Science.gov

Sample records for rare bryophyte species

  1. [Species diversity of floor bryophyte communities in Bogda Mountains, Xinjiang].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuanming; Cao, Tong; Pan, Borong

    2003-06-01

    By means of species similarity coefficient and species diversity index, the characteristics of species diversity of floor bryophyte communities in Bogda Mountain, Xinjiang were studied. The results showed that the bryoflora of Bogda Mountain had the characteristics of richness and complexion. There were 186 floor species (including infraspecies taxa) belonging to 73 genera of 32 families. The species similarity between mountain desert and mountain grassland belt was the highest (0.6809), while that between mountain forest and alpine cushion belt was the lowest (0.1342). The bryophyte community in mountain forest was the ominant one among the floor bryophyte communities. The bryophyte community in mountain forest had the richest species diversity, and the mountain forest was the distribution center of bryophyte diversity and the key area for bryophyte diversity conservation in Bogda Mountain area.

  2. Arsenic and mercury in native aquatic bryophytes: differences among species.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Santiago; Villares, Rubén; López, Jesús; Carballeira, Alejo

    2013-04-01

    This study investigated the capacities of five species of aquatic bryophytes to accumulate As and Hg from their natural habitats in rivers in Galicia (NW Spain). The distributions of the concentrations of both elements in all species were skewed to the right, with a higher incidence of extreme values in the As data, which may indicate a greater degree of contamination by this metalloid. There were no significant differences in the accumulation of either of the elements between the different species studied, which justifies their combined use as biomonitors of As and Hg, at least in the study area.

  3. [Species diversity of bryophytes in West Tianmu Mountain of Zhejiang Province].

    PubMed

    Li, Fenxia; Wang, Youfang; Liu, Li; Yang, Shuzhen

    2006-02-01

    In this paper, an investigation was made on the bryophytes at different altitudes of West Tianmu Mountain, with their species composition, similarity, and alpha- and beta-diversities. The results showed that at altitude 1100 m, the bryophytes under deciduous broad-leaved forest had the highest species number and richness, and the highest similarity with the bryophytes under deciduous broad-leaved shrub at 1300 m. The beta diversity index at altitude 800-1100 m was the largest, suggesting an obvious change and alternation of bryophyte species there. At altitude 1100 m, the species diversity of bryophytes was the highest, where should be the key area for bryophyte diversity conservation in West Tianmu Mountain.

  4. Forests Regenerating after Clear-Cutting Function as Habitat for Bryophyte and Lichen Species of Conservation Concern

    PubMed Central

    Rudolphi, Jörgen; Gustafsson, Lena

    2011-01-01

    The majority of managed forests in Fennoscandia are younger than 70 years old but yet little is known about their potential to host rare and threatened species. In this study, we examined red-listed bryophytes and lichens in 19 young stands originating from clear-cutting (30–70 years old) in the boreal region, finding 19 red-listed species (six bryophytes and 13 lichens). We used adjoining old stands, which most likely never had been clear-cut, as reference. The old stands contained significantly more species, but when taking the amount of biological legacies (i.e., remaining deciduous trees and dead wood) from the previous forest generation into account, bryophyte species number did not differ between old and young stands, and lichen number was even higher in young stands. No dispersal effect could be detected from the old to the young stands. The amount of wetlands in the surroundings was important for bryophytes, as was the area of old forest for both lichens and bryophytes. A cardinal position of young stands to the north of old stands was beneficial to red-listed bryophytes as well as lichens. We conclude that young forest plantations may function as habitat for red-listed species, but that this depends on presence of structures from the previous forest generation, and also on qualities in the surrounding landscape. Nevertheless, at repeated clear-cuttings, a successive decrease in species populations in young production stands is likely, due to increased fragmentation and reduced substrate amounts. Retention of dead wood and deciduous trees might be efficient conservation measures. Although priority needs to be given to preservation of remnant old-growth forests, we argue that young forests rich in biological legacies and located in landscapes with high amounts of old forests may have a conservation value. PMID:21490926

  5. Forests regenerating after clear-cutting function as habitat for bryophyte and lichen species of conservation concern.

    PubMed

    Rudolphi, Jörgen; Gustafsson, Lena

    2011-04-07

    The majority of managed forests in Fennoscandia are younger than 70 years old but yet little is known about their potential to host rare and threatened species. In this study, we examined red-listed bryophytes and lichens in 19 young stands originating from clear-cutting (30-70 years old) in the boreal region, finding 19 red-listed species (six bryophytes and 13 lichens). We used adjoining old stands, which most likely never had been clear-cut, as reference. The old stands contained significantly more species, but when taking the amount of biological legacies (i.e., remaining deciduous trees and dead wood) from the previous forest generation into account, bryophyte species number did not differ between old and young stands, and lichen number was even higher in young stands. No dispersal effect could be detected from the old to the young stands. The amount of wetlands in the surroundings was important for bryophytes, as was the area of old forest for both lichens and bryophytes. A cardinal position of young stands to the north of old stands was beneficial to red-listed bryophytes as well as lichens. We conclude that young forest plantations may function as habitat for red-listed species, but that this depends on presence of structures from the previous forest generation, and also on qualities in the surrounding landscape. Nevertheless, at repeated clear-cuttings, a successive decrease in species populations in young production stands is likely, due to increased fragmentation and reduced substrate amounts. Retention of dead wood and deciduous trees might be efficient conservation measures. Although priority needs to be given to preservation of remnant old-growth forests, we argue that young forests rich in biological legacies and located in landscapes with high amounts of old forests may have a conservation value.

  6. How to describe species richness patterns for bryophyte conservation?

    PubMed

    Hespanhol, Helena; Cezón, Katia; Felicísimo, Ángel M; Muñoz, Jesús; Mateo, Rubén G

    2015-12-01

    A large amount of data for inconspicuous taxa is stored in natural history collections; however, this information is often neglected for biodiversity patterns studies. Here, we evaluate the performance of direct interpolation of museum collections data, equivalent to the traditional approach used in bryophyte conservation planning, and stacked species distribution models (S-SDMs) to produce reliable reconstructions of species richness patterns, given that differences between these methods have been insufficiently evaluated for inconspicuous taxa. Our objective was to contrast if species distribution models produce better inferences of diversity richness than simply selecting areas with the higher species numbers. As model species, we selected Iberian species of the genus Grimmia (Bryophyta), and we used four well-collected areas to compare and validate the following models: 1) four Maxent richness models, each generated without the data from one of the four areas, and a reference model created using all of the data and 2) four richness models obtained through direct spatial interpolation, each generated without the data from one area, and a reference model created with all of the data. The correlations between the partial and reference Maxent models were higher in all cases (0.45 to 0.99), whereas the correlations between the spatial interpolation models were negative and weak (-0.3 to -0.06). Our results demonstrate for the first time that S-SDMs offer a useful tool for identifying detailed richness patterns for inconspicuous taxa such as bryophytes and improving incomplete distributions by assessing the potential richness of under-surveyed areas, filling major gaps in the available data. In addition, the proposed strategy would enhance the value of the vast number of specimens housed in biological collections.

  7. Higher photosynthetic capacity and different functional trait scaling relationships in erect bryophytes compared with prostrate species.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhe; Liu, Xin; Bao, Weikai

    2016-02-01

    Ecophysiological studies of bryophytes have generally been conducted at the shoot or canopy scale. However, their growth forms are diverse, and knowledge of whether bryophytes with different shoot structures have different functional trait levels and scaling relationships is limited. We collected 27 bryophyte species and categorised them into two groups based on their growth forms: erect and prostrate species. Twenty-one morphological, nutrient and photosynthetic traits were quantified. Trait levels and bivariate trait scaling relationships across species were compared between the two groups. The two groups had similar mean values for shoot mass per area (SMA), light saturation point and mass-based nitrogen (N(mass)) and phosphorus concentrations. Erect bryophytes possessed higher values for mass-based chlorophyll concentration (Chl(mass)), light-saturated assimilation rate (A(mass)) and photosynthetic nitrogen/phosphorus use efficiency. N(mass), Chl(mass) and A(mass) were positively related, and these traits were negatively associated with SMA. Furthermore, the slope of the regression of N(mass) versus Chl(mass) was steeper for erect bryophytes than that for prostrate bryophytes, whereas this pattern was reversed for the relationship between Chl(mass) and A(mass). In conclusion, erect bryophytes possess higher photosynthetic capacities than prostrate species. Furthermore, erect bryophytes invest more nitrogen in chloroplast pigments to improve their light-harvesting ability, while the structure of prostrate species permits more efficient light capture. This study confirms the effect of growth form on the functional trait levels and scaling relationships of bryophytes. It also suggests that bryophytes could be good models for investigating the carbon economy and nutrient allocation of plants at the shoot rather than the leaf scale.

  8. Rare Carboniferous and Permian glacial and non-glacial bryophytes and associated lycophyte megaspores of the Paraná Basin, Brazil: A new occurrence and paleoenvironmental considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricardi-Branco, Fresia; Rohn, Rosemarie; Longhim, Marcia Emilia; Costa, Juliana Sampaio; Martine, Ariel Milani; Christiano-de-Souza, Isabel Cortez

    2016-12-01

    Fossil bryophytes are rare because their preservation is compromised by the presence of a thin cuticle (if any) and a lack of lignin. Except for the occurrence of one bryophyte in the glacial Dwyka Group of the Karoo Basin, the other rare Late Paleozoic records in Gondwana are notably from the Paraná Basin in Southeast/South Brazil. Four bryophyte sites (including a newly discovered one) were found in the lower part of the thick Permo-Carboniferous glacial succession of the Itararé Group, and one was found in the Guadalupian Teresina Formation, which was roughly assigned to an epeiric sea (or "lake") dominated by a warm, semi-arid climate. This study describes the fossils from the new occurrence from the Itararé Group and discusses the context in which the bryophyte beds originated in the basin. The new samples confirm that all of the bryophytes of the Itararé Group can be classified as Dwykea araroii Ricardi-Branco et al. (a possible pleurocarp) and are associated with the lycophyte megaspore Sublagenicula brasiliensis (Dijkstra) Dybová-Jachowicz. In the much younger Teresina Formation, the bryophytes are Yguajemanus yucapirus Cristiano-de-Souza et al. and Capimirinus riopretensis Cristiano-de-Souza et al., and abundant charophytes and rare dwarf lycophyte stems and bracts are present in the same layers. Although the two stratigraphic units represent distinct paleoenvironments and climates, they seem to share some characteristics: a) the bryophyte assemblages were transported very little; b) they were deposited in very calm environments; c) they were the main components (along with some lycophytes) of local or poorly diversified regional vegetation. The low number of species, which is characteristic of opportunistic communities, can be explained by local or regional conditions that would have been stressful for the vascular plants in other areas. During the deposition of the Itararé Group, the main control was probably the cold climate in addition to a

  9. Epiphytes in wooded pastures: Isolation matters for lichen but not for bryophyte species richness

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Christine; Scheidegger, Christoph; Bergamini, Ariel

    2017-01-01

    Sylvo-pastoral systems are species-rich man-made landscapes that are currently often severely threatened by abandonment or management intensification. At low tree densities, single trees in these systems represent habitat islands for epiphytic cryptogams. Here, we focused on sycamore maple (Acer pseudoplatanus) wooded pastures in the northern European Alps. We assessed per tree species richness of bryophytes and lichens on 90 sycamore maple trees distributed across six study sites. We analysed the effects of a range of explanatory variables (tree characteristics, environmental variables and isolation measures) on the richness of epiphytic bryophytes and lichens and various functional subgroups (based on diaspore size, habitat preference and red list status). Furthermore, we estimated the effect of these variables on the occurrence of two specific bryophyte species (Tayloria rudolphiana, Orthotrichum rogeri) and one lichen species (Lobaria pulmonaria) of major conservation concern. Bryophytes and lichens, as well as their subgroups, were differently and sometimes contrastingly affected by the variables considered: tree diameter at breast height had no significant effect on bryophytes but negatively affected many lichen groups; tree phenological age positively affected red-listed lichens but not red-listed bryophytes; increasing isolation from neighbouring trees negatively affected lichens but not bryophytes. However, the high-priority bryophyte species T. rudolphiana was also negatively affected by increased isolation at small spatial scales. Orthotrichum rogeri was more frequent on young trees and L. pulmonaria was more frequent on trees with thin stems and large crowns. The results indicate that local dispersal is important for lichens, whereas long distance dispersal seems to be more important for colonisation by bryophytes. Furthermore, our study highlights that different conservation measures need to be taken depending on the taxonomic and functional species

  10. Epiphytes in wooded pastures: Isolation matters for lichen but not for bryophyte species richness.

    PubMed

    Kiebacher, Thomas; Keller, Christine; Scheidegger, Christoph; Bergamini, Ariel

    2017-01-01

    Sylvo-pastoral systems are species-rich man-made landscapes that are currently often severely threatened by abandonment or management intensification. At low tree densities, single trees in these systems represent habitat islands for epiphytic cryptogams. Here, we focused on sycamore maple (Acer pseudoplatanus) wooded pastures in the northern European Alps. We assessed per tree species richness of bryophytes and lichens on 90 sycamore maple trees distributed across six study sites. We analysed the effects of a range of explanatory variables (tree characteristics, environmental variables and isolation measures) on the richness of epiphytic bryophytes and lichens and various functional subgroups (based on diaspore size, habitat preference and red list status). Furthermore, we estimated the effect of these variables on the occurrence of two specific bryophyte species (Tayloria rudolphiana, Orthotrichum rogeri) and one lichen species (Lobaria pulmonaria) of major conservation concern. Bryophytes and lichens, as well as their subgroups, were differently and sometimes contrastingly affected by the variables considered: tree diameter at breast height had no significant effect on bryophytes but negatively affected many lichen groups; tree phenological age positively affected red-listed lichens but not red-listed bryophytes; increasing isolation from neighbouring trees negatively affected lichens but not bryophytes. However, the high-priority bryophyte species T. rudolphiana was also negatively affected by increased isolation at small spatial scales. Orthotrichum rogeri was more frequent on young trees and L. pulmonaria was more frequent on trees with thin stems and large crowns. The results indicate that local dispersal is important for lichens, whereas long distance dispersal seems to be more important for colonisation by bryophytes. Furthermore, our study highlights that different conservation measures need to be taken depending on the taxonomic and functional species

  11. Bryophyte Species Richness and Composition along an Altitudinal Gradient in Gongga Mountain, China

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Shou-Qin; Wu, Yan-Hong; Wang, Gen-Xu; Zhou, Jun; Yu, Dong; Bing, Hai-Jian; Luo, Ji

    2013-01-01

    An investigation of terrestrial bryophyte species diversity and community structure along an altitudinal gradient from 2,001 to 4,221 m a.s.l. in Gongga Mountain in Sichuan, China was carried out in June 2010. Factors which might affect bryophyte species composition and diversity, including climate, elevation, slope, depth of litter, vegetation type, soil pH and soil Eh, were examined to understand the altitudinal feature of bryophyte distribution. A total of 14 representative elevations were chosen along an altitudinal gradient, with study sites at each elevation chosen according to habitat type (forests, grasslands) and accessibility. At each elevation, three 100 m × 2 m transects that are 50 m apart were set along the contour line, and three 50 cm × 50 cm quadrats were set along each transect at an interval of 30 m. Species diversity, cover, biomass, and thickness of terrestrial bryophytes were examined. A total of 165 species, including 42 liverworts and 123 mosses, are recorded in Gongga mountain. Ground bryophyte species richness does not show any clear elevation trend. The terrestrial bryophyte cover increases with elevation. The terrestrial bryophyte biomass and thickness display a clear humped relationship with the elevation, with the maximum around 3,758 m. At this altitude, biomass is 700.3 g m−2 and the maximum thickness is 8 cm. Bryophyte distribution is primarily associated with the depth of litter, the air temperature and the precipitation. Further studies are necessary to include other epiphytes types and vascular vegetation in a larger altitudinal range. PMID:23472146

  12. Bryophyte species richness and composition along an altitudinal gradient in Gongga Mountain, China.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shou-Qin; Wu, Yan-Hong; Wang, Gen-Xu; Zhou, Jun; Yu, Dong; Bing, Hai-Jian; Luo, Ji

    2013-01-01

    An investigation of terrestrial bryophyte species diversity and community structure along an altitudinal gradient from 2,001 to 4,221 m a.s.l. in Gongga Mountain in Sichuan, China was carried out in June 2010. Factors which might affect bryophyte species composition and diversity, including climate, elevation, slope, depth of litter, vegetation type, soil pH and soil Eh, were examined to understand the altitudinal feature of bryophyte distribution. A total of 14 representative elevations were chosen along an altitudinal gradient, with study sites at each elevation chosen according to habitat type (forests, grasslands) and accessibility. At each elevation, three 100 m × 2 m transects that are 50 m apart were set along the contour line, and three 50 cm × 50 cm quadrats were set along each transect at an interval of 30 m. Species diversity, cover, biomass, and thickness of terrestrial bryophytes were examined. A total of 165 species, including 42 liverworts and 123 mosses, are recorded in Gongga mountain. Ground bryophyte species richness does not show any clear elevation trend. The terrestrial bryophyte cover increases with elevation. The terrestrial bryophyte biomass and thickness display a clear humped relationship with the elevation, with the maximum around 3,758 m. At this altitude, biomass is 700.3 g m(-2) and the maximum thickness is 8 cm. Bryophyte distribution is primarily associated with the depth of litter, the air temperature and the precipitation. Further studies are necessary to include other epiphytes types and vascular vegetation in a larger altitudinal range.

  13. Species richness of vascular plants, bryophytes, and lichens along an altitudinal gradient in western Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grytnes, John Arvid; Heegaard, Einar; Ihlen, Per G.

    2006-05-01

    Species richness patterns of ground-dwelling vascular plants, bryophytes, and lichens were compared along an altitudinal gradient (310-1135 m a.s.l.), in western Norway. Total species richness peaked at intermediate altitudes, vascular plant species richness peaked immediately above the forest limit (at 600-700 m a.s.l.), bryophyte species richness had no statistically significant trend, whereas lichen richness increased from the lowest point and up to the forest limit, with no trend above. It is proposed that the pattern in vascular plant species richness is enhanced by an ecotone effect. Bryophyte species richness responds to local scale factors whereas the lichen species richness may be responding to the shading from the forest trees.

  14. [Niches of seven bryophyte species in Hani peat land of Changbai Mountains].

    PubMed

    Chen, Xu; Bu, Zhao-jun; Wang, Sheng-zhong; Li, Hong-kai; Zhao, Hong-yan

    2009-03-01

    Based on field investigation and by using Levins and Pianka formula, the niches of seven bryophyte species in Hani Peatland of Changbai Mountains were studied. The results showed that the average niche breadth in nine environmental factors (total nitrogen, total phosphorous, K+ and Ca2+ in peat, pH,and electrical conductivity of surface water, tree coverage, shrub coverage, and depth to water table) of the seven species decreased in the order of Aulacomnium palustre > Sphagnum fallax > S. magellanicum > S. capillifolium = Polytrichum juniperinum > S. palustre > S. fuiscum. S. fuscum tended to be niche-specific species, while A. palustre tended to be niche-general species. Among the nine environmental factors, surface water electrical conductivity had the highest mean overlap value, while depth to water table, tree coverage, surface water pH, and shrub coverage had the lowest one, being the main environmental factors affecting the distribution of bryophytes. Most bryophyte species differentiated in their niches in the factors of depth to water table, tree coverage, surface water pH, and shrub coverage; while a few bryophyte species had higher overlap value in all of the test environmental factors due to their collaboration relationships in water use. This higher overlap value could offer indirect evidence of interspecific competition of bryophytes.

  15. Moisture conditions and the presence of bryophytes determine fescue species abundance in a dry calcareous grassland.

    PubMed

    Otsus, Merit; Zobel, Martin

    2004-01-01

    Festuca ovina is the abundant matrix-forming species and F. rubra a subordinate species in shallow-soil calcareous grasslands. F. pratensis is a transient species, occurring sparsely in this community. We hypothesised that the different abundances of these three species are primarily due to the differential effect of moisture conditions on their germination and early establishment, and that the effect of the pattern of rainfall intensity depends on the presence or absence of a bryophyte layer. We studied the dependence of the germination and establishment of the three fescue species on the moisture conditions both in the laboratory and in the patches of intact grassland community (microcosms). In a laboratory germination experiment, F. pratensis showed the highest, F. rubra, the intermediate and F. ovina, the lowest drought tolerance. In microcosms, the establishment of F. ovina was the highest. At the same time, the annual mortality of seedlings of F. ovina was the lowest. All three species responded positively to an increasing irrigation level. Differently from F. ovina, F. rubra showed a positive response only in plots from which the bryophyte layer had been removed, while F. pratensis responded positively to both irrigation and bryophyte removal. We conclude that moisture conditions have a differential effect on the three fescue species mainly in the seedling establishment, not in the germination phase. For the successful establishment of F. rubra and F. pratensis, the coincidence of high rainfall and local disturbance, removing bryophytes, is required. The presence or absence of bryophytes had no effect on establishment in dry years, while in rainy years the removal of bryophytes has a clear positive effect.

  16. Bacterial-biota dynamics of eight bryophyte species from different ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Koua, Faisal Hammad Mekky; Kimbara, Kazuhide; Tani, Akio

    2014-01-01

    Despite the importance of bryophyte-associated microorganisms in various ecological aspects including their crucial roles in the soil-enrichment of organic mass and N2 fixation, nonetheless, little is known about the microbial diversity of the bryophyte phyllospheres (epi-/endophytes). To get insights into bacterial community structures and their dynamics on the bryophyte habitats in different ecosystems and their potential biological roles, we utilized the 16S rRNA gene PCR-DGGE and subsequent phylogenetic analyses to investigate the bacterial community of eight bryophyte species collected from three distinct ecosystems from western Japan. Forty-two bacterial species belonging to γ-proteobacteria and Firmicutes with 71.4% and 28.6%, respectively, were identified among 90 DGGE gel band population. These DGGE-bands were assigned to 13 different genera with obvious predomination the genus Clostridium with 21.4% from the total bacterial community. These analyses provide new insights into bryophyte-associated bacteria and their relations to the ecosystems. PMID:25737654

  17. Bryophyte species associations with coarse woody debris and stand ages in Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rambo, T.; Muir, Patricia S.

    1998-01-01

    We quantified the relationships of 93 forest floor bryophyte species, including epiphytes from incorporated litterfall, to substrate and stand age in Pseudotsuga menziesii-Tsuga heterophylla stands at two sites in western Oregon. We used the method of Dufr??ne and Legendre that combines a species' relative abundance and relative frequency, to calculate that species' importance in relation to environmental variables. The resulting 'indicator value' describes a species' reliability for indicating the given environmental parameter. Thirty-nine species were indicative of either humus, a decay class of coarse woody debris, or stand age. Bryophyte community composition changed along the continuum of coarse woody debris decomposition from recently fallen trees with intact bark to forest floor humus. Richness of forest floor bryophytes will be enhanced when a full range of coarse woody debris decay classes is present. A suite of bryophytes indicated old-growth forest. These were mainly either epiphytes associated with older conifers or liverworts associated with coarse woody debris. Hardwood-associated epiphytes mainly indicated young stands. Mature conifers, hardwoods, and coarse woody debris are biological legacies that can be protected when thinning managed stands to foster habitat complexity and biodiversity, consistent with an ecosystem approach to forest management.

  18. Bryophyte species diversity in secondary forests dominated by the introduced species Spathodea campanulata Beauv. in Puerto Rico

    Treesearch

    M. E. Perez; I. Sastre de Jesús; A. E. Lugo; O. J. Abelleira Martínez

    2012-01-01

    The introduced tree species Spathodea campanulata (Bignoniaceae) forms novel forests in Puerto Rico, these having emerged after the abandonment of fields in the mid-20th century and resulting in forests with a new species composition. We assessed bryophyte species richness in these novel forests and sought correlations with geological substrate, past land use, forest...

  19. Rare Species (RS)

    Treesearch

    Steve Sutherland

    2006-01-01

    The FIREMON Rare Species (RS) method is used to assess changes in uncommon, perennial plant species when other monitoring methods are not effective. This method monitors individual plants and statistically quantifies changes in plant survivorship, growth, and reproduction over time. Plants are spatially located using distance along and from a permanent baseline, and...

  20. Endangered Species: Wild & Rare.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braus, Judy, Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Ranger Rick's NatureScope is a creative education series dedicated to inspiring in children an understanding and appreciation of the natural world while developing the skills they will need to make responsible decisions about the environment. The topic of this issue is "Endangered Species: Wild and Rare." Contents are organized into the…

  1. Endangered Species: Wild & Rare.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braus, Judy, Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Ranger Rick's NatureScope is a creative education series dedicated to inspiring in children an understanding and appreciation of the natural world while developing the skills they will need to make responsible decisions about the environment. The topic of this issue is "Endangered Species: Wild and Rare." Contents are organized into the…

  2. Effects of air pollution from road transport on growth and physiology of six transplanted bryophyte species.

    PubMed

    Bignal, Keeley L; Ashmore, Mike R; Headley, Alistair D

    2008-11-01

    Motor vehicles emit a cocktail of pollutants; however, little is known about the effects of these pollutants on bryophytes located in roadside habitats. Six bryophyte species were transplanted to either a woodland or a moorland site adjacent to a motorway, and were monitored over sevenmonths from autumn through to spring. All species showed an increase in one or more of the following near the motorway: growth, membrane leakage, chlorophyll concentration, and nitrogen concentration. The strongest effects were observed in the first 50-100 m from the motorway: this was consistent with the nitrogen dioxide pollution profile, which decreased to background levels at a distance of 100-125 m. It is hypothesised that motor vehicle pollution was responsible for the effects observed, and that nitrogen oxides had a key influence. The observed effects may lead to changes in vegetation composition with significant implications for nature conservation and management of roadside sites.

  3. Modeling species distributions from heterogeneous data for the biogeographic regionalization of the European bryophyte flora.

    PubMed

    Mateo, Rubén G; Vanderpoorten, Alain; Muñoz, Jesús; Laenen, Benjamin; Désamoré, Aurélie

    2013-01-01

    The definition of biogeographic regions provides a fundamental framework for a range of basic and applied questions in biogeography, evolutionary biology, systematics and conservation. Previous research suggested that environmental forcing results in highly congruent regionalization patterns across taxa, but that the size and number of regions depends on the dispersal ability of the taxa considered. We produced a biogeographic regionalization of European bryophytes and hypothesized that (1) regions defined for bryophytes would differ from those defined for other taxa due to the highly specific eco-physiology of the group and (2) their high dispersal ability would result in the resolution of few, large regions. Species distributions were recorded using 10,000 km2 MGRS pixels. Because of the lack of data across large portions of the area, species distribution models employing macroclimatic variables as predictors were used to determine the potential composition of empty pixels. K-means clustering analyses of the pixels based on their potential species composition were employed to define biogeographic regions. The optimal number of regions was determined by v-fold cross-validation and Moran's I statistic. The spatial congruence of the regions identified from their potential bryophyte assemblages with large-scale vegetation patterns is at odds with our primary hypothesis. This reinforces the notion that post-glacial migration patterns might have been much more similar in bryophytes and vascular plants than previously thought. The substantially lower optimal number of clusters and the absence of nested patterns within the main biogeographic regions, as compared to identical analyses in vascular plants, support our second hypothesis. The modelling approach implemented here is, however, based on many assumptions that are discussed but can only be tested when additional data on species distributions become available, highlighting the substantial importance of developing

  4. Modeling Species Distributions from Heterogeneous Data for the Biogeographic Regionalization of the European Bryophyte Flora

    PubMed Central

    Mateo, Rubén G.; Vanderpoorten, Alain; Muñoz, Jesús

    2013-01-01

    The definition of biogeographic regions provides a fundamental framework for a range of basic and applied questions in biogeography, evolutionary biology, systematics and conservation. Previous research suggested that environmental forcing results in highly congruent regionalization patterns across taxa, but that the size and number of regions depends on the dispersal ability of the taxa considered. We produced a biogeographic regionalization of European bryophytes and hypothesized that (1) regions defined for bryophytes would differ from those defined for other taxa due to the highly specific eco-physiology of the group and (2) their high dispersal ability would result in the resolution of few, large regions. Species distributions were recorded using 10,000 km2 MGRS pixels. Because of the lack of data across large portions of the area, species distribution models employing macroclimatic variables as predictors were used to determine the potential composition of empty pixels. K-means clustering analyses of the pixels based on their potential species composition were employed to define biogeographic regions. The optimal number of regions was determined by v-fold cross-validation and Moran’s I statistic. The spatial congruence of the regions identified from their potential bryophyte assemblages with large-scale vegetation patterns is at odds with our primary hypothesis. This reinforces the notion that post-glacial migration patterns might have been much more similar in bryophytes and vascular plants than previously thought. The substantially lower optimal number of clusters and the absence of nested patterns within the main biogeographic regions, as compared to identical analyses in vascular plants, support our second hypothesis. The modelling approach implemented here is, however, based on many assumptions that are discussed but can only be tested when additional data on species distributions become available, highlighting the substantial importance of developing

  5. Geographical, temporal and environmental determinants of bryophyte species richness in the Macaronesian islands.

    PubMed

    Aranda, Silvia C; Gabriel, Rosalina; Borges, Paulo A V; Santos, Ana M C; de Azevedo, Eduardo Brito; Patiño, Jairo; Hortal, Joaquín; Lobo, Jorge M

    2014-01-01

    Species richness on oceanic islands has been related to a series of ecological factors including island size and isolation (i.e. the Equilibrium Model of Island Biogeography, EMIB), habitat diversity, climate (i.e., temperature and precipitation) and more recently island ontogeny (i.e. the General Dynamic Model of oceanic island biogeography, GDM). Here we evaluate the relationship of these factors with the diversity of bryophytes in the Macaronesian region (Azores, Madeira, Canary Islands and Cape Verde). The predictive power of EMIB, habitat diversity, climate and the GDM on total bryophyte richness, as well as moss and liverwort richness (the two dominant bryophyte groups), was evaluated through ordinary least squares regressions. After choosing the best subset of variables using inference statistics, we used partial regression analyses to identify the independent and shared effects of each model. The variables included within each model were similar for mosses and liverworts, with orographic mist layer being one of the most important predictors of richness. Models combining climate with either the GDM or habitat diversity explained most of richness variation (up to 91%). There was a high portion of shared variance between all pairwise combinations of factors in mosses, while in liverworts around half of the variability in species richness was accounted for exclusively by climate. Our results suggest that the effects of climate and habitat are strong and prevalent in this region, while geographical factors have limited influence on Macaronesian bryophyte diversity. Although climate is of great importance for liverwort richness, in mosses its effect is similar to or, at least, indiscernible from the effect of habitat diversity and, strikingly, the effect of island ontogeny. These results indicate that for highly vagile taxa on oceanic islands, the dispersal process may be less important for successful colonization than the availability of suitable ecological

  6. Geographical, Temporal and Environmental Determinants of Bryophyte Species Richness in the Macaronesian Islands

    PubMed Central

    Aranda, Silvia C.; Gabriel, Rosalina; Borges, Paulo A. V.; Santos, Ana M. C.; de Azevedo, Eduardo Brito; Patiño, Jairo; Hortal, Joaquín; Lobo, Jorge M.

    2014-01-01

    Species richness on oceanic islands has been related to a series of ecological factors including island size and isolation (i.e. the Equilibrium Model of Island Biogeography, EMIB), habitat diversity, climate (i.e., temperature and precipitation) and more recently island ontogeny (i.e. the General Dynamic Model of oceanic island biogeography, GDM). Here we evaluate the relationship of these factors with the diversity of bryophytes in the Macaronesian region (Azores, Madeira, Canary Islands and Cape Verde). The predictive power of EMIB, habitat diversity, climate and the GDM on total bryophyte richness, as well as moss and liverwort richness (the two dominant bryophyte groups), was evaluated through ordinary least squares regressions. After choosing the best subset of variables using inference statistics, we used partial regression analyses to identify the independent and shared effects of each model. The variables included within each model were similar for mosses and liverworts, with orographic mist layer being one of the most important predictors of richness. Models combining climate with either the GDM or habitat diversity explained most of richness variation (up to 91%). There was a high portion of shared variance between all pairwise combinations of factors in mosses, while in liverworts around half of the variability in species richness was accounted for exclusively by climate. Our results suggest that the effects of climate and habitat are strong and prevalent in this region, while geographical factors have limited influence on Macaronesian bryophyte diversity. Although climate is of great importance for liverwort richness, in mosses its effect is similar to or, at least, indiscernible from the effect of habitat diversity and, strikingly, the effect of island ontogeny. These results indicate that for highly vagile taxa on oceanic islands, the dispersal process may be less important for successful colonization than the availability of suitable ecological

  7. Similar cation exchange capacities among bryophyte species refute a presumed mechanism of peatland acidification.

    PubMed

    Soudzilovskaia, N A; Cornelissen, J H C; During, H J; van Logtestijn, R S P; Lang, S I; Aerts, R

    2010-09-01

    Fen-bog succession is accompanied by strong increases of carbon accumulation rates. We tested the prevailing hypothesis that living Sphagna have extraordinarily high cation exchange capacity (CEC) and therefore acidify their environment by exchanging tissue-bound protons for basic cations in soil water. As Sphagnum invasion in a peatland usually coincides with succession from a brown moss-dominated alkaline fen to an acidic bog, the CEC of Sphagna is widely believed to play an important role in this acidification process. However, Sphagnum CEC has never been compared explicitly to that of a wide range of other bryophyte taxa. Whether high CEC directly leads to the ability to acidify the environment in situ also remains to be tested. We screened 20 predominant subarctic bryophyte species, including fen brown mosses and bog Sphagna for CEC, in situ soil water acidification capacity (AC), and peat acid neutralizing capacity (ANC). All these bryophyte species possessed substantial CEC, which was remarkably similar for brown mosses and Sphagna. This refutes the commonly accepted idea of living Sphagnum CEC being responsible for peatland acidification, as Sphagnum's ecological predecessors, brown mosses, can do the same job. Sphagnum AC was several times higher than that of other bryophytes, suggesting that CE (cation exchange) sites of Sphagna in situ are not saturated with basic cations, probably due to the virtual absence of these cations in the bog water. Together, these results suggest that Sphagna can not realize their CEC in bogs, while fen mosses can do so in fens. The fen peat ANC was 65% higher than bog ANC, indicating that acidity released by brown mosses in the CE process was neutralized, maintaining an alkaline environment. We propose two successional pathways indicating boundaries for a fen-bog shift with respect to bryophyte CEC. In neither of them is Sphagnum CE an important factor. We conclude that living Sphagnum CEC does not play any considerable role

  8. Restricted variation in plant barcoding markers limits identification in closely related bryophyte species.

    PubMed

    Hassel, Kristian; Segreto, Rossana; Ekrem, Torbjørn

    2013-11-01

    Species-level identification and delimitation of bryophytes using the proposed general barcode markers for land plants has been challenging. Bryophyta (mosses) is the second most species-rich group of land plants after angiosperms, and it is thus of great importance to find useful barcoding regions also for this group of plants. We investigated how the plastid regions atpF-atpH, rbcL and trnH-psbA and the nuclear ITS2 region performed as barcode markers on closely related bryophyte taxa of selected moss (Bartramia, Distichium, Fissidens, Meesia and Syntrichia) and liverwort (Blepharostoma) genera from boreal and arctic regions. We also evaluated how sequencing success of herbarium specimens is related to length of the sequenced fragment, specimen age and taxonomic group. Sequencing success was higher for shorter fragments and younger herbarium specimens, but was lower than expected in the genera Distichium and Fissidens, indicating imperfect universality of the primers used. None of the studied DNA barcode regions showed a consistent barcode gap across the studied genera. As a single locus, the region atpF-atpH performed slightly better than rbcL and ITS2 and much better than trnH-psbA in terms of grouping conspecific sequences in monophyletic groups. This marker also gave a higher percentage of correct hits when conducting blast searches on a local database of identified sequences. Concatenated data sets of two and three markers grouped more conspecific sequences in monophyletic groups, but the improvement was not great compared with atpF-atpH alone. A discussion of recent studies testing barcode regions for bryophytes is given. We conclude that atpF-atpH, rbcL and ITS2 are to be the most promising barcode markers for mosses.

  9. Rare species occupy uncommon niches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markham, John

    2014-08-01

    The fact that temperate grasslands often contain upwards of 30 vascular plant species per m2 yet these species seem to have relatively similar life histories and resource requirements has made explaining species coexistence in these communities a major focus of research. While the reduction of competition by disturbance has been a popular explanation for species coexistence, in tallgrass prairies any level of disturbance either has no effect, or decreases diversity, since it favors the dominant plants. Although there has long been speculation that grassland species could coexist by niche partitioning the concept received renewed interest when it was shown that soil hydrology could explain species coexistence. One aspect of community structure that has not been explained by niche partitioning is the rareness and commonness of species within communities. There are three classes of explanations for rareness: narrow habitat requirements, low competitive ability combined with frequency dependent fitness and, dispersal ability. However, evidence for these explanations tend to be anecdotal, focusing on particular species. Here I show that in tallgrass prairies common and rare species consistently occupy different parts of niche space, with rare species being restricted by the cover of common species and occupying the rare available niches.

  10. Rare species occupy uncommon niches

    PubMed Central

    Markham, John

    2014-01-01

    The fact that temperate grasslands often contain upwards of 30 vascular plant species per m2 yet these species seem to have relatively similar life histories and resource requirements has made explaining species coexistence in these communities a major focus of research. While the reduction of competition by disturbance has been a popular explanation for species coexistence, in tallgrass prairies any level of disturbance either has no effect, or decreases diversity, since it favors the dominant plants. Although there has long been speculation that grassland species could coexist by niche partitioning the concept received renewed interest when it was shown that soil hydrology could explain species coexistence. One aspect of community structure that has not been explained by niche partitioning is the rareness and commonness of species within communities. There are three classes of explanations for rareness: narrow habitat requirements, low competitive ability combined with frequency dependent fitness and, dispersal ability. However, evidence for these explanations tend to be anecdotal, focusing on particular species. Here I show that in tallgrass prairies common and rare species consistently occupy different parts of niche space, with rare species being restricted by the cover of common species and occupying the rare available niches. PMID:25110113

  11. Molecular analysis of fungal diversity associated with three bryophyte species in the Fildes Region, King George Island, maritime Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tao; Xiang, Hai-Bo; Zhang, Yu-Qin; Liu, Hong-Yu; Wei, Yu-Zhen; Zhao, Li-Xun; Yu, Li-Yan

    2013-09-01

    The fungal communities associated with three bryophytes species (the liverwort Barbilophozia hatcheri, the mosses Chorisodontium aciphyllum and Sanionia uncinata) in the Fildes Region, King George Island, maritime Antarctica, were studied using clone library analysis. Fungal communities showed low diversity; the 680 clones belonged to 93 OTUs. Of these, 78 belonged to the phylum Ascomycota, 13 to the phylum Basidiomycota, 1 to the phylum Zygomycota, and 1 to an unknown phylum. Among the OTUs, the most common orders in the Ascomycota were Helotiales (42 OTUs) and Chaetothyriales (14 OTUs) and the most common orders in the Basidiomycota were Sebacinales (3 OTUs) and Platygloeales (3 OTUs). Most OTUs clustered within clades that contained phylotypes identified from samples in Antarctic or Arctic ecosystems or from bryophytes in other ecosystems. In addition, we found that host-related factor may shape the fungal communities associated with bryophytes in this region. This is the first systematic study of the fungal community in Antarctic bryophytes to be performed using culture-independent method and the results may improve understanding of the endophytic fungal evolution and ecology in the Antarctic ecosystem.

  12. Methylobacteria isolated from bryophytes and the 2-fold description of the same microbial species.

    PubMed

    Schauer, S; Kutschera, U

    2013-02-01

    On the surface of healthy land plants (embryophytes), numerous non-pathogenic bacteria have been discovered and described. Among these epiphytic microbes, pink-pigmented facultative methylotrophic microbes of the genus Methylobacterium are of special significance, because these microorganisms consume methanol emitted via the stomatal pores and secrete growth-promoting phytohormones. Methylobacterium funariae, Schauer and Kutschera 2011, a species isolated in our lab from the common cord moss, described as a nova species in this journal, was recently characterized for a second time as a "new taxon" under a different name, "M. bullatum." Based on a phylogenetic analysis, we show that these taxa are identical. In addition, we provide novel information on the exact cell size, and describe the correct type locality of this bacterial species, which was classified as a phytosymbiont. Finally, we discuss the hypothesis that certain methylobacteria may preferentially colonize bryophytes. With reference to our recent discovery that thalli of ferns form, like liverworts and moss protonemata, associations with methylobacteria, we argue that the haploid phase of cryptogames are preferred host organisms of these pink-pigmented microbial phytosymbionts.

  13. Uptake of heavy metals to the extracellular and intracellular compartments in three species of aquatic bryophyte.

    PubMed

    Vázquez, M D; López, J; Carballeira, A

    1999-09-01

    Shoot tips of Fontinalis antipyretica, Scapania undulata, and Fissidens polyphyllus were maintained for 60 min with solutions containing 0, 1, 10, 50, 100, or 200 ppm of Cd, Co, Cu, Ni, Pb, or Zn. A sequential extraction procedure was then used to estimate the amounts of the corresponding metal, and of K and Mg, in the extracellular compartment (extraction with NiCl(2) or EDTA), the intracellular compartment (subsequent extraction with cold dilute HNO(3)), and the particulate fraction (subsequent extraction with hot concentrated HNO(3)). In most cases more metal was taken up to the extracellular compartment than to the intracellular compartment, while particulate-fraction content was negligible. The relationship between metal concentration in the water and metal content in the extracellular compartment was well modeled with a Michaelis-Menten-type equation. Results suggest that in S. undulata extracellular cation-binding sites have a high metal affinity, while in F. polyphyllus it is relatively low. However, postincubation intracellular contents were highest in the latter species. The ranking of the six metals by amounts taken up into the intracellular compartment was the same for all three bryophyte species. Uptake of heavy metals led to considerable losses of intracellular K (probably due to effects on plasma membrane properties), and of extracellular Mg (probably due to displacement from cation-binding sites). Losses of intracellular K were most marked in S. undulata, followed by F. antipyretica. By contrast, S. undulata was the species from which losses of extracellular Mg were lowest.

  14. Do Species-specific Hydraulic Traits Predict Ecosystem Response and Community Structure? Evidence From Co-occurring Bryophytes of a Sloping Wetland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lintz, H. E.; Russell, M. C.; Hardman, A. C.

    2007-12-01

    Ecosystems comprise a complex assortment species, and each species has a unique set of physiological and anatomical characteristics or traits. Landscape-level forecasts of ecosystem response to climate change can benefit by accounting for species-specific traits. Here, we demonstrate how a hydraulic trait can be quantified and aggregrated to community and ecosystem levels using a model life form and system, bryophytes in a sloping wetland. Growth and reproduction of bryophytes depend on the quantity of external water held, which varies by species. Wetlands provide a soil substrate that supplies either an unlimited amount of water, or at minimum, a shallow water table for part of the year. We hypothesized and confirmed that external water holding capacity of bryophyte species (measured in the laboratory) corresponded to bryophyte community structure along a hydrology gradient in the wetland. In addition, we demonstrated that water holding capacity by species can be aggregated to the level of the wetland ecosystem to reveal an emergent community property, water holding capacity of the bryophyte mat. Our results support ecological theory presented by Paul Keddy (1999) that co-occurring organisms show similarity in resource acquisition along gradients of resource limitation. We promote a conceptual framework that incorporates species-specific traits as modeling currency that can bridge scales.

  15. Protecting rare, old-growth, forest-associated species under the Survey and Manage program guidelines of the northwest forest plan.

    Treesearch

    Randy Molina; Bruce G. Marcot; Robin. Lesher

    2006-01-01

    The Survey and Manage Program of the Northwest Forest Plan (MFP) represents an unparalleled attempt to protect rare, little-known species associated with late-successional and old-growth forests on more than 7.7 million ha of federal lands. Approximately 400 species of amphibians, bryophytes, fungi, lichens, mollusks, vascular plants, arthropod functional groups, and...

  16. [Research advances on interactions among bryophytes].

    PubMed

    Bu, Zhao-Jun; Chen, Xu; Jiang, Li-Hong; Li, Hong-Kai; Zhao, Hong-Yan

    2009-02-01

    This paper summarized the present research status and advances on the intra- and interspecific positive interaction, intra- and inter-specific competition, niche, and coexistence of bryophytes. Bryophytes are generally the dominant plants in harsh environments, and there is a trade-off between their water retention and light and nutrient resource availability. Because of the lesser importance of competition in harsh environments, the positive interaction among bryophytes is common, but the intra- and inter-specific competition among bryophytes and the competition between bryophytes and vascular plants are not rare. Competition hierarchy may exist among some bryophytes, but often changes with environments. In the process of bryophyte community formation, the random process, nature of colonization, and difference in regeneration strategy can result in the niche overlap and coexistence of bryophytes, and the niche differentiation resulted from competition is also one of the mechanisms for bryophytes coexistence. Bryophytes should not be simply classified as stress tolerated-ruderal life history strategists, and competition is still one of important factors for constructing some bryophyte communities and vegetations co-existed by bryophytes and vascular plants.

  17. Comparisons of photosynthesis-related traits of 27 abundant or subordinate bryophyte species in a subalpine old-growth fir forest.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhe; Bader, Maaike Y; Liu, Xin; Zhu, Zhangming; Bao, Weikai

    2017-09-01

    Bryophyte communities can exhibit similar structural and taxonomic diversity as vascular plant communities, just at a smaller scale. Whether the physiological diversity can be similarly diverse, and whether it can explain local abundance patterns is unknown, due to a lack of community-wide studies of physiological traits. This study re-analyzed data on photosynthesis-related traits (including the nitrogen, phosphorus and chlorophyll concentrations, photosynthetic capacities, and photosynthetic nutrient use efficiencies) of 27 bryophyte species in a subalpine old-growth fir forest on the eastern Tibetan Plateau. We explored differences between taxonomic groups and hypothesized that the most abundant bryophyte species had physiological advantages relative to other subdominant species. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to summarize the differences among species and trait values of the most abundant and other co-occurring subdominant species. Species from the Polytrichaceae were separated out on both PCA axes, indicating their high chlorophyll concentrations and photosynthetic capacities (axis 1) and relatively high-light requirements (axis 2). Mniaceae species also had relatively high photosynthetic capacities, but their light saturation points were low. In contrast, Racomitrium joseph-hookeri and Lepidozia reptans, two species with a high shoot mass per area, had high-light requirements and low nutrient and chlorophyll concentrations and photosynthetic capacities. The nutrient concentrations, photosynthetic capacities, and photosynthetic nutrient use efficiencies of the most abundant bryophyte species did not differ from co-occurring subdominant species. Our research confirms the links between the photosynthesis-related traits and adaptation strategies of bryophytes. However, species relative abundance was not related to these traits.

  18. How do bryophytes govern generative recruitment of vascular plants?

    PubMed

    Soudzilovskaia, Nadejda A; Graae, Bente J; Douma, Jacob C; Grau, Oriol; Milbau, Ann; Shevtsova, Anna; Wolters, Loes; Cornelissen, Johannes H C

    2011-06-01

    Interactions between vascular plants and bryophytes determine plant community composition in many ecosystems. Yet, little is known about the importance of interspecific differences between bryophytes with respect to their effects on vascular plants. We compared the extent to which species-specific bryophyte effects on vascular plant generative recruitment depend on the following underlying mechanisms: allelopathy, mechanical obstruction, soil moisture and temperature control. We sowed 10 vascular plant species into monospecific mats of six chemically and structurally diverse bryophytes, and examined 1-yr seedling recruitment. Allelopathic effects were also assessed in a laboratory phyto-assay. Although all bryophytes suppressed vascular plant regeneration, there were significant differences between the bryophyte species. The lack of interactions indicated the absence of species-specific adaptations of vascular plants for recruitment in bryophyte mats. Differences between bryophyte species were best explained by alterations in temperature regime under bryophyte mats, mostly by reduced temperature amplitudes during germination. The temperature regime under bryophyte mats was well predicted by species-specific bryophyte cushion thickness. The fitness of established seedlings was not affected by the presence of bryophytes. Our results suggest that climatically or anthropogenically driven changes in the species' composition of bryophyte communities have knock-on effects on vascular plant populations via generative reproduction.

  19. A primary survey on bryophyte species reveals two novel classes of nucleotide-binding site (NBS) genes.

    PubMed

    Xue, Jia-Yu; Wang, Yue; Wu, Ping; Wang, Qiang; Yang, Le-Tian; Pan, Xiao-Han; Wang, Bin; Chen, Jian-Qun

    2012-01-01

    Due to their potential roles in pathogen defense, genes encoding nucleotide-binding site (NBS) domain have been particularly surveyed in many angiosperm genomes. Two typical classes were found: one is the TIR-NBS-LRR (TNL) class and the other is the CC-NBS-LRR (CNL) class. It is seldom known, however, what kind of NBS-encoding genes are mainly present in other plant groups, especially the most ancient groups of land plants, that is, bryophytes. To fill this gap of knowledge, in this study, we mainly focused on two bryophyte species: the moss Physcomitrella patens and the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha, to survey their NBS-encoding genes. Surprisingly, two novel classes of NBS-encoding genes were discovered. The first novel class is identified from the P. patens genome and a typical member of this class has a protein kinase (PK) domain at the N-terminus and a LRR domain at the C-terminus, forming a complete structure of PK-NBS-LRR (PNL), reminiscent of TNL and CNL classes in angiosperms. The second class is found from the liverwort genome and a typical member of this class possesses an α/β-hydrolase domain at the N-terminus and also a LRR domain at the C-terminus (Hydrolase-NBS-LRR, HNL). Analysis on intron positions and phases also confirmed the novelty of HNL and PNL classes, as reflected by their specific intron locations or phase characteristics. Phylogenetic analysis covering all four classes of NBS-encoding genes revealed a closer relationship among the HNL, PNL and TNL classes, suggesting the CNL class having a more divergent status from the others. The presence of specific introns highlights the chimerical structures of HNL, PNL and TNL genes, and implies their possible origin via exon-shuffling during the quick lineage separation processes of early land plants.

  20. Locally rare species influence grassland ecosystem multifunctionality.

    PubMed

    Soliveres, Santiago; Manning, Peter; Prati, Daniel; Gossner, Martin M; Alt, Fabian; Arndt, Hartmut; Baumgartner, Vanessa; Binkenstein, Julia; Birkhofer, Klaus; Blaser, Stefan; Blüthgen, Nico; Boch, Steffen; Böhm, Stefan; Börschig, Carmen; Buscot, Francois; Diekötter, Tim; Heinze, Johannes; Hölzel, Norbert; Jung, Kirsten; Klaus, Valentin H; Klein, Alexandra-Maria; Kleinebecker, Till; Klemmer, Sandra; Krauss, Jochen; Lange, Markus; Morris, E Kathryn; Müller, Jörg; Oelmann, Yvonne; Overmann, Jörg; Pašalić, Esther; Renner, Swen C; Rillig, Matthias C; Schaefer, H Martin; Schloter, Michael; Schmitt, Barbara; Schöning, Ingo; Schrumpf, Marion; Sikorski, Johannes; Socher, Stephanie A; Solly, Emily F; Sonnemann, Ilja; Sorkau, Elisabeth; Steckel, Juliane; Steffan-Dewenter, Ingolf; Stempfhuber, Barbara; Tschapka, Marco; Türke, Manfred; Venter, Paul; Weiner, Christiane N; Weisser, Wolfgang W; Werner, Michael; Westphal, Catrin; Wilcke, Wolfgang; Wolters, Volkmar; Wubet, Tesfaye; Wurst, Susanne; Fischer, Markus; Allan, Eric

    2016-05-19

    Species diversity promotes the delivery of multiple ecosystem functions (multifunctionality). However, the relative functional importance of rare and common species in driving the biodiversity-multifunctionality relationship remains unknown. We studied the relationship between the diversity of rare and common species (according to their local abundances and across nine different trophic groups), and multifunctionality indices derived from 14 ecosystem functions on 150 grasslands across a land-use intensity (LUI) gradient. The diversity of above- and below-ground rare species had opposite effects, with rare above-ground species being associated with high levels of multifunctionality, probably because their effects on different functions did not trade off against each other. Conversely, common species were only related to average, not high, levels of multifunctionality, and their functional effects declined with LUI. Apart from the community-level effects of diversity, we found significant positive associations between the abundance of individual species and multifunctionality in 6% of the species tested. Species-specific functional effects were best predicted by their response to LUI: species that declined in abundance with land use intensification were those associated with higher levels of multifunctionality. Our results highlight the importance of rare species for ecosystem multifunctionality and help guiding future conservation priorities.

  1. Locally rare species influence grassland ecosystem multifunctionality

    PubMed Central

    Manning, Peter; Prati, Daniel; Gossner, Martin M.; Alt, Fabian; Arndt, Hartmut; Baumgartner, Vanessa; Binkenstein, Julia; Birkhofer, Klaus; Blaser, Stefan; Blüthgen, Nico; Boch, Steffen; Böhm, Stefan; Börschig, Carmen; Buscot, Francois; Diekötter, Tim; Heinze, Johannes; Hölzel, Norbert; Jung, Kirsten; Klaus, Valentin H.; Klein, Alexandra-Maria; Kleinebecker, Till; Klemmer, Sandra; Krauss, Jochen; Lange, Markus; Morris, E. Kathryn; Müller, Jörg; Oelmann, Yvonne; Overmann, Jörg; Pašalić, Esther; Renner, Swen C.; Rillig, Matthias C.; Schaefer, H. Martin; Schloter, Michael; Schmitt, Barbara; Schöning, Ingo; Schrumpf, Marion; Sikorski, Johannes; Socher, Stephanie A.; Solly, Emily F.; Sonnemann, Ilja; Sorkau, Elisabeth; Steckel, Juliane; Steffan-Dewenter, Ingolf; Stempfhuber, Barbara; Tschapka, Marco; Türke, Manfred; Venter, Paul; Weiner, Christiane N.; Weisser, Wolfgang W.; Werner, Michael; Westphal, Catrin; Wilcke, Wolfgang; Wolters, Volkmar; Wubet, Tesfaye; Wurst, Susanne; Fischer, Markus; Allan, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Species diversity promotes the delivery of multiple ecosystem functions (multifunctionality). However, the relative functional importance of rare and common species in driving the biodiversity–multifunctionality relationship remains unknown. We studied the relationship between the diversity of rare and common species (according to their local abundances and across nine different trophic groups), and multifunctionality indices derived from 14 ecosystem functions on 150 grasslands across a land-use intensity (LUI) gradient. The diversity of above- and below-ground rare species had opposite effects, with rare above-ground species being associated with high levels of multifunctionality, probably because their effects on different functions did not trade off against each other. Conversely, common species were only related to average, not high, levels of multifunctionality, and their functional effects declined with LUI. Apart from the community-level effects of diversity, we found significant positive associations between the abundance of individual species and multifunctionality in 6% of the species tested. Species-specific functional effects were best predicted by their response to LUI: species that declined in abundance with land use intensification were those associated with higher levels of multifunctionality. Our results highlight the importance of rare species for ecosystem multifunctionality and help guiding future conservation priorities. PMID:27114572

  2. Fatal attraction: rare species in the spotlight

    PubMed Central

    Angulo, Elena; Deves, Anne-Laure; Saint Jalmes, Michel; Courchamp, Franck

    2009-01-01

    The exploitation of rare and endangered species can end in the species's extinction because the increased value people associate with rarity increases the economic incentive to exploit the last individuals, creating a positive feedback loop. This recently proposed concept, called the anthropogenic Allee effect (AAE), relies on the assumption that people do value rarity, but this remains to be established. Moreover, it also remains to be determined whether attraction to rarity is a trait confined to a minority of hobbyists (e.g. wildlife collectors, exotic pet owners) or characteristic of the general public. We estimated how much the general public valued rare species compared with common ones, using five different metrics related to personal investment: time spent, physical effort, unpleasantness, economic investment and risk. We surveyed the visitors of a zoo. To see the rare species, the visitors to the zoo invested more time in searching and contemplation, they were ready to expend more physical effort, they tolerated more unpleasant conditions, they were willing to pay more and, finally, they risked more to obtain (steal) a rare species. Our results provide substantial evidence of how the general public places more value on rare species, compared with common species. This confirms the AAE as an actual process, which in addition concerns a large part of the population. This has important consequences for the conservation of species that are rare now, or that could become so in the future. PMID:19141425

  3. Phytohormone Profiling across the Bryophytes.

    PubMed

    Záveská Drábková, Lenka; Dobrev, Petre I; Motyka, Václav

    2015-01-01

    Bryophytes represent a very diverse group of non-vascular plants such as mosses, liverworts and hornworts and the oldest extant lineage of land plants. Determination of endogenous phytohormone profiles in bryophytes can provide substantial information about early land plant evolution. In this study, we screened thirty bryophyte species including six liverworts and twenty-four mosses for their phytohormone profiles in order to relate the hormonome with phylogeny in the plant kingdom. Samples belonging to nine orders (Pelliales, Jungermanniales, Porellales, Sphagnales, Tetraphidales, Polytrichales, Dicranales, Bryales, Hypnales) were collected in Central and Northern Bohemia. The phytohormone content was analysed with a high performance liquid chromatography electrospray tandem-mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS/MS). As revealed for growth hormones, some common traits such as weak conjugation of both cytokinins and auxins, intensive production of cisZ-type cytokinins and strong oxidative degradation of auxins with abundance of a major primary catabolite 2-oxindole-3-acetic acid were pronounced in all bryophytes. Whereas apparent dissimilarities in growth hormones profiles between liverworts and mosses were evident, no obvious trends in stress hormone levels (abscisic acid, jasmonic acid, salicylic acid) were found with respect to the phylogeny. The apparent differences in conjugation and/or degradation strategies of growth hormones between liverworts and mosses might potentially show a hidden link between vascular plants and liverworts. On the other hand, the complement of stress hormones in bryophytes probably correlate rather with prevailing environmental conditions and plant survival strategy than with plant evolution.

  4. Bryophyte-feeding of Litoleptis (Diptera: Rhagionidae) with descriptions of new species from Japan.

    PubMed

    Imada, Yume

    2016-03-29

    Here we report the larval phytophagous habit of Litoleptis for the first time, and describe six new species of Litoleptis in Japan; L. japonica n. sp., L. kiiensis n. sp., L. niyodoensis n. sp., L. himukaensis n. sp., L. izuensis n. sp., and L. asterellaphile n. sp. All the species described here are thallus-miners of liverworts belonging to Aytoniaceae and Conocephalaceae (Marchantiopsida: Marchantiophyta). Each fly species mined thalli of only one of the following genera: Conocephalum, Reboulia, and Asterella. The descriptions of the Japanese Litoleptis species here expand the concept of this genus. The female genital morphology of Litoleptis strengthened the current placement of Litoleptis as a member of Spaniinae.

  5. Fern and bryophyte endozoochory by slugs.

    PubMed

    Boch, Steffen; Berlinger, Matthias; Fischer, Markus; Knop, Eva; Nentwig, Wolfgang; Türke, Manfred; Prati, Daniel

    2013-07-01

    Endozoochory plays a prominent role for the dispersal of seed plants, and dispersal vectors are well known. However, for taxa such as ferns and bryophytes, endozoochory has only been suggested anecdotally but never tested in controlled experiments. We fed fertile leaflets of three ferns and capsules of four bryophyte species to three slug species. We found that, overall, spores germinated from slug feces in 57.3% of all 89 fern and in 51.3% of all 117 bryophyte samples, showing that the spores survived gut passage of slugs. Moreover, the number of samples within which spores successfully germinated did not differ among plant species but varied strongly among slug species. This opens new ecological perspectives suggesting that fern and bryophyte endozoochory by gastropods is a so-far-overlooked mode of dispersal, which might increase local population sizes of these taxa by spore deposition on suitable substrates.

  6. A Guide to Alaskan Black Spruce Wetland Bryophytes: Species Specific to Delineation for Interior and South Central Regions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    spores that again develop into 1n protonema. Asexual reproduction can also occur through the development of specialized propagules (e.g., gemmae...ae) Asexual reproductive structures; uni- or multicellular, filamentous or variously shaped, relatively undifferentiated structures serving in...Anthocerotes). The sexual reproductive life cycle of a bryophyte has two alternating generations. The haploid (1n) generation begins from a

  7. A new species of Cladophialophora (hyphomycetes) from boreal and montane bryophytes.

    PubMed

    Davey, Marie L; Currah, Randolph S

    2007-01-01

    During a survey of bryophilous fungi from boreal and montane habitats in central Alberta, a hitherto undescribed species of Cladophialophora was recovered from Polytrichum juniperinum, Aulacomnium palustre, and Sphagnum fuscum. On potato dextrose agar (PDA) colonies grew slowly, attaining a diameter of 25 mm after 30 d, were dark grey, velvety, radially sulcate, and convolute and cracked at the centre. Micronematous conidiophores gave rise to branched chains of small (1-2 x 8-22 microm), cylindrical to fusiform conidia with truncate, swollen scars at each end. Phylogenies built on the ITS and ribosomal SSU regions indicate the isolates form a monophyletic clade within the family Herpotrichiellaceae (Chaetothyriales) that is composed of two geographically based groups, each with 99% within-group sequence similarity and 97-98% between-group sequence similarity. A teleomorph has not been found but would likely be similar to species of Capronia. In vitro inoculation of the isolates onto axenically grown P. juniperinum produced no discernible host symptoms, and host penetration could not be detected using light microscopy. The production of polyphenol oxidases by the fungus and the role of other Cladophialophora species as latent endophytes and saprobes suggest that a potential role for the fungus is the degradation of the polyphenol-rich cell walls of mosses. A dichotomous key to species of the genus Cladophialophora is provided.

  8. Assessment of pollution with aquatic bryophytes in Maritsa River (Bulgaria).

    PubMed

    Gecheva, Gana; Yurukova, Lilyana; Ganeva, Anna

    2011-10-01

    Bryophyte species composition and 26 common physico-chemical and inorganic chemical parameters were assessed at 23 selected sites in the Maritsa River (BG) over a 4-year period. Principal components analyses (PCA) of both bryophytes and water variables distinguished different locations in the ecosystem. The data imply that the content of elements measured in bryophytes represents river contamination, while species compositional patterns reflect hydromorphology and general degradation. This study for the first time combined aquatic bryophyte occurrence, the bioaccumulation of 17 macro-and microelements in 17 species, and 26 water factors by principal components analysis (PCA) in an assessment of river pollution.

  9. Medicinal mosses in pre-Linnaean bryophyte floras of central Europe. An example from the natural history of Poland.

    PubMed

    Drobnik, Jacek; Stebel, Adam

    2014-05-14

    The paper presents information about the earliest botanical work from Poland, Warsavia physice illustrata which takes bryophytes into account. It was elaborated by a German physician Christian Heinrich Erndtel and issued in 1730 in Dresden. That time understanding of bryophytes was imprecise and in many cases they were confused with lichens and club mosses. Bryophyte taxa polynomials (18 names) were identified using pre- and post-Linnaean botanical monographs from years 1590 to 1801. Their current names and pharmacological value are provided, as well as the old ethnobotanical data about bryophytes (cited from 18th-century sources). Altogether 18 bryophyte species were identified from the vicinity of Warsaw (17 mosses and 1 liverwort). Some of them are still abundant in this area (for example Climacium dendroides, Plagiomnium undulatum and Polytrichum juniperinum) while some other are rare or extinct (for example Neckera crispa and Rhodobryum roseum). Despite the technical ability to observe specific microscopic differences among bryophytes, physicians of 18th century were hardly interested in using any of them as medicinal stock. It may be concluded that the competences in pre-Linnaean bryology did not put into practice using moss-derived materia medica of 18th century (the only exceptions were Fontinalis antipyretica and Polytrichum spp.). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. A Guide to Alaskan Black Spruce Wetland Bryophytes: Species Specific to Delineation for Interior and South Central Regions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-01

    spores that again develop into 1n protonema. Asexual reproduction can also occur through the development of specialized propagules (e.g., gemmae...Anthocerotes). The sexual reproductive life cycle of a bryophyte has two alternating generations. The haploid (1n) generation begins from a...costa ceasing below the leaf apex; lamina cells thick-walled, irregular to quadrate, with one conical mamilla on each face. Asexual gemmae, when

  11. Bryophyte colonization history of the virgin volcanic island Surtsey, Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingimundardóttir, G. V.; Weibull, H.; Cronberg, N.

    2014-08-01

    The island Surtsey was formed in a volcanic eruption south of Iceland in 1963-1967 and has since then been protected and monitored by scientists. The first two moss species were found on Surtsey as early as 1967 and several new bryophyte species were discovered every year until 1973 when regular sampling ended. Systematic bryophyte inventories in a grid of 100 m × 100 m quadrats were made in 1971 and 1972: the number of observed species doubled, with 36 species found in 1971 and 72 species in 1972. Here we report results from an inventory in 2008, when every other of the grid's quadrats were searched for bryophytes. Despite lower sampling intensity than in 1972, distributional expansion and contraction of earlier colonists was revealed as well as the presence of new colonists. A total of 38 species were discovered, 15 of those were not encountered in 1972 and eight had never been reported from Surtsey before (Bryum elegans, Ceratodon heterophyllus, Didymodon rigidulus, Eurhynchium praelongum, Schistidium confertum, S. papillosum, Tortula hoppeana and T. muralis). Habitat loss due to erosion and reduced thermal activity in combination with successional vegetation changes are likely to have played a significant role in the decline of some bryophyte species which were abundant in 1972 (Leptobryum pyriforme, Schistidium apocarpum coll., Funaria hygrometrica, Philonotis spp., Pohlia spp, Schistidium strictum, Sanionia uncinata) while others have continued to thrive and expand (e.g. Schistidium maritimum, Racomitrium lanuginosum, R. ericoides, R. fasciculare and Bryum argenteum). Some species (especially Bryum spp.) benefit from the formation of new habitats, such as grassland within a gull colony, which was established in 1984. Several newcomers are rarely producing sporophytes on Iceland and are unlikely to have been dispersed by airborne spores. They are more likely to have been introduced to Surtsey by seagulls in the form of vegetative fragments or dispersal agents

  12. Bryophyte colonization history of the virgin volcanic island Surtsey, Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingimundardóttir, G. V.; Weibull, H.; Cronberg, N.

    2014-03-01

    The island Surtsey was formed in a volcanic eruption south of Iceland in 1963-1967 and has since then been protected and monitored by scientists. The first two moss species were found on Surtsey as early as 1967 and several new bryophyte species were discovered every year until 1973 when regular sampling ended. Systematic bryophyte inventories in a grid of 100 m × 100 m quadrats were made in 1971 and 1972. The number of observed species almost doubled between years with 36 species found in 1971 and 72 species in 1972. Here we report results from an inventory in 2008, when every other of the grid's quadrats were searched for bryophytes. Despite lower sampling intensity than in 1972, distributional expansion and contraction of earlier colonists was revealed as well as presence of new colonists. A total of 38 species were discovered, 15 of those were not encountered in 1972 and eight had never been reported from Surtsey before (Bryum elegans, Ceratodon heterophyllus, Didymodon rigidulus, Eurhynchium praelongum, Schistidium confertum, S. papillosum, Tortula hoppeana and T. muralis). Habitat loss due to erosion and reduced thermal activity in combination with successional vegetation changes are likely to have played a significant role in the decline of some bryophyte species which were abundant in 1972 (Leptobryum pyriforme, Schistidium apocarpum coll., Funaria hygrometrica, Philonotis spp., Pohlia spp, Schistidium strictum, Sanionia uncinata) while others have continued to thrive and expand (e.g. Schistidium maritimum, Racomitrium lanuginosum, R. ericoides, R. fasciculare and Bryum argenteum). Some species (especially Bryum spp.) benefit from the formation of new habitats, such as grassland within a gull colony, which was established in 1984. Several newcomers are rarely producing sporophytes on Iceland and unlikely to have dispersed by airborne spores. They are more likely to have been introduced to Surtsey by seagulls in the form of vegetative fragments or dispersal

  13. Phytohormone Profiling across the Bryophytes

    PubMed Central

    Záveská Drábková, Lenka; Dobrev, Petre I.; Motyka, Václav

    2015-01-01

    Background Bryophytes represent a very diverse group of non-vascular plants such as mosses, liverworts and hornworts and the oldest extant lineage of land plants. Determination of endogenous phytohormone profiles in bryophytes can provide substantial information about early land plant evolution. In this study, we screened thirty bryophyte species including six liverworts and twenty-four mosses for their phytohormone profiles in order to relate the hormonome with phylogeny in the plant kingdom. Methodology Samples belonging to nine orders (Pelliales, Jungermanniales, Porellales, Sphagnales, Tetraphidales, Polytrichales, Dicranales, Bryales, Hypnales) were collected in Central and Northern Bohemia. The phytohormone content was analysed with a high performance liquid chromatography electrospray tandem-mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS/MS). Principal Findings As revealed for growth hormones, some common traits such as weak conjugation of both cytokinins and auxins, intensive production of cisZ-type cytokinins and strong oxidative degradation of auxins with abundance of a major primary catabolite 2-oxindole-3-acetic acid were pronounced in all bryophytes. Whereas apparent dissimilarities in growth hormones profiles between liverworts and mosses were evident, no obvious trends in stress hormone levels (abscisic acid, jasmonic acid, salicylic acid) were found with respect to the phylogeny. Conclusion The apparent differences in conjugation and/or degradation strategies of growth hormones between liverworts and mosses might potentially show a hidden link between vascular plants and liverworts. On the other hand, the complement of stress hormones in bryophytes probably correlate rather with prevailing environmental conditions and plant survival strategy than with plant evolution. PMID:25974061

  14. Bryophyte diversity and range size distribution along two altitudinal gradients: Continent vs. island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ah-Peng, Claudine; Wilding, Nicholas; Kluge, Juergen; Descamps-Julien, Blandine; Bardat, Jacques; Chuah-Petiot, Min; Strasberg, Dominique; Hedderson, Terry A. J.

    2012-07-01

    We compare patterns of bryophyte diversity and variation in species altitudinal ranges between a continental and an island altitudinal gradient. We use our ecological data set along the highest summit (Piton des Neiges, 3069 m) of Réunion Island (Mascarene archipelago) and compare it to available published data of another high volcanic massif in Colombia (Nevado del Ruiz, 5321 m). The distribution of narrow-ranged and large-ranged species was investigated. We tested the effect of geometric constraints on species distribution along the two gradients by comparing empirical to predicted data using the Mid-Domain Null Programme (McCain, 2004). Species richness was comparable between the island and continental gradient for epiphytic bryophytes, 265 and 295 species respectively. The comparison between the two tropical high mountains demonstrates important differences in the distribution of range sizes with altitude and a dominance of species with small range sizes on the Réunion gradient. For the island gradient, mean altitudinal range increases with altitude whilst concurrently species richness decreases revealing a Rapoport effect in altitudinal distribution of bryophyte communities. Geometric constraints did not explain much of the species richness pattern for the island. Conversely, for the continental gradient, dominated by large-ranged species, geometric constraints could not be ruled out as a primary structuring feature for the species richness pattern. This study also highlights that the island's cloud forest hosts not only high species richness but also high number of rare species, which is of prime interest for conservation planners.

  15. Recovery of a Bryophyte Community on Hurricane Island, Maine

    Treesearch

    R.E. Leonard; P.W. Conkling; J.L. McMahon; J.L. McMahon

    1984-01-01

    Recovery of a bryophyte community on an artifically denuded granite ledge was monitored for 4 years on Hurricane Island, Maine. Predominant bryophyte species were Dicranum polysetum, Polytrichum juniperinurn, Dicranum flagellare, Polytrichum piliferum, and Dicranum fuscescens. Site factors such as nutrient supply, moisture, and availability of reproductive material...

  16. Changes in bryophyte and lichen communities on Scots pines along an alkaline dust pollution gradient.

    PubMed

    Degtjarenko, Polina; Marmor, Liis; Randlane, Tiina

    2016-09-01

    Dust pollution can cause a significant damage of environment and endanger human health. Our study aimed to investigate epiphytic lichens and bryophytes in relation to long-term alkaline dust pollution and provide new insights into the bioindicators of dust pollution. We measured the bark pH of Scots pines and the species richness and cover of two cryptogam groups in 32 sample plots in the vicinity of limestone quarries (up to ca. 3 km) in northern Estonia. The bark pH decreased gradually with increasing distance from quarries. We recorded the changes in natural epiphytic communities, resulting in diversified artificial communities on pines near the pollution source; the distance over 2 km from the quarries was sufficient to re-establish the normal acidity of the bark and natural communities of both lichens and bryophytes. The cover of lichens and the number of bryophytes are a more promising indicator of environmental conditions than individual species occurrence. We confirmed previously proposed and suggested new bioindicator species of dust pollution (e.g., Lecidella elaeochroma, Opegrapha varia, Schistidium apocarpum). Limestone quarrying activity revealed a "parapositive" impact on cryptogamic communities, meaning that quarrying might, besides disturbances of natural communities, temporarily contribute to the distribution of locally rare species.

  17. Bryophytes from Tuxedni Wilderness area, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schofield, W.B.; Talbot, S. S.; Talbot, S.L.

    2002-01-01

    The bryoflora of two small maritime islands, Chisik and Duck Island (2,302 ha), comprising Tuxedni Wilderness in western lower Cook Inlet, Alaska, was examined to determine species composition in an area where no previous collections had been reported. The field study was conducted from sites selected to represent the totality of environmental variation within Tuxedni Wilderness. Data were analyzed using published reports to compare the bryophyte distribution patterns at three levels, the Northern Hemisphere, North America, and Alaska. A total of 286 bryophytes were identified: 230 mosses and 56 liverworts. Bryum miniatum, Dichodontium olympicum, and Orthotrichum pollens are new to Alaska. The annotated list of species for Tuxedni Wilderness expands the known range for many species and fills distribution gaps within Hulte??n's Central Pacific Coast district. Compared with bryophyte distribution in the Northern Hemisphere, the bryoflora of Tuxedni Wilderness primarily includes taxa of boreal (61%), montane (13%), temperate (11%), arctic-alpine (7%), cosmopolitan (7%), distribution; 4% of the total moss flora are North America endemics. A brief summary of the botanical exploration of the general area is provided, as is a description of the bryophytes present in the vegetation and habitat types of Chisik and Duck Islands.

  18. Forensic botany: usability of bryophyte material in forensic studies.

    PubMed

    Virtanen, Viivi; Korpelainen, Helena; Kostamo, Kirsi

    2007-10-25

    Two experiments were performed to test the relevance of bryophyte (Plantae, Bryophyta) material for forensic studies. The first experiment was conducted to reveal if, and how well, plant fragments attach to footwear in general. In the test, 16 persons walked outdoors wearing rubber boots or hiking boots. After 24h of use outdoors the boots were carefully cleaned, and all plant fragments were collected. Afterwards, all plant material was examined to identify the species. In the second experiment, fresh material of nine bryophyte species was kept in a shed in adverse conditions for 18 months, after which DNA was extracted and subjected to genotyping to test the quality of the material. Both experiments give support for the usability of bryophyte material in forensic studies. The bryophyte fragments become attached to shoes, where they remain even after the wearer walks on a dry road for several hours. Bryophyte DNA stays intact, allowing DNA profiling after lengthy periods following detachment from the original plant source. Based on these experiments, and considering the fact that many bryophytes are clonal plants, we propose that bryophytes are among the most usable plants to provide botanical evidence for forensic investigations.

  19. Great Basin rare and vulnerable species

    Treesearch

    Erica Fleishman

    2008-01-01

    Many native species of plants and animals in the Great Basin have a restricted geographic distribution that reflects the region’s biogeographic history. Conservation of these species has become increasingly challenging in the face of changing environmental conditions and land management practices. This paper provides an overview of major stressors contributing to...

  20. In vitro culture and secondary metabolite isolation in bryophytes.

    PubMed

    Sabovljevic, Aneta; Sabovljevic, Marko; Jockovic, Nebojsa

    2009-01-01

    Bryophytes, the second largest group of land plants, are extremely rich in terpenoids, phenols, glycosides, and fatty acids. Although bryophytes could be used in medicine, their chemistry is not very well known and the problem remains to obtain enough quantity of same species for analysis. In vitro cultivation of bryophytes is the most appropriate way for large biomass production and isolate of numerous useful compounds showing some interesting biologic activities. This technique is also useful in developmental, cellular, molecular, biochemical, and eco-physiologic studies.

  1. Stand Structure and Substrate Diversity as Two Major Drivers for Bryophyte Distribution in a Temperate Montane Ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yun; Niu, Shuai; Li, Peikun; Jia, Hongru; Wang, Hailiang; Ye, Yongzhong; Yuan, Zhiliang

    2017-01-01

    Elucidating the major drivers of bryophyte distribution is the first step to protecting bryophyte diversity. Topography, forest, substrates (ground, tree trunks, roots, rocks, and rotten wood), and spatial factor, which factors are the major drivers of bryophyte distribution? In this study, 53 plots were set in 400 m(2) along the elevation gradient in Xiaoqinling, China. All bryophytes in the plots were collected and identified. Regression analysis was used to examine the relationship between bryophyte and substrate diversity. We compared the patterns of overall bryophyte diversity and diversity of bryophytes found on the ground, tree, and rock along elevational gradients. Canonical correspondence analysis was applied to relate species composition to selected environmental variables. The importance of topography, forest, substrates, and spatial factors was determined by variance partitioning. A total of 1378 bryophyte specimens were collected, and 240 species were identified. Bryophyte diversity was closely related to substrate diversity. The overall bryophyte diversity significantly increased with elevation; however, the response varied among ground, tree, and rock bryophytes. Tree diversity and herb layer were considered important environmental factors in determining bryophyte distribution. Species abundance was best explained by stand structure (17%), and species diversity was best explained by stand structure (35%) and substrate (40%). Results directly indicated that substrate diversity can improve bryophyte species diversity. The effects of micro-habitat formed by stand structure and substrate diversity were higher than those of spatial processes and topography factors on bryophyte distribution. This study proved that the determinant factors influencing bryophyte diversity reflect the trends in recent forest management, providing a real opportunity to improve forest biodiversity conservation.

  2. Stand Structure and Substrate Diversity as Two Major Drivers for Bryophyte Distribution in a Temperate Montane Ecosystem

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yun; Niu, Shuai; Li, Peikun; Jia, Hongru; Wang, Hailiang; Ye, Yongzhong; Yuan, Zhiliang

    2017-01-01

    Elucidating the major drivers of bryophyte distribution is the first step to protecting bryophyte diversity. Topography, forest, substrates (ground, tree trunks, roots, rocks, and rotten wood), and spatial factor, which factors are the major drivers of bryophyte distribution? In this study, 53 plots were set in 400 m2 along the elevation gradient in Xiaoqinling, China. All bryophytes in the plots were collected and identified. Regression analysis was used to examine the relationship between bryophyte and substrate diversity. We compared the patterns of overall bryophyte diversity and diversity of bryophytes found on the ground, tree, and rock along elevational gradients. Canonical correspondence analysis was applied to relate species composition to selected environmental variables. The importance of topography, forest, substrates, and spatial factors was determined by variance partitioning. A total of 1378 bryophyte specimens were collected, and 240 species were identified. Bryophyte diversity was closely related to substrate diversity. The overall bryophyte diversity significantly increased with elevation; however, the response varied among ground, tree, and rock bryophytes. Tree diversity and herb layer were considered important environmental factors in determining bryophyte distribution. Species abundance was best explained by stand structure (17%), and species diversity was best explained by stand structure (35%) and substrate (40%). Results directly indicated that substrate diversity can improve bryophyte species diversity. The effects of micro-habitat formed by stand structure and substrate diversity were higher than those of spatial processes and topography factors on bryophyte distribution. This study proved that the determinant factors influencing bryophyte diversity reflect the trends in recent forest management, providing a real opportunity to improve forest biodiversity conservation. PMID:28603535

  3. Using micropropagation to conserve threatened rare species in sustainable forests.

    Treesearch

    J.L. Edson; David L. Wenny; A.D. Leege-Brusven; R.L. Everett

    1997-01-01

    For forests to be sustainable, viable populations of rare plants should be maintained. Where habitat management alone cannot conserve species threatened by human activity, micropropagation may advance species recovery. Micropropagation protocols were developed for Pacific Northwest endemics; Hackelia venusta, Douglasia idahoensis, Astragalus species, and Cornus...

  4. Rare Species Support Vulnerable Functions in High-Diversity Ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Mouillot, David; Bellwood, David R.; Baraloto, Christopher; Chave, Jerome; Galzin, Rene; Harmelin-Vivien, Mireille; Kulbicki, Michel; Lavergne, Sebastien; Lavorel, Sandra; Mouquet, Nicolas; Paine, C. E. Timothy; Renaud, Julien; Thuiller, Wilfried

    2013-01-01

    Around the world, the human-induced collapses of populations and species have triggered a sixth mass extinction crisis, with rare species often being the first to disappear. Although the role of species diversity in the maintenance of ecosystem processes has been widely investigated, the role of rare species remains controversial. A critical issue is whether common species insure against the loss of functions supported by rare species. This issue is even more critical in species-rich ecosystems where high functional redundancy among species is likely and where it is thus often assumed that ecosystem functioning is buffered against species loss. Here, using extensive datasets of species occurrences and functional traits from three highly diverse ecosystems (846 coral reef fishes, 2,979 alpine plants, and 662 tropical trees), we demonstrate that the most distinct combinations of traits are supported predominantly by rare species both in terms of local abundance and regional occupancy. Moreover, species that have low functional redundancy and are likely to support the most vulnerable functions, with no other species carrying similar combinations of traits, are rarer than expected by chance in all three ecosystems. For instance, 63% and 98% of fish species that are likely to support highly vulnerable functions in coral reef ecosystems are locally and regionally rare, respectively. For alpine plants, 32% and 89% of such species are locally and regionally rare, respectively. Remarkably, 47% of fish species and 55% of tropical tree species that are likely to support highly vulnerable functions have only one individual per sample on average. Our results emphasize the importance of rare species conservation, even in highly diverse ecosystems, which are thought to exhibit high functional redundancy. Rare species offer more than aesthetic, cultural, or taxonomic diversity value; they disproportionately increase the potential breadth of functions provided by ecosystems across

  5. Rare species support vulnerable functions in high-diversity ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Mouillot, David; Bellwood, David R; Baraloto, Christopher; Chave, Jerome; Galzin, Rene; Harmelin-Vivien, Mireille; Kulbicki, Michel; Lavergne, Sebastien; Lavorel, Sandra; Mouquet, Nicolas; Paine, C E Timothy; Renaud, Julien; Thuiller, Wilfried

    2013-01-01

    Around the world, the human-induced collapses of populations and species have triggered a sixth mass extinction crisis, with rare species often being the first to disappear. Although the role of species diversity in the maintenance of ecosystem processes has been widely investigated, the role of rare species remains controversial. A critical issue is whether common species insure against the loss of functions supported by rare species. This issue is even more critical in species-rich ecosystems where high functional redundancy among species is likely and where it is thus often assumed that ecosystem functioning is buffered against species loss. Here, using extensive datasets of species occurrences and functional traits from three highly diverse ecosystems (846 coral reef fishes, 2,979 alpine plants, and 662 tropical trees), we demonstrate that the most distinct combinations of traits are supported predominantly by rare species both in terms of local abundance and regional occupancy. Moreover, species that have low functional redundancy and are likely to support the most vulnerable functions, with no other species carrying similar combinations of traits, are rarer than expected by chance in all three ecosystems. For instance, 63% and 98% of fish species that are likely to support highly vulnerable functions in coral reef ecosystems are locally and regionally rare, respectively. For alpine plants, 32% and 89% of such species are locally and regionally rare, respectively. Remarkably, 47% of fish species and 55% of tropical tree species that are likely to support highly vulnerable functions have only one individual per sample on average. Our results emphasize the importance of rare species conservation, even in highly diverse ecosystems, which are thought to exhibit high functional redundancy. Rare species offer more than aesthetic, cultural, or taxonomic diversity value; they disproportionately increase the potential breadth of functions provided by ecosystems across

  6. [Rare plant species: floristic, phytocoenotic and population approach].

    PubMed

    Zlobin, Iu A

    2011-01-01

    The system of concepts used when estimating the rarity of plants is analyzed and the basic categories of rarity are defined, namely: true, diffuse, peripheral and temporal. The insufficiency of scientific information on ecological and coenotic relationships of rare plants is demonstrated and the necessity of a complex assessment of population system of a rare plant species is substantiated. The importance and limitations of the information on rare plants contained in the Red Books and the Red Lists for phytosozological practice is discussed.

  7. Organic-matter retention and macroinvertebrate utilization of seasonally inundated bryophytes in a mid-order Piedmont River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wood, James; Pattillo, Meryom; Freeman, Mary C.

    2016-01-01

    There is increased understanding of the role of bryophytes in supporting invertebrate biomass and for their influence on nutrient cycling and carbon balance in aquatic systems, but the structural and functional role of bryophytes growing in seasonally inundated habitats is substantially less studied. We conducted a study on the Middle Oconee River, near Athens, GA, to assess invertebrate abundance and organic-matter retention in seasonally inundated patches of the liverwort Porella pinnata, a species that tends to be submerged only when water levels in rivers are substantially above base flow. Aquatic invertebrate utilization of these seasonally inundated habitats has rarely been investigated. Macroinvertebrate biomass, insect density, and organic-matter content were significantly greater in patches of P. pinnata than on adjacent bare rock. Bryophyte biomass explained additional variation in organic matter, insect biomass, and density. The most abundant insects in P. pinnata patches were Dipterans and Plecopterans. Our results suggest an important structural role of seasonally inundated bryophyte habitats in riverine ecosystems.

  8. Total flavonoid concentrations of bryophytes from Tianmu Mountain, Zhejiang Province (China): Phylogeny and ecological factors

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Jianguo; Dai, Xiling; Xiao, Jianbo; Wu, Yuhuan; Wang, Quanxi

    2017-01-01

    The flavonoids in bryophytes may have great significance in phylogeny and metabolism research. However, to date there has been little research on bryophyte metabolites, especially flavonoids. To redress this somewhat, we determined flavonoid concentrations of bryophytes from Tianmu Mountain through a colorimetric assay and considered the factors influencing the results. This is the first time that the flavonoid contents of bryophytes have been examined in detail. The results revealed a range of total flavonoid concentrations in 90 samples collected from Tianmu Mountain from 1.8 to 22.3 mg/g (w/w). The total flavonoid contents of liverworts were generally higher than those of mosses; acrocarpous mosses had generally higher values than that of pleurocarpous mosses. The total flavonoid contents of bryophytes growing at lower light levels were general higher than those growing in full-sun. The total flavonoid contents of epiphytic bryophytes were highest, while those of aquatic bryophytes were the lowest. Total flavonoid contents of species growing at low-latitudes were much higher than those at high-latitude individuals. In conclusion, total flavonoid contents of bryophytes have some connection with plant phylogeny; more flavonoids might be contained in relatively primitive bryophytes. Meanwhile, the effects of ecological factors on total flavonoid contents of bryophytes exist; light and habitat (especially tree habitat and river habitat) might be representative factor. PMID:28263997

  9. Total flavonoid concentrations of bryophytes from Tianmu Mountain, Zhejiang Province (China): Phylogeny and ecological factors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Cao, Jianguo; Dai, Xiling; Xiao, Jianbo; Wu, Yuhuan; Wang, Quanxi

    2017-01-01

    The flavonoids in bryophytes may have great significance in phylogeny and metabolism research. However, to date there has been little research on bryophyte metabolites, especially flavonoids. To redress this somewhat, we determined flavonoid concentrations of bryophytes from Tianmu Mountain through a colorimetric assay and considered the factors influencing the results. This is the first time that the flavonoid contents of bryophytes have been examined in detail. The results revealed a range of total flavonoid concentrations in 90 samples collected from Tianmu Mountain from 1.8 to 22.3 mg/g (w/w). The total flavonoid contents of liverworts were generally higher than those of mosses; acrocarpous mosses had generally higher values than that of pleurocarpous mosses. The total flavonoid contents of bryophytes growing at lower light levels were general higher than those growing in full-sun. The total flavonoid contents of epiphytic bryophytes were highest, while those of aquatic bryophytes were the lowest. Total flavonoid contents of species growing at low-latitudes were much higher than those at high-latitude individuals. In conclusion, total flavonoid contents of bryophytes have some connection with plant phylogeny; more flavonoids might be contained in relatively primitive bryophytes. Meanwhile, the effects of ecological factors on total flavonoid contents of bryophytes exist; light and habitat (especially tree habitat and river habitat) might be representative factor.

  10. Realistic losses of rare species disproportionately impact higher trophic levels.

    PubMed

    Bracken, Matthew E S; Low, Natalie H N

    2012-05-01

    Predicting the consequences of changes in biodiversity requires understanding both species' susceptibility to extirpation and their functional roles in ecosystems. However, few studies have evaluated the effects of realistic, non-random biodiversity losses, severely limiting the applicability of biodiversity research to conservation. Here, we removed sessile species from a rocky shore community in a way that deliberately mimicked natural patterns of species loss. We found that the rarest species in the system act from the bottom up to disproportionately impact the diversity and abundance of consumers. Realistic losses of rare species in a diverse assemblage of seaweeds and sessile invertebrates, collectively comprising <10% of sessile biomass, resulted in a 42-47% decline in consumer biomass. In contrast, removal of an equivalent biomass of dominant sessile species had no effect on consumers. Our results highlight the 'cornerstone' role that rare species can play in shaping the structure of the community they support.

  11. Bryophytes for Beginners: The Usability of a Printed Dichotomous Key versus a Multi-Access Computer-Based Key for Bryophyte Identification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stagg, Bethan C.; Donkin, Maria E.; Smith, Alison M.

    2015-01-01

    Bryophytes are a rewarding study group in field biology and the UK bryophyte flora has international importance to biodiversity conservation. We designed an identification key to common woodland moss species and compared the usability of two formats, web-based multi-access and printed dichotomous key, with undergraduate students. The rate of…

  12. Bryophytes for Beginners: The Usability of a Printed Dichotomous Key versus a Multi-Access Computer-Based Key for Bryophyte Identification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stagg, Bethan C.; Donkin, Maria E.; Smith, Alison M.

    2015-01-01

    Bryophytes are a rewarding study group in field biology and the UK bryophyte flora has international importance to biodiversity conservation. We designed an identification key to common woodland moss species and compared the usability of two formats, web-based multi-access and printed dichotomous key, with undergraduate students. The rate of…

  13. Contrasting species-environment relationships in communities of testate amoebae, bryophytes and vascular plants along the fen-bog gradient.

    PubMed

    Lamentowicz, Mariusz; Lamentowicz, Lukasz; van der Knaap, Willem O; Gabka, Maciej; Mitchell, Edward A D

    2010-04-01

    We studied the vegetation, testate amoebae and abiotic variables (depth of the water table, pH, electrical conductivity, Ca and Mg concentrations of water extracted from mosses) along the bog to extremely rich fen gradient in sub-alpine peatlands of the Upper Engadine (Swiss Alps). Testate amoeba diversity was correlated to that of mosses but not of vascular plants. Diversity peaked in rich fen for testate amoebae and in extremely rich fen for mosses, while for testate amoebae and mosses it was lowest in bog but for vascular plants in extremely rich fen. Multiple factor and redundancy analyses (RDA) revealed a stronger correlation of testate amoebae than of vegetation to water table and hydrochemical variables and relatively strong correlation between testate amoeba and moss community data. In RDA, hydrochemical variables explained a higher proportion of the testate amoeba and moss data than water table depth. Abiotic variables explained a higher percentage of the species data for testate amoebae (30.3% or 19.5% for binary data) than for mosses (13.4%) and vascular plants (10%). These results show that (1) vascular plant, moss and testate amoeba communities respond differently to ecological gradients in peatlands and (2) testate amoebae are more strongly related than vascular plants to the abiotic factors at the mire surface. These differences are related to vertical trophic gradients and associated niche differentiation.

  14. Neutrality and the Response of Rare Species to Environmental Variance

    PubMed Central

    Benedetti-Cecchi, Lisandro; Bertocci, Iacopo; Vaselli, Stefano; Maggi, Elena; Bulleri, Fabio

    2008-01-01

    Neutral models and differential responses of species to environmental heterogeneity offer complementary explanations of species abundance distribution and dynamics. Under what circumstances one model prevails over the other is still a matter of debate. We show that the decay of similarity over time in rocky seashore assemblages of algae and invertebrates sampled over a period of 16 years was consistent with the predictions of a stochastic model of ecological drift at time scales larger than 2 years, but not at time scales between 3 and 24 months when similarity was quantified with an index that reflected changes in abundance of rare species. A field experiment was performed to examine whether assemblages responded neutrally or non-neutrally to changes in temporal variance of disturbance. The experimental results did not reject neutrality, but identified a positive effect of intermediate levels of environmental heterogeneity on the abundance of rare species. This effect translated into a marked decrease in the characteristic time scale of species turnover, highlighting the role of rare species in driving assemblage dynamics in fluctuating environments. PMID:18648545

  15. Rare species contribute disproportionately to the functional structure of species assemblages.

    PubMed

    Leitão, Rafael P; Zuanon, Jansen; Villéger, Sébastien; Williams, Stephen E; Baraloto, Christopher; Fortunel, Claire; Mendonça, Fernando P; Mouillot, David

    2016-04-13

    There is broad consensus that the diversity of functional traits within species assemblages drives several ecological processes. It is also widely recognized that rare species are the first to become extinct following human-induced disturbances. Surprisingly, however, the functional importance of rare species is still poorly understood, particularly in tropical species-rich assemblages where the majority of species are rare, and the rate of species extinction can be high. Here, we investigated the consequences of local and regional extinctions on the functional structure of species assemblages. We used three extensive datasets (stream fish from the Brazilian Amazon, rainforest trees from French Guiana, and birds from the Australian Wet Tropics) and built an integrative measure of species rarity versus commonness, combining local abundance, geographical range, and habitat breadth. Using different scenarios of species loss, we found a disproportionate impact of rare species extinction for the three groups, with significant reductions in levels of functional richness, specialization, and originality of assemblages, which may severely undermine the integrity of ecological processes. The whole breadth of functional abilities within species assemblages, which is disproportionately supported by rare species, is certainly critical in maintaining ecosystems particularly under the ongoing rapid environmental transitions. © 2016 The Author(s).

  16. Rare species contribute disproportionately to the functional structure of species assemblages

    PubMed Central

    Zuanon, Jansen; Williams, Stephen E.; Baraloto, Christopher; Mendonça, Fernando P.

    2016-01-01

    There is broad consensus that the diversity of functional traits within species assemblages drives several ecological processes. It is also widely recognized that rare species are the first to become extinct following human-induced disturbances. Surprisingly, however, the functional importance of rare species is still poorly understood, particularly in tropical species-rich assemblages where the majority of species are rare, and the rate of species extinction can be high. Here, we investigated the consequences of local and regional extinctions on the functional structure of species assemblages. We used three extensive datasets (stream fish from the Brazilian Amazon, rainforest trees from French Guiana, and birds from the Australian Wet Tropics) and built an integrative measure of species rarity versus commonness, combining local abundance, geographical range, and habitat breadth. Using different scenarios of species loss, we found a disproportionate impact of rare species extinction for the three groups, with significant reductions in levels of functional richness, specialization, and originality of assemblages, which may severely undermine the integrity of ecological processes. The whole breadth of functional abilities within species assemblages, which is disproportionately supported by rare species, is certainly critical in maintaining ecosystems particularly under the ongoing rapid environmental transitions. PMID:27053754

  17. Pollination ecology of the rare desert species Eremosparton songoricum (Fabaceae

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The pollination ecology of Eremosparton songoricum (Litv.) Vass., a rare desert species endemic to central Asia, was examined by a series of observational studies and manipulative experiments in two natural populations during 2007–2008. Results showed that the duration of flowering lasted 21 and 23 ...

  18. [Relationships between characteristics of ground bryophyte communities and environmental factors in urban area of Chongqing, China].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Pi, Chun-yan; Tian, Shang

    2015-10-01

    The present study focused on bryophyte species composition, species diversity and the relationship between bryophyte communities and environmental factors in urban area of Chongqing City, by using biodiversity indices and the canonical correspondence analysis (CCA), based on the data of 44 plots. The results revealed that 86 species belonging to 43 genera and 25 families were found in saxicolous bryophyte communities, while 46 species belonging to 28 genera and 22 families were found in terricolous ones. The diversity indices of both saxicolous and terricolous bryophyte communities from campuses were higher than those of parks, natural scenic resorts, Jinyunshan National Nature Reserve. TWINSPAN classified saxicolous and terricolous bryophyte communities into three and two groups, respectively. CCA results showed canopy density was the major environmental factor of saxicolous bryophyte communities influencing bryophyte distribution in parks and campuses, whereas altitude, relative humidity and human disturbance were the major environmental factors in natural scenic resorts and nature reserve. Soil pH, canopy density and human disturbance were the major environmental factors in terricolous bryophyte communities in parks and campuses, whereas altitude, relative humidity and water content of the soil were the major environmental factors in those of natural scenic resorts and nature reserve.

  19. Commonly rare and rarely common: comparing population abundance of invasive and native aquatic species.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Gretchen J A; Vander Zanden, M Jake; Blum, Michael J; Clayton, Murray K; Hain, Ernie F; Hauxwell, Jennifer; Izzo, Marit; Kornis, Matthew S; McIntyre, Peter B; Mikulyuk, Alison; Nilsson, Erika; Olden, Julian D; Papeş, Monica; Sharma, Sapna

    2013-01-01

    Invasive species are leading drivers of environmental change. Their impacts are often linked to their population size, but surprisingly little is known about how frequently they achieve high abundances. A nearly universal pattern in ecology is that species are rare in most locations and abundant in a few, generating right-skewed abundance distributions. Here, we use abundance data from over 24,000 populations of 17 invasive and 104 native aquatic species to test whether invasive species differ from native counterparts in statistical patterns of abundance across multiple sites. Invasive species on average reached significantly higher densities than native species and exhibited significantly higher variance. However, invasive and native species did not differ in terms of coefficient of variation, skewness, or kurtosis. Abundance distributions of all species were highly right skewed (skewness>0), meaning both invasive and native species occurred at low densities in most locations where they were present. The average abundance of invasive and native species was 6% and 2%, respectively, of the maximum abundance observed within a taxonomic group. The biological significance of the differences between invasive and native species depends on species-specific relationships between abundance and impact. Recognition of cross-site heterogeneity in population densities brings a new dimension to invasive species management, and may help to refine optimal prevention, containment, control, and eradication strategies.

  20. Commonly Rare and Rarely Common: Comparing Population Abundance of Invasive and Native Aquatic Species

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Gretchen J. A.; Vander Zanden, M. Jake; Blum, Michael J.; Clayton, Murray K.; Hain, Ernie F.; Hauxwell, Jennifer; Izzo, Marit; Kornis, Matthew S.; McIntyre, Peter B.; Mikulyuk, Alison; Nilsson, Erika; Olden, Julian D.; Papeş, Monica; Sharma, Sapna

    2013-01-01

    Invasive species are leading drivers of environmental change. Their impacts are often linked to their population size, but surprisingly little is known about how frequently they achieve high abundances. A nearly universal pattern in ecology is that species are rare in most locations and abundant in a few, generating right-skewed abundance distributions. Here, we use abundance data from over 24,000 populations of 17 invasive and 104 native aquatic species to test whether invasive species differ from native counterparts in statistical patterns of abundance across multiple sites. Invasive species on average reached significantly higher densities than native species and exhibited significantly higher variance. However, invasive and native species did not differ in terms of coefficient of variation, skewness, or kurtosis. Abundance distributions of all species were highly right skewed (skewness>0), meaning both invasive and native species occurred at low densities in most locations where they were present. The average abundance of invasive and native species was 6% and 2%, respectively, of the maximum abundance observed within a taxonomic group. The biological significance of the differences between invasive and native species depends on species-specific relationships between abundance and impact. Recognition of cross-site heterogeneity in population densities brings a new dimension to invasive species management, and may help to refine optimal prevention, containment, control, and eradication strategies. PMID:24194883

  1. Lichen and bryophyte distribution on oak in London in relation to air pollution and bark acidity.

    PubMed

    Larsen, R S; Bell, J N B; James, P W; Chimonides, P J; Rumsey, F J; Tremper, A; Purvis, O W

    2007-03-01

    Epiphytic lichen and bryophyte distribution and frequency were investigated on the trunks of 145 young oak trees throughout London and surrounding counties, and compared with pollution levels and bark pH. Sixty-four lichen and four bryophyte species were recorded. Three major zones were identified: (i) two central regions with a few lichens, bryophytes absent; (ii) a surrounding region with a more diverse flora including a high cover of nitrophyte lichens; and (iii) an outer region, characterised by species absent from central London, including acidophytes. Nineteen species were correlated with nitrogen oxides and 16 with bark pH, suggesting that transport-related pollution and bark acidity influence lichen and bryophyte distribution in London today. Lichens and bryophytes are responding to factors that influence human and environmental health in London. Biomonitoring therefore has a practical role to assess the effects of measures to improve London's air quality.

  2. Bryophytes from Simeonof Island in the Shumagin Islands, southwestern Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schofield, W.B.; Talbot, S. S.; Talbot, S.L.

    2004-01-01

    Simeonof Island is located south of the Alaska Peninsula in the hyperoceanic sector of the middle boreal subzone. We examined the bryoflora of Simeonof Island to determine species composition in an area where no previous collections had been reported. This field study was conducted in sites selected to represent the spectrum of environmental variation within Simeonof Island. Data were analyzed using published reports to compare bryophyte distribution patterns at three levels, the Northern Hemisphere, North America, and Alaska. A total of 271 bryophytes were identified: 202 mosses and 69 liverworts. The annotated list of species for Simeonof Island expands the known range for many species and fills distribution gaps within Hulte??n's Western Pacific Coast district. Maps and notes on the distribution of 14 significant distribution records are presented. Compared with bryophyte distribution in the Northern Hemisphere, the bryoflora of Simeonof Island primarily includes taxa of boreal (55%), temperate (20%), arctic (10%), and cosmopolitan (8%) distribution; 6% of the moss flora are western North America endemics. A description of the bryophytes present in the vegetation and habitat types is provided as is a quantitative analysis of the most frequently occurring bryophytes in crowberry heath.

  3. Predicting methane emission from bryophyte distribution in northern Canadian peatlands

    SciTech Connect

    Bubier, J.L.; Moore, T.R.; Juggins, S.

    1995-04-01

    A predictive model for bryophyte distribution, water table position, and seasonal mean methane (CH{sub 4}) emission was developed for two areas of northern peatland: the Clay Belt of Ontario and the Labrador Trough of Quebec. Water table position and CH{sub 4} flux were the most important environmental variables in canonical correspondence analyses (CCA) of bryophyte data. Water chemistry constituted a second environmental gradient, independent of hydrology and CH{sub 4} flux. Weighted averaging regression and calibration were used to develop a model for predicting log CH{sub 4} flux from bryophyte distribution. The model showed an increase in log CH{sub 4} flux from hummock to carpet and pool species, corresponding with a decrease in height above the mean water table position. The exceptions were rich-fen pool species, which had low CH{sub 4} flux optima in spite of their moisture status. Tolerances were greatest for mid-hummock species and least for carpet and pool species. No overlap in tolerances occurred between hummock and pool species, suggesting that at either end of the height gradient are the best predictors of CH{sub 4} flux. Error analyses showed that bryophytes are equally as effective as water table position for predicting mean CH{sub 4} flux. Bryophytes are distributed in well-defined zones along microtopographic gradients: they integrate long-term changes in the water table, which fluctuates on a daily and seasonal basis along with CH{sub 4} flux, and may be more easily mapped with remote-sensing techniques. Bryophytes, however, are only useful for predicting CH{sub 4} flux within a region; similar species values cannot be extrapolated to other northern peatlands where different climatic and biogeochemical factors may exist. The model may be used in paleoreconstructions of methane emission and for biological monitoring of climate change. 62 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Living together and living apart: the sexual lives of bryophytes.

    PubMed

    Haig, David

    2016-10-19

    Haploid gametophytes of bryophytes spread by clonal growth but mate locally, within an area defined by the range of sperm movement. Rarity of establishment from spores or vegetative competition can result in unisexual populations unable to reproduce sexually. Females typically outcompete males, probably because females expend fewer resources than males on the production of gametes. Extreme sexual dimorphism-tiny males growing as epiphytes on much larger females-has evolved many times. Haploid selfing is common in bryophytes with bisexual gametophytes, and results in completely homozygous sporophytes. Spores from these sporophytes recapitulate the genotype of their single haploid parent. This process can be considered analogous to 'asexual' reproduction with 'sexual' reproduction occurring after rare outcrossing between haploid parents. Ferns also produce bisexual haploid gametophytes but, unlike bryophytes, haploid outcrossing predominates over haploid selfing. This difference is probably related to clonal growth and vegetative competition occurring in the haploid but not the diploid phase in bryophytes, but the reverse in ferns. Ferns are thereby subject to stronger inbreeding depression than bryophytes.This article is part of the themed issue 'Weird sex: the underappreciated diversity of sexual reproduction'.

  5. The importance of rare species: a trait-based assessment of rare species contributions to functional diversity and possible ecosystem function in tall-grass prairies

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Meha; Flynn, Dan FB; Prager, Case M; Hart, Georgia M; DeVan, Caroline M; Ahrestani, Farshid S; Palmer, Matthew I; Bunker, Daniel E; Knops, Johannes MH; Jouseau, Claire F; Naeem, Shahid

    2014-01-01

    The majority of species in ecosystems are rare, but the ecosystem consequences of losing rare species are poorly known. To understand how rare species may influence ecosystem functioning, this study quantifies the contribution of species based on their relative level of rarity to community functional diversity using a trait-based approach. Given that rarity can be defined in several different ways, we use four different definitions of rarity: abundance (mean and maximum), geographic range, and habitat specificity. We find that rarer species contribute to functional diversity when rarity is defined by maximum abundance, geographic range, and habitat specificity. However, rarer species are functionally redundant when rarity is defined by mean abundance. Furthermore, when using abundance-weighted analyses, we find that rare species typically contribute significantly less to functional diversity than common species due to their low abundances. These results suggest that rare species have the potential to play an important role in ecosystem functioning, either by offering novel contributions to functional diversity or via functional redundancy depending on how rare species are defined. Yet, these contributions are likely to be greatest if the abundance of rare species increases due to environmental change. We argue that given the paucity of data on rare species, understanding the contribution of rare species to community functional diversity is an important first step to understanding the potential role of rare species in ecosystem functioning. PMID:24455165

  6. The importance of rare species: a trait-based assessment of rare species contributions to functional diversity and possible ecosystem function in tall-grass prairies.

    PubMed

    Jain, Meha; Flynn, Dan Fb; Prager, Case M; Hart, Georgia M; Devan, Caroline M; Ahrestani, Farshid S; Palmer, Matthew I; Bunker, Daniel E; Knops, Johannes Mh; Jouseau, Claire F; Naeem, Shahid

    2014-01-01

    The majority of species in ecosystems are rare, but the ecosystem consequences of losing rare species are poorly known. To understand how rare species may influence ecosystem functioning, this study quantifies the contribution of species based on their relative level of rarity to community functional diversity using a trait-based approach. Given that rarity can be defined in several different ways, we use four different definitions of rarity: abundance (mean and maximum), geographic range, and habitat specificity. We find that rarer species contribute to functional diversity when rarity is defined by maximum abundance, geographic range, and habitat specificity. However, rarer species are functionally redundant when rarity is defined by mean abundance. Furthermore, when using abundance-weighted analyses, we find that rare species typically contribute significantly less to functional diversity than common species due to their low abundances. These results suggest that rare species have the potential to play an important role in ecosystem functioning, either by offering novel contributions to functional diversity or via functional redundancy depending on how rare species are defined. Yet, these contributions are likely to be greatest if the abundance of rare species increases due to environmental change. We argue that given the paucity of data on rare species, understanding the contribution of rare species to community functional diversity is an important first step to understanding the potential role of rare species in ecosystem functioning.

  7. Kocuria Species Peritonitis: Although Rare, We Have To Care

    PubMed Central

    Dotis, John; Printza, Nikoleta; Stabouli, Stella; Papachristou, Fotios

    2015-01-01

    Kocuria species are found in the environment and on human skin. These micro-organisms are generally considered to be nonpathogenic saprophytes, rarely causing infection. However, the peritoneum has been reported to be a site of Kocuria infection. We reviewed all cases of peritonitis in peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients caused by Kocuria species that were reported in the worldwide literature. In total, 12 episodes of Kocuria species peritonitis have been reported in 9 PD patients. The median age of the patients was 62 years (range: 8 – 78 years). In the reported episodes, 4 different Kocuria species were isolated, with K. varians being the predominant species (41.7%). The most common initial symptom was abdominal pain (83.3%), followed by turbid effluent (75%) and fever (33.3%). Intraperitoneal first-generation cephalosporins and glycopeptides were the most-used antibiotics, with first-generation cephalosporins being more often preferred as first-line therapy. The median duration of treatment was 14 days, and in 2 episodes, the Tenckhoff catheter was removed. Although Kocuria peritonitis in PD patients is rare, it should be promptly treated because relapses can occur, especially with K. varians episodes. PMID:24584591

  8. Bryophyte spore germinability is inhibited by peatland substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bu, Zhao-Jun; Li, Zhi; Liu, Li-Jie; Sundberg, Sebastian; Feng, Ya-Min; Yang, Yun-He; Liu, Shuang; Song, Xue; Zhang, Xing-Lin

    2017-01-01

    Bryophyte substrates and species may affect spore germination through allelopathy. Polytrichum strictum is currently expanding in peatlands in north-eastern China - is this an effect of its superior spore germinability or do its gametophytes have a stronger allelopathic effect than do Sphagnum? We conducted a spore burial experiment to test the effect of species identity, substrate and water table depth (WTD) on spore germinability and bryophyte allelopathic effect with P. strictum and two Sphagnum species (S. palustre and S. magellanicum). After 5 months of burial during a growing season, the spores were tested for germinability. Allelopathic effect of bryophyte substrates was assessed by the difference between spore germinability after being stored inside or outside the substrates. After burial, more than 90% of the spores lost their germinability across all three species due to ageing and allelopathy. Spore germinability differed among species, where the spores in S. palustre had a higher germination frequency than those in P. strictum. The three bryophytes maintained a higher germinability in Sphagnum than in Polytrichum hummocks, probably due to a stronger allelopathic effect of P. strictum. Water table drawdown by 10 cm increased germinability by more than 60% across the three species. The study indicates that P. strictum does not possess an advantage regarding spore germination but rather its gametophytes have a stronger allelopathic effect. Due to the weaker inhibitive effect of Sphagnum gametophytes, P. strictum may have a potential establishment superiority over Sphagnum in peatlands, in addition to a better drought tolerance, which may explain its current expansion.

  9. Effects of neighboring vascular plants on the abundance of bryophytes in different vegetation types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jägerbrand, Annika K.; Kudo, Gaku; Alatalo, Juha M.; Molau, Ulf

    2012-07-01

    Due to the climate change, vegetation of tundra ecosystems is predicted to shift toward shrub and tree dominance, and this change may influence bryophytes. To estimate how changes in growing environment and the dominance of vascular plants influence bryophyte abundance, we compared the relationship of occurrence of bryophytes among other plant types in a five-year experiment of warming (T), fertilization (F) and T + F in two vegetation types, heath and meadow, in a subarctic-alpine ecosystem. We compared individual leaf area among shrub species to confirm that deciduous shrubs might cause severe shading effect. Effects of neighboring functional types on the performance of Hylocomium splendens was also analyzed. Results show that F and T + F treatments significantly influenced bryophyte abundance negatively. Under natural conditions, bryophytes in the heath site were negatively related to the abundance of shrubs and lichens and the relationship between lichens and bryophytes strengthened after the experimental period. After five years of experimental treatments in the meadow, a positive abundance relationship emerged between bryophytes and deciduous shrubs, evergreen shrubs and forbs. This relationship was not found in the heath site. Our study therefore shows that the abundance relationships between bryophytes and plants in two vegetation types within the same area can be different. Deciduous shrubs had larger leaf area than evergreen shrubs but did not show any shading effect on H. splendens.

  10. The Effects of Bryophyte Morphology on Epiphytic Diatom Distribution in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapp, J. M.; Lowe, R. L.

    2005-05-01

    Diatoms and aquatic bryophytes have specific habitat requirements and are easily accessible in the field, making them ideal taxa for assessing water quality and environmental change. Although they both inhabit the same substrates within streams, there is a dearth of information regarding the relationship between these two indicator organisms. With this study, we examined the relationship between bryophytes and their epiphytic diatom communities from streams in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. We hypothesized that bryophyte morphologies with more crevices between leaves would provide algae with a more protected micro-environment, resulting in a higher density of diatoms on these taxa compared to bryophytes with greatly exposed leaves. In addition, we also expect that bryophytes rich in crevices will have a high relative abundance of non-rheophilic taxa. Diatom community structure on bryophytes was determined using light microscopy. Using scanning electron microscopy, bryophytes were examined to compare the distribution and density of diatoms on the abnate and adnate surfaces of leaves. Preliminary results indicate that diatom density is not correlated with bryophyte species.

  11. Species survival emerge from rare events of individual migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelnik, Yuval R.; Solomon, Sorin; Yaari, Gur

    2015-01-01

    Ecosystems greatly vary in their species composition and interactions, yet they all show remarkable resilience to external influences. Recent experiments have highlighted the significant effects of spatial structure and connectivity on the extinction and survival of species. It has also been emphasized lately that in order to study extinction dynamics reliably, it is essential to incorporate stochasticity, and in particular the discrete nature of populations, into the model. Accordingly, we applied a bottom-up modeling approach that includes both spatial features and stochastic interactions to study survival mechanisms of species. Using the simplest spatial extension of the Lotka-Volterra predator-prey model with competition, subject to demographic and environmental noise, we were able to systematically study emergent properties of this rich system. By scanning the relevant parameter space, we show that both survival and extinction processes often result from a combination of habitat fragmentation and individual rare events of recolonization.

  12. Species survival emerge from rare events of individual migration.

    PubMed

    Zelnik, Yuval R; Solomon, Sorin; Yaari, Gur

    2015-01-19

    Ecosystems greatly vary in their species composition and interactions, yet they all show remarkable resilience to external influences. Recent experiments have highlighted the significant effects of spatial structure and connectivity on the extinction and survival of species. It has also been emphasized lately that in order to study extinction dynamics reliably, it is essential to incorporate stochasticity, and in particular the discrete nature of populations, into the model. Accordingly, we applied a bottom-up modeling approach that includes both spatial features and stochastic interactions to study survival mechanisms of species. Using the simplest spatial extension of the Lotka-Volterra predator-prey model with competition, subject to demographic and environmental noise, we were able to systematically study emergent properties of this rich system. By scanning the relevant parameter space, we show that both survival and extinction processes often result from a combination of habitat fragmentation and individual rare events of recolonization.

  13. Species survival emerge from rare events of individual migration

    PubMed Central

    Zelnik, Yuval R.; Solomon, Sorin; Yaari, Gur

    2015-01-01

    Ecosystems greatly vary in their species composition and interactions, yet they all show remarkable resilience to external influences. Recent experiments have highlighted the significant effects of spatial structure and connectivity on the extinction and survival of species. It has also been emphasized lately that in order to study extinction dynamics reliably, it is essential to incorporate stochasticity, and in particular the discrete nature of populations, into the model. Accordingly, we applied a bottom-up modeling approach that includes both spatial features and stochastic interactions to study survival mechanisms of species. Using the simplest spatial extension of the Lotka-Volterra predator-prey model with competition, subject to demographic and environmental noise, we were able to systematically study emergent properties of this rich system. By scanning the relevant parameter space, we show that both survival and extinction processes often result from a combination of habitat fragmentation and individual rare events of recolonization. PMID:25597477

  14. The temperature acclimation potential of tropical bryophytes.

    PubMed

    Wagner, S; Zotz, G; Bader, M Y

    2014-01-01

    Bryophyte biomass and diversity in tropical moist forests decrease dramatically from higher altitudes towards the lowlands. High respiratory carbon losses at high temperatures may partly explain this pattern, if montane species are unable to acclimatise their metabolic rates to lowland temperatures. We transplanted ten bryophyte species from two altitudes (1200 and 500 m a.s.l.) to lower (warmer) altitudes (500 m and sea level) in Panama. We studied short-term temperature acclimation of CO2 exchange for 2.5 months, and survival and growth for 21 months following transplantation. Short-term acclimation did not occur, and on a longer time scale mortality was highest and growth lowest in the transplanted samples. A few transplanted samples of most species, however, survived the whole experiment and finished with growth rates similar to controls. This recovery of growth rate suggests temperature acclimation, in spite of no measurable metabolic changes in smaller random samples. This acclimation even compensated for shorter periods of CO2 uptake due to more rapid drying. Nevertheless, these species are not abundant in lowland forests, perhaps due to dispersal or establishment limitation. The apparent heterogeneity of the acclimation potential within species may allow populations to adapt locally and avoid being forced uphill under climatic warming.

  15. Bryophyte-cyanobacteria associations contribute to ecosystem-N-budget of boreal forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salemaa, Maija; Lindroos, Antti-Jussi; Merilä, Päivi; Mäkipää, Raisa; Smolander, Aino

    2014-05-01

    Bryophytes frequently dominate the ground vegetation on the forest floor in boreal region. Northern ecosystems are often nitrogen limited, and therefore biological nitrogen (N2) fixation of bryophyte-associated microbes is an important source of new N. In this study we estimated the N stock of bryophyte layer and the N input rate by N2 fixation of bryophyte-cyanobacteria associations at the ecosystem level. We studied 12 intensively monitored forest ecosystem plots (ICP Forests Level II) along a latitudinal gradient in Finland during 2009-2013. The total biomass and N stock of the bryophytes varied 700-2000 kg ha-1 and 9-23 kg ha-1, respectively. N2 fixation rate associated to bryophytes increased towards the north and was at highest 1-2 kg N ha-1 year-1 (based on the bryophyte biomass in the monitoring plots). This N input was at the same level as the N deposition in the northern Finland (1.5 kg N ha-1 year-1). In comparison, via needle litterfall and other tree litter c.a. 5 kg N ha-1 is annually returned to the nutrient cycle. In southern Finland, very low rates of N2 fixation were found probably because of inhibition by the anthropogenic N deposition. The upper parts of the bryophyte shoots showed 2-3 times higher N2-fixing rate than the lower parts, but differences between Hylocomium splendens and Pleurozium schreberi were minor. However, Dicranum species showed much lower N2 fixation rates compared to these two species. The moisture level of bryophytes and light/temperature conditions regulated strongly the rate of N2-fixing activity. The results showed that the bryophyte layer significantly contributes to the N input and plays an important role in controlling the N and C balances of boreal forests.

  16. Bryophyte communities as biomonitors of environmental factors in the Goujiang karst bauxite, southwestern China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shiqiang; Zhang, Zhaohui; Wang, Zhihui

    2015-12-15

    Bauxite mining on karst results in several ecological and environmental issues including heavy metal pollution, soil erosion and the destruction of vegetation. In turn, these may affect the distribution of plant communities and endanger human health. In general, bryophytes (mosses, liverworts and hornworts) are pioneer plants, lacking roots, vascular systems and well-developed cuticles. Due to their high sensitivity to the environment, they are often used to monitor air and soil pollution. A total of 25 bryophyte taxa from 19 genera and 9 families were recorded on Goujiang karst bauxite near the city of Zunyi in the Guizhou Province of southwestern China. Eleven principal bryophyte communities were identified, most of which consisted of only one species (monospecific assemblage), although the proportion of these single-species communities differed at the six locations. The levels of heavy metals also differed in soil from the six locations: iron, 8748.9-10,023μg/g; zinc, 146.7-240.9μg/g; copper, 24.6-60.4μg/g; and nickel, 35.6-95.1μg/g. A canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) of the bryophyte communities and environmental variables revealed the effect of gradient (slope), altitude and heavy metals in the soil on the distribution of the principal bryophyte communities. More than 36% of bryophyte taxa identified reproduced asexually by gemmae, as gemmiferous bryophyte communities tolerate substrates with high levels of heavy metals more readily than non-gemmiferous communities do. The distribution of heavy metals in the soil is reflected in the distribution of the bryophyte communities. The distribution characteristics of the principal bryophyte communities and of the gemmiferous bryophyte communities are useful in monitoring heavy metal pollution in karst bauxite. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Stochastic processes dominate during boreal bryophyte community assembly.

    PubMed

    Fenton, Nicole J; Bergeron, Yves

    2013-09-01

    Why are plant species found in certain locations and not in others? The study of community assembly rules has attempted to answer this question, and many studies articulate the historic dichotomy of deterministic (predictable niches) vs. stochastic (random or semi-random processes). The study of successional sequences to determine whether they converge, as would be expected by deterministic theory, or diverge, as stochastic theory would suggest, has been one method used to investigate this question. In this article we ask the question: Do similar boreal bryophyte communities develop in the similar habitat created by convergent succession after fires of different severities? Or do the stochastic processes generated by fires of different severity lead to different communities? Specifically we predict that deterministic structure will be more important for large forest-floor species than stochastic processes, and that the inverse will be true for small bryophyte species. We used multivariate regression trees and model selection to determine the relative weight of structure (forest structure, substrates, soil structure) and processes (fire severity) for two groups of bryophyte species sampled in 12 sites (seven high-severity and five low-severity fires). Contrary to our first hypothesis, processes were as important for large forest-floor bryophytes as for small pocket species. Fire severity, its interaction with the quality of available habitat, and its impact on the creation of biological legacies played dominant roles in determining community structure. In this study, sites with nearly identical forest structure, generated via convergent succession after high- and low-severity fire, were compared to see whether these sites supported similar bryophyte communities. While similar to some degree, both the large forest-floor species and the pocket species differed after high-severity fire compared to low-severity fire. This result suggests that the "how," or process of

  18. Shifts in bryophyte carbon isotope ratio across an elevation × soil age matrix on Mauna Loa, Hawaii: do bryophytes behave like vascular plants?

    PubMed

    Waite, Mashuri; Sack, Lawren

    2011-05-01

    The carbon isotope ratio (δ(13)C) of vascular plant leaf tissue is determined by isotope discrimination, primarily mediated by stomatal and mesophyll diffusion resistances and by photosynthetic rate. These effects lead to predictable trends in leaf δ(13)C across natural gradients of elevation, irradiance and nutrient supply. Less is known about shifts in δ(13)C for bryophytes at landscape scale, as bryophytes lack stomata in the dominant gametophyte phase, and thus lack active control over CO(2) diffusion. Twelve bryophyte species were sampled across a matrix of elevation and soil ages on Mauna Loa, Hawaii Island. We tested hypotheses based on previous findings for vascular plants, which tend to have less negative δ(13)C at higher elevations or irradiances, and for leaves with higher leaf mass per area (LMA). Across the matrix, bryophytes spanned the range of δ(13)C values typical of C(3) vascular plants. Bryophytes were remarkably similar to vascular plants in exhibiting less negative δ(13)C with increasing elevation, and with lower overstory cover; additionally δ(13)C was related to bryophyte canopy projected mass per area, a trait analogous to LMA in vascular plants, also correlated negatively with overstory cover. The similarity of responses of δ(13)C in bryophytes and vascular plants to environmental factors, despite differing morphologies and diffusion pathways, points to a strong direct role of photosynthetic rate in determining δ(13)C variation at the landscape scale.

  19. Microsites Matter: Improving the Success of Rare Species Reintroductions

    PubMed Central

    Dunwiddie, Peter W.; Martin, R. Adam

    2016-01-01

    Our study was undertaken to better understand how to increase the success rates of recovery plantings of a rare hemiparasite, golden paintbrush (Castilleja levisecta—Orobanchaceae). This species is endemic to western Washington and Oregon, USA, and southwestern British Columbia, Canada. Over 5000 golden paintbrush plants were outplanted as plugs in 2007 at six different native prairie sites that were considered to be suitable habitat, based on general evaluations of vegetation and soil conditions. Outplantings were installed at regular intervals along transects up to 1 km long to include a range of conditions occurring at each site. All plantings were re-examined five years later. The patchy distribution of surviving plugs and new recruits within each reintroduction site suggested success is strongly influenced by microsite characteristics. Indicator species analysis of taxa growing in microsites around outplanted golden paintbrush identified species that were positively or negatively associated with paintbrush survival. Species such as Festuca roemeri, Eriophyllum lanatum, and Viola adunca were strong indicators at some sites; non-natives such as Hypochaeris radicata and Teesdalia nudicaulis tended to be frequent negative indicators. Overall, higher richness of native perennial forbs was strongly correlated with both survival and flowering of golden paintbrush, a pattern that may reflect interactions of this hemiparasite with the immediately surrounding plant community. Topographic position also influenced outcomes, with greater survival occurring on mounds and in swales, where soils generally were deeper. Our findings suggest that assessments of site suitability based on vegetation alone, and coarser, site-level assessments that do not characterize heterogeneity at the microsite scale, may not be strong predictors of restoration success over the longer term and in sites with variability in vegetation and soils. By identifying suitable microsites to focus rare

  20. Microsites Matter: Improving the Success of Rare Species Reintroductions.

    PubMed

    Dunwiddie, Peter W; Martin, R Adam

    2016-01-01

    Our study was undertaken to better understand how to increase the success rates of recovery plantings of a rare hemiparasite, golden paintbrush (Castilleja levisecta-Orobanchaceae). This species is endemic to western Washington and Oregon, USA, and southwestern British Columbia, Canada. Over 5000 golden paintbrush plants were outplanted as plugs in 2007 at six different native prairie sites that were considered to be suitable habitat, based on general evaluations of vegetation and soil conditions. Outplantings were installed at regular intervals along transects up to 1 km long to include a range of conditions occurring at each site. All plantings were re-examined five years later. The patchy distribution of surviving plugs and new recruits within each reintroduction site suggested success is strongly influenced by microsite characteristics. Indicator species analysis of taxa growing in microsites around outplanted golden paintbrush identified species that were positively or negatively associated with paintbrush survival. Species such as Festuca roemeri, Eriophyllum lanatum, and Viola adunca were strong indicators at some sites; non-natives such as Hypochaeris radicata and Teesdalia nudicaulis tended to be frequent negative indicators. Overall, higher richness of native perennial forbs was strongly correlated with both survival and flowering of golden paintbrush, a pattern that may reflect interactions of this hemiparasite with the immediately surrounding plant community. Topographic position also influenced outcomes, with greater survival occurring on mounds and in swales, where soils generally were deeper. Our findings suggest that assessments of site suitability based on vegetation alone, and coarser, site-level assessments that do not characterize heterogeneity at the microsite scale, may not be strong predictors of restoration success over the longer term and in sites with variability in vegetation and soils. By identifying suitable microsites to focus rare

  1. Estimation of stand-level leaf area for boreal bryophytes.

    PubMed

    Bond-Lamberty, Ben; Gower, Stith T

    2007-04-01

    Bryophytes dominate the carbon and nitrogen cycling of many poorly drained terrestrial ecosystems and are important in the vegetation-atmosphere exchange of carbon and water, yet few studies have estimated their leaf area at the stand scale. This study quantified the bryophyte-specific leaf area (SLA) and leaf area index (LAI) in a group of different-aged boreal forest stands in well and poorly drained soils. Species-specific SLA (for three feather mosses, four Sphagnum spp. and Aulacomnium palustre mixed with Tomentypnum nitens) was assessed by determining the projected area using a flatbed scanner and cross-sectional geometry using a dissecting microscope. The hemisurface leaf area was computed as the product of SLA and live biomass and was scaled by coverage data collected at all stands. Pleurozium schreberi dominated the spatial coverage, biomass and leaf area in the well-drained stands, particularly the oldest, while S. fuscum and A. palustre were important in the poorly drained stands. Live moss biomass ranged from 47 to 230 g m(-2) in the well-drained stands dominated by feather mosses and from 102 to 228 g m(-2) in the poorly drained stands. Bryophyte SLA varied between 135 and 473 cm(2) g(-1), for A. palustre and S. capillifolium, respectively. SLA was strongly and significantly affected by bryophyte species, but did not vary between stands; in general, there was no significant difference between the SLA of non-Sphagnum mosses. Bryophyte LAI increased with stand age, peaking at 3.1 and 3.7 in the well and poorly drained stands, respectively; this represented approximately 40% of the overstory LAI in the well-drained stands and 100-1,000% in the poorly drained stands, underscoring the important role bryophytes play in the water and carbon budgets of these boreal forests.

  2. Distribution drivers and physiological responses in geothermal bryophyte communities.

    PubMed

    García, Estefanía Llaneza; Rosenstiel, Todd N; Graves, Camille; Shortlidge, Erin E; Eppley, Sarah M

    2016-04-01

    Our ability to explain community structure rests on our ability to define the importance of ecological niches, including realized ecological niches, in shaping communities, but few studies of plant distributions have combined predictive models with physiological measures. Using field surveys and statistical modeling, we predicted distribution drivers in geothermal bryophyte (moss) communities of Lassen Volcanic National Park (California, USA). In the laboratory, we used drying and rewetting experiments to test whether the strong species-specific effects of relative humidity on distributions predicted by the models were correlated with physiological characters. We found that the three most common bryophytes in geothermal communities were significantly affected by three distinct distribution drivers: temperature, light, and relative humidity. Aulacomnium palustre, whose distribution is significantly affected by relative humidity according to our model, and which occurs in high-humidity sites, showed extreme signs of stress after drying and never recovered optimal values of PSII efficiency after rewetting. Campylopus introflexus, whose distribution is not affected by humidity according to our model, was able to maintain optimal values of PSII efficiency for 48 hr at 50% water loss and recovered optimal values of PSII efficiency after rewetting. Our results suggest that species-specific environmental stressors tightly constrain the ecological niches of geothermal bryophytes. Tests of tolerance to drying in two bryophyte species corresponded with model predictions of the comparative importance of relative humidity as distribution drivers for these species. © 2016 Botanical Society of America.

  3. Why Are C3-C4 Intermediate Species Rare?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, J. E.; Field, C. B.; Berry, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    While C3-C4 intermediate photosynthesis is thought to represent the evolutionary bridge between C3 and C4 photosynthesis, C3-C4 intermediate species are ecologically rare in comparison to both C3 and C4 species. Here, we report results from a laboratory experiment, field observations, and model simulations that suggest a new explanation for the ecological rarity of C3-C4 intermediate species. In the laboratory experiment, we combined gas exchange and fluorescence to characterize the temperature response of photosynthesis in three closely-related species in the genus Flaveria that are representatives of the C3, C3-C4 intermediate, and C4 photosynthetic pathways. The leaf temperature that maximized the quantum yield for CO2 assimilation (Topt(ΦCO2)) was 24.9 ± 0.7°C in Flaveria robusta (C3), 29.8 ± 1.0°C in F. chloraefolia (C3-C4), and 35.7 ± 0.8°C in F. bidentis (C4), and was linearly related to the temperature sensitivity of the coupling between CO2 assimilation and electron transport (d(ΦCO2/ ΦPSII)/dT)). While F. chloraefolia does not simultaneously occur with F. robusta and F. bidentis in naturally-assembled communities, this C3-C4 intermediate species does occur with other C3 and C4 species. During the growing season in two of these mixed-photosynthetic-type communities, leaf temperatures for F. chloraefolia were similar to the Topt(ΦCO2) determined in the laboratory. A model of maximum potential carbon gain suggests that competitive coexistence of C3, C3-C4 intermediate, and C4 species could be dependent on a temperature regime that highlights the distinct relative advantages of the C3-C4 intermediate pathway. In combination, these results suggest that the relative temperature sensitivity of the C3, C3-C4 intermediate, and C4 photosynthetic pathways combined with environmental variation in temperature may help to explain why C3-C4 intermediate species are generally rare.

  4. [Rearing immature horse flies (Diptera: Tabanidae) by using a substrate of bryophytes and sand].

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Ruth L M; Rafael, José A

    2006-01-01

    A new method for rearing immature horse flies by using a substrate of bryophytes and sand is described and the advantages of such substrate for maintenance of species with long development periods are discussed.

  5. The Rengen Grassland experiment: bryophytes biomass and element concentrations after 65 years of fertilizer application.

    PubMed

    Hejcman, Michal; Száková, Jirina; Schellberg, Jürgen; Srek, Petr; Tlustos, Pavel; Balík, Jirí

    2010-07-01

    The Rengen Grassland Experiment in Germany, established in 1941, consists of the following fertilizer treatments applied under a two cut management: control, Ca, CaN, CaNP, CaNP-KCl, and CaNP-K(2)SO(4). The aim of this study was (1) to identify effects of fertilizer application on biomass and species composition of bryophytes and (2) to investigate the impact of fertilizer application on macro- (N, P, K, Ca, Mg), micro- (Cu, Fe, Mn, Zn), and toxic (As, Cd, Cr, Pb, Ni) element concentrations in bryophyte biomass. In June 2006, Rhytidiadelphus squarrosus was the only bryophyte species recorded in the control. In treatment Ca, R. squarrosus was the dominant bryophyte species whereas Brachythecium rutabulum occurred sporadically only in a single plot of that treatment. The latter was the only bryophyte species collected in CaN, CaNP, CaNP-KCl, and CaNP-K(2)SO(4) treatments. Dry matter accumulation of bryophytes was highest in the control (180 g m(-2)) followed by Ca (46 g m(-2)), CaNP (25 g m(-2)), CaNP-KCl (15 g m(-2)), CaNP-K(2)SO(4) (9 g m(-2)), and CaN (2 g m(-2)) treatments. A negative correlation between biomass production of bryophytes and dry matter production of vascular plants was revealed up to a threshold value of 400 g m(-2). Above this limit, biomass production of bryophytes remained obviously unaffected by further increase in biomass production of vascular plants. A significant effect of treatment on As, Cd, Cr, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, P, Ca, Mg, K, and N concentrations was revealed. Concentrations of these elements were a function of amount of elements supplied with fertilizers. Bryophytes seem to be promising bio-indicators not only for airborne deposition of toxic element but also for fertilizer introduced as well.

  6. Structural characterization and chemical classification of some bryophytes found in Latvia.

    PubMed

    Maksimova, Viktorija; Klavina, Laura; Bikovens, Oskars; Zicmanis, Andris; Purmalis, Oskars

    2013-07-01

    Bryophytes are the second largest taxonomic group in the plant kingdom; yet, studies conducted to better understand their chemical composition are rare. The aim of this study was to characterize the chemical composition of bryophytes common in Northern Europe by using elemental, spectral, and non-destructive analytical methods, such as Fourier transform IR spectrometry (FT-IR), solid-phase (13) C-NMR spectrometry, and pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS), for the purpose of investigating their chemotaxonomic relationships on the basis of chemical-composition data. The results of all these analyses showed that bryophytes consist mainly of carbohydrates. Judging by FT-IR spectra, the OH groups in combination of CO groups were the most abundant groups. The (13) C-NMR spectra provided information on the presence of such compounds as phenolics and lipids. It was found that the amount of phenolic compounds in bryophytes is relatively small. This finding definitely confirmed the absence of lignin in the studied bryophytes. Cluster analysis was used to better understand differences in the chemical composition of bryophyte samples and to evaluate possible usage of these methods in the chemotaxonomy of bryophytes.

  7. Bryophyte responses to microclimatic edge effects across riparian buffers.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Katherine J; Mallik, Azim U

    2006-08-01

    Although riparian buffers are an important aspect of forest management in the boreal forest of Canada, little is known about the habitat conditions within buffers, due in part to complex edge effects in response to both the upland clearcut and the stream. We investigated microclimatic conditions and bryophyte growth and vitality in seven locations between the stream edge and 60 m into the upland undisturbed conifer forests and at the clearcut sites with riparian buffer 30 km northwest of Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada. We hypothesized that the growth and vitality of a pleurocarpous moss, Hylocomium splendens, and an acrocarpous moss, Polytrichum commune, would be directly related to the microclimatic gradients detected. We further hypothesized that sensitivity of the bryophytes to environmental factors will vary depending on their life form type, i.e., pleurocarpous moss will respond differently than the acrocarpous moss. Both bryophyte species were transplanted in pots and placed at 10-m intervals along 60-m transects perpendicular to the stream across the buffer and undisturbed sites. Bryophyte growth, cover, and vitality, as well as microclimatic parameters and plant cover, were measured over the summer in 2003. The riparian buffers were simultaneously affected by microclimatic gradients extending from both the clearcut edge and the riparian-upland ecotonal edge. Both bryophyte species responded to changes in the microclimatic conditions. However, vapor pressure deficit (VPD) was the most important factor influencing the growth of H. splendens, whereas for P. commune growth soil moisture was most important. Our study confirms earlier findings that interior forest bryophytes such as H. splendens can be used as indicators to monitor edge effects and biodiversity recovery following forest harvesting. We demonstrate that growth and vitality of these bryophytes reflect the prevailing near-ground microclimatic conditions at the forest edges. Abundance estimates of such

  8. Turnover of recently assimilated carbon in arctic bryophytes.

    PubMed

    Street, L E; Subke, J A; Sommerkorn, M; Heinemeyer, A; Williams, M

    2011-10-01

    Carbon (C) allocation and turnover in arctic bryophytes is largely unknown, but their response to climatic change has potentially significant impacts on arctic ecosystem C budgets. Using a combination of pulse-chase experiments and a newly developed model of C turnover in bryophytes, we show significant differences in C turnover between two contrasting arctic moss species (Polytrichum piliferum and Sphagnum fuscum). (13)C abundance in moss tissues (measured up to 1 year) and respired CO(2) (traced over 5 days) were used to parameterise the bryophyte C model with four pools representing labile and structural C in photosynthetic and stem tissue. The model was optimised using an Ensemble Kalman Filter to ensure a focus on estimating the confidence intervals (CI) on model parameters and outputs. The ratio of aboveground NPP:GPP in Polytrichum piliferum was 23% (CI 9-35%), with an average turnover time of 1.7 days (CI 1.1-2.5 days). The aboveground NPP:GPP ratio in Sphagnum fuscum was 43% (CI 19-65%) with an average turnover time of 3.1 days (CI 1.6-6.1 days). These results are the first to show differences in C partitioning between arctic bryophyte species in situ and highlight the importance of modelling C dynamics of this group separately from vascular plants for a realistic representation of vegetation in arctic C models.

  9. Predicted changes in vegetation structure affect the susceptibility to invasion of bryophyte-dominated subarctic heath

    PubMed Central

    Eckstein, R. Lutz; Pereira,, Eva; Milbau, Ann; Graae, Bente Jessen

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims A meta-analysis of global change experiments in arctic tundra sites suggests that plant productivity and the cover of shrubs, grasses and dead plant material (i.e. litter) will increase and the cover of bryophytes will decrease in response to higher air temperatures. However, little is known about which effects these changes in vegetation structure will have on seedling recruitment of species and invasibility of arctic ecosystems. Methods A field experiment was done in a bryophyte-dominated, species-rich subarctic heath by manipulating the cover of bryophytes and litter in a factorial design. Three phases of seedling recruitment (seedling emergence, summer seedling survival, first-year recruitment) of the grass Anthoxanthum alpinum and the shrub Betula nana were analysed after they were sown into the experimental plots. Key Results Bryophyte and litter removal significantly increased seedling emergence of both species but the effects of manipulations of vegetation structure varied strongly for the later phases of recruitment. Summer survival and first-year recruitment were significantly higher in Anthoxanthum. Although bryophyte removal generally increased summer survival and recruitment, seedlings of Betula showed high mortality in early August on plots where bryophytes had been removed. Conclusions Large species-specific variation and significant effects of experimental manipulations on seedling recruitment suggest that changes in vegetation structure as a consequence of global warming will affect the abundance of grasses and shrubs, the species composition and the susceptibility to invasion of subarctic heath vegetation. PMID:21624960

  10. Central European medicinal bryophytes in the 16th-century work by Caspar Schwenckfeld, and their ethnopharmacological origin.

    PubMed

    Drobnik, Jacek; Stebel, Adam

    2015-12-04

    Ubiquitous bryophyte species are reported from European, American and Asian ethnopharmacies. Some of their traditional medicinal uses are similar in distant and isolated cultures, and moreover, medicinal properties of some bryophytes are currently confirmed as justified by their chemical constituents. Aims of the work: we identify bryophytes listed in a medicinal and botanical work from 1600, and compare their medicinal applications (known in Europe between 1530-1600) with other ethnopharmacological data about these species and with modern pharmacological knowledge. This way we attempt to display origins of medicinal usage of bryophytes in Central Europe. Bryophyte species in bibliographical sources printed in Central Europe (starting from O. Brunfels' Herbarum vivae Eicones... Argentorati, 1530) were identified according to old and recent taxonomical references. Caspar Schwenckfeld's scientific output from 1600 was treated here as a summary of 16th-century knowledge about medicinal bryophytes. Central European pharmacy about the year 1600 was familiar with the following bryophytes: Marchantia polymorpha L., Polytrichum commune Hedw., P. formosum Hedw. and Funaria hygrometrica Hedw. Between 1530-1600 in Central Europe the number of medicinal bryophytes increased from 2 (Lichen sive Hepatica and Polytrichon) to 4. Pharmaceutical usage of them was similar as in other, distant ethnopharmacies. Further 2-4 mosses (Rhytidiadelphus loreus and Rh. squarrosus; Thuidium tamariscinum and Th. delicatulum) were recognised as non-medicinal. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Stakeholder perspectives on the importance of rare-species research for deep-sea environmental management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Phillip J.; Campbell, Lisa M.; Van Dover, Cindy L.

    2017-07-01

    The apparent prevalence of rare species (rarity) in the deep sea is a concern for environmental management and conservation of biodiversity. Rare species are often considered at risk of extinction and, in terrestrial and shallow water environments, have been shown to play key roles within an ecosystem. In the deep-sea environment, current research focuses primarily on abundant species and deep-sea stakeholders are questioning the importance of rare species in ecosystem functioning. This study asks whether deep-sea stakeholders (primarily scientists) view rare-species research as a priority in guiding environmental management. Delphi methodology (i.e., an iterative survey approach) was used to understand views about whether or not 'deep-sea scientists should allocate more resources to research on rare species in the deep sea, even if this means less resources might be available for abundant-species research.' Results suggest little consensus regarding the prioritization of resources for rare-species research. From Survey 1 to Survey 3, the average participant response shifted toward a view that rare-species research is not a priority if it comes at a cost to research on abundant species. Participants pointed to the need for a balanced approach and highlighted knowledge gaps about even the most fundamental questions, including whether rare species are truly 'rare' or simply under-sampled. Participants emphasized the lack of basic biological knowledge for rare and abundant species, particularly abundant meio- and microscopic species, as well as uncertainty in the roles rare and abundant species play in ecosystem processes. Approaches that jointly consider the role of rare and abundant species in ecosystem functioning (e.g., biological trait analysis) may help to clarify the extent to which rare species need to be incorporated into deep-sea environment management in order to maintain ecosystem functioning.

  12. Bryophytes in fragments of Terra Firme forest on the great curve of the Xingu River, Pará state, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Pantoja, A C C; Ilkiu-Borges, A L; Tavares-Martins, A C C; Garcia, E T

    2015-08-01

    Microclimatic conditions of tropical forest favour the high richness of bryophytes, which by being sensitive to environmental changes, are important indicators of habitat conditions. The aim of this study was to determine the richness and species composition of the bryophyte flora in fragments of terra firme forest on the great curve of the Xingu River, Pará state, Brazil. The collections were made in August and September 2012 in 14 fragments, in which were installed two plots per fragment, one at the edge and one inside, measuring 10 × 10 m each. The results showed 77 species in 45 genera and 18 families. Lejeunea setiloba Spruce and Marchesinia brachiata (Sw.) Schiffn. are new records for Pará state. The richness families in this study were the ones typically found in tropical forest surveys. A high richness of rare species in comparison to common ones, a pattern usually observed for plants in tropical forests was not reported in this study, probably due to historical fragmentation and disturbance in the area. The richness and species composition were determined mainly by the physiognomic characteristics of the studied forest fragments.

  13. Pheromones and Other Semiochemicals for Monitoring Rare and Endangered Species.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Mattias C

    2016-09-01

    As global biodiversity declines, biodiversity and conservation have become ever more important research topics. Research in chemical ecology for conservation purposes has not adapted to address this need. During the last 10-15 years, only a few insect pheromones have been developed for biodiversity and conservation studies, including the identification and application of pheromones specifically for population monitoring. These investigations, supplemented with our knowledge from decades of studying pest insects, demonstrate that monitoring with pheromones and other semiochemicals can be applied widely for conservation of rare and threatened insects. Here, I summarize ongoing conservation research, and outline potential applications of chemical ecology and pheromone-based monitoring to studies of insect biodiversity and conservation research. Such applications include monitoring of insect population dynamics and distribution changes, including delineation of current ranges, the tracking of range expansions and contractions, and determination of their underlying causes. Sensitive and selective monitoring systems can further elucidate the importance of insect dispersal and landscape movements for conservation. Pheromone-based monitoring of indicator species will also be useful in identifying biodiversity hotspots, and in characterizing general changes in biodiversity in response to landscape, climatic, or other environmental changes.

  14. 7 CFR 650.22 - Rare, threatened, and endangered species of plants and animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Rare, threatened, and endangered species of plants and... Related Environmental Concerns § 650.22 Rare, threatened, and endangered species of plants and animals. (a... endangered species is the destruction or deterioration of their habitats by human activities such as...

  15. 7 CFR 650.22 - Rare, threatened, and endangered species of plants and animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Rare, threatened, and endangered species of plants and... Related Environmental Concerns § 650.22 Rare, threatened, and endangered species of plants and animals. (a... endangered species is the destruction or deterioration of their habitats by human activities such as...

  16. 7 CFR 650.22 - Rare, threatened, and endangered species of plants and animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Rare, threatened, and endangered species of plants and... Related Environmental Concerns § 650.22 Rare, threatened, and endangered species of plants and animals. (a... endangered species is the destruction or deterioration of their habitats by human activities such as...

  17. 7 CFR 650.22 - Rare, threatened, and endangered species of plants and animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Rare, threatened, and endangered species of plants and... Related Environmental Concerns § 650.22 Rare, threatened, and endangered species of plants and animals. (a... endangered species is the destruction or deterioration of their habitats by human activities such as...

  18. 7 CFR 650.22 - Rare, threatened, and endangered species of plants and animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Rare, threatened, and endangered species of plants and... Related Environmental Concerns § 650.22 Rare, threatened, and endangered species of plants and animals. (a... endangered species is the destruction or deterioration of their habitats by human activities such as...

  19. Bryophyte diversity and evolution: windows into the early evolution of land plants.

    PubMed

    Shaw, A Jonathan; Szövényi, Péter; Shaw, Blanka

    2011-03-01

    The "bryophytes" comprise three phyla of plants united by a similar haploid-dominant life cycle and unbranched sporophytes bearing one sporangium: the liverworts (Marchantiophyta), mosses (Bryophyta), and hornworts (Anthocerophyta). Combined, these groups include some 20000 species. As descendents of embryophytes that diverged before tracheophytes appeared, bryophytes offer unique windows into the early evolution of land plants. We review insights into the evolution of plant life cycles, in particular the elaboration of the sporophyte generation, the major lineages within bryophyte phyla, and reproductive processes that shape patterns of bryophyte evolution. Recent transcriptomic work suggests extensive overlap in gene expression in bryophyte sporophytes vs. gametophytes, but also novel patterns in the sporophyte, supporting Bower's antithetic hypothesis for origin of alternation of generations. Major lineages of liverworts, mosses, and hornworts have been resolved and general patterns of morphological evolution can now be inferred. The life cycles of bryophytes, arguably more similar to those of early embryophytes than are those in any other living plant group, provide unique insights into gametophyte mating patterns, sexual conflicts, and the efficacy and effects of spore dispersal during early land plant evolution.

  20. Bryophyte dispersal inferred from colonization of an introduced substratum on Whiteface Mountain, New York.

    PubMed

    Miller, Norton G; McDaniel, Stuart F

    2004-08-01

    A long-standing debate in bryophyte biogeography concerns the frequency of long-distance spore dispersal. The diversity of bryophytes on mortared rock walls along the Veterans Memorial Highway on Whiteface Mountain, New York, USA, was studied to document the recruitment of species over the 65 years since the highway was constructed. The highway is situated in the Adirondack Mountains, a relatively unpopulated region with a largely acidic flora. The introduction of mortar has increased the bryophyte diversity by 50% above that of native lithic substrata on the mountain. The composition of the native and mortar floras differed greatly, suggesting that the walls were not colonized by locally abundant ruderal species. Many of the species sampled on the walls are typically found only in lower elevation forested sites, distant (∼5 km or more) from the highway, and not on anthropogenic calcium carbonate. These results suggest that a bryophyte community consisting of common and uncommon species assembled from distant sites at the rate of at least one species per year in the last 65 years. These data provide the ecological context for experimental and phylogeographic studies and suggest that some bryophytes may be capable of routine dispersal over distances of at least 5 km.

  1. [Response of bryophytes to global change and its bioindicatortation].

    PubMed

    Wu, Yuhuan; Gao, Chien; Cheng, Guodong; Yu, Xinghua; Cao, Tong

    2002-07-01

    Bryophytes are sensitive to atmosphere components concentration and global climate change resulted from relatively simple structures. Bryophyte is an ideal kind of biological indicator of global changes, environmental pollution, nutrient condition, forest integrity and ecosystem health. In order to use bryophytes as indicators to environmental and global changes, further studies on response and adaptation of bryophytes to the global changes are needed.

  2. Could the canopy structure of bryophytes serve as an indicator of microbial biodiversity? A test for testate amoebae and microcrustaceans from a subtropical cloud forest in Dominican Republic.

    PubMed

    Acosta-Mercado, D; Cancel-Morales, N; Chinea, J D; Santos-Flores, C J; De Jesús, I Sastre

    2012-07-01

    The mechanisms that ultimately regulate the diversity of microbial eukaryotic communities in bryophyte ecosystems remain a contentious topic in microbial ecology. Although there is robust consensus that abiotic factors, such as water chemistry of the bryophyte and pH, explain a significant proportion of protist and microcrustacean diversity, there is no systematic assessment of the role of bryophyte habitat complexity on such prominent microbial groups. Water-holding capacity is correlated with bryophyte morphology and canopy structure. Similarly, canopy structure explains biodiversity dynamics of the macrobiota suggesting that canopy structure may also be a potential parameter for understanding microbial diversity. Canopy roughness of the dominant bryophyte species within the Bahoruco Cloud Forest, Cachote, Dominican Republic, concomitant with their associated diversity of testate amoebae and microcrustaceans was estimated to determine whether canopy structure could be added to the list of factors explaining microbial biodiversity in bryophytes. We hypothesized that smooth (with high moisture content) canopies will have higher species richness, density, and biomass of testate amoebae and higher richness and density of microcrustaceans than rough (desiccation-prone) canopies. For testate amoebae, we found 83 morphospecies with relative low abundances. Species richness and density differed among bryophytes with different bryophyte canopy structures and based on non-metric multidimensional scaling, canopy roughness explained 25% of the variation in species composition although not as predicted. Acroporium pungens (low roughness, LR) had the lowest species richness (2 ± 0.61 SD per gram dry weight bryophyte), and density (2.1 ± 0.61 SD individual per gram of dry weight bryophyte); whereas Thuidium urceolatum (high roughness) had the highest richness (24 ± 10.82 SD) and density (94 ± 64.30 SD). The fact that the bryophyte with the highest roughness had the highest

  3. Extant diversity of bryophytes emerged from successive post-Mesozoic diversification bursts.

    PubMed

    Laenen, B; Shaw, B; Schneider, H; Goffinet, B; Paradis, E; Désamoré, A; Heinrichs, J; Villarreal, J C; Gradstein, S R; McDaniel, S F; Long, D G; Forrest, L L; Hollingsworth, M L; Crandall-Stotler, B; Davis, E C; Engel, J; Von Konrat, M; Cooper, E D; Patiño, J; Cox, C J; Vanderpoorten, A; Shaw, A J

    2014-10-27

    Unraveling the macroevolutionary history of bryophytes, which arose soon after the origin of land plants but exhibit substantially lower species richness than the more recently derived angiosperms, has been challenged by the scarce fossil record. Here we demonstrate that overall estimates of net species diversification are approximately half those reported in ferns and ∼30% those described for angiosperms. Nevertheless, statistical rate analyses on time-calibrated large-scale phylogenies reveal that mosses and liverworts underwent bursts of diversification since the mid-Mesozoic. The diversification rates further increase in specific lineages towards the Cenozoic to reach, in the most recently derived lineages, values that are comparable to those reported in angiosperms. This suggests that low diversification rates do not fully account for current patterns of bryophyte species richness, and we hypothesize that, as in gymnosperms, the low extant bryophyte species richness also results from massive extinctions.

  4. Bryophytes: liverworts, mosses, and hornworts: extraction and isolation procedures.

    PubMed

    Asakawa, Yoshinori; Ludwiczuk, Agnieszka

    2013-01-01

    There are more than 20,000 species of bryophytes in the world. Among them, almost of liverworts (Marchantiophyta) possess beautiful blue, yellow colored or colorless cellular oil bodies from which over several hundred new terpenoids, acetogenins, and aromatic compounds including flavonoids with more than 40 new carbon skeletons have been isolated. Some of the isolated compounds from liverworts show antimicrobial, antifungal, antiviral, allergenic contact dermatitis, cytotoxicity, insect antifeedant and mortality, antioxidant, nitric oxide (NO) production and plant growth inhibitory, neurotrophic and piscicidal activity, tublin polymerization inhibitory, muscle relaxing, and liver X-receptor (LXR)α agonist and (LXR)β antagonist activities, among others. The bio- and chemical diversity, chemical analysis of bryophytes including extraction, distillation, purification, TLC, GC and GC-MS, and HPLC analysis of oil bodies of liverworts are surveyed.

  5. Establishment of bryophytes on a reclaimed surface mine site at Goose Lake Prairie State Park, Illinois

    SciTech Connect

    Rastorfer, J.R.

    1980-01-01

    The location of the site at Goose Lake Prairie State Park provided an impetus to revegetate the reclaimed acid minesoil as a demonstration site with prairie floristic species. Because many bryophytes are pioneer plants and because baseline data were needed, surveys were made (1976-1978) to ascertain the natural establishment of mosses and liverworts on the site. Different habitats were surveyed with respect to types of fine-textured mineral soils; namely, abandoned (cultivated) field soil, old minesoil (spoil), and two reclaimed minesoils distinguished by reclamation efforts initiated in 1972 to 1973 and 1975 to 1976. Thirty moss species and one liverwort species were identified from the entire site, and two additional moss species were found in areas adjacent to the site. The role of bryophytes in the development of prairie plant communities on reclaimed minesoil is still uncertain. However, existing research data provide support for the following hypotheses: (1) bryophytes should help reduce soil erosion by binding soil particles via their rhizoidal systems, and by the relatively high water-holding capacity of their gametophytic shoots; (2) bryophytes might reduce heavy-metal toxicity to certain vascular plants at soil surfaces, because they have an ability to accumulate these elements; and (3) bryophytes may enhance nitrogen fixation through their associations with blue-green algae and possibly with nitrogen-fixing bacteria.

  6. Rare and endangered species of plants--the soviet side.

    PubMed

    Elias, T S

    1983-01-07

    In late 1972, the Soviet Union embarked on a program to identify and document plant species that are threatened with extinction. Perhaps 2000 species in the Soviet Union are in need of monitoring or protective measures, while nearly 200 may be in immediate danger of extinction. Currently, the Soviet Union has an official, national list of endangered species, and each of the 15 republics has prepared a regional list. Once a revised national list is prepared, Soviet scientists hope that the Supreme Soviet will pass a law protecting those species. A corresponding law for endangered animals was passed in 1980.

  7. Protecting rare, old-growth, forest-associated species under the Survey and Manage Program guidelines of the Northwest Forest Plan.

    PubMed

    Molina, Randy; Marcot, Bruce G; Lesher, Robin

    2006-04-01

    The Survey and Manage Program of the Northwest Forest Plan (NWFP) represents an unparalleled attempt to protect rare, little-known species associated with late-successional and old-growth forests on more than 9.7 million ha of federal lands. Approximately 400 species of amphibians, bryophytes, fungi, lichens, mollusks, vascular plants, arthropod functional groups, and one mammal were listed under this program because viability evaluations indicated the plan's network of reserve land allocations might not sustain the species over time. The program's standards and guidelines used an adaptive approach, protecting known sites and collecting new information to address concerns for species persistence and to develop management strategies. Since implementation in 1994, approximately 68,000 known sites have been recorded at an expense of several tens of millions of dollars. New knowledge from surveys reduced concern for nearly 100 species, and they were removed from the protection list. Although successful in protecting hundreds of rare species not typically considered in most conservation programs, some of the enacted conservation measures created conflicts in meeting other management objectives of the plan, particularly timber harvest. The program accrued important gains in knowledge, reduced uncertainty about conservation of a number of species, and developed new methods of species inventory that will be useful in future management planning and implementation at many scales. The program, however was not completed because of changes in land-management philosophy. Ongoing litigation regarding its termination and potential changes to the plan cast further uncertainty on how the original goal of maintaining persistence of late-successional and old-growth species will be met and measured. The outcomes, controversies, and management frustrations of the program exemplify the inherent difficulties in balancing broad, regional conservation goals with social and economic goals of

  8. A Novel Experimental Design for Examining Bryophyte Response to Increased Ultraviolet Radiation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuselier, Linda; True, Nicole

    2009-01-01

    Bryophytes were among the earliest colonizers of terrestrial environs, and despite their interesting life histories and population dynamics, they are rarely used in undergraduate introductory biology labs. In an inquiry-based laboratory exercise for introductory biology, students implement a controlled experiment to investigate effects of…

  9. A Novel Experimental Design for Examining Bryophyte Response to Increased Ultraviolet Radiation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuselier, Linda; True, Nicole

    2009-01-01

    Bryophytes were among the earliest colonizers of terrestrial environs, and despite their interesting life histories and population dynamics, they are rarely used in undergraduate introductory biology labs. In an inquiry-based laboratory exercise for introductory biology, students implement a controlled experiment to investigate effects of…

  10. Using Bryophytes and Stable isotopes to Assess Paleohydrological Changes in a Subarctic Alaskan Peatland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, M.; Peteet, D.; Sambrotto, R.

    2007-12-01

    Hydrologic changes resulting from climate change have important effects on vegetation change and global feedback cycles in the high latitudes. In an attempt to move beyond pollen analysis to interpret past climate, a number of geochemical and biological proxies were used, including bulk peat δ 13C, δ15N, and bryophytes, to make paleohydrological inferences from peat cores in south central Alaska. Bryophyte species distribution and composition are sensitive to water table position and pH, making them good candidates for paleohydrologic analyses. Bryophyte species were identified in \\1-m2 plots from the forest edge to the wettest swale across numerous peatland sites on the Kenai Peninsula, taking pH, conductivity, and temperature measurements for each plot. This modern calibration was used to conduct bryophyte analysis from two peatland cores from the Kenai Peninsula lowlands dated to 14.2 ka and 18.8 ka. Both records exhibit good preservation of both leaves and stems, allowing for analysis and identification. Late-glacial domination of brown moss species denotes rich fen conditions, and high moisture availability, as is indicated in the δ13C record. Increased δ13C values ca. 10 ka indicate a shift from moister to drier conditions, and the bryophyte species switch to higher hummock brown moss species and Sphagnum spp. Similar shifts in δ15N from negative values to near 0‰ suggest a switch of nutrient input to the fen from combined nitrogen pools to atmospheric nitrogen sources. The bryophyte species composition shows a dominance of acidic poor fen conditions in the mid- to late- Holocene. These shifts corroborate what was previously interpreted in the pollen and macrofossil record from these peatland sites.

  11. Adaptive evolution of rbcL in Conocephalum (Hepaticae, bryophytes).

    PubMed

    Miwa, Hidetsugu; Odrzykoski, Ireneusz J; Matsui, Atsushi; Hasegawa, Masami; Akiyama, Hiroyuki; Jia, Yu; Sabirov, Renat; Takahashi, Hideki; Boufford, David E; Murakami, Noriaki

    2009-07-15

    An excess of nonsynonymous substitutions over synonymous ones has been regarded as an important indicator of adaptive evolution or positive selection at the molecular level. We now report such a case for rbcL sequences among cryptic species in Conocephalum (Hepaticae, Bryophytes). This finding can be regarded as evidence of adaptive evolution in several cryptic species (especially in F and JN types) within the genus. Bryophytes are small land plants with simple morphology. We can therefore expect the existence of several biologically distinct units or cryptic species within each morphological species. In our previous study, we found three rbcL types in Asian Conocephalum japonicum (Thunb.) Grolle and also found evidence strongly suggesting that the three types are reproductively isolated cryptic species. Additionally, we examined rbcL sequence variation in six cryptic species of C. conicum (L.) Dumort. previously recognized by allozyme analyses. As a result, we were able to discriminate the six cryptic species based only on their rbcL sequences. We were able to show that rbcL sequence variation is also useful in finding cryptic species of C. conicum.

  12. ABUNDANT OR RARE? A HYBRID APPROACH FOR DETERMINING SPECIES RELATIVE ABUNDANCE AT AN ECOREGOIONAL SCALE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Everyone knows what abundant and rare species are, but quantifying the concept proves elusive. As part of an EPA/USGS project to assess near-coastal species vulnerability to climate change affects, we designed a hybrid approach to determine species relative abundance at an ecoreg...

  13. ABUNDANT OR RARE? A HYBRID APPROACH FOR DETERMINING SPECIES RELATIVE ABUNDANCE AT AN ECOREGOIONAL SCALE - 2014

    EPA Science Inventory

    Everyone knows what abundant and rare species are, but quantifying the concept proves elusive. As part of an EPA/USGS project to assess near-coastal species vulnerability to climate change affects, we designed a hybrid approach to determine species relative abundance at an ecoreg...

  14. ABUNDANT OR RARE? A HYBRID APPROACH FOR DETERMINING SPECIES RELATIVE ABUNDANCE AT AN ECOREGOIONAL SCALE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Everyone knows what abundant and rare species are, but quantifying the concept proves elusive. As part of an EPA/USGS project to assess near-coastal species vulnerability to climate change affects, we designed a hybrid approach to determine species relative abundance at an ecoreg...

  15. ABUNDANT OR RARE? A HYBRID APPROACH FOR DETERMINING SPECIES RELATIVE ABUNDANCE AT AN ECOREGOIONAL SCALE - 2014

    EPA Science Inventory

    Everyone knows what abundant and rare species are, but quantifying the concept proves elusive. As part of an EPA/USGS project to assess near-coastal species vulnerability to climate change affects, we designed a hybrid approach to determine species relative abundance at an ecoreg...

  16. Heavy metal bioaccumulation by the bryophyte Scleropodium purum at three French sites under various influences: rural conditions, traffic, and industry.

    PubMed

    Mariet, Clarisse; Gaudry, André; Ayrault, Sophie; Moskura, Mélanie; Denayer, Franck; Bernard, Nadine

    2011-03-01

    An active biomonitoring of the heavy metals pollution experiment was undertaken by means of the bryophyte species Scleropodium purum transplanted at three different sites exposed to rural, traffic, or industrial influences. Concentrations of about 40 elements in S. purum were determined by instrumental neutron activation analysis and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Accumulation rates of heavy metals were determined in the three sites. These accumulation rates in polluted sites were matched together and also to those recorded at the rural site. The changes of the accumulation rate of heavy metals in S. purum versus their concentrations in PM(10) particles simultaneously collected above show some different accumulation properties of S. purum according to elements and sites. S. purum has a weak efficiency in the three sites to accumulate elements like V, Cr, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Sb, and Pb originating from atmospheric hot sources generally enriched in particulates matter (PM(10)), whereas it is particularly high for Br, Th, and Rb. For other elements, Co, La, Ce, and Hf, and rare earth elements, Fe, Sr, Nb, Ti, Al, and Sc, the collection efficiency by S. purum is intermediate. In the industrial site Dunkerque, a magnification of the collection efficiency by S. purum for elements originating from steel and aluminum productions and petroleum refinement suggests that these metals could be enriched in coarse particles with a better accumulation by the bryophyte with respect to PM10.

  17. Assessing airborne pollution effects on bryophytes: lessons learned through long-term integrated monitoring in Austria.

    PubMed

    Zechmeister, H G; Dirnböck, T; Hülber, K; Mirtl, M

    2007-06-01

    The study uses measured and calculated data on airborne pollutants, particularly nitrogen (ranges between 28 to 43kgN*ha(-1)*yr(-1)) and sulphur (10 to 18kgSO(4)-S*ha(-1)*yr(-1)), in order to assess their long-term (1992 to 2005) effects on bryophytes at the UN-ECE Integrated Monitoring site 'Zöbelboden' in Austria. Bryophytes were used as reaction indicators on 20 epiphytic plots using the IM monitoring method and on 14 terrestrial plots using standardised photography. The plots were recorded in the years 1992, 1993, 1998, and 2004/2005. Most species remained stable in terms of their overall population size during the observed period, even though there were rapid turnover rates of a large percentage of species on all investigated plots. Only a few bryophytes (Hypnum cupressiforme, Leucodon sciuroides) responded unambiguously to N and S deposition. Nitrogen deposition had a weak but significant effect on the distribution of bryophyte communities. However, the time shifts in bryophyte communities did not depend on total deposition of N and S.

  18. Detecting the influence of rare stressors on rare species in Yosemite National Park using a novel stratified permutation test

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Matchett, John R.; Stark, Philip B.; Ostoja, Steven M.; Knapp, Roland A.; McKenny, Heather C.; Brooks, Matthew L.; Langford, William T.; Joppa, Lucas N.; Berlow, Eric L.

    2015-01-01

    Statistical models often use observational data to predict phenomena; however, interpreting model terms to understand their influence can be problematic. This issue poses a challenge in species conservation where setting priorities requires estimating influences of potential stressors using observational data. We present a novel approach for inferring influence of a rare stressor on a rare species by blending predictive models with nonparametric permutation tests. We illustrate the approach with two case studies involving rare amphibians in Yosemite National Park, USA. The endangered frog, Rana sierrae, is known to be negatively impacted by non-native fish, while the threatened toad, Anaxyrus canorus, is potentially affected by packstock. Both stressors and amphibians are rare, occurring in ~10% of potential habitat patches. We first predict amphibian occupancy with a statistical model that includes all predictors but the stressor to stratify potential habitat by predicted suitability. A stratified permutation test then evaluates the association between stressor and amphibian, all else equal. Our approach confirms the known negative relationship between fish and R. sierrae, but finds no evidence of a negative relationship between current packstock use and A. canorus breeding. Our statistical approach has potential broad application for deriving understanding (not just prediction) from observational data.

  19. Detecting the influence of rare stressors on rare species in Yosemite National Park using a novel stratified permutation test

    PubMed Central

    Matchett, J. R.; Stark, Philip B.; Ostoja, Steven M.; Knapp, Roland A.; McKenny, Heather C.; Brooks, Matthew L.; Langford, William T.; Joppa, Lucas N.; Berlow, Eric L.

    2015-01-01

    Statistical models often use observational data to predict phenomena; however, interpreting model terms to understand their influence can be problematic. This issue poses a challenge in species conservation where setting priorities requires estimating influences of potential stressors using observational data. We present a novel approach for inferring influence of a rare stressor on a rare species by blending predictive models with nonparametric permutation tests. We illustrate the approach with two case studies involving rare amphibians in Yosemite National Park, USA. The endangered frog, Rana sierrae, is known to be negatively impacted by non-native fish, while the threatened toad, Anaxyrus canorus, is potentially affected by packstock. Both stressors and amphibians are rare, occurring in ~10% of potential habitat patches. We first predict amphibian occupancy with a statistical model that includes all predictors but the stressor to stratify potential habitat by predicted suitability. A stratified permutation test then evaluates the association between stressor and amphibian, all else equal. Our approach confirms the known negative relationship between fish and R. sierrae, but finds no evidence of a negative relationship between current packstock use and A. canorus breeding. Our statistical approach has potential broad application for deriving understanding (not just prediction) from observational data. PMID:26031755

  20. Detecting the influence of rare stressors on rare species in Yosemite National Park using a novel stratified permutation test.

    PubMed

    Matchett, J R; Stark, Philip B; Ostoja, Steven M; Knapp, Roland A; McKenny, Heather C; Brooks, Matthew L; Langford, William T; Joppa, Lucas N; Berlow, Eric L

    2015-06-02

    Statistical models often use observational data to predict phenomena; however, interpreting model terms to understand their influence can be problematic. This issue poses a challenge in species conservation where setting priorities requires estimating influences of potential stressors using observational data. We present a novel approach for inferring influence of a rare stressor on a rare species by blending predictive models with nonparametric permutation tests. We illustrate the approach with two case studies involving rare amphibians in Yosemite National Park, USA. The endangered frog, Rana sierrae, is known to be negatively impacted by non-native fish, while the threatened toad, Anaxyrus canorus, is potentially affected by packstock. Both stressors and amphibians are rare, occurring in ~10% of potential habitat patches. We first predict amphibian occupancy with a statistical model that includes all predictors but the stressor to stratify potential habitat by predicted suitability. A stratified permutation test then evaluates the association between stressor and amphibian, all else equal. Our approach confirms the known negative relationship between fish and R. sierrae, but finds no evidence of a negative relationship between current packstock use and A. canorus breeding. Our statistical approach has potential broad application for deriving understanding (not just prediction) from observational data.

  1. Rare and endangered species of Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park; endangered, threatened, and rare animal, plant, and community handbook

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pratt, Linda W.; Pratt, Thane K.; Foote, David; Marcos Gorresen, mgorresen@usgs.gov

    2011-01-01

    In some cases, HAVO offers the best opportunity to save these species and communities from extinction. Increasingly, the park has attempted to restore rare populations by conducting surveys to locate them, controlling threats such as feral livestock, and bolstering existing populations or creating new ones by planting nursery stock. To aid such efforts, our original intent was to publish an identification guide for researchers and field management personnel. Particularly, we wanted to familiarize the reader with the many rare plant species which otherwise are known mainly from the technical literature. Because we soon came to realize that this handbook would be useful to a much larger, general readership, our aim is to make this information available to anyone interested in endangered animals and plants at Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park.

  2. Searching for American chestnut: the estimation of rare species attributes in a national forest inventory

    Treesearch

    Francis A. Roesch; William H. McWilliams

    2007-01-01

    American chestnut, once a dominant tree species in forests of the Northeastern United States, has become extremely rare. It is so rare, in fact, that on completion of 80 percent of the plot measurements of the U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service's most recent inventory in Pennsylvania, only 33 American chestnut trees with a diameter at breast height !Y 1...

  3. Searching for American chestnut: the estimation of rare species attributes in a national forest inventory

    Treesearch

    Francis A. Roesch; William H. McWilliams

    2005-01-01

    American chestnut, once a dominant tree species in forests of the Northeastern United States, has become extremely rare. It is so rare, in fact, that on completion of 80 percent of the plot measurements of the U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service's most recent inventory in Pennsylvania, only 33 American chestnut trees with a diameter at breast height 2: 1...

  4. Up in the tree--the overlooked richness of bryophytes and lichens in tree crowns.

    PubMed

    Boch, Steffen; Müller, Jörg; Prati, Daniel; Blaser, Stefan; Fischer, Markus

    2013-01-01

    Assessing diversity is among the major tasks in ecology and conservation science. In ecological and conservation studies, epiphytic cryptogams are usually sampled up to accessible heights in forests. Thus, their diversity, especially of canopy specialists, likely is underestimated. If the proportion of those species differs among forest types, plot-based diversity assessments are biased and may result in misleading conservation recommendations. We sampled bryophytes and lichens in 30 forest plots of 20 m × 20 m in three German regions, considering all substrates, and including epiphytic litter fall. First, the sampling of epiphytic species was restricted to the lower 2 m of trees and shrubs. Then, on one representative tree per plot, we additionally recorded epiphytic species in the crown, using tree climbing techniques. Per tree, on average 54% of lichen and 20% of bryophyte species were overlooked if the crown was not been included. After sampling all substrates per plot, including the bark of all shrubs and trees, still 38% of the lichen and 4% of the bryophyte species were overlooked if the tree crown of the sampled tree was not included. The number of overlooked lichen species varied strongly among regions. Furthermore, the number of overlooked bryophyte and lichen species per plot was higher in European beech than in coniferous stands and increased with increasing diameter at breast height of the sampled tree. Thus, our results indicate a bias of comparative studies which might have led to misleading conservation recommendations of plot-based diversity assessments.

  5. Up in the Tree – The Overlooked Richness of Bryophytes and Lichens in Tree Crowns

    PubMed Central

    Boch, Steffen; Müller, Jörg; Prati, Daniel; Blaser, Stefan; Fischer, Markus

    2013-01-01

    Assessing diversity is among the major tasks in ecology and conservation science. In ecological and conservation studies, epiphytic cryptogams are usually sampled up to accessible heights in forests. Thus, their diversity, especially of canopy specialists, likely is underestimated. If the proportion of those species differs among forest types, plot-based diversity assessments are biased and may result in misleading conservation recommendations. We sampled bryophytes and lichens in 30 forest plots of 20 m × 20 m in three German regions, considering all substrates, and including epiphytic litter fall. First, the sampling of epiphytic species was restricted to the lower 2 m of trees and shrubs. Then, on one representative tree per plot, we additionally recorded epiphytic species in the crown, using tree climbing techniques. Per tree, on average 54% of lichen and 20% of bryophyte species were overlooked if the crown was not been included. After sampling all substrates per plot, including the bark of all shrubs and trees, still 38% of the lichen and 4% of the bryophyte species were overlooked if the tree crown of the sampled tree was not included. The number of overlooked lichen species varied strongly among regions. Furthermore, the number of overlooked bryophyte and lichen species per plot was higher in European beech than in coniferous stands and increased with increasing diameter at breast height of the sampled tree. Thus, our results indicate a bias of comparative studies which might have led to misleading conservation recommendations of plot-based diversity assessments. PMID:24358373

  6. Number of genera as a potential screening tool for assessing quality of bryophyte communities in Ohio wetlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schumacher, William; Stapanian, Martin A.; Andreas, Barbara; Gara, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Bryophytes (mosses, liverworts, and hornworts) have numerous advantages as indicators of environmental quality. A quality assessment index for bryophyte species assemblages (BQAI) was developed for the State of Ohio, USA. Reliable identification of bryophytes to species often requires considerable training, practice, and time. In contrast, reliable identification to genera for most bryophytes in Ohio requires much less training. We identified 110 bryophyte species (14 liverworts and 96 mosses) belonging to 69 genera (13 liverwort and 56 moss) in 45 wetlands (27 emergent, 13 forested, and 5 shrub) in Ohio. As expected, there were more genera and higher BQAI scores in forested than in emergent wetlands. Number of genera was highly correlated (r ≥ 0.9) with BQAI in emergent and forested wetlands and for the combined set of wetlands. Number of genera and BQAI responded almost identically to an index of wetland disturbance. The results suggest that number of genera has potential as a screening tool for assessing bryophyte community quality in wetlands in some regions.

  7. A new macropterous species of a rarely collected subfamily (Heteroptera, Tingidae, Vianaidinae).

    PubMed

    Guidoti, Marcus; Montemayor, Sara I

    2016-08-11

    Pterovianaida duckensis n. sp., a new macropterous species of the rarely collected subfamily Vianaidinae is here described. The group currently comprises nine species, two of them fossils. Pterovianaida Montemayor and Carpintero is a recent monotypic genus described for a macropterous species collected in Peru. Here, a new macropterous species of Pterovianaida is described, and characters of the head, pronotum and hemelytra distinguish this species from the type species. This is the first record of a macropterous Vianaidinae for Brazil. A key to all extant species of this subfamily is provided.

  8. Secondary metabolites in bryophytes: an ecological aspect.

    PubMed

    Xie, Chun-Feng; Lou, Hong-Xiang

    2009-03-01

    Bryophytes frequently grow in an unfavorable environment as the earliest land plants, and inevitably biosynthesize secondary metabolites against biotic or abiotic stress. They not only defend against the plant competition, microbial attack, and insect or animal predation, but also function in UV protection, drought tolerance, and freezing survival. This review covers the ecological aspect of secondary metabolites in bryophytes and is taxonomically presented according to the ecological significances.

  9. Effects of acidification on bryophyte communities in West Virginia mountain streams

    SciTech Connect

    Stephenson, S.L.; Studlar, S.M.; McQuattie, C.J.; Edwards, P.J.

    1995-01-01

    Bryophytes (mosses and liverworts) are often more responsive to water chemistry changes than are vascular plants. In this study, the relationships of bryophyte communities to stream pH and water chemistry were studied, using six streams on or near the Fernow Experimental Forest in Tucker County, West Virginia. Streams were surveyed with line transacts using stratified random sampling. Bryophyte communities, based on species composition and structure, fell into three groups, corresponding to basic, moderately acidic, and very acidic stream water. For streams with sandstone beds, species diversity declined with decreasing pH, and no bryophytes were present at pH 3.15. The dominant species in moderately acidic to highly acidic streams is Scapania undulate, a species found to have exceptional tolerance to high acidity and toxic metal levels in Europe and Japan. Scapania undulate was transplanted from a stream with a pH of 5.97 to one with a pH of 3.15. In 3 mo, ultrastructural damage was observed. Acidity (pH) probably was not the only factor involved in controlling species composition and cell ultrastructure, since the two most acidic streams are subject to acid mine drainage and have very high concentrations of dissolved solids, particularly SO{sub 4} and Al. Other trace metals commonly associated with acidic surface waters also may have contributed to the differences in species composition. 77 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Estimating global nitrous oxide emissions by lichens and bryophytes with a process-based productivity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porada, Philipp; Pöschl, Ulrich; Kleidon, Axel; Beer, Christian; Weber, Bettina

    2017-03-01

    Nitrous oxide is a strong greenhouse gas and atmospheric ozone-depleting agent which is largely emitted by soils. Recently, lichens and bryophytes have also been shown to release significant amounts of nitrous oxide. This finding relies on ecosystem-scale estimates of net primary productivity of lichens and bryophytes, which are converted to nitrous oxide emissions by empirical relationships between productivity and respiration, as well as between respiration and nitrous oxide release. Here we obtain an alternative estimate of nitrous oxide emissions which is based on a global process-based non-vascular vegetation model of lichens and bryophytes. The model quantifies photosynthesis and respiration of lichens and bryophytes directly as a function of environmental conditions, such as light and temperature. Nitrous oxide emissions are then derived from simulated respiration assuming a fixed relationship between the two fluxes. This approach yields a global estimate of 0.27 (0.19-0.35) (Tg N2O) year-1 released by lichens and bryophytes. This is lower than previous estimates but corresponds to about 50 % of the atmospheric deposition of nitrous oxide into the oceans or 25 % of the atmospheric deposition on land. Uncertainty in our simulated estimate results from large variation in emission rates due to both physiological differences between species and spatial heterogeneity of climatic conditions. To constrain our predictions, combined online gas exchange measurements of respiration and nitrous oxide emissions may be helpful.

  11. Climate threat on the Macaronesian endemic bryophyte flora

    PubMed Central

    Patiño, Jairo; Mateo, Rubén G.; Zanatta, Florian; Marquet, Adrien; Aranda, Silvia C.; Borges, Paulo A. V.; Dirkse, Gerard; Gabriel, Rosalina; Gonzalez-Mancebo, Juana M.; Guisan, Antoine; Muñoz, Jesús; Sim-Sim, Manuela; Vanderpoorten, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Oceanic islands are of fundamental importance for the conservation of biodiversity because they exhibit high endemism rates coupled with fast extinction rates. Nowhere in Europe is this pattern more conspicuous than in the Macaronesian biogeographic region. A large network of protected areas within the region has been developed, but the question of whether these areas will still be climatically suitable for the globally threatened endemic element in the coming decades remains open. Here, we make predictions on the fate of the Macaronesian endemic bryophyte flora in the context of ongoing climate change. The potential distribution of 35 Macaronesian endemic bryophyte species was assessed under present and future climate conditions using an ensemble modelling approach. Projections of the models under different climate change scenarios predicted an average decrease of suitable areas of 62–87% per species and a significant elevational increase by 2070, so that even the commonest species were predicted to fit either the Vulnerable or Endangered IUCN categories. Complete extinctions were foreseen for six of the studied Macaronesian endemic species. Given the uncertainty regarding the capacity of endemic species to track areas of suitable climate within and outside the islands, active management associated to an effective monitoring program is suggested. PMID:27377592

  12. Climate threat on the Macaronesian endemic bryophyte flora.

    PubMed

    Patiño, Jairo; Mateo, Rubén G; Zanatta, Florian; Marquet, Adrien; Aranda, Silvia C; Borges, Paulo A V; Dirkse, Gerard; Gabriel, Rosalina; Gonzalez-Mancebo, Juana M; Guisan, Antoine; Muñoz, Jesús; Sim-Sim, Manuela; Vanderpoorten, Alain

    2016-07-05

    Oceanic islands are of fundamental importance for the conservation of biodiversity because they exhibit high endemism rates coupled with fast extinction rates. Nowhere in Europe is this pattern more conspicuous than in the Macaronesian biogeographic region. A large network of protected areas within the region has been developed, but the question of whether these areas will still be climatically suitable for the globally threatened endemic element in the coming decades remains open. Here, we make predictions on the fate of the Macaronesian endemic bryophyte flora in the context of ongoing climate change. The potential distribution of 35 Macaronesian endemic bryophyte species was assessed under present and future climate conditions using an ensemble modelling approach. Projections of the models under different climate change scenarios predicted an average decrease of suitable areas of 62-87% per species and a significant elevational increase by 2070, so that even the commonest species were predicted to fit either the Vulnerable or Endangered IUCN categories. Complete extinctions were foreseen for six of the studied Macaronesian endemic species. Given the uncertainty regarding the capacity of endemic species to track areas of suitable climate within and outside the islands, active management associated to an effective monitoring program is suggested.

  13. System-level strategies for conserving rare or little-known species

    Treesearch

    Bruce G. Marcot; Carolyn Hull Sieg

    2007-01-01

    In this chapter we review the literature on system-level strategies for conserving rare or little-known (RLK) species, continuing from the species-level approaches addressed in the previous chapter. We define system-level approaches as those that result in conservation actions focused on providing for community or ecosystem composition, structure, or function.

  14. Determining habitat potential and surveying for nine rare plant species in south-central Utah

    Treesearch

    Deborah J. Clark; Christine M. Groebner

    2001-01-01

    In south-central Utah, lands within and adjacent to Capitol Reef National Park contain populations of nine rare plant species. In an effort to enhance the combined knowledge about these species, the Bureau of Land Management, the USDA Forest Service, and the National Park Service signed an Interagency Agreement and hired an interagency biologist and field crew to...

  15. Pollen source and resource limitation to fruit production in the rare species Eremosparton songoricum (Fabaceae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Eremosparton songoricum (Litv.) Vass. is a rare, central Asian desert species which shows lower fruit set and seed set (<16%) than most hermaphroditic species. We hypothesized that fruit production was limited by pollen and resources. To evaluate potential fruit abortion due to pollen limitation, su...

  16. THE GOLDEN MOUSE (OCHROTOMYS NUTTALLI) AS A MODEL FOR MANAGEMENT OF "RARE" SPECIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Most mammalian species in North America are neither widespread nor abundant. Nonetheless, the term "rare"- although often used to describe species¿ is difficult to quantify, despite the fact that rarity is a fundamental concept in management and conservation. This results in eco...

  17. Consumer preference for seeds and seedlings of rare species impacts tree diversity at multiple scales.

    PubMed

    Young, Hillary S; McCauley, Douglas J; Guevara, Roger; Dirzo, Rodolfo

    2013-07-01

    Positive density-dependent seed and seedling predation, where herbivores selectively eat seeds or seedlings of common species, is thought to play a major role in creating and maintaining plant community diversity. However, many herbivores and seed predators are known to exhibit preferences for rare foods, which could lead to negative density-dependent predation. In this study, we first demonstrate the occurrence of increased predation of locally rare tree species by a widespread group of insular seed and seedling predators, land crabs. We then build computer simulations based on these empirical data to examine the effects of such predation on diversity patterns. Simulations show that herbivore preferences for locally rare species are likely to drive scale-dependent effects on plant community diversity: at small scales these foraging patterns decrease plant community diversity via the selective consumption of rare plant species, while at the landscape level they should increase diversity, at least for short periods, by promoting clustered local dominance of a variety of species. Finally, we compared observed patterns of plant diversity at the site to those obtained via computer simulations, and found that diversity patterns generated under simulations were highly consistent with observed diversity patterns. We posit that preference for rare species by herbivores may be prevalent in low- or moderate-diversity systems, and that these effects may help explain diversity patterns across different spatial scales in such ecosystems.

  18. Predispersal seed predation is higher in a rare species than in its widespread sympatric congeners (Astragalus, Fabaceae).

    PubMed

    Combs, Julie K; Lambert, Amy M; Reichard, Sarah H

    2013-11-01

    Rare plants may be rare, in part, because they are more susceptible to damage by predispersal insect seed predators than widespread congeneric species; thus, seed predation may be an important determinant of plant rarity. Scant evidence exists to either support or reject this hypothesis, limiting our ability to predict herbivore effects on plant rarity. We used a comparative framework to test this hypothesis in rare-common, sympatric congeners. We compared seed consumption by insect type and seed production among a rare Astragalus (Fabaceae) species and two sympatric, widespread congeners. We measured plant traits and tested whether traits were correlated with seed damage within and among rare-common species. Seed predation was significantly higher in a rare species than in common congeners over 2 yr. Seed production per pod was significantly lower in the rare species. Seed weevils exclusively consumed seeds of the rare species. Higher seed predation in the rare species is related to a combination of factors: plant phenology, dispersal ability, and vigor; seed predator identity; and insect phenology. Our results support the hypothesis that a rare plant is more susceptible to seed predators than two common, sympatric congeners. Seed predator reduction is a promising management tool to increase seed-set, recruitment, and survival of the rare species. Further studies that compare rare-common, sympatric congeners are greatly needed to broadly evaluate the hypothesis concerning rarity and susceptibility to seed predators and to inform conservation plans for rare species.

  19. Negative density-dependent mortality varies over time in a wet tropical forest, advantaging rare species, common species, or no species.

    PubMed

    Bachelot, Bénédicte; Kobe, Richard K; Vriesendorp, Corine

    2015-11-01

    Although one of the most widely studied hypotheses for high tree diversity in the tropics, the Janzen-Connell hypothesis (JC), and the community compensatory trend upon which it is based, have conflicting support from prior studies. Some of this variation could arise from temporal variation in seedling survival of common and rare species. Using 10 years of data from La Selva Biological Station in Costa Rica, we analyzed annual seedling survival and found that negative density-dependence (negative DD) was significantly stronger for rare species than for common species in 2 years and was significantly stronger for common species than for rare species in 4 years. This temporal variation in survival was correlated with climatic variables: in warmer and wetter years, common species had higher negative DD than rare species. The relationship between climate and variation in JC effects on seedling survival of common and rare species could have important consequences for the maintenance of tree species diversity in Central America, which is predicted to experience warmer and wetter years as global change proceeds.

  20. The Unexpected Re-Growth of Ice-Entombed Bryophytes in the Canadian High Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Farge, C.

    2014-12-01

    The rapid retreat of glaciers and ice caps throughout the Canadian Arctic is exposing pristine vegetation preserved beneath cold-based ice. For the past half century this vegetation has been consistently reported as dead. This interpretation has been overturned by the successful re-growth of Little Ice Age (1550-1850 AD) bryophytes emerging from the Teardrop Glacier, Sverdrup Pass, Ellesmere Island (79° N) collected in 2009. Some populations showed regeneration in the field and lab experiments confirmed their capacity to regrow. The species richness of these subglacial populations is exceptional, comprising >62 species that represent 44% of the extant bryophyte flora of Sverdrup Pass. Cold-based glaciers are known to provide critical habitats for a variety of microbiota (i.e., fungi, algae, cyanobacteria, bacteria and viruses) in high latitude ecosystems. The regeneration of Little Ice Age bryophytes fundamentally expands the concept of biological refugia to land plants that was previously restricted to survival above and beyond glacial margins. Given this novel understanding of subglacial ecosystems, fieldwork is now being extended southward to plateau ice caps on Baffin Island, Nunavut, where ice retreat is exposing subglacial populations of greater antiquity (thousands to tens of thousands of radiocarbon years before present). Bryophytes by nature are totipotent (stem cell equivalency) and poikilohydric (desiccation tolerance), which facilitate their unique adaptation to extreme environments. Continuity of the Arctic bryophyte flora extends back through the Holocene to the late Tertiary [Beaufort Fm, 2-5 Ma], when the majority of taxa were the same, based on records spanning the archipelago from Ellesmere to Banks Island. This record contrasts with that of vascular plants, which have had a number of extinctions, necessitating recolonization of arctic populations from outside the region. The biological significance of a stable bryophyte element highlights their

  1. Distribution Patterns of Ohio Stoneflies, with an Emphasis on Rare and Uncommon Species

    PubMed Central

    Grubbs, Scott A.; Pessimo, Massimo; DeWalt, R. Edward

    2013-01-01

    Presently, 102 stonefly species (Plecoptera) have been reported from Ohio. All 9 Nearctic families are represented. Over 90% of the fauna exhibit a combination of broad Nearctic-widespread, eastern Nearctic-widespread, Appalachian, and eastern Nearctic-unglaciated distributions. In contrast, only 2 species display a central Nearctic-Prairie distribution. Seven species of Perlidae are likely no longer present (Acroneuria evoluta Klapálek, A. perplexa Frison, Attaneuria ruralis (Hagen), and Neoperla mainensis Banks) or have experienced marked range reductions (Acroneuria abnormis (Newman), A. frisoni Stark and Brown, and A. filicis Frison). Another nearly 31% of the fauna (32 species) are rare, uncommon, or have highly-limited distributions within the state. Twelve of these species have Appalachian distributions, and an additional 8 have eastern Nearctic-unglaciated distributions. The distributional status for each of the 32 rare/uncommon species is discussed. PMID:24219390

  2. Desiccation tolerance in Bryophytes: relevance to the evolution of desiccation tolerance in Land Plants

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The majority of desiccation-tolerant plants are found in the less complex clades that constitute the algae, lichens and bryophytes. However, within the larger and more complex groups of vascular land plants there are some 120-130 species that exhibit some degree of vegetative desiccation tolerance. ...

  3. A new Ecuadorian species of the rare Neotropical caddisfly genus Amphoropsyche Holzenthal (Trichoptera, Leptoceridae).

    PubMed

    Holzenthal, Ralph W; Ríos-Touma, Blanca

    2016-01-01

    A new species of the rare long-horned caddisfly genus Amphoropsyche Holzenthal is described from Ecuador, bringing the number of species known from the genus to 15. All species are very regional in their distributions and known only from very few specimens. The new species, Amphoropsyche real, is similar to a number of previously described species from Colombia (Amphoropsyche ayura, Amphoropsyche cauca, Amphoropsyche flinti, Amphoropsyche quebrada, and Amphoropsyche stellata) and Ecuador (Amphoropsyche napo and Amphoropsyche tandayapa). The males can be distinguished from the others by features of segment X of the male genitalia, especially the prominent midlateral and subapicodorsal spinelike setae. An updated taxonomic key to males of the genus is provided.

  4. Conservation value of sites of hybridization in peripheral populations of rare plant species.

    PubMed

    Thompson, John D; Gaudeul, Myriam; Debussche, Max

    2010-02-01

    Populations at the periphery of a species' range are of interest to conservation biologists because they can show marked genetic differentiation from populations at the center of a range and because of potential hybridization among rare and common species. We examined two closely related Cyclamen species. One is a narrow endemic, and the other is more geographically widespread (both protected by law in continental southern France). We used floral traits and genetic variability to test for hybridization among the species in peripheral populations of the rare species. The species co-occurred on Corsica in a disjunct, peripheral part of the distribution of the endemic species and in an ecologically marginal area for the widespread species. The two species have hybridized and the endemic species showed high levels of introgression with its widespread congener. Genetic and floral variability in sites with both species was markedly higher than in sites with a single species. Our results highlight the need for a conservation strategy that integrates hybrid populations because they represent a source of novel diversity that may have adaptive potential.

  5. Regeneration of Little Ice Age bryophytes emerging from a polar glacier with implications of totipotency in extreme environments.

    PubMed

    La Farge, Catherine; Williams, Krista H; England, John H

    2013-06-11

    Across the Canadian Arctic Archipelago, widespread ice retreat during the 20th century has sharply accelerated since 2004. In Sverdrup Pass, central Ellesmere Island, rapid glacier retreat is exposing intact plant communities whose radiocarbon dates demonstrate entombment during the Little Ice Age (1550-1850 AD). The exhumed bryophyte assemblages have exceptional structural integrity (i.e., setae, stem structures, leaf hair points) and have remarkable species richness (60 of 144 extant taxa in Sverdrup Pass). Although the populations are often discolored (blackened), some have developed green stem apices or lateral branches suggesting in vivo regrowth. To test their biological viability, Little Ice Age populations emerging from the ice margin were collected for in vitro growth experiments. Our results include a unique successful regeneration of subglacial bryophytes following 400 y of ice entombment. This finding demonstrates the totipotent capacity of bryophytes, the ability of a cell to dedifferentiate into a meristematic state (analogous to stem cells) and develop a new plant. In polar ecosystems, regrowth of bryophyte tissue buried by ice for 400 y significantly expands our understanding of their role in recolonization of polar landscapes (past or present). Regeneration of subglacial bryophytes broadens the concept of Ice Age refugia, traditionally confined to survival of land plants to sites above and beyond glacier margins. Our results emphasize the unrecognized resilience of bryophytes, which are commonly overlooked vis-a-vis their contribution to the establishment, colonization, and maintenance of polar terrestrial ecosystems.

  6. Regeneration of Little Ice Age bryophytes emerging from a polar glacier with implications of totipotency in extreme environments

    PubMed Central

    La Farge, Catherine; Williams, Krista H.; England, John H.

    2013-01-01

    Across the Canadian Arctic Archipelago, widespread ice retreat during the 20th century has sharply accelerated since 2004. In Sverdrup Pass, central Ellesmere Island, rapid glacier retreat is exposing intact plant communities whose radiocarbon dates demonstrate entombment during the Little Ice Age (1550–1850 AD). The exhumed bryophyte assemblages have exceptional structural integrity (i.e., setae, stem structures, leaf hair points) and have remarkable species richness (60 of 144 extant taxa in Sverdrup Pass). Although the populations are often discolored (blackened), some have developed green stem apices or lateral branches suggesting in vivo regrowth. To test their biological viability, Little Ice Age populations emerging from the ice margin were collected for in vitro growth experiments. Our results include a unique successful regeneration of subglacial bryophytes following 400 y of ice entombment. This finding demonstrates the totipotent capacity of bryophytes, the ability of a cell to dedifferentiate into a meristematic state (analogous to stem cells) and develop a new plant. In polar ecosystems, regrowth of bryophyte tissue buried by ice for 400 y significantly expands our understanding of their role in recolonization of polar landscapes (past or present). Regeneration of subglacial bryophytes broadens the concept of Ice Age refugia, traditionally confined to survival of land plants to sites above and beyond glacier margins. Our results emphasize the unrecognized resilience of bryophytes, which are commonly overlooked vis-a-vis their contribution to the establishment, colonization, and maintenance of polar terrestrial ecosystems. PMID:23716658

  7. [Relationships between distribution of soil-born bryophytes in urban area of Hangzhou and related ecological factors].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Cao, Tong; Wang, Jian; Cao, Yang

    2008-04-01

    At the 21 sampling sites in urban area of Hangzhou, 47 species of soil-born bryophytes belonging to 31 genera and 22 families were recorded. Based on the ecological importance value of these species and the data of ecological factors at the sampling sites, the relationships between the distribution of the bryophytes species in urban area of Hangzhou and related ecological factors were studied by canonical correspondence analysis. The results showed that human disturbance and soil pH were the most important factors determining the distribution of the bryophytes. In urban parks and green lands where human disturbance was greater, soil pH was alkali, and the species were mainly belonging to the genera of Haplocladium and Bryum and the family of Pottiaceae. In hilly area where human disturbance was lesser, soil pH turned to acidic, and the bryophytes were more, with pleurocarpous mosses and liverworts being relatively rich. The niche width of the 47 bryophytes was calculated, which revealed that most of them had very narrow niche width (<0.1). The Pseudotaxiphyllum pohliaecarpum widely distributed in the hilly area of southwest Xihu Lake had the widest niche width (0.3510), followed by Trichostomum planifolium (0.2239) and Haplocladium microphyllum (0.2185), the commonest species in the parks and greenlands in urban area of Hangzhou.

  8. Epiphytic bryophytes as bio-indicators of atmospheric nitrogen deposition in a subtropical montane cloud forest: Response patterns, mechanism, and critical load.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xian-Meng; Song, Liang; Liu, Wen-Yao; Lu, Hua-Zheng; Qi, Jin-Hua; Li, Su; Chen, Xi; Wu, Jia-Fu; Liu, Shuai; Wu, Chuan-Sheng

    2017-10-01

    Increasing trends of atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition due to pollution and land-use changes are dramatically altering global biogeochemical cycles. Bryophytes, which are extremely vulnerable to N deposition, often play essential roles in these cycles by contributing to large nutrient pools in boreal and montane forest ecosystems. To interpret the sensitivity of epiphytic bryophytes for N deposition and to determine their critical load (CL) in a subtropical montane cloud forest, community-level, physiological and chemical responses of epiphytic bryophytes were tested in a 2-year field experiment of N additions. The results showed a significant decrease in the cover of the bryophyte communities at an N addition level of 7.4 kg ha(-1) yr(-1), which is consistent with declines in the biomass production, vitality, and net photosynthetic rate responses of two dominant bryophyte species. Given the background N deposition rate of 10.5 kg ha(-1)yr(-1) for the study site, a CL of N deposition is therefore estimated as ca. 18 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1). A disordered cellular carbon (C) metabolism, including photosynthesis inhibition and ensuing chlorophyll degradation, due to the leakage of magnesium and potassium and corresponding downstream effects, along with direct toxic effects of excessive N additions is suggested as the main mechanism driving the decline of epiphytic bryophytes. Our results confirmed the process of C metabolism and the chemical stability of epiphytic bryophytes are strongly influenced by N addition levels; when coupled to the strong correlations found with the loss of bryophytes, this study provides important and timely evidence on the response mechanisms of bryophytes in an increasingly N-polluted world. In addition, this study underlines a general decline in community heterogeneity and biomass production of epiphytic bryophytes induced by increasing N deposition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Similar Local and Landscape Processes Affect Both a Common and a Rare Newt Species

    PubMed Central

    Denoël, Mathieu; Perez, Amélie; Cornet, Yves; Ficetola, Gentile Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Although rare species are often the focus of conservation measures, more common species may experience similar decline and suffer from the same threatening processes. We tested this hypothesis by examining, through an information-theoretic approach, the importance of ecological processes at multiple scales in the great crested newt Triturus cristatus, regionally endangered and protected in Europe, and the more common smooth newt, Lissotriton vulgaris. Both species were similarly affected by the same processes, i.e. suitability of aquatic and terrestrial components of their habitat at different scales, connectivity among breeding sites, and the presence of introduced fish. T. cristatus depended more on water depth and aquatic vegetation than L. vulgaris. The results show that environmental pressures threaten both common and rare species, and therefore the more widespread species should not be neglected in conservation programs. Because environmental trends are leading to a deterioration of aquatic and terrestrial habitat features required by newt populations, populations of the common species may follow the fate of the rarest species. This could have substantial conservation implications because of the numerical importance of common species in ecosystems and because commonness could be a transient state moving towards rarity. On the other hand, in agreement with the umbrella species concept, targeting conservation efforts on the most demanding species would also protect part of the populations of the most common species. PMID:23658765

  10. High migration rates shape the postglacial history of amphi-Atlantic bryophytes.

    PubMed

    Désamoré, Aurélie; Patiño, Jairo; Mardulyn, Patrick; Mcdaniel, Stuart F; Zanatta, Florian; Laenen, Benjamin; Vanderpoorten, Alain

    2016-11-01

    Paleontological evidence and current patterns of angiosperm species richness suggest that European biota experienced more severe bottlenecks than North American ones during the last glacial maximum. How well this pattern fits other plant species is less clear. Bryophytes offer a unique opportunity to contrast the impact of the last glacial maximum in North America and Europe because about 60% of the European bryoflora is shared with North America. Here, we use population genetic analyses based on approximate Bayesian computation on eight amphi-Atlantic species to test the hypothesis that North American populations were less impacted by the last glacial maximum, exhibiting higher levels of genetic diversity than European ones and ultimately serving as a refugium for the postglacial recolonization of Europe. In contrast with this hypothesis, the best-fit demographic model involved similar patterns of population size contractions, comparable levels of genetic diversity and balanced migration rates between European and North American populations. Our results thus suggest that bryophytes have experienced comparable demographic glacial histories on both sides of the Atlantic. Although a weak, but significant genetic structure was systematically recovered between European and North American populations, evidence for migration from and towards both continents suggests that amphi-Atlantic bryophyte population may function as a metapopulation network. Reconstructing the biogeographic history of either North American or European bryophyte populations therefore requires a large, trans-Atlantic geographic framework.

  11. Advances in the reintroduction of rare and endangered wild plant species.

    PubMed

    Ren, Hai; Jian, ShuGuang; Liu, HongXiao; Zhang, QianMei; Lu, HongFang

    2014-06-01

    Human disturbance and climate change have increased the risk of extinction for rare and endangered wild plant species. One effective way to conserve these rare and endangered species is through reintroduction. In this review, we summarize the advances in wild plant reintroduction from five perspectives: the establishment of reintroduction biology as an important tool for biodiversity conservation; the importance of genetic diversity in reintroduction; reintroduction under global climate change; recruitment limitation in reintroduction; and reintroduction and ecological restoration. In addition, we consider the future of plant reintroduction strategies.

  12. Soil Cations Influence Bryophyte Susceptibility to Bisulfite

    PubMed Central

    BHARALI, BHAGAWAN; BATES, JEFFREY W.

    2002-01-01

    The hypothesis that metal ions absorbed by bryophytes from the underlying soil may ameliorate adverse effects of SO2 was investigated in the terricolous moss species Pleurozium schreberi (Brid.) Mitt. and Rhytidiadelphus triquetrus (Hedw.) Warnst. Dilute sodium bisulfite solutions (equivalent to dissolved SO2) were applied to shoots isolated from soil or in contact with artificial substrata. Marked inhibition of net photosynthesis was observed within 2 h of treatment with 0·3 mm bisulfite in both mosses. Progressive recovery of net photosynthesis occurred 2–8 h after bisulfite treatment, although the extent of this depended on the concentration and pH of the solution. When R. triquetrus and P. schreberi were grown on artificial substrata (calcareous, acid‐mineral or acid‐organic) with weekly bisulfite applications, the only significant effect was poorer growth of P. schreberi receiving bisulfite on the calcareous and acid‐organic substrata. In both species, growth on the calcareous substratum led to increased concentrations of exchangeable Ca2+, whereas exchangeable Fe3+ concentrations increased following growth on the acid‐mineral soil. In another experiment the two mosses were pre‐treated with either Ca2+ or Fe3+ before incubation with bisulfite. In P. schreberi, the depression of net photosynthetic rate caused by bisulfite was ameliorated from 33 to 64 % of the control by pre‐treatment with Fe3+, but it was unaffected by Ca2+ pre‐treatment. In R. triquetrus, the amelioration caused by Fe3+ pre‐treatment was from 16 to 60 % of the control, but pre‐treatment with Ca2+ gave a greater amelioration, to 75 % of the control value. The responses are discussed in terms of soil preferences of the mosses and possible underlying bisulfite amelioration mechanisms. PMID:12234145

  13. Diversity and cold adaptation of culturable endophytic fungi from bryophytes in the Fildes Region, King George Island, maritime Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tao; Zhang, Yu-Qin; Liu, Hong-Yu; Wei, Yu-Zhen; Li, Hai-Long; Su, Jing; Zhao, Li-Xun; Yu, Li-Yan

    2013-04-01

    Endophytic fungi associated with three bryophyte species in the Fildes Region, King George Island, maritime Antarctica, that is, the liverwort Barbilophozia hatcheri, the mosses Chorisodontium aciphyllum and Sanionia uncinata, were studied by culture-dependent method. A total of 128 endophytic fungi were isolated from 1329 tissue segments of 14 samples. The colonization rate of endophytic fungi in three bryophytes species were 12.3%, 12.1%, and 8.7%, respectively. These isolates were identified to 21 taxa, with 15 Ascomycota, 5 Basidiomycota, and 1 unidentified fungus, based on morphological characteristics and sequence analyses of ITS region and D1/D2 domain. The dominant fungal endophyte was Hyaloscyphaceae sp. in B. hatcheri, Rhizoscyphus sp. in C. aciphyllum, and one unidentified fungus in S. uncinata; and their relative frequencies were 33.3%, 32.1%, and 80.0%, respectively. Furthermore, different Shannon-Weiner diversity indices (0.91-1.99) for endophytic fungi and low endophytic fungal composition similarities (0.19-0.40) were found in three bryophyte species. Growth temperature tests indicated that 21 taxa belong to psychrophiles (9), psychrotrophs (11), and mesophile (1). The results herein demonstrate that the Antarctic bryophytes are an interesting source of fungal endophytes and the endophytic fungal composition is different among the bryophyte species, and suggest that these fungal endophytes are adapted to cold stress in Antarctica.

  14. Estimating global nitrous oxide emissions by lichens and bryophytes with a process-based productivity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porada, Philipp; Pöschl, Ulrich; Kleidon, Axel; Beer, Christian; Weber, Bettina

    2017-04-01

    Lichens and bryophytes have been shown to release significant amounts of nitrous oxide (N2O), which is a strong greenhouse gas and atmospheric ozone - depleting agent. Relative contributions of lichens and bryophytes to nitrous oxide emissions are largest in dryland and tundra regions, with potential implications for the nitrogen balance of these ecosystems. So far, this estimate is based on large-scale values of net primary productivity of lichens and bryophytes, which are derived from empirical upscaling of field measurements. Productivity is then converted to nitrous oxide emissions by empirical relationships between productivity and respiration, as well as respiration and nitrous oxide release. Alternatively, we quantify nitrous oxide emissions using a global process-based non-vascular vegetation model of lichens and bryophytes. The model simulates photosynthesis and respiration of lichens and bryophytes directly as a function of climatic conditions, such as light and temperature. Nitrous oxide emissions are then derived from simulated respiration, assuming a fixed relationship between the two fluxes, which is based on laboratory experiments under varying environmental conditions. Our approach yields a global estimate of 0.27 (0.19 - 0.35) Tg N2O yr-1 released by lichens and bryophytes. This is at the lower end of the range of a previous, empirical estimate, but corresponds to about 50 % of the atmospheric deposition of nitrous oxide into the oceans or 25 % of the atmospheric deposition on land. We conclude that, while productivity of lichens and bryophytes at large scale is relatively well constrained, improved estimates of their respiration may help to reduce uncertainty of predicted N2O emissions. This is particularly important for quantifying the spatial distribution of N2O emissions by lichens and bryophytes, since simulated respiration shows a different global pattern than productivity. We find that both physiological variation among species as well as

  15. Fungal biomass associated with the phyllosphere of bryophytes and vascular plants.

    PubMed

    Davey, M L; Nybakken, L; Kauserud, H; Ohlson, M

    2009-11-01

    Little is known about the amount of fungal biomass in the phyllosphere of bryophytes compared to higher plants. In this study, fungal biomass associated with the phyllosphere of three bryophytes (Hylocomium splendens, Pleurozium schreberi, Polytrichum commune) and three vascular plants (Avenella flexuosa, Gymnocarpium dryopteris, Vaccinium myrtillus) was investigated using ergosterol content as a proxy for fungal biomass. Phyllosphere fungi accounted for 0.2-4.0 % of the dry mass of moss gametophytes, representing the first estimation of fungal biomass associated with bryophytes. Significantly more fungal biomass was associated with the phyllosphere of bryophytes than co-occurring vascular plants. The ergosterol present in moss gametophytic tissues differed significantly between species, while the ergosterol present in vascular plant leaf tissues did not. The photosynthetic tissues of mosses had less associated fungal biomass than their senescent tissues, and the magnitude of this difference varied in a species-specific manner. The fungal biomass associated with the vascular plants studied varied significantly between localities, while that of mosses did not. The observed differences in phyllosphere community biomass suggest their size could be affected by host anatomical and physiological attributes, including micro-niche availability and chemical host defenses, in addition to abiotic factors like moisture and nutrient availability.

  16. An overview of methods for developing bioenergetic and life history models for rare and endangered species

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Petersen, J.H.; DeAngelis, D.L.; Paukert, C.P.

    2008-01-01

    Many fish species are at risk to some degree, and conservation efforts are planned or underway to preserve sensitive populations. For many imperiled species, models could serve as useful tools for researchers and managers as they seek to understand individual growth, quantify predator-prey dynamics, and identify critical sources of mortality. Development and application of models for rare species however, has been constrained by small population sizes, difficulty in obtaining sampling permits, limited opportunities for funding, and regulations on how endangered species can be used in laboratory studies. Bioenergetic and life history models should help with endangered species-recovery planning since these types of models have been used successfully in the last 25 years to address management problems for many commercially and recreationally important fish species. In this paper we discuss five approaches to developing models and parameters for rare species. Borrowing model functions and parameters from related species is simple, but uncorroborated results can be misleading. Directly estimating parameters with laboratory studies may be possible for rare species that have locally abundant populations. Monte Carlo filtering can be used to estimate several parameters by means of performing simple laboratory growth experiments to first determine test criteria. Pattern-oriented modeling (POM) is a new and developing field of research that uses field-observed patterns to build, test, and parameterize models. Models developed using the POM approach are closely linked to field data, produce testable hypotheses, and require a close working relationship between modelers and empiricists. Artificial evolution in individual-based models can be used to gain insight into adaptive behaviors for poorly understood species and thus can fill in knowledge gaps. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2008.

  17. The utility strategic surveys for rare and little-known species under the Northwest Forest Plan.

    Treesearch

    Deanna H. Olson; Kelli J. Van Norman; Robert D. Huff

    2007-01-01

    Management of over 400 rare species thought to be associated with late successional and old-growth forest conditions on U.S. federal lands within the range of the northern spotted owl (Strix occidentalis caurina) included a four-pronged "survey-and-manage" approach in 1994–2004 and 2006-2007, which included predisturbance surveys,...

  18. Species-level strategies for conserving rare or little-known species [Chapter 6

    Treesearch

    Bruce G. Marcot; Curtis H. Flather

    2007-01-01

    Conservation science is concerned, in part, with anticipating how natural or human-caused disturbance affects the pattern of commonness and rarity among the biota of a given area (Lubchenco et al. 1991; also see chap. 1). In this and the next chapter, we review various species- and system-level approaches proposed or applied to species conservation planning and...

  19. Epiphytic bryophytes growing on Laurus azorica (Seub.) Franco in three laurel forest areas in Tenerife (Canary Islands)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Mancebo, Juana M.; Romaguera, Francisco; Losada-Lima, Ana; Suárez, Andrés

    2004-05-01

    We examined bryophyte species growing on Laurus azorica, in three localities of the laurel forest in Tenerife (Canary Islands), in order to determine differences in species composition, richness and cover, that depend on variations in mist frequency and density. Among the 35 bryophyte species found (26 liverworts and nine mosses), 16 occurred in all three locations while nine species occurred in only one location. Detrended correspondence analysis and canonical correspondence analysis revealed that the epiphyte-phorophyte relationship varied in terms of cover, richness and bryophyte composition, depending on the humidity conditions (related to mist frequency and plot height) and tree age. In spite of differences in the dominant species found at each locality, the community types have many species in common and may be seen as a natural unit of the communities involved. Variation in the dominant species at each locality is mainly related to a trade off between humidity conditions and tree diameter, and the speed of the successional processes. Plot aspect was the only variable among those considered with no significant influence, which might be related to the closed canopy conditions. Variation in cover, richness and bryophyte composition related to plot height and tree diameter increased in the drier location. Cover was positively related to species richness in all analyses. This is related to low diversity during initial colonization and the fact that the highest biomass species, related to later successional stages, also occur on younger trees, especially in the more humid areas.

  20. Impacts of invasive nonnative plant species on the rare forest herb Scutellaria montana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikkema, Jordan J.; Boyd, Jennifer N.

    2015-11-01

    Invasive plant species and overabundant herbivore populations have the potential to significantly impact rare plant species given their increased risk for local extirpation and extinction. We used interacting invasive species removal and grazer exclusion treatments replicated across two locations in an occurrence of rare Scutellaria montana (large-flowered skullcap) in Chattanooga, Tennessee, USA, to assess: 1) competition by invasive Ligustrum sinense (Chinese privet) and Lonicera japonica (Japanese honeysuckle) and 2) the role of invasive species in mediating Oedocoilus virginianus (white-tailed deer) grazing of S. montana. Contrary to our hypothesis that invasive species presence would suppress S. montana directly via competition, S. montana individuals experienced a seasonal increase in stem height when invasive species were intact but not when invasive species were removed. Marginally significant results indicated that invasive species may afford S. montana protection from grazers, and we suggest that invasive species also could protect S. montana from smaller herbivores and/or positively influence abiotic conditions. In contrast to growth responses, S. montana individuals protected from O. virginianus exhibited a decrease in flowering between seasons relative to unprotected plants, but invasive species did not affect this variable. Although it has been suggested that invasive plant species may negatively influence S. montana growth and fecundity, our findings do not support related concerns. As such, we suggest that invasive species eradication efforts in S. montana habitat could be more detrimental than positive due to associated disturbance. However, the low level of invasion of our study site may not be representative of potential interference in more heavily infested habitat.

  1. Inferring national and regional declines of rare orchid species with probabilistic models.

    PubMed

    Duffy, Karl J; Kingston, Naomi E; Sayers, Brendan A; Roberts, David L; Stout, Jane C

    2009-02-01

    Fragmentation of natural habitats can increase numbers of rare species. Conservation of rare species requires experts and resources, which may be lacking for many species. In the absence of regular surveys and expert knowledge, historical sighting records can provide data on the distribution of a species. Numerous models have been developed recently to make inferences regarding the threat status of a taxon on the basis of variation in trends of sightings over time. We applied 5 such models to national and regional (county) data on 3 red-listed orchid species (Cephalanthera longifolia, Hammarbya paludosa, and Pseudorchis albida) and 1 species that has recently come to the attention of conservation authorities (Neotinea maculata) in the Republic of Ireland. In addition, we used an optimal linear estimate to calculate the time of extinction for each species overall and within each county. To account for bias in recording effort over time, we used rarefaction analysis. On the basis of sighting records, we inferred that these species are not threatened with extinction and, although there have been declines, there is no clear geographical pattern of decline in any species. Most counties where these orchid species occurred had a low number of sightings; hence, we were cautious in our interpretation of output from statistical models. We suggest the main drivers of decline in these species in Ireland are modification of habitats for increased agricultural production and lack of appropriate management. Our results show that the application of probabilistic models can be used even when sighting data are scarce, provided multiple models are used simultaneously and rarefaction is used to account for bias in recording effort among species over time. These models could be used frequently when making an initial conservation assessment of species in a region, particularly if there is a relatively constant recording rate and some knowledge of the underlying recording process

  2. Response of epiphytic bryophytes to simulated N deposition in a subtropical montane cloud forest in southwestern China.

    PubMed

    Song, Liang; Liu, Wen-Yao; Ma, Wen-Zhang; Qi, Jin-Hua

    2012-11-01

    A field manipulation experiment was conducted in a subtropical montane cloud forest in southwestern China to determine the possible responses of epiphytic bryophytes to increasing nitrogen (N) deposition from community to physiology level, and to find sensitive epiphytic bryophytes that may be used as indicators for assessing the degree of N pollution. N addition had significantly negative effects on species richness and cover of the epiphytic bryophyte community. Harmful effects of high N loads were recorded for chlorophyll, growth, and vitality of the species tested. The decline of some epiphytic bryophytes may result from detrimental effects on degradation to photosynthetic pigments. Bazzania himalayana (Mitt.) Schiffn., Bazzania ovistipula (Steph.) Mizut., and Homaliodendron flabellatum (Sm.) Fleisch. are candidates in atmospheric nitrogen monitoring. Epiphytic bryophytes in the montane cloud forest are very sensitive to increasing N deposition and often difficult to recover once they have been destroyed, providing early detection of enhanced N pollution for trees or even the whole forest ecosystem. The inference that increasing N pollution may lead to loss of biodiversity is a concern to the developing economy in western China, and should alert the government to the adverse impacts caused by increased industrial pollution during the process of China's West Development.

  3. A new Ecuadorian species of the rare Neotropical caddisfly genus Amphoropsyche Holzenthal (Trichoptera, Leptoceridae)

    PubMed Central

    Holzenthal, Ralph W.; Ríos-Touma, Blanca

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A new species of the rare long-horned caddisfly genus Amphoropsyche Holzenthal is described from Ecuador, bringing the number of species known from the genus to 15. All species are very regional in their distributions and known only from very few specimens. The new species, Amphoropsyche real, is similar to a number of previously described species from Colombia (Amphoropsyche ayura, Amphoropsyche cauca, Amphoropsyche flinti, Amphoropsyche quebrada, and Amphoropsyche stellata) and Ecuador (Amphoropsyche napo and Amphoropsyche tandayapa). The males can be distinguished from the others by features of segment X of the male genitalia, especially the prominent midlateral and subapicodorsal spinelike setae. An updated taxonomic key to males of the genus is provided. PMID:28138286

  4. The Relationship between Species Diversity and Genetic Structure in the Rare Picea chihuahuana Tree Species Community, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Simental-Rodríguez, Sergio Leonel; Quiñones-Pérez, Carmen Zulema; Moya, Daniel; Hernández-Tecles, Enrique; López-Sánchez, Carlos Antonio; Wehenkel, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Species diversity and genetic diversity, the most basic elements of biodiversity, have long been treated as separate topics, although populations evolve within a community context. Recent studies on community genetics and ecology have suggested that genetic diversity is not completely independent of species diversity. The Mexican Picea chihuahuana Martínez is an endemic species listed as “Endangered” on the Red List. Forty populations of Chihuahua spruce have been identified. This species is often associated with tree species of eight genera in gallery forests. This rare Picea chihuahuana tree community covers an area no more than 300 ha and has been subject of several studies involving different topics such as ecology, genetic structure and climate change. The overall aim of these studies was to obtain a dataset for developing management tools to help decision makers implement preservation and conservation strategies. However, this unique forest tree community may also represent an excellent subject for helping us to understand the interplay between ecological and evolutionary processes in determining community structure and dynamics. The AFLP technique and species composition data were used together to test the hypothesis that species diversity is related to the adaptive genetic structure of some dominant tree species (Picea chihuahuana, Pinus strobiformis, Pseudotsuga menziesii and Populus tremuloides) of the Picea chihuahuana tree community at fourteen locations. The Hill numbers were used as a diversity measure. The results revealed a significant correlation between tree species diversity and genetic structure in Populus tremuloides. Because the relationship between the two levels of diversity was found to be positive for the putative adaptive AFLP detected, genetic and species structures of the tree community were possibly simultaneously adapted to a combination of ecological or environmental factors. The present findings indicate that interactions

  5. The relationship between species diversity and genetic structure in the rare Picea chihuahuana tree species community, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Simental-Rodríguez, Sergio Leonel; Quiñones-Pérez, Carmen Zulema; Moya, Daniel; Hernández-Tecles, Enrique; López-Sánchez, Carlos Antonio; Wehenkel, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Species diversity and genetic diversity, the most basic elements of biodiversity, have long been treated as separate topics, although populations evolve within a community context. Recent studies on community genetics and ecology have suggested that genetic diversity is not completely independent of species diversity. The Mexican Picea chihuahuana Martínez is an endemic species listed as "Endangered" on the Red List. Forty populations of Chihuahua spruce have been identified. This species is often associated with tree species of eight genera in gallery forests. This rare Picea chihuahuana tree community covers an area no more than 300 ha and has been subject of several studies involving different topics such as ecology, genetic structure and climate change. The overall aim of these studies was to obtain a dataset for developing management tools to help decision makers implement preservation and conservation strategies. However, this unique forest tree community may also represent an excellent subject for helping us to understand the interplay between ecological and evolutionary processes in determining community structure and dynamics. The AFLP technique and species composition data were used together to test the hypothesis that species diversity is related to the adaptive genetic structure of some dominant tree species (Picea chihuahuana, Pinus strobiformis, Pseudotsuga menziesii and Populus tremuloides) of the Picea chihuahuana tree community at fourteen locations. The Hill numbers were used as a diversity measure. The results revealed a significant correlation between tree species diversity and genetic structure in Populus tremuloides. Because the relationship between the two levels of diversity was found to be positive for the putative adaptive AFLP detected, genetic and species structures of the tree community were possibly simultaneously adapted to a combination of ecological or environmental factors. The present findings indicate that interactions between

  6. Seasonality of reproduction of epiphytic bryophytes in flooded forests from the Caxiuanã National Forest, Eastern Amazon.

    PubMed

    Cerqueira, Gabriela R; Ilkiu-Borges, Anna Luiza; Ferreira, Leandro V

    2016-05-13

    This work aimed to recognize the reproductive biology of the epiphytic bryoflora of phorophytes of Virola surinamensis (Rol. ex. Rottb.) Warb. in várzea and igapó forests in the Caxiuanã National Forest, to answer the following question: The reproductive period of the bryophyte species is influenced by the environment due the climatic seasonality present in flooded forests, being higher the occurrence of the sexual and asexual reproduction in the rainiest months? The bryophytes were identified and analyzed for the type of reproduction, sexual system and reproductive structures. In total, 502 samples of bryophytes were analyzed, resulting in 54 species, of which 34 were fertile. The comparison of the fertility of the species in different environmental conditions (dry or rainy, and igapó or várzea forest) was assessed using the chi-square test. The fertility of the seven studied species could not be defined by a pattern, considering the forest type and the seasonality. However, two species were associated to the forest type and two further species to the seasonality, showing that, for some bryophyte species, invest in constant fertility may be favoring the maintenance of their populations in tropical forests.

  7. Hybridization is associated with changes in sexual system in the bryophyte genus Atrichum.

    PubMed

    Perley, Danielle S; Jesson, Linley K

    2015-04-01

    Over 50% of bryophytes have separate sexes, and numerous transitions have occurred between combined and separate sexes. Polyploidy and hybridization is one proximate mechanism hypothesized to cause evolutionary transitions to hermaphroditism in bryophytes because sex is expressed at the haploid stage and in nonpolyploid dioecious species males have a single V chromosome and females a U. Hermaphroditism can arise if gametophytes of allopolyploids have both U and V chromosomes. We examined the association between polyploidy and hermaphroditism in the bryophyte genus Atrichum, which has species where gametophytes can be haploid, diploid, or triploid, and some species have hermaphroditic individuals. We generated phylogenies of Atrichum from sequences of three plastid regions (rbcL, rps4, and trnL-trnF) and the second intron for the nuclear gene Leafy/Floricaula to further understand the relationships among haploid, diploid, and triploid species, and those with combined or separate sexes. The existence of multiple sequences of Leafy/Floricaula in diploid and triploid, but not haploid, individuals is consistent with independent allopolyploid origins of the diploid and triploid species. Allopolyploidy was associated with a likely gain in hermaphroditism in triploid Atrichum undulatum and possibly diploid A. altecristatum, but not in the allopolyploid A. crispulum (diploid at the gametophyte level). These results highlight a role for hybridization and polyploidy in sexual system evolution, but the presence of diploid (allopolyploid) dioecious species suggest that other factors may influence the maintenance of sexual systems after an evolutionary transition. © 2015 Botanical Society of America, Inc.

  8. [Ordination analysis on relationship between bryophyte distribution and climatic factors].

    PubMed

    Cao, T; Guo, S; Gao, C

    2000-10-01

    Based on the data of climate and bryoflora in 21 mountainous regions of China, 61 moss families, 23 genera of Dicranaceae, 17 species of genus Campylopus and 35 species of genus Dicranum were analyzed by Canonical Correspond Analysis(CCA) and Detrended Canonical Correspond Analysis (DDCA) to reveal their distribution relationships with nine climatic factors, including annual average temperature, January average temperature, July average temperature, annual average rainfall, annual average fog days, annual average frost days and annual average light hours. The similarity of geographical elements among nine mountains in China and their relationships with climatic factors were also analyzed. The methods of applying DDCA and CCA to analyze the relationships between bryophyte and climatic factors were thus introduced. The studies indicate that CCA and DCCA are applicable in florology and phytogeography.

  9. Quantification of Rare Single-Molecule Species Based on Fluorescence Lifetime.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cong; Rastogi, Ajay; Yeh, Hsin-Chih

    2017-04-11

    Single-molecule tracking combined with fluorescence lifetime analysis can be a powerful tool for direct molecular quantification in solution. However, it is not clear what molecular identification accuracy and number of single-molecule tracks are required to achieve a precise quantification of rare molecular species. Here we carry out this calculation based on experimentally obtained single-molecule lifetime data and an unbiased ratio estimator. Our results indicate that even at the molecular identification accuracy of 0.99999, 1.8 million tracks are still required in order to achieve 95% confidence level in rare species quantification with relative error less than ±5%. Our work highlights the fundamental challenges that we are facing in precise single-molecule identification and quantification without amplification.

  10. Improving inferences in population studies of rare species that are detected imperfectly

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    MacKenzie, D.I.; Nichols, J.D.; Sutton, N.; Kawanishi, K.; Bailey, L.L.

    2005-01-01

    For the vast majority of cases, it is highly unlikely that all the individuals of a population will be encountered during a study. Furthermore, it is unlikely that a constant fraction of the population is encountered over times, locations, or species to be compared. Hence, simple counts usually will not be good indices of population size. We recommend that detection probabilities (the probability of including an individual in a count) be estimated and incorporated into inference procedures. However, most techniques for estimating detection probability require moderate sample sizes, which may not be achievable when studying rare species. In order to improve the reliability of inferences from studies of rare species, we suggest two general approaches that researchers may wish to consider that incorporate the concept of imperfect detectability: (1) borrowing information about detectability or the other quantities of interest from other times, places, or species; and (2) using state variables other than abundance (e.g., species richness and occupancy). We illustrate these suggestions with examples and discuss the relative benefits and drawbacks of each approach.

  11. Altitude affects the reproductive performance in monoicous and dioicous bryophytes: examples from a Brazilian Atlantic rainforest

    PubMed Central

    Maciel-Silva, Adaíses S.; Marques Valio, Ivany F.; Rydin, Håkan

    2012-01-01

    Background and aims Short life cycles and trade-offs linked to breeding systems make bryophytes good models for the study of plant reproductive strategies. Our aim was to test if differences in sexual reproductive performance of bryophytes in tropical rainforests are driven by the breeding system of the species (monoicous or dioicous) or are mainly affected by the habitat. Methodology The reproductive performance (sexual branches, gametangia (sex organs), fertilization and sporophyte production) of 11 species was repeatedly monitored and analysed from populations at sea-level and montane sites of a Brazilian Atlantic rainforest over 15 months. Principal results Monoicous species had the highest reproductive performance, particularly for sexual branches, fertilized gametangia and sporophyte production. Species at the sea-level site produced more sexual branches and had more female-biased sex ratios of gametangia than species in the montane site. Fertilizations were more frequent at the montane site, but sporophyte frequency was similar between the two sites. Fertilization tended to occur mostly in the periods of heavy rain (October to December). Conclusions Breeding system is not the only major influence on the reproductive performance of bryophytes. We show that habitat is also an important factor determining life-history differentiation. Female-biased sex ratios and low rates of fertilization are seen to be compensated for by high production of reproductive structures at the initial phases of the reproductive cycle. PMID:22822422

  12. The Role of Explicitly Modeling Bryophytes in Simulating Carbon Exchange and Permafrost Dynamics of an Arctic Coastal Tundra at Barrow, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, F.; Thornton, P. E.; McGuire, A. D.; Oechel, W. C.; Yang, B.; Tweedie, C. E.; Rogers, A.; Norby, R. J.

    2013-12-01

    Bryophyte cover is greater than 50% in many Arctic tundra ecosystems. In regions of the Arctic where shrubs are expanding it is expected that bryophyte cover will be substantially reduced. Such a loss in cover could influence the hydrological, biogeochemical, and permafrost dynamics of Arctic tundra ecosystems. The explicit representation of bryophyte physiological and biophysical processes in large-scale ecological and land surface models is rare, and we hypothesize that the representation of bryophytes has consequences for estimates of the exchange of water, energy, and carbon by these models. This study explicitly represents the effects of bryophyte function and structure on the exchange of carbon (e.g., summer photosynthesis effects) and energy (e.g., summer insulation effects) with the atmosphere in the Community Land Model (CLM-CN). The modified model was evaluated for its ability to simulate C exchange, soil temperature, and soil moisture since the 1970s at Barrow, Alaska through comparison with data from AmeriFlux sites, USDA Soil Climate Networks observation sites at Barrow, and other sources. We also compare the outputs of the CLM-CN simulations with those of the recently developed Dynamical Organic Soil coupled Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (DOS-TEM). Overall, our evaluation indicates that bryophytes are important contributors to land-atmospheric C exchanges in Arctic tundra and that they play an important role to permafrost thermal and hydrological processes which are critical to permafrost stability. Our next step in this study is to examine the climate system effects of explicitly representing bryophyte dynamics in the land surface model. Key Words: Bryophytes, Arctic coastal tundra, Vegetation composition, Net Ecosystem Exchange, Permafrost, Land Surface Model, Terrestrial Ecosystem Model

  13. Influence of artifact removal on rare species recovery in natural complex communities using high-throughput sequencing.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Aibin; Xiong, Wei; He, Song; Macisaac, Hugh J

    2014-01-01

    Large-scale high-throughput sequencing techniques are rapidly becoming popular methods to profile complex communities and have generated deep insights into community biodiversity. However, several technical problems, especially sequencing artifacts such as nucleotide calling errors, could artificially inflate biodiversity estimates. Sequence filtering for artifact removal is a conventional method for deleting error-prone sequences from high-throughput sequencing data. As rare species represented by low-abundance sequences in datasets may be sensitive to artifact removal process, the influence of artifact removal on rare species recovery has not been well evaluated in natural complex communities. Here we employed both internal (reliable operational taxonomic units selected from communities themselves) and external (indicator species spiked into communities) references to evaluate the influence of artifact removal on rare species recovery using 454 pyrosequencing of complex plankton communities collected from both freshwater and marine habitats. Multiple analyses revealed three clear patterns: 1) rare species were eliminated during sequence filtering process at all tested filtering stringencies, 2) more rare taxa were eliminated as filtering stringencies increased, and 3) elimination of rare species intensified as biomass of a species in a community was reduced. Our results suggest that cautions be applied when processing high-throughput sequencing data, especially for rare taxa detection for conservation of species at risk and for rapid response programs targeting non-indigenous species. Establishment of both internal and external references proposed here provides a practical strategy to evaluate artifact removal process.

  14. Population biology of two rare fern species: long life and long-lasting stability.

    PubMed

    Bucharová, Anna; Münzbergová, Zuzana; Tájek, Premysl

    2010-08-01

    This study describes the population dynamics of two rare fern species and evaluates the prospects of their survival. This is the first detailed demography study of ferns using transition matrix models. The study species, Asplenium adulterinum and A. cuneifolium, are restricted to serpentine rocks and differ in ploidy level and partly in habitat requirements. Both species are of interest in nature conservation. • Single life-history traits were evaluated and transition matrix models were used to describe the dynamics of the populations. Population growth rates, elasticity values, and life-table response experiments were used to compare the dynamics between species, years, and different habitat types. Predicted population performance based on models was compared with real data on population growth. • All populations of both species are growing. Stable stage distribution based on stochastic simulation corresponds to current stage distribution. The most critical phase of the life cycle is stasis of large adult plants. Reproduction is of low importance. Extinction probability of small populations is low. Mean life span of individuals of both species is 30-50 yr. When compared with real data, the model successfully predicted population performance over 10 yr. • Populations in the study region are not endangered, and current population dynamics are stable. Differences in life-history traits between species, probability of extinction between species and habitat, and different ploidy-and, thus, probably different dispersal ability-suggest the existence of metapopulation dynamics.

  15. Predicting locations of rare aquatic species’ habitat with a combination of species-specific and assemblage-based models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKenna, James E.; Carlson, Douglas M.; Payne-Wynne, Molly L.

    2013-01-01

    Aim: Rare aquatic species are a substantial component of biodiversity, and their conservation is a major objective of many management plans. However, they are difficult to assess, and their optimal habitats are often poorly known. Methods to effectively predict the likely locations of suitable rare aquatic species habitats are needed. We combine two modelling approaches to predict occurrence and general abundance of several rare fish species. Location: Allegheny watershed of western New York State (USA) Methods: Our method used two empirical neural network modelling approaches (species specific and assemblage based) to predict stream-by-stream occurrence and general abundance of rare darters, based on broad-scale habitat conditions. Species-specific models were developed for longhead darter (Percina macrocephala), spotted darter (Etheostoma maculatum) and variegate darter (Etheostoma variatum) in the Allegheny drainage. An additional model predicted the type of rare darter-containing assemblage expected in each stream reach. Predictions from both models were then combined inclusively and exclusively and compared with additional independent data. Results Example rare darter predictions demonstrate the method's effectiveness. Models performed well (R2 ≥ 0.79), identified where suitable darter habitat was most likely to occur, and predictions matched well to those of collection sites. Additional independent data showed that the most conservative (exclusive) model slightly underestimated the distributions of these rare darters or predictions were displaced by one stream reach, suggesting that new darter habitat types were detected in the later collections. Main conclusions Broad-scale habitat variables can be used to effectively identify rare species' habitats. Combining species-specific and assemblage-based models enhances our ability to make use of the sparse data on rare species and to identify habitat units most likely and least likely to support those species

  16. Predicting habitat suitability for rare plants at local spatial scales using a species distribution model.

    PubMed

    Gogol-Prokurat, Melanie

    2011-01-01

    If species distribution models (SDMs) can rank habitat suitability at a local scale, they may be a valuable conservation planning tool for rare, patchily distributed species. This study assessed the ability of Maxent, an SDM reported to be appropriate for modeling rare species, to rank habitat suitability at a local scale for four edaphic endemic rare plants of gabbroic soils in El Dorado County, California, and examined the effects of grain size, spatial extent, and fine-grain environmental predictors on local-scale model accuracy. Models were developed using species occurrence data mapped on public lands and were evaluated using an independent data set of presence and absence locations on surrounding lands, mimicking a typical conservation-planning scenario that prioritizes potential habitat on unsurveyed lands surrounding known occurrences. Maxent produced models that were successful at discriminating between suitable and unsuitable habitat at the local scale for all four species, and predicted habitat suitability values were proportional to likelihood of occurrence or population abundance for three of four species. Unfortunately, models with the best discrimination (i.e., AUC) were not always the most useful for ranking habitat suitability. The use of independent test data showed metrics that were valuable for evaluating which variables and model choices (e.g., grain, extent) to use in guiding habitat prioritization for conservation of these species. A goodness-of-fit test was used to determine whether habitat suitability values ranked habitat suitability on a continuous scale. If they did not, a minimum acceptable error predicted area criterion was used to determine the threshold for classifying habitat as suitable or unsuitable. I found a trade-off between model extent and the use of fine-grain environmental variables: goodness of fit was improved at larger extents, and fine-grain environmental variables improved local-scale accuracy, but fine-grain variables

  17. Altitudinal changes in temperature responses of net photosynthesis and dark respiration in tropical bryophytes.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Sebastian; Zotz, Gerhard; Salazar Allen, Noris; Bader, Maaike Y

    2013-03-01

    There is a conspicuous increase of poikilohydric organisms (mosses, liverworts and macrolichens) with altitude in the tropics. This study addresses the hypothesis that the lack of bryophytes in the lowlands is due to high-temperature effects on the carbon balance. In particular, it is tested experimentally whether temperature responses of CO(2)-exchange rates would lead to higher respiratory carbon losses at night, relative to potential daily gains, in lowland compared with lower montane forests. Gas-exchange measurements were used to determine water-, light-, CO(2)- and temperature-response curves of net photosynthesis and dark respiration of 18 tropical bryophyte species from three altitudes (sea level, 500 m and 1200 m) in Panama. Optimum temperatures of net photosynthesis were closely related to mean temperatures in the habitats in which the species grew at the different altitudes. The ratio of dark respiration to net photosynthesis at mean ambient night and day temperatures did not, as expected, decrease with altitude. Water-, light- and CO(2)-responses varied between species but not systematically with altitude. Drivers other than temperature-dependent metabolic rates must be more important in explaining the altitudinal gradient in bryophyte abundance. This does not discard near-zero carbon balances as a major problem for lowland species, but the main effect of temperature probably lies in increasing evaporation rates, thus restricting the time available for photosynthetic carbon gain, rather than in increasing nightly respiration rates. Since optimum temperatures for photosynthesis were so fine tuned to habitat temperatures we analysed published temperature responses of bryophyte species worldwide and found the same pattern on the large scale as we found along the tropical mountain slope we studied.

  18. Altitudinal changes in temperature responses of net photosynthesis and dark respiration in tropical bryophytes

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Sebastian; Zotz, Gerhard; Salazar Allen, Noris; Bader, Maaike Y.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims There is a conspicuous increase of poikilohydric organisms (mosses, liverworts and macrolichens) with altitude in the tropics. This study addresses the hypothesis that the lack of bryophytes in the lowlands is due to high-temperature effects on the carbon balance. In particular, it is tested experimentally whether temperature responses of CO2-exchange rates would lead to higher respiratory carbon losses at night, relative to potential daily gains, in lowland compared with lower montane forests. Methods Gas-exchange measurements were used to determine water-, light-, CO2- and temperature-response curves of net photosynthesis and dark respiration of 18 tropical bryophyte species from three altitudes (sea level, 500 m and 1200 m) in Panama. Key Results Optimum temperatures of net photosynthesis were closely related to mean temperatures in the habitats in which the species grew at the different altitudes. The ratio of dark respiration to net photosynthesis at mean ambient night and day temperatures did not, as expected, decrease with altitude. Water-, light- and CO2-responses varied between species but not systematically with altitude. Conclusions Drivers other than temperature-dependent metabolic rates must be more important in explaining the altitudinal gradient in bryophyte abundance. This does not discard near-zero carbon balances as a major problem for lowland species, but the main effect of temperature probably lies in increasing evaporation rates, thus restricting the time available for photosynthetic carbon gain, rather than in increasing nightly respiration rates. Since optimum temperatures for photosynthesis were so fine tuned to habitat temperatures we analysed published temperature responses of bryophyte species worldwide and found the same pattern on the large scale as we found along the tropical mountain slope we studied. PMID:23258418

  19. Biobanking efforts and new advances in male fertility preservation for rare and endangered species

    PubMed Central

    Comizzoli, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Understanding and sustaining biodiversity is a multi-disciplinary science that benefits highly from the creation of organized and accessible collections of biomaterials (Genome Resource Banks). Large cryo-collections are invaluable tools for understanding, cataloging, and protecting the genetic diversity of the world's unique animals and plants. Specifically, the systematic collection and preservation of semen from rare species has been developed significantly in recent decades with some biobanks now being actively used for endangered species management and propagation (including the introduction of species such as the black-footed ferret and the giant panda). Innovations emerging from the growing field of male fertility preservation for humans, livestock species, and laboratory animals are also becoming relevant to the protection and the propagation of valuable domestic and wild species. These new approaches extend beyond the “classical” methods associated with sperm freezing to include testicular tissue preservation combined with xenografting or in vitro culture, all of which have potential for rescuing vast amounts of unused germplasm. There also are other options under development that are predicted to have a high impact within the next decade (stem cell technologies, bio-stabilization of sperm cells at ambient temperatures, and the use of genomics tools). However, biobanking efforts and new fertility preservation strategies have to expand the way beyond mammalian species, which will offer knowledge and tools to better manage species that serve as valuable biomedical models or require assistance to reverse endangerment. PMID:25966625

  20. Biobanking efforts and new advances in male fertility preservation for rare and endangered species.

    PubMed

    Comizzoli, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Understanding and sustaining biodiversity is a multi-disciplinary science that benefits highly from the creation of organized and accessible collections of biomaterials (Genome Resource Banks). Large cryo-collections are invaluable tools for understanding, cataloging, and protecting the genetic diversity of the world's unique animals and plants. Specifically, the systematic collection and preservation of semen from rare species has been developed significantly in recent decades with some biobanks now being actively used for endangered species management and propagation (including the introduction of species such as the black-footed ferret and the giant panda). Innovations emerging from the growing field of male fertility preservation for humans, livestock species, and laboratory animals are also becoming relevant to the protection and the propagation of valuable domestic and wild species. These new approaches extend beyond the "classical" methods associated with sperm freezing to include testicular tissue preservation combined with xenografting or in vitro culture, all of which have potential for rescuing vast amounts of unused germplasm. There also are other options under development that are predicted to have a high impact within the next decade (stem cell technologies, bio-stabilization of sperm cells at ambient temperatures, and the use of genomics tools). However, biobanking efforts and new fertility preservation strategies have to expand the way beyond mammalian species, which will offer knowledge and tools to better manage species that serve as valuable biomedical models or require assistance to reverse endangerment.

  1. Recent advances and prospects in germplasm preservation of rare and endangered species.

    PubMed

    Comizzoli, Pierre; Holt, William V

    2014-01-01

    Fertility preservation strategies using cryopreservation have enormous potential for helping sustain and protect rare and endangered species, especially to assist managing or 'rescuing' the genomes of genetically valuable individuals. However, wide-scale applications are still limited by significant physiological variations among species and a sheer lack of fundamental knowledge about basic reproductive traits as well as in germplasm cryobiology. Cryo-studies have been conducted in more species (mainly vertebrates) in the recent years but a vast majority still remains un-studied. Semen cryopreservation represents the most extensive effort with live births reported in more and more species after artificial insemination. Oocyte freezing remains challenging and unsuccessful in wild species and will require more research before becoming a standard procedure. As an alternative to fully grown gametes, gonadal tissue preservation has become a promising option in vertebrates. Yet, more fertility preservation options are necessary to save species so a change in strategy might be required. It is worthwhile thinking beyond systematic characterizations and considering the application of cutting edge approaches to universally preserve the fertility of a vast array of species.

  2. Description of a new species and redescriptions of two rare species of Parapercis (Perciformes: Pinguipedidae) from the tropical Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    Ho, Hsuan-Ching

    2015-08-10

    Parapercis johnsoni sp. nov. is described based on 19 specimens from Marquesas Islands, French Polynesia. It differs from congeners in having a combination of the following characters: dorsal-fin rays V, 21; anal-fin rays I, 17; pectoral-fin rays modally 17; pored lateral-line scales modally 52 or 53; predorsal scales 7 or 8; transverse scale rows 3.5 or 4 + 14 or 15; total gill rakers on 1st gill arch 13-16; single row of teeth on vomer; 6 large canines at front of lower jaw; and a distinct coloration. Two rare species, P. flavescens Fourmanoir & Rivaton, 1979 and P. fuscolineata Fourmanoir, 1985, are redescribed based on the types and newly identified specimens. Comments on other species occurring in the area are provided.

  3. Bryophyte Evapotranspiration in a Boreal Forest Chronosequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bond-Lamberty, B.; Ewers, B.; Angstmann, J.; Gower, S.

    2008-12-01

    Forest water fluxes, in particular evapotranspiration (ET), are less well constrained than are carbon fluxes, and the effect of changing stand age on forest ET is not well understood. We combined field and lab measurements to estimate the bryophyte contribution to ET in a black spruce-dominated boreal chronosequence in Manitoba, Canada. Site ages were 17, 42, 76 and 156 years, and each site contained separate well- and poorly-drained stands (bogs). Field plots (N=4) were surveyed for moss diversity and microtopography; meteorological variables were recorded continuously. Field measurements were made 3-4 times during the growing season using a custom chamber attached to a LI-COR 6400. In addition, large tubs of moss were incubated in a controlled-environment chamber and water loss rates measured via weighing; these tubs were also measured using the same protocol as performed in the field. In the lab, fully-saturated feathermoss and Sphagnum lost water at rates as high as 1.5 and 4.5 mm day-1, respectively, at 25 °C. Over the entire year, modeled bryophyte ET ranged from 0.2-0.3 and 0.2-0.5 mm day-1 in the well- and poorly-drained stands, respectively. During the growing season, these rates were 0.7-0.8 and 0.6- 1.4 mm day-1. Ignoring bog microtopography would have resulted in underestimation of fluxes by ~10%. There was no clear trend of moss ET flux with stand age, except at the very youngest stands, where bryophyte spatial coverage was low. Our results emphasize the important contribution that bryophytes make to the ET flux of boreal forests.

  4. An integrative approach to delimiting species in a rare but widespread mycoheterotrophic orchid.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Craig F; Freudenstein, John V

    2011-07-01

    In the spirit of recent calls for species delimitation studies to become more pluralistic, incorporating multiple sources of evidence, we adopted an integrative, phylogeographic approach to delimiting species and evolutionarily significant units (ESUs) in the Corallorhiza striata species complex. This rare, North American, mycoheterotrophic orchid has been a taxonomic challenge regarding species boundaries, displaying complex patterns of variation and reduced vegetative morphology. We employed plastid DNA, nuclear DNA and morphometrics, treating the C. striata complex as a case study for integrative species delimitation. We found evidence for the differentiation of the endangered C. bentleyi (eastern USA) + C. striata var. involuta (Mexico) from the remaining C. striata (= C. striata s.s.; USA, Canada, Mexico). Corallorhiza striata involuta and C. bentleyi, disjunct by thousands of kilometres (Mexico-Appalachia), were genetically identical but morphologically distinct. Evidence suggests the C. striata complex represents three species: C. bentleyi, C. involuta and a widespread C. striata s.s under operational criteria of diagnosability and common allele pools. In contrast, Bayesian coalescent estimation delimited four species, but more informative loci and a resultant species tree will be needed to place higher confidence in future analyses. Three distinct groupings were identified within C. striata s.s., corresponding to C. striata striata, C. striata vreelandii, and Californian accessions, but these were not delimited as species because of occupying a common allele pool. Each comprises an ESU, warranting conservation considerations. This study represents perhaps the most geographically comprehensive example of integrative species delimitation for any orchid and any mycoheterotroph.

  5. Diaspore bank of bryophytes in tropical rain forests: the importance of breeding system, phylum and microhabitat.

    PubMed

    Maciel-Silva, Adaíses S; Válio, Ivany Ferraz Marques; Rydin, Håkan

    2012-02-01

    Diaspore banks are crucial for the maintenance and resilience of plant communities, but diaspore banks of bryophytes remain poorly known, especially from tropical ecosystems. This is the first study to focus on the role of diaspore banks of bryophytes in tropical rain forests. Our aim was to test whether microhabitat (substrate type) and species traits (breeding system, phylum) are important in explaining the diaspore bank composition. Using samples cultivated in the laboratory, we assessed the number of species and shoots emerging from bark, decaying wood and soil from two sites of the Atlantic rain forest (montane and sea level) in Brazil by comparing the contribution of species by phylum (mosses, liverworts) and breeding system (monoicous, dioicous). More species emerged from bark (68) and decaying wood (55) than from soil (22). Similar numbers of species were found at both sites. Mosses were more numerous in terms of number of species and shoots, and monoicous species dominated over dioicous species. Substrate pH had only weak effects on shoot emergence. Species commonly producing sporophytes and gemmae had a high contribution to the diaspore banks. These superficial diaspore banks represented the extant vegetation rather well, but held more monoicous species (probably short-lived species) compared to dioicous ones. We propose that diaspore bank dynamics are driven by species traits and microhabitat characteristics, and that short-term diaspore banks of bryophytes in tropical rain forests contribute to fast (re)establishment of species after disturbances and during succession, particularly dioicous mosses investing in asexual reproduction and monoicous mosses investing in sexual reproduction.

  6. Microhabitat and Environmental Relationships of Bryophytes in Blue Oak (Quercus douglasii H. & A.) Woodlands and Forests of Central Coastal California

    Treesearch

    Mark Borchert; Daniel Norris

    1991-01-01

    Microhabitat preferences and species-environment patterns were quantified for bryophytes in blue oak woodlands and forests of central coastal California. Presence data for mosses collected from 149 400 m2 plots were analyzed using canonical correspondence analysis (CCA), a multivariate direct gradient analysis technique. Separate ordinations were performed for...

  7. The Point Count Transect Method for Estimates of Biodiversity on Coral Reefs: Improving the Sampling of Rare Species.

    PubMed

    Roberts, T Edward; Bridge, Thomas C; Caley, M Julian; Baird, Andrew H

    2016-01-01

    Understanding patterns in species richness and diversity over environmental gradients (such as altitude and depth) is an enduring component of ecology. As most biological communities feature few common and many rare species, quantifying the presence and abundance of rare species is a crucial requirement for analysis of these patterns. Coral reefs present specific challenges for data collection, with limitations on time and site accessibility making efficiency crucial. Many commonly used methods, such as line intercept transects (LIT), are poorly suited to questions requiring the detection of rare events or species. Here, an alternative method for surveying reef-building corals is presented; the point count transect (PCT). The PCT consists of a count of coral colonies at a series of sample stations, located at regular intervals along a transect. In contrast the LIT records the proportion of each species occurring under a transect tape of a given length. The same site was surveyed using PCT and LIT to compare species richness estimates between the methods. The total number of species increased faster per individual sampled and unit of time invested using PCT. Furthermore, 41 of the 44 additional species recorded by the PCT occurred ≤ 3 times, demonstrating the increased capacity of PCT to detect rare species. PCT provides a more accurate estimate of local-scale species richness than the LIT, and is an efficient alternative method for surveying reef corals to address questions associated with alpha-diversity, and rare or incidental events.

  8. Primary Cell Wall Composition of Bryophytes and Charophytes

    PubMed Central

    POPPER, ZOË A.; FRY, STEPHEN C.

    2003-01-01

    Major differences in primary cell wall (PCW) components between non‐vascular plant taxa are reported. (1) Xyloglucan: driselase digestion yielded isoprimeverose (the diagnostic repeat unit of xyloglucan) from PCW‐rich material of Anthoceros (a hornwort), mosses and both leafy and thalloid liverworts, as well as numerous vascular plants, showing xyloglucan to be a PCW component in all land plants tested. In contrast, charophycean green algae (Klebsormidium flaccidium, Coleochaete scutata and Chara corallina), thought to be closely related to land plants, did not contain xyloglucan. They did not yield isoprimeverose; additionally, charophyte material was not digestible with xyloglucan‐specific endoglucanase or cellulase to give xyloglucan‐derived oligosaccharides. (2) Uronic acids: acid hydrolysis of PCW‐rich material from the charophytes, the hornwort, thalloid and leafy liverworts and a basal moss yielded higher concentrations of glucuronic acid than that from the remaining land plants including the less basal mosses and all vascular plants tested. Polysaccharides of the hornwort Anthoceros contained an unusual repeat‐unit, glucuronic acid‐α(1→3)‐galactose, not found in appreciable amounts in any other plants tested. Galacturonic acid was consistently the most abundant PCW uronic acid, but was present in higher concentrations in acid hydrolysates of bryophytes and charophytes than in those of any of the vascular plants. Mannuronic acid was not detected in any of the species surveyed. (3) Mannose: acid hydrolysis of charophyte and bryophyte PCW‐rich material also yielded appreciably higher concentrations of mannose than are found in vascular plant PCWs. (4) Mixed‐linkage glucan (MLG) was absent from all algae and bryophytes tested; however, upon digestion with licheninase, PCW‐rich material from the alga Ulva lactuca and the leafy liverwort Lophocolea bidentata yielded penta‐ to decasaccharides, indicating the presence of MLG

  9. Primary cell wall composition of bryophytes and charophytes.

    PubMed

    Popper, Zoë A; Fry, Stephen C

    2003-01-01

    Major differences in primary cell wall (PCW) components between non-vascular plant taxa are reported. (1) Xyloglucan: driselase digestion yielded isoprimeverose (the diagnostic repeat unit of xyloglucan) from PCW-rich material of Anthoceros (a hornwort), mosses and both leafy and thalloid liverworts, as well as numerous vascular plants, showing xyloglucan to be a PCW component in all land plants tested. In contrast, charophycean green algae (Klebsormidium flaccidium, Coleochaete scutata and Chara corallina), thought to be closely related to land plants, did not contain xyloglucan. They did not yield isoprimeverose; additionally, charophyte material was not digestible with xyloglucan-specific endoglucanase or cellulase to give xyloglucan-derived oligosaccharides. (2) Uronic acids: acid hydrolysis of PCW-rich material from the charophytes, the hornwort, thalloid and leafy liverworts and a basal moss yielded higher concentrations of glucuronic acid than that from the remaining land plants including the less basal mosses and all vascular plants tested. Polysaccharides of the hornwort Anthoceros contained an unusual repeat-unit, glucuronic acid-alpha(1-->3)-galactose, not found in appreciable amounts in any other plants tested. Galacturonic acid was consistently the most abundant PCW uronic acid, but was present in higher concentrations in acid hydrolysates of bryophytes and charophytes than in those of any of the vascular plants. Mannuronic acid was not detected in any of the species surveyed. (3) Mannose: acid hydrolysis of charophyte and bryophyte PCW-rich material also yielded appreciably higher concentrations of mannose than are found in vascular plant PCWs. (4) Mixed-linkage glucan (MLG) was absent from all algae and bryophytes tested; however, upon digestion with licheninase, PCW-rich material from the alga Ulva lactuca and the leafy liverwort Lophocolea bidentata yielded penta- to decasaccharides, indicating the presence of MLG-related polysaccharides. Our

  10. Projections of suitable habitat for rare species under global warming scenarios.

    PubMed

    Ledig, F Thomas; Rehfeldt, Gerald E; Sáenz-Romero, Cuauhtémoc; Flores-López, Celestino

    2010-06-01

    Modeling the contemporary and future climate niche for rare plants is a major hurdle in conservation, yet such projections are necessary to prevent extinctions that may result from climate change. • We used recently developed spline climatic models and modified Random Forests statistical procedures to predict suitable habitats of three rare, endangered spruces of Mexico and a spruce of the southwestern USA. We used three general circulation models and two sets of carbon emission scenarios (optimistic and pessimistic) for future climates. • Our procedures predicted present occurrence perfectly. For the decades 2030, 2060, and 2090, the ranges of all taxa progressively decreased, to the point of transient disappearance for one species in the decade 2060 but reappearance in 2090. Contrary to intuition, habitat did not develop to the north for any of the Mexican taxa; rather, climate niches for two taxa re-materialized several hundred kilometers southward in the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt. The climate niche for a third Mexican taxon shrank drastically, and its two mitotypes responded differently, one of the first demonstrations of the importance of intraspecific genetic variation in climate niches. The climate niche of the U.S. species shrank northward and upward in elevation. • The results are important for conservation of these species and are of general significance for conservation by assisted colonization. We conclude that our procedures for producing models and projecting the climate niches of Mexican spruces provide a way for handling other rare plants, which constitute the great bulk of the world's endangered and most vulnerable flora.

  11. Divergent selection along climatic gradients in a rare central European endemic species, Saxifraga sponhemica

    PubMed Central

    Walisch, Tania J.; Colling, Guy; Bodenseh, Melanie; Matthies, Diethart

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims The effects of habitat fragmentation on quantitative genetic variation in plant populations are still poorly known. Saxifraga sponhemica is a rare endemic of Central Europe with a disjunct distribution, and a stable and specialized habitat of treeless screes and cliffs. This study therefore used S. sponhemica as a model species to compare quantitative and molecular variation in order to explore (1) the relative importance of drift and selection in shaping the distribution of quantitative genetic variation along climatic gradients; (2) the relationship between plant fitness, quantitative genetic variation, molecular genetic variation and population size; and (3) the relationship between the differentiation of a trait among populations and its evolvability. Methods Genetic variation within and among 22 populations from the whole distribution area of S. sponhemica was studied using RAPD (random amplified polymorphic DNA) markers, and climatic variables were obtained for each site. Seeds were collected from each population and germinated, and seedlings were transplanted into a common garden for determination of variation in plant traits. Key Results In contrast to previous results from rare plant species, strong evidence was found for divergent selection. Most population trait means of S. sponhemica were significantly related to climate gradients, indicating adaptation. Quantitative genetic differentiation increased with geographical distance, even when neutral molecular divergence was controlled for, and QST exceeded FST for some traits. The evolvability of traits was negatively correlated with the degree of differentiation among populations (QST), i.e. traits under strong selection showed little genetic variation within populations. The evolutionary potential of a population was not related to its size, the performance of the population or its neutral genetic diversity. However, performance in the common garden was lower for plants from

  12. First record of the rare species Aeromonas culicicola from a drinking water supply.

    PubMed

    Figueras, M J; Suarez-Franquet, A; Chacón, M R; Soler, L; Navarro, M; Alejandre, C; Grasa, B; Martínez-Murcia, A J; Guarro, J

    2005-01-01

    We describe the recovery of the rare species Aeromonas culicicola, so far known only in mosquitoes in India, from a drinking water supply in Spain. Typing, using enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus-PCR, revealed that the 27 new isolates belonged to 3 very closely related strains. These strains were genetically identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Spanish strains differed from the mosquito strains in three nucleotide positions. The AHCYTOEN gene was present in these water strains, which may have a public health significance.

  13. Gene flow among populations of two rare co-occurring fern species differing in ploidy level.

    PubMed

    Bucharová, Anna; Münzbergová, Zuzana

    2012-01-01

    Differences in ploidy levels among different fern species have a vast influence on their mating system, their colonization ability and on the gene flow among populations. Differences in the colonization abilities of species with different ploidy levels are well known: tetraploids, in contrast to diploids, are able to undergo intra-gametophytic selfing. Because fertilization is a post-dispersal process in ferns, selfing results in better colonization abilities in tetraploids because of single spore colonization. Considerably less is known about the gene flow among populations of different ploidy levels. The present study examines two rare fern species that differ in ploidy. While it has already been confirmed that tetraploid species are better at colonizing, the present study focuses on the gene flow among existing populations. We analyzed the genetic structure of a set of populations in a 10×10 km study region using isoenzymes. Genetic variation in tetraploid species is distributed mainly among populations; the genetic distance between populations is correlated with the geographical distance, and larger populations host more genetic diversity than smaller populations. In the diploid species, most variability is partitioned within populations; the genetic distance is not related to geographic distance, and the genetic diversity of populations is not related to the population size. This suggests that in tetraploid species, which undergo selfing, gene flow is limited. In contrast, in the diploid species, which experience outcrossing, gene flow is extensive and the whole system behaves as one large population. Our results suggest that in ferns, the ability to colonize new habitats and the gene flow among existing populations are affected by the mating system.

  14. Bryophytes: Hoard of remedies, an ethno-medicinal review.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Satish; Chandra, Dinesh; Barh, Anupam; Pankaj; Pandey, Raj Kumar; Sharma, Ishwar Prakash

    2017-01-01

    Bryophytes are the second largest group of land plants after angiosperms. There is very less knowledge available about medicinal properties of these plants. Bryophytes are popular remedy among the tribal people of different parts of the world. Tribal people use these plants to cure various ailments in their daily lives. Bryophytes are used to cure hepatic disorders, skin diseases, cardiovascular diseases, used as antipyretic, antimicrobial, wound healing and many more other ailments by different tribal communities of Africa, America, Europe, Poland, Argentina, Australia, New Zealand, Turkey, Japan, Taiwan, Pakistan, China, Nepal and different parts of South, North and Eastern India. Apart from ethno-medicinal uses some bryophytes possesses antitumor activities against different cancer cell lines and this property of bryophytes needs to be more focused in the future. Compile information about medicinal properties and anticancer properties of bryophytes is lacking till date. In the present review, the authors tried to compile all the ethno-medicinal and other related information of bryophytes and fill the knowledge lacuna in this particular field. Some published reviews are available but the information is segregated. This manuscript will help people doing research in the bryophytes.

  15. Development of microsatellite markers using pyrosequencing in Galium trifidum (Rubiaceae), a rare species in Central Europe.

    PubMed

    Szczecińska, Monika; Kwaśniewski, Mirosław; Sawicki, Jakub; Chwiałkowska, Karolina; Szandar, Kamil; Pisarek, Włodzimierz

    2012-01-01

    We identify a large number of microsatellites from Galium trfidum, a plant species considered rare and endangered in Central and Western Europe. Using a combination of a total enriched genomic library and small-scale 454 pyrosequencing, we determined 9755 contigs with a length of 100 to 6192 bp. Within this dataset, we identified 153 SSR motifs in 144 contigs. Here, we tested 14 microsatellite loci in 2 populations of G. trifidum. The number of alleles and expected heterozygosity were 1-8 (mean 3.2) and 0.00-0.876 (0.549 on average), respectively. The markers described in this study will be useful for evaluating genetic diversity within and between populations, and gene flow between G. trifidum populations. These markers could also be applied to investigate the biological aspects of G. trifidum, such as the population dynamics and clonal structure, and to develop effective conservation programs for the Central European populations of this species.

  16. Development of Microsatellite Markers Using Pyrosequencing in Galium trifidum (Rubiaceae), a Rare Species in Central Europe

    PubMed Central

    Szczecińska, Monika; Kwaśniewski, Mirosław; Sawicki, Jakub; Chwiałkowska, Karolina; Szandar, Kamil; Pisarek, Włodzimierz

    2012-01-01

    We identify a large number of microsatellites from Galium trfidum, a plant species considered rare and endangered in Central and Western Europe. Using a combination of a total enriched genomic library and small-scale 454 pyrosequencing, we determined 9755 contigs with a length of 100 to 6192 bp. Within this dataset, we identified 153 SSR motifs in 144 contigs. Here, we tested 14 microsatellite loci in 2 populations of G. trifidum. The number of alleles and expected heterozygosity were 1–8 (mean 3.2) and 0.00–0.876 (0.549 on average), respectively. The markers described in this study will be useful for evaluating genetic diversity within and between populations, and gene flow between G. trifidum populations. These markers could also be applied to investigate the biological aspects of G. trifidum, such as the population dynamics and clonal structure, and to develop effective conservation programs for the Central European populations of this species. PMID:22949837

  17. High levels of genetic diversity and population structure in an endemic and rare species: implications for conservation

    PubMed Central

    Turchetto, Caroline; Segatto, Ana Lúcia A.; Mäder, Geraldo; Rodrigues, Daniele M.; Bonatto, Sandro L.; Freitas, Loreta B.

    2016-01-01

    The analysis of genetic structure and variability of isolated species is of critical importance in evaluating whether stochastic or human-caused factors are affecting rare species. Low genetic diversity compromises the ability of populations to evolve and reduces their chances of survival under environmental changes. Petunia secreta, a rare and endemic species, is an annual and heliophilous herb that is bee-pollinated and easily recognizable by its purple and salverform corolla. It was described as a new species of the Petunia genus in 2005. Few individuals of P. secreta have been observed in nature and little is known about this species. All the natural populations of P. secreta that were found were studied using 15 microsatellite loci, two intergenic plastid sequences and morphological traits. Statistical analysis was performed to describe the genetic diversity of this rare species and the results compared with those of more widespread and frequent Petunia species from the same geographic area to understand whether factors associated with population size could affect rare species of this genus. The results showed that despite its rarity, P. secreta presented high genetic diversity that was equivalent to or even higher than that of widespread Petunia species. It was shown that this species is divided into two evolutionary lineages, and the genetic differentiation indices between them and other congeneric species presented different patterns. The major risk to P. secreta maintenance is its rarity, suggesting the necessity of a preservation programme and more biological and evolutionary studies that handle the two evolutionary lineages independently. PMID:26768602

  18. Modeling Spatial Distribution of a Rare and Endangered Plant Species (Brainea insignis) in Central Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W.-C.; Lo, N.-J.; Chang, W.-I.; Huang, K.-Y.

    2012-07-01

    With an increase in the rate of species extinction, we should choose right methods that are sustainable on the basis of appropriate science and human needs to conserve ecosystems and rare species. Species distribution modeling (SDM) uses 3S technology and statistics and becomes increasingly important in ecology. Brainea insignis (cycad-fern, CF) has been categorized a rare, endangered plant species, and thus was chosen as a target for the study. Five sampling schemes were created with different combinations of CF samples collected from three sites in Huisun forest station and one site, 10 km farther north from Huisun. Four models, MAXENT, GARP, generalized linear models (GLM), and discriminant analysis (DA), were developed based on topographic variables, and were evaluated by five sampling schemes. The accuracy of MAXENT was the highest, followed by GLM and GARP, and DA was the lowest. More importantly, they can identify the potential habitat less than 10% of the study area in the first round of SDM, thereby prioritizing either the field-survey area where microclimatic, edaphic or biotic data can be collected for refining predictions of potential habitat in the later rounds of SDM or search areas for new population discovery. However, it was shown unlikely to extend spatial patterns of CFs from one area to another with a big separation or to a larger area by predictive models merely based on topographic variables. Follow-up studies will attempt to incorporate proxy indicators that can be extracted from hyperspectral images or LIDAR DEM and substitute for direct parameters to make predictive models applicable on a broader scale.

  19. Effects of bryophytes on succession from alkaline marsh to Sphagnum bog

    SciTech Connect

    Glime, J.M.; Wetzel, R.G.; Kennedy, B.J.

    1982-10-01

    The alkaline eastern marsh of Lawrence Lake, a marl lake in southwestern Michigan, was sampled by randomly placed line transects to determine the bryophyte cover and corresponding vascular plant zones. Cluster analysis indicated three distinct bryophyte zones which correspond with the recognized vascular plant zones. Mosses occupied over 50% of the surface in some areas. Invasion of Sphagnum, vertical zonation of the mosses on hummocks, zonation with distance from the lake, the abundance of non-Sphagnum moss hummocks, and the ability of the non-Sphagnum species to lower the pH of marsh water during laboratory incubations are evidence that non-Sphagnum mosses facilitate succession from alkaline marsh to Sphagnum bog.

  20. Development of Novel Instrumentation to Measure All Nitrous Oxide Mono-Substituted Rare Isotopic Species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, X.; Leen, J. B.; Gupta, M.; Baer, D. S.

    2015-12-01

    Analysis of isotopic ratios is of great importance to study the sources and sinks of nitrous oxide (N2O) in atmosphere. N2O has four mono-substituted rare isotopic species - 14N15N16O, 15N14N16O, 14N218O, and 14N217O. Here we report on the development of novel instrumentation which is capable of measuring all four N2O isotopic species and therefore enables a complete characterization of abundance variations of these species. This instrument, which employs cavity enhanced absorption technology and a mid-infrared laser, has been developed for simultaneous measurements of all four isotopic species in either a continuous flow mode or a batch mode. A precision of better than 1 per mil for 14N217O has been achieved with samples of 10 ppm N2O in 300 seconds of measurement time. In addition, a precision of better than 1 per mil for 14N15N16O and 15N14N16O and 2 per mil for 14N218O has been achieved with samples of 300 ppb N2O or higher in 300 seconds of measurement time.

  1. Rare Isotopic Species of Sulfur Monoxide: The Rotational Spectrum in the THz Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lattanzi, Valerio; Cazzoli, Gabriele; Puzzarini, Cristina

    2015-11-01

    Many sulfur-bearing species have been detected in different astronomical environments and have allowed us to derive important information about the chemical and physical composition of interstellar regions. In particular, these species have also been shown to trace and probe hot-core environment time evolution. Among the most prominent sulfur-bearing molecules is SO, the sulfur monoxide radical, one of the more ubiquitous and abundant, which is also observed in its isotopic substituted species such as 34SO and S18O. Due to the importance of this simple diatomic system, and in order to face the challenge of modern radioastronomical facilities, an extension to the THz range of the rare isotopologues of sulfur monoxide has been performed. High-resolution rotational molecular spectroscopy has been employed to extend the available data set of four isotopic species, SO, 34SO, S17O, and S18O, up to the 1.5 THz region. The frequency coverage and spectral resolution of our measurements allowed a better constraint of the molecular constants of the four species considered, specifically focusing on the two oxygen-substituted isotopologues. Our measurements were also employed in an isotopically invariant fit including all of the available pure rotational and ro-vibrational transitions for all of the SO isotopologues, thus enabling accurate predictions of the rotational transitions at higher frequencies. We also provide comparisons with recent works performed on the same system, demonstrating the quality of our experiment and the improvement of the data sets for all of the species considered. Transition frequencies for this system can now be used with confidence by the astronomical community well into the THz spectral region.

  2. RARE ISOTOPIC SPECIES OF SULFUR MONOXIDE: THE ROTATIONAL SPECTRUM IN THE THz REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Lattanzi, Valerio; Cazzoli, Gabriele; Puzzarini, Cristina

    2015-11-01

    Many sulfur-bearing species have been detected in different astronomical environments and have allowed us to derive important information about the chemical and physical composition of interstellar regions. In particular, these species have also been shown to trace and probe hot-core environment time evolution. Among the most prominent sulfur-bearing molecules is SO, the sulfur monoxide radical, one of the more ubiquitous and abundant, which is also observed in its isotopic substituted species such as {sup 34}SO and S{sup 18}O. Due to the importance of this simple diatomic system, and in order to face the challenge of modern radioastronomical facilities, an extension to the THz range of the rare isotopologues of sulfur monoxide has been performed. High-resolution rotational molecular spectroscopy has been employed to extend the available data set of four isotopic species, SO, {sup 34}SO, S{sup 17}O, and S{sup 18}O, up to the 1.5 THz region. The frequency coverage and spectral resolution of our measurements allowed a better constraint of the molecular constants of the four species considered, specifically focusing on the two oxygen-substituted isotopologues. Our measurements were also employed in an isotopically invariant fit including all of the available pure rotational and ro-vibrational transitions for all of the SO isotopologues, thus enabling accurate predictions of the rotational transitions at higher frequencies. We also provide comparisons with recent works performed on the same system, demonstrating the quality of our experiment and the improvement of the data sets for all of the species considered. Transition frequencies for this system can now be used with confidence by the astronomical community well into the THz spectral region.

  3. [Effects of bryophytes in dark coniferous forest of Changbai Mountains on three conifers seed germination and seedling growth].

    PubMed

    Lin, Fei; Hao, Zhanqing; Ye, Ji; Jiang, Ping

    2006-08-01

    This paper studied the effects of Hylocomium splendens and Rhytidiadelphus triquetrus, the main bryophytes in dark coniferous forests of Changbai Mountains, on the seed germination and seedling growth of Pinus koraiensis, Picea koraiensis and Larix olgensis. The results indicated that at definite concentrations, the water extract of H. splendens inhibited Picea koraiensis seed germination, while that of R. triquetrus promoted it. Although the water extracts of the two bryophytes had no obvious effects on the seed germination of Picea koraiensis and Larix olgensis, they expedited the occurrence of the tree species' daily germination peak. The water extracts of test bryophytes inhibited the seedling growth of P. koraiensis and Picea koraiensis, but promoted that of Larix olgensis. The living shoots of the two bryophytes had no obvious effects on the seed germination of Picea koraiensis and Larix olgensis, but delayed the daily germination peak of Picea koraiensis while promoted that of Larix olgensis, andthe killed shoots inhibited the seed germination of all test tree species. Living shoots in larger amounts promoted the seedling growth of Picea koraiensis and Larix olgensis, but killed shoots were inadverse.

  4. A two-phase sampling design for increasing detections of rare species in occupancy surveys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pacifici, Krishna; Dorazio, Robert M.; Dorazio, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    1. Occupancy estimation is a commonly used tool in ecological studies owing to the ease at which data can be collected and the large spatial extent that can be covered. One major obstacle to using an occupancy-based approach is the complications associated with designing and implementing an efficient survey. These logistical challenges become magnified when working with rare species when effort can be wasted in areas with none or very few individuals. 2. Here, we develop a two-phase sampling approach that mitigates these problems by using a design that places more effort in areas with higher predicted probability of occurrence. We compare our new sampling design to traditional single-season occupancy estimation under a range of conditions and population characteristics. We develop an intuitive measure of predictive error to compare the two approaches and use simulations to assess the relative accuracy of each approach. 3. Our two-phase approach exhibited lower predictive error rates compared to the traditional single-season approach in highly spatially correlated environments. The difference was greatest when detection probability was high (0·75) regardless of the habitat or sample size. When the true occupancy rate was below 0·4 (0·05-0·4), we found that allocating 25% of the sample to the first phase resulted in the lowest error rates. 4. In the majority of scenarios, the two-phase approach showed lower error rates compared to the traditional single-season approach suggesting our new approach is fairly robust to a broad range of conditions and design factors and merits use under a wide variety of settings. 5. Synthesis and applications. Conservation and management of rare species are a challenging task facing natural resource managers. It is critical for studies involving rare species to efficiently allocate effort and resources as they are usually of a finite nature. We believe our approach provides a framework for optimal allocation of effort while

  5. Redescription of the rare species Podospongia loveni (Porifera) from the Cantabrian Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristobo, Javier; Ríos, Pilar; Sánchez, Francisco; Anadón, Nuria

    2009-05-01

    Podospongia [du Bocage, B., 1869. Eponges siliceuses nouvelles du Portugal et de l'Île Saint-Iago (Archipel de Cap-Vert). Jornal de Sciencias mathematicas, physicas e naturais 2, 159-162], which at present includes only five species, is a rare genus generally found in deeper waters down to 600 m depth from Natal coast in South Africa, to New Caledonia, the Central and North Atlantic and the Mediterranean Sea. Species of this genus are characterised by a choanosomal skeleton composed of tracts of megascleres radiating from a centrum and stipitate body. Microscleres are spinorhabds and aciculospinorhabds packed in a vertical arrangement in the ectosome and scattered throughout choanosome. As a result of two oceanographic projects (Ecomarg, date; Cocace, date) on the continental shelf of the Cantabrian Sea, ten stipitate sponge specimens were collected and assigned to Podospongia loveni [du Bocage, B., 1869. Eponges siliceuses nouvelles du Portugal et de l'Île Saint-Iago (Archipel de Cap-Vert). Jornal de Sciencias mathematicas, physicas e naturais 2, 159-162]. Since the holotype was destroyed [Kelly, M., Samaai, T., 2002. Family Podospongiidae de Laubenfels, 1936. In: Hooper, J.N.A., Soest, RW.M., (Eds.), Systema Porifera: A Guide to the Classification of Sponges, New York, pp. 694-702] and with the existence of several specimens from a close region, we hereby redescribe this species. scanning electron microscopy pictures of the spicules and skeletal architecture of P. loveni are for the first time provided.

  6. No increase in colonization rate of boreal bryophytes close to propagule sources.

    PubMed

    Hylander, Kristoffer

    2009-01-01

    Knowledge of the process of recolonization, and which temporal and spatial scale it operates on, is central to our understanding of species distributions, metapopulation dynamics, regional extinction risks, and ecosystem resilience. In this study the recolonization pattern of boreal forest bryophytes was investigated in stands that had been clear-cut approximately 50 years ago. Species known to be sensitive to clear-cutting were inventoried in 23 mature forest stands and in adjacent young stands at 10, 20, 40, and 80 m from the former forest-clear-cut edge. Based on previous studies showing that bryophytes tend to be dispersal limited at local population levels, it was hypothesized that the recolonizaton of many bryophyte species should be higher closer to the mature forest edge. It was also hypothesized that some species would show full recovery, while for others the young stands would still be inhospitable. All these patterns were found for individual species, but the main pattern was, however, quite different. Most species had started to recolonize the young stands (i.e., little or much, depending on species), but without any tendency of a higher colonization rate close to the mature stands. Possible explanations for the limited signs of positive influence of local propagule sources might be microsite limitation or that the local propagule availability displays a rapid decline from its sources and is masked by a higher regional propagule rain. For organisms with light propagules able to build up a regional background level, the role of mature forest stands in the recolonization process of the matrix may rather be to contribute to the regional background level of spores in the landscape than to affect the adjacent stands directly.

  7. Using anecdotal occurrence data for rare or elusive species: the illusion of reality and a call for evidentiary standards

    Treesearch

    Kevin S. McKelvey; Keith B. Aubry; Michael K. Schwartz

    2008-01-01

    Anecdotal occurrence data (unverifiable observations of organisms or their sign) and inconclusive physical data are often used to assess the current and historical ranges of rare or elusive species. However, the use of such data for species conservation can lead to large errors of omission and commission, which can influence the allocation of limited funds and the...

  8. Using anecdotal occurrence data for rare or elusive species: The illusion of reality and a call for evidentiary standards

    Treesearch

    Kevin S. McKelvey; Keith B. Aubry; Michael K. Schwartz

    2008-01-01

    Anecdotal occurrence data (unverifiable observations of organisms or their sign) and inconclusive physical data are often used to assess the current and historical ranges of rare or elusive species. However, the use of such data for species conservation can lead to large errors of omission and commission, which can influence the allocation of limited funds and the...

  9. Remote sensing-based predictors improve distribution models of rare, early successional and boradleaf tree species in Utah

    Treesearch

    N. E. Zimmermann; T. C. Edwards; G. G. Moisen; T. S. Frescino; J. A. Blackard

    2007-01-01

    Compared to bioclimatic variables, remote sensing predictors are rarely used for predictive species modelling. When used, the predictors represent typically habitat classifications or filters rather than gradual spectral, surface or biophysical properties. Consequently, the full potential of remotely sensed predictors for modelling the spatial distribution of species...

  10. Bryophyte-Cyanobacteria Associations during Primary Succession in Recently Deglaciated Areas of Tierra del Fuego (Chile)

    PubMed Central

    Arróniz-Crespo, María; Pérez-Ortega, Sergio; De los Ríos, Asunción; Green, T. G. Allan; Ochoa-Hueso, Raúl; Casermeiro, Miguel Ángel; de la Cruz, María Teresa; Pintado, Ana; Palacios, David; Rozzi, Ricardo; Tysklind, Niklas; Sancho, Leopoldo G.

    2014-01-01

    Bryophyte establishment represents a positive feedback process that enhances soil development in newly exposed terrain. Further, biological nitrogen (N) fixation by cyanobacteria in association with mosses can be an important supply of N to terrestrial ecosystems, however the role of these associations during post-glacial primary succession is not yet fully understood. Here, we analyzed chronosequences in front of two receding glaciers with contrasting climatic conditions (wetter vs drier) at Cordillera Darwin (Tierra del Fuego) and found that most mosses had the capacity to support an epiphytic flora of cyanobacteria and exhibited high rates of N2 fixation. Pioneer moss-cyanobacteria associations showed the highest N2 fixation rates (4.60 and 4.96 µg N g−1 bryo. d−1) very early after glacier retreat (4 and 7 years) which may help accelerate soil development under wetter conditions. In drier climate, N2 fixation on bryophyte-cyanobacteria associations was also high (0.94 and 1.42 µg N g−1 bryo. d−1) but peaked at intermediate-aged sites (26 and 66 years). N2 fixation capacity on bryophytes was primarily driven by epiphytic cyanobacteria abundance rather than community composition. Most liverworts showed low colonization and N2 fixation rates, and mosses did not exhibit consistent differences across life forms and habitat (saxicolous vs terricolous). We also found a clear relationship between cyanobacteria genera and the stages of ecological succession, but no relationship was found with host species identity. Glacier forelands in Tierra del Fuego show fast rates of soil transformation which imply large quantities of N inputs. Our results highlight the potential contribution of bryophyte-cyanobacteria associations to N accumulation during post-glacial primary succession and further describe the factors that drive N2-fixation rates in post-glacial areas with very low N deposition. PMID:24819926

  11. Bryophyte-cyanobacteria associations during primary succession in recently Deglaciated areas of Tierra del Fuego (Chile).

    PubMed

    Arróniz-Crespo, María; Pérez-Ortega, Sergio; De Los Ríos, Asunción; Green, T G Allan; Ochoa-Hueso, Raúl; Casermeiro, Miguel Ángel; de la Cruz, María Teresa; Pintado, Ana; Palacios, David; Rozzi, Ricardo; Tysklind, Niklas; Sancho, Leopoldo G

    2014-01-01

    Bryophyte establishment represents a positive feedback process that enhances soil development in newly exposed terrain. Further, biological nitrogen (N) fixation by cyanobacteria in association with mosses can be an important supply of N to terrestrial ecosystems, however the role of these associations during post-glacial primary succession is not yet fully understood. Here, we analyzed chronosequences in front of two receding glaciers with contrasting climatic conditions (wetter vs drier) at Cordillera Darwin (Tierra del Fuego) and found that most mosses had the capacity to support an epiphytic flora of cyanobacteria and exhibited high rates of N2 fixation. Pioneer moss-cyanobacteria associations showed the highest N2 fixation rates (4.60 and 4.96 µg N g-1 bryo. d-1) very early after glacier retreat (4 and 7 years) which may help accelerate soil development under wetter conditions. In drier climate, N2 fixation on bryophyte-cyanobacteria associations was also high (0.94 and 1.42 µg N g-1 bryo. d-1) but peaked at intermediate-aged sites (26 and 66 years). N2 fixation capacity on bryophytes was primarily driven by epiphytic cyanobacteria abundance rather than community composition. Most liverworts showed low colonization and N2 fixation rates, and mosses did not exhibit consistent differences across life forms and habitat (saxicolous vs terricolous). We also found a clear relationship between cyanobacteria genera and the stages of ecological succession, but no relationship was found with host species identity. Glacier forelands in Tierra del Fuego show fast rates of soil transformation which imply large quantities of N inputs. Our results highlight the potential contribution of bryophyte-cyanobacteria associations to N accumulation during post-glacial primary succession and further describe the factors that drive N2-fixation rates in post-glacial areas with very low N deposition.

  12. Robust Detection of Rare Species Using Environmental DNA: The Importance of Primer Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Wilcox, Taylor M.; McKelvey, Kevin S.; Young, Michael K.; Jane, Stephen F.; Lowe, Winsor H.; Whiteley, Andrew R.; Schwartz, Michael K.

    2013-01-01

    Environmental DNA (eDNA) is being rapidly adopted as a tool to detect rare animals. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) using probe-based chemistries may represent a particularly powerful tool because of the method’s sensitivity, specificity, and potential to quantify target DNA. However, there has been little work understanding the performance of these assays in the presence of closely related, sympatric taxa. If related species cause any cross-amplification or interference, false positives and negatives may be generated. These errors can be disastrous if false positives lead to overestimate the abundance of an endangered species or if false negatives prevent detection of an invasive species. In this study we test factors that influence the specificity and sensitivity of TaqMan MGB assays using co-occurring, closely related brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) and bull trout (S. confluentus) as a case study. We found qPCR to be substantially more sensitive than traditional PCR, with a high probability of detection at concentrations as low as 0.5 target copies/µl. We also found that number and placement of base pair mismatches between the Taqman MGB assay and non-target templates was important to target specificity, and that specificity was most influenced by base pair mismatches in the primers, rather than in the probe. We found that insufficient specificity can result in both false positive and false negative results, particularly in the presence of abundant related species. Our results highlight the utility of qPCR as a highly sensitive eDNA tool, and underscore the importance of careful assay design. PMID:23555689

  13. Rare earth elements (REEs): effects on germination and growth of selected crop and native plant species.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Philippe J; Carpenter, David; Boutin, Céline; Allison, Jane E

    2014-02-01

    The phytotoxicity of rare earth elements (REEs) is still poorly understood. The exposure-response relationships of three native Canadian plant species (common milkweed, Asclepias syriaca L., showy ticktrefoil, Desmodium canadense (L.) DC. and switchgrass, Panicum virgatum L.) and two commonly used crop species (radish, Raphanus sativus L., and tomato, Solanum lycopersicum L.) to the REEs lanthanum (La), yttrium (Y) and cerium (Ce) were tested. In separate experiments, seven to eight doses of each element were added to the soil prior to sowing seeds. Effects of REE dose on germination were established through measures of total percent germination and speed of germination; effects on growth were established through determination of above ground biomass. Ce was also tested at two pH levels and plant tissue analysis was conducted on pooled samples. Effects on germination were mostly observed with Ce at low pH. However, effects on growth were more pronounced, with detectable inhibition concentrations causing 10% and 25% reductions in biomass for the two native forb species (A. syriaca and D. canadense) with all REEs and on all species tested with Ce in both soil pH treatments. Concentration of Ce in aboveground biomass was lower than root Ce content, and followed the dose-response trend. From values measured in natural soils around the world, our results continue to support the notion that REEs are of limited toxicity and not considered extremely hazardous to the environment. However, in areas where REE contamination is likely, the slow accumulation of these elements in the environment could become problematic. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. Robust detection of rare species using environmental DNA: the importance of primer specificity.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, Taylor M; McKelvey, Kevin S; Young, Michael K; Jane, Stephen F; Lowe, Winsor H; Whiteley, Andrew R; Schwartz, Michael K

    2013-01-01

    Environmental DNA (eDNA) is being rapidly adopted as a tool to detect rare animals. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) using probe-based chemistries may represent a particularly powerful tool because of the method's sensitivity, specificity, and potential to quantify target DNA. However, there has been little work understanding the performance of these assays in the presence of closely related, sympatric taxa. If related species cause any cross-amplification or interference, false positives and negatives may be generated. These errors can be disastrous if false positives lead to overestimate the abundance of an endangered species or if false negatives prevent detection of an invasive species. In this study we test factors that influence the specificity and sensitivity of TaqMan MGB assays using co-occurring, closely related brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) and bull trout (S. confluentus) as a case study. We found qPCR to be substantially more sensitive than traditional PCR, with a high probability of detection at concentrations as low as 0.5 target copies/µl. We also found that number and placement of base pair mismatches between the Taqman MGB assay and non-target templates was important to target specificity, and that specificity was most influenced by base pair mismatches in the primers, rather than in the probe. We found that insufficient specificity can result in both false positive and false negative results, particularly in the presence of abundant related species. Our results highlight the utility of qPCR as a highly sensitive eDNA tool, and underscore the importance of careful assay design.

  15. Forest floor bryophytes of Pseudotsuga menziesii-Tsuga heterophylla stand in Oregon: Influences of substrate and overstory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rambo, T.; Muir, Patricia S.

    1998-01-01

    Species richness and abundance of bryophytes inhabiting forest floor substrates were assessed at two sites in western Oregon. Bryophyte diversity, abundance, and community composition were compared between sites, and between young forest stands (~55 yrs) and old-growth stands (400 + yrs) within each site. Relationships of stand structural features to diversity and community composition were assessed by stratifying sampling between 'diversity' plots placed in areas of greater structural diversity, such as hardwood openings and remnant old-growth trees, and 'matrix' plots situated within the remaining more homogeneous conifer-dominated forest matrix. Richness, particularly for liverworts, was significantly higher in old-growth than young stands, and the two ages differed significantly in community composition. Substrate (ground versus coarse woody debris) and overstory (conifers versus hardwoods) were most strongly correlated with variation in community composition. Relatively open hardwood-dominated diversity plots differed in composition from matrix plots. Bryophyte abundance was lower in denser stands and plots, and positively correlated with canopy gaps, percentage of hardwoods, and incident solar radiation. These results suggest that availability of light may limit bryophyte productivity in these stands.

  16. Retention capacities of several bryophytes for Hg(II) with special reference to the elevation and morphology of moss growth.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shou-Qin; Wang, Ding-Yong; He, Ming; Li, Xian-Yuan; Zhang, Cheng

    2007-10-01

    Hg(II) Retention capacities of nine bryophyte species, collected from Jinfo Mountains (JFM) in Chongqing, China, had been investigated with special reference to the effect of morphology and elevation of moss growth. Results indicated that adsorption capacities of bryophytes for Hg(II) became stronger with the increase of multi-branches and leafy-shoots, as well as the elevation of moss growth, which was observed both in adsorption isotherm and adsorption kinetics experiments. Contrarily, the desorption kinetics showed a decrease tendency with the increase of multi-branches and leafy-shoots and the elevation of moss growth. The results demonstrated that bryophytes with higher multi-branches and leafy-shoots and higher growth elevation had a stronger adsorption capacity and a weaker desorption tendency, and therefore had a stronger retention capacity to Hg(II). The results disclosed the different relative sensitivity and retention capacity of mosses to pollution resulting from heavy metals, due to the differences in growth elevation and morphology. These should be considered when bryophytes were chosen as a tool for biomonitoring materials to environmental pollution, especially caused by Hg(II).

  17. Emergence of Rare Species of Nontuberculous Mycobacteria as Potential Pathogens in Saudi Arabian Clinical Setting

    PubMed Central

    Varghese, Bright; Enani, Mushira; Shoukri, Mohammed; AlThawadi, Sahar; AlJohani, Sameera; Al- Hajoj, Sahal

    2017-01-01

    Background Clinical relevance of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) is increasing worldwide including in Saudi Arabia. A high species diversity of NTM’s has been noticed in a recent study. However, the identification in diagnostic laboratories is mostly limited to common species. The impact of NTM species diversity on clinical outcome is so far neglected in most of the clinical settings. Methodology/Principal Findings During April 2014 to September 2015, a nationwide collection of suspected NTM clinical isolates with clinical and demographical data were carried out. Primary identification was performed by commercial line probe assays. Isolates identified up to Mycobacterium species level by line probe assays only were included and subjected to sequencing of 16S rRNA, rpoB, hsp65 and 16S-23S ITS region genes. The sequence data were subjected to BLAST analysis in GenBank and Ez-Taxon databases. Male Saudi nationals were dominated in the study population and falling majorly into the 46–59 years age group. Pulmonary cases were 59.3% with a surprising clinical relevance of 75% based on American Thoracic Society guidelines. Among the 40.7% extra-pulmonary cases, 50% of them were skin infections. The identification revealed 16 species and all of them are reporting for the first time in Saudi Arabia. The major species obtained were Mycobacterium monascence (18.5%), M. cosmeticum (11.1%), M. kubicae (11.1%), M. duvalli (7.4%), M.terrae (7.4%) and M. triplex (7.4%). This is the first report on clinical relevance of M. kubicae, M. tusciae, M.yongonense, M. arupense and M.iranicum causing pulmonary disease and M. monascence, M. duvalli, M. perigrinum, M. insubricum, M. holsaticum and M. kyorinense causing various extra-pulmonary diseases in Saudi Arabia. Ascites caused by M. monascence and cecum infection by M. holsaticum were the rarest incidents. Conclusions/Significance To the first time in the country, clinical significance of various rare NTM’s are well explored and

  18. The influence of nitrogen in stemflow and precipitation on epiphytic bryophytes, Isothecium myosuroides Brid., Dicranum scoparium Hewd. and Thuidium tamariscinum (Hewd.) Schimp of Atlantic oakwoods.

    PubMed

    Leith, I D; Mitchell, R J; Truscott, A-M; Cape, J N; van Dijk, N; Smith, R I; Fowler, D; Sutton, M A

    2008-09-01

    The spatial relationship between the concentration and deposition of the major ions in precipitation and stemflow and their influence on the tissue nitrogen concentration of three epiphytic bryophytes on Quercus petraea (Matt) Liebl. and Q. robur L. was investigated at seven UK Atlantic oak woodland sites with a range of total N deposition of 55-250 mmol m(-2). The main driver of change in tissue N concentrations of three epiphytic bryophytes (Isothecium myosuroides Brid. (Eurhynchium myosuroides (Brid.) Schp.), Dicranum scoparium Hewd. and Thuidium tamariscinum (Hewd.) Schimp.) was total N deposition in stemflow, dominated by ammonium deposition. The three epiphytic species also showed strong relationships between tissue N concentration and total N deposition in rainfall but a poor correlation with total N ion concentration in rainfall. This study shows that epiphytic bryophytes utilise stemflow N and thus increase their risk from inputs of total N deposition compared to terricolous species at the same site.

  19. Herbicides do not ensure for higher wheat yield, but eliminate rare plant species.

    PubMed

    Gaba, Sabrina; Gabriel, Edith; Chadœuf, Joël; Bonneu, Florent; Bretagnolle, Vincent

    2016-07-25

    Weed control is generally considered to be essential for crop production and herbicides have become the main method used for weed control in developed countries. However, concerns about harmful environmental consequences have led to strong pressure on farmers to reduce the use of herbicides. As food demand is forecast to increase by 50% over the next century, an in-depth quantitative analysis of crop yields, weeds and herbicides is required to balance economic and environmental issues. This study analysed the relationship between weeds, herbicides and winter wheat yields using data from 150 winter wheat fields in western France. A Bayesian hierarchical model was built to take account of farmers' behaviour, including implicitly their perception of weeds and weed control practices, on the effectiveness of treatment. No relationship was detected between crop yields and herbicide use. Herbicides were found to be more effective at controlling rare plant species than abundant weed species. These results suggest that reducing the use of herbicides by up to 50% could maintain crop production, a result confirmed by previous studies, while encouraging weed biodiversity. Food security and biodiversity conservation may, therefore, be achieved simultaneously in intensive agriculture simply by reducing the use of herbicides.

  20. Native and engineered tropism of vectors derived from a rare species D adenovirus serotype 43

    PubMed Central

    Belousova, Natalya; Mikheeva, Galina; Xiong, Chiyi; Stagg, Loren J.; Gagea, Mihai; Fox, Patricia S.; Bassett, Roland L.; Ladbury, John E.; Braun, Michael B.; Stehle, Thilo; Li, Chun; Krasnykh, Victor

    2016-01-01

    Unique molecular properties of species D adenoviruses (Ads)—the most diverse yet underexplored group of Ads—have been used to develop improved gene vectors. The low seroprevalence in humans of adenovirus serotype 43 (Ad43), an otherwise unstudied species D Ad, identified this rare serotype as an attractive new human gene therapy vector platform. Thus, in this study we wished to assess biological properties of Ad43 essential to its vectorization. We found that (1) Ad43 virions do not bind blood coagulation factor X and cause low random transduction upon vascular delivery; (2) they clear host tissues more quickly than do traditionally used Ad5 vectors; (3) Ad43 uses CD46 as primary receptor; (4) Ad43 can use integrins as alternative primary receptors. As the first step toward vectorization of Ad43, we demonstrated that the primary receptor specificity of the Ad43 fiber can be altered to achieve infection via Her2, an established oncotarget. Whereas this modification required use of the Ad5 fiber shaft, the presence of this domain in chimeric virions did not make them susceptible for neutralization by anti-Ad5 antibodies. PMID:27462785

  1. Herbicides do not ensure for higher wheat yield, but eliminate rare plant species

    PubMed Central

    Gaba, Sabrina; Gabriel, Edith; Chadœuf, Joël; Bonneu, Florent; Bretagnolle, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Weed control is generally considered to be essential for crop production and herbicides have become the main method used for weed control in developed countries. However, concerns about harmful environmental consequences have led to strong pressure on farmers to reduce the use of herbicides. As food demand is forecast to increase by 50% over the next century, an in-depth quantitative analysis of crop yields, weeds and herbicides is required to balance economic and environmental issues. This study analysed the relationship between weeds, herbicides and winter wheat yields using data from 150 winter wheat fields in western France. A Bayesian hierarchical model was built to take account of farmers’ behaviour, including implicitly their perception of weeds and weed control practices, on the effectiveness of treatment. No relationship was detected between crop yields and herbicide use. Herbicides were found to be more effective at controlling rare plant species than abundant weed species. These results suggest that reducing the use of herbicides by up to 50% could maintain crop production, a result confirmed by previous studies, while encouraging weed biodiversity. Food security and biodiversity conservation may, therefore, be achieved simultaneously in intensive agriculture simply by reducing the use of herbicides. PMID:27453451

  2. Phytoextraction of rare earth elements in herbaceous plant species growing close to roads.

    PubMed

    Mikołajczak, Patrycja; Borowiak, Klaudia; Niedzielski, Przemysław

    2017-06-01

    The aim of study was to determine the phytoextraction of rare earth elements (REEs) to roots, stems and leaves of five herbaceous plant species (Achillea millefolium L., Artemisia vulgaris L., Papaver rhoeas L., Taraxacum officinale AND Tripleurospermum inodorum), growing in four areas located in close proximity to a road with varied traffic intensity. Additionally, the relationship between road traffic intensity, REE concentration in soil and the content of these elements in plant organs was estimated. A. vulgaris and P. rhoeas were able to effectively transport REEs in their leaves, independently of area collection. The highest content of REEs was observed in P. rhoeas leaves and T. inodorum roots. Generally, HREEs were accumulated in P. rhoeas roots and leaves and also in the stems of T. inodorum and T. officinale, whereas LREEs were accumulated in T. inodorum roots and T. officinale stems. It is worth underlining that there was a clear relationship between road traffic intensity and REE, HREE and LREE concentration in soil. No positive correlation was found between the concentration of these elements in soil and their content in plants, with the exception of T. officinale. An effective transport of REEs from the root system to leaves was observed, what points to the possible ability of some of the tested plant species to remove REEs from soils near roads.

  3. Native and engineered tropism of vectors derived from a rare species D adenovirus serotype 43.

    PubMed

    Belousova, Natalya; Mikheeva, Galina; Xiong, Chiyi; Stagg, Loren J; Gagea, Mihai; Fox, Patricia S; Bassett, Roland L; Ladbury, John E; Braun, Michael B; Stehle, Thilo; Li, Chun; Krasnykh, Victor

    2016-08-16

    Unique molecular properties of species D adenoviruses (Ads)-the most diverse yet underexplored group of Ads-have been used to develop improved gene vectors. The low seroprevalence in humans of adenovirus serotype 43 (Ad43), an otherwise unstudied species D Ad, identified this rare serotype as an attractive new human gene therapy vector platform. Thus, in this study we wished to assess biological properties of Ad43 essential to its vectorization. We found that (1) Ad43 virions do not bind blood coagulation factor X and cause low random transduction upon vascular delivery; (2) they clear host tissues more quickly than do traditionally used Ad5 vectors; (3) Ad43 uses CD46 as primary receptor; (4) Ad43 can use integrins as alternative primary receptors. As the first step toward vectorization of Ad43, we demonstrated that the primary receptor specificity of the Ad43 fiber can be altered to achieve infection via Her2, an established oncotarget. Whereas this modification required use of the Ad5 fiber shaft, the presence of this domain in chimeric virions did not make them susceptible for neutralization by anti-Ad5 antibodies.

  4. High levels of genetic diversity and population structure in an endemic and rare species: implications for conservation.

    PubMed

    Turchetto, Caroline; Segatto, Ana Lúcia A; Mäder, Geraldo; Rodrigues, Daniele M; Bonatto, Sandro L; Freitas, Loreta B

    2016-01-13

    The analysis of genetic structure and variability of isolated species is of critical importance in evaluating whether stochastic or human-caused factors are affecting rare species. Low genetic diversity compromises the ability of populations to evolve and reduces their chances of survival under environmental changes. Petunia secreta, a rare and endemic species, is an annual and heliophilous herb that is bee-pollinated and easily recognizable by its purple and salverform corolla. It was described as a new species of the Petunia genus in 2005. Few individuals of P. secreta have been observed in nature and little is known about this species. All the natural populations of P. secreta that were found were studied using 15 microsatellite loci, two intergenic plastid sequences and morphological traits. Statistical analysis was performed to describe the genetic diversity of this rare species and the results compared with those of more widespread and frequent Petunia species from the same geographic area to understand whether factors associated with population size could affect rare species of this genus. The results showed that despite its rarity, P. secreta presented high genetic diversity that was equivalent to or even higher than that of widespread Petunia species. It was shown that this species is divided into two evolutionary lineages, and the genetic differentiation indices between them and other congeneric species presented different patterns. The major risk to P. secreta maintenance is its rarity, suggesting the necessity of a preservation programme and more biological and evolutionary studies that handle the two evolutionary lineages independently. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company.

  5. Bryophyte Tissue-specific Carbon Isotope Record from Galindez Island, Argentine Islands, Western Antarctic Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beilman, D. W.; Yumol, L. M.; Yu, Z.; Parnikoza, I.

    2016-12-01

    Mossbank ecosystems of the western Antarctic Peninsula (AP) provide an under-utilized archive of past terrestrial environmental change. We measured the stable carbon isotope values (δ13C) of both modern and subfossil bryophytes to characterize differences between species and tissues and to identify changes over time. Living plants of common species including Polytrichum strictum and Chorisodontium aciphyllum were collected from several populations between 64° 09' and 67°35'S and had a wide range of δ13C values from -22 to -32‰ that were distinct between species and tissues. In particular, leaves were consistently more enriched in 13C than stems on average by 2‰. Radiocarbon-dated subfossil leaf tissue in a mossbank peat core raised from Galindez Island (65° 14' 51.4"S, 64° 15' 2.3" W) showed that peat formation began 2300 years ago, and provided evidence for very slow growth or a hiatus between about 1100 and 600 years ago during a period of colder air temperatures evident in depleted hydrogen and oxygen isotope values in James Ross Island ice on the eastern AP. Bryophyte macrofossil remains showed a relatively simple bryophyte community of mainly P. strictum throughout the core, but several periods when wet-adapted species became dominant. Subfossil leaf δ13C values of P. strictum varied from -24 to -30‰, and revealed source-independent discrimination that was higher in recent decades than any time during the last 2300 years. Changes in species' abundance between P. strictum and Pohlia nutans varied with discrimination, suggesting that mossbanks have been sensitive to hydroclimate variation during the Late Holocene, and that moss growth conditions at this western AP site have been anomalous in recent decades.

  6. The importance of data quality for generating reliable distribution models for rare, elusive, and cryptic species.

    PubMed

    Aubry, Keith B; Raley, Catherine M; McKelvey, Kevin S

    2017-01-01

    The availability of spatially referenced environmental data and species occurrence records in online databases enable practitioners to easily generate species distribution models (SDMs) for a broad array of taxa. Such databases often include occurrence records of unknown reliability, yet little information is available on the influence of data quality on SDMs generated for rare, elusive, and cryptic species that are prone to misidentification in the field. We investigated this question for the fisher (Pekania pennanti), a forest carnivore of conservation concern in the Pacific States that is often confused with the more common Pacific marten (Martes caurina). Fisher occurrence records supported by physical evidence (verifiable records) were available from a limited area, whereas occurrence records of unknown quality (unscreened records) were available from throughout the fisher's historical range. We reserved 20% of the verifiable records to use as a test sample for both models and generated SDMs with each dataset using Maxent. The verifiable model performed substantially better than the unscreened model based on multiple metrics including AUCtest values (0.78 and 0.62, respectively), evaluation of training and test gains, and statistical tests of how well each model predicted test localities. In addition, the verifiable model was consistent with our knowledge of the fisher's habitat relations and potential distribution, whereas the unscreened model indicated a much broader area of high-quality habitat (indices > 0.5) that included large expanses of high-elevation habitat that fishers do not occupy. Because Pacific martens remain relatively common in upper elevation habitats in the Cascade Range and Sierra Nevada, the SDM based on unscreened records likely reflects primarily a conflation of marten and fisher habitat. Consequently, accurate identifications are far more important than the spatial extent of occurrence records for generating reliable SDMs for the

  7. Metal accumulation by stream bryophytes, related to chemical speciation.

    PubMed

    Tipping, E; Vincent, C D; Lawlor, A J; Lofts, S

    2008-12-01

    Metal accumulation by aquatic bryophytes was investigated using data for headwater streams of differing chemistry. The Windermere Humic Aqueous Model (WHAM) was applied to calculate chemical speciation, including competitive proton and metal interactions with external binding sites on the plants. The speciation modelling approach gives smaller deviations between observed and predicted bryophyte contents of Cu, Zn, Cd and Pb than regressions based on total filtered metal concentrations. If all four metals, and Ni, are considered together, the WHAM predictions are superior at the 1% level. Optimised constants for bryophyte binding by the trace metals are similar to those for humic substances and simple carboxylate ligands. Bryophyte contents of Na, Mg and Ca are approximately explained by binding at external sites, while most of the K is intracellular. Oxide phases account for some of the Al, and most of the Mn, Fe and Co.

  8. Element accumulation in boreal bryophytes, lichens and vascular plants exposed to heavy metal and sulfur deposition in Finland.

    PubMed

    Salemaa, Maija; Derome, John; Helmisaari, Heljä-Sisko; Nieminen, Tiina; Vanha-Majamaa, Ilkka

    2004-05-25

    Macronutrient (N, P, K, Mg, S, Ca), heavy metal (Fe, Zn, Mn, Cu, Ni, Cd, Pb) and Al concentrations in understorey bryophytes, lichens and vascular plant species growing in Scots pine forests at four distances from the Harjavalta Cu-Ni smelter (0.5, 2, 4 and 8 km) were compared to those at two background sites in Finland. The aim was to study the relationship between element accumulation and the distribution of the species along a pollution gradient. Elevated sulfur, nitrogen and heavy metal concentrations were found in all species groups near the pollution source. Macronutrient concentrations tended to decrease in the order: vascular plants>bryophytes>lichens, when all the species groups grew on the same plot. Heavy metal concentrations (except Mn) were the highest in bryophytes, followed by lichens, and were the lowest in vascular plants. In general, vascular plants, being capable of restricting the uptake of toxic elements, grew closer to the smelter than lichens, while bryophytes began to increase in the understorey vegetation at further distances from the smelter. A pioneer moss (Pohlia nutans) was an exception, because it accumulated considerably higher amounts of Cu and Ni than the other species and still survived close to the smelter. The abundance of most of the species decreased with increasing Cu and Ni concentrations in their tissues. Cetraria islandica, instead, showed a positive relationship between the abundance and Cu, Ni and S concentrations of the thallus. It is probable that, in addition to heavy metals, sporadically high SO(2) emissions have also affected the distribution of the plant species.

  9. Bryophyte dispersal by flying foxes: a novel discovery.

    PubMed

    Parsons, J G; Cairns, A; Johnson, C N; Robson, S K A; Shilton, L A; Westcott, D A

    2007-05-01

    This research provides the first evidence of dispersal of bryophytes and associated microorganisms through ingestion by a highly mobile vertebrate vector, the spectacled flying fox (Pteropus conspicillatus). Bryophyte fragments were found in faeces collected at four P. conspicillatus' camps in the Wet Tropics bioregion, northeastern Australia. These fragments were viable when grown in culture; live invertebrates and other organisms were also present. Our study has significantly increased understanding of the role of flying foxes as dispersal vectors in tropical forests.

  10. Spatial Distribution Patterns in the Very Rare and Species-Rich Picea chihuahuana Tree Community (Mexico)

    PubMed Central

    Wehenkel, Christian; Brazão-Protázio, João Marcelo; Carrillo-Parra, Artemio; Martínez-Guerrero, José Hugo; Crecente-Campo, Felipe

    2015-01-01

    The very rare Mexican Picea chihuahuana tree community covers an area of no more than 300 ha in the Sierra Madre Occidental. This special tree community has been the subject of several studies aimed at learning more about the genetic structure and ecology of the species and the potential effects of climate change. The spatial distribution of trees is a result of many ecological processes and can affect the degree of competition between neighbouring trees, tree density, variability in size and distribution, regeneration, survival, growth, mortality, crown formation and the biological diversity within forest communities. Numerous scale-dependent measures have been established in order to describe spatial forest structure. The overall aim of most of these studies has been to obtain data to help design preservation and conservation strategies. In this study, we examined the spatial distribution pattern of trees in the P. chihuahuana tree community in 12 localities, in relation to i) tree stand density, ii) diameter distribution (vertical structure), iii) tree species diversity, iv) geographical latitude and v) tree dominance at a fine scale (in 0.25 ha plots), with the aim of obtaining a better understanding of the complex ecosystem processes and biological diversity. Because of the strongly mixed nature of this tree community, which often produces low population densities of each tree species and random tree fall gaps caused by tree death, we expect aggregated patterns in individual Picea chihuahuana trees and in the P. chihuahuana tree community, repulsive Picea patterns to other tree species and repulsive patterns of young to adult trees. Each location was represented by one plot of 50 x 50 m (0.25 ha) established in the centre of the tree community. The findings demonstrate that the hypothesis of aggregated tree pattern is not applicable to the mean pattern measured by Clark-Evans index, Uniform Angle index and Mean Directional index of the uneven-aged P

  11. Spatial Distribution Patterns in the Very Rare and Species-Rich Picea chihuahuana Tree Community (Mexico).

    PubMed

    Wehenkel, Christian; Brazão-Protázio, João Marcelo; Carrillo-Parra, Artemio; Martínez-Guerrero, José Hugo; Crecente-Campo, Felipe

    2015-01-01

    The very rare Mexican Picea chihuahuana tree community covers an area of no more than 300 ha in the Sierra Madre Occidental. This special tree community has been the subject of several studies aimed at learning more about the genetic structure and ecology of the species and the potential effects of climate change. The spatial distribution of trees is a result of many ecological processes and can affect the degree of competition between neighbouring trees, tree density, variability in size and distribution, regeneration, survival, growth, mortality, crown formation and the biological diversity within forest communities. Numerous scale-dependent measures have been established in order to describe spatial forest structure. The overall aim of most of these studies has been to obtain data to help design preservation and conservation strategies. In this study, we examined the spatial distribution pattern of trees in the P. chihuahuana tree community in 12 localities, in relation to i) tree stand density, ii) diameter distribution (vertical structure), iii) tree species diversity, iv) geographical latitude and v) tree dominance at a fine scale (in 0.25 ha plots), with the aim of obtaining a better understanding of the complex ecosystem processes and biological diversity. Because of the strongly mixed nature of this tree community, which often produces low population densities of each tree species and random tree fall gaps caused by tree death, we expect aggregated patterns in individual Picea chihuahuana trees and in the P. chihuahuana tree community, repulsive Picea patterns to other tree species and repulsive patterns of young to adult trees. Each location was represented by one plot of 50 x 50 m (0.25 ha) established in the centre of the tree community. The findings demonstrate that the hypothesis of aggregated tree pattern is not applicable to the mean pattern measured by Clark-Evans index, Uniform Angle index and Mean Directional index of the uneven-aged P

  12. Phytochemical and biological studies of bryophytes.

    PubMed

    Asakawa, Yoshinori; Ludwiczuk, Agnieszka; Nagashima, Fumihiro

    2013-07-01

    The bryophytes contain the Marchantiophyta (liverworts), Bryophyta (mosses) and Anthocerotophyta (hornworts). Of these, the Marchantiophyta have a cellular oil body which produce a number of mono-, sesqui- and di-terpenoids, aromatic compounds like bibenzyl, bis-bibenzyls and acetogenins. Most sesqui- and di-terpenoids obtained from liverworts are enantiomers of those found in higher plants. Many of these compounds display a characteristic odor, and can have interesting biological activities. These include: allergenic contact dermatitis, antimicrobial, antifungal and antiviral, cytotoxic, insecticidal, insect antifeedant, superoxide anion radical release, 5-lipoxygenase, calmodulin, hyaluronidase, cyclooxygenase, DNA polymerase β, and α-glucosidase and NO production inhibitory, antioxidant, piscicidal, neurotrophic and muscle relaxing activities among others. Each liverwort biosynthesizes unique components, which are valuable for their chemotaxonomic classification. Typical chemical structures and biological activity of the selected liverwort constituents as well as the hemi- and total synthesis of some biologically active compounds are summarized.

  13. Simple sequence repeats in bryophyte mitochondrial genomes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chao-Xian; Zhu, Rui-Liang; Liu, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Simple sequence repeats (SSRs) are thought to be common in plant mitochondrial (mt) genomes, but have yet to be fully described for bryophytes. We screened the mt genomes of two liverworts (Marchantia polymorpha and Pleurozia purpurea), two mosses (Physcomitrella patens and Anomodon rugelii) and two hornworts (Phaeoceros laevis and Nothoceros aenigmaticus), and detected 475 SSRs. Some SSRs are found conserved during the evolution, among which except one exists in both liverworts and mosses, all others are shared only by the two liverworts, mosses or hornworts. SSRs are known as DNA tracts having high mutation rates; however, according to our observations, they still can evolve slowly. The conservativeness of these SSRs suggests that they are under strong selection and could play critical roles in maintaining the gene functions.

  14. Multi-species attributes as the condition for adaptive sampling of rare species using two-stage sequential sampling with an auxiliary variable

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Panahbehagh, B.; Smith, D.R.; Salehi, M.M.; Hornbach, D.J.; Brown, D.J.; Chan, F.; Marinova, D.; Anderssen, R.S.

    2011-01-01

    Assessing populations of rare species is challenging because of the large effort required to locate patches of occupied habitat and achieve precise estimates of density and abundance. The presence of a rare species has been shown to be correlated with presence or abundance of more common species. Thus, ecological community richness or abundance can be used to inform sampling of rare species. Adaptive sampling designs have been developed specifically for rare and clustered populations and have been applied to a wide range of rare species. However, adaptive sampling can be logistically challenging, in part, because variation in final sample size introduces uncertainty in survey planning. Two-stage sequential sampling (TSS), a recently developed design, allows for adaptive sampling, but avoids edge units and has an upper bound on final sample size. In this paper we present an extension of two-stage sequential sampling that incorporates an auxiliary variable (TSSAV), such as community attributes, as the condition for adaptive sampling. We develop a set of simulations to approximate sampling of endangered freshwater mussels to evaluate the performance of the TSSAV design. The performance measures that we are interested in are efficiency and probability of sampling a unit occupied by the rare species. Efficiency measures the precision of population estimate from the TSSAV design relative to a standard design, such as simple random sampling (SRS). The simulations indicate that the density and distribution of the auxiliary population is the most important determinant of the performance of the TSSAV design. Of the design factors, such as sample size, the fraction of the primary units sampled was most important. For the best scenarios, the odds of sampling the rare species was approximately 1.5 times higher for TSSAV compared to SRS and efficiency was as high as 2 (i.e., variance from TSSAV was half that of SRS). We have found that design performance, especially for adaptive

  15. Rare or rarely detected? Ceraceosorus guamensis sp. nov.: a second described species of Ceraceosorales and the potential for underdetection of rare lineages with common sampling techniques.

    PubMed

    Kijpornyongpan, Teeratas; Catherine Aime, M

    2016-08-01

    Ceraceosorales is a monotypic order in Ustilaginomycotina. Its namesake, Ceraceosorus bombacis, was described as a phytopathogen of Bombax ceiba in India. In this study, we describe Ceraceosorus guamensis sp. nov., collected on the South Pacific island of Guam, which appears to represent the second isolation of any member of this order in over 40 years. Ceraceosorus species are monokaryotic and filamentous in culture, producing conidia on potato dextrose agar. However, both species behave yeast-like when cultured on corn meal agar. The internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region (spanning the ITS1-5.8S-ITS2) in both species of Ceraceosorus is highly heterogeneous containing multiple disparate copies that can vary intragenomically by up to 3.5 %. Moreover, this region could not be amplified using the fungal ITS primers most frequently used for culture-independent methods of assessing fungal biodiversity. This fact, combined with the extremely slow growth rates on commonly employed media, may indicate that members of this lineage are potentially underdetected by current sampling methods.

  16. Effects of seed cryopreservation, stratification and scarification on germination for five rare species of pitcher plants.

    PubMed

    Khanna, Sruti; Jenkins, Heather; Bucalo, Kylie; Determann, Ron O; Cruse-Sanders, Jennifer M; Pullman, Gerald S

    2014-01-01

    Habitat loss and over collection have caused North American pitcher plants to become rare, including U.S. federally endangered Sarracenia alabamensis and S. oreophila, and S. leucophylla, S. psittacina and S. purpurea spp. venosa, endangered in several states. To develop reliable seed cryopreservation protocols for endangered Sarracenia species enabling similar germination percentages before and after storage in liquid nitrogen (LN) either in vivo or using in vitro tools. Seed germination pre- and post-cryopreservation were compared following seed drying with germination in soil, aseptic environment with wet filter paper or enriched medium, and using scarification or stratification for dormancy removal. After cryostorage, germination in vitro (1/6- or 1/3-strength MS medium) increased compared to germination on peat moss. Germination pre- and post-cryopreservation was similar for S. alabamensis and S. oreophila when seeds were stratified and grown in vitro. S. leucophylla and S. psittacina also showed high germination after cryopreservation when germinated on medium following stratification. Rapid liquid nitrogen exposure and rewarming induced seed coat cracking that damaged seeds, likely allowing internal damage during acid scarification and microbial entry during germination in non-sterile environments.

  17. Concentrations of selected heavy metals in bryophyte tissues at Cu-mine heap Podlipa in Ľubietová (Central Slovakia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Širka, Pavel; Midula, Pavol

    2017-04-01

    Mine heaps and wastes created by mining industry belong to one of the most extreme man-made habitat types. In addition to their specific microclimatic conditions mine heaps are also characterized by increased contents of heavy metals and toxic substances in the soil substrate. These substances are transported into plant bodies and create difficult conditions for their growth. However, there are some plants that can cope with extremely high metal contents and are capable of growing on metalliferous habitats. These plants develop unique adaptation mechanisms and basically represent modified ecotypes with specific tolerances to certain heavy metals adapted through microevolutionary processes. The toxic effects of heavy metals on vascular plants are known for quite a long time, however, bryophytes are also known to accumulate certain heavy metals without any visible signs of damage. Because of this ability they have been successfully used in biomonitoring. Chemical analysis of contaminants in samples of bryophytes can reflect the state of environmental pollution. The aim of this work was to analyze the concentrations of 6 heavy metals (Fe, Cu, Zn, Mn, Pb and Cd) in tissues of 16 bryophyte samples at an abandoned Cu deposit Podlipa in Ľubietová and to compare them with concentrations of these elemens in soil samples and 9 vascular plant species (belonging to different growth forms) in a research performed by Andráš et al. (2014) in the studied area. Bryophytes were collected at 10 sampling sites randomly chosen in the dump-field area and consist of 14 different moss species. Only above-ground parts of bryophyte thalli (separated from rhizoids, gravel, soil, needles etc.) were used for analysis. Samples were dried at room temperature and subjected to microwave mineralization (MWS - 2 Berghof). The detailed procedure is defined in the Application Report MWS - 2 / Food, Pharma, Cosmetics (Berghof). In order to determine the concentrations of studied elements, atomic

  18. The importance of data quality for generating reliable distribution models for rare, elusive, and cryptic species

    PubMed Central

    Aubry, Keith B.; Raley, Catherine M.; McKelvey, Kevin S.

    2017-01-01

    The availability of spatially referenced environmental data and species occurrence records in online databases enable practitioners to easily generate species distribution models (SDMs) for a broad array of taxa. Such databases often include occurrence records of unknown reliability, yet little information is available on the influence of data quality on SDMs generated for rare, elusive, and cryptic species that are prone to misidentification in the field. We investigated this question for the fisher (Pekania pennanti), a forest carnivore of conservation concern in the Pacific States that is often confused with the more common Pacific marten (Martes caurina). Fisher occurrence records supported by physical evidence (verifiable records) were available from a limited area, whereas occurrence records of unknown quality (unscreened records) were available from throughout the fisher’s historical range. We reserved 20% of the verifiable records to use as a test sample for both models and generated SDMs with each dataset using Maxent. The verifiable model performed substantially better than the unscreened model based on multiple metrics including AUCtest values (0.78 and 0.62, respectively), evaluation of training and test gains, and statistical tests of how well each model predicted test localities. In addition, the verifiable model was consistent with our knowledge of the fisher’s habitat relations and potential distribution, whereas the unscreened model indicated a much broader area of high-quality habitat (indices > 0.5) that included large expanses of high-elevation habitat that fishers do not occupy. Because Pacific martens remain relatively common in upper elevation habitats in the Cascade Range and Sierra Nevada, the SDM based on unscreened records likely reflects primarily a conflation of marten and fisher habitat. Consequently, accurate identifications are far more important than the spatial extent of occurrence records for generating reliable SDMs for the

  19. Medium term ecohydrological response of peatland bryophytes to canopy disturbance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, Rhoswen; Kettridge, Nick; Krause, Stefan; Devito, Kevin; Granath, Gustaf; Petrone, Richard; Mandoza, Carl; Waddington, James Micheal

    2016-04-01

    Canopy disturbance in northern forested peatlands is widespread. Canopy changes impact the ecohydrological function of moss and peat, which provide the principal carbon store within these carbon rich ecosystems. Different mosses have contrasting contributions to carbon and water fluxes (e.g. Sphagnum fuscum and Pleurozium schreberi) and are strongly influenced by canopy cover. As a result, changes in canopy cover lead to long-term shifts in species composition and associated ecohydrological function. Despite this, the medium-term response to such disturbance, the associated lag in this transition to a new ecohydrological and biogeochemical regime, is not understood. Here we investigate this medium term ecohydrological response to canopy removal using a randomised plot design within a north Albertan peatland. We show no significant ecohydrological change in treatment plots four years after canopy removal. Notably, Pleurozium schreberi and Sphagnum fuscum remained within respective plots post treatment and there was no significant difference in plot resistance to evapotranspiration or carbon exchange. Our results show that canopy removal alone has little impact on bryophyte ecohydrology in the short/medium term. This resistance to disturbance contrasts strongly with dramatic short-term changes observed within mineral soils suggesting that concurrent shifts in the large scale hydrology induced within such disturbances are necessary to cause rapid ecohydrological transitions. Understanding this lagged response is critical to determine the decadal response of carbon and water fluxes in response to disturbance and the rate at which important medium term ecohydrological feedbacks are invoked.

  20. Selective removal of either metastable species from a mixed 3P 0,2 rare-gas metastable beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunning, F. B.; Cook, T. B.; West, W. P.; Stebbings, R. F.

    1975-01-01

    A tunable CW laser has been used to selectively remove either of the two metastable species, 3P 0,2, which are initially present in a neon metastable beam. The method is applicable to other rare gases and provides the opportunity for separate investigation of effects due to atoms in either the 3P 0 or 3P 2 state.

  1. Formation of social acceptability judgments and their implications for management of rare and little-known species.

    Treesearch

    George H. Stankey; Bruce. Shindler

    2006-01-01

    Effective policies for management of rare and little-known species (RLKS) must be not only scientifically valid and cost-effective but also consistent with prevailing social beliefs and values. Limited public awareness of RLKS, however; constrains efforts to frame such policies. Lacking public support, resistance to RLKS programs is likely, particularly when other uses...

  2. Empyema of preexisting subdural hemorrhage caused by a rare salmonella species after exposure to bearded dragons in a foster home.

    PubMed

    Tabarani, Christy M; Bennett, Nicholas J; Kiska, Deanna L; Riddell, Scott W; Botash, Ann S; Domachowske, Joseph B

    2010-02-01

    An infant had a subdural empyema caused by the rare Salmonella species enterica subspecies houtenae (IV) serotype 44:z4,z23:- after only indirect exposure to exotic reptiles in her foster home. Infants recovering from preexisting subdural hematoma are at risk for development of empyema.

  3. Effect of copper and lead on lipid metabolism in bryophytes and lichens.

    PubMed

    Guschina, I A; Harwood, J L

    2000-12-01

    Bryophytes and lichens have a widespread occurrence and can survive under extreme environmental conditions, such as drought, low temperatures, continuous light or prolonged darkness. It has been shown that lipid metabolism is sensitive to both metal response and metal resistance mechanisms in many organisms, including yeast, Silene cucubalus, and in the marine brown algae Fucus spp. and Ascophyllum nodosum. In the present study, the effects of lead and copper on lipid metabolism have been studied in two moss species, Rhytidiadelphus squarrosus and Dicranum scoparium, and also in the lichen Peltigera horizontalis with a cyanobacterial Nostoc photobiont.

  4. Fairly processing rare and common species in multivariate analysis of ecological series. Application to macrobenthic communities from Algiers harbour.

    PubMed

    Manté, C; Claudet, J; Rebzani-Zahaf, C

    2003-01-01

    Systematic sampling of communities gives rise to large contingency tables summing up possible changes in the assemblages' structure. Such tables are generally analysed by multivariate statistical methods, which are ill-suited for simultaneously analysing rare and common species (Field et al., 1982). In order to separately process species belonging to either of these categories, we propose a statistical method to select common species in a sequence of ecological surveys. It is based on a precise definition of rarity, and depends on a rarity parameter. In this work, this parameter will be optimised so that the sub-table of common species captures the essential features of the complete table as well as possible. In this way we analysed the spatio-temporal evolution of macrobenthic communities from the Algiers harbour to study the pollution influence during a year. The examination of the communities' structuring was done through Principal Components Analysis (PCA) of the species proportions table. Environmental variables were simultaneously sampled. We show that the data structure can be explained by about 25% of the total number of present species. Two environmental gradients were brought to the fore inside the harbour, the first one representing pollution, and the second one representing hydrological instabilities. Since rare species can also convey information, the complete table was also coded according to a generalised presence/absence index and submitted to Correspondence Analysis. The results were consistent with those of PCA, but they depended on more species, and highlighted the influence of sedimentology on the assemblages composition.

  5. San Diego Multiple Species Conservation Program (MSCP) Rare Plant Monitoring Review and Revision

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McEachern, Kathryn; Pavlik, Bruce M.; Rebman, Jon; Sutter, Rob

    2007-01-01

    Introduction The San Diego Multiple Species Conservation Program (MSCP) was developed for the conservation of plants and animals in the south part of San Diego County, under the California Natural Community Conservation Planning Act of 1991 (California Department of Fish and Game) and the Federal Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended (16 U.S. Code 1531-1544.) The Program is on the leading edge of conservation, as it seeks to both guide development and conserve at-risk species with the oversight of both State and Federal agencies. Lands were identified for inclusion in the MSCP based on their value as habitat for at-risk plants or plant communities (Natural Community Conservation Planning, 2005). Since its inception in the mid-1990s the Program has protected over 100,000 acres, involving 15 jurisdictions and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) and California Department of Fish and Game (CDFG) in the conservation of 87 taxa. Surveys for covered species have been conducted, and management and monitoring have been implemented at some high priority sites. Each jurisdiction or agency manages and monitors their conservation areas independently, while collaborating regionally for long-term protection. The San Diego MSCP is on the forefront of conservation, in one of the most rapidly growing urban areas of the country. The planning effort that developed the MSCP was state-of-the-art, using expert knowledge, spatial habitat modeling, and principles of preserve design to identify and prioritize areas for protection. Land acquisition and protection are ahead of schedule for most jurisdictions. Surveys have verified the locations of many rare plant populations known from earlier collections, and they provide general information on population size and health useful for further conservation planning. Management plans have been written or are in development for most MSCP parcels under jurisdictional control. Several agencies are developing databases for implementation

  6. Three new species and new distributional data for five rare species of Aphelinus (Hymenoptera: Aphelinidae) from China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ye; Li, Cheng-de

    2016-03-15

    Eight species of Aphelinus Dalman (Hymenoptera, Aphelinidae) from China are reviewed. Three species, A. pseudonepalensis sp. nov., A. truncaticlavus sp. nov. and A. maculigaster sp. nov. are newly described, four species, A. meghalayanus Hayat, A. huberi Hayat, A. sharpae Hayat, and A. maculatus Yasnosh are reported as new to China, and A. asychis Walker is newly reported from Tibet, China. A key to the Chinese species of Aphelinus based on females is given.

  7. Bryophytes and lichens: small but indispensable forest dwellers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hutten, Martin; Woodward, Andrea

    2002-01-01

    * What is a Bryophyte? * Bryophytes are the small green plants commonly known as mosses, liverworts and hornworts. Compared to plants, they have primitive tissues for conducting food and water, and they lack a protective outer surface to maintain water balance. Most bryophytes, because they lack tissues such as roots, obtain their water through direct surface contact with their environment. During dry weather they have the capacity to withstand complete dehydration. Bryophytes that are dry may appear dead but will regain normal function when moisture is available. Instead of producing seeds, bryophytes can either reproduce sexually by means of spores, or asexually when small pieces break off and grow into new individuals. * What is a Lichen? * Lichens are dual organisms consisting of a fungus and an alga or a cyanobacterium. The fungus provides the alga with structure, protection, nutrients, and water absorbed from the atmosphere and the substrate (e.g., soil, rotten logs, tree branches). In return, the alga provides carbohydrates from photosynthesis to the fungus. Algae from some lichens grow independently of the fungus, but in lichen form, the algae can inhabit more challenging environments than when growing alone. Most lichens can reproduce asexually. They either produce specialized propagules containing both partners, or parts of the lichen simply break, allowing both the fungus and the alga to disperse together. In some lichens, the fungal partner reproduces sexually by releasing spores, but the partner alga must be present in order for a lichen to reform.

  8. Bryophytes and lichens: Small but indispensable forest dwellers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hutten, Martin; Woodward, Andrea

    2002-01-01

    * What is a Bryophyte? * Bryophytes are the small green plants commonly known as mosses, liverworts and hornworts. Compared to plants, they have primitive tissues for conducting food and water, and they lack a protective outer surface to maintain water balance. Most bryophytes, because they lack tissues such as roots, obtain their water through direct surface contact with their environment. During dry weather they have the capacity to withstand complete dehydration. Bryophytes that are dry may appear dead but will regain normal function when moisture is available. Instead of producing seeds, bryophytes can either reproduce sexually by means of spores, or asexually when small pieces break off and grow into new individuals. * What is a Lichen? * Lichens are dual organisms consisting of a fungus and an alga or a cyanobacterium. The fungus provides the alga with structure, protection, nutrients, and water absorbed from the atmosphere and the substrate (e.g., soil, rotten logs, tree branches). In return, the alga provides carbohydrates from photosynthesis to the fungus. Algae from some lichens grow independently of the fungus, but in lichen form, the algae can inhabit more challenging environments than when growing alone. Most lichens can reproduce asexually. They either produce specialized propagules containing both partners, or parts of the lichen simply break, allowing both the fungus and the alga to disperse together. In some lichens, the fungal partner reproduces sexually by releasing spores, but the partner alga must be present in order for a lichen to reform.

  9. Remote sensing-based predictors improve distribution models of rare, early successional and broadleaf tree species in Utah.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, N E; Edwards, T C; Moisen, G G; Frescino, T S; Blackard, J A

    2007-10-01

    Compared to bioclimatic variables, remote sensing predictors are rarely used for predictive species modelling. When used, the predictors represent typically habitat classifications or filters rather than gradual spectral, surface or biophysical properties. Consequently, the full potential of remotely sensed predictors for modelling the spatial distribution of species remains unexplored. Here we analysed the partial contributions of remotely sensed and climatic predictor sets to explain and predict the distribution of 19 tree species in Utah. We also tested how these partial contributions were related to characteristics such as successional types or species traits.We developed two spatial predictor sets of remotely sensed and topo-climatic variables to explain the distribution of tree species. We used variation partitioning techniques applied to generalized linear models to explore the combined and partial predictive powers of the two predictor sets. Non-parametric tests were used to explore the relationships between the partial model contributions of both predictor sets and species characteristics.More than 60% of the variation explained by the models represented contributions by one of the two partial predictor sets alone, with topo-climatic variables outperforming the remotely sensed predictors. However, the partial models derived from only remotely sensed predictors still provided high model accuracies, indicating a significant correlation between climate and remote sensing variables. The overall accuracy of the models was high, but small sample sizes had a strong effect on cross-validated accuracies for rare species.Models of early successional and broadleaf species benefited significantly more from adding remotely sensed predictors than did late seral and needleleaf species. The core-satellite species types differed significantly with respect to overall model accuracies. Models of satellite and urban species, both with low prevalence, benefited more from use

  10. Remote sensing-based predictors improve distribution models of rare, early successional and broadleaf tree species in Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zimmermann, N.E.; Edwards, T.C.; Moisen, Gretchen G.; Frescino, T.S.; Blackard, J.A.

    2007-01-01

    1. Compared to bioclimatic variables, remote sensing predictors are rarely used for predictive species modelling. When used, the predictors represent typically habitat classifications or filters rather than gradual spectral, surface or biophysical properties. Consequently, the full potential of remotely sensed predictors for modelling the spatial distribution of species remains unexplored. Here we analysed the partial contributions of remotely sensed and climatic predictor sets to explain and predict the distribution of 19 tree species in Utah. We also tested how these partial contributions were related to characteristics such as successional types or species traits. 2. We developed two spatial predictor sets of remotely sensed and topo-climatic variables to explain the distribution of tree species. We used variation partitioning techniques applied to generalized linear models to explore the combined and partial predictive powers of the two predictor sets. Non-parametric tests were used to explore the relationships between the partial model contributions of both predictor sets and species characteristics. 3. More than 60% of the variation explained by the models represented contributions by one of the two partial predictor sets alone, with topo-climatic variables outperforming the remotely sensed predictors. However, the partial models derived from only remotely sensed predictors still provided high model accuracies, indicating a significant correlation between climate and remote sensing variables. The overall accuracy of the models was high, but small sample sizes had a strong effect on cross-validated accuracies for rare species. 4. Models of early successional and broadleaf species benefited significantly more from adding remotely sensed predictors than did late seral and needleleaf species. The core-satellite species types differed significantly with respect to overall model accuracies. Models of satellite and urban species, both with low prevalence, benefited

  11. Conducting tissues and phyletic relationships of bryophytes.

    PubMed Central

    Ligrone, R; Ducket, J G; Renzaglia, K S

    2000-01-01

    Internal specialized conducting tissues, if present, are restricted to the gametophytic generation in liverworts while they may occur in both generations in mosses. Conducting tissues are unknown in the anthocerotes. Water-conducting cells (WCCs) with walls perforated by plasmodesma-derived pores occur in the Calobryales and Pallaviciniaceae (Metzgeriales among liverworts and in Takakia among mosses. Imperforate WCCs (hydroids) are present in bryoid mosses. A polarized cytoplasmic organization and a distinctive axial system of microtubules is present in the highly specialized food-conducting cells of polytrichaceous mosses (leptoids) and in less specialized parenchyma cells of the leafy stem and seta in other mosses including Sphagnumn. A similar organization, suggested to reflect specialization in long-distance symplasmic transport of nutrients, also occurs in other parts of the plant in mosses, including rhizoids and caulonemata, and may be observed in thallus parenchyma cells of liverworts. Perforate WCCs in the Calobryales, Metzgeriales and Takakia, and hydroids in bryoid mosses, probably evolved independently Because of fundamental differences in developmental design, homology of any of these cells with tracheids is highly unlikely. Likewise, putative food-conducting of bryophytes present highly distinctive characteristics and cannot be considered homologous with the sieve cells of tracheophytes. PMID:10905610

  12. Looking beyond rare species as umbrella species: Northern Bobwhites (Colinus virginianus) and conservation of grassland and shrubland birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crosby, Andrew D.; Elmore, R.D.; Leslie,, David M.; Will, Rodney E.

    2015-01-01

    Changes in land use and land cover throughout the eastern half of North America have caused substantial declines in populations of birds that rely on grassland and shrubland vegetation types, including socially and economically important game birds such as the Northern Bobwhite (Colinus virginianus; hereafter bobwhites). As much attention is focused on habitat management and restoration for bobwhites, they may act as an umbrella species for other bird species with similar habitat requirements. We quantified the relationship of bobwhites to the overall bird community and evaluated the potential for bobwhites to act as an umbrella species for grassland and shrubland birds. We monitored bobwhite presence and bird community composition within 31 sample units on selected private lands in the south-central United States from 2009 to 2011. Bobwhites were strongly associated with other grassland and shrubland birds and were a significant positive predictor for 9 species. Seven of these, including Bell's Vireo (Vireo bell), Dicksissel (Spiza americana), and Grasshopper Sparrow (Ammodramus savannarum), are listed as species of conservation concern. Species richness and occupancy probability of grassland and shrubland birds were higher relative to the overall bird community in sample units occupied by bobwhites. Our results show that bobwhites can act as an umbrella species for grassland and shrubland birds, although the specific species in any given situation will depend on region and management objectives. These results suggest that efficiency in conservation funding can be increased by using public interest in popular game species to leverage resources to meet multiple conservation objectives.

  13. Loss of Rare Fish Species from Tropical Floodplain Food Webs Affects Community Structure and Ecosystem Multifunctionality in a Mesocosm Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Pendleton, Richard M.; Hoeinghaus, David J.; Gomes, Luiz C.; Agostinho, Angelo A.

    2014-01-01

    Experiments with realistic scenarios of species loss from multitrophic ecosystems may improve insight into how biodiversity affects ecosystem functioning. Using 1000 L mesocoms, we examined effects of nonrandom species loss on community structure and ecosystem functioning of experimental food webs based on multitrophic tropical floodplain lagoon ecosystems. Realistic biodiversity scenarios were developed based on long-term field surveys, and experimental assemblages replicated sequential loss of rare species which occurred across all trophic levels of these complex food webs. Response variables represented multiple components of ecosystem functioning, including nutrient cycling, primary and secondary production, organic matter accumulation and whole ecosystem metabolism. Species richness significantly affected ecosystem function, even after statistically controlling for potentially confounding factors such as total biomass and direct trophic interactions. Overall, loss of rare species was generally associated with lower nutrient concentrations, phytoplankton and zooplankton densities, and whole ecosystem metabolism when compared with more diverse assemblages. This pattern was also observed for overall ecosystem multifunctionality, a combined metric representing the ability of an ecosystem to simultaneously maintain multiple functions. One key exception was attributed to time-dependent effects of intraguild predation, which initially increased values for most ecosystem response variables, but resulted in decreases over time likely due to reduced nutrient remineralization by surviving predators. At the same time, loss of species did not result in strong trophic cascades, possibly a result of compensation and complexity of these multitrophic ecosystems along with a dominance of bottom-up effects. Our results indicate that although rare species may comprise minor components of communities, their loss can have profound ecosystem consequences across multiple trophic

  14. Loss of rare fish species from tropical floodplain food webs affects community structure and ecosystem multifunctionality in a mesocosm experiment.

    PubMed

    Pendleton, Richard M; Hoeinghaus, David J; Gomes, Luiz C; Agostinho, Angelo A

    2014-01-01

    Experiments with realistic scenarios of species loss from multitrophic ecosystems may improve insight into how biodiversity affects ecosystem functioning. Using 1000 L mesocoms, we examined effects of nonrandom species loss on community structure and ecosystem functioning of experimental food webs based on multitrophic tropical floodplain lagoon ecosystems. Realistic biodiversity scenarios were developed based on long-term field surveys, and experimental assemblages replicated sequential loss of rare species which occurred across all trophic levels of these complex food webs. Response variables represented multiple components of ecosystem functioning, including nutrient cycling, primary and secondary production, organic matter accumulation and whole ecosystem metabolism. Species richness significantly affected ecosystem function, even after statistically controlling for potentially confounding factors such as total biomass and direct trophic interactions. Overall, loss of rare species was generally associated with lower nutrient concentrations, phytoplankton and zooplankton densities, and whole ecosystem metabolism when compared with more diverse assemblages. This pattern was also observed for overall ecosystem multifunctionality, a combined metric representing the ability of an ecosystem to simultaneously maintain multiple functions. One key exception was attributed to time-dependent effects of intraguild predation, which initially increased values for most ecosystem response variables, but resulted in decreases over time likely due to reduced nutrient remineralization by surviving predators. At the same time, loss of species did not result in strong trophic cascades, possibly a result of compensation and complexity of these multitrophic ecosystems along with a dominance of bottom-up effects. Our results indicate that although rare species may comprise minor components of communities, their loss can have profound ecosystem consequences across multiple trophic

  15. Methodology significantly affects genome size estimates: quantitative evidence using bryophytes.

    PubMed

    Bainard, Jillian D; Fazekas, Aron J; Newmaster, Steven G

    2010-08-01

    Flow cytometry (FCM) is commonly used to determine plant genome size estimates. Methodology has improved and changed during the past three decades, and researchers are encouraged to optimize protocols for their specific application. However, this step is typically omitted or undescribed in the current plant genome size literature, and this omission could have serious consequences for the genome size estimates obtained. Using four bryophyte species (Brachythecium velutinum, Fissidens taxifolius, Hedwigia ciliata, and Thuidium minutulum), three methodological approaches to the use of FCM in plant genome size estimation were tested. These included nine different buffers (Baranyi's, de Laat's, Galbraith's, General Purpose, LB01, MgSO(4), Otto's, Tris.MgCl(2), and Woody Plant), seven propidium iodide (PI) staining periods (5, 10, 15, 20, 45, 60, and 120 min), and six PI concentrations (10, 25, 50, 100, 150, and 200 microg ml(-1)). Buffer, staining period and staining concentration all had a statistically significant effect (P = 0.05) on the genome size estimates obtained for all four species. Buffer choice and PI concentration had the greatest effect, altering the 1C-values by as much as 8% and 14%, respectively. As well, the quality of the data varied with the different methodology used. Using the methodology determined to be the most accurate in this study (LB01 buffer and PI staining for 20 min at 150 microg ml(-1)), three new genome size estimates were obtained: B. velutinum: 0.46 pg, H. ciliata: 0.30 pg, and T. minutulum: 0.46 pg. While the peak quality of flow cytometry histograms is important, researchers must consider that changes in methodology can also affect the relative peak positions and therefore the genome size estimates obtained for plants using FCM.

  16. Diversity and antagonistic potential of bacteria associated with bryophytes from nutrient-poor habitats of the Baltic Sea Coast.

    PubMed

    Opelt, Katja; Berg, Gabriele

    2004-11-01

    Very little is known about the interaction of bryophytes with bacteria. Therefore, we analyzed bacteria associated with three bryophyte species, Tortula ruralis, Aulacomnium palustre, and Sphagnum rubellum, which represent typical moss species of three nutrient-poor plant communities at the southern Baltic Sea coast in Germany. By use of two cultivation-independent techniques, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis of the 16S ribosomal DNA, a high degree of moss specificity was found for associated bacterial communities. This specificity could be further evidenced by a cultivation-dependent approach for the following parameters: (i) plate counts of bacteria on R2A medium, (ii) proportion of antagonistic isolates, (iii) antagonistic activity as well as spectrum against pathogens, and (iv) diversity and richness of antagonistic isolates. The proportion of isolates with antagonistic activity against the pathogenic model fungus Verticillium dahliae was highest for S. rubellum (31%), followed by A. palustre (17%) and T. ruralis (5%). A high percentage (99%) of moss-associated antagonistic bacteria produced antifungal compounds. The high recovery of antagonistic isolates strongly suggests that bryophytes represent an ecological niche which harbors a diverse and hitherto largely uncharacterized microbial population with yet unknown and untapped potential biotechnological applications, e.g., for biological control of plant pathogens.

  17. Diversity and Antagonistic Potential of Bacteria Associated with Bryophytes from Nutrient-Poor Habitats of the Baltic Sea Coast

    PubMed Central

    Opelt, Katja; Berg, Gabriele

    2004-01-01

    Very little is known about the interaction of bryophytes with bacteria. Therefore, we analyzed bacteria associated with three bryophyte species, Tortula ruralis, Aulacomnium palustre, and Sphagnum rubellum, which represent typical moss species of three nutrient-poor plant communities at the southern Baltic Sea coast in Germany. By use of two cultivation-independent techniques, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis of the 16S ribosomal DNA, a high degree of moss specificity was found for associated bacterial communities. This specificity could be further evidenced by a cultivation-dependent approach for the following parameters: (i) plate counts of bacteria on R2A medium, (ii) proportion of antagonistic isolates, (iii) antagonistic activity as well as spectrum against pathogens, and (iv) diversity and richness of antagonistic isolates. The proportion of isolates with antagonistic activity against the pathogenic model fungus Verticillium dahliae was highest for S. rubellum (31%), followed by A. palustre (17%) and T. ruralis (5%). A high percentage (99%) of moss-associated antagonistic bacteria produced antifungal compounds. The high recovery of antagonistic isolates strongly suggests that bryophytes represent an ecological niche which harbors a diverse and hitherto largely uncharacterized microbial population with yet unknown and untapped potential biotechnological applications, e.g., for biological control of plant pathogens. PMID:15528520

  18. Fossil bryophytes as recorders of ancient CO2 levels: Experimental evidence and a Cretaceous case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, Benjamin J.; Beerling, David J.; Brentnall, Stuart J.; Royer, Dana L.

    2005-09-01

    Biological and geochemical CO2 proxies provide critical constraints on understanding the role of atmospheric CO2 in driving climate change during Earth history. As no single existing CO2 proxy is without its limitations, there is a clear need for new approaches to reconstructing past CO2 concentrations. Here we develop a new pre-Quaternary CO2 proxy based on the stable carbon isotope composition (δ13C) of astomatous land plants. In a series of CO2-controlled laboratory experiments, we show that the carbon isotope discrimination (Δ13C) of a range of bryophyte (liverwort and moss) species increases with atmospheric CO2 across the range 375 to 6000 ppm. Separate experiments establish that variations in growth temperature, water content and substrate type have minor impacts on the Δ13C of liverworts but not mosses, indicating the greater potential of liverworts to faithfully record past variations in CO2. A mechanistic model for calculating past CO2 concentrations from bryophyte Δ13C (White et al., 1994) is extended and calibrated using our experimental results. The potential for fossil liverworts to record past CO2 changes is investigated by analyzing the δ13C of specimens collected from Alexander Island, Antarctica dating to the "greenhouse" world of the mid-Cretaceous. Our analysis and isotopic model yield mid-Cretaceous CO2 concentrations of 1000-1400 ppm, in general agreement with independent proxy data and long-term carbon cycle models. The exceptionally long evolutionary history of bryophytes offers the possibility of reconstructing CO2 concentrations back to the mid-Ordovician, pre-dating all currently used quantitative CO2 proxies.

  19. High potential for chemical weathering and climate effects of early lichens and bryophytes in the Late Ordovician

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porada, Philipp; Lenton, Tim; Pohl, Alexandre; Weber, Bettina; Mander, Luke; Donnadieu, Yannick; Beer, Christian; Pöschl, Ulrich; Kleidon, Axel

    2016-04-01

    Non-vascular vegetation in the Late Ordovician may have considerably increased global chemical weathering, thereby reducing atmospheric CO2 concentration and contributing to a decrease in global temperature and the onset of glaciations. Usually, enhancement of weathering by non-vascular vegetation is estimated using field experiments which are limited to small areas and a low number of species. This makes it difficult to extrapolate to the global scale and to climatic conditions of the past, which differ markedly from the recent climate. Here we present a global, spatially explicit modelling approach to estimate chemical weathering by non-vascular vegetation in the Late Ordovician. During this period, vegetation probably consisted of early forms of today's lichens and bryophytes. We simulate these organisms with a process-based model, which takes into account their physiological diversity by representing multiple species. The productivity of lichens and bryophytes is then related to chemical weathering of surface rocks. The rationale is that the organisms dissolve rocks to extract phosphorus for the production of new biomass. To account for the limited supply of unweathered rock material in shallow regions, we cap biotic weathering at the erosion rate. We estimate a potential global weathering flux of 10.2 km3 yr-1 of rock, which is around 12 times larger than today's global chemical weathering. The high weathering potential implies a considerable impact of lichens and bryophytes on atmospheric CO2 concentration in the Ordovician. Moreover, we find that biotic weathering is highly sensitive to atmospheric CO2, which suggests a strong feedback between chemical weathering by lichens and bryophytes and climate.

  20. Redescription of the Advertisement Call of Five Species of Thoropa (Anura, Cycloramphidae), Including Recordings of Rare and Endangered Species

    PubMed Central

    Assis, Clodoaldo L.; Feio, Renato N.; Toledo, Luís Felipe

    2016-01-01

    Frogs of the genus Thoropa comprise six endemic Brazilian species on the Eastern side of the country. Little is known about their natural history, especially about their acoustic communication. Therefore, aiming to provide an overview of their vocalizations, we analyzed and redescribed male advertisement calls of three living and two possibly extinct species. The smaller species, T. petropolitana and T. lutzi, produce simple calls (one single note) with a higher frequency range than the remaining larger ones. On the other hand, the larger species present complex calls, with more than one note: T. megatympanum calls have three notes, T. taophora calls have four notes, and T. miliaris calls varies from three to six notes. Population snout-vent length negatively correlated with peak of dominant frequency as expected. However, highlighted differences between two populations of T. lutzi, which could indicate need of further taxonomic evaluation of those lineages. Peculiar morphology, such as the absence of vocal sacs and slits, may have contributed to their call variation and highly banded frequency structure. If the observed population differences reflect species-level differences, T. lutzi may be classified as a critically endangered species, as T. petropolitana. Furthermore, we provided a suggestion to an unusual behavior in frogs: calling with the mouth open in the smaller species of the genus. PMID:27617833

  1. Redescription of the Advertisement Call of Five Species of Thoropa (Anura, Cycloramphidae), Including Recordings of Rare and Endangered Species.

    PubMed

    Nunes-de-Almeida, Carlos H L; Assis, Clodoaldo L; Feio, Renato N; Toledo, Luís Felipe

    2016-01-01

    Frogs of the genus Thoropa comprise six endemic Brazilian species on the Eastern side of the country. Little is known about their natural history, especially about their acoustic communication. Therefore, aiming to provide an overview of their vocalizations, we analyzed and redescribed male advertisement calls of three living and two possibly extinct species. The smaller species, T. petropolitana and T. lutzi, produce simple calls (one single note) with a higher frequency range than the remaining larger ones. On the other hand, the larger species present complex calls, with more than one note: T. megatympanum calls have three notes, T. taophora calls have four notes, and T. miliaris calls varies from three to six notes. Population snout-vent length negatively correlated with peak of dominant frequency as expected. However, highlighted differences between two populations of T. lutzi, which could indicate need of further taxonomic evaluation of those lineages. Peculiar morphology, such as the absence of vocal sacs and slits, may have contributed to their call variation and highly banded frequency structure. If the observed population differences reflect species-level differences, T. lutzi may be classified as a critically endangered species, as T. petropolitana. Furthermore, we provided a suggestion to an unusual behavior in frogs: calling with the mouth open in the smaller species of the genus.

  2. Predicting Environmental Suitability for a Rare and Threatened Species (Lao Newt, Laotriton laoensis) Using Validated Species Distribution Models

    PubMed Central

    Chunco, Amanda J.; Phimmachak, Somphouthone; Sivongxay, Niane; Stuart, Bryan L.

    2013-01-01

    The Lao newt (Laotriton laoensis) is a recently described species currently known only from northern Laos. Little is known about the species, but it is threatened as a result of overharvesting. We integrated field survey results with climate and altitude data to predict the geographic distribution of this species using the niche modeling program Maxent, and we validated these predictions by using interviews with local residents to confirm model predictions of presence and absence. The results of the validated Maxent models were then used to characterize the environmental conditions of areas predicted suitable for L. laoensis. Finally, we overlaid the resulting model with a map of current national protected areas in Laos to determine whether or not any land predicted to be suitable for this species is coincident with a national protected area. We found that both area under the curve (AUC) values and interview data provided strong support for the predictive power of these models, and we suggest that interview data could be used more widely in species distribution niche modeling. Our results further indicated that this species is mostly likely geographically restricted to high altitude regions (i.e., over 1,000 m elevation) in northern Laos and that only a minute fraction of suitable habitat is currently protected. This work thus emphasizes that increased protection efforts, including listing this species as endangered and the establishment of protected areas in the region predicted to be suitable for L. laoensis, are urgently needed. PMID:23555808

  3. Predicting environmental suitability for a rare and threatened species (Lao newt, Laotriton laoensis) using validated species distribution models.

    PubMed

    Chunco, Amanda J; Phimmachak, Somphouthone; Sivongxay, Niane; Stuart, Bryan L

    2013-01-01

    The Lao newt (Laotriton laoensis) is a recently described species currently known only from northern Laos. Little is known about the species, but it is threatened as a result of overharvesting. We integrated field survey results with climate and altitude data to predict the geographic distribution of this species using the niche modeling program Maxent, and we validated these predictions by using interviews with local residents to confirm model predictions of presence and absence. The results of the validated Maxent models were then used to characterize the environmental conditions of areas predicted suitable for L. laoensis. Finally, we overlaid the resulting model with a map of current national protected areas in Laos to determine whether or not any land predicted to be suitable for this species is coincident with a national protected area. We found that both area under the curve (AUC) values and interview data provided strong support for the predictive power of these models, and we suggest that interview data could be used more widely in species distribution niche modeling. Our results further indicated that this species is mostly likely geographically restricted to high altitude regions (i.e., over 1,000 m elevation) in northern Laos and that only a minute fraction of suitable habitat is currently protected. This work thus emphasizes that increased protection efforts, including listing this species as endangered and the establishment of protected areas in the region predicted to be suitable for L. laoensis, are urgently needed.

  4. RNA editing in bryophytes and a molecular phylogeny of land plants.

    PubMed Central

    Malek, O; Lättig, K; Hiesel, R; Brennicke, A; Knoop, V

    1996-01-01

    RNA editing has been observed to date in all groups of vascular plants, but not in bryophytes. Its occurrence was therefore assumed to correlate with the evolution of tracheophytes. To gain more insight into both the phylogeny of early land plants and the evolution of mitochondrial RNA editing we have investigated a number of vascular and non-vascular plant species. Contrary to the belief that editing is absent from bryophytes, here we report mitochondrial RNA editing in cox3 mRNA of the liverwort Pellia epiphylla, the mosses Tetraphis pellucida and Ceratodon purpureus and the hornwort Anthroceros crispulus. RNA editing in plants consequently predates the evolution of tracheophytes. Editing is also found in the eusporangiate ferns Ophioglossum petiolatum and Angiopteris palmiformis, the whisk fern Tmesipteris elongata and the gnetopsid Ephedra gerardiana, but was not detected in Gnetum gnemon.cox3 mRNA of the lycopsid Isoetes lacustris shows the highest frequency of RNA editing ever observed in a plant, with 39% of all cytidine residues converted to uridines. The frequency of RNA editing correlates with the genomic GC content rather than with the phylogenetic position of a species. Phylogenetic trees derived from the slowly evolving mitochondrial sequences find external support from the assessments of classical systematics. Images PMID:8635473

  5. [Factors limiting distribution of the rare lichen species Lobaria pulmonaria (in forests of the Kologriv Forest Nature Reserve)].

    PubMed

    Ivanova, N V

    2015-01-01

    The distribution patterns and coenotic confines ofthe epiphytic lichen Lobaria pulmonaria have been studied. The factors limiting the habitat of this rare lichen species in the Kologriv Forest Nature Reserve (southern taiga subzone) have been revealed. It has been shown that L. pulmonaria is attracted to forest areas, which are less affected by humans and characterized by better light conditions than other communities. It has been found that L. pulmonaria is able to colonize trees at various ontogenetic states, beginning from virginal ones.

  6. A new species of the rare African wool carder bee genus Anthidioma (Hymenoptera: Megachilidae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A new species of the genus Anthidioma Pasteels (Megachilidae: Anthidiini) is described and figured from a female collected in the Obib Dunes in Namibia. Anthidioma obibense, new species, is differentieated from the only other species of the genus, A. chalicodomoides, on the basis of its integumenta...

  7. Effects of clonality on the genetic variability of rare, insular species: the case of Ruta microcarpa from the Canary Islands

    PubMed Central

    Meloni, M; Reid, A; Caujapé-Castells, J; Marrero, Á; Fernández-Palacios, J M; Mesa-Coelo, R A; Conti, E

    2013-01-01

    Many plant species combine sexual and clonal reproduction. Clonal propagation has ecological costs mainly related to inbreeding depression and pollen discounting; at the same time, species able to reproduce clonally have ecological and evolutionary advantages being able to persist when conditions are not favorable for sexual reproduction. The presence of clonality has profound consequences on the genetic structure of populations, especially when it represents the predominant reproductive strategy in a population. Theoretical studies suggest that high rate of clonal propagation should increase the effective number of alleles and heterozygosity in a population, while an opposite effect is expected on genetic differentiation among populations and on genotypic diversity. In this study, we ask how clonal propagation affects the genetic diversity of rare insular species, which are often characterized by low levels of genetic diversity, hence at risk of extinction. We used eight polymorphic microsatellite markers to study the genetic structure of the critically endangered insular endemic Ruta microcarpa. We found that clonality appears to positively affect the genetic diversity of R. microcarpa by increasing allelic diversity, polymorphism, and heterozygosity. Moreover, clonal propagation seems to be a more successful reproductive strategy in small, isolated population subjected to environmental stress. Our results suggest that clonal propagation may benefit rare species. However, the advantage of clonal growth may be only short-lived for prolonged clonal growth could ultimately lead to monoclonal populations. Some degree of sexual reproduction may be needed in a predominantly clonal species to ensure long-term viability. PMID:23789068

  8. Negative density dependence is stronger in resource-rich environments and diversifies communities when stronger for common but not rare species.

    PubMed

    LaManna, Joseph A; Walton, Maranda L; Turner, Benjamin L; Myers, Jonathan A

    2016-06-01

    Conspecific negative density dependence is thought to maintain diversity by limiting abundances of common species. Yet the extent to which this mechanism can explain patterns of species diversity across environmental gradients is largely unknown. We examined density-dependent recruitment of seedlings and saplings and changes in local species diversity across a soil-resource gradient for 38 woody-plant species in a temperate forest. At both life stages, the strength of negative density dependence increased with resource availability, becoming relatively stronger for rare species during seedling recruitment, but stronger for common species during sapling recruitment. Moreover, negative density dependence appeared to reduce diversity when stronger for rare than common species, but increase diversity when stronger for common species. Our results suggest that negative density dependence is stronger in resource-rich environments and can either decrease or maintain diversity depending on its relative strength among common and rare species. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/CNRS.

  9. Massisteria marina has a sister: Massisteria voersi sp. nov., a rare species isolated from coastal waters of the Baltic Sea.

    PubMed

    Mylnikov, Alexander P; Weber, Felix; Jürgens, Klaus; Wylezich, Claudia

    2015-08-01

    For many years, the genus Massisteria (Cercozoa, Leucodictyida) comprised only one species, M. marina. This small species has a biphasic life cycle and feeds through filose, radiating pseudopodia. It has a distinct swimming form and is regularly detected in association with detritus aggregates. However, environmental sequences closely related to this species indicate a larger species richness than hitherto described for the genus Massisteria. Here we provide the first report of Massisteria voersi sp. nov., investigated with microscopic and molecular methods. Several strains of this new species were isolated from brackish water at a Baltic Sea coastal monitoring station. Their characteristics are typical of the genus. Massisteria voersi differs from M. marina by smaller cell size (2.3-3 μm vs. 2.5-9 μm) and absent fused motile cells. Additionally, in contrast to M. marina, the new species lacks a paranuclear body and its kinetosomes are arranged in parallel. Both species are quite distantly related regarding their 18S rRNA gene sequences. The sparse availability of environmental sequences closely related to M. voersi as well as our preliminary results from fluorescence in situ hybridization studies suggest that this new species is a representative of low-abundance populations comprising the so-called "rare biosphere." Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. Rare Failures of DNA Bar Codes to Separate Morphologically Distinct Species in a Biodiversity Survey of Iberian Leaf Beetles

    PubMed Central

    Baselga, Andrés; Gómez-Rodríguez, Carola; Novoa, Francisco; Vogler, Alfried P.

    2013-01-01

    During a survey of genetic and species diversity patterns of leaf beetle (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) assemblages across the Iberian Peninsula we found a broad congruence between morphologically delimited species and variation in the cytochrome oxidase (cox1) gene. However, one species pair each in the genera Longitarsus Berthold and Pachybrachis Chevrolat was inseparable using molecular methods, whereas diagnostic morphological characters (including male or female genitalia) unequivocally separated the named species. Parsimony haplotype networks and maximum likelihood trees built from cox1 showed high genetic structure within each species pair, but no correlation with the morphological types and neither with geographic distributions. This contrasted with all analysed congeneric species, which were recovered as monophyletic. A limited number of specimens were sequenced for the nuclear 18S rRNA gene, which showed no or very limited variation within the species pair and no separation of morphological types. These results suggest that processes of lineage sorting for either group are lagging behind the clear morphological and presumably reproductive separation. In the Iberian chrysomelids, incongruence between DNA-based and morphological delimitations is a rare exception, but the discovery of these species pairs may be useful as an evolutionary model for studying the process of speciation in this ecological and geographical setting. In addition, the study of biodiversity patterns based on DNA requires an evolutionary understanding of these incongruences and their potential causes. PMID:24040352

  11. Rare failures of DNA barcodes [corrected] to separate morphologically distinct species in a biodiversity survey of Iberian leaf beetles.

    PubMed

    Baselga, Andrés; Gómez-Rodríguez, Carola; Novoa, Francisco; Vogler, Alfried P

    2013-01-01

    During a survey of genetic and species diversity patterns of leaf beetle (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) assemblages across the Iberian Peninsula we found a broad congruence between morphologically delimited species and variation in the cytochrome oxidase (cox1) gene. However, one species pair each in the genera Longitarsus Berthold and Pachybrachis Chevrolat was inseparable using molecular methods, whereas diagnostic morphological characters (including male or female genitalia) unequivocally separated the named species. Parsimony haplotype networks and maximum likelihood trees built from cox1 showed high genetic structure within each species pair, but no correlation with the morphological types and neither with geographic distributions. This contrasted with all analysed congeneric species, which were recovered as monophyletic. A limited number of specimens were sequenced for the nuclear 18S rRNA gene, which showed no or very limited variation within the species pair and no separation of morphological types. These results suggest that processes of lineage sorting for either group are lagging behind the clear morphological and presumably reproductive separation. In the Iberian chrysomelids, incongruence between DNA-based and morphological delimitations is a rare exception, but the discovery of these species pairs may be useful as an evolutionary model for studying the process of speciation in this ecological and geographical setting. In addition, the study of biodiversity patterns based on DNA requires an evolutionary understanding of these incongruences and their potential causes.

  12. Projections of suitable habitat for rare species under global warming scenarios

    Treesearch

    F. Thomas Ledig; Gerald E. Rehfeldt; Cuauhtemoc Saenz-Romero; Flores-Lopez Celestino

    2010-01-01

    Premise of the study: Modeling the contemporary and future climate niche for rare plants is a major hurdle in conservation, yet such projections are necessary to prevent extinctions that may result from climate change. Methods: We used recently developed spline climatic models and modifi ed Random Forests...

  13. Robust detection of rare species using environmental DNA: The importance of primer specificity

    Treesearch

    Taylor M. Wilcox; Kevin S. McKelvey; Michael K. Young; Stephen F. Jane; Winsor H. Lowe; Andrew R. Whiteley; Michael K. Schwartz

    2013-01-01

    Environmental DNA (eDNA) is being rapidly adopted as a tool to detect rare animals. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) using probebased chemistries may represent a particularly powerful tool because of the method's sensitivity, specificity, and potential to quantify target DNA. However, there has been little work understanding the performance of these assays in the presence...

  14. Banking on the past: seed banks as a reservoir for rare and native species in restored vernal pools

    PubMed Central

    Faist, Akasha M.; Ferrenberg, Scott; Collinge, Sharon K.

    2013-01-01

    Soil seed banks serve as reservoirs for future plant communities, and when diverse and abundant can buffer vegetation communities against environmental fluctuations. Sparse seed banks, however, may lead to future declines of already rare species. Seed banks in wetland communities are often robust and can persist over long time periods making wetlands model systems for studying the spatial and temporal links between above- and belowground communities. Using collected soils and germination trials, we assessed species diversity and density in the seed banks of restored, ephemeral wetlands (vernal pools) in California's Central Valley, USA. Using long-term vegetation surveys, we compared the community structure of seed banks to that of aboveground vegetation and assessed the temporal links between below- and aboveground communities. We also compared the proportional abundances of different cover classes as well as the abundance of native plants in seed banks to aboveground communities. The proportional abundances of both rare and native species were greater in seed bank samples than in aboveground samples, yet the seed bank had lower species richness than aboveground vegetation. However, the seed bank had greater levels of differentiation among pools (beta diversity; β) than aboveground samples. Additionally, the seed bank was more similar to the earlier (2003–06) aboveground community than the more recent (2007–10) aboveground community. The correlation of species composition in the current seed bank to an earlier aboveground community suggests that seed banks exhibit storage effects while aboveground species composition in this system is not driven by seed bank composition, but is perhaps due to environmental filtering. We conclude that the seed bank of these pools is neither prone to the same temporal rates of invasion as the aboveground community, nor is seed abundance presently a limiting factor in the aboveground frequency of native species or a promoting

  15. Identification and Management of Multiple Threats to Rare and Endangered Plant Species

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-30

    Proportion of A. rostellata (A), A. serpentaria (B) and T. erectum (C) plants attacked by herbivores in one open and fenced plot per species from 2009...by the angular cut of stems. These three species also showed frequent attack by a variety of invertebrate herbivores . Population growth rate (λ) of... herbivores . These effects are most likely species-specific as has been demonstrated in Minnesota where foliar nitrogen content for Carex pensylvanica

  16. Forestry impacts on the hidden fungal biodiversity associated with bryophytes.

    PubMed

    Davey, Marie L; Kauserud, Håvard; Ohlson, Mikael

    2014-10-01

    Recent studies have revealed an unexpectedly high, cryptic diversity of fungi associated with boreal forest bryophytes. Forestry practices heavily influence the boreal forest and fundamentally transform the landscape. However, little is known about how bryophyte-associated fungal communities are affected by these large-scale habitat transformations. This study assesses to what degree bryophyte-associated fungal communities are structured across the forest successional stages created by current forestry practices. Shoots of Hylocomium splendens were collected in Picea abies dominated forests of different ages, and their associated fungal communities were surveyed by pyrosequencing of ITS2 amplicons. Although community richness, diversity and evenness were relatively stable across the forest types and all were consistently dominated by ascomycete taxa, there was a marked shift in fungal community composition between young and old forests. Numerous fungal operational taxonomic units (OTUs) showed distinct affinities for different forest ages. Spatial structure was also detected among the sites, suggesting that environmental gradients resulting from the topography of the study area and dispersal limitations may also significantly affect bryophyte-associated fungal community structure. This study confirms that Hylocomium splendens hosts an immense diversity of fungi and demonstrates that this community is structured in part by forest age, and as such is highly influenced by modern forestry practices.

  17. Biochemical and Molecular Mechanisms of Desiccation Tolerance in Bryophytes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bryophytes, because they descend from the earliest branching events in the phylogeny of land plants, hold an important position in our investigations into the mechanisms by which plants respond to dehydration and by what paths such mechanisms have evolved. This is true regardless of what aspect of p...

  18. The importance of data quality for generating reliable distribution models for rare, elusive, and cryptic species

    Treesearch

    Keith B. Aubry; Catherine M. Raley; Kevin S. McKelvey

    2017-01-01

    The availability of spatially referenced environmental data and species occurrence records in online databases enable practitioners to easily generate species distribution models (SDMs) for a broad array of taxa. Such databases often include occurrence records of unknown reliability, yet little information is available on the influence of data quality on SDMs generated...

  19. Rare pits, large vessels and extreme vulnerability to cavitation in a ring-porous tree species.

    PubMed

    Christman, Mairgareth A; Sperry, John S; Smith, Duncan D

    2012-02-01

    • The rare pit hypothesis predicts that the extensive inter-vessel pitting in large early-wood vessels of ring-porous trees should render many of these vessels extremely vulnerable to cavitation by air-seeding. This prediction was tested in Quercus gambelii. • Cavitation was assessed from native hydraulic conductivity at field sap tension and in dehydrated branches. Single-vessel air injections gave air-seeding pressures through vessel files; these data were used to estimate air-seeding pressures for inter-vessel walls and pits. • Extensive cavitation occurred at xylem sap tensions below 1 MPa. Refilling occurred below 0.5 MPa and was inhibited by phloem girdling. Remaining vessels cavitated over a wide range to above 4 MPa. Similarly, 40% of injected vessel files air-seeded below 1.0 MPa, whereas the remainder seeded over a wide range exceeding 5 MPa. Inter-vessel walls averaged 1.02 MPa air-seeding pressure, similar and opposite to the mean cavitation tension of 1.22 MPa. Consistent with the rare pit hypothesis, only 7% of inter-vessel pits were estimated to air-seed by 1.22 MPa. • The results confirm the rare pit prediction that a significant fraction of large vessels in Q. gambelii experience high probability of failure by air-seeding. © 2011 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2011 New Phytologist Trust.

  20. Effect of forest clear-cutting on subtropical bryophyte communities in waterfalls, on dripping walls, and along streams.

    PubMed

    Patiño, Jairo; Hylander, Kristoffer; González-Mancebo, Juana M

    2010-09-01

    Forested freshwater ecosystems worldwide are threatened by a number of anthropogenic disturbances, such as water pollution and canalization. Transient or permanent deforestation can also be a serious threat to organisms in forested watersheds, but its effects on different types of freshwater systems has been little studied. We investigated lotic bryophyte communities on rock and soil in subtropical cloud laurel forests on La Gomera Island in the Canary Islands, Spain, and asked whether the response to forest clear-cutting varied among the communities associated with dripping walls, streams, and waterfalls. We compared three successional forest stages: ancient forests (> 250 years), young forests (20-50 years after clear-cutting), and open stands (5-15 years after clear-cutting). In each of 56 study sites we sampled general vegetation and substrate data in a 0.01-ha plot and took composition data of bryophyte species in 3 + 3 subplots of 1 x 1 m. The general pattern of decline in species richness and change in species composition after forest clear-cutting was stronger for streamside assemblages compared to assemblages on dripping walls and in waterfalls. The change in species numbers on rocks was larger than that on soils, because a guild of species growing on soil (but not on rocks) were favored by disturbance and thus increased in the disturbed sites. Most of the sensitive species could be classified as typical laurel forest species. Mosses were generally more tolerant to forest clear-cutting than were liverworts. We suggest that streamsides are more sensitive to disturbance than waterfalls and dripping walls because of a larger variation in microclimate before than after clear-cutting and because they are more easily invaded by early-successional species (both bryophytes and highly competitive vascular plants). We propose that special care should be taken along small streams within disturbed watersheds if bryophyte assemblages and threatened species should be

  1. Disentangling effects of uncertainties on population projections: climate change impact on an epixylic bryophyte

    PubMed Central

    Ruete, Alejandro; Yang, Wei; Bärring, Lars; Stenseth, Nils Chr.; Snäll, Tord

    2012-01-01

    Assessment of future ecosystem risks should account for the relevant uncertainty sources. This means accounting for the joint effects of climate variables and using modelling techniques that allow proper treatment of uncertainties. We investigate the influence of three of the IPCC's scenarios of greenhouse gas emissions (special report on emission scenarios (SRES)) on projections of the future abundance of a bryophyte model species. We also compare the relative importance of uncertainty sources on the population projections. The whole chain global climate model (GCM)—regional climate model—population dynamics model is addressed. The uncertainty depends on both natural- and model-related sources, in particular on GCM uncertainty. Ignoring the uncertainties gives an unwarranted impression of confidence in the results. The most likely population development of the bryophyte Buxbaumia viridis towards the end of this century is negative: even with a low-emission scenario, there is more than a 65 per cent risk for the population to be halved. The conclusion of a population decline is valid for all SRES scenarios investigated. Uncertainties are no longer an obstacle, but a mandatory aspect to include in the viability analysis of populations. PMID:22456878

  2. Boulders increase resistance to clear-cut logging but not subsequent recolonization rates of boreal bryophytes.

    PubMed

    Schmalholz, Martin; Hylander, Kristoffer

    2011-12-01

    The extent to which a plant assemblage might recolonize a disturbed system is in general related to the availability of propagule sources and sites with appropriate conditions for establishment. Both these factors might be sensitive to aspects of spatial heterogeneity. Microtopographic variation may enhance initial resistance by reducing the impact of the disturbance and facilitating establishment of incoming propagules by providing shaded "safe-sites". This study explores the influence of microtopographic heterogeneity (caused by variation in surface boulder cover) on the recolonization of closed-canopy forest floor bryophytes using a chronosequence of 75 spruce-dominated forests in south-central Sweden (2-163 years after clear-cutting). We found that high boulder cover did increase survival and subsequent persistence in young forests at both investigated scales (i.e. 1,000 and 100 m(2)), although this pattern became less evident on the smaller spatial scale. Species accumulation in boulder-poor subplots was not different when surrounded by boulder-rich compared with boulder-poor subplots suggesting short-distance recolonization from boulder-created refugia to be of little importance during recolonization. To conclude, it seems that boulders increase initial resistance to clear-cutting for this bryophyte guild, but that the subsequent recolonization process is more likely to depend on external propagule sources and factors affecting establishment such as the microclimate in the developing stand.

  3. Disentangling effects of uncertainties on population projections: climate change impact on an epixylic bryophyte.

    PubMed

    Ruete, Alejandro; Yang, Wei; Bärring, Lars; Stenseth, Nils Chr; Snäll, Tord

    2012-08-07

    Assessment of future ecosystem risks should account for the relevant uncertainty sources. This means accounting for the joint effects of climate variables and using modelling techniques that allow proper treatment of uncertainties. We investigate the influence of three of the IPCC's scenarios of greenhouse gas emissions (special report on emission scenarios (SRES)) on projections of the future abundance of a bryophyte model species. We also compare the relative importance of uncertainty sources on the population projections. The whole chain global climate model (GCM)-regional climate model-population dynamics model is addressed. The uncertainty depends on both natural- and model-related sources, in particular on GCM uncertainty. Ignoring the uncertainties gives an unwarranted impression of confidence in the results. The most likely population development of the bryophyte Buxbaumia viridis towards the end of this century is negative: even with a low-emission scenario, there is more than a 65 per cent risk for the population to be halved. The conclusion of a population decline is valid for all SRES scenarios investigated. Uncertainties are no longer an obstacle, but a mandatory aspect to include in the viability analysis of populations.

  4. Biological assessment for rare and endangered plant species: Related to CERCLA characterization activities

    SciTech Connect

    Sackschewsky, M.R.

    1992-04-01

    Environmental characterization in support of hazardous, radioactive, and mixed waste cleanup (in accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980) can involve a large number of both nonintrusive and intrusive activities. Many of these activities could have a detrimental impact on listed plant species. These impacts can be minimized by following simple conservation policies while conducting the various field activities. For instance, frequent off-road vehicular traffic and have a severe impact on native habitats and, therefore, should be kept to a minimum. Personnel performing the field activities should be trained to preserve, respect, and minimize their impact on native habitat while performing work in the field. In addition, areas where sampling is planned should be surveyed for the presence of listed plant species before the initiation of the field activities. Extremely distributed areas could be exempted from this requirement provided adequate habitat assessments have been performed by qualified personnel. Twelve special status plant species are known to survive on or very near the Hanford Site. None of these species currently are listed as Federal Threatened or Endangered Species. However, four local species currently are candidates for federal protection. These species are the Northern Wormwood (Artemisia campestris ssp. borealis var. wormskioldii), Persistantsepal Yellowcress (Rorippa columbiae), Hoover's Desert Parsley (Lomatium tuberosum), and Columbia Milkvetch (Astragalus columbianus).

  5. Biological assessment for rare and endangered plant species: Related to CERCLA characterization activities

    SciTech Connect

    Sackschewsky, M.R.

    1992-04-01

    Environmental characterization in support of hazardous, radioactive, and mixed waste cleanup (in accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980) can involve a large number of both nonintrusive and intrusive activities. Many of these activities could have a detrimental impact on listed plant species. These impacts can be minimized by following simple conservation policies while conducting the various field activities. For instance, frequent off-road vehicular traffic and have a severe impact on native habitats and, therefore, should be kept to a minimum. Personnel performing the field activities should be trained to preserve, respect, and minimize their impact on native habitat while performing work in the field. In addition, areas where sampling is planned should be surveyed for the presence of listed plant species before the initiation of the field activities. Extremely distributed areas could be exempted from this requirement provided adequate habitat assessments have been performed by qualified personnel. Twelve special status plant species are known to survive on or very near the Hanford Site. None of these species currently are listed as Federal Threatened or Endangered Species. However, four local species currently are candidates for federal protection. These species are the Northern Wormwood (Artemisia campestris ssp. borealis var. wormskioldii), Persistantsepal Yellowcress (Rorippa columbiae), Hoover`s Desert Parsley (Lomatium tuberosum), and Columbia Milkvetch (Astragalus columbianus).

  6. A new species of the rare endoparasitic copepod Entobius (Copepoda: Entobiidae) from Mexico with a key to the species of the genus.

    PubMed

    Suárez-Morales, Eduardo; Carrera-Parra, Luis F

    2012-09-01

    Abstract: In a study of the benthic polychaete fauna of the southern Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean Sea, several specimens of the terebellid polychaete Scionides reticulata (Ehlers) were found to host endoparasitic copepods that represent an undescribed species of the rare cyclopoid genus Entobius Dogiel, 1948. The new species, E. scionides sp. n., can be distinguished from its congeners by a combination of characters including a genital region without constrictions, three-segmented antennules, a reduced antenna with a blunt terminal process, reduced ornamentation of endopods of legs 1-4 and its relatively small size (2.3-2.7 mm). It is the smallest species of the genus. Comments on immature females are also provided, but males of this species remain unknown. It has a high prevalence (53%) in populations of the terebellid S. reticulata in the southern Gulf of Mexico, but it is absent from the Caribbean. This is the first occurrence of this copepod genus in the Americas. The finding of the new species of Entobius in S. reticulata confirms the strict specificity of most members of the genus and expands the host range of this copepod genus. A key for the identification of the species of Entobius is provided.

  7. [Study on species and distribution of flora of national rare and endangered medicinal plant in the Three Gorges area].

    PubMed

    Chen, Shao-Cheng

    2013-04-01

    According to the China Plant Red Data Book and National Key Protected Wild Plants, the distribution of the rare and endangered plants and national conservative plants in the Three Gorges area were investigated and statistically analyzed. Its floristic composition and characteristics of geographical distribution were explored. As a result, a total of 97 species of medicinal flora belonging to rare and endangered national protection plants were found in the Three Gorges area. They come from 81 genera of 46 families. Their vertical distribution is obvious and horizontal distribution has discontinuous overlap. There are many ancient relict medicinal plants in the Three Gorges area. These medicinal plants have obvious temperate characteristics, and are easily found at warm and moist ravines and hillsides; The proportion of tree is much higher than that of herb, vine, shrub and fern. Most of them belong to specific and monotypic genera.

  8. TESTING INDICATOR GROUPS FOR RESERVE SELECTION: ARE RARE SPECIES AT RISK OF BEING LEFT OUT?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Indicators of biodiversity are potential tools for selecting areas for conservation when information about species' distributions is scarce. The concept involves selecting areas based on groups of conservation targets whose distributions represent more broadly defined patterns o...

  9. Three new species and reassessment of the rare Neotropical ant genus Leptanilloides (Hymenoptera, Formicidae, Leptanilloidinae)

    PubMed Central

    Borowiec, Marek L.; Longino, John T.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract We describe three new species of the Neotropical ant genus Leptanilloides: Leptanilloides gracilis sp. n. based on workers from Mexico and Guatemala, Leptanilloides erinys sp. n. based on workers and a gyne from Ecuador, and Leptanilloides femoralis sp. n. based on workers from Venezuela. The description of Leptanilloides gracilis is a northern extension of the known range of the genus, now numbering eleven described species. We also describe and discuss three unassociated male morphotypes from Central America. We report the occurrence of a metatibial gland in Leptanilloides and a fused promesonotal connection (suture) in some species. We provide a modified, detailed diagnosis of the genus and a revised key to the worker caste of the known species. PMID:22140337

  10. TESTING INDICATOR GROUPS FOR RESERVE SELECTION: ARE RARE SPECIES AT RISK OF BEING LEFT OUT?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Indicators of biodiversity are potential tools for selecting areas for conservation when information about species' distributions is scarce. The concept involves selecting areas based on groups of conservation targets whose distributions represent more broadly defined patterns o...

  11. Assessment of phylogenetic relationship of rare plant species collected from Saudi Arabia using internal transcribed spacer sequences of nuclear ribosomal DNA.

    PubMed

    Al-Qurainy, F; Khan, S; Nadeem, M; Tarroum, M; Alaklabi, A

    2013-03-11

    The rare and endangered plants of any country are important genetic resources that often require urgent conservation measures. Assessment of phylogenetic relationships and evaluation of genetic diversity is very important prior to implementation of conservation strategies for saving rare and endangered plant species. We used internal transcribed spacer sequences of nuclear ribosomal DNA for the evaluation of sequence identity from the available taxa in the GenBank database by using the Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST). Two rare plant species viz, Heliotropium strigosum claded with H. pilosum (98% branch support) and Pancratium tortuosum claded with P. tenuifolium (61% branch support) clearly. However, some species, viz Scadoxus multiflorus, Commiphora myrrha and Senecio hadiensis showed close relationships with more than one species. We conclude that nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer sequences are useful markers for phylogenetic study of these rare plant species in Saudi Arabia.

  12. Polymorphic microsatellite markers for the rare and endangered cactus Uebelmannia pectinifera (Cactaceae) and its congeneric species.

    PubMed

    Moraes, E M; Cidade, F W; Silva, G A R; Machado, M C

    2014-12-04

    The cactus genus Uebelmannia includes 3 narrow endemic species associated with rocky savanna habitats in eastern South America. Because of their rarity and illegal over-collection, all of these species are endangered. Taxonomic uncertainties resulting from dramatic local variation in morphology within Uebelmannia species preclude effective conservation efforts, such as the reintroduction or translocation of plants, to restore declining populations. In this study, we developed and characterized 18 perfect, dinucleotide simple-sequence repeat markers for U. pectinifera, the most widely distributed species in the genus, and tested the cross-amplification of these markers in the remaining congeneric species and subspecies. All markers were polymorphic in a sample from 2 U. pectinifera populations. The effective number of alleles ranged from 1.6 to 8.7, with an average per population of 3.3 (SE ± 0.30) and 4.5 (SE ± 0.50). Expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.375 to 0.847 and 8-10 loci showed departures from Hardy- Weinberg equilibrium in the analyzed populations. Based on the observed polymorphism level of each marker, as well as the analysis of null allele presence and evidence of amplification of duplicate loci, a subset of 12 loci can be used as reliable markers to investigate the genetic structure, diversity, and species limits of the Uebelmannia genus.

  13. Limiting factors of four rare plant species in `Ōla`A Forest of Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    VanDeMark, Joshua R.; Pratt, Linda W.; Euaparadorn, Melody

    2010-01-01

    In conclusion, 2 of the 3 regularly-monitored rare plant species of `Ōla`a Forest appeared to have more than 1 limiting factor inhibiting the natural increase in their populations, while for P. floribunda the most important factor was high seedling mortality. Most plants of the monitored C. giffardii population appeared to be hybrids, probably with the more common species C. lysiosepala. Seed germination rates were low, and natural seedlings were not observed. Pollinators were not seen in many hours of observation, indicating that cross pollination is a rare or uncommon event. The re-introduced population of P. floribunda had relatively low mortality, and reproduction was successful with high rates of fruit formation from abundant flowers. Seed germination rates were high, and a soil seed bank was detected. Natural seedling recruitment was observed, but high seedling mortality indicated that this life stage was the most vulnerable in the species. The population of S. alba was small and the vine life form precluded an accurate estimate of the number of adult plants in `Ōla`a Forest. Natural dormancy was likely a factor in the observed low rate of seed germination. No soil seed bank was detected, and alien rodents were implicated as seed predators. Natural recruitment was observed at multiple sites in `Ōla`a, but seedling mortality was high. The cause of seedling mortality was not identified.

  14. Climate warming increases biodiversity of small rodents by favoring rare or less abundant species in a grassland ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Guangshun; Liu, Jun; Xu, Lei; Yu, Guirui; He, Honglin; Zhang, Zhibin

    2013-06-01

    Our Earth is facing the challenge of accelerating climate change, which imposes a great threat to biodiversity. Many published studies suggest that climate warming may cause a dramatic decline in biodiversity, especially in colder and drier regions. In this study, we investigated the effects of temperature, precipitation and a normalized difference vegetation index on biodiversity indices of rodent communities in the current or previous year for both detrended and nondetrended data in semi-arid grassland of Inner Mongolia during 1982-2006. Our results demonstrate that temperature showed predominantly positive effects on the biodiversity of small rodents; precipitation showed both positive and negative effects; a normalized difference vegetation index showed positive effects; and cross-correlation function values between rodent abundance and temperature were negatively correlated with rodent abundance. Our results suggest that recent climate warming increased the biodiversity of small rodents by providing more benefits to population growth of rare or less abundant species than that of more abundant species in Inner Mongolia grassland, which does not support the popular view that global warming would decrease biodiversity in colder and drier regions. We hypothesized that higher temperatures might benefit rare or less abundant species (with smaller populations and more folivorous diets) by reducing the probability of local extinction and/or by increasing herbaceous food resources.

  15. Uptake and Effects of Six Rare Earth Elements (REEs) on Selected Native and Crop Species Growing in Contaminated Soils

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, David; Boutin, Céline; Allison, Jane E.; Parsons, Jessica L.; Ellis, Deanna M.

    2015-01-01

    Rare earth elements (REEs) have become increasingly important metals used in modern technology. Processes including mining, oil refining, discarding of obsolete equipment containing REEs, and the use of REE-containing phosphate fertilizers may increase the likelihood of environmental contamination. However, there is a scarcity of information on the toxicity and accumulation of these metals to terrestrial primary producers in contaminated soils. The objective of this work was to assess the phytotoxicity and uptake from contaminated soil of six REEs (chloride forms of praseodymium, neodymium, samarium, terbium, dysprosium, and erbium) on three native plants (Asclepias syriaca L., Desmodium canadense (L.) DC., Panicum virgatum L.) and two crop species (Raphanus sativus L., Solanum lycopersicum L.) in separate dose-response experiments under growth chamber conditions. Limited effects of REEs were found on seed germination and speed of germination. Effects on aboveground and belowground biomass were more pronounced, especially for the three native species, which were always more sensitive than the crop species tested. Inhibition concentrations (IC25 and IC50) causing 25 or 50% reductions in plant biomass respectively, were measured. For the native species, the majority of aboveground biomass IC25s (11 out of 18) fell within 100 to 300 mg REE/kg dry soil. In comparison to the native species, IC25s for the crops were always greater than 400 mg REE/kg, with the majority of results (seven out of 12) falling above 700 mg REE/kg. IC50s were often not detected for the crops. Root biomass of native species was also affected at lower doses than in crops. REE uptake by plants was higher in the belowground parts than in the above-ground plant tissues. Results also revealed that chloride may have contributed to the sensitivity of the native species, Desmodium canadense, one of the most sensitive species studied. Nevertheless, these results demonstrated that phytotoxicity may be a

  16. Primulina cardaminifolia (Gesneriaceae), a rare new species from limestone areas in Guangxi, China.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei-Bin; Liu, Yan; Kono, Yoshiko; Chang, Hsuan; Peng, Ching-I; Chung, Kuo-Fang

    2013-12-01

    Primulina cardaminifolia Yan Liu & W.B. Xu (Gesneriaceae), a distinct new species with imparipinnate leaves, is described and illustrated from a limestone valley in Guangxi Zhuangzu Autonomous Region, China. To assure its generic placement and phylogenetic affinity, phylogenetic analyses were performed using DNA sequences of nuclear ITS and chloroplast trnL-F intron spacer region. Additionally, somatic chromosome number was counted and pollen stainability was tested. Phylogenetic analyses support its placement in Primulina; however, two phylogenetically distinct ITS sequence types were detected, suggesting a probable hybrid origin. Its pollen stainability is 100% and its chromosome number, 2n = 36, is congruent with all known counts of diploid species of the genus. All available data support the recognition of the new species Primulina cardaminifolia and suggest that it could have derived from homoploid hybrid speciation. Color plates, line drawings and a distribution map are provided to aid in identification.

  17. Penicillium species as a rare isolate in tracheal granulation tissue: a case series

    PubMed Central

    Randhawa, Premjit S; Nouraei, SA Reza; Howard, David J; Sandhu, Gurpreet S; Petrou, Michael A

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Granulation tissue formation is a major problem complicating the treatment of upper airway stenosis. We present two cases of recurrent tracheal granulation tissue colonisation by Penicillium species in patients undergoing laryngotracheal reconstructive surgery for post-intubation tracheal stenosis. We believe that although most Penicillium species do not cause invasive disease they can be a contributory factor to the occurrence of upper airway stenosis. Case presentation A microbiological and mycological study of tracheal granulation tissue in two patients with recurrent laryngotracheal stenosis was carried out. Penicillium species was seen microscopically and cultured from tracheal granulation tissue. Neither patient grew any bacteria known to be associated with airway granulation tissue formation. Amphotericin B, itraconazole, flucytosine voriconazole and caspofungin were highly active against both isolates. Conclusion A search for a fungal cause should form part of the investigation for recurrent tracheal granulation tissue during laryngotracheal reconstruction. PMID:18346276

  18. [Population structure and environmental relationships of the tropical tree Nectandra rudis (Lauraceae), a rare species in western Mexico].

    PubMed

    Guzmán, Ramón Cuevas; Moya, Edmundo García; García, J Antonio Vázquez; López, Nora M Núñez

    2008-03-01

    Population structure and environmental relationships of the tropical tree Nectandra rudis (Lauraceae), a rare species in western Mexico. The tree N. rudis is a rare species from western Mexico of which community and population features are unknown. We studied a population in an altitudinal gradient, from 550-1,850 m above sea level in the Sierra de Manantlan, Jalisco, Mexico. We established four 60x48 m sample sites at vertical distances of 100 m along this altitudinal gradient. Within each plot, ten 100 m2 circular sub-sampling units were randomly located. At each unit, we recorded diameter at breast height (dbh) and tree height for all woody vegetation > or =2.5 cm dbh. Basal area, tree density, frequency, species richness and importance values per species and plot. We estimated the vertical structure (total tree height) and diameter( as M=5log(10)N) for all N. rudis individuals. A direct ordination through Canonical Correspondence Analysis was done, involving amongst other species, edaphic and environmental data matrices. The record of 44 N. rudis individuals, in seven out the 56 plots sampled, represents the most septentrional record for the species and the first in Western Mexico. Its density and basal area represented 4.5 % and 8.7 % respectively of the total estimated for the community. The greatest importance values were observed at 1 650 m above sea level. The population structure of N. rudis is structured into five diameter categories in an inverse "J" shaped distribution. This is a typical behavior observed to occur in the Lauraceae, which produces big seeds of short viability that germinate when there is high soil moisture content. The species tend to form dense seedling banks although only a reduced number of them are able to survive. Species richness varies from 27 to 39 at plot level; the greatest importance values for the plots on which N. rudis was found, corresponds to Urera verrucosa (Liebm.) V.W. Steinm., N. rudis, Ficus sp., Beilschmiedia

  19. Effects of urban particulate deposition on microbial communities living in bryophytes: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Meyer, C; Bernard, N; Moskura, M; Toussaint, M L; Denayer, F; Gilbert, D

    2010-10-01

    Our previous in situ study showed that bryophyte-microorganism complexes were affected by particulate atmospheric pollution. Here, the effect of urban particulate wet deposits on microbial communities living in bryophytes was studied under controlled conditions. An urban particulate solution was prepared with particles extracted from analyzer' filters and nebulized on bryophytes in treatments differing in frequency and quantity. The bryophytes did not accumulate metallic trace elements, which were present in very weak concentrations. However, in treated microcosms the total microbial biomass and the biomasses of cyanobacteria, active testate amoebae and fungi significantly decreased in response to the deposition of particles. These results confirm that microbial communities living in terrestrial bryophytes could be more sensitive indicators of atmospheric pollution than bryophytes. Moreover, they suggest that unicellular predators--such as testate amoebae--could be especially useful microbial indicators, since they seem to be both directly and indirectly affected by pollution.

  20. Rare & Endangered Species: Understanding Our Disappearing Plants and Animals. Activities Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Gas Association, Arlington, VA. Educational Services.

    About 464 plants and animals found in the United States and its territories are listed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service as threatened or endangered. Another 3900 are candidates for protection. The activities in this guide are designed to help teachers and students understand the issue of endangered species. It includes ideas for several…

  1. Comparative sequence analyses of multiple loci reveal rare Aspergillus species in transplant recipients (transnet study)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Invasive aspergillosis (IA) is the leading cause of mortality in blood and marrow transplant recipients. Although A. fumigatus accounts for the majority of IA, non-fumigatus species are emerging as an uncommon, yet devastating cause of IA. The Transplant Associated Infection Surveillance Network (...

  2. Temporally adaptive sampling: a case study in rare species survey design with marbled salamanders (Ambystoma opacum).

    PubMed

    Charney, Noah D; Kubel, Jacob E; Eiseman, Charles S

    2015-01-01

    Improving detection rates for elusive species with clumped distributions is often accomplished through adaptive sampling designs. This approach can be extended to include species with temporally variable detection probabilities. By concentrating survey effort in years when the focal species are most abundant or visible, overall detection rates can be improved. This requires either long-term monitoring at a few locations where the species are known to occur or models capable of predicting population trends using climatic and demographic data. For marbled salamanders (Ambystoma opacum) in Massachusetts, we demonstrate that annual variation in detection probability of larvae is regionally correlated. In our data, the difference in survey success between years was far more important than the difference among the three survey methods we employed: diurnal surveys, nocturnal surveys, and dipnet surveys. Based on these data, we simulate future surveys to locate unknown populations under a temporally adaptive sampling framework. In the simulations, when pond dynamics are correlated over the focal region, the temporally adaptive design improved mean survey success by as much as 26% over a non-adaptive sampling design. Employing a temporally adaptive strategy costs very little, is simple, and has the potential to substantially improve the efficient use of scarce conservation funds.

  3. Rare & Endangered Species: Understanding Our Disappearing Plants and Animals. Activities Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Gas Association, Arlington, VA. Educational Services.

    About 464 plants and animals found in the United States and its territories are listed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service as threatened or endangered. Another 3900 are candidates for protection. The activities in this guide are designed to help teachers and students understand the issue of endangered species. It includes ideas for several…

  4. Population ecology of turbot and brill: What can we learn from two rare flatfish species?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Hammen, Tessa; Poos, Jan Jaap; van Overzee, Harriët M. J.; Heessen, Henk J. L.; Magnusson, Arni; Rijnsdorp, Adriaan D.

    2013-11-01

    Turbot and brill are widely distributed in the Northeast Atlantic but occur at low abundance. They are ecologically very similar and closely related. The low abundance and the similarities make them particularly interesting to study the population dynamics because it raises the questions how the populations can sustain themselves at low abundances and how turbot and brill avoid strong interspecific competition. Knowledge of both species is hampered by lack of analysed data. The main objective of this study is therefore to increase the knowledge of turbot and brill and in particular to compare the two species in order to address the above questions. Based on biological samples collected in the North Sea, we calculated seasonal von Bertalanffy growth parameters, maturity ogives, monthly gonado-somatic indices (GSI) and condition factors (Fulton's K) and indices of inter- and intraspecific mean crowding and compared the results for turbot and brill. The main differences between the two species were found in their spawning period, with brill having a more protracted spawning period. Brill also showed an earlier peak in their GSI values, suggesting an earlier start of their spawning period. The mean crowding showed that interspecific competition was lower than intraspecific competition. The exploitation pattern was also studied. Turbot and brill are exploited as a bycatch species in the mixed demersal fishery. We found that productivity is highest in areas where the maximum temperature is close to the optimal temperature for growth (16-18 °C) and landings decrease where salinity falls below ~ 5 psu (turbot) and ~ 15 psu (brill). Recent fishing mortality rates of North Sea turbot are around 0.5-0.7, but there is no indication that recruitment is impaired at low levels of spawning stock biomass. We conclude that although both species have similar ecological characteristics, differences may reduce inter-specific competition.

  5. [Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) in mammals' and its importance for studies of rare species (with Felidae family as an example)].

    PubMed

    Tarasian, K K; Sorokin, P A; Kholodova, M V; Rozhnov, V V

    2014-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) appears to be a suitable tool for solving various tasks of popu- lationgenetics. Information on genetic basis of immunity facilitates understanding of evolutionary his- tory and assessment of current state and prospects of studied population/species survival. On the one hand, MHC variability is maintained through pathogen dependent mechanisms, i.e., directional selection of individuals resistant to diseases, that are present in the environment and balancing selection which gives advantage to those individuals carrying unusual or rare alleles of MHC genes. On the other hand, MHC genes have an influence on reproduction efficiency of individuals. Because of MHC polygeny, its studying requires an application of methods that introduce additional stages between amplification of a certain gene segment and its sequencing. In the article, different tech- niques of allele separation are considered, as well as a simplified version of MHC variability analysis based on the examination of microsatellite loci. Despite the high information value of MHC, it is still not used in zoological studies as often as it deserves. Using as an example predatory mammals of Felidae family which contains quite a few threatened species, we show that a majority of studies on MHC in wild cats is descriptive ones and only few of them deal with genes comparative analysis. The rise of interest to the studies of major histocompatibility complex in non-model species may help not only in solving the fundamental problems of evolution and phylogenetic structure of the family but also in planning the measures for conservation of rare and endangered species exposed to various anthropogenic stresses.

  6. Are Bryophytes Shade Plants? Photosynthetic Light Responses and Proportions of Chlorophyll a, Chlorophyll b and Total Carotenoids

    PubMed Central

    MARSCHALL, MARIANN; PROCTOR, MICHAEL C. F.

    2004-01-01

    • Background and Aims Data are presented from 39 species of mosses and 16 liverworts for ratios of chlorophylls and total carotenoids, and light saturation of photosynthetic electron flow or photosynthetic CO2 uptake, in relation to the postulate that bryophyte cells in general show shade-plant characteristics. • Methods Pigment concentrations were measured by spectrophotometer in 80 % acetone extracts. Light-saturation curves were constructed by (modulated) chlorophyll florescence and for some species by infra-red gas analysis. • Key Results The pigment measurements were widely variable but broadly in line with the findings of previous authors. Median values (mosses/liverworts) were: total chlorophyll, 1·64/3·76 mg g−1; chlorophyll a : b, 2·29/1·99; chlorophylls : carotenoids, 4·74/6·75). The PPFD values at 95 % saturation (estimated from fitted curves) also ranged widely, but were almost all <1000 µmol m−2 s−1; the median for mosses was 583 and for liverworts 214 µmol m−2 s−1. The two highest PPFD95% values were from Polytrichum species with lamella systems forming a ventilated photosynthetic tissue. Total chlorophyll, chlorophyll a : b and chlorophylls : carotenoids all correlated significantly with PPFD95%. • Conclusions Bryophytes include but are not inherently shade plants. Light-saturation levels for species of open sun-exposed habitats are lower than for vascular sun plants and are probably limited by CO2 diffusion into unistratose leaves; this limit can only be exceeded by bryophytes with ventilated photosynthetic tissues which provide increased area for CO2 uptake. PMID:15319230

  7. Performance of forest bryophytes with different geographical distributions transplanted across a topographically heterogeneous landscape.

    PubMed

    Dahlberg, C Johan; Ehrlén, Johan; Hylander, Kristoffer

    2014-01-01

    Most species distribution models assume a close link between climatic conditions and species distributions. Yet, we know little about the link between species' geographical distributions and the sensitivity of performance to local environmental factors. We studied the performance of three bryophyte species transplanted at south- and north-facing slopes in a boreal forest landscape in Sweden. At the same sites, we measured both air and ground temperature. We hypothesized that the two southerly distributed species Eurhynchium angustirete and Herzogiella seligeri perform better on south-facing slopes and in warm conditions, and that the northerly distributed species Barbilophozia lycopodioides perform better on north-facing slopes and in relatively cool conditions. The northern, but not the two southern species, showed the predicted relationship with slope aspect. However, the performance of one of the two southern species was still enhanced by warm temperatures. An important reason for the inconsistent results can be that microclimatic gradients across landscapes are complex and influenced by many climate-forcing factors. Therefore, comparing only north- and south-facing slopes might not capture the complexity of microclimatic gradients. Population growth rates and potential distributions are the integrated results of all vital rates. Still, the study of selected vital rates constitutes an important first step to understand the relationship between population growth rates and geographical distributions and is essential to better predict how climate change influences species distributions.

  8. Performance of Forest Bryophytes with Different Geographical Distributions Transplanted across a Topographically Heterogeneous Landscape

    PubMed Central

    Dahlberg, C. Johan; Ehrlén, Johan; Hylander, Kristoffer

    2014-01-01

    Most species distribution models assume a close link between climatic conditions and species distributions. Yet, we know little about the link between species' geographical distributions and the sensitivity of performance to local environmental factors. We studied the performance of three bryophyte species transplanted at south- and north-facing slopes in a boreal forest landscape in Sweden. At the same sites, we measured both air and ground temperature. We hypothesized that the two southerly distributed species Eurhynchium angustirete and Herzogiella seligeri perform better on south-facing slopes and in warm conditions, and that the northerly distributed species Barbilophozia lycopodioides perform better on north-facing slopes and in relatively cool conditions. The northern, but not the two southern species, showed the predicted relationship with slope aspect. However, the performance of one of the two southern species was still enhanced by warm temperatures. An important reason for the inconsistent results can be that microclimatic gradients across landscapes are complex and influenced by many climate-forcing factors. Therefore, comparing only north- and south-facing slopes might not capture the complexity of microclimatic gradients. Population growth rates and potential distributions are the integrated results of all vital rates. Still, the study of selected vital rates constitutes an important first step to understand the relationship between population growth rates and geographical distributions and is essential to better predict how climate change influences species distributions. PMID:25387233

  9. Admixture and the organization of genetic diversity in a butterfly species complex revealed through common and rare genetic variants.

    PubMed

    Gompert, Zachariah; Lucas, Lauren K; Buerkle, C Alex; Forister, Matthew L; Fordyce, James A; Nice, Chris C

    2014-09-01

    Detailed information about the geographic distribution of genetic and genomic variation is necessary to better understand the organization and structure of biological diversity. In particular, spatial isolation within species and hybridization between them can blur species boundaries and create evolutionary relationships that are inconsistent with a strictly bifurcating tree model. Here, we analyse genome-wide DNA sequence and genetic ancestry variation in Lycaeides butterflies to quantify the effects of admixture and spatial isolation on how biological diversity is organized in this group. We document geographically widespread and pervasive historical admixture, with more restricted recent hybridization. This includes evidence supporting previously known and unknown instances of admixture. The genome composition of admixed individuals varies much more among than within populations, and tree- and genetic ancestry-based analyses indicate that multiple distinct admixed lineages or populations exist. We find that most genetic variants in Lycaeides are rare (minor allele frequency <0.5%). Because the spatial and taxonomic distributions of alleles reflect demographic and selective processes since mutation, rare alleles, which are presumably younger than common alleles, were spatially and taxonomically restricted compared with common variants. Thus, we show patterns of genetic variation in this group are multifaceted, and we argue that this complexity challenges simplistic notions concerning the organization of biological diversity into discrete, easily delineated and hierarchically structured entities.

  10. Bryophyte-Feeders in a Basal Brachyceran Lineage (Diptera: Rhagionidae: Spaniinae): Adult Oviposition Behavior and Changes in the Larval Mouthpart Morphology Accompanied with the Diet Shifts.

    PubMed

    Imada, Yume; Kato, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Dipteran larval morphology exhibits overwhelming variety, affected by their diverse feeding habits and habitat use. In particular, larval mouthpart morphology is associated with feeding behavior, providing key taxonomic traits. Despite most larval Brachycera being carnivorous, a basal brachyceran family, Rhagionidae, contains bryophyte-feeding taxa with multiple feeding habits. To elucidate the life history, biology, and morphological evolution of the bryophyte-feeding rhagionids, the larval feeding behavior and morphology, and the adult oviposition behavior of four species belonging to three genera of Spaniinae (Spania Meigen, Litoleptis Chillcott and Ptiolina Zetterstedt) are described. Moreover, changes of the larval morphology associated with the evolution of bryophyte-feeding are traced by molecular phylogenetic analyses. Spania and Litoleptis (thallus-miners of thallose liverworts) share a toothed form of apical mandibular sclerite with an orifice on its dorsal surface, which contrasts to those of the other members of Rhagionidae possessing a blade-like mandibular hook with an adoral groove; whereas, Ptiolina (stem borer of mosses) exhibits a weak groove on the adoral surface of mandible and highly sclerotized maxilla with toothed projections. Based on the larval feeding behavior of the thallus-miners, it is inferred that the toothed mandibles with the dorsal orifice facilitate scraping plant tissue and then imbibing it with a great deal of the sap. A phylogeny indicated that the bryophyte-feeding genera formed a clade with Spaniopsis and was sister to Symphoromyia, which presumably are detritivores. This study indicates that the loss or reduction of adoral mandibular groove and mandibular brush is coincident with the evolution of bryophyte-feeding, and it is subsequently followed by the occurrence of dorsal mandibular orifice and the loss of creeping welts accompanying the evolution of thallus-mining.

  11. Bryophyte-Feeders in a Basal Brachyceran Lineage (Diptera: Rhagionidae: Spaniinae): Adult Oviposition Behavior and Changes in the Larval Mouthpart Morphology Accompanied with the Diet Shifts

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Dipteran larval morphology exhibits overwhelming variety, affected by their diverse feeding habits and habitat use. In particular, larval mouthpart morphology is associated with feeding behavior, providing key taxonomic traits. Despite most larval Brachycera being carnivorous, a basal brachyceran family, Rhagionidae, contains bryophyte-feeding taxa with multiple feeding habits. To elucidate the life history, biology, and morphological evolution of the bryophyte-feeding rhagionids, the larval feeding behavior and morphology, and the adult oviposition behavior of four species belonging to three genera of Spaniinae (Spania Meigen, Litoleptis Chillcott and Ptiolina Zetterstedt) are described. Moreover, changes of the larval morphology associated with the evolution of bryophyte-feeding are traced by molecular phylogenetic analyses. Spania and Litoleptis (thallus-miners of thallose liverworts) share a toothed form of apical mandibular sclerite with an orifice on its dorsal surface, which contrasts to those of the other members of Rhagionidae possessing a blade-like mandibular hook with an adoral groove; whereas, Ptiolina (stem borer of mosses) exhibits a weak groove on the adoral surface of mandible and highly sclerotized maxilla with toothed projections. Based on the larval feeding behavior of the thallus-miners, it is inferred that the toothed mandibles with the dorsal orifice facilitate scraping plant tissue and then imbibing it with a great deal of the sap. A phylogeny indicated that the bryophyte-feeding genera formed a clade with Spaniopsis and was sister to Symphoromyia, which presumably are detritivores. This study indicates that the loss or reduction of adoral mandibular groove and mandibular brush is coincident with the evolution of bryophyte-feeding, and it is subsequently followed by the occurrence of dorsal mandibular orifice and the loss of creeping welts accompanying the evolution of thallus-mining. PMID:27812169

  12. On a new species of the rare syllid genus Exogonoides (Annelida, Phyllodocida, Syllidae).

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Marcelo Veronesi; Martín, Guillermo San; Carrerette, Orlemir; Paresque, Karla

    2016-07-27

    The genus Exogonoides Day, 1963, was described probably based on a single specimen, broken into two pieces (Aguado & San Martín 2008) and no other specimens of the type species, E. antennata Day, 1963, were ever found, which characterizes this species and, until now, the very genus Exogonoides, as 'singletons' (Lim et al. 2012). Although described as a member of the Syllidae Grube, 1850, the positioning of the genus in the family was recently questioned (Aguado & San Martín 2008), since the pharynx of the holotype was dissected for the original description and not preserved with the specimen, resulting that the presence of the proventricle, considered the main synapomorphy of the family, could not be confirmed.

  13. The 'plant economic spectrum' in bryophytes, a comparative study in subalpine forest.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhe; Liu, Xin; Bader, Maaike Y; Feng, Defeng; Bao, Weikai

    2017-02-01

    Tradeoffs among functional traits of vascular plants are starting to be better understood, but it is unclear whether bryophytes possess similar tradeoffs or how trait relationships, or the 'economic spectrum', differ between the two groups. We determined functional-trait values [including shoot mass per area (SMA), light-saturated assimilation rate (Amass), dark respiration rate (Rdmass), N and P concentrations (Nmass and Pmass), and photosynthetic N and P use efficiency (PNUE and PPUE)] and their bivariate relationships for 28 bryophytes growing in a subalpine old-growth fir forest on the eastern Tibetan Plateau. Trait values and scaling relationships of these bryophytes were compared with data for vascular plant leaves from the Global Plant Trait Network (GLOPNET) dataset. We found that the Amass, Nmass, N:P, PNUE and PPUE of bryophyte shoots were lower than those of vascular plant leaves. In contrast, bryophytes possessed higher Pmass and the two groups had similar values of SMA and Rdmass. The Nmass and Pmass were closely associated with Amass and Rdmass, and these traits were all significantly negatively related to SMA. Metabolic rates increased faster with nutrient concentrations in bryophytes than in vascular plants. Our research indicates that bryophytes have similar trait relationships as vascular plant leaves, although the slopes of the relationships differ for most trait combinations. This study confirms a functional-trait tradeoff in bryophytes, and reveals that bryophytes allocate greater proportions of N and P into the metabolic pools. © 2017 Botanical Society of America.

  14. Glacial survival may matter after all: nunatak signatures in the rare European populations of two west-arctic species.

    PubMed

    Westergaard, Kristine B; Alsos, Inger G; Popp, Magnus; Engelskjøn, Torstein; Flatberg, Kjell I; Brochmann, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Biogeographers claimed for more than a century that arctic plants survived glaciations in ice-free refugia within the limits of the North European ice sheets. Molecular studies have, however, provided overwhelming support for postglacial immigration into northern Europe, even from the west across the Atlantic. For the first time we can here present molecular evidence strongly favouring in situ glacial persistence of two species, the rare arctic-alpine pioneer species Sagina caespitosa and Arenaria humifusa. Both belong to the 'west-arctic element' of amphi-Atlantic disjuncts, having their few and only European occurrences well within the limits of the last glaciation. Sequencing of non-coding regions of chloroplast DNA revealed only limited variation. However, two very distinct and partly diverse genetic groups, one East and one West Atlantic, were detected in each species based on amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs), excluding postglacial dispersal from North America as explanation for their European occurrences. Patterns of genetic diversity and distinctiveness indicate that glacial populations existed in East Greenland and/or Svalbard (A. humifusa) and in southern Scandinavia (S. caespitosa). Despite their presumed lack of long-distance dispersal adaptations, intermixed populations in several regions indicate postglacial contact zones. Both species are declining in Nordic countries, probably due to climate change-induced habitat loss. Little or no current connectivity between their highly fragmented and partly distinct populations call for conservation of several populations in each geographic region.

  15. High resilience of bryophyte assemblages in streamside compared to upland forests.

    PubMed

    Dynesius, Mats; Hylander, Kristoffer; Nilsson, Christer

    2009-04-01

    Landscape heterogeneity causes spatial variation in disturbance regimes and resilience. We asked whether the resilience of bryophyte (liverwort and moss) assemblages to clear-cutting differs between streamside and upland boreal forests in northern Sweden. We hypothesized that bryophyte survival and recolonization rates are higher in streamside areas, thus raising resilience. Conversely, disturbance-intolerant but also invading species should be more frequent here, potentially reducing resilience. In each of 18 sites, we compared two 0.1-ha plots (one streamside and one upland) located in old forest that had never been clear-cut with two matching plots in young stands established after clear-cutting of old forests 30-50 years earlier. We used the magnitude of the difference in assemblages between old and young stands as a measure of change and, therefore, resilience (large difference implying low resilience). Species assemblages were more resilient in streamside than in upland forests. Species composition changed significantly in upland but not in streamside forests. Reductions in species richness were more pronounced in upland forests for total richness and for eight subgroups of species. Two results indicated lower survival/recolonization in upland forests: (1) species had a stronger association with old stands in upland areas, and (2) among species present in both the old streamside and old upland plot in a site, fewer appeared in the young upland than in the corresponding streamside plot. Simultaneously, a higher proportion of species invaded streamside areas; 40 of the 262 species encountered in streamside forests increased their occupancy by two or more sites compared to only two of 134 species in uplands. We suggest that in boreal forests spatial variation in resilience of assemblages of forest organisms intolerant of canopy removal is related to factors governed mainly by topography. More generally, we argue that landscape-scale variation in resilience of

  16. Spectroscopic quantification of extremely rare molecular species in the presence of interfering optical absorption

    DOEpatents

    Ognibene, Ted; Bench, Graham; McCartt, Alan Daniel; Turteltaub, Kenneth; Rella, Chris W.; Tan, Sze; Hoffnagle, John A.; Crosson, Eric

    2017-05-09

    Optical spectrometer apparatus, systems, and methods for analysis of carbon-14 including a resonant optical cavity configured to accept a sample gas including carbon-14, an optical source configured to deliver optical radiation to the resonant optical cavity, an optical detector configured to detect optical radiation emitted from the resonant cavity and to provide a detector signal; and a processor configured to compute a carbon-14 concentration from the detector signal, wherein computing the carbon-14 concentration from the detector signal includes fitting a spectroscopic model to a measured spectrogram, wherein the spectroscopic model accounts for contributions from one or more interfering species that spectroscopically interfere with carbon-14.

  17. Frankincense Revisited, Part II: Volatiles in Rare Boswellia Species and Hybrids.

    PubMed

    Niebler, Johannes; Eslamieh, Jason; Buettner, Andrea

    2016-05-01

    In this second part of the investigation of volatiles and semivolatiles in Boswellia gum resins, an additional five less common species were analyzed by (SPME-)GC/MS, namely B. ameero, B. elongata, B. neglecta, B. popoviana, and B. rivae. Moreover, the results of hybridization experiments are reported in combination with the volatile composition of their gum resins. Our study shows that B. sacra benefits from an intraspecific cross-pollination, as the resulting hybrid B. sacra var. supersacra has a far higher seed germination rate and viability.

  18. Three poorly known and rarely reported bucephalid species (Digenea) in fishes from the Western Mediterranean.

    PubMed

    Bartoli, Pierre; Bray, Rodney A; Gibson, David I

    2005-10-01

    Three poorly known bucephalid species are described from off Corsica, in the Western Mediterranean Sea. Bucephalus gorgon (Linton, 1905) (syn. B. introversus Manter, 1940) from Seriola dumerili is reported for only the third time in the Mediterranean Sea. Prosorhynchoides arcuatus (Linton, 1900) from Sarda sarda is reported for the first time from the Mediterranean Sea. P. tergestinum (Stossich, 1883) n. comb. (originally in Gasterostomum von Siebold 1848; has also been in Bucephalopsis Diesing, 1855 and Bucephalus von Baer, 1827) from Gobius geniporus is reported for only the second time.

  19. Allopolyploidy in bryophytes: Multiple origins of Plagiomnium medium

    PubMed Central

    Wyatt, Robert; Odrzykoski, Ireneusz J.; Stoneburner, Ann; Bass, Henry W.; Galau, Glenn A.

    1988-01-01

    Bryophytes are thought to be unique among land plants in lacking the important evolutionary process of allopolyploidy, which involves interspecific hybridization and chromosome doubling. Electrophoretic data show, however, that the polyploid moss Plagiomnium medium is an allopolyploid derivative of Plagiomnium ellipticum and Plagiomnium insigne, that P. medium has originated more than once from these progenitors, and that cross-fertilization results in interlocus genetic recombination. Evidence from restriction fragment length polymorphisms in chloroplast DNA implicates P. insigne as the female parent in interspecific hybridizations with P. ellipticum. Contrary to prevailing views, it appears that those evolutionary processes responsible for genetic differentiation and speciation in other land plants occur in the bryophytes as well. Images PMID:16593968

  20. Estimating the contribution of bryophytes to the atmospheric COS budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gimeno, Teresa; Ogee, Jerome; Wingate, Lisa

    2017-04-01

    In the past decade, global biogeochemical modellers have embraced enthusiastically the potential of carbonyl sulphide (COS) as a tracer for gross primary productivity (GPP). COS is the most abundant sulphur-containing gas in the atmosphere, it is produced mainly in the ocean and it is consumed by the biosphere, with terrestrial vegetation being the most important contributor. Plant COS uptake is proportional to photosynthetic CO2 withdraw and that is why measurements of the biosphere-atmosphere COS flux can serve a proxy for GPP. Plant COS uptake is mediated by the light-independent enzyme carbonic anhydrase that irreversibly hydrolyses COS into H2S, which is quickly utilised as a sulphur source. Currently, there are no described plant-processes with COS as a by-product and hence the atmospheric-plant COS flux is assumed unidirectional. So far, we had focused on characterizing plant COS uptake dynamics on vascular plants and previous studies are consistent with the unidirectional flux assumption. However, although early works on sulphur metabolism suggested non-vascular plants might not abide to this assumption, we lack estimates of COS uptake dynamics for non-vascular communities. Bryophytes are key constituents of biocrusts and non-vascular photoautrophic communities and in temperate and cold latitudes contribute significantly to ecosystem carbon and nutrient cycling. We expect that in these ecosystems the coupling between COS and CO2 uptake will be influenced by specific environmental cues that control gas-exchange in bryophytes. We expect tissue hydration to be the most influential driver on COS uptake. In contrast, light would constrain CO2 but not COS uptake and therefore we expect greater uncoupling of COS and CO2 in the dark than in vascular plants. We characterized COS and CO2 uptake dynamics in two broadly distributed bryophytes, with contrasting life forms and evolutionary origins: the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha and the feather moss Scleropodium

  1. [Characteristics of seed germination of rare plant species Reaumuria trigyna in west Ordos].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying-juan; Wang, Yu-shan; Li, Qing-feng

    2008-12-01

    Reaumuria trigyna is a relic species in the desert shrubbery vegetation in arid regions of northwestern China, and plays an important role in the maintenance of the stability of desert vegetation. In this paper, the seed traits and germination strategy of R. trigyna under different environmental conditions, e.g., light, temperature, soil moisture, and sand bury, were investigated. The results showed that R. trigyna seed had high vigor and high germination rate, and endured reserve. The seed could germinate either in light or in darkness, and the optimal temperature for germination was 20 degrees C - 25 degrees C or 15 degrees C/25 degrees C, with the germination rate being 93%. The seed could start to germinate when soil moisture content was 2%, and the germination rate was the highest (89%) when the moisture content was 12%. The optimal sand burial depth of R. trigyna seed was 1 cm, and no seed would germinate when the sand burial depth was >5 cm. Sand burial depth had significant effects on the seedling's emergence percentage and growth height, but lesser effects on seedling' s mass. Soil moisture and sand burial depth were the main environmental factors limiting the seed germination and seedling emergence of R. trigyna. The high seed germination rate of R. trigyna enhanced the survival risk of its seedlings, which was unfavorable to its handling with the extreme changes of desert environment. Such a character of R. trigyna seed was one of the factors causing the species endangered.

  2. Estimating impacts of lichens and bryophytes on global biogeochemical cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porada, Philipp; Weber, Bettina; Elbert, Wolfgang; Pöschl, Ulrich; Kleidon, Axel

    2014-02-01

    Lichens and bryophytes may significantly affect global biogeochemical cycles by fixation of nitrogen and biotic enhancement of surface weathering rates. Most of the studies suggesting these effects, however, are either conceptual or rely on upscaling of regional estimates to obtain global numbers. Here we use a different method, based on estimates of net carbon uptake, to quantify the impacts of lichens and bryophytes on biogeochemical cycles at the global scale. We focus on three processes, namely, nitrogen fixation, phosphorus uptake, and chemical weathering. Our estimates have the form of potential rates, which means that we quantify the amount of nitrogen and phosphorus needed by the organisms to build up biomass, also accounting for resorption and leaching of nutrients. Subsequently, we use potential phosphorus uptake on bare ground to estimate chemical weathering by the organisms, assuming that they release weathering agents to obtain phosphorus. The predicted requirement for nitrogen ranges from 3.5 to 34 Tgyr-1 and for phosphorus it ranges from 0.46 to 4.6 Tgyr-1. Estimates of chemical weathering are between 0.058 and 1.1 km3 yr-1 of rock. These values seem to have a realistic order of magnitude, and they support the notion that lichens and bryophytes have the potential to play an important role for biogeochemical cycles.

  3. Effects of engineered iron nanoparticles on the bryophyte, Physcomitrella patens (Hedw.) Bruch & Schimp, after foliar exposure.

    PubMed

    Canivet, L; Dubot, P; Garçon, G; Denayer, F-O

    2015-03-01

    The effects of iron nanoparticles on bryophytes (Physcomitrella patens) were studied following foliar exposure. We used iron nanoparticles (Fe-NP) representative of industrial emissions from the metallurgical industries. After a characterization of iron nanoparticles and the validation of nanoparticle internalization in cells, the effects (cytotoxicity, oxidative stress, lipid peroxidation of membrane) of iron nanoparticles were determined through the axenic culturing of Physcomitrella patens exposed at five different concentrations (5 ng, 50 ng, 500 ng, 5 µg and 50 µg per plant). Following exposure, the plant health, measured as ATP concentrations, was not impacted. Moreover, we studied oxidative stress in three ways: through the measure of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, through malondialdehyde (MDA) production and also through glutathione regulation. At concentrations tested over a short period, the level of ROS, MDA and glutathione were not significantly disturbed.

  4. Final Technical Report: Improved ECR Charge Breeder for Rare Ion Species

    SciTech Connect

    Cornelius, Wayne D

    2011-04-29

    The purpose of this project was to develop a charge-breeder system not only for producing the highly charged ion species needed for nuclear physics experiments, but one that could be used as a test bed for testing and developing additional techniques and technologies. The charge-breeder ion source developed under this grant was designed as a charge-breeder from the beginning and has none of the limitations inherent of converted primary ECR sources. Additionally, the major source components are designed to be easily replaced. This document describes the design, fabrication, and testing of the Scientific Solutions charge-breeder ion source. This source was delivered to Texas A&M University in October 2007 for further testing.

  5. Impacts of long-term enhanced UV-B radiation on bryophytes in two sub-Arctic heathland sites of contrasting water availability

    PubMed Central

    Arróniz-Crespo, M.; Gwynn-Jones, D.; Callaghan, T. V.; Núñez-Olivera, E.; Martínez-Abaigar, J.; Horton, P.; Phoenix, G. K.

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims Anthropogenic depletion of stratospheric ozone in Arctic latitudes has resulted in an increase of ultraviolet-B radiation (UV-B) reaching the biosphere. UV-B exposure is known to reduce above-ground biomass and plant height, to increase DNA damage and cause accumulation of UV-absorbing compounds in polar plants. However, many studies on Arctic mosses tended to be inconclusive. The importance of different water availability in influencing UV-B impacts on lower plants in the Arctic has been poorly explored and might partially explain the observed wide variation of responses, given the importance of water in controlling bryophyte physiology. This study aimed to assess the long-term responses of three common sub-Arctic bryophytes to enhanced UV-B radiation (+UV-B) and to elucidate the influence of water supply on those responses. Methods Responses of three sub-Arctic bryophytes (the mosses Hylocomium splendens and Polytrichum commune and the liverwort Barbilophozia lycopodioides) to +UV-B for 15 and 13 years were studied in two field experiments using lamps for UV-B enhancement with identical design and located in neighbouring areas with contrasting water availability (naturally mesic and drier sites). Responses evaluated included bryophyte abundance, growth, sporophyte production and sclerophylly; cellular protection by accumulation of UV-absorbing compounds, β-carotene, xanthophylls and development of non-photochemical quenching (NPQ); and impacts on photosynthesis performance by maximum quantum yield (Fv /Fm) and electron transport rate (ETR) through photosystem II (PSII) and chlorophyll concentrations. Results Responses were species specific: H. splendens responded most to +UV-B, with reduction in both annual growth (–22 %) and sporophyte production (–44 %), together with increased β-carotene, violaxanthin, total chlorophyll and NPQ, and decreased zeaxanthin and de-epoxidation of the xanthophyll cycle pool (DES). Barbilophozia

  6. Impacts of long-term enhanced UV-B radiation on bryophytes in two sub-Arctic heathland sites of contrasting water availability.

    PubMed

    Arróniz-Crespo, M; Gwynn-Jones, D; Callaghan, T V; Núñez-Olivera, E; Martínez-Abaigar, J; Horton, P; Phoenix, G K

    2011-09-01

    Anthropogenic depletion of stratospheric ozone in Arctic latitudes has resulted in an increase of ultraviolet-B radiation (UV-B) reaching the biosphere. UV-B exposure is known to reduce above-ground biomass and plant height, to increase DNA damage and cause accumulation of UV-absorbing compounds in polar plants. However, many studies on Arctic mosses tended to be inconclusive. The importance of different water availability in influencing UV-B impacts on lower plants in the Arctic has been poorly explored and might partially explain the observed wide variation of responses, given the importance of water in controlling bryophyte physiology. This study aimed to assess the long-term responses of three common sub-Arctic bryophytes to enhanced UV-B radiation (+UV-B) and to elucidate the influence of water supply on those responses. Responses of three sub-Arctic bryophytes (the mosses Hylocomium splendens and Polytrichum commune and the liverwort Barbilophozia lycopodioides) to +UV-B for 15 and 13 years were studied in two field experiments using lamps for UV-B enhancement with identical design and located in neighbouring areas with contrasting water availability (naturally mesic and drier sites). Responses evaluated included bryophyte abundance, growth, sporophyte production and sclerophylly; cellular protection by accumulation of UV-absorbing compounds, β-carotene, xanthophylls and development of non-photochemical quenching (NPQ); and impacts on photosynthesis performance by maximum quantum yield (F(v) /F(m)) and electron transport rate (ETR) through photosystem II (PSII) and chlorophyll concentrations. Responses were species specific: H. splendens responded most to +UV-B, with reduction in both annual growth (-22 %) and sporophyte production (-44 %), together with increased β-carotene, violaxanthin, total chlorophyll and NPQ, and decreased zeaxanthin and de-epoxidation of the xanthophyll cycle pool (DES). Barbilophozia lycopodioides responded less to +UV-B, showing

  7. Outside the envelope: rare events disrupt the relationship between climate factors and species interactions.

    PubMed

    Stuble, Katharine L; Zefferman, Emily; Wolf, Kristina; Vaughn, Kurt J; Young, Truman P

    2017-03-19

    The order in which species arrive during community assembly can be an important driver of community composition and function. However, the strength of these priority effects can be variable, in part because of strong site and year effects. To understand how priority effects vary in importance with abiotic conditions, we initiated identical community assembly experiments in which we varied the timing of arrival of native and exotic grass species in each of four years across three grassland sites in northern California. This uniquely replicated experiment tested the power of priority to determine initial community structure in a restoration context across a natural range of conditions. There were large and significant differences in both total seeded cover and the strength of priority across sites and years of initiation, confirming the suspicion that most ecological experiments may lack spatial and temporal generality. On the other hand, much of the variation in strength of priority could be related to climate. Strikingly, however, the model fit across the three sites and the first three years of the study (the first nine experiments) was radically altered when we included the fourth year, which was characterized by an unusual weather pattern with higher temporal variability in rainfall (a rainfall pattern predicted to increase with climate change). This year produced relatively low strength of priority, supporting the suggestion that highly variable climates may be associated with lower strength of priority effects. Experiments that examine community assembly over a range of naturally occurring abiotic conditions enhance our ability to predict when priority effects will be important, allowing us to explore shifting patterns of community assembly in the face of climate change and optimize restoration strategies based on environmental conditions. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  8. Taxonomy of Atlantic Central African orchids 2. A second species of the rare genus Distylodon (Orchidaceae, Angraecinae) collected in Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Droissart, Vincent; Cribb, Phillip J.; Simo-Droissart, Murielle; Stévart, Tariq

    2014-01-01

    Abstract While conducting field inventories in South Cameroon, we collected two specimens of a new species that we considered to belong to the genus Angraecopsis. Afterwards, a careful examination of specimens housed at main herbaria, along with the nomenclatural types, allows us to place it in Distylodon, a monotypic genus previously known from East Africa. Distylodon sonkeanum Droissart, Stévart & P.J.Cribb, sp. nov. was collected in the lowland coastal forest of Atlantic Central Africa. It is known from a single locality in the surroundings of the Campo-Ma’an National Park. The species differs from D. comptum, by its several-flowered inflorescences, longer leaves and spur, and shorter pedicel and ovary. The species appears to be rare and is assessed as Critically Endangered [CR B2ab(iii)] according to IUCN Red List Categories and Criteria. New field investigations are required to attempt to find it in the low-elevation parts of the Campo-Ma’an National Park in Cameroon. PMID:24843291

  9. Taxonomy of Atlantic Central African orchids 2. A second species of the rare genus Distylodon (Orchidaceae, Angraecinae) collected in Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Droissart, Vincent; Cribb, Phillip J; Simo-Droissart, Murielle; Stévart, Tariq

    2014-01-01

    While conducting field inventories in South Cameroon, we collected two specimens of a new species that we considered to belong to the genus Angraecopsis. Afterwards, a careful examination of specimens housed at main herbaria, along with the nomenclatural types, allows us to place it in Distylodon, a monotypic genus previously known from East Africa. Distylodon sonkeanum Droissart, Stévart & P.J.Cribb, sp. nov. was collected in the lowland coastal forest of Atlantic Central Africa. It is known from a single locality in the surroundings of the Campo-Ma'an National Park. The species differs from D. comptum, by its several-flowered inflorescences, longer leaves and spur, and shorter pedicel and ovary. The species appears to be rare and is assessed as Critically Endangered [CR B2ab(iii)] according to IUCN Red List Categories and Criteria. New field investigations are required to attempt to find it in the low-elevation parts of the Campo-Ma'an National Park in Cameroon.

  10. Essential oil composition and antimicrobial activity of wild and cultivated Moroccan Achillea ageratum L.: a rare and threatened medicinal species.

    PubMed

    El Bouzidi, Laila; Abbad, Abdelaziz; Hassani, Lahcen; Fattarsi, Karine; Leach, David; Markouk, Mohammed; Legendre, Laurent; Bekkouche, Khalid

    2012-03-01

    The essential oils of leaves and flowers of the wild and cultivated Moroccan Achillea ageratum L., a rare and threatened medicinal species, were examined by GC/MS, and their chemical compositions were compared. At least nine components were identified in both wild and cultivated A. ageratum oils, representing more than 95% of the oils. Artemisyl acetate (62.34-78.79%), yomogi alcohol (4.89-12.40%), santolina alcohol (4.86-11.77%), and artemisia alcohol (3.36-7.04%) were the major compounds. Terpene-alcohol proportion was higher in wild A. ageratum than in cultivated A. ageratum. The antibacterial analysis showed that both oils presented high activity against all the studied Gram-positive strains in a range of MIC values from 2.55 to 7.02 mg/ml, but they appeared not effective against the tested Gram-negative ones (MIC values 20.40-41.10 mg/ml). They also exhibited remarkable antifungal activities against Candida species with MIC values ranging from 5.83 to 8.42 mg/ml. From these results, it was concluded that domestication of this threatened medicinal species using clonal propagation did not significantly affect its chemical composition and consequently its antimicrobial properties. Copyright © 2012 Verlag Helvetica Chimica Acta AG, Zürich.

  11. Nosocomial outbreak of Enteroccocus gallinarum: untaming of rare species of enterococci.

    PubMed

    Contreras, G A; DiazGranados, C A; Cortes, L; Reyes, J; Vanegas, S; Panesso, D; Rincón, S; Díaz, L; Prada, G; Murray, B E; Arias, C A

    2008-12-01

    An unusual increase in infections caused by vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus gallinarum (VREG) was identified in May 2004, in a Colombian tertiary care teaching hospital. A case-control study was subsequently designed to identify risk factors associated with the development of infections due to these organisms. All VREG isolates were subjected to antimicrobial susceptibility testing, vancomycin resistance gene detection and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) typing. Additionally, the presence of genes associated with an acquired pathogenicity island of E. faecalis and a hyl-like gene of E. faecium was assessed by hybridisation assays. Eleven cases of VREG were identified between May through June 2004. VREG was isolated from blood (N=4), surgical secretions (N=4), paranasal sinus secretion (N=1), lung abscess (N=1) and urine (N=1). Infections with VREG were associated with mucositis, hospitalisation in the haematology ward and surgical unit, length of hospital stay prior to culture and invasive procedures within 30 days prior to the culture. Logistic regression found that female sex and hospitalisation in the surgical unit were independent factors for VREG infection. All isolates were identified as E. gallinarum, harboured the vanC1 gene and exhibited indistinguishable restriction patterns by PFGE. Virulence-associated genes were not detected. This is the first documented hospital-wide outbreak of VREG and highlights the fact that uncommon species of enterococci are capable of nosocomial dissemination.

  12. Distribution pattern of rare earth ions between water and montmorillonite and its relation to the sorbed species of the ions.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Yoshio; Tada, Akisa; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2004-09-01

    REE (rare earth element) distribution coefficients (Kd) between the aqueous phase and montmorillonite surface were obtained to investigate the relation between the REE distribution patterns and the species of REE sorbed on the solid-water interface. It was shown that the features in the REE patterns, such as the slope of the REE patterns, the tetrad effect, and the Y/Ho ratio, were closely related to the REE species at the montmorillonite-water interface. In a binary system (REE-montmorillonite) below pH 5, three features (a larger Kd value for a lighter REE, the absence of the tetrad effect, and the Y/Ho ratio being unchanged from its initial value) suggest that hydrated REE are directly sorbed as an outer-sphere complex at the montmorillonite-water interface. Above pH 5.5, the features in the REE patterns, the larger Kd value for heavier REE, the M-type tetrad effect, and the reduced Y/Ho ratio, showed the formation of an inner-sphere complex of REE with -OH group at the montmorillonite surface. In addition, the REE patterns in the presence of humic acid at pH 5.9 were also studied, where the REE patterns became flat, suggesting that the humate complex is dominant as both dissolved and sorbed species of REE in the ternary system. All of these results were consistent with the spectroscopic data (laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy) showing the local structure of Eu(III) conducted in the same experimental system. The present results suggest that the features in the REE distribution patterns include information on the REE species at the solid-water interface.

  13. The impact of bryophytes on the carbon stocks of northern boreal forest soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagemann, U.; Moroni, M. T.; Shaw, C. H.; Kurz, W. A.

    2012-04-01

    Dead organic matter (DOM), organic layer, and mineral soil carbon (C) dynamics in cool and humid northern boreal forests are expected to differ from those of drier or warmer boreal forests, because processes such as paludification and woody debris (WD) burial within the organic layer by overgrowing moss are more pronounced in regions with low average temperatures, vigorous moss layers, and long fire-return intervals. However, very few studies have provided field-measured data for these mostly remote regions. Hence, C cycling models such as the Carbon Budget Model of the Canadian Forest Sector (CBM-CFS3) have rarely been validated with field data from northern boreal forest soils, resulting in large uncertainties for estimated C stocks in a large proportion of the boreal forest ecozone. We present (i) measured data on organic layer and mineral soil (0-45 cm) C stocks in 18 old-growth and disturbed high-boreal black spruce stands in Labrador, Canada; (ii) a comparison of field-measured soil C stocks with those predicted using the CBM-CFS3; and (iii) special characteristics of the DOM and soil C dynamics of northern boreal forest soils that require modifications of model parameters and structure. Measured organic layer C stocks (30.4-47.4 Mg C ha-1) were within the range reported for other boreal forests. However, mineral soil C stocks (121.5-208.1 Mg C ha-1) contributed 58-76% to total ecosystem C stocks. Mineral soil C stocks were thus considerably higher than observed in other upland boreal forests in drier or warmer regions, but similar to values reported for black spruce on poorly drained sites and peat soils. In addition, large amounts of deadwood C (4.7-18.2 Mg C ha-1) were found to be buried within the organic layer, contributing up to 31% to total organic layer C stocks. The comparison of field-measured and CBM-CFS3 modeled C stocks showed that organic layer and mineral soil DOM in Labrador black spruce stands likely decays at lower rates than assumed by CBM

  14. How rare is too rare to harvest? Management challenges posed by timber species occurring at low densities in the Brazilian Amazon

    Treesearch

    Mark Schulze; James Grogan; R. Matthew Landis; Edson. Vidal

    2008-01-01

    Tropical forests are characterized by diverse assemblages of plant and animal species compared to temperate forests. Corollary to this general rule is that most tree species, whether valued for timber or not, occur at low densities (

  15. Organic nitrogen uptake is a significant contributor to nitrogen economy of subtropical epiphytic bryophytes.

    PubMed

    Song, Liang; Lu, Hua-Zheng; Xu, Xing-Liang; Li, Su; Shi, Xian-Meng; Chen, Xi; Wu, Yi; Huang, Jun-Biao; Chen, Quan; Liu, Shuai; Wu, Chuan-Sheng; Liu, Wen-Yao

    2016-07-27

    Without any root contact with the soil, epiphytic bryophytes must experience and explore poor, patchy, and heterogeneous habitats; while, the nitrogen (N) uptake and use strategies of these organisms remain uncharacterized, which obscures their roles in the N cycle. To investigate the N sources, N preferences, and responses to enhanced N deposition in epiphytic bryophytes, we carried out an in situ manipulation experiment via the (15)N labelling technique in an Asian cloud forest. Epiphytic bryophytes obtained more N from air deposition than from the bark, but the contribution of N from the bark was non-negligible. Glycine accounted for 28.4% to 44.5% of the total N in bryophyte tissue, which implies that organic N might serve as an important N source. Increased N deposition increased the total N uptake, but did not alter the N preference of the epiphytic bryophytes. This study provides sound evidence that epiphytic bryophytes could take up N from the bark and wet deposition in both organic and inorganic N forms. It is thus important to consider organic N and bark N sources, which were usually neglected, when estimating the role of epiphytic bryophytes in N cycling and the impacts of N deposition on epiphytic bryophytes in cloud forests.

  16. Organic nitrogen uptake is a significant contributor to nitrogen economy of subtropical epiphytic bryophytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Liang; Lu, Hua-Zheng; Xu, Xing-Liang; Li, Su; Shi, Xian-Meng; Chen, Xi; Wu, Yi; Huang, Jun-Biao; Chen, Quan; Liu, Shuai; Wu, Chuan-Sheng; Liu, Wen-Yao

    2016-07-01

    Without any root contact with the soil, epiphytic bryophytes must experience and explore poor, patchy, and heterogeneous habitats; while, the nitrogen (N) uptake and use strategies of these organisms remain uncharacterized, which obscures their roles in the N cycle. To investigate the N sources, N preferences, and responses to enhanced N deposition in epiphytic bryophytes, we carried out an in situ manipulation experiment via the 15N labelling technique in an Asian cloud forest. Epiphytic bryophytes obtained more N from air deposition than from the bark, but the contribution of N from the bark was non-negligible. Glycine accounted for 28.4% to 44.5% of the total N in bryophyte tissue, which implies that organic N might serve as an important N source. Increased N deposition increased the total N uptake, but did not alter the N preference of the epiphytic bryophytes. This study provides sound evidence that epiphytic bryophytes could take up N from the bark and wet deposition in both organic and inorganic N forms. It is thus important to consider organic N and bark N sources, which were usually neglected, when estimating the role of epiphytic bryophytes in N cycling and the impacts of N deposition on epiphytic bryophytes in cloud forests.

  17. Organic nitrogen uptake is a significant contributor to nitrogen economy of subtropical epiphytic bryophytes

    PubMed Central

    Song, Liang; Lu, Hua-Zheng; Xu, Xing-Liang; Li, Su; Shi, Xian-Meng; Chen, Xi; Wu, Yi; Huang, Jun-Biao; Chen, Quan; Liu, Shuai; Wu, Chuan-Sheng; Liu, Wen-Yao

    2016-01-01

    Without any root contact with the soil, epiphytic bryophytes must experience and explore poor, patchy, and heterogeneous habitats; while, the nitrogen (N) uptake and use strategies of these organisms remain uncharacterized, which obscures their roles in the N cycle. To investigate the N sources, N preferences, and responses to enhanced N deposition in epiphytic bryophytes, we carried out an in situ manipulation experiment via the 15N labelling technique in an Asian cloud forest. Epiphytic bryophytes obtained more N from air deposition than from the bark, but the contribution of N from the bark was non-negligible. Glycine accounted for 28.4% to 44.5% of the total N in bryophyte tissue, which implies that organic N might serve as an important N source. Increased N deposition increased the total N uptake, but did not alter the N preference of the epiphytic bryophytes. This study provides sound evidence that epiphytic bryophytes could take up N from the bark and wet deposition in both organic and inorganic N forms. It is thus important to consider organic N and bark N sources, which were usually neglected, when estimating the role of epiphytic bryophytes in N cycling and the impacts of N deposition on epiphytic bryophytes in cloud forests. PMID:27460310

  18. On the diversity and richness of understory bryophytes at Nectandra Cloud Forest Reserve, Costa Rica

    PubMed Central

    Norris, Daniel H; Kraichak, Ekaphan; Risk, Allen C; Lucas, Diane; Allard, Dorothy J; Rosengren, Frida; Clark, Theresa A; Fenton, Nicole; Tessler, Michael; Phephu, Nonkululo

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background A survey of the understory bryophytes in the Nectandra Cloud Forest Preserve yielded 1083 specimens distributed among 55 families, represented by 74 genera of mosses, 75 genera of liverworts and 3 of hornworts. We studied and analyzed the bryophytic distribution on six types of substrates: 1) corticolous, 2) epiphyllous, 3) saxicolous, 4) terricolous, 5) aquatic and 6) lignicolous. The richness and composition of bryophyte genera are compared to those of other previous bryophyte surveys from 4 other sites with different oceanic exposures, climatic and geographic conditions in Costa Rica. New information This is a report of the first extensive general survey of bryophytes at the Nectandra Reserve, a premontane cloud forest located on the Atlantic slope of Costa Rica, an area much less studied compared to the Monteverde cloud forest on the Pacific slope. PMID:28765721

  19. On the diversity and richness of understory bryophytes at Nectandra Cloud Forest Reserve, Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Norris, Daniel H; Kraichak, Ekaphan; Risk, Allen C; Lucas, Diane; Allard, Dorothy J; Rosengren, Frida; Clark, Theresa A; Fenton, Nicole; Tessler, Michael; Phephu, Nonkululo; Lennette, Evelyne T

    2017-01-01

    A survey of the understory bryophytes in the Nectandra Cloud Forest Preserve yielded 1083 specimens distributed among 55 families, represented by 74 genera of mosses, 75 genera of liverworts and 3 of hornworts. We studied and analyzed the bryophytic distribution on six types of substrates: 1) corticolous, 2) epiphyllous, 3) saxicolous, 4) terricolous, 5) aquatic and 6) lignicolous. The richness and composition of bryophyte genera are compared to those of other previous bryophyte surveys from 4 other sites with different oceanic exposures, climatic and geographic conditions in Costa Rica. This is a report of the first extensive general survey of bryophytes at the Nectandra Reserve, a premontane cloud forest located on the Atlantic slope of Costa Rica, an area much less studied compared to the Monteverde cloud forest on the Pacific slope.

  20. Origin and distribution of rare earth elements in various lichen and moss species over the last century in France.

    PubMed

    Agnan, Y; Séjalon-Delmas, N; Probst, A

    2014-07-15

    Rare earth elements (REE) are known to be powerful environmental tracers in natural biogeochemical compartments. In this study, the atmospheric deposition of REE was investigated using various lichens and mosses as well as herbarium samples from 1870 to 1998 from six major forested areas in France. The comparison between the REE distribution patterns in organisms and bedrocks showed a regional uniformity influence from dust particles originating from the bedrock and/or soil weathering that were entrapped by lichens and mosses. These lithological signatures were consistent over the last century. The REE patterns of different organism species allowed minor influence of the species to be highlighted compared to the regional lithology. This was even true where the morphological features played a role in the bioaccumulation levels, which were related to the variable efficiency in trapping atmospheric dust particles. A comparison between REE profiles in the organisms and bark indicated a lack of influence of the substrate on lichen REE content. Lichens and mosses appear to be robust passive monitors of REE atmospheric deposition over decades because the mineral data was preserved in herbarium samples despite organic degradation being shown by carbon isotopes and SEM observations. To overcome the bias of REE concentration that resulted from organic degradation, the use of a normalized method is recommended to interpret the historical samples.

  1. Studies on endangered and rare non-commercial fish species recorded in the Pomeranian Bay (southern Baltic Sea) in 2010-2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Więcaszek, Beata; Sobecka, Ewa; Keszka, Sławomir; Stepanowska, Katarzyna; Dudko, Stanisław; Biernaczyk, Marcin; Wrzecionkowski, Konrad

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents the results of studies on endangered and rare non-commercial fish species ( Spinachia spinachia, Nerophis ophidion, Syngnathus typhle, Agonus cataphractus, Pholis gunnellus, Enchelyopus cimbrius, Cyclopterus lumpus) and one lamprey species ( Lampetra fluviatilis), recorded as bycatch during monitoring surveys in 2010-2013 in the Pomeranian Bay. Two species were observed for the first time in the Pomeranian Bay: A. cataphractus and E. cimbrius. Descriptions of parasite fauna are provided for C. lumpus and E. cimbrius, which were infected with four pathogenic species from Neomonada, Digenea, Nematoda, and Acanthocephala. Almost all parasite species were new in the hosts examined.

  2. Chilean blue whales as a case study to illustrate methods to estimate abundance and evaluate conservation status of rare species.

    PubMed

    Williams, Rob; Hedley, Sharon L; Branch, Trevor A; Bravington, Mark V; Zerbini, Alexandre N; Findlay, Ken P

    2011-06-01

    Often abundance of rare species cannot be estimated with conventional design-based methods, so we illustrate with a population of blue whales (Balaenoptera musculus) a spatial model-based method to estimate abundance. We analyzed data from line-transect surveys of blue whales off the coast of Chile, where the population was hunted to low levels. Field protocols allowed deviation from planned track lines to collect identification photographs and tissue samples for genetic analyses, which resulted in an ad hoc sampling design with increased effort in areas of higher densities. Thus, we used spatial modeling methods to estimate abundance. Spatial models are increasingly being used to analyze data from surveys of marine, aquatic, and terrestrial species, but estimation of uncertainty from such models is often problematic. We developed a new, broadly applicable variance estimator that showed there were likely 303 whales (95% CI 176-625) in the study area. The survey did not span the whales' entire range, so this is a minimum estimate. We estimated current minimum abundance relative to pre-exploitation abundance (i.e., status) with a population dynamics model that incorporated our minimum abundance estimate, likely population growth rates from a meta-analysis of rates of increase in large baleen whales, and two alternative assumptions about historic catches. From this model, we estimated that the population was at a minimum of 9.5% (95% CI 4.9-18.0%) of pre-exploitation levels in 1998 under one catch assumption and 7.2% (CI 3.7-13.7%) of pre-exploitation levels under the other. Thus, although Chilean blue whales are probably still at a small fraction of pre-exploitation abundance, even these minimum abundance estimates demonstrate that their status is better than that of Antarctic blue whales, which are still <1% of pre-exploitation population size. We anticipate our methods will be broadly applicable in aquatic and terrestrial surveys for rarely encountered species

  3. Uranium in spring water and bryophytes at basin creek in central idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shacklette, H.T.; Erdman, J.A.

    1982-01-01

    Arkosic sandstones and conglomerates of Tertiary age beneath the Challis Volcanics of Eocene age at Basin Creek, 10 km northeast of Stanley, Idaho, contain uranium-bearing vitrainized carbon fragments. The economic potential of these sandstones and conglomerates is currently being assessed. Springs abound at the contacts of rock units, and water from these springs supports abundant growths of bryophytes (mosses and liverworts). Water from 22 springs and associated bryophytes were sampled; two springs were found to contain apparently anomalous concentrations (normalized) of uranium - as much as 6.5 ??g/L (ppb) in water and 1800 ??g/g (ppm) in ash of mosses. Moss samples from both springs also contained anomalous concentrations of arsenic, and one contained highly anomalous amounts of beryllium. Water from a third spring contained slightly anomalous amounts of uranium, and two species of mosses at the spring contained anomalous uranium (400 and 700 ??g/g) and high levels of both cadmium and lead. Water from a fourth spring was normal for uranium (0.18 ??g/L), but the moss from the water contained a moderate uranium level and highly anomalous concentrations of lead, germanium, and thallium. These results suggest that, in the Basin Creek area, moss sampling at springs may give a more reliable indication of uranium occurrence than would water sampling. The reason for this may be the ability of mosses to concentrate uranium and its associated pathfinder elements and to integrate uranium fluctuations that occur in the spring water over any period of time. ?? 1982.

  4. Investigating the impact of light and water status on the exchange of COS, 13CO2, CO18O and H218O from bryophytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gimeno, Teresa; Royles, Jessica; Ogee, Jerome; Jones, Samuel; Burlett, Regis; West, Jason; Sauze, Joana; Wohl, Steven; Genty, Bernard; Griffiths, Howard; Wingate, Lisa

    2016-04-01

    Terrestrial surfaces are often covered by photoautotrophic communities that play a significant role in the biological fixation of C and N at the global scale. Bryophytes (mosses, liverworts and hornworts) are key members in these communities and are especially adapted to thrive in hostile environments, by growing slowly and surviving repeated dehydration events. Consequently, bryophyte communities can be extremely long-lived (>1500yrs) and can serve as valuable records of historic climate change. In particular the carbon and oxygen isotope compositions of mosses can be used as powerful proxies describing how growing season changes in atmospheric CO2 and rainfall have changed in the distant past over the land surface. Interpreting the climate signals of bryophyte biomass requires a robust understanding of how changes in photosynthetic activity and moisture status regulate the growth and isotopic composition of bryophyte biomass. Thus theoretical models predicting how changes in isotopic enrichment and CO2 discrimination respond to dehydration and rehydration are used to tease apart climatic and isotopic source signals. Testing these models with high resolution datasets obtained from new generation laser spectrometers can provide more information on how these plants that lack stomata cope with water loss. In addition novel tracers such as carbonyl sulfide (COS) can also be measured at high resolution and precision (<5ppt) and used to constrain understanding of diffusional and enzymatic limitations during dehydration and rehydration events in the light and the dark. Here, we will present for the first time simultaneous high-resolution chamber measurements of COS, 13CO2, CO18O and H218O fluxes by a bryophyte species (Marchantia sp.) in the light and during the dark, through complete desiccation cycles. Our measurements consistently reveal a strong enrichment dynamic in the oxygen isotope composition of transpired water over the dessication cycle that caused an increase

  5. Effects of bryophyte and lichen cover on permafrost soil temperature at large scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porada, Philipp; Ekici, Altug; Beer, Christian

    2017-04-01

    Bryophytes and lichens covering the soil surface at high latitudes act as an insulating layer, which has a net cooling effect on the soil and thereby protects permafrost. Climate change, however, may lead to changes in the average surface coverage of bryophytes and lichens. This can result in thawing of permafrost and an associated release of soil carbon to the atmosphere, which may cause a positive feedback on atmospheric CO2 concentration. Hence, it is crucial to predict the future large-scale response of bryophyte and lichen cover to climatic change at high latitudes. Current global land surface models, however, contain mostly empirical approaches to represent the surface cover of bryophytes and lichens, which makes it difficult to quantify its future extent and dynamics. Therefore, we integrate a process-based model of bryophyte and lichen growth into the global land surface model JSBACH (Jena Scheme for Biosphere-Atmosphere Coupling in Hamburg). Thereby, we explicitly simulate dynamic thermal properties of the bryophyte and lichen cover and their relation to environmental factors. To quantify the insulating effect of the cover on the soil, we compare simulations with and without simulated bryophyte and lichen cover. We estimate that the bryophyte and lichen cover exerts an average cooling effect of 2.7 K on temperature in the topsoil for the region north of 50o N under current climatic conditions. Locally, a cooling of up to 5.7 K may be reached. Furthermore, we show that using a simple, empirical representation of the bryophyte and lichen cover instead of a dynamic one results only in an average cooling of around 0.5 K. We conclude that bryophytes and lichens have a significant impact on soil temperature in high-latitude ecosystems and that dynamic thermal properties are necessary for a realistic representation of the cooling effect.

  6. Bryophytes as Climate Indicators: moss and liverwort photosynthetic limitations and carbon isotope signals in organic material and peat deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, H.; Royles, J.; Horwath, A.; Hodell, D. A.; Convey, P.; Hodgson, D.; Wingate, L.; Ogeé, J.

    2011-12-01

    Bryophytes make a significant contribution to carbon sequestration and storage in polar, boreal, temperate and tropical biomes, and yet there is limited understanding of the determinants of carbon isotope composition. Bryophytes are poikilohydric and lack stomata in the vegetative (gametophyte) stage, and lack of roots and reliance on liquid water to maintain hydration status also imposes diffusional limitations on CO2 uptake and extent of carbon isotope discrimination. Real-time gas exchange and instantaneous discrimination studies can be used to quantify responses to liquid phase limitation. Thus, wetted tissues show less negative δ13C signals due to liquid phase conductance and, as the thallus surface dries, maximum CO2 assimilation and discrimination are attained when the limitation is primarily the internal (mesophyll) conductance. Continued desiccation then leads to additional biochemical limitation in drought tolerant species, and low discrimination, although the carbon gain is low at this time. In this paper we explore the extent of carbon isotope discrimination in bulk organic material and cellulose as a function of climatic and environmental conditions, in temperate, tropical and Antarctic bryophytes. Field studies have been used to investigate seasonal variations in precipitation and water vapour inputs for cloud forest formations as a function of bryophyte biomass, diversity and isotope composition in epiphytes (particularly leafy liverworts) along an altitudinal gradient in Peru. In the Antarctic, moss banks sampled on Signy Island consisted of only two species, primarily Chorisodontium aciphyllum and some Polytrichum strictum, allowing the collection of shallow and deep cores representative of growth over the past 200 to 2000 years. The well-preserved peat has provided data on growth (14C) and stable isotopic proxies (13C, 18O) for material contemporary with recent anthropogenic climate forcing (over the past 200 years), for comparison with longer

  7. Levels of platinum group elements and rare-earth elements in wild mushroom species growing in Poland.

    PubMed

    Mleczek, Mirosław; Niedzielski, Przemysław; Kalač, Pavel; Siwulski, Marek; Rzymski, Piotr; Gąsecka, Monika

    2016-01-01

    Due to limited data-describing abilities of mushrooms to accumulate platinum group elements (PGEs) and rare-earth elements (REEs), the aim of this study was to determine, by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry followed by microwave-assisted sample digestion by nitric acid, the content of these elements in 20 mushroom species (10 above ground and 10 growing on wood), mostly edible, collected near a busy trunk road. The highest content of PGEs in above-ground mushroom species was observed in Lepista gilva and Suillus bovinus fruit bodies (0.38 ± 0.05 and 0.37 ± 0.03 mg kg(-1) DW, respectively), while in mushrooms growing on wood, the highest content was observed in Pleurotus ostreatus (0.35 ± 0.04 mg kg(-1) DW). The mean content of PGEs for both these groups was 0.23 ± 0.08 and 0.26 ± 0.07 mg kg(-1) DW, respectively. The highest content of REEs in Suillus luteus and Tricholoma equestra was 5.03 ± 0.50 and 2.18 ± 0.56 mg kg(-1) DW, respectively, but within mushrooms growing on wood in Ganoderma applanatum fruiting bodies it was 4.19 ± 0.78 mg kg(-1) DW. Mean contents of REEs were 1.39 ± 1.21 and 1.61 ± 0.97 mg kg(-1) DW in above-ground species and species growing on wood, respectively. Generally, the group of mushroom species growing on wood was capable of slightly higher accumulation of both REEs and PGEs. No limits have been established for both the groups until now.

  8. Standardized broth microdilution antimicrobial susceptibility testing of Francisella tularensis subsp. holarctica strains from Europe and rare Francisella species.

    PubMed

    Georgi, Enrico; Schacht, Erik; Scholz, Holger C; Splettstoesser, Wolf D

    2012-10-01

    Tularaemia is a widespread zoonosis in Europe caused by Francisella tularensis subsp. holarctica. Because of a lack of standardized CLSI-approved antibiotic susceptibility data from European Francisella strains, the antibiotic susceptibilities of a selection of F. tularensis subsp. holarctica isolates originating from Germany, Austria, France, Spain and other European countries were determined. Rarely isolated species and subspecies of Francisella such as Francisella philomiragia, F. tularensis subsp. novicida and F. tularensis subsp. mediasiatica as well as the type strain of Francisella hispaniensis were included in this study. MIC data were obtained using cation-adjusted Mueller-Hinton broth with a 2% growth supplement. The broth microdilution testing system comprised 14 antibiotics, including gentamicin, streptomycin, ciprofloxacin and tetracycline. All of the 91 strains tested were susceptible to aminoglycosides, quinolones, tetracycline and chloramphenicol. The antimicrobial susceptibility of rare Francisellae was similar to the antibiotic profile of F. tularensis subsp. holarctica strains. For erythromycin, we detected two geographically distinct groups of F. tularensis subsp. holarctica isolates in western Europe. One group was resistant and the other one was susceptible. Both groups overlapped in a small region in Germany. Being performed in accordance with CLSI criteria, this study provides reliable data on antibiotic susceptibility patterns of European Francisella isolates. The standardized methodology of this study can be used for testing of suspicious colonies from clinical specimens for therapeutic guidance. Based on the results, aminoglycosides or quinolones are recommended as first-choice antibiotics for the therapy of F. hispaniensis, F. philomiragia or F. tularensis subsp. novicida infections in immunocompromised patients.

  9. Effects of human trampling on abundance and diversity of vascular plants, bryophytes and lichens in alpine heath vegetation, Northern Sweden.

    PubMed

    Jägerbrand, Annika K; Alatalo, Juha M

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of human trampling on cover, diversity and species richness in an alpine heath ecosystem in northern Sweden. We tested the hypothesis that proximity to trails decreases plant cover, diversity and species richness of the canopy and the understory. We found a significant decrease in plant cover with proximity to the trail for the understory, but not for the canopy level, and significant decreases in the abundance of deciduous shrubs in the canopy layer and lichens in the understory. Proximity also had a significant negative impact on species richness of lichens. However, there were no significant changes in species richness, diversity or evenness of distribution in the canopy or understory with proximity to the trail. While not significant, liverworts, acrocarpous and pleurocarpous bryophytes tended to have contrasting abundance patterns with differing proximity to the trail, indicating that trampling may cause shifts in dominance hierarchies of different groups of bryophytes. Due to the decrease in understory cover, the abundance of litter, rock and soil increased with proximity to the trail. These results demonstrate that low-frequency human trampling in alpine heaths over long periods can have major negative impacts on lichen abundance and species richness. To our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate that trampling can decrease species richness of lichens. It emphasises the importance of including species-level data on non-vascular plants when conducting studies in alpine or tundra ecosystems, since they often make up the majority of species and play a significant role in ecosystem functioning and response in many of these extreme environments.

  10. Baseline survey for rare plant species and native plant communities within the Kamehameha Schools 'Lupea Safe Harbor Planning Project Area, North Kona District, Island of Hawai'i

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jacobi, James; F. R. Warshauer, frwvolcano@hotmail.com; Jonathan Price, jpprice@hawaii.edu

    2010-01-01

    Non-zero baseline values are proposed for the one listed plant species found within the Lupea Project area, one species that is a candidate for listing, and the four other rare species we found that may be considered for listing in the future. Additionally, a zero baseline is proposed for 23 other species that were predicted, but not found within the project area. These include 14 Endangered species, one Threatened species, two candidates for listing, and six species of concern. Subsequent monitoring of the site will be necessary to determine if the populations of these species have increased or decreased relative to their baseline values. It is presumed that the management activities Kamehameha Schools has proposed for this area, particularly removal of the ungulates and weed control, will provide a benefit to the habitat as a whole and allow for natural regeneration and maintenance of the all elements of the plant communities found there.

  11. Biomonitoring of testate amoebae (protozoa) as toxic metals absorbed in aquatic bryophytes from the Hg-Tl mineralized area (China).

    PubMed

    Yang, Zai-Chao; Wang, Zhi-Hui; Zhang, Zhao-Hui

    2011-05-01

    Toxic metal pollution in bodies of water is a source of danger to the health of people living in developing countries. The untreated mine wastes located near some Chinese ore mines may cause water pollution, which ultimately results in various diseases. The aim of the present study is to assess the response of testate amoebae communities to pollution by toxic metals in groundwater, stream water, and aquatic bryophytes in Lanmuchang stream located in the Hg-Tl mineralized area in southwestern Guizhou Province, China. Measurements were made of the levels of Hg, As, Cd, Tl, Cu, Zn, and Pb in three mosses: Hyophila propagulifera, Rhynchostegium riparioides, and Hygroamblystegium tenax. Mean moss concentrations of Hg, As, Cu, Pb, and Zn were significantly higher than stream water values and testate amoebae species richness and abundance were significantly lower in the 'polluted' group. We then studied the correlation between toxic metals and testate amoebae. The total species abundance is correlated negatively to Hg and Cu concentrations. Our results indicated that testate amoebae are sensitive to toxic metal pollution and aquatic bryophytes are bioaccumulators of trace metals, and results also showed potential microecosystem health risks.

  12. Effects of bryophyte and lichen cover on permafrost soil temperature at large scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porada, Philipp; Ekici, Altug; Beer, Christian

    2016-09-01

    Bryophyte and lichen cover on the forest floor at high latitudes exerts an insulating effect on the ground. In this way, the cover decreases mean annual soil temperature and can protect permafrost soil. Climate change, however, may change bryophyte and lichen cover, with effects on the permafrost state and related carbon balance. It is, therefore, crucial to predict how the bryophyte and lichen cover will react to environmental change at the global scale. To date, current global land surface models contain only empirical representations of the bryophyte and lichen cover, which makes it impractical to predict the future state and function of bryophytes and lichens. For this reason, we integrate a process-based model of bryophyte and lichen growth into the global land surface model JSBACH (Jena Scheme for Biosphere-Atmosphere Coupling in Hamburg). The model simulates bryophyte and lichen cover on upland sites. Wetlands are not included. We take into account the dynamic nature of the thermal properties of the bryophyte and lichen cover and their relation to environmental factors. Subsequently, we compare simulations with and without bryophyte and lichen cover to quantify the insulating effect of the organisms on the soil. We find an average cooling effect of the bryophyte and lichen cover of 2.7 K on temperature in the topsoil for the region north of 50° N under the current climate. Locally, a cooling of up to 5.7 K may be reached. Moreover, we show that using a simple, empirical representation of the bryophyte and lichen cover without dynamic properties only results in an average cooling of around 0.5 K. This suggests that (a) bryophytes and lichens have a significant impact on soil temperature in high-latitude ecosystems and (b) a process-based description of their thermal properties is necessary for a realistic representation of the cooling effect. The advanced land surface scheme, including a dynamic bryophyte and lichen model, will be the basis for an improved

  13. Survey of volatile oxylipins and their biosynthetic precursors in bryophytes.

    PubMed

    Croisier, Emmanuel; Rempt, Martin; Pohnert, Georg

    2010-04-01

    Oxylipins are metabolites which are derived from the oxidative fragmentation of polyunsaturated fatty acids. These metabolites play central roles in plant hormonal regulation and defense. Here we survey the production of volatile oxylipins in bryophytes and report the production of a high structural variety of C5, C6, C8 and C9 volatiles of mosses. In liverworts and hornworts oxylipin production was not as pronounced as in the 23 screened mosses. A biosynthetic investigation revealed that both, C18 and C20 fatty acids serve as precursors for the volatile oxylipins that are mainly produced after mechanical wounding of the green tissue of mosses.

  14. Long-lived sperm in the geothermal bryophyte Pohlia nutans.

    PubMed

    Rosenstiel, Todd N; Eppley, Sarah M

    2009-12-23

    Non-vascular plants rely on sperm to cross the distance between male and female reproductive organs for fertilization and sexual reproduction to occur. The majority of non-vascular plants have separate sexes, and thus, this distance may be a few millimetres to many metres. Because sperm need water for transport, it has been assumed that sperm lifespans are short and that this type of sexual reproduction limits the expansion of non-vascular plants in terrestrial environments. However, little data is available on the lifespan of sperm in non-vascular plants, and none is available for bryophytes, the group thought to have first colonized terrestrial habitats. Here, we documented the lifespan of sperm of Pohlia nutans, collected from a geothermal spring's area, and tested the effects of variation under environmental conditions on this lifespan. Surprisingly, 20 per cent of the sperm were still motile after 100 h, and sperm lifespan was not significantly affected by temperature variation between 22 and 60 degrees C. Lifespan was significantly affected by sperm dilution and temperatures above 75 degrees C. These results suggest the need to reconsider the importance of sperm motility in bryophyte fertilization.

  15. Heavy metals in aquatic bryophytes from the Ore mountains (Germany).

    PubMed

    Samecka-Cymerman, A; Kolon, K; Kempers, A

    2002-07-01

    Concentration of the metals Ni, Cr, Co, Zn, Mn, Pb, Cd, Cu, Ba, Al, and V as well as the macronutrients Ca, Mg, and K were measured in water and in the aquatic bryophytes Platyhypnidium riparioides, Scapania sp., and Fontinalis antipyretica sampled from streams in the Erzgebirge (Ore Mountains, eastern Germany). These plants, as used to evaluate the spatial distribution of elements in the examined streams, contained elevated levels of all the investigated metals except Sr. The highest levels of Cd (195 mg/kg), Cu (233 mg/kg), Zn (22500 mg/kg), Pb (595 mg/kg), and Co (140 mg/kg) seriously exceed background values. In recent years input of pollutants has decreased in the Erzgebirge area and the deposition can now be addressed as being comparable to that of rural areas without major local or regional influences. This investigation indicates that the studied aquatic mosses reflect part of the pollutant loadings released in the past in the Erzgebirge area of which remnants are still present in the environment. Two models describing the con-centrations of Fe and Zn in aquatic bryophytes in relation to concentrations of some elements in water are presented.

  16. Long-lived sperm in the geothermal bryophyte Pohlia nutans

    PubMed Central

    Rosenstiel, Todd N.; Eppley, Sarah M.

    2009-01-01

    Non-vascular plants rely on sperm to cross the distance between male and female reproductive organs for fertilization and sexual reproduction to occur. The majority of non-vascular plants have separate sexes, and thus, this distance may be a few millimetres to many metres. Because sperm need water for transport, it has been assumed that sperm lifespans are short and that this type of sexual reproduction limits the expansion of non-vascular plants in terrestrial environments. However, little data is available on the lifespan of sperm in non-vascular plants, and none is available for bryophytes, the group thought to have first colonized terrestrial habitats. Here, we documented the lifespan of sperm of Pohlia nutans, collected from a geothermal spring's area, and tested the effects of variation under environmental conditions on this lifespan. Surprisingly, 20 per cent of the sperm were still motile after 100 h, and sperm lifespan was not significantly affected by temperature variation between 22 and 60°C. Lifespan was significantly affected by sperm dilution and temperatures above 75°C. These results suggest the need to reconsider the importance of sperm motility in bryophyte fertilization. PMID:19640871

  17. The white-margined penstemon (Penstemon albomarginatus Jones), a rare Mohave Desert species, and the Hualapai Mountains land exchange in Mohave County, Arizona

    Treesearch

    John L. Anderson

    2001-01-01

    The white-margined penstemon (Penstemon albomarginatus Jones) is a rare Mohave Desert species with an unusual tripartite distribution with disjunct localities in Arizona, California, and Nevada. The Arizona population is the largest single population occurring with a range of 15 miles by 5 miles in Dutch Flat near Yucca, Arizona in Mohave County. The land ownership...

  18. The rare mantis shrimp Areosquilla indica (Hansen, 1976) (Crustacea, Stomatopoda) from the Great Barrier Reef: first Australian records of the genus and species.

    PubMed

    Ahyong, Shane T; Wassenberg, Theodore J

    2015-08-18

    The rare mantis shrimp genus Areosquilla is recorded from Australia for the first time based on nine specimens of A. indica (Hansen, 1926) collected from the Great Barrier Reef. Morphological variation beyond that observed in previous accounts is reported. The present record and other recent discoveries bring the Australian stomatopod fauna to 152 species and 68 genera.

  19. The mossy north: an inverse latitudinal diversity gradient in European bryophytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mateo, Rubén G.; Broennimann, Olivier; Normand, Signe; Petitpierre, Blaise; Araújo, Miguel B.; Svenning, Jens-C.; Baselga, Andrés; Fernández-González, Federico; Gómez-Rubio, Virgilio; Muñoz, Jesús; Suarez, Guillermo M.; Luoto, Miska; Guisan, Antoine; Vanderpoorten, Alain

    2016-05-01

    It remains hotly debated whether latitudinal diversity gradients are common across taxonomic groups and whether a single mechanism can explain such gradients. Investigating species richness (SR) patterns of European land plants, we determine whether SR increases with decreasing latitude, as predicted by theory, and whether the assembly mechanisms differ among taxonomic groups. SR increases towards the south in spermatophytes, but towards the north in ferns and bryophytes. SR patterns in spermatophytes are consistent with their patterns of beta diversity, with high levels of nestedness and turnover in the north and in the south, respectively, indicating species exclusion towards the north and increased opportunities for speciation in the south. Liverworts exhibit the highest levels of nestedness, suggesting that they represent the most sensitive group to the impact of past climate change. Nevertheless, although the extent of liverwort species turnover in the south is substantially and significantly lower than in spermatophytes, liverworts share with the latter a higher nestedness in the north and a higher turn-over in the south, in contrast to mosses and ferns. The extent to which the similarity in the patterns displayed by spermatophytes and liverworts reflects a similar assembly mechanism remains, however, to be demonstrated.

  20. The mossy north: an inverse latitudinal diversity gradient in European bryophytes.

    PubMed

    Mateo, Rubén G; Broennimann, Olivier; Normand, Signe; Petitpierre, Blaise; Araújo, Miguel B; Svenning, Jens-C; Baselga, Andrés; Fernández-González, Federico; Gómez-Rubio, Virgilio; Muñoz, Jesús; Suarez, Guillermo M; Luoto, Miska; Guisan, Antoine; Vanderpoorten, Alain

    2016-05-06

    It remains hotly debated whether latitudinal diversity gradients are common across taxonomic groups and whether a single mechanism can explain such gradients. Investigating species richness (SR) patterns of European land plants, we determine whether SR increases with decreasing latitude, as predicted by theory, and whether the assembly mechanisms differ among taxonomic groups. SR increases towards the south in spermatophytes, but towards the north in ferns and bryophytes. SR patterns in spermatophytes are consistent with their patterns of beta diversity, with high levels of nestedness and turnover in the north and in the south, respectively, indicating species exclusion towards the north and increased opportunities for speciation in the south. Liverworts exhibit the highest levels of nestedness, suggesting that they represent the most sensitive group to the impact of past climate change. Nevertheless, although the extent of liverwort species turnover in the south is substantially and significantly lower than in spermatophytes, liverworts share with the latter a higher nestedness in the north and a higher turn-over in the south, in contrast to mosses and ferns. The extent to which the similarity in the patterns displayed by spermatophytes and liverworts reflects a similar assembly mechanism remains, however, to be demonstrated.

  1. The mossy north: an inverse latitudinal diversity gradient in European bryophytes

    PubMed Central

    Mateo, Rubén G.; Broennimann, Olivier; Normand, Signe; Petitpierre, Blaise; Araújo, Miguel B.; Svenning, Jens-C.; Baselga, Andrés; Fernández-González, Federico; Gómez-Rubio, Virgilio; Muñoz, Jesús; Suarez, Guillermo M.; Luoto, Miska; Guisan, Antoine; Vanderpoorten, Alain

    2016-01-01

    It remains hotly debated whether latitudinal diversity gradients are common across taxonomic groups and whether a single mechanism can explain such gradients. Investigating species richness (SR) patterns of European land plants, we determine whether SR increases with decreasing latitude, as predicted by theory, and whether the assembly mechanisms differ among taxonomic groups. SR increases towards the south in spermatophytes, but towards the north in ferns and bryophytes. SR patterns in spermatophytes are consistent with their patterns of beta diversity, with high levels of nestedness and turnover in the north and in the south, respectively, indicating species exclusion towards the north and increased opportunities for speciation in the south. Liverworts exhibit the highest levels of nestedness, suggesting that they represent the most sensitive group to the impact of past climate change. Nevertheless, although the extent of liverwort species turnover in the south is substantially and significantly lower than in spermatophytes, liverworts share with the latter a higher nestedness in the north and a higher turn-over in the south, in contrast to mosses and ferns. The extent to which the similarity in the patterns displayed by spermatophytes and liverworts reflects a similar assembly mechanism remains, however, to be demonstrated. PMID:27151094

  2. Biogeochemical characterization of an undisturbed highly acidic, metal-rich bryophyte habitat, east-central Alaska, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gough, L.P.; Eppinger, R.G.; Briggs, P.H.; Giles, S.

    2006-01-01

    We report on the geochemistry of soil and bryophyte-laden sediment and on the biogeochemistry of willows growing in an undisturbed volcanogenic massive sulfide deposit in the Alaska Range ecoregion of east-central Alaska. We also describe an unusual bryophyte assemblage found growing in the acidic metal-rich waters that drain the area. Ferricrete-cemented silty alluvial sediments within seeps and streams are covered with the liverwort Gymnocolea inflata whereas the mosses Polytrichum commune and P. juniperinum inhabit the area adjacent to the water and within the splash zone. Both the liverwort-encrusted sediment and Polytrichum thalli have high concentrations of major and trace metal cations (e.g., Al, As, Cu, Fe, Hg, La, Mn, Pb, and Zn). Soils in the area do not reflect the geochemical signature of the mineral deposit and we postulate they are influenced by the chemistry of eolian sediments derived from outside the deposit area. The willow, Salix pulchra, growing mostly within and adjacent to the larger streams, has much higher concentrations of Al, As, Cd, Cr, Fe, La, Pb, and Zn when compared to the same species collected in non-mineralized areas of Alaska. The Cd levels are especially high and are shown to exceed, by an order of magnitude, levels demonstrated to be toxic to ptarmigan in Colorado. Willow, growing in this naturally occurring metal-rich Red Mountain alteration zone, may adversely affect the health of browsing animals. ?? 2006 Regents of the University of Colorado.

  3. Amplicon-pyrosequencing-based detection of compositional shifts in bryophyte-associated fungal communities along an elevation gradient.

    PubMed

    Davey, Marie L; Heegaard, Einar; Halvorsen, Rune; Kauserud, Håvard; Ohlson, Mikael

    2013-01-01

    Although bryophytes are a dominant vegetation component of boreal and alpine ecosystems, little is known about their associated fungal communities. HPLC assays of ergosterol (fungal biomass) and amplicon pyrosequencing of the ITS2 region of rDNA were used to investigate how the fungal communities associated with four bryophyte species changed across an elevational gradient transitioning from conifer forest to the low-alpine. Fungal biomass and OTU richness associated with the four moss hosts did not vary significantly across the gradient (P > 0.05), and both were more strongly affected by host and tissue type. Despite largely constant levels of fungal biomass, distinct shifts in community composition of fungi associated with Hylocomium, Pleurozium and Polytrichum occurred between the elevation zones of the gradient. This likely is a result of influence on fungal communities by major environmental factors such as temperature, directly or indirectly mediated by, or interacting with, the response of other components of the vegetation (i.e. the dominant trees). Fungal communities associated with Dicranum were an exception, exhibiting spatial autocorrelation between plots, and no significant structuring by elevation. Nevertheless, the detection of distinct fungal assemblages associated with a single host growing in different elevation zones along an elevational gradient is of particular relevance in the light of the ongoing changes in vegetation patterns in boreal and alpine systems due to global climate warming.

  4. Population genetic structure of two rare tree species (Colubrina oppositifolia and Alphitonia ponderosa, Rhamnaceae) from Hawaiian dry and mesic forests using random amplified polymorphic DNA markers.

    PubMed

    Kwon, J A; Morden, C W

    2002-06-01

    Hawaiian dry and mesic forests contain an increasingly rare assemblage of species due to habitat destruction, invasive alien weeds and exotic pests. Two rare Rhamnaceae species in these ecosystems, Colubrina oppositifolia and Alphitonia ponderosa, were examined using random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers to determine the genetic structure of the populations and the amount of variation relative to other native Hawaiian species. Relative variation is lower than with other Hawaiian species, although this is probably not a consequence of genetic bottleneck. Larger populations of both species contain the highest levels of genetic diversity and smaller populations generally the least as determined by number of polymorphic loci, estimated heterozygosity, and Shannon's index of genetic diversity. Populations on separate islands were readily discernible for both species as were two populations of C. oppositifolia on Hawai'i island (North and South Kona populations). Substructure among Kaua'i subpopulations of A. ponderosa that were ecologically separated was also evident. Although population diversity is thought to have remained at predisturbance levels, population size continues to decline as recruitment is either absent or does not keep pace with senescence of mature plants. Recovery efforts must focus on control of alien species if these and other endemic dry and mesic forest species are to persist.

  5. Metabolic characteristics of dominant microbes and key rare species from an acidic hot spring in Taiwan revealed by metagenomics.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kuei-Han; Liao, Ben-Yang; Chang, Hao-Wei; Huang, Shiao-Wei; Chang, Ting-Yan; Yang, Cheng-Yu; Wang, Yu-Bin; Lin, Yu-Teh Kirk; Wu, Yu-Wei; Tang, Sen-Lin; Yu, Hon-Tsen

    2015-12-03

    Microbial diversity and community structures in acidic hot springs have been characterized by 16S rRNA gene-based diversity surveys. However, our understanding regarding the interactions among microbes, or between microbes and environmental factors, remains limited. In the present study, a metagenomic approach, followed by bioinformatics analyses, were used to predict interactions within the microbial ecosystem in Shi-Huang-Ping (SHP), an acidic hot spring in northern Taiwan. Characterizing environmental parameters and potential metabolic pathways highlighted the importance of carbon assimilatory pathways. Four distinct carbon assimilatory pathways were identified in five dominant genera of bacteria. Of those dominant carbon fixers, Hydrogenobaculum bacteria outcompeted other carbon assimilators and dominated the SHP, presumably due to their ability to metabolize hydrogen and to withstand an anaerobic environment with fluctuating temperatures. Furthermore, most dominant microbes were capable of metabolizing inorganic sulfur-related compounds (abundant in SHP). However, Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans was the only species among key rare microbes with the capability to fix nitrogen, suggesting a key role in nitrogen cycling. In addition to potential metabolic interactions, based on the 16S rRNAs gene sequence of Nanoarchaeum-related and its potential host Ignicoccus-related archaea, as well as sequences of viruses and CRISPR arrays, we inferred that there were complex microbe-microbe interactions. Our study provided evidence that there were numerous microbe-microbe and microbe-environment interactions within the microbial community in an acidic hot spring. We proposed that Hydrogenobaculum bacteria were the dominant microbial genus, as they were able to metabolize hydrogen, assimilate carbon and live in an anaerobic environment with fluctuating temperatures.

  6. Metabolic characteristics of dominant microbes and key rare species from an acidic hot spring in Taiwan revealed by metagenomics

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Kuei -Han; Liao, Ben -Yang; Chang, Hao -Wei; Huang, Shiao -Wei; Chang, Ting -Yan; Yang, Cheng -Yu; Wang, Yu -Bin; Lin, Yu-Teh Kirk; Wu, Yu -Wei; Tang, Sen -Lin; Yu, Hon -Tsen

    2015-12-03

    Microbial diversity and community structures in acidic hot springs have been characterized by 16S rRNA gene-based diversity surveys. However, our understanding regarding the interactions among microbes, or between microbes and environmental factors, remains limited. In the present study, a metagenomic approach, followed by bioinformatics analyses, were used to predict interactions within the microbial ecosystem in Shi-Huang-Ping (SHP), an acidic hot spring in northern Taiwan. Characterizing environmental parameters and potential metabolic pathways highlighted the importance of carbon assimilatory pathways. Four distinct carbon assimilatory pathways were identified in five dominant genera of bacteria. Of those dominant carbon fixers, Hydrogenobaculum bacteria outcompeted other carbon assimilators and dominated the SHP, presumably due to their ability to metabolize hydrogen and to withstand an anaerobic environment with fluctuating temperatures. Furthermore, most dominant microbes were capable of metabolizing inorganic sulfur-related compounds (abundant in SHP). However, Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans was the only species among key rare microbes with the capability to fix nitrogen, suggesting a key role in nitrogen cycling. In addition to potential metabolic interactions, based on the 16S rRNAs gene sequence of Nanoarchaeum-related and its potential host Ignicoccus-related archaea, as well as sequences of viruses and CRISPR arrays, we inferred that there were complex microbe-microbe interactions. In conclusion, our study provided evidence that there were numerous microbe-microbe and microbe-environment interactions within the microbial community in an acidic hot spring. We proposed that Hydrogenobaculum bacteria were the dominant microbial genus, as they were able to metabolize hydrogen, assimilate carbon and live in an anaerobic environment with fluctuating temperatures.

  7. Metabolic characteristics of dominant microbes and key rare species from an acidic hot spring in Taiwan revealed by metagenomics

    DOE PAGES

    Lin, Kuei -Han; Liao, Ben -Yang; Chang, Hao -Wei; ...

    2015-12-03

    Microbial diversity and community structures in acidic hot springs have been characterized by 16S rRNA gene-based diversity surveys. However, our understanding regarding the interactions among microbes, or between microbes and environmental factors, remains limited. In the present study, a metagenomic approach, followed by bioinformatics analyses, were used to predict interactions within the microbial ecosystem in Shi-Huang-Ping (SHP), an acidic hot spring in northern Taiwan. Characterizing environmental parameters and potential metabolic pathways highlighted the importance of carbon assimilatory pathways. Four distinct carbon assimilatory pathways were identified in five dominant genera of bacteria. Of those dominant carbon fixers, Hydrogenobaculum bacteria outcompeted othermore » carbon assimilators and dominated the SHP, presumably due to their ability to metabolize hydrogen and to withstand an anaerobic environment with fluctuating temperatures. Furthermore, most dominant microbes were capable of metabolizing inorganic sulfur-related compounds (abundant in SHP). However, Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans was the only species among key rare microbes with the capability to fix nitrogen, suggesting a key role in nitrogen cycling. In addition to potential metabolic interactions, based on the 16S rRNAs gene sequence of Nanoarchaeum-related and its potential host Ignicoccus-related archaea, as well as sequences of viruses and CRISPR arrays, we inferred that there were complex microbe-microbe interactions. In conclusion, our study provided evidence that there were numerous microbe-microbe and microbe-environment interactions within the microbial community in an acidic hot spring. We proposed that Hydrogenobaculum bacteria were the dominant microbial genus, as they were able to metabolize hydrogen, assimilate carbon and live in an anaerobic environment with fluctuating temperatures.« less

  8. Criterion 1: Conservation of biological diversity - Indicator 7: The status (threatened, rare, vulnerable, endangered, or extinct) of forest dependent species at risk of not maintaining viable breeding populations, as determined by legislation or scientific assessment

    Treesearch

    Curtis H. Flather; Taylor H. Ricketts; Carolyn Hull Sieg; Michael S. Knowles; John P. Fay; Jason McNees

    2003-01-01

    As the number of species classified as rare increases, the likelihood of species extinction also increases. This indicator focuses on species that have the greatest chance of being lost from the biotic community and therefore presages potential declines in species richness. The trend in species extinction since the turn of the 20th century varies by taxonomic group....

  9. No evidence of sexual niche partitioning in a dioecious moss with rare sexual reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Bisang, Irene; Ehrlén, Johan; Korpelainen, Helena; Hedenäs, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Roughly half of the species of bryophytes have separate sexes (dioecious) and half are hermaphroditic (monoecious). This variation has major consequences for the ecology and evolution of the different species. In some sexually reproducing dioecious bryophytes, sex ratio has been shown to vary with environmental conditions. This study focuses on the dioecious wetland moss Drepanocladus trifarius, which rarely produces sexual branches or sporophytes and lacks apparent secondary sex characteristics, and examines whether genetic sexes exhibit different habitat preferences, i.e. whether sexual niche partitioning occurs. Methods A total of 277 shoots of D. trifarius were randomly sampled at 214 locations and 12 environmental factors were quantified at each site. Sex was assigned to the individual shoots collected in the natural environments, regardless of their reproductive status, using a specifically designed molecular marker associated with female sex. Key Results Male and female shoots did not differ in shoot biomass, the sexes were randomly distributed with respect to each other, and environmental conditions at male and female sampling locations did not differ. Collectively, this demonstrates a lack of sexual niche segregation. Adult genetic sex ratio was female-biased, with 2·8 females for every male individual. Conclusions The results show that although the sexes of D. trifarius did not differ with regard to annual growth, spatial distribution or habitat requirements, the genetic sex ratio was nevertheless significantly female-biased. This supports the notion that factors other than sex-related differences in reproductive costs and sexual dimorphism can also drive the evolution of biased sex ratios in plants. PMID:26359424

  10. Using transplants to measure accumulation rates of epiphytic bryophytes in forests of western Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosso, A.L.; Muir, Patricia S.; Rambo, T.

    2001-01-01

    We sought a simple and effective transplant method that could be used to measure biomass accumulation rates of epiphytic bryophytes. Trials were carried out in the Pseudotsuga menziesii-dominated forests of western Oregon. We tested multiple transplant methods over a 13-month period while comparing accumulation rates of Antitrichia curtipendula (Hedw.) Brid. and Isothecium myosuroides Brid. among an old-growth stand, a young stand, and a recent clearcut. In our study area, Antitrichia is considered to be an old-growth associate while Isothecium is a more ubiquitous species. Methods tested included containment in net bags, containment in hairnets, and directly tying mats to substrates. Three sizes of transplants were tested with both natural and inert artificial substrates. Transplants of approximately five g enclosed in plastic net bags and tied to either natural or artificial substrates worked well for our purposes. Only minor differences were found in mean accumulation rates between the old growth and young stand, though variation in accumulation rates was higher in the old growth. Neither species appeared capable of surviving in the clearcut. Antitrichia accumulated biomass 60% faster in the canopy than in the understory on average. Antitrichia also accumulated at a faster rate than Isothecium, with mean 13-month biomass increases of 11.8 and 3.7% respectively for 5 g transplants in the understory. Our results suggest that Antitrichia's association with old growth may be due more to dispersal or establishment limitations than to a decreased ability to grow in young stands.

  11. Contribution of genosystematics to current concepts of phylogeny and classification of bryophytes.

    PubMed

    Troitsky, A V; Ignatov, M S; Bobrova, V K; Milyutina, I A

    2007-12-01

    This paper is a survey of the current state of molecular studies on bryophyte phylogeny. Molecular data have greatly contributed to developing a phylogeny and classification of bryophytes. The previous traditional systems of classification based on morphological data are being significantly revised. New data of the authors are presented on phylogeny of Hypnales pleurocarpous mosses inferred from nucleotide sequence data of the nuclear DNA internal transcribed spacers ITS1-2 and the trnL-F region of the chloroplast genome.

  12. Responses to desiccation stress in bryophytes and an important role of dithiothreitol-insensitive non-photochemical quenching against photoinhibition in dehydrated states.

    PubMed

    Nabe, Hayase; Funabiki, Ryoko; Kashino, Yasuhiro; Koike, Hiroyuki; Satoh, Kazuhiko

    2007-11-01

    The effects of air drying and hypertonic treatments in the dark on seven bryophytes, which had grown under different water environments, were studied. All the desiccation-tolerant species tested lost most of their PSII photochemical activity when photosynthetic electron transport was inhibited by air drying, while, in all the sensitive species, the PSII photochemical activity remained at a high level even when photosynthesis was totally inhibited. The PSI reaction center remained active under drying conditions in both sensitive and tolerant species, but the activity became non-detectable in the light only in tolerant species due to deactivation of the cyclic electron flow around PSI and of the back reaction in PSI. Light-induced non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) was found to be induced not only by the xanthophyll cycle but also by a DeltapH-induced, dithiothreitol-insensitive mechanism in both the desiccation-tolerant and -intolerant bryophytes. Both mechanisms are thought to have an important role in protecting desiccation-tolerant species from photoinhibition under drying conditions. Fluorescence emission spectra at 77K showed that dehydration-induced quenching of PSII fluorescence was observed only in tolerant species and was due to neither state 1-state 2 transition nor detachment of light-harvesting chlorophyll protein complexes from PSII core complexes. The presence of dehydration-induced quenching of PSI fluorescence was also suggested.

  13. Rare alluvial sands of El Monte Valley, California (San Diego County), support high herpetofaunal species richness and diversity, despite severe habitat disturbance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Richmond, Jonathan Q.; Rochester, Carlton J.; Smith, Nathan W.; Nordland, Jeffrey A.; Fisher, Robert N.

    2016-01-01

    We characterized the species richness, diversity, and distribution of amphibians and reptiles inhabiting El Monte Valley, a heavily disturbed, alluvium-filled basin within the lower San Diego River in Lakeside, California. This rare habitat type in coastal southern California is designated as a critical sand resource by the state of California and is currently under consideration for a large-scale sand mining operation with subsequent habitat restoration. We conducted field surveys from June 2015 to May 2016 using drift fence lines with funnel traps, coverboard arrays, walking transects, and road driving. We recorded 1,208 total captures, revealing high species richness and diversity, but with marked unevenness in species' abundances. Snakes were the most species-rich taxonomic group (13 species representing 11 genera), followed by lizards (11 species representing 9 genera). After the southern Pacific rattlesnake (Crotalus oreganus helleri), the California glossy snake (Arizona elegans occidentalis) was the second most frequently detected snake species (n = 23 captures). Amphibian species richness was limited to only three species in three genera. Despite the relatively limited 12-month sampling period, a longstanding drought, and severe habitat disturbance, our study demonstrates that El Monte Valley harbors a rich herpetofauna that includes many sensitive species.

  14. Occurrence of morphological and anatomical adaptive traits in young and adult plants of the rare Mediterranean cliff species Primula palinuri Petagna.

    PubMed

    De Micco, Veronica; Aronne, Giovanna

    2012-01-01

    Cliffs worldwide are known to be reservoirs of relict biodiversity. Despite the presence of harsh abiotic conditions, large endemic floras live in such environments. Primula palinuri Petagna is a rare endemic plant species, surviving on cliff sites along a few kilometres of the Tyrrhenian coast in southern Italy. This species is declared at risk of extinction due to human impact on the coastal areas in question. Population surveys have shown that most of the plants are old individuals, while seedlings and plants at early stages of development are rare. We followed the growth of P. palinuri plants from seed germination to the adult phase and analysed the morphoanatomical traits of plants at all stages of development. Our results showed that the pressure of cliff environmental factors has been selected for seasonal habitus and structural adaptive traits in this species. The main morphoanatomical modifications are suberized cell layers and accumulation of phenolic compounds in cell structures. These features are strictly related to regulation of water uptake and storage as well as defence from predation. However, we found them well established only in adult plants and not in juvenile individuals. These findings contribute to explain the rare recruitment of the present relict populations, identifying some of the biological traits which result in species vulnerability.

  15. Occurrence of Morphological and Anatomical Adaptive Traits in Young and Adult Plants of the Rare Mediterranean Cliff Species Primula palinuri Petagna

    PubMed Central

    De Micco, Veronica; Aronne, Giovanna

    2012-01-01

    Cliffs worldwide are known to be reservoirs of relict biodiversity. Despite the presence of harsh abiotic conditions, large endemic floras live in such environments. Primula palinuri Petagna is a rare endemic plant species, surviving on cliff sites along a few kilometres of the Tyrrhenian coast in southern Italy. This species is declared at risk of extinction due to human impact on the coastal areas in question. Population surveys have shown that most of the plants are old individuals, while seedlings and plants at early stages of development are rare. We followed the growth of P. palinuri plants from seed germination to the adult phase and analysed the morphoanatomical traits of plants at all stages of development. Our results showed that the pressure of cliff environmental factors has been selected for seasonal habitus and structural adaptive traits in this species. The main morphoanatomical modifications are suberized cell layers and accumulation of phenolic compounds in cell structures. These features are strictly related to regulation of water uptake and storage as well as defence from predation. However, we found them well established only in adult plants and not in juvenile individuals. These findings contribute to explain the rare recruitment of the present relict populations, identifying some of the biological traits which result in species vulnerability. PMID:22666127

  16. First evidence of bryophyte diaspores in the plumage of transequatorial migrant birds

    PubMed Central

    Behling, Emily; Gousse, Hannah; Qian, Emily; Elphick, Chris S.; Lamarre, Jean-François; Bêty, Joël; Liebezeit, Joe; Rozzi, Ricardo; Goffinet, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    Correlations between transequatorial migratory bird routes and bipolar biogeographic disjunctions in bryophytes suggest that disjunctions between northern and southern high latitude regions may result from bird-mediated dispersal; supporting evidence is, however, exclusively circumstantial. Birds disperse plant units (diaspores) internally via ingestion (endozoochory) or externally by the attachment of diaspores to the body (ectozoochory). Endozoochory is known to be the primary means of bird-mediated dispersal for seeds and invertebrates at local, regional, and continental scales. Data supporting the role of bird-mediated endozoochory or ectozoochory in the long distance dispersal of bryophytes remain sparse, however, despite the large number of bryophytes displaying bipolar disjunctions. To determine if transequatorial migrant shorebirds may play a role in the ectozoochory of bryophyte diaspores, we developed a method for screening feathers of wild birds. We provide the first evidence of microscopic bryophyte diaspores, as well as those from non-bryophyte lineages, embedded in the plumage of long distance transequatorial migrant birds captured in their arctic breeding grounds. The number of diaspores recovered suggests that entire migratory populations may be departing their northern breeding grounds laden with potentially viable plant parts and that they could thereby play significant roles in bipolar range expansions of lineages previously ignored in the migrant bird dispersal literature. PMID:24949241

  17. [Biomass and carbon storage of ground bryophytes under six types of young coniferous forest plantations].

    PubMed

    Bao, Weikai; Lei, Bo; Leng, Li

    2005-10-01

    This paper studied the biomass and carbon storage of the ground bryophytes under young Picea balfouriana (P), Pinus tabulaeformis (Y), Pinus armandii (H), Larix kaempferi (L), Picea balfouriana-Pinus tabulaeformis (P-Y), and Pinus tabulaeformis-Pinus armandii (Y-H) forest plantations in the upper reach of Minjiang River, Sichuan Province. The results showed that total biomass and carbon storage of ground bryophytes were relatively low, being 3.11 - 460.36 kg x hm(-2) and 1.12 +/- 0.03 x 168.95 +/- 0.92 kg x hm(-2), respectively. On plot level, only the bryophyte biomass between forest P and others, and the carbon storage between forest L and others were significantly different. The ground bryophyte had the highest biomass and carbon storage under forest P, while the lowest ones under forest H. Comprehensive analysis suggested that forest type and its structural feature might be the important factors determining the biomass and carbon storage of ground bryophytes, and thinning was an important measure to improve ground bryophyte growth and biomass production.

  18. [Bryophytes, a potent source of drugs for tomorrow's medicine?].

    PubMed

    Krzaczkowski, Lucie; Wright, Michel; Gairin, Jean Edouard

    2008-11-01

    Although secondary plant metabolites provided numerous leads for the development of a wide array of therapeutic drugs, the discovery of new drugs with novel structures has declined in the past few years. Indeed higher plants have a similar evolutionary history and so produce similar metabolites. Search for novel sources of new therapeutic compounds within unexplored parts of biodiversity is thus an attractive challenge. Bryophytes, a group of small terrestrial plants remain relatively untouched in the drug discovery process whereas some have been used as medicinal plants. Studies of their secondary metabolites are recent but reveal original compounds, some of which not synthesized by higher plants. However investigations often meet difficulties during harvest or isolation of active compounds. In consequence, small quantities of substances obtained may be the main reason for the lack of biological tests. Strategies to overcome those troubles may exist and then lead to innovative medicinal applications.

  19. Impact of plant species, substrate types and porosity on the fractionation of rare-earth elements in plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semhi, K.; Clauer, N.; Chaudhuri, S.

    2009-04-01

    The distribution and content of rare-earth elements (REEs) were determined in two radish species (Raphanus sativus and Raphanus raphanistrum) that were grown under laboratory-controlled conditions, in three substrates consisting in illite for one and in smectite for the two others, the two latter being of the same type but with different porosities. The plants were split into two segments: the leaves and the stems+roots. The results indicate that both species pick up systematically higher amounts of REEs when grown in the illite substrate, considering that the smectite contains about 3 times more REEs. In R. sativus, the REE concentration of the leaves and of the stems+roots, whatever the substrate, ranges from 1.4 to 1.9 g/g. After normalization to the substrate in which they grew, the distribution patterns for the leaves of those from illite substrate are nearly flat, but irregular with a positive Eu anomaly. Those for the stems+roots are similar, but enriched in heavy REEs, also with a positive Eu anomaly. The REE concentrations of the leaves and the stems+roots of R. sativus grown in smectite are analytically similar at 1.6 and 1.4 g/g, respectively. The REE distribution patterns for the two organs, normalized again to those of the substrate, are very similar, flat with a distinct Eu anomaly. The heavy REE of the stems+roots of R. sativus grown on illite are enriched relative to those of the leaves, and a distinct positive Eu anomaly is observed in both the leaves and stems+roots from species grown on both illite and smectite. In the case of R. raphanistrum, the REE concentrations of the leaves and the stems+roots for those grown in the illite substrate were found to be significantly different at 11.0 and 6.6 g/g, respectively. The REE distribution patterns for the two different plant organs normalized to those of the substrates were found to be quite similar, all being quite flat, with a more or less pronounced Ce negative anomaly, and a prominent

  20. Redescription of the rare Philippine false gecko Pseudogekko brevipes (Reptilia: Squamata: Gekkonidae) and description of a new species.

    PubMed

    Davis, Drew R; Watters, Jessa L; Köhler, Gunther; Whitsett, Collin; Huron, Nicholas A; Brown, Rafe M; Diesmos, Arvin C; Siler, Cameron D

    2015-09-22

    Recent investigations into the species diversity of false geckos (genus Pseudogekko Taylor) have revealed several cryptic species, highlighting the need for a more thorough understanding of diversity within this enigmatic genus of endemic Philippine geckos. Newly available genetic data reveal that two of the four currently recognized species are complexes of multiple deeply divergent evolutionary lineages. In this paper we evaluate species diversity in one of these complexes, P. brevipes Boettger, and describe one additional new species. For nearly a century, P. brevipes has been recognized as a single, "widespread" species with a geographic range spanning two major faunal regions and several island groups. Poor understanding of this species has persisted due to both limited sampling and its apparent rarity. We evaluate both morphological and genetic data to define species limits in P. brevipes, and find character-based evidence to justify the recognition of two unique evolutionary lineages, one of which we describe as a new species (P. atiorum sp. nov.). The species included in this study have allopatric distributions and differ from congeners by numerous diagnostic characters of external morphology, and therefore should be recognized as full species in accordance with lineage-based species concepts. This newly described species increases the total number of species of Pseudogekko to seven.

  1. Intra- and Interlaboratory Agreement in Assessing the In Vitro Activity of Micafungin against Common and Rare Candida Species with the EUCAST, CLSI, and Etest Methods

    PubMed Central

    Geertsen, E.; Curfs-Breuker, I.; Mouton, J. W.

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of resistant strains among common and rare Candida species necessitates continuous monitoring of the in vitro susceptibilities of those isolates. We therefore assessed the in vitro activities of micafungin against 1,099 molecularly identified isolates belonging to 5 common and 20 rare Candida species by the EUCAST, CLSI, and Etest methods, assessing both the intralaboratory agreement and the interlaboratory agreement for two centers. The median micafungin EUCAST MICs were as follows, from the lowest to the highest: for Candida albicans, 0.004 mg/liter; for C. glabrata, 0.016 mg/liter; for C. tropicalis, 0.031 mg/liter; for C. krusei, 0.125 mg/liter; for C. parapsilosis, 2 mg/liter. Among rare Candida species, high MICs were found for C. guilliermondii, C. lipolytica, C. orthopsilosis, C. metapsilosis, and C. fermentati. No resistant isolates were found by the CLSI method, whereas resistance rates of 1 to 2% were found by the EUCAST method. Overall, the EUCAST method resulted in MICs 1 to 2 dilutions higher than those found by the CLSI and Etest methods. The intra- and interlaboratory agreement between methods was >92%, except for the interlaboratory agreement between the EUCAST and CLSI methods (81%), where 17 to 31% of the differences were >2 2-fold dilutions for C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. tropicalis, and other rare Candida species and <6% for C. parapsilosis and C. krusei. For the other interlaboratory comparisons, the EUCAST method resulted in higher MICs than the Etest method for all species, but <7% of these differences were >2 2-fold dilutions. Overall, the CLSI method resulted in lower MICs than the Etest method, with 11% of all isolates demonstrating >2 2-fold-dilution differences (6 to 20% for C. albicans, C. tropicalis, and rare Candida species; <5% for C. glabrata, C. krusei, and C. parapsilosis) and smaller differences found after 24 h. Despite these differences, categorical agreement was excellent (>97%), with only 1 to 2% very major

  2. Intra- and Interlaboratory Agreement in Assessing the In Vitro Activity of Micafungin against Common and Rare Candida Species with the EUCAST, CLSI, and Etest Methods.

    PubMed

    Meletiadis, J; Geertsen, E; Curfs-Breuker, I; Meis, J F; Mouton, J W

    2016-10-01

    The emergence of resistant strains among common and rare Candida species necessitates continuous monitoring of the in vitro susceptibilities of those isolates. We therefore assessed the in vitro activities of micafungin against 1,099 molecularly identified isolates belonging to 5 common and 20 rare Candida species by the EUCAST, CLSI, and Etest methods, assessing both the intralaboratory agreement and the interlaboratory agreement for two centers. The median micafungin EUCAST MICs were as follows, from the lowest to the highest: for Candida albicans, 0.004 mg/liter; for C. glabrata, 0.016 mg/liter; for C. tropicalis, 0.031 mg/liter; for C. krusei, 0.125 mg/liter; for C. parapsilosis, 2 mg/liter. Among rare Candida species, high MICs were found for C. guilliermondii, C. lipolytica, C. orthopsilosis, C. metapsilosis, and C. fermentati. No resistant isolates were found by the CLSI method, whereas resistance rates of 1 to 2% were found by the EUCAST method. Overall, the EUCAST method resulted in MICs 1 to 2 dilutions higher than those found by the CLSI and Etest methods. The intra- and interlaboratory agreement between methods was >92%, except for the interlaboratory agreement between the EUCAST and CLSI methods (81%), where 17 to 31% of the differences were >2 2-fold dilutions for C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. tropicalis, and other rare Candida species and <6% for C. parapsilosis and C. krusei For the other interlaboratory comparisons, the EUCAST method resulted in higher MICs than the Etest method for all species, but <7% of these differences were >2 2-fold dilutions. Overall, the CLSI method resulted in lower MICs than the Etest method, with 11% of all isolates demonstrating >2 2-fold-dilution differences (6 to 20% for C. albicans, C. tropicalis, and rare Candida species; <5% for C. glabrata, C. krusei, and C. parapsilosis) and smaller differences found after 24 h. Despite these differences, categorical agreement was excellent (>97%), with only 1 to 2% very major

  3. Comparing copper resistance in two bryophytes: Mielichhoferia elongata Hornsch. versus Physcomitrella patens Hedw.

    PubMed

    Sassmann, Stefan; Wernitznig, Stefan; Lichtscheidl, Irene K; Lang, Ingeborg

    2010-10-01

    The bryophyte Mielichhoferia elongata is known to occur on copper-rich substrate, but the exact resistance level remained to be determined by in vitro experiments. Here, we tested its copper tolerance in graded copper solutions and compared the results to the moss Physcomitrella patens that is not known to inhabit heavy metal sites. Our results confirm the survival of M. elongata in classical resistance experiments of up to 10 mM Cu-ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) solution. Interestingly, P. patens is equally resistant. Cultured on copper-enriched agar plates for over 5 weeks, P. patens survived even higher copper levels of up to 100 mM Cu-EDTA and an increment of growth was detected on all concentrations tested. Obviously, P. patens is able to withstand harmfully high levels of copper in both solution and substrate. In this short communication, we give a detailed description of the growth rates and discuss the results in comparison to other moss species and heavy metals.

  4. From trace evidence to bioinformatics: putting bryophytes into molecular biology education.

    PubMed

    Fuselier, Linda; Bougary, Azhar; Malott, Michelle

    2011-01-01

    Students benefit most from their science education when they participate fully in the process of science in the context of real-world problems. We describe a student-directed open-inquiry lab experience that has no predetermined outcomes and requires students to engage in all components of scientific inquiry from posing a question through evaluating and reporting results. Over 5 weeks, students learn how bryophytes are used in forensics and become proficient in important molecular biology lab skills including DNA isolation, polymerase chain reaction, gel electrophoresis, capillary electrophoresis, and genotyping. For this portion of the experience, there is no specialized equipment necessary outside of gel electrophoresis supplies and a thermocycler. In an optional extension of the experience, students sequence a plastid intron and use introductory bioinformatics skills to identify species related to their forensics case. Students who participated in the lab experience performed well on content-based assessment, and student attitudes toward the experience were positive and indicative of engaged learning. The lab experience is easily modified for higher or lower level courses and can be used in secondary education.

  5. Accumulation response of chloroplasts induced by mechanical stimulation in bryophyte cells.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yoshikatsu; Wada, Masamitsu; Kadota, Akeo

    2003-03-01

    Chloroplast movement has been studied in many plants but mainly as a model system for light signaling. However, we recently showed that the avoidance response of chloroplasts is also induced by mechanical stimulation in fern protonemal cells. Here we report the discovery of a mechanically induced accumulation response of chloroplasts in bryophytes. When mechanical stimulation was directly applied with a capillary to a part of a cell, chloroplasts moved towards and accumulated at the pressed site within 30 min after the onset of stimulation in all species tested. The accumulation movement of chloroplasts was inhibited by Cremart but not by cytochalasin B in red-light-grown protonemata of Physcomitrella patens (Hedw.) B., S. & G. To determine the contribution of external Ca(2+) to the response, we examined the effects on the accumulation movement of gadolinium (Ga(3+)), an inhibitor of stretch-activated ion channels, and lanthanum (La(3+)), a potent inhibitor of calcium channels. Mechano-relocation of chloroplasts was abolished by these drugs, but no effects were observed on photo-relocation of chloroplasts, irrespective of light colors and intensity. These results suggest that influx of external Ca(2+) through the plasma membrane is essential for the early steps in signaling of mechano-relocation of chloroplasts whose motility system is dependent on microtubules.

  6. An Inventory of Rare and Endangered Plant Species Found in the St. Louis, Missouri, Corps of Engineers District.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-06-01

    8217n no Icand (Al eventh o t s p ec 1o un 113 incni o ccur w! t Porn t ho bunodari Co i:h s;{ Lou Ls v! s C c c L-In thle Stv. Loo 1) Dis tI-i c C1 ;t...it. compe t it 1 , d i sea . A(I cjd apCrod Rare. A rare spc cci" or subspr

  7. Evolution of heavy metal tolerance in bryophytes II. An ecological and experimental investigation of the copper moss, Scopelophila cataractae (Pottiaceae)

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, J. )

    1987-06-01

    About six bryophyte species (including both mosses and liverworts) are generally thought to be restricted to copper-enriched substrates and are consequently known as copper mosses. One of these, Scopelophila cataractae (Pottiaceae), is known from several sites in southern Arizona and occurs at six localities in the Eastern US. Chemical analyses of substrates from the eastern US localities showed that all but one population grew on copper-enriched soil. The one substrate sample low in copper was very high in iron. Plants from five of the six eastern US localities for S. cataractae were grown experimentally on four soil types ranging from highly to not contaminated, and all grew best on the soil contaminated with copper, lead, and zinc. There was no significant variation in growth between populations on the four soil treatments. This lack of population differentiation is in contrast to flowering plants and may be related to the absence of sexual reproduction in S. cataractae in North America.

  8. Inventory of the mosses, liverworts, and lichens of Olympic National Park, Washington- Species list

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hutten, M.; Woodward, Andrea; Hutten, K.

    2005-01-01

    The identification of non-vascular cryptogam species (lichens, mosses, liverworts, and hornworts) is especially challenging because of their small size, their often microscopic or chemical distinguishing features, and their enormous diversity. Consequently, they are a poorly known component of Olympic National Park, despite their ecological and aesthetic importance. This project is the first attempt at a systematic, comprehensive survey of non-vascular cryptogams in the Park and presents the current species list with descriptions of the substrate and vascular vegetation type where they were observed. The authors strove to collect from as many park environments as feasible, and distributed collections along important environmental gradients in different regions of the park using vascular vegetation as an environmental indicator. They also collected opportunistically when interesting habitats or microhabitats were encountered. Finally, the authors updated the nomenclature in the Park’s previous collection of nonvascular plants. This study identified approximately 13,200 bryophyte and lichen species, adding approximately 425 new species to the Olympic National Park Herbarium. These data, combined with select literature reports and personal data from Martin and Karen Hutten, added more than 350 species to the previously documented Olympic Peninsula lichen and bryophyte list. The authors discuss the list in a local, regional, and global context of rarity, as well as cryptogam conservation and further work needed in Olympic National Park. The improved inventory of Olympic National Park cryptogams represented by this project enables Olympic National Park to protect populations of rare and sensitive species, assess the damage caused by illegal harvest, and contribute information to the Bureau of Land Management and U.S. Forest Service Sensitive Species Programs.

  9. Does cross-taxon analysis show similarity in diversity patterns between vascular plants and bryophytes? Some answers from a literature review.

    PubMed

    Bagella, Simonetta

    2014-04-01

    The objective of this study was to clarify the taxon surrogacy hypothesis relative to vascular plants and bryophytes. A literature review was conducted to obtain papers that met the following criteria: (i) they examined species richness values; or (ii) they evaluated the species richness within the same study sites, or under the same spatial variation conditions. Twenty-seven papers were accessed. The richness of the two taxa, compared in 32 cases, positively co-varied in about half of the comparisons. The response to the spatial variation in environmental or human-induced factors of the two taxa in terms of species richness was rather variable. Based on current knowledge, the main documented findings regard forest habitats and nival gradients. In forest habitats, co-variation in species richness is likely when similar environments are analysed and seems to be strengthened for boreal forests. Along the nival gradient, a different response in terms of richness of the two taxa suggests that vascular plants cannot be considered good surrogates for bryophytes.

  10. Effects of seed density and proximity to refuge habitat on seed predation rates for a rare and a common Lupinus species.

    PubMed

    Pardini, Eleanor A; Patten, Melissa V; Knight, Tiffany M

    2017-03-01

    Biotic interactions such as seed predation can play a role in explaining patterns of abundance among plant species. The effect of seed predation will depend on how the strength of predation differs across species and environments, and on the degree to which seed loss at one life-cycle phase increases fitness at another phase. Few studies have simultaneously quantified predispersal and postdispersal predation in co-occurring rare and common congeners, despite the value of estimating both for understanding causes of rarity. We quantified predispersal seed predation on the rare, herbaceous species Lupinus tidestromii (Fabaceae) and its common, shrubby congener L. chamissonis across multiple years in the same community. We experimentally measured postdispersal seed predation at two seed densities and locations near or far from an exotic grass housing high densities of deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus), their primary, native seed predator. The common L. chamissonis had the lowest predispersal seed predation of the two lupine species, potentially because of its height: its high racemes received less predation than those low to the ground. By contrast, the same species experienced higher postdispersal seed predation, and at predators traveled long distances away from refuge habitat to consume their seeds. Across both plant species, mice preferentially predated high-density seed sources. Our results show differences in the magnitude and direction of seed predation between the species across different life-cycle phases. We demonstrated possible roles of proximity to refuge habitat, seed density, and seed size in these patterns. Congeneric comparisons would benefit from a comprehensive framework that considers seed predation across different life-cycle phases and the environmental context of predation. © 2017 Botanical Society of America.

  11. Tanaidacean fauna of the Kuril-Kamchatka Trench and adjacent abyssal plain - abundance, diversity and rare species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Błażewicz-Paszkowycz, Magdalena; Pabis, Krzysztof; Jóźwiak, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Here we examine the distribution patterns, abundance, and species richness of tanaidacean peracarids in the abyssal-hadal transition zone. Material was collected in the region of Kuril-Kamchatka Trench during the German-Russian KuramBio Expedition with use of a giant boxcorer (GKG) of sampling area 0.25 m2. In the 23 samples collected from depths 4900 to 5800 m 48 species of Tanaidacea belonging to 11 families have been identified; most of the species (80%) are new to science. There was no evidence of a distribution pattern associated with depth or geographic location of stations in the nMDS analysis. Frequency of occurrence of twelve species was high (at 34-78% of stations) although the stations were distributed along a distance of about 1000 km. This observation is rationalized by the uniform environmental conditions of temperature, hydrostatic pressure, salinity, conductivity, and character of bottom deposits in the investigated area. Mean tanaidacean densities were 25.0±18.0 ind./0.25 m2, with mean values of species richness (number of species per sample) and diversity (Shannon Index) as high as 9.7±4.6 and 1.9±0.3 respectively. Singletons constituted about 20% of all species and more than one third of the species occurred as low counts per sample. The species accumulation curve did not reach the asymptotic level suggesting under-sampling of the studied area.

  12. Differential proteomics of dehydration and rehydration in bryophytes: evidence towards a common desiccation tolerance mechanism.

    PubMed

    Cruz DE Carvalho, Ricardo; Bernardes DA Silva, Anabela; Soares, Renata; Almeida, André M; Coelho, Ana Varela; Marques DA Silva, Jorge; Branquinho, Cristina

    2014-07-01

    All bryophytes evolved desiccation tolerance (DT) mechanisms during the invasion of terrestrial habitats by early land plants. Are these DT mechanisms still present in bryophytes that colonize aquatic habitats? The aquatic bryophyte Fontinalis antipyretica Hedw. was subjected to two drying regimes and alterations in protein profiles and sucrose accumulation during dehydration and rehydration were investigated. Results show that during fast dehydration, there is very little variation in protein profiles, and upon rehydration proteins are leaked. On the other hand, slow dehydration induces changes in both dehydration and rehydration protein profiles, being similar to the protein profiles displayed by the terrestrial bryophytes Physcomitrella patens (Hedw.) Bruch and Schimp. and, to what is comparable with Syntrichia ruralis (Hedw.) F. Weber and D. Mohr. During dehydration there was a reduction in proteins associated with photosynthesis and the cytoskeleton, and an associated accumulation of proteins involved in sugar metabolism and plant defence mechanisms. Upon rehydration, protein accumulation patterns return to control values for both photosynthesis and cytoskeleton whereas proteins associated with sugar metabolism and defence proteins remain high. The current results suggest that bryophytes from different ecological adaptations may share common DT mechanisms.

  13. The bryophyte Fontinalis antipyretica Hedw. bioaccumulates oxytetracycline, flumequine and oxolinic acid in the freshwater environment.

    PubMed

    Delépée, Raphaël; Pouliquen, Hervé; Le Bris, Hervé

    2004-04-25

    In recent years, the fate of pharmacological substances in the aquatic environment have been more and more studied. Oxolinic acid (OA), flumequine (FLU) and oxytetracycline (OTC) are commonly used antibacterial agents. A large amount of these drugs is released into water directly by dissolved fraction and indirectly in urine and feces. Monitoring these compounds in the freshwater environment is difficult because of the lack of suitable indicators. The aim of this work was to evaluate the OA, FLU and OTC bioaccumulation abilities of Fontinalis antipyretica Hedw., known for heavy metal bioaccumulation. The experiment described was decomposed for two times: a 10-days accumulation period during which bryophytes were in contact with antibiotics and a 15-days post-exposure period during which bryophytes were in water with no antibiotic. This experiment showed that this bryophyte strongly accumulates OA, FLU and OTC in freshwater. Bioaccumulation factors (ratio of concentrations in bryophyte and water) ranged between 75 and 450. Moreover, OA, FLU and OTC persisted in the bryophyte for a long time with clearance between 0.19 and 3.04 ng/g/day. Mean residence times ranged between 18 and 59 days. Accumulation and decontamination mechanism models were proposed.

  14. A new species of the rare buthid scorpion genus Lissothus Vachon, 1948 from Central Algeria (Scorpiones, Buthidae).

    PubMed

    Lourenço, Wilson Roberto; Sadine, Salah Eddine

    2014-06-01

    Taxonomic considerations are given for the genus Lissothus Vachon, 1948 (Scorpiones, Buthidae). Two species are currently known, Lissothus bernardi Vachon, 1948 from Libya and Lissothus occidentalis Vachon, 1950 from Mauritania. In this contribution, a new species, Lissothus chaambi sp. n., is described from the desert of Central Algeria. The new species is most closely related to L. bernardi. The geographical distribution of the genus is discussed. Copyright © 2014 Académie des sciences. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Characterization of Arsenic Biotransformation by a Typical Bryophyte Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xixiang; Wang, Lihong; Liu, Yifei; Jiang, Tenglong; Gao, Jianwei

    2017-02-01

    Arsenic (As) is a ubiquitous environmental toxin that has created catastrophic human health and environmental problems around world. Physcomitrella patens is a potential model plant for the study of environmental monitoring, which exists in all kinds of ecosystems. In this study, arsenic metabolism was investigated by this moss. When supplied with different levels of arsenate (50, 100, 200 µmol/L) for a 4-week period, the total arsenic concentrations were up to 231.4-565.4 mg/kg DW in this moss. Arsenite concentration increased with increasing external arsenate concentrations, the proportion was up to 25.1-36.8% of the total As. An arsenate reductase, PpACR2, was identified and functionally characterized. Heterologous expression of PpACR2 in an As(V)-sensitive strain WC3110 (ΔarsC) of Escherichia coli conferred As(V) resistance. Purified PpACR2 protein exhibited the arsenate reductase activity. Given its powerful As accumulation ability, the bryophyte could be exploited in bioremediation of As-contaminated environments.

  16. Wildlife studies of Site 300 emphasizing rare and endangered species: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, San Joaquin County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Orloff, S.

    1986-11-01

    The primary purpose of this project was to determine the presence and status of any endangered, threatened, fully protected, or otherwise sensitive wildlife species on Site 300 that might be affected by Site operations and developments. We directed our studies mainly toward the federally endangered San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes macrotis mutica), but also toward another 15 special status species that potentially occur on site, including the state threatened Alameda striped racer (Masticophis lateralis euryxanthus).

  17. Detecting rare species with random or subjective sampling: a case study of red-listed saproxylic beetles in boreal Sweden.

    PubMed

    Hedgren, Olof; Weslien, Jan

    2008-02-01

    Efficient sampling design in field studies is important for economical and statistical reasons. We compared two ways to distribute sampling effort over an area, either randomly or subjectively. We searched for red-listed saproxylic (wood-living) beetles in 30 spruce stands in boreal Sweden by sifting wood from dead trees. We randomly selected positions within each stand with a geographic positioning system and sampled the nearest dead tree (random sample). In the same stand we also sampled dead trees that, based on literature, were likely to host such species (subjective sampling). The subjective sampling (two to five samples per stand, depending on stand size) was compared with the higher, random sampling effort (fixed level of 12 samples/stand). Subjective sampling was significantly more efficient. Red-listed species were found in 36% of the subjective samples and in 16% of the random samples. Nevertheless, the larger random effort resulted in a comparable number of red-listed species per stand and in 13 detected species in total (vs. 12 species with subjective sampling). Random sampling was less efficient, but provided an unbiased alternative more suitable for statistical purposes, as needed in, for example, monitoring programs. Moreover, new species-specific knowledge can be gained through random searches.

  18. The impact of specialist and generalist pre-dispersal seed predators on the reproductive output of a common and a rare Euphorbia species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boieiro, Mário; Rego, Carla; Serrano, Artur R. M.; Espadaler, Xavier

    2010-03-01

    Pre-dispersal seed predators can have a severe impact on the reproductive output of their hosts, which can translate into negative effects on population dynamics. Here we compared the losses due to specialist and generalist insect seed predators in two Euphorbia species, a rare ( Euphorbia welwitschii) and a common one ( Euphorbia characias). Pre-dispersal losses to specialist seed-wasps ( Eurytoma jaltica) and generalist hemipterans ( Cydnus aterrimus and Dicranocephalus agilis) were on average higher for the rare E. welwitschii than for its widespread congener. In both Euphorbia species, the variation in losses to specialist and generalist seed predators was not related with traits indicative of plant size, fecundity, or isolation. Nevertheless, the temporal variation in losses to seed-wasps seemed to be intimately associated with the magnitude of yearly variation in fruit production. The impact of seed-wasps and hemipterans on the reproductive output of both Euphorbia species was additive, though there was evidence for infochemical-mediated interference at the fruit level. The moderate levels of seed predation in E. welwitschii, together with the results from the comparative analysis with its widespread congener, suggest that insect seed predation is not a causal effect of plant rarity.

  19. Identification by Molecular Methods and Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry and Antifungal Susceptibility Profiles of Clinically Significant Rare Aspergillus Species in a Referral Chest Hospital in Delhi, India.

    PubMed

    Masih, Aradhana; Singh, Pradeep K; Kathuria, Shallu; Agarwal, Kshitij; Meis, Jacques F; Chowdhary, Anuradha

    2016-09-01

    Aspergillus species cause a wide spectrum of clinical infections. Although Aspergillus fumigatus and Aspergillus flavus remain the most commonly isolated species in aspergillosis, in the last decade, rare and cryptic Aspergillus species have emerged in diverse clinical settings. The present study analyzed the distribution and in vitro antifungal susceptibility profiles of rare Aspergillus species in clinical samples from patients with suspected aspergillosis in 8 medical centers in India. Further, a matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry in-house database was developed to identify these clinically relevant Aspergillus species. β-Tubulin and calmodulin gene sequencing identified 45 rare Aspergillus isolates to the species level, except for a solitary isolate. They included 23 less common Aspergillus species belonging to 12 sections, mainly in Circumdati, Nidulantes, Flavi, Terrei, Versicolores, Aspergillus, and Nigri Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) identified only 8 (38%) of the 23 rare Aspergillus isolates to the species level. Following the creation of an in-house database with the remaining 14 species not available in the Bruker database, the MALDI-TOF MS identification rate increased to 95%. Overall, high MICs of ≥2 μg/ml were noted for amphotericin B in 29% of the rare Aspergillus species, followed by voriconazole in 20% and isavuconazole in 7%, whereas MICs of >0.5 μg/ml for posaconazole were observed in 15% of the isolates. Regarding the clinical diagnoses in 45 patients with positive rare Aspergillus species cultures, 19 (42%) were regarded to represent colonization. In the remaining 26 patients, rare Aspergillus species were the etiologic agent of invasive, chronic, and allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, allergic fungal rhinosinusitis, keratitis, and mycetoma.

  20. Identification by Molecular Methods and Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization–Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry and Antifungal Susceptibility Profiles of Clinically Significant Rare Aspergillus Species in a Referral Chest Hospital in Delhi, India

    PubMed Central

    Masih, Aradhana; Singh, Pradeep K.; Kathuria, Shallu; Agarwal, Kshitij

    2016-01-01

    Aspergillus species cause a wide spectrum of clinical infections. Although Aspergillus fumigatus and Aspergillus flavus remain the most commonly isolated species in aspergillosis, in the last decade, rare and cryptic Aspergillus species have emerged in diverse clinical settings. The present study analyzed the distribution and in vitro antifungal susceptibility profiles of rare Aspergillus species in clinical samples from patients with suspected aspergillosis in 8 medical centers in India. Further, a matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry in-house database was developed to identify these clinically relevant Aspergillus species. β-Tubulin and calmodulin gene sequencing identified 45 rare Aspergillus isolates to the species level, except for a solitary isolate. They included 23 less common Aspergillus species belonging to 12 sections, mainly in Circumdati, Nidulantes, Flavi, Terrei, Versicolores, Aspergillus, and Nigri. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) identified only 8 (38%) of the 23 rare Aspergillus isolates to the species level. Following the creation of an in-house database with the remaining 14 species not available in the Bruker database, the MALDI-TOF MS identification rate increased to 95%. Overall, high MICs of ≥2 μg/ml were noted for amphotericin B in 29% of the rare Aspergillus species, followed by voriconazole in 20% and isavuconazole in 7%, whereas MICs of >0.5 μg/ml for posaconazole were observed in 15% of the isolates. Regarding the clinical diagnoses in 45 patients with positive rare Aspergillus species cultures, 19 (42%) were regarded to represent colonization. In the remaining 26 patients, rare Aspergillus species were the etiologic agent of invasive, chronic, and allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, allergic fungal rhinosinusitis, keratitis, and mycetoma. PMID:27413188

  1. Direct and interaction-mediated effects of environmental changes on peatland bryophytes.

    PubMed

    Bu, Zhao-Jun; Rydin, Håkan; Chen, Xu

    2011-06-01

    Ecosystem processes of northern peatlands are largely governed by the vitality and species composition in the bryophyte layer, and may be affected by global warming and eutrophication. In a factorial experiment in northeast China, we tested the effects of raised levels of nitrogen (0, 1 and 2 g m(-2) year(-1)), phosphorus (0, 0.1 and 0.2 g m(-2) year(-1)) and temperature (ambient and +3°C) on Polytrichum strictum, Sphagnum magellanicum and S. palustre, to see if the effects could be altered by inter-specific interactions. In all species, growth declined with nitrogen addition and increased with phosphorus addition, but only P. strictum responded to raised temperature with increased production of side-shoots (branching). In Sphagnum, growth and branching changed in the same direction, but in Polytrichum, the two responses were uncoupled: with nitrogen addition there was a decrease in growth (smaller than in Sphagnum) but an increase in branching; with phosphorus addition growth increased but branching was unaffected. There were no two-way interactions among the P, N and T treatments. With increasing temperature, our results indicate that S. palustre should decrease relative to P. strictum (Polytrichum increased its branching and had a negative neighbor effect on S. palustre). With a slight increase in phosphorus availability, the increase in length growth and production of side-shoots in P. strictum and S. magellanicum may give them a competitive superiority over S. palustre. The negative response in Sphagnum to nitrogen could favor the expansion of vascular plants, but P. strictum may endure thanks to its increased branching.

  2. Methylobacterium haplocladii sp. nov. and Methylobacterium brachythecii sp. nov., isolated from bryophytes.

    PubMed

    Tani, Akio; Sahin, Nurettin

    2013-09-01

    Pink-pigmented, facultatively methylotrophic bacteria, strains 87e(T) and 99b(T), were isolated from the bryophytes Haplocladium microphyllum and Brachythecium plumosum, respectively. The cells of both strains were Gram-reaction-negative, motile, non-spore-forming rods. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, strains 87e(T) and 99b(T) were found to be related to Methylobacterium organophilum ATCC 27886(T) (97.1% and 97.7%, respectively). Strains 87e(T) and 99b(T) showed highest 16S rRNA gene similarity to Methylobacterium gnaphalii 23e(T) (98.3 and 99.0%, respectively). The phylogenetic similarities to all other species of the genus Methylobacterium with validly published names were less than 97%. Major cellular fatty acids of both strains were C(18:1)ω7c and C(18:0). The results of DNA-DNA hybridization, phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA and cpn60 gene sequences, fatty acid profiles, whole-cell matrix-assisted, laser-desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/MS) analysis, and physiological and biochemical tests allowed genotypic and phenotypic differentiation of strains 87e(T) and 99b(T) from their phylogenetically closest relatives. We propose that strains 87e(T) and 99b(T) represent novel species within the genus Methylobacterium, for which the names Methylobacterium haplocladii sp. nov. (type strain 87e(T) =DSM 24195(T) =NBRC 107714(T)) and Methylobacterium brachythecii sp. nov. (type strain 99b(T) =DSM 24105(T) =NBRC 107710(T)) are proposed.

  3. Quantifying the effect of lichen and bryophyte cover on permafrost soil within a global land surface model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porada, Philipp; Ekici, Altug; Beer, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Vegetation near the surface, such as bryophytes and lichens, has an insulating effect on the soil at high latitudes and it can therefore protect permafrost conditions. Warming due to climate change, however, may change the average surface coverage of bryophytes and lichens. This can result in permafrost thawing associated with a release of soil carbon to the atmosphere, which may lead to a positive feedback on atmospheric CO2. Thus, it is important to predict how the bryophyte and lichen cover at high latitudes will react to environmental change. However, current global land surface models so far contain mostly empirical approaches to represent bryophytes and lichens, which makes it impractical to predict their future state and function. For this reason, we integrate a process-based model of bryophyte and lichen growth into the global land surface model JSBACH. We explicitly represent dynamic thermal properties of the bryophyte and lichen cover and their relation to climate. Subsequently, we compare simulations with and without bryophyte and lichen cover to quantify the insulating effect. We estimate an annual average cooling effect of the bryophyte and lichen cover of 2.7 K on topsoil temperature for the northern high latitudes under current climate. Locally, the cooling may reach up to 5.7 K. Moreover, we show that neglecting dynamic properties of the bryophyte and lichen cover by using a simple, empirical scheme only results in an average cooling of around 0.5 K. This suggests that bryophytes and lichens have a significant impact on soil temperature in high-latitude ecosystems and also that a process-based description of their thermal properties is necessary for a realistic representation of the cooling effect.

  4. Description of the tadpoles of three rare species of megophryid frogs (Amphibia: Anura: Megophryidae) from Gunung Mulu, Sarawak, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Oberhummer, Evelyne; Barten, Catherin; Schweizer, Manuel; Das, Indraneil; Haas, Alexander; Hertwig, Stefan T

    2014-07-09

    The megophryid frogs Leptobrachella brevicrus, Leptolalax dringi and Megophrys dringi are species exclusively known  from highly localised areas in isolated mountain ranges on Borneo. The tadpoles and adults in this study were collected at the shared type locality for the three species in Gunung Mulu National Park, Sarawak, Malaysia (Borneo). The species identities of larvae were determined via comparison to syntopic adults using DNA barcoding techniques based on partial 16S rRNA mitochondrial gene sequences. The genetic data supported the status of the three taxa as valid species. Descriptions of colouration in life and after preservation, external morphological features, morphometric measurements and ecological notes in comparison to congeneric species are supplied. The tadpoles of L. brevicrus and L. dringi show similar adaptations to a fossorial lifestyle. These include an elongated, vermiform body, a relatively long tail and small eyes. Both were found in the gravel beds of a small mountain stream. In contrast, the larvae of M. dringi are adapted to occupying and feeding at the surface of pools within the stream. 

  5. Hooked from the deep: a rare new species of Taeniogyrus (Holothuroidea, Chiridotidae) from the continental slope of Brazil, southwestern Atlantic.

    PubMed

    Moura, Rafael Bendayan De; Campos, Lúcia De Siqueira; Esteves, André Morgado

    2015-06-13

    Most species of Taeniogyrus Semper, 1867 are known from shallow water in the Indo-Pacific, with other records in Antarctica, Mediterranean Sea, and the Atlantic. A new species of Taeniogyrus is described and illustrated here from the continental slope of Campos Basin, southeast of Brazil. In this species, sigmoid hooks (336-405 µm) are much larger than in any other in the genus, bearing a long and conspicuous hook region. Wheels with six spokes (86-169 µm), inner margin with 60-125 continuous teeth, are confined to round papillae along each interradius. Polian vesicles are ventral, numerous (15-21), of different sizes, and tubular shaped with a terminal round region. This new species represents the deepest record of the genus Taeniogyrus. It increases to three the number of chiridotids in Brazilian waters, and the number of Taeniogyrus species in the Atlantic. Additionally, Taeniogyrus furcipraeditus (Salvini-Plawen, 1972) from the Mediterranean Sea and Taeniogyrus havelockensis (Rao, 1975) from the Andaman Sea are proposed as new combinations.

  6. Measurement and modeling of bryophyte evaporation in a boreal forest chronosequence

    SciTech Connect

    Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Gower, Stith T.; Amiro, Brian; Ewers, Brent

    2011-01-19

    The effects of changing climate and disturbance on forest water cycling are not well understood. In particular bryophytes contribute significantly to forest evapotranspiration (ET) in poorly-drained boreal forests, but few studies have directly measured this flux and how it changes with stand age and soil drainage. We used large chambers to measure bryophyte evaporation (E) in Canadian Picea mariana forests of varying ages and soil drainages, as well under controlled laboratory conditions, and modeled daily E using site-specific meteorological data to drive a Penman-Monteith-based model. Field measurements of E averaged 0.37 mm day-1, and ranged from 0.03 (Pleurozium schreberii in a 77-year-old dry stand) to 1.43 mm day-1 (Sphagnum riparium in a 43-year-old bog). canopy resistance ranged from ~0 (at 25 °C, some values were <0) to ~1500 s m-1 for dry, cold (5 °C) mosses. In the laboratory, moss canopy resistance was constant until a moss water content of ~6 g g-1 and then climbed sharply with further drying; no difference was observed between the three moss groups (feather mosses, hollow mosses, and hummock mosses) tested. Modeled annual E fluxes from bryophytes ranged from 0.4 mm day-1, in the well-drained stands, to ~1 mm day-1 in the 43-year-old bog, during the growing season. Eddy covariance data imply that bryophytes contributed 18-31% and 49-69% to the total ET flux, at the well- and poorly-drained stands respectively. Bryophyte E was greater in bogs than in upland stands, was driven by low-lying mosses, and did not vary with stand age; this suggests that shifts in forest age due to increasing fire will have little effect on the bryophyte contribution to ET.

  7. The role of mid-palaeozoic mesofossils in the detection of early bryophytes.

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, D

    2000-01-01

    Recently discovered Silurian and Devonian coalified mesofossils provide an additional source of data on early embryophytes. Those reviewed in this paper are considered of some relevance to understanding the early history of bryophytes while highlighting the difficulties of recognizing bryophytes in often very fragmentary fossils. The first group comprises sporophytes in which terminal sporangia contain permanent dyads and tetrads. Such spores (cryptospores) are similar to those found dispersed in older Ordovician and Silurian strata, when they are considered evidence for a land vegetation of embryophytes at a bryophyte grade. The phylogenetic significance of plants, where the axes associated with both dyad- and tetrad-containing sporangia are branching, a character state not found in extant bryophytes, is discussed. The second group comprises axial fossils, many with occasional stomata, in which central conducting strands include G-type tracheids and a number of novel types of elongate elements not readily compared with those of any tracheophyte. They include smooth-walled, evenly thickened elongate elements as well as those with numerous branching +/- anastomosing projections into the lumen. Some of the latter bear an additional microporate layer, but the homogenized lateral walls between adjacent cells are never perforate. Such cells, which occur in various combinations in central strands, are compared with the leptoids and hydroids of mosses, hydroids of liverworts and presumed water-conducting cells in coeval Lower Devonian plants such as Aglaophyton. It is concluded that lack of information on the chemistry of their walls hampers sensible assessment of their functions and the affinities of the plants. Finally, a minute fossil, comprising an elongate sporangium in which a central cylindrical cavity containing spores and possible elaters terminates in a complex poral dehiscence apparatus, is used to exemplify problems of identifying early bryophytes. It is

  8. Newly rare or newly common: evolutionary feedbacks through changes in population density and relative species abundance, and their management implications

    PubMed Central

    Lankau, Richard A; Strauss, Sharon Y

    2011-01-01

    Environmental management typically seeks to increase or maintain the population sizes of desirable species and to decrease population sizes of undesirable pests, pathogens, or invaders. With changes in population size come long-recognized changes in ecological processes that act in a density-dependent fashion. While the ecological effects of density dependence have been well studied, the evolutionary effects of changes in population size, via changes in ecological interactions with community members, are underappreciated. Here, we provide examples of changing selective pressures on, or evolution in, species as a result of changes in either density of conspecifics or changes in the frequency of heterospecific versus conspecific interactions. We also discuss the management implications of such evolutionary responses in species that have experienced rapid increases or decreases in density caused by human actions. PMID:25567977

  9. Is the extremely rare Iberian endemic plant species Castrilanthemum debeauxii (Compositae, Anthemideae) a 'living fossil'? Evidence from a multi-locus species tree reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Tomasello, Salvatore; Álvarez, Inés; Vargas, Pablo; Oberprieler, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    The present study provides results of multi-species coalescent species tree analyses of DNA sequences sampled from multiple nuclear and plastid regions to infer the phylogenetic relationships among the members of the subtribe Leucanthemopsidinae (Compositae, Anthemideae), to which besides the annual Castrilanthemum debeauxii (Degen, Hervier & É.Rev.) Vogt & Oberp., one of the rarest flowering plant species of the Iberian Peninsula, two other unispecific genera (Hymenostemma, Prolongoa), and the polyploidy complex of the genus Leucanthemopsis belong. Based on sequence information from two single- to low-copy nuclear regions (C16, D35, characterised by Chapman et al. (2007)), the multi-copy region of the nrDNA internal transcribed spacer regions ITS1 and ITS2, and two intergenic spacer regions of the cpDNA gene trees were reconstructed using Bayesian inference methods. For the reconstruction of a multi-locus species tree we applied three different methods: (a) analysis of concatenated sequences using Bayesian inference (MrBayes), (b) a tree reconciliation approach by minimizing the number of deep coalescences (PhyloNet), and (c) a coalescent-based species-tree method in a Bayesian framework ((∗)BEAST). All three species tree reconstruction methods unequivocally support the close relationship of the subtribe with the hitherto unclassified genus Phalacrocarpum, the sister-group relationship of Castrilanthemum with the three remaining genera of the subtribe, and the further sister-group relationship of the clade of Hymenostemma+Prolongoa with a monophyletic genus Leucanthemopsis. Dating of the (∗)BEAST phylogeny supports the long-lasting (Early Miocene, 15-22Ma) taxonomical independence and the switch from the plesiomorphic perennial to the apomorphic annual life-form assumed for the Castrilanthemum lineage that may have occurred not earlier than in the Pliocene (3Ma) when the establishment of a Mediterranean climate with summer droughts triggered evolution towards

  10. Genetic Diversity and Population Structure of the Rare and Endangered Plant Species Pulsatilla patens (L.) Mill in East Central Europe.

    PubMed

    Szczecińska, Monika; Sramko, Gabor; Wołosz, Katarzyna; Sawicki, Jakub

    2016-01-01

    Pulsatilla patens s.s. is a one of the most endangered plant species in Europe. The present range of this species in Europe is highly fragmented and the size of the populations has been dramatically reduced in the past 50 years. The rapid disappearance of P. patens localities in Europe has prompted the European Commission to initiate active protection of this critically endangered species. The aim of this study was to estimate the degree and distribution of genetic diversity within European populations of this endangered species. We screened 29 populations of P. patens using a set of six microsatellite primers. The results of our study indicate that the analyzed populations are characterized by low levels of genetic diversity (Ho = 0.005) and very high levels of inbreeding (FIS = 0.90). These results suggest that genetic erosion could be partially responsible for the lower fitness in smaller populations of this species. Private allelic richness was very low, being as low as 0.00 for most populations. Average genetic diversity over loci and mean number of alleles in P. patens populations were significantly correlated with population size, suggesting severe genetic drift. The results of AMOVA point to higher levels of variation within populations than between populations.The results of Structure and PCoA analyses suggest that the genetic structure of the studied P. patens populations fall into three clusters corresponding to geographical regions. The most isolated populations (mostly from Romania) formed a separate group with a homogeneous gene pool located at the southern, steppic part of the distribution range. Baltic, mostly Polish, populations fall into two genetic groups which were not fully compatible with their geographic distribution.Our results indicate the serious genetic depauperation of P. patens in the western part of its range, even hinting at an ongoing extinction vortex. Therefore, special conservation attention is required to maintain the populations

  11. Genetic Diversity and Population Structure of the Rare and Endangered Plant Species Pulsatilla patens (L.) Mill in East Central Europe

    PubMed Central

    Szczecińska, Monika; Sramko, Gabor; Wołosz, Katarzyna; Sawicki, Jakub

    2016-01-01

    Pulsatilla patens s.s. is a one of the most endangered plant species in Europe. The present range of this species in Europe is highly fragmented and the size of the populations has been dramatically reduced in the past 50 years. The rapid disappearance of P. patens localities in Europe has prompted the European Commission to initiate active protection of this critically endangered species. The aim of this study was to estimate the degree and distribution of genetic diversity within European populations of this endangered species. We screened 29 populations of P. patens using a set of six microsatellite primers. The results of our study indicate that the analyzed populations are characterized by low levels of genetic diversity (Ho = 0.005) and very high levels of inbreeding (FIS = 0.90). These results suggest that genetic erosion could be partially responsible for the lower fitness in smaller populations of this species. Private allelic richness was very low, being as low as 0.00 for most populations. Average genetic diversity over loci and mean number of alleles in P. patens populations were significantly correlated with population size, suggesting severe genetic drift. The results of AMOVA point to higher levels of variation within populations than between populations.The results of Structure and PCoA analyses suggest that the genetic structure of the studied P. patens populations fall into three clusters corresponding to geographical regions. The most isolated populations (mostly from Romania) formed a separate group with a homogeneous gene pool located at the southern, steppic part of the distribution range. Baltic, mostly Polish, populations fall into two genetic groups which were not fully compatible with their geographic distribution.Our results indicate the serious genetic depauperation of P. patens in the western part of its range, even hinting at an ongoing extinction vortex. Therefore, special conservation attention is required to maintain the populations

  12. Desiccation tolerance in bryophytes: The dehydration and rehydration transcriptomes in the desiccation-tolerant bryophyte Bryum argenteum.

    PubMed

    Gao, Bei; Li, Xiaoshuang; Zhang, Daoyuan; Liang, Yuqing; Yang, Honglan; Chen, Moxian; Zhang, Yuanming; Zhang, Jianhua; Wood, Andrew J

    2017-08-08

    The desiccation tolerant bryophyte Bryum argenteum is an important component of desert biological soil crusts (BSCs) and is emerging as a model system for studying vegetative desiccation tolerance. Here we present and analyze the hydration-dehydration-rehydration transcriptomes in B. argenteum to establish a desiccation-tolerance transcriptomic atlas. B. argenteum gametophores representing five different hydration stages (hydrated (H0), dehydrated for 2 h (D2), 24 h (D24), then rehydrated for 2 h (R2) and 48 h (R48)), were sampled for transcriptome analyses. Illumina high throughput RNA-Seq technology was employed and generated more than 488.46 million reads. An in-house de novo transcriptome assembly optimization pipeline based on Trinity assembler was developed to obtain a reference Hydration-Dehydration-Rehydration (H-D-R) transcriptome comprising of 76,206 transcripts, with an N50 of 2,016 bp and average length of 1,222 bp. Comprehensive transcription factor (TF) annotation discovered 978 TFs in 62 families, among which 404 TFs within 40 families were differentially expressed upon dehydration-rehydration. Pfam term enrichment analysis revealed 172 protein families/domains were significantly associated with the H-D-R cycle and confirmed early rehydration (i.e. the R2 stage) as exhibiting the maximum stress-induced changes in gene expression.

  13. The role of epiphytic bryophytes in interception, storage, and the regulated release of atmospheric moisture in a tropical montane cloud forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ah-Peng, Claudine; Cardoso, Anabelle Williamson; Flores, Olivier; West, Adam; Wilding, Nicholas; Strasberg, Dominique; Hedderson, Terry A. J.

    2017-05-01

    Epiphytes in tropical montane cloud forests (TMCF) intercept atmospheric water and, as a result, form a vital part of the hydrological cycle of this ecosystem. Our study investigates the role of bryophytes in such systems on La Réunion Island (Mascarenes). To better understand ecohydrological functioning of the forest, we investigated cloud water interception (CWI) by two locally abundant liverwort species (Bazzania decrescens and Mastigophora diclados) using a novel lysimetric approach. We also evaluated biomass and water storage capacity of our study species, as well as of the entire bryophyte community in our plots, which we extrapolated to the forest community level. Both study species exhibited excellent abilities to intercept and store cloud water, and showed distinct diurnal variation in this ability according to varying climatic conditions. The two liverwort species' response to climatic conditions differed dramatically from one another, with B. decrescens storing double the mean and maximum litres of water per hectare despite having less than half the abundance of M. diclados. Despite its lower water storage capacity, M. diclados had a greater ability to intercept atmospheric moisture than B. decrescens. The differences in CWI were attributed to differences in plant structure of these two species, which explains their microhabitat requirements in this system. Our two species in this system were estimated to store 34,569 l.ha-1 of water, the equivalent of 3.46 mm of rainfall. The abundance of our study species combined with their atmospheric water interception, storage, and regulated release ability make both species ecologically important in the forest's microhydrological cycle. For the first time these data allow us to better understand the role of these plants in the microhydrological cycle of tropical montane cloud forests and to determine whether the diversity and functioning of these and similar systems will be at risk from predicted cloud layer

  14. Illumina sequencing-based community analysis of bacteria associated with different bryophytes collected from Tibet, China.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jing Yan; Ma, Jing; Li, Xue Dong; Li, Yan Hong

    2016-11-16

    Previous studies on the bacteria associated with the bryophytes showed that there were abundant bacteria inhabited in/on these hosts. However, the type of bacteria and whether these discriminate between different bryophytes based on a particular factor remains largely unknown. This study was designed to analyze the biodiversity and community of the bacteria associated with ten liverworts and ten mosses using Illumina-sequencing techniques based on bacterial 16S rRNA gene. A total of 125,762 high quality sequences and 437 OTUs were obtained from twenty bryophytes. Generally, there were no obvious differences between the richness of bacteria associated with liverworts and mosses; however, the diversity was significantly higher in liverworts than in mosses. The taxonomic analyses showed that there were abundant bacteria inhabited with each bryophyte and those primarily detected in all samples were within the phyla Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Acidobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Armatimonadetes and Planctomycetes. In addition, bacteria assigned to Chloroflexi, Fibrobacteres, Gemmatimonadetes, Chlamydiae, group of TM6 and WCHB1-60 also appeared in part of the bryophytes. The assigned bacteria included those adapted to aquatic, anaerobic and even extreme drought environments, which is consistent with the bryophyte transition from aquatic to terrestrial conditions. Of them, approximately 10 recognized genera were shared by all the samples in a higher proportion, such as Burkholderia, Novosphingobium, Mucilaginibacter, Sorangium, Frankia, Frondihatitans, Haliangium, Rhizobacter, Granulicella and Hafnia, and 11 unclassified genera were also detected in all samples, which exhibited that large amounts of unclassified bacteria could interact with the bryophytes. The Heatmap and Principle Coordinate Analyses showed that bacteria associated with six mosses displayed a higher community similarity. Notably, the bacteria associated with another four mosses exhibited higher similarity

  15. Susceptibility to Laurel Wilt and disease incidence in two rare plant species, Pondberry and Pondspice Plant Disease.

    Treesearch

    Stephen Fraedrich; T Harrington; C Bates; J Johnson; L. Reid; Glenda Susan Best; T Leininger; Tracy Hawkins

    2011-01-01

    Laurel wilt, caused by Raffaelea lauricola, has been responsible for extensive losses of redbay (Persea borbonia) in South Carolina and Georgia since 2003. Symptoms of the disease have been noted in other species of the Lauraceae such as the federally endangered pondberry (Lindera melissifolia) and the threatened pondspice (Litsea aestivalis). Pondberry and pondspice...

  16. Why choose Random Forest to predict rare species distribution with few samples in large undersampled areas? Three Asian crane species models provide supporting evidence.

    PubMed

    Mi, Chunrong; Huettmann, Falk; Guo, Yumin; Han, Xuesong; Wen, Lijia

    2017-01-01

    Species distribution models (SDMs) have become an essential tool in ecology, biogeography, evolution and, more recently, in conservation biology. How to generalize species distributions in large undersampled areas, especially with few samples, is a fundamental issue of SDMs. In order to explore this issue, we used the best available presence records for the Hooded Crane (Grus monacha, n = 33), White-naped Crane (Grus vipio, n = 40), and Black-necked Crane (Grus nigricollis, n = 75) in China as three case studies, employing four powerful and commonly used machine learning algorithms to map the breeding distributions of the three species: TreeNet (Stochastic Gradient Boosting, Boosted Regression Tree Model), Random Forest, CART (Classification and Regression Tree) and Maxent (Maximum Entropy Models). In addition, we developed an ensemble forecast by averaging predicted probability of the above four models results. Commonly used model performance metrics (Area under ROC (AUC) and true skill statistic (TSS)) were employed to evaluate model accuracy. The latest satellite tracking data and compiled literature data were used as two independent testing datasets to confront model predictions. We found Random Forest demonstrated the best performance for the most assessment method, provided a better model fit to the testing data, and achieved better species range maps for each crane species in undersampled areas. Random Forest has been generally available for more than 20 years and has been known to perform extremely well in ecological predictions. However, while increasingly on the rise, its potential is still widely underused in conservation, (spatial) ecological applications and for inference. Our results show that it informs ecological and biogeographical theories as well as being suitable for conservation applications, specifically when the study area is undersampled. This method helps to save model-selection time and effort, and allows robust and rapid

  17. Why choose Random Forest to predict rare species distribution with few samples in large undersampled areas? Three Asian crane species models provide supporting evidence

    PubMed Central

    Mi, Chunrong; Huettmann, Falk; Han, Xuesong; Wen, Lijia

    2017-01-01

    Species distribution models (SDMs) have become an essential tool in ecology, biogeography, evolution and, more recently, in conservation biology. How to generalize species distributions in large undersampled areas, especially with few samples, is a fundamental issue of SDMs. In order to explore this issue, we used the best available presence records for the Hooded Crane (Grus monacha, n = 33), White-naped Crane (Grus vipio, n = 40), and Black-necked Crane (Grus nigricollis, n = 75) in China as three case studies, employing four powerful and commonly used machine learning algorithms to map the breeding distributions of the three species: TreeNet (Stochastic Gradient Boosting, Boosted Regression Tree Model), Random Forest, CART (Classification and Regression Tree) and Maxent (Maximum Entropy Models). In addition, we developed an ensemble forecast by averaging predicted probability of the above four models results. Commonly used model performance metrics (Area under ROC (AUC) and true skill statistic (TSS)) were employed to evaluate model accuracy. The latest satellite tracking data and compiled literature data were used as two independent testing datasets to confront model predictions. We found Random Forest demonstrated the best performance for the most assessment method, provided a better model fit to the testing data, and achieved better species range maps for each crane species in undersampled areas. Random Forest has been generally available for more than 20 years and has been known to perform extremely well in ecological predictions. However, while increasingly on the rise, its potential is still widely underused in conservation, (spatial) ecological applications and for inference. Our results show that it informs ecological and biogeographical theories as well as being suitable for conservation applications, specifically when the study area is undersampled. This method helps to save model-selection time and effort, and allows robust and rapid

  18. Electronic absorption spectra of rare earth (III) species in NaCl-2CsCl eutectic based melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkovich, V. A.; Ivanov, A. B.; Yakimov, S. M.; Tsarevskii, D. V.; Golovanova, O. A.; Sukhikh, V. V.; Griffiths, T. R.

    2016-09-01

    Electronic absorption spectra of ions of trivalent rare earth elements were measured in the melts based on NaCl-2CsCl eutectic in the wavelength ranges of 190-1350 and 1450-1700 nm. The measurements were performed at 550-850 °C. The EAS of Y, La, Ce and Lu containing melts have no absorption bands in the studied regions. For the remaining REEs (Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb) the absorption bands in the EAS were assigned to the corresponding f-f electron transitions. The Stark effect was observed for Yb(III) F5/2 excited state. Increasing temperature leads to decreasing intensity of the absorption bands, except for the bands resulting from hypersensitive transitions. Beer's law was confirmed up to 0.4 M solutions of REE.

  19. The morphology of the immature stages of two rare Lixus species (Coleoptera, Curculionidae, Lixinae) and notes on their biology.

    PubMed

    Trnka, Filip; Stejskal, Robert; Skuhrovec, Jiří

    2016-01-01

    The mature larvae and pupae of Lixus (Ortholixus) bituberculatus Smreczyński, 1968 and Lixus (Dilixellus) neglectus Fremuth, 1983 (Curculionidae: Lixinae: Lixini) are described and compared with known larvae of 21 other Lixus and 2 Hypolixus taxa. The mature larva and pupa of Lixus bituberculatus are the first immature stages described representing the subgenus Ortholixus. The larva of Lixus neglectus, in the subgenus Dilixellus, is distinguished from the known larvae of four species in this subgenus by having more pigmented sclerites on the larval body. All descriptions of mature larvae from the tribe Lixini, as do all known species from the tribe Cleonini, fit the diagnosis of the mature larva of the Lixinae subfamily. Furthermore, new biological information of these species in the Czech Republic, Slovakia and Romania is provided. For Lixus bituberculatus, a chicory, Cichorium intybus L. (Asteraceae), is identified as a host plant, and Lixus neglectus is found on dock Rumex thyrsiflorus Fingerh. (Polygonaceae). Both species are probably monophagous or oligophagous. Adults of Lixus bituberculatus often inhabit host plants growing in active, dry and sunny pastures with sparse patches without vegetation, being mostly active during the night in April/May and then again in September, when the highest activity levels are observed. Adults of Lixus neglectus inhabit dry grasslands on sandy soils with host plants, being active during the day from May to September, with the highest level of activity in May/June and September. The larvae of both species are borers in the stem and root of the host plant, and they pupate in root or root neck. Adults leave the pupation cells at the end of summer and do not hibernate in the host plants. Finally, Romania is a new geographic record for Lixus bituberculatus.

  20. The morphology of the immature stages of two rare Lixus species (Coleoptera, Curculionidae, Lixinae) and notes on their biology

    PubMed Central

    Trnka, Filip; Stejskal, Robert; Skuhrovec, Jiří

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The mature larvae and pupae of Lixus (Ortholixus) bituberculatus Smreczyński, 1968 and Lixus (Dilixellus) neglectus Fremuth, 1983 (Curculionidae: Lixinae: Lixini) are described and compared with known larvae of 21 other Lixus and 2 Hypolixus taxa. The mature larva and pupa of Lixus bituberculatus are the first immature stages described representing the subgenus Ortholixus. The larva of Lixus neglectus, in the subgenus Dilixellus, is distinguished from the known larvae of four species in this subgenus by having more pigmented sclerites on the larval body. All descriptions of mature larvae from the tribe Lixini, as do all known species from the tribe Cleonini, fit the diagnosis of the mature larva of the Lixinae subfamily. Furthermore, new biological information of these species in the Czech Republic, Slovakia and Romania is provided. For Lixus bituberculatus, a chicory, Cichorium intybus L. (Asteraceae), is identified as a host plant, and Lixus neglectus is found on dock Rumex thyrsiflorus Fingerh. (Polygonaceae). Both species are probably monophagous or oligophagous. Adults of Lixus bituberculatus often inhabit host plants growing in active, dry and sunny pastures with sparse patches without vegetation, being mostly active during the night in April/May and then again in September, when the highest activity levels are observed. Adults of Lixus neglectus inhabit dry grasslands on sandy soils with host plants, being active during the day from May to September, with the highest level of activity in May/June and September. The larvae of both species are borers in the stem and root of the host plant, and they pupate in root or root neck. Adults leave the pupation cells at the end of summer and do not hibernate in the host plants. Finally, Romania is a new geographic record for Lixus bituberculatus. PMID:27551208

  1. A low false negative filter for detecting rare bird species from short video segments using a probable observation data set-based EKF method.

    PubMed

    Song, Dezhen; Xu, Yiliang

    2010-09-01

    We report a new filter to assist the search for rare bird species. Since a rare bird only appears in front of a camera with very low occurrence (e.g., less than ten times per year) for very short duration (e.g., less than a fraction of a second), our algorithm must have a very low false negative rate. We verify the bird body axis information with the known bird flying dynamics from the short video segment. Since a regular extended Kalman filter (EKF) cannot converge due to high measurement error and limited data, we develop a novel probable observation data set (PODS)-based EKF method. The new PODS-EKF searches the measurement error range for all probable observation data that ensures the convergence of the corresponding EKF in short time frame. The algorithm has been extensively tested using both simulated inputs and real video data of four representative bird species. In the physical experiments, our algorithm has been tested on rock pigeons and red-tailed hawks with 119 motion sequences. The area under the ROC curve is 95.0%. During the one-year search of ivory-billed woodpeckers, the system reduces the raw video data of 29.41 TB to only 146.7 MB (reduction rate 99.9995%).

  2. The rehydration transcriptome of the desiccation-tolerant bryophyte Tortula ruralis: transcript classification and analysis

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, Melvin J; Dowd, Scot E; Zaragoza, Joaquin; Mauget, Steven A; Payton, Paxton R

    2004-01-01

    are important in the recovery of the gametophytes from desiccation. A comparison of the GO distribution of Tortula clusters with an identical analysis of 9,981 clusters from the desiccation sensitive bryophyte species Physcomitrella patens, revealed, and accentuated, the differences between stressed and unstressed transcriptomes. Cross species sequence comparisons indicated that on the whole the Tortula clusters were more closely related to those from Physcomitrella than Arabidopsis (complete genome BLASTx comparison) although because of the differences in the databases there were more high scoring matches to the Arabidopsis sequences. The most abundant transcripts contained within the Tortula ESTs encode Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) proteins that are normally associated with drying plant tissues. This suggests that LEAs may also play a role in recovery from desiccation when water is reintroduced into a dried tissue. Conclusion The establishment of a rehydration EST collection for Tortula ruralis, an important plant model for plant stress responses and vegetative desiccation tolerance, is an important step in understanding the genome level response to cellular dehydration. The type of transcript analysis performed here has laid the foundation for more detailed functional and genome level analyses of the genes involved in desiccation tolerance in plants. PMID:15546486

  3. Tree species traits but not diversity mitigate stem breakage in a subtropical forest following a rare and extreme ice storm.

    PubMed

    Nadrowski, Karin; Pietsch, Katherina; Baruffol, Martin; Both, Sabine; Gutknecht, Jessica; Bruelheide, Helge; Heklau, Heike; Kahl, Anja; Kahl, Tiemo; Niklaus, Pascal; Kröber, Wenzel; Liu, Xiaojuan; Mi, Xiangcheng; Michalski, Stefan; von Oheimb, Goddert; Purschke, Oliver; Schmid, Bernhard; Fang, Teng; Welk, Erik; Wirth, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Future climates are likely to include extreme events, which in turn have great impacts on ecological systems. In this study, we investigated possible effects that could mitigate stem breakage caused by a rare and extreme ice storm in a Chinese subtropical forest across a gradient of forest diversity. We used Bayesian modeling to correct stem breakage for tree size and variance components analysis to quantify the influence of taxon, leaf and wood functional traits, and stand level properties on the probability of stem breakage. We show that the taxon explained four times more variance in individual stem breakage than did stand level properties; trees with higher specific leaf area (SLA) were less susceptible to breakage. However, a large part of the variation at the taxon scale remained unexplained, implying that unmeasured or undefined traits could be used to predict damage caused by ice storms. When aggregated at the plot level, functional diversity and wood density increased after the ice storm. We suggest that for the adaption of forest management to climate change, much can still be learned from looking at functional traits at the taxon level.

  4. Tree Species Traits but Not Diversity Mitigate Stem Breakage in a Subtropical Forest following a Rare and Extreme Ice Storm

    PubMed Central

    Nadrowski, Karin; Pietsch, Katherina; Baruffol, Martin; Both, Sabine; Gutknecht, Jessica; Bruelheide, Helge; Heklau, Heike; Kahl, Anja; Kahl, Tiemo; Niklaus, Pascal; Kröber, Wenzel; Liu, Xiaojuan; Mi, Xiangcheng; Michalski, Stefan; von Oheimb, Goddert; Purschke, Oliver; Schmid, Bernhard; Fang, Teng; Welk, Erik; Wirth, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Future climates are likely to include extreme events, which in turn have great impacts on ecological systems. In this study, we investigated possible effects that could mitigate stem breakage caused by a rare and extreme ice storm in a Chinese subtropical forest across a gradient of forest diversity. We used Bayesian modeling to correct stem breakage for tree size and variance components analysis to quantify the influence of taxon, leaf and wood functional traits, and stand level properties on the probability of stem breakage. We show that the taxon explained four times more variance in individual stem breakage than did stand level properties; trees with higher specific leaf area (SLA) were less susceptible to breakage. However, a large part of the variation at the taxon scale remained unexplained, implying that unmeasured or undefined traits could be used to predict damage caused by ice storms. When aggregated at the plot level, functional diversity and wood density increased after the ice storm. We suggest that for the adaption of forest management to climate change, much can still be learned from looking at functional traits at the taxon level. PMID:24879434

  5. The European land leech: biology and DNA-based taxonomy of a rare species that is threatened by climate warming.

    PubMed

    Kutschera, U; Pfeiffer, I; Ebermann, E

    2007-12-01

    The European land leech Xerobdella lecomtei was discovered in 1868 and is one of the rarest animals on Earth. During the 1960s, several individuals of these approx. 40 mm long, cold-adapted terrestrial annelids that inhabit the moist soils of birch forests around Graz, Austria, were investigated. Only one original research paper has been published on the biology of this species. Between 2001 and 2005, we re-investigated the morphology of preserved specimens and searched for living individuals in their natural habitat that appeared to be intact. We found only one juvenile individual (length approx. 10 mm), indicating that this local leech population became largely extinct over the past four decades. The feeding behaviour of our 'lonesome George of the annelids' was studied and is described here in detail. After its death, the Xerobdella individual was used for chemical extraction and molecular studies (deoxyribonucleic acid [DNA] barcoding, based on one gene, the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I). In addition, novel DNA barcodes for a land leech from Madagascar and a recently discovered species from Europe were obtained. Our phylogenetic tree shows that X. lecomtei is not a member of the tropical land leeches (family Haemadipsidae), as previously thought, but represents a separate line of descent (family Xerobdellidae). The decline of the local leech population around Graz correlates with a rise in average summer temperatures of +3 degrees C between 1961 and 2004. This warming led to a drastic reduction in the moisture content of the soil where X. lecomtei lives. We suggest that human-induced climate change without apparent habitat destruction can lead to the extinction of populations of cold-adapted species that have a low colonization ability.

  6. The European land leech: biology and DNA-based taxonomy of a rare species that is threatened by climate warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutschera, U.; Pfeiffer, I.; Ebermann, E.

    2007-12-01

    The European land leech Xerobdella lecomtei was discovered in 1868 and is one of the rarest animals on Earth. During the 1960s, several individuals of these approx. 40 mm long, cold-adapted terrestrial annelids that inhabit the moist soils of birch forests around Graz, Austria, were investigated. Only one original research paper has been published on the biology of this species. Between 2001 and 2005, we re-investigated the morphology of preserved specimens and searched for living individuals in their natural habitat that appeared to be intact. We found only one juvenile individual (length approx. 10 mm), indicating that this local leech population became largely extinct over the past four decades. The feeding behaviour of our ‘lonesome George of the annelids’ was studied and is described here in detail. After its death, the Xerobdella individual was used for chemical extraction and molecular studies (deoxyribonucleic acid [DNA] barcoding, based on one gene, the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I). In addition, novel DNA barcodes for a land leech from Madagascar and a recently discovered species from Europe were obtained. Our phylogenetic tree shows that X. lecomtei is not a member of the tropical land leeches (family Haemadipsidae), as previously thought, but represents a separate line of descent (family Xerobdellidae). The decline of the local leech population around Graz correlates with a rise in average summer temperatures of +3°C between 1961 and 2004. This warming led to a drastic reduction in the moisture content of the soil where X. lecomtei lives. We suggest that human-induced climate change without apparent habitat destruction can lead to the extinction of populations of cold-adapted species that have a low colonization ability.

  7. Water relations and gas exchange of fan bryophytes and their adaptations to microhabitats in an Asian subtropical montane cloud forest.

    PubMed

    Song, Liang; Zhang, Yong-Jiang; Chen, Xi; Li, Su; Lu, Hua-Zheng; Wu, Chuan-Sheng; Tan, Zheng-Hong; Liu, Wen-Yao; Shi, Xian-Meng

    2015-07-01

    Fan life forms are bryophytes with shoots rising from vertical substratum that branch repeatedly in the horizontal plane to form flattened photosynthetic surfaces, which are well suited for intercepting water from moving air. However, detailed water relations, gas exchange characteristics of fan bryophytes and their adaptations to particular microhabitats remain poorly understood. In this study, we measured and analyzed microclimatic data, as well as water release curves, pressure-volume relationships and photosynthetic water and light response curves for three common fan bryophytes in an Asian subtropical montane cloud forest (SMCF). Results demonstrate high relative humidity but low light levels and temperatures in the understory, and a strong effect of fog on water availability for bryophytes in the SMCF. The facts that fan bryophytes in dry air lose most of their free water within 1 h, and a strong dependence of net photosynthesis rates on water content, imply that the transition from a hydrated, photosynthetically active state to a dry, inactive state is rapid. In addition, fan bryophytes developed relatively high cell wall elasticity and the osmoregulatory capacity to tolerate desiccation. These fan bryophytes had low light saturation and compensation point of photosynthesis, indicating shade tolerance. It is likely that fan bryophytes can flourish on tree trunks in the SMCF because of substantial annual precipitation, average relative humidity, and frequent and persistent fog, which can provide continual water sources for them to intercept. Nevertheless, the low water retention capacity and strong dependence of net photosynthesis on water content of fan bryophytes indicate a high risk of unbalanced carbon budget if the frequency and severity of drought increase in the future as predicted.

  8. Flavor, glucosinolates, and isothiocyanates of nau (Cook's scurvy grass, Lepidium oleraceum) and other rare New Zealand Lepidium species.

    PubMed

    Sansom, Catherine E; Jones, Veronika S; Joyce, Nigel I; Smallfield, Bruce M; Perry, Nigel B; van Klink, John W

    2015-02-18

    The traditionally consumed New Zealand native plant nau, Cook's scurvy grass, Lepidium oleraceum, has a pungent wasabi-like taste, with potential for development as a flavor ingredient. The main glucosinolate in this Brassicaceae was identified by LC-MS and NMR spectroscopy as 3-butenyl glucosinolate (gluconapin, 7-22 mg/g DM in leaves). The leaves were treated to mimic chewing, and the headspace was analyzed by solid-phase microextraction and GC-MS. This showed that 3-butenyl isothiocyanate, with a wasabi-like flavor, was produced by the endogenous myrosinase. Different postharvest treatments were used to create leaf powders as potential flavor products, which were tasted and analyzed for gluconapin and release of 3-butenyl isothiocyanate. A high drying temperature (75 °C) did not give major glucosinolate degradation, but did largely inactivate the myrosinase, resulting in no wasabi-like flavor release. Drying at 45 °C produced more pungent flavor than freeze-drying. Seven other Lepidium species endemic to New Zealand were also analyzed to determine their flavor potential and also whether glucosinolates were taxonomic markers. Six contained mostly gluconapin, but the critically endangered Lepidium banksii had a distinct composition including isopropyl glucosinolate, not detected in the other species.

  9. Chromosomal Integration of the Klebsiella pneumoniae Carbapenemase Gene, blaKPC, in Klebsiella Species Is Elusive but Not Rare.

    PubMed

    Mathers, Amy J; Stoesser, Nicole; Chai, Weidong; Carroll, Joanne; Barry, Katie; Cherunvanky, Anita; Sebra, Robert; Kasarskis, Andrew; Peto, Tim E; Walker, A Sarah; Sifri, Costi D; Crook, Derrick W; Sheppard, Anna E

    2017-03-01

    Carbapenemase genes in Enterobacteriaceae are mostly described as being plasmid associated. However, the genetic context of carbapenemase genes is not always confirmed in epidemiological surveys, and the frequency of their chromosomal integration therefore is unknown. A previously sequenced collection of blaKPC-positive Enterobacteriaceae from a single U.S. institution (2007 to 2012; n = 281 isolates from 182 patients) was analyzed to identify chromosomal insertions of Tn4401, the transposon most frequently harboring blaKPC Using a combination of short- and long-read sequencing, we confirmed five independent chromosomal integration events from 6/182 (3%) patients, corresponding to 15/281 (5%) isolates. Three patients had isolates identified by perirectal screening, and three had infections which were all successfully treated. When a single copy of blaKPC was in the chromosome, one or both of the phenotypic carbapenemase tests were negative. All chromosomally integrated blaKPC genes were from Klebsiella spp., predominantly K. pneumoniae clonal group 258 (CG258), even though these represented only a small proportion of the isolates. Integration occurred via IS15-ΔI-mediated transposition of a larger, composite region encompassing Tn4401 at one locus of chromosomal integration, seen in the same strain (K. pneumoniae ST340) in two patients. In summary, we identified five independent chromosomal integrations of blaKPC in a large outbreak, demonstrating that this is not a rare event. blaKPC was more frequently integrated into the chromosome of epidemic CG258 K. pneumoniae lineages (ST11, ST258, and ST340) and was more difficult to detect by routine phenotypic methods in this context. The presence of chromosomally integrated blaKPC within successful, globally disseminated K. pneumoniae strains therefore is likely underestimated.