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Sample records for rapid protein identification

  1. Small acid soluble proteins for rapid spore identification.

    SciTech Connect

    Branda, Steven S.; Lane, Todd W.; VanderNoot, Victoria A.; Jokerst, Amanda S.

    2006-12-01

    This one year LDRD addressed the problem of rapid characterization of bacterial spores such as those from the genus Bacillus, the group that contains pathogenic spores such as B. anthracis. In this effort we addressed the feasibility of using a proteomics based approach to spore characterization using a subset of conserved spore proteins known as the small acid soluble proteins or SASPs. We proposed developing techniques that built on our previous expertise in microseparations to rapidly characterize or identify spores. An alternative SASP extraction method was developed that was amenable to both the subsequent fluorescent labeling required for laser-induced fluorescence detection and the low ionic strength requirements for isoelectric focusing. For the microseparations, both capillary isoelectric focusing and chip gel electrophoresis were employed. A variety of methods were evaluated to improve the molecular weight resolution for the SASPs, which are in a molecular weight range that is not well resolved by the current methods. Isoelectric focusing was optimized and employed to resolve the SASPs using UV absorbance detection. Proteomic signatures of native wild type Bacillus spores and clones genetically engineered to produce altered SASP patterns were assessed by slab gel electrophoresis, capillary isoelectric focusing with absorbance detection as well as microchip based gel electrophoresis employing sensitive laser-induced fluorescence detection.

  2. Rapid identification of sequences for orphan enzymes to power accurate protein annotation.

    PubMed

    Ramkissoon, Kevin R; Miller, Jennifer K; Ojha, Sunil; Watson, Douglas S; Bomar, Martha G; Galande, Amit K; Shearer, Alexander G

    2013-01-01

    The power of genome sequencing depends on the ability to understand what those genes and their proteins products actually do. The automated methods used to assign functions to putative proteins in newly sequenced organisms are limited by the size of our library of proteins with both known function and sequence. Unfortunately this library grows slowly, lagging well behind the rapid increase in novel protein sequences produced by modern genome sequencing methods. One potential source for rapidly expanding this functional library is the "back catalog" of enzymology--"orphan enzymes," those enzymes that have been characterized and yet lack any associated sequence. There are hundreds of orphan enzymes in the Enzyme Commission (EC) database alone. In this study, we demonstrate how this orphan enzyme "back catalog" is a fertile source for rapidly advancing the state of protein annotation. Starting from three orphan enzyme samples, we applied mass-spectrometry based analysis and computational methods (including sequence similarity networks, sequence and structural alignments, and operon context analysis) to rapidly identify the specific sequence for each orphan while avoiding the most time- and labor-intensive aspects of typical sequence identifications. We then used these three new sequences to more accurately predict the catalytic function of 385 previously uncharacterized or misannotated proteins. We expect that this kind of rapid sequence identification could be efficiently applied on a larger scale to make enzymology's "back catalog" another powerful tool to drive accurate genome annotation.

  3. Rapid Identification of Novel Immunodominant Proteins and Characterization of a Specific Linear Epitope of Campylobacter jejuni

    PubMed Central

    Hoppe, Sebastian; Bier, Frank F.; Nickisch-Rosenegk, Markus v.

    2013-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni remains one of the major gut pathogens of our time. Its zoonotic nature and wide-spread distribution in industrialized countries calls for a quick and reliable diagnostic tool. Antibody-based detection presents a suitable means to identify pathogenic bacteria. However, the knowledge about immunodominant targets is limited. Thus, an approach is presented, which allows for the rapid screening of numerous cDNA derived expression clones to identify novel antigens. The deeper understanding of immunodominant proteins assists in the design of diagnostic tools and furthers the insight into the bacterium’s pathogenicity as well as revealing potential candidates for vaccination. We have successfully screened 1536 clones of an expression library to identify 22 proteins that have not been described as immunodominant before. After subcloning the corresponding 22 genes and expression of full-length proteins, we investigated the immunodominant character by microarrays and ELISA. Subsequently, seven proteins were selected for epitope mapping. For cj0669 and cj0920c linear epitopes were identified. For cj0669, specificity assays revealed a specific linear epitope site. Consequently, an eleven amino acid residue sequence TLIKELKRLGI was analyzed via alanine scan, which revealed the glycine residue to be significant for binding of the antibody. The innovative approach presented herein of generating cDNAs of prokaryotes in combination with a microarray platform rendering time-consuming purification steps obsolete has helped to illuminate novel immunodominant proteins of C.jejuni. The findings of a specific linear epitope pave the way for a plethora of future research and the potential use in diagnostic applications such as serological screenings. Moreover, the current approach is easily adaptable to other highly relevant bacteria making it a formidable tool for the future discovery of antigens and potential biomarkers. Consequently, it is desirable to simplify

  4. Rapid identification of novel immunodominant proteins and characterization of a specific linear epitope of Campylobacter jejuni.

    PubMed

    Hoppe, Sebastian; Bier, Frank F; von Nickisch-Rosenegk, Markus; Nickisch-Rosenegk, Markus V

    2013-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni remains one of the major gut pathogens of our time. Its zoonotic nature and wide-spread distribution in industrialized countries calls for a quick and reliable diagnostic tool. Antibody-based detection presents a suitable means to identify pathogenic bacteria. However, the knowledge about immunodominant targets is limited. Thus, an approach is presented, which allows for the rapid screening of numerous cDNA derived expression clones to identify novel antigens. The deeper understanding of immunodominant proteins assists in the design of diagnostic tools and furthers the insight into the bacterium's pathogenicity as well as revealing potential candidates for vaccination. We have successfully screened 1536 clones of an expression library to identify 22 proteins that have not been described as immunodominant before. After subcloning the corresponding 22 genes and expression of full-length proteins, we investigated the immunodominant character by microarrays and ELISA. Subsequently, seven proteins were selected for epitope mapping. For cj0669 and cj0920c linear epitopes were identified. For cj0669, specificity assays revealed a specific linear epitope site. Consequently, an eleven amino acid residue sequence TLIKELKRLGI was analyzed via alanine scan, which revealed the glycine residue to be significant for binding of the antibody. The innovative approach presented herein of generating cDNAs of prokaryotes in combination with a microarray platform rendering time-consuming purification steps obsolete has helped to illuminate novel immunodominant proteins of C.jejuni. The findings of a specific linear epitope pave the way for a plethora of future research and the potential use in diagnostic applications such as serological screenings. Moreover, the current approach is easily adaptable to other highly relevant bacteria making it a formidable tool for the future discovery of antigens and potential biomarkers. Consequently, it is desirable to simplify the

  5. A rapid and selective mass spectrometric method for the identification of nitrated proteins.

    PubMed

    Amoresano, Angela; Chiappetta, Giovanni; Pucci, Piero; Marino, Gennaro

    2008-01-01

    The nitration of protein tyrosine residues represents an important posttranslational modification during development, oxidative stress, and biological aging. The major challenge in the proteomic analysis of nitroproteins is the need to discriminate modified proteins, usually occurring at substoichiometric levels, from the large amount of nonmodified proteins. Moreover, precise localization of the nitration site is often required to fully describe the biological process. Identification of the specific targets of protein oxidation was previously accomplished using immunoprecipitation techniques followed by immunochemical detection. Here, we report a totally new approach involving dansyl chloride labeling of the nitration sites which relies on the enormous potential of MS(n) analysis. The tryptic digest from the entire protein mixture is directly analyzed by MS on a linear ion trap mass spectrometer. Discrimination between nitro- and unmodified peptide is based on two selectivity criteria obtained by combining a precursor ion scan and a MS3 analysis. The novel labeling procedure was successfully applied to the identification of 3-nitrotyrosine residues in complex protein mixtures. PMID:19082935

  6. Rapid Identification of Protein Kinase Phosphorylation Site Motifs Using Combinatorial Peptide Libraries.

    PubMed

    Miller, Chad J; Turk, Benjamin E

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic protein kinases phosphorylate substrates at serine, threonine, and tyrosine residues that fall within the context of short sequence motifs. Knowing the phosphorylation site motif for a protein kinase facilitates designing substrates for kinase assays and mapping phosphorylation sites in protein substrates. Here, we describe an arrayed peptide library protocol for rapidly determining kinase phosphorylation consensus sequences. This method uses a set of peptide mixtures in which each of the 20 amino acid residues is systematically substituted at nine positions surrounding a central site of phosphorylation. Peptide mixtures are arrayed in multiwell plates and analyzed by radiolabel assay with the kinase of interest. The preferred sequence is determined from the relative rate of phosphorylation of each peptide in the array. Consensus peptides based on these sequences typically serve as efficient and specific kinase substrates for high-throughput screening or incorporation into biosensors.

  7. Identification of Thermostabilizing Mutations for Membrane Proteins: Rapid Method Based on Statistical Thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Satoshi; Kajiwara, Yuta; Takamuku, Yuuki; Suzuki, Nanao; Murata, Takeshi; Kinoshita, Masahiro

    2016-04-28

    Membrane proteins are responsible for the communication between cells and their environments. They are indispensable to the expression of life phenomena and also implicated in a number of diseases. Nevertheless, the studies on membrane proteins are far behind those on water-soluble proteins, primarily due to their low structural stability. Introduction of mutations can enhance their thermostability and stability in detergents, but the stabilizing mutations are currently identified by experiments. The recently reported computational methods suffer such drawbacks as the exploration of only limited mutational space and the empiricism whose results are difficult to physically interpret. Here we develop a rapid method that allows us to treat all of the possible mutations. It employs a free-energy function (FEF) that takes into account the translational entropy of hydrocarbon groups within the lipid bilayer as well as the protein intramolecular hydrogen bonding. The method is illustrated for the adenosine A2a receptor whose wild-type structure is known and utilized. We propose a reliable strategy of finding key residues to be mutated and selecting their mutations, which will lead to considerably higher stability. Representative single mutants predicted to be stabilizing or destabilizing were experimentally examined and the success rate was found to be remarkably high. The melting temperature Tm for two of them was substantially higher than that of the wild type. A double mutant with even higher Tm was also obtained. Our FEF captures the essential physics of the stability changes upon mutations.

  8. Identification of Thermostabilizing Mutations for Membrane Proteins: Rapid Method Based on Statistical Thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Satoshi; Kajiwara, Yuta; Takamuku, Yuuki; Suzuki, Nanao; Murata, Takeshi; Kinoshita, Masahiro

    2016-04-28

    Membrane proteins are responsible for the communication between cells and their environments. They are indispensable to the expression of life phenomena and also implicated in a number of diseases. Nevertheless, the studies on membrane proteins are far behind those on water-soluble proteins, primarily due to their low structural stability. Introduction of mutations can enhance their thermostability and stability in detergents, but the stabilizing mutations are currently identified by experiments. The recently reported computational methods suffer such drawbacks as the exploration of only limited mutational space and the empiricism whose results are difficult to physically interpret. Here we develop a rapid method that allows us to treat all of the possible mutations. It employs a free-energy function (FEF) that takes into account the translational entropy of hydrocarbon groups within the lipid bilayer as well as the protein intramolecular hydrogen bonding. The method is illustrated for the adenosine A2a receptor whose wild-type structure is known and utilized. We propose a reliable strategy of finding key residues to be mutated and selecting their mutations, which will lead to considerably higher stability. Representative single mutants predicted to be stabilizing or destabilizing were experimentally examined and the success rate was found to be remarkably high. The melting temperature Tm for two of them was substantially higher than that of the wild type. A double mutant with even higher Tm was also obtained. Our FEF captures the essential physics of the stability changes upon mutations. PMID:27056055

  9. A rapid method for capture and identification of immunogenic proteins in Bordetella pertussis enriched membranes fractions: a fast-track strategy applicable to other microorganisms.

    PubMed

    West, Rolieria; Whitmon, Jennifer; Williamson, Yulanda M; Moura, Hercules; Nelson, Marguerite; Melnick, Nikkol; Tondella, Maria Lucia C; Schieltz, David; Rees, Jon; Woolfitt, Adrian R; Barr, John R; Ades, Edwin W; Carlone, George M; Sampson, Jacquelyn S

    2012-03-16

    Mass spectrometry (MS) coupled with 1-D and 2-D electrophoresis can be utilized to detect and identify immunogenic proteins, but these methods are laborious and time-consuming. We describe an alternative, simple, rapid gel-free strategy to identify multiple immunogenic proteins from Bordetella pertussis (Bp). It couples immunoprecipitation to nano liquid chromatography- tandem mass spectrometry (IP-nLC-MS/MS) and is significantly both time- and labor-saving. We developed a gel-free magnetic bead-based immunoprecipitation (IP) method using different NP-40/PBS concentrations in which solubilized proteins of Bp Tohama I membrane fractions were precipitated with polyclonal rabbit anti-Bp whole cell immune sera. Immune complexes were analyzed by MS and Scaffold analysis (>95% protein identification probability). Total immunoproteins identified were 50, 63 and 49 for 0.90%, 0.45% and 0.22% NP-40/PBS buffer concentrations respectively. Known Bp proteins identified included pertactin, serotype 2 fimbrial subunit and filamentous hemagglutinin. As proof of concept that this gel-free protein immunoprecipitation method enabled the capture of multiple immunogenic proteins, IP samples were also analyzed by SDS-PAGE and immunoblotting. Bypassing gels and subjecting immunoprecipitated proteins directly to MS is a simple and rapid antigen identification method with relatively high throughput. IP-nLC-MS/MS provides a novel alternative approach for current methods used for the identification of immunogenic proteins.

  10. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry for rapid identification of clinical fungal isolates based on ribosomal protein biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Panda, Ashutosh; Ghosh, Anup K; Mirdha, Bijay R; Xess, Immaculata; Paul, Saikat; Samantaray, Jyotish C; Srinivasan, Alagiri; Khalil, Shehla; Rastogi, Neha; Dabas, Yubhisha

    2015-02-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the identification of clinical fungal isolates (yeast and molds) by protein profiling using Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/MS). A total of 125 clinical fungal culture isolates (yeast and filamentous fungi) were collected. The test set included 88 yeast isolates (Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Candida guilliermondii, Candida kefyr, Candida krusei, Candida parapsilosis, Candida rugosa, Candida tropicalis and Cryptococcus neoformans) and 37 isolates of molds (Alternaria spp., Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus fumigatus, Aspergillus niger, Cunninghamella spp., Histoplasma capsulatum, Microsporum gypseum, Microsporum nanum, Rhizomucor spp. and Trichophyton spp.). The correlation between MALDI TOF MS and conventional identification for all these 125 fungal isolates included in the study was 87.2% at the species level and 90.4% at the genus level. MALDI TOF MS results revealed that the correlation in yeast (n=88) identification was 100% both at the genus and species levels whereas, the correlation in mold (n=37) identification was more heterogeneous i.e. 10.81% isolates had correct identification up to the genus level, 56.7% isolates had correct identification both at the genus and species levels, whereas 32.42% isolates were deemed Not Reliable Identification (NRI). But, with the modification in sample preparation protocol for molds, there was a significant improvement in identification. 86.4% isolates had correct identification till the genus and species levels whereas, only 2.7% isolates had Not Reliable Identification. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that MALDI-TOF MS could be a possible alternative to conventional techniques both for the identification and differentiation of clinical fungal isolates. However, the main limitation of this technique is that MS identification could be more precise only if the reference spectrum of the fungal species is available in the

  11. Cell-Free Expression and In Situ Immobilization of Parasite Proteins from Clonorchis sinensis for Rapid Identification of Antigenic Candidates.

    PubMed

    Catherine, Christy; Lee, Seung-Won; Ju, Jung Won; Kim, Ho-Cheol; Shin, Hyun-Il; Kim, Yu Jung; Kim, Dong-Myung

    2015-01-01

    Progress towards genetic sequencing of human parasites has provided the groundwork for a post-genomic approach to develop novel antigens for the diagnosis and treatment of parasite infections. To fully utilize the genomic data, however, high-throughput methodologies are required for functional analysis of the proteins encoded in the genomic sequences. In this study, we investigated cell-free expression and in situ immobilization of parasite proteins as a novel platform for the discovery of antigenic proteins. PCR-amplified parasite DNA was immobilized on microbeads that were also functionalized to capture synthesized proteins. When the microbeads were incubated in a reaction mixture for cell-free synthesis, proteins expressed from the microbead-immobilized DNA were instantly immobilized on the same microbeads, providing a physical linkage between the genetic information and encoded proteins. This approach of in situ expression and isolation enables streamlined recovery and analysis of cell-free synthesized proteins and also allows facile identification of the genes coding antigenic proteins through direct PCR of the microbead-bound DNA. PMID:26599101

  12. Cell-Free Expression and In Situ Immobilization of Parasite Proteins from Clonorchis sinensis for Rapid Identification of Antigenic Candidates

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Jung Won; Kim, Ho-Cheol; Shin, Hyun-Il; Kim, Yu Jung; Kim, Dong-Myung

    2015-01-01

    Progress towards genetic sequencing of human parasites has provided the groundwork for a post-genomic approach to develop novel antigens for the diagnosis and treatment of parasite infections. To fully utilize the genomic data, however, high-throughput methodologies are required for functional analysis of the proteins encoded in the genomic sequences. In this study, we investigated cell-free expression and in situ immobilization of parasite proteins as a novel platform for the discovery of antigenic proteins. PCR-amplified parasite DNA was immobilized on microbeads that were also functionalized to capture synthesized proteins. When the microbeads were incubated in a reaction mixture for cell-free synthesis, proteins expressed from the microbead-immobilized DNA were instantly immobilized on the same microbeads, providing a physical linkage between the genetic information and encoded proteins. This approach of in situ expression and isolation enables streamlined recovery and analysis of cell-free synthesized proteins and also allows facile identification of the genes coding antigenic proteins through direct PCR of the microbead-bound DNA. PMID:26599101

  13. Rapid identification of amino acid types in proteins using phase modulated 2D HN(CACB) and 2D HN(COCACB).

    PubMed

    Dubey, Abhinav; Mondal, Somnath; Chandra, Kousik; Atreya, Hanudatta S

    2016-06-01

    We present a simple approach to rapidly identify amino acid types in proteins from a 2D spectrum. The method is based on the fact that (13)C(β) chemical shifts of different amino acid types fall in distinct spectral regions. By evolving the (13)C chemical shifts in the conventional HNCACB or HN(CO)CACB type experiment for a single specified delay period, the phase of the cross peaks of different amino acid residues are modulated depending on their (13)C(β) shift values. Following this specified evolution period, the 2D HN projections of these experiments are acquired. The (13)C evolution period can be chosen such that all residues belonging to a given set of amino acid types have the same phase pattern (positive or negative) facilitating their identification. This approach does not require the preparation of any additional samples, involves the analysis of 2D [(15)N-(1)H] HSQC-type spectra obtained from the routinely used triple resonance experiments with minor modifications, and is applicable to deuterated proteins. The method will be useful for quick assignment of signals that shift during ligand binding or in combination with selective labeling/unlabeling approaches for identification of amino acid types to aid the sequential assignment process. PMID:27078090

  14. Tagging ribosomal protein S7 allows rapid identification of mutants defective in assembly and function of 30 S subunits.

    PubMed

    Fredrick, K; Dunny, G M; Noller, H F

    2000-05-01

    Ribosomal protein S7 nucleates folding of the 16 S rRNA 3' major domain, which ultimately forms the head of the 30 S ribosomal subunit. Recent crystal structures indicate that S7 lies on the interface side of the 30 S subunit, near the tRNA binding sites of the ribosome. To map the functional surface of S7, we have tagged the protein with a Protein Kinase A recognition site and engineered alanine substitutions that target each exposed, conserved residue. We have also deleted conserved features of S7, using its structure to guide our design. By radiolabeling the tag sequence using Protein Kinase A, we are able to track the partitioning of each mutant protein into 30 S, 70 S, and polyribosome fractions in vivo. Overexpression of S7 confers a growth defect, and we observe a striking correlation between this phenotype and proficiency in 30 S subunit assembly among our collection of mutants. We find that the side chain of K35 is required for efficient assembly of S7 into 30 S subunits in vivo, whereas those of at least 17 other conserved exposed residues are not required. In addition, an S7 derivative lacking the N-terminal 17 residues causes ribosomes to accumulate on mRNA to abnormally high levels, indicating that our approach can yield interesting mutant ribosomes.

  15. A reversible Renilla luciferase protein complementation assay for rapid identification of protein-protein interactions reveals the existence of an interaction network involved in xyloglucan biosynthesis in the plant Golgi apparatus

    DOE PAGES

    Lund, C. H.; Bromley, J. R.; Stenbaek, A.; Rasmussen, R. E.; Scheller, H. V.; Sakuragi, Y.

    2014-10-18

    A growing body of evidence suggests that protein–protein interactions (PPIs) occur amongst glycosyltransferases (GTs) required for plant glycan biosynthesis (e.g. cell wall polysaccharides and N-glycans) in the Golgi apparatus, and may control the functions of these enzymes. However, identification of PPIs in the endomembrane system in a relatively fast and simple fashion is technically challenging, hampering the progress in understanding the functional coordination of the enzymes in Golgi glycan biosynthesis. To solve the challenges, we adapted and streamlined a reversible Renilla luciferase protein complementation assay (Rluc-PCA), originally reported for use in human cells, for transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana. Wemore » tested Rluc-PCA and successfully identified luminescence complementation amongst Golgi-localizing GTs known to form a heterodimer (GAUT1 and GAUT7) and those which homooligomerize (ARAD1). In contrast, no interaction was shown between negative controls (e.g. GAUT7, ARAD1, IRX9). Rluc-PCA was used to investigate PPIs amongst Golgi-localizing GTs involved in biosynthesis of hemicelluloses. Although no PPI was identified among six GTs involved in xylan biosynthesis, Rluc-PCA confirmed three previously proposed interactions and identified seven novel PPIs amongst GTs involved in xyloglucan biosynthesis. Notably, three of the novel PPIs were confirmed by a yeast-based split-ubiquitin assay. Finally, Gateway-enabled expression vectors were generated, allowing rapid construction of fusion proteins to the Rluc reporters and epitope tags. In conclusion, our results show that Rluc-PCA coupled with transient expression in N. benthamiana is a fast and versatile method suitable for analysis of PPIs between Golgi resident proteins in an easy and mid-throughput fashion in planta.« less

  16. A reversible Renilla luciferase protein complementation assay for rapid identification of protein-protein interactions reveals the existence of an interaction network involved in xyloglucan biosynthesis in the plant Golgi apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, C. H.; Bromley, J. R.; Stenbaek, A.; Rasmussen, R. E.; Scheller, H. V.; Sakuragi, Y.

    2014-10-18

    A growing body of evidence suggests that protein–protein interactions (PPIs) occur amongst glycosyltransferases (GTs) required for plant glycan biosynthesis (e.g. cell wall polysaccharides and N-glycans) in the Golgi apparatus, and may control the functions of these enzymes. However, identification of PPIs in the endomembrane system in a relatively fast and simple fashion is technically challenging, hampering the progress in understanding the functional coordination of the enzymes in Golgi glycan biosynthesis. To solve the challenges, we adapted and streamlined a reversible Renilla luciferase protein complementation assay (Rluc-PCA), originally reported for use in human cells, for transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana. We tested Rluc-PCA and successfully identified luminescence complementation amongst Golgi-localizing GTs known to form a heterodimer (GAUT1 and GAUT7) and those which homooligomerize (ARAD1). In contrast, no interaction was shown between negative controls (e.g. GAUT7, ARAD1, IRX9). Rluc-PCA was used to investigate PPIs amongst Golgi-localizing GTs involved in biosynthesis of hemicelluloses. Although no PPI was identified among six GTs involved in xylan biosynthesis, Rluc-PCA confirmed three previously proposed interactions and identified seven novel PPIs amongst GTs involved in xyloglucan biosynthesis. Notably, three of the novel PPIs were confirmed by a yeast-based split-ubiquitin assay. Finally, Gateway-enabled expression vectors were generated, allowing rapid construction of fusion proteins to the Rluc reporters and epitope tags. In conclusion, our results show that Rluc-PCA coupled with transient expression in N. benthamiana is a fast and versatile method suitable for analysis of PPIs between Golgi resident proteins in an easy and mid-throughput fashion in planta.

  17. Rapid methods for identification of yeasts.

    PubMed Central

    Huppert, M; Harper, G; Sun, S H; Delanerolle, V

    1975-01-01

    Opportunistic infections by yeasts have been implicated as one of the major causes of complications in the compromised patient. Rapid recognition and identification of these yeasts is essential for patient management, but conventional liquid medium methods for completing identification tests are cumbersome and time consuming. Rapid tests have been devised based on modifications of methods commonly used in bacteriology. These rapid methods included tests for carbohydrate and nitrate assimilation, fermentation, and urease production. These were compared with several current methods for accuracy of results, for time to final identification, and for economy of time and reagents. In addition, the usual tests for pseudogerm tube formation, for production of hyphae or pseudohyphae, and for growth temperatures were included. The rapid tests achieved 96% or better accuracy compared with expected results, and 46 species of yeasts were identified in 1 to 2 days compared with the 10 to 14 days required by conventional liquid culture methods. Images PMID:1241586

  18. Rapid identification of microorganisms by intrinsic fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatta, Hemant; Goldys, Ewa M.; Learmonth, Robert

    2005-03-01

    Microbial contamination has serious consequences for the industries that use fermentation processes. Common contaminants such as faster growing lactic acid bacteria or wild yeast can rapidly outnumber inoculated culture yeast and produce undesirable end products. Our study focuses on a rapid method of identification of such contaminants based on autofluorescence spectroscopy of bacterial and yeast species. Lactic acid bacteria (Lac-tobacillus casei), and yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) were cultured under controlled conditions and studied for variations in their autofluorescence. We observed spectral differences in the spectral range representative of tryptophan residues of proteins, with excitation at 290 nm and emission scanned in the 300 nm - 440 nm range. Excitation scans between 240 nm and 310 nm were also performed for the emission at 340 nm. Moreover, we observed clearly pronounced differences in the excitation and emission in the visible range, with 410 nm excitation. These results demonstrate that bacterial and yeast species can be differentiated using their intrinsic fluorescence both in UV and in the visible region. The comparative spectroscopic study of selected strains of Saccharomyces yeast showed clear differences between strains. Spectrally-resolved laser scanning microscopy was carried out to link the results obtained using ensembles of cells with spectral properties of individual cells. Strongly fluorescent subpopulation were observed for all yeast strains with excitation at 405 nm. The fluorescence spectra showed variations correlated with cell brightness. The presented results demonstrate that using autofluorescence, it is possible to differentiate between yeast and lactic acid bacteria and between different yeast species.

  19. Transcriptomics-assisted quantitative trait locus fine mapping for the rapid identification of a nodulin 26-like intrinsic protein gene regulating boron efficiency in allotetraploid rapeseed.

    PubMed

    Hua, Yingpeng; Zhang, Didi; Zhou, Ting; He, Mingliang; Ding, Guangda; Shi, Lei; Xu, Fangsen

    2016-07-01

    Allotetraploid rapeseed (Brassica napus L., An An Cn Cn , 2n = 4x = 38) is extraordinarily susceptible to boron (B) deficiency, a ubiquitous problem causing severe losses in seed yield. The breeding of B-efficient rapeseed germ plasm is a cost-effective and environmentally friendly strategy for the agricultural industry; however, genes regulating B efficiency in allotetraploid rapeseed have not yet been isolated. In this research, quantitative trait locus (QTL) fine mapping and digital gene expression (DGE) profiling were combined to identify the candidate genes underlying the major-effect QTL qBEC-A3a, which regulates B efficiency. Comparative phenotype analyses of the near-isogenic lines (NILs) indicated that qBEC-A3a plays a significant role in improving B efficiency under B deficiency. Exploiting QTL fine mapping and DGE analyses revealed a nodulin 26-like intrinsic protein (NIP) gene, which encodes a likely boric acid channel. The gene co-expression network for putative B transporters also highlighted its central role in the efficiency of B uptake. An integration of whole-genome re-sequencing (WGS) with bulked segregant analysis (BSA) authenticated the emerging availability of QTL-seq for the QTL analyses in allotetraploid rapeseed. Transcriptomics-assisted QTL mapping and comparative genomics provided novel insights into the rapid identification of quantitative trait genes (QTGs) in plant species with complex genomes. PMID:26934080

  20. Rapid detection and identification of infectious agents

    SciTech Connect

    Kingsbury, D.T.; Falkow, S.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains papers divided among five sections. Some of the paper titles are: Aspects of Using Nucleic Acid Filter Hybridization to Characterize and Detect Enteroviral RNAs; Rapid Identification of Lesihmania Species using Specific Hybridization of Kinetoplast DNA Sequences; Selection of DNA Probes for use in the Diagnosis of Infectious Disease; and Summary of DNA Probes.

  1. Functionalized quantum dots with dopamine dithiocarbamate as the matrix for the quantification of efavirenz in human plasma and as affinity probes for rapid identification of microwave tryptic digested proteins in MALDI-TOF-MS.

    PubMed

    Kailasa, Suresh Kumar; Wu, Hui-Fen

    2012-06-01

    Functionalized quantum dots with dopamine dithiocarbamate (QDs-DDTC) were utilized for the first time as an efficient material for the quantification of efavirenz in human plasma of HIV infected patients and rapid identification of microwave tryptic digest proteins (cytochrome c, lysozyme and BSA) by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). The synthesized QDs-DDTC was characterized by using spectroscopic (UV-visible, FT-IR and (1)H NMR) and microscopic (SEM and TEM) techniques. Functionalized QDs-DDTC exhibited a high desorption/ionization efficiency for the rapid quantification of small molecules (efavirenz, tobramycin and aspartame) at low-mass region. QDs-DDTC has well ability to trap target species, and capable to transfer laser energy for efficient desorption/ionization of analytes with background-free detection. The use of QDs-DDTC as a matrix provided good linearity for the quantification of small molecules (R(2)=~0.9983), with good reproducibility (RSD<10%), in the analysis of efavirenz in the plasma of HIV infected patients by the standard addition method. We also demonstrated that the use of functionalized QDs-DDTC as affinity probes for the rapid identification of microwave tryptic digested proteins (cytochrome c, lysozyme and BSA) by MALDI-TOF-MS. QDs-DDTC-based MALDI-TOF-MS approach provides simplicity, rapidity, accuracy, and precision for the determination of efavirenz in human plasma of HIV infected patients and rapid identification of microwave tryptic digested proteins. This new material presents a marked advance in the development of matrix-free mass spectrometric methods for the rapid and precise quantitative determination of a variety of molecules. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Proteomics: The clinical link.

  2. A reversible Renilla luciferase protein complementation assay for rapid identification of protein–protein interactions reveals the existence of an interaction network involved in xyloglucan biosynthesis in the plant Golgi apparatus

    PubMed Central

    Lund, Christian H.; Bromley, Jennifer R.; Stenbæk, Anne; Rasmussen, Randi E.; Scheller, Henrik V.; Sakuragi, Yumiko

    2015-01-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that protein–protein interactions (PPIs) occur amongst glycosyltransferases (GTs) required for plant glycan biosynthesis (e.g. cell wall polysaccharides and N-glycans) in the Golgi apparatus, and may control the functions of these enzymes. However, identification of PPIs in the endomembrane system in a relatively fast and simple fashion is technically challenging, hampering the progress in understanding the functional coordination of the enzymes in Golgi glycan biosynthesis. To solve the challenges, we adapted and streamlined a reversible Renilla luciferase protein complementation assay (Rluc-PCA), originally reported for use in human cells, for transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana. We tested Rluc-PCA and successfully identified luminescence complementation amongst Golgi-localizing GTs known to form a heterodimer (GAUT1 and GAUT7) and those which homooligomerize (ARAD1). In contrast, no interaction was shown between negative controls (e.g. GAUT7, ARAD1, IRX9). Rluc-PCA was used to investigate PPIs amongst Golgi-localizing GTs involved in biosynthesis of hemicelluloses. Although no PPI was identified among six GTs involved in xylan biosynthesis, Rluc-PCA confirmed three previously proposed interactions and identified seven novel PPIs amongst GTs involved in xyloglucan biosynthesis. Notably, three of the novel PPIs were confirmed by a yeast-based split-ubiquitin assay. Finally, Gateway-enabled expression vectors were generated, allowing rapid construction of fusion proteins to the Rluc reporters and epitope tags. Our results show that Rluc-PCA coupled with transient expression in N. benthamiana is a fast and versatile method suitable for analysis of PPIs between Golgi resident proteins in an easy and mid-throughput fashion in planta. PMID:25326916

  3. Identification of a receptor-like protein kinase gene rapidly induced by abscisic acid, dehydration, high salt, and cold treatments in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed Central

    Hong, S W; Jon, J H; Kwak, J M; Nam, H G

    1997-01-01

    A cDNA clone for a receptor-like protein kinase gene (RPK1) was isolated from Arabidopsis thaliana. The clone is 1952 bp long with 1623 bp of an open reading frame encoding a peptide of 540 amino acids. The deduced peptide (RPK1) contains four distinctive domains characteristic of receptor kinases: (a) a putative amino-terminal signal sequence domain; (b) a domain with five extracellular leucine-rich repeat sequences; (c) a membrane-spanning domain; and (d) a cytoplasmic protein kinase domain that contains all of the 11 subdomains conserved among protein kinases. The RPK1 gene is expressed in flowers, stems, leaves, and roots. Expression of the RPK1 gene is induced within 1 h after treatment with abscisic acid (ABA). The gene is also rapidly induced by several environmental stresses such as dehydration, high salt, and low temperature, suggesting that the gene is involved in a general stress response. The dehydration-induced expression is not impaired in aba-1, abi1-1, abi2-1, and abi3-1 mutants, suggesting that the dehydration-induced expression of the RPK1 gene is ABA-independent. A possible role of this gene in the signal transduction pathway of ABA and the environmental stresses is discussed. PMID:9112773

  4. Adaptive spectroscopy for rapid chemical identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinakarababu, Dineshbabu V.; Gehm, Michael E.

    2009-05-01

    Spectroscopic chemical identification is fundamentally a classification task where sensor measurements are compared to a library of known compounds with the hope of determining an unambiguous match. When the measurement signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is very low (e.g. from short exposure times, weak analyte signatures, etc.), classification can become very challenging, requiring a multiple-measurement framework such as sequential hypothesis testing, and dramatically extending the time required to classify the sample. There are a wide variety of defense, security, and medical applications where rapid identification is essential, and hence such delays are disastrous. In this paper, we discuss an approach for adaptive spectroscopic detection where the introduction of a tunable spectral filter enables the system to measure the projection of the sample spectrum along arbitrary bases in the spectral domain. The net effect is a significant reduction in time-to-decision in low SNR cases. We describe the general operation of such an instrument, present results from initial simulations, and report on our experimental progress.

  5. Rapid evolution of reproductive proteins in abalone and Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Panhuis, Tami M; Clark, Nathaniel L; Swanson, Willie J

    2006-02-28

    Observations from different taxa, including plants, protozoa, insects and mammals, indicate that proteins involved in reproduction evolve rapidly. Several models of adaptive evolution have been proposed to explain this phenomenon, such as sexual conflict, sexual selection, self versus non-self recognition and pathogen resistance. Here we discuss the potential role of sexual conflict in the rapid evolution of reproductive genes in two different animal systems, abalone (Haliotis) and Drosophila. In abalone, we reveal how specific interacting sperm-egg proteins were identified and discuss this identification in the light of models for rapid protein evolution and speciation. For Drosophila, we describe the genomic approaches taken to identify male accessory gland proteins and female reproductive tract proteins. Patterns of protein evolution from both abalone and Drosophila support the predicted patterns of rapid protein evolution driven by sexual conflict. We stress however that other selective pressures may contribute to the rapid evolution that is observed. We conclude that the key to distinguishing between sexual conflict and other mechanisms of protein evolution will be an integration of genetic, experimental and theoretical data.

  6. Rapid and sensitive identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Knisley, C V; Damato, J J; McClatchy, J K; Brennan, P J

    1985-01-01

    The fatty acid constituents of 14 species of Mycobacterium (14 isolates) and one isolate each of Corynebacterium xerosis, Nocardia asteroides, and Streptomyces albus were examined with the purpose of distinguishing Mycobacterium tuberculosis from other acid-fast bacilli. Combined thin-layer chromatography (TLC) of methyl mycolates and gas-liquid chromatography (GLC) of shorter-chain fatty acid esters provided an unequivocal identification of M. tuberculosis in a matter of 2 to 3 days. The methodology included rapid and simplified procedures for methanolysis and extraction of bacterial lipids with equally facilitated GLC and TLC analyses. These studies were performed with 0.5 to 1.0 mg of dry bacterial cells (approximately 2.5 X 10(7) CFU). When applied to 100 unknown cultures, the methodology with combined TLC-GLC correctly identified all 49 of the M. tuberculosis-Mycobacterium bovis cultures and a variety of other mycobacterium taxa. It was also interesting to note that 28 of 39 (72%) of the nontuberculous mycobacteria were correctly identified. An additional five species were tentatively identified as belonging to either of two species (Mycobacterium malmoense, Mycobacterium terrae), but in all cases, the two species belonged to the same Runyon group. All six nonmycobacterial species were differentiated from the mycobacteria studied. Images PMID:3932458

  7. Rapid visco analysis of food protein pastes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Whey protein isolate (WPI) powders are used in many formulations to boost nutrients. To predict the pasting behavior of proteins, WPI was tested under varying temperatures, using the Rapid-Visco-Analyzer (RVA), under pasting temperatures from 65 to 75 degrees'C, RVA speeds from 100 to 500 rpm, and ...

  8. Rapid identification of Listeria spp.: an AOAC performance test of the MIT 1000 rapid microbial identification system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methods that rapidly confirm the identification of foodborne pathogens are highly desired. The Micro Imaging Technology (MIT) 1000 Rapid Microbial Identification (RMID) System is a benchtop instrument that detects laser light scattered from individual bacterial cells in solution with an array of 35 ...

  9. Rapid Bioinformatic Identification of Thermostabilizing Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Sauer, David B.; Karpowich, Nathan K.; Song, Jin Mei; Wang, Da-Neng

    2015-01-01

    Ex vivo stability is a valuable protein characteristic but is laborious to improve experimentally. In addition to biopharmaceutical and industrial applications, stable protein is important for biochemical and structural studies. Taking advantage of the large number of available genomic sequences and growth temperature data, we present two bioinformatic methods to identify a limited set of amino acids or positions that likely underlie thermostability. Because these methods allow thousands of homologs to be examined in silico, they have the advantage of providing both speed and statistical power. Using these methods, we introduced, via mutation, amino acids from thermoadapted homologs into an exemplar mesophilic membrane protein, and demonstrated significantly increased thermostability while preserving protein activity. PMID:26445442

  10. Developmental validation of a novel lateral flow strip test for rapid identification of human blood (Rapid Stain Identification--Blood).

    PubMed

    Schweers, Brett A; Old, Jennifer; Boonlayangoor, P W; Reich, Karl A

    2008-06-01

    Human blood is the body fluid most commonly encountered at crime scenes, and blood detection may aid investigators in reconstructing what occurred during a crime. In addition, blood detection can help determine which items of evidence should be processed for DNA-STR testing. Unfortunately, many common substances can cause red-brown stains that resemble blood. Furthermore, many current human blood detection methods are presumptive and prone to false positive results. Here, the developmental validation of a new blood identification test, Rapid Stain Identification--Blood (RSID--Blood), is described. RSID--Blood utilizes two anti-glycophorin A (red blood cell membrane specific protein) monoclonal antibodies in a lateral flow strip test format to detect human blood. We present evidence demonstrating that this test is accurate, reproducible, easy to use, and highly specific for human blood. Importantly, RSID--Blood does not cross-react with ferret, skunk, or primate blood and exhibits no high-dose hook effect. Also, we describe studies on the sensitivity, body fluid specificity, and species specificity of RSID--Blood. In addition, we show that the test can detect blood from a variety of forensic exhibits prior to processing for DNA-STR analysis. In conclusion, we suggest that RSID--Blood is effective and useful for the detection of human blood on forensic exhibits, and offers improved blood detection when compared to other currently used methods.

  11. Protein expression strategies for identification of novel target proteins.

    PubMed

    Schuster, M; Wasserbauer, E; Einhauer, A; Ortner, C; Jungbauer, A; Hammerschmid, F; Werner, G

    2000-04-01

    Identification of new target proteins is a novel paradigm in drug discovery. A major bottleneck of this strategy is the rapid and simultaneous expression of proteins from differential gene expression to identify eligible candidates. By searching for a generic system enabling high throughput expression analysis and purification of unknown cDNAs, we evaluated the YEpFLAG-1 yeast expression system. We have selected cDNAs encoding model proteins (eukaryotic initiation factor-5A [eIF-5A] and Homo sapiens differentiation-dependent protein-A4) and cDNA encoding an unknown protein (UP-1) for overexpression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae using fusions with a peptide that changes its conformation in the presence of Ca2+ ions, the FLAG tag (Eastman Kodak, Rochester, NY). The cDNAs encoding unknown proteins originating from a directionally cloned cDNA library were expressed in all three possible reading frames. The expressed proteins were detected by an antibody directed against the FLAG tag and/or by antibodies against the model proteins. The alpha-leader sequence, encoding a yeast mating pheromone, upstream of the gene fusion site facilitates secretion into the culture supernatant. EIF-5A could be highly overexpressed and was secreted into the culture supernatant. In contrast, the Homo sapiens differentiation-dependent protein-A4 as well as the protein UP-1, whose cDNA did not match to any known gene, could not be detected in the culture supernatant. The expression product of the correct frame remained in the cells, whereas the FLAG-tagged proteins secreted into the supernatant were short, out-of-frame products. The presence of transmembrane domains or patches of hydrophobic amino acids may preclude secretion of these proteins into the culture supernatant. Subsequently, isolation and purification of the various proteins was accomplished by affinity chromatography or affinity extraction using magnetizable beads coated with the anti-FLAG monoclonal antibody. The purity of

  12. A rapid PCR-based approach for molecular identification of filamentous fungi.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuanyuan; Prior, Bernard A; Shi, Guiyang; Wang, Zhengxiang

    2011-08-01

    In this study, a novel rapid and efficient DNA extraction method based on alkaline lysis, which can deal with a large number of filamentous fungal isolates in the same batch, was established. The filamentous fungal genomic DNA required only 20 min to prepare and can be directly used as a template for PCR amplification. The amplified internal transcribed spacer regions were easy to identify by analysis. The extracted DNA also can be used to amplify other protein-coding genes for fungal identification. This method can be used for rapid systematic identification of filamentous fungal isolates.

  13. catRAPID signature: identification of ribonucleoproteins and RNA-binding regions

    PubMed Central

    Livi, Carmen Maria; Klus, Petr; Delli Ponti, Riccardo; Tartaglia, Gian Gaetano

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: Recent technological advances revealed that an unexpected large number of proteins interact with transcripts even if the RNA-binding domains are not annotated. We introduce catRAPID signature to identify ribonucleoproteins based on physico-chemical features instead of sequence similarity searches. The algorithm, trained on human proteins and tested on model organisms, calculates the overall RNA-binding propensity followed by the prediction of RNA-binding regions. catRAPID signature outperforms other algorithms in the identification of RNA-binding proteins and detection of non-classical RNA-binding regions. Results are visualized on a webpage and can be downloaded or forwarded to catRAPID omics for predictions of RNA targets. Availability and implementation: catRAPID signature can be accessed at http://s.tartaglialab.com/new_submission/signature. Contact: gian.tartaglia@crg.es or gian@tartaglialab.com Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:26520853

  14. Two unusual occurrences of trichomoniasis: rapid species identification by PCR.

    PubMed

    Bellanger, A P; Cabaret, O; Costa, J M; Foulet, F; Bretagne, S; Botterel, F

    2008-09-01

    PCR analysis in two unusual occurrences of trichomoniasis, trichomonal empyema due to Trichomonas tenax and Trichomonas vaginalis in an infant urine sample, allowed us to obtain rapid and accurate trichomonad species identification. The weak sensitivity of wet preparations and the low viability of the flagellates can be remedied by the PCR method. PMID:18632901

  15. Rapid protein profiling facilitates surveillance of invasive mosquito species

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Invasive aedine mosquito species have become a major issue in many parts of the world as most of them are recognised vectors or potentially involved in transmission of pathogens. Surveillance of these mosquitoes (e.g. Ae. aegypti, Yellow fever mosquito, Aedes albopictus, Asian tiger mosquito) is mainly done by collecting eggs using ovitraps and by identification of the larvae hatched in the laboratory. In order to replace this challenging and laborious procedure, we have evaluated matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) for easy and rapid species identification. Methods Individual protein profiles were generated using five eggs each of nine aedine species (Ae. aegypti, Ae. albopictus, Ae. atropalpus, Ae. cretinus, Ae. geniculatus, Ae. japonicus, Ae. koreicus, Ae. phoeniciae, Ae. triseriatus) from various geographical origins, and species-specific biomarker mass sets could be generated. A blinded validation using our reference data base for automated egg identification was performed. In addition, pools of 10 aedine eggs (132 two-species and 18 three-species pools) in different ratios were evaluated. Results Specific biomarker mass sets comprising 18 marker masses could be generated for eggs of nine container-inhabiting aedine species, including all the major invasive and indigenous species of Europe and North America. Two additional masses shared by all investigated aedine species are used as internal calibrators. Identification of single eggs was highly accurate (100% specificity, 98.75% sensitivity), and this method is also of value for the identification of species in pools of ten eggs. When mixing two or three species, all were identified in all pools in at least 2 or 1 of the 4 loaded replicates, respectively, if the “lesser abundant” species in the pool accounted for three or more eggs. Conclusions MALDI-TOF MS, which is widely applied for routine identification of microorganisms in clinical

  16. Protein Identification Using Top-Down

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xiaowen; Sirotkin, Yakov; Shen, Yufeng; Anderson, Gordon A.; Tsai, Yi-Hsuan S.; Ting, Ying S.; Goodlett, David R.; Smith, Richard D.; Bafna, Vineet; Pevzner, Pavel A.

    2012-06-01

    In the last two years, due to advances in protein separation and mass spectrometry, top-down mass spectrometry moved from analyzing single proteins to analyzing complex samples and identifying hundreds and even thousands of proteins. However, computational tools for database search of top-down spectra against protein databases are still in infancy. We describe MS-Align+, a fast algorithm for top-down protein identification based on spectral alignment that enables searches for unexpected post-translational modifications (PTMs). We also propose a method for evaluating statistical significance of top-down protein identifications and further benchmark MS-Align+ along with PIITA, ProSightPTM and SEQUEST, which were previously used for top-down MS/MS database searches. We demonstrate that MS-Align+ and PIITA significantly increase the number of identified proteins as compared to ProSightPTM and SEQUEST.

  17. HRR length and velocity decision regions for rapid target identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Moayyed A.

    1999-09-01

    Effective theater defense requires rapid target identification with ground sensors. Modern radar performs target recognition and target imaging tasks, in addition to conventional tasks of detection and tracking. New processing techniques, like stepped frequency waveforms and RF hardware are now becoming available and will soon result in lower- cost high resolution rate. Additional feature extraction, namely length and velocity obtained from tracker can be used to design an efficient and a rapid ID after a preliminary recognition is performed. Prior information of these features for critical set of targets can be used to design decision regions for a given SNR value.

  18. Rapid identification of single microbes by various Raman spectroscopic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rösch, Petra; Harz, Michaela; Schmitt, Michael; Peschke, Klaus-Dieter; Ronneberger, Olaf; Burkhardt, Hans; Motzkus, Hans-Walter; Lankers, Markus; Hofer, Stefan; Thiele, Hans; Popp, Jürgen

    2006-02-01

    A fast and unambiguous identification of microorganisms is necessary not only for medical purposes but also in technical processes such as the production of pharmaceuticals. Conventional microbiological identification methods are based on the morphology and the ability of microbes to grow under different conditions on various cultivation media depending on their biochemical properties. These methods require pure cultures which need cultivation of at least 6 h but normally much longer. Recently also additional methods to identify bacteria are established e.g. mass spectroscopy, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), flow cytometry or fluorescence spectroscopy. Alternative approaches for the identification of microorganisms are vibrational spectroscopic techniques. With Raman spectroscopy a spectroscopic fingerprint of the microorganisms can be achieved. Using UV-resonance Raman spectroscopy (UVRR) macromolecules like DNA/RNA and proteins are resonantly enhanced. With an excitation wavelength of e.g. 244 nm it is possible to determine the ratio of guanine/cytosine to all DNA bases which allows a genotypic identification of microorganisms. The application of UVRR requires a large amount of microorganisms (> 10 6 cells) e.g. at least a micro colony. For the analysis of single cells micro-Raman spectroscopy with an excitation wavelength of 532 nm can be used. Here, the obtained information is from all type of molecules inside the cells which lead to a chemotaxonomic identification. In this contribution we show how wavelength dependent Raman spectroscopy yields significant molecular information applicable for the identification of microorganisms on a single cell level.

  19. Identification of Post-translational Modifications of Plant Protein Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Piquerez, Sophie J. M.; Balmuth, Alexi L.; Sklenář, Jan; Jones, Alexandra M.E.; Rathjen, John P.; Ntoukakis, Vardis

    2014-01-01

    Plants adapt quickly to changing environments due to elaborate perception and signaling systems. During pathogen attack, plants rapidly respond to infection via the recruitment and activation of immune complexes. Activation of immune complexes is associated with post-translational modifications (PTMs) of proteins, such as phosphorylation, glycosylation, or ubiquitination. Understanding how these PTMs are choreographed will lead to a better understanding of how resistance is achieved. Here we describe a protein purification method for nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (NB-LRR)-interacting proteins and the subsequent identification of their post-translational modifications (PTMs). With small modifications, the protocol can be applied for the purification of other plant protein complexes. The method is based on the expression of an epitope-tagged version of the protein of interest, which is subsequently partially purified by immunoprecipitation and subjected to mass spectrometry for identification of interacting proteins and PTMs. This protocol demonstrates that: i). Dynamic changes in PTMs such as phosphorylation can be detected by mass spectrometry; ii). It is important to have sufficient quantities of the protein of interest, and this can compensate for the lack of purity of the immunoprecipitate; iii). In order to detect PTMs of a protein of interest, this protein has to be immunoprecipitated to get a sufficient quantity of protein. PMID:24637539

  20. Continuous-Flow Detector for Rapid Pathogen Identification

    SciTech Connect

    Barrett, Louise M.; Skulan, Andrew J.; Singh, Anup K.; Cummings, Eric B.; Fiechtner, Gregory J.

    2006-09-01

    This report describes the continued development of a low-power, portable detector for the rapid identification of pathogens such as B. anthracis and smallpox. Based on our successful demonstration of the continuous filter/concentrator inlet, we believe strongly that the inlet section will enable differentiation between viable and non-viable populations, between types of cells, and between pathogens and background contamination. Selective, continuous focusing of particles in a microstream enables highly selective and sensitive identification using fluorescently labeled antibodies and other receptors such as peptides, aptamers, or small ligands to minimize false positives. Processes such as mixing and lysing will also benefit from the highly localized particle streams. The concentrator is based on faceted prisms to contract microfluidic flows while maintaining uniform flowfields. The resulting interfaces, capable of high throughput, serve as high-, low-, and band-pass filters to direct selected bioparticles to a rapid, affinity-based detection system. The proposed device is superior to existing array-based detectors as antibody-pathogen binding can be accomplished in seconds rather than tens of minutes or even hours. The system is being designed to interface with aerosol collectors under development by the National Laboratories or commercial systems. The focused stream is designed to be interrogated using diode lasers to differentiate pathogens by light scattering. Identification of particles is done using fluorescently labeled antibodies to tag the particles, followed by multiplexed laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) detection (achieved by labeling each antibody with a different dye).

  1. Identification of extracellularly phosphorylated membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Burghoff, Sandra; Willberg, Wibke; Schrader, Jürgen

    2015-10-01

    Ecto-protein kinases phosphorylate extracellular membrane proteins and exhibit similarities to casein kinases and protein kinases A and C. However, the identification of their protein substrates still remains a challenge because a clear separation from intracellular phosphoproteins is difficult. Here, we describe a straightforward method for the identification of extracellularly phosphorylated membrane proteins in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and K562 cells which used the protease bromelain to selectively remove ectoproteins from intact cells and combined this with the subsequent analysis using IMAC and LC-MS/MS. A "false-positive" strategy in which cells without protease treatment served as controls was applied. Using this approach we identified novel phosphorylation sites on five ectophosphoproteins (NOTCH1, otopetrin 1, regulator of G-protein signalling 13 (RGS13), protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor type D isoform 3 (PTPRD), usherin isoform B (USH2A)). Use of bromelain appears to be a reliable technique for the further identification of phosphorylated surface-exposed peptides when extracellular adenosine-5'-triphosphate is elevated during purinergic signalling.

  2. Rapid Molecular Identification of Human Taeniid Cestodes by Pyrosequencing Approach

    PubMed Central

    Thanchomnang, Tongjit; Tantrawatpan, Chairat; Intapan, Pewpan M.; Sanpool, Oranuch; Janwan, Penchom; Lulitanond, Viraphong; Tourtip, Somjintana; Yamasaki, Hiroshi; Maleewong, Wanchai

    2014-01-01

    Taenia saginata, T. solium, and T. asiatica are causative agents of taeniasis in humans. The difficulty of morphological identification of human taeniids can lead to misdiagnosis or confusion. To overcome this problem, several molecular methods have been developed, but use of these tends to be time-consuming. Here, a rapid and high-throughput pyrosequencing approach was developed for the identification of three human taeniids originating from various countries. Primers targeting the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) gene of the three Taenia species were designed. Variations in a 26-nucleotide target region were used for identification. The reproducibility and accuracy of the pyrosequencing technology was confirmed by Sanger sequencing. This technique will be a valuable tool to distinguish between sympatric human taeniids that occur in Thailand, Asia and Pacific countries. This method could potentially be used for the molecular identification of the taeniid species that might be associated with suspicious cysts and lesions, or cyst residues in humans or livestock at the slaughterhouse. PMID:24945530

  3. Rapid molecular identification of human taeniid cestodes by pyrosequencing approach.

    PubMed

    Thanchomnang, Tongjit; Tantrawatpan, Chairat; Intapan, Pewpan M; Sanpool, Oranuch; Janwan, Penchom; Lulitanond, Viraphong; Tourtip, Somjintana; Yamasaki, Hiroshi; Maleewong, Wanchai

    2014-01-01

    Taenia saginata, T. solium, and T. asiatica are causative agents of taeniasis in humans. The difficulty of morphological identification of human taeniids can lead to misdiagnosis or confusion. To overcome this problem, several molecular methods have been developed, but use of these tends to be time-consuming. Here, a rapid and high-throughput pyrosequencing approach was developed for the identification of three human taeniids originating from various countries. Primers targeting the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) gene of the three Taenia species were designed. Variations in a 26-nucleotide target region were used for identification. The reproducibility and accuracy of the pyrosequencing technology was confirmed by Sanger sequencing. This technique will be a valuable tool to distinguish between sympatric human taeniids that occur in Thailand, Asia and Pacific countries. This method could potentially be used for the molecular identification of the taeniid species that might be associated with suspicious cysts and lesions, or cyst residues in humans or livestock at the slaughterhouse. PMID:24945530

  4. Rapid identification of cytokinins by an immunological method

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, R.O.; Jameson, P.E.; Morris, J.W. ); Laloue, M. )

    1991-04-01

    A method for rapid identification of bacterial cytokinins has been developed in which cultures are fed ({sup 3}H)adenine, the cytokinins (including, {sup 3}H-labeled cytokinins) are isolated by immunoaffinity chromatography, and analyzed by HPLC with on-line scintillation counting. Analysis of Agrobacterium tumefaciens strains showed that some produced primarily trans-zeatin, whereas others produced primarily trans-zeatin riboside. Pseudomonas syringae pv savastanoi produced mixtures of transzeatin, dihydrozeatin, 1{double prime}-methyl-trans-zeatin riboside, and other unknown cytokinin-like substances. Corynebacterium fascians, produced cis-zeatin, isopentenyladenine and isopentenyladenosine. The technique is designed for qualitative rather than quantitative studies and allows ready identification of bacterial cytokinins. It may also have utility in the study of plant cytokinins if adequate incorporation of label into cytokinin precursor pools can be achieved.

  5. Rapid identification of clinically important bacteroides by coagglutination method.

    PubMed

    Lalitha, M K; Anandi, V; Elias, L; Kalpana, C R

    1991-03-01

    A coagglutination technique using indigenous reagents was applied for the rapid identification of Bacteroides fragilis and the black pigmented bacteroides group, using colony suspensions. All the 58 strains of B. fragilis and 42 strains of black pigmented bacteroides tested could be correctly identified by this method. The specificity of the coagglutination reagent was confirmed by the absence of cross reactivity with the related species of bacteroides, viz., B. distasonis, B. ovatus, B. vulgatus and B. thetaiotaomicron as well as other anaerobic and aerobic bacteria. A panel of four antisera against B. fragilis was required for correct identification of the strains tested, indicating the presence of multiple serotypes. On the other hand, all 42 strains of black pigmented bacteroides tested could be identified, using a single reagent as these strains appeared to have no antigenic type variants. PMID:1855827

  6. Rapid Detection and Identification of Biogenic Aerosol Releases and Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, J.; Macher, J.; Ghosal, S.; Ahmed, K.; Hemati, K.; Wall, S.; Kumagai, K.

    2011-12-01

    Biogenic aerosols can be important contributors to aerosol chemistry, cloud droplet and ice nucleation, absorption and scattering of radiation, human health and comfort, and plant, animal, and microbial ecology. Many types of bioaerosols, e.g., fungal spores, are released into the atmosphere in response to specific climatological and meteorological conditions. The rapid identification of bioaerosol releases is thus important for better characterization of the above phenomena, as well as enabling public officials to respond quickly and appropriately to releases of infectious agents or biological toxins. One approach to rapid and accurate bioaerosol detection is to employ sequential, automated samples that can be fed directly into an image acquisition and data analysis device. Raman spectroscopy-based identification of bioaerosols, automated analysis of microscopy images, and automated detection of near-monodisperse peaks in aerosol size-distribution data were investigated as complementary approaches to traditional, manual methods for the identification and counting of fungal and actinomycete spores. Manual light microscopy is a widely used analytical technique that is compatible with a number of air sample formats and requires minimal sample preparation. However, a major drawback is its dependence on a human analyst's ability to distinguish particles and accurately count, size, and identify them. Therefore, automated methods, such as those evaluated in this study, have the potential to provide cost-effective and rapid alternatives if demonstrated to be accurate and reliable. An exploratory examination of individual spores for several macro- and microfungi (those with and without large fruiting bodies) by Raman microspectroscopy found unique spectral features that were used to identify fungi to the genus level. Automated analyses of digital spore images accurately recognized and counted single fungal spores and clusters. An automated procedure to discriminate near

  7. Rapid identification of bacteria with a disposable colorimetric sensing array.

    PubMed

    Carey, James R; Suslick, Kenneth S; Hulkower, Keren I; Imlay, James A; Imlay, Karin R C; Ingison, Crystal K; Ponder, Jennifer B; Sen, Avijit; Wittrig, Aaron E

    2011-05-18

    Rapid identification of both species and even specific strains of human pathogenic bacteria grown on standard agar has been achieved from the volatiles they produce using a disposable colorimetric sensor array in a Petri dish imaged with an inexpensive scanner. All 10 strains of bacteria tested, including Enterococcus faecalis and Staphylococcus aureus and their antibiotic-resistant forms, were identified with 98.8% accuracy within 10 h, a clinically important time frame. Furthermore, the colorimetric sensor arrays also proved useful as a simple research tool for the study of bacterial metabolism and as an easy method for the optimization of bacterial production of fine chemicals or other fermentation processes. PMID:21524080

  8. Rapid identification of Enterobacteriaceae associated with bacteremia: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Hicock, P I; Marshall, K E

    1980-10-01

    A preliminary report of a method to rapidly identify Enterobacteriaceae associated with bacteremia is described. When both bottles of a blood culture set revealed gram-negative rods on the Gram stain, an aliquot of the positive culture sample was repeatedly washed in sterile deionized water to remove RBCs and culture media. The concentrated suspension of organisms was used to inoculate API 20ETM identification strips which were generally read within 6-8 hr. Samples were also processed using conventional techniques. Ten episodes of bacteremia associated with Enterobacteriaceae were correctly identified using this rapid system. One Klebsiella pneumoniae with growth only in the aerobic bottle was excluded from the study, but was identified by conventional methods. Further advantages of this protocol are described.

  9. Rapid Accurate Identification of Bacterial and Viral Pathogens

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, John

    2007-03-09

    The goals of this program were to develop two assays for rapid, accurate identification of pathogenic organisms at the strain level. The first assay "Quantitative Genome Profiling or QGP" is a real time PCR assay with a restriction enzyme-based component. Its underlying concept is that certain enzymes should cleave genomic DNA at many sites and that in some cases these cuts will interrupt the connection on the genomic DNA between flanking PCR primer pairs thereby eliminating selected PCR amplifications. When this occurs the appearance of the real-time PCR threshold (Ct) signal during DNA amplification is totally eliminated or, if cutting is incomplete, greatly delayed compared to an uncut control. This temporal difference in appearance of the Ct signal relative to undigested control DNA provides a rapid, high-throughput approach for DNA-based identification of different but closely related pathogens depending upon the nucleotide sequence of the target region. The second assay we developed uses the nucleotide sequence of pairs of shmi identifier tags (-21 bp) to identify DNA molecules. Subtle differences in linked tag pair combinations can also be used to distinguish between closely related isolates..

  10. [Rapid identification of variable star spectrum based on information entropy].

    PubMed

    Cai, Jiang-hui; Meng, Wen-jun; Sun, Shi-wei; Zhao, Xu-jun; Zhang, Ji-fu

    2012-01-01

    Variable star is very important for mankind studying cosmic origin and evolution. For studying variable star, the chief difficulty results from the filtration and identification of variable star, that is how to validly identify variable star spectra from large high-dimensional star spectra data. The traditional outlier definition tries to find the difference between the outlier data and the general model by different ways, and then the result is quantitatively analyzed and filtrated. However, the time complexity of this method is over size and its results are inscrutable and unaccountable. Information entropy is a measure of the uncertainty associated with a random variable. In the present paper, information entropy is imported as the standard of dataset common mode. A novel method is proposed to identify the variable star spectrum rapidly based on information entropy. The time complexity of this method is observably reduced and the man-made impact is effectively overcome. The preliminary experimental results based on Sloan star spectrum data show that the method is workable for rapid identification of variable star spectrum. PMID:22497171

  11. Rapid molecular identification and characteristics of Lactobacillus strains.

    PubMed

    Markiewicz, L H; Biedrzycka, E; Wasilewska, E; Bielecka, M

    2010-09-01

    Eleven type strains and 24 Lactobacillus isolates, preliminarily classified to the species due to phenotypic features, were investigated. Standard methods of identification with species-specific PCRs and typing with PFGE (with ApaI, NotI and SmaI restriction enzymes) allowed us to distinguish 16 unique strains belonging to 5 species (L. acidophilus, L. delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus, L. plantarum, L. rhamnosus, L. salivarius). Alternative approach with 16S-23S rDNA ARDRA identification (with merely two restrictases, BsuRI and TaqI) and PCR-based typing (RAPD with two random- and rep-PCR with (GTG)(5) primers) showed to be more discriminative, i.e. 21 unique strains were classified in the same species as above. As a result, 7 out of 24 phenotypically species-assigned isolates were reclassified. The alternative procedure of rapid identification and typing of Lactobacillus isolates appeared to be equally effective and shortened from 1 week to 2-3 d (in comparison to the standard methods).

  12. Preparation of recombinant protein spotted arrays for proteome-wide identification of kinase targets.

    PubMed

    Im, Hogune; Snyder, Michael

    2013-04-01

    Protein microarrays allow unique approaches for interrogating global protein interaction networks. Protein arrays can be divided into two categories: antibody arrays and functional protein arrays. Antibody arrays consist of various antibodies and are appropriate for profiling protein abundance and modifications. Functional full-length protein arrays employ full-length proteins with various post-translational modifications. A key advantage of the latter is rapid parallel processing of large number of proteins for studying highly controlled biochemical activities, protein-protein interactions, protein-nucleic acid interactions, and protein-small molecule interactions. This unit presents a protocol for constructing functional yeast protein microarrays for global kinase substrate identification. This approach enables the rapid determination of protein interaction networks in yeast on a proteome-wide level. The same methodology can be readily applied to higher eukaryotic systems with careful consideration of overexpression strategy.

  13. Rapid experimental SAD phasing and hot-spot identification with halogenated fragments.

    PubMed

    Bauman, Joseph D; Harrison, Jerry Joe E K; Arnold, Eddy

    2016-01-01

    Through X-ray crystallographic fragment screening, 4-bromopyrazole was discovered to be a 'magic bullet' that is capable of binding at many of the ligand 'hot spots' found in HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT). The binding locations can be in pockets that are 'hidden' in the unliganded crystal form, allowing rapid identification of these sites for in silico screening. In addition to hot-spot identification, this ubiquitous yet specific binding provides an avenue for X-ray crystallographic phase determination, which can be a significant bottleneck in the determination of the structures of novel proteins. The anomalous signal from 4-bromopyrazole or 4-iodopyrazole was sufficient to determine the structures of three proteins (HIV-1 RT, influenza A endonuclease and proteinase K) by single-wavelength anomalous dispersion (SAD) from single crystals. Both compounds are inexpensive, readily available, safe and very soluble in DMSO or water, allowing efficient soaking into crystals.

  14. Microwave-assisted protein staining: mass spectrometry compatible methods for rapid protein visualisation.

    PubMed

    Nesatyy, Victor J; Dacanay, Andrew; Kelly, John F; Ross, Neil W

    2002-01-01

    The effects of microwave irradiation on the staining of electrophoresed and electroblotted proteins have been assessed using currently available detection methods. Although the absorption of microwave radiation was found to be uneven, band intensity following microwave-assisted protein staining (MAPS) was comparable and in some cases exceeded the intensity of the bands visualised by the original staining methods. It was found that microwave treatment drastically reduced the duration of the staining protocols for visualisation of the proteins separated by both one- and two-dimensional electrophoresis. Application of MAPS methods did not affect peptide mass fingerprinting analysis by mass spectrometry and subsequent identification of the protein by database searching. The peptide mass maps corresponding to the proteins visualised using both the conventional and MAPS methods did not show significant difference in signal/noise ratio. Moreover, it appeared that microwave treatment of the gels resulted in the increased recovery of the peptides following in-gel trypsin digestion. Briefly, microwave-assisted protein staining methods were rapid, compatible with mass spectrometry and were equally effective on thin (0.75-mm) and thick (1.5-mm) gels (such as those used in 2D electrophoresis). PMID:11816041

  15. Protein-protein binding site identification by enumerating the configurations

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The ability to predict protein-protein binding sites has a wide range of applications, including signal transduction studies, de novo drug design, structure identification and comparison of functional sites. The interface in a complex involves two structurally matched protein subunits, and the binding sites can be predicted by identifying structural matches at protein surfaces. Results We propose a method which enumerates “all” the configurations (or poses) between two proteins (3D coordinates of the two subunits in a complex) and evaluates each configuration by the interaction between its components using the Atomic Contact Energy function. The enumeration is achieved efficiently by exploring a set of rigid transformations. Our approach incorporates a surface identification technique and a method for avoiding clashes of two subunits when computing rigid transformations. When the optimal transformations according to the Atomic Contact Energy function are identified, the corresponding binding sites are given as predictions. Our results show that this approach consistently performs better than other methods in binding site identification. Conclusions Our method achieved a success rate higher than other methods, with the prediction quality improved in terms of both accuracy and coverage. Moreover, our method is being able to predict the configurations of two binding proteins, where most of other methods predict only the binding sites. The software package is available at http://sites.google.com/site/guofeics/dobi for non-commercial use. PMID:22768846

  16. Passive IFF: Autonomous Nonintrusive Rapid Identification of Friendly Assets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moynihan, Philip; Steenburg, Robert Van; Chao, Tien-Hsin

    2004-01-01

    A proposed optoelectronic instrument would identify targets rapidly, without need to radiate an interrogating signal, apply identifying marks to the targets, or equip the targets with transponders. The instrument was conceived as an identification, friend or foe (IFF) system in a battlefield setting, where it would be part of a targeting system for weapons, by providing rapid identification for aimed weapons to help in deciding whether and when to trigger them. The instrument could also be adapted to law-enforcement and industrial applications in which it is necessary to rapidly identify objects in view. The instrument would comprise mainly an optical correlator and a neural processor (see figure). The inherent parallel-processing speed and capability of the optical correlator would be exploited to obtain rapid identification of a set of probable targets within a scene of interest and to define regions within the scene for the neural processor to analyze. The neural processor would then concentrate on each region selected by the optical correlator in an effort to identify the target. Depending on whether or not a target was recognized by comparison of its image data with data in an internal database on which the neural processor was trained, the processor would generate an identifying signal (typically, friend or foe ). The time taken for this identification process would be less than the time needed by a human or robotic gunner to acquire a view of, and aim at, a target. An optical correlator that has been under development for several years and that has been demonstrated to be capable of tracking a cruise missile might be considered a prototype of the optical correlator in the proposed IFF instrument. This optical correlator features a 512-by-512-pixel input image frame and operates at an input frame rate of 60 Hz. It includes a spatial light modulator (SLM) for video-to-optical image conversion, a pair of precise lenses to effect Fourier transforms, a filter SLM

  17. Rapid Protein Separations in Microfluidic Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fan, Z. H.; Das, Champak; Xia, Zheng; Stoyanov, Alexander V.; Fredrickson, Carl K.

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes fabrication of glass and plastic microfluidic devices for protein separations. Although the long-term goal is to develop a microfluidic device for two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, this paper focuses on the first dimension-isoelectric focusing (IEF). A laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) imaging system has been built for imaging an entire channel in an IEF device. The whole-channel imaging eliminates the need to migrate focused protein bands, which is required if a single-point detector is used. Using the devices and the imaging system, we are able to perform IEF separations of proteins within minutes rather than hours in traditional bench-top instruments.

  18. Rapid Bacterial Identification Using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Valentine, Nancy B.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Su, Yin-Fong; Forrester, Joel B.

    2007-02-01

    Recent studies at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) using infrared spectroscopy combined with statistical analysis have shown the ability to identify and discriminate vegetative bacteria, bacterial spores and background interferents from one another. Since the anthrax releases in 2001, rapid identification of unknown powders has become a necessity. Bacterial endospores are formed by some Bacillus species as a result of the vegetative bacteria undergoing environmental stress, e.g. a lack of nutrients. Endospores are formed as a survival mechanism and are extremely resistant to heat, cold, sunlight and some chemicals. They become airborne easily and are thus readily dispersed which was demonstrated in the Hart building. Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy is one of several rapid analytical methods used for bacterial endospore identification. The most common means of bacterial identification is culturing, but this is a time-consuming process, taking hours to days. It is difficult to rapidly identify potentially harmful bacterial agents in a highly reproducible way. Various analytical methods, including FTIR, Raman, photoacoustic FTIR and Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization (MALDI) have been used to identify vegetative bacteria and bacterial endospores. Each has shown certain areas of promise, but each has shortcomings in terms of sensitivity, measurement time or portability. IR spectroscopy has been successfully used to distinguish between the sporulated and vegetative state. [1,2] It has also shown its utility at distinguishing between the spores of different species. [2-4] There are several Bacillus species that occur commonly in nature, so it is important to be able to distinguish between the many different species versus those that present an imminent health threat. The spectra of the different sporulated species are all quite similar, though there are some subtle yet reproducible spectroscopic differences. Thus, a more robust and

  19. PCR and blot hybridization for rapid identification of Haloferax species.

    PubMed

    Asker, Dalal; Ohta, Yoshiyuki

    2002-05-01

    Based on the amplification of a 16S rDNA, a PCR assay for the identification of species of Haloferax to genus level was performed. Two variable regions of the 16S rDNA in Haloferax spp. were selected as genus-specific primers for the PCR assay and hybridization probe. Five genera of halophilic Archaea and Escherichia coli were examined as outside groups. Using this approach, all strains of Haloferax spp. were positive. In contrast, all species belonging to the most closely related genera, including Natrinema, Halorubrum, Halobacterium, and Haloarcula, were negative. In addition, the mass bloom of halophilic Archaea that develops in the El-Mallahet saltern of Alexandria City was positive using the same approach. This assay, which does not require pure cultures of microorganisms, is a specific and rapid method for identifying Haloferax spp. in hypersaline environments.

  20. Insect Seminal Fluid Proteins: Identification and Function

    PubMed Central

    Avila, Frank W.; Sirot, Laura K.; LaFlamme, Brooke A.; Rubinstein, C. Dustin; Wolfner, Mariana F.

    2014-01-01

    Seminal fluid proteins (SFPs) produced in reproductive tract tissues of male insects and transferred to females during mating induce numerous physiological and behavioral post-mating changes in females. These changes include decreasing receptivity to re-mating, affecting sperm storage parameters, increasing egg production, modulating sperm competition, feeding behaviors, and mating plug formation. In addition, SFPs also have anti-microbial functions and induce expression of anti-microbial peptides in at least some insects. Here, we review recent identification of insect SFPs and discuss the multiple roles these proteins play in the post-mating processes of female insects. PMID:20868282

  1. [Rapid Identification of Infectious Microorganisms in Clinical Samples by MALDI-TOF MS Analysis].

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Toyofumi

    2015-04-01

    Matrix-laser desorption ionization time-of flight/mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) is a powerful tool for the detection of target molecules in body fluids. Recently, the MALDI-TOF MS technique was applied for the rapid detection of protein profiles in cultured strains, and has rapid, simple, and universal advantages over the conventional technique. MALDI mass patterns were compared with the unique ribosomal 16S protein profiles of standard microorganism strains in a commercial database. Although this present MS technique has already been adopted as a routine method for the identification of general bacteria in the clinical laboratory field, there are still many problems to overcome regarding current challenges, necessitating the identification of more valuable species of microorganism. As the first step, we have begun the standardization of sample preparation to identify species causing infectious diseases by MALDI-TOF MS. In this special issue, we summarize the challenges in the modified preparation of clinical samples, such as blood, urine, and sputum, in our laboratory to rapidly diagnose severe infectious disease, and describe the current trends in clinical microbiology.

  2. [Rapid Identification of Infectious Microorganisms in Clinical Samples by MALDI-TOF MS Analysis].

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Toyofumi

    2015-04-01

    Matrix-laser desorption ionization time-of flight/mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) is a powerful tool for the detection of target molecules in body fluids. Recently, the MALDI-TOF MS technique was applied for the rapid detection of protein profiles in cultured strains, and has rapid, simple, and universal advantages over the conventional technique. MALDI mass patterns were compared with the unique ribosomal 16S protein profiles of standard microorganism strains in a commercial database. Although this present MS technique has already been adopted as a routine method for the identification of general bacteria in the clinical laboratory field, there are still many problems to overcome regarding current challenges, necessitating the identification of more valuable species of microorganism. As the first step, we have begun the standardization of sample preparation to identify species causing infectious diseases by MALDI-TOF MS. In this special issue, we summarize the challenges in the modified preparation of clinical samples, such as blood, urine, and sputum, in our laboratory to rapidly diagnose severe infectious disease, and describe the current trends in clinical microbiology. PMID:26536780

  3. Identification of the role of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling in the trajectory of serotonergic differentiation in a rapid assay in mouse embryonic stem cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, Atsushi; Kasai, Atsushi; Toi, Akihiro; Kurita, Maki; Kimoto, Saki; Hayata-Takano, Atsuko; Nakazawa, Takanobu; Nagayasu, Kazuki; Shintani, Norihito; Hashimoto, Ryota; Ito, Akira; Meltzer, Herbert Y; Ago, Yukio; Waschek, James A; Onaka, Yusuke; Matsuda, Toshio; Baba, Akemichi; Hashimoto, Hitoshi

    2015-02-01

    The mechanism by which extracellular molecules control serotonergic cell fate remains elusive. Recently, we showed that noggin, which inactivates bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), induces serotonergic differentiation of mouse embryonic (ES) and induced pluripotent stem cells with coordinated gene expression along the serotonergic lineage. Here, we created a rapid assay for serotonergic induction by generating knock-in ES cells expressing a naturally secreted Gaussia luciferase driven by the enhancer of Pet-1/Fev, a landmark of serotonergic differentiation. Using these cells, we performed candidate-based screening and identified BMP type I receptor kinase inhibitors LDN-193189 and DMH1 as activators of luciferase. LDN-193189 induced ES cells to express the genes encoding Pet-1, tryptophan hydroxylase 2, and the serotonin transporter, and increased serotonin release without altering dopamine release. In contrast, TGF-β receptor inhibitor SB-431542 selectively inhibited serotonergic differentiation, without changing overall neuronal differentiation. LDN-193189 inhibited expression of the BMP signaling target gene Id, and induced the TGF-β target gene Lefty, whereas the opposite effect was observed with SB-431542. This study thus provides a new tool to investigate serotonergic differentiation and suggests that inhibition of BMP type I receptors and concomitant activation of TGF-β receptor signaling are implicated in serotonergic differentiation. Candidate-based screening for serotonergic induction using a rapid assay in mouse embryonic stem cells revealed that the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) type I receptor kinase inhibitors selectively induce serotonergic differentiation, whereas the TGF-β receptor inhibitor SB-431542 inhibits the differentiation. These results suggest that inhibition of BMP type I receptors and concomitant activation of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) receptor signaling are involved in the early trajectory of serotonergic

  4. Development of an antigen-based rapid diagnostic test for the identification of blowfly (Calliphoridae) species of forensic significance.

    PubMed

    McDonagh, Laura; Thornton, Chris; Wallman, James F; Stevens, Jamie R

    2009-06-01

    In this study we examine the limitations of currently used sequence-based approaches to blowfly (Calliphoridae) identification and evaluate the utility of an immunological approach to discriminate between blowfly species of forensic importance. By investigating antigenic similarity and dissimilarity between the first instar larval stages of four forensically important blowfly species, we have been able to identify immunoreactive proteins of potential use in the development of species-specific immuno-diagnostic tests. Here we outline our protein-based approach to species determination, and describe how it may be adapted to develop rapid diagnostic assays for the 'on-site' identification of blowfly species.

  5. Identification of cholinergic and non-cholinergic neurons in the pons expressing phosphorylated cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element-binding protein as a function of rapid eye movement sleep.

    PubMed

    Datta, S; Siwek, D F; Stack, E C

    2009-09-29

    Recent studies have shown that in the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPT), increased neuronal activity and kainate receptor-mediated activation of intracellular protein kinase A (PKA) are important physiological and molecular steps for the generation of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. In the present study performed on rats, phosphorylated cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (pCREB) immunostaining was used as a marker for increased intracellular PKA activation and as a reflection of increased neuronal activity. To identify whether activated cells were either cholinergic or noncholinergic, the PPT and laterodorsal tegmental nucleus (LDT) cells were immunostained for choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) in combination with pCREB or c-Fos. The results demonstrated that during high rapid eye movement sleep (HR, approximately 27%), significantly higher numbers of cells expressed pCREB and c-Fos in the PPT, of which 95% of pCREB-expressing cells were ChAT-positive. With HR, the numbers of pCREB-positive cells were also significantly higher in the medial pontine reticular formation (mPRF), pontine reticular nucleus oral (PnO), and dorsal subcoeruleus nucleus (SubCD) but very few in the locus coeruleus (LC) and dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN). Conversely, with low rapid eye movement sleep (LR, approximately 2%), the numbers of pCREB expressing cells were very few in the PPT, mPRF, PnO, and SubCD but significantly higher in the LC and DRN. The results of regression analyses revealed significant positive relationships between the total percentages of REM sleep and numbers of ChAT+/pCREB+ (Rsqr=0.98) cells in the PPT and pCREB+ cells in the mPRF (Rsqr=0.88), PnO (Rsqr=0.87), and SubCD (Rsqr=0.84); whereas significantly negative relationships were associated with the pCREB+ cells in the LC (Rsqr=0.70) and DRN (Rsqr=0.60). These results provide evidence supporting the hypothesis that during REM sleep, the PPT cholinergic neurons are active, whereas the LC and DRN neurons are

  6. [Rapid identification of microorganisms using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Sogawa, Kazuyuki; Watanabe, Masaharu; Nomura, Fumio

    2013-01-01

    In a clinical diagnostic microbiology laboratory, the current method of identifying bacterial isolates is based mainly on phenotypic characteristics, such as the growth pattern on different media, colony morphology, Gram stain, and various biochemical reactions. These techniques collectively allow high-level accuracy in identifying most bacterial isolates, but they are costly and time-consuming. In our clinical microbiology laboratory, we prospectively assessed the ability of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) to identify bacterial strains that were routinely isolated from clinical samples. Bacterial colonies obtained from a total of 468 strains of 92 bacterial species isolated at the Department of Clinical Laboratory at Chiba University were directly placed on target MALDI plates, followed by the addition of CHCA matrix solution. The plates were then subjected to MALDI-TOF MS measurement, and the microorganisms were identified by pattern matching by the libraries in the BioTyper 2.0 software. The identification rates at species and genus levels were 91.7% (429/468) and 97.0% (454/468), respectively. MALDI-TOF MS is a rapid, simple, and high-throughput proteomic technique for the identification of a variety of bacterial species. Since colony to colony differences and the effects of culture duration on the results are minimal, it can be implemented in a conventional laboratory setting. Although for some pathogens, the preanalytic processes should be refined and current database should be improved to obtain more accurate results, the MALDI-TOF MS-based method generally performs as well as the conventional methods and is a promising technology in clinical laboratories.

  7. Epock: rapid analysis of protein pocket dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Laurent, Benoist; Chavent, Matthieu; Cragnolini, Tristan; Dahl, Anna Caroline E.; Pasquali, Samuela; Derreumaux, Philippe; Sansom, Mark S.P.; Baaden, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Summary: The volume of an internal protein pocket is fundamental to ligand accessibility. Few programs that compute such volumes manage dynamic data from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Limited performance often prohibits analysis of large datasets. We present Epock, an efficient command-line tool that calculates pocket volumes from MD trajectories. A plugin for the VMD program provides a graphical user interface to facilitate input creation, run Epock and analyse the results. Availability and implementation: Epock C++ source code, Python analysis scripts, VMD Tcl plugin, documentation and installation instructions are freely available at http://epock.bitbucket.org. Contact: benoist.laurent@gmail.com or baaden@smplinux.de Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25505095

  8. Rapid flow cytometric measurement of protein inclusions and nuclear trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Whiten, D. R.; San Gil, R.; McAlary, L.; Yerbury, J. J.; Ecroyd, H.; Wilson, M. R.

    2016-01-01

    Proteinaceous cytoplasmic inclusions are an indicator of dysfunction in normal cellular proteostasis and a hallmark of many neurodegenerative diseases. We describe a simple and rapid new flow cytometry-based method to enumerate, characterise and, if desired, physically recover protein inclusions from cells. This technique can analyse and resolve a broad variety of inclusions differing in both size and protein composition, making it applicable to essentially any model of intracellular protein aggregation. The method also allows rapid quantification of the nuclear trafficking of fluorescently labelled molecules. PMID:27516358

  9. Rapid flow cytometric measurement of protein inclusions and nuclear trafficking.

    PubMed

    Whiten, D R; San Gil, R; McAlary, L; Yerbury, J J; Ecroyd, H; Wilson, M R

    2016-01-01

    Proteinaceous cytoplasmic inclusions are an indicator of dysfunction in normal cellular proteostasis and a hallmark of many neurodegenerative diseases. We describe a simple and rapid new flow cytometry-based method to enumerate, characterise and, if desired, physically recover protein inclusions from cells. This technique can analyse and resolve a broad variety of inclusions differing in both size and protein composition, making it applicable to essentially any model of intracellular protein aggregation. The method also allows rapid quantification of the nuclear trafficking of fluorescently labelled molecules. PMID:27516358

  10. YahO protein as a calibrant for top-down proteomic identification of Shiga toxin using MALDI-TOF-TOF-MS/MS and post-source decay

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization tandem time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF-TOF) mass spectrometry is increasingly utilized for rapid top-down proteomic identification of proteins. This identification may involve analysis of either a pure protein or a protein mixture. For analysis of a pure protein...

  11. Proteomic identification of rainbow trout sperm proteins.

    PubMed

    Nynca, Joanna; Arnold, Georg J; Fröhlich, Thomas; Otte, Kathrin; Ciereszko, Andrzej

    2014-06-01

    Proteomics represents a powerful tool for the analysis of fish spermatozoa, since these cells are transcriptionally inactive. The aim of the present study was to generate an inventory of the most prominent rainbow trout sperm proteins by SDS-PAGE prefractionation combined with nano-LC-MS/MS based identification. This study provides the first in-depth analysis of the rainbow trout sperm proteome, with a total of 206 identified proteins. We found that rainbow trout spermatozoa are equipped with functionally diverse proteins related to energetic metabolism, signal transduction, protein turnover, transport, cytoskeleton, oxidative injuries, and stress and reproduction. The availability of a catalog of rainbow trout sperm proteins provides a crucial tool for the understanding of fundamental molecular processes in fish spermatozoa, for the ongoing development of novel markers of sperm quality and for the optimization of short- and long-term sperm preservation procedures. The MS data are available at ProteomeXchange with the dataset identifier PXD000355 and DOI 10.6019/PXD000355.

  12. Raman-Spectroscopy for a rapid identification of single microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popp, Jürgen; Rösch, Petra; Harz, Michaela; Schmitt, Michael; Peschke, Klaus-Dieter; Ronneberger, Olaf; Burkhardt, Hans

    2006-03-01

    A rapid analysis of microorganisms is necessary for medical, pharmaceutical or food technology applications to identify harmful bacteria. Conventional identification methods require pure cultures from isolates and are often time demanding. Raman spectroscopy offers an alternative approach to identify microorganisms. With Raman microscopy it is possible to measure structures in the sub micrometer range, and therefore single bacteria cells are accessible. Micro-Raman mapping experiments proof that the bacterium shows a spatial homogeneity, since bacteria normally exhibit no compartments, therefore one spectrum of a single vegetative bacterial cell is sufficient to identify the strain. In contrary bacterial spores and yeast cells exhibit a high spatial dependency of the observed Raman spectra. For heterogeneous samples like single spores or yeast cells a mean spectrum from up to ten different positions is required to describe the complete cell. Using micro-Raman spectra of single bacterial cells and average spectra of yeast cells it is possible to create a database and identify microorganisms on species or even strain level.

  13. Rapid identification of chemical genetic interactions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Dilworth, David; Nelson, Christopher J

    2015-04-05

    Determining the mode of action of bioactive chemicals is of interest to a broad range of academic, pharmaceutical, and industrial scientists. Saccharomyces cerevisiae, or budding yeast, is a model eukaryote for which a complete collection of ~6,000 gene deletion mutants and hypomorphic essential gene mutants are commercially available. These collections of mutants can be used to systematically detect chemical-gene interactions, i.e. genes necessary to tolerate a chemical. This information, in turn, reports on the likely mode of action of the compound. Here we describe a protocol for the rapid identification of chemical-genetic interactions in budding yeast. We demonstrate the method using the chemotherapeutic agent 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), which has a well-defined mechanism of action. Our results show that the nuclear TRAMP RNA exosome and DNA repair enzymes are needed for proliferation in the presence of 5-FU, which is consistent with previous microarray based bar-coding chemical genetic approaches and the knowledge that 5-FU adversely affects both RNA and DNA metabolism. The required validation protocols of these high-throughput screens are also described.

  14. Rapid Identification and Verification of Indirubin-Containing Medicinal Plants

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhigang; Tu, Yuan; Xia, Ye; Cheng, Peipei; Sun, Wei; Shi, Yuhua; Guo, Licheng; He, Haibo; Xiong, Chao; Chen, Shilin; Zhang, Xiuqiao

    2015-01-01

    Indirubin, one of the key components of medicinal plants including Isatis tinctoria, Polygonum tinctorium, and Strobilanthes cusia, possesses great medicinal efficacy in the treatment of chronic myelocytic leukemia (CML). Due to misidentification and similar name, materials containing indirubin and their close relatives frequently fall prey to adulteration. In this study, we selected an internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) for distinguishing these indirubin-containing species from five of their usual adulterants, after assessing identification efficiency of matK, rbcL, psbA-trnH, and ITS2 among these species. The results of genetic distances and neighbor-joining (NJ) phylogenetic tree indicated that ITS2 region is a powerful DNA barcode to accurately identify these indirubin-containing species and discriminate them from their adulterants. Additionally, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was used to verify indirubin in different organs of the above species. The results showed that indirubin had been detected in the leaves of Is. tinctoria, P. tinctorium, S. cusia, and Indigo Naturalis (made from their mixture), but not in their roots, or in the leaves of their adulterants. Therefore, this study provides a novel and rapid method to identify and verify indirubin-containing medicinal plants for effective natural treatment of CML. PMID:26089942

  15. Rapid Identification of Pathogens from Pediatric Blood Cultures by Use of the FilmArray Blood Culture Identification Panel

    PubMed Central

    Polanco, Wanda; Carter, Donna; Shulman, Stanford

    2014-01-01

    The performance of the FilmArray blood culture identification (BCID) panel has been studied in adult patients. We describe here an evaluation of this assay for the rapid identification of pathogens in Bactec Peds Plus/F and Bactec standard anaerobic/F bottles that contained blood samples from pediatric patients at a tertiary care children's hospital. PMID:25274998

  16. Identification of protein interacting partners using tandem affinity purification.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Dalan; Urena, Luis; Thorne, Lucy; Goodfellow, Ian

    2012-01-01

    A critical and often limiting step in understanding the function of host and viral proteins is the identification of interacting cellular or viral protein partners. There are many approaches that allow the identification of interacting partners, including the yeast two hybrid system, as well as pull down assays using recombinant proteins and immunoprecipitation of endogenous proteins followed by mass spectrometry identification(1). Recent studies have highlighted the utility of double-affinity tag mediated purification, coupled with two specific elution steps in the identification of interacting proteins. This approach, termed Tandem Affinity Purification (TAP), was initially used in yeast(2,3) but more recently has been adapted to use in mammalian cells(4-8). As proof-of-concept we have established a tandem affinity purification (TAP) method using the well-characterized eukaryotic translation initiation factor eIF4E(9,10).The cellular translation factor eIF4E is a critical component of the cellular eIF4F complex involved in cap-dependent translation initiation(10). The TAP tag used in the current study is composed of two Protein G units and a streptavidin binding peptide separated by a Tobacco Etch Virus (TEV) protease cleavage sequence. The TAP tag used in the current study is composed of two Protein G units and a streptavidin binding peptide separated by a Tobacco Etch Virus (TEV) protease cleavage sequence(8). To forgo the need for the generation of clonal cell lines, we developed a rapid system that relies on the expression of the TAP-tagged bait protein from an episomally maintained plasmid based on pMEP4 (Invitrogen). Expression of tagged murine eIF4E from this plasmid was controlled using the cadmium chloride inducible metallothionein promoter. Lysis of the expressing cells and subsequent affinity purification via binding to rabbit IgG agarose, TEV protease cleavage, binding to streptavidin linked agarose and subsequent biotin elution identified numerous

  17. Quantitative identification of protein nitration sites.

    PubMed

    Chiappetta, Giovanni; Corbo, Claudia; Palmese, Angelo; Galli, Francesco; Piroddi, Marta; Marino, Gennaro; Amoresano, Angela

    2009-03-01

    Several labelling strategies have been developed targeting specific amino acid residues and/or PTMs. Methods specifically tailored for the qualitative and sometimes quantitative determination of PTMs have emerged. Many research groups have focused their attention towards o-nitrotyrosine residues, developing various methodologies for their identification, while direct quantification has remained elusive. So far the iTRAQ chemistry has been limited to primary amines. Here, we report a new strategy based on the use of iTRAQ reagents coupled to MS analysis for the selective labelling of o-nitrotyrosine residues. This method was proved to lead to the simultaneous localisation and quantification of nitration sites both in model proteins and in biological systems. PMID:19242934

  18. A method to rapidly create protein aggregates in living cells

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Yusuke; Mizumoto, Kota; Dey, Gautam; Kudo, Takamasa; Perrino, John; Chen, Ling-chun; Meyer, Tobias; Wandless, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    The accumulation of protein aggregates is a common pathological hallmark of many neurodegenerative diseases. However, we do not fully understand how aggregates are formed or the complex network of chaperones, proteasomes and other regulatory factors involved in their clearance. Here, we report a chemically controllable fluorescent protein that enables us to rapidly produce small aggregates inside living cells on the order of seconds, as well as monitor the movement and coalescence of individual aggregates into larger structures. This method can be applied to diverse experimental systems, including live animals, and may prove valuable for understanding cellular responses and diseases associated with protein aggregates. PMID:27229621

  19. Identification and Molecular Mechanisms of the Rapid Tonicity-induced Relocalization of the Aquaporin 4 Channel.

    PubMed

    Kitchen, Philip; Day, Rebecca E; Taylor, Luke H J; Salman, Mootaz M; Bill, Roslyn M; Conner, Matthew T; Conner, Alex C

    2015-07-01

    The aquaporin family of integral membrane proteins is composed of channels that mediate cellular water flow. Aquaporin 4 (AQP4) is highly expressed in the glial cells of the central nervous system and facilitates the osmotically driven pathological brain swelling associated with stroke and traumatic brain injury. Here we show that AQP4 cell surface expression can be rapidly and reversibly regulated in response to changes of tonicity in primary cortical rat astrocytes and in transfected HEK293 cells. The translocation mechanism involves PKA activation, influx of extracellular calcium, and activation of calmodulin. We identify five putative PKA phosphorylation sites and use site-directed mutagenesis to show that only phosphorylation at one of these sites, serine 276, is necessary for the translocation response. We discuss our findings in the context of the identification of new therapeutic approaches to treating brain edema. PMID:26013827

  20. A rapid method of reconstituting human erythrocyte sugar transport proteins.

    PubMed

    Carruthers, A; Melchior, D L

    1984-06-01

    A rapid reconstitution procedure for human erythrocyte hexose transfer activity is described. The procedure (reverse-phase evaporation) avoids exposure of the isolated proteins to detergent, organic solvent, sonication, or freeze-thaw steps during insertion into synthetic membranes and may be effected within 15 min. The so-formed vesicles are unilamellar structures with a large encapsulated volume, narrow size range, and low passive permeabilities. Contamination by carry-through of endogenous (red cell) lipids is less than 1%. Reconstituted hexose transfer activity was examined by using unfractionated proteins (bands 3, 4.5, and 6) and purified proteins (bands 4.5 and 3). With unfractionated proteins, hexose transport activity is low [0.34 mumol X (mg of protein)-1 X min-1], is inhibited by cytochalasin B, and increases monotonically with protein concentration. Kinetic analysis indicates that Vmax values for both influx and efflux of D-glucose are identical. Reconstitution of the cytochalasin B binding protein (band 4.5) results in hexose transport with high specific activity [5 mumol X (mg of protein)-1 X min-1] and symmetry in transfer kinetics. Band 3 proteins also appear to mediate cytochalasin B sensitive D-glucose transport activity.

  1. Identification of Posttranslational Modification-Dependent Protein Interactions Using Yeast Surface Displayed Human Proteome Libraries.

    PubMed

    Bidlingmaier, Scott; Liu, Bin

    2015-01-01

    The identification of proteins that interact specifically with posttranslational modifications such as phosphorylation is often necessary to understand cellular signaling pathways. Numerous methods for identifying proteins that interact with posttranslational modifications have been utilized, including affinity-based purification and analysis, protein microarrays, phage display, and tethered catalysis. Although these techniques have been used successfully, each has limitations. Recently, yeast surface-displayed human proteome libraries have been utilized to identify protein fragments with affinity for various target molecules, including phosphorylated peptides. When coupled with fluorescently activated cell sorting and high throughput methods for the analysis of selection outputs, yeast surface-displayed human proteome libraries can rapidly and efficiently identify protein fragments with affinity for any soluble ligand that can be fluorescently detected, including posttranslational modifications. In this review we compare the use of yeast surface display libraries to other methods for the identification of interactions between proteins and posttranslational modifications and discuss future applications of the technology. PMID:26060076

  2. Identification of secreted bacterial proteins by noncanonical amino acid tagging

    PubMed Central

    Mahdavi, Alborz; Szychowski, Janek; Ngo, John T.; Sweredoski, Michael J.; Graham, Robert L. J.; Hess, Sonja; Schneewind, Olaf; Mazmanian, Sarkis K.; Tirrell, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Pathogenic microbes have evolved complex secretion systems to deliver virulence factors into host cells. Identification of these factors is critical for understanding the infection process. We report a powerful and versatile approach to the selective labeling and identification of secreted pathogen proteins. Selective labeling of microbial proteins is accomplished via translational incorporation of azidonorleucine (Anl), a methionine surrogate that requires a mutant form of the methionyl-tRNA synthetase for activation. Secreted pathogen proteins containing Anl can be tagged by azide-alkyne cycloaddition and enriched by affinity purification. Application of the method to analysis of the type III secretion system of the human pathogen Yersinia enterocolitica enabled efficient identification of secreted proteins, identification of distinct secretion profiles for intracellular and extracellular bacteria, and determination of the order of substrate injection into host cells. This approach should be widely useful for the identification of virulence factors in microbial pathogens and the development of potential new targets for antimicrobial therapy. PMID:24347637

  3. A Collective Variable for the Rapid Exploration of Protein Druggability.

    PubMed

    Cuchillo, Rémi; Pinto-Gil, Kevin; Michel, Julien

    2015-03-10

    An efficient molecular simulation methodology has been developed for the evaluation of the druggability (ligandability) of a protein. Previously proposed techniques were designed to assess the druggability of crystallographic structures and cannot be tightly coupled to molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. By contrast, the present approach, JEDI (Just Exploring Druggability at protein Interfaces), features a druggability potential made of a combination of empirical descriptors that can be collected "on-the-fly" during MD simulations. Extensive validation studies indicate that JEDI analyses discriminate druggable and nondruggable protein binding site conformations with accuracy similar to alternative methodologies, and at a fraction of the computational cost. Since the JEDI function is continuous and differentiable, the druggability potential can be used as collective variable to rapidly detect cryptic druggable binding sites in proteins with a variety of MD free energy methods. Protocols for applications to flexible docking problems are outlined. PMID:26579775

  4. Evaluation of a rapid protein analyzer for determination of protein in milk and cream.

    PubMed

    Amamcharla, J K; Metzger, L E

    2010-08-01

    Accurate and rapid measurement of the protein content of milk is important from both a product quality and an economic standpoint. The Sprint rapid protein analyzer (CEM Corporation, Matthews, NC) is a commercial system based on a dye-binding technique and can be used for rapid measurement of protein in foods. The objective of the present study was to compare the Sprint method with the reference method (Kjeldahl method). Milk and cream samples were analyzed in duplicate for true protein and crude protein (CP) using the reference method as well as the rapid method. Method comparison statistics (regression analysis, graphical representation, standard deviation of residuals, repeatability, and so on) were used to evaluate the agreement between the 2 methods. Regression coefficients and the intercepts were not significantly different from 1 and zero for CP measurement in milk and cream, respectively. The average coefficient of variance between the duplicate CP measurements for the Sprint method was found to be 0.40, 0.49, and 0.76 for milk, light cream, and heavy cream, respectively. True protein measurement in milk and cream also followed a similar trend. Overall, there exists a sufficient level of agreement between the Sprint rapid protein analyzer and Kjeldahl method for true protein and CP measurement of milk and cream samples.

  5. BEST-HNN and 2D-(HN) NH experiments for rapid backbone assignment in proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Dinesh; Paul, Subhradip; Hosur, Ramakrishna V.

    2010-05-01

    HNN has proven to be an extremely valuable experiment for rapid and unambiguous backbone (H N, 15N) assignment in ( 13C, 15N) labeled proteins. However, low sensitivity of the experiment is often a limiting factor, especially when the transverse relaxation times ( T2) are short. We show here that BEST modification Schanda et al. (2006) [2] increases the sensitivity per unit time by more than a factor of 2.0 and thus substantially increases the speed of data collection; good 3D data can be collected in 8-10 h. Next, we present a simple method for amino-acid type identification based on simple 2D versions of the HNN experiment, labeled here as 2D-(HN) NH. Each of these experiments which produce anchor points for Gly, Ala, Ser/Thr residues, can be recorded in less than an hour. These enable rapid data acquisition, rapid analysis, and consequently rapid assignment of backbone (H N, 15N) resonances. The 2D-(HN) NH experiment does not involve aliphatic/aromatic protons and hence can be applied to deuterated protein samples as well, which is an additional advantage. The experiments have been demonstrated with human ubiquitin (76 aa) and acetic-acid denatured HIV-1 protease (99 aa), as representatives of folded and unfolded protein systems, respectively.

  6. Byonic: Advanced Peptide and Protein Identification Software

    PubMed Central

    Bern, Marshall; Kil, Yong J.; Becker, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Byonic™ is the name of a software package for peptide and protein identification by tandem mass spectrometry. This software, which has only recently become commercially available, facilitates a much wider range of search possibilities than previous search software such as SEQUEST and Mascot. Byonic allows the user to define an essentially unlimited number of variable modification types. Byonic also allows the user to set a separate limit on the number of occurrences of each modification type, so that a search may consider only one or two chance modifications such as oxidations and deamidations per peptide, yet allow three or four biological modifications such as phosphorylations, which tend to cluster together. Hence Byonic can search for 10s or even 100s of modification types simultaneously without a prohibitively large combinatorial explosion. Byonic’s Wildcard Search™ allows the user to search for unanticipated or even unknown modifications alongside known modifications. Finally, Byonic’s Glycopeptide Search allows the user to identify glycopeptides without prior knowledge of glycan masses or glycosylation sites. PMID:23255153

  7. Four hour identification of Enterobacteriaceae with the API Rapid 20E and Micro-ID systems.

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, B; Humphry, P S

    1985-01-01

    One hundred strains of Enterobacteriaceae were examined in parallel with the API Rapid 20E and Micro-ID commercial four hour identification systems. With the API Rapid 20E system 78% of the strains were correctly identified, 15% were not identified, and 7% were misidentified. The respective figures with the Micro-ID system were 74%, 11%, and 15%. PMID:3902898

  8. Identification of Substrates of Protein-Group SUMOylation.

    PubMed

    Psakhye, Ivan; Jentsch, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Protein modification by conjugation to the ubiquitin-related protein SUMO (SUMOylation) regulates numerous cellular functions and is reversible. However, unlike typical posttranslational modifications, SUMOylation often targets and regulates proteins of functionally and physically linked protein groups, rather than individual proteins. Functional studies of protein-group SUMOylation are thus particularly challenging, as they require the identification of ideally all members of a modified protein group. Here, we describe mass spectrometric approaches to detect SUMOylated protein groups in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, yet the protocols can be readily adapted for studies of SUMOylation in mammalian cells. PMID:27631809

  9. Use of bacteriophage cell wall-binding proteins for rapid diagnostics of Listeria.

    PubMed

    Schmelcher, Mathias; Loessner, Martin J

    2014-01-01

    Diagnostic protocols for food-borne bacterial pathogens such as Listeria need to be sensitive, specific, rapid, and inexpensive. Conventional culture methods are hampered by lengthy enrichment and incubation steps. Bacteriophage-derived high-affinity binding molecules (cell wall-binding domains, CBDs) specific for Listeria cells have recently been introduced as tools for detection and differentiation of this pathogen in foods. When coupled with magnetic separation, these proteins offer advantages in sensitivity and speed compared to the standard diagnostic methods. Furthermore, fusion of CBDs to differently colored fluorescent reporter proteins enables differentiation of Listeria strains in mixed cultures. This chapter provides protocols for detection of Listeria in food by CBD-based magnetic separation and subsequent multiplexed identification of strains of different serotypes with reporter-CBD fusion proteins.

  10. Mass Spectrometry and Next-Generation Sequencing Reveal an Abundant and Rapidly Evolving Abalone Sperm Protein

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Melody R.; McDowall, Margo H.; Stewart, Lia; Ouaddi, Aleena; MacCoss, Michael J.; Swanson, Willie J.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Abalone, a broadcast spawning marine mollusk, is an important model for molecular interactions and positive selection in fertilization, but the focus has previously been on only two sperm proteins, lysin and sp18.We used genomic and proteomic techniques to bring new insights to this model by characterizing the testis transcriptome and sperm proteome of the Red abalone Haliotis rufescens. One pair of homologous, testis-specific proteins contains a secretion signal and is small, abundant, and associated with the acrosome. Comparative analysis revealed that homologs are extremely divergent between species, and show strong evidence for positive selection. The acrosomal localization and rapid evolution of these proteins indicates that they play an important role in fertilization, and could be involved in the species-specificity of sperm-egg interactions in abalone. Our genomic and proteomic characterization of abalone fertilization resulted in the identification of interesting, novel peptides that have eluded detection in this important model system for 20 years. PMID:23585193

  11. Rapid protein crystallization by a micro osmotic screening system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Po-Hsiung; Su, Yu-Chuan

    2007-03-01

    This work presents a micro osmotic screening system that grows protein crystals in hours while consuming only micrograms of samples. Throughout the crystallization process, water can be driven in or out of a protein solution (across a semi-permeable membrane) to adjust its concentrations as desired. With the bi-directional and adjustable flow control realized by osmosis, each protein sample can be screened for crystallization conditions over a highly extended range. In the prototype demonstration, 6 × 8 screening arrays having an overall size of 20 × 24 × 2.5 mm3 were fabricated and characterized with crystallization experiments. In these experiments, crystallization conditions for four proteins, including lysozyme, catalase, thaumatin and xylanase, were identified within 2-6 h while consuming less than 20 µl of sample solution for each protein. Furthermore, it was also demonstrated that diffraction-quality crystals may be grown and harvested from the prototype system. As such, this osmotic system pioneers a new class of rapid screening schemes for high-throughput protein crystallization. A portion of this paper was presented at the 10th International Conference on Miniaturized Systems for Chemistry and Life Sciences, Tokyo, Japan, November 2006.

  12. Seed Storage Proteins as a System for Teaching Protein Identification by Mass Spectrometry in Biochemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Karl A.; Tan-Wilson, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) has become an important tool in studying biological systems. One application is the identification of proteins and peptides by the matching of peptide and peptide fragment masses to the sequences of proteins in protein sequence databases. Often prior protein separation of complex protein mixtures by 2D-PAGE is needed,…

  13. APols-aided protein precipitation: a rapid method for concentrating proteins for proteomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Ning, Zhibin; Hawley, Brett; Seebun, Deeptee; Figeys, Daniel

    2014-10-01

    Amphipols (APols) are a newly designed and milder class of detergent. They have been used primarily in protein structure analysis for membrane protein trapping and stabilization. We have recently demonstrated that APols can be used as an alternative detergent for proteome extraction and digestion, to achieve a "One-stop" single-tube workflow for proteomics. In this workflow, APols are removed by precipitation after protein digestion without depleting the digested peptides. Here, we took further advantage of this precipitation characteristic of APols to concentrate proteins from diluted samples. In contrast with tryptic peptides, a decrease in pH leads to the unbiased co-precipitation of APols with proteins, including globular hydrophilic proteins. We demonstrated that this precipitation is a combined effect of acid precipitation and the APols' protein interactions. Also, we have been able to demonstrate that APols-aided protein precipitation works well on diluted samples, such as secretome sample, and provides a rapid method for protein concentration.

  14. Improved protocol for rapid identification of certain spa types using high resolution melting curve analysis.

    PubMed

    Mayerhofer, Benjamin; Stöger, Anna; Pietzka, Ariane T; Fernandez, Haizpea Lasa; Prewein, Bernhard; Sorschag, Sieglinde; Kunert, Renate; Allerberger, Franz; Ruppitsch, Werner

    2015-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most significant pathogens associated with health care. For efficient surveillance, control and outbreak investigation, S. aureus typing is essential. A high resolution melting curve analysis was developed and evaluated for rapid identification of the most frequent spa types found in an Austrian hospital consortium covering 2,435 beds. Among 557 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates 38 different spa types were identified by sequence analysis of the hypervariable region X of the protein A gene (spa). Identification of spa types through their characteristic high resolution melting curve profiles was considerably improved by double spiking with genomic DNA from spa type t030 and spa type t003 and allowed unambiguous and fast identification of the ten most frequent spa types t001 (58%), t003 (12%), t190 (9%), t041 (5%), t022 (2%), t032 (2%), t008 (2%), t002 (1%), t5712 (1%) and t2203 (1%), representing 93% of all isolates within this hospital consortium. The performance of the assay was evaluated by testing samples with unknown spa types from the daily routine and by testing three different high resolution melting curve analysis real-time PCR instruments. The ten most frequent spa types were identified from all samples and on all instruments with 100% specificity and 100% sensitivity. Compared to classical spa typing by sequence analysis, this gene scanning assay is faster, cheaper and can be performed in a single closed tube assay format. Therefore it is an optimal screening tool to detect the most frequent endemic spa types and to exclude non-endemic spa types within a hospital. PMID:25768007

  15. Improved protocol for rapid identification of certain spa types using high resolution melting curve analysis.

    PubMed

    Mayerhofer, Benjamin; Stöger, Anna; Pietzka, Ariane T; Fernandez, Haizpea Lasa; Prewein, Bernhard; Sorschag, Sieglinde; Kunert, Renate; Allerberger, Franz; Ruppitsch, Werner

    2015-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most significant pathogens associated with health care. For efficient surveillance, control and outbreak investigation, S. aureus typing is essential. A high resolution melting curve analysis was developed and evaluated for rapid identification of the most frequent spa types found in an Austrian hospital consortium covering 2,435 beds. Among 557 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates 38 different spa types were identified by sequence analysis of the hypervariable region X of the protein A gene (spa). Identification of spa types through their characteristic high resolution melting curve profiles was considerably improved by double spiking with genomic DNA from spa type t030 and spa type t003 and allowed unambiguous and fast identification of the ten most frequent spa types t001 (58%), t003 (12%), t190 (9%), t041 (5%), t022 (2%), t032 (2%), t008 (2%), t002 (1%), t5712 (1%) and t2203 (1%), representing 93% of all isolates within this hospital consortium. The performance of the assay was evaluated by testing samples with unknown spa types from the daily routine and by testing three different high resolution melting curve analysis real-time PCR instruments. The ten most frequent spa types were identified from all samples and on all instruments with 100% specificity and 100% sensitivity. Compared to classical spa typing by sequence analysis, this gene scanning assay is faster, cheaper and can be performed in a single closed tube assay format. Therefore it is an optimal screening tool to detect the most frequent endemic spa types and to exclude non-endemic spa types within a hospital.

  16. Flunitrazepam rapidly reduces GABAA receptor subunit protein expression via a protein kinase C-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Jonathan D; Price, Sally A; Bristow, David R

    1998-01-01

    Acute flunitrazepam (1 μM) exposure for 1 h reduced GABAA receptor α1 (22±4%, mean±s.e.mean) and β2/3 (21±4%) subunit protein levels in cultured rat cerebellar granule cells. This rapid decrease in subunit proteins was completely prevented by bisindolymaleimide 1 (1 μM), an inhibitor of protein kinase C, but not by N-[2-((p-bromocinnamyl)amino)ethyl]-5-isoquinolinesulfonamide (H-89, 4.8 μM), an inhibitor of protein kinases A and G. These results suggest the existence of a benzodiazepine-induced mechanism to rapidly alter GABAA receptor protein expression, that appears to be dependent on protein kinase C activity. PMID:9723942

  17. Progress towards rapid identification of phytochemicals in plant extracts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    New mass spectrometry equipment is bringing closer to reality the rapid accurate assessment of chemical composition of extracts from a variety of plant materials. Using a variety of plant sources, we are using HPLC separation, UV-VIS spectrometry, ion trap mass fragmentation and accurate mass deter...

  18. A rapid, one step molecular identification of Trichoderma citrinoviride and Trichoderma reesei.

    PubMed

    Saroj, Dina B; Dengeti, Shrinivas N; Aher, Supriya; Gupta, Anil K

    2015-06-01

    Trichoderma species are widely used as production hosts for industrial enzymes. Identification of Trichoderma species requires a complex molecular biology based identification involving amplification and sequencing of multiple genes. Industrial laboratories are required to run identification tests repeatedly in cell banking procedures and also to prove absence of production host in the product. Such demands can be fulfilled by a brief method which enables confirmation of strain identity. This communication describes one step identification method for two common Trichoderma species; T. citrinoviride and T. reesei, based on identification of polymorphic region in the nucleotide sequence of translation elongation factor 1 alpha. A unique forward primer and common reverse primer resulted in 153 and 139 bp amplicon for T. citrinoviride and T. reesei, respectively. Simplification was further introduced by using mycelium as template for PCR amplification. Method described in this communication allows rapid, one step identification of two Trichoderma species.

  19. Rapid and generic identification of influenza A and other respiratory viruses with mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Majchrzykiewicz-Koehorst, Joanna A; Heikens, Esther; Trip, Hein; Hulst, Albert G; de Jong, Ad L; Viveen, Marco C; Sedee, Norbert J A; van der Plas, Jan; Coenjaerts, Frank E J; Paauw, Armand

    2015-03-01

    The rapid identification of existing and emerging respiratory viruses is crucial in combating outbreaks and epidemics. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) is a rapid and reliable identification method in bacterial diagnostics, but has not been used in virological diagnostics. Mass spectrometry systems have been investigated for the identification of respiratory viruses. However, sample preparation methods were laborious and time-consuming. In this study, a reliable and rapid sample preparation method was developed allowing identification of cultured respiratory viruses. Tenfold serial dilutions of ten cultures influenza A strains, mixed samples of influenza A virus with human metapneumovirus or respiratory syncytial virus, and reconstituted clinical samples were treated with the developed sample preparation method. Subsequently, peptides were subjected to MALDI-TOF MS and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The influenza A strains were identified to the subtype level within 3h with MALDI-TOF MS and 6h with LC-MS/MS, excluding the culturing time. The sensitivity of LC-MS/MS was higher compared to MALDI-TOF MS. In addition, LC-MS/MS was able to discriminate between two viruses in mixed samples and was able to identify virus from reconstituted clinical samples. The development of an improved and rapid sample preparation method allowed generic and rapid identification of cultured respiratory viruses by mass spectrometry.

  20. Detection and identification of protein interactions of S100 proteins by ProteinChip technology.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Roland; Melle, Christian; Escher, Niko; von Eggeling, Ferdinand

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this work was to establish an approach for identification of protein interactions. This assay used an anti-S100A8 antibody coupled on beads and incubated with cell extract. The bead eluates were analyzed using ProteinChip technology and subsequently subjected to an appropriate digestion. Molecular masses of digestion fragments were determined by SELDI-MS, and database analysis revealed S100A10 as interacting protein. This result was confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation and immunocapturing. Using S100A10 as new bait, a specific interaction with S100A7 was detectable. PMID:16212425

  1. Micro-apparatus for rapid determinations of protein solubilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, Marc L.; Munson, Sibyl

    1991-01-01

    We have developed a column-based micro-technique for rapid determinations of protein solubilities. While retaining a large crystal surface area, the column dead volume has been reduced to equal to or less than 5 micro liters. The technique was tested with tetragonal lysozyme (pH 4.5, 0.1 M acetate, 3.0 percent NaCl, 5-25 C) and column volumes of about 60, 300, and 900 micro liters. Identical solubility data were obtained, indicating that equilibration was obtained even in the smallest columns. In addition, solubility data for Br- and I- salts of lysozyme (pH 4.5, 0.1 M acetate buffer, 0.5 M salt concentrations) were obtained. It appears that the technique can be further miniaturized. The limit in further reducing the crystalline column volume is determined by the minimum solution sample size needed to determine the protein concentration.

  2. Rapid Cell Population Identification in Flow Cytometry Data*

    PubMed Central

    Aghaeepour, Nima; Nikolic, Radina; Hoos, Holger H.; Brinkman, Ryan R.

    2011-01-01

    We have developed flowMeans, a time-efficient and accurate method for automated identification of cell populations in flow cytometry (FCM) data based on K-means clustering. Unlike traditional K-means, flowMeans can identify concave cell populations by modelling a single population with multiple clusters. flowMeans uses a change point detection algorithm to determine the number of sub-populations, enabling the method to be used in high throughput FCM data analysis pipelines. Our approach compares favourably to manual analysis by human experts and current state-of-the-art automated gating algorithms. flowMeans is freely available as an open source R package through Bioconductor. PMID:21182178

  3. Human tissue profiling with multidimensional protein identification technology.

    PubMed

    Cagney, Gerard; Park, Stephen; Chung, Clement; Tong, Bianca; O'Dushlaine, Colm; Shields, Denis C; Emili, Andrew

    2005-01-01

    Profiling of tissues and cell types through systematic characterization of expressed genes or proteins shows promise as a basic research tool, and has potential applications in disease diagnosis and classification. We used multidimensional protein identification protein identification technology (MudPIT) to analyze proteomes for enriched nuclear extracts of eight human tissues: brain, heart, liver, lung, muscle, pancreas, spleen, and testis. We show that the method is approximately 80% reproducible. We address issues of relative abundance, tissue-specificity, and selectivity, and the significance of proteins whose expression does not correlate with that of the corresponding mRNA. Surprisingly, most proteins are detected in a single tissue. These proteins tend to fulfill specialist (and potentially tissue-specific) functions compared to proteins expressed in two or more tissues.

  4. Rapid Evolution of Virus Sequences in Intrinsically Disordered Protein Regions

    PubMed Central

    Gitlin, Leonid; Hagai, Tzachi; LaBarbera, Anthony; Solovey, Mark; Andino, Raul

    2014-01-01

    Nodamura Virus (NoV) is a nodavirus originally isolated from insects that can replicate in a wide variety of hosts, including mammals. Because of their simplicity and ability to replicate in many diverse hosts, NoV, and the Nodaviridae in general, provide a unique window into the evolution of viruses and host-virus interactions. Here we show that the C-terminus of the viral polymerase exhibits extreme structural and evolutionary flexibility. Indeed, fewer than 10 positively charged residues from the 110 amino acid-long C-terminal region of protein A are required to support RNA1 replication. Strikingly, this region can be replaced by completely unrelated protein sequences, yet still produce a functional replicase. Structure predictions, as well as evolutionary and mutational analyses, indicate that the C-terminal region is structurally disordered and evolves faster than the rest of the viral proteome. Thus, the function of an intrinsically unstructured protein region can be independent of most of its primary sequence, conferring both functional robustness and sequence plasticity on the protein. Our results provide an experimental explanation for rapid evolution of unstructured regions, which enables an effective exploration of the sequence space, and likely function space, available to the virus. PMID:25502394

  5. Rapid evolution of virus sequences in intrinsically disordered protein regions.

    PubMed

    Gitlin, Leonid; Hagai, Tzachi; LaBarbera, Anthony; Solovey, Mark; Andino, Raul

    2014-12-01

    Nodamura Virus (NoV) is a nodavirus originally isolated from insects that can replicate in a wide variety of hosts, including mammals. Because of their simplicity and ability to replicate in many diverse hosts, NoV, and the Nodaviridae in general, provide a unique window into the evolution of viruses and host-virus interactions. Here we show that the C-terminus of the viral polymerase exhibits extreme structural and evolutionary flexibility. Indeed, fewer than 10 positively charged residues from the 110 amino acid-long C-terminal region of protein A are required to support RNA1 replication. Strikingly, this region can be replaced by completely unrelated protein sequences, yet still produce a functional replicase. Structure predictions, as well as evolutionary and mutational analyses, indicate that the C-terminal region is structurally disordered and evolves faster than the rest of the viral proteome. Thus, the function of an intrinsically unstructured protein region can be independent of most of its primary sequence, conferring both functional robustness and sequence plasticity on the protein. Our results provide an experimental explanation for rapid evolution of unstructured regions, which enables an effective exploration of the sequence space, and likely function space, available to the virus. PMID:25502394

  6. A novel microbead-based microfluidic device for rapid bacterial identification and antibiotic susceptibility testing.

    PubMed

    He, J; Mu, X; Guo, Z; Hao, H; Zhang, C; Zhao, Z; Wang, Q

    2014-12-01

    Effective treatment of infectious diseases depends on the ability to rapidly identify the infecting bacteria and the use of sensitive antibiotics. The currently used identification assays usually take more than 72 h to perform and have a low sensitivity. Herein, we present a microbead-based microfluidic platform that is highly sensitive and rapid for bacterial detection and antibiotic sensitivity testing. The platform includes four units, one of which is used for bacterial identification and the other three are used for susceptibility testing. Our results showed that Escherichia coli O157 at a cell density range of 10(1)-10(5) CFU/μL could be detected within 30 min. Additionally, the effects of three antibiotics on E. coli O157 were evaluated within 4-8 h. Overall, this integrated microbead-based microdevice provides a sensitive, rapid, reliable, and highly effective platform for the identification of bacteria, as well as antibiotic sensitivity testing.

  7. Evaluation of an immunochromatographic assay for rapid identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex in clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Marzouk, Manel; Kahla, Imen Ben; Hannachi, Naila; Ferjeni, Asma; Salma, Walid Ben; Ghezal, Samira; Boukadida, Jalel

    2011-04-01

    Identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC) remains slow. Over the years, several new technologies have been proposed to accelerate and simplify the detection of MTC. In this context, we evaluated an immunochromatographic assay (ICA) (BIO-LINE SD Ag MPT64 TB) for rapid identification of MTC, based on detection of a specific MPT64 antigen of MTC. We have tested it on i) mycobacterial cultures: 210 MTC strains and 28 nontuberculous mycobacteria; ii) M. bovis bacille Calmette-Guérin strain SSI (Statens Serum Institut, Denmark); and iii) 22 microorganisms other than mycobacteria, isolated from cultures. We concluded that this kit has an excellent specificity (100%) and sensitivity (99%) from isolated cultures. The ICA (BIO-LINE SD Ag MPT64 TB) allows excellent MTC identification from clinical isolates. It is a rapid, simple, and inexpensive test, and has a definite contribution in the rapid laboratory diagnosis of tuberculosis. PMID:21396535

  8. Preparation of a blood culture pellet for rapid bacterial identification and antibiotic susceptibility testing.

    PubMed

    Croxatto, Antony; Prod'hom, Guy; Durussel, Christian; Greub, Gilbert

    2014-10-15

    Bloodstream infections and sepsis are a major cause of morbidity and mortality. The successful outcome of patients suffering from bacteremia depends on a rapid identification of the infectious agent to guide optimal antibiotic treatment. The analysis of Gram stains from positive blood culture can be rapidly conducted and already significantly impact the antibiotic regimen. However, the accurate identification of the infectious agent is still required to establish the optimal targeted treatment. We present here a simple and fast bacterial pellet preparation from a positive blood culture that can be used as a sample for several essential downstream applications such as identification by MALDI-TOF MS, antibiotic susceptibility testing (AST) by disc diffusion assay or automated AST systems and by automated PCR-based diagnostic testing. The performance of these different identification and AST systems applied directly on the blood culture bacterial pellets is very similar to the performance normally obtained from isolated colonies grown on agar plates. Compared to conventional approaches, the rapid acquisition of a bacterial pellet significantly reduces the time to report both identification and AST. Thus, following blood culture positivity, identification by MALDI-TOF can be reported within less than 1 hr whereas results of AST by automated AST systems or disc diffusion assays within 8 to 18 hr, respectively. Similarly, the results of a rapid PCR-based assay can be communicated to the clinicians less than 2 hr following the report of a bacteremia. Together, these results demonstrate that the rapid preparation of a blood culture bacterial pellet has a significant impact on the identification and AST turnaround time and thus on the successful outcome of patients suffering from bloodstream infections.

  9. Rapid identification of mycobacteria and rapid detection of drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis in cultured isolates and in respiratory specimens.

    PubMed

    Yam, Wing-Cheong; Siu, Kit-Hang Gilman

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in molecular biology and better understanding of the genetic basis of drug resistance have allowed rapid identification of mycobacteria and rapid detection of drug resistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis present in cultured isolates or in respiratory specimens. In this chapter, several simple nucleic acid amplification-based techniques are introduced as molecular approach for clinical diagnosis of tuberculosis. A one-tube nested IS6110-based polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is used for M. tuberculosis complex identification; the use of a multiplex allele-specific PCR is demonstrated to detect the isoniazid resistance; PCR-sequencing assays are applied for rifampicin and ofloxacin resistance detection and 16S rDNA sequencing is utilized for identification of mycobacterial species from cultures of acid fast bacilli (AFB). Despite the high specificity and sensitivity of the molecular techniques, mycobacterial culture remains the "Gold Standard" for tuberculosis diagnosis. Negative results of molecular tests never preclude the infection or the presence of drug resistance. These technological advancements are, therefore, not intended to replace the conventional tests, but rather have major complementary roles in tuberculosis diagnosis.

  10. [Rapid identification of meningitis due to bacterial pathogens].

    PubMed

    Ubukata, Kimiko

    2013-01-01

    We constructed a new real-time PCR method to detect causative pathogens in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from patient due to bacterial meningitis. The eight pathogens targeted in the PCR are Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus agalactiae, Staphylococcus aurues, Neisseria meningitides, Listeria monocytogenes, Esherichia coli, and Mycoplasma pneumoniae. The total time from DNA extraction from CSF to PCR analysis was 1.5 hour. The pathogens were detected in 72% of the CSF samples (n=115) by real-time PCR, but in only 48% by culture, although the microorganisms were completely concordant. The detection rate of pathogens with PCR was significantly better than that with cultures in patients with antibiotic administration.In conclusion, detection with real-time PCR is useful for rapidly identifying the causative pathogens of meningitis and for examining the clinical course of chemotherapy.

  11. Rapid identification of chromosomal rearrangements by PRINS technique

    SciTech Connect

    Pellestor, F.; Giradet, A.; Andreo, B.

    1994-09-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements contribute significantly to human reproductive failure, malformation/mental retardation syndromes and carcinogenesis. The variety of structural rearrangements is almost infinite and an identification by conventional cytogenetics is often labor intensive and may remain doubtful. Recent advances in molecular cytogenetics have provided new tools for detecting chromosomal abnormalities. The fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) procedure is actually the most employed technique and has led to numerous clinical applications. However, techniques required to produce suitable probes are time consuming and not accessible to all cytogenetics laboratories. The PRimed In Situ labeling (PRINS) method provides an alternate way for in situ chromosome screening. In this procedure, the chromosomal detection is performed by in situ annealing of a specific primer and subsequent primer extension by a Taq DNA polymerase in the presence of labeled nucleotides. Application of PRINS in clinical diagnosis is still limited. We have developed a semi-automatic PRINS protocol and used it to identify the origin of several chromosomal abnormalities. We report here the results of studies of three structural rearrangements: a translocation t(21;21), a supernumerary ring marker chromosome 18 and a complex chromosome 13 mosaicism involving a 13;13 Robertsonian translocation and a ring chromosome 13.

  12. Rapid detection of translation-terminating mutations at the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene by direct protein truncation test

    SciTech Connect

    Van Der Luut, R.; Khan, P.M.; Van Leeuwen, C.; Tops, C.; Roest, P.; Den Dunnen, J. )

    1994-03-01

    Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is usually associated with protein truncating mutations in the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene. The APC mutations are known to play a major role in colorectal carcinogensis. For the identification of protein truncating mutations of the APC gene, the authors developed a rapid, sensitive, and direct screening procedure. The technique is based on the in vitro transcription and translation of the genomic PCR products and is called the protein truncation test. Samples of DNA from individual FAP patients, members of a FAP family, colorectal tumors, and colorectal tumor-derived cell lines were used to show the effectiveness of this method. 9 refs., 2 figs.

  13. Functional recognition imaging using artificial neural networks: applications to rapid cellular identification via broadband electromechanical response.

    PubMed

    Nikiforov, M P; Reukov, V V; Thompson, G L; Vertegel, A A; Guo, S; Kalinin, S V; Jesse, S

    2009-10-01

    Functional recognition imaging in scanning probe microscopy (SPM) using artificial neural network identification is demonstrated. This approach utilizes statistical analysis of complex SPM responses at a single spatial location to identify the target behavior, which is reminiscent of associative thinking in the human brain, obviating the need for analytical models. We demonstrate, as an example of recognition imaging, rapid identification of cellular organisms using the difference in electromechanical activity over a broad frequency range. Single-pixel identification of model Micrococcus lysodeikticus and Pseudomonas fluorescens bacteria is achieved, demonstrating the viability of the method.

  14. Functional Recognition Imaging Using Artificial Neural Networks: Applications to Rapid Cellular Identification by Broadband Electromechanical Response

    PubMed Central

    Nikiforov, M.P.; Reukov, V.V.; Thompson, G.L.; Vertegel, A.A.; Guo, S.; Jesse, S.; Kalinin, S.V.

    2010-01-01

    Functional recognition imaging in Scanning Probe Microscopy (SPM) using artificial neural network identification is demonstrated. This approach utilizes statistical analysis of complex SPM responses to identify the target behavior, reminiscent of associative thinking in the human brain and obviating the need for analytical models. As an example of recognition imaging, we demonstrate rapid identification of cellular organisms using difference in electromechanical activity in a broad frequency range. Single-pixel identification of model Micrococcus lysodeikticus and Pseudomonas fluorescens bacteria is achieved, demonstrating the viability of the method. PMID:19752493

  15. STRAP PTM: Software Tool for Rapid Annotation and Differential Comparison of Protein Post-Translational Modifications

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Jean L.; Bhatia, Vivek N.; Whelan, Stephen A.; Costello, Catherine E.

    2014-01-01

    The identification of protein post-translational modifications (PTMs) is an increasingly important component of proteomics and biomarker discovery, but very few tools exist for performing fast and easy characterization of global PTM changes and differential comparison of PTMs across groups of data obtained from liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry experiments. STRAP PTM (Software Tool for Rapid Annotation of Proteins: Post-Translational Modification edition) is a program that was developed to facilitate the characterization of PTMs using spectral counting and a novel scoring algorithm to accelerate the identification of differential PTMs from complex data sets. The software facilitates multi-sample comparison by collating, scoring, and ranking PTMs and by summarizing data visually. The freely available software (beta release) installs on a PC and processes data in protXML format obtained from files parsed through the Trans-Proteomic Pipeline. The easy-to-use interface allows examination of results at protein, peptide, and PTM levels, and the overall design offers tremendous flexibility that provides proteomics insight beyond simple assignment and counting. PMID:25422678

  16. Dealing with the identification of protein species in ancient amphorae.

    PubMed

    Dallongeville, Sophie; Garnier, Nicolas; Casasola, Dario Bernal; Bonifay, Michel; Rolando, Christian; Tokarski, Caroline

    2011-03-01

    This manuscript deals with the identification of protein residues in amphorae, including particularly identification of protein species. The work described was performed on fishes, the anchovy (Engraulis encrasicolus) and bonito (Sarda sarda) species frequently found in the Mediterranean area. Based on proteomic techniques, the analytical strategy was adapted to analysis of protein residues from tiny ceramic fragments. The major difficulty was to extract proteins and limit their hydrolysis during the sample preparation; consequently, multiple soft extraction techniques were evaluated. The most valuable results were obtained using a solution containing high amounts of denaturing agents, urea and thiourea, reducing agent, dithiothreitol, and detergent, 3-[(3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio]-1-propanesulfonate. The analysis using nano liquid chromatography-nano electrospray ionization double quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry resulted in the identification of up to 200 proteins for the anchovy and bonito species, among which 73 peptides were found to be fish-specific. Because bonito and anchovy species are not documented and fully sequenced in genomic databases, the preliminary protein identification was realized via sequence homology to other fish sequenced species. Amino acid substitutions of peptides were assigned on the basis of the interpretation of tandem mass spectrometry spectra using de novo sequencing; these peptides, not reported up to now in databases, constitute species-specific markers. The method developed was finally applied to an archaeological sample replica impregnated with a mixture of fish tissue from both species; this experiment successfully led to the identification of 17 fish proteins, including 33 fish-specific peptides. This work shows that the analytical method developed has great potential for the identification of protein species in complex archaeological samples. PMID:20890751

  17. Rapid Identification of Aldose Reductase Inhibitory Compounds from Perilla frutescens

    PubMed Central

    Paek, Ji Hun; Shin, Kuk Hyun; Kang, Young-Hee; Lee, Jae-Yong; Lim, Soon Sung

    2013-01-01

    The ethyl acetate (EtOAc) soluble fraction of methanol extracts of Perilla frutescens (P. frutescens) inhibits aldose reductase (AR), the key enzyme in the polyol pathway. Our investigation of inhibitory compounds from the EtOAc soluble fraction of P. frutescens was followed by identification of the inhibitory compounds by a combination of HPLC microfractionation and a 96-well enzyme assay. This allowed the biological activities to be efficiently matched with selected HPLC peaks. Structural analyses of the active compounds were performed by LC-MSn. The main AR inhibiting compounds were tentatively identified as chlorogenic acid and rosmarinic acid by LC-MSn. A two-step high speed counter current chromatography (HSCCC) isolation method was developed with a solvent system of n-hexane-ethyl acetate-methanol-water at 1.5 : 5 : 1 : 5, v/v and 3 : 7 : 5 : 5, v/v. The chemical structures of the isolated compounds were determined by 1H- and 13C-nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry (NMR). The main compounds inhibiting AR in the EtOAc fraction of methanol extracts of P. frutescens were identified as chlorogenic acid (2) (IC50 = 3.16 μM), rosmarinic acid (4) (IC50 = 2.77 μM), luteolin (5) (IC50 = 6.34 μM), and methyl rosmarinic acid (6) (IC50 = 4.03 μM). PMID:24308003

  18. Plant protein kinase substrates identification using protein microarrays.

    PubMed

    Ma, Shisong; Dinesh-Kumar, Savithramma P

    2015-01-01

    Protein kinases regulate signaling pathways by phosphorylating their targets. They play critical roles in plant signaling networks. Although many important protein kinases have been identified in plants, their substrates are largely unknown. We have developed and produced plant protein microarrays with more than 15,000 purified plant proteins. Here, we describe a detailed protocol to use these microarrays to identify plant protein kinase substrates via in vitro phosphorylation assays on these arrays. PMID:25930701

  19. Stable isotope, site-specific mass tagging for protein identification

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Xian

    2006-10-24

    Proteolytic peptide mass mapping as measured by mass spectrometry provides an important method for the identification of proteins, which are usually identified by matching the measured and calculated m/z values of the proteolytic peptides. A unique identification is, however, heavily dependent upon the mass accuracy and sequence coverage of the fragment ions generated by peptide ionization. The present invention describes a method for increasing the specificity, accuracy and efficiency of the assignments of particular proteolytic peptides and consequent protein identification, by the incorporation of selected amino acid residue(s) enriched with stable isotope(s) into the protein sequence without the need for ultrahigh instrumental accuracy. Selected amino acid(s) are labeled with .sup.13C/.sup.15N/.sup.2H and incorporated into proteins in a sequence-specific manner during cell culturing. Each of these labeled amino acids carries a defined mass change encoded in its monoisotopic distribution pattern. Through their characteristic patterns, the peptides with mass tag(s) can then be readily distinguished from other peptides in mass spectra. The present method of identifying unique proteins can also be extended to protein complexes and will significantly increase data search specificity, efficiency and accuracy for protein identifications.

  20. Growth medium for the rapid isolation and identification of anthrax

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiel, Johnathan L.; Parker, Jill E.; Grubbs, Teri R.; Alls, John L.

    2000-07-01

    Anthrax has been recognized as a highly likely biological warfare or terrorist agent. The purpose of this work was to design a culture technique to rapidly isolate and identify `live' anthrax. In liquid or solid media form, 3AT medium (3-amino-L-tyrosine, the main ingredient) accelerated germination and growth of anthrax spores in 5 to 6 hours to a point expected at 18 to 24 hours with ordinary medium. During accelerated growth, standard definitive diagnostic tests such as sensitivity to lysis by penicillin or bacteriophage can be run. During this time, the bacteria synthesized a fluorescent and thermochemiluminescent polymer. Bacteria captured by specific antibody are, therefore, already labeled. Because living bacteria are required to generate the polymer, the test converts immunoassays for anthrax into viability assays. Furthermore, the polymer formation leads to the death of the vegetative form and non-viability of the spores produced in the medium. By altering the formulation of the medium, other microbes and even animal and human cells can be grown in it and labeled (including viruses grown in the animal or human cells).

  1. Rapid Detection and Identification of Respiratory Viruses by Direct Immunofluorescence

    PubMed Central

    D'Alessio, Donn; Williams, Stanley; Dick, Elliot C.

    1970-01-01

    The use of fluorescein-conjugated antiserum against respiratory syncytial (RS) and parainfluenza 1 and 3 viruses was compared with conventional techniques in the rapid detection of virus in tissue cultures inoculated with pharyngeal specimens known to contain these viruses. Twenty-three specimens were tested: 9 RS, 8 parainfluenza 1, and 6 parainfluenza 3. The fluorescent-antibody technique (FA) detected virus in 52% of the tissue cultures in 24 hr, and, by 72 hr, 22 of the 23 cultures were FA-positive whereas only 5 were positive by conventional techniques. Additionally, conjugated antisera were prepared against herpes simplex, influenza A2, and adenovirus type 5. All conjugates stained only the homologous virus and were 100- to 10,000-fold more sensitive than conventional techniques in detecting descending dilutions of virus inocula by 24 hr. With the procedures described, several antisera could be conjugated and ready for use within 24 hr. Serum fractionation was by ammonium sulfate precipitation, and with the procedure outlined virtually complete recovery of the globulin fraction and elimination of all of the albumin were accomplished. Images PMID:4098101

  2. Rapid identification of antibiotic resistance using droplet microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Keays, Marie C; O'Brien, Mark; Hussain, Anam; Kiely, Patrick A; Dalton, Tara

    2016-04-01

    Culturing bacteria and monitoring bacterial cell growth is a critical issue when dealing with patients who present with bacterial infections. One of the main challenges that arises is the time taken to identify the particular strain of bacteria and consequently, decide the correct treatment. In the majority of cases, broad spectrum antibiotics are used to target infections when a narrow spectrum drug would be more appropriate. The efficient monitoring of bacterial growth and potential antibiotic resistance is necessary to identify the best treatment options for patients. Minturising the reactions into microfluidic droplets offers a novel method to rapidy analyze bacteria. Microfluidics facilitates low volume reactions that provide a unique system where each droplet reaction acts as an individual bioreactor. Here, we designed and built a novel platform that allowed us to create and monitor E.coli microfluidic droplet cultures. Optical capacity was built in and measurements of bacterial cultures were captured facilitating the continuous monitoring of individual reactions. The capacity of the instrument was demonstrated by the application of treatments to both bacteria and drug resistant strains of bacteria. We were able to detect responses within one hour in the droplet cultures, demonstrating the capacity of this workflow to the culture and rapid characterization of bacterial strains.

  3. Identification and evolution of structurally dominant nodes in protein-protein interaction networks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pei; Yu, Xinghuo; Lü, Jinhu

    2014-02-01

    It is well known that protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks are typical evolving complex networks. Identification of important nodes has been an emerging popular topic in complex networks. Many indexes have been proposed to measure the importance of nodes in complex networks, such as degree, closeness, betweenness, k-shell, clustering coefficient, semi-local centrality, eigenvector centrality. Based on multivariate statistical analysis, through integrating the above indexes and further considering the appearances of nodes in network motifs, this paper aims at developing a new measure to characterize the structurally dominant proteins (SDP) in PPI networks. Moreover, we will further investigate the evolution of the defined dominant nodes in temporal evolving real-world and artificial PPI networks. Our results indicate that the constructed artificial networks have some similar statistical properties as those of the real-world evolving networks. In this case, the artificial PPI networks can be used to further investigate the above evolution characteristics of the real-world evolving networks. Simulation results reveal that SDP in the yeast PPI networks are evolutionary conserved, however, the undominant nodes evolve rapidly. Furthermore, PPI networks are very robust against random mutations, while fragile yet with certain robustness to targeted mutations on SDP. Our investigations shed some light on the future applications of the evolving characteristics of bio-molecular networks, such as reengineering of particular networks for technological, synthetic or pharmacological purposes. PMID:24681922

  4. Identification of four plastid-localized protein kinases.

    PubMed

    Richter, Andreas S; Gartmann, Hans; Fechler, Mona; Rödiger, Anja; Baginsky, Sacha; Grimm, Bernhard

    2016-06-01

    In chloroplasts, protein phosphorylation regulates important processes, including metabolism, photosynthesis, gene expression, and signaling. Because the hitherto known plastid protein kinases represent only a fraction of existing kinases, we aimed at the identification of novel plastid-localized protein kinases that potentially phosphorylate enzymes of the tetrapyrrole biosynthesis (TBS) pathway. We screened publicly available databases for proteins annotated as putative protein kinase family proteins with predicted chloroplast localization. Additionally, we analyzed chloroplast fractions which were separated by sucrose density gradient centrifugation by mass spectrometry. We identified four new candidates for protein kinases, which were confirmed to be plastid localized by expression of GFP-fusion proteins in tobacco leaves. A phosphorylation assay with the purified kinases confirmed the protein kinase activity for two of them. PMID:27214872

  5. Rapid and Accurate Identification of Animal Species in Natural Leather Goods by Liquid Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Izuchi, Yukari; Takashima, Tsuneo; Hatano, Naoya

    2016-01-01

    The demand for leather goods has grown globally in recent years. Industry revenue is forecast to reach $91.2 billion by 2018. There is an ongoing labelling problem in the leather items market, in that it is currently impossible to identify the species that a given piece of leather is derived from. To address this issue, we developed a rapid and simple method for the specific identification of leather derived from cattle, horses, pigs, sheep, goats, and deer by analysing peptides produced by the trypsin-digestion of proteins contained in leather goods using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. We determined species-specific amino acid sequences by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry analysis using the Mascot software program and demonstrated that collagen α-1(I), collagen α-2(I), and collagen α-1(III) from the dermal layer of the skin are particularly useful in species identification.

  6. Rapid and Accurate Identification of Animal Species in Natural Leather Goods by Liquid Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Izuchi, Yukari; Takashima, Tsuneo; Hatano, Naoya

    2016-01-01

    The demand for leather goods has grown globally in recent years. Industry revenue is forecast to reach $91.2 billion by 2018. There is an ongoing labelling problem in the leather items market, in that it is currently impossible to identify the species that a given piece of leather is derived from. To address this issue, we developed a rapid and simple method for the specific identification of leather derived from cattle, horses, pigs, sheep, goats, and deer by analysing peptides produced by the trypsin-digestion of proteins contained in leather goods using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. We determined species-specific amino acid sequences by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry analysis using the Mascot software program and demonstrated that collagen α-1(I), collagen α-2(I), and collagen α-1(III) from the dermal layer of the skin are particularly useful in species identification. PMID:27313979

  7. Rapid and Accurate Identification of Animal Species in Natural Leather Goods by Liquid Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Izuchi, Yukari; Takashima, Tsuneo; Hatano, Naoya

    2016-01-01

    The demand for leather goods has grown globally in recent years. Industry revenue is forecast to reach $91.2 billion by 2018. There is an ongoing labelling problem in the leather items market, in that it is currently impossible to identify the species that a given piece of leather is derived from. To address this issue, we developed a rapid and simple method for the specific identification of leather derived from cattle, horses, pigs, sheep, goats, and deer by analysing peptides produced by the trypsin-digestion of proteins contained in leather goods using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. We determined species-specific amino acid sequences by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry analysis using the Mascot software program and demonstrated that collagen α-1(I), collagen α-2(I), and collagen α-1(III) from the dermal layer of the skin are particularly useful in species identification. PMID:27313979

  8. Network Understanding of Herb Medicine via Rapid Identification of Ingredient-Target Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hai-Ping; Pan, Jian-Bo; Zhang, Chi; Ji, Nan; Wang, Hao; Ji, Zhi-Liang

    2014-01-01

    Today, herb medicines have become the major source for discovery of novel agents in countermining diseases. However, many of them are largely under-explored in pharmacology due to the limitation of current experimental approaches. Therefore, we proposed a computational framework in this study for network understanding of herb pharmacology via rapid identification of putative ingredient-target interactions in human structural proteome level. A marketing anti-cancer herb medicine in China, Yadanzi (Brucea javanica), was chosen for mechanistic study. Total 7,119 ingredient-target interactions were identified for thirteen Yadanzi active ingredients. Among them, about 29.5% were estimated to have better binding affinity than their corresponding marketing drug-target interactions. Further Bioinformatics analyses suggest that simultaneous manipulation of multiple proteins in the MAPK signaling pathway and the phosphorylation process of anti-apoptosis may largely answer for Yadanzi against non-small cell lung cancers. In summary, our strategy provides an efficient however economic solution for systematic understanding of herbs' power. PMID:24429698

  9. Network understanding of herb medicine via rapid identification of ingredient-target interactions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hai-Ping; Pan, Jian-Bo; Zhang, Chi; Ji, Nan; Wang, Hao; Ji, Zhi-Liang

    2014-01-01

    Today, herb medicines have become the major source for discovery of novel agents in countermining diseases. However, many of them are largely under-explored in pharmacology due to the limitation of current experimental approaches. Therefore, we proposed a computational framework in this study for network understanding of herb pharmacology via rapid identification of putative ingredient-target interactions in human structural proteome level. A marketing anti-cancer herb medicine in China, Yadanzi (Brucea javanica), was chosen for mechanistic study. Total 7,119 ingredient-target interactions were identified for thirteen Yadanzi active ingredients. Among them, about 29.5% were estimated to have better binding affinity than their corresponding marketing drug-target interactions. Further Bioinformatics analyses suggest that simultaneous manipulation of multiple proteins in the MAPK signaling pathway and the phosphorylation process of anti-apoptosis may largely answer for Yadanzi against non-small cell lung cancers. In summary, our strategy provides an efficient however economic solution for systematic understanding of herbs' power.

  10. Network understanding of herb medicine via rapid identification of ingredient-target interactions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hai-Ping; Pan, Jian-Bo; Zhang, Chi; Ji, Nan; Wang, Hao; Ji, Zhi-Liang

    2014-01-01

    Today, herb medicines have become the major source for discovery of novel agents in countermining diseases. However, many of them are largely under-explored in pharmacology due to the limitation of current experimental approaches. Therefore, we proposed a computational framework in this study for network understanding of herb pharmacology via rapid identification of putative ingredient-target interactions in human structural proteome level. A marketing anti-cancer herb medicine in China, Yadanzi (Brucea javanica), was chosen for mechanistic study. Total 7,119 ingredient-target interactions were identified for thirteen Yadanzi active ingredients. Among them, about 29.5% were estimated to have better binding affinity than their corresponding marketing drug-target interactions. Further Bioinformatics analyses suggest that simultaneous manipulation of multiple proteins in the MAPK signaling pathway and the phosphorylation process of anti-apoptosis may largely answer for Yadanzi against non-small cell lung cancers. In summary, our strategy provides an efficient however economic solution for systematic understanding of herbs' power. PMID:24429698

  11. Network Understanding of Herb Medicine via Rapid Identification of Ingredient-Target Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hai-Ping; Pan, Jian-Bo; Zhang, Chi; Ji, Nan; Wang, Hao; Ji, Zhi-Liang

    2014-01-01

    Today, herb medicines have become the major source for discovery of novel agents in countermining diseases. However, many of them are largely under-explored in pharmacology due to the limitation of current experimental approaches. Therefore, we proposed a computational framework in this study for network understanding of herb pharmacology via rapid identification of putative ingredient-target interactions in human structural proteome level. A marketing anti-cancer herb medicine in China, Yadanzi (Brucea javanica), was chosen for mechanistic study. Total 7,119 ingredient-target interactions were identified for thirteen Yadanzi active ingredients. Among them, about 29.5% were estimated to have better binding affinity than their corresponding marketing drug-target interactions. Further Bioinformatics analyses suggest that simultaneous manipulation of multiple proteins in the MAPK signaling pathway and the phosphorylation process of anti-apoptosis may largely answer for Yadanzi against non-small cell lung cancers. In summary, our strategy provides an efficient however economic solution for systematic understanding of herbs' power.

  12. Rapid identification of major Escherichia coli sequence types causing urinary tract and bloodstream infections.

    PubMed

    Doumith, M; Day, M; Ciesielczuk, H; Hope, R; Underwood, A; Reynolds, R; Wain, J; Livermore, D M; Woodford, N

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli sequence types (STs) 69, 73, 95, and 131 are collectively responsible for a large proportion of E. coli urinary tract and bloodstream infections, and they differ markedly in their antibiotic susceptibilities. Here, we describe a novel PCR method to rapidly detect and distinguish these lineages. Three hundred eighteen published E. coli genomes were compared in order to identify signature sequences unique to each of the four major STs. The specificities of these sequences were assessed in silico by seeking them in an additional 98 genomes. A PCR assay was designed to amplify size-distinguishable fragments unique to the four lineages and was validated using 515 E. coli isolates of known STs. Genome comparisons identified 22 regions ranging in size from 335 bp to 26.5 kb that are unique to one or more of the four predominant E. coli STs, with two to 10 specific regions per ST. These regions predominantly harbor genes encoding hypothetical proteins and are within or adjacent to prophage sequences. Most (13/22) were highly conserved (>96.5% identity) in the genomes of their respective ST. The new assay correctly identified all 142 representatives of the four major STs in the validation set (n = 515), with only two ST12 isolates misidentified as ST95. Compared with MLST, the assay has 100% sensitivity and 99.5% specificity. The rapid identification of major extraintestinal E. coli STs will benefit future epidemiological studies and could be developed to tailor antibiotic therapy to the different susceptibilities of these dominant lineages. PMID:25355761

  13. Proteomics: Protein Identification Using Online Databases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eurich, Chris; Fields, Peter A.; Rice, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Proteomics is an emerging area of systems biology that allows simultaneous study of thousands of proteins expressed in cells, tissues, or whole organisms. We have developed this activity to enable high school or college students to explore proteomic databases using mass spectrometry data files generated from yeast proteins in a college laboratory…

  14. Using Semantics, Grammar, Phonology, and Rapid Naming Tasks To Predict Word Identification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammill, Donald D.; Mather, Nancy; Allen, Elizabeth A.; Roberts, Rhia

    2002-01-01

    This study investigated the relative importance of semantic, grammatical, phonological, and rapid naming abilities in predicting word identification skills in 200 children (grades 1-6) using correlation, factor analysis, multiple regression, and predictive outcome analysis techniques. Composite measures of these abilities correlated significantly…

  15. A Perl procedure for protein identification by Peptide Mass Fingerprinting

    PubMed Central

    Tiengo, Alessandra; Barbarini, Nicola; Troiani, Sonia; Rusconi, Luisa; Magni, Paolo

    2009-01-01

    Background One of the topics of major interest in proteomics is protein identification. Protein identification can be achieved by analyzing the mass spectrum of a protein sample through different approaches. One of them, called Peptide Mass Fingerprinting (PMF), combines mass spectrometry (MS) data with searching strategies in a suitable database of known protein to provide a list of candidate proteins ranked by a score. To this aim, several algorithms and software tools have been proposed. However, the scoring methods and mainly the statistical evaluation of the results can be significantly improved. Results In this work, a Perl procedure for protein identification by PMF, called MsPI (Mass spectrometry Protein Identification), is presented. The implemented scoring methods were derived from the literature. MsPI implements a strategy to remove the contaminant masses present in the acquired spectra. Moreover, MsPI includes a statistical method to assign to each candidate protein, in addition to the scoring value, a p-value. Results obtained by MsPI on a dataset of 10 protein samples were compared with those achieved using two other software tools, i.e. Piums and Mascot. Piums implements one of the scoring methods available in MsPI, while Mascot is one of the most frequently used software tools in the protein identification field. MsPI scripts are available for downloading on the web site . Conclusion The performances of MsPI seem to be better than those of Piums and Mascot. In fact, on the considered dataset, MsPI includes in its candidate proteins list, the "true" proteins nine times over ten, whereas Piums includes in its list the "true" proteins only four time over ten. Even if Mascot also correctly includes in the candidates list the "true" proteins nine times over ten, it provides longer candidate lists, therefore increasing the number of false positives when the molecular weight of the proteins in the sample is approximatively known (e.g. by the 1-D/2-D

  16. Identification of protein stability determinants in chloroplasts

    PubMed Central

    Apel, Wiebke; Schulze, Waltraud X; Bock, Ralph

    2010-01-01

    Although chloroplast protein stability has long been recognised as a major level of post-translational regulation in photosynthesis and gene expression, the factors determining protein stability in plastids are largely unknown. Here, we have identified stability determinants in vivo by producing plants with transgenic chloroplasts that express a reporter protein whose N- and C-termini were systematically modified. We found that major stability determinants are located in the N-terminus. Moreover, testing of all 20 amino acids in the position after the initiator methionine revealed strong differences in protein stability and indicated an important role of the penultimate N-terminal amino acid residue in determining the protein half life. We propose that the stability of plastid proteins is largely determined by three factors: (i) the action of methionine aminopeptidase (the enzyme that removes the initiator methionine and exposes the penultimate N-terminal amino acid residue), (ii) an N-end rule-like protein degradation pathway, and (iii) additional sequence determinants in the N-terminal region. PMID:20545891

  17. Selection on rapidly evolving proteins in the Arabidopsis genome.

    PubMed Central

    Barrier, Marianne; Bustamante, Carlos D; Yu, Jiaye; Purugganan, Michael D

    2003-01-01

    Genes that have undergone positive or diversifying selection are likely to be associated with adaptive divergence between species. One indicator of adaptive selection at the molecular level is an excess of amino acid replacement fixed differences per replacement site relative to the number of synonymous fixed differences per synonymous site (omega = K(a)/K(s)). We used an evolutionary expressed sequence tag (EST) approach to estimate the distribution of omega among 304 orthologous loci between Arabidopsis thaliana and A. lyrata to identify genes potentially involved in the adaptive divergence between these two Brassicaceae species. We find that 14 of 304 genes (approximately 5%) have an estimated omega > 1 and are candidates for genes with increased selection intensities. Molecular population genetic analyses of 6 of these rapidly evolving protein loci indicate that, despite their high levels of between-species nonsynonymous divergence, these genes do not have elevated levels of intraspecific replacement polymorphisms compared to previously studied genes. A hierarchical Bayesian analysis of protein-coding region evolution within and between species also indicates that the selection intensities of these genes are elevated compared to previously studied A. thaliana nuclear loci. PMID:12618409

  18. Peroxymonosulfate Rapidly Inactivates the Disease-Associated Prion Protein.

    PubMed

    Chesney, Alexandra R; Booth, Clarissa J; Lietz, Christopher B; Li, Lingjun; Pedersen, Joel A

    2016-07-01

    Prions, the etiological agents in transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, exhibit remarkable resistance to most methods of inactivation that are effective against conventional pathogens. Prions are composed of pathogenic conformers of the prion protein (PrP(TSE)). Some prion diseases are transmitted, in part, through environmental routes. The recalcitrance of prions to inactivation may lead to a persistent reservoir of infectivity that contributes to the environmental maintenance of epizootics. At present, few methods exist to remediate prion-contaminated land surfaces. Here we conducted a proof-of-principle study to examine the ability of peroxymonosulfate to degrade PrP(TSE). We find that peroxymonosulfate rapidly degrades PrP(TSE) from two species. Transition-metal-catalyzed decomposition of peroxymonosulfate to produce sulfate radicals appears to enhance degradation. We further demonstrate that exposure to peroxymonosulfate significantly reduced PrP(C) to PrP(TSE) converting ability as measured by protein misfolding cyclic amplification, used as a proxy for infectivity. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry revealed that exposure to peroxymonosulfate results in oxidative modifications to methionine and tryptophan residues. This study indicates that peroxymonosulfate may hold promise for decontamination of prion-contaminated surfaces. PMID:27247993

  19. Identification of Ina proteins from Fusarium acuminatum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheel, Jan Frederik; Kunert, Anna Theresa; Pöschl, Ulrich; Fröhlich-Nowoisky, Janine

    2015-04-01

    Freezing of water above -36° C is based on ice nucleation activity (INA) mediated by ice nucleators (IN) which can be of various origins. Beside mineral IN, biological particles are a potentially important source of atmospheric IN. The best-known biological IN are common plant-associated bacteria. The IN activity of these bacteria is induced by a surface protein on the outer cell membrane, which is fully characterized. In contrast, much less is known about the nature of fungal IN. The fungal genus Fusarium is widely spread throughout the earth. It belongs to the Ascomycota and is one of the most severe fungal pathogens. It can affect a variety of organisms from plants to animals including humans. INA of Fusarium was already described about 30 years ago and INA of Fusarium as well as other fungal genera is assumed to be mediated by proteins or at least to contain a proteinaceous compound. Although many efforts were made the precise INA machinery of Fusarium and other fungal species including the proteins and their corresponding genes remain unidentified. In this study preparations from living fungal samples of F. acuminatum were fractionated by liquid chromatography and IN active fractions were identified by freezing assays. SDS-page and de novo sequencing by mass spectrometry were used to identify the primary structure of the protein. Preliminary results show that the INA protein of F. acuminatum is contained in the early size exclusion chromatography fractions indicating a high molecular size. Moreover we could identify a single protein band from IN active fractions at 130-145 kDa corresponding to sizes of IN proteins from bacterial species. To our knowledge this is for the first time an isolation of a single protein from in vivo samples, which can be assigned as IN active from Fusarium.

  20. Rapid identification of Leishmania species by specific hybridization of kinetoplast DNA in cutaneous lesions.

    PubMed Central

    Wirth, D F; Pratt, D M

    1982-01-01

    Kinetoplast DNA (kDNA) was isolated from various species of the protozoic parasite Leishmania and analyzed by nucleic acid hybridization to detect species-related heterogeneity of kDNA. Purified DNA isolated from L. mexicana and L. braziliensis displayed no homology in nucleic acid hybridization studies. These results confirmed that rapid kDNA sequence change and evolution is occurring in New World species of Leishmania and suggested that such isolated kDNA could be used as a specific hybridization probe for the rapid identification of Leishmania species by using whole organisms. This work further demonstrates that such species-specific identification is feasible on isolated Leishmania promastigotes and, more important, directly on tissue touch blots derived from the cutaneous lesion. Thus, specific hybridization of isolated kDNA provides the basis for a rapid, accurate method for the diagnosis of human leishmaniasis directly from infected tissue. Images PMID:6960359

  1. Rapid identification of Leishmania species by specific hybridization of kinetoplast DNA in cutaneous lesions.

    PubMed

    Wirth, D F; Pratt, D M

    1982-11-01

    Kinetoplast DNA (kDNA) was isolated from various species of the protozoic parasite Leishmania and analyzed by nucleic acid hybridization to detect species-related heterogeneity of kDNA. Purified DNA isolated from L. mexicana and L. braziliensis displayed no homology in nucleic acid hybridization studies. These results confirmed that rapid kDNA sequence change and evolution is occurring in New World species of Leishmania and suggested that such isolated kDNA could be used as a specific hybridization probe for the rapid identification of Leishmania species by using whole organisms. This work further demonstrates that such species-specific identification is feasible on isolated Leishmania promastigotes and, more important, directly on tissue touch blots derived from the cutaneous lesion. Thus, specific hybridization of isolated kDNA provides the basis for a rapid, accurate method for the diagnosis of human leishmaniasis directly from infected tissue. PMID:6960359

  2. Sensitive and rapid identification of Vibrio vulnificus by loop-mediated isothermal amplification.

    PubMed

    Ren, Chun-Hua; Hu, Chao-Qun; Luo, Peng; Wang, Qing-Bai

    2009-01-01

    Vibrio vulnificus is a serious bacterial pathogen for humans and aquatic animals. We developed a rapid, sensitive and specific identification method for V. vulnificus using loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) technique. A set of primers, composed of two outer primers and two inner primers, was designed based on the cytolysin gene sequence of V. vulnificus. The LAMP reaction was processed in a heat block at 65 degrees C for 60 min. The amplification products were detected by visual inspection using SYBR Green I, as well as by electrophoresis on agarose gels. Our results showed that the LAMP reaction was highly specific to V. vulnificus. This method was 10-fold more sensitive than conventional PCR. In conclusion, the LAMP assay was extremely rapid, simple, cost-effective, sensitive and specific for the rapid identification of V. vulnificus.

  3. BioID Identification of Lamin-Associated Proteins.

    PubMed

    Mehus, Aaron A; Anderson, Ruthellen H; Roux, Kyle J

    2016-01-01

    A- and B-type lamins support the nuclear envelope, contribute to heterochromatin organization, and regulate a myriad of nuclear processes. The mechanisms by which lamins function in different cell types and the mechanisms by which lamin mutations cause over a dozen human diseases (laminopathies) remain unclear. The identification of proteins associated with lamins is likely to provide fundamental insight into these mechanisms. BioID (proximity-dependent biotin identification) is a unique and powerful method for identifying protein-protein and proximity-based interactions in living cells. BioID utilizes a mutant biotin ligase from bacteria that is fused to a protein of interest (bait). When expressed in living cells and stimulated with excess biotin, this BioID-fusion protein promiscuously biotinylates directly interacting and vicinal endogenous proteins. Following biotin-affinity capture, the biotinylated proteins can be identified using mass spectrometry. BioID thus enables screening for physiologically relevant protein associations that occur over time in living cells. BioID is applicable to insoluble proteins such as lamins that are often refractory to study by other methods and can identify weak and/or transient interactions. We discuss the use of BioID to elucidate novel lamin-interacting proteins and its applications in a broad range of biological systems, and provide detailed protocols to guide new applications.

  4. Multicolor Quantum Dot-Based Chemical Nose for Rapid and Array-Free Differentiation of Multiple Proteins.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qinfeng; Zhang, Yihong; Tang, Bo; Zhang, Chun-yang

    2016-02-16

    Nanomaterial-based differential sensors (e.g., chemical nose) have shown great potential for identification of multiple proteins because of their modulatable recognition and transduction capability but with the limitation of array separation, single-channel read-out, and long incubation time. Here, we develop a multicolor quantum dot (QD)-based multichannel sensing platform for rapid identification of multiple proteins in an array-free format within 1 min. A protein-binding dye of bromophenol blue (BPB) is explored as an efficient reversible quencher of QDs, and the mixture of BPB with multicolor QDs may generate the quenched QD-BPB complexes. The addition of proteins will disrupt the QD-BPB complexes as a result of the competitive protein-BPB binding, inducing the separation of BPB from the QDs and the generation of distinct fluorescence patterns. The multicolor patterns may be collected at a single-wavelength excitation and differentiated by a linear discriminant analysis (LDA). This multichannel sensing platform allows for the discrimination of ten proteins and seven cell lines with the fastest response rate reported to date, holding great promise for rapid and high-throughput medical diagnostics. PMID:26759896

  5. Multicolor Quantum Dot-Based Chemical Nose for Rapid and Array-Free Differentiation of Multiple Proteins.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qinfeng; Zhang, Yihong; Tang, Bo; Zhang, Chun-yang

    2016-02-16

    Nanomaterial-based differential sensors (e.g., chemical nose) have shown great potential for identification of multiple proteins because of their modulatable recognition and transduction capability but with the limitation of array separation, single-channel read-out, and long incubation time. Here, we develop a multicolor quantum dot (QD)-based multichannel sensing platform for rapid identification of multiple proteins in an array-free format within 1 min. A protein-binding dye of bromophenol blue (BPB) is explored as an efficient reversible quencher of QDs, and the mixture of BPB with multicolor QDs may generate the quenched QD-BPB complexes. The addition of proteins will disrupt the QD-BPB complexes as a result of the competitive protein-BPB binding, inducing the separation of BPB from the QDs and the generation of distinct fluorescence patterns. The multicolor patterns may be collected at a single-wavelength excitation and differentiated by a linear discriminant analysis (LDA). This multichannel sensing platform allows for the discrimination of ten proteins and seven cell lines with the fastest response rate reported to date, holding great promise for rapid and high-throughput medical diagnostics.

  6. Imaging metals in proteins by combining electrophoresis with rapid x-ray fluorescence mapping.

    SciTech Connect

    Finney, L.; Chishti, Y.; Khare, T.; Giometti, C.; Levina, A.; Lay, P. A.; Vogt, S.; Univ. of Sydney; Northwestern Univ.

    2010-01-01

    Growing evidence points toward a very dynamic role for metals in biology. This suggests that physiological circumstance may mandate metal ion redistribution among ligands. This work addresses a critical need for technology that detects, identifies, and measures the metal-containing components of complex biological matrixes. We describe a direct, user-friendly approach for identifying and quantifying metal?protein adducts in complex samples using native- or SDS-PAGE, blotting, and rapid synchrotron X-ray fluorescence mapping with micro-XANES (X-ray absorption near-edge structure) of entire blots. The identification and quantification of each metal bound to a protein spot has been demonstrated, and the technique has been applied in two exemplary cases. In the first, the speciation of the in vitro binding of exogenous chromium to blood serum proteins was influenced markedly by both the oxidation state of chromium exposed to the serum proteins and the treatment conditions, which is of relevance to the biochemistry of Cr dietary supplements. In the second case, in vivo changes in endogenous metal speciation were examined to probe the influence of oxygen depletion on iron speciation in Shewanella oneidensis.

  7. Detection and identification of protein citrullination in complex biological systems.

    PubMed

    Clancy, Kathleen W; Weerapana, Eranthie; Thompson, Paul R

    2016-02-01

    Protein citrullination is a post-translational modification of arginine that is catalyzed by the Protein Arginine Deiminase (PAD) family of enzymes. Aberrantly increased citrullination is associated with a host of inflammatory diseases and cancer and PAD inhibitors have shown remarkable efficacy in a range of diseases including rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, atherosclerosis, and ulcerative colitis. In rheumatoid arthritis, citrullinated proteins serve as key antigens for rheumatoid arthritis-associated autoantibodies. These data suggest that citrullinated proteins may serve more generally as biomarkers of specific disease states, however, the identification of citrullinated residues remains challenging due to the small 1Da mass change that occurs upon citrullination. Herein, we highlight the available techniques to identify citrullinated proteins/residues focusing on advanced MS techniques as well as chemical derivatization strategies that are currently being employed to identify citrullinated proteins as well as the specific residues modified within those proteins.

  8. Identification of proteins bound to a thioaptamer probe on a proteomics array

    SciTech Connect

    Wang He; Yang, Xianbin; Bowick, Gavin C.; Herzog, Norbert K.; Luxon, Bruce A.; Lomas, Lee O. . E-mail: lomas@ciphergen.com; Gorenstein, David G. . E-mail: dggorens@utmb.edu

    2006-09-01

    A rapid method to screen and identify unknown bound proteins to specific nucleic acid probes anchored on ProteinChip array surfaces from crude biological samples has been developed in this paper. It was demonstrated with screening specific binding proteins from LPS-stimulated mouse 70Z/3 pre-B cell nuclear extracts by direct coupling of thioaptamer XBY-S2 to the pre-activated ProteinChip array surfaces. With pre-fractionation of crude nuclear extracts by ion exchange method, specific 'on-chip' captured proteins have been obtained that were pure enough to do 'on-chip' digestion and the subsequent identification of the 'on-chip' bound proteins by microsequencing of the trypsin digested peptide fragments through tandem MS. Five mouse heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs) A1, A2/B1, A3, A/B, and D0 were identified. To verify those bound hnRNPs, a novel thioaptamer/antibody sandwich assay provides highly sensitive and selective identification of proteins on ProteinChip arrays.

  9. Recovery and identification of mature enamel proteins in ancient teeth.

    PubMed

    Porto, Isabel M; Laure, Helen J; Tykot, Robert H; de Sousa, Frederico B; Rosa, Jose C; Gerlach, Raquel F

    2011-12-01

    Proteins in mineralized tissues provide a window to the past, and dental enamel is peculiar in being highly resistant to diagenesis and providing information on a very narrow window of time, such as the developing period; however, to date, complete proteins have not been extracted successfully from ancient teeth. In this work we tested the ability of a whole-crown micro-etch technique to obtain enamel protein samples from mature enamel of recently extracted (n = 2) and ancient (n = 2; ad 800 to 1100) third molars. Samples were analyzed using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight/time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF/TOF) mass spectrometry, and the resulting spectra were searched against the Swiss-Prot protein database using the Mascot software for protein identification. In our protocol, the separation of proteins in gel is not necessary. Successful identification of specific enamel proteins was obtained after whole-crown superficial enamel etching with 10% HCl. Most protein fragments recovered from dry teeth and mummy teeth contained amino-terminal amelogenin peptides. Only one peptide specific for the amelogenin X-isoform was identified. In conclusion, the reported techniques allowed the successful recovery of proteins specific to dental enamel from samples obtained in a very conservative manner, which may also be important in forensic and/or archeological science. PMID:22243232

  10. The tandem affinity purification method: an efficient system for protein complex purification and protein interaction identification.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaoli; Song, Yuan; Li, Yuhua; Chang, Jianfeng; Zhang, Hua; An, Lizhe

    2010-08-01

    Isolation and identification of protein partners in multi-protein complexes are important in gaining further insights into the cellular roles of proteins and determining the possible mechanisms by which proteins have an effect in the molecular environment. The tandem affinity purification (TAP) method was originally developed in yeast for the purification of protein complexes and identification of protein-protein interactions. With modifications to this method and many variations in the original tag made over the past few years, the TAP system could be applied in mammalian, plant, bacteria and other systems for protein complex analysis. In this review, we describe the application of the TAP method in various organisms, the modification in the tag, the disadvantages, the developments and the future prospects of the TAP method. PMID:20399864

  11. Rapid identification of Yersinia pestis and Brucella melitensis by chip-based continuous flow PCR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietzsch, Michael; Hlawatsch, Nadine; Melzer, Falk; Tomaso, Herbert; Gärtner, Claudia; Neubauer, Heinrich

    2012-06-01

    To combat the threat of biological agents like Yersinia pestis and Brucella melitensis in bioterroristic scenarios requires fast, easy-to-use and safe identification systems. In this study we describe a system for rapid amplification of specific genetic markers for the identification of Yersinia pestis and Brucella melitensis. Using chip based PCR and continuous flow technology we were able to amplify the targets simultaneously with a 2-step reaction profile within 20 minutes. The subsequent analysis of amplified fragments by standard gel electrophoresis requires another 45 minutes. We were able to detect both pathogens within 75 minutes being much faster than most other nucleic acid amplification technologies.

  12. Identification of intracellular receptor proteins for activated protein kinase C.

    PubMed Central

    Mochly-Rosen, D; Khaner, H; Lopez, J

    1991-01-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) translocates from the cytosol to the particulate fraction on activation. This activation-induced translocation of PKC is thought to reflect PKC binding to the membrane lipids. However, immunological and biochemical data suggest that PKC may bind to proteins in the cytoskeletal elements in the particulate fraction and in the nuclei. Here we describe evidence for the presence of intracellular receptor proteins that bind activated PKC. Several proteins from the detergent-insoluble material of the particulate fraction bound PKC in the presence of phosphatidylserine and calcium; binding was further increased with the addition of diacylglycerol. Binding of PKC to two of these proteins was concentration-dependent, saturable, and specific, suggesting that these binding proteins are receptors for activated C-kinase, termed here "RACKs." PKC binds to RACKs via a site on PKC distinct from the substrate binding site. We suggest that binding to RACKs may play a role in activation-induced translocation of PKC. Images PMID:1850844

  13. Identification & Characterization of Fungal Ice Nucleation Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheel, Jan Frederik; Kunert, Anna Theresa; Kampf, Christopher Johannes; Mauri, Sergio; Weidner, Tobias; Pöschl, Ulrich; Fröhlich-Nowoisky, Janine

    2016-04-01

    Freezing of water at relatively warm subfreezing temperatures is dependent on ice nucleation catalysis facilitated by ice nuclei (IN). These IN can be of various origins and although extensive research was done and progress was achieved, the nature and mechanisms leading to an effective IN are to date still poorly understood. Some of the most important processes of our geosphere like the water cycle are highly dependent on effective ice nucleation at temperatures between -2°C - -8°C, a temperature range which is almost exclusively covered by biological IN (BioIN). BioIN are usually macromolecular structures of biological polymers. Sugars as well as proteins have been reported to serve as IN and the best characterized BioIN are ice nucleation proteins (IN-P) from gram negative bacteria. Fungal strains from Fusarium spp. were described to be effective IN at subfreezing temperatures up to -2°C already 25 years ago and more and more fungal species are described to serve as efficient IN. Fungal IN are also thought to be proteins or at least contain a proteinaceous compound, but to date the fungal IN-P primary structure as well as their coding genetic elements of all IN active fungi are unknown. The aim of this study is a.) to identify the proteins and their coding genetic elements from IN active fungi (F. acuminatum, F. avenaceum, M. alpina) and b.) to characterize the mechanisms by which fungal IN serve as effective IN. We designed an interdisciplinary approach using biological, analytical and physical methods to identify fungal IN-P and describe their biological, chemical, and physical properties.

  14. Bioinformatics pipeline for functional identification and characterization of proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skarzyńska, Agnieszka; Pawełkowicz, Magdalena; Krzywkowski, Tomasz; Świerkula, Katarzyna; PlÄ der, Wojciech; Przybecki, Zbigniew

    2015-09-01

    The new sequencing methods, called Next Generation Sequencing gives an opportunity to possess a vast amount of data in short time. This data requires structural and functional annotation. Functional identification and characterization of predicted proteins could be done by in silico approches, thanks to a numerous computational tools available nowadays. However, there is a need to confirm the results of proteins function prediction using different programs and comparing the results or confirm experimentally. Here we present a bioinformatics pipeline for structural and functional annotation of proteins.

  15. Seed storage proteins as a system for teaching protein identification by mass spectrometry in biochemistry laboratory.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Karl A; Tan-Wilson, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) has become an important tool in studying biological systems. One application is the identification of proteins and peptides by the matching of peptide and peptide fragment masses to the sequences of proteins in protein sequence databases. Often prior protein separation of complex protein mixtures by 2D-PAGE is needed, requiring more time and expertise than instructors of large laboratory classes can devote. We have developed an experimental module for our Biochemistry Laboratory course that engages students in MS-based protein identification following protein separation by one-dimensional SDS-PAGE, a technique that is usually taught in this type of course. The module is based on soybean seed storage proteins, a relatively simple mixture of proteins present in high levels in the seed, allowing the identification of the main protein bands by MS/MS and in some cases, even by peptide mass fingerprinting. Students can identify their protein bands using software available on the Internet, and are challenged to deduce post-translational modifications that have occurred upon germination. A collection of mass spectral data and tutorials that can be used as a stand-alone computer-based laboratory module were also assembled.

  16. Potential use of microarray technology for rapid identification of central nervous system pathogens.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Eric H; Niemeyer, Debra M; Folio, Les; Agan, Brian K; Rowley, Robb K

    2004-08-01

    Outbreaks of central nervous system (CNS) diseases result in significant productivity and financial losses, threatening peace and wartime readiness capabilities. To meet this threat, rapid clinical diagnostic tools for detecting and identifying CNS pathogens are needed. Current tools and techniques cannot efficiently deal with CNS pathogen diversity; they cannot provide real-time identification of pathogen serogroups and strains, and they require days, sometimes weeks, for examination of tissue culture. Rapid and precise CNS pathogen diagnostics are needed to provide the opportunity for tailored therapeutic regimens and focused preventive efforts to decrease morbidity and mortality. Such diagnostics are available through genetic and genomic technologies, which have the potential for reducing the time required in serogroup or strain identification from 500+ hours for some viral cultures to less than 3 hours for all pathogens. In the near future, microarray diagnostics and future derivations of these technologies will change the paradigm used for outbreak investigations and will improve health care for all. PMID:15379069

  17. Rapid Identification of Black Grain Eumycetoma Causative Agents Using Rolling Circle Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Sarah A.; van den Ende, Bert H. G. Gerrits; Fahal, Ahmed H.; van de Sande, Wendy W. J.; de Hoog, G. S.

    2014-01-01

    Accurate identification of mycetoma causative agent is a priority for treatment. However, current identification tools are far from being satisfactory for both reliable diagnosis and epidemiological investigations. A rapid, simple, and highly efficient molecular based method for identification of agents of black grain eumycetoma is introduced, aiming to improve diagnostic in endemic areas. Rolling Circle Amplification (RCA) uses species-specific padlock probes and isothermal DNA amplification. The tests were based on ITS sequences and developed for Falciformispora senegalensis, F. tompkinsii, Madurella fahalii, M. mycetomatis, M. pseudomycetomatis, M. tropicana, Medicopsis romeroi, and Trematosphaeria grisea. With the isothermal RCA assay, 62 isolates were successfully identified with 100% specificity and no cross reactivity or false results. The main advantage of this technique is the low-cost, high specificity, and simplicity. In addition, it is highly reproducible and can be performed within a single day. PMID:25474355

  18. Rapid and Efficient Protein Digestion using Trypsin Coated Magnetic Nanoparticles under Pressure Cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Byoungsoo; Lopez-Ferrer, Daniel; Kim, Byoung Chan; Na, Hyon Bin; Park, Yong Il; Weitz, Karl K.; Warner, Marvin G.; Hyeon, Taeghwan; Lee, Sang-Won; Smith, Richard D.; Kim, Jungbae

    2011-01-01

    Trypsin-coated magnetic nanoparticles (EC-TR/NPs), prepared via a simple crosslinking of the enzyme to magnetic nanoparticles, were highly stable and could be easily captured using a magnet after the digestion was complete. EC-TR/NPs showed a negligible loss of trypsin activity after multiple uses and continuous shaking, while a control sample of covalently-attached trypsin on NPs resulted in a rapid inactivation under the same conditions due to the denaturation and autolysis of trypsin. Digestions were carried out on a single model protein, a five protein mixture, and a whole mouse brain proteome, and also compared for digestion at atmospheric pressure and 37 ºC for 12 h, and in combination with pressure cycling technology (PCT) at room temperature for 1 min. In all cases, the EC-TR/NPs performed equally as well or better than free trypsin in terms of the number of peptide/protein identifications and reproducibility across technical replicates. However, the concomitant use of EC-TR/NPs and PCT resulted in very fast (~1 min) and more reproducible digestions.

  19. Vibratory reaction unit for the rapid analysis of proteins and glycochains.

    PubMed

    Sasakura, Yukie; Nogami, Makoto; Kobayashi, Noriko; Kanda, Katsuhiro

    2007-01-01

    A protein digestion system using immobilized enzymes for protein identification and glycochain analyses has been developed, and a vibration reaction unit for micro-scale sample convection on an enzyme-immobilized solid surface was constructed. BSA as a model substrate was digested by this unit, and was successfully identified by mass spectrometry (MS) analyses. Compared to the conventional liquid-phase digestion, the reaction unit increased the number of matched peptides from 9 to 26, protein score from 455 to 1247, and sequence coverage from 21% to 48%. Glycopeptidase F (NGF), an enzyme that cleaves N-glycans from glycoproteins, was also immobilized and used to remove the glycochains from human immunoglobulin G (IgG). Trypsin and NGF were immobilized on the same solid surface and used to remove glycochains from IgG in single-step. Glycochains were labeled with fluorescent reagent and analyzed by HPLC. Several peaks corresponding to the glycochains of IgG were detected. These results suggested that the single-step digestion system, by immobilized multiple enzymes (trypsin and NGF) would be effective for the rapid structural analysis of glycoproteins. PMID:19662179

  20. Rapid Bacterial Identification, Resistance, Virulence and Type Profiling using Selected Reaction Monitoring Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Charretier, Yannick; Dauwalder, Olivier; Franceschi, Christine; Degout-Charmette, Elodie; Zambardi, Gilles; Cecchini, Tiphaine; Bardet, Chloe; Lacoux, Xavier; Dufour, Philippe; Veron, Laurent; Rostaing, Hervé; Lanet, Veronique; Fortin, Tanguy; Beaulieu, Corinne; Perrot, Nadine; Dechaume, Dominique; Pons, Sylvie; Girard, Victoria; Salvador, Arnaud; Durand, Géraldine; Mallard, Frédéric; Theretz, Alain; Broyer, Patrick; Chatellier, Sonia; Gervasi, Gaspard; Van Nuenen, Marc; Roitsch, Carolyn Ann; Van Belkum, Alex; Lemoine, Jérôme; Vandenesch, François; Charrier, Jean-Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) in Selected Reaction Monitoring (SRM) mode is proposed for in-depth characterisation of microorganisms in a multiplexed analysis. Within 60-80 minutes, the SRM method performs microbial identification (I), antibiotic-resistance detection (R), virulence assessment (V) and it provides epidemiological typing information (T). This SRM application is illustrated by the analysis of the human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus, demonstrating its promise for rapid characterisation of bacteria from positive blood cultures of sepsis patients. PMID:26350205

  1. Proteomic identification of erythrocyte membrane protein deficiency in hereditary spherocytosis.

    PubMed

    Peker, Selen; Akar, Nejat; Demiralp, Duygu Ozel

    2012-03-01

    Hereditary spherocytosis (HS) is the most common congenital hemolytic anemia in Caucasians, with an estimated prevalence ranging from 1:2000 to 1:5000. The molecular defect in one of the erythrocytes (RBC) membrane proteins underlying HS like; spectrin-α, spectrin-β, ankyrin, band 3 and protein 4.2 that lead to membrane destabilization and vesiculation, may change the RBCs into denser and more rigid cells (spherocytes), which are removed by the spleen, leading to the development of hemolytic anemia. It is classified as mild, moderate and severe, according to the degree of the hemolytic anemia and the associated symptoms. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) is potentially valuable method for studying heritable disorders as HS that involve membrane proteins. This separation technique of proteins based upon two biophysically unrelated parameters; molecular weight and charge, is a good option in clinical proteomics in terms of ability to separate complex mixtures, display post-translational modifications and changes after phosphorylation. In this study, we have used contemporary methods with some modifications for the solubilisation, separation and identification of erythrocyte membrane proteins in normal and in HS RBCs. Spectrin alpha and beta chain, ankyrin and band 3 proteins expression differences were found with PDQuest software 8.0.1. and peptide mass fingerprinting (PMF) analysis performed for identification of proteins in this study.

  2. A Coffee Ring Aptasensor for Rapid Protein Detection

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Jessica T.; Ho, Chih-Ming; Lillehoj, Peter B.

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a new biosensing platform for rapid protein detection that combines one of the simplest methods for biomolecular concentration, coffee ring formation, with a sensitive aptamer-based optical detection scheme. In this approach, aptamer beacons are utilized for signal transduction where a fluorescence signal is emitted in the presence of the target molecule. Signal amplification is achieved by concentrating aptamer-target complexes within liquid droplets, resulting in the formation of coffee ring “spots”. Surfaces with various chemical coatings were utilized to investigate the correlation between surface hydrophobicity, concentration efficiency and signal amplification. Based on our results, we found that the increase in coffee ring diameter with larger droplet volumes is independent of surface hydrophobicity. Furthermore, we show that highly hydrophobic surfaces produce enhanced particle concentration, via coffee ring formation, resulting in signal intensities 6-fold greater than those on hydrophilic surfaces. To validate this biosensing platform for the detection of clinical samples, we detected α-thrombin in human serum and 4x diluted whole blood. Based on our results, coffee ring spots produced detection signals 40x larger than samples in liquid droplets. Additionally, this biosensor exhibits a lower limit of detection of 2 ng/mL (54 pM) in serum, and 4 ng/mL (105 pM) in blood. Based on its simplicity and high performance, this platform demonstrates immense potential as an inexpensive diagnostic tool for the detection of disease biomarkers, particularly for use in developing countries that lack the resources and facilities required for conventional biodetection practices. PMID:23540796

  3. Ultrasensitive isolation, identification and quantification of DNA–protein adducts by ELISA-based RADAR assay

    PubMed Central

    Kiianitsa, Kostantin; Maizels, Nancy

    2014-01-01

    Enzymes that form transient DNA–protein covalent complexes are targets for several potent classes of drugs used to treat infectious disease and cancer, making it important to establish robust and rapid procedures for analysis of these complexes. We report a method for isolation of DNA–protein adducts and their identification and quantification, using techniques compatible with high-throughput screening. This method is based on the RADAR assay for DNA adducts that we previously developed (Kiianitsa and Maizels (2013) A rapid and sensitive assay for DNA–protein covalent complexes in living cells. Nucleic Acids Res., 41:e104), but incorporates three key new steps of broad applicability. (i) Silica-assisted ethanol/isopropanol precipitation ensures reproducible and efficient recovery of DNA and DNA–protein adducts at low centrifugal forces, enabling cell culture and DNA precipitation to be carried out in a single microtiter plate. (ii) Rigorous purification of DNA–protein adducts by a procedure that eliminates free proteins and free nucleic acids, generating samples suitable for detection of novel protein adducts (e.g. by mass spectroscopy). (iii) Identification and quantification of DNA–protein adducts by direct ELISA assay. The ELISA-based RADAR assay can detect Top1–DNA and Top2a–DNA adducts in human cells, and gyrase–DNA adducts in Escherichia coli. This approach will be useful for discovery and characterization of new drugs to treat infectious disease and cancer, and for development of companion diagnostics assays for individualized medicine. PMID:24914050

  4. Rapid identification of moulds and arthroconidial yeasts from positive blood cultures by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, João N; Sztajnbok, Jaques; da Silva, Afonso Rafael; Vieira, Vinicius Adriano; Galastri, Anne Layze; Bissoli, Leandro; Litvinov, Nadia; Del Negro, Gilda Maria Barbaro; Motta, Adriana Lopes; Rossi, Flávia; Benard, Gil

    2016-11-01

    Moulds and arthroconidial yeasts are potential life-threatening agents of fungemia in immunocompromised patients. Fast and accurate identification (ID) of these pathogens hastens initiation of targeted antifungal therapy, thereby improving the patients' prognosis. We describe a new strategy that enabled the identification of moulds and arthroconidial yeasts directly from positive blood cultures by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry (MS). Positive blood cultures (BCs) with Gram staining showing hyphae and/or arthroconidia were prospectively selected and submitted to an in-house protein extraction protocol. Mass spectra were obtained by Vitek MS™ system, and identifications were carried out with in the research use only (RUO) mode with an extended database (SARAMIS™ [v.4.12] plus in-house database). Fusarium solani, Fusarium verticillioides, Exophiala dermatitidis, Saprochaete clavata, and Trichosporon asahii had correct species ID by MALDI-TOF MS analysis of positive BCs. All cases were related to critically ill patients with high mortality fungemia and direct ID from positive BCs was helpful for rapid administration of targeted antifungal therapy. PMID:27317582

  5. Identification and verification of novel rodent postsynaptic density proteins.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Bryen A; Fernholz, Brian D; Boussac, Muriel; Xu, Chongfeng; Grigorean, Gabriela; Ziff, Edward B; Neubert, Thomas A

    2004-09-01

    The postsynaptic density (PSD) is a cellular structure specialized in receiving and transducing synaptic information. Here we describe the identification of 452 proteins isolated from biochemically purified PSD fractions of rat and mouse brains using nanoflow HPLC coupled to electrospray tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Fluorescence microscopy and Western blotting were used to verify that many of the novel proteins identified exhibit subcellular distributions consistent with those of PSD-localized proteins. In addition to identifying most previously described PSD components, we also detected proteins involved in signaling to the nucleus as well as regulators of ADP-ribosylation factor signaling, ubiquitination, RNA trafficking, and protein translation. These results suggest new mechanisms by which the PSD helps regulate synaptic strength and transmission.

  6. Identification and Validation of ISG15 Target Proteins.

    PubMed

    Durfee, Larissa A; Huibregtse, Jon M

    2010-01-01

    ISG15 is an interferon-induced ubiquitin-like protein (Ubl) that has antiviral properties. The core E1, E2 and E3 enzymes for conjugation of human ISG15 are Ube1L, UbcH8 and Herc5, all of which are induced at the transcriptional level by Type 1 interferon signaling. Several proteomics studies have, together, identified over 300 cellular proteins as ISG15 targets. These targets include a broad range of constitutively expressed proteins and approximately 15 interferon-induced proteins. This chapter provides an overview of the target identification process and the validation of these targets. We also discuss the limited number of examples where the biochemical effect of ISG15 conjugation on target proteins has been characterized. PMID:21222286

  7. Label-Free Identification and Quantification of SUMO Target Proteins.

    PubMed

    Hendriks, Ivo A; Vertegaal, Alfred C O

    2016-01-01

    Mass spectrometry-based approaches are utilized with increasing frequency to facilitate identification of novel SUMO target proteins and to elucidate the dynamics of SUMOylation in response to cellular stresses. Here, we describe a robust method for the identification of SUMO target proteins, and the relative quantification of SUMOylation dynamics, using a label-free approach. The method relies on a decahistidine (His10)-tagged SUMO, which is expressed at a low level in a mammalian cell line or model organism. The His10-tag allows for a single-step, high-yield, and high-purity enrichment of SUMOylated proteins, which are then digested and analyzed by high-resolution mass spectrometry. Matching between runs and label-free quantification integrated in the freely available MaxQuant software allow for a high rate and accuracy of quantification, providing a strong alternative to laborious sample or cell labeling techniques. The method described here allows for identification of >1000 SUMO target proteins, and characterization of their SUMOylation dynamics, without requiring sample fractionation. The purification procedure, starting from total lysate, can be performed in ~4 days. PMID:27631806

  8. Identification of Essential Proteins Based on a New Combination of Local Interaction Density and Protein Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jiawei; Qi, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Background Computational approaches aided by computer science have been used to predict essential proteins and are faster than expensive, time-consuming, laborious experimental approaches. However, the performance of such approaches is still poor, making practical applications of computational approaches difficult in some fields. Hence, the development of more suitable and efficient computing methods is necessary for identification of essential proteins. Method In this paper, we propose a new method for predicting essential proteins in a protein interaction network, local interaction density combined with protein complexes (LIDC), based on statistical analyses of essential proteins and protein complexes. First, we introduce a new local topological centrality, local interaction density (LID), of the yeast PPI network; second, we discuss a new integration strategy for multiple bioinformatics. The LIDC method was then developed through a combination of LID and protein complex information based on our new integration strategy. The purpose of LIDC is discovery of important features of essential proteins with their neighbors in real protein complexes, thereby improving the efficiency of identification. Results Experimental results based on three different PPI(protein-protein interaction) networks of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Escherichia coli showed that LIDC outperformed classical topological centrality measures and some recent combinational methods. Moreover, when predicting MIPS datasets, the better improvement of performance obtained by LIDC is over all nine reference methods (i.e., DC, BC, NC, LID, PeC, CoEWC, WDC, ION, and UC). Conclusions LIDC is more effective for the prediction of essential proteins than other recently developed methods. PMID:26125187

  9. Identification of an Oncogenic RAB Protein

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, Douglas B.; Zoncu, Roberto; Root, David E.; Sabatini, David M.; Sawyers, Charles L.

    2015-01-01

    In an shRNA screen for genes that affect AKT phosphorylation, we identified the RAB35 small GTPase—a protein previously implicated in endomembrane trafficking—as a new regulator of the PI3K pathway. Depletion of RAB35 suppresses AKT phosphorylation in response to growth factors, whereas expression of a dominant active GTPase-deficient mutant of RAB35 constitutively activates the PI3K/AKT pathway. RAB35 functions downstream of growth factor receptors and upstream of PDK1 and mTORC2 and co-purifies with PI3K in immunoprecipitation assays. Two somatic RAB35 mutations found in human tumors generate alleles that constitutively activate PI3K/AKT signaling, suppress apoptosis, and transform cells in a PI3K-dependent manner. Furthermore, oncogenic RAB35 is sufficient to drive PDGFRα to LAMP2-positive endomembranes in the absence of ligand, suggesting there may be latent oncogenic potential in dysregulated endomembrane trafficking. PMID:26338797

  10. Identification of an oncogenic RAB protein.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Douglas B; Zoncu, Roberto; Root, David E; Sabatini, David M; Sawyers, Charles L

    2015-10-01

    In a short hairpin RNA screen for genes that affect AKT phosphorylation, we identified the RAB35 small guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase)-a protein previously implicated in endomembrane trafficking-as a regulator of the phosphatidylinositol 3'-OH kinase (PI3K) pathway. Depletion of RAB35 suppresses AKT phosphorylation in response to growth factors, whereas expression of a dominant active GTPase-deficient mutant of RAB35 constitutively activates the PI3K/AKT pathway. RAB35 functions downstream of growth factor receptors and upstream of PDK1 and mTORC2 and copurifies with PI3K in immunoprecipitation assays. Two somatic RAB35 mutations found in human tumors generate alleles that constitutively activate PI3K/AKT signaling, suppress apoptosis, and transform cells in a PI3K-dependent manner. Furthermore, oncogenic RAB35 is sufficient to drive platelet-derived growth factor receptor α to LAMP2-positive endomembranes in the absence of ligand, suggesting that there may be latent oncogenic potential in dysregulated endomembrane trafficking.

  11. Identification of local variations within secondary structures of proteins.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Prasun; Bansal, Manju

    2015-05-01

    Secondary-structure elements (SSEs) play an important role in the folding of proteins. Identification of SSEs in proteins is a common problem in structural biology. A new method, ASSP (Assignment of Secondary Structure in Proteins), using only the path traversed by the C(α) atoms has been developed. The algorithm is based on the premise that the protein structure can be divided into continuous or uniform stretches, which can be defined in terms of helical parameters, and depending on their values the stretches can be classified into different SSEs, namely α-helices, 310-helices, π-helices, extended β-strands and polyproline II (PPII) and other left-handed helices. The methodology was validated using an unbiased clustering of these parameters for a protein data set consisting of 1008 protein chains, which suggested that there are seven well defined clusters associated with different SSEs. Apart from α-helices and extended β-strands, 310-helices and π-helices were also found to occur in substantial numbers. ASSP was able to discriminate non-α-helical segments from flanking α-helices, which were often identified as part of α-helices by other algorithms. ASSP can also lead to the identification of novel SSEs. It is believed that ASSP could provide a better understanding of the finer nuances of protein secondary structure and could make an important contribution to the better understanding of comparatively less frequently occurring structural motifs. At the same time, it can contribute to the identification of novel SSEs. A standalone version of the program for the Linux as well as the Windows operating systems is freely downloadable and a web-server version is also available at http://nucleix.mbu.iisc.ernet.in/assp/index.php.

  12. Identification of local variations within secondary structures of proteins.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Prasun; Bansal, Manju

    2015-05-01

    Secondary-structure elements (SSEs) play an important role in the folding of proteins. Identification of SSEs in proteins is a common problem in structural biology. A new method, ASSP (Assignment of Secondary Structure in Proteins), using only the path traversed by the C(α) atoms has been developed. The algorithm is based on the premise that the protein structure can be divided into continuous or uniform stretches, which can be defined in terms of helical parameters, and depending on their values the stretches can be classified into different SSEs, namely α-helices, 310-helices, π-helices, extended β-strands and polyproline II (PPII) and other left-handed helices. The methodology was validated using an unbiased clustering of these parameters for a protein data set consisting of 1008 protein chains, which suggested that there are seven well defined clusters associated with different SSEs. Apart from α-helices and extended β-strands, 310-helices and π-helices were also found to occur in substantial numbers. ASSP was able to discriminate non-α-helical segments from flanking α-helices, which were often identified as part of α-helices by other algorithms. ASSP can also lead to the identification of novel SSEs. It is believed that ASSP could provide a better understanding of the finer nuances of protein secondary structure and could make an important contribution to the better understanding of comparatively less frequently occurring structural motifs. At the same time, it can contribute to the identification of novel SSEs. A standalone version of the program for the Linux as well as the Windows operating systems is freely downloadable and a web-server version is also available at http://nucleix.mbu.iisc.ernet.in/assp/index.php. PMID:25945573

  13. Rapid identification and typing of Yersinia pestis and other Yersinia species by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Accurate identification is necessary to discriminate harmless environmental Yersinia species from the food-borne pathogens Yersinia enterocolitica and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and from the group A bioterrorism plague agent Yersinia pestis. In order to circumvent the limitations of current phenotypic and PCR-based identification methods, we aimed to assess the usefulness of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) protein profiling for accurate and rapid identification of Yersinia species. As a first step, we built a database of 39 different Yersinia strains representing 12 different Yersinia species, including 13 Y. pestis isolates representative of the Antiqua, Medievalis and Orientalis biotypes. The organisms were deposited on the MALDI-TOF plate after appropriate ethanol-based inactivation, and a protein profile was obtained within 6 minutes for each of the Yersinia species. Results When compared with a 3,025-profile database, every Yersinia species yielded a unique protein profile and was unambiguously identified. In the second step of analysis, environmental and clinical isolates of Y. pestis (n = 2) and Y. enterocolitica (n = 11) were compared to the database and correctly identified. In particular, Y. pestis was unambiguously identified at the species level, and MALDI-TOF was able to successfully differentiate the three biotypes. Conclusion These data indicate that MALDI-TOF can be used as a rapid and accurate first-line method for the identification of Yersinia isolates. PMID:21073689

  14. Integrating gene synthesis and microfluidic protein analysis for rapid protein engineering

    PubMed Central

    Blackburn, Matthew C.; Petrova, Ekaterina; Correia, Bruno E.; Maerkl, Sebastian J.

    2016-01-01

    The capability to rapidly design proteins with novel functions will have a significant impact on medicine, biotechnology and synthetic biology. Synthetic genes are becoming a commodity, but integrated approaches have yet to be developed that take full advantage of gene synthesis. We developed a solid-phase gene synthesis method based on asymmetric primer extension (APE) and coupled this process directly to high-throughput, on-chip protein expression, purification and characterization (via mechanically induced trapping of molecular interactions, MITOMI). By completely circumventing molecular cloning and cell-based steps, APE-MITOMI reduces the time between protein design and quantitative characterization to 3–4 days. With APE-MITOMI we synthesized and characterized over 400 zinc-finger (ZF) transcription factors (TF), showing that although ZF TFs can be readily engineered to recognize a particular DNA sequence, engineering the precise binding energy landscape remains challenging. We also found that it is possible to engineer ZF–DNA affinity precisely and independently of sequence specificity and that in silico modeling can explain some of the observed affinity differences. APE-MITOMI is a generic approach that should facilitate fundamental studies in protein biophysics, and protein design/engineering. PMID:26704969

  15. Identification of immunogenic maize proteins in a casein hydrolysate formula.

    PubMed

    Frisner, H; Rosendal, A; Barkholt, V

    2000-05-01

    Cow's milk-based formulas used for infants with cow's milk allergy are based on hydrolyzed proteins. The formulas that are successful in preventing allergic responses are extensively hydrolyzed. Nevertheless, reactions to such formulas are occasionally reported, and protein material of higher molecular weight than expected has been detected by binding immunoglobulin E (IgE) from patients' sera. This paper presents the identification of high-molecular-weight material in the extensively hydrolyzed casein formula, Nutramigen. The material was concentrated by simple centrifugation. The proteins in the pellet were separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), and protein-containing bands were analyzed by protein sequencing after electroblotting. The proteins were identified as maize zeins, which are water-insoluble proteins of apparent M(r) 20,000 and 23,000, presumably originating from the maize starch in Nutramigen. Rabbits immunized with this formula developed antibodies against zeins but not against milk proteins. The maize zeins are probably identical to the recently reported components in Nutramigen (1), detected by binding of IgE from milk allergic patients, but not correlated to clinical allergic reactivity. The clinical relevance of maize proteins in Nutramigen remains to be established. PMID:10893013

  16. Identification of differential protein interactors of lamin A and progerin

    PubMed Central

    Kubben, Nard; Voncken, Jan Willem; Demmers, Jeroen; Calis, Chantal; van Almen, Geert

    2010-01-01

    The nuclear lamina is an interconnected meshwork of intermediate filament proteins underlying the nuclear envelope. The lamina is an important regulator of nuclear structural integrity as well as nuclear processes, including transcription, DNA replication and chromatin remodeling. The major components of the lamina are A- and B-type lamins. Mutations in lamins impair lamina functions and cause a set of highly tissue-specific diseases collectively referred to as laminopathies. The phenotypic diversity amongst laminopathies is hypothesized to be caused by mutations affecting specific protein interactions, possibly in a tissue-specific manner. Current technologies to identify interaction partners of lamin A and its mutants are hampered by the insoluble nature of lamina components. To overcome the limitations of current technologies, we developed and applied a novel, unbiased approach to identify lamin A-interacting proteins. This approach involves expression of the high-affinity OneSTrEP-tag, precipitation of lamin-protein complexes after reversible protein cross-linking and subsequent protein identification by mass spectrometry. We used this approach to identify in mouse embryonic fibroblasts and cardiac myocyte NklTAg cell lines proteins that interact with lamin A and its mutant isoform progerin, which causes the premature aging disorder Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS). We identified a total of 313 lamina-interacting proteins, including several novel lamin A interactors, and we characterize a set of 35 proteins which preferentially interact with lamin A or progerin. PMID:21327095

  17. Systematic identification of protein combinations mediating chromatin looping

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kai; Li, Nan; Ainsworth, Richard I.; Wang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Chromatin looping plays a pivotal role in gene expression and other biological processes through bringing distal regulatory elements into spatial proximity. The formation of chromatin loops is mainly mediated by DNA-binding proteins (DBPs) that bind to the interacting sites and form complexes in three-dimensional (3D) space. Previously, identification of DBP cooperation has been limited to those binding to neighbouring regions in the proximal linear genome (1D cooperation). Here we present the first study that integrates protein ChIP-seq and Hi-C data to systematically identify both the 1D- and 3D-cooperation between DBPs. We develop a new network model that allows identification of cooperation between multiple DBPs and reveals cell-type-specific and -independent regulations. Using this framework, we retrieve many known and previously unknown 3D-cooperations between DBPs in chromosomal loops that may be a key factor in influencing the 3D organization of chromatin. PMID:27461729

  18. Functional module identification in protein interaction networks by interaction patterns

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yijie; Qian, Xiaoning

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: Identifying functional modules in protein–protein interaction (PPI) networks may shed light on cellular functional organization and thereafter underlying cellular mechanisms. Many existing module identification algorithms aim to detect densely connected groups of proteins as potential modules. However, based on this simple topological criterion of ‘higher than expected connectivity’, those algorithms may miss biologically meaningful modules of functional significance, in which proteins have similar interaction patterns to other proteins in networks but may not be densely connected to each other. A few blockmodel module identification algorithms have been proposed to address the problem but the lack of global optimum guarantee and the prohibitive computational complexity have been the bottleneck of their applications in real-world large-scale PPI networks. Results: In this article, we propose a novel optimization formulation LCP2 (low two-hop conductance sets) using the concept of Markov random walk on graphs, which enables simultaneous identification of both dense and sparse modules based on protein interaction patterns in given networks through searching for LCP2 by random walk. A spectral approximate algorithm SLCP2 is derived to identify non-overlapping functional modules. Based on a bottom-up greedy strategy, we further extend LCP2 to a new algorithm (greedy algorithm for LCP2) GLCP2 to identify overlapping functional modules. We compare SLCP2 and GLCP2 with a range of state-of-the-art algorithms on synthetic networks and real-world PPI networks. The performance evaluation based on several criteria with respect to protein complex prediction, high level Gene Ontology term prediction and especially sparse module detection, has demonstrated that our algorithms based on searching for LCP2 outperform all other compared algorithms. Availability and implementation: All data and code are available at http://www.cse.usf.edu/∼xqian/fmi/slcp2hop

  19. Amplified protein detection and identification through DNA-conjugated M13 bacteriophage.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ju Hun; Domaille, Dylan W; Cha, Jennifer N

    2012-06-26

    Sensitive protein detection and accurate identification continues to be in great demand for disease screening in clinical and laboratory settings. For these diagnostics to be of clinical value, it is necessary to develop sensors that have high sensitivity but favorable cost-to-benefit ratios. However, many of these sensing platforms are thermally unstable or require significant materials synthesis, engineering, or fabrication. Recently, we demonstrated that naturally occurring M13 bacteriophage can serve as biological scaffolds for engineering protein diagnostics. These viruses have five copies of the pIII protein, which can bind specifically to target antigens, and thousands of pVIII coat proteins, which can be genetically or chemically modified to react with signal-producing materials, such as plasmon-shifting gold nanoparticles (Au NPs). In this report, we show that DNA-conjugated M13 bacteriophage can act as inexpensive protein sensors that can rapidly induce a color change in the presence of a target protein yet also offer the ability to identify the detected antigen in a separate step. Many copies of a specific DNA oligonucleotide were appended to each virus to create phage-DNA conjugates that can hybridize with DNA-conjugated gold nanoparticles. In the case of a colorimetric positive result, the identity of the antigen can also be easily determined by using a DNA microarray. This saves precious resources by establishing a rapid, quantitative method to first screen for the presence of antigen followed by a highly specific typing assay if necessary.

  20. Purify First: rapid expression and purification of proteins from XMRV.

    PubMed

    Gillette, William K; Esposito, Dominic; Taylor, Troy E; Hopkins, Ralph F; Bagni, Rachel K; Hartley, James L

    2011-04-01

    Purifying proteins from recombinant sources is often difficult, time-consuming, and costly. We have recently instituted a series of improvements in our protein purification pipeline that allows much more accurate choice of expression host and conditions and purification protocols. The key elements are parallel cloning, small scale parallel expression and lysate preparation, and small scale parallel protein purification. Compared to analyzing expression data only, results from multiple small scale protein purifications predict success at scale-up with greatly improved reliability. Using these new procedures we purified eight of nine proteins from xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV) on the first attempt at large scale. PMID:21146612

  1. Rapid Multi-Damage Identification for Health Monitoring of Laminated Composites Using Piezoelectric Wafer Sensor Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Si, Liang; Wang, Qian

    2016-01-01

    Through the use of the wave reflection from any damage in a structure, a Hilbert spectral analysis-based rapid multi-damage identification (HSA-RMDI) technique with piezoelectric wafer sensor arrays (PWSA) is developed to monitor and identify the presence, location and severity of damage in carbon fiber composite structures. The capability of the rapid multi-damage identification technique to extract and estimate hidden significant information from the collected data and to provide a high-resolution energy-time spectrum can be employed to successfully interpret the Lamb waves interactions with single/multiple damage. Nevertheless, to accomplish the precise positioning and effective quantification of multiple damage in a composite structure, two functional metrics from the RMDI technique are proposed and used in damage identification, which are the energy density metric and the energy time-phase shift metric. In the designed damage experimental tests, invisible damage to the naked eyes, especially delaminations, were detected in the leftward propagating waves as well as in the selected sensor responses, where the time-phase shift spectra could locate the multiple damage whereas the energy density spectra were used to quantify the multiple damage. The increasing damage was shown to follow a linear trend calculated by the RMDI technique. All damage cases considered showed completely the developed RMDI technique potential as an effective online damage inspection and assessment tool. PMID:27153070

  2. A novel multiplex isothermal amplification method for rapid detection and identification of viruses.

    PubMed

    Nyan, Dougbeh-Chris; Swinson, Kevin L

    2015-12-08

    A rapid multiplex isothermal amplification assay has been developed for detection and identification of multiple blood-borne viruses that infect millions of people world-wide. These infections may lead to chronic diseases or death if not diagnosed and treated in a timely manner. Sets of virus-specific oligonucleotides and oligofluorophores were designed and used in a reverse-transcription loop-mediated multiplexed isothermal amplification reaction for detection and gel electrophoretic identification of human Immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis-B virus (HBV), hepatitis-C virus (HCV), hepatitis-E virus (HEV), dengue virus (DENV), and West Nile (WNV) virus infection in blood plasma. Amplification was catalyzed with two thermostable enzymes for 30-60 minutes under isothermal condition, utilizing a simple digital heat source. Electrophoretic analysis of amplified products demonstrated simultaneous detection of 6 viruses that were distinctly identified by unique ladder-like banding patterns. Naked-eye fluorescent visualization of amplicons revealed intensely fluorescing products that indicated positive detection. The test demonstrated a 97% sensitivity and a 100% specificity, with no cross-reaction with other viruses observed. This portable detection tool may have clinical and field utility in the developing and developed world settings. This may enable rapid diagnosis and identification of viruses for targeted therapeutic intervention and prevention of disease transmission.

  3. Evaluation of the rapid CORYNE identification system for Corynebacterium species and other coryneforms.

    PubMed Central

    Gavin, S E; Leonard, R B; Briselden, A M; Coyle, M B

    1992-01-01

    The Rapid CORYNE system for identification of aerobic, nonsporeforming, gram-positive rods was evaluated according to the manufacturer's instructions with 177 organisms. After inoculation with a heavy suspension of growth, strips containing 20 cupules were incubated for 24 h, reagents were added, and the results of 21 biochemical reactions were recorded as numerical profiles. The strains consisted of pathogenic species of the genus Corynebacterium, primarily C. diphtheriae (n = 29), opportunistic species of Corynebacterium including C. jeikeium (n = 75), recognized species of non-corynebacteria such as Gardnerella and Arcanobacterium (n = 51), and Centers for Disease Control (CDC) coryneform groups (n = 22). Results from single tests read after 24 h yielded correct identifications to species level with no additional tests for 26 (89.7%) of the pathogenic species; 64 (85.3%) of the opportunistic organisms; 51 (100%) of the non-corynebacteria, and 8 (36.4%) of the CDC coryneform groups. Supplemental tests produced the correct identification for three additional pathogenic isolates (100% total) and four additional isolates from the opportunistic species (90.6% total). Twelve of the 15 isolates not identified by the system were in the CDC coryneform groups. Four of the six misidentified and one of the unidentified isolates were C. matruchotii, which was not included in the data base. The system is an excellent rapid alternative to conventional biochemical tests. PMID:1629322

  4. Rapid and accurate identification of microorganisms contaminating cosmetic products based on DNA sequence homology.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Y; Shibayama, H; Suzuki, Y; Karita, S; Takamatsu, S

    2005-12-01

    The aim of this study was to develop rapid and accurate procedures to identify microorganisms contaminating cosmetic products, based on the identity of the nucleotide sequences of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of the ribosomal RNA coding DNA (rDNA). Five types of microorganisms were isolated from the inner portion of lotion bottle caps, skin care lotions, and cleansing gels. The rDNA ITS region of microorganisms was amplified through the use of colony-direct PCR or ordinal PCR using DNA extracts as templates. The nucleotide sequences of the amplified DNA were determined and subjected to homology search of a publicly available DNA database. Thereby, we obtained DNA sequences possessing high similarity with the query sequences from the databases of all the five organisms analyzed. The traditional identification procedure requires expert skills, and a time period of approximately 1 month to identify the microorganisms. On the contrary, 3-7 days were sufficient to complete all the procedures employed in the current method, including isolation and cultivation of organisms, DNA sequencing, and the database homology search. Moreover, it was possible to develop the skills necessary to perform the molecular techniques required for the identification procedures within 1 week. Consequently, the current method is useful for rapid and accurate identification of microorganisms, contaminating cosmetics.

  5. Rapid Multi-Damage Identification for Health Monitoring of Laminated Composites Using Piezoelectric Wafer Sensor Arrays.

    PubMed

    Si, Liang; Wang, Qian

    2016-01-01

    Through the use of the wave reflection from any damage in a structure, a Hilbert spectral analysis-based rapid multi-damage identification (HSA-RMDI) technique with piezoelectric wafer sensor arrays (PWSA) is developed to monitor and identify the presence, location and severity of damage in carbon fiber composite structures. The capability of the rapid multi-damage identification technique to extract and estimate hidden significant information from the collected data and to provide a high-resolution energy-time spectrum can be employed to successfully interpret the Lamb waves interactions with single/multiple damage. Nevertheless, to accomplish the precise positioning and effective quantification of multiple damage in a composite structure, two functional metrics from the RMDI technique are proposed and used in damage identification, which are the energy density metric and the energy time-phase shift metric. In the designed damage experimental tests, invisible damage to the naked eyes, especially delaminations, were detected in the leftward propagating waves as well as in the selected sensor responses, where the time-phase shift spectra could locate the multiple damage whereas the energy density spectra were used to quantify the multiple damage. The increasing damage was shown to follow a linear trend calculated by the RMDI technique. All damage cases considered showed completely the developed RMDI technique potential as an effective online damage inspection and assessment tool. PMID:27153070

  6. A novel multiplex isothermal amplification method for rapid detection and identification of viruses.

    PubMed

    Nyan, Dougbeh-Chris; Swinson, Kevin L

    2015-01-01

    A rapid multiplex isothermal amplification assay has been developed for detection and identification of multiple blood-borne viruses that infect millions of people world-wide. These infections may lead to chronic diseases or death if not diagnosed and treated in a timely manner. Sets of virus-specific oligonucleotides and oligofluorophores were designed and used in a reverse-transcription loop-mediated multiplexed isothermal amplification reaction for detection and gel electrophoretic identification of human Immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis-B virus (HBV), hepatitis-C virus (HCV), hepatitis-E virus (HEV), dengue virus (DENV), and West Nile (WNV) virus infection in blood plasma. Amplification was catalyzed with two thermostable enzymes for 30-60 minutes under isothermal condition, utilizing a simple digital heat source. Electrophoretic analysis of amplified products demonstrated simultaneous detection of 6 viruses that were distinctly identified by unique ladder-like banding patterns. Naked-eye fluorescent visualization of amplicons revealed intensely fluorescing products that indicated positive detection. The test demonstrated a 97% sensitivity and a 100% specificity, with no cross-reaction with other viruses observed. This portable detection tool may have clinical and field utility in the developing and developed world settings. This may enable rapid diagnosis and identification of viruses for targeted therapeutic intervention and prevention of disease transmission. PMID:26643761

  7. A novel multiplex isothermal amplification method for rapid detection and identification of viruses

    PubMed Central

    Nyan, Dougbeh-Chris; Swinson, Kevin L.

    2015-01-01

    A rapid multiplex isothermal amplification assay has been developed for detection and identification of multiple blood-borne viruses that infect millions of people world-wide. These infections may lead to chronic diseases or death if not diagnosed and treated in a timely manner. Sets of virus-specific oligonucleotides and oligofluorophores were designed and used in a reverse-transcription loop-mediated multiplexed isothermal amplification reaction for detection and gel electrophoretic identification of human Immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis-B virus (HBV), hepatitis-C virus (HCV), hepatitis-E virus (HEV), dengue virus (DENV), and West Nile (WNV) virus infection in blood plasma. Amplification was catalyzed with two thermostable enzymes for 30–60 minutes under isothermal condition, utilizing a simple digital heat source. Electrophoretic analysis of amplified products demonstrated simultaneous detection of 6 viruses that were distinctly identified by unique ladder-like banding patterns. Naked-eye fluorescent visualization of amplicons revealed intensely fluorescing products that indicated positive detection. The test demonstrated a 97% sensitivity and a 100% specificity, with no cross-reaction with other viruses observed. This portable detection tool may have clinical and field utility in the developing and developed world settings. This may enable rapid diagnosis and identification of viruses for targeted therapeutic intervention and prevention of disease transmission. PMID:26643761

  8. Identification of AOSC-binding proteins in neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ming; Nie, Qin; Xin, Xianliang; Geng, Meiyu

    2008-11-01

    Acidic oligosaccharide sugar chain (AOSC), a D-mannuronic acid oligosaccharide, derived from brown algae polysaccharide, has been completed Phase I clinical trial in China as an anti-Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) drug candidate. The identification of AOSC-binding protein(s) in neurons is very important for understanding its action mechanism. To determine the binding protein(s) of AOSC in neurons mediating its anti-AD activities, confocal microscopy, affinity chromatography, and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis were used. Confocal microscopy analysis shows that AOSC binds to SH-SY5Y cells in concentration-, time-, and temperature-dependent fashions. The AOSC binding proteins were purified by affinity chromatography and identified by LC-MS/MS analysis. The results showed that there are 349 proteins binding AOSC, including clathrin, adaptor protein-2 (AP-2) and amyloid precursor protein (APP). These results suggest that the binding/entrance of AOSC to neurons is probably responsible for anti-AD activities.

  9. Identification of novel CBP interacting proteins in embryonic orofacial tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Yin Xiaolong; Warner, Dennis R.; Roberts, Emily A.; Pisano, M. Michele; Greene, Robert M. . E-mail: greene@louisville.edu

    2005-04-15

    cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB)-binding protein (CBP) plays an important role as a general co-integrator of multiple signaling pathways and interacts with a large number of transcription factors and co-factors, through its numerous protein-binding domains. To identify nuclear factors associated with CBP in developing orofacial tissue, a yeast two-hybrid screen of a cDNA library derived from orofacial tissue from gestational day 11 to 13 mouse embryos was conducted. Using the carboxy terminus (amino acid residues 1676-2441) of CBP as bait, several novel proteins that bind CBP were identified, including an Msx-interacting-zinc finger protein, CDC42 interaction protein 4/thyroid hormone receptor interactor 10, SH3-domain GRB2-like 1, CCR4-NOT transcription complex subunit 3, adaptor protein complex AP-1 {beta}1 subunit, eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2B subunit 1 ({alpha}), and cyclin G-associated kinase. Results of the yeast two-hybrid screen were confirmed by glutathione S-transferase pull-down assays. The identification of these proteins as novel CBP-binding partners allows exploration of new mechanisms by which CBP regulates and integrates diverse cell signaling pathways.

  10. Identification of Topping Responsive Proteins in Tobacco Roots

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fei; Zhang, Huizhen; Wang, Shaoxin; Xiao, Wanfu; Ding, Chao; Liu, Weiqun; Guo, Hongxiang

    2016-01-01

    The process of topping elicits many responses in the tobacco plant, including an increase in nicotine biosynthesis, and the secondary growth of roots. Some topping responsive miRNAs and genes have been identified in our previous study, but the mechanism of the tobacco response to topping has not yet been fully elucidated. In this study, topping responsive proteins isolated from tobacco roots were screened using two-dimensional electrophoresis. Of the proteins identified, calreticulin and auxin-responsive protein indole acetic acid (IAA9) were involved in the secondary growth of roots; leucine-rich repeat disease resistance, heat shock protein 70, and farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase 1 were involved in the wounding stress response; and F-box protein played an important role in promoting the ability of nicotine synthesis after topping. In addition, we identified five tobacco bHLH proteins (NtbHLH, NtMYC1a, NtMYC1b, NtMYC2a, and NtMYC2b) related to nicotine biosynthesis. NtMYC2 was suggested to be the main positive transcription factor, with NtbHLH protein being a negative regulator in the jasmonic acid (JA)-mediated activation of nicotine biosynthesis after topping. Tobacco topping activates a comprehensive range of biological processes involving the IAA and JA signaling pathways, and the identification of proteins involved in these processes will improve our understanding of the topping response. PMID:27200055

  11. Identification of Immunogenic and Serum Binding Proteins of Staphylococcus epidermidis

    PubMed Central

    Sellman, Bret R.; Howell, Alan P.; Kelly-Boyd, Cari; Baker, Steve M.

    2005-01-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis is a commensal of human skin and a leading cause of nosocomial bloodstream infections. Limited information is available about S. epidermidis proteins that are expressed upon transition to the bloodstream or those involved in host-pathogen interactions. A cell surface fraction from S. epidermidis 0-47 grown in rabbit serum to mimic environmental signals encountered during a bloodstream infection was separated by two-dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis. Following 2D separation, the proteins were transferred to nitrocellulose and detected with either pooled sera generated in rabbits immunized with live S. epidermidis 0-47 or with biotin-labeled serum proteins eluted from the surface of bacteria grown in rabbit serum. Twenty-nine immunoreactive or serum binding proteins of S. epidermidis were identified by mass spectrometry. Twenty-seven of the corresponding genes were expressed in Escherichia coli, and the purified recombinant proteins were used to immunize mice. In a preliminary screen, 12 of the 27 recombinant proteins induced a response that reduced the number of bacteria recovered from the spleen or bloodstream of infected mice. In subsequent vaccination studies, 5 of the 12 proteins resulted in a statistically significant reduction in the number of bacteria. The identification of five candidate vaccine antigens from the initial screen of only 29 proteins demonstrates the utility of this approach. PMID:16177335

  12. Separating the wheat from the chaff: unbiased filtering of background tandem mass spectra improves protein identification.

    PubMed

    Junqueira, Magno; Spirin, Victor; Santana Balbuena, Tiago; Waridel, Patrice; Surendranath, Vineeth; Kryukov, Grigoriy; Adzhubei, Ivan; Thomas, Henrik; Sunyaev, Shamil; Shevchenko, Andrej

    2008-08-01

    Only a small fraction of spectra acquired in LC-MS/MS runs matches peptides from target proteins upon database searches. The remaining, operationally termed background, spectra originate from a variety of poorly controlled sources and affect the throughput and confidence of database searches. Here, we report an algorithm and its software implementation that rapidly removes background spectra, regardless of their precise origin. The method estimates the dissimilarity distance between screened MS/MS spectra and unannotated spectra from a partially redundant background library compiled from several control and blank runs. Filtering MS/MS queries enhanced the protein identification capacity when searches lacked spectrum to sequence matching specificity. In sequence-similarity searches it reduced by, on average, 30-fold the number of orphan hits, which were not explicitly related to background protein contaminants and required manual validation. Removing high quality background MS/MS spectra, while preserving in the data set the genuine spectra from target proteins, decreased the false positive rate of stringent database searches and improved the identification of low-abundance proteins. PMID:18558732

  13. Evaluation of Verigene Blood Culture Test Systems for Rapid Identification of Positive Blood Cultures.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Seok; Kang, Go-Eun; Kim, Han-Sung; Kim, Hyun Soo; Song, Wonkeun; Lee, Kyu Man

    2016-01-01

    The performance of molecular tests using the Verigene Gram-Positive and Gram-Negative Blood Culture nucleic acid tests (BC-GP and BC-GN, resp.; Naosphere, Northbrook, IL, USA) was evaluated for the identification of microorganisms detected from blood cultures. Ninety-nine blood cultures containing Gram-positive bacteria and 150 containing Gram-negative bacteria were analyzed using the BC-GP and BC-GN assays, respectively. Blood cultures were performed using the Bactec blood culture system (BD Diagnostic Systems, Franklin Lakes, NJ, USA) and conventional identification and antibiotic-susceptibility tests were performed using a MicroScan system (Siemens, West Sacramento, CA, USA). When a single strain of bacteria was isolated from the blood culture, Verigene assays correctly identified 97.9% (94/96) of Gram-positive bacteria and 93.8% (137/146) of Gram-negative bacteria. Resistance genes mecA and vanA were correctly detected by the BC-GP assay, while the extended-spectrum β-lactamase CTX-M and the carbapenemase OXA resistance gene were detected from 30 cases cultures by the BC-GN assay. The BC-GP and BC-GN assays showed high agreement with conventional identification and susceptibility tests. These tests are useful for rapid identification of microorganisms and the detection of clinically important resistance genes from positive Bactec blood cultures.

  14. Characterization and identification of clinically relevant microorganisms using rapid evaporative ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Strittmatter, Nicole; Rebec, Monica; Jones, Emrys A; Golf, Ottmar; Abdolrasouli, Alireza; Balog, Julia; Behrends, Volker; Veselkov, Kirill A; Takats, Zoltan

    2014-07-01

    Rapid evaporative ionization mass spectrometry (REIMS) was investigated for its suitability as a general identification system for bacteria and fungi. Strains of 28 clinically relevant bacterial species were analyzed in negative ion mode, and corresponding data was subjected to unsupervised and supervised multivariate statistical analyses. The created supervised model yielded correct cross-validation results of 95.9%, 97.8%, and 100% on species, genus, and Gram-stain level, respectively. These results were not affected by the resolution of the mass spectral data. Blind identification tests were performed for strains cultured on different culture media and analyzed using different instrumental platforms which led to 97.8-100% correct identification. Seven different Escherichia coli strains were subjected to different culture conditions and were distinguishable with 88% accuracy. In addition, the technique proved suitable to distinguish five pathogenic Candida species with 98.8% accuracy without any further modification to the experimental workflow. These results prove that REIMS is sufficiently specific to serve as a culture condition-independent tool for the identification and characterization of microorganisms.

  15. [Rapid identification of microorganisms based on Fourier transform near infrared spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Yue, Tian-li; Wang, Jun; Yuan, Ya-hong; Gao, Zhen-peng

    2010-11-01

    Fourier transform-near infrared (FT-NIR) spectra of microorganisms reflect the overall molecular composition of the sample. The spectra were specific and can serve as spectroscopic fingerprints that enable highly accurate identification of microorganisms. Bacterial powders of one yeast and five bacteria strains were prepared to collect FT-NIR spectra. FT-NIR measurements were done using a diffuse reflection-integrating sphere. Reduction of data was performed by principal component analysis (PCA) and two identification models based on linear discriminant analysis (LDA) and artificial neural network (ANN) were established to identify bacterial strains. The reproducibility of the method was proved to be excellent (D(yly2) : 1.61 +/- 1.05-10.97 +/- 6. 65) and high identification accuracy was achieved in both the LDA model (Accuracy rate: 100%) and the ANN model (Average relative error: 5.75%). FT-NIR spectroscopy combined with multivariate statistical analysis (MSA) may provide a novel answer to the fields which need for rapid microbial identification and it will have great prospect in industry.

  16. Final Progress Report: Isotope Identification Algorithm for Rapid and Accurate Determination of Radioisotopes Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Rawool-Sullivan, Mohini; Bounds, John Alan; Brumby, Steven P.; Prasad, Lakshman; Sullivan, John P.

    2012-04-30

    This is the final report of the project titled, 'Isotope Identification Algorithm for Rapid and Accurate Determination of Radioisotopes,' PMIS project number LA10-HUMANID-PD03. The goal of the work was to demonstrate principles of emulating a human analysis approach towards the data collected using radiation isotope identification devices (RIIDs). It summarizes work performed over the FY10 time period. The goal of the work was to demonstrate principles of emulating a human analysis approach towards the data collected using radiation isotope identification devices (RIIDs). Human analysts begin analyzing a spectrum based on features in the spectrum - lines and shapes that are present in a given spectrum. The proposed work was to carry out a feasibility study that will pick out all gamma ray peaks and other features such as Compton edges, bremsstrahlung, presence/absence of shielding and presence of neutrons and escape peaks. Ultimately success of this feasibility study will allow us to collectively explain identified features and form a realistic scenario that produced a given spectrum in the future. We wanted to develop and demonstrate machine learning algorithms that will qualitatively enhance the automated identification capabilities of portable radiological sensors that are currently being used in the field.

  17. Evaluation of Verigene Blood Culture Test Systems for Rapid Identification of Positive Blood Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae-Seok; Kang, Go-Eun; Kim, Han-Sung; Song, Wonkeun; Lee, Kyu Man

    2016-01-01

    The performance of molecular tests using the Verigene Gram-Positive and Gram-Negative Blood Culture nucleic acid tests (BC-GP and BC-GN, resp.; Naosphere, Northbrook, IL, USA) was evaluated for the identification of microorganisms detected from blood cultures. Ninety-nine blood cultures containing Gram-positive bacteria and 150 containing Gram-negative bacteria were analyzed using the BC-GP and BC-GN assays, respectively. Blood cultures were performed using the Bactec blood culture system (BD Diagnostic Systems, Franklin Lakes, NJ, USA) and conventional identification and antibiotic-susceptibility tests were performed using a MicroScan system (Siemens, West Sacramento, CA, USA). When a single strain of bacteria was isolated from the blood culture, Verigene assays correctly identified 97.9% (94/96) of Gram-positive bacteria and 93.8% (137/146) of Gram-negative bacteria. Resistance genes mecA and vanA were correctly detected by the BC-GP assay, while the extended-spectrum β-lactamase CTX-M and the carbapenemase OXA resistance gene were detected from 30 cases cultures by the BC-GN assay. The BC-GP and BC-GN assays showed high agreement with conventional identification and susceptibility tests. These tests are useful for rapid identification of microorganisms and the detection of clinically important resistance genes from positive Bactec blood cultures. PMID:26904669

  18. Rapid identification of kidney cyst mutations by whole exome sequencing in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Sean; Willer, Jason; Marjoram, Lindsay; Bagwell, Jennifer; Mankiewicz, Jamie; Leshchiner, Ignaty; Goessling, Wolfram; Bagnat, Michel; Katsanis, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    Forward genetic approaches in zebrafish have provided invaluable information about developmental processes. However, the relative difficulty of mapping and isolating mutations has limited the number of new genetic screens. Recent improvements in the annotation of the zebrafish genome coupled to a reduction in sequencing costs prompted the development of whole genome and RNA sequencing approaches for gene discovery. Here we describe a whole exome sequencing (WES) approach that allows rapid and cost-effective identification of mutations. We used our WES methodology to isolate four mutations that cause kidney cysts; we identified novel alleles in two ciliary genes as well as two novel mutants. The WES approach described here does not require specialized infrastructure or training and is therefore widely accessible. This methodology should thus help facilitate genetic screens and expedite the identification of mutants that can inform basic biological processes and the causality of genetic disorders in humans. PMID:24130329

  19. SNARE proteins synaptobrevin, SNAP-25, and syntaxin are involved in rapid and slow endocytosis at synapses.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jianhua; Luo, Fujun; Zhang, Zhen; Xue, Lei; Wu, Xin-Sheng; Chiang, Hsueh-Cheng; Shin, Wonchul; Wu, Ling-Gang

    2013-05-30

    Rapid endocytosis, which takes only a few seconds, is widely observed in secretory cells. Although it is more efficient in recycling vesicles than in slow clathrin-mediated endocytosis, its underlying mechanism, thought to be clathrin independent, is largely unclear. Here, we report that cleavage of three SNARE proteins essential for exocytosis, including synaptobrevin, SNAP-25, and syntaxin, inhibited rapid endocytosis at the calyx of Held nerve terminal, suggesting the involvement of the three SNARE proteins in rapid endocytosis. These SNARE proteins were also involved in slow endocytosis. In addition, SNAP-25 and syntaxin facilitated vesicle mobilization to the readily releasable pool, most likely via their roles in endocytosis and/or exocytosis. We conclude that both rapid and slow endocytosis share the involvement of SNARE proteins. The dual role of three SNARE proteins in exo- and endocytosis suggests that SNARE proteins may be molecular substrates contributing to the exocytosis-endocytosis coupling, which maintains exocytosis in secretory cells.

  20. Selective, rapid and optically switchable regulation of protein function in live mammalian cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Yu-Hsuan; Essig, Sebastian; James, John R.; Lang, Kathrin; Chin, Jason W.

    2015-07-01

    The rapid and selective regulation of a target protein within living cells that contain closely related family members is an outstanding challenge. Here we introduce genetically directed bioorthogonal ligand tethering (BOLT) and demonstrate selective inhibition (iBOLT) of protein function. In iBOLT, inhibitor-conjugate/target protein pairs are created where the target protein contains a genetically encoded unnatural amino acid with bioorthogonal reactivity and the inhibitor conjugate contains a complementary bioorthogonal group. iBOLT enables the first rapid and specific inhibition of MEK isozymes, and introducing photoisomerizable linkers in the inhibitor conjugate enables reversible, optical regulation of protein activity (photo-BOLT) in live mammalian cells. We demonstrate that a pan kinase inhibitor conjugate allows selective and rapid inhibition of the lymphocyte specific kinase, indicating the modularity and scalability of BOLT. We anticipate that BOLT will enable the rapid and selective regulation of diverse proteins for which no selective small-molecule ligands exist.

  1. Can the rapid identification of mature spermatozoa during microdissection testicular sperm extraction guide operative planning?

    PubMed

    Alrabeeah, K; Doucet, R; Boulet, E; Phillips, S; Al-Hathal, N; Bissonnette, F; Kadoch, I J; Zini, A

    2015-05-01

    The minimum sperm count and quality that must be identified during microdissection testicular sperm extraction (micro-TESE) to deem the procedure successful remains to be established. We conducted a retrospective study of 81 consecutive men with non-obstructive azoospermia who underwent a primary (first) micro-TESE between March 2007 and October 2013. Final assessment of sperm recovery [reported on the day of (intracytoplasmic sperm injection) ICSI] was recorded as (i) successful (available spermatozoa for ICSI) or (ii) unsuccessful (no spermatozoa for ICSI). The decision to perform a unilateral (with limited or complete microdissection) or bilateral micro-TESE was guided by the intra-operative identification of sperm recovery (≥5 motile or non-motile sperm) from the first testicle. Overall, sperm recovery was successful in 56% (45/81) of the men. A unilateral micro-TESE was performed in 47% (38/81) of the men (based on intra-operative identification of sperm) and in 100% (38/38) of these men, spermatozoa was found on final assessment. In 42% (16/38) of the unilateral cases, a limited microdissection was performed (owing to the rapid intra-operative identification of sperm). The remaining 43 men underwent a bilateral micro-TESE and 16% (7/43) of these men had sperm identified on final assessment. The cumulative ICSI pregnancy rates (per cycle started and per embryo transfer) were 47% (21/45) and 60% (21/35), respectively, with a mean (±SD) of 1.9 ± 1.0 embryos transferred. The data demonstrate that intra-operative assessment of sperm recovery can correctly identify those men that require a unilateral micro-TESE. Moreover, the rapid identification of sperm recovery can allow some men to undergo a limited unilateral micro-TESE and avoid the need for complete testicular microdissection.

  2. Identification of a Non-Pentapeptide Region Associated with Rapid Mycobacterial Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Warholm, Per; Light, Sara

    2016-01-01

    A large portion of the coding capacity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is devoted to the production of proteins containing several copies of the pentapeptide-2 repeat, namely the PE/PPE_MPTR proteins. Protein domain repeats have a variety of binding properties and are involved in protein-protein interactions as well as binding to other ligands such as DNA and RNA. They are not as common in prokaryotes, compared to eukaryotes, but the enrichment of pentapeptide-2 repeats in Mycobacteria constitutes an exception to that rule. The genes encoding the PE/PPE_MPTR proteins have undergone many rearrangements and here we have identified the expansion patterns across the Mycobacteria. We have performed a reclassification of the PE/PPE_MPTR proteins using cohesive regions rather than sparse domain architectures. It is clear that these proteins have undergone large insertions of several pentapeptide-2 domains appearing adjacent to one another in a repetitive pattern. Further, we have identified a non-pentapeptide motif associated with rapid mycobacterial evolution. The sequence composition of this region suggests a different structure compared to pentapeptide-2 repeats. By studying the evolution of the PE/PPE_MPTR proteins, we have distinguished features pertaining to tuberculosis-inducing species. Further studies of the non-pentapeptide region associated with repeat expansions promises to shed light on the pathogenicity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. PMID:27149271

  3. High-throughput identification of proteins with AMPylation using self-assembled human protein (NAPPA) microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiaobo; LaBaer, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Summary AMPylation (adenylylation) has been recognized as an important post translational modification employed by pathogens to regulate host cellular proteins and their associated signaling pathways. AMPylation has potential functions in various cellular processes and is widely conserved across both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. However, despite the identification of many AMPylators, relatively few candidate substrates of AMPylation are known. This is changing with the recent development of a robust and reliable method to identify new substrates using protein microarrays, which can significantly expand the list of potential substrates. Here, we describe procedures to detect AMPylated and auto-AMPylated proteins in a sensitive, high throughput, and non-radioactive manner. The approach employs high-density protein microarrays fabricated using NAPPA (Nucleic Acid Programmable Protein Arrays) technology, which enables the highly successful display of fresh recombinant human proteins in situ. The modification of target proteins is determined via copper-catalyzed azide–alkyne cycloaddition. The assay can be accomplished within 11 hours. PMID:25881200

  4. Rapid Identification and Characterization of Francisella by Molecular Biology and Other Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Xin-He; Zhao, Long-Fei; Chen, Xiao-Ming; Ren, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is the causative pathogen of tularemia and a Tier 1 bioterror agent on the CDC list. Considering the fact that some subpopulation of the F. tularensis strains is more virulent, more significantly associated with mortality, and therefore poses more threat to humans, rapid identification and characterization of this subpopulation strains is of invaluable importance. This review summarizes the up-to-date developments of assays for mainly detecting and characterizing F. tularensis and a touch of caveats of some of the assays. PMID:27335619

  5. Retinal proteins modified by 4-hydroxynonenal: identification of molecular targets.

    PubMed

    Kapphahn, Rebecca J; Giwa, Babatomiwa M; Berg, Kristin M; Roehrich, Heidi; Feng, Xiao; Olsen, Timothy W; Ferrington, Deborah A

    2006-07-01

    The reactive aldehyde, 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE), is a product of lipid peroxidation that can covalently modify and inactivate proteins. Previously, we reported increased HNE modification of select retinal proteins resolved by one-dimensional gel electrophoresis in aged Fisher 344 x Brown Norway rats (Louie, J.L., Kapphahn, R.J., Ferrington, D.A., 2002. Proteasome function and protein oxidation in the aged retina. Exp. Eye Res. 75, 271-284). In the current study, quantitative assessment of HNE molar content using slot blot immunoassays showed HNE content is increased 30% in aged rat retina. In contrast, there was no age-related difference in HNE content in individual spots resolved by 2D gel electrophoresis suggesting the increased modification is likely on membrane proteins that are missing on 2D gels. The HNE-immunoreactive proteins resolved by 2D gel electrophoresis were identified by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. These proteins are involved in metabolism, chaperone function, and fatty acid transport. Proteins that were frequently modified and had the highest molar content of HNE included triosephosphate isomerase, alpha enolase, heat shock cognate 70 and betaB2 crystallin. Immunochemical detection of HNE adducts on retinal sections showed greater immune reaction in ganglion cells, photoreceptor inner segment, and the inner plexiform layer. Identification of HNE modified proteins in two alternative model systems, human retinal pigment epithelial cells in culture (ARPE19) and human donor eyes, indicated that triosephosphate isomerase and alpha enolase are generally modified. These results identify a common subset of proteins that contain HNE adducts and suggest that select retinal proteins are molecular targets for HNE modification. PMID:16530755

  6. Identification of contractile vacuole proteins in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Paul N; Jimenez, Veronica; Park, Miyoung; Martins, Vicente P; Atwood, James; Moles, Kristen; Collins, Dalis; Rohloff, Peter; Tarleton, Rick; Moreno, Silvia N J; Orlando, Ron; Docampo, Roberto

    2011-03-18

    Contractile vacuole complexes are critical components of cell volume regulation and have been shown to have other functional roles in several free-living protists. However, very little is known about the functions of the contractile vacuole complex of the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiologic agent of Chagas disease, other than a role in osmoregulation. Identification of the protein composition of these organelles is important for understanding their physiological roles. We applied a combined proteomic and bioinfomatic approach to identify proteins localized to the contractile vacuole. Proteomic analysis of a T. cruzi fraction enriched for contractile vacuoles and analyzed by one-dimensional gel electrophoresis and LC-MS/MS resulted in the addition of 109 newly detected proteins to the group of expressed proteins of epimastigotes. We also identified different peptides that map to at least 39 members of the dispersed gene family 1 (DGF-1) providing evidence that many members of this family are simultaneously expressed in epimastigotes. Of the proteins present in the fraction we selected several homologues with known localizations in contractile vacuoles of other organisms and others that we expected to be present in these vacuoles on the basis of their potential roles. We determined the localization of each by expression as GFP-fusion proteins or with specific antibodies. Six of these putative proteins (Rab11, Rab32, AP180, ATPase subunit B, VAMP1, and phosphate transporter) predominantly localized to the vacuole bladder. TcSNARE2.1, TcSNARE2.2, and calmodulin localized to the spongiome. Calmodulin was also cytosolic. Our results demonstrate the utility of combining subcellular fractionation, proteomic analysis, and bioinformatic approaches for localization of organellar proteins that are difficult to detect with whole cell methodologies. The CV localization of the proteins investigated revealed potential novel roles of these organelles in phosphate metabolism

  7. Identification of Sequences Encoding Symbiodinium minutum Mitochondrial Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Butterfield, Erin R.; Howe, Christopher J.; Nisbet, R. Ellen R.

    2016-01-01

    The dinoflagellates are an extremely diverse group of algae closely related to the Apicomplexa and the ciliates. Much work has previously been undertaken to determine the presence of various biochemical pathways within dinoflagellate mitochondria. However, these studies were unable to identify several key transcripts including those encoding proteins involved in the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, iron–sulfur cluster biosynthesis, and protein import. Here, we analyze the draft nuclear genome of the dinoflagellate Symbiodinium minutum, as well as RNAseq data to identify nuclear genes encoding mitochondrial proteins. The results confirm the presence of a complete tricarboxylic acid cycle in the dinoflagellates. Results also demonstrate the difficulties in using the genome sequence for the identification of genes due to the large number of introns, but show that it is highly useful for the determination of gene duplication events. PMID:26798115

  8. Identification of Sequences Encoding Symbiodinium minutum Mitochondrial Proteins.

    PubMed

    Butterfield, Erin R; Howe, Christopher J; Nisbet, R Ellen R

    2016-01-21

    The dinoflagellates are an extremely diverse group of algae closely related to the Apicomplexa and the ciliates. Much work has previously been undertaken to determine the presence of various biochemical pathways within dinoflagellate mitochondria. However, these studies were unable to identify several key transcripts including those encoding proteins involved in the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, iron-sulfur cluster biosynthesis, and protein import. Here, we analyze the draft nuclear genome of the dinoflagellate Symbiodinium minutum, as well as RNAseq data to identify nuclear genes encoding mitochondrial proteins. The results confirm the presence of a complete tricarboxylic acid cycle in the dinoflagellates. Results also demonstrate the difficulties in using the genome sequence for the identification of genes due to the large number of introns, but show that it is highly useful for the determination of gene duplication events.

  9. Affinity purification of protein complexes for analysis by multidimensional protein identification technology.

    PubMed

    Banks, Charles A S; Kong, Stephanie E; Washburn, Michael P

    2012-12-01

    Characterizing protein complexes and identifying their subunits promote our understanding of the machinery involved in many in vivo processes. Proteomic studies can identify a protein's binding partners, and this can provide insight into how protein complexes function and how they are regulated. In addition, the composition of a protein complex within an organism can be investigated as a function of time, as a function of location, or during the response of an organism to a change in environment. There are many ways to isolate a complex and identify its constituents. This review will focus on complex isolation using affinity purification and will address issues that biochemists should bear in mind as they isolate protein complexes for mass spectrometric analysis by multidimensional protein identification technology (MudPIT)(1). Protein complex analysis by mass spectrometry frequently involves the collaborative efforts of biochemists or biologists who purify protein complexes and proteomic specialists who analyze the samples - for fruitful collaborations it can be helpful for these specialized groups to be acquainted with basic principles of their collaborator's discipline. With this in mind, we first review the variety of affinity purification methods which might be considered for preparing complexes for analysis, and then provide brief primers on the principles of MudPIT mass spectrometry and data analysis. From this foundation, we then discuss how these techniques are integrated and optimized and suggest salient points to consider when preparing purified samples for protein identification, performing mass spectrometry runs, and analyzing the resulting data.

  10. Identification of the Species of Origin for Meat Products by Rapid Evaporative Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Balog, Julia; Perenyi, Dora; Guallar-Hoyas, Cristina; Egri, Attila; Pringle, Steven D; Stead, Sara; Chevallier, Olivier P; Elliott, Chris T; Takats, Zoltan

    2016-06-15

    Increasingly abundant food fraud cases have brought food authenticity and safety into major focus. This study presents a fast and effective way to identify meat products using rapid evaporative ionization mass spectrometry (REIMS). The experimental setup was demonstrated to be able to record a mass spectrometric profile of meat specimens in a time frame of <5 s. A multivariate statistical algorithm was developed and successfully tested for the identification of animal tissue with different anatomical origin, breed, and species with 100% accuracy at species and 97% accuracy at breed level. Detection of the presence of meat originating from a different species (horse, cattle, and venison) has also been demonstrated with high accuracy using mixed patties with a 5% detection limit. REIMS technology was found to be a promising tool in food safety applications providing a reliable and simple method for the rapid characterization of food products.

  11. ERP and Adaptive Autoregressive identification with spectral power decomposition to study rapid auditory processing in infants.

    PubMed

    Piazza, C; Cantiani, C; Tacchino, G; Molteni, M; Reni, G; Bianchi, A M

    2014-01-01

    The ability to process rapidly-occurring auditory stimuli plays an important role in the mechanisms of language acquisition. For this reason, the research community has begun to investigate infant auditory processing, particularly using the Event Related Potentials (ERP) technique. In this paper we approach this issue by means of time domain and time-frequency domain analysis. For the latter, we propose the use of Adaptive Autoregressive (AAR) identification with spectral power decomposition. Results show EEG delta-theta oscillation enhancement related to the processing of acoustic frequency and duration changes, suggesting that, as expected, power modulation encodes rapid auditory processing (RAP) in infants and that the time-frequency analysis method proposed is able to identify this modulation.

  12. Identification of the Species of Origin for Meat Products by Rapid Evaporative Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Balog, Julia; Perenyi, Dora; Guallar-Hoyas, Cristina; Egri, Attila; Pringle, Steven D; Stead, Sara; Chevallier, Olivier P; Elliott, Chris T; Takats, Zoltan

    2016-06-15

    Increasingly abundant food fraud cases have brought food authenticity and safety into major focus. This study presents a fast and effective way to identify meat products using rapid evaporative ionization mass spectrometry (REIMS). The experimental setup was demonstrated to be able to record a mass spectrometric profile of meat specimens in a time frame of <5 s. A multivariate statistical algorithm was developed and successfully tested for the identification of animal tissue with different anatomical origin, breed, and species with 100% accuracy at species and 97% accuracy at breed level. Detection of the presence of meat originating from a different species (horse, cattle, and venison) has also been demonstrated with high accuracy using mixed patties with a 5% detection limit. REIMS technology was found to be a promising tool in food safety applications providing a reliable and simple method for the rapid characterization of food products. PMID:27167240

  13. Rapid identification of emerging infectious agents using PCR and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sampath, Rangarajan; Hall, Thomas A; Massire, Christian; Li, Feng; Blyn, Lawrence B; Eshoo, Mark W; Hofstadler, Steven A; Ecker, David J

    2007-04-01

    Newly emergent infectious diseases are a global public health problem. The population dense regions of Southeast Asia are the epicenter of many emerging diseases, as evidenced by the outbreak of Nipah, SARS, avian influenza (H5N1), Dengue, and enterovirus 71 in this region in the past decade. Rapid identification, epidemiologic surveillance, and mitigation of transmission are major challenges in ensuring public health safety. Here we describe a powerful new approach for infectious disease surveillance that is based on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to amplify nucleic acid targets from large groupings of organisms, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) for accurate mass measurements of the PCR products, and base composition signature analysis to identify organisms in a sample. This approach is capable of automated analysis of more than 1,500 PCR reactions a day. It is applicable to the surveillance of bacterial, viral, fungal, or protozoal pathogens and will facilitate rapid characterization of known and emerging pathogens. PMID:17470915

  14. Rapid protein immobilization for thin film continuous flow biocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Britton, Joshua; Raston, Colin L; Weiss, Gregory A

    2016-08-01

    A versatile enzyme immobilization strategy for thin film continuous flow processing is reported. Here, non-covalent and glutaraldehyde bioconjugation are used to immobilize enzymes on the surfaces of borosilicate reactors. This approach requires only ng of protein per reactor tube, with the stock protein solution readily recycled to sequentially coat >10 reactors. Confining reagents to thin films during immobilization reduced the amount of protein, piranha-cleaning solution, and other reagents by ∼96%. Through this technique, there was no loss of catalytic activity over 10 h processing. The results reported here combines the benefits of thin film flow processing with the mild conditions of biocatalysis. PMID:27461146

  15. A rapid method to improve protein detection by indirect ELISA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA) is a rapid, high-throughput, quantitative immunoassay for the selective detection of target antigens. The general principle behind an ELISA is antibody mediated capture and detection of an antigen with a measureable substrate. Numerous incarnations of th...

  16. Crux: rapid open source protein tandem mass spectrometry analysis.

    PubMed

    McIlwain, Sean; Tamura, Kaipo; Kertesz-Farkas, Attila; Grant, Charles E; Diament, Benjamin; Frewen, Barbara; Howbert, J Jeffry; Hoopmann, Michael R; Käll, Lukas; Eng, Jimmy K; MacCoss, Michael J; Noble, William Stafford

    2014-10-01

    Efficiently and accurately analyzing big protein tandem mass spectrometry data sets requires robust software that incorporates state-of-the-art computational, machine learning, and statistical methods. The Crux mass spectrometry analysis software toolkit ( http://cruxtoolkit.sourceforge.net ) is an open source project that aims to provide users with a cross-platform suite of analysis tools for interpreting protein mass spectrometry data. PMID:25182276

  17. Genome-Wide Identification and Expression of Xenopus F-Box Family of Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Saritas-Yildirim, Banu; Pliner, Hannah A.; Ochoa, Angelica; Silva, Elena M.

    2015-01-01

    Protein degradation via the multistep ubiquitin/26S proteasome pathway is a rapid way to alter the protein profile and drive cell processes and developmental changes. Many key regulators of embryonic development are targeted for degradation by E3 ubiquitin ligases. The most studied family of E3 ubiquitin ligases is the SCF ubiquitin ligases, which use F-box adaptor proteins to recognize and recruit target proteins. Here, we used a bioinformatics screen and phylogenetic analysis to identify and annotate the family of F-box proteins in the Xenopus tropicalis genome. To shed light on the function of the F-box proteins, we analyzed expression of F-box genes during early stages of Xenopus development. Many F-box genes are broadly expressed with expression domains localized to diverse tissues including brain, spinal cord, eye, neural crest derivatives, somites, kidneys, and heart. All together, our genome-wide identification and expression profiling of the Xenopus F-box family of proteins provide a foundation for future research aimed to identify the precise role of F-box dependent E3 ubiquitin ligases and their targets in the regulatory circuits of development. PMID:26327321

  18. SIMULTANEOUS AND RAPID IDENTIFICATION OF ESCHERICHIA COLI, LISTERIA MONOCYTOGENES, AND SALMONELLA TYPHIMONIUM BY SURFACE-ENHANCED RAMAN SCATTERING SPECTROSCOPY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The development of rapid and routine identification methods for foodborne bacteria is of considerable importance due to concerns regarding bio-/agro-terrorism, public health, and economic loss. The traditional techniques are time consuming and are not sufficiently rapid to assure the safety of ready...

  19. Identification of 24h Ixodes scapularis immunogenic tick saliva proteins.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Lauren A; Radulović, Željko M; Kim, Tae K; Porter, Lindsay M; Mulenga, Albert

    2015-04-01

    Ixodes scapularis is arguably the most medically important tick species in the United States. This tick transmits 5 of the 14 human tick-borne disease (TBD) agents in the USA: Borrelia burgdorferi, Anaplasma phagocytophilum, B. miyamotoi, Babesia microti, and Powassan virus disease. Except for the Powassan virus disease, I. scapularis-vectored TBD agents require more than 24h post attachment to be transmitted. This study describes identification of 24h immunogenic I. scapularis tick saliva proteins, which could provide opportunities to develop strategies to stop tick feeding before transmission of the majority of pathogens. A 24h fed female I. scapularis phage display cDNA expression library was biopanned using rabbit antibodies to 24h fed I. scapularis female tick saliva proteins, subjected to next generation sequencing, de novo assembly, and bioinformatic analyses. A total of 182 contigs were assembled, of which ∼19% (35/182) are novel and did not show identity to any known proteins in GenBank. The remaining ∼81% (147/182) of contigs were provisionally identified based on matches in GenBank including ∼18% (27/147) that matched protein sequences previously annotated as hypothetical and putative tick saliva proteins. Others include proteases and protease inhibitors (∼3%, 5/147), transporters and/or ligand binding proteins (∼6%, 9/147), immunogenic tick saliva housekeeping enzyme-like (17%, 25/147), ribosomal protein-like (∼31%, 46/147), and those classified as miscellaneous (∼24%, 35/147). Notable among the miscellaneous class include antimicrobial peptides (microplusin and ricinusin), myosin-like proteins that have been previously found in tick saliva, and heat shock tick saliva protein. Data in this study provides the foundation for in-depth analysis of I. scapularis feeding during the first 24h, before the majority of TBD agents can be transmitted.

  20. Identification of 24 h Ixodes scapularis immunogenic tick saliva proteins

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Lauren A.; Radulović, Željko M.; Kim, Tae K.; Porter, Lindsay M.; Mulenga, Albert

    2015-01-01

    Ixodes scapularis is arguably the most medically important tick species in the United States. This tick transmits 5 of the 14 human tick-borne disease (TBD) agents in the USA: Borrelia burgdorferi, Anaplasma phagocytophilum, B. miyamotoi, Babesia microti, and Powassan virus disease. Except for the Powassan virus disease, I. scapularis-vectored TBD agents require more than 24 h post attachment to be transmitted. This study describes identification of 24 h immunogenic I. scapularis tick saliva proteins, which could provide opportunities to develop strategies to stop tick feeding before transmission of the majority of pathogens. A 24 h fed female I. scapularis phage display cDNA expression library was biopanned using rabbit antibodies to 24 h fed I. scapularis female tick saliva proteins, subjected to next generation sequencing, de novo assembly, and bioinformatic analyses. A total of 182 contigs were assembled, of which ~19% (35/182) are novel and did not show identity to any known proteins in GenBank. The remaining ~81% (147/182) of contigs were provisionally identified based on matches in GenBank including ~18% (27/147) that matched protein sequences previously annotated as hypothetical and putative tick saliva proteins. Others include proteases and protease inhibitors (~3%, 5/147), transporters and/or ligand binding proteins (~6%, 9/147), immunogenic tick saliva housekeeping enzyme-like (17%, 25/147), ribosomal protein-like (~31%, 46/147), and those classified as miscellaneous (~24%, 35/147). Notable among the miscellaneous class include antimicrobial peptides (microplusin and ricinusin), myosin-like proteins that have been previously found in tick saliva, and heat shock tick saliva protein. Data in this study provides the foundation for in-depth analysis of I. scapularis feeding during the first 24 h, before the majority of TBD agents can be transmitted. PMID:25825233

  1. LAMP technology: Rapid identification of Brucella and Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Trangoni, Marcos D.; Gioffré, Andrea K.; Cerón Cucchi, María E.; Caimi, Karina C.; Ruybal, Paula; Zumárraga, Martín J.; Cravero, Silvio L.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we developed new sets of primers to detect Brucella spp. and M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) through isothermal amplification. We selected a previously well-characterized target gene, bscp31, specific for Brucella spp. and IS900 for MAP. The limits of detection using the loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) protocols described herein were similar to those of conventional PCR targeting the same sequences. Hydroxynaphtol blue and SYBR GreenTM allowed direct naked-eye detection with identical sensitivity as agarose gel electrophoresis. We included the LAMP-based protocol in a rapid identification scheme of the respective pathogens, and all tested isolates were correctly identified within 2 to 3 h. In addition, both protocols were suitable for specifically identifying the respective pathogens; in the case of Brucella, it also allowed the identification of all the biovars tested. We conclude that LAMP is a suitable rapid molecular typing tool that could help to shorten the time required to identify insidious bacteria in low-complexity laboratories, mainly in developing countries. PMID:26273282

  2. [Rapid identification of microorganisms by mass spectrometry in a blood culture system. Comparison of two procedures].

    PubMed

    Cattani, María E; Posse, Tamara; Hermes, Ricardo L; Kaufman, Sara C

    2015-01-01

    Rapid identification of microorganisms is critical in hospitalized infected patients. Blood culture is currently the gold standard for detecting and identifying microorganisms causing bacteremia or sepsis. The introduction of mass spectrometry by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF MS) in microbiology laboratories, especially in microorganisms growing in blood culture bottles, provides rapid identification. This study evaluates the performance of the Maldi Sepsityper Biotyper procedure (hereinafter, MS) compared to that of an in-home method (hereinafter, HF). Eight hundred and forty (840) positive blood culture bottles were processed using the HF procedure, 542 of which were also processed using MS. The organisms were identified in 670 (79.76%) and 391 (72.14%) bottles respectively (p = 0,0013). This study demonstrates the effectiveness of both procedures for identifying microorganisms directly from positive blood culture bottles. However, the HF procedure proved to be more effective than MS, especially in the presence of Gram positive organisms.

  3. [Rapid identification and susceptibility to killer toxins of yeasts isolated from non-systemic mycoses].

    PubMed

    Sangorrín, M P; Lopes, C A; Rivero, A; Caballero, A C

    2007-01-01

    Rapid identification and susceptibility to killer toxins of yeasts isolated from non-systemic mycoses. The use of quick and reliable yeast identification methods, as well as the development of new antifungal agents with more specific targets, will enable a more efficient treatment of mycoses. In the present work, a total of 53 clinical isolates obtained from non-systemic infections in Neuquén Hospitals and an ophthalmologic clinic in Buenos Aires during 2005, were identified by means of a rapid molecular method (ITS1-5.8S ADNr-ITS2 PCR-RFLP). Additionally, the killer susceptibility of the isolates was tested against reference and indigenous killer yeasts on plate tests. Eight yeast species were identified among the clinical isolates: Candida albicans (52%), Candida parapsilosis (17%), Candida tropicalis (10%), Candida krusei (5%), Candida glabrata (4%), Candida guilliermondii (4%), Kluyveromyces lactis (4%) and Saccharomyces cerevisiae (4%). Sixty-nine percent of the isolates corresponding to the predominant species (C. albicans) were related to vaginal infections. On the other hand, 61% of the yeasts associated with ocular infections were identified as C. parapsilosis. Two indigenous killer isolates DVMais5 and HCMeiss5, belonging to Pichia anomala and P. kluyveri respectively, exhibited the broadest killer spectrum against clinical isolates.

  4. Rapid method for protein quantitation by Bradford assay after elimination of the interference of polysorbate 80.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yongfeng; Wei, Haiming; Sun, Rui; Tian, Zhigang; Zheng, Xiaodong

    2016-02-01

    Bradford assay is one of the most common methods for measuring protein concentrations. However, some pharmaceutical excipients, such as detergents, interfere with Bradford assay even at low concentrations. Protein precipitation can be used to overcome sample incompatibility with protein quantitation. But the rate of protein recovery caused by acetone precipitation is only about 70%. In this study, we found that sucrose not only could increase the rate of protein recovery after 1 h acetone precipitation, but also did not interfere with Bradford assay. So we developed a method for rapid protein quantitation in protein drugs even if they contained interfering substances.

  5. Fluorescent In situ hybridization allows rapid identification of microorganisms in blood cultures.

    PubMed

    Kempf, V A; Trebesius, K; Autenrieth, I B

    2000-02-01

    Using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with rRNA-targeted fluorescently labelled oligonucleotide probes, pathogens were rapidly detected and identified in positive blood culture bottles without cultivation and biotyping. In this study, 115 blood cultures with a positive growth index as determined by a continuous-reading automated blood culture system were examined by both conventional laboratory methods and FISH. For this purpose, oligonucleotide probes that allowed identification of approximately 95% of those pathogens typically associated with bacteremia were produced. The sensitivity and specificity of these probes were 100%. From all 115 blood cultures, microorganisms were grown after 1 day and identification to the family, genus, or species level was achieved after 1 to 3 days while 111 samples (96.5%) were similarly identified by FISH within 2.5 h. Staphylococci were identified in 62 of 62 samples, streptococci and enterococci were identified in 19 of 20 samples, gram-negative rods were identified in 28 of 30 samples, and fungi were identified in two of two samples. Thus, FISH is an appropriate method for identification of pathogens grown in blood cultures from septicemic patients.

  6. Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization Allows Rapid Identification of Microorganisms in Blood Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Kempf, Volkhard A. J.; Trebesius, Karlheinz; Autenrieth, Ingo B.

    2000-01-01

    Using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with rRNA-targeted fluorescently labelled oligonucleotide probes, pathogens were rapidly detected and identified in positive blood culture bottles without cultivation and biotyping. In this study, 115 blood cultures with a positive growth index as determined by a continuous-reading automated blood culture system were examined by both conventional laboratory methods and FISH. For this purpose, oligonucleotide probes that allowed identification of approximately 95% of those pathogens typically associated with bacteremia were produced. The sensitivity and specificity of these probes were 100%. From all 115 blood cultures, microorganisms were grown after 1 day and identification to the family, genus, or species level was achieved after 1 to 3 days while 111 samples (96.5%) were similarly identified by FISH within 2.5 h. Staphylococci were identified in 62 of 62 samples, streptococci and enterococci were identified in 19 of 20 samples, gram-negative rods were identified in 28 of 30 samples, and fungi were identified in two of two samples. Thus, FISH is an appropriate method for identification of pathogens grown in blood cultures from septicemic patients. PMID:10655393

  7. Rapid diagnostic test that uses isocitrate lyase activity for identification of Yersinia pestis.

    PubMed

    Hillier, S L; Charnetzky, W T

    1981-04-01

    The presence of high levels of isocitrate lyase activity in Yersinia pestis grown on blood agar base medium, as compared with low levels of this enzyme in Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and Yersinia enterocolitica, suggested that the differences in the levels of this enzyme could be used for the presumptive identification of Y. pestis. A modified, semiquantitative assay for isocitrate lyase activity is described which requires no expensive instrumentation, utilizes readily available chemicals and substrates, and requires only 20 min for completion. This test yielded positive results with all 108 isolates of Y. pestis tested and negative results with all strains of Y. pseudotuberculosis (68 isolates) and Y. enterocolitica (202 isolates) tested. Less than 2% of the approximately 1,300 non-Yersinia isolates from the family Enterobacteriaceae and none of the 93 isolates from the family Pseudomonadaceae yielded positive results. We conclude that this test provides for rapid identification of Y. pestis and should be useful in the initial screening of isolates from rodent and flea populations and in the presumptive identification of this organism from suspected cases of human plague.

  8. Rapid development of new protein biosensors utilizing peptides obtained via phage display.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jun; Park, Jong Pil; Dooley, Kevin; Cropek, Donald M; West, Alan C; Banta, Scott

    2011-01-01

    There is a consistent demand for new biosensors for the detection of protein targets, and a systematic method for the rapid development of new sensors is needed. Here we present a platform where short unstructured peptides that bind to a desired target are selected using M13 phage display. The selected peptides are then chemically synthesized and immobilized on gold, allowing for detection of the target using electrochemical techniques such as electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). A quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) is also used as a diagnostic tool during biosensor development. We demonstrate the utility of this approach by creating a novel peptide-based electrochemical biosensor for the enzyme alanine aminotransferase (ALT), a well-known biomarker of hepatotoxicity. Biopanning of the M13 phage display library over immobilized ALT, led to the rapid identification of a new peptide (ALT5-8) with an amino acid sequence of WHWRNPDFWYLK. Phage particles expressing this peptide exhibited nanomolar affinity for immobilized ALT (K(d,app) = 85±20 nM). The newly identified ALT5-8 peptide was then chemically synthesized with a C-terminal cysteine for gold immobilization. The performance of the gold-immobilized peptides was studied with cyclic voltammetry (CV), QCM, and EIS. Using QCM, the sensitivity for ALT detection was 8.9±0.9 Hz/(µg/mL) and the limit of detection (LOD) was 60 ng/mL. Using EIS measurements, the sensitivity was 142±12 impedance percentage change %/(µg/mL) and the LOD was 92 ng/mL. In both cases, the LOD was below the typical concentration of ALT in human blood. Although both QCM and EIS produced similar LODs, EIS is preferable due to a larger linear dynamic range. Using QCM, the immobilized peptide exhibited a nanomolar dissociation constant for ALT (K(d) = 20.1±0.6 nM). These results demonstrate a simple and rapid platform for developing and assessing the performance of sensitive, peptide-based biosensors for new protein targets

  9. Rapid Electrochemical Detection and Identification of Microbiological and Chemical Contaminants for Manned Spaceflight Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, Duane; Botkin, Douglas; Gazda, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Microbial control in the spacecraft environment is a daunting task, especially in the presence of human crew members. Currently, assessing the potential crew health risk associated with a microbial contamination event requires return of representative environmental samples that are analyzed in a ground-based laboratory. It is therefore not currently possible to quickly identify microbes during spaceflight. This project addresses the unmet need for spaceflight-compatible microbial identification technology. The electrochemical detection and identification platform is expected to provide a sensitive, specific, and rapid sample-to-answer capability for in-flight microbial monitoring that can distinguish between related microorganisms (pathogens and non-pathogens) as well as chemical contaminants. This will dramatically enhance our ability to monitor the spacecraft environment and the health risk to the crew. Further, the project is expected to eliminate the need for sample return while significantly reducing crew time required for detection of multiple targets. Initial work will focus on the optimization of bacterial detection and identification. The platform is designed to release nucleic acids (DNA and RNA) from microorganisms without the use of harmful chemicals. Bacterial DNA or RNA is captured by bacteria-specific probe molecules that are bound to a microelectrode, and that capture event can generate a small change in the electrical current (Lam, et al. 2012. Anal. Chem. 84(1): 21-5.). This current is measured, and a determination is made whether a given microbe is present in the sample analyzed. Chemical detection can be accomplished by directly applying a sample to the microelectrode and measuring the resulting current change. This rapid microbial and chemical detection device is designed to be a low-cost, low-power platform anticipated to be operated independently of an external power source, characteristics optimal for manned spaceflight and areas where power

  10. Immunoprecipitation of Plasma Membrane Receptor-Like Kinases for Identification of Phosphorylation Sites and Associated Proteins.

    PubMed

    Kadota, Yasuhiro; Macho, Alberto P; Zipfel, Cyril

    2016-01-01

    Membrane proteins are difficult to study for numerous reasons. The surface of membrane proteins is relatively hydrophobic and sometimes very unstable, additionally requiring detergents for their extraction from the membrane. This leads to challenges at all levels, including expression, solubilization, purification, identification of associated proteins, and the identification of post-translational modifications. However, recent advances in immunoprecipitation technology allow to isolate membrane proteins efficiently, facilitating the study of protein-protein interactions, the identification of novel associated proteins, and to identify post-translational modifications, such as phosphorylation. Here, we describe an optimized immunoprecipitation protocol for plant plasma membrane receptor-like kinases. PMID:26577786

  11. Rapid Protein Depletion in Human Cells by Auxin-Inducible Degron Tagging with Short Homology Donors.

    PubMed

    Natsume, Toyoaki; Kiyomitsu, Tomomi; Saga, Yumiko; Kanemaki, Masato T

    2016-04-01

    Studying the role of essential proteins is dependent upon a method for rapid inactivation, in order to study the immediate phenotypic consequences. Auxin-inducible degron (AID) technology allows rapid depletion of proteins in animal cells and fungi, but its application to human cells has been limited by the difficulties of tagging endogenous proteins. We have developed a simple and scalable CRISPR/Cas-based method to tag endogenous proteins in human HCT116 and mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells by using donor constructs that harbor synthetic short homology arms. Using a combination of AID tagging with CRISPR/Cas, we have generated conditional alleles of essential nuclear and cytoplasmic proteins in HCT116 cells, which can then be depleted very rapidly after the addition of auxin to the culture medium. This approach should greatly facilitate the functional analysis of essential proteins, particularly those of previously unknown function.

  12. Rapid Protein Depletion in Human Cells by Auxin-Inducible Degron Tagging with Short Homology Donors.

    PubMed

    Natsume, Toyoaki; Kiyomitsu, Tomomi; Saga, Yumiko; Kanemaki, Masato T

    2016-04-01

    Studying the role of essential proteins is dependent upon a method for rapid inactivation, in order to study the immediate phenotypic consequences. Auxin-inducible degron (AID) technology allows rapid depletion of proteins in animal cells and fungi, but its application to human cells has been limited by the difficulties of tagging endogenous proteins. We have developed a simple and scalable CRISPR/Cas-based method to tag endogenous proteins in human HCT116 and mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells by using donor constructs that harbor synthetic short homology arms. Using a combination of AID tagging with CRISPR/Cas, we have generated conditional alleles of essential nuclear and cytoplasmic proteins in HCT116 cells, which can then be depleted very rapidly after the addition of auxin to the culture medium. This approach should greatly facilitate the functional analysis of essential proteins, particularly those of previously unknown function. PMID:27052166

  13. Identification of Proteins that Modify Cataract of the Eye Lens

    PubMed Central

    Hoehenwarter, Wolfgang; Tang, Yajun; Ackermann, Renate; Pleissner, Klaus-Peter; Schmid, Monika; Stein, Robert; Zimny-Arndt, Ursula; Kumar, Nalin M.; Jungblut, Peter R.

    2010-01-01

    The occurrence of a nuclear cataract in the eye lens due to disruption of theα3Cx46 connexin gene, Gja3, is dependent on strain background in a mouse model, implicating factors that modify the pathology. The differences upon cataractogenesis in the urea soluble proteins of the lens of two mouse strains, C57BL/6J and 129/SvJ, were analyzed by a comparative proteomics approach. Determination of the complete proteome of an organ offers the opportunity to characterize at a molecular level, differences in gene expression and post-translational modifications occurring during pathology and between individuals. The abundance of 63 protein species was altered between the strains. A unique aspect of this study is the identification of chaperonin subunit 6A, mortalin, ERp29 and syntaxin binding protein 6 in the eye lens. DNA polymorphisms resulting in non-conservative amino acid changes that led to altered physicochemical properties of the proteins were detected for mortalin, chaperonin subunit 6A, annexin A1 and possibly gamma N crystallin. The results show HSP27/25 and/or ERp29 are the likely major modifying factors for cataractogenesis. Extension of the results suggests that small heat shock proteins have a major role for influencing cataract formation in humans. PMID:19003866

  14. Identification of Inhibitors of Biological Interactions Involving Intrinsically Disordered Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Marasco, Daniela; Scognamiglio, Pasqualina Liana

    2015-01-01

    Protein–protein interactions involving disordered partners have unique features and represent prominent targets in drug discovery processes. Intrinsically Disordered Proteins (IDPs) are involved in cellular regulation, signaling and control: they bind to multiple partners and these high-specificity/low-affinity interactions play crucial roles in many human diseases. Disordered regions, terminal tails and flexible linkers are particularly abundant in DNA-binding proteins and play crucial roles in the affinity and specificity of DNA recognizing processes. Protein complexes involving IDPs are short-lived and typically involve short amino acid stretches bearing few “hot spots”, thus the identification of molecules able to modulate them can produce important lead compounds: in this scenario peptides and/or peptidomimetics, deriving from structure-based, combinatorial or protein dissection approaches, can play a key role as hit compounds. Here, we propose a panoramic review of the structural features of IDPs and how they regulate molecular recognition mechanisms focusing attention on recently reported drug-design strategies in the field of IDPs. PMID:25849651

  15. Identification of specific protein markers in microdissected hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Melle, Christian; Ernst, Günther; Scheibner, Olaf; Kaufmann, Roland; Schimmel, Bettina; Bleul, Annett; Settmacher, Utz; Hommann, Merten; Claussen, Uwe; von Eggeling, Ferdinand

    2007-01-01

    At present, the molecular mechanisms of hepatocellular carcinogenesis are not well-understood, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) stays one of the most frequent and high-risk metastatic visceral neoplasms worldwide. For the identification of tumor-relevant proteins, we analyzed microdissected cells from nontumorous liver tissue (n = 28) and tissue derived from hepatic tumor center (n = 25), as well as tumor margin (n = 23). We unequivocally identified 53 proteins from hepatic tumor tissues by peptide fingerprint mapping and SELDI mass spectrometry that were separated using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Among a number of signals that were detected as significantly different in the protein profiling analysis, we identified for the first time ferritin light subunit (FLS) and adenylate kinase 3 alpha-like 1 (AK3), showing decreased expressions in hepatic tumor, as well as biliverdin reductase B (BVRB) that was upregulated in HCC. The use of ProteinChip technology in combination with tissue microdissection gives insight of the complex changes occurring at the protein level in hepatocellular cancer associated with tumor development and progression and resulted in three new potential diagnostically useful markers. PMID:17203974

  16. Identification of differentially expressed serum proteins in gastric adenocarcinoma☆

    PubMed Central

    Subbannayya, Yashwanth; Mir, Sartaj Ahmad; Renuse, Santosh; Manda, Srikanth S.; Pinto, Sneha M.; Puttamallesh, Vinuth N.; Solanki, Hitendra Singh; Manju, H.C.; Syed, Nazia; Sharma, Rakesh; Christopher, Rita; Vijayakumar, M.; Kumar, K.V. Veerendra; Prasad, T.S. Keshava; Ramaswamy, Girija; Kumar, Rekha V.; Chatterjee, Aditi; Pandey, Akhilesh; Gowda, Harsha

    2015-01-01

    Gastric adenocarcinoma is an aggressive cancer with poor prognosis. Blood based biomarkers of gastric cancer have the potential to improve diagnosis and monitoring of these tumors. Proteins that show altered levels in the circulation of gastric cancer patients could prove useful as putative biomarkers. We used an iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic approach to identify proteins that show altered levels in the sera of patients with gastric cancer. Our study resulted in identification of 643 proteins, of which 48 proteins showed increased levels and 11 proteins showed decreased levels in serum from gastric cancer patients compared to age and sex matched healthy controls. Proteins that showed increased expression in gastric cancer included inter-alpha-trypsin inhibitor heavy chain H4 (ITIH4), Mannose-binding protein C (MBL2), sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 2 (IGFBP2), serum amyloid A protein (SAA1), Orosomucoid 1 (ORM1) and extracellular superoxide dismutase [Cu–Zn] (SOD3). We used multiple reaction monitoring assays and validated elevated levels of ITIH4 and SAA1 proteins in serum from gastric cancer patients. Biological significance Gastric cancer is a highly aggressive cancer associated with high mortality. Serum-based biomarkers are of considerable interest in diagnosis and monitoring of various diseases including cancers. Gastric cancer is often diagnosed at advanced stages resulting in poor prognosis and high mortality. Pathological diagnosis using biopsy specimens remains the gold standard for diagnosis of gastric cancer. Serum-based biomarkers are of considerable importance as they are minimally invasive. In this study, we carried out quantitative proteomic profiling of serum from gastric cancer patients to identify proteins that show altered levels in gastric cancer patients. We identified more than 50 proteins that showed altered levels in gastric cancer patient sera. Validation in a large cohort of well

  17. A Simple and Rapid Identification Method for Mycobacterium bovis BCG with Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Kouzaki, Yuji; Maeda, Takuya; Sasaki, Hiroaki; Tamura, Shinsuke; Hamamoto, Takaaki; Yuki, Atsushi; Sato, Akinori; Miyahira, Yasushi; Kawana, Akihiko

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) is widely used as a live attenuated vaccine against Mycobacterium tuberculosis and is an agent for standard prophylaxis against the recurrence of bladder cancer. Unfortunately, it can cause severe infectious diseases, especially in immunocompromised patients, and the ability to immediately distinguish BCG from other M. tuberculosis complexes is therefore important. In this study, we developed a simple and easy-to-perform identification procedure using loop-mediated amplification (LAMP) to detect deletions within the region of difference, which is deleted specifically in all M. bovis BCG strains. Reactions were performed at 64°C for 30 min and successful targeted gene amplifications were detected by real-time turbidity using a turbidimeter and visual inspection of color change. The assay had an equivalent detection limit of 1.0 pg of genomic DNA using a turbidimeter whereas it was 10 pg with visual inspection, and it showed specificity against 49 strains of 44 pathogens, including M. tuberculosis complex. The expected LAMP products were confirmed through identical melting curves in real-time LAMP procedures. We employed the Procedure for Ultra Rapid Extraction (PURE) kit to isolate mycobacterial DNA and found that the highest sensitivity limit with a minimum total cell count of mycobacterium (including DNA purification with PURE) was up to 1 × 103 cells/reaction, based on color changes under natural light with FDA reagents. The detection limit of this procedure when applied to artificial serum, urine, cerebrospinal fluid, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid samples was also about 1 × 103 cells/reaction. Therefore, this substitute method using conventional culture or clinical specimens followed by LAMP combined with PURE could be a powerful tool to enable the rapid identification of M. bovis BCG as point-of-care testing. It is suitable for practical use not only in resource-limited situations, but also in any clinical situation

  18. Rapid Identification of Emerging Human-Pathogenic Sporothrix Species with Rolling Circle Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Anderson M.; Najafzadeh, Mohammad J.; de Hoog, G. Sybren; de Camargo, Zoilo P.

    2015-01-01

    Sporothrix infections are emerging as an important human and animal threat among otherwise healthy patients, especially in Brazil and China. Correct identification of sporotrichosis agents is beneficial for epidemiological surveillance, enabling implementation of adequate public-health policies and guiding antifungal therapy. In areas of limited resources where sporotrichosis is endemic, high-throughput detection methods that are specific and sensitive are preferred over phenotypic methods that usually result in misidentification of closely related Sporothrix species. We sought to establish rolling circle amplification (RCA) as a low-cost screening tool for species-specific identification of human-pathogenic Sporothrix. We developed six species-specific padlock probes targeting polymorphisms in the gene encoding calmodulin. BLAST-searches revealed candidate probes that were conserved intraspecifically; no significant homology with sequences from humans, mice, plants or microorganisms outside members of Sporothrix were found. The accuracy of our RCA-based assay was demonstrated through the specificity of probe-template binding to 25 S. brasiliensis, 58 S. schenckii, 5 S. globosa, 1 S. luriei, 4 S. mexicana, and 3 S. pallida samples. No cross reactivity between closely related species was evident in vitro, and padlock probes yielded 100% specificity and sensitivity down to 3 × 106 copies of the target sequence. RCA-based speciation matched identifications via phylogenetic analysis of the gene encoding calmodulin and the rDNA operon (kappa 1.0; 95% confidence interval 1.0-1.0), supporting its use as a reliable alternative to DNA sequencing. This method is a powerful tool for rapid identification and specific detection of medically relevant Sporothrix, and due to its robustness has potential for ecological studies. PMID:26696992

  19. Rapid Identification of Emerging Human-Pathogenic Sporothrix Species with Rolling Circle Amplification.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Anderson M; Najafzadeh, Mohammad J; de Hoog, G Sybren; de Camargo, Zoilo P

    2015-01-01

    Sporothrix infections are emerging as an important human and animal threat among otherwise healthy patients, especially in Brazil and China. Correct identification of sporotrichosis agents is beneficial for epidemiological surveillance, enabling implementation of adequate public-health policies and guiding antifungal therapy. In areas of limited resources where sporotrichosis is endemic, high-throughput detection methods that are specific and sensitive are preferred over phenotypic methods that usually result in misidentification of closely related Sporothrix species. We sought to establish rolling circle amplification (RCA) as a low-cost screening tool for species-specific identification of human-pathogenic Sporothrix. We developed six species-specific padlock probes targeting polymorphisms in the gene encoding calmodulin. BLAST-searches revealed candidate probes that were conserved intraspecifically; no significant homology with sequences from humans, mice, plants or microorganisms outside members of Sporothrix were found. The accuracy of our RCA-based assay was demonstrated through the specificity of probe-template binding to 25 S. brasiliensis, 58 S. schenckii, 5 S. globosa, 1 S. luriei, 4 S. mexicana, and 3 S. pallida samples. No cross reactivity between closely related species was evident in vitro, and padlock probes yielded 100% specificity and sensitivity down to 3 × 10(6) copies of the target sequence. RCA-based speciation matched identifications via phylogenetic analysis of the gene encoding calmodulin and the rDNA operon (kappa 1.0; 95% confidence interval 1.0-1.0), supporting its use as a reliable alternative to DNA sequencing. This method is a powerful tool for rapid identification and specific detection of medically relevant Sporothrix, and due to its robustness has potential for ecological studies. PMID:26696992

  20. Extraction and identification of electroimmunoprecipitated proteins from agarose gels.

    PubMed

    Beyer, Natascha Helena; Schou, Christian; Houen, Gunnar; Heegaard, Niels H H

    2008-01-31

    A method for the identification of protein antigens captured in electroimmunoprecipitates was developed. Different antigen-antibody precipitates were generated by agarose gel immunoelectrophoresis. The immunoprecipitates were excised and various methods for extracting and dissociating the precipitates were systematically studied by analyzing for protein components of the extracts using peptide mass fingerprinting after sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The optimal recovery of antigen was obtained by 24-h extraction at 37 degrees C using a minimal volume of 0.06 M Tris-HCl, 10% SDS (pH 7). This simple and robust method is useful for the characterization of antibody specificity. It can also be used to identify antigens generating unknown precipitates in crossed immunoelectrophoresis with polyspecific antisera, including human IgG-antigen complexes electroimmunoprecipitated by secondary antibodies. Thus, the method may prove useful as an additional technique in biomarker discovery.

  1. Identification of protein coding regions in RNA transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Shiyuyun; Lomsadze, Alexandre; Borodovsky, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Massive parallel sequencing of RNA transcripts by next-generation technology (RNA-Seq) generates critically important data for eukaryotic gene discovery. Gene finding in transcripts can be done by statistical (alignment-free) as well as by alignment-based methods. We describe a new tool, GeneMarkS-T, for ab initio identification of protein-coding regions in RNA transcripts. The algorithm parameters are estimated by unsupervised training which makes unnecessary manually curated preparation of training sets. We demonstrate that (i) the unsupervised training is robust with respect to the presence of transcripts assembly errors and (ii) the accuracy of GeneMarkS-T in identifying protein-coding regions and, particularly, in predicting translation initiation sites in modelled as well as in assembled transcripts compares favourably to other existing methods. PMID:25870408

  2. Using the global proteome machine for protein identification.

    PubMed

    Beavis, Ronald C

    2006-01-01

    This chapter describes the use of an open-source, freely available informatics system for the identification of proteins using tandem mass spectra of peptides derived from an enzymatic digest of a mixture of mature proteins. The chapter describes the use of features of the Global Proteome Machine (GPM) interface that assist in making comprehensive assignments between spectra and sequences, including the detection of point mutations, posttranslational modifications, and experimental artifacts. The use of this interface to validate results using the GPM Database is also described. This data repository allows analysts to compare their own results to those obtained by other scientists to determine the degree to which their data are consistent with previous measurements.

  3. Identification and comparative analysis of accessory gland proteins in Orthoptera.

    PubMed

    Braswell, W Evan; Andrés, José A; Maroja, Luana S; Harrison, Richard G; Howard, Daniel J; Swanson, Willie J

    2006-09-01

    Accessory reproductive gland proteins (Acps) in Drosophila evolve quickly and appear to play an important role in ensuring the fertilization success of males. Moreover, Acps are thought to be involved in establishing barriers to fertilization between closely related species. While accessory glands are known to occur in the males of many insect groups, the proteins that are passed on to females by males during mating have not been well characterized outside of Drosophila. To gain a better understanding of these proteins, we characterized ESTs from the accessory glands of two cricket species, Allonemobius fasciatus and Gryllus firmus. Using an expressed sequence tag (EST) approach, followed by bioinformatic and evolutionary analyses, we found that many proteins are secreted and, therefore, available for transfer to the female during mating. Further, we found that most ESTs are novel, showing little sequence similarity between taxa. Evolutionary analyses suggest that cricket proteins are subject to diversifying selection and indicate that Allonemobius is much less polymorphic than Gryllus. Despite rapid nucleotide sequence divergence, there appears to be functional conservation of protein classes among Drosophila and cricket taxa.

  4. Rapid identification of intact bacterial resistance plasmids via optical mapping of single DNA molecules.

    PubMed

    Nyberg, Lena K; Quaderi, Saair; Emilsson, Gustav; Karami, Nahid; Lagerstedt, Erik; Müller, Vilhelm; Noble, Charleston; Hammarberg, Susanna; Nilsson, Adam N; Sjöberg, Fei; Fritzsche, Joachim; Kristiansson, Erik; Sandegren, Linus; Ambjörnsson, Tobias; Westerlund, Fredrik

    2016-01-01

    The rapid spread of antibiotic resistance - currently one of the greatest threats to human health according to WHO - is to a large extent enabled by plasmid-mediated horizontal transfer of resistance genes. Rapid identification and characterization of plasmids is thus important both for individual clinical outcomes and for epidemiological monitoring of antibiotic resistance. Toward this aim, we have developed an optical DNA mapping procedure where individual intact plasmids are elongated within nanofluidic channels and visualized through fluorescence microscopy, yielding barcodes that reflect the underlying sequence. The assay rapidly identifies plasmids through statistical comparisons with barcodes based on publicly available sequence repositories and also enables detection of structural variations. Since the assay yields holistic sequence information for individual intact plasmids, it is an ideal complement to next generation sequencing efforts which involve reassembly of sequence reads from fragmented DNA molecules. The assay should be applicable in microbiology labs around the world in applications ranging from fundamental plasmid biology to clinical epidemiology and diagnostics. PMID:27460437

  5. A rapid screening procedure for the identification of high-titer retrovirus packaging clones.

    PubMed

    Murdoch, B; Pereira, D S; Wu, X; Dick, J E; Ellis, J

    1997-07-01

    We have developed a viral RNA (vRNA) dot blot assay for rapid identification of high-titer retrovirus vector production by packaging cell clones. The procedure employs Trizol LS reagent to purify vRNA from packaging cell supernatants, a sensitive dot blot assay, and Phosphorlmager technology to quantify packaged viral genomes in 2 days. Experiments performed on viral supernatants of known biological titer demonstrated that the vRNA dot blot assay was extremely sensitive and that dot intensity correlated directly with viral titer. It is often necessary to analyze approximately 100 virus producing cell clones, making this method useful as a rapid screen to identify the highest virus producing clones. The vRNA dot blot assay consistently identified a subset of candidate high-titer producer cell clones. In three independent screens the supernatant with the highest biological titer was produced by one of the previously defined candidate high-titer producer clones. Our procedure greatly facilitates virus titration by: (1) rapidly eliminating the vast majority of low-titer producer cell clones; (2) accurately identifying the subset of candidate high-titer producer clones for further biological titration and assessment of the proviral genomic structure; and (3) reducing laborious tissue culture manipulations to a minimum. Furthermore, the reliance of this method on molecular detection makes it ideally suited for the isolation of high-titer clones lacking a drug selection marker.

  6. Rapid identification of intact bacterial resistance plasmids via optical mapping of single DNA molecules

    PubMed Central

    Nyberg, Lena K.; Quaderi, Saair; Emilsson, Gustav; Karami, Nahid; Lagerstedt, Erik; Müller, Vilhelm; Noble, Charleston; Hammarberg, Susanna; Nilsson, Adam N.; Sjöberg, Fei; Fritzsche, Joachim; Kristiansson, Erik; Sandegren, Linus; Ambjörnsson, Tobias; Westerlund, Fredrik

    2016-01-01

    The rapid spread of antibiotic resistance – currently one of the greatest threats to human health according to WHO – is to a large extent enabled by plasmid-mediated horizontal transfer of resistance genes. Rapid identification and characterization of plasmids is thus important both for individual clinical outcomes and for epidemiological monitoring of antibiotic resistance. Toward this aim, we have developed an optical DNA mapping procedure where individual intact plasmids are elongated within nanofluidic channels and visualized through fluorescence microscopy, yielding barcodes that reflect the underlying sequence. The assay rapidly identifies plasmids through statistical comparisons with barcodes based on publicly available sequence repositories and also enables detection of structural variations. Since the assay yields holistic sequence information for individual intact plasmids, it is an ideal complement to next generation sequencing efforts which involve reassembly of sequence reads from fragmented DNA molecules. The assay should be applicable in microbiology labs around the world in applications ranging from fundamental plasmid biology to clinical epidemiology and diagnostics. PMID:27460437

  7. Age-Related Declines in Early Sensory Memory: Identification of Rapid Auditory and Visual Stimulus Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Fogerty, Daniel; Humes, Larry E.; Busey, Thomas A.

    2016-01-01

    Age-related temporal-processing declines of rapidly presented sequences may involve contributions of sensory memory. This study investigated recall for rapidly presented auditory (vowel) and visual (letter) sequences presented at six different stimulus onset asynchronies (SOA) that spanned threshold SOAs for sequence identification. Younger, middle-aged, and older adults participated in all tasks. Results were investigated at both equivalent performance levels (i.e., SOA threshold) and at identical physical stimulus values (i.e., SOAs). For four-item sequences, results demonstrated best performance for the first and last items in the auditory sequences, but only the first item for visual sequences. For two-item sequences, adults identified the second vowel or letter significantly better than the first. Overall, when temporal-order performance was equated for each individual by testing at SOA thresholds, recall accuracy for each position across the age groups was highly similar. These results suggest that modality-specific processing declines of older adults primarily determine temporal-order performance for rapid sequences. However, there is some evidence for a second amodal processing decline in older adults related to early sensory memory for final items in a sequence. This selective deficit was observed particularly for longer sequence lengths and was not accounted for by temporal masking. PMID:27199737

  8. Age-Related Declines in Early Sensory Memory: Identification of Rapid Auditory and Visual Stimulus Sequences.

    PubMed

    Fogerty, Daniel; Humes, Larry E; Busey, Thomas A

    2016-01-01

    Age-related temporal-processing declines of rapidly presented sequences may involve contributions of sensory memory. This study investigated recall for rapidly presented auditory (vowel) and visual (letter) sequences presented at six different stimulus onset asynchronies (SOA) that spanned threshold SOAs for sequence identification. Younger, middle-aged, and older adults participated in all tasks. Results were investigated at both equivalent performance levels (i.e., SOA threshold) and at identical physical stimulus values (i.e., SOAs). For four-item sequences, results demonstrated best performance for the first and last items in the auditory sequences, but only the first item for visual sequences. For two-item sequences, adults identified the second vowel or letter significantly better than the first. Overall, when temporal-order performance was equated for each individual by testing at SOA thresholds, recall accuracy for each position across the age groups was highly similar. These results suggest that modality-specific processing declines of older adults primarily determine temporal-order performance for rapid sequences. However, there is some evidence for a second amodal processing decline in older adults related to early sensory memory for final items in a sequence. This selective deficit was observed particularly for longer sequence lengths and was not accounted for by temporal masking.

  9. Age-Related Declines in Early Sensory Memory: Identification of Rapid Auditory and Visual Stimulus Sequences.

    PubMed

    Fogerty, Daniel; Humes, Larry E; Busey, Thomas A

    2016-01-01

    Age-related temporal-processing declines of rapidly presented sequences may involve contributions of sensory memory. This study investigated recall for rapidly presented auditory (vowel) and visual (letter) sequences presented at six different stimulus onset asynchronies (SOA) that spanned threshold SOAs for sequence identification. Younger, middle-aged, and older adults participated in all tasks. Results were investigated at both equivalent performance levels (i.e., SOA threshold) and at identical physical stimulus values (i.e., SOAs). For four-item sequences, results demonstrated best performance for the first and last items in the auditory sequences, but only the first item for visual sequences. For two-item sequences, adults identified the second vowel or letter significantly better than the first. Overall, when temporal-order performance was equated for each individual by testing at SOA thresholds, recall accuracy for each position across the age groups was highly similar. These results suggest that modality-specific processing declines of older adults primarily determine temporal-order performance for rapid sequences. However, there is some evidence for a second amodal processing decline in older adults related to early sensory memory for final items in a sequence. This selective deficit was observed particularly for longer sequence lengths and was not accounted for by temporal masking. PMID:27199737

  10. Rapid condition assessment of structural condition after a blast using state-space identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eskew, Edward; Jang, Shinae

    2015-04-01

    After a blast event, it is important to quickly quantify the structural damage for emergency operations. In order improve the speed, accuracy, and efficiency of condition assessments after a blast, the authors have previously performed work to develop a methodology for rapid assessment of the structural condition of a building after a blast. The method involved determining a post-event equivalent stiffness matrix using vibration measurements and a finite element (FE) model. A structural model was built for the damaged structure based on the equivalent stiffness, and inter-story drifts from the blast are determined using numerical simulations, with forces determined from the blast parameters. The inter-story drifts are then compared to blast design conditions to assess the structures damage. This method still involved engineering judgment in terms of determining significant frequencies, which can lead to error, especially with noisy measurements. In an effort to improve accuracy and automate the process, this paper will look into a similar method of rapid condition assessment using subspace state-space identification. The accuracy of the method will be tested using a benchmark structural model, as well as experimental testing. The blast damage assessments will be validated using pressure-impulse (P-I) diagrams, which present the condition limits across blast parameters. Comparisons between P-I diagrams generated using the true system parameters and equivalent parameters will show the accuracy of the rapid condition based blast assessments.

  11. Shedding light on black boxes in protein identification.

    PubMed

    Vaudel, Marc; Venne, A Saskia; Berven, Frode S; Zahedi, René P; Martens, Lennart; Barsnes, Harald

    2014-05-01

    Performing a well thought-out proteomics data analysis can be a daunting task, especially for newcomers to the field. Even researchers experienced in the proteomics field can find it challenging to follow existing publication guidelines for MS-based protein identification and characterization in detail. One of the primary goals of bioinformatics is to enable any researcher to interpret the vast amounts of data generated in modern biology, by providing user-friendly and robust end-user applications, clear documentation, and corresponding teaching materials. In that spirit, we here present an extensive tutorial for peptide and protein identification, available at http://compomics.com/bioinformatics-for-proteomics. The material is completely based on freely available and open-source tools, and has already been used and refined at numerous international courses over the past 3 years. During this time, it has demonstrated its ability to allow even complete beginners to intuitively conduct advanced bioinformatics workflows, interpret the results, and understand their context. This tutorial is thus aimed at fully empowering users, by removing black boxes in the proteomics informatics pipeline. PMID:24678044

  12. Shedding light on black boxes in protein identification.

    PubMed

    Vaudel, Marc; Venne, A Saskia; Berven, Frode S; Zahedi, René P; Martens, Lennart; Barsnes, Harald

    2014-05-01

    Performing a well thought-out proteomics data analysis can be a daunting task, especially for newcomers to the field. Even researchers experienced in the proteomics field can find it challenging to follow existing publication guidelines for MS-based protein identification and characterization in detail. One of the primary goals of bioinformatics is to enable any researcher to interpret the vast amounts of data generated in modern biology, by providing user-friendly and robust end-user applications, clear documentation, and corresponding teaching materials. In that spirit, we here present an extensive tutorial for peptide and protein identification, available at http://compomics.com/bioinformatics-for-proteomics. The material is completely based on freely available and open-source tools, and has already been used and refined at numerous international courses over the past 3 years. During this time, it has demonstrated its ability to allow even complete beginners to intuitively conduct advanced bioinformatics workflows, interpret the results, and understand their context. This tutorial is thus aimed at fully empowering users, by removing black boxes in the proteomics informatics pipeline.

  13. Identification of two new Pmp22 mouse mutants using large-scale mutagenesis and a novel rapid mapping strategy.

    PubMed

    Isaacs, A M; Davies, K E; Hunter, A J; Nolan, P M; Vizor, L; Peters, J; Gale, D G; Kelsell, D P; Latham, I D; Chase, J M; Fisher, E M; Bouzyk, M M; Potter, A; Masih, M; Walsh, F S; Sims, M A; Doncaster, K E; Parsons, C A; Martin, J; Brown, S D; Rastan, S; Spurr, N K; Gray, I C

    2000-07-22

    Mouse mutants have a key role in discerning mammalian gene function and modelling human disease; however, at present mutants exist for only 1-2% of all mouse genes. In order to address this phenotype gap, we have embarked on a genome-wide, phenotype-driven, large-scale N-ethyl-N--nitrosourea (ENU) mutagenesis screen for dominant mutations of clinical and pharmacological interest in the mouse. Here we describe the identification of two similar neurological phenotypes and determination of the underlying mutations using a novel rapid mapping strategy incorporating speed back-crosses and high throughput genotyping. Two mutant mice were identified with marked resting tremor and further characterized using the SHIRPA behavioural and functional assessment protocol. Back-cross animals were generated using in vitro fertilization and genome scans performed utilizing DNA pools derived from multiple mutant mice. Both mutants were mapped to a region on chromosome 11 containing the peripheral myelin protein 22 gene (Pmp22). Sequence analysis revealed novel point mutations in Pmp22 in both lines. The first mutation, H12R, alters the same amino acid as in the severe human peripheral neuropathy Dejerine Sottas syndrome and Y153TER in the other mutant truncates the Pmp22 protein by seven amino acids. Histological analysis of both lines revealed hypo-myelination of peripheral nerves. This is the first report of the generation of a clinically relevant neurological mutant and its rapid genetic characterization from a large-scale mutagenesis screen for dominant phenotypes in the mouse, and validates the use of large-scale screens to generate desired clinical phenotypes in mice. PMID:10915775

  14. Rapid identification of microorganisms from positive blood cultures by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry subsequent to very short-term incubation on solid medium.

    PubMed

    Idelevich, E A; Schüle, I; Grünastel, B; Wüllenweber, J; Peters, G; Becker, K

    2014-10-01

    Rapid identification of the causative microorganism is important for appropriate antimicrobial therapy of bloodstream infections. Bacteria from positive blood culture (BC) bottles are not readily available for identification by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). Lysis and centrifugation procedures suggested for direct MALDI-TOF MS from positive BCs without previous culture are associated with additional hands-on processing time and costs. Here, we describe an alternative approach applying MALDI-TOF MS from bacterial cultures incubated very briefly on solid medium. After plating of positive BC broth on Columbia blood agar (n = 165), MALDI-TOF MS was performed after 1.5, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 12 and (for control) 24 h of incubation until reliable identification to the species level was achieved (score ≥2.0). Mean incubation time needed to achieve species-level identification was 5.9 and 2.0 h for Gram-positive aerobic cocci (GPC, n = 86) and Gram-negative aerobic rods (GNR, n = 42), respectively. Short agar cultures with incubation times ≤2, ≤4, ≤6, ≤8 and ≤12 h yielded species identification in 1.2%, 18.6%, 64.0%, 96.5%, 98.8% of GPC, and in 76.2%, 95.2%, 97.6%, 97.6%, 97.6% of GNR, respectively. Control species identification at 24 h was achieved in 100% of GPC and 97.6% of GNR. Ethanol/formic acid protein extraction performed for an additional 34 GPC isolates cultivated from positive BCs showed further reduction in time to species identification (3.1 h). MALDI-TOF MS using biomass subsequent to very short-term incubation on solid medium allows very early and reliable bacterial identification from positive BCs without additional time and cost expenditure.

  15. Catheter-related Mycobacterium fortuitum bloodstream infection: rapid identification using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Artacho-Reinoso, M J; Olbrich, P; Solano-Paéz, P; Ybot-Gonzalez, P; Lepe, J A; Neth, O; Aznar, J

    2014-04-01

    We present the case of a 6-year-old boy diagnosed with stage III mediastinal Non Hodgkin Lymphoblastic T cell Lymphoma who suffered from catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBI) due to Mycobacterium fortuitum whilst receiving chemotherapy. Isolation of this rare pathogen was done directly from blood culture and identification was made rapidly within 48 h using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectro-metry as well as specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-reverse hybridization method. This allowed prompt directed antibiotic therapy apart from central venous catheter removal and resulted in an excellent clinical response. This case highlights the potential benefit of using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, a fast, cost-effective and precise methodology, in the diagnosis and subsequent management of invasive bacterial infection. PMID:24554588

  16. Rapid Identification of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) by the Vitek MS Saramis system.

    PubMed

    Shan, Weiguang; Li, Jiaping; Fang, Ying; Wang, Xuan; Gu, Danxia; Zhang, Rong

    2016-01-01

    A rapid, sensitive, and accurate Vitek MS assay was developed to distinguish clinical isolates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) from clinical isolates of methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) by developing an in-house knowledgebase of SuperSpectra. Three unique peaks, including peaks at 2305.6 and 3007.3 Da specific to MRSA, and 6816.7 Da specific to MSSA, were selected for differentiating MRSA and MSSA. This assay accurately identified 84 and 91% of clinical MRSA and MSSA strains out of the total 142 clinically acquired S. aureus strains that were tested. This method will greatly improve the efficiency of single clinical sample identification of MRSA, thereby facilitating a reduction in the transmission of MRSA in clinical settings.

  17. Rapid and low-level toxic PCR-based method for routine identification of Flavobacterium psychrophilum.

    PubMed

    Cepeda, C; Santos, Y

    2000-12-01

    We describe a rapid, low-toxicity and simple method for the detection of the bacterial fish pathogen Flavobacterium psychrophilum. The method, based on the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), combined the electrophoresis of PCR products in a vertical agarose gel and a modified methylene blue stain. DNA was amplified directly either from bacterial suspensions or from tissues experimentally infected with F. psychrophilum, using different non-toxic commercial DNA extraction kits. The protocol allowed to detect 15 to 150 cells of the pathogen in bacterial suspension, without prior DNA extraction, and 7500 to 75,000 cells in seeded spleen tissue and ovarian fluid using Dynabeads DNA DIRECT extraction system. This method, which has the advantage of not using hazardous products, is proposed as a fast tool for routine identification of F. psychrophilum.

  18. Single step, rapid identification of pathogenic microorganisms in a culture bottle.

    PubMed

    Chu, Yu W; Wang, Bo Y; Engebretson, David A; Carey, James R

    2013-10-21

    Efforts to treat bloodstream infections, which have a relatively high mortality rate, are delayed by the lengthy multi-step process required to identify the causative bacteria. Due to this delay, broad spectrum antibiotics are prescribed on a presumptive basis, leading to the rise of antibiotic resistant microorganisms. Here, as proof of principle, we describe a colourimetric sensor that rapidly identifies opportunistic pathogenic bacteria in a single step in TSB media. The device is composed of a reaction chamber and an array of chemoresponsive dyes deposited on a substrate in a prearranged pattern. This single step, disposable, automated system can detect and identify of eight strains of bacteria, starting with clinically relevant concentrations bacteria in twenty four hours in TSB media. Thus, this technology may be used to streamline the current blood culture process by combining detection and identification in a single step.

  19. Rapid Detection and Identification of a Pathogen's DNA Using Phi29 DNA Polymerase

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Y.; Dunn, J.; Gao, S.; Bruno, J. F.; Luft, B. J.

    2008-10-31

    Zoonotic pathogens including those transmitted by insect vectors are some of the most deadly of all infectious diseases known to mankind. A number of these agents have been further weaponized and are widely recognized as being potentially significant biothreat agents. We describe a novel method based on multiply-primed rolling circle in vitro amplification for profiling genomic DNAs to permit rapid, cultivation-free differential detection and identification of circular plasmids in infectious agents. Using Phi29 DNA polymerase and a two-step priming reaction we could reproducibly detect and characterize by DNA sequencing circular DNA from Borrelia burgdorferi B31 in DNA samples containing as little as 25 pg of Borrelia DNA amongst a vast excess of human DNA. This simple technology can ultimately be adapted as a sensitive method to detect specific DNA from both known and unknown pathogens in a wide variety of complex environments.

  20. [Comparison of rapid latex and conventional methods for the identification of Staphylococcus aureus].

    PubMed

    Chen, C H; Chou, M Y

    1991-01-01

    Rapid latex agglutination assay, staphaurex (Wellcome Diagnostics) was compared with the tube coagulase, thermo-stable nuclease, deoxyribonuclease and mannitol fermentation test for the identification of Staphylococcus aureus. A total of 277 clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus, 201 Staphylococcus epidermidis, and 25 Staphylococcus saprophyticus were tested. The results showed that sensitivities were: staphaurex, 99.6%; rabbit plasma, 99.6%; human plasma, 99.2%; thermostable nuclease, 100%; deoxyribonuclease, 100%; mannitol fermentation, 98.9%; as for specificities results showed: staphaurex, 96.6%; rabbit plasma 100%; human plasma, 100%; thermo-stable nuclease, 98.7%; deoxyribonuclease 95.7%; mannitol fermentation, 91.1%; respectively. In our study, staphaurex is recommended because it is simple to operate, save in time and economic in cost.

  1. ID Learning Unit-Diagnostics Update: Current Laboratory Methods for Rapid Pathogen Identification in Patients With Bloodstream Infections.

    PubMed

    Rubach, Matthew P; Hanson, Kimberly E

    2015-12-01

    Diagnostic assays that rapidly identify bloodstream pathogens have the potential to improve patient outcomes and antibiotic stewardship efforts. Current tests are based on the detection of nucleic acids that are specific to a targeted pathogen or based on organism identification using mass spectrometry. Most rapid assays require a positive blood culture as their sample input and expedite pathogen identification by 24-72 hours. For those assays that also report detection of drug resistance markers, information on antimicrobial resistance is expedited by 48-96 hours. This learning unit reviews the basic principles of rapid microorganism identification assays for bloodstream infections with the aim of assisting clinicians in the interpretation and optimal utilization of test results. PMID:26719845

  2. ID Learning Unit—Diagnostics Update: Current Laboratory Methods for Rapid Pathogen Identification in Patients With Bloodstream Infections

    PubMed Central

    Rubach, Matthew P.; Hanson, Kimberly E.

    2015-01-01

    Diagnostic assays that rapidly identify bloodstream pathogens have the potential to improve patient outcomes and antibiotic stewardship efforts. Current tests are based on the detection of nucleic acids that are specific to a targeted pathogen or based on organism identification using mass spectrometry. Most rapid assays require a positive blood culture as their sample input and expedite pathogen identification by 24–72 hours. For those assays that also report detection of drug resistance markers, information on antimicrobial resistance is expedited by 48–96 hours. This learning unit reviews the basic principles of rapid microorganism identification assays for bloodstream infections with the aim of assisting clinicians in the interpretation and optimal utilization of test results. PMID:26719845

  3. Evaluation of three rapid diagnostic methods for direct identification of microorganisms in positive blood cultures.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Raquel M; Bauerle, Elizabeth R; Fang, Ferric C; Butler-Wu, Susan M

    2014-07-01

    The identification of organisms from positive blood cultures generally takes several days. However, recently developed rapid diagnostic methods offer the potential for organism identification within only a few hours of blood culture positivity. In this study, we evaluated the performance of three commercial methods to rapidly identify organisms directly from positive blood cultures: QuickFISH (AdvanDx, Wolburn, MA), Verigene Gram-Positive Blood Culture (BC-GP; Nanosphere, Northbrook, IL), and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) with Sepsityper processing (Bruker Daltonics, Billerica, MA). A total of 159 blood cultures (VersaTREK Trek Diagnostic Systems, Cleveland, OH) positive for Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria as well as yeast were analyzed with QuickFISH and MALDI-TOF MS. In all, 102 blood cultures were analyzed using the BC-GP assay. For monomicrobial cultures, we observed 98.0% concordance with routine methods for both QuickFISH (143/146) and the BC-GP assay (93/95). MALDI-TOF MS demonstrated 80.1% (117/146) and 87.7% (128/146) concordance with routine methods to the genus and species levels, respectively. None of the methods tested were capable of consistently identifying polymicrobial cultures in their entirety or reliably differentiating Streptococcus pneumoniae from viridans streptococci. Nevertheless, the methods evaluated in this study are convenient and accurate for the most commonly encountered pathogens and have the potential to dramatically reduce turnaround time for the provision of results to the treating physician.

  4. Rapid identification of bacterial pathogens using a PCR- and microarray-based assay

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background During the course of a bacterial infection, the rapid identification of the causative agent(s) is necessary for the determination of effective treatment options. We have developed a method based on a modified broad-range PCR and an oligonucleotide microarray for the simultaneous detection and identification of 12 bacterial pathogens at the species level. The broad-range PCR primer mixture was designed using conserved regions of the bacterial topoisomerase genes gyrB and parE. The primer design allowed the use of a novel DNA amplification method, which produced labeled, single-stranded DNA suitable for microarray hybridization. The probes on the microarray were designed from the alignments of species- or genus-specific variable regions of the gyrB and parE genes flanked by the primers. We included mecA-specific primers and probes in the same assay to indicate the presence of methicillin resistance in the bacterial species. The feasibility of this assay in routine diagnostic testing was evaluated using 146 blood culture positive and 40 blood culture negative samples. Results Comparison of our results with those of a conventional culture-based method revealed a sensitivity of 96% (initial sensitivity of 82%) and specificity of 98%. Furthermore, only one cross-reaction was observed upon investigating 102 culture isolates from 70 untargeted bacteria. The total assay time was only three hours, including the time required for the DNA extraction, PCR and microarray steps in sequence. Conclusion The assay rapidly provides reliable data, which can guide optimal antimicrobial treatment decisions in a timely manner. PMID:19664269

  5. Rapid direct identification of Cryptococcus neoformans from pigeon droppings by nested PCR using CNLAC1 gene.

    PubMed

    Chae, H S; Park, G N; Kim, S H; Jo, H J; Kim, J T; Jeoung, H Y; An, D J; Kim, N H; Shin, B W; Kang, Y I; Chang, K S

    2012-08-01

    Isolation and identification of Cryptococcus neoformans and pathogenic yeast-like fungi from pigeon droppings has been taken for a long time and requires various nutrients for its growth. In this study, we attempted to establish a rapid direct identification method of Cr. neoformans from pigeon dropping samples by nested-PCR using internal transcribed spacer (ITS) CAP64 and CNLAC1 genes, polysaccharide capsule gene and laccase-associated gene to produce melanin pigment, respectively, which are common genes of yeasts. The ITS and CAP64 genes were amplified in all pathogenic yeasts, but CNLAC1 was amplified only in Cr. neoformans. The ITS gene was useful for yeast genotyping depending on nucleotide sequence. Homology of CAP64 genes among the yeasts were very high. The specificity of PCR using CNLAC1 was demonstrated in Cr. neoformans environmental strains but not in other yeast-like fungi. The CNLAC1 gene was detected in 5 serotypes of Cr. neoformans. The nested-PCR amplified up to 10(-11) μg of the genomic DNA and showed high sensitivity. All pigeon droppings among 31 Cr. neoformans-positive samples were positive and all pigeon droppings among 348 Cr. neoformans-negative samples were negative by the direct nested-PCR. In addition, after primary enrichment of pigeon droppings in Sabouraud dextrose broth, all Cr. neoformans-negative samples were negative by the nested-PCR, which showed high specificity. The nested-PCR showed high sensitivity without culture of pigeon droppings. Nested-PCR using CNLAC1 provides a rapid and reliable molecular diagnostic method to overcome weak points such as long culture time of many conventional methods.

  6. Evaluation of Three Rapid Diagnostic Methods for Direct Identification of Microorganisms in Positive Blood Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Raquel M.; Bauerle, Elizabeth R.; Fang, Ferric C.

    2014-01-01

    The identification of organisms from positive blood cultures generally takes several days. However, recently developed rapid diagnostic methods offer the potential for organism identification within only a few hours of blood culture positivity. In this study, we evaluated the performance of three commercial methods to rapidly identify organisms directly from positive blood cultures: QuickFISH (AdvanDx, Wolburn, MA), Verigene Gram-Positive Blood Culture (BC-GP; Nanosphere, Northbrook, IL), and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) with Sepsityper processing (Bruker Daltonics, Billerica, MA). A total of 159 blood cultures (VersaTREK Trek Diagnostic Systems, Cleveland, OH) positive for Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria as well as yeast were analyzed with QuickFISH and MALDI-TOF MS. In all, 102 blood cultures were analyzed using the BC-GP assay. For monomicrobial cultures, we observed 98.0% concordance with routine methods for both QuickFISH (143/146) and the BC-GP assay (93/95). MALDI-TOF MS demonstrated 80.1% (117/146) and 87.7% (128/146) concordance with routine methods to the genus and species levels, respectively. None of the methods tested were capable of consistently identifying polymicrobial cultures in their entirety or reliably differentiating Streptococcus pneumoniae from viridans streptococci. Nevertheless, the methods evaluated in this study are convenient and accurate for the most commonly encountered pathogens and have the potential to dramatically reduce turnaround time for the provision of results to the treating physician. PMID:24808235

  7. Rapid Classification and Identification of Microcystis aeruginosa Strains Using MALDI–TOF MS and Polygenetic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Li-Wei; Jiang, Wen-Jing; Sato, Hiroaki; Kawachi, Masanobu; Lu, Xi-Wu

    2016-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption–ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI–TOF MS) was used to establish a rapid, simple, and accurate method to differentiate among strains of Microcystis aeruginosa, one of the most prevalent types of bloom-forming cyanobacteria. M. aeruginosa NIES-843, for which a complete genome has been sequenced, was used to characterize ribosomal proteins as biomarkers and to optimize conditions for observing ribosomal proteins as major peaks in a given mass spectrum. Thirty-one of 52 ribosomal subunit proteins were detected and identified along the mass spectrum. Fifty-five strains of M. aeruginosa from different habitats were analyzed using MALDI–TOF MS; among these samples, different ribosomal protein types were observed. A polygenetic analysis was performed using an unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic means and different ribosomal protein types to classify the strains into five major clades. Two clades primarily contained toxic strains, and the other three clades contained exclusively non-toxic strains. This is the first study to differentiate cyanobacterial strains using MALDI–TOF MS. PMID:27227555

  8. Rapid and high throughput molecular identification of diverse mosquito species by high resolution melting analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ajamma, Yvonne Ukamaka; Mararo, Enock; Omondi, David; Onchuru, Thomas; Muigai, Anne W. T.; Masiga, Daniel; Villinger, Jandouwe

    2016-01-01

    -species. This approach can be employed for rapid identification of mosquitoes. PMID:27703667

  9. Rapid and high throughput molecular identification of diverse mosquito species by high resolution melting analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ajamma, Yvonne Ukamaka; Mararo, Enock; Omondi, David; Onchuru, Thomas; Muigai, Anne W. T.; Masiga, Daniel; Villinger, Jandouwe

    2016-01-01

    -species. This approach can be employed for rapid identification of mosquitoes.

  10. Performance of chromogenic media for Candida in rapid presumptive identification of Candida species from clinical materials

    PubMed Central

    Pravin Charles, M. V.; Kali, Arunava; Joseph, Noyal Mariya

    2015-01-01

    Background: In perspective of the worldwide increase in a number of immunocompromised patients, the need for identification of Candida species has become a major concern. The development of chromogenic differential media, introduced recently, facilitate rapid speciation. However, it can be employed for routine mycology workup only after an exhaustive evaluation of its benefit and cost effectiveness. This study was undertaken to evaluate the benefit and cost effectiveness of chromogenic media for speciation of Candida clinical isolates. Materials and Methods: Sputum samples of 382 patients were screened for the presence of Candida spp. by Gram stain and culture on sabouraud dextrose agar. Candida species were identified using Gram stain morphology, germ tube formation, cornmeal agar with Tween-80, sugar fermentation tests and morphology on HiCrome Candida differential agar. All the Candida isolates were inoculated on HiCrome Candida agar (HiMedia, Mumbai, India). Results: The sensitivity and specificity of HiCrome agar for identification of Candida albicans were 90% and 96.42%, respectively whereas sensitivity and specificity of carbohydrate fermentation test were 86.67% and 74.07%, respectively. Sensitivity and specificity values of HiCrome agar for detection of C. albicans, Candida parapsilosis and Candida glabrata were above 90%. Conclusions: We found HiCrome agar has high sensitivity and specificity comparable to that of the conventional method. In addition, use of this differential media could significantly cut down the turnaround time as well as cost of sample processing. PMID:26109791

  11. Beacon-based (bbFISH®) technology for rapid pathogens identification in blood cultures

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Diagnosis and treatment of bloodstream infections (BSI) are often hampered by the delay in obtaining the final results of blood cultures. Rapid identification of pathogens involved in BSI is of great importance in order to improve survival of septic patients. Beacon-based fluorescent in situ hybridization (hemoFISH® Gram positive and hemoFISH® Gram negative test kits, miacom diagnostics GmbH Düsseldorf, Germany) accelerates the identification of most frequent bacterial pathogens of sepsis. Results In this study a total of 558 blood culture (377 blood culture positive and 181 negative) were tested with the hemoFISH® method and the results were evaluated in comparison with the traditional culture based methods. The overall sensitivity and specificity of the hemoFISH® tests were 94.16% and 100%, while, the PPV and NPV were 100 and 89.16%, respectively. As the hemoFISH® results were obtained within 45 mins, the time difference between the final results of the traditional culture method and the hemoFISH® assay was about two days. Conclusions Considering the good sensitivity and specificity of the hemoFISH® assays as well as the significant time saving in obtaining the final results (p-value 0.0001), the introduction of the system could be rialable in the microbiology laboratories, even alongside the traditional systems. PMID:24750976

  12. Rapid Identification of Chemoresistance Mechanisms Using Yeast DNA Mismatch Repair Mutants.

    PubMed

    Ojini, Irene; Gammie, Alison

    2015-07-21

    Resistance to cancer therapy is a major obstacle in the long-term treatment of cancer. A greater understanding of drug resistance mechanisms will ultimately lead to the development of effective therapeutic strategies to prevent resistance from occurring. Here, we exploit the mutator phenotype of mismatch repair defective yeast cells combined with whole genome sequencing to identify drug resistance mutations in key pathways involved in the development of chemoresistance. The utility of this approach was demonstrated via the identification of the known CAN1 and TOP1 resistance targets for two compounds, canavanine and camptothecin, respectively. We have also experimentally validated the plasma membrane transporter HNM1 as the primary drug resistance target of mechlorethamine. Furthermore, the sequencing of mitoxantrone-resistant strains identified inactivating mutations within IPT1, a gene encoding inositolphosphotransferase, an enzyme involved in sphingolipid biosynthesis. In the case of bactobolin, a promising anticancer drug, the endocytosis pathway was identified as the drug resistance target responsible for conferring resistance. Finally, we show that that rapamycin, an mTOR inhibitor previously shown to alter the fitness of the ipt1 mutant, can effectively prevent the formation of mitoxantrone resistance. The rapid and robust nature of these techniques, using Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model organism, should accelerate the identification of drug resistance targets and guide the development of novel therapeutic combination strategies to prevent the development of chemoresistance in various cancers.

  13. Development of species-specific primers for rapid identification of Debaryomyces hansenii.

    PubMed

    Wrent, Petra; Rivas, Eva-María; Gil de Prado, Elena; Peinado, José M; de Silóniz, María-Isabel

    2015-01-16

    In this work, we developed a specific PCR assay for Debaryomyces hansenii strains that uses a putative homologous PAD1 region (729 bp) present in this yeast species as a target. The amplification of this sequence with the D. hansenii specific primer pair (DhPADF/DhPADR) was found to be a rapid, specific and an affordable method enabling identification of D. hansenii from other yeast strains. Primers were tested in almost 100 strains, 49 strains from Type Culture Collection belonging to the genus Debaryomyces and to other yeast species commonly found in foods or related genera. These primers were able to discriminate between closely related species of Debaryomyces, such as Debaryomyces fabryi and Debaryomyces subglobosus, with a 100% detection rate for D. hansenii. Also, the method was tested in 45 strains from different foods. Results confirmed the specificity of the PCR method and detected two earlier misidentifications of D. hansenii strains obtained by RFLP analysis of the 5.8S ITS rDNA region. Subsequently we confirmed by sequencing the D1/D2 domain of 26S rDNA that these strains belonged to D. fabryi. We call attention in this work to the fact that the RFLPs of the 5.8S ITS rDNA profiles of D. hansenii, D. fabryi and D. subglobosus are the same and this technique will thus lead to incorrect identifications. PMID:25462930

  14. A novel biosensor for rapid identification of high temperature resistant species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lingrui; Xing, Da; Zhou, Xiaoming

    2007-11-01

    In this paper, a novel biosensor technique for identification of high temperature resistant species based on quantitative measurement of delayed fluorescence (DF) is described. The biosensor, which uses light-emitting diode lattice as excitation light source, is portable and can detect DF emission from plants in vivo. Compared with its primary version in our previous report, the biosensor presented here can better control environmental factors. Moreover, the improved biosensor can automatically complete the measurements of light response curves of DF intensity in a programmed mode. The testing of the improved biosensor has been made in two maize species (Zea May L.) after high temperature treatment. Contrast evaluations of the effects of heat stress on seedlings photosynthesis were made from measurements of net photosynthesis rate (Pn) based on consumption of CO II. Current testing has demonstrated that the DF intensity well correlates with Pn in each plant species after heat stress. We thus conclude that the DF technique is a breakthrough to traditional strategy of identifying the differences in heat tolerance based on gas exchange, and can provide a reliable approach for rapid and non-invasive determination of the effects of heat stress on photosynthesis and identification of high temperature resistant species.

  15. Rapid identification of Fusarium graminearum species complex using Rolling Circle Amplification (RCA).

    PubMed

    Davari, Mahdi; van Diepeningen, Anne D; Babai-Ahari, Assadollah; Arzanlou, Mahdi; Najafzadeh, Mohammed Javad; van der Lee, Theo A J; de Hoog, G Sybren

    2012-04-01

    Rolling Circle Amplification (RCA) of DNA is a sensitive and cost effective method for the rapid identification of pathogenic fungi without the need for sequencing. Amplification products can be visualized on 1% agarose gel to verify the specificity of probe-template binding or directly by adding fluorescent dyes. Fusarium Head Blight (FHB) is currently the world's largest threat to the production of cereal crops with the production of a range of mycotoxins as an additional risk. We designed sets of RCA padlock probes based on polymorphisms in the elongation factor 1-α (EF-1α) gene to detect the dominant FHB species, comprising lineages of the Fusarium graminearum species complex (FGSC). The method also enabled the identification of species of the Fusarium oxysporum (FOSC), the Fusarium incarnatum-equiseti (FIESC), and the Fusarium tricinctum (FTSC) species complexes, and used strains from the CBS culture collection as reference. Subsequently probes were applied to characterize isolates from wheat and wild grasses, and inoculated wheat kernels. The RCA assays successfully amplified DNA of the target fungi, both in environmental samples and in the contaminated wheat samples, while no cross reactivity was observed with uncontaminated wheat or related Fusarium species. As RCA does not require expensive instrumentation, the technique has a good potential for local and point of care screening for toxigenic Fusarium species in cereals. PMID:22326479

  16. Evaluation of Fluorescent Capillary Electrophoresis for Rapid Identification of Candida Fungal Infections.

    PubMed

    Obručová, Hana; Tihelková, Radka; Kotásková, Iva; Růžička, Filip; Holá, Veronika; Němcová, Eva; Freiberger, Tomáš

    2016-05-01

    Early diagnosis of fungal infection is critical for initiating antifungal therapy and reducing the high mortality rate in immunocompromised patients. In this study, we focused on rapid and sensitive identification of clinically important Candida species, utilizing the variability in the length of the ITS2 rRNA gene and fluorescent capillary electrophoresis (f-ITS2-PCR-CE). The method was developed and optimized on 29 various Candida reference strains from which 26 Candida species were clearly identified, while Candida guilliermondii, C. fermentati, and C. carpophila, which are closely related, could not be distinguished. The method was subsequently validated on 143 blinded monofungal clinical isolates (comprising 26 species) and was able to identify 88% of species unambiguously. This indicated a higher resolution power than the classical phenotypic approach which correctly identified 73%. Finally, the culture-independent potential of this technique was addressed by the analysis of 55 retrospective DNA samples extracted directly from clinical material. The method showed 100% sensitivity and specificity compared to those of the combined results of cultivation and panfungal PCR followed by sequencing used as a gold standard. In conclusion, this newly developed f-ITS2-PCR-CE analytical approach was shown to be a fast, sensitive, and highly reproducible tool for both culture-dependent and culture-independent identification of clinically important Candida strains, including species of the "psilosis" complex.

  17. Rapid identification and detection of pine pathogenic fungi associated with mountain pine beetles by padlock probes.

    PubMed

    Tsui, Clement K M; Wang, Bin; Khadempour, Lily; Alamouti, Sepideh Massoumi; Bohlmann, Jörg; Murray, Brent W; Hamelin, Richard C

    2010-10-01

    Fifteen million hectares of pine forests in western Canada have been attacked by the mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae; MPB), leading to devastating economic losses. Grosmannia clavigera and Leptographium longiclavatum, are two fungi intimately associated with the beetles, and are crucial components of the epidemic. To detect and discriminate these two closely related pathogens, we utilized a method based on ligase-mediated nucleotide discrimination with padlock probe technology, and signal amplification by hyperbranched rolling circle amplification (HRCA). Two padlock probes were designed to target species-specific single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) located at the inter-generic spacer 2 region and large subunit of the rRNA respectively, which allows discrimination between the two species. Thirty-four strains of G. clavigera and twenty-five strains of L. longiclavatum representing a broad geographic origin were tested with this assay. The HRCA results were largely in agreement with the conventional identification based on morphology or DNA-based methods. Both probes can also efficiently distinguish the two MPB-associated fungi from other fungi in the MPB, as well as other related fungi in the order Ophiostomatales. We also tested this diagnostic method for the direct detection of these fungi from the DNA of MPB. A nested PCR approach was used to enrich amplicons for signal detection. The results confirmed the presence of these two fungi in MPB. Thus, the padlock probe assay coupled with HRCA is a rapid, sensitive and reproducible method for the identification and detection of these ophiostomatoid fungi.

  18. Development of a rapid identification method for Aeromonas species by multiplex-PCR.

    PubMed

    Sen, Keya

    2005-11-01

    Existing biochemical methods cannot distinguish among some species of Aeromonads, while genetic methods are labor intensive. In this study, primers were developed to three genes of Aeromonas: lipase, elastase, and DNA gyraseB. In addition, six previously described primer sets, five corresponding to species-specific signature regions of the 16S rRNA gene from A. veronii, A. popoffii, A. caviae, A. jandaei, and A. schubertii, respectively, and one corresponding to A. hydrophila specific lipase (hydrolipase), were chosen. The primer sets were combined in a series of multiplex-PCR (mPCR) assays against 38 previously characterized strains. Following PCR, each species was distinguished by the production of a unique combination of amplicons. When the assays were tested using 63 drinking water isolates, there was complete agreement in the species identification (ID) for 59 isolates, with ID established by biochemical assays. Sequencing the gyrB and the 16S rRNA gene from the remaining four strains established that the ID obtained by mPCR was correct for three strains. For only one strain, no consensus ID could be obtained. A rapid and reliable method for identification of different Aeromonas species is proposed that does not require restriction enzyme digestions, thus simplifying and speeding up the process.

  19. A cell-free expression and purification process for rapid production of protein biologics.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Challise J; Pendleton, Erik D; Sasmor, Henri H; Hicks, William L; Farnum, John B; Muto, Machiko; Amendt, Eric M; Schoborg, Jennifer A; Martin, Rey W; Clark, Lauren G; Anderson, Mark J; Choudhury, Alaksh; Fior, Raffaella; Lo, Yu-Hwa; Griffey, Richard H; Chappell, Stephen A; Jewett, Michael C; Mauro, Vincent P; Dresios, John

    2016-02-01

    Cell-free protein synthesis has emerged as a powerful technology for rapid and efficient protein production. Cell-free methods are also amenable to automation and such systems have been extensively used for high-throughput protein production and screening; however, current fluidic systems are not adequate for manufacturing protein biopharmaceuticals. In this work, we report on the initial development of a fluidic process for rapid end-to-end production of recombinant protein biologics. This process incorporates a bioreactor module that can be used with eukaryotic or prokaryotic lysates that are programmed for combined transcription/translation of an engineered DNA template encoding for specific protein targets. Purification of the cell-free expressed product occurs through a series of protein separation modules that are configurable for process-specific isolation of different proteins. Using this approach, we demonstrate production of two bioactive human protein therapeutics, erythropoietin and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, in yeast and bacterial extracts, respectively, each within 24 hours. This process is flexible, scalable and amenable to automation for rapid production at the point-of-need of proteins with significant pharmaceutical, medical, or biotechnological value.

  20. Identification and localization of the FMR-1 protein product

    SciTech Connect

    Verheij, C.; Hoogeveen, A.T.; Verkerk, A.J.M.H.; DeGraaf, E.; Bakker, C.; Reuser, A.J.J.

    1994-07-15

    The fragile X syndrome results from amplification of the CGG repeat found in the FMR-1 gene. As a first step in the identification and localization of the FMR-1 gene product, antibodies were raised against different regions of the FMR-1 protein (FMRP). These antibodies were used to analyze FMRP in lymphoblastoid cell lines from patients (n=5) and controls (n=3). FMRP was immunoprecipated and subsequently analyzed by immunoblotting. Four molecular species (67-74 kDa) were found which were absent in 4 of the 5 patients. The lack is in agreement with the absence of FMR-1 mRNA. The patient expressing FMRP`s shows a mosaic DNA pattern with part of the cells carrying a premutation and others carrying a full mutation. The premutation allele is preceded by an unmethylated CpG island and is expressed into FMR-1 mRNA which is subsequently translated into protein. The four different FMRPs most likely result from alternative splicing of the FMR-1 mRNA. Two splice products were mimicked in cDNA constructs transiently expressed in COS-1 cells. Both splice products appeared to encode for stable protein products and were recognized by the antibodies. The molecular weight of the protein products was in agreement with two of the protein products found in the lymphoblastoid cell lines, indicating that the FMRPs detected in lymphoblasts are the result of alternative splicing. The intracellular localization of FMRP in COS-1 cells was cytoplasmatic. The finding of four FMRPs of the same molecular weight in controls and the mosaic patient indicate that the CGG repeat is not translated.

  1. Rapid regulation of nuclear proteins by rapamycin-induced translocation in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Ding, Lin; Laor, Dana; Weisman, Ronit; Forsburg, Susan L

    2014-07-01

    Genetic analysis of protein function requires a rapid means of inactivating the gene under study. Typically, this exploits temperature-sensitive mutations or promoter shut-off techniques. We report the adaptation to Schizosaccharomyces pombe of the anchor-away technique, originally designed in budding yeast by Laemmli lab. This method relies on a rapamycin-mediated interaction between the FRB- and FKBP12-binding domains to relocalize nuclear proteins of interest to the cytoplasm. We demonstrate a rapid nuclear depletion of abundant proteins as proof of principle.

  2. Identification of protein secretion systems in bacterial genomes

    PubMed Central

    Abby, Sophie S.; Cury, Jean; Guglielmini, Julien; Néron, Bertrand; Touchon, Marie; Rocha, Eduardo P. C.

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria with two cell membranes (diderms) have evolved complex systems for protein secretion. These systems were extensively studied in some model bacteria, but the characterisation of their diversity has lagged behind due to lack of standard annotation tools. We built online and standalone computational tools to accurately predict protein secretion systems and related appendages in bacteria with LPS-containing outer membranes. They consist of models describing the systems’ components and genetic organization to be used with MacSyFinder to search for T1SS-T6SS, T9SS, flagella, Type IV pili and Tad pili. We identified ~10,000 candidate systems in bacterial genomes, where T1SS and T5SS were by far the most abundant and widespread. All these data are made available in a public database. The recently described T6SSiii and T9SS were restricted to Bacteroidetes, and T6SSii to Francisella. The T2SS, T3SS, and T4SS were frequently encoded in single-copy in one locus, whereas most T1SS were encoded in two loci. The secretion systems of diderm Firmicutes were similar to those found in other diderms. Novel systems may remain to be discovered, since some clades of environmental bacteria lacked all known protein secretion systems. Our models can be fully customized, which should facilitate the identification of novel systems. PMID:26979785

  3. Rapid identification and source-tracking of Listeria monocytogenes using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jadhav, Snehal; Gulati, Vandana; Fox, Edward M; Karpe, Avinash; Beale, David J; Sevior, Danielle; Bhave, Mrinal; Palombo, Enzo A

    2015-06-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is an important foodborne pathogen responsible for the sometimes fatal disease listeriosis. Public health concerns and stringent regulations associated with the presence of this pathogen in food and food processing environments underline the need for rapid and reliable detection and subtyping techniques. In the current study, the application of matrix assisted laser desorption/ionisation-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) as a single identification and source-tracking tool for a collection of L. monocytogenes isolates, obtained predominantly from dairy sources within Australia, was explored. The isolates were cultured on different growth media and analysed using MALDI-TOF MS at two incubation times (24 and 48 h). Whilst reliable genus-level identification was achieved from most media, identification at the species level was found to be dependent on culture conditions. Successful speciation was highest for isolates cultured on the chromogenic Agar Listeria Ottaviani Agosti agar (ALOA, 91% of isolates) and non-selective horse blood agar (HBA, 89%) for 24h. Chemometric statistical analysis of the MALDI-TOF MS data enabled source-tracking of L. monocytogenes isolates obtained from four different dairy sources. Strain-level discrimination was also observed to be influenced by culture conditions. In addition, t-test/analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to identify potential biomarker peaks that differentiated the isolates according to their source of isolation. Source-tracking using MALDI-TOF MS was compared and correlated with the gold standard pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) technique. The discriminatory index and the congruence between both techniques were compared using the Simpsons Diversity Index and adjusted Rand and Wallace coefficients. Overall, MALDI-TOF MS based source-tracking (using data obtained by culturing the isolates on HBA) and PFGE demonstrated good congruence with a Wallace coefficient of 0.71 and

  4. Rapid changes in protein phosphorylation associated with light-induced gravity perception in corn roots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McFadden, J. J.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of light and calcium depletion on in vivo protein phosphorylation was tested using dark-grown roots of Merit corn. Light caused rapid and specific promotion of phosphorylation of three polypeptides. Pretreatment of roots with ethylene glycol bis N,N,N',N' tetraacetic acid and A23187 prevented light-induced changes in protein phosphorylation. We postulate that these changes in protein phosphorylation are involved in the light-induced gravity response.

  5. Rapid degradation of abnormal proteins in vacuoles from Acer pseudoplatanus L. cells

    SciTech Connect

    Canut, H.; Alibert, G.; Carrasco, A.; Boudet, A.M.

    1986-06-01

    In Acer pseudoplatanus cells, the proteins synthesized in the presence of an amino acid analog ((/sup 14/C)p-fluorophenylalanine), were degraded more rapidly than normal ones ((/sup 14/C)phenylalanine as precursor). The degradation of an important part of these abnormal proteins occurred inside the vacuoles. The degradation process was not apparently associated to a specific proteolytic system but was related to a preferential transfer of these aberrant proteins from the cytoplasm to the vacuole.

  6. Rapid and reliable species identification of wild mushrooms by matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS).

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Ryota; Yamada, Sayumi; Tu, Zhihao; Sugawara, Akiko; Suzuki, Kousuke; Hoshiba, Toshihiro; Eisaka, Sadao; Yamaguchi, Akihiro

    2016-08-31

    Mushrooms are a favourite natural food in many countries. However, some wild species cause food poisoning, sometimes lethal, due to misidentification caused by confusing fruiting bodies similar to those of edible species. The morphological inspection of mycelia, spores and fruiting bodies have been traditionally used for the identification of mushrooms. More recently, DNA sequencing analysis has been successfully applied to mushrooms and to many other species. This study focuses on a simpler and more rapid methodology for the identification of wild mushrooms via protein profiling based on matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). A preliminary study using 6 commercially available cultivated mushrooms suggested that a more reproducible spectrum was obtained from a portion of the cap than from the stem of a fruiting body by the extraction of proteins with a formic acid-acetonitrile mixture (1 + 1). We used 157 wild mushroom-fruiting bodies collected in the centre of Hokkaido from June to November 2014. Sequencing analysis of a portion of the ribosomal RNA gene provided 134 identifications of mushrooms by genus or species, however 23 samples containing 10 unknown species that had lower concordance rate of the nucleotide sequences in a BLAST search (less than 97%) and 13 samples that had unidentifiable poor or mixed sequencing signals remained unknown. MALDI-TOF MS analysis yielded a reproducible spectrum (frequency of matching score ≥ 2.0 was ≥6 spectra from 12 spectra measurements) for 114 of 157 samples. Profiling scores that matched each other within the database gave correct species identification (with scores of ≥2.0) for 110 samples (96%). An in-house prepared database was constructed from 106 independent species, except for overlapping identifications. We used 48 wild mushrooms that were collected in autumn 2015 to validate the in-house database. As a result, 21 mushrooms were identified at the species level with

  7. Rapid and reliable species identification of wild mushrooms by matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS).

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Ryota; Yamada, Sayumi; Tu, Zhihao; Sugawara, Akiko; Suzuki, Kousuke; Hoshiba, Toshihiro; Eisaka, Sadao; Yamaguchi, Akihiro

    2016-08-31

    Mushrooms are a favourite natural food in many countries. However, some wild species cause food poisoning, sometimes lethal, due to misidentification caused by confusing fruiting bodies similar to those of edible species. The morphological inspection of mycelia, spores and fruiting bodies have been traditionally used for the identification of mushrooms. More recently, DNA sequencing analysis has been successfully applied to mushrooms and to many other species. This study focuses on a simpler and more rapid methodology for the identification of wild mushrooms via protein profiling based on matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). A preliminary study using 6 commercially available cultivated mushrooms suggested that a more reproducible spectrum was obtained from a portion of the cap than from the stem of a fruiting body by the extraction of proteins with a formic acid-acetonitrile mixture (1 + 1). We used 157 wild mushroom-fruiting bodies collected in the centre of Hokkaido from June to November 2014. Sequencing analysis of a portion of the ribosomal RNA gene provided 134 identifications of mushrooms by genus or species, however 23 samples containing 10 unknown species that had lower concordance rate of the nucleotide sequences in a BLAST search (less than 97%) and 13 samples that had unidentifiable poor or mixed sequencing signals remained unknown. MALDI-TOF MS analysis yielded a reproducible spectrum (frequency of matching score ≥ 2.0 was ≥6 spectra from 12 spectra measurements) for 114 of 157 samples. Profiling scores that matched each other within the database gave correct species identification (with scores of ≥2.0) for 110 samples (96%). An in-house prepared database was constructed from 106 independent species, except for overlapping identifications. We used 48 wild mushrooms that were collected in autumn 2015 to validate the in-house database. As a result, 21 mushrooms were identified at the species level with

  8. Rapid and reliable detection and identification of GM events using multiplex PCR coupled with oligonucleotide microarray.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaodan; Li, Yingcong; Zhao, Heng; Wen, Si-yuan; Wang, Sheng-qi; Huang, Jian; Huang, Kun-lun; Luo, Yun-bo

    2005-05-18

    To devise a rapid and reliable method for the detection and identification of genetically modified (GM) events, we developed a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) coupled with a DNA microarray system simultaneously aiming at many targets in a single reaction. The system included probes for screening gene, species reference gene, specific gene, construct-specific gene, event-specific gene, and internal and negative control genes. 18S rRNA was combined with species reference genes as internal controls to assess the efficiency of all reactions and to eliminate false negatives. Two sets of the multiplex PCR system were used to amplify four and five targets, respectively. Eight different structure genes could be detected and identified simultaneously for Roundup Ready soybean in a single microarray. The microarray specificity was validated by its ability to discriminate two GM maizes Bt176 and Bt11. The advantages of this method are its high specificity and greatly reduced false-positives and -negatives. The multiplex PCR coupled with microarray technology presented here is a rapid and reliable tool for the simultaneous detection of GM organism ingredients.

  9. FT-IR microspectroscopy in rapid identification of bacteria in pure and mixed culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontoura, Inglid; Belo, Ricardo; Sakane, Kumiko; Cardoso, Maria Angélica Gargione; Khouri, Sônia; Uehara, Mituo; Raniero, Leandro; Martin, Airton A.

    2010-02-01

    In recent years FT-IR microspectroscopy has been developed for microbiology analysis and applied successfully in pure cultures of microorganisms to rapidly identify strains of bacteria, yeasts and fungi. The investigation and characterization of microorganism mixed cultures is also of growing importance, especially in hospitals where it is common to poly-microbial infections. In this work, the rapid identification of bacteria in pure and mixed cultures was studied. The bacteria were obtained from the Institute Oswaldo Cruz culture collection at Brazil. Escherichia coli ATCC 10799 and Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 14456 were analyzed, 3 inoculations were examined in triplicate: Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and a mixed culture of them. The inoculations were prepared according to McFarland 0.5, incubated at 37 ° C for 6 hours, diluted in saline, placed in the CaF2 window and store for one hour at 50°C to obtain thin film. The measurement was performed by Spectrum Spotlight 400 (Perkin-Elmer) equipment in the range of 4000-900 cm-1, with 32 scans using a transmittance technique with point and image modes. The data were processed (baseline, normalization, calculation of first derivate followed by smoothing with 9 point using a Savitzky-Golay algorithm) and a cluster analysis were done by Ward's algorithm and an excellent discrimination between pure and mixed culture was obtained. Our preliminary results indicate that the FT-IR microspectroscopy associated with cluster analysis can be used to discriminate between pure and mixed culture.

  10. Rapid and field-deployable biological and chemical Raman-based identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botonjic-Sehic, Edita; Paxon, Tracy L.; Boudries, Hacene

    2011-06-01

    Pathogen detection using Raman spectroscopy is achieved through the use of a sandwich immunoassay. Antibody-modified magnetic beads are used to capture and concentrate target analytes in solution and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) tags are conjugated with antibodies and act as labels to enable specific detection of biological pathogens. The rapid detection of biological pathogens is critical to first responders, thus assays to detect E.Coli and Anthrax have been developed and will be reported. The problems associated with pathogen detection resulting from the spectral complexity and variability of microorganisms are overcome through the use of SERS tags, which provide an intense, easily recognizable, and spectrally consistent Raman signal. The developed E. coli assay has been tested with 5 strains of E. coli and shows a low limit of detection, on the order of 10 and 100 c.f.u. per assay. Additionally, the SERS assay utilizes magnetic beads to collect the labeled pathogens into the focal point of the detection laser beam, making the assay robust to commonly encountered white powder interferants such as flour, baking powder, and corn starch. The reagents were also found to be stable at room temperature over extended periods of time with testing conducted over a one year period. Finally, through a specialized software algorithm, the assays are interfaced to the Raman instrument, StreetLab Mobile, for rapid-field-deployable biological identification.

  11. Rapid identification of Candida dubliniensis using a species-specific molecular beacon.

    PubMed

    Park, S; Wong, M; Marras, S A; Cross, E W; Kiehn, T E; Chaturvedi, V; Tyagi, S; Perlin, D S

    2000-08-01

    Candida dubliniensis is an opportunistic fungal pathogen that has been linked to oral candidiasis in AIDS patients, although it has recently been isolated from other body sites. DNA sequence analysis of the internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) region of rRNA genes from reference Candida strains was used to develop molecular beacon probes for rapid, high-fidelity identification of C. dubliniensis as well as C. albicans. Molecular beacons are small nucleic acid hairpin probes that brightly fluoresce when they are bound to their targets and have a significant advantage over conventional nucleic acid probes because they exhibit a higher degree of specificity with better signal-to-noise ratios. When applied to an unknown collection of 23 strains that largely contained C. albicans and a smaller amount of C. dubliniensis, the species-specific probes were 100% accurate in identifying both species following PCR amplification of the ITS2 region. The results obtained with the molecular beacons were independently verified by random amplified polymorphic DNA analysis-based genotyping and by restriction enzyme analysis with enzymes BsmAI and NspBII, which cleave recognition sequences within the ITS2 regions of C. dubliniensis and C. albicans, respectively. Molecular beacons are promising new probes for the rapid detection of Candida species.

  12. A complex standard for protein identification, designed by evolution.

    PubMed

    Vaudel, Marc; Burkhart, Julia M; Breiter, Daniela; Zahedi, René P; Sickmann, Albert; Martens, Lennart

    2012-10-01

    Shotgun proteomic investigations rely on the algorithmic assignment of mass spectra to peptides. The quality of these matches is therefore a cornerstone in the analysis and has been the subject of numerous recent developments. In order to establish the benefits of novel algorithms, they are applied to reference samples of known content. However, these were recently shown to be either too simple to resemble typical real-life samples or as leading to results of lower accuracy as the method itself. Here, we describe how to use the proteome of Pyrococcus furiosus , a hyperthermophile, as a standard to evaluate proteomics identification workflows. Indeed, we prove that the Pyrococcus furiosus proteome provides a valid method for detecting random hits, comparable to the decoy databases currently in popular use, but we also prove that the Pyrococcus furiosus proteome goes squarely beyond the decoy approach by also providing many hundreds of highly reliable true positive hits. Searching the Pyrococcus furiosus proteome can thus be used as a unique test that provides the ability to reliably detect both false positives as well as proteome-scale true positives, allowing the rigorous testing of identification algorithms at the peptide and protein level.

  13. An Innovative Method for Rapid Identification and Detection of Vibrio alginolyticus in Different Infection Models

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Kaifei; Li, Jun; Wang, Yuxiao; Liu, Jianfei; Yan, He; Shi, Lei; Zhou, Lijun

    2016-01-01

    Vibrio alginolyticus is one of the most common pathogenic marine Vibrio species, and has been found to cause serious seafood-poisoning or fatal extra-intestinal infections in humans, such as necrotizing soft-tissue infections, bacteremia, septic shock, and multiple organ failures. Delayed accurate diagnosis and treatment of most Vibrio infections usually result to high mortality rates. The objective of this study was to establish a rapid diagnostic method to detect and identify the presence of V. alginolyticus in different samples, so as to facilitate timely treatment. The widely employed conventional methods for detection of V. alginolyticus include biochemical identification and a variety of PCR methods. The former is of low specificity and time-consuming (2–3 days), while the latter has improved accuracy and processing time. Despite such advancements, these methods are still complicated, time-consuming, expensive, require expertise and advanced laboratory systems, and are not optimal for field use. With the goal of providing a simple and efficient way to detect V. alginolyticus, we established a rapid diagnostic method based on loop-mediated Isothermal amplification (LAMP) technology that is feasible to use in both experimental and field environments. Three primer pairs targeting the toxR gene of V. alginolyticus were designed, and amplification was carried out in an ESE tube scanner and Real-Time PCR device. We successfully identified 93 V. alginolyticus strains from a total of 105 different bacterial isolates and confirmed their identity by 16s rDNA sequencing. We also applied this method on infected mouse blood and contaminated scallop samples, and accurate results were both easily and rapidly (20–60 min) obtained. Therefore, the RT-LAMP assay we developed can be conveniently used to detect the presence of V. alginolyticus in different samples. Furthermore, this method will also fulfill the gap for real-time screening of V. alginolyticus infections

  14. Comparison of three commercial rapid agglutination test kits for identification of coagulase positive staphylococci from foods and animals.

    PubMed

    Holme, I J; Rosef, O; Ewald, S

    1991-01-01

    Three rapid agglutination assays for the identification of Staphylococcus aureus Monostaph (Bionor A/S, Skien, Norway), Staphyslide-Test (BioMerieux, Lyon, France) and Staph-Rapid-Test (Roche, Basel, Switzerland), were compared. A total of 104 Gram-positive, catalase positive cocci were tested: Nineteen Staphylococcus reference strains comprising 15 spp. (4 strains were coagulase positive), and 7 Micrococcus reference strains comprising 4 spp.; 22 food isolates comprising 13 S. aureus, 8 coagulase positive Staphylococcus spp., and 1 Micrococcus sp.; 56 animal isolates comprising 11 S. aureus, 9 S. hyicus subsp. hyicus, 2 S. intermedius, 15 coagulase positive and 19 coagulase negative Staphylococcus spp. Totally 54 strains were coagulase positive. Considering agglutination of a coagulase positive strain as a correct identification, Monostaph, Staph-Rapid-Test, and Staphyslide-Test correctly identified 52 (96.3%), 47 (87.0%) and 48 (89.0%) of the coagulase positive staphylococci, respectively. Monostaph, Staph-Rapid-Test and Staphyslide-Test showed 1 (2.0%), 4 (8.0%) and 4 (8.0%) false positive reactions respectively. Monostaph, Staph-Rapid-Test and Staphyslide-Test gave 0 (0.0%), 6 (5.8%) and 7 (6.7%) non-interpretable reactions, respectively. Monostaph may be a good alternative to the tube-coagulase test for rapid and reliable identification of coagulase positive staphylococci from both food and veterinary sources. However, false negative reactions may occur with coagulase positive strains of S. hyicus subsp. hyicus and S. intermedius.

  15. DNA binding protein identification by combining pseudo amino acid composition and profile-based protein representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bin; Wang, Shanyi; Wang, Xiaolong

    2015-10-01

    DNA-binding proteins play an important role in most cellular processes. Therefore, it is necessary to develop an efficient predictor for identifying DNA-binding proteins only based on the sequence information of proteins. The bottleneck for constructing a useful predictor is to find suitable features capturing the characteristics of DNA binding proteins. We applied PseAAC to DNA binding protein identification, and PseAAC was further improved by incorporating the evolutionary information by using profile-based protein representation. Finally, Combined with Support Vector Machines (SVMs), a predictor called iDNAPro-PseAAC was proposed. Experimental results on an updated benchmark dataset showed that iDNAPro-PseAAC outperformed some state-of-the-art approaches, and it can achieve stable performance on an independent dataset. By using an ensemble learning approach to incorporate more negative samples (non-DNA binding proteins) in the training process, the performance of iDNAPro-PseAAC was further improved. The web server of iDNAPro-PseAAC is available at http://bioinformatics.hitsz.edu.cn/iDNAPro-PseAAC/.

  16. Template-based identification of protein-protein interfaces using eFindSitePPI.

    PubMed

    Maheshwari, Surabhi; Brylinski, Michal

    2016-01-15

    Protein-protein interactions orchestrate virtually all cellular processes, therefore, their exhaustive exploration is essential for the comprehensive understanding of cellular networks. A reliable identification of interfacial residues is vital not only to infer the function of individual proteins and their assembly into biological complexes, but also to elucidate the molecular and physicochemical basis of interactions between proteins. With the exponential growth of protein sequence data, computational approaches for detecting protein interface sites have drawn an increased interest. In this communication, we discuss the major features of eFindSite(PPI), a recently developed template-based method for interface residue prediction available at http://brylinski.cct.lsu.edu/efindsiteppi. We describe the requirements and installation procedures for the stand-alone version, and explain the content and format of output data. Furthermore, the functionality of the eFindSite(PPI) web application that is designed to provide a simple and convenient access for the scientific community is presented with illustrative examples. Finally, we discuss common problems encountered in predicting protein interfaces and set forth directions for the future development of eFindSite(PPI). PMID:26235816

  17. High-throughput identification of proteins with AMPylation using self-assembled human protein (NAPPA) microarrays.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaobo; LaBaer, Joshua

    2015-05-01

    AMPylation (adenylylation) has been recognized as an important post-translational modification that is used by pathogens to regulate host cellular proteins and their associated signaling pathways. AMPylation has potential functions in various cellular processes, and it is widely conserved across both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. However, despite the identification of many AMPylators, relatively few candidate substrates of AMPylation are known. This is changing with the recent development of a robust and reliable method for identifying new substrates using protein microarrays, which can markedly expand the list of potential substrates. Here we describe procedures for detecting AMPylated and auto-AMPylated proteins in a sensitive, high-throughput and nonradioactive manner. The approach uses high-density protein microarrays fabricated using nucleic acid programmable protein array (NAPPA) technology, which enables the highly successful display of fresh recombinant human proteins in situ. The modification of target proteins is determined via copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC). The assay can be accomplished within 11 h. PMID:25881200

  18. High-throughput identification of proteins with AMPylation using self-assembled human protein (NAPPA) microarrays.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaobo; LaBaer, Joshua

    2015-05-01

    AMPylation (adenylylation) has been recognized as an important post-translational modification that is used by pathogens to regulate host cellular proteins and their associated signaling pathways. AMPylation has potential functions in various cellular processes, and it is widely conserved across both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. However, despite the identification of many AMPylators, relatively few candidate substrates of AMPylation are known. This is changing with the recent development of a robust and reliable method for identifying new substrates using protein microarrays, which can markedly expand the list of potential substrates. Here we describe procedures for detecting AMPylated and auto-AMPylated proteins in a sensitive, high-throughput and nonradioactive manner. The approach uses high-density protein microarrays fabricated using nucleic acid programmable protein array (NAPPA) technology, which enables the highly successful display of fresh recombinant human proteins in situ. The modification of target proteins is determined via copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC). The assay can be accomplished within 11 h.

  19. Rapid identification of thermotolerant Campylobacter jejuni, Campylobacter coli, Campylobacter lari, and Campylobacter upsaliensis from various geographic locations by a GTPase-based PCR-reverse hybridization assay.

    PubMed

    van Doorn, L J; Verschuuren-van Haperen, A; Burnens, A; Huysmans, M; Vandamme, P; Giesendorf, B A; Blaser, M J; Quint, W G

    1999-06-01

    Recently, a gene from Campylobacter jejuni encoding a putative GTPase was identified. Based on two semiconserved GTP-binding sites encoded within this gene, PCR primers were selected that allow amplification of a 153-bp fragment from C. jejuni, C. coli, C. lari, and C. upsaliensis. Sequence analysis of these PCR products revealed consistent interspecies variation, which allowed the definition of species-specific probes for each of the four thermotolerant Campylobacter species. Multiple probes were used to develop a line probe assay (LiPA) that permits analysis of PCR products by a single reverse hybridization step. A total of 320 reference strains and clinical isolates from various geographic origins were tested by the GTP-based PCR-LiPA. The PCR-LiPA is highly specific in comparison with conventional identification methods, including biochemical and whole-cell protein analyses. In conclusion, a simple method has been developed for rapid and highly specific identification of thermotolerant Campylobacter species.

  20. Rapid fingerprinting of milk thermal processing history by intact protein mass spectrometry with nondenaturing chromatography.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Phil; Philo, Mark; Watson, Andrew; Mills, E N Clare

    2011-12-14

    Thermal processing of foods results in proteins undergoing conformational changes, aggregation, and chemical modification notably with sugars via the Maillard reaction. This can impact their functional, nutritional, and allergenic properties. Native size-exclusion chromatography with online electrospray mass spectrometry (SEC-ESI-MS) was used to characterize processing-induced changes in milk proteins in a range of milk products. Milk products could be readily grouped into either pasteurized liquid milks, heavily processed milks, or milk powders by SEC behavior, particularly by aggregation of whey proteins by thermal processing. Maillard modification of all major milk proteins by lactose was observed by MS and was primarily present in milk powders. The method developed is a rapid tool for fingerprinting the processing history of milk and has potential as a quality control method for food ingredient manufacture. The method described here can profile milk protein oligomeric state, aggregation, and Maillard modification in a single shot, rapid analysis. PMID:22007861

  1. Identification of Antigenic Proteins of the Nosocomial Pathogen Klebsiella pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Hoppe, Sebastian; Bier, Frank F.; von Nickisch-Rosenegk, Markus

    2014-01-01

    The continuous expansion of nosocomial infections around the globe has become a precarious situation. Key challenges include mounting dissemination of multiple resistances to antibiotics, the easy transmission and the growing mortality rates of hospital-acquired bacterial diseases. Thus, new ways to rapidly detect these infections are vital. Consequently, researchers around the globe pursue innovative approaches for point-of-care devices. In many cases the specific interaction of an antigen and a corresponding antibody is pivotal. However, the knowledge about suitable antigens is lacking. The aim of this study was to identify novel antigens as specific diagnostic markers. Additionally, these proteins might be aptly used for the generation of vaccines to improve current treatment options. Hence, a cDNA-based expression library was constructed and screened via microarrays to detect novel antigens of Klebsiella pneumoniae, a prominent agent of nosocomial infections well-known for its extensive antibiotics resistance, especially by extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBL). After screening 1536 clones, 14 previously unknown immunogenic proteins were identified. Subsequently, each protein was expressed in full-length and its immunodominant character examined by ELISA and microarray analyses. Consequently, six proteins were selected for epitope mapping and three thereof possessed linear epitopes. After specificity analysis, homology survey and 3d structural modelling, one epitope sequence GAVVALSTTFA of KPN_00363, an ion channel protein, was identified harboring specificity for K. pneumoniae. The remaining epitopes showed ambiguous results regarding the specificity for K. pneumoniae. The approach adopted herein has been successfully utilized to discover novel antigens of Campylobacter jejuni and Salmonella enterica antigens before. Now, we have transferred this knowledge to the key nosocomial agent, K. pneumoniae. By identifying several novel antigens and their linear

  2. Identification and isolation of a hyperphosphorylated, conformationally changed intermediate of human protein tau expressed in yeast.

    PubMed

    Vandebroek, Tom; Vanhelmont, Thomas; Terwel, Dick; Borghgraef, Peter; Lemaire, Katleen; Snauwaert, Johan; Wera, Stefaan; Van Leuven, Fred; Winderickx, Joris

    2005-08-30

    Hyperphosphorylation and aggregation of protein tau are typical for neurodegenerative tauopathies, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). We demonstrate here that human tau expressed in yeast acquired pathological phosphoepitopes, assumed a pathological conformation, and formed aggregates. These processes were modulated by yeast kinases Mds1 and Pho85, orthologues of GSK-3beta and cdk5, respectively. Surprisingly, inactivation of Pho85 increased phosphorylation of tau-4R, concomitant with increased conformational change defined by antibody MC1 and a 40-fold increase in aggregation. Soluble protein tau, purified from yeast lacking PHO85, spontaneously and rapidly formed tau filaments in vitro. Further fractionation of tau by anion-exchange chromatography yielded a hyperphosphorylated monomeric subfraction, termed hP-tau/MC1, with slow electrophoretic mobility and enriched with all major epitopes, including MC1. Isolated hP-tau/MC1 vastly accelerated in vitro aggregation of wild-type tau-4R, demonstrating its functional capacity to initiate aggregation, as well as its structural stability. Combined, this novel yeast model recapitulates hyperphosphorylation, conformation, and aggregation of protein tau, provides insight in molecular changes crucial in tauopathies, offers a source for isolation of modified protein tau, and has potential for identification of modulating compounds and genes.

  3. Staphylococcal enterotoxin and its rapid identification in foods by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay-based methodology.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Reginald W

    2005-06-01

    The problem of Staphylococcus aureus and other species as contaminants in the food supply remains significant on a global level. Time and temperature abuse of a food product contaminated with enterotoxigenic staphylococci can result in formation of enterotoxin, which can produce foodborne illness when the product is ingested. Between 100 and 200 ng of enterotoxin can cause symptoms consistent with staphylococcal intoxication. Although humans are the primary reservoirs of contamination, animals, air, dust, and food contact surfaces can serve as vehicles in the transfer of this pathogen to the food supply. Foods may become contaminated during production or processing and in homes or food establishments, where the organism can proliferate to high concentrations and subsequently produce enterotoxin. The staphylococcal enterotoxins are highly heat stable and can remain biologically active after exposure to retort temperatures. Prior to the development of serological methods for the identification of enterotoxin, monkeys (gastric intubation) and later kittens (intravenous injection) were used in assays for toxin detection. When enterotoxins were identified as mature proteins that were antigenic, serological assays were developed for use in the laboratory analysis of foods suspected of containing preformed enterotoxin. More recently developed methods are tracer-labeled immunoassays. Of these methods, the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays are highly specific, highly sensitive, and rapid for the detection of enterotoxin in foods.

  4. Human neutrophil calmodulin-binding proteins: identification of the calmodulin-dependent protein phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Blackburn, W.D.; Tallant, E.A.; Wallace, R.W.

    1986-05-01

    The molecular events in linking neutrophil activation and ligand binding to specific membrane receptors are mediated in part by an increase in intracellular Ca/sup 2 +/. One mechanism by which Ca/sup 2 +/ may trigger neutrophil activation is through Ca/sup 2 +//calmodulin (CaM)-regulated proteins and enzymes. To determine which Ca/sup 2 +//CaM-regulated enzymes may be present in the neutrophil, they have used Western blotting techniques and /sup 125/I-CaM to identify neutrophil CaM-binding proteins. Eleven proteins with molecular weights ranging from 230K to 13.5K bound /sup 125/I-CaM in a Ca/sup 2 +/-dependent manner. One predominant region of /sup 125/I-Cam binding was to a 59K protein; a protein with an identical mobility was labeled by an antisera against brain CaM-dependent phosphatase. Ca/sup 2 +/-dependent phosphatase activity, which was inhibited by the CaM antagonist trifluoperazine, was detected in a neutrophil extract; a radioimmunoassay for the phosphatase indicated that it was present in the extract at approximately 0.2 ..mu..g/mg protein. Most of the CaM-binding proteins, including the 59K protein, were rapidly degraded upon lysis of the neutrophil. There was a close correlation between the degradation of the 59K protein and the loss of Ca/sup 2 +/-dependent phosphatase activity in the neutrophil extract. Thus, human neutrophils contain numerous CaM-binding proteins which are presumably Ca/sup 2 +//calmodulin-regulated enzymes and proteins; the 59K protein is a CaM-dependent phosphatase.

  5. Rapid Identification of Helicoverpa armigera and Helicoverpa zea (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) Using Ribosomal RNA Internal Transcribed Spacer 1

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rapid identification of invasive species is crucial for deploying management strategies to prevent establishment. Recent Helicoverpa armigera (Hübner) invasions and subsequent establishment in some countries of South America has increased the risk of this species invading North America. Differentiat...

  6. Phylogenetic Species Identification in Rattus Highlights Rapid Radiation and Morphological Similarity of New Guinean Species

    PubMed Central

    Robins, Judith H.; Tintinger, Vernon; Aplin, Ken P.; Hingston, Melanie; Matisoo-Smith, Elizabeth; Penny, David; Lavery, Shane D.

    2014-01-01

    The genus Rattus is highly speciose, the taxonomy is complex, and individuals are often difficult to identify to the species level. Previous studies have demonstrated the usefulness of phylogenetic approaches to identification in Rattus but some species, especially among the endemics of the New Guinean region, showed poor resolution. Possible reasons for this are simple misidentification, incomplete gene lineage sorting, hybridization, and phylogenetically distinct lineages that are unrecognised taxonomically. To assess these explanations we analysed 217 samples, representing nominally 25 Rattus species, collected in New Guinea, Asia, Australia and the Pacific. To reduce misidentification problems we sequenced museum specimens from earlier morphological studies and recently collected tissues from samples with associated voucher specimens. We also reassessed vouchers from previously sequenced specimens. We inferred combined and separate phylogenies from two mitochondrial DNA regions comprising 550 base pair D-loop sequences and both long (655 base pair) and short (150 base pair) cytochrome oxidase I sequences. Our phylogenetic species identification for 17 species was consistent with morphological designations and current taxonomy thus reinforcing the usefulness of this approach. We reduced misidentifications and consequently the number of polyphyletic species in our phylogenies but the New Guinean Rattus clades still exhibited considerable complexity. Only three of our eight New Guinean species were monophyletic. We found good evidence for either incomplete mitochondrial lineage sorting or hybridization between species within two pairs, R. leucopus/R. cf. verecundus and R. steini/R. praetor. Additionally, our results showed that R. praetor, R. niobe and R. verecundus each likely encompass more than one species. Our study clearly points to the need for a revised taxonomy of the rats of New Guinea, based on broader sampling and informed by both morphology and

  7. VIP Barcoding: composition vector-based software for rapid species identification based on DNA barcoding.

    PubMed

    Fan, Long; Hui, Jerome H L; Yu, Zu Guo; Chu, Ka Hou

    2014-07-01

    Species identification based on short sequences of DNA markers, that is, DNA barcoding, has emerged as an integral part of modern taxonomy. However, software for the analysis of large and multilocus barcoding data sets is scarce. The Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST) is currently the fastest tool capable of handling large databases (e.g. >5000 sequences), but its accuracy is a concern and has been criticized for its local optimization. However, current more accurate software requires sequence alignment or complex calculations, which are time-consuming when dealing with large data sets during data preprocessing or during the search stage. Therefore, it is imperative to develop a practical program for both accurate and scalable species identification for DNA barcoding. In this context, we present VIP Barcoding: a user-friendly software in graphical user interface for rapid DNA barcoding. It adopts a hybrid, two-stage algorithm. First, an alignment-free composition vector (CV) method is utilized to reduce searching space by screening a reference database. The alignment-based K2P distance nearest-neighbour method is then employed to analyse the smaller data set generated in the first stage. In comparison with other software, we demonstrate that VIP Barcoding has (i) higher accuracy than Blastn and several alignment-free methods and (ii) higher scalability than alignment-based distance methods and character-based methods. These results suggest that this platform is able to deal with both large-scale and multilocus barcoding data with accuracy and can contribute to DNA barcoding for modern taxonomy. VIP Barcoding is free and available at http://msl.sls.cuhk.edu.hk/vipbarcoding/.

  8. Identification of recombinant baculoviruses using green fluorescent protein as a selectable marker.

    PubMed

    Wilson, L E; Wilkinson, N; Marlow, S A; Possee, R D; King, L A

    1997-04-01

    A rapid procedure for the production and identification of recombinant baculoviruses is described that uses the autofluorescent properties of the Aquorea victoria green fluorescent protein (GFP). Expression of the GFP cDNA (without signal peptide sequence) in Spodoptera frugiperda cells resulted in the synthesis of a 30-kDa protein, which was confirmed as GFP by Western blotting and by the emission of green fluorescence when illuminated with longwave UV light (495 or 365 nm). To use GFP as a marker for the selection of recombinant baculoviruses, we prepared a virus, BacGFP1, in which the GFP cDNA was inserted in lieu of lacZ in BacPAK6. Before the use of BacPAK6 or BacGFP1 in a cotransfection to prepare recombinant baculoviruses, the virus DNA was linearized with Bsu361 to improve the recovery of non-parental virus plaques. The use of BacGFP1 DNA resulted in the recovery of 79%-91% plaques with the non-parental phenotype. Plaques were rapidly identified by simply exposing them briefly to longwave UV light (365 nm) without the need for exogenous substrates or biological stains. PMID:9105619

  9. Rapid detection and identification of beer-spoilage lactic acid bacteria by microcolony method.

    PubMed

    Asano, Shizuka; Iijima, Kazumaru; Suzuki, Koji; Motoyama, Yasuo; Ogata, Tomoo; Kitagawa, Yasushi

    2009-08-01

    We evaluated a microcolony method for the detection and identification of beer-spoilage lactic acid bacteria (LAB). In this approach, bacterial cells were trapped on a polycarbonate membrane filter and cultured on ABD medium, a medium that allows highly specific detection of beer-spoilage LAB strains. After short-time incubation, viable cells forming microcolonies were stained with carboxyfluorescein diacetate (CFDA) and counted with muFinder Inspection System. In our study, we first investigated the growth behavior of various beer-spoilage LAB by traditional culture method, and Lactobacillus lindneri and several L. paracollinoides strains were selected as slow growers on ABD medium. Then the detection speeds were evaluated by microcolony method, using these slowly growing strains. As a result, all of the slowly growing beer-spoilage LAB strains were detected within 3 days of incubation. The specificity of this method was found to be exceptionally high and even discriminated intra-species differences in beer-spoilage ability of LAB strains upon detection. These results indicate that our microcolony approach allows rapid and specific detection of beer-spoilage LAB strains with inexpensive CFDA staining. For further confirmation of species status of detected strains, subsequent treatment with species-specific fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) probes was shown as effective for identifying the CFDA-detected microcolonies to the species level. In addition, no false-positive results arising from noise signals were recognized for CFDA staining and FISH methods. Taken together, the developed microcolony method was demonstrated as a rapid and highly specific countermeasure against beer-spoilage LAB, and compared favorably with the conventional culture methods. PMID:19619859

  10. Fluorescent In Situ Folding Control for Rapid Optimization of Cell-Free Membrane Protein Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Müller-Lucks, Annika; Bock, Sinja; Wu, Binghua; Beitz, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Cell-free synthesis is an open and powerful tool for high-yield protein production in small reaction volumes predestined for high-throughput structural and functional analysis. Membrane proteins require addition of detergents for solubilization, liposomes, or nanodiscs. Hence, the number of parameters to be tested is significantly higher than with soluble proteins. Optimization is commonly done with respect to protein yield, yet without knowledge of the protein folding status. This approach contains a large inherent risk of ending up with non-functional protein. We show that fluorophore formation in C-terminal fusions with green fluorescent protein (GFP) indicates the folding state of a membrane protein in situ, i.e. within the cell-free reaction mixture, as confirmed by circular dichroism (CD), proteoliposome reconstitution and functional assays. Quantification of protein yield and in-gel fluorescence intensity imply suitability of the method for membrane proteins of bacterial, protozoan, plant, and mammalian origin, representing vacuolar and plasma membrane localization, as well as intra- and extracellular positioning of the C-terminus. We conclude that GFP-fusions provide an extension to cell-free protein synthesis systems eliminating the need for experimental folding control and, thus, enabling rapid optimization towards membrane protein quality. PMID:22848743

  11. Rapid identification of transience in streambed conductance by inversion of floodwave responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gianni, Guillaume; Richon, Julien; Perrochet, Pierre; Vogel, Alexandre; Brunner, Philip

    2016-04-01

    Streambed conductance controls the interaction between surface and groundwater. However, the streambed conductance is often subject to transience. Directly measuring hydraulic properties in a river yields only point values, is time-consuming and therefore not suited to detect transience of physical properties. Here, we present a method to continuously monitor transience in streambed conductance. Input data are time series of stream stage and near stream hydraulic head. The method is based on the inversion of floodwave responses. The analytical model consists of three parameters: x, the distance between streambank and an observation well, α, the aquifer diffusivity, and a the retardation coefficient that is inversely proportional to the streambed conductance. Estimation of a is carried out over successive time steps in order to identify transience in streambed conductance. The method is tested using synthetic data and is applied to field data from the Rhône River and its alluvial aquifer (Switzerland). The synthetic method demonstrated the robustness of the proposed methodology. Application of the method to the field data allowed identifying transience in streambed properties, following flood events in the Rhône. This method requires transience in the surface water, and the river should not change its width significantly with a rising water level. If these conditions are fulfilled, this method allows for a rapid and effective identification of transience in streambed conductance.

  12. Rapid Identification of Paragonimiasis Foci by Lay Informants in Lao People's Democratic Republic

    PubMed Central

    Odermatt, Peter; Veasna, Duong; Zhang, Wei; Vannavong, Nanthasane; Phrommala, Souraxay; Habe, Shigehisa; Barennes, Hubert; Strobel, Michel

    2009-01-01

    Background Paragonimiasis is a food-borne trematodiasis leading to lung disease. Worldwide, an estimated 21 million people are infected. Foci of ongoing transmission remain often unnoticed. We evaluated a simple questionnaire approach using lay-informants at the village level to identify paragonimiasis foci and suspected paragonimiasis cases. Methodology/Principal Findings The study was carried out in an endemic area of Lao People's Democratic Republic. Leaders of 49 remote villages in northern Vientiane Province were asked to notify suspected paragonimiasis patients using a four-item questionnaire sent through administrative channels: persons responding positively for having chronic cough (more than 3 weeks) and/or blood in sputum with or without fever. We validated the village leaders' reports in ten representative villages with a door-to-door survey. We examined three sputa of suspected patients for the presence of Paragonimus eggs and acid fast bacilli. 91.8% of village leaders participated and notified a total of 220 suspected patients; 76.2% were eventually confirmed; an additional 138 suspected cases were found in the survey. Sensitivity of village leaders' notice for “chronic cough” and “blood in sputum” was 100%; “blood in sputum” alone reached a sensitivity of 85.7%. Significance Our approach led to the identification of three previously unknown foci of transmission. A rapid and simple lay-informant questionnaire approach is a promising low-cost community diagnostic tool of paragonimiasis control programs. PMID:19771150

  13. Potential of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for the rapid identification of carious teeth.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vivek K; Rai, Awadhesh K

    2011-05-01

    The importance of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for the rapid identification of teeth affected by caries has been demonstrated. The major and minor elemental constituents of teeth samples were analyzed using the prominent transitions of the atomic lines present in the sample. The elements detected in the tooth sample were: calcium, magnesium, copper, zinc, strontium, titanium, carbon, phosphorous, hydrogen, oxygen, sodium, and potassium. The results revealed that the caries-affected part contained a less amount of calcium and phosphorous in comparison to the healthy part of the tooth sample, whereas higher content of magnesium, copper, zinc, strontium, carbon, sodium, and potassium were present in the caries-affected part. For the first time, we have observed that hydrogen and oxygen were less in healthy parts compared to the caries-affected part of the tooth sample. The density of calcium and phosphorous, which are the main matrix of teeth, was less in the caries-affected part than in the healthy part. The variation in densities of the trace constituents like magnesium and carbon, etc., in caries and healthy parts of the tooth sample are also discussed. The presence of different metal elements in healthy and caries-affected parts of the tooth samples and the possible role of different metal elements in the formation of caries have been discussed.

  14. RAPHIDOPHYCEAE [CHADEFAUD EX SILVA] SYSTEMATICS AND RAPID IDENTIFICATION: SEQUENCE ANALYSES AND REAL-TIME PCR ASSAYS

    PubMed Central

    Bowers, Holly A.; Tomas, Carmelo; Tengs, Torstein; Kempton, Jason W.; Lewitus, Alan J.; Oldach, David W.

    2010-01-01

    Species within the class Raphidophyceae were associated with fish kill events in Japanese, European, Canadian, and U.S. coastal waters. Fish mortality was attributable to gill damage with exposure to reactive oxygen species (peroxide, superoxide, and hydroxide radicals), neurotoxins, physical clogging, and hemolytic substances. Morphological identification of these organisms in environmental water samples is difficult, particularly when fixatives are used. Because of this difficulty and the continued global emergence of these species in coastal estuarine waters, we initiated the development and validation of a suite of real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays. Sequencing was used to generate complete data sets for nuclear encoded small-subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA; 18S); internal transcribed spacers 1 and 2, 5.8S; and plastid encoded SSU rRNA (16S) for confirmed raphidophyte cultures from various geographic locations. Sequences for several Chattonella species (C. antiqua, C. marina, C. ovata, C. subsalsa, and C. verruculosa), Heterosigma akashiwo, and Fibrocapsa japonica were generated and used to design rapid and specific PCR assays for several species including C. verruculosa Hara et Chihara, C. subsalsa Biecheler, the complex comprised of C. marina Hara et Chihara, C. antiqua Ono and C. ovata, H. akashiwo Ono, and F. japonica Toriumi et Takano using appropriate loci. With this comprehensive data set, we were also able to perform phylogenetic analyses to determine the relationship between these species. PMID:20411032

  15. An integrated lab-on-chip for rapid identification and simultaneous differentiation of tropical pathogens.

    PubMed

    Tan, Jeslin J L; Capozzoli, Monica; Sato, Mitsuharu; Watthanaworawit, Wanitda; Ling, Clare L; Mauduit, Marjorie; Malleret, Benoît; Grüner, Anne-Charlotte; Tan, Rosemary; Nosten, François H; Snounou, Georges; Rénia, Laurent; Ng, Lisa F P

    2014-01-01

    Tropical pathogens often cause febrile illnesses in humans and are responsible for considerable morbidity and mortality. The similarities in clinical symptoms provoked by these pathogens make diagnosis difficult. Thus, early, rapid and accurate diagnosis will be crucial in patient management and in the control of these diseases. In this study, a microfluidic lab-on-chip integrating multiplex molecular amplification and DNA microarray hybridization was developed for simultaneous detection and species differentiation of 26 globally important tropical pathogens. The analytical performance of the lab-on-chip for each pathogen ranged from 102 to 103 DNA or RNA copies. Assay performance was further verified with human whole blood spiked with Plasmodium falciparum and Chikungunya virus that yielded a range of detection from 200 to 4×105 parasites, and from 250 to 4×107 PFU respectively. This lab-on-chip was subsequently assessed and evaluated using 170 retrospective patient specimens in Singapore and Thailand. The lab-on-chip had a detection sensitivity of 83.1% and a specificity of 100% for P. falciparum; a sensitivity of 91.3% and a specificity of 99.3% for P. vivax; a positive 90.0% agreement and a specificity of 100% for Chikungunya virus; and a positive 85.0% agreement and a specificity of 100% for Dengue virus serotype 3 with reference methods conducted on the samples. Results suggested the practicality of an amplification microarray-based approach in a field setting for high-throughput detection and identification of tropical pathogens.

  16. Ultrasensitive detection and rapid identification of multiple foodborne pathogens with the naked eyes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Heng; Zhang, Yali; Lin, Yankui; Liang, Tongwen; Chen, Zhihua; Li, Jinfeng; Yue, Zhenfeng; Lv, Jingzhang; Jiang, Qing; Yi, Changqing

    2015-09-15

    In this study, a novel approach for ultrasensitive detection and rapid high-throughput identification of a panel of common foodborne pathogens with the naked eyes is presented. As a proof-of-concept application, a multiple pathogen analysis array is fabricated through immobilizing three specific polyT-capture probes which can respectively recognize rfbE gene (Escherichia coli O157:H7), invA gene (Salmonella enterica), inlA gene (Listeria monocytogenes) on the plastic substrates. PCR has been developed for amplification and labeling target genes of rfbE, invA, inlA with biotin. The biotinated target DNA is then captured onto the surface of plastic strips through specific DNA hybridization. The succeeding staining of biotinated DNA duplexes with avidin-horseradish peroxidise (AV-HRP) and biotinated anti-HRP antibody greatly amplifies the detectable signal through the multiple cycle signal amplification strategy, and thus realizing ultrasensitive and specific detection of the above three pathogens in food samples with the naked eyes. Results showed approximately 5 copies target pathogenic DNA could be detected with the naked eyes. This simple but very efficient colorimetric assay also show excellent anti-interference capability and good stability, and can be readily applied to point-of-care diagnosis.

  17. Development of an overnight rapid bovine identification test (ORBIT) for field use.

    PubMed

    Mageau, R P; Cutrufelli, M E; Schwab, B; Johnston, R W

    1984-01-01

    An Overnight Rapid Bovine Identification Test (ORBIT) has been developed as a serological screen test for species verification of raw, whole tissue, bovine meat products. The test, an agar-gel immunodiffusion technique, uses stabilized reagent paper discs and prepared agar plates that have a printed template for correct placement of test components. This test is reliable, practical, economical, and easily performed in the field, such as at a meat import inspection station. The only nonbovine species found to react in the test are the bovine-related species of American bison (buffalo) and water buffalo (from Australia); however, these rare-occurring species do not present a problem for the intended application of the test. Stability of all test components, when stored in a refrigerator, is excellent for at least 1 year. The nature and stability of the test make it suitable for commercial development into test kits which should be highly practical and economical for wide availability and application of this procedure to meat inspection programs concerned with species verification.

  18. Rapid removal of unincorporated label and proteins from DNA sequencing reactions.

    PubMed

    Kaczorowski, T; Sektas, M

    1996-04-01

    This article presents a simple and rapid method for removal of unincorporated label and proteins from DNA sequencing reactions by using Wizard purification resin. This method can be successfully applied for preparation of end-labeled oligonucleotides free of unincorporated label, which is important in experiments (including DNA sequencing) when the level of background should be as low as possible. Also, this method is effective in removal of proteins from DNA sequencing reactions. PMID:8734430

  19. Transduction proteins of olfactory receptor cells: identification of guanine nucleotide binding proteins and protein kinase C

    SciTech Connect

    Anholt, R.R.H.; Mumby, S.M.; Stoffers, D.A.; Girard, P.R.; Kuo, J.F.; Snyder, S.H.

    1987-02-10

    The authors have analyzed guanine nucleotide binding proteins (G-proteins) in the olfactory epithelium of Rana catesbeiana using subunit-specific antisera. The olfactory epithelium contained the ..cap alpha.. subunits of three G-proteins, migrating on polyacrylamide gels in SDS with apparent molecular weights of 45,000, 42,000, and 40,000, corresponding to G/sub s/, G/sub i/, and G/sub o/, respectively. A single ..beta.. subunit with an apparent molecular weight of 36,000 was detected. An antiserum against the ..cap alpha.. subunit of retinal transducin failed to detect immunoreactive proteins in olfactory cilia detached from the epithelium. The olfactory cilia appeared to be enriched in immunoreactive G/sub s..cap alpha../ relative to G/sub ichemically bond/ and G/sub ochemically bond/ when compared to membranes prepared from the olfactory epithelium after detachment of the cilia. Bound antibody was detected by autoradiography after incubation with (/sup 125/I)protein. Immunohistochemical studies using an antiserum against the ..beta.. subunit of G-proteins revealed intense staining of the ciliary surface of the olfactory epithelium and of the axon bundles in the lamina propria. In contrast, an antiserum against a common sequence of the ..cap alpha.. subunits preferentially stained the cell membranes of the olfactory receptor cells and the acinar cells of Bowman's glands and the deep submucosal glands. In addition to G-proteins, they have identified protein kinase C in olfactory cilia via a protein kinase C specific antiserum and via phorbol ester binding. However, in contrast to the G-proteins, protein kinase C occurred also in cilia isolated from respiratory epithelium.

  20. Rapid identification and quantitation for oral bacteria based on short-end capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jin; Ni, Yi; Liu, Chenchen; Yamaguchi, Yoshinori; Chen, Qinmiao; Sekine, Shinichi; Zhu, Xifang; Dou, Xiaoming

    2016-11-01

    High-speed capillary electrophoresis (HSCE) is a promising technology applied in ultra-rapid and high-performance analysis of biomolecules (such as nucleic acids, protein). In present study, the short-end capillary electrophoresis coupled with one novel space domain internal standard method (SDIS) was employed for the rapid and simultaneous analysis of specific genes from three oral bacteria (Porphyromonas gingivalis (P.g), Treponema denticola (T.d) and Tannerela forsythia (T.f)). The reliability, reproducibility and accuracy properties of above mentioned SDIS method were investigated in detail. The results showed the target gene fragments of P.g, T.d and T.f could be precisely, fast identified and quantitated within 95s via present short-end CE system. The analyte concentration and the ratio of space domain signals (between target sample and internal standard sample) featured a well linear relationship calculated via SDIS method. And the correlation coefficients R(2) and detection limits for P.g, T.d, T.f genes were 0.9855, 0.9896, 0.9969 and 0.077, 0.114 and 0.098ng/μl, respectively. PMID:27591633

  1. Development of a rapid and simple method for detection of protein contaminants in carmine.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Norihisa; Ohtsu, Yutaka; Maezawa-Kase, Daisuke; Sano, Ken-Ichi

    2015-01-01

    Protein contaminants in carmine can cause dyspnea and anaphylactic reactions in users and consumers of products containing this pigment. The method generally used for detection of proteins in carmine has low reproducibility and is time-consuming. In this study, a rapid, simple, and highly reproducible method was developed for the detection of protein contaminants in carmine. This method incorporates acidic protein denaturation conditions and ultrafiltration. To prevent protein aggregation, sodium dodecyl sulfate containing gel electrophoresis running buffer was used for dispersing the carmine before filtration. An ultrafiltration device was used to separate the protein contaminants from carminic acid in the carmine solution. Two ultrafiltration devices were compared, and a cylindrical device containing a modified polyethersulfone membrane gave the best results. The method had high reproducibility. PMID:25892994

  2. Development of a Rapid and Simple Method for Detection of Protein Contaminants in Carmine

    PubMed Central

    Nakayama, Norihisa; Ohtsu, Yutaka; Maezawa-Kase, Daisuke; Sano, Ken-Ichi

    2015-01-01

    Protein contaminants in carmine can cause dyspnea and anaphylactic reactions in users and consumers of products containing this pigment. The method generally used for detection of proteins in carmine has low reproducibility and is time-consuming. In this study, a rapid, simple, and highly reproducible method was developed for the detection of protein contaminants in carmine. This method incorporates acidic protein denaturation conditions and ultrafiltration. To prevent protein aggregation, sodium dodecyl sulfate containing gel electrophoresis running buffer was used for dispersing the carmine before filtration. An ultrafiltration device was used to separate the protein contaminants from carminic acid in the carmine solution. Two ultrafiltration devices were compared, and a cylindrical device containing a modified polyethersulfone membrane gave the best results. The method had high reproducibility. PMID:25892994

  3. Rapid search for tertiary fragments reveals protein sequence–structure relationships

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jianfu; Grigoryan, Gevorg

    2015-01-01

    Finding backbone substructures from the Protein Data Bank that match an arbitrary query structural motif, composed of multiple disjoint segments, is a problem of growing relevance in structure prediction and protein design. Although numerous protein structure search approaches have been proposed, methods that address this specific task without additional restrictions and on practical time scales are generally lacking. Here, we propose a solution, dubbed MASTER, that is both rapid, enabling searches over the Protein Data Bank in a matter of seconds, and provably correct, finding all matches below a user-specified root-mean-square deviation cutoff. We show that despite the potentially exponential time complexity of the problem, running times in practice are modest even for queries with many segments. The ability to explore naturally plausible structural and sequence variations around a given motif has the potential to synthesize its design principles in an automated manner; so we go on to illustrate the utility of MASTER to protein structural biology. We demonstrate its capacity to rapidly establish structure–sequence relationships, uncover the native designability landscapes of tertiary structural motifs, identify structural signatures of binding, and automatically rewire protein topologies. Given the broad utility of protein tertiary fragment searches, we hope that providing MASTER in an open-source format will enable novel advances in understanding, predicting, and designing protein structure. PMID:25420575

  4. Rapid Oligo-Galacturonide Induced Changes in Protein Phosphorylation in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Kohorn, Bruce D; Hoon, Divya; Minkoff, Benjamin B; Sussman, Michael R; Kohorn, Susan L

    2016-04-01

    The wall-associated kinases (WAKs)(1)are receptor protein kinases that bind to long polymers of cross-linked pectin in the cell wall. These plasma-membrane-associated protein kinases also bind soluble pectin fragments called oligo-galacturonides (OGs) released from the wall after pathogen attack and damage. WAKs are required for cell expansion during development but bind water soluble OGs generated from walls with a higher affinity than the wall-associated polysaccharides. OGs activate a WAK-dependent, distinct stress-like response pathway to help plants resist pathogen attack. In this report, a quantitative mass-spectrometric-based phosphoproteomic analysis was used to identify Arabidopsis cellular events rapidly induced by OGsin planta Using N(14/)N(15)isotopicin vivometabolic labeling, we screened 1,000 phosphoproteins for rapid OG-induced changes and found 50 proteins with increased phosphorylation, while there were none that decreased significantly. Seven of the phosphosites within these proteins overlap with those altered by another signaling molecule plants use to indicate the presence of pathogens (the bacterial "elicitor" peptide Flg22), indicating distinct but overlapping pathways activated by these two types of chemicals. Genetic analysis of genes encoding 10 OG-specific and two Flg22/OG-induced phosphoproteins reveals that null mutations in eight proteins compromise the OG response. These phosphorylated proteins with genetic evidence supporting their role in the OG response include two cytoplasmic kinases, two membrane-associated scaffold proteins, a phospholipase C, a CDPK, an unknown cadmium response protein, and a motor protein. Null mutants in two proteins, the putative scaffold protein REM1.3, and a cytoplasmic receptor like kinase ROG2, enhance and suppress, respectively, a dominantWAKallele. Altogether, the results of these chemical and genetic experiments reveal the identity of several phosphorylated proteins involved in the kinase

  5. Evaluation of FilmArray and Verigene Systems for Rapid Identification of Positive Blood Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Bhatti, M. M.; Boonlayangoor, S.; Beavis, K. G.

    2014-01-01

    The Verigene tests for Gram-positive and Gram-negative organisms in blood culture and the FilmArray blood culture identification panel were assessed for their ability to identify pathogens from positive blood cultures. Both platforms correctly identified bacteria in 92% of monomicrobial cultures analyzed, with times to identification that were significantly shorter than those for identification from subcultures. PMID:25031445

  6. Rapid identification of Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei by intact cell Matrix-assisted Laser Desorption/Ionisation mass spectrometric typing

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Burkholderia (B.) pseudomallei and B. mallei are genetically closely related species. B. pseudomallei causes melioidosis in humans and animals, whereas B. mallei is the causative agent of glanders in equines and rarely also in humans. Both agents have been classified by the CDC as priority category B biological agents. Rapid identification is crucial, because both agents are intrinsically resistant to many antibiotics. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) has the potential of rapid and reliable identification of pathogens, but is limited by the availability of a database containing validated reference spectra. The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of MALDI-TOF MS for the rapid and reliable identification and differentiation of B. pseudomallei and B. mallei and to build up a reliable reference database for both organisms. Results A collection of ten B. pseudomallei and seventeen B. mallei strains was used to generate a library of reference spectra. Samples of both species could be identified by MALDI-TOF MS, if a dedicated subset of the reference spectra library was used. In comparison with samples representing B. mallei, higher genetic diversity among B. pseudomallei was reflected in the higher average Eucledian distances between the mass spectra and a broader range of identification score values obtained with commercial software for the identification of microorganisms. The type strain of B. pseudomallei (ATCC 23343) was isolated decades ago and is outstanding in the spectrum-based dendrograms probably due to massive methylations as indicated by two intensive series of mass increments of 14 Da specifically and reproducibly found in the spectra of this strain. Conclusions Handling of pathogens under BSL 3 conditions is dangerous and cumbersome but can be minimized by inactivation of bacteria with ethanol, subsequent protein extraction under BSL 1 conditions and MALDI-TOF MS analysis being faster than

  7. Rapid identification of human SNAP-25 transcript variants by a miniaturized capillary electrophoresis system.

    PubMed

    Németh, Nóra; Kerékgyártó, Márta; Sasvári-Székely, Mária; Rónai, Zsolt; Guttman, András

    2014-02-01

    The 25 kDa synaptosomal-associated protein (SNAP-25) is a crucial component of the soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor complex and plays an important role in neurotransmission in the central nervous system. SNAP-25 has two different splice variants, SNAP-25a and SNAP-25b, differing in nine amino acids that results in a slight functional alteration of the generated soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor complex. Two independent techniques, a PCR-miniaturized CE method and a real-time PCR based approach were elaborated for the specific and quantitative detection of the two SNAP-25 transcription variants. DNA-constructs coding for the two isoforms were used for optimization. Excellent specificity was observed with the use of our previously described highly sensitive miniaturized CE system in combination with quantitative PCR. The ratio of the two isoforms were reliably detected in a range of at least four orders of magnitude with a linear regression of R(2) = 0.987. Expression of the two isoforms was determined in human samples, where SNAP-25 was detected even in non-neural tissues, although at approximately a 100-fold lower level compared to the central nervous system. The relative amount of the SNAP-25b isoform was higher in the brain, whereas expression of SNAP-25a variant proved to be slightly higher in extra-neural cell types. The genomics approach in conjunction with the miniaturized CE system introduced in this paper is readily applicable for rapid alternative splice variant analysis.

  8. Towards a Black-Box for Biological EXAFS Data Analysis - I. Identification of Zinc Finger Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Wellenreuther, Gerd; Meyer-Klaucke, Wolfram

    2007-02-02

    EXAFS allows the determination of metal binding motifs in proteins. Here we present an algorithm for the identification of one subgroup, the Zinc finger proteins, by an automated refinement of biological EXAFS data. In combination with scoring criteria inspired by high resolution crystal structures these refinements led to the identification of these motifs, that playing an important role in protein-DNA and protein-RNA interactions. Robust criteria were identified investigating several EXAFS data sets from different zinc binding proteins. For all structural zinc motifs the automated EXAFS refinement led to results consistent with published ones.

  9. Data requirements for protein identification using chemically-assisted fragmentation and tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Juhlin, Kenton D; Swift, Dionne D; Lacey, Martin P; Correa, Paul E; Keough, Thomas W

    2005-01-01

    Many laboratories identify proteins by searching tandem mass spectrometry data against genomic or protein sequence databases. These database searches typically use the measured peptide masses or the derived peptide sequence and, in this paper, we focus on the latter. We study the minimum peptide sequence data requirements for definitive protein identification from protein sequence databases. Accurate mass measurements are not needed for definitive protein identification, even when a limited amount of sequence data is available for searching. This information has implications for the mass spectrometry performance (and cost), data base search strategies and proteomics research.

  10. P2P proteomics -- data sharing for enhanced protein identification

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In order to tackle the important and challenging problem in proteomics of identifying known and new protein sequences using high-throughput methods, we propose a data-sharing platform that uses fully distributed P2P technologies to share specifications of peer-interaction protocols and service components. By using such a platform, information to be searched is no longer centralised in a few repositories but gathered from experiments in peer proteomics laboratories, which can subsequently be searched by fellow researchers. Methods The system distributively runs a data-sharing protocol specified in the Lightweight Communication Calculus underlying the system through which researchers interact via message passing. For this, researchers interact with the system through particular components that link to database querying systems based on BLAST and/or OMSSA and GUI-based visualisation environments. We have tested the proposed platform with data drawn from preexisting MS/MS data reservoirs from the 2006 ABRF (Association of Biomolecular Resource Facilities) test sample, which was extensively tested during the ABRF Proteomics Standards Research Group 2006 worldwide survey. In particular we have taken the data available from a subset of proteomics laboratories of Spain's National Institute for Proteomics, ProteoRed, a network for the coordination, integration and development of the Spanish proteomics facilities. Results and Discussion We performed queries against nine databases including seven ProteoRed proteomics laboratories, the NCBI Swiss-Prot database and the local database of the CSIC/UAB Proteomics Laboratory. A detailed analysis of the results indicated the presence of a protein that was supported by other NCBI matches and highly scored matches in several proteomics labs. The analysis clearly indicated that the protein was a relatively high concentrated contaminant that could be present in the ABRF sample. This fact is evident from the information that

  11. A Rapid Method for Determining the Concentration of Recombinant Protein Secreted from Pichia pastoris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, L. W.; Zhao, Y.; Niu, L. P.; Jiang, R.; Song, Y.; Feng, H.; feng, K.; Qi, C.

    2011-02-01

    Pichia secretive expression system is one of powerful eukaryotic expression systems in genetic engineering, which is especially suitable for industrial utilization. Because of the low concentration of the target protein in initial experiment, the methods and conditions for expression of the target protein should be optimized according to the protein yield repetitively. It is necessary to set up a rapid, simple and convenient analysis method for protein expression levels instead of the generally used method such as ultrafiltration, purification, dialysis, lyophilization and so on. In this paper, acetone precipitation method was chosen to concentrate the recombinant protein firstly after comparing with four different protein precipitation methods systematically, and then the protein was analyzed by SDS-Polyacrylamide Gel Electrophoresis. The recombinant protein was determined with the feature of protein band by the Automated Image Capture and 1-D Analysis Software directly. With this method, the optimized expression conditions of basic fibroblast growth factor secreted from pichia were obtained, which is as the same as using traditional methods. Hence, a convenient tool to determine the optimized conditions for the expression of recombinant proteins in Pichia was established.

  12. WDR76 Co-Localizes with Heterochromatin Related Proteins and Rapidly Responds to DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Gilmore, Joshua M.; Sardiu, Mihaela E.; Groppe, Brad D.; Thornton, Janet L.; Liu, Xingyu; Dayebgadoh, Gerald; Banks, Charles A.; Slaughter, Brian D.; Unruh, Jay R.; Workman, Jerry L.; Florens, Laurence; Washburn, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    Proteins that respond to DNA damage play critical roles in normal and diseased states in human biology. Studies have suggested that the S. cerevisiae protein CMR1/YDL156w is associated with histones and is possibly associated with DNA repair and replication processes. Through a quantitative proteomic analysis of affinity purifications here we show that the human homologue of this protein, WDR76, shares multiple protein associations with the histones H2A, H2B, and H4. Furthermore, our quantitative proteomic analysis of WDR76 associated proteins demonstrated links to proteins in the DNA damage response like PARP1 and XRCC5 and heterochromatin related proteins like CBX1, CBX3, and CBX5. Co-immunoprecipitation studies validated these interactions. Next, quantitative imaging studies demonstrated that WDR76 was recruited to laser induced DNA damage immediately after induction, and we compared the recruitment of WDR76 to laser induced DNA damage to known DNA damage proteins like PARP1, XRCC5, and RPA1. In addition, WDR76 co-localizes to puncta with the heterochromatin proteins CBX1 and CBX5, which are also recruited to DNA damage but much less intensely than WDR76. This work demonstrates the chromatin and DNA damage protein associations of WDR76 and demonstrates the rapid response of WDR76 to laser induced DNA damage. PMID:27248496

  13. Rapid identification of Pterocarpus santalinus and Dalbergia louvelii by FTIR and 2D correlation IR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fang-Da; Xu, Chang-Hua; Li, Ming-Yu; Huang, An-Min; Sun, Su-Qin

    2014-07-01

    Since Pterocarpus santalinus and Dalbergia louvelii, which are of precious Rosewood, are very similar in their appearance and anatomy characteristics, cheaper Hongmu D. louvelii is often illegally used to impersonate valuable P. santalinus, especially in Chinese furniture manufacture. In order to develop a rapid and effective method for easy confused wood furniture differentiation, we applied tri-step identification method, i.e., conventional infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), second derivative infrared (SD-IR) spectroscopy and two-dimensional correlation infrared (2DCOS-IR) spectroscopy to investigate P. santalinus and D. louvelii furniture. According to FT-IR and SD-IR spectra, it has been found two unconditional stable difference at 848 cm-1 and 700 cm-1 and relative stable differences at 1735 cm-1, 1623 cm-1, 1614 cm-1, 1602 cm-1, 1509 cm-1, 1456 cm-1, 1200 cm-1, 1158 cm-1, 1055 cm-1, 1034 cm-1 and 895 cm-1 between D. louvelii and P. santalinus IR spectra. The stable discrepancy indicates that the category of extractives is different between the two species. Besides, the relative stable differences imply that the content of holocellulose in P. santalinus is more than that of D. louvelii, whereas the quantity of extractives in D. louvelii is higher. Furthermore, evident differences have been observed in their 2DCOS-IR spectra of 1550-1415 cm-1 and 1325-1030 cm-1. P. santalinus has two strong auto-peaks at 1459 cm-1 and 1467 cm-1, three mid-strong auto-peaks at 1518 cm-1, 1089 cm-1 and 1100 cm-1 and five weak auto-peaks at 1432 cm-1, 1437 cm-1, 1046 cm-1, 1056 cm-1 and 1307 cm-1 while D. louvelii has four strong auto-peaks at 1465 cm-1, 1523 cm-1, 1084 cm-1 and 1100 cm-1, four mid-strong auto-peaks at 1430 cm-1, 1499 cm-1, 1505 cm-1 and 1056 cm-1 and two auto-peaks at 1540 cm-1 and 1284 cm-1. This study has proved that FT-IR integrated with 2DCOS-IR could be applicable for precious wood furniture authentication in a direct, rapid and holistic manner.

  14. Randomized Trial of Rapid Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction–Based Blood Culture Identification and Susceptibility Testing

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Ritu; Teng, Christine B.; Cunningham, Scott A.; Ihde, Sherry M.; Steckelberg, James M.; Moriarty, James P.; Shah, Nilay D.; Mandrekar, Jayawant N.; Patel, Robin

    2015-01-01

    Background. The value of rapid, panel-based molecular diagnostics for positive blood culture bottles (BCBs) has not been rigorously assessed. We performed a prospective randomized controlled trial evaluating outcomes associated with rapid multiplex PCR (rmPCR) detection of bacteria, fungi, and resistance genes directly from positive BCBs. Methods. A total of 617 patients with positive BCBs underwent stratified randomization into 3 arms: standard BCB processing (control, n = 207), rmPCR reported with templated comments (rmPCR, n = 198), or rmPCR reported with templated comments and real-time audit and feedback of antimicrobial orders by an antimicrobial stewardship team (rmPCR/AS, n = 212). The primary outcome was antimicrobial therapy duration. Secondary outcomes were time to antimicrobial de-escalation or escalation, length of stay (LOS), mortality, and cost. Results. Time from BCB Gram stain to microorganism identification was shorter in the intervention group (1.3 hours) vs control (22.3 hours) (P < .001). Compared to the control group, both intervention groups had decreased broad-spectrum piperacillin-tazobactam (control 56 hours, rmPCR 44 hours, rmPCR/AS 45 hours; P = .01) and increased narrow-spectrum β-lactam (control 42 hours, rmPCR 71 hours, rmPCR/AS 85 hours; P = .04) use, and less treatment of contaminants (control 25%, rmPCR 11%, rmPCR/AS 8%; P = .015). Time from Gram stain to appropriate antimicrobial de-escalation or escalation was shortest in the rmPCR/AS group (de-escalation: rmPCR/AS 21 hours, control 34 hours, rmPCR 38 hours, P < .001; escalation: rmPCR/AS 5 hours, control 24 hours, rmPCR 6 hours, P = .04). Groups did not differ in mortality, LOS, or cost. Conclusions. rmPCR reported with templated comments reduced treatment of contaminants and use of broad-spectrum antimicrobials. Addition of antimicrobial stewardship enhanced antimicrobial de-escalation. Clinical Trials Registration. NCT01898208. PMID:26197846

  15. Hypertonic stress induces rapid and widespread protein damage in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Burkewitz, Kris; Choe, Keith; Strange, Kevin

    2011-09-01

    Proteostasis is defined as the homeostatic mechanisms that maintain the function of all cytoplasmic proteins. We recently demonstrated that the capacity of the proteostasis network is a critical factor that defines the limits of cellular and organismal survival in hypertonic environments. The current studies were performed to determine the extent of protein damage induced by cellular water loss. Using worm strains expressing fluorescently tagged foreign and endogenous proteins and proteins with temperature-sensitive point mutations, we demonstrate that hypertonic stress causes aggregation and misfolding of diverse proteins in multiple cell types. Protein damage is rapid. Aggregation of a polyglutamine yellow fluorescent protein reporter is observable with <1 h of hypertonic stress, and aggregate volume doubles approximately every 10 min. Aggregate formation is irreversible and occurs after as little as 10 min of exposure to hypertonic conditions. To determine whether endogenous proteins are aggregated by hypertonic stress, we quantified the relative amount of total cellular protein present in detergent-insoluble extracts. Exposure for 4 h to 400 mM or 500 mM NaCl induced a 55-120% increase in endogenous protein aggregation. Inhibition of insulin signaling or acclimation to mild hypertonic stress increased survival under extreme hypertonic conditions and prevented aggregation of endogenous proteins. Our results demonstrate that hypertonic stress causes widespread and dramatic protein damage and that cells have a significant capacity to remodel the network of proteins that function to maintain proteostasis. These findings have important implications for understanding how cells cope with hypertonic stress and other protein-damaging stressors. PMID:21613604

  16. Use of electrochemical DNA biosensors for rapid molecular identification of uropathogens in clinical urine specimens.

    PubMed

    Liao, Joseph C; Mastali, Mitra; Gau, Vincent; Suchard, Marc A; Møller, Annette K; Bruckner, David A; Babbitt, Jane T; Li, Yang; Gornbein, Jeffrey; Landaw, Elliot M; McCabe, Edward R B; Churchill, Bernard M; Haake, David A

    2006-02-01

    We describe the first species-specific detection of bacterial pathogens in human clinical fluid samples using a microfabricated electrochemical sensor array. Each of the 16 sensors in the array consisted of three single-layer gold electrodes-working, reference, and auxiliary. Each of the working electrodes contained one representative from a library of capture probes, each specific for a clinically relevant bacterial urinary pathogen. The library included probes for Escherichia coli, Proteus mirabilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterocococcus spp., and the Klebsiella-Enterobacter group. A bacterial 16S rRNA target derived from single-step bacterial lysis was hybridized both to the biotin-modified capture probe on the sensor surface and to a second, fluorescein-modified detector probe. Detection of the target-probe hybrids was achieved through binding of a horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-conjugated anti-fluorescein antibody to the detector probe. Amperometric measurement of the catalyzed HRP reaction was obtained at a fixed potential of -200 mV between the working and reference electrodes. Species-specific detection of as few as 2,600 uropathogenic bacteria in culture, inoculated urine, and clinical urine samples was achieved within 45 min from the beginning of sample processing. In a feasibility study of this amperometric detection system using blinded clinical urine specimens, the sensor array had 100% sensitivity for direct detection of gram-negative bacteria without nucleic acid purification or amplification. Identification was demonstrated for 98% of gram-negative bacteria for which species-specific probes were available. When combined with a microfluidics-based sample preparation module, the integrated system could serve as a point-of-care device for rapid diagnosis of urinary tract infections.

  17. Potential of mid IR spectroscopy in the rapid label free identification of skin malignancies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kastl, Lena; Kemper, Björn; Lloyd, Gavin R.; Nallala, Jayakrupakar; Stone, Nick; Naranjo, Valery; Penaranda, Francisco; Schnekenburger, Jürgen

    2016-03-01

    The rapid inspection of suspicious skin lesions for pathological cell types is the objective of optical point of care diagnostics technologies. A marker free fast diagnosis of skin malignancies would overcome the limitations of the current gold standard surgical biopsy. The time consuming and costly biopsy procedure requires the inspection of each sample by a trained pathologist, which limits the analysis of potentially malignant lesions. Optical technologies like RAMAN or infrared spectroscopy, which provide both, localization and chemical information, can be used to differentiate malignant from healthy tissue by the analysis of multi cell structures and cell type specific spectra. We here report the application of midIR spectroscopy towards fast and reliable skin diagnostics. Within the European research project MINERVA we developed standardized in vitro skin systems with increasing complexity, from single skin cell types as fibroblasts, keratinocytes and melanoma cells, to mixtures of these and finally three dimensional human skin equivalents. The standards were characterized in the established midIR range and also with newly developed systems for fast imaging up to 12 μm. The analysis of the spectra by novel data processing algorithms demonstrated the clear separation of all cell types, especially the tumor cells. The signals from single cell layers were sufficient for cell type differentiation. We have compared different midIR systems and found all of them suitable for specific cell type identification. Our data demonstrate the potential of midIR spectroscopy for fast image acquisition and an improved data processing as sensitive and specific optical biopsy technology.

  18. Rapid Identification of Pseudomonas spp. via Raman Spectroscopy Using Pyoverdine as Capture Probe.

    PubMed

    Pahlow, Susanne; Stöckel, Stephan; Pollok, Sibyll; Cialla-May, Dana; Rösch, Petra; Weber, Karina; Popp, Jürgen

    2016-02-01

    Pyoverdine is a substance which is excreted by fluorescent pseudomonads in order to scavenge iron from their environment. Due to specific receptors of the bacterial cell wall, the iron loaded pyoverdine molecules are recognized and transported into the cell. This process can be exploited for developing efficient isolation and enrichment strategies for members of the Pseudomonas genus, which are capable of colonizing various environments and also include human pathogens like P. aeruginosa and the less virulent P. fluorescens. A significant advantage over antibody based systems is the fact that siderophores like pyoverdine can be considered as "immutable ligands," since the probability for mutations within the siderophore uptake systems of bacteria is very low. While each species of Pseudomonas usually produces structurally unique pyoverdines, which can be utilized only by the producer strain, cross reactivity does occur. In order to achieve a reliable identification of the captured pathogens, further investigations of the isolated cells are necessary. In this proof of concept study, we combine the advantages of an isolation strategy relying on "immutable ligands" with the high specificity and speed of Raman microspectroscopy. In order to isolate the bacterial cells, pyoverdine was immobilized covalently on planar aluminum chip substrates. After capturing, single cell Raman spectra of the isolated species were acquired. Due to the specific spectroscopic fingerprint of each species, the bacteria can be identified. This approach allows a very rapid detection of potential pathogens, since time-consuming culturing steps are unnecessary. We could prove that pyoverdine based isolation of bacteria is fully Raman compatible and further investigated the capability of this approach by isolating and identifying P. aeruginosa and P. fluorescens from tap water samples, which are both opportunistic pathogens and can pose a threat for immunocompromised patients. PMID:26705822

  19. Identification of Protein Succination as a Novel Modification of Tubulin

    PubMed Central

    Piroli, Gerardo G.; Manuel, Allison M.; Walla, Michael D.; Jepson, Matthew J.; Brock, Jonathan W.C.; Rajesh, Mathur P.; Tanis, Ross M.; Cotham, William E.; Frizzell, Norma

    2015-01-01

    Protein succination is a stable post-translational modification that occurs when fumarate reacts with cysteine residues to generate S-(2-succino)cysteine (2SC). We demonstrate that both alpha (α) and beta (β) tubulin are increasingly modified by succination in 3T3-L1 adipocytes and in the adipose tissue of db/db mice. Incubation of purified tubulin from porcine brain with fumarate (50 mM) or the pharmacological compound dimethylfumarate (DMF, 500 μM) inhibited polymerization up to 35% and 59%, respectively. Using mass spectrometry we identified Cys347α, Cys376α, Cys12β and Cys303β as sites of succination in porcine brain tubulin and the relative abundance of succination at these cysteines increased in association with fumarate concentration. The increase in succination after incubation with fumarate altered tubulin recognition by an anti-α-tubulin antibody. Succinated tubulin in adipocytes cultured in high glucose vs. normal glucose also had reduced reactivity with the anti-αtubulin antibody; suggesting that succination may interfere with tubulin:protein interactions. DMF reacted rapidly with 11 of the 20 cysteines in the αβ tubulin dimer, decreased the number of free sulfhydryls and inhibited the proliferation of 3T3-L1 fibroblasts. Our data suggests that inhibition of tubulin polymerization is an important, undocumented mechanism of action of DMF. Taken together, our results demonstrate that succination is a novel post-translational modification of tubulin and suggest that extensive modification by fumarate, either physiologically or pharmacologically, may alter microtubule dynamics. PMID:24909641

  20. Rapid Identification of the Foodborne Pathogen Trichinella spp. by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mayer-Scholl, Anne; Murugaiyan, Jayaseelan; Neumann, Jennifer; Bahn, Peter; Reckinger, Sabine; Nöckler, Karsten

    2016-01-01

    Human trichinellosis occurs through consumption of raw or inadequately processed meat or meat products containing larvae of the parasitic nematodes of the genus Trichinella. Currently, nine species and three genotypes are recognized, of which T. spiralis, T. britovi and T. pseudospiralis have the highest public health relevance. To date, the differentiation of the larvae to the species and genotype level is based primarily on molecular methods, which can be relatively time consuming and labor intensive. Due to its rapidness and ease of use a matrix assisted laser desorption / ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) reference spectra database using Trichinella strains of all known species and genotypes was created. A formicacid/acetonitrile protein extraction was carried out after pooling 10 larvae of each Trichinella species and genotype. Each sample was spotted 9 times using α-cyano 4-hydoxy cinnamic acid matrix and a MicroFlex LT mass spectrometer was used to acquire 3 spectra (m/z 2000 to 20000 Da) from each spot resulting in 27 spectra/species or genotype. Following the spectra quality assessment, Biotyper software was used to create a main spectra library (MSP) representing nine species and three genotypes of Trichinella. The evaluation of the spectra generated by MALDI-TOF MS revealed a classification which was comparable to the results obtained by molecular methods. Also, each Trichinella species utilized in this study was distinct and distinguishable with a high confidence level. Further, different conservation methods such as freezing and conservation in alcohol and the host species origin of the isolated larvae did not have a significant influence on the generated spectra. Therefore, the described MALDI-TOF MS can successfully be implemented for both genus and species level identification and represents a major step forward in the use of this technique in foodborne parasitology.

  1. Rapid Identification of the Foodborne Pathogen Trichinella spp. by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Mayer-Scholl, Anne; Murugaiyan, Jayaseelan; Neumann, Jennifer; Bahn, Peter; Reckinger, Sabine; Nöckler, Karsten

    2016-01-01

    Human trichinellosis occurs through consumption of raw or inadequately processed meat or meat products containing larvae of the parasitic nematodes of the genus Trichinella. Currently, nine species and three genotypes are recognized, of which T. spiralis, T. britovi and T. pseudospiralis have the highest public health relevance. To date, the differentiation of the larvae to the species and genotype level is based primarily on molecular methods, which can be relatively time consuming and labor intensive. Due to its rapidness and ease of use a matrix assisted laser desorption / ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) reference spectra database using Trichinella strains of all known species and genotypes was created. A formicacid/acetonitrile protein extraction was carried out after pooling 10 larvae of each Trichinella species and genotype. Each sample was spotted 9 times using α-cyano 4-hydoxy cinnamic acid matrix and a MicroFlex LT mass spectrometer was used to acquire 3 spectra (m/z 2000 to 20000 Da) from each spot resulting in 27 spectra/species or genotype. Following the spectra quality assessment, Biotyper software was used to create a main spectra library (MSP) representing nine species and three genotypes of Trichinella. The evaluation of the spectra generated by MALDI-TOF MS revealed a classification which was comparable to the results obtained by molecular methods. Also, each Trichinella species utilized in this study was distinct and distinguishable with a high confidence level. Further, different conservation methods such as freezing and conservation in alcohol and the host species origin of the isolated larvae did not have a significant influence on the generated spectra. Therefore, the described MALDI-TOF MS can successfully be implemented for both genus and species level identification and represents a major step forward in the use of this technique in foodborne parasitology. PMID:26999436

  2. Microtubule protein ADP-ribosylation in vitro leads to assembly inhibition and rapid depolymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Scaife, R.M. ); Wilson, L. ); Purich, D.L. )

    1992-01-14

    Bovine brain microtubule protein, containing both tubulin and microtubule-associated proteins, undergoes ADP-ribosylation in the presence of ({sup 14}C)NAD{sup +} and a turkey erythrocyte mono-ADP-ribosyltransferase in vitro. The modification reaction could be demonstrated in crude brain tissue extracts where selective ADP-ribosylation of both the {alpha} and {beta} chains of tubulin and of the high molecular weight microtubule-associated protein MAP-2 occurred. In experiments with purified microtubule protein, tubulin dimer, the high molecular weight microtubule-associated protein MAP-2, and another high molecular weight microtubule-associated protein which may be a MAP-1 species were heavily labeled. Tubulin and MAP-2 incorporated ({sup 14}C)ADP-ribose to an average extent of approximately 2.4 and 30 mol of ADP-ribose/mol of protein, respectively. Assembly of microtubule protein into microtubules in vitro was inhibited by ADP-ribosylation, and incubation of assembled steady-state microtubules with ADP-ribosyltransferase and NAD{sup +} resulted in rapid depolymerization of the microtubules. Thus, the eukaryotic enzyme can ADP-ribosylate tubulin and microtubule-associated proteins to much greater extents than previously observed with cholera and pertussis toxins, and the modification can significantly modulate microtubule assembly and disassembly.

  3. Duplex DNA-Invading γ-Modified Peptide Nucleic Acids Enable Rapid Identification of Bloodstream Infections in Whole Blood

    PubMed Central

    Nölling, Jörk; Rapireddy, Srinivas; Amburg, Joel I.; Crawford, Elizabeth M.; Prakash, Ranjit A.; Rabson, Arthur R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bloodstream infections are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. Early and targeted antimicrobial intervention is lifesaving, yet current diagnostic approaches fail to provide actionable information within a clinically viable time frame due to their reliance on blood culturing. Here, we present a novel pathogen identification (PID) platform that features the use of duplex DNA-invading γ-modified peptide nucleic acids (γPNAs) for the rapid identification of bacterial and fungal pathogens directly from blood, without culturing. The PID platform provides species-level information in under 2.5 hours while reaching single-CFU-per-milliliter sensitivity across the entire 21-pathogen panel. The clinical utility of the PID platform was demonstrated through assessment of 61 clinical specimens, which showed >95% sensitivity and >90% overall correlation to blood culture findings. This rapid γPNA-based platform promises to improve patient care by enabling the administration of a targeted first-line antimicrobial intervention. PMID:27094328

  4. Rapid Identification of Pathogens from Positive Blood Cultures by Multiplex PCR using the FilmArray System

    PubMed Central

    Blaschke, Anne J.; Heyrend, Caroline; Byington, Carrie L.; Fisher, Mark A.; Barker, Elizabeth; Garrone, Nicholas F.; Thatcher, Stephanie A.; Pavia, Andrew T.; Barney, Trenda; Alger, Garrison D.; Daly, Judy A.; Ririe, Kirk M.; Ota, Irene; Poritz, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    Sepsis is a leading cause of death. Rapid and accurate identification of pathogens and antimicrobial resistance directly from blood culture could improve patient outcomes. The FilmArray® (FA; Idaho Technology, Inc., Salt Lake City, UT) Blood Culture (BC) panel can identify > 25 pathogens and 4 antibiotic resistance genes from positive blood cultures in 1 hour. We compared a development version of the panel to conventional culture and susceptibility testing on 102 archived blood cultures from adults and children with bacteremia. Of 109 pathogens identified by culture, 95% were identified by FA. Among 111 prospectively collected blood cultures, the FA identified 84 of 92 pathogens (91%) covered by the panel. Among 25 Staphylococcus aureus and 21 Enterococcus species detected, FA identified all culture-proven MRSA and VRE. The FA BC panel is an accurate method for the rapid identification of pathogens and resistance genes from blood culture. PMID:22999332

  5. Two-Step Scheme for Rapid Identification and Differentiation of Legionella pneumophila and Non-Legionella pneumophila Species▿

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Xiao-Yong; Li, Lian-Qing; Hu, Chao-Hui; Zhu, Qing-Yi

    2010-01-01

    A rapid two-step scheme based on PCR amplification and enzymatic digestion analysis of a 226-bp fragment of the 16S rRNA gene was developed to identify the Legionella genus by PCR amplification and to differentiate the Legionella pneumophila and non-Legionella pneumophila species by enzymatic digestion analysis. Among 42 ATCC strains (16 strains of L. pneumophila and 26 strains of non-L. pneumophila) and 200 Legionella isolates from environmental water samples, including pools, rivers, lakes, and cooling towers in Guangdong province, 99.59% of L. pneumophila and non-L. pneumophila strains were correctly identified and differentiated by this scheme. The procedure of this two-step identification and differentiation scheme is simple and takes only about 4 h. These results suggest that this two-step scheme provides a simple and convenient method for the rapid identification and differentiation of L. pneumophila and non-L. pneumophila species. PMID:20007397

  6. Development of a Multiplex-PCR assay for the rapid identification of Geobacillus stearothermophilus and Anoxybacillus flavithermus.

    PubMed

    Pennacchia, Carmela; Breeuwer, Pieter; Meyer, Rolf

    2014-10-01

    The presence of thermophilic bacilli in dairy products is indicator of poor hygiene. Their rapid detection and identification is fundamental to improve the industrial reactivity in the implementation of corrective and preventive actions. In this study a rapid and reliable identification of Geobacillus stearothermophilus and Anoxybacillus flavithermus was achieved by species-specific PCR assays. Two primer sets, targeting the ITS 16S-23S rRNA region and the rpoB gene sequence of the target species respectively, were employed. Species-specificity of both primer sets was evaluated by using 53 reference strains of DSMZ collection; among them, 13 species of the genus Geobacillus and 15 of the genus Anoxybacillus were represented. Moreover, 99 wild strains and 23 bulk cells collected from 24 infant formula powders gathered from several countries worldwide were included in the analyses. Both primer sets were highly specific and the expected PCR fragments were obtained only when DNA from G. stearothermophilus or A. flavithermus was used. After testing their specificity, they were combined in a Multiplex-PCR assay for the simultaneous identification of the two target species. The specificity of the Multiplex-PCR was evaluated by using both wild strains and bulk cells. Every analysis confirmed the reliable identification results provided by the single species-specific PCR methodology. The easiness, the rapidity (about 4 h from DNA isolation to results) and the reliability of the PCR procedures developed in this study highlight the advantage of their application for the specific detection and identification of the thermophilic species G. stearothermophilus and A. flavithermus. PMID:24929881

  7. Development of a Multiplex-PCR assay for the rapid identification of Geobacillus stearothermophilus and Anoxybacillus flavithermus.

    PubMed

    Pennacchia, Carmela; Breeuwer, Pieter; Meyer, Rolf

    2014-10-01

    The presence of thermophilic bacilli in dairy products is indicator of poor hygiene. Their rapid detection and identification is fundamental to improve the industrial reactivity in the implementation of corrective and preventive actions. In this study a rapid and reliable identification of Geobacillus stearothermophilus and Anoxybacillus flavithermus was achieved by species-specific PCR assays. Two primer sets, targeting the ITS 16S-23S rRNA region and the rpoB gene sequence of the target species respectively, were employed. Species-specificity of both primer sets was evaluated by using 53 reference strains of DSMZ collection; among them, 13 species of the genus Geobacillus and 15 of the genus Anoxybacillus were represented. Moreover, 99 wild strains and 23 bulk cells collected from 24 infant formula powders gathered from several countries worldwide were included in the analyses. Both primer sets were highly specific and the expected PCR fragments were obtained only when DNA from G. stearothermophilus or A. flavithermus was used. After testing their specificity, they were combined in a Multiplex-PCR assay for the simultaneous identification of the two target species. The specificity of the Multiplex-PCR was evaluated by using both wild strains and bulk cells. Every analysis confirmed the reliable identification results provided by the single species-specific PCR methodology. The easiness, the rapidity (about 4 h from DNA isolation to results) and the reliability of the PCR procedures developed in this study highlight the advantage of their application for the specific detection and identification of the thermophilic species G. stearothermophilus and A. flavithermus.

  8. Repurposing an endogenous degradation system for rapid and targeted depletion of C. elegans proteins

    PubMed Central

    Armenti, Stephen T.; Lohmer, Lauren L.; Sherwood, David R.; Nance, Jeremy

    2014-01-01

    The capability to conditionally inactivate gene function is essential for understanding the molecular basis of development. In gene and mRNA targeting approaches, protein products can perdure, complicating genetic analysis. Current methods for selective protein degradation require drug treatment or take hours for protein removal, limiting their utility in studying rapid developmental processes in vivo. Here, we repurpose an endogenous protein degradation system to rapidly remove targeted C. elegans proteins. We show that upon expression of the E3 ubiquitin ligase substrate-recognition subunit ZIF-1, proteins tagged with the ZF1 zinc-finger domain can be quickly degraded in all somatic cell types examined with temporal and spatial control. We demonstrate that genes can be engineered to become conditional loss-of-function alleles by introducing sequences encoding the ZF1 tag into endogenous loci. Finally, we use ZF1 tagging to establish the site of cdc-42 gene function during a cell invasion event. ZF1 tagging provides a powerful new tool for the analysis of dynamic developmental events. PMID:25377555

  9. Rapid synthesis of DNA-cysteine conjugates for expressed protein ligation

    SciTech Connect

    Lovrinovic, Marina; Niemeyer, Christof M. . E-mail: christof.niemeyer@uni-dortmund.de

    2005-09-30

    We report a rapid method for the covalent modification of commercially available amino-modified DNA oligonucleotides with a cysteine moiety. The resulting DNA-cysteine conjugates are versatile reagents for the efficient preparation of covalent DNA-protein conjugates by means of expressed protein ligation (EPL). The EPL method allows for the site-specific coupling of cysteine-modified DNA oligomers with recombinant intein-fusion proteins, the latter of which contain a C-terminal thioester enabling the mild and highly specific reaction with N-terminal cysteine compounds. We prepared a cysteine-modifier reagent in a single-step reaction which allows for the rapid and near quantitative synthesis of cysteine-DNA conjugates. The latter were ligated with the green fluorescent protein mutant EYFP, recombinantly expressed as an intein-fusion protein, allowing for the mild and selective formation of EYFP-DNA conjugates in high yields of about 60%. We anticipate many applications of our approach, ranging from protein microarrays to the arising field of nanobiotechnology.

  10. Rapid screening of membrane protein activity: electrophysiological analysis of OmpF reconstituted in proteoliposomes.

    PubMed

    Kreir, Mohamed; Farre, Cecilia; Beckler, Matthias; George, Michael; Fertig, Niels

    2008-04-01

    Solvent-free planar lipid bilayers were formed in an automatic manner by bursting of giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) after gentle suction application through micron-sized apertures in a borosilicate glass substrate. Incubation of GUVs with the purified ion channel protein of interest yielded proteoliposomes. These proteoliposomes allow for immediate recording of channel activity after GUV sealing. This approach reduces the time-consuming, laborious and sometimes difficult protein reconstitution processes normally performed after bilayer formation. Bilayer recordings are attractive for investigations of membrane proteins not accessible to patch clamp analysis, like e.g. proteins from organelles. In the presented work, we show the example of the outer membrane protein OmpF from Escherichia coli. We reconstituted OmpF in proteoliposomes and observed the characteristic trimeric conductance levels and the typical gating induced by pH and transmembrane voltage. Moreover, OmpF is the main entrance for beta-lactam antibiotics and we investigated translocation processes of antibiotics and modulation of OmpF by spermine. We suggest that the rapid formation of porin containing lipid bilayers is of potential for the efficient electrophysiological characterization of the OmpF protein, for studying membrane permeation processes and for the rapid screening of antibiotics. PMID:18369514

  11. DNA binding proteins explore multiple local configurations during docking via rapid rebinding

    PubMed Central

    Ganji, Mahipal; Docter, Margreet; Le Grice, Stuart F.J.; Abbondanzieri, Elio A.

    2016-01-01

    Finding the target site and associating in a specific orientation are essential tasks for DNA-binding proteins. In order to make the target search process as efficient as possible, proteins should not only rapidly diffuse to the target site but also dynamically explore multiple local configurations before diffusing away. Protein flipping is an example of this second process that has been observed previously, but the underlying mechanism of flipping remains unclear. Here, we probed the mechanism of protein flipping at the single molecule level, using HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) as a model system. In order to test the effects of long-range attractive forces on flipping efficiency, we varied the salt concentration and macromolecular crowding conditions. As expected, increased salt concentrations weaken the binding of RT to DNA while increased crowding strengthens the binding. Moreover, when we analyzed the flipping kinetics, i.e. the rate and probability of flipping, at each condition we found that flipping was more efficient when RT bound more strongly. Our data are consistent with a view that DNA bound proteins undergo multiple rapid re-binding events, or short hops, that allow the protein to explore other configurations without completely dissociating from the DNA. PMID:27471033

  12. Assessment of an abbreviated odorant identification task for children: a rapid screening device for schools and clinics.

    PubMed

    Richman, R A; Wallace, K; Sheehe, P R

    1995-04-01

    To validate the level of olfactory performance of children, we tested 825 volunteers, aged 4-17 years, with an abbreviated form of our pediatric odorant identification task. The test consisted of sniffing and identifying five odorants (baby powder, bubble gum, candy cane, licorice and peach). Mean olfactory scores increased as a function of age, reaching a plateau of about 94-95% correct at 8 years of age. In general, girls out-performed boys. Physicians require a test instrument such as the one we have devised to allow them to diagnose olfactory dysfunction in children. The present task is particularly applicable in screening large numbers of children in clinics or schools because it can be administered easily and rapidly. Adult subjects with olfactory dysfunction also performed poorly on this odorant identification task designed for children. Therefore, we expect that our odorant identification task will also detect children with severe olfactory dysfunction. PMID:7795355

  13. Evaluation of the synergistic effects of milk proteins in a rapid viscosity analyzer.

    PubMed

    Stephani, Rodrigo; Borges de Souza, Alisson; Leal de Oliveira, Marcone Augusto; Perrone, Ítalo Tuler; Fernandes de Carvalho, Antônio; Cappa de Oliveira, Luiz Fernando

    2015-12-01

    Protein systems (PS) are routinely used by companies from Brazil and around the globe to improve the texture, yield, and palatability of processed foods. Understanding the synergistic behavior among the different protein structures of these systems during thermal treatment under the influence of pH can help to better define optimum conditions for products and processes. The interpretation of the reactions and interactions that occur simultaneously among the protein constituents of these systems as dispersions during thermal processing is still a major challenge. Here, using a rapid viscosity analyzer, we observed the rheological changes in the startup viscosities of 5 PS obtained by combining varying proportions of milk protein concentrate and whey protein concentrate under different conditions of pH (5.0, 6.5, and 7.0) and heat processing (85°C/15min and 95°C/5min). The solutions were standardized to 25% of total solids and 17% of protein. Ten analytical parameters were used to characterize each of the startup-viscosity ramps for 35 experiments conducted in a 2×3 × 5 mixed planning matrix, using principal component analysis to interpret behavioral similarities. The study showed the clear influence of pH 5.5 in the elevation of the initial temperature of the PS startup viscosity by at least 5°C, as well as the effect of different milk protein concentrate:whey protein concentrate ratios above 15:85 at pH 7.0 on the viscographic profile curves. These results suggested that the primary agent driving the changes was the synergism among the reactions and interactions of casein with whey proteins during processing. This study reinforces the importance of the rapid viscosity analyzer as an analytical tool for the simulation of industrial processes involving PS, and the use of the startup viscosity ramp as a means of interpreting the interactions of system components with respect to changes related to the treatment temperature.

  14. Root-mean-square-deviation-based rapid backbone resonance assignments in proteins.

    PubMed

    Rout, Ashok K; Barnwal, Ravi P; Agarwal, Geetika; Chary, Kandala V R

    2010-10-01

    We have shown that the methodology based on the estimation of root-mean-square deviation (RMSD) between two sets of chemical shifts is very useful to rapidly assign the spectral signatures of (1)H(N), (13)C(α), (13)C(β), (13)C', (1)H(α) and (15)N spins of a given protein in one state from the knowledge of its resonance assignments in a different state, without resorting to routine established procedures (manual and automated). We demonstrate the utility of this methodology to rapidly assign the 3D spectra of a metal-binding protein in its holo-state from the knowledge of its assignments in apo-state, the spectra of a protein in its paramagnetic state from the knowledge of its assignments in diamagnetic state and, finally, the spectra of a mutant protein from the knowledge of the chemical shifts of the corresponding wild-type protein. The underlying assumption of this methodology is that, it is impossible for any two amino acid residues in a given protein to have all the six chemical shifts degenerate and that the protein under consideration does not undergo large conformational changes in going from one conformational state to another. The methodology has been tested using experimental data on three proteins, M-crystallin (8.5 kDa, predominantly β-sheet, for apo- to holo-state), Calbindin (7.5 kDa, predominantly α-helical, for diamagnetic to paramagnetic state and apo to holo) and EhCaBP1 (14.3 kDa, α-helical, the wild-type protein with one of its mutant). In all the cases, the extent of assignment is found to be greater than 85%.

  15. Rapid identification of Acinetobacter spp. by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) from colony and blood culture material

    PubMed Central

    Essig, A.; Hagen, R. M.; Riecker, M.; Jerke, K.; Ellison, D.; Poppert, S.

    2011-01-01

    Multi-drug-resistant strains of the Acinetobacter baumannii complex cause nosocomial infections. Rapid identification of Acinetobacter spp. is desirable in order to facilitate therapeutic or hygiene decisions. We evaluated a newly designed DNA probe that can be used under standard conditions in both a microwave oven and a slide chamber for the rapid identification of Acinetobacter spp. by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Using FISH, the new probe correctly identified 81/81 Acinetobacter spp. isolates and excluded 109/109 tested non-target organisms from agar culture. Furthermore, the new probe correctly identified 7/7 Acinetobacter spp. in 214 blood cultures determined to contain Gram-negative bacteria by Gram staining. Using either the microwave oven or slide chamber technique, the new probe was able to identify Acinetobacter spp. in 100% of the samples tested. FISH used in conjunction with our newly designed probe provides an easy, cheap, precise, and rapid method for the preliminary identification of Acinetobacter spp., especially in laboratories where more sophisticated methods like matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) are not available. PMID:24516735

  16. Rapid species identification of seafood spoilage and pathogenic Gram-positive bacteria by MALDI-TOF mass fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Böhme, Karola; Fernández-No, Inmaculada C; Barros-Velázquez, Jorge; Gallardo, Jose M; Cañas, Benito; Calo-Mata, Pilar

    2011-11-01

    The rapid identification of food pathogenic and spoilage bacteria is important to ensure food quality and safety. Seafood contaminated with pathogenic bacteria is one of the major causes of food intoxications, and the rapid spoilage of seafood products results in high economic losses. In this study, a collection of the main seafood pathogenic and spoilage Gram-positive bacteria was compiled, including Bacillus spp., Listeria spp., Clostridium spp., Staphylococcus spp. and Carnobacterium spp. The strains, belonging to 20 different species, were obtained from the culture collections and studied by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). A reference library was created, including the spectral fingerprints of 32 reference strains and the extracted peak lists with 10-30 peak masses. Genus-specific as well as species-specific peak masses were assigned and could serve as biomarkers for the rapid bacterial identification. Furthermore, the peak mass lists were clustered with the web-application SPECLUST to show the phyloproteomic relationships among the studied strains. Afterwards, the method was successfully applied to identify six strains isolated from seafood by comparison with the reference library. Additionally, phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene was carried out and contrasted with the proteomic approach. This is the first time MALDI-TOF MS fingerprinting is applied to Gram-positive bacterial identification in seafood, being a fast and accurate technique to ensure seafood quality and safety.

  17. Rapid identification of viruses causing sugarcane mosaic by direct sequencing of RT-PCR products from crude extracts: a method for large scale virus surveys.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Maximiliano; Rago, Alejandro M; Serino, Germán

    2009-05-01

    Sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV) and sorghum mosaic virus (SrMV) diversity studies are important to characterize virus populations in sugarcane producing areas, enabling (i) identification of shifts in predominant strains, (ii) detecting associations of strains with specific varieties, and (iii) possibly exposing the appearance of new strains which may affect the performance of varieties in a region. Recent studies have shown significant sequence variability within SCMV populations around the world, indicating that isolate identification would be best achieved by direct analysis of sequence data. Because virus sequence-based studies that require the characterization of large numbers of isolates may be impractical using standard sample preparation and processing methodology, a simple protocol that yields quality sequence information, requiring neither viral RNA purification nor cloning of RT-PCR products was developed. Rapid virus release extracts are obtained by submerging a portion of leaf tissue into an extraction buffer, followed by a brief incubation at 95 degrees C. An aliquot of the extract is pipetted into an RT-PCR amplification mix for the detection of SCMV and the SrMV coat protein gene fragments. RT-PCR fragments are sequenced directly using oligonucleotide primers similar to the RT-PCR primers, yielding sequence information of an adequate quality. This rapid, cost effective protocol is practical for large scale virus diversity and evolutionary studies.

  18. A proteomic approach for the rapid, multi-informative and reliable identification of blood.

    PubMed

    Patel, E; Cicatiello, P; Deininger, L; Clench, M R; Marino, G; Giardina, P; Langenburg, G; West, A; Marshall, P; Sears, V; Francese, S

    2016-01-01

    Blood evidence is frequently encountered at the scene of violent crimes and can provide valuable intelligence in the forensic investigation of serious offences. Because many of the current enhancement methods used by crime scene investigators are presumptive, the visualisation of blood is not always reliable nor does it bear additional information. In the work presented here, two methods employing a shotgun bottom up proteomic approach for the detection of blood are reported; the developed protocols employ both an in solution digestion method and a recently proposed procedure involving immobilization of trypsin on hydrophobin Vmh2 coated MALDI sample plate. The methods are complementary as whilst one yields more identifiable proteins (as biomolecular signatures), the other is extremely rapid (5 minutes). Additionally, data demonstrate the opportunity to discriminate blood provenance even when two different blood sources are present in a mixture. This approach is also suitable for old bloodstains which had been previously chemically enhanced, as experiments conducted on a 9-year-old bloodstain deposited on a ceramic tile demonstrate. PMID:26596622

  19. Genomic identification, rapid evolution, and expression of Argonaute genes in the tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus.

    PubMed

    Tao, Wenjing; Sun, Lina; Chen, Jinlin; Shi, Hongjuan; Wang, Deshou

    2016-09-01

    Argonaute proteins are key components of the small RNA-induced silencing complex and have multiple roles in RNA-directed regulatory pathways. Argonaute genes can be divided into two subfamilies: the Ago (interacting with microRNA/small interfering RNA) and Piwi subfamilies (interacting with piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs)). In the present study, genome-wide analyses firstly yielded the identification of different members of Agos and Piwis in the tilapia, coelacanth, spotted gar, and elephant shark. The additional teleost Ago3b was generated following the fish-specific genome duplication event. Selective pressure analysis on Agos and Piwis between cichlids and other teleosts showed an accelerated evolution of Piwil1 in the cichlid lineages, and the positive selected sites were located in the region of PIWI domain, suggesting that these amino acid substitutions are adapt to targeted cleavage of messenger RNA (mRNA) in cichlids. Ago1 and Ago4 were detected at higher levels at 5 days after hatching (dah) in both ovaries and testes compared with other stages, supporting the previously reported requirement of Ago-mediated pathways to clear the maternal mRNAs during the early embryogenesis. The Piwis were abundantly expressed in tilapia testes, indicating their essential roles in male germline, especially in spermatogenesis. Notable expression of Piwis was also detected in skeletal muscle, indicating that piRNA pathway may not only be confined to development and maintenance of the germline but may also play important roles in somatic tissues. The expression of Piwil1 and Piwil2 was examined by quantitative PCR (qPCR) and in situ hybridization (ISH) to validate the spatial and temporal expression profiles. Taken together, these results present a thorough overview of tilapia Argonaute family and provide a new perspective on the evolution and function of this family in teleosts. PMID:27491892

  20. Toward genomic identification of β-barrel membrane proteins: Composition and architecture of known structures

    PubMed Central

    Wimley, William C.

    2002-01-01

    The amino acid composition and architecture of all β-barrel membrane proteins of known three-dimensional structure have been examined to generate information that will be useful in identifying β-barrels in genome databases. The database consists of 15 nonredundant structures, including several novel, recent structures. Known structures include monomeric, dimeric, and trimeric β-barrels with between 8 and 22 membrane-spanning β-strands each. For this analysis the membrane-interacting surfaces of the β-barrels were identified with an experimentally derived, whole-residue hydrophobicity scale, and then the barrels were aligned normal to the bilayer and the position of the bilayer midplane was determined for each protein from the hydrophobicity profile. The abundance of each amino acid, relative to the genomic abundance, was calculated for the barrel exterior and interior. The architecture and diversity of known β-barrels was also examined. For example, the distribution of rise-per-residue values perpendicular to the bilayer plane was found to be 2.7 ± 0.25 Å per residue, or about 10 ± 1 residues across the membrane. Also, as noted by other authors, nearly every known membrane-spanning β-barrel strand was found to have a short loop of seven residues or less connecting it to at least one adjacent strand. Using this information we have begun to generate rapid screening algorithms for the identification of β-barrel membrane proteins in genomic databases. Application of one algorithm to the genomes of Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa confirms its ability to identify β-barrels, and reveals dozens of unidentified open reading frames that potentially code for β-barrel outer membrane proteins. PMID:11790840

  1. Identification of small molecule binding sites within proteins using phage display technology.

    SciTech Connect

    Rodi, D. J.; Agoston, G. E.; Manon, R.; Lapcevich, R.; Green, S. J.; Makowski, L.; Biosciences Division; EntreMed Inc.; Florida State Univ.

    2001-11-01

    Affinity selection of peptides displayed on phage particles was used as the basis for mapping molecular contacts between small molecule ligands and their protein targets. Analysis of the crystal structures of complexes between proteins and small molecule ligands revealed that virtually all ligands of molecular weight 300 Da or greater have a continuous binding epitope of 5 residues or more. This observation led to the development of a technique for binding site identification which involves statistical analysis of an affinity-selected set of peptides obtained by screening of libraries of random, phage-displayed peptides against small molecules attached to solid surfaces. A random sample of the selected peptides is sequenced and used as input for a similarity scanning program which calculates cumulative similarity scores along the length of the putative receptor. Regions of the protein sequence exhibiting the highest similarity with the selected peptides proved to have a high probability of being involved in ligand binding. This technique has been employed successfully to map the contact residues in multiple known targets of the anticancer drugs paclitaxel (Taxol), docetaxel (Taxotere) and 2-methoxyestradiol and the glycosaminoglycan hyaluronan, and to identify a novel paclitaxel receptor [1]. These data corroborate the observation that the binding properties of peptides displayed on the surface of phage particles can mimic the binding properties of peptides in naturally occurring proteins. It follows directly that structural context is relatively unimportant for determining the binding properties of these disordered peptides. This technique represents a novel, rapid, high resolution method for identifying potential ligand binding sites in the absence of three-dimensional information and has the potential to greatly enhance the speed of development of novel small molecule pharmaceuticals.

  2. Cross-Species Interaction between Rapidly Evolving Telomere-Specific Drosophila Proteins.

    PubMed

    Vedelek, Balázs; Blastyák, András; Boros, Imre M

    2015-01-01

    Telomere integrity in Drosophila melanogaster is maintained by a putative multisubunit complex called terminin that is believed to act in analogy to the mammalian shelterin complex in protecting chromosome ends from being recognized as sites of DNA damage. The five proteins supposed to form the terminin complex are HP1-ORC associated protein, HP1-HOAP interacting protein, Verrocchio, Drosophila Telomere Loss/Modigliani and Heterochromatic Protein 1. Four of these proteins evolve rapidly within the Drosophila genus. The accelerated evolution of terminin components may indicate the involvement of these proteins in the process by which new species arise, as the resulting divergence of terminin proteins might prevent hybrid formation, thus driving speciation. However, terminin is not an experimentally proven entity, and no biochemical studies have been performed to investigate its assembly and action in detail. Motivated by these facts in order to initiate biochemical studies on terminin function, we attempted to reconstitute terminin by co-expressing its subunits in bacteria and investigated the possible role of the fast-evolving parts of terminin components in complex assembly. Our results suggest formation of stable subcomplexes of terminin, but not of the whole complex in vitro. We found that the accelerated evolution is restricted to definable regions of terminin components, and that the divergence of D. melanogaster Drosophila Telomere Loss and D. yakuba Verrocchio proteins does not preclude their stable interaction.

  3. Cross-Species Interaction between Rapidly Evolving Telomere-Specific Drosophila Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Vedelek, Balázs; Blastyák, András; Boros, Imre M.

    2015-01-01

    Telomere integrity in Drosophila melanogaster is maintained by a putative multisubunit complex called terminin that is believed to act in analogy to the mammalian shelterin complex in protecting chromosome ends from being recognized as sites of DNA damage. The five proteins supposed to form the terminin complex are HP1-ORC associated protein, HP1-HOAP interacting protein, Verrocchio, Drosophila Telomere Loss/Modigliani and Heterochromatic Protein 1. Four of these proteins evolve rapidly within the Drosophila genus. The accelerated evolution of terminin components may indicate the involvement of these proteins in the process by which new species arise, as the resulting divergence of terminin proteins might prevent hybrid formation, thus driving speciation. However, terminin is not an experimentally proven entity, and no biochemical studies have been performed to investigate its assembly and action in detail. Motivated by these facts in order to initiate biochemical studies on terminin function, we attempted to reconstitute terminin by co-expressing its subunits in bacteria and investigated the possible role of the fast-evolving parts of terminin components in complex assembly. Our results suggest formation of stable subcomplexes of terminin, but not of the whole complex in vitro. We found that the accelerated evolution is restricted to definable regions of terminin components, and that the divergence of D. melanogaster Drosophila Telomere Loss and D. yakuba Verrocchio proteins does not preclude their stable interaction. PMID:26566042

  4. Rapid identification of microorganisms from sterile body fluids by use of FilmArray.

    PubMed

    Altun, Osman; Almuhayawi, Mohammed; Ullberg, Måns; Özenci, Volkan

    2015-02-01

    We evaluated the clinical performance of the FilmArray blood culture identification (BCID) panel in the identification of microorganisms from positive blood culture bottles inoculated with sterile body fluids. All organisms included in the FA BCID panel were accurately identified in 84/84 (100%) and 18/24 (75%) samples with mono- and polymicrobial growth, respectively.

  5. Rapid screening for structural integrity of expressed proteins by heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Gronenborn, A. M.; Clore, G. M.

    1996-01-01

    A simple and rapid method based on 15N labeling and 1H-15N heteronuclear single quantum coherence spectroscopy is presented to directly assess the structural integrity of overexpressed proteins in crude Escherichia coli extracts without the need for any purification. The method is demonstrated using two different expression systems and two different proteins, the B1 immunoglobulin-binding domain of streptococcal protein G (56 residues) and human interleukin-1 beta (153 residues). It is shown that high quality 1H-15N correlation spectra, recorded in as little as 15 min and displaying only cross-peaks arising from the overexpressed protein of interest, can be obtained from crude E. coli extracts. PMID:8771212

  6. Rapid induction of chromatin-associated DNA mismatch repair proteins after MNNG treatment

    PubMed Central

    Schroering, Allen G.; Williams, Kandace J.

    2008-01-01

    Treatment with low concentrations of monofunctional alkylating agents induces a G2 arrest only after the second round of DNA synthesis in mammalian cells and requires a proficient mismatch repair (MMR) pathway. Here we have investigated rapid alkylation-induced recruitment of DNA repair proteins to chromosomal DNA within synchronized populations of MMR proficient cells (HeLa MR) after MNNG treatment. Within the first hour, the concentrations of MutSα and PCNA increase well beyond their constitutive chromosomally bound levels and MutLα is newly recruited to the chromatin-bound MutSα. Remarkably, immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrate rapid association of these proteins on the alkylation-damaged chromatin, even when DNA replication is completely blocked. The extent of association of PCNA and MMR proteins on the chromatin is dependent upon the concentration of MNNG and on the specific type of replication block. A subpopulation of the MutSα-associated PCNA also becomes monoubiquitinated, a known requirement for PCNA to interact with translesion synthesis (TLS) polymerases. In addition, chromatin-bound SMC1 and NBS1 proteins, associated with DNA double-strand-breaks (DSBs), become phosphorylated within one to two hours of exposure to MNNG. However, these activated proteins are not colocalized on the chromatin with MutSα in response to MNNG exposure. PCNA, MutSα/MutLα and activated SMC1/NBS1 remain chromatin-bound for at least 6–8 hours after alkylation damage. Thus, cells that are exposed to low levels of alkylation treatment undergo rapid recruitment to and/or activation of key proteins already on the chromatin without the requirement for DNA replication, apparently via different DNA-damage signaling pathways. PMID:18468964

  7. Rapid Evolution of the Sequences and Gene Repertoires of Secreted Proteins in Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Eduardo P. C.

    2012-01-01

    Proteins secreted to the extracellular environment or to the periphery of the cell envelope, the secretome, play essential roles in foraging, antagonistic and mutualistic interactions. We hypothesize that arms races, genetic conflicts and varying selective pressures should lead to the rapid change of sequences and gene repertoires of the secretome. The analysis of 42 bacterial pan-genomes shows that secreted, and especially extracellular proteins, are predominantly encoded in the accessory genome, i.e. among genes not ubiquitous within the clade. Genes encoding outer membrane proteins might engage more frequently in intra-chromosomal gene conversion because they are more often in multi-genic families. The gene sequences encoding the secretome evolve faster than the rest of the genome and in particular at non-synonymous positions. Cell wall proteins in Firmicutes evolve particularly fast when compared with outer membrane proteins of Proteobacteria. Virulence factors are over-represented in the secretome, notably in outer membrane proteins, but cell localization explains more of the variance in substitution rates and gene repertoires than sequence homology to known virulence factors. Accordingly, the repertoires and sequences of the genes encoding the secretome change fast in the clades of obligatory and facultative pathogens and also in the clades of mutualists and free-living bacteria. Our study shows that cell localization shapes genome evolution. In agreement with our hypothesis, the repertoires and the sequences of genes encoding secreted proteins evolve fast. The particularly rapid change of extracellular proteins suggests that these public goods are key players in bacterial adaptation. PMID:23189144

  8. Rapid Cross-Metathesis for Reversible Protein Modifications via Chemical Access to Se-Allyl-selenocysteine in Proteins

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Cross-metathesis (CM) has recently emerged as a viable strategy for protein modification. Here, efficient protein CM has been demonstrated through biomimetic chemical access to Se-allyl-selenocysteine (Seac), a metathesis-reactive amino acid substrate, via dehydroalanine. On-protein reaction kinetics reveal a rapid reaction with rate constants of Seac-mediated-CM comparable or superior to off-protein rates of many current bioconjugations. This use of Se-relayed Seac CM on proteins has now enabled reactions with substrates (allyl GlcNAc, N-allyl acetamide) that were previously not possible for the corresponding sulfur analogue. This CM strategy was applied to histone proteins to install a mimic of acetylated lysine (KAc, an epigenetic marker). The resulting synthetic H3 was successfully recognized by antibody that binds natural H3-K9Ac. Moreover, Cope-type selenoxide elimination allowed this putative marker (and function) to be chemically expunged, regenerating an H3 that can be rewritten to complete a chemically enabled “write (CM)–erase (ox)–rewrite (CM)” cycle. PMID:23889088

  9. Rapid detection and identification of viral and bacterial fish pathogens using a DNA array-based multiplex assay.

    PubMed

    Lievens, B; Frans, I; Heusdens, C; Justé, A; Jonstrup, S P; Lieffrig, F; Willems, K A

    2011-11-01

    Fish diseases can be caused by a variety of diverse organisms, including bacteria, fungi, viruses and protozoa, and pose a universal threat to the ornamental fish industry and aquaculture. The lack of rapid, accurate and reliable means by which fish pathogens can be detected and identified has been one of the main limitations in fish pathogen diagnosis and fish disease management and has consequently stimulated the search for alternative diagnostic techniques. Here, we describe a method based on multiplex and broad-range PCR amplification combined with DNA array hybridization for the simultaneous detection and identification of all cyprinid herpesviruses (CyHV-1, CyHV-2 and CyHV-3) and some of the most important fish pathogenic Flavobacterium species, including F. branchiophilum, F. columnare and F. psychrophilum. For virus identification, the DNA polymerase and helicase genes were targeted. For bacterial identification, the ribosomal RNA gene was used. The developed methodology permitted 100% specificity for the identification of the target species. Detection sensitivity was equivalent to 10 viral genomes or less than a picogram of bacterial DNA. The utility and power of the array for sensitive pathogen detection and identification in complex samples such as infected tissue is demonstrated in this study. PMID:21988358

  10. Rapid detection and identification of viral and bacterial fish pathogens using a DNA array-based multiplex assay.

    PubMed

    Lievens, B; Frans, I; Heusdens, C; Justé, A; Jonstrup, S P; Lieffrig, F; Willems, K A

    2011-11-01

    Fish diseases can be caused by a variety of diverse organisms, including bacteria, fungi, viruses and protozoa, and pose a universal threat to the ornamental fish industry and aquaculture. The lack of rapid, accurate and reliable means by which fish pathogens can be detected and identified has been one of the main limitations in fish pathogen diagnosis and fish disease management and has consequently stimulated the search for alternative diagnostic techniques. Here, we describe a method based on multiplex and broad-range PCR amplification combined with DNA array hybridization for the simultaneous detection and identification of all cyprinid herpesviruses (CyHV-1, CyHV-2 and CyHV-3) and some of the most important fish pathogenic Flavobacterium species, including F. branchiophilum, F. columnare and F. psychrophilum. For virus identification, the DNA polymerase and helicase genes were targeted. For bacterial identification, the ribosomal RNA gene was used. The developed methodology permitted 100% specificity for the identification of the target species. Detection sensitivity was equivalent to 10 viral genomes or less than a picogram of bacterial DNA. The utility and power of the array for sensitive pathogen detection and identification in complex samples such as infected tissue is demonstrated in this study.

  11. Selection in the Rapid Evolution of Gamete Recognition Proteins in Marine Invertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Vacquier, Victor D.; Swanson, Willie J.

    2011-01-01

    Animal fertilization is governed by the interaction (binding) of proteins on the surfaces of sperm and egg. In many examples presented herein, fertilization proteins evolve rapidly and show the signature of positive selection (adaptive evolution). This review describes the molecular evolution of fertilization proteins in sea urchins, abalone, and oysters, animals with external fertilization that broadcast their gametes into seawater. Theories regarding the selective forces responsible for the rapid evolution driven by positive selection seen in many fertilization proteins are discussed. This strong selection acting on divergence of interacting fertilization proteins might lead to prezygotic reproductive isolation and be a significant factor in the speciation process. Since only a fraction of all eggs are fertilized and only an infinitesimal fraction of male gametes succeed in fertilizing an egg, gametes are obviously a category of entities subjected to intense selection. It is curious that this is never mentioned in the literature dealing with selection, perhaps because we know so little about fitness differences among gametes.(ErnstMayr, 1997) PMID:21730046

  12. Application of replica plating and computer analysis for rapid identification of bacteria in some foods. I. Identification scheme.

    PubMed

    Corlett, D A; Lee, J S; Sinnhuber, R O

    1965-09-01

    A method was devised and tested for a quantitative identification of microbial flora in foods. The colonies developing on the initial isolation plates were picked with sterile toothpicks and inoculated on a master plate in prearranged spacing and order. The growth on the master plates was then replicated on a series of solid-agar plates containing differential or selective agents. The characteristic growth and physiological responses of microbial isolates to penicillin, tylosin, vancomycin, streptomycin, chloramphenicol, neomycin, colistin, and to S S Agar, Staphylococcus Medium No. 110, and Potato Dextrose Agar were recorded, together with Gram reaction and cell morphology. This information was then fed into an IBM 1410 digital computer which grouped and analyzed each isolate into 10 microbial genera, or groups, according to the identification key. The identification scheme was established by use of reference culture studies and from the literature. This system was used to analyze the microbial flora in dover sole (Microstomus pacificus) and ground beef. The method described in this article enables one to examine large numbers of microbial isolates with simplicity. PMID:5325942

  13. Application of replica plating and computer analysis for rapid identification of bacteria in some foods. I. Identification scheme.

    PubMed

    Corlett, D A; Lee, J S; Sinnhuber, R O

    1965-09-01

    A method was devised and tested for a quantitative identification of microbial flora in foods. The colonies developing on the initial isolation plates were picked with sterile toothpicks and inoculated on a master plate in prearranged spacing and order. The growth on the master plates was then replicated on a series of solid-agar plates containing differential or selective agents. The characteristic growth and physiological responses of microbial isolates to penicillin, tylosin, vancomycin, streptomycin, chloramphenicol, neomycin, colistin, and to S S Agar, Staphylococcus Medium No. 110, and Potato Dextrose Agar were recorded, together with Gram reaction and cell morphology. This information was then fed into an IBM 1410 digital computer which grouped and analyzed each isolate into 10 microbial genera, or groups, according to the identification key. The identification scheme was established by use of reference culture studies and from the literature. This system was used to analyze the microbial flora in dover sole (Microstomus pacificus) and ground beef. The method described in this article enables one to examine large numbers of microbial isolates with simplicity.

  14. Rapid amyloid fibril formation by a winter flounder antifreeze protein requires specific interaction with ice.

    PubMed

    Dubé, André; Leggiadro, Cindy; Ewart, Kathryn Vanya

    2016-05-01

    A typically α-helical antifreeze protein (wflAFP-6) from winter flounder, Pseudopleuronectes americanus, forms amyloid fibrils during freezing. In this study, the effects of distinct components of the freezing process were examined. Freezing of wflAFP-6 in the presence of template ice was shown to be necessary for rapid conversion to an amyloid conformation. Neither subfreezing temperature nor phase change was sufficient. Thus, specific interaction with the ice surface was essential. The ice-induced formation of amyloid appeared to be unique to this helical antifreeze, it required high concentrations of protein and it occurred over a range of pH values. These results define a method for rapid formation of amyloid by wflAFP-6 on demand under physiological conditions. PMID:27086686

  15. Identification of the chemical forms of selenium in soy protein

    SciTech Connect

    Rodibaugh, R.

    1989-01-01

    Soybeans (Glycine max. L. Merr., Century) were grown hydroponically and intrinsically radiolabeled with {sup 75}Se, an isotope of selenium (Se). The isotope was provided as {sup 75}Se-Na{sub 2}SeO{sub 3} during the reproductive stage of growth until onset of senescence. Harvested seeds were processed into defatted soy meal. Soluble proteins were extracted in 20mM Tris-HCl buffer and fractionated into 11S, 7S, and 2S protein fractions by isoelectric precipitation. The 11S and 7S globulins, containing the glycinin and conglycinin storage proteins respectively, constitute the majority of extractable soy proteins. These storage proteins are the predominant proteins in soy protein isolate frequently used in food for human consumption. Approximately 24% of the defatted meal was soluble protein and accounted for 65% of the radioactivity associated with the soybean meal. The 11S fraction contained approximately 31% of the extracted protein and 27% of the extracted radioactivity. The 7S fraction contained approximately 32% and 35% of the extractable protein and radioactivity, respectively. The 2S fraction, containing the sulfur (S)-rich trypsin inhibitors, accounted for 17% of the protein and 27% of the radioactivity extracted from the defatted soy meal. Purification of the storage proteins by gel filtration and affinity chromatography showed higher levels of radioactivity associated with glycinin than conglycinin. Purified 11S proteins contained 1.09 ng Se per mg protein while 7S proteins contained 0.36 ng Se per mg protein.

  16. Hide and seek: Identification and confirmation of small molecule protein targets.

    PubMed

    Ursu, Andrei; Waldmann, Herbert

    2015-08-15

    Target identification and confirmation for small molecules is often the rate limiting step in drug discovery. A robust method to identify proteins addressed by small molecules is affinity chromatography using chemical probes. These usually consist of the compound of interest equipped with a linker molecule and a proper tag. Recently, methods emerged that allow the identification of protein targets without prior functionalization of the small molecule of interest. The digest offers an update on the newest developments in the area of target identification with special focus on confirmation techniques. PMID:26115575

  17. Identification of Associated Proteins by Immunoprecipitation and Mass Spectrometry Analysis.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xiumei; Yan, Jianshe

    2016-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions play central roles in intercellular and intracellular signal transduction. Impairment of protein-protein interactions causes many diseases such as cancer, cardiomyopathies, diabetes, microbial infections, and genetic and neurodegenerative disorders. Immunoprecipitation is a technique in which a target protein of interest bound by an antibody is used to pull down the protein complex out of cell lysates, which can be identified by mass spectrometry. Here, we describe the protocol to immunoprecipitate and identify the components of the protein complexes of ElmoE in Dictyostelium discoideum cells. PMID:27271899

  18. Identification and characterization of secreted proteins in Eimeria tenella

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramlee, Intan Azlinda; Firdaus-Raih, Mohd; Wan, Kiew-Lian

    2015-09-01

    Eimeria tenella is a protozoan parasite that causes coccidiosis, an economically important disease in the poultry industry. The characterization of proteins that are secreted by parasites have been shown to play important roles in parasite invasion and are considered to be potential control agents. In this study, 775 proteins potentially secreted by E. tenella were identified. These proteins were further filtered to remove mitochondrial proteins. Out of 763 putative secreted proteins, 259 proteins possess transmembrane domains while another 150 proteins have GPI (Glycosylphosphatidylinositol) anchors. Homology search revealed that 315 and 448 proteins have matches with known and hypothetical proteins in the database, respectively. Within this data set, previously characterized secretory proteins such as micronemes, rhoptry kinases and dense granules were detected.

  19. Identification and characterization of the surface proteins of Clostridium difficile

    SciTech Connect

    Dailey, D.C.

    1988-01-01

    Several clostridial proteins were detected on the clostridial cell surface by sensitive radioiodination techniques. Two major proteins and six minor proteins comprised the radioiodinated proteins on the clostridial cell surface. Cellular fractionation of surface radiolabeled C. difficile determined that the radioiodinated proteins were found in the cell wall fraction of C. difficile and surprisingly were also present in the clostridial membrane. Furthermore, an interesting phenomenon of disulfide-crosslinking of the cell surface proteins of C. difficile was observed. Disulfide-linked protein complexes were found in both the membrane and cell wall fractions. In addition, the cell surface proteins of C. difficile were found to be released into the culture medium. In attempts to further characterize the clostridial proteins recombinant DNA techniques were employed. In addition, the role of the clostridial cell surface proteins in the interactions of C. difficile with human PMNs was also investigated.

  20. A novel fluorescence in situ hybridization test for rapid pathogen identification in positive blood cultures.

    PubMed

    Makristathis, A; Riss, S; Hirschl, A M

    2014-10-01

    A novel molecular beacon-based fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) test allowing for the identification of a wide range of bacterial pathogens directly in positive blood cultures (BCs) was evaluated with positive BCs of 152 patients. Depending on the Gram stain, either a Gram-negative or a Gram-positive panel was used. The time to result was 30 min, and the hands-on time was only 10 min. Seven per cent of the cultured microorganisms were not included in the FISH panels; the identification rate of those included was 95.2%. Overall, the FISH test enabled accurate pathogen identification in 88.2% of all cases analysed.

  1. Combination of MS protein identification and bioassay of chromatographic fractions to identify biologically active substances from complex protein sources.

    PubMed

    Kuromitsu, Sadao; Yokota, Hiroyuki; Hiramoto, Masashi; Yuri, Masatoshi; Naitou, Masanori; Nakamura, Naoto; Kawabata, Shigeki; Kobori, Masato; Katoh, Masao; Furuchi, Kiyoshi; Mita, Haruhisa; Yamada, Tetsuo

    2009-06-01

    Purification of biologically active proteins from complex biological sources is a difficult task, usually requiring large amounts of sample and many separation steps. We found an active substance in a serum response element-dependent luciferase reporter gene bioassay in interstitial cystitis urine that we attempted to purify with column chromatography and the bioassay. With anion-exchange Mono Q and C4 reversed-phase columns, apparently sharp active peaks were obtained. However, more than 20 kinds of proteins were identified from the active fractions with MS, indicating that the purification was not complete. As further purification was difficult, we chose a candidate molecule by means of studying the correlation between MS protein identification scores and bioassay responses of chromatographic fractions near the active peaks. As a result, epidermal growth factor (EGF) was nominated as a candidate molecule among the identified proteins because the elution profile of EGF was consistent with that of the bioassay, and the correlation coefficient of EGF between MS protein identification scores and bioassay responses was the highest among all the identified proteins. With recombinant EGF and anti-EGF and anti-EGF receptor antibodies, EGF was confirmed to be the desired substance in interstitial cystitis urine. This approach required only 20 ml of urine sample and two column chromatographic steps. The combination of MS protein identification and bioassay of chromatographic fractions may be useful for identifying biologically active substances from complex protein sources.

  2. Unifying protein inference and peptide identification with feedback to update consistency between peptides.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jinhong; Chen, Bolin; Wu, Fang-Xiang

    2013-01-01

    We first propose a new method to process peptide identification reports from databases search engines. Then via it we develop a method for unifying protein inference and peptide identification by adding a feedback from protein inference to peptide identification. The feedback information is a list of high-confidence proteins, which is used to update an adjacency matrix between peptides. The adjacency matrix is used in the regularization of peptide scores. Logistic regression (LR) is used to compute the probability of peptide identification with the regularized scores. Protein scores are then calculated with the LR probability of peptides. Instead of selecting the best peptide match for each MS/MS, we select multiple peptides. By testing on two datasets, the results have shown that the proposed method can robustly assign accurate probabilities to peptides, and have a higher discrimination power than PeptideProphet to distinguish correct and incorrect identified peptides. Additionally, not only can our method infer more true positive proteins but also infer less false positive proteins than ProteinProphet at the same false positive rate. The coverage of inferred proteins is also significantly increased due to the selection of multiple peptides for each MS/MS and the improvement of their scores by the feedback from the inferred proteins.

  3. Proteins involved in motility and sperm-egg interaction evolve more rapidly in mouse spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Vicens, Alberto; Lüke, Lena; Roldan, Eduardo R S

    2014-01-01

    Proteomic studies of spermatozoa have identified a large catalog of integral sperm proteins. Rapid evolution of these proteins may underlie adaptive changes of sperm traits involved in different events leading to fertilization, although the selective forces underlying such rapid evolution are not well understood. A variety of selective forces may differentially affect several steps ending in fertilization, thus resulting in a compartmentalized adaptation of sperm proteins. Here we analyzed the evolution of genes associated to various events in the sperm's life, from sperm formation to sperm-egg interaction. Evolutionary analyses were performed on gene sequences from 17 mouse strains whose genomes have been sequenced. Four of these are derived from wild Mus musculus, M. domesticus, M. castaneus and M. spretus. We found a higher proportion of genes exhibiting a signature of positive selection among those related to sperm motility and sperm-egg interaction. Furthermore, sperm proteins involved in sperm-egg interaction exhibited accelerated evolution in comparison to those involved in other events. Thus, we identified a large set of candidate proteins for future comparative analyses of genotype-phenotype associations in spermatozoa of species subjected to different sexual selection pressures. Adaptive evolution of proteins involved in motility could be driven by sperm competition, since this selective force is known to increase the proportion of motile sperm and their swimming velocity. On the other hand, sperm proteins involved in gamete interaction could be coevolving with their egg partners through episodes of sexual selection or sexual conflict resulting in species-specific sperm-egg interactions and barriers preventing interspecies fertilization.

  4. Potential of MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry as a rapid detection technique in plant pathology: identification of plant-associated microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Faheem; Babalola, Olubukola O; Tak, Hamid I

    2012-09-01

    Plant diseases caused by plant pathogens substantially reduce crop production every year, resulting in massive economic losses throughout the world. Accurate detection and identification of plant pathogens is fundamental to plant pathogen diagnostics and, thus, plant disease management. Diagnostics and disease-management strategies require techniques to enable simultaneous detection and quantification of a wide range of pathogenic and non-pathogenic microorganisms. Over the past decade, rapid development of matrix-assisted laser-desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) techniques for characterization of microorganisms has enabled substantially improved detection and identification of microorganisms. In the biological sciences, MALDI-TOF MS is used to analyze specific peptides or proteins directly desorbed from intact bacteria, fungal spores, nematodes, and other microorganisms. The ability to record biomarker ions, in a broad m/z range, which are unique to and representative of individual microorganisms, forms the basis of taxonomic identification of microorganisms by MALDI-TOF MS. Recent advances in mass spectrometry have initiated new research, i.e. analysis of more complex microbial communities. Such studies are just beginning but have great potential for elucidation not only of the interactions between microorganisms and their host plants but also those among different microbial taxa living in association with plants. There has been a recent effort by the mass spectrometry community to make data from large scale mass spectrometry experiments publicly available in the form of a centralized repository. Such a resource could enable the use of MALDI-TOF MS as a universal technique for detection of plant pathogens and non-pathogens. The effects of experimental conditions are sufficiently understood, reproducible spectra can be obtained from computational database search, and microorganisms can be rapidly characterized by genus, species

  5. A NOVEL TECHNIQUE FOR THE RAPID IDENTIFICATION OF ALPHA EMITTERS RELEASED DURING A RADIOLOGICAL INCIDENT.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Currently there are no standard radioanalytical methods applicable to the initial phase of a radiological emergency, for the early identification and quantification of alpha emitting radionuclides. Of particular interest are determinations of the presence and concentration of is...

  6. Supplementation of CHROMagar Candida Medium with Pal's Medium for Rapid Identification of Candida dubliniensis

    PubMed Central

    Sahand, Ismail H.; Moragues, María D.; Eraso, Elena; Villar-Vidal, María; Quindós, Guillermo; Pontón, José

    2005-01-01

    CHROMagar Candida medium is used for the isolation and identification of Candida species, but it does not differentiate Candida albicans from Candida dubliniensis. This differentiation can be achieved by using Pal's agar, which cannot be used in primary isolation. We have combined both media to obtain a new medium that can be used for the isolation and identification of C. dubliniensis in primary cultures. PMID:16272515

  7. Rapid evolution of pearl oyster shell matrix proteins with repetitive, low-complexity domains

    PubMed Central

    McDougall, Carmel; Aguilera, Felipe; Degnan, Bernard M.

    2013-01-01

    The lysine (K)-rich mantle protein (KRMP) and shematrin protein families are unique to the organic matrices of pearl oyster shells. Similar to other proteins that are constituents of tough, extracellular structures, such as spider silk, shematrins and KRMPs, contain repetitive, low-complexity domains (RLCDs). Comprehensive analysis of available gene sequences in three species of pearl oyster using BLAST and hidden Markov models reveal that both gene families have large memberships in these species. The shematrin gene family expanded before the speciation of these oysters, leading to a minimum of eight orthology groups. By contrast, KRMPs expanded primarily after speciation leading to species-specific gene repertoires. Regardless of their evolutionary history, the rapid evolution of shematrins and KRMPs appears to be the result of the intrinsic instability of repetitive sequences encoding the RLCDs, and the gain, loss and shuffling of other motifs. This mode of molecular evolution is likely to contribute to structural characteristics and evolvability of the pearl oyster shell. Based on these observations, we infer that analogous RLCD proteins throughout the animal kingdom also have the capacity to rapidly evolve and as a result change their structural properties. PMID:23427100

  8. Melting Temperature Mapping Method: A Novel Method for Rapid Identification of Unknown Pathogenic Microorganisms within Three Hours of Sample Collection.

    PubMed

    Niimi, Hideki; Ueno, Tomohiro; Hayashi, Shirou; Abe, Akihito; Tsurue, Takahiro; Mori, Masashi; Tabata, Homare; Minami, Hiroshi; Goto, Michihiko; Akiyama, Makoto; Yamamoto, Yoshihiro; Saito, Shigeru; Kitajima, Isao

    2015-07-28

    Acquiring the earliest possible identification of pathogenic microorganisms is critical for selecting the appropriate antimicrobial therapy in infected patients. We herein report the novel "melting temperature (Tm) mapping method" for rapidly identifying the dominant bacteria in a clinical sample from sterile sites. Employing only seven primer sets, more than 100 bacterial species can be identified. In particular, using the Difference Value, it is possible to identify samples suitable for Tm mapping identification. Moreover, this method can be used to rapidly diagnose the absence of bacteria in clinical samples. We tested the Tm mapping method using 200 whole blood samples obtained from patients with suspected sepsis, 85% (171/200) of which matched the culture results based on the detection level. A total of 130 samples were negative according to the Tm mapping method, 98% (128/130) of which were also negative based on the culture method. Meanwhile, 70 samples were positive according to the Tm mapping method, and of the 59 suitable for identification, 100% (59/59) exhibited a "match" or "broad match" with the culture or sequencing results. These findings were obtained within three hours of whole blood collection. The Tm mapping method is therefore useful for identifying infectious diseases requiring prompt treatment.

  9. [Clinical evaluation of rapid identification of bacteria from positive-testing blood culture bottles by internal transcribed spacer PCR].

    PubMed

    Senda, Yasuko; Fujita, Shinichi; Sakai, Yoshio; Wada, Takashi

    2011-05-01

    Delays in diagnosis and initiation of treatment of severe infections such as sepsis greatly influence patient prognosis. Our laboratory introduced rapid identification of bacterial species by PCR for positive blood culture samples as a routine laboratory test since April 2008. We extracted DNA directly from positive blood culture bottles and amplified the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of pathogenic microorganisms by PCR in order to identify bacterial species from electrophoretic patterns of PCR products. Of 167 strains from 167 samples excluding three samples with polymicrobial organisms, 144 strains (86.2%) were correctly identified at species level and 17 strains (10.2%) at genus level. The time required between DNA extraction and bacterial identification was about one and one-half hours. In patients with MRSA sepsis, the time of initiation of treatments such as administration of anti-MRSA drugs and intravascular catheter removal has clearly become earlier with the introduction of ITS-PCR, resulting decreased mortality from 35.0% to 16.0%. Rapid identification of pathogens directly from blood culture bottles by ITS-PCR seems to be useful for appropriate treatment of severe infectious diseases.

  10. Application of PCR and High-Resolution Melting for Rapid Identification of Yeasts Routinely Isolated in a Clinical Microbiology Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Ninghui, Guo; Bing, Wang; Wei, Ren; Mengmeng, Liu; Meiling, Chu; Dongya, Meng; Liqiong, Yao; Wencheng, Xue

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to develop a method for rapid and accurate identification of yeasts obtained in the clinic, especially from immunocompromised patients, in order to provide a timely and appropriate antifungal therapy. A total of 112 Candida isolates were analyzed in this study; 28 of them were used to validate the PCR-HRM method in species identification in a blinded manner. Strains were identified by conventional techniques that use VITEK 2 YST cards and Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). These methods were compared to the newly developed technique based on real-time polymerase-chain reaction high-resolution melting (PCR-HRM). Discordant results were resolved with internal transcribed spacer (ITS) gene sequencing, the "golden standard" used to evaluate the reliability of all methods in identifying yeasts at the species level. PCR-HRM sensitivity was assessed with the isolated strains. VITEK 2, MALDI-TOF-MS, and PCR-HRM accurately identified 89.2% (74/83), 97.6% (81/83), 100% (83/83) of the isolates, respectively. PCR-HRM detection limit was 1fg/μl of yeasts. In validation assays, a 100% accuracy rate was achieved by the use of PCR-HRM. Therefore, the PCR-HRM method is a rapid, sensitive, and specific diagnostic approach, which provides a cost-effective and more suitable alternative for yeast identification in a clinical laboratory. Future research is needed for automation of data acquisition.

  11. Bicistronic expression plasmid for the rapid production of recombinant fused proteins in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Yero, Daniel; Pajón, Rolando; Niebla, Olivia; Sardiñas, Gretel; Vivar, Isbel; Perera, Yasser; García, Darien; Delgado, Maité; Cobas, Karem

    2006-04-01

    In the post-genomic era, every aspect of the production of proteins must be accelerated. In this way, several vectors are currently exploited for rapid production of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli. N-terminal fusions to the first 47 amino acids of the LpdA (dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase A) protein of Neisseria meningitidis have been shown to increase the expression of recombinant proteins. Consequently, we have constructed a modified N-terminal LpdA fusion vector, introducing the blue/white colony selection by exploiting a bicistronic gene organization. In the new vector, the sequence encoding the first 47 amino acids of meningococcal LpdA and the alpha-peptide sequence of beta-galactosidase were connected via a ribosome-binding site, and two MCSs (multiple cloning sites) were located surrounding the latter, allowing efficient cloning by colour selection of recombinants. The vector was also improved with the addition of a C-terminal polyhistidine tag, and an EKS (enterokinase recognition sequence) immediately after the LpdA fusion sequence. The new plasmid was employed in the expression and purification of six different bacterial polypeptides. One of these recombinant proteins, P6 protein from Haemophilus influenzae, was used as a model and its N-terminal fusion sequence was totally removed from the recombinant version after incubation with the enterokinase protease, while the polyhistidine tail successfully allowed the purification of the unfused protein from the protease reaction. Two completely new neisserial vaccine candidates, NMB0088 and NMB1126 proteins, were cloned, expressed and purified using this system. To our knowledge, this constitutes the first report of the cloning and expression of these proteins in E. coli.

  12. Application of atmospheric pressure matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry for rapid identification of Neisseria species.

    PubMed

    Gudlavalleti, Seshu K; Sundaram, Appavu K; Razumovski, Jane; Doroshenko, Vladimir

    2008-07-01

    Atmospheric pressure matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (AP-MALDI MS) was applied to develop a proteomics-based method to detect and identify Neisseria species. Heat-inactivated clinical isolate cell suspensions of Neisseria gonorrhoeae and strains belonging to five serogroups (A, B, C, W135, and Y) of Neisseria meningitidis were subjected to on-probe protein/peptide extraction and tryptic digestion followed by AP-MALDI tandem MS (MS/MS)-based proteomic analysis. Amino acid sequences derived from three protonated peptides with m/z values of 1743.8, 1894.8, and 1946.8 were identified by AP-MALDI MS/MS and MASCOT proteome database search analysis as belonging to neisserial acyl carrier protein, neisserial-conserved hypothetical protein, and neisserial putative DNA binding protein, respectively. These three peptide masses can thus be potential biomarkers for neisserial species identification by AP-MALDI MS.

  13. A Simple and Rapid Method for Preparing a Cell-Free Bacterial Lysate for Protein Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Kaduri, Maya; Shainsky-Roitman, Janna; Goldfeder, Mor; Ivanir, Eran; Benhar, Itai; Shoham, Yuval; Schroeder, Avi

    2016-01-01

    Cell-free protein synthesis (CFPS) systems are important laboratory tools that are used for various synthetic biology applications. Here, we present a simple and inexpensive laboratory-scale method for preparing a CFPS system from E. coli. The procedure uses basic lab equipment, a minimal set of reagents, and requires less than one hour to process the bacterial cell mass into a functional S30-T7 extract. BL21(DE3) and MRE600 E. coli strains were used to prepare the S30-T7 extract. The CFPS system was used to produce a set of fluorescent and therapeutic proteins of different molecular weights (up to 66 kDa). This system was able to produce 40–150 μg-protein/ml, with variations depending on the plasmid type, expressed protein and E. coli strain. Interestingly, the BL21-based CFPS exhibited stability and increased activity at 40 and 45°C. To the best of our knowledge, this is the most rapid and affordable lab-scale protocol for preparing a cell-free protein synthesis system, with high thermal stability and efficacy in producing therapeutic proteins. PMID:27768741

  14. Myeloperoxidase-derived oxidants rapidly oxidize and disrupt zinc-cysteine/histidine clusters in proteins.

    PubMed

    Cook, Naomi L; Pattison, David I; Davies, Michael J

    2012-12-01

    Zinc is an abundant cellular transition metal ion, which binds avidly to protein cysteine (Cys) and histidine (His) residues to form zinc-Cys/His clusters; these play a key role in the function of many proteins (e.g., DNA binding and repair enzymes, transcription factors, nitric oxide synthase). Leukocyte-derived myeloperoxidase generates powerful oxidants including hypochlorous (HOCl), hypobromous (HOBr), and hypothiocyanous (HOSCN) acids from H(2)O(2) and (pseudo)halide ions. Excessive or misplaced formation of these species is associated with cellular dysfunction, apoptosis and necrosis, and multiple inflammatory diseases. HOCl and HOBr react rapidly with sulfur-containing compounds, and HOSCN reacts specifically with thiols. Consequently, we hypothesized that zinc-Cys/His clusters would be targets for these oxidants, and the activity of such enzymes would be perturbed. This hypothesis has been tested using yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH), which contains a well-characterized Zn(1)Cys(2)His(1) cluster. Incubation of YADH with pathologically relevant concentrations of HOSCN, HOCl, and HOBr resulted in rapid oxidation of the protein (rate constants, determined by competition kinetics, for reaction of HOCl and HOSCN with YADH being (3.3±0.9)×10(8) and (2.9±0.4)×10(4) M(-1) s(-1) per YADH monomer, respectively), loss of enzyme activity, Zn(2+) release, changes in protein structure (particularly formation of disulfide cross-links), and oxidation of Cys residues. The loss of enzyme activity correlated with Zn(2+) release, loss of thiols, and changes in protein structure. We conclude that exposure of zinc-Cys/His clusters to inflammatory oxidants can result in impaired protein activity, thiol oxidation, and Zn(2+) release. These reactions may contribute to inflammation-induced tissue damage.

  15. Myeloperoxidase-derived oxidants rapidly oxidize and disrupt zinc-cysteine/histidine clusters in proteins.

    PubMed

    Cook, Naomi L; Pattison, David I; Davies, Michael J

    2012-12-01

    Zinc is an abundant cellular transition metal ion, which binds avidly to protein cysteine (Cys) and histidine (His) residues to form zinc-Cys/His clusters; these play a key role in the function of many proteins (e.g., DNA binding and repair enzymes, transcription factors, nitric oxide synthase). Leukocyte-derived myeloperoxidase generates powerful oxidants including hypochlorous (HOCl), hypobromous (HOBr), and hypothiocyanous (HOSCN) acids from H(2)O(2) and (pseudo)halide ions. Excessive or misplaced formation of these species is associated with cellular dysfunction, apoptosis and necrosis, and multiple inflammatory diseases. HOCl and HOBr react rapidly with sulfur-containing compounds, and HOSCN reacts specifically with thiols. Consequently, we hypothesized that zinc-Cys/His clusters would be targets for these oxidants, and the activity of such enzymes would be perturbed. This hypothesis has been tested using yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH), which contains a well-characterized Zn(1)Cys(2)His(1) cluster. Incubation of YADH with pathologically relevant concentrations of HOSCN, HOCl, and HOBr resulted in rapid oxidation of the protein (rate constants, determined by competition kinetics, for reaction of HOCl and HOSCN with YADH being (3.3±0.9)×10(8) and (2.9±0.4)×10(4) M(-1) s(-1) per YADH monomer, respectively), loss of enzyme activity, Zn(2+) release, changes in protein structure (particularly formation of disulfide cross-links), and oxidation of Cys residues. The loss of enzyme activity correlated with Zn(2+) release, loss of thiols, and changes in protein structure. We conclude that exposure of zinc-Cys/His clusters to inflammatory oxidants can result in impaired protein activity, thiol oxidation, and Zn(2+) release. These reactions may contribute to inflammation-induced tissue damage. PMID:23032100

  16. Identification of binary interactions between human cytomegalovirus virion proteins.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Stacia L; Bresnahan, Wade A

    2011-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) virions are composed of a DNA-containing nucleocapsid surrounded by a tegument layer and host-derived lipid envelope studded with virally encoded glycoproteins. These complex virions are estimated to be composed of more than 50 viral proteins. Assembly of HCMV virions is poorly understood, especially with respect to acquisition of the tegument; however, it is thought to involve the stepwise addition of virion components through protein-protein interactions. We sought to identify interactions among HCMV virion proteins using yeast two-hybrid analysis. Using 33 known capsid and tegument proteins, we tested 1,089 pairwise combinations for binary interaction in the two-hybrid assay. We identified 24 interactions among HCMV virion proteins, including 13 novel interactions among tegument proteins and one novel interaction between capsid proteins. Several of these novel interactions were confirmed by coimmunoprecipitation of protein complexes from transfected cells. In addition, we demonstrate three of these interactions in the context of HCMV infection. This study reveals several new protein-protein interactions among HCMV tegument proteins, some of which are likely important for HCMV replication and pathogenesis. PMID:20962080

  17. Identification of immunodominant proteins from Mannheimia haemolytica and Histophilus somni by an immunoproteomic approach.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Angel H; Gutiérrez-Ortega, Abel; Hernández-Gutiérrez, Rodolfo

    2015-10-01

    Mannheimia haemolytica and Histophilus somni are frequently isolated from diseased cattle with bovine respiratory disease (BRD). They compromise animal lung function and the immune responses generated are not sufficient to limit infection. Identification of specific immunogenic antigens for vaccine development represents a great challenge. Immunogenic proteins were identified by immunoproteomic approach with sera from cattle immunized with a commercial cellular vaccine of M. haemolytica and H. somni. Proteins of M. haemolytica were identified as solute ABC transporter, iron-binding protein, and hypothetical protein of capsular biosynthesis. Histophilus somni proteins correspond to porin, amino acid ABC transporter, hypothetical outer membrane protein, cysteine synthase, and outer membrane protein P6. Although these antigens share strong similarities with other proteins from animal pathogens, the ABC system proteins have been associated with virulence and these proteins could be considered as potential vaccine candidates for BRD.

  18. Identification of immunodominant proteins from Mannheimia haemolytica and Histophilus somni by an immunoproteomic approach

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Angel H.; Gutiérrez-Ortega, Abel; Hernández-Gutiérrez, Rodolfo

    2015-01-01

    Mannheimia haemolytica and Histophilus somni are frequently isolated from diseased cattle with bovine respiratory disease (BRD). They compromise animal lung function and the immune responses generated are not sufficient to limit infection. Identification of specific immunogenic antigens for vaccine development represents a great challenge. Immunogenic proteins were identified by immunoproteomic approach with sera from cattle immunized with a commercial cellular vaccine of M. haemolytica and H. somni. Proteins of M. haemolytica were identified as solute ABC transporter, iron-binding protein, and hypothetical protein of capsular biosynthesis. Histophilus somni proteins correspond to porin, amino acid ABC transporter, hypothetical outer membrane protein, cysteine synthase, and outer membrane protein P6. Although these antigens share strong similarities with other proteins from animal pathogens, the ABC system proteins have been associated with virulence and these proteins could be considered as potential vaccine candidates for BRD. PMID:26424916

  19. Changes in Sensory Evoked Responses Coincide with Rapid Improvement in Speech Identification Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alain, Claude; Campeanu, Sandra; Tremblay, Kelly

    2010-01-01

    Perceptual learning is sometimes characterized by rapid improvements in performance within the first hour of training (fast perceptual learning), which may be accompanied by changes in sensory and/or response pathways. Here, we report rapid physiological changes in the human auditory system that coincide with learning during a 1-hour test session…

  20. Rapid Identification of Mycobacterium Species with the Aid of Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) From Clinical Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Siddhartha; Bandyopadhyay, Debasis; Paine, Suman Kalyan; Gupta, Soma; Banerjee, Surajita; Bhattacharya, Sujata; Gachhui, Ratan; Bhattacharya, Basudev

    2010-01-01

    Mycobacteria are aerobic, nonspore forming, non-motile,single-cell bacteria.Of more than 40 currently recognized species of mycobacteria, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of human TB is the commonest pathogen for pulmonary and extra pulmonary tuberculosis cases. The other members of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC) or the nontubercular mycobacterium (NTM) produces similar diseases which cannot be differentiated from tuberculosis by clinical symptoms and signs. But this differentiation is important as the chemotherapy varies widely according to the strain of mycobacterium. The burden of morbidity and mortality of tuberculosis is rapidly growing worldwide, particularly with the HIV/AIDS epidemic. The strain identification of Mycobacterium remains a cumbersome, labor intensive and expensive procedure, which requires 3 to 12 weeks of time. The conventional methods of strain identification lack proper standardization and precise diagnosis. The prime objective of this study is to overcome these problems. A multiplex PCR using 3 amplicons of 165,365, and 541 base pair target sequences was done with a total number of 165 clinical isolates of suspected Koch’s patients. Strain identification was compared both by conventional methods and multiplex PCR. The results of the study show that this multiplex PCR is supposed to be less complicated, less time consuming, cost-effective and superior to the conventional methods. It is also applicable for culture negative samples where strain identification is not possible by conventional approach. PMID:21258579

  1. MALDI-TOF MS is more accurate than VITEK II ANC card and API Rapid ID 32 A system for the identification of Clostridium species.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Jin; Kim, Si Hyun; Park, Hyun-Jung; Park, Hae-Geun; Park, Dongchul; Song, Sae Am; Lee, Hee Joo; Yong, Dongeun; Choi, Jun Yong; Kook, Joong-Ki; Kim, Hye Ran; Shin, Jeong Hwan

    2016-08-01

    All 50 Clostridium difficile strains were definitely identified by Vitek2 system, Rapid ID 32A system, and MALDI-TOF. For 18 non-difficile Clostridium strains, the identification results were correct in 0, 2, and 17 strains by Vitek2, Rapid ID 32A, and MALDI-TOF, respectively. MALDI-TOF could be used as the primary tool for identification of Clostridium species.

  2. MALDI-TOF MS is more accurate than VITEK II ANC card and API Rapid ID 32 A system for the identification of Clostridium species.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Jin; Kim, Si Hyun; Park, Hyun-Jung; Park, Hae-Geun; Park, Dongchul; Song, Sae Am; Lee, Hee Joo; Yong, Dongeun; Choi, Jun Yong; Kook, Joong-Ki; Kim, Hye Ran; Shin, Jeong Hwan

    2016-08-01

    All 50 Clostridium difficile strains were definitely identified by Vitek2 system, Rapid ID 32A system, and MALDI-TOF. For 18 non-difficile Clostridium strains, the identification results were correct in 0, 2, and 17 strains by Vitek2, Rapid ID 32A, and MALDI-TOF, respectively. MALDI-TOF could be used as the primary tool for identification of Clostridium species. PMID:27296834

  3. Identification of a Protein that Purifies with the Scrapie Prion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolton, David C.; McKinley, Michael P.; Prusiner, Stanley B.

    1982-12-01

    Purification of prions from scrapie-infected hamster brain yielded a protein that was not found in a similar fraction from uninfected brain. The protein migrated with an apparent molecular size of 27,000 to 30,000 daltons in sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gels. The resistance of this protein to digestion by proteinase K distinguished it from proteins of similar molecular weight found in normal hamster brain. Initial results suggest that the amount of this protein correlates with the titer of the agent.

  4. Identification of protein-protein interactions by standard gal4p-based yeast two-hybrid screening.

    PubMed

    Wagemans, Jeroen; Lavigne, Rob

    2015-01-01

    Yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) screening permits identification of completely new protein interaction partners for a protein of interest, in addition to confirming binary protein-protein interactions. After discussing the general advantages and drawbacks of Y2H and existing alternatives, this chapter provides a detailed protocol for traditional Gal4p-based Y2H library screens in Saccharomyces cerevisiae AH109. This includes bait transformation, bait auto-activation testing, prey library transformation, Y2H evaluation, and subsequent identification of the prey plasmids. Moreover, a one-on-one mating protocol to confirm interactions between suspected partners is given. Finally, a quantitative α-galactosidase assay protocol to compare interaction strengths is provided.

  5. Rapid identification and discrimination of bacterial strains by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy and neural networks.

    PubMed

    Manzoor, S; Moncayo, S; Navarro-Villoslada, F; Ayala, J A; Izquierdo-Hornillos, R; de Villena, F J Manuel; Caceres, J O

    2014-04-01

    Identification and discrimination of bacterial strains of same species exhibiting resistance to antibiotics using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and neural networks (NN) algorithm is reported. The method has been applied to identify 40 bacterial strains causing hospital acquired infections (HAI), i.e. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Salmonella typhimurium, Salmonella pullurum and Salmonella salamae. The strains analyzed included both isolated from clinical samples and constructed in laboratory that differ in mutations as a result of their resistance to one or more antibiotics. Small changes in the atomic composition of the bacterial strains, as a result of their mutations and genetic variations, were detected by the LIBS-NN methodology and led to their identification and classification. This is of utmost importance because solely identification of bacterial species is not sufficient for disease diagnosis and identification of the actual strain is also required. The proposed method was successfully able to discriminate strains of the same bacterial species. The optimized NN models provided reliable bacterial strain identification with an index of spectral correlation higher than 95% for the samples analyzed, showing the potential and effectiveness of the method to address the safety and social-cost HAI-related issue.

  6. Brachypodium distachyon grain: identification and subcellular localization of storage proteins

    PubMed Central

    Larré, C.; Penninck, S.; Bouchet, B.; Lollier, V.; Tranquet, O.; Denery-Papini, S.; Guillon, F.; Rogniaux, H.

    2010-01-01

    Seed storage proteins are of great importance in nutrition and in industrial transformation because of their functional properties. Brachypodium distachyon has been proposed as a new model plant to study temperate cereals. The protein composition of Brachypodium grain was investigated by separating the proteins on the basis of their solubility combined with a proteomic approach. Salt-soluble proteins as well as salt-insoluble proteins separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis revealed 284 and 120 spots, respectively. Proteins from the major spots were sequenced by mass spectrometry and identified by searching against a Brachypodium putative protein database. Our analysis detected globulins and prolamins but no albumins. Globulins were represented mainly by the 11S type and their solubility properties corresponded to the glutelin found in rice. An in silico search for storage proteins returned more translated genes than expressed products identified by mass spectrometry, particularly in the case of prolamin type proteins, reflecting a strong expression of globulins at the expense of prolamins. Microscopic examination of endosperm cells revealed scarce small-size starch granules surrounded by protein bodies containing 11S globulins. The presence of protein bodies containing glutelins makes B. distachyon closer to rice or oat than to wheat endosperm. PMID:20385545

  7. Proteins of human milk. I. Identification of major components

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, N.G.; Powers, M.T.; Tollaksen, S.L.

    1982-04-01

    Traditionally, human milk proteins are identified largely by reference to bovine milk. Hence, to identify the major proteins in human milk, we subjected human and bovine milk, in parallel, to high-resolution two-dimensional electrophoresis. Isoelectric precipitation at pH 4.6 was our criterion for distinguishing whey proteins from those of the casein complex. The ..cap alpha..- and..beta..-caseins were identified on the basis of relative abundance, relative molecular mass, and relative isoelectric points. No protein disappeared from ISO-DALT patterns of human milk after rennin treatment, and no new protein comparable to bovine para K-casein appeared in the BASO-DALT patterns; this suggests that K-casein is absent from human milk. The proteins identified in human milk patterns include the ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. casein families, lactalbumin, albumin, transferrin, IgA, and lactoferrin. Numerous additional proteins seen in patterns for human milk remain to be identified.

  8. Rapid and Adaptable Measurement of Protein Thermal Stability by Differential Scanning Fluorimetry: Updating a Common Biochemical Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, R. Jeremy; Savas, Christopher J.; Kartje, Zachary; Hoops, Geoffrey C.

    2014-01-01

    Measurement of protein denaturation and protein folding is a common laboratory technique used in undergraduate biochemistry laboratories. Differential scanning fluorimetry (DSF) provides a rapid, sensitive, and general method for measuring protein thermal stability in an undergraduate biochemistry laboratory. In this method, the thermal…

  9. A Rapid and Simple LC-MS Method Using Collagen Marker Peptides for Identification of the Animal Source of Leather.

    PubMed

    Kumazawa, Yuki; Taga, Yuki; Iwai, Kenji; Koyama, Yoh-Ichi

    2016-08-01

    Identification of the animal source of leather is difficult using traditional methods, including microscopic observation and PCR. In the present study, a LC-MS method was developed for detecting interspecies differences in the amino acid sequence of type I collagen, which is a major component of leather, among six animals (cattle, horse, pig, sheep, goat, and deer). After a dechroming procedure and trypsin digestion, six tryptic peptides of type I collagen were monitored by LC-MS in multiple reaction monitoring mode for the animal source identification using the patterns of the presence or absence of the marker peptides. We analyzed commercial leathers from various production areas using this method, and found some leathers in which the commercial label disagreed with the identified animal source. Our method enabled rapid and simple leather certification and could be applied to other animals whether or not their collagen sequences are available in public databases.

  10. A Rapid and Simple LC-MS Method Using Collagen Marker Peptides for Identification of the Animal Source of Leather.

    PubMed

    Kumazawa, Yuki; Taga, Yuki; Iwai, Kenji; Koyama, Yoh-Ichi

    2016-08-01

    Identification of the animal source of leather is difficult using traditional methods, including microscopic observation and PCR. In the present study, a LC-MS method was developed for detecting interspecies differences in the amino acid sequence of type I collagen, which is a major component of leather, among six animals (cattle, horse, pig, sheep, goat, and deer). After a dechroming procedure and trypsin digestion, six tryptic peptides of type I collagen were monitored by LC-MS in multiple reaction monitoring mode for the animal source identification using the patterns of the presence or absence of the marker peptides. We analyzed commercial leathers from various production areas using this method, and found some leathers in which the commercial label disagreed with the identified animal source. Our method enabled rapid and simple leather certification and could be applied to other animals whether or not their collagen sequences are available in public databases. PMID:27397145

  11. Quantitative one-step RT-PCR assay for rapid and sensitive identification and titration of polioviruses in clinical specimens.

    PubMed

    Laassri, Majid; Dipiazza, Anthony; Bidzhieva, Bella; Zagorodnyaya, Tatiana; Chumakov, Konstantin

    2013-04-01

    Rapid identification and quantitation of polioviruses in clinical specimens is important for surveillance and analysis of virus shedding by vaccine recipients, which could be used to assess the level of mucosal immunity. A quantitative one step RT-PCR was developed for identification and titration of all three poliovirus serotypes. The assay could be an alternative to the traditional procedure based on cell culture isolation and subsequent determination of poliovirus serotype and virus titration. The method is based on quantitative PCR performed with reverse transcription reaction in the same tube. The multiplex assay that quantifies all three serotypes of poliovirus was found to be highly specific, sensitive, and takes only one day to complete.

  12. Rapid heating of Alaska pollock and chicken breast myofibrillar proteins as affecting gel rheological properties.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenjie; Stevenson, Clint D; Lanier, Tyre C

    2013-07-01

    Surimi seafoods (fish/poikilotherm protein) in the U.S.A. are typically cooked rapidly to 90+°C, while comminuted products made from land animals (meat/homeotherm protein) are purposely cooked much more slowly, and to lower endpoint temperatures (near 70 °C). We studied heating rate (0.5, 25, or 90 °C/min) and endpoint temperature (45 to 90 °C) effects on rheological properties (fracture, small strain) of washed myofibril gels derived from fish (Alaska pollock) compared with chicken breast at a common pH (6.75). This was contrasted with published data on gelation kinetics of chicken myosin over the same temperature range. Heating rate had no effect on fracture properties of fish gels but slow heating did yield somewhat stronger, but not more deformable, chicken gels. Maximum gel strength by rapid heating could be achieved within 5 min holding after less than 1 min heating time. Dynamic testing by small strain revealed poor correspondence of the present data to that published for gelling response of chicken breast myosin in the same temperature range. The common practice of reporting small-strain rheological parameters measured at the endpoint temperature was also shown to be misleading, since upon cooling, there was much less difference in rigidity between rapidly and slowly heated gels for either species.

  13. Rapid heating of Alaska pollock and chicken breast myofibrillar proteins as affecting gel rheological properties.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenjie; Stevenson, Clint D; Lanier, Tyre C

    2013-07-01

    Surimi seafoods (fish/poikilotherm protein) in the U.S.A. are typically cooked rapidly to 90+°C, while comminuted products made from land animals (meat/homeotherm protein) are purposely cooked much more slowly, and to lower endpoint temperatures (near 70 °C). We studied heating rate (0.5, 25, or 90 °C/min) and endpoint temperature (45 to 90 °C) effects on rheological properties (fracture, small strain) of washed myofibril gels derived from fish (Alaska pollock) compared with chicken breast at a common pH (6.75). This was contrasted with published data on gelation kinetics of chicken myosin over the same temperature range. Heating rate had no effect on fracture properties of fish gels but slow heating did yield somewhat stronger, but not more deformable, chicken gels. Maximum gel strength by rapid heating could be achieved within 5 min holding after less than 1 min heating time. Dynamic testing by small strain revealed poor correspondence of the present data to that published for gelling response of chicken breast myosin in the same temperature range. The common practice of reporting small-strain rheological parameters measured at the endpoint temperature was also shown to be misleading, since upon cooling, there was much less difference in rigidity between rapidly and slowly heated gels for either species. PMID:23646872

  14. Rapid Identification of Biothreat and Other Clinically Relevant Bacterial Species by Use of Universal PCR Coupled with High-Resolution Melting Analysis▿

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Samuel; Ramachandran, Padmini; Rothman, Richard; Hsieh, Yu-Hsiang; Hardick, Andrew; Won, Helen; Kecojevic, Aleksandar; Jackman, Joany; Gaydos, Charlotte

    2009-01-01

    A rapid assay for eubacterial species identification is described using high-resolution melt analysis to characterize PCR products. Unique melt profiles generated from multiple hypervariable regions of the 16S rRNA gene for 100 clinically relevant bacterial pathogens, including category A and B biothreat agents and their surrogates, allowed highly specific species identification. PMID:19458181

  15. Evaluation of the synergistic effects of milk proteins in a rapid viscosity analyzer.

    PubMed

    Stephani, Rodrigo; Borges de Souza, Alisson; Leal de Oliveira, Marcone Augusto; Perrone, Ítalo Tuler; Fernandes de Carvalho, Antônio; Cappa de Oliveira, Luiz Fernando

    2015-12-01

    Protein systems (PS) are routinely used by companies from Brazil and around the globe to improve the texture, yield, and palatability of processed foods. Understanding the synergistic behavior among the different protein structures of these systems during thermal treatment under the influence of pH can help to better define optimum conditions for products and processes. The interpretation of the reactions and interactions that occur simultaneously among the protein constituents of these systems as dispersions during thermal processing is still a major challenge. Here, using a rapid viscosity analyzer, we observed the rheological changes in the startup viscosities of 5 PS obtained by combining varying proportions of milk protein concentrate and whey protein concentrate under different conditions of pH (5.0, 6.5, and 7.0) and heat processing (85°C/15min and 95°C/5min). The solutions were standardized to 25% of total solids and 17% of protein. Ten analytical parameters were used to characterize each of the startup-viscosity ramps for 35 experiments conducted in a 2×3 × 5 mixed planning matrix, using principal component analysis to interpret behavioral similarities. The study showed the clear influence of pH 5.5 in the elevation of the initial temperature of the PS startup viscosity by at least 5°C, as well as the effect of different milk protein concentrate:whey protein concentrate ratios above 15:85 at pH 7.0 on the viscographic profile curves. These results suggested that the primary agent driving the changes was the synergism among the reactions and interactions of casein with whey proteins during processing. This study reinforces the importance of the rapid viscosity analyzer as an analytical tool for the simulation of industrial processes involving PS, and the use of the startup viscosity ramp as a means of interpreting the interactions of system components with respect to changes related to the treatment temperature. PMID:26409966

  16. Hypothesis: Paralog Formation from Progenitor Proteins and Paralog Mutagenesis Spur the Rapid Evolution of Telomere Binding Proteins.

    PubMed

    Lustig, Arthur J

    2016-01-01

    Through elegant studies in fungal cells and complex organisms, we propose a unifying paradigm for the rapid evolution of telomere binding proteins (TBPs) that associate with either (or both) telomeric DNA and telomeric proteins. TBPs protect and regulate telomere structure and function. Four critical factors are involved. First, TBPs that commonly bind to telomeric DNA include the c-Myb binding proteins, OB-fold single-stranded binding proteins, and G-G base paired Hoogsteen structure (G4) binding proteins. Each contributes independently or, in some cases, cooperatively, to provide a minimum level of telomere function. As a result of these minimal requirements and the great abundance of homologs of these motifs in the proteome, DNA telomere-binding activity may be generated more easily than expected. Second, telomere dysfunction gives rise to genome instability, through the elevation of recombination rates, genome ploidy, and the frequency of gene mutations. The formation of paralogs that diverge from their progenitor proteins ultimately can form a high frequency of altered TBPs with altered functions. Third, TBPs that assemble into complexes (e.g., mammalian shelterin) derive benefits from the novel emergent functions. Fourth, a limiting factor in the evolution of TBP complexes is the formation of mutually compatible interaction surfaces amongst the TBPs. These factors may have different degrees of importance in the evolution of different phyla, illustrated by the apparently simpler telomeres in complex plants. Selective pressures that can utilize the mechanisms of paralog formation and mutagenesis to drive TBP evolution along routes dependent on the requisite physiologic changes.

  17. Hypothesis: Paralog Formation from Progenitor Proteins and Paralog Mutagenesis Spur the Rapid Evolution of Telomere Binding Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Lustig, Arthur J.

    2016-01-01

    Through elegant studies in fungal cells and complex organisms, we propose a unifying paradigm for the rapid evolution of telomere binding proteins (TBPs) that associate with either (or both) telomeric DNA and telomeric proteins. TBPs protect and regulate telomere structure and function. Four critical factors are involved. First, TBPs that commonly bind to telomeric DNA include the c-Myb binding proteins, OB-fold single-stranded binding proteins, and G-G base paired Hoogsteen structure (G4) binding proteins. Each contributes independently or, in some cases, cooperatively, to provide a minimum level of telomere function. As a result of these minimal requirements and the great abundance of homologs of these motifs in the proteome, DNA telomere-binding activity may be generated more easily than expected. Second, telomere dysfunction gives rise to genome instability, through the elevation of recombination rates, genome ploidy, and the frequency of gene mutations. The formation of paralogs that diverge from their progenitor proteins ultimately can form a high frequency of altered TBPs with altered functions. Third, TBPs that assemble into complexes (e.g., mammalian shelterin) derive benefits from the novel emergent functions. Fourth, a limiting factor in the evolution of TBP complexes is the formation of mutually compatible interaction surfaces amongst the TBPs. These factors may have different degrees of importance in the evolution of different phyla, illustrated by the apparently simpler telomeres in complex plants. Selective pressures that can utilize the mechanisms of paralog formation and mutagenesis to drive TBP evolution along routes dependent on the requisite physiologic changes. PMID:26904098

  18. Identification of urinary protein biomarkers for tobacco smoking.

    PubMed

    Haniff, Aj Nabill; Gam, Lay-Harn

    2016-01-01

    Smoking, passive smoking, and nonsmoking are conditions that give different degrees of stress to the body. In this study, a proteomic technique was used to analyze differentially urinary protein expression between these three groups of subjects. Urinary proteins were precipitated using ammonium sulfate followed by separation according to molecular weights using SDS-PAGE. The gel was stained by Coommassie blue, and the image of the gel was captured for the comparison study. The protein bands that were consistently detected but expressed at different intensity between the smokers and nonsmokers were targeted for further analysis. Three targeted protein bands were excised from the gel, consisting of a unique protein band of smokers and a pair of differentially expressed protein bands from smokers and nonsmokers. The proteins were digested in gel by trypsin. The tryptic peptides were analyzed with ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Protein identity was determined by the product ion spectrum in the MS/MS scan. Four unique proteins from the smokers, namely, pancreatic alpha amylase, proepidermal growth factor, protein 4.1, and prostatic acid phosphatase, were found to be potential urinary biomarkers to indicate smoking status of a person. PMID:25640279

  19. Identification of host proteins, Spata3 and Dkk2, interacting with Toxoplasma gondii micronemal protein MIC3.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yifan; Fang, Rui; Yuan, Yuan; Pan, Ming; Hu, Min; Zhou, Yanqin; Shen, Bang; Zhao, Junlong

    2016-07-01

    As an obligate intracellular protozoan, Toxoplasma gondii is a successful pathogen infecting a variety of animals, including humans. As an adhesin involving in host invasion, the micronemal protein MIC3 plays important roles in host cell attachment, as well as modulation of host EGFR signaling cascade. However, the specific host proteins that interact with MIC3 are unknown and the identification of such proteins will increase our understanding of how MIC3 exerts its functions. This study was designed to identify host proteins interacting with MIC3 by yeast two-hybrid screens. Using MIC3 as bait, a library expressing mouse proteins was screened, uncovering eight mouse proteins that showed positive interactions with MIC3. Two of which, spermatogenesis-associated protein 3 (Spata3) and dickkopf-related protein 2 (Dkk2), were further confirmed to interact with MIC3 by additional protein-protein interaction tests. The results also revealed that the tandem repeat EGF domains of MIC3 were critical in mediating the interactions with the identified host proteins. This is the first study to show that MIC3 interacts with host proteins that are involved in reproduction, growth, and development. The results will provide a clearer understanding of the functions of adhesion-associated micronemal proteins in T. gondii.

  20. Rapid identification of bacterial biofilms and biofilm wound models using a multichannel nanosensor.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoning; Kong, Hao; Mout, Rubul; Saha, Krishnendu; Moyano, Daniel F; Robinson, Sandra M; Rana, Subinoy; Zhang, Xinrong; Riley, Margaret A; Rotello, Vincent M

    2014-12-23

    Identification of infectious bacteria responsible for biofilm-associated infections is challenging due to the complex and heterogeneous biofilm matrix. To address this issue and minimize the impact of heterogeneity on biofilm identification, we developed a gold nanoparticle (AuNP)-based multichannel sensor to detect and identify biofilms based on their physicochemical properties. Our results showed that the sensor can discriminate six bacterial biofilms including two composed of uropathogenic bacteria. The capability of the sensor was further demonstrated through discrimination of biofilms in a mixed bacteria/mammalian cell in vitro wound model.

  1. Identification of human liver microsomal proteins adducted by a reactive metabolite using shotgun proteomics.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yanou; Xiao, Qing; Humphreys, W Griffith; Dongre, Ashok; Shu, Yue-Zhong

    2014-09-15

    Covalent modification of cellular proteins by chemically reactive compounds/metabolites has the potential to disrupt biological function and elicit serious adverse drug reactions. Information on the nature and binding patterns of protein targets are critical toward understanding the mechanism of drug induced toxicity. Protein covalent binding studies established in liver microsomes can quantitively estimate the extent of protein modification, but they provide little information on the nature of the modified proteins. In this article, we describe a label-free shotgun proteomic workflow for the identification of target proteins modified in situ by reactive metabolites in human liver microsome incubations. First, we developed a shotgun proteomic workflow for the characterization of the human liver microsomal subproteome, which consists of predominately membrane-bound proteins. Human liver microsomes were solubilized with a combination of MS-compatible organic solvents followed by protein reduction, alkylation, and tryptic digestion. The unmodified samples were analyzed by UHPLC-MS/MS, and the proteins were identified by database searching. This workflow led to the successful identification of 329 human liver microsomal subproteome proteins with 1% FDR (false discovery rate). The same method was then applied to identify the modifications of human liver microsomal proteins by a known reactive metabolite 2-(methylsulfonyl)benzo[d]thiazole (2), either after incubation directly with 2 or with its parent compound 2-(methylthio)benzo[d]thiazole (1). A total of 19 modified constituent peptides which could be mapped to 18 proteins were identified in human liver microsomes incubated directly with 2. Among these, 5 modified constituent peptides which could be mapped to 4 proteins were identified in incubation with 1, which is known to generate 2 in human liver microsomal incubations. This label-free workflow is generally applicable to the identification and characterization of

  2. Genetically encoded norbornene directs site-specific cellular protein labelling via a rapid bioorthogonal reaction

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Kolbus, Jessica; Chou, Chungjung; Deiters, Alexander; Chin, Jason W.

    2013-01-01

    The site-specific incorporation of bioorthogonal groups via genetic code expansion provides a powerful general strategy for site-specifically labelling proteins with any probe. However, the slow reactivity of the bioorthogonal functional groups that can be encoded genetically limits the utility of this strategy. We demonstrate the genetic encoding of a norbornene amino acid using the pyrrolysyl tRNA synthetase/tRNACUA pair in Escherichia coli and mammalian cells. We developed a series of tetrazine-based probes that exhibit `turn-on' fluorescence on their rapid reaction with norbornenes. We demonstrate that the labelling of an encoded norbornene is specific with respect to the entire soluble E. coli proteome and thousands of times faster than established encodable bioorthogonal reactions. We show explicitly the advantages of this approach over state-of-the-art bioorthogonal reactions for protein labelling in vitro and on mammalian cells, and demonstrate the rapid bioorthogonal site-specific labelling of a protein on the mammalian cell surface. PMID:22437715

  3. Rapid and Efficient Protein Digestion using Trypsin Coated Magnetic Nanoparticles under Pressure Cycles

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Byoungsoo; Lopez-Ferrer, Daniel; Kim, Byoung Chan; Na, Hyon Bin; Park, Yong Il; Weitz, Karl K.; Warner, Marvin G.; Hyeon, Taeghwan; Lee, Sang-Won; Smith, Richard D.; Kim, Jungbae

    2011-01-01

    Trypsin-coated magnetic nanoparticles (EC-TR/NPs), prepared via a simple multilayer random crosslinking of the trypsin molecules onto magnetic nanoparticles, were highly stable and could be easily captured using a magnet after the digestion was complete. EC-TR/NPs showed a negligible loss of trypsin activity after multiple uses and continuous shaking, while the conventional immobilization of covalently-attached trypsin on NPs resulted in a rapid inactivation under the same conditions due to the denaturation and autolysis of trypsin. A single model protein, a five protein mixture, and a whole mouse brain proteome were digested at atmospheric pressure and 37 °C for 12 h or in combination with pressure cycling technology (PCT) at room temperature for 1 min. In all cases, EC-TR/NPs performed equally to or better than free trypsin in terms of both identified peptide/protein number and the digestion reproducibility. In addition, the concomitant use of EC-TR/NPs and PCT resulted in very rapid (~1 min) and efficient digestions with more reproducible digestion results. PMID:21204257

  4. Protein polymer hydrogels by in situ, rapid and reversible self-gelation

    PubMed Central

    Asai, Daisuke; Xu, Donghua; Liu, Wenge; Quiroz, Felipe Garcia; Callahan, Daniel J.; Zalutsky, Michael R.; Craig, Stephen L.; Chilkoti, Ashutosh

    2013-01-01

    Protein-based biomaterials are an important class of materials for applications in biotechnology and medicine. The exquisite control of their composition, stereochemistry, and chain length offers unique opportunities to engineer biofunctionality, biocompatibility, and biodegradability into these materials. Here, we report the synthesis of a thermally responsive peptide polymer-based hydrogel composed of a recombinant elastin-like polypeptide (ELP) that rapidly forms a reversibly cross-linked hydrogel by the formation of intermolecular disulfide cross-links. To do so, we designed and synthesized ELPs that incorporate periodic cysteine residues (cELPs), and show that cELPs are thermally responsive protein polymers that display rapid gelation under physiologically relevant, mild oxidative conditions. Gelation of cELPs, at concentrations as low as 2.5 wt%, occurs in ~2.5 min upon addition a low concentration of hydrogen peroxide (0.3 wt%). We show the utility of these hydrogels for the sustained release of a model protein in vitro, and demonstrate the ability of this injectable biomaterial to pervade tumors to maximize tumor coverage and retention time upon intratumoral injection. cELPs represent a new class of injectable reversibly cross-linked hydrogels with properties intermediate between ELP coacervates and chemically cross-linked ELP hydrogels that will find useful applications in drug delivery and tissue engineering. PMID:22538198

  5. Specific changes in rapidly transported proteins during regeneration of the goldfish optic nerve

    SciTech Connect

    Benowitz, L.I.; Shashoua, V.E.; Yoon, M.G.

    1981-03-01

    Double labeling methods were used to identify changes in the complement of proteins synthesized in the retinal ganglion cells and transported down the optic nerve during the process of axonal regeneration. Eight to 62 days after goldfish underwent a unilateral optic nerve crush, one eye was labeled with (3H)-, the other with (14C)proline. Control and regenerating optic nerves were dissected out and homogenized together after 5 hr, a time which allowed us to examine selectively membrane-bound components which migrate in the rapid phase of axoplasmic transport. Proteins from the two sides were so-purified and separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Analysis of the 3H and 14C incorporation patterns along the gels revealed a radical shift away from the normal labeling spectrum during regeneration, with selective changes in labeling at particular molecular weights varying over a 3-fold range. Eight days after crushing the optic nerve, the greatest increases in labeling were seen for material with apparent molecular weights of 24,000 to 27,000, 44,000, and 210,000 daltons. These peaks declined thereafter, and on days 29 to 39, the most prominent increases were at 110,000 to 140,000 daltons. These studies indicate a continuously changing pattern in the synthesis and/or degradation of proteins that are rapidly transported down the optic nerve during regeneration and point to molecular species potential significance in the establishment of the visual map upon the brain.

  6. Rapid and efficient purification of native histidine-tagged protein expressed by recombinant vaccinia virus.

    PubMed Central

    Janknecht, R; de Martynoff, G; Lou, J; Hipskind, R A; Nordheim, A; Stunnenberg, H G

    1991-01-01

    Vaccinia virus has been used as a vector to express foreign genes for the production of functional and posttranslationally modified proteins. A procedure is described here that allows the rapid native purification of vaccinia-expressed proteins fused to an amino-terminal tag of six histidines. Extracts from cells infected with recombinant vaccinia virus are loaded onto Ni2+.nitrilotriacetic acid (Ni2+.NTA)-agarose and histidine-tagged proteins are selectively eluted with imidazole-containing buffers. In the case of the human serum response factor (SRF), a transcription factor involved in the regulation of the c-fos protooncogene, the vaccinia-expressed histidine-tagged SRF (SRF-6His) could be purified solely by this step to greater than 95% purity. SRF-6His was shown to resemble authentic SRF by functional criteria: it was transported to the nucleus, bound specifically the c-fos serum response element, interacted with the p62TCF protein to form a ternary complex, and stimulated in vitro transcription from the serum response element. Thus, the combination of vaccinia virus expression and affinity purification by Ni2+.NTA chromatography promises to be useful for the production of proteins in a functional and posttranslationally modified form. Images PMID:1924358

  7. Repressing a repressor: gibberellin-induced rapid reduction of the RGA protein in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Silverstone, A L; Jung, H S; Dill, A; Kawaide, H; Kamiya, Y; Sun, T P

    2001-07-01

    RGA (for repressor of ga1-3) and SPINDLY (SPY) are likely repressors of gibberellin (GA) signaling in Arabidopsis because the recessive rga and spy mutations partially suppressed the phenotype of the GA-deficient mutant ga1-3. We found that neither rga nor spy altered the GA levels in the wild-type or the ga1-3 background. However, expression of the GA biosynthetic gene GA4 was reduced 26% by the rga mutation, suggesting that partial derepression of the GA response pathway by rga resulted in the feedback inhibition of GA4 expression. The green fluorescent protein (GFP)-RGA fusion protein was localized to nuclei in transgenic Arabidopsis. This result supports the predicted function of RGA as a transcriptional regulator based on sequence analysis. Confocal microscopy and immunoblot analyses demonstrated that the levels of both the GFP-RGA fusion protein and endogenous RGA were reduced rapidly by GA treatment. Therefore, the GA signal appears to derepress the GA signaling pathway by degrading the repressor protein RGA. The effect of rga on GA4 gene expression and the effect of GA on RGA protein level allow us to identify part of the mechanism by which GA homeostasis is achieved.

  8. Large-scale identification of yeast integral membrane protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    Miller, John P.; Lo, Russell S.; Ben-Hur, Asa; Desmarais, Cynthia; Stagljar, Igor; Noble, William Stafford; Fields, Stanley

    2005-01-01

    We carried out a large-scale screen to identify interactions between integral membrane proteins of Saccharomyces cerevisiae by using a modified split-ubiquitin technique. Among 705 proteins annotated as integral membrane, we identified 1,985 putative interactions involving 536 proteins. To ascribe confidence levels to the interactions, we used a support vector machine algorithm to classify interactions based on the assay results and protein data derived from the literature. Previously identified and computationally supported interactions were used to train the support vector machine, which identified 131 interactions of highest confidence, 209 of the next highest confidence, 468 of the next highest, and the remaining 1,085 of low confidence. This study provides numerous putative interactions among a class of proteins that have been difficult to analyze on a high-throughput basis by other approaches. The results identify potential previously undescribed components of established biological processes and roles for integral membrane proteins of ascribed functions. PMID:16093310

  9. The Mycoplasma hyorhinis p37 Protein Rapidly Induces Genes in Fibroblasts Associated with Inflammation and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gomersall, Amber Cathie; Li, Song Feng; Parish, Roger W.

    2015-01-01

    The p37 protein at the surface of Mycoplasma hyorhinis cells forms part of a high-affinity transport system and has been found associated with animal and human cancers. Here we show in NIH3T3 fibroblasts, p37 rapidly induces the expression of genes implicated in inflammation and cancer progression. This gene activation was principally via the Tlr4 receptor. Activity was lost from p37 when the C-terminal 20 amino acids were removed or the four amino acids specific for the hydrogen bonding of thiamine pyrophosphate had been replaced by valine. Blocking the IL6 receptor or inhibiting STAT3 signalling resulted in increased p37-induced gene expression. Since cancer associated fibroblasts support growth, invasion and metastasis via their ability to regulate tumour-related inflammation, the rapid induction in fibroblasts of pro-inflammatory genes by p37 might be expected to influence cancer development. PMID:26512722

  10. Rapid diagnosis and quantification of herpes simplex virus with a green fluorescent protein reporter system.

    PubMed

    Kung, S H; Wang, Y C; Lin, C H; Kuo, R L; Liu, W T

    2000-11-01

    A genetically modified cell line (Vero-ICP10-EGFP) was constructed for detection of herpes simplex virus (HSV) by a simple, rapid and direct method. The cell line was developed by stable transfection of Vero cell with a plasmid encoding the green fluorescent protein (GFP) driven by the promoter of the HSV-2 ICP10 gene. As early as 6 h after infection with HSV, fluorescence-emitting cells can be observed under a fluorescence microscope. A single infected cell emitting fluorescence can be observed with soft agar overlay by inverted fluorescence microscopy. No induction of detectable fluorescence was seen following infections with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), varicella zoster virus (VZV), coxsackievirus A16 and enterovirus 71. Analysis by flow cytometry also demonstrated that intensity of the triggered fluorescence is proportional to the titer of HSV inoculated. Taken together, this novel GFP reporter system could become a useful means for rapid detection and quantification of HSV in clinical specimens.

  11. Detection and proteomic identification of S-nitrosated proteins in human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    López-Sánchez, Laura M; Corrales, Fernando J; De La Mata, Manuel; Muntané, Jordi; Rodríguez-Ariza, Antonio

    2008-01-01

    The S-nitrosation of protein thiols is a redox-based posttranslational modification that modulates protein function and cell phenotype. Although the detection of S-nitrosated proteins is problematical because of the lability of S-nitrosothiols, an increasing range of proteins has been shown to undergo S-nitrosation with the improvement of molecular tools. This chapter describes the methodology used to identify potential targets of S-nitrosation in cultured primary human hepatocytes using proteomic approaches. This methodology is based on the biotin switch method, which labels S-nitrosated proteins with an affinity tag, allowing their selective detection and proteomic identification.

  12. Identification of Ultramodified Proteins Using Top-Down Mass Spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xiaowen; Hengel, Shawna M.; Wu, Si; Tolic, Nikola; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Pevzner, Pavel A.

    2013-11-05

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) play an important role in various biological processes through changing protein structure and function. Some ultramodified proteins (like histones) have multiple PTMs forming PTM patterns that define the functionality of a protein. While bottom-up mass spectrometry (MS) has been successful in identifying individual PTMs within short peptides, it is unable to identify PTM patterns spread along entire proteins in a coordinated fashion. In contrast, top-down MS analyzes intact proteins and reveals PTM patterns along the entire proteins. However, while recent advances in instrumentation have made top-down MS accessible to many laboratories, most computational tools for top-down MS focus on proteins with few PTMs and are unable to identify complex PTM patterns. We propose a new algorithm, MS-Align-E, that identifies both expected and unexpected PTMs in ultramodified proteins. We demonstrate that MS-Align-E identifies many protein forms of histone H4 and benchmark it against the currently accepted software tools.

  13. Identification of ultramodified proteins using top-down spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xiaowen; Hengel, Shawna M.; Wu, Si; Tolic, Nikola; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Pevzner, Pavel A.

    2013-04-10

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) play an important role in various biological processes through changing protein structure and function. Some ultramodified proteins (like histones) have multiple PTMs forming PTM patterns that define the functionality of a protein. While bottom-up mass spectrometry (MS) has been successful in identifying individual PTMs within short peptides, it is unable to identify PTM patterns spread along entire proteins in a coordinated fashion. In contrast, top-down MS analyzes intact proteins and reveals PTM patterns along the entire proteins. However, while recent advances in instrumentation have made top-down MS accessible to many laboratories, most computational tools for top-down MS focus on proteins with few PTMs and are unable to identify complex PTM patterns. We propose a new algorithm, MS-Align-E, that identifies both expected and unexpected PTMs in ultramodified proteins. We demonstrate that MS-Align-E identifies many protein forms of histone H4 and benchmark it against the currently accepted software tools.

  14. Proteomic identification of germline proteins in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Turner, B Elizabeth; Basecke, Sophia M; Bazan, Grace C; Dodge, Eric S; Haire, Cassy M; Heussman, Dylan J; Johnson, Chelsey L; Mukai, Chelsea K; Naccarati, Adrianna M; Norton, Sunny-June; Sato, Jennifer R; Talavera, Chihara O; Wade, Michael V; Hillers, Kenneth J

    2015-01-01

    Sexual reproduction involves fusion of 2 haploid gametes to form diploid offspring with genetic contributions from both parents. Gamete formation represents a unique developmental program involving the action of numerous germline-specific proteins. In an attempt to identify novel proteins involved in reproduction and embryonic development, we have carried out a proteomic characterization of the process in Caenorhabditis elegans. To identify candidate proteins, we used 2D gel electrophoresis (2DGE) to compare protein abundance in nucleus-enriched extracts from wild-type C. elegans, and in extracts from mutant worms with greatly reduced gonads (glp-4(bn2) worms reared at 25°C); 84 proteins whose abundance correlated with germline presence were identified. To validate candidates, we used feeding RNAi to deplete candidate proteins, and looked for reduction in fertility and/or germline cytological defects. Of 20 candidates so screened for involvement in fertility, depletion of 13 (65%) caused a significant reduction in fertility, and 6 (30%) resulted in sterility (<5 % of wild-type fertility). Five of the 13 proteins with demonstrated roles in fertility have not previously been implicated in germline function. The high frequency of defects observed after RNAi depletion of candidate proteins suggests that this approach is effective at identifying germline proteins, thus contributing to our understanding of this complex organ. PMID:26435885

  15. Innovative applications of bacteriophages in rapid detection and identification of foodborne pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Relative to traditional microbiological approaches, biosensors are a rapid method for foodborne bacterial pathogen detection. Biosensors function by detecting the interaction of the target pathogen, or pathogen derived molecule, with a biological recognition component which must have sufficient aff...

  16. Large-Scale Identification of Putative Exported Proteins in Candida albicans by Genetic Selection

    PubMed Central

    Monteoliva, L.; López Matas, M.; Gil, C.; Nombela, C.; Pla, J.

    2002-01-01

    In all living organisms, secreted proteins play essential roles in different processes. Of special interest is the construction of the fungal cell wall, since this structure is absent from mammalian cells. The identification of the proteins involved in its biogenesis is therefore a primary goal in antifungal research. To perform a systematic identification of such proteins in Candida albicans, we carried out a genetic screening in which in-frame fusions with an intracellular allele of invertase gene SUC2 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae can be used to select and identify putatively exported proteins in the heterologous host S. cerevisiae. Eighty-three clones were selected, including 11 previously identified genes from C. albicans as well as 41 C. albicans genes that encode proteins homologous to already described proteins from related organisms. They include enzymes involved in cell wall synthesis and protein secretion. We also found membrane receptors and transporters presumably related to the interaction of C. albicans with the environment as well as extracellular enzymes and proteins involved in different morphological transitions. In addition, 11 C. albicans open reading frames (ORFs) identified in this screening encode proteins homologous to unknown or putative proteins, while 5 ORFs encode novel secreted proteins without known homologues in other organisms. This screening procedure therefore not only identifies a set of targets of interest in antifungal research but also provides new clues for understanding the topological locations of many proteins involved in processes relevant to the pathogenicity of this microorganism. PMID:12456000

  17. Implementation of an FTIR spectral library of 486 filamentous fungi strains for rapid identification of molds.

    PubMed

    Lecellier, A; Gaydou, V; Mounier, J; Hermet, A; Castrec, L; Barbier, G; Ablain, W; Manfait, M; Toubas, D; Sockalingum, G D

    2015-02-01

    Filamentous fungi may cause food and feed spoilage and produce harmful metabolites to human and animal health such as mycotoxins. Identification of fungi using conventional phenotypic methods is time-consuming and molecular methods are still quite expensive and require specific laboratory skills. In the last two decades, it has been shown that Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was an efficient tool for microorganism identification. The aims of this study were to use a simple protocol for the identification of filamentous fungi using FTIR spectroscopy coupled with a partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA), to implement a procedure to validate the obtained results, and to assess the transferability of the method and database. FTIR spectra of 486 strains (43 genera and 140 species) were recorded. An IR spectral database built with 288 strains was used to identify 105 different strains. It was found that 99.17% and 92.3% of spectra derived from these strains were correctly assigned at the genus and species levels, respectively. The establishment of a score and a threshold permitted to validate 80.79% of the results obtained. A standardization function (SF) was also implemented and tested on FTIR data from another instrument on a different site and permitted to increase the percentage of well predicted spectra for this set from 72.15% to 89.13%. This study confirms the good performance of high throughput FTIR spectroscopy for fungal identification using a spectral library of molds of industrial relevance.

  18. [Effects of rapid weight reduction diet on protein metabolism and physical performance].

    PubMed

    Morita, Y; Igawa, S; Takahashi, H; Tomida, K; Hirota, K

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide information on the requirement of nutrition, especially of the protein during rapid weight reduction immediately before a competition of a weight-classification system sport, boxing. Weight reduction period was 9 days. Subjects were divided into three groups of free diet group (group A: n = 5), high protein diet group (group B: n = 5) and ordinary protein diet group (group C: n = 4). Group A had taken food ad libitum. Group B had taken 2.0 g/kg/day of protein in the first half and 1.5 g/kg/day of protein in the second half of weight reduction period, and Group C had taken 1.0 g/kg/day of protein throughout weight reduction period. Groups B and C had taken 2,000 kcal/day in the first half and 1,200 kcal/day in the second half of weight reduction period. Anthropometry and nutritional investigation were performed, and urine components were analyzed. The main results obtained were as follows: 1) Calorie and protein intake in Group A averaged 883 kcal/day and 0.9 g/kg/day in the second half of weight reduction period. 2) 3-methylhistidine and urea nitrogen in urine and 3-Me/Cr increased significantly at the end of weight reduction period in Group A, but decreased significantly in groups B and C. Nitrogen balance changed to a negative value only in group A. Differences in each of urine components were statistically significant between group A and the other two groups at the end of period. 3) Heart rate and oxygen intake at the same submaximal work load increased significantly in group A at the end of weight reduction period, but in groups B and C no noticeable changes were observed.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mass spectrometry without isotope labeling can be used for rapid protein quantification.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Wenbo; Wang, Meiyao; She, Jin-Xiong

    2011-06-15

    The validation of putative biomarker candidates has become the major bottle-neck in protein biomarker development. Conventional immunoaffinity methods are limited by the availability of antibodies and kits. Here we demonstrate the feasibility of using selected reaction monitoring (SRM) without isotope labeling to achieve fast and reproducible quantification of serum proteins. The SRM/MRM assays for three standard serum proteins, including ceruloplasmin (CP), serum aymloid A (SAA) and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), have good linear ranges, generally 10(3) to 10(4) . There are almost perfect correlations between SRM intensities and the loaded peptide amounts (R(2) is usually ~0.99). Our data suggest that SRM/MRM is able to quantify proteins within the range of 0.2-2 fmol, which is comparable to the commercial ELISA/LUMINEX kits for these proteins. Excellent correlations between SRM/MRM and ELISA/LUMINEX assays were observed for SAA and SHBG (R(2)=0.928 and 0.851, respectively). However, the correlation between SRM/MRM and ELISA for CP is less desirable (R(2)=0.565). The reproducibility for SRM/MRM assays is generally very good but may depend on the proteins/peptides being analyzed (R(2)=0.931 and 0.882 for SAA and SHBG, and 0.723 for CP). The SRM/MRM assay without isotope labeling is a rapid and useful method for protein biomarker validation in a modest number of samples and is especially useful when other assays such as ELISA or LUMINEX are not available. PMID:21594933

  20. Identification of tuberculosis-associated proteins in whole blood supernatant

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Biological parameters are useful tools for understanding and monitoring complicated disease processes. In this study, we attempted to identify proteins associated with active pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) using a proteomic approach. Methods To assess TB-associated changes in the composition of human proteins, whole blood supernatants were collected from patients with active TB and healthy control subjects. Two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) was performed to analyze proteins with high molecular weights (approximately >20 kDa). Baseline protein levels were initially compared between patients with active TB and control subjects. Possible changes of protein patterns in active TB were also compared ex vivo between whole blood samples incubated with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb)-specific antigens (stimulated condition) and under unstimulated conditions. Immunoblot and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) were performed to confirm differences in identified proteins. Results Under the baseline condition, we found that the levels of retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4), fetuin-A (also called α-HS-glycoprotein), and vitamin D-binding protein differed between patients with active TB and control subjects on 2D gels. Immunoblotting results confirmed differential expression of RBP4 and fetuin-A. ELISA results further confirmed significantly lower levels of these two proteins in samples from patients with active TB than in control subjects (P < 0.0001). Mtb-specific antigen stimulation ex vivo altered clusterin expression in whole blood samples collected from patients with active TB. Conclusions We identified TB-associated proteins in whole blood supernatants. The dynamics of protein expression during disease progression may improve our understanding of the pathogenesis of TB. PMID:21418657

  1. Identification of new Palmitoylated Proteins in Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Caballero, Marina C.; Alonso, Andrés M.; Deng, Bin; Attias, Marcia; de Souza, Wanderley; Corvi, María M.

    2016-01-01

    Protein palmitoylation has been shown to be an important post-translational modification in eukaryotic cells. This modification alters the localization and/or the function of the targeted protein. In the recent years protein palmitoylation has risen in importance in apicomplexan parasites as well. In Toxoplasma gondii, some proteins have been reported to be modified by palmitate. With the development of new techniques that allow the isolation of palmitoylated proteins, this significant post-translational modification has begun to be studied in more detail in T. gondii. Here we describe the palmitoylome of the tachyzoite stage of T. gondii using a combination of the acyl-biotin exchange chemistry method and mass spectrometry analysis. We identified 401 proteins found in multiple cellular compartments, with a wide range of functions that vary from metabolic processes, gliding and host-cell invasion to even regulation of transcription and translation. Besides, we found that more rhoptry proteins than the ones already described for Toxoplasma are palmitoylated, suggesting an important role for this modification in the invasion mechanism of the host-cell. This study documents that protein palmitoylation is a common modification in T. gondii that could have an impact on different cellular processes. PMID:26825284

  2. A rapid radioimmunoassay using /sup 125/I-labeled staphylococcal protein A for antibody to varicella-zoster virus

    SciTech Connect

    Richman, D.D.; Cleveland, P.H.; Oxman, M.N.; Zaia, J.A.

    1981-05-01

    A sensitive radioimmunoassay for serum antibody to varicella-zoster virus is described; it uses 125I-labeled staphylococcal protein A and a specially designed immunofiltration apparatus. The assay accurately distinguishes between individuals who are susceptible and those who are immune to infection with varicella-zoster virus. In addition, it can detect passive antibody in recipients of varicella-zoster immune globulin. This radioimmunoassay also detects the heterologous antibody responses that occasionally occur in patients infected with herpes simplex virus, which also have been detected by other antibody assays. The particular advantages of this assay are the use of noninfectious reagents, the speed of execution (less than 3 hr), the requirement for only small quantities of serum (30 microliters), the objectivity of end-point determination, and the capability of screening large numbers of sera. Consequently, this radioimmunoassay is especially useful for the rapid identification of susceptible individuals, which is essential for the appropriate management of patients and hospital personnel after exposure to varicella.

  3. Point mutations in the major outer membrane protein drive hypervirulence of a rapidly expanding clone of Campylobacter jejuni.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zuowei; Periaswamy, Balamurugan; Sahin, Orhan; Yaeger, Michael; Plummer, Paul; Zhai, Weiwei; Shen, Zhangqi; Dai, Lei; Chen, Swaine L; Zhang, Qijing

    2016-09-20

    Infections due to clonal expansion of highly virulent bacterial strains are clear and present threats to human and animal health. Association of genetic changes with disease is now a routine, but identification of causative mutations that enable disease remains difficult. Campylobacter jejuni is an important zoonotic pathogen transmitted to humans mainly via the foodborne route. C. jejuni typically colonizes the gut, but a hypervirulent and rapidly expanding clone of C. jejuni recently emerged, which is able to translocate across the intestinal tract, causing systemic infection and abortion in pregnant animals. The genetic basis responsible for this hypervirulence is unknown. Here, we developed a strategy, termed "directed genome evolution," by using hybridization between abortifacient and nonabortifacient strains followed by selection in an animal disease model and whole-genome sequence analysis. This strategy successfully identified SNPs in porA, encoding the major outer membrane protein, are responsible for the hypervirulence. Defined mutagenesis verified that these mutations were both necessary and sufficient for causing abortion. Furthermore, sequence analysis identified porA as the gene with the top genome-wide signal of adaptive evolution using Fu's Fs, a population genetic metric for recent population size changes, which is consistent with the recent expansion of clone "sheep abortion." These results identify a key virulence factor in Campylobacter and a potential target for the control of this zoonotic pathogen. Furthermore, this study provides general, unbiased experimental and computational approaches that are broadly applicable for efficient elucidation of disease-causing mutations in bacterial pathogens. PMID:27601641

  4. Identification of a Fluorescent Protein from Rhacostoma Atlantica.

    PubMed

    Tota, Michael R; Allen, Jeanna M; Karolin, Jan O; Geddes, Chris D; Ward, William W

    2016-09-01

    We have cloned a novel fluorescent protein from the jellyfish Rhacostoma atlantica. The closest known related fluorescent protein is the Phialidium yellow fluorescent protein, with only a 55% amino acid sequence identity. A somewhat unusual alanine-tyrosine-glycine amino acid sequence forms the presumed chromophore of the novel protein. The protein has an absorption peak at 466 nm and a fluorescence emission peak at 498 nm. The fluorescence quantum yield was measured to be 0.77 and the extinction coefficient is 58 200 M(-1) cm(-1) . Several mutations were identified that shift the absorption peak to about 494 nm and the emission peak to between 512 and 514 nm. PMID:27288884

  5. Nanoparticle-based energy transfer for rapid and simple detection of protein glycosylation

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Eunkeu; Lee, Dohoon; Kim, Young-Pil; Cha, Seung YOUP; Oh, Doo BEYONG; Kim, Jungbae; Kang, Hyun AH; Kim, Hak SUNG

    2006-12-04

    Glycan moiety of glycoproteins plays an essential role in its biological activity in vivo, and the analysis of glycosylation is of great importance in the development of protein therapeutics. In this study, we report a rapid and simple detection of protein glycosylation based on the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between concanavalin A-conjugated gold nanoparticles (ConA-AuNPs) and dextran-conjugated quantum dots (Dex-QDs). The increased photoluminescence (PL) signals of Dex-QDs due to the competitive inhibition of glycoproteins were well correlated with the glycosylation chain length of glucose oxidases as well as the mannosylation degree of bovine serum albumin (BSA). The parallel analysis of the diversely mannosylated BSAs using an image analyzer further demonstrated the potential of this new technique in high-throughput screening of glycoprotein and carbohydrate therapeutics.

  6. Identification of shed proteins from Chinese hamster ovary cells: Application of statistical confidence using human and mouse protein databases

    SciTech Connect

    Ahram, Mamoun; Strittmatter, Eric F.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Hunter, Joel C.; Miller, John H.; Springer, David L.

    2005-05-01

    The shedding process releases ligands, receptors, and other proteins from the surface of the cell and is a mechanism whereby cells communicate. Even though altered regulation of this process has been implicated in several diseases, global approaches to evaluate shed proteins have not been developed. A goal of this study was to identify global changes in shed proteins in media taken from cells exposed to low-doses of radiation in an effort to develop a fundamental understanding of the bystander response. CHO cells were chosen for this study because they have been widely used for radiation studies and since they have been reported to respond to radiation by releasing factors into the media that cause genomic instability and cytotoxicity in unexposed cells, i.e., a bystander effect. Media samples taken for irradiated cells were evaluated using a combination of tandem- and FTICR-mass spectrometry analysis. Since the hamster genome has not been sequenced, mass spectrometry data was searched against the mouse and human proteins databases. Nearly 150 proteins that were identified by tandem mass spectrometry were confirmed by FTICR. When both types of mass spectrometry data were evaluated with a new confidence scoring tool, which is based on discriminant analyses, about 500 protein were identified. Approximately 20% of these identifications were either integral membrane proteins or membrane associated proteins, suggesting that they were derived from the cell surface, hence were likely shed. However, estimates of quantitative changes, based on two independent mass spectrometry approaches, did not identify any protein abundance changes attributable to the bystander effect. Results from this study demonstrate the feasibility of global evaluation of shed proteins using mass spectrometry in conjunction with cross-species protein databases and that significant improvement in peptide/protein identifications is provided by the confidence scoring tool.

  7. Analytical approaches for the characterization and identification of olive (Olea europaea) oil proteins.

    PubMed

    Esteve, Clara; D'Amato, Alfonsina; Marina, María Luisa; García, María Concepción; Righetti, Pier Giorgio

    2013-10-30

    Proteins in olive oil have been scarcely investigated probably due to the difficulty of working with such a lipidic matrix and the dramatically low abundance of proteins in this biological material. Additionally, this scarce information has generated contradictory results, thus requiring further investigations. This work treats this subject from a comprehensive point of view and proposes the use of different analytical approaches to delve into the characterization and identification of proteins in olive oil. Different extraction methodologies, including capture via combinational hexapeptide ligand libraries (CPLLs), were tried. A sequence of methodologies, starting with off-gel isoelectric focusing (IEF) followed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) or high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) using an ultraperformance liquid chromatography (UPLC) column, was applied to profile proteins from olive seed, pulp, and oil. Besides this, and for the first time, a tentative identification of oil proteins by mass spectrometry has been attempted.

  8. Method for identification of rigid domains and hinge residues in proteins based on exhaustive enumeration.

    PubMed

    Sim, Jaehyun; Sim, Jun; Park, Eunsung; Lee, Julian

    2015-06-01

    Many proteins undergo large-scale motions where relatively rigid domains move against each other. The identification of rigid domains, as well as the hinge residues important for their relative movements, is important for various applications including flexible docking simulations. In this work, we develop a method for protein rigid domain identification based on an exhaustive enumeration of maximal rigid domains, the rigid domains not fully contained within other domains. The computation is performed by mapping the problem to that of finding maximal cliques in a graph. A minimal set of rigid domains are then selected, which cover most of the protein with minimal overlap. In contrast to the results of existing methods that partition a protein into non-overlapping domains using approximate algorithms, the rigid domains obtained from exact enumeration naturally contain overlapping regions, which correspond to the hinges of the inter-domain bending motion. The performance of the algorithm is demonstrated on several proteins.

  9. Direct, Specific and Rapid Detection of Staphylococcal Proteins and Exotoxins Using a Multiplex Antibody Microarray

    PubMed Central

    Stieber, Bettina; Monecke, Stefan; Müller, Elke; Büchler, Joseph; Ehricht, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Background S. aureus is a pathogen in humans and animals that harbors a wide variety of virulence factors and resistance genes. This bacterium can cause a wide range of mild to life-threatening diseases. In the latter case, fast diagnostic procedures are important. In routine diagnostic laboratories, several genotypic and phenotypic methods are available to identify S. aureus strains and determine their resistances. However, there is a demand for multiplex routine diagnostic tests to directly detect staphylococcal toxins and proteins. Methods In this study, an antibody microarray based assay was established and validated for the rapid detection of staphylococcal markers and exotoxins. The following targets were included: staphylococcal protein A, penicillin binding protein 2a, alpha- and beta-hemolysins, Panton Valentine leukocidin, toxic shock syndrome toxin, enterotoxins A and B as well as staphylokinase. All were detected simultaneously within a single experiment, starting from a clonal culture on standard media. The detection of bound proteins was performed using a new fluorescence reading device for microarrays. Results 110 reference strains and clinical isolates were analyzed using this assay, with a DNA microarray for genotypic characterization performed in parallel. The results showed a general high concordance of genotypic and phenotypic data. However, genotypic analysis found the hla gene present in all S. aureus isolates but its expression under given conditions depended on the clonal complex affiliation of the actual isolate. Conclusions The multiplex antibody assay described herein allowed a rapid and reliable detection of clinically relevant staphylococcal toxins as well as resistance- and species-specific markers. PMID:26624622

  10. Rapid alterations of cell cycle control proteins in human T lymphocytes in microgravity

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    In our study we aimed to identify rapidly reacting gravity-responsive mechanisms in mammalian cells in order to understand if and how altered gravity is translated into a cellular response. In a combination of experiments using "functional weightlessness" provided by 2D-clinostats and real microgravity provided by several parabolic flight campaigns and compared to in-flight-1g-controls, we identified rapid gravity-responsive reactions inside the cell cycle regulatory machinery of human T lymphocytes. In response to 2D clinorotation, we detected an enhanced expression of p21 Waf1/Cip1 protein within minutes, less cdc25C protein expression and enhanced Ser147-phosphorylation of cyclinB1 after CD3/CD28 stimulation. Additionally, during 2D clinorotation, Tyr-15-phosphorylation occurred later and was shorter than in the 1 g controls. In CD3/CD28-stimulated primary human T cells, mRNA expression of the cell cycle arrest protein p21 increased 4.1-fold after 20s real microgravity in primary CD4+ T cells and 2.9-fold in Jurkat T cells, compared to 1 g in-flight controls after CD3/CD28 stimulation. The histone acetyltransferase (HAT) inhibitor curcumin was able to abrogate microgravity-induced p21 mRNA expression, whereas expression was enhanced by a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor. Therefore, we suppose that cell cycle progression in human T lymphocytes requires Earth gravity and that the disturbed expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins could contribute to the breakdown of the human immune system in space. PMID:22273506

  11. Identification of protein O-GlcNAcylation sites using electron transfer dissociation mass spectrometry on native peptides.

    PubMed

    Chalkley, Robert J; Thalhammer, Agnes; Schoepfer, Ralf; Burlingame, A L

    2009-06-01

    Protein O-GlcNAcylation occurs in all animals and plants and is implicated in modulation of a wide range of cytosolic and nuclear protein functions, including gene silencing, nutrient and stress sensing, phosphorylation signaling, and diseases such as diabetes and Alzheimer's. The limiting factor impeding rapid progress in deciphering the biological functions of protein O-GlcNAcylation has been the inability to easily identify exact residues of modification. We describe a robust, high-sensitivity strategy able to assign O-GlcNAcylation sites of native modified peptides using electron transfer dissociation mass spectrometry. We have studied the murine postsynaptic density pseudoorganelle and report the assignment of 58 modification sites from a single experiment--significantly increasing the number of sites known in the literature. Components of several repressor complexes, such as NCoR1, polyhomeotic-like protein3, and EMSY, are modified. In addition, 28 O-GlcNAc sites were found on the protein Bassoon, effectively matching the number of phosphorylation sites reported previously on this protein. This finding suggests that on certain proteins, O-GlcNAcylation may be as extensive and important as phosphorylation in regulating protein function. Three of the newly discovered O-GlcNAc sites on Bassoon have previously been reported as phosphorylation sites, highlighting the interplay of the modifications. Surprisingly, several peptides with GlcNAc modifications on asparagines within the N-X-S/T consensus sequence were also observed from membrane protein extracellular domains. This powerful strategy fulfills a long-standing need in the biological community by facilitating modification site identifications that will accelerate understanding of the biological significance of this elusive regulatory posttranslational modification.

  12. Identification of Trypanosome Proteins in Plasma from African Sleeping Sickness Patients Infected with T. b. rhodesiense

    PubMed Central

    Enyaru, John C.; Carr, Steven A.; Pearson, Terry W.

    2013-01-01

    Control of human African sleeping sickness, caused by subspecies of the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei, is based on preventing transmission by elimination of the tsetse vector and by active diagnostic screening and treatment of infected patients. To identify trypanosome proteins that have potential as biomarkers for detection and monitoring of African sleeping sickness, we have used a ‘deep-mining” proteomics approach to identify trypanosome proteins in human plasma. Abundant human plasma proteins were removed by immunodepletion. Depleted plasma samples were then digested to peptides with trypsin, fractionated by basic reversed phase and each fraction analyzed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). This sample processing and analysis method enabled identification of low levels of trypanosome proteins in pooled plasma from late stage sleeping sickness patients infected with Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense. A total of 254 trypanosome proteins were confidently identified. Many of the parasite proteins identified were of unknown function, although metabolic enzymes, chaperones, proteases and ubiquitin-related/acting proteins were found. This approach to the identification of conserved, soluble trypanosome proteins in human plasma offers a possible route to improved disease diagnosis and monitoring, since these molecules are potential biomarkers for the development of a new generation of antigen-detection assays. The combined immuno-depletion/mass spectrometric approach can be applied to a variety of infectious diseases for unbiased biomarker identification. PMID:23951171

  13. Large-scale identification of encystment-related proteins and genes in Pseudourostyla cristata

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xiuxia; Chen, Fenfen; Niu, Tao; Qu, Ruidan; Chen, Jiwu

    2015-01-01

    The transformation of a ciliate into cyst is an advance strategy against an adverse situation. However, the molecular mechanism for the encystation of free-living ciliates is poorly understood. A large-scale identification of the encystment-related proteins and genes in ciliate would provide us with deeper insights into the molecular mechanisms for the encystations of ciliate. We identified the encystment-related proteins and genes in Pseudourostyla cristata with shotgun LC-MS/MS and scale qRT-PCR, respectively, in this report. A total of 668 proteins were detected in the resting cysts, 102 of these proteins were high credible proteins, whereas 88 high credible proteins of the 724 total proteins were found in the vegetative cells. Compared with the vegetative cell, 6 specific proteins were found in the resting cyst. However, the majority of high credible proteins in the resting cyst and the vegetative cell were co-expressed. We compared 47 genes of the co-expressed proteins with known functions in both the cyst and the vegetative cell using scale qRT-PCR. Twenty-seven of 47 genes were differentially expressed in the cyst compared with the vegetative cell. In our identifications, many uncharacterized proteins were also found. These results will help reveal the molecular mechanism for the formation of cyst in ciliates. PMID:26079518

  14. Proteomic identification of putative plasmodesmatal proteins from Chara corallina.

    PubMed

    Faulkner, Christine R; Blackman, Leila M; Cordwell, Stuart J; Overall, Robyn L

    2005-07-01

    Plasmodesmata are channels that bridge the cell walls of plant cells, allowing regulated transport of molecules between neighbouring cells. We have used a proteomic strategy to identify putative plasmodesmata-associated proteins in the giant-celled green alga Chara corallina. Proteins were extracted from the plasmodesmata-rich nodal complexes and the middle of the long internodal cells, which do not contain plasmodesmata. Comparison of protein spot patterns generated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of both the soluble and cell wall fractions from the two cell types was done. Fifty-eight spots that were common to the nodal and internodal soluble fractions were analysed by matrix assisted laser desorption/ionisation-time of flight mass spectrometry, and peptide mass fingerprint data were used to search the database. Matches were made to four of these spots, in each case to housekeeping proteins. Further, a number of nodal specific spots were identified, 11 from the soluble fraction and nine from the wall fraction. These spots were excised from the gels and analysed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry to obtain peptide sequence. Database searches suggest that these spots include homologues to previously identified plasmodesmata-associated proteins cp-wap13 and heat shock cognate 70, as well as RNA-binding proteins, eukaryotic initiation factor 4A and a beta-1,3-glucanase. Several spots remained unidentified providing exciting new candidate plasmodesmata-associated proteins.

  15. Can bioinformatics help in the identification of moonlighting proteins?

    PubMed

    Hernández, Sergio; Calvo, Alejandra; Ferragut, Gabriela; Franco, Luís; Hermoso, Antoni; Amela, Isaac; Gómez, Antonio; Querol, Enrique; Cedano, Juan

    2014-12-01

    Protein multitasking or moonlighting is the capability of certain proteins to execute two or more unique biological functions. This ability to perform moonlighting functions helps us to understand one of the ways used by cells to perform many complex functions with a limited number of genes. Usually, moonlighting proteins are revealed experimentally by serendipity, and the proteins described probably represent just the tip of the iceberg. It would be helpful if bioinformatics could predict protein multifunctionality, especially because of the large amounts of sequences coming from genome projects. In the present article, we describe several approaches that use sequences, structures, interactomics and current bioinformatics algorithms and programs to try to overcome this problem. The sequence analysis has been performed: (i) by remote homology searches using PSI-BLAST, (ii) by the detection of functional motifs, and (iii) by the co-evolutionary relationship between amino acids. Programs designed to identify functional motifs/domains are basically oriented to detect the main function, but usually fail in the detection of secondary ones. Remote homology searches such as PSI-BLAST seem to be more versatile in this task, and it is a good complement for the information obtained from protein-protein interaction (PPI) databases. Structural information and mutation correlation analysis can help us to map the functional sites. Mutation correlation analysis can be used only in very restricted situations, but can suggest how the evolutionary process of the acquisition of the second function took place. PMID:25399591

  16. On-tissue protein identification and imaging by MALDI-ion mobility mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Stauber, Jonathan; MacAleese, Luke; Franck, Julien; Claude, Emmanuelle; Snel, Marten; Kaletas, Basak Kükrer; Wiel, Ingrid M V D; Wisztorski, Maxence; Fournier, Isabelle; Heeren, Ron M A

    2010-03-01

    MALDI imaging mass spectrometry (MALDI-IMS) has become a powerful tool for the detection and localization of drugs, proteins, and lipids on-tissue. Nevertheless, this approach can only perform identification of low mass molecules as lipids, pharmaceuticals, and peptides. In this article, a combination of approaches for the detection and imaging of proteins and their identification directly on-tissue is described after tryptic digestion. Enzymatic digestion protocols for different kinds of tissues--formalin fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) and frozen tissues--are combined with MALDI-ion mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS). This combination enables localization and identification of proteins via their related digested peptides. In a number of cases, ion mobility separates isobaric ions that cannot be identified by conventional MALDI time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry. The amount of detected peaks per measurement increases (versus conventional MALDI-TOF), which enables mass and time selected ion images and the identification of separated ions. These experiments demonstrate the feasibility of direct proteins identification by ion-mobility-TOF IMS from tissue. The tissue digestion combined with MALDI-IM-TOF-IMS approach allows a proteomics "bottom-up" strategy with different kinds of tissue samples, especially FFPE tissues conserved for a long time in hospital sample banks. The combination of IM with IMS marks the development of IMS approaches as real proteomic tools, which brings new perspectives to biological studies.

  17. Rapid functional analysis in Xenopus oocytes of Po protein adhesive interactions.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, M; Colma, D R

    2001-06-01

    We have developed a coupled Xenopus oocyte expression system for evaluating the functional effects of mutations in known or suspected adhesion molecules, which allows for a very rapid assessment of intercellular adhesion. As a model protein, we first used Protein zero (Po), an adhesion molecule that mediates self-adhesion of the Schwann cell plasma membrane to form compact myelin in the mammalian PNS. A wide variety of mutations in Po cause certain human peripheral neuropathies, such as the Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) type 1B and Dejerine-Sottas syndrome (DSS). After wild-type Po mRNA is injected, the protein is synthesized and correctly targeted to the oocyte cell surface. When two oocytes are paired, wild-type Po redistributes and concentrates at the cell-cell apposition region, and by electron microscopy, the oocyte pairs show close cell-cell appositions and are devoid of the microvilli that are observed in uninjected oocyte pairs. These are hallmark features of highly adhesive cell:cell interfaces. Several point mutations in Po were engineered, corresponding to the molecular defects in the CMT type 1B or DSS. The proteins encoded by these mutations reached the cell surface but failed to concentrate at the oocyte interface. Po carrying a point mutation that is found in DSS is not targeted on the plasma membrane and fail to accumulate at the cell-cell contact site. PMID:11519730

  18. [Rapid identification 15 effective components of anti common cold medicine with MRM by LC-MS/MS].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jian-Guo; Zhang, Xi-Ru; Zhang, Yi-Hua; Song, Geng-Shen

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports the establishment of a method for rapid identification 15 effective components of anti common cold medicine (paracetamol, aminophenazone, pseudoephedrine hydrochloride, methylephedrine hydrochloride, caffeine, amantadine hydrochloride, phenazone, guaifenesin, chlorphenamine maleate, dextromethorphen hydrobromide, diphenhydramine hydrochloride, promethazine hydrochloride, propyphenazone, benorilate and diclofenac sodium) with MRM by LC-MS/MS. The samples were extracted by methanol and were separated from a Altantis T3 column within 15 min with a gradient of acetonitrile-ammonium acetate (containing 0.25% glacial acetic acid), a tandem quadrupole mass spectrometer equipped with electrospray ionization source (ESI) was used in positive ion mode, and multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) was performed for qualitative analysis of these compounds. The minimum detectable quantity were 0.33-2.5 microg x kg(-1) of the 15 compounds. The method is simple, accurate and with good reproducibility for rapid identification many components in the same chromatographic condition, and provides a reference for qualitative analysis illegally added chemicals in anti common cold medicine. PMID:23600148

  19. Rapid in situ identification of bioactive compounds in plants by in vivo nanospray high-resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chang, Qing; Peng, Yue'e; Dan, Conghui; Shuai, Qin; Hu, Shenghong

    2015-03-25

    A method for the rapid in situ identification of bioactive compounds in fresh plants has been developed using in vivo nanospray coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry (HR-MS). Using a homemade in vivo nanospray ion source, the plant liquid was drawn out from a target region and ionized in situ. The ionized bioactive compounds were then identified using Q-Orbitrap HR-MS. The accurate mass measurements of these bioactive compounds were performed by full-scan or selected ion monitoring (SIM), and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) was used in the structural elucidation. Without sample pretreatment, 12 bioactive compounds in 7 different plant species were identified, namely, isoalliin in onion; butylphthalide in celery; N-methylpelletierine, pelletierine, and pseudopelletierine in pomegranate; chlorogenic acid in crabapple; solamargine, solasonine, and solasodine in nightshade; aloin and aloe-emodin in aloe; and menthone in mint. This work demonstrates that in vivo nanospray HR-MS is a good method for rapid in situ identification of bioactive compounds in plants. PMID:25749134

  20. Rapid molecular identification of Listeria species by use of real-time PCR and high-resolution melting analysis.

    PubMed

    Jin, Dazhi; Luo, Yun; Zhang, Zheng; Fang, Weijia; Ye, Julian; Wu, Fang; Ding, Gangqiang

    2012-05-01

    Identification of Listeria species via a molecular method is critical for food safety and clinical diagnosis. In this study, an assay integrating real-time quantitative PCR (Q-PCR) with high-resolution melting (HRM) curve analysis was developed and assessed for rapid identification of six Listeria species. The ssrA gene, which encodes a transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA) is conserved and common to all bacterial phyla, contains a variable domain in Listeria spp. Therefore, Q-PCR and a HRM profile were applied to characterize this gene. Fifty-three Listeria species and 45 non-Listeria species were detected using one primer set, with an accuracy of 100% in reference to conventional methods. There was a 93.3% correction rate to 30 artificially contaminated samples. Thus, Q-PCR with melting profiling analysis proved able to identify Listeria species accurately. Consequently, this study demonstrates that the assay we developed is a functional tool for rapidly identifying six Listeria species, and has the potential for discriminating novel species food safety and epidemiological research.

  1. Development of loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay for rapid and sensitive identification of ostrich meat.

    PubMed

    Abdulmawjood, Amir; Grabowski, Nils; Fohler, Svenja; Kittler, Sophie; Nagengast, Helga; Klein, Guenter

    2014-01-01

    Animal species identification is one of the primary duties of official food control. Since ostrich meat is difficult to be differentiated macroscopically from beef, therefore new analytical methods are needed. To enforce labeling regulations for the authentication of ostrich meat, it might be of importance to develop and evaluate a rapid and reliable assay. In the present study, a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay based on the cytochrome b gene of the mitochondrial DNA of the species Struthio camelus was developed. The LAMP assay was used in combination with a real-time fluorometer. The developed system allowed the detection of 0.01% ostrich meat products. In parallel, a direct swab method without nucleic acid extraction using the HYPLEX LPTV buffer was also evaluated. This rapid processing method allowed detection of ostrich meat without major incubation steps. In summary, the LAMP assay had excellent sensitivity and specificity for detecting ostrich meat and could provide a sampling-to-result identification-time of 15 to 20 minutes. PMID:24963709

  2. Development of Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification (LAMP) Assay for Rapid and Sensitive Identification of Ostrich Meat

    PubMed Central

    Abdulmawjood, Amir; Grabowski, Nils; Fohler, Svenja; Kittler, Sophie; Nagengast, Helga; Klein, Guenter

    2014-01-01

    Animal species identification is one of the primary duties of official food control. Since ostrich meat is difficult to be differentiated macroscopically from beef, therefore new analytical methods are needed. To enforce labeling regulations for the authentication of ostrich meat, it might be of importance to develop and evaluate a rapid and reliable assay. In the present study, a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay based on the cytochrome b gene of the mitochondrial DNA of the species Struthio camelus was developed. The LAMP assay was used in combination with a real-time fluorometer. The developed system allowed the detection of 0.01% ostrich meat products. In parallel, a direct swab method without nucleic acid extraction using the HYPLEX LPTV buffer was also evaluated. This rapid processing method allowed detection of ostrich meat without major incubation steps. In summary, the LAMP assay had excellent sensitivity and specificity for detecting ostrich meat and could provide a sampling-to-result identification-time of 15 to 20 minutes. PMID:24963709

  3. Rapid, on-site identification of explosives in nanoliter droplets using a UV reflected fiber optic sensor.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Li, Qiang; Zhou, Hong; Hao, Hongxia; Wang, Tongzhou; Zhao, Songmin; Lu, Ying; Huang, Guoliang

    2012-11-01

    A portable UV (190-400 nm) spectrophotometric based reflected fiber optic sensor system is presented for the on-site detection and identification of explosives. A reflected fiber optic sensor for explosives analysis was developed, with low sample consumption (20-100 nL) and a wide concentration quantification range (1.1-250 mg L(-1)). Seven common explosives [pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), trinitrophenylmethylnitramine (CE), trinitrotoluene (TNT), dinitrotoluene (DNT), picric acid (PA), cyclotetramethylenetetranitramine (HMX), cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine (RDX)] and a PETN-RDX mixture (to simulate the Semtex used in many terrorist bombings) were quantitatively analyzed and identified by the proposed system in less than 3s per test, with limits of detection (LOD) of 0.3 mg L(-1). Due to chemical interference problems in the UV wavelengths range, a novel feature matching algorithm (FMA) was proposed for explosive identification, which was proved to have higher specificity and better anti-interference ability. Real post-blast debris samples were analyzed by the proposed method, and the results were validated against an LC/MS/MS method. The rapid, cost-effective detection with low sample consumption and wide applicability achieved by this system is highly suitable for homeland security on-site applications, such as rapid sample screening in post-blast debris.

  4. Rapid and Accurate Identification of Human-Associated Staphylococci by Use of Multiplex PCR▿

    PubMed Central

    Hirotaki, Shintaro; Sasaki, Takashi; Kuwahara-Arai, Kyoko; Hiramatsu, Keiichi

    2011-01-01

    Although staphylococci are identified by phenotypic analysis in many clinical laboratories, these results are often incorrect because of phenotypic variation. Genetic analysis is necessary for definitive species identification. In the present study, we developed a simple multiplex-PCR (M-PCR) for species identification of human-associated staphylococci, which were as follows: Staphylococcus aureus, S. capitis, S. caprae, S. epidermidis, S. haemolyticus, S. hominis, S. lugdunensis, S. saprophyticus, and S. warneri. This method was designed on the basis of nucleotide sequences of the thermonuclease (nuc) genes that were universally conserved in staphylococci except the S. sciuri group and showed moderate sequence diversity. In order to validate this assay, 361 staphylococcal strains were studied, which had been identified at the species levels by sequence analysis of the hsp60 genes. In consequence, M-PCR demonstrated a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 100%. By virtue of simplicity and accuracy, this method will be useful in clinical research. PMID:21832022

  5. Rapid plant identification using species- and group-specific primers targeting chloroplast DNA.

    PubMed

    Wallinger, Corinna; Juen, Anita; Staudacher, Karin; Schallhart, Nikolaus; Mitterrutzner, Evi; Steiner, Eva-Maria; Thalinger, Bettina; Traugott, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Plant identification is challenging when no morphologically assignable parts are available. There is a lack of broadly applicable methods for identifying plants in this situation, for example when roots grow in mixture and for decayed or semi-digested plant material. These difficulties have also impeded the progress made in ecological disciplines such as soil- and trophic ecology. Here, a PCR-based approach is presented which allows identifying a variety of plant taxa commonly occurring in Central European agricultural land. Based on the trnT-F cpDNA region, PCR assays were developed to identify two plant families (Poaceae and Apiaceae), the genera Trifolium and Plantago, and nine plant species: Achillea millefolium, Fagopyrum esculentum, Lolium perenne, Lupinus angustifolius, Phaseolus coccineus, Sinapis alba, Taraxacum officinale, Triticum aestivum, and Zea mays. These assays allowed identification of plants based on size-specific amplicons ranging from 116 bp to 381 bp. Their specificity and sensitivity was consistently high, enabling the detection of small amounts of plant DNA, for example, in decaying plant material and in the intestine or faeces of herbivores. To increase the efficacy of identifying plant species from large number of samples, specific primers were combined in multiplex PCRs, allowing screening for multiple species within a single reaction. The molecular assays outlined here will be applicable manifold, such as for root- and leaf litter identification, botanical trace evidence, and the analysis of herbivory. PMID:22253728

  6. Rapid Plant Identification Using Species- and Group-Specific Primers Targeting Chloroplast DNA

    PubMed Central

    Staudacher, Karin; Schallhart, Nikolaus; Mitterrutzner, Evi; Steiner, Eva-Maria; Thalinger, Bettina; Traugott, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Plant identification is challenging when no morphologically assignable parts are available. There is a lack of broadly applicable methods for identifying plants in this situation, for example when roots grow in mixture and for decayed or semi-digested plant material. These difficulties have also impeded the progress made in ecological disciplines such as soil- and trophic ecology. Here, a PCR-based approach is presented which allows identifying a variety of plant taxa commonly occurring in Central European agricultural land. Based on the trnT-F cpDNA region, PCR assays were developed to identify two plant families (Poaceae and Apiaceae), the genera Trifolium and Plantago, and nine plant species: Achillea millefolium, Fagopyrum esculentum, Lolium perenne, Lupinus angustifolius, Phaseolus coccineus, Sinapis alba, Taraxacum officinale, Triticum aestivum, and Zea mays. These assays allowed identification of plants based on size-specific amplicons ranging from 116 bp to 381 bp. Their specificity and sensitivity was consistently high, enabling the detection of small amounts of plant DNA, for example, in decaying plant material and in the intestine or faeces of herbivores. To increase the efficacy of identifying plant species from large number of samples, specific primers were combined in multiplex PCRs, allowing screening for multiple species within a single reaction. The molecular assays outlined here will be applicable manifold, such as for root- and leaf litter identification, botanical trace evidence, and the analysis of herbivory. PMID:22253728

  7. Development of conductive polymer analysis for the rapid detection and identification of phytopathogenic microbes.

    PubMed

    Wilson, A D; Lester, D G; Oberle, C S

    2004-05-01

    ABSTRACT Conductive polymer analysis, a type of electronic aroma detection technology, was evaluated for its efficacy in the detection, identification, and discrimination of plant-pathogenic microorganisms on standardized media and in diseased plant tissues. The method is based on the acquisition of a diagnostic electronic fingerprint derived from multisensor responses to distinct mixtures of volatile metabolites released into sampled headspace. Protocols were established to apply this technology specifically to plant disease diagnosis. This involved development of standardized cultural methods, new instrument architecture for sampling, sample preparation, prerun procedures, run parameters and schedules, recognition files and libraries, data manipulations, and validation protocols for interpretations of results. The collective output from a 32-sensor array produced unique electronic aroma signature patterns diagnostic of individual microbial species in culture and specific pathogen-host combinations associated with diseased plants. The level of discrimination applied in identifications of unknowns was regulated by confidence level and sensitivity settings during construction of application-specific reference libraries for each category of microbe or microbe-host combination identified. Applications of this technology were demonstrated for the diagnosis of specific disease systems, including bacterial and fungal diseases and decays of trees; for host identifications; and for determinations of levels of infection and relatedness between microbial species. Other potential applications to plant pathology are discussed with some advantages and limitations for each type of diagnostic application. PMID:18943759

  8. Simple method for identification of plasmid-coded proteins.

    PubMed

    Sancar, A; Hack, A M; Rupp, W D

    1979-01-01

    Proteins encoded by plasmid DNA are specifically labeled in UV-irradiated cells of Escherichia coli carrying recA and uvrA mutations because extensive degradation of the chromosome DNA occurs concurrently with amplification of plasmid DNA.

  9. Improved recovery and identification of membrane proteins from rat hepatic cells using a centrifugal proteomic reactor.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hu; Wang, Fangjun; Wang, Yuwei; Ning, Zhibin; Hou, Weimin; Wright, Theodore G; Sundaram, Meenakshi; Zhong, Shumei; Yao, Zemin; Figeys, Daniel

    2011-10-01

    Despite their importance in many biological processes, membrane proteins are underrepresented in proteomic analysis because of their poor solubility (hydrophobicity) and often low abundance. We describe a novel approach for the identification of plasma membrane proteins and intracellular microsomal proteins that combines membrane fractionation, a centrifugal proteomic reactor for streamlined protein extraction, protein digestion and fractionation by centrifugation, and high performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem MS. The performance of this approach was illustrated for the study of the proteome of ER and Golgi microsomal membranes in rat hepatic cells. The centrifugal proteomic reactor identified 945 plasma membrane proteins and 955 microsomal membrane proteins, of which 63 and 47% were predicted as bona fide membrane proteins, respectively. Among these proteins, >800 proteins were undetectable by the conventional in-gel digestion approach. The majority of the membrane proteins only identified by the centrifugal proteomic reactor were proteins with ≥ 2 transmembrane segments or proteins with high molecular mass (e.g. >150 kDa) and hydrophobicity. The improved proteomic reactor allowed the detection of a group of endocytic and/or signaling receptor proteins on the plasma membrane, as well as apolipoproteins and glycerolipid synthesis enzymes that play a role in the assembly and secretion of apolipoprotein B100-containing very low density lipoproteins. Thus, the centrifugal proteomic reactor offers a new analytical tool for structure and function studies of membrane proteins involved in lipid and lipoprotein metabolism.

  10. Trans-splicing as a novel method to rapidly produce antibody fusion proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Iwasaki, Ryohei; Kiuchi, Hiroki; Ihara, Masaki; Mori, Toshihiro; Kawakami, Masayuki; Ueda, Hiroshi

    2009-07-03

    To cultivate the use of trans-splicing as a novel means to rapidly express various antibody fusion proteins, we tried to express antibody-reporter enzyme fusions in a COS-1 co-transfection model. When a vector designed to induce trans-splicing with IgH pre-mRNA was co-transfected with a vector encoding the mouse IgM locus, the expression of V{sub H}-secreted human placental alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) as well as Fab-SEAP were successfully expressed both in mRNA and protein levels. Especially, the vectors encoding complementary sequence to S{mu} as a binding domain was accurate and efficient, producing trans-spliced mRNA of up to 2% of cis-spliced one. Since S{mu} sequence should exist in every IgH pre-mRNA, our finding will lead to the rapid production and analysis of various antibody-enzyme fusions suitable for enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) or antibody-dependent enzyme prodrug therapy (ADEPT).

  11. Extracellular vesicles are rapidly purified from human plasma by PRotein Organic Solvent PRecipitation (PROSPR)

    PubMed Central

    Gallart-Palau, Xavier; Serra, Aida; Wong, Andrew See Weng; Sandin, Sara; Lai, Mitchell K. P.; Chen, Christopher P.; Kon, Oi Lian; Sze, Siu Kwan

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) such as exosomes and microvesicles mediate intercellular communication and regulate a diverse range of crucial biological processes. Host cells that are damaged, infected or transformed release biomarker-containing EVs into the peripheral circulation, where they can be readily accessed for use in diagnostic or prognostic testing. However, current methods of EV isolation from blood plasma are complex and often require relatively large sample volumes, hence are inefficient for widespread use in clinical settings. Here, we report a novel and inexpensive method of rapidly isolating EVs from small volumes of human blood plasma by PRotein Organic Solvent PRecipitation (PROSPR). PROSPR encompasses a rapid three-step protocol to remove soluble proteins from plasma via precipitation in cold acetone, leaving the lipid-encapsulated EVs behind in suspension. This generates higher purity EVs that can then be obtained from filtration or classical ultracentrifugation methods. We foresee that PROSPR-based purification of EVs will significantly accelerate the discovery of new disease biomarkers and the characterization of EVs with potential for clinical applications. PMID:26419333

  12. Rapid comparison of protein binding site surfaces with Property Encoded Shape Distributions (PESD)

    PubMed Central

    Das, Sourav; Kokardekar, Arshad

    2009-01-01

    Patterns in shape and property distributions on the surface of binding sites are often conserved across functional proteins without significant conservation of the underlying amino-acid residues. To explore similarities of these sites from the viewpoint of a ligand, a sequence and fold-independent method was created to rapidly and accurately compare binding sites of proteins represented by property-mapped triangulated Gauss-Connolly surfaces. Within this paradigm, signatures for each binding site surface are produced by calculating their property-encoded shape distributions (PESD), a measure of the probability that a particular property will be at a specific distance to another on the molecular surface. Similarity between the signatures can then be treated as a measure of similarity between binding sites. As postulated, the PESD method rapidly detected high levels of similarity in binding site surface characteristics even in cases where there was very low similarity at the sequence level. In a screening experiment involving each member of the PDBBind 2005 dataset as a query against the rest of the set, PESD was able to retrieve a binding site with identical E.C. (Enzyme Commission) numbers as the top match in 79.5% of cases. The ability of the method in detecting similarity in binding sites with low sequence conservations were compared with state-of-the-art binding site comparison methods. PMID:19919089

  13. Identification of novel sweet protein for nutritional applications

    PubMed Central

    Gnanavel, Mutharasu; Serva Peddha, Muthukumar

    2011-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity and diabetes has increased exponentially in recent years around the globe, especially in India. Sweet proteins have the potential to substitute the sugars, by acting as natural, good and low calorie sweeteners. They also do not trigger a demand for insulin in diabetic patients unlike sucrose. In humans, the sweet taste perception is mainly due to taste-specific G protein-coupled heterodimeric receptors T1R2-T1R3. These receptors recognize diverse natural and synthetic sweeteners such as monelin, brazzein, thaumatin, curculin, mabinlin, miraculin and pentadin. Structural modeling of new sweetener proteins will be a great leap in further advancement of knowledge and their utility as sweeteners. We have explored the fingerprints of sweetness by studying the aminoacid composition and structure properties of the above proteins. The structural analysis of monellin revealed that the individual A or B chains of monellin are not contributing to its sweetness. However, the native conformation and ionic interaction between AspB7 of monellin with active site of T1R2-T1R3 receptor, along with hydrogen bonding stability of IleB6 and IleB8 are responsible for the sweet taste. Based on structural similarity search, we found a new hypothetical protein from Shewanella loihica, which has the presence of Asp32 with adjacent isoleucine residues. Further, we examined the lead protein by two-step docking for the study of interaction of functionally conserved residues with receptors. The identified protein showed similar ionic and hydrophobic interactions with monelin. This gives a promising opportunity to explore this protein for potential health application in the low calorie sweetener industry viz., soft drinks, snacks, food, chocolate industries etc. PMID:22125379

  14. Identification of novel sweet protein for nutritional applications.

    PubMed

    Gnanavel, Mutharasu; Serva Peddha, Muthukumar

    2011-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity and diabetes has increased exponentially in recent years around the globe, especially in India. Sweet proteins have the potential to substitute the sugars, by acting as natural, good and low calorie sweeteners. They also do not trigger a demand for insulin in diabetic patients unlike sucrose. In humans, the sweet taste perception is mainly due to taste-specific G protein-coupled heterodimeric receptors T1R2-T1R3. These receptors recognize diverse natural and synthetic sweeteners such as monelin, brazzein, thaumatin, curculin, mabinlin, miraculin and pentadin. Structural modeling of new sweetener proteins will be a great leap in further advancement of knowledge and their utility as sweeteners. We have explored the fingerprints of sweetness by studying the aminoacid composition and structure properties of the above proteins. The structural analysis of monellin revealed that the individual A or B chains of monellin are not contributing to its sweetness. However, the native conformation and ionic interaction between AspB7 of monellin with active site of T1R2-T1R3 receptor, along with hydrogen bonding stability of IleB6 and IleB8 are responsible for the sweet taste. Based on structural similarity search, we found a new hypothetical protein from Shewanella loihica, which has the presence of Asp(32) with adjacent isoleucine residues. Further, we examined the lead protein by two-step docking for the study of interaction of functionally conserved residues with receptors. The identified protein showed similar ionic and hydrophobic interactions with monelin. This gives a promising opportunity to explore this protein for potential health application in the low calorie sweetener industry viz., soft drinks, snacks, food, chocolate industries etc. PMID:22125379

  15. A medium for the isolation, enumeration and rapid presumptive identification of injured Clostridium perfringens and Bacillus cereus.

    PubMed

    Hood, A M; Tuck, A; Dane, C R

    1990-09-01

    A blood-free egg yolk medium (BCP) containing pyruvate, inositol, mannitol and a bromocresol purple indicator in a nutrient agar base has been developed to initiate the growth of Clostridium perfringens. It is comparable to blood agar for the growth of normal, chilled stored vegetative cells and heat-injured spores of Cl. perfringens and Bacillus cereus. It has the advantage over blood agar in exhibiting presumptive evidence of Cl. perfringens (production of lecithinase and inositol fermentation) after an overnight incubation at 43 degrees - 45 degrees C. Pyruvate, catalase and other hydrogen peroxide degraders were found to remove toxins rapidly formed in media exposed to air and light. Free radical scavengers of superoxide, hydroxyl ions and singlet oxygen were ineffective. Without scavengers the formation of 10-20 micrograms/ml hydrogen peroxide in the exposed medium was indicated and found lethal to injured Cl. perfringens. The BCP medium has been used successfully for the rapid identification and enumeration of Cl. perfringens in foods and faeces from food poisoning outbreaks and cases of suspected infectious diarrhoea. Greater recovery of severely injured vegetative Cl. perfrigens could be obtained by pre-incubation at 37 degrees C of inoculated media for 2-4 h followed by overnight incubation at 43 degrees - 45 degrees C. Tryptose-sulphite-cycloserine and Shahidi-Ferguson-perfringens agar base were found to inhibit the growth of several strains of injured vegetative Cl. perfringens. This was not completely overcome by the addition of pyruvate. The inclusion of mannitol also allows the medium to be used for the presumptive identification of B. cereus. Growth and lecithinase activity are profuse on BCP. Heat-injured spores are recovered equally well on BCP and blood agar. A scheme for the identification of some other clostridia on BCP is presented.

  16. Description and evaluation of the semiautomated 4-hour rapid ID 32 Strep method for identification of streptococci and members of related genera.

    PubMed Central

    Freney, J; Bland, S; Etienne, J; Desmonceaux, M; Boeufgras, J M; Fleurette, J

    1992-01-01

    The rapid ID 32 Strep system (bioMérieux, La Balme les Grottes, France) is a new system which allows the identification in 4 h of most streptococci and members of related genera encountered in medical and veterinary bacteriology. Four hundred thirty-three isolates first identified by conventional methods and belonging to the genera Streptococcus, Lactococcus, Enterococcus, Aerococcus, Gemella, Leuconostoc, Erysipelothrix, Gardnerella, and Listeria were tested. Overall, rapid ID 32 Strep correctly identified 413 (95.3%) of the strains, with 109 (25.1%) requiring extra tests for complete identification. Sixteen strains (3.7%) were not identified, and 4 (1.0%) were misidentified. The rapid ID 32 Strep system is a suitable alternative for rapid identification of members of the genus Streptococcus and of related genera. PMID:1400965

  17. Identification of a mastigoneme protein from Phytophthora nicotianae.

    PubMed

    Blackman, Leila M; Arikawa, Mikihiko; Yamada, Shuhei; Suzaki, Toshinobu; Hardham, Adrienne R

    2011-01-01

    Tripartite tubular hairs (mastigonemes) on the anterior flagellum of protists in the stramenopile taxon are responsible for reversing the thrust of flagellar beat and for cell motility. Immunoprecipitation experiments using antibodies directed towards mastigonemes on the flagella of zoospores ofPhytophthora nicotianaehave facilitated the cloning of a gene encoding a mastigoneme shaft protein in this Oomycete. Expression of the gene, designatedPnMas2, is up-regulated during asexual sporulation, a period during which many zoospore components are synthesized. Analysis of the sequence of the PnMas2 protein has revealed that, like other stramenopile mastigoneme proteins, PnMas2 has an N-terminal secretion signal and contains four cysteine-rich epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like domains. Evidence from non-denaturing gels indicates that PnMas2 forms large oligomeric complexes, most likely through disulphide bridging. Bioinformatic analysis has revealed thatPhytophthoraspecies typically contain three or four putative mastigoneme proteins containing the four EGF-like domains. These proteins are similar in sequence to mastigoneme proteins in other stramenopile protists including the algaeOchromonas danica,Aureococcus anophagefferensandScytosiphon lomentariaand the diatomsThalassiosira pseudonana and T. weissflogii.

  18. Automatic annotation of protein function based on family identification.

    PubMed

    Abascal, Federico; Valencia, Alfonso

    2003-11-15

    Although genomes are being sequenced at an impressive rate, the information generated tells us little about protein function, which is slow to characterize by traditional methods. Automatic protein function annotation based on computational methods has alleviated this imbalance. The most powerful current approach for inferring the function of new proteins is by studying the annotations of their homologues, since their common origin is assumed to be reflected in their structure and function. Unfortunately, as proteins evolve they acquire new functions, so annotation based on homology must be carried out in the context of orthologues or subfamilies. Evolution adds new complications through domain shuffling: homology (or orthology) frequently corresponds to domains rather than complete proteins. Moreover, the function of a protein may be seen as the result of combining the functions of its domains. Additionally, automatic annotation has to deal with problems related to the annotations in the databases: errors (which are likely to be propagated), inconsistencies, or different degrees of function specification. We describe a method that addresses these difficulties for the annotation of protein function. Sequence relationships are detected and measured to obtain a map of the sequence space, which is searched for differentiated groups of proteins (similar to islands on the map), which are expected to have a common function and correspond to groups of orthologues or subfamilies. This mapmaking is done by applying a clustering algorithm based on Normalized cuts in graphs. The domain problem is addressed in a simple way: pairwise local alignments are analyzed to determine the extent to which they cover the entire sequence lengths of the two proteins. This analysis determines both what homologues are preferred for functional inheritance and the level of confidence of the annotation. To alleviate the problems associated with database annotations, the information on all the

  19. SoyProDB: A database for the identification of soybean seed proteins

    PubMed Central

    Tavakolan, Mona; Alkharouf, Nadim W; Khan, Farooq H; Natarajan, Savithiry

    2013-01-01

    Soybean continues to serve as a rich and inexpensive source of protein for humans and animals. A substantial amount of information has been reported on the genotypic variation and beneficial genetic manipulation of soybeans. For better understanding of the consequences of genetic manipulation, elucidation of soybean protein composition is necessary, because of its direct relationship to phenotype. We have conducted studies to determine the composition of storage, allergen and anti-nutritional proteins in cultivated soybean using a combined proteomics approach. Two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2DPAGE) was implemented for the separation of proteins along with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) for the identification of proteins. Our analysis resulted in the identification of several proteins, and a web based database named soybean protein database (SoyProDB) was subsequently built to house and allow scientists to search the data. This database will be useful to scientists who wish to genetically alter soybean with higher quality storage proteins, and also helpful for consumers to get a greater understanding about proteins that compose soy products available in the market. The database is freely accessible. Availability http://bioinformatics.towson.edu/Soybean_Seed_Proteins_2D_Gel_DB/Home.aspx PMID:23423175

  20. Differential protein mapping of ovarian serous adenocarcinomas: identification of potential markers for distinct tumor stage.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanfei; Wu, Rong; Cho, Kathleen R; Thomas, Dafydd G; Gossner, Gabrielle; Liu, J Rebecca; Giordano, Thomas J; Shedden, Kerby A; Misek, David E; Lubman, David M

    2009-03-01

    Ovarian serous carcinomas (OSCs) comprise over half of all ovarian carcinomas and account for the majority of ovarian cancer-related deaths. We used a 2-dimensional liquid-based protein mapping strategy to characterize global protein expression patterns in 19 OSC tumor samples from 15 different patients to facilitate molecular classification of tumor stage. Protein expression profiles were produced, using pI-based separation in the first dimension and hydrophobicity-based separation in the second dimension, over a pH range of 4.0-7.0. Hierarchical clustering was applied to protein maps to indicate the tumor interrelationships. The 19 tumor samples could be classified into two different groups, one group associated with low stage (Stage 1) tumors and the other group associated with high stage (Stages 3/4) tumors. Proteins that were differentially expressed in different groups were selected for identification by LTQ-ESI-MS/MS. Fourteen of the selected proteins were overexpressed in the low stage tumors; 46 of the proteins were overexpressed in the high stage tumors. These proteins are known to play an important role in cellular functions such as glycolysis, protein biosynthesis, and cytoskeleton rearrangement and may serve as markers associated with different stages of OSCs. To further confirm the stage-dependent protein identifications, Lamin A/C and Vimentin expression in ovarian serous carcinomas was assessed by immunohistochemistry using ovarian tumor tissue microarrays for 66 samples.

  1. A simple, rapid and inexpensive screening method for the identification of Pythium insidiosum.

    PubMed

    Tondolo, Juliana Simoni Moraes; Loreto, Erico Silva; Denardi, Laura Bedin; Mario, Débora Alves Nunes; Alves, Sydney Hartz; Santurio, Janio Morais

    2013-04-01

    Growth of Pythium insidiosum mycelia around minocycline disks (30μg) did not occur within 7days of incubation at 35°C when the isolates were grown on Sabouraud, corn meal, Muller-Hinton or RPMI agar. This technique offers a simple and rapid method for the differentiation of P. insidiosum from true filamentous fungi. PMID:23419825

  2. Rapid identification and classification of Staphylococcus aureus by attenuated total reflectance fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important bacterium that can cause serious infections in humans such as pneumonia and bacteremia. Rapid detection of this pathogen is crucial in food industries and clinical laboratories to control S. aureus food poisoning and human infections. In this study, fourier tran...

  3. Rapid Screening and Species Identification of E. Coli, Listeria, and Salmonella by SERS Technique

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Techniques for routine and rapid screening of the presence of foodborne bacteria are needed, and this study reports the feasibility of citrate-reduced silver colloidal SERS for identifying E. coli, Listeria, and Salmonella. Relative standard deviation (RSD) of SERS spectra from silver colloidal susp...

  4. Rapid identification of salmonella serotypes with stereo and hyperspectral microscope imaging Methods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The hyperspectral microscope imaging (HMI) method can reduce detection time within 8 hours including incubation process. The early and rapid detection with this method in conjunction with the high throughput capabilities makes HMI method a prime candidate for implementation for the food industry. Th...

  5. Rapid Identification of Salmonella Serotypes with Stereo and Hyperspectral Microscope Imaging Methods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The hyperspectral microscope imaging (HMI) method can reduce detection time within 8 hours including incubation process. The early and rapid detection with this method in conjunction with the high throughput capabilities makes HMI method a prime candidate for implementation for the food industry. Th...

  6. Identification of cancer protein biomarkers using proteomic techniques

    DOEpatents

    Mor, Gil G.; Ward, David C.; Bray-Ward, Patricia

    2016-10-18

    The claimed invention describes methods to diagnose or aid in the diagnosis of cancer. The claimed methods are based on the identification of biomarkers which are particularly well suited to discriminate between cancer subjects and healthy subjects. These biomarkers were identified using a unique and novel screening method described herein. The biomarkers identified herein can also be used in the prognosis and monitoring of cancer. The invention comprises the use of leptin, prolactin, OPN and IGF-II for diagnosing, prognosis and monitoring of ovarian cancer.

  7. Identification of cancer protein biomarkers using proteomic techniques

    DOEpatents

    Mor, Gil G.; Ward, David C.; Bray-Ward, Patricia

    2010-02-23

    The claimed invention describes methods to diagnose or aid in the diagnosis of cancer. The claimed methods are based on the identification of biomarkers which are particularly well suited to discriminate between cancer subjects and healthy subjects. These biomarkers were identified using a unique and novel screening method described herein. The biomarkers identified herein can also be used in the prognosis and monitoring of cancer. The invention comprises the use of leptin, prolactin, OPN and IGF-II for diagnosing, prognosis and monitoring of ovarian cancer.

  8. Identification of cancer protein biomarkers using proteomic techniques

    DOEpatents

    Mor, Gil G; Ward, David C; Bray-Ward, Patricia

    2015-03-10

    The claimed invention describes methods to diagnose or aid in the diagnosis of cancer. The claimed methods are based on the id