-analyses.

    PubMed

    Song, Guo-Min; Bian, Wei; Zeng, Xian-Tao; Zhou, Jian-Guo; Luo, Yong-Qiang; Tian, Xu

    2016-06-01

    The laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) is an important approach of treating acute cholecystitis and the timing of performing this given treatment is associated with clinical outcomes. Although several meta-analyses have been done to investigate the optimal timing of implementing this treatment, the conflicting findings from these meta-analyses still confuse decision-making. And thus, we performed this systematic review to assess discordant meta-analyses and generate conclusive findings to facilitate informed decision-making in clinical context eventually. We electronically searched the PubMed, Cochrane Library, and EMBASE to include meta-analysis comparing early (within 7 days of the onset of symptoms) with delayed LC (at least 1 week after initial conservative treatment) for acute cholecystitis through August 2015. Two independent investigators completed all tasks including scanning and appraising eligibility, abstracting essential information using prespecified extraction form, assessing methodological quality using Oxford Levels of Evidence and Assessment of Multiple Systematic Reviews (AMSTAR) tool, and assessing the reporting quality using Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA), as well as implementing Jadad algorithm in each step for the whole process. A heterogeneity degree of ≤50% is accepted. Seven eligible meta-analyses were included eventually. Only one was Level I of evidence and remaining studies were Level II of evidence. The AMSTAR scores varied from 8 to 11 with a median of 9. The PRISMA scores varied from 19 to 26. The most heterogeneity level fell into the desired criteria. After implementing Jadad algorithm, 2 meta-analyses with more eligible RCTs were selected based on search strategies and implication of selection. The best available evidence indicated a nonsignificant difference in mortality, bile duct injury, bile leakage, overall complications, and conversion to open surgery, but a significant reduction

  18. Rapid Evaporation of microbubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautam, Jitendra; Esmaeeli, Asghar

    2008-11-01

    When a liquid is heated to a temperature far above its boiling point, it evaporates abruptly. Boiling of liquid at high temperatures can be explosive and destructive, and poses a potential hazard for a host of industrial processes. Explosive boiling may occur if a cold and volatile liquid is brought into contact with a hot and non-volatile liquid, or if a liquid is superheated or depressurized rapidly. Such possibilities are realized, for example, in the depressurization of low boiling point liquefied natural gas (LNG) in the pipelines or storage tanks as a result of a leak. While boiling of highly heated liquids can be destructive at macroscale, the (nearly) instantaneous pace of the process and the release of large amount of kinetic energy make the phenomena extremely attractive at microscale where it is possible to utilize the released energy to derive micromechanical systems. For instance, there is currently a growing interest in micro-explosion of liquid for generation of micro bubbles for actuation purposes. The aim of the current study is to gain a fundamental understanding of the subject using direct numerical simulations. In particular, we seek to investigate the boundary between stable and unstable nucleus growth in terms of the degree of liquid superheat and to compare the dynamics of unstable and stable growth.

  19. Rapid Polymer Sequencer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stolc, Viktor (Inventor); Brock, Matthew W (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Method and system for rapid and accurate determination of each of a sequence of unknown polymer components, such as nucleic acid components. A self-assembling monolayer of a selected substance is optionally provided on an interior surface of a pipette tip, and the interior surface is immersed in a selected liquid. A selected electrical field is impressed in a longitudinal direction, or in a transverse direction, in the tip region, a polymer sequence is passed through the tip region, and a change in an electrical current signal is measured as each polymer component passes through the tip region. Each of the measured changes in electrical current signals is compared with a database of reference electrical change signals, with each reference signal corresponding to an identified polymer component, to identify the unknown polymer component with a reference polymer component. The nanopore preferably has a pore inner diameter of no more than about 40 nm and is prepared by heating and pulling a very small section of a glass tubing.

  20. New Rh2(II,II) Architecture for the Catalytic Reduction of H⁺.

    PubMed

    White, Travis A; Witt, Suzanne E; Li, Zhanyong; Dunbar, Kim R; Turro, Claudia

    2015-10-19

    Formamidinate-bridged Rh2(II,II) complexes containing diimine ligands of the formula cis-[Rh2(II,II)(μ-DTolF)2(NN)2](2+) (Rh2-NN2), where DTolF = p-ditolylformamidinate and NN = dppn (benzo[i]dipyrido[3,2-a:2',3'-h]quinoxaline), dppz (dipyrido[3,2-a:2',3'-c]phenazine), and phen (1,10-phenanthroline), electrocatalytically reduce H(+) to H2 in DMF solutions containing CH3COOH at a glassy carbon electrode. Cathodic scans in the absence of acid display a Rh(III,II/II,II) reduction at -0.90 V vs Fc(+)/Fc followed by NN(0/-) reduction at -1.13, -1.36, and -1.65 V for Rh2-dppn2, Rh2-dppz2, and Rh2-phen2, respectively. Upon the addition of acid, Rh2-dppn2 and Rh2-dppz2 undergo reduction-protonation-reduction at each pyrazine-containing NN ligand prior to the Rh2(II,II/II,I) reduction. The Rh2(II,I) species is then protonated at one of the metal centers, resulting in the formation of the corresponding Rh2(II,III)-hydride. In the case of Rh2-phen2, the reduction of the phen ligand is followed by intramolecular electron transfer to the Rh2(II,II) core in the presence of protons to form a Rh2(II,III)-hydride species. Further reduction and protonation at the Rh2 core for all three complexes rapidly catalyzes H2 formation with varied calculated turnover frequencies (TOF) and overpotential values (η): 2.6 × 10(4) s(-1) and 0.56 V for Rh2-dppn, 2.8 × 10(4) s(-1) and 0.50 V for Rh2-dppz2, and 5.9 × 10(4) s(-1) and 0.64 V for Rh2-phen2. Bulk electrolysis confirmed H2 formation, and further CH3COOH addition regenerates H2 production, attesting to the robust nature of the architecture. The cis-[Rh2(II,II)(μ-DTolF)2(NN)2](2+) architecture benefits by combining electron-rich formamidinate bridges, a redox-active Rh2(II,II) core, and electron-accepting NN diimine ligands to allow for the electrocatalysis of H(+) substrate to H2 fuel.

  1. The Use of Meta-Analytic Statistical Significance Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polanin, Joshua R.; Pigott, Terri D.

    2015-01-01

    Meta-analysis multiplicity, the concept of conducting multiple tests of statistical significance within one review, is an underdeveloped literature. We address this issue by considering how Type I errors can impact meta-analytic results, suggest how statistical power may be affected through the use of multiplicity corrections, and propose how…

  2. Maternal Meta-Emotion Philosophy and Adolescent Depressive Symptomatology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, Lynn Fainsilber; Hunter, Erin C.

    2007-01-01

    The current study examined the relations between maternal meta-emotion philosophy and adolescent depressive symptoms, as well as general adolescent adjustment and the quality of parent-child interaction. Consistent with previous findings on children in the preschool period and middle childhood, it was expected that an emotion coaching meta-emotion…

  3. Updated Meta-Analysis of Learner Control within Educational Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karich, Abbey C.; Burns, Matthew K.; Maki, Kathrin E.

    2014-01-01

    Giving a student control over their learning has theoretical and intuitive appeal, but its effects are neither powerful nor consistent in the empirical literature base. This meta-analysis updated previous meta-analytic research by Niemiec, Sikorski, and Walberg by studying the overall effectiveness of providing learner control within educational…

  4. Empirical ethics and its alleged meta-ethical fallacies.

    PubMed

    de Vries, Rob; Gordijn, Bert

    2009-05-01

    This paper analyses the concept of empirical ethics as well as three meta-ethical fallacies that empirical ethics is said to face: the is-ought problem, the naturalistic fallacy and violation of the fact-value distinction. Moreover, it answers the question of whether empirical ethics (necessarily) commits these three basic meta-ethical fallacies.

  5. Comparing Active Pediatric Obesity Treatments Using Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilles, Allyson; Cassano, Michael; Shepherd, Elizabeth J.; Higgins, Diana; Hecker, Jeffrey E.; Nangle, Douglas W.

    2008-01-01

    The current meta-analysis reviews research on the treatment of pediatric obesity focusing on studies that have been published since 1994. Eleven studies (22 comparisons, 115 effect sizes, N = 447) were included in the present meta-analysis. Results indicated that comprehensive behavioral interventions may be improved in at least two ways:…

  6. School Counseling Outcome: A Meta-Analytic Examination of Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whiston, Susan C.; Tai, Wendi Lee; Rahardja, Daryn; Eder, Kelly

    2011-01-01

    The effectiveness of school counseling interventions is important in this era of evidence-based practices. In this study, Meta-Analysis 1 involved treatment-control comparisons and Meta-Analysis 2 involved pretest-posttest differences. The overall average weighted effect size for school counseling interventions was 0.30. The study examined whether…

  7. How to Critically Read Ecological Meta-Analyses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lortie, Christopher J.; Stewart, Gavin; Rothstein, Hannah; Lau, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Meta-analysis offers ecologists a powerful tool for knowledge synthesis. Albeit a form of review, it also shares many similarities with primary empirical research. Consequently, critical reading of meta-analyses incorporates criteria from both sets of approaches particularly because ecology is a discipline that embraces heterogeneity and broad…

  8. Methods for the Joint Meta-Analysis of Multiple Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trikalinos, Thomas A.; Hoaglin, David C.; Small, Kevin M.; Terrin, Norma; Schmid, Christopher H.

    2014-01-01

    Existing methods for meta-analysis of diagnostic test accuracy focus primarily on a single index test. We propose models for the joint meta-analysis of studies comparing multiple index tests on the same participants in paired designs. These models respect the grouping of data by studies, account for the within-study correlation between the tests'…

  9. Perceived Discrimination and Health: A Meta-Analytic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pascoe, Elizabeth A.; Richman, Laura Smart

    2009-01-01

    Perceived discrimination has been studied with regard to its impact on several types of health effects. This meta-analysis provides a comprehensive account of the relationships between multiple forms of perceived discrimination and both mental and physical health outcomes. In addition, this meta-analysis examines potential mechanisms by which…

  10. Meta-Management of Virtual Organizations: Toward Information Technology Support.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Shouhong

    2000-01-01

    Shifting between different linkages of the partners for satisfying a need is the major characteristic of the virtual organization, and meta-management beyond the individual organizational level must be applied in order to optimize the benefit for the entire organizational network. Presents a meta-management support framework based on the…

  11. Classroom Communication and Instructional Processes: Advances through Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gayle, Barbara Mae, Ed.; Preiss, Raymond W., Ed.; Burrell, Nancy, Ed.; Allen, Mike, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    This volume offers a systematic review of the literature on communication education and instruction. Making meta-analysis findings accessible and relevant, the editors of this volume approach the topic from the perspective that meta-analysis serves as a useful tool for summarizing experiments and for determining how and why specific teaching and…

  12. What Makes a Good Educator? The Relevance of Meta Programmes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Nigel

    2004-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a qualitative study which explores the relevance of meta programmes to students' perceptions of teaching quality. Meta programmes are a model of personality preferences from the discipline of Neuro Linguistic Programming (NLP). Research into teaching effectiveness indicates that students rate as important "hygiene…

  13. Comprehensive School Reform and Student Achievement: A Meta-Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borman, Geoffrey D.; Hewes, Gina M.; Overman, Laura T.; Brown, Shelly

    Using 232 studies, this meta analysis reviewed the research on the achievement effects of the nationally disseminated and externally developed school improvement programs known as "whole-school" or "comprehensive" reforms. In addition to reviewing the overall achievement effects of comprehensive school reform (CSR), the meta analysis considered…

  14. Description Meta Tags in Public Home and Linked Pages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craven, Timothy C.

    2001-01-01

    Random samples of 1,872 Web pages registered with Yahoo! And 1,638 pages reachable from Yahoo!-registered pages were analyzed for use of meta tags and specifically those containing descriptions. Results: 727 (38.8%) of the Yahoo!-registered pages and 442 (27%) of the other pages included descriptions in meta tages. Some descriptions greatly…

  15. The Development of the Meta-Affective Trait Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uzuntiryaki-Kondakci, Esen; Kirbulut, Zubeyde Demet

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a Meta-Affective Trait Scale (MATS) to measure the meta-affective inclinations related to emotions that students have while they are studying for their classes. First, a pilot study was performed with 380 10th-grade students. Results of the exploratory factor analysis supported a two-factor structure of the…

  16. Meta-Analysis: A Systematic Method for Synthesizing Counseling Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whiston, Susan C.; Li, Peiwei

    2011-01-01

    The authors provide a template for counseling researchers who are interested in quantitatively aggregating research findings. Meta-analytic studies can provide relevant information to the counseling field by systematically synthesizing studies performed by researchers from diverse fields. Methodologically sound meta-analyses require careful…

  17. Illustration of a Multilevel Model for Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de la Torre, Jimmy; Camilli, Gregory; Vargas, Sadako; Vernon, R. Fox

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the authors present a multilevel (or hierarchical linear) model that illustrates issues in the application of the model to data from meta-analytic studies. In doing so, several issues are discussed that typically arise in the course of a meta-analysis. These include the presence of non-zero between-study variability, how multiple…

  18. Fitting Meta-Analytic Structural Equation Models with Complex Datasets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Sandra Jo; Polanin, Joshua R.; Lipsey, Mark W.

    2016-01-01

    A modification of the first stage of the standard procedure for two-stage meta-analytic structural equation modeling for use with large complex datasets is presented. This modification addresses two common problems that arise in such meta-analyses: (a) primary studies that provide multiple measures of the same construct and (b) the correlation…

  19. Meta-Synthesis of Research on Information Seeking Behaviour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urquhart, Christine

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Meta-synthesis methods may help to make more sense of information behaviour research evidence. Aims and objectives: The objectives are to: 1) identify and examine the theoretical research strategies commonly used in information behaviour research; 2) discuss meta-synthesis methods that might be appropriate to the type of research…

  20. Browsing through rapid-fire imaging: requirements and industry initiatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittenburg, Kent; Chiyoda, Carlos; Heinrichs, Michael; Lanning, Tom

    1999-12-01

    It is well established that humans possess cognitive abilities to process images extremely rapidly. At GTE Laboratories we have been experimenting with Web-based browsing interfaces that take advantage of this human facility. We have prototyped a number of browsing applications in different domains that offer the advantages of high interactivity and visual engagement. Our hypothesis, confirmed by user evaluations and a pilot experiment, is that many users will be drawn to interfaces that provide rapid presentation of images for browsing tasks in many contexts, among them online shopping, multimedia title selection, and people directories. In this paper we present our application prototypes using a system called PolyNav and discuss the imaging requirements for applications like these. We also raise the suggestion that if the Web industry at large standardized on an XML for meta-content that included images, then the possibility exist that rapid-fire image browsing could become a standard part of the Web experience for content selection in a variety of domains.

  1. A Meta-Look at Meta-Studies of the Effectiveness of Development Assistance to Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, David W.; Moore, Audrey Schuh

    2010-01-01

    What insights and generalisations can be drawn from looking across the work of multiple governmental and non-governmental organisations aimed at supporting basic education in low and medium income countries? To address this question, this study analysed findings of nine evaluation meta-studies completed by international assistance organisations,…

  2. MetaJC++: A flexible and automatic program transformation technique using meta framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beevi, Nadera S.; Reghu, M.; Chitraprasad, D.; Vinodchandra, S. S.

    2014-09-01

    Compiler is a tool to translate abstract code containing natural language terms to machine code. Meta compilers are available to compile more than one languages. We have developed a meta framework intends to combine two dissimilar programming languages, namely C++ and Java to provide a flexible object oriented programming platform for the user. Suitable constructs from both the languages have been combined, thereby forming a new and stronger Meta-Language. The framework is developed using the compiler writing tools, Flex and Yacc to design the front end of the compiler. The lexer and parser have been developed to accommodate the complete keyword set and syntax set of both the languages. Two intermediate representations have been used in between the translation of the source program to machine code. Abstract Syntax Tree has been used as a high level intermediate representation that preserves the hierarchical properties of the source program. A new machine-independent stack-based byte-code has also been devised to act as a low level intermediate representation. The byte-code is essentially organised into an output class file that can be used to produce an interpreted output. The results especially in the spheres of providing C++ concepts in Java have given an insight regarding the potential strong features of the resultant meta-language.

  3. Copper(II) and lead(II) sorption from aqueous solution by non-living Spirogyra neglecta.

    PubMed

    Singh, Alpana; Kumar, Dhananjay; Gaur, J P

    2007-12-01

    Dried biomass of Spirogyra neglecta rapidly sorbed the test metals and the process became saturated in 10-20min. Maximum sorption of Pb(II) [116.1mgg(-1)] and Cu(II) [115.3mgg(-1)] occurred at 0.1gl(-1) biomass and 100mgl(-1) metal concentration in the solution. Sorption of Cu(II) and Pb(II) occurred optimally at pH 4.5 and 5.0, respectively. Lead(II) and Cu(II) sorption were lesser from binary metal solution than from single metal solution. Lead(II) more severely inhibited Cu(II) sorption than vice versa thus reflecting greater affinity of Pb(II) for the biomass. NaOH pretreatment slightly enhanced the metal removal ability of the biomass. During repeated sorption/desorption cycles, Pb(II) and Cu(II) sorption decreased by 11% and 27%, respectively, at the end of the fifth cycle due inter alia to 10-15% loss of biomass. Nevertheless, Spirogyra appears to be a good sorbent for removing metals Cu(II) and Pb(II) from wastewaters.

  4. Hybrid and adaptive meta-model-based global optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, J.; Li, G. Y.; Dong, Z.

    2012-01-01

    As an efficient and robust technique for global optimization, meta-model-based search methods have been increasingly used in solving complex and computation intensive design optimization problems. In this work, a hybrid and adaptive meta-model-based global optimization method that can automatically select appropriate meta-modelling techniques during the search process to improve search efficiency is introduced. The search initially applies three representative meta-models concurrently. Progress towards a better performing model is then introduced by selecting sample data points adaptively according to the calculated values of the three meta-models to improve modelling accuracy and search efficiency. To demonstrate the superior performance of the new algorithm over existing search methods, the new method is tested using various benchmark global optimization problems and applied to a real industrial design optimization example involving vehicle crash simulation. The method is particularly suitable for design problems involving computation intensive, black-box analyses and simulations.

  5. Characterization of Meta-Materials Using Computational Electromagnetic Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deshpande, Manohar; Shin, Joon

    2005-01-01

    An efficient and powerful computational method is presented to synthesize a meta-material to specified electromagnetic properties. Using the periodicity of meta-materials, the Finite Element Methodology (FEM) is developed to estimate the reflection and transmission through the meta-material structure for a normal plane wave incidence. For efficient computations of the reflection and transmission over a wide band frequency range through a meta-material a Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) approach is also developed. Using the Nicholson-Ross method and the Genetic Algorithms, a robust procedure to extract electromagnetic properties of meta-material from the knowledge of its reflection and transmission coefficients is described. Few numerical examples are also presented to validate the present approach.

  6. The trazodone metabolite meta-chlorophenylpiperazine can cause false-positive urine amphetamine immunoassay results.

    PubMed

    Baron, Jason M; Griggs, David A; Nixon, Andrea L; Long, William H; Flood, James G

    2011-07-01

    Amphetamines and methamphetamines are part of an important class of drugs included in most urine drugs of abuse screening panels, and a common assay to detect these drugs is the Amphetamines II immunoassay (Roche Diagnostics). To demonstrate that meta-chlorophenylpiperazine (m-CPP), a trazodone metabolite, cross-reacts in the Amphetamines II assay, we tested reference standards of m-CPP at various concentrations (200 to 20,000 g/L). We also tested real patient urine samples containing m-CPP (detected and quantified by HPLC) with no detectable amphetamine, methamphetamine, or MDMA (demonstrated by GC MS). In both the m-CPP standards and the patient urine samples, we found a strong association between m-CPP concentration and Amphetamines II immunoreactivity (r = 0.990 for the urine samples). Further, we found that patients taking trazodone can produce urine with sufficient m-CPP to result in false-positive Amphetamines II results. At our institution, false-positive amphetamine results occur not infrequently in patients taking trazodone with at least 8 trazodone-associated false-positive results during a single 26-day period. Laboratories should remain cognizant of this interference when interpreting results of this assay.

  7. RAPID FORMATION OF SATURN AFTER JUPITER COMPLETION

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Ormel, Chris W.; Ida, Shigeru E-mail: ormel@astro.berkeley.edu

    2012-09-01

    We have investigated Saturn's core formation at a radial pressure maximum in a protoplanetary disk, which is created by gap opening by Jupiter. A core formed via planetesimal accretion induces the fragmentation of surrounding planetesimals, which generally inhibits further growth of the core by removal of the resulting fragments due to radial drift caused by gas drag. However, the emergence of the pressure maximum halts the drift of the fragments, while their orbital eccentricities and inclinations are efficiently damped by gas drag. As a result, the core of Saturn rapidly grows via accretion of the fragments near the pressure maximum. We have found that in the minimum-mass solar nebula, kilometer-sized planetesimals can produce a core exceeding 10 Earth masses within two million years. Since Jupiter may not have undergone significant type II inward migration, it is likely that Jupiter's formation was completed when the local disk mass has already decayed to a value comparable to or less than Jovian mass. The expected rapid growth of Saturn's core on a timescale comparable to or shorter than the observationally inferred disk lifetime enables Saturn to acquire the current amount of envelope gas before the disk gas is completely depleted. The high heat energy release rate onto the core surface due to the rapid accretion of the fragments delays onset of runaway gas accretion until the core mass becomes somewhat larger than that of Jupiter, which is consistent with the estimate based on interior modeling. Therefore, the rapid formation of Saturn induced by gap opening of Jupiter can account for the formation of multiple gas giants (Jupiter and Saturn) without significant inward migration and larger core mass of Saturn than that of Jupiter.

  8. Environmental Polychlorinated Biphenyl Exposure and Breast Cancer Risk: A Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jingwen; Huang, Yue; Wang, Xiaoling; Lin, Kun; Wu, Kusheng

    2015-01-01

    Background Association between polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) exposure and breast cancer risk has been widely studied, but the results remain controversial. We performed a meta-analysis to evaluate the evidences from observational studies on PCB exposure and breast cancer risk. Methods Relevant studies with data on internal PCB dose were identified from PubMed, EMBASE, CBM and CNKI databases through November 2014. Multivariable-adjusted odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were applied to assess the association between PCB exposure and breast cancer risk. Heterogeneity test, sensitivity analysis, subgroup analysis and publication bias test were also performed. To further explore the association between specific groups of PCB congeners and breast cancer, we examined the PCB congeners classified, according to their structural, biological and pharmacokinetics properties, as group I (potentially estrogenic), group II (potentially anti-estrogenic and immunotoxic, dioxin-like), and group III (phenobarbital, CYP1A and CYP2B inducers, biologically persistent). Results Of 660 studies screened, 25 studies which met criteria were selected, involving a total of 12866 participants (6088 cases and 6778 controls) from eight countries. The results showed that the risk of breast cancer was associated with group II (OR = 1.23, 95% CI: 1.08–1.40) and group III (OR = 1.25, 95% CI: 1.09–1.43) PCBs, but not with group I (OR = 1.10, 95%CI: 0.97–1.24) PCBs or total PCB exposure (OR = 1.09, 95%CI: 0.97–1.22). Conclusions Our meta-analysis based on the selected studies found group II and group III PCB exposure might contribute to the risk of breast cancer. More studies in developing countries with higher PCB levels are needed, as well as studies to explore the relationships between mixtures of organochlorine compounds and breast cancer risk. PMID:26555153

  9. Students' Decision Steps in Meta-Cognitive Learning in Free Online Groups (MetaL-FrOG): A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sen Fa, Kinsley Ng; Hussin, Firuz Hussin

    2011-01-01

    What prompts the students to respond in online dialogic discussion? Why some students chose to fall out? This case study through the lens of phenomenography observation attempts to explain the five decision steps of students to respond in Meta-cognitive Learning in Free Online Groups (MetaL-FrOG) discussion. It presents a part of a research…

  10. Meta-connectomics: human brain network and connectivity meta-analyses.

    PubMed

    Crossley, N A; Fox, P T; Bullmore, E T

    2016-04-01

    Abnormal brain connectivity or network dysfunction has been suggested as a paradigm to understand several psychiatric disorders. We here review the use of novel meta-analytic approaches in neuroscience that go beyond a summary description of existing results by applying network analysis methods to previously published studies and/or publicly accessible databases. We define this strategy of combining connectivity with other brain characteristics as 'meta-connectomics'. For example, we show how network analysis of task-based neuroimaging studies has been used to infer functional co-activation from primary data on regional activations. This approach has been able to relate cognition to functional network topology, demonstrating that the brain is composed of cognitively specialized functional subnetworks or modules, linked by a rich club of cognitively generalized regions that mediate many inter-modular connections. Another major application of meta-connectomics has been efforts to link meta-analytic maps of disorder-related abnormalities or MRI 'lesions' to the complex topology of the normative connectome. This work has highlighted the general importance of network hubs as hotspots for concentration of cortical grey-matter deficits in schizophrenia, Alzheimer's disease and other disorders. Finally, we show how by incorporating cellular and transcriptional data on individual nodes with network models of the connectome, studies have begun to elucidate the microscopic mechanisms underpinning the macroscopic organization of whole-brain networks. We argue that meta-connectomics is an exciting field, providing robust and integrative insights into brain organization that will likely play an important future role in consolidating network models of psychiatric disorders. PMID:26809184

  11. Rapid Active Sampling Package

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, Gregory

    2010-01-01

    A field-deployable, battery-powered Rapid Active Sampling Package (RASP), originally designed for sampling strong materials during lunar and planetary missions, shows strong utility for terrestrial geological use. The technology is proving to be simple and effective for sampling and processing materials of strength. Although this originally was intended for planetary and lunar applications, the RASP is very useful as a powered hand tool for geologists and the mining industry to quickly sample and process rocks in the field on Earth. The RASP allows geologists to surgically acquire samples of rock for later laboratory analysis. This tool, roughly the size of a wrench, allows the user to cut away swaths of weathering rinds, revealing pristine rock surfaces for observation and subsequent sampling with the same tool. RASPing deeper (.3.5 cm) exposes single rock strata in-situ. Where a geologist fs hammer can only expose unweathered layers of rock, the RASP can do the same, and then has the added ability to capture and process samples into powder with particle sizes less than 150 microns, making it easier for XRD/XRF (x-ray diffraction/x-ray fluorescence). The tool uses a rotating rasp bit (or two counter-rotating bits) that resides inside or above the catch container. The container has an open slot to allow the bit to extend outside the container and to allow cuttings to enter and be caught. When the slot and rasp bit are in contact with a substrate, the bit is plunged into it in a matter of seconds to reach pristine rock. A user in the field may sample a rock multiple times at multiple depths in minutes, instead of having to cut out huge, heavy rock samples for transport back to a lab for analysis. Because of the speed and accuracy of the RASP, hundreds of samples can be taken in one day. RASP-acquired samples are small and easily carried. A user can characterize more area in less time than by using conventional methods. The field-deployable RASP used a Ni

  12. Activation Likelihood Estimation meta-analysis revisited

    PubMed Central

    Eickhoff, Simon B.; Bzdok, Danilo; Laird, Angela R.; Kurth, Florian; Fox, Peter T.

    2011-01-01

    A widely used technique for coordinate-based meta-analysis of neuroimaging data is activation likelihood estimation (ALE), which determines the convergence of foci reported from different experiments. ALE analysis involves modelling these foci as probability distributions whose width is based on empirical estimates of the spatial uncertainty due to the between-subject and between-template variability of neuroimaging data. ALE results are assessed against a null-distribution of random spatial association between experiments, resulting in random-effects inference. In the present revision of this algorithm, we address two remaining drawbacks of the previous algorithm. First, the assessment of spatial association between experiments was based on a highly time-consuming permutation test, which nevertheless entailed the danger of underestimating the right tail of the null-distribution. In this report, we outline how this previous approach may be replaced by a faster and more precise analytical method. Second, the previously applied correction procedure, i.e. controlling the false discovery rate (FDR), is supplemented by new approaches for correcting the family-wise error rate and the cluster-level significance. The different alternatives for drawing inference on meta-analytic results are evaluated on an exemplary dataset on face perception as well as discussed with respect to their methodological limitations and advantages. In summary, we thus replaced the previous permutation algorithm with a faster and more rigorous analytical solution for the null-distribution and comprehensively address the issue of multiple-comparison corrections. The proposed revision of the ALE-algorithm should provide an improved tool for conducting coordinate-based meta-analyses on functional imaging data. PMID:21963913

  13. Global meta-analysis of transcriptomics studies.

    PubMed

    Caldas, José; Vinga, Susana

    2014-01-01

    Transcriptomics meta-analysis aims at re-using existing data to derive novel biological hypotheses, and is motivated by the public availability of a large number of independent studies. Current methods are based on breaking down studies into multiple comparisons between phenotypes (e.g. disease vs. healthy), based on the studies' experimental designs, followed by computing the overlap between the resulting differential expression signatures. While useful, in this methodology each study yields multiple independent phenotype comparisons, and connections are established not between studies, but rather between subsets of the studies corresponding to phenotype comparisons. We propose a rank-based statistical meta-analysis framework that establishes global connections between transcriptomics studies without breaking down studies into sets of phenotype comparisons. By using a rank product method, our framework extracts global features from each study, corresponding to genes that are consistently among the most expressed or differentially expressed genes in that study. Those features are then statistically modelled via a term-frequency inverse-document frequency (TF-IDF) model, which is then used for connecting studies. Our framework is fast and parameter-free; when applied to large collections of Homo sapiens and Streptococcus pneumoniae transcriptomics studies, it performs better than similarity-based approaches in retrieving related studies, using a Medical Subject Headings gold standard. Finally, we highlight via case studies how the framework can be used to derive novel biological hypotheses regarding related studies and the genes that drive those connections. Our proposed statistical framework shows that it is possible to perform a meta-analysis of transcriptomics studies with arbitrary experimental designs by deriving global expression features rather than decomposing studies into multiple phenotype comparisons. PMID:24586684

  14. JPSS CGS Tools For Rapid Algorithm Updates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, D. C.; Grant, K. D.

    2011-12-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) are jointly acquiring the next-generation civilian weather and environmental satellite system: the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS). JPSS will contribute the afternoon orbit component and ground processing system of the restructured National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS). As such, JPSS replaces the current Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellites (POES) managed by NOAA and the ground processing component of both POES and the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) replacement known as the Defense Weather Satellite System (DWSS), managed by the Department of Defense (DoD). The JPSS satellites will carry a suite of sensors designed to collect meteorological, oceanographic, climatological, and solar-geophysical observations of the earth, atmosphere, and space. The ground processing system for JPSS is known as the JPSS Common Ground System (JPSS CGS), and consists of a Command, Control, and Communications Segment (C3S) and the Interface Data Processing Segment (IDPS). Both are developed by Raytheon Intelligence and Information Systems (IIS). The Interface Data Processing Segment will process NPOESS Preparatory Project, Joint Polar Satellite System and Defense Weather Satellite System satellite data to provide environmental data products to NOAA and DoD processing centers operated by the United States government. Under NPOESS, Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems Algorithms and Data Products (A&DP) organization was responsible for the algorithms that produce the EDRs, including their quality aspects. For JPSS, that responsibility has transferred to NOAA's Center for Satellite Applications & Research (STAR). As the Calibration and Validation (Cal/Val) activities move forward following both the NPP launch and subsequent JPSS and DWSS launches, rapid algorithm updates may be required. Raytheon and

  15. MODEL-DRIVEN META-ANALYSES FOR INFORMING HEALTH CARE: A DIABETES META-ANALYSIS AS AN EXEMPLAR

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Sharon A.; Becker, Betsy Jane; García, Alexandra A.; Brown, Adama; Ramírez, Gilbert

    2015-01-01

    A relatively novel type of meta-analysis, a model-driven meta-analysis, involves the quantitative synthesis of descriptive, correlational data and is useful for identifying key predictors of health outcomes and informing clinical guidelines. Few such meta-analyses have been conducted and thus, large bodies of research remain unsynthesized and uninterpreted for application in health care. We describe the unique challenges of conducting a model-driven meta-analysis, focusing primarily on issues related to locating a sample of published and unpublished primary studies, extracting and verifying descriptive and correlational data, and conducting analyses. A current meta-analysis of the research on predictors of key health outcomes in diabetes is used to illustrate our main points. PMID:25142707

  16. Model-driven meta-analyses for informing health care: a diabetes meta-analysis as an exemplar.

    PubMed

    Brown, Sharon A; Becker, Betsy Jane; García, Alexandra A; Brown, Adama; Ramírez, Gilbert

    2015-04-01

    A relatively novel type of meta-analysis, a model-driven meta-analysis, involves the quantitative synthesis of descriptive, correlational data and is useful for identifying key predictors of health outcomes and informing clinical guidelines. Few such meta-analyses have been conducted and thus, large bodies of research remain unsynthesized and uninterpreted for application in health care. We describe the unique challenges of conducting a model-driven meta-analysis, focusing primarily on issues related to locating a sample of published and unpublished primary studies, extracting and verifying descriptive and correlational data, and conducting analyses. A current meta-analysis of the research on predictors of key health outcomes in diabetes is used to illustrate our main points.

  17. Microwave meta-atom enhanced spintronic rectification

    SciTech Connect

    Gou, Peng; Xi, Fuchun; Qian, Qinbai; Xu, Jie; Gui, Y. S.; Hu, C.-M.; An, Zhenghua

    2015-04-06

    An artificial meta-atom (MA), or alternatively, a plasmonic antenna, has been demonstrated to significantly enhance the microwave spin rectifying photovoltage by more than two orders in magnitude (∼280) in the ferromagnetic resonance regime. The large enhancement is attributed to the unique structure of the MA which magnifies both microwave electric (∼5) and magnetic (∼56) fields in the same near-field spatial region. Our work develops the interdisciplinary direction with artificial and natural magnetism and may find promising applications in high-frequency or opto-spintronic devices and wireless microwave energy harvesting.

  18. ESR1 Gene Polymorphisms and Prostate Cancer Risk: A HuGE Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu-Mei; Liu, Zu-Wang; Guo, Jing-Bo; Wang, Xiao-Fang; Zhao, Xin-Xin; Zheng, Xuan

    2013-01-01

    Background Many published data on the association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the ESR1 gene and prostate cancer susceptibility are inconclusive. The aim of this Human Genome Epidemiology (HuGE) review and meta-analysis is to derive a more precise estimation of this relationship. Methods A literature search of PubMed, Embase, Web of Science and Chinese Biomedical (CBM) databases was conducted from their inception through July 1st, 2012. Crude odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated to assess the strength of association. Results Twelve case-control studies were included with a total 2,165 prostate cancer cases and 3,361 healthy controls. When all the eligible studies were pooled into the meta-analysis, ESR1 PvuII (C>T) and XbaI (A>G) polymorphisms showed no association with the risk of prostate cancer. However, in the stratified analyses based on ethnicity and country, the results indicated that ESR1 PvuII (C>T) polymorphism was significantly associated with increased risk of prostate cancer among Asian populations, especially among Indian population; while ESR1 XbaI (A>G) polymorphism may significantly increase the risk of prostate cancer among American population. Furthermore, we also performed a pooled analysis for all eligible case-control studies to explore the role of codon 10 (T>C), codon 325 (C>G), codon 594 (G>A) and +261G>C polymorphisms in prostate cancer risk. Nevertheless, no significant associations between these polymorphisms and the risk of prostate cancer were observed. Conclusion Results from the current meta-analysis indicate that ESR1 PvuII (C>T) polymorphism may be a risk factor for prostate cancer among Asian populations, especially among Indian population; while ESR1 XbaI (A>G) polymorphism may increase the risk of prostate cancer among American population. PMID:23805288

  19. Association between a Functional HLA-G 14-bp Insertion/deletion Polymorphism and Susceptibility to Autoimmune Diseases: A Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Y H; Bae, S-C

    2015-12-09

    The aim of this study was to determine whether a functional human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) 14-bp insertion (I)/deletion (D) polymorphism is associated with susceptibility to autoimmune diseases. A meta-analysis was conducted to assess the association between an HLA-G 14-bp I/D polymorphism and autoimmune diseases using 1) allele contrast, as well as 2) recessive, 3) dominant, and 4) codominant models. Sixteen articles that included 20 comparative studies with 3,555 patients and 5,225 controls were included in the meta-analysis. These studies were performed on nine Caucasian, six South American, three Asian, one Arab, and one African population samples. Our meta-analysis revealed no association between autoimmune diseases and the HLA-G 14-bp I/D polymorphism [odds ratio (OR) for allele I = 1.055; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.963-1.156; p = 0.251)]. However, meta-analysis according to autoimmune disease type revealed an association between systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and the II+ID genotype of the HLA-G 14-bp I/D polymorphism (OR = 1.205; 95% CI = 1.036-1.403; p = 0.016). Furthermore, analysis using a codominant model revealed an association between this polymorphism and SLE (OR for ID vs. DD = 1.203; 95% CI = 1.024-1.413; p = 0.024). In contrast, our meta-analysis revealed no association between rheumatoid arthritis (RA), multiple sclerosis (MS), or Crohn's disease (CD) and the HLA-G 14-bp I/D polymorphism. This meta-analysis showed that the HLA-G 14-bp I/D polymorphism is associated with susceptibility to a subgroup of autoimmune diseases such as SLE, but not RA, MS, or CD. These results support the existence of an association between the HLA-G gene and a subgroup of autoimmune diseases.

  20. Determination of Pb(II), Zn(II), Cd(II), and Co(II) ions by flame atomic absorption spectrometry in food and water samples after preconcentration by coprecipitation with Mo(VI)-diethyldithiocarbamate.

    PubMed

    Tufekci, Mehmet; Bulut, Volkan Numan; Elvan, Hamide; Ozdes, Duygu; Soylak, Mustafa; Duran, Celal

    2013-02-01

    A new, simple, and rapid separation and preconcentration procedure, for determination of Pb(II), Cd(II), Zn(II), and Co(II) ions in environmental real samples, has been developed. The method is based on the combination of coprecipitation of analyte ions by the aid of the Mo(VI)-diethyldithiocarbamate-(Mo(VI)-DDTC) precipitate and flame atomic absorption spectrometric determinations. The effects of experimental conditions like pH of the aqueous solution, amounts of DDTC and Mo(VI), standing time, centrifugation rate and time, sample volume, etc. and also the influences of some foreign ions were investigated in detail on the quantitative recoveries of the analyte ions. The preconcentration factors were found to be 150 for Pb(II), Zn(II) and Co(II), and 200 for Cd(II) ions. The detection limits were in the range of 0.1-2.2 μg L(-1) while the relative standard deviations were found to be lower than 5 % for the studied analyte ions. The accuracy of the method was checked by spiked/recovery tests and the analysis of certified reference material (CRM TMDW-500 Drinking Water). The procedure was successfully applied to seawater and stream water as liquid samples and baby food and dried eggplant as solid samples in order to determine the levels of Pb(II), Cd(II), Zn(II), and Co(II) ions. PMID:22527456

  1. Survivin Overexpression Is Associated with Aggressive Clinicopathological Features in Cervical Carcinoma: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Ke-yan; Wang, Zhi-lian; Gu, Qian-yun; Hao, Min

    2016-01-01

    Objective Overexpression of survivin has been reported in many human tumors. However, the clinicopathological features associated with survivin overexpression in cervical carcinoma remain controversial. Thus, the current meta-analysis was performed to assess the clinicopathological significance of survivin in cervical carcinoma. Methods PubMed, EMBASE, and Web of Science databases were searched for relevant studies published through November 1, 2015. A meta-analysis was performed to evaluate the association between survivin expression and clinicopathological outcome in cervical carcinoma. Results Eleven eligible studies with a total of 865 patients were included. Survivin overexpression was closely related to lymph node metastasis (odds ratio [OR] = 0.679, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.509–0.905, P = 0.008) but was not significantly associated with tumor FIGO stage (I+II vs. III+IV) (OR = 0.843, 95% CI: 0.626–1.137, P = 0.264), tumor grade (G1+G2 vs. G3) (OR = 0.913, 95% CI: 0.689–1.210, P = 0.527), tumor size (>4 vs. ≤4 cm) (OR = 0.825, 95% CI: 0.434–1.570, P = 0.559), or stromal involvement (OR = 0.820, 95% CI: 0.545–1.233, P = 0.340). The correlation between survivin expression and overall survival was evaluated among a total of 238 patients from three eligible studies. The pooled HR was 1.129 (95% CI: 0.597–1.661; P = 0.000), indicating that survivin expression was significantly associated with poor survival in cervical carcinoma. Conclusions Based on the current meta-analysis, survivin is strongly associated with lymph node metastasis and poor prognosis. Additionally, survivin is a novel clinicopathological marker of cervical carcinoma and thus may be a therapeutic target for cervical carcinoma. PMID:27764228

  2. Benefits and applications of interdisciplinary digital tools for environmental meta-reviews and analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grubert, Emily; Siders, Anne

    2016-09-01

    Digitally-aided reviews of large bodies of text-based information, such as academic literature, are growing in capability but are not yet common in environmental fields. Environmental sciences and studies can benefit from application of digital tools to create comprehensive, replicable, interdisciplinary reviews that provide rapid, up-to-date, and policy-relevant reports of existing work. This work reviews the potential for applications of computational text mining and analysis tools originating in the humanities to environmental science and policy questions. Two process-oriented case studies of digitally-aided environmental literature reviews and meta-analyses illustrate potential benefits and limitations. A medium-sized, medium-resolution review (∼8000 journal abstracts and titles) focuses on topic modeling as a rapid way to identify thematic changes over time. A small, high-resolution review (∼300 full text journal articles) combines collocation and network analysis with manual coding to synthesize and question empirical field work. We note that even small digitally-aided analyses are close to the upper limit of what can be done manually. Established computational methods developed in humanities disciplines and refined by humanities and social science scholars to interrogate large bodies of textual data are applicable and useful in environmental sciences but have not yet been widely applied. Two case studies provide evidence that digital tools can enhance insight. Two major conclusions emerge. First, digital tools enable scholars to engage large literatures rapidly and, in some cases, more comprehensively than is possible manually. Digital tools can confirm manually identified patterns or identify additional patterns visible only at a large scale. Second, digital tools allow for more replicable and transparent conclusions to be drawn from literature reviews and meta-analyses. The methodological subfields of digital humanities and computational social

  3. Methods for the joint meta-analysis of multiple tests.

    PubMed

    Trikalinos, Thomas A; Hoaglin, David C; Small, Kevin M; Terrin, Norma; Schmid, Christopher H

    2014-12-01

    Existing methods for meta-analysis of diagnostic test accuracy focus primarily on a single index test. We propose models for the joint meta-analysis of studies comparing multiple index tests on the same participants in paired designs. These models respect the grouping of data by studies, account for the within-study correlation between the tests' true-positive rates (TPRs) and between their false-positive rates (FPRs) (induced because tests are applied to the same participants), and allow for between-study correlations between TPRs and FPRs (such as those induced by threshold effects). We estimate models in the Bayesian setting. We demonstrate using a meta-analysis of screening for Down syndrome with two tests: shortened humerus (arm bone), and shortened femur (thigh bone). Separate and joint meta-analyses yielded similar TPR and FPR estimates. For example, the summary TPR for a shortened humerus was 35.3% (95% credible interval (CrI): 26.9, 41.8%) versus 37.9% (27.7, 50.3%) with joint versus separate meta-analysis. Joint meta-analysis is more efficient when calculating comparative accuracy: the difference in the summary TPRs was 0.0% (-8.9, 9.5%; TPR higher for shortened humerus) with joint versus 2.6% (-14.7, 19.8%) with separate meta-analyses. Simulation and empirical analyses are needed to refine the role of the proposed methodology.

  4. Data analysis with the DIANA meta-scheduling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anjum, A.; McClatchey, R.; Willers, I.

    2008-07-01

    The concepts, design and evaluation of the Data Intensive and Network Aware (DIANA) meta-scheduling approach for solving the challenges of data analysis being faced by CERN experiments are discussed in this paper. Our results suggest that data analysis can be made robust by employing fault tolerant and decentralized meta-scheduling algorithms supported in our DIANA meta-scheduler. The DIANA meta-scheduler supports data intensive bulk scheduling, is network aware and follows a policy centric meta-scheduling. In this paper, we demonstrate that a decentralized and dynamic meta-scheduling approach is an effective strategy to cope with increasing numbers of users, jobs and datasets. We present 'quality of service' related statistics for physics analysis through the application of a policy centric fair-share scheduling model. The DIANA meta-schedulers create a peer-to-peer hierarchy of schedulers to accomplish resource management that changes with evolving loads and is dynamic and adapts to the volatile nature of the resources.

  5. Meta-tools for software development and knowledge acquisition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eriksson, Henrik; Musen, Mark A.

    1992-01-01

    The effectiveness of tools that provide support for software development is highly dependent on the match between the tools and their task. Knowledge-acquisition (KA) tools constitute a class of development tools targeted at knowledge-based systems. Generally, KA tools that are custom-tailored for particular application domains are more effective than are general KA tools that cover a large class of domains. The high cost of custom-tailoring KA tools manually has encouraged researchers to develop meta-tools for KA tools. Current research issues in meta-tools for knowledge acquisition are the specification styles, or meta-views, for target KA tools used, and the relationships between the specification entered in the meta-tool and other specifications for the target program under development. We examine different types of meta-views and meta-tools. Our current project is to provide meta-tools that produce KA tools from multiple specification sources--for instance, from a task analysis of the target application.

  6. Visualizing Meta-Features in Proteomic Maps

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The steps of a high-throughput proteomics experiment include the separation, differential expression and mass spectrometry-based identification of proteins. However, the last and more challenging step is inferring the biological role of the identified proteins through their association with interaction networks, biological pathways, analysis of the effect of post-translational modifications, and other protein-related information. Results In this paper, we present an integrative visualization methodology that allows combining experimentally produced proteomic features with protein meta-features, typically coming from meta-analysis tools and databases, in synthetic Proteomic Feature Maps. Using three proteomics analysis scenarios, we show that the proposed visualization approach is effective in filtering, navigating and interacting with the proteomics data in order to address visually challenging biological questions. The novelty of our approach lies in the ease of integration of any user-defined proteomic features in easy-to-comprehend visual representations that resemble the familiar 2D-gel images, and can be adapted to the user's needs. The main capabilities of the developed VIP software, which implements the presented visualization methodology, are also highlighted and discussed. Conclusions By using this visualization and the associated VIP software, researchers can explore a complex heterogeneous proteomics dataset from different perspectives in order to address visually important biological queries and formulate new hypotheses for further investigation. VIP is freely available at http://pelopas.uop.gr/~egian/VIP/index.html. PMID:21798033

  7. Photosystem II: evolutionary perspectives.

    PubMed Central

    Rutherford, A W; Faller, P

    2003-01-01

    Based on the current model of its structure and function, photosystem II (PSII) seems to have evolved from an ancestor that was homodimeric in terms of its protein core and contained a special pair of chlorophylls as the photo-oxidizable cofactor. It is proposed that the key event in the evolution of PSII was a mutation that resulted in the separation of the two pigments that made up the special chlorophyll pair, making them into two chlorophylls that were neither special nor paired. These ordinary chlorophylls, along with the two adjacent monomeric chlorophylls, were very oxidizing: a property proposed to be intrinsic to monomeric chlorophylls in the environment provided by reaction centre (RC) proteins. It seems likely that other (mainly electrostatic) changes in the environments of the pigments probably tuned their redox potentials further but these changes would have been minor compared with the redox jump imposed by splitting of the special pair. This sudden increase in redox potential allowed the development of oxygen evolution. The highly oxidizing homodimeric RC would probably have been not only inefficient in terms of photochemistry and charge storage but also wasteful in terms of protein or pigments undergoing damage due to the oxidative chemistry. These problems would have constituted selective pressures in favour of the lop-sided, heterodimeric system that exists as PSII today, in which the highly oxidized species are limited to only one side of the heterodimer: the sacrificial, rapidly turned-over D1 protein. It is also suggested that one reason for maintaining an oxidizable tyrosine, TyrD, on the D2 side of the RC, is that the proton associated with its tyrosyl radical, has an electrostatic role in confining P(+) to the expendable D1 side. PMID:12594932

  8. Safety of Immunosuppressive Drugs Used as Maintenance Therapy in Kidney Transplantation: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Celline Cardoso; Silveira, Micheline Rosa; de Araújo, Vânia Eloisa; de Lemos, Livia Lovato Pires; de Oliveira Costa, Juliana; Reis, Carlos Augusto Lins; de Assis Acurcio, Francisco; Braga Ceccato, Maria das Gracas

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the safety of regimens containing calcineurin inhibitors (CNI), proliferation signal inhibitors (TOR-I) and antimetabolites, we conducted a meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials (RCTs) and observational studies. A total of 4,960 citations were identified in our electronic search and 14 additional articles were identified through hand searching. Forty-eight articles (11,432 participants) from 42 studies (38 RCTs and four cohorts) met the inclusion criteria. Meta-analysis results revealed the following: (i) tacrolimus was associated with an increased risk for diabetes and lower risk of dyslipidemia, compared to cyclosporine; (ii) mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) was associated with increased risk for total infections, abdominal pain, diarrhea and vomiting, compared with azathioprine; (iii) sirolimus was associated with higher risk of anemia, diabetes, dyslipidemia, lymphoceles and withdrawal compared to tacrolimus or cyclosporine, and cyclosporine was associated with an increased risk of CMV infection; (iv) the combination of CNI with antimetabolites was associated with more adverse events than CNI alone; (v) TOR-I was related to more adverse events than MMF. The data observed in this meta-analysis are similar to those describe by others authors; thus, the choice of treatment must be made by the clinical staff based on specific patient characteristics. PMID:24275847

  9. Indium-111-Photofrin-II scintillation scan

    SciTech Connect

    Origitano, T.C.; Karesh, S.M.; Reichman, O.H.; Henkin, R.E.; Caron, M.J.

    1989-04-01

    Photodynamic therapy is under intense investigation as an adjuvant treatment for malignant glial tumors of the central nervous system. Photofrin-II (HpD-II) is currently the most actively investigated photosensitizing agent. A crucial issue regarding the safe and efficacious usage of HpD-II-based photodynamic therapy is the individual in vivo kinetics of tumor uptake and retention, compared with normal brain clearance. The optimal time for photoactivation of sensitized tumor must be known to ensure a high target-to-nontarget ratio, resulting in the maximal tumor destruction while preserving normal brain. Our laboratory developed a radionuclide scan based on 111indium (111In)-labeled HpD-II to evaluate HpD-II localization and clearance noninvasively within a canine model of intracerebral gliosarcoma. Synthesis of the 111In-HpD-II complex in greater than 90% yield is achieved by a simple, rapid labeling method. Radiochemical purity and stability were verified by high-performance liquid chromatography. Using the canine model of intracerebral gliosarcoma, we followed the uptake of 111In-HpD-II in tumors with serial scintillation scanning. Localization of the tumor by 111In-HpD-II has been verified by contrast-enhanced computed tomographic scan followed by gross and histological examination of the enhancing brain region. Total body biodistribution of 111In-HpD-II at various times after injection has been evaluated. The ratio of uptake in tumor compared with surrounding brain peaked at 72 hours after injection. The knowledge of regional distribution and concentration of a photosensitizing agent within a tumor mass and surrounding brain allows for the most efficacious timing and localization of a photoactivating source.

  10. RapidMic: Rapid Computation of the Maximal Information Coefficient

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Dongming; Wang, Mingwen; Zheng, Weifan; Wang, Hongjun

    2014-01-01

    To discover relationships and associations rapidly in large-scale datasets, we propose a cross-platform tool for the rapid computation of the maximal information coefficient based on parallel computing methods. Through parallel processing, the provided tool can effectively analyze large-scale biological datasets with a markedly reduced computing time. The experimental results show that the proposed tool is notably fast, and is able to perform an all-pairs analysis of a large biological dataset using a normal computer. The source code and guidelines can be downloaded from https://github.com/HelloWorldCN/RapidMic. PMID:24526831

  11. Medical Student Research: An Integrated Mixed-Methods Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Amgad, Mohamed; Man Kin Tsui, Marco; Liptrott, Sarah J.; Shash, Emad

    2015-01-01

    Importance Despite the rapidly declining number of physician-investigators, there is no consistent structure within medical education so far for involving medical students in research. Objective To conduct an integrated mixed-methods systematic review and meta-analysis of published studies about medical students' participation in research, and to evaluate the evidence in order to guide policy decision-making regarding this issue. Evidence Review We followed the PRISMA statement guidelines during the preparation of this review and meta-analysis. We searched various databases as well as the bibliographies of the included studies between March 2012 and September 2013. We identified all relevant quantitative and qualitative studies assessing the effect of medical student participation in research, without restrictions regarding study design or publication date. Prespecified outcome-specific quality criteria were used to judge the admission of each quantitative outcome into the meta-analysis. Initial screening of titles and abstracts resulted in the retrieval of 256 articles for full-text assessment. Eventually, 79 articles were included in our study, including eight qualitative studies. An integrated approach was used to combine quantitative and qualitative studies into a single synthesis. Once all included studies were identified, a data-driven thematic analysis was performed. Findings and Conclusions Medical student participation in research is associated with improved short- and long- term scientific productivity, more informed career choices and improved knowledge about-, interest in- and attitudes towards research. Financial worries, gender, having a higher degree (MSc or PhD) before matriculation and perceived competitiveness of the residency of choice are among the factors that affect the engagement of medical students in research and/or their scientific productivity. Intercalated BSc degrees, mandatory graduation theses and curricular research components may

  12. A meta-analysis of active video games on health outcomes among children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Gao, Z; Chen, S; Pasco, D; Pope, Z

    2015-09-01

    This meta-analysis synthesizes current literature concerning the effects of active video games (AVGs) on children/adolescents' health-related outcomes. A total of 512 published studies on AVGs were located, and 35 articles were included based on the following criteria: (i) data-based research articles published in English between 1985 and 2015; (ii) studied some types of AVGs and related outcomes among children/adolescents and (iii) had at least one comparison within each study. Data were extracted to conduct comparisons for outcome measures in three separate categories: AVGs and sedentary behaviours, AVGs and laboratory-based exercise, and AVGs and field-based physical activity. Effect size for each entry was calculated with the Comprehensive Meta-Analysis software in 2015. Mean effect size (Hedge's g) and standard deviation were calculated for each comparison. Compared with sedentary behaviours, AVGs had a large effect on health outcomes. The effect sizes for physiological outcomes were marginal when comparing AVGs with laboratory-based exercises. The comparison between AVGs and field-based physical activity had null to moderate effect sizes. AVGs could yield equivalent health benefits to children/adolescents as laboratory-based exercise or field-based physical activity. Therefore, AVGs can be a good alternative for sedentary behaviour and addition to traditional physical activity and sports in children/adolescents. PMID:25943852

  13. Power considerations for λ inflation factor in meta-analyses of genome-wide association studies.

    PubMed

    Georgiopoulos, Georgios; Evangelou, Evangelos

    2016-01-01

    The genomic control (GC) approach is extensively used to effectively control false positive signals due to population stratification in genome-wide association studies (GWAS). However, GC affects the statistical power of GWAS. The loss of power depends on the magnitude of the inflation factor (λ) that is used for GC. We simulated meta-analyses of different GWAS. Minor allele frequency (MAF) ranged from 0·001 to 0·5 and λ was sampled from two scenarios: (i) random scenario (empirically-derived distribution of real λ values) and (ii) selected scenario from simulation parameter modification. Adjustment for λ was considered under single correction (within study corrected standard errors) and double correction (additional λ corrected summary estimate). MAF was a pivotal determinant of observed power. In random λ scenario, double correction induced a symmetric power reduction in comparison to single correction. For MAF 1·2 and MAF >5%. Our results provide a quick but detailed index for power considerations of future meta-analyses of GWAS that enables a more flexible design from early steps based on the number of studies accumulated in different groups and the λ values observed in the single studies. PMID:27193946

  14. Production ratio of meta-stable isomer in {sup 180}Ta by neutrino-induced reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Hayakawa, Takehito; Kajino, Toshitaka; Chiba, Satoshi; Mathews, Grant

    2010-05-12

    The nucleosynthesis of {sup 180}Ta has remained an unsolved problem and as its origin many nucleosynthesis mechanisms have been proposed. This isotope has the unique feature that the naturally occurring abundance of {sup 180}Ta is actually a meta-stable isomer (half-life of >=10{sup 15} yr), while the ground state is a 1{sup +} unstable state which beta-decays with a half-life of only 8.15 hr. We have made a new time-dependent calculation of {sup 180}Ta meta-stable isomer residual ratio after supernova neutrino-induced reactions. This isomer residual ratio is crucial for understanding the production and survival of this naturally occurring rare isotope. We have constructed a new model under temperature evolution after type II supernova explosion. We include the explicit linking between the isomer and all known excited states and found that the residual ratio is insensitive to astrophysical parameters such as neutrino energy spectrum, explosion energy, decay time constant. We find that the explicit time evolution of the synthesis of {sup 180}Ta avoids the overproduction relative to {sup 138}La for a neutrino process neutrino temperature of 4 MeV.

  15. A meta-analysis of active video games on health outcomes among children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Gao, Z; Chen, S; Pasco, D; Pope, Z

    2015-09-01

    This meta-analysis synthesizes current literature concerning the effects of active video games (AVGs) on children/adolescents' health-related outcomes. A total of 512 published studies on AVGs were located, and 35 articles were included based on the following criteria: (i) data-based research articles published in English between 1985 and 2015; (ii) studied some types of AVGs and related outcomes among children/adolescents and (iii) had at least one comparison within each study. Data were extracted to conduct comparisons for outcome measures in three separate categories: AVGs and sedentary behaviours, AVGs and laboratory-based exercise, and AVGs and field-based physical activity. Effect size for each entry was calculated with the Comprehensive Meta-Analysis software in 2015. Mean effect size (Hedge's g) and standard deviation were calculated for each comparison. Compared with sedentary behaviours, AVGs had a large effect on health outcomes. The effect sizes for physiological outcomes were marginal when comparing AVGs with laboratory-based exercises. The comparison between AVGs and field-based physical activity had null to moderate effect sizes. AVGs could yield equivalent health benefits to children/adolescents as laboratory-based exercise or field-based physical activity. Therefore, AVGs can be a good alternative for sedentary behaviour and addition to traditional physical activity and sports in children/adolescents.

  16. A meta-substrate to enhance the bandwidth of metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongsheng; Wang, Zuojia; Zhang, Runren; Wang, Huaping; Lin, Shisheng; Yu, Faxin; Moser, Herbert O

    2014-06-12

    We propose the concept of a meta-substrate to broaden the bandwidth of left-handed metamaterials. The meta-substrate, which behaves like an inhomogeneous magnetic substrate, is composed of another kind of magnetic metamaterials like metallic closed rings. When conventional metamaterial rings are printed on this kind of meta-substrate in a proper way, the interaction of the metamaterials units can be greatly enhanced, yielding an increased bandwidth of negative permeability. An equivalent circuit analytical model is used to quantitatively characterize this phenomenon. Both numerical and experimental demonstrations are carried out, showing good agreement with theoretical predictions.

  17. A meta-substrate to enhance the bandwidth of metamaterials

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hongsheng; Wang, Zuojia; Zhang, Runren; Wang, Huaping; Lin, Shisheng; Yu, Faxin; Moser, Herbert O.

    2014-01-01

    We propose the concept of a meta-substrate to broaden the bandwidth of left-handed metamaterials. The meta-substrate, which behaves like an inhomogeneous magnetic substrate, is composed of another kind of magnetic metamaterials like metallic closed rings. When conventional metamaterial rings are printed on this kind of meta-substrate in a proper way, the interaction of the metamaterials units can be greatly enhanced, yielding an increased bandwidth of negative permeability. An equivalent circuit analytical model is used to quantitatively characterize this phenomenon. Both numerical and experimental demonstrations are carried out, showing good agreement with theoretical predictions. PMID:24919678

  18. Functional multi-band THz meta-foils

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jianfeng; Moser, Herbert O.; Xu, Su; Jian, Linke; Banas, Agnieszka; Banas, Krzysztof; Chen, Hongsheng; Bettiol, Andrew A.; Breese, Mark B. H.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we present the first experimental demonstration of double- and triple-band negative refraction index meta-foils in the terahertz (THz) region. Multi-band meta-foils constructed by multi-cell S-string resonators in a single structure exhibit simultaneously negative permittivity and negative permeability responses at multiple frequencies. The phenomena are confirmed by numerical simulations and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy measurements. The flexible, freestanding multi-band meta-foils provide a promising candidate for the development of multi-frequency THz materials and devices. PMID:24346309

  19. ‘Trying to pin down jelly’ - exploring intuitive processes in quality assessment for meta-ethnography

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Studies that systematically search for and synthesise qualitative research are becoming more evident in health care, and they can make an important contribution to patient care. However, there is still no agreement as to whether, or how we should appraise studies for inclusion. We aimed to explore the intuitive processes that determined the ‘quality’ of qualitative research for inclusion in qualitative research syntheses. We were particularly interested to explore the way that knowledge was constructed. Methods We used qualitative methods to explore the process of quality appraisal within a team of seven qualitative researchers funded to undertake a meta-ethnography of chronic non-malignant musculoskeletal pain. Team discussions took place monthly between October 2010 and June 2012 and were recorded and transcribed. Data was coded and organised using constant comparative method. The development of our conceptual analysis was both iterative and collaborative. The strength of this team approach to quality came from open and honest discussion, where team members felt free to agree, disagree, or change their position within the safety of the group. Results We suggest two core facets of quality for inclusion in meta-ethnography - (1) Conceptual clarity; how clearly has the author articulated a concept that facilitates theoretical insight. (2) Interpretive rigour; fundamentally, can the interpretation ‘be trusted?’ Our findings showed that three important categories help the reader to judge interpretive rigour: (ii) What is the context of the interpretation? (ii) How inductive is the interpretation? (iii) Has the researcher challenged their interpretation? Conclusions We highlight that methods alone do not determine the quality of research for inclusion into a meta-ethnography. The strength of a concept and its capacity to facilitate theoretical insight is integral to meta-ethnography, and arguably to the quality of research. However, we suggest that

  20. Rapid Diversity Loss of Competing Animal Species in Well-Connected Landscapes.

    PubMed

    Schippers, Peter; Hemerik, Lia; Baveco, Johannes M; Verboom, Jana

    2015-01-01

    Population viability of a single species, when evaluated with metapopulation based landscape evaluation tools, always increases when the connectivity of the landscape increases. However, when interactions between species are taken into account, results can differ. We explore this issue using a stochastic spatially explicit meta-community model with 21 competing species in five different competitive settings: (1) weak, coexisting competition, (2) neutral competition, (3) strong, excluding competition, (4) hierarchical competition and (5) random species competition. The species compete in randomly generated landscapes with various fragmentation levels. With this model we study species loss over time. Simulation results show that overall diversity, the species richness in the entire landscape, decreases slowly in fragmented landscapes whereas in well-connected landscapes rapid species losses occur. These results are robust with respect to changing competitive settings, species parameters and spatial configurations. They indicate that optimal landscape configuration for species conservation differs between metapopulation approaches, modelling species separately and meta-community approaches allowing species interactions. The mechanism behind this is that species in well-connected landscapes rapidly outcompete each other. Species that become abundant, by chance or by their completive strength, send out large amounts of dispersers that colonize and take over other patches that are occupied by species that are less abundant. This mechanism causes rapid species loss. In fragmented landscapes the colonization rate is lower, and it is difficult for a new species to establish in an already occupied patch. So, here dominant species cannot easily take over patches occupied by other species and higher diversity is maintained for a longer time. These results suggest that fragmented landscapes have benefits for species conservation previously unrecognized by the landscape ecology

  1. Selenium Exposure and Cancer Risk: an Updated Meta-analysis and Meta-regression

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Xianlei; Wang, Chen; Yu, Wanqi; Fan, Wenjie; Wang, Shan; Shen, Ning; Wu, Pengcheng; Li, Xiuyang; Wang, Fudi

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the associations between selenium exposure and cancer risk. We identified 69 studies and applied meta-analysis, meta-regression and dose-response analysis to obtain available evidence. The results indicated that high selenium exposure had a protective effect on cancer risk (pooled OR = 0.78; 95%CI: 0.73–0.83). The results of linear and nonlinear dose-response analysis indicated that high serum/plasma selenium and toenail selenium had the efficacy on cancer prevention. However, we did not find a protective efficacy of selenium supplement. High selenium exposure may have different effects on specific types of cancer. It decreased the risk of breast cancer, lung cancer, esophageal cancer, gastric cancer, and prostate cancer, but it was not associated with colorectal cancer, bladder cancer, and skin cancer. PMID:26786590

  2. FIRE II - Cirrus Data Sets

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-07-26

    FIRE II - Cirrus Data Sets First ISCCP Regional Experiment (FIRE) II ... stratocumulus systems, the radiative properties of these clouds and their interactions. Relevant Documents:  FIRE Project Guide FIRE II - Cirrus Home Page FIRE II - Cirrus Mission Summaries ...

  3. Meta-code for systematic analysis of chemical addition (SACHA): application to fluorination of C70 and carbon nanostructure growth.

    PubMed

    Ewels, Christopher P; Lier, Gregory Van; Geerlings, Paul; Charlier, Jean-Christophe

    2007-01-01

    We present a new computer program able to systematically study chemical addition to and growth or evolution of carbon nanostructures. SACHA is a meta-code able to exploit a wide variety of pre-existing molecular structure codes, automating the otherwise onerous task of constructing, running, and analyzing the large number of input files that are required when exploring structural isomers and addition paths. By way of examples we consider fluorination of the fullerene cage C70 and carbon nanostructure growth through C2 addition. We discuss the possibilities for extension of this technique to rapidly and efficiently explore structural energy landscapes and application to other areas of chemical and materials research.

  4. P300 Amplitude in Alzheimer's Disease: A Meta-Analysis and Meta-Regression.

    PubMed

    Hedges, Dawson; Janis, Rebecca; Mickelson, Stephen; Keith, Cierra; Bennett, David; Brown, Bruce L

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease accounts for 60% of all dementia. Numerous biomarkers have been developed that can help in making an early diagnosis. The P300 is an event-related potential that may be abnormal in Alzheimer's disease. Given the possible association between P300 amplitude and Alzheimer's disease and the need for biomarkers in early Alzheimer's disease, the main purpose of this meta-analysis and meta-regression was to characterize P300 amplitude in probable Alzheimer's disease compared to healthy controls. Using online search engines, we identified peer-reviewed articles containing amplitude measures for the P300 in response to a visual or auditory oddball stimulus in subjects with Alzheimer's disease and in a healthy control group and pooled effect sizes for differences in P300 amplitude between Alzheimer's disease and control groups to obtain summary effect sizes. We also used meta-regression to determine whether age, sex, educational attainment, or dementia severity affected the association between P300 amplitude and Alzheimer's disease. Twenty articles containing a total of 646 subjects met inclusion and exclusion criteria. The overall effect size from all electrode locations was 1.079 (95% confidence interval=0.745-1.412, P<.001). The pooled effect sizes for the Cz, Fz, and Pz locations were 1.226 (P<.001), 0.724 (P=.0007), and 1.430 (P<.001), respectively. Meta-regression showed an association between amplitude and educational attainment, but no association between amplitude and age, sex, and dementia severity. In conclusion, P300 amplitude is smaller in subjects with Alzheimer's disease than in healthy controls.

  5. Parallel-META 2.0: Enhanced Metagenomic Data Analysis with Functional Annotation, High Performance Computing and Advanced Visualization

    PubMed Central

    Song, Baoxing; Xu, Jian; Ning, Kang

    2014-01-01

    The metagenomic method directly sequences and analyses genome information from microbial communities. The main computational tasks for metagenomic analyses include taxonomical and functional structure analysis for all genomes in a microbial community (also referred to as a metagenomic sample). With the advancement of Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) techniques, the number of metagenomic samples and the data size for each sample are increasing rapidly. Current metagenomic analysis is both data- and computation- intensive, especially when there are many species in a metagenomic sample, and each has a large number of sequences. As such, metagenomic analyses require extensive computational power. The increasing analytical requirements further augment the challenges for computation analysis. In this work, we have proposed Parallel-META 2.0, a metagenomic analysis software package, to cope with such needs for efficient and fast analyses of taxonomical and functional structures for microbial communities. Parallel-META 2.0 is an extended and improved version of Parallel-META 1.0, which enhances the taxonomical analysis using multiple databases, improves computation efficiency by optimized parallel computing, and supports interactive visualization of results in multiple views. Furthermore, it enables functional analysis for metagenomic samples including short-reads assembly, gene prediction and functional annotation. Therefore, it could provide accurate taxonomical and functional analyses of the metagenomic samples in high-throughput manner and on large scale. PMID:24595159

  6. Parallel-META 2.0: enhanced metagenomic data analysis with functional annotation, high performance computing and advanced visualization.

    PubMed

    Su, Xiaoquan; Pan, Weihua; Song, Baoxing; Xu, Jian; Ning, Kang

    2014-01-01

    The metagenomic method directly sequences and analyses genome information from microbial communities. The main computational tasks for metagenomic analyses include taxonomical and functional structure analysis for all genomes in a microbial community (also referred to as a metagenomic sample). With the advancement of Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) techniques, the number of metagenomic samples and the data size for each sample are increasing rapidly. Current metagenomic analysis is both data- and computation- intensive, especially when there are many species in a metagenomic sample, and each has a large number of sequences. As such, metagenomic analyses require extensive computational power. The increasing analytical requirements further augment the challenges for computation analysis. In this work, we have proposed Parallel-META 2.0, a metagenomic analysis software package, to cope with such needs for efficient and fast analyses of taxonomical and functional structures for microbial communities. Parallel-META 2.0 is an extended and improved version of Parallel-META 1.0, which enhances the taxonomical analysis using multiple databases, improves computation efficiency by optimized parallel computing, and supports interactive visualization of results in multiple views. Furthermore, it enables functional analysis for metagenomic samples including short-reads assembly, gene prediction and functional annotation. Therefore, it could provide accurate taxonomical and functional analyses of the metagenomic samples in high-throughput manner and on large scale.

  7. Can China afford rapid aging?

    PubMed

    Jiang, Quanbao; Yang, Shucai; Sánchez-Barricarte, Jesús J

    2016-01-01

    China's rapid aging has caused widespread concern, but it seems that the situations and consequences of rapid aging are not adequately acknowledged. This study analyzed the problem of ageing in China from the aspects of elderly people's health status, income source, daily care, suicide, the weak social security system in terms of pension, health expenses, and long-term care costs as well as incoming accelerating ageing process in China. All these factors indicate that it is difficult for China to afford the issue of a rapidly aging population. PMID:27478724

  8. [Rapid diagnosis of respiratory infection].

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Toru

    2012-08-01

    The identification of pathogens is very important for the diagnosis and treatment of respiratory infectious disease. Bacterial culture is a basic method to identify various pathogens, but it takes several days to get the final results. Many new methods for the rapid diagnosis of respiratory infection have been developed in recent years. This has changed the treatment of respiratory infection. Broad-spectrum antibiotics were often used to treat respiratory infection previously, but rapid diagnosis has changed the choice of antibiotics from broad-spectrum to specific ones. New methods of rapid diagnosis are very useful and powerful tools in the treatment of respiratory infection.

  9. Effectiveness and safety of vedolizumab for treatment of Crohn's disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Moćko, Paweł; Smela-Lipińska, Beata; Pilc, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this systematic review (SR) and meta-analysis was to assess the efficacy and safety of vedolizumab in the treatment of Crohn's disease (CD). Material and methods A systematic literature search was conducted in Medline/PubMed, Embase and Cochrane Library until 25 January, 2015. Included studies were critically appraised according to the PRISMA protocol. Assessment in specified subgroups of CD patients and meta-analysis with Revman software were performed. Results Two randomized controlled trial (RCTs) were included in a meta-analysis for the induction phase of therapy: GEMINI II and GEMINI III. The clinical response was significantly higher for patients who received vedolizumab compared to placebo in the general population (risk benefit (RB) = 1.48; p = 0.0006) and in both analyzed subgroups: patients with previous failure of anti-TNFs treatment (RB = 1.51; p = 0.006) and patients naive to earlier anti-TNFs (RB = 1.41; p = 0.001). The clinical remission in the general population and subpopulation of TNF-antagonist naive patients was significantly higher for patients who received vedolizumab compared to placebo (RB = 1.77; p = 0.003; RB = 2.29; p = 0.0004; respectively). Meta-analysis for adverse events, serious adverse events (SAEs) and serious infections, revealed that vedolizumab was as safe as placebo in the induction phase of therapy. Conclusions The clinical response was significantly higher for patients who received vedolizumab in the general population and in both analyzed subgroups of patients. The clinical remission in the general population and subpopulation of TNF-antagonist naive patients was significantly higher for vedolizumab, but no significant differences were revealed in the subgroup of patients with previous TNF antagonist failure. PMID:27695501

  10. DisMeta: a meta server for construct design and optimization.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuanpeng Janet; Acton, Thomas B; Montelione, Gaetano T

    2014-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered or unstructured regions in proteins are both common and biologically important, particularly in regulation, signaling, and modulating intermolecular recognition processes. From a practical point of view, however, such disordered regions often can pose significant challenges for crystallization. Disordered regions are also detrimental to NMR spectral quality, complicating the analysis of resonance assignments and three-dimensional protein structures by NMR methods. The DisMeta Server has been used by Northeastern Structural Genomics (NESG) consortium as a primary tool for construct design and optimization in preparing samples for both NMR and crystallization studies. It is a meta-server that generates a consensus analysis of eight different sequence-based disorder predictors to identify regions that are likely to be disordered. DisMeta also identifies predicted secretion signal peptides, transmembrane segments, and low-complexity regions. Identification of disordered regions, by either experimental or computational methods, is an important step in the NESG structure production pipeline, allowing the rational design of protein constructs that have improved expression and solubility, improved crystallization, and better quality NMR spectra.

  11. Domain Definition and Search Techniques in Meta-Analyses of L2 Research (or Why 18 Meta-Analyses of Feedback Have Different Results)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plonsky, Luke; Brown, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Applied linguists have turned increasingly in recent years to meta-analysis as the preferred means of synthesizing quantitative research. The first step in the meta-analytic process involves defining a domain of interest. Despite its apparent simplicity, this step involves a great deal of subjectivity on the part of the meta-analyst. This article…

  12. Antimicrobial Resistance of Acinetobacter baumannii to Imipenem in Iran: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pourhajibagher, Maryam; Hashemi, Farhad B.; Pourakbari, Babak; Aziemzadeh, Masoud; Bahador, Abbas

    2016-01-01

    Imipenem-resistant multi-drug resistant (IR-MDR) Acinetobacter baumannii has been emerged as a morbidity successful nosocomial pathogen throughout the world.To address imipenem being yet the most effective antimicrobial agent against A. baumannii to control outbreaks and treat patients, a systematic review and meta-analysis was performed to evaluate the prevalence of IR-MDR A. baumannii. We systematically searched Web of Science, PubMed, MEDLINE, Science Direct, EMBASE, Scopus, Cochrane Library, Google Scholar, and Iranian databases to identify studies addressing the antibiotic resistance of A. baumannii to imipenem and the frequency of MDR strains in Iran. Out of 58 articles and after a secondary screening using inclusion and exclusion criteria and on the basis of title and abstract evaluation, 51 studies were selected for analysis. The meta-analysis revealed that 55% [95% confidence interval (CI), 53.0–56.5] of A. baumannii were resistant to imipenem and 74% (95% CI, 61.3–83.9) were MDR. The MDR A. baumannii population in Iran is rapidly changing toward a growing resistance to imipenem. Our findings highlight the critical need for a comprehensive monitoring and infection control policy as well as a national susceptibility review program that evaluates IR-MDR A. baumannii isolates from various parts of Iran. PMID:27099638

  13. Is the gram stain useful in the microbiologic diagnosis of VAP? A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    O'Horo, John C; Thompson, Deb; Safdar, Nasia

    2012-08-01

    In a meta-analysis examining respiratory specimen Gram stain for diagnosis of ventilator-associated pneumonia, absence of bacteria on Gram stain had a high negative predictive value, but a positive Gram stain correlated poorly with organisms recovered in culture. Rapid and accurate diagnosis of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is a major challenge and no generally accepted gold standard exists for VAP diagnosis. We conducted a meta-analysis to examine the role of respiratory specimen Gram stain to diagnose VAP, and the correlation with final culture results. In 21 studies, pooled sensitivity of Gram stain for VAP was 0.79 (95% confidence interval [CI], .77-0.81; P < .0001) and specificity was 0.75 (95% CI, .73-.78; P < .0001). Negative predictive value of Gram stain for a VAP prevalence of 20%-30% was 91%, suggesting that VAP is unlikely with a negative Gram stain but the positive predictive value of Gram stain was only 40%. Pooled kappa was 0.42 for gram-positive organisms and 0.34 for gram-negative organisms, suggesting fair concordance between organisms on Gram stain and recovery by culture. Therefore, a positive Gram stain should not be used to narrow anti-infective therapy until culture results become available.

  14. Metagenomic and Meta-transcriptomic Analysis of a Chromate-Reducing Aquifer Microbial Community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beller, H. R.; Lim, H.; Han, R.; Karaoz, U.; Brodie, E. L.

    2011-12-01

    As part of a highly interdisciplinary study of in situ reductive immobilization of Cr at DOE's Hanford 100H site, we are developing a systems biology approach (employing metagenomic and meta-transcriptomic data) to identify highly expressed genes in the native microbial community under conditions of interest, without requiring any a priori sequence information or assumptions about what processes might be occurring. A key scientific goal is to determine if there are diagnostic biomolecular signatures indicative of important aquifer biogeochemical processes that can be used to (a) help discriminate between direct (enzymatic) and indirect (abiotic) oxidation-reduction processes relevant to bioremediation and (b) to inform and constrain reactive transport models even when geochemical field measurements do not reveal all relevant processes. We are in the process of collecting metagenomic and meta-transcriptomic sequence information from various experimental systems under conditions relevant to in situ chromate reduction at Hanford 100H. This poster focuses on Hanford microcosm studies. To characterize functional changes in an aquifer-derived, chromate-reducing microbial community as it transitions successively through electron-accepting conditions relevant to the Hanford subsurface, we inoculated anaerobic microcosms with groundwater from the Cr-contaminated Hanford 100H site and supplemented them with lactate and electron acceptors present at the site [e.g., nitrate, sulfate, and Fe(III)]. Metagenomic and meta-transcriptomic "snapshots" were taken during denitrification, sulfate and Fe(III) reduction, and nitrate-dependent oxidation of Fe(II) and sulfide. We conducted Illumina paired-end sequencing, assembled with ABySS-pe, and initially annotated using MG-RAST and CAMERA. cDNA samples for meta-transcriptome sequencing represented mRNA enriched using a new subtractive hybridization method resulting in 61-78% of reads mapping to their corresponding metagenomes

  15. Rapid diagnostic tests for malaria.

    PubMed

    Visser, Theodoor; Daily, Jennifer; Hotte, Nora; Dolkart, Caitlin; Cunningham, Jane; Yadav, Prashant

    2015-12-01

    Maintaining quality, competitiveness and innovation in global health technology is a constant challenge for manufacturers, while affordability, access and equity are challenges for governments and international agencies. In this paper we discuss these issues with reference to rapid diagnostic tests for malaria. Strategies to control and eliminate malaria depend on early and accurate diagnosis. Rapid diagnostic tests for malaria require little training and equipment and can be performed by non-specialists in remote settings. Use of these tests has expanded significantly over the last few years, following recommendations to test all suspected malaria cases before treatment and the implementation of an evaluation programme to assess the performance of the malaria rapid diagnostic tests. Despite these gains, challenges exist that, if not addressed, could jeopardize the progress made to date. We discuss recent developments in rapid diagnostic tests for malaria, highlight some of the challenges and provide suggestions to address them.

  16. Rapid diagnostic tests for malaria

    PubMed Central

    Daily, Jennifer; Hotte, Nora; Dolkart, Caitlin; Cunningham, Jane; Yadav, Prashant

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Maintaining quality, competitiveness and innovation in global health technology is a constant challenge for manufacturers, while affordability, access and equity are challenges for governments and international agencies. In this paper we discuss these issues with reference to rapid diagnostic tests for malaria. Strategies to control and eliminate malaria depend on early and accurate diagnosis. Rapid diagnostic tests for malaria require little training and equipment and can be performed by non-specialists in remote settings. Use of these tests has expanded significantly over the last few years, following recommendations to test all suspected malaria cases before treatment and the implementation of an evaluation programme to assess the performance of the malaria rapid diagnostic tests. Despite these gains, challenges exist that, if not addressed, could jeopardize the progress made to date. We discuss recent developments in rapid diagnostic tests for malaria, highlight some of the challenges and provide suggestions to address them. PMID:26668438

  17. Rapid deployment intrusion detection system

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, R.H.

    1997-08-01

    A rapidly deployable security system is one that provides intrusion detection, assessment, communications, and annunciation capabilities; is easy to install and configure; can be rapidly deployed, and is reusable. A rapidly deployable intrusion detection system (RADIDS) has many potential applications within the DOE Complex: back-up protection for failed zones in a perimeter intrusion detection and assessment system, intrusion detection and assessment capabilities in temporary locations, protection of assets during Complex reconfiguration, and protection in hazardous locations, protection of assets during Complex reconfiguration, and protection in hazardous locations. Many DOE user-need documents have indicated an interest in a rapidly deployable intrusion detection system. The purpose of the RADIDS project is to design, develop, and implement such a system. 2 figs.

  18. A qualitative meta-synthesis and theory of postpartum depression.

    PubMed

    Mollard, Elizabeth K

    2014-09-01

    To synthesize existing qualitative literature on the first-hand experiences of women suffering from postpartum depression (PPD), to uncover potential common themes, a meta-synthesis of 12 qualitative studies using Noblit and Hare's 7-phase model of meta-ethnography was used. Four themes were discovered: crushed maternal role expectation, going into hiding, loss of sense of self, intense feelings of vulnerability, plus practical life concerns. A preliminary theory of PPD as a 4-step process is proposed, based on the relationships between the themes in this meta-synthesis. This 4-step process is compared and contrasted with Cheryl Tatano Beck's 4-stage theory of PPD "Teetering on the Edge". This meta-synthesis and theory offers a significant contribution to the literature in helping identify PPD distinctly from depression outside of the postpartum period, and deserves further study.

  19. Implementation and characterization of meta-resonator antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, In Kwang; Varadan, Vasundara V.

    2015-04-01

    Metamaterials are artificially engineered microstructures that have strong resonance behavior although their electrical size is very small. Meta-resonator (metamaterial resonator) antennas use the resonance of the metamaterials to reduce the size of radiators and design multiband antennas. A split-ring resonator (SRR) is a well-studied metamaterial structure which obtains negative permittivity and/or permeability in a narrow frequency region. In this paper, metamaterial structures and meta-resonator antennas are designed and simulated using a full wave simulator. 2D metaresonator antennas are fabricated by photolithography and 3D meta-resonator antennas are fabricated by LTCC (Low- Temperature Co-fired Ceramic) technique. A free space measurement system is used to characterize metamaterial samples. Several 2D/3D meta-resonator antennas with SRRs are described.

  20. Meta-Envy-Free Cake-Cutting Protocols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manabe, Yoshifumi; Okamoto, Tatsuaki

    This paper discusses cake-cutting protocols when the cake is a heterogeneous good that is represented by an interval in the real line. We propose a new desirable property, the meta-envy-freeness of cake-cutting, which has not been formally considered before. Though envy-freeness was considered to be one of the most important desirable properties, envy-freeness does not prevent envy about role assignment in the protocols. We define meta-envy-freeness that formalizes this kind of envy. We show that current envy-free cake-cutting protocols do not satisfy meta-envy-freeness. Formerly proposed properties such as strong envy-free, exact, and equitable do not directly consider this type of envy and these properties are very difficult to realize. This paper then shows meta-envy-free cake-cutting protocols for two and three party cases.

  1. Graphical Tools for Network Meta-Analysis in STATA

    PubMed Central

    Chaimani, Anna; Higgins, Julian P. T.; Mavridis, Dimitris; Spyridonos, Panagiota; Salanti, Georgia

    2013-01-01

    Network meta-analysis synthesizes direct and indirect evidence in a network of trials that compare multiple interventions and has the potential to rank the competing treatments according to the studied outcome. Despite its usefulness network meta-analysis is often criticized for its complexity and for being accessible only to researchers with strong statistical and computational skills. The evaluation of the underlying model assumptions, the statistical technicalities and presentation of the results in a concise and understandable way are all challenging aspects in the network meta-analysis methodology. In this paper we aim to make the methodology accessible to non-statisticians by presenting and explaining a series of graphical tools via worked examples. To this end, we provide a set of STATA routines that can be easily employed to present the evidence base, evaluate the assumptions, fit the network meta-analysis model and interpret its results. PMID:24098547

  2. Meta-Research: Broadening the Scope of PLOS Biology.

    PubMed

    Kousta, Stavroula; Ferguson, Christine; Ganley, Emma

    2016-01-01

    In growing recognition of the importance of how scientific research is designed, performed, communicated, and evaluated, PLOS Biology announces a broadening of its scope to cover meta-research articles.

  3. Graphical tools for network meta-analysis in STATA.

    PubMed

    Chaimani, Anna; Higgins, Julian P T; Mavridis, Dimitris; Spyridonos, Panagiota; Salanti, Georgia

    2013-01-01

    Network meta-analysis synthesizes direct and indirect evidence in a network of trials that compare multiple interventions and has the potential to rank the competing treatments according to the studied outcome. Despite its usefulness network meta-analysis is often criticized for its complexity and for being accessible only to researchers with strong statistical and computational skills. The evaluation of the underlying model assumptions, the statistical technicalities and presentation of the results in a concise and understandable way are all challenging aspects in the network meta-analysis methodology. In this paper we aim to make the methodology accessible to non-statisticians by presenting and explaining a series of graphical tools via worked examples. To this end, we provide a set of STATA routines that can be easily employed to present the evidence base, evaluate the assumptions, fit the network meta-analysis model and interpret its results.

  4. Can reliance be placed on a single meta-analysis?

    PubMed

    McConaghy, N

    1990-09-01

    Meta-analysis replaced statistical significance with effect size in the hope of resolving controversy concerning evaluation of treatment effects. Statistical significance measured reliability of the effect of treatment, not its efficacy. It was strongly influenced by the number of subjects investigated. Effect size as assessed originally, eliminated this influence but by standardizing the size of the treatment effect could distort it. Meta-analyses which combine the results of studies which employ different subject types, outcome measures, treatment aims, no-treatment rather than placebo controls or therapists with varying experience can be misleading. To ensure discussion of these variables meta-analyses should be used as an aid rather than a substitute for literature review. While meta-analyses produce contradictory findings, it seems unwise to rely on the conclusions of an individual analysis. Their consistent finding that placebo treatments obtain markedly higher effect sizes than no treatment hopefully will render the use of untreated control groups obsolete.

  5. Are heritability and selection related to population size in nature? Meta-analysis and conservation implications.

    PubMed

    Wood, Jacquelyn L A; Yates, Matthew C; Fraser, Dylan J

    2016-06-01

    It is widely thought that small populations should have less additive genetic variance and respond less efficiently to natural selection than large populations. Across taxa, we meta-analytically quantified the relationship between adult census population size (N) and additive genetic variance (proxy: h (2)) and found no reduction in h (2) with decreasing N; surveyed populations ranged from four to one million individuals (1735 h (2) estimates, 146 populations, 83 species). In terms of adaptation, ecological conditions may systematically differ between populations of varying N; the magnitude of selection these populations experience may therefore also differ. We thus also meta-analytically tested whether selection changes with N and found little evidence for systematic differences in the strength, direction or form of selection with N across different trait types and taxa (7344 selection estimates, 172 populations, 80 species). Collectively, our results (i) indirectly suggest that genetic drift neither overwhelms selection more in small than in large natural populations, nor weakens adaptive potential/h (2) in small populations, and (ii) imply that natural populations of varying sizes experience a variety of environmental conditions, without consistently differing habitat quality at small N. However, we caution that the data are currently insufficient to determine whether some small populations may retain adaptive potential definitively. Further study is required into (i) selection and genetic variation in completely isolated populations of known N, under-represented taxonomic groups, and nongeneralist species, (ii) adaptive potential using multidimensional approaches and (iii) the nature of selective pressures for specific traits. PMID:27247616

  6. Rapid electrochemiluminescence assays of polymerase chain reaction products.

    PubMed

    Kenten, J H; Casadei, J; Link, J; Lupold, S; Willey, J; Powell, M; Rees, A; Massey, R

    1991-09-01

    We demonstrate the first use of an electrochemiluminescent (ECL) label, [4-(N-succimidyloxycarbonylpropyl)-4'-methyl-2,2'- bipyridine]ruthenium(II) dihexafluorophosphate (Origen label; IGEN Inc.), in DNA probe assays. This label allows rapid (less than 25 min) quantification and detection of polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-amplified products from oncogenes, viruses, and cloned genes. For the PCR, we used labeled oligonucleotide primers complementary to human papiloma virus and the Ha-ras oncogene. These samples were followed by ECL analysis or hybridization with specific, Origen-labeled oligonucleotide probes. These studies demonstrate the speed, specificity, and effectiveness of the new ECL labels, compared with 32P, for nucleic acid probe applications. We describe formats involving conventional methodologies and a new format that requires no wash step, allowing simple and rapid sample analysis. These rapid assays also reduce PCR contamination, by requiring less sample handling. Improvements in ECL detectability are currently under investigation for use in DNA probe assays without amplification.

  7. From species distributions to meta-communities

    PubMed Central

    Thuiller, Wilfried; Pollock, Laura J.; Gueguen, Maya; Münkemüller, Tamara

    2015-01-01

    The extent that biotic interactions and dispersal influence species ranges and diversity patterns across scales remains an open question. Answering this question requires framing an analysis on the frontier between species distribution modeling (SDM), which ignores biotic interactions and dispersal limitation, and community ecology, which provides specific predictions on community and meta-community structure and resulting diversity patterns such as species richness and functional diversity. Using both empirical and simulated datasets, we tested whether predicted occurrences from fine-resolution SDMs provide good estimates of community structure and diversity patterns at resolutions ranging from a resolution typical of studies within reserves (250m) to that typical of a regional biodiversity study (5km). For both datasets, we show that the imprint of biotic interactions and dispersal limitation quickly vanishes when spatial resolution is reduced, which demonstrates the value of SDMs for tracking the imprint of community assembly processes across scales. PMID:26439311

  8. Aluminum plasmonic multicolor meta-hologram.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yao-Wei; Chen, Wei Ting; Tsai, Wei-Yi; Wu, Pin Chieh; Wang, Chih-Ming; Sun, Greg; Tsai, Din Ping

    2015-05-13

    We report a phase-modulated multicolor meta-hologram (MCMH) that is polarization-dependent and capable of producing images in three primary colors. The MCMH structure is made of aluminum nanorods that are arranged in a two-dimensional array of pixels with surface plasmon resonances in red, green, and blue. The aluminum nanorod array is patterned on a 30 nm thick SiO2 spacer layer sputtered on top of a 130 nm thick aluminum mirror. With proper design of the structure, we obtain resonances of narrow bandwidths to allow for implementation of the multicolor scheme. Taking into account of the wavelength dependence of the diffraction angle, we can project images to specific locations with predetermined size and order. With tuning of aluminum nanorod size, we demonstrate that the image color can be continuously varied across the visible spectrum.

  9. Depressive realism: a meta-analytic review.

    PubMed

    Moore, Michael T; Fresco, David M

    2012-08-01

    The current investigation represents the first meta-analysis of the depressive realism literature. A search of this literature revealed 75 relevant studies representing 7305 participants from across the US and Canada, as well as from England, Spain, and Israel. Results generally indicated a small overall depressive realism effect (Cohen's d=-.07). Overall, however, both dysphoric/depressed individuals (d=.14) and nondysphoric/nondepressed individuals evidenced a substantial positive bias (d=.29), with this bias being larger in nondysphoric/nondepressed individuals. Examination of potential moderator variables indicated that studies lacking an objective standard of reality (d=-.15 versus -.03, for studies possessing such a standard) and that utilize self-report measures to measure symptoms of depression (d=.16 versus -.04, for studies which utilize structured interviews) were more likely to find depressive realism effects. Methodological paradigm was also found to influence whether results consistent with depressive realism were found (d's ranged from -.09 to .14).

  10. Aluminum plasmonic multicolor meta-hologram.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yao-Wei; Chen, Wei Ting; Tsai, Wei-Yi; Wu, Pin Chieh; Wang, Chih-Ming; Sun, Greg; Tsai, Din Ping

    2015-05-13

    We report a phase-modulated multicolor meta-hologram (MCMH) that is polarization-dependent and capable of producing images in three primary colors. The MCMH structure is made of aluminum nanorods that are arranged in a two-dimensional array of pixels with surface plasmon resonances in red, green, and blue. The aluminum nanorod array is patterned on a 30 nm thick SiO2 spacer layer sputtered on top of a 130 nm thick aluminum mirror. With proper design of the structure, we obtain resonances of narrow bandwidths to allow for implementation of the multicolor scheme. Taking into account of the wavelength dependence of the diffraction angle, we can project images to specific locations with predetermined size and order. With tuning of aluminum nanorod size, we demonstrate that the image color can be continuously varied across the visible spectrum. PMID:25844757

  11. Meta-data based mediator generation

    SciTech Connect

    Critchlaw, T

    1998-06-28

    Mediators are a critical component of any data warehouse; they transform data from source formats to the warehouse representation while resolving semantic and syntactic conflicts. The close relationship between mediators and databases requires a mediator to be updated whenever an associated schema is modified. Failure to quickly perform these updates significantly reduces the reliability of the warehouse because queries do not have access to the most current data. This may result in incorrect or misleading responses, and reduce user confidence in the warehouse. Unfortunately, this maintenance may be a significant undertaking if a warehouse integrates several dynamic data sources. This paper describes a meta-data framework, and associated software, designed to automate a significant portion of the mediator generation task and thereby reduce the effort involved in adapting to schema changes. By allowing the DBA to concentrate on identifying the modifications at a high level, instead of reprogramming the mediator, turnaround time is reduced and warehouse reliability is improved.

  12. Meta-analysis of SUMO1

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Brian J

    2008-01-01

    An abundantly growing body of literature implicates conjugation of SUMO in the regulation of many proteins and processes, yet the regulation of SUMO pathways is poorly understood. To gain insight into the players in the SUMO1 pathway I have performed an in-silico co-expression meta-analysis of SUMO1, comparing many different multi-microarray studies of various normal and human tumour tissues, from the Oncomine database. This serves as a data-driven predictor of pathway partners of SUMO1. While the data obtained need to be confirmed by future independent experiments and can currently only be considered a hypothesis, results implicate defender against cell death (DAD1) and the anti-apoptotic DEK oncogene as new pathway partners of SUMO1. PMID:18710513

  13. Cognitive Expertise: An ALE Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Nicola; Lotze, Martin; Eickhoff, Simon B

    2016-01-01

    Expert performance constitutes the endpoint of skill acquisition and is accompanied by widespread neuroplastic changes. To reveal common mechanisms of reorganization associated with long-term expertise in a cognitive domain (mental calculation, chess, language, memory, music without motor involvement), we used activation likelihood estimation meta-analysis and compared brain activation of experts to nonexperts. Twenty-six studies matched inclusion criteria, most of which reported an increase and not a decrease of activation foci in experts. Increased activation occurred in the left rolandic operculum (OP 4) and left primary auditory cortex and in bilateral premotor cortex in studies that used auditory stimulation. In studies with visual stimulation, experts showed enhanced activation in the right inferior parietal cortex (area PGp) and the right lingual gyrus. Experts' brain activation patterns seem to be characterized by enhanced or additional activity in domain-specific primary, association, and motor structures, confirming that learning is localized and very specialized. PMID:26467981

  14. Type II Transmembrane Serine Proteases*

    PubMed Central

    Bugge, Thomas H.; Antalis, Toni M.; Wu, Qingyu

    2009-01-01

    Analysis of genome and expressed sequence tag data bases at the turn of the millennium unveiled a new protease family named the type II transmembrane serine proteases (TTSPs) in a Journal of Biological Chemistry minireview (Hooper, J. D., Clements, J. A., Quigley, J. P., and Antalis, T. M. (2001) J. Biol. Chem. 276, 857–860). Since then, the number of known TTSPs has more than doubled, and more importantly, our understanding of the physiological functions of individual TTSPs and their contribution to human disease has greatly increased. Progress has also been made in identifying molecular substrates and endogenous inhibitors. This minireview summarizes the current knowledge of the rapidly advancing TTSP field. PMID:19487698

  15. Drivers of Wetland Conversion: a Global Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    van Asselen, Sanneke; Verburg, Peter H.; Vermaat, Jan E.; Janse, Jan H.

    2013-01-01

    Meta-analysis of case studies has become an important tool for synthesizing case study findings in land change. Meta-analyses of deforestation, urbanization, desertification and change in shifting cultivation systems have been published. This present study adds to this literature, with an analysis of the proximate causes and underlying forces of wetland conversion at a global scale using two complementary approaches of systematic review. Firstly, a meta-analysis of 105 case-study papers describing wetland conversion was performed, showing that different combinations of multiple-factor proximate causes, and underlying forces, drive wetland conversion. Agricultural development has been the main proximate cause of wetland conversion, and economic growth and population density are the most frequently identified underlying forces. Secondly, to add a more quantitative component to the study, a logistic meta-regression analysis was performed to estimate the likelihood of wetland conversion worldwide, using globally-consistent biophysical and socioeconomic location factor maps. Significant factors explaining wetland conversion, in order of importance, are market influence, total wetland area (lower conversion probability), mean annual temperature and cropland or built-up area. The regression analyses results support the outcomes of the meta-analysis of the processes of conversion mentioned in the individual case studies. In other meta-analyses of land change, similar factors (e.g., agricultural development, population growth, market/economic factors) are also identified as important causes of various types of land change (e.g., deforestation, desertification). Meta-analysis helps to identify commonalities across the various local case studies and identify which variables may lead to individual cases to behave differently. The meta-regression provides maps indicating the likelihood of wetland conversion worldwide based on the location factors that have determined historic

  16. Meta-modelling the Medical Record: Design and Application

    PubMed Central

    Huet, Bernard; Lesueur, Bruno; Lebeux, Pierre; Blain, Gilles

    2000-01-01

    This project is based on a user-oriented design for medical record, thanks to a meta-model able to generate various models for an application domain. The meta-model is constituted of basic concepts: User Semantic Group, sentence-type, variable, graph. A beginning of implementation is in echocardiography report; The advantages are a very thorough personalization of the document for the user, and a greater independence of the design diagram from the technological platform.

  17. Massive Meta-Data: A New Data Mining Resource

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hugo, W.

    2012-04-01

    Worldwide standardisation, and interoperability initiatives such as GBIF, Open Access and GEOSS (to name but three of many) have led to the emergence of interlinked and overlapping meta-data repositories containing, potentially, tens of millions of entries collectively. This forms the backbone of an emerging global scientific data infrastructure that is both driven by changes in the way we work, and opens up new possibilities in management, research, and collaboration. Several initiatives are concentrated on building a generalised, shared, easily available, scalable, and indefinitely preserved scientific data infrastructure to aid future scientific work. This paper deals with the parallel aspect of the meta-data that will be used to support the global scientific data infrastructure. There are obvious practical issues (semantic interoperability and speed of discovery being the most important), but we are here more concerned with some of the less obvious conceptual questions and opportunities: 1. Can we use meta-data to assess, pinpoint, and reduce duplication of meta-data? 2. Can we use it to reduce overlaps of mandates in data portals, research collaborations, and research networks? 3. What possibilities exist for mining the relationships that exist implicitly in very large meta-data collections? 4. Is it possible to define an explicit 'scientific data infrastructure' as a complex, multi-relational network database, that can become self-maintaining and self-organising in true Web 2.0 and 'social networking' fashion? The paper provides a blueprint for a new approach to massive meta-data collections, and how this can be processed using established analysis techniques to answer the questions posed. It assesses the practical implications of working with standard meta-data definitions (such as ISO 19115, Dublin Core, and EML) in a meta-data mining context, and makes recommendations in respect of extension to support self-organising, semantically oriented 'networks of

  18. A brief overview of systematic reviews and meta-analyses

    PubMed Central

    Sriganesh, Kamath; Shanthanna, Harsha; Busse, Jason W

    2016-01-01

    Systematic reviews (SRs) are performed to acquire all evidence to address a specific clinical question and involve a reproducible and thorough search of the literature and critical appraisal of eligible studies. When combined with a meta-analysis (quantitatively pooling of results of individual studies), a rigorously conducted SR provides the best available evidence for informing clinical practice. In this article, we provide a brief overview of SRs and meta-analyses for anaesthesiologists. PMID:27729699

  19. Mesenchymal stem cells improve locomotor recovery in traumatic spinal cord injury: systematic review with meta-analyses of rat models.

    PubMed

    Oliveri, Roberto S; Bello, Segun; Biering-Sørensen, Fin

    2014-02-01

    Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) is a devastating event with huge personal and societal costs. A limited number of treatments exist to ameliorate the progressive secondary damage that rapidly follows the primary mechanical impact. Mesenchymal stem or stromal cells (MSCs) have anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects and may thus reduce secondary damage after administration. We performed a systematic review with quantitative syntheses to assess the evidence of MSCs versus controls for locomotor recovery in rat models of traumatic SCI, and identified 83 eligible controlled studies comprising a total of 1,568 rats. Between-study heterogeneity was large. Fifty-three studies (64%) were reported as randomised, but only four reported adequate methodologies for randomisation. Forty-eight studies (58%) reported the use of a blinded outcome assessment. A random-effects meta-analysis yielded a difference in behavioural Basso-Beattie-Bresnahan (BBB) locomotor score means of 3.9 (95% confidence interval [CI] 3.2 to 4.7; P<0.001) in favour of MSCs. Trial sequential analysis confirmed the findings of the meta-analyses with the upper monitoring boundary for benefit being crossed by the cumulative Z-curve before reaching the diversity-adjusted required information size. Only time from intervention to last follow-up remained statistically significant after adjustment using multivariate random-effects meta-regression modelling. Lack of other demonstrable explanatory variables could be due to insufficient meta-analytic study power. MSCs would seem to demonstrate a substantial beneficial effect on locomotor recovery in a widely-used animal model of traumatic SCI. However, the animal results should be interpreted with caution concerning the internal and external validity of the studies in relation to the design of future clinical trials.

  20. Further analysis of SAS 3 observations of the rapid burster /MXB 1730-335/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, H. L.; Hoffman, J. A.; Doty, J.; Lewin, W. H. G.; Ulmer, M. P.

    1979-01-01

    SAS 3 observations of the rapid burster MXB 1730-335 are analyzed with specific reference to the rapidly repetitive type II bursts and also the type I bursts. It is found that: (1) there are two stable patterns in the recurrence of the rapidly repetitive type II bursts, designated modes I and II; (2) the range of type II burst energies is a factor of about 100 for mode I and a factor of about 10 for mode II; (3) type II burst spectra are best fitted by a blackbody of constant temperature (of the order of 18 million K), constant column density, and decreasing intensity; and (4) type I bursts are best fitted by a blackbody spectrum with decreasing temperature (approximately 24 million K during the first few seconds and 16 million K about 10 sec later). The spectral fits for both types of burst are shown to yield sizes for the emission region comparable to the radius of a neutron star. A model for the rapid burster is suggested.

  1. The Flynn Effect: A Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Trahan, Lisa; Stuebing, Karla K.; Hiscock, Merril K.; Fletcher, Jack M.

    2014-01-01

    The “Flynn effect” refers to the observed rise in IQ scores over time, resulting in norms obsolescence. Although the Flynn effect is widely accepted, most approaches to estimating it have relied upon “scorecard” approaches that make estimates of its magnitude and error of measurement controversial and prevent determination of factors that moderate the Flynn effect across different IQ tests. We conducted a meta-analysis to determine the magnitude of the Flynn effect with a higher degree of precision, to determine the error of measurement, and to assess the impact of several moderator variables on the mean effect size. Across 285 studies (N = 14,031) since 1951 with administrations of two intelligence tests with different normative bases, the meta-analytic mean was 2.31, 95% CI [1.99, 2.64], standard score points per decade. The mean effect size for 53 comparisons (N = 3,951) (excluding three atypical studies that inflate the estimates) involving modern (since 1972) Stanford-Binet and Wechsler IQ tests (2.93, 95% CI [2.3, 3.5], IQ points per decade) was comparable to previous estimates of about 3 points per decade, but not consistent with the hypothesis that the Flynn effect is diminishing. For modern tests, study sample (larger increases for validation research samples vs. test standardization samples) and order of administration explained unique variance in the Flynn effect, but age and ability level were not significant moderators. These results supported previous estimates of the Flynn effect and its robustness across different age groups, measures, samples, and levels of performance. PMID:24979188

  2. The Flynn effect: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Trahan, Lisa H; Stuebing, Karla K; Fletcher, Jack M; Hiscock, Merrill

    2014-09-01

    The Flynn effect refers to the observed rise in IQ scores over time, which results in norms obsolescence. Although the Flynn effect is widely accepted, most efforts to estimate it have relied upon "scorecard" approaches that make estimates of its magnitude and error of measurement controversial and prevent determination of factors that moderate the Flynn effect across different IQ tests. We conducted a meta-analysis to determine the magnitude of the Flynn effect with a higher degree of precision, to determine the error of measurement, and to assess the impact of several moderator variables on the mean effect size. Across 285 studies (N = 14,031) since 1951 with administrations of 2 intelligence tests with different normative bases, the meta-analytic mean was 2.31, 95% CI [1.99, 2.64], standard score points per decade. The mean effect size for 53 comparisons (N = 3,951, excluding 3 atypical studies that inflate the estimates) involving modern (since 1972) Stanford-Binet and Wechsler IQ tests (2.93, 95% CI [2.3, 3.5], IQ points per decade) was comparable to previous estimates of about 3 points per decade but was not consistent with the hypothesis that the Flynn effect is diminishing. For modern tests, study sample (larger increases for validation research samples vs. test standardization samples) and order of administration explained unique variance in the Flynn effect, but age and ability level were not significant moderators. These results supported previous estimates of the Flynn effect and its robustness across different age groups, measures, samples, and levels of performance.

  3. The Flynn effect: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Trahan, Lisa H; Stuebing, Karla K; Fletcher, Jack M; Hiscock, Merrill

    2014-09-01

    The Flynn effect refers to the observed rise in IQ scores over time, which results in norms obsolescence. Although the Flynn effect is widely accepted, most efforts to estimate it have relied upon "scorecard" approaches that make estimates of its magnitude and error of measurement controversial and prevent determination of factors that moderate the Flynn effect across different IQ tests. We conducted a meta-analysis to determine the magnitude of the Flynn effect with a higher degree of precision, to determine the error of measurement, and to assess the impact of several moderator variables on the mean effect size. Across 285 studies (N = 14,031) since 1951 with administrations of 2 intelligence tests with different normative bases, the meta-analytic mean was 2.31, 95% CI [1.99, 2.64], standard score points per decade. The mean effect size for 53 comparisons (N = 3,951, excluding 3 atypical studies that inflate the estimates) involving modern (since 1972) Stanford-Binet and Wechsler IQ tests (2.93, 95% CI [2.3, 3.5], IQ points per decade) was comparable to previous estimates of about 3 points per decade but was not consistent with the hypothesis that the Flynn effect is diminishing. For modern tests, study sample (larger increases for validation research samples vs. test standardization samples) and order of administration explained unique variance in the Flynn effect, but age and ability level were not significant moderators. These results supported previous estimates of the Flynn effect and its robustness across different age groups, measures, samples, and levels of performance. PMID:24979188

  4. Design, fabrication and testing of tunable RF meta-atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langley, Derrick

    Metamaterials are engineered structures designed to alter the propagation of electromagnetic waves incident upon the structure. The focus of this research was the effect of metamaterials on electromagnetic signals at radio frequencies. RF meta-atoms were investigated to further develop the theory, modeling, design and fabrication of metamaterials. Comparing the analytic modeling and experimental testing, the results provide a deeper understanding into metamaterials which could lead to applications for beam steering, invisibility cloaking, negative refraction, super lenses, and hyper lenses. RF meta-atoms integrated with microelectromechanical systems produce tunable meta-atoms in the 10 -- 15 GHz and 1 -- 4 GHz frequency ranges. RF meta-atoms with structural design changes are developed to show how inductance changes based on structural modifications. RF meta-atoms integrated with gain medium are investigated showing that loss due to material characteristics can be compensated using active elements such as a Low Noise Amplifier. Integrating the amplifier into the split ring resonator causes a deeper null at the resonant frequency. The research results show that the resonant frequency can be tuned using microelectromechanical systems, or by induction with structural designs and reduce loss associated with the material conductivity by compensating with an active gain medium. Proposals that offer future research activities are discussed for inductance and active element meta-atoms. In addition, terahertz (THz), infrared (IR), and optical structures are briefly investigated.

  5. A meta-analysis of parton distribution functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jun; Nadolsky, Pavel

    2014-07-01

    A "meta-analysis" is a method for comparison and combination of nonperturbative parton distribution functions (PDFs) in a nucleon obtained with heterogeneous procedures and assumptions. Each input parton distribution set is converted into a "meta-parametrization" based on a common functional form. By analyzing parameters of the meta-parametrizations from all input PDF ensembles, a combined PDF ensemble can be produced that has a smaller total number of PDF member sets than the original ensembles. The meta-parametrizations simplify the computation of the PDF uncertainty in theoretical predictions and provide an alternative to the 2010 PDF4LHC convention for combination of PDF uncertainties. As a practical example, we construct a META ensemble for computation of QCD observables at the Large Hadron Collider using the next-to-next-to-leading order PDF sets from CTEQ, MSTW, and NNPDF groups as the input. The META ensemble includes a central set that reproduces the average of LHC predictions based on the three input PDF ensembles and Hessian eigenvector sets for computing the combined PDF+α s uncertainty at a common QCD coupling strength of 0.118.

  6. Type II universal spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hervik, S.; Málek, T.; Pravda, V.; Pravdová, A.

    2015-12-01

    We study type II universal metrics of the Lorentzian signature. These metrics simultaneously solve vacuum field equations of all theories of gravitation with the Lagrangian being a polynomial curvature invariant constructed from the metric, the Riemann tensor and its covariant derivatives of an arbitrary order. We provide examples of type II universal metrics for all composite number dimensions. On the other hand, we have no examples for prime number dimensions and we prove the non-existence of type II universal spacetimes in five dimensions. We also present type II vacuum solutions of selected classes of gravitational theories, such as Lovelock, quadratic and L({{Riemann}}) gravities.

  7. Angiotensin II receptor signalling.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Derek; Yee, Daniel K; Fluharty, Steven J

    2007-05-01

    Angiotensin II plays a key role in the regulation of body fluid homeostasis. To correct body fluid deficits that occur during hypovolaemia, an animal needs to ingest both water and electrolytes. Thus, it is not surprising that angiotensin II, which is synthesized in response to hypovolaemia, acts centrally to increase both water and NaCl intake. Here, we review findings relating to the properties of angiotensin II receptors that give rise to changes in behaviour. Data are described to suggest that divergent signal transduction pathways are responsible for separable behavioural responses to angiotensin II, and a hypothesis is proposed to explain how this divergence may map onto neural circuits in the brain.

  8. The link between genetic variation and variability in vaccine responses: systematic review and meta-analyses.

    PubMed

    Posteraro, Brunella; Pastorino, Roberta; Di Giannantonio, Paolo; Ianuale, Carolina; Amore, Rosarita; Ricciardi, Walter; Boccia, Stefania

    2014-03-26

    Although immune response to vaccines can be influenced by several parameters, human genetic variations are thought to strongly influence the variability in vaccine responsiveness. Systematic reviews and meta-analyses are needed to clarify the genetic contribution to this variability, which may affect the efficacy of existing vaccines. We performed a systematic literature search to identify all studies describing the associations of allelic variants or single nucleotide polymorphisms in immune response genes with vaccine responses until July 2013. The studies fulfilling inclusion criteria were meta-analyzed. Thirteen studies (11,686 subjects) evaluated the associations of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) and other immunity gene variations with the responses to single vaccines, including MMR-II (measles and rubella virus), HepB (hepatitis virus), influenza virus, and MenC (serogroup C meningococcus) vaccines. Seven HLA genetic variants were included in the meta-analyses. The pooled ORs showed that DRB1*07 (2.46 [95% CI=1.60-3.77]; P for heterogeneity=0.117; I(2)=49.1%), DQA1*02:01 (2.21 [95% CI=1.22-4.00]; P for heterogeneity=0.995; I(2)=0.0%), DQB1*02:01 (2.03 [95% CI=1.35-3.07]; P for heterogeneity=0.449; I(2)=0.0%), and DQB1*03:03 (3.31 [95% CI=1.12-9.78]; P for heterogeneity=0.188; I(2)=42.4%) were associated with a significant decrease of antibody responses to MMR-II, HepB, and influenza vaccines. The pooled ORs showed that DRB1*13 (0.52 [95% CI=0.32-0.84]; P for heterogeneity=0.001; I(2)=85.1%) and DRB1*13:01 (0.19 [95% CI=0.06-0.58]; P for heterogeneity=0.367; I(2)=0.0%) were associated with a significant increase of antibody responses to the above vaccines. While our findings reinforce the concept that individuals with a particular HLA allelic composition are more likely to respond efficiently to vaccines, future studies should be encouraged to further elucidate the link between genetic variation and variability of the human immune response to vaccines.

  9. Urban Older Adults Becoming Unhealthier in Modern China: A Cross-Temporal Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tengxiao; Tan, Hao; Wu, Yiling; Han, Buxin; Wang, Ting

    2016-06-01

    This study investigated patterns of change in the health status of urban older adults in urban China from 2001 to 2013. A cross-temporal meta-analysis was applied to 111 selected studies in which the SF-36 had been administered to urban older adults in China. Scores from a total of 72,441 participants were analyzed. Correlations between the SF-36 scores and sampling years were examined. The self-reported health status of urban older adults in China has declined significantly in the past 13 years. The observed decline in the health status of older adults suggests that economic progress and a rapidly aging population have had more negative than positive effects on the health of this population. PMID:27146398

  10. Application of the DataChip/MetaChip technology for the evaluation of ajoene toxicity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Woo; Lee, Moo-Yeal; Ku, Bosung; Yi, Sang Hyun; Ryu, Jae-Ha; Jeon, Raok; Yang, Mihi

    2014-02-01

    The DataChip is a universal platform for three-dimensional (3D) cell cultures on a micropillar chip, which can be applicable to a variety of human cells to simulate organ-specific toxicity. In addition, the MetaChip is developed for various combinations of drug metabolizing enzymes that can be spotted into the microwell chip and incubated with 3D human cells to simulate systematic compound metabolism in the human liver on a microscale format. Ajoenes have been known for various therapeutics activities, including anticancer effects, but there was limited information available in regard to their metabolism and cytotoxicity. In the present work, the metabolism-mediated toxicity of ajoenes was evaluated on a DataChip/MetaChip platform. In detail, we tested cytotoxicity of E- and Z-ajoene on 3D cultured Hep3B human hepatoma cells coupled with mixtures of drug metabolizing enzymes. Metabolic profiles of ajoenes were assessed with 23 representative drug metabolizing enzymes on the MetaChip. As a result, cytotoxicity of E-ajoene was significantly augmented in the presence of cytochrome P450 (CYP) isoforms, such as CYP2E1 and CYP3A5. Both E- and Z-ajoene were drastically detoxified in the presence of Phase II enzymes, including major UGTs, SULTs, NATs, and GSTs. Interestingly, All Mix, an artificial human liver microsome containing representative P450 mixture and phase II enzyme mixture, attenuated P450-induced cytotoxicity of ajoenes. Conclusively, we were able to confirm the metabolism-medicated toxicity of ajoenes on the chip.

  11. Eight Functional Polymorphisms in the Estrogen Receptor 1 Gene and Endometrial Cancer Risk: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xin; Gu, Yang; Wang, Ding-ning; Ni, Sha; Yan, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objective Emerging evidence indicates that common functional polymorphisms in the estrogen receptor 1 (ESR1) gene may have an impact on an individual’s susceptibility to endometrial cancer, but individually published results are inconclusive. The aim of this meta-analysis is to derive a more precise estimation of the associations between eight polymorphisms in the ESR1 gene and endometrial cancer risk. Methods A literature search of PubMed, Embase, Web of Science and China Biology Medicine (CBM) databases was conducted on publications published before November 1st, 2012. Crude odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. Statistical analyses were performed using the STATA 12.0 software. Results Thirteen case-control studies were included with a total of 7,649 endometrial cancer cases and 16,855 healthy controls. When all the eligible studies were pooled into the meta-analysis, the results indicated that PvuII (C>T) polymorphism was associated with an increased risk of endometrial cancer, especially among Caucasian populations. There were also significant associations between rs3020314 (C>T) polymorphism and an increased risk of endometrial cancer. Furthermore, rs2234670 (S/L) polymorphism may decrease the risk of endometrial cancer. However, no statistically significant associations were found in XbaI (A>G), Codon 325 (C>G), Codon 243 (C>T), VNTR (S/L) and rs2046210 (G>A) polymorphisms. Conclusion The current meta-analysis suggests that PvuII (C>T) and rs3020314 (C>T) polymorphisms may be risk factors for endometrial cancer, especially among Caucasian populations. PMID:23593326

  12. Insertion/deletion polymorphism in intron 16 of ACE gene in idiopathic recurrent spontaneous abortion: case-control study, systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Pereza, Nina; Ostojić, Saša; Zdravčević, Matea; Volk, Marija; Kapović, Miljenko; Peterlin, Borut

    2016-02-01

    The insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism in intron 16 of the angiotensin I-converting enzyme gene (ACE) has been extensively studied as a predisposing factor for idiopathic recurrent spontaneous abortion (IRSA). A case-control study including 149 women with ≥3 spontaneous abortions and 149 controls was performed to test the association of ACE I/D polymorphism with IRSA. A systematic review was conducted of previous case-control studies, with strict selection criteria for meta-analyses. We also aimed to evaluate the potential differences in summary estimates between studies defining IRSA as ≥2 and ≥3 spontaneous abortions. Genotyping was performed by PCR, and systematic review conducted using PubMed and Scopus. There was no association of the polymorphism with IRSA in Slovenian women. Sixteen case-control studies, showing substantial differences regarding IRSA definition and selection criteria for women were identified. Meta-analysis was performed and included four studies defining IRSA as ≥2 spontaneous abortions and the current study, which defined IRSA as ≥3 spontaneous abortions. Based on random effects model, meta-analysis conducted on 1192 patients and 736 controls showed no association with IRSA under dominant(DD+IDvsII) and recessive(DDvsID+II) genetic models. Well-designed studies are needed to evaluate the role of ACE I/D polymorphism in IRSA defined as ≥3 spontaneous abortions. PMID:26673102

  13. Insertion/deletion polymorphism in intron 16 of ACE gene in idiopathic recurrent spontaneous abortion: case-control study, systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Pereza, Nina; Ostojić, Saša; Zdravčević, Matea; Volk, Marija; Kapović, Miljenko; Peterlin, Borut

    2016-02-01

    The insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism in intron 16 of the angiotensin I-converting enzyme gene (ACE) has been extensively studied as a predisposing factor for idiopathic recurrent spontaneous abortion (IRSA). A case-control study including 149 women with ≥3 spontaneous abortions and 149 controls was performed to test the association of ACE I/D polymorphism with IRSA. A systematic review was conducted of previous case-control studies, with strict selection criteria for meta-analyses. We also aimed to evaluate the potential differences in summary estimates between studies defining IRSA as ≥2 and ≥3 spontaneous abortions. Genotyping was performed by PCR, and systematic review conducted using PubMed and Scopus. There was no association of the polymorphism with IRSA in Slovenian women. Sixteen case-control studies, showing substantial differences regarding IRSA definition and selection criteria for women were identified. Meta-analysis was performed and included four studies defining IRSA as ≥2 spontaneous abortions and the current study, which defined IRSA as ≥3 spontaneous abortions. Based on random effects model, meta-analysis conducted on 1192 patients and 736 controls showed no association with IRSA under dominant(DD+IDvsII) and recessive(DDvsID+II) genetic models. Well-designed studies are needed to evaluate the role of ACE I/D polymorphism in IRSA defined as ≥3 spontaneous abortions.

  14. Meta-Analyses of Human Cell-Based Cardiac Regeneration Therapies: Controversies in Meta-Analyses Results on Cardiac Cell-Based Regenerative Studies.

    PubMed

    Gyöngyösi, Mariann; Wojakowski, Wojciech; Navarese, Eliano P; Moye, Lemuel À

    2016-04-15

    In contrast to multiple publication-based meta-analyses involving clinical cardiac regeneration therapy in patients with recent myocardial infarction, a recently published meta-analysis based on individual patient data reported no effect of cell therapy on left ventricular function or clinical outcome. A comprehensive review of the data collection, statistics, and the overall principles of meta-analyses provides further clarification and explanation for this controversy. The advantages and pitfalls of different types of meta-analyses are reviewed here. Each meta-analysis approach has a place when pivotal clinical trials are lacking and sheds light on the magnitude of the treatment in a complex healthcare field. PMID:27081108

  15. Meta-Analyses of Human Cell-Based Cardiac Regeneration Therapies: Controversies in Meta-Analyses Results on Cardiac Cell-Based Regenerative Studies.

    PubMed

    Gyöngyösi, Mariann; Wojakowski, Wojciech; Navarese, Eliano P; Moye, Lemuel À

    2016-04-15

    In contrast to multiple publication-based meta-analyses involving clinical cardiac regeneration therapy in patients with recent myocardial infarction, a recently published meta-analysis based on individual patient data reported no effect of cell therapy on left ventricular function or clinical outcome. A comprehensive review of the data collection, statistics, and the overall principles of meta-analyses provides further clarification and explanation for this controversy. The advantages and pitfalls of different types of meta-analyses are reviewed here. Each meta-analysis approach has a place when pivotal clinical trials are lacking and sheds light on the magnitude of the treatment in a complex healthcare field.

  16. Treatment with Antiangiogenic Drugs in Multiple Lines in Patients with Metastatic Colorectal Cancer: Meta-Analysis of Randomized Trials.

    PubMed

    Hofheinz, R-D; Ronellenfitsch, U; Kubicka, S; Falcone, A; Burkholder, I; Hacker, U T

    2016-01-01

    Background. In metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC), continuing antiangiogenic drugs beyond progression might provide clinical benefit. We synthesized the available evidence in a meta-analysis. Patients and Methods. We conducted a meta-analysis of studies investigating the use of antiangiogenic drugs beyond progression. Eligible studies were randomized phase II/III trials. Primary endpoints were overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS). Secondary endpoints were the impact of continuing antiangiogenic drugs (i) in subgroups, (ii) in different types of compounds targeting the VEGF-axis (monoclonal antibodies versus tyrosine kinase inhibitors), and (iii) on remission rates and prevention of progression. Results. Eight studies (3,668 patients) were included. Continuing antiangiogenic treatment beyond progression significantly improved PFS (HR 0.64; 95%-CI, 0.55-0.75) and OS (HR 0.83; 95%-CI, 0.76-0.89). PFS was significantly improved in all subgroups with comparable HR. OS was improved in all subgroups stratified by age, gender, and ECOG status. The rate of patients achieving at least stable disease was improved with an OR of 2.25 (95%-CI, 1.41-3.58). Conclusions. This analysis shows a significant PFS and OS benefit as well as a benefit regarding disease stabilization when using antiangiogenic drugs beyond progression in mCRC. Future studies should focus on the optimal sequence of administering antiangiogenic drugs. PMID:27656206

  17. Treatment with Antiangiogenic Drugs in Multiple Lines in Patients with Metastatic Colorectal Cancer: Meta-Analysis of Randomized Trials

    PubMed Central

    Kubicka, S.; Falcone, A.; Burkholder, I.; Hacker, U. T.

    2016-01-01

    Background. In metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC), continuing antiangiogenic drugs beyond progression might provide clinical benefit. We synthesized the available evidence in a meta-analysis. Patients and Methods. We conducted a meta-analysis of studies investigating the use of antiangiogenic drugs beyond progression. Eligible studies were randomized phase II/III trials. Primary endpoints were overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS). Secondary endpoints were the impact of continuing antiangiogenic drugs (i) in subgroups, (ii) in different types of compounds targeting the VEGF-axis (monoclonal antibodies versus tyrosine kinase inhibitors), and (iii) on remission rates and prevention of progression. Results. Eight studies (3,668 patients) were included. Continuing antiangiogenic treatment beyond progression significantly improved PFS (HR 0.64; 95%-CI, 0.55–0.75) and OS (HR 0.83; 95%-CI, 0.76–0.89). PFS was significantly improved in all subgroups with comparable HR. OS was improved in all subgroups stratified by age, gender, and ECOG status. The rate of patients achieving at least stable disease was improved with an OR of 2.25 (95%-CI, 1.41–3.58). Conclusions. This analysis shows a significant PFS and OS benefit as well as a benefit regarding disease stabilization when using antiangiogenic drugs beyond progression in mCRC. Future studies should focus on the optimal sequence of administering antiangiogenic drugs. PMID:27656206

  18. Treatment with Antiangiogenic Drugs in Multiple Lines in Patients with Metastatic Colorectal Cancer: Meta-Analysis of Randomized Trials

    PubMed Central

    Kubicka, S.; Falcone, A.; Burkholder, I.; Hacker, U. T.

    2016-01-01

    Background. In metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC), continuing antiangiogenic drugs beyond progression might provide clinical benefit. We synthesized the available evidence in a meta-analysis. Patients and Methods. We conducted a meta-analysis of studies investigating the use of antiangiogenic drugs beyond progression. Eligible studies were randomized phase II/III trials. Primary endpoints were overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS). Secondary endpoints were the impact of continuing antiangiogenic drugs (i) in subgroups, (ii) in different types of compounds targeting the VEGF-axis (monoclonal antibodies versus tyrosine kinase inhibitors), and (iii) on remission rates and prevention of progression. Results. Eight studies (3,668 patients) were included. Continuing antiangiogenic treatment beyond progression significantly improved PFS (HR 0.64; 95%-CI, 0.55–0.75) and OS (HR 0.83; 95%-CI, 0.76–0.89). PFS was significantly improved in all subgroups with comparable HR. OS was improved in all subgroups stratified by age, gender, and ECOG status. The rate of patients achieving at least stable disease was improved with an OR of 2.25 (95%-CI, 1.41–3.58). Conclusions. This analysis shows a significant PFS and OS benefit as well as a benefit regarding disease stabilization when using antiangiogenic drugs beyond progression in mCRC. Future studies should focus on the optimal sequence of administering antiangiogenic drugs.

  19. Nitric oxide (N0) donor-mediated inhibition of phosphorylation shows that light-mediated degradation of photosystem II D1 protein and phosphorylation are not tightly linked

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A major outcome of the photochemistry during oxygenic photosynthesis is the rapid turn over of the D1 protein in the light compared to the other proteins of the photosystem II (PS II) reaction center. D1 is a major factor of PS II instability and its replacement a primary event of the PS II repair c...

  20. Oxidation of Fe(II)-EDTA by nitrite and by two nitrate-reducing Fe(II)-oxidizing Acidovorax strains.

    PubMed

    Klueglein, N; Picardal, F; Zedda, M; Zwiener, C; Kappler, A

    2015-03-01

    The enzymatic oxidation of Fe(II) by nitrate-reducing bacteria was first suggested about two decades ago. It has since been found that most strains are mixotrophic and need an additional organic co-substrate for complete and prolonged Fe(II) oxidation. Research during the last few years has tried to determine to what extent the observed Fe(II) oxidation is driven enzymatically, or abiotically by nitrite produced during heterotrophic denitrification. A recent study reported that nitrite was not able to oxidize Fe(II)-EDTA abiotically, but the addition of the mixotrophic nitrate-reducing Fe(II)-oxidizer, Acidovorax sp. strain 2AN, led to Fe(II) oxidation (Chakraborty & Picardal, 2013). This, along with other results of that study, was used to argue that Fe(II) oxidation in strain 2AN was enzymatically catalyzed. However, the absence of abiotic Fe(II)-EDTA oxidation by nitrite reported in that study contrasts with previously published data. We have repeated the abiotic and biotic experiments and observed rapid abiotic oxidation of Fe(II)-EDTA by nitrite, resulting in the formation of Fe(III)-EDTA and the green Fe(II)-EDTA-NO complex. Additionally, we found that cultivating the Acidovorax strains BoFeN1 and 2AN with 10 mM nitrate, 5 mm acetate, and approximately 10 mM Fe(II)-EDTA resulted only in incomplete Fe(II)-EDTA oxidation of 47-71%. Cultures of strain BoFeN1 turned green (due to the presence of Fe(II)-EDTA-NO) and the green color persisted over the course of the experiments, whereas strain 2AN was able to further oxidize the Fe(II)-EDTA-NO complex. Our work shows that the two used Acidovorax strains behave very differently in their ability to deal with toxic effects of Fe-EDTA species and the further reduction of the Fe(II)-EDTA-NO nitrosyl complex. Although the enzymatic oxidation of Fe(II) cannot be ruled out, this study underlines the importance of nitrite in nitrate-reducing Fe(II)- and Fe(II)-EDTA-oxidizing cultures and demonstrates that Fe(II)-EDTA cannot

  1. NAT1 polymorphisms and cancer risk: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kunyi; Gao, Lijuan; Wu, Yuqi; Chen, Jianyi; Lin, Chengguang; Liang, Shaohua; Su, Jianxin; Ye, Jinming; He, Xuyu

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the association between the N-acetyltransferase 1 (NAT1) slow and rapid acetylation phenotypes with cancer risk based on a meta-analysis. Methods: Previously published case-control studies were retrieved from PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science. Odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were determined to assess the relationship between NAT1 polymorphisms and cancer risk. Results: A total of 73 studies (24874 cases and 30226 controls) were included in this meta-analysis. No significant association was identified between NAT1 polymorphisms (slow acetylation versus rapid acetylation genotypes: OR = 0.978, 95% CI = 0.927-1.030, P < 0.001 for heterogeneity, I2 = 45.5%) and cancer risk, whereas a significantly reduced risk of pancreatic cancer was identified in individuals with NAT1 slow acetylation genotype (OR = 0.856, 95% CI = 0.733-0.999, P =0.509 for heterogeneity, I2 = 0). When the NAT1 slow acetylation genotype was analysed on the basis of stratified analyses of ethnicity, a significantly reduced risk of head and neck cancers was found among Asian (OR=0.281, 95% CI = 0.127-0.622). When the NAT1 slow acetylation genotype was analysed on the basis of stratified analyses of source of control, only significantly reduced risks of colorectal cancer (OR = 0.882, 95% CI = 0.798- 0.974, P = 0.212 for heterogeneity, I2 = 22.9) and pancreatic cancer (OR=0.856, 95% CI = 0.733-0.999, P = 0.509 for heterogeneity, I2 = 0) were found among hospital-based studies. Conclusions: No significant association between the NAT1 polymorphisms and the risk of cancer was found except for pancreatic cancer. PMID:26309576

  2. A Meta-Meta-Analysis: Empirical Review of Statistical Power, Type I Error Rates, Effect Sizes, and Model Selection of Meta-Analyses Published in Psychology.

    PubMed

    Cafri, Guy; Kromrey, Jeffrey D; Brannick, Michael T

    2010-03-31

    This article uses meta-analyses published in Psychological Bulletin from 1995 to 2005 to describe meta-analyses in psychology, including examination of statistical power, Type I errors resulting from multiple comparisons, and model choice. Retrospective power estimates indicated that univariate categorical and continuous moderators, individual moderators in multivariate analyses, and tests of residual variability within individual levels of categorical moderators had the lowest and most concerning levels of power. Using methods of calculating power prospectively for significance tests in meta-analysis, we illustrate how power varies as a function of the number of effect sizes, the average sample size per effect size, effect size magnitude, and level of heterogeneity of effect sizes. In most meta-analyses many significance tests were conducted, resulting in a sizable estimated probability of a Type I error, particularly for tests of means within levels of a moderator, univariate categorical moderators, and residual variability within individual levels of a moderator. Across all surveyed studies, the median effect size and the median difference between two levels of study level moderators were smaller than Cohen's (1988) conventions for a medium effect size for a correlation or difference between two correlations. The median Birge's (1932) ratio was larger than the convention of medium heterogeneity proposed by Hedges and Pigott (2001) and indicates that the typical meta-analysis shows variability in underlying effects well beyond that expected by sampling error alone. Fixed-effects models were used with greater frequency than random-effects models; however, random-effects models were used with increased frequency over time. Results related to model selection of this study are carefully compared with those from Schmidt, Oh, and Hayes (2009), who independently designed and produced a study similar to the one reported here. Recommendations for conducting future meta

  3. The FT-IR spectrometric analysis of the changes of polyphenol oxidase II secondary structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Chunhua; Dai, Ya; Liu, Qingliang; Xie, Yongshu; Xu, Xiaolong

    2003-01-01

    Polyphenol oxidase II is a novel protein purified from tobacco, which acts as a key role in plant defense system. From the analysis of FT-IR spectrums, Fourier self-deconvolution (FSD) spectrums and second-derivative spectrums of PPO II at different pH and peroxide PPO II adduct, the secondary structure fractions are analyzed. PPO II at low pH (pH=3.0) and peroxide PPO II adduct almost keep the same secondary structure of native PPO II. The percentages of β-turn and random coil increase rapidly and the percentages of α-helix and anti-parallel β-sheet decrease rapidly at high pH (pH=10.0) comparing with that of native PPO II. All these conclusions are proved by the secondary structure calculations of circular dichroism spectrums in different states.

  4. Publication bias in dermatology systematic reviews and meta-analyses.

    PubMed

    Atakpo, Paul; Vassar, Matt

    2016-05-01

    Systematic reviews and meta-analyses in dermatology provide high-level evidence for clinicians and policy makers that influence clinical decision making and treatment guidelines. One methodological problem with systematic reviews is the under representation of unpublished studies. This problem is due in part to publication bias. Omission of statistically non-significant data from meta-analyses may result in overestimation of treatment effect sizes which may lead to clinical consequences. Our goal was to assess whether systematic reviewers in dermatology evaluate and report publication bias. Further, we wanted to conduct our own evaluation of publication bias on meta-analyses that failed to do so. Our study considered systematic reviews and meta-analyses from ten dermatology journals from 2006 to 2016. A PubMed search was conducted, and all full-text articles that met our inclusion criteria were retrieved and coded by the primary author. 293 articles were included in our analysis. Additionally, we formally evaluated publication bias in meta-analyses that failed to do so using trim and fill and cumulative meta-analysis by precision methods. Publication bias was mentioned in 107 articles (36.5%) and was formally evaluated in 64 articles (21.8%). Visual inspection of a funnel plot was the most common method of evaluating publication bias. Publication bias was present in 45 articles (15.3%), not present in 57 articles (19.5%) and not determined in 191 articles (65.2%). Using the trim and fill method, 7 meta-analyses (33.33%) showed evidence of publication bias. Although the trim and fill method only found evidence of publication bias in 7 meta-analyses, the cumulative meta-analysis by precision method found evidence of publication bias in 15 meta-analyses (71.4%). Many of the reviews in our study did not mention or evaluate publication bias. Further, of the 42 articles that stated following PRISMA reporting guidelines, 19 (45.2%) evaluated for publication bias. In

  5. Elements of effective palliative care models: a rapid review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Population ageing, changes to the profiles of life-limiting illnesses and evolving societal attitudes prompt a critical evaluation of models of palliative care. We set out to identify evidence-based models of palliative care to inform policy reform in Australia. Method A rapid review of electronic databases and the grey literature was undertaken over an eight week period in April-June 2012. We included policy documents and comparative studies from countries within the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) published in English since 2001. Meta-analysis was planned where >1 study met criteria; otherwise, synthesis was narrative using methods described by Popay et al. (2006). Results Of 1,959 peer-reviewed articles, 23 reported systematic reviews, 9 additional RCTs and 34 non-randomised comparative studies. Variation in the content of models, contexts in which these were implemented and lack of detailed reporting meant that elements of models constituted a more meaningful unit of analysis than models themselves. Case management was the element most consistently reported in models for which comparative studies provided evidence for effectiveness. Essential attributes of population-based palliative care models identified by policy and addressed by more than one element were communication and coordination between providers (including primary care), skill enhancement, and capacity to respond rapidly to individuals’ changing needs and preferences over time. Conclusion Models of palliative care should integrate specialist expertise with primary and community care services and enable transitions across settings, including residential aged care. The increasing complexity of care needs, services, interventions and contextual drivers warrants future research aimed at elucidating the interactions between different components and the roles played by patient, provider and health system factors. The findings of this review are limited by its

  6. Ovarian Cancer Stage II

    MedlinePlus

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Ovarian Cancer Stage II Add to My Pictures View /Download : ... 1650x675 View Download Large: 3300x1350 View Download Title: Ovarian Cancer Stage II Description: Three-panel drawing of stage ...

  7. World War II Homefront.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia, Rachel

    2002-01-01

    Presents an annotated bibliography that provides Web sites focusing on the U.S. homefront during World War II. Covers various topics such as the homefront, Japanese Americans, women during World War II, posters, and African Americans. Includes lesson plan sources and a list of additional resources. (CMK)

  8. Mesospheric ozone measurements by SAGE II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, D. A.; Cunnold, D. M.

    1994-04-01

    SAGE II observations of ozone at sunrise and sunset (solar zenith angle = 90 deg) at approximately the same tropical latitude and on the same day exhibit larger concentrations at sunrise than at sunset between 55 and 65 km. Because of the rapid conversion between atomic oxygen and ozone, the onion-peeling scheme used in SAGE II retrievals, which is based on an assumption of constant ozone, is invalid. A one-dimensional photochemical model is used to simulate the diurnal variation of ozone particularly within the solar zenith angle of 80 deg - 100 deg. This model indicates that the retrieved SAGE II sunrise and sunset ozone values are both overestimated. The Chapman reactions produce an adequate simulation of the ozone sunrise/sunset ratio only below 60 km, while above 60 km this ratio is highly affected by the odd oxygen loss due to odd hydrogen reactions, particularly OH. The SAGE II ozone measurements are in excellent agreement with model results to which an onion peeling procedure is applied. The SAGE II ozone observations provide information on the mesospheric chemistry not only through the ozone profile averages but also from the sunrise/sunset ratio.

  9. Mesospheric ozone measurements by SAGE II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, D. A.; Cunnold, D. M.

    1994-01-01

    SAGE II observations of ozone at sunrise and sunset (solar zenith angle = 90 deg) at approximately the same tropical latitude and on the same day exhibit larger concentrations at sunrise than at sunset between 55 and 65 km. Because of the rapid conversion between atomic oxygen and ozone, the onion-peeling scheme used in SAGE II retrievals, which is based on an assumption of constant ozone, is invalid. A one-dimensional photochemical model is used to simulate the diurnal variation of ozone particularly within the solar zenith angle of 80 deg - 100 deg. This model indicates that the retrieved SAGE II sunrise and sunset ozone values are both overestimated. The Chapman reactions produce an adequate simulation of the ozone sunrise/sunset ratio only below 60 km, while above 60 km this ratio is highly affected by the odd oxygen loss due to odd hydrogen reactions, particularly OH. The SAGE II ozone measurements are in excellent agreement with model results to which an onion peeling procedure is applied. The SAGE II ozone observations provide information on the mesospheric chemistry not only through the ozone profile averages but also from the sunrise/sunset ratio.

  10. Water Resources of Rapides Parish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Griffith, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    Rapides Parish, located in central Louisiana, contains fresh groundwater and surface-water resources. In 2005, about 443 million gallons per day (Mgal/d) were withdrawn from water sources in Rapides Parish. About 92 percent (409 Mgal/d) was withdrawn from surface water, and 8 percent (34 Mgal/d) was withdrawn from groundwater. Withdrawals for power generation accounted for 91 percent (403 Mgal/d) of the total water withdrawn. Withdrawals for other uses included public supply (27 Mgal/d), irrigation (9 Mgal/d), and aquaculture (3 Mgal/d). Water withdrawals in the parish generally increased from 1960 to 1995 and decreased from 1995 to 2005. This fact sheet summarizes basic information on the water resources of Rapides Parish, La. Information on groundwater and surface-water availability, quality, development, use, and trends is based on previously published reports listed in the references section.

  11. MetaCluster 5.0: a two-round binning approach for metagenomic data for low-abundance species in a noisy sample

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi; Leung, Henry C.M.; Yiu, S.M.; Chin, Francis Y.L.

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: Metagenomic binning remains an important topic in metagenomic analysis. Existing unsupervised binning methods for next-generation sequencing (NGS) reads do not perform well on (i) samples with low-abundance species or (ii) samples (even with high abundance) when there are many extremely low-abundance species. These two problems are common for real metagenomic datasets. Binning methods that can solve these problems are desirable. Results: We proposed a two-round binning method (MetaCluster 5.0) that aims at identifying both low-abundance and high-abundance species in the presence of a large amount of noise due to many extremely low-abundance species. In summary, MetaCluster 5.0 uses a filtering strategy to remove noise from the extremely low-abundance species. It separate reads of high-abundance species from those of low-abundance species in two different rounds. To overcome the issue of low coverage for low-abundance species, multiple w values are used to group reads with overlapping w-mers, whereas reads from high-abundance species are grouped with high confidence based on a large w and then binning expands to low-abundance species using a relaxed (shorter) w. Compared to the recent tools, TOSS and MetaCluster 4.0, MetaCluster 5.0 can find more species (especially those with low abundance of say 6× to 10×) and can achieve better sensitivity and specificity using less memory and running time. Availability: http://i.cs.hku.hk/~alse/MetaCluster/ Contact: chin@cs.hku.hk PMID:22962452

  12. Association between oestrogen receptor alpha (ESR1) gene polymorphisms and endometriosis: a meta-analysis of 24 case-control studies.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Luyang; Gu, Chenglei; Huang, Ke; Fan, Wensheng; Li, Lian; Ye, Mingxia; Han, Weidong; Meng, Yuanguang

    2016-09-01

    The PvuII (C > T), XbaI (A > G) and (TA)n polymorphisms of ESR1 gene are potentially associated with susceptibility to endometriosis. A meta-analysis was conducted to evaluate comprehensively the associations between endometriosis and ESR1 polymorphisms. Twenty-four studies, including 2740 cases and 3208 controls, were retrieved through searches of PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, CBM and CNKI. Meta-analyses showed that PvuII was associated with endometriosis only for stage I-III, only under a recessive model (OR = 1.53, 95% CI 1.05 to 2.21; P = 0.025). The short allele and TA13 of (TA)n were associated with a higher risk of endometriosis (ORS = 1.71, 95% CI 1.01 to 2.81, P = 0.046; ORTA13 = 1.45, 95% CI 1.06 to 1.97, PTA13 = 0.019); TA20 repeats was associated with a lower risk (OR = 0.36, 95% CI 0.16 to 0.80; P = 0.012). No statistically significant association was found in the XbaI polymorphism. This meta-analysis indicated that the PvuII and XbaI polymorphisms were not associated with the risk of endometriosis, whereas stage classification of endometriosis was likely to influence the association of PvuII polymorphism. The (TA)n polymorphisms might play roles in the susceptibility to, or protection against, the pathogenesis of endometriosis. PMID:27373811

  13. Plea for routinely presenting prediction intervals in meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    IntHout, Joanna; Ioannidis, John P A; Rovers, Maroeska M; Goeman, Jelle J

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Evaluating the variation in the strength of the effect across studies is a key feature of meta-analyses. This variability is reflected by measures like τ2 or I2, but their clinical interpretation is not straightforward. A prediction interval is less complicated: it presents the expected range of true effects in similar studies. We aimed to show the advantages of having the prediction interval routinely reported in meta-analyses. Design We show how the prediction interval can help understand the uncertainty about whether an intervention works or not. To evaluate the implications of using this interval to interpret the results, we selected the first meta-analysis per intervention review of the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews Issues 2009–2013 with a dichotomous (n=2009) or continuous (n=1254) outcome, and generated 95% prediction intervals for them. Results In 72.4% of 479 statistically significant (random-effects p<0.05) meta-analyses in the Cochrane Database 2009–2013 with heterogeneity (I2>0), the 95% prediction interval suggested that the intervention effect could be null or even be in the opposite direction. In 20.3% of those 479 meta-analyses, the prediction interval showed that the effect could be completely opposite to the point estimate of the meta-analysis. We demonstrate also how the prediction interval can be used to calculate the probability that a new trial will show a negative effect and to improve the calculations of the power of a new trial. Conclusions The prediction interval reflects the variation in treatment effects over different settings, including what effect is to be expected in future patients, such as the patients that a clinician is interested to treat. Prediction intervals should be routinely reported to allow more informative inferences in meta-analyses. PMID:27406637

  14. MetaShare: Enabling Knowledge-Based Data Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennington, D. D.; Salayandia, L.; Gates, A.; Osuna, F.

    2013-12-01

    MetaShare is a free and open source knowledge-based system for supporting data management planning, now required by some agencies and publishers. MetaShare supports users as they describe the types of data they will collect, expected standards, and expected policies for sharing. MetaShare's semantic model captures relationships between disciplines, tools, data types, data formats, and metadata standards. As the user plans their data management activities, MetaShare recommends choices based on practices and decisions from a community that has used the system for similar purposes, and extends the knowledge base to capture new relationships. The MetaShare knowledge base is being seeded with information for geoscience and environmental science domains, and is currently undergoing testing on at the University of Texas at El Paso. Through time and usage, it is expected to grow to support a variety of research domains, enabling community-based learning of data management practices. Knowledge of a user's choices during the planning phase can be used to support other tasks in the data life cycle, e.g., collecting, disseminating, and archiving data. A key barrier to scientific data sharing is the lack of sufficient metadata that provides context under which data were collected. The next phase of MetaShare development will automatically generate data collection instruments with embedded metadata and semantic annotations based on the information provided during the planning phase. While not comprehensive, this metadata will be sufficient for discovery and will enable user's to focus on more detailed descriptions of their data. Details are available at: Salayandia, L., Pennington, D., Gates, A., and Osuna, F. (accepted). MetaShare: From data management plans to knowledge base systems. AAAI Fall Symposium Series Workshop on Discovery Informatics, November 15-17, 2013, Arlington, VA.

  15. Rapid toxicity screening of gasification ashes.

    PubMed

    Zhen, Xu; Rong, Le; Ng, Wei Cheng; Ong, Cynthia; Baeg, Gyeong Hun; Zhang, Wenlin; Lee, Si Ni; Li, Sam Fong Yau; Dai, Yanjun; Tong, Yen Wah; Neoh, Koon Gee; Wang, Chi-Hwa

    2016-04-01

    The solid residues including bottom ashes and fly ashes produced by waste gasification technology could be reused as secondary raw materials. However, the applications and utilizations of these ashes are very often restricted by their toxicity. Therefore, toxicity screening of ash is the primary condition for reusing the ash. In this manuscript, we establish a standard for rapid screening of gasification ashes on the basis of in vitro and in vivo testing, and henceforth guide the proper disposal of the ashes. We used three different test models comprising human cell lines (liver and lung cells), Drosophila melanogaster and Daphnia magna to examine the toxicity of six different types of ashes. For each ash, different leachate concentrations were used to examine the toxicity, with C0 being the original extracted leachate concentration, while C/C0 being subsequent diluted concentrations. The IC50 for each leachate was also quantified for use as an index to classify toxicity levels. The results demonstrated that the toxicity evaluation of different types of ashes using different models is consistent with each other. As the different models show consistent qualitative results, we chose one or two of the models (liver cells or lung cells models) as the standard for rapid toxicity screening of gasification ashes. We may classify the gasification ashes into three categories according to the IC50, 24h value on liver cells or lung cells models, namely "toxic level I" (IC50, 24h>C/C0=0.5), "toxic level II" (C/C0=0.05

  16. Orthodontics treatments for managing obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in children: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Nelly T; Desplats, Eve; Almeida, Fernanda R

    2016-02-01

    A small maxilla and/or mandible may predispose children to sleep-disordered breathing, which is a continuum of severity from snoring to obstructive sleep apnea. Preliminary studies have suggested that orthodontic treatments, such as orthopedic mandibular advancement or rapid maxillary expansion, may be effective treatments. The aim is to investigate the efficacy of orthopedic mandibular advancement and/or rapid maxillary expansion in the treatment of pediatric obstructive sleep apnea. Pubmed, Medline, Embase, and Internet were searched for eligible studies published until April 2014. Articles with adequate data were selected for the meta-analysis; other articles were reported in the qualitative assessment. Data extraction was conducted by two independent authors. A total of 58 studies were identified. Only eight studies were included in the review; of these, six were included in the meta-analysis. The research yielded only a small number of studies. Consequently, any conclusions from the pooled diagnostic parameters and their interpretation should be treated carefully. Although the included studies were limited, these orthodontic treatments may be effective in managing pediatric snoring and obstructive sleep apnea. Other related health outcomes, such as neurocognitive and cardiovascular functions have not yet been systematically addressed. More studies are needed with larger sample size, specific inclusion and exclusion criteria and standardized data reporting to help establish guidelines for the orthodontic treatment of pediatric obstructive sleep apnea. PMID:26164371

  17. Role of presynaptic phosphoprotein synapsin II in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Molinaro, Luke; Hui, Patricia; Tan, Mattea; Mishra, Ram K

    2015-09-22

    Synapsin II is a member of the neuronal phosphoprotein family. These phosphoproteins are evolutionarily conserved across many organisms and are important in a variety of synaptic functions, including synaptogenesis and the regulation of neurotransmitter release. A number of genome-wide scans, meta-analyses, and genetic susceptibility studies have implicated the synapsin II gene (3p25) in the etiology of schizophrenia (SZ) and other psychiatric disorders. Further studies have found a reduction of synapsin II mRNA and protein in the prefrontal cortex in post-mortem samples from schizophrenic patients. Disruptions in the expression of this gene may cause synaptic dysfunction, which can result in neurotransmitter imbalances, likely contributing to the pathogenesis of SZ. SZ is a costly, debilitating psychiatric illness affecting approximately 1.1% of the world's population, amounting to 51 million people today. The disorder is characterized by positive (hallucinations, paranoia), negative (social withdrawal, lack of motivation), and cognitive (memory impairments, attention deficits) symptoms. This review provides a comprehensive summary of the structure, function, and involvement of the synapsin family, specifically synapsin II, in the pathophysiology of SZ and possible target for therapeutic intervention/implications. PMID:26425441

  18. Role of presynaptic phosphoprotein synapsin II in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Molinaro, Luke; Hui, Patricia; Tan, Mattea; Mishra, Ram K

    2015-01-01

    Synapsin II is a member of the neuronal phosphoprotein family. These phosphoproteins are evolutionarily conserved across many organisms and are important in a variety of synaptic functions, including synaptogenesis and the regulation of neurotransmitter release. A number of genome-wide scans, meta-analyses, and genetic susceptibility studies have implicated the synapsin II gene (3p25) in the etiology of schizophrenia (SZ) and other psychiatric disorders. Further studies have found a reduction of synapsin II mRNA and protein in the prefrontal cortex in post-mortem samples from schizophrenic patients. Disruptions in the expression of this gene may cause synaptic dysfunction, which can result in neurotransmitter imbalances, likely contributing to the pathogenesis of SZ. SZ is a costly, debilitating psychiatric illness affecting approximately 1.1% of the world’s population, amounting to 51 million people today. The disorder is characterized by positive (hallucinations, paranoia), negative (social withdrawal, lack of motivation), and cognitive (memory impairments, attention deficits) symptoms. This review provides a comprehensive summary of the structure, function, and involvement of the synapsin family, specifically synapsin II, in the pathophysiology of SZ and possible target for therapeutic intervention/implications. PMID:26425441

  19. Meta-ecosystem metabolism across fluvial networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulseth, A. J.; Singer, G. A.; Battin, T. J.

    2013-12-01

    Freshwater ecosystems store, transform, and export terrestrial carbon and play an important role for regional and global carbon fluxes. Ecosystem metabolism is a measure of how and how much carbon is produced and transformed and - for streams and rivers - is typically estimated at the reach scale (typically tens to hundreds of meters). Due to methodological constraints we so far lack an understanding of metabolism of the fluvial meta-ecosystem continuum, i.e. at the scale of a fluvial network. To address this issue, we measured metabolism in multiple reaches across a 254 km2 catchment in Lower Austria, capturing both temporal dynamics and the spatial scale of the whole fluvial network. Stream metabolism was estimated from diel changes in oxygen and corrected for reaeration; continuously in 15 streams and during a short-term ';snap-shot' campaign across 42 streams. Across the network, the streams varied in catchment size (0.1 to 254 km2) and water chemistry (DOC: 1.0 to 2.7 mg L-1, NO3: 259 to 1277 μg L-1, NH4:<0.1 to 30 μg L-1, and PO4:<0.1 to 20 μg L-1) as a consequence of subcatchment landuse, elevation and geology. Gross primary production (GPP) and ecosystem respiration (ER) were suppressed across the network by high stream discharge events such as snow melt and heavy rains. Larger streams (catchment size > 35 km2) had higher GPP and tended to be more autotrophic than lower order streams. However, streams located above 1000 m elevation had higher GPP than streams of equivalent size found elsewhere in the stream network. During the winter months, all streams across the network were net heterotrophic, with GPP typically <1.0 g 02 m-2 d-1. The degree of autotrophy versus heterotrophy across the network was driven in part by light, which is contingent on location within the stream network. We will discuss scaling GPP and ER from the reach to the network scale in order to elucidate patterns of meta-ecosystem metabolism across fluvial networks.

  20. Intermittent Versus Daily Pulmonary Tuberculosis Treatment Regimens: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kasozi, Samuel; Clark, Justin; Doi, Suhail A. R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Several systematic reviews suggest that intermittent pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) chemotherapy is effective, but intensity (daily versus intermittent) and duration of rifampicin use (intensive phase only versus both phases) have not been distinguished. In addition, the various outcomes (success, failure, relapse, and default) have only selectively been evaluated. Methods We conducted a meta-analysis of proportions using all four outcomes as multi-category proportions to examine the effectiveness of WHO category 1 TB treatment regimens. Database searches of studies reporting treatment outcomes of HIV negative subjects were included and stratified by intensity of therapy and duration of rifampicin therapy. Using a bias-adjusted statistical model, we pooled proportions of the four treatment outcome categories using a method that handles multi-category proportions. Results A total of 27 studies comprising of 48 data sets with 10,624 participants were studied. Overall, treatment success was similar among patients treated with intermittent (I/I) (88%) (95% CI, 81–92) and daily (D/D) (90%) (95% CI, 84–95) regimens. Default was significantly less with I/I (0%) (95% CI, 0–2) compared to D/D regimens (5%) (95% CI, 1–9). Nevertheless, I/I relapse rates (7%) (95% CI, 3–11) were higher than D/D relapse rates (1%) (95% CI, 0–3). Conclusion Treatment regimens that are offered completely intermittently versus completely daily are associated with a trade-off between treatment relapse and treatment default. There is a possibility that I/I regimens can be improved by increasing treatment duration, and this needs to be urgently addressed by future studies. PMID:26056374

  1. Evolution of rapid nerve conduction.

    PubMed

    Castelfranco, Ann M; Hartline, Daniel K

    2016-06-15

    Rapid conduction of nerve impulses is a priority for organisms needing to react quickly to events in their environment. While myelin may be viewed as the crowning innovation bringing about rapid conduction, the evolution of rapid communication mechanisms, including those refined and enhanced in the evolution of myelin, has much deeper roots. In this review, a sequence is traced starting with diffusional communication, followed by transport-facilitated communication, the rise of electrical signaling modalities, the invention of voltage-gated channels and "all-or-none" impulses, the emergence of elongate nerve axons specialized for communication and their fine-tuning to enhance impulse conduction speeds. Finally within the evolution of myelin itself, several innovations have arisen and have been interactively refined for speed enhancement, including the addition and sealing of layers, their limitation by space availability, and the optimization of key parameters: channel density, lengths of exposed nodes and lengths of internodes. We finish by suggesting several design principles that appear to govern the evolution of rapid conduction. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Myelin Evolution.

  2. Rapid-Equilibrium Enzyme Kinetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberty, Robert A.

    2008-01-01

    Rapid-equilibrium rate equations for enzyme-catalyzed reactions are especially useful because if experimental data can be fit by these simpler rate equations, the Michaelis constants can be interpreted as equilibrium constants. However, for some reactions it is necessary to use the more complicated steady-state rate equations. Thermodynamics is…

  3. Rapid Prototyping Enters Mainstream Manufacturing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winek, Gary

    1996-01-01

    Explains rapid prototyping, a process that uses computer-assisted design files to create a three-dimensional object automatically, speeding the industrial design process. Five commercially available systems and two emerging types--the 3-D printing process and repetitive masking and depositing--are described. (SK)

  4. Rapidly Deployed Modular Telemetry System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varnavas, Kosta A. (Inventor); Sims, William Herbert, III (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention is a telemetry system, and more specifically is a rapidly deployed modular telemetry apparatus which utilizes of SDR technology and the FPGA programming capability to reduce the number of hardware components and programming required to deploy a telemetry system.

  5. The Effectiveness of Different Interventions to Promote Poison Prevention Behaviours in Households with Children: A Network Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Achana, Felix A.; Sutton, Alex J.; Kendrick, Denise; Wynn, Persephone; Young, Ben; Jones, David R.; Hubbard, Stephanie J.; Cooper, Nicola J.

    2015-01-01

    Background There is evidence from 2 previous meta-analyses that interventions to promote poison prevention behaviours are effective in increasing a range of poison prevention practices in households with children. The published meta-analyses compared any intervention against a “usual care or no intervention” which potentially limits the usefulness of the analysis to decision makers. We aim to use network meta-analysis to simultaneously evaluate the effectiveness of different interventions to increase prevalence of safe storage of i) Medicines only, ii) Other household products only, iii) Poisons (both medicines and non-medicines), iv) Poisonous plants; and v) Possession of poison control centre (PCC) telephone number in households with children. Methods Data on the effectiveness of poison prevention interventions was extracted from primary studies identified in 2 newly-undertaken systematic reviews. Effect estimates were pooled across studies using a random effects network meta-analysis model. Results 28 of the 47 primary studies identified were included in the analysis. Compared to usual care intervention, the intervention with education and low cost/free equipment elements was most effective in promoting safe storage of medicines (odds ratio 2.51, 95% credible interval 1.01 to 6.00) while interventions with education, low cost/free equipment, home safety inspection and fitting components were most effective in promoting safe storage of other household products (2.52, 1.12 to 7.13), safe storage of poisons (11.10, 1.60 to 141.50) and possession of PCC number (38.82, 2.19 to 687.10). No one intervention package was more effective than the others in promoting safe storage of poisonous plants. Conclusion The most effective interventions varied by poison prevention practice, but education alone was not the most effective intervention for any poison prevention practice. Commissioners and providers of poison prevention interventions should tailor the interventions

  6. MetaLocGramN: A meta-predictor of protein subcellular localization for Gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Magnus, Marcin; Pawlowski, Marcin; Bujnicki, Janusz M

    2012-12-01

    Subcellular localization is a key functional characteristic of proteins. It is determined by signals encoded in the protein sequence. The experimental determination of subcellular localization is laborious. Thus, a number of computational methods have been developed to predict the protein location from sequence. However predictions made by different methods often disagree with each other and it is not always clear which algorithm performs best for the given cellular compartment. We benchmarked primary subcellular localization predictors for proteins from Gram-negative bacteria, PSORTb3, PSLpred, CELLO, and SOSUI-GramN, on a common dataset that included 1056 proteins. We found that PSORTb3 performs best on the average, but is outperformed by other methods in predictions of extracellular proteins. This motivated us to develop a meta-predictor, which combines the primary methods by using the logistic regression models, to take advantage of their combined strengths, and to eliminate their individual weaknesses. MetaLocGramN runs the primary methods, and based on their output classifies protein sequences into one of five major localizations of the Gram-negative bacterial cell: cytoplasm, plasma membrane, periplasm, outer membrane, and extracellular space. MetaLocGramN achieves the average Matthews correlation coefficient of 0.806, i.e. 12% better than the best individual primary method. MetaLocGramN is a meta-predictor specialized in predicting subcellular localization for proteins from Gram-negative bacteria. According to our benchmark, it performs better than all other tools run independently. MetaLocGramN is a web and SOAP server available for free use by all academic users at the URL http://iimcb.genesilico.pl/MetaLocGramN. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Computational Methods for Protein Interaction and Structural Prediction. PMID:22705560

  7. A Tutorial on Conducting Meta-Analyses of Clinical Outcome Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robey, Randall R.; Dalebout, Susan D.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this tutorial is to enhance the familiarity and accessibility of meta-analyses in the domains of audiology and speech-language pathology for investigating questions of treatment efficacy and treatment effectiveness. Steps to conducting a meta-analysis are explained and an example of meta-analysis using published data is included.…

  8. Rethinking Meta-Analysis: Applications for Air Pollution Data and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Julie E; Petito Boyce, Catherine; Sax, Sonja N; Beyer, Leslie A; Prueitt, Robyn L

    2015-01-01

    Meta-analyses offer a rigorous and transparent systematic framework for synthesizing data that can be used for a wide range of research areas, study designs, and data types. Both the outcome of meta-analyses and the meta-analysis process itself can yield useful insights for answering scientific questions and making policy decisions. Development of the National Ambient Air Quality Standards illustrates many potential applications of meta-analysis. These applications demonstrate the strengths and limitations of meta-analysis, issues that arise in various data realms, how meta-analysis design choices can influence interpretation of results, and how meta-analysis can be used to address bias and heterogeneity. Reviewing available data from a meta-analysis perspective can provide a useful framework and impetus for identifying and refining strategies for future research. Moreover, increased pervasiveness of a meta-analysis mindset—focusing on how the pieces of the research puzzle fit together—would benefit scientific research and data syntheses regardless of whether or not a quantitative meta-analysis is undertaken. While an individual meta-analysis can only synthesize studies addressing the same research question, the results of separate meta-analyses can be combined to address a question encompassing multiple data types. This observation applies to any scientific or policy area where information from a variety of disciplines must be considered to address a broader research question. PMID:25969128

  9. Less Is Less: A Systematic Review of Graph Use in Meta-Analyses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schild, Anne H. E.; Voracek, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Graphs are an essential part of scientific communication. Complex datasets, of which meta-analyses are textbook examples, benefit the most from visualization. Although a number of graph options for meta-analyses exist, the extent to which these are used was hitherto unclear. A systematic review on graph use in meta-analyses in three disciplines…

  10. Examining the Inclusion of Quantitative Research in a Meta-Ethnographic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booker, Rhae-Ann Richardson

    2010-01-01

    This study explored how one might extend meta-ethnography to quantitative research for the advancement of interpretive review methods. Using the same population of 139 studies on racial-ethnic matching as data, my investigation entailed an extended meta-ethnography (EME) and comparison of its results to a published meta-analysis (PMA). Adhering to…

  11. Publication Bias: The Antagonist of Meta-Analytic Reviews and Effective Policymaking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banks, George C.; Kepes, Sven; Banks, Karen P.

    2012-01-01

    This article offers three contributions for conducting meta-analytic reviews in education research. First, we review publication bias and the challenges it presents for meta-analytic researchers. Second, we review the most recent and optimal techniques for evaluating the presence and influence of publication bias in meta-analyses. We then…

  12. Reconsidering Changes in Parent-Child Conflict across Adolescence: A Meta-Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laursen, Brett; Coy, Katherine C.; Collins, W. Andrew

    1998-01-01

    A series of meta-analyses identified changes in parent-child conflict during adolescence and moderating factors. Results of age meta-analyses indicated that conflict rate and total conflict declined from early to mid adolescence and from mid to late adolescence; conflict affect increased from early to mid-adolescence. Puberty meta-analyses…

  13. Web Indexing with Meta Fields: A Survey of Web Objects in Polymer Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Qin, Jian; Wesley, Kathryn

    1998-01-01

    This survey of 1037 World Wide Web objects on polymer chemistry collected by four search engines (AltaVista, Lycos, Excite, Webcrawler) examined document information and use of meta fields, images, and chemical names. Found that the use of meta fields was not widespread and that knowledge of meta fields in HTML varied among Web object creators.…

  14. A Review of Meta-Analyses in Education: Methodological Strengths and Weaknesses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahn, Soyeon; Ames, Allison J.; Myers, Nicholas D.

    2012-01-01

    The current review addresses the validity of published meta-analyses in education that determines the credibility and generalizability of study findings using a total of 56 meta-analyses published in education in the 2000s. Our objectives were to evaluate the current meta-analytic practices in education, identify methodological strengths and…

  15. How Can Meta-Analyses Guide Practice? A Review of the Learning Disability Research Base

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Therrien, William J.; Zaman, Maliha; Banda, Devender R.

    2011-01-01

    Meta-analysis is considered an acceptable method to evaluate research studies for evidence-based practices. The purpose of this review is to examine the applicability of using meta-analyses in the learning disability field to guide classroom practice. The authors evaluated 15 learning disability meta-analyses in three domains: large-scale…

  16. A Meta-Ethnographic Synthesis of Support Services for Adult Learners in Distance Learning Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuquero, Jean M.

    2010-01-01

    This qualitative research study utilized Noblit and Hare's (1988) meta-ethnographic approach to synthesize findings of five dissertations that focused on distance learning support services for adult learners. Noblit and Hare's (1988) meta-ethnographic approach consists of seven phases. Each meta-ethnographic phase guided the identification process…

  17. Dynamical manipulation of electromagnetic polarization using anisotropic meta-mirror.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jianhua; Huang, Cheng; Pan, Wenbo; Pu, Mingbo; Guo, Yinghui; Luo, Xiangang

    2016-01-01

    Polarization control of electromagnetic wave is very important in many fields. Here, we propose an active meta-mirror to dynamically manipulate electromagnetic polarization state at a broad band. This meta-mirror is composed of a double-layered metallic pattern backed by a metallic flat plate, and the active elements of PIN diodes are integrated into the meta-atom to control the reflection phase difference between two orthogonal polarization modes. Through switching the operating state of the PIN diodes, the meta-mirror is expected to achieve three polarization states which are left-handed, right-handed circular polarizations and linear polarization, respectively. We fabricated this active meta-mirror and validated its polarization conversion performance by measurement. The linearly polarized incident wave can be dynamically converted to right-handed or left-handed circular polarization in the frequency range between 3.4 and 8.8 GHz with the average loss of 1 dB. Furthermore, it also can keep its initial linear polarization state. PMID:27469028

  18. Meta-heuristic algorithms as tools for hydrological science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Do Guen; Kim, Joong Hoon

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, meta-heuristic optimization techniques are introduced and their applications to water resources engineering, particularly in hydrological science are introduced. In recent years, meta-heuristic optimization techniques have been introduced that can overcome the problems inherent in iterative simulations. These methods are able to find good solutions and require limited computation time and memory use without requiring complex derivatives. Simulation-based meta-heuristic methods such as Genetic algorithms (GAs) and Harmony Search (HS) have powerful searching abilities, which can occasionally overcome the several drawbacks of traditional mathematical methods. For example, HS algorithms can be conceptualized from a musical performance process and used to achieve better harmony; such optimization algorithms seek a near global optimum determined by the value of an objective function, providing a more robust determination of musical performance than can be achieved through typical aesthetic estimation. In this paper, meta-heuristic algorithms and their applications (focus on GAs and HS) in hydrological science are discussed by subject, including a review of existing literature in the field. Then, recent trends in optimization are presented and a relatively new technique such as Smallest Small World Cellular Harmony Search (SSWCHS) is briefly introduced, with a summary of promising results obtained in previous studies. As a result, previous studies have demonstrated that meta-heuristic algorithms are effective tools for the development of hydrological models and the management of water resources.

  19. Goodness-of-fit test for meta-analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhongxue; Zhang, Guoyi; Li, Jing

    2015-11-01

    Meta-analysis is a very useful tool to combine information from different sources. Fixed effect and random effect models are widely used in meta-analysis. Despite their popularity, they may give us misleading results if the models don’t fit the data but are blindly used. Therefore, like any statistical analysis, checking the model fitting is an important step. However, in practice, the goodness-of-fit in meta-analysis is rarely discussed. In this paper, we propose some tests to check the goodness-of-fit for the fixed and random effect models with assumption of normal distributions in meta-analysis. Through simulation study, we show that the proposed tests control type I error rate very well. To demonstrate the usefulness of the proposed tests, we also apply them to some real data sets. Our study shows that the proposed tests are useful tools in checking the goodness-of-fit of the normal models used in meta-analysis.

  20. Dynamical manipulation of electromagnetic polarization using anisotropic meta-mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Jianhua; Huang, Cheng; Pan, Wenbo; Pu, Mingbo; Guo, Yinghui; Luo, Xiangang

    2016-07-01

    Polarization control of electromagnetic wave is very important in many fields. Here, we propose an active meta-mirror to dynamically manipulate electromagnetic polarization state at a broad band. This meta-mirror is composed of a double-layered metallic pattern backed by a metallic flat plate, and the active elements of PIN diodes are integrated into the meta-atom to control the reflection phase difference between two orthogonal polarization modes. Through switching the operating state of the PIN diodes, the meta-mirror is expected to achieve three polarization states which are left-handed, right-handed circular polarizations and linear polarization, respectively. We fabricated this active meta-mirror and validated its polarization conversion performance by measurement. The linearly polarized incident wave can be dynamically converted to right-handed or left-handed circular polarization in the frequency range between 3.4 and 8.8 GHz with the average loss of 1 dB. Furthermore, it also can keep its initial linear polarization state.