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Sample records for rapidly growing field

  1. Growing Magnetic Fields in Central Compact Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernal, C. G.; Page, D.

    2011-10-01

    We study the effects of growth models of magnetic fields in Central Compact Objects (CCOs). Such a field evolution is not a new idea (Blandford, Applegate, & Hernquist 1983) but the evolutionary implications not have been followed up completely (Michel 1994). We discussed the new class of neutron stars which belong to five main types that have mainly been recognized in the last ten years. The possibility that a rapid weakly magnetized pulsar might have formed in SN1987A is commented.

  2. Rapidly Growing Thyroid Mass in an Immunocompromised Young Male Adult

    PubMed Central

    Santiago, Mónica; Martinez, José Hernán; Palermo, Coromoto; Figueroa, Carlos; Torres, Oberto; Trinidad, Rafael; Gonzalez, Eva; Miranda, Maria de Lourdes; Garcia, Miosotis; Villamarzo, Guillermo

    2013-01-01

    We describe a 20-year-old man diagnosed with a myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), admitted to our hospital due to pancytopenia and fever of undetermined origin after myelosuppression with chemotherapy. Disseminated aspergillosis (DIA) was suspected when he developed skin and lung involvement. A rapidly growing mass was detected on the left neck area, during hospitalization. A thyroid ultrasound reported a 3.7 × 2.5 × 2.9 cm oval heterogeneous structure, suggestive of an abscess versus a hematoma. Fine needle aspiration of the thyroid revealed invasion of aspergillosis. Fungal thyroiditis is a rare occurrence. Thyroid fungal infection is difficult to diagnose; for this reason it is rarely diagnosed antemortem. To our knowledge, this is the 10th case reported in the literature in an adult where the diagnosis of fungal invasion to the thyroid was able to be corroborated antemortem by fine needle aspiration biopsy. PMID:23936688

  3. Glasses crystallize rapidly at free surfaces by growing crystals upward.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ye; Zhu, Lei; Kearns, Kenneth L; Ediger, Mark D; Yu, Lian

    2011-04-12

    The crystallization of glasses and amorphous solids is studied in many fields to understand the stability of amorphous materials, the fabrication of glass ceramics, and the mechanism of biomineralization. Recent studies have found that crystal growth in organic glasses can be orders of magnitude faster at the free surface than in the interior, a phenomenon potentially important for understanding glass crystallization in general. Current explanations differ for surface-enhanced crystal growth, including released tension and enhanced mobility at glass surfaces. We report here a feature of the phenomenon relevant for elucidating its mechanism: Despite their higher densities, surface crystals rise substantially above the glass surface as they grow laterally, without penetrating deep into the bulk. For indomethacin (IMC), an organic glass able to grow surface crystals in two polymorphs (α and γ), the growth front can be hundreds of nanometers above the glass surface. The process of surface crystal growth, meanwhile, is unperturbed by eliminating bulk material deeper than some threshold depth (ca. 300 nm for α IMC and less than 180 nm for γ IMC). As a growth strategy, the upward-lateral growth of surface crystals increases the system's surface energy, but can effectively take advantage of surface mobility and circumvent slow growth in the bulk.

  4. Primary amyloid goiter mimicking rapid growing thyroid malignancy.

    PubMed

    Joung, Kyong Hye; Park, Jae-Yong; Kim, Koon Soon; Koo, Bon Seok

    2014-02-01

    Amyloid accumulation in the thyroid gland leading to a clinically detectable mass, known as amyloid goiter, is a rare condition associated with primary amyloidosis. Moreover, a localized primary amyloid goiter involving only the thyroid gland is rarer still. Here, we report a patient with a localized primary amyloid goiter that had grown rapidly, causing dysphagia and dyspnea on exercise, and confused us with malignancy such as anaplastic carcinoma. After surgery, no further symptoms occurred. A diagnosis of amyloid goiter was established on microscopic examination. In patients with a rapidly enlarging thyroid gland presenting with dysphagia, dyspnea, or hoarseness, amyloid goiter and malignancy should both be suspected, even when systemic amyloidosis is not suspected.

  5. Intraoral tumor with rapid growing. Report of a case.

    PubMed

    González-Martín-Moro, Javier; Cebrián-Carretero, Jose Luis; Gómez-García, Elena; del Castillo-Pardo de Vera, Jose Luis; del Val, Daniel

    2005-01-01

    The appearance of an intraoral mass is common in our specialty. Most are benign lesions, but some are primary malignancies. Metastases account for less than 1% of all oral malignancies. An 86 year old woman was referred to our department with a large, asymptomatic, intraoral, fast-growing mass. She had no previous cancer history or other relevant physical findings. The radiology studies showed underlying bone erosion. The histological study showed a metastatic adenocarcinoma with a suspected origin in the abdomen. We were unable to identify it by non invasive diagnostic procedures. Given the patient's general status and despite the ominous prognosis of such lesions, we decided not to perform any aggressive therapy beyond removing the oral mass, in order to maintain her quality of life. There have been no local recurrences until this time.

  6. E-cigarettes: a rapidly growing Internet phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Yamin, Cyrus K; Bitton, Asaf; Bates, David W

    2010-11-02

    Electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) aerosolize nicotine and produce a vapor that emulates that of cigarettes but purportedly has fewer traditional toxins than secondhand smoke. Although e-cigarettes are widely sold online and by retailers, new research suggests that they may contain unexpected toxins and may provide unreliable nicotine delivery. Many countries have already banned or strictly regulated e-cigarettes. Currently in the United States, e-cigarettes are exempt from regulation as drug-delivery devices. Meanwhile, the presence of e-cigarettes on the Internet, including in Web searches, virtual user communities, and online stores where people sell e-cigarettes on commission, is increasing rapidly. Physicians should be aware of the popularity, questionable efficacy claims, and safety concerns of e-cigarettes so that they may counsel patients against use and advocate for research to inform an evidence-based regulatory approach.

  7. [Phyllodes tumour: a rare, rapidly growing breast tumour].

    PubMed

    den Exter, Paul L; Hornstra, Bonne J; Vree, Robbert

    2009-01-01

    A 40-year-old woman presented at the breast outpatient clinic with a giant tumour of her left breast. The size, rapid growth and radiological characteristics of the lesion led us to suspect a phyllodes tumour. A histological examination of a needle biopsy confirmed this diagnosis. An additional CT scan revealed no signs of metastases. We performed a mastectomy during which a tumour measuring 48 x 33 x 25 cm was resected. Histological examination revealed a borderline phyllodes tumour. Phyllodes tumours are rare fibroepithelial neoplasms of the breast and pre-operatively these are often difficult to differentiate from fibroadenomas. Phyllodes tumours have a variable clinical course with the ability to metastasize and a propensity to recur locally. Complete excision with wide margins is essential to prevent local recurrence. In our case, the surgical margins were limited and our patient was therefore treated with postoperative radiation therapy.

  8. Rapidly growing aortic arch aneurysm in Behcet's disease.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Nozomi; Sakano, Yasuhito; Ohki, Shin-Ichi; Misawa, Yoshio

    2011-03-01

    We present a patient with a nine-year history of Behçet's disease (BD), who developed a rapidly expanding aneurysm of the aortic arch. Three-dimensional computed tomography demonstrated a saccular aortic arch aneurysm with a maximal diameter of 5 cm. No bacteria were detected by serial blood cultures. The aneurysm, however, showed a multi-lobular cavity, mimicking an infectious aneurysm. Therefore, we prescribed antibacterial agents for one week. The patient still had a high-fever and an elevated C-reactive protein level thereafter. Aortic arch replacement was performed emergently. Because we were unable to determine whether the aneurysm was caused by infection or BD, the implanted prosthetic graft and the anastomotic sites were covered with a pedicle graft of the greater omentum, and we continued to administer antibacterial agents for four weeks postoperatively. The pathological examination showed neither bacteria nor cystic medial necrosis in the resected aortic wall. Inflammatory changes with eosinophilic infiltration were recognized mainly around the adventitia near the aneurysm. The patient had a favorable postoperative course without any complications.

  9. Halogenated graphenes: rapidly growing family of graphene derivatives.

    PubMed

    Karlický, František; Kumara Ramanatha Datta, Kasibhatta; Otyepka, Michal; Zbořil, Radek

    2013-08-27

    Graphene derivatives containing covalently bound halogens (graphene halides) represent promising two-dimensional systems having interesting physical and chemical properties. The attachment of halogen atoms to sp(2) carbons changes the hybridization state to sp(3), which has a principal impact on electronic properties and local structure of the material. The fully fluorinated graphene derivative, fluorographene (graphene fluoride, C1F1), is the thinnest insulator and the only stable stoichiometric graphene halide (C1X1). In this review, we discuss structural properties, syntheses, chemistry, stabilities, and electronic properties of fluorographene and other partially fluorinated, chlorinated, and brominated graphenes. Remarkable optical, mechanical, vibrational, thermodynamic, and conductivity properties of graphene halides are also explored as well as the properties of rare structures including multilayered fluorinated graphenes, iodine-doped graphene, and mixed graphene halides. Finally, patterned halogenation is presented as an interesting approach for generating materials with applications in the field of graphene-based electronic devices.

  10. Integrated Field Screening for Rapid Sediment Characterization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-08-01

    Screening for Rapid Sediment Characterization August 2004 Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for the...Integrated Field Screening for Rapid Sediment Characterization 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT...acceptance of three field screening techniques to delineate chemical concentrations and potential biological effects of sediment contaminants. Defining

  11. Intra-urban air pollution in a rapidly growing Sahelian city.

    PubMed

    Lindén, J; Boman, J; Holmer, B; Thorsson, S; Eliasson, I

    2012-04-01

    In this paper we analyze spatial and temporal variations of air pollution (PM(1), PM(2.5), PM(10), CO, NO(x), O(3), Toluene and Benzene) and climate in areas of different development typology in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso. Analyses are based on measurements from fixed sites and car traverse measurements during field studies in 2007 and 2010. Large spatial and temporal variations were found, showing a generally poor air quality situation, with extreme levels of PM(10), commonly exceeding air quality guidelines of WHO. Pollution levels increase considerably with increased atmospheric stability. Important sources were transported dust and re-suspension of dust from unpaved roads, but also traffic emissions and biomass burning. The spatial variations are examined with focus on effects for variations in potential exposure depending on for example area of residence and daily activity pattern, showing that great differences are likely to exist. Ouagadougou, like most developing countries worldwide, currently experiences an extremely rapid population growth in combination with limited financial means. This is likely to create increasingly harmful air pollution situations for the rapidly growing populations of these areas, and shows an urgent need for increased understanding of the pollution situation as well as development of mitigation strategies.

  12. Evaluation of Various Culture Media for Detection of Rapidly Growing Mycobacteria from Patients with Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Preece, Clair L.; Wichelhaus, Thomas A.; Perry, Audrey; Jones, Amanda L.; Cummings, Stephen P.; Hogardt, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Isolation of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) from the sputum of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) is challenging due to overgrowth by rapidly growing species that colonize the lungs of patients with CF. Extended incubation on Burkholderia cepacia selective agar (BCSA) has been recommended as an expedient culture method for the isolation of rapidly growing NTM in this setting. The aim of this study was to assess five selective media designed for the isolation of Burkholderia cepacia complex, along with two media designed for the isolation of mycobacteria (rapidly growing mycobacteria [RGM] medium and Middlebrook 7H11 agar), for their abilities to isolate NTM. All seven media were challenged with 147 isolates of rapidly growing mycobacteria and 185 isolates belonging to other species. RGM medium was then compared with the most selective brand of BCSA for the isolation of NTM from 224 sputum samples from patients with CF. Different agars designed for the isolation of B. cepacia complex varied considerably in their inhibition of other bacteria and fungi. RGM medium supported the growth of all isolates of mycobacteria and was more selective than any other medium. NTM were recovered from 17 of 224 sputum samples using RGM medium, compared with only 7 samples using the most selective brand of BCSA (P = 0.023). RGM medium offers a superior option, compared to other selective agars, for the isolation of rapidly growing mycobacteria from the sputum of patients with CF. Furthermore, the convenience of using RGM medium enables routine screening for rapidly growing NTM in all submitted sputum samples from patients with CF. PMID:27098962

  13. Rapid-growing juvenile xanthogranuloma on the scalp in 18-month-old girl.

    PubMed

    Park, Young Woo; Koh, Eun Jeong; Choi, Ha Young

    2011-09-01

    Juvenile xanthogranuloma (JXG) is an uncommon histiocytic cutaneous lesion. An 18-month-old girl visited our clinic due to rapid growing orange-yellowish lesion on scalp. Enlarging time from 1 mm to 12 mm was just 8 weeks. We excised the tumor and adjacent normal tissue. Histopathological study showed numerous eosinophils and Touton giant cells within the lesion. Immunohistochemical study revealed positive immunoreactivity for CD68 in most areas. No recurrence was seen during 12 months after resection. We report a case with rapidly growing JXG on scalp with peculiar histopathologic findings.

  14. Development of a rapid ATP bioluminescence assay for biocidal susceptibility testing of rapidly growing mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Renuka; Yadav, Jagjit S

    2010-10-01

    An ATP-based biocide susceptibility assay for mycobacteria was developed by optimizing the cell lysis and assay conditions. Compared to the conventional agar plating method, the assay was rapid (1.5 h) and showed high sensitivity and specificity as determined by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. The test species, Mycobacterium immunogenum, M. chelonae, and M. abscessus, showed various susceptibilities to the glutaraldehyde- and isothiazolone-based test biocides.

  15. Vibrio natriegens: A Rapidly Growing Micro-Organism Ideally Suited for Class Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullenger, L.; Gill, Nijole R.

    1973-01-01

    Describes five microbiological experiments using the marine organism Vibrio natriegens. This organism is highly suitable for laboratory work because it is non-pathogenic and grows extremely rapidly, having the distinction of the lowest mean generation time yet recorded (9.8 minutes). (JR)

  16. A Novel Rapidly Growing Mycobacterium Species Causing an Abdominal Cerebrospinal Fluid Pseudocyst Infection

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Cory K.; de Man, Tom J. B.; Toney, Nadege C.; Kamboj, Kamal; Balada-Llasat, Joan-Miquel; Wang, Shu-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are a rare cause of ventriculoperitoneal shunt infections. We describe the isolation and identification of a novel, rapidly growing, nonpigmented NTM from an abdominal cerebrospinal fluid pseudocyst. The patient presented with fevers, nausea, and abdominal pain and clinically improved after shunt removal. NTM identification was performed by amplicon and whole-genome sequencing. PMID:27704004

  17. Structural analysis of biofilm formation by rapidly and slowly growing nontuberculous mycobacteria

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) and rapidly growing mycobacteria (RGM) such as M. abscessus, M. mucogenicum, M. chelonae and M. fortuitum, implicated in healthcare-associated infections, are often isolated from potable water supplies as part of the microbial flora. To understa...

  18. Public Relations in Rapidly Growing Suburban Districts: Insights from Texas Superintendents Bonny Cain and Doug Otto

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Decman, John M.

    2005-01-01

    Throughout Texas, enrollments in suburban school districts have been rising, and in some instances, the increases have been substantial. Causes of this demographic trend are multifaceted, but in most instances they are an intricate mix of state population growth and urban flight. Rapidly growing suburban districts, like all Texas districts,…

  19. An aircraft study of rapid precipitation development and electrification in a growing convective cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willis, P. T.; Hallett, J.; Black, R. A.; Hendricks, W.

    The rapid initial precipitation growth and initial electrification of a convective cloud, growing as a new cell on the upshear side of a cloud system in Florida, is traced from radar data and aircraft penetrations at the -7°C to -10°C level. This study combines radar, microphysical and electrical measurements so that an examination of the interactions between the cloud dynamics, microphysics and electrification is possible. The first pass (-7°C) was characterized by a strong 23 m/s updraft, all liquid cloud water, no precipitation, and no significant electrification. In the 300 s between the two penetrations, precipitation developed very rapidly from < 15 dBZ to < 45 dBZ, and the vertical component of the electric field increased from below the measurement threshold to - 25 kv/m. The second penetration, which started at - 7°C and ended at - 10°C, was still exclusively updraft, but with lesser peak velocities and a more complex structure; i.e., no downdraft, but with relative minima in the updraft. The microphysics of the second pass displayed a segment of exclusively cloud liquid water (no precipitation size hydrometeors), a small segment of all liquid precipitation size hydrometeors, a small region of mixed hydrometeors and an extensive region of graupel hydrometeors, ranging in size from 100 μm to several mm. High cloud liquid water coexisted with the liquid and graupel hydrometeors in the strong updrafts. The electrification was observed to occur exclusively in the segments of the cloud pass where graupel were observed. Within this graupel region, where the graupel often coexisted with supercooled cloud liquid water, significant electric field occurred only at relative minima in the updraft. These relative velocity minima were also minima in the cloud liquid water content. The observed updraft velocities in these relative minima were close to balance velocities for the observed larger graupel hydrometeors. The strongest updrafts, where the formation and

  20. Rapidly growing pigmented tumor on a scalp nevus sebaceous of a pediatric patient: Observation or excision.

    PubMed

    Gaitan-Gaona, Francisco; Said, Mirra C; Galvan-Linares, Aldo; Palafox-Vigil, Gloria; Valdes-Rodriguez, Rodrigo

    2014-07-15

    A 14-year-old girl presented with a new, rapidly growing, pigmented tumor on a previously existing yellowish, verrucous plaque on the scalp. The patient received complete surgical excision. Routine histology ruled out basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and the histological diagnosis was pigmented trichoblastoma arising in nevus sebaceous (NS). It is important to define management for new lesions developing in pediatric patients with existing nevus sebaceus.

  1. Rapidly Growing Right Ventricular Outflow Tract Mass in Patient with Sarcomatoid Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jongmin; Choi, Kyung Un; Kim, Jeong Su; Hwang, Ki Won; Lee, Sang Hyun; Chon, Min Ku; Lee, Soo Yong; Lee, Dae Sung

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac metastasis from renal cell carcinoma (RCC) without inferior vena cava (IVC) involvements is extremely rare with few reported cases. Sarcomatoid RCC with rhabdoid feature is a rare pathologic type of RCC having aggressive behavior due to great metastatic potential. Here, we report a case of rapidly growing cardiac metastasis of RCC which brought on right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) obstruction without IVC and right atrial involvement in a 61-year-old woman. Cardiac arrest occurred during radical nephrectomy and echocardiography revealed mass nearly obstructing the RVOT which was not recognized by preoperative echocardiography 1 month ago. Postoperative immunohistochemical evaluation of renal mass revealed sarcomatoid RCC with rhabdoid feature. PMID:28090262

  2. Disseminated Cryptococcosis with Rapidly Growing Lung Nodules in an End-stage Renal Disease Patient

    PubMed Central

    Inaba, Atsushi; Okada, Akira; Yoshida, Taiko; Itoyama, Satoshi; Nakai, Tatsuro; Hisada, Tetsuya; Takano, Hideki

    2017-01-01

    A 73-year-old man with type 2 diabetes mellitus and end-stage renal disease was diagnosed with acute myocardial infarction. He required continuous dialysis after percutaneous coronary intervention. Subsequently, multiple nodules were discovered in both lungs for the first time, and Cryptococcus neoformans was isolated from the patient's sputum, blood, bilateral pleural fluid, and cerebrospinal fluid cultures, resulting in a diagnosis of disseminated cryptococcosis. This case represents an invaluable example of disseminated cryptococcosis with rapidly growing lung nodules in a dialysis patient, and illustrates that dialysis causes innate immune disorder and the reactivation of cryptococcosis. PMID:28154287

  3. Airborne observations of electric fields around growing and decaying cumulus clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giori, K. L.; Nanevicz, J. E.

    1991-01-01

    Airborne electric field data were gathered in an atmospheric electrification study near Cape Canaveral, FL. A Learjet 36A was instrumented with eight electric field meters (mills) and five different particle probes. The local electric field enhancements at each field mill site were determined under lab conditions and verified using in-flight data. The overdetermined system of eight equations (one for each field mill) was solved using a weighted least squares algorithm to compute the magnitude and direction of the ambient electric field. The signal processing system allowed the measured data to be expressed in terms of earth coordinates, regardless of the attitude of the aircraft. Thus, it was possible to take maximum advantage of the Learjet's speed and maneuverability in studying the electric field structure in the vicinity of the clouds. Data gathered while circling just outside the boundary of a growing cumulus cloud show a nonsymmetric pattern of electric field strength. Field intensity grew rapidly over a period of less than 10 minutes. The observed direction of the ambient electric field vector can be explained by an ascending motion of the charge centers of a classic tripole model of a thunderstorm.

  4. Nuclear oncology, a fast growing field of nuclear medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivier, Pierre

    2004-07-01

    Nuclear Medicine in oncology has been for a long time synonymous with bone scintigraphy, the first ever whole body imaging modality, and with treatment of thyroid cancer with iodine-131. More recently, somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS) using peptides such as 111In-labelled octreotide became a reference imaging method in the detection and staging of neuroendocrine tumors while 131I- and 123I-MIBG remain the tracers of reference for pheochromocytomas and neuroblastomas. Lymphoscintigraphic imaging based on peritumoral injection of 99mTc-labelled colloids supports, in combination with per operative detection, the procedure of sentinel node identification in breast cancers and melanomas. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is currently experiencing a considerable growth in oncology based on the use of 18F-FDG (fluorodeoxyglucose), a very sensitive, although non-specific, tumor tracer. Development of instrumentation is crucial in this expansion of PET imaging with new crystals being more sensitive and hybrid imagers that permit to reduce the acquisition time and offer fused PET-CT images. Current developments in therapy can be classified into three categories. Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) based on monoclonal antibodies (or fragments) labelled with beta-emitters. This technique has recently made its entrance in clinical practice with a 90Y-labelled anti-CD20 antibody ( 90Y-ibritumomab tiuxetan (Zevalin ®)) approved in US for the treatment of some subtypes of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Radionuclide-bone pain palliation has experienced developments with 153Sm-EDTMP, 186Re-HEDP or 89Sr, efficient in patients with widespread disease. Last, the same peptides, as those used in SRS, are being developed for therapy, labelled with 90Y, 111In or 177Lu in patients who failed to respond to other treatments. Overall, nuclear oncology is currently a fast growing field thanks to the combined developments of radiopharmaceuticals and instrumentation.

  5. Overweight, obesity, and inactivity and urban design in rapidly growing Chinese cities.

    PubMed

    Day, Kristen; Alfonzo, Mariela; Chen, Yufei; Guo, Zhan; Lee, Karen K

    2013-05-01

    China faces rising rates of overweight, obesity, and physical inactivity among its citizens. Risk is highest in China's rapidly growing cities and urban populations. Current urban development practices and policies in China heighten this risk. These include policies that support decentralization in land use planning; practices of neighborhood gating; and policies and practices tied to motor vehicle travel, transit planning, and bicycle and pedestrian infrastructure. In this paper, we review cultural, political, and economic issues that influence overweight, obesity, and inactivity in China. We examine key urban planning features and policies that shape urban environments that may compromise physical activity as part of everyday life, including walking and bicycling. We review the empirical research to identify planning and design strategies that support physical activity in other high-density cities in developing and developed countries. Finally, we identify successful strategies to increase physical activity in another growing, high-density city - New York City - to suggest strategies that may have relevance for rapidly urbanizing Chinese cities.

  6. Mycobacteriocins produced by rapidly growing mycobacteria are Tween-hydrolyzing esterases.

    PubMed Central

    Saito, H; Tomioka, H; Watanabe, T; Yoneyama, T

    1983-01-01

    Smegmatocin, a protein produced by Mycobacterium smegmatis ATCC 14468, was found to have an esterase activity, hydrolyzing Tween 80, polyoxyethylene sorbitan monooleate, added to the assay medium for various "bacteriocins" from mycobacteria. Because M. diernhoferi ATCC 19340 (indicator strain for smegmatocin) is highly susceptible to oleic acid and smegmatocin requires Tween 80 for manifestation of its anti-M. diernhoferi activity, it is likely that smegmatocin-mediated antimicrobial action is caused by oleic acid generated by hydrolysis of Tween 80 by the inherent esterase action of smegmatocin. Other mycobacteriocins from rapidly growing mycobacteria also have inherent esterase activity against Tween 80 and require Tween 80 for expression of antimycobacterial action. Smegmatocin was found to hydrolyze various polyoxyethylene (sorbitan) fatty acyl esters but not sorbitan monooleate and glyceryl esters. Images PMID:6826523

  7. In vitro susceptibilities of rapidly growing mycobacteria to newer antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed Central

    Khardori, N; Nguyen, H; Rosenbaum, B; Rolston, K; Bodey, G P

    1994-01-01

    The in vitro antimicrobial susceptibilities of 42 isolates of rapidly growing mycobacteria (Mycobacterium fortuitum, M. chelonae, and Mycobacterium species [other than M. fortuitum and M. chelonae]) to nine quinolones, including newer agents, two new aminoglycosides, and an aminocyclitol (trospectomycin) were determined by a broth microdilution method. The new quinolones, PD 117596, PD 127391, and PD 117558, showed excellent in vitro activities against M. fortuitum (MICs for 90% of isolates [MIC90s], 0.06, 0.06, and 0.12 microgram/ml, respectively). The MIC90 of ciprofloxacin for M. fortuitum was 0.5 microgram/ml. Only 14 to 28% of isolates of M. chelonae were susceptible to various quinolones. Most isolates of all three species were susceptible to the new aminoglycosides SCH 21420 and SCH 22591. The MIC90s of trospectomycin were 8 micrograms/ml for M. chelonae, 32 micrograms/ml for Mycobacterium species, and > 64 micrograms/ml for M. fortuitum. PMID:8141567

  8. Rapid urbanization and the growing threat of violence and conflict: a 21st century crisis.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ronak B; Burkle, Frederick M

    2012-04-01

    As the global population is concentrated into complex environments, rapid urbanization increases the threat of conflict and insecurity. Many fast-growing cities create conditions of significant disparities in standards of living, which set up a natural environment for conflict over resources. As urban slums become a haven for criminal elements, youth gangs, and the arms trade, they also create insecurity for much of the population. Specific populations, such as women, migrants, and refugees, bear the brunt of this lack of security, with significant impacts on their livelihoods, health, and access to basic services. This lack of security and violence also has great costs to the general population, both economic and social. Cities have increasingly become the battlefield of recent conflicts as they serve as the seats of power and gateways to resources. International agencies, non-governmental organizations, and policy-makers must act to stem this tide of growing urban insecurity. Protecting urban populations and preventing future conflict will require better urban planning, investment in livelihood programs for youth, cooperation with local communities, enhanced policing, and strengthening the capacity of judicial systems.

  9. Mycobacterial contamination of metalworking fluids: involvement of a possible new taxon of rapidly growing mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Moore, J S; Christensen, M; Wilson, R W; Wallace, R J; Zhang, Y; Nash, D R; Shelton, B

    2000-01-01

    Contamination of air and metalworking fluid (MWF) systems with a rapidly growing mycobacterium (RGM) was detected in 1995 in a single manufacturing plant with recent cases of hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP). Extensive environmental sampling was performed to determine the extent of the contamination and its variability over time. RGM were present in multiple indoor air samples, 100% of the central MWF storage tanks, and 75% of the freestanding cutting, drilling, and grinding machines. With one exception, contamination was limited to a recently introduced formulation (brand) of semisynthetic MWF used in 95% of the facility's machining operations. In general, the mycobacterial counts were stable over time, with the degree of contamination ranging from 10(2)-10(7) colony forming units (CFU)/mL. A few systems were culture positive for the mycobacterium (> 10(1) CFU/mL), changed to culture negative (< 10(1) CFU/mL), then changed back to culture positive without explanation. Samples obtained from diluted (5%) but unused MWF, a replenishment line with 2% unused MWF, an MWF pasteurizer, city water, and deionized water were culture negative for this species of mycobacterium. Inoculation and growth studies demonstrated that this mycobacterium does not grow in liquid samples of 5% unused MWF. By molecular techniques, the mycobacterial isolates consisted of a single strain and represented a previously undescribed taxon closely related to Mycobacterium chelonae/abscessus. The relationship of this mycobacterium to the cases of HP is unknown.

  10. Rapidly growing tropical trees mobilize remarkable amounts of nitrogen, in ways that differ surprisingly among species.

    PubMed

    Russell, Ann E; Raich, James W

    2012-06-26

    Fast-growing forests such as tropical secondary forests can accumulate large amounts of carbon (C), and thereby play an important role in the atmospheric CO(2) balance. Because nitrogen (N) cycling is inextricably linked with C cycling, the question becomes: Where does the N come from to match high rates of C accumulation? In unique experimental 16-y-old plantations established in abandoned pasture in lowland Costa Rica, we used a mass-balance approach to quantify N accumulation in vegetation, identify sources of N, and evaluate differences among tree species in N cycling. The replicated design contained four broad-leaved evergreen tree species growing under similar environmental conditions. Nitrogen uptake was rapid, reaching 409 (± 30) kg · ha(-1) · y(-1), double the rate reported from a Puerto Rican forest and greater than four times that observed at Hubbard Brook Forest (New Hampshire, USA). Nitrogen amassed in vegetation was 874 (± 176) kg · ha(-1), whereas net losses of soil N (0-100 cm) varied from 217 (±146) to 3,354 (± 915) kg · ha(-1) (P = 0.018) over 16 y. Soil C:N, δ(13)C values, and N budgets indicated that soil was the main source of biomass N. In Vochysia guatemalensis, however, N fixation contributed >60 kg · ha(-1) · y(-1). All species apparently promoted soil N turnover, such that the soil N mean residence time was 32-54 y, an order of magnitude lower than the global mean. High rates of N uptake were associated with substantial N losses in three of the species, in which an average of 1.6 g N was lost for every gram of N accumulated in biomass.

  11. Mushroom growing project at the Los Humeros, Mexico geothermal field

    SciTech Connect

    Rangel, M.E.R.

    1998-12-01

    There are several projects of direct (non-electrical) use of geothermal energy in Mexico. Personnel of the Comision Federal de Electricidad (CFE) have experience in various of these projects, like drying of timber and fruits, space heating, food processing, etc. Taking this in consideration, CFE built the Los Humeros mushroom plant using for heat source the geothermal steam from Well H-1. The main purpose of the project was to take advantage of residual geothermal energy in a food production operation and to develop the appropriate technology. In 1992, existing installations were renovated, preparing appropriate areas for pasteurization, inoculation and production. The mushroom Pleurotus ostreatus var. florida and columbinus was used. A year later, CFE proposed the construction of improved facilities for growing edible mushrooms. New materials and equipment, as well as different operation conditions, were proposed on the basis of the experience gained in the initial project. The construction and renovation activities were completed in 1994.

  12. An Automated System for Rapid Non-Destructive Enumeration of Growing Microbes

    PubMed Central

    London, Roanna; Schwedock, Julie; Sage, Andrew; Valley, Heather; Meadows, Jamie; Waddington, Michael; Straus, Don

    2010-01-01

    Background The power and simplicity of visual colony counting have made it the mainstay of microbiological analysis for more than 130 years. A disadvantage of the method is the long time required to generate visible colonies from cells in a sample. New rapid testing technologies generally have failed to maintain one or more of the major advantages of culture-based methods. Principal Findings We present a new technology and platform that uses digital imaging of cellular autofluorescence to detect and enumerate growing microcolonies many generations before they become visible to the eye. The data presented demonstrate that the method preserves the viability of the microcolonies it detects, thus enabling generation of pure cultures for microbial identification. While visual colony counting detects Escherichia coli colonies containing about 5×106 cells, the new imaging method detects E. coli microcolonies when they contain about 120 cells and microcolonies of the yeast Candida albicans when they contain only about 12 cells. We demonstrate that digital imaging of microcolony autofluorescence detects a broad spectrum of prokaryotic and eukaryotic microbes and present a model for predicting the time to detection for individual strains. Results from the analysis of environmental samples from pharmaceutical manufacturing plants containing a mixture of unidentified microbes demonstrate the method's improved test turnaround times. Conclusion This work demonstrates a new technology and automated platform that substantially shortens test times while maintaining key advantages of the current methods. PMID:20062794

  13. Clinical and Taxonomic Status of Pathogenic Nonpigmented or Late-Pigmenting Rapidly Growing Mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Brown-Elliott, Barbara A.; Wallace, Richard J.

    2002-01-01

    The history, taxonomy, geographic distribution, clinical disease, and therapy of the pathogenic nonpigmented or late-pigmenting rapidly growing mycobacteria (RGM) are reviewed. Community-acquired disease and health care-associated disease are highlighted for each species. The latter grouping includes health care-associated outbreaks and pseudo-outbreaks as well as sporadic disease cases. Treatment recommendations for each species and type of disease are also described. Special emphasis is on the Mycobacterium fortuitum group, including M. fortuitum, M. peregrinum, and the unnamed third biovariant complex with its recent taxonomic changes and newly recognized species (including M. septicum, M. mageritense, and proposed species M. houstonense and M. bonickei). The clinical and taxonomic status of M. chelonae, M. abscessus, and M. mucogenicum is also detailed, along with that of the closely related new species, M. immunogenum. Additionally, newly recognized species, M. wolinskyi and M. goodii, as well as M. smegmatis sensu stricto, are included in a discussion of the M. smegmatis group. Laboratory diagnosis of RGM using phenotypic methods such as biochemical testing and high-performance liquid chromatography and molecular methods of diagnosis are also discussed. The latter includes PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis, hybridization, ribotyping, and sequence analysis. Susceptibility testing and antibiotic susceptibility patterns of the RGM are also annotated, along with the current recommendations from the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (NCCLS) for mycobacterial susceptibility testing. PMID:12364376

  14. A Rapidly Growing Instability in the Wake of Airfoils with Multiple Trailing Vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, Jason; Savas, Omer

    2000-11-01

    Dye flow visualization and two-dimensional PIV measurements are performed in the wakes of airfoils with multiple trailing vortices. The circulation-based Reynolds number of the vortices is of order 100,000. From the flow visualization data, an instability is observed to develop in the wake within 25 spans downstream of the airfoil. At approximately 50 spans, the instability becomes highly non-linear and three-dimensional, which, for some run parameters, results in an exchange of vorticity from opposite sides of the wake. By 200 spans, the dye is completely dispersed from the vortices and no coherent structures are visible in the wake. The PIV data indicate that the wake's "two-dimensional" kinetic energy decreases by a half at the onset of the non-linear behavior. By 200 spans, the "two-dimensional" kinetic energy is a fraction of its initial value. Further quantitative analyses demonstrate that at 200 spans, the resulting vortex core radius is on average 20of the individual vortices. The results of this study indicate that this rapidly growing instability has the potential for being a solution to the wake hazard problem

  15. History of Reading: Status and Sources of a Growing Field.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cranney, A. Garr; Miller, Janet

    Recent developments in the field of reading indicate that a number of reading educators recognize the importance of studying the history of reading as a part of the knowledge base of reading education. A questionnaire was mailed to all coordinators of United States and Canadian programs listed in the International Reading Association's…

  16. Mercuric reductase activity and evidence of broad-spectrum mercury resistance among clinical isolates of rapidly growing mycobacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Steingrube, V.A.; Wallace, R.J. Jr.; Steele, L.C.; Pang, Y.J. )

    1991-05-01

    Resistance to mercury was evaluated in 356 rapidly growing mycobacteria belonging to eight taxonomic groups. Resistance to inorganic Hg2+ ranged from 0% among the unnamed third biovariant complex of Mycobacterium fortuitum to 83% among M. chelonae-like organisms. With cell extracts and 203Hg(NO3)2 as the substrate, mercuric reductase (HgRe) activity was demonstrable in six of eight taxonomic groups. HgRe activity was inducible and required NADPH or NADH and a thiol donor for optimai activity. Species with HgRe activity were also resistant to organomercurial compounds, including phenylmercuric acetate. Attempts at intraspecies and intragenus transfer of HgRe activity by conjugation or transformation were unsuccessful. Mercury resistance is common in rapidly growing mycobacteria and appears to function via the same inducible enzyme systems already defined in other bacterial species. This system offers potential as a strain marker for epidemiologic investigations and for studying genetic systems in rapidly growing mycobacteria.

  17. Rapidly growing Brtl/+ mouse model of osteogenesis imperfecta improves bone mass and strength with sclerostin antibody treatment.

    PubMed

    Sinder, Benjamin P; Salemi, Joseph D; Ominsky, Michael S; Caird, Michelle S; Marini, Joan C; Kozloff, Kenneth M

    2015-02-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a heritable collagen-related bone dysplasia, characterized by brittle bones with increased fracture risk that presents most severely in children. Anti-resorptive bisphosphonates are frequently used to treat pediatric OI and controlled clinical trials have shown that bisphosphonate therapy improves vertebral outcomes but has little benefit on long bone fracture rate. New treatments which increase bone mass throughout the pediatric OI skeleton would be beneficial. Sclerostin antibody (Scl-Ab) is a potential candidate anabolic therapy for pediatric OI and functions by stimulating osteoblastic bone formation via the canonical Wnt signaling pathway. To explore the effect of Scl-Ab on the rapidly growing OI skeleton, we treated rapidly growing 3week old Brtl/+ mice, harboring a typical heterozygous OI-causing Gly→Cys substitution on col1a1, for 5weeks with Scl-Ab. Scl-Ab had anabolic effects in Brtl/+ and led to new cortical bone formation and increased cortical bone mass. This anabolic action resulted in improved mechanical strength to WT Veh levels without altering the underlying brittle nature of the material. While Scl-Ab was anabolic in trabecular bone of the distal femur in both genotypes, the effect was less strong in these rapidly growing Brtl/+ mice compared to WT. In conclusion, Scl-Ab was able to stimulate bone formation in a rapidly growing Brtl/+ murine model of OI, and represents a potential new therapy to improve bone mass and reduce fracture risk in pediatric OI.

  18. Management of a rapidly growing peritoneal dialysis population at the First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xueqing; Yang, Xiao; Huang, Naya

    2014-06-01

    Managing a rapidly growing peritoneal dialysis program with more than 1000 patients involves multiple challenges, labor constraints, logistics, and excessive geographic distance. This paper describes how Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, China, manages those issues, while simultaneously improving quality of the care and, subsequently, clinical outcomes.

  19. Rapidly Growing Brtl/+ Mouse Model of Osteogenesis Imperfecta Improves Bone Mass and Strength with Sclerostin Antibody Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Sinder, Benjamin P.; Salemi, Joseph D.; Ominsky, Michael S.; Caird, Michelle S.; Marini, Joan C.; Kozloff, Kenneth M.

    2014-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a heritable collagen-related bone dysplasia, characterized by brittle bones with increased fracture risk that presents most severely in children. Anti-resorptive bisphosphonates are frequently used to treat pediatric OI and controlled clinical trials have shown bisphosphonate therapy improves vertebral outcomes but has little benefit on long bone fracture rate. New treatments which increase bone mass throughout the pediatric OI skeleton would be beneficial. Sclerostin antibody (Scl-Ab) is a potential candidate anabolic therapy for pediatric OI and functions by stimulating osteoblastic bone formation via the canonical wnt signaling pathway. To explore the effect of Scl-Ab on the rapidly growing OI skeleton, we treated rapidly growing 3 week old Brtl/+ mice, harboring a typical heterozygous OI-causing Gly->Cys substitution on col1a1, for 5 weeks with Scl-Ab. Scl-Ab had anabolic effects in Brtl/+ and led to new cortical bone formation and increased cortical bone mass. This anabolic action resulted in improved mechanical strength to WT Veh levels without altering the underlying brittle nature of the material. While Scl-Ab was anabolic in trabecular bone of the distal femur in both genotypes, the effect was less strong in these rapidly growing Brtl/+ mice compared to WT. In conclusion, Scl-Ab was able to stimulate bone formation in a rapidly growing Brtl/+ murine model of OI, and represents a potential new therapy to improve bone mass and reduce fracture risk in pediatric OI. PMID:25445450

  20. Effect of diet composition on pregnancy outcome in overnourished rapidly growing adolescent sheep.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Jacqueline M; Milne, John S; Redmer, Dale A; Aitken, Raymond P

    2006-12-01

    of exposure to high protein intakes. The data imply that it is high-energy intakes that are the primary cause of impaired placental development and adverse pregnancy outcome in rapidly growing adolescent sheep.

  1. Composite Tissue Transplantation: A Rapidly Advancing Field

    PubMed Central

    Ravindra, K.V.; Wu, S.; Bozulic, L.; Xu, H.; Breidenbach, W.C.; Ildstad, S.T.

    2008-01-01

    Composite tissue allotransplantation (CTA) is emerging as a potential treatment for complex tissue defects. It is currently being performed with increasing frequency in the clinic. The feasibility of the procedure has been confirmed through 30 hand transplantation, 3 facial reconstructions, and vascularized knee, esophageal, and tracheal allografts. A major drawback for CTA is the requirement for lifelong immunosuppression. The toxicity of these agents has limited the widespread application of CTA. Methods to reduce or eliminate the requirement for immunosuppression and promote CTA acceptance would represent a significant step forward in the field. Multiple studies suggest that mixed chimerism established by bone marrow transplantation promotes tolerance resulting in allograft acceptance. This overview focuses on the history and the exponentially expanding applications of the new frontier in CTA transplantation: immunology associated with CTA; preclinical animal models of CTA; clinical experience with CTA; and advances in mixed chimerism–induced tolerance in CTA. Additionally, some important hurdles that must be overcome in using bone marrow chimerism to induce tolerance to CTA are also discussed. PMID:18589081

  2. Multistate US Outbreak of Rapidly Growing Mycobacterial Infections Associated with Medical Tourism to the Dominican Republic, 2013-2014(1).

    PubMed

    Schnabel, David; Esposito, Douglas H; Gaines, Joanna; Ridpath, Alison; Barry, M Anita; Feldman, Katherine A; Mullins, Jocelyn; Burns, Rachel; Ahmad, Nina; Nyangoma, Edith N; Nguyen, Duc B; Perz, Joseph F; Moulton-Meissner, Heather A; Jensen, Bette J; Lin, Ying; Posivak-Khouly, Leah; Jani, Nisha; Morgan, Oliver W; Brunette, Gary W; Pritchard, P Scott; Greenbaum, Adena H; Rhee, Susan M; Blythe, David; Sotir, Mark

    2016-08-01

    During 2013, the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene in Baltimore, MD, USA, received report of 2 Maryland residents whose surgical sites were infected with rapidly growing mycobacteria after cosmetic procedures at a clinic (clinic A) in the Dominican Republic. A multistate investigation was initiated; a probable case was defined as a surgical site infection unresponsive to therapy in a patient who had undergone cosmetic surgery in the Dominican Republic. We identified 21 case-patients in 6 states who had surgery in 1 of 5 Dominican Republic clinics; 13 (62%) had surgery at clinic A. Isolates from 12 (92%) of those patients were culture-positive for Mycobacterium abscessus complex. Of 9 clinic A case-patients with available data, all required therapeutic surgical intervention, 8 (92%) were hospitalized, and 7 (78%) required ≥3 months of antibacterial drug therapy. Healthcare providers should consider infection with rapidly growing mycobacteria in patients who have surgical site infections unresponsive to standard treatment.

  3. Cellular Midpalatal Suture Changes after Rapid Maxillary Expansion in Growing Subjects: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Caprioglio, Alberto; Fastuca, Rosamaria; Zecca, Piero Antonio; Beretta, Matteo; Mangano, Carlo; Piattelli, Adriano; Macchi, Aldo; Iezzi, Giovanna

    2017-01-01

    The present case report aimed to investigate immediate histologic changes in midpalatal suture in humans following rapid maxillary expansion compared to control. Three patients (mean age 8.3 ± 0.9 years) were enrolled in the case report and underwent midpalatal suture biopsy. Two patients underwent treatment before biopsy. The third patient did not show transversal maxillary deficiency and was enrolled as a control. Biopsy samples of midpalatal suture at 7 (subject 1) and 30 days (subject 2) after maxillary expansion as well as of one control (subject 3) were collected and processed for histology. In the control (subject 3) inter-digitations at the palatal suture gap were observed. At 7 days (subject 1) mature bone with small marrow spaces and trabecular bone with the peculiar storiform appearance inside the soft tissue and collagen fibers running parallel only in the central part were present. At 30 days (subject 2), a greater number of newly-formed bone trabeculae with a perpendicular orientation to the long axis of the suture could be seen. At 30 days the fibrous component of bone tissue was less represented compared to the sample at 7 days. Data from the preliminary histological results showed that bone formation was observed in the gap after rapid maxillary expansion, although the healing process was still ongoing. PMID:28287481

  4. Rapidly growing complex fibroadenoma with surrounding ductal hyperplasia mimics breast malignancy on serial F-18 FDG PET/CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Makis, William; Ciarallo, Anthony; Hickeson, Marc; Derbekyan, Vilma

    2011-07-01

    A 30-year-old woman was referred for an F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET/CT to rule out lymphoma, and was found to have an incidental FDG-avid right breast nodule that grew significantly in size and FDG uptake on a subsequent scan, raising suspicion of a growing breast malignancy. Histologic evaluation showed a complex fibroadenoma with adenosis and surrounding ductal hyperplasia. Although variable F-18 FDG uptake in fibroadenomas has been described, a distinction between simple and complex fibroadenomas has not been made in the PET literature, even though complex fibroadenomas have a higher propensity to develop into malignancies. This case shows that a rapidly growing complex fibroadenoma can mimic a breast malignancy on serial F-18 FDG PET/CT scans, showing significant increase in both size and FDG-avidity on follow-up studies.

  5. Environmental Field Surveys, EMF Rapid Program, Engineering Project No.3

    SciTech Connect

    Enertech Consultants

    1996-04-01

    The EMF Research and Public Information Dissemination Program (RAPID) includes several engineering research in the area of exposure assessment and source characterization. RAPID engineering project No. 3: ''Environmental Field Surveys'' was performed to obtain information on the levels and characteristics of different environments, for which only limited data were available, especially in comparison to magnetic field data for the residential environment and for electric utility facilities, such as power lines and substations. This project was also to provide information on the contribution of various field sources in the surveyed environments. Magnetic field surveys were performed at four sites for each of five environments: schools, hospitals, office buildings, machine shops, and grocery stores. Of the twenty sites surveyed, 11 were located in the San Francisco Bay Area and 9 in Massachusetts. The surveys used a protocol based on magnetic field measurements and observation of activity patterns, designed to provide estimates of magnetic field exposure by type of people and by type of sources. The magnetic field surveys conducted by this project produced a large amount of data which will form a part of the EMF measurement database Field and exposure data were obtained separately for ''area exposure'' and ''at exposure points''. An exposure point is a location where persons engage in fixed, site specific activities near a local source that creates a significant increase in the area field. The area field is produced by ''area sources'', whose location and field distribution is in general not related to the location of the people in the area.

  6. Growing Indian Fig Opuntia on selenium-laden agriculture drainage sediment under field conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Growing alternative crops for saline and selenium (Se) impacted lands in arid regions, e.g., Western United States, depends upon the plant’s ability to tolerate the presence of high salts and boron (B). In this field study, we planted 2-month old cacti plants on 30 x 1m beds and evaluated the abilit...

  7. Social Adjustment among Students Growing up in Foreign Mission-Field Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Firmin, Michael; Warner, Susan; Lowe, Amybeth

    2006-01-01

    This study utilized a qualitative research method with a sample of 24 students at a private evangelical Christian university in the midwest. The students' developmental years had been spent growing up in mission foreign-field contexts as missionary kids (MKs). In-depth interviews were conducted and transcribed, with coding and theme analysis…

  8. Characteristics of growing media mixes and application for open-field production of strawberry (Fragaria ananassa)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pathogen-free growing media are widely used for strawberry production in protected structures in Europe but not common in the United States. There is a need to investigate the feasibility of producing strawberry fruits in open fields with the pathogen-free media in the U.S. The objective of the stud...

  9. Rapid growing clay coatings to reduce the fire threat of furniture.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yeon Seok; Li, Yu-Chin; Pitts, William M; Werrel, Martin; Davis, Rick D

    2014-02-12

    Layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly coatings reduce the flammability of textiles and polyurethane foam but require extensive repetitive processing steps to produce the desired coating thickness and nanoparticle fire retardant content that translates into a fire retardant coating. Reported here is a new hybrid bi-layer (BL) approach to fabricate fire retardant coatings on polyurethane foam. Utilizing hydrogen bonding and electrostatic attraction along with the pH adjustment, a fast growing coating with significant fire retardant clay content was achieved. This hybrid BL coating exhibits significant fire performance improvement in both bench scale and real scale tests. Cone calorimetry bench scale tests show a 42% and 71% reduction in peak and average heat release rates, respectively. Real scale furniture mockups constructed using the hybrid LbL coating reduced the peak and average heat release rates by 53% and 63%, respectively. This is the first time that the fire safety in a real scale test has been reported for any LbL technology. This hybrid LbL coating is the fastest approach to develop an effective fire retardant coating for polyurethane foam.

  10. Relative in vitro growth rates of duckweeds (Lemnaceae) - the most rapidly growing higher plants.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, P; Adelmann, K; Zimmer, S; Schmidt, C; Appenroth, K-J

    2015-01-01

    Relative growth rates (RGR), doubling times (DT) and relative weekly yields (RY) of 39 clones (ecotypes) from 13 species representing all five genera of duckweeds were determined under standardised cultivation conditions. RGR ranged overall from 0.153 to 0.519 day(-1) , DT from 1.34 to 4.54 days and RY from 2.9 to 37.8 week(-1) . The RGR and RY data can be compared directly to other published findings to only a limited extent on account of missing clonal designations for and limited accessibility to previously investigated clones, as well as the use of different data denominators. However, they are consistent with the published results of other comparative duckweed studies of similar scope in showing that RGR does not vary primarily at the level of the genus or species, but rather reflects the adaptation of individual clones to specific local conditions. The RGR data support the widely held assumption that duckweeds can grow faster than other higher plants and that they can thus surpass land-based agricultural crops in productivity. Duckweeds are highly promising for the production of biomass for nutrition and energy, but extensive clonal comparison will be required to identify the most suitable isolates for this purpose.

  11. Rapid Proton Transfer Mediated by a Strong Laser Field

    SciTech Connect

    Markevitch, Alexei N.; Levis, Robert J.; Romanov, Dmitri A.; Smith, Stanley M.

    2006-04-28

    Kinetic energy distributions of H{sup +} ejected from a polyatomic molecule, anthraquinone, subjected to 60 fs, 800 nm laser pulses of intensity between 0.2 and 4.0x10{sup 14} W{center_dot}cm{sup -2}, reveal field-driven restructuring of the molecule prior to Coulomb explosion. Calculations demonstrate fast intramolecular proton migration into a field-dressed metastable potential energy minimum. The proton migration occurs in the direction perpendicular to the polarization of the laser field. Rapid field-mediated isomerization is an important new phenomenon in coupling of polyatomic molecules with intense lasers.

  12. Method and apparatus for rapidly growing films on substrates using pulsed supersonic jets

    DOEpatents

    Eres, Diula; Lowndes, Douglas H.

    1992-01-01

    A method and apparatus for the rapid and economical deposition of uniform and high quality films upon a substrate for subsequent use in producing electronic devices, for example. The resultant films are either epitaxial (crystalline) or amorphous depending upon the incidence rate and the temperature and structure of the substrate. The deposition is carried out in a chamber maintained at about 10.sup.-6 Torr. A gaseous source of the material for forming the deposit is injected into the deposition chamber in the form of a pulsed supersonic jet so as to obtain a high incidence rate. The supersonic jet is produced by a pulsed valve between a relatively high presure reservoir, containing the source gaseous molecules, and the deposition chamber; the valve has a small nozzle orifice (e.g., 0.1-1.0 mm diameter). The type of deposit (crystalline amorphous) is then dependent upon the temperature and structure of the substrate. Very high deposition rates are achieved, and the deposit is very smooth and of uniform thickness. Typically the deposition rate is about 100 times that of much more expensive conventional molecular beam methods for deposition, and comparable to certain expensive plasma-assisted CVD methods of the art. The high growth rate of this method results in a reduced contamination of the deposit from other elements in the environment. The method is illustrated by the deposition of epitaxial and amorphour germanium films upon GaAs substrates.

  13. A rapidly growing moraine-dammed glacial lake on Ngozumpa Glacier, Nepal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Sarah S.; Benn, Douglas I.; Dennis, Kathryn; Luckman, Adrian

    2012-04-01

    Moraine-dammed glacial lakes are becoming increasingly common in the Himalaya as a result of glacier mass loss, causing concern about glacier lake outburst flood risk. In addition to extant lakes, the potential exists for many more to form, as more glaciers ablate down to the level of potential moraine dams. In this paper, we document the recent rapid growth of, a moraine-dammed lake on Ngozumpa Glacier, Nepal. Using a combination of ground-based mapping and sonar surveys, aerial photographs (< 1 m resolution), and ASTER imagery (15 m resolution), processes and rates of lake expansion have been determined. The lake first formed between 1984 and 1992 when collapse of an englacial conduit allowed water to accumulate at the level of a gap in the lateral moraine, ~km from the glacier terminus. Lake growth was initially slow, but since 2001 it has undergone exponential growth at an average rate of 10% y-1. In 2009, the lake area was 300,000 m2, and its volume was at least 2.2 million m3. Calving, subaqueous melting, and melting of subaerial ice faces all contribute to the expansion of the lake; but large-scale, full-height slab calving is now the dominant contributor to growth. Comparison with other lakes in the region indicate that lake growth will likely continue unchecked whilst the spillway remains at its current level and may attain a volume of hundreds of millions of cubic metres within the next few decades.

  14. Multistate US Outbreak of Rapidly Growing Mycobacterial Infections Associated with Medical Tourism to the Dominican Republic, 2013–20141

    PubMed Central

    Esposito, Douglas H.; Gaines, Joanna; Ridpath, Alison; Barry, M. Anita; Feldman, Katherine A.; Mullins, Jocelyn; Burns, Rachel; Ahmad, Nina; Nyangoma, Edith N.; Nguyen, Duc B.; Perz, Joseph F.; Moulton-Meissner, Heather A.; Jensen, Bette J.; Lin, Ying; Posivak-Khouly, Leah; Jani, Nisha; Morgan, Oliver W.; Brunette, Gary W.; Pritchard, P. Scott; Greenbaum, Adena H.; Rhee, Susan M.; Blythe, David; Sotir, Mark

    2016-01-01

    During 2013, the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene in Baltimore, MD, USA, received report of 2 Maryland residents whose surgical sites were infected with rapidly growing mycobacteria after cosmetic procedures at a clinic (clinic A) in the Dominican Republic. A multistate investigation was initiated; a probable case was defined as a surgical site infection unresponsive to therapy in a patient who had undergone cosmetic surgery in the Dominican Republic. We identified 21 case-patients in 6 states who had surgery in 1 of 5 Dominican Republic clinics; 13 (62%) had surgery at clinic A. Isolates from 12 (92%) of those patients were culture-positive for Mycobacterium abscessus complex. Of 9 clinic A case-patients with available data, all required therapeutic surgical intervention, 8 (92%) were hospitalized, and 7 (78%) required ≥3 months of antibacterial drug therapy. Healthcare providers should consider infection with rapidly growing mycobacteria in patients who have surgical site infections unresponsive to standard treatment. PMID:27434822

  15. Prosthetic joint infections secondary to rapidly growing mycobacteria: Two case reports and a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Henry, Michael W; Miller, Andy O; Kahn, Barbara; Windsor, Russel E; Brause, Barry D

    2016-01-01

    Rapidly growing mycobacteria (RGM) are a rare but treatable cause of prosthetic joint infections. This study reports on two patients comprising three prosthetic joint infections caused by RGM successfully treated at the institution. With removal of the infected prosthetic joint and judicious use of prolonged courses of antibiotics, patients with prosthetic joint infections secondary to RGM can both be cured and retain function of the affected joint. In addition, this study identified 40 additional cases reported during an extensive review of the literature and provide a summary of these cases. These infections can present within days of arthroplasty or can develop only decades after the index surgery. The clinical presentations often mimic those of more routine bacterial prosthetic joint infections.

  16. Rapidly changing climatic conditions for wine grape growing in the Okanagan Valley region of British Columbia, Canada.

    PubMed

    Rayne, Sierra; Forest, Kaya

    2016-06-15

    A statistical analysis was conducted on long-term climate records for sites bordering Okanagan Lake in the Okanagan Valley viticultural region of British Columbia, Canada. Average wine grape growing season temperatures are increasing rapidly in the area over the post-1980 period at rates upwards of 7.0±1.3°C/century. Similar increases in the average dormant season temperature are evident. These temperature changes are likely some of the most extreme observed among the world's wine producing areas during the past few decades. Growing degree day base 10°C (GDD10) has increased by nearly 50% at some locations since the 1970s, resulting in major impacts on the corresponding climate classification for viticulture. If current climate trends continue, the southern and central portions of the region will likely enter Winkler region II within the next few decades, placing them in the same category as well-established warmer wine regions from France, Spain, Italy, and Australia. The large dormant season temperature increases over the last several decades have resulted in the area no longer being a cold season outlier when compared to most other cool-climate viticultural areas. Based on average growing season temperatures, the southern end of Okanagan Lake has moved out of the cool-climate viticultural classification and into the intermediate zone, while the central and northern regions are now at the cool/intermediate viticulture interface, similar to the historical positions of the Rhine Valley in Germany, northern Oregon in the United States, and the Loire Valley, Burgundy-Cote, Burgundy-Beaujolais, and Champagne appelations of France. The corresponding suitable grape species for the area have evolved into warmer region varietals during this time frame, having substantial economic impacts on producers. Increased temperatures are also expected to bring greater threats from agricultural pests, notably Pierce's disease from the bacterium Xylella fastidiosa.

  17. Magnetometeorology: Relationships between the weather and the earth's magnetic field. [solar cycle effects on length of growing season

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, J. W.; Willis, D. M.

    1974-01-01

    A comparison of meteorological pressures and the strength of the earth's magnetic field suggests that the magnetic field exerts, through some unknown process, a controlling influence on the average pressure in the troposphere at high latitudes. Changes in the length of the growing season are related to the solar cycle effects on the geomagnetic field. On average, the growing season is about 25 days longer near sunspot maximum than near sunspot minimum. Comparison of growing season and solar data reveals the geophysically interesting fact that the growing season tends to be the longest about a year after sunspot maximum.

  18. Rapid infectious disease screening for field medical emergencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Winston; Rao, Srivasta V.; Low, Peter W.; Hess, John R.

    2000-08-01

    Current blood tests cannot provide rapid support for field medical emergencies that require blood in excess of the tested supply, especially, when additional blood needs to be drawn from the available walking pool. A fluorescence-based rapid infectious disease screening system, based on a disposable disk with an array of wash-free, one-step, membrane strips and an array of optical probes can be used to quantify a panel of transmissible diseases in parallel with high specificity, high sensitivity, and operational simplicity. We have designed and constructed a sandwich membrane assay platform and a laboratory prototype optoelectronic measuring device and used this combined system to quantify hepatitis C antibody over the concentration range of 2 ng/ml to 100 ng/ml in 3 to 5 minutes.

  19. Rapid change of field line connectivity and reconnection in stochastic magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Yi-Min; Bhattacharjee, A.; Boozer, Allen H.

    2014-10-01

    Magnetic fields without a direction of continuous symmetry have the generic feature that neighboring field lines exponentiate away from each other and become stochastic, and hence the ideal constraint of preserving magnetic field line connectivity becomes exponentially sensitive to small deviations from ideal Ohm's law. The idea of breaking field line connectivity by stochasticity as a mechanism for fast reconnection is tested with numerical simulations based on reduced magnetohydrodynamics equations with a strong guide field line-tied to two perfectly conducting end plates. Starting from an ideally stable force-free equilibrium, the system is allowed to undergo resistive relaxation. Two distinct phases are found in the process of resistive relaxation. During the quasi-static phase, rapid change of field line connectivity and strong induced flow are found in regions of high field line exponentiation. However, although the field line connectivity of individual field lines can change rapidly, the overall pattern of field line mapping appears to deform gradually. From this perspective, field line exponentiation appears to cause enhanced diffusion rather than reconnection. In some cases, resistive quasi-static evolution can cause the ideally stable initial equilibrium to cross a stability threshold, leading to formation of intense current filaments and rapid change of field line mapping into a qualitatively different pattern. It is in this onset phase that the change of field line connectivity is more appropriately designated as magnetic reconnection. Our results show that rapid change of field line connectivity appears to be a necessary, but not a sufficient condition for fast reconnection.

  20. Field test of the Rapid Transuranic Monitoring Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    McIsaac, C.V.; Sill, C.W.; Gehrke, R.J.; Killian, E.W.; Watts, K.D.; Amaro, C.R.

    1993-12-01

    A field test of the Rapid Transuranic Monitoring Laboratory (RTML) developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) was conducted as part of a demonstration sponsored by the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID). The RTML is a mobile, field- deployable laboratory developed for use at buried radioactive waste remediation sites to allow onsite preparation and analysis of soil, smear, and air filter samples for alpha and gamma-emitting contaminants. Analytical instruments installed in the RTML include an extended range, germanium photon analysis spectrometer with an automatic sample changer, two large-area ionization chamber alpha spectrometers, and four alpha continuous air monitors. The performance of the RTML was tested at the Test Reactor Area and Cold Test Pit near the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the INEL. Objectives, experimental procedures, and an evaluation of the performance of the RTML are presented.

  1. Miniaturized extinction culturing is the preferred strategy for rapid isolation of fast-growing methane-oxidizing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Hoefman, Sven; van der Ha, David; De Vos, Paul; Boon, Nico; Heylen, Kim

    2012-05-01

    Methane-oxidizing bacteria (MOB) have a large potential as a microbial sink for the greenhouse gas methane as well as for biotechnological purposes. However, their application in biotechnology has so far been hampered, in part due to the relative slow growth rate of the available strains. To enable the availability of novel strains, this study compares the isolation of MOB by conventional dilution plating with miniaturized extinction culturing, both performed after an initial enrichment step. The extinction approach rendered 22 MOB isolates from four environmental samples, while no MOB could be isolated by plating. In most cases, extinction culturing immediately yielded MOB monocultures making laborious purification redundant. Both type I (Methylomonas spp.) and type II (Methylosinus sp.) MOB were isolated. The isolated methanotrophic diversity represented at least 11 different strains and several novel species based on 16S rRNA gene sequence dissimilarity. These strains possessed the particulate (100%) and soluble (64%) methane monooxygenase gene. Also, 73% of the strains could be linked to a highly active fast-growing mixed MOB community. In conclusion, miniaturized extinction culturing was more efficient in rapidly isolating numerous MOB requiring little effort and fewer materials, compared with the more widely applied plating procedure. This miniaturized approach allowed straightforward isolation and could be very useful for subsequent screening of desired characteristics, in view of their future biotechnological potential.

  2. Effect of Antibiotics and Antibiofilm Agents in the Ultrastructure and Development of Biofilms Developed by Nonpigmented Rapidly Growing Mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Egea, María-Carmen; García-Pedrazuela, María; Mahillo-Fernandez, Ignacio; Esteban, Jaime

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the effect of amikacin, ciprofloxacin, and clarithromycin, alone and associated with N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and Tween 80, at different times and concentrations in nonpigmented rapidly growing mycobacteria (NPRGM) biofilms. For this purpose, confocal laser scanning microscopy and image analysis were used to study the development and behavior of intrinsic autofluorescence, covered area, thickness, and cell viability in NPRGM biofilms after adding antibiotics alone and associated with antibiofilm agents. In this study, ciprofloxacin is the most active antibiotic against this type of biofilm and thickness is the most affected parameter. NAC and Tween 80 combined with antibiotics exert a synergistic effect in increasing the percentage of dead bacteria and also reducing the percentage of covered surface and thickness of NPRGM biofilms. Tween 80 seems to be an antibiofilm agent more effective than NAC due to its higher reduction in the percentage of cover surface and thickness. In conclusion, the results obtained in this work show that phenotypic parameters (thickness, percentage of covered surface, autofluorescence, percentage of live/dead bacteria) are affected by combining antibiotics and antibiofilm agents, ciprofloxacin and Tween 80 being the most active agents against NPRGM biofilms.

  3. “Mycobacterium massilipolynesiensis” sp. nov., a rapidly-growing mycobacterium of medical interest related to Mycobacterium phlei

    PubMed Central

    Phelippeau, M.; Asmar, S.; Osman, D. Aboubaker; Sassi, M.; Robert, C.; Michelle, C.; Musso, D.; Drancourt, M.

    2017-01-01

    In French Polynesia, respiratory tract clinical isolate M26, displayed unusual phenotype and contradictory phylogenetic affiliations, suggesting a hitherto unidentified rapidly-growing Mycobacterium species. The phenotype of strain M26 was further characterized and its genome sequenced. Strain M26 genome consists in a 5,732,017-bp circular chromosome with a G + C% of 67.54%, comprising 5,500 protein-coding genes and 52 RNA genes (including two copies of the 16 S rRNA gene). One region coding for a putative prophage was also predicted. An intriguing characteristic of strain M26’s genome is the large number of genes encoding polyketide synthases and nonribosomal peptide synthases. Phylogenomic analysis showed that strain M26’s genome is closest to the Mycobacterium phlei genome with a 76.6% average nucleotide identity. Comparative genomics of 33 Mycobacterium genomes yielded 361 genes unique to M26 strain which functional annotation revealed 84.21% of unknown function and 3.88% encoding lipid transport and metabolism; while 48.87% of genes absent in M26 strain have unknown function, 9.5% are implicated in transcription and 19% are implicated in transport and metabolism. Strain M26’s unique phenotypic and genomic characteristics indicate it is representative of a new species named “Mycobacterium massilipolynesiensis”. Looking for mycobacteria in remote areas allows for the discovery of new Mycobacterium species. PMID:28074866

  4. Field demonstration of rapid turnaround, multilevel groundwater screening

    SciTech Connect

    Tingle, A.R.; Baker, L.; Long, D.D.; Miracle, M.

    1994-09-01

    A combined technology approach to rapidly characterizing source area and downgradient groundwater associated with a past fuel spill has been field tested. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the presence and extent of fuel-related compounds or indications of their biodegradation in groundwater. The distance from the source area to be investigated was established by calculating the potential extent of a plume based only on groundwater flow velocities. To accomplish this objective, commercially available technologies were combined and used to rapidly assess the source area and downgradient groundwater associated with the fuel discharge. The source of contamination that was investigated overlies glacial sand and gravel outwash deposits. Historical data suggest that from 1955 to 1970 as many as 1 to 6 million pi of aviation gasoline (AVGAS) were god at the study area. Although the remedial investigation (RI) for this study area indicated fuel-related groundwater contamination at the source area, fuel-related contamination was not detected in downgradient monitoring wells. Rapid horizontal groundwater velocities and the 24-year time span from the last reported spill farther suggest that a plume of contaminated groundwater could extend several thousand feet downgradient. The lack of contamination downgradient from the source suggests two possibilities: (1) monitoring wells installed during the RI did not intersect the plume or (2) fuel-related compounds had naturally degraded.

  5. Rapid topography mapping of scalar fields: Large molecular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeole, Sachin D.; López, Rafael; Gadre, Shridhar R.

    2012-08-01

    An efficient and rapid algorithm for topography mapping of scalar fields, molecular electron density (MED) and molecular electrostatic potential (MESP) is presented. The highlight of the work is the use of fast function evaluation by Deformed-atoms-in-molecules (DAM) method. The DAM method provides very rapid as well as sufficiently accurate function and gradient evaluation. For mapping the topography of large systems, the molecular tailoring approach (MTA) is invoked. This new code is tested out for mapping the MED and MESP critical points (CP's) of small systems. It is further applied to large molecular clusters viz. (H2O)25, (C6H6)8 and also to a unit cell of valine crystal at MP2/6-31+G(d) level of theory. The completeness of the topography is checked by extensive search as well as applying the Poincaré-Hopf relation. The results obtained show that the DAM method in combination with MTA provides a rapid and efficient route for mapping the topography of large molecular systems.

  6. Rapid adhesive bonding and field repair of aerospace materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, B. A.

    1985-01-01

    Adhesive bonding in the aerospace industry typically utilizes autoclaves or presses which have considerable thermal mass. As a consequence, the rates of heatup and cooldown of the bonded parts are limited and the total time and cost of the bonding process are often relatively high. Many of the adhesives themselves do not inherently require long processing times. Bonding could be performed rapidly if the heat was concentrated in the bond lines or at least in the adherends. Rapid Adhesive Bonding concepts are developed to utilize induction heating techniques to provide heat directly to the bond line and/or adherends without heating the entire structure, supports, and fixtures of a bonding assembly. Bonding times for specimens can be cut by a factor of 10 to 100 compared to standard press or autoclave bonding. The development of Rapid Adhesive Bonding for lap shear specimens (per ASTM D1002 and D3163), for aerospace panel or component bonding, and for field repair needs of metallic and advanced fiber reinforced polymeric-matrix composite structures is reviewed. Equipment and procedures are described for bonding and repairing thin sheets, simple geometries, and honeycomb core panels.

  7. Phytoextraction of heavy metals by willows growing in biosolids under field conditions.

    PubMed

    Laidlaw, W S; Arndt, S K; Huynh, T T; Gregory, D; Baker, A J M

    2012-01-01

    Biosolids produced by sewage treatment facilities can exceed guideline thresholds for contaminant elements. Phytoextraction is one technique with the potential to reduce these elements allowing reuse of the biosolids as a soil amendment. In this field trial, cuttings of seven species/cultivars of Salix(willows) were planted directly into soil and into biosolids to identify their suitability for decontaminating biosolids. Trees were irrigated and harvested each year for three consecutive years. Harvested biomass was weighed and analyzed for the contaminant elements: As, Cd, Cu, Cr, Hg, Pb, Ni, and Zn. All Salix cultivars, except S. chilensis, growing in soils produced 10 to 20 t ha(-1) of biomass, whereas most Salix cultivars growing in biosolids produced significantly less biomass (<6 t ha(-1)). Salix matsudana (30 t ha(-1)) and S. × reichardtii A. Kerner (18 t ha(-1)) had similar aboveground biomass production in both soil and biosolids. These were also the most successful cultivars in extracting metals from biosolids, driven by superior biomass increases and not high tissue concentrations. The willows were effectual in extracting the most soluble/exchangeable metals (Cd, 0.18; Ni, 0.40; and Zn, 11.66 kg ha(-1)), whereas Cr and Cu were extracted to a lesser degree (0.02 and 0.11 kg ha(-1)). Low bioavailable elements, As, Hg, and Pb, were not detectable in any of the aboveground biomass of the willows.

  8. Groundwater geochemistry in the Seminole Well Field, Cedar Rapids, Iowa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boyd, Robert A.

    1999-01-01

    The City of Cedar Rapids obtains its municipal water supply from four well fields in an alluvial aquifer along the Cedar River in east-central Iowa. Since 1992, the City and the U.S. Geological Survey have cooperatively studied the groundwater-flow system and water chemistry near the well fields. The geochemistry in the alluvial aquifer near the Seminole Well Field was assessed to identify potentially reactive minerals and possible chemical reactions that produce observed changes in water chemistry. Calcite, dolomite, ferrihydrite, quartz, rhodochrosite, and siderite were identified as potentially reactive minerals by calculating saturation indexes. Aluminosiicate minerals including albite, Ca-montmorillonite, gibbsite, illite, K-feldspar, and kaolinite were identified as potentially reactive minerals using hypothetical saturation indexes calculated with an assumed dissolved aluminum concentration of 1 microgram per liter. Balanced chemical equations derived from inverse-modeling techniques were used to assess chemical reactions as precipitation percolates to the water table. Calcite dissolution was predominate, but aluminosilicate weathering, cation exchange, and redox reactions also likely occurred. Microbial-catalyzed redox reactions altered the chemical composition of water infiltrating from the Cedar River into the alluvial aquifer by consuming dissolved oxygen, reducing nitrate, and increasing dissolved iron and manganese concentrations. Nitrate reduction only occurred in relatively shallow (3 to 7 meters below land surface) groundwater near the Cedar River and did not occur in water infiltrating to deeper zones of the alluvial aquifer.

  9. Rapid parameterization of small molecules using the Force Field Toolkit

    PubMed Central

    Mayne, Christopher G.; Saam, Jan; Schulten, Klaus; Tajkhorshid, Emad; Gumbart, James C.

    2013-01-01

    The inability to rapidly generate accurate and robust parameters for novel chemical matter continues to severely limit the application of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to many biological systems of interest, especially in fields such as drug discovery. Although the release of generalized versions of common classical force fields, e.g., GAFF and CGenFF, have posited guidelines for parameterization of small molecules, many technical challenges remain that have hampered their wide-scale extension. The Force Field Toolkit (ffTK), described herein, minimizes common barriers to ligand parameterization through algorithm and method development, automation of tedious and error-prone tasks, and graphical user interface design. Distributed as a VMD plugin, ffTK facilitates the traversal of a clear and organized workflow resulting in a complete set of CHARMM-compatible parameters. A variety of tools are provided to generate quantum mechanical target data, set up multidimensional optimization routines, and analyze parameter performance. Parameters developed for a small test set of molecules using ffTK were comparable to existing CGenFF parameters in their ability to reproduce experimentally measured values for pure-solvent properties (<15% error from experiment) and free energy of solvation (±0.5 kcal/mol from experiment). PMID:24000174

  10. Rapid assessment of rice seed availability for wildlife in harvested fields

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Halstead, B.J.; Miller, M.R.; Casazza, M.L.; Coates, P.S.; Farinha, M.A.; Benjamin, Gustafson K.; Yee, J.L.; Fleskes, J.P.

    2011-01-01

    Rice seed remaining in commercial fields after harvest (waste rice) is a critical food resource for wintering waterfowl in rice-growing regions of North America. Accurate and precise estimates of the seed mass density of waste rice are essential for planning waterfowl wintering habitat extents and management. In the Sacramento Valley of California, USA, the existing method for obtaining estimates of availability of waste rice in harvested fields produces relatively precise estimates, but the labor-, time-, and machineryintensive process is not practical for routine assessments needed to examine long-term trends in waste rice availability. We tested several experimental methods designed to rapidly derive estimates that would not be burdened with disadvantages of the existing method. We first conducted a simulation study of the efficiency of each method and then conducted field tests. For each approach, methods did not vary in root mean squared error, although some methods did exhibit bias for both simulations and field tests. Methods also varied substantially in the time to conduct each sample and in the number of samples required to detect a standard trend. Overall, modified line-intercept methods performed well for estimating the density of rice seeds. Waste rice in the straw, although not measured directly, can be accounted for by a positive relationship with density of rice on the ground. Rapid assessment of food availability is a useful tool to help waterfowl managers establish and implement wetland restoration and agricultural habitat-enhancement goals for wintering waterfowl. ?? 2011 The Wildlife Society.

  11. Effects of landscape change on fish assemblage structure in a rapidly growing metropolitan area in North Carolina, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kennen, J.G.; Chang, M.; Tracy, B.H.

    2005-01-01

    We evaluated a comprehensive set of natural and land-use attributes that represent the major facets of urban development at fish monitoring sites in the rapidly growing Raleigh-Durham, North Carolina metropolitan area. We used principal component and correlation analysis to obtain a nonredundant subset of variables that extracted most variation in the complete set. With this subset of variables, we assessed the effect of urban growth on fish assemblage structure. We evaluated variation in fish assemblage structure with nonmetric multidimensional scaling (NMDS). We used correlation analysis to identify the most important environmental and landscape variables associated with significant NMDS axes. The second NMDS axis is related to many indices of land-use/land-cover change and habitat. Significant correlations with proportion of largest forest patch to total patch size (r = -0.460, P < 0.01), diversity of patch types (r = 0.554, P < 0.001), and population density (r = 0.385, P < 0.05) helped identify NMDS axis 2 as a disturbance gradient. Positive and negative correlations between the abundance of redbreast sunfish Lepomis auritus and bluehead chub Nocomis leptocephalus, respectively, and NMDS axis 2 also were evident. The North Carolina index of biotic integrity and many of its component metrics were highly correlated with urbanization. These results indicate that aquatic ecosystem integrity would be optimized by a comprehensive integrated management strategy that includes the preservation of landscape function by maximizing the conservation of contiguous tracts of forested lands and vegetative cover in watersheds. ?? 2005 by the American Fisheries Society.

  12. Mycobacterium saopaulense sp. nov., a rapidly growing mycobacterium closely related to members of the Mycobacterium chelonae–Mycobacterium abscessus group

    PubMed Central

    Nogueira, Christiane Lourenço; Whipps, Christopher M.; Matsumoto, Cristianne Kayoko; Chimara, Erica; Droz, Sara; Tortoli, Enrico; de Freitas, Denise; Cnockaert, Margo; Palomino, Juan Carlos; Martin, Anandi; Vandamme, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Five isolates of non-pigmented, rapidly growing mycobacteria were isolated from three patients and, in an earlier study, from zebrafish. Phenotypic and molecular tests confirmed that these isolates belong to the Mycobacterium chelonae–Mycobacterium abscessus group, but they could not be confidently assigned to any known species of this group. Phenotypic analysis and biochemical tests were not helpful for distinguishing these isolates from other members of the M. chelonae–M. abscessus group. The isolates presented higher drug resistance in comparison with other members of the group, showing susceptibility only to clarithromycin. The five isolates showed a unique PCR restriction analysis pattern of the hsp65 gene, 100 % similarity in 16S rRNA gene and hsp65 sequences and 1–2 nt differences in rpoB and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences. Phylogenetic analysis of a concatenated dataset including 16S rRNA gene, hsp65, and rpoB sequences from type strains of more closely related species placed the five isolates together, as a distinct lineage from previously described species, suggesting a sister relationship to a group consisting of M. chelonae, Mycobacterium salmoniphilum, Mycobacterium franklinii and Mycobacterium immunogenum. DNA–DNA hybridization values >70 % confirmed that the five isolates belong to the same species, while values < 70 % between one of the isolates and the type strains of M. chelonae and M. abscessus confirmed that the isolates belong to a distinct species. The polyphasic characterization of these isolates, supported by DNA–DNA hybridization results, demonstrated that they share characteristics with M. chelonae–M. abscessus members, but constitute a different species, for which the name Mycobacterium saopaulense sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is EPM 10906T ( = CCUG 66554T = LMG 28586T = INCQS 0733T). PMID:26358475

  13. Modified Field's staining--a rapid stain for Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Afzan, M Yusuf; Sivanandam, S; Kumar, G Suresh

    2010-10-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis, a flagellate protozoan parasite commonly found in the human genitourinary tract, is transmitted primarily by sexual intercourse. Diagnosis is usually by in vitro culture method and staining with Giemsa stain. There are laboratories that use Gram stain as well. We compared the use of modified Field's (MF), Giemsa, and Gram stains on 2 axenic and xenic isolates of T. vaginalis, respectively. Three smears from every sediment of spun cultures of all 4 isolates were stained, respectively, with each of the stains. We showed that MF staining, apart from being a rapid stain (20 s), confers sharper staining contrast, which differentiates the nucleus and the cytoplasm of the organism when compared to Giemsa and Gram staining especially on parasites from spiked urine samples. The alternative staining procedure offers in a diagnostic setting a rapid stain that can easily visualize the parasite with sharp contrasting characteristics between organelles especially the nucleus and cytoplasm. Vacuoles are more clearly visible in parasites stained with MF than when stained with Giemsa.

  14. Simple and rapid field tests for brucellosis in livestock.

    PubMed

    Abdoel, Theresia; Dias, Isabel Travassos; Cardoso, Regina; Smits, Henk L

    2008-08-25

    Four simple and rapid field tests for the serodiagnosis of brucellosis in cattle, goat, sheep and swine were developed. The performance of the assays was investigated using serum samples collected in Portugal from animals originating from herds with a defined sanitary status with respect to the presence of brucellosis. The sensitivity calculated for the bovine, caprine, ovine and swine Brucella lateral flow assays based on results obtained for samples collected from animals with culture confirmed brucellosis was 90%, 100%, 90% and 73%, respectively. None of the samples from animals from herds free of brucellosis reacted in the flow assays indicating a high specificity. However, as expected, some degree of reactivity was observed when testing selected serum samples that reacted non-specific in reference tests for brucellosis.

  15. RAPID CASING CORROSION IN HIGH TEMPERATURE LIQUID DOMINATED GEOTHERMAL FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Bixley, P.F.; Wilson, D.M.

    1985-01-22

    Downhole logging and workover operations on 12-20 year old wells in several high temperature, liquid-dominated geothermal fields in New Zealand has shown that severe corrosion has commonly occurred in the production casing string where this is unprotected by larger diameter casings. To date corrosion products from only one well have been examined in detail. These indicate that corrosion attack commences at the outer casing wall and continues at a rate as great as 0.8mm/year. Rapid corrosion has been attributed to neutral or slightly acid high bicarbonate waters formed by the absorption of steam and gas into shallow aquifers not directly connected to the deeper, high chloride reservoir.

  16. Rapid Numerical Simulation of Viscous Axisymmetric Flow Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tweedt, Daniel L.; Chima, Rodrick V.

    1995-01-01

    A two-dimensional Navier-Stokes code has been developed for rapid numerical simulation of axisymmetric flow fields, including flow fields with an azimuthal velocity component. The azimuthal-invariant Navier-Stokes equations in a cylindrical coordinate system are mapped to a general body-fitted coordinate system, with the streamwise viscous terms then neglected by applying the thin-layer approximation. Turbulence effects are modeled using an algebraic model, typically the Baldwin-Lomax turbulence model, although a modified Cebeci-Smith model can also be used. The equations are discretized using central finite differences and solved using a multistage Runge-Kutta algorithm with a spatially varying time step and implicit residual smoothing. Results are presented for calculations of supersonic flow over a waisted body-of-revolution, transonic flow through a normal shock wave in a straight circular duct of constant cross sectional area, swirling supersonic (inviscid) flow through a strong shock in a straight radial duct, and swirling subsonic flow in an annular-to-circular diffuser duct. Comparisons between computed and experimental results are in fair to good agreement, demonstrating that the viscous code can be a useful tool for practical engineering design and analysis work.

  17. Electric Field Measurements During the Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) Field Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bateman, Monte G.; Blakeslee, Richard J.; Mach, Douglas M.

    2010-01-01

    During the Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) field program, a system of 6 electric field mills was flown on one of NASA's Global Hawk aircraft. We placed several mills on the aircraft to enable us to measure the vector electric field. We created a distributed, ethernet-connected system so that each sensor has its own embedded Linux system, complete with web server. This makes our current generation system fully "sensor web enabled." The Global Hawk has several unique qualities, but relevant to quality storm electric field measurements are high altitude (20 km) and long duration (20-30 hours) flights. There are several aircraft participating in the GRIP program, and coordinated measurements are happening. Lightning and electric field measurements will be used to study the relationships between lightning and other storm characteristics. It has been long understood that lightning can be used as a marker for strong convective activity. Past research and field programs suggest that lightning flash rate may serve as an indicator and precursor for rapid intensification change in tropical cyclones and hurricanes. We have the opportunity to sample hurricanes for many hours at a time and observe intensification (or de-intensification) periods. The electrical properties of hurricanes during such periods are not well known. American

  18. Rapid brain MRI acquisition techniques at ultra-high fields

    PubMed Central

    Setsompop, Kawin; Feinberg, David A.; Polimeni, Jonathan R.

    2017-01-01

    Ultra-high-field MRI provides large increases in signal-to-noise ratio as well as enhancement of several contrast mechanisms in both structural and functional imaging. Combined, these gains result in a substantial boost in contrast-to-noise ratio that can be exploited for higher spatial resolution imaging to extract finer-scale information about the brain. With increased spatial resolution, however, is a concurrent increased image encoding burden that can cause unacceptably long scan times for structural imaging and slow temporal sampling of the hemodynamic response in functional MRI—particularly when whole-brain imaging is desired. To address this issue, new directions of imaging technology development—such as the move from conventional 2D slice-by-slice imaging to more efficient Simultaneous MultiSlice (SMS) or MultiBand imaging (which can be viewed as “pseudo-3D” encoding) as well as full 3D imaging—have provided dramatic improvements in acquisition speed. Such imaging paradigms provide higher SNR efficiency as well as improved encoding efficiency. Moreover, SMS and 3D imaging can make better use of coil sensitivity information in multi-channel receiver arrays used for parallel imaging acquisitions through controlled aliasing in multiple spatial directions. This has enabled unprecedented acceleration factors of an order of magnitude or higher in these imaging acquisition schemes, with low image artifact levels and high SNR. Here we review the latest developments of SMS and 3D imaging methods and related technologies at ultra-high field for rapid high-resolution functional and structural imaging of the brain. PMID:26835884

  19. Evaluation of capillary and myofiber density in the pectoralis major muscles of rapidly growing, high-yield broiler chickens during increased heat stress.

    PubMed

    Joiner, K S; Hamlin, G A; Lien, A R J; Bilgili, S F

    2014-09-01

    Skeletal muscle development proceeds from early embryogenesis through marketing age in broiler chickens. While myofiber formation is essentially complete at hatching, myofiber hypertrophy can increase after hatch by assimilation of satellite cell nuclei into myofibers. As the diameter of the myofibers increases, capillary density peripheral to the myofiber is marginalized, limiting oxygen supply and subsequent diffusion into the myofiber, inducing microischemia. The superficial and deep pectoralis muscles constitute 25% of the total body weight in a market-age bird; thus compromise of those muscle groups can have profound economic impact on broiler production. We hypothesized that marginal capillary support relative to the hypertrophic myofibers increases the incidence of microischemia, especially in contemporary high-yield broilers under stressing conditions such as high environmental temperatures. We evaluated the following parameters in four different broiler strains at 39 and 53 days of age when reared under thermoneutral (20 to 25 C) versus hot (30 to 35 C) environmental conditions: capillary density, myofiber density and diameter, and degree of myodegeneration. Our data demonstrate that myofiber diameter significantly increased with age (P > or = 0.0001), while the absolute numbers of capillaries, blood vessels, and myofibers visible in five 400 x microscopic fields decreased (P > or = 0.0001). This is concomitant with marginalization of vascular support in rapidly growing myofibers. The myofiber diameter was significantly lower with hot environmental temperatures (P > or = 0.001); therefore, the absolute number of myofibers visible in five 400X microscopic fields was significantly higher. The incidence and subjective degree of myodegeneration characterized by loss of cross-striations, myocyte hyperrefractility, sarcoplasmic vacuolation, and nuclear pyknosis or loss also increased in hot conditions. Differences among strains were not observed.

  20. Growing Together: Boston Area Youth Follow Food from Field to Table.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeVaux, Ari

    2001-01-01

    The Food Project brings together Boston-area youth to grow and distribute food for the hungry and in the process, develop leadership and job skills. Summer crew workers (high school students) grow vegetables, distribute them to food pantries, and sell them at farmer's markets. Crew leaders learn more about sustainable agriculture and hone…

  1. High temperature and deformation field measurements at the vicinity of dynamically growing shear bands

    SciTech Connect

    Rosakis, A.J.; Ravichandran, G.; Zhou, M.

    1995-12-31

    The phenomenon of dynamic initiation and propagation of adiabatic shear bands is experimentally and numerically investigated. Pre-notched metal plates are subjected to asymmetric impact load histories (dynamic mode-II loading). Dynamic shear bands emanate from the notch tip and propagate rapidly in a direction nearly parallel to the direction of the impact. Real time temperature histories along a line intersecting and perpendicular to the shear band paths are recorded by means of a high-speed infrared detector system. The materials studied are C-300 (a maraging steel) and Ti - 6 Al - 4 V alloy. Experiments show that the peak temperatures inside the propagating shear bands are approaching 90% of the melting point for C-300 and are significantly lower for the titanium alloy (up to 600{degrees}C). Additionally, measured distances of shear band propagation indicate stronger resistance to shear banding by the Ti - 6Al - 4V alloy. Deformation fields around the propagating shear bands are recorded using high-speed photography. Shear band speeds are found to strongly depend on impact velocities, and are as high as 1200 m/s for C-300 steels. Finite Element simulations of the experiments are carried out under the context of plane strain, considering finite deformations, inertia, heat conduction, thermal softening, strain hardening and strain-rate hardening. In the simulations, the shear band propagation is assumed to be governed by a critical plastic strain criterion. The results are compared with experimental measurements obtained using the high-speed infrared detectors and high-speed photography.

  2. Growing Pains from Rapid Growth: A Historical Case Study of George Fox University from 1983 to 2003

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Railsback, Gary L.

    2007-01-01

    This article is a historical case study of George Fox University (GFU) in Newberg, Oregon. Using organizational lifecycle as a theoretical framework, George Fox University had a long and delayed childhood in that it remained a small and struggling institution for most of the 20th century, and then experienced rapid growth in the late 1980s. This…

  3. Calculating High Resolution CWSI Maps for Entire Growing Season of a Cultivated Barley Field with UAV-Collected Surface Temperatures.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, H.; Jensen, R.; Nieto Solana, H.; Friborg, T.; Thomsen, A.

    2015-12-01

    With agriculture as the largest consumer of freshwater and an overall increasing pressure on water resources, developing more efficient irrigation systems is important. Combining the crop water stress index (CWSI) with unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) enables detection of which specific areas within a cultivated field that requires irrigation to ensure healthy growing plants. In this study remotely sensed, high resolution surface temperatures are collected with a thermal camera onboard an UAV. Temperatures are used to calculate spatially distributed, high resolution CWSI maps over a barley field during growing seasons 2014 and 2015. In early stages of the barley growing season, surface temperatures are an ensemble of both soil and canopy temperatures. Canopy temperatures are extracted using leaf area index and the two source energy balance modelling scheme. This approach enables CWSI calculations for homogeneous and evenly distributed crops (such as barley) during early as well as late stages of a growing season. CWSI maps are calculated using both an empirical and an analytical approach and are compared and validated against modelled canopy conductance and transpiration rates.

  4. Concentrations of Cu, growth, and chlorophyll content of field-cultivated wheat growing in naturally enriched Cu soil

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, C.M.; Vardaka, E.; Lanaras, T.

    1997-02-01

    The Serbo-Macedonian massif of northern Greece is notable for the occurrence of numerous small areas of sulphide mineralisation. Varying degrees of porphyry copper mineralisation, associated with post-Miocene volcanic rocks of rhyolitic composition, can be encountered in agricultural fields which are used mainly for wheat production. Although Cu is a trace element essential to plant nutrition, in excess, it is phytotoxic causing stunted growth, chlorosis and root malformation. Previous studies on wheat growing in these naturally enriched Cu soils have shown that plants have reduced growth, chlorosis and chloroplast ultrastructural changes and a reduced efficiency of the photochemistry of photosystem II (PSII). The objective of this study was to examine the relationship between the Cu concentration of the soil and the plant tissue Cu concentration, growth and chlorophyll content of field-cultivated wheat growing in soils with varying degrees of porphyry copper mineralisation. 15 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Integrated Field-Screening for Rapid Sediment Characterization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-09-30

    control response. A scatter plot representing the IC50’ s response for both QwikSed and the sea urchin development test (percent of control) on the same...Rapid Sediment Characterization 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR( S ) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f...WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME( S ) AND ADDRESS(ES) Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center, San Diego,4301 Pacific Hwy,San Diego

  6. Rapid dissipation of magnetic fields due to the Hall current

    SciTech Connect

    Vainshtein, S. I.; Chitre, S. M.; Olinto, A. V.

    2000-04-01

    We propose a mechanism for the fast dissipation of magnetic fields which is effective in a stratified medium where ion motions can be neglected. In such a medium, the field is frozen into the electrons, and Hall currents prevail. Although Hall currents conserve magnetic energy, in the presence of density gradients they are able to create current sheets which can be sites for efficient dissipation of magnetic fields. We recover the frequency {omega}{sub MH} for Hall oscillations modified by the presence of density gradients. We show that these oscillations can lead to an exchange of energy between different components of the field. We calculate the time evolution, and show that magnetic fields can dissipate on a time scale of order 1/{omega}{sub MH}. This mechanism can play an important role in magnetic dissipation in systems with very steep density gradients, where the ions are static such as those found in the solid crust of neutron stars. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  7. An aerosol climatology for a rapidly growing arid region (southern Arizona): Major aerosol species and remotely sensed aerosol properties

    PubMed Central

    Sorooshian, Armin; Wonaschütz, Anna; Jarjour, Elias G.; Hashimoto, Bryce I.; Schichtel, Bret A.; Betterton, Eric A.

    2014-01-01

    This study reports a comprehensive characterization of atmospheric aerosol particle properties in relation to meteorological and back trajectory data in the southern Arizona region, which includes two of the fastest growing metropolitan areas in the United States (Phoenix and Tucson). Multiple data sets (MODIS, AERONET, OMI/TOMS, MISR, GOCART, ground-based aerosol measurements) are used to examine monthly trends in aerosol composition, aerosol optical depth (AOD), and aerosol size. Fine soil, sulfate, and organics dominate PM2.5 mass in the region. Dust strongly influences the region between March and July owing to the dry and hot meteorological conditions and back trajectory patterns. Because monsoon precipitation begins typically in July, dust levels decrease, while AOD, sulfate, and organic aerosol reach their maximum levels because of summertime photochemistry and monsoon moisture. Evidence points to biogenic volatile organic compounds being a significant source of secondary organic aerosol in this region. Biomass burning also is shown to be a major contributor to the carbonaceous aerosol budget in the region, leading to enhanced organic and elemental carbon levels aloft at a sky-island site north of Tucson (Mt. Lemmon). Phoenix exhibits different monthly trends for aerosol components in comparison with the other sites owing to the strong influence of fossil carbon and anthropogenic dust. Trend analyses between 1988 and 2009 indicate that the strongest statistically significant trends are reductions in sulfate, elemental carbon, and organic carbon, and increases in fine soil during the spring (March–May) at select sites. These results can be explained by population growth, land-use changes, and improved source controls. PMID:24707452

  8. A Multi-Level Approach to Modeling Rapidly Growing Mega-Regions as a Coupled Human-Natural System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, J. A.; Tang, W.; Meentemeyer, R. K.

    2013-12-01

    concept of our modeling approach and describe its strengths and weaknesses. We furthermore use empirical data for the states of North and South Carolina to demonstrate how the modeling framework can be applied to a large, heterogeneous study system with diverse decision-making agents. Grimm et al. (2005) Pattern-Oriented Modeling of Agent-Based Complex Systems: Lessons from Ecology. Science 310, 987-991. Liu et al. (2013) Framing Sustainability in a Telecoupled World. Ecology and Society 18(2), 26. Meentemeyer et al. (2013) FUTURES: Multilevel Simulations of Merging Urban-Rural Landscape Structure Using a Stochastic Patch-Growing Algorithm. Annals of the Association of American Geographers 103(4), 785-807.

  9. Rapid subsidence over oil fields measured by SAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fielding, E. J.; Blom, R. G.; Goldstein, R. M.

    1998-01-01

    The Lost Hills and Belridge oil felds are in the San Joaquin Valley, California. The major oil reservoir is high porosity and low permeability diatomite. Extraction of large volumes from shallow depths causes reduction in pore pressure and subsequent compaction, forming a surface subsidence bowl. We measure this subsidence from space using interferometric analysis of SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) data collected by the European Space Agency Remote Sensing Satellites (ERS-1 and ERS-2). Maximum subsidence rates are as high as 40 mm in 35 days or > 400 mm/yr, measured from interferograms with time separations ranging from one day to 26 months. The 8- and 26-month interferograms contain areas where the subsidence gradient exceeds the measurement possible with ERS SAR, but shows increased detail in areas of less rapid subsidence. Synoptic mapping of subsidence distribution from satellite data powerfully complements ground-based techniques, permits measurements where access is difficult, and aids identification of underlying causes.

  10. Are BVOC exchanges in agricultural ecosystems overestimated? Insights from fluxes measured in a maize field over a whole growing season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachy, Aurélie; Aubinet, Marc; Schoon, Niels; Amelynck, Crist; Bodson, Bernard; Moureaux, Christine; Heinesch, Bernard

    2016-04-01

    Although maize is the second most important crop worldwide, and the most important C4 crop, no study on biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) has yet been conducted on this crop at ecosystem scale and over a whole growing season. This has led to large uncertainties in cropland BVOC emission estimations. This paper seeks to fill this gap by presenting, for the first time, BVOC fluxes measured in a maize field at ecosystem scale (using the disjunct eddy covariance by mass scanning technique) over a whole growing season in Belgium. The maize field emitted mainly methanol, although exchanges were bi-directional. The second most exchanged compound was acetic acid, which was taken up mainly in the growing season. Bi-directional exchanges of acetaldehyde, acetone and other oxygenated VOCs also occurred, whereas the terpenes, benzene and toluene exchanges were small, albeit significant. Surprisingly, BVOC exchanges were of the same order of magnitude on bare soil and on well developed vegetation, suggesting that soil is a major BVOC reservoir in agricultural ecosystems. Quantitatively, the maize BVOC emissions observed were lower than those reported in other maize, crops and grasses studies. The standard emission factors (SEFs) estimated in this study (231 ± 19 µg m-2 h-1 for methanol, 8 ± 5 µg m-2 h-1 for isoprene and 4 ± 6 µg m-2 h-1 for monoterpenes) were also much lower than those currently used by models for C4 crops, particularly for terpenes. These results suggest that maize fields are small BVOC exchangers in north-western Europe, with a lower BVOC emission impact than that modelled for growing C4 crops in this part of the world. They also reveal the high variability in BVOC exchanges across world regions for maize and suggest that SEFs should be estimated for each region separately.

  11. North Field 󈨛 Rapid Runway Repair Test Report. Volume 1.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-11-01

    the grass, south of the repair site. Paint, polymer, and solvent, as well as storage drums for paint and polymer wastes, were stored in a designated ...events began. Fire and crash rescue support was provided by North Auxiliary Field. A "hot brakes" area was designated at the intersection of the NE/SW...upheaval and sag limits for each repair. Computer simulations, using the results of a runway survey and a test limit of 80 percent design limit load for

  12. 3D deformation field in growing plant roots reveals both mechanical and biological responses to axial mechanical forces.

    PubMed

    Bizet, François; Bengough, A Glyn; Hummel, Irène; Bogeat-Triboulot, Marie-Béatrice; Dupuy, Lionel X

    2016-10-01

    Strong regions and physical barriers in soils may slow root elongation, leading to reduced water and nutrient uptake and decreased yield. In this study, the biomechanical responses of roots to axial mechanical forces were assessed by combining 3D live imaging, kinematics and a novel mechanical sensor. This system quantified Young's elastic modulus of intact poplar roots (32MPa), a rapid <0.2 mN touch-elongation sensitivity, and the critical elongation force applied by growing roots that resulted in bending. Kinematic analysis revealed a multiphase bio-mechanical response of elongation rate and curvature in 3D. Measured critical elongation force was accurately predicted from an Euler buckling model, indicating that no biologically mediated accommodation to mechanical forces influenced bending during this short period of time. Force applied by growing roots increased more than 15-fold when buckling was prevented by lateral bracing of the root. The junction between the growing and the mature zones was identified as a zone of mechanical weakness that seemed critical to the bending process. This work identified key limiting factors for root growth and buckling under mechanical constraints. The findings are relevant to crop and soil sciences, and advance our understanding of root growth in heterogeneous structured soils.

  13. 3D deformation field in growing plant roots reveals both mechanical and biological responses to axial mechanical forces

    PubMed Central

    Bizet, François; Bengough, A. Glyn; Hummel, Irène; Bogeat-Triboulot, Marie-Béatrice; Dupuy, Lionel X.

    2016-01-01

    Strong regions and physical barriers in soils may slow root elongation, leading to reduced water and nutrient uptake and decreased yield. In this study, the biomechanical responses of roots to axial mechanical forces were assessed by combining 3D live imaging, kinematics and a novel mechanical sensor. This system quantified Young’s elastic modulus of intact poplar roots (32MPa), a rapid <0.2 mN touch-elongation sensitivity, and the critical elongation force applied by growing roots that resulted in bending. Kinematic analysis revealed a multiphase bio-mechanical response of elongation rate and curvature in 3D. Measured critical elongation force was accurately predicted from an Euler buckling model, indicating that no biologically mediated accommodation to mechanical forces influenced bending during this short period of time. Force applied by growing roots increased more than 15-fold when buckling was prevented by lateral bracing of the root. The junction between the growing and the mature zones was identified as a zone of mechanical weakness that seemed critical to the bending process. This work identified key limiting factors for root growth and buckling under mechanical constraints. The findings are relevant to crop and soil sciences, and advance our understanding of root growth in heterogeneous structured soils. PMID:27664958

  14. A Framework Predicting Water Availability in a Rapidly Growing, Semi-Arid Region under Future Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, B.; Benner, S. G.; Glenn, N. F.; Lindquist, E.; Dahal, K. R.; Bolte, J.; Vache, K. B.; Flores, A. N.

    2014-12-01

    Climate change can lead to dramatic variations in hydrologic regime, affecting both surface water and groundwater supply. This effect is most significant in populated semi-arid regions where water availability are highly sensitive to climate-induced outcomes. However, predicting water availability at regional scales, while resolving some of the key internal variability and structure in semi-arid regions is difficult due to the highly non-linearity relationship between rainfall and runoff. In this study, we describe the development of a modeling framework to evaluate future water availability that captures elements of the coupled response of the biophysical system to climate change and human systems. The framework is built under the Envision multi-agent simulation tool, characterizing the spatial patterns of water demand in the semi-arid Treasure Valley area of Southwest Idaho - a rapidly developing socio-ecological system where urban growth is displacing agricultural production. The semi-conceptual HBV model, a population growth and allocation model (Target), a vegetation state and transition model (SSTM), and a statistically based fire disturbance model (SpatialAllocator) are integrated to simulate hydrology, population and land use. Six alternative scenarios are composed by combining two climate change scenarios (RCP4.5 and RCP8.5) with three population growth and allocation scenarios (Status Quo, Managed Growth, and Unconstrained Growth). Five-year calibration and validation performances are assessed with Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency. Irrigation activities are simulated using local water rights. Results show that in all scenarios, annual mean stream flow decreases as the projected rainfall increases because the projected warmer climate also enhances water losses to evapotranspiration. Seasonal maximum stream flow tends to occur earlier than in current conditions due to the earlier peak of snow melting. The aridity index and water deficit generally increase in the

  15. Field trials of a rapid test for G6PD deficiency in combination with a rapid diagnosis of malaria.

    PubMed

    Tantular, I S; Iwai, K; Lin, K; Basuki, S; Horie, T; Htay, H H; Matsuoka, H; Marwoto, H; Wongsrichanalai, C; Dachlan, Y P; Kojima, S; Ishii, A; Kawamoto, F

    1999-04-01

    A rapid single-step screening method for detection of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6 PD) deficiency was evaluated on Halmahera Island, Maluku Province, Indonesia, and in Shan and Mon States, Myanmar, in combination with a rapid diagnosis of malaria by an acridine orange staining method. Severe deficiency was detected by the rapid test in 45 of 1126 volunteers in Indonesia and 54 of 1079 in Myanmar, but it was difficult to distinguish blood samples with mild deficiency from those with normal activity. 89 of 99 severely deficient cases were later confirmed by formazan ring method in the laboratory, but 5 with mild and 5 with no deficiency were misdiagnosed as severe. Of the samples diagnosed as mild and no deficiency on-site, none was found to be severely deficient by the formazan method. Malaria patients were simultaenously++ detected on-site in 273 samples on Halmahera island and 277 samples from Shan and Mon States. In Mon State, primaquine was prescribed safely to G6 PD-normal malaria patients infected with Plasmodium vivax and/or gametocytes of P. falciparum. The new rapid test for G6 PD deficiency may be useful for detecting severe cases under field conditions, and both rapid tests combined are can be useful in malaria-endemic areas, facilitating early diagnosis, prompt and radical treatment of malaria and suppression of malaria transmission.

  16. Rapid, learning-induced inhibitory synaptogenesis in murine barrel field

    PubMed Central

    Jasinska, M.; Siucinska, E.; Cybulska-Klosowicz, A.; Pyza, E.; Furness, D.N.; Kossut, M.; Glazewski, S.

    2010-01-01

    The structure of neurones changes during development and in response to injury or alteration in sensory experience. Changes occur in the number, shape and dimensions of dendritic spines together with their synapses. However, precise data on these changes in response to learning are sparse. Here, we show using quantitative transmission electron microscopy that a simple form of learning involving mystacial vibrissae results in about 70% increase in the density of inhibitory synapses on spines of neurones located in layer IV barrels that represent the stimulated vibrissae. The spines contain one asymmetrical (excitatory) and one symmetrical (inhibitory) synapse (double-synapse spines) and their density increases 3-fold due to learning with no apparent change in the density of asymmetrical synapses. This effect seems to be specific for learning as pseudoconditioning (where the conditioned and unconditioned stimuli are delivered at random) does not lead to the enhancement of symmetrical synapses, but instead results in an up-regulation of asymmetrical synapses on spines. Symmetrical synapses of cells located in barrels receiving the conditioned stimulus show also a greater concentration of γ-amino-butyric acid (GABA) in their presynaptic terminals. These results indicate that the immediate effect of classical conditioning in the ‘conditioned’ barrels is rapid, pronounced and inhibitory. PMID:20089926

  17. Field methods for rapidly characterizing paint waste during bridge rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Shu, Zhan; Axe, Lisa; Jahan, Kauser; Ramanujachary, Kandalam V

    2015-09-01

    For Department of Transportation (DOT) agencies, bridge rehabilitation involving paint removal results in waste that is often managed as hazardous. Hence, an approach that provides field characterization of the waste classification would be beneficial. In this study, an analysis of variables critical to the leaching process was conducted to develop a predictive tool for waste classification. This approach first involved identifying mechanistic processes that control leaching. Because steel grit is used to remove paint, elevated iron concentrations remain in the paint waste. As such, iron oxide coatings provide an important surface for metal adsorption. The diffuse layer model was invoked (logKMe=4.65 for Pb and logKMe=2.11 for Cr), where 90% of the data were captured within the 95% confidence level. Based on an understanding of mechanistic processes along with principal component analysis (PCA) of data obtained from field-portable X-ray fluorescence (FP-XRF), statistically-based models for leaching from paint waste were developed. Modeling resulted in 96% of the data falling within the 95% confidence level for Pb (R(2) 0.6-0.9, p ⩽ 0.04), Ba (R(2) 0.5-0.7, p ⩽ 0.1), and Zn (R(2) 0.6-0.7, p ⩽ 0.08). However, the regression model obtained for Cr leaching was not significant (R(2) 0.3-0.5, p ⩽ 0.75). The results of this work may assist DOT agencies with applying a predictive tool in the field that addresses the mobility of trace metals as well as disposal and management of paint waste during bridge rehabilitation.

  18. Planetary Nebulae: Reviews and Previews of a Rapidly Evolving Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balick, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Observational results from the ground and space in the past decade and covering the entire spectrum have jolted and energized research into the nature, the formation, and the evolution of planetary nebulae (PNs). The 101-level bubble structure of PNs turned out to be a pleasant but misleading fantasy as observations by HST and ALMA revealed basic details of their infancy. Some combination of close geriatric binary stars (the precusrors of SN Ia's) and magnetic fields dredged into the dusty winds appear to play vital roles in the ejection and collimation of AGB atmospheres. As a result, PNe and their antecedents, AGB stars and prePNs, are providing an array of new opportunities to study asymmetric wind formation, complex gas dynamics, CNO production rates in various galactic environments, and galaxy structure and evolution. I shall review the highlights of recent results, summarize their interpretations, and show some of the observational opportunities to monitor in the next decade, many of which couple strongly to research to related fields.This talk is dedicated to the career of Olivier Chesneau (1972-2014) who pioneered new high-resolution imaging methods that peered into the deep inner cores of nascent planetary nebulae. We remember Olivier as everyone's enthusiastic friend and colleague whose career ended in full stride.

  19. Pitch-angle diffusion of electrons through growing and propagating along a magnetic field electromagnetic wave in Earth's radiation belts

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, C.-R. Dokgo, K.; Min, K.-W.; Woo, M.-H.; Choi, E.-J.; Hwang, J.; Park, Y.-D.; Lee, D.-Y.

    2015-06-15

    The diffusion of electrons via a linearly polarized, growing electromagnetic (EM) wave propagating along a uniform magnetic field is investigated. The diffusion of electrons that interact with the growing EM wave is investigated through the autocorrelation function of the parallel electron acceleration in several tens of electron gyration timescales, which is a relatively short time compared with the bounce time of electrons between two mirror points in Earth's radiation belts. Furthermore, the pitch-angle diffusion coefficient is derived for the resonant and non-resonant electrons, and the effect of the wave growth on the electron diffusion is discussed. The results can be applied to other problems related to local acceleration or the heating of electrons in space plasmas, such as in the radiation belts.

  20. A rapid estimation of near field tsunami run-up

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Riqueime, Sebastian; Fuentes, Mauricio; Hayes, Gavin; Campos, Jamie

    2015-01-01

    Many efforts have been made to quickly estimate the maximum run-up height of tsunamis associated with large earthquakes. This is a difficult task, because of the time it takes to construct a tsunami model using real time data from the source. It is possible to construct a database of potential seismic sources and their corresponding tsunami a priori.However, such models are generally based on uniform slip distributions and thus oversimplify the knowledge of the earthquake source. Here, we show how to predict tsunami run-up from any seismic source model using an analytic solution, that was specifically designed for subduction zones with a well defined geometry, i.e., Chile, Japan, Nicaragua, Alaska. The main idea of this work is to provide a tool for emergency response, trading off accuracy for speed. The solutions we present for large earthquakes appear promising. Here, run-up models are computed for: The 1992 Mw 7.7 Nicaragua Earthquake, the 2001 Mw 8.4 Perú Earthquake, the 2003Mw 8.3 Hokkaido Earthquake, the 2007 Mw 8.1 Perú Earthquake, the 2010 Mw 8.8 Maule Earthquake, the 2011 Mw 9.0 Tohoku Earthquake and the recent 2014 Mw 8.2 Iquique Earthquake. The maximum run-up estimations are consistent with measurements made inland after each event, with a peak of 9 m for Nicaragua, 8 m for Perú (2001), 32 m for Maule, 41 m for Tohoku, and 4.1 m for Iquique. Considering recent advances made in the analysis of real time GPS data and the ability to rapidly resolve the finiteness of a large earthquake close to existing GPS networks, it will be possible in the near future to perform these calculations within the first minutes after the occurrence of similar events. Thus, such calculations will provide faster run-up information than is available from existing uniform-slip seismic source databases or past events of pre-modeled seismic sources.

  1. Norway`s development prospect list grows through old field reworkings and new finds

    SciTech Connect

    Knott, D.

    1998-08-17

    The list of Norwegian offshore fields under development or lined up for development has grown considerably in the last year. Wood Mackenzie Consultants Ltd., Edinburgh, says fields likely to be brought on stream in the next 5 years have total reserves of 6.4 billion bbl of oil and 25.7 tcf of gas. The analyst attributes growth in the developments list to several factors: development delays on current projects due to construction or technical problems; delays forced on operators by the Norwegian government; the award of a number of gas sales allocations by the GFU (Gas Negotiating Committee); the planned exploitation of older finds previously considered uncommercial for technical or logistical reasons; and the continuing normal progression of discoveries through to the development stage following a sustained period of successful exploration.

  2. RAPID ARSENITE OXIDATION BY THERMUS AQUATICUS AND THERMUS THERMOPHILUS: FIELD AND LABORATORY INVESTIGATIONS. (R826189)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thermus aquaticus and Thermus thermophilus, common inhabitants of terrestrial hot springs and thermally polluted domestic and industrial waters, have been found to rapidly oxidize arsenite to arsenate. Field investigations at a hot spring in Yellowstone National Park revealed ...

  3. Pancreatic Cancer: Progress and Challenges in a Rapidly Moving Field.

    PubMed

    Collisson, Eric A; Olive, Kenneth P

    2017-03-01

    "Pancreatic Cancer: Advances in Science and Clinical Care," a Special Conference of the American Association for Cancer Research, was held in Orlando, FL, on May 12 to 15, bringing together more than 450 basic, translational, clinical, and epidemiologic pancreatic cancer researchers as well as pancreatic cancer patients, survivors, and advocates. Pancreatic cancer remains one of the great challenges in medicine, but the accelerating pace of research and early hints of clinical successes to come were palpable throughout the meeting. Prominent meeting themes included immunology and the tumor microenvironment, heterogeneity of both the epithelial and stromal compartments, personalized medicine efforts to integrate molecular information into clinical practice, new approaches to early detection, and clinical trials using a host of novel targeted therapies. Adding to the vibrant atmosphere of the meeting, a coalition of pancreatic cancer research and support foundations participated, with several innovative initiatives announced by individual organizations. We present here a summary of meeting highlights, a series of "success factors" that will benchmark the progress of the field over the next 2 years, and three challenges to the pancreatic cancer research community as it moves toward to the goal of extending patient survival. Cancer Res; 77(5); 1060-2. ©2017 AACR.

  4. [Quantifying direct N2O emissions from paddy fields during rice growing season in China: model establishment].

    PubMed

    Zou, Jian-Wen; Qin, Yan-Mei; Liu, Shu-Wei

    2009-02-15

    Various water management regimes, such as continuous flooding (F), flooding-midseason drainage-reflooding (F-D-F), and flooding-midseason drainage-reflooding-moist intermittent irrigation but without water logging (F-D-F-M), are currently practiced in paddy rice production in China. These water regimes have incurred a sensitive change in direct N2O emission from rice paddy fields. In order to establish statistical models quantifying the country-specific emission factor and background emission of N2O in paddy fields during the rice growing season, we compiled and statistically analyzed field data on 71 N2O measurements from 17 field studies that were published in peer-reviewed Chinese and English journals. For each field study, we documented the seasonal N2O emission, the type and amount of organic amendment and fertilizer nitrogen application, the water management regime, the drainage duration, the field location and cropping season. Seasonal total N2O was, on average, equivalent to 0.02% of the nitrogen applied in the continuous flooding rice paddies. Under the water regime of F-D-F or the F-D-F-M, seasonal N2O emissions increased with N fertilizer applied in rice paddies. Applying an Ordinary Least Square (OLS) linear regression model resulted in an emission factor of 0.42% for N2O, and in unpronounced background N2 O emission under the water regime of F-D-F. Under the F-D-F-M water regime, N2O emission factor and N2O-N background emission were estimated to be 0.73% and 0.79 kg x hm(-2) during the paddy rice growing season, respectively. After considering three different water regimes in rice paddies in China, the emission factor of N for N2O and N2O-N background emission averaged 0.54% and 0.43 kg x hm(-2). The results of this study suggest that paddy rice relative to upland crop production could have contributed to mitigating N2O emissions from agriculture in China. The emission factor of N for N2O and its background emissions can be directly adopted to develop

  5. Rapid Field-Usable Cyanide Sensor Development for Blood and Saliva

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-12-2-0123 TITLE: Rapid Field-Usable Cyanide Sensor...ANNUAL REPORT 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 26 2012 25 2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Rapid Field-Usable Cyanide Sensor Development for Blood and...Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Cyanide is a deadly poison which may be ingested or inhaled

  6. Selected Water-Quality Data from the Cedar River and Cedar Rapids Well Fields, Cedar Rapids, Iowa, 1999-2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Littin, Gregory R.; Schnoebelen, Douglas J.

    2010-01-01

    The Cedar River alluvial aquifer is the primary source of municipal water in the Cedar Rapids, Iowa area. Municipal wells are completed in the alluvial aquifer at approximately 40 to 80 feet deep. The City of Cedar Rapids and the U.S. Geological Survey have been conducting a cooperative study of the groundwater-flow system and water quality near the well fields since 1992. Previous cooperative studies between the City of Cedar Rapids and the U.S. Geological Survey have documented hydrologic and water-quality data, geochemistry, and groundwater models. Water-quality samples were collected for studies involving well field monitoring, trends, source-water protection, groundwater geochemistry, evaluation of surface and ground-water interaction, assessment of pesticides in groundwater and surface water, and to evaluate water quality near a wetland area in the Seminole well field. Typical water-quality analyses included major ions (boron, bromide, calcium, chloride, fluoride, iron, magnesium, manganese, potassium, silica, sodium, and sulfate), nutrients (ammonia as nitrogen, nitrite as nitrogen, nitrite plus nitrate as nitrogen, and orthophosphate as phosphorus), dissolved organic carbon, and selected pesticides including two degradates of the herbicide atrazine. In addition, two synoptic samplings included analyses of additional pesticide degradates in water samples. Physical field parameters (alkalinity, dissolved oxygen, pH, specific conductance and water temperature) were recorded with each water sample collected. This report presents the results of water quality data-collection activities from January 1999 through December 2005. Methods of data collection, quality-assurance samples, water-quality analyses, and statistical summaries are presented. Data include the results of water-quality analyses from quarterly and synoptic sampling from monitoring wells, municipal wells, and the Cedar River.

  7. Selected water-quality data from the Cedar River and Cedar Rapids well fields, Cedar Rapids, Iowa, 2006-10

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Littin, Gregory R.

    2012-01-01

    The Cedar River alluvial aquifer is the primary source of municipal water in the Cedar Rapids, Iowa area. Municipal wells are completed in the alluvial aquifer approximately 40 to 80 feet below land surface. The City of Cedar Rapids and the U.S. Geological Survey have been conducting a cooperative study of the groundwater-flow system and water quality of the aquifer since 1992. Cooperative reports between the City of Cedar Rapids and the U.S. Geological Survey have documented hydrologic and water-quality data, geochemistry, and groundwater models. Water-quality samples were collected for studies involving well field monitoring, trends, source-water protection, groundwater geochemistry, surface-water-groundwater interaction, and pesticides in groundwater and surface water. Water-quality analyses were conducted for major ions (boron, bromide, calcium, chloride, fluoride, iron, magnesium, manganese, potassium, silica, sodium, and sulfate), nutrients (ammonia as nitrogen, nitrite as nitrogen, nitrite plus nitrate as nitrogen, and orthophosphate as phosphorus), dissolved organic carbon, and selected pesticides including two degradates of the herbicide atrazine. Physical characteristics (alkalinity, dissolved oxygen, pH, specific conductance and water temperature) were measured in the field and recorded for each water sample collected. This report presents the results of routine water-quality data-collection activities from January 2006 through December 2010. Methods of data collection, quality-assurance, and water-quality analyses are presented. Data include the results of water-quality analyses from quarterly sampling from monitoring wells, municipal wells, and the Cedar River.

  8. The status of health communication: education and employment outlook for a growing field.

    PubMed

    McKeever, Brooke Weberling

    2014-12-01

    Using an online survey of health communication practitioners and academics (N = 372), this study investigates the educational background (degrees, knowledge, skills, and coursework) perceived to be important for employment in health communication. It provides an update on what may be needed in terms of graduate education, as well as which areas may be emerging as most important in the field. The purpose is to inform students, educators, administrators, and practitioners about the current status and possible future trends in health communication education and practice.

  9. Effects of exposure to electromagnetic field (1.8/0.9 GHz) on testicular function and structure in growing rats.

    PubMed

    Ozlem Nisbet, H; Nisbet, Cevat; Akar, Aysegul; Cevik, Mesut; Karayigit, M Onder

    2012-10-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the possible effects of whole-body electromagnetic field (EMF) exposure on reproduction in growing male rats. Male albino Wistar rats (2 days old) were exposed to EMF 1800 and 900 MHz for 2 h continuously per day for 90 days. Sham control was kept under similar conditions except that the field was not applied for the same period. After blood samples were collected, the animals were sacrificed 24 h after the last exposure and the tissues of interest were harvested. The mean plasma total testosterone showed similarity among the two study groups and was significantly higher than the sham control rats. The percentage of epididymal sperm motility was significantly higher in the 1800 MHz group (P<0.05). The morphologically normal spermatozoa rates were higher and the tail abnormality and total percentage abnormalities were lower in the 900 MHz group (P<0.05). Histopathologic parameters in the 1800 MHz group were significantly higher (P<0.05). In conclusion, the present study indicated that exposure to electromagnetic wave caused an increase in testosterone level, epididymal sperm motility (forward), and normal sperm morphology of rats. As a consequences, 1800 and 900 MHz EMF could be considered to be a cause of precocious puberty in growing rats.

  10. Guidelines for growing perennial grasses for biofuel and bioproducts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Guidelines for growing perennial grasses for biofuel and bioproducts Rob Mitchell Abstract: Switchgrass, big bluestem, and warm-season grass mixtures provide numerous benefits. Existing field equipment, herbicides, and cultivar improvement promote rapid establishment in the planting year. These gra...

  11. Total dural irradiation: RapidArc versus static-field IMRT: A case study

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, Paul J.

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare conventional fixed-gantry angle intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with RapidArc for total dural irradiation. We also hypothesize that target volume-individualized collimator angles may produce substantial normal tissue sparing when planning with RapidArc. Five-, 7-, and 9-field fixed-gantry angle sliding-window IMRT plans were generated for comparison with RapidArc plans. Optimization and normal tissue constraints were constant for all plans. All plans were normalized so that 95% of the planning target volume (PTV) received at least 100% of the dose. RapidArc was delivered using 350 Degree-Sign clockwise and counterclockwise arcs. Conventional collimator angles of 45 Degree-Sign and 315 Degree-Sign were compared with 90 Degree-Sign on both arcs. Dose prescription was 59.4 Gy in 33 fractions. PTV metrics used for comparison were coverage, V{sub 107}%, D1%, conformality index (CI{sub 95}%), and heterogeneity index (D{sub 5}%-D{sub 95}%). Brain dose, the main challenge of this case, was compared using D{sub 1}%, Dmean, and V{sub 5} Gy. Dose to optic chiasm, optic nerves, globes, and lenses was also compared. The use of unconventional collimator angles (90 Degree-Sign on both arcs) substantially reduced dose to normal brain. All plans achieved acceptable target coverage. Homogeneity was similar for RapidArc and 9-field IMRT plans. However, heterogeneity increased with decreasing number of IMRT fields, resulting in unacceptable hotspots within the brain. Conformality was marginally better with RapidArc relative to IMRT. Low dose to brain, as indicated by V5Gy, was comparable in all plans. Doses to organs at risk (OARs) showed no clinically meaningful differences. The number of monitor units was lower and delivery time was reduced with RapidArc. The case-individualized RapidArc plan compared favorably with the 9-field conventional IMRT plan. In view of lower monitor unit requirements and shorter delivery time, Rapid

  12. Alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT) anomalies are associated with lung disease due to rapidly growing mycobacteria and AAT inhibits Mycobacterium abscessus infection of macrophages.

    PubMed

    Chan, Edward D; Kaminska, Aleksandra M; Gill, Wendy; Chmura, Kathryn; Feldman, Nicole E; Bai, Xiyuan; Floyd, Corinne M; Fulton, Kayte E; Huitt, Gwen A; Strand, Matthew J; Iseman, Michael D; Shapiro, Leland

    2007-01-01

    Rapidly growing mycobacteria (RGM) are ubiquitous in the environment but cause lung disease in only a fraction of exposed individuals. This variable susceptibility to disease implies vulnerability to RGM infection due to weakness in host defense. Since most persons who contract RGM lung disease have no known host defense defect, it is likely that uncharacterized host deficiencies exist that predispose to RGM infection. Alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT) is a host factor that may protect individuals from respiratory infections. Therefore, we assessed AAT protein anomalies as a risk factor for RGM lung disease. In a cohort of 100 patients with RGM lung disease, Mycobacterium (M.) abscessus was the most prevalent organism, isolated in 64 (64%) subjects. Anomalous AAT proteins were present in 27% of the cohort, which is 1.6 times the estimated prevalence of anomalous AAT proteins in the United States population (p=0.008). In in vitro studies, both AAT and a synthetic inhibitor of serine proteases suppressed M. abscessus infection of monocyte-derived macrophages by up to 65% (p<0.01). AAT may be an anti-RGM host-defense factor, and anomalous AAT phenotypes or AAT deficiency may constitute risk factors for pulmonary disease due to RGM.

  13. A rapidly growing epidermoid cyst in an intrapancreatic accessory spleen treated by laparoscopic spleen-preserving distal pancreatectomy: Report of a case.

    PubMed

    Kumamoto, Yusuke; Kaizu, Takashi; Tajima, Hiroshi; Kubo, Hidefumi; Nishiyama, Ryo; Watanabe, Masahiko

    2015-06-02

    Epidermoid cysts arising in an intrapancreatic accessory spleen are exceedingly rare, furthermore the natural course of them is hardly known. We report a case correctly diagnosed with epidermoid cyst in an intrapancreatic accessory spleen, followed by 1 year observation, finally underwent surgical treatment. The patient presented with diarrhea. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) revealed a pancreatic cyst 20 mm in diameter, surrounded by a solid component showing the same enhancement as the spleen, suggesting the presence of an epidermoid cyst in an intrapancreatic accessory spleen. One year later, back discomfort developed, and a CT scan revealed that the cyst had grown to 38 mm in diameter. To obtain a definitive diagnosis, we performed a laparoscopic spleen-preserving distal pancreatectomy. The histopathological diagnosis was compatible with an epidermoid cyst in an intrapancreatic accessory spleen, which is benign. The postoperative course was uneventful. This case demonstrates that an epidermoid cyst arising in an intrapancreatic accessory spleen can rapidly grow, even if it is benign. Laparoscopic spleen-preserving distal pancreatectomy can be a useful procedure, with the advantages of low invasiveness and organ preservation, for the treatment of benign or low-grade malignant tumors located in the pancreatic body or tail.

  14. A field-deployable device for the rapid detection of cyanide poisoning in whole blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehringer, Hans; Tong, Winnie; Chung, Roy; Boss, Gerry; O'Farrell, Brendan

    2012-06-01

    Feasibility of a field-deployable device for the rapid and early diagnosis of cyanide poisoning in whole blood using the spectral shift of the vitamin B12 precursor cobinamide upon binding with cyanide as an indicator is being assessed. Cyanide is an extremely potent and rapid acting poison with as little as 50 mg fatal to humans. Cyanide poisoning has been recognized as a threat from smoke inhalation and potentially through weapons of mass destruction. Currently, no portable rapid tests for the detection of cyanide in whole blood are available. Cobinamide has an extremely high affinity for cyanide and captures hemoglobin associated cyanide from red blood cells. Upon binding of cyanide, cobinamide undergoes a spectral shift that can be measured with a spectrophotometer. We have combined the unique cyanide-binding properties of cobinamide with blood separation technology, sample transport and a detection system, and are developing a rapid, field deployable, disposable device which will deliver an intuitive result to a first responder, allowing for rapid response to exposure events. Feasibility of the cobinamide-Cyanide chemistry in a rapid test using a whole blood sample from a finger-stick has been demonstrated with an assay time from sample collection to a valid result of under 5 minutes. Data showing the efficacy of the diagnostic method and initial device design concepts will be shown.

  15. A Portable Kit for Rapid Diagnosis of Infectious Diseases under Field Conditions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-08-14

    A PORTABLE KIT FOR RAPID~ DIAGNOSIS OF INFECTIOUS DISEASES UNDER FIELD CONDITIONS W. R. SANBORN REPORT NO. 80-22 ELECT o JUL 198 ~SA NAV) AL HEALTH ...DIAGNOSIS of INFECTIOUS DISEASES under FIELD CONDITIONS I / Warren R. Sanborn Head, Microbiology Branch Biological Sciences Division Naval Health ...formation. Blood and stool examinations for parasites require a microscope, I as do examinations for certain superficial mycoses . The McArthur microscope

  16. [Quantifying direct N2O emissions from paddy fields during rice growing season in China: model and input data validation].

    PubMed

    Zou, Jian-Wen; Liu, Shu-Wei; Qin, Yan-Mei; Feng, De-Sheng; Zhu, Hui-Lin; Xu, Yong-Zhong

    2009-04-15

    The models on direct N2O emissions from rice paddies under different water regimes developed by the authors were validated against field measurements in China reported in 2005-2007 and in other regions. In flooding rice paddies (F), N2O emission predicted by the model was consistent with previous reports in other regions. Under the water regime of flooding-midseason drainage-reflooding (F-D-F), the model developed in this study was comparable to that established by using worldwide database. The models also well fitted N2O emissions from rice paddies under the water regime of flooding-midseason drainage-reflooding-moisture but without waterlogging (F-D-F-M) in China. Consistency of rice production data derived from the database of this study with those reported in previous studies suggests that the model input data of rice production had high reliability. The input data showed that water management and nitrogen input regimes have greatly changed in rice paddies since the 1950s. During the 1950s-1970s, about 20%-25% of the rice paddy was continuous water logging, and 75%-80% under the water regime of F-D-F. Since the 1980s, about 12%-16%, 77% and 7%-12% of paddy fields were under the water regimes of F, F-D-F and F-D-F-M, respectively. Total N input during the rice growing season averaged 87.49 kg x hm(-2) in the 1950s and 224.64 kg x hm(-2) in the 1990s. Chemical N input during the rice growing season has increased from 37.4 kg x hm(-2) in the 1950s to 198.8 kg x hm(-2) in the 1990s, accounting for 43% and 88% of the seasonal total N inputs, respectively. Manure N input was applied at stable rate, ranging from 45.2 kg x hm(-2) to 48.2 kg x hm(-2) during the 1950s-1970s, but thereafter it decreased over time. The contribution of manure N to total N inputs has decreased from 52% in the 1950s to 9% in the 1990s. Crop residue N retained during the rice growing season has increased from 4.9 kg x hm(-2) in the 1950s to 6.3 kg x hm(-2) in the 1980s. A high spatial

  17. Validation of the Puumala virus rapid field test for bank voles in Germany.

    PubMed

    Reil, D; Imholt, C; Rosenfeld, U M; Drewes, S; Fischer, S; Heuser, E; Petraityte-Burneikiene, R; Ulrich, R G; Jacob, J

    2017-02-01

    Puumala virus (PUUV) causes many human infections in large parts of Europe and can lead to mild to moderate disease. The bank vole (Myodes glareolus) is the only reservoir of PUUV in Central Europe. A commercial PUUV rapid field test for rodents was validated for bank-vole blood samples collected in two PUUV-endemic regions in Germany (North Rhine-Westphalia and Baden-Württemberg). A comparison of the results of the rapid field test and standard ELISAs indicated a test efficacy of 93-95%, largely independent of the origin of the antigens used in the ELISA. In ELISAs, reactivity for the German PUUV strain was higher compared to the Swedish strain but not compared to the Finnish strain, which was used for the rapid field test. In conclusion, the use of the rapid field test can facilitate short-term estimation of PUUV seroprevalence in bank-vole populations in Germany and can aid in assessing human PUUV infection risk.

  18. Rapid Field Measurement of Dissolved Inorganic Carbon Based on CO{sub 2} Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    VESPER, DJ, Edenborn, Harry

    2012-01-01

    Dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) is commonly measured in water and is an important parameter for understanding carbonate equilibrium, carbon cycling, and water-rock interaction. While accurate measurements can be made in the analytical laboratory, we have developed a rapid, portable technique that can be used to obtain accurate and precise data in the field as well.

  19. Rapid field assessment of RO desalination of brackish agricultural drainage water.

    PubMed

    Thompson, John; Rahardianto, Anditya; Gu, Han; Uchymiak, Michal; Bartman, Alex; Hedrick, Marcos; Lara, David; Cooper, Jim; Faria, Jose; Christofides, Panagiotis D; Cohen, Yoram

    2013-05-15

    Rapid field evaluation of RO feed filtration requirements, selection of effective antiscalant type and dose, and estimation of suitable scale-free RO recovery level were demonstrated using a novel approach based on direct observation of mineral scaling and flux decline measurements, utilizing an automated Membrane Monitor (MeMo). The MeMo, operated in a stand-alone single-pass desalting mode, enabled rapid assessment of the adequacy of feed filtration by enabling direct observation of particulate deposition on the membrane surface. The diagnostic field study with RO feed water of high mineral scaling propensity revealed (via direct MeMo observation) that suspended particulates (even for feed water of turbidity <1 NTU) could serve as seeds for promoting surface crystal nucleation. With feed filtration optimized, a suitable maximum RO water recovery, with complete mineral scale suppression facilitated by an effective antiscalant dose, can be systematically and directly identified (via MeMo) in the field for a given feed water quality. Scale-free operating conditions, determined via standalone MeMo rapid diagnostic tests, were shown to be applicable to spiral-would RO system as validated via both flux decline measurements and ex-situ RO plant membrane scale monitoring. It was shown that the present approach is suitable for rapid field assessment of RO operability and it is particularly advantageous when evaluating water sources of composition that may vary both temporally and across the regions of interest.

  20. Standing Helicon Wave Induced by a Rapidly Bent Magnetic Field in Plasmas.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kazunori; Takayama, Sho; Komuro, Atsushi; Ando, Akira

    2016-04-01

    An electron energy probability function and a rf magnetic field are measured in a rf hydrogen helicon source, where axial and transverse static magnetic fields are applied to the source by solenoids and to the diffusion chamber by filter magnets, respectively. It is demonstrated that the helicon wave is reflected by the rapidly bent magnetic field and the resultant standing wave heats the electrons between the source and the magnetic filter, while the electron cooling effect by the magnetic filter is maintained. It is interpreted that the standing wave is generated by the presence of a spatially localized change of a refractive index.

  1. Diversity, community composition, and dynamics of nonpigmented and late-pigmenting rapidly growing mycobacteria in an urban tap water production and distribution system.

    PubMed

    Dubrou, S; Konjek, J; Macheras, E; Welté, B; Guidicelli, L; Chignon, E; Joyeux, M; Gaillard, J L; Heym, B; Tully, T; Sapriel, G

    2013-09-01

    Nonpigmented and late-pigmenting rapidly growing mycobacteria (RGM) have been reported to commonly colonize water production and distribution systems. However, there is little information about the nature and distribution of RGM species within the different parts of such complex networks or about their clustering into specific RGM species communities. We conducted a large-scale survey between 2007 and 2009 in the Parisian urban tap water production and distribution system. We analyzed 1,418 water samples from 36 sites, covering all production units, water storage tanks, and distribution units; RGM isolates were identified by using rpoB gene sequencing. We detected 18 RGM species and putative new species, with most isolates being Mycobacterium chelonae and Mycobacterium llatzerense. Using hierarchical clustering and principal-component analysis, we found that RGM were organized into various communities correlating with water origin (groundwater or surface water) and location within the distribution network. Water treatment plants were more specifically associated with species of the Mycobacterium septicum group. On average, M. chelonae dominated network sites fed by surface water, and M. llatzerense dominated those fed by groundwater. Overall, the M. chelonae prevalence index increased along the distribution network and was associated with a correlative decrease in the prevalence index of M. llatzerense, suggesting competitive or niche exclusion between these two dominant species. Our data describe the great diversity and complexity of RGM species living in the interconnected environments that constitute the water production and distribution system of a large city and highlight the prevalence index of the potentially pathogenic species M. chelonae in the distribution network.

  2. Diversity, Community Composition, and Dynamics of Nonpigmented and Late-Pigmenting Rapidly Growing Mycobacteria in an Urban Tap Water Production and Distribution System

    PubMed Central

    Dubrou, S.; Konjek, J.; Macheras, E.; Welté, B.; Guidicelli, L.; Chignon, E.; Joyeux, M.; Gaillard, J. L.; Heym, B.; Tully, T.

    2013-01-01

    Nonpigmented and late-pigmenting rapidly growing mycobacteria (RGM) have been reported to commonly colonize water production and distribution systems. However, there is little information about the nature and distribution of RGM species within the different parts of such complex networks or about their clustering into specific RGM species communities. We conducted a large-scale survey between 2007 and 2009 in the Parisian urban tap water production and distribution system. We analyzed 1,418 water samples from 36 sites, covering all production units, water storage tanks, and distribution units; RGM isolates were identified by using rpoB gene sequencing. We detected 18 RGM species and putative new species, with most isolates being Mycobacterium chelonae and Mycobacterium llatzerense. Using hierarchical clustering and principal-component analysis, we found that RGM were organized into various communities correlating with water origin (groundwater or surface water) and location within the distribution network. Water treatment plants were more specifically associated with species of the Mycobacterium septicum group. On average, M. chelonae dominated network sites fed by surface water, and M. llatzerense dominated those fed by groundwater. Overall, the M. chelonae prevalence index increased along the distribution network and was associated with a correlative decrease in the prevalence index of M. llatzerense, suggesting competitive or niche exclusion between these two dominant species. Our data describe the great diversity and complexity of RGM species living in the interconnected environments that constitute the water production and distribution system of a large city and highlight the prevalence index of the potentially pathogenic species M. chelonae in the distribution network. PMID:23835173

  3. Strong Peak Electric Field in Streamer Discharges Caused by Rapid Changes in the External Electric Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ihaddadene, K. M. A.; Celestin, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    Laboratory spark discharges in air and lightning stepped leaders produce X-rays [e.g., Dwyer et al., GRL, 32, L20809, 2005; Nguyen et al., J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys., 41, 234012, 2008; Rahman et al., GRL, 35, L06805, 2008; March and Montanyà, GRL, 37, L19801, 2010; 38, L04803, 2011; Kochkin et al., J. Phys. D: Appl., 45, 425202, 2012; 48, 025205, 2015]. However, the processes behind the production of these X-rays are still not fully understood. Recently, the encounter between negative and positive streamers has been suggested as a plausible mechanism for the production of X-rays by spark discharges [Cooray et al., JASTP, 71, 1890, 2009; Kochkin et al., J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys., 45, 425202, 2012], but the increase of the electric field involved in this process is accompanied by a strong increase of the conductivity, which in turn makes this electric field collapse over a few tens of picoseconds, preventing the production of significant X-ray emissions [Ihaddadene and Celestin, GRL, 45, 5644, 2015]. Moreover, it has been reported that X-ray emission in laboratory spark discharges is influenced by the time derivative of the applied voltage [March and Montanya, GRL, 37, L19801, 2010]. Additionally, Celestin and Pasko [JGR, 116, A03315, 2011, Section 3.3] have indicated that quickly increasing applied voltages had an impact on peak electric fields in streamer numerical models. In this work, we simulate numerically the effect of impulsive applied electric fields on the dynamics of streamer discharges in air at ground level and investigate conditions under which production of thermal runaway electrons and the associated X-rays is possible.

  4. Rapidly Rotating, X-Ray Bright Stars in the Kepler Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, Steve B.; Mason, Elena; Boyd, Patricia; Smith, Krista Lynne; Gelino, Dawn M.

    2016-11-01

    We present Kepler light curves and optical spectroscopy of twenty X-ray bright stars located in the Kepler field of view. The stars, spectral type F-K, show evidence for rapid rotation including chromospheric activity 100 times or more above the Sun at maximum and flaring behavior in their light curves. Eighteen of our objects appear to be (sub)giants and may belong to the class of FK Com variables, which are evolved rapidly spinning single stars with no excretion disk and high levels of chromospheric activity. Such stars are rare and are likely the result of W UMa binary mergers, a process believed to produce the FK Com class of variable and their descendants. The FK Com stage, including the presence of an excretion disk, is short lived but leads to longer-lived stages consisting of single, rapidly rotating evolved (sub)giants with high levels of stellar activity.

  5. Flood hazard and a rapidly growing capital in the floodplain: Social response on major 18th-century Danube floods in Pest (East-Budapest)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiss, Andrea

    2014-05-01

    Due to its floodplain location, Pest was especially prone to damages caused by great flood events. Before water regulation works, the greatest flood events, and the highest rate of destruction occurred during ice jam floods. Whereas in the first half of the 18th century Pest is restricted to the medieval downtown located on a higher terrain (Danube terrace), from the mid 18th century onwards the rapidly growing population established suburbs around the downtown in the lower-lying flood plain. Thus, while in the first half of the century floods were more dangerous for the harvest in the agricultural lands, in the second half of the century at the same place suburbs, urban areas with thousands of inhabitants were prone to the same danger. In the first half of the century at least three particularly large flood events, in 1712, 1732 and 1744, caused increasing problems in the close vicinity of the town (and its lands), the second half of the century - as part of a climatic anomaly (Maldá) famous of its weather extremes - was characterised by two extreme (in 1775 and 1799), at least two larger (1789 and 1795) and some more, medium-sized ice jam floods. While in terms of damaged houses the loss was only some dozens in the early part of the century, several hundreds of houses - actually, complete suburbs were erased by floods in 1775 and 1799. In the poster presentation a series of known damaging 18th-century floods, occurred at Pest, is presented, the short-term impacts (e.g. damages), and medium-, long-term administrative responses as well as related long-term landscape changes influenced by floods and flood protection are discussed. Another important aim of the poster is to present the main reasons why in the 18th century these great ice jam floods caused much greater damages (e.g. percentage of collapsed houses in suburbs) in Pest protected by dams than, for example, in the Buda suburbs with no dams, partly also located in high flood-risk areas, in the immediate

  6. Rapid Acquisition and Fielding for Information Assurance and Cyber Security in the Navy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    information is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and...maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing the collection of information. Send comments regarding this burden estimate or any other aspect of...in-Publication Data Porche, Isaac, 1968– Rapid acquisition and fielding for information assurance and cyber security in the Navy / Isaac R. Porche

  7. Field-Usable Lateral Flow Immunoassay for the Rapid Detection of White Spot Syndrome Virus (WSSV)

    PubMed Central

    Kulabhusan, Prabir Kumar; Rajwade, Jyutika M.; Sugumar, Vimal; Taju, Gani; Sahul Hameed, A. S.

    2017-01-01

    Background White spot disease (WSD), a major threat to sustainable aquaculture worldwide, is caused by White spot syndrome virus (WSSV). The diagnosis of WSD relies heavily on molecular detection of the virus by one-step PCR. These procedures are neither field-usable nor rapid enough considering the speed at which the virus spreads. Thus, development of a rapid, reliable and field-usable diagnostic method for the detection of WSSV infection is imperative to prevent huge economic losses. Methods/Principal Findings Here, we report on the development of a lateral flow immunoassay (LFIA) employing gold nanoparticles conjugated to a polyclonal antibody against VP28 (envelope protein of WSSV). The LFIA detected WSSV in ~20 min and showed no cross-reactivity with other shrimp viruses, viz. Monodon Baculovirus (MBV), Hepatopancreatic parvovirus (HPV) and Infectious Hypodermal and Hematopoietic Necrosis virus (IHHNV). The limit of detection (LOD) of the assay, as determined by real-time PCR, was 103 copies of WSSV. In a time course infectivity experiment, ~104 WSSV particles were injected in Litopenaeus vannamei. The LFIA could rapidly (~ 20 min) detect the virus in different tissues after 3 h (hemolymph), 6 h (gill tissue) and 12 h (head soft tissue, eye stalk, and pleopod) of infection. Based on these findings, a validation study was performed using 75 field samples collected from different geographical locations in India. The LFIA results obtained were compared with the conventional “gold standard test”, viz. one-step PCR. The analysis of results in 2x2 matrix indicated very high sensitivity (100%) and specificity (96.77%) of LFIA. Similarly, Cohen’s kappa coefficient of 0.983 suggested "very good agreement” between the developed LFIA and the conventional one-step PCR. Conclusion The LFIA developed for the rapid detection of WSSV has an excellent potential for use in the field and could prove to be a boon to the aquaculture industry. PMID:28046005

  8. Rapid adhesive bonding concepts for specimen and panel fabrication and field repair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, B. A.; Hodges, W. T.

    1984-01-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center has developed bonding concepts for aerospace composite materials which employ induction heating to directly apply heat to the bond line and/or adherends without simultaneously heating the entire structure, supports, and fixtures of a bonding assembly. These methods have demonstrated bonding process time reductions of two to three orders of magnitude, by comparison with conventional press molding. Attention is presently given to rapid adhesive bonding for lap shear specimens for aerospace panel bonding or field repair, as well as for the field repair requirements of metallic and advanced polymeric matrix composite structures.

  9. Standing helicon induced by a rapidly bent magnetic field in plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Kazunori; Takayama, Sho; Komuro, Atsushi; Ando, Akira; Plasma physics Team

    2016-09-01

    An electron energy probability function and an rf magnetic field are measured in an rf hydrogen helicon source, where axial and transverse static magnetic fields are applied to the source by solenoids and to the diffusion chamber by filter magnets, respectively. It is demonstrated that the helicon wave is reflected by the rapidly bent magnetic field and the resultant standing wave heats the electrons between the source and the magnetic filter, while the electron cooling effect by the magnetic filter is maintained. It is interpreted that the standing wave is generated by the presence of spatially localized change of a refractive index. The application to the hydrogen negative ion source used for the neutral beam injection system for fusion plasma heating is discussed. This work is partially supported by grant-in-aid for scientific research (16H04084 and 26247096) from the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science.

  10. Are BVOC exchanges in agricultural ecosystems overestimated? Insights from fluxes measured in a maize field over a whole growing season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachy, Aurélie; Aubinet, Marc; Schoon, Niels; Amelynck, Crist; Bodson, Bernard; Moureaux, Christine; Heinesch, Bernard

    2016-04-01

    Maize is the most important C4 crop worldwide. It is also the second most important crop worldwide (C3 and C4 mixed), and is a dominant crop in some world regions. Therefore, it can potentially influence local climate and air quality through its exchanges of gases with the atmosphere. Among others, biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) are known to influence the atmospheric composition and thereby modify greenhouse gases lifetime and pollutant formation in the atmosphere. However, so far, only two studies have dealt with BVOC exchanges from maize. Moreover, these studies were conducted on a limited range of meteorological and phenological conditions, so that the knowledge of BVOC exchanges by this crop remains poor. Here, we present the first BVOC measurement campaign performed at ecosystem-scale on a maize field during a whole growing season. It was carried out in the Lonzée Terrestrial Observatory (LTO), an ICOS site. BVOC fluxes were measured by the disjunct by mass-scanning eddy covariance technique with a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer for BVOC mixing ratios measurements. Outstanding results are (i) BVOC exchanges from soil were as important as BVOC exchanges from maize itself; (ii) BVOC exchanges observed on our site were much lower than exchanges observed by other maize studies, even under normalized temperature and light conditions, (iii) they were also lower than those observed on other crops grown in Europe. Lastly (iv), BVOC exchanges observed on our site under standard environmental conditions, i.e., standard emission factors SEF, were much lower than those currently considered by BVOC exchange up-scaling models. From those observations, we deduced that (i) soil BVOC exchanges should be better understood and should be incorporated in terrestrial BVOC exchanges models, and that (ii) SEF for the C4 crop plant functional type cannot be evaluated at global scale but should be determined for each important agronomic and pedo-climatic region

  11. Test plan for preparing the Rapid Transuranic Monitoring Laboratory for field deployment

    SciTech Connect

    McIsaac, C.V.; Sill, C.W.; Gehrke, R.J.; Killian, E.W.; Watts, K.D.

    1994-04-01

    This plan describes experimental work that will be performed during fiscal year 1994 to prepare the Rapid Transuranic Monitoring Laboratory (RTML) for routine field use by US Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Restoration and Waste Management programs. The RTML is a mobile, field-deployable laboratory developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) that provides a rapid, cost-effective means of characterizing and monitoring radioactive waste remediation sites for low-level radioactive contaminants. Analytical instruments currently installed in the RTML include an extended-range, germanium photon analysis spectrometer with an automatic sample changer; two, large-area, ionization chamber alpha spectrometers; and four alpha continuous air monitors. The RTML was field tested at the INEL during June 1993 in conjunction with the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration`s remote retrieval demonstration. The major tasks described in this test plan are to (a) evaluate the beta detectors for use in screening soil samples for {sup 90}Sr, (b) upgrade the alpha spectral analysis software programs, and (c) upgrade the photon spectral analysis software programs.

  12. Rapid and Enhanced Proteolytic Digestion using Electric-Field-oriented Enzyme Reactor

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yu; Yi, Tie; Park, Sung-Soo; Chadwick, Wayne; Shen, Rong-Fong; Wu, Wells W.; Martin, Bronwen; Maudsley, Stuart

    2011-01-01

    We have created a novel enzyme reactor using electric field-mediated orientation and immobilization of proteolytic enzymes (trypsin/chymotrypsin) on biocompatible PVDF membranes in a continuous flow-through chamber. Using less than 5 minutes, this reactor in various enzyme combinations can produce enhanced rapid digestion for standardized prototypic proteins, hydrophilic proteins and hydrophobic transmembrane proteins when compared to in-solution techniques. With improved digestive efficiency, our reactor improved the overall functional analysis of lipid raft proteomes by identifying more closely functionally linked proteins and elucidated a richer set of biological processes and pathways linked to the proteins than traditional in-solution methods. PMID:21338726

  13. Obesity reduces bone density through activation of PPAR gamma and suppression of Wnt/Beta-Catenin in rapidly growing male rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The relationship between obesity and skeletal development remains largely ambiguous. In this report, total enteral nutrition (TEN) was used to feed growing male rats intragastrically, with a high 45% fat diet (HFD) to induce obesity. We found that fat mass was increased (P<0.05) compared to rats fed...

  14. Phase-field investigation on the non-equilibrium interface dynamics of rapid alloy solidification

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Jeong

    2011-01-01

    The research program reported here is focused on critical issues that represent conspicuous gaps in current understanding of rapid solidification, limiting our ability to predict and control microstructural evolution (i.e. morphological dynamics and microsegregation) at high undercooling, where conditions depart significantly from local equilibrium. More specifically, through careful application of phase-field modeling, using appropriate thin-interface and anti-trapping corrections and addressing important details such as transient effects and a velocity-dependent (i.e. adaptive) numerics, the current analysis provides a reasonable simulation-based picture of non-equilibrium solute partitioning and the corresponding oscillatory dynamics associated with single-phase rapid solidification and show that this method is a suitable means for a self-consistent simulation of transient behavior and operating point selection under rapid growth conditions. Moving beyond the limitations of conventional theoretical/analytical treatments of non-equilibrium solute partitioning, these results serve to substantiate recent experimental findings and analytical treatments for single-phase rapid solidification. The departure from the equilibrium solid concentration at the solid-liquid interface was often observed during rapid solidification, and the energetic associated non-equilibrium solute partitioning has been treated in detail, providing possible ranges of interface concentrations for a given growth condition. Use of these treatments for analytical description of specific single-phase dendritic and cellular operating point selection, however, requires a model for solute partitioning under a given set of growth conditions. Therefore, analytical solute trapping models which describe the chemical partitioning as a function of steady state interface velocities have been developed and widely utilized in most of the theoretical investigations of rapid solidification. However, these

  15. Continuous Magnetic Field Monitoring Using Rapid Re-Excitation of NMR Probe Sets.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, Benjamin E; Brunner, David O; Wilm, Bertram J; Barmet, Christoph; Pruessmann, Klaas P

    2016-06-01

    MRI relies on static and spatially varying dynamic magnetic fields of high accuracy. NMR field probes permit the direct observation of spatiotemporal field dynamics for diverse purposes such as data correction, field control, sequence validation, and hardware characterization. However, due to probe signal decay and dephasing existing field cameras are limited in terms of readout duration and the extent of k -space that can be covered. The present work aims to overcome these limitations by the transition to short-lived NMR probes and rapid re-excitation. The proposed approach uses probes with T 2 so short that thermal relaxation dominates signal decay even in the presence of strongest gradients. They are integrated with transmit, receive and sequencing electronics that permit high-rate re-excitation with optional probe alternation as well as complementary RF pulse recording. The system is demonstrated by monitoring of sample MRI sequences with long readouts and large gradient moments. It is compared with the conventional long-lived probe concept and characterized in terms of net sensitivity and sources of systematic error. Continuous k -space trajectory mapping is demonstrated and validated by trajectory-based image reconstruction.

  16. Combining rapid bioassessment and field-based microcosms for identifying impacts in an urban river.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Matthew L; Pettigrove, Vincent; Carew, Melissa E; Hoffmann, Ary A

    2010-08-01

    Rapid bioassessment indices based on macroinvertebrates are the most commonly used tools for assessing stream condition. However, once stream degradation has been detected, it is often difficult to identify which environmental stressors are most important because of changes in multiple correlated factors. In this study, we examined eight sites in an urban river watershed using a field-based microcosm experiment and the rapid bioassessment-based biotic index, SIGNAL. The experiment assessed the effects of polluted river sediment by examining the macroinvertebrate taxa that colonized sediments at an unpolluted wetland. Results were compared with an assessment of field-collected macroinvertebrates using SIGNAL, a biotic index that assigns pollution sensitivity scores to macroinvertebrate families, and environmental data, to determine whether sediment pollution or other factors such as habitat deterioration were likely to be influencing riverine macroinvertebrate communities. The microcosm results indicated that common species (Tanytarsus fuscithorax, Procladius paludicola, and Ablabesmyia notabilis) and the overall macroinvertebrate assemblage did not significantly change among sediments from different sites, with the exception of local effects on a few uncommon taxa (Chironomus pseudoppositus, Kiefferulus martini, Cladotanytarsus australomancus, Chaoboridae, Polypedilum "S1," and Tanytarsus belairensis). In contrast, SIGNAL showed a gradual trend of deterioration from upstream to downstream, decreasing from a score of 6.5 in upstream areas (unimpacted) to a score of 4.4 in the downstream sites (moderately impacted). This result combined with a significant correlation of SIGNAL scores to habitat data suggested that habitat deterioration rather than polluted sediment was likely to be responsible for the declining stream condition detected with the rapid bioassessment approach. The addition of the microcosms to other monitoring approaches could be useful for determining

  17. Growing seasons of Nordic mountain birch in northernmost Europe as indicated by long-term field studies and analyses of satellite images.

    PubMed

    Shutova, E; Wielgolaski, F E; Karlsen, S R; Makarova, O; Berlina, N; Filimonova, T; Haraldsson, E; Aspholm, P E; Flø, L; Høgda, K A

    2006-11-01

    The phenophases first greening (bud burst) and yellowing of Nordic mountain birch (Betula pubescens ssp.tortuosa, also called B. p. ssp. czerepanovii) were observed at three sites on the Kola Peninsula in northernmost Europe during the period 1964-2003, and at two sites in the trans-boundary Pasvik-Enare region during 1994-2003. The field observations were compared with satellite images based on the GIMMS-NDVI dataset covering 1982-2002 at the start and end of the growing season. A trend for a delay of first greening was observed at only one of the sites (Kandalaksha) over the 40 year period. This fits well with the delayed onset of the growing season for that site based on satellite images. No significant changes in time of greening at the other sites were found with either field observations or satellite analyses throughout the study period. These results differ from the earlier spring generally observed in other parts of Europe in recent decades. In the coldest regions of Europe, e.g. in northern high mountains and the northernmost continental areas, increased precipitation associated with the generally positive North Atlantic Oscillation in the last few decades has often fallen as snow. Increased snow may delay the time of onset of the growing season, although increased temperature generally causes earlier spring phenophases. Autumn yellowing of birch leaves tends towards an earlier date at all sites. Due to both later birch greening and earlier yellowing at the Kandalaksha site, the growing season there has also become significantly shorter during the years observed. The sites showing the most advanced yellowing in the field throughout the study period fit well with areas showing an earlier end of the growing season from satellite images covering 1982-2002. The earlier yellowing is highly correlated with a trend at the sites in autumn for earlier decreasing air temperature over the study period, indicating that this environmental factor is important also for

  18. Recommendations for Guidelines for Environment-Specific Magnetic-Field Measurements, Rapid Program Engineering Project #2

    SciTech Connect

    Electric Research and Management, Inc.; IIT Research Institute; Magnetic Measurements; Survey Research Center, University of California; T. Dan Bracken, Inc.

    1997-03-11

    The purpose of this project was to document widely applicable methods for characterizing the magnetic fields in a given environment, recognizing the many sources co-existing within that space. The guidelines are designed to allow the reader to follow an efficient process to (1) plan the goals and requirements of a magnetic-field study, (2) develop a study structure and protocol, and (3) document and carry out the plan. These guidelines take the reader first through the process of developing a basic study strategy, then through planning and performing the data collection. Last, the critical factors of data management, analysis reporting, and quality assurance are discussed. The guidelines are structured to allow the researcher to develop a protocol that responds to specific site and project needs. The Research and Public Information Dissemination Program (RAPID) is based on exposure to magnetic fields and the potential health effects. Therefore, the most important focus for these magnetic-field measurement guidelines is relevance to exposure. The assumed objective of an environment-specific measurement is to characterize the environment (given a set of occupants and magnetic-field sources) so that information about the exposure of the occupants may be inferred. Ideally, the researcher seeks to obtain complete or "perfect" information about these magnetic fields, so that personal exposure might also be modeled perfectly. However, complete data collection is not feasible. In fact, it has been made more difficult as the research field has moved to expand the list of field parameters measured, increasing the cost and complexity of performing a measurement and analyzing the data. The guidelines address this issue by guiding the user to design a measurement protocol that will gather the most exposure-relevant information based on the locations of people in relation to the sources. We suggest that the "microenvironment" become the base unit of area in a study, with

  19. Two-dimensional shear bands growing dynamically in plates: An investigation of transient deformation fields, temperature fields and shear band toughness

    SciTech Connect

    Rosakis, A.J.

    1995-12-31

    The phenomenon of dynamic initiation and propagation of two-dimensional adiabatic shear bands is experimentally and numerically investigated. Prenotched metal plates are subjected to asymmetric impact load histories (dynamic mode-II loading). Dynamic shear bands emanate from the notch-tip and propagate rapidly in a direction nearly parallel to the direction of impact. Real time temperature histories along a line intersecting and perpendicular to the shear band paths are recorded by means of a high speed infrared detector system. The materials studied are C-300 (a maraging steel), HY-100 steel and Ti-6Al-4V. Experiments show that the peak temperatures inside the propagating shear bands are approaching 90% of the melting point for C-300 and are significantly lower for the titanium alloy (up to 6000C). Additionally, measured distances of shear band propagation indicate stronger resistance to shear banding by HY-100 steel and Ti-6Al-4V. Deformation fields around the propagating shear band are recorded using high speed photography. Shear band speeds are found to strongly depend on impact velocity are as high as 1200 m/s for C-300 steel. Finite element simulations of the experiment are carried out under the context of plane strain, considering finite deformations, inertia, heat conduction, thermal softening, strain hardening and strain-rate hardening. In the simulations, the shear band propagation is assumed to be governed by a critical plastic strain criterion. The results are compared with experimental measurements obtained using the high speed infrared detectors and high speed photography. Finally, the numerical calculations are used to investigate motions of shear band toughness. The shear band driving force is calculated as a function of shear band velocity and compared to the crack driving force versus velocity relations for mode-I, opening cracks in the same material.

  20. Self-Consistent Field Model Spectra and Images for the Rapid Rotator α Cephei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aufdenberg, Jason P.; MacGregor, K.; Sola, M.

    2012-05-01

    Non-LTE synthetic radiation fields have been coupled to Self-Consistent Field (SCF) rotating star models to predict images, interferometric observables (visibilities and closure phases), spectral energy distributions (SEDs), and high-resolution spectra for comparison with rapid rotater alpha Cephei (Alderamin). SCF models include differential rotation from the interior to the surface and differ from Roche models that assume a point-mass approximation of the gravitational potential and axially symmetric uniform rotation. SCF models are parametrized by a mass, the ratio of the axial rotation rate to the critical rate, and the degree and kind (solar or anti-solar) of differential rotation. Model spectra have been computed using a parallel interpolation algorithm (coded in Fortran90 with openMPI) which maps a radiation field database onto the rotationally distorted model star. The SCF model describes the surface shape and gravitational field from the pole to the equator. The luminosity and the von Zeipel exponent specify the variation in effective temperature with stellar latitude. The radiation field is interpolated at each point on the star for each wavelength, emergent angle, local effective, and local surface gravity. Model images are compared to the reconstructed images of Alderamin (Zhao et al. 2009) from the Michigan InfraRed Combiner (MIRC) at the CHARA Array. Model SEDs are compared to ultraviolet, visual and near-IR spectrophotometry. High-resolution model spectra are compared Alderamin's Mg II 4481 A line from the ELODIE spectral archive. We have found models near 2.2 solar masses with anti-solar differential rotation which match simultaneously the absolute magnitude, B-V color index, and projected axial ratio measured for Alderamin. The model images differ from the observations in brightness-temperature distribution over the projected stellar surface, the strength of the Mg II line profile, and the strength of the ultraviolet continuum. This work is

  1. Spatiotemporal variations in growing season exchanges of CO2, H2O,and sensible heat in agricultural fields of the Southern GreatPlains

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, Marc L.; Billesbach, David P.; Berry, Joseph A.; Riley,William J.; Torn, Margaret S.

    2007-06-13

    Climate, vegetation cover, and management create fine-scaleheterogeneity in unirrigated agricultural regions, with important but notwell-quantified consequences for spatial and temporal variations insurface CO2, water, and heat fluxes. We measured eddy covariance fluxesin seven agricultural fields--comprising winter wheat, pasture, andsorghum--in the U.S. Southern Great Plains (SGP) during the 2001-2003growing seasons. Land-cover was the dominant source of variation insurface fluxes, with 50-100 percent differences between fields planted inwinter-spring versus fields planted in summer. Interannual variation wasdriven mainly by precipitation, which varied more than two-fold betweenyears. Peak aboveground biomass and growing-season net ecosystem exchange(NEE) of CO2 increased in rough proportion to precipitation. Based on apartitioning of gross fluxes with a regression model, ecosystemrespiration increased linearly with gross primary production, but with anoffset that increased near the time of seed production. Because theregression model was designed for well-watered periods, it successfullyretrieved NEE and ecosystem parameters during the peak growing season,and identified periods of moisture limitation during the summer. Insummary, the effects of crop type, land management, and water limitationon carbon, water, and energy fluxes were large. Capturing the controllingfactors in landscape scale models will be necessary to estimate theecological feedbacks to climate and other environmental impactsassociated with changing human needs for agricultural production of food,fiber, and energy.

  2. Field flatteners fabricated with a rapid prototyper for K-edge subtraction imaging of small animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Ying; Zhang, Honglin; Bewer, Brian; Florin Gh. Popescu, Bogdan; Nichol, Helen; Chapman, Dean

    2008-04-01

    One of the difficulties in X-ray imaging is the need to record a wide dynamic range of intensities on the detector. For example, some rays may miss the object being imaged entirely while others may suffer many orders of magnitude attenuation in passing through. In K-edge subtraction (KES) [E. Rubenstein, et al., Trans. Am. Clin. Climatol. Assoc. 97 (1985) 27.] imaging subtle differences in transmission through an object about the absorption edge of an element are used to create an image of the projected density of that element. This is done by a logarithmic subtraction of images acquired with energies above and below the absorption edge. For KES, the detector must register this transmitted intensity range in a linear manner for the subtraction method to be successful. The range of intensities which may strike the detector has inspired the concept of a field flattener. A field flattener is a device placed in the beam path that attenuates the input monochromatic beam to equalize X-ray absorption due to differences in the density of soft and hard tissues of an object before it passes through the object and thus achieves a flattened image. This removes the need for a wide dynamic range linear detector and allows detectors with modest performance to be used successfully in KES applications. The field flattener improves the S/ N ratio since X-ray exposures can be increased up to detector saturation. However, a field flattener removes anatomical information from each raw image (above or below K-edge) that may provide useful landmarks. Using rapid prototyping technology, two sets of field flatteners were fabricated and used in a KES experiment. This paper describes the procedure to design and fabricate field flatteners based on animal images from X-ray computed tomography (CT). Analysis of experimental data and KES images of a rat head with and without the field flattener are also presented. The results show a promising improvement of S/ N ratio using a field flattener

  3. Strong-field dynamo action in rapidly rotating convection with no inertia.

    PubMed

    Hughes, David W; Cattaneo, Fausto

    2016-06-01

    The earth's magnetic field is generated by dynamo action driven by convection in the outer core. For numerical reasons, inertial and viscous forces play an important role in geodynamo models; however, the primary dynamical balance in the earth's core is believed to be between buoyancy, Coriolis, and magnetic forces. The hope has been that by setting the Ekman number to be as small as computationally feasible, an asymptotic regime would be reached in which the correct force balance is achieved. However, recent analyses of geodynamo models suggest that the desired balance has still not yet been attained. Here we adopt a complementary approach consisting of a model of rapidly rotating convection in which inertial forces are neglected from the outset. Within this framework we are able to construct a branch of solutions in which the dynamo generates a strong magnetic field that satisfies the expected force balance. The resulting strongly magnetized convection is dramatically different from the corresponding solutions in which the field is weak.

  4. Rapid and field-deployable biological and chemical Raman-based identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botonjic-Sehic, Edita; Paxon, Tracy L.; Boudries, Hacene

    2011-06-01

    Pathogen detection using Raman spectroscopy is achieved through the use of a sandwich immunoassay. Antibody-modified magnetic beads are used to capture and concentrate target analytes in solution and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) tags are conjugated with antibodies and act as labels to enable specific detection of biological pathogens. The rapid detection of biological pathogens is critical to first responders, thus assays to detect E.Coli and Anthrax have been developed and will be reported. The problems associated with pathogen detection resulting from the spectral complexity and variability of microorganisms are overcome through the use of SERS tags, which provide an intense, easily recognizable, and spectrally consistent Raman signal. The developed E. coli assay has been tested with 5 strains of E. coli and shows a low limit of detection, on the order of 10 and 100 c.f.u. per assay. Additionally, the SERS assay utilizes magnetic beads to collect the labeled pathogens into the focal point of the detection laser beam, making the assay robust to commonly encountered white powder interferants such as flour, baking powder, and corn starch. The reagents were also found to be stable at room temperature over extended periods of time with testing conducted over a one year period. Finally, through a specialized software algorithm, the assays are interfaced to the Raman instrument, StreetLab Mobile, for rapid-field-deployable biological identification.

  5. Rapid evolution of analog circuits configured on a field programmable transistor array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoica, A.; Ferguson, M. I.; Zebulum, R. S.; Keymeulen, D.; Duong, V.; Daud, T.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to illustrate evolution of analog circuits on a stand-alone board-level evolvable system (SABLES). SABLES is part of an effort to achieve integrated evolvable systems. SABLES provides autonomous, fast (tens to hundreds of seconds), on-chip circuit evolution involving about 100,000 circuit evaluations. Its main components are a JPL Field Programmable Transistor Array (FPTA) chip used as transistor-level reconfigurable hardware, and a TI DSP that implements the evolutionary algorithm controlling the FPTA reconfiguration. The paper details an example of evolution on SABLES and points out to certain transient and memory effects that affect the stability of solutions obtained reusing the same piece of hardware for rapid testing of individuals during evolution.

  6. Field Testing of Rapid Electrokinetic Nanoparticle Treatment for Corrosion Control of Steel in Concrete

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardenas, Henry E.; Alexander, Joshua B.; Kupwade-Patil,Kunal; Calle, Luz Marina

    2009-01-01

    This work field tested the use of electrokinetics for delivery of concrete sealing nanoparticles concurrent with the extraction of chlorides. Several cylinders of concrete were batched and placed in immersion at the Kennedy Space Center Beach Corrosion Test Site. The specimens were batched with steel reinforcement and a 4.5 wt.% (weight percent) content of sodium chloride. Upon arrival at Kennedy Space Center, the specimens were placed in the saltwater immersion pool at the Beach Corrosion Test Site. Following 30 days of saltwater exposure, the specimens were subjected to rapid chloride extraction concurrent with electrokinetic nanoparticle treatment. The treatments were operated at up to eight times the typical current density in order to complete the treatment in 7 days. The findings indicated that the short-term corrosion resistance of the concrete specimens was significantly enhanced as was the strength of the concrete.

  7. Field accuracy of fourth-generation rapid diagnostic tests for acute HIV-1: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Joseph M.; Macpherson, Peter; Adams, Emily R.; Ochodo, Eleanor; Sands, Anita; Taegtmeyer, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Fourth-generation HIV-1 rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) detect HIV-1 p24 antigen to screen for acute HIV-1. However, diagnostic accuracy during clinical use may be suboptimal. Methods: Clinical sensitivity and specificity of fourth-generation RDTs for acute HIV-1 were collated from field evaluation studies in adults identified by a systematic literature search. Results: Four studies with 17 381 participants from Australia, Swaziland, the United Kingdom and Malawi were identified. All reported 0% sensitivity of the HIV-1 p24 component for acute HIV-1 diagnosis; 26 acute infections were missed. Specificity ranged from 98.3 to 99.9%. Conclusion: Fourth-generation RDTs are currently unsuitable for the detection of acute HIV-1. PMID:26558545

  8. Orientation of growing crystals of Co- or Gd-containing L-threonine dehydrogenase by magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maki, Syou; Ishikawa, Kazuhiko; Ataka, Mitsuo

    2009-12-01

    L-Threonine dehydrogenase from Pyrococcus horikoshii (TDH) is a water-soluble metalloenzyme, the molecular structure of which has been unknown until recently. The Zn 2+ ion in the native TDH, prepared as a recombinant protein, is replaced artificially with Co 2+, Ni 2+ or Gd 3+. These samples are crystallized in homogeneous magnetic fields of 2-10 T. Half of the Co- or Gd-substituted crystals show magnetic orientation in a field of 2 T at 278 K whereas the crystals of the native TDH require a 4 T magnetic field for half orientation. The sensitivity to magnetic orientation can thus be increased by metal substitution. On the other hand, we cannot assign clear changes in the size, number, and quality of the native and metal-substituted crystals with and without the presence of the magnetic field.

  9. Rapid tsunami models and earthquake source parameters: Far-field and local applications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Geist, E.L.

    2005-01-01

    Rapid tsunami models have recently been developed to forecast far-field tsunami amplitudes from initial earthquake information (magnitude and hypocenter). Earthquake source parameters that directly affect tsunami generation as used in rapid tsunami models are examined, with particular attention to local versus far-field application of those models. First, validity of the assumption that the focal mechanism and type of faulting for tsunamigenic earthquakes is similar in a given region can be evaluated by measuring the seismic consistency of past events. Second, the assumption that slip occurs uniformly over an area of rupture will most often underestimate the amplitude and leading-wave steepness of the local tsunami. Third, sometimes large magnitude earthquakes will exhibit a high degree of spatial heterogeneity such that tsunami sources will be composed of distinct sub-events that can cause constructive and destructive interference in the wavefield away from the source. Using a stochastic source model, it is demonstrated that local tsunami amplitudes vary by as much as a factor of two or more, depending on the local bathymetry. If other earthquake source parameters such as focal depth or shear modulus are varied in addition to the slip distribution patterns, even greater uncertainty in local tsunami amplitude is expected for earthquakes of similar magnitude. Because of the short amount of time available to issue local warnings and because of the high degree of uncertainty associated with local, model-based forecasts as suggested by this study, direct wave height observations and a strong public education and preparedness program are critical for those regions near suspected tsunami sources.

  10. Growing inhomogeneities in cosmological Goldstone modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benson, Katherine M.

    1992-08-01

    We examine the evolution of initial inhomogeneities in a Goldstone field in an expanding Friedmann-Robertson-Walker universe. We find subhorizon inhomogeneities grow, relative to the homogeneous state. This stems not from growing fluctuations - which simply redshift - but from rapid (ϱ ~ a-6) decay of the homogeneous state. We show how Goldstone modes escape assumptions - some inapplicable, some ill-founded - underpinning conventional analyses of cosmological fluctuations. Finally, we reconcile our analysis to standard cosmology, noting that the Goldstone evolution is essentially decoupled and dynamical. This material is based upon work supported by NSF grants PHY-87-14654 (while the author was at Harvard University) and PHY91-06210.

  11. OPG-Fc treatment in growing pigs leads to rapid reductions in bone resorption markers, serum calcium, and bone formation markers.

    PubMed

    Sipos, W; Zysset, P; Kostenuik, P; Mayrhofer, E; Bogdan, C; Rauner, M; Stolina, M; Dwyer, D; Sommerfeld-Stur, I; Pendl, G; Resch, H; Dall'Ara, E; Varga, P; Pietschmann, P

    2011-12-01

    Inhibition of the receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) is a novel therapeutic option in the treatment of osteoporosis and related diseases. The aim of this study was to evaluate bone metabolism and structure in pigs after RANKL inhibition. 12 growing pigs were assigned to 2 groups with 6 animals each. The OPG group received recombinant human OPG-Fc (5 mg/kg IV) at day 0, the control group was given 0.9% NaCl solution. Serum levels of OPG-Fc, calcium (Ca), phosphorus (P), and bone turnover markers were evaluated every 5 days, and pigs were euthanized on day 20. Serum OPG-Fc concentration peaked at day 5 and coincided with significantly decreased Ca, P, and bone turnover markers. By day 15, measureable OPG-Fc serum levels could only be detected in 2/6 animals. With OPG-Fc clearance starting at day 10, serum Ca and P concentrations were not different between the 2 groups. TRACP5b, P1CP, and BAP levels significantly decreased by 40-70% relative to vehicle controls in the OPG-Fc group between days 5 and 10, indicating that pharmacologic concentration of OPG-Fc led to systemic concomitant inhibition of bone formation and resorption in young growing pigs. Dual X-ray absorptiometry data derived from the proximal femur did not differ between the 2 groups. μCT analysis of selected bone sites demonstrated an OPG-Fc-induced improvement of specific bone architectural indices and bone mineralization.

  12. Comparative evaluation of two rapid field tests for malaria diagnosis: Partec Rapid Malaria Test® and Binax Now® Malaria Rapid Diagnostic Test

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background About 90% of all malaria deaths in sub-Saharan Africa occur in children under five years. Fast and reliable diagnosis of malaria requires confirmation of the presence of malaria parasites in the blood of patients with fever or history suggestive of malaria; hence a prompt and accurate diagnosis of malaria is the key to effective disease management. Confirmation of malaria infection requires the availability of a rapid, sensitive, and specific testing at an affordable cost. We compared two recent methods (the novel Partec Rapid Malaria Test® (PT) and the Binax Now® Malaria Rapid Diagnostic Test (BN RDT) with the conventional Giemsa stain microscopy (GM) for the diagnosis of malaria among children in a clinical laboratory of a hospital in a rural endemic area of Ghana. Methods Blood samples were collected from 263 children admitted with fever or a history of fever to the pediatric clinic of the Agogo Presbyterian Hospital. The three different test methods PT, BN RDT and GM were performed independently by well trained and competent laboratory staff to assess the presence of malaria parasites. Results were analyzed and compared using GM as the reference standard. Results In 107 (40.7%) of 263 study participants, Plasmodium sp. was detected by GM. PT and BN RDT showed positive results in 111 (42.2%) and 114 (43.4%), respectively. Compared to GM reference standard, the sensitivities of the PT and BN RDT were 100% (95% CI: 96.6-100) and 97.2% (95% CI: 92.0-99.4), respectively, specificities were 97.4% (95% CI: 93.6-99.3) and 93.6% (95% CI: 88.5-96.9), respectively. There was a strong agreement (kappa) between the applied test methods (GM vs PT: 0.97; p < 0.001 and GM vs BN RDT: 0.90; p < 0.001). The average turnaround time per tests was 17 minutes. Conclusion In this study two rapid malaria tests, PT and BN RDT, demonstrated a good quality of their performance compared to conventional GM. Both methods require little training, have short turnaround times, are

  13. Acute Pulmonary Artery Obstruction as the Primary Manifestation of a Rapidly Growing Intimal Sarcoma in a 54-Year-Old Patient.

    PubMed

    Westhofen, Sumi; Kugler, Christian; Reichenspurner, Hermann; Deuse, Tobias

    2016-12-01

    Pulmonary artery sarcoma is a rare malignant neoplasm that is often misdiagnosed and most often only recognized postmortem during the autopsy. We present the case of a male patient with a rapidly progressive pulmonary tumor who underwent urgent pneumonectomy for increasing symptoms of chest pain and septic clinical picture. Histological analysis revealed the diagnosis of a pulmonary artery sarcoma. Despite an R1-resection and adjuvant chemotherapy, the patient is in good clinical health and free of tumor relapse 1 year after the surgery.

  14. Acute Pulmonary Artery Obstruction as the Primary Manifestation of a Rapidly Growing Intimal Sarcoma in a 54-Year-Old Patient

    PubMed Central

    Westhofen, Sumi; Kugler, Christian; Reichenspurner, Hermann; Deuse, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary artery sarcoma is a rare malignant neoplasm that is often misdiagnosed and most often only recognized postmortem during the autopsy. We present the case of a male patient with a rapidly progressive pulmonary tumor who underwent urgent pneumonectomy for increasing symptoms of chest pain and septic clinical picture. Histological analysis revealed the diagnosis of a pulmonary artery sarcoma. Despite an R1-resection and adjuvant chemotherapy, the patient is in good clinical health and free of tumor relapse 1 year after the surgery. PMID:28018820

  15. Investigating the fluid dynamics of rapid processes within microfluidic devices using bright-field microscopy.

    PubMed

    Pirbodaghi, Tohid; Vigolo, Daniele; Akbari, Samin; deMello, Andrew

    2015-05-07

    The widespread application of microfluidic devices in the biological and chemical sciences requires the implementation of complex designs and geometries, which in turn leads to atypical fluid dynamic phenomena. Accordingly, a complete understanding of fluid dynamics in such systems is key in the facile engineering of novel and efficient analytical tools. Herein, we present an accurate approach for studying the fluid dynamics of rapid processes within microfluidic devices using bright-field microscopy with white light illumination and a standard high-speed camera. Specifically, we combine Ghost Particle Velocimetry and the detection of moving objects in automated video surveillance to track submicron size tracing particles via cross correlation between the speckle patterns of successive images. The efficacy of the presented technique is demonstrated by measuring the flow field over a square pillar (80 μm × 80 μm) in a 200 μm wide microchannel at high volumetric flow rates. Experimental results are in excellent agreement with those obtained via computational fluid dynamics simulations. The method is subsequently used to study the dynamics of droplet generation at a flow focusing microfluidic geometry. A unique feature of the presented technique is the ability to perform velocimetry analysis of high-speed phenomena, which is not possible using micron-resolution particle image velocimetry (μPIV) approaches based on confocal or fluorescence microscopy.

  16. Rapid and effective correction of RF inhomogeneity for high field magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Cohen, M S; DuBois, R M; Zeineh, M M

    2000-08-01

    The well-known variability in the distribution of high frequency electromagnetic fields in the human body causes problems in the analysis of structural information in high field magnetic resonance images. We describe a method of compensating for the purely intensity-based effects. In our simple and rapid correction algorithm, we first use statistical means to determine the background image noise level and the edges of the image features. We next populate all "noise" pixels with the mean signal intensity of the image features. These data are then smoothed by convolution with a gaussian filter using Fourier methods. Finally, the original data that are above the noise level are normalized to the smoothed images, thereby eliminating the lowest spatial frequencies in the final, corrected data. Processing of a 124 slice, 256 x 256 volume dataset requires under 70 sec on a laptop personal computer. Overall, the method is less prone to artifacts from edges or from sensitivity to absolute head position than are other correction techniques. Following intensity correction, the images demonstrated obvious qualitative improvement and, when subjected to automated segmentation tools, the accuracy of segmentation improved, in one example, from 35.3% to 84.7% correct, as compared to a manually-constructed gold standard.

  17. A quantitative health assessment index for rapid evaluation of fish condition in the field

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, S.M. ); Brown, A.M. ); Goede, R.W. )

    1993-01-01

    The health assessment index (HAI) is an extension and refinement of a previously published field necropsy system. The HAI is a quantitative index that allows statistical comparisons of fish health among data sets. Index variables are assigned numerical values based on the degree of severity or damage incurred by an organ or tissue from environmental stressors. This approach has been used to evaluate the general health status of fish populations in a wide range of reservoir types in the Tennessee River basin (North Carolina, Tennessee, Alabama, Kentucky), in Hartwell Reservoir (Georgia, South Carolina) that is contaminated by polychlorinated biphenyls, and in the Pigeon River (Tennessee, North Carolina) that receives effluents from a bleaches kraft mill. The ability of the HAI to accurately characterize the health of fish in these systems was evaluated by comparing this index to other types of fish health measures (contaminant, bioindicator, and reproductive analysis) made at the same time as the HAI. In all cases, the HAI demonstrated the same pattern of fish health status between sites as did each of the other more sophisticated health assessment methods. The HAI has proven to be a simple and inexpensive means of rapidly assessing general fish health in field situations. 29 refs., 5 tabs.

  18. Validation of a Rapid Rabies Diagnostic Tool for Field Surveillance in Developing Countries

    PubMed Central

    Léchenne, Monique; Naïssengar, Kemdongarti; Lepelletier, Anthony; Alfaroukh, Idriss Oumar; Bourhy, Hervé; Zinsstag, Jakob; Dacheux, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Background One root cause of the neglect of rabies is the lack of adequate diagnostic tests in the context of low income countries. A rapid, performance friendly and low cost method to detect rabies virus (RABV) in brain samples will contribute positively to surveillance and consequently to accurate data reporting, which is presently missing in the majority of rabies endemic countries. Methodology/Principal findings We evaluated a rapid immunodiagnostic test (RIDT) in comparison with the standard fluorescent antibody test (FAT) and confirmed the detection of the viral RNA by real time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). Our analysis is a multicentre approach to validate the performance of the RIDT in both a field laboratory (N’Djamena, Chad) and an international reference laboratory (Institut Pasteur, Paris, France). In the field laboratory, 48 samples from dogs were tested and in the reference laboratory setting, a total of 73 samples was tested, representing a wide diversity of RABV in terms of animal species tested (13 different species), geographical origin of isolates with special emphasis on Africa, and different phylogenetic clades. Under reference laboratory conditions, specificity was 93.3% and sensitivity was 95.3% compared to the gold standard FAT test. Under field laboratory conditions, the RIDT yielded a higher reliability than the FAT test particularly on fresh and decomposed samples. Viral RNA was later extracted directly from the test filter paper and further used successfully for sequencing and genotyping. Conclusion/Significance The RIDT shows excellent performance qualities both in regard to user friendliness and reliability of the result. In addition, the test cassettes can be used as a vehicle to ship viral RNA to reference laboratories for further laboratory confirmation of the diagnosis and for epidemiological investigations using nucleotide sequencing. The potential for satisfactory use in remote locations is

  19. Growing Opuntia (cactus) and Brassica species for the long-term remediation of selenium-contaminated soil under field conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Identifying alternative crops for planting in Se-containing agricultural soils of western central California will depend upon the plants’ ability to tolerate high salt and boron (B) conditions. Multi-year field studies were conducted on Se-laden soils with different cactus clones (Opuntia-ficus indi...

  20. Field-Applicable Recombinase Polymerase Amplification Assay for Rapid Detection of Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Liljander, Anne; Yu, Mingyan; O'Brien, Elizabeth; Heller, Martin; Nepper, Julia F; Weibel, Douglas B; Gluecks, Ilona; Younan, Mario; Frey, Joachim; Falquet, Laurent; Jores, Joerg

    2015-09-01

    Contagious caprine pleuropneumonia (CCPP) is a highly contagious disease caused by Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae that affects goats in Africa and Asia. Current available methods for the diagnosis of Mycoplasma infection, including cultivation, serological assays, and PCR, are time-consuming and require fully equipped stationary laboratories, which make them incompatible with testing in the resource-poor settings that are most relevant to this disease. We report a rapid, specific, and sensitive assay employing isothermal DNA amplification using recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) for the detection of M. capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae. We developed the assay using a specific target sequence in M. capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae, as found in the genome sequence of the field strain ILRI181 and the type strain F38 and that was further evidenced in 10 field strains from different geographical regions. Detection limits corresponding to 5 × 10(3) and 5 × 10(4) cells/ml were obtained using genomic DNA and bacterial culture from M. capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae strain ILRI181, while no amplification was obtained from 71 related Mycoplasma isolates or from the Acholeplasma or the Pasteurella isolates, demonstrating a high degree of specificity. The assay produces a fluorescent signal within 15 to 20 min and worked well using pleural fluid obtained directly from CCPP-positive animals without prior DNA extraction. We demonstrate that the diagnosis of CCPP can be achieved, with a short sample preparation time and a simple read-out device that can be powered by a car battery, in <45 min in a simulated field setting.

  1. Too Fast to Measure: Network Adjustment of Rapidly Changing Gravity Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, J.; Ferre, T. P. A.

    2014-12-01

    Measurements of spatially-variable gravity at the field scale are difficult; measurements of the time-varying field even more so. Every previous gravity survey using relative gravimeters—still the workhorse of gravity studies, despite their nearly 80 year history—has assumed a static gravity field during the course of a survey, which may last days to weeks. With recently-improved instrumentation, however, measurements of fields changing on the order of tens of nm/sec2 per day are now possible. In particular, the A-10 portable absolute gravimeter provides not only absolute control, but also the change in that control during the course of a survey. Using digitally-recording spring-based relative gravimeters (namely, the ZLS Burris meter and the Scintrex CG-5), with their more efficient data collection and lower drift than previous generations, many more data are collected in a day. We demonstrate a method for incorporating in the least-squares network adjustment of relative gravity data a relation between the rate of change of gravity, dg, and distance from an infiltration source, x. This relation accounts for the fact that gravity at stations adjacent to the infiltration source changes more rapidly than stations further away; if all measurements collected over several days are to be included in a single network-adjustment, consideration of this change is required. Two methods are used to simulate the dg(x) relation: a simple model where dg is a linear function of x, and a coupled-hydrogeophysical method where a groundwater flow model predicts the nonlinear spatial variation of dg. Then, the change in gravity between different, independently adjusted surveys is used to parameterize the groundwater model. Data from two recent field examples, an artificial recharge facility near Tucson, Arizona, USA, and from the 2014 Lower Colorado River pulse flow experiment, clearly show the need to account for gravity change during a survey; maximum rates of change for the two

  2. Rapid evaluation of fresh ex vivo kidney tissue with full-field optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Manu; Robinson, Brian D.; Salamoon, Bekheit; Thouvenin, Olivier; Boccara, Claude; Mukherjee, Sushmita

    2015-01-01

    Background: Full-field optical coherence tomography (FFOCT) is a real-time imaging technique that rapidly generates images reminiscent of histology without any tissue processing, warranting its exploration for evaluation of ex vivo kidney tissue. Methods: Fresh tissue sections from tumor and adjacent nonneoplastic kidney (n = 25 nephrectomy specimens; clear cell renal cell carcinoma (CCRCC) = 12, papillary RCC (PRCC) = 4, chromophobe RCC (ChRCC) = 4, papillary urothelial carcinoma (PUC) = 1, angiomyolipoma (AML) = 2 and cystic nephroma = 2) were imaged with a commercial FFOCT device. Sections were submitted for routine histopathological diagnosis. Results: Glomeruli, tubules, interstitium, and blood vessels were identified in nonneoplastic tissue. In tumor sections, the normal architecture was completely replaced by either sheets of cells/trabeculae or papillary structures. The former pattern was seen predominantly in CCRCC/ChRCC and the latter in PRCC/PUC (as confirmed on H&E). Although the cellular details were not very prominent at this resolution, we could identify unique cytoplasmic signatures in some kidney tumors. For example, the hyper-intense punctate signal in the cytoplasm of CRCC represents glycogen/lipid, large cells with abundant hyper-intense cytoplasm representing histiocytes in PRCC, and signal-void large polygonal cell representing adipocytes in AML. According to a blinded analysis was performed by an uropathologist, all nonneoplastic tissues were differentiated from neoplastic tissues. Further, all benign tumors were called benign and malignant were called malignant. A diagnostic accuracy of 80% was obtained in subtyping the tumors. Conclusion: The ability of FFOCT to reliably differentiate nonneoplastic from neoplastic tissue and identify some tumor types makes it a valuable tool for rapid evaluation of ex vivo kidney tissue e.g. for intraoperative margin assessment and kidney biopsy adequacy. Recently, higher resolution images were achieved

  3. Crystal growing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neville, J. P.

    1990-01-01

    One objective is to demonstrate the way crystals grow and how they affect the behavior of material. Another objective is to compare the growth of crystals in metals and nonmetals. The procedures, which involve a supersaturated solution of a salt that will separate into crystals on cooling and the pouring off of an eutectic solution to expose the crystals formed by a solid solution when an alloy of two metals forms a solid and eutectic solution on cooling, are described.

  4. Nuclear DNA methylation and chromatin condensation phenotypes are distinct between normally proliferating/aging, rapidly growing/immortal, and senescent cells.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jin Ho; Gertych, Arkadiusz; Tajbakhsh, Jian

    2013-03-01

    This study reports on probing the utility of in situ chromatin texture features such as nuclear DNA methylation and chromatin condensation patterns - visualized by fluorescent staining and evaluated by dedicated three-dimensional (3D) quantitative and high-throughput cell-by-cell image analysis - in assessing the proliferative capacity, i.e. growth behavior of cells: to provide a more dynamic picture of a cell population with potential implications in basic science, cancer diagnostics/prognostics and therapeutic drug development. Two types of primary cells and four different cancer cell lines were propagated and subjected to cell-counting, flow cytometry, confocal imaging, and 3D image analysis at various points in culture. Additionally a subset of primary and cancer cells was accelerated into senescence by oxidative stress. DNA methylation and chromatin condensation levels decreased with declining doubling times when primary cells aged in culture with the lowest levels reached at the stage of proliferative senescence. In comparison, immortal cancer cells with constant but higher doubling times mostly displayed lower and constant levels of the two in situ-derived features. However, stress-induced senescent primary and cancer cells showed similar levels of these features compared with primary cells that had reached natural growth arrest. With regards to global DNA methylation and chromatin condensation levels, aggressively growing cancer cells seem to take an intermediate level between normally proliferating and senescent cells. Thus, normal cells apparently reach cancer-cell equivalent stages of the two parameters at some point in aging, which might challenge phenotypic distinction between these two types of cells. Companion high-resolution molecular profiling could provide information on possible underlying differences that would explain benign versus malign cell growth behaviors.

  5. Improving our knowledge of the rapid geomagnetic field intensity variation observed in Europe around 800 AD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Paccard, M.; Chauvin, A.; Lanos, P.; Dufresne, P.; Kovacheva, M.; Hill, M. J.; Beamud, E.; Gutiérrez-Lloret, S.; Cañavate, V.; Blain, S.; Bouvier, A.; Oberlin, C.; Guibert, P.; Sapin, C.; Pringent, D.

    2011-12-01

    Available European data indicate that during the past 2500 years there have been periods of rapid intensity geomagnetic fluctuations interspersed with periods of little change. The challenge now is to precisely describe these rapid changes. The aim of this study is to obtain an improved description of the sharp geomagnetic intensity change that took place in Western Europe around 800 yrs AD as well as to investigate if this peak is observed at a continental scale. For this purpose 13 precisely dated early medieval Spanish pottery fragments, 4 archeological French kilns and a 3 collections of bricks used for the construction of different historical buildings from France and with ages ranging between 330 to 1290 AD have been studied. The material collected has been dated by archeological/historical constraints together with radiocarbon,thermoluminiscence (TL) and archeomagentic analysis. From classical Thellier experiments including TRM anisotropy and cooling rate corrections upon archeointensity estimates and conducted on 164 specimens (119 of them giving reliable results) ten new high-quality mean intensities have been obtained. The new intensity data together with a selection of the most reliable data from Western Europe have been relocated to the latitude of Paris and confirm the existence of an intensity maxima of ~85 μT centred at ~850 AD and related to intensity changes up to 20 μT per century. The results also indicate that a previous abrupt intensity change (reaching a maximum value of ~ 90 μT) took place in Western Europe around 650 AD. A selection of high-quality intensity data from Bulgaria, Italy and Greece indicate a very similar intensity trend for Eastern Europe. Although available data indicate that the duration of such periods of high intensities may be of less than one century more data are needed to infer the exact duration of these maximums. A comparison between the selected data and regional and global geomagnetic field models indicates that

  6. Field-deployable colorimetric biosensor system for the rapid detection of pathogenic organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duy, Janice

    The rapid identification of pathogenic organisms is necessary for recognizing and managing human and environmental health risks. Numerous detection schemes are available, but most are difficult to employ in non-laboratory settings due to their need for bulky, specialized equipment, multiple reagents, or highly trained personnel. To address this problem, a rapid, field-compatible biosensor system based on the colorimetric detection of nucleic acid hybrids was developed. Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes were used to capture ribosomal RNA sequences from environmental samples. Non-target nucleic acids, including single-base mismatches flanked by adenines and uracils, were removed with a micrococcal nuclease digestion step. Matched PNA-RNA hybrids remained intact and were indicated by the cyanine dye DiSC2(5). PNA-containing duplexes function as templates for the aggregation of DiSC2(5), visualized as a change in solution color from blue to purple. This transition can be measured as an increase in the solution absorbance at 540 nm (dye aggregate) at the expense of the dye monomer peak at 650 nm. These concomitant spectral changes were used to calculate a "hybridization signal" using the ratio A aggregate/Amonomer ≈ A540/A650. Testing with pathogenic environmental samples was accomplished using two model organisms: the harmful algal bloom-causing dinoflagellate Alexandrium species, and the potato wart disease-causing fungus Synchytrium endobioticum. In both cases, the colorimetric approach was able to distinguish the targets with sensitivities rivaling those of established techniques, but with the advantages of decreased hands-on time and cost. Assay fieldability was tested with a portable colorimeter designed to quantify the dye-indicated hybridization signal and assembled from commercially available components. Side-by-side testing revealed no difference in the sensing performance of the colorimeter compared to a laboratory spectrophotometer (Pearson's r=0

  7. Development of an in vitro Assay, Based on the BioFilm Ring Test®, for Rapid Profiling of Biofilm-Growing Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Di Domenico, Enea G.; Toma, Luigi; Provot, Christian; Ascenzioni, Fiorentina; Sperduti, Isabella; Prignano, Grazia; Gallo, Maria T.; Pimpinelli, Fulvia; Bordignon, Valentina; Bernardi, Thierry; Ensoli, Fabrizio

    2016-01-01

    Microbial biofilm represents a major virulence factor associated with chronic and recurrent infections. Pathogenic bacteria embedded in biofilms are highly resistant to environmental and chemical agents, including antibiotics and therefore difficult to eradicate. Thus, reliable tests to assess biofilm formation by bacterial strains as well as the impact of chemicals or antibiotics on biofilm formation represent desirable tools for a most effective therapeutic management and microbiological risk control. Current methods to evaluate biofilm formation are usually time-consuming, costly, and hardly applicable in the clinical setting. The aim of the present study was to develop and assess a simple and reliable in vitro procedure for the characterization of biofilm-producing bacterial strains for future clinical applications based on the BioFilm Ring Test® (BRT) technology. The procedure developed for clinical testing (cBRT) can provide an accurate and timely (5 h) measurement of biofilm formation for the most common pathogenic bacteria seen in clinical practice. The results gathered by the cBRT assay were in agreement with the traditional crystal violet (CV) staining test, according to the κ coefficient test (κ = 0.623). However, the cBRT assay showed higher levels of specificity (92.2%) and accuracy (88.1%) as compared to CV. The results indicate that this procedure offers an easy, rapid and robust assay to test microbial biofilm and a promising tool for clinical microbiology. PMID:27708625

  8. Compartmental analysis of roots in intact rapidly-growing Spergularia marina and Lactuca sativa: partial characterization of the symplasms functional in the radial transport of Na/sup +/ and K/sup +/

    SciTech Connect

    Lazof, D.B.

    1987-01-01

    Techniques of compartmental analysis were adapted to the study of intact roots of rapidly-growing Spergularia marine and Lactuca sativa. Using large numbers of plants short time-courses of uptake and chase, /sup 42/K/sup +/ and /sup 22/Na/sup +/ transport could be resolved, even during a chase following a brief 10 minute labeling period. The use of intact plant systems allowed distinction of that portion of the isotope flux into the root, associated with the ion-conducting symplasms. A small compartment, which rapidly (t/sub .5/ < 1 min) exchanges with the external medium was implicated in the radial transport of N/sup +/, accounting for the observed obtention of linear translocation rates within minutes of transferring to labeled solution. The ion contents of this compartment varied in proportion to the external ion concentration. When K/sup +/ was at a high external concentration, labeled K/sup +/ exchanged into this same symplasm, but chasing a short pulse indicated that K/sup +/ transport to the xylem was not through a rapidly-exchanging compartment. At physiological concentrations of K/sup +/ the evidence indicated that transport of K/sup +/ across the root proceeded through a compartment which was not exchanging rapidly with the external medium. The rise to a linear rate of isotope translocation was gradual and translocation during a chase, following a brief pulse,was prolonged, indicating that this compartment retained its specific activity for a considerable period.

  9. Hydraulic Signals from the Roots and Rapid Cell-Wall Hardening in Growing Maize (Zea mays L.) Leaves Are Primary Responses to Polyethylene Glycol-Induced Water Deficits.

    PubMed

    Chazen, O.; Neumann, P. M.

    1994-04-01

    We investigated mechanisms involved in inhibition of maize (Zea mays L.) leaf-elongation growth following addition of non-penetrating osmolyte to the root medium. The elongation rate of the first true leaf remained inhibited for 4 h after addition of polyethylene glycol 6000 (PEG; -0.5 MPa water potential), despite progressive osmotic adjustment in the growing leaf tissues. Thus, inhibition of leaf growth did not appear to be directly related to loss of leaf capacity to maintain osmotic potential gradients. Comparative cell-wall-extension capacities of immature (still expanding) leaf tissues were measured by creep extensiometry using whole plants. Reductions in irreversible (plastic) extension capacity (i.e. wall hardening) were detected minutes and hours after addition of PEG to the roots, by both in vivo and in vitro assay. The onset of the wall-hardening response could be detected by in vitro assay only 2 min after addition of PEG. Thus, initiation of wall hardening appeared to precede transcription-regulated responses. The inhibition of both leaf growth and wall-extension capacity was reversed by removal of PEG after 4 h. Moreover, wall hardening could be induced by other osmolytes (mannitol, NaCl). Thus, the leaf responses did not appear to be related to any specific (toxic) effect of PEG. We conclude that hardening of leaf cell walls is a primary event in the chain of growth regulatory responses to PEG-induced water deficits in maize. The signaling processes by which PEG, which is not expected to penetrate root cell walls or membranes, might cause cell-wall hardening in relatively distant leaves was also investigated. Plants with live or killed roots were exposed to PEG. The killed roots were presumed to be unable to produce hormonal or electrical signals in response to addition of PEG; however, inhibition of leaf elongation and hardening of leaf cell walls were detected with both live and killed roots. Thus, neither hormonal signaling nor signaling via

  10. Risk of encountering ticks and tick-borne pathogens in a rapidly growing metropolitan area in the U.S. Great Plains.

    PubMed

    Noden, Bruce H; Loss, Scott R; Maichak, Courtney; Williams, Faithful

    2017-01-01

    The prevalence of tick-borne diseases has increased dramatically in many urban areas of the U.S., yet little is known about the ecology of ticks and tick-borne pathogens in relation to characteristics of North American urban and suburban landscapes. This study aimed to begin identification of the risk of encountering ticks and tick-borne pathogens within a rapidly expanding metropolitan area in the U.S. Great Plains region. Ten sites across Oklahoma City, Oklahoma were selected for tick sampling based on presence of tick habitat and level of urbanization intensity. Sampling was conducted using CO2 traps and flagging in June, July and October 2015. A total of 552 ticks were collected from eight of the ten sampled greenspaces. The majority of ticks collected in summer were Amblyomma americanum (N=534 (97.8%)), followed by Dermacentor variabilis (N=10 (1.8%)) and Amblyomma maculatum (N=2 (0.3%)). Ixodes scapularis adult females (N=4) and nymphal A. americanum (N=2) were also collected in October 2015. Tick species diversity was highest in sites with >15% of the surrounding landscape composed of undeveloped land. Rickettsia sp. (including R. amblyommii and 'Candidatus R. andeanae'), Ehrlichia chaffeensis and/or E. ewingii were detected in tick pools from all eight sites where ticks were found. Our data suggest that the risk of encountering ticks and tick-borne pathogens exists throughout the Oklahoma City metropolitan area and that tick populations are likely influenced by urbanization intensity. Continued research is needed to clarify the full range of abiotic and biotic features of urban landscapes that influence the risk of encountering ticks and transmitting tick-borne diseases.

  11. Genotypic Variation in Grain P Loading across Diverse Rice Growing Environments and Implications for Field P Balances.

    PubMed

    Vandamme, Elke; Wissuwa, Matthias; Rose, Terry; Dieng, Ibnou; Drame, Khady N; Fofana, Mamadou; Senthilkumar, Kalimuthu; Venuprasad, Ramaiah; Jallow, Demba; Segda, Zacharie; Suriyagoda, Lalith; Sirisena, Dinarathna; Kato, Yoichiro; Saito, Kazuki

    2016-01-01

    More than 60% of phosphorus (P) taken up by rice (Oryza spp.) is accumulated in the grains at harvest and hence exported from fields, leading to a continuous removal of P. If P removed from fields is not replaced by P inputs then soil P stocks decline, with consequences for subsequent crops. Breeding rice genotypes with a low concentration of P in the grains could be a strategy to reduce maintenance fertilizer needs and slow soil P depletion in low input systems. This study aimed to assess variation in grain P concentrations among rice genotypes across diverse environments and evaluate the implications for field P balances at various grain yield levels. Multi-location screening experiments were conducted at different sites across Africa and Asia and yield components and grain P concentrations were determined at harvest. Genotypic variation in grain P concentration was evaluated while considering differences in P supply and grain yield using cluster analysis to group environments and boundary line analysis to determine minimum grain P concentrations at various yield levels. Average grain P concentrations across genotypes varied almost 3-fold among environments, from 1.4 to 3.9 mg g(-1). Minimum grain P concentrations associated with grain yields of 150, 300, and 500 g m(-2) varied between 1.2 and 1.7, 1.3 and 1.8, and 1.7 and 2.2 mg g(-1) among genotypes respectively. Two genotypes, Santhi Sufaid and DJ123, were identified as potential donors for breeding for low grain P concentration. Improvements in P balances that could be achieved by exploiting this genotypic variation are in the range of less than 0.10 g P m(-2) (1 kg P ha(-1)) in low yielding systems, and 0.15-0.50 g P m(-2) (1.5-5.0 kg P ha(-1)) in higher yielding systems. Improved crop management and alternative breeding approaches may be required to achieve larger reductions in grain P concentrations in rice.

  12. Genotypic Variation in Grain P Loading across Diverse Rice Growing Environments and Implications for Field P Balances

    PubMed Central

    Vandamme, Elke; Wissuwa, Matthias; Rose, Terry; Dieng, Ibnou; Drame, Khady N.; Fofana, Mamadou; Senthilkumar, Kalimuthu; Venuprasad, Ramaiah; Jallow, Demba; Segda, Zacharie; Suriyagoda, Lalith; Sirisena, Dinarathna; Kato, Yoichiro; Saito, Kazuki

    2016-01-01

    More than 60% of phosphorus (P) taken up by rice (Oryza spp.) is accumulated in the grains at harvest and hence exported from fields, leading to a continuous removal of P. If P removed from fields is not replaced by P inputs then soil P stocks decline, with consequences for subsequent crops. Breeding rice genotypes with a low concentration of P in the grains could be a strategy to reduce maintenance fertilizer needs and slow soil P depletion in low input systems. This study aimed to assess variation in grain P concentrations among rice genotypes across diverse environments and evaluate the implications for field P balances at various grain yield levels. Multi-location screening experiments were conducted at different sites across Africa and Asia and yield components and grain P concentrations were determined at harvest. Genotypic variation in grain P concentration was evaluated while considering differences in P supply and grain yield using cluster analysis to group environments and boundary line analysis to determine minimum grain P concentrations at various yield levels. Average grain P concentrations across genotypes varied almost 3-fold among environments, from 1.4 to 3.9 mg g−1. Minimum grain P concentrations associated with grain yields of 150, 300, and 500 g m−2 varied between 1.2 and 1.7, 1.3 and 1.8, and 1.7 and 2.2 mg g−1 among genotypes respectively. Two genotypes, Santhi Sufaid and DJ123, were identified as potential donors for breeding for low grain P concentration. Improvements in P balances that could be achieved by exploiting this genotypic variation are in the range of less than 0.10 g P m−2 (1 kg P ha−1) in low yielding systems, and 0.15–0.50 g P m−2 (1.5–5.0 kg P ha−1) in higher yielding systems. Improved crop management and alternative breeding approaches may be required to achieve larger reductions in grain P concentrations in rice. PMID:27729916

  13. Rapid analysis of non-uniformly sampled pulsed field gradient data for velocity estimation.

    PubMed

    Raghavan, K; Park, J C; Pavlovskaya, G E; Gibbs, S J

    2001-06-01

    Bretthorst's recent generalization of the Lomb-Scargle periodogram shows that a sufficient statistic for frequency estimation from non-uniformly, but simultaneously sampled quadrature data is equivalent to the FFT of those data with the missing samples replaced by zeros. We have applied this concept to the rapid analysis of pulsed field gradient MRI data which have been non-uniformly sampled in the velocity encoding wave vector q. For a small number of q samples, it is more computationally efficient to calculate the periodogram directly rather than using the FFT algorithm with a large number of zeros. The algorithm we have implemented for finding the peak of the generalized periodogram is simple and robust; it involves repeated apodization and grid searching of the periodogram until the desired velocity resolution is achieved. The final estimate is refined by quadratic interpolation. We have tested the method for fully developed Poiseuille flow of a Newtonian fluid and have demonstrated substantial improvement in the precision of velocity measurement achievable in a fixed acquisition time with non-uniform sampling. The method is readily extendible to multidimensional data. Analysis of a 256 by 256 pixel image with 8 q samples and an effective velocity resolution of better than 1/680 of the Nyquist range requires approximately 1 minute computation time on a 400 MHz SUN Ultrasparc II processor.

  14. Rapid immunohistochemistry based on alternating current electric field for intraoperative diagnosis of brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Tanino, Mishie; Sasajima, Toshio; Nanjo, Hiroshi; Akesaka, Shiori; Kagaya, Masami; Kimura, Taichi; Ishida, Yusuke; Oda, Masaya; Takahashi, Masataka; Sugawara, Taku; Yoshioka, Toshiaki; Nishihara, Hiroshi; Akagami, Yoichi; Goto, Akiteru; Minamiya, Yoshihiro; Tanaka, Shinya

    2015-01-01

    Rapid immunohistochemistry (R-IHC) can contribute to the intraoperative diagnosis of central nervous system (CNS) tumors. We have recently developed a new IHC method based on an alternating current electric field to facilitate the antigen-antibody reaction. To ensure the requirement of R-IHC for intraoperative diagnosis, 183 cases of CNS tumors were reviewed regarding the accuracy rate of diagnosis without R-IHC. The diagnostic accuracy was 90.7 % (166/183 cases) [corrected] in which definitive diagnoses were not provided in 17 cases because of the failure of glioma grading and differential diagnosis of lymphoma and glioma. To establish the clinicopathological application, R-IHC for frozen specimens was compared with standard IHC for permanent specimens. 33 gliomas were analyzed, and the Ki-67/MIB-1 indices of frozen specimens by R-IHC were consistent with the grade and statistically correlated with those of permanent specimens. Thus, R-IHC provided supportive information to determine the grade of glioma. For discrimination between glioma and lymphoma, R-IHC was able to provide clear results of CD20 and Ki-67/MIB-1 in four frozen specimens of CNS lymphoma as well as standard IHC. We conclude that the R-IHC for frozen specimens can provide important information for intraoperative diagnosis of CNS tumors.

  15. Rapid acquisition of high resolution full wave-field borehole seismic data

    SciTech Connect

    Sleefe, G.E.; Harding, R.S. Jr.; Fairborn, J.W.; Paulsson, B.N.P.

    1993-04-01

    An essential requirement for both Vertical Seismic Profiling (VSP) and Cross-Hole Seismic Profiling (CHSP) is the rapid acquisition of high resolution borehole seismic data. Additionally, full wave-field recording using three-component receivers enables the use of both transmitted and reflected elastic wave events in the resulting seismic images of the subsurface. To this end, an advanced three- component multi-station borehole seismic receiver system has been designed and developed by Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) and OYO Geospace. The system requires data from multiple three-component wall-locking accelerometer packages and telemeters digital data to the surface in real-time. Due to the multiplicity of measurement stations and the real-time data link, acquisition time for the borehole seismic survey is significantly reduced. The system was tested at the Chevron La Habra Test Site using Chevron`s clamped axial borehole vibrator as the seismic source. Several source and receiver fans were acquired using a four-station version of the advanced system. For comparison purposes, an equivalent data set was acquired using a standard analog wall-locking geophone receiver. The test data indicate several enhancements provided by the multi-station receiver relative to the standard, drastically improved signal-to-noise ratio, increased signal bandwidth, the detection of multiple reflectors, and a true 4:1 reduction in survey time.

  16. Weakened magnetic braking as the origin of anomalously rapid rotation in old field stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Saders, Jennifer L.; Ceillier, Tugdual; Metcalfe, Travis S.; Silva Aguirre, Victor; Pinsonneault, Marc H.; García, Rafael A.; Mathur, Savita; Davies, Guy R.

    2016-01-01

    A knowledge of stellar ages is crucial for our understanding of many astrophysical phenomena, and yet ages can be difficult to determine. As they become older, stars lose mass and angular momentum, resulting in an observed slowdown in surface rotation. The technique of ‘gyrochronology’ uses the rotation period of a star to calculate its age. However, stars of known age must be used for calibration, and, until recently, the approach was untested for old stars (older than 1 gigayear, Gyr). Rotation periods are now known for stars in an open cluster of intermediate age (NGC 6819; 2.5 Gyr old), and for old field stars whose ages have been determined with asteroseismology. The data for the cluster agree with previous period-age relations, but these relations fail to describe the asteroseismic sample. Here we report stellar evolutionary modelling, and confirm the presence of unexpectedly rapid rotation in stars that are more evolved than the Sun. We demonstrate that models that incorporate dramatically weakened magnetic braking for old stars can—unlike existing models—reproduce both the asteroseismic and the cluster data. Our findings might suggest a fundamental change in the nature of ageing stellar dynamos, with the Sun being close to the critical transition to much weaker magnetized winds. This weakened braking limits the diagnostic power of gyrochronology for those stars that are more than halfway through their main-sequence lifetimes.

  17. Rapid full-field OCT assessment of clinical tissue specimens (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalimier, Eugénie; Harms, Fabrice; Brossollet, Charles; Benoit, Emilie; Martins, Franck; Boccara, Claude A.

    2016-03-01

    FFOCT (Full Field Optical Coherence Tomography) is a novel optical technology that gives access to very high resolution tomography images of biological tissues within minutes, non-invasively. This makes it an attractive tool to bridge the gap between medical imaging modalities (MRI, ultrasound, CT) used for cancer lesion identification or targeting and histological diagnosis. Clinical tissue specimens, such as surgical cancer margins or biopsies, can potentially be assessed rapidly, by the clinician, in the aim to help him decide on the course of action. A fast FFOCT prototype was built, that provides 1cm2 images with 1 µm resolution in 1 minute, and can accommodate samples up to 50mm diameter. Specific work was carried out to implement a large sample holder, high-speed image acquisition system, optimized scanning, and accelerated GPU tiles stitching. Results obtained on breast, urology, and digestive tissues show the efficiency of the technique for the detection of cancer on clinical tissue specimens, and reinforce the clinical relevance of the technique. The technical and clinical results show that the fast FFOCT system can successfully be used for a fast assessment of cancer excision margins or biopsies providing a very valuable tool in the clinical environment.

  18. Modeling cavitation in a rapidly changing pressure field - application to a small ultrasonic horn.

    PubMed

    Žnidarčič, Anton; Mettin, Robert; Dular, Matevž

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasonic horn transducers are frequently used in applications of acoustic cavitation in liquids. It has been observed that if the horn tip is sufficiently small and driven at high amplitude, cavitation is very strong, and the tip can be covered entirely by the gas/vapor phase for longer time intervals. A peculiar dynamics of the attached cavity can emerge with expansion and collapse at a self-generated frequency in the subharmonic range, i.e. below the acoustic driving frequency. The term "acoustic supercavitation" was proposed for this type of cavitation Žnidarčič et al. (2014) [1]. We tested several established hydrodynamic cavitation models on this problem, but none of them was able to correctly predict the flow features. As a specific characteristic of such acoustic cavitation problems lies in the rapidly changing driving pressures, we present an improved approach to cavitation modeling, which does not neglect the second derivatives in the Rayleigh-Plesset equation. Comparison with measurements of acoustic supercavitation at an ultrasonic horn of 20kHz frequency revealed a good agreement in terms of cavity dynamics, cavity volume and emitted pressure pulsations. The newly developed cavitation model is particularly suited for simulation of cavitating flow in highly fluctuating driving pressure fields.

  19. Weakened magnetic braking as the origin of anomalously rapid rotation in old field stars.

    PubMed

    van Saders, Jennifer L; Ceillier, Tugdual; Metcalfe, Travis S; Aguirre, Victor Silva; Pinsonneault, Marc H; García, Rafael A; Mathur, Savita; Davies, Guy R

    2016-01-14

    A knowledge of stellar ages is crucial for our understanding of many astrophysical phenomena, and yet ages can be difficult to determine. As they become older, stars lose mass and angular momentum, resulting in an observed slowdown in surface rotation. The technique of 'gyrochronology' uses the rotation period of a star to calculate its age. However, stars of known age must be used for calibration, and, until recently, the approach was untested for old stars (older than 1 gigayear, Gyr). Rotation periods are now known for stars in an open cluster of intermediate age (NGC 6819; 2.5 Gyr old), and for old field stars whose ages have been determined with asteroseismology. The data for the cluster agree with previous period-age relations, but these relations fail to describe the asteroseismic sample. Here we report stellar evolutionary modelling, and confirm the presence of unexpectedly rapid rotation in stars that are more evolved than the Sun. We demonstrate that models that incorporate dramatically weakened magnetic braking for old stars can--unlike existing models--reproduce both the asteroseismic and the cluster data. Our findings might suggest a fundamental change in the nature of ageing stellar dynamos, with the Sun being close to the critical transition to much weaker magnetized winds. This weakened braking limits the diagnostic power of gyrochronology for those stars that are more than halfway through their main-sequence lifetimes.

  20. Carbonaceous Matter in Growing Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, M. V.; Stangl, C. M.; Horan, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric nanoparticles constitute the greatest portion of ambient aerosol loading by number. A major source of atmospheric nanoparticles is new particle formation (NPF), a gas to particle conversion process whereby clusters nucleate from gas phase precursors to form clusters on the order of one or a few nanometers and then grow rapidly to climatically relevant sizes. A substantial fraction of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) are thought to arise from NPF. In order to better predict the frequency, growth rates, and climatic impacts of NPF, knowledge of the chemical mechanisms by which nucleated nanoparticles grow is needed. The two main contributors to particle growth are (neutralized) sulfate and carbonaceous matter. Particle growth by sulfuric acid condensation is generally well understood, though uncertainty remains about the extent of base neutralization and the relative roles of ammonia and amines. Much less is known about carbonaceous matter, and field measurements suggest that nitrogen-containing species are important. In this presentation, recent work by our group will be described that uses a combination of ambient measurements, laboratory experiments and computational work to study carbonaceous matter in growing nanoparticles. These studies span a range of particle sizes from the initial adsorption of molecules onto a nanometer-size ammonium bisulfate seed cluster to reactions in particles that are large enough to support condensed-phase chemistry.

  1. Rapid Water Uptake and Limited Storage Capacity at Height of Growing Season in Four Temperate Tree Species in a Central Pennsylvania Catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaines, K.; Meinzer, F. C.; Duffy, C.; Thomas, E.; Eissenstat, D. M.

    2014-12-01

    rapid water uptake and tree water storage limited to about a month in duration. These findings are necessary for modeling of hydrologic parameters that are influenced by tree water age. They also indicate that trees on shallow soil in this catchment may be at risk if droughts lasting over a month occur more frequently in future years.

  2. Temperature fields during the development of autoignition in a rapid compression machine.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, J F; MacNamara, J P; Mohamed, C; Whitaker, B J; Pan, J; Sheppard, C G

    2001-01-01

    Temperature and concentration fields have been investigated in the cylindrical combustion chamber of a rapid compression machine (RCM) by schlieren photography, chemiluminescent imaging and planar laser induced fluorescence of acetone and of formaldehyde in a 2-dimensional sheet across the diameter. The timescale of particular interest was up to 10 ms after the piston has stopped. Experiments were performed in non-reactive and reactive conditions. Acetone was seeded in non-reactive mixtures. Combustion was studied first in a system containing di-tert-butyl peroxide vapour in the presence of oxygen. The decomposition of di-tert-butyl peroxide generates methyl radicals, which are then oxidised if oxygen is present. The overall reaction is exothermic and is characteristic of a conventional thermal ignition. In addition, chemiluminescence, resulting from CH2O*, accompanies the oxidation process. The combustion of n-pentane was then investigated at compressed gas temperatures that spanned the range in which there is a negative temperature dependence of the overall reaction rate, typically 750-850 K. The response to thermal feedback in this more complex thermokinetic system can be the opposite of the "thermal runaway" that accompanies di-tert-butyl peroxide combustion. The purpose of making comparisons between these two types of systems was to show how the temperature field generated in the RCM is modified in different ways by the interaction with the chemistry and to discuss the implications of this for the spatial development of spontaneous ignition. As the piston of the RCM moves it shears gas off the walls of the chamber. This probably creates a roll-up vortex, but more importantly it also collects gas from the walls and moves it across the cylinder head pushing it forward into a plug at the centre. Thus, soon after the end of compression there is an adiabatically heated gas which extends virtually to the wall, but this incorporates a plug of colder gas at its core

  3. Assessment of the suitability of mannitol salt agar for growing bovine-associated coagulase-negative staphylococci and its use under field conditions.

    PubMed

    De Visscher, A; Haesebrouck, F; Piepers, S; Vanderhaeghen, W; Supré, K; Leroy, F; Van Coillie, E; De Vliegher, S

    2013-10-01

    This study aimed at testing the applicability of mannitol salt agar (MSA), a medium generally used in human medicine for differentiating Staphylococcus aureus from coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS), for culturing bovine-associated CNS species. All test isolates from a comprehensive collection of well-identified CNS species, including both reference strains and field isolates, were able to grow. Subsequently, bulk milk samples and teat apex swabs were used to examine the capability of MSA for yielding CNS under field conditions. Sixty-nine and 47 phenotypically different colonies were retrieved from bulk milk and teat apices, respectively. The majority of isolates from teat apices were staphylococci, whereas in bulk milk, staphylococci formed a minority. After 24h of growth, recovery of separate colonies of CNS was much more convenient on MSA compared to a non-selective blood agar. The results of this study indicate that MSA is a suitable medium for both growth and recovery of bovine-associated CNS.

  4. Selection for Fungicide Resistance Within a Growing Season in Field Populations of Phytophthora infestans at the Center of Origin.

    PubMed

    Grünwald, Niklaus J; Sturbaum, Anne K; Montes, Gaspar Romero; Serrano, Edith Garay; Lozoya-Saldaña, Hector; Fry, William E

    2006-12-01

    ABSTRACT The central highlands of Mexico should provide an optimal testing ground for evaluating the potential threat of selection for resistance to fungicides in the population of Phytophthora infestans. We evaluated the hypotheses that exposure to the fungicides azoxystrobin, cymoxanil, dimethomorph, fluazinam, mancozeb, metalaxyl, and propamocarb hydrochloride would lead to (i) a shift in the sensitivity distributions (i.e., selection) and (ii) a lower genotypic diversity of the population. We compared populations from unsprayed plots with populations that had been exposed to several applications of each of the fungicides within a single field season. This study provides novel baseline data and shows that the Toluca valley P. infestans population has a wide range of sensitivities to the fungicides fluazinam, cymoxanil, dimethomorph, metalaxyl, and propamocarb. Directional selection toward resistance combined with a reduction in genetic diversity of the P. infestans population was observed only for the fungicide metalaxyl. The results obtained provide direct experimental support for continuing vigilance regarding further introductions of exotic strains of P. infestans into the United States.

  5. Evolution of Rhyolite at Laguna del Maule, a Rapidly Inflating Volcanic Field in the Southern Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, N. L.; Singer, B. S.; Jicha, B. R.; Hildreth, E. W.; Fierstein, J.; Rogers, N. W.

    2012-12-01

    The Laguna del Maule Volcanic Field (LdM) is host to both the foremost example of post-glacial rhyolitic volcanism in the southern Andes and rapid, ongoing crustal deformation. The flare-up of high-silica eruptions was coeval with deglaciation at 24 ka. Rhyolite and rhyodacite domes and coulees totaling 6.5 km3 form a 20 km ring around the central lake basin. This spatial and temporal concentration of rhyolite is unprecedented in the history of the volcanic field. Colinear major and trace element variation suggests these lavas share a common evolutionary history (Hildreth et al., 2010). Moreover, geodetic observations (InSAR & GPS) have identified rapid inflation centered in the western side of the rhyolite dome ring at a rate of 17 cm/year for five years, which has accelerated to 30 cm/yr since April 2012. The best fit to the geodetic data is an expanding magma body located at 5 km depth (Fournier et al., 2010; Le Mevel, 2012). The distribution of high-silica volcanism, most notably geochemically similar high-silica rhyolite lavas erupted 12 km apart of opposite sides of the lake within a few kyr of each other, raises the possibility that the shallow magma intrusion represents only a portion of a larger rhyolitic body, potentially of caldera forming dimensions. We aim to combine petrologic models with a precise geochronology to formulate a model of the evolution of the LdM magma system to its current state. New 40Ar/39Ar age determinations show rhyolitic volcanism beginning at 23 ka with the eruption of the Espejos rhyolite, followed by the Cari Launa Rhyolite at 14.5 ka, two flows of the Barrancas complex at 6.4 and 3.9 ka, and the Divisoria rhyolite at 2.2 ka. In contrast, significant andesitic and dacitic volcanism is largely absent from the central basin of LdM since the early post-glacial period suggesting a coincident basin-wide evolution from andesite to dacite to rhyolite and is consistent with a shallow body of low-density rhyolite blocking the eruption

  6. An Event Related Field Study of Rapid Grammatical Plasticity in Adult Second-Language Learners.

    PubMed

    Bastarrika, Ainhoa; Davidson, Douglas J

    2017-01-01

    The present study used magnetoencephalography (MEG) to investigate how Spanish adult learners of Basque respond to morphosyntactic violations after a short period of training on a small fragment of Basque grammar. Participants (n = 17) were exposed to violation and control phrases in three phases (pretest, training, generalization-test). In each phase participants listened to short Basque phrases and they judged whether they were correct or incorrect. During the pre-test and generalization-test, participants did not receive any feedback. During the training blocks feedback was provided after each response. We also ran two Spanish control blocks before and after training. We analyzed the event-related magnetic- field (ERF) recorded in response to a critical word during all three phases. In the pretest, classification was below chance and we found no electrophysiological differences between violation and control stimuli. Then participants were explicitly taught a Basque grammar rule. From the first training block participants were able to correctly classify control and violation stimuli and an evoked violation response was present. Although the timing of the electrophysiological responses matched participants' L1 effect, the effect size was smaller for L2 and the topographical distribution differed from the L1. While the L1 effect was bilaterally distributed on the auditory sensors, the L2 effect was present at right frontal sensors. During training blocks two and three, the violation-control effect size increased and the topography evolved to a more L1-like pattern. Moreover, this pattern was maintained in the generalization test. We conclude that rapid changes in neuronal responses can be observed in adult learners of a simple morphosyntactic rule, and that native-like responses can be achieved at least in small fragments of second language.

  7. An Event Related Field Study of Rapid Grammatical Plasticity in Adult Second-Language Learners

    PubMed Central

    Bastarrika, Ainhoa; Davidson, Douglas J.

    2017-01-01

    The present study used magnetoencephalography (MEG) to investigate how Spanish adult learners of Basque respond to morphosyntactic violations after a short period of training on a small fragment of Basque grammar. Participants (n = 17) were exposed to violation and control phrases in three phases (pretest, training, generalization-test). In each phase participants listened to short Basque phrases and they judged whether they were correct or incorrect. During the pre-test and generalization-test, participants did not receive any feedback. During the training blocks feedback was provided after each response. We also ran two Spanish control blocks before and after training. We analyzed the event-related magnetic- field (ERF) recorded in response to a critical word during all three phases. In the pretest, classification was below chance and we found no electrophysiological differences between violation and control stimuli. Then participants were explicitly taught a Basque grammar rule. From the first training block participants were able to correctly classify control and violation stimuli and an evoked violation response was present. Although the timing of the electrophysiological responses matched participants' L1 effect, the effect size was smaller for L2 and the topographical distribution differed from the L1. While the L1 effect was bilaterally distributed on the auditory sensors, the L2 effect was present at right frontal sensors. During training blocks two and three, the violation-control effect size increased and the topography evolved to a more L1-like pattern. Moreover, this pattern was maintained in the generalization test. We conclude that rapid changes in neuronal responses can be observed in adult learners of a simple morphosyntactic rule, and that native-like responses can be achieved at least in small fragments of second language. PMID:28174530

  8. Rapid release of mercury from intertidal sediments exposed to solar radiation: a field experiment.

    PubMed

    Canário, João; Vale, Carlos

    2004-07-15

    There is increasing evidence of the primary importance of photochemical reactions and transfer of gaseous mercury to the atmosphere. Although mercury in aquatic sediments is efficiently retained, resuspension and bioturbation in intertidal sediments may expose temporarily anoxic sediments to solar radiation. Field experiments were performed to investigate these processes. Anoxic sediments from two areas in the Tagus estuary with different degrees of Hg contamination (experiments I and II) were homogenized and distributed into two sets of 36 uncovered Petri dishes. The samples were placed on the intertidal sediments and exposed to direct solar radiation and kept under dark (control) for 6-8 h. The decrease rates of acid volatile sulfides (abrupt in the first 3 h) and of pyrite (linear) were the same in sediments under solar radiation and dark. The total Hg concentrations were relatively constant in sediments kept in dark, but decreased from 17.6 to 7.65 and 3.45 to 1.35 nmol g(-1) in experiments I and II, respectively. In those exposed to solar radiation during the period of higher UV intensity. Similar evolutions were found in nonreactive Hg in pore waters (3.00-2.59 and 0.725-0.105 nM). On the contrary, reactive Hg was higher in pore waters of the sediments exposed to solar radiation and increased with time, from 424 to 845 pM and 53 to 193 pM. These results indicate that most mercury released in pore waters was photochemically reduced in a short period of time and escaped rapidly to the atmosphere. Episodes of bottom resuspension and bioturbation in the intertidal sediments enhance the transfer of gaseous mercury to the atmosphere.

  9. Diagnostic performance characteristics of a rapid field test for anthrax in cattle.

    PubMed

    Muller, Janine; Gwozdz, Jacek; Hodgeman, Rachel; Ainsworth, Catherine; Kluver, Patrick; Czarnecki, Jill; Warner, Simone; Fegan, Mark

    2015-07-01

    Although diagnosis of anthrax can be made in the field with a peripheral blood smear, and in the laboratory with bacterial culture or molecular based tests, these tests require either considerable experience or specialised equipment. Here we report on the evaluation of the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of a simple and rapid in-field diagnostic test for anthrax, the anthrax immunochromatographic test (AICT). The AICT detects the protective antigen (PA) component of the anthrax toxin present within the blood of an animal that has died from anthrax. The test provides a result in 15min and offers the advantage of avoiding the necessity for on-site necropsy and subsequent occupational risks and environmental contamination. The specificity of the test was determined by testing samples taken from 622 animals, not infected with Bacillus anthracis. Diagnostic sensitivity was estimated on samples taken from 58 animals, naturally infected with B. anthracis collected over a 10-year period. All samples used to estimate the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of the AICT were also tested using the gold standard of bacterial culture. The diagnostic specificity of the test was estimated to be 100% (99.4-100%; 95% CI) and the diagnostic sensitivity was estimated to be 93.1% (83.3-98.1%; 95% CI) (Clopper-Pearson method). Four samples produced false negative AICT results. These were among 9 samples, all of which tested positive for B. anthracis by culture, where there was a time delay between collection and testing of >48h and/or the samples were collected from animals that were >48h post-mortem. A statistically significant difference (P<0.001; Fishers exact test) was found between the ability of the AICT to detect PA in samples from culture positive animals <48h post-mortem, 49 of 49, Se=100% (92.8-100%; 95% CI) compared with samples tested >48h post-mortem 5 of 9 Se=56% (21-86.3%; 95% CI) (Clopper-Pearson method). Based upon these results a post hoc cut-off for use of

  10. Field evaluation of a rapid diagnostic test (Parascreen™) for malaria diagnosis in the Peruvian Amazon

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The rapid diagnostic tests for malaria (RDT) constitute a fast and opportune alternative for non-complicated malaria diagnosis in areas where microscopy is not available. The objective of this study was to validate a RDT named Parascreen™ under field conditions in Iquitos, department of Loreto, Peru. Parascreen™ is a RDT that detects the histidine-rich protein 2 (HRP2) antigen from Plasmodium falciparum and lactate deshydrogenase from all Plasmodium species. Methods Parascreen™ was compared with microscopy performed by experts (EM) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using the following indicators: sensitivity (Se), specificity (Sp), positive (PV+) and negative predictive values (PV-), positive (LR+) and negative likehood ratio (LR-). Results 332 patients with suspected non-complicated malaria who attended to the MOH health centres were enrolled between October and December 2006. For P. falciparum malaria, Parascreen™ in comparison with EM, had Se: 53.5%, Sp: 98.7%, PV+: 66.7%, PV-: 97.8%, LR+: 42.27 and LR-: 0.47; and for non-P. falciparum malaria, Se: 77.1%, Sp: 97.6%, PV+: 91.4%, PV-: 92.7%, LR+: 32.0 and LR-: 0.22. The comparison of Parascreen™ with PCR showed, for P. falciparum malaria, Se: 81.8%, Sp: 99.1%, PV+: 75%, PV-: 99.4, LR+: 87.27 and LR-: 0.18; and for non-P. falciparum malaria Se: 76.1%, Sp: 99.2%, PV+: 97.1%, PV-: 92.0%, LR+: 92.51 and LR-: 0.24. Conclusions The study results indicate that Parascreen™ is not a valid and acceptable test for malaria diagnosis under the field conditions found in the Peruvian Amazon. The relative proportion of Plasmodium species, in addition to the genetic characteristics of the parasites in the area, must be considered before applying any RDT, especially after the finding of P. falciparum malaria parasites lacking pfhrp2 gene in this region. PMID:20529273

  11. Currents, magnetization and AC-losses of YBa 2Cu 3O 7 superconductors in rapidly changing magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwasnitza, K.; Plotzner, V.; Waldmann, M.; Widmer, E.

    1988-06-01

    In YBa 2Cu 3O 7 samples of different shape time dependent magnetization currents were induced at 4.2K by the application of rapid magnetic field changes. This contactless method allows the study of the intergrain and intragrain currents in the resistive flux flow state.

  12. A Method to Teach Age-Specific Demography with Field Grown Rapid Cycling "Brassica rapa" (Wisconsin Fast Plants)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Martin G.; Terrana, Sebastian

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate that rapid cycling "Brassica rapa" (Wisconsin Fast Plants) can be used in inquiry-based, student ecological fieldwork. We are the first to describe age-specific survival for field-grown Fast Plants and identify life history traits associated with individual survival. This experiment can be adapted by educators as a…

  13. AutoGrow: A Novel Algorithm for Protein Inhibitor Design

    PubMed Central

    Durrant, Jacob; Amaro, Rommie E.; McCammon, J. Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Due in part to the increasing availability of crystallographic protein structures as well as rapid improvements in computing power, the past few decades have seen an explosion in the field of computer-based rational drug design. Several algorithms have been developed to identify or generate potential ligands in silico by optimizing the ligand-receptor hydrogen bond, electrostatic, and hydrophobic interactions. We here present AutoGrow, a novel computer-aided drug design algorithm that combines the strengths of both fragment-based growing and docking algorithms. To validate AutoGrow, we recreate three crystallographically resolved ligands from their constituent fragments. PMID:19207419

  14. Large multifocal cardiac myxoma causing the sudden unexpected death of a 2-month-old infant--a rapidly growing, acquired lesion versus a congenital process?: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kure, Kiyoe; Lingamfelter, Daniel; Taboada, Eugenio

    2011-06-01

    We report the occurrence of a clinically undiagnosed biatrial myxoma with left ventricular involvement in a 2-month-old male infant, resulting in sudden death. During a routine well-baby examination, a grade (34) holosystolic murmur was detected at the left sternal border with radiation to the axilla and back. On the following day, the patient collapsed and died suddenly. An autopsy revealed a large multifocal neoplasm diffusely involving the aortic valve while displaying mitral, tricuspid, and left ventricular extensions. The ensuing histopathologic and immunohistochemical studies were diagnostic for myxoma. We discuss the occurrence of cardiac myxoma within the pediatric population and review the literature as to theorize whether this lesion was a congenital process versus a rapidly growing tumor that developed after the child was born. Lastly, we address the potential for sudden death in patients with such tumors.

  15. Utilization of proteomics in experimental field conditions--A case study of poplars growing on grassland affected by long-term starch wastewater irrigation.

    PubMed

    Szuba, Agnieszka; Lorenc-Plucińska, Gabriela

    2015-08-03

    The presented study verified the possibility of using proteomics as a tool for investigating poplars growing on obviously separate plots. The examination covered poplars planted on grassland irrigated for 40 years with potato industry wastewater and in a plot appropriate for poplar planting, spaced at a distance of 67 km from each other (hereinafter referred to as forest). The work aimed to compare the obtained proteomic results with data on biometric and biochemical parameters and mineral composition as well as to assess, at a molecular level, the usefulness of grasslands for planting. Proteome analysis showed that most of the stress-related proteins detected were less abundant on the irrigated grassland, confirming the viability of its revegetation with poplars. Proteomic data corresponded well with the other results, highlighting the probable reason for the proteome changes; i.e. deficiency of phosphate ions detected in the forest area. Moreover, proteome analysis revealed biotic stress symptoms in plants growing on the grassland, which were also well explained by other data but would not have been detected without performing the proteomic analysis. Therefore, environmental plant proteomics is a useful and valuable tool during field studies, even when samples are taken from plots some distance apart.

  16. Three-Dimensional Evaluation of the Upper Airway Morphological Changes in Growing Patients with Skeletal Class III Malocclusion Treated by Protraction Headgear and Rapid Palatal Expansion: A Comparative Research

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ju; Wu, Zizhong; Xie, Yongtao; Li, Liang; Liu, Hong; Guo, Tiantian; Chen, Chen; Zhang, Shijie

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the morphological changes of upper airway after protraction headgear and rapid maxillary expansion (PE) treatment in growing patients with Class III malocclusion and maxillary skeletal deficiency compared with untreated Class III patients by cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Methods Thirty growing patients who have completed PE therapy were included in PE group. The control group (n = 30) was selected from the growing untreated patients with the same diagnosis. The CBCT scans of the pre-treatment (T1) and post-treatment (T2) of PE group and the control group were collected. Reconstruction and registration of the 3D models of T1 and T2 were completed. By comparing the data obtained from T1, T2 and control group, the morphological changes of the upper airway during the PE treatment were evaluated. Results Comparing with the data from T1 group, the subspinale (A) of maxilla and the upper incisor (UI) of the T2 group were moved in the anterior direction. The gnathion (Gn) of mandible was moved in the posterior-inferior direction. The displacement of the hyoid bone as well as the length and width of dental arch showed significant difference. The volume and mean cross-sectional area of nasopharynx, velopharynx and glossopharynx region showed significant difference. The largest anteroposterior/the largest lateral (AP/LR) ratios of the velopharynx and glossopharynx were increased, but the AP/LR ratio of the hypopharynx was decreased. In addition, the length and width of the maxillary dental arch, the displacement of the hyoid bone, the volume of nasopharynx and velopharynx, and the AP/LR ratio of the hypopharynx and velopharynx showed significant difference between the data from control and T2 group. Conclusion The PE treatment of Class Ⅲ malocclusion with maxillary skeletal hypoplasia leads to a significant increase in the volume of nasopharynx and velopharynx. PMID:26252015

  17. One-day pulsed-field gel electrophoresis protocol for rapid determination of emetic Bacillus cereus isolates.

    PubMed

    Kaminska, Paulina S; Fiedoruk, Krzysztof; Jankowska, Dominika; Mahillon, Jacques; Nowosad, Karol; Drewicka, Ewa; Zambrzycka, Monika; Swiecicka, Izabela

    2015-04-01

    Bacillus cereus, the Gram-positive and spore-forming ubiquitous bacterium, may cause emesis as the result of food intoxication with cereulide, a heat-stable emetic toxin. Rapid determination of cereulide-positive B. cereus isolates is of highest importance due to consequences of this intoxication for human health and life. Here we present a 1-day pulsed-field gel electrophoresis for emetic B. cereus isolates, which allows rapid and efficient determination of their genomic relatedness and helps determining the source of intoxication in case of outbreaks caused by these bacilli.

  18. Growing Spaceships?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Glen A.

    2013-01-01

    NASA currently has a program called the Space Synthetic Biology Project. Synthetic Biology or SynBio is the design and construction of new biological functions and systems not found in nature. Four NASA field centers, along with experts from industry and academia, have been partnering on the Space Synthetic Biology Project and are working on new breakthroughs in this increasingly useful pursuit, which is part a science discipline and part engineering. Led by researchers at NASA s Ames Research Center, the team is studying how this powerful new tool can help NASA now and in the future. The project was created to harness biology in reliable, robust, engineered systems to support the agency s exploration and science missions, to improve life on Earth and to help shape NASA's future. The program also is intended to contribute foundational tools to the synthetic biology research community.

  19. Field Evaluation of a Semiautomated Method for Rapid and Simple Analysis of Recreational Water Microbiological Quality

    PubMed Central

    Anglès d'Auriac, Marc B.; Roberts, Hildegarde; Shaw, Terri; Sirevåg, Reidun; Hermansen, Leonila Fajardo; Berg, James D.

    2000-01-01

    An early warning system using a rapid enzymatic semiautomated method suitable for fecal coliform detection in recreational waters within 8 h was developed further and evaluated in this study. This rapid method was compared to the standard method followed in the United Kingdom. We used 1,011 samples originating from 206 different locations in Wales. When we assessed the presence or absence of fecal coliforms, targeting very low levels of contamination, we obtained 83.9% agreement between the rapid method and the lauryl sulfate broth-membrane filtration technique, whereas direct confirmation of the samples processed by the rapid method showed 89.3% agreement. Environmental enzymatic background activity was found to be the main limiting factor for this method. Owing to a specific and integrated handling of the results by the software of the instrument, the percentage of false-positive results (a consequence of enzymatic background) was successfully limited to 2.9% by the direct confirmation evaluation. However, 7.8% false-negative results due to “late-growers” had to be accepted in order to produce results within a working day. At present, the method can be used in a more conservative way to assess the environmental threshold of 100 CFU of fecal coliforms per 100 ml in recreational waters. The implications of our findings with regard to the applicability of rapid enzymatic methods are discussed. PMID:11010890

  20. Two-gluon rapidity correlations of strong colour field in pp, pA and AA collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ye-Yin; Xu, Ming-Mei; Zhang, Heng-Ying; Wu, Yuan-Fang

    2016-11-01

    Using the CGC formalism, we calculate the two-gluon rapidity correlations of strong colour fields in pp, pA and AA collisions, respectively. If one trigger gluon is fixed at central rapidity, a ridge-like correlation pattern is obtained in symmetry pp and AA collisions, and a huge bump-like correlation pattern is presented in asymmetry pA collisions. It is demonstrated that long-range ridge-like rapidity correlations are caused by the stronger correlation with the gluon of colour source. These features are independent of the azimuthal angular of two selected gluon. They are qualitatively consistent with current observed data at LHC. The transverse momentum and incident energy dependence of the ridge and bump-like correlations are also systematically studied. The ridge is more likely observed at higher incident energy and lower transverse momentum of trigger gluon.

  1. Bioaccumulation and translocation of metals in the natural vegetation growing on fly ash lagoons: a field study from Santaldih thermal power plant, West Bengal, India.

    PubMed

    Maiti, Subodh Kumar; Jaiswal, Shishir

    2008-01-01

    A field study was conducted in the fly ash lagoons of Santandih Thermal Power Plant located in West Bengal (India) to find out total, EDTA and DTPA extractable metals in fly ash and their bioaccumulation in root and shoot portion of the naturally growing vegetation. Fly ash sample has alkaline pH and low conductivity. The concentration of total Cu, Zn, Pb and Ni were found higher than weathered fly ash and natural soil, where as Co, Cd and Cr were found traces. Five dominant vegetation namely, Typha latifolia, Fimbristylis dichotoma, Amaranthus defluxes, Saccharum spontaenum and Cynodon dactylon were collected in the winter months (November-December). Bioaccumulation of metals in root and shoot portions were found varied significantly among the species, but all concentration were found within toxic limits. Correlation between total, DTPA and EDTA extractable metals viz. root and shoot metals concentration were studied. Translocation factor (TF) for Cu, Zn and Ni were found less than unity, indicates that these metals are immobilized in the root part of the plants. Metals like Mn have TF greater than unity. The study infers that natural vegetation removed Mn by phytoextraction mechanisms (TF > 1), while other metals like Zn, Cu, Pb and Ni were removed by rhizofiltration mechanisms (TF < 1). The field study revealed that T. latifolia and S. spontaenum plants could be used for bioremediation of fly ash lagoon.

  2. Laboratory and Field Evaluation of Rapid Setting Cementitious Materials for Large Crater Repair

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-01

    pavement fill material used during preparation of the test craters...60 Figure 43. Filling the proportional mixer with Rapid Set DOT cement...87 Figure 84. Section 2 of Crater 4 was filled with a portion of the material from Batch 6

  3. Rapid changes in corticospinal excitability during force field adaptation of human walking.

    PubMed

    Barthélemy, D; Alain, S; Grey, M J; Nielsen, J B; Bouyer, L J

    2012-03-01

    Force field adaptation of locomotor muscle activity is one way of studying the ability of the motor control networks in the brain and spinal cord to adapt in a flexible way to changes in the environment. Here, we investigate whether the corticospinal tract is involved in this adaptation. We measured changes in motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) elicited by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in the tibialis anterior (TA) muscle before, during, and after subjects adapted to a force field applied to the ankle joint during treadmill walking. When the force field assisted dorsiflexion during the swing phase of the step cycle, subjects adapted by decreasing TA EMG activity. In contrast, when the force field resisted dorsiflexion, they increased TA EMG activity. After the force field was removed, normal EMG activity gradually returned over the next 5 min of walking. TA MEPs elicited in the early swing phase of the step cycle were smaller during adaptation to the assistive force field and larger during adaptation to the resistive force field. When elicited 5 min after the force field was removed, MEPs returned to their original values. The changes in TA MEPs were larger than what could be explained by changes in background TA EMG activity. These effects seemed specific to walking, as similar changes in TA MEP were not seen when seated subjects were tested during static dorsiflexion. These observations suggest that the corticospinal tract contributes to the adaptation of walking to an external force field.

  4. EMF Rapid Program Engineering Projects, Project 1, Development of Recommendations for Guidelines for Field Source Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Electric Research and Management, Inc.

    1997-03-11

    The goal of this project is to develop a protocol for measuring the electric and magnetic fields around sources. Data from these measurements may help direct future biological effects research by better defining the complexity of magnetic and electric fields to which humanity is exposed, as well asprovide the basis for rigorous field exposure analysis and risk assessment once the relationship between field exposure and biological response. is better understood. The data base also should have sufficient spatial and temporal characteristics to guide electric and magnetic field management. The goal of Task A is to construct a set of characteristics that would be ideal to have for guiding and interpreting biological studies and for focusing any future effort at field management. This ideal set will then be quantified and reduced according to the availability (or possible development of) instrumentation to measure the desired characteristics. Factors that also will be used to define pragmatic data sets will be the cost of collecting the data, the cost of developing an adequate data base, and the needed precision in measuring specific characteristics. A field, electric or magnetic, will always be ,some function of time and space. The first step in this section of the protocol development will be to determine what span of time and what portion of space are required to quantify the electric and magnetic fields around sources such as appliances and electrical apparatus. Constraints on time will be set by examining measurement limitations and biological data requirements.

  5. A review of rapid and field-portable analytical techniques for the diagnosis of cyanide exposure.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Randy; Logue, Brian A

    2017-04-01

    Although commonly known as a highly toxic chemical, cyanide is also an essential reagent for many industrial processes in areas such as mining, electroplating and synthetic fiber production. The "heavy" use of cyanide in these industries, along with its necessary transportation, increases the possibility of human exposure. Another relatively common, but consistently overlooked, mode of cyanide exposure is inhalation of fire smoke. Both civilians and fire rescue personnel risk exposure during the unfortunate event of a structure fire. Additionally, fire rescue personnel risk long-term effects of habitual exposure throughout their careers in fire rescue. The relatively rapid onset of cyanide toxicity and the fact that cyanide exposure symptoms mimic other medical conditions necessitate a rapid, sensitive, portable, and accurate method for the diagnosis of cyanide exposure. This review focuses on the important issues concerning accurate point-of-care diagnosis of cyanide exposure and cyanide detection technologies that may allow a commercial cyanide exposure diagnostic to become a reality.

  6. Field Evaluation of a Dual Rapid Immunodiagnostic Test for HIV and Syphilis infection in Peru

    PubMed Central

    Bristow, Claire C.; Leon, Segundo R.; Huang, Emily; Ramos, Lourdes B.; Vargas, Silver K.; Flores, Juan A.; Konda, Kelika A.; Caceres, Carlos F.; Klausner, Jeffrey D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Integrated prevention for HIV and syphilis is warranted because both syphilis and HIV infections have evidence-based, scalable interventions using current health care mechanisms. The advent of dual rapid point-of-care tests, single devices that can detect multiple infections using the same specimen, provides the opportunity to integrate the screening of syphilis into HIV programs, potentially increasing the numbers of people tested and allowing for same-day testing and treatment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the MedMira Multiplo Rapid TP/HIV Antibody Test (MedMira Inc, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada), a qualitative, rapid immunoassay that detects antibodies to T. pallidum and HIV. Methods The reference standard test for comparison to the T. pallidum component of the Multiplo TP/HIV Test was Treponema Pallidum Particle Agglutination assay. For the HIV component, the reference test included a 4th-generation enzyme immunoassay with a confirmatory Western blot test. Results The sensitivity and specificity for the HIV antibody component were 93.8% (95% CI: 69.8%, 99.8%) and 100% (95% CI: 97.7%, 100%), respectively. The Treponema pallidum component of the test had a sensitivity of 81.0% (95% CI: 68.1%, 94.6%) and a specificity of 100% (95% CI: 97.6%, 100%). Conclusions Our study showed excellent performance of the HIV antibody component of the test and very good performance for the Treponema pallidum antibody component of the MedMira Multiplo Rapid TP/HIV Antibody Test, which should be considered to improve screening coverage. Use of effective dual tests will create improved access to more comprehensive care by integrating the screening of syphilis into HIV prevention programs. PMID:26650998

  7. Methods for automatized detection of rapid changes in lateral boundary condition fields for NWP limited area models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tudor, M.

    2015-08-01

    Three-hourly temporal resolution of lateral boundary data for limited area models (LAMs) can be too infrequent to resolve rapidly moving storms. This problem is expected to be worse with increasing horizontal resolution. In order to detect intensive disturbances in surface pressure moving rapidly through the model domain, a filtered surface pressure field (MCUF) is computed operationally in the ARPEGE global model of Météo France. The field is distributed in the coupling files along with conventional meteorological fields used for lateral boundary conditions (LBCs) for the operational forecast using limited area model ALADIN (Aire Limitée Adaptation dynamique Développement InterNational) in the Meteorological and Hydrological Service of Croatia (DHMZ). Here an analysis is performed of the MCUF field for the LACE coupling domain for the period from 23 January 2006, when it became available, until 15 November 2014. The MCUF field is a good indicator of rapidly moving pressure disturbances (RMPDs). Its spatial and temporal distribution can be associated with the usual cyclone tracks and areas known to be supporting cyclogenesis. An alternative set of coupling files from the IFS operational run in the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) is also available operationally in DHMZ with 3-hourly temporal resolution, but the MCUF field is not available. Here, several methods are tested that detect RMPDs in surface pressure a posteriori from the IFS model fields provided in the coupling files. MCUF is computed by running ALADIN on the coupling files from IFS. The error function is computed using one-time-step integration of ALADIN on the coupling files without initialization, initialized with digital filter initialization (DFI) or scale-selective DFI (SSDFI). Finally, the amplitude of changes in the mean sea level pressure is computed from the fields in the coupling files. The results are compared to the MCUF field of ARPEGE and the results of same

  8. Phenotypic and molecular fingerprinting of fast growing rhizobia of field-grown pigeonpea from the eastern edge of the Brazilian Pantanal.

    PubMed

    Costa, F M; Schiavo, J A; Brasil, M S; Leite, J; Xavier, G R; Fernandes, P I

    2014-01-21

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the diversity of rhizobial isolates obtained from root nodules of pigeonpea plants grown at the eastern edge of the Brazilian Pantanal. The bacterial isolates were isolated from root nodules from field-growing pigeonpea grown in two rural settlements of the Aquidauana municipality. The bacterial isolates were characterized phenotypically by means of cultural characterization, intrinsic antibiotic resistance (IAR), salt and high incubation temperature tolerance, and amylolytic and cellulolytic activities. The molecular characterization of the bacterial isolates was carried out using amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA) and Box-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) techniques. In addition, the symbiotic performance of selected rhizobial isolates was evaluated in a greenhouse experiment using sterile substrate. The phenotypic characterization revealed that the bacterial strains obtained from pigeonpea root nodules presented characteristics that are uncommon among rhizobial isolates, indicating the presence of new species nodulating the pigeonpea plants in the Brazilian Pantanal. The molecular fingerprinting of these bacterial isolates also showed a highly diverse collection, with both techniques revealing less than 25% similarity among bacterial isolates. The evaluation of symbiotic performance also indicated the presence of microorganisms with high potential to increase the growth and nitrogen content at the shoots of pigeonpea plants. The results obtained in this study indicate the presence of a highly diversified rhizobial community nodulating the pigeonpea at the eastern edge of the Brazilian Pantanal.

  9. Development and field testing of a rapid and ultra-stable atmospheric carbon dioxide spectrometer

    DOE PAGES

    Xiang, B.; Nelson, D. D.; McManus, J. B.; ...

    2014-08-05

    We present field test results for a new spectroscopic instrument to measure atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) with high precision (0.02 ppm at 1 Hz) and demonstrate high stability (within 0.1 ppm over more than 8 months), without the need for hourly, daily, or even monthly calibration against high-pressure gas cylinders. The technical novelty of this instrument (ABsolute Carbon dioxide, ABC) is the spectral null method using an internal quartz reference cell with known CO2 column density. Compared to a previously described prototype, the field instrument has better stability and benefits from more precise thermal control of the optics and moremore » accurate pressure measurements in the sample cell (at the mTorr level). The instrument has been deployed at a long-term ecological research site (the Harvard Forest, USA), where it has measured for eight months without on-site calibration and with minimal maintenance, showing drift bounds of less than 0.1 ppm. Field measurements agree well with those of another commercially available cavity ring-down CO2 instrument (Picarro G2301) run with a standard calibration protocol. This field test demonstrates that ABC is capable of performing high-accuracy, unattended, continuous field measurements with minimal use of calibration cylinders.« less

  10. Development and field testing of a rapid and ultra-stable atmospheric carbon dioxide spectrometer

    DOE PAGES

    Xiang, B.; Nelson, D. D.; McManus, J. B.; ...

    2014-12-15

    We present field test results for a new spectroscopic instrument to measure atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) with high precision (0.02 μmol mol-1, or ppm at 1 Hz) and demonstrate high stability (within 0.1 ppm over more than 8 months), without the need for hourly, daily, or even monthly calibration against high-pressure gas cylinders. The technical novelty of this instrument (ABsolute Carbon dioxide, ABC) is the spectral null method using an internal quartz reference cell with known CO2 column density. Compared to a previously described prototype, the field instrument has better stability and benefits from more precise thermal control of themore » optics and more accurate pressure measurements in the sample cell (at the mTorr level). The instrument has been deployed at a long-term ecological research site (the Harvard Forest, USA), where it has measured for 8 months without on-site calibration and with minimal maintenance, showing drift bounds of less than 0.1 ppm. Field measurements agree well with those of a commercially available cavity ring-down CO2 instrument (Picarro G2301) run with a standard calibration protocol. This field test demonstrates that ABC is capable of performing high-accuracy, unattended, continuous field measurements with minimal use of reference gas cylinders.« less

  11. Rapid Evolution of Parasite Resistance in a Warmer Environment: Insights from a Large Scale Field Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Mateos-Gonzalez, Fernando; Sundström, L. Fredrik; Schmid, Marian; Björklund, Mats

    2015-01-01

    Global climate change is expected to have major effects on host-parasite dynamics, with potentially enormous consequences for entire ecosystems. To develop an accurate prognostic framework, theoretical models must be supported by empirical research. We investigated potential changes in host-parasite dynamics between a fish parasite, the eyefluke Diplostomum baeri, and an intermediate host, the European perch Perca fluviatilis, in a large-scale semi-enclosed area in the Baltic Sea, the Biotest Lake, which since 1980 receives heated water from a nuclear power plant. Two sample screenings, in two consecutive years, showed that fish from the warmer Biotest Lake were now less parasitized than fish from the Baltic Sea. These results are contrasting previous screenings performed six years after the temperature change, which showed the inverse situation. An experimental infection, by which perch from both populations were exposed to D. baeri from the Baltic Sea, revealed that perch from the Baltic Sea were successfully infected, while Biotest fish were not. These findings suggest that the elevated temperature may have resulted, among other outcomes, in an extremely rapid evolutionary change through which fish from the experimental Biotest Lake have gained resistance to the parasite. Our results confirm the need to account for both rapid evolutionary adaptation and biotic interactions in predictive models, and highlight the importance of empirical research in order to validate future projections. PMID:26035300

  12. Rapid immunocytochemistry based on alternating current electric field using squash smear preparation of central nervous system tumors.

    PubMed

    Moriya, Jun; Tanino, Mishie Ann; Takenami, Tomoko; Endoh, Tomoko; Urushido, Masana; Kato, Yasutaka; Wang, Lei; Kimura, Taichi; Tsuda, Masumi; Nishihara, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Shinya

    2016-01-01

    The role of intraoperative pathological diagnosis for central nervous system (CNS) tumors is crucial for neurosurgery when determining the surgical procedure. Especially, treatment of carmustine (BCNU) wafers requires a conclusive diagnosis of high-grade glioma proven by intraoperative diagnosis. Recently, we demonstrated the usefulness of rapid immunohistochemistry (R-IHC) that facilitates antigen-antibody reaction under alternative current (AC) electric field in the intraoperative diagnosis of CNS tumors; however, a higher proportion of water and lipid in the brain parenchyma sometimes leads to freezing artifacts, resulting in poor quality of frozen sections. On the other hand, squash smear preparation of CNS tumors for cytology does not affect the frozen artifacts, and the importance of smear preparation is now being re-recognized as being better than that of the tissue sections. In this study, we established the rapid immunocytochemistry (R-ICC) protocol for squash smears of CNS tumors using AC electric field that takes only 22 min, and demonstrated its usefulness for semi-quantitative Ki-67/MIB-1 labeling index and CD 20 by R-ICC for intraoperative diagnosis. R-ICC by AC electric field may become a substantial tool for compensating R-IHC and will be applied for broad antibodies in the future.

  13. Utilisation of young and old soil carbon sources by microbial groups differ during the growing season and between experimental treatments in a long-term field experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Börjesson, Gunnar; Menichetti, Lorenzo; Thornton, Barry; Campbell, Colin; Kätterer, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM)is the largest active carbon pool in the terrestrial environment. SOM is a key factor for soil fertility, but is also important for the sequestration of atmospheric CO2. In agricultural soils, management of plant residues and the use of organic fertilisers play important roles for maintaining SOM. Switching from C3 plants to C4 plants such as maize, enables a natural labelling in situ; when coupled with compound specific 13C isotope analysis of phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) it allows the proportion of new C (fixed after the switch added to soil from above- and belowground litter and root exudates) and the proportion of old C (fixed prior to the switch derived from turnover of organic matter) utilised by the soil microbial community to be determined. (new paragraph) A field experiment in Sweden, amended with different mineral and organic fertilisers since 1956, was grown with C3 plants, mainly cereals until 1999. From the year 2000 silage maize was grown every year. In 2012, soil from four replicate plots of five experimental treatments, N fertilised, N fertilised amended with straw and sewage sludge, and two controls (bare fallow and cropped unfertilised) were sampled three times, at the start, middle and end of the growing season. Phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) were extracted from all soil samples and analysed for concentrations and 13C content. (new paragraph) Total PLFA concentrations and also the PLFA/SOM ratios increased with SOM in the different treatments. Seasonal variation in total PLFA was small except for the most SOM-rich treatment (sewage sludge) where concentrations significantly decreased during the growing season indicating the depletion of a labile SOM pool. Weighted mean values of δ13C in PLFAs show that the plots fertilised with only calcium nitrate had the highest δ13C-values in PLFAs before (-20.24 o) and after the vegetation period (-20.37 o), due to a large input of 13C-enriched plant material. However, during

  14. Comparative field evaluation of two rapid immunochromatographic tests for the diagnosis of bovine tuberculosis in African buffaloes (Syncerus caffer).

    PubMed

    Michel, A L; Simões, M

    2009-01-15

    Panels of sera from African buffalo with confirmed bovine tuberculosis and from known uninfected controls were used to evaluate the performance of two commercial rapid chromatographic immunoassays (A and B) for the detection of antibodies to Mycobacterium bovis. The sensitivity was 33% and 23%, respectively, while the specificity was determined at 90% and 94%, respectively. Overall the performance of both diagnostic tests under field conditions was not found sufficiently high to support their use in bovine tuberculosis management and control strategies in South African game reserves.

  15. Light emission from a dielectric subjected to a rapidly alternating electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernyshev, V. V.

    1983-12-01

    Experiments are reported in which light emission was observed in liquid and solid dielectrics which were in contact with a ferroelectric during the polarization reversal (switching) of the ferroelectric domains. In the experiments, samples of an optically nontransparent ferroelectric ceramic, barium titanate, in the form of 10-mm-diameter, 2-mm-thick disk were used, with a 50-Hz sinusoidal switching voltage applied to the disks through deposited electrodes. In experiments with liquid electrodes, the sample was immersed in a glass cell holding the liquid. The solid dielectrics studied were reactively sputtered silicon dioxide and an anodic aluminum oxide produced by electrochemical oxidation through a vacuum-deposited film of pure aluminum. Results indicate there is a threshold field above which the light emission is observed. The existence of this threshold and its level are in agreement with data in the literature on the critical field for the switching of domains in ferroelectrics.

  16. Rapid modelling of the redshift-space power spectrum multipoles for a masked density field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, M. J.; Peacock, J. A.; Taylor, A. N.; de la Torre, S.

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we reformulate the forward modelling of the redshift-space power spectrum multipole moments for a masked density field, as encountered in galaxy redshift surveys. Exploiting the symmetries of the redshift-space correlation function, we provide a masked-field generalization of the Hankel transform relation between the multipole moments in real and Fourier space. Using this result, we detail how a likelihood analysis requiring computation for a broad range of desired P(k) models may be executed 103-104 times faster than with other common approaches, together with significant gains in spectral resolution. We present a concrete application to the complex angular geometry of the VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey PDR-1 release and discuss the validity of this technique for finite-angle surveys.

  17. RAPID COMMUNICATION: High performance superconducting wire in high applied magnetic fields via nanoscale defect engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wee, Sung Hun; Goyal, Amit; Zuev, Yuri L.; Cantoni, Claudia

    2008-09-01

    High temperature superconducting (HTS) wires capable of carrying large critical currents with low dissipation levels in high applied magnetic fields are needed for a wide range of applications. In particular, for electric power applications involving rotating machinery, such as large-scale motors and generators, a high critical current, Ic, and a high engineering critical current density, JE, in applied magnetic fields in the range of 3-5 Tesla (T) at 65 K are required. In addition, exceeding the minimum performance requirements needed for these applications results in a lower fabrication cost, which is regarded as crucial to realize or enable many large-scale bulk applications of HTS materials. Here we report the fabrication of short segments of a potential superconducting wire comprised of a 4 µm thick YBa2Cu3O7-δ (YBCO) layer on a biaxially textured substrate with a 50% higher Ic and JE than the highest values reported previously. The YBCO film contained columns of self-assembled nanodots of BaZrO3 (BZO) roughly oriented along the c-axis of YBCO. Although the YBCO film was grown at a high deposition rate, three-dimensional self-assembly of the insulating BZO nanodots still occurred. For all magnetic field orientations, minimum Ic and JE at 65 K, 3 T for the wire were 353 A cm-1 and 65.4 kA cm-2, respectively.

  18. Equipping Liberal Arts Students with Skills in Data Analytics: Drake University Partners with Regional Businesses to Offer New Programs in a Rapidly Growing Field. A BHEF Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Business-Higher Education Forum, 2016

    2016-01-01

    This case study examines how Business-Higher Education Forum (BHEF) member Drake University, a private university with a strong liberal arts tradition, is equipping its students to become data-enabled professionals. Through the collaboration of its business and higher education members, BHEF launched the National Higher Education and Workforce…

  19. CLUSTERING OF OBSCURED AND UNOBSCURED QUASARS IN THE BOOeTES FIELD: PLACING RAPIDLY GROWING BLACK HOLES IN THE COSMIC WEB

    SciTech Connect

    Hickox, Ryan C.; Alexander, David M.; Goulding, Andrew D.; Myers, Adam D.; Brodwin, Mark; Forman, William R.; Jones, Christine; Murray, Stephen S.; Eisenstein, Daniel; Caldwell, Nelson; Brown, Michael J. I.; Cool, Richard J.; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Dey, Arjun; Jannuzi, Buell T.; Assef, Roberto J.; Eisenhardt, Peter R.; Gorjian, Varoujan; Stern, Daniel; Le Floc'h, Emeric

    2011-04-20

    We present the first measurement of the spatial clustering of mid-infrared-selected obscured and unobscured quasars, using a sample in the redshift range 0.7 < z < 1.8 selected from the 9 deg{sup 2} Booetes multiwavelength survey. Recently, the Spitzer Space Telescope and X-ray observations have revealed large populations of obscured quasars that have been inferred from models of the X-ray background and supermassive black hole evolution. To date, little is known about obscured quasar clustering, which allows us to measure the masses of their host dark matter halos and explore their role in the cosmic evolution of black holes and galaxies. In this study, we use a sample of 806 mid-infrared-selected quasars and {approx}250,000 galaxies to calculate the projected quasar-galaxy cross-correlation function w{sub p} (R). The observed clustering yields characteristic dark matter halo masses of log(M{sub halo} [h {sup -1} M{sub sun}]) = 12.7{sup +0.4}{sub -0.6} and 13.3{sup +0.3}{sub -0.4} for unobscured quasars (QSO-1s) and obscured quasars (Obs-QSOs), respectively. The results for QSO-1s are in excellent agreement with previous measurements for optically selected quasars, while we conclude that the Obs-QSOs are at least as strongly clustered as the QSO-1s. We test for the effects of photometric redshift errors on the optically faint Obs-QSOs, and find that our method yields a robust lower limit on the clustering; photo-z errors may cause us to underestimate the clustering amplitude of the Obs-QSOs by at most {approx}20%. We compare our results to previous studies, and speculate on physical implications of stronger clustering for obscured quasars.

  20. Clustering of Obscured and Unobscured Quasars in the Boötes Field: Placing Rapidly Growing Black Holes in the Cosmic Web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickox, Ryan C.; Myers, Adam D.; Brodwin, Mark; Alexander, David M.; Forman, William R.; Jones, Christine; Murray, Stephen S.; Brown, Michael J. I.; Cool, Richard J.; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Dey, Arjun; Jannuzi, Buell T.; Eisenstein, Daniel; Assef, Roberto J.; Eisenhardt, Peter R.; Gorjian, Varoujan; Stern, Daniel; Le Floc'h, Emeric; Caldwell, Nelson; Goulding, Andrew D.; Mullaney, James R.

    2011-04-01

    We present the first measurement of the spatial clustering of mid-infrared-selected obscured and unobscured quasars, using a sample in the redshift range 0.7 < z < 1.8 selected from the 9 deg2 Boötes multiwavelength survey. Recently, the Spitzer Space Telescope and X-ray observations have revealed large populations of obscured quasars that have been inferred from models of the X-ray background and supermassive black hole evolution. To date, little is known about obscured quasar clustering, which allows us to measure the masses of their host dark matter halos and explore their role in the cosmic evolution of black holes and galaxies. In this study, we use a sample of 806 mid-infrared-selected quasars and ≈250,000 galaxies to calculate the projected quasar-galaxy cross-correlation function wp (R). The observed clustering yields characteristic dark matter halo masses of log(M halo [h -1 M sun]) = 12.7+0.4 -0.6 and 13.3+0.3 -0.4 for unobscured quasars (QSO-1s) and obscured quasars (Obs-QSOs), respectively. The results for QSO-1s are in excellent agreement with previous measurements for optically selected quasars, while we conclude that the Obs-QSOs are at least as strongly clustered as the QSO-1s. We test for the effects of photometric redshift errors on the optically faint Obs-QSOs, and find that our method yields a robust lower limit on the clustering; photo-z errors may cause us to underestimate the clustering amplitude of the Obs-QSOs by at most ~20%. We compare our results to previous studies, and speculate on physical implications of stronger clustering for obscured quasars.

  1. Development of a Rapid, Standardized Data Inventory for R2K Field Programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arko, R. A.; Chayes, D. N.; Carbotte, S. M.; Ryan, W. B.; Lehnert, K. A.; Shank, T. M.

    2003-12-01

    Effective data management for Ridge2000 requires the production of a complete data inventory for every field program in a timely and standardized way. We are developing a set of forms to document 1.) basic field program information (dates and locations, platform, science party, etc); 2.) an inventory of sensor systems, data types (marine geophysical, physical and chemical oceanographic, rock and sediment samples, and biological), and file formats; 3.) supplemental attachments (written reports, instrument diagrams, etc); and 4.) a basic navigation track. We regard this as the minimal set of metadata which should be produced immediately at the end of a field program, in order to publicize it in an online database and satisfy agency requirements. We have developed a prototype set of Portable Document Format (PDF) forms which can be completed during a cruise through a combination of manual and automated input. PDF is a stable and widely-used format, with software available as both a commercial product (Adobe Acrobat) and an open-source library (http://www.pdflib.org). Completing a PDF form requires only the Acrobat Reader software, which is freely available for every major computing platform. Acrobat offers extensive functionality to aid in data inventory, including the ability to verify content on-the-fly, import data from other files and forms, show controlled vocabularies as pop-up menus, export to XML format, and print a high-quality readable report. Prototype forms have been tested on a recent transit of the CGC Healy, and we plan to continue testing on other ships and soliciting community feedback over the next several months. We envision a long-term plan in which a master set of forms is deployed with every R2K field program, along with a copy of Acrobat Reader, on lightweight storage media such as USB keys. The completed forms will then be transmitted to the data management center, where they are ingested automatically and the information made available in the

  2. Rapid field-based landslide hazard assessment in response to post-earthquake emergency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frattini, Paolo; Gambini, Stefano; Cancelliere, Giorgio

    2016-04-01

    On April 25, 2015 a Mw 7.8 earthquake occurred 80 km to the northwest of Kathmandu (Nepal). The largest aftershock, occurred on May 12, 2015, was the Mw 7.3 Nepal earthquake (SE of Zham, China), 80 km to the east of Kathmandu. . The earthquakes killed ~9000 people and severely damaged a 10,000 sqkm region in Nepal and neighboring countries. Several thousands of landslides have been triggered during the event, causing widespread damages to mountain villages and the evacuation of thousands of people. Rasuwa was one of the most damaged districts. This contribution describes landslide hazard analysis of the Saramthali, Yarsa and Bhorle VDCs (122 km2, Rasuwa district). Hazard is expressed in terms of qualitative classes (low, medium, high), through a simple matrix approach that combines frequency classes and magnitude classes. The hazard analysis is based primarily on the experience gained during a field survey conducted in September 2014. During the survey, local knowledge has been systematically exploited through interviews with local people that have experienced the earthquake and the coseismic landslides. People helped us to recognize fractures and active deformations, and allowed to reconstruct a correct chronicle of landslide events, in order to assign the landslide events to the first shock, the second shock, or the post-earthquake 2015 monsoon. The field experience was complemented with a standard analysis of the relationship between potential controlling factors and the distribution of landslides reported in Kargel et al (2016). This analysis allowed recognizing the most important controlling factor. This information was integrated with the field observations to verify the mapped units and to complete the mapping in area not accessible for field activity. Finally, the work was completed with the analysis and the use of a detailed landslide inventory produced by the University of Milano Bicocca that covers most of the area affected by coseismic landslides in

  3. Rapid bacteriophage MS2 transport in an oxic sandy aquifer in cold climate: Field experiments and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kvitsand, Hanne M. L.; Ilyas, Aamir; Østerhus, Stein W.

    2015-12-01

    Virus removal during rapid transport in an unconfined, low-temperature (6°C) sand and gravel aquifer was investigated at a riverbank field site, 25 km south of Trondheim in central Norway. The data from bacteriophage MS2 inactivation and transport experiments were applied in a two-site kinetic transport model using HYDRUS-1D, to evaluate the mechanisms of virus removal and whether these mechanisms were sufficient to protect the groundwater supplies. The results demonstrated that inactivation was negligible to the overall removal and that irreversible MS2 attachment to aquifer grains, coated with iron precipitates, played a dominant role in the removal of MS2; 4.1 log units of MS2 were removed by attachment during 38 m travel distance and less than 2 days residence time. Although the total removal was high, pathways capable of allowing virus migration at rapid velocities were present in the aquifer. The risk of rapid transport of viable viruses should be recognized, particularly for water supplies without permanent disinfection.

  4. AC electric field for rapid assembly of nanostructured polyaniline onto microsized gap for sensor devices.

    PubMed

    La Ferrara, Vera; Rametta, Gabriella; De Maria, Antonella

    2015-07-01

    Interconnected network of nanostructured polyaniline (PANI) is giving strong potential for enhancing device performances than bulk PANI counterparts. For nanostructured device processing, the main challenge is to get prototypes on large area by requiring precision, low cost and high rate assembly. Among processes meeting these requests, the alternate current electric fields are often used for nanostructure assembling. For the first time, we show the assembly of nanostructured PANI onto large electrode gaps (30-60 μm width) by applying alternate current electric fields, at low frequencies, to PANI particles dispersed in acetonitrile (ACN). An important advantage is the short assembly time, limited to 5-10 s, although electrode gaps are microsized. That encouraging result is due to a combination of forces, such as dielectrophoresis (DEP), induced-charge electrokinetic (ICEK) flow and alternate current electroosmotic (ACEO) flow, which speed up the assembly process when low frequencies and large electrode gaps are used. The main achievement of the present study is the development of ammonia sensors created by direct assembling of nanostructured PANI onto electrodes. Sensors exhibit high sensitivity to low gas concentrations as well as excellent reversibility at room temperature, even after storage in air.

  5. Effects of protein concentration and degradability on performance, ruminal fermentation, and nitrogen metabolism in rapidly growing heifers fed high-concentrate diets from 100 to 230 kg body weight.

    PubMed

    Devant, M; Ferret, A; Gasa, J; Calsamiglia, S; Casals, R

    2000-06-01

    Twenty crossbred heifers (101 +/- 4.5 kg BW) were used to examine the effects of protein concentration and degradability on performance, ruminal fermentation, nutrient digestion, N balance, and urinary excretion of purine derivatives. Heifers were offered concentrate and barley straw for ad libitum consumption. Two protein concentrations (17 vs 14%, DM basis) and two protein sources differing in ruminal degradability (58 vs 42% of CP for soybean meal and treated soybean meal, respectively) were tested. The experiment was divided into four consecutive 28-d periods to evaluate the age (period) effect. Increasing protein concentration and degradability did not improve ADG or intake (P > .05). The increase in urinary N excretion (P < .001) in heifers fed 17% CP suggests that N was in excess of requirements. When the low-degradable protein source was supplemented and(or) CP concentration was low, ruminal NH3 N concentrations fell below 5 mg/100 mL. Urinary excretion of purine derivatives was not affected (P > .05) by protein concentration and degradability, suggesting that in high-concentrate diets NH3 N concentration was not limiting microbial growth. Total VFA concentration decreased (P < .001) and the acetate:propionate ratio increased (P < .01) with advancing period, suggesting an increase in ruminal absorption capacity and an increase in fiber fermentation. The decrease in ruminal NH3 N concentration in the last period suggests a greater use of NH3 N by microorganisms. This hypothesis is supported by the increase (P < .001) in urinary excretion of allantoin and estimated duodenal flows of purine bases and microbial protein with advancing period. Reducing CP concentration and increasing ruminal undegradable protein supply did not affect animal performance or estimated duodenal flow of microbial protein in rapidly growing heifers fed high-concentrate diets.

  6. Field evaluation of a rapid diagnostic test to detect antibodies in human toxocariasis.

    PubMed

    Lim, P K C; Yamasaki, H; Mak, J W; Wong, S F; Chong, C W; Yap, I K S; Ambu, S; Kumarasamy, V

    2015-08-01

    Human toxocariasis which is caused mainly by the larvae of Toxocara canis and Toxocara cati, is a worldwide zoonotic disease that can be a potentially serious human infection. The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using T. canis excretory-secretory (TES) antigens harvested from T. canis larvae is currently the serological test for confirming toxocariasis. An alternative to producing large amounts of Toxocara TES and improved diagnosis for toxocariasis is through the development of highly specific recombinant antigens such as the T. canis second stage larva excretory-secretory 30 kDa protein (recTES-30). The aim of this study was to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of a rapid diagnostic kit (RDT, named as iToxocara kit) in comparison to recTES-30 ELISA in Serendah Orang Asli village in Selangor, Malaysia. A total of 133 subjects were included in the study. The overall prevalence rates by ELISA and RDT were 29.3% and 33.1%, respectively, with more positive cases detected in males than females. However, no association was found between toxocariasis and gender or age. The percentage sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of RDT were 85.7%, 90.1%, 80% and 93.2%, respectively. The prevalence for toxocariasis in this population using both ELISA and RDT was 27.1% (36/133) and the K-concordance test suggested good agreement of the two tests with a Cohen's kappa of 0.722, P<0.01. In addition, the followed-up Spearman rank correlation showed a moderately high correlation at R=0.704 and P<0.01. In conclusion, the RDT kit was faster and easier to use than an ELISA and is useful for the laboratory diagnosis of hospitalized cases of toxocariasis.

  7. A Survey of the Rapidly Emerging Field of Nanotechnology: Potential Applications for Scientific Instruments and Technologies for Atmospheric Entry Probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyyappan, M.; Arnold, J. O.

    2005-01-01

    The field of Nanotechnology is well funded worldwide and innovations applicable to Solar System Exploration are emerging much more rapidly than thought possible just a few years ago. This presentation will survey recent innovations from nanotechnololgy with a focus on novel applications to atmospheric entry science and probe technology, in a fashion similar to that presented by Arnold and Venkatapathy at the previous workshop forum at Lisbon Portugal, October 6-9, 2003. Nanotechnology is a rapidly emerging field that builds systems, devices and materials from the bottom up, atom by atom, and in so doing provides them with novel and remarkable macro-scale performance. This technology has the potential to revolutionize space exploration by reducing mass and simultaneously increasing capability. Thermal, Radiation, Impact Protective Shields: Atmospheric probes and humans on long duration deep space missions involved in Solar System Exploration must safely endure 3 significant hazards: (i) atmospheric entry; (ii) radiation; and (iii) micrometeorite or debris impact. Nanostructured materials could be developed to address all three hazards with a single protective shield, which would involve much less mass than a traditional approach. The concept can be ready in time for incorporation into NASA s Crew Exploration Vehicle, and possible entry probes to fly on the Jupiter Icy Moons

  8. Development of a lateral flow immunoassay for rapid field detection of the red imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta (Hymenoptera: Formicidae).

    PubMed

    Valles, Steven M; Strong, Charles A; Callcott, Anne-Marie A

    2016-07-01

    The red imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta, is an aggressive, highly invasive pest ant species from South America that has been introduced into North America, Asia, and Australia. Quarantine efforts have been imposed in the USA to minimize further spread of the ant. To aid the quarantine efforts, there remains an acute need for a rapid, field portable method for the identification of these ants. In this report, we describe two novel monoclonal antibodies that specifically bind the S. invicta venom protein 2 produced by S. invicta. Using these monoclonal antibodies we developed a lateral flow immunoassay that provides a rapid and portable method for the identification of S. invicta ants. The lateral flow immunoassay was validated against purified S. invicta venom protein 2 and 33 unique ant species (representing 15 % of the total species and 42 % of the Myrmicinae genera found in Florida), and only S. invicta and the S. invicta/richteri hybrid produced a positive result. These monoclonal antibodies were selective to S. invicta venom protein 2 and did not bind to proteins from congeners (i.e., S. geminata or S. richteri) known to produce a S. invicta venom protein 2 ortholog. This S. invicta lateral flow immunoassay provides a new tool for regulatory agencies in the USA to enforce quarantine protocols and limit the spread of this invasive ant. Graphical Abstract Field method to detect and identify the red imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta.

  9. Rapid Fielding: Case Study Concerning the Fielding of the Multiple Launch Rocket System (MLRS) M270A1 to 2d Battalion 4th Field Artillery Fort Sill, Oklahoma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-16

    benchmark them against improper fielding? Determine if the process asks the tactical commander to accept risks . 47 The acquisition framework establishes...capability within the strategic framework . Tactical risk becomes an issue for discussion at this point because of the nature of the overall strategy...package fielding and placement of the Multiple Launch Rocket System case study within the acquisition framework . Literary review briefly details rapid

  10. How Does Your Garlic Grow?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shimabukuro, Mary A.; Fearing, Vickie

    1993-01-01

    Garlic is an ideal plant for the elementary classroom. It grows rapidly in water without aeration for several weeks and remains relatively free of microbial contamination. Simple experiments with garlic purchased at grocery stores can illustrate various aspects of plant growth. (PR)

  11. Phase transition in an Aubry-André system with a rapidly oscillating magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Tridev; Shashidhara, Rajath; Guha Sarkar, Tapomoy; Bandyopadhyay, Jayendra N.

    2016-11-01

    We investigate a variant of the Aubry-André-Harper (AAH) model corresponding to a bosonic optical lattice of ultracold atoms under an effective oscillatory magnetic field. In the limit of high-frequency oscillation, the system maybe approximated by an effective time-independent Hamiltonian. We have studied localization-delocalization transition exhibited by the effective Hamiltonian. The effective Hamiltonian is found to retain the tight-binding tridiagonal form in position space. In a striking contrast to the usual AAH model, this non-dual system shows an energy-dependent mobility edge—a feature which is usually reminiscent of Hamiltonians with beyond-nearest-neighbor hoppings in real space. Finally, we discuss possibilities of experimentally realizing this system in optical lattices.

  12. Field-based high throughput phenotyping rapidly identifies genomic regions controlling yield components in rice

    PubMed Central

    Tanger, Paul; Klassen, Stephen; Mojica, Julius P.; Lovell, John T.; Moyers, Brook T.; Baraoidan, Marietta; Naredo, Maria Elizabeth B.; McNally, Kenneth L.; Poland, Jesse; Bush, Daniel R.; Leung, Hei; Leach, Jan E.; McKay, John K.

    2017-01-01

    To ensure food security in the face of population growth, decreasing water and land for agriculture, and increasing climate variability, crop yields must increase faster than the current rates. Increased yields will require implementing novel approaches in genetic discovery and breeding. Here we demonstrate the potential of field-based high throughput phenotyping (HTP) on a large recombinant population of rice to identify genetic variation underlying important traits. We find that detecting quantitative trait loci (QTL) with HTP phenotyping is as accurate and effective as traditional labor-intensive measures of flowering time, height, biomass, grain yield, and harvest index. Genetic mapping in this population, derived from a cross of an modern cultivar (IR64) with a landrace (Aswina), identified four alleles with negative effect on grain yield that are fixed in IR64, demonstrating the potential for HTP of large populations as a strategy for the second green revolution. PMID:28220807

  13. Continued Rapid Uplift at Laguna del Maule Volcanic Field (Chile) from 2007 through 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Mével, H.; Feigl, K. L.; Cordova, L.; DeMets, C.; Lundgren, P.

    2014-12-01

    The current rate of uplift at Laguna del Maule (LdM) volcanic field in Chile is among the highest ever observed geodetically for a volcano that is not actively erupting. Using data from interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) and the Global Positioning System (GPS) recorded at five continuously operating stations, we measure the deformation field with dense sampling in time (1/day) and space (1/hectare). These data track the temporal evolution of the current unrest episode from its inception (sometime between 2004 and 2007) to vertical velocities faster than 200 mm/yr that continue through (at least) July 2014. Building on our previous work, we evaluate the temporal evolution by analyzing data from InSAR (ALOS, TerraSAR-X, TanDEM-X) and GPS [http://dx.doi.org/ 10.1093/gji/ggt438]. In addition, we consider InSAR data from (ERS, ENVISAT, COSMO-Skymed, and UAVSAR), as well as constraints from magneto-telluric (MT), seismic, and gravity surveys. The goal is to test the hypothesis that a recent magma intrusion is feeding a large, existing magma reservoir. What will happen next? To address this question, we analyze the temporal evolution of deformation at other large silicic systems such as Yellowstone, Long Valley, and Three Sisters, during well-studied episodes of unrest. We consider several parameterizations, including piecewise linear, parabolic, and Gaussian functions of time. By choosing the best-fitting model, we expect to constrain the time scales of such episodes and elucidate the processes driving them.

  14. Development of a rapid soil water content detection technique using active infrared thermal methods for in-field applications.

    PubMed

    Antonucci, Francesca; Pallottino, Federico; Costa, Corrado; Rimatori, Valentina; Giorgi, Stefano; Papetti, Patrizia; Menesatti, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the suitability of active infrared thermography and thermometry in combination with multivariate statistical partial least squares analysis as rapid soil water content detection techniques both in the laboratory and the field. Such techniques allow fast soil water content measurements helpful in both agricultural and environmental fields. These techniques, based on the theory of heat dissipation, were tested by directly measuring temperature dynamic variation of samples after heating. For the assessment of temperature dynamic variations data were collected during three intervals (3, 6 and 10 s). To account for the presence of specific heats differences between water and soil, the analyses were regulated using slopes to linearly describe their trends. For all analyses, the best model was achieved for a 10 s slope. Three different approaches were considered, two in the laboratory and one in the field. The first laboratory-based one was centred on active infrared thermography, considered measurement of temperature variation as independent variable and reported r = 0.74. The second laboratory-based one was focused on active infrared thermometry, added irradiation as independent variable and reported r = 0.76. The in-field experiment was performed by active infrared thermometry, heating bare soil by solar irradiance after exposure due to primary tillage. Some meteorological parameters were inserted as independent variables in the prediction model, which presented r = 0.61. In order to obtain more general and wide estimations in-field a Partial Least Squares Discriminant Analysis on three classes of percentage of soil water content was performed obtaining a high correct classification in the test (88.89%). The prediction error values were lower in the field with respect to laboratory analyses. Both techniques could be used in conjunction with a Geographic Information System for obtaining detailed information on soil heterogeneity.

  15. The Taylor Creek Rhyolite of New Mexico: a rapidly emplaced field of lava domes and flows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duffield, W.A.; Dalrymple, G.B.

    1990-01-01

    The Tertiary Taylor Creek Rhyolite of southwest New Mexico comprises at least 20 lava domes and flows. Each of the lavas was erupted from its own vent, and the vents are distributed throughout a 20 km by 50 km area. The volume of the rhyolite and genetically associated pyroclastic deposits is at least 100 km3 (denserock equivalent). The rhyolite contains 15%-35% quartz, sanidine, plagioclase, ??biotite, ??hornblende phenocrysts. Quartz and sanidine account for about 98% of the phenocrysts and are present in roughly equal amounts. With rare exceptions, the groundmass consists of intergrowths of fine-grained silica and alkali feldspar. Whole-rock major-element composition varies little, and the rhyolite is metaluminous to weakly peraluminous; mean SiO2 content is about 77.5??0.3%. Similarly, major-element compositions of the two feldsparphenocryst species also are nearly constant. However, whole-rock concentrations of some trace-elements vary as much as several hundred percent. Initial radiometric age determinations, all K-Ar and fission track, suggest that the rhyolite lava field grew during a period of at least 2 m.y. Subsequent 40Ar/39Ar ages indicate that the period of growth was no more than 100 000 years. The time-space-composition relations thus suggest that the Taylor Creek Rhyolite was erupted from a single magma reservoir whose average width was at least 30 km, comparable in size to several penecontemporaneous nearby calderas. However, this rhyolite apparently is not related to a caldera structure. Possibly, the Taylor Creek Phyolite magma body never became sufficiently volatile rich to produce a large-volume pyroclastic eruption and associated caldera collapse, but instead leaked repeatedly to feed many relatively small domes and flows. The new 40Ar/39Ar ages do not resolve preexisting unknown relative-age relations among the domes and flows of the lava field. Nonetheless, the indicated geologically brief period during which Taylor Creek Rhyolite magma was

  16. Growing and Growing: Promoting Functional Thinking with Geometric Growing Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markworth, Kimberly A.

    2010-01-01

    Design research methodology is used in this study to develop an empirically-substantiated instruction theory about students' development of functional thinking in the context of geometric growing patterns. The two research questions are: (1) How does students' functional thinking develop in the context of geometric growing patterns? (2) What are…

  17. Rapid measurement of field-saturated hydraulic conductivity for areal characterization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nimmo, J.R.; Schmidt, K.M.; Perkins, K.S.; Stock, J.D.

    2009-01-01

    To provide an improved methodology for characterizing the field-saturated hydraulic conductivity (Kfs) over broad areas with extreme spatial variability and ordinary limitations of time and resources, we developed and tested a simplified apparatus and procedure, correcting mathematically for the major deficiencies of the simplified implementation. The methodology includes use of a portable, falling-head, small-diameter (???20 cm) single-ring infiltrometer and an analytical formula for Kfs that compensates both for nonconstant falling head and for the subsurface radial spreading that unavoidably occurs with small ring size. We applied this method to alluvial fan deposits varying in degree of pedogenic maturity in the arid Mojave National Preserve, California. The measurements are consistent with a more rigorous and time-consuming Kfs measurement method, produce the expected systematic trends in Kfs when compared among soils of contrasting degrees of pedogenic development, and relate in expected ways to results of widely accepted methods. ?? Soil Science Society of America. All rights reserved.

  18. Rapid detection of Aspergillus flavus in rice using biofunctionalized carbon nanotube field effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Villamizar, Raquel A; Maroto, Alicia; Rius, F Xavier

    2011-01-01

    In the present study, we have used carbon nanotube field effect transistors (FET) that have been functionalized with protein G and IgG to detect Aspergillus flavus in contaminated milled rice. The adsorbed protein G on the carbon nanotubes walls enables the IgG anti-Aspergillus antibodies to be well oriented and therefore to display full antigen binding capacity for fungal antigens. A solution of Tween 20 and gelatine was used as an effective blocking agent to prevent the non-specific binding of the antibodies and other moulds and also to protect the transducer against the interferences present in the rice samples. Our FET devices were able to detect at least 10 μg/g of A. flavus in only 30 min. To evaluate the selectivity of our biosensors, Fusarium oxysporum and Penicillium chrysogenum were tested as potential competing moulds for A. flavus. We have proved that our devices are highly selective tools for detecting mycotoxigenic moulds at low concentrations in real samples.

  19. Rapid elimination of field colonies of subterranean termites (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae) using bistrifluron solid bait pellets.

    PubMed

    Evans, Theodore A

    2010-04-01

    The efficacy of bistrifluron, a chitin synthesis inhibitor, in cellulose bait pellets was evaluated on the mound-building subterranean termite, Coptotermes acinaciformis (Froggatt). Three concentrations of the bistrifluron were used: 0 (untreated control), 0.5, and 1.0% over an 8 wk period. Both doses of bistrifluron bait eliminated (viz. termites absent from nest or mound) termite colonies: 83% of colonies (10 of 12) were either eliminated or moribund (viz. colony had no reproductive capacity and decreased workforce) after 8 wk, compared with none of the control colonies. The remaining two treated colonies were deemed to be in decline. Early signs that bistrifluron was affecting the colonies included: 3 wk after baiting mound temperatures showed a loss of metabolic heat, 4 wk after baiting foraging activity in feeding stations was reduced or absent, and dissection of two mounds at 4 wk showed they were moribund. Colony elimination was achieved in around half or less the time, and with less bait toxicant, than other bait products tested under similar conditions in the field, because of either the active ingredient, the high surface area of the pellets, or a combination of both. This suggests the sometimes long times reported for control using baits may be reduced significantly. The use of a mound building species demonstrated clearly colony level effects before and after termites stopped foraging in bait stations.

  20. Rapid detection of peanut oil adulteration using low-field nuclear magnetic resonance and chemometrics.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wenran; Wang, Xin; Chen, Lihua

    2017-02-01

    (1)H low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (LF-NMR) and chemometrics were employed to screen the quality changes of peanut oil (PEO) adulterated with soybean oil (SO), rapeseed oil (RO), or palm oil (PAO) in ratios ranging from 0% to 100%. Significant differences in the LF-NMR parameters, single component relaxation time (T2W), and peak area proportion (S21 and S22), were detected between pure and adulterated peanut oil samples. As the ratio of adulteration increased, the T2W, S21, and S22 changed linearly; however, the multicomponent relaxation times (T21 and T22) changed slightly. The established principal component analysis or discriminant analysis models can correctly differentiate authentic PEO from fake and adulterated samples with at least 10% of SO, RO, or PAO. The binary blends of oils can be clearly classified by discriminant analysis when the adulteration ratio is above 30%, illustrating possible applications in screening the oil species in peanut oil blends.

  1. Rapid Microbiome Changes in Freshly Deposited Cow Feces under Field Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Kelvin; Shaw, Timothy I.; Oladeinde, Adelumola; Glenn, Travis C.; Oakley, Brian; Molina, Marirosa

    2016-01-01

    Although development of next generation sequencing (NGS) has substantially improved our understanding of the microbial ecology of animal feces, previous studies have mostly focused on freshly excreted feces. There is still limited understanding of the aging process dynamics of fecal microbiomes in intact cowpats exposed to natural environments. Fresh cowpats were sampled at multiple time points for 57 days under field conditions; half the samples were exposed to sunlight (unshaded) while the other half was protected from sunlight (shaded). The 16SRNA hypervariable region 4 was amplified from each sample and sequenced on an Illumina MiSeq Platform. While Clostridia, Bacteroidia, and Sphingobacteria were dominant classes of bacteria in fresh cowpats, Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Bacilli were the dominant classes by the end of the study, indicating a general shift from anaerobic to aerobic bacterial populations. This change was most likely influenced by the shift from cattle gut (anaerobic) to pasture ground (aerobic). Reduced moisture in cowpats may also contribute to the community shift since air can penetrate the dryer cowpat more easily. Twelve genera consisting pathogenic bacteria were detected, with Mycobacterium, Bacillus, and Clostridium being the most abundant; their combined abundance accounts for 90% of the total pathogenic genera. Taxonomic richness and diversity increased throughout the study for most samples, which could be due to bacteria regrowth and colonization of bacteria from the environment. In contrast to the high taxonomic diversity, the changes of PICRUSt inferred function profile were minimal for all cowpats throughout the study, which suggest that core functions predicted by PICRUSt may be too conserved to distinguish differences between aerobe and anaerobe. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study demonstrating that cowpat exposure to air and sunlight can cause drastic microbiome changes soon

  2. Rapid variations in fluid chemistry constrain hydrothermal phase separation at the Main Endeavour Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Love, Brooke; Lilley, Marvin; Butterfield, David; Olson, Eric; Larson, Benjamin

    2017-02-01

    Previous work at the Main Endeavour Field (MEF) has shown that chloride concentration in high-temperature vent fluids has not exceeded 510 mmol/kg (94% of seawater), which is consistent with brine condensation and loss at depth, followed by upward flow of a vapor phase toward the seafloor. Magmatic and seismic events have been shown to affect fluid temperature and composition and these effects help narrow the possibilities for sub-surface processes. However, chloride-temperature data alone are insufficient to determine details of phase separation in the upflow zone. Here we use variation in chloride and gas content in a set of fluid samples collected over several days from one sulfide chimney structure in the MEF to constrain processes of mixing and phase separation. The combination of gas (primarily magmatic CO2 and seawater-derived Ar) and chloride data, indicate that neither variation in the amount of brine lost, nor mixing of the vapor phase produced at depth with variable quantities of (i) brine or (ii) altered gas rich seawater that has not undergone phase separation, can explain the co-variation of gas and chloride content. The gas-chloride data require additional phase separation of the ascending vapor-like fluid. Mixing and gas partitioning calculations show that near-critical temperature and pressure conditions can produce the fluid compositions observed at Sully vent as a vapor-liquid conjugate pair or as vapor-liquid pair with some remixing, and that the gas partition coefficients implied agree with theoretically predicted values.Plain Language SummaryWhen the chemistry of fluids from deep sea hot springs changes over a short time span, it allows us to narrow down the conditions and processes that created those fluids. This gives us a better idea what is happening under the seafloor where the water is interacting with hot rocks and minerals, boiling, and taking on the character it will have when it emerges at</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24642225','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24642225"><span><span class="hlt">Rapid</span> evaluation of a protein-based voltage probe using a <span class="hlt">field</span>-induced membrane potential change.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Tsutsui, Hidekazu; Jinno, Yuka; Tomita, Akiko; Okamura, Yasushi</p> <p>2014-07-01</p> <p>The development of a high performance protein probe for the measurement of membrane potential will allow elucidation of spatiotemporal regulation of electrical signals within a network of excitable cells. Engineering such a probe requires a functional screen of many candidates. Although the glass-microelectrode technique generally provides an accurate measure of a given test probe, throughputs are limited. In this study, we focused on an approach that uses the membrane potential changes induced by an external electric <span class="hlt">field</span> in a geometrically simple mammalian cell. For quantitative evaluation of membrane voltage probes that rely on the structural transition of the S1-S4 voltage sensor domain and hence have non-linear voltage dependencies, it was crucial to introduce exogenous inwardly rectifying potassium conductance to reduce cell-to-cell variability in resting membrane potentials. Importantly, the addition of the exogenous conductance drastically altered the profile of the <span class="hlt">field</span>-induced potential. Following a site-directed random mutagenesis and the <span class="hlt">rapid</span> screen, we identified a mutant of a voltage probe Mermaid, exhibiting positively shifted voltage sensitivity. Due to its simplicity, the current approach will be applicable under a microfluidic configuration to carry out an efficient screen. Additionally, we demonstrate another interesting aspect of the <span class="hlt">field</span>-induced optical signals, ability to visualize electrical couplings between cells.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4269717','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4269717"><span>Auditory evoked <span class="hlt">fields</span> measured noninvasively with small-animal MEG reveal <span class="hlt">rapid</span> repetition suppression in the guinea pig</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Christianson, G. Björn; Chait, Maria; de Cheveigné, Alain</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>In animal models, single-neuron response properties such as stimulus-specific adaptation have been described as possible precursors to mismatch negativity, a human brain response to stimulus change. In the present study, we attempted to bridge the gap between human and animal studies by characterising responses to changes in the frequency of repeated tone series in the anesthetised guinea pig using small-animal magnetoencephalography (MEG). We showed that 1) auditory evoked <span class="hlt">fields</span> (AEFs) qualitatively similar to those observed in human MEG studies can be detected noninvasively in rodents using small-animal MEG; 2) guinea pig AEF amplitudes reduce <span class="hlt">rapidly</span> with tone repetition, and this AEF reduction is largely complete by the second tone in a repeated series; and 3) differences between responses to the first (deviant) and later (standard) tones after a frequency transition resemble those previously observed in awake humans using a similar stimulus paradigm. PMID:25231619</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16859698','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16859698"><span><span class="hlt">Rapid</span> semi-continuous calibration and <span class="hlt">field</span> test of membrane-enclosed silicone collector as passive water sampler.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Paschke, Albrecht; Schwab, Katrin; Brümmer, Janine; Schüürmann, Gerrit; Paschke, Heidrun; Popp, Peter</p> <p>2006-08-18</p> <p>The new membrane-enclosed silicone collector (MESCO) was, in two different configurations with respect to the thickness of low-density polyethylene membrane used, subject to serial batch extraction tests to obtain (preliminary) sampling rates for estimating water concentrations of selected chlorinated organic compounds and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. This <span class="hlt">rapid</span> calibration procedure is simple to implement compared to experiments in a flow-through apparatus and yielded reasonable sampling rates in the range of 50 microL-2 mL per hour for the compounds tested. The new MESCO formats were also exposed for 28 days in the polluted creek to test their <span class="hlt">field</span> performance. For priority contaminants of special interest, alpha-hexachlorocyclohexane and hexachlorobenzene, the time-weighted average concentrations derived from the freshly calibrated sampling devices agree well with those obtained by conventional water analysis of spot samples.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015PhDT........71G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015PhDT........71G"><span>A hybrid CFD-DSMC model designed to simulate <span class="hlt">rapidly</span> rarefying flow <span class="hlt">fields</span> and its application to physical vapor deposition</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Gott, Kevin</p> <p></p> <p>This research endeavors to better understand the physical vapor deposition (PVD) vapor transport process by determining the most appropriate fluidic model to design PVD coating manufacturing. An initial analysis was completed based on the calculation of Knudsen number from titanium vapor properties. The results show a dense Navier-Stokes solver best describes flow near the evaporative source, but the material properties suggest expansion into the chamber may result in a strong drop in density and a rarefied flow close to the substrate. A hybrid CFD-DSMC solver is constructed in OpenFOAM for <span class="hlt">rapidly</span> rarefying flow <span class="hlt">fields</span> such as PVD vapor transport. The models are patched together combined using a new patching methodology designed to take advantage of the one-way motion of vapor from the CFD region to the DSMC region. Particles do not return to the dense CFD region, therefore the temperature and velocity can be solved independently in each domain. This novel technique allows a hybrid method to be applied to <span class="hlt">rapidly</span> rarefying PVD flow <span class="hlt">fields</span> in a stable manner. Parameter studies are performed on a CFD, Navier-Stokes continuum based compressible solver, a Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) rarefied particle solver, a collisionless free molecular solver and the hybrid CFD-DSMC solver. The radial momentum at the inlet and radial diffusion characteristics in the flow <span class="hlt">field</span> are shown to be the most important to achieve an accurate deposition profile. The hybrid model also shows sensitivity to the shape of the CFD region and rarefied regions shows sensitivity to the Knudsen number. The models are also compared to each other and appropriate experimental data to determine which model is most likely to accurately describe PVD coating deposition processes. The Navier-Stokes solvers are expected to yield backflow across the majority of realistic inlet conditions, making their physics unrealistic for PVD flow <span class="hlt">fields</span>. A DSMC with improved collision model may yield an accurate</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=food+AND+consumption+AND+students&pg=6&id=EJ1116368','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=food+AND+consumption+AND+students&pg=6&id=EJ1116368"><span>Parents'/Carers' Perceptions and Experiences of <span class="hlt">Growing</span>, Preparing and Eating Their Own Fruit and Vegetables as Part of the "<span class="hlt">Field</span> to Fork" Project</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Burton, Diana M.; May, Stephanie</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>This paper reports research into a project to encourage KS1 and KS2 pupils to eat more healthily by supporting their families to <span class="hlt">grow</span> their own fruit and vegetables at home. Participants were recruited through a Primary School Trust comprising four primary schools in the North West of England. They were given practical support to enable them to…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=324600','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=324600"><span><span class="hlt">Field</span> evaluation of green and red leaf lettuce genotypes in the Imperial, San Joaquin, and Salinas Valleys of California for heat tolerance and extension of the <span class="hlt">growing</span> seasons</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Global warming poses serious threats and challenges to the production of leafy vegetables. Being a cool-season crop, lettuce is vulnerable to heat-stress. To adapt to climate change, this study was conducted to evaluate the performance of leaf lettuce genotypes for heat tolerance by <span class="hlt">growing</span> them in ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22555255','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22555255"><span>MO-AB-BRA-08: <span class="hlt">Rapid</span> Treatment <span class="hlt">Field</span> Uniformity Optimization for Total Skin Electron Beam Therapy Using Cherenkov Imaging</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Andreozzi, J; Zhang, R; Glaser, A; Pogue, B; Jarvis, L; Williams, B; Gladstone, D</p> <p>2015-06-15</p> <p>Purpose: To evaluate treatment <span class="hlt">field</span> heterogeneity resulting from gantry angle choice in total skin electron beam therapy (TSEBT) following a modified Stanford dual-<span class="hlt">field</span> technique, and determine a relationship between source to surface distance (SSD) and optimized gantry angle spread. Methods: Cherenkov imaging was used to image 62 treatment <span class="hlt">fields</span> on a sheet of 1.2m x 2.2m x 1.2cm polyethylene following standard TSEBT setup at our institution (6 MeV, 888 MU/min, no spoiler, SSD=441cm), where gantry angles spanned from 239.5° to 300.5° at 1° increments. Average Cherenkov intensity and coefficient of variation in the region of interest were compared for the set of composite Cherenkov images created by summing all unique combinations of angle pairs to simulate dual-<span class="hlt">field</span> treatment. The angle pair which produced the lowest coefficient of variation was further studied using an ionization chamber. The experiment was repeated at SSD=300cm, and SSD=370.5cm. Cherenkov imaging was also implemented during TSEBT of three patients. Results: The most uniform treatment region from a symmetric angle spread was achieved using gantry angles +/−17.5° about the horizontal axis at SSD=441cm, +/−18.5° at SSD=370.5cm, and +/−19.5° at SSD=300cm. Ionization chamber measurements comparing the original treatment spread (+/−14.5°) and the optimized angle pair (+/−17.5°) at SSD=441cm showed no significant deviation (r=0.999) in percent depth dose curves, and chamber measurements from nine locations within the <span class="hlt">field</span> showed an improvement in dose uniformity from 24.41% to 9.75%. Ionization chamber measurements correlated strongly (r=0.981) with Cherenkov intensity measured concurrently on the flat Plastic Water phantom. Patient images and TLD results also showed modest uniformity improvements. Conclusion: A decreasing linear relationship between optimal angle spread and SSD was observed. Cherenkov imaging offers a new method of <span class="hlt">rapidly</span> analyzing and optimizing TSEBT setup</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26832984','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26832984"><span>A <span class="hlt">rapid</span> and high-throughput microplate spectrophotometric method for <span class="hlt">field</span> measurement of nitrate in seawater and freshwater.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Wu, Jiapeng; Hong, Yiguo; Guan, Fengjie; Wang, Yan; Tan, Yehui; Yue, Weizhong; Wu, Meilin; Bin, Liying; Wang, Jiaping; Wen, Jiali</p> <p>2016-02-01</p> <p>The well-known zinc-cadmium reduction method is frequently used for determination of nitrate. However, this method is seldom to be applied on <span class="hlt">field</span> research of nitrate due to the long time consuming and large sample volume demand. Here, we reported a modified zinc-cadmium reduction method (MZCRM) for measurement of nitrate at natural-abundance level in both seawater and freshwater. The main improvements of MZCRM include using small volume disposable tubes for reaction, a vortex apparatus for shaking to increase reduction rate, and a microplate reader for high-throughput spectrophotometric measurements. Considering salt effect, two salinity sections (5~10 psu and 20~35 psu) were set up for more accurate determination of nitrate in low and high salinity condition respectively. Under optimized experimental conditions, the reduction rates were stabilized on 72% and 63% on the salinity of 5 and 20 psu respectively. The lowest detection limit for nitrate was 0.5 μM and was linear up to 100 μM (RSDs was 4.8%). Environmental samples assay demonstrated that MZCRM was well consistent with conventional zinc-cadmium reduction method. In total, this modified method improved accuracy and efficiency of operations greatly, and would be realized a <span class="hlt">rapid</span> and high-throughput determination of nitrate in <span class="hlt">field</span> analysis of nitrate with low cost.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23912422','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23912422"><span><span class="hlt">Rapid</span> and nondestructive measurement of labile Mn, Cu, Zn, Pb and As in DGT by using <span class="hlt">field</span> portable-XRF.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Chen, Zheng; Williams, Paul N; Zhang, Hao</p> <p>2013-09-01</p> <p>The technique of diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) is often employed to quantify labile metals in situ; however, it is a challenge to perform the measurements in-<span class="hlt">field</span>. This study evaluated the capability of <span class="hlt">field</span>-portable X-ray fluorescence (FP-XRF) to swiftly generate elemental speciation information with DGT. Biologically available metal ions in environmental samples passively preconcentrate in the thin films of DGT devices, providing an ideal and uniform matrix for XRF nondestructive detection. Strong correlation coefficients (r > 0.992 for Mn, Cu, Zn, Pb and As) were obtained for all elements during calibration. The limits of quantitation (LOQ) for the investigated elements of FP-XRF on DGT devices are 2.74 for Mn, 4.89 for Cu, 2.89 for Zn, 2.55 for Pb, and 0.48 for As (unit: μg cm(-2)). When Pb and As co-existed in the solution trials, As did not interfere with Pb detection when using Chelex-DGT. However, there was a significant enhancement of the Pb reading attributed to As when ferrihydrite binding gels were tested, consistent with Fe-oxyhydroxide surfaces absorbing large quantities of As. This study demonstrates the value of the FP-XRF technique to <span class="hlt">rapidly</span> and nondestructively detect the metals accumulated in DGT devices, providing a new and simple diagnostic tool for on-site environmental monitoring of labile metals/metalloids.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFM.V33C2668F','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFM.V33C2668F"><span><span class="hlt">Rapid</span> uplift in Laguna del Maule volcanic <span class="hlt">field</span> of the Andean Southern Volcanic Zone (Chile) measured by satellite radar interferometry</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Feigl, K.; Ali, T.; Singer, B. S.; Pesicek, J. D.; Thurber, C. H.; Jicha, B. R.; Lara, L. E.; Hildreth, E. W.; Fierstein, J.; Williams-Jones, G.; Unsworth, M. J.; Keranen, K. M.</p> <p>2011-12-01</p> <p>The Laguna del Maule (LdM) volcanic <span class="hlt">field</span> of the Andean Southern Volcanic Zone extends over 500 square kilometers and comprises more than 130 individual vents. As described by Hildreth et al. (2010), the history has been defined from sixty-eight Ar/Ar and K-Ar dates. Silicic eruptions have occurred throughout the past 3.7 Ma, including welded ignimbrite associated with caldera formation at 950 ka, small rhyolitic eruptions between 336 and 38 ka, and a culminating ring of 36 post-glacial rhyodacite and rhyolite coulees and domes that encircle the lake. Dating of five post-glacial flows implies that these silicic eruptions occurred within the last 25 kyr. <span class="hlt">Field</span> relations indicate that initial eruptions comprised modest volumes of mafic rhyodacite magma that were followed by larger volumes of high silica rhyolite. The post-glacial flare-up of silicic magmatism from vents distributed around the lake, is unprecedented in the history of this volcanic <span class="hlt">field</span>. Using satellite radar interferometry (InSAR), Fournier et al. (2010) measured uplift at a rate of more than 180 mm/year between 2007 and 2008 in a round pattern centered on the west side of LdM. More recent InSAR observations suggest that <span class="hlt">rapid</span> uplift has continued from 2008 through early 2011. In contrast, Fournier et al. found no measurable deformation in an interferogram spanning 2003 through 2004. In this study, we model the deformation <span class="hlt">field</span> using the General Inversion of Phase Technique (GIPhT), as described by Feigl and Thurber (2009). Two different models fit the data. The first model assumes a sill at ~5 km depth has been inflating at a rate of more than 20 million cubic meters per year since 2007. The second model assumes that the water level in the lake dropped at a rate of 20 m/yr from January 2007 through February 2010, thus reducing the load on an elastic simulation of the crust. The rate of intrusion inferred from InSAR is an order of magnitude higher than the average rate derived from well-dated arc</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70022910','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70022910"><span>Herbicides and herbicide degradates in shallow groundwater and the Cedar River near a municipal well <span class="hlt">field</span>, Cedar <span class="hlt">Rapids</span>, Iowa</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Boyd, R.A.</p> <p>2000-01-01</p> <p>Water samples were collected near a Cedar <span class="hlt">Rapids</span>, Iowa municipal well <span class="hlt">field</span> from June 1998 to August 1998 and analyzed for selected triazine and acetanilide herbicides and degradates. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the occurrence of herbicides and herbicide degradates in the well <span class="hlt">field</span> during a period following springtime application of herbicides to upstream cropland. The well <span class="hlt">field</span> is in an alluvial aquifer adjacent to the Cedar River. Parent herbicide concentrations generally were greatest in June, and decreased in July and August. Atrazine was most frequently detected and occurred at the greatest concentrations; acetochlor, cyanazine and metolachlor also were detected, but at lesser concentrations than atrazine. Triazine degradate concentrations were relatively small (<0.50 ??g/l) and generally decreased from June to August. Although the rate of groundwater movement is relatively fast (approx. 1 m per day) in the alluvial aquifer near the Cedar River, deethylatrazine (DEA) to atrazine ratios in groundwater samples collected near the Cedar River indicate that atrazine and DEA probably are gradually transported into the alluvial aquifer from the Cedar River. Deisopropylatrazine (DIA) to DEA ratios in water samples indicate most DIA in the Cedar River and alluvial aquifer is produced by atrazine degradation, although some could be from cyanazine degradation. Acetanilide degradates were detected more frequently and at greater concentrations than their corresponding parent herbicides. Ethanesulfonic-acid (ESA) degradates comprised at least 80% of the total acetanilide-degradate concentrations in samples collected from the Cedar River and alluvial aquifer in June, July and August; oxanilic acid degradates comprised less than 20% of the total concentrations. ESA-degradate concentrations generally were smallest in June and greater in July and August. Acetanilide degradate concentrations in groundwater adjacent to the Cedar River indicate acetanilide</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19334748','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19334748"><span>Use of <span class="hlt">field</span>-portable XRF analyzers for <span class="hlt">rapid</span> screening of toxic elements in FDA-regulated products.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Palmer, Peter T; Jacobs, Richard; Baker, Peter E; Ferguson, Kelly; Webber, Siri</p> <p>2009-04-08</p> <p>Analytical instrumentation continues its amazing evolution, especially in regard to generating ever more sensitive, faster, and reliable measurements. Perhaps the most difficult challenges are making these instruments small enough to use in the <span class="hlt">field</span>, equipping them with well-designed software that facilitates and simplifies their use by nonexperts while preserving enough of their analytical capabilities to render them useful for a wide variety of applications. Perhaps the most impressive and underappreciated example of instruments that meet these criteria are <span class="hlt">field</span>-portable X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analyzers. In the past, these analyzers have been routinely used for environmental applications (lead in paint and soil, metal particulates in air samples collected onto filters), geology studies (ore and soil analysis, precious metal identification), and recycling industries (alloy identification). However, their use in the analysis of toxic elements in food, food ingredients, dietary supplements, and medicinal and herbal products, especially within the FDA and regulatory environments, has been surprisingly limited to date. Although XRF will not replace atomic spectrometry techniques such as ICP-MS for sub-parts per million level analyses, it offers a number of significant advantages including minimal sample preparation, high sample throughputs, <span class="hlt">rapid</span> and definitive identification of many toxic elements, and accurate quantitative results. As should be obvious from many recent news reports on elevated levels of toxic elements in children's lunchboxes, toys, and supplements, <span class="hlt">field</span>-portable XRF analyzers can fill a very important niche and are becoming increasingly popular for a wide variety of elemental analysis applications. This perspective begins with a brief review of the theory of XRF to highlight the underlying principle, instrumentation, and spectra. It includes a discussion of various analytical figures of merit of XRF to illustrate its strengths and limitations</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19171680','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19171680"><span>Using a <span class="hlt">field</span> quantitative real-time PCR test to <span class="hlt">rapidly</span> identify highly viremic rift valley fever cases.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Njenga, M Kariuki; Paweska, Janusz; Wanjala, Rose; Rao, Carol Y; Weiner, Matthew; Omballa, Victor; Luman, Elizabeth T; Mutonga, David; Sharif, Shanaaz; Panning, Marcus; Drosten, Christian; Feikin, Daniel R; Breiman, Robert F</p> <p>2009-04-01</p> <p>Approximately 8% of Rift Valley fever (RVF) cases develop severe disease, leading to hemorrhage, hepatitis, and/or encephalitis and resulting in up to 50% of deaths. A major obstacle in the management of RVF and other viral hemorrhagic fever cases in outbreaks that occur in rural settings is the inability to <span class="hlt">rapidly</span> identify such cases, with poor prognosis early enough to allow for more-aggressive therapies. During an RVF outbreak in Kenya in 2006 to 2007, we evaluated whether quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) could be used in the <span class="hlt">field</span> to <span class="hlt">rapidly</span> identify viremic RVF cases with risk of death. In 52 of 430 RVF cases analyzed by qRT-PCR and virus culture, 18 died (case fatality rate [CFR] = 34.6%). Levels of viremia in fatal cases were significantly higher than those in nonfatal cases (mean of 10(5.2) versus 10(2.9) per ml; P < 0.005). A negative correlation between the levels of infectious virus particles and the qRT-PCR crossover threshold (C(T)) values allowed the use of qRT-PCR to assess prognosis. The CFR was 50.0% among cases with C(T) values of <27.0 (corresponding to 2.1 x 10(4) viral RNA particles/ml of serum) and 4.5% among cases with C(T) values of >or=27.0. This cutoff yielded 93.8% sensitivity and a 95.5% negative predictive value; the specificity and positive predictive value were 58% and 50%, respectively. This study shows a correlation between high viremia and fatality and indicates that qRT-PCR testing can identify nearly all fatal RVF cases.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AGUFMSM13C2529C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AGUFMSM13C2529C"><span>On the Electrons Dynamics during <span class="hlt">Rapid</span> Island Coalescence in Asymmetric Magnetic Reconnection: Case With and With No Guide <span class="hlt">Field</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Cazzola, E.; Innocenti, M. E.; Markidis, S.; Goldman, M. V.; Newman, D. L.; Lapenta, G.</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>We present a set of fully kinetic 2.5D simulations of electron dynamics during <span class="hlt">rapid</span> magnetic islands coalescence in asymmetric conditions. Simulations are performed using the massively parallel fully kinetic implicit moment method code iPIC3D (Markidis et al. 2010). The domain is a double periodic box with two current sheets initially representing two different reconnection conditions with the same asymmetric ratio. In the upper sheet the conventional hyperbolic continuous functions for magnetic <span class="hlt">field</span> and density are initialised across the layer (e.g. Pritchett 2008). In the lower layer the same asymmetric conditions are used the presence of an extremely steep gradient describing a pure tangential discontinuity.Cases with and without guide <span class="hlt">field</span> are compared. While the upper layer shows the typical reconnection evolution of an asymmetric configuration, the lower layer very soon develops not-uniformly distributed multiple reconnection points which <span class="hlt">rapidly</span> evolve in a series of magnetic islands. Quick islands coalescence follows. Even though the electrons dynamics during island merging has been studied in both symmetric and asymmetric conditions (e.g. Pritchett 2007, 2008b, Drake et al. 2006, Oka et al. 2010, Huang et al. 2014), these simulations show new interesting features such as the presence of three distinct regions, here named X, M and D, with very different properties. Regions X and M manifest typical signatures of ongoing reconnection, distinguishable thanks to the direct comparison with the outcomes of the upper layer. In particular, M-type regions are different because reconnection occurs between two merging islands in a vertical fashion with respect to the direction of the current sheets initially set. In contrast, regions D present a quite diverse features, not showing the typical signatures of a occurring reconnection. The present work is supported by the NASA MMS Grant NNX08AO84G. Additional support for the KULeuven team is provided by the European</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFM.V31B2786L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFM.V31B2786L"><span><span class="hlt">Rapid</span> uplift during 2007-2012 at Laguna del Maule volcanic <span class="hlt">field</span>, Andean Southern Volcanic Zone, Chile</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Le Mevel, H.; Feigl, K.; Ali, T.; Cordova V., M. L.; DeMets, C.; Singer, B. S.</p> <p>2012-12-01</p> <p>The Laguna del Maule (LdM) volcanic <span class="hlt">field</span> includes an unusual concentration of post-glacial rhyolitic lava coulees and domes, dated between 24 to 2 thousand years old that cover more than 100 square kilometers and erupted from 24 vents that encircle a 20-km-diameter lake basin on the range crest. The recent concentration of rhyolite is unparalleled in the Southern Volcanic Zone of the Andes. Moreover, the western portion of the LdM volcanic <span class="hlt">field</span> has experienced <span class="hlt">rapid</span> uplift since 2007, leading to questions about the current configuration of the magmatic system and processes that drive the ongoing inflation. We aim to quantify the active deformation of the LdM volcanic <span class="hlt">field</span> and its evolution with time. To do so, we use interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) data acquired by three satellite missions: Envisat in 2003 and 2004, ALOS between 2007 and 2010, and TerraSAR-X in 2012. An interferogram spanning March 2003 to February 2004 "shows no deformation" (Fournier et al., 2010). From 2007 through 2012, however, the shortening of the satellite-to-ground distance revealed a range change rate of greater than 200 mm/yr along the radar line of sight. The deformation includes a circular area 20 km in diameter centered on the western portion of the circle of young rhyolite domes. To analyze the InSAR results, we employ the General Inversion for Phase Technique (GIPhT; Feigl and Thurber, 2009; Ali and Feigl, 2012). We have considered several hypotheses to interpret this deformation. Artefacts such as orbital errors, atmospheric perturbations or topographic contribution cannot account for the observed signal. We also reject the hypothesis of uplift due to gravitational unloading of the crust based on our modeling of independently measured lake level variations over the observed time interval. We thus attribute the deformation to the intrusion of magma into the upper crust below the southwest region of the LdM volcanic <span class="hlt">field</span>. The best fit to the InSAR data is</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25446719','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25446719"><span><span class="hlt">Rapid</span> <span class="hlt">field</span> estimation of biochemical oxygen demand in a subtropical eutrophic urban lake with chlorophyll a fluorescence.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Xu, Zhen; Xu, Y Jun</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Development of a technique for <span class="hlt">rapid</span> <span class="hlt">field</span> estimation of biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) is necessary for cost-effective monitoring and management of urban lakes. While several studies reported the usefulness of laboratory tryptophan-like fluorescence technique in predicting 5-day BOD (BOD₅) of wastewater and leachates, little is known about the predictability of <span class="hlt">field</span> chlorophyll fluorescence measurements for BOD of urban lake waters that are constantly exposed to the mixture of chemical compounds. This study was conducted to develop a numeric relationship between chlorophyll a fluorescence and BOD for a eutrophic urban lake that is widely representative of lake water conditions in the subtropical southern USA. From October 2012 to September 2013, in situ measurements at the studied lake were made every 2 weeks on chlorophyll a fluorescence and other water quality parameters including water temperature, pH, dissolved oxygen, and specific conductivity. Water samples were taken for 5-day BOD and 10-day BOD (BOD₁₀) analysis with and without incubation. The results showed a clear seasonal trend of both BOD measurements being high during the summer and low during the winter. There was a linear, positive relationship between chlorophyll a fluorescence and BOD, and the relationship appeared to be stronger with the 10-day BOD (r(2) = 0.83) than with the 5-day BOD (r(2) = 0.76). BOD dropped each day with declining chlorophyll a fluorescence, suggesting that die-off of phytoplankton has been the main consumption of oxygen in the studied lake. Ambient conditions such as rainfall and water temperature may have partially affected BOD variation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27591631','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27591631"><span><span class="hlt">Rapid</span> prediction of total petroleum hydrocarbons in soil using a hand-held mid-infrared <span class="hlt">field</span> instrument.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Webster, Grant T; Soriano-Disla, José M; Kirk, Joel; Janik, Leslie J; Forrester, Sean T; McLaughlin, Mike J; Stewart, Richard J</p> <p>2016-11-01</p> <p>This manuscript reports on the performance of a hand-held diffuse reflectance (mid)-infrared Fourier transform (DRIFT) spectrometer for the prediction of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) in three different diesel-contaminated soils. These soils include: a carbonate dominated clay, a kaolinite dominated clay and a loam from Padova Italy, north Western Australia and southern Nigeria, respectively. Soils were analysed for TPH concentration using a standard laboratory methods and scanned in DRIFT mode with the hand-held spectrometer to determine TPH calibration models. Successful partial least square regression (PLSR) predictions, with coefficient of determination (R(2)) ~0.99 and root mean square error (RMSE) <200mg/kg, were obtained for the low range TPH concentrations of 0 to ~3,000mg/kg. These predictions were carried out using a set of independent samples for each soil type. Prediction models were also tested for the full concentration range (0-60,000mg/kg) for each soil type model with R(2) and RMSE values of ~0.99 and <1,255mg/kg, respectively. Furthermore, a number of intermediate concentration range models were also generated for each soil type with similar R(2) values of ~0.99 and RMSE values <800mg/kg. This study shows the capability of using a portable mid-infrared (MIR) DRIFT spectrometer for predicting TPH in a variety of soil types and the potential for being a <span class="hlt">rapid</span> in-<span class="hlt">field</span> screening method for TPH concentration levels at common regulatory thresholds. A novel hand-held mid-infrared instrument can accurately detect TPH across different soil types and concentrations, which paves the way for a variety of applications in the <span class="hlt">field</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/6282207','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/6282207"><span>Trans<span class="hlt">Rapid</span> TR-07 maglev-spectrum magnetic <span class="hlt">field</span> effects on daily pineal indoleamine metabolic rhythms in rodents</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Groh, K.R.</p> <p>1993-01-01</p> <p>This study examined the effects on pineal function of magnetic <span class="hlt">field</span> (MF) exposures (ac and dc components) similar to those produced by the Trans<span class="hlt">Rapid</span> TR-07 and other electromagnetic maglev systems (EMS). Rats were entrained to a light-dark cycle and then exposed to a continuous, or to an inverted, intermittent (on = 45 s, off = 15 s, induced current = 267 G/s) simulated multifrequency ac and dc magnetic <span class="hlt">field</span> (MF) at 1 or 7 times the TR-07 maglev vehicle MF intensity for 2 hr. Other groups of rats were exposed to only the ac or the dc-component of the maglev MF. For comparison, one group was exposed to an inverted, intermittent 60-Hz MF. Each group was compared to an unexposed group of rats for changes in pineal melatonin and serotonin-N-acetyltransferase (NAT). MF exposures at an intensity equivalent to that produced by the TR-07 vehicle had no effect on melatonin or NAT compared with sham-exposed animals under any of the conditions examined. However, 7X TR-07-level continuous 2-h MF exposures significantly depressed pineal NAT by 45%. Pineal melatonin was also depressed 33--43% by a continuous 7X TR-07 MF exposure and 28% by an intermittent 60-Hz 850-mG MF, but the results were not statically significant. This study demonstrates that intermittent, combined ac and dc MFs similar to those produced by the TR-07 EMS maglev vehicle alter the normal circadian rhythm of pineal indoleamine metabolism. The pineal regulatory enzyme NAT was more sensitive to MF exposure than melatonin and may be a more desirable measure of the biological effects of MF exposure.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li class="active"><span>13</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_13 --> <div id="page_14" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li class="active"><span>14</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="261"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10161808','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10161808"><span>Trans<span class="hlt">Rapid</span> TR-07 maglev-spectrum magnetic <span class="hlt">field</span> effects on daily pineal indoleamine metabolic rhythms in rodents</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Groh, K.R.</p> <p>1993-06-01</p> <p>This study examined the effects on pineal function of magnetic <span class="hlt">field</span> (MF) exposures (ac and dc components) similar to those produced by the Trans<span class="hlt">Rapid</span> TR-07 and other electromagnetic maglev systems (EMS). Rats were entrained to a light-dark cycle and then exposed to a continuous, or to an inverted, intermittent (on = 45 s, off = 15 s, induced current = 267 G/s) simulated multifrequency ac and dc magnetic <span class="hlt">field</span> (MF) at 1 or 7 times the TR-07 maglev vehicle MF intensity for 2 hr. Other groups of rats were exposed to only the ac or the dc-component of the maglev MF. For comparison, one group was exposed to an inverted, intermittent 60-Hz MF. Each group was compared to an unexposed group of rats for changes in pineal melatonin and serotonin-N-acetyltransferase (NAT). MF exposures at an intensity equivalent to that produced by the TR-07 vehicle had no effect on melatonin or NAT compared with sham-exposed animals under any of the conditions examined. However, 7X TR-07-level continuous 2-h MF exposures significantly depressed pineal NAT by 45%. Pineal melatonin was also depressed 33--43% by a continuous 7X TR-07 MF exposure and 28% by an intermittent 60-Hz 850-mG MF, but the results were not statically significant. This study demonstrates that intermittent, combined ac and dc MFs similar to those produced by the TR-07 EMS maglev vehicle alter the normal circadian rhythm of pineal indoleamine metabolism. The pineal regulatory enzyme NAT was more sensitive to MF exposure than melatonin and may be a more desirable measure of the biological effects of MF exposure.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/909407','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/909407"><span>Fast-<span class="hlt">growing</span> willow shrub named `Canastota`</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Abrahamson, Lawrence P.; Kopp, Richard F.; Smart, Lawrence B.; Volk, Timothy A.</p> <p>2007-05-15</p> <p>A distinct male cultivar of Salix sachalinensis.times.S. miyabeana named `Canastota`, characterized by <span class="hlt">rapid</span> stem growth producing greater than 2.7-fold more woody biomass than its female parent (Salix sachalinensis `SX61`), 28% greater woody biomass yield than its male parent (Salix miyabeana `SX64`), and 20% greater woody biomass yield than a standard production cultivar, Salix dasyclados `SV1` when grown in the same <span class="hlt">field</span> for the same length of time (two <span class="hlt">growing</span> seasons after coppice) in Tully, N.Y. `Canastota` can be planted from dormant stem cuttings, produces multiple stems after coppice, and the stem biomass can be harvested when the plant is dormant. In the spring following harvest, the plant will re-sprout very vigorously, producing new stems that can be harvested after two to four years of growth. This harvest cycle can be repeated several times. `Canastota` displays a low incidence of rust disease or damage by willow sawfly.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70020869','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70020869"><span>Characterizing ground water flow in the municipal well <span class="hlt">fields</span> of Cedar <span class="hlt">Rapids</span>, Iowa, with selected environmental tracers</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Boyd, R.A.</p> <p>1998-01-01</p> <p>Cedar <span class="hlt">Rapids</span> obtains its municipal water supply from a shallow alluvial aquifer along the Cedar River in east-central Iowa. Water samples were collected and analyzed for selected isotopes and chlorofluorocarbons to characterize the ground-water flow system near the municipal well <span class="hlt">fields</span>. Analyses of deuterium and oxygen-18 indicate that water in the alluvial aquifer and in the underlying carbonate bedrock aquifer was recharged from precipitation during modern climatic conditions. Analyses of tritium indicate modern, post-1952, water in the alluvial aquifer and older, pre-1952, water in the bedrock aquifer. Mixing of the modern and older waters occurs in areas where (1) the confining layer between the two aquifers is discontinuous, (2) the bedrock aquifer is fractured, or (3) pumping of supply wells induces the flow of water between aquifers. Analyses of chlorofluorocarbons were used to determine the date of recharge of water samples. Water in the bedrock aquifer likely was recharged prior to the 1950s. Water in the alluvial aquifer likely was recharged from the 1960s to 1990s. Biodegradation or sorption probably affected some of the ground water analyzed for chlorofluorocarbons. These processes reduce the concentrations of CFCs, which results in older than actual calculated dates of recharge.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24148390','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24148390"><span><span class="hlt">Rapid</span> and sensitive determination of tellurium in soil and plant samples by sector-<span class="hlt">field</span> inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Yang, Guosheng; Zheng, Jian; Tagami, Keiko; Uchida, Shigeo</p> <p>2013-11-15</p> <p>In this work, we report a <span class="hlt">rapid</span> and highly sensitive analytical method for the determination of tellurium in soil and plant samples using sector <span class="hlt">field</span> inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (SF-ICP-MS). Soil and plant samples were digested using Aqua regia. After appropriate dilution, Te in soil and plant samples was directly analyzed without any separation and preconcentration. This simple sample preparation approach avoided to a maximum extent any contamination and loss of Te prior to the analysis. The developed analytical method was validated by the analysis of soil/sediment and plant reference materials. Satisfactory detection limits of 0.17 ng g(-1) for soil and 0.02 ng g(-1) for plant samples were achieved, which meant that the developed method was applicable to studying the soil-to-plant transfer factor of Te. Our work represents for the first time that data on the soil-to-plant transfer factor of Te were obtained for Japanese samples which can be used for the estimation of internal radiation dose of radioactive tellurium due to the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JARS....8.3512C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JARS....8.3512C"><span>Classification of small agricultural <span class="hlt">fields</span> using combined Landsat-8 and <span class="hlt">Rapid</span>Eye imagery: case study of northern Serbia</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Crnojević, Vladimir; Lugonja, Predrag; Brkljač, Branko; Brunet, Borislav</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>A pixel-based cropland classification study based on the fusion of data from satellite images with different resolutions is presented. It is based on a time series of multispectral images acquired at different resolutions by different imaging instruments, Landsat-8 and <span class="hlt">Rapid</span>Eye. The proposed data fusion method capabilities are explored with the aim of overcoming the shortcomings of different instruments in the particular cropland classification scenario characterized by the very small size of crop <span class="hlt">fields</span> over the chosen agricultural region situated in the plains of Vojvodina in northern Serbia. This paper proposes a data fusion method that is successfully utilized in combination with arobust random forest classifier in improving the overall classification performance, as well as in enabling application of satellite imagery with a coarser spatial resolution in the given specific cropland classification task. The developed method effectively exploits available data and provides an improvement over the existing pixel-based classification approaches through the combination of different data sources. Another contribution of this paper is the employment of crowdsourcing in the process of reference data collection via dedicated smartphone application.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27853537','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27853537"><span>Global <span class="hlt">field</span> synchronization reveals <span class="hlt">rapid</span> eye movement sleep as most synchronized brain state in the human EEG.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Achermann, Peter; Rusterholz, Thomas; Dürr, Roland; König, Thomas; Tarokh, Leila</p> <p>2016-10-01</p> <p>Sleep is characterized by a loss of consciousness, which has been attributed to a breakdown of functional connectivity between brain regions. Global <span class="hlt">field</span> synchronization (GFS) can estimate functional connectivity of brain processes. GFS is a frequency-dependent measure of global synchronicity of multi-channel EEG data. Our aim was to explore and extend the hypothesis of disconnection during sleep by comparing GFS spectra of different vigilance states. The analysis was performed on eight healthy adult male subjects. EEG was recorded during a baseline night, a recovery night after 40 h of sustained wakefulness and at 3 h intervals during the 40 h of wakefulness. Compared to non-<span class="hlt">rapid</span> eye movement (NREM) sleep, REM sleep showed larger GFS values in all frequencies except in the spindle and theta bands, where NREM sleep showed a peak in GFS. Sleep deprivation did not affect GFS spectra in REM and NREM sleep. Waking GFS values were lower compared with REM and NREM sleep except for the alpha band. Waking alpha GFS decreased following sleep deprivation in the eyes closed condition only. Our surprising finding of higher synchrony during REM sleep challenges the view of REM sleep as a desynchronized brain state and may provide insight into the function of REM sleep.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5098962','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5098962"><span>Global <span class="hlt">field</span> synchronization reveals <span class="hlt">rapid</span> eye movement sleep as most synchronized brain state in the human EEG</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Achermann, Peter; Rusterholz, Thomas; Dürr, Roland; König, Thomas</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Sleep is characterized by a loss of consciousness, which has been attributed to a breakdown of functional connectivity between brain regions. Global <span class="hlt">field</span> synchronization (GFS) can estimate functional connectivity of brain processes. GFS is a frequency-dependent measure of global synchronicity of multi-channel EEG data. Our aim was to explore and extend the hypothesis of disconnection during sleep by comparing GFS spectra of different vigilance states. The analysis was performed on eight healthy adult male subjects. EEG was recorded during a baseline night, a recovery night after 40 h of sustained wakefulness and at 3 h intervals during the 40 h of wakefulness. Compared to non-<span class="hlt">rapid</span> eye movement (NREM) sleep, REM sleep showed larger GFS values in all frequencies except in the spindle and theta bands, where NREM sleep showed a peak in GFS. Sleep deprivation did not affect GFS spectra in REM and NREM sleep. Waking GFS values were lower compared with REM and NREM sleep except for the alpha band. Waking alpha GFS decreased following sleep deprivation in the eyes closed condition only. Our surprising finding of higher synchrony during REM sleep challenges the view of REM sleep as a desynchronized brain state and may provide insight into the function of REM sleep. PMID:27853537</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3534268','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3534268"><span><span class="hlt">Rapid</span>Arc radiotherapy for whole pelvic lymph node in cervical cancer with 6 and 15 MV: a treatment planning comparison with fixed <span class="hlt">field</span> IMRT</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Zhai, De-Yin; Yin, Yong; Gong, Guan-Zhong; Liu, Tong-Hai; Chen, Jin-Hu; Ma, Chang-Sheng; Lu, Jie</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Dosimetric differences were investigated among single and dual arc <span class="hlt">Rapid</span>Arc and fixed-<span class="hlt">field</span> intensity-modulated radiotherapy (f-IMRT) treatment plans for whole pelvic irradiation of lymph nodes. A total of 12 patients who had undergone radical surgery for cervical cancer and who had demonstrated multiple pelvic lymph node metastases were treated with radiotherapy. For all 12 cases, 7-<span class="hlt">field</span> IMRT, single-arc <span class="hlt">Rapid</span>Arc and dual-arc <span class="hlt">Rapid</span>Arc were applied with 6 MV and 15 MV X-ray energies. The radiation dosimetric parameters for the different plans were compared with one another. All the plans met the clinical requirements. The homogeneity, conformity and external volume indices of f-IMRT and dual-arc <span class="hlt">Rapid</span>Arc were better than for single-arc <span class="hlt">Rapid</span>Arc (P < 0.05), while the differences between f-IMRT and dual-arc <span class="hlt">Rapid</span>Arc were not significant. There were no significant differences in the radiation dose to organs at risk, except for the small bowel receiving >40 Gy (f-IMRT and dual-arc < single-arc, P < 0.05). The differences in dose distributions between the two applied X-ray energies for each of the modality plans were not significant. <span class="hlt">Rapid</span>Arc plans resulted in fewer monitor units than the corresponding f-IMRT plans. Also, there were no differences between the two photon energies, except for a reduction in the number of MUs for 15 MV (P > 0.05). Compared to f-IMRT, no significant dosimetric benefits were found using <span class="hlt">Rapid</span>Arc for whole pelvic lymph node irradiation. However, <span class="hlt">Rapid</span>Arc has been associated with shorter treatment time and fewer monitor units, supporting the case for its safety and efficacy for pelvic irradiation. PMID:23283869</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4372373','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4372373"><span><span class="hlt">Field</span> Application of SD Bioline Malaria Ag Pf/Pan <span class="hlt">Rapid</span> Diagnostic Test for Malaria in Greece</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Tseroni, Maria; Pervanidou, Danai; Tserkezou, Persefoni; Rachiotis, George; Pinaka, Ourania; Baka, Agoritsa; Georgakopoulou, Theano; Vakali, Annita; Dionysopoulou, Martha; Terzaki, Irene; Marka, Andriani; Detsis, Marios; Evlampidou, Zafiroula; Mpimpa, Anastasia; Vassalou, Evdokia; Tsiodras, Sotirios; Tsakris, Athanasios; Kremastinou, Jenny; Hadjichristodoulou, Christos</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Greece, a malaria-free country since 1974, has experienced re-emergence of Plasmodium vivax autochthonous malaria cases in some agriculture areas over the last three years. In early 2012, an integrated control programme (MALWEST Project) was launched in order to prevent re-establishment of the disease. In the context of this project, the <span class="hlt">rapid</span> diagnostic tests (RDT) of SD Bioline Malaria Ag Pf/Pan that detects hrp-2 and pan-LDH antigens were used. The aim of this study was to assess the <span class="hlt">field</span> application of the RDT for the P. vivax diagnosis in comparison to light microscopy and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). A total of 955 samples were tested with all three diagnostic tools. Agreement of RDT against microscopy and PCR for the diagnosis of P. vivax was satisfactory (K value: 0.849 and 0.976, respectively). The sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive value of RDT against PCR was 95.6% (95% C.I.: 84.8-99.3), 100% (95% C.I.: 99.6-100.0) and 100% (95% CI: 91.7-100.0) respectively, while the sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive value of RDT against microscopic examination was 97.4% (95% C.I.: 86.1-99.6), 99.4% (95% C.I.: 98.6-99.8) and 86.1% (95% CI: 72.1-94.7), respectively. Our results indicate that RDT performed satisfactory in a non-endemic country and therefore is recommended for malaria diagnosis, especially in areas where health professionals lack experience on light microscopy. PMID:25803815</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JBO....20k6010Z','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JBO....20k6010Z"><span><span class="hlt">Rapid</span> and high-resolution imaging of human liver specimens by full-<span class="hlt">field</span> optical coherence tomography</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Zhu, Yue; Gao, Wanrong; Zhou, Yuan; Guo, Yingcheng; Guo, Feng; He, Yong</p> <p>2015-11-01</p> <p>We report <span class="hlt">rapid</span> and high-resolution tomographic en face imaging of human liver specimens by full-<span class="hlt">field</span> optical coherence tomography (FF-OCT). First, the arrangement of the FF-OCT system was described and the performance of the system was measured. The measured axial and lateral resolutions of the system are 0.8 and 0.9 μm, respectively. The system has a sensitivity of ˜60 dB and can achieve an imaging rate of 7 fps and a penetration depth of ˜80 μm. The histological structures of normal liver can be seen clearly in the en face tomographic images, including central veins, cords of hepatocytes separated by sinusoidal spaces, and portal area (portal vein, the hepatic arteriole, and the bile duct). A wide variety of histological subtypes of hepatocellular carcinoma was observed in en face tomographic images, revealing notable cancerous features, including the nuclear atypia (enlarged convoluted nuclei), the polygonal tumor cells with obvious resemblance to hepatocytes with enlarged nuclei. In addition, thicker fibrous bands, which make the cytoplasmic plump vesicular nuclei indistinct, were also seen in the images. Finally, comparison between the portal vein in a normal specimen versus that seen in the rare type of cholangiocarcinoma was made. The results show that the cholangiocarcinoma presents with a blurred pattern of portal vein in the lateral direction and an aggregated distribution in the axial direction; the surrounding sinusoidal spaces and nuclei of cholangiocarcinoma are absent. The findings in this work may be used as additional signs of liver cancer or cholangiocarcinoma, demonstrating capacity of FF-OCT device for early cancer diagnosis and many other tumor-related studies in biopsy.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24162574','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24162574"><span>Primer modification improves <span class="hlt">rapid</span> and sensitive in vitro and <span class="hlt">field</span>-deployable assays for detection of high plains virus variants.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Arif, M; Aguilar-Moreno, G S; Wayadande, A; Fletcher, J; Ochoa-Corona, F M</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>A high consequence pathogen, High plains virus (HPV) causes considerable damage to wheat if the crop is infected during early stages of development. Methods for the early, accurate, and sensitive detection of HPV in plant tissues are needed for the management of disease outbreaks and reservoir hosts. In this study, the effectiveness of five methods-real-time SYBR green and TaqMan reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR), endpoint RT-PCR, RT-helicase dependent amplification (RT-HDA) and the Razor Ex BioDetection System (Razor Ex)-for the broad-range detection of HPV variants was evaluated. Specific PCR primer sets and probes were designed to target the HPV nucleoprotein gene. Primer set HPV6F and HPV4R, which amplifies a product of 96 bp, was validated in silico against published sequences and in vitro against an inclusivity panel of infected plant samples and an exclusivity panel of near-neighbor viruses. The primers were modified by adding a customized 22 nucleotide long tail at the 5' terminus, raising the primers' melting temperature (Tm; ca. 10°C) to make them compatible with RT-HDA (required optimal Tm = 68°C), in which the use of primers lacking such tails gave no amplification. All of the methods allowed the detection of as little as 1 fg of either plasmid DNA carrying the target gene sequence or of infected plant samples. The described in vitro and in-<span class="hlt">field</span> assays are accurate, <span class="hlt">rapid</span>, sensitive, and useful for pathogen detection and disease diagnosis, microbial quantification, and certification and breeding programs, as well as for biosecurity and microbial forensics applications.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=221529','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=221529"><span>Potential of E.coli O157:H7 to <span class="hlt">grow</span> on <span class="hlt">field</span>-cored lettuce as impacted by postharvest storage time and temperature</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>A recent development in iceberg lettuce production is <span class="hlt">field</span> coring where the outer leaves and the cores of the lettuce heads are removed at the time of harvesting in order to reduce shipping waste and maximize production yield. Using a coring knife contaminated with 2 x 105 cells of E. coli O157:H7,...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=262461&keyword=geomorphology&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=78683245&CFTOKEN=16050027','EPA-EIMS'); return false;" href="http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=262461&keyword=geomorphology&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=78683245&CFTOKEN=16050027"><span>A validation study of a <span class="hlt">rapid</span> <span class="hlt">field</span>-based rating system for discriminating among flow permanence classes of headwater streams in South Carolina</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p><span class="hlt">Rapid</span> <span class="hlt">field</span>-based protocols for classifying flow permanence of headwater streams are needed to inform timely regulatory decisions. Such an existing method was developed for and has been used in North Carolina since 1997. The method uses ordinal scoring of 26 geomorphology, hydr...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25286303','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25286303"><span><span class="hlt">Growing</span> for different ends.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Catts, Oron; Zurr, Ionat</p> <p>2014-11-01</p> <p>Tissue engineering and regenerative biology are usually discussed in relation to biomedical research and applications. However, hand in hand with developments of this <span class="hlt">field</span> in the biomedical context, other approaches and uses for non-medical ends have been explored. There is a <span class="hlt">growing</span> interest in exploring spin off tissue engineering and regenerative biology technologies in areas such as consumer products, art and design. This paper outlines developments regarding in vitro meat and leather, actuators and bio-mechanic interfaces, speculative design and contemporary artistic practices. The authors draw on their extensive experience of using tissue engineering for non-medical ends to speculate about what lead to these applications and their possible future development and uses. Avoiding utopian and dystopian postures and using the notion of the contestable, this paper also mentions some philosophical and ethical consideration stemming from the use of non-medical approaches to tissue constructs. This article is part of a directed issue entitled: Regenerative Medicine: the challenge of translation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11531571','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11531571"><span><span class="hlt">Rapid</span> large-scale magnetic-<span class="hlt">field</span> dissipation in a collisionless current sheet via coupling between Kelvin-Helmholtz and lower-hybrid drift instabilities.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Shinohara, I; Suzuki, H; Fujimoto, M; Hoshino, M</p> <p>2001-08-27</p> <p><span class="hlt">Rapid</span> large-scale magnetic-<span class="hlt">field</span> dissipation is observed in a full kinetic simulation of cross-<span class="hlt">field</span> current instabilities in a current sheet even when the thickness of the current sheet is at ion scale. The Kelvin-Helmholtz instability caused by the velocity shear between the current-carrying ions and the cold background ions excites the lower-hybrid drift instability at the edges of the undulated current sheet. We show that the nonlinear coupling between these two instabilities is responsible for the observed <span class="hlt">rapid</span> dissipation. The simulation result presents a new route for magnetic-<span class="hlt">field</span> dissipation in an ion-scale current sheet and demonstrates the general significance of nonlinear cross-scale coupling in collisionless plasmas.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27494637','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27494637"><span>Nutritional value of raw and micronised <span class="hlt">field</span> beans (Vicia faba L. var. minor) with and without enzyme supplementation containing tannase for <span class="hlt">growing</span> chickens.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Abdulla, Jalil Mahmwd; Rose, Stephen Paul; Mackenzie, Alexander Mackay; Ivanova, Sonya Georgieva; Staykova, Genoveva Petrova; Pirgozliev, Vasil Radoslavov</p> <p>2016-10-01</p> <p>An experiment examined the effects of two <span class="hlt">field</span> bean cultivar samples with different tannin contents, the effect of heat treatment (micronising) and the effect of dietary supplementation of a proprietary enzyme preparation containing tannase, pectinase, and xylanase activities on metabolisable energy (ME), total tract dry matter digestibility (DMD) and ether extract digestibility (EED), nitrogen retention (NR), tannin degradability, gastrointestinal tract (GIT) development, and endogenous mucin losses excretion in broiler chickens. The Control diet contained per kg 221 g crude protein and 12.83 MJ ME. Four additional diets contained 300 g/kg of each of the two untreated or micronised experimental <span class="hlt">field</span> bean cultivar samples. Each diet was then split into two batches and one of them was supplemented with 3400 units tannase per kg diet resulting in 10 diets in total. Each diet was fed to seven pens with two randomly selected male broilers each. Birds fed the high tannin bean sample had a lower weight gain (p < 0.001), and a lower determined apparent ME (p < 0.05), and DMD (p < 0.001) but a higher tannin degradability (p < 0.001). Compared to the Control diet, feeding <span class="hlt">field</span> beans increased (p < 0.001) the weights of the proventriculus and gizzard of the birds, and also increased endogenous mucin losses (p < 0.05). Supplementing diets with the tannase-containing enzyme preparation improved dietary ME (p < 0.001), DMD (p < 0.001), NR (p < 0.001) and DEE (p < 0.05), but did not change tannin degradability. Heat treatment of the beans reduced the degradability of condensed tannins and increased endogenous mucin losses (p < 0.05). The differences in the feeding value of the different <span class="hlt">field</span> bean samples were not improved by heat treatment, but enzyme supplementation improved the feeding value of all diets regardless of the bean samples or heat treatment. Further research is warranted to study the effectiveness of tannase supplementation in poultry</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4367185','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4367185"><span>Utilizing Biopsychosocial and Strengths-Based Approaches Within the <span class="hlt">Field</span> of Child Health: What We Know and Where We Can <span class="hlt">Grow</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Black, Jessica M.; Hoeft, Fumiko</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>We continue to increase our understanding of the experiences and settings that contribute to positive developmental outcomes in childhood, and those that confer greater risk. Although the mechanisms by which the risk and protective factors affect developmental outcomes need to be further elucidated through research, converging findings from the <span class="hlt">field</span> of child health (spanning both physical and mental health) indicate that a biopsychosocial approach is useful. Here, we examine the evidence that early experiences confer both risk and protective processes on biopsychosocial development in childhood, and touch on some implications for the life course. Although this interdisciplinary <span class="hlt">field</span> of research has already garnered substantial attention, here we aim to highlight the opportunity to use a strengths-based approach with the biopsychosocial model, with particular focus on children who experience prolonged stress. We close with consideration for future directions with an emphasis on policy and practice in clinical and educational settings to improve well-being in these early stages of the life course. PMID:25732011</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012EGUGA..14.7688D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012EGUGA..14.7688D"><span><span class="hlt">Field</span> measurement of erosion rates: time-lapse monitoring of <span class="hlt">rapid</span> stone flaking at Howden Minster, UK</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Doehne, E.; Pinchin, S.</p> <p>2012-04-01</p> <p>The use of a solar-powered, <span class="hlt">field</span> time-lapse camera and environmental monitoring system enabled measurements of the pattern and rate of loss of stone from the surface of Howden Minster, an abandoned monastery in Yorkshire dating to 1380 AD. Acquiring a photograph every 1-3 hours allowed the stone damage to be correlated with local environmental conditions. Image comparison techniques borrowed from observational astronomy, such as blink comparison, were used to determine what elements had changed from image to image. Results indicate that loss is episodic rather than continuous and in several cases is related to specific environmental conditions, such as condensation/dew formation or high winds. Damage was found also to be synchronous, with surface change (flaking, granular disintegration, and loss of flakes) occurring at the same time on different stone blocks. Crystallization pressure from magnesium sulfate phase transitions appear to be the main cause of the loss of stone surfaces. Significant variation in surface loss rates was observed and appears to be related to variations in salt concentration. An examination of stone texture by ESEM/EDS revealed signification variations and suggests that salt concentrations are controlled in part by stone micromorphology. Quantitative data on rates of surface loss are not available from most monuments. Time-lapse methods permit the relatively inexpensive acquisition of this type of data, which is needed to aid conservation decision-making and the evaluation of interventions. Such tools should also prove useful to geomorphologists studying honeycomb weathering, the moving rocks on Death Valley's Racetrack Playa, and other phenomena that are otherwise difficult to study. Context: The <span class="hlt">rapid</span> deterioration of magnesian limestone structures in the north of England has been a serious problem for more than one hundred years. While air quality in England has improved during this period, the rate of stone loss in these carved stone</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21839679','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21839679"><span>Sphagnum-dwelling testate amoebae in subarctic bogs are more sensitive to soil warming in the <span class="hlt">growing</span> season than in winter: the results of eight-year <span class="hlt">field</span> climate manipulations.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Tsyganov, Andrey N; Aerts, Rien; Nijs, Ivan; Cornelissen, Johannes H C; Beyens, Louis</p> <p>2012-05-01</p> <p>Sphagnum-dwelling testate amoebae are widely used in paleoclimate reconstructions as a proxy for climate-induced changes in bogs. However, the sensitivity of proxies to seasonal climate components is an important issue when interpreting proxy records. Here, we studied the effects of summer warming, winter snow addition solely and winter snow addition together with spring warming on testate amoeba assemblages after eight years of experimental <span class="hlt">field</span> climate manipulations. All manipulations were accomplished using open top chambers in a dry blanket bog located in the sub-Arctic (Abisko, Sweden). We estimated sensitivity of abundance, diversity and assemblage structure of living and empty shell assemblages of testate amoebae in the living and decaying layers of Sphagnum. Our results show that, in a sub-arctic climate, testate amoebae are more sensitive to climate changes in the <span class="hlt">growing</span> season than in winter. Summer warming reduced species richness and shifted assemblage composition towards predominance of xerophilous species for the living and empty shell assemblages in both layers. The higher soil temperatures during the <span class="hlt">growing</span> season also decreased abundance of empty shells in both layers hinting at a possible increase in their decomposition rates. Thus, although possible effects of climate changes on preservation of empty shells should always be taken into account, species diversity and structure of testate amoeba assemblages in dry subarctic bogs are sensitive proxies for climatic changes during the <span class="hlt">growing</span> season.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008SPIE.6945E..0DL','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008SPIE.6945E..0DL"><span>Utility of point of care test devices for infectious disease testing of blood and oral fluid and application to <span class="hlt">rapid</span> testing in the <span class="hlt">field</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Lee, Stephen R.; Kardos, Keith W.; Yearwood, Graham D.; Guillon, Geraldine B.; Kurtz, Lisa A.; Mokkapati, Vijaya K.</p> <p>2008-04-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Rapid</span>, point of care (POC) testing has been increasingly deployed as an aid in the diagnosis of infectious disease, due to its ability to deliver <span class="hlt">rapid</span>, actionable results. In the case of HIV, a number of <span class="hlt">rapid</span> test devices have been FDA approved and CLIA-waived in order to enable diagnosis of HIV infection outside of traditional laboratory settings. These settings include STD clinics, community outreach centers and mobile testing units, as well as identifying HIV infection among pregnant women and managing occupational exposure to infection. The OraQuick ® <span class="hlt">rapid</span> test platform has been widely used to identify HIV in POC settings, due to its simplicity, ease of use and the ability to utilize oral fluid as an alternative specimen to blood. More recently, a <span class="hlt">rapid</span> test for antibodies to hepatitis C virus (HCV) has been developed on the same test platform which uses serum, plasma, finger-stick blood, venous blood and oral fluid. Clinical testing using this POC test device has shown that performance is equivalent to state of the art, laboratory based tests. These devices may be suitable for <span class="hlt">rapid</span> <span class="hlt">field</span> testing of blood and other body fluids for the presence of infectious agents.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li class="active"><span>14</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_14 --> <div id="page_15" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li class="active"><span>15</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="281"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017APS..APR.S4009B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017APS..APR.S4009B"><span>First Results from the 7 Ms Chandra Deep <span class="hlt">Field</span>-South Survey: A Good Hard Look at <span class="hlt">Growing</span> Supermassive Black Holes in the Distant Universe</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Brandt, William; Chandra Deep Fields Team</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>Sensitive cosmic X-ray surveys with the Chandra, XMM-Newton, and now NuSTAR observatories have revolutionized our ability to find and study distant active galactic nuclei (AGNs), the main sites of supermassive black hole growth in the Universe. I will describe some recent discoveries about the demographics, physics, and ecology of distant AGNs coming from the deepest Chandra survey to date, the 7 Ms Chandra Deep <span class="hlt">Field</span>-South. Some specific topics covered will include (1) robust X-ray spectral and variability characterization of the AGNs producing most of cosmic accretion power; (2) the demographics of AGNs in the first galaxies as revealed by direct detection and stacking; and (3) AGN/galaxy interactions as investigated via the host properties of X-ray AGNs. I will also briefly describe other remarkable discoveries coming from this survey; e.g., measurements of the evolving X-ray binary populations of normal and starburst galaxies.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://kidshealth.org/en/parents/growing-pains.html','NIH-MEDLINEPLUS'); return false;" href="https://kidshealth.org/en/parents/growing-pains.html"><span><span class="hlt">Growing</span> Pains (For Parents)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePlus</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>... Lessons? Visit KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Your Child's Development (Birth to 3 Years) Feeding Your 1- to 3-Month-Old Feeding Your 4- to 7-Month-Old Feeding Your 8- to 12-Month-Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old <span class="hlt">Growing</span> ... > For Parents > <span class="hlt">Growing</span> Pains Print A A A What's in ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22548442','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22548442"><span>SU-E-T-393: Evaluation of Large <span class="hlt">Field</span> IMRT Versus <span class="hlt">Rapid</span>Arc Planning for Carcinoma Cervix with Para-Aotic Node Irradiation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Raman, S Kothanda; Girigesh, Y; MISHRA, M; Lalit, K</p> <p>2015-06-15</p> <p>Purpose: The objective of this work is to evaluate and compare Large <span class="hlt">field</span> IMRT and <span class="hlt">Rapid</span>Arc planning for Carcinoma Cervix and Para-aotic node irradiation. Methods: In this study, ten patients of Cervix with para-aotic node have been selected with PTV length 35+2cm. All plans were generated in Eclipse TPS V10.0 with Dynamic IMRT and <span class="hlt">Rapid</span>Arc technique using 6MV photon energy. In IMRT planning, 7 <span class="hlt">fields</span> were chosen to get optimal plan and in <span class="hlt">Rapid</span>Arc, double Full arc clockwise and counter clockwise were used for planning. All the plans were generated with single isocenter and calculated using AAA dose algorithm. For all the cases the prescribed dose to PTV was same and the plan acceptance criteria is; 95% of the PTV volume should receive 100% prescribed dose. The tolerance doses for the OAR’s is also taken in to account. The evaluation criteria used for analysis are; 1) Homogeneity Index, 2) Conformity Index, 3) Mean Dose to OAR’s, 4)Total monitor units delivered. Results: DVH analysis were performed for both IMRT and <span class="hlt">Rapid</span>Arc planning. In both the plans, 95% of PTV volume receives prescribed dose and maximum dose are less than 107%. The conformity index are same in both the techniques. The mean Homogeneity index are 1.036 and 1.053 for IMRT and <span class="hlt">Rapid</span>Arc plan. The mean (mean + SD) dose of bladder and rectum in IMRT is 44.2+1.55, 42.05+2.52 and <span class="hlt">Rapid</span>Arc is 46.66+1.6, 44.2+2.75 respectively. There is no significant difference found in Right Femoral head, Left Femoral head and Kidney doses. It is found that total MU’s are more in IMRT compared with <span class="hlt">Rapid</span>Arc planning. Conclusion: In the case of cervix with Para-arotic node single isocenter irradiation, IMRT planning in large-<span class="hlt">field</span> is better compared to <span class="hlt">Rapid</span>Arc planning in terms of Homogeneity Index and mean dose of Bladder and Rectum.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/2423','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/2423"><span>Electric and Magnetic <span class="hlt">Fields</span> (EMF) <span class="hlt">RAPID</span> Program Engineering Project 8: FINAL REPORT, Evaluation of <span class="hlt">Field</span> Reduction Technologies, Volume 1 (Report) and Volume 2 (Appendices)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Commonwealth Associates, Inc.; IIT Research Institute</p> <p>1997-08-01</p> <p>This draft report consists of two volumes. Volume 1, the main body, contains an introducto~ sectionj an overview of magnetic <span class="hlt">fields</span> sectio~ and <span class="hlt">field</span> reduction technology evaluation section. Magnetic <span class="hlt">field</span> reduction methods are evalpated for transmission lines, distribution Iines,sulxtations, building wiring applkmd machinery, and transportation systems. The evaluation considers effectiveness, co% and other ftiors. Volume 2 contains five appendices, Append~ A presents magnetic <span class="hlt">field</span> shielding information. Appendices B and C present design assumptions and magnetic <span class="hlt">field</span> plots for transmission and distribution lines, respectively. Appendices D and E present cost estimate details for transmission and distribution limes, respectively.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010PhRvA..81d2111T','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010PhRvA..81d2111T"><span>Interference fringes of m=0 spin states under the Majorana transition caused by <span class="hlt">rapid</span> half-rotation of a magnetic <span class="hlt">field</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Takahashi, Atsushi; Morinaga, Atsuo</p> <p>2010-04-01</p> <p>The phase shift and visibility of fringes in the Ramsey atom interferometer composed of the |F=1,mF=0> and |F=2,mF=0> states were examined systematically for <span class="hlt">rapid</span> half-rotation of the magnetic <span class="hlt">field</span>. It was verified that the phase shifts by π rad in the adiabatic regime, but it does not shift from the original one in the nonadiabatic regime. These results support Robbins and Berry’s claim [J. M. Robbins and M. V. Berry, J. Phys. A 27, L435 (1994)]. The fact that the interference fringes disappear in the intermediate regime and reappear in the nonadiabatic regime can be explained by the Majorana transition caused by a <span class="hlt">rapid</span> reverse of the magnetic <span class="hlt">field</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20080008238','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20080008238"><span>Apparatus for <span class="hlt">growing</span> crystals</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Jasinski, Thomas J. (Inventor); Witt, August F. (Inventor)</p> <p>1986-01-01</p> <p>An improved apparatus and method for <span class="hlt">growing</span> crystals from a melt employing a heat pipe, consisting of one or more sections, each section serving to control temperature and thermal gradients in the crystal as it forms inside the pipe.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.marchofdimes.org/pregnancy/how-your-baby-grows.aspx','NIH-MEDLINEPLUS'); return false;" href="http://www.marchofdimes.org/pregnancy/how-your-baby-grows.aspx"><span>How Your Baby <span class="hlt">Grows</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePlus</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>... Pregnancy > Prenatal care > Pregnancy week by week Pregnancy week by week Week by week Videos Swipe to advance Learn ... <span class="hlt">grows</span> each week during pregnancy. Pick your week. Weeks 1-2 Conception (also called fertilization) usually happens ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=world+AND+population+AND+projections&pg=2&id=EJ398243','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=world+AND+population+AND+projections&pg=2&id=EJ398243"><span>The <span class="hlt">Growing</span> Human Population.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Keyfitz, Nathan</p> <p>1989-01-01</p> <p>Discusses the issue of human population. Illustrates the projections of the <span class="hlt">growing</span> human population in terms of developed and less developed countries. Describes the family planning programs in several countries. Lists three references for further reading. (YP)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/825158','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/825158"><span>Development of a Multiplexed, Bead-Based Assessment Tool for <span class="hlt">Rapid</span> Identification and Quantitation of Microorganisms in <span class="hlt">Field</span> Samples. Final Report</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Lowe, M.; Halden, R.</p> <p>2002-10-09</p> <p>This was the final report for DOE NABIR grant DE-FG02-01ER63264 (PI Mary Lowe). The grant was entitled ''Development of a Multiplexed Bead-Based Assessment Tool for <span class="hlt">Rapid</span> Identification and Quantitation of Microorganisms in <span class="hlt">Field</span> Samples.'' The grant duration was one year. The purpose was to develop a bead-based assay for measuring analyte DNAs in environmental PCR products and to apply the method to a <span class="hlt">field</span> experiment. The primary experiment was located at the UMTRA Old Rifle site.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1271648','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1271648"><span><span class="hlt">Growing</span> America's Energy Future</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p></p> <p>2016-06-01</p> <p>The emerging U.S. bioenergy industry provides a secure and <span class="hlt">growing</span> supply of transportation fuels, biopower, and bioproducts produced from a range of abundant, renewable biomass resources. Bioenergy can help ensure a secure, sustainable, and economically sound future by reducing U.S. dependence on foreign oil, developing domestic clean energy sources, and generating domestic green jobs. Bioenergy can also help address <span class="hlt">growing</span> concerns about climate change by reducing greenhouse gas emissions to create a healthier environment for current and future generations.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20040089584&hterms=potato+starch&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dpotato%2Bstarch','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20040089584&hterms=potato+starch&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dpotato%2Bstarch"><span>Cultural systems for <span class="hlt">growing</span> potatoes in space</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Tibbitts, T.; Bula, R.; Corey, R.; Morrow, R.</p> <p>1988-01-01</p> <p>Higher plants are being evaluated for life support to provide needed food, oxygen and water as well as removal of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. The successful utilization of plants in space will require the development of not only highly productive <span class="hlt">growing</span> systems but also highly efficient bioregenerative systems. It will be necessary to recycle all inedible plant parts and all human wastes so that the entire complement of elemental compounds can be reused. Potatoes have been proposed as one of the desirable crops because they are 1) extremely productive, yielding more than 100 metric tons per hectare from <span class="hlt">field</span> plantings, 2) the edible tubers are high in digestible starch (70%) and protein (10%) on a dry weight basis, 3) up to 80% of the total plant production is in tubers and thus edible, 4) the plants are easily propagated either from tubers or from tissue culture plantlets, 5) the tubers can be utilized with a minimum of processing, and 6) potatoes can be prepared in a variety of different forms for the human diet (Tibbitts et al., 1982). However potatoes have a growth pattern that complicates the development of <span class="hlt">growing</span> the plants in controlled systems. Tubers are borne on underground stems that are botanically termed 'rhizomes', but in common usage termed 'stolons'. The stolons must be maintained in a dark, moist area with sufficient provision for enlargement of tubers. Stems <span class="hlt">rapidly</span> terminate in flowers forcing extensive branching and spreading of plants so that individual plants will cover 0.2 m2 or more area. Thus the <span class="hlt">growing</span> system must be developed to provide an area that is darkened for tuber and root growth and of sufficient size for plant spread. A system developed for <span class="hlt">growing</span> potatoes, or any plants, in space will have certain requirements that must be met to make them a useful part of a life support system. The system must 1) be constructed of materials, and involve media, that can be reused for many successive cycles of plant growth, 2</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11539774','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11539774"><span>Cultural systems for <span class="hlt">growing</span> potatoes in space.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Tibbitts, T; Bula, R; Corey, R; Morrow, R</p> <p>1988-01-01</p> <p>Higher plants are being evaluated for life support to provide needed food, oxygen and water as well as removal of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. The successful utilization of plants in space will require the development of not only highly productive <span class="hlt">growing</span> systems but also highly efficient bioregenerative systems. It will be necessary to recycle all inedible plant parts and all human wastes so that the entire complement of elemental compounds can be reused. Potatoes have been proposed as one of the desirable crops because they are 1) extremely productive, yielding more than 100 metric tons per hectare from <span class="hlt">field</span> plantings, 2) the edible tubers are high in digestible starch (70%) and protein (10%) on a dry weight basis, 3) up to 80% of the total plant production is in tubers and thus edible, 4) the plants are easily propagated either from tubers or from tissue culture plantlets, 5) the tubers can be utilized with a minimum of processing, and 6) potatoes can be prepared in a variety of different forms for the human diet (Tibbitts et al., 1982). However potatoes have a growth pattern that complicates the development of <span class="hlt">growing</span> the plants in controlled systems. Tubers are borne on underground stems that are botanically termed 'rhizomes', but in common usage termed 'stolons'. The stolons must be maintained in a dark, moist area with sufficient provision for enlargement of tubers. Stems <span class="hlt">rapidly</span> terminate in flowers forcing extensive branching and spreading of plants so that individual plants will cover 0.2 m2 or more area. Thus the <span class="hlt">growing</span> system must be developed to provide an area that is darkened for tuber and root growth and of sufficient size for plant spread. A system developed for <span class="hlt">growing</span> potatoes, or any plants, in space will have certain requirements that must be met to make them a useful part of a life support system. The system must 1) be constructed of materials, and involve media, that can be reused for many successive cycles of plant growth, 2</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016csss.confE.118S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016csss.confE.118S"><span>Hunting For Strong Magnetic <span class="hlt">Fields</span> In <span class="hlt">Rapidly</span> Rotating Sun-Like Stars With Stokes-I Observations</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Shulyak, Denis; Malo, Lison; Reiners, Ansgar; Kochukhov, Oleg; Jeffers, Sandra; Piskunov, Nikolai</p> <p>2016-06-01</p> <p>Stars with convective envelopes can generate strong magnetic <span class="hlt">fields</span> through rotationally driven dynamos. Theory suggests that the maximum magnetic <span class="hlt">field</span> strength depends on the energy budget stored in the stellar convective shell and can reach values of several kilogauss in fastest rotating stars. We test this predictions by measuring total magnetic flux and polarization in a sample of sun-like stars that rotate close to the activity saturation limit. We detect average magnetic flux densities of several hundred G in several of our targets,with the strongest <span class="hlt">field</span> of about 1 kG in a K type star V383 Lac showing that young sun-like starscan produce average <span class="hlt">fields</span> on the kG level.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19850004021','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19850004021"><span>A Sphere-Scanning Radiometer for <span class="hlt">Rapid</span> Directional Measurements of Sky and Ground Radiance: the PARABOLA <span class="hlt">Field</span> Instrument</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Deering, D. W.; Leone, P.</p> <p>1984-01-01</p> <p>A unique <span class="hlt">field</span> instrument, called the PARABOLA, a collapsable support boom, which is self contained and easily transportable to remote sites to enable the acquisition of radiance data for almost the complete (4 pi) sky and ground-looking hemispheres in only 11 seconds was designed. The PARABOLA samples in 15 deg instantaneous <span class="hlt">field</span> of view sectors in three narrow bandpass spectral channels simultaneously. <span class="hlt">Field</span> measurement on a variety of earth surface cover types using a truck boom, a specially designed pickup truck mounting system, and a hot air balloon were studied. The PARABOLA instrument has potential for climatological and other studies which require characterization of the distribution of diffuse solar radiation within the sky hemisphere.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/7061568','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/7061568"><span>Marked <span class="hlt">rapid</span> alterations in nocturnal pineal serotonin metabolism in mice and rats exposed to weak intermittent magnetic <span class="hlt">fields</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Lerchl, A.; Nonaka, K.O.; Stokkan, K.A.; Reiter, R.J. )</p> <p>1990-05-31</p> <p>Adult AMES mice and male Sprague Dawley rats were exposed to an artificial magnetic <span class="hlt">field</span>, generated by Helmholtz coils. 3.5 hours after the onset of darkness the coils were activated for one hour resulting in an inversion of the horizontal component of the earth's magnetic <span class="hlt">field</span>. The coils were activated and deactivated at 5 min intervals during the 1 hour exposure period. In both mice and rats, the levels of serotonin in the pineal were markedly increased by the exposure. In rats, an increase of pineal 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid and a decrease of the activity of the pineal enzyme serotonin-N-acetyltransferase also was observed. However, pineal and serum melatonin levels were not altered. The results indicate that the metabolism of serotonin in the pineal is quickly affected by the exposure of animals to a magnetic <span class="hlt">field</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED318846.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED318846.pdf"><span><span class="hlt">Growing</span> Old in Sweden.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Berglind, Hans</p> <p></p> <p>This document contains the bases of lectures delivered in Florida by a visiting Stockholm University sociology professor. The first chapter, "<span class="hlt">Growing</span> Old in Sweden," includes information on the income, standard of living, and quality of services available to the elderly in that country. That information is presented within the changing…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=rope&pg=4&id=EJ725929','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=rope&pg=4&id=EJ725929"><span><span class="hlt">Growing</span> into Leadership</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Alvy, Harvey; Robbins, Pam</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p>New school principals have the necessity to lead at the very time they are learning the ropes of their new jobs. Some essential themes are identified that can guide new principals into <span class="hlt">growing</span> in their new leadership roles, which are presented and discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=erik+AND+erikson&pg=6&id=ED308517','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=erik+AND+erikson&pg=6&id=ED308517"><span><span class="hlt">Growing</span> through Literature.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Thomas, Barbara J.</p> <p></p> <p>"<span class="hlt">Growing</span> through Literature" is a curriculum using Joan M. and Erik H. Erikson's theory of the Life Cycle as a structure for selecting and teaching literature to inner-city high school students at Brighton High School in Massachusetts. The program consists of four component parts: Journals, Selected Stories, Discussion, and…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=george+AND+orwell&pg=3&id=EJ286527','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=george+AND+orwell&pg=3&id=EJ286527"><span><span class="hlt">Growing</span> Up with "1984."</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Franza, August</p> <p>1983-01-01</p> <p>Relates changing student reaction to George Orwell's "1984" over 20 years of teaching. Finds present high school students' acceptance of Orwell's bleak world vision both a sign of student honesty and a frightening indication of the <span class="hlt">growing</span> reality of the book. (MM)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=germination&pg=5&id=ED020107','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=germination&pg=5&id=ED020107"><span><span class="hlt">GROWING</span> SEEDS, TEACHER'S GUIDE.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Elementary Science Study, Newton, MA.</p> <p></p> <p>THIS TEACHER'S GUIDE IS DESIGNED FOR USE WITH AN ELEMENTARY SCIENCE STUDY UNIT, "<span class="hlt">GROWING</span> SEEDS," IN WHICH SUCH BASIC SCIENCE SKILLS AND PROCESSES AS MEASUREMENT, OBSERVATION, AND HYPOTHESIS FORMATION ARE INTRODUCED THROUGH STUDENT ACTIVITIES INVOLVING SEEDS, GERMINATION, AND SEEDLING GROWTH. THE MATERIALS WERE DEVELOPED FOR USE IN…</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li class="active"><span>15</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_15 --> <div id="page_16" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li class="active"><span>16</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="301"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED281636.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED281636.pdf"><span>Families on the <span class="hlt">Grow</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Lee, Irene K.; Phillips, Marjorie M.</p> <p></p> <p>This correspondence course was designed to help parents better understand their <span class="hlt">growing</span> children and themselves as parents. The introduction briefly sketches the importance of the family in child development. Each of the five illustrated lessons contains 7 to 12 pages on one aspect of family life. Each lesson contains a set of objectives, a…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014IJAsB..13..182F','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014IJAsB..13..182F"><span><span class="hlt">Field</span> method for <span class="hlt">rapid</span> quantification of labile organic carbon in hyper-arid desert soils validated by two thermal methods</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Fletcher, Lauren E.; Valdivia-Silva, Julio E.; Perez-Montaño, Saul; Condori-Apaza, Renee M.; Conley, Catharine A.; Navarro-Gonzalez, Rafael; McKay, Christopher P.</p> <p>2014-03-01</p> <p>The objective of this work was to develop a <span class="hlt">field</span> method for the determination of labile organic carbon in hyper-arid desert soils. Industry standard methods rely on expensive analytical equipment that are not possible to take into the <span class="hlt">field</span>, while scientific challenges require fast turn-around of large numbers of samples in order to characterize the soils throughout this region. Here we present a method utilizing acid-hydrolysis extraction of the labile fraction of organic carbon followed by potassium permanganate oxidation, which provides a quick and inexpensive approach to investigate samples in the <span class="hlt">field</span>. Strict reagent standardization and calibration steps within this method allowed the determination of very low levels of organic carbon in hyper-arid soils, in particular, with results similar to those determined by the alternative methods of Calcination and Pyrolysis-Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry. <span class="hlt">Field</span> testing of this protocol increased the understanding of the role of organic materials in hyper-arid environments and allowed real-time, strategic decision making for planning for more detailed laboratory-based analysis.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28404996','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28404996"><span>A <span class="hlt">rapid</span> and non-invasive method for measuring the peak positive pressure of HIFU <span class="hlt">fields</span> by a laser beam.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Wang, Hua; Zeng, Deping; Chen, Ziguang; Yang, Zengtao</p> <p>2017-04-12</p> <p>Based on the acousto-optic interaction, we propose a laser deflection method for <span class="hlt">rapidly</span>, non-invasively and quantitatively measuring the peak positive pressure of HIFU <span class="hlt">fields</span>. In the characterization of HIFU <span class="hlt">fields</span>, the effect of nonlinear propagation is considered. The relation between the laser deflection length and the peak positive pressure is derived. Then the laser deflection method is assessed by comparing it with the hydrophone method. The experimental results show that the peak positive pressure measured by laser deflection method is little higher than that obtained by the hydrophone, confirming that they are in reasonable agreement. Considering that the peak pressure measured by hydrophones is always underestimated, the laser deflection method is assumed to be more accurate than the hydrophone method due to the absence of the errors in hydrophone spatial-averaging measurement and the influence of waveform distortion on hydrophone corrections. Moreover, noting that the Lorentz formula still remains applicable to high-pressure environments, the laser deflection method exhibits a great potential for measuring HIFU <span class="hlt">field</span> under high-pressure amplitude. Additionally, the laser deflection method provides a <span class="hlt">rapid</span> way for measuring the peak positive pressure, without the scan time, which is required by the hydrophones.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28146158','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28146158"><span>Poor sensitivity of <span class="hlt">rapid</span> tests for the detection of antibodies to the hepatitis B virus: implications for <span class="hlt">field</span> studies.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Cruz, Helena Medina; Scalioni, Leticia de Paula; Paula, Vanessa Salete de; Miguel, Juliana Custódio; Ó, Kycia Maria Rodrigues do; Milagres, Flavio Augusto Pádua; Cruz, Marcelo Santos; Bastos, Francisco Inácio; Flores, Priscila Pollo; Leal, Erotildes; Motta-Castro, Ana Rita Coimbra; Lewis-Ximenez, Lia Laura; Lampe, Elisabeth; Villar, Livia Melo</p> <p>2017-03-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Rapid</span> tests (RTs) can be used as an alternative method for the conventional diagnosis of hepatitis B virus (HBV). This study aims to evaluate antibodies to HBsAg (anti-HBs) and antibodies to HBeAg (anti-HBe) RTs under different Brazilian settings. The following three groups were included: GI: viral hepatitis outpatient services; GII: low resource areas; and GIII: crack users and beauticians. Imuno-rápido anti-HBsAg™ and Imuno-rápido anti-HBeAg™ RTs were evaluated and showed specificities greater than 95% in all groups. The sensitivity values to anti-HBs were 50.38%, 51.05% and 46.73% and the sensitivity values to anti-HBe were 76.99%, 10.34% and 11.76% in the GI, GII and GIII groups, respectively. The assays had a low sensitivity and high specificity, which indicated their use for screening in regions endemic for HBV.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2572385','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2572385"><span><span class="hlt">Field</span> trial of applicability of lot quality assurance sampling survey method for <span class="hlt">rapid</span> assessment of prevalence of active trachoma.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Myatt, Mark; Limburg, Hans; Minassian, Darwin; Katyola, Damson</p> <p>2003-01-01</p> <p>OBJECTIVE: To test the applicability of lot quality assurance sampling (LQAS) for the <span class="hlt">rapid</span> assessment of the prevalence of active trachoma. METHODS: Prevalence of active trachoma in six communities was found by examining all children aged 2-5 years. Trial surveys were conducted in these communities. A sampling plan appropriate for classifying communities with prevalences < or =20% and > or =40% was applied to the survey data. Operating characteristic and average sample number curves were plotted, and screening test indices were calculated. The ability of LQAS to provide a three-class classification system was investigated. FINDINGS: Ninety-six trial surveys were conducted. All communities with prevalences < or =20% and > or =40% were identified correctly. The method discriminated between communities with prevalences < or =30% and >30%, with sensitivity of 98% (95% confidence interval (CI)=88.2-99.9%), specificity of 84.4% (CI=69.9-93.0%), positive predictive value of 87.7% (CI=75.7-94.5%), negative predictive value of 97.4% (CI=84.9-99.9%), and accuracy of 91.7% (CI=83.8-96.1%). Agreement between the three prevalence classes and survey classifications was 84.4% (CI=75.2-90.7%). The time needed to complete the surveys was consistent with the need to complete a survey in one day. CONCLUSION: Lot quality assurance sampling provides a method of classifying communities according to the prevalence of active trachoma. It merits serious consideration as a replacement for the assessment of the prevalence of active trachoma with the currently used trachoma <span class="hlt">rapid</span> assessment method. It may be extended to provide a multi-class classification method. PMID:14997240</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26190467','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26190467"><span>A <span class="hlt">Rapid</span> <span class="hlt">Field</span>-Deployable Reverse Transcription-Insulated Isothermal Polymerase Chain Reaction Assay for Sensitive and Specific Detection of Bluetongue Virus.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ambagala, A; Pahari, S; Fisher, M; Lee, P-Y A; Pasick, J; Ostlund, E N; Johnson, D J; Lung, O</p> <p>2017-04-01</p> <p>Bluetongue is a non-contagious, haemorrhagic, Culicoides-borne disease of ruminants. The causative agent, bluetongue virus (BTV), is a member of the Orbivirus genus of the Reoviridae family. So far, 26 BTV serotypes have been identified worldwide. The global distribution of bluetongue has been expanding, and <span class="hlt">rapid</span> detection of BTV, preferably in the <span class="hlt">field</span>, is critical for timely implementation of animal movement restrictions and vector control measures. To date, many laboratory-based, molecular assays for detection of BTV have been developed. These methods require the samples to be shipped to a central laboratory with sophisticated instruments and highly skilled technicians to perform the assays, conduct analyses and interpret the results. Here, we report the development and evaluation of a <span class="hlt">rapid</span>, portable, user-friendly, pan-BTV reverse transcription-insulated isothermal polymerase chain reaction (RT-iiPCR) assay that can potentially be used in low-resource <span class="hlt">field</span> conditions. The total length of the assay was <60 min, and at the end of the assay, the results were automatically displayed as '+' or '-' without the need for data interpretation. The RT-iiPCR assay detected 36 BTV isolates and two in vitro transcribed RNA samples representing all 26 BTV serotypes. The assay did not cross-react with other animal viruses tested, including two closely related orbiviruses. The analytical sensitivity of the assay was as low as nine copies of in vitro transcribed double-stranded BTV RNA. Analysis of BTV-infected whole blood samples showed that the BTV RT-iiPCR assay was as sensitive as real-time RT-PCR. The assay can potentially be used for <span class="hlt">rapid</span> screening of animals for BTV in routine diagnostics and for monitoring bluetongue outbreaks both in ruminants and in Culicoides vectors in the <span class="hlt">field</span> and in the laboratory.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16705835','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16705835"><span>Design and development of low cost, simple, <span class="hlt">rapid</span> and safe, modified <span class="hlt">field</span> kits for the visual detection and determination of arsenic in drinking water samples.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Cherukurii, Jyotsna; Anjaneyulu, Y</p> <p>2005-08-01</p> <p>Arsenic is naturally found in surface and ground waters and the inorganic forms of arsenic are the most toxic forms. The adverse health effects of arsenic may involve the respiratory, gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, nervous, and haematopoietic systems. Arsenic contamination in drinking water is a global problem widely seen in Bangladesh and West Bengal of the Indian sub continent. As there is a great demand for <span class="hlt">field</span> test kits due to the anticipated reduction of the US EPA arsenic standard from 50ppb to 10ppb a <span class="hlt">field</span> kit which offers <span class="hlt">rapid</span>, simple and safe method for precise estimation of arsenic at 10ppb in drinking water samples is developed. <span class="hlt">Field</span> methods, based on the mercuric-bromide-stain, consist of three different major parts, which are carried out stepwise. The first part of the procedure is to remove serious interference caused by hydrogen sulphide. In commercially available kits either the sulphide is oxidized to sulphate and the excess oxidizing reagent removed prior to the hydride generation step or, the hydrogen sulphide is filtered out by passing the gas stream through a filter impregnated with lead acetate during the hydride generation step. The present method employs cupric chloride in combination with ferric chloride or Fentonis reagent for the removal of hydrogen sulphide, which is <span class="hlt">rapid</span>, simple and more efficient. Other interferences at this step of the analyses are normally not expected for drinking water analysis. In the second step, the generation of the arsine gas involves the classical way of using zinc metal and hydrochloric acid, which produce the enascenti hydrogen, which is the actual reducing agent. Hydrochloric acid can be replaced by sulfamic acid, which is solid and avoids a major disadvantage of having to handle a corrosive liquid in the <span class="hlt">field</span>. The arsine gas produces a yellowish spot on the reagent paper. Depending on the arsenic content, either, Yellow n H (HgBr)2 As (10-50ppb), Brown n (HgBr)3 As (50-100ppb) or Black n Hg3 As2</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19920046998&hterms=motor+combustible&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3Dmotor%2Bcombustible','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19920046998&hterms=motor+combustible&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3Dmotor%2Bcombustible"><span>Semi-coupled flow and thermal analysis of the <span class="hlt">field</span> joint during <span class="hlt">rapid</span> pressurization of the redesigned solid rocket motor</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Ghaffarian, Benny; Majumdar, Alok K.; Colbert, Robert; Clayton, J. L.</p> <p>1992-01-01</p> <p>A transient, semi-coupled, multi-dimensional thermal and flow analysis methodology was developed to predict the thermal/gas dynamic conditions in the <span class="hlt">field</span> joint region of the Redesigned Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM). Transient temperature response, pressure history, and combustion gas flow rate (within the <span class="hlt">field</span> joint region), were of principle interest, in the course of this study. The thermal environment in the <span class="hlt">field</span> joint was modeled using SINDA, a finite difference based thermal network analyzer. The combustion gas flow boundary condition was generated using the FLAP code; this code performs a transient, lumped-parameter, control volume analysis to solve the mass, momentum, and energy conservation equations. The FLAP computer code was modified to account for erosion of the NBR insulation material, following ignition. An independent grid sensitivity study was conducted to determine an appropriate grid distribution near the wall. The predicted results, obtained using an optimum grid distribution and computer generated flow boundary condition, were compared with subscale test data.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27738414','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27738414"><span>A <span class="hlt">rapid</span> two-dimensional data collection system for the study of ferroelectric materials under external applied electric <span class="hlt">fields</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Vergentev, Tikhon; Bronwald, Iurii; Chernyshov, Dmitry; Gorfman, Semen; Ryding, Stephanie H M; Thompson, Paul; Cernik, Robert J</p> <p>2016-10-01</p> <p>Synchrotron X-rays on the Swiss Norwegian Beamline and BM28 (XMaS) at the ESRF have been used to record the diffraction response of the PMN-PT relaxor piezoelectric 67% Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3-33% PbTiO3 as a function of externally applied electric <span class="hlt">field</span>. A DC <span class="hlt">field</span> in the range 0-18 kV cm(-1) was applied along the [001] pseudo-cubic direction using a specially designed sample cell for in situ single-crystal diffraction experiments. The cell allowed data to be collected on a Pilatus 2M area detector in a large volume of reciprocal space using transmission geometry. The data showed good agreement with a twinned single-phase monoclinic structure model. The results from the area detector were compared with previous Bragg peak mapping using variable electric <span class="hlt">fields</span> and a single detector where the structural model was ambiguous. The coverage of a significantly larger section of reciprocal space facilitated by the area detector allowed precise phase analysis.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5045728','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5045728"><span>A <span class="hlt">rapid</span> two-dimensional data collection system for the study of ferroelectric materials under external applied electric <span class="hlt">fields</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Vergentev, Tikhon; Bronwald, Iurii; Chernyshov, Dmitry; Gorfman, Semen; Ryding, Stephanie H. M.; Thompson, Paul; Cernik, Robert J.</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Synchrotron X-rays on the Swiss Norwegian Beamline and BM28 (XMaS) at the ESRF have been used to record the diffraction response of the PMN–PT relaxor piezoelectric 67% Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3–33% PbTiO3 as a function of externally applied electric <span class="hlt">field</span>. A DC <span class="hlt">field</span> in the range 0–18 kV cm−1 was applied along the [001] pseudo-cubic direction using a specially designed sample cell for in situ single-crystal diffraction experiments. The cell allowed data to be collected on a Pilatus 2M area detector in a large volume of reciprocal space using transmission geometry. The data showed good agreement with a twinned single-phase monoclinic structure model. The results from the area detector were compared with previous Bragg peak mapping using variable electric <span class="hlt">fields</span> and a single detector where the structural model was ambiguous. The coverage of a significantly larger section of reciprocal space facilitated by the area detector allowed precise phase analysis. PMID:27738414</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23298397','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23298397"><span>Single-dose <span class="hlt">field</span> bioassay for sensitivity testing in sea lice, Lepeophtheirus salmonis: development of a <span class="hlt">rapid</span> diagnostic tool.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Helgesen, K O; Horsberg, T E</p> <p>2013-03-01</p> <p>Sea lice on farmed salmonids are often treated with chemicals. Sensitivity testing of sea lice can reduce the number of treatments by identifying substances the sea lice are susceptible to. This study describes a simpler protocol for <span class="hlt">field</span> sensitivity testing than today's six-dose bioassay. The protocol, which uses a single dose of the delousing agents deltamethrin, azamethiphos and emamectin benzoate, was developed on four different strains of sea lice and their subsequent generations. A sensitive strain and a strain showing reduced sensitivity were identified for each chemical after performing traditional bioassays and small-scale treatments. The single doses for each chemical were established by modelling dose-response curves from 24-h bioassays on strains with differences in sensitivity. The largest difference between the lower 80% prediction interval for the sensitive strain and the upper 80% prediction interval for the strain showing reduced sensitivity was identified for each delousing agent. The concentration of the chemical and the % mortality corresponding to each of the 80% prediction intervals were subsequently established. To validate the protocol for <span class="hlt">field</span> use, further studies on both sensitive and resistant strains of sea lice under <span class="hlt">field</span> conditions are required.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JPhD...49b5306C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JPhD...49b5306C"><span>ZnO nanorod arrays prepared by chemical bath deposition combined with <span class="hlt">rapid</span> thermal annealing: structural, photoluminescence and <span class="hlt">field</span> emission characteristics</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Chen, Hung-Wei; Yang, Hsi-Wen; He, Hsin-Min; Lee, Yi-Mu</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>ZnO nanorod arrays were prepared by low temperature chemical bath deposition (CBD) combined with <span class="hlt">rapid</span> thermal annealing (RTA) under different ambient conditions. The structure and morphology of the synthesized ZnO have been characterized by <span class="hlt">field</span>-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and x-ray diffraction (XRD). The obtained ZnO samples are highly crystalline with a hexagonal wurtzite phase and also display well-aligned array structure. A pronounced effect on increased nanorod length was found for the RTA-treated ZnO as compared to the as-grown ZnO. Analysis of XRD indicates that the (0 0 2) feature peak of the as-grown ZnO was shifted towards a lower angle as compared to the peaks of RTA-treated ZnO samples due to the reduction of tensile strain along the c-axis by RTA. Photoluminescence (PL) studies reveal that the ZnO nanorod arrays receiving RTA in an O2 environment have the sharpest UV emission band and greatest intensity ratio of near band-edge emission (NBE) to deep level emission (DLE). Additionally, the effects of RTA on the <span class="hlt">field</span> emission properties were evaluated. The results demonstrate that RTA an O2 environment can lower the turn-on <span class="hlt">field</span> and improve the <span class="hlt">field</span> enhancement factor. The stability of the <span class="hlt">field</span> emission current was also tested for 4 h.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/946467','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/946467"><span><span class="hlt">Rapid</span> Calibration of High Resolution Geologic Models to Dynamic Data Using Inverse Modeling: <span class="hlt">Field</span> Application and Validation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Akhil Datta-Gupta</p> <p>2008-03-31</p> <p>Streamline-based assisted and automatic history matching techniques have shown great potential in reconciling high resolution geologic models to production data. However, a major drawback of these approaches has been incompressibility or slight compressibility assumptions that have limited applications to two-phase water-oil displacements only. We propose an approach to history matching three-phase flow using a novel compressible streamline formulation and streamline-derived analytic sensitivities. First, we utilize a generalized streamline model to account for compressible flow by introducing an 'effective density' of total fluids along streamlines. Second, we analytically compute parameter sensitivities that define the relationship between the reservoir properties and the production response, viz. water-cut and gas/oil ratio (GOR). These sensitivities are an integral part of history matching, and streamline models permit efficient computation of these sensitivities through a single flow simulation. We calibrate geologic models to production data by matching the water-cut and gas/oil ratio using our previously proposed generalized travel time inversion (GTTI) technique. For <span class="hlt">field</span> applications, however, the highly non-monotonic profile of the gas/oil ratio data often presents a challenge to this technique. In this work we present a transformation of the <span class="hlt">field</span> production data that makes it more amenable to GTTI. Further, we generalize the approach to incorporate bottom-hole flowing pressure during three-phase history matching. We examine the practical feasibility of the method using a <span class="hlt">field</span>-scale synthetic example (SPE-9 comparative study) and a <span class="hlt">field</span> application. Recently Ensemble Kalman Filtering (EnKF) has gained increased attention for history matching and continuous reservoir model updating using data from permanent downhole sensors. It is a sequential Monte-Carlo approach that works with an ensemble of reservoir models. Specifically, the method utilizes cross</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19920016155','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19920016155"><span>Macromolecular crystal <span class="hlt">growing</span> system</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Snyder, Robert S. (Inventor); Herren, Blair J. (Inventor); Carter, Daniel C. (Inventor); Yost, Vaughn H. (Inventor); Bugg, Charles E. (Inventor); Delucas, Lawrence J. (Inventor); Suddath, Fred L. (Inventor)</p> <p>1991-01-01</p> <p>A macromolecular crystal <span class="hlt">growing</span> system especially designed for <span class="hlt">growing</span> crystals in the low gravity of space as well as the gravity of earth includes at least one tray assembly, a carrier assembly which receives the tray, and a refrigeration-incubation module in which the carrier assembly is received. The tray assembly includes a plurality of sealed chambers with a plastic syringe and a plug means for the double tip of the syringe provided therein. Ganging mechanisms operate the syringes and plugs simultaneously in a precise and smooth operation. Preferably, the tray assemblies are mounted on ball bearing slides for smooth operation in inserting and removing the tray assemblies into the carrier assembly. The plugging mechanism also includes a loading control mechanism. A mechanism for leaving a syringe unplugged is also provided.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=cancer+AND+his&pg=2&id=EJ807543','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=cancer+AND+his&pg=2&id=EJ807543"><span><span class="hlt">Growing</span> up with Retinoblastoma</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Maley, Tom</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p>An account is given of <span class="hlt">growing</span> up as a child blinded as a result of a cancer of the eye known as retinoblastoma. The role of his mother is brought out, variously as a source of objective knowledge, of one's personal worth, and of the worth of other people in one's community. The strengths and weaknesses of his first school in his home area and…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5319371','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5319371"><span>Poor sensitivity of <span class="hlt">rapid</span> tests for the detection of antibodies to the hepatitis B virus: implications for <span class="hlt">field</span> studies</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Cruz, Helena Medina; Scalioni, Leticia de Paula; de Paula, Vanessa Salete; Miguel, Juliana Custódio; do Ó, Kycia Maria Rodrigues; Milagres, Flavio Augusto Pádua; Cruz, Marcelo Santos; Bastos, Francisco Inácio; Flores, Priscila Pollo; Leal, Erotildes; Motta-Castro, Ana Rita Coimbra; Lewis-Ximenez, Lia Laura; Lampe, Elisabeth; Villar, Livia Melo</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Rapid</span> tests (RTs) can be used as an alternative method for the conventional diagnosis of hepatitis B virus (HBV). This study aims to evaluate antibodies to HBsAg (anti-HBs) and antibodies to HBeAg (anti-HBe) RTs under different Brazilian settings. The following three groups were included: GI: viral hepatitis outpatient services; GII: low resource areas; and GIII: crack users and beauticians. Imuno-rápido anti-HBsAg™ and Imuno-rápido anti-HBeAg™ RTs were evaluated and showed specificities greater than 95% in all groups. The sensitivity values to anti-HBs were 50.38%, 51.05% and 46.73% and the sensitivity values to anti-HBe were 76.99%, 10.34% and 11.76% in the GI, GII and GIII groups, respectively. The assays had a low sensitivity and high specificity, which indicated their use for screening in regions endemic for HBV. PMID:28146158</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3593507','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3593507"><span>The accuracy of the first response histidine-rich protein2 <span class="hlt">rapid</span> diagnostic test compared with malaria microscopy for guiding <span class="hlt">field</span> treatment in an outbreak of falciparum malaria</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Ghouth, Abdulla Salim Bin; Nasseb, Faraj Mubarak; Al-Kaldy, Khaled Hussin</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Background: Recent WHO guidelines recommended a universal “test and treat” strategy for malaria mainly by use of the <span class="hlt">rapid</span> diagnostic test (RDT) in all areas. There are concerns about RDT that use the antigen histidine-rich protein2 (HRP2) to detect Plasmodium falciparum, because infection can persist after effective treatment. Aim: The aim of this paper is to describe the accuracy of the first response (HRP2)-RDT compared with malaria microscopy used for guiding the <span class="hlt">field</span> treatment of patients in an outbreak situation in the Al-Rahabah area in Al-Rydah district in Hadramout/Yemen. Materials and Methods: An ad hoc cross sectional survey of all febrile patients in the affected area was conducted in May 2011. The <span class="hlt">field</span> team was developed including the case management group and the entomology group. The group of case management prepared their plan based on “test and treat” strategy by using First Response Malaria Antigen HRP2 <span class="hlt">rapid</span> diagnostic test for falciparum malaria, artemsinin-based combination therapy (ACT) according to the national policy of anti-malaria drugs in Yemen were supplied to treat those who were found to be RDT positive in the <span class="hlt">field</span>; also blood smear films were taken from every patient with fever in order to validate the use of the RDT in the <span class="hlt">field</span>. Blood film slides prepared and read by skilled lab technicians, the fourth reading was done by one lab expert in the malaria referral lab. Results: The accuracy parameters of HRP2 compared with microscopy are: Sensitivity (74%), specificity (94%). The positive predictive value is 68% and the negative predictive value is 96%. Total agreement is 148/162 (93%) and the overall prevalence is 14%. All the positive malaria cases were of P. falciparum either coming from RDT or microscopy. Conclusions: HRP2–<span class="hlt">rapid</span> test is an acceptable test as a guide for <span class="hlt">field</span> treatment in an outbreak situation where prompt response is indicated. Good prepared blood film slides should be used as it is feasible to</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19790012519','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19790012519"><span>Variations of the earth's magnetic <span class="hlt">field</span> and <span class="hlt">rapid</span> climatic cooling: A possible link through changes in global ice volume</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Rampino, M. R.</p> <p>1979-01-01</p> <p>A possible relationship between large scale changes in global ice volume, variations in the earth's magnetic <span class="hlt">field</span>, and short term climatic cooling is investigated through a study of the geomagnetic and climatic records of the past 300,000 years. The calculations suggest that redistribution of the Earth's water mass can cause rotational instabilities which lead to geomagnetic excursions; these magnetic variations in turn may lead to short-term coolings through upper atmosphere effects. Such double coincidences of magnetic excursions and sudden coolings at times of ice volume changes have occurred at 13,500, 30,000, 110,000, and 135,000 YBP.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22280618','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22280618"><span><span class="hlt">Rapid</span> production of large-area deep sub-wavelength hybrid structures by femtosecond laser light-<span class="hlt">field</span> tailoring</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Wang, Lei; Chen, Qi-Dai E-mail: hbsun@jlu.edu.cn; Yang, Rui; Xu, Bin-Bin; Wang, Hai-Yu; Yang, Hai; Huo, Cheng-Song; Tu, Hai-Ling; Sun, Hong-Bo E-mail: hbsun@jlu.edu.cn</p> <p>2014-01-20</p> <p>The goal of creation of large-area deep sub-wavelength nanostructures by femtosecond laser irradiation onto various materials is being hindered by the limited coherence length. Here, we report solution of the problem by light <span class="hlt">field</span> tailoring of the incident beam with a phase mask, which serves generation of wavelets. Direct interference between the wavelets, here the first-order diffracted beams, and interference between a wavelet and its induced waves such as surface plasmon polariton are responsible for creation of microgratings and superimposed nanogratings, respectively. The principle of wavelets interference enables extension of uniformly induced hybrid structures containing deep sub-wavelength nanofeatures to macro-dimension.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009E%26PSL.284..132G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009E%26PSL.284..132G"><span>Evidence for <span class="hlt">rapid</span> geomagnetic <span class="hlt">field</span> intensity variations in Western Europe over the past 800 years from new French archeointensity data</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Genevey, Agnès; Gallet, Yves; Rosen, Jean; Le Goff, Maxime</p> <p>2009-06-01</p> <p>The number of reliable archeointensity determinations obtained from Western Europe for the past millennium remains limited. Moreover, the large scatter between different datasets available is puzzling. The present study analyzed 31 new groups of baked clay (ceramic or brick) fragments sampled in France (29 groups) and in Belgium (2 groups). These groups contain several fragments collected from different artefacts and are precisely dated principally from historical constraints between the XIIIth and the XIXth centuries. Additionally, we re-evaluated 14 intensity values that we previously obtained from the same time period. The fragments were analyzed using two different thermal methods: (1) the "in <span class="hlt">field</span>-zero <span class="hlt">field</span>" (IZ) or the IZZI version of the classical Thellier and Thellier method and (2) the Triaxe protocol that involves high-temperature magnetization measurements. Data were corrected for the anisotropy of thermoremanent magnetization (TRM) and the dependence of TRM acquisition on the cooling rate was taken into account in the different protocols. Archeointensity data obtained on twin specimens sampled from the same fragment and using both experimental techniques generally show a good agreement (i.e. within 5%) at the fragment and at the site level. All retained site-level averaged intensity results (43 of 45 groups) have standard deviations of less than 5 µT. Furthermore, groups of approximately the same age have very consistent archeointensity. Altogether, the data presented herein recover a detailed and smoothed geomagnetic <span class="hlt">field</span> intensity variation curve characterized by two peaks in intensity, the first during the second half of the XIVth century and the second around AD 1600, followed by a significant decreasing trend in intensity during most the XVIIth and XVIIIth centuries. This evolution does not satisfactorily fit with the expected intensity values for France derived from geomagnetic <span class="hlt">field</span> models relying on a different evolution of the axial dipole</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li class="active"><span>16</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_16 --> <div id="page_17" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li class="active"><span>17</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="321"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ920386.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ920386.pdf"><span>Geothermal <span class="hlt">Grows</span> Up</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Johnson, William C.; Kraemer, Steven; Ormond, Paul</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Self-declared energy and carbon reduction goals on the part of progressive colleges and universities have driven ground source geothermal space heating and cooling systems into <span class="hlt">rapid</span> evolution, as part of long-term climate action planning efforts. The period of single-building or single-well solutions is quickly being eclipsed by highly engineered…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2446863','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2446863"><span><span class="hlt">Field</span> Evaluation of a <span class="hlt">Rapid</span> Immunochromatographic Assay for Detection of Trypanosoma cruzi Infection by Use of Whole Blood▿</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Roddy, Paul; Goiri, Javier; Flevaud, Laurence; Palma, Pedro Pablo; Morote, Silvia; Lima, Nines; Villa, Luis; Torrico, Faustino; Albajar-Viñas, Pedro</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>Laboratory and clinical diagnostic classification of seropositive individuals, followed by treatment and supportive therapy, is an established component of Chagas' disease control in areas where this disease is endemic. However, most Chagas' disease patients live in remote areas where neither equipped laboratories nor skilled human resources are widely available. Employing a <span class="hlt">rapid</span> diagnostic test (RDT), when using whole blood samples, is the best option for Chagas' disease control. A high sensitivity and specificity for the Chagas Stat-Pak RDT (Chembio Diagnostic Systems, Inc., Medford, NY) has been reported for assays using serum and plasma, but its validity for the detection of antibodies to Trypanosoma cruzi infection in whole blood is unknown. This cross-sectional study measured the sensitivity and specificity of the Chagas Stat-Pak with whole blood, using conventional serological assays for comparison. The interobserver reliability in the interpretation of the Chagas Stat-Pak results and “ease-of-use” criterion needed to perform the Chagas Stat-Pak and conventional assays were also measured. The Chagas Stat-Pak yielded a high specificity (99.0%, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 98.4 to 99.4%) but a relatively low sensitivity (93.4%, 95% CI = 87.4 to 97.1%). The interobserver reliability was excellent (kappa [n = 1,913] = 0.999, P < 0.0001), and the quantified ease-of-use criterion suggested that the RDT is simple to perform. Despite the attributes of the Chagas Stat-Pak, it is not an ideal diagnostic test for the population investigated in the present study due to its relatively low sensitivity and high cost. The RDT manufacturer is called upon to improve the test if the international community hopes to make progress in controlling Chagas infections in areas where this disease is endemic. PMID:18400910</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3623245','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3623245"><span>Development of a <span class="hlt">Rapid</span>, Sensitive, and <span class="hlt">Field</span>-Deployable Razor Ex BioDetection System and Quantitative PCR Assay for Detection of Phymatotrichopsis omnivora Using Multiple Gene Targets</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Arif, M.; Marek, S. M.; Melcher, U.</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>A validated, multigene-based method using real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) and the Razor Ex BioDetection system was developed for detection of Phymatotrichopsis omnivora. This soilborne fungus causes Phymatotrichopsis root rot of cotton, alfalfa, and other dicot crops in the southwestern United States and northern Mexico, leading to significant crop losses and limiting the range of crops that can be grown in soils where the fungus is established. It is on multiple lists of regulated organisms. Because P. omnivora is difficult to isolate, accurate and sensitive culture-independent diagnostic tools are needed to confirm infections by this fungus. Specific PCR primers and probes were designed based on P. omnivora nucleotide sequences of the genes encoding rRNA internal transcribed spacers, beta-tubulin, and the second-largest subunit of RNA polymerase II (RPB2). PCR products were cloned and sequenced to confirm their identity. All primer sets allowed early detection of P. omnivora in infected but asymptomatic plants. A modified <span class="hlt">rapid</span> DNA purification method, which facilitates a quick (∼30-min) on-site assay capability for P. omnivora detection, was developed. Combined use of three target genes increased the assay accuracy and broadened the range of detection. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a multigene-based, <span class="hlt">field</span>-deployable, <span class="hlt">rapid</span>, and reliable identification method for a fungal plant pathogen and should serve as a model for the development of <span class="hlt">field</span>-deployable assays of other phytopathogens. PMID:23354717</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23016449','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23016449"><span>Capillary electrophoresis with <span class="hlt">field</span>-amplified sample stacking for <span class="hlt">rapid</span> and sensitive determination of sulfadiazine and sulfamethoxazole.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Li, Yuqin; Cui, Yingjie; Jia, Baoxiu; Wang, Hao; Liu, Caihong; Qi, Yongxiu</p> <p>2012-09-01</p> <p>A new capillary electrophoresis method with <span class="hlt">field</span>-amplified sample stacking (FASS) was developed for the analysis of sulfadiazine and sulfamethoxazole. After optimization of the separation and concentration conditions, the two compounds can be separated within 7 min and quantified with high sensitivity, with detection limits of 0.48 ng/mL for sulfadiazine and 0.76 ng/mL for sulfamethoxazole. This resulted in a 300-1500-fold improvement in concentration sensitivity relative to conventional capillary electrophoresis methods. The method was useful for qualitative and quantitative analysis of sulfadiazine and sulfamethoxazole in their preparations with recovery of 99.0%-102% for sulfadiazine and 99.5% - 99.7% for sulfamethoxazole.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25777355','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25777355"><span>Consciousness wanted, attention found: Reasons for the advantage of the left visual <span class="hlt">field</span> in identifying T2 among <span class="hlt">rapidly</span> presented series.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Verleger, Rolf; Śmigasiewicz, Kamila</p> <p>2015-09-01</p> <p>Everyday experience suggests that people are equally aware of events in both hemi-<span class="hlt">fields</span>. However, when two streams of stimuli are <span class="hlt">rapidly</span> presented left and right containing two targets, the second target is better identified in the left than in the right visual <span class="hlt">field</span>. This might be considered evidence for a right-hemisphere advantage in generating conscious percepts. However, this putative asymmetry of conscious perception cannot be measured independently of participants' access to their conscious percepts, and there is actually evidence from split-brain patients for the reverse, left-hemisphere advantage in having access to conscious percepts. Several other topics were studied in search of the responsible mechanism, among others: Mutual inhibition of hemispheres, cooperation of hemispheres in perceiving midline stimuli, and asymmetries in processing various perceptual inputs. Directing attention by salient cues turned out to be one of the few mechanisms capable of modifying the left visual-<span class="hlt">field</span> advantage in this paradigm. Thus, this left visual-<span class="hlt">field</span> advantage is best explained by the notion of a right-hemisphere advantage in directing attention to salient events. Dovetailing with the pathological asymmetries of attention after right-hemisphere lesions and with asymmetries of brain activation when healthy participants shift their attention, the present results extend that body of evidence by demonstrating unusually large and reliable behavioral asymmetries for attention-directing processes in healthy participants.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25172952','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25172952"><span><span class="hlt">Rapid</span> mapping of visual receptive <span class="hlt">fields</span> by filtered back projection: application to multi-neuronal electrophysiology and imaging.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Johnston, Jamie; Ding, Huayu; Seibel, Sofie H; Esposti, Federico; Lagnado, Leon</p> <p>2014-11-15</p> <p>Neurons in the visual system vary widely in the spatiotemporal properties of their receptive <span class="hlt">fields</span> (RFs), and understanding these variations is key to elucidating how visual information is processed. We present a new approach for mapping RFs based on the filtered back projection (FBP), an algorithm used for tomographic reconstructions. To estimate RFs, a series of bars were flashed across the retina at pseudo-random positions and at a minimum of five orientations. We apply this method to retinal neurons and show that it can accurately recover the spatial RF and impulse response of ganglion cells recorded on a multi-electrode array. We also demonstrate its utility for in vivo imaging by mapping the RFs of an array of bipolar cell synapses expressing a genetically encoded Ca(2+) indicator. We find that FBP offers several advantages over the commonly used spike-triggered average (STA): (i) ON and OFF components of a RF can be separated; (ii) the impulse response can be reconstructed at sample rates of 125 Hz, rather than the refresh rate of a monitor; (iii) FBP reveals the response properties of neurons that are not evident using STA, including those that display orientation selectivity, or fire at low mean spike rates; and (iv) the FBP method is fast, allowing the RFs of all the bipolar cell synaptic terminals in a <span class="hlt">field</span> of view to be reconstructed in under 4 min. Use of the FBP will benefit investigations of the visual system that employ electrophysiology or optical reporters to measure activity across populations of neurons.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12279861','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12279861"><span>Determination of settlement patterns in <span class="hlt">rapidly</span> <span class="hlt">growing</span> rural areas.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Goodwin, H L; Doeksen, G A; Oehrtman, R L</p> <p>1984-11-01</p> <p>The primary factors affecting settlement patterns in rural areas of the United States are examined using factor analysis of survey responses from 1,156 households in Oklahoma. "Results indicate that quality of services, age of home and availability of services, rural atmosphere and job and family considerations impact most significantly. Analysis of variance indicates that differences exist in the relative weighting of factors by socio-economic, demographic and locational variables."</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://pubs.water.usgs.gov/wsp2000/','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="http://pubs.water.usgs.gov/wsp2000/"><span>Water for a <span class="hlt">rapidly</span> <span class="hlt">growing</span> urban community, Oakland County, Michigan</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Twenter, F.R.; Knutilla, R.L.</p> <p>1972-01-01</p> <p>Oakland County, an area of 899 square miles, is in southeastern Michigan. The southern part of the county is overlapped by the suburbs of the city of Detroit. In 1970, about 850,000 people were living in the county and using about 100 million gallons of water a day. More than 80 percent of the water used for large industrial and municipal supplies came from Detroit's water system. The average annual rate of streamflow from the county is about 370 million gallons per day (575 cubic feet per second). Median annual 7-day low flows range from 0 to 0.25 cfs per square mile. Low flows can be augmented by more than 60,000 acre-feet of water captured during high streamflow by construction of small reservoirs at 21 inventoried sites. Glacial deposits and the Marshall Sandstone are the prime sources of ground water. Most wells that penetrate the full thickness of glacial deposits in the northwestern part of the county will yield at least 50 gpm (gallons per minute), and many will yield more than 400 gpm. The Marshall Sandstone, which occurs only in the Holly area, is capable of yielding more than 1,000 gpm. The chemical quality of both surface and ground water is relatively good throughout the county. Only in the southern part of the county is the dissolved solids above the acceptable standard of 500 milligrams per liter.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013SPIE.8761E..0RL','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013SPIE.8761E..0RL"><span>Evaluating a novel application of optical fibre evanescent <span class="hlt">field</span> absorbance: <span class="hlt">rapid</span> measurement of red colour in winegrape homogenates</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Lye, Peter G.; Bradbury, Ronald; Lamb, David W.</p> <p></p> <p>Silica optical fibres were used to measure colour (mg anthocyanin/g fresh berry weight) in samples of red wine grape homogenates via optical Fibre Evanescent <span class="hlt">Field</span> Absorbance (FEFA). Colour measurements from 126 samples of grape homogenate were compared against the standard industry spectrophotometric reference method that involves chemical extraction and subsequent optical absorption measurements of clarified samples at 520 nm. FEFA absorbance on homogenates at 520 nm (FEFA520h) was correlated with the industry reference method measurements of colour (R2 = 0.46, n = 126). Using a simple regression equation colour could be predicted with a standard error of cross-validation (SECV) of 0.21 mg/g, with a range of 0.6 to 2.2 mg anthocyanin/g and a standard deviation of 0.33 mg/g. With a Ratio of Performance Deviation (RPD) of 1.6, the technique when utilizing only a single detection wavelength, is not robust enough to apply in a diagnostic sense, however the results do demonstrate the potential of the FEFA method as a fast and low-cost assay of colour in homogenized samples.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27017069','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27017069"><span>Automatic segmentation of cartilage in high-<span class="hlt">field</span> magnetic resonance images of the knee joint with an improved voxel-classification-driven region-<span class="hlt">growing</span> algorithm using vicinity-correlated subsampling.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Öztürk, Ceyda Nur; Albayrak, Songül</p> <p>2016-05-01</p> <p>Anatomical structures that can deteriorate over time, such as cartilage, can be successfully delineated with voxel-classification approaches in magnetic resonance (MR) images. However, segmentation via voxel-classification is a computationally demanding process for high-<span class="hlt">field</span> MR images with high spatial resolutions. In this study, the whole femoral, tibial, and patellar cartilage compartments in the knee joint were automatically segmented in high-<span class="hlt">field</span> MR images obtained from Osteoarthritis Initiative using a voxel-classification-driven region-<span class="hlt">growing</span> algorithm with sample-expand method. Computational complexity of the classification was alleviated via subsampling of the background voxels in the training MR images and selecting a small subset of significant features by taking into consideration systems with limited memory and processing power. Although subsampling of the voxels may lead to a loss of generality of the training models and a decrease in segmentation accuracies, effective subsampling strategies can overcome these problems. Therefore, different subsampling techniques, which involve uniform, Gaussian, vicinity-correlated (VC) sparse, and VC dense subsampling, were used to generate four training models. The segmentation system was experimented using 10 training and 23 testing MR images, and the effects of different training models on segmentation accuracies were investigated. Experimental results showed that the highest mean Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) values for all compartments were obtained when the training models of VC sparse subsampling technique were used. Mean DSC values optimized with this technique were 82.6%, 83.1%, and 72.6% for femoral, tibial, and patellar cartilage compartments, respectively, when mean sensitivities were 79.9%, 84.0%, and 71.5%, and mean specificities were 99.8%, 99.9%, and 99.9%.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA435623','DTIC-ST'); return false;" href="http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA435623"><span>Application of Solid Phase Microextraction Coupled with Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry as a <span class="hlt">Rapid</span> Method for <span class="hlt">Field</span> Sampling and Analysis of Chemical Warfare Agents and Toxic Industrial Chemicals</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://publicaccess.dtic.mil/psm/api/service/search/search">DTIC Science & Technology</a></p> <p></p> <p>2003-01-01</p> <p>PHASE MICROEXTRACTION COUPLED WITH GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY/MASS SPECTROMETRY AS A <span class="hlt">RAPID</span> METHOD FOR <span class="hlt">FIELD</span> SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS OF CHEMICAL WARFARE AGENTS...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE APPLICATION OF SOLID PHASE MICROEXTRACTION COUPLED WITH GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY/MASS SPECTROMETRY AS A <span class="hlt">RAPID</span> METHOD FOR <span class="hlt">FIELD</span>...unclassified Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 iii ABSTRACT APPLICATION OF SOLID PHASE MICROEXTRACTION COUPLED WITH</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27773771','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27773771"><span>Ultrasonic-assisted Kabachnik-<span class="hlt">Fields</span> reaction for <span class="hlt">rapid</span> fabrication of AIE-active fluorescent organic nanoparticles.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Long, Zi; Liu, Meiying; Jiang, Ruming; Zeng, Guangjiang; Wan, Qing; Huang, Hongye; Deng, Fengjie; Wan, Yiqun; Zhang, Xiaoyong; Wei, Yen</p> <p>2017-03-01</p> <p>Aggregation-induced emission (AIE)-active fluorescent organic nanoparticles (FNPs) have been extensively explored for fluorescence "turn-on" bio-imaging applications with the unique advantages over conventional FNPs. Transformation of AIE-active molecules into FNPs can greatly expand their biomedical application potential. Here we reported a novel "one-pot" strategy for fabricating AIE-active FNPs through an ultrasonic-assisted, catalysts-free and solvent-free Kabachnik-<span class="hlt">Fields</span> (KF) reaction for the first time. The KF reaction can be completed within 10min to generate AIE-active PTH-CHO-PEI-DEP FNPs through mixing polyethylenimine and aldehyde group containing AIE dyes and diethyl phosphate. These PTH-CHO-PEI-DEP FNPs were confirmed by proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR) spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and fluorescence spectroscopy etc. The cell uptake behavior as well as cell viability of PTH-CHO-PEI-DEP FNPs was examined to evaluate their potential for biomedical application. We demonstrated that the amphiphilic α-aminophosphonate polymers could self-assemble into PTH-CHO-PEI-DEP FNPs in aqueous solution and showed excellent water dispersibility. TEM image shows the size of PTH-CHO-PEI-DEP FNPs is 100-200nm. More importantly, the PTH-CHO-PEI-DEP FNPs emit strong green fluorescence and desirable biocompatibility, making them very suitable for biomedical applications. Finally, thus smart FNPs design together with their excellent performance will open a new avenue in the development of FNPs for following biological processes such as carcinogenesis.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=251232','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=251232"><span>Lighting during <span class="hlt">grow</span>-out and Salmonella in broiler flocks</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Lighting is used during broiler <span class="hlt">grow</span>-out to modify bird behavior to reach the goals of production. The protocols for lighting intensity vary. In a <span class="hlt">field</span> project, we evaluated if the lighting protocol impacts the burden of Salmonella in <span class="hlt">grow</span>-out broiler flocks. Conventional <span class="hlt">grow</span>-out flocks reared ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016MRE.....3j5001Z','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016MRE.....3j5001Z"><span>Inducing magnetic anisotropy and optimized microstructure in <span class="hlt">rapidly</span> solidified Nd-Fe-B based magnets by thermal gradient, magnetic <span class="hlt">field</span> and hot deformation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Zhao, L. Z.; Li, W.; Wu, X. H.; Hussain, M.; Liu, Z. W.; Zhang, G. Q.; Greneche, J. M.</p> <p>2016-10-01</p> <p>Direct preparation of Nd-Fe-B alloys by <span class="hlt">rapid</span> solidification of copper mold casting is a very simple and low cost process for mini-magnets, but these magnets are generally magnetically isotropic. In this work, high coercivity Nd24Co20Fe41B11Al4 rods were produced by injection casting. To induce magnetic anisotropy, temperature gradient, assisted magnetic <span class="hlt">field</span>, and hot deformation (HD) procedures were employed. As-cast samples showed non-uniform microstructure due to the melt convection. The thermal gradient during solidification led to the formation of radially distributed acicular hard magnetic grains, which gives the magnetic anisotropy. The growth of the oriented grains was confirmed by phase <span class="hlt">field</span> simulation. A magnetic <span class="hlt">field</span> up to 1 T applied along the casting direction could not induce significant magnetic anisotropy, but it improved the magnetic properties by reducing the non-uniformity and forming a uniform microstructure. The annealed alloys exhibited high intrinsic coercivity but disappeared anisotropy. HD was demonstrated to be a good approach for inducing magnetic anisotropy and enhanced coercivity by deforming and refining the grains. This work provides an alternative approach for preparing fully dense Nd-rich anisotropic bulk Nd-Fe-B magnets.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/220642','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/220642"><span><span class="hlt">Rapid</span>-onset/offset, variably scheduled 60 Hz electric and magnetic <span class="hlt">field</span> exposure reduces nocturnal serum melatonin concentration in nonhuman primates</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Rogers, W.R.; Smith, H.D.; Reiter, R.J.; Barlow-Walden, L.</p> <p>1995-12-31</p> <p>Experiments with rodents indicate that power-frequency electric <span class="hlt">field</span> (EF) or magnetic <span class="hlt">field</span> (MF) exposure can suppress the normal nocturnal increase in melatonin concentration in pineal gland and blood. In a separate set of three experiments conducted with nonhuman primates, the authors did not observe melatonin suppression as a result of 6 weeks of day-time exposure to combined 60 Hz electric and magnetic <span class="hlt">fields</span> (E/MF) with regularly schedule ``slow`` E/MF onsets/offsets. The study described here used a different exposure paradigm in which two baboons were exposed to E/MF with ``<span class="hlt">rapid</span>`` E/MF onsets/offsets accompanied by EF transients not found with slowly ramped E/MF onset/offset; profound reductions in nocturnal serum melatonin concentration were observed in this experiment. If replicated in a more extensive experiment, the observation of melatonin suppression only in the presence of E/MF transients would suggest that very specific exposure parameters determine the effects of 60 Hz E/MF on melatonin.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26742664','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26742664"><span>Sleep to <span class="hlt">grow</span> smart?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Volk, Carina; Huber, Reto</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Sleep is undisputable an essential part of our life, if we do not sleep enough we feel the consequences the next day. The importance of sleep for healthy brain functioning has been well studied in adults, but less is known for the role of sleep in the paediatric age. Childhood and adolescence is a critical phase for brain development. The increased need for sleep during this developmental phase fosters the <span class="hlt">growing</span> recognition for a central role of sleep during development. In this review we summarize the findings that demonstrate a close relationship between sleep and brain maturation, discuss the consequences of insufficient sleep during childhood and adolescence and outline initial attempts that have been made in order to improve sleep in this age range.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/534508','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/534508"><span><span class="hlt">Growing</span> a market economy</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Basu, N.; Pryor, R.J.</p> <p>1997-09-01</p> <p>This report presents a microsimulation model of a transition economy. Transition is defined as the process of moving from a state-enterprise economy to a market economy. The emphasis is on <span class="hlt">growing</span> a market economy starting from basic microprinciples. The model described in this report extends and modifies the capabilities of Aspen, a new agent-based model that is being developed at Sandia National Laboratories on a massively parallel Paragon computer. Aspen is significantly different from traditional models of the economy. Aspen`s emphasis on disequilibrium growth paths, its analysis based on evolution and emergent behavior rather than on a mechanistic view of society, and its use of learning algorithms to simulate the behavior of some agents rather than an assumption of perfect rationality make this model well-suited for analyzing economic variables of interest from transition economies. Preliminary results from several runs of the model are included.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19427231','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19427231"><span>China's <span class="hlt">growing</span> biomedical industry.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Han, Pei</p> <p>2009-06-01</p> <p>The biomedical industry in China is developing <span class="hlt">rapidly</span>, and new biological drugs are increasing their share of the pharmaceutical market based on people's needs. China is the largest producer and user of vaccines in the world, but the existing production of vaccines is far from enough to meet the needs of the market. The entire market of biological drugs in China is still smaller than that for traditional medicines and chemicals. Therefore, the biopharmaceutical industry has the potential to be the rising star in the pharmaceutical market in the future.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24274685','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24274685"><span>High-resolution hydrodynamic chromatographic separation of large DNA using narrow, bare open capillaries: a <span class="hlt">rapid</span> and economical alternative technology to pulsed-<span class="hlt">field</span> gel electrophoresis?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Liu, Lei; Veerappan, Vijaykumar; Pu, Qiaosheng; Cheng, Chang; Wang, Xiayan; Lu, Liping; Allen, Randy D; Guo, Guangsheng</p> <p>2014-01-07</p> <p>A high-resolution, <span class="hlt">rapid</span>, and economical hydrodynamic chromatographic (HDC) method for large DNA separations in free solution was developed using narrow (5 μm diameter), bare open capillaries. Size-based separation was achieved in a chromatographic format with larger DNA molecules being eluting faster than smaller ones. Lambda DNA Mono Cut Mix was baseline-separated with the percentage resolutions generally less than 9.0% for all DNA fragments (1.5 to 48.5 kbp) tested in this work. High efficiencies were achieved for large DNA from this chromatographic technique, and the number of theoretical plates reached 3.6 × 10(5) plates for the longest (48.5 kbp) and 3.7 × 10(5) plates for the shortest (1.5 kbp) fragments. HDC parameters and performances were also discussed. The method was further applied for fractionating large DNA fragments from real-world samples (SacII digested Arabidopsis plant bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) DNA and PmeI digested Rice BAC DNA) to demonstrate its feasibility for BAC DNA finger printing. <span class="hlt">Rapid</span> separation of PmeI digested Rice BAC DNA covering from 0.44 to 119.041 kbp was achieved in less than 26 min. All DNA fragments of these samples were baseline separated in narrow bare open capillaries, while the smallest fragment (0.44 kbp) was missing in pulsed-<span class="hlt">field</span> gel electrophoresis (PFGE) separation mode. It is demonstrated that narrow bare open capillary chromatography can realize a <span class="hlt">rapid</span> separation for a wide size range of DNA mixtures that contain both small and large DNA fragments in a single run.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24300833','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24300833"><span>Development of a loop-mediated isothermal amplification assay combined with a lateral flow dipstick for <span class="hlt">rapid</span> and simple detection of classical swine fever virus in the <span class="hlt">field</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Chowdry, Vinay Kumar; Luo, Yuzi; Widén, Frederik; Qiu, Hua-Ji; Shan, Hu; Belák, Sándor; Liu, Lihong</p> <p>2014-03-01</p> <p>Classical swine fever (CSF) is a highly contagious viral disease and may cause heavy economic loss to farmers. The <span class="hlt">rapid</span>, simple and accurate diagnosis of the disease at the frontline, for example on the farms of concern is crucial for disease control. This study describes the development and evaluation of a new loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay coupled with lateral flow dipstick (LFD) for the detection of classical swine fever virus (CSFV). This RT-LAMP-LFD assay combines the efficient one-step isothermal amplification of CSF viral RNA and the simplicity of the LFD to read the results within two to five minutes. Seven genotypes (1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3 and 3.1), but not genotype 3.4, were successfully detected by the RT-LAMP-LFD assay, indicating that the method has a broad range of detection and can be applied in different geographical areas where CSFV strains belonging to these genotypes are present. The performance of this RT-LAMP-LFD assay was similar to that of the real-time RT-PCR. The analytical sensitivity was about 100copies per reaction when testing two genotypes (1.1 and 2.3). No cross-reactivity to non-CSFV pestiviruses was observed. This RT-LAMP-LFD assay can be a useful novel tool for the <span class="hlt">rapid</span>, simple and economic diagnosis of classical swine fever in the <span class="hlt">field</span>.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li class="active"><span>17</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_17 --> <div id="page_18" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li class="active"><span>18</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="341"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27043644','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27043644"><span>Measurement of <span class="hlt">Rapid</span> Amiloride-Dependent pH Changes at the Cell Surface Using a Proton-Sensitive <span class="hlt">Field</span>-Effect Transistor.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Schaffhauser, Daniel; Fine, Michael; Tabata, Miyuki; Goda, Tatsuro; Miyahara, Yuji</p> <p>2016-03-30</p> <p>We present a novel method for the <span class="hlt">rapid</span> measurement of pH fluxes at close proximity to the surface of the plasma membrane in mammalian cells using an ion-sensitive <span class="hlt">field</span>-effect transistor (ISFET). In conjuction with an efficient continuous superfusion system, the ISFET sensor was capable of recording <span class="hlt">rapid</span> changes in pH at the cells' surface induced by intervals of ammonia loading and unloading, even when using highly buffered solutions. Furthermore, the system was able to isolate physiologically relevant signals by not only detecting the transients caused by ammonia loading and unloading, but display steady-state signals as would be expected by a proton transport-mediated influence on the extracellular proton-gradient. Proof of concept was demonstrated through the use of 5-(N-ethyl-N-isopropyl)amiloride (EIPA), a small molecule inhibitor of sodium/hydrogen exchangers (NHE). As the primary transporter responsible for proton balance during cellular regulation of pH, non-electrogenic NHE transport is notoriously difficult to detect with traditional methods. Using the NHE positive cell lines, Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells and NHE3-reconstituted mouse skin fibroblasts (MSF), the sensor exhibited a significant response to EIPA inhibition, whereas NHE-deficient MSF cells were unaffected by application of the inhibitor.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=267350','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=267350"><span>Comparative <span class="hlt">field</span> evaluation of the fluorescent-antibody test, virus isolation from tissue culture, and enzyme immunodiagnosis for <span class="hlt">rapid</span> laboratory diagnosis of rabies.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Bourhy, H; Rollin, P E; Vincent, J; Sureau, P</p> <p>1989-01-01</p> <p>The rabies tissue culture infection test (RTCIT) and <span class="hlt">rapid</span> rabies enzyme immunodiagnosis (RREID) were compared to the fluorescent-antibody test (FAT) with <span class="hlt">field</span> specimens. At the French National Reference Center for Rabies, 15,248 specimens were analyzed by FAT and RTCIT, and 2,290 of those specimens were also tested by RREID; 818 other specimens were tested by FAT and RREID in 12 laboratories located in Africa, Asia, and Latin America. The sensitivities and specificities of RREID and RTCIT were comparable. This study showed that both tests can be used as backup procedures to confirm FAT. RREID is also strongly recommended for epidemiological studies and for laboratories which are not equipped for performing FAT. PMID:2654181</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003AdG.....1..127R','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003AdG.....1..127R"><span>Space Gravity Spectroscopy - determination of the Earth's gravitational <span class="hlt">field</span> by means of Newton interpolated LEO ephemeris Case studies on dynamic (CHAMP <span class="hlt">Rapid</span> Science Orbit) and kinematic orbits</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Reubelt, T.; Austen, G.; Grafarend, E. W.</p> <p>2003-07-01</p> <p>An algorithm for the (kinematic) orbit analysis of a Low Earth Orbiting (LEO) GPS tracked satellite to determine the spherical harmonic coefficients of the terrestrial gravitational <span class="hlt">field</span> is presented. A contribution to existing long wavelength gravity <span class="hlt">field</span> models is expected since the kinematic orbit of a LEO satellite can nowadays be determined with very high accuracy in the range of a few centimeters. To demonstrate the applicability of the proposed method, first results from the analysis of real CHAMP <span class="hlt">Rapid</span> Science (dynamic) Orbits (RSO) and kinematic orbits are illustrated. In particular, we take advantage of Newton's Law of Motion which balances the acceleration vector and the gradient of the gravitational potential with respect to an Inertial Frame of Reference (IRF). The satellite's acceleration vector is determined by means of the second order functional of Newton's Interpolation Formula from relative satellite ephemeris (baselines) with respect to the IRF. Therefore the satellite ephemeris, which are normally given in a Body fixed Frame of Reference (BRF) have to be transformed into the IRF. Subsequently the Newton interpolated accelerations have to be reduced for disturbing gravitational and non-gravitational accelerations in order to obtain the accelerations caused by the Earth's gravitational <span class="hlt">field</span>. For a first insight in real data processing these reductions have been neglected. The gradient of the gravitational potential, conventionally expressed in vector-valued spherical harmonics and given in a Body Fixed Frame of Reference, must be transformed from BRF to IRF by means of the polar motion matrix, the precession-nutation matrices and the Greenwich Siderial Time Angle (GAST). The resulting linear system of equations is solved by means of a least squares adjustment in terms of a Gauss-Markov model in order to estimate the spherical harmonics coefficients of the Earth's gravitational <span class="hlt">field</span>.Key words. space gravity spectroscopy, spherical harmonics</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=history+AND+water+AND+earth&pg=2&id=EJ183179','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=history+AND+water+AND+earth&pg=2&id=EJ183179"><span>Esprit <span class="hlt">Grows</span> in Brooklyn</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Progressive Architecture, 1978</p> <p>1978-01-01</p> <p>The Brooklyn Children's Museum, the world's oldest children's museum, has a new home underground. The museum's teaching collection of artifacts is particularly strong in the areas of ethnology, natural history, and technology. Objects relating to these <span class="hlt">fields</span> are organized according to the historic physical divisions of fire, air, earth, and…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1096307.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1096307.pdf"><span><span class="hlt">Growing</span> Up with TESOL</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Richards, Jack C.</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>One characteristic of the <span class="hlt">field</span> of TESOL is that it appears to be in a constant state of change. For example, new curriculum frameworks currently being implemented in different parts of the world include competency-based, text-based, and task-based models. In many countries English is now being introduced at the primary rather than secondary…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=homeschooling+AND+effects+AND+children&id=ED415947','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=homeschooling+AND+effects+AND+children&id=ED415947"><span><span class="hlt">Growing</span> without Schooling, 1996.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Sheffer, Susannah, Ed.</p> <p>1996-01-01</p> <p>These five issues provide news and support to parents who home school their children. Each issue contains news items and a substantial resource section which provides book evaluations, directory additions, resource lists, resource persons in the <span class="hlt">fields</span> of law, psychology, and school districts, pen-pals, and advertisements. The February/March 1996…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1176681','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1176681"><span>Fast-<span class="hlt">growing</span> willow shrub named `Tully Champion`</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Abrahamson, Lawrence P.; Kopp, Richard F.; Smart, Lawrence B.; Volk, Timothy A.</p> <p>2007-08-28</p> <p>A distinct female cultivar of Salix viminalis.times.S. miyabeana named `Tully Champion`, characterized by <span class="hlt">rapid</span> stem growth producing greater than 25% more woody biomass than two current production clones (Salix dasyclados `SV1` and Salix miyabeana `SX64`), more than 2.5-fold greater biomass than one of its parents (Salix miyabeana `SX67`), and nearly 3-fold more biomass than another production clone (Salix sacchalinensis, `SX61`) when grown in the same <span class="hlt">field</span> for the same length of time (two <span class="hlt">growing</span> seasons after coppice) in Tully, N.Y. `Tully Champion` can be planted from dormant stem cuttings, produces multiple stems after coppice, and the stem biomass can be harvested when the plant is dormant. In the spring following harvest, the plant will re-sprout very vigorously, producing new stems that can be harvested repeatedly after two to four years of growth. `Tully Champion` displays a low incidence of rust disease and is not damaged by potato leafhoppers.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25793443','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25793443"><span>Large-scale deployment of seed treatments has driven <span class="hlt">rapid</span> increase in use of neonicotinoid insecticides and preemptive pest management in US <span class="hlt">field</span> crops.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Douglas, Margaret R; Tooker, John F</p> <p>2015-04-21</p> <p>Neonicotinoids are the most widely used class of insecticides worldwide, but patterns of their use in the U.S. are poorly documented, constraining attempts to understand their role in pest management and potential nontarget effects. We synthesized publicly available data to estimate and interpret trends in neonicotinoid use since their introduction in 1994, with a special focus on seed treatments, a major use not captured by the national pesticide-use survey. Neonicotinoid use increased <span class="hlt">rapidly</span> between 2003 and 2011, as seed-applied products were introduced in <span class="hlt">field</span> crops, marking an unprecedented shift toward large-scale, preemptive insecticide use: 34-44% of soybeans and 79-100% of maize hectares were treated in 2011. This finding contradicts recent analyses, which concluded that insecticides are used today on fewer maize hectares than a decade or two ago. If current trends continue, neonicotinoid use will increase further through application to more hectares of soybean and other crop species and escalation of per-seed rates. Alternatively, our results, and other recent analyses, suggest that carefully targeted efforts could considerably reduce neonicotinoid use in <span class="hlt">field</span> crops without yield declines or economic harm to farmers, reducing the potential for pest resistance, nontarget pest outbreaks, environmental contamination, and harm to wildlife, including pollinator species.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22314877','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22314877"><span>Complex-plane generalization of scalar Levin transforms: A robust, <span class="hlt">rapidly</span> convergent method to compute potentials and <span class="hlt">fields</span> in multi-layered media</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Sainath, Kamalesh; Teixeira, Fernando L.; Donderici, Burkay</p> <p>2014-07-15</p> <p>We propose the complex-plane generalization of a powerful algebraic sequence acceleration algorithm, the method of weighted averages (MWA), to guarantee exponential-cum-algebraic convergence of Fourier and Fourier–Hankel (F–H) integral transforms. This “complex-plane” MWA, effected via a linear-path detour in the complex plane, results in <span class="hlt">rapid</span>, absolute convergence of <span class="hlt">field</span> and potential solutions in multi-layered environments regardless of the source-observer geometry and anisotropy/loss of the media present. In this work, we first introduce a new integration path used to evaluate the <span class="hlt">field</span> contribution arising from the radiation spectra. Subsequently, we (1) exhibit the foundational relations behind the complex-plane extension to a general Levin-type sequence convergence accelerator, (2) specialize this analysis to one member of the Levin transform family (the MWA), (3) address and circumvent restrictions, arising for two-dimensional integrals associated with wave dynamics problems, through minimal complex-plane detour restrictions and a novel partition of the integration domain, (4) develop and compare two formulations based on standard/real-axis MWA variants, and (5) present validation results and convergence characteristics for one of these two formulations.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5161023','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5161023"><span><span class="hlt">Rapid</span> and sensitive detection of Mycoplasma synoviae by an insulated isothermal polymerase chain reaction-based assay on a <span class="hlt">field</span>-deployable device</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Kuo, Hung-Chih; Lo, Dan-Yuan; Chen, Chiou-Lin; Tsai, Yun-Long; Ping, Jia-Fong; Lee, Chien-Hsien; Lee, Pei-Yu Alison; Chang, Hsiao-Fen Grace</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Mycoplasma synoviae (MS), causing respiratory diseases, arthritis, and eggshell apex abnormalities in avian species, is an important pathogen in the poultry industry. Implementation of a biosecurity plan is important in MS infection management. Working on a <span class="hlt">field</span>-deployable POCKIT™ device, an insulated isothermal polymerase chain reaction (iiPCR) assay has a potential for timely MS detection on the farm. The MS iiPCR assay had limit of detection 95% of about 9 genome equivalents by testing serial dilutions of a standard DNA. The detection endpoint of the assay for detection of MS genomic DNA was comparable to a reference real-time PCR. The assay did not crossreact with other important avian pathogens, including avian reovirus, Mycoplasma gallisepticum, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Pasteurella multocida, and Salmonella Pullorum. When 92 synovial fluid and respiratory tract swab samples collected from chickens, turkeys, and geese suspected of MS infection were tested, the clinical performance of the MS iiPCR had 97.8% agreement (Cohen's kappa value, 0.95) with that of the reference real-time PCR. In conclusion, the MS iiPCR/POCKIT™ system, working with <span class="hlt">field</span>-deployable manual or automatic nucleic acid extraction methods, has potential to serve as a <span class="hlt">rapid</span> and sensitive on-site tool to facilitate timely detection of MS. PMID:27389062</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JCoPh.269..403S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JCoPh.269..403S"><span>Complex-plane generalization of scalar Levin transforms: A robust, <span class="hlt">rapidly</span> convergent method to compute potentials and <span class="hlt">fields</span> in multi-layered media</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Sainath, Kamalesh; Teixeira, Fernando L.; Donderici, Burkay</p> <p>2014-07-01</p> <p>We propose the complex-plane generalization of a powerful algebraic sequence acceleration algorithm, the method of weighted averages (MWA), to guarantee exponential-cum-algebraic convergence of Fourier and Fourier-Hankel (F-H) integral transforms. This “complex-plane” MWA, effected via a linear-path detour in the complex plane, results in <span class="hlt">rapid</span>, absolute convergence of <span class="hlt">field</span> and potential solutions in multi-layered environments regardless of the source-observer geometry and anisotropy/loss of the media present. In this work, we first introduce a new integration path used to evaluate the <span class="hlt">field</span> contribution arising from the radiation spectra. Subsequently, we (1) exhibit the foundational relations behind the complex-plane extension to a general Levin-type sequence convergence accelerator, (2) specialize this analysis to one member of the Levin transform family (the MWA), (3) address and circumvent restrictions, arising for two-dimensional integrals associated with wave dynamics problems, through minimal complex-plane detour restrictions and a novel partition of the integration domain, (4) develop and compare two formulations based on standard/real-axis MWA variants, and (5) present validation results and convergence characteristics for one of these two formulations.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23373976','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23373976"><span><span class="hlt">Growing</span> and evolving soft robots.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Rieffel, John; Knox, Davis; Smith, Schuyler; Trimmer, Barry</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Completely soft and flexible robots offer to revolutionize <span class="hlt">fields</span> ranging from search and rescue to endoscopic surgery. One of the outstanding challenges in this burgeoning <span class="hlt">field</span> is the chicken-and-egg problem of body-brain design: Development of locomotion requires the preexistence of a locomotion-capable body, and development of a location-capable body requires the preexistence of a locomotive gait. This problem is compounded by the high degree of coupling between the material properties of a soft body (such as stiffness or damping coefficients) and the effectiveness of a gait. This article synthesizes four years of research into soft robotics, in particular describing three approaches to the co-discovery of soft robot morphology and control. In the first, muscle placement and firing patterns are coevolved for a fixed body shape with fixed material properties. In the second, the material properties of a simulated soft body coevolve alongside locomotive gaits, with body shape and muscle placement fixed. In the third, a developmental encoding is used to scalably <span class="hlt">grow</span> elaborate soft body shapes from a small seed structure. Considerations of the simulation time and the challenges of physically implementing soft robots in the real world are discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA528118','DTIC-ST'); return false;" href="http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA528118"><span><span class="hlt">Rapid</span> Capability <span class="hlt">Fielding</span> Toolbox Study</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://publicaccess.dtic.mil/psm/api/service/search/search">DTIC Science & Technology</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-03-01</p> <p>Minds and former President,  Walt   Disney  Imagineering  Bran Ferren is the co‐founder, Co‐Chairman and Chief Creative Officer of Applied Minds, a company...that  provides advanced technology, creative design, and consulting services to a variety of clients, including  The  Walt   Disney   Company,  NASA  and...GM.    Before  founding  Applied  Minds,  Ferren  held  various  leadership  positions,  including  president,  at  Walt   Disney   Imagineering,  the</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008eso..pres...24.','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008eso..pres...24."><span>How Do Galaxies <span class="hlt">Grow</span>?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p></p> <p>2008-08-01</p> <p>Astronomers have caught multiple massive galaxies in the act of merging about 4 billion years ago. This discovery, made possible by combining the power of the best ground- and space-based telescopes, uniquely supports the favoured theory of how galaxies form. ESO PR Photo 24/08 ESO PR Photo 24/08 Merging Galaxies in Groups How do galaxies form? The most widely accepted answer to this fundamental question is the model of 'hierarchical formation', a step-wise process in which small galaxies merge to build larger ones. One can think of the galaxies forming in a similar way to how streams merge to form rivers, and how these rivers, in turn, merge to form an even larger river. This theoretical model predicts that massive galaxies <span class="hlt">grow</span> through many merging events in their lifetime. But when did their cosmological growth spurts finish? When did the most massive galaxies get most of their mass? To answer these questions, astronomers study massive galaxies in clusters, the cosmological equivalent of cities filled with galaxies. "Whether the brightest galaxies in clusters grew substantially in the last few billion years is intensely debated. Our observations show that in this time, these galaxies have increased their mass by 50%," says Kim-Vy Tran from the University of Zürich, Switzerland, who led the research. The astronomers made use of a large ensemble of telescopes and instruments, including ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT) and the Hubble Space Telescope, to study in great detail galaxies located 4 billion light-years away. These galaxies lie in an extraordinary system made of four galaxy groups that will assemble into a cluster. In particular, the team took images with VIMOS and spectra with FORS2, both instruments on the VLT. From these and other observations, the astronomers could identify a total of 198 galaxies belonging to these four groups. The brightest galaxies in each group contain between 100 and 1000 billion of stars, a property that makes them comparable</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010eso..pres...40.','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010eso..pres...40."><span><span class="hlt">Growing</span> Galaxies Gently</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-10-01</p> <p>New observations from ESO's Very Large Telescope have, for the first time, provided direct evidence that young galaxies can <span class="hlt">grow</span> by sucking in the cool gas around them and using it as fuel for the formation of many new stars. In the first few billion years after the Big Bang the mass of a typical galaxy increased dramatically and understanding why this happened is one of the hottest problems in modern astrophysics. The results appear in the 14 October issue of the journal Nature. The first galaxies formed well before the Universe was one billion years old and were much smaller than the giant systems - including the Milky Way - that we see today. So somehow the average galaxy size has increased as the Universe has evolved. Galaxies often collide and then merge to form larger systems and this process is certainly an important growth mechanism. However, an additional, gentler way has been proposed. A European team of astronomers has used ESO's Very Large Telescope to test this very different idea - that young galaxies can also <span class="hlt">grow</span> by sucking in cool streams of the hydrogen and helium gas that filled the early Universe and forming new stars from this primitive material. Just as a commercial company can expand either by merging with other companies, or by hiring more staff, young galaxies could perhaps also <span class="hlt">grow</span> in two different ways - by merging with other galaxies or by accreting material. The team leader, Giovanni Cresci (Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri) says: "The new results from the VLT are the first direct evidence that the accretion of pristine gas really happened and was enough to fuel vigorous star formation and the growth of massive galaxies in the young Universe." The discovery will have a major impact on our understanding of the evolution of the Universe from the Big Bang to the present day. Theories of galaxy formation and evolution may have to be re-written. The group began by selecting three very distant galaxies to see if they could find evidence</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4581857','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4581857"><span>Comparative Validation of Five Quantitative <span class="hlt">Rapid</span> Test Kits for the Analysis of Salt Iodine Content: Laboratory Performance, User- and <span class="hlt">Field</span>-Friendliness</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Rohner, Fabian; Kangambèga, Marcelline O.; Khan, Noor; Kargougou, Robert; Garnier, Denis; Sanou, Ibrahima; Ouaro, Bertine D.; Petry, Nicolai; Wirth, James P.; Jooste, Pieter</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Background Iodine deficiency has important health and development consequences and the introduction of iodized salt as national programs has been a great public health success in the past decades. To render national salt iodization programs sustainable and ensure adequate iodization levels, simple methods to quantitatively assess whether salt is adequately iodized are required. Several methods claim to be simple and reliable, and are available on the market or are in development. Objective This work has validated the currently available quantitative <span class="hlt">rapid</span> test kits (quantRTK) in a comparative manner for both their laboratory performance and ease of use in <span class="hlt">field</span> settings. Methods Laboratory performance parameters (linearity, detection and quantification limit, intra- and inter-assay imprecision) were conducted on 5 quantRTK. We assessed inter-operator imprecision using salt of different quality along with the comparison of 59 salt samples from across the globe; measurements were made both in a laboratory and a <span class="hlt">field</span> setting by technicians and non-technicians. Results from the quantRTK were compared against iodometric titration for validity. An ‘ease-of-use’ rating system was developed to identify the most suitable quantRTK for a given task. Results Most of the devices showed acceptable laboratory performance, but for some of the devices, use by non-technicians revealed poorer performance when working in a routine manner. Of the quantRTK tested, the iCheck® and I-Reader® showed most consistent performance and ease of use, and a newly developed paper-based method (saltPAD) holds promise if further developed. Conclusions User- and <span class="hlt">field</span>-friendly devices are now available and the most appropriate quantRTK can be selected depending on the number of samples and the budget available. PMID:26401655</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015EGUGA..1713929O','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015EGUGA..1713929O"><span>Aboveground biomass estimation using SAR-optical (Lidar, <span class="hlt">Rapid</span>Eye) and <span class="hlt">field</span> inventory datasets in Skukuza, Kruger National Park in South Africa</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Onyango Odipo, Victor; Hüttich, Christian; Luck, Wolfgang; Schmullius, Christiane</p> <p>2015-04-01</p> <p>African savanna covers approximately two-thirds of sub-saharan Africa, playing important roles as a carbon pool, habitat for mankind and wildlife, source of livelihood, an important tropical climate modifier, among other ecological roles. Sub-saharan Africa alone accounts for 25% of the tropical aboveground carbon stock (193 Gt C). Global and national level AGB estimates rely on extrapolations with regression models from few <span class="hlt">field</span> inventories, leading in some cases, up to 100% uncertainty. Remote sensing has proven to provide reliable vegetation structural mapping, given the high spatial and temporal resolution allowing datasets to be availed in areas where ground based inventories are infeasible due to time and financial constraints. The availability of freely accessible optical remotely-sensed datasets has made this feat attainable. However, the heterogeneity of tropical savannas (co-existence of trees and grasses), coupled with erratic rainfall events and atmospheric clouds and aerosol in the tropics has made it difficult to extract biophysical properties of the savannas by solely using optical datasets. This has necessitated an assessment of synergies between active and passive remotely sensed datasets to benefit from the complementarities. In this study we assess the extent to which multi-level sub-centimeter Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) Lidar, high resolution <span class="hlt">Rapid</span>Eye and microwave (ALOS PALSAR L-band and Sentinel-1 C-band) remotely sensed datasets can be used together with tree census datasets to estimate AGB within the complex southern Africa savanna ecosystem. A random forest (RF) regression model is produced which relates the Lidar canopy-height metrics (CHM) with both synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and high resolution <span class="hlt">Rapid</span>Eye datasets. As a validation, we compare our results with both national and global level ABG estimates.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26948045','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26948045"><span>A <span class="hlt">rapid</span> and accurate quantification method for real-time dynamic analysis of cellular lipids during microalgal fermentation processes in Chlorella protothecoides with low <span class="hlt">field</span> nuclear magnetic resonance.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Wang, Tao; Liu, Tingting; Wang, Zejian; Tian, Xiwei; Yang, Yi; Guo, Meijin; Chu, Ju; Zhuang, Yingping</p> <p>2016-05-01</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">rapid</span> and real-time lipid determination can provide valuable information on process regulation and optimization in the algal lipid mass production. In this study, a <span class="hlt">rapid</span>, accurate and precise quantification method of in vivo cellular lipids of Chlorella protothecoides using low <span class="hlt">field</span> nuclear magnetic resonance (LF-NMR) was newly developed. LF-NMR was extremely sensitive to the algal lipids with the limits of the detection (LOD) of 0.0026g and 0.32g/L in dry lipid samples and algal broth, respectively, as well as limits of quantification (LOQ) of 0.0093g and 1.18g/L. Moreover, the LF-NMR signal was specifically proportional to the cellular lipids of C. protothecoides, thus the superior regression curves existing in a wide detection range from 0.02 to 0.42g for dry lipids and from 1.12 to 8.97gL(-1) of lipid concentration for in vivo lipid quantification were obtained with all R(2) higher than 0.99, irrespective of the lipid content and fatty acids profile variations. The accuracy of this novel method was further verified to be reliable by comparing lipid quantification results to those obtained by GC-MS. And the relative standard deviation (RSD) of LF-NMR results were smaller than 2%, suggesting the precision of this method. Finally, this method was successfully used in the on-line lipid monitoring during the algal lipid fermentation processes, making it possible for better understanding of the lipid accumulation mechanism and dynamic bioprocess control.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFMEP23C0834K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFMEP23C0834K"><span>Toward a <span class="hlt">Rapid</span> Synthesis of <span class="hlt">Field</span> and Desktop Data for Classifying Streams in the Pacific Northwest: Guiding the Sampling and Management of Salmonid Habitat</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kasprak, A.; Wheaton, J. M.; Bouwes, N.; Weber, N. P.; Trahan, N. C.; Jordan, C. E.</p> <p>2012-12-01</p> <p>River managers often seek to understand habitat availability and quality for riverine organisms within the physical template provided by their landscape. Yet the large amount of natural heterogeneity in landscapes gives rise to stream systems which are highly variable over small spatial scales, potentially complicating site selection for surveying aquatic habitat while simultaneously making a simple, wide-reaching management strategy elusive. This is particularly true in the rugged John Day River Basin of northern Oregon, where efforts as part of the Columbia Habitat Monitoring Program to conduct site-based surveys of physical habitat for endangered steelhead salmon (Oncorhynchus mykiss) are underway. As a complete understanding of the type and distribution of habitat available to these fish would require visits to all streams in the basin (impractical due to its large size), here we develop an approach for classifying channel types which combines remote desktop GIS analyses with <span class="hlt">rapid</span> <span class="hlt">field</span>-based stream and landscape surveys. At the core of this method, we build off of the River Styles Framework, an open-ended and process-based approach for classifying streams and informing management decisions. This framework is combined with on-the-ground fluvial audits, which aim to quickly and continuously map sediment dynamics and channel behavior along selected channels. Validation of this classification method is completed by on-the-ground stream surveys using a digital iPad platform and by <span class="hlt">rapid</span> small aircraft overflights to confirm or refine predictions. We further compare this method with existing channel classification approaches for the region (e.g. Beechie, Montgomery and Buffington). The results of this study will help guide both the refinement of site stratification and selection for salmonid habitat monitoring within the basin, and will be vital in designing and prioritizing restoration and management strategies tailored to the distribution of river styles found</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5867327','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5867327"><span>Watching how composites <span class="hlt">grow</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Ashley, S.</p> <p>1993-07-01</p> <p>This article reports on a powerful x-ray analysis technique that has been developed to let researchers see, in three dimensions and microscopic detail, inside a ceramic composite as it is forming. The high-resolution imaging technique, called X-ray tomographic microscopy (XTM), is similar to medical computed tomography (CT) in which physicians take X-ray images of a patient's body from different angles and then reconstruct the data computationally into three-dimensional pictures of organs. The new method appears to have significant application in <span class="hlt">fields</span> ranging from materials science to medical bone studies of osteoporosis--situations in which investigators need to visualize the microscopic behavior of complex materials.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li class="active"><span>18</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_18 --> <div id="page_19" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li class="active"><span>19</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="361"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005JAP....97j4504N','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005JAP....97j4504N"><span>Keto defect sites in fluorene-based organic <span class="hlt">field</span>-effect transistors: The origin of <span class="hlt">rapid</span> degradation on the performance of the device</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Noh, Yong-Young; Kim, Dong-Yu; Yoshida, Yuji; Yase, Kiyoshi; Jung, Byung-Jun; Lim, Eunhee; Shim, Hong-Ku; Azumi, Reiko</p> <p>2005-05-01</p> <p>The effect of keto defects in fluorene units on the performance of organic <span class="hlt">field</span>-effect transistors (OFETs) was examined based on fluorene end-capped fused bithiophenes (BFTT) and biphenyl end-capped fused bithiophene oligomers (BPTT). The formation of keto defects after various periods of UV illumination in air on BFTT films was confirmed by the increase of the long-wavelength emission at 2.1-2.3eV in the photoluminescent (PL) spectrum and the generation of a Fourier transfer infrared (FTIR) peak at 1721cm-1, corresponding to the carbonyl stretching mode of the fluorenone moiety. For both BPTT films irradiated in air and BFTT in nitrogen, i.e., a keto-free system, no increase in long-wavelength emission in the PL spectrum, was found and the peak corresponding to the carbonyl stretching mode of the fluorenone moiety was absent in the FTIR spectrum. The threshold voltage, i.e., switch-on voltage, of the OFETs was increased and the <span class="hlt">field</span>-effect mobility and on-state drain current were <span class="hlt">rapidly</span> decreased after the formation of ketonic defects, since these defects induce the formation of numerous trap sites in the band gap of the semiconducting conjugated oligomer. The density of trap sites (Nt) generated after the formation of keto defects was determined using space-charge-limited current spectroscopy. A Nt of around 2.7×1015cm-3 was found for the BFTT film due to the formation of keto defects after 6h of UV irradiation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21484340','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21484340"><span><span class="hlt">Rapid</span> change of AM fungal community in a rain-fed wheat <span class="hlt">field</span> with short-term plastic film mulching practice.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Liu, Yongjun; Mao, Lin; He, Xinhua; Cheng, Gang; Ma, Xiaojun; An, Lizhe; Feng, Huyuan</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Plastic film mulching (PFM) is a widely used agricultural practice in the temperate semi-arid Loess Plateau of China. However, how beneficial soil microbes, arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi in particular, respond to the PFM practice is not known. Here, a <span class="hlt">field</span> experiment was performed to study the effects of a 3-month short-term PFM practice on AM fungi in plots planted with spring wheat (Triticum aestivum L. cv. Dingxi-2) in the Loess Plateau. AM colonization, spore density, wheat spike weight, and grain phosphorus (P) content were significantly increased in the PFM treatments, and these changes were mainly attributable to changes in soil properties such as available P and soil moisture. Alkaline phosphatase activity was significantly higher in PFM soils, but levels of AM fungal-related glomalin were similar between treatments. A total of nine AM fungal phylotypes were detected in root samples based on AM fungal SSU rDNA analyses, with six and five phylotypes in PFM and no-PFM plots, respectively. Although AM fungal phylotype richness was not statistically different between treatments, the community compositions were different, with four and three specific phylotypes in the PFM and no-PFM plots, respectively. A significant and <span class="hlt">rapid</span> change in AM fungal, wheat, and soil variables following PFM suggested that the functioning of the AM symbiosis had been changed in the wheat <span class="hlt">field</span> under PFM. Future studies are needed to investigate whether PFM applied over a longer term has a similar effect on the AM fungal community and their functioning in an agricultural ecosystem.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009MeScT..20l5403S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009MeScT..20l5403S"><span>Characterization of a two-dimensional temperature <span class="hlt">field</span> within a <span class="hlt">rapid</span> compression machine using a toluene planar laser-induced fluorescence imaging technique</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Strozzi, Camille; Sotton, Julien; Mura, Arnaud; Bellenoue, Marc</p> <p>2009-12-01</p> <p>The homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) combustion process is an advanced operating mode for automotive engines. The self-ignition mechanisms that occur within the combustion chamber exhibit extreme temperature dependence. Therefore, the thorough understanding of corresponding phenomena requires the use of diagnostic methods featuring a sufficient thermal sensitivity, applicable in severe conditions similar to those encountered within engines. In this respect, toluene planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) is applied to the inert compression flow generated within an optical <span class="hlt">rapid</span> compression machine (RCM). A relatively simple diagnostic system is retained: a single wavelength excitation device (266 nm) and a single (filtered) collection system. This diagnostic system is associated with an image processing strategy specifically adapted to RCM devices. Despite the severe conditions under consideration (40 bar, 700-950 K), the method allows us to obtain relatively large two-dimensional temperature <span class="hlt">fields</span> that display a level of description seldom achieved in such devices. In particular the temperature gradients, which play a crucial role in HCCI combustion processes, can be estimated. The present experimental results confirm the good reliability and accuracy of the method. The information gathered with this toluene PLIF method puts in evidence its high potentialities for the study of aero-thermal-reactive processes as they take place in real engine conditions. The retained strategy also brings new possibilities of non-intrusive analysis for flows practically encountered within industrial devices.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4957099','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4957099"><span>Novel method for <span class="hlt">rapid</span> in-situ hybridization of HER2 using non-contact alternating-current electric-<span class="hlt">field</span> mixing</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Saito, Yoshitaro; Imai, Kazuhiro; Nakamura, Ryuta; Nanjo, Hiroshi; Terata, Kaori; Konno, Hayato; Akagami, Yoichi; Minamiya, Yoshihiro</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-targeted agents are an effective approach to treating HER2-positive breast cancer patients. However, the lack of survival benefit in HER2-negative patients as well as the toxic effects and high cost of the drugs highlight the need for accurate and prompt assessment of HER2 status. Our aim was to evaluate the clinical utility of a novel <span class="hlt">rapid</span> dual in-situ hybridization (RISH) method developed to facilitate hybridization. The method takes advantage of the non-contact mixing effect of an alternating current (AC) electric <span class="hlt">field</span>. One hundred sixty-three specimens were used from patients diagnosed with primary breast cancers identified immunohistochemically as HER2 0/1(+), (2+) or (3+). The specimens were all tested using conventional dual in-situ hybridization (DISH), DISH with an automated slide stainer, and RISH. With RISH the HER2 test was completed within 6 h, as compared to 20–22 h needed for the standard protocol. Although RISH produced results more promptly using smaller amounts of labeled antibody, the staining and accuracy of HER2 status evaluation with RISH was equal to or greater than with DISH. These results suggest RISH could be used as a clinical tool to promptly determine HER2 status. PMID:27443187</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4879300','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4879300"><span>Development of a Novel Cocktail Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay and a <span class="hlt">Field</span>-Applicable Lateral-Flow <span class="hlt">Rapid</span> Test for Diagnosis of Contagious Bovine Pleuropneumonia</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Heller, Martin; Gicheru, Nimmo; Tjipura-Zaire, Georgina; Muriuki, Cecilia; Yu, Mingyan; Botelho, Ana; Naessens, Jan; Jores, Joerg</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Contagious bovine pleuropneumonia (CBPP) is a severe respiratory disease that is widespread in sub-Saharan Africa. It is caused by Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides, a bacterium belonging to the Mycoplasma mycoides cluster. In the absence of an efficient CBPP vaccine, improved and easy-to-use diagnostic assays for recurrent testing combined with isolation and treatment of positive animals represent an option for CBPP control in Africa. Here we describe the comprehensive screening of 17 immunogenic Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides proteins using well-characterized bovine sera for the development of a novel cocktail enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for laboratory use. Two recombinant Mycoplasma immunogens, MSC_0136 and MSC_0636, were used to set up a standardized cocktail ELISA protocol. According to the results from more than 100 serum samples tested, the sensitivity and specificity of the novel cocktail ELISA were 85.6% and 96.4%, respectively, with an overall diagnostic accuracy comparable to that of the Office International des Epizooties (OIE)-prescribed serological assays. In addition, we provide a proof of principle for a <span class="hlt">field</span>-applicable, easy-to-use commercially produced prototype lateral-flow test for <span class="hlt">rapid</span> (<30-min) diagnosis of CBPP. PMID:27053669</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3923160','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3923160"><span><span class="hlt">Growing</span> evening primroses (Oenothera)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Greiner, Stephan; Köhl, Karin</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>The model plant Oenothera has contributed significantly to the biological sciences and it dominated the early development of plant genetics, cytogenetics, and evolutionary biology. The great advantage of using Oenothera as a model system is a large body of genetic, cytological, morphological, and ecological information collected over more than a century. The Oenothera system offers a well-studied taxonomy, population structure, and ecology. Cytogenetics and formal genetics at the population level are extensively developed, providing an excellent basis to study evolutionary questions. Further, Oenothera is grown as an oil seed crop for the production of essential fatty acids (gamma-linoleic acid) and is considered to be a medicinal plant due to its many pharmaceutically active secondary metabolites, such as ellagitannins. Although Oenothera has been cultivated as a laboratory organism since the end of the 19th century, there is a substantial lack of literature dealing with modern greenhouse techniques for the genus. This review compiles an overview about the growth requirements for the genus Oenothera, with a special focus on its genetically best-studied subsections Oenothera and Munzia. Requirements for greenhouse, <span class="hlt">field</span>, and agronomic cultures are presented, together with information on substrate types, pest control, as well as vegetative and seed propagation, cross pollination, harvest, and seed storage. Particular aspects like germination, bolting, and flowering induction in taxonomically diverse material are reviewed. Methods recommended are supported by ecological and experimental data. An overview of the possibilities for wide hybridization and polyploidy induction in the genus is given. Germplasm resources are referenced. In summary, a comprehensive guideline for successful laboratory cultivation of Oenothera species is provided. PMID:24592268</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFMGP31A1102B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFMGP31A1102B"><span>Recent Progress in Understanding a Paleomagnetic Record of <span class="hlt">Rapid</span> Transitional <span class="hlt">Field</span> Change in the Sheep Creek Transition Zone (Miocene), North Central Nevada</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Bogue, S. W.; Glen, J. M.; Harmon, L.</p> <p>2011-12-01</p> <p>New <span class="hlt">field</span>, laboratory, and modeling results from the Sheep Creek transition zone suggest that a directional change with an average rate of at least 0.1 °/day occurred during a 15 month long interval toward the end of this 15.2 Ma reverse-to-normal geomagnetic polarity switch. The evidence for this brief episode of <span class="hlt">rapid</span> transitional <span class="hlt">field</span> change comes from a 3.9 m thick lava flow ("Flow 20") that erupted and began to acquire a primary thermoremanence while the geomagnetic <span class="hlt">field</span> was pointing east and down. Flow 20 was then buried, reheated, and partially remagnetized in a north-down direction by the 8.2 m thick lava ("Flow 21") that succeeded it. After correction for the difference between natural and laboratory cooling rates, the unblocking temperatures of the secondary thermoremanence provide estimates of the maximum temperatures reached at each level in Flow 20 as it was rewarmed by heat conducting downward from Flow 21. This reheating increased the temperature at the base of Flow 21 to about 315°C. To better model this thermal behavior, we improved the conductive cooling calculation of Bogue and Glen (2010) by incorporating a temperature and porosity dependent thermal diffusivity and simulating in several ways the release of latent heat as the lavas crystallize. We find that the observed thermal remagnetization could not have occurred unless Flow 21, an andesitic basalt, was unrealistically hot (>1300°C). Assuming that Flow 21 was closer to 1100°C at emplacement, the intensity of the observed reheating implies that Flow 20 was still warm (about 125°C near its base) when buried. In other words, the interval between the eruptions of Flows 20 and 21 was short, of the order of a few years. One source of uncertainly is the extent to which heat produced by post-emplacement crystallization of Flow 21 contributed to the baking of Flow 20. Nonetheless, the calculations show that maximum baking temperatures in the lower part of Flow 20 change by only 20°C when the</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70036728','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70036728"><span><span class="hlt">Rapid</span> diagnosis of avian influenza virus in wild birds: Use of a portable rRT-PCR and freeze-dried reagents in the <span class="hlt">field</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Takekawa, J.Y.; Hill, N.J.; Schultz, A.K.; Iverson, S.A.; Cardona, C.J.; Boyce, W.M.; Dudley, J.P.</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Wild birds have been implicated in the spread of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) of the H5N1 subtype, prompting surveillance along migratory flyways. Sampling of wild birds for avian influenza virus (AIV) is often conducted in remote regions, but results are often delayed because of the need to transport samples to a laboratory equipped for molecular testing. Real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR) is a molecular technique that offers one of the most accurate and sensitive methods for diagnosis of AIV. The previously strict lab protocols needed for rRT-PCR are now being adapted for the <span class="hlt">field</span>. Development of freeze-dried (lyophilized) reagents that do not require cold chain, with sensitivity at the level of wet reagents has brought on-site remote testing to a practical goal. Here we present a method for the <span class="hlt">rapid</span> diagnosis of AIV in wild birds using an rRT-PCR unit (Ruggedized Advanced Pathogen Identification Device or <span class="hlt">RAPID</span>, Idaho Technologies, Salt Lake City, UT) that employs lyophilized reagents (Influenza A Target 1 Taqman; ASAY-ASY-0109, Idaho Technologies). The reagents contain all of the necessary components for testing at appropriate concentrations in a single tube: primers, probes, enzymes, buffers and internal positive controls, eliminating errors associated with improper storage or handling of wet reagents. The portable unit performs a screen for Influenza A by targeting the matrix gene and yields results in 2-3 hours. Genetic subtyping is also possible with H5 and H7 primer sets that target the hemagglutinin gene. The system is suitable for use on cloacal and oropharyngeal samples collected from wild birds, as demonstrated here on the migratory shorebird species, the western sandpiper (Calidrus mauri) captured in Northern California. Animal handling followed protocols approved by the Animal Care and Use Committee of the U.S. Geological Survey Western Ecological Research Center and permits of the U.S. Geological Survey</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21847073','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21847073"><span><span class="hlt">Rapid</span> diagnosis of avian influenza virus in wild birds: use of a portable rRT-PCR and freeze-dried reagents in the <span class="hlt">field</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Takekawa, John Y; Hill, Nichola J; Schultz, Annie K; Iverson, Samuel A; Cardona, Carol J; Boyce, Walter M; Dudley, Joseph P</p> <p>2011-08-02</p> <p>Wild birds have been implicated in the spread of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) of the H5N1 subtype, prompting surveillance along migratory flyways. Sampling of wild birds for avian influenza virus (AIV) is often conducted in remote regions, but results are often delayed because of the need to transport samples to a laboratory equipped for molecular testing. Real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR) is a molecular technique that offers one of the most accurate and sensitive methods for diagnosis of AIV. The previously strict lab protocols needed for rRT-PCR are now being adapted for the <span class="hlt">field</span>. Development of freeze-dried (lyophilized) reagents that do not require cold chain, with sensitivity at the level of wet reagents has brought on-site remote testing to a practical goal. Here we present a method for the <span class="hlt">rapid</span> diagnosis of AIV in wild birds using an rRT-PCR unit (Ruggedized Advanced Pathogen Identification Device or <span class="hlt">RAPID</span>, Idaho Technologies, Salt Lake City, UT) that employs lyophilized reagents (Influenza A Target 1 Taqman; ASAY-ASY-0109, Idaho Technologies). The reagents contain all of the necessary components for testing at appropriate concentrations in a single tube: primers, probes, enzymes, buffers and internal positive controls, eliminating errors associated with improper storage or handling of wet reagents. The portable unit performs a screen for Influenza A by targeting the matrix gene and yields results in 2-3 hours. Genetic subtyping is also possible with H5 and H7 primer sets that target the hemagglutinin gene. The system is suitable for use on cloacal and oropharyngeal samples collected from wild birds, as demonstrated here on the migratory shorebird species, the western sandpiper (Calidrus mauri) captured in Northern California. Animal handling followed protocols approved by the Animal Care and Use Committee of the U.S. Geological Survey Western Ecological Research Center and permits of the U.S. Geological Survey</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4248774','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4248774"><span><span class="hlt">Field</span> Evaluation of the InBios Chagas Detect Plus <span class="hlt">Rapid</span> Test in Serum and Whole-Blood Specimens in Bolivia</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Shah, Vishal; Ferrufino, Lisbeth; Gilman, Robert H.; Ramirez, Margot; Saenza, Eliana; Malaga, Edith; Sanchez, Gerardo; Okamoto, Emi E.; Sherbuck, Jacqueline E.; Clark, Eva H.; Galdos-Cardenas, Gerson; Bozo, Ricardo; Flores-Franco, Jorge Luis; Colanzi, Rony; Verastegui, Manuela</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Trypanosoma cruzi causes Chagas disease, which affects an estimated 7 million to 8 million people. Chagas disease is endemic throughout Latin America, with the highest prevalence in Bolivia. Conventional diagnosis requires a well-equipped laboratory with experienced personnel. We evaluated the Chagas Detect Plus (CDP) (InBios, Seattle, WA), a <span class="hlt">rapid</span> immunochromatographic assay for IgG antibodies to T. cruzi. CDP performance was compared to infection status based on results obtained by indirect hemagglutination assay, immunofluorescent-antibody test, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Confirmed infection required positive results by at least 2 conventional assays. We used specimens from adults of both sexes in a general hospital in the city of Santa Cruz and from pregnant women in a hospital and children in villages in the Bolivian Chaco, an area of hyperendemicity. CDP was performed in paired whole-blood and serum specimens from 385 individuals in the two hospital studies and in 200 serum specimens from the community study. CDP showed sensitivities/specificities of 96.2% (95% confidence interval, 92.7 to 98.4)/98.8% (95.9 to 99.9) in whole blood and 99.3% (97.5 to 99.9)/96.9% (94.2 to 98.6) in serum, with no differences by sex, age group, or study site. CDP showed excellent sensitivity and specificity in our study population, comparable to those of conventional serology. The test is reliable for <span class="hlt">field</span> surveys, requires no laboratory equipment, and performed well in serum and whole blood. The CDP could also be used for accurate maternal screening to identify neonates at risk of congenital transmission. CDP performance data in diverse geographic areas are needed to strengthen the evidence base for its use. PMID:25274804</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25203275','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25203275"><span>Bias for the left visual <span class="hlt">field</span> in <span class="hlt">rapid</span> serial visual presentation: effects of additional salient cues suggest a critical role of attention.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Śmigasiewicz, Kamila; Asanowicz, Dariusz; Westphal, Nicole; Verleger, Rolf</p> <p>2015-02-01</p> <p>Everyday experience suggests that people are equally aware of stimuli in both hemifields. However, when two streams of stimuli are <span class="hlt">rapidly</span> presented left and right, the second target (T2) is better identified in the left hemifield than in the right hemifield. This left visual <span class="hlt">field</span> (LVF) advantage may result from differences between hemifields in attracting attention. Therefore, we introduced a visual cue shortly before T2 onset to draw attention to one stream. Thus, to identify T2, attention was correctly positioned with valid cues but had to be redirected to the other stream with invalid ones. If the LVF advantage is caused by differences between hemifields in attracting attention, invalid cues should increase, and valid cues should reduce the LVF advantage as compared with neutral cues. This prediction was confirmed. ERP analysis revealed that cues evoked an early posterior negativity, confirming that attention was attracted by the cue. This negativity was earlier with cues in the LVF, which suggests that responses to salient events are faster in the right hemisphere than in the left hemisphere. Valid cues speeded up, and invalid cues delayed T2-evoked N2pc; in addition, valid cues enlarged T2-evoked P3. After N2pc, right-side T2 evoked more sustained contralateral negativity than left T2, least long-lasting after valid cues. Difficulties in identifying invalidly cued right T2 were reflected in prematurely ending P3 waveforms. Overall, these data provide evidence that the LVF advantage is because of different abilities of the hemispheres in shifting attention to relevant events in their contralateral hemifield.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007ApPhA..89..321R','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007ApPhA..89..321R"><span><span class="hlt">Rapid</span> laser prototyping of plasmonic components</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Reinhardt, C.; Kiyan, R.; Passinger, S.; Stepanov, A. L.; Ostendorf, A.; Chichkov, B. N.</p> <p>2007-11-01</p> <p>Renewed and <span class="hlt">growing</span> interest in the <span class="hlt">field</span> of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) comes from a <span class="hlt">rapid</span> advance of nanostructuring technologies. In this paper, we will report on the application of two-photon polymerization (2PP) technique for the fabrication of dielectric SPP-structures, which can be used for localization, guiding, and manipulation of SPPs on a subwavelength scale. This technology is based on nonlinear absorption of near-infrared femtosecond laser pulses. Resolutions down to 100 nm (and even better) are already achievable. Characterization of these structures is performed by leakage radiation microscopy. 2PP allows the fabrication of dielectric waveguides, splitters, and couplers directly on metal surfaces. The dielectric structures on metal films are demonstrated to be very efficient for the excitation of SPPs. Using these structures, one can achieve excitation and focusing of the resulting plasmon <span class="hlt">field</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19870006812','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19870006812"><span>The nonlinear development of Gortler vortices in <span class="hlt">growing</span> boundary layers</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Hall, Philip</p> <p>1986-01-01</p> <p>The development of Gortler vortices in boundary layers over curved walls in the nonlinear regime is investigated. The growth of the boundary layer makes a parallel flow analysis impossible except in the high wavenumber regime so in general the instability equations must be integrated numerically. Here the spanwise dependence of the basic flow is described using Fourier series expansion whilst the normal and streamwise variations are taken into account using finite differences. The calculations suggest that a given disturbance imposed at some position along the wall will eventually reach a local equilibrium state essentially independent of the initial conditions. In fact, the equilibrium state reached is qualitatively similar to the large amplitude high wave-number solution described asymptotically by Hall (1982). In general, it is found that the nonlinear interactions are dominated by a mean <span class="hlt">field</span> type of interaction between the mean flow and the fundamental. Thus, even though higher harmonics of the fundamental are necessarily generated, most of the disturbance energy is confined to the mean flow correction and the fundamental. A major result of the calculations is finding that the downstream velocity <span class="hlt">field</span> develops a strongly inflection character as the flow moves downstream. The latter result suggests that the major effect of Gortler vortices on boundary layers of practical importance might be to make them highly receptive to <span class="hlt">rapidly</span> <span class="hlt">growing</span> Rayleigh modes of instability.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19880065867&hterms=character+development&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3Dcharacter%2Bdevelopment','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19880065867&hterms=character+development&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3Dcharacter%2Bdevelopment"><span>The nonlinear development of Goertler vortices in <span class="hlt">growing</span> boundary layers</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Hall, Philip</p> <p>1988-01-01</p> <p>The development of Goertler vortices in boundary layers over curved walls in the nonlinear regime is investigated. The growth of the boundary layer makes a parallel flow analysis impossible except in the high wavenumber regime so in general the instability equations must be integrated numerically. Here the spanwise dependence of the basic flow is described using Fourier series expansion while the normal and streamwise variations are taken into account using finite differences. The calculations suggest that a given disturbance imposed at some position along the wall will eventually reach a local equilibrium state essentially independent of the initial conditions. In fact, the equilibrium state reached is qualitatively similar to the large amplitude high wave-number solution described asymptotically by Hall (1982). In general, it is found that the nonlinear interactions are dominated by a mean <span class="hlt">field</span> type of interaction between the mean flow and the fundamental. Thus, even though higher harmonics of the fundamental are necessarily generated, most of the disturbance energy is confined to the mean flow correction and the fundamental. A major result of the calculations is finding that the downstream velocity <span class="hlt">field</span> develops a strongly inflectional character as the flow moves downstream. The latter result suggests that the major effect of Goertler vortices on boundary layers of practical importance might be to make them highly receptive to <span class="hlt">rapidly</span> <span class="hlt">growing</span> Rayleigh modes of instability.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20110016450','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20110016450"><span>Rotating Vessels for <span class="hlt">Growing</span> Protein Crystals</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Cottingham, Paul</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p>Rotating vessels have been proposed as means of <span class="hlt">growing</span> larger, more nearly uniform protein crystals than would otherwise be possible in the presence of normal Earth gravitation. Heretofore, nonrotating vessels have been used. It is difficult to <span class="hlt">grow</span> high-quality protein crystals in the terrestrial gravitational <span class="hlt">field</span> because of convection plumes created by the interaction between gravitation and density gradients in protein-solution depletion layers around <span class="hlt">growing</span> crystals. The density gradients and the associated convection plumes cause the surfaces of <span class="hlt">growing</span> crystals to be exposed to nonuniform solution densities, thereby causing the crystals to form in irregular shapes. The microgravitational environment of outer space has been utilized to eliminate gravitation-induced convection, but this approach is generally not favorable because of the high cost and limited availability of space flight. The use of a rotating vessel according to the proposal is intended to ameliorate the effects of gravitation and the resultant convection, relative to the corresponding effects in a non-rotating vessel. The rotation would exert an averaging effect over time, distributing the convective force on the depletion layer. Therefore, the depletion layer would be more nearly uniform and, as a result, the <span class="hlt">growing</span> crystal would be more nearly perfect. The proposal admits of variations (see figure), including the following: The <span class="hlt">growing</span> crystal could be rotated about its own central axis or an external axis. The crystal-growth vessel could be of any of various shapes, including cylindrical, hemispherical, conical, and combinations thereof. The crystal-growth vessel could be suspended in a viscous fluid in an outer vessel to isolate the <span class="hlt">growing</span> crystal from both ambient vibrations and vibrations induced by a mechanism that drives the rotation. The rotation could be coupled to the crystal-growth vessel by viscous or magnetic means. The crystal-growth vessel could be supported within the</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19840008688','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19840008688"><span>Birth of space plant <span class="hlt">growing</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Mashinskiy, A.; Nechitaylo, G.</p> <p>1983-01-01</p> <p>The attempts, and successes, to <span class="hlt">grow</span> plants in space, and get them to fully develop, bloom and produce seeds using orchids are presented. The psychological advantages of the presence of plants onboard space vehicles and space stations is indicated.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011NatCC...1..195H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011NatCC...1..195H"><span>Sociology: The <span class="hlt">growing</span> climate divide</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Hoffman, Andrew J.</p> <p>2011-07-01</p> <p>Climate change has reached the level of a 'scientific consensus', but is not yet a 'social consensus'. New analysis highlights that a <span class="hlt">growing</span> divide between liberals and conservatives in the American public is a major obstacle to achieving this end.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16659479','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16659479"><span>Method for <span class="hlt">growing</span> plants aeroponically.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Zobel, R W; Del Tredici, P; Torrey, J G</p> <p>1976-03-01</p> <p>A simple, inexpensive system for <span class="hlt">growing</span> plants with their roots bathed in nutrient mist is described. The aeroponics system uses a spinner from a home humidifier to propel nutrient solution into a polyethylene-lined plywood box atop which plants are supported on plastic light-fixture "egg crating." Success in <span class="hlt">growing</span> a number of herbaceous and woody species, including nodulated legumes and nonlegumes, is reported.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=65164&keyword=transformer&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=78242228&CFTOKEN=38148673','EPA-EIMS'); return false;" href="http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=65164&keyword=transformer&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=78242228&CFTOKEN=38148673"><span>QUANTIFICATION AND INTERPRETATION OF TOTAL PETROLEUM HYDROCARBONS IN SEDIMENT SAMPLES BY A GC/MS METHOD AND COMPARISON WITH EPA 418.1 AND A <span class="hlt">RAPID</span> <span class="hlt">FIELD</span> METHOD</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>ABSTRACT: Total Petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) as a lumped parameter can be easily and <span class="hlt">rapidly</span> measured or monitored. Despite interpretational problems, it has become an accepted regulatory benchmark used widely to evaluate the extent of petroleum product contamination. Three cu...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2916916','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2916916"><span>Comparative <span class="hlt">field</span> performance and adherence to test results of four malaria <span class="hlt">rapid</span> diagnostic tests among febrile patients more than five years of age in Blantyre, Malawi</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>Background Malaria <span class="hlt">rapid</span> diagnostics tests (RDTs) can increase availability of laboratory-based diagnosis and improve the overall management of febrile patients in malaria endemic areas. In preparation to scale-up RDTs in health facilities in Malawi, an evaluation of four RDTs to help guide national-level decision-making was conducted. Methods A cross sectional study of four histidine rich-protein-type-2- (HRP2) based RDTs at four health centres in Blantyre, Malawi, was undertaken to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of RDTs, assess prescriber adherence to RDT test results and explore operational issues regarding RDT implementation. Three RDTs were evaluated in only one health centre each and one RDT was evaluated in two health centres. Light microscopy in a reference laboratory was used as the gold standard. Results A total of 2,576 patients were included in the analysis. All of the RDTs tested had relatively high sensitivity for detecting any parasitaemia [Bioline SD (97%), First response malaria (92%), Paracheck (91%), ICT diagnostics (90%)], but low specificity [Bioline SD (39%), First response malaria (42%), Paracheck (68%), ICT diagnostics (54%)]. Specificity was significantly lower in patients who self-treated with an anti-malarial in the previous two weeks (odds ratio (OR) 0.5; p-value < 0.001), patients 5-15 years old versus patients > 15 years old (OR 0.4, p-value < 0.001) and when the RDT was performed by a community health worker versus a laboratory technician (OR 0.4; p-value < 0.001). Health workers correctly prescribed anti-malarials for patients with positive RDT results, but ignored negative RDT results with 58% of patients with a negative RDT result treated with an anti-malarial. Conclusions The results of this evaluation, combined with other published data and global recommendations, have been used to select RDTs for national scale-up. In addition, the study identified some key issues that need to be further delineated: the low <span class="hlt">field</span></p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li class="active"><span>19</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_19 --> <div id="page_20" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li class="active"><span>20</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="381"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016EGUGA..18.4696C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016EGUGA..18.4696C"><span>On the Electron Dynamics during <span class="hlt">Rapid</span> Asymmetric Magnetic Island Coalescence: Insights on the Electrons Agyrotropy with the Presence of a Guide <span class="hlt">Field</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Cazzola, Emanuele; Lapenta, Giovanni; Innocenti, Maria Elena; Goldman, Martin; Newman, David; Markidis, Stefano</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p>The work presents a fully kinetic analysis of the electrons dynamics during <span class="hlt">rapid</span> island coalescence in asymmetric magnetic reconnection, especially focused on the comparison between the case with and with no initial guide <span class="hlt">field</span>. Formation and growth of the islands are caused by an intentionally unstable initial configuration across the current sheet with the same asymmetric profiles as those traditionally proposed in the literature (e.g. Pritchett, 2008). Particular attentions is given to the different evolution of the presumed reconnection sites. Three main regions are eventually identified, named by X-, D- and M-regions, which describe, respectively, the regions featuring a traditional reconnection event, those showing an opposite behavior with respect to the former and the reconnection regions occurring between two magnetic islands (Cazzola et al., 2015). Further analysis is mainly addressed to evaluate both the electrons departure from the isotropic and gyrotropic behavior. Whether the first quantity has been clearly established and confirmed by observations, the latter has always appeared of difficult interpretation, and an ultimate accepted method on how to render it from PIC simulations still seems far to be achieved. In light of the upcoming data from the freshly launched MMS NASA mission, outcomes from some of the main techniques to spot agyrotropic regions are here compared to highligh the presence of possible relevant differences (Scudder and Daughton, 2008; Swisdak, 2015). References [1] P. Pritchett, "Collisionless magnetic reconnection in an asymmetric current sheet," Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics (1978-2012), vol. 113, no. A6, 2008. [2] E. Cazzola, M. E. Innocenti, S. Markidis, M. V. Goldman, D. L. Newman, and G. Lapenta, "On the electron dynamics during island coalescence in asymmetric magnetic reconnection," Physics of Plasmas (1994-present), vol. 22, no. 9, p. 092901, 2015. [3] J. Scudder and W. Daughton, "Illuminating electron</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15710434','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15710434"><span>Parasites <span class="hlt">grow</span> larger in faster <span class="hlt">growing</span> fish hosts.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Barber, Iain</p> <p>2005-02-01</p> <p>Parasites depend on host-derived energy for growth and development, and so are potentially affected by the host's ability to acquire nutrients under competitive foraging scenarios. Although parasites might be expected to <span class="hlt">grow</span> faster in hosts that are better at acquiring nutrients from natural ecosystems, it is also possible that the most competitive hosts are better at countering infections, if they have an improved immune response or are able to limit the availability of nutrients to parasites. I first quantified the ability of uninfected three-spined sticklebacks Gasterosteus aculeatus to compete in groups for sequentially-presented food items, and then exposed either the best or worst competitors to infective stages of the cestode Schistocephalus solidus. Fish were subsequently raised in their original groups, under competitive feeding regimes, for 96 days, after which fish and parasite growth was determined. Unexpectedly, pre-exposure host competitive ability had no effect on susceptibility to infection, or on post-infection growth rate. Furthermore, despite a 120-fold variation in parasite mass at the end of the study, pre-infection competitive ability was not related to parasite growth. The closest predictor of parasite mass was body size-corrected host growth rate, indicating that the fastest <span class="hlt">growing</span> fish developed the largest parasites. Faster <span class="hlt">growing</span> hosts therefore apparently provide ideal environments for <span class="hlt">growing</span> parasites. This finding has important implications for ecology and aquaculture.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24600952','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24600952"><span>[<span class="hlt">Growing</span> old as a woman].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Boyer-Weinmann, Martine</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Growing</span> old as a woman. Since Diderot, a classic writer, and his friend Sophie Volland with whom he corresponded, debated the difference between the "handsome old man" and "beautiful old age", or a hypothetical "beautiful old woman", the representations of <span class="hlt">growing</span> old have changed, to the benefit of women. Has the considerable contribution of female writers to the debate played a role? In what ways does literature, through its figurations of the ages of life, provide a valuable perspective of the contemporary mutations of the view of old age?</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Home+AND+environment+AND+elementary+AND+child+AND+development&pg=6&id=ED526829','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Home+AND+environment+AND+elementary+AND+child+AND+development&pg=6&id=ED526829"><span>Kinderland in the Fatherland: <span class="hlt">Growing</span> Children in Imperial Berlin</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Brian, Amanda</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>This dissertation explores the milieu in which children of Imperial Berlin were raised. When contemporaries in the <span class="hlt">rapidly</span> expanding capital of the Second German Empire (1871-1918) looked at children, this milieu darkened. The city, they argued, threatened children's <span class="hlt">growing</span> bodies, and such institutions as the home, the clinic, and the school…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED391679.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED391679.pdf"><span>Exploring Classroom Hydroponics. <span class="hlt">Growing</span> Ideas.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>National Gardening Association, Burlington, VT.</p> <p></p> <p><span class="hlt">Growing</span> Ideas, the National Gardening Association's series for elementary, middle, and junior high school educators, helps teachers engage students in using plants and gardens as contexts for developing a deeper, richer understanding of the world around them. This volume's focus is on hydroponics. It presents basic hydroponics information along…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ232961.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ232961.pdf"><span><span class="hlt">Growing</span> Crystals on the Ceiling.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Christman, Robert A.</p> <p>1980-01-01</p> <p>Described is a method of studying <span class="hlt">growing</span> crystals in a classroom utilizing a carrousel projector standing vertically. A saturated salt solution is placed on a slide on the lens of the projector and the heat from the projector causes the water to evaporate and salt to crystalize. (Author/DS)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19830000465&hterms=growing+crystals&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dgrowing%2Bcrystals','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19830000465&hterms=growing+crystals&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dgrowing%2Bcrystals"><span><span class="hlt">Growing</span> Crystals for Infrared Detectors</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Lehoczky, S. L.; Szofran, F. R.</p> <p>1984-01-01</p> <p>Unidirectional solidification yields bulk crystals with compositional homogeneity. Unidirectionaly crystal-growth furnace assembly travels vertically so crystal <span class="hlt">grows</span> upward from bottom tapered end of ampoule. Separately controlled furnaces used for hot (upper) and cold (lower) zones. New process produces ingots with radial compositional homogeneity suitable for fabricating infrared detectors.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=trade+AND+secret&pg=3&id=EJ790331','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=trade+AND+secret&pg=3&id=EJ790331"><span>Colleges' Earmarks <span class="hlt">Grow</span>, Amid Criticism</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Brainard, Jeffrey; Hermes, J. J.</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>A record-breaking number of Congressional pork-barrel projects this year has loaded college and university plates with more earmarks than ever before, despite <span class="hlt">growing</span> worries that the noncompetitive grants undermine the American scientific enterprise, and in spite of promises by some lawmakers to cut back. An analysis by "The Chronicle" shows that…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED367544.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED367544.pdf"><span><span class="hlt">Growing</span> Ideas, 1990-1993.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Pranis, Eve, Ed.</p> <p>1993-01-01</p> <p>This series of journals includes volumes 1-4 of "<span class="hlt">Growing</span> Ideas," a journal of garden-based learning. Each issue provides instructional ideas, horticultural information and a forum for exchange among teachers using classroom gardening to stimulate learning. Ideas in each issue are separated into three sections. The "Green Tips"…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/40203374','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/40203374"><span>Organization of <span class="hlt">growing</span> random networks</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Krapivsky, P. L.; Redner, S.</p> <p>2001-06-01</p> <p>The organizational development of <span class="hlt">growing</span> random networks is investigated. These <span class="hlt">growing</span> networks are built by adding nodes successively, and linking each to an earlier node of degree k with an attachment probability A{sub k}. When A{sub k} <span class="hlt">grows</span> more slowly than linearly with k, the number of nodes with k links, N{sub k}(t), decays faster than a power law in k, while for A{sub k} <span class="hlt">growing</span> faster than linearly in k, a single node emerges which connects to nearly all other nodes. When A{sub k} is asymptotically linear, N{sub k}(t){similar_to}tk{sup {minus}{nu}}, with {nu} dependent on details of the attachment probability, but in the range 2{lt}{nu}{lt}{infinity}. The combined age and degree distribution of nodes shows that old nodes typically have a large degree. There is also a significant correlation in the degrees of neighboring nodes, so that nodes of similar degree are more likely to be connected. The size distributions of the in and out components of the network with respect to a given node{emdash}namely, its {open_quotes}descendants{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}ancestors{close_quotes}{emdash}are also determined. The in component exhibits a robust s{sup {minus}2} power-law tail, where s is the component size. The out component has a typical size of order lnt, and it provides basic insights into the genealogy of the network.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Robert+AND+Thomson&pg=2&id=ED425262','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Robert+AND+Thomson&pg=2&id=ED425262"><span>Consequences of <span class="hlt">Growing</span> Up Poor.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Duncan, Greg J., Ed.; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne, Ed.</p> <p></p> <p>The consequences and correlates of <span class="hlt">growing</span> up poor as well as the mechanisms through which poverty influences children are explored. This book is organized with a primary focus on research findings and a secondary concern with policy implications. The chapters are: (1) "Poor Families, Poor Outcomes: The Well-Being of Children and Youth" (Jeanne…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013APS..MARW28006K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013APS..MARW28006K"><span>Extreme Mechanics of <span class="hlt">Growing</span> Matter</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kuhl, Ellen</p> <p>2013-03-01</p> <p>Growth is a distinguishing feature of all living things. Unlike standard materials, living matter can autonomously respond to alterations in its environment. As a result of a continuous ultrastructural turnover and renewal of cells and extracellular matrix, living matter can undergo extreme changes in composition, size, and shape within the order of months, weeks, or days. While hard matter typically adapts by increasing its density to <span class="hlt">grow</span> strong, soft matter adapts by increasing its volume to <span class="hlt">grow</span> large. Here we provide a state-of-the-art review of <span class="hlt">growing</span> matter, and compare existing mathematical models for growth and remodeling of living systems. Applications are plentiful ranging from plant growth to tumor growth, from asthma in the lungs to restenosis in the vasculature, from plastic to reconstructive surgery, and from skeletal muscle adaptation to heart failure. Using these examples, we discuss current challenges and potential future directions. We hope to initiate critical discussions around the biophysical modeling of <span class="hlt">growing</span> matter as a powerful tool to better understand biological systems in health and disease. This research has been supported by the NSF CAREER award CMMI 0952021.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=process+AND+educational+AND+University&pg=4&id=EJ1013309','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=process+AND+educational+AND+University&pg=4&id=EJ1013309"><span><span class="hlt">Growing</span> an Emerging Research University</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Birx, Donald L.; Anderson-Fletcher, Elizabeth; Whitney, Elizabeth</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>The emerging research college or university is one of the most formidable resources a region has to reinvent and <span class="hlt">grow</span> its economy. This paper is the first of two that outlines a process of building research universities that enhance regional technology development and facilitate flexible networks of collaboration and resource sharing. Although the…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=moss&pg=3&id=EJ1001829','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=moss&pg=3&id=EJ1001829"><span><span class="hlt">Growing</span> Patterns: Seeing beyond Counting</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Markworth, Kimberly A.</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Over the past two decades, mathematical patterns have been acknowledged as important early components of children's development of algebraic reasoning (NCTM 2000). In particular, <span class="hlt">growing</span> patterns have attracted significant attention as a context that helps students develop an understanding of functional relationships (Lee and Freiman 2006; Moss et…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=clarence&pg=4&id=EJ319453','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=clarence&pg=4&id=EJ319453"><span><span class="hlt">Growing</span> Up in Interracial Families.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Spivey, Philip; And Others</p> <p>1984-01-01</p> <p>Provides excerpts from personal accounts presented at a 1984 conference on the needs of children of interracial families: "Communicating is the Key" (Philip Spivey); "<span class="hlt">Growing</span> Up with an Asian American Heritage" (Clarence L. Chen); "An Hispanic Perspective on Biracial, Bicultural Families" (Irma Garcia Rose); and…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19920042218&hterms=Dendrite+growth&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D60%26Ntt%3DDendrite%2Bgrowth','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19920042218&hterms=Dendrite+growth&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D60%26Ntt%3DDendrite%2Bgrowth"><span>Buoyancy effects of a <span class="hlt">growing</span>, isolated dendrite</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Canright, D.; Davis, S. H.</p> <p>1991-01-01</p> <p>The buoyancy effect of a <span class="hlt">growing</span> isolated dendrite on the solidification process in the undercooling liquid material was investigated by developing an analytic solution to the growth/convection problem in powers of a buoyancy parameter G. The solution depends on the Prandtl number P and the Stefan number S (undercooling) for the local velocity and thermal <span class="hlt">fields</span> and also the buoyant alteration of the interface shape. Results suggest that buoyancy effect for metals (low P) may be qualitatively different from that for organics (high P).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=335471&keyword=software&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=90808193&CFTOKEN=55235997','EPA-EIMS'); return false;" href="http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=335471&keyword=software&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=90808193&CFTOKEN=55235997"><span>The Human Exposure Model (HEM): A Tool to Support <span class="hlt">Rapid</span> Assessment of Human Health Impacts from Near-<span class="hlt">Field</span> Consumer Product Exposures</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>The US EPA is developing an open and publically available software program called the Human Exposure Model (HEM) to provide near-<span class="hlt">field</span> exposure information for Life Cycle Impact Assessments (LCIAs). Historically, LCIAs have often omitted impacts from near-<span class="hlt">field</span> sources of exposur...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=299092','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=299092"><span>A <span class="hlt">rapid</span> <span class="hlt">field</span> detection system for citrus huanglongbing associated ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ from the psyllid vector, diaphorina citri kuwayama and its implications in disease management</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>We report the development of an affordable detection kit for the detection of ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ (Las) from the psyllid vector, Diaphorina citri, which can provide real time test results in the <span class="hlt">field</span> or <span class="hlt">field</span> laboratory within 30-40 minutes without the need for expensive laboratory ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22652433','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22652433"><span>High-resolution melt PCR analysis for <span class="hlt">rapid</span> identification of Chlamydia abortus live vaccine strain 1B among C. abortus strains and <span class="hlt">field</span> isolates.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Vorimore, Fabien; Cavanna, Noémie; Vicari, Nadia; Magnino, Simone; Willems, Hermann; Rodolakis, Annie; Siarkou, Victoria I; Laroucau, Karine</p> <p>2012-09-01</p> <p>We describe a novel high-resolution melt assay that clearly differentiates Chlamydia abortus live vaccine strain 1B from <span class="hlt">field</span> C. abortus strains and <span class="hlt">field</span> wild-type isolates based on previously described single nucleotide polymorphisms. This modern genotyping technique is inexpensive, easy to use, and less time-consuming than PCR-RFLP.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016RAA....16...95Y','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016RAA....16...95Y"><span>Irreversible <span class="hlt">rapid</span> changes of magnetic <span class="hlt">field</span> associated with the 2012 October 23 circular near-limb X1.8 Flare</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ye, Dan-Dan; Liu, Chang; Wang, Haimin</p> <p>2016-06-01</p> <p>It has been found that photospheric magnetic <span class="hlt">fields</span> can change in accordance with restructuring of the three-dimensional magnetic <span class="hlt">field</span> following solar eruptions. Previous studies mainly use vector magnetic <span class="hlt">field</span> data taken for events near the disk center. In this paper, we analyze the magnetic <span class="hlt">field</span> evolution associated with the 2012 October 23 X1.8 flare in NOAA AR 11598 that is close to the solar limb, using both the 45 s cadence line-of-sight and 12 min cadence vector magnetograms from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board Solar Dynamics Observatory. This flare is classified as a circular-ribbon flare with spine-fan type magnetic topology containing a null point. In the line-of-sight magnetograms, there are two apparent polarity inversion lines (PILs). The PIL closer to the limb is affected more by the projection effect. Between these two PILs there lie positive polarity magnetic <span class="hlt">fields</span>, which are surrounded by negative polarity <span class="hlt">fields</span> outside the PILs. We find that after the flare, both the apparent limb-ward and disk-ward negative fluxes decrease, while the positive flux in-between increases. We also find that the horizontal magnetic <span class="hlt">fields</span> have a significant increase along the disk-ward PIL, but in the surrounding area, they decrease. Synthesizing the observed <span class="hlt">field</span> changes, we conclude that the magnetic <span class="hlt">fields</span> collapse toward the surface above the disk-ward PIL as depicted in the coronal implosion scenario, while the peripheral <span class="hlt">field</span> turns to a more vertical configuration after the flare. We also suggest that this event is an asymmetric circular-ribbon flare: a flux rope is likely present above the disk-ward PIL. Its eruption causes instability of the entire fan-spine structure and the implosion near that PIL.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li class="active"><span>20</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_20 --> <div id="page_21" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li class="active"><span>21</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="401"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24126552','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24126552"><span><span class="hlt">Fields</span> of application of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion in the treatment of diabetes and implications in the use of <span class="hlt">rapid</span>-acting insulin analogues.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Pitocco, D; Rizzi, A; Scavone, G; Tanese, L; Zaccardi, F; Manto, A; Ghirlanda, G</p> <p>2013-09-01</p> <p>In western countries, diabetes mellitus, because of macrovascular and microvascular complications related to it, is still an important cause of death. Patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) have a six-time higher risk of mortality than healthy patients. Since the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT) established how an intensive therapy is necessary to prevent diabetes mellitus complications, many studies have been conducted to understand which method is able to reach an optimal metabolic control. In the past 30 years continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion established/introduced as a validate alternative to multiple daily injections. Several trials demonstrated that, when compared to MDI, CSII brings to a better metabolic control, in terms of a reduction of glycated hemoglobin and blood glucose variability, hypoglycemic episodes and improvement in quality of life. Because of their pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic characteristics, <span class="hlt">rapid</span>-action insulin analogues are imposed as best insulin to be used in CSII. The <span class="hlt">rapid</span> onset and the fast reached peak make them better mimic the way how pancreas secretes insulin. CSII by pump is not free from issues. Catheter occlusions, blockages, clogs can arrest insulin administration. The consequent higher levels of glycemic values, can easily bring to the onset of ketoacidosis, with an high risk for patients' life. Aspart is a <span class="hlt">rapid</span> analogue obtained by aminoacidic substitution. It is as effective as lispro and glulisine in gaining a good metabolic control and even better in reducing glucose variability. Some studies tried to compare <span class="hlt">rapid</span> analogues in terms of stability. Obtained data are controversial. An in vivo study evidenced higher stability or glulisine, while studies in vitro highlighted a higher safety of aspart. Nowadays it is not possible to assess which analogues is safer. When the infusion set is changed every 48 hours equivalent rates of occlusions have been observed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017ApJ...835L...4K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017ApJ...835L...4K"><span>The Global and Small-scale Magnetic <span class="hlt">Fields</span> of Fully Convective, <span class="hlt">Rapidly</span> Spinning M Dwarf Pair GJ65 A and B</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kochukhov, Oleg; Lavail, Alexis</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>The nearby M dwarf binary GJ65 AB, also known as BL Cet and UV Cet, is a unique benchmark for investigation of dynamo-driven activity of low-mass stars. Magnetic activity of GJ65 was repeatedly assessed by indirect means, such as studies of flares, photometric variability, X-ray, and radio emission. Here, we present a direct analysis of large-scale and local surface magnetic <span class="hlt">fields</span> in both components. Interpreting high-resolution circular polarization spectra (sensitive to a large-scale <span class="hlt">field</span> geometry) we uncovered a remarkable difference of the global stellar <span class="hlt">field</span> topologies. Despite nearly identical masses and rotation rates, the secondary exhibits an axisymmetric, dipolar-like global <span class="hlt">field</span> with an average strength of 1.3 kG while the primary has a much weaker, more complex, and non-axisymmetric 0.3 kG <span class="hlt">field</span>. On the other hand, an analysis of the differential Zeeman intensification (sensitive to the total magnetic flux) shows the two stars having similar magnetic fluxes of 5.2 and 6.7 kG for GJ65 A and B, respectively, although there is evidence that the <span class="hlt">field</span> strength distribution in GJ65 B is shifted toward a higher <span class="hlt">field</span> strength compared to GJ65 A. Based on these complementary magnetic <span class="hlt">field</span> diagnostic results, we suggest that the dissimilar radio and X-ray variability of GJ65 A and B is linked to their different global magnetic <span class="hlt">field</span> topologies. However, this difference appears to be restricted to the upper atmospheric layers but does not encompass the bulk of the stars and has no influence on the fundamental stellar properties.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015APS..DNP.KH009K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015APS..DNP.KH009K"><span><span class="hlt">Growing</span> the Nuclear Workforce Through Outreach</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kilburn, Micha</p> <p>2015-10-01</p> <p>Many students don't encounter physics in the classroom until college or the end of high school. Most college students never encounter nuclear physics in the classroom. In order to <span class="hlt">grow</span> the nuclear science workforce, students need to be aware of the <span class="hlt">field</span> much earlier in the education. However, teaching teens about nuclear science can be a daunting task at the outset. I will present and describe successful outreach curricula and programs that can be duplicated by any college, university or laboratory. These include workshops for boy scouts and girl scouts as well as teaching nuclear science with magnetic marbles. I will also present some results from assessments of JINA-CEE's more intensive programs aimed at recruiting youth to the <span class="hlt">field</span>. JINA-CEE</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009LNCS.5808..433S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009LNCS.5808..433S"><span>Stream Clustering of <span class="hlt">Growing</span> Objects</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Siddiqui, Zaigham Faraz; Spiliopoulou, Myra</p> <p></p> <p>We study incremental clustering of objects that <span class="hlt">grow</span> and accumulate over time. The objects come from a multi-table stream e.g. streams of <Literal>Customer</Literal> and <Literal>Transaction</Literal>. As the Transactions stream accumulates, the Customers’ profiles <span class="hlt">grow</span>. First, we use an incremental propositionalisation to convert the multi-table stream into a single-table stream upon which we apply clustering. For this purpose, we develop an online version of K-Means algorithm that can handle these swelling objects and any new objects that arrive. The algorithm also monitors the quality of the model and performs re-clustering when it deteriorates. We evaluate our method on the PKDD Challenge 1999 dataset.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4928480','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4928480"><span>Silicone Granulomas, a <span class="hlt">Growing</span> Problem?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Curreri, Alexis T.; Taylor, Gina A.; Burris, Katy</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>The formation of granulomas is known to be a possible adverse effect of liquid silicone administration, used for soft tissue augmentation. Its plumping effects provide enhancement of certain body parts, such as the lips, hips, and buttocks. The desire for enhancement, perhaps influenced by popular culture and an unrealistic standard of beauty, leads individuals to seek silicone injections. There is a <span class="hlt">growing</span> population of women and men receiving injections by unlicensed, unskilled “practitioners” not related to the healthcare profession. Complications under such circumstances are not uncommon, particularly the emergence of silicone granulomas, and the authors’ medical center has seen an increase in such cases. In this case report, the authors illustrate a young patient with significant complications from her silicone injections, review current therapies for silicone granulomas, and discuss this <span class="hlt">growing</span> medical problem. PMID:27386046</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005E%26PSL.238..110V','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005E%26PSL.238..110V"><span>The use of <span class="hlt">field</span> dependence of AC susceptibility for the interpretation of magnetic mineralogy and magnetic fabrics in the HSDP-2 basalts, Hawaii [<span class="hlt">rapid</span> communication</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Vahle, Carsten; Kontny, Agnes</p> <p>2005-09-01</p> <p>We applied the <span class="hlt">field</span> dependence parameter χHd (%) = [( k300A/m - k30A/m) / k300A/m] × 100 given by de Wall for the subaerial and submarine basalts drilled by the 3109 m deep HSDP-2 borehole on Hawaii in order to verify the hypothesis that mainly composition controls the <span class="hlt">field</span> dependence of AC susceptibility in titanomagnetite of natural occurrences. When we used this parameter, our data showed a significant scattering compared to data presented in earlier studies. In addition to composition, the effect of measurement temperature, grain size and anisotropy on the <span class="hlt">field</span> dependent susceptibility were examined and found to be critical. The impact of grain size is weaker than the other effects. It cannot be totally excluded that the observed effects arise indirectly through an overlap of the other effects for the investigated basalts. The most important factor for the variation of <span class="hlt">field</span> dependence is the degree of oxidation, causing a modification of the titanomagnetite composition or formation of titanomaghemite, and the mixing of Ti-rich with Ti-poor titanomagnetites, which strongly reduces the χHd parameter. <span class="hlt">Field</span> dependence is not only related to titanomagnetite composition, especially for intermediate titanomagnetites with TCs between 100 and 300 °C. Temperature dependent susceptibility measurements at different <span class="hlt">field</span> amplitudes for these intermediate types showed at constant geometry of the k( T) curve great differences in susceptibility, resulting in significant changes of the <span class="hlt">field</span> dependence parameter over the temperature interval from - 100 to 260 °C. Therefore variations of the ambient measurement temperatures are able to influence the <span class="hlt">field</span> dependence. The second important effect is the degree of particle shape and alignment, which controls the <span class="hlt">field</span> dependence in different orientations especially for the intermediate titanomagnetite, which is intensively intergrown with elongated hemoilmenite grains. As a consequence, samples with higher degrees of</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20020063420','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20020063420"><span><span class="hlt">Rapid</span> Prototyping</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p></p> <p>1999-01-01</p> <p>Javelin, a Lone Peak Engineering Inc. Company has introduced the SteamRoller(TM) System as a commercial product. The system was designed by Javelin during a Phase II NASA funded small commercial product. The purpose of the invention was to allow automated-feed of flexible ceramic tapes to the Laminated Object Manufacturing <span class="hlt">rapid</span> prototyping equipment. The ceramic material that Javelin was working with during the Phase II project is silicon nitride. This engineered ceramic material is of interest for space-based component.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004ApPhL..84.5425L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004ApPhL..84.5425L"><span>Three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of <span class="hlt">rapid</span> start-up in strapped oven magnetrons due to variation in the insulating magnetic <span class="hlt">field</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Luginsland, J. W.; Lau, Y. Y.; Neculaes, V. B.; Gilgenbach, R. M.; Jones, M. C.; Frese, M. H.; Watrous, J. J.</p> <p>2004-06-01</p> <p>A three-dimensional parallel particle-in-cell code, ICEPIC, is used to simulate the geometry and the magnetic <span class="hlt">field</span> profiles of the recent low-noise, fast startup magnetron experiments at the University of Michigan. The fast startup, the power levels, and the starting currents that have been observed in these experiments are quantitatively reproduced in the simulations. The tendency for low noise operation has also been reproduced with the use of an azimuthally varying magnetic <span class="hlt">field</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4592793','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4592793"><span>Measuring microscale strain <span class="hlt">fields</span> in articular cartilage during <span class="hlt">rapid</span> impact reveals thresholds for chondrocyte death and a protective role for the superficial layer</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Bartell, Lena R.; Fortier, Lisa A.; Bonassar, Lawrence J.; Cohen, Itai</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Articular cartilage is a heterogeneous soft tissue that dissipates and distributes loads in mammalian joints. Though robust, cartilage is susceptible to damage from loading at high rates or magnitudes. Such injurious loads have been implicated in degenerative changes, including chronic osteoarthritis (OA), which remains a leading cause of disability in developed nations. Despite decades of research, mechanisms of OA initiation after trauma remain poorly understood. Indeed, although bulk cartilage mechanics are measurable during impact, current techniques cannot access microscale mechanics at those <span class="hlt">rapid</span> time scales. We aimed to address this knowledge gap by imaging the microscale mechanics and corresponding acute biological changes of cartilage in response to <span class="hlt">rapid</span> loading. In this study, we utilized fast-camera and confocal microscopy to achieve roughly 85 μm spatial resolution of the cartilage deformation during a <span class="hlt">rapid</span> (~3 ms), localized impact and the chondrocyte death following impact. Our results showed that, at these high rates, strain and chondrocyte death were highly correlated (p<0.001) with a threshold of 8% microscale strain norm before any cell death occurred. Additionally, chondrocyte death had developed by two hours after impact, suggesting a time frame for clinical therapeutics. Moreover, when the superficial layer was removed, strain – and subsequently chondrocyte death – penetrated deeper into the samples (p<0.001), suggesting a protective role for the superficial layer of articular cartilage. Combined, these results provide insight regarding the detailed biomechanics that drive early chondrocyte damage after trauma and emphasize the importance of understanding cartilage and its mechanics on the microscale. PMID:26150096</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19760000202&hterms=growing+crystals&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3Dgrowing%2Bcrystals','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19760000202&hterms=growing+crystals&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3Dgrowing%2Bcrystals"><span><span class="hlt">Growing</span> crystals from eutectic melts</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Bhat, B. N.</p> <p>1976-01-01</p> <p>Inverted Bridgman Method yields crystals of higher homogeneity and better structure than those grown by ordinary Bridgman method. Process controls thermotransport by holding molten alloy in known temperature for known period of time. <span class="hlt">Rapid</span> cooling quenches in state of segregation. Method is applicable to other eutectiferous systems where thermotransport is appreciable.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015SolE....6..573F','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015SolE....6..573F"><span><span class="hlt">Rapid</span> revegetation by sowing seed mixtures of shrub and herbaceous species</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Feng, J.; Zhang, C.; Zhao, T.; Zhang, Q.</p> <p>2015-05-01</p> <p>Fast revegetation by means of sowing seed mixtures of shrub and herbaceous species is a measure to prevent bare soils from wind and water erosion. A <span class="hlt">field</span> experiment was used to test the effect of species selection and the ratio of shrub to herbaceous species on vegetation formation and shrub growth. Results showed that herbaceous species hastened cover formation and maintained a high coverage for a longer period. However, the growth of shrubs was hindered. In the North China Plain or where the soil and climate are similar, the ratio of shrub to herbaceous seeds is proposed to be 6 : 4-7 : 3 (weight ratio). Among the herbaceous species tested, Festuca arundinacea Schreb. <span class="hlt">grows</span> relatively slow, so it should be mixed with other fast-<span class="hlt">growing</span> species in the practice of <span class="hlt">rapid</span> revegetation, and a seeding density lower than 6 g m-2 is proposed when applied; Orychophragmus violaceus O. E. Schulz. wilts when the seeds are ripe, leading to a significant decrease of coverage, so other species with different phenology should be involved when it is applied; Viola philippica Car. is a good ground cover plant which <span class="hlt">grows</span> fast and maintains a stable coverage from July to October, and a seeding density of 1.5 g m-2 is proposed for <span class="hlt">rapid</span> revegetation. Herbaceous species have different traits. Three different types of herbs were found in our experiment: slow-<span class="hlt">growing</span> stable species (F. arundinacea), fast-<span class="hlt">growing</span> unstable species (O. violaceus) and fast-<span class="hlt">growing</span> stable species (V. philippica). Shrubs, slow-<span class="hlt">growing</span> stable species and fast-<span class="hlt">growing</span> unstable species should not be used alone because they cannot cover the ground fast or they cannot maintain a long period of good coverage. A small seeding rate of fast-<span class="hlt">growing</span> stable species should be used to ensure a fair coverage against erosion. Because natural environmental conditions are heterogeneous and stochastic, more species should be added to enhance the stability of plant community.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23181490','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23181490"><span>One simple DNA extraction device and its combination with modified visual loop-mediated isothermal amplification for <span class="hlt">rapid</span> on-<span class="hlt">field</span> detection of genetically modified organisms.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Zhang, Miao; Liu, Yinan; Chen, Lili; Quan, Sheng; Jiang, Shimeng; Zhang, Dabing; Yang, Litao</p> <p>2013-01-02</p> <p>Quickness, simplicity, and effectiveness are the three major criteria for establishing a good molecular diagnosis method in many <span class="hlt">fields</span>. Herein we report a novel detection system for genetically modified organisms (GMOs), which can be utilized to perform both on-<span class="hlt">field</span> quick screening and routine laboratory diagnosis. In this system, a newly designed inexpensive DNA extraction device was used in combination with a modified visual loop-mediated isothermal amplification (vLAMP) assay. The main parts of the DNA extraction device included a silica gel membrane filtration column and a modified syringe. The DNA extraction device could be easily operated without using other laboratory instruments, making it applicable to an on-<span class="hlt">field</span> GMO test. High-quality genomic DNA (gDNA) suitable for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and isothermal amplification could be quickly isolated from plant tissues using this device within 15 min. In the modified vLAMP assay, a microcrystalline wax encapsulated detection bead containing SYBR green fluorescent dye was introduced to avoid dye inhibition and cross-contaminations from post-LAMP operation. The system was successfully applied and validated in screening and identification of GM rice, soybean, and maize samples collected from both <span class="hlt">field</span> testing and the Grain Inspection, Packers, and Stockyards Administration (GIPSA) proficiency test program, which demonstrated that it was well-adapted to both on-<span class="hlt">field</span> testing and/or routine laboratory analysis of GMOs.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA124679','DTIC-ST'); return false;" href="http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA124679"><span>Far-Infrared Photoconductivity of High Purity n-GaAs in a Magnetic <span class="hlt">Field</span> Using <span class="hlt">Rapid</span>-Scan Fourier Transform Spectroscopy.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://publicaccess.dtic.mil/psm/api/service/search/search">DTIC Science & Technology</a></p> <p></p> <p>1982-12-01</p> <p>sources SSP Three letter computer command for control of the sample spacing TGS Pyroelectric detector TI Triangle apodization function TP Trapezoidal...of the authors use notation other than (n,l,m). The high <span class="hlt">field</span> limit is y>>l and the low <span class="hlt">field</span> limit is y<<l where y = hwC /2R * (31) • = cyclotron...130). When one is input, the beam goes to detector one (DI) which is a TGS room temperature detector. Code 2 will direct the beam to detector two</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4783486','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4783486"><span><span class="hlt">Growing</span> Hemorrhagic Choroidal Fissure Cyst</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Gelal, Fazıl; Gurkan, Gokhan; Feran, Hamit</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Choroidal fissure cysts are often incidentally discovered. They are usually asymptomatic. The authors report a case of <span class="hlt">growing</span> and hemorrhagic choroidal fissure cyst which was treated surgically. A 22-year-old female presented with headache. Cranial MRI showed a left-sided choroidal fissure cyst. Follow-up MRI showed that the size of the cyst had increased gradually. Twenty months later, the patient was admitted to our emergency department with severe headache. MRI and CT showed an intracystic hematoma. Although such cysts usually have a benign course without symptoms and progression, they may rarely present with intracystic hemorrhage, enlargement of the cyst and increasing symptomatology. PMID:26962426</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004PhyA..340..714K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004PhyA..340..714K"><span>Universal properties of <span class="hlt">growing</span> networks</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Krapivsky, P. L.; Derrida, B.</p> <p>2004-09-01</p> <p>Networks <span class="hlt">growing</span> according to the rule that every new node has a probability pk of being attached to k preexisting nodes, have a universal phase diagram and exhibit power-law decays of the distribution of cluster sizes in the non-percolating phase. The percolation transition is continuous but of infinite order and the size of the giant component is infinitely differentiable at the transition (though of course non-analytic). At the transition the average cluster size (of the finite components) is discontinuous.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3698392','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3698392"><span>A <span class="hlt">rapid</span>, controlled-environment seedling root screen for wheat correlates well with rooting depths at vegetative, but not reproductive, stages at two <span class="hlt">field</span> sites</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Watt, M.; Moosavi, S.; Cunningham, S. C.; Kirkegaard, J. A.; Rebetzke, G. J.; Richards, R. A.</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Background and Aims Root length and depth determine capture of water and nutrients by plants, and are targets for crop improvement. Here we assess a controlled-environment wheat seedling screen to determine speed, repeatability and relatedness to performance of young and adult plants in the <span class="hlt">field</span>. Methods Recombinant inbred lines (RILs) and diverse genotypes were grown in rolled, moist germination paper in growth cabinets, and primary root number and length were measured when leaf 1 or 2 were fully expanded. For comparison, plants were grown in the <span class="hlt">field</span> and root systems were harvested at the two-leaf stage with either a shovel or a soil core. From about the four-leaf stage, roots were extracted with a steel coring tube only, placed directly over the plant and pushed to the required depth with a hydraulic ram attached to a tractor. Key Results In growth cabinets, repeatability was greatest (r = 0·8, P < 0·01) when the paper was maintained moist and seed weight, pathogens and germination times were controlled. Scanned total root length (slow) was strongly correlated (r = 0·7, P < 0·01) with length of the two longest seminal axile roots measured with a ruler (fast), such that 100–200 genotypes were measured per day. Correlation to <span class="hlt">field</span>-grown roots at two sites at two leaves was positive and significant within the RILs and cultivars (r = 0·6, P = 0·01), and at one of the two sites at the five-leaf stage within the RILs (r = 0·8, P = 0·05). Measurements made in the <span class="hlt">field</span> with a shovel or extracted soil cores were fast (5 min per core) and had significant positive correlations to scanner measurements after root washing and cleaning (>2 h per core). <span class="hlt">Field</span> measurements at two- and five-leaf stages did not correlate with root depth at flowering. Conclusions The seedling screen was fast, repeatable and reliable for selecting lines with greater total root length in the young vegetative phase in the <span class="hlt">field</span>. Lack of significant correlation with reproductive stage</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25209697','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25209697"><span>Assessment of Preparation of Samples Under the <span class="hlt">Field</span> Conditions and a Portable Real-Time RT-PCR Assay for the <span class="hlt">Rapid</span> On-Site Detection of Newcastle Disease Virus.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Liu, L; Benyeda, Z; Zohari, S; Yacoub, A; Isaksson, M; Leijon, M; LeBlanc, N; Benyeda, J; Belák, S</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p>Newcastle disease virus (NDV), also known as virulent forms of avian paramyxovirus serotype 1 (AMPV-1), is the causative agent of Newcastle disease affecting many species of birds and causing heavy losses to the poultry industry worldwide. Early, <span class="hlt">rapid</span> and sensitive detection of the viruses or the viral nucleic acids is very important for disease diagnosis and control. This study aimed to evaluate sample preparation under <span class="hlt">field</span> conditions and the application of a real-time RT-PCR method in the portable T-COR4 platform for the <span class="hlt">rapid</span>, on-site detection of NDV on a farm. In the laboratory setting, the portable real-time RT-PCR assay had a similar performance compared with that obtained with a larger, stationary Rotor Gene real-time thermocycler. In the <span class="hlt">field</span> conditions, viral nucleic acids were manually extracted just outside of animal units with minimal equipment and real-time RT-PCR detection was performed with the portable thermocycler T-COR4 placed in a nearby room. The portable assay at the farm detected viral RNA in 15 samples and reached an agreement of 83% (39/47) when the same RNA preparations were tested in the Rotor Gene thermocycler under the laboratory setting. The results demonstrated the feasibility of performing <span class="hlt">field</span> detection but also the need to improve and further simplify sample preparation procedures.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://kidshealth.org/en/kids/growing-pains.html','NIH-MEDLINEPLUS'); return false;" href="http://kidshealth.org/en/kids/growing-pains.html"><span>What a Pain! Kids and <span class="hlt">Growing</span> Pains</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePlus</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>... What Happens in the Operating Room? What a Pain! Kids and <span class="hlt">Growing</span> Pains KidsHealth > For Kids > What a Pain! Kids and ... something doctors call <span class="hlt">growing</span> pains . What Are <span class="hlt">Growing</span> Pains? <span class="hlt">Growing</span> pains aren't a disease. You probably ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://kidshealth.org/en/kids/growing-pains.html','NIH-MEDLINEPLUS'); return false;" href="https://kidshealth.org/en/kids/growing-pains.html"><span>What a Pain! Kids and <span class="hlt">Growing</span> Pains</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePlus</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>... dientes Video: Getting an X-ray What a Pain! Kids and <span class="hlt">Growing</span> Pains KidsHealth > For Kids > What a Pain! Kids and ... something doctors call <span class="hlt">growing</span> pains . What Are <span class="hlt">Growing</span> Pains? <span class="hlt">Growing</span> pains aren't a disease. You probably ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4498037','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4498037"><span>A decision support system (GesCoN) for managing fertigation in vegetable crops. Part II—model calibration and validation under different environmental <span class="hlt">growing</span> conditions on <span class="hlt">field</span> grown tomato</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Conversa, Giulia; Bonasia, Anna; Di Gioia, Francesco; Elia, Antonio</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>The GesCoN model was evaluated for its capability to simulate growth, nitrogen uptake, and productivity of open <span class="hlt">field</span> tomato grown under different environmental and cultural conditions. Five datasets collected from experimental trials carried out in Foggia (IT) were used for calibration and 13 datasets collected from trials conducted in Foggia, Perugia (IT), and Florida (USA) were used for validation. The goodness of fitting was performed by comparing the observed and simulated shoot dry weight (SDW) and N crop uptake during crop seasons, total dry weight (TDW), N uptake and fresh yield (TFY). In SDW model calibration, the relative RMSE values fell within the good 10–15% range, percent BIAS (PBIAS) ranged between −11.5 and 7.4%. The Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency (NSE) was very close to the optimal value 1. In the N uptake calibration RRMSE and PBIAS were very low (7%, and −1.78, respectively) and NSE close to 1. The validation of SDW (RRMSE = 16.7%; NSE = 0.96) and N uptake (RRMSE = 16.8%; NSE = 0.96) showed the good accuracy of GesCoN. A model under- or overestimation of the SDW and N uptake occurred when higher or a lower N rates and/or a more or less efficient system were used compared to the calibration trial. The in-season adjustment, using the “SDWcheck” procedure, greatly improved model simulations both in the calibration and in the validation phases. The TFY prediction was quite good except in Florida, where a large overestimation (+16%) was linked to a different harvest index (0.53) compared to the cultivars used for model calibration and validation in Italian areas. The soil water content at the 10–30 cm depth appears to be well-simulated by the software, and the GesCoN proved to be able to adaptively control potential yield and DW accumulation under limited N soil availability scenarios and consequently to modify fertilizer application. The DSSwell simulate SDW accumulation and N uptake of different tomato genotypes grown under Mediterranean and</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li class="active"><span>21</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_21 --> <div id="page_22" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li class="active"><span>22</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="421"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27701077','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27701077"><span>Evaluation and improvement of a single nucleotide polymorphism-based PCR assay for <span class="hlt">rapid</span> differentiation of live attenuated vaccine strains from <span class="hlt">field</span> isolates of Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Zhu, Weifeng; Li, Jingtao; Wang, Ya; Kang, Chao; Jin, Meilin; Chen, Huanchun</p> <p>2016-11-01</p> <p>A single nucleotide polymorphism-based PCR assay has been developed to differentiate the attenuated vaccine strain used in Japan from <span class="hlt">field</span> isolates of Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae found in pigs. However, this assay has been evaluated with only Japanese strains and isolates; therefore, it is unknown whether it could be used in other countries with E. rhusiopathiae strains and isolates of different genetic backgrounds. In our study, the PCR assay was evaluated using Chinese E. rhusiopathiae vaccine strains and <span class="hlt">field</span> isolates. The PCR assay was able to differentiate the attenuated vaccine strains from the <span class="hlt">field</span> isolates of E. rhusiopathiae in China but with a pattern different from that observed in Japan (only a single nucleotide polymorphism was detected in the Chinese vaccine strains compared with 5 in the Japanese vaccine strains). Importantly, either a DNA polymerase without 3' to 5' exonuclease activity or an exo(+) polymerase with an antibody inhibiting the proofreading activity was required. In conclusion, after evaluation and improvement, this fast differentiation assay can be extended from Japan to China.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15605569','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15605569"><span>How to <span class="hlt">grow</span> great leaders.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ready, Douglas A</p> <p>2004-12-01</p> <p>Few leaders excel at both the unit and enterprise levels. More than ever, though, corporations need people capable of running business units, functions, or regions and focusing on broader company goals. It's up to organizations to develop leaders who can manage the inherent tensions between unit and enterprise priorities. Take the example of RBC Financial Group, one of the largest, most profitable companies in Canada. In the mid-1990's, RBC revamped its competitive strategy in a couple of ways. After the government announced that the Big Six banks in Canada could neither merge with nor acquire one another, RBC decided to <span class="hlt">grow</span> through cross-border acquisitions. Additionally, because customers were starting to seek bundled products and services, RBC reached across its traditional stand-alone businesses to offer integrated solutions. These changes in strategy didn't elicit immediate companywide support. Instinctively, employees reacted against what would amount to a delicate balancing act: They would have to lift their focus out of their silos while continuing to meet unit goals. However, by communicating extensively with staff members, cross-fertilizing talent across unit boundaries, and targeting rewards to shape performance, RBC was able to cultivate rising leaders with the unit expertise and the enterprise vision to help the company fulfill its new aims. <span class="hlt">Growing</span> such well-rounded leaders takes sustained effort because unit-enterprise tensions are quite real. Three common conditions reinforce these tensions. First, most organizational structures foster silo thinking and unimaginative career paths. Second, most companies lack venues for airing and resolving conflicts that arise when there are competing priorities. Third, many have misguided reward systems that pit unit performance against enterprise considerations. Such long-established patterns of organizational behavior are tough to break. Fortunately, as RBC discovered, people can be trained to think and work</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4662019','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4662019"><span>Modeling of subglacial hydrological development following <span class="hlt">rapid</span> supraglacial lake drainage</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Dow, C F; Kulessa, B; Rutt, I C; Tsai, V C; Pimentel, S; Doyle, S H; van As, D; Lindbäck, K; Pettersson, R; Jones, G A; Hubbard, A</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">rapid</span> drainage of supraglacial lakes injects substantial volumes of water to the bed of the Greenland ice sheet over short timescales. The effect of these water pulses on the development of basal hydrological systems is largely unknown. To address this, we develop a lake drainage model incorporating both (1) a subglacial radial flux element driven by elastic hydraulic jacking and (2) downstream drainage through a linked channelized and distributed system. Here we present the model and examine whether substantial, efficient subglacial channels can form during or following lake drainage events and their effect on the water pressure in the surrounding distributed system. We force the model with <span class="hlt">field</span> data from a lake drainage site, 70 km from the terminus of Russell Glacier in West Greenland. The model outputs suggest that efficient subglacial channels do not readily form in the vicinity of the lake during <span class="hlt">rapid</span> drainage and instead water is evacuated primarily by a transient turbulent sheet and the distributed system. Following lake drainage, channels <span class="hlt">grow</span> but are not large enough to reduce the water pressure in the surrounding distributed system, unless preexisting channels are present throughout the domain. Our results have implications for the analysis of subglacial hydrological systems in regions where <span class="hlt">rapid</span> lake drainage provides the primary mechanism for surface-to-bed connections. Key Points Model for subglacial hydrological analysis of <span class="hlt">rapid</span> lake drainage events Limited subglacial channel growth during and following <span class="hlt">rapid</span> lake drainage Persistence of distributed drainage in inland areas where channel growth is limited PMID:26640746</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22548127','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22548127"><span>CFD and PIV analysis of hemodynamics in a <span class="hlt">growing</span> intracranial aneurysm.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Raschi, Marcelo; Mut, Fernando; Byrne, Greg; Putman, Christopher M; Tateshima, Satoshi; Viñuela, Fernando; Tanoue, Tetsuya; Tanishita, Kazuo; Cebral, Juan R</p> <p>2012-02-01</p> <p>Hemodynamics is thought to be a fundamental factor in the formation, progression, and rupture of cerebral aneurysms. Understanding these mechanisms is important to improve their rupture risk assessment and treatment. In this study, we analyze the blood flow <span class="hlt">field</span> in a <span class="hlt">growing</span> cerebral aneurysm using experimental particle image velocimetry (PIV) and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) techniques. Patient-specific models were constructed from longitudinal 3D computed tomography angiography images acquired at 1-y intervals. Physical silicone models were constructed from the computed tomography angiography images using <span class="hlt">rapid</span> prototyping techniques, and pulsatile flow <span class="hlt">fields</span> were measured with PIV. Corresponding CFD models were created and run under matching flow conditions. Both flow <span class="hlt">fields</span> were aligned, interpolated, and compared qualitatively by inspection and quantitatively by defining similarity measures between the PIV and CFD vector <span class="hlt">fields</span>. Results showed that both flow <span class="hlt">fields</span> were in good agreement. Specifically, both techniques provided consistent representations of the main intra-aneurysmal flow structures and their change during the geometric evolution of the aneurysm. Despite differences observed mainly in the near wall region, and the inherent limitations of each technique, the information derived is consistent and can be used to study the role of hemodynamics in the natural history of intracranial aneurysms.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3885734','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3885734"><span>Development and standardization of a monoclonal antibody-based <span class="hlt">rapid</span> flow-through immunoassay for the detection of Aphanomyces invadans in the <span class="hlt">field</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Adil, B; Naveen Kumar, B. T.; Patil, Rajreddy; Ballyaya, Abhiman; Ramesh, K. S.; Poojary, Sathish Rama; Byadgi, Omkar V.; Siriyappagouder, Prabhugouda</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>A monoclonal antibody-based flow-through immunoassay (FTA) was developed using a nitrocellulose membrane placed on the top of adsorbent pads enclosed in a plastic cassette with a test zone at the center. The FTA could be completed within 10 min. Clear purple dots against a white background indicated the presence of Aphanomyces (A.) invadans. The FTA limit of detection was 7 µg/mL for A. invadans compared to 56 µg/mL for the immunodot. FTA and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) could detect A. invadans in fish tissue homogenates at a 10-11 dilution compared to a 10-8 dilution by immunodot. In fish suffering from natural cases of epizootic ulcerative syndrome (EUS) collected from Mangalore, India, FTA and PCR could detect A. invadans in 100% of the samples compared to 89.04% detected by immunodot. FTA reagents were stable and produced expected results for 4 months when stored at 4~8℃. This <span class="hlt">rapid</span> test could serve as simple and cost-effective on-site screening tool to detect A. invadans in fish from EUS outbreak areas and in ports during the shipment of live or frozen fish. PMID:23820211</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/7165022','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/7165022"><span>Effect of protozoan predation on relative abundance of fast- and slow-<span class="hlt">growing</span> bacteria</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Sinclair, J.L.; Alexander, M.</p> <p>1989-01-01</p> <p>Survival of six bacterial species with different growth rates was tested in raw sewage and sewage rendered free of protozoa. When the six species were inoculated at the same densities into sewage containing protozoa, the three slow-<span class="hlt">growing</span> species were <span class="hlt">rapidly</span> eliminated, and two of the three fast-<span class="hlt">growing</span> species survived in detectable numbers. It is suggested that in environments with intense protozoan predation, protozoa may alter composition of bacterial communities by eliminating slow-<span class="hlt">growing</span> bacteria.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014APS..MARS50004R','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014APS..MARS50004R"><span>Measurement of mesoscopic Si:P delta-doped devices fabricated by <span class="hlt">rapid</span> STM hydrogen depassivation lithography via <span class="hlt">field</span>-emission</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Rudolph, M.; Carr, S. M.; Subramania, G.; Ten Eyck, G.; Dominguez, J.; Lilly, M. P.; Carroll, M. S.; Bussmann, E.</p> <p>2014-03-01</p> <p>Recently, a method to fabricate nanoelectronic and quantum devices has been developed that utilizes scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) to place dopants (P) into Si with deterministic atomic-precision. Dopant placement is achieved via STM hydrogen depassivation lithography (HDL). Typically HDL is performed in a low-voltage tunneling mode where electrons desorb one H at a time, which requires extremely slow scan rates. Here, we introduce a high-voltage <span class="hlt">field</span>-emission HDL, increasing patterning scan rate by an order of magnitude. Using the <span class="hlt">field</span>-emission mode, we fabricated several HDL-patterned Si:P delta-doped devices, including a microscale multi-terminal Hall Effect device and a nanoscale quantum point contact. Low temperature transport measurements of the Hall device reveal a dopant density of 1014 cm-2, resistance of 2 k Ω/square, and mobility of 30 cm2/Vs. The quantum point contact showed a blockaded voltage range of 80 mV, comparable to other similar devices patterned using conventional HDL. This work was performed, in part, at the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, a U.S. DOE, Office of Basic Energy Sciences user facility. The work was supported by the Sandia National Laboratories Directed Research and Development Program. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed-Martin Company, for the U. S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011JPhCS.313a2006G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011JPhCS.313a2006G"><span><span class="hlt">Growing</span> axons analysis by using Granulometric Size Distribution</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Gonzalez, Mariela A.; Ballarin, Virginia L.; Rapacioli, Melina; Celín, A. R.; Sánchez, V.; Flores, V.</p> <p>2011-09-01</p> <p>Neurite growth (neuritogenesis) in vitro is a common methodology in the <span class="hlt">field</span> of developmental neurobiology. Morphological analyses of <span class="hlt">growing</span> neurites are usually difficult because their thinness and low contrast usually prevent to observe clearly their shape, number, length and spatial orientation. This paper presents the use of the granulometric size distribution in order to automatically obtain information about the shape, size and spatial orientation of <span class="hlt">growing</span> axons in tissue cultures. The results here presented show that the granulometric size distribution results in a very useful morphological tool since it allows the automatic detection of <span class="hlt">growing</span> axons and the precise characterization of a relevant parameter indicative of the axonal growth spatial orientation such as the quantification of the angle of deviation of the <span class="hlt">growing</span> direction. The developed algorithms automatically quantify this orientation by facilitating the analysis of these images, which is important given the large number of images that need to be processed for this type of study.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015ApNan...5..763H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015ApNan...5..763H"><span>Assessment by Ames test and comet assay of toxicity potential of polymer used to develop <span class="hlt">field</span>-capable <span class="hlt">rapid</span>-detection device to analyze environmental samples</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Hebert, Amanda; Bishop, Michelle; Bhattacharyya, Dhiman; Gleason, Karen; Torosian, Stephen</p> <p>2015-08-01</p> <p>There is need for devices that decrease detection time of food-borne pathogens from days to real-time. In this study, a <span class="hlt">rapid</span>-detection device is being developed and assessed for potential cytotoxicity. The device is comprised of melt-spun polypropylene coupons coated via oxidative chemical vapor deposition (oCVD) with 3,4-Ethylenedioxythiophene (EDOT), for conductivity and 3-Thiopheneethanol (3TE), allowing antibody attachment. The Ames test and comet assay have been used in this study to examine the toxicity potentials of EDOT, 3TE, and polymerized EDOT-co-3TE. For this study, Salmonella typhimurium strain TA1535 was used to assess the mutagenic potential of EDOT, 3TE and the copolymer. The average mutagenic potential of EDOT, 3TE and copolymer was calculated to be 0.86, 0.56, and 0.92, respectively. For mutagenic potential, on a scale from 0 to 1, close to 1 indicates low potential for toxicity, whereas a value of 0 indicates a high potential for toxicity. The comet assay is a single-cell gel electrophoresis technique that is widely used for this purpose. This assay measures toxicity based on the area or intensity of the comet-like shape that DNA fragments produce when DNA damage has occurred. Three cell lines were assessed; FRhK-4, BHK-21, and Vero cells. After averaging the results of all three strains, the tail intensity of the copolymer was 8.8 % and tail moment was 3.0, and is most similar to the untreated control, with average tail intensity of 5.7 % and tail moment of 1.7. The assays conducted in this study provide evidence that the copolymer is non-toxic to humans.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.epa.gov/radiation/rapid-radiochemical-methods-selected-radionuclides','PESTICIDES'); return false;" href="https://www.epa.gov/radiation/rapid-radiochemical-methods-selected-radionuclides"><span><span class="hlt">Rapid</span> Radiochemical Methods for Selected Radionuclides</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.epa.gov/pesticides/search.htm">EPA Pesticide Factsheets</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>The <span class="hlt">rapid</span> methods documents are supplement guidance in a planned series designed to present radioanalytical laboratory personnel, Incident Commanders (and their designees), and other <span class="hlt">field</span> response personnel.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12073892','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12073892"><span>Size characterization of barley starch granules by gravitational <span class="hlt">field</span>-flow fractionation: a <span class="hlt">rapid</span>, low-cost method to assess the brewing capability of different strains.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Reschiglian, Pierluigi; Zattoni, Andrea; Casolari, Sonia; Krumlova, Andrea; Budinska, Marcela; Chmelík, Josef</p> <p>2002-04-01</p> <p>Cereal starch occurs as two types of micrometer-sized granules, large and small. Large starch granules are more susceptible to enzymatic hydrolysis. When cereal starch is used for fermentation processes, as in brewing of barley malt, the barley strains with the highest content of large starch granules should be preferred. Gravitational <span class="hlt">field</span>-flow fractionation (GFFF) is a separation method able to fractionate starch samples at low cost and short analysis time. In this work, the search for the best GFFF conditions for the analytical separation of barley starch within an inter-laboratory approach is presented. For different barley strains cultivated under monitored conditions the size distributions of starch granules is here quickly monitored and characterized by GFFF. As a consequence, dimensional characterization of barley starch can allow for the selection of the most suitable strains with the lowest content of non-degradable starch.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21230180','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21230180"><span>Four-point correlation function of a passive scalar <span class="hlt">field</span> in <span class="hlt">rapidly</span> fluctuating turbulence: Numerical analysis of an exact closure equation.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Mizuno, Y; Ohi, K; Sogabe, T; Yamamoto, Y; Kaneda, Y</p> <p>2010-09-01</p> <p>A numerical analysis is made on the four-point correlation function in a similarity range of a model of two-dimensional passive scalar <span class="hlt">field</span> ψ advected by a turbulent velocity <span class="hlt">field</span> with infinitely small correlation time. The model yields an exact closure equation for the four-point correlation Ψ{4} of ψ, which may be casted into the form of an eigenvalue problem in the similarity range. The analysis of the eigenvalue problem gives not only the scale dependence of Ψ{4} , but also the dependence on the configuration of the four points. The numerical analysis gives S4(R)∝R{ζ{4}} in the similarity range in which S2(R)∝R{ζ{2}} , where S_{N} is the structure function defined by S{N}(R)≡⟨[ψ(x+R)-ψ(x)]{N} and ζ{4}≠2ζ{2} . The estimate of ζ_{4} by the numerical analysis of the eigenvalue problem is in good agreement with numerical simulations so far reported. The agreement supports the idea of universality of the exponent ζ{4} in the sense that ζ_{4} is insensitive to conditions of ψ outside the similarity range. The numerical analysis also shows that the correlation C(R,r)≡[ψ(x+R)-ψ(x)]{2}[ψ(x+r)-ψ(x)]{2}> is stronger than that given by the joint-normal approximation, and scales like C(R,r)∝(r/R){χ} for r/R<1 with R and r in the similarity range, where χ is a constant depending on the angle between R and r .</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/756838','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/756838"><span><span class="hlt">Growing</span> plants on atoll soils</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Stone, E L; Migvar, L; Robison, W L</p> <p>2000-02-16</p> <p>Many years ago people living on atolls depended entirely on foods gathered from the sea and reefs and grown on land. Only a few plants, such as coconut (ni), Pandanus (bob), and arrowroot (mok-mok), could be grown on the lower rainfall atolls, although adequate groundwater conditions also allowed taro (iaraj, kotak, wot) to be cultivated. On higher rainfall atolls, breadfruit (ma) was a major food source, and banana (binana, kepran), lime (laim), and taros (iaraj, kotak, wot) could be grown. The early atoll populations were experts in <span class="hlt">growing</span> plants that were vital to sustaining their nutrition requirements and to providing materials for thatch, basketry, cordage, canoe construction, flowers, and medicine. They knew which varieties of food plants grew well or poorly on their atolls, how to propagate them, and where on their atoll they grew best. They knew the uses of most native plants and what the various woods were well suited for. Many varieties of Pandanus (bob) and breadfruit (ma) grew well with high rainfall, but only a few produced well on drier atolls. Such information had been passed down through the generations although some of it has been lost in the last century. Today there are new plants and new varieties of existing plants that can be grown on atolls. There are also new materials and information on how to <span class="hlt">grow</span> both the old and new plants more effectively. However, there are also introduced weeds and pests to control. Today, there is also an acute need to <span class="hlt">grow</span> more of the useful plants adapted to atolls. Increasing numbers of people living on an atoll without an equal increase in income or food production stretches the available food supplies. Much has been written about the poor conditions for plant growth on atolls. As compared with many places in the world where crops are grown, however, atolls can provide some highly favorable conditions. For instance, the driving force for plant growth is sunlight, and on atolls light is abundant throughout the</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25801518','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25801518"><span>[<span class="hlt">Growing</span> old differently: Transdisciplinary perspective].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Zimmermann, H-P</p> <p>2015-04-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Growing</span> old differently: the phrase is intended to call something other to mind than merely the fact that images and forms of old age and aging have multiplied and diversified to an enormous extent. The suggestion put forward here is that otherness (as opposed to mere differences) should be positively reinforced. In other words, it is not just a matter of noting different forms of old age and aging but more than this, of seeking out opportunities for aging differently. In order to explore this, the article follows an older strand of theory, which has recently come to be frequently quoted in gerontology: the phenomenology of difference as reasoned analytically by Lévinas and Sartre and applied to gerontology by Améry and de Beauvoir. Here, opportunities for aging crucially depend on the way we look at it, how we observe and describe it and not least, how gerontology frames it. A distinction is made between two perspectives and their associated consequences for old age: alienation and alterity. Alienation means looking at old age above all as a disconcerting "other", as a perplexing, problematic deviation from the norm of vitality. Alterity, by contrast, refers to different options for living life in old age: options to be explored and opened up in contradistinction to cultural or academic alienation. Not least, the article appeals for diversity in scholarly approaches and for cross-disciplinary perspectives.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3516225','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3516225"><span>Esophageal malignancy: A <span class="hlt">growing</span> concern</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Chai, Jianyuan; Jamal, M Mazen</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Esophageal cancer is mainly found in Asia and east Africa and is one of the deadliest cancers in the world. However, it has not garnered much attention in the Western world due to its low incidence rate. An increasing amount of data indicate that esophageal cancer, particularly esophageal adenocarcinoma, has been rising by 6-fold annually and is now becoming the fastest <span class="hlt">growing</span> cancer in the United States. This rise has been associated with the increase of the obese population, as abdominal fat puts extra pressure on the stomach and causes gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Long standing GERD can induce esophagitis and metaplasia and, ultimately, leads to adenocarcinoma. Acid suppression has been the main strategy to treat GERD; however, it has not been proven to control esophageal malignancy effectively. In fact, its side effects have triggered multiple warnings from regulatory agencies. The high mortality and fast growth of esophageal cancer demand more vigorous efforts to look into its deeper mechanisms and come up with better therapeutic options. PMID:23236223</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20822439','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20822439"><span>Psychological wisdom research: commonalities and differences in a <span class="hlt">growing</span> <span class="hlt">field</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Staudinger, Ursula M; Glück, Judith</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Wisdom represents a fruitful topic for psychological investigations for at least two reasons. First, the study of wisdom emphasizes the search for the continued optimization and the further cultural evolution of the human condition. Second, it exemplifies the collaboration of cognitive, emotional, and motivational processes. The growth and scope of psychological wisdom research over the past few decades demonstrate that it is possible to investigate this complex construct with empirical rigor. Since the 1970s, five main areas have been established: lay definitions of wisdom, conceptualizing and measuring wisdom, understanding the development of wisdom, investigating the plasticity of wisdom, and applying psychological knowledge about wisdom in life contexts.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12282936','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12282936"><span>Environmental education: a fast-<span class="hlt">growing</span> <span class="hlt">field</span> in Latin America.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Wood, D W</p> <p>1989-01-01</p> <p>Private conservation organizations have become more prevalent throughout Latin America in the last decade. They range from well organized and financed, internationally-recognized organizations, to small volunteer groups. They are committed to preserving the natural resources and cover national park management, the protection of wildlife, reforestation, environmental contamination and other issues. Also in Latin America environmental education has become an important part of the resource conservation programs. One of the most advanced and successful programs is in Ecuador and is called Natura. It has produced many educational materials including slide programs, television spots and programs, booklets, a complete primary school curriculum, posters, radio programs and a profile of Ecuador's environment. Their programs have been successful because they analyze their target audience and tailor the program to their needs and desires. They also follow up with evaluation questionnaires and testing for each program. It has been difficult for organizations such as these to implement programs in rural areas. There are some groups developing environmental education programs in rural areas through alliances with development assistance organizations. There are essential for the protection of wild areas where human needs must be balanced with longterm ecological priorities.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=teacher+AND+student+AND+relationship&pg=2&id=EJ1003225','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=teacher+AND+student+AND+relationship&pg=2&id=EJ1003225"><span>Teacher-Student Relationships: A <span class="hlt">Growing</span> <span class="hlt">Field</span> of Study</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Bernstein-Yamashiro, Beth; Noam, Gil G.</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>A substantial percentage of students come to school with a number of stress factors from life circumstances, personal clinical attributes, and typical adolescent challenges. As a result, some students become disengaged from school, are unsuccessful, or drop out of school. School structures are not always equipped to respond to such problems. A…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA589474','DTIC-ST'); return false;" href="http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA589474"><span>Mission Command: Preparing the <span class="hlt">Fields</span> for the Seed to <span class="hlt">Grow</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://publicaccess.dtic.mil/psm/api/service/search/search">DTIC Science & Technology</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-03-01</p> <p>we create a culture of trust that allows mission command to flourish in garrison in the same manner it has in combat? In his best -selling book, The... workouts . In this simplest of examples, the tension of extending the trust to subordinates who wish to exercise initiative can be seen, and easily...teaching, and coaching;  Awarding rewards and status; and  Recruitment, selection, promotion, and communication procedures.32 Selecting the best of</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20030063126&hterms=deutsch&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3Ddeutsch','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20030063126&hterms=deutsch&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3Ddeutsch"><span>Oceanic Impacts: A <span class="hlt">Growing</span> <span class="hlt">Field</span> of Fundamental Geoscience</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Gersonde, Rainer; Deutsch, Alexander; Ivanov, Boris A.; Kyte, Frank T.</p> <p>2002-01-01</p> <p>The importance of oceanic impacts of collisional events and resulting energy release, are briefly described. Data collection methods from the Eltanin (a mesosiderite projectile) deep water impact, are presented.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li class="active"><span>22</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_22 --> <div id="page_23" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li class="active"><span>23</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="441"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=intelligence+AND+emotional+AND+children&pg=7&id=EJ867907','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=intelligence+AND+emotional+AND+children&pg=7&id=EJ867907"><span><span class="hlt">Growing</span> Emotional Intelligence through Community-Based Arts</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Aguilar, Jill; Bedau, Dani; Anthony, Chris</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>The community-based arts environment is uniquely suited to addressing the needs of young people in the area of <span class="hlt">growing</span> emotional intelligence. The arts offer specific structures, systems, and dynamics that allow for the emergence of the emotional adolescent self. Leaders in the community-based arts <span class="hlt">field</span> must consciously position their…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14975922','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14975922"><span><span class="hlt">Rapid</span> <span class="hlt">field</span> measurement of the assimilation rate versus internal CO(2) concentration relationship in green ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica Marsh.): the influence of light intensity.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Davis, J E; Arkebauer, T J; Norman, J M; Brandle, J R</p> <p>1987-12-01</p> <p>Assimilation rate (A) versus intercellular CO(2) concentration (C(i)) relationships for leaflets of five-year-old green ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica Marsh.) trees were computed from gas exchange measurements obtained in the <span class="hlt">field</span> with a closed-circuit, portable photosynthesis measurement system comprising an LI-6200 gas analyzer and an LI-6000 computer, (Li-Cor, Inc., Lincoln, Nebraska, USA). Observations were made over a range of light intensities achieved by attenuating direct sunlight with neutral density filters, and over a range of ambient CO(2) concentrations achieved by breathing into the assimilation chamber and then lowering the CO(2) concentration to the desired level with the LI-6200's soda-lime scrubber. Boundary layer conductance was determined by use of a leaf replica made of moist filter paper. Typically, A-C(i) curves at four light intensities were obtained in three to four hours. The initial slope (when A = 0) of the A-C(i) curve obtained at a light intensity of 1750 micromol m(-2) s(-1) (full sunlight) was similar to that obtained at a light intensity of 840 micromol m(-2) s(-1). However, when light intensity was reduced further (to 370 and 160 micromol m(-2) s(-1)), the initial slope of the A-C(i) curve also decreased, indicating that at these light intensities, assimilation was limited by photochemical energy supply, as well as CO(2) concentration.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23871564','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23871564"><span><span class="hlt">Rapid</span> speciation and determination of vanadium compounds using ion-pair reversed-phase ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography inductively coupled plasma-sector <span class="hlt">field</span> mass spectrometry.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kilibarda, Nikola; Afton, Scott E; Harrington, James M; Yan, Fei; Levine, Keith E</p> <p>2013-08-23</p> <p>Environmental vanadium contamination is a potential concern to public health, as evidenced by its place on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Drinking Water Contaminant Candidate List as a priority contaminant. Vanadium toxicity varies significantly between different oxidation states; therefore, it is crucial to be able to monitor the speciation of vanadium in environmental samples. In this study, a novel method is described that utilizes ion-pair reversed-phase ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography with inductively coupled plasma-sector <span class="hlt">field</span> mass spectrometry (IP-RP-UHPLC-ICP-SFMS) to separate vanadyl and vanadate ions and resolve a major polyatomic spectral interference ((35)Cl(16)O(+)) in less than a minute. Detection limits were obtained in the low ngL(-1) (part per trillion) range with linear calibrations across several orders of magnitude (50ngL(-1)-100μgL(-1)). The mechanism of chromatographic retention was elucidated through investigation of the role of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, tetrabutylammonium ion and pH on elution. The optimized method was then applied to the speciation of vanadium in local lake water samples.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://pubs.usgs.gov/sir/2008/5108/','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="https://pubs.usgs.gov/sir/2008/5108/"><span>Effectiveness of an alluvial wetland on improving ground-water quality in a municipal well <span class="hlt">field</span>, Cedar <span class="hlt">Rapids</span>, Iowa, 1998-2006</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Schnoebelen, Douglas J.</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>An alluvial wetland proved useful in improving water quality. Samples from observation wells completed in the alluvial wetland near the municipal well <span class="hlt">field</span> had nitrate concentrations that were four to six times lower when compared to river or upland sites; however, iron and manganese concentrations in samples from observation wells in the wetland areas were an order of magnitude higher when compared to the river or an upgradient well. Biological and chemical reduction processes were determined to mobilize inorganic constituents in accordance with physical chemistry principles. Generally, selected pesticides and two pesticide degradates of atrazine that were sampled for in alluvial wetland wells remained relatively unchanged, and indicated only a slight decrease in concentration compared to the Cedar River water samples. Pesticides were not detected above regulatory limits in any of the observation wells; however, one sample from the Cedar River had an atrazine detection at 4.5 micrograms per liter, which is above the maximum contaminant level of 3.0 micrograms per liter for drinking-water regulations for that compound. Results indicate that alluvial wetlands may provide substantial reductions of nitrate concentrations in ground water, and may be a useful strategy for the reduction of nitrate for municipal wells. Results for reducing pesticides were less dramatic than for nitrate, as pesticide concentrations were reduced slightly from the river to the wetland.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19880056707&hterms=growing+crystals&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3Dgrowing%2Bcrystals','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19880056707&hterms=growing+crystals&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3Dgrowing%2Bcrystals"><span>Crystal <span class="hlt">growing</span> from the melt</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Davis, S. H.</p> <p>1987-01-01</p> <p>The mechanical and electrical properties of crystals produced by a unidirectional process depend strongly on the temperature and flow <span class="hlt">fields</span> since these control the concentration of solute at the melt-crystal interface. The solute gradient there drives morphological instabilities that lead to cellular or dendritic interfaces. In the presentation several features of flow-solidification interactions will be discussed. These will include the effects of convection driven by density changes and buoyancy and the imposition of forced flow.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AGUFMEP53A0934A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AGUFMEP53A0934A"><span>How High Do Sandbars <span class="hlt">Grow</span>?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Alexander, J. S.; McElroy, B. J.</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>Bar forms in wide sandy rivers store sediment, control channel hydraulics, and are fundamental units of riverine ecosystems. Bar form height is often used as a measure of channel depth in ancient fluvial deposits and is also a crucially important measure of habitat quality in modern rivers. In the Great Plains of North America, priority bird species use emergent bars to nest, and sandbar heights are a direct predictor of flood hazard for bird nests. Our current understanding of controls on bar height are limited to few datasets and ad hoc observations from specific settings. We here examine a new dataset of bar heights and explore models of bar growth. We present bar a height dataset from the Platte and Niobrara Rivers in Nebraska, and an unchannelized reach of the Missouri River along the Nebraska-South Dakota border. Bar height data are normalized by flow frequency, and we examine parsimonious statistical models between expected controls (depth, stage, discharge, flow duration, work etc.) and maximum bar heights. From this we generate empirical-statistical models of maximum bar height for wide, sand-bedded rivers in the Great Plains of the United States and rivers of similar morphology elsewhere. Migration of bar forms is driven by downstream slip-face additions of sediment sourced from their stoss sides, but bars also sequester sediment and <span class="hlt">grow</span> vertically and longitudinally. We explore our empirical data with a geometric-kinematic model of bar growth driven by sediment transport from smaller-scale bedforms. Our goal is to understand physical limitations on bar growth and geometry, with implications for interpreting the rock record and predicting physically-driven riverine habitat variables.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25794902','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25794902"><span><span class="hlt">Rapid</span> real-time PCR methods to distinguish Salmonella Enteritidis wildtype <span class="hlt">field</span> isolates from vaccine strains Salmovac SE/Gallivac SE and AviPro SALMONELLA VAC E.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Maurischat, Sven; Szabo, Istvan; Baumann, Beatrice; Malorny, Burkhard</p> <p>2015-05-01</p> <p>Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis is a major non-typhoid Salmonella serovar causing human salmonellosis mainly associated with the consumption of poultry and products thereof. To reduce infections in poultry, S. Enteritidis live vaccine strains AviPro SALMONELLA VAC E and Salmovac SE/Gallivac SE have been licensed and used in several countries worldwide. To definitively diagnose a S. Enteritidis contamination in vaccinated herds a reliable and fast method for the differentiation between vaccine and wildtype <span class="hlt">field</span> isolates is required. In this study, we developed and validated real-time PCR (qPCR) assays to distinguish those variants genetically. Suitable target sequences were identified by whole genome sequencing (WGS) using the Illumina MiSeq system. SNP regions in kdpA and nhaA proved to be most useful for differentiation of AviPro SALMONELLA VAC E and Salmovac SE/Gallivac SE, respectively, from wildtype strains. For each vaccine strain one TaqMan-qPCR assay and one alternative approach using High Resolution Melting (HRM) analysis was designed. All 30 Salmovac SE and 7 AviPro SALMONELLA VAC E vaccine strain reisolates tested were correctly identified by both approaches (100% inclusivity). Furthermore, all 137 (TaqMan) and 97 (HRM) Salmonella non-vaccine and related Enterobacteriaceae strains tested were excluded (100% exclusivity). The analytical detection limits were determined to be approx. 10(2) genome copies/reaction for the TaqMan and 10(4) genome copies/reaction for the HRM approach. The real-time PCR assays proved to be a reliable and fast alternative to the cultural vaccine strain identification tests helping decision makers in control measurements to take action within a shorter period of time.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009SPIE.7372E..0GZ','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009SPIE.7372E..0GZ"><span><span class="hlt">Rapid</span> skin profiling with non-contact full-<span class="hlt">field</span> optical coherence tomography: study of patients with diabetes mellitus type I</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Zakharov, P.; Talary, M. S.; Kolm, I.; Caduff, A.</p> <p>2009-07-01</p> <p>The application of the full-<span class="hlt">field</span> optical coherence tomography (OCT) microscope to the characterisation of skin morphology is described. An automated procedure for analysis and interpretation of the OCT data has been developed which provides measures of the laterally averaged depth profiles of the skin reflectance. The skin at the dorsal side of the upper arm of 22 patients with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus has been characterised in a non-contact way. The OCT signal profile was compared with the optical histological data obtained with a commercial confocal microscope (CM). The highest correlation to the epidermal thickness (ET) obtained using CM was found for the distance from the entrance OCT peak to the first minimum of the reflection profile (R2=0.657, p<0.0001). The distance to the second OCT reflection peak was found to be less correlated to ET (R2=0.403, p=0.0009). A further analysis was undertaken to explore the relation between the subjects' demographical data and the OCT reflection profile. The distance to the second OCT peak demonstrated a correlation with a marginal statistical significance for the body-mass index (positive correlation with p=0.01) and age (negative correlation with p=0.062). At the same time the amplitude of the OCT signal, when compensated for signal attenuation with depth, is negatively correlated with age (p<0.0002). We suggest that this may be an effect of photo degradation of the dermal collagen. In the patient population studied, no relation could be determined between the measured skin morphology and the duration of diabetes or concentration of glycated haemoglobin in the blood.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1381764','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1381764"><span>Fungal infections: a <span class="hlt">growing</span> threat.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Dixon, D M; McNeil, M M; Cohen, M L; Gellin, B G; La Montagne, J R</p> <p>1996-01-01</p> <p>THE EMERGENCE OF newly identified fungal pathogens and the reemergence of previously uncommon fungal diseases is primarily related to increases in the numbers of susceptible persons: people with HIV infection, bone marrow and organ transplant recipients, cancer patients being treated with chemotherapy, critically ill persons, and very low birth weight ( < or = 1500 g) infants. These immunocompromised populations are at risk for infection not only with opportunistic pathogens (for example, Pneumocystis, Candida, Cryptococcus, Trichosporon, Malassezia, Aspergillus, Penicillium marneffei, and numerous other moulds or yeasts) but also with fungal pathogens that usually infect otherwise healthy persons not previously exposed to endemic fungi (for example, Coccidioides immitis, Histoplasma capsulatum, and Blastomyces dermatitidis) and Sporothrix schenckii. Morbidity, mortality, and health care costs associated with fungal infections are high. Addressing the emergence of fungal diseases will require increased surveillance coupled with the availability of <span class="hlt">rapid</span>, noninvasive diagnostic tests; monitoring the development of resistance to antifungal agents; and research focused on the understanding, prevention, and control of fungal infections. Images p[227]-a p226-a p232-a PMID:8643813</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/801544','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/801544"><span>FFAGS for <span class="hlt">rapid</span> acceleration</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Carol J. Johnstone and Shane Koscielniak</p> <p>2002-09-30</p> <p>When large transverse and longitudinal emittances are to be transported through a circular machine, extremely <span class="hlt">rapid</span> acceleration holds the advantage that the beam becomes immune to nonlinear resonances because there is insufficient time for amplitudes to build up. Uncooled muon beams exhibit large emittances and require fast acceleration to avoid decay losses and would benefit from this style of acceleration. The approach here employs a fixed-<span class="hlt">field</span> alternating gradient or FFAG magnet structure and a fixed frequency acceleration system. Acceptance is enhanced by the use only of linear lattice elements, and fixed-frequency rf enables the use of cavities with large shunt resistance and quality factor.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=PIA03889&hterms=nino&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3Dnino%2B4','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=PIA03889&hterms=nino&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3Dnino%2B4"><span>El Nino Continues to <span class="hlt">Grow</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p></p> <p>2002-01-01</p> <p><p/> The latest image from NASA's Jason oceanography satellite, taken during a 10-day collection cycle ending December 2, 2002, shows the Pacific dominated by two significant areas of higher-than-normal sealevel (warmer ocean temperatures). In the central equatorial Pacific, the large area of higher than normal sea surface heights(warmer than normal sea surface temperatures) associated with <span class="hlt">growing</span> El Nino conditions has recently migrated eastward toward the coast of South America. Meanwhile, the influence of the 20- to 30-year larger than El Nino/La Nina pattern called the Pacific Decadal Oscillation continues to create warm, higher-than-normal sea-surface heights in the north Pacific that are connected in a warm horseshoe pattern with the western and southern Pacific. Sea-surface heights are a measure of how much heat is stored in the ocean below. This heat influences both present weather and future planetary climate events.<p/>The image shows red areas in the north Pacific and at the equator that are about 10 centimeters (4 inches) above normal; white areas indicate sea surface heights between 14 and 32 centimeters (6 to 13 inches) above normal. These regions contrast with the western tropical Pacific, where lower-than-normal sea levels (blue areas) have developed that are between 5 and 13 centimeters (2 and 5 inches) below normal, while purple areas range from 14 to 18 centimeters (6 to 7 inches) below normal. Along the equator, the red sea surface heights equate to sea surface temperature departures greater than one degree Celsius (two degrees Fahrenheit) and the white sea surface heights are sea surface temperatures 1.5 to 2.5 degrees Celsius(three to five degrees Fahrenheit) above normal.<p/>The U.S. portion of the Jason mission is managed by JPL for NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, Washington, D.C. Research on Earth's oceans using Jason and other space-based capabilities is conducted by NASA's Earth Science Enterprise to better understand and protect our</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27081988','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27081988"><span>Stress Induced Branching of <span class="hlt">Growing</span> Crystals on Curved Surfaces.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Köhler, Christian; Backofen, Rainer; Voigt, Axel</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p>If two-dimensional crystals <span class="hlt">grow</span> on a curved surface, the Gaussian curvature of the surface induces elastic stress and affects the growth pathway. The elastic stress can be alleviated by incorporating defects or, if this is energetically unfavorable, via an elastic instability which leads to anisotropic growth with branched ribbonlike structures. This instability provides a generic route to <span class="hlt">grow</span> defect-free crystals on curved surfaces. Depending on the elastic properties of the crystal and the geometric properties of the surface, different growth morphologies with two-, four-, and sixfold symmetry develop. Using a phase <span class="hlt">field</span> crystal type modeling approach, we provide a microscopic understanding of the morphology selection.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21664848','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21664848"><span><span class="hlt">Rapid</span> frequency scan EPR.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Tseitlin, Mark; Rinard, George A; Quine, Richard W; Eaton, Sandra S; Eaton, Gareth R</p> <p>2011-08-01</p> <p>In <span class="hlt">rapid</span> frequency scan EPR with triangular scans, sufficient time must be allowed to insure that the magnetization in the x, y plane decays to baseline at the end of the scan, which typically is about 5T(2) after the spins are excited. To permit relaxation of signals excited toward the extremes of the scan the total scan time required may be much longer than 5T(2). However, with periodic, saw-tooth excitation, the slow-scan EPR spectrum can be recovered by Fourier deconvolution of data recorded with a total scan period of 5T(2), even if some spins are excited later in the scan. This scan time is similar to polyphase excitation methods. The peak power required for either polyphase excitation or <span class="hlt">rapid</span> frequency scans is substantially smaller than for pulsed EPR. The use of an arbitrary waveform generator (AWG) and cross loop resonator facilitated implementation of the <span class="hlt">rapid</span> frequency scan experiments reported here. The use of constant continuous low B(1), periodic excitation waveform, and constant external magnetic <span class="hlt">field</span> is similar to polyphase excitation, but could be implemented without the AWG that is required for polyphase excitation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19840021899','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19840021899"><span><span class="hlt">Rapid</span> adhesive bonding concepts</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Stein, B. A.; Tyeryar, J. R.; Hodges, W. T.</p> <p>1984-01-01</p> <p>Adhesive bonding in the aerospace industry typically utilizes autoclaves or presses which have considerable thermal mass. As a consequence, the rates of heatup and cooldown of the bonded parts are limited and the total time and cost of the bonding process is often relatively high. Many of the adhesives themselves do not inherently require long processing times. Bonding could be performed <span class="hlt">rapidly</span> if the heat was concentrated in the bond lines or at least in the adherends. <span class="hlt">Rapid</span> adhesive bonding concepts were developed to utilize induction heating techniques to provide heat directly to the bond line and/or adherends without heating the entire structure, supports, and fixtures of a bonding assembly. Bonding times for specimens are cut by a factor of 10 to 100 compared to standard press bonding. The development of <span class="hlt">rapid</span> adhesive bonding for lap shear specimens (per ASTM D1003 and D3163), for aerospace panel bonding, and for <span class="hlt">field</span> repair needs of metallic and advanced fiber reinforced polymeric matrix composite structures are reviewed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3145835','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3145835"><span><span class="hlt">Rapid</span> Frequency Scan EPR</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Tseitlin, Mark; Rinard, George A.; Quine, Richard W.; Eaton, Sandra S.; Eaton, Gareth R.</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>In <span class="hlt">rapid</span> frequency scan EPR with triangular scans, sufficient time must be allowed to insure that the magnetization in the x,y plane decays to baseline at the end of the scan, which typically is about 5 T2 after the spins are excited. To permit relaxation of signals excited toward the extremes of the scan the total scan time required may be much longer than 5 T2. However, with periodic, saw-tooth excitation, the slow-scan EPR spectrum can be recovered by Fourier deconvolution of data recorded with a total scan period of 5 T2, even if some spins are excited later in the scan. This scan time is similar to polyphase excitation methods. The peak power required for either polyphase excitation or <span class="hlt">rapid</span> frequency scans is substantially smaller than for pulsed EPR. The use of an arbitrary waveform generator (AWG) and cross loop resonator facilitated implementation of the <span class="hlt">rapid</span> frequency scan experiments reported here. The use of constant continuous low B1, periodic excitation waveform, and constant external magnetic <span class="hlt">field</span> is similar to polyphase excitation, but could be implemented without the AWG that is required for polyphase excitation. PMID:21664848</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4622370','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4622370"><span>Disc Golf, a <span class="hlt">Growing</span> Sport</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Nelson, Joseph T.; Jones, Richard E.; Runstrom, Michael; Hardy, Jolene</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Background Disc golf is a sport played much like traditional golf, but rather than using a ball and club, players throw flying discs with various throwing motions. It has been played by an estimated 8 to 12 million people in the United States. Like all sports, injuries sustained while playing disc golf are not uncommon. Although formalized in the 1970s, it has grown at a <span class="hlt">rapid</span> pace; however, disc golf–related injuries have yet to be described in the medical literature. Purpose To describe the most common injuries incurred by disc golf players while comparing the different types of throwing styles. Study Design Descriptive epidemiology study. Methods The data in this study were collected from 883 disc golf players who responded to an online survey collected over a 1-month period. Respondents answered 49 questions related to demographics, experience, style of play, and injury details. Using a chi-square analysis, common injuries sustained in players using backhand and forehand throwing styles were compared. Results More than 81% of respondents stated that they had sustained an injury playing disc golf, including injuries to the elbow (n = 325), shoulder (n = 305), back (n = 218), and knee (n = 199). The injuries were most commonly described as a muscle strain (n = 241), sprain (n = 162), and tendinitis (n = 145). The type of throw primarily used by players varied, with 86.2% using backhand, 12.7% using forehand, and 1.1% using an overhead throw. Players using a forehand throw were more likely to sustain an elbow injury (P = .014). Many players (n = 115) stated they had undergone surgery due to a disc golf–related injury, with the most common surgeries including meniscal, shoulder, spine, and foot/ankle surgeries. Conclusion The majority of surveyed disc golfers sustained at least 1 injury while playing disc golf, with many requiring surgery. The types of injuries sustained by players varied by the types of throw primarily used. As the sport of disc golf continues</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AGUFMED21C0838C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AGUFMED21C0838C"><span>Watching Faults <span class="hlt">Grow</span> in Sand</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Cooke, M. L.</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>Accretionary sandbox experiments provide a rich environment for investigating the processes of fault development. These experiments engage students because 1) they enable direct observation of fault growth, which is impossible in the crust (type 1 physical model), 2) they are not only representational but can also be manipulated (type 2 physical model), 3) they can be used to test hypotheses (type 3 physical model) and 4) they resemble experiments performed by structural geology researchers around the world. The structural geology courses at UMass Amherst utilize a series of accretionary sandboxes experiments where students first watch a video of an experiment and then perform a group experiment. The experiments motivate discussions of what conditions they would change and what outcomes they would expect from these changes; hypothesis development. These discussions inevitably lead to calculations of the scaling relationships between model and crustal fault growth and provide insight into the crustal processes represented within the dry sand. Sketching of the experiments has been shown to be a very effective assessment method as the students reveal which features they are analyzing. Another approach used at UMass is to set up a forensic experiment. The experiment is set up with spatially varying basal friction before the meeting and students must figure out what the basal conditions are through the experiment. This experiment leads to discussions of equilibrium and force balance within the accretionary wedge. Displacement <span class="hlt">fields</span> can be captured throughout the experiment using inexpensive digital image correlation techniques to foster quantitative analysis of the experiments.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADB181660','DTIC-ST'); return false;" href="http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADB181660"><span><span class="hlt">Rapid</span> <span class="hlt">Field</span> Toxicity Test for Water Supplies</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://publicaccess.dtic.mil/psm/api/service/search/search">DTIC Science & Technology</a></p> <p></p> <p>1994-02-28</p> <p>four hours to allow toxins to react with the cells, bioluminescent bacteria , and for the cells to regain their ight-producing powers. In 1993, the...chart bioluminescent bacteria . recorder, where it is depicted as a cumulative curve (Fig. 5). Mud testing uses the suspended particulate phase (SPP, Fig...in perfect Correlation with the bioluminescent bacteria assay agreement. Correlation of E50 with LC50 is shown (Fig. 10) is good below an EC50 (half</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA472634','DTIC-ST'); return false;" href="http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA472634"><span>The <span class="hlt">Rapid</span> <span class="hlt">Field</span> Initiative Business Analysis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://publicaccess.dtic.mil/psm/api/service/search/search">DTIC Science & Technology</a></p> <p></p> <p>2007-06-21</p> <p>operations. While none of the investigators are certified in using Lean Six Sigma, we familiarized ourselves with the Lean Six Sigma methodology . Additionally...we are all very familiar with the use of the Systems Decision Process (SDP) which compares favorably with the Lean Six Sigma methodology . The</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008APS..DFD.BH010G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008APS..DFD.BH010G"><span><span class="hlt">Rapid</span> Evaporation of microbubbles</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Gautam, Jitendra; Esmaeeli, Asghar</p> <p>2008-11-01</p> <p>When a liquid is heated to a temperature far above its boiling point, it evaporates abruptly. Boiling of liquid at high temperatures can be explosive and destructive, and poses a potential hazard for a host of industrial processes. Explosive boiling may occur if a cold and volatile liquid is brought into contact with a hot and non-volatile liquid, or if a liquid is superheated or depressurized <span class="hlt">rapidly</span>. Such possibilities are realized, for example, in the depressurization of low boiling point liquefied natural gas (LNG) in the pipelines or storage tanks as a result of a leak. While boiling of highly heated liquids can be destructive at macroscale, the (nearly) instantaneous pace of the process and the release of large amount of kinetic energy make the phenomena extremely attractive at microscale where it is possible to utilize the released energy to derive micromechanical systems. For instance, there is currently a <span class="hlt">growing</span> interest in micro-explosion of liquid for generation of micro bubbles for actuation purposes. The aim of the current study is to gain a fundamental understanding of the subject using direct numerical simulations. In particular, we seek to investigate the boundary between stable and unstable nucleus growth in terms of the degree of liquid superheat and to compare the dynamics of unstable and stable growth.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li class="active"><span>23</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_23 --> <div id="page_24" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li class="active"><span>24</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="461"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007198.htm','NIH-MEDLINEPLUS'); return false;" href="https://medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007198.htm"><span><span class="hlt">Rapid</span> shallow breathing</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePlus</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Tachypnea; Breathing - <span class="hlt">rapid</span> and shallow; Fast shallow breathing; Respiratory rate - <span class="hlt">rapid</span> and shallow ... Shallow, <span class="hlt">rapid</span> breathing has many possible medical causes, including: Asthma Blood clot in an artery in the lung Choking Chronic obstructive ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15761149','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15761149"><span>The magnetic <span class="hlt">field</span> of the Large Magellanic Cloud revealed through Faraday rotation.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Gaensler, B M; Haverkorn, M; Staveley-Smith, L; Dickey, J M; McClure-Griffiths, N M; Dickel, J R; Wolleben, M</p> <p>2005-03-11</p> <p>We have measured the Faraday rotation toward a large sample of polarized radio sources behind the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) to determine the structure of this galaxy's magnetic <span class="hlt">field</span>. The magnetic <span class="hlt">field</span> of the LMC consists of a coherent axisymmetric spiral of <span class="hlt">field</span> strength approximately 1 microgauss. Strong fluctuations in the magnetic <span class="hlt">field</span> are also seen on small (<0.5 parsec) and large (approximately 100 parsecs) scales. The large bursts of recent star formation and supernova activity in the LMC argue against standard dynamo theory, adding to the <span class="hlt">growing</span> evidence for <span class="hlt">rapid</span> <span class="hlt">field</span> amplification in galaxies.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19940000114&hterms=growing+crystals&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3Dgrowing%2Bcrystals','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19940000114&hterms=growing+crystals&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3Dgrowing%2Bcrystals"><span><span class="hlt">Growing</span> Organic Crystals By The Czochralski Method</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Shields, Angela; Frazier, Donald O.; Penn, Benjamin G.; Aggarwal, M. D.; Wang, W. S.</p> <p>1994-01-01</p> <p>Apparatus <span class="hlt">grows</span> high-quality single crystals of organic compounds by Czochralski method. In Czochralski process, <span class="hlt">growing</span> crystal lifted from middle of molten material without touching walls. Because of low melting temperatures of organic crystals, glass vessels usable. Traditional method for inorganic semiconductors adapted to optically nonlinear organic materials.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19890000492&hterms=Pharmacology&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3DPharmacology','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19890000492&hterms=Pharmacology&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3DPharmacology"><span>Using Inorganic Crystals To <span class="hlt">Grow</span> Protein Crystals</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Shlichta, Paul J.; Mcpherson, Alexander A.</p> <p>1989-01-01</p> <p>Solid materials serve as nucleating agents. Protein crystals induced by heterogeneous nucleation and in some cases by epitaxy to <span class="hlt">grow</span> at lower supersaturations than needed for spontaneous nucleation. Heterogeneous nucleation makes possible to <span class="hlt">grow</span> large, defect-free single crystals of protein more readily. Such protein crystals benefits research in biochemistry and pharmacology.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED244131.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED244131.pdf"><span><span class="hlt">Growing</span> Vegetables. People on the Farm.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Department of Agriculture, Washington, DC. Office of Governmental and Public Affairs.</p> <p></p> <p>This booklet, one in a series about life on modern farms, describes farm operations and some activities in the lives of six vegetable farmers throughout the United States. The booklet visits the tomato <span class="hlt">growing</span> of Carl Schneider and his partners and the lettuce <span class="hlt">growing</span> farm of Norman Martella, both in California. It then includes brief accounts of…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=billing&id=EJ1093258','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=billing&id=EJ1093258"><span>Geometric <span class="hlt">Growing</span> Patterns: What's the Rule?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Hourigan, Mairéad; Leavy, Aisling</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>While within a geometric repeating pattern, there is an identifiable core which is made up of objects that repeat in a predictable manner, a geometric <span class="hlt">growing</span> pattern (also called visual or pictorial <span class="hlt">growing</span> patterns in other curricula) "is a pattern that is made from a sequence of figures [or objects] that change from one term to the next in…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19850046161&hterms=growing+old&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dgrowing%2Bold','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19850046161&hterms=growing+old&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dgrowing%2Bold"><span>Relationships of a <span class="hlt">growing</span> magnetic flux region to flares</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Martin, S. F.; Bentley, R. D.; Schadee, A.; Antalova, A.; Kucera, A.; Dezso, L.; Gesztelyi, L.; Harvey, K. L.; Jones, H.; Livi, S. H. B.</p> <p>1984-01-01</p> <p>The evolution of flare sites at the boundaries of major new and <span class="hlt">growing</span> magnetic flux regions within complexes of active regions has been analyzed using H-alpha images. A spectrum of possible relationships of <span class="hlt">growing</span> flux regions to flares is described. An 'intimate' interaction between old and new flux and flare sites occurs at the boundaries of their regions. Forced or 'intimidated' interaction involves new flux pushing older, lower flux density <span class="hlt">fields</span> toward a neighboring old polarity inversion line, followed by the occurrence of a flare. In 'influential' interaction, magnetic lines of force over an old polarity inversion line reconnect to new emerging flux, and a flare occurs when the magnetic <span class="hlt">field</span> overlying the filament becomes too weak to prevent its eruption. 'Inconsequential' interaction occurs when a new flux region is too small or has the wrong orientation for creating flare conditions. 'Incidental' interaction involves a flare occurring without any significant relationship to new flux regions.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26905859','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26905859"><span><span class="hlt">Growing</span> Carbon Nanotubes from Both Sides of Graphene.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Jiang, Jinlong; Li, Yilun; Gao, Caitian; Kim, Nam Dong; Fan, Xiujun; Wang, Gunuk; Peng, Zhiwei; Hauge, Robert H; Tour, James M</p> <p>2016-03-23</p> <p>The design and synthesis of hybrid structures between graphene and carbon nanotubes is an intriguing topic in the <span class="hlt">field</span> of carbon nanomaterials. Here the synthesis of vertically aligned CNT carpets underneath graphene and from both sides of graphene is described with continuous ordering over a large area. Scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopic characterizations show that CNT carpets <span class="hlt">grow</span> underneath graphene through a base-growth mechanism, and <span class="hlt">grow</span> on top of graphene through a tip-growth mechanism. Good electrical contact is observed from the top CNT carpets, through the graphene layer, to the bottom CNT carpets. This sandwich-like CNT/graphene/CNT hybrid structure could provide an approach to design and fabricate multilayered graphene/CNTs materials, as well as potential applications in the <span class="hlt">fields</span> of nanomanufacturing and energy storage.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20110012146','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20110012146"><span><span class="hlt">Rapid</span> Polymer Sequencer</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Stolc, Viktor (Inventor); Brock, Mathew W. (Inventor)</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Method and system for <span class="hlt">rapid</span> and accurate determination of each of a sequence of unknown polymer components, such as nucleic acid components. A self-assembling monolayer of a selected substance is optionally provided on an interior surface of a pipette tip, and the interior surface is immersed in a selected liquid. A selected electrical <span class="hlt">field</span> is impressed in a longitudinal or transverse direction at the tip, a polymer sequence is passed through the tip, and a change in an electrical current signal is measured as each polymer component passes through the tip. Each measured change in electrical current signals is compared with a database of reference signals, with each reference signal identified with a polymer component, to identify the unknown polymer component. The tip preferably has a pore inner diameter of no more than about 40 nm and is prepared by heating and pulling a very small section of a glass tubing.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016SPIE.9909E..0FB','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016SPIE.9909E..0FB"><span>The <span class="hlt">rapid</span> transient surveyor</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Baranec, C.; Lu, J. R.; Wright, S. A.; Tonry, J.; Tully, R. B.; Szapudi, I.; Takamiya, M.; Hunter, L.; Riddle, R.; Chen, S.; Chun, M.</p> <p>2016-07-01</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">Rapid</span> Transient Surveyor (RTS) is a proposed <span class="hlt">rapid</span>-response, high-cadence adaptive optics (AO) facility for the UH 2.2-m telescope on Maunakea. RTS will uniquely address the need for high-acuity and sensitive near-infrared spectral follow-up observations of tens of thousands of objects in mere months by combining an excellent observing site, unmatched robotic observational efficiency, and an AO system that significantly increases both sensitivity and spatial resolving power. We will initially use RTS to obtain the infrared spectra of 4,000 Type Ia supernovae identified by the Asteroid Terrestrial-Impact Last Alert System over a two year period that will be crucial to precisely measuring distances and mapping the distribution of dark matter in the z < 0.1 universe. RTS will comprise an upgraded version of the Robo-AO laser AO system and will respond quickly to target-of-opportunity events, minimizing the time between discovery and characterization. RTS will acquire simultaneous-multicolor images with an acuity of 0.07-0.10" across the entire visible spectrum (20% i'-band Strehl in median conditions) and <0.16" in the near infrared, and will detect companions at 0.5" at contrast ratio of 500. The system will include a high-efficiency prism integral <span class="hlt">field</span> unit spectrograph: R = 70-140 over a total bandpass of 840-1830nm with an 8.7" by 6.0" <span class="hlt">field</span> of view (0.15" spaxels). The AO correction boosts the infrared point-source sensitivity of the spectrograph against the sky background by a factor of seven for faint targets, giving the UH 2.2-m the H-band sensitivity of a 5.7-m telescope without AO.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017ERL....12c5007M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017ERL....12c5007M"><span>Fast <span class="hlt">growing</span> research on negative emissions</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Minx, Jan C.; Lamb, William F.; Callaghan, Max W.; Bornmann, Lutz; Fuss, Sabine</p> <p>2017-03-01</p> <p>Generating negative emissions by removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere is a key requirement for limiting global warming to well below 2 °C, or even 1.5 °C, and therefore for achieving the long-term climate goals of the recent Paris Agreement. Despite being a relatively young topic, negative emission technologies (NETs) have attracted <span class="hlt">growing</span> attention in climate change research over the last decade. A sizeable body of evidence on NETs has accumulated across different <span class="hlt">fields</span> that is by today too large and too diverse to be comprehensively tracked by individuals. Yet, understanding the size, composition and thematic structure of this literature corpus is a crucial pre-condition for effective scientific assessments of NETs as, for example, required for the new special report on the 1.5 °C by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). In this paper we use scientometric methods and topic modelling to identify and characterize the available evidence on NETs as recorded in the Web of Science. We find that the development of the literature on NETs has started later than for climate change as a whole, but proceeds more quickly by now. A total number of about 2900 studies have accumulated between 1991 and 2016 with almost 500 new publications in 2016. The discourse on NETs takes place in distinct communities around energy systems, forests as well as biochar and other soil carbon options. Integrated analysis of NET portfolios—though crucial for understanding how much NETs are possible at what costs and risks—are still in their infancy and do not feature as a theme across the literature corpus. Overall, our analysis suggests that NETs research is relatively marginal in the wider climate change discourse despite its importance for global climate policy.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009nmat.book..163S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009nmat.book..163S"><span><span class="hlt">Rapid</span> Laser Prototyping Of Polymer-Based Nanoplasmonic Components</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Stepanov, A. L.; Kiyan, R.; Reinhardt, C.; Seidel, A.; Pas-Singer, S.; Chichkov, B. N.</p> <p></p> <p>Renewed and <span class="hlt">growing</span> interest in the <span class="hlt">field</span> of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) comes from a <span class="hlt">rapid</span> advance of nanostructuring technologies. The application of two-photon polymerization technique for the fabrication of dielectric and metallic SPP-structures, which can be used for localization, guiding, and manipulation of SPPs waves on a subwavelength scale, is studied. This technology is based on nonlinear absorption of near-infrared femtosecond laser pulses. Excitation, propagation, and interaction of SPP waves with nanostructures are controlled and studied by leakage radiation imaging. It is demonstrated that created nanostructures on metal film are very efficient for the excitation and focusing of SPPs. Examples of passive and active SPP components are presented and discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19700000462','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19700000462"><span><span class="hlt">Growing</span> single crystals in silica gel</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Rubin, B.</p> <p>1970-01-01</p> <p>Two types of chemical reactions for crystal <span class="hlt">growing</span> are discussed. The first is a metathetical reaction to produce calcium tartrate tetrahydrate crystals, the second is a decomplexation reaction to produce cuprous chloride crystals.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=S71-51318&hterms=Citrus&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3DCitrus','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=S71-51318&hterms=Citrus&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3DCitrus"><span>Plants <span class="hlt">growing</span> in Apollo 15 lunar material</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p></p> <p>1971-01-01</p> <p>A close view of germ free plants - lettuce (left), tomato (right center and left center) and citrus (right). This type of testing is an effort at the Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC) to <span class="hlt">grow</span> germ-free plants.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3768200','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3768200"><span>FLUCTUATING MOTOR FORCES BEND <span class="hlt">GROWING</span> MICROTUBULES</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Shekhar, Nandini; Neelam, Srujana; Wu, Jun; Ladd, Anthony JC; Dickinson, Richard B.; Lele, Tanmay P.</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Despite their rigidity, microtubules in living cells bend significantly during polymerization resulting in greater curvature than can be explained by thermal forces alone. However, the source of the non-thermal forces that bend <span class="hlt">growing</span> microtubules remains obscure. We analyzed the motion of microtubule tips in NIH-3T3 fibroblasts expressing EGFP-EB1, a fluorescent +TIP protein that specifically binds to the <span class="hlt">growing</span> ends of microtubules. We found that dynein inhibition significantly reduced the deviation of the <span class="hlt">growing</span> tip from its initial trajectory. Inhibiting myosin modestly reduced tip fluctuations, while simultaneous myosin and dynein inhibition caused no further decrease in fluctuations compared to dynein inhibition alone. Our results can be interpreted with a model in which dynein linkages play a key role in generating and transmitting fluctuating forces that bend <span class="hlt">growing</span> microtubules. PMID:24039637</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016APS..DFDH21004A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016APS..DFDH21004A"><span>Visualization of airflow <span class="hlt">growing</span> soap bubbles</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Al Rahbi, Hamood; Bock, Matthew; Ryu, Sangjin</p> <p>2016-11-01</p> <p>Visualizing airflow inside <span class="hlt">growing</span> soap bubbles can answer questions regarding the fluid dynamics of soap bubble blowing, which is a model system for flows with a gas-liquid-gas interface. Also, understanding the soap bubble blowing process is practical because it can contribute to controlling industrial processes similar to soap bubble blowing. In this study, we visualized airflow which <span class="hlt">grows</span> soap bubbles using the smoke wire technique to understand how airflow blows soap bubbles. The soap bubble blower setup was built to mimic the human blowing process of soap bubbles, which consists of a blower, a nozzle and a bubble ring. The smoke wire was placed between the nozzle and the bubble ring, and smoke-visualized airflow was captured using a high speed camera. Our visualization shows how air jet flows into the <span class="hlt">growing</span> soap bubble on the ring and how the airflow interacts with the soap film of <span class="hlt">growing</span> bubble.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=542022','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=542022"><span>Method for <span class="hlt">Growing</span> Plants Aeroponically 1</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Zobel, Richard W.; Del Tredici, Peter; Torrey, John G.</p> <p>1976-01-01</p> <p>A simple, inexpensive system for <span class="hlt">growing</span> plants with their roots bathed in nutrient mist is described. The aeroponics system uses a spinner from a home humidifier to propel nutrient solution into a polyethylene-lined plywood box atop which plants are supported on plastic light-fixture “egg crating.” Success in <span class="hlt">growing</span> a number of herbaceous and woody species, including nodulated legumes and nonlegumes, is reported. Images PMID:16659479</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JGRD..12111264O','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JGRD..12111264O"><span>"Explosively <span class="hlt">growing</span>" vortices of unstably stratified atmosphere</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Onishchenko, O. G.; Horton, W.; Pokhotelov, O. A.; Fedun, V.</p> <p>2016-10-01</p> <p>A new type of "explosively <span class="hlt">growing</span>" vortex structure is investigated theoretically in the framework of ideal fluid hydrodynamics. It is shown that vortex structures may arise in convectively unstable atmospheric layers containing background vorticity. From an exact analytical vortex solution the vertical vorticity structure and toroidal speed are derived and analyzed. The assumption that vorticity is constant with height leads to a solution that <span class="hlt">grows</span> explosively when the flow is inviscid. The results shown are in agreement with observations and laboratory experiments</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24113888','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24113888"><span>Why we cannot <span class="hlt">grow</span> a human arm.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ricci, John L</p> <p>2013-11-01</p> <p>There are several significant issues that prevent us from <span class="hlt">growing</span> a human arm now, or within the next 10-20 years. From a tissue engineering perspective, while we can <span class="hlt">grow</span> many of the components necessary for construction of a human arm, we can only <span class="hlt">grow</span> them in relatively small volumes, and when scaled up to large volumes we lack the ability to develop adequate blood/nerve supply. From a genetic engineering perspective, we will probably never be able to turn on the specific genes necessary to "<span class="hlt">grow</span> an arm" unless it is attached to a fetus and this presents enormous ethical issues related to farming of human organs and structures. Perhaps the most daunting problem facing the transplantation of a tissue engineered or transplanted arm is that of re-innervation of the structure. Since the sensory and motor nerve cells of the arm are located outside of the structure, re-innervation requires those nerves to regenerate over relatively large distances to repopulate the nervous system of the arm. This is something with which we have had little success. We can <span class="hlt">grow</span> repair parts, but "<span class="hlt">growing</span> an arm" presents too many insurmountable problems. The best we could possibly do with tissue engineering or genetic engineering would be the equivalent of a fetal arm and the technical problems, costs, and ethical hurdles are enormous. A more likely solution is a functional, permanent, neuroelectronically-controlled prosthesis. These are nearly a reality today.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009SuScT..22i0101M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009SuScT..22i0101M"><span>PUBLISHER'S NOTE: <span class="hlt">Rapid</span> Communications <span class="hlt">Rapid</span> Communications</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Miller, Tom</p> <p>2009-09-01</p> <p>As part of a general review of Superconductor Science and Technology, we have been examining the scope for <span class="hlt">Rapid</span> Communications (RAPs). We recognize these articles make up an important part of the journal representing the latest state-of-the-art research in superconductivity. To reflect this, we have devised a new scope for this article type: '<span class="hlt">Rapid</span> Communications. The journal offers open access to outstanding short articles (no longer than 5 journal pages or 4500 words including figures) reporting new and timely developments in superconductivity and its applications. These articles should report very substantial new advances in superconductivity to the readers of Superconductor Science and Technology, but are not expected to meet any requirement of 'general interest'. RAPs will be processed quickly (average receipt to online publication for RAPs is around 60 days) and are permanently free to read in the electronic journal. Authors submitting a RAP should provide reasons why the work is urgent and requires <span class="hlt">rapid</span> publication. Each RAP will be assessed for suitability by our Reviews and <span class="hlt">Rapid</span> Communications Editor before full peer review takes place.' The essential points are: They should report very substantial new advances in superconductivity and its application; They must be no longer than 5 journal pages long (approx. 4500 words); Average publication time for a <span class="hlt">Rapid</span> Communication is 60 days; They are free to read. As mentioned in the previous publisher's announcement (2009 Supercond. Sci. Technol. 22 010101), each submitted <span class="hlt">Rapid</span> Communication must come with a letter justifying why it should be prioritized over regular papers and will be pre-assessed by our Reviews and <span class="hlt">Rapid</span> Communications Editor. In addition, we will work with the authors of any <span class="hlt">Rapid</span> Communication to promote and raise the visibility of the work presented in it. We will be making further changes to the journal in the near future and we write to you accordingly. Thank you for your kind</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li class="active"><span>24</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_24 --> <div id="page_25" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li class="active"><span>25</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="481"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22413285','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22413285"><span>Fluctuating magnetic <span class="hlt">field</span> induced resonant activation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Mondal, Shrabani; Das, Sudip; Baura, Alendu; Bag, Bidhan Chandra</p> <p>2014-12-14</p> <p>In this paper, we have studied the properties of a Brownian particle at stationary state in the presence of a fluctuating magnetic <span class="hlt">field</span>. Time dependence of the <span class="hlt">field</span> makes the system thermodynamically open. As a signature of that the steady state distribution function becomes function of damping strength, intensity of fluctuations and constant parts of the applied magnetic <span class="hlt">field</span>. It also depends on the correlation time of the fluctuating magnetic <span class="hlt">field</span>. Our another observation is that the random magnetic <span class="hlt">field</span> can induce the resonant activation phenomenon. Here correlation time is increased under the fixed variance of the fluctuating <span class="hlt">field</span>. But if the correlation time (τ) increases under the fixed <span class="hlt">field</span> strength then the mean first passage time <span class="hlt">rapidly</span> <span class="hlt">grows</span> at low τ and it almost converges at other limit. This is sharp contrast to the usual colored noise driven open system case where the mean first passage time diverges exponentially. We have also observed that a giant enhancement of barrier crossing rate occurs particularly at large strength of constant parts of the applied magnetic <span class="hlt">field</span> even for very weak fluctuating magnetic <span class="hlt">field</span>. Finally, break down of the Arrhenius result and disappearance of the Kramers’ turn over phenomenon may occur in the presence of a fluctuating magnetic <span class="hlt">field</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21272502','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21272502"><span><span class="hlt">Rapidly</span> <span class="hlt">growing</span> hemorrhagic papule on the cheek of a 54-year-old man.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Junck, Marianne; Huerter, Christopher J; Sarma, Deba P</p> <p>2011-01-15</p> <p>A 54-year-old man sought medical attention for a growth on his right cheek that had been present for three months. The growth began as a small, brown “pimple” that gradually increased in size over time. Physical examination revealed a 9 mm well-circumscribed erythematous nodule with a hemorrhagic crust. On dermoscopy, the lesion was completely vascular appearing, with no pigment visualized. A clinical diagnosis of pyogenic granuloma was made. The lesion was biopsied and histopathologic examination revealed a 2.8 mm thick, Clark level IV, ulcerated, amelanotic nodular melanoma. Because the literature contains reports of nodular melanoma mimicking the presentation of a pyogenic granuloma, all such lesions should be biopsied for histopathologic diagnosis.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26250364','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26250364"><span><span class="hlt">Rapidly-growing</span> buccal mass in a 6-month-old infant.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kumar, A; Brierley, D; Hunter, K D; Lee, N</p> <p>2015-11-01</p> <p>Lipoblastoma and lipoblastomatosis are rare benign tumours of fetal-embryonal adipocytes that usually present in young children, which is why they are not often included in the differential diagnosis of soft tissue lesions in infants. We describe a case of a 6-month-old infant with an intraoral buccal lipoblastoma.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3515508','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3515508"><span>Scar sarcoidosis on a finger mimicking a <span class="hlt">rapidly</span> <span class="hlt">growing</span> soft tissue tumour: a case report</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Background Scar sarcoidosis is a rare and uncommon but specific cutaneous manifestation of sarcoidosis. In general it arises in pre-existing scars deriving from mechanical traumas. As most surgeons dealing with scars might not be aware of cutaneous sarcoidosis and its different types of appearance the appropriate staging and treatment might be missed or at least delayed. To our knowledge this is the first case in literature of scar sarcoidosis on a finger. Case presentation We present a case of a 33-year-old carpenter who developed scar sarcoidosis on his right index finger 4 years after the tendon of the long digital flexor got accidentally cut by an angle grinder. He was referred due to a swelling of the finger suspected to be a malignant soft tissue tumour. The circumference of the affected finger had almost doubled, adding up to 94 mm. Incision biopsy revealed typical noncaseating granulomas. Further investigation showed a systemic extent of the disease with involvement of the lung. A systemic treatment with oral steroids led to an almost full regression of the swelling with restoration of function and resolution of lung infiltrates. Conclusion In case of a suspicious and/or progressive swelling a definite diagnosis should be achieved by biopsy within a short time to enable a proper treatment. If scar sarcoidosis is proven further investigation is necessary to exclude a systemical involvement. A surgical treatment of the swelling is not indicated. PMID:23031186</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=283213','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=283213"><span>Impairment of osteoclastic bone resorption in <span class="hlt">rapidly</span> <span class="hlt">growing</span> female p47phox knockout mice</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Bone formation is dependent on the activity and differentiation of osteoblasts; whereas resorption of preexisting mineralized bone matrix by osteoclasts is necessary not only for bone development but also for regeneration and remodeling. Bone remodeling is a process in which osteoblasts and osteocla...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://pubs.water.usgs.gov/ofr2005-1269/','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="http://pubs.water.usgs.gov/ofr2005-1269/"><span>Water resources in a <span class="hlt">rapidly</span> <span class="hlt">growing</span> region-Oakland County, Michigan</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Aichele, Stephen S.</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p>Despite considerable expansion of urban areas, streamflow characteristics at most sites have not been affected. However, at several sites in areas of the county that are both supplied by ground water and sewered, statistically significant downward trends in low-flow stream discharges have been noted between 1970 and 2003. Stream chemistry, compared to a previous study of county water resources prepared in 1972, has generally improved, with marked decreases in concentrations of nitrogen, phosphorus, and sulfate. Chloride concentrations, however, have increased dramatically in river and lake water across the county. Detectable concentrations of personal-care products, flame retardants, and petroleum fuel compounds were identified at all river sites sampled. </p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=dubai&pg=2&id=EJ830054','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=dubai&pg=2&id=EJ830054"><span>Complexity in Quality Assurance in a <span class="hlt">Rapidly</span> <span class="hlt">Growing</span> Free Economic Environment: A UAE Case Study</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Rawazik, Wessen; Carroll, Martin</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>The Knowledge and Human Development Authority in Dubai has developed an innovative system of quality assurance designed to ensure that the appropriate international standards are being maintained through this cross-border method of delivery. This paper describes and provides the strategic rationale for this new model of "validation" and…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19648708','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19648708"><span>Challenges of collaboration to address health disparities in the <span class="hlt">rapidly</span> <span class="hlt">growing</span> community of Las Vegas, Nevada.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Woodson, Joyce M; Braxton-Calhoun, Millicent; Black, Jacqueline; Marinelli, Rosalie; O'Hair, Alyssa; Constantino, Nora L</p> <p>2009-08-01</p> <p>Collaboration was established between a university and the faith-based community in Clark County, Nevada to develop a coalition to address chronic disease in the African American population. The university faculty enlisted several churches and health related agencies to join the coalition. The challenges of collaborating with a community coalition to develop and implement a grant are discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20160010558','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20160010558"><span>Implementation of a Multichannel Serial Data Streaming Algorithm using the Xilinx Serial <span class="hlt">Rapid</span>IO Solution</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Doxley, Charles A.</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>In the current world of applications that use reconfigurable technology implemented on <span class="hlt">field</span> programmable gate arrays (FPGAs), there is a need for flexible architectures that can <span class="hlt">grow</span> as the systems evolve. A project has limited resources and a fixed set of requirements that development efforts are tasked to meet. Designers must develop robust solutions that practically meet the current customer demands and also have the ability to <span class="hlt">grow</span> for future performance. This paper describes the development of a high speed serial data streaming algorithm that allows for transmission of multiple data channels over a single serial link. The technique has the ability to change to meet new applications developed for future design considerations. This approach uses the Xilinx Serial <span class="hlt">Rapid</span>IO LOGICORE Solution to implement a flexible infrastructure to meet the current project requirements with the ability to adapt future system designs.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5184837','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5184837"><span>Giant mature teratoma in the mediastinum presenting with <span class="hlt">rapid</span> growth</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Fujita, Kohei; Hayashi, Kazuki; Motoishi, Makoto; Sawai, Satoru; Terashima, Tsuyoshi; Mio, Tadashi</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Teratomas are primary germ-cell tumours in the mediastinum. Although they are generally slow-<span class="hlt">growing</span> and asymptomatic, <span class="hlt">rapid</span> growth causing life-threatening complications can occur. Sebaceous secretion, insulin production, chorionic gonadotropin secretion and pancreatic enzyme secretion are the presumptive causes of tumour progression. Only few cases of <span class="hlt">rapidly</span> <span class="hlt">growing</span> teratomas have been reported previously. Here, we present a case of a giant mature teratoma in the mediastinum that presented with <span class="hlt">rapid</span> growth and compare the characteristics of this case with those of previous cases. PMID:28031857</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..16.1915J','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..16.1915J"><span>A new <span class="hlt">rapid</span> and non-destructive method to detect tephra layers and cryptotephras: applying to the first distal tephrostratigraphic record of the Chaîne des Puys volcanic <span class="hlt">field</span> (France).</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Jouannic, Gwénolé; Walter-Simonnet, Anne-Véronique; Bossuet, Gilles; Delabrousse, Eric; Cubizolle, Hervé</p> <p>2014-05-01</p> <p>Tephrostratigraphy has been considerably developed for 30 years, mainly in palaeo-environmental studies. In such studies, distal tephra layers are important chronological markers, but they are also tools to establish or specify record of past eruptions of a volcanic <span class="hlt">field</span>. Nowadays, development of effective <span class="hlt">rapid</span> methods to detect tephra layers in sedimentary records of various compositions is a challenge. Many classic methods for detection of tephra layers, like regular sampling or magnetic susceptibility measurements, have shown their limits. Regular sampling takes a long time, and finding tephra layers remains uncertain. Moreover, magnetic susceptibility maesurements, although it is a non-destructive method, is ineffective when tephra layers are made of volcanic glass shards with differentiated magma composition. X-ray fluorescence (XRF) is also a non-destructive method but it takes a very long time to analyze a core with sufficient high resolution, and measurements only concern the surface of the sediment. We propose a new method allows detection of tephra layers with, for the first time, a 3D resolution: the Computed Tomography Scan (CT- Scan). This method, regularly used in medicine, allows there to obtain pictures of materials density on 3D with inframillimetric measurement ranges. Then, it is possible to detect tephras, cryptotephras (invisible by naked eye), reworked tephra layers even when tephra layers don't outcrop at the surface of the sediment (and are therefore undetectable by usual methods like XRF and magnetic susceptibility). This method has been tried out on tephras sedimented in different types of sediments (silicated, carbonated and organic matter). Our results show that this method is very efficient for peaty environment. Used on coring carried out in Forez Mountains (French Massif Central), CT-Scan allows to detect more tephra layers than usual methods (XRF and magnetic susceptibility). Results presented here allow to build the first</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2553776','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2553776"><span><span class="hlt">Growing</span> pains: contemporary knowledge and recommended practice</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Evans, Angela M</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>Background Leg pain in children, described as <span class="hlt">growing</span> pains, is a frequent clinical presentation seen by an array of health care professionals. Described since 1823, <span class="hlt">growing</span> pains continues to puzzle practitioners, yet diagnostic criteria and evidence based treatment is available. Methods The medical literature has been searched exhaustively to access all articles (English language) pertaining to leg pains in children which are ascribed to being '<span class="hlt">growing</span> pains'. Results The literature, whilst plentiful in quantity and spanning two centuries, is generally replete with reiterated opinion and anecdote and lacking in scientific rigour. The author searched 45 articles for relevance, determined according to title, abstract and full text, resulting in a yield of 22 original studies and 23 review articles. From the original studies, one small (non-blinded) randomised controlled trial that focused on GP treatment with leg muscle stretching was found. Nine prevalence studies were found revealing disparate estimates. Ten cohort (some case-controlled) studies, which investigated pain attribute differences in affected versus unaffected groups, were found. One series of single case experiment designs and one animal model study were found. Conclusion <span class="hlt">Growing</span> pains is prevalent in young children, presents frequently in the health care setting where it is poorly managed and is continuing to be researched. A common childhood complaint, <span class="hlt">growing</span> pains needs to be acknowledged and better managed in the contemporary medical setting. PMID:18822152</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015EL....11228003C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015EL....11228003C"><span><span class="hlt">Growing</span> local likelihood network: Emergence of communities</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Chen, S.; Small, M.</p> <p>2015-10-01</p> <p>In many real situations, networks <span class="hlt">grow</span> only via local interactions. New nodes are added to the <span class="hlt">growing</span> network with information only pertaining to a small subset of existing nodes. Multilevel marketing, social networks, and disease models can all be depicted as <span class="hlt">growing</span> networks based on local (network path-length) distance information. In these examples, all nodes whose distance from a chosen center is less than d form a subgraph. Hence, we <span class="hlt">grow</span> networks with information only from these subgraphs. Moreover, we use a likelihood-based method, where at each step we modify the networks by changing their likelihood to be closer to the expected degree distribution. Combining the local information and the likelihood method, we <span class="hlt">grow</span> networks that exhibit novel features. We discover that the likelihood method, over certain parameter ranges, can generate networks with highly modulated communities, even when global information is not available. Communities and clusters are abundant in real-life networks, and the method proposed here provides a natural mechanism for the emergence of communities in scale-free networks. In addition, the algorithmic implementation of network growth via local information is substantially faster than global methods and allows for the exploration of much larger networks.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20100009672','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20100009672"><span><span class="hlt">Rapid</span> Active Sampling Package</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Peters, Gregory</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>A <span class="hlt">field</span>-deployable, battery-powered <span class="hlt">Rapid</span> Active Sampling Package (RASP), originally designed for sampling strong materials during lunar and planetary missions, shows strong utility for terrestrial geological use. The technology is proving to be simple and effective for sampling and processing materials of strength. Although this originally was intended for planetary and lunar applications, the RASP is very useful as a powered hand tool for geologists and the mining industry to quickly sample and process rocks in the <span class="hlt">field</span> on Earth. The RASP allows geologists to surgically acquire samples of rock for later laboratory analysis. This tool, roughly the size of a wrench, allows the user to cut away swaths of weathering rinds, revealing pristine rock surfaces for observation and subsequent sampling with the same tool. RASPing deeper (.3.5 cm) exposes single rock strata in-situ. Where a geologist fs hammer can only expose unweathered layers of rock, the RASP can do the same, and then has the added ability to capture and process samples into powder with particle sizes less than 150 microns, making it easier for XRD/XRF (x-ray diffraction/x-ray fluorescence). The tool uses a rotating rasp bit (or two counter-rotating bits) that resides inside or above the catch container. The container has an open slot to allow the bit to extend outside the container and to allow cuttings to enter and be caught. When the slot and rasp bit are in contact with a substrate, the bit is plunged into it in a matter of seconds to reach pristine rock. A user in the <span class="hlt">field</span> may sample a rock multiple times at multiple depths in minutes, instead of having to cut out huge, heavy rock samples for transport back to a lab for analysis. Because of the speed and accuracy of the RASP, hundreds of samples can be taken in one day. RASP-acquired samples are small and easily carried. A user can characterize more area in less time than by using conventional methods. The <span class="hlt">field</span>-deployable RASP used a Ni</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015SolED...7..369F','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015SolED...7..369F"><span><span class="hlt">Rapid</span> revegetation by sowing seed mixtures of shrub and herbaceous species</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Feng, J. J.; Zhang, C. L.; Zhao, T. N.</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Fast revegetation by means of sowing seed mixture of shrub and herbaceous species is a measure to prevent bare soils from wind and water erosion. <span class="hlt">Field</span> experiment was used to test the effect of species selection and the ratio of shrub to herbaceous species on vegetation formation and shrub growth. Results showed that herbaceous species hastened cover formation and maintained a high coverage for longer period. However, the growth of shrubs was hindered. In North China Plain or where the soil and climate are similar, the ratio of shrub to herbaceous seeds is proposed to be 6:4-7:3 (weight ratio). Among the herbaceous species tested, Festuca arundinacea Schreb. <span class="hlt">grows</span> relatively slow so it should be mixed with other fast-<span class="hlt">growing</span> species in the practice of <span class="hlt">rapid</span> revegetation, and a seeding density lower than 6 g m-2 is proposed when applied; Orychophragmus violaceus O. E. Schulz. wilts when the seeds are ripe, leading to a significant decrease of coverage, so other species with different phenology should be involved when it is applied; Viola philippica Car. is a good ground cover plant, which <span class="hlt">grows</span> fast and maintains a stable coverage form July to October, and a seeding density of 1.5 g m-2 is proposed for <span class="hlt">rapid</span> revegetation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006AdSpR..37...93K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006AdSpR..37...93K"><span><span class="hlt">Growing</span> pioneer plants for a lunar base</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kozyrovska, N. O.; Lutvynenko, T. L.; Korniichuk, O. S.; Kovalchuk, M. V.; Voznyuk, T. M.; Kononuchenko, O.; Zaetz, I.; Rogutskyy, I. S.; Mytrokhyn, O. V.; Mashkovska, S. P.; Foing, B. H.; Kordyum, V. A.</p> <p></p> <p>A precursory scenario of cultivating the first plants in a lunar greenhouse was elaborated in frames of a conceptual study to <span class="hlt">grow</span> plants for a permanently manned lunar base. A prototype plant growth system represents an ornamental plant Tagetes patula L. for <span class="hlt">growing</span> in a lunar rock anorthosite as a substrate. Microbial community anticipated to be in use to support a growth and development of the plant in a substrate of low bioavailability and provide an acceptable growth and blossoming of T. patula under growth limiting conditions.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Town+AND+Planning&pg=6&id=EJ476544','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Town+AND+Planning&pg=6&id=EJ476544"><span>The Human Services Planning Associations Meet Social Service Needs in <span class="hlt">Growing</span> Small Towns and Rural Counties.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Sills, Mark R.</p> <p>1993-01-01</p> <p>The Planning Alliance for Community Empowerment, a public-private organization, was formed to address the need for coordinated, efficiently managed social services programs in <span class="hlt">rapidly</span> <span class="hlt">growing</span> Henderson County, North Carolina. For small rural towns and counties, planning organizations lead to greater availability of services and efficient…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20140016605','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20140016605"><span><span class="hlt">Rapid</span> Polymer Sequencer</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Stolc, Viktor (Inventor); Brock, Matthew W (Inventor)</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Method and system for <span class="hlt">rapid</span> and accurate determination of each of a sequence of unknown polymer components, such as nucleic acid components. A self-assembling monolayer of a selected substance is optionally provided on an interior surface of a pipette tip, and the interior surface is immersed in a selected liquid. A selected electrical <span class="hlt">field</span> is impressed in a longitudinal direction, or in a transverse direction, in the tip region, a polymer sequence is passed through the tip region, and a change in an electrical current signal is measured as each polymer component passes through the tip region. Each of the measured changes in electrical current signals is compared with a database of reference electrical change signals, with each reference signal corresponding to an identified polymer component, to identify the unknown polymer component with a reference polymer component. The nanopore preferably has a pore inner diameter of no more than about 40 nm and is prepared by heating and pulling a very small section of a glass tubing.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25314838','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25314838"><span><span class="hlt">Growing</span> skull fracture in a red-tailed hawk (Buteo jamaicensis).</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Rush, E Marie; Shores, Andrew; Meintel, Sarah; Hathcock, John T</p> <p>2014-09-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Growing</span> skull fractures have been reported in humans for many years, usually resulting from injury to the soft skull during the <span class="hlt">rapid</span> growth period of an infant's life. Nestling raptors have thin, fragile skulls, a <span class="hlt">rapid</span> growth rate, and compete aggressively for food items. Skull trauma may occur, which may lead to the development of a <span class="hlt">growing</span> skull fracture. <span class="hlt">Growing</span> skull fractures may be under-diagnosed in raptor rehabilitation facilities that do not have access to advanced technologic equipment. Three-dimensional (3-D) computed tomography was used to diagnose a <span class="hlt">growing</span> skull fracture in a red-tailed hawk (Buteo jamaicensis). The lesion was surgically repaired and the animal was eventually returned to the wild. This is the first report of a <span class="hlt">growing</span> skull fracture in an animal. In this case, 3-D computed topographic imaging was utilized to diagnose a <span class="hlt">growing</span> skull fracture in a red-tailed hawk, surgical repair was performed, and the bird recovered completely and was ultimately released.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4024764','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4024764"><span><span class="hlt">Rapid</span> control of phase growth by nanoparticles</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Chen, Lian-Yi; Xu, Jia-Quan; Choi, Hongseok; Konishi, Hiromi; Jin, Song; Li, Xiao-Chun</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Effective control of phase growth under harsh conditions (such as high temperature, highly conductive liquids or high growth rate), where surfactants are unstable or ineffective, is still a long-standing challenge. Here we show a general approach for <span class="hlt">rapid</span> control of diffusional growth through nanoparticle self-assembly on the fast-<span class="hlt">growing</span> phase during cooling. After phase nucleation, the nanoparticles spontaneously assemble, within a few milliseconds, as a thin coating on the <span class="hlt">growing</span> phase to block/limit diffusion, resulting in a uniformly dispersed phase orders of magnitude smaller than samples without nanoparticles. The effectiveness of this approach is demonstrated in both inorganic (immiscible alloy and eutectic alloy) and organic materials. Our approach overcomes the microstructure refinement limit set by the fast phase growth during cooling and breaks the inherent limitations of surfactants for growth control. Considering the <span class="hlt">growing</span> availability of numerous types and sizes of nanoparticles, the nanoparticle-enabled growth control will find broad applications. PMID:24809454</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li class="active"><span>25</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_25 --> <center> <div class="footer-extlink text-muted"><small>Some links on this page may take you to non-federal websites. 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