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Sample records for rare site giant

  1. Soft Tissue Giant Cell Tumour of Low Malignant Potential: A Rare Tumour at a Rare Site

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Amoolya; V., Geethamani; C., Vijaya

    2013-01-01

    “Soft tissue giant cell tumour of low malignant potential” is considered as the soft tissue counterpart of osteoclastoma of the bone. It is a primary soft tissue tumour which is classified under the category of fibrohistiocytic tumours of intermediate malignancy.Seventy percent of the tumours involve the extremities and only about seven percent of them arise in head and neck region. They are composed of nodules of histiocytes in a vascular stroma, with multinucleated osteoclast-like giant cells positive for vimentin, smooth muscle actin (SMA), CD68 and Tarterate Resistant Acid Phosphatase (TRAP). We are presenting a case of a 75-year-old man who had a nodule on the ala of the nose. Histopathology showed a histiocytic lesion. Benign fibrous histiocytoma, plexiform fibrohistiocytic tumour, solitary reticulohistiocytoma and histioid leprosy were ruled out by using special stains and immunostains. Expression of smooth muscle actin and CD68 confirmed the diagnosis of a soft tissue giant cell tumour with a low malignant potential. PMID:24551690

  2. Giant cell-rich osteosarcoma of the parotid gland: An exceptionally rare entity at an unusual site.

    PubMed

    Huang, Eric C; Ghazikhanian, Varand; Qian, Xiaohua

    2016-12-01

    Giant cell-rich osteosarcoma is a rare histologic variant of conventional osteosarcoma that affects mainly the extremities. Extraskeletal giant cell-rich osteosarcoma is therefore exceedingly rare. Here, we report the first case of this uncommon tumor involving the parotid gland in a 62-year-old male who presented with initial right jaw swelling. Radiologic work-up revealed a 6.2 cm mass involving the right parotid gland. Fine-needle aspiration cytology showed numerous multinucleated giant cells in a background of dyshesive epithelioid cells and rare clusters of spindle stromal cells, suspicious for malignancy. The subsequent excisional biopsy showed histopathologic features diagnostic for giant cell-rich osteosarcoma. Diagn. Cytopathol. 2016;44:1107-1111. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Rare cause of odynophagia: Giant esophageal ulcer.

    PubMed

    Veroux, Massimiliano; Aprile, Giuseppe; Amore, Francesca F; Corona, Daniela; Giaquinta, Alessia; Veroux, Pierfrancesco

    2016-04-14

    Gastrointestinal complications are a frequent cause of morbidity after transplantation and may affect up to 40% of kidney transplant recipients. Here we report a rare case of idiopathic giant esophageal ulcer in a kidney transplant recipient. A 37-year-old female presented with a one-week history of odynophagia and weight loss. Upon admission, the patient presented cold sores, and a quantitative cytomegalovirus polymerase chain reaction was positive (10(5) copies/mL). An upper endoscopy demonstrated the presence of a giant ulcer. Serological test and tissue biopsies were unable to demonstrate an infectious origin of the ulcer. Immunosuppression was reduced and everolimus was introduced. An empirical i.v. therapy with acyclovir was started, resulting in a dramatic improvement in symptoms and complete healing of the ulcer. Only two cases of idiopathic giant esophageal ulcer in kidney transplant recipients have been reported in the literature; in both cases, steroid therapy was successful without recurrence of symptoms or endoscopic findings. However, this report suggests that correction of immune imbalance is mandatory to treat such a rare complication.

  4. Giant oral lipoma: a rare entity*

    PubMed Central

    Ponce, José Burgos; Ferreira, Gustavo Zanna; Santos, Paulo Sérgio da Silva; Lara, Vanessa Soares

    2016-01-01

    Lipomas are very common benign slow-growing soft tissue neoplasms composed of mature adipose tissue mostly diagnosed in the fifth decade of life. These tumors rarely present in the oral cavity, representing less than approximately 5% of all benign mouth tumors. They are usually less than 2cm in size and etiology remains unclear. We report a young male patient presenting with a giant lipoma in the buccal mucosa. Histopathology revealed a large area of mature fat cells consistent with conventional lipoma and an area of the mucosal lining of the lesion suggestive of morsicatio buccarum. In the present article, we emphasize the clinicopathological features and differential diagnosis of the disease.

  5. Rare liver tumor: symptomatic giant von Meyenburg complex

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Yardesh; Cawich, Shamir O.; Ramjit, Chunilal; Naraynsingh, Vijay

    2016-01-01

    von Meyenburg complexes are hamartomas that arise from intra-hepatic bile ducts. Symptomatic lesions are uncommon and giant lesions are exceedingly rare. When encountered, they should be excised because there are reports of malignant change in large, symptomatic lesions. We report a case of a symptomatic giant von Meyenburg complex. PMID:28068648

  6. Giant lupus vulgaris: A rare presentation.

    PubMed

    Sacchidanand, S; Sharavana, S; Mallikarjun, M; Nataraja, H V

    2012-01-01

    Cutaneous tuberculosis continues to be an important public health problem even with the availability of highly effective anti-tuberculous drugs. It constitutes 0.1% of all cases of extrapulmonary tuberculosis. Lupus vulgaris is the most common form of cutaneous tuberculosis that occurs in previously sensitized individuals with a moderate degree of immunity against tubercle bacilli. The different types of lupus vulgaris include plaque, ulcerative, vegetative, papular and nodular, and tumor forms. A 40-year-old man presented with large multiple plaques over right upper limb, right side of chest and back, and right lower limb for the past 30 years. Histopathology showed numerous noncaseating granulomas with Langhan's type of giant cells. The Mantoux test showed strong positivity and there was excellent response to anti-tuberculous treatment. This case is being reported because of its extreme chronicity of 30 years duration, unusually large size and multiplicity of lesions.

  7. Giant lupus vulgaris: A rare presentation

    PubMed Central

    Sacchidanand, S.; Sharavana, S.; Mallikarjun, M.; Nataraja, H. V.

    2012-01-01

    Cutaneous tuberculosis continues to be an important public health problem even with the availability of highly effective anti-tuberculous drugs. It constitutes 0.1% of all cases of extrapulmonary tuberculosis. Lupus vulgaris is the most common form of cutaneous tuberculosis that occurs in previously sensitized individuals with a moderate degree of immunity against tubercle bacilli. The different types of lupus vulgaris include plaque, ulcerative, vegetative, papular and nodular, and tumor forms. A 40-year-old man presented with large multiple plaques over right upper limb, right side of chest and back, and right lower limb for the past 30 years. Histopathology showed numerous noncaseating granulomas with Langhan's type of giant cells. The Mantoux test showed strong positivity and there was excellent response to anti-tuberculous treatment. This case is being reported because of its extreme chronicity of 30 years duration, unusually large size and multiplicity of lesions. PMID:23130259

  8. A Rare Case Report on Suboccipital Region Benign Giant Osteoma

    PubMed Central

    Bhattarai, Binod

    2016-01-01

    Herein we report a rare case of a giant suboccipital osteoma in a 55-year-old woman presenting primarily due to cosmetic issue. We discuss the management algorithm taken in the patient, highlighting excision of a potentially curable bony tumor only after ruling out its extension to the ear cavity, mastoid ear cells, transverse sinus, and the intracranial compartment. PMID:27051540

  9. Rare Giant Cell Tumor of Olecranon Bone!!!!

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Pawan; Gautam, Vishal; Saini, Narender; Sharma, Yogesh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Giant cell tumor (GCT) is a bone tumor involving epiphyseal area of bone abutting the subchondral bone. Commonly found in long bones such as proximal tibia and distal femur. We report a case of GCT of olecranon bone in a 23-year-old male. Case Report: A 23-year-old patient presented to our outpatient department with pain and mild swelling at the elbow from last 2 to 3 months. On examination, it was seen that there was a moderate swelling at the tip of the olecranon. The magnetic resonance imaging reported a lytic lesion in the olecranon but sparing the coronoid process of the ulna, the biopsy report confirmed that histologically it was a GCT of the bone. Total excision of the tumor was done after lifting the aponeurosis of the triceps muscle. The area remaining after excision of the tumor was phenol cauterized and cleaned with hydrogen peroxide solution. Triceps was reinserted on the remaining ulna. At follow-up the radiographs showed adequate excision of the tumor. The patient gained a full range of movement at the elbow and was functionally restored. There were no signs of any systemic spread of the tumor. Conclusion: GCT though a very common bone tumor could be missed if present in atypical locations. Radiographically soap bubble appearance might not be present in every case, and there could be multiple diagnoses for lytic lesion in bone. Proper investigations and histopathological examination are necessary for accurate diagnosis and further treatment planning. Early treatment helps in complete excision of tumor along with return of adequate function of the patient. PMID:28164048

  10. Giant cell arteritis: a systemic disease with rare cutaneous manifestations.

    PubMed

    Baum, E W; Sams, W M; Payne, R R

    1982-06-01

    Giant cell arteritis is a systemic disease usually occurring in patients in the fifth decade or older, more often in women. Dermatologic manifestations are rare but, when found, are usually expressed as scalp ulcerations or blanching associated with gangrene of the tongue. The dermatologist should be familiar with the entity because it is often more severe when associated with scalp necrosis, and prompt intervention with corticosteroids can prevent catastrophic sequelae.

  11. Giant appendicolith: Rare finding in a common ailment

    PubMed Central

    Singhal, Sanjeev; Singhal, Anu; Mahajan, Harsh; Prakash, Brahm; Kapur, Sunil; Arora, Pankaj K.; Tiwari, Bishwanath; Sethi, Punit

    2016-01-01

    Acute appendicitis is one of the commonest surgical emergencies worldwide. There is considerable variation in prevalence of appendicoliths with appendicitis. Most of the patients with appendicoliths are asymptomatic and they are not pathognomic for acute appendicitis. However, appendicoliths show increased association with perforation and abscess formation. Appendicolith are quite common, being present in 3% of general population and in nearly 10% cases of appendicitis. However, giant appendicoliths measuring over 2 centimeters (cms) are extremely rare. Computed Tomography (CT) has increased their pre-operative diagnosis considerably. Use of spectral analysis can give us the details of composition of the stone pre-operatively. We present a young male diagnosed pre-operatively on Non-Contrast Computed Tomography (NCCT) to have a giant calcium struvite appendicolith. On laparoscopy he had a 3 cm stone and an incidental Meckel's diverticulum and underwent appendectomy. The case is presented for the unique size of the appendicolith alongwith review of literature. PMID:27073312

  12. Giant intradural extramedullary spinal hydatid cyst--a rare presentation.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Muddassir; Kirmani, Sanna; Rashid, Mubashir

    2012-01-01

    The hydatidosis, or echinococcosis, has a characteristic geographic distribution, occurring most frequently in sheep-raising regions in Mediterranean, Central Asian, and South American countries and in Australia. Spinal hydatidosis is very rare, and intradural location is a rarer category of spinal hydatidosis. We report a case of intradural extramedullary spinal hydatid cyst in a 9-year-old boy. On magnetic resonance imaging, an intradural extramedullary giant cystic lesion was seen mimicking an arachnoid cyst. However, endemic origin of the patient and positive serology helped to make the diagnosis of hydatid cyst, which was confirmed on postoperative histopathology. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Giant Magellan Telescope site testing: summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas-Osip, Joanna E.; McCarthy, Patrick; Prieto, Gabriel; Phillips, Mark M.; Johns, Matt

    2010-07-01

    Cerro Las Campanas located at Las Campanas Observatory (LCO) in Chile has been selected as the site for the Giant Magellan Telescope. We report results obtained since the commencement, in 2005, of a systematic site testing survey of potential GMT sites at LCO. Meteorological (cloud cover, temperature, pressure, wind, and humidity) and DIMM seeing data have been obtained at three potential sites, and are compared with identical data taken at the site of the twin Magellan 6.5m telescopes. In addition, measurements of the turbulence profile of the free-atmosphere above LCO have been collected with a MASS/DIMM. Furthermore, we consider photometric quality, light pollution, and precipitable water vapor (PWV). LCO, and Co. Las Campanas in particular, have dark skies, little or no risk of future light pollution, excellent seeing, moderate winds, PWV adequate for mid-IR astronomy during a reasonable fraction of the nights, and a high fraction of clear nights overall. Finally, Co. Las Campanas meets or exceeds all the defined science requirements.

  14. Peripheral giant cell fibroma: A rare type of gingival overgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Monali; Rathod, Chaitali V.; Shah, Vandana

    2012-01-01

    This case report describes a rare benign tumor in a 21-year-old female was referred to the department of Periodontics, regarding areas of gingival enlargement affecting both the maxilla and mandible on the right side. She was not having any systemic and family history. Surgical excision of the lesions was carried out under local anesthetic. Histopathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of giant cell fibroma. The condition responded to surgical excision and appears to have limited growth potential. It may affect a wide spectrum of ages, but it is most commonly found in young people and can be alarming due to rapid enlargement and ulceration; so careful diagnosis is important to avoid unnecessary aggressive treatment. PMID:23055599

  15. Synchronous Multicentric Giant Cell Tumour (GCT)-A Rare Case Report.

    PubMed

    Shekhar, Anshu; Murgod, Gururaj; Korlhalli, Suresh

    2014-02-01

    Giant Cell Tumours (GCT) of bone account for 5% of all primary bone tumours. Multicentric variety is a rare variant of this condition, accounting for less than 1% of all cases and can occur as synchronous or metachronous lesions. We report a 22-year-old male patient with 18 months history of painful progressive swellings around the right knee. Radiographs revealed expansile lytic lesions in the distal femur, proximal tibia and fibula and core needle biopsy was typical of GCT. Biochemical parameters were normal and radiological investigations did not reveal any metastasis. The patient was treated by above knee amputation due to the extensive nature of the tumours. The excised tissue from all sites had features of giant cell tumor with no atypia or malignant cells seen. The patient is free from recurrence or metastasis at three years follow up.

  16. Wide Giant Planets are Rare: Planet Demographics from Direct Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biller, Beth

    2015-08-01

    The previous generation of direct imaging surveys probed samples of 100-200 stars with AO-driven coronagraphic imaging and advanced techniques such as Angular Differential Imaging (ADI) (e.g. surveys such as SEEDS, IDPS, the NICI Science Campaign, among others). These surveys found that wide giant planets are comparatively rare, especially at separations > 50 AU: for instance, Biller et al. 2013 find for a sample of 78 young moving group stars that the the frequency of 1-20 M Jup companions at semi-major axes from 10-150 AU is <18% at a 95.4% confidence level using DUSTY models and <6% at a 95.4% using COND models. As next generation planet-finding cameras such as GPI at Gemini, SPHERE at VLT, project 1640, and SceXAO at Suburu come online, our understanding of wide planet populations is likely to undergo a rapid evolution, especially for planets at separations of 10-50 AU. New large-scale surveys (400-500 stars) are now underway with these new instruments, e.g. NIRSUR with SPHERE and GPIES with GPI. In this talk, I will review the previous generation of surveys and the statistical results that they have yielded. I will also discuss prospects for the new generation of ongoing surveys.

  17. Giant congenital melanocytic nevus with developmental dysplasia of bilateral hip: a rare association.

    PubMed

    Imchen, Sutsungkokla; Ghosh, Sangita; Dayal, Surabhi; Marwah, Nisha; Jindal, Nidhi; Sangal, Shikha

    2013-11-01

    Giant congenital melanocytic nevi are rare congenital disfiguring benign neoplasms with a risk of transformation to malignant melanoma. They often present with various extra-cutaneous features. Here, we describe a case of giant melanocytic nevus with developmental dysplasia of bilateral hip, a novel association.

  18. A Rare Triad of Giant Occipital Encephalocele with Lipomyelomeningocele, Tetralogy of Fallot, and Situs Inversus

    PubMed Central

    Franco, Arie; Jo, Stephanie Y; Mehta, Amar S; Pandya, Dave J; Yang, Carina W

    2016-01-01

    Giant encephalocele is an uncommon congenital anomaly with very few published reports available in the English literature. Tetralogy of Fallot associated with situs inversus is also infrequently reported. To our knowledge there are no published reports of an association between giant encephalocele and Tetralogy of Fallot. The additional finding of situs inversus results in a rare pathologic triad, not heretofore described. PMID:27200165

  19. Giant Cutaneous Horn Overlying A Verruca at an Uncommon Site: Medical Marvel vs Superstitious Dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Sanjeeva, Karthik Kathladka; Ali, Puttur Sainuddin Mohammed Ameer; Rao, Srikar; Rai, Arvind Shivram

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous horn has been a matter of discussion to mankind since time immemorial and a subject of fascination for the layman. There have been instances where certain groups saw it with angst and disgust, with a person having a large cutaneous horn on an exposed area getting a dismal look. We present a case of a 64-year-old man with a giant cutaneous horn over his left gluteal region. Cutaneous horns more commonly present in the sun-exposed areas. In our case it has presented in an uncommon site. The patient had delayed and denied medical treatment due to his superstitious beliefs, after having sought advice from faith healers leading to progression of the disease. This case has been presented for its giant size (rare variety), its location being over the gluteal region (photo-protected site) and its benign histopathology suggestive of wart in spite of the giant size. PMID:26023596

  20. Giant Cutaneous Horn Overlying A Verruca at an Uncommon Site: Medical Marvel vs Superstitious Dilemma.

    PubMed

    Sanjeeva, Karthik Kathladka; Ali, Puttur Sainuddin Mohammed Ameer; Pinto, Malcolm; Rao, Srikar; Rai, Arvind Shivram

    2015-04-01

    Cutaneous horn has been a matter of discussion to mankind since time immemorial and a subject of fascination for the layman. There have been instances where certain groups saw it with angst and disgust, with a person having a large cutaneous horn on an exposed area getting a dismal look. We present a case of a 64-year-old man with a giant cutaneous horn over his left gluteal region. Cutaneous horns more commonly present in the sun-exposed areas. In our case it has presented in an uncommon site. The patient had delayed and denied medical treatment due to his superstitious beliefs, after having sought advice from faith healers leading to progression of the disease. This case has been presented for its giant size (rare variety), its location being over the gluteal region (photo-protected site) and its benign histopathology suggestive of wart in spite of the giant size.

  1. Giant Perineal Solitary Fibrous Tumor: A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Yoshino Bonifaci, Ana Maria; Crochik, Fabio da Silva; Murta, Claudio Bovolenta; Claro, Joaquim Francisco de Almeida; Manzano, Joao Padua

    2017-01-01

    Background. Solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) is a fibroblastic mesenchymal tumor that was initially described from the pleura but currently arises at almost every anatomic site. It is usually benign, and surgical resection is curative. SFT involving the perineum is extremely rare. This is the third case report of a perineal SFT in the literature. Case Presentation. We reported an uncommon case of a 64-year-old man presenting with a huge perineal mass that started growing 3 years before his arrival in our service. He was asymptomatic. A contrast-enhanced CT scan revealed a heterogeneous well-circumscribed perineal mass with soft-tissue density. Invasion of the surrounding organs, distal metastasis, and lymph node swelling were absent. The complete resection of mass was done successfully. The specimen was a 23.0 × 14.0 × 8.0 cm encapsulated tumor. Mass weight was 1,170 g. After pathological analysis, we confirmed that the mass was a solitary fibrous tumor. The diagnosis was based on clinical findings and histological morphology and immunohistochemistry study. Conclusion. SFTs are usually indolent tumors with a favorable prognosis. The perineal location is extremely rare. Complete resection of the mass is the treatment of choice. PMID:28352487

  2. Giant vertebrobasilar aneurysm: a rare cause of central sleep apnoea.

    PubMed

    Haley, Mark Daniel; Henderson, Duncan Bruce Henry; Nowell, Mark; Adams, William M; Whitfield, Peter C

    2017-09-21

    We report a case of central sleep apnoea (CSA) due to a giant vertebrobasilar aneurysm with brainstem compression. A flow diverter stent was deployed with coil embolization of the right vertebral artery distal to the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) to occlude the aneurysm. The patient's symptoms improved following therapy.

  3. Giant sialoliths of Wharton duct: Report of two rare cases and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Shahoon, Hossein; Farhadi, Sareh; Hamedi, Roya

    2015-01-01

    Sialolithiasis is a common disease of the major salivary glands, characterized by the obstruction of a salivary gland or its excretory duct due to the formation of calcareous concretions. Sialoliths usually measure from 1 mm to <10 mm. They rarely measure more than 15 mm, and infrequently giant salivary gland calculi >15 mm have been reported in the literature. The submandibular gland and its duct appear to be the most susceptible sites for this disease. In this article, we report two unique cases, including a giant bilateral case, measuring 50 mm in length and 5 mm in width on the right side and one, 30 mm in length, and 5 mm in width on the left side; and another case, measuring 83 mm in length. The diagnostic and therapeutic approaches consisted of transocclusal radiography with the conservative transoral surgical technique in both cases. The follow-up showed the normal function of the relevant salivary glands. To the best of our knowledge and belief, similar cases have not been reported in the literature. PMID:26604966

  4. Bilateral giant juvenile fibroadenomas of the breasts—a rare indication for bilateral skin reducing mastectomy

    PubMed Central

    Neto, Francisco Laitano; Zerwes, Felipe Pereira

    2016-01-01

    Fibroadenoma is the most common benign tumor of the breast but giant juvenile fibroadenoma represent only 0.5% of all fibroadenomas and when bilateral are much more rare. We describe the case of a 25 years old girl that presented with bilateral giant juvenile fibroadenomas and was treated by bilateral skin reducing mastectomy using the inferior dermal flap, implant, and free nipple graft. PMID:27563567

  5. Migrating giant honey bees (Apis dorsata) congregate annually at stopover site in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Willard S

    2012-01-01

    Giant honey bees (Apis dorsata) of southern Asia are vital honey producers and pollinators of cultivated crops and wild plants. They are known to migrate seasonally up to 200 km. It has been assumed their migrations occur stepwise, with stops for rest and foraging, but bivouacking bees have rarely been seen by scientists. Here I report discovery of a site in northern Thailand where bivouacs appeared in large congregations during the wet seasons of 2009 and 2010. The bivouac congregation stopover site is a small mango orchard along the Pai River. Bivouacs rested in branches of mango and other tree species in the immediate vicinity. Departures were preceded by dances indicating approximate direction and apparently, distance of flights. Such consistent stopover sites likely occur throughout southern Asia and may support critical, vulnerable stages in the life history of giant honey bees that must be conserved for populations of the species to survive.

  6. Migrating Giant Honey Bees (Apis dorsata) Congregate Annually at Stopover Site in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Willard S.

    2012-01-01

    Giant honey bees (Apis dorsata) of southern Asia are vital honey producers and pollinators of cultivated crops and wild plants. They are known to migrate seasonally up to 200 km. It has been assumed their migrations occur stepwise, with stops for rest and foraging, but bivouacking bees have rarely been seen by scientists. Here I report discovery of a site in northern Thailand where bivouacs appeared in large congregations during the wet seasons of 2009 and 2010. The bivouac congregation stopover site is a small mango orchard along the Pai River. Bivouacs rested in branches of mango and other tree species in the immediate vicinity. Departures were preceded by dances indicating approximate direction and apparently, distance of flights. Such consistent stopover sites likely occur throughout southern Asia and may support critical, vulnerable stages in the life history of giant honey bees that must be conserved for populations of the species to survive. PMID:23028715

  7. A pre-pubertal girl with giant juvenile fibroadenoma: A rare case report.

    PubMed

    Gaurav, Kumar; Chandra, Gautam; Neelam, Kumari; Kumar, Sanjeet; Singla, Harish; Yadav, Sanjay Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Fibroadenomas are benign neoplasms usually arising between the ages of 15-25 years. Approximately 0.4% fibroadenomas arise in juvenile age group. Usually the diagnosis is straightforward by clinical examination and FNAC. But sometimes rapid growth and giant size may pose difficulty in clinical approach. In this paper we are presenting a rare case of giant juvenile fibroadenoma in a 10 years old girl which was diagnosed by FNAC and treated by excision. Diagnosis was confirmed by histopathology. Giant juvenile fibroadenomas are over 5cm in diameter and tend to show rapid growth mimicking a carcinoma. But histological features are similar to smaller fibroadenomas and can be enucleated. Through this case we want to emphasize that these giant benign neoplasms should be suspected in any pre-pubertal girl with breast lump and should always be treated with breast conserving surgery. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  8. [Rare giant retroauricular epidermoid cyst: a case report].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Enhui; Zhang, Yi; Xue, Xiaocheng

    2016-03-01

    Epidermnoid cysts are henign, cutaneous cysts which commonly occur on face, neck and trunk. Retroauricular epidermoid cyst is rare reported which should be differentiated from auricle pseudocyst, lipoma, steatocystoma and fibroma. The hitopathological examination is a gold standard of diagnosis. Surgery of complete excision is the first choice of treatment methods.

  9. Giant cystic primary mucoepidermoid carcinoma of mandible: a rare case and literature review.

    PubMed

    Verma, Roshan Kumar; Sunku, Satheesh Kumar; Bal, Amanjeet; Panda, Naresh K

    2014-01-01

    Primary intra-osseous mucoepidermoid carcinoma arising from jaw is an extremely rare condition accounting to less than 2% of all mucoepidermoid carcinomas. In the jaw, it occurs more commonly in mandible than maxilla. They are low-grade cancers and affect jaw as uni- or multi-locular radiographic lesions. Here we discuss a rare case of giant cystic primary intra-cystic mucoepidermoid carcinoma of the mandible which was excised in toto. Here we discuss the clinical features, radiological and histological characteristics of this rare lesion, and review the literature.

  10. Giant magnetic anisotropy of rare-earth adatoms and dimers adsorbed by graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kai-Cheng; Li, Yong-Feng; Liu, Yong; Zhu, Yan; Shi, Li-Bin

    2017-05-24

    Nowadays, transition-metal adatoms and dimers with giant magnetic anisotropy have attracted much attention due to their potential applications in data storage, spintronics and quantum computations. Using density-functional calculations, we investigated the magnetic anisotropy of the rare-earth adatoms and dimers adsorbed by graphene oxide. Our calculations reveal that the adatoms of Tm, Er and Sm possess giant magnetic anisotropy, typically larger than 40 meV. When the dimers of (Tm,Er,Sm)-Ir are adsorbed onto graphene oxide, the magnetic anisotropy even exceeds 200 meV. The magnetic anisotropy can be tuned by the external electric field as well as the environment.

  11. Giant primary mediastinal liposarcoma: A rare cause of atrial flutter.

    PubMed

    Arrarás-Martínez, Miguel J; Rieger-Reyes, Cristina; Panadero-Paz, Carolina; Landa-Oviedo, Hugo S; García-Tirado, Javier

    2015-11-01

    We report the case of a 68-year-old man who presented with atrial flutter and was observed radiologically to have a large mass in the posterior mediastinum. During surgical removal, spontaneous recovery of sinus rhythm occurred. There was no late recurrence of arrhythmia. The diagnosis was mediastinal liposarcoma of mixed type (extremely rare). Supraventricular arrhythmia associated with mediastinal tumors is exceptional. Surgery appears to be the only potentially curative treatment for these tumors. In cases like ours presenting with arrhythmia, surgery is considered essential for control of the arrhythmia. © The Author(s) 2015.

  12. Case Report: A giant but silent adrenal pheochromocytoma – a rare entity

    PubMed Central

    Munakomi, Sunil; Rajbanshi, Saroj; Adhikary, Prof Shailesh

    2016-01-01

    Herein we report a rare entity of a giant adrenal pheochromocytoma in a fifty-year-old male presenting with a vague abdominal pain. A computerised tomogram of the abdomen revealed a well-defined  left supraadrenal giant lesion with no evidence of invasion to surrounding structures.The patient underwent surgical excision without any untoward postoperative events. Histopathological study revealed a benign pheochromocytoma. This report highlights the importance of acknowledging the fact that sometimes a giant adrenal pheochromocytoma can present with paucity of clinical  signs and symptoms.Thorough investigations and a multidisciplinary team approach may lead  to a better outcome in these patients. PMID:27785358

  13. Reconstruction Approach to a Rare Case of Acquired Scrotal Giant Muscular Hamartoma

    PubMed Central

    Bogetti, Paolo; Rolle, Luigi; Baglioni, Elisabetta Adelaide; Parisi, Andrea; Spaziante, Luca; Rivarossa, Filippo; Ceruti, Carlo; Preto, Mirko; Bocchiotti, Maria Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Acquired scrotal giant muscular hamartoma is an uncommon benign lesion with fewer than 10 documented cases all over the world. It is characterized by a proliferation of dermal smooth muscle bundles of scrotum dartos fascia. The authors report a rare case of acquired scrotal giant muscular hamartoma, which occurred in a 70-year-old severely obese and diabetic man presenting with a progressive scrotal enlargement and swelling in the last year, causing marked reduction in quality of life and cosmetic problems. The patient underwent a wide excision of the hamartomatous lesion, and then, a reductive scrotoplasty and autologous skin grafting of penis were performed. Anatomopathological examination showed an acquired scrotal giant muscular hamartoma arising from muscular fascia of dartos. This surgical technique is a valid, safe, effective, and minimally invasive option to treat this pathology, achieving both excellent functional and aesthetic results, with a marked improvement of the patient’s quality of life. PMID:27757322

  14. Primary cutaneous mucormycosis presenting as a giant plaque: uncommon presentation of a rare mycosis.

    PubMed

    Vinay, Keshavamurthy; Chandrasegaran, Ariganesh; Kanwar, Amrinder J; Saikia, Uma N; Kaur, Harsimran; Shivaprakash, M R; Dogra, Sunil

    2014-08-01

    Mucormycosis is an uncommon systemic mycosis affecting the immunocompromised individuals. It is usually caused by organisms of the genera Rhizopus and Mucor, although rarely other organisms have also been implicated. Mycoses due to these angioinvasive fungi have an acute onset, rapidly progressive course with high mortality rate. A rare and less well known is the chronic subtype of primary cutaneous mucormycosis (PCM). Herein, we report a case of PCM clinically presenting as a chronic, giant destructive plaque in a young immunocompetent male and coin the term chronic granulomatous mucormycosis. A clinicopathological classification for cutaneous mucormycosis is also proposed.

  15. A Rare Cause of Childhood Ileus: Giant Mesenteric Lipoma and a Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Turk, Erdal; Edirne, Yesim; Karaca, Fahri; Memetoglu, Mehmet Erdal; Unal, Emel; Ermumcu, Ozgur

    2013-01-01

    Mesenteric lipomas are benign tumors of mature fat cells. They are usually asymptomatic and create a clinical picture that depends on the localization and size of the lipoma. Although rare, unusually large mesenteric giant lipomas can cause partial or complete bowel obstruction. Lipomas resulting in partial bowel obstruction can present with symptoms such as intermittent abdominal pain and abdominal distention. With complete obstruction, a child can present with an acute abdomen. Treatment is the excision of the mass along with the affected portion of bowel. In this case study, a 2-year-old female presented with a bowel obstruction due to the presence of a giant mesenteric lipoma. Clinical features of 16 cases published in the English literature to date are presented. PMID:25610284

  16. Giant Magellan Telescope site testing: PWV statistics and calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas-Osip, Joanna E.; Prieto, Gabriel; McWilliam, Andrew; Phillips, Mark M.; McCarthy, Patrick; Johns, Matt; Querel, Richard; Naylor, David

    2010-07-01

    Cerro Las Campanas located at Las Campanas Observatory (LCO) in Chile has been selected as the site for the Giant Magellan Telescope. We report results obtained since the commencement, in 2005, of a systematic site testing survey of potential GMT sites at LCO. Atmospheric precipitable water vapor (PWV) adversely impacts mid-IR astronomy through reduced transparency and increased background. Prior to the GMT site testing effort, little was known regarding the PWV characteristics at LCO and therefore, a multi-pronged approach was used to ensure the determination of the fraction of the time suitable for mid-IR observations. High time resolution monitoring was achieved with an Infrared Radiometer for Millimeter Astronomy (IRMA) from the University of Lethbridge deployed at LCO since September of 2007. Absolute calibrations via the robust Brault method (described in Thomas-Osip et al.1) are provided by the Magellan Inamori Kyocera Echelle (MIKE), mounted on the Clay 6.5-m telescope on a timescale of several per month. We find that conditions suitable for mid-IR astronomy (PWV < 1.5 mm) are concentrated in the southern winter and spring months. Nearly 40% of clear time during these seasons have PWV < 1.5mm. Approximately 10% of these nights meet our PWV requirement for the entire night.

  17. Classic tongue lipoma: a common tumour at a rare site

    PubMed Central

    Magadum, Dilip; Sanadi, Appasab; Agrawal, Jiwanasha Manish; Agrawal, Manish Suresh

    2013-01-01

    Lipoma is the commonest benign tumour occurring at any anatomical site where fat is present, but occurrence in the oral cavity is rare. Tongue which is totally devoid of fat cells is a rare site for lipoma. This is one such rare case of the universal tumour, presenting at the lateral margin of the tongue, for which complete tumour excision was done. Macroscopically the mass had a hard consistency and measured 3.0×2.0 cm. From microscopic examination, diagnosis of lipoma was made. Recurrence of tongue lipoma is rare. PMID:23370950

  18. Surgical treatment of rare giant malignant tumors of the scalp: A report of 3 cases with different tumor types

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaoliang; Li, Wenzhong; Yuan, Hepei; Gu, Weihong; Chen, Dawei

    2016-01-01

    The scalp is the most frequent site of occurrence of malignant tumors. As an area that is generally neglected by the patient and not closely monitored during physical examinations, scalp tumors can go unnoticed until they become malignant. The present study reports 3 cases of rare giant malignant tumors of the scalp, namely a peripheral nerve sheath tumor, a fibrous tumor and a malignant proliferating trichilemmal tumor, that were treated at The First Bethune Hospital of Jilin University (Changchun, China). Vascularized free anterolateral thigh flap surgery was performed in 2 of the 3 cases. A local flap repair was applied to the third case. The implanted skin grafts remained viable post-operatively and wound repair was uneventful. No signs of malignancy were detected on the edge of the pathological section upon closer pathological examination. In the follow-up period, no recurrence was detected in any of the cases. PMID:27900013

  19. Galaxy evolution. Quasar quartet embedded in giant nebula reveals rare massive structure in distant universe.

    PubMed

    Hennawi, Joseph F; Prochaska, J Xavier; Cantalupo, Sebastiano; Arrigoni-Battaia, Fabrizio

    2015-05-15

    All galaxies once passed through a hyperluminous quasar phase powered by accretion onto a supermassive black hole. But because these episodes are brief, quasars are rare objects typically separated by cosmological distances. In a survey for Lyman-α emission at redshift z ≈ 2, we discovered a physical association of four quasars embedded in a giant nebula. Located within a substantial overdensity of galaxies, this system is probably the progenitor of a massive galaxy cluster. The chance probability of finding a quadruple quasar is estimated to be ∼10(-7), implying a physical connection between Lyman-α nebulae and the locations of rare protoclusters. Our findings imply that the most massive structures in the distant universe have a tremendous supply (≃10(11) solar masses) of cool dense (volume density ≃ 1 cm(-3)) gas, which is in conflict with current cosmological simulations.

  20. Rare giant traumatic cervical arteriovenous fistula in neurofibromatosis type 1 patient.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Douglas G; Alleyne, Cargill H

    2012-06-28

    Arteriovenous fistulas can rarely occur in patients with neurofibromatosis type 1. These lesions typically result from traumatic insult to the dysplastic parent artery. The damaged artery forms abnormal connections with nearby paraspinal and epidural venous structures. Surgical treatment of these lesions can be extremely challenging given the proximity to the spinal cord and the ability of the fistula to recruit vessels from adjacent vascular structures. A 29-year-old woman with neurofibromatosis type 1 and a motor vehicle collision 2 years earlier presented with gait difficulty, lower extremity spasticity and neck and arm pain. Her investigation revealed a giant cervical vertebral arteriovenous fistula. The fistula was successfully treated in multiple stages using all endovascular techniques including detachable coils, stents and glue embolisation. Reduction in flow and improvement in symptoms are reasonable goals in this specific rare subgroup of complex cervical arteriovenous fistulae.

  1. Giant Hernia of Morgagni with Acute Coronary Syndrome: A Rare Case Report and Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Munir; Al-Arifi, Ahmed; Najm, Hani K

    2015-09-01

    Hernia of Morgagni is a congenital defect of the sternal part of the diaphragm and frequently presents on the right side of the midline. The hernial sac is usually small and can be dealt with through either an abdominal approach or through a lateral thoracotomy incision. Median sternotomy as an approach to repair these defects has very rarely been described in the literature when concomitant cardiac surgical procedures were required. We report the case of a 42 year-old male with Morgagni hernia that was approached through median sternotomy because of concomitant requirement for open heart surgery. The patient presented with acute coronary syndrome necessitating urgent coronary artery bypass surgery and was found to have a giant hernia of Morgagni due to bilateral defects. This entity is very rarely described and may pose difficulty in repair due to excessive adhesions to the surrounding thoracic or mediastinal tissues. Median sternotomy seems to be the ideal approach to deal with these giant lesions. Clinical presentation of Morgagni hernia and different options for surgical repair of the defect are discussed with reference to relevant literature.

  2. Naturally rare versus newly rare: demographic inferences on two timescales inform conservation of Galápagos giant tortoises

    PubMed Central

    Garrick, Ryan C; Kajdacsi, Brittney; Russello, Michael A; Benavides, Edgar; Hyseni, Chaz; Gibbs, James P; Tapia, Washington; Caccone, Adalgisa

    2015-01-01

    Long-term population history can influence the genetic effects of recent bottlenecks. Therefore, for threatened or endangered species, an understanding of the past is relevant when formulating conservation strategies. Levels of variation at neutral markers have been useful for estimating local effective population sizes (Ne) and inferring whether population sizes increased or decreased over time. Furthermore, analyses of genotypic, allelic frequency, and phylogenetic information can potentially be used to separate historical from recent demographic changes. For 15 populations of Galápagos giant tortoises (Chelonoidis sp.), we used 12 microsatellite loci and DNA sequences from the mitochondrial control region and a nuclear intron, to reconstruct demographic history on shallow (past ∽100 generations, ∽2500 years) and deep (pre-Holocene, >10 thousand years ago) timescales. At the deep timescale, three populations showed strong signals of growth, but with different magnitudes and timing, indicating different underlying causes. Furthermore, estimated historical Ne of populations across the archipelago showed no correlation with island age or size, underscoring the complexity of predicting demographic history a priori. At the shallow timescale, all populations carried some signature of a genetic bottleneck, and for 12 populations, point estimates of contemporary Ne were very small (i.e., < 50). On the basis of the comparison of these genetic estimates with published census size data, Ne generally represented ∽0.16 of the census size. However, the variance in this ratio across populations was considerable. Overall, our data suggest that idiosyncratic and geographically localized forces shaped the demographic history of tortoise populations. Furthermore, from a conservation perspective, the separation of demographic events occurring on shallow versus deep timescales permits the identification of naturally rare versus newly rare populations; this distinction should

  3. Naturally rare versus newly rare: demographic inferences on two timescales inform conservation of Galápagos giant tortoises.

    PubMed

    Garrick, Ryan C; Kajdacsi, Brittney; Russello, Michael A; Benavides, Edgar; Hyseni, Chaz; Gibbs, James P; Tapia, Washington; Caccone, Adalgisa

    2015-02-01

    Long-term population history can influence the genetic effects of recent bottlenecks. Therefore, for threatened or endangered species, an understanding of the past is relevant when formulating conservation strategies. Levels of variation at neutral markers have been useful for estimating local effective population sizes (N e ) and inferring whether population sizes increased or decreased over time. Furthermore, analyses of genotypic, allelic frequency, and phylogenetic information can potentially be used to separate historical from recent demographic changes. For 15 populations of Galápagos giant tortoises (Chelonoidis sp.), we used 12 microsatellite loci and DNA sequences from the mitochondrial control region and a nuclear intron, to reconstruct demographic history on shallow (past ∽100 generations, ∽2500 years) and deep (pre-Holocene, >10 thousand years ago) timescales. At the deep timescale, three populations showed strong signals of growth, but with different magnitudes and timing, indicating different underlying causes. Furthermore, estimated historical N e of populations across the archipelago showed no correlation with island age or size, underscoring the complexity of predicting demographic history a priori. At the shallow timescale, all populations carried some signature of a genetic bottleneck, and for 12 populations, point estimates of contemporary N e were very small (i.e., < 50). On the basis of the comparison of these genetic estimates with published census size data, N e generally represented ∽0.16 of the census size. However, the variance in this ratio across populations was considerable. Overall, our data suggest that idiosyncratic and geographically localized forces shaped the demographic history of tortoise populations. Furthermore, from a conservation perspective, the separation of demographic events occurring on shallow versus deep timescales permits the identification of naturally rare versus newly rare populations; this distinction

  4. Giant Rhinophyma: A Rare Case of Total Nasal Obstruction and Restitutio Ad Integrum.

    PubMed

    Wolter, Andreas; Scholz, Till; Liebau, Jutta

    2017-03-24

    Rhinophyma is considered the end stage in the development of rosacea, accompanied by hypertrophy of the sebaceous glands, which causes an enlargement of the nose. It is an uncommon condition that often results in both functional and cosmetic impairment. A large variety of surgical and nonsurgical treatments have been published to treat it. Closure is usually obtained by wound granulating in by secondary intention, skin grafting or local flaps. Rarely these lesions can attain a giant size and pose a challenge in surgical treatment. We present a 63-year-old male with the necessity for tracheostomy at the ICU due to total nasal obstruction and recurrent episodes of pneumonia caused by a huge giant rhinophyma, which had undergone extreme growth in the last five years. The tumor was removed under general anesthesia by decortication with an electrosurgical wire loop to recreate the aesthetic units of the nose preserving the alar cartilage as well as the pilosebaceous appendages. The wounds healed in by secondary intention with a very pleasant cosmetic and improved functional result. The relevant literature is discussed. Level of Evidence V This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266 .

  5. Giant saccular superior vena cava aneurysm—a rare and difficult clinical case

    PubMed Central

    Janczak, Dariusz; Skiba, Jacek; Gemel, Marek; Mak, Marek; Ziomek, Agnieszka; Malinowski, Maciej; Dorobisz, Tadeusz; Lesniak, Michal; Janczak, Dawid

    2016-01-01

    A superior vena cava (SVC) aneurysm is an extremely rare case of vascular malformation in the chest cavity. This is a report of a case of a 57-year-old woman with a saccular SVC aneurysm which was 8 cm wide. The chest computed tomography (CT) scan confirmed a giant 75 mm × 79 mm × 81 mm mass containing the contrast medium from SVC, constricting the right lung parenchyma, narrowing the right innominate vein, in contact with the anterolateral chest cavity wall, and adjoining the superior mediastinum. Under general anesthesia and employing the median sternotomy approach, using a cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), the venous aneurysm was successfully resected. The postoperative period was uneventful. Radical surgical resection using a sternotomy and a CPB is recommended. PMID:27076981

  6. Giant cemento-ossifying fibroma of the mandible: a rare case.

    PubMed

    Sujatha, D; Shubha, Gurudath; Anuradha, Pai; Ragavendra, Mahadev Naik

    2013-01-01

    The World Health Organization classifies cemento-ossifying fibroma (COF) as a fibro-osseous neoplasm included among the nonodontogenic tumors derived from the mesenchymal blast cells of the periodontal ligament, with a potential for forming fibrous tissue, cementum and bone, or a combination of such elements. These are slow-growing lesions, and are more frequent in women, between the third and fourth decades of life. Case reports of massive expansile COFs (measuring more than 10 cm) are rarely reported in the literature. This article aims to describe a case of giant cemento-ossifying fibroma with radiographic and 3D CT features in a 34 year old female patient, who came with the complaint of progressive swelling of the face which had started 6 years earlier.

  7. Giant mesenteric cyst: a rare cause of abdominal distension diagnosed with CT and managed with ultrasound-guided drainage.

    PubMed

    Ma, Alexander; Ayre, Karyn; Wijeyekoon, Sanjaya

    2012-09-03

    This rare cystic lesion has an approximate incidence of 1 in 200,000. This patient complained of abdominal distension and was diagnosed with a giant mesenteric cyst measuring 26 cm in height using CT imaging. She underwent a successful ultrasound-guided drainage, which is not previously reported in the literature. This represents utilisation of an established procedure in a novel situation.

  8. Giant bladder diverticulum presenting with recurrent acute urinary retention--a rare event in adult patients: case report.

    PubMed

    Petito, Luigi; Lurati, Massimo; Verbo, Alessandro; Manno, Alberto; Pedretti, Giorgio; Coco, Claudio

    2006-01-01

    Acquired giant bladder diverticula of obstructive genesis are not particularly unusual. On the other hand, acute urinary retention due to bladder diverticula is an extremely rare event in adult patients, since most cases are paediatric. A 40-year-old white male with a history of invasive urological procedures presented with recurrent acute urinary retention. Diagnostic procedures including cystourethrography and cystoscopy revealed a giant bladder diverticulum causing ab extrinseco compression of the urethra. The iatrogenic aetiology of the vicious circle of chronic urethral obstruction and increased luminal pressure promoting diverticular growth is discussed.

  9. Finite amplitude method applied to the giant dipole resonance in heavy rare-earth nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oishi, Tomohiro; Kortelainen, Markus; Hinohara, Nobuo

    2016-03-01

    Background: The quasiparticle random phase approximation (QRPA), within the framework of nuclear density functional theory (DFT), has been a standard tool to access the collective excitations of atomic nuclei. Recently, the finite amplitude method (FAM) was developed in order to perform the QRPA calculations efficiently without any truncation on the two-quasiparticle model space. Purpose: We discuss the nuclear giant dipole resonance (GDR) in heavy rare-earth isotopes, for which the conventional matrix diagonalization of the QRPA is numerically demanding. A role of the Thomas-Reiche-Kuhn (TRK) sum rule enhancement factor, connected to the isovector effective mass, is also investigated. Methods: The electric dipole photoabsorption cross section was calculated within a parallelized FAM-QRPA scheme. We employed the Skyrme energy density functional self-consistently in the DFT calculation for the ground states and FAM-QRPA calculation for the excitations. Results: The mean GDR frequency and width are mostly reproduced with the FAM-QRPA, when compared to experimental data, although some deficiency is observed with isotopes heavier than erbium. A role of the TRK enhancement factor in actual GDR strength is clearly shown: its increment leads to a shift of the GDR strength to higher-energy region, without a significant change in the transition amplitudes. Conclusions: The newly developed FAM-QRPA scheme shows remarkable efficiency, which enables one to perform systematic analysis of GDR for heavy rare-earth nuclei. The theoretical deficiency of the photoabsorption cross section could not be improved by only adjusting the TRK enhancement factor, suggesting the necessity of an approach beyond self-consistent QRPA and/or a more systematic optimization of the energy density functional (EDF) parameters.

  10. Synovial sarcomna of larynx-a rare site.

    PubMed

    Sridhar Reddy, D; Shobhan Babu, A; Lenin, A

    2007-03-01

    Synovial sarcoma is a soft tissue sarcoma of unknown histiogenesis and occurs predominantly in the lower limbs of young adults and the head and neck is a relatively rare site, there are about 10 cases with laryngeal localization in the world literature. We present a 52 year old male with synovial sarcoma of larynx. Total laryngectomy was done and patient is free from disease till date.

  11. Dentigerous cyst in an uncommon site: a rare entity.

    PubMed

    Bharath, K P; Revathy, V; Poornima, S; Subba Reddy, V V

    2011-12-01

    Trauma to the deciduous teeth may have severe consequences. Pulp necrosis is the commonly observed sequel in traumatized primary teeth and is one of the possible etiologic factors for the development of dentigerous cyst. Dentigerous cyst is more commonly seen in mandibular third molar and maxillary canine region and is rarely associated with other teeth. This article addresses a case of dentigerous cyst associated with the germ of upper permanent central incisor, an uncommon site of occurrence, which was impacted, dislodged from its natural site of eruption after trauma to the predecessor incisor.

  12. A rare case of giant occipital meningocele with Dandy Walker Syndrome: Can it grow bigger than this?

    PubMed Central

    Mankotia, Dipanker Singh; Satyarthee, Guru Dutta; Singh, Bhoopendra; Sharma, Bhawani Shankar

    2016-01-01

    Association of Dandy–Walker syndrome with occipital meningocele (OMC) is extremely rare and about thirty cases are reported till date in the Western literature. However, OMC is classified by Talamonti et al. into small, large, and giant categories with respective diameters were upto 5 cm in small, large with 5–9 cm, and giant with >9 cm. Usually the size of OMC progressively increases as raised intracranial pressure leads to compensatory cerebrospinal fluid escape into sac with the growth of children. Authors report an interesting case of an 18-month-old female child with extra-gigantic OMC, whose size was almost same since birth, representing the first case of its kind, who underwent successful surgical repair. Clinical presentation, radiological features, and surgical management options in literature are reviewed briefly for this rare disease association. PMID:28217162

  13. Giant mesenteric cyst: a rare cause of abdominal distension diagnosed with CT and managed with ultrasound-guided drainage

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Alexander; Ayre, Karyn; Wijeyekoon, Sanjaya

    2012-01-01

    This rare cystic lesion has an approximate incidence of 1 in 200 000. This patient complained of abdominal distension and was diagnosed with a giant mesenteric cyst measuring 26 cm in height using CT imaging. She underwent a successful ultrasound-guided drainage, which is not previously reported in the literature. This represents utilisation of an established procedure in a novel situation. PMID:22948982

  14. Giant Osteoma of Mandible Causing Dyspnea: A Rare Case Presentation and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, Hassan Mirmohammad; Shamloo, Nafise; Taghavi, Nasim; Safi, Yaser; Aghdashi, Farzad; Ismaeilnejad, Mohammad

    2015-09-01

    Osteomas are benign slow growing tumors of bone. Tumors are usually asymptomatic until they attain remarkable size and cause asymmetry or dysfunction. In view of few reported cases of giant osteoma of mandible, this article presents a case of giant osteoma of left mandible in a 53-year old male causing dyspnea due to compression of air way space.

  15. Metastasis at the colostomy site: a rare case report.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Yi-Hung; Chin, Chih-Chien; Lee, Kam-Fai

    2012-08-01

    Metastasis at the colostomy site is rare. Most reported patients with such metastases undergo abdominoperineal resection and this kind of metastases happened after a longer period post-cancer surgery. In our patient, because it happened during a short interval between rectal cancer surgery and stoma closure, colostomy site metastasis probably occurred owing to ablative cancer cell reflux and seeding from the obstruction during decompressive colostomy rather than local, lymphatic or haematogenous spread. Meticulous histologic analyses to rule out undetected, concomitant polyps and metachronous cancer are very important for patients with obstructive colorectal cancer who undergo decompressive colostomy. The potential risk of colostomy site metastasis during staged surgery for obstructive colorectal cancer remains uncertain; however, the result from this case report raises the question of such a risk for further studies in a greater number of patients.

  16. Acute upper limb ischemia, a rare presentation of giant cell arteritis.

    PubMed

    Almeida-Morais, Luís; Galego, Sofia; Marques, Nélia; Pack, Tiago; Rodrigues, Hugo; Abreu, Rodolfo; Vasconcelos, Leonor; Marques, Hugo; Sousa Guerreiro, António

    2016-04-01

    Giant cell arteritis (GCA) is a systemic large vessel vasculitis, with extracranial arterial involvement described in 10-15% of cases, usually affecting the aorta and its branches. Patients with GCA are more likely to develop aortic aneurysms, but these are rarely present at the time of the diagnosis. We report the case of an 80-year-old Caucasian woman, who reported proximal muscle pain in the arms with morning stiffness of the shoulders for eight months. In the previous two months, she had developed worsening bilateral arm claudication, severe pain, cold extremities and digital necrosis. She had no palpable radial pulses and no measurable blood pressure. The patient had normochromic anemia, erythrocyte sedimentation rate of 120 mm/h, and a negative infectious and autoimmune workup. Computed tomography angiography revealed concentric wall thickening of the aorta extending to the aortic arch branches, particularly the subclavian and axillary arteries, which were severely stenotic, with areas of bilateral occlusion and an aneurysm of the ascending aorta (47 mm). Despite corticosteroid therapy there was progression to acute critical ischemia. She accordingly underwent surgical revascularization using a bilateral carotid-humeral bypass. After surgery, corticosteroid therapy was maintained and at six-month follow-up she was clinically stable with reduced inflammatory markers. GCA, usually a chronic benign vasculitis, presented exceptionally in this case as acute critical upper limb ischemia, resulting from a massive inflammatory process of the subclavian and axillary arteries, treated with salvage surgical revascularization. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  17. A rare complication of colonic diverticulosis: giant diverticulum. Case report and overview of pathophysiology, diagnosis and therapeutic options.

    PubMed

    Vanderstappen, J H H; Hoofwijk, A G M; Sikkink, C J J M

    2014-01-01

    A rare complication of diverticulosis of the colon is giant colonic diverticulum, an entity first described by Bonvin in 1946. The experience of any surgeon with this problem is at the most still small and reported management in the literature has been varied. We present the case of a 84-year-old woman presenting with a painless abdominal mass and constipation. A 30 x 10 cm gas-filled cyst was discovered on abdominal X-ray and CT examination. Furthermore, we provide an overview of pathophysiology, diagnosis and therapeutic options.

  18. Hoarseness of voice, respiratory distress and dysphagia due to giant primary posterior mediastinal ectopic goitre: a rare clinical entity.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, Ikram Ulhaq; Cheema, Ahsan Iqbal; AlShamasi, Zahra; Mutairi, Hadi

    2016-04-25

    Primary posterior mediastinal ectopic goitre is an extremely rare entity; we report a case of a 28-year-old man who presented with dysphagia, respiratory distress and hoarseness of voice, gradually worsening over a period of 3 months. CT scan of the thorax revealed a giant posterior mediastinal ectopic goitre. The mass was removed through a right posterolateral thoracotomy. The patient's symptoms, respiratory distress and dysphagia disappeared immediately after surgery while his voice gradually returned to normal after 6 weeks.

  19. Post Surgical Giant Epidermal Inclusion Cyst of the Lid and Orbit- A Rare Case.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Salil Kumar; Mandal, Aparna; Bandyopadhya, Arghya

    2015-09-01

    Epidermoid cyst within the lid and orbit is extremely rare. Epidermoid tumours are inclusion of ectodermal elements in the site not normally containing these structures. It is of two types; primary type related to implantation of ectoderm at the time of closure of the neural groove and secondary type caused by post traumatic inclusion of the surface epithelium. A 45-year-old male had complaint of swelling on the right upper lid and orbital region. It first appeared two years back. It was painless progressively increased in size and shape. There was difficulty in opening of eye lid due to large swelling, feeling of heaviness in the right upper lid and occasional headache. There was history of right eye ocular infection following vegetative matter injury three years back. Evisceration of right eye was done for aforementioned reason. USG report shows cystic encapsulated mass with calcification foci in right upper lid-orbital region with fat component. MRI right orbit shows fairly large hyperintense cystic lesion seen involving right orbit with posterior extension up to optic canal. No intracranial extension. FNAC confirmed epidermal inclusion cyst. We did upper lid reconstruction with removal of mass. We have successfully removed the mass without any complication and with one year follow-up there is no recurrence.

  20. Surgical site infection after thyroidectomy: a rare but significant complication

    PubMed Central

    Elfenbein, Dawn M.; Schneider, David F.; Chen, Herbert; Sippel, Rebecca S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Surgical site infections (SSIs) after thyroidectomy are rare but can have significant consequences. Thyroidectomy is a clean case, and the patterns for use of prophylactic antibiotics vary. We hypothesized that patient and operative characteristics may predict a higher risk of SSI, and that SSI are associated with other complications leading to increased resource utilization. Methods Data from the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program dataset for patients who underwent thyroidectomy through cervical incisions from 2005–2011 were included. Bivariate analysis using t-tests and chi-square tests were performed, and variables with P < 0.2 were considered for inclusion in a multivariate logistic regression model. Results A total of 49,326 patients underwent thyroidectomy from 2005–2011 and 179 (0.36%) had an SSI. On multivariate analysis, the strongest predictors of SSI were operative time (P < 0.001) and wound classification clean-contaminated (odds ratio 6.1; 95% confidence interval, 3.6, 10.3). Preoperative factors associated with SSI on multivariate analysis had lower magnitudes of influence on SSI risk but included obesity, alcohol use, and nonindependent functional status. Patients with SSI were more likely to have a wound dehiscence, renal insufficiency, bleeding requiring transfusion, and return to the operating room on a multivariate model of outcomes. Conclusions Although rare, SSI after thyroidectomy are associated with other postoperative complications. We have identified preoperative and intraoperative factors that are associated with SSI, and this may help identify high-risk patients who may benefit from selective use of antibiotics. PMID:24739508

  1. Giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath: a rare periungual location simulating myxoid cyst*

    PubMed Central

    Minotto, Renan; Rodrigues, Camila Britto; Grill, Aline Barcellos; Furian, Roque

    2017-01-01

    Giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath is a benign soft tissue tumor most frequent between the third and fifth decades of life. It can mimic and make differential diagnoses with several hand tumors. Definitive diagnosis and the treatment of choice are reached with complete resection and histopathological examination. Here we describe a case with clinical presentation similar to that of a myxoid cyst. PMID:28225971

  2. Giant Inguinoscrotal Hernia—Report of a Rare Case With Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Karthikeyan, Vilvapathy Senguttuvan; Sistla, Sarath Chandra; Ram, Duvuru; Ali, Sheik Manwar; Rajkumar, Nagarajan

    2014-01-01

    Massive inguinoscrotal hernias extending below the midpoint of the inner thigh, in the standing position constitute giant inguinoscrotal hernias. We report a patient who presented with giant right inguinal hernia with bilateral hydrocele for 25 years. He had no cardiorespiratory illnesses. He was taken up for surgery under general anesthesia after preoperative respiratory exercises. Sliding hernia with entire greater omentum, small bowel, and appendix as contents was identified. Meshplasty after omentectomy with bilateral subtotal excision of sac, right orchidectomy, and scrotoplasty were done. Giant inguinoscrotal hernias pose significant problems while replacing bowel contents because of the increase in intraabdominal and intrathoracic pressures. Recurrence is another complication seen after successful surgical management. Various techniques such as preoperative pneumoperitoneum, debulking abdominal contents with extensive bowel resections, or omentectomy and phrenectomy have been tried. Postoperative elective ventilation is also needed in many cases. We describe simple reduction with omentectomy as a viable technique in this patient. He did not need elective ventilation due to preoperative respiratory exercises and preparation and review of the literature. PMID:25216421

  3. Giant Lymph Node Hyperplasia (Castleman's Disease) as a Rare Cause of Back Pain.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyoung-Han; Kim, Sang-Dae; Kim, Se-Hoon; Park, Jung-Yul

    2008-03-01

    Giant lymph node hyperplasia (Castleman's disease) is a nonneoplastic lymphoproliferative disorder of unknown etiology that usually occurs in the chest. Its morphological recognition is based on a composition of various histological features. The mass is often asymptomatic, but it can cause nonspecific thoracic symptoms, such as regional pain. This disease can be found wherever lymph nodes are present, but two-thirds of these tumors are found in the chest, along the tracheobronchial tree in the mediastinum or lung hilus. However, we experienced an unusual case of Castleman's disease as a cause of back pain that was localized in the posterior mediastinum bordering the chest wall.

  4. Giant Lymph Node Hyperplasia (Castleman's Disease) as a Rare Cause of Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyoung-Han; Kim, Se-Hoon; Park, Jung-Yul

    2008-01-01

    Giant lymph node hyperplasia (Castleman's disease) is a nonneoplastic lymphoproliferative disorder of unknown etiology that usually occurs in the chest. Its morphological recognition is based on a composition of various histological features. The mass is often asymptomatic, but it can cause nonspecific thoracic symptoms, such as regional pain. This disease can be found wherever lymph nodes are present, but two-thirds of these tumors are found in the chest, along the tracheobronchial tree in the mediastinum or lung hilus. However, we experienced an unusual case of Castleman's disease as a cause of back pain that was localized in the posterior mediastinum bordering the chest wall. PMID:19096628

  5. Donor-site giant cell reaction following backfill with synthetic bone material during osteochondral plug transfer.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Donald E; Hart, Joseph M; Hart, Jennifer A; Miller, Mark D

    2009-10-01

    Osteochondral defects are common in younger, active patients. Multiple strategies have been used to treat these lesions, including microfracture and osteochondral plug transfer. We describe a patient experiencing chronic knee pain and a full-thickness cartilage defect on the lateral femoral condyle. After failing conservative management and microfracture surgery, the patient underwent osteochondral autograft plug transfer, with backfilling of the donor sites using synthetic bone graft substitute. Initial recovery was uncomplicated until the patient experienced pain following a twist of the knee. Magnetic resonance imaging for the subsequent knee injury revealed poor healing at the donor sites. The donor sites were debrided, and specimens revealed a foreign body giant cell reaction. Donor-site morbidity is of primary concern during osteochondral plug transfer; however, insufficient data exist to support the use of synthetic bone graft material. Our results indicate that off-label use of synthetic bone graft substitute during a primary procedure requires further investigation.

  6. Formation of carbonatite-related giant rare-earth-element deposits by the recycling of marine sediments

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Zengqian; Liu, Yan; Tian, Shihong; Yang, Zhiming; Xie, Yuling

    2015-01-01

    Carbonatite-associated rare-earth-element (REE) deposits are the most significant source of the world’s REEs; however, their genesis remains unclear. Here, we present new Sr-Nd-Pb and C-O isotopic data for Cenozoic carbonatite-hosted giant REE deposits in southwest China. These REE deposits are located along the western margin of the Yangtze Craton that experienced Proterozoic lithospheric accretion, and controlled by Cenozoic strike-slip faults related to Indo-Asian continental collision. The Cenozoic carbonatites were emplaced as stocks or dykes with associated syenites, and tend to be extremely enriched in Ba, Sr, and REEs and have high 87Sr/86Sr ratios (>0.7055). These carbonatites were likely formed by melting of the sub-continental lithospheric mantle (SCLM), which had been previously metasomatized by high-flux REE- and CO2-rich fluids derived from subducted marine sediments. The fertility of these carbonatites depends on the release of REEs from recycled marine sediments and on the intensity of metasomatic REE refertilization of the SCLM. We suggest that cratonic edges, particularly along ancient convergent margins, possess the optimal configuration for generating giant REE deposits; therefore, areas of metamorphic basement bounded or cut by translithospheric faults along cratonic edges have a high potential for such deposits. PMID:26035414

  7. Fatal spontaneous subdural bleeding due to neonatal giant cell hepatitis: a rare differential diagnosis of shaken baby syndrome.

    PubMed

    Guddat, Saskia S; Ehrlich, Edwin; Martin, Hubert; Tsokos, Michael

    2011-09-01

    A 7-week-old girl showed vomiting after feeding, facial pallor, loss of muscle tone and respiratory depression. An emergency doctor performed successful resuscitation and after arrival in hospital, cranial ultrasound showed left-sided subdural hemorrhage, cerebral edema with a shift of the midline, and a decrease in cerebral perfusion. Ophthalmologic examination showed retinal hemorrhage. In view of this, the doctors suspected shaken baby syndrome and approached the parents with their suspicions, but they denied any shaking or trauma. Despite surgery for the subdural hemorrhage the girl died a few hours later with a severe coagulopathy. Autopsy verified subdural hemorrhage, cerebral edema and retinal hemorrhage, but also revealed intact bridging veins and a lack of optic nerve sheath hemorrhage, therefore shaken baby syndrome could not be proven by autopsy. Histological examination showed severe neonatal giant cell hepatitis as the cause of the severe coagulopathy and the associated spontaneous subdural bleeding. Neonatal giant cell hepatitis may be responsible for unexpected deaths in infancy and, although rarely associated with subdural bleeding, must be considered as a potential differential diagnosis of shaken baby syndrome.

  8. Undifferentiated carcinoma of the pancreas with osteoclast-like giant cells: a rare case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Sah, Shambhu K; Li, Ying; Li, Yongmei

    2015-01-01

    Undifferentiated carcinoma of the pancreas with osteoclast-like giant cells (UCPOGC) is an extremely rare non-endocrine pancreatic tumor. To date, some cases have been reported, however, histogenesis and biologic behavior of UCPOGC remain controversial. We report a case of an UCPOGC in a 54-year-old female, who presented with a three-month history of recurrent abdominal pain without any incentive. Abdominal computed tomography (CT) revealed a large cystic mass of 10.5 × 9.3 cm in the body and tail of the pancreas compressing the adjacent bowel loop and stomach. The preliminary diagnosis was considered as a malignant tumor of body and tail of the pancreas. The patient had open distal pancreatic mass resection with splenectomy and according to the results of histopathological and immunohistochemical studies, the diagnosis of an UCPOGC was established.

  9. Giant pulmonary teratoma with huge splenic lymphangiomatosis: a very rare case.

    PubMed

    Alsubaie, Hemail M; Alsubaie, Khaled M; Mahfouz, Mohammed Eid

    2017-09-01

    Teratomas are tumors composed of tissues derived from more than one germ cell line. They manifested with a great variety of clinical and radiological features. We report a case of a giant left hemithorax teratoma in a female with huge spleen tumor and review the relevant literature. A 38-year-old female with progressively aggravating dyspnea at rest from a mild trauma. Absent breath sounds on the left side. There was splenomegaly. Computed tomography scan revealed a huge mass (20 × 15 × 18 cm), containing elements of heterogeneous density in the left hemithorax. The spleen tumor was occupying most of the spleen without any other abdominal manifestations. The patient underwent left thoracotomy and laparoscopic splenectomy. Histopathological examination revealed a benign mature teratoma and cystic lymphangiomatosis of the spleen. To the best of our knowledge and after reviewing the available literature this is the first case of huge mature pulmonary teratoma with large cystic spleen lymphangiomatosis.

  10. Rare case of giant cystic adenomyoma mimicking a uterine malformation, diagnosed and treated by hysteroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pontrelli, Giovanni; Bounous, Valentina Elisabetta; Scarperi, Stefano; Minelli, Luca; Di Spiezio Sardo, Attilio; Florio, Pasquale

    2015-08-01

    We describe a case of giant cystic uterine adenomyoma that was diagnosed and treated by hysteroscopy. In a 27-year-old woman with menometrorrhagia, severe dysmenorrhea, and chronic pelvic pain, pelvic ultrasonography revealed an enlarged uterine cavity filled with homogeneous low echogenic fluid content. A large cornual hematometra of 8.0 cm in diameter in a bicornuate uterus was suspected, and this hypothesis was also supported by magnetic resonance imaging findings. On the contrary, hysteroscopy revealed a bilocular huge cystic lesion of the posterior uterine wall that was removed by means of monopolar loop resection. The operative finding and the histopathologic examination confirmed the diagnosis of cystic adenomyoma of the uterus. Hysteroscopy may represent a valid tool for diagnosis and minimally invasive treatment of cystic adenomyoma, including those of large volume. Its use is helpful in differential diagnosis between cystic adenomyoma and uterine malformations as a possible cause of pelvic pain.

  11. A rare case of giant multicystic solitary fibrous tumor of the orbit.

    PubMed

    Alam, Shahid; Backiavathy, Varsha; Mukherjee, Bipasha; Subramanian, Krishnakumar

    2017-08-17

    Solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) is a rare spindle cell tumor of the orbit of mesenchymal origin. Though these tumors are mostly solid, partial or complete cystic changes can rarely occur. Only six such previous cases of cystic fibrous tumor of the orbit have been mentioned in the literature. We report a case of an elderly male who presented with a huge left sided medial orbital mass. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a predominant cystic orbital mass separated by septae and suggested a diagnosis of Hydatid cyst. The patient underwent complete excision of the mass and histopathology and immunohistochemistry were suggestive of cystic SFT. Cystic degeneration in SFT is extremely rare and can be a harbinger of malignancy, and pose risk of recurrence. Close follow up and monitoring is required for all such cases.

  12. Giant pericardial cyst in a 5-year-old child: A rare anomaly

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sanjay; Jain, Promil; Sen, Rajeev; Rattan, KN; Agarwal, Ruchi; Garg, Shilpa

    2011-01-01

    Pericardial cysts are uncommon congenital abnormalities that occur in the middle mediastinum. Most of these are found incidentally on chest x-rays. The occurrence of pericardial cyst in children is quite rare. It needs to be differentiated from other cystic mediastinal masses. A rare case of pericardial cyst in a 5 year old male child is reported. The child presented with chest pain, cough and fever. The preoperative diagnosis of pericardial cyst was suggestive on echocardiography and CT scan. It was confirmed on histopathology after successful surgical excision. The rarity of this benign mediastinal lesion in children prompted us to report this case. PMID:21677811

  13. Giant mesenteric lymphangioma: a rare cause of a life-threatening complication in an adult

    PubMed Central

    Siddique, Khurram; Bhandari, Santosh; Basu, Sanjoy

    2010-01-01

    Mesenteric cyst lymphangiomas (MCLs) are rare benign tumours of unknown aetiology seen mostly in children. Clinical presentation can be diverse ranging from incidental abdominal cysts to an acute abdomen. A 24-year-old previously fit and healthy young man presented with a 2-week history of cramping, central abdominal pain and vomiting requiring acute hospital admission. He was a diagnostic conundrum despite extensive preoperative investigations. Recurring symptoms required urgent surgical exploration, resection and histological confirmation with a successful outcome. We review the literature and present here this rare case in an adult of MCL that has the potential to grow, invade and develop major life-threatening complications. PMID:22778193

  14. Giant mesenteric lymphangioma: a rare cause of a life-threatening complication in an adult.

    PubMed

    Siddique, Khurram; Bhandari, Santosh; Basu, Sanjoy

    2010-09-07

    Mesenteric cyst lymphangiomas (MCLs) are rare benign tumours of unknown aetiology seen mostly in children. Clinical presentation can be diverse ranging from incidental abdominal cysts to an acute abdomen. A 24-year-old previously fit and healthy young man presented with a 2-week history of cramping, central abdominal pain and vomiting requiring acute hospital admission. He was a diagnostic conundrum despite extensive preoperative investigations. Recurring symptoms required urgent surgical exploration, resection and histological confirmation with a successful outcome. We review the literature and present here this rare case in an adult of MCL that has the potential to grow, invade and develop major life-threatening complications.

  15. A rare case of asymptomatic bilateral submandibular gland sialolithiasis: a giant, fistulized calculus on the right and multiple calculi on the left.

    PubMed

    Emir, Hatice; Kaptan, Zeynep Kizilkaya; Uzunkulaoglu, Hakki; Dogan, Sedat

    2010-10-01

    Sialolithiasis is the most common disease of the submandibular gland; sialoliths account for at least 80% of all salivary duct calculi. We present a rare case of asymptomatic bilateral submandibular gland sialoliths. On the right, the patient had a giant (35 × 35 mm) sialolith that had fistulized into the oral cavity. In the left submandibular gland, he had 30 differently sized sialoliths.

  16. Pediatric giant cell glioblastoma: New insights into a rare tumor entity

    PubMed Central

    Karremann, Michael; Butenhoff, Sandra; Rausche, Ulrike; Pietsch, Torsten; Wolff, Johannes E. A.; Kramm, Christof M.

    2009-01-01

    Little is known about giant cell glioblastoma (GCG) in pediatric patients. The present study identified 18 pediatric patients with centrally reviewed GCG from the HIT-GBM database of the Gesellschaft für Paediatrische Onkologie und Haematologie in Germany, Austria, and Switzerland. Clinical and epidemiological data were compared with those of 178 pediatric patients with centrally reviewed glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) from the same database. In this unique series, median age, male preference, and median clinical history did not differ significantly between pediatric GCG and GBM patients. GCG showed a stronger predilection for cerebral hemispheres than did GBM, which may only partly explain the higher percentage of gross total tumor resections in GCG patients. Most surprising, the widely distributed hypothesis that GCG may imply a better prognosis than GBM could not be substantiated for our pediatric series. Future studies with larger patient numbers and molecular pathological analyses are still needed to corroborate the present findings and further elucidate the biology of GCG in children. PMID:19050301

  17. Prolapsed giant sigmoid lipoma: a rare cause of adult ischaemic intussusception.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Mark; Martin, Jennifer; Mullan, Fred

    2014-05-22

    Intussusception is a rare cause of obstruction in adults and has a variable, non-specific presentation. Adult intussusception is usually associated with an underlying organic pathology, such as a benign or malignant tumour which acts as the lead point. Prolapse of the lead-point mass through the anal canal is an extremely rare presentation with very few reported cases in the literature. We describe a case of a 67-year-old man who presented with rectal prolapse of a large soft tissue mass. CT of the abdomen and barium enema revealed partial intussusception of an upper sigmoid lipomatous polyp. Examination under anaesthesia was performed and the prolapse reduced. A laparoscopic sigmoid colectomy was planned. The patient subsequently re-presented clinically unwell with a recurrent necrotic prolapsing mass. Laparotomy and sigmoid colectomy was performed and the patient recovered fully. The resected mass was a 7×4.5×4.0 cm necrotic sigmoid lipoma. 2014 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  18. Breast lumps: a rare site for rheumatoid nodules

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Hiam; Vidya, Raghavan

    2015-01-01

    Granulomatous mastitis (GM) of the breast is a rare benign inflammatory disease and its presentation closely mimics breast cancer. Its diagnosis is mainly based on histology and there is no consensus agreement regarding its management. We report a case of a 60-year-old woman presenting with a right breast lump associated with a history of rheumatoid arthritis and raised rheumatoid factor. Following triple assessment (history and examination, imaging and biopsy), GM was diagnosed and she was treated conservatively. PMID:25903203

  19. Giant piezoresistive on/off ratios in rare-earth chalcogenide thin films enabling nanomechanical switching.

    PubMed

    Copel, M; Kuroda, M A; Gordon, M S; Liu, X-H; Mahajan, S S; Martyna, G J; Moumen, N; Armstrong, C; Rossnagel, S M; Shaw, T M; Solomon, P M; Theis, T N; Yurkas, J J; Zhu, Y; Newns, D M

    2013-10-09

    Sophisticated microelectromechanical systems for device and sensor applications have flourished in the past decade. These devices exploit piezoelectric, capacitive, and piezoresistive effects, and coupling between them. However, high-performance piezoresistivity (as defined by on/off ratio) has primarily been observed in macroscopic single crystals. In this Letter, we show for the first time that rare-earth monochalcogenides in thin film form can modulate a current by more than 1000 times due to a pressure-induced insulator to metal transition. Furthermore, films as thin as 8 nm show a piezoresistive response. The combination of high performance and scalability make these promising candidates for nanoscale applications, such as the recently proposed piezoelectronic transistor (PET). The PET would mechanically couple a piezoelectric thin film with a piezoresistive switching layer, potentially scaling to higher speeds and lower powers than today's complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor technology.

  20. Breast lumps: a rare site for rheumatoid nodules.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Fahad Mujtaba; Ali, Hiam; Vidya, Raghavan

    2015-04-22

    Granulomatous mastitis (GM) of the breast is a rare benign inflammatory disease and its presentation closely mimics breast cancer. Its diagnosis is mainly based on histology and there is no consensus agreement regarding its management. We report a case of a 60-year-old woman presenting with a right breast lump associated with a history of rheumatoid arthritis and raised rheumatoid factor. Following triple assessment (history and examination, imaging and biopsy), GM was diagnosed and she was treated conservatively. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  1. Giant ectopic liver, hepatocellular carcinoma and pachydermia-a rare genetic syndrome?

    PubMed

    Dettmer, Matthias; Itin, Peter; Miny, Peter; Gandhi, Manoj; Cathomas, Gieri; Willi, Niels

    2011-08-10

    Ectopic liver is a very uncommon developmental anomaly that predisposes to the development of hepatocellular carcinoma. We describe the second documented case of a hepatocellular carcinoma developing in the primary liver of a patient with a rare and uncharacterized genetic symptom complex. Also present was the largest ectopic liver ever reported, measuring 12 cm in diameter which contained a solitary focus of metastatic hepatocellular carcinoma. The primary hepatocellular carcinoma is believed to have arisen in the native liver from a hepatic adenoma that was diagnosed 15 years earlier. The patient's uncharacterised condition featured prominent thick, yellow skin over the dorsum of the fingers, and was associated with follicular hyperkeratosis, abnormal plantar creases, digital clubbing, misshaped ears, a lingua plicata and an angioleiomyolipoma of the right kidney. This unique case of hepatocellular carcinoma arising from liver cell adenoma in a patient with an uncharacterised condition featuring a large ectopic liver invites discussion of the role of local factors in carcinogenesis in the parent liver but not the ectopic liver. It also underlines the imperative ongoing need for clinical autopsies.

  2. Orientations and other features of the Neolithic 'giants' churches' of Finland from on-site and lidar observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridderstad, M. P.

    2015-07-01

    The orientations and placement of 52 Neolithic stone enclosures in Finland known as 'Giants' Churches' were analysed. In addition, other characteristic features, such as cairns and standing stones in or near the Giants' Churches, were investigated. The axis and gate orientations of the structures were measured using both on-site and airborne laser scanning (lidar) observations. The results showed lidar observations to be useful in archaeoastronomical analysis as a complementary tool to be used with on-site measurements and observations. The Giants' Churches were found to be orientations towards certain solar and lunar events that could have acted as 'seasonal pointers'. The orientations of the gates of the GCs were found to replicate the axis orientations to a large degree. The majority (over 90%) of the GCs were positioned on the eastern or southeastern side of the ridge they were built on, indicating the interest of the builders in the eastern horizon and possibly the rising of celestial bodies. The orientations of large (>35-m long) Giants' Churches and small (≤35-m long) ones were compared. The observed differences in the orientations of these two groups suggested that the structures traditionally known as Giants' Churches may be a heterogeneous group consisting of at least two types of structures represented in this study by the two selected size groups. Many large GCs were found to have been oriented towards the solstices, while the smaller ones did not show this feature. It is possible that the smaller Giants' Churches were oriented towards the Moon, while the larger ones were associated to solar events. The smaller Giants' Churches could be the remains of large houses or otherwise belong to a different tradition of construction.

  3. Laryngeal lymphoma: the high and low grades of rare lymphoma involvement sites.

    PubMed

    Azzopardi, Charles Paul; Degaetano, James; Betts, Alexandra; Farrugia, Eric; Magri, Claude; Refalo, Nicholas; Gatt, Alexander; Camilleri, David J

    2014-01-01

    The larynx is an extremely rare site of involvement by lymphomatous disease. We present two cases of isolated laryngeal high-grade and another low-grade lymphoma, together with a literature review of laryngeal lymphoma management.

  4. Hanford Site Rare Plant Monitoring Report for Calendar Year 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Salstrom, D; Easterly, R; Lindsey, Cole T.; Nugent, John J.

    2013-03-21

    Two patches of Columbian yellowcress on the Hanford Reach were visited in both 2011 and 2012 to compare ramet counts between years: near Allerd Pumphouse (Rkm 615.4) and near White Bluffs Boat Launch (Rkm 593.3) (Figure 3). In 2012, the population near Allerd Pumphouse had 45 ramets present within a 5x3 m area. At the same population in 2011, there were 60 ramets. In 2012, the population near White Bluffs Boat Launch had 105 ramets in a 2x2 m area. At the same population in 2011, there were 100 ramets. This data shows that while annual variability does exist, ramet counts were relatively similar from 2011 to 2012. This is likely due to the similar flow regimes of 2011 and 2012, which both had above average snowpack, high flows, and extended spring flooding seasons. A total of 19.6 miles (31.5 km) of the Hanford shoreline were surveyed in 2012, with ten patches identified and approximately 1,250 ramets counted. It is not known how many individual plants this count represents due to the rhizomatous nature of the species. Two of these sites were identified previously in the WNHP database, and the remaining eight were newly identified locations. Eleven of the ramets had flowers and/or buds in the patches located during 2012, but no fruits were found

  5. Control of the active site structure of giant bilayer hemoglobin from the Annelid Eisenia foetida using hierarchic assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Girasole, Marco; Arcovito, Alessandro; Marconi, Augusta; Davoli, Camilla; Congiu-Castellano, Agostina; Bellelli, Andrea; Amiconi, Gino

    2005-12-05

    The active site structure of the oxygenated derivative of the main subassemblies (whole protein, dodecamers, and trimers) of the giant haemoglobin from Eisenia foetida has been characterized by x-ray absorption near edge structure spectroscopy. The data revealed a remarkable effect of the hierarchic assemblies on the active site of the subunit. Specifically, the whole protein has the same site structure of the dodecamer, while a sharp conformational transition occurs when the dodecamer is disassembled into trimers (and monomers) revealing that constraints due to the protein matrix determine the active site geometry and, consequently, the protein function in these large complexes.

  6. Control of the active site structure of giant bilayer hemoglobin from the Annelid Eisenia foetida using hierarchic assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girasole, Marco; Arcovito, Alessandro; Marconi, Augusta; Davoli, Camilla; Congiu-Castellano, Agostina; Bellelli, Andrea; Amiconi, Gino

    2005-12-01

    The active site structure of the oxygenated derivative of the main subassemblies (whole protein, dodecamers, and trimers) of the giant haemoglobin from Eisenia foetida has been characterized by x-ray absorption near edge structure spectroscopy. The data revealed a remarkable effect of the hierarchic assemblies on the active site of the subunit. Specifically, the whole protein has the same site structure of the dodecamer, while a sharp conformational transition occurs when the dodecamer is disassembled into trimers (and monomers) revealing that constraints due to the protein matrix determine the active site geometry and, consequently, the protein function in these large complexes.

  7. Initial computational fluid dynamics modeling of the Giant Magellan Telescope site and enclosure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danks, Ryan; Smeaton, William; Bigelow, Bruce; Burgett, William

    2016-08-01

    In the era of extremely large telescopes (ELTs), with telescope apertures growing in size and tighter image quality requirements, maintaining a controlled observation environment is critical. Image quality is directly influenced by thermal gradients, the level of turbulence in the incoming air flow and the wind forces acting on the telescope. Thus any ELT enclosure must be able to modulate the speed and direction of the incoming air and limit the inflow of disturbed ground-layer air. However, gaining an a priori understanding of the wind environment's impacts on a proposed telescope is complicated by the fact that telescopes are usually located in remote, mountainous areas, which often do not have high quality historic records of the wind conditions, and can be subjected to highly complex flow patterns that may not be well represented by the traditional analytic approaches used in typical building design. As part of the design process for the Giant Magellan Telescope at Cerro Las Campanas, Chile; the authors conducted a parametric design study using computational fluid dynamics which assessed how the telescope's position on the mesa, its ventilation configuration and the design of the enclosure and windscreens could be optimized to minimize the infiltration of ground-layer air. These simulations yielded an understanding of how the enclosure and the natural wind flows at the site could best work together to provide a consistent, well controlled observation environment. Future work will seek to quantify the aerothermal environment in terms of image quality.

  8. Melanotic neuroectodermal tumor of infancy: Cytology and histopathology of a rare lesion at an uncommon site.

    PubMed

    Batta, Nishant; Narang, Vikram; Kaur, Harpreet; Selhi, Pavneet Kaur; Sood, Neena

    2016-11-07

    Melanotic neuroectodermal tumour of infancy is a rare, pigmented neoplasm generally arising in infants during the first year of life. The cytological features are rarely described in the literature. This case due to its rarity and unusual site emphasising the cytopathological features and the necessity of histology for differentiating it from other round cell tumours has been presented. Diagn. Cytopathol. 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Primary Retroperitoneal Melanoma Presented in a Rare Extracutaneous Site for Malignant Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Alsharedi, Mohamed; Zgheib, Nadim Bou; Khelfa, Yousef; Raufi, Ali; Elmsherghi, Nabiha; Lebowicz, Yehuda

    2016-09-05

    Malignant melanoma, as the name implies, is a malignant tumor of melanocytes, found in the skin, eyes, meningeal lining and the mucosal epithelium of the aero-digestive and genitourinary tracts. Malignant melanoma is typically skin malignancy, which rarely presents at extracutaneous site. Here we present a rare case of primary retroperitoneal melanoma and review the findings in comparison with other cases described in literature.

  10. Satellites of giant planets — possible sites for origin and existence of biospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simakov, Michael B.

    All giant planets of the Solar system have a big number of satellites (61 of Jupiter, 52 of Saturn, known in 2003). A small part of them consist very large bodies, quite comparable to planets of terrestrial type, but including very significant share of water ice. Some from them have an atmosphere. E.g., the mass of a column of the Titan’s atmosphere exceeds 15 times the mass of the Earth atmosphere column. Formation (or capture) of satellites is a natural phenomenon, and satellite systems definitely should exist at extrasolar planets. As an example, we can see on Titan, the largest satellite of Saturn, which has a dense nitrogen atmosphere and a large quantity of liquid water under ice cover and so has a great exobiological significance. The most recent models of the Titan’s interior lead to the conclusion that a substantial liquid layer exists today under relatively thin ice cover inside Titan. The putative internal water ocean along with complex atmospheric photochemistry provide some exobiological niches on this body: (1) an upper layer of the internal water ocean; (2) pores, veins, channels and pockets filled with brines inside of the lowest part of the icy layer; (3) the places of cryogenic volcanism; (4) set of caves in icy layer connecting with cryovolcanic processes; (5) the brine-filled cracks in icy crust caused by tidal forces; (6) liquid water pools on the surface originated from meteoritic strikes; (7) the sites of hydrothermal activity on the bottom of the ocean. We can see all conditions needed for origin and evolution of biosphere — liquid water, complex organic chemistry and energy sources for support of biological processes — are on the Saturnian moon. Galileo spacecraft has given indications, primarily from magnetometer and gravity data, of the possibility that three of Jupiter’s four large moons, Europa, Ganymede and Callisto have such oceans also. The existing of liquid water ocean within icy world can be consequences of the physical

  11. Non-operative management of a rare diagnosis of splenic torsion in a child with a history of giant omphalocele: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Splenic torsion is rare and as a result the appropriate management is unclear. While there has been a shift towards splenectomy and laparoscopic splenopexy, we present a successful case of non-operative management of splenic torsion in a patient with a history of a giant omphalocele. Case presentation A 3 year-old female presented with a three-day history of abdominal pain, fever and non-bloody emesis three and a half years after repair of her giant omphalocele. Abdominal radiographs and ultrasound demonstrated migration of the spleen and a subsequent computerized tomography scan confirmed splenic torsion and an infarcted spleen. Given her late presentation, she was successfully managed with observation, analgesia, immunization against capsulated organisms and daily penicillin prophylaxis with excellent outcome at 19 months follow-up. A review of the literature revealed that splenic torsion is rarely managed non-operatively. Rarer still is the occurrence of splenic torsion following a history of omphalocele. Conclusion Although rare, splenic torsion should be considered in a child with a history of omphalocele presenting with abdominal pain. Non-operative management of an infarcted spleen can be a safe treatment option to avoid surgery in complex patients. PMID:24602190

  12. Diagnosing an atypical site of giant cell arteritis with magnetic resonance angiography: a case report.

    PubMed

    Tan, Boon L; Liu, Jonathan J; Yong, Tuck Y; Tan, Chrismin C; Li, Jordan Y

    2016-06-23

    Giant cell arteritis typically involves the temporal arteries, but can involve other cranial arteries. Temporal artery biopsy is the mainstay for the diagnosis of giant cell arteritis; however, biopsy may be problematic if giant cell arteritis involves other cranial arteries that are inaccessible for sampling. In these situations, magnetic resonance angiography is a useful, non-invasive adjunctive method in the diagnosis of giant cell arteritis. In this case report, we describe a case of giant cell arteritis involving only the occipital artery which was revealed by magnetic resonance angiography. A 67-year-old Caucasian man was admitted to our hospital with a 4-week history of malaise, fever, and mild occipital headaches. There were no other positive findings on physical examination. Laboratory studies were remarkable for normocytic anemia, raised inflammatory markers, and mildly deranged liver function tests. To exclude intracranial pathology, he underwent a cranial magnetic resonance imaging with gadolinium, which demonstrated a thickened wall and mural enhancement of his right occipital artery, consistent with giant cell arteritis. His temporal arteries were normal. His occipital arteries were not accessible for biopsy and he was commenced on high-dose prednisolone (60 mg daily). His symptoms resolved completely after a week of glucocorticoid steroid treatment and he was well on 5 mg of prednisolone once a day on follow-up. While magnetic resonance angiography may not replace the need for biopsy, it may have a diagnostic role in suspected giant cell arteritis, such as when the involved arteries are inaccessible for biopsy.

  13. A very rare association between giant right atrial myxoma and patent foramen ovale. Extracellular matrix and morphological aspects: a case report.

    PubMed

    Molnar, Adrian; Encică, Svetlana; Săcui, Diana Maria; Mureşan, Ioan; Trifan, Aurelian Cătălin

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of sporadic giant cardiac myxoma with a rare localization in the right atrium, operated in our Service, in a 73-year-old female patient who also presented a patent foramen ovale and a history of ischemic stroke in the year prior to current admission. Intra-operatively, the tumor had a very friable, gelatinous aspect, with a high potential for embolization due to its reduced consistency. The present paper refers to clinical, histochemical and immunohistochemical particularities, as well as to macroscopic and microscopic characteristics of the cardiac myxoma, emphasizing the extracellular matrix aspects, and without leaving out the cellular components of this rare tumor, with possible inference in the management of this disease. The authors present their own observations related to the data from the literature. Also, there are some particularities of the case which justify the current presentation.

  14. Hairy cell leukemia: Uncommon clinical features, unusual sites of involvement and some rare associations.

    PubMed

    Tadmor, Tamar; Polliack, Aaron

    2015-12-01

    Unusual clinical manifestations and associations with auto-immunity or other systemic disorders are uncommon clinical features of hairy cell leukemia (HCL). The exact prevalence of these rare associations is difficult to determine as they are mostly published as anecdotal case reports and generally not included in larger published series. This chapter deals with uncommon clinical manifestations and rare sites of involvement in HCL. It also summarizes the association with systemic hemato-oncological disorders as well as second malignancies, based on review of the relevant literature and from personal experience. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Slope Failure Hazards at Basalt Geomorphosites: A Comparative Analysis of the Giant's Causeway World Heritage Site, UK and Penghu Marine Geopark, Taiwan.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruendemann, Ciaran; Chung Lin, Jiun; Smith, Bernard

    2010-05-01

    Columnar basalt landscapes hold a fascination that transcends geographical and cultural boundaries. It is because of this that they feature so prominently on the global register of significant geomorphosites. Arguably the most iconic of these basalt landscapes is the Giant's Causeway in Northern Ireland, a status recognized by its inscription as a World Heritage Site. Recognition at this level invariably brings visitor pressure, and with it concern as to the impact they exert on site integrity. Rarely, however, is the same overt concern expressed for the risks that such sites pose to the visitors - or not at least until disaster strikes. Yet, the very features that make these sites attractive - tall, exposed, largely unconstrained columns - render many of them intrinsically unstable, prone to catastrophic collapse and potentially hazardous to visitors. In this presentation we highlight the nature of these slope instability issues through a comparative analysis of two geographically contrasting basalt geomorphosites. Investigations of slope hazard at the Giant's Causeway have shown that many are linked to the distinctive structural characteristics and weathering patterns of flood basalts. Typically, individual flows comprise a columnar ‘colonnade', topped by a blocky ‘entablature' and separated from the flows above and below it by a structurally weaker, but often less-permeable, palaeosol that formed during periods of volcanic quiescence. The collapse of columns is often facilitated by a combination of weathering along ever-widening joints and wedging outwards by debris that falls into them. This gradual distortion of the colonnade makes columns increasingly susceptible to collapse. Often this is triggered by intense rainfall (perhaps following a dry spell) that rapidly infiltrates joints and is ponded on the underlying palaeosol. The precise nature of the failure (toppling or outwards rotation of the column base) is largely dictated by the nature of the

  16. Computer simulations of rare earth sites in glass: experimental tests and applications to laser materials

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, M.J.

    1984-11-01

    Computer simulations of the microscopic structure of BeF/sub 2/ glasses using molecular dynamics are reviewed and compared with x-ray and neutron diffraction, EXAFS, NMR, and optical measurements. Unique information about the site-to-site variations in the local environments of rare earth ions is obtained using optical selective excitation and laser-induced fluorescence line-narrowing techniques. Applications and limitations of computer simulations to the development of laser glasses and to predictions of other static and dynamic properties of glasses are discussed. 35 references, 2 figures, 2 tables.

  17. Recovery of Rare Earths, Niobium, and Thorium from the Tailings of Giant Bayan Obo Ore in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xiu-Lan; Bai, Li; Wang, Qing-Chun; Liu, Jia; Chi, Ming-Yu; Wang, Zhi-Chang

    2012-06-01

    The recovery of rare earths, niobium, and thorium from Bayan Obo's tailings has been investigated because the Bayan Obo ore is rich in rare earths and rich in niobium and thorium, but it is mined mainly as an iron ore and will be used up soon. By carbochlorination between 823 K (550 °C) and 873 K (600 °C) for 2 hours, 76 to 93 pct of rare earths were recovered from the tailings, which were much higher than those from Bayan Obo's rare earth concentrate, together with 65 to 78 pct of niobium, 72 to 92 pct of thorium, 84 to 91 pct of iron, and 81 to 94 pct of fluorine. This suggests a cooperative reaction mechanism that carbochlorination of iron minerals (and carbonates) in the tailings enhances that of rare earth minerals, which is supported by a thermodynamic analysis. Subsequently, niobium separation from the low-volatile, ultrahigh iron chloride mixture was achieved efficiently by selective oxidation with Fe2O3. This process, combined with the best available technologies for separation of rare earths and thorium from the involatile chloride mixture and for comprehensively using other valuable elements, allows the ore to minimize radioactive waste and to use rare metal resources sustainably in the future.

  18. Rare Presentation of Giant Cell Tumor in the Internal Auditory Canal: Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Jada, Ajit S; Shrivastava, Raj K; Mannan, Abul; Kobets, Andrew; Manolidis, Spiros

    2015-07-01

    Giant cell tumor (GCT) is a benign but locally aggressive bone tumor that usually involves the end of long bones. It is a relatively common neoplasm in patients, constituting 5 to 10% of all benign bone tumors. Approximately 2% of GCTs occur in the craniofacial skeleton with a predilection for the ethmoid, sphenoid, and temporal bones. The skull base location is unique and not commonly described. Hearing loss, headache, tinnitus, and subcutaneous masses are the most commonly reported symptoms in GCTs of the skull base. In this case report we present the first description of a GCT within the internal auditory canal causing cranial neuropathy and review the recent pertinent literature.

  19. Rare Presentation of Giant Cell Tumor in the Internal Auditory Canal: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Jada, Ajit S.; Shrivastava, Raj K.; Mannan, Abul; Kobets, Andrew; Manolidis, Spiros

    2015-01-01

    Giant cell tumor (GCT) is a benign but locally aggressive bone tumor that usually involves the end of long bones. It is a relatively common neoplasm in patients, constituting 5 to 10% of all benign bone tumors. Approximately 2% of GCTs occur in the craniofacial skeleton with a predilection for the ethmoid, sphenoid, and temporal bones. The skull base location is unique and not commonly described. Hearing loss, headache, tinnitus, and subcutaneous masses are the most commonly reported symptoms in GCTs of the skull base. In this case report we present the first description of a GCT within the internal auditory canal causing cranial neuropathy and review the recent pertinent literature. PMID:26251814

  20. Electric field-induced giant strain and photoluminescence-enhancement effect in rare-earth modified lead-free piezoelectric ceramics.

    PubMed

    Yao, Qirong; Wang, Feifei; Xu, Feng; Leung, Chung Ming; Wang, Tao; Tang, Yanxue; Ye, Xiang; Xie, Yiqun; Sun, Dazhi; Shi, Wangzhou

    2015-03-11

    In this work, an electric field-induced giant strain response and excellent photoluminescence-enhancement effect was obtained in a rare-earth ion modified lead-free piezoelectric system. Pr(3+)-modified 0.93(Bi0.5Na0.5)TiO3-0.07BaTiO3 ceramics were designed and fabricated by a conventional fabrication process. The ferroelectric, dielectric, piezoelectric, and photoluminescence performances were systematically studied, and a schematic phase diagram was constructed. It was found the Pr(3+) substitution induced a transition from ferroelectric a long-range order structure to a relaxor pseudocubic phase with short-range coherence structure. Around a critical composition of 0.8 mol % Pr(3+), a giant reversible strain of ∼0.43% with a normalized strain Smax/Emax of up to 770 pm/V was obtained at ∼5 kV/mm. Furthermore, the in situ electric field enhanced the photoluminescence intensity by ∼40% in the proposed system. These findings have great potential for actuator and multifunctional device applications, which may also open up a range of new applications.

  1. Decline of a Rare Moth at Its Last Known English Site: Causes and Lessons for Conservation

    PubMed Central

    Baker, David; Barrett, Sinead; Beale, Colin M.; Crawford, Terry J.; Ellis, Sam; Gullett, Tallulah; Parsons, Mark S.; Relf, Penny; Robertson, Paul; Small, Julian; Wainwright, Dave

    2016-01-01

    The conditions required by rare species are often only approximately known. Monitoring such species over time can help refine management of their protected areas. We report population trends of a rare moth, the Dark Bordered Beauty Epione vespertaria (Linnaeus, 1767) (Lepidoptera: Geometridae) at its last known English site on a protected lowland heath, and those of its host-plant, Salix repens (L.) (Malpighiales: Salicaceae). Between 2007 and 2014, adult moth density reduced by an average of 30–35% annually over the monitored area, and its range over the monitored area contracted in concert. By comparing data from before this decline (2005) with data taken in 2013, we show that the density of host-plants over the monitored area reduced three-fold overall, and ten-fold in the areas of highest host-plant density. In addition, plants were significantly smaller in 2013. In 2005, moth larvae tended to be found on plants that were significantly larger than average at the time. By 2013, far fewer plants were of an equivalent size. This suggests that the rapid decline of the moth population coincides with, and is likely driven by, changes in the host-plant population. Why the host-plant population has changed remains less certain, but fire, frost damage and grazing damage have probably contributed. It is likely that a reduction in grazing pressure in parts of the site would aid host-plant recovery, although grazing remains an important site management activity. Our work confirms the value of constant monitoring of rare or priority insect species, of the risks posed to species with few populations even when their populations are large, of the potential conflict between bespoke management for species and generic management of habitats, and hence the value of refining our knowledge of rare species’ requirements so that their needs can be incorporated into the management of protected areas. PMID:27333285

  2. Site-preference and valency for rare-earth sites in (R-Ce)2Fe14B magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Aftab; Khan, Mahmud; McCallum, R. W.; Johnson, D. D.

    2013-01-01

    Rare-earth (R) permanent magnets of R2Fe14B have technological importance due to their high energy products, and they have two R-sites (Wyckoff 4f and 4g, with four-fold multiplicity) that affect chemistry and valence. Designing magnetic behavior and stability via alloying is technologically relevant to reduce critical (expensive) R-content while retaining key properties; cerium, an abundant (cheap) R-element, offers this potential. We calculate magnetic properties and Ce site preference in (R1-xCex)2Fe14B [R = La,Nd] using density functional theory (DFT) methods—including a DFT + U scheme to treat localized 4f-electrons. Fe moments compare well with neutron data—almost unaffected by Hubbard U, and weakly affected by spin-orbit coupling. In La2Fe14B, Ce alloys for 0≤x≤1 and prefers smaller R(4f) sites, as observed, a trend we find unaffected by valence. Whereas, in Nd2Fe14B, Ce is predicted to have limited alloying (x ≤0.3) with a preference for larger R(4g) sites, resulting in weak partial ordering and segregation. The Curie temperatures versus x for (Nd,Ce) were predicted for a typical sample processing and verified experimentally.

  3. Prenatal imaging of a fetus with the rare combination of a right congenital diaphragmatic hernia and a giant omphalocele.

    PubMed

    Nonaka, Ayasa; Hidaka, Nobuhiro; Kido, Saki; Fukushima, Kotaro; Kato, Kiyoko

    2014-11-01

    A co-existing right congenital diaphragmatic hernia and omphalocele is rare. We present images of a fetus diagnosed with this rare combination of anomalies. Early neonatal death occurred immediately after full-term birth due to severe respiratory insufficiency. In this case, disturbance of chest wall development due to the omphalocele rather than the diaphragmatic hernia was considered as the main cause of lung hypoplasia. Our experience suggests that caution should be exercised for severe respiratory insufficiency in a neonate with an omphalocele and diaphragmatic hernia, even in the absence of an intra-thoracic liver, one of the indicators of poor outcome for congenital diaphragmatic hernia.

  4. Chondroid Syringoma: Fine-needle Aspiration Cytology of a Rare Entity at an Unusual Site

    PubMed Central

    Lamba, Sangeeta; Nanda, Annu

    2017-01-01

    Chondroid syringoma, also known as benign mixed tumour of the skin, is a rare benign adnexal tumour. It is a biphasic tumour, composed of both epithelial and mesenchymal components and constitutes <0.01% of all primary skin tumours. It is mostly located in the head and neck region, followed by the hand, foot, axillary region, abdomen, penis, vulva and scrotum. The arm is a rare site of involvement. Making a correct diagnosis of chondroid syringoma is important to guide the clinician in optimal management. We present a case of chondroid syringoma on the left arm in a 37-year-old male. Fine-needle aspiration was performed and diagnosed as chondroid syringoma, which was confirmed on histopathology. This case highlights the importance of considering chondroid syringoma in the evaluation of subcutaneous swellings of the arm and the role of Fine-Needle Aspiration Cytology (FNAC) in diagnosing this uncommon tumour.

  5. A Large-Sized Phytobezoar Located on the Rare Site of the Gastrointestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jee Eun; Kim, Gi Ae; Kim, Ga Hee; Yoon, Da Lim; Jeon, Sung Jin; Jung, Hwoon-Yong; Kim, Jin-Ho

    2013-01-01

    Bezoars are concretions of undigested material and are most often observed in the stomach. They can occur at any site in the gastrointestinal tract; however, duodenal localization is very rare. We report the case of a 71-year-old male who had undergone subtotal gastrectomy with gastroduodenostomy and experienced severe epigastric discomfort, abdominal pain, and vomiting for a few days. An approximately 7×8 cm-sized mass was found on an abdominal computed tomography scan. On following endoscopy, a large bezoar was revealed in the duodenum and was removed using an endoscopic removal technique, assisted by a large amount of Coca-Cola infusion. PMID:23964339

  6. Endangered, threatened, and rare vascular flora of the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Knox, J.N.; Sharitz, R.R.

    1990-01-01

    This report summarizes information on the 30 endangered, threatened, or rare plants found on the Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina. Of these 30 species, eight are under review by the US Fish and Wildlife Service as possible candidates for the proposed threatened and endangered list. Twenty-seven of the species are on the state of South Carolina's list prepared by the South Carolina Advisory Committee on Rare, Threatened, and Endangered Vascular Plants. These 27 plants include regionally threatened species, statewide threatened species, and rare species. Approximately two-thirds of these plants are found in wetland habitats. Also included in this report are summaries of 29 plant species that are likely to occur on the SRS, but have not been found there. Fourteen of these plants are on the federal list and range in status from endangered to possible candidates for deletion from the list. Twenty-eight are on the state of South Carolina list; approximately two-thirds of these also occur in wetland habitats. 31 refs., 45 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Conservation value of sites of hybridization in peripheral populations of rare plant species.

    PubMed

    Thompson, John D; Gaudeul, Myriam; Debussche, Max

    2010-02-01

    Populations at the periphery of a species' range are of interest to conservation biologists because they can show marked genetic differentiation from populations at the center of a range and because of potential hybridization among rare and common species. We examined two closely related Cyclamen species. One is a narrow endemic, and the other is more geographically widespread (both protected by law in continental southern France). We used floral traits and genetic variability to test for hybridization among the species in peripheral populations of the rare species. The species co-occurred on Corsica in a disjunct, peripheral part of the distribution of the endemic species and in an ecologically marginal area for the widespread species. The two species have hybridized and the endemic species showed high levels of introgression with its widespread congener. Genetic and floral variability in sites with both species was markedly higher than in sites with a single species. Our results highlight the need for a conservation strategy that integrates hybrid populations because they represent a source of novel diversity that may have adaptive potential.

  8. Characterization of the phosphorylation sites of the squid (Loligo pealei) high-molecular-weight neurofilament protein from giant axon axoplasm.

    PubMed

    Jaffe, H; Sharma, P; Grant, P; Pant, H

    2001-02-01

    Axonal caliber in vertebrates is attributed, in part, to the extensive phosphorylation of NFM and NFH C-terminal tail domain KSP repeats by proline-directed kinases. The squid giant axon, primarily involved in rapid impulse conduction during jet propulsion motility, is enriched in squid-specific neurofilaments, particularly the highly phosphorylated NF-220. Of the 228 serine-threonine candidate phosphate acceptor sites in the NF-220 tail domain (residues 401-1220), 82 are found in numerous repeats of three different motifs SAR/K, SEK/R, K/RSP, with 62 of these tightly clustered in the C-terminal repeat segment (residues 840-1160). Characterization of the in vivo NF-220 phosphorylated sites should provide clues as to the relevant kinases. To characterize these sites, proteolytic digests of NF-220 were analyzed by a combination of HPLC, electrospray tandem mass spectrometry and database searching. A total of 53 phosphorylation sites were characterized, with 47 clustered in the C-terminal repeat segment (residues 840-1160), representing 76% (47/62) of the total acceptor sites in the region. As in mammalian NFH, approximately 64% of the K/RSP sites (14/22) in this region were found to be phosphorylated implicating proline-directed kinases. Significantly, 78% of serines (31/40) in the KAES*EK and EKS*ARSP motifs were also phosphorylated suggesting that non proline-directed kinases such as CKI may also be involved. This is consistent with previous studies showing that CKI is the principal kinase associated with axoplasmic NF preparations. It also suggests that phosphorylation of large macromolecules with multiple phospho-sites requires sequential phosphorylation by several kinases.

  9. Giant spin-driven ferroelectric polarization and magnetoelectric effect in perovskite rare-earth maganites under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Tsuyoshi

    2015-03-01

    The discovery of ferroelectricity in TbMnO3 triggered extensive studies on a type of multiferroics, ``spin-driven ferroelectrics.'' Unlike conventional ferroelectrics such as BaTiO3, spin-driven ferroelectrics exhibit remarkable magnetoelectric (ME) effects. However, the ferroelectric polarization P in spin-driven ferroelectrics ever reported (<10-1 μ C/cm2) is much smaller than that in conventional ferroelectrics (typically 100 ~ 101 μ C/cm2). Thus, the quest for robust magnetically-controllable P comparable to that in conventional ferroelectrics is still a major challenge in the research on multiferroics. In this study, we utilized the ``high-pressure'' to attain a magnetically-controllable spin-driven P with its magnitude being comparable to that in conventional ferroelectrics [T. Aoyama et al., Nature Commun. 5, 4927 (2014)]. With a home-made high-pressure measurement system with a diamond anvil cell, we investigated high-pressure effects on ME properties of perovskite RMnO3 (R = Gd, Tb, and Dy). Our study revealed that these manganites exhibit a pressure-induced ME phase transition and that the high-pressure phase shows the largest P (e.g., 1 μC/cm2 in TbMnO3) among spin-driven ferroelectrics ever reported. Moreover, P is further enhanced by applying a magnetic field. Our study demonstrates that it is possible to attain giant spin-driven ferroelectric polarization which comes close to that in conventional ferroelectrics, and to control it magnetically.

  10. A Unique Yttrofluorite-Hosted Giant Heavy Rare Earth Deposit: Round Top Mountain, Hudspeth County, Texas, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pingitore, N. E.; Clague, J. W.; Gorski, D.

    2013-12-01

    Round Top Mountain is a surface-exposed peraluminous rhyolite laccolith, enriched in heavy rare earth elements, as well as niobium-tantalum, beryllium, lithium, fluorine, tin, rubidium, thorium, and uranium. The extreme extent of the deposit (diameter one mile) makes it a target for recovery of valuable yttrium and HREEs, and possibly other scarce elements. The Texas Bureau of Economic Geology estimated the laccolith mass as at least 1.6 billion tons. A Preliminary Economic Assessment for Texas Rare Earth Resources listed an inferred mineral resource of 430,598,000 kg REOs (rare earth oxides), with over 70% Y+HREEs (YHREE). Put in global perspective, China is thought to produce ~25,000 tons YHREE per year, and exports but a small fraction of that. Because of the extremely fine grain size of the late-phase fluorine-carried critical fluid mineralization, it has not been clear which minerals host the YHREEs. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy experiments at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource revealed that virtually all of the YHREE content resides in yttrofluorite, rather than in the other reported REE minerals in the deposit, bastnaesite and xenotime. The extended x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectra of the sample suite were all quite similar, and proved a close match to known model compound specimens of yttrofluorite from two locations, in Sweden and New Mexico. Small spectral variation between the two model compounds and among the samples is attributable to the variable elemental composition and altervalent substitutional nature of yttrofluorite (Ca [1-x] Y,REE [x])F[2+x]. We found no other reported deposit in the world in which yttrofluorite is the exclusive, or even more than a minor, YHREE host mineral. Leaching experiments show that the YHREEs are easily liberated by dissolution with dilute sulfuric acid, due to the solubility of yttrofluorite. Flotation separation of the yttrofluorite had been demonstrated, but was rendered inefficient by the

  11. Ancient DNA microsatellite analyses of the extinct New Zealand giant moa (Dinornis robustus) identify relatives within a single fossil site.

    PubMed

    Allentoft, M E; Heller, R; Holdaway, R N; Bunce, M

    2015-12-01

    By analysing ancient DNA (aDNA) from 74 (14)C-dated individuals of the extinct South Island giant moa (Dinornis robustus) of New Zealand, we identified four dyads of closely related adult females. Although our total sample included bones from four fossil deposits located within a 10 km radius, these eight individuals had all been excavated from the same locality. Indications of kinship were based on high pairwise genetic relatedness (rXY) in six microsatellite markers genotyped from aDNA, coupled with overlapping radiocarbon ages. The observed rXY values in the four dyads exceeded a conservative cutoff value for potential relatives obtained from simulated data. In three of the four dyads, the kinship was further supported by observing shared and rare mitochondrial haplotypes. Simulations demonstrated that the proportion of observed dyads above the cutoff value was at least 20 times higher than expected in a randomly mating population with temporal sampling, also when introducing population structure in the simulations. We conclude that the results must reflect social structure in the moa population and we discuss the implications for future aDNA research.

  12. Ancient DNA microsatellite analyses of the extinct New Zealand giant moa (Dinornis robustus) identify relatives within a single fossil site

    PubMed Central

    Allentoft, M E; Heller, R; Holdaway, R N; Bunce, M

    2015-01-01

    By analysing ancient DNA (aDNA) from 74 14C-dated individuals of the extinct South Island giant moa (Dinornis robustus) of New Zealand, we identified four dyads of closely related adult females. Although our total sample included bones from four fossil deposits located within a 10 km radius, these eight individuals had all been excavated from the same locality. Indications of kinship were based on high pairwise genetic relatedness (rXY) in six microsatellite markers genotyped from aDNA, coupled with overlapping radiocarbon ages. The observed rXY values in the four dyads exceeded a conservative cutoff value for potential relatives obtained from simulated data. In three of the four dyads, the kinship was further supported by observing shared and rare mitochondrial haplotypes. Simulations demonstrated that the proportion of observed dyads above the cutoff value was at least 20 times higher than expected in a randomly mating population with temporal sampling, also when introducing population structure in the simulations. We conclude that the results must reflect social structure in the moa population and we discuss the implications for future aDNA research. PMID:26039408

  13. Pleomorphic adenoma of the lower lip: A rare site of location

    PubMed Central

    Sengul, Ilker; Sengul, Demet; Aribas, Duygu

    2011-01-01

    Context: Pleomorphic adenoma is the most common neoplasm of the minor salivary glands which are uncommon among the entire salivary gland tumors. The lower lip is a very rare site of occurrence for pleomorphic adenoma. We intended to present a case of pleomorphic adenoma of the lower lip. Case Report: A 49-year-old Turkish man presented with the painless mass on his lower lip. A total excision was choiced for the mass by both we and the patient because of some cosmetic reasons. The histopathological evaluation revealed the diagnosis of pleomorphic adenoma and neither complication nor recurrence was observed during a clinical follow-up for 40 months. Conclusions: A clinician should be vigilant for the possibility of existence of a pleomorphic adenoma located on the lower lip even it is rare. Once it is diagnosed concisely, a wide excision is suggested in general if there is no cosmetic care and no risk of damage to functional structures of head and neck. PMID:22540103

  14. [Inflammatory granuloma of iliac bone harvest site: a rare complication of Horsley bone wax].

    PubMed

    Faghahati, S; Gleizal, A; Beziat, J-L

    2013-08-01

    Bone wax or Horsley wax, which is used very frequently in bone surgery, is a non-absorbable mixture of beeswax (70%) and Vaseline. It permits the haemostasis of bone gaps by mechanical obstruction of bone pores containing blood capillaries. Complications due to this product are rare but sometimes quoted in literature. We report the case of a 17-year-old patient who, 10 months after surgery and after an asymptomatic period, presented an inflammatory granuloma at the scar of iliac bone harvest, which had been used as a maxillary graft. This complication necessitated a first exploratory and cleansing surgery, as well as a second surgery, which clarified the origin of the inflammation and made it possible to eliminate the wax remains. We think that bone wax should be used sparingly and with caution, firmly applied to the bleeding site without leaving any free particles.

  15. Giant Cell Tumor: A Rare Condition in the Immature Skeleton—A Retrospective Study of Symptoms, Treatment, and Outcome in 16 Children

    PubMed Central

    Skeie, Anette Torød; Lobmaier, Ingvild Koren; Zaikova, Olga

    2016-01-01

    Background. Pediatric giant cell tumor (GCT) of bone is rare and the course of the disease in the immature skeleton is sparsely described. We performed a retrospective study addressing symptoms, treatment, and outcome in children with GCT. Methods. Review of medical records and images of patients with GCT. Patients were detected from our hospital prospective database and those with open epiphyseal cartilages were included. Results. 16 children (75% girls) from 6 to 15 years old were identified. Eight lesions (50%) were in long bones and 4 (25%) in flat bones. One lesion appeared to be purely epiphyseal. All patients had pain as the initial symptom. Local recurrence developed in 2 patients. 14 of 16 patients returned to normal activity with no sequelae. One patient developed anisomelia after surgery. Conclusions. The biological tumor behavior in children does not seem to differ from what is reported in adults. Lesions in flat bones are very unusual, but our data alone do not provide enough evidence to conclude that this is more common in the immature skeleton. Literature review showed only one previous case report describing a purely epiphyseal GCT. Intralesional curettage is appropriate treatment and gives good functional results with acceptable recurrence rates. PMID:27999474

  16. Giant Cell Tumor: A Rare Condition in the Immature Skeleton-A Retrospective Study of Symptoms, Treatment, and Outcome in 16 Children.

    PubMed

    Strøm, Thale M Asp; Skeie, Anette Torød; Lobmaier, Ingvild Koren; Zaikova, Olga

    2016-01-01

    Background. Pediatric giant cell tumor (GCT) of bone is rare and the course of the disease in the immature skeleton is sparsely described. We performed a retrospective study addressing symptoms, treatment, and outcome in children with GCT. Methods. Review of medical records and images of patients with GCT. Patients were detected from our hospital prospective database and those with open epiphyseal cartilages were included. Results. 16 children (75% girls) from 6 to 15 years old were identified. Eight lesions (50%) were in long bones and 4 (25%) in flat bones. One lesion appeared to be purely epiphyseal. All patients had pain as the initial symptom. Local recurrence developed in 2 patients. 14 of 16 patients returned to normal activity with no sequelae. One patient developed anisomelia after surgery. Conclusions. The biological tumor behavior in children does not seem to differ from what is reported in adults. Lesions in flat bones are very unusual, but our data alone do not provide enough evidence to conclude that this is more common in the immature skeleton. Literature review showed only one previous case report describing a purely epiphyseal GCT. Intralesional curettage is appropriate treatment and gives good functional results with acceptable recurrence rates.

  17. Testicular Ectopia in the Anterior Abdominal Wall of a Neonate: A Rare Site of Ectopic Testis

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, Salman Atiq; Marei, Tamer Ibrahim; Al-Makhaita, Ghada

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 3-day Final Diagnosis: Ectopic right testis in anterior abdominal wall Symptoms: — Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Testicular ultrasound and MRI abdomen Specialty: Radiology Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Abnormal testicular descent can either be undescended or, less commonly, ectopic. Most undescended testes complete the course of descent by the first year of life only if these remain in the normal path of descent. The deviation of the testis may occur to an ectopic location during the transinguinal phase. Of the known ectopic sites, the anterior abdominal wall is the rarest site of testicular ectopia and to our knowledge only 3 cases of this nature have been reported in the available literature to date. Case Report: This rare case of testicular ectopia occurred in a 3-day-old boy in whom the right scrotal sac was empty; on abdominal ultrasound, the right testis was found in the subcutaneous tissues of the right antero-lateral abdominal wall. These findings were confirmed on abdominal MRI, where the right testis was seen beneath the skin between the subcutaneous tissues and external oblique aponeurosis. No aponeurotic or muscular defect was appreciable under the abdominal wall. The neonate underwent orchiopexy at the age of 6 months and remained uneventful postoperatively. Conclusions: Preoperative imaging is recommended to detect and confirm the ectopic site as well as the morphology of testis, thereby increasing the chance of surveillance and preservation of an ectopic testis. Imaging can serve as preoperative road mapping to localize the exact site for surgical exploration of an ectopic testis if there is no apparent or palpable swelling over the anterior abdominal wall. PMID:27411886

  18. Giant cell tumour of tendon sheath with simultaneous two tendon involvement of the foot treated with excision of the tumour and reconstruction of the flexor retinaculum using tibialis posterior tendon in a paediatric patient: A rare case report.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Vivek; Ansari, Tahir; Mittal, Samarth; Sharma, Pankaj; Nalwa, Aasma

    2015-12-01

    Giant cell tumour of tendon sheath is a benign soft tissue tumour arising from the tendon sheath. The involvement of foot and ankle by such tumours is relatively rare. Children are not commonly afflicted by this condition. All such tumours are reported to arise either from a single tendon sheath or one joint. We report a case of giant cell tumour of tendon sheath in a 12-year-old child, arising simultaneously from the tendon sheaths of tibialis posterior and flexor digitorum longus tendons, as well as extending into the ankle joint. It was treated by complete excision of the mass along with the tendon sheaths with reconstruction of the flexor retinaculum. The location of the tumour, age of the patient, diffuse nature of the tumour and novel technique of reconstruction of the flexor retinaculum make this case extremely rare and the first to be reported in literature.

  19. Unusual target site disruption by the rare-cutting HNH restriction endonuclease PacI.

    PubMed

    Shen, Betty W; Heiter, Daniel F; Chan, Siu-Hong; Wang, Hua; Xu, Shuang-Yong; Morgan, Richard D; Wilson, Geoffrey G; Stoddard, Barry L

    2010-06-09

    The crystal structure of the rare-cutting HNH restriction endonuclease PacI in complex with its eight-base-pair target recognition sequence 5'-TTAATTAA-3' has been determined to 1.9 A resolution. The enzyme forms an extended homodimer, with each subunit containing two zinc-bound motifs surrounding a betabetaalpha-metal catalytic site. The latter is unusual in that a tyrosine residue likely initiates strand cleavage. PacI dramatically distorts its target sequence from Watson-Crick duplex DNA base pairing, with every base separated from its original partner. Two bases on each strand are unpaired, four are engaged in noncanonical A:A and T:T base pairs, and the remaining two bases are matched with new Watson-Crick partners. This represents a highly unusual DNA binding mechanism for a restriction endonuclease, and implies that initial recognition of the target site might involve significantly different contacts from those visualized in the DNA-bound cocrystal structures.

  20. Management of Giant cell tumor occupying the 5th metacarpal bone in 6 years old child.

    PubMed

    Al Lahham, Salim; Al Hetmi, Talal; Sharkawy, Mahmoud

    2013-01-01

    Giant cell tumor of the bone (GCTOB) is a relatively uncommon tumor of the bone. It is characterized by the presence of multinucleated giant cells. Giant-cell tumor of the bone accounts for 4-5% of primary bone tumors and ∼20% of benign bone tumors. Giant cell tumors of the hand are rare, accounting for only 2-4% of all giant cell tumors. Giant cell tumor (GCT) of the bones of the hand has some special features as compared to GCT at other sites. Because of the aggressive nature of this lesion, adequate assessment of the treatment method is required. The aim is to eradicate the disease but preserve as much hand function as possible. Methods of treatment include curettage with or without bone grafts, local resection possibly combined with reconstruction using homologous or autologous bone, amputation, and resection of one or more rays.

  1. Giant cell tumour of the mandibular condyle.

    PubMed

    Della Sala, S W; Recla, M; Campolongo, F; Bortot, G; Bauer, M; Peterlongo, P

    1996-01-01

    The authors report a case of giant cell tumour of the mandibular condyle, which is a rare finding. This tumour, studied using the main three radiological modalities (plain radiography, CT and MRI) showed characteristic radiological features of "giant cell tumour".

  2. Geochemistry of the rare earth elements in ferromanganese nodules from DOMES Site A, northern equatorial Pacific

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Calvert, S.E.; Piper, D.Z.; Baedecker, P.A.

    1987-01-01

    The distribution of rare earth elements (REE) in ferromanganese nodules from DOMES Site A has been determined by instrumental neutron activation methods. The concentrations of the REE vary markedly. Low concentrations characterize samples from a depression (the valley), in which Quaternary sediments are thin or absent; high concentrations are found in samples from the surrounding abyssal hills (the highlands) where the Quaternary sediment section is relatively thick. Moreover, the valley nodules are strongly depleted in the light trivalent REE (LREE) and Ce compared with nodules from the highlands, some of the former showing negative Ce anomalies. The REE abundances in the nodules are strongly influenced by the REE abundances in coexisting bottom water. Some controls on the REE chemistry of bottom waters include: a) the more effective removal of the LREE relative to the HREE from seawater because of the greater degree of complexation of the latter elements with seawater ligands, b) the very efficient oxidative scavenging of Ce on particle surfaces in seawater, and c) the strong depletion of both Ce and the LREE in, or a larger benthic flux of the HREE into, the Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW) which flows through the valley. The distinctive REE chemistry of valley nodules is a function of their growth from geochemically evolved AABW. In contrast, the REE chemistry of highland nodules indicates growth from a local, less evolved seawater source. ?? 1987.

  3. Remedial actions at the former Vitro Rare Metals plant site, Canonsburg, Washington County, Pennsylvania. Final Environmental Impact Statement. Volume I

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-07-01

    The environmental impacts associated with remedial actions in connection with residual radioactive materials remaining at the inactive uranium processing site located in Canonsburg, Washington County, Pennsylvania are evaluated. The Canonsburg site is an 18.5-acre property that was formerly owned by the Vitro Rare Metals Company. The expanded Canonsburg site would be 30-acre property that would include the Canonsburg site (the former Vitro Rare Metals plant), seven adjacent private houses, and the former Georges Pottery property. During the period 1942 through 1957 the Vitro Manufacturing Company and its successor, the Vitro Corporation of America, processed onsite residues and ores, and government-owned ores, concentrates, and scraps to extract uranium and other rare metals. The Canonsburg site is now the Canon Industrial Park. In addition to storing the residual radioactive materials of this process at the Canonsburg site, about 12,000 tons of radioactively contaminated materials were transferred to a railroad landfill in Burrell Township, Indiana County, Pennsylvania. This Canonsburg FEIS evaluates five alternatives for removing the potential public health hazard associated with the radioactively contaminated materials. In addition to no action, these alternatives involve various combinations of stabilization of the radioactively contaminated materials in place or decontamination of the Canonsburg and Burrell sites by removing the radioactively contaminated materials to another location. In addition to the two sites mentioned, a third site located in Hanover Township, Washington County, Pennsylvania has been considered as a disposal site to which the radioactively contaminated materials presently located at either of the other two sites might be moved.

  4. Rare Sites of Metastases in Prostate Cancer Detected on Ga-68 PSMA PET/CT Scan—A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Dureja, Sugandha; Thakral, Parul; Pant, Vineet; Sen, Ishita

    2017-01-01

    Ga-68 labeled prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) whole body PET/CT scan is a novel upcoming modality for the evaluation of prostate cancer. We present three cases of prostate cancer showing rare sites of metastases like brain, penis, and liver detected on Ga-68 PSMA PET/CT scan thus emphasizing its role in lesion detection and staging. PMID:28242977

  5. Giant prostatic calculi

    PubMed Central

    Najoui, Mohammed; Qarro, Abdelmounaim; Ammani, Abdelghani; Alami, Mohammed

    2013-01-01

    Prostatic parenchymal calculi are common, usually incidental, findings on morphological examinations. They are typically asymptomatic and may be present in association with normal glands, benign prostatic hyperplasia, and prostate cancer. However giant prostatic calculi are rare. Less than 20 cases have been reported in the literature. We present the case of a 35-year-old man with two giant prostatic calculi that replaced the entire gland. He underwent an open cystolithotomy, two giant stones were removed from the prostate, and we used a lithotripsy in situ for extraction of stone fragments. PMID:23565316

  6. Unusual Giant Prostatic Urethral Calculus

    PubMed Central

    Bello, A.; Maitama, H. Y.; Mbibu, N. H.; Kalayi, G. D.; Ahmed, A.

    2010-01-01

    Giant vesico-prostatic urethral calculus is uncommon. Urethral stones rarely form primarily in the urethra, and they are usually associated with urethral strictures, posterior urethral valve or diverticula. We report a case of a 32-year-old man with giant vesico-prostatic (collar-stud) urethral stone presenting with sepsis and bladder outlet obstruction. The clinical presentation, management, and outcome of the giant prostatic urethral calculus are reviewed. PMID:22091328

  7. The Link between Rare-Earth Peak Formation and the Astrophysical Site of the R Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mumpower, Matthew R.; McLaughlin, Gail C.; Surman, Rebecca; Steiner, Andrew W.

    2016-12-01

    The primary astrophysical source of the rare-earth elements is the rapid neutron capture process (r process). The rare-earth peak that is seen in the solar r-process residuals has been proposed to originate as a pile-up of nuclei during the end of the r process. We introduce a new method utilizing Monte Carlo studies of nuclear masses in the rare-earth region, that includes self-consistently adjusting β-decay rates and neutron capture rates, to find the mass surfaces necessary for the formation of the rare-earth peak. We demonstrate our method with two types of astrophysical scenario, one corresponding to conditions typical of hot winds from core-collapse supernovae and stellar-mass accretion disks, and one corresponding to conditions typical of the ejection of the material from the tidal tails of neutron star mergers. In each type of astrophysical condition, this method successfully locates a region of enhanced stability in the mass surface that is responsible for the rare-earth peak. For each scenario, we find that the change in the mass surface has qualitatively different features, thus future measurements can shed light on the type of environment in which the r process occurred.

  8. Using physical parameters and geographic information system analyses to predict potential riparian restoration sites for giant cane in southern Illinois

    Treesearch

    Amanda M. Nelson; Timothy J. Stoebner; Jon E. Schoonover; Karl W.J. Williard

    2014-01-01

    Riparian buffers have been widely advocated as a best management practice for improving stream and lake water quality. Giant cane (Arundinaria gigantean) is a good candidate to include in multispecies riparian buffers designs, as it promotes infiltration of surface runoff and deposition of sediment and associated nutrients. To examine the potential...

  9. A preliminary investigation of the variables affecting the distribution of giant gartersnakes (Thamnophis gigas) in the Sacramento Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Halstead, Brian J.; Skalos, Shannon M.; Casazza, Michael L.; Wylie, Glenn D.

    2015-09-30

    Giant gartersnakes (Thamnophis gigas) comprise a species of rare, semi-aquatic snake precinctive to the Central Valley of California. Because of the loss of more than 90% of their natural habitat, giant gartersnakes are listed as Threatened by the United States and California endangered species acts. Little is known, however, about the distribution of giant gartersnakes in the Sacramento Valley, which is where most extant populations occur. We conducted detection-nondetection surveys for giant gartersnakes throughout the rice-growing regions of the Sacramento Valley, and used occupancy models to examine evidence for the effects of landscape-scale GIS-derived variables, local habitat and vegetation composition, and prey communities on patterns of giant gartersnake occurrence. Although our results are based on a relatively small sample of sites, we found that distance to historic marsh, relative fish count, and an interaction of distance to historic marsh with proportion of habitat composed of submerged vegetation were important variables for explaining occupancy of giant gartersnakes. In particular, giant gartersnakes were more likely to occur closer to historic marsh and where relatively fewer fish were captured in traps. At locations in or near historic marsh, giant gartersnakes were more likely to occur in areas with less submerged vegetation, but this relationship was reversed (and more uncertain) at sites distant from historic marsh. Additional research with a larger sample of sites would further elucidate the distribution of giant gartersnakes in the Sacramento Valley.

  10. A UNIFORM ANALYSIS OF 118 STARS WITH HIGH-CONTRAST IMAGING: LONG-PERIOD EXTRASOLAR GIANT PLANETS ARE RARE AROUND SUN-LIKE STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, Eric L.; Close, Laird M.

    2010-07-10

    We expand on the results of Nielsen et al., using the null result for giant extrasolar planets around the 118 target stars from the Very Large Telescope (VLT) NACO H- and Ks-band planet search (conducted by Masciadri and collaborators in 2003 and 2004), the VLT and MMT Simultaneous Differential Imager survey, and the Gemini Deep Planet Survey to set constraints on the population of giant extrasolar planets. Our analysis is extended to include the planet luminosity models of Fortney et al., as well as the correlation between stellar mass and frequency of giant planets found by Johnson et al. Doubling the sample size of FGKM stars strengthens our conclusions: a model for extrasolar giant planets with power laws for mass and semimajor axis as given by Cumming et al. cannot, with 95% confidence, have planets beyond 65 AU, compared to the value of 94 AU reported by Nielsen et al., using the models of Baraffe et al. When the Johnson et al. correction for stellar mass (which gives fewer Jupiter-mass companions to M stars with respect to solar-type stars) is applied, however, this limit moves out to 82 AU. For the relatively new Fortney et al. models, which predict fainter planets across most of parameter space, these upper limits, with and without a correction for stellar mass, are 182 and 234 AU, respectively.

  11. Response of rare, common and abundant bacterioplankton to anthropogenic perturbations in a Mediterranean coastal site.

    PubMed

    Baltar, Federico; Palovaara, Joakim; Vila-Costa, Maria; Salazar, Guillem; Calvo, Eva; Pelejero, Carles; Marrasé, Cèlia; Gasol, Josep M; Pinhassi, Jarone

    2015-06-01

    Bacterioplankton communities are made up of a small set of abundant taxa and a large number of low-abundant organisms (i.e. 'rare biosphere'). Despite the critical role played by bacteria in marine ecosystems, it remains unknown how this large diversity of organisms are affected by human-induced perturbations, or what controls the responsiveness of rare compared to abundant bacteria. We studied the response of a Mediterranean bacterioplankton community to two anthropogenic perturbations (i.e. nutrient enrichment and/or acidification) in two mesocosm experiments (in winter and summer). Nutrient enrichment increased the relative abundance of some operational taxonomic units (OTUs), e.g. Polaribacter, Tenacibaculum, Rhodobacteraceae and caused a relative decrease in others (e.g. Croceibacter). Interestingly, a synergistic effect of acidification and nutrient enrichment was observed on specific OTUs (e.g. SAR86). We analyzed the OTUs that became abundant at the end of the experiments and whether they belonged to the rare (<0.1% of relative abundance), the common (0.1-1.0% of relative abundance) or the abundant (>1% relative abundance) fractions. Most of the abundant OTUs at the end of the experiments were abundant, or at least common, in the original community of both experiments, suggesting that ecosystem alterations do not necessarily call for rare members to grow.

  12. Structural and functional dissection reveals distinct roles of Ca2+-binding sites in the giant adhesin SiiE of Salmonella enterica

    PubMed Central

    Klingl, Stefan; Sandmann, Achim; Taccardi, Nicola; Sticht, Heinrich; Muller, Yves A.; Hensel, Michael

    2017-01-01

    The giant non-fimbrial adhesin SiiE of Salmonella enterica mediates the first contact to the apical site of epithelial cells and enables subsequent invasion. SiiE is a 595 kDa protein composed of 53 repetitive bacterial immunoglobulin (BIg) domains and the only known substrate of the SPI4-encoded type 1 secretion system (T1SS). The crystal structure of BIg50-52 of SiiE revealed two distinct Ca2+-binding sites per BIg domain formed by conserved aspartate or glutamate residues. In a mutational analysis Ca2+-binding sites were disrupted by aspartate to serine exchange at various positions in the BIg domains of SiiE. Amounts of secreted SiiE diminish with a decreasing number of intact Ca2+-binding sites. BIg domains of SiiE contain distinct Ca2+-binding sites, with type I sites being similar to other T1SS-secreted proteins and type II sites newly identified in SiiE. We functionally and structurally dissected the roles of type I and type II Ca2+-binding sites in SiiE, as well as the importance of Ca2+-binding sites in various positions of SiiE. Type I Ca2+-binding sites were critical for efficient secretion of SiiE and a decreasing number of type I sites correlated with reduced secretion. Type II sites were less important for secretion, stability and surface expression of SiiE, however integrity of type II sites in the C-terminal portion was required for the function of SiiE in mediating adhesion and invasion. PMID:28558023

  13. Tunable giant exchange bias in the single-phase rare-earth-transition-metal intermetallics YM n12 -xF ex with highly homogenous intersublattice exchange coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Yuanhua; Wu, Rui; Zhang, Yinfeng; Liu, Shunquan; Du, Honglin; Han, Jingzhi; Wang, Changsheng; Chen, Xiping; Xie, Lei; Yang, Yingchang; Yang, Jinbo

    2017-08-01

    A tunable giant exchange bias effect is discovered in a family of bulk intermetallic compounds YM n12 -xF ex . Experimental data demonstrate that the exchange bias effect originates from global interactions among ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic sublattices but not the interfacial exchange coupling or inhomogeneous magnetic clusters. A giant exchange bias with a loop shift of up to 6.1 kOe has been observed in YM n4.4F e7.6 compound. In a narrow temperature range, the exchange bias field shows a sudden switching-off whereas the coercivity shows a sudden switching-on with increasing temperature. This unique feature indicates that the intersublattice exchange coupling is highly homogenous. Our theoretical calculations reveal this switching feature, which agrees very well with the experiments and provides insights into the physical underpinnings of the observed exchange bias and coercivity.

  14. Identification and characterization of LA08NC01 cosmids containing rare cutter AscI sites

    SciTech Connect

    Schertzer, M.; Wood, S.; Yaremko, M.L.

    1994-09-01

    LA08NC01 is a flow-sorted human chromosome 8 cosmid library that was constructed and arrayed at Los Alamos. We have used this library to produce a sub-library of those cosmids containing AscI (GGCGCGCC) sites, which are therefore AscI-linking clones. Two protocols have been employed to identify AscI sites. The first protocol relies upon restriction digestion for cloning into doubly digesting plasmids and thereby recovering an end clone. The second protocol relies upon sequence directly, by using a 12-mer NNNNGGCGCGCC as a DNA hybridization probe. Using these protocols we have identified and confirmed 44 cosmids that contain AscI sites. Our goal is to develop markers that are rich in information. Consequently, these cosmids have been screened for CA repeats, which provide a polymorphic STS. The region surrounding the AscI site has been sequenced to provide an identifier and developed as an STS site for those cosmids lacking a CA repeat. The sequence identifier has been used for sequence database library searches. We have identified 3 genes from 8p after screening the identifiers for 10 cosmids. In addition, we have found 2 additional AscI sites from the known genes SFTP2 and POLB. Identification of the AscI site adjacent to POLB required a chromosome walk of 2 steps. Many of these cosmids are rich in information since they are frequently polymorphic, contain STS sites, provide linking clones for PFGE mapping, and often encode genes that may be placed on expression maps. In conclusion, while the total number of identified cosmids is small, the majority of them are extremely rich in information.

  15. Terrestrial ecology of semi-aquatic giant gartersnakes (Thamnophis gigas)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Halstead, Brian J.; Skalos, Shannon M.; Wylie, Glenn D.; Casazza, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    Wetlands are a vital component of habitat for semiaquatic herpetofauna, but for most species adjacent terrestrial habitats are also essential. We examined the use of terrestrial environments by Giant Gartersnakes (Thamnophis gigas) to provide behavioral information relevant to conservation of this state and federally listed threatened species. We used radio telemetry data collected 1995–2011 from adults at several sites throughout the Sacramento Valley, California, USA, to examine Giant Gartersnake use of the terrestrial environment. We found Giant Gartersnakes in terrestrial environments more than half the time during the summer, with the use of terrestrial habitats increasing to nearly 100% during brumation. While in terrestrial habitats, we found Giant Gartersnakes underground more than half the time in the early afternoon during summer, and the probability of being underground increased to nearly 100% of the time at all hours during brumation. Extreme temperatures also increased the probability that we would find Giant Gartersnakes underground. Under most conditions, we found Giant Gartersnakes to be within 10 m of water at 95% of observations. For females during brumation and individuals that we found underground, however, the average individual had a 10% probability of being located > 20 m from water. Individual variation in each of the response variables was extensive; therefore, predicting the behavior of an individual was fraught with uncertainty. Nonetheless, our estimates provide resource managers with valuable information about the importance of protecting and carefully managing terrestrial habitats for conserving a rare semiaquatic snake.

  16. Unusual site and uncommon presentation of epidermoid cyst: a rare case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Sahoo, Manash Ranjan; Gowda, Manoj S; Behera, Syam Sundar

    2013-01-01

    Epidermoid cyst of gastrointestinal tract is very rare, and only a few cases of epidermoid cyst of the caecum have been reported in the literature. We report the first case of epidermoid cyst of the caecum in an elderly man, mimicking mesenteric cyst clinically. It was treated by laparoscopic excision of the cyst. The cyst was spherical, extending from and expanding the serosal surface of the caecum with no communication through the muscularis wall. Histologically, the inner lining of the cyst was composed of benign, mature, keratinised and stratified squamous epithelium with a well-formed granular layer. On opening, the cyst contained pultaceous cheesy material. No calcification, hair, teeth or bone elements were detected. PMID:23302551

  17. Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Renal Pelvis, A Rare Site for a Commonly Known Malignancy.

    PubMed

    Nachiappan, Murugappan; Litake, Manjusha Madhusudhan; Paravatraj, Varun Gautam; Sharma, Navil; Narasimhan, Aditya

    2016-01-01

    Chronic nephrolithiasis predisposes to squamous metaplasia and subsequently SCC which is a rare malignancy of the upper urinary tract. A 60-year-old woman with a long standing history of renal calculi presented with flank pain and fever. Investigations revealed a mass in the superior pole of a non functioning left kidney while the right kidney was sub optimally functioning, hydronephrotic and there was presence of bilateral staghorn calculi. Patient underwent decompression of right kidney by double j stenting and left radical nephrectomy that revealed well differentiated squamous cell carcinoma of renal pelvis. Most SCC of the renal pelvis present with advanced disease and dismal prognosis while our patient presented with localized disease without lymphatic and distant metastasis. Thus radical nephrectomy can be curative if the disease can be diagnosed at an earlier stage. This emphasizes the need of early treatment of nephrolithiasis to prevent the development of SCC and screening of patients with long standing staghorn calculi.

  18. Rare Site of Ectopic Pregnancy in a Patient with Bicornuate Uterus

    PubMed Central

    El Namoury, Mohamed; Heider, Mostafa

    2016-01-01

    Ectopic pregnancy occurs in about 1-2% in normal cycles but in IVF cycles the rate jumps to 4%. No definite cause for ectopic pregnancy was detected, but many risk factors were described as abnormal tube, pelvic infection, or surgery. In this case report we found 2 abnormalities in eight-year infertile woman; the first abnormality was bicornuate uterus and the second abnormality was the site of ectopic pregnancy which was in between the two horns of uterus. ‎This is the only case reported with primary abdominal pregnancy with bicornuate uterus and both healthy ovaries and tubes.‎ The case was unstable and managed by laparotomy and repair of ectopic site after enucleation of sac using Vicryl 2/0. The case was discharged 24 hours after operation in good health. PMID:28042488

  19. Site-preference and valency for rare-earth sites in (R-Ce)2Fe14B [R =La,Nd] magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Aftab; Khan, Mahmud; McCallum, R. W.; Johnson, D. D.

    2013-03-01

    Rare-earth (R) permanent magnets of R2Fe14B have technological importance due to their high energy products, and they have two symmetry distinct R-sites (Wyckoff 4f and 4g) that affect chemistry and valence. Designing magnetic behavior and stability via alloying is technologically relevant to reduce critical (expensive) R-content while retaining key properties; cerium, an abundant (cheap) R-element, offers this potential. We calculate magnetic properties and Ce site preference in (R1-xCex)Fe14B [R=La,Nd] using density functional theory (DFT) methods. The Fe moments compare well with neutron scattering data - remain weakly affected by Hubbard U, but improved with spin-orbit coupling. In (La,Ce)2Fe14B, Ce alloys for 0 < x < 1 with a preference for smaller R(4f) sites, as observed, a trend we find unaffected by valence. Whereas in (Nd,Ce)2Fe14B, Ce is predicted to have limited alloying (x < 0.3) with a preference for larger R(4g) sites, resulting in weak partial ordering and segregation. Curie temperatures versus x were predicted for a typical sample processing and verified experimentally. We shall also present some initial results on the critical mixed valency of Ce in related compounds. Work at Ames Laboratory was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, ARPA-E under the REACT program (0472-1526)

  20. Survey and assessment of the rare vascular plants of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Site

    SciTech Connect

    Cholewa, A.F.; Henderson, D.M.

    1984-01-31

    A two-year study of the rare vascular plants of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory generated new data on the abundance, distribution, and habitat features of eight taxa presently under review at either the federal or state level, or recently proposed for such review. Astragalus ceramicus Sheld. var. apus Barneby is common on the INEL and adjacent areas and will be recommended for removal from further consideration at the federal level and placed on Idaho's Federal Watch List. Coryphanta missouriensis (Sweet) Britt and Rose is common throughout east central Idaho, but will be recommended for retainment on the State Watch List. Gymnosteris nudicaulis (H. and A.) Greene and Oxytheca dendroidea Nutt. are also recommended for retention on the State Watch List. Four taxa not previously known to occur in Idaho or not known from the southeastern part of the state (Astragalus gilviflorus Sheld., Astragalus kentrophyta Gray var. jessiae (Peck) Barneby, Gilia polycladon Torr., and Lesquerella kingii S. Watts. var. cobrensis Roll. and Shaw) were encountered and evaluated with reference to current or potential threats, and are recommended for placement on Idaho's State Watch List. 14 references, 1 figure.

  1. Primary structure of a constituent polypeptide chain (AIII) of the giant haemoglobin from the deep-sea tube worm Lamellibrachia. A possible H2S-binding site.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, T; Takagi, T; Ohta, S

    1990-02-15

    The deep-sea tube worm Lamellibrachia, belonging to the Phylum Vestimentifera, contains two giant extracellular haemoglobins, a 3000 kDa haemoglobin and a 440 kDa haemoglobin. The former consists of four haem-containing chains (AI-AIV) and two linker chains (AV and AVI) for the assembly of the haem-containing chains [Suzuki, Takagi & Ohta (1988) Biochem. J. 255, 541-545]. The tube-worm haemoglobins are believed to have a function of transporting sulphide (H2S) to internal bacterial symbionts, as well as of facilitating O2 transport [Arp & Childress (1983) Science 219, 295-297]. We have determined the complete amino acid sequence of Lamellibrachia chain AIII by automated or manual Edman sequencing. The chain is composed of 144 amino acid residues, has three cysteine residues at positions 3, 74 and 133, and has a molecular mass of 16,620 Da, including a haem group. The sequence showed significant homology (30-50% identity) with those of haem-containing chains of annelid giant haemoglobins. Two of the three cysteine residues are located at the positions where an intrachain disulphide bridge is formed in all annelid chains, but the remaining one (Cys-74) was located at a unique position, compared with annelid chains. Since the chain AIII was shown to have a reactive thiol group in the intact 3000 kDa molecule by preliminary experiments, the cysteine residue at position 74 appears to be one of the most probable candidates for the sulphide-binding sites. A phylogenetic tree was constructed from nine chains of annelid giant haemoglobins and one chain of vestimentiferan tube-worm haemoglobin now determined. The tree clearly showed that Lamellibrachia chain AIII belongs to the family of strain A of annelid giant haemoglobins, and that the two classes of Annelida, polychaete and oligochaete, and the vestimentiferan tube worm diverged at almost the same time. H.p.l.c. patterns of peptides (Figs. 4-7), amino acid compositions of peptides (Table 2) and amino acid sequences of

  2. Local A-Site Layering in Rare-Earth Orthochromite Perovskites by Solution Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Luke M; Kashtiban, Reza J; Kepaptsoglou, Demie; Ramasse, Quentin M; Sloan, Jeremy; Walton, Richard I

    2016-12-19

    Cation size effects were examined in the mixed A-site perovskites La0.5 Sm0.5 CrO3 and La0.5 Tb0.5 CrO3 prepared through both hydrothermal and solid-state methods. Atomically resolved electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) in the transmission electron microscope shows that while the La and Sm cations are randomly distributed, increased cation-radius variance in La0.5 Tb0.5 CrO3 results in regions of localised La and Tb layers, an atomic arrangement exclusive to the hydrothermally prepared material. Solid-state preparation gives lower homogeneity resulting in separate nanoscale regions rich in La(3+) and Tb(3+) . The A-site layering in hydrothermal La0.5 Tb0.5 CrO3 is randomised upon annealing at high temperature, resulting in magnetic behaviour that is dependent on synthesis route. © 2016 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  3. A conceptual model for site-level ecology of the giant gartersnake (Thamnophis gigas) in the Sacramento Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Halstead, Brian J.; Wylie, Glenn D.; Casazza, Michael L.; Hansen, Eric C.; Scherer, Rick D.; Patterson, Laura C.

    2015-08-14

    Bayesian networks further provide a clear visual display of the model that facilitates understanding among various stakeholders (Marcot and others, 2001; Uusitalo , 2007). Empirical data and expert judgment can be combined, as continuous or categorical variables, to update knowledge about the system (Marcot and others, 2001; Uusitalo , 2007). Importantly, Bayesian network models allow inference from causes to consequences, but also from consequences to causes, so that data can inform the states of nodes (values of different random variables) in either direction (Marcot and others, 2001; Uusitalo , 2007). Because they can incorporate both decision nodes that represent management actions and utility nodes that quantify the costs and benefits of outcomes, Bayesian networks are ideally suited to risk analysis and adaptive management (Nyberg and others, 2006; Howes and others, 2010). Thus, Bayesian network models are useful in situations where empirical data are not available, such as questions concerning the responses of giant gartersnakes to management.

  4. Giant invasive mole presenting as a cause of abdominopelvic mass in a perimenopausal woman: An unusual presentation of a rare pathology

    PubMed Central

    Şimşek, Memet; Üçer, Özlem

    2016-01-01

    Invasive mole is a benign gestational trophoblastic disease that arises from the myometrial invasion of any gestational event via direct extension through tissue or vascular structures. Invasive mole (and other gestational trophoblastic diseases) may present with life-threatening complications including uterine perforation, excessive bleeding, acute hemoperitoneum, and abdominal pain. We report a case of invasive mole presenting as abdominal distention in a 51-year-old perimenopausal woman (gravida 12, para 12, abortion 0). The patient was admitted to the gynecology clinic with a giant uterine mass filling the pelvic and abdominal cavity. To our knowledge, this is the first case in the literature of a gestational trophoblastic neoplasia presenting with uterine mass of 28 weeks' gestational size in this age group. Interestingly, complications such as uterine rupture or invasion of the adjacent structures (such as parametrial tissues or blood vessels) had not developed in our patient despite the considerable enlargement of the uterus. PMID:27896261

  5. Structure, Variation, and Co-occurrence of Soil Microbial Communities in Abandoned Sites of a Rare Earth Elements Mine.

    PubMed

    Chao, Yuanqing; Liu, Wenshen; Chen, Yanmei; Chen, Wenhui; Zhao, Lihua; Ding, Qiaobei; Wang, Shizhong; Tang, Ye-Tao; Zhang, Tong; Qiu, Rong-Liang

    2016-11-01

    Mining activity for rare earth elements (REEs) has caused serious environmental pollution, particularly for soil ecosystems. However, the effects of REEs on soil microbiota are still poorly understood. In this study, soils were collected from abandoned sites of a REEs mine, and the structure, diversity, and co-occurrence patterns of soil microbiota were evaluated by Illumina high-throughput sequencing targeting 16S rRNA genes. Although microbiota developed significantly along with the natural restoration, the microbial structure on the site abandoned for 10 years still significantly differed from that on the unmined site. Potential plant growth promoting bacteria (PGPB) were identified by comparing 16S sequences against a self-constructed PGPB database via BLAST, and it was found that siderophore-producing and phosphorus-solubilizing bacteria were more abundant in the studied soils than in reference soils. Canonical correspondence analysis indicated that species richness of plant community was the prime factor affecting microbial structure, followed by limiting nutrients (total carbon and total nitrogen) and REEs content. Further co-occurring network analysis revealed nonrandom assembly patterns of microbiota in the studied soils. These results increase our understanding of microbial variation and assembly pattern during natural restoration in REE contaminated soils.

  6. Electronic and geometric structure of doped rare-gas clusters: surface, site and size effects studied with luminescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Pietrowski, R.; von Haeften, K.; Laarmann, T.; Möller, T.; Museur, L.; Kanaev, A. V.

    2006-05-01

    The electronic and geometric structure of rare gas clusters doped with rare-gas atoms Rg = Xe, Kr or Ar is investigated with fluorescence excitation spectroscopy in the VUV spectral range. Several absorption bands are observed in the region of the first electronic excitations of the impurity atoms, which are related to the lowest spin-orbit split atomic 3P1 and 1P1 states. Due to influence of surrounding atoms of the cluster, the atomic lines are shifted to the blue and broadened (“electronical cage effect”). From the known interaction potentials and the measured spectral shifts the coordination of the impurity atom in ArN, KrN, NeN and HeN could be studied in great detail. In the interior of KrN and ArN the Xe atoms are located in substitutional sites with 12 nearest neighbours and internuclear distances comparable to that of the host matrix. In NeN and HeN the cluster atoms (18 and 22, respectively) arrange themselves around the Xe impurity with a bondlength comparable to that of the heteronuclear dimer. The results confirm that He clusters are liquid while Ne clusters are solid for N≥ 300. Smaller Ne clusters exhibit a liquid like behaviour. When doping is strong, small Rgm-clusters (Rg = Xe, Kr, Ar, m≤10 2) are formed in the interior sites of the host cluster made of Ne or He. Specific electronically excited states, assigned to interface excitons are observed. Their absorption bands appear and shift towards lower energy when the cluster size m increases, according to the Frenkel exciton model. The characteristic bulk excitons appear in the spectra, only when the cluster radius exceeds the penetration depth of the interface exciton, which can be considerably larger than that in free Rgm clusters. This effect is sensitive to electron affinities of the guest and the host cluster.

  7. Internal mammary lymph node recurrence: rare but characteristic metastasis site in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Gu, Yajia; Leaw, Shiangjiin; Wang, Zhonghua; Wang, Peihua; Hu, Xichun; Chen, Jiayi; Lu, Jingsong; Shao, Zhimin

    2010-09-07

    To assess the frequency of IMLN recurrence, its associated risk factors with disease-free interval (DFI) and its predicting factors on overall survival time. 133 cases of breast cancer IMLN recurrence were identified via the computerized CT reporting system between February 2003 and June 2008, during which chest CT for patients with breast cancer (n = 8867) were performed consecutively at Cancer Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai, China. Patients' charts were retrieved and patients' characteristics, disease characteristics, and treatments after recurrence were collected for analysis. The frequency was 1.5% (133/8867). IMLN recurrence was presented as the first metastatic site in 121 (91%) patients while 88 (66.2%) had other concurrent metastases. Typical chest CT images included swelling of the IMLN at the ipsilateral side with local lump and sternal erosion located mostly between the second and third intercostal space. The median disease-free interval (DFI) of IMLN recurrence was 38 months. The independent factors that could delay the IMLN recurrence were small tumor size (HR 0.5 95%CI: 0.4 - 0.8; p = 0.002), and positive ER/PR disease (HR 0.6, 95% CI: 0.4 - 0.9; p = 0.006). The median survival time after IMLN recurrence was 42 months, with a 5-year survival rate of 30%. Univariate analysis showed four variables significantly influenced the survival time: DFI of IMLN recurrence (p = 0.001), no concurrent distant metastasis (p = 0.024), endocrine therapy for patients with positive ER/PR (p = 0.000), radiotherapy (p = 0.040). The independent factors that reduced the death risk were no concurrent distant metastases (HR: 0.7, 95% CI: 0.4 - 0.9; p = 0.031), endocrine therapy for patients with positive ER/PR status (HR: 0.2, 95% CI: 0.1 - 0.5; p = 0.001) and palliative radiotherapy (HR: 0.3, 95% CI: 0.1- 0.9; p = 0.026). The risk of IMLN recurrence is low and there are certain characteristics features on CT images. ER/PR status is both a risk factor for DFI of IMLN

  8. The VLT/NaCo large program to probe the occurrence of exoplanets and brown dwarfs at wide orbits. IV. Gravitational instability rarely forms wide, giant planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigan, A.; Bonavita, M.; Biller, B.; Forgan, D.; Rice, K.; Chauvin, G.; Desidera, S.; Meunier, J.-C.; Delorme, P.; Schlieder, J. E.; Bonnefoy, M.; Carson, J.; Covino, E.; Hagelberg, J.; Henning, T.; Janson, M.; Lagrange, A.-M.; Quanz, S. P.; Zurlo, A.; Beuzit, J.-L.; Boccaletti, A.; Buenzli, E.; Feldt, M.; Girard, J. H. V.; Gratton, R.; Kasper, M.; Le Coroller, H.; Mesa, D.; Messina, S.; Meyer, M.; Montagnier, G.; Mordasini, C.; Mouillet, D.; Moutou, C.; Reggiani, M.; Segransan, D.; Thalmann, C.

    2017-06-01

    Understanding the formation and evolution of giant planets (≥1 MJup) at wide orbital separation (≥5 AU) is one of the goals of direct imaging. Over the past 15 yr, many surveys have placed strong constraints on the occurrence rate of wide-orbit giants, mostly based on non-detections, but very few have tried to make a direct link with planet formation theories. In the present work, we combine the results of our previously published VLT/NaCo large program with the results of 12 past imaging surveys to constitute a statistical sample of 199 FGK stars within 100 pc, including three stars with sub-stellar companions. Using Monte Carlo simulations and assuming linear flat distributions for the mass and semi-major axis of planets, we estimate the sub-stellar companion frequency to be within 0.75-5.70% at the 68% confidence level (CL) within 20-300 AU and 0.5-75 MJup, which is compatible with previously published results. We also compare our results with the predictions of state-of-the-art population synthesis models based on the gravitational instability (GI) formation scenario with and without scattering. We estimate that in both the scattered and non-scattered populations, we would be able to detect more than 30% of companions in the 1-75 MJup range (95% CL). With the threesub-stellar detections in our sample, we estimate the fraction of stars that host a planetary system formed by GI to be within 1.0-8.6% (95% CL). We also conclude that even though GI is not common, it predicts a mass distribution of wide-orbit massive companions that is much closer to what is observed than what the core accretion scenario predicts. Finally, we associate the present paper with the release of the Direct Imaging Virtual Archive (DIVA), a public database that aims at gathering the results of past, present, and future direct imaging surveys. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Chile (ESO Large Program 184.C-0157 and Open Time 089.C-0137A and 090.C-0252

  9. Lichens On Galapagos Giant Tortoises.

    PubMed

    Hendrickson, J R; Weber, W A

    1964-06-19

    The association of Physcia picta with the giant Galdpagos tortoise is believed to be the first reported occurrence of lichens on land animals. The habitat is restricted to specific sites on the carapace of male tortoises.

  10. Constraints on Extrasolar Planet Populations from VLT NACO/SDI and MMT SDI and Direct Adaptive Optics Imaging Surveys: Giant Planets are Rare at Large Separations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Eric L.; Close, Laird M.; Biller, Beth A.; Masciadri, Elena; Lenzen, Rainer

    2008-02-01

    We examine the implications for the distribution of extrasolar planets based on the null results from two of the largest direct imaging surveys published to date. Combining the measured contrast curves from 22 of the stars observed with the VLT NACO adaptive optics system by Masciadri and coworkers and 48 of the stars observed with the VLT NACO SDI and MMT SDI devices by Biller and coworkers (for a total of 60 unique stars), we consider what distributions of planet masses and semimajor axes can be ruled out by these data, based on Monte Carlo simulations of planet populations. We can set the following upper limit with 95% confidence: the fraction of stars with planets with semimajor axis between 20 and 100 AU, and mass above 4 MJup, is 20% or less. Also, with a distribution of planet mass of dN/dM propto M-1.16 in the range of 0.5-13 MJup, we can rule out a power-law distribution for semimajor axis (dN/da propto aα) with index 0 and upper cutoff of 18 AU, and index -0.5 with an upper cutoff of 48 AU. For the distribution suggested by Cumming et al., a power-law of index -0.61, we can place an upper limit of 75 AU on the semimajor axis distribution. In general, we find that even null results from direct imaging surveys are very powerful in constraining the distributions of giant planets (0.5-13 MJup) at large separations, but more work needs to be done to close the gap between planets that can be detected by direct imaging, and those to which the radial velocity method is sensitive.

  11. A 4-month-old baby presenting with dermal necrotizing granulomatous giant cell reaction at the injection site of 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Adjuvants (for example, aluminum salts) are frequently incorporated in licensed vaccines to enhance the host immune response. Such vaccines include the pneumococcal conjugate, combinations of diphtheria–tetanus/acellular pertussis, tetanus– diphtheria/acellular pertussis, hepatitis B, some Haemophilus influenzae type b, hepatitis A, and human papillomavirus. These preparations have been associated with complicated local adverse events, especially if administered subcutaneously or intradermally in comparison to deep intramuscular injection. We describe a severe inflammatory reaction at the site of an injection of 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine. Case presentation A 4-month-old Arab baby boy developed dermal necrotizing granulomatous giant cell reaction at the injection site (right anterior thigh) of the second dose of 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine. Ziehl–Neelsen and periodic-acid Schiff were negative. This reaction probably resulted from improper intramuscular administration because the first (at 2 months of age) and third (at 10 months of age) doses were uneventful. Conclusions Dermal necrotizing granulomatous reactions are a serious complication of the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine. Health care providers need to administer this preparation deeply into a muscle mass. Completing the vaccine series is an acceptable option. Physicians are encouraged to report their experience with completing vaccine series following adverse events. PMID:25152179

  12. Metamagnetism and giant magnetoresistance of the rare-earth intermetallic compounds R2Ni2Pb (R=Er,Ho,Dy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chinchure, Aravind D.; Muñoz Sandoval, E.; Mydosh, J. A.

    2002-07-01

    We have measured the magnetization and magnetoresistance for a series of rare-earth (R=Er,Ho,Dy) plumbide intermetallic compounds, R2Ni2Pb. These materials form in an unusual orthorhombic structure with space group Cmmm. After multiple magnetic transitions, the ground state exhibits a steplike series of large-moment metamagnetic transitions in low fields (1-2 T) concomitant with switchinglike properties of the magnetoresistance where sharp changes of up to 30% are found. We relate these properties to the layered magnetic structure of the compound.

  13. Investigation on the site occupation of rare-earth ions in CaIn2O4 with the fluorescence probe of Eu(3).

    PubMed

    Chi, Fengfeng; Wei, Xiantao; Qin, Yanguang; Li, Fei; Chen, Yonghu; Duan, Changkui; Yin, Min

    2017-05-17

    Rare-earth doped CaIn2O4 phosphors have been widely investigated due to their excellent luminescent property, but the site occupation of rare-earth ions in CaIn2O4 is not very clear and needs to be clarified. Using Eu(3+) as a fluorescence probe, such a clarification has been made in this work. 1% and 2% Eu(3+) doped CaIn2O4 powder samples have been prepared by the sol-gel method. The X-ray diffraction results indicate that the lanthanide doping does not influence the structure of CaIn2O4. Site selective excitation at low temperature disclosed five different luminescent centers marked as A, B, C1, C2 and C3. The spectral analysis revealed that the A and B sites belong to Eu(3+) embedded in In(3+) sites; the other three are attributed to Eu(3+) substitution on Ca(2+) sites, which show slight distortion. Energy transfers from the B site to the A and C1 sites were observed in the 2% Eu(3+) doped CaIn2O4 sample. The transitions of Eu(3+) ions in the Ca(2+) sites make the main contribution to the emission spectra excited at room temperature. These results may provide a guide for optimizing rare-earth doped CaIn2O4 phosphors for their application in the solid state lighting field.

  14. Epithelioid osteoblastoma of maxilla: A rare and aggressive variant of a benign neoplasm at an uncommon site

    PubMed Central

    Rana, Vandana; Saxena, Vivek; Sahai, Kavita; Singh, Giriraj

    2016-01-01

    Osteoblastoma (OB) is an uncommon benign bone-forming tumor accounting for <1% of all bone neoplasms. Unlike conventional OB, its small subset variant “Epithelioid osteoblastoma (EO)” is characterized by its propensity for local invasion and recurrent behavior. This rare variant of an uncommon tumor when occurs in an atypical site can lead to diagnostic problems more so due to ambiguous clinico-radiologic presentation. This was what faced in the present case of 18-year-old female with a swelling in upper jaw. OB is usually more common in males and involves primarily the posterior element of the spine and the sacrum (40–55%). Less frequently, long bones of limbs are involved. Clinical, radiological and histopathological correlation in this case guided us to reach at right diagnosis of EO which helped the patient in getting correct treatment which involves surgical excision over conventional curettage. The purpose behind this case presentation is to improve the awareness about this recurrent tumor variant which has many close differentials including well-differentiated osteoblastic osteosarcoma. PMID:27601840

  15. Rare earth elements of seep carbonates: Indication for redox variations and microbiological processes at modern seep sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Dong; Lin, Zhijia; Bian, Youyan; Chen, Duofu; Peckmann, Jörn; Bohrmann, Gerhard; Roberts, Harry H.

    2013-03-01

    At marine seeps, methane is microbially oxidized resulting in the precipitation of carbonates close to the seafloor. Methane oxidation leads to sulfate depletion in sediment pore water, which induces a change in redox conditions. Rare earth element (REE) patterns of authigenic carbonate phases collected from modern seeps of the Gulf of Mexico, the Black Sea, and the Congo Fan were analyzed. Different carbonate minerals including aragonite and calcite with different crystal habits have been selected for analysis. Total REE content (ΣREE) of seep carbonates varies widely, from 0.1 ppm to 42.5 ppm, but a common trend is that the ΣREE in microcrystalline phases is higher than that of the associated later phases including micospar, sparite and blocky cement, suggesting that ΣREE may be a function of diagenesis. The shale-normalized REE patterns of the seep carbonates often show different Ce anomalies even in samples from a specific site, suggesting that the formation conditions of seep carbonates are variable and complex. Overall, our results show that apart from anoxic, oxic conditions are at least temporarily common in seep environments.

  16. Giant Cell Arteritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patient / Caregiver Diseases & Conditions Giant Cell Arteritis Giant Cell Arteritis Fast Facts Giant cell arteritis (GCA) is ... polymyalgia rheumatica (also called PMR). What is giant cell arteritis? GCA is a type of vasculitis or ...

  17. Giant fornix syndrome: a case series.

    PubMed

    Turaka, Kiran; Penne, Robert B; Rapuano, Christopher J; Ayres, Brandon D; Abazari, Azin; Eagle, Ralph C; Hammersmith, Kristin M

    2012-01-01

    To describe the demographics, characteristics, and treatment of giant fornix syndrome, a rare cause of chronic purulent conjunctivitis in the elderly. Retrospective chart review of five patients with giant fornix syndrome evaluated by the Cornea Service, Oculoplastics and Orbital Surgery Service and the Department of Pathology at the Wills Eye Institute. The median age of the 5 female patients was 75 years (mean 80, range 70-95). The median duration of eye symptoms before presentation was 2 years (mean 2.4, range 1-4). Before referral, the chronic conjunctivitis was treated with topical antibiotics in all 5 cases and with additional dacryocystorhinostomy in one case. The right eye was affected in 2 cases, and the left eye was affected in the other 3 cases. Floppy eyelids were present in 2 cases. The superior fornix was involved in 4 cases, and the inferior fornix was involved in one case. Pseudomembranes and superficial punctate keratitis (SPK) were seen in 3 cases. Diagnosis of giant fornix syndrome was made in all 5 cases. Conjunctival culture grew methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and S. aureus in singular cases. Case 1 was treated with topical moxifloxacin, Case 2 was treated with topical vancomycin and repair of the upper eyelid, Case 3 was treated with topical besifloxacin, and Case 4 was treated with dacryocystorhinostomy and topical vancomycin. Case 5 was treated with reconstruction of the left upper eyelid. The median duration of follow up was 4 months (mean 21.6, range 1-84). Giant fornix syndrome can lead to chronic relapsing conjunctivitis in the elderly. Deep conjunctival fornices in affected patients can be a site for prolonged sequestration of bacteria causing recurrent infections. Removing the infected debris from the superior fornix and reconstruction of the upper eyelid may prevent the recurrent chronic persistent infection.

  18. Giant impacts on giant planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Pater, Imke

    2013-10-01

    The 2009 impact and recent superbolides on Jupiter caught the world by surprise and cast doubt on impactor flux estimates for the outer solar system. Enhanced amateur planetary imaging techniques yield both high spatial resolution {enabling the 2009 impact debris field detection} and rapid frame rates {enabling the 2010/2012 impact flash detections and lightcurve measurements}.We propose a ToO program to image future impacts on Jupiter and Saturn. To remove the possibility of impact cloud non-detections, the program will be triggered only if an existing impact debris field is seen, an object on a collision course with Jupiter or Saturn is discovered, or an impact light curve is measured with an estimated total energy large enough to generate an impact cloud in a giant planet atmosphere {10^20 J}.HST provides the only way to image these events in the ultraviolet, providing information on aerosol altitudes and on smaller particles that are less visible to ground-based infrared observations. High-resolution imaging with proper timing {not achievable from the ground} is required to measure precisely both the velocity fields of impact sites and the optical spectrum of impact debris. HST observations of past impacts on Jupiter have also served both as cornerstones of science investigations at other wavelengths and as vehicles for effective public outreach.Large outer solar system impacts are governed by the same physics as in the terrestrial events that dominate the impact threat to humans. Studying the behavior of impactors of various sizes and compositions, as they enter the atmosphere at varying angles and speeds, will better quantify terrestrial impact hazards.

  19. Giant impacts on giant planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Pater, Imke

    2014-10-01

    The 2009 impact and recent superbolides on Jupiter caught the world by surprise and cast doubt on impactor flux estimates for the outer solar system. Enhanced amateur planetary imaging techniques yield both high spatial resolution (enabling the 2009 impact debris field detection) and rapid frame rates (enabling the 2010/2012 impact flash detections and lightcurve measurements).We propose a ToO program to image future impacts on Jupiter and Saturn. To remove the possibility of impact cloud non-detections, the program will be triggered only if an existing impact debris field is seen, an object on a collision course with Jupiter or Saturn is discovered, or an impact light curve is measured with an estimated total energy large enough to generate an impact cloud in a giant planet atmosphere (10^20 J).HST provides the only way to image these events in the ultraviolet, providing information on aerosol altitudes and on smaller particles that are less visible to ground-based infrared observations. High-resolution imaging with proper timing (not achievable from the ground) is required to measure precisely both the velocity fields of impact sites and the optical spectrum of impact debris. HST observations of past impacts on Jupiter have also served both as cornerstones of science investigations at other wavelengths and as vehicles for effective public outreach.Large outer solar system impacts are governed by the same physics as in the terrestrial events that dominate the impact threat to humans. Studying the behavior of impactors of various sizes and compositions, as they enter the atmosphere at varying angles and speeds, will better quantify terrestrial impact hazards.

  20. Giant impacts on giant planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Pater, Imke

    2012-10-01

    The 2009 impact on Jupiter caught the world by surprise and cast doubt on impactor flux estimates for the outer solar system. Enhanced amateur planetary imaging techniques yield both high spatial resolution {enabling the 2009 impact debris field detection} and rapid frame rates {enabling the 2010 impact flash detections and lightcurve measurements}.We propose a Target of Opportunity program to image future impacts on Jupiter and Saturn. To remove the possibility of impact cloud non-detections, the program will be triggered only if an existing impact debris field is seen, an object on a collision course with Jupiter or Saturn is discovered, or an impact light curve is measured with an estimated total energy large enough to generate an impact cloud in a giant planet atmosphere.HST provides the only way to image these events in the ultraviolet, providing information on aerosol altitudes and on smaller particles that are less visible to ground-based infrared observations. High-resolution imaging with proper timing {not achievable from the ground} is required to measure precisely both the velocity fields of impact sites and the optical spectrum of impact debris. HST observations of past impacts on Jupiter have also served both as cornerstones of science investigations at other wavelengths and as vehicles for effective public outreach.Large outer solar system impacts are governed by the same physics as in the terrestrial events that dominate the impact threat to humans. Studying the behavior of impactors of various sizes and compositions, as they enter the atmosphere at varying angles and speeds, will better quantify terrestrial impact hazards.

  1. SYNOVIAL GIANT CELL TUMOR OF THE KNEE.

    PubMed

    Abdalla, Rene Jorge; Cohen, Moisés; Nóbrega, Jezimar; Forgas, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    Synovial giant cell tumor is a benign neoplasm, rarely reported in the form of malignant metastasis. Synovial giant cell tumor most frequently occurs on the hand, and, most uncommon, on the ankle and knee. In the present study, the authors describe a rare case of synovial giant cell tumor on the knee as well as the treatment approach. Arthroscopy has been shown, in this case, to be the optimal method for treating this kind of lesion, once it allowed a less aggressive approach, while providing good visualization of all compartments of knee joint and full tumor resection.

  2. SYNOVIAL GIANT CELL TUMOR OF THE KNEE

    PubMed Central

    Abdalla, Rene Jorge; Cohen, Moisés; Nóbrega, Jezimar; Forgas, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Synovial giant cell tumor is a benign neoplasm, rarely reported in the form of malignant metastasis. Synovial giant cell tumor most frequently occurs on the hand, and, most uncommon, on the ankle and knee. In the present study, the authors describe a rare case of synovial giant cell tumor on the knee as well as the treatment approach. Arthroscopy has been shown, in this case, to be the optimal method for treating this kind of lesion, once it allowed a less aggressive approach, while providing good visualization of all compartments of knee joint and full tumor resection. PMID:27004193

  3. Evaluation of microorganisms cultured from injured and repressed tissue regeneration sites in endangered giant aquatic Ozark Hellbender salamanders.

    PubMed

    Nickerson, Cheryl A; Ott, C Mark; Castro, Sarah L; Garcia, Veronica M; Molina, Thomas C; Briggler, Jeffrey T; Pitt, Amber L; Tavano, Joseph J; Byram, J Kelly; Barrila, Jennifer; Nickerson, Max A

    2011-01-01

    Investigation into the causes underlying the rapid, global amphibian decline provides critical insight into the effects of changing ecosystems. Hypothesized and confirmed links between amphibian declines, disease, and environmental changes are increasingly represented in published literature. However, there are few long-term amphibian studies that include data on population size, abnormality/injury rates, disease, and habitat variables to adequately assess changes through time. We cultured and identified microorganisms isolated from abnormal/injured and repressed tissue regeneration sites of the endangered Ozark Hellbender, Cryptobranchus alleganiensis bishopi, to discover potential causative agents responsible for their significant decline in health and population. This organism and our study site were chosen because the population and habitat of C. a. bishopi have been intensively studied from 1969-2009, and the abnormality/injury rate and apparent lack of regeneration were established. Although many bacterial and fungal isolates recovered were common environmental organisms, several opportunistic pathogens were identified in association with only the injured tissues of C.a. bishopi. Bacterial isolates included Aeromonas hydrophila, a known amphibian pathogen, Granulicetella adiacens, Gordonai terrae, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Aerococcus viridans, Streptococcus pneumoniae and a variety of Pseudomonads, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa, P. stutzeri, and P. alcaligenes. Fungal isolates included species in the genera Penicillium, Acremonium, Cladosporium, Curvularia, Fusarium, Streptomycetes, and the Class Hyphomycetes. Many of the opportunistic pathogens identified are known to form biofilms. Lack of isolation of the same organism from all wounds suggests that the etiological agent responsible for the damage to C. a. bishopi may not be a single organism. To our knowledge, this is the first study to profile the external microbial consortia cultured from a

  4. Giant left ventricular pseudoaneurysm.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Sumi; Garg, Nadish; Xie, Gong-Yuan; Dellsperger, Kevin C

    2010-01-01

    Left ventricular (LV) pseudoaneurysm (PS) is an uncommon, often fatal complication associated with myocardial infarction, cardiothoracic surgery, trauma, and, rarely, infective endocarditis. A 28-year-old man with prior history of bioprosthetic mitral valve replacement presented with congestive heart failure and bacteremia with Abiotrophia granulitica. Transesophageal echocardiogram showed bioprosthesis dysfunction, large vegetations, mitral regurgitation, and probable PS. Cardiac and chest CT confirmed a PS communicating with the left ventricle Patient had pulseless electrical activity and died. Autopsy showed a giant PS with layered thrombus and pseudo-endothelialized cavity. Our case highlights the importance of multimodality imaging as an important tool in management of PS.

  5. A Giant Urethral Calculus.

    PubMed

    Sigdel, G; Agarwal, A; Keshaw, B W

    2014-01-01

    Urethral calculi are rare forms of urolithiasis. Majority of the calculi are migratory from urinary bladder or upper urinary tract. Primary urethral calculi usually occur in presence of urethral stricture or diverticulum. In this article we report a case of a giant posterior urethral calculus measuring 7x3x2 cm in a 47 years old male. Patient presented with acute retention of urine which was preceded by burning micturition and dribbling of urine for one week. The calculus was pushed in to the bladder through the cystoscope and was removed by suprapubic cystolithotomy.

  6. Giant Fecaloma Causing Small Bowel Obstruction: Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Mushtaq, Mosin; Shah, Mubashir A; Malik, Aijaz A; Wani, Khurshid A; Thakur, Natasha; Q Parray, Fazl

    2015-04-01

    Fecaloma is a mass of hardened feces being impacted mostly in rectum and sigmoid. The most common sites of the fecaloma is the sigmoid colon and the rectum. There are several causes of fecaloma and have been described in association with Hirschsprung's disease, psychiatric patients, Chagas disease, both inflammatory and neoplastic, and in patients suffering with chronic constipation. Up to now several cases of giant fecaloma has been reported in the literature most of them presenting with megacolon or urinary retention. We herein report a case of giant fecaloma leading to bowel obstruction who was successfully treated by surgery. A 30-yrar-old man presented with sign and symptoms of acute bowel obstruction. He underwent exploratory laparotomy and enterotomy. He was found to have a giant fecaloma causing bowel obstruction in the jejunum. He was discharged after the operation with good condition. Jejunal fecaloma is extremely rare condition.

  7. Multidisciplinary approach to giant paratesticular liposarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Sopeña-Sutil, Raquel; Silan, Francesco; Butron-Vila, Maria Teresa; Guerrero-Ramos, Felix; Lagaron-Comba, Emilio; Passas-Martinez, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Primary paratesticular tumours are very rare and the spermatic cord (SCT) is the most frequent site of origin, with 20% of malignancy. Although liposarcoma is the most frequent histotype (46.6 %), less than 200 cases have been reported in the literature. We report the case of a 56-year-old man who presented a giant scrotal mass of 25 years of evolution and measuring 40 × 40 cm. It could be considered the greatest paratesticular liposarcoma described to date. Computed tomogaphy (CT) revealed mass features consistent with liposarcoma and the simultaneous presence of bilateral inguinal hernia with bladder involvement. A multidisciplinary approach was taken to remove the mass, solve the hernia, and provide functional results. PMID:27695588

  8. Giant Intradiverticular Bladder Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Mohamad Syafeeq Faeez Md; Aziz, Ahmad Fuad Abdul; Ghani, Khairul Asri Mohd; Siang, Christopher Lee Kheng; Yunus, Rosna; Yusof, Mubarak Mohd

    2017-01-01

    Patient: Male, 74 Final Diagnosis: Giant intradiverticular bladder tumor with metastasis Symptoms: Hematuria Medication:— Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Urology Objective: Rare disease Background: Intradiverticular bladder tumors are rare. This renders diagnosis of an intradiverticular bladder tumor difficult. Imaging plays a vital role in achieving the diagnosis, and subsequently staging of the disease. Case Report: A 74-year-old male presented to our center with a few months history of constitutional symptoms. Upon further history, he reported hematuria two months prior to presentation, which stopped temporarily, only to recur a few days prior to coming to the hospital. The patient admitted to having lower urinary tract symptoms. However, there was no dysuria, no sandy urine, and no fever. Palpation of his abdomen revealed a vague mass at the suprapubic region, which was non tender. In view of his history and the clinical examination findings, an ultrasound of the abdomen and computed tomography (CT) was arranged. These investigations revealed a giant tumor that seemed to be arising from a bladder diverticulum, with a mass effect and hydronephrosis. He later underwent operative intervention. Conclusions: Intradiverticular bladder tumors may present a challenge to the treating physician in an atypical presentation; thus requiring a high index of suspicion and knowledge of tumor pathophysiology. As illustrated in our case, CT with its wide availability and multiplanar imaging capabilities offers a useful means for diagnosis, disease staging, operative planning, and follow-up. PMID:28246375

  9. Spontaneous thrombosis in giant intracranial aneurysms.

    PubMed Central

    Whittle, I R; Dorsch, N W; Besser, M

    1982-01-01

    Twelve patients in a series of 22 with giant intracranial aneurysms demonstrated neuroradiological features of partial or total spontaneous intra-aneurysmal thrombosis. The presence of this intra-aneurysmal clot significantly altered the computed tomographic appearance of the giant aneurysm. Massive intra-aneurysmal thrombosis did not protect against subarachnoid haemorrhage and the likelihood of rupture of a clot containing giant aneurysm was not significantly different from that of a non-thrombosed giant aneurysm. Although parent artery occlusion from a thrombosed giant aneurysm, and massive aneurysmal thrombosis leading to the formation of giant serpentine aneurysm were documented, these are rare epiphenomena. The risk of embolisation from a partially thrombosed giant aneurysm, which was documented in one case, would appear to be greater than that from a non-thrombosed giant aneurysm. The findings in this series, and a review of literature, suggest that the presence of intra-aneurysmal clot in giant intracranial aneurysms has little prognostic significance and does not alter the management or outcome after treatment. Images PMID:7175528

  10. Giant Antrochoanal Polyp-A Rare Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Siddappa, Shruti Malavalli; Shivakumar, Andanooru Mahalingappa

    2017-01-01

    Antrochoanal polyp (ACP), also called as Killian polyp, is an infrequent, benign lesion of maxillary origin in non-atopic patients. The antrochoanal polyp is shaped according to the anatomical constraints of the lateral nasal wall, particularly the middle meatus and antrum, resembling typically a dumbbell. Here presenting a common problem with unusual presentation.

  11. Using Rare Earth Element (REE) tracers to identify preferential micro-sites of post-fire aeolian erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Pelt, R.; Zobeck, T. M.; Barnes, M. A.; Baddock, M.; D'Odorico, P.

    2011-12-01

    Plant communities in desert environments are spatially anisotropic. Nutrient islands develop below shrub canopies and in the bases of bunch grasses that enhance plant growth and reinforce the spatial anisotropy. Catastrophic disturbance that removes the vegetation such as fire or drought can result in the release of the trapped sediment which becomes redistributed over the landscape by wind and water. We applied Rare Earth Element (REE) tracers to different landscape positions of an anisotropic Northern Chihuahua Desert ecosystem at the Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge in central New Mexico in an effort to study this process. We delineated three 0.5 m by 6 m plots of desert grassland and three plots of desert grassland-shrubland ecotone. Nitric acid was used to dissolve the REE oxides (Eu2O3, Dy2O3, and Pr6O11) which were then diluted in distilled water to a target concentration of 1 g REE l-1 and applied to the surface at a rate of 4 l m-2. From laboratory column studies using soil collected at the site, we estimated that this would penetrate the surface to a depth of 2.5 cm resulting in a sediment REE concentration of approximately 100 mg kg-1. Eu was applied to bare surfaces between vegetation characterized as sand with a surface covering of gravel, Pr was applied under grass clumps, and Dy was applied under Creosote Bush (Larrea tridentata (DC.). Two replicate 0.25 m2 areas of each surface type were also tagged to obtain a sample of tagged surface sediment for analysis. The area containing the plots was burned by U.S. Fish and Wildlife personnel on April 14, 2010. During the next two days, two grassland plots and two grassland-shrubland ecotone plots were tested by placing a portable boundary layer field wind tunnel over the plots and blowing them with 12 m s-1 wind for 10 minutes during which time a paired set of entrained sediment samples were captured at the outlet of the wind tunnel. This period was followed by a 30 minute test in which clean quartz sand

  12. Using Rare Earth Element (REE) tracers to identify perferential micro-sites of post-fire aeolian erosion

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Plant communities in desert environments are spatially anisotropic. We applied Rare Earth Element (REE) tracers to different landscape positions of an anisotropic Northern Chihuahua Desert ecosystem in an effort to study preferential sediment source areas. We delineated three 0.5 m by 6 m plots of...

  13. Active season microhabitat and vegetation selection by giant gartersnakes associated with a restored marsh in California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Halstead, Brian J.; Valcarcel, Patricia; Wylie, Glenn D.; Coates, Peter S.; Casazza, Michael L.; Rosenberg, Daniel K.

    2016-01-01

    Studies of habitat selection can reveal important patterns to guide habitat restoration and management for species of conservation concern. Giant gartersnakes Thamnophis gigas are endemic to the Central Valley of California, where >90% of their historical wetland habitat has been converted to agricultural and other uses. Information about the selection of habitats by individual giant gartersnakes would guide habitat restoration by indicating which habitat features and vegetation types are likely to be selected by these rare snakes. We examined activity patterns and selection of microhabitats and vegetation types by adult female giant gartersnakes with radiotelemetry at a site composed of rice agriculture and restored wetlands using a paired case-control study design. Adult female giant gartersnakes were 14.7 (95% credible interval [CRI] = 9.4–23.7) times more likely to be active (foraging, mating, or moving) when located in aquatic habitats than when located in terrestrial habitats. Microhabitats associated with cover—particularly emergent vegetation, terrestrial vegetation, and litter—were positively selected by giant gartersnakes. Individual giant gartersnakes varied greatly in their selection of rice and rock habitats, but varied little in their selection of open water. Tules Schoenoplectus acutus were the most strongly selected vegetation type, and duckweed Lemna spp., water-primrose Ludwigia spp., forbs, and grasses also were positively selected at the levels of availability observed at our study site. Management practices that promote the interface of water with emergent aquatic and herbaceous terrestrial vegetation will likely benefit giant gartersnakes. Given their strong selection of tules, restoration of native tule marshes will likely provide the greatest benefit to these threatened aquatic snakes.

  14. Wildlife studies of Site 300 emphasizing rare and endangered species: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, San Joaquin County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Orloff, S.

    1986-11-01

    The primary purpose of this project was to determine the presence and status of any endangered, threatened, fully protected, or otherwise sensitive wildlife species on Site 300 that might be affected by Site operations and developments. We directed our studies mainly toward the federally endangered San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes macrotis mutica), but also toward another 15 special status species that potentially occur on site, including the state threatened Alameda striped racer (Masticophis lateralis euryxanthus).

  15. Giant cell reparative granuloma of the axis.

    PubMed

    Bayar, Mehmet Akif; Erdem, Yavuz; Gokcek, Cevdet; Koktekir, Ender; Kilic, Celal; Yasitli, Ugur; Tekiner, Ayhan

    2009-10-01

    Giant cell reparative granuloma (GCRG) is a rare, benign fibroosseous lesion. It typically arises in the mandible and maxilla, and less frequently in the skull bones. We report a case of GCRG of the axis, which is the first to be reported in the literature. A 35-year-old man was admitted to our clinic with the complaint of pain at his neck. There was no neurological deficit. CT and MRI showed a lesion destructing the body of the axis. Biopsy specimens were taken through the transoral-transpharyngeal route. Histopathological diagnosis was GCRG. The lesion was removed subtotally by the same route. We filled the tumor cavity with a bone graft and the patient was discharged with a halo brace without any neurological deficits. The follow-up CT revealed one year after the surgery showed sclerosis at the tumor site. The etiopathogenesis of GCRG is still controversial and the differential diagnosis, especially from giant cell tumor of bone is quite difficult. The treatment of choice for these lesions is complete surgical removal. Some authors recommend radiotherapy if total removal fails.

  16. Idiopathic Giant Cell Myocarditis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kumari M.K., Kalpana; Mysorekar, Vijaya V.; S., Praveen

    2012-01-01

    Giant-cell myocarditis is a disease of relatively young, predominantly healthy adults. The patients usually die of heart failure and ventricular arrhythmia unless a cardiac transplantation is performed. We are reporting here an autopsy case of idiopathic giant cell myocarditis with no symptoms in a 27-year old -worker who died suddenly. The purpose of this report was to emphasize that idiopathic giant cell myocarditis was a rare disease and that it could exist in the absence of any symptomatic heart disease. PMID:23205365

  17. Reconstruction of the Midfoot Using a Free Vascularized Fibular Graft After En Bloc Excision for Giant Cell Tumor of the Tarsal Bones: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Hara, Hitomi; Kawamoto, Teruya; Onishi, Yasuo; Fujioka, Hiroyuki; Nishida, Kotaro; Kuroda, Ryosuke; Kurosaka, Masahiro; Akisue, Toshihiro

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a 32-year-old Japanese female with a giant cell tumor of bone involving multiple midfoot bones. Giant cell tumors of bone account for approximately 5% of all primary bone tumors and most often arise at the ends of long bones. The small bones, such as those of the hands and feet, are rare sites for giant cell tumors. Giant cell tumors of the small bones tend to exhibit more aggressive clinical behavior than those of the long bones. The present patient underwent en bloc tumor excision involving multiple tarsals and metatarsals. We reconstructed the longitudinal arch of the foot with a free vascularized fibular graft. At the 2-year follow-up visit, bony union had been achieved, with no tumor recurrence. Copyright © 2016 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Lymphoepithelial carcinoma arising from the maxillary antrum: a clinicopathological report of a rare lesion in an unusual site.

    PubMed

    Muthayam, Santan Reddy; Kaushik, Rachna; Pushpanshu, Kumar; Singh, Kumar Tathagat; Raj, Vineet; Kumar, Bimleshwar

    2014-12-01

    Lymphoepithelial carcinoma (LEC) of the maxillary sinus is an exceedingly rare malignancy. It may be asymptomatic or present with non-specific obstructive nasal symptoms which makes its pre-operative diagnosis very challenging. This report describes our clinical and radiological findings in a 45-year-old Indian female patient with locally-advanced LEC of the right maxillary antrum. Histopathological and immunohistochemical results are also discussed. The case was effectively managed by external beam radiotherapy and the patient has remained disease-free at 20-month follow-up.

  19. Urolithiasis with penile erection: a rare presentation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bing; Xing, Yue

    2012-06-01

    Urinary stones are rarely seen in the urethra and are usually encountered in men with urethral stricture or infection. We describe a unique case of giant impacted stones in a 20-year-old man with unreal penile erection.

  20. The Silent Giant.

    PubMed

    Necek, Magdalena; Biskup, Ewelina

    2015-11-25

    SFT is a rare spindle cell neoplasm arising mostly at pleural and in rare cases at extrapleural sites. Histology and immunohistology are diagnostic tools. It is crucial to consider SFT as differential diagnosis in pulmonary nodules since they often remain clinically silent until they reach large dimension and to proceed with curative resection without delay. It is essential to follow up patients for a long period of time as recurrence may occur.

  1. Imaging Extrasolar Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowler, Brendan P.

    2016-10-01

    High-contrast adaptive optics (AO) imaging is a powerful technique to probe the architectures of planetary systems from the outside-in and survey the atmospheres of self-luminous giant planets. Direct imaging has rapidly matured over the past decade and especially the last few years with the advent of high-order AO systems, dedicated planet-finding instruments with specialized coronagraphs, and innovative observing and post-processing strategies to suppress speckle noise. This review summarizes recent progress in high-contrast imaging with particular emphasis on observational results, discoveries near and below the deuterium-burning limit, and a practical overview of large-scale surveys and dedicated instruments. I conclude with a statistical meta-analysis of deep imaging surveys in the literature. Based on observations of 384 unique and single young (≈5-300 Myr) stars spanning stellar masses between 0.1 and 3.0 M ⊙, the overall occurrence rate of 5-13 M Jup companions at orbital distances of 30-300 au is {0.6}-0.5+0.7 % assuming hot-start evolutionary models. The most massive giant planets regularly accessible to direct imaging are about as rare as hot Jupiters are around Sun-like stars. Dividing this sample into individual stellar mass bins does not reveal any statistically significant trend in planet frequency with host mass: giant planets are found around {2.8}-2.3+3.7 % of BA stars, <4.1% of FGK stars, and <3.9% of M dwarfs. Looking forward, extreme AO systems and the next generation of ground- and space-based telescopes with smaller inner working angles and deeper detection limits will increase the pace of discovery to ultimately map the demographics, composition, evolution, and origin of planets spanning a broad range of masses and ages.

  2. Lupus erythematosus and localized scleroderma coexistent at the same sites: a rare presentation of overlap syndrome of connective-tissue diseases.

    PubMed

    Pascucci, Anabella; Lynch, Peter J; Fazel, Nasim

    2016-05-01

    Overlap syndromes are known to occur with connective-tissue diseases (CTDs). Rarely, the overlap occurs at the same tissue site. We report the case of a patient with clinical and histopathologic findings consistent with the presence of discoid lupus erythematosus (DLE) and localized scleroderma within the same lesions. Based on our case and other reported cases in the literature, the following features are common in patients with an overlap of lupus erythematosus (LE) and localized scleroderma: predilection for young women, photodistributed lesions, DLE, linear morphology clinically, and positivity along the dermoepidermal junction on direct immunofluorescence. Most patients showed good response to antimalarials, topical steroids, or systemic steroids.

  3. Metastatic giant basal cell carcinoma: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Bellahammou, Khadija; Lakhdissi, Asmaa; Akkar, Othman; Rais, Fadoua; Naoual, Benhmidou; Elghissassi, Ibrahim; M’rabti, Hind; Errihani, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma is the most common skin cancer, characterised by a slow growing behavior, metastasis are extremely rare, and it occurs in less than 0, 1% of all cases. Giant basal cell carcinoma is a rare form of basal cell carcinoma, more aggressive and defined as a tumor measuring more than 5 cm at its largest diameter. Only 1% of all basal cell carcinoma develops to a giant basal cell carcinoma, resulting of patient's negligence. Giant basal cell carcinoma is associated with higher potential of metastasis and even death, compared to ordinary basal cell carcinoma. We report a case of giant basal cell carcinoma metastaticin lung occurring in a 79 years old male patient, with a fatal evolution after one course of systemic chemotherapy. Giant basal cell carcinoma is a very rare entity, early detection of these tumors could prevent metastasis occurrence and improve the prognosis of this malignancy. PMID:27795755

  4. Metastatic giant basal cell carcinoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Bellahammou, Khadija; Lakhdissi, Asmaa; Akkar, Othman; Rais, Fadoua; Naoual, Benhmidou; Elghissassi, Ibrahim; M'rabti, Hind; Errihani, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma is the most common skin cancer, characterised by a slow growing behavior, metastasis are extremely rare, and it occurs in less than 0, 1% of all cases. Giant basal cell carcinoma is a rare form of basal cell carcinoma, more aggressive and defined as a tumor measuring more than 5 cm at its largest diameter. Only 1% of all basal cell carcinoma develops to a giant basal cell carcinoma, resulting of patient's negligence. Giant basal cell carcinoma is associated with higher potential of metastasis and even death, compared to ordinary basal cell carcinoma. We report a case of giant basal cell carcinoma metastaticin lung occurring in a 79 years old male patient, with a fatal evolution after one course of systemic chemotherapy. Giant basal cell carcinoma is a very rare entity, early detection of these tumors could prevent metastasis occurrence and improve the prognosis of this malignancy.

  5. Three cases giant panda attack on human at Beijing Zoo.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peixun; Wang, Tianbing; Xiong, Jian; Xue, Feng; Xu, Hailin; Chen, Jianhai; Zhang, Dianying; Fu, Zhongguo; Jiang, Baoguo

    2014-01-01

    Panda is regarded as Chinese national treasure. Most people always thought they were cute and just ate bamboo and had never imagined a panda could be vicious. Giant panda attacks on human are rare. There, we present three cases of giant panda attacks on humans at the Panda House at Beijing Zoo from September 2006 to June 2009 to warn people of the giant panda's potentially dangerous behavior.

  6. Three cases giant panda attack on human at Beijing Zoo

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Peixun; Wang, Tianbing; Xiong, Jian; Xue, Feng; Xu, Hailin; Chen, Jianhai; Zhang, Dianying; Fu, Zhongguo; Jiang, Baoguo

    2014-01-01

    Panda is regarded as Chinese national treasure. Most people always thought they were cute and just ate bamboo and had never imagined a panda could be vicious. Giant panda attacks on human are rare. There, we present three cases of giant panda attacks on humans at the Panda House at Beijing Zoo from September 2006 to June 2009 to warn people of the giant panda’s potentially dangerous behavior. PMID:25550978

  7. Giant extragenital Bowen's disease.

    PubMed

    Bakardzhiev, Ilko; Chokoeva, Anastasiya Atanasova; Tchernev, Georgi

    2015-12-01

    Giant extragenital forms of Morbus Bowen are extremely rare. The already described cases in the word literature are most commonly with periungual localization, as well as located on the foot and neck area. The clinical manifestation is presented most commonly by non-specific erythematous to erythematous-squamous plaques or papules, which is confusing to the clinician. From the pathogenic point of view, it is important to be confirmed or rejected the presence of human papilloma viruses (HPVs) in each case of affected patient, as this information is mandatory in respect to the adequate selection of the subsequent regimen. If HPVs are detected, systemic antiviral therapy could be initiated to reduce the size of the lesions before subsequent surgical eradication. A postoperative prevention through vaccination could be also considered additionally. In cases of HPV-negative giant extragenital forms of Morbus Bowen (as in the described patient), the focus should be on local immunomodulation by substances such as imiquimod, which reduce the size of the lesions, thereby creating optimal opportunities for their future surgical eradication. Other possible options described in the literature include topical application of 5-fluorouracil, photodynamic therapy, cryotherapy, and laser therapy (carbon dioxide laser). The choice of the most appropriate regimen should have been an individual decision of the clinician, considering also the location and the extent of the lesion.

  8. The scalp as a donor site for split-thickness skin graft: a rare complication case report.

    PubMed

    Robert, N; May, P; Binder, J P; Revol, M; Servant, J M

    2011-05-01

    The scalp is a useful and reliable donor site for the paediatric burn population that can be harvested several times with minimal morbidity. However, the scalp cannot be used as skin graft donor site with impunity. Scalp alopecia and chronic folliculitis can be observed among the complications. In these cases, the reconstruction phase offers different surgical procedures such as primary closure, staged excision or tissue expansion. We report the case of a patient (29-years-old), treated 20 years ago for second-degree burns covering up to 20% total body surface area (TBSA) by using thin split-thickness skin grafts of his scalp. As a teenager, he developed multiple episodes of folliculitis at the donor site of the scalp and then of recurrent abscesses, resistant to all existing medical treatments. Surgical treatment consisted in the skin excision of his scalp donor site which was immediately covered by a thin split-thickness skin graft. Four months after surgery, the patient was satisfied with the functional and aesthetic result. Copyright © 2010 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Rare Site of Parasitic Dermoid Cyst at Uterovesical Fold of Peritoneum with Absent One-Sided Adnexa

    PubMed Central

    Sehgal, Alka; Ballega, Puneeti; Punia, RPS

    2016-01-01

    Teratomas are the most common type of germ cell tumour. It can be congenital or acquired and are usually found in gonads (testes and ovaries). Parasitic dermoid cysts are rare and their actual incidence is unknown. We are reporting a case of 25-year-old gravida two, para one and one living child, who underwent emergency cesarean section in view of symptomatic placenta previa. A parasitic dermoid cyst was found incidently in front of uterus which was attached to uterovasical fold of bladder. This cyst did not show any connection to uterus or adnexa. Uterus, uterine cavity, right side tube and ovary were normal. Her left sided fallopian tube and ovary was completely absent. She did not have any symptoms related to the dermoid cyst. Histopathology confirmed parasitic mature dermoid cyst. PMID:28208952

  10. Rare Site of Parasitic Dermoid Cyst at Uterovesical Fold of Peritoneum with Absent One-Sided Adnexa.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Sunita; Sehgal, Alka; Ballega, Puneeti; Punia, Rps

    2016-12-01

    Teratomas are the most common type of germ cell tumour. It can be congenital or acquired and are usually found in gonads (testes and ovaries). Parasitic dermoid cysts are rare and their actual incidence is unknown. We are reporting a case of 25-year-old gravida two, para one and one living child, who underwent emergency cesarean section in view of symptomatic placenta previa. A parasitic dermoid cyst was found incidently in front of uterus which was attached to uterovasical fold of bladder. This cyst did not show any connection to uterus or adnexa. Uterus, uterine cavity, right side tube and ovary were normal. Her left sided fallopian tube and ovary was completely absent. She did not have any symptoms related to the dermoid cyst. Histopathology confirmed parasitic mature dermoid cyst.

  11. Malignant Eccrine Poroma of the Vulva: An Intriguing Case of a Rare Tumor at an Unusual Site

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Pranshu; Sen, Sumit; Sharma, Neha; Sen, Debasish

    2016-01-01

    Malignant eccrine poroma is a rare malignancy of the eccrine sweat glands, occurring most frequently on the lower extremities. It affects both sexes equally usually in the 6th to 7th decade of life. Metastasis to regional lymph nodes may occur in 20% that may be fatal in 60% cases. Its aggressive nature, rarity of occurrence, and unusual presentations make it very important to be evaluated properly by the clinician. We hereby report a case of a 75-year-old female presenting with two exophytic tumors over her vulva with local extension. On histopathological examination, it was diagnosed as malignant eccrine poroma. On magnetic resonance imaging of the pelvic region, metastatic extension in regional lymph nodes was found. She was treated by radical vulvectomy with bilateral inguinal and femoral lymph node dissection followed by radiotherapy. PMID:27512190

  12. Malignant Eccrine Poroma of the Vulva: An Intriguing Case of a Rare Tumor at an Unusual Site.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Pranshu; Sen, Sumit; Sharma, Neha; Sen, Debasish

    2016-01-01

    Malignant eccrine poroma is a rare malignancy of the eccrine sweat glands, occurring most frequently on the lower extremities. It affects both sexes equally usually in the 6(th) to 7(th) decade of life. Metastasis to regional lymph nodes may occur in 20% that may be fatal in 60% cases. Its aggressive nature, rarity of occurrence, and unusual presentations make it very important to be evaluated properly by the clinician. We hereby report a case of a 75-year-old female presenting with two exophytic tumors over her vulva with local extension. On histopathological examination, it was diagnosed as malignant eccrine poroma. On magnetic resonance imaging of the pelvic region, metastatic extension in regional lymph nodes was found. She was treated by radical vulvectomy with bilateral inguinal and femoral lymph node dissection followed by radiotherapy.

  13. [Giant esophageal fibrovascular polyp].

    PubMed

    Palacios, Fernando; Contardo, Carlos; Guevara, Jorge; Vera, Augusto; Aguilar, Luis; Huamán, Manuel; Palomino, Américo; Yabar, Alejandro

    2003-01-01

    Fibrovascular polyps are extremely rare benign neoplasias of the esophagus, which usually originate in the lower cricoid area. They do not produce any discomfort in the patient for a long time, however it may make itself evident by the patient's regurgitation of the polyp, producing asphyxia or, more frequently, dysphagia. The case of a 58 year old male patient is presented herein, with a 9 month record of dysphagia, weight loss and intermittent melena. The barium x-ray showed a distended esophagus, with a tumor running from the upper esophageal sphincter to the cardia. The endoscopy confirmed the presence of a pediculated tumor, implanted in the cervical esophagus. Surgeons suspected the potential malignancy of the tumor and performed a transhiatal esophagectomy. The final pathologic diagnosis was giant fibrovascular esophageal polyp.

  14. An extremely rare splice site mutation in the gene encoding complement factor I in a patient with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ipe, Tina S; Lim, Jooeun; Reyes, Meredith Anne; Ero, Mike; Leveque, Christopher; Lewis, Bradley; Kain, Jamey

    2017-04-28

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a rare disease characterized by thrombocytopenia, microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, and acute kidney failure. The disease is difficult to diagnose due to its similarity with other hematologic disorders, such as thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP). However, genetic mutations are found in 50-70% of patients with aHUS and can be useful in its diagnosis. A 40-year-old male presented to our hospital with acute kidney injury, evidenced by high creatinine levels (8.3 mg/dL) and kidney biopsy results. The patient was preliminarily diagnosed with TTP and therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE) was initiated. After four treatments, TPE was discontinued due to lack of ADAMTS13 activity and inhibitor assay results that were not consistent with TTP, improved hematologic laboratory results, and aHUS genetic testing results. Next-generation sequencing showed a rare mutation at a splice site in the gene encoding complement factor I (CFI). Implication of this mutation in aHUS has not been previously described. Treatment with eculizumab reduced creatinine levels below 4.0 mg/dL, and the patient remained on maintenance dosage of eculizumab (1200 mg/14 days) to prevent aHUS recurrence. An extremely rare, heterozygous mutation in the gene encoding CFI likely affecting splicing was associated for the first time with aHUS. Sequencing was critical for rapid diagnosis and subsequent timely treatment with eculizumab, which resulted in improved renal function. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Giant Magnons Meet Giant Gravitons

    SciTech Connect

    Hofman, Diego M.

    2008-07-28

    We study the worldsheet reflection matrix of a string attached to a D-brane in AdS{sub 5}xS{sup 5}. The D-brane corresponds to a maximal giant graviton that wraps an S{sup 3} inside S{sup 5}. In the gauge theory, the open string is described by a spin chain with boundaries. We focus on open strings with a large SO(6) charge and define an asymptotic boundary reflection matrix. Using the symmetries of the problem, we review the computation of the boundary reflection matrix, up to a phase. We also discuss weak and strong coupling computations where we obtain the overall phase factor and test our exact results.

  16. Absorption spectroscopy of heavy alkaline earth metals Ba and Sr in rare gas matrices—CCSD(T) calculations and atomic site occupancies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Barry M.; McCaffrey, John G.

    2016-01-01

    Isolation of the heavier alkaline earth metals Ba and Sr in the solid rare gases (RGs) Ar, Kr, and Xe is analysed with absorption spectroscopy and interpreted partly with the assistance of ab initio calculations of the diatomic M ṡ RG ground state interaction potentials. The y1P←a1S resonance transitions in the visible spectral region are used to compare the isolation conditions of these two metal atom systems and calcium. Complex absorption bands were recorded in all three metal atom systems even after extensive sample annealing. Coupled cluster calculations conducted on the ground states of the nine M ṡ RG diatomics (M = Ca, Sr, and Ba; RG = Ar, Kr, and Xe) at the coupled cluster single, double, and non-iterative triple level of theory revealed long bond lengths (>5 Å) and shallow bound regions (<130 cm-1). All of the M ṡ RG diatomics have bond lengths considerably longer than those of the rare gas dimers, with the consequence that isolation of these metal atoms in a single substitutional site of the solid rare gas is unlikely, with the possible exception of Ca/Xe. The luminescence of metal dimer bands has been recorded for Ba and Sr revealing very different behaviours. Resonance fluorescence with a lifetime of 15 ns is observed for the lowest energy transition of Sr2 while this transition is quenched in Ba2. This behaviour is consistent with the absence of vibrational structure on the dimer absorption band in Ba2 indicating lifetime broadening arising from efficient relaxation to low-lying molecular states. More extensive 2D excitation-emission data recorded for the complex site structures present on the absorption bands of the atomic Ba and Sr systems will be presented in future publications.

  17. Absorption spectroscopy of heavy alkaline earth metals Ba and Sr in rare gas matrices—CCSD(T) calculations and atomic site occupancies

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Barry M.; McCaffrey, John G.

    2016-01-28

    Isolation of the heavier alkaline earth metals Ba and Sr in the solid rare gases (RGs) Ar, Kr, and Xe is analysed with absorption spectroscopy and interpreted partly with the assistance of ab initio calculations of the diatomic M ⋅ RG ground state interaction potentials. The y{sup 1}P←a{sup 1}S resonance transitions in the visible spectral region are used to compare the isolation conditions of these two metal atom systems and calcium. Complex absorption bands were recorded in all three metal atom systems even after extensive sample annealing. Coupled cluster calculations conducted on the ground states of the nine M ⋅ RG diatomics (M = Ca, Sr, and Ba; RG = Ar, Kr, and Xe) at the coupled cluster single, double, and non-iterative triple level of theory revealed long bond lengths (>5 Å) and shallow bound regions (<130 cm{sup −1}). All of the M ⋅ RG diatomics have bond lengths considerably longer than those of the rare gas dimers, with the consequence that isolation of these metal atoms in a single substitutional site of the solid rare gas is unlikely, with the possible exception of Ca/Xe. The luminescence of metal dimer bands has been recorded for Ba and Sr revealing very different behaviours. Resonance fluorescence with a lifetime of 15 ns is observed for the lowest energy transition of Sr{sub 2} while this transition is quenched in Ba{sub 2}. This behaviour is consistent with the absence of vibrational structure on the dimer absorption band in Ba{sub 2} indicating lifetime broadening arising from efficient relaxation to low-lying molecular states. More extensive 2D excitation-emission data recorded for the complex site structures present on the absorption bands of the atomic Ba and Sr systems will be presented in future publications.

  18. Absorption spectroscopy of heavy alkaline earth metals Ba and Sr in rare gas matrices--CCSD(T) calculations and atomic site occupancies.

    PubMed

    Davis, Barry M; McCaffrey, John G

    2016-01-28

    Isolation of the heavier alkaline earth metals Ba and Sr in the solid rare gases (RGs) Ar, Kr, and Xe is analysed with absorption spectroscopy and interpreted partly with the assistance of ab initio calculations of the diatomic M ⋅ RG ground state interaction potentials. The y(1)P ← a(1)S resonance transitions in the visible spectral region are used to compare the isolation conditions of these two metal atom systems and calcium. Complex absorption bands were recorded in all three metal atom systems even after extensive sample annealing. Coupled cluster calculations conducted on the ground states of the nine M ⋅ RG diatomics (M = Ca, Sr, and Ba; RG = Ar, Kr, and Xe) at the coupled cluster single, double, and non-iterative triple level of theory revealed long bond lengths (>5 Å) and shallow bound regions (<130 cm(-1)). All of the M ⋅ RG diatomics have bond lengths considerably longer than those of the rare gas dimers, with the consequence that isolation of these metal atoms in a single substitutional site of the solid rare gas is unlikely, with the possible exception of Ca/Xe. The luminescence of metal dimer bands has been recorded for Ba and Sr revealing very different behaviours. Resonance fluorescence with a lifetime of 15 ns is observed for the lowest energy transition of Sr2 while this transition is quenched in Ba2. This behaviour is consistent with the absence of vibrational structure on the dimer absorption band in Ba2 indicating lifetime broadening arising from efficient relaxation to low-lying molecular states. More extensive 2D excitation-emission data recorded for the complex site structures present on the absorption bands of the atomic Ba and Sr systems will be presented in future publications.

  19. Short-term and long-term evapotranspiration rates at ecological restoration sites along a large river receiving rare flow events

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shanafield, Margaret; Jurado, Hugo Gutierrez; Burgueño, Jesús Eliana Rodríguez; Hernández, Jorge Ramírez; Jarchow, Christopher; Nagler, Pamela L.

    2017-01-01

    Many large rivers around the world no longer flow to their deltas, due to ever greater water withdrawals and diversions for human needs. However, the importance of riparian ecosystems is drawing increasing recognition, leading to the allocation of environmental flows to restore river processes. Accurate estimates of riparian plant evapotranspiration (ET) are needed to understand how the riverine system responds to these rare events and achieve the goals of environmental flows. In 2014, historic environmental flows were released into the Lower Colorado River at Morelos Dam (Mexico); this once perennial but now dry reach is the final stretch to the mighty Colorado River Delta. One of the primary goals was to supply native vegetation restoration sites along the reach with water to help seedlings establish and boost groundwater levels to foster the planted saplings. Patterns in ET before, during, and after the flows are useful for evaluating whether this goal was met and understanding the role that ET plays in this now ephemeral river system. Here, diurnal fluctuations in groundwater levels and MODIS data were used to compare estimates of ET specifically at three native vegetation restoration sites during 2014 planned flow events, while MODIS data was used to evaluate long-term (2002 – 2016) ET responses to restoration efforts at these sites. Overall, ET was generally 0 - 10 mm d-1 across sites and although daily ET values from groundwater data were highly variable, weekly averaged estimates were highly correlated with MODIS-derived estimates at most sites. The influence of the 2014 flow events was not immediately apparent in the results, although the process of clearing vegetation and planting native vegetation at the restoration sites was clearly visible in the results.

  20. Carcinoid tumor of the duodenum: a rare tumor at an unusual site. Case series from a single institution.

    PubMed

    Waisberg, Jaques; Joppert-Netto, George; Vasconcellos, Cidia; Sartini, Gustavo Henrique; Miranda, Lucimar Sonja Villela de; Franco, Maria Isete Fares

    2013-01-01

    Duodenal carcinoids are extremely rare, and their characteristics and biological behavior have not been fully elucidated. To analyze the clinicopathological characteristics of patients with resected duodenal carcinoids. Twenty patients (12 females and 8 males) were investigated. Their average age was 66.4 ± 5.8 years old (43 to 88 years old). The data corresponding to the clinical picture, diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis of patients with duodenal carcinoid tumors subjected to resection over a period of 18 years (1993-2011) were analyzed. The most common symptoms were dyspepsia (50%) and epigastric pain (45%) followed by weight loss (10%) and vomiting (5%). Carcinoid syndrome was not observed in any patient. The lesion was located on the first part of the duodenum in 15 (75%) patients, the second part in 4 (20%) patients, and the third part in 1 (5%) patient. The diagnosis of a carcinoid tumor was established through an endoscopic excision biopsy in 19 (95%) patients and an histopathological examination of the surgical specimen in 1 (5%) patient. The average tumor size was 1.1 cm ± 0.4 cm (0.3 cm to 6.0 cm). Nineteen (95%) patients were initially treated by endoscopic resection of the duodenal lesion. One patient (5%), whose tumor was on the third part of the duodenum underwent a duodenectomy of the third and fourth duodenal parts and duodenojejunal anastomosis. The duodenal carcinoid resection margin was involved in four (20%) patients. Four (20%) patients were subjected to a partial gastrectomy to fully remove the lesion. The tumor was restricted to the submucosal layer in 16 (80%) cases, and it penetrated into the muscular layer in 4 (20%) cases. All patients exhibited positive chromogranin A, neuron-specific enolase, and/or synaptophysin immunostaining. The average duration of the follow-up period was 39.6 months (3 to 96 months). Twelve (60%) of the 20 cases in this series are alive without any evidence of active disease. Only one (5%) patient died due to

  1. Giant cell arteritis presenting with uveitis.

    PubMed

    Slemp, Stephanie N; Martin, Sarah E; Burgett, Richard A; Hattab, Eyas M

    2014-10-01

    Giant cell arteritis, also known as temporal arteritis, is the most common primary vasculitis affecting the nervous system. Early recognition of this treatable condition is essential to avoid potentially devastating complications. Giant cell arteritis occurs in adults older than 50 years and affects large and medium-sized arteries, especially the external and internal carotid arteries and their branches. Severe inflammation of the vessel wall may result in obstruction of the lumen and end-organ ischemia. Typical giant cell arteritis symptoms include headache, scalp tenderness, jaw claudication, and polymyalgia rheumatica. Ischemia induced by the arteritis can lead to blindness. Herein, we describe a rare case of giant cell arteritis in a patient who initially presented with uveitis, thus eluding timely diagnosis and prompt therapy.

  2. Giant lymph node hyperplasia a diagnostic dilemma in the neck.

    PubMed

    Raut, V; Cullen, J; Hughes, D

    2001-04-01

    Giant lymph node hyperplasia (GLNH) or Castleman's disease is a rare pathological entity commonly presenting as a solitary mediastinal tumour (unifocal variant), although other anatomical sites have been reported including the head and neck, abdomen and axilla. Though the head and neck is the second commonest site for this lesion, only 60 cases [1,2] have been reported in the literature. Pre-operative diagnosis of the unifocal variant can be difficult as routine investigations carried out in the clinic setting are often inconclusive. A multicentric form of this disease with a poorer prognosis in comparison to the unifocal lesion has been described by Gaba et al. in 1978 [3]. We present a case of an unusually large, slow growing, asymptomatic, unifocal variant of this tumour restricted to the neck which underwent successful surgical excision. A review of the literature, histopathological characteristics and differential diagnosis is also presented.

  3. Recurrent Giant Cell Tumor of Skull Combined with Multiple Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dae Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Giant cell tumors are benign but locally invasive and frequently recur. Giant cell tumors of the skull are extremely rare. A patient underwent a surgery to remove a tumor, but the tumor recurred. Additionally, the patient developed multiple aneurysms. The patient underwent total tumor resection and trapping for the aneurysms, followed by radiotherapy. We report this rare case and suggest some possibilities for treating tumor growth combined with aneurysm development. PMID:27195256

  4. Giant Serpentine Aneurysm of the Middle Cerebral Artery

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Joo; Kwun, Byung Duk; Kim, Chang Jin

    2010-01-01

    Giant serpentine aneurysms are rare and have distinct angiographic findings. The rarity, large size, complex anatomy and hemodynamic characteristics of giant serpentine aneurysms make treatment difficult. We report a case of a giant serpentine aneurysm of the right middle cerebral artery (MCA) that presented as headache. Treatment involved a superficial temporal artery (STA)-MCA bypass followed by aneurysm resection. The patient was discharged without neurological deficits, and early and late follow-up angiography disclosed successful removal of the aneurysm and a patent bypass graft. We conclude that STA-MCA bypass and aneurysm excision is a successful treatment method for a giant serpentine aneurysm. PMID:20856671

  5. Giant necrotic pituitary apoplexy.

    PubMed

    Fanous, Andrew A; Quigley, Edward P; Chin, Steven S; Couldwell, William T

    2013-10-01

    Apoplexy of the pituitary gland is a rare complication of pituitary adenomas, involving hemorrhage with or without necrosis within the tumor. This condition may be either asymptomatic or may present with severe headache, visual impairment, ophthalmoplegia, and pituitary failure. Transsphenoidal surgery is the treatment of choice, and early intervention is usually required to ensure reversal of visual impairment. Reports of pituitary apoplectic lesions exceeding 60.0mm in diameter are very rare. A 39-year-old man with long-standing history of nasal congestion, decreased libido and infertility presented with a sudden onset of severe headache and diplopia. MRI of the head demonstrated a massive skull base lesion of 70.0 × 60.0 × 25.0mm, compatible with a giant pituitary macroadenoma. The lesion failed to enhance after administration of a contrast agent, suggesting complete necrotic apoplexy. Urgent surgical decompression was performed, and the lesion was resected via a transnasal transsphenoidal approach. Pathological analysis revealed evidence of necrotic pituitary apoplexy. At the 2 month follow-up, the patient had near-complete to complete resolution of his visual impairment. To the authors' knowledge, this report is unique as the patient demonstrated complete necrotic apoplexy and it underlines the diagnostic dilemma in such a case. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Transforming giants.

    PubMed

    Kanter, Rosabeth Moss

    2008-01-01

    Large corporations have long been seen as lumbering, inflexible, bureaucratic--and clueless about global developments. But recently some multinationals seem to be transforming themselves: They're engaging employees, moving quickly, and introducing innovations that show true connection with the world. Harvard Business School's Kanter ventured with a research team inside a dozen global giants--including IBM, Procter & Gamble, Omron, CEMEX, Cisco, and Banco Real--to discover what has been driving the change. After conducting more than 350 interviews on five continents, she and her colleagues came away with a strong sense that we are witnessing the dawn of a new model of corporate power: The coordination of actions and decisions on the front lines now appears to stem from widely shared values and a sturdy platform of common processes and technology, not from top-down decrees. In particular, the values that engage the passions of far-flung workforces stress openness, inclusion, and making the world a better place. Through this shift in what might be called their guidance systems, the companies have become as creative and nimble as much smaller ones, even while taking on social and environmental challenges of a scale that only large enterprises could attempt. IBM, for instance, has created a nonprofit partnership, World Community Grid, through which any organization or individual can donate unused computing power to research projects and see what is being done with the donation in real time. IBM has gained an inspiring showcase for its new technology, helped business partners connect with the company in a positive way, and offered individuals all over the globe the chance to contribute to something big.

  7. Escape variants of the XPR1 gammaretrovirus receptor are rare due to reliance on a splice donor site and a short hypervariable loop

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xiaoyu; Martin, Carrie; Bouchard, Christelle; Kozak, Christine A.

    2014-01-01

    Entry determinants in the XPR1 receptor for the xenotropic/polytropic mouse leukemia viruses (XP-MLVs) lie in its third and fourth putative extracellular loops (ECLs). The critical ECL3 receptor determinant overlies a splice donor and is evolutionarily conserved in vertebrate XPR1 genes; 2 of the 3 rare replacement mutations at this site destroy this receptor determinant. The 13 residue ECL4 is hypervariable, and replacement mutations carrying an intact ECL3 site alter but do not abolish receptor activity, including replacement of the entire loop with that of a jellyfish (Cnidaria) XPR1. Because ECL4 deletions are found in all X-MLV-infected Mus subspecies, we deleted each ECL4 residue to determine if deletion-associated restriction is residue-specific or is effected by loop size. All deletions influence receptor function, although different deletions affect different XP-MLVs. Thus, receptor usage of a constrained splice site and a loop that tolerates mutations severely limits the likelihood of host escape mutations. PMID:25151060

  8. A Case Report of a Giant Tubular Adenoma With a Concurrent Fibroadenoma of the Breast

    PubMed Central

    Kalipatnapu, Sasank; Samuel, Vimalin; Johnson, Martha; Perookavil Daniel, Koshy

    2015-01-01

    Tubular adenomas are rare benign epithelial tumors of the breast. Only a handful of cases have been reported in literature. We describe a very rare case of a giant tubular adenoma with a concurrent fibroadenoma in a young woman.

  9. Giant Cavernous Haemangioma of the Anterior Mediastinum

    PubMed Central

    Kaya, Seyda Ors; Samancılar, Ozgur; Usluer, Ozan; Acar, Tuba; Yener, Ali Galip

    2015-01-01

    Cavernous hemangiomas of the anterior mediastinum is rare. We present a case of a 56-year-old male patient with a giant cavernous hemangioma of the anterior mediastinum, 18 cm in diameters, approached by left posterolateral thoracotomy. To the best of our knowledge, such a unique case has not been previously presented in the literature. PMID:26644773

  10. [A case of giant lumbar neurinoma].

    PubMed

    Bocchini, R; Broggi, S; Gandini, G; Nessi, F; Ponzio, F

    1987-11-30

    A rare case of a giant extradural neurinoma of the IV lumbar root with an anterior development and a soft neurological picture is reported. The Authors stress the important role of CT both in the neurinoma diagnosis and in the correct preoperative evaluation of its extension and its relationship with contiguous organs.

  11. Giant infantile gliosarcoma: magnetic resonance imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Sanal, Hatice Tuba; Bulakbasi, Nail; Kocaoglu, Murat; Onguru, Onder; Chen, Lina

    2008-08-01

    Gliosarcoma is an uncommon variant of glioblastoma multiforme, which is composed of gliomatous and sarcomatous elements. The tumor is rarely encountered in childhood. This case report presents the magnetic resonance imaging characteristics of a giant gliosarcoma in a 3-year-old girl. Size and location of the tumor are described.

  12. Giant Cell Arteritis

    MedlinePlus

    Giant cell arteritis is a disorder that causes inflammation of your arteries, usually in the scalp, neck, and arms. ... arteries, which keeps blood from flowing well. Giant cell arteritis often occurs with another disorder called polymyalgia ...

  13. Annular elastolytic giant cell granuloma in association with Hashimoto's thyroiditis

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Rishi; Arunprasath, P.; Padmavathy, L.; Srivenkateswaran, K.

    2016-01-01

    Annular elastolytic giant cell granuloma (AEGCG) is a rare granulomatous skin disease characterized clinically by annular plaques with elevated borders and atrophic centers found mainly on sun-exposed skin and histologically by diffuse granulomatous infiltrates composed of multinucleated giant cells, histiocytes and lymphocytes in the dermis along with phagocytosis of elastic fibers by multinucleated giant cells. We report a case of AEGCG in a 50-year-old woman and is highlighted for the classical clinical and histological findings of the disease and its rare co-existence with Hashimoto's thyroiditis. PMID:27057492

  14. Structure and expression of the rat epididymal secretory protein I gene. An androgen-regulated member of the lipocalin superfamily with a rare splice donor site.

    PubMed Central

    Girotti, M; Jones, R; Emery, D C; Chia, W; Hall, L

    1992-01-01

    The complete rat epididymal secretory protein I (ESP I) gene was isolated from a genomic library constructed in bacteriophage lambda Charon 4A. The complete nucleotide sequence of the gene and its immediate 5' and 3' flanking sequences were determined. Interesting features include the presence of a rare, but functional, splice donor site (...GC) and the presence of a putative androgen-receptor-binding element. A detailed analysis of ESP I regulation was carried out after castration and subsequent testosterone treatment, demonstrating the requirement for androgens. Efferent-duct ligation and cryptorchism, on the other hand, had no effect on the steady-state concentrations of ESP I transcripts. Comparison of the exon/intron organization of the ESP I gene with those of members of the lipocalin superfamily provides strong support for a common ancestral origin. Images Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:1731756

  15. Giant Urinary Bladder and Bilateral Giant Hydronephrosis due to Bladder Neck Obstruction: One Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Tazi, Mohammed Fadl; Riyach, Omar; Ahallal, Youness; Mellas, Soufiane; Khallouk, Abdelhak; El Fassi, Mohammed Jamal; Farih, Moulay Hassan

    2012-01-01

    Bilateral hydronephrosis secondary to urinary obstruction leads to a buildup of back pressure in the urinary tract and may lead to impairment of renal function. Cases of giant hydronephrosis are rare and usually contain no more than 1-2 litres of fluid in the collecting system. Here, we report a rarely seen case with giant urinary bladder and bilateral giant hydronephrosis due to bladder neck obstruction which contains 4000 mL fluid in the collecting system of the kidney mimicking an ascites in an adult male.

  16. Giant Urinary Bladder and Bilateral Giant Hydronephrosis due to Bladder Neck Obstruction: One Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Tazi, Mohammed Fadl; Riyach, Omar; Ahallal, Youness; Mellas, Soufiane; Khallouk, Abdelhak; El Fassi, Mohammed Jamal; Farih, Moulay Hassan

    2012-01-01

    Bilateral hydronephrosis secondary to urinary obstruction leads to a buildup of back pressure in the urinary tract and may lead to impairment of renal function. Cases of giant hydronephrosis are rare and usually contain no more than 1-2 litres of fluid in the collecting system. Here, we report a rarely seen case with giant urinary bladder and bilateral giant hydronephrosis due to bladder neck obstruction which contains 4000 mL fluid in the collecting system of the kidney mimicking an ascites in an adult male. PMID:22606637

  17. Subsurface dolomite formation during post-depositional flow of sulphate-bearing fluids from underlying salt giants: Early Pliocene example at DSDP Leg 42A, Site 374, Ionian Abyssal Plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenzie, Judith A.; Evans, Nick; Hodell, David; Aloisi, Giovanni; Vasconcelos, Crisogono

    2017-04-01

    Deciphering exact mechanisms for the formation of massive dolomite deposits has long been an enigma in sedimentary geology. The recognition that microbes can play a role in the dolomite precipitation process has added a new dimension to the study of the origin of dolomite formations in both shallow and deep-water environments. This scientific advance has evolved, particularly, through the investigation of dolomite-containing, organic-rich hemipelagic sediments cored on various continental margins during DSDP and ODP drilling campaigns, as well as intensive evaluations of modern hypersaline dolomite-precipitating environments with complementary culture experiments conducted in the laboratory. For example, the association of an active subsurface microbial community in contact with underlying brines of unknown origin leading to in situ dolomite precipitation has been observed in a Quaternary sequence of hemi-pelagic, organic carbon-rich sediments drilled on the Peru Margin, ODP Leg 201, Site 1229 (1). Specifically, it can be concluded that the long-term activity of subsurface microbes can be maintained by post-depositional flow of sulfate-bearing fluids from underlying large-scale evaporite deposits, or salt giants, promoting in situ dolomite precipitation. Another example of dolomite precipitation directly associated with the underlying Messinian salt giant was found at DSDP Leg 42A, Site 374 in the Ionian Abyssal Plain. Deep-sea drilling recovered a lowermost Pliocene sequence of diagenetically altered sediment (Unit II) separating the overlying Pliocene open-marine deposits (Unit I) and the underlying end Messinian dolomitic mudstone with gypsum layers (Unit III). The lower portion of this altered interval contained in Core 11, Section 2 (378.0 - 381.5 mbsf) comprises a dolomicrite with an unusual crystal morphology (2). The original interstitial water geochemical profiles indicate that a saline brine is diffusing upwards from below and into the dolomicrite

  18. Magnetic hyperfine interactions on Cd sites of the rare-earth cadmium compounds R Cd (R =Ce , Pr, Nd, Sm, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, and Er)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavalcante, F. H. M.; Leite Neto, O. F. L. S.; Saitovitch, H.; Cavalcante, J. T. P. D.; Carbonari, A. W.; Saxena, R. N.; Bosch-Santos, B.; Pereira, L. F. D.; Mestnik-Filho, J.; Forker, M.

    2016-08-01

    This paper reports the investigation of the magnetic hyperfine field Bh f in a series of rare-earth (R ) cadmium intermetallic compounds R Cd and GdCd2 measured by perturbed angular correlation (PAC) spectroscopy using 111In/111Cd as probe nuclei at Cd sites as well as first-principles calculations of Bh f at Cd sites in the studied compounds. Vapor-solid state reaction of R metals with Cd vapor and the 111In radioisotope was found to be an appropriate route of doping rare-earth cadmium compounds with the PAC probe 111In/111Cd. The observation that the hyperfine parameters depend on details of the sample preparation provides information on the phase preference of diffusing 111In in the rare-earth cadmium phase system. The 111Cd hyperfine field has been determined in the compounds R Cd for the R constituents Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, and Er, in several cases as a function of temperature. For most R constituents, the temperature dependence Bh f(T ) of 111Cd:R Cd is consistent with ferromagnetic order of the compound. DyCd, however, presents a remarkable anomaly: a finite magnetic hyperfine field is observed only in the temperature interval 35 K ≤ T ≤ 80 K which indicates a transition from ferromagnetic order to a spin arrangement where all 4 f -induced contributions to the magnetic hyperfine field at the Cd site cancel. First-principles calculation results for DyCd show that the (π , π , 0) antiferromagnetic configuration is energetically more favorable than the ferromagnetic. The approach used in the calculations to simulate the R Cd system successfully reproduces the experimental values of Bh f at Cd sites and shows that the main contribution to Bh f comes from the valence electron polarization. The de Gennes plot of the hyperfine field Bh f of 111Cd:R Cd vs the 4 f -spin projection (g -1 )J reflects a decrease of the strength of indirect 4 f -4 f exchange across the R series. Possible mechanisms are discussed and the experimental results indicate that

  19. Dust dispersal and Pb enrichment at the rare-metal Orlovka-Spokoinoe mining and ore processing site: insights from REE patterns and elemental ratios.

    PubMed

    Dolgopolova, Alla; Weiss, Dominik J; Seltmann, Reimar; Dulski, Peter

    2006-04-30

    Different geological, technogenic and environmental samples from the Orlovka-Spokoinoe Ta-Nb-Sn-W mining site and ore processing complex in Eastern Transbaikalia (Russia), were analysed for Pb, Y, Zr, Hf and rare earth elements (REE) to assess the effect of dust and metal dispersal on the environment within the Orlovka-Spokoinoe mining site. Potential source material analysed included ore-bearing and barren granites, host rocks, tailing pond sediments, and ore concentrates. Lichens and birch leaves were used as receptor samples. The REE enrichment relative to chondrite, the extent of the Eu anomalies, the enrichments of heavy REE (HREE), and Zr/Hf and Yb/Y ratios suggest that tailings, barren granites, and metasedimentary host rocks are the main sources of dust in the studied mining environment. In addition, calculated lead enrichment (relative to host rocks) suggests that the environment is polluted with Pb. Our results clearly demonstrate the potential of REE patterns and elemental ratios as a reliable technique to trace dust and metals sources and dispersal within a confined mining area offering a new tool for environmental assessment studies.

  20. Partial Breast Reconstruction with Goldilocks Technique After Excision of Giant Fibroadenoma: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Ter Louw, Ryan P.; Bruce, Sara B.

    2017-01-01

    Summary: Giant juvenile fibroadenomas are relatively rare, accounting for less than 1% fibroadenomas. Large breast tumors create significant asymmetry and provide unique reconstructive challenges after removal. In this case, we describe a 21-year-old female with delayed presentation of a giant fibroadenoma of the right breast. This represents an unusual presentation of benign breast disease requiring reduction of the skin envelope, extensive glandular resection, lower pole reconstruction, and free nipple grafting to achieve symmetry with the opposite breast. A novel modification of the Goldilocks mastectomy technique is described for partial breast reconstruction. Adaptation of the Goldilocks mastectomy technique provides adequate soft tissue for partial breast reconstruction. Using the lower pole deepithelialization breast skin flap provides autologous vascularized tissue to supplement volume loss after tumor and glandular excision. Benign breast disease can create significant breast deformities. Application and combination of the Goldilocks mastectomy technique allow for partial breast reconstruction without the need for an additional donor site or prosthetic devices. PMID:28203501

  1. Management of giant liver hemangiomas: an update.

    PubMed

    Hoekstra, Lisette T; Bieze, Matthanja; Erdogan, Deha; Roelofs, Joris J T H; Beuers, Ulrich H W; van Gulik, Thomas M

    2013-03-01

    Liver hemangiomas are the most common benign liver tumors and are usually incidental findings. Liver hemangiomas are readily demonstrated by abdominal ultrasonography, computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. Giant liver hemangiomas are defined by a diameter larger than 5 cm. In patients with a giant liver hemangioma, observation is justified in the absence of symptoms. Surgical resection is indicated in patients with abdominal (mechanical) complaints or complications, or when diagnosis remains inconclusive. Enucleation is the preferred surgical method, according to existing literature and our own experience. Spontaneous or traumatic rupture of a giant hepatic hemangioma is rare, however, the mortality rate is high (36-39%). An uncommon complication of a giant hemangioma is disseminated intravascular coagulation (Kasabach-Merritt syndrome); intervention is then required. Herein, the authors provide a literature update of the current evidence concerning the management of giant hepatic hemangiomas. In addition, the authors assessed treatment strategies and outcomes in a series of patients with giant liver hemangiomas managed in our department.

  2. Sonar Subsea Images of Large Temples, Mammoths, Giant Sloths. Huge Artwork Carvings, Eroded Cities, Human Images, and Paleo Astronomy Sites that Must be Over Ten Thousand Years Old.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, R. L.

    2016-12-01

    Computer enhancing of side scanning sonar plots revealed images of massive art, apparent ruins of cities, and subsea temples. Some images are about four to twenty kilometers in length. Present water depths imply that many of the finds must have been created over ten thousand years ago. Also, large carvings of giant sloths, Ice Age elk, mammoths, mastodons, and other cold climate creatures concurrently indicate great age. In offshore areas of North America, some human faces have beards and what appear to be Caucasian characteristics that clearly contrast with the native tribal images. A few images have possible physical appearances associated with Polynesians. Contacts and at least limited migrations must have occurred much further in the ancient past than previously believed. Greatly rising sea levels and radical changes away from late Ice Age climates had to be devastating to very ancient civilizations. Many images indicate that these cultures were capable of construction and massive art at or near the technological level of the Old Kingdom in Egypt. Paleo astronomy is obvious in some plots. Major concerns are how to further evaluate, catalog, protect, and conserve the creations of those cultures.

  3. KEPLER RAPIDLY ROTATING GIANT STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Costa, A. D.; Martins, B. L. Canto; Bravo, J. P.; Paz-Chinchón, F.; Chagas, M. L. das; Leão, I. C.; Oliveira, G. Pereira de; Silva, R. Rodrigues da; Roque, S.; Oliveira, L. L. A. de; Silva, D. Freire da; De Medeiros, J. R.

    2015-07-10

    Rapidly rotating giant stars are relatively rare and may represent important stages of stellar evolution, resulting from stellar coalescence of close binary systems or accretion of substellar companions by their hosting stars. In the present Letter, we report 17 giant stars observed in the scope of the Kepler space mission exhibiting rapid rotation behavior. For the first time, the abnormal rotational behavior for this puzzling family of stars is revealed by direct measurements of rotation, namely from photometric rotation period, exhibiting a very short rotation period with values ranging from 13 to 55 days. This finding points to remarkable surface rotation rates, up to 18 times the rotation of the Sun. These giants are combined with six others recently listed in the literature for mid-infrared (IR) diagnostics based on Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer information, from which a trend for an IR excess is revealed for at least one-half of the stars, but at a level far lower than the dust excess emission shown by planet-bearing main-sequence stars.

  4. Giant eruptions of very massive stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, Kris

    2016-07-01

    Giant eruptions or supernova-impostor events are far more mysterious than true supernovae. An extreme example can release as much radiative energy as a SN, ejecting several Mʘ of material. These events involve continuous radiation-driven outflows rather than blast waves. They constitute one of the main unsolved problems in stellar astrophysics, but have received little theoretical attention. The most notorious giant-eruption survivor, ƞ Carinae, is amazingly close to us for such a rare event. It offers a wealth of observational clues, many of them quite unexpected in terms of simple theory.

  5. Malignant Melanoma in Association With a Thymic Nevus in a Patient With a Giant Congenital Nevus.

    PubMed

    Shvartser-Beryozkin, Yulia; Yakobson, Alexander; Benharroch, Daniel; Saute, Milton; Feinmesser, Meora

    2017-07-01

    Nevi and melanocytic proliferations are known to appear in multiple extracutaneous sites, including lymph nodes and meninges. We report a case of an anterior mediastinal mass in a patient with a giant congenital nevus and neurofibromatosis type I. Histologically, the tumor was found to be a malignant melanoma in the thymus arising in association with a nevus that involved most of the thymic tissue. There was no sign of cutaneous melanoma on skin examination. We suggest that the tumor originated from the benign nevus in the thymus, a rare extracutaneous location for nevi and malignant melanoma.

  6. The Electric Giant Resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Woude, A.

    The following sections are included: * Introduction * Experimental Methods to Study Giant Resonances * Introduction * The Tools * Introduction * Tools for Isoscalar Scattering * INELASTIC α-SCATTERING * INELASTIC PROTON SCATTERING * Tools for Isovector Excitations * γ-ABSORPTION AND PARTICLE CAPTURE REACTIONS * CHARGE EXCHANGE REACTIONS - THE (π+, π0) REACTION * Tools For Isoscalar And Isovector Excitations * INELASTIC ELECTRON SCATTERING * GIANT RESONANCE EXCITATION BY FAST HEAVY IONS * From Multipole Cross Section To Multipole Strength * The Electric Isoscalar Resonances * The Isoscalar Giant Monopole Resonance * Systematics on the GMR * Compressibility and the Giant Monopole Resonance * Introduction * The Compressibility of nuclear matter from the GMR energies * Discussion * The Isoscalar Giant Quadrupole Resonance * General Trends In Medium-Heavy and Heavy Nuclei * The GQR In Light Nuclei * The Isoscalar 3- Strength, LEOR and HEOR * Isoscalar 4+ Strength * Miscellaneous; Isoscalar 1- and L > 4-Strength * The Electric Isovector Giant Resonances * The Isovector Giant Dipole Resonance: GDR * The Isovector Giant Monopole Resonances: IVGMR * The Isovector Quadrupole Resonance: IVGQR * The Effect of Ground State Deformation on the Shape of Giant Resonance: Microscopic Picture * Giant Resonances Built on Excited States * Introduction * Capture Reactions on Light Nuclei * Statistical decay of GDR γ Emission in Heavy Compound Systems * Introduction * Theoretical Predictions * Some Experimental Results * Summary and Outlook * Acknowledgements * General References * References

  7. Sensory ecology: giant eyes for giant predators?

    PubMed

    Partridge, Julian C

    2012-04-24

    Mathematical models suggest the enormous eyes of giant and colossal squid evolved to see the bioluminescence induced by the approach of predatory whales. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Recurrent renal giant leiomyosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Öziş, Salih Erpulat; Gülpınar, Kamil; Şahlı, Zafer; Konak, Baha Burak; Keskin, Mete; Özdemir, Süleyman; Ataoğlu, Ömür

    2016-01-01

    Primary renal leiomyosarcomas are rare, aggressive tumors. They constitute 1–2% of adult malignant renal tumors. Although leiomyosarcomas are the most common histological type (50–60%) of renal sarcomas, information on renal leiomyosarcoma is limited. Local or systemic recurrences are common. The radiological appearance of renal leiomyosarcomas is not specific, therefore renal leiomyosarcoma cannot be distinguished from renal cell carcinoma by imaging methods in all patients. A 74-year-old female patient presented to our clinic complaining of a palpable mass on the right side of her abdomen in November 2012. The abdominal magnetic resonance imaging revealed a mass, 25 × 24 × 23 cm in size. Her past medical history revealed that she has undergone right radical nephrectomy in 2007, due to a 11 × 12 × 13 cm renal mass that was then reported as renal cell carcinoma on abdominal magnetic resonance imaging, but the pathological diagnosis was low-grade renal leiomyosarcoma. The most recent follow-up of the patient was in 2011, with no signs of local recurrence or distant metastases within this four-year period. The patient underwent laparotomy on November 2012, and a 35 cm retroperitoneal mass was excised. The pathological examination of the mass was reported as high-grade leiomyosarcoma. The formation of this giant retroperitoneal mass in 1 year can be explained by the transformation of the lesion’s pathology from low-grade to a high-grade tumor. PMID:27436926

  9. Evaluation of a novel method based on amplification of DNA fragments surrounding rare restriction sites (ADSRRS fingerprinting) for typing strains of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium.

    PubMed

    Krawczyk, Beata; Lewandowski, Krzysztof; Bronk, Marek; Samet, Alfred; Myjak, Przemysław; Kur, Józef

    2003-03-01

    In the search for an effective DNA-typing technique for use in hospital epidemiology, the performance and convenience of a novel assay based on the fingerprinting of bacterial genomes by amplification of DNA fragments surrounding rare restriction sites (ADSRRS fingerprinting) was tested. A large number of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (VREM) isolates from haematological ward patients of the Clinical Hospital in Gdańsk were examined. We found that ADSRRS fingerprinting analysis is a rapid method that offers good discriminatory power. The method demonstrated also excellent reproducibility. The usefulness of the ADSRRS fingerprinting method for molecular typing was compared with pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) method, which is currently considered the gold standard for molecular typing of isolates recovered from patients and the environment in the course of investigation and control of nosocomial outbreaks. Clustering of ADSRRS fingerprinting data matched pulsed field gel electrophoresis data. The features of ADSRRS fingerprinting technique is discussed in comparison with conventional methods. Data presented here demonstrate the complexity of the epidemiological situation concerning VREM that may occur in a single medical ward.

  10. Connecting Active-Site Loop Conformations and Catalysis in Triosephosphate Isomerase: Insights from a Rare Variation at Residue 96 in the Plasmodial Enzyme.

    PubMed

    Pareek, Vidhi; Samanta, Moumita; Joshi, Niranjan V; Balaram, Hemalatha; Murthy, Mathur R N; Balaram, Padmanabhan

    2016-04-01

    Despite extensive research into triosephosphate isomerases (TIMs), there exists a gap in understanding of the remarkable conjunction between catalytic loop-6 (residues 166-176) movement and the conformational flip of Glu165 (catalytic base) upon substrate binding that primes the active site for efficient catalysis. The overwhelming occurrence of serine at position 96 (98% of the 6277 unique TIM sequences), spatially proximal to E165 and the loop-6 residues, raises questions about its role in catalysis. Notably, Plasmodium falciparum TIM has an extremely rare residue--phenylalanine--at this position whereas, curiously, the mutant F96S was catalytically defective. We have obtained insights into the influence of residue 96 on the loop-6 conformational flip and E165 positioning by combining kinetic and structural studies on the PfTIM F96 mutants F96Y, F96A, F96S/S73A, and F96S/L167V with sequence conservation analysis and comparative analysis of the available apo and holo structures of the enzyme from diverse organisms.

  11. Bilateral Giant Juvenile Fibroadenoma of Breast.

    PubMed

    Makkar, Nikhil; Singh, Sumitoj; Paul, Surinder; Sandhu, Mandeep Singh; Kumar, Ashok

    2017-06-01

    Fibroadenomas are benign lesions of breast commonly found in young age group. These focal tumours contain both mesenchymal and glandular tissue. Giant juvenile fibroma of breast is rare variant of fibroadenoma found usually in less than 20 years of age. They present with rapid enlargement of single or multiple, discrete, painless large nodule of breast. A 14-years-old premenarche girl presented with large bilateral breast lumps for two months. FNAC showed features of juvenile fibroadenoma. Breast conserving surgical excision of lumps was performed and histopathology confirmed the diagnosis of juvenile fibroadenoma. Giant juvenile fibroadenomas are characterised by rapid enlargement of encapsulated mass. The aetiology is unknown, although end-organ hypersensitivity to normal level of estrogen is postulated. We present a case of bilateral giant juvenile fibroadenoma for its rarity.

  12. Giant sigmoid diverticulitis mimicking acute appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Anderton, M; Griffiths, B; Ferguson, G

    2011-09-01

    Giant colonic diverticula are a rare manifestation of diverticular disease and there are fewer than 150 cases described in the literature. They may have an acute or chronic presentation or may remain asymptomatic and be found incidentally. As the majority (over 80%) of giant diverticula are located in the sigmoid colon, they usually present with left-sided symptoms but due to the variable location of the sigmoid loop, right-sided symptoms are possible. We describe the acute presentation of an inflamed giant sigmoid diverticulum with right iliac fossa pain. We discuss both the treatment options for this interesting condition and also the important role of computed tomography in the diagnosis and management of abdominal pain in elderly patients.

  13. Ex utero intrapartum treatment (EXIT) for congenital giant ranula.

    PubMed

    Chan, Dorothy F Y; Lee, Cheuk H; Fung, Tak Y; Chan, Daniel L W; Abdullah, Victor; Ng, Pak C

    2006-10-01

    Congenital giant ranula causing life-threatening upper airway obstruction is a rare condition. A well-planned ex utero intrapartum treatment (EXIT) procedure for aspiration and decompression of the cystic lesion is simple, efficacious and effective in securing a patent airway before the fetus is completely delivered, and may prevent lifelong neurodevelopmental complications associated with perinatal asphyxia in such cases. EXIT could be a life-saving procedure for congenital giant ranula.

  14. Determination of antimicrobial resistance of Enterococcus strains isolated from pigs and their genotypic characterization by method of amplification of DNA fragments surrounding rare restriction sites (ADSRRS fingerprinting).

    PubMed

    Nowakiewicz, Aneta; Ziółkowska, Grażyna; Trościańczyk, Aleksandra; Zięba, Przemysław; Gnat, Sebastian

    2017-03-01

    In this study, we analysed phenotypic resistance profiles and their reflection in the genomic profiles of Enterococcus spp. strains isolated from pigs raised on different farms. Samples were collected from five pig farms (n=90 animals) and tested for Enterococcus. MICs of 12 antimicrobials were determined using the broth microdilution method, and epidemiological molecular analysis of strains belonging to selected species (faecalis, faecium and hirae) was performed using the ADSRRS-fingerprinting (amplification of DNA fragments surrounding rare restriction sites) method with a few modifications. The highest percentage of strains was resistant to tetracycline (73.4 %), erythromycin and tylosin (42.5 %) and rifampin (25.2 %), and a large number of strains exhibited high-level resistance to both kanamycin (25.2 %) and streptomycin (27.6 %). The strains of E. faecalis, E. faecium and E. hirae (n=184) revealed varied phenotypic resistance profiles, among which as many as seven met the criteria for multidrug resistance (30.4 % of strains tested). ADSRRS-fingerprinting analysis produced 17 genotypic profiles of individual strains which were correlated with their phenotypic resistance profiles. Only E. hirae strains susceptible to all of the chemotherapeutics tested had two different ADSRRS profiles. Moreover, eight animals were carriers of more than one genotype belonging to the same Enterococcus spp., mainly E. faecalis. Given the possibility of transmission to humans of the high-resistance/multidrug resistance enterococci and the significant role of pigs as food animals in this process, it is necessary to introduce a multilevel control strategy by carrying out research on the resistance and molecular characteristics of indicator bacterial strains isolated from animals on individual farms.

  15. The influence of A-site rare-earth for barium substitution on the chemical structure and ferroelectric properties of BZT thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Ostos, C.; Martinez-Sarrion, M.L.; Mestres, L.; Prieto, P.

    2009-10-15

    Rare-earth (RE) doped Ba(Zr,Ti)O{sub 3} (BZT) thin films were prepared by rf-magnetron sputtering from a Ba{sub 0.90}Ln{sub 0.067}Zr{sub 0.09}Ti{sub 0.91}O{sub 3} (Ln=La, Nd) target. The films were deposited at a substrate temperature of 600 deg. C in a high oxygen pressure atmosphere. X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns of RE-BZT films revealed a <001> epitaxial crystal growth on Nb-doped SrTiO{sub 3}, <001> and <011> growth on single-crystal Si, and a <111>-preferred orientation on Pt-coated Si substrates. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed uniform growth of the films deposited, along with the presence of crystals of about half-micron size on the film's surface. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) evidenced high crystalline films with thicknesses of about 100 nm for 30 min of sputtering. Electron-probe microanalysis (EPMA) corroborated the growth rate (3.0-3.5 nm/min) of films deposited on Pt-coated Si substrates. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), in depth profile mode, showed variations in photoelectron Ti 2p doublet positions at lower energies with spin-orbital distances characteristic of BaTiO{sub 3}-based compounds. The XPS analysis revealed that lanthanide ions positioned onto the A-site of the BZT-perovskite structure increasing the MO{sub 6}-octahedra distortion (M=Ti, Zr) and, thereby, modifying the Ti-O binding length. Polarization-electric field hysteresis loops on Ag/RE-doped BZT/Pt capacitor showed good ferroelectric behavior and higher remanent polarization values than corresponding non-doped system. - Graphical abstract: XPS narrow-scan spectra of Ti 2p doublets of the Nd-doped BZT films deposited on Pt-coated Si substrate.

  16. The influence of A-site rare-earth for barium substitution on the chemical structure and ferroelectric properties of BZT thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostos, C.; Martínez-Sarrión, M. L.; Mestres, L.; Delgado, E.; Prieto, P.

    2009-10-01

    Rare-earth ( RE) doped Ba(Zr,Ti)O 3 (BZT) thin films were prepared by rf-magnetron sputtering from a Ba 0.90Ln0.067Zr 0.09Ti 0.91O 3 ( Ln=La, Nd) target. The films were deposited at a substrate temperature of 600 °C in a high oxygen pressure atmosphere. X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns of RE-BZT films revealed a <001> epitaxial crystal growth on Nb-doped SrTiO 3, <001> and <011> growth on single-crystal Si, and a <111>-preferred orientation on Pt-coated Si substrates. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed uniform growth of the films deposited, along with the presence of crystals of about half-micron size on the film's surface. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) evidenced high crystalline films with thicknesses of about 100 nm for 30 min of sputtering. Electron-probe microanalysis (EPMA) corroborated the growth rate (3.0-3.5 nm/min) of films deposited on Pt-coated Si substrates. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), in depth profile mode, showed variations in photoelectron Ti 2 p doublet positions at lower energies with spin-orbital distances characteristic of BaTiO 3-based compounds. The XPS analysis revealed that lanthanide ions positioned onto the A-site of the BZT-perovskite structure increasing the MO 6-octahedra distortion ( M=Ti, Zr) and, thereby, modifying the Ti-O binding length. Polarization-electric field hysteresis loops on Ag/ RE-doped BZT/Pt capacitor showed good ferroelectric behavior and higher remanent polarization values than corresponding non-doped system.

  17. β-SiH-containing tris(silazido) rare-earth complexes as homogeneous and grafted single-site catalyst precursors for hydroamination

    DOE PAGES

    Eedugurala, Naresh; Wang, Zhuoran; Yan, KaKing; ...

    2017-01-25

    A series of homoleptic rare-earth silazido compounds and their silica-grafted derivatives were prepared to compare spectroscopic and catalytic features under homogeneous and interfacial conditions. Trivalent tris(silazido) compounds Ln{N(SiHMe2)tBu}3 (Ln = Sc (1), Y (2), Lu (3)) are prepared in high yield by salt metathesis reactions. Solution-phase and solid-state characterization of 1–3 by NMR and IR spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction reveals Ln←H–Si interactions. These features are retained in solvent-coordinated 2·Et2O, 2·THF, and 3·THF. The change in spectroscopic features characterizing the secondary interactions (νSiH, 1JSiH) from the unactivated SiH in the silazane HN(SiHMe2)tBu follows the trend 3 > 2 > 1 ≈more » 2·Et2O > 2·THF ≈ 3·THF. Ligand lability follows the same pattern, with Et2O readily dissociating from 2·Et2O while THF is displaced only during surface grafting reactions. 1 and 2·THF graft onto mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSN) to give Ln{N(SiHMe2)tBu}n@MSN (Ln = Sc (1@MSN), Y (2@MSN)) along with THF and protonated silazido as HN(SiHMe2)tBu and H2NtBu. The surface species are characterized by multinuclear and multidimensional solid-state (SS) NMR spectroscopic techniques, as well as diffuse reflectance FTIR, elemental analysis, and reaction stoichiometry. A key 1JSiH SSNMR measurement reveals that the grafted sites most closely resemble Ln·THF adducts, suggesting that siloxane coordination occurs in grafted compounds. These species catalyze the hydroamination/bicyclization of aminodialkenes, and both solution-phase and interfacial conditions provide the bicyclized product with equivalent cis:trans ratios. As a result, similar diastereoselectivities mediated by catalytic sites under the two conditions suggest similar effective environments.« less

  18. Atypical giant haemangioma of liver with systemic inflammatory manifestations.

    PubMed

    Khalid, Mohd; Ahmad, Mehtab; Jain, Amit; Rizvi, Imran

    2013-01-25

    Haemangioma is the most common benign tumour of the liver. Most of them are small in size (less than 4 cm) and are often asymptomatic and discovered incidentally on modern diagnostic imaging. Lesions with a diameter larger than 4 cm are called giant haemangiomas, and these are usually located in the right hepatic lobe. Although haemangioma is the most frequent benign tumour of the liver, 'giant' haemangiomas are rare. Such lesions may give rise to symptoms requiring treatment. In this case report, we describe the case of a 50-year-old Indian man who presented with giant liver haemangioma and systemic inflammatory manifestations.

  19. Giant submandibular gland duct sialolith mimicking an impacted canine tooth

    PubMed Central

    Bhullar, Ramandeep Singh; Dhawan, Amit; Bhullar, Kanwalpreet; Malhotra, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    Sialolithiasis is the most common disease affecting the salivary glands and accounts for 80% of salivary gland disorders. Chronic sialolithiasis promotes stone formation. Size of the salivary stones may range from 0.1 mm to 30 mm or be even bigger. Those salivary stones, the size of which exceeds 15 mm in any one dimension or 1 g in weight are classified as giant sialoliths. Giant sialoliths of the submandibular gland duct are rarely reported. Here, we report a case of a giant sialolith of the submandibular gland duct mimicking an impacted mandibular canine tooth on routine radiographic examination and its surgical management through an intraoral approach. PMID:26668461

  20. Isolated giant molluscum contagiosum mimicking epidermoid cyst

    PubMed Central

    Uzuncakmak, Tugba K.; Kuru, Burce C.; Zemheri, Ebru I.; Zindanci, Ilkin; Turkoglu, Zafer; Kavala, Mukaddes

    2016-01-01

    Molluscum contagiosum is a benign cutaneous viral infection which is caused by double- stranded DNA poxvirus. It affects mainly children and young adults and usually presents with single or multiple umblicated papules or nodules on face, arms, legs and anogenital regions. It may present in atypical size and clinical appearance in patients with altered or impaired immunity and rarely in immuncompetent patients. Herein we present an immuncompetent young adult patient with isolated giant molluscum contagiosum, which was mimicking epidermoid cyst clinically. PMID:27648389

  1. Giant Pleomorphic Adenoma of the Parotid Gland.

    PubMed

    Sajid, Muhammad; Rehman, Sajid; Misbah, Junaid

    2015-10-01

    Salivary gland tumours are a relatively rare entity. Pleomorphic adenoma is the most common amongst these, comprising 60 - 70% of all parotid tumours. Pleomorphic adenomas are benign and tend to increase in size slowly. Here we are presenting a case of giant pleomorphic adenoma of the parotid, being the largest in size to be excised in Pakistan in recorded literature measuring 24 x 22 x 12 cm and weighing 1.8 kgs. Superficial parotidectomy was done with an excellent cosmetic outcome.

  2. Successful minimally-invasive management of a case of giant prostatic hypertrophy associated with recurrent nephrogenic adenoma of the prostate

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Benign Prostatic Hypertrophy (BPH) is said to affect at least a third of men over 60. However, the literature contains fewer than 200 reports of prostates over 200g in mass - Giant Prostatic Hypertrophy (GPH). Nephrogenic adenomas are benign lesions of the urinary tract that are believed to represent the local proliferation of shed renal tubular cells implanting at sites of urothelial injury. Case presentation We present the first case in the literature of these two rare pathologies co-existing in the same patient and the successful management and 36-month follow-up of the patient’s symptoms with minimally invasive therapy, including the still-uncommon selective prostatic artery embolisation. We also briefly discuss the role of PAX2 in injured renal tissues and nephrogenic adenomas. Conclusions Symptomatic Giant Prostatic Hypertrophy (GPH) can be successfully managed with a combination of serial TURPs, 5 α-reductase inhibition and selective prostatic artery embolisation (SPAE). PMID:23565707

  3. Successful minimally-invasive management of a case of giant prostatic hypertrophy associated with recurrent nephrogenic adenoma of the prostate.

    PubMed

    Learney, Robert M; Malde, Sachin; Downes, Mark; Shrotri, Nitin

    2013-04-08

    Benign Prostatic Hypertrophy (BPH) is said to affect at least a third of men over 60. However, the literature contains fewer than 200 reports of prostates over 200g in mass - Giant Prostatic Hypertrophy (GPH). Nephrogenic adenomas are benign lesions of the urinary tract that are believed to represent the local proliferation of shed renal tubular cells implanting at sites of urothelial injury. We present the first case in the literature of these two rare pathologies co-existing in the same patient and the successful management and 36-month follow-up of the patient's symptoms with minimally invasive therapy, including the still-uncommon selective prostatic artery embolisation. We also briefly discuss the role of PAX2 in injured renal tissues and nephrogenic adenomas. Symptomatic Giant Prostatic Hypertrophy (GPH) can be successfully managed with a combination of serial TURPs, 5 α-reductase inhibition and selective prostatic artery embolisation (SPAE).

  4. Giant peritoneal loose body in the pelvic cavity confirmed by laparoscopic exploration: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong; Ling, Yun-zhi; Cui, Ming-ming; Xia, Zhi-xiu; Feng, Yong; Chen, Chun-sheng

    2015-03-24

    A 51-year-old previously healthy male underwent a routine medical examination. Computed tomography and ultrasonography showed an oval-shaped mass that was about 50 × 40 mm in size in the left iliac fossa. Prior to surgery, the lesion was suspected to be a teratoma with core calcification or stromal tumor derived from the rectosigmoid colon. During the procedure, a yellow-white, egg-shaped mass was discovered that was completely free from the pelvic cavity in front of the rectum. The giant, peritoneal loose body was taken out through the enlarged port site. Histological examination showed that the mass consisted of well-circumscribed, unencapsulated, paucicellular tissue, with an obviously hyalinized fibrosclerotic center. A giant peritoneal body is extremely rare. We report such a case and review previously published literature.

  5. Low major histocompatibility complex class II DQA diversity in the Giant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca)

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Liang; Ruan, Xiang-Dong; Ge, Yun-Fa; Wan, Qiu-Hong; Fang, Sheng-Guo

    2007-01-01

    Background The giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) is one of the most endangered animals due to habitat fragmentation and loss. Although the captive breeding program for this species is now nearly two decades old, researches on the genetic background of such captive populations, especially on adaptive molecular polymorphism of major histocompatibility complex (MHC), are still limited. In this study, we characterized adaptive variation of the giant panda's MHC DQA gene by PCR amplification of its antigen-recognizing region (i.e. the exon 2) and subsequent single-strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP) and sequence analyses. Results The results revealed a low level of DQA exon 2 diversity in this rare animal, presenting 6 alleles from 61 giant panda individuals. The observed polymorphism was restricted to 9 amino acid substitutions, all of which occurred at and adjacent to positions forming the functionally important antigen-binding sites. All the samples were in Hardy-Weinberg proportions. A significantly higher rate of non-synonymous than synonymous substitutions at the antigen-binding sites indicated positive selection for diversity in the locus. Conclusion The DQA allelic diversity of giant pandas was low relative to other vertebrates. Nonetheless, the pandas exhibited more alleles in DQA than those in DRB, suggesting the alpha chain genes would play a leading role when coping with certain pathogens and thus should be included in conservation genetic investigation. The microsatellite and MHC loci might predict long-term persistence potential and short-term survival ability, respectively. Consequently, it is recommended to utilize multiple suites of microsatellite markers and multiple MHC loci to detect overall genetic variation in order to design unbiased conservation strategies. PMID:17555583

  6. Unstable giant gravitons

    SciTech Connect

    Mello Koch, Robert de; Ives, Norman; Smolic, Jelena; Smolic, Milena

    2006-03-15

    We find giant graviton solutions in Frolov's three parameter generalization of the Lunin-Maldacena background. The background we study has {gamma}-tilde{sub 1}=0 and {gamma}-tilde{sub 2}={gamma}-tilde{sub 3}={gamma}-tilde. This class of backgrounds provides a nonsupersymmetric example of the gauge theory/gravity correspondence that can be tested quantitatively, as recently shown by Frolov, Roiban, and Tseytlin. The giant graviton solutions we find have a greater energy than the point gravitons, making them unstable states. Despite this, we find striking quantitative agreement between the gauge theory and gravity descriptions of open strings attached to the giant.

  7. Thymoma type B1 arising in a giant supradiaphragmatic thymolipoma.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Tevfik; Han, Serdar; Han, Unsal; Atac, Gokce Kaan; Yanik, Serdar

    2014-11-01

    Thymolipomas are uncommon tumors of the anterior mediastinum. They may extend into, but rarely stem from, the chest cavity. Furthermore, thymoma arising in a thymolipoma is extremely rare. We report a unique case of thymoma type B1 that originated form a giant thymolipoma located in the chest cavity, which was resected by a lateral thoracotomy in a 23-year-old woman. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of thymoma type B1 arising within a giant thymolipoma. © The Author(s) 2013 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  8. Congenital giant right atrium in an elderly woman.

    PubMed

    Santra, Gouranga; Paul, Rudrajit; Das, Shubhabrata; Datta, Arnab; Pradhan, Sourav; Sarkar, R N

    2014-07-01

    Enlargement of right atrium is usually secondary to pulmonary hypertension due to valvular heart diseases or obstructive pulmonary disorders, atrial septal defect, tricuspid atresia or stenosis, pulmonary stenosis, primary pulmonary hypertension, Ebstein's anomaly. Congenital enlargement of right atrium is rare and it commonly presents in children. Our patient presented with congenital giant right atrium at 65 years of age, other cardiac diseases being excluded. Patient developed tricuspid regurgitation, but pulmonary hypertension was absent till the date. Congenital giant right atrium has rarely been reported from India.

  9. Core formation by giant impacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tonks, W. B.; Melosh, H. J.

    1991-01-01

    Ideas about the accretion and early evolution of the Earth and the other terrestrial planets have recently undergone a number of revolutionary changes. It has become clear that giant impacts were far from rare events. In the later stages of accretion any given planetary embryo is liable to be struck several times by other bodies of up to half its own diameter. Such an impact may have the ability to trigger core formation. Traditional accretion models have had great difficulty explaining the formation of the core. If one admits the importance of infrequent large events that may melt an entire hemisphere, the core formation difficulty vanishes. Millimeter-size iron blebs in the melted region will rain out due to their density difference with the silicate melt. Core formation may not require the melting of the entire hemisphere of the planet. The conditions are explored under which impact induced core formation may occur.

  10. Tracks of a Giant

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-08-25

    The giant, 70-meter-wide antenna at NASA Deep Space Network complex in Goldstone, Calif., tracks a spacecraft on Nov. 17, 2009. This antenna, officially known as Deep Space Station 14, is also nicknamed the Mars antenna.

  11. The Next Giant Step

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Artist Robert McCall painted "The Next Giant Step" in 1979 to commemorate the heroism and courage of spaceflight pioneers. Located in the lobby of Johnson's building 2, the mural depicts America's ...

  12. Silvics of Giant Sequoia

    Treesearch

    C. Phillip Weatherspoon

    1986-01-01

    Ecological relationships-including habitat and life history---of giant sequoia (Sequoiadendron giganteum [Lindl.] Buchholz) in natural stands are summarized. Such silvical information provides an important foundation for sound management of the species.

  13. The Giant Cell.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stockdale, Dennis

    1998-01-01

    Provides directions for the construction of giant plastic cells, including details for building and installing the organelles. Also contains instructions for preparing the ribosomes, nucleolus, nucleus, and mitochondria. (DDR)

  14. Giant Earlobe Epidermoid Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Guisado, Joaquín; Scilletta, Alessandra; Cabrera-Sánchez, Emilio; Rioja, Luis F; Perrotta, Rosario

    2012-01-01

    Epidermoid cysts represent the most common cutaneous cysts. They are usually small and benign; however, sometimes they can grow to giant epidermoid cists, and occasionally malignancies develop. Giant epidermoid cysts at the earlobe have never been described but in other locations. We describe a case of a giant epidermoid cyst at the earlobe, a location where such a large cyst has never been reported before. The mass was completely resected and the wound of the pedunculated base was sutured with four stitches of nylon 5/0. Histopathology confirmed the presumptive diagnosis of an epidermoid cyst. Six months after the resection, the patient did not have any relapse of the epidermoid cyst. The earlobe is a potential location for giant epidermoid cysts. Although the clinical diagnosis could be enough, due to the possibility of malignancy and to ensure appropriate diagnosis, we consider that all cysts should be sent to the anatomic pathology laboratory for histological evaluation. PMID:22557855

  15. The Giant Cell.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stockdale, Dennis

    1998-01-01

    Provides directions for the construction of giant plastic cells, including details for building and installing the organelles. Also contains instructions for preparing the ribosomes, nucleolus, nucleus, and mitochondria. (DDR)

  16. Remission of hypertension after treatment of giant simple renal cyst: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Renal cysts are common in old patients, and usually remain untreated. Giant renal cysts measuring more than 15 cm in greatest diameter are uncommon and the association with hypertension is very rare. We present a case of a 25-year-old woman with a giant right renal cyst associated with hypertension that was treated by laparoscopic excision, followed by resolution hypertension. PMID:20062669

  17. Giant Cell Arteritis and Polymyalgia Rheumatica

    MedlinePlus

    ... Controlfamilydoctor.org editorial staff Home Diseases and Conditions Giant Cell Arteritis and Polymyalgia Rheumatica Condition Giant Cell Arteritis and Polymyalgia Rheumatica Share Print Giant ...

  18. Capella: Separating the Giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, P. R.; Dupree, A. K.

    2002-01-01

    Images from the Faint Object Camera (FOC) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) are used to spatially separate the two giants of Capella (α Aurigae; HD 34029) for the first time at ultraviolet wavelengths. The images were obtained with broadband filters that isolate the wavelength regions 2500-3000 Å and 1300-1500 Å. The cool G8 giant is found to be weaker than the hot G1 giant by factors of around 4 and 17, respectively, in these bands. The latter factor is largely due to the much stronger G1 continuum at short wavelengths. No evidence is found for material lying between the two stars in the images. In addition, the objective prisms of the FOC were used to obtain low-resolution spectra from 1200 to 3000 Å, allowing individual emission lines from each star to be spatially separated. Cool-to-hot star ratios for the emission lines H I Lyα, O I λ1305, Si II λ1816, C II λ1335, He II λ1640, and Si IV λ1393 are presented, showing that the cool giant is weaker than the hot giant by factors of 5-10 in these lines. The O I emission is only a factor of 2.5 weaker in the cool giant, most probably resulting from fluorescence in the extended atmosphere of the cool giant. The line ratios are compared with values derived from International Ultraviolet Explorer and HST/Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph spectra, which could separate the stars spectrally but not spatially. Reasonable agreement is found although the FOC ratios generally imply lower contributions from the cool giant. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by AURA, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555.

  19. Rare earths

    SciTech Connect

    Vijayan, S.; Melnyk, A.J.; Singh, R.D.; Nuttall, K.

    1989-01-01

    For conventional applications, there is limited demand for rare earth elements as well as yttrium and scandium. But the emergence of new high technology applications such as supermagnets, lasers, and superconductors should result in significant demand for some of these elements. This article examines the anticipated applications and demands for rare earth elements over the next decade. It also looks at the implications on the use of available resources. In the context of a growing demand, process methods are reviewed for the recovery of rare earth elements from conventional and unconventional resources. And the article also discusses the challenges facing the mining industry in meeting this opportunity.

  20. Recurrent giant fibrovascular polyp of the esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ser Yee; Chan, Weng Hoong; Sivanandan, Ranjiv; Lim, Dennis Teck Hock; Wong, Wai Keong

    2009-01-01

    Giant fibrovascular polyps of the esophagus and hypopharynx are rare benign esophageal tumors. They arise most commonly in the upper esophagus and may, rarely, originate in the hypopharynx. They can vary significantly in size. Even though they are benign, they may be lethal due to either bleeding or, rarely, asphyxiation if a large polyp is regurgitated. Patients commonly present with dysphagia or hematemesis. The polyps may not be well visualized on endoscopy and imaging plays a vital role in aiding diagnosis as well as providing important information for pre-operative planning, such as the location of the pedicle, the vascularity of the polyp and the tissue elements of the mass. They can also be recurrent in rare cases, especially if the resection margins of the base are involved. We review the recent literature and report a case of a 61-year-old man with a recurrent giant esophageal fibrovascular polyp with illustrative contrast barium swallow, CT and intra-operative images, who required several surgeries via a combination of endoscopic, trans-oral, trans-cervical, trans-thoracic and trans-abdominal approaches. PMID:19653354

  1. Ulcerated Giant Dermatofibroma following Routine Childhood Vaccination in a Young Boy

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Michelle S.Y.; Foong, Alice Y.W.; Koh, Mark J.A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The development of cutaneous neoplasms at immunization sites following vaccination is uncommon, and only few have been reported in the literature worldwide. We report an unusual case of an ulcerated giant dermatofibroma that developed as a chronic nonhealing plaque in the immunization scar of a young boy after vaccination. Case Report A 13-month-old Chinese boy presented with an unusual skin reaction on the vaccination site at the right anterolateral thigh following a routine intramuscular injection of ‘5-in-1’ (diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, polio and Haemophilus influenzae B) vaccine at 4 months of age. The immunization site developed a slightly raised papule with a central punctum that progressively grew in size, ulcerated and showed occasional bleeding over a span of 9 months. On follow-up, the lesion showed a chronic granulomatous reaction with surrounding induration and a central scarring. The right inguinal lymph node was palpable. Ultrasound of the lesion showed only nonspecific focal skin thickening. An incisional skin biopsy with careful histopathological evaluation revealed microscopic features consistent with an ulcerated giant dermatofibroma. Conclusion Neoplastic development in immunization scars following vaccination is a rare occurrence and, hence, makes this case a diagnostic challenge. A high index of suspicion is crucial in atypical presentations of a common skin lesion, as typified by this case. Careful history taking and clinicopathological correlation of clinical findings with gross and microscopic findings along with targeted immunohistological staining is often essential to aid early diagnosis. PMID:27721753

  2. Idiopathic giant cell myocarditis in childhood: A case report.

    PubMed

    Pehlivan, Sultan; Akçan, Ramazan; Heybet, Eyup Ruşen; Cavlak, Mehmet; Pehlivan, Ali

    2016-03-01

    Idiopathic giant cell myocarditis is a rare entity of unknown origin, which causes sudden death in more than half of the affected patients. It is rarely seen in childhood, and might result in death due to heart failure and ventricular arrhythmias. Idiopathic giant cell myocarditis is mostly diagnosed at autopsy incidentally. Here we present a rare case of childhood idiopathic giant cell myocarditis. A 10-year old boy found dead in his bed in the morning. Interview with family members revealed death the boy was in good health conditions apart from being overweight. At autopsy, external examination was completely normal. Internal examination revealed normal findings; the heart was 297g and macroscopically normal. No traces of any toxic agents detected in complete toxicological analyses. Areas characterized with granulomatous lesions, lymphocytes, histiocytes, and multinucleated giant cells were observed in myocardium at histopathological examination. No necrosis was observed in granulomatous areas. Tuberculosis was negative in the PCR assays. There were no signs indicative of fungal infection, and clinical status of the case was not compatible with the sarcoidosis. In this respect death was attributed to idiopathic giant cell myocarditis.

  3. Giant anal condyloma (giant condyloma acuminatum of anus) after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation associated with human papillomavirus: a case report.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Jin-Soo; Kim, Gee-Bum; Choi, Byung-Seok; Kim, Min-Sung; Park, Sang-Gon

    2015-01-19

    Condyloma acuminatum are caused by human papillomavirus. Giant condyloma acuminatum is a locally invasive, destructive, and large sized mass. Risk factors for the development of giant condyloma acuminatum include an immunodeficient state, such as human immunodeficiency virus infection, post-organ transplantation, or post-allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. However, reports of giant condyloma after bone marrow transplantation are extremely rare (0.3 to 1.3%). The standard treatment for giant condyloma acuminatum is recommended as wide surgical resection due to its high rate of success and low rate of recurrence. A 31-year-old Korean man presented to our hospital with anal discomfort for more than one month due to a protruding mass. He had a history of BCR-ABL-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia and had undergone an allogenic stem cell transplantation. Gross findings revealed a large perianal cauliflower-like mass over 7cm in size with invasion of the anal orifice. He was diagnosed with giant anal condyloma occurring after an allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. However, we achieved successful treatment using a combination of topical podophyllin and cryotherapy and transanal surgical excision, followed by bleomycin irrigation. We report an extremely rare case of giant condyloma acuminatum of anus due to human papillomavirus type six in a patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia following an allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. The tumor was successfully treated with a combination of topical podophyllin and cryotherapy and transanal surgical excision, followed by bleomycin irrigation.

  4. Giant sialolith of submandibular gland: report of a case†.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Selçuk; Vuralkan, Erkan; Çobanog˘lu, Bengü; Arslan, Ahmet; Ural, Ahmet

    2015-04-05

    Sialolithiasis is one of the most common diseases of salivary glands in middle-aged patients. Sialoliths are localized in submandibular glands in nearly 80% of the reported cases and they are classified as 'giant' in case any dimension exceeds 15 mm. Giant sialolith in submandibular gland is a rare disorder. Here, an unusual case of giant sialolith in submandibular gland is reported. A 42-year-old man referred with complaints of recurrent pain and swelling in the left submandibular area. Computerized tomography revealed a calcified mass of 42 × 17 mm size within the submandibular gland. Excision was performed in the submandibular gland and a giant sialolith of 35 mm length localized in the body of the gland was detected. The postoperative period was uneventful and the patient fully recovered. Published by Oxford University Press and JSCR Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015.

  5. Super giant basal cell carcinoma of the abdominal wall: still possible in the 21st century.

    PubMed

    de Bree, Eelco; Laliotis, Aggelos; Manios, Andreas; Tsiftsis, Dimitris D; Melissas, John

    2010-07-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is very common and usually encountered when it is small in size. Giant BCC (i.e. greater than 5 cm in diameter) is quite rare and comprises 0.5 percent of all BCC. Extremely rarely, tumors larger than 20 cm have been reported. Herein, a case with an enormous, vegetating BCC of the abdominal wall, 30 x 20 cm in size, is described. This report demonstrates that such a case can still be observed in the civilized world of the 21st century, which remains profoundly astonishing. A literature survey was performed and revealed only 7 cases with such super giant BCC (i.e. larger than 20 cm in diameter). Generally, this tumor attains these enormous proportions due to neglect on the patient's part, and is usually located at sites covered by clothes. Treatment is mainly surgical and generally curative, resulting also in an improved quality of life. Tumor size of more than 10 cm in diameter is associated with increased risk for metastatic disease, severe morbidity and consequently impaired prognosis.

  6. Uterine prolapse complicated with a giant cervical polyp.

    PubMed

    Massinde, Anthony Naju; Mpogoro, Filbert; Rumanyika, Richard Nyerere; Magoma, Moke

    2012-01-01

    Uterine prolapse with giant cervical polyp is a rare combination. Although uterine prolapse is common among elderly and menopausal women, giant cervical polyps are commonly encountered in young reproductive-age adults. A 55-year-old, para 7, Tanzanian woman, 7 months postmenopausal, presented with history of a protruding vaginal mass for 3 months. She also had a third-degree uterine prolapse with the cervix beyond the hymen and a huge, ulcerated, round mass on the anterior lip of the cervix. The mass had a large stalk, bled easily on touch, and measured approximately 6 × 6 cm in its largest diameter. The external cervical os and posterior cervical lip were identified and appeared normal. Transvaginal hysterectomy was performed with unremarkable recovery. Giant cervical polyp associated with uterine prolapse, although rare, can occur in menopausal women. Transvaginal hysterectomy as was done in this patient may be all that is required in benign polyps.

  7. [Giant Meckel's diverticulum in an adult].

    PubMed

    Rivas, Tomas Contreras; Gallardo, Nasser Eluzen; Valenzuela, Sebastian King; Pezoa, María Elena Molina; Zúñiga, José Miguel; Muñoz, Carol Bustamante; Saralic, Biserka Spralja

    2014-10-07

    Meckel's diverticulum results from a partial persistence of the omphalomesenteric duct and is the most common congenital anomaly of the gastrointestinal tract, affecting about 2% of the general population. Its presentation as a giant Meckel's diverticulum (>5 cm) is rare and is associated with major complications. We report a case of a 53 year-old woman with constipation for at least ten years. A colonoscopy from eight years ago suggested megacolon. The patient consults in the last month for abdominal pain associated with anorexia. The computed tomography scan image suggested an ileal megadiverticulum. An exploratory laparotomy revealed a saccular dilatation of the distal ileum of 6 x 15.5 cm, located 20 cm away from the ileocecal valve. We resected the involved segment of distal ileum and performed a manual ileo-ascendo anastomosis. The biopsy showed a saccular dilatation of the wall, lined by small intestinal mucosa with areas of gastric metaplasia, supporting the diagnosis of giant Meckel's diverticulum.

  8. Giant Fecalith Causing Near Intestinal Obstruction and Rectal Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Nigar, Sofia; Sunkara, Tagore; Culliford, Andrea; Gaduputi, Vinaya

    2017-01-01

    Fecal impaction if left untreated can lead to the hardening of stools and the formation of fecalith. Fecaliths rarely cause serious complications and are usually managed conservatively. We present this rare case of a giant fecalith causing near obstruction in an institutionalized paraplegic patient at high risk for chronic constipation and fecal impaction. This case was also unusual for causing ischemic pressure necrosis in the rectum, thereby highlighting the possible serious complications of fecalith. PMID:28611554

  9. A giant ancient schwannoma mimicking an adnexal mass

    PubMed Central

    Karaköse, Oktay; Pülat, Hüseyin; Oğuz, Serhat; Zihni, İsmail; Özçelik, Kazım Çağlar; Yalta, Tülin Deniz; Eken, Hüseyin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Ancient schwannoma is a rare tumor of the peripheral nerve sheath. As degenerative properties are defined histologically, it can be wrongly interpreted as malignant. Case presentation: The case presented here is of a giant ancient schwannoma with a pelvic retroperitoneal location, which was mimicking an adnexal mass. Conclusion: In the rarely seen cases in the retroperitoneum, it may reach very large dimensions. PMID:27472696

  10. Giant-cell aortitis: an unusual case of Bentall operation.

    PubMed

    Lemaire, Anaïs; Cuttone, Fabio; Caprio, Sabino; Massetti, Massimo; Galateau-Salle, Françoise

    2014-03-01

    Noninfectious ascending aortitis is a very rare cause of ascending aortic aneurysm. We report a case of the truly fortuitous finding of this rare condition in a 67-year-old man operated on for an ascending aortic aneurysm associated with dystrophic aortic valve regurgitation. Intraoperative inspection revealed dissection of the aorta just above the left main coronary artery. A modified Bentall operation was performed. The pathological diagnosis was giant cell arteritis.

  11. Giant congenital melanocytic nevus.

    PubMed

    Viana, Ana Carolina Leite; Gontijo, Bernardo; Bittencourt, Flávia Vasques

    2013-01-01

    Giant congenital melanocytic nevus is usually defined as a melanocytic lesion present at birth that will reach a diameter ≥ 20 cm in adulthood. Its incidence is estimated in <1:20,000 newborns. Despite its rarity, this lesion is important because it may associate with severe complications such as malignant melanoma, affect the central nervous system (neurocutaneous melanosis), and have major psychosocial impact on the patient and his family due to its unsightly appearance. Giant congenital melanocytic nevus generally presents as a brown lesion, with flat or mammilated surface, well-demarcated borders and hypertrichosis. Congenital melanocytic nevus is primarily a clinical diagnosis. However, congenital nevi are histologically distinguished from acquired nevi mainly by their larger size, the spread of the nevus cells to the deep layers of the skin and by their more varied architecture and morphology. Although giant congenital melanocytic nevus is recognized as a risk factor for the development of melanoma, the precise magnitude of this risk is still controversial. The estimated lifetime risk of developing melanoma varies from 5 to 10%. On account of these uncertainties and the size of the lesions, the management of giant congenital melanocytic nevus needs individualization. Treatment may include surgical and non-surgical procedures, psychological intervention and/or clinical follow-up, with special attention to changes in color, texture or on the surface of the lesion. The only absolute indication for surgery in giant congenital melanocytic nevus is the development of a malignant neoplasm on the lesion.

  12. Giant congenital melanocytic nevus*

    PubMed Central

    Viana, Ana Carolina Leite; Gontijo, Bernardo; Bittencourt, Flávia Vasques

    2013-01-01

    Giant congenital melanocytic nevus is usually defined as a melanocytic lesion present at birth that will reach a diameter ≥ 20 cm in adulthood. Its incidence is estimated in <1:20,000 newborns. Despite its rarity, this lesion is important because it may associate with severe complications such as malignant melanoma, affect the central nervous system (neurocutaneous melanosis), and have major psychosocial impact on the patient and his family due to its unsightly appearance. Giant congenital melanocytic nevus generally presents as a brown lesion, with flat or mammilated surface, well-demarcated borders and hypertrichosis. Congenital melanocytic nevus is primarily a clinical diagnosis. However, congenital nevi are histologically distinguished from acquired nevi mainly by their larger size, the spread of the nevus cells to the deep layers of the skin and by their more varied architecture and morphology. Although giant congenital melanocytic nevus is recognized as a risk factor for the development of melanoma, the precise magnitude of this risk is still controversial. The estimated lifetime risk of developing melanoma varies from 5 to 10%. On account of these uncertainties and the size of the lesions, the management of giant congenital melanocytic nevus needs individualization. Treatment may include surgical and non-surgical procedures, psychological intervention and/or clinical follow-up, with special attention to changes in color, texture or on the surface of the lesion. The only absolute indication for surgery in giant congenital melanocytic nevus is the development of a malignant neoplasm on the lesion. PMID:24474093

  13. Application of an integrated biomarker response index to assess ground water contamination in the vicinity of a rare earth mine tailings site.

    PubMed

    Si, Wantong; He, Xiaoying; Li, Ailing; Liu, Li; Li, Jisheng; Gong, Donghui; Liu, Juan; Liu, Jumei; Shen, Weishou; Zhang, Xuefeng

    2016-09-01

    We utilized a multi-biomarker approach (Integrated Biomarker Response version 2, IBRv2) to investigate the scope and dispersion of groundwater contamination surrounding a rare earth mine tailings impoundment. Parameters of SD rat included in our IBRv2 analyses were glutathione levels, superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase activities, total anti-oxidative capacity, chromosome aberration, and micronucleus formation. The concentration of 20 pollutants including Cl(-), SO4 (2-), Na(+), K(+), Mg(2+), Ca(2+), TH, CODMn, As, Se, TDS, Be, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Mo, Cd, and Pb in the groundwater were also analyzed. The results of this study indicated that groundwater polluted by tailings impoundment leakage exhibited significant ecotoxicological effects. The selected biomarkers responded sensitively to groundwater pollution. Analyses showed a significant relationship between IBRv2 values and the Nemerow composite index. IBRv2 could serve as a sensitive ecotoxicological diagnosis method for assessing groundwater contamination in the vicinity of rare earth mine tailings. According to the trend of IBRv2 value and Nemerow composite index, the maximum diffusion distance of groundwater pollutants from rare earth mine tailings was approximately 5.7 km.

  14. [A case report of giant cemento-ossifying fibroma].

    PubMed

    Lu, Run; Liang, Wen-Wu; Yang, Zhan; Liu, Chun-Hai; Zhao, Yue-Tao

    2010-12-01

    Cemento-ossifying fibroma is a rare benign tumor from periodontium, which usually occurs in mandible body and mandible ramus. It consists of collagen fibrils, fibroblast, and cementoblast. This article reported a case of giant cemento-ossifying fibroma and discussed the clinical features and treatment.

  15. Giant urethral calculus in a 6-year-old girl.

    PubMed

    Rivilla, F; Luis, A; Llanos, D; Ruiz, A

    2008-12-01

    Urinary stones are rarely seen in the urethra and are usually encountered in men with urethral stricture or diverticulum. Primary urethral calculi are extremely infrequent in females. We describe a case of a giant urethral stone impacted in a 6-year-old girl.

  16. Giant intramuscular haemangioma of the chest wall with osteolytic change.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Katsunari; Ueda, Mitsuhiro; Miyamoto, Yoshihiro

    2012-05-01

    Intramuscular haemangioma of the chest wall is very rare, and only few cases associated with rib destruction has been reported. Here, we describe a 37-year old woman with a giant intramuscular haemangioma arising in the left back and associated with rib destruction.

  17. LITHIUM-RICH GIANTS IN GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, Evan N.; Cohen, Judith G.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Hong, Jerry; Guo, Michelle; Guo, Rachel; Cunha, Katia

    2016-03-10

    Although red giants deplete lithium on their surfaces, some giants are Li-rich. Intermediate-mass asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars can generate Li through the Cameron–Fowler conveyor, but the existence of Li-rich, low-mass red giant branch (RGB) stars is puzzling. Globular clusters are the best sites to examine this phenomenon because it is straightforward to determine membership in the cluster and to identify the evolutionary state of each star. In 72 hours of Keck/DEIMOS exposures in 25 clusters, we found four Li-rich RGB and two Li-rich AGB stars. There were 1696 RGB and 125 AGB stars with measurements or upper limits consistent with normal abundances of Li. Hence, the frequency of Li-richness in globular clusters is (0.2 ± 0.1)% for the RGB, (1.6 ± 1.1)% for the AGB, and (0.3 ± 0.1)% for all giants. Because the Li-rich RGB stars are on the lower RGB, Li self-generation mechanisms proposed to occur at the luminosity function bump or He core flash cannot explain these four lower RGB stars. We propose the following origin for Li enrichment: (1) All luminous giants experience a brief phase of Li enrichment at the He core flash. (2) All post-RGB stars with binary companions on the lower RGB will engage in mass transfer. This scenario predicts that 0.1% of lower RGB stars will appear Li-rich due to mass transfer from a recently Li-enhanced companion. This frequency is at the lower end of our confidence interval.

  18. Lithium-rich Giants in Globular Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirby, Evan N.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Zhang, Andrew J.; Hong, Jerry; Guo, Michelle; Guo, Rachel; Cohen, Judith G.; Cunha, Katia

    2016-03-01

    Although red giants deplete lithium on their surfaces, some giants are Li-rich. Intermediate-mass asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars can generate Li through the Cameron-Fowler conveyor, but the existence of Li-rich, low-mass red giant branch (RGB) stars is puzzling. Globular clusters are the best sites to examine this phenomenon because it is straightforward to determine membership in the cluster and to identify the evolutionary state of each star. In 72 hours of Keck/DEIMOS exposures in 25 clusters, we found four Li-rich RGB and two Li-rich AGB stars. There were 1696 RGB and 125 AGB stars with measurements or upper limits consistent with normal abundances of Li. Hence, the frequency of Li-richness in globular clusters is (0.2 ± 0.1)% for the RGB, (1.6 ± 1.1)% for the AGB, and (0.3 ± 0.1)% for all giants. Because the Li-rich RGB stars are on the lower RGB, Li self-generation mechanisms proposed to occur at the luminosity function bump or He core flash cannot explain these four lower RGB stars. We propose the following origin for Li enrichment: (1) All luminous giants experience a brief phase of Li enrichment at the He core flash. (2) All post-RGB stars with binary companions on the lower RGB will engage in mass transfer. This scenario predicts that 0.1% of lower RGB stars will appear Li-rich due to mass transfer from a recently Li-enhanced companion. This frequency is at the lower end of our confidence interval. The data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  19. Important population viability analysis parameters for giant pandas (Aliuropoda melanoleuca).

    PubMed

    Gong, Minghao; Song, Yanling; Yang, Zhisong; Lin, Chen

    2012-06-01

    Population viability analysis (PVA) is a tool to evaluate the risk of extinction for endangered species and aid conservation decision-making. The quality of PVA output is dependent on parameters related to population dynamics and life-history; however, it has been difficult to collect this information for the giant panda (Aliuropoda melanoleuca), a rare and endangered mammal native to China, confined to some 30 fragmented habitat patches. Since giant pandas are long-lived, mature late, have lower reproductive rates, and show little sexual dimorphism, obtaining data to perform adequate PVA has been difficult. Here, we develop a parameter sensitivity index by modeling the dynamics of six giant panda populations in the Minshan Mountains, in order to determine the parameters most influential to giant panda populations. Our data shows that the giant panda populations are most sensitive to changes in four female parameters: initial breeding age, reproductive rate, mortality rate between age 0 and 1, and mortality rate of adults. The parameter sensitivity index strongly correlated with initial population size, as smaller populations were more sensitive to changes in these four variables. This model suggests that demographic parameters of females have more influence on the results of PVA, indicating that females may play a more important role in giant panda population dynamics than males. Consequently, reintroduction of female individuals to a small giant panda population should be a high priority for conservation efforts. Our findings form a technical basis for the coming program of giant panda reintroduction, and inform which parameters are crucial to successfully and feasibly monitoring wild giant panda populations.

  20. Giant star seismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hekker, S.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.

    2017-06-01

    The internal properties of stars in the red-giant phase undergo significant changes on relatively short timescales. Long near-uninterrupted high-precision photometric timeseries observations from dedicated space missions such as CoRoT and Kepler have provided seismic inferences of the global and internal properties of a large number of evolved stars, including red giants. These inferences are confronted with predictions from theoretical models to improve our understanding of stellar structure and evolution. Our knowledge and understanding of red giants have indeed increased tremendously using these seismic inferences, and we anticipate that more information is still hidden in the data. Unraveling this will further improve our understanding of stellar evolution. This will also have significant impact on our knowledge of the Milky Way Galaxy as well as on exo-planet host stars. The latter is important for our understanding of the formation and structure of planetary systems.

  1. Dispersal and disturbance as factors limiting the distribution of rare plant species at the Savannah River Site and the Carolina Sandhills National Wildlife Refuge.

    SciTech Connect

    Primack, Richard; Walker, Joan.

    2003-12-10

    An experiment was conducted to identify effective methods of creating new populations of herbaceous species in managed upland longleaf pine forest at two locations in the Fall-line Sandhills of South Carolina. We included thirteen species and a variety of site treatments. All sites were burned and lightly raked prior to planting. Sowing seeds on untreated or fertilized treatments resulted in the lowest establishment of all treatments. Digging the planting area to remove belowground plant structures and using hardware cloth cages to exclude potential mammalian seed predators and herbivores led to increased establishment of target species. Establishment was higher using seedling transplants compared to seeds. Success rate was highly variable among sites so population establishment efforts should try to incorporate many sites initially to find the sites that give the greatest chance of success, or increase efforts to carefully identify species, habitat requirements and screen potential sites accordingly. Some species showed very low rates of success despite the variety of methods used; for such species additional work is required on their basic ecology, in particular germination biology and site requirements, as part of a restoration project. The overall low rate of establishment success emphasizes the need to protect and manage existing populations of uncommon Sandhills species, and to recognize that establishing large, long-term, reproducing populations of such species will be difficult.

  2. Phase stable rare earth garnets

    DOEpatents

    Kuntz, Joshua D.; Cherepy, Nerine J.; Roberts, Jeffery J.; Payne, Stephen A.

    2013-06-11

    A transparent ceramic according to one embodiment includes a rare earth garnet comprising A.sub.hB.sub.iC.sub.jO.sub.12, where h is 3.+-.10%, i is 2.+-.10%, and j is 3.+-.10%. A includes a rare earth element or a mixture of rare earth elements, B includes at least one of aluminum, gallium and scandium, and C includes at least one of aluminum, gallium and scandium, where A is at a dodecahedral site of the garnet, B is at an octahedral site of the garnet, and C is at a tetrahedral site of the garnet. In one embodiment, the rare earth garment has scintillation properties. A radiation detector in one embodiment includes a transparent ceramic as described above and a photo detector optically coupled to the rare earth garnet.

  3. An Innocent Giant

    PubMed Central

    Solanki, Lakhan Singh; Dhingra, Mandeep; Raghubanshi, Gunjan; Thami, Gurvinder Pal

    2014-01-01

    A cutaneous horn (cornu cutaneum) is a protrusion from the skin composed of a cornified material. It may be associated with a benign, premalignant, or malignant lesion at the base, masking numerous dermatoses. In a 24-year-old female, a giant cutaneous horn arising from a seborrheic keratosis located on the leg is presented. This case has been reported to emphasize that a giant cutaneous horn may also occur in young patients, even in photoprotected areas, and are not always associated with malignancy. PMID:25484426

  4. Rare earths

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gambogi, J.

    2013-01-01

    Global mine production of rare earths was estimated to have declined slightly in 2012 relative to 2011 (Fig. 1). Production in China was estimated to have decreased to 95 from 105 kt (104,700 from 115,700 st) in 2011, while new mine production in the United States and Australia increased.

  5. Giant Cell Fibroma in Children: Report of Two Cases and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Nikitakis, Nikolaos G.; Emmanouil, Dimitris; Maroulakos, Michail P.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background Giant cell fibroma is a type of fibrous tumour of the oral mucosa which rarely affects children under the age of 10. The purpose of this paper was to contribute two clinically and histologically documented cases of giant cell fibroma in the free gingiva of a 7 and 6 year old boys. Methods Both nodules were presented in the mandibular anterior region. In the differential diagnosis several fibrous hyperplastic lesions were considered such as traumatic fibroma, papilloma, peripheral ossifying fibroma, peripheral odontogenic fibroma, giant cell fibroma and odontogenic hamartoma. Results The lesions were removed and the histological examination revealed fibrocollagenous connective tissue with the presence of stellate giant cells which confirmed the diagnosis of giant cell fibroma. Conclusions Dentists should be aware of the existence of giant cell fibroma in children, which must be included in the differential diagnosis of nodular lesions of the gingiva and adequately diagnosed and treated by removal and histopathological examination. PMID:24422028

  6. Painful scoliosis due to superposed giant cell bone tumor and aneurysmal bone cyst in a child.

    PubMed

    Togral, Guray; Arikan, Murat; Hasturk, Askin E; Gungor, Safak

    2014-07-01

    Giant cell bone tumors are the most common precursor lesions of aneurysmal bone cysts (ABCs) developing secondarily. In giant cell bone tumors containing an explicit ABC component, the observation of the solid component of the giant cell bone tumor plays a critical role in the separation of the primary ABC. In general, ABC cases together with giant cell tumors in the bone are diagnosed histopathologically. The combination of giant cell bone tumor with superposed ABC and that of painful scoliosis with backache is rarely seen in children. In this case study, we discussed the diagnosis and the treatment of a giant cell tumor and superposed an ABC present in the fifth lumbar spine in a pediatric patient admitted to our clinic with a complaint of acute scoliotic back pain.

  7. Imaging of giant cell tumor of bone

    PubMed Central

    Purohit, Shaligram; Pardiwala, Dinshaw N

    2007-01-01

    Giant cell tumor (GCT) of bone is a benign but locally aggressive and destructive lesion generally occurring in skeletally mature individuals. Typically involving the epiphysiometaphyseal region of long bones, the most common sites include the distal femur, proximal tibia and distal radius. On radiographs, GCT demonstrates a lytic lesion centered in the epiphysis but involving the metaphysis and extending at least in part to the adjacent articular cortex. Most are eccentric, but become symmetric and centrally located with growth. Most cases show circumscribed borders or so-called geographical destruction with no periosteal reaction unless a pathological fracture is present. There is no mineralized tumor matrix. Giant cell tumor can produce wide-ranging appearances depending on site, complications such as hemorrhage or pathological fracture and after surgical intervention. This review demonstrates a spectrum of these features and describes the imaging characteristics of GCT in conventional radiographs, computerized tomography scans, magnetic resonance imaging, bone scans, positron emission tomography scans and angiography. PMID:21139758

  8. Luminescent properties of rare earth fully activated apatites, LiRE9(SiO4)6O2 (RE = Ce, Eu, and Tb): site selective crystal field effect.

    PubMed

    Kim, Donghyeon; Park, Doyoung; Oh, Namgyeong; Kim, Jaegyeom; Jeong, Euh Duck; Kim, Seung-Joo; Kim, Sungyun; Park, Jung-Chul

    2015-02-16

    Novel LiCe9(SiO4)6O2 and LiTb9(SiO4)6O2 compounds have been successfully synthesized, and the site selectivity and occupancy of activator ions have been estimated including LiEu9(SiO4)6O2 compound. The rare earth (RE) fully occupied compounds, as well as the RE partially occupied congeners are required for the assessment of site selectivity of RE (activator) ions in apatite-type compounds. The splitting energies of the 6H and 4F Wycoff positions of LiRE9(SiO4)6O2 (RE = Ce, Eu, and Tb) compounds are calculated based on crystal field theory: ΔECe(6H) = 3849.3 cm(-1), ΔECe(4F) = 4228.1 cm(-1), ΔEEu(6H) = 3870.0 cm(-1), ΔEEu(4F) = 4092.8 cm(-1), ΔETb(6H) = 3637.6 cm(-1), ΔETb(4F) = 4396.1 cm(-1), indicating that the splitting energy for the 4F site is larger than that for the 6H site in all compounds; thus the absorption energy is higher for the 6H site. In apatite-type LiRE9(SiO4)6O2 (RE = Ce, Eu, and Tb) compounds, the Ce(3+) ions predominantly occupy the 4F site associated with the absorption band around 300 nm at lower Ce(3+) concentration, and then enter the 6H site associated the absorption band around 245 nm. For the Eu(3+)-doped compounds, the 4F site and 6H site are mixed within the charge transfer band (CTB) between 220 and 350 nm. Eu(3+) ions initially preferentially occupy the 6H site (around 290 nm) at lower Eu(3+) concentration and subsequently enter the 4F site (around 320 nm) with increasing Eu(3+) concentration. For the Tb(3+)-doped compounds, the absorption due to the two different sites is mixed within f-d absorption band between 200 and 300 nm. At lower Tb(3+) concentration, the Tb(3+) ions enter favorably 6H site around 240 nm and then enter 4F site around 270 nm. These compounds may provide a platform for modeling a new phosphor and application in the solid-state lighting field.

  9. Gauging the flexibility of the active site in soybean lipoxygenase-1 (SLO-1) through an atom-centered density matrix propagation (ADMP) treatment that facilitates the sampling of rare events

    PubMed Central

    Phatak, Prasad; Sumner, Isaiah; Iyengar, Srinivasan S.

    2012-01-01

    We present a computational methodology to sample rare events in large biological enzymes that may involve electronically polarizing, reactive processes. The approach includes simultaneous dynamical treatment of electronic and nuclear degrees of freedom, where contributions from the electronic portion are computed using hybrid density functional theory and the computational costs are reduced through a hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) treatment. Thus, the paper involves a QM/MM dynamical treatment of rare events. The method is applied to probe the effect of the active site elements on the critical hydrogen transfer step in the soybean lipoxygenase-1 (SLO-1) catalyzed oxidation of linoleic acid. It is found that the dynamical fluctuations and associated flexibility of the active site are critical towards maintaining the electrostatics in the regime where the reactive process can occur smoothly. Physical constraints enforced to limit the active site flexibility are akin to mutations and, in the cases studied, have a detrimental effect on the electrostatic fluctuations, thus adversely affecting the hydrogen transfer process. PMID:22838384

  10. Gauging the flexibility of the active site in soybean lipoxygenase-1 (SLO-1) through an atom-centered density matrix propagation (ADMP) treatment that facilitates the sampling of rare events.

    PubMed

    Phatak, Prasad; Sumner, Isaiah; Iyengar, Srinivasan S

    2012-08-30

    We present a computational methodology to sample rare events in large biological enzymes that may involve electronically polarizing, reactive processes. The approach includes simultaneous dynamical treatment of electronic and nuclear degrees of freedom, where contributions from the electronic portion are computed using hybrid density functional theory and the computational costs are reduced through a hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) treatment. Thus, the paper involves a QM/MM dynamical treatment of rare events. The method is applied to probe the effect of the active site elements on the critical hydrogen transfer step in the soybean lipoxygenase-1 (SLO-1) catalyzed oxidation of linoleic acid. It is found that the dynamical fluctuations and associated flexibility of the active site are critical toward maintaining the electrostatics in the regime where the reactive process can occur smoothly. Physical constraints enforced to limit the active site flexibility are akin to mutations and, in the cases studied, have a detrimental effect on the electrostatic fluctuations, thus adversely affecting the hydrogen transfer process.

  11. Multifocal Central Giant Cell Granuloma - A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Sandhya, Tamgadge; Avinash, Tamgadge; Snehal, Dhauskar; Neha, Tiwari; Uma, Mudaliar

    2016-01-01

    Central giant cell granuloma is a benign, aggressive neoplasm composed of multinucleated giant cells that almost exclusively occurs in the jaws though extra- gnathic incidence is rare. Multifocal CGCGs of the jaws are very rare and suggestive of systemic diseases such as hyperparathyroidism, an inherited syndrome such as Noonan- like multiple giant cell lesion syndrome or other disorders.Very few cases of multifocal CGCGs in the jaws without any concomitant systemic disease have been reported. This paper describes an unusual case reported to the Oral Surgery Department of Dr. D.Y.Patil Dental College & Hospital, Nerul, Navi-Mumbai in 2014 in a 45-year-old male with multifocal central giant cell granuloma involving maxilla and mandible. The serum alkaline phosphatase, calcium and phosphorus levels were within the normal limits. After complete clinical examination hyperparathyroidism and clinical characteristic of any syndromes such as Noonan-like syndrome and neurofibromatosis were ruled out. Thus this paper reports a non-syndromic multifocal central giant cell granuloma. PMID:27799978

  12. Shadows on a Giant

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-07-02

    Saturn rings cast wide shadows on the planet, and the shadow of a moon also graces the gas giant in this scene from NASA Cassini spacecraft. The moon Enceladus is not shown in this view, but it does cast a small, elongated shadow.

  13. Giant scrotal elephantiasis.

    PubMed

    Kuepper, Daniel

    2005-02-01

    How much can a man carry? Penoscrotal elephantiasis is a debilitating syndrome. This is a case report of a patient with giant genital elephantiasis secondary to long-standing lymphogranuloma venereum infection in Ethiopia. Complete surgical resection of the pathologic tissue and penile reconstruction was undertaken with good cosmetic and functional results.

  14. [Giant retroperitoneal liposarcoma].

    PubMed

    Mezzour, Mohamed Hicham; El Messaoudi, Yasser Arafat; Fekak, Hamid; Rabii, Redouane; Marnissi, Farida; Karkouri, Mehdi; Salam, Siham; Iraki, Moulay Ahmed; Joual, Abdenbi; Meziane, Fathi

    2006-02-01

    The authors report a case of giant retroperitoneal liposarcoma. The diagnosis was suspected after scanography and magnetic resonance imaging and confirmed by the histological analysis of the extracted piece after surgical treatment. Postoperative evolution was favourable after one year without recurrence or distant metastasis. The authors discuss the pathologic and therapeutic aspects and the prognosis of retroperitoneal liposarcoma.

  15. Electroluminescence of Giant Stretchability.

    PubMed

    Yang, Can Hui; Chen, Baohong; Zhou, Jinxiong; Chen, Yong Mei; Suo, Zhigang

    2016-06-01

    A new type of electroluminescent device achieves giant stretchability by integrating electronic and ionic components. The device uses phosphor powders as electroluminescent materials, and hydrogels as stretchable and transparent ionic conductors. Subject to cyclic voltage, the phosphor powders luminesce, but the ionic conductors do not electrolyze. The device produces constant luminance when stretched up to an area strain of 1500%.

  16. Giant Malignant Pheochromocytoma with Palpable Rib Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Gokce, Gokhan; Kilicli, Fatih; Elagoz, Sahande; Ayan, Semih; Gultekin, Emin Yener

    2014-01-01

    Pheochromocytoma is a rare and usually benign neuroendocrine neoplasm. Only 10% of all these tumors are malignant and there are no definitive histological or cytological criteria of malignancy. Single malignancy criteria are the presence of advanced locoregional disease or metastases. We report a case, with a giant retroperitoneal tumor having multiple metastases including palpable rib metastases, who was diagnosed as a malignant pheochromocytoma. The patient was treated with surgery. The literature was reviewed to evaluate tumor features and current diagnostic and therapeutic approaches for patients with metastatic or potentially malignant pheochromocytoma. PMID:25152826

  17. Giant velum interpositum meningioma in a child.

    PubMed

    Moiyadi, Aliasgar V; Shetty, Prakash

    2012-07-01

    Intraventricular meningiomas are rare, but are relatively more often seen in children. Large size at presentation often obscures anatomical details. A particular subset of such tumors arising from the velum interpositum pose a significant surgical challenge. Thorough preoperative imaging, especially with respect to the course of the deep venous structures, provides useful evidence as to the origin. Preservation of venous anatomy at surgery is vital. We describe a 3-year-old girl with a giant velum interpositum meningioma that was completely excised with excellent outcome. This is probably the youngest such case reported.

  18. Remedial actions at the former Vitro Rare Metals plant site, Canonsburg, Washington County, Pennsylvania. Final Environmental Impact Statement. Volume II. Appendices

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-07-01

    This report provides a summary of the conceptual design and other information necessary to understand the proposed remedial action at the expanded Canonsburg, Pennsylvania site. This design constitutes the current approach to stabilizing the radioactively contaminated materials in place in a manner that would fully protect the public health and environment. This summary is intended to provide sufficient detail for the reader to understand the proposed remedial action and the anticipated environmental impacts. The site conceptual design has been developed using available data. In some cases, elements of the design have not been developed fully and will be made final during the detailed design process.

  19. HHV-6A in syncytial giant-cell hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Potenza, Leonardo; Luppi, Mario; Barozzi, Patrizia; Rossi, Giulio; Cocchi, Stefania; Codeluppi, Mauro; Pecorari, Monica; Masetti, Michele; Di Benedetto, Fabrizio; Gennari, William; Portolani, Marinella; Gerunda, Giorgio Enrico; Lazzarotto, Tiziana; Landini, Maria Paola; Schulz, Thomas F; Torelli, Giuseppe; Guaraldi, Giovanni

    2008-08-07

    Syncytial giant-cell hepatitis is a rare but severe form of hepatitis that is associated with autoimmune diseases, drug reactions, and viral infections. We used serologic, molecular, and immunohistochemical methods to search for an infectious cause in a case of syncytial giant-cell hepatitis that developed in a liver-transplant recipient who had latent infection with variant B of human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6B) and who had received the organ from a donor with variant A latent infection (HHV-6A). At the onset of the disease, the detection of HHV-6A (but not HHV-6B) DNA in plasma, in affected liver tissue, and in single micromanipulated syncytial giant cells with the use of two different polymerase-chain-reaction (PCR) assays indicated the presence of active HHV-6A infection in the patient. Expression of the HHV-6A-specific early protein, p41/38, but not of the HHV-6B-specific late protein, p101, was demonstrated only in liver syncytial giant cells in the absence of other infectious pathogens. The same markers of HHV-6A active infection were documented in serial follow-up samples from the patient and disappeared only at the resolution of syncytial giant-cell hepatitis. Neither HHV-6B DNA nor late protein was identified in the same follow-up samples from the patient. Thus, HHV-6A may be a cause of syncytial giant-cell hepatitis.

  20. Giant cell tumor of soft tissue arising in breast.

    PubMed

    May, Steve A; Deavers, Michael T; Resetkova, Erika; Johnson, Deborah; Albarracin, Constance T

    2007-10-01

    Primary giant cell tumor of soft tissue (GCT-ST) arising in breast is exceedingly rare. We report a case of a 60-year-old woman with a primary breast giant cell tumor that appeared histologically identical to giant cell tumor of bone and had a clinically malignant course. The patient presented with a cystic mass of the breast, suspected on imaging to be an organizing hematoma, possibly related to previous injury. Histopathological evaluation revealed a neoplasm composed of mononuclear cells admixed with osteoclast-like giant cells resembling giant cell tumor of bone. Immunohistochemical staining was positive for CD68, smooth muscle actin, and vimentin, but was negative for a panel of epithelial and additional muscle markers. These features were most consistent with GCT-ST, an uncommon neoplasm of low malignant potential. Despite aggressive surgical treatment achieving clear surgical margins, the patient expired with pulmonary metastases within a year of her initial presentation. This case demonstrates the difficulty of predicting clinical behavior of GCT-ST of breast on the basis of histological features and depth of tumor alone. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of a GCT-ST arising in the breast associated with a fatal outcome. The distinction of this entity from other more common primary breast tumors with giant cell morphology is also emphasized.

  1. Genetic Alterations in Gliosarcoma and Giant Cell Glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Oh, Ji Eun; Ohta, Takashi; Nonoguchi, Naosuke; Satomi, Kaishi; Capper, David; Pierscianek, Daniela; Sure, Ulrich; Vital, Anne; Paulus, Werner; Mittelbronn, Michel; Antonelli, Manila; Kleihues, Paul; Giangaspero, Felice; Ohgaki, Hiroko

    2016-07-01

    The majority of glioblastomas develop rapidly with a short clinical history (primary glioblastoma IDH wild-type), whereas secondary glioblastomas progress from diffuse astrocytoma or anaplastic astrocytoma. IDH mutations are the genetic hallmark of secondary glioblastomas. Gliosarcomas and giant cell glioblastomas are rare histological glioblastoma variants, which usually develop rapidly. We determined the genetic patterns of 36 gliosarcomas and 19 giant cell glioblastomas. IDH1 and IDH2 mutations were absent in all 36 gliosarcomas and in 18 of 19 giant cell glioblastomas analyzed, indicating that they are histological variants of primary glioblastoma. Furthermore, LOH 10q (88%) and TERT promoter mutations (83%) were frequent in gliosarcomas. Copy number profiling using the 450k methylome array in 5 gliosarcomas revealed CDKN2A homozygous deletion (3 cases), trisomy chromosome 7 (2 cases), and monosomy chromosome 10 (2 cases). Giant cell glioblastomas had LOH 10q in 50% and LOH 19q in 42% of cases. ATRX loss was detected immunohistochemically in 19% of giant cell glioblastomas, but absent in 17 gliosarcomas. These and previous results suggest that gliosarcomas are a variant of, and genetically similar to, primary glioblastomas, except for a lack of EGFR amplification, while giant cell glioblastoma occupies a hybrid position between primary and secondary glioblastomas. © 2015 International Society of Neuropathology.

  2. Secondary malignant giant-cell tumor of bone. Clinicopathological assessment of nineteen patients

    SciTech Connect

    Rock, M.G.; Sim, F.H.; Unni, K.K.; Witrak, G.A.; Frassica, F.J.; Schray, M.F.; Beabout, J.W.; Dahlin, D.C.

    1986-09-01

    Twenty-six patients who had a malignant giant-cell tumor of bone--a sarcoma either juxtaposed to a zone of typical benign giant-cell tumor or occurring at the site of a previously documented benign giant-cell tumor--have been seen at the Mayo Clinic. Of the twenty-six tumors, nineteen were secondary to a previous attempt at local control of a benign giant-cell tumor. All but one of these nineteen patients with a secondary tumor had received therapeutic irradiation four to thirty-nine years earlier. The nature and duration of the symptoms and the sites of predilection of the malignant giant-cell tumors were the same as for benign giant-cell tumor. Fibrosarcoma occurred three times as frequently as osteosarcoma. The best results of treatment of the secondary sarcoma were obtained with early ablation.

  3. Fatal canine distemper virus infection of giant pandas in China

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Na; Yu, Yicong; Wang, Tiecheng; Wilker, Peter; Wang, Jianzhong; Li, Yuanguo; Sun, Zhe; Gao, Yuwei; Xia, Xianzhu

    2016-01-01

    We report an outbreak of canine distemper virus (CDV) infection among endangered giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca). Five of six CDV infected giant pandas died. The surviving giant panda was previously vaccinated against CDV. Genomic sequencing of CDV isolated from one of the infected pandas (giant panda/SX/2014) suggests it belongs to the Asia-1 cluster. The hemagglutinin protein of the isolated virus and virus sequenced from lung samples originating from deceased giant pandas all possessed the substitutions V26M, T213A, K281R, S300N, P340Q, and Y549H. The presence of the Y549H substitution is notable as it is found at the signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM) receptor-binding site and has been implicated in the emergence of highly pathogenic CDV and host switching. These findings demonstrate that giant pandas are susceptible to CDV and suggest that surveillance and vaccination among all captive giant pandas are warranted to support conservation efforts for this endangered species. PMID:27310722

  4. Fatal canine distemper virus infection of giant pandas in China.

    PubMed

    Feng, Na; Yu, Yicong; Wang, Tiecheng; Wilker, Peter; Wang, Jianzhong; Li, Yuanguo; Sun, Zhe; Gao, Yuwei; Xia, Xianzhu

    2016-06-16

    We report an outbreak of canine distemper virus (CDV) infection among endangered giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca). Five of six CDV infected giant pandas died. The surviving giant panda was previously vaccinated against CDV. Genomic sequencing of CDV isolated from one of the infected pandas (giant panda/SX/2014) suggests it belongs to the Asia-1 cluster. The hemagglutinin protein of the isolated virus and virus sequenced from lung samples originating from deceased giant pandas all possessed the substitutions V26M, T213A, K281R, S300N, P340Q, and Y549H. The presence of the Y549H substitution is notable as it is found at the signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM) receptor-binding site and has been implicated in the emergence of highly pathogenic CDV and host switching. These findings demonstrate that giant pandas are susceptible to CDV and suggest that surveillance and vaccination among all captive giant pandas are warranted to support conservation efforts for this endangered species.

  5. Phenotypic expression and origin of the rare beta-thalassemia splice site mutation HBB:c.315 + 1G>T.

    PubMed

    Broquere, Cédrick; Brudey, Karine; Harteveld, Cornelis L; Saint-Martin, Christian; Elion, Jacques; Giordano, Piero C; Romana, Marc

    2010-06-01

    We present the hematological characteristics of five patients from Surinam and the bordering French Guyana, who are carriers of the rare beta-thalassemia (beta-thal) mutation HBB:c.315+1G>T. Analysis of the phenotype/genotype relationship shows that this allele is a beta(0)-thal variant and illustrates the modulating effect of the alpha-globin gene status on the beta-thal phenotype. The ethnic origin of the five probands, belonging to the so-called Bush Negroes Maroons of Surinam and French Guyana, strongly suggests that this beta-thal mutation has a West African origin and spread in this ethnic group because of a founder effect and/or genetic drift.

  6. Structure of an N276-Dependent HIV-1 Neutralizing Antibody Targeting a Rare V5 Glycan Hole Adjacent to the CD4 Binding Site

    SciTech Connect

    Wibmer, Constantinos Kurt; Gorman, Jason; Anthony, Colin S.; Mkhize, Nonhlanhla N.; Druz, Aliaksandr; York, Talita; Schmidt, Stephen D.; Labuschagne, Phillip; Louder, Mark K.; Bailer, Robert T.; Abdool Karim, Salim S.; Mascola, John R.; Williamson, Carolyn; Moore, Penny L.; Kwong, Peter D.; Morris, Lynn; Kirchhoff, F.

    2016-08-31

    ABSTRACT

    All HIV-1-infected individuals develop strain-specific neutralizing antibodies to their infecting virus, which in some cases mature into broadly neutralizing antibodies. Defining the epitopes of strain-specific antibodies that overlap conserved sites of vulnerability might provide mechanistic insights into how broadly neutralizing antibodies arise. We previously described an HIV-1 clade C-infected donor, CAP257, who developed broadly neutralizing plasma antibodies targeting an N276 glycan-dependent epitope in the CD4 binding site. The initial CD4 binding site response potently neutralized the heterologous tier 2 clade B viral strain RHPA, which was used to design resurfaced gp120 antigens for single-B-cell sorting. Here we report the isolation and structural characterization of CAP257-RH1, an N276 glycan-dependent CD4 binding site antibody representative of the early CD4 binding site plasma response in donor CAP257. The cocrystal structure of CAP257-RH1 bound to RHPA gp120 revealed critical interactions with the N276 glycan, loop D, and V5, but not with aspartic acid 368, similarly to HJ16 and 179NC75. The CAP257-RH1 monoclonal antibody was derived from the immunoglobulin-variable IGHV3-33 and IGLV3-10 genes and neutralized RHPA but not the transmitted/founder virus from donor CAP257. Its narrow neutralization breadth was attributed to a binding angle that was incompatible with glycosylated V5 loops present in almost all HIV-1 strains, including the CAP257 transmitted/founder virus. Deep sequencing of autologous CAP257 viruses, however, revealed minority variants early in infection that lacked V5 glycans. These glycan-free V5 loops are unusual holes in the glycan shield that may have been necessary for initiating this N276 glycan-dependent CD4 binding site B-cell lineage.

    IMPORTANCEThe conserved CD4 binding site on gp120 is a major target for HIV-1 vaccine design, but key events in the elicitation and maturation of

  7. Structure of an N276-Dependent HIV-1 Neutralizing Antibody Targeting a Rare V5 Glycan Hole Adjacent to the CD4 Binding Site

    PubMed Central

    Wibmer, Constantinos Kurt; Gorman, Jason; Anthony, Colin S.; Mkhize, Nonhlanhla N.; Druz, Aliaksandr; York, Talita; Schmidt, Stephen D.; Labuschagne, Phillip; Louder, Mark K.; Bailer, Robert T.; Abdool Karim, Salim S.; Mascola, John R.; Williamson, Carolyn; Moore, Penny L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT All HIV-1-infected individuals develop strain-specific neutralizing antibodies to their infecting virus, which in some cases mature into broadly neutralizing antibodies. Defining the epitopes of strain-specific antibodies that overlap conserved sites of vulnerability might provide mechanistic insights into how broadly neutralizing antibodies arise. We previously described an HIV-1 clade C-infected donor, CAP257, who developed broadly neutralizing plasma antibodies targeting an N276 glycan-dependent epitope in the CD4 binding site. The initial CD4 binding site response potently neutralized the heterologous tier 2 clade B viral strain RHPA, which was used to design resurfaced gp120 antigens for single-B-cell sorting. Here we report the isolation and structural characterization of CAP257-RH1, an N276 glycan-dependent CD4 binding site antibody representative of the early CD4 binding site plasma response in donor CAP257. The cocrystal structure of CAP257-RH1 bound to RHPA gp120 revealed critical interactions with the N276 glycan, loop D, and V5, but not with aspartic acid 368, similarly to HJ16 and 179NC75. The CAP257-RH1 monoclonal antibody was derived from the immunoglobulin-variable IGHV3-33 and IGLV3-10 genes and neutralized RHPA but not the transmitted/founder virus from donor CAP257. Its narrow neutralization breadth was attributed to a binding angle that was incompatible with glycosylated V5 loops present in almost all HIV-1 strains, including the CAP257 transmitted/founder virus. Deep sequencing of autologous CAP257 viruses, however, revealed minority variants early in infection that lacked V5 glycans. These glycan-free V5 loops are unusual holes in the glycan shield that may have been necessary for initiating this N276 glycan-dependent CD4 binding site B-cell lineage. IMPORTANCE The conserved CD4 binding site on gp120 is a major target for HIV-1 vaccine design, but key events in the elicitation and maturation of different antibody lineages to this site

  8. Metaplastic ossification of the temporal artery with osteoclast-like giant cells: a mimicker of giant cell (temporal) arteritis.

    PubMed

    Sekulic, Miroslav; Truskinovsky, Alexander M

    2017-05-11

    To describe a patient presenting with suspected giant cell (temporal) arteritis (GCA) in whom subsequent temporal artery biopsy showed luminal narrowing by medial calcification, metaplastic ossification, and fibrointimal proliferation, consistent with calciphylaxis. A 55-year-old man with end-stage renal disease presented with unilateral loss of vision and elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate and was initially treated as though he had GCA; however, a subsequent temporal artery biopsy showed marked luminal narrowing by medial calcification, metaplastic ossification, and fibrointimal proliferation, consistent with calciphylaxis. In addition, the tunica media of the affected artery contained multinucleate giant cells, but these represented osteoclasts and foreign body giant cells reacting to calcium, rather than a part of GCA. This is a rare report of metaplastic ossification and the finding of non-GCA-related giant cells in the tunica media of the temporal artery, thus representing a clinical and histopathologic mimicker of GCA. The clinical differential diagnosis of GCA includes other etiologies that can present similarly; however, temporal artery biopsy can discern the underlying pathology. Importantly, the identification of giant cells is not required for the diagnosis of GCA, and likewise, as our case shows, the finding of giant cells in the wall of a temporal artery does not always imply a diagnosis of GCA.

  9. Giant Cell Tumor of Bone - An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Sobti, Anshul; Agrawal, Pranshu; Agarwala, Sanjay; Agarwal, Manish

    2016-01-01

    Giant Cell tumors (GCT) are benign tumors with potential for aggressive behavior and capacity to metastasize. Although rarely lethal, benign bone tumors may be associated with a substantial disturbance of the local bony architecture that can be particularly troublesome in peri-articular locations. Its histogenesis remains unclear. It is characterized by a proliferation of mononuclear stromal cells and the presence of many multi- nucleated giant cells with homogenous distribution. There is no widely held consensus regarding the ideal treatment method selection. There are advocates of varying surgical techniques ranging from intra-lesional curettage to wide resection. As most giant cell tumors are benign and are located near a joint in young adults, several authors favor an intralesional approach that preserves anatomy of bone in lieu of resection. Although GCT is classified as a benign lesion, few patients develop progressive lung metastases with poor outcomes. Treatment is mainly surgical. Options of chemotherapy and radiotherapy are reserved for selected cases. Recent advances in the understanding of pathogenesis are essential to develop new treatments for this locally destructive primary bone tumor. PMID:26894211

  10. Management of giant pseudomeningoceles after spinal surgery

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Pseudomeningoceles are a rare complication after spinal surgery, and studies on these complex formations are few. Methods Between October 2000 and March 2008, 11 patients who developed symptomatic pseudomeningoceles after spinal surgery were recruited. In this retrospective study, we reported our experiences in the management of these complex, symptomatic pseudomeningoceles after spinal surgery. A giant pseudomeningocele was defined as a pseudomeningocele >8 cm in length. We also evaluated the risk factors for the formation of giant pseudomeningoceles. Results All patients were treated successfully with a combined treatment protocol of open revision surgery for extirpation of the pseudomeningoceles, repair of dural tears, and implantation of a subarachnoid catheter for drainage. Surgery-related complications were not observed. Recurrence of pseudomeningocele was not observed for any patient at a mean follow-up of 16.5 months. This result was confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging. Conclusions We conclude that a combined treatment protocol involving open revision surgery for extirpation of pseudomeningoceles, repair of dural tears, and implantation of a subarachnoid catheter for drainage is safe and effective to treat giant pseudomeningoceles. PMID:20302667

  11. Giant thoracic osteophyte: a distinct clinical entity.

    PubMed

    Coumans, Jean-Valery C E; Neal, Jonathan B; Grottkau, Brian E; Nahed, Brian V; Shin, John H; Walcott, Brian P

    2014-09-01

    Calcified lesions described within the neural axis are classified as either an ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament, diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis, or ossification of the ligamentum flavum. We aim to describe a unique pathologic entity: the giant thoracic osteophyte. We identified four patients who were surgically treated at the Massachusetts General Hospital from 2006 to 2012 with unusual calcified lesions in the ventral aspect of the spinal canal. In order to differentiate giant thoracic osteophytes from calcified extruded disc material, disc volumetrics were performed on actual and simulated disc spaces. All patients underwent operative resection of the calcific lesion as they had signs and/or symptoms of spinal cord compression. The lesions were found to be isolated, large calcific masses that originated from the posterior aspect of adjacent thoracic vertebral bodies. Pathological examination was negative for tumor. Adjacent disc volumes were not significantly different from the index disc (p=0.91). A simulated calculation hypothesizing that the calcific mass was extruded disc material demonstrated a significant difference (p=0.01), making this scenario unlikely. In conclusion, giant thoracic osteophyte is a unique and rare entity that can be found in the thoracic spine. The central tenant of surgical treatment is resection to relieve spinal cord compression.

  12. How rare are diffusive rare events?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, D. P.; Larralde, H.

    2008-05-01

    We study the time until first occurrence, the first-passage time, of rare density fluctuations in diffusive systems. We approach the problem using a model consisting of many independent random walkers on a lattice. The existence of spatial correlations makes this problem analytically intractable. However, for a mean-field approximation in which the walkers can jump anywhere in the system, we obtain a simple asymptotic form for the mean first-passage time to have a given number k of particles at a distinguished site. We show numerically, and argue heuristically, that for large enough k, the mean-field results give a good approximation for first-passage times for systems with nearest-neighbour dynamics, especially for two and higher spatial dimensions. Finally, we show how the results change when density fluctuations anywhere in the system, rather than at a specific distinguished site, are considered.

  13. Not so Rare, Rare Diseases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waldman, H. Barry; Perlman, Steven P.; Munter, Beverly L.; Chaudhry, Ramiz A.

    2008-01-01

    A rare disease or condition is defined by federal legislation such that it: (1) affects less than 200,000 persons in the U.S.; or (2) affects more than 200,000 persons in the U.S. but for which there is no reasonable expectation that the cost of developing and making available in the U.S. a drug for such disease or condition will be recovered from…

  14. Not so Rare, Rare Diseases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waldman, H. Barry; Perlman, Steven P.; Munter, Beverly L.; Chaudhry, Ramiz A.

    2008-01-01

    A rare disease or condition is defined by federal legislation such that it: (1) affects less than 200,000 persons in the U.S.; or (2) affects more than 200,000 persons in the U.S. but for which there is no reasonable expectation that the cost of developing and making available in the U.S. a drug for such disease or condition will be recovered from…

  15. Ferroelectricity and giant magnetocapacitance in perovskite rare-earth manganites.

    PubMed

    Goto, T; Kimura, T; Lawes, G; Ramirez, A P; Tokura, Y

    2004-06-25

    The relationships among magnetism, lattice modulation, and dielectric properties have been investigated for RMnO3 (R=Eu, Gd, Tb, and Dy). These compounds show a transition to an incommensurate lattice structure below their Néel temperature, and subsequently undergo an incommensurate-commensurate (IC-C) phase transition. For TbMnO3 and DyMnO3 it was found that the IC-C transition is accompanied by a ferroelectric transition, associated with a lattice modulation in the C phase. DyMnO3 shows a gigantic magnetocapacitance with a change of dielectric constant up to Deltaepsilon/epsilon approximately 500%.

  16. [Rare case giant cancerous tumor forgotten after kidney heterotopic transplantation].

    PubMed

    Tyapochkin, Y A; Zubarev, V F; Golikov, A V; Afanasyeva, T V; S Klimkin, A

    2016-08-01

    The annual number of cases of kidney transplantation in the Russian Federation varies from 900 to 1000. The generally accepted method of operation is the heterotopic allotransplantation into one of the iliac region. Proper kidney recipient are psychologically "forgotten", often completely lost sight of postoperative monitoring, especially in the long term, but may remind of itself in extraordinary cases like ours.

  17. Guiding the Giant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-08-01

    New ESO Survey Provides Targets for the VLT Giant astronomical telescopes like the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT) must be used efficiently. Observing time is expensive and there are long waiting lines of excellent research programmes. Thus the work at the telescope must be very well prepared and optimized as much as possible - mistakes should be avoided and no time lost! Astronomers working with the new 8-m class optical/infrared telescopes must base their observations on detailed lists of suitable target objects if they want to perform cutting-edge science. This is particularly true for research programmes that depend on observations of large samples of comparatively rare, distant objects. This type of work requires that extensive catalogues of such objects must be prepared in advance. One such major catalogue - that will serve as a very useful basis for future VLT observations - has just become available from the new ESO Imaging Survey (EIS). The Need for Sky Surveys Astronomers have since long recognized the need to carry out preparatory observations with other telescopes in order to "guide" large telescopes. To this end, surveys of smaller or larger parts of the sky have been performed by wide-field telescopes, paving the way for subsequent work at the limits of the largest available ground-based telescopes. For instance, a complete photographic survey of the sourthern sky (declination < -17.5°) was carried out in the 1970's with the ESO 1-metre Schmidt Telescope in support of the work at the 3.6-m telescope at the ESO La Silla observatory. However, while until recently most observational programmes could rely on samples of objects found on photographic plates, this is no longer possible. New image surveys must match the fainter limiting magnitudes reached by the new and larger telescopes. Modern digital, multi-colour, deep imaging surveys have thus become an indispensable complement to the 8-m telescopes. The new generation of imaging surveys will, without

  18. Giant hydronephrosis: still a reality!

    PubMed

    Kaura, Kawaljit Singh; Kumar, Manoj; Sokhal, Ashok Kr; Gupta, Ashok Kr; Purkait, Bimalesh; Saini, Durgesh; Sankhwar, Satyanarayan

    2017-09-01

    Giant hydronephrosis (GH) is a rare entity in both developed and developing countries with less than 500 cases reported in the literature. Delayed diagnosis and management of GH, can result in long-term complications like hypertension, rupture of the kidney, renal failure and malignant change. We aim to highlight the importance of this often neglected entity and build a consensus for its early diagnosis and management. Patients with GH were thoroughly worked up, managed and followed up between June 2013 and December 2015 and epidemiologic, radiological, perioperative and follow-up data was recorded. A total of 35 patients (adults and children) were reported. Flank pain in adults and abdominal lump in children were the most common clinical presentation. Percutaneous nephrostomy tube was placed in all patients and detailed work up was done to reach final diagnosis. Pelvi-ureteric junction obstruction (PUJO) was the final diagnosis in 32 patients (91.4%). Kidneys were non-functioning in 13 cases (37.1%) so nephrectomies were performed. Reduction pyeloplasty with nephropexy was done in 21 patients (60%) with 81% success and 23.1% complication rates. GH requires early diagnosis and management to prevent higher nephrectomy rate along with poor success rate of conservative surgery like pyeloplasty.

  19. Ice Giant Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rymer, A. M.; Arridge, C. S.; Masters, A.; Turtle, E. P.; Simon, A. A.; Hofstadter, M. D.; Turrini, D.; Politi, R.

    2015-12-01

    The Ice Giants in our solar system, Uranus and Neptune, are fundamentally different from their Gas Giant siblings Jupiter and Saturn, from the different proportions of rock and ice to the configuration of their planetary magnetic fields. Kepler space telescope discoveries of exo-planets indicate that planets of this type are among the most ubiquitous universally and therefore a future mission to explore the nature of the Ice Giants in our own solar system will provide insights into the nature of extra-solar system objects in general. Uranus has the smallest self- luminosity of all the planets, potentially related to catastrophic events early in the planet's history, which also may explain Uranus' large obliquity. Uranus' atmosphere is subject to extreme seasonal forcing making it unique in the Solar System. Neptune is also unique in a number of ways, notably its large moon Triton which is likely a captured Kuiper Belt Object and one of only two moons in the solar system with a robustly collisional atmosphere. Similar to Uranus, the angle between the solar wind and the magnetic dipole axis is subject to large-amplitude variations on both diurnal and seasonal timescales, but peculiarly it has one of the quietest magnetospheres of the solar system, at least according to Voyager 2, the only spacecraft to encounter Neptune to date. A comprehensive mission, as advocated in the Decadal Survey, would provide enormous science return but is also challenging and expensive. In this presentation we will discuss mission scenarios and suggest how collaboration between disciplines and internationally can help us to pursue a mission that includes Ice Giant exploration.

  20. Giant cell arteritis

    PubMed Central

    Calvo-Romero, J

    2003-01-01

    Giant cell arteritis (GCA), temporal arteritis or Horton's arteritis, is a systemic vasculitis which involves large and medium sized vessels, especially the extracranial branches of the carotid arteries, in persons usually older than 50 years. Permanent visual loss, ischaemic strokes, and thoracic and abdominal aortic aneurysms are feared complications of GCA. The treatment consists of high dose steroids. Mortality, with a correct treatment, in patients with GCA seems to be similar that of controls. PMID:13679546

  1. Giant Cell Arteritis.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Gary S

    2016-11-01

    This issue provides a clinical overview of giant cell arteritis, focusing on diagnosis, treatment, and practice improvement. The content of In the Clinic is drawn from the clinical information and education resources of the American College of Physicians (ACP), including MKSAP (Medical Knowledge and Self-Assessment Program). Annals of Internal Medicine editors develop In the Clinic in collaboration with the ACP's Medical Education and Publishing divisions and with the assistance of additional science writers and physician writers.

  2. The first-order giant neurons of the giant fiber system in the squid: electrophysiological and ultrastructural observations.

    PubMed

    Pozzo-Miller, L D; Moreira, J E; Llinás, R R

    1998-06-01

    The giant fiber system controlling mantle contraction used for jet propulsion in squid consists of two sets of three giant neurons organized in tandem. The somata of the 1st- and 2nd-order giant cells are located in the brain, while the perikarya of the 3rd-order giant cells are encountered in the stellate ganglia of the mantle. The somata and dendrites of one fused pair of 1st-order giant cells are thought to receive synaptic input from the eye, statocyst, skin proprioceptors, and supraesophageal lobes. To define the cellular properties for integration of such an extensive synaptic load, especially given its diversity, intracellular recordings and electron microscopic observations were performed on 1st-order giant cells in an isolated head preparation. Spontaneous bursts of action potentials and spikes evoked by extracellular stimulation of the brachial lobe were sensitive to the Na+ channel blocker TTX. Action potentials were also abolished by recording with microelectrodes containing the membrane impermeant, use dependent Na+ channel blocker QX-314. The small action potential amplitude and the abundant synaptic input imply that the spike initiation zone is remotely located from the recording site. The high spontaneous activity in the isolated head preparation, as well as the presence of synaptic junctions resembling inhibitory synapses, suggest; that afferent synapses on 1st-order giant neurons might represent the inhibitory control of the giant fiber system. The characterization of the electroresponsive properties of the 1st-order giant neurons will provide a description of the single cell integrative properties that trigger the rapid jet propulsion necessary for escape behavior in squid.

  3. Histiocytoid giant cellulitis-like Sweet's syndrome: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    So, Jessica Kim; Carlos, Casey A; Frucht, Corey S; Cohen, Philip R

    2015-01-25

    Histiocytoid Sweet syndrome is an uncommon variant in which the dermal infiltrate is composed of mononuclear cells with a histiocytic appearance that represent immature myeloid cells. Giant cellulitis-like Sweet syndrome is a recently described variant characterized by relapsing widespread giant lesions. We report a unique patient with histiocytoid giant cellulitis-like Sweet syndrome and review the current literature on histiocytoid Sweet syndrome and giant cellulitis-like Sweet syndrome. We reviewed PubMed for the following terms and have reviewed the literature: histiocytoid, giant cellulitis-like, and Sweet syndrome. Six individuals, including our patient, have been reported with giant cellulitis-like Sweet syndrome; four had obesity, two had a hematologic malignancy, and one had breast cancer. Histiocytoid Sweet syndrome has been reported in association with autoimmune diseases, infection or inflammation, inflammatory bowel disease, malignancies, medications, and other conditions. Histiocytoid Sweet syndrome is a rare variant of Sweet syndrome, often associated with malignancy. Giant cellulitis-like Sweet syndrome has been reported in six individuals; four of the patients were obese and three of the patients had an associated cancer. Our patient had histiocytoid giant cellulitis-like Sweet syndrome-associated myelodysplastic syndrome/myeloproliferative disorder. The diagnosis of histiocytoid Sweet syndrome or giant cellulitis-like Sweet syndrome should prompt the clinician to consider additional evaluation for a Sweet syndrome-associated malignancy.

  4. [Breast lesions as the presenting feature of giant cell arteritis].

    PubMed

    Meriglier, E; Belhadj Chaidi, R; Debouverie, O; Luca, L; Roblot, P

    2016-08-01

    Giant cell arteritis most commonly involves the external carotid branches. Although they are less typical, extra-cephalic forms have also been reported. We report the case of a 59-year-old female patient who developed bilateral, painful breast nodules with fever and altered general status since two months. Two weeks later, she presented frontal headache and scalp tenderness. A colour duplex ultrasound of the temporal artery showed a halo sign. The results of a breast needle biopsy were inconclusive but the temporal artery biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of giant cell arteritis. The disease course was rapidly favourable after institution of corticosteroids. Breast involvement is rare but could be the first sign of giant cell arteritis. The internal mammary artery, which is a branch of the subclavian artery, can be affected and responsible for breast nodules. Copyright © 2015 Société Nationale Française de Médecine Interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Giant biatrial myxoma with two different gross findings.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Taiyo; Yokoyama, Yukifusa; Yuhara, Satoshi; Okawa, Hideyuki; Hasegawa, Hiroki; Yokote, Jun; Tamaki, Shuji; Mii, Shinji

    2017-08-18

    We experienced a giant biatrial myxoma concomitant with hepatocellular carcinoma. Most of myxomas originate from the left atrium, and biatrial myxomas are extremely rare. Excision of the giant cardiac tumor was performed to avoid risks of life-threatening complications. The resected mass was grossly composed of two parts with the border of interatrial septum and with the shape of peanut shell. Although microscopic examinations revealed enlarged vessels, hemorrhages and hemosiderosis in the left part and high cellularity with chronic inflammation in the right part, spindle-shaped cells in a loose myxoid stroma were observed in both parts of the tumor, consistent with the diagnosis of myxoma. His second operation for hepatic cancer was successfully performed following 1 month after the first operation. Surgical treatment should be considered for giant atrium tumor which has risk of life-threatening complications even if patients have another cancer.

  6. The Medich giant platelet syndrome: two new cases.

    PubMed

    Gunning, William; Dole, Mukund; Brecher, Martin; White, James G

    2013-01-01

    Hypogranular platelet disorders in human subjects are relatively rare. They include the gray platelet syndrome, αδ storage pool deficiency, the Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome, and the white platelet syndrome. Perhaps the rarest of them all is the Medich giant platelet disorder. No additional cases of this condition have been reported since description of the first case in 2004. This study describes two children with thrombocytopenia and giant, hypogranular platelets found shortly after birth. Electron microscopic study of their platelets revealed sheets of membrane wrapped into tubes resembling scrolls. The scroll-like structures were open at both ends and often filled with glycogen particles. The abnormal structures are identical to those found in the initial case. As a result, the disorder can now be referred to as the Medich giant platelet syndrome.

  7. Giant Cell Myocarditis: Not Always a Presentation of Cardiogenic Shock.

    PubMed

    Tompkins, Rose; Cole, William J; Rosenzweig, Barry P; Axel, Leon; Bangalore, Sripal; Lala, Anuradha

    2015-01-01

    Giant cell myocarditis is a rare and often fatal disease. The most obvious presentation often described in the literature is one of rapid hemodynamic deterioration due to cardiogenic shock necessitating urgent consideration of mechanical circulatory support and heart transplantation. We present the case of a 60-year-old man whose initial presentation was consistent with myopericarditis but who went on to develop a rapid decline in left ventricular systolic function without overt hemodynamic compromise or dramatic symptomatology. Giant cell myocarditis was confirmed via endomyocardial biopsy. Combined immunosuppression with corticosteroids and calcineurin inhibitor resulted in resolution of symptoms and sustained recovery of left ventricular function one year later. Our case highlights that giant cell myocarditis does not always present with cardiogenic shock and should be considered in the evaluation of new onset cardiomyopathy of uncertain etiology as a timely diagnosis has distinct clinical implications on management and prognosis.

  8. Giant Cell Myocarditis: Not Always a Presentation of Cardiogenic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Tompkins, Rose; Cole, William J.; Rosenzweig, Barry P.; Axel, Leon; Bangalore, Sripal; Lala, Anuradha

    2015-01-01

    Giant cell myocarditis is a rare and often fatal disease. The most obvious presentation often described in the literature is one of rapid hemodynamic deterioration due to cardiogenic shock necessitating urgent consideration of mechanical circulatory support and heart transplantation. We present the case of a 60-year-old man whose initial presentation was consistent with myopericarditis but who went on to develop a rapid decline in left ventricular systolic function without overt hemodynamic compromise or dramatic symptomatology. Giant cell myocarditis was confirmed via endomyocardial biopsy. Combined immunosuppression with corticosteroids and calcineurin inhibitor resulted in resolution of symptoms and sustained recovery of left ventricular function one year later. Our case highlights that giant cell myocarditis does not always present with cardiogenic shock and should be considered in the evaluation of new onset cardiomyopathy of uncertain etiology as a timely diagnosis has distinct clinical implications on management and prognosis. PMID:26257963

  9. Giant sialolith of submandibular gland: report of a case†

    PubMed Central

    Arslan, Selçuk; Vuralkan, Erkan; Çobanog˘lu, Bengü; Arslan, Ahmet; Ural, Ahmet

    2015-01-01

    Sialolithiasis is one of the most common diseases of salivary glands in middle-aged patients. Sialoliths are localized in submandibular glands in nearly 80% of the reported cases and they are classified as ‘giant’ in case any dimension exceeds 15 mm. Giant sialolith in submandibular gland is a rare disorder. Here, an unusual case of giant sialolith in submandibular gland is reported. A 42-year-old man referred with complaints of recurrent pain and swelling in the left submandibular area. Computerized tomography revealed a calcified mass of 42 × 17 mm size within the submandibular gland. Excision was performed in the submandibular gland and a giant sialolith of 35 mm length localized in the body of the gland was detected. The postoperative period was uneventful and the patient fully recovered. PMID:25848088

  10. Giant bulla mimicking tension pneumothorax.

    PubMed

    Gökçe, Mertol; Saydam, Ozkan; Altin, Remzi; Kart, Levent

    2009-01-01

    In the chest X-ray, we observe tension pneumothorax (TPX) as wide radiolucent view in a hemithorax and pushing the mediastinal structures contralateral. Giant bulla may mimic TPX with wide radiolucent view and mediastinal shift. The present report includes giant pulmonary bulla in 35-year-old woman. The giant bulla was diagnosed as a TPX in emergency, and chest tube was performed. The differentiation between TPX and a giant bulla may be very difficult. The therapies of these two similar entities are completely different. So that, we must be careful about anamnesis, physical examination and radiology for true diagnosis.

  11. A class of rare antiferromagnetic metallic oxides: double perovskite AMn3V4O12 (A = Na(+), Ca(2+), and La(3+)) and the site-selective doping effect.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guangbiao; Wang, Yuanxu; Cheng, Zhenxiang; Yan, Yuli; Peng, Chengxiao; Wang, Chao; Dong, Shuai

    2015-05-21

    We have investigated the structural, electronic, and magnetic properties of A-site-ordered double-perovskite-structured oxides, AA'3B4O12 (A = Na, Ca, and La) with Mn and V at A' and B sites, respectively, using first-principle calculations based on the density functional theory. Our calculation results show that the antiferromagnetic phase is the ground state for all the compounds. By changing the A-site ions from Na(+) to Ca(2+) and then to La(3+), the transfer of charge between Mn and O ions was changed from 1.56 to 1.55 and then to 1.50, and that between the V and O ions changed from 2.01 to 1.95 and then to 1.93, revealing the cause for the unusual site-selective doping effect. Mn 3d electrons dominate the magnetic moment and are localized, with an intense hybridization with O 2p orbitals, which indicates that the magnetic exchange interaction between Mn ions is mediated through O and that the super exchange mechanism will take effect. These materials have a large one-electron bandwidth W, and the ratio of the on-site Coulomb repulsion U to W is less than the critical value (U/W)c, which leads to metallic behavior of AMn3V4O12. This is further evidenced by the large number of free electrons contributed by V at the Fermi surface. These calculations, in combination with the reported experimental data, prove that these double perovskites belong to the rare antiferromagnetic metallic oxides.

  12. Giant cell (Temporal) arteritis with anterior ischemic optic neuropathy: a biopsy-proven case in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Cheng-Kuo; Lee, Chin-Cheng; Huang, Kai-Han; Wu, Tzu-En; Peng, Pai-Huei

    2010-07-01

    Giant cell arteritis with arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy has rarely been diagnosed in Taiwan. Recently, we encountered a 76-year-old Taiwanese patient who presented with right visual impairment and marked pale swelling of his right disc. He also suffered body weight loss, general malaise and many typical manifestations of giant cell arteritis, such as jaw claudication, a tender, non-pulsating engorgement of his temporal arteries, and a highly elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein level. Biopsy of his right superficial temporal artery revealed a granulomatous inflammation with multinucleated giant cell infiltration. This was a biopsy-proven case of giant cell arteritis with arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy and indicated that although rare, this disease could occur in patients in Taiwan. Copyright 2010 Formosan Medical Association & Elsevier. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. A giant dumbbell shaped vesico-prostatic urethral calculus: a case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Prabhuswamy, Vinod Kumar; Tiwari, Rahul; Krishnamoorthy, Ramakrishnan

    2013-01-01

    Calculi in the urethra are an uncommon entity. Giant calculi in prostatic urethra are extremely rare. The decision about treatment strategy of calculi depends upon the size, shape, and position of the calculus and the status of the urethra. If the stone is large and immovable, it may be extracted via the perineal or the suprapubic approach. In most of the previous reported cases, giant calculi were extracted via the transvesical approach and external urethrotomy. A 38-year-old male patient presented with complaints of lower urinary tract symptoms. Further investigations showed a giant urethral calculus secondary to stricture of bulbo-membranous part of the urethra. Surgical removal of calculus was done via transvesical approach. Two calculi were found and extracted. One was a huge dumbbell calculus and the other was a smaller round calculus. This case was reported because of the rare size and the dumbbell nature of the stone. Giant urethral calculi are better managed by open surgery.

  14. Peripheral Giant Cell Granuloma: A Review of 123 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Shadman, Niloofar; Ebrahimi, Shahram Farzin; Jafari, Shahin; Eslami, Mohammad

    2009-01-01

    Background: Peripheral giant cell granuloma is one of the reactive hyperplastic lesions of the oral cavity, which originates from the periosteum or periodontal membrane following local irritation or chronic trauma. The purpose of this study was to present the clinical characteristics of peripheral giant cell granuloma in a group of Iranian population. Methods: A series of 123 consecutive confirmed cases of peripheral giant cell granuloma after biopsy were evaluated. Age, sex, anatomic location, consistency, etiologic factor, pain and bleeding history, color, surface texture, and pedicle situation were recorded and were analyzed by chi-square test and values were considered to be significant if P < 0.05. Results: Age ranged from 6 to 75 years (mean 33 years). Women affected more than men (M/F 1:1.1). Peripheral giant cell granuloma was seen in the mandible more than in the maxilla and in the anterior region more than in the posterior region. In most cases, lesions were pink, pedunculated and had non-ulcerated surface. In less than half of the cases, there was no history of bleeding and also pain was rarely reported. Calculus was the most common etiologic factor. Conclusion: The results confirmed that the clinical features of peripheral giant cell granuloma in a group of Iranian population are almost similar to those reported by other investigators. PMID:21528029

  15. The Chemical Composition Contrast between M3 and M13 Revisited: New Abundances for 28 Giant Stars in M3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sneden, Christopher; Kraft, Robert P.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Peterson, Ruth C.; Fulbright, Jon P.

    2004-04-01

    relative contribution of rare to abundant isotopes of Mg. This points to a scenario in which these abundance ratios arose in the ejected material of 3-6 Msolar cluster stars, material that was then used to form the atmospheres of the presently evolving low-mass cluster stars. It also suggests that the low oxygen abundance seen among the most evolved M13 giants arose in hot bottom O-to-N processing in these same intermediate-mass cluster stars. Thus, mixing is required by the dependence of some abundance ratios on luminosity, but an earlier nucleosynthesis process in a hotter environment than giants or main-sequence stars is required by the variations previously seen in stars near the main sequence. The nature and the site of the earlier process is constrained but not pinpointed by the observed Mg isotopic ratio. Based on data obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation. The authors wish to recognize and acknowledge the very significant cultural role and reverence that the summit of Mauna Kea has always had within the indigenous Hawaiian community. We are most fortunate to have the opportunity to conduct observations from this mountain.

  16. Complete transthoracic resection of giant posterior mediastinal goiter: case report and review of surgical strategies

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Honglin; Ren, Dian; Liu, Yi; Li, Xin; Wu, Yi; Chen, Gang; Chen, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Intrathoracic goiters generally occupy anterior mediastinum, rarely involving the posterior mediastinal space. Reported herein is a 54-year-old female with a giant posterior mediastinal mass that was successfully resected via right posterolateral thoracotomy. The final pathologic diagnosis was giant posterior mediastinal goiter. This patient has done well postoperatively, with no evidence of local recurrence at 12-month follow-up. Related surgical strategies in past publications are summarized. PMID:27217766

  17. Giant prostatic hyperplasia: report of a previously asymptomatic man presenting with gross hematuria and hypovolemic shock.

    PubMed

    Wroclawski, Marcelo Langer; Carneiro, Ariê; Tristão, Rodrigo Alves; Sakuramoto, Paulo Kouiti; Youssef, Jorg Daoud Merched; Lopes Neto, Antonio Correa; Santiago, Lucila Heloísa Simardi; Pompeo, Antonio Carlos Lima

    2015-01-01

    Giant prostatic hyperplasia is a rare condition characterized by very high volume benign prostatic enlargement (>500g). Few cases have been reported so far and most of them are associated with severe lower urinary symptoms. We report the first case of asymptomatic giant prostatic hyperplasia in an elderly man who had a 720g prostate adenoma, sudden gross hematuria and hypovolemic shock. The patient was successfully treated with open transvesical prostatectomy and had an uneventful postoperative recovery.

  18. An undiagnosed giant right renal hydatid cyst treated laparoscopically: Case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Osman, Elsawi; Khan, Ziauddin; Abualsel, Abdulmenem; Bhatty, Tanweer

    2016-01-01

    Hydatid disease caused by the tape worm Echinococcus granulosus is a rare occurrence in the urinary system in general. We are hereby presenting a case of a gentleman in his fourth decade with a giant right renal hydatid cyst. The clinical manifestations, radiological features, and serology were all not suggestive of hydatid disease; however, typical Echinococcus scolices were detected histologically following cyst aspiration. The giant cyst was successfully treated laparoscopically. PMID:28057995

  19. Giant prostatic hyperplasia: report of a previously asymptomatic man presenting with gross hematuria and hypovolemic shock

    PubMed Central

    Wroclawski, Marcelo Langer; Carneiro, Ariê; Tristão, Rodrigo Alves; Sakuramoto, Paulo Kouiti; Youssef, Jorg Daoud Merched; Lopes, Antonio Correa; Santiago, Lucila Heloísa Simardi; Pompeo, Antonio Carlos Lima

    2015-01-01

    Giant prostatic hyperplasia is a rare condition characterized by very high volume benign prostatic enlargement (>500g). Few cases have been reported so far and most of them are associated with severe lower urinary symptoms. We report the first case of asymptomatic giant prostatic hyperplasia in an elderly man who had a 720g prostate adenoma, sudden gross hematuria and hypovolemic shock. The patient was successfully treated with open transvesical prostatectomy and had an uneventful postoperative recovery. PMID:26132361

  20. Giant cell tumor occurring in familial Paget's disease of bone: report of clinical characteristics and linkage analysis of a large pedigree.

    PubMed

    Gianfrancesco, Fernando; Rendina, Domenico; Merlotti, Daniela; Esposito, Teresa; Amyere, Mustapha; Formicola, Daniela; Muscariello, Riccardo; De Filippo, Gianpaolo; Strazzullo, Pasquale; Nuti, Ranuccio; Vikkula, Mikka; Gennari, Luigi

    2013-02-01

    Neoplastic degeneration represents a rare but serious complication of Paget's disease of bone (PDB). Although osteosarcomas have been described in up to 1% of PDB cases, giant cell tumors are less frequent and mainly occur in patients with polyostotic disease. We recently characterized a large pedigree with 14 affected members of whom four developed giant cell tumors at pagetic sites. The high number of affected subjects across multiple generations allowed us to better characterize the clinical phenotype and look for possible susceptibility loci. Of interest, all the affected members had polyostotic PDB, but subjects developing giant cell tumors showed an increased disease severity with a reduced clinical response to bisphosphonate treatment and an increased prevalence of bone pain, deformities, and fractures. Together with an increased occurrence of common pagetic complications, affected patients of this pedigree also evidenced a fivefold higher prevalence of coronary artery disease with respect to either the unaffected family members or a comparative cohort of 150 unrelated PDB cases from the same geographical area. This association was further enhanced in the four cases with PDB and giant cell tumors, all of them developing coronary artery disease before 60 years of age. Despite the early onset and the severe phenotype, PDB patients from this pedigree were negative for the presence of SQSTM1 or TNFRSF11A mutations, previously associated with enhanced disease severity. Genome-wide linkage analysis identified six possible candidate regions on chromosomes 1, 5, 6, 8, 10, and 20. Because the chromosome 8 and 10 loci were next to the TNFRSF11B and OPTN genes, we extended the genetic screening to these two genes, but we failed to identify any causative mutation at both the genomic and transcription level, suggesting that a different genetic defect is associated with PDB and potentially giant cell tumor of bone in this pedigree. Copyright © 2013 American Society for

  1. Giant mesenteric cyst

    PubMed Central

    Guraya, Salman Yousuf; Salman, Shaista; Almaramhy, Hamdi H.

    2011-01-01

    Mesenteric cysts are uncommon benign abdominal lesions with no classical clinical features. The preoperative diagnosis requires the common imaging modalities but the final diagnosis is established only during surgery or histological analysis. The treatment of choice is complete surgical excision. We report an 18-year-old female with a non-specific abdominal pain and discomfort since 3 weeks. Her CT scan showed a huge cystic swelling, which necessitated surgical exploration. Preoperatively, a giant cyst was encountered with displacement of bowel loops. The cyst was completely removed and histology report confirmed mesenteric cyst without evidence of malignancy. PMID:24765349

  2. Giant mesenteric cyst.

    PubMed

    Guraya, Salman Yousuf; Salman, Shaista; Almaramhy, Hamdi H

    2011-09-28

    Mesenteric cysts are uncommon benign abdominal lesions with no classical clinical features. The preoperative diagnosis requires the common imaging modalities but the final diagnosis is established only during surgery or histological analysis. The treatment of choice is complete surgical excision. We report an 18-year-old female with a non-specific abdominal pain and discomfort since 3 weeks. Her CT scan showed a huge cystic swelling, which necessitated surgical exploration. Preoperatively, a giant cyst was encountered with displacement of bowel loops. The cyst was completely removed and histology report confirmed mesenteric cyst without evidence of malignancy.

  3. Contrasting effects of giant kelp on dynamics of surfperch populations.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Russell J; Holbrook, Sally J

    1990-10-01

    The effect of giant kelp, Macrocystis pyrifera, on the population dynamics of two temperate reef fishes, striped surfperch (Embiotoca lateralis) and black surfperch (E. jacksoni), was examined. Based on an understanding of how particular reef resources influence abundances of the surfperch and of the effect of giant kelp on those resources, we anticipated that Macrocystis would adversely affect populations of striped surfperch but would enhance those of black surfperch. The natural establishment of giant kelp at sites at Santa Cruz Island, California, resulted in the predicted dynamical responses of surfperch. Abundances of striped surfperch declined rapidly when and where dense forests of giant kelp appeared, but showed little change where Macrocystis was continuously absent over the 8 y period of study. Abundances of adult black surperch, which increased following the appearance of giant kelp, were lagged by >1 y because the dynamical response involved enhanced local recruitment. No change in abundance of black surfperch populations was evident at areas without giant kelp.The mechanism by which giant kelp altered the dynamics of the surfperch involved modification of the assemblage of understory algae used by surfperch as foraging microhabitat. Foliose algae (including Gelidium robustum) were much reduced and turf was greatly enhanced following the appearance of Macrocystis; these two benthic substrata are the favored foraging microhabitat for striped surfperch and black surfperch respectively. Populations of both surfperch species tracked temporal changes in the local availability of their favored foraging microhabitat. Thus, while neither species used Macrocystis directly, temporal and spatial variation in giant kelp indirectly influenced the dynamics of these fishes by altering their foraging base. These results indicate that the dynamics of striped surfperch and black surfperch were governed to a large degree by density-dependent consumer

  4. Habitat suitability and conservation of the Giant Gartersnake (Thamnophis gigas) in the Sacramento Valley of California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Halstead, B.J.; Wylie, G.D.; Casazza, M.L.

    2010-01-01

    Resource managers often have little information regarding the habitat requirements and distribution of rare species. Factor analysis-based habitat suitability models describe the ecological niche of a species and identify locations where these conditions occur on the landscape using existing occurrence data. We used factor analyses to assess the suitability of habitats for Thamnophis gigas (Giant Gartersnake), a rare, threatened species endemic to the Central Valley of California, USA, and to map the locations of habitat suitable for T. gigas in the Sacramento Valley. Factor analyses indicated that the niche of T. gigas is composed of sites near rice agriculture with low stream densities. Sites with high canal densities and near wetlands also appeared suitable, but results for these variables were sensitive to potential sampling bias. In the Sacramento Valley, suitable habitats occur primarily in the central portion of the valley floor. Based upon the results of the factor analyses, recovery planning for T. gigas will require an on-the-ground assessment of the current distribution and abundance of T. gigas, maintaining the few remaining natural wetlands and the practice of rice agriculture in the Sacramento Valley, and studying the effects of agricultural practices and land use changes on populations of T. gigas. ?? 2010 by the American Society of Ichthyologists and Herpetologists.

  5. Habitat suitability and conservation of the giant gartersnake (Thamnophis gigas) in the Sacramento Valley of California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Halstead, Brian J.; Wylie, Glenn D.; Casazza, Michael L.

    2010-01-01

    Resource managers often have little information regarding the habitat requirements and distribution of rare species. Factor analysis-based habitat suitability models describe the ecological niche of a species and identify locations where these conditions occur on the landscape using existing occurrence data.We used factor analyses to assess the suitability of habitats for Thamnophis gigas (Giant Gartersnake), a rare, threatened species endemic to the Central Valley of California, USA, and to map the locations of habitat suitable for T. gigas in the Sacramento Valley. Factor analyses indicated that the niche of T. gigas is composed of sites near rice agriculture with low stream densities. Sites with high canal densities and near wetlands also appeared suitable, but results for these variables were sensitive to potential sampling bias. In the Sacramento Valley, suitable habitats occur primarily in the central portion of the valley floor. Based upon the results of the factor analyses, recovery planning for T. gigas will require an on-the-ground assessment of the current distribution and abundance of T. gigas, maintaining the few remaining natural wetlands and the practice of rice agriculture in the Sacramento Valley, and studying the effects of agricultural practices and land use changes on populations of T. gigas.

  6. Carnivora from the Kanapoi hominin site, northern Kenya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werdelin, Lars; Manthi, Fredrick Kyalo

    2012-02-01

    The assemblage from Kanapoi represents the most diverse early Pliocene carnivore assemblage from sub-Saharan Africa. Carnivora from Kanapoi were originally described by Werdelin (2003a), but continuing field work has brought to light significant new material from the site, shedding new light on the earliest post-Miocene radiation of Carnivora in Africa. Most importantly, a second species of Enhydriodon has been recovered from the site, including the first specimen to include a large part of the neurocranium. This makes Kanapoi the first site to include two species of this genus. This addition to the fauna will be of prime significance to understanding the ecology and evolutionary radiation of these giant, extinct otters. Other significant new finds include additional material of a wildcat-sized felid. Finds of this group are rare, and the new Kanapoi material adds significantly to our knowledge of the stem lineage of the genus Felis, which is widespread in Africa today.

  7. Giant cystic sacral schwannoma mimicking tarlov cyst: a case report.

    PubMed

    Attiah, Mark A; Syre, Peter P; Pierce, John; Belyaeva, Elizaveta; Welch, William C

    2016-05-01

    To present a rare case of a giant schwannoma of the sacrum mimicking a Tarlov cyst. A 58-year-old woman had a 1-year history of low back pain. MRI revealed a large cystic mass in the sacral canal with bony erosion. Radiological diagnosis of Tarlov cyst was made. The patient underwent surgical treatment for the lesion, which revealed a solid mass. Histopathological examination of the tumor confirmed the diagnosis of schwannoma. The postoperative course was uneventful and the patient has had significant improvement in her pain 1 month postoperatively. Giant cystic schwannoma of the sacrum is a very rare diagnosis overlooked by practitioners for more common cystic etiologies, but its treatment is significantly different. Care should be taken to include this diagnosis in a differential for a cystic sacral mass.

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging findings of undifferentiated carcinoma with osteoclast-like giant cells of pancreas.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kyung Yoon; Choi, Joon-Il; Choi, Moon Hyung; Park, Michael Yong; Rha, Sung Eun; Byun, Jae Young; Jung, Eun Sun; Lall, Chandana

    2016-01-01

    Undifferentiated carcinoma with osteoclast-like giant cells is a rare pancreatic and periampullary neoplasm with less than 50 cases reported in the literature. Pathologically, this tumor mimics a giant cell tumor in bones. We report a case of undifferentiated carcinoma with osteoclast-like giant cells in a 55-year-old man presenting as a pancreatic mass with associated regional and distant lymphadenopathy. On T1- and T2-weighted images, the mass shows dark signal intensity which was atypical for a pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

  9. Establishment and cryopreservation of a giant panda skeletal muscle-derived cell line.

    PubMed

    Yu, Fang-Jian; Zeng, Chang-Jun; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Cheng-Dong; Xiong, Tie-Yi; Fang, Sheng-Guo; Zhang, He-Min

    2015-06-01

    The giant panda Ailuropoda melanoleuca is an endangered species and is a symbol for wildlife conservation. Although efforts have been made to protect this rare and endangered species through breeding and conservative biology, the long-term preservation of giant panda genome resources (gametes, tissues, organs, genomic libraries, etc.) is still a practical option. In this study, the giant panda skeletal muscle-derived cell line was successfully established via primary explants culture and cryopreservation techniques. The population doubling time of giant panda skeletal cells was approximately 33.8 h, and this population maintained a high cell viability before and after cryopreservation (95.6% and 90.7%, respectively). The two skeletal muscle-specific genes SMYD1 and MYF6 were expressed and detected by RT-PCR in the giant panda skeletal muscle-derived cell line. Karyotyping analysis revealed that the frequencies of giant panda skeletal muscle cells showing a chromosome number of 2n=42 ranged from 90.6∼94.2%. Thus, the giant panda skeletal muscle-derived cell line provides a vital resource and material platform for further studies and is likely to be useful for the protection of this rare and endangered species.

  10. Giant congenital nevus

    MedlinePlus

    ... A congenital pigmented or melanocytic nevus is a dark-colored, often hairy, patch of skin. It is ... rare. Symptoms A nevus will appear as a dark-colored patch with any of the following: Brown ...

  11. Gas Giants Form Quickly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    This is an artist's concept of a hypothetical 10-million-year-old star system. The bright blur at the center is a star much like our sun. The other orb in the image is a gas-giant planet like Jupiter. Wisps of white throughout the image represent traces of gas.

    Astronomers using NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope have found evidence showing that gas-giant planets either form within the first 10 million years of a sun-like star's life, or not at all. The lifespan for sun-like stars is about 10 billion years.

    The scientists came to this conclusion after searching for traces of gas around 15 different sun-like stars, most with ages ranging from 3 million to 30 million years. With the help of Spitzer's Infrared Spectrometer instrument, they were able to search for relatively warm gas in the inner regions of these star systems, an area comparable to the zone between Earth and Jupiter in our own solar system. They also used ground-based radio telescopes to search for cooler gas in the outer regions of these systems, an area comparable to the zone around Saturn and beyond.

  12. Giant papillary conjunctivitis.

    PubMed Central

    Donshik, P C

    1994-01-01

    Giant papillary conjunctivitis is a syndrome found frequently as a complication of contact lenses. Many variables can affect the onset and severity of the presenting signs and symptoms. Rigid gas permeable contact lenses appear to result in less severe signs and symptoms, with a longer time before the development of giant papillary conjunctivitis. Nonionic, low-water-content soft contact lenses tend to produce less severe signs and symptoms than ionic, low-water-content soft contact lenses. Enzymatic treatment appears to lessen the severity of signs and symptoms. The association of an allergy appears to play a role in the onset of the severity of the signs and symptoms but does not appear to affect the final ability of the individual to wear contact lenses. Using multiple treatment options, such as changing the polymer to a glyceryl methyl methacrylate or a rigid lens, or utilizing a soft lens on a frequent-replacement basis, can result in a success rate of over 90%. In individuals who still have a return of symptoms, the use of topical mast cell stabilizers or a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug as an adjunctive therapy offers the added possibility of keeping these patients in contact lenses. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 11 A FIGURE 11 B FIGURE 11 C FIGURE 11 D PMID:7886881

  13. Gas Giants Form Quickly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    This is an artist's concept of a hypothetical 10-million-year-old star system. The bright blur at the center is a star much like our sun. The other orb in the image is a gas-giant planet like Jupiter. Wisps of white throughout the image represent traces of gas.

    Astronomers using NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope have found evidence showing that gas-giant planets either form within the first 10 million years of a sun-like star's life, or not at all. The lifespan for sun-like stars is about 10 billion years.

    The scientists came to this conclusion after searching for traces of gas around 15 different sun-like stars, most with ages ranging from 3 million to 30 million years. With the help of Spitzer's Infrared Spectrometer instrument, they were able to search for relatively warm gas in the inner regions of these star systems, an area comparable to the zone between Earth and Jupiter in our own solar system. They also used ground-based radio telescopes to search for cooler gas in the outer regions of these systems, an area comparable to the zone around Saturn and beyond.

  14. Brain Herniation into Giant Arachnoid Granulation: An Unusual Case

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Gonçalo Roque

    2017-01-01

    Arachnoid granulations are structures filled with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) that extend into the venous sinuses through openings in the dura mater and allow the drainage of CSF from subarachnoid space into venous system. Usually they are asymptomatic but can be symptomatic when large enough to cause sinus occlusion. We report a rare case of a brain herniation into a giant arachnoid granulation in an asymptomatic elderly male patient, which was discovered incidentally. PMID:28392955

  15. Chylous ascites after resection of giant adrenocortical carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Karakoyun, Rojbin; Demirci, Erkan; Alikanoglu, Arsenal Sezgin

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative chylous ascites (PCA) is a rare clinical state that occurs during abdominal surgery. Despite its rarity, the need to diagnose and treat PCA is increasing in importance with the increased number of wide resections and lymph node dissections being performed and the serious consequences of treatment. Here we describe the PCA complications we observed after resection for treating a case of giant adrenocortical carcinoma and we have the brief review of the PCA complication. PMID:28149812

  16. A Challenging Giant Dermatofibrosarcoma Protuberans on the Face

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, Gimena Castro; Arias, Cintia; Luna, Paula; Sorín, Irene

    2016-01-01

    Dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans (DFSP) is a malignant fibrohistiocytic tumor that appears exclusively on the skin. It is a low-grade malignant soft tissue tumor of subcutaneous tissues that has a propensity for local recurrence but seldom metastasizes. It may rarely occur on the head and neck accounting for less than one percent of total head and neck malignancies. We present a man with a giant DFSP on the face. Oncological, functional, and aesthetic aspects are set forth. PMID:27437151

  17. Central Giant Cell Granuloma: A potential endodontic misdiagnosis.

    PubMed

    Seifi, Safoura; Fouroghi, Ramin

    2009-01-01

    Central Giant Cell Granulomas (CGCGs) may manifest as radiolucencies anywhere in the mandible or maxilla. In rare cases, it can appear as a localized periradicular area and mimic an endodontic lesion. This case report presents an uncommon location of CGCG which was not accurately diagnosed nor timely treated. Periodic follow ups of periapical radiolucencies after RCT are necessary. Dentists should include CGCG in differential diagnosis of lesions that are refractory to endodontic treatment. [Iranian Endodontic Journal 2009;4(4):158-60].

  18. Reinflating Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-01-01

    Two new, large gas-giant exoplanets have been discovered orbiting close to their host stars. A recent study examining these planets and others like them may help us to better understand what happens to close-in hot Jupiters as their host stars reach the end of their main-sequence lives.OversizedGiantsUnbinned transit light curves for HAT-P-65b. [Adapted from Hartman et al. 2016]The discovery of HAT-P-65b and HAT-P-66b, two new transiting hot Jupiters, is intriguing. These planets have periods of just under 3 days and masses of roughly 0.5 and 0.8 times that of Jupiter, but their sizes are whats really interesting: they have inflated radii of 1.89 and 1.59 times that of Jupiter.These two planets, discovered using the Hungarian-made Automated Telescope Network (HATNet) in Arizona and Hawaii, mark the latest in an ever-growing sample of gas-giant exoplanets with radii larger than expected based on theoretical planetary structure models.What causes this discrepancy? Did the planets just fail to contract to the expected size when they were initially formed, or were they reinflated later in their lifetimes? If the latter, how? These are questions that scientists are only now starting to be able to address using statistics of the sample of close-in, transiting planets.Unbinned transit light curves for HAT-P-66b. [Hartman et al. 2016]Exploring Other PlanetsLed by Joel Hartman (Princeton University), the team that discovered HAT-P-65b and HAT-P-66b has examined these planets observed parameters and those of dozens of other known close-in, transiting exoplanets discovered with a variety of transiting exoplanet missions: HAT, WASP, Kepler, TrES, and KELT. Hartman and collaborators used this sample to draw conclusions about what causes some of these planets to have such large radii.The team found that there is a statistically significant correlation between the radii of close-in giant planets and the fractional ages of their host stars (i.e., the stars age divided by its full

  19. Allometry indicates giant eyes of giant squid are not exceptional.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Lars; Motani, Ryosuke; Oufiero, Christopher E; Martin, Christopher H; McGee, Matthew D; Gamarra, Ashlee R; Lee, Johanna J; Wainwright, Peter C

    2013-02-18

    The eyes of giant and colossal squid are among the largest eyes in the history of life. It was recently proposed that sperm whale predation is the main driver of eye size evolution in giant squid, on the basis of an optical model that suggested optimal performance in detecting large luminous visual targets such as whales in the deep sea. However, it is poorly understood how the eye size of giant and colossal squid compares to that of other aquatic organisms when scaling effects are considered. We performed a large-scale comparative study that included 87 squid species and 237 species of acanthomorph fish. While squid have larger eyes than most acanthomorphs, a comparison of relative eye size among squid suggests that giant and colossal squid do not have unusually large eyes. After revising constants used in a previous model we found that large eyes perform equally well in detecting point targets and large luminous targets in the deep sea. The eyes of giant and colossal squid do not appear exceptionally large when allometric effects are considered. It is probable that the giant eyes of giant squid result from a phylogenetically conserved developmental pattern manifested in very large animals. Whatever the cause of large eyes, they appear to have several advantages for vision in the reduced light of the deep mesopelagic zone.

  20. Allometry indicates giant eyes of giant squid are not exceptional

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The eyes of giant and colossal squid are among the largest eyes in the history of life. It was recently proposed that sperm whale predation is the main driver of eye size evolution in giant squid, on the basis of an optical model that suggested optimal performance in detecting large luminous visual targets such as whales in the deep sea. However, it is poorly understood how the eye size of giant and colossal squid compares to that of other aquatic organisms when scaling effects are considered. Results We performed a large-scale comparative study that included 87 squid species and 237 species of acanthomorph fish. While squid have larger eyes than most acanthomorphs, a comparison of relative eye size among squid suggests that giant and colossal squid do not have unusually large eyes. After revising constants used in a previous model we found that large eyes perform equally well in detecting point targets and large luminous targets in the deep sea. Conclusions The eyes of giant and colossal squid do not appear exceptionally large when allometric effects are considered. It is probable that the giant eyes of giant squid result from a phylogenetically conserved developmental pattern manifested in very large animals. Whatever the cause of large eyes, they appear to have several advantages for vision in the reduced light of the deep mesopelagic zone. PMID:23418818

  1. Red Giant Plunging Through Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Poster Version

    This image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope (left panel) shows the 'bow shock' of a dying star named R Hydrae, or R Hya, in the constellation Hydra.

    Bow shocks are formed where the stellar wind from a star are pushed into a bow shape (illustration, right panel) as the star plunges through the gas and dust between stars. Our own Sun has a bow shock, but prior to this image one had never been observed around this particular class of red giant star.

    R Hya moves through space at approximately 50 kilometers per second. As it does so, it discharges dust and gas into space. Because the star is relatively cool, that ejecta quickly assumes a solid state and collides with the interstellar medium. The resulting dusty nebula is invisible to the naked eye but can be detected using an infrared telescope. This bow shock is 16,295 astronomical units from the star to the apex and 6,188 astronomical units thick (an astronomical unit is the distance between the sun and Earth). The mass of the bow shock is about 400 times the mass of the Earth.

    The false-color Spitzer image shows infrared emissions at 70 microns. Brighter colors represent greater intensities of infrared light at that wavelength. The location of the star itself is drawn onto the picture in the black 'unobserved' region in the center.

  2. Red Giant Plunging Through Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Poster Version

    This image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope (left panel) shows the 'bow shock' of a dying star named R Hydrae, or R Hya, in the constellation Hydra.

    Bow shocks are formed where the stellar wind from a star are pushed into a bow shape (illustration, right panel) as the star plunges through the gas and dust between stars. Our own Sun has a bow shock, but prior to this image one had never been observed around this particular class of red giant star.

    R Hya moves through space at approximately 50 kilometers per second. As it does so, it discharges dust and gas into space. Because the star is relatively cool, that ejecta quickly assumes a solid state and collides with the interstellar medium. The resulting dusty nebula is invisible to the naked eye but can be detected using an infrared telescope. This bow shock is 16,295 astronomical units from the star to the apex and 6,188 astronomical units thick (an astronomical unit is the distance between the sun and Earth). The mass of the bow shock is about 400 times the mass of the Earth.

    The false-color Spitzer image shows infrared emissions at 70 microns. Brighter colors represent greater intensities of infrared light at that wavelength. The location of the star itself is drawn onto the picture in the black 'unobserved' region in the center.

  3. Management of Giant Sequoia at Blodgett Forest Research Station

    Treesearch

    Robert C. Heald

    1986-01-01

    Researchers at Blodgett Forest Research Station, University of California, are studying giant sequoia (Sequoiadendron giganteum [Lindl.] Buchholz) growth under both even-age and selection management in relationship to the presence of several shrub species and five native conifers. The sequoias are also being studied under several types of site...

  4. Giant Intradural Mucocele in a Patient with Adult Onset Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Kechagias, E.; Georgakoulias, N.; Ioakimidou, C.; Kyriazi, S.; Kontogeorgos, G.; Seretis, A.

    2009-01-01

    A rare case of mucopyocele in a patient who presented with epileptic seizures is reported. The computed tomography scan (CT) and the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging revealed an intradural extension of a giant fronto-ethmoidal mucopyocele, eroding the cribriform plate and compressing both frontal lobes. The lesion was removed by craniotomy with elimination of the mass effect and reconstruction of the anterior skull base. An intracranial-intradural mucopyocele is an extremely rare cause of generalized convulsion as a presenting symptom, with only 6 cases reported in the literature. The total removal of the lesion associated with anterior fossa reconstruction is the treatment of choice. PMID:20847833

  5. Giant magnetostrictive composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duenas, Terrisa Ann

    The limitation of magnetostrictive composites has been in their low magnetostrictive response when compared to their monolithic counterparts. In this dissertation research is presented describing the methods and analysis used to create a giant magnetostrictive composite (GMC) producing giant strains at low fields, exhibiting magnetization ``jumping'' and the ΔE effect. This composite combines the giant magnetostrictive material, Terfenol-D (Tb0.3Dy0.7Fe2) in particle form, with a nonmetallic binder and is capable of producing strains (at room temperature) exceeding 1000 ppm at a nominal field of 1.5 kOe mechanically unloaded and 1200 ppm at 8 MPa preload (2.5 kOe). Several studies leading to the high response of this composite are presented. A connectivity study shows that a [1-3] connected composite produces 50% more strain than a [0-3] composite. A resin study indicates that the lower the viscosity of the resin, the greater the magnetostrictive response; this is attributed to the removal of voids during degassing. A void study correlates the increase in voids to the decrease in strain response. A model is used to correlate analysis with experimental results within 10% accuracy and shows that an optimal volume fraction exists based on the properties of the binder. Using a Polyscience Spurr low- viscosity (60 cps) binder this volume fraction is nominally 20%; this optimum is attributed to the balance of epoxy contracting on the particle (built-in preload) and the actuation delivered by the magnetostrictive material. In addition to the connectivity, resin, void, and volume-fraction study, particle size and gradation studies are presented. Widely dispersed (<106, <212, <300 μm), narrowly dispersed (<45, (90-106), (275-300) μm), and an optimized bimodal (18.7% of (45-90) μm with 81.3% of (250-300) μm) particle distributions are studied. Results show that the larger the particle size, the higher the magnetostrictive response; this is attributed to the reduction of

  6. Giant Impacts on Earth-Like Worlds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-05-01

    examine the collisional histories of Earth-like planets that form. Their goal is to understand if our solar systems formation and evolution is typical or unique.How Common Are Giant Impacts?Histogram of the total number of giant impacts received by the 164 Earth-like worlds produced in the authors fragmentation-inclusive simulations. [Quintana et al. 2016]The authors find that including fragmentation does not affect the final number of planets that are formed in the simulation (an average of 34 in each system, consistent with our solar systems terrestrial planet count). But when fragmentation is included, fewer collisions end in merger which results in typical accretion timescales roughly doubling. So the effects of fragmentation influence the collisional history of the system and the length of time needed for the final system to form.Examining the 164 Earth-analogs produced in the fragmentation-inclusive simulations, Quintana and collaborators find that impacts large enough to completely strip a planets atmosphere are rare; fewer than 1% of the Earth-like worlds experienced this.But giant impacts that are able to strip ~50% of an Earth-analogs atmosphere roughly the energy of the giant impact thought to have formed our Moon are more common. Almost all of the authors Earth-analogs experienced at least 1 giant impact of this size in the 2-Gyr simulation, and the average Earth-like world experienced ~3 such impacts.These results suggest that our planets impact history with the Moon-forming impact likely being the last giant impact Earth experienced is fairly typical for Earth-like worlds. The outcomes also indicate that smaller impacts that are still potentially life-threatening are much more common than bulk atmospheric removal. Higher-resolution simulations could be used to examine such smaller impacts.CitationElisa V. Quintana et al 2016 ApJ 821 126. doi:10.3847/0004-637X/821/2/126

  7. On to the Ice Giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reh, Kim; Hofstdater, Mark; Simon, Amy; Elliott, John

    2017-04-01

    Voyager 2 mission flew by Uranus in 1986 and Neptune in 1989 resulting in stunning remote observations not previously accessible from the ground. There have been no follow-up space flight missions to examine ice giants and, as a result there are significant gaps in our understanding of planetary formation and evolution. This gap not only affects our understanding of our own solar system but also our understanding of exoplanets; the majority of planets discovered around other stars are thought to be ice giants. Ice Giants are likely to be far more abundant in our galaxy than previously thought. The U.S. 2011 Planetary Science Decadal Survey committee recognized the importance of Uranus and Neptune, and prioritized the exploration of the Ice Giants. Following from this, NASA and ESA have recently completed a study of candidate missions to Uranus and Neptune, the so-called ice giant planets. The intent was to examine what could be accomplished within the budget realities of the predictable future. This "Pre-Decadal Study," focused on opportunities for missions launching in the 2020's and early 2030's. This paper presents results from the Ice Giants study (science, architectures and technologies) and concludes that compelling and affordable missions to the Ice Giants are within our reach.

  8. Giant magnetofossils and hyperthermal events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Liao; Roberts, Andrew P.; Williams, Wyn; Fitz Gerald, John D.; Larrasoaña, Juan C.; Jovane, Luigi; Muxworthy, Adrian R.

    2012-10-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria biomineralize magnetic minerals with precisely controlled size, morphology, and stoichiometry. These cosmopolitan bacteria are widely observed in aquatic environments. If preserved after burial, the inorganic remains of magnetotactic bacteria act as magnetofossils that record ancient geomagnetic field variations. They also have potential to provide paleoenvironmental information. In contrast to conventional magnetofossils, giant magnetofossils (most likely produced by eukaryotic organisms) have only been reported once before from Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM; 55.8 Ma) sediments on the New Jersey coastal plain. Here, using transmission electron microscopic observations, we present evidence for abundant giant magnetofossils, including previously reported elongated prisms and spindles, and new giant bullet-shaped magnetite crystals, in the Southern Ocean near Antarctica, not only during the PETM, but also shortly before and after the PETM. Moreover, we have discovered giant bullet-shaped magnetite crystals from the equatorial Indian Ocean during the Mid-Eocene Climatic Optimum (˜40 Ma). Our results indicate a more widespread geographic, environmental, and temporal distribution of giant magnetofossils in the geological record with a link to "hyperthermal" events. Enhanced global weathering during hyperthermals, and expanded suboxic diagenetic environments, probably provided more bioavailable iron that enabled biomineralization of giant magnetofossils. Our micromagnetic modelling indicates the presence of magnetic multi-domain (i.e., not ideal for navigation) and single domain (i.e., ideal for navigation) structures in the giant magnetite particles depending on their size, morphology and spatial arrangement. Different giant magnetite crystal morphologies appear to have had different biological functions, including magnetotaxis and other non-navigational purposes. Our observations suggest that hyperthermals provided ideal conditions for

  9. Giant Baker's Cyst Associated with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Bılgın, Emre; Ketencı, İsmail Emre; Ugurlar, Meriç

    2017-01-01

    We report a rare case of a “giant Baker's cyst-related rheumatoid arthritis (RA)” with 95 × 26 mm dimensions originating from the semimembranosus tendon. The patient presented with chronic pain and a palpable mass behind his left calf located between the posteriosuperior aspect of the popliteal fossa and the distal third of the calf. In MRI cystic lesion which was located in soft tissue at the posterior of gastrocnemius, extensive synovial pannus inside and degeneration of medial meniscus posterior horn were observed. Arthroscopic joint debridement and partial excision of the cyst via biomechanical valve excision were performed. The patient continued his follow-up visits at Rheumatology Department and there was no recurrence of cyst-related symptoms in 1-year follow-up. Similar cases were reported in the literature previously. However, as far as we know, a giant Baker's cyst-related RA, which was treated as described, has not yet been presented. PMID:28116197

  10. Molecular genetic analysis of giant cell glioblastomas.

    PubMed Central

    Meyer-Puttlitz, B.; Hayashi, Y.; Waha, A.; Rollbrocker, B.; Boström, J.; Wiestler, O. D.; Louis, D. N.; Reifenberger, G.; von Deimling, A.

    1997-01-01

    Glioblastomas (GBMs) are a heterogeneous group of tumors. Recently, distinct molecular genetic alterations have been linked to subgroups of patients with GBM. Giant cell (gc)GBMs are a rare variant of GBM characterized by a marked preponderance of multinucleated giant cells. Several reports have associated this entity with a more favorable prognosis than the majority of GBMs. To evaluate whether gcGBM may also represent a genetically defined subgroup of GBM, we analyzed a series of 19 gcGBMs for mutations in the TP53 gene for amplification of the EGFR and CDK4 genes and for homozygous deletions in the CDKN2A (p16/MTS1) gene. Seventeen of nineteen gcGBMs carried TP53 mutations whereas EGFR and CDK4 gene amplification was seen in only one tumor each and homozygous deletion of CDKN2A was not observed at all. The strikingly high incidence of TP53 mutations and the relative absence of other genetic alterations groups gcGBM together with a previously recognized molecular genetic variant of GBM (type 1 GBM). It is tempting to speculate that the better prognosis of gcGBM patients may result from the low incidence of EGFR amplification and CDKN2A deletion, changes known for their growth-promoting potential. Images Figure 1 PMID:9284834

  11. Giant intradiploic pseudomeningocele of occipital bone.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rajinder; Chandra, Sarat P; Sharma, Bhawani Shanker

    2012-01-01

    The management of intradiploic CSF collection is controversial. Although it is a benign lesion, even then delay in diagnosis and treatment may lead to significant morbidity. The authors report a very rare case of giant posttraumatic intradiploic pseudomeningocele involving the occipital bone, occipital condyles, and clivus. The pathogenesis and management of intradiploic CSF collection are discussed. This 16-year-old boy presented with a history of enlarging swelling in the suboccipital region associated with headache, lower cranial nerve palsy, and features of high cervical compressive myelopathy. Investigations revealed a giant intradiploic lesion involving the occipital bone, condyles, and clivus associated with secondary basilar invagination, hydrocephalus, and syringomyelia. Intrathecal contrast administration did not reveal communication of intradiploic space with the subarachnoid space. A large occipital craniotomy was performed. A linear fracture and dural defect in the midline was identified, which was closed with fascial graft after removing the inner table of the skull. Cranioplasty was performed using the expanded calvarial bone. Ventriculoperitoneal shunt insertion was performed for hydrocephalus, and the patient improved remarkably. Posttraumatic intradiploic CSF collection, although a benign condition, may present with severe complications if treatment is delayed. Early diagnosis and treatment is essential. The authors suggest that this condition should be treated early, as for growing skull fractures.

  12. Giant Solitary Fibrous Tumor of Orbit.

    PubMed

    Tenekeci, Goktekin; Sari, Alper; Vayisoglu, Yusuf; Serin, Onur

    2015-07-01

    Solitary fibrous tumors (SFTs) have been reported in various locations in the body. Solitary fibrous tumors are extremely rare tumors, especially when located in the orbit. Diagnosis of SFT cannot be made based on histopathology only because it exhibits a variable microscopic appearance, and necessitates immunohistochemistry to confirm the diagnosis. A 51-year-old man was admitted to our clinic for the evaluation of a mass bulging in his left eye. Clinical examination revealed a painless mass extruding out of the orbital cavity with dimensions of 8 × 7  cm. Exenteration of the left eye including the upper and lower eyelid and reconstruction of the orbital cavity using a temporoparietal fascia flap and a temporal muscle flap was performed. SFT of orbital region is known as a slow growing and painless tumor. Based on previous studies, increased mitotic rate of the tumor gives the impression that the tumor has a malignant nature. Until now a small number or orbital SFTs were reported and none of them presented with a giant mass protruding out of the orbital cavity. We present a unique case of orbital SFT filling the whole orbital cavity and protruding outward as a giant mass. This case has been reported to expand our knowledge in this debated entity.

  13. Usefulness of immunosuppression for giant cell myocarditis.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Leslie T; Hare, Joshua M; Tazelaar, Henry D; Edwards, William D; Starling, Randall C; Deng, Mario C; Menon, Santosh; Mullen, G Martin; Jaski, Brian; Bailey, Kent R; Cunningham, Madeleine W; Dec, G William

    2008-12-01

    Giant cell myocarditis (GCM) is a rare and highly lethal disorder. The only multicenter case series with treatment data lacked cardiac function assessments and had a retrospective design. We conducted a prospective, multicenter study of immunosuppression including cyclosporine and steroids for acute, microscopically-confirmed GCM. From June 1999 to June 2005 in a standard protocol, 11 subjects received high dose steroids and cyclosporine, and 9 subjects received muromonab-CD3. In these, 7 of 11 were women, the mean age was 60 +/- 15 years, and the mean time from symptom onset to presentation was 27 +/- 33 days. During 1 year of treatment, 1 subject died of respiratory complications on day 178, and 2 subjects received heart transplantations on days 2 and 27, respectively. Serial endomyocardial biopsies revealed that after 4 weeks of treatment the degree of necrosis, cellular inflammation, and giant cells decreased (p = 0.001). One patient who completed the trial subsequently died of a fatal GCM recurrence after withdrawal of immunosuppression. Her case demonstrates for the first time that there is a risk of recurrent, sometimes fatal, GCM after cessation of immunosuppression. In conclusion, this prospective study of immunosuppression for GCM confirms retrospective case reports that such therapy improves long-term survival. Additionally, withdrawal of immunosuppression can be associated with fatal GCM recurrence.

  14. [Giant viruses: update, enigmas, controversies and perspectives].

    PubMed

    Claverie, Jean-Michel; Abergel, Chantal

    2016-12-01

    Unlike microbes known in his time, the first virus (that of tobacco mosaic disease) was discovered by Ivanoski in 1892 because it was not retained by Chamberland's porcelain candles. For more than a century afterward, viruses were equated with this simple property that is still extensively used today (using modern 0,2 µm pore filters) as a practical criterion to delineate the "viral fraction" from other microbes in medical or environmental samples. The first documented exception to the simplistic criterion of particle size came with the discovery of Mimivirus, the viral nature of which was eventually recognized in 2003, following ten years during which it was mistaken for an obligate intracellular bacterium. Thirteen more years later, we now realize that non-filtering "giant viruses" are not rare, probably ubiquitous, and come in a large variety of virion shapes, genome sizes, gene contents, and replication strategies. Following a quick description of the 4 giant virus families known today, we discuss the enigmas, controversies and perspectives of conceptual revolutions that are brought about by this new and booming area of virology. © 2016 médecine/sciences – Inserm.

  15. A giant Ordovician anomalocaridid.

    PubMed

    Van Roy, Peter; Briggs, Derek E G

    2011-05-26

    Anomalocaridids, giant lightly sclerotized invertebrate predators, occur in a number of exceptionally preserved early and middle Cambrian (542-501 million years ago) biotas and have come to symbolize the unfamiliar morphologies displayed by stem organisms in faunas of the Burgess Shale type. They are characterized by a pair of anterior, segmented appendages, a circlet of plates around the mouth, and an elongate segmented trunk lacking true tergites with a pair of flexible lateral lobes per segment. Disarticulated body parts, such as the anterior appendages and oral circlet, had been assigned to a range of taxonomic groups--but the discovery of complete specimens from the middle Cambrian Burgess Shale showed that these disparate elements all belong to a single kind of animal. Phylogenetic analyses support a position of anomalocaridids in the arthropod stem, as a sister group to the euarthropods. The anomalocaridids were the largest animals in Cambrian communities. The youngest unequivocal examples occur in the middle Cambrian Marjum Formation of Utah but an arthropod retaining some anomalocaridid characteristics is present in the Devonian of Germany. Here we report the post-Cambrian occurrence of anomalocaridids, from the Early Ordovician (488-472 million years ago) Fezouata Biota in southeastern Morocco, including specimens larger than any in Cambrian biotas. These giant animals were an important element of some marine communities for about 30 million years longer than previously realized. The Moroccan specimens confirm the presence of a dorsal array of flexible blades attached to a transverse rachis on the trunk segments; these blades probably functioned as gills.

  16. Giant Hedge-Hogs: Spikes on Giant Gravitons

    SciTech Connect

    Sadri, D

    2004-01-28

    We consider giant gravitons on the maximally supersymmetric plane-wave background of type IIB string theory. Fixing the light-cone gauge, we work out the low energy effective light-cone Hamiltonian of the three-sphere giant graviton. At first order, this is a U(1) gauge theory on R x S{sup 3}. We place sources in this effective gauge theory. Although non-vanishing net electric charge configurations are disallowed by Gauss' law, electric dipoles can be formed. From the string theory point of view these dipoles can be understood as open strings piercing the three-sphere, generalizing the usual BIons to the giant gravitons, BIGGons. Our results can be used to give a two dimensional (worldsheet) description of giant gravitons, similar to Polchinski's description for the usual D-branes, in agreement with the discussions of hep-th/0204196.

  17. Giant resonances: Progress, new directions, new challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Bertrand, J.R.; Beene, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    A review of some recent developments in the field of giant multipole resonances is presented. Particular emphasis is placed on directions that the authors feel will be followed in this field during the next several years. In particular, the use of high-energy heavy ions to excite the giant resonances is shown to provide exciting new capabilities for giant resonance studies. Among subjects covered are: Coulomb excitation of giant resonances, photon decay of giant resonances, the recent controversy over the identity of the giant monopole resonance, the most recent value for incompressibility of nuclear matter from analysis of giant monopole data, the isospin character of the 63 A/sup /minus/1/3/ GQR, agreement between (e,e/prime/) and (hadron, hadron/prime/) excitation of the giant quadrupole resonance, prospects for multiphonon giant resonance observation, and isolation of the isovector giant quadrupole resonance. 55 refs., 23 figs., 4 tabs.

  18. Low-temperature formation and stabilization of rare allotropes of cyclooctasulfur (β-S8 and γ-S8) in the presence of organic carbon at a sulfur-rich glacial site in the Canadian High Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, Graham E.; Cosmidis, Julie; Grasby, Stephen E.; Trivedi, Christopher B.; Spear, John R.; Templeton, Alexis S.

    2017-03-01

    Large-scale deposits of elemental sulfur form annually on a glacier's surface at Borup Fiord Pass in the Canadian High Arctic. However, the mechanisms of mineralization and stabilization of elemental sulfur at this site are currently unknown. Here we show that X-ray diffraction (XRD) data for fresh sulfur precipitates collected from the surface of a melt pool over sulfide-rich ice reveal the presence of three sulfur allotropes, α-S8, β-S8, and γ-S8 (the three solid forms of cyclooctasulfur (S8)). The detection of the β-S8 allotrope of elemental sulfur is notable, since β-S8 typically only forms in high temperature environments (>96 °C). The γ-S8 allotrope is also rare in natural settings and has previously been implicated as a signature of microbial sulfur cycling. Using combustion and infrared spectroscopy approaches, organic carbon is also detected within the sample bearing the three allotropes of elemental sulfur. Electron microscopy and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) at the C K-edge show that the sulfur precipitates are intimately associated with the organic carbon at the submicron scale. The occurrence of β-S8 and γ-S8 in this low-temperature setting indicates that there are unknown pathways for the formation and stabilization of these rare allotropes of elemental sulfur. In particular, we infer that the occurrence of these allotropes is related to their association with organic carbon. The formation of carbon-associated sulfur globules may not be a direct by-product of microbial activity; however, a potential role of direct or indirect microbial mediation in the formation and stabilization of β-S8 and γ-S8 remains to be assessed.

  19. Changes of foraging patch selection and utilization by a giant panda after bamboo flowering.

    PubMed

    Li, Guochun; Song, Huadong; Altigani, Latifa A A; Zheng, Xueli; Bu, Shuhai

    2017-07-01

    The bamboo flowering leads to the habitat fragmentation and food quality decline of a giant panda. Few empirical research has been conducted about the giant panda's response to the bamboo flowering. Here, we investigated the characteristics of bamboo stands, giant panda's activity, and selection and utilization of bamboo stands by giant panda in Taibaishan National Nature Reserve, China, over a 3-year period (September 2013-May 2016) during the Fargesia qinlingensis flowering period. Our results indicated that the proportion of whole bamboo stands flowering has gradually expanded from 26.7% in 2013 and 33.9% in 2014 to 52.3% in 2015. Although the flowering bamboo has lower crude protein and higher crude fiber than a non-flowering bamboo, the giant panda still fed on flowering bamboo from the evidence of droppings. The giant panda left its feeding sites and moved to the high elevation along river when the proportion of flowering reached 69.2% at elevation of 2350-2450 m in the third year. With the decline of the quality of bamboo stand of Fargesia qinlingensis, the giant panda abandoned its feeding sites when the threshold value of bamboo flowering reached 56.9-69.2%. Flexibility in foraging strategy and spatial behavior can help the giant panda to better adapt to the environment.

  20. Giant Cell Tumour of Proximal Phalanx of Ring Finger: Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Soni, Rishit; Shah, Malkesh; Patel, Amit; Golwala, Paresh

    2016-01-01

    Giant cell tumour (GCT) of bone arising from a phalanx of a finger is extremely rare. Only two percent of all reported GCTs are found in the hand, which show a higher rate of recurrence as compared to those occurring at a more proximal location. Here we report a rare case of giant cell tumour of proximal phalanx of the ring finger in a 20-year-old male, which was treated with extended curettage and bone grafting. After two years of follow-up, the patient was asymptomatic with complete functional recovery and no signs of recurrence. PMID:27900230

  1. Pediatric giant right atrial aneurysm: a case series and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Harder, Erika E; Ohye, Richard G; Knepp, Marc D; Owens, Sonal T

    2014-01-01

    Giant right atrial aneurysm is a rare form of congenital heart disease with a wide spectrum of clinical presentation varying from asymptomatic patients to those with refractory atrial arrhythmias or severe airway obstruction. Diagnosis is often confused with other causes of right atrial dilation such as Ebstein disease. Because of its rare occurrence and variable clinical presentation, inconsistencies in medical and surgical management strategies exist between centers. We present five cases of giant right atrial aneurysm managed at our institution and discuss the clinical presentation, diagnostic challenges, and medical and surgical management. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. [Giant retroperitoneal liposarcoma--case report].

    PubMed

    Bánky, Balázs; Bányász, Zsolt; Mayer, Arpád; Almási, Kálmán; Szucs, Iván

    2005-06-01

    Retroperitoneal liposarcomas are the most frequent soft tissue sarcomas and the second most frequent retroperitoneal tumours. They represent less then 0.1% of all human malignancies. Hereby we describe the treatment of our patient where of a 15-kg giant retroperitoneal liposarcoma was successfully removed and a local recurrence two years later was operated on as well. This was the 3rd largest retroperitoneal malignant tumor that was successfully removed according to the available literature of the last five decades. These typically symptom-free tumors usually grow extreme size before diagnosed. The "gold-standard" of treatment remains surgical total excision, but the high local recurrence rate (50-60%) hopefully can be reduced by adjuvant radio- and chemotherapy. Multidisciplinary treatment and long-time follow-up can provide as high as 40% 5-year survival rate. We summarize the recent clinical, diagnostic and therapeutic methods of this rare condition.

  3. Giant esophageal epiphrenic diverticulum: presentation and treatment.

    PubMed

    Santos, Marcelo Protásio Dos; Akerman, Denise; Santos, Caio Pasquali Dias Dos; Santos, Paulo Vicente Dos; Radtke, Marcos Claudio; Beraldo, Fernando Bray; Gonçalves, José Eduardo

    2017-09-21

    Epiphrenic diverticulum is a rare disease associated with esophageal motor disorders that is usually asymptomatic and has a well-established surgical indication. We report a case of giant epiphrenic diverticulum in a 59-year-old symptomatic woman who was diagnosed after underwent complementary exams. Because of her symptoms, the surgical treatment was chosen, and esophageal diverticulectomy was performed along with laparoscopic cardiomyotomy and anterior partial fundoplication. RESUMO O divertículo epifrênico é uma patologia rara associada a distúrbios motores esofágicos e, frequentemente, assintomática, tendo indicações cirúrgicas bem estabelecidas. Relatamos um caso de divertículo epifrênico gigante em paciente de 59 anos, sexo feminino, sintomática, diagnosticada por exames complementares. Devido à sintomatologia, optou-se por tratamento cirúrgico, sendo realizada a diverticulectomia esofágica com cardiomiotomia e fundoplicatura parcial anterior laparoscópica.

  4. Idiopathic giant cell myocarditis and cardiac sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Blauwet, Lori A; Cooper, Leslie T

    2013-11-01

    Idiopathic giant cell myocarditis (GCM) and cardiac sarcoidosis (CS) are rare disorders that cause cardiomyopathy, often with ventricular arrhythmias or heart block. Infection, autoimmune processes, and genetics have all been implicated in the pathogenesis of these diseases, but the etiology for both diseases is likely a complex multifactorial process. Both GCM and CS are generally progressive despite treatment with standard heart failure and arrhythmia therapies. Making the diagnosis of GCM or CS on initial clinical presentation is possible in only a small percentage of patients, so myocardial tissue diagnosis is required. The use of multiple noninvasive imaging modalities may aid in diagnosis and assessment of response to treatment. Establishing the diagnosis of GCM or CS early is crucial, as tailored immunosuppressive treatment may significantly alter the clinical course of these patients. The prognosis of patients with GCM is poor, while the prognosis for patients with CS varies according to degree of left ventricular dysfunction.

  5. Giant complex odontoma in maxillary sinus

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho Visioli, Adriano Rossini; de Oliveira e Silva, Cléverson; Marson, Fabiano Carlos; Takeshita, Wilton Mitsunari

    2015-01-01

    In this manuscript, we present a rare case report of giant complex odontoma in the maxillary sinus, where the applied therapy included complete excision of the lesion with a conservative approach. Odontomas are also called benign growth abnormalities or hamartomas. They represent a more common type of odontogenic tumor and are related to various disorders such as bad dental placements, expansion, increased volumetric bone, and no eruption of permanent teeth. Usually they have an asymptomatic evolutionary course. The etiologic factors, although obscure, are related to local trauma, infection, and genetic factor. The structural composition of an odontoma consists of mature dental tissues. Odontomas can be differentiated according to their anatomical presentations: Compound odontoma-clusters of several denticles and complex odontoma-well defined tumefaction mass. The diagnosis can be performed by radiographic examination. PMID:26389051

  6. Giant Platelets in Platelet Donors – A Blessing in Disguise?

    PubMed Central

    Choudhury, Nabajyoti; Ray, Deepanjan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Inherited thrombocytopenias, including inherited giant platelet disorders (IGPD) are relatively rare, but their prevalence is probably underestimated. Harris platelet syndrome, the most common IGPD reported from Indian subcontinent, mostly from eastern part, is characterised by a low platelet count, high mean platelet volume (MPV) and absence of bleeding. Aim A short study was conducted to assess the prevalence of giant platelets in voluntary donors of single donor platelets (SDP) and analyse the effect of transfusion of such SDPs in patients. Materials and Methods Voluntary donors of SDPs were screened as per standard guidelines prior to the procedure. A complete blood count (including MPV) along with a peripheral smear was done. A total of 45 donors were screened for plateletpheresis. Following plateletpheresis from these donors, a platelet count from the collection bag was done after one hour. The SDP was transfused as a single unit or divided into two and transfused to the same patient at two different occasions, as per clinical need. Platelet counts on pateints were done after one hour and the platelet recovery was noted. Results Out of the 45 donors who were screened, 30 (66.67%) were found to have giant platelets. It was observed that the pre procedure platelet counts in donors having giant platelets were relatively low (1.5 -1.7 lacs) and so also the platelet yield (2.7-3x1011) compared to donors who did not, but the post transfusion platelet recovery was greater. Conclusion Since presence of giant platelets has been seen to be common in the Eastern part of India, a peripheral smear examination should always be considered during screening of plateletpheresis donors to avoid rejecting donors with giant platelets whose platelet counts are given falsely low by autoanalysers. PMID:26266124

  7. Osteoclasts and giant cells: macrophage–macrophage fusion mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Vignery, Agnès

    2000-01-01

    Membrane fusion is a ubiquitous event that occurs in a wide range of biological processes. While intracellular membrane fusion mediating organelle trafficking is well understood, much less is known about cell–cell fusion mediating sperm cell–oocyte, myoblast–myoblast and macrophage–macrophage fusion. In the case of mononuclear phagocytes, their fusion is not only associated with the differentiation of osteoclasts, cells which play a key role in the pathogenesis of osteoporosis, but also of giant cells that are present in chronic inflammatory reactions and in tumours. Despite the biological and pathophysiological importance of intercellular fusion events, the actual molecular mechanism of macrophage fusion is still unclear. One of the main research themes in my laboratory has been to investigate the molecular mechanism of mononuclear phagocyte fusion. Our hypothesis has been that macrophage–macrophage fusion, similar to virus–cell fusion, is mediated by specific cell surface proteins. But, in contrast with myoblasts and sperm cells, macrophage fusion is a rare event that occurs in specific instances. To test our hypothesis, we established an in vitro cell–cell fusion assay as a model system which uses alveolar macrophages. Upon multinucleation, these macrophages acquire the osteoclast phenotype. This indicates that multinucleation of macrophages leads to a specific and novel functional phenotype in macrophages. To identify the components of the fusion machinery, we generated four monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) which block the fusion of alveolar macrophages and purified the unique antigen recognized by these mAbs. This led us to the cloning of MFR (Macrophage Fusion Receptor). MFR was cloned simultaneously as P84/SHPS-1/SIRPα/BIT by other laboratories. We subsequently showed that the recombinant extracellular domain of MFR blocks fusion. Most recently, we identified a lower molecular weight form of MFR that is missing two extracellular immunoglobulin (Ig

  8. Theories of Giant Planet Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, Jack J.; Young, Richard E. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    An overview of current theories of planetary formation, with emphasis on giant planets, is presented. The most detailed models are based upon observations of our own Solar System and of young stars and their environments. While these models predict that rocky planets should form around most single stars, the frequency of formation of gas giant planets is more difficult to predict theoretically. Terrestrial planets are believed to grow via pairwise accretion until the spacing of planetary orbits becomes large enough that the configuration is stable for the age of the system. Giant planets begin their growth as do terrestrial planets, but they become massive enough that they are able to accumulate substantial amounts of gas before the protoplanetary disk dissipates. Most models for extrasolar giant planets suggest that they formed as did Jupiter and Saturn (in nearly circular orbits, far enough from the star that ice could), and subsequently migrated to their current positions, although some models suggest in situ formation.

  9. Landscape of the lost giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2013-09-01

    The Pleistocene megafauna extinction erased a group of remarkable animals. Whether humans had a prominent role in the extinction remains controversial, but it is emerging that the disappearance of the giants has markedly affected the environment.

  10. What Is Giant Cell Arteritis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... 01, 2017 Giant cell arteritis (GCA) is an inflammation (swelling) of the arteries, which are the blood ... help nourish your eyes, reduced blood flow can cause sudden, painless vision loss. This condition is called ...

  11. Pharma giants swap research programs.

    PubMed

    2014-07-01

    Pharmaceutical giants Novartis and GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) agreed in late April to swap some assets, with Novartis handing off its vaccine business to GSK and getting most of the British company's cancer portfolio in return.

  12. Giant sacrolumbar meningioma. Case report.

    PubMed

    Feldenzer, J A; McGillicuddy, J E; Hopkins, J W

    1990-06-01

    A case of giant sacral meningioma with presacral and lumbar extension is presented. The difficulties in diagnosis and management are emphasized including the staged multidisciplinary surgical approaches and preoperative tumor embolization.

  13. Atmospheres of Extrasolar Giant Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marley, Mark

    2006-01-01

    The next decade will almost certainly see the direct imaging of extrasolar giant planets around nearby stars. Unlike purely radial velocity detections, direct imaging will open the door to characterizing the atmosphere and interiors of extrasola planets and ultimately provide clues on their formation and evolution through time. This process has already begun for the transiting planets, placing new constraints on their atmospheric structure, composition, and evolution. Indeed the key to understanding giant planet detectability, interpreting spectra, and constraining effective temperature and hence evolution-is the atmosphere. I will review the universe of extrasolar giant planet models, focusing on what we have already learned from modeling and what we will likely be able to learn from the first generation of direct detection data. In addition to these theoretical considerations, I will review the observations and interpretation of the - transiting hot Jupiters. These objects provide a test of our ability to model exotic atmospheres and challenge our current understanding of giant planet evolution.

  14. Theories of Giant Planet Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, Jack J.; Young, Richard E. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    An overview of current theories of planetary formation, with emphasis on giant planets, is presented. The most detailed models are based upon observations of our own Solar System and of young stars and their environments. While these models predict that rocky planets should form around most single stars, the frequency of formation of gas giant planets is more difficult to predict theoretically. Terrestrial planets are believed to grow via pairwise accretion until the spacing of planetary orbits becomes large enough that the configuration is stable for the age of the system. Giant planets begin their growth as do terrestrial planets, but they become massive enough that they are able to accumulate substantial amounts of gas before the protoplanetary disk dissipates. Most models for extrasolar giant planets suggest that they formed as did Jupiter and Saturn (in nearly circular orbits, far enough from the star that ice could), and subsequently migrated to their current positions, although some models suggest in situ formation.

  15. Mineral resource of the month: rare earths

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hedrick, James B.

    2004-01-01

    As if classified as a top-secret project, the rare earths have been shrouded in secrecy. The principal ore mineral of the group, bastnäsite, rarely appears in the leading mineralogy texts. The long names of the rare-earth elements and some unusual arrangements of letters, many Scandinavian in origin, may have intimidated even those skilled in phonics. Somewhat obscurely labeled, the rare earths are neither rare nor earths (the historical term for oxides). They are a relatively abundant group of metallic elements that occur in nature as nonmetallic compounds and have hundreds of commercial applications.

  16. Giant cell arteritis: a review

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Pravin; Karia, Niral; Jain, Shaifali; Dasgupta, Bhaskar

    2013-01-01

    Giant cell arteritis is the most common vasculitis in Caucasians. Acute visual loss in one or both eyes is by far the most feared and irreversible complication of giant cell arteritis. This article reviews recent guidelines on early recognition of systemic, cranial, and ophthalmic manifestations, and current management and diagnostic strategies and advances in imaging. We share our experience of the fast track pathway and imaging in associated disorders, such as large-vessel vasculitis. PMID:28539785

  17. The Lushan earthquake and the giant panda: impacts and conservation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zejun; Yuan, Shibin; Qi, Dunwu; Zhang, Mingchun

    2014-06-01

    Earthquakes not only result in a great loss of human life and property, but also have profound effects on the Earth's biodiversity. The Lushan earthquake occurred on 20 Apr 2013, with a magnitude of 7.0 and an intensity of 9.0 degrees. A distance of 17.0 km from its epicenter to the nearest distribution site of giant pandas recorded in the Third National Survey was determined. Making use of research on the Wenchuan earthquake (with a magnitude of 8.0), which occurred approximately 5 years ago, we briefly analyze the impacts of the Lushan earthquake on giant pandas and their habitat. An earthquake may interrupt ongoing behaviors of giant pandas and may also cause injury or death. In addition, an earthquake can damage conservation facilities for pandas, and result in further habitat fragmentation and degradation. However, from a historical point of view, the impacts of human activities on giant pandas and their habitat may, in fact, far outweigh those of natural disasters such as earthquakes. Measures taken to promote habitat restoration and conservation network reconstruction in earthquake-affected areas should be based on requirements of giant pandas, not those of humans. © 2013 International Society of Zoological Sciences, Institute of Zoology/Chinese Academy of Sciences and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  18. Giant xanthogranuloma of the pelvis with S1 origin: Complete removal with only posterior approach, technical note

    PubMed Central

    Marotta, Nicola; Landi, Alessandro; Mancarella, Cristina; Rocco, Pierluigi; Pietrantonio, Andrea; Galati, Gaspare; Bolognese, Antonio; Delfini, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Xanthogranulomas (XG) are benign proliferative disorder of histiocytes, a non-Langerhans cell histiocytosis. Whose etiology is unknown. The nature of these lesions is controversial and could be either reactive or neoplastic; the presence of monoclonal cells does, however, favor the second hypothesis. Xanthogranuloma is frequently found in young adults and children (under 20 years old), mainly in the skin. In about 5%-10% of all Juvenile XG (JXG) cases xanthogranuloma are extracutaneous. Within this group, the site most frequently involved is the eye. Other involved organs are heart, liver, adrenals, oropharynx, lung, spleen, central nervous system and subcutaneous tissue, although involvement of the spine is uncommon. Isolated lesions involving the sacral region are extremely rare. To date, this is the first reported case of a giant JXG arising from S1 with extension into the pelvic region in an adult spine. PMID:25610853

  19. Major histocompatibility complex alleles associated with parasite susceptibility in wild giant pandas

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, L; Wu, Q; Hu, Y; Wu, H; Wei, F

    2015-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) polymorphism is thought to be driven by antagonistic coevolution between pathogens and hosts, mediated through either overdominance or frequency-dependent selection. However, investigations under natural conditions are still rare for endangered mammals which often exhibit depleted variation, and the mechanism of selection underlying the maintenance of characteristics remains a considerable debate. In this study, 87 wild giant pandas were used to investigate MHC variation associated with parasite load. With the knowledge of the MHC profile provided by the genomic data of the giant panda, seven DRB1, seven DQA1 and eight DQA2 alleles were identified at each single locus. Positive selection evidenced by a significantly higher number of non-synonymous substitutions per non-synonymous codon site relative to synonymous substitutions per synonymous codon site could only be detected at the DRB1 locus, which leads to the speculation that DRB1 may have a more important role in dealing with parasite infection for pandas. Coprological analyses revealed that 55.17% of individuals exhibited infection with 1–2 helminthes and 95.3% of infected pandas carried Baylisascaris shroederi. Using a generalized linear model, we found that Aime-DRB1*10 was significantly associated with parasite infection, but no resistant alleles could be detected. MHC heterozygosity of the pandas was found to be uncorrelated with the infection status or the infection intensity. These results suggested that the possible selection mechanisms in extant wild pandas may be frequency dependent rather than being determined by overdominance selection. Our findings could guide the candidate selection for the ongoing reintroduction or translocation of pandas. PMID:25248466

  20. Major histocompatibility complex alleles associated with parasite susceptibility in wild giant pandas.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L; Wu, Q; Hu, Y; Wu, H; Wei, F

    2015-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) polymorphism is thought to be driven by antagonistic coevolution between pathogens and hosts, mediated through either overdominance or frequency-dependent selection. However, investigations under natural conditions are still rare for endangered mammals which often exhibit depleted variation, and the mechanism of selection underlying the maintenance of characteristics remains a considerable debate. In this study, 87 wild giant pandas were used to investigate MHC variation associated with parasite load. With the knowledge of the MHC profile provided by the genomic data of the giant panda, seven DRB1, seven DQA1 and eight DQA2 alleles were identified at each single locus. Positive selection evidenced by a significantly higher number of non-synonymous substitutions per non-synonymous codon site relative to synonymous substitutions per synonymous codon site could only be detected at the DRB1 locus, which leads to the speculation that DRB1 may have a more important role in dealing with parasite infection for pandas. Coprological analyses revealed that 55.17% of individuals exhibited infection with 1-2 helminthes and 95.3% of infected pandas carried Baylisascaris shroederi. Using a generalized linear model, we found that Aime-DRB1*10 was significantly associated with parasite infection, but no resistant alleles could be detected. MHC heterozygosity of the pandas was found to be uncorrelated with the infection status or the infection intensity. These results suggested that the possible selection mechanisms in extant wild pandas may be frequency dependent rather than being determined by overdominance selection. Our findings could guide the candidate selection for the ongoing reintroduction or translocation of pandas.

  1. Giants in the Local Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luck, R. Earle; Heiter, Ulrike

    2007-06-01

    We present parameter and abundance data for a sample of 298 nearby giants. The spectroscopic data for this work have a resolution of R~60,000, S/N>150, and spectral coverage from 475 to 685 nm. Overall trends in the Z>10 abundances are dominated by Galactic chemical evolution, while the light-element abundances are influenced by stellar evolution, as well as Galactic evolution. We find several super-Li stars in our sample and confirm that Li abundances in the first giant branch are related to mixing depths. Once astration of lithium on the main sequence along with the overall range of main-sequence lithium abundances are taken into account, the lithium abundances of the giants are not dramatically at odds with the predictions of standard stellar evolution. We find the giants to be carbon-diluted in accord with standard stellar evolution and that the carbon and oxygen abundances determined for the local giants are consistent with those found in local field dwarfs. We find that there is evidence for systematic carbon variations in the red giant clump in the sense that the blue side of the clump is carbon-poor (more diluted) than the red side.

  2. Kuiper Prize: Giant Planet Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingersoll, Andrew P.

    2007-10-01

    The study of giant planet atmospheres is near and dear to me, for several reasons. First, the giant planets are photogenic; the colored clouds are great tracers, and one can make fantastic movies of the atmosphere in motion. Second, the giant planets challenge us with storms that last for hundreds of years and winds that blow faster the farther you go from the sun. Third, they remind us of Earth with their hurricanes, auroras, and lightning, but they also are the link to the 200 giant planets that have been discovered around other stars. This talk will cover the past, present, and future (one hopes) of giant planet research. I will review the surprises of the Voyager and Galileo eras, and will discuss what we are learning now from the Cassini orbiter. I will review the prospects for answering the outstanding questions like: Where's the water? What is providing the colors of the clouds? How deep do the features extend? Where do the winds get their energy? What is the role of the magnetic field? Finally, I will briefly discuss how extrasolar giant planets compare with objects in our own solar system.

  3. The Giant Magnetocaloric Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pecharsky, Vitalij K.

    1998-03-01

    Since the discovery of the magnetocaloric effect in pure iron by E.Warburg in 1881, it has been measured experimentally on many magnetic metals and compounds. The majority of the materials studied order magnetically undergoing a second order phase transformation. The magnetocaloric effect, typically peaking near the Curie or the Néel temperature, generally ranges from 0.5 to 2 K (in terms of adiabatic temperature change) or at 1 to 4 J/kg K (in terms of isothermal magnetic entropy change) per 1 T magnetic field change. The giant magnetocaloric effect recently discovered in Gd_5(Si_xGe_1-x)4 alloys, where x <= 0.5, is associated with a first order magnetic phase transition and it reaches values of 3 to 4 K and 6 to 10 J/kg K per 1 T field change, respectively. The refrigerant capacity, which is the measure of how much heat can be transferred from a cold to a hot reservoir in one ideal thermodynamic cycle, is larger than that of the best second order phase transition materials by 25 to 100%. When the Gd_5(Si_xGe_1-x)4 alloys are compared with other known materials, which show first order magnetic phase transition, such as Dy, Ho, Er, HoCo_2, NdMn_2Si_2, Fe_0.49Rh_0.51, and (Hf_0.83Ta_0.17)Fe_2+x, only Fe_0.49Rh_0.51 has comparable magnetocaloric properties. However, the first order magnetic phase transition in Fe_0.49Rh_0.51 is irreversible, and the magnetocaloric effect disappears after one magnetizing/demagnetizing cycle. A study of the crystal structure, thermodynamics, and magnetism of the Gd_5(Si_xGe_1-x)4 alloys, where 0 <= x <= 1 allowed us to obtain a qualitative understanding of the basic relations between the composition, the crystal structure, and the change in thermodynamics and magnetocaloric properties, which occur in the Gd_5(Si_xGe_1-x)4 system, and which brings about the giant magnetocaloric effect when x <= 0.5.

  4. Acute Interstitial Nephritis Following Multiple Asian Giant Hornet Stings

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiang-Dong; Liu, Zheng; Zhai, Ying; Zhao, Ming; Shen, Hai-Yan; Li, Yi; Zhang, Bo; Liu, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Male, 42 Final Diagnosis: Acute interstitial nephritis Symptoms: Difficulty breathing • headache • numbness • oliguria Medication: Methylprednisolone Clinical Procedure: Plasma exchange Specialty: Nephrology Objective: Rare disease Background: The Asian giant hornet is the largest wasp species in the world. Its stings can cause acute interstitial nephritis and acute renal failure. From July to October, 2013, Asian giant hornet attacks have killed 42 people and injured 1675 people with their powerful venomous stings in Hanzhong, Ankang, and Shangluo, three cities in the southern part of Shaanxi Province, China. Case Report: We report here a case of a 42-year-old man with acute interstitial nephritis following multiple Asian giant hornet stings. On admission, the patient had difficulty breathing, headache, and numbness in both limbs (arm and leg). He was treated in the Emergency Department and Department of Nephrology with plasma exchange and dialysis within 24 hours after being stung. A kidney biopsy revealed acute interstitial nephritis with interstitial infiltrations of eosinophils and lymphocytes. After intensive treatment, his liver function recovered within 10 days. Along with oral methylprednisolone, his renal function recovered 1 month later. Conclusions: This case shows that acute interstitial nephritis happens several days after being stung. Since the number of deaths in southern Shaanxi province is much higher than other places, our report draws the attention of fellow clinicians to the acute interstitial nephritis following multiple Asian giant hornet stings. PMID:26076055

  5. Giant primary angiosarcoma of the small intestine showing severe sepsis.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Mizuna; Ohara, Masanori; Kimura, Noriko; Domen, Hiromitsu; Yamabuki, Takumi; Komuro, Kazuteru; Tsuchikawa, Takahiro; Hirano, Satoshi; Iwashiro, Nozomu

    2014-11-21

    Primary malignant tumors of the small intestine are rare, comprising less than 2% of all gastrointestinal tumors. An 85-year-old woman was admitted with fever of 40 °C and marked abdominal distension. Her medical history was unremarkable, but blood examination showed elevated inflammatory markers. Abdominal computed tomography showed a giant tumor with central necrosis, extending from the epigastrium to the pelvic cavity. Giant gastrointestinal stromal tumor of the small intestine communicating with the gastrointestinal tract or with superimposed infection was suspected. Because no improvement occurred in response to antibiotics, surgery was performed. Laparotomy revealed giant hemorrhagic tumor adherent to the small intestine and occupying the peritoneal cavity. The giant tumor was a solid tumor weighing 3490 g, measuring 24 cm × 17.5 cm × 18 cm and showing marked necrosis. Histologically, the tumor comprised spindle-shaped cells with anaplastic large nuclei. Immunohistochemical studies showed tumor cells positive for vimentin, CD31, and factor VIII-related antigen, but negative for c-kit and CD34. Angiosarcoma was diagnosed. Although no postoperative complications occurred, the patient experienced enlargement of multiple metastatic tumors in the abdominal cavity and died 42 d postoperatively. The prognosis of small intestinal angiosarcoma is very poor, even after volume-reducing palliative surgery.

  6. A Case of Giant Uterine Lipoleiomyoma Simulating Malignancy.

    PubMed

    Karaman, Erbil; Çim, Numan; Bulut, Gülay; Elçi, Gülhan; Andıç, Esra; Tekin, Mustafa; Kolusarı, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Uterine leiomyoma is the most common benign pathology in women and lipoleiomyoma is an extremely rare and specific type of leiomyoma. Here, we report an unusual case of giant pedunculated subserous lipoleiomyoma misdiagnosed preoperatively as leiomyosarcoma. Case. A 45-year-old woman admitted to our gynecology outpatient clinic for complaints of abdominal distention, tiredness, and pelvic pain for the last 6 months. Sonography and abdominal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a giant semisolid mass that filled whole abdominal cavity from pelvis to subdiaphragmatic area. A primary diagnosis of uterine sarcoma or ovarian malignancy was made. On operation, total abdominal hysterectomy with a pedunculated mass of size 30 × 23 × 12 cm and weighing 5.4 kg and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy were performed. The histopathology revealed a lipoleiomyoma with extensive cystic and fatty degeneration without any malignancy. Discussion. The diagnosis of leiomyoma is done usually with pelvic ultrasound but sometimes it is difficult to reach a correct diagnosis especially in cases of giant and pedunculated lipoleiomyoma that included fatty tissue which may mimick malignancy. Conclusion. Subserous pedunculated giant lipoleiomyoma should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of leiomyosarcoma or ovarian malignancy.

  7. Spontaneous thrombosis of giant cavernous internal carotid artery aneurysm in a neonate. Case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Kasliwal, Manish Kumar; Suri, Ashish; Sai Kiran, Narayanam Anantha; Sharma, Bhawani Shanker

    2008-01-01

    Neonatal intracranial aneurysms are rare, with only 20 cases being reported in the literature. No case of spontaneous resolution of a giant intracranial cavernous segment aneurysm in a neonate is reported till date. The authors describe a 3-week-old male child who presented with a left-sided tonic seizure episode and was diagnosed as having a right-sided giant cavernous internal carotid artery aneurysm. The aneurysm was found to be totally thrombosed on angiography done before planning definitive treatment. The child is doing well at 2 years of follow-up. Spontaneous thrombosis, an exceptionally rare but fortunate outcome in a rare case of giant neonatal internal carotid artery aneurysm, has led the authors to report this case. The need of repeat imaging or angiography should be considered to rule out this rare outcome, more so if there is any delay between the ictus and treatment. 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel

  8. Strong genetic population structure in the boring giant clam, Tridacna crocea, across the Indo-Malay Archipelago: implications related to evolutionary processes and connectivity.

    PubMed

    Kochzius, Marc; Nuryanto, Agus

    2008-09-01

    Even though the Indo-Malay Archipelago hosts the world's greatest diversity of marine species, studies on the genetic population structure and gene flow of marine organisms within this area are rather rare. Consequently, not much is known about connectivity of marine populations in the Indo-Malay Archipelago, despite the fact that such information is important to understand evolutionary and ecological processes in the centre of marine biodiversity. This study aims to investigate the genetic population structure of the boring giant clam, Tridacna crocea. The analysis is based on a 456-bp fragment of the cytochrome oxidase I gene from 300 individuals collected from 15 localities across the Indo-Malay Archipelago. Tridacna crocea shows a very strong genetic population structure and isolation by distance, indicating restricted gene flow between almost all sample sites. The observed Phi(ST)-value of 0.28 is very high compared to other studies on giant clams. According to the pronounced genetic differences, the sample sites can be divided into four groups from West to East: (i) Eastern Indian Ocean, (ii) Java Sea, (iii) South China Sea, Indonesian throughflow, as well as seas in the East of Sulawesi, and (iv) Western Pacific. This complex genetic population structure and pattern of connectivity, characterised by restricted gene flow between some sites and panmixing between others can be attributed to the geological history and prevailing current regimes in the Indo-Malay Archipelago.

  9. Giant cell arteritis.

    PubMed

    Ninan, Jem; Lester, Susan; Hill, Catherine

    2016-02-01

    Giant cell arteritis (GCA) is the most common vasculitis of the elderly. The diagnosis can be challenging at times because of the limitation of the American Rheumatology Association (ARA) classification criteria and the significant proportion of biopsy-negative patients with GCA. We discuss the role of advanced imaging techniques, including positron emission tomography (PET) scanning, in establishing diagnosis and improved histopathology techniques to improve the sensitivity of temporal artery biopsy. There have been significant advances in the understanding of the pathogenesis of GCA, particularly the role of cytokine pathways such as the interleukins, IL-6-IL-17 axis, and the IL-12-interferon-γ axis and their implication for new therapies. We highlight that glucocorticoids remain the primary treatment for GCA, but recognize the risk of steroid-induced side effects. A number of pharmacotherapies to enable glucocorticoid dose reduction and prevent relapse have been studied. Early diagnosis and fast-track pathways have improved outcomes by encouraging adherence to evidence-based practice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Giant calvarial cavernous hemangioma

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Satish Kumar; Singh, Pankaj Kumar; Garg, Kanwaljeet; Satyarthee, Guru Dutta; Sharma, Mehar C.; Singh, Manmohan; Sharma, Bhawani Shankar

    2015-01-01

    Though hemangiomas of the bone are quite common, calvarial (skull) cavernous hemangiomas are relatively rare pathologies. Calvarial hemangiomas are usually small and asymptomatic. However, they may occasionally grow in size to achieve large sizes and can present as a palpable swelling. We present a child with massive temporo-parieto-occipital calvarial cavernous hemangioma, who was managed with a multimodal approach with excellent cosmetic and neurologic outcome. PMID:25878743

  11. An Adolescent Girl with Giant Fibroadenoma - A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Ferdousee, Ishrat; Arafat, S M Yasir; Ahmed, Zuhayer

    2016-09-01

    Though fibroadenoma is the most common benign tumor of the breast and is more common under the age of 30, giant fibroadenoma is rare representing less than 4% of all fibroadenomas. A 12 years old girl presented with rapidly enlarging well-circumscribed firm, non-tender mass in right breast for 2 months which was painless and with no history of trauma, nipple discharge, fever, anorexia, weight loss or axillary lymphadenopathy. There was no family history of neoplasms. Clinically, the lump was about 12 × 12 cm and not fixed to skin or underlying structures with the absence of nipple retraction or discharge. There was no axillary lymphadenopathy. Fine needle aspiration cytology showed a benign proliferative breast disease. Total excision of mass was done preserving nipple and areola having weight of 535 gm with histopathological features suggestive of giant fibroadenoma. Giant fibroadenoma is a benign breast disease that may mimic rare malignant lesion. So, breast and nipple conserving surgery should always be performed irrespective of size of tumor as in this case.

  12. DISCOVERY OF SUPER-Li-RICH RED GIANTS IN DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, Evan N.; Fu, Xiaoting; Deng, Licai; Guhathakurta, Puragra

    2012-06-10

    Stars destroy lithium (Li) in their normal evolution. The convective envelopes of evolved red giants reach temperatures of millions of kelvin, hot enough for the {sup 7}Li(p, {alpha}){sup 4}He reaction to burn Li efficiently. Only about 1% of first-ascent red giants more luminous than the luminosity function bump in the red giant branch exhibit A(Li) > 1.5. Nonetheless, Li-rich red giants do exist. We present 15 Li-rich red giants-14 of which are new discoveries-among a sample of 2054 red giants in Milky Way dwarf satellite galaxies. Our sample more than doubles the number of low-mass, metal-poor ([Fe/H] {approx}< -0.7) Li-rich red giants, and it includes the most-metal-poor Li-enhanced star known ([Fe/H] = -2.82, A(Li){sub NLTE} = 3.15). Because most of the stars have Li abundances larger than the universe's primordial value, the Li in these stars must have been created rather than saved from destruction. These Li-rich stars appear like other stars in the same galaxies in every measurable regard other than Li abundance. We consider the possibility that Li enrichment is a universal phase of evolution that affects all stars, and it seems rare only because it is brief.

  13. ON THE SERENDIPITOUS DISCOVERY OF A Li-RICH GIANT IN THE GLOBULAR CLUSTER NGC 362

    SciTech Connect

    D’Orazi, Valentina; Gratton, Raffaele G.; Lucatello, Sara; Momany, Yazan; Angelou, George C.; Bragaglia, Angela; Carretta, Eugenio; Sollima, Antonio; Lattanzio, John C.

    2015-03-10

    We have serendipitously identified the first lithium-rich giant star located close to the red giant branch bump in a globular cluster. Through intermediate-resolution FLAMES spectra we derived a lithium abundance of A(Li) = 2.55 (assuming local thermodynamical equilibrium), which is extremely high considering the star’s evolutionary stage. Kinematic and photometric analysis confirm the object as a member of the globular cluster NGC 362. This is the fourth Li-rich giant discovered in a globular cluster, but is the only one known to exist at a luminosity close to the bump magnitude. The three previous detections are clearly more evolved, located close to, or beyond, the tip of their red giant branch. Our observations are able to discard the accretion of planets/brown dwarfs, as well as an enhanced mass-loss mechanism as a formation channel for this rare object. While the star sits just above the cluster bump luminosity, its temperature places it toward the blue side of the giant branch in the color–magnitude diagram. We require further dedicated observations to unambiguously identify the star as a red giant: we are currently unable to confirm whether Li production has occurred at the bump of the luminosity function or if the star is on the pre-zero-age horizontal branch. The latter scenario provides the opportunity for the star to have synthesized Li rapidly during the core helium flash or gradually during its red giant branch ascent via some extra mixing process.

  14. Disseminated giant porokeratosis and porokeratosis of Mibelli in Bankura and Bardhaman districts, West Bengal, India.

    PubMed

    Koley, Sankha; Mandal, Rajesh Kumar; Bar, Chittaranjan

    2014-09-01

    Porokeratosis of Mibelli (PM) is a rare genodermatosis. It is caused by proliferation of abnormal clones of epidermal cells in response to several stimuli, the most important of which is sunlight. Giant porokeratosis is thought to be a variant of PM. We report two cases of disseminated PM and one case of disseminated giant porokeratosis from the Bankura and Bardhaman districts of West Bengal in India; presenting to a single observer in the summer of 2012. Interestingly we have noted that the majority of cases of porokeratosis in India have been reported from West Bengal. Few patients with a single lesion of giant porokeratosis have been reported in world literature. As far as we know, this is the first case report of disseminated giant porokeratosis in world literature. © 2014 The International Society of Dermatology.

  15. A unique advantage for giant eyes in giant squid.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Dan-Eric; Warrant, Eric J; Johnsen, Sönke; Hanlon, Roger; Shashar, Nadav

    2012-04-24

    Giant and colossal deep-sea squid (Architeuthis and Mesonychoteuthis) have the largest eyes in the animal kingdom [1, 2], but there is no explanation for why they would need eyes that are nearly three times the diameter of those of any other extant animal. Here we develop a theory for visual detection in pelagic habitats, which predicts that such giant eyes are unlikely to evolve for detecting mates or prey at long distance but are instead uniquely suited for detecting very large predators, such as sperm whales. We also provide photographic documentation of an eyeball of about 27 cm with a 9 cm pupil in a giant squid, and we predict that, below 600 m depth, it would allow detection of sperm whales at distances exceeding 120 m. With this long range of vision, giant squid get an early warning of approaching sperm whales. Because the sonar range of sperm whales exceeds 120 m [3-5], we hypothesize that a well-prepared and powerful evasive response to hunting sperm whales may have driven the evolution of huge dimensions in both eyes and bodies of giant and colossal squid. Our theory also provides insights into the vision of Mesozoic ichthyosaurs with unusually large eyes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Clump Giants in the Hyades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mushotzky, Richard F. (Technical Monitor); Brickhouse, Nancy

    2003-01-01

    The project is entitled 'Clump Giants in the Hyades.' This observation of one of the late-type Hyades giants (Gamma Tau) has implications for understanding the formation of late-type stellar coronae as a function of the evolutionary state of the star. The Hyades giants are interesting because they are all clump giants in the Helium burning phase, similar to the cool primary of Capella. The Hyades giants show significantly more magnetic activity than expected from their state of evolution (and slowed-down rotation). Thus these systems provide an important clue to dynamo action. The data were obtained by the satellite on 13 March 2001 for a total RGS exposure of 58220 seconds. These data were delivered to the PI on 7 August 2001. The data could not be reprocessed until SAS Version 5.3.3 which became available 7 June 2002. Although the guidelines for assessing background rates suggested that half the data were contaminated, it does not appear that the spectral region of the RGS was adversely affected by unusually high background. The spectra show strong lines of Fe XVII and XVIII, O VII and VIII, Ne IX and X, along with numerous weaker lines. The emission measure distribution is highly reminiscent of Capella; if anything, the emission measure distribution is steeper at 6 million K than for Capella. Gamma Tau is the second brightest of the Hyades clump giants. Pallavicini et al. have shown that the luminosity of the brightest Hyades giant (Theta Tau) is remarkably similar to its luminosity as measured by Einstein. Short-term variability is also modest. We are addressing the variability issue now for Gamma Tau. Initial results were reported at the 2003 Seattle AAS meeting. A paper is in preparation for submission to the Astrophysical Journal.

  17. Formation of the giant planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, Jack J.

    2006-01-01

    The observed properties of giant planets, models of their evolution and observations of protoplanetary disks provide constraints on the formation of gas giant planets. The four largest planets in our Solar System contain considerable quantities of hydrogen and helium, which could not have condensed into solid planetesimals within the protoplanetary disk. All three (transiting) extrasolar giant planets with well determined masses and radii also must contain substantial amounts of these light gases. Jupiter and Saturn are mostly hydrogen and helium, but have larger abundances of heavier elements than does the Sun. Neptune and Uranus are primarily composed of heavier elements. HD 149026 b, which is slightly more massive than is Saturn, appears to have comparable quantities of light gases and heavy elements. HD 209458 b and TrES-1 are primarily hydrogen and helium, but may contain supersolar abundances of heavy elements. Spacecraft flybys and observations of satellite orbits provide estimates of the gravitational moments of the giant planets in our Solar System, which in turn provide information on the internal distribution of matter within Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune. Atmospheric thermal structure and heat flow measurements constrain the interior temperatures of planets. Internal processes may cause giant planets to become more compositionally differentiated or alternatively more homogeneous; high-pressure laboratory .experiments provide data useful for modeling these processes. The preponderance of evidence supports the core nucleated gas accretion model. According to this model, giant planets begin their growth by the accumulation of small solid bodies, as do terrestrial planets. However, unlike terrestrial planets, the growing giant planet cores become massive enough that they are able to accumulate substantial amounts of gas before the protoplanetary disk dissipates. The primary questions regarding the core nucleated growth model is under what conditions

  18. Clump Giants in the Hyades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mushotzky, Richard F. (Technical Monitor); Brickhouse, Nancy

    2003-01-01

    The project is entitled 'Clump Giants in the Hyades.' This observation of one of the late-type Hyades giants (Gamma Tau) has implications for understanding the formation of late-type stellar coronae as a function of the evolutionary state of the star. The Hyades giants are interesting because they are all clump giants in the Helium burning phase, similar to the cool primary of Capella. The Hyades giants show significantly more magnetic activity than expected from their state of evolution (and slowed-down rotation). Thus these systems provide an important clue to dynamo action. The data were obtained by the satellite on 13 March 2001 for a total RGS exposure of 58220 seconds. These data were delivered to the PI on 7 August 2001. The data could not be reprocessed until SAS Version 5.3.3 which became available 7 June 2002. Although the guidelines for assessing background rates suggested that half the data were contaminated, it does not appear that the spectral region of the RGS was adversely affected by unusually high background. The spectra show strong lines of Fe XVII and XVIII, O VII and VIII, Ne IX and X, along with numerous weaker lines. The emission measure distribution is highly reminiscent of Capella; if anything, the emission measure distribution is steeper at 6 million K than for Capella. Gamma Tau is the second brightest of the Hyades clump giants. Pallavicini et al. have shown that the luminosity of the brightest Hyades giant (Theta Tau) is remarkably similar to its luminosity as measured by Einstein. Short-term variability is also modest. We are addressing the variability issue now for Gamma Tau. Initial results were reported at the 2003 Seattle AAS meeting. A paper is in preparation for submission to the Astrophysical Journal.

  19. Formation of the giant planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, Jack J.

    2006-01-01

    The observed properties of giant planets, models of their evolution and observations of protoplanetary disks provide constraints on the formation of gas giant planets. The four largest planets in our Solar System contain considerable quantities of hydrogen and helium, which could not have condensed into solid planetesimals within the protoplanetary disk. All three (transiting) extrasolar giant planets with well determined masses and radii also must contain substantial amounts of these light gases. Jupiter and Saturn are mostly hydrogen and helium, but have larger abundances of heavier elements than does the Sun. Neptune and Uranus are primarily composed of heavier elements. HD 149026 b, which is slightly more massive than is Saturn, appears to have comparable quantities of light gases and heavy elements. HD 209458 b and TrES-1 are primarily hydrogen and helium, but may contain supersolar abundances of heavy elements. Spacecraft flybys and observations of satellite orbits provide estimates of the gravitational moments of the giant planets in our Solar System, which in turn provide information on the internal distribution of matter within Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune. Atmospheric thermal structure and heat flow measurements constrain the interior temperatures of planets. Internal processes may cause giant planets to become more compositionally differentiated or alternatively more homogeneous; high-pressure laboratory .experiments provide data useful for modeling these processes. The preponderance of evidence supports the core nucleated gas accretion model. According to this model, giant planets begin their growth by the accumulation of small solid bodies, as do terrestrial planets. However, unlike terrestrial planets, the growing giant planet cores become massive enough that they are able to accumulate substantial amounts of gas before the protoplanetary disk dissipates. The primary questions regarding the core nucleated growth model is under what conditions

  20. Angiomatous Hamartoma - A Rare Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Wadhera, Raman; Kaintura, Madhuri; Bhukar, Sandeep; Pillai, Dheeraj Shashikumar

    2016-01-01

    Eccrine Angiomatous Hamartoma (EAH) is a benign rare skin neoplasm characterised histologically by abnormal proliferation of sweat glands and surrounding capillaries and other dermal elements like fatty lobules and hair. It usually presents at birth or in early childhood in the form of solitary nodules mostly affecting the extremities. Here, we report a case of angiomatous hamartoma over the face which presented as a cystic swelling in preauricular region in a 55-year-old man. The late onset and a rare site for presentation of EAH prompted us to report the case. There is not even a single case of EAH arising in the “preauricular” region, reported. PMID:27790478

  1. Perianal giant condyloma acuminata [buschke lowenstein tumour] - first case report from the Kashmir valley.

    PubMed

    Chowdri, Nisar A; Gagloo, Mushtaq A; Parray, Fazal Q; Sheikh, Zahoor A; Rouf, A; Wani, A

    2007-10-01

    Buschke Lowenstein tumour or giant condyloma acuminata is a rare entity with only less then 50 cases reported in English literature so far. No such case has been reported from the Kashmir valley. They are considered as intermediate lesions between simple condyloma acuminata and invasive squamous cell carcinoma. A 57-year-old heterosexual male presented with a giant perianal condyloma. The lesion was surgically excised completely. Postoperatively patient was put on topical 5-FU ointment. Patient is recurrence free 6 months after surgery. The giant condyloma acuminate is an aggressive tumour with propensity for recurrance and malignant transformation. Surgical excision is the treatment of choice. One such rare case is discussed with review of literature.

  2. Giant fibroadenoma presenting like fungating breast cancer in a Nigerian teenager.

    PubMed

    Arowolo, O A; Akinkuolie, A A; Adisa, A O; Obonna, G C; Olasode, B J

    2013-03-01

    Giant fibroadenoma of the breast is a rare benign breast tumour which seldom grows to a giant size, it is even rarer for this benign tumour to grow rapidly, ulcerate spontaneously and present like a fungating breast tumour in a way mimicking breast cancer. This is a presentation of a 14 year old premenarchal girl with a massive ulcerating and fungating left breast mass that was initially thought to be a fungating locally advanced breast carcinoma on clinical examination. Further examination of the morphology of the resected surgical specimen and histological examination confirmed it to be giant fibroadenoma of the breast. It was successfully managed by partial mastectomy and breast reconstruction with an excellent result and a high degree of patient satisfaction was achieved. Though a rare clinical entity benign breast tumour can present like a fungating breast cancer and this must be bore in mind especially in young adolescent patients presenting with ulcerating breast tumour.

  3. Giant cell tumor of the greater wing of the sphenoid: an unusual presentation.

    PubMed

    Pelaz, Andrés Coca; Llorente Pendás, José L; Rodrigo Tapia, Juan P; Suárez Nieto, Carlos

    2008-05-01

    We report a very unusual presentation of giant cell tumor probably originated on the greater wing of the sphenoid and show a review about the knowledge and the treatment of the lesion in this rare localization. We treated a 48-year-old man with a giant cell tumor of the infratemporal fossa. He presented with a right-side hearing loss and facial pain. The tumor was resected by means of a subtemporal-preauricular approach, and after 12 months of follow-up, the patient is free of recurrence. Giant cell tumors of the skull base are an extremely rare neoplasm, and there is not much information on the literature about the treatment and the prognostic. Wide resection ought to be made, and at the follow-up, the clinician must try to diagnose not only local recurrence but also the possibility of distant metastases to the lung.

  4. Chronic disseminated intravascular coagulation induced by left atrial thrombus in a patient with giant “normal” heart

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Qianqian; Tian, Ran; Zhang, Xu; Gao, Xin; Lai, Jinzhi; Tian, Zhuang; Yan, Xiaowei; Zhang, Shuyang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: We herein describe a patient with chronic disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) induced by a giant thrombus in the left atrium. A 63-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital for evaluation of extensive mucocutaneous hemorrhage, especially at the sites of venipuncture, on May 21, 2015. Considering her long history of rheumatic heart disease and atrial fibrillation and her mitral valve replacement performed several years previously, we strongly suspected that the bleeding was closely related to postoperative over-anticoagulation of warfarin. After careful investigation, we found that her coagulopathy was induced by the chronic DIC, which was in turn secondary to a left atrial giant thrombus. This is a rarely reported cause of chronic DIC. Cardiac computed tomography and echocardiography showed apparent biatrial enlargement; the morphology and function of the ventricles were unaffected. After anticoagulant therapy, the bleeding tendency and coagulation index were significantly improved. Conclusion: A left atrial thrombus should be considered as a differential diagnosis of chronic DIC, especially in patients with predisposing heart conditions. Because treatment of the underlying cause is paramount in the management of chronic DIC, this case is of great clinical value. PMID:28002328

  5. Giant cemento-ossifying fibroma of the maxilla.

    PubMed

    Unal, Adnan; Yurtsever Kum, Nurcan; Kum, Rauf Oguzhan; Erdogan, Aysun; Ciliz, Deniz Sozmen; Guresci, Servet; Ozcan, Muge

    2015-11-14

    Fibro-osseous lesions of the skull and facial bones are benign tumors, but they can be mistaken for malignant tumors due to their clinically aggressive behavior. Cemento-ossifying fibroma (COF) is a benign fibro-osseous lesion characterized by slow growth and fibrous and calcified tissue content. COFs are locally destructive lesions causing deformities in the bones. The recurrence risk is high if they are not completely removed. In this case report we describe a giant COF mimicking chondrosarcoma in the oral cavity of a 55-year-old woman causing significant facial deformity and feeding problems. Giant COF occurs rarely in the jaws and given that this lesion has similar imaging and clinical features to several other tumors, the diagnosis is always a challenge for clinicians, radiologists and pathologists.

  6. [Giant parathyroid adenoma causing early recurrence of renal stones].

    PubMed

    Traxer, Olivier; Mouton, Albert; Abbecassis, Rémy; Tassard, Marc; Vigneau, Cécile; Gattegno, Bernard; Thibault, Philippe

    2004-06-01

    Primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) is not a rare disease. Renal stones are the most frequent complication of PHPT The authors report the case of a patient with giant parathyroid adenoma responsible for early recurrence of renal stones. Ultrasound examination of the neck, parathyroid MRI and Technetium99m-Sestamibi scintigraphy confirmed the parathyroid adenoma. Surgical exploration allowed resection of a giant adenoma (6.5 x 2.5 x 1.5 cm weighing 17 g). In the light of this case, the authors describe the characteristics of HPT define the place of preoperative imaging and emphasize the need for systematic aetiological work-up looking for HPT in all patients with a first episode of renal stones.

  7. Giant, solid, invasive prolactinoma in a prepubescent boy with gynecomastia.

    PubMed

    Furtado, Sunil V; Saikiran, Narayanam A; Ghosal, Nandita; Hegde, Alangar S

    2010-01-01

    Pituitary adenomas are extremely rare in prepubescent children. Most of these tumors are functioning adenomas, but can also present with vision disturbances and changes in body morphology. We discuss the presentation, management, and outcome of a giant, solid, invasive prolactinoma in a 7-year-old boy who presented with visual disturbances and gynecomastia. The child demonstrated significant improvement in vision and a reduction in size of the tumor after subtotal tumor decompression and treatment with oral bromocriptine for 4 months. Tumor decompression and oral dopamine agonist therapy comprise the accepted treatment for pediatric prolactinomas. To our knowledge, only two previous reports described a giant prolactinoma in a prepubescent child. The relevant literature on pediatric pituitary tumours and prolactinoma is reviewed.

  8. Giant lateral left ventricular wall aneurysm sparing the submitral apparatus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Left ventricular aneurysms are a frequent and serious complication following acute transmural myocardial infarction and are most commonly located at the ventricular apex. The majority of these patients presents with severe mitral insufficiency, congestive heart failure, systemic embolism and sudden cardiac death. Giant aneurysms occurring in a submitral position between anterior and posterior papillary muscles on the lateral ventricular wall constitute a minor entity and those leaving the mitral apparatus intact are extremely rare. Herein, we report the case of a 57 y/o Caucasian male patient with a past medical history of coronary artery disease and myocardial infarction with a giant left ventricular aneurysm measuring 15x10x8 cm in diameter. Despite the size of the aneurysm and its close topographical relation to the posterior mitral annulus the mitral apparatus was intact with a competent valve and normal left atrial size. He underwent successful surgical ventricular restoration. PMID:24172071

  9. Giant Gartner duct cyst and elevated CA-125.

    PubMed

    Vlahovic, A; Stankovic, Z B; Djuricic, S; Savic, D

    2014-12-01

    Gartner duct cysts represent vestigial remnants of the caudal end of the mesonephric (Wolffian) ducts. They are often associated with ureteral and renal abnormalities. In most cases they are solitary, less than 2 cm in diameter. Giant Gartner duct cysts are extremely rare. We present a girl with a giant Gartner duct cyst, without notable associated abnormalities or pathology, successfully treated by surgical excision. Preoperative aspiration revealed elevated level of CA-125 in the cyst fluid, with normal serum level of the same marker. Analyzing the aspirated fluid for CA-125 may be a useful tool for evaluation of cystic lesions in this region. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Solitary giant neurofibroma of the scalp with calvarial defect in a child.

    PubMed

    Ismail, N J; Shehu, B B; Lasseini, A; Hassan, I; Shilong, D J; Obande, J O; Sahabi, S M

    2010-01-01

    Neurofibroma of the scalp are mostly multiple as part of neurofibromatosis or other phakomatosis. De novo solitary types are less common and rarely erode the skull, unlike the intracranial counterpart. Skull erosion has been reported in adults with longstanding plexiform neurofibromas. We report a giant neurofibroma on the scalp of a five-year-old boy, managed in our center. Although this condition is a rare entity, it should be anticipated and the treatment strategy should include repair of the skull defect.

  11. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia and giant cell hepatitis: Report of three infants.

    PubMed

    Ünal, Şule; Kuşkonmaz, Barış; Balamtekin, Necati; Baysoy, Gökhan; Aytaç Elmas, Selin; Orhan, Diclehan; Kale, Gülsev; Yüce, Aysel; Gürakan, Figen; Gümrük, Fatma; Çetin, Mualla

    2010-12-05

    Giant cell hepatitis associated with direct Coombs' test-positive hemolytic anemia is a rare condition of childhood and the pathogenesis remains unclear. An autoimmune activation and loss of self-tolerance in these patients may be the underlying pathology related to the response of some of the patients to immunosuppressive treatment. Herein, we report the clinical presentation and course of three consecutive patients with this rare condition. We conclude that serum ferritin at diagnosis may be used for prediction of the outcome.

  12. [Giant negative T waves in idiopathic apical diverticulum of the left ventricle in adults].

    PubMed

    Barboteu, M; Desnos, M; Hagège, A; Dufour, M; Chauvaud, S; Junes, G; Baleynaud, S; Bruneval, P; Guérot, C

    1995-10-01

    Left ventricular diverticula, congenital or acquired, with normal coronary arteries are rare. Apical diverticula are exceptionally rare in the adult. The authors present the clinical, paraclinical, anatomopathological pre- and postoperative data in a case of apical diverticulum of the left ventricle presenting with giant negative T waves. The differential diagnosis of these electrocardiographic changes is discussed, in particular apical cardiomyopathy, especially as the two conditions may be associated.

  13. Open questions about giant viruses.

    PubMed

    Claverie, Jean-Michel; Abergel, Chantal

    2013-01-01

    The recent discovery of giant viruses exhibiting double-stranded DNA genomes larger than a million base pairs, encoding more than a thousand proteins and packed in near micron-sized icosahedral particles, opened a new and unexpected chapter in virology. As of today, these giant viruses and their closest relatives of lesser dimensions infect unicellular eukaryotes found in aquatic environments, but belonging to a wide diversity of early branching phyla. This broad phylogenetic distribution of hosts is consistent with the hypothesis that giant viruses originated prior to the radiation of the eukaryotic domain and/or might have been involved in the partition of nuclear versus cytoplasmic functions in ancestral cells. The distinctive features of the known giant viruses, in particular the recurrent presence of components of the translation apparatus in their proteome, raise a number of fundamental questions about their origin, their mode of evolution, and the relationship they may entertain with other dsDNA viruses, the genome size of which exhibits the widest distribution among all biological entities, from less than 5 kb to more than 1.25 Mb (a ratio of 1:250). At a more conceptual level, the convergence between the discovery of increasingly reduced parasitic cellular organisms and that of giant viruses exhibiting a widening array of cellular-like functions may ultimately abolish the historical discontinuity between the viral and the cellular world. 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved

  14. Gravitational scattering by giant planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laakso, T.; Rantala, J.; Kaasalainen, M.

    2006-09-01

    We seek to characterize giant-planet systems by their gravitational scattering properties. We do this to a given system by integrating it numerically along with a large number of hypothetical small bodies that are initially in eccentric habitable zone (HZ)-crossing orbits. Our analysis produces a single number, the escape rate, which represents the rate at which the small-body flux is perturbed away by the giant planets into orbits that no longer pose a threat to terrestrial planets inside the HZ. Obtaining the escape rate this way is similar to computing the largest Liapunov exponent as the exponential rate of divergence of two nearby orbits. For a terrestrial planet inside the HZ, the escape rate value quantifies the "protective" effect that the studied giant-planet system offers. Therefore, escape rates could provide information on whether certain giant-planet configurations produce a more desirable environment for life than the others. We present some computed escape rates on selected planetary systems, focusing on effects of varying the masses and semi-major axes of the giant planets. In the case of our Solar System we find rather surprisingly that Jupiter, in its current orbit, may provide a minimal amount of protection to the Earth.

  15. Giant Magellan Telescope: overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johns, Matt; McCarthy, Patrick; Raybould, Keith; Bouchez, Antonin; Farahani, Arash; Filgueira, Jose; Jacoby, George; Shectman, Steve; Sheehan, Michael

    2012-09-01

    The Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT) is a 25-meter optical/infrared extremely large telescope that is being built by an international consortium of universities and research institutions. It will be located at the Las Campanas Observatory, Chile. The GMT primary mirror consists of seven 8.4-m borosilicate honeycomb mirror segments made at the Steward Observatory Mirror Lab (SOML). Six identical off-axis segments and one on-axis segment are arranged on a single nearly-paraboloidal parent surface having an overall focal ratio of f/0.7. The fabrication, testing and verification procedures required to produce the closely-matched off-axis mirror segments were developed during the production of the first mirror. Production of the second and third off-axis segments is underway. GMT incorporates a seven-segment Gregorian adaptive secondary to implement three modes of adaptive-optics operation: natural-guide star AO, laser-tomography AO, and ground-layer AO. A wide-field corrector/ADC is available for use in seeing-limited mode over a 20-arcmin diameter field of view. Up to seven instruments can be mounted simultaneously on the telescope in a large Gregorian Instrument Rotator. Conceptual design studies were completed for six AO and seeing-limited instruments, plus a multi-object fiber feed, and a roadmap for phased deployment of the GMT instrument suite is being developed. The partner institutions have made firm commitments for approximately 45% of the funds required to build the telescope. Project Office efforts are currently focused on advancing the telescope and enclosure design in preparation for subsystem- and system-level preliminary design reviews which are scheduled to be completed in the first half of 2013.

  16. Rotation of Giant Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kissin, Yevgeni; Thompson, Christopher

    2015-07-01

    The internal rotation of post-main sequence stars is investigated, in response to the convective pumping of angular momentum toward the stellar core, combined with a tight magnetic coupling between core and envelope. The spin evolution is calculated using model stars of initial mass 1, 1.5, and 5 {M}⊙ , taking into account mass loss on the giant branches. We also include the deposition of orbital angular momentum from a sub-stellar companion, as influenced by tidal drag along with the excitation of orbital eccentricity by a fluctuating gravitational quadrupole moment. A range of angular velocity profiles {{Ω }}(r) is considered in the envelope, extending from solid rotation to constant specific angular momentum. We focus on the backreaction of the Coriolis force, and the threshold for dynamo action in the inner envelope. Quantitative agreement with measurements of core rotation in subgiants and post-He core flash stars by Kepler is obtained with a two-layer angular velocity profile: uniform specific angular momentum where the Coriolis parameter {Co}\\equiv {{Ω }}{τ }{con}≲ 1 (here {τ }{con} is the convective time), and {{Ω }}(r)\\propto {r}-1 where {Co}≳ 1. The inner profile is interpreted in terms of a balance between the Coriolis force and angular pressure gradients driven by radially extended convective plumes. Inward angular momentum pumping reduces the surface rotation of subgiants, and the need for a rejuvenated magnetic wind torque. The co-evolution of internal magnetic fields and rotation is considered in Kissin & Thompson, along with the breaking of the rotational coupling between core and envelope due to heavy mass loss.

  17. Primary ciliary dyskinesia: Kartagener syndrome with central giant cell granuloma. A case report.

    PubMed

    Türkoğlu, Kivanç; Orhan, Kaan; Demir, Pinar; Karabulut, Bariş; Can-Karabulut, Deniz C

    2010-10-01

    This paper describes a clinical case of both giant cell granuloma and Kartagener syndrome in a 15-year-old male patient, with emphasis on the radiographic aspects of this extremely unusual pathology. To our knowledge, the presence of these 2 rare clinical conditions in the same patient has not been previously reported.

  18. A Case of Giant Cowper's Gland Syringocele in an Adult Male Patient

    PubMed Central

    Surana, Santosh; Elshazly, Mohamed; Allam, Adel; Jayappa, Sateesh; AlRefai, Deena

    2015-01-01

    Cowper's gland syringocele is an uncommon, underdiagnosed cystic dilatation of Cowper's gland ducts showing various radiological patterns. Herein we report a rare case of giant Cowper's gland syringocele in an adult male patient, with description of MRI findings and management outcome. PMID:26413368

  19. Cardiac failure due to a giant desmoid tumour of the posterior mediastinum.

    PubMed

    Bouchikh, Mohammed; Arame, Alex; Riquet, Marc; Le Pimpec-Barthes, Françoise

    2013-12-01

    We report a rare case of a giant desmoid tumour responsible for cardiac and respiratory failure. Complete removal was decided upon, despite an initial failure in another centre because of symptom severity. In such cases, wide local resection remains the best therapeutic approach, but the risk of local recurrence is high. Literature review confirms the exceptional presentation and the benefit of aggressive surgery.

  20. Giant calvarial intraosseous angiolipoma: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rahul; Josiah, Darnell T; Turner, Ryan C; Cantu-Durand, David E; Williams, H James; Gyure, Kymberly; Voelker, Joseph L

    2016-04-13

    Intraosseous angiolipomas are very rare tumors occurring most commonly in the ribs and mandible. Only two cases with intracranial involvement have been reported in the literature. We report a case of a giant calvarial angiolipoma and its surgical treatment in a 30-year-old female who presented with a slowly expanding skull mass and discuss relevant radiological, histological and surgical findings.

  1. The Frequency of Lithium-Rich Giants in Globular Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirby, Evan N.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Zhang, Andrew J.; Hong, Jerry; Guo, Michelle; Guo, Rachel; Cohen, Judith G.; Cunha, Katia M. L.

    2016-01-01

    Although red giants destroy lithium, some giants are Li-rich. Intermediate-mass asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars can generate Li through the Cameron-Fowler conveyor, but the existence of Li-rich, low-mass red giant branch (RGB) stars is puzzling. Globular clusters are the best sites to examine this phenomenon because it is straightforward to determine membership in the cluster and to identify the evolutionary state of each star. In 72 hours of Keck/DEIMOS exposures in 25 clusters, we found four Li-rich RGB and two Li-rich AGB stars. There were 1696 RGB and 125 AGB stars with measurements or upper limits consistent with normal abundances of Li. Hence, the frequency of Li-richness in globular clusters is (0.2 ± 0.1)% for the RGB, (1.6 ± 1.1)% for the AGB, and (0.3 ± 0.1)% for all giants. Because the Li-rich RGB stars are on the lower RGB, Li self-generation mechanisms proposed to occur at the luminosity function bump or He core flash cannot explain these four lower RGB stars. We propose the following origin for Li enrichment: (1) All luminous giants experience a brief phase of Li enrichment at the He core flash. (2) All post-RGB stars with binary companions on the lower RGB will engage in mass transfer. This scenario predicts that 0.1% of lower RGB stars will appear Li-rich due to mass transfer from a recently Li-enhanced companion. This frequency is at the lower end of our confidence interval.

  2. Giant arachnoid granulation mimicking dural sinus thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Ayaz, Ercan; Atalay, Basak; Baysal, Begumhan; Senturk, Senem; Aslan, Ahmet

    2017-01-01

    Arachnoid granulations (AG) are composed of dense, collagenous connective tissue that includes clusters of arachnoid cells. They tend to invaginate into the dural sinuses, through which cerebrospinal fluid enters the venous system. AG are most commonly seen at the junction between the middle and lateral thirds of the transverse sinuses near the entry sites of the superficial veins. Presently described is the case of a 21-year-old female who presented at the clinic with recurrent headaches. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging revealed a 3.5-cm lesion, which extended from confluens sinuum through the superior sagittal sinus. The lesion had created a scallop-shaped area of erosion in the neighboring occipital bone. To exclude sinus thrombosis, MR venography was performed, which displayed a maintained venous flow around the lesion. Headaches were treated symptomatically with medical therapy. Giant AG can be misdiagnosed as dural sinus thrombosis. MR imaging combined with MR venography is the most useful diagnostic tool to differentiate giant AG from dural sinus thrombosis. PMID:28971178

  3. Giant arachnoid granulation mimicking dural sinus thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Ayaz, Ercan; Atalay, Basak; Baysal, Begumhan; Senturk, Senem; Aslan, Ahmet

    2017-01-01

    Arachnoid granulations (AG) are composed of dense, collagenous connective tissue that includes clusters of arachnoid cells. They tend to invaginate into the dural sinuses, through which cerebrospinal fluid enters the venous system. AG are most commonly seen at the junction between the middle and lateral thirds of the transverse sinuses near the entry sites of the superficial veins. Presently described is the case of a 21-year-old female who presented at the clinic with recurrent headaches. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging revealed a 3.5-cm lesion, which extended from confluens sinuum through the superior sagittal sinus. The lesion had created a scallop-shaped area of erosion in the neighboring occipital bone. To exclude sinus thrombosis, MR venography was performed, which displayed a maintained venous flow around the lesion. Headaches were treated symptomatically with medical therapy. Giant AG can be misdiagnosed as dural sinus thrombosis. MR imaging combined with MR venography is the most useful diagnostic tool to differentiate giant AG from dural sinus thrombosis.

  4. Polymyalgia Rheumatica and Giant Cell Arteritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Clinical Trial Journal Articles Polymyalgia Rheumatica and Giant Cell Arteritis May 2016 Questions and Answers about Polymyalgia Rheumatica and Giant Cell Arteritis This publication contains general information about polymyalgia ...

  5. Giant lobelias exemplify convergent evolution.

    PubMed

    Givnish, Thomas J

    2010-01-14

    Giant lobeliads on tropical mountains in East Africa and Hawaii have highly unusual, giant-rosette growth forms that appear to be convergent on each other and on those of several independently evolved groups of Asteraceae and other families. A recent phylogenetic analysis by Antonelli, based on sequencing the widest selection of lobeliads to date, raises doubts about this paradigmatic example of convergent evolution. Here I address the kinds of evidence needed to test for convergent evolution and argue that the analysis by Antonelli fails on four points. Antonelli's analysis makes several important contributions to our understanding of lobeliad evolution and geographic spread, but his claim regarding convergence appears to be invalid. Giant lobeliads in Hawaii and Africa represent paradigmatic examples of convergent evolution.

  6. Structure of giant muscle proteins

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Logan C.; Wright, Nathan T.

    2013-01-01

    Giant muscle proteins (e.g., titin, nebulin, and obscurin) play a seminal role in muscle elasticity, stretch response, and sarcomeric organization. Each giant protein consists of multiple tandem structural domains, usually arranged in a modular fashion spanning 500 kDa to 4 MDa. Although many of the domains are similar in structure, subtle differences create a unique function of each domain. Recent high and low resolution structural and dynamic studies now suggest more nuanced overall protein structures than previously realized. These findings show that atomic structure, interactions between tandem domains, and intrasarcomeric environment all influence the shape, motion, and therefore function of giant proteins. In this article we will review the current understanding of titin, obscurin, and nebulin structure, from the atomic level through the molecular level. PMID:24376425

  7. CMB lensing and giant rings

    SciTech Connect

    Rathaus, Ben; Itzhaki, Nissan E-mail: ben.rathaus@gmail.com

    2012-05-01

    We study the CMB lensing signature of a pre-inationary particle (PIP), assuming it is responsible for the giant rings anomaly that was found recently in the WMAP data. Simulating Planck-like data we find that generically the CMB lensing signal to noise ratio associated with such a PIP is quite small and it would be difficult to cross correlate the temperature giant rings with the CMB lensing signal. However, if the pre-inationary particle is also responsible for the bulk flow measured from the local large scale structure, which happens to point roughly at the same direction as the giant rings, then the CMB lensing signal to noise ratio is fairly significant.

  8. Giant lobelias exemplify convergent evolution

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Giant lobeliads on tropical mountains in East Africa and Hawaii have highly unusual, giant-rosette growth forms that appear to be convergent on each other and on those of several independently evolved groups of Asteraceae and other families. A recent phylogenetic analysis by Antonelli, based on sequencing the widest selection of lobeliads to date, raises doubts about this paradigmatic example of convergent evolution. Here I address the kinds of evidence needed to test for convergent evolution and argue that the analysis by Antonelli fails on four points. Antonelli's analysis makes several important contributions to our understanding of lobeliad evolution and geographic spread, but his claim regarding convergence appears to be invalid. Giant lobeliads in Hawaii and Africa represent paradigmatic examples of convergent evolution. PMID:20074322

  9. Atmospheres of Extrasolar Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marley, M. S.; Fortney, J.; Seager, S.; Barman, T.

    The key to understanding an extrasolar giant planet's spectrum - and hence its detectability and evolution - lies with its atmosphere. Now that direct observations of thermal emission from extrasolar giant planets (EGPs) are in hand, atmosphere models can be used to constrain atmospheric composition, thermal structure, and ultimately the formation and evolution of detected planets. We review the important physical processes that influence the atmospheric structure and evolution of EGPs and consider what has already been learned from the first generation of observations and modeling. We pay particular attention to the roles of cloud structure, metallicity, and atmospheric chemistry in affecting detectable properties through Spitzer Space Telescope observations of the transiting giant planets. Our review stresses the uncertainties that ultimately limit our ability to interpret EGP observations. Finally we will conclude with a look to the future as characterization of multiple individual planets in a single stellar system leads to the study of comparative planetary architectures.

  10. The frequency of giant planets around metal-poor stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortier, A.; Santos, N. C.; Sozzetti, A.; Mayor, M.; Latham, D.; Bonfils, X.; Udry, S.

    2012-07-01

    Context. The discovery of about 700 extrasolar planets, so far, has lead to the first statistics concerning extrasolar planets. The presence of giant planets seems to depend on stellar metallicity and mass. For example, they are more frequent around metal-rich stars, with an exponential increase in planet occurrence rates with metallicity. Aims: We analyzed two samples of metal-poor stars (-2.0 ≤ [Fe/H] ≤ 0.0) to see if giant planets are indeed rare around these objects. Radial velocity datasets were obtained with two different spectrographs (HARPS and HIRES). Detection limits for these data, expressed in minimum planetary mass and period, are calculated. These produce trustworthy numbers for the planet frequency. Methods: A general Lomb-Scargle (GLS) periodogram analysis was used together with a bootstrapping method to produce the detection limits. Planet frequencies were calculated based on a binomial distribution function within metallicity bins. Results: Almost all hot Jupiters and most giant planets should have been found in these data. Hot Jupiters around metal-poor stars have a frequency lower than 1.0% at one sigma. Giant planets with periods up to 1800 days, however, have a higher frequency of fp = 2.63-0.8+2.5%. Taking into account the different metallicities of the stars, we show that giant planets appear to be very frequent (fp = 4.48-1.38+4.04%) around stars with [Fe/H] > - 0.7, while they are rare around stars with [Fe/H] ≤ - 0.7 ( ≤ 2.36% at one sigma). Conclusions: Giant planet frequency is indeed a strong function of metallicity, even in the low-metallicity tail. However, the frequencies are most likely higher than previously thought. The data presented herein are based on observations collected at the La Silla Parana Observatory, ESO (Chile) with the HARPS spectrograph at the 3.6-m telescope (ESO runs ID 72.C-0488, 082.C-0212, and 085.C-0063) and at the W. M. Keck Observatory that is operated as a scientific partnership among the

  11. Review of Giant cell arteritis

    PubMed Central

    Chacko, Joseph G.; Chacko, J. Anthony; Salter, Michael W.

    2014-01-01

    Giant-cell arteritis (GCA) is a systemic autoimmune disease affecting primarily the elderly. Giant cell arteritis can cause sudden and potentially bilateral sequential vision loss in the elderly. Therefore, it is considered a medical emergency in ophthalmology and a significant cause of morbidity in an increasingly aging population. Ophthalmologists need to be able to recognize the classic symptoms and signs of this disease, and then be able to work-up and treat these patients in an efficient manner. An in-depth review of GCA from the literature as well as personal clinical experience follows. PMID:25859139

  12. Calculation of the energy loss for an electron passing near giant fullerenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henrard, L.; Lambin, Ph

    1996-11-01

    We present a theoretical analysis of the electron energy-loss spectra of isolated giant fullerenes. We use a macroscopic dielectric description of spherical onion-like fullerenes and a discrete dipole approximation (DDA) framework for tubular fullerenes. In the DDA model, an anisotropic dynamical polarizability is assigned to each carbon site. We stress the fundamental importance of the hollow character of giant fullerenes in the electron energy-loss resonances.

  13. Charting the Giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-06-01

    zero expansion asymptotically after an infinite time and has a flat geometry). All three observational tests by means of supernovae (green), the cosmic microwave background (blue) and galaxy clusters converge at a Universe around Ωm ~ 0.3 and ΩΛ ~ 0.7. The dark red region for the galaxy cluster determination corresponds to 95% certainty (2-sigma statistical deviation) when assuming good knowledge of all other cosmological parameters, and the light red region assumes a minimum knowledge. For the supernovae and WMAP results, the inner and outer regions corespond to 68% (1-sigma) and 95% certainty, respectively. References: Schuecker et al. 2003, A&A, 398, 867 (REFLEX); Tonry et al. 2003, ApJ, 594, 1 (supernovae); Riess et al. 2004, ApJ, 607, 665 (supernovae) Galaxy clusters are far from being evenly distributed in the Universe. Instead, they tend to conglomerate into even larger structures, "super-clusters". Thus, from stars which gather in galaxies, galaxies which congregate in clusters and clusters tying together in super-clusters, the Universe shows structuring on all scales, from the smallest to the largest ones. This is a relict of the very early (formation) epoch of the Universe, the so-called "inflationary" period. At that time, only a minuscule fraction of one second after the Big Bang, the tiny density fluctuations were amplified and over the eons, they gave birth to the much larger structures. Because of the link between the first fluctuations and the giant structures now observed, the unique REFLEX catalogue - the largest of its kind - allows astronomers to put considerable constraints on the content of the Universe, and in particular on the amount of dark matter that is believed to pervade it. Rather interestingly, these constraints are totally independent from all other methods so far used to assert the existence of dark matter, such as the study of very distant supernovae (see e.g. ESO PR 21/98) or the analysis of the Cosmic Microwave background (e

  14. Giant right atrial thrombi treated with thrombolysis

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Bailén, Manuel; López-Caler, Carmen; Castillo-Rivera, Ana; Rucabado-Aguilar, Luis; Cuadra, José Ángel Ramos; Toral, Juan Lara; Cabezas, Cristobal Lozano; Guerrero, Juan Carlos Fernández

    2008-01-01

    The present report describes giant atrial thrombi that were treated with thrombolysis in a community hospital. Two patients with giant atrial thrombi whose treatment involved complications are presented. Both patients developed cardiogenic shock and were treated unsuccessfully with thrombolysis. Because thrombolysis of giant thrombi may be ineffective, patients in this situation may require surgery. PMID:18401474

  15. Cabergoline treatment in invasive giant prolactinoma.

    PubMed

    Alsubaie, Sadeem; Almalki, Mussa H

    2014-01-01

    Patients with invasive giant prolactinoma suffer from a constellation of symptoms including headache, blurred vision, lethargy, and sexual dysfunction. Cabergoline, a potent dopamine agonist, is a known medication prescribed for the treatment of invasive giant prolactinoma. Here, we report a case of invasive giant prolactinoma in a 52-year-old Saudi male with dramatic response to cabergoline treatment clinically, biochemically, and radiologically.

  16. Giant right atrial thrombi treated with thrombolysis.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Bailén, Manuel; López-Caler, Carmen; Castillo-Rivera, Ana; Rucabado-Aguilar, Luis; Ramos Cuadra, José Angel; Lara Toral, Juan; Lozano Cabezas, Cristobal; Fernández Guerrero, Juan Carlos

    2008-04-01

    The present report describes giant atrial thrombi that were treated with thrombolysis in a community hospital. Two patients with giant atrial thrombi whose treatment involved complications are presented. Both patients developed cardiogenic shock and were treated unsuccessfully with thrombolysis. Because thrombolysis of giant thrombi may be ineffective, patients in this situation may require surgery.

  17. Symplastic/pseudoanaplastic giant cell tumor of the bone

    PubMed Central

    Agaram, Narasimhan; Hwang, Sinchun; Lu, Chao; Wang, Lu; Healey, John; Hameed, Meera

    2016-01-01

    Objective Giant cell tumor of bone (GCTB) is a locally aggressive primary bone tumor. Its malignant counterpart is quite rare. Rarely, a conventional GCTB shows marked nuclear atypia, referred to as symplastic/pseudoanaplastic change, which can mimic sarcomatous transformation. Recently, somatic driver mutations of histone H3.3 exclusively in H3F3A have been described in GCTB. We report a series of 9 cases of GCTB with symplastic/pseudoanaplastic change, along with analysis of H3F3A variants. Materials and methods Nine cases of GCTB with symplastic change were identified. Clinico-radiological features, morphological features, and immunohistochemical stain for Ki-67 stain were reviewed. H3F3A variants were also analyzed using Sanger sequencing. Results Histologically, conventional giant cell tumor areas with scattered foci of markedly atypical cells were seen in all of the cases and all showed rare if any Ki-67 labeling. One patient had received denosumab treatment and another radiation therapy. Radiological features were characteristic of conventional GCTB. Mutation in H3F3A (p.Gly34Trp [G34W]) was found in 6 of the 7 cases. Clinical follow-up ranged from 6 to 208 months. Local recurrences were seen in 4 cases (44 %). Conclusions GCTB with symplastic/pseudoanaplastic change is an uncommon variant of conventional GCTB, which can mimic primary sarcoma or sarcomatous transformation. These tumors possess the same missense mutation in histone H3.3 as conventional GCTB. PMID:27020452

  18. Evaluation of stem injection for managing giant reed (Arundo donax).

    PubMed

    Spencer, David F

    2014-01-01

    Giant reed is an emergent aquatic plant that may be weedy in riparian habitats. Two herbicides approved for controlling giant reed in the US are glyphosate (N-(phosphonomethyl) glycine) and imazapyr (2-[4,5-dihydro-4-methyl-4-(1-methylethyl)-5-oxo-1H-imidazol-2-yl]-3-pyridinecarboxylic acid). Foliar applications of these herbicides may be restricted in some areas, such as those, which are within the range of threatened or endangered species. We conducted two field experiments at sites in northern and central California. The first experiment evaluated the effects of three aquatic herbicides (glyphosate, imazapyr, and triclopyr [(3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinyl)oxy]acetic acid) injected into all of the stems within a giant reed (5 mL stem(-1)). In this experiment, leaf chlorophyll content, the proportion of living stems, and the number of new stems produced during the year after treatment declined (>80%) following injection of either full strength glyphosate or imazapyr. The effects of injecting full strength triclopyr were considerably less. In a second experiment, different proportions (0, 10%, 25%, or 100%) of the stems within a plant were injected with full strength glyphosate. Results indicated that it was necessary to inject all of the stems within a clump to achieve the greatest reduction in the plant growth characteristics measured. These results imply that giant reed may be successfully controlled by injecting full strength glyphosate (5 mL stem(-1)) into all of the stems within a clump. While labor intensive and thus potentially more costly this method, offers a new method for managing giant reed in sensitive sites where foliar spray applications may be restricted.

  19. Excitation and photon decay of giant multipole resonances - the role and future of medium-energy heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Bertrand, F.E.; Beene, J.R.; Horen, D.J.

    1988-01-01

    Inelastic scattering of medium energy heavy ions provides very large cross sections and peak-to-continuum ratios for excitation of giant resonances. For energies above about 50 MeV/nucleon, giant resonances are excited primarily through Coulomb excitation, which is indifferent to isospin, thus providing a good probe for the study of isovector giant resonances. The extremely large cross sections available from heavy ion excitation permit the study of rare decay modes of the photon decay of giant resonances following excitation by 22 and 84 MeV/nucleon /sup 17/O projectiles. The singles results at 84 MeV/nucleon yield peak cross sections for the isoscalar giant quadrupole resonance and the isovector giant dipole resonance of approximately 0.8 and 3 barns/sr, respectively. Data on the ground state decay of the isoscalar giant quadrupole and isovector giant dipole resonances are presented and compared with calculations. Decays to low-lying excited states are also discussed. Preliminary results from an experiment to isolate the /sup 208/Pb isovector quadrupole resonance using its gamma decay are presented.

  20. Saturn: A Giant Thrust into Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    Saturn: A Giant Thrust into Space. The film provides an introduction and overview of the Saturn launch vehicle. It is designed with stages to drop off as fuel is spent. There may be two, three, or four stages, depending on the payload. The Saturn rocket will be used to send Apollo missions to the Moon and back. Guidance systems and booster engine rockets are based on proven mechanisms. Scale models are used to test the engines. Hardware, airframes, guidance systems, instrumentation, and the rockets are produced at sites throughout the country. The engines go to Marshall Space Flight Center for further tests. After partial assembly, the vehicle is shipped to Cape Canaveral in large pieces where it is assembled using specially built equipment and structures. Further trials are performed to assure successful launches. [Entire movie available on DVD from CASI as Doc ID 20070030961. Contact help@sti.nasa.gov

  1. Giant ureteric and staghorn calculi in a young adult Nigerian male: a case report.

    PubMed

    Gali, B M; Ali, A; Ibrahim, A G; Bakari, A; Minoza, K

    2010-01-01

    Ureteric calculi are usually small and solitary.The term giant has been applied to ureteric calculi that aremore than five cms in length and/or 50g or more in weight. These are uncommon and may present with few or no urological symptoms and might be ignored or be missed. To present a rare case of a giant left ureteric calculus associated with an ipsilateral staghorn calculus. A 31-year-old Nigerian male presented with recurrent left abdominal pain, dysuria, urinary frequency, and fever which had been on for 10 years. Patient was clinically evaluated. He had plain abdominal X-rays, abdominal ultrasonography and intravenous urography. He had to undergo nephrouterorectomy. Patient took analgesics and antibiotics purchased from patent chemist shops for relief of symptoms by himself. He was fit except for a hard cylindrical mass felt arising from the pelvis. Abdomino-pelvic ultrasound scan, plain abdominal X-ray and Intravenous urogram showed a giant ureteric calculus with an ipsilateral staghorn calculus in a nonfunctioning hydronephrotic left kidney. There was no evidence of underlying anatomic or metabolic abnormalities. He had left nephroureterectomy. The ureteric calculus measured 10.5 x 3.0cm and weighed 20.1gm. Giant ureteric calculi are rare. The association giant ureteric calculus with an ipsilateral staghorn renal calculus without underlying anatomic abnormalities appear not have been reported earlier.

  2. Giant Serpentine Aneurysms: Multidisciplinary Management

    PubMed Central

    Anshun, W.; Feng, L.; Daming, W.

    2000-01-01

    Summary Sixty-five cases of intracranial giant serpentine aneurysms (GSΛs), including 61 cases reported in the literature and four additional cases presented in this study were reviewed. The clinical presentation, possible causes, natural history, and especially management of GSAs are discussed with emphasis on the need for aggressive intervention and multidisciplinary management. PMID:20667180

  3. The giant panda gut microbiome.

    PubMed

    Wei, Fuwen; Wang, Xiao; Wu, Qi

    2015-08-01

    Giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) are bamboo specialists that evolved from carnivores. Their gut microbiota probably aids in the digestion of cellulose and this is considered an example of gut microbiota adaptation to a bamboo diet. However, this issue remains unresolved and further functional and compositional studies are needed.

  4. Controlling nucleation in giant liposomes.

    PubMed

    Tester, Chantel C; Whittaker, Michael L; Joester, Derk

    2014-05-30

    We introduce giant liposomes to investigate phase transformations in picoliter volumes. Precipitation of calcium carbonate in the confinement of DPPC liposomes leads to dramatic stabilization of amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC). In contrast, amorphous strontium carbonate (ASC) is a transient species, and BaCO3 precipitation leads directly to the formation of crystalline witherite.

  5. Tenosynovial Giant Cell Tumor Arising on the Scapular Region

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Asako; Ueno, Takashi; Takayama, Ryoko; Ansai, Shin-ichi; Futagami, Ayako; Kawana, Seiji

    2013-01-01

    Tenosynovial giant cell tumor (TSGCT) is a benign soft tissue tumor arising from the synovial membrane that composes the lining of joints, tendons and bursae. TSGCT is a common tumor occurring in the hands and fingers, and also consecutively in the knees, ankles, feet and hips. It is rarely found in the scapular region. To the best of our knowledge, only 2 cases arising on the upper back have been reported. This report presents the case of a 44-year-old Japanese female with a TSGCT arising on her right scapular region. PMID:24403889

  6. Incidental finding of a giant asymptomatic right atrial tumor

    PubMed Central

    Strecker, Thomas; Agaimy, Abbas; Zelzer, Peter; Weyand, Michael; Wachter, David Lukas

    2014-01-01

    Primary cardiac tumors are very rare, atrial myxoma being the most common benign tumor of the heart. They may present with a great variety of incidental asymptomatic masses to severe life-threatening cardiovascular complications necessitating emergency surgery. Here we report the diagnostic evaluation and successful surgical resection of such a giant cardiac tumor which was found on a routine medical check-up in a 62-year-old patient. Histology confirmed diagnosis of unusually huge myxoma. This article demonstrates it’s necessary to include cardiac tumors in the differential diagnosis of subtle and non-specific cardiothoracic symptoms. PMID:25120848

  7. Giant nontraumatic intradiploic arachnoid cyst in a young male*

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Rajesh; Gupta, Puneet; Mahajan, Manik; Sharma, Poonam; Gupta, Anchal; Khurana, Arti

    2016-01-01

    Intradiploic arachnoid cysts have scarcely been reported in the literature, most reported cases being secondary to trauma. Nontraumatic arachnoid cysts are quite rare and have been reported mostly in adults. Here, we report the case of a 16-year-old male presenting with a slowly growing mass in the occipital region and intermittent headaches. On the basis of the findings of X-rays, computed tomography scans, and magnetic resonance imaging scans of the head, the mass was diagnosed as a giant intradiploic arachnoid cyst. PMID:27818549

  8. Bone Deformities as a Complication of Giant Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Aslan, Ahmet; Kartal, Yiğitcan; Ayaz, Ercan; Aslan, Mine; Bulut, Safiye Sanem Dereli; Ağırbaşlı, Mehmet Ali; Oysu, Aslıhan Semiz

    2017-07-01

    The contained rupture of thoracic aortic aneurysm and related bone deformities is a rare condition. The diagnosis is critical due to potential and fatal complications. Radiologic evaluation is required to show the location, extension, and complications. Herein we present the X-ray radiography, ultrasonography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance images of a giant dissected and contained rupture of the thoracic aortic aneurysm. The aneurysm destructed the adjacent vertebrae and rib, resulting in compression of dural sac and spinal cord, and obliteration of the neural foramina. Our case demonstrates a gigantic expansion of an aneurysm (14 cm) with chronic skeletal complications.

  9. Giant cemento-ossifying fibroma of the mandible

    PubMed Central

    Naik, Raghavendra Mahadev; Guruprasad, Yadavalli; Sujatha, D; Gurudath, Shubha; Pai, Anuradha; Suresh, KV

    2014-01-01

    Cemento-ossifying fibroma (COF) is classified as a fibro-osseous neoplasm and included among the non-odontogenic tumors derived from the mesenchymal blast cells of the periodontal ligament, with a potential for forming fibrous tissue, cementum and bone, or a combination of such elements. These are slow-growing lesions, and are more frequent in women between the third and fourth decades of life. Case reports of massive expansile COF, measuring more than 10 cm are rarely reported in the literature. We report a case of giant cemento-ossifying fibroma of the mandible in a 34 year old female patient. PMID:24678226

  10. Giant cemento-ossifying fibroma of the mandible.

    PubMed

    Naik, Raghavendra Mahadev; Guruprasad, Yadavalli; Sujatha, D; Gurudath, Shubha; Pai, Anuradha; Suresh, Kv

    2014-01-01

    Cemento-ossifying fibroma (COF) is classified as a fibro-osseous neoplasm and included among the non-odontogenic tumors derived from the mesenchymal blast cells of the periodontal ligament, with a potential for forming fibrous tissue, cementum and bone, or a combination of such elements. These are slow-growing lesions, and are more frequent in women between the third and fourth decades of life. Case reports of massive expansile COF, measuring more than 10 cm are rarely reported in the literature. We report a case of giant cemento-ossifying fibroma of the mandible in a 34 year old female patient.

  11. Hepatic resection for primary giant leiomyoma of the liver

    PubMed Central

    Ciciliano, F; lannelli, A; Marano, I

    2001-01-01

    Background Smooth muscle tumours are common in the genito-urinary and gastro-intestinal tracts, but primary leiomyoma of the liver is extremely rare. Only a few cases have been reported to date. Case outline We report a case of giant leiomyoma of the liver in a 67-year-old woman that was treated by an extended right hepatectomy. There was no evidence of leiomyoma elsewhere in the abdomen (including the uterus). Discussion This appears to be the largest hepatic leiomyoma reported in the literature. PMID:18333008

  12. [Giant mesenteric lipoma in children: A case-report].

    PubMed

    Hida, M; Azahouani, A; Elazzouzi, D

    2017-03-27

    Mesenteric lipoma is an extremely rare disease in children. Fewer than 50 cases have been reported in the literature. Diagnosis is based on clinical examination, ultrasound, and computed tomography (CT). However, only the histological study of the specimen during laparotomy or laparoscopy can confirm the diagnosis. Thus, surgery, be it by laparotomy or laparoscopic, is both a means of exploration and treatment in mesenteric lipoma. We report on a case of giant lipoma of the mesentery in a 7-year-old girl presenting paroxysmal abdominal pain with a subocclusive syndrome lasting 1 week.

  13. A Giant Parietal Wall Hematoma: Unusual Complication of Laparoscopic Appendectomy

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Sanjay; Shetty, Sadanand V.

    2000-01-01

    Laparoscopic appendectomy is an established procedure in the treatment of appendicitis. Complications of the procedure are related to the Veress needle and trocar insertions or pertain to actual operative procedures. Trocar-related major bleeding is rare, and, if it occurs, is detected on the table or during the immediate postoperative period. Delay in recognition may lead to significant morbidity and mortality. We report a case of giant parietal wall hematoma in a 34-year-old female, presenting one week after discharge from the hospital. The hematoma was completely evacuated by exploration through paramedian incision, followed by an uneventful recovery. PMID:10987406

  14. The formation of giant low surface brightness galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Yehuda; Silk, Joseph; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.

    1992-01-01

    It is demonstrated that the initial structure of galaxies can be strongly affected by their large-scale environments. In particular, rare (about 3 sigma) massive galaxies in voids will have normal bulges, but unevolved, extended disks; it is proposed that the low surface brightness objects Malin I and Malin II are prototypes of this class of object. The model predicts that searches for more examples of 'crouching giants' should be fruitful, but that such galaxies do not provide a substantial fraction of mass in the universe. The identification of dwarf galaxies is relatively unaffected by their environment.

  15. Management considerations for giant congenital melanocytic nevi in adults.

    PubMed

    Green, Margaret C; Mitchum, Marsha D; Marquart, Jason D; Bingham, Jonathan L

    2014-04-01

    Giant congenital melanocytic nevi (GCMN) are a rare type of melanocytic nevus that covers a large body surface, often with satellite nevi scattered on the rest of the skin. There are several complications associated with GCMN, including malignant melanoma and neurocutaneous melanosis. The management of GCMN is very complex because of the cosmetic appearance and the associated psychological distress, the risk of severe complications, and the need for long-term follow-up. We report a case of a 43-year-old active-duty female with a GCMN reporting new and symptomatic satellite lesions with atypical features on dermoscopy.

  16. [Intrathoracic giant peripheral nerve sheath tumor during Von Recklinghausen disease].

    PubMed

    Ngabou, U D; Mounguengui, D; Owono Mbouengou, J P; El Wali, A; Nguema Edzang, B; Boguikouma, J B; Tchoua, R; Aziz, N E

    2014-06-01

    We report the case of a patient aged 23, admitted for bilateral intrathoracic tumor, including a giant right. Surgery was performed by right sternothoracotomy. After 7 days, she presented an irreversible cardiac arrest. The malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors are rare and aggressive. Their incidence is 0.001% in the general population and 0.16% in patients with neurofibromatosis type 1. These tumors are characterized by their risk of recurrence and poor prognosis. The treatment is the surgical resection. We analyze incidence, diagnosis and prognosis of these tumors.

  17. Giant Cervical Osteophyte: An Unusual Cause of Dysphagia

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Sudhir Kumar; Bhosale, Sunil Krishna; Aggarwal, Rishi Anil

    2016-01-01

    Dysphagia due to skeletal causes is a rare entity. A large cervical osteophyte can cause mechanical compression of the pharyngo-oesophageal segment leading to dysphagia. Large cervical osteophytes can occur in cervical spondylosis, ankylosing spondylitis or Diffuse Idiopathic Skeletal Hyperostosis (DISH). A 60-year-old female came with progressive dysphagia due to a giant cervical osteophyte anterior to C4 and C5 vertebral bodies causing compression of the pharyngo-oesophageal segment. The patient was treated by surgical excision of the osteophyte by orthopaedic surgeons. The patient had complete relief of dysphagia following excision of the osteophyte. PMID:27891363

  18. Nursery of Giants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Hidden behind a shroud of dust in the constellation Cygnus is a stellar nursery called DR21, which is giving birth to some of the most massive stars in our galaxy. Visible light images reveal no trace of this interstellar cauldron because of heavy dust obscuration. In fact, visible light is attenuated in DR21 by a factor of more than 10,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 (ten thousand trillion heptillion).

    New images from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope allow us to peek behind the cosmic veil and pinpoint one of the most massive natal stars yet seen in our Milky Way galaxy. The never-before-seen star is 100,000 times as bright as the Sun. Also revealed for the first time is a powerful outflow of hot gas emanating from this star and bursting through a giant molecular cloud.

    This image is a large-scale mosaic assembled from individual photographs obtained with the InfraRed Array Camera (IRAC) aboard Spitzer. The image covers an area about two times that of a full moon. The mosaic is a composite of images obtained at mid-infrared wavelengths of 3.6 microns (blue), 4.5 microns (green), 5.8 microns (orange) and 8 microns (red). The brightest infrared cloud near the top center corresponds to DR21, which presumably contains a cluster of newly forming stars at a distance of 10,000 light-years.

    Protruding out from DR21 toward the bottom left of the image is a gaseous outflow (green), containing both carbon monoxide and molecular hydrogen. Data from the Spitzer spectrograph, which breaks light into its constituent individual wavelengths, indicate the presence of hot steam formed as the outflow heats the surrounding molecular gas. Outflows are physical signatures of processes that create supersonic beams, or jets, of gas. They are usually accompanied by discs of material around the new star, which likely contain the materials from which future planetary systems are formed. Additional newborn stars, depicted in green, can be seen surrounding the

  19. Nursery of Giants

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-04-13

    Hidden behind a shroud of dust in the constellation Cygnus is a stellar nursery called DR21, which is giving birth to some of the most massive stars in our galaxy. Visible light images reveal no trace of this interstellar cauldron because of heavy dust obscuration. In fact, visible light is attenuated in DR21 by a factor of more than 10,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 (ten thousand trillion heptillion). New images from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope allow us to peek behind the cosmic veil and pinpoint one of the most massive natal stars yet seen in our Milky Way galaxy. The never-before-seen star is 100,000 times as bright as the Sun. Also revealed for the first time is a powerful outflow of hot gas emanating from this star and bursting through a giant molecular cloud. This image is a large-scale mosaic assembled from individual photographs obtained with the InfraRed Array Camera (IRAC) aboard Spitzer. The image covers an area about two times that of a full moon. The mosaic is a composite of images obtained at mid-infrared wavelengths of 3.6 microns (blue), 4.5 microns (green), 5.8 microns (orange) and 8 microns (red). The brightest infrared cloud near the top center corresponds to DR21, which presumably contains a cluster of newly forming stars at a distance of 10,000 light-years. Protruding out from DR21 toward the bottom left of the image is a gaseous outflow (green), containing both carbon monoxide and molecular hydrogen. Data from the Spitzer spectrograph, which breaks light into its constituent individual wavelengths, indicate the presence of hot steam formed as the outflow heats the surrounding molecular gas. Outflows are physical signatures of processes that create supersonic beams, or jets, of gas. They are usually accompanied by discs of material around the new star, which likely contain the materials from which future planetary systems are formed. Additional newborn stars, depicted in green, can be seen surrounding the DR21 region

  20. Polyomavirus (BK)-associated pleomorphic giant cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder: a case report.

    PubMed

    Alexiev, Borislav A; Papadimitriou, John C; Chai, Toby C; Ramos, Emilio; Staats, Paul N; Drachenberg, Cinthia B

    2013-04-01

    This report describes the morphological features of a pleomorphic giant cell carcinoma with focal trophoblastic differentiation of the urinary bladder in a male, 12 years post living related donor renal transplant. The voided urine cytology demonstrated rare decoy cells admixed with markedly atypical urothelial cell clusters, papillae and giant cells. Cystoprostatectomy demonstrated a nodular mass involving the trigone and right lateral-posterior wall, adjacent to the ureteral orifice. Hematoxylin-eosin stained sections showed two synchronous malignancies: (a) pleomorphic giant cell carcinoma with focal trophoblastic differentiation of the urinary bladder, metastatic to the omentum and (b) prostatic adenocarcinoma, Gleason score 3+4=7, involving the right prostate lobe. Strong diffuse expression of polyomavirus large T antigen was demonstrated in the primary and metastatic pleomorphic giant cell carcinoma, supporting a possible role for polyomavirus (BK) in the oncogenetic pathway. The prostatic adenocarcinoma was negative for polyomavirus large T antigen. Our findings of p63, CK7 and CK903 expression in pleomorphic giant cell carcinoma suggest that the tumor is of urothelial derivation. This is the first report describing the morphological features of urinary bladder pleomorphic giant cell carcinoma with trophoblastic differentiation, positive for polyomavirus large T antigen, arising in the background of BKV reactivation.

  1. Rare Disorders and Diseases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Umlauf, Mary; Monaco, Jana; FitzZaland, Mary; FitzZaland, Richard; Novitsky, Scott

    2008-01-01

    According to the National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD), a rare or "orphan" disease affects fewer than 200,000 people in the United States. There are more than 6,000 rare disorders that, taken together, affect approximately 25 million Americans. "Exceptional Parent" ("EP") recognizes that when a disorder affects a child or adult, it…

  2. Rare Disorders and Diseases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Umlauf, Mary; Monaco, Jana; FitzZaland, Mary; FitzZaland, Richard; Novitsky, Scott

    2008-01-01

    According to the National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD), a rare or "orphan" disease affects fewer than 200,000 people in the United States. There are more than 6,000 rare disorders that, taken together, affect approximately 25 million Americans. "Exceptional Parent" ("EP") recognizes that when a disorder affects a child or adult, it…

  3. Giant retroperitoneal sarcomas.

    PubMed

    Ianoşi, G; Neagoe, Daniela; Buteică, Elena; Ianoşi, Simona; Drighiciu, Corina; Stănoiu, B; Burada, F; Mercuţ, D

    2007-01-01

    Retroperitoneal sarcomas are rare malignant tumors, which are developing from mesenchymal stem cells residing in muscle, fat, and connective tissues. Underlying the rarity of this kind of tumors in general population, the aim of this paper is to present three cases of retroperitoneal sarcomas operated in Surgical Department of Military Hospital of Craiova (a retroperitoneal liposarcoma, a dedifferentiated liposarcoma and a malignant fibrous histiocytoma). From clinical point of view, we note the poverty of symptoms and non-specificity of these and a great tolerability of retroperitoneal space that offers the possibility for a great development of the tumor. CT-scan and MRI are the best investigations for diagnosis but surgical exploration is the best way for a good evaluation of these tumors. From histological point of view, we try to present new features about these kinds of tumors in order to classify them. Results of surgery correlated with complementary therapies were good without per-operative mortality or postoperative morbidity but we noted a recidive of one tumor (with different histological pattern) 21 months after the surgical intervention. The rarity of retroperitoneal sarcomas, combined with the vast array of histologic subtypes, has complicated our understanding of these tumors and impeded the development of effective therapies.

  4. Intraoperative squash cytology and histology of giant cell ependymoma: A diagnostic dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Cakir, Ebru; Kucuk, Ulku; Ersen, Ayca; Pala, Emel E; Senoglu, Mehmet; Binatli, Ali O; Yildirim, Zubeyde

    2017-01-01

    Giant cell ependymomas (GCE) are extremely rare tumors, with 24 cases described in the literature. Squash cytology is a rapid, reliable, simple technique for intraoperative consultation in neurosurgical practice. We describe a rare case of GCE arising at level of L4-L5 in a 66-year-old woman and discuss the cytologic/histologic features. Intraoperative smears were highly cellular with a prominent fibrillary background and exhibited papillary structures and sheets composed of highly atypical and bizarre cells. Some of the cells showed nuclear pseudoinclusions and rarely formed pseudorosette-like arrays. Intraoperative diagnosis was high grade glial tumor. On paraffin sections, besides extensive polymorphism, there were no microvascular proliferation, necrosis, and mitosis and the final diagnosis was WHO grade II GCE. GCE may be a diagnostic challenge on intraoperative smears, frozen, and paraffin sections. It must be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of giant cell exhibiting benign and malignant tumors of brain. PMID:28182061

  5. Giant Cell Reparative Granuloma of the Petrous Temporal Bone

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Joy C.; Thorell, William E.; Treves, John S.; Fidler, Mary E.; Moore, Gary F.; Leibrock, Lyal G.

    2000-01-01

    Giant cell reparative granuloma (GCRG) is an unusual, benign bone lesion that most commonly affects the maxilla and mandible; skull involvement is rare. The etiology is uncertain but may be related to trauma. GCRG is difficult to distinguish from giant cell tumor of the bone and has a lower recurrence rate. Thirteen reports of temporal bone GCRG in 11 patients have been reported. One report of a petrous GCRG in a 3-year-old girl has been identified. A 38-year-old male presented with a 2-year history of fullness in his left ear, ipsilateral hearing loss, and intermittent cacosmia. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed a large left-sided anterior temporal extradural mass. The patient underwent a left frontotemporal craniotomy and resection of a left temporal fossa tumor that involved the petrous and squamous parts of the temporal bone. The patient's post-operative course was uneventful, except for increased hearing loss secondary to opening of the epitympanum. Follow-up at one month revealed no other problems. Histopathology of the specimen was consistent with a giant cell reparative granuloma. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2p91-aFigure 3 PMID:17171108

  6. The first skull of the earliest giant panda

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Changzhu; Ciochon, Russell L.; Dong, Wei; Hunt, Robert M.; Liu, Jinyi; Jaeger, Marc; Zhu, Qizhi

    2007-01-01

    Fossils of the giant panda Ailuropoda (Order Carnivora, Family Ursidae) are largely isolated teeth, mandibles, and a few rare skulls, known from the late Pliocene to late Pleistocene in China and Southeast Asia. Much of this material represents a Pleistocene chronospecies, Ailuropoda baconi, an animal larger than the living giant panda, Ailuropoda melanoleuca. The earliest certain record of Ailuropoda is the late Pliocene chronospecies, Ailuropoda microta, smaller than either A. baconi or A. melanoleuca, and previously known only from teeth and a few mandibles from karst caves in south China. Here, we report the discovery of the first skull of A. microta, establishing its cranial anatomy and demonstrating that the specialized cranial and dental adaptations of Ailuropoda for durophagous feeding behavior centered on bamboo were already evident in this late Pliocene species. The skull from Jinyin cave (Guangxi) and dental remains from other karst localities in southeastern China show that Ailuropoda microta occupied south China from ≈2 to 2.4 Myr ago after a marked global climatic deterioration. Dental and basicranial anatomy indicate a less specialized morphology early in the history of the lineage and support derivation of the giant panda from the Miocene Asian ursid Ailurarctos PMID:17578912

  7. Giant congenital intercostal arteriovenous malformation with extensive involvement of chest wall and ribs: surgical experience.

    PubMed

    Parashi, Hrishikesh Sukhadeo; Bhosle, Krishnarao Narayan; Thakare, Nitin Dashrath; Sharma, Ajay; Potwar, Sushrut Suhas

    2013-06-01

    Intercostal arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are rare lesions. Review of literature shows that most reported cases are secondary to trauma or iatrogenic in origin. Congenital intercostal AVMs are extremely rare. We believe that only 1 case report of congenital intercostal arteriovenous malformation has been reported previously in the literature. We present an exceedingly rare case of giant congenital intercostal AVM in a young patient diagnosed on contrast-enhanced computed tomography of the thorax and treated by surgical resection of the involved chest wall and ribs with reconstruction of the surgical defect. Copyright © 2013 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Giant Perineal Condyloma Acuminatum (Buschke-Lowenstein Tumour): A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Badiu, D C; Manea, C A; Mandu, M; Chiperi, V; Marin, I E; Mehedintu, C; Popa, C C; David, O I; Bratila, E; Grigorean, V T

    2016-01-01

    The giant condyloma acuminatum, also known as Buschke- Lowenstein tumor (BLT), is a rare sexually-transmitted disease. Moreover, the condyloma acuminatum produced by Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) infection becomes one the most common sexually-transmitted infection which affects the perineal region. Under such situations, the first therapeutic option is surgical excision. The objective of this article is to present a case in which the tumor has reached giant dimensions and also to stress the importance of an in toto resection, taking into account the high rate of recurrence and the significant potential of malignant transformation of BLT. Celsius.

  9. Cabergoline-related impulse control disorder in an adolescent with a giant prolactinoma.

    PubMed

    Bulwer, C; Conn, R; Shankar, A; Ferrau, F; Kapur, S; Ederies, A; Korbonits, M; Spoudeas, H A

    2017-03-27

    Giant prolactinomas, rare in children, can have devastating endocrine, neurological and visual sequelae. Dopamine agonists (DA) are effective first-line therapy with few side-effects at doses usually used for prolactinoma treatment(1) , but higher-dose therapy for Parkinson's disease has well-recognized associations with impulse control disorders (ICD) including pathological gambling, impulsive eating, compulsive shopping and hypersexuality. Such associations are not well recognized with prolactinomas; to our knowledge this is the first reported case of hypersexuality in an adolescent receiving cabergoline for a giant prolactinoma. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  10. Dedifferentiated Giant-Cell Tumor of Bone with an Undifferentiated Round Cell Mesenchymal Component

    PubMed Central

    Estrada-Villaseñor, Eréndira G.; Cortés-González, Socorro; Linares-González, Luis Miguel; González-Guzmán, Roberto; Rico-Martínez, Genaro

    2014-01-01

    The dedifferentiated giant-cell tumor of the bone is a very rare variant of the giant-cell tumor (GCT). We report the clinical, radiographic and histological findings of a dedifferentiated GCT in which the dedifferentiated component consisted of small round cells. We also comment on previously reported cases of dedifferentiated GCT, discuss the clinical implications of this dual histology, and analyze the information published about the coexistence of similar genetic abnormalities in GCT and small round cell tumors of the bone. PMID:25276319

  11. Giant Angioleiomyoma of Knee Presenting as Painless Ulcer: The First Case Report.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Souradip; Chattopadhyay, Debarati; Dhiman, Pratibha; Gupta, Sandipan

    2015-01-01

    Angioleiomyomas are benign tumors originating in the vascular smooth muscle. The tumor typically presents as painful, solitary, small (<2 cm), slow growing, subcutaneous nodule. Angioleiomyoma of the knee is rare, and only few cases have been reported so far. We have described herein a giant angioleiomyoma of the knee presenting as a painless ulcer in a 22-year-old man. There was no intra-articular extension of the tumor, and total excision was curative. This is the first case report of giant angioleiomyoma of the knee as well as the first case report of angioleiomyoma presenting as a painless ulcerative lesion.

  12. Giant Herbig-Haro Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reipurth, Bo; Bally, John; Devine, David

    1997-12-01

    We present the discovery of a number of Herbig-Haro flows which extend over parsec-scale distances. The largest of these is the well known HH 111 jet complex, which is shown, through CCD images and a proper motion study, to have an angular extent of almost one degree on the sky, corresponding to 7.7 pc, making it the largest known HH flow. In our imaging survey we also found that T Tauri is at the center of a huge bipolar HH flow, HH 355, with a total extent of 38 arcmin, corresponding to 1.55 pc, and aligned with the axis of the tiny HH 255 flow surrounding the infrared companion T Tau S. We additionally have found a number of other giant HH flow candidates, including HH 315 at PV Cep, HH 41/295 at Haro 5a/6a, HH 300 in Bl8w, HH 354 in Li 165, HH 376 in Li 152, and HH 114/115 and HH 243/244/245/179 in the X Orionis molecular ring. It thus appears that it is common for HH flows to attain parsec-scale dimensions. The ubiquity of parsec-scale HH flows profoundly alters our view of the impact of young stars on their environment. Giant flows have dynamical ages comparable to the duration of the accretion phase of the sources, and provide a fossil record of their mass loss and accretion history. Multiple internal working surfaces and their S-shaped point symmetry provide evidence for variability of ejection velocity and orientation of the source jets. Giant HH flows are either longer or comparable in length to associated CO outflows, providing evidence for unified models in which HH flows power CO flows. Many giant flows have burst out of their source cloud cores and are dissociating molecules and injecting momentum and kinetic energy into the interclump medium of the host clouds. They contribute to the UV radiation field, and may produce C I and C ii in cloud interiors. Giant flows may contribute to the chemical rejuvenation of clouds, the generation of turbulent motions, and the self-regulation of star formation. The terminal working surfaces of giant flows may be

  13. The submillimeter giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, D. H.

    1985-08-01

    The construction of new radiotelescopes to study the 0.3-1 mm radio band is being carried out at arid and high altitude sites around the world to avoid absorption of the radiation by atmospheric water vapor. The band offers data on the distribution of astromonical molecules in dark and dust clouds and quasars. A 30-m dish is being built at 9300 ft altitude in southern Spain, a synthesis array at 8400 ft ASL in the French Alps, and a 15-m dish at La Silla. Kitt Peak has received a new 12-m-diameter reflector and three 10.4-m dishes are operating in Owens Valley in California. A 10.4-m submillimeter dish is being constructed on Mauna Kea in Hawaii. The need to protect the devices from distortions due to moisture and vibrations is spurring the use of composite materials to retain accuracies in the tens of microns in focusing.

  14. Case Study: Giant Cell Arteritis with Vertebral Artery Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Daniel Chomlak, R.; Ghazanfari, Farshad; Datta, Mineesh

    2016-01-01

    In giant cell arteritis (GCA), involvement of the vertebral arteries is rare with reported rates of 3%–4% for ischemic events secondary to vertebral artery stenosis or occlusion for those patients with GCA. This case study describes a patient who initially presented with acute onset of vertigo but was also found to have transient, side-alternating upper limb neurological findings. While initial imaging showed no vascular abnormalities, it was not until GCA was eventually confirmed with a temporal artery biopsy that the initial scans were shown to have bilateral narrowing of the vertebral arteries. While rare, vertebral artery involvement is an important complication to consider in the setting of GCA due to the high rate of associated mortality, despite immunosuppressive therapy. PMID:27279753

  15. Giant scrotal elephantiasis of inflammatory etiology: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Denzinger, Stefan; Watzlawek, Elke; Burger, Maximilian; Wieland, Wolf F; Otto, Wolfgang

    2007-01-01

    Background Scrotal lymphedema is rare outside endemic filariasis regions in Africa and Asia. It is of variable origin in the western world. Case presentation We present a case of a 40-year-old European man with massive elephantiasis of the scrotum attributed to chronic inflammation of the lower urinary tract caused by urinary outlet obstruction and diabetes mellitus. The patient underwent subtotal scrotectomy saving penis, testes and spermatic cords and followed by scrotal reconstruction with adequate cosmetic and functional outcome. Conclusion In this report we discuss a rare case of scrotal elephantiasis in an European patient, reflect on the etiology and the diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. Surgery can be successful even in giant scrotal elephantiasis. PMID:17543128

  16. Symptomatic giant adrenal myelolipoma associated with cholelithiasis: Two case reports

    PubMed Central

    Bano, Shahina; Yadav, Sachchida Nand; Chaudhary, Vikas; Garga, Umesh Carga

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we have discussed about two cases of adrenal myelolipoma and aim to discuss the role of imaging in their diagnosis and their management. Different imaging techniques such as ultrasound, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging were used to aid in diagnosis in each of the cases. The findings have been highlighted here. In each of the cases, the diagnosis could be confirmed by imaging, and there was cholelithiasis seen associated with unilateral adrenal myelolipoma. Adrenal myelolipomas are rare, benign, non-functional tumors of adrenal gland. Most tumors are unilateral and small; bilateral, giant myelolipomas are extremely rare. The association of adrenal myelolipoma with gallstones is uncommon. To our knowledge only two cases of such an association have been reported in the literature. However, the possibility does exist and steps should be taken to ensure a complete diagnosis. Also, it is important to understand the key points which help us in diagnosing adrenal myelolipomas by imaging. PMID:22346105

  17. Long-term Cu stabilization and biomass yields of Giant reed and poplar after adding a biochar, alone or with iron grit, into a contaminated soil from a wood preservation site.

    PubMed

    Oustriere, Nadège; Marchand, Lilian; Lottier, Nathalie; Motelica, Mikael; Mench, Michel

    2017-02-01

    A 2-year pot experiment was carried out to examine the aging effect of biochar (B), alone or combined with iron grit (Z), on Cu stabilization and plant growth in a contaminated soil (964mg Cu kg(-1)) from a wood preservation site. The experiment consisted in 3 soil treatments, either planted with Arundo donax L. (Ad) or Populus nigra L. (Pn): (1) untreated Cu-contaminated soil (Ad, Pn); (2) Unt+1% (w/w) B (AdB, PnB), and (3) Unt+1% B+1% Z (AdBZ, PnBZ). After 22months, the soil pore water (SPW) was sampled and roots and shoots were harvested. The SPW compositions at 3 and 22months were compared, showing that the SPW Cu(2+) concentration increased again in the PnB and PnBZ soils. Cultivation of A. donax enhanced the dissolved organic matter concentration in the SPW, which decreased its Cu(2+) concentration but promoted its total Cu concentration in the Ad and AdB soils. Adding Z with B reduced both SPW Cu(2+) and Cu concentrations in the pots cultivated by A. donax and P. nigra as compared to B alone. The B and BZ treatments did not enhance root and shoot yields of both plant species as compared to the Unt soil but their shoot Cu concentrations were in the range of common values. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Superficial temporal artery-middle cerebral artery bypass surgery in a pediatric giant intracranial aneurysm presenting as migraine-like episodes.

    PubMed

    Goedee, H S; Depauw, P R A M; vd Zwam, B; Temmink, A H

    2009-02-01

    Aneurysms of the intracranial arteries in the pediatric population are reportedly rare. There is a male predominance, association with connective tissue disorders, as well as bacterial, mycotic infections, and trauma. Common sites of presentation are the internal carotid artery bifurcation, posterior circulation, and distal segment of middle cerebral artery. Clinical manifestations can vary from seizures and subarachnoidal hemorrhage to headache, irritability, lethargy, vomiting, or focal motor deficits. Current treatment modalities encompass endovascular or surgical approach. We present a case report on an 11-year-old girl with migraine-like episodes due to an underlying giant fusiform middle cerebral artery aneurysm treated successfully with two superficial temporal artery-middle cerebral artery bypasses.

  19. Giant cell arteritis among Hispanic Americans.

    PubMed

    Lam, Byron L; Wirthlin, Robert S; Gonzalez, Ariadna; Dubovy, Sander R; Feuer, William J

    2007-01-01

    To compare the prevalence and clinical course of giant cell arteritis (GCA) among Hispanic and non-Hispanic patients. Comparative case series. Two hundred fifty-seven consecutive patients who underwent temporal artery biopsy in our institution from 1996 to 2002 were studied. A prospective telephone survey was conducted to determine race and Hispanic origin separately by means of methodology of the US Census Bureau. One hundred thirty-four patients completed the interview, with 65 (49%) identifying themselves as Hispanic and 69 (51%) as non-Hispanic. Of the 32 respondents with biopsy-proven GCA, all identified themselves racially as white, and 13 (41%) were Hispanic and 19 (59%) were non-Hispanic (P = .32). Statistically significant differences in age, presenting symptoms, and final visual acuity were not observed among Hispanic and non-Hispanic patients with GCA. Although GCA has been reported to be rare in Hispanics, we found the prevalence and clinical course of GCA to be similar in Hispanic and non-Hispanic patients.

  20. Giant cell arteritis: Current treatment and management

    PubMed Central

    Ponte, Cristina; Rodrigues, Ana Filipa; O’Neill, Lorraine; Luqmani, Raashid Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoids remain the cornerstone of medical therapy in giant cell arteritis (GCA) and should be started immediately to prevent severe consequences of the disease, such as blindness. However, glucocorticoid therapy leads to significant toxicity in over 80% of the patients. Various steroid-sparing agents have been tried, but robust scientific evidence of their efficacy and safety is still lacking. Tocilizumab, a monoclonal IL-6 receptor blocker, has shown promising results in a number of case series and is now being tested in a multi-centre randomized controlled trial. Other targeted treatments, such as the use of abatacept, are also now under investigation in GCA. The need for surgical treatment is rare and should ideally be performed in a quiescent phase of the disease. Not all patients follow the same course, but there are no valid biomarkers to assess therapy response. Monitoring of disease progress still relies on assessing clinical features and measuring inflammatory markers (C-reactive protein and erythrocyte sedimentation rate). Imaging techniques (e.g., ultrasound) are clearly important screening tools for aortic aneurysms and assessing patients with large-vessel involvement, but may also have an important role as biomarkers of disease activity over time or in response to therapy. Although GCA is the most common form of primary vasculitis, the optimal strategies for treatment and monitoring remain uncertain. PMID:26090367