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Sample records for rare-earth element doped

  1. Rare earth elements in synthetic zircon. 1. synthesis, and rare earth element and phosphorus doping.

    SciTech Connect

    Hanchar, J. M.; Finch, R. J.; Hoskin, W. O.; Watson, E. B.; Cherniak, D. J.; Mariano, A. N.; Chemical Engineering; George Washington Univ.; Univ. of Canterbury; Australian National Univ.; Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst.

    2001-05-01

    Sedimentary mineral assemblages commonly contain detrital zircon crystals as part of the heavy-mineral fraction. Age spectra determined by U-Pb isotopic analysis of single zircon crystals within a sample may directly image the age composition--but not the chemical composition--of the source region. Rare earth element (REE) abundances have been measured for zircons from a range of common crustal igneous rock types from different tectonic environments, as well as kimberlite, carbonatite, and high-grade metamorphic rocks, to assess the potential of using zircon REE characteristics to infer the rock types present in sediment source regions. Except for zircon with probable mantle affinities, zircon REE abundances and normalized patterns show little intersample and intrasample variation. To evaluate the actual variation in detrital zircon REE composition in a true sediment of known mixed provenance, zircons from a sandstone sample from the Statfjord Formation (North Sea) were analyzed. Despite a provenance including high-grade metasediment and granitoids and a range in zircon age of 2.82 b.y., the zircon REEs exhibit a narrow abundance range with no systematic differences in pattern shape. These evidences show zircon REE patterns and abundances are generally not useful as indicators of provenance.

  2. Radioluminescence and thermoluminescence of rare earth element and phosphorus-doped zircon

    SciTech Connect

    Karali, T.; Can, N.; Townsend, P.D.; Rowlands, A.P.; Hanchar, J.M.

    2000-06-01

    The radioluminescence and thermoluminescence spectra of synthetic zircon crystals doped with individual trivalent rare earth element (REE) ions (Pr, Sm, Eu, Gd, Dy, Ho, Er, and Yb) and P are reported in the temperature range 25 to 673 K. Although there is some intrinsic UV/blue emission from the host lattice, the dominant signals are from the rare-earth sites, with signals characteristic of the REE{sup 3+} states. The shapes of the glow curves are different for each dopant, and there are distinct differences between glow peak temperatures for different rare-earth lines of the same element. Within the overall set of signals there are indications of linear trends in which some glow peak temperatures vary as a function of the ionic size of the rare earth ions. The temperature shifts of the peaks are considerable, up to 200{degree}, and much larger than those cited in other rare-earth-doped crystals of LaF{sub 3} and Bi{sub 4}Ge{sub 3}O{sub 12}. The data clearly suggest that the rare-earth ions are active both in the trapping and luminescence steps, and hence the TL occurs within localized defect complexes that include REE{sup 3+} ions.

  3. Scarcity of rare earth elements.

    PubMed

    de Boer, M A; Lammertsma, K

    2013-11-01

    Rare earth elements (REEs) are important for green and a large variety of high-tech technologies and are, therefore, in high demand. As a result, supply with REEs is likely to be disrupted (the degree of depends on the REE) in the near future. The 17 REEs are divided into heavy and light REEs. Other critical elements besides REEs, identified by the European Commission, are also becoming less easily available. Although there is no deficiency in the earth's crust of rare earth oxides, the economic accessibility is limited. The increased demand for REEs, the decreasing export from China, and geopolitical concerns on availability contributed to the (re)opening of mines in Australia and the USA and other mines are slow to follow. As a result, short supply of particularly terbium, dysprosium, praseodymium, and neodymium is expected to be problematic for at least the short term, also because they cannot be substituted. Recycling REEs from electronic waste would be a solution, but so far there are hardly any established REE recycling methods. Decreasing the dependency on REEs, for example, by identifying possible replacements or increasing their efficient use, represents another possibility.

  4. Scarcity of rare earth elements.

    PubMed

    de Boer, M A; Lammertsma, K

    2013-11-01

    Rare earth elements (REEs) are important for green and a large variety of high-tech technologies and are, therefore, in high demand. As a result, supply with REEs is likely to be disrupted (the degree of depends on the REE) in the near future. The 17 REEs are divided into heavy and light REEs. Other critical elements besides REEs, identified by the European Commission, are also becoming less easily available. Although there is no deficiency in the earth's crust of rare earth oxides, the economic accessibility is limited. The increased demand for REEs, the decreasing export from China, and geopolitical concerns on availability contributed to the (re)opening of mines in Australia and the USA and other mines are slow to follow. As a result, short supply of particularly terbium, dysprosium, praseodymium, and neodymium is expected to be problematic for at least the short term, also because they cannot be substituted. Recycling REEs from electronic waste would be a solution, but so far there are hardly any established REE recycling methods. Decreasing the dependency on REEs, for example, by identifying possible replacements or increasing their efficient use, represents another possibility. PMID:24009098

  5. Rare earth elements: end use and recyclability

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goonan, Thomas G.

    2011-01-01

    Rare earth elements are used in mature markets (such as catalysts, glassmaking, lighting, and metallurgy), which account for 59 percent of the total worldwide consumption of rare earth elements, and in newer, high-growth markets (such as battery alloys, ceramics, and permanent magnets), which account for 41 percent of the total worldwide consumption of rare earth elements. In mature market segments, lanthanum and cerium constitute about 80 percent of rare earth elements used, and in new market segments, dysprosium, neodymium, and praseodymium account for about 85 percent of rare earth elements used. Regardless of the end use, rare earth elements are not recycled in large quantities, but could be if recycling became mandated or very high prices of rare earth elements made recycling feasible.

  6. Rare Earth Element Mines, Deposits, and Occurrences

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Orris, Greta J.; Grauch, Richard I.

    2002-01-01

    Data on rare earth (including yttrium) mines, deposits, and occurrences were compiled as part of an effort by the USGS and the University of Arizona Center for Mineral Resources to summarize current knowledge on the supply and demand outlook and related topics for this group of elements. Economic competition and environmental concerns are increasingly constraining the mining and processing of rare earths from the Mountain Pass mine in California. For many years, the deposit at Mountain Pass was the world's dominant source of rare earth elements and the United States was essentially self-sufficient. Starting approximately 10 years ago, the U.S. has become increasingly dependent (> 90 percent of separated rare earths) upon imports from China, now the dominant source of rare earths. A knowledge of the known economic and noneconomic sources of rare earths is basic to evaluating the outlook for rare earth supply and associated issues.

  7. Role of vacancies, light elements and rare-earth metals doping in CeO2.

    PubMed

    Shi, H; Hussain, T; Ahuja, R; Kang, T W; Luo, W

    2016-01-01

    The magnetic properties and electronic structures of pure, doped and defective cerium oxide (CeO2) have been studied theoretically by means of ab initio calculations based on the density function theory (DFT) with the hybrid HF/DFT technique named PBE0. Carbon (C), nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), sulphur (S), lanthanum (La) and praseodymium (Pr) doped in CeO2 and CeO2 containing oxygen vacancies (Ov) were considered. Our spin-polarized calculations show that C, N, Pr dopants and Ov defects magnetize the non-magnetic CeO2 in different degree. The optical band gap related to photocatalysis for pure CeO2, corresponding to the ultraviolet region, is reduced obviously by C, N, S, Pr impurities and oxygen vacancies, shifting to the visible region and even further to the infrared range. Especially, N-, S- and Pr-doped CeO2 could be used to photocatalytic water splitting for hydrogen production. As the concentration of Ov increasing up to 5%, the CeO2 exhibits a half-metallic properties. PMID:27554285

  8. Role of vacancies, light elements and rare-earth metals doping in CeO2

    PubMed Central

    Shi, H.; Hussain, T.; Ahuja, R.; Kang, T. W.; Luo, W.

    2016-01-01

    The magnetic properties and electronic structures of pure, doped and defective cerium oxide (CeO2) have been studied theoretically by means of ab initio calculations based on the density function theory (DFT) with the hybrid HF/DFT technique named PBE0. Carbon (C), nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), sulphur (S), lanthanum (La) and praseodymium (Pr) doped in CeO2 and CeO2 containing oxygen vacancies (Ov) were considered. Our spin-polarized calculations show that C, N, Pr dopants and Ov defects magnetize the non-magnetic CeO2 in different degree. The optical band gap related to photocatalysis for pure CeO2, corresponding to the ultraviolet region, is reduced obviously by C, N, S, Pr impurities and oxygen vacancies, shifting to the visible region and even further to the infrared range. Especially, N-, S- and Pr-doped CeO2 could be used to photocatalytic water splitting for hydrogen production. As the concentration of Ov increasing up to 5%, the CeO2 exhibits a half-metallic properties. PMID:27554285

  9. Role of vacancies, light elements and rare-earth metals doping in CeO2.

    PubMed

    Shi, H; Hussain, T; Ahuja, R; Kang, T W; Luo, W

    2016-08-24

    The magnetic properties and electronic structures of pure, doped and defective cerium oxide (CeO2) have been studied theoretically by means of ab initio calculations based on the density function theory (DFT) with the hybrid HF/DFT technique named PBE0. Carbon (C), nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), sulphur (S), lanthanum (La) and praseodymium (Pr) doped in CeO2 and CeO2 containing oxygen vacancies (Ov) were considered. Our spin-polarized calculations show that C, N, Pr dopants and Ov defects magnetize the non-magnetic CeO2 in different degree. The optical band gap related to photocatalysis for pure CeO2, corresponding to the ultraviolet region, is reduced obviously by C, N, S, Pr impurities and oxygen vacancies, shifting to the visible region and even further to the infrared range. Especially, N-, S- and Pr-doped CeO2 could be used to photocatalytic water splitting for hydrogen production. As the concentration of Ov increasing up to 5%, the CeO2 exhibits a half-metallic properties.

  10. Role of vacancies, light elements and rare-earth metals doping in CeO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, H.; Hussain, T.; Ahuja, R.; Kang, T. W.; Luo, W.

    2016-08-01

    The magnetic properties and electronic structures of pure, doped and defective cerium oxide (CeO2) have been studied theoretically by means of ab initio calculations based on the density function theory (DFT) with the hybrid HF/DFT technique named PBE0. Carbon (C), nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), sulphur (S), lanthanum (La) and praseodymium (Pr) doped in CeO2 and CeO2 containing oxygen vacancies (Ov) were considered. Our spin-polarized calculations show that C, N, Pr dopants and Ov defects magnetize the non-magnetic CeO2 in different degree. The optical band gap related to photocatalysis for pure CeO2, corresponding to the ultraviolet region, is reduced obviously by C, N, S, Pr impurities and oxygen vacancies, shifting to the visible region and even further to the infrared range. Especially, N-, S- and Pr-doped CeO2 could be used to photocatalytic water splitting for hydrogen production. As the concentration of Ov increasing up to 5%, the CeO2 exhibits a half-metallic properties.

  11. Magnetocaloric effect in heavy rare-earth elements doped Fe-based bulk metallic glasses with tunable Curie temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jiawei; Huo, Juntao; Chang, Chuntao E-mail: dujun@nimte.ac.cn; Du, Juan E-mail: dujun@nimte.ac.cn; Man, Qikui; Wang, Xinmin; Li, Run-Wei; Law, Jiayan

    2014-08-14

    The effects of heavy rare earth (RE) additions on the Curie temperature (T{sub C}) and magnetocaloric effect of the Fe-RE-B-Nb (RE = Gd, Dy and Ho) bulk metallic glasses were studied. The type of dopping RE element and its concentration can easily tune T{sub C} in a large temperature range of 120 K without significantly decreasing the magnetic entropy change (ΔS{sub M}) and refrigerant capacity (RC) of the alloys. The observed values of ΔS{sub M} and RC of these alloys compare favorably with those of recently reported Fe-based metallic glasses with enhanced RC compared to Gd{sub 5}Ge{sub 1.9}Si{sub 2}Fe{sub 0.1}. The tunable T{sub C} and large glass-forming ability of these RE doped Fe-based bulk metallic glasses can be used in a wide temperature range with the final required shapes.

  12. Mineral resource of the month: rare earth elements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2011-01-01

    The article provides information on rare earth elements, which are group of 17 natural metallic elements. The rare earth elements are scandium, yttrium and lanthanides and classified into light rare earth elements (LREE) and heavy rate earth elements (HREE). The principal ores of the rare earth elements are identified. An overview of China's production of 97 percent of the rare earths in the world is provided. Commercial applications of rare earths are described.

  13. Removal of Phosphorus in Metallurgical Silicon by Rare Earth Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Kai; Løvvik, Ole Martin; Safarian, Jafar; Ma, Xiang; Tangstad, Merete

    2014-09-01

    Removal of phosphorus in metallurgical silicon is one of the crucial steps for the production of solar grade Si feedstock. The possibility of doping rare earth elements for phosphorus removal has in this work been studied both theoretically and experimentally. Thermochemical properties of Ce, Nd, and Pr monophosphides have first been estimated by ab initio thermodynamic simulations based on density functional theory and the direct phonon method. The reliability of the first principles calculations was assessed by coupling with the phase diagram data of the Pr-P system. Equilibrium calculations confirmed the existence of stable rare earth monophosphides in solid silicon. Experimental investigations were then carried out, employing a high temperature resistance furnace. The Ce-doped silicon samples were examined by electron probe micro analyzer and inductively coupled plasma analysis. The efficiency of phosphorus removal by means of rare earth doping was discussed in detail in the paper.

  14. Rare earth elements and permanent magnets (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dent, Peter C.

    2012-04-01

    Rare earth (RE) magnets have become virtually indispensible in a wide variety of industries such as aerospace, automotive, electronics, medical, and military. RE elements are essential ingredients in these high performance magnets based on intermetallic compounds RECo5, RE2TM17 (TM: transition metal), and RE2TM14B. Rare earth magnets are known for their superior magnetic properties—high induction, and coercive force. These properties arise due to the extremely high magnetocrystalline anisotropy made possible by unique 3d-4f interactions between transition metals and rare earths. For more than 40 years, these magnets remain the number one choice in applications that require high magnetic fields in extreme operating conditions—high demagnetization forces and high temperature. EEC produces and specializes in RECo5 and RE2TM17 type sintered magnets. Samarium and gadolinium are key RE ingredients in the powder metallurgical magnet production processes which include melting, crushing, jet milling, pressing, sintering, and heat treating. The magnetic properties and applications of these magnets will be discussed. We will also briefly discuss the past, current, and future of the permanent magnet business. Currently, over 95% of all pure rare earth oxides are sourced from China, which currently controls the market. We will provide insights regarding current and potential new magnet technologies and designer choices, which may mitigate rare earth supply chain issues now and into the future.

  15. What about the rare-earth elements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is insufficient understanding of the nutritional physiology of pecan trees and orchards; thus, affecting nutmeat yield and quality, disease resistance and alternate bearing. An analysis of the rare-earth element composition of pecan and related hickory cousins found that they hyperaccumulate ...

  16. Rare earth element systematics in hydrothermal fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Michard, A. )

    1989-03-01

    Rare earth element concentrations have been measured in hydrothermal solutions from geothermal fields in Italy, Dominica, Valles Caldera, Salton Sea and the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. The measured abundances show that hydrothermal activity is not expected to affect the REE balance of either continental or oceanic rocks. The REE enrichment of the solutions increases when the pH decreases. High-temperature solutions (> 230{degree}C) percolating through different rock types may show similar REE patterns.

  17. Anthropogenic Cycles of Rare Earth Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, X.; Graedel, T. E.

    2009-12-01

    This research will develop quantitatively resolved anthropogenic cycles and in-use stocks for the rare earth metals specifically cerium, lanthanum and dysprosium in Japan, China, and the U.S. for the year of 2007. Rare earth elements (REE) is a group of 17 scare metals widely used in a growing number of emerging technologies and have been in high demand for emerging technologies as raw materials during past the three decades. New market participants from newly industrializing countries, primarily China, have had strong impacts on the demand of share. Consequently, the importance to sustain a reliable, steady, uninterrupted supply on global market triggered comprehensive research to recognize and understand the life cycles of rare earths. Moreover, because China plays a dominant role in mining production since 1990, it requires the assessment for the countries, which are almost completely dependent on imports from China with respect to rare earth resources. The study aims to analyze the flows and stocks of rare earth elements individually as elemental form in spite of their natural geological co-occurrence and mixed composition in applications. By applying the method of Material Flow Analysis (MFA) work has been done on evaluating current and historical flows of specific technologically significant materials, for example, copper, zinc, nickel, etc., determining the stocks available in different types of reservoirs (e.g., lithosphere, in-use) and the flows among the reservoirs, developing scenarios of possible futures of metal use, and assessing the environmental and policy implications of the results. Therefore, REE as a new target deserves inclusion because of its potential demand-supply conflict and importance to secure the competitive advantage of technical innovation in future. This work will generate a quantitatively resolved anthropogenic life cycle and in-use stocks for REE for the main target countries for a chosen year, 2007, providing flows and stocks from

  18. Rare earth doped zinc oxide varistors

    DOEpatents

    McMillan, A.D.; Modine, F.A.; Lauf, R.J.; Alim, M.A.; Mahan, G.D.; Bartkowiak, M.

    1998-12-29

    A varistor includes a Bi-free, essentially homogeneous sintered body of a ceramic composition including, expressed as nominal weight %, 0.2--4.0% oxide of at least one rare earth element, 0.5--4.0% Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}, 0.05--0.4% K{sub 2}O, 0.05--0.2% Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 0--0.2% CaO, 0.00005--0.01% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 0--2% MnO, 0--0.05% MgO, 0--0.5% TiO{sub 3}, 0--0.2% SnO{sub 2}, 0--0.02% B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, balance ZnO. 4 figs.

  19. Rare earth doped zinc oxide varistors

    DOEpatents

    McMillan, April D.; Modine, Frank A.; Lauf, Robert J.; Alim, Mohammad A.; Mahan, Gerald D.; Bartkowiak, Miroslaw

    1998-01-01

    A varistor includes a Bi-free, essentially homogeneous sintered body of a ceramic composition including, expressed as nominal weight %, 0.2-4.0% oxide of at least one rare earth element, 0.5-4.0% Co.sub.3 O.sub.4, 0.05-0.4% K.sub.2 O, 0.05-0.2% Cr.sub.2 O.sub.3, 0-0.2% CaO, 0.00005-0.01% Al.sub.2 O.sub.3, 0-2% MnO, 0-0.05% MgO, 0-0.5% TiO.sub.3, 0-0.2% SnO.sub.2, 0-0.02% B.sub.2 O.sub.3, balance ZnO.

  20. Note: Portable rare-earth element analyzer using pyroelectric crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Imashuku, Susumu Fuyuno, Naoto; Hanasaki, Kohei; Kawai, Jun

    2013-12-15

    We report a portable rare-earth element analyzer with a palm-top size chamber including the electron source of a pyroelectric crystal and the sample stage utilizing cathodoluminescence (CL) phenomenon. The portable rare-earth element analyzer utilizing CL phenomenon is the smallest reported so far. The portable rare-earth element analyzer detected the rare-earth elements Dy, Tb, Er, and Sm of ppm order in zircon, which were not detected by scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis. We also performed an elemental mapping of rare-earth elements by capturing a CL image using CCD camera.

  1. Rare earth element diffusion in apatite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherniak, D. J.

    2000-11-01

    Diffusion of rare earth elements (REEs) in natural and synthetic fluorapatite has been characterized under anhydrous conditions. Three types of experiments were run. In the first set of experiments, Sm was introduced into the apatite by means of ion implantation, with diffusivities extracted through measurement of the "relaxation" of the implanted profile after diffusion anneals. The second group consisted of "in diffusion" experiments, in which apatite was immersed in reservoirs of synthetic REE apatite analogs of various compositions. The final set of experiments was "out-diffusion" experiments run on synthetic Nd-doped apatite immersed in a reservoir of synthetic (undoped) fluorapatite. REE depth profiles in all cases were measured with Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry. Diffusion rates for the REE vary significantly among these sets of experiments. For the ion-implantation experiments, the following Arrhenius relation was obtained for Sm, over the temperature range 750°C to 1100°C: D imp=6.3×10-7exp(-298±17 kJ/mol/RT) m2/s Diffusion of a series of REE, from light to heavy, was investigated in the "in-diffusion" experiments. Over the temperature range 800°C to 1250°C, the following Arrhenius relations are obtained for La, Nd, Dy, and Yb, for in-diffusion experiments using REE silicate oxyapatite sources: D La=2.6×10-7exp(-324±9 kJ/mol/RT) m2/sD Nd=2.4×10-6exp(-348±13 kJ/mol/RT) m2/sD Dy=9.7×10-7exp(-340±11 kJ/mol/RT) m2/sD Yb=1.3×10-8exp(-292±23 kJ/mol/RT) m2/s Diffusivities of the REE in these "in-diffusion" experiments are all quite similar, suggesting little difference in diffusion rates in apatite with increasing ionic radii of the REEs. The "out-diffusion" experiments on the Nd-doped synthetic apatite, over the temperature range 950°C to 1400°C, yield the Arrhenius law: D out=9.3×10-6exp(-392±31 kJ/mol/RT) m2/s The differences in REE diffusion among these three sets of experiments (i.e., ion implantation, in-diffusion, and out

  2. Tunable, rare earth-doped solid state lasers

    DOEpatents

    Emmett, John L.; Jacobs, Ralph R.; Krupke, William F.; Weber, Marvin J.

    1980-01-01

    Laser apparatus comprising combinations of an excimer pump laser and a rare earth-doped solid matrix, utilizing the 5d-4f radiative transition in a rare earth ion to produce visible and ultra-violet laser radiation with high overall efficiency in selected cases and relatively long radiative lifetimes.

  3. Rare earth elements in river waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, Steven J.; Jacobsen, Stein B.

    1988-01-01

    To characterize the input to the oceans of rare earth elements (REE) in the dissolved and the suspended loads of rivers, the REE concentrations were measured in samples of Amazon, Indus, Mississippi, Murray-Darling, and Ohio rivers and in samples of smaller rivers that had more distinct drainage basin lithology and water chemistry. It was found that, in the suspended loads of small rivers, the REE pattern was dependent on drainage basin geology, whereas the suspended loads in major rivers had relatively uniform REE patterns and were heavy-REE depleted relative to the North American Shale composite (NASC). The dissolved loads in the five major rivers had marked relative heavy-REE enrichments, relative to the NASC and the suspended material, with the (La/Yb)N ratio of about 0.4 (as compared with the ratio of about 1.9 in suspended loads).

  4. [Biological effects of rare earth elements and their action mechanisms].

    PubMed

    He, Yuejun; Xue, Li

    2005-10-01

    This paper reviewed the effects of rare earth elements on plant root development, biomass, quality, and resistance against stress. Applying appropriate amount of rare earth elements could not only promote seed germination and root development, increase plant biomass, but also improve harvest quality and plant resistance against stress. The plant uptake characteristics of rare earth elements, as well as their contents, distribution, existing forms, and cytolocalization in plants were discussed, with the focus on the effects of rare earth elements on photosynthesis and chlorophyll formation, nutrient uptake, relationships between rare earth elements and calcium, and action mechanisms of rare earth elements on cell membrane and enzymes. Rare earth elements could enhance chlorophyll content and improve photosynthetic rate, and thus, could increase plant biomass. When an appropriate amount of rare earth elements was applied, the uptake of nutrients by plant and their transformation and utilization were promoted. Rare earth elements could replace calcium ion to participate in enzymatic reactions, maintain the osmosis and stability of cell membrane, promote the protection function of cell membrane, and enhance the plant resistance capability against stress. In the end, further researches on rare earth elements were suggested.

  5. Mimicking the magnetic properties of rare earth elements using superatoms.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shi-Bo; Berkdemir, Cuneyt; Castleman, A W

    2015-04-21

    Rare earth elements (REs) consist of a very important group in the periodic table that is vital to many modern technologies. The mining process, however, is extremely damaging to the environment, making them low yield and very expensive. Therefore, mimicking the properties of REs in a superatom framework is especially valuable but at the same time, technically challenging and requiring advanced concepts about manipulating properties of atom/molecular complexes. Herein, by using photoelectron imaging spectroscopy, we provide original idea and direct experimental evidence that chosen boron-doped clusters could mimic the magnetic characteristics of REs. Specifically, the neutral LaB and NdB clusters are found to have similar unpaired electrons and magnetic moments as their isovalent REs (namely Nd and Eu, respectively), opening up the great possibility in accomplishing rare earth mimicry. Extension of the superatom concept into the rare earth group not only further shows the power and advance of this concept but also, will stimulate more efforts to explore new superatomic clusters to mimic the chemistry of these heavy atoms, which will be of great importance in designing novel building blocks in the application of cluster-assembled nanomaterials. Additionally, based on these experimental findings, a novel "magic boron" counting rule is proposed to estimate the numbers of unpaired electrons in diatomic LnB clusters. PMID:25848014

  6. Mimicking the magnetic properties of rare earth elements using superatoms

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Shi-Bo; Berkdemir, Cuneyt; Castleman, A. W.

    2015-01-01

    Rare earth elements (REs) consist of a very important group in the periodic table that is vital to many modern technologies. The mining process, however, is extremely damaging to the environment, making them low yield and very expensive. Therefore, mimicking the properties of REs in a superatom framework is especially valuable but at the same time, technically challenging and requiring advanced concepts about manipulating properties of atom/molecular complexes. Herein, by using photoelectron imaging spectroscopy, we provide original idea and direct experimental evidence that chosen boron-doped clusters could mimic the magnetic characteristics of REs. Specifically, the neutral LaB and NdB clusters are found to have similar unpaired electrons and magnetic moments as their isovalent REs (namely Nd and Eu, respectively), opening up the great possibility in accomplishing rare earth mimicry. Extension of the superatom concept into the rare earth group not only further shows the power and advance of this concept but also, will stimulate more efforts to explore new superatomic clusters to mimic the chemistry of these heavy atoms, which will be of great importance in designing novel building blocks in the application of cluster-assembled nanomaterials. Additionally, based on these experimental findings, a novel “magic boron” counting rule is proposed to estimate the numbers of unpaired electrons in diatomic LnB clusters. PMID:25848014

  7. Mimicking the magnetic properties of rare earth elements using superatoms.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shi-Bo; Berkdemir, Cuneyt; Castleman, A W

    2015-04-21

    Rare earth elements (REs) consist of a very important group in the periodic table that is vital to many modern technologies. The mining process, however, is extremely damaging to the environment, making them low yield and very expensive. Therefore, mimicking the properties of REs in a superatom framework is especially valuable but at the same time, technically challenging and requiring advanced concepts about manipulating properties of atom/molecular complexes. Herein, by using photoelectron imaging spectroscopy, we provide original idea and direct experimental evidence that chosen boron-doped clusters could mimic the magnetic characteristics of REs. Specifically, the neutral LaB and NdB clusters are found to have similar unpaired electrons and magnetic moments as their isovalent REs (namely Nd and Eu, respectively), opening up the great possibility in accomplishing rare earth mimicry. Extension of the superatom concept into the rare earth group not only further shows the power and advance of this concept but also, will stimulate more efforts to explore new superatomic clusters to mimic the chemistry of these heavy atoms, which will be of great importance in designing novel building blocks in the application of cluster-assembled nanomaterials. Additionally, based on these experimental findings, a novel "magic boron" counting rule is proposed to estimate the numbers of unpaired electrons in diatomic LnB clusters.

  8. Promising wastewater treatment using rare earth-doped nanoferrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, M. A.; Bishay, Samiha T.; Khafagy, Rasha M.; Saleh, N. M.

    2014-01-01

    Single-phases of the spinel nanoferrites Zn0.5Co0.5Al0.5R0.04Fe1.46O4; R=Sm, Pr, Ce and La, were synthesized using the flash auto combustion method. X-ray diffraction (XRD) results indicated that doping nanoferrites with small concentrations of rare earth elements (RE) allowed their entrance to the spinel lattice. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) images revealed that doping with different RE elements resulted in the formation of different nanometric shapes such as nanospheres and nanowires. Doping with Sm3+ and Ce3+ resulted in the formation of nanospheres with average diameter of 14 and 30 nm respectively. In addition to the granular nanospheres, doping with Pr3+ and La3+ resulted in the formation of some nanowires with different aspect ratios (average length of ≈100 nm and diameter of ≈9 nm) and (average length of ≈150 nm and outer diameter of ≈22 nm) respectively. At fixed temperature, the Ac conductivity (σ) increased as the RE ionic radius increases except for Ce, due to the role of valance fluctuation from Ce3+ to Ce4+ ions. La- and Pr-doped nanoferrites showed the highest ac conductivity values, which is most probably due to the presence of large numbers of nanowires in these two types of ferrites. For all entire samples, the effective magnetic moment (μeff) decreased, while the Curie temperature (TC) increased as the RE ionic radius increases. The synthesized rare earth nanoferrites showed promising results in purifying colored wastewater. La-doped ferrite was capable for up-taking 92% of the dye content, followed by Pr-doped ferrite, which adsorbed 85% of the dye, while Sm- and Ce-doped ferrites showed lower dye removal efficiency of 80% and 72% respectively. High dye uptake shown by La- and Pr-doped ferrites is most probably due to the presence of nanowires and their higher Ac conductivity values. These excellent results were not previously reported.

  9. Rare Earth Doped Magnetic Clusters of Gold for Medical Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Brahm Deo; Kumar, Vijay

    2011-03-01

    In recent years gold clusters have been studied extensively due to their unusual properties and applications in cancer treatment and catalysis. Small gold clusters having up to 15 atoms are planar as shown in figure 1. Thereafter a transition occurs to 3D structures but the atomic structures continue to have high dispersion. Doping of these clusters could transform them in to new structures and affect the properties. Gold clusters with cage structures such as W@Au12 can be prepared with large highest occupied-lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (HOMO-LUMO) gap by doping with a transition metal atom such as W. By changing the transition metal atom, cage structures of different sizes as well as different HOMO-LUMO gaps can be formed which could be useful in different optical applications. In these structures gold clusters are generally non-magnetic. However, it is also possible to form magnetic clusters of gold such as Gold clusters have been found to be good for cancer treatment. We have performed ab initio calculations on doping of rare earths in small gold clusters to obtain magnetic clusters using projector augmented wave pseudopotential method within generalized gradient approximation for the exchange-correlation energy. Elemental gold clusters having up to 15 atoms are planar and thereafter 3D structures become favorable. We have explored the changes in the growth behavior when a rare earth atom is doped and studied the variation in the magnetic behavior as a function of size. Our results suggest that gold clusters may have twin advantage of treating cancer as well as be helful in magnetic imaging such as by MRI.

  10. Rare earth elements in Hamersley BIF minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alibert, Chantal

    2016-07-01

    Minerals from the Hamersley banded iron formation, Western Australia, were analyzed for Y and rare earth elements (YREEs) by laser ablation ICP-MS to investigate diagenetic pathways, from precursor phases to BIF minerals. One group of apatites carries the seawater REE signature, giving evidence that P and REEs, thoroughly scavenged from the water column by Si-ferrihydrite particles, were released upon microbial Fe3+ reductive dissolution of Si-ferrihydrite in pore-water and finally sequestered mainly in authigenic apatite. The absence of fractionation between apatite and seawater suggests that REE were first incorporated into an amorphous calcium phosphate as fully hydrated cations, i.e. as outer-sphere complexes. The iron oxides and carbonates carry only a small fraction of the whole-rock REE budget. Their REE patterns are distinctly enriched in Yb and show some M-type tetrad effect consistent with experimental Kd(REE) between solid and saline solution with low carbonate ion concentrations. It is deduced that hematite formed at an incipient stage of Fe2+-catalyzed dissolution of Si-ferrihydrite, via a dissolution-reprecipitation pathway. The REE pattern of greenalite, found as sub-micron particles in quartz in a chert-siderite sample, is consistent with its authigenic origin by precipitation in pore-water after dissolution of a small amount of Si-ferrihydrite. Magnetite carries very low YREEs (ppb-level), has an homogeneous pattern distinctly enriched in the mid-REEs compared to hematite, and includes a late population depleted in light-REEs, Ba and As. Magnetite forming aggregates and massive laminae is tentatively interpreted as reflecting some fluid-aided hematite-magnetite re-equilibration or transformation at low-grade metamorphic temperatures.

  11. Rare Earth Doped High Temperature Ceramic Selective Emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L.; Pal, AnnaMarie; Patton, Martin O.; Jenkins, Phillip P.

    1999-01-01

    As a result of their electron structure, rare earth ions in crystals at high temperature emit radiation in several narrow bands rather than in a continuous blackbody manner. This study develops a spectral emittance model for films of rare earth containing materials. Although there are several possible rare earth doped high temperature materials, this study was confined to rare earth aluminum garnets. Good agreement between experimental and theoretical spectral emittances was found for erbium, thulium and erbium-holmium aluminum garnets. Spectral emittances of these films are sensitive to temperature differences across the film. Emitter efficiency is also a sensitive function of temperature. For thulium aluminum garnet the efficiency is 0.38 at 1700 K but only 0.19 at 1262 K.

  12. Rare earths and other trace elements in Luna 16 soil.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helmke, P. A.; Haskin, L. A.

    1972-01-01

    An analysis has been made of four small samples of material brought to earth by the Luna 16 mission, with the aim to determine rare earths and other trace elements in these samples. The analytical results are tabulated, and the rare earth abundances are compared with the average for chondrites. A comparison is also made with the results of similar analyses of Apollo samples.

  13. [Content of rare earth elements in wild Hypericum japonicum Thunb].

    PubMed

    Wei, Zhen-Lin; Rui, Yu-Kui; Tian, Zhi-Huan

    2009-06-01

    Rare earth elements are important nutritional elements for human health, and today more and more attention has been paid to the effective components in Chinese traditional medicine, especially to rare earth elements. Fifteen rare earth elements in wild hypericum japonicum Thunb were analyzed by the methods of ICP-MS. The results showed that the concentrations of La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Yb, Tm, Lu and Y ranged from 6 ng x g(-1) x DW to 14 522 ng x g(-1) x DW, and among them the concentrations of La, Ce and Nd were higher than 2 000 ng x g(-1) x DW. Compared with the concentration of rare earth elements in rice, corn, wheat and barley, the total concentration of rare earth elements in hypericum japonicum Thunb was much higher, which could be the mechanism of curative effect of hypericum japonicum Thunb on liverish diseases. The character of elements and the content of rare earth elements in soil should be responsible for the difference, but the distributive mechanism of rare earth elements in hypericum japonicum Thunb should be further studied.

  14. Photoluminescence characteristics of rare earth-doped nanoporous aluminum oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Azevedo, W. M.; de Carvalho, D. D.; de Vasconcelos, E. A.; da Silva, E. F.

    2004-07-01

    In this work we present photoluminescence characterization of rare earth ion-doped nanoporous aluminum oxide synthesized by the anodization process in diverse solvents. We find that the luminescence of doped aluminum oxide strongly depends on the synthesis medium. When synthesized in an inorganic acid only rare earth fluorescence is present, whereas nanoporous aluminum oxide synthesized in organic solvent presents two strong unexpected luminescence emission lines, one at 429 nm and the other at 491 nm, with quite long decay time when excited with long wavelength ultraviolet light. The results suggest that light simulation of primary colors and chromaticity control of the emitted light can be done by the a combination of different rare earth ions present in the sample.

  15. Bioleaching of rare earth elements from monazite sand.

    PubMed

    Brisson, Vanessa L; Zhuang, Wei-Qin; Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

    2016-02-01

    Three fungal strains were found to be capable of bioleaching rare earth elements from monazite, a rare earth phosphate mineral, utilizing the monazite as a phosphate source and releasing rare earth cations into solution. These organisms include one known phosphate solubilizing fungus, Aspergillus niger ATCC 1015, as well as two newly isolated fungi: an Aspergillus terreus strain ML3-1 and a Paecilomyces spp. strain WE3-F. Although monazite also contains the radioactive element Thorium, bioleaching by these fungi preferentially solubilized rare earth elements over Thorium, leaving the Thorium in the solid residual. Adjustments in growth media composition improved bioleaching performance measured as rare earth release. Cell-free spent medium generated during growth of A. terreus strain ML3-1 and Paecilomyces spp. strain WE3-F in the presence of monazite leached rare earths to concentrations 1.7-3.8 times those of HCl solutions of comparable pH, indicating that compounds exogenously released by these organisms contribute substantially to leaching. Organic acids released by the organisms included acetic, citric, gluconic, itaconic, oxalic, and succinic acids. Abiotic leaching with laboratory prepared solutions of these acids was not as effective as bioleaching or leaching with cell-free spent medium at releasing rare earths from monazite, indicating that compounds other than the identified organic acids contribute to leaching performance.

  16. Multilayer Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC) Architectures Utilizing Rare Earth Doped YSZ and Rare Earth Pyrochlores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitt, Michael P.; Rai, Amarendra K.; Bhattacharya, Rabi; Zhu, Dongming; Wolfe, Douglas E.

    2014-01-01

    To allow for increased gas turbine efficiencies, new insulating thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) must be developed to protect the underlying metallic components from higher operating temperatures. This work focused on using rare earth doped (Yb and Gd) yttria stabilized zirconia (t' Low-k) and Gd2Zr2O7 pyrochlores (GZO) combined with novel nanolayered and thick layered microstructures to enable operation beyond the 1200 C stability limit of current 7 wt% yttria stabilized zirconia (7YSZ) coatings. It was observed that the layered system can reduce the thermal conductivity by approximately 45 percent with respect to YSZ after 20 hr of testing at 1316 C. The erosion rate of GZO is shown to be an order to magnitude higher than YSZ and t' Low-k, but this can be reduced by almost 57 percent when utilizing a nanolayered structure. Lastly, the thermal instability of the layered system is investigated and thought is given to optimization of layer thickness.

  17. Rare Earth Element Partition Coefficients from Enstatite/Melt Synthesis Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwandt, Craig S.; McKay, Gordon A.

    1997-01-01

    Enstatite (En(80)Fs(19)Wo(01)) was synthesized from a hypersthene normative basaltic melt doped at the same time with La, Ce, Nd, Sm, Eu, Dy, Er, Yb and Lu. The rare earth element concentrations were measured in both the basaltic glass and the enstatite. Rare earth element concentrations in the glass were determined by electron microprobe analysis with uncertainties less than two percent relative. Rare earth element concentrations in enstatite were determined by secondary ion mass spectrometry with uncertainties less than five percent relative. The resulting rare earth element partition signature for enstatite is similar to previous calculated and composite low-Ca pigeonite signatures, but is better defined and differs in several details. The partition coefficients are consistent with crystal structural constraints.

  18. Accumulation of rare earth elements by siderophore-forming Arthrobacter luteolus isolated from rare earth environment of Chavara, India.

    PubMed

    Emmanuel, E S Challaraj; Ananthi, T; Anandkumar, B; Maruthamuthu, S

    2012-03-01

    In this study, Arthrobacter luteolus, isolated from rare earth environment of Chavara (Quilon district, Kerala, India), were found to produce catechol-type siderophores. The bacterial strain accumulated rare earth elements such as samarium and scandium. The siderophores may play a role in the accumulation of rare earth elements. Catecholate siderophore and low-molecular-weight organic acids were found to be present in experiments with Arthrobacter luteolus. The influence of siderophore on the accumulation of rare earth elements by bacteria has been extensively discussed.

  19. Rare Earth Doped Semiconductors and Materials Research Society Symposium Proceedings, Volume 301

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballance, John

    1994-02-01

    The properties of rare earth ions in solids were studied in detail for decades, but until recently this work was restricted to dominantly ionic hosts such as fluorides and oxides, and to a lesser extent to more covalently bonded hosts, such as tetrahedral 2-6 semiconductors. The idea of rare earth elements incorporated into covalent semiconductors such as GaAs and Si may be traced to a short communication in 1963 by R.L. Bell (J. Appl. Phys. 34, 1563 (1963)) proposing a dc-pumped rare earth laser. At about the same time, three unpublished technical reports appeared as a result of U.S. Department of Defense sponsored research in rare earth doped Si, GaAs, and InP to fabricate LED's. Attempts by other researchers to identify sharp 4f specific emissions in these hosts essentially failed.

  20. Energetics of Rare Earth Doped Uranium Oxide Solid Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lei

    The physical and chemical properties of UO2 nuclear fuels are affected as fission products accumulate during irradiation. The lanthanides, a main group of fission products, form extensive solid solutions with uranium oxide in the fluorite structure. Thermodynamic studies of such solid solutions had been performed to obtain partial molar free energies of oxygen as a function of dopant concentration and temperature; however, direct measurement of formation enthalpies was hampered by the refractory nature of these oxides. In this work, high temperature oxide melt solution calorimetry was utilized to study the thermochemistry of various rare earth doped uranium oxide LnxU 1-xO2-0.5x+y (Ln = La, Y, Nd) over a wide range of dopant concentrations and oxygen contents. The sintered solid solutions were carefully characterized to determine their phase purity, chemical composition, and uranium oxidation state, with most of the materials in the oxygen excess regime. The enthalpies of formation of LnxU1-xO2-0.5x+y were calculated from the calorimetric data. The oxidation enthalpies of these solid solutions are similar to that of UO2. The formation enthalpies from constituent oxides (LnO1.5, UO2, and UO3) become increasingly negative with addition of dopant cations and appear relatively independent of the uranium oxidation state (oxygen content) when the type and concentration of the dopants are the same. This is valid in the oxygen excess regime; thus an estimation of formation enthalpies of LnxU1-xO2 materials can be made. The formation enthalpies from elements of hyperstoichiometric LnxU1-xO 2-0.5x+y materials obtained from calorimetric measurements are in good agreement with those calculated from free energy data. A direct comparison between the formation enthalpies from calorimetric study and computational research using density functional theory was also performed. The experimental and computational energies of LnxU 1-xO2 (Ln = La, Y, Nd) generally agree within 10 k

  1. Optical properties of rare-earth-doped silicon nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hryciw, Aaron Christopher

    Silicon-based light-emitting materials show much promise for integrated photonics applications. In particular, nanocrystalline silicon can exhibit efficient visible emission, though the mechanism of luminescence is still the subject of some controversy. This thesis reports on the optical properties and device applications of silicon nanocomposite thin films with varying characteristics: amorphous and crystalline nanoclusters (NCs), both undoped and doped with rare-earth (RE) elements. Silicon nanocomposite thin films can be prepared by co-evaporation of Si, SiO, and/or SiO2 followed by annealing to induce phase separation. Such films typically exhibit a broad photoluminescence (PL) band centred between ˜600-800 nm. RE-doped a-Si-NC films can exhibit relatively sharp emission in the near infrared, with excitation cross-sections on the order of 10 -16 cm2 due to the sensitisation effect of the Si NCs---an increase in excitation efficiency by over five orders of magnitude compared with typical values for RE-doped SiO2. Er3+ in particular is important due to its emission at 1.5 mum, corresponding to the wavelength of minimum attenuation in conventional silica optical fibres. To demonstrate control over the spectral width and centre wavelength of emission for photonic applications, undoped and RE-doped a-Si-NC films have been incorporated into optical resonator structures (microcavities) with Ag mirrors. For a-Si films, the emission is tunable from 475 to 875 nm, extendable to 1630 nm upon the addition of Er. It is well known that Si NCs are capable of efficient energy transfer to many of the RE3+ ions; the specific nature of the non-radiative transfer process, however, has not been established with certainty. Efficient nanocluster-mediated excitation has been demonstrated for Nd-, Tb-, Dy-, Er-, Tm-, and Yb-doped a-Si-NC films. From luminescence modelling of ensembles of a-Si NCs, the observed quenching with increased annealing temperature can be accounted for by

  2. Rare Earth Doped Yttrium Aluminum Garnet (YAG) Selective Emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L.; Pal, AnnaMarie T.; Patton, Martin O.; Jenkins, Phillip P.

    1999-01-01

    As a result of their electron structure, rare earth ions in crystals at high temperature emit radiation in several narrow bands rather than in a continuous blackbody manner. This study presents a spectral emittance model for films and cylinders of rare earth doped yttrium aluminum garnets. Good agreement between experimental and theoretical film spectral emittances was found for erbium and holmium aluminum garnets. Spectral emittances of films are sensitive to temperature differences across the film. For operating conditions of interest, the film emitter experiences a linear temperature variation whereas the cylinder emitter has a more advantageous uniform temperature. Emitter efficiency is also a sensitive function of temperature. For holminum aluminum garnet film the efficiency is 0.35 at 1446K but only 0.27 at 1270 K.

  3. Photoluminescence in rare-earth doped As2S3 glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iovu, Mihai S.; Andriesh, Andrei M.; Culeac, Ion P.

    2005-02-01

    Chalcogenide glasses doped with various rare-earth ions are extensively studied as potential materials for fiber optic amplifiers operating at 1.3 and 1.5 μm telecommunication windows. The experimental results on optical absorption and photoluminescence of arsenic sulfide glasses and optical fibers doped with rare-earth elements (Pr3+, Sm3+, Er3+ and Dy3+) are presented. Near the absorption edge the rare-earth impurities affect strongly the slope and the magnitude of the week absorption tail. Fluorescence spectra of bulk samples and optical fibers of arsenic sulfide doped with different concentrations of Pr3+ and Dy3+ indicate on the presence of luminescent band located around 1.3 and 1.5 μm. These bands correspond to the electron transitions from the discrete levels (6F7/2&rarr:6H13/2 and 6F5/2&rarr6H11/2 for Dy3+ and 1G4/1&rarr3H6 and 3F3&rarr3H4 for Pr3+, respectively), and which confirmed the presence of trivalent rare-earth ions in the glass matrix. The observed effects of rare-earth dopants on the As2S3 glass are discussed in connection with the expected behavior of the impurities in the glass.

  4. Effects of spraying rare earths on contents of rare Earth elements and effective components in tea.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dongfeng; Wang, Changhong; Ye, Sheng; Qi, Hongtao; Zhao, Guiwen

    2003-11-01

    Rare earth (RE) fertilizer is widely applied in China to increase the yield and the quality of crops including tea. However, the effects of spraying RE fertilizer on the contents of rare earth elements (REE) and effective components in tea are unknown. The results from basin and field experiments show that the values of the REE concentrations in new shoots of tea plants and the concentration of REE in the soil (REE/REEs) either from control basins or from treatment basins were smaller than those in other parts of tea plant and similar between control and treatment. The longer the interval between spraying RE fertilizer and picking the shoots of tea plants, the less the effects from spraying. About 80% summation operator REE (the sum of the concentrations of 15 REE) in tea, whether it came from spraying or not, was insoluble in the infusion. About 10% the soluble REE of summation operator REE in tea infusion was bound to polysaccharide, and the amount of REE bound polysaccharide decreased over time. At least a 25 day safety interval is needed between spraying and picking if the microelement fertilizer is used, in order to enhance tea output and to ensure tea safety. PMID:14582968

  5. Magnetic Nanofluid Rare Earth Element Extraction Process Report, Techno Economic Analysis, and Results for Geothermal Fluids

    DOE Data Explorer

    Pete McGrail

    2016-03-14

    This GDR submission is an interim technical report and raw data files from the first year of testing on functionalized nanoparticles for rare earth element extraction from geothermal fluids. The report contains Rare Earth Element uptake results (percent removal, mg Rare Earth Element/gram of sorbent, distribution coefficient) for the elements of Neodymium, Europium, Yttrium, Dysprosium, and Cesium. A detailed techno economic analysis is also presented in the report for a scaled up geothermal rare earth element extraction process. All rare earth element uptake testing was done on simulated geothermal brines with one rare earth element in each brine. The rare earth element uptake testing was conducted at room temperature.

  6. Review on dielectric properties of rare earth doped barium titanate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, Fatin Adila; Osman, Rozana Aina Maulat; Idris, Mohd Sobri

    2016-07-01

    Rare earth doped Barium Titanate (BaTiO3) were studied due to high permittivity, excellent electrical properties and have wide usage in various applications. This paper reviewed on the electrical properties of RE doped BaTiO3 (RE: Lanthanum (La), Erbium (Er), Samarium (Sm), Neodymium (Nd), Cerium (Ce)), processing method, phase transition occurred and solid solution range for complete study. Most of the RE doped BaTiO3 downshifted the Curie temperature (TC). Transition temperature also known as Curie temperature, TC where the ceramics had a transition from ferroelectric to a paraelectric phase. In this review, the dielectric constant of La-doped BaTiO3, Er-doped BaTiO3, Sm-doped BaTiO3, Nd-doped BaTiO3 and Ce-doped BaTiO3 had been proved to increase and the transition temperature or also known as TC also lowered down to room temperature as for all the RE doped BaTiO3 except for Er-doped BaTiO3.

  7. Multi-objective optimization of chromatographic rare earth element separation.

    PubMed

    Knutson, Hans-Kristian; Holmqvist, Anders; Nilsson, Bernt

    2015-10-16

    The importance of rare earth elements in modern technological industry grows, and as a result the interest for developing separation processes increases. This work is a part of developing chromatography as a rare earth element processing method. Process optimization is an important step in process development, and there are several competing objectives that need to be considered in a chromatographic separation process. Most studies are limited to evaluating the two competing objectives productivity and yield, and studies of scenarios with tri-objective optimizations are scarce. Tri-objective optimizations are much needed when evaluating the chromatographic separation of rare earth elements due to the importance of product pool concentration along with productivity and yield as process objectives. In this work, a multi-objective optimization strategy considering productivity, yield and pool concentration is proposed. This was carried out in the frame of a model based optimization study on a batch chromatography separation of the rare earth elements samarium, europium and gadolinium. The findings from the multi-objective optimization were used to provide with a general strategy for achieving desirable operation points, resulting in a productivity ranging between 0.61 and 0.75 kgEu/mcolumn(3), h(-1) and a pool concentration between 0.52 and 0.79 kgEu/m(3), while maintaining a purity above 99% and never falling below an 80% yield for the main target component europium. PMID:26375205

  8. Multi-objective optimization of chromatographic rare earth element separation.

    PubMed

    Knutson, Hans-Kristian; Holmqvist, Anders; Nilsson, Bernt

    2015-10-16

    The importance of rare earth elements in modern technological industry grows, and as a result the interest for developing separation processes increases. This work is a part of developing chromatography as a rare earth element processing method. Process optimization is an important step in process development, and there are several competing objectives that need to be considered in a chromatographic separation process. Most studies are limited to evaluating the two competing objectives productivity and yield, and studies of scenarios with tri-objective optimizations are scarce. Tri-objective optimizations are much needed when evaluating the chromatographic separation of rare earth elements due to the importance of product pool concentration along with productivity and yield as process objectives. In this work, a multi-objective optimization strategy considering productivity, yield and pool concentration is proposed. This was carried out in the frame of a model based optimization study on a batch chromatography separation of the rare earth elements samarium, europium and gadolinium. The findings from the multi-objective optimization were used to provide with a general strategy for achieving desirable operation points, resulting in a productivity ranging between 0.61 and 0.75 kgEu/mcolumn(3), h(-1) and a pool concentration between 0.52 and 0.79 kgEu/m(3), while maintaining a purity above 99% and never falling below an 80% yield for the main target component europium.

  9. Method to Recover Media Ligand Losses During Sorption of Rare Earth Elements from Simulated Geothermal Brines

    DOE Data Explorer

    Dean Stull

    2016-05-24

    This document describes the method and results of an in-situ experiment used to confirm that ligand bleed from a sorptive media can be contained. The experiment focused on maintaining the media's sorption of rare earth elements (REE) obtained from a simulated geothermal brine doped with known mineral concentrations.

  10. Multicomponent, Rare-Earth-Doped Thermal-Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Robert A.; Zhu, Dongming

    2005-01-01

    Multicomponent, rare-earth-doped, perovskite-type thermal-barrier coating materials have been developed in an effort to obtain lower thermal conductivity, greater phase stability, and greater high-temperature capability, relative to those of the prior thermal-barrier coating material of choice, which is yttria-partially stabilized zirconia. As used here, "thermal-barrier coatings" (TBCs) denotes thin ceramic layers used to insulate air-cooled metallic components of heat engines (e.g., gas turbines) from hot gases. These layers are generally fabricated by plasma spraying or physical vapor deposition of the TBC materials onto the metal components. A TBC as deposited has some porosity, which is desirable in that it reduces the thermal conductivity below the intrinsic thermal conductivity of the fully dense form of the material. Undesirably, the thermal conductivity gradually increases because the porosity gradually decreases as a consequence of sintering during high-temperature service. Because of these and other considerations such as phase transformations, the maximum allowable service temperature for yttria-partially stabilized zirconia TBCs lies in the range of about 1,200 to 1,300 C. In contrast, the present multicomponent, rare-earth-doped, perovskite-type TBCs can withstand higher temperatures.

  11. Spectroscopic studies of Yb3+-doped rare earth orthosilicate crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos, S.; Denoyer, A.; Jandl, S.; Viana, B.; Vivien, D.; Loiseau, P.; Ferrand, B.

    2004-06-01

    Infrared transmission and Raman scattering have been used to study Raman active phonons and crystal-field excitations in Yb3+-doped yttrium, lutetium and scandium orthosilicate crystals (Y2SiO5 (YSO), Lu2SiO5 (LSO) and Sc2SiO5 (SSO)), which belong to the same C2h6 crystallographic space group. Energy levels of the Yb3+ ion 2F5/2 manifold are presented. In the three hosts, Yb3+ ions experience high crystal field strength, particularly in Yb:SSO. Satellites in the infrared transmission spectra have been detected for the first time in the Yb3+-doped rare earth orthosilicates. They could be attributed to perturbed Yb3+ sites of the lattices or to magnetically coupled Yb3+ pairs.

  12. Calculation of binary phase diagrams between the actinide elements, rare earth elements, and transition metal elements

    SciTech Connect

    Selle, J E

    1992-06-26

    Attempts were made to apply the Kaufman method of calculating binary phase diagrams to the calculation of binary phase diagrams between the rare earths, actinides, and the refractory transition metals. Difficulties were encountered in applying the method to the rare earths and actinides, and modifications were necessary to provide accurate representation of known diagrams. To calculate the interaction parameters for rare earth-rare earth diagrams, it was necessary to use the atomic volumes for each of the phases: liquid, body-centered cubic, hexagonal close-packed, and face-centered cubic. Determination of the atomic volumes of each of these phases for each element is discussed in detail. In some cases, empirical means were necessary. Results are presented on the calculation of rare earth-rare earth, rare earth-actinide, and actinide-actinide diagrams. For rare earth-refractory transition metal diagrams and actinide-refractory transition metal diagrams, empirical means were required to develop values for the enthalpy of vaporization for rare earth elements and values for the constant (C) required when intermediate phases are present. Results of using the values determined for each element are presented.

  13. Oxidation Effects in Rare Earth Doped Topological Insulator Thin Films.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, A I; van der Laan, G; Harrison, S E; Cibin, G; Hesjedal, T

    2016-01-01

    The breaking of time-reversal symmetry (TRS) in topological insulators is a prerequisite for unlocking their exotic properties and for observing the quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE). The incorporation of dopants which exhibit magnetic long-range order is the most promising approach for TRS-breaking. REBiTe3, wherein 50% of the Bi is substitutionally replaced by a RE atom (RE = Gd, Dy, and Ho), is a predicted QAHE system. Despite the low solubility of REs in bulk crystals of a few %, highly doped thin films have been demonstrated, which are free of secondary phases and of high crystalline quality. Here we study the effects of exposure to atmosphere of rare earth-doped Bi2(Se, Te)3 thin films using x-ray absorption spectroscopy. We demonstrate that these RE dopants are all trivalent and effectively substitute for Bi(3+) in the Bi2(Se, Te)3 matrix. We find an unexpected high degree of sample oxidation for the most highly doped samples, which is not restricted to the surface of the films. In the low-doping limit, the RE-doped films mostly show surface oxidation, which can be prevented by surface passivation, encapsulation, or in-situ cleaving to recover the topological surface state. PMID:26956771

  14. Oxidation Effects in Rare Earth Doped Topological Insulator Thin Films

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa, A. I.; van der Laan, G.; Harrison, S. E.; Cibin, G.; Hesjedal, T.

    2016-01-01

    The breaking of time-reversal symmetry (TRS) in topological insulators is a prerequisite for unlocking their exotic properties and for observing the quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE). The incorporation of dopants which exhibit magnetic long-range order is the most promising approach for TRS-breaking. REBiTe3, wherein 50% of the Bi is substitutionally replaced by a RE atom (RE = Gd, Dy, and Ho), is a predicted QAHE system. Despite the low solubility of REs in bulk crystals of a few %, highly doped thin films have been demonstrated, which are free of secondary phases and of high crystalline quality. Here we study the effects of exposure to atmosphere of rare earth-doped Bi2(Se, Te)3 thin films using x-ray absorption spectroscopy. We demonstrate that these RE dopants are all trivalent and effectively substitute for Bi3+ in the Bi2(Se, Te)3 matrix. We find an unexpected high degree of sample oxidation for the most highly doped samples, which is not restricted to the surface of the films. In the low-doping limit, the RE-doped films mostly show surface oxidation, which can be prevented by surface passivation, encapsulation, or in-situ cleaving to recover the topological surface state. PMID:26956771

  15. Uncovering the end uses of the rare earth elements.

    PubMed

    Du, Xiaoyue; Graedel, T E

    2013-09-01

    The rare earth elements (REE) are a group of fifteen elements with unique properties that make them indispensable for a wide variety of emerging and conventional established technologies. However, quantitative knowledge of REE remains sparse, despite the current heightened interest in future availability of the resources. Mining is heavily concentrated in China, whose monopoly position and potential restriction of exports render primary supply vulnerable to short term disruption. We have drawn upon the published literature and unpublished materials in different languages to derive the first quantitative annual domestic production by end use of individual rare earth elements from 1995 to 2007. The information is illustrated in Sankey diagrams for the years 1995 and 2007. Other years are available in the supporting information. Comparing 1995 and 2007, the production of the rare earth elements in China, Japan, and the US changed dramatically in quantities and structure. The information can provide a solid foundation for industries, academic institutions and governments to make decisions and develop strategies.

  16. Ion probe measurement of rare earth elements in biogenic phosphates

    SciTech Connect

    Grandjean, P.; Albarede, F. )

    1989-12-01

    The rare earth element (REE) distributions in individuals fish teeth and conodonts have been measured by ion probe. Concentrations and La/Yb ratios show little variations, except in the enamel, which suggests that REE uptake from the sedimented biogenic debris takes place at the water-sediment interface as an essentially quantitative process without fractionation. Late diagenetic disturbances remained of marginal importance. Hence, REE in phosphatic debris might reflect the input from the overlying water column.

  17. Ion probe measurement of rare earth elements in biogenic phosphates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grandjean, Patricia; Albarède, Francis

    1989-12-01

    The rare earth element (REE) distributions in individual fish teeth and conodonts have been measured by ion probe. Concentrations and La/Yb ratios show little variations, except in the enamel, which suggests that REE uptake from the sedimented biogenic debris takes place at the water-sediment interface as an essentially quantitative process without fractionation. Late diagenetic disturbances remained of marginal importance. Hence, REE in phosphatic debris might reflect the input from the overlying water column.

  18. Compositional and phase relations among rare earth element minerals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burt, D. M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper discusses the compositional and phase relationships among minerals in which rare earth elements (REE) occur as essential constituents (e.g., bastnaesite, monazite, xenotime, aeschynite, allanite). Particular consideration is given to the vector representation of complex coupled substitutions in selected REE-bearing minerals and to the REE partitioning between minerals as related to the acid-base tendencies and mineral stabilities. It is shown that the treatment of coupled substitutions as vector quantities facilitates graphical representation of mineral composition spaces.

  19. 40 CFR 721.10423 - Complex strontium aluminate, rare earth doped (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... earth doped (generic). 721.10423 Section 721.10423 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10423 Complex strontium aluminate, rare earth doped... substances identified generically as complex strontium aluminate, rare earth doped (PMNs P-12-22, P-12-23,...

  20. Influence of rare earth doping on thermoelectric properties of SrTiO{sub 3} ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, J. Wang, C. L.; Li, Y.; Su, W. B.; Zhu, Y. H.; Li, J. C.; Mei, L. M.

    2013-12-14

    Thermoelectric properties of SrTiO{sub 3} ceramics, doped with different rare earth elements, were investigated in this work. It's found that the ionic radius of doping elements plays an important role on thermoelectric properties: SrTiO{sub 3} ceramics doped with large rare earth ions (such as La, Nd, and Sm) exhibit large power factors, and those doped with small ions (such as Gd, Dy, Er, and Y) exhibit low thermal conductivities. Therefore, a simple approach for enhancing the thermoelectric performance of SrTiO{sub 3} ceramics is proposed: mainly doped with large ions to obtain a large power factor and, simultaneously, slightly co-doped with small ions to obtain a low thermal conductivity. Based on this rule, Sr{sub 0.8}La{sub 0.18}Yb{sub 0.02}TiO{sub 3} ceramics were prepared, whose ZT value at 1 023 K reaches 0.31, increasing by a factor of 19% compared with the single-doped counterpart Sr{sub 0.8}La{sub 0.2}TiO{sub 3} (ZT = 0.26)

  1. Coal fly ash as a resource for rare earth elements.

    PubMed

    Franus, Wojciech; Wiatros-Motyka, Małgorzata M; Wdowin, Magdalena

    2015-06-01

    Rare earth elements (REE) have been recognised as critical raw materials, crucial for many clean technologies. As the gap between their global demand and supply increases, the search for their alternative resources becomes more and more important, especially for the countries which depend highly on their import. Coal fly ash (CFA), which when not utilised is considered waste, has been regarded as the possible source of many elements, including REE. Due to the increase in the energy demand, CFA production is expected to grow, making research into the use of this material a necessity. As Poland is the second biggest coal consumer in the European Union, the authors have studied different coal fly ashes from ten Polish power plants for their rare earth element content. All the fly ashes have a broadly similar distribution of rear earth elements, with light REE being dominant. Most of the samples have REE content relatively high and according to Seredin and Dai (Int J Coal Geol 94: 67-93, 2012) classification can be considered promising REE raw materials. PMID:25613802

  2. Coal fly ash as a resource for rare earth elements.

    PubMed

    Franus, Wojciech; Wiatros-Motyka, Małgorzata M; Wdowin, Magdalena

    2015-06-01

    Rare earth elements (REE) have been recognised as critical raw materials, crucial for many clean technologies. As the gap between their global demand and supply increases, the search for their alternative resources becomes more and more important, especially for the countries which depend highly on their import. Coal fly ash (CFA), which when not utilised is considered waste, has been regarded as the possible source of many elements, including REE. Due to the increase in the energy demand, CFA production is expected to grow, making research into the use of this material a necessity. As Poland is the second biggest coal consumer in the European Union, the authors have studied different coal fly ashes from ten Polish power plants for their rare earth element content. All the fly ashes have a broadly similar distribution of rear earth elements, with light REE being dominant. Most of the samples have REE content relatively high and according to Seredin and Dai (Int J Coal Geol 94: 67-93, 2012) classification can be considered promising REE raw materials.

  3. Rare earth element patterns in biotite, muscovite and tourmaline minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Laul, J.C.; Lepel, E.A.

    1986-04-21

    Rare earth element concentrations in the minerals biotite and muscovite from the mica schist country rocks of the Etta pegmatite and tourmalines from the Bob Ingersoll pegmatite have been measured by INAA and CNAA. The concentrations range from 10/sup -4/ g/g to 10/sup -10g//sub g/. The REE patterns of biotite, muscovite and tourmaline reported herein are highly fractionated from light to heavy REE. The REE concentrations in biotite and muscovite are high and indigenous. The pegmatite tourmalines contain low concentrations of REE. Variations in tourmaline REE patterns reflect the geochemical evolution of pegmatite melt/fluid system during crystallization.

  4. Compositional and phase relations among rare earth element minerals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burt, D. M.

    1989-01-01

    A review is presented that mainly treats minerals in which the rare-earth elements are essential constituents, e.g., bastnaesite, monazite, xenotime, aeschynite, allanite. The chemical mechanisms and limits of REE substitution in some rock-forming minerals (zircon, apatite, titanite, garnet) are also derived. Vector representation of complex coupled substitutions in selected REE-bearing minerals is examined and some comments on REE-partitioning between minerals as related to acid-based tendencies and mineral stabilities are presented. As the same or analogous coupled substitutions involving the REE occur in a wide variety of mineral structures, they are discussed together.

  5. Rare earth element content of cryptocrystalline magnesites of Konya, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zedef, Veysel; Russell, Michael

    2016-04-01

    We examined the rare earth element content of several cryptocrystalline magnesites as well as hydromagnesite, host rock serpentinites, lake water and hot spring water from Turkey. Southwestern Turkey hosts cryptocrystalline magnesites, sedimentary magnesites with presently forming, biologically mediated hydromagnesites and travertines. Our results show the REE content of the minerals, rocks and waters are well below detection limits. One hydromagnesite sample from Lake Salda has slightly high La (2.38ppb), Ce (3.91 ppb) and Nd (1.68 ppb) when compared to other samples, but these are also still below detection limits of the method we followed.

  6. Performance evaluation of Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) for quantitative analysis of rare earth elements in phosphate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devangad, Praveen; Unnikrishnan, V. K.; Nayak, Rajesh; Tamboli, M. M.; Muhammed Shameem, K. M.; Santhosh, C.; Kumar, G. A.; Sardar, D. K.

    2016-02-01

    In the current study, we have determined the elemental compositions of synthesized rare earth doped phosphate glasses using a laboratory Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) system. LIBS spectra of this rare earth (samarium (Sm), thulium (Tm) and ytterbium (Yb)) doped glass samples with known composition are recorded using a highly sensitive detector. Major atomic emission lines of Sm, Tm and Yb found in LIBS spectra are reported. By considering the atomic emission line of phosphorous as an internal standard, calibration curves were constructed for all the rare earth concentrations. Very good linear regression coefficient (R2) values were obtained using this technique. Analytical predictive skill of LIBS was studied further using leave-one-out method. Low values of the reported correlation uncertainty between measured LIBS concentration ratio and certified concentration ratio confirms that LIBS technique has great potential for quantitative analysis of rare earth elements in glass matrix.

  7. Assessing rare earth elements in quartz rich geological samples.

    PubMed

    Santoro, A; Thoss, V; Guevara, S Ribeiro; Urgast, D; Raab, A; Mastrolitti, S; Feldmann, J

    2016-01-01

    Sodium peroxide (Na2O2) fusion coupled to Inductively Coupled Plasma Tandem Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS/MS) measurements was used to rapidly screen quartz-rich geological samples for rare earth element (REE) content. The method accuracy was checked with a geological reference material and Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) measurements. The used mass-mode combinations presented accurate results (only exception being (157)Gd in He gas mode) with recovery of the geological reference material QLO-1 between 80% and 98% (lower values for Lu, Nd and Sm) and in general comparable to INAA measurements. Low limits of detection for all elements were achieved, generally below 10 pg g(-1), as well as measurement repeatability below 15%. Overall, the Na2O2/ICP-MS/MS method proved to be a suitable lab-based method to quickly and accurately screen rock samples originating from quartz-rich geological areas for rare earth element content; particularly useful if checking commercial viability.

  8. Sensing Using Rare-Earth-Doped Upconversion Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Shuwei; Chen, Guanying; Yang, Chunhui

    2013-01-01

    Optical sensing plays an important role in theranostics due to its capability to detect hint biochemical entities or molecular targets as well as to precisely monitor specific fundamental psychological processes. Rare-earth (RE) doped upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) are promising for these endeavors due to their unique frequency converting capability; they emit efficient and sharp visible or ultraviolet (UV) luminescence via use of ladder-like energy levels of RE ions when excited at near infrared (NIR) light that are silent to tissues. These features allow not only a high penetration depth in biological tissues but also a high detection sensitivity. Indeed, the energy transfer between UCNPs and biomolecular or chemical indicators provide opportunities for high-sensitive bio- and chemical-sensing. A temperature-sensitive change of the intensity ratio between two close UC bands promises them for use in temperature mapping of a single living cell. In this work, we review recent investigations on using UCNPs for the detection of biomolecules (avidin, ATP, etc.), ions (cyanide, mecury, etc.), small gas molecules (oxygen, carbon dioxide, ammonia, etc.), as well as for in vitro temperature sensing. We also briefly summarize chemical methods in synthesizing UCNPs of high efficiency that are important for the detection limit. PMID:23650480

  9. Silica-optical-fiber-based rare-earth-doped sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Tong; Grattan, Kenneth T. V.; Wade, Scott A.; Forsyth, David

    2001-10-01

    This paper reports on work done with a range of silica fibres, doped with several important rare earth ions such as Er, Nd, Yb and Tm, to create a range of novel optical sensors. The approach reported herein is based on monitoring and analysis of the fluorescence decay from such fibres in the time domain as well as in the frequency domain. With these fibres, temperature sensors operating in the range from as low as -200 degree(s)C to beyond 1000 degree(s)C have been constructed. A temperature resolution of the order of a few degrees Celsius has been typically reported from these types of sensors. Fibre of this type has been used in a simple yet effective structural integrity monitoring system (being incorporated successfully into concrete samples) and an optical fire alarm system with potential applications for engine monitoring has been developed. A further recent discovery is a small level of strain sensitivity in such fibres - this has been explored over the region from 0 to 2000(mu) e, showing a level of resolution better than a few tens of microstrain, and sensors based on this effect are discussed and reported on in this work.

  10. Sensing using rare-earth-doped upconversion nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Hao, Shuwei; Chen, Guanying; Yang, Chunhui

    2013-01-01

    Optical sensing plays an important role in theranostics due to its capability to detect hint biochemical entities or molecular targets as well as to precisely monitor specific fundamental psychological processes. Rare-earth (RE) doped upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) are promising for these endeavors due to their unique frequency converting capability; they emit efficient and sharp visible or ultraviolet (UV) luminescence via use of ladder-like energy levels of RE ions when excited at near infrared (NIR) light that are silent to tissues. These features allow not only a high penetration depth in biological tissues but also a high detection sensitivity. Indeed, the energy transfer between UCNPs and biomolecular or chemical indicators provide opportunities for high-sensitive bio- and chemical-sensing. A temperature-sensitive change of the intensity ratio between two close UC bands promises them for use in temperature mapping of a single living cell. In this work, we review recent investigations on using UCNPs for the detection of biomolecules (avidin, ATP, etc.), ions (cyanide, mecury, etc.), small gas molecules (oxygen, carbon dioxide, ammonia, etc.), as well as for in vitro temperature sensing. We also briefly summarize chemical methods in synthesizing UCNPs of high efficiency that are important for the detection limit. PMID:23650480

  11. Bacterial Cell Surface Adsorption of Rare Earth Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Y.; Park, D.; Reed, D.; Fujita, Y.; Yung, M.; Anderko, A.; Eslamimanesh, A.

    2015-12-01

    Rare earth elements (REE) play a critical role in many emerging clean energy technologies, including high-power magnets, wind turbines, solar panels, hybrid/electric vehicle batteries and lamp phosphors. In order to sustain demand for such technologies given current domestic REE shortages, there is a need to develop new approaches for ore processing/refining and recycling of REE-containing materials. To this end, we have developed a microbially-mediated bioadsorption strategy with application towards enrichment of REE from complex mixtures. Specifically, the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus was genetically engineered to display lanthanide binding tags (LBTs), short peptides that possess high affinity and specificity for rare earth elements, on its cell surface S-layer protein. Under optimal conditions, LBT-displayed cells adsorbed greater than 5-fold more REE than control cells lacking LBTs. Competition binding experiments with a selection of REEs demonstrated that our engineered cells could facilitate separation of light- from heavy- REE. Importantly, binding of REE onto our engineered strains was much more favorable compared to non-REE metals. Finally, REE bound to the cell surface could be stripped off using citrate, providing an effective and non-toxic REE recovery method. Together, this data highlights the potential of our approach for selective REE enrichment from REE containing mixtures.

  12. Standard reference water samples for rare earth element determinations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Verplanck, P.L.; Antweiler, R.C.; Nordstrom, D.K.; Taylor, H.E.

    2001-01-01

    Standard reference water samples (SRWS) were collected from two mine sites, one near Ophir, CO, USA and the other near Redding, CA, USA. The samples were filtered, preserved, and analyzed for rare earth element (REE) concentrations (La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, and Lu) by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). These two samples were acid mine waters with elevated concentrations of REEs (0.45-161 ??g/1). Seventeen international laboratories participated in a 'round-robin' chemical analysis program, which made it possible to evaluate the data by robust statistical procedures that are insensitive to outliers. The resulting most probable values are reported. Ten to 15 of the participants also reported values for Ba, Y, and Sc. Field parameters, major ion, and other trace element concentrations, not subject to statistical evaluation, are provided.

  13. Rare earth elements activate endocytosis in plant cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lihong; Li, Jigang; Zhou, Qing; Yang, Guangmei; Ding, Xiao Lan; Li, Xiaodong; Cai, Chen Xin; Zhang, Zhao; Wei, Hai Yan; Lu, Tian Hong; Deng, Xing Wang; Huang, Xiao Hua

    2014-01-01

    It has long been observed that rare earth elements (REEs) regulate multiple facets of plant growth and development. However, the underlying mechanisms remain largely unclear. Here, using electron microscopic autoradiography, we show the life cycle of a light REE (lanthanum) and a heavy REE (terbium) in horseradish leaf cells. Our data indicate that REEs were first anchored on the plasma membrane in the form of nanoscale particles, and then entered the cells by endocytosis. Consistently, REEs activated endocytosis in plant cells, which may be the cellular basis of REE actions in plants. Moreover, we discovered that a portion of REEs was successively released into the cytoplasm, self-assembled to form nanoscale clusters, and finally deposited in horseradish leaf cells. Taken together, our data reveal the life cycle of REEs and their cellular behaviors in plant cells, which shed light on the cellular mechanisms of REE actions in living organisms. PMID:25114214

  14. Rare earth elements activate endocytosis in plant cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lihong; Li, Jigang; Zhou, Qing; Yang, Guangmei; Ding, Xiao Lan; Li, Xiaodong; Cai, Chen Xin; Zhang, Zhao; Wei, Hai Yan; Lu, Tian Hong; Deng, Xing Wang; Huang, Xiao Hua

    2014-09-01

    It has long been observed that rare earth elements (REEs) regulate multiple facets of plant growth and development. However, the underlying mechanisms remain largely unclear. Here, using electron microscopic autoradiography, we show the life cycle of a light REE (lanthanum) and a heavy REE (terbium) in horseradish leaf cells. Our data indicate that REEs were first anchored on the plasma membrane in the form of nanoscale particles, and then entered the cells by endocytosis. Consistently, REEs activated endocytosis in plant cells, which may be the cellular basis of REE actions in plants. Moreover, we discovered that a portion of REEs was successively released into the cytoplasm, self-assembled to form nanoscale clusters, and finally deposited in horseradish leaf cells. Taken together, our data reveal the life cycle of REEs and their cellular behaviors in plant cells, which shed light on the cellular mechanisms of REE actions in living organisms.

  15. Mitochondrial potential (ΔΨm) changes in single rat hepatocytes: the effect of orthovanadate nanoparticles doped with rare-earth elements.

    PubMed

    Kavok, Nataliya S; Averchenko, Katherine A; Klochkov, Vladimir K; Yefimova, Svetlana L; Malyukin, Yuri V

    2014-12-01

    Rare-earth-based nanoparticles (NPs) are widely used as fluorescent probes for imaging in vitro and in vivo. One of the challenges that restrain NPs applications in biomedical research is their effect on subcellular structures. In this paper, the ability of lanthanide NPs to affect the cellular oxidative balance and alter the mitochondrial function was analyzed. Since size and shape mutually affect the cellular internalization and intracellular distribution of NPs, the investigations were performed with NPs of spherical (GdYVO4:Eu(3+), spindle-(GdVO4: Eu(3+) and rod-like (LaVO4: Eu(3+) shapes. Quantitative microfluorimetry with JC-1 (5,5',6,6'-tetrachloro-1,1',3,3'-tetraethylbenzimidazolocarbocyanine iodide) as a mitochondrial probe was used for monitoring of the mitochondrial transmembrane potential (ΔΨ m) in single living cells. Changes in the ratio of the JC-1 probe fluorescence were used to analyze the NPs effect on ΔΨ(m). The fastest suppressive effect (within 1 hour) was found for spherical NPs. Gradual lowering of ΔΨ(m) was observed at the exposure of cells within 24 hours for all types of NPs. Exogenous thiols were required for ΔΨ(m) protection. The protective role of exogenous glutathione (GSH) proves that the increase of reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation with depletion of GSH can mediate NPs toxicity. The dynamics of the shape-dependent effect can be explained by the features of NPs transportation into cells.

  16. PROCESS FOR SEPARATING AMERICIUM AND CURIUM FROM RARE EARTH ELEMENTS

    DOEpatents

    Baybarz, R.D.; Lloyd, M.H.

    1963-02-26

    This invention relates to methods of separating americium and curium values from rare earth values. In accordance with the invention americium, curium, and rare earth values are sorbed on an anion exchange resin. A major portion of the rare earth values are selectively stripped from the resin with a concentrated aqueous solution of lithium chloride, and americium, curium, and a minor portion of rare earth values are then stripped from the resin with a dilute aqueous solution of lithium chloride. The americium and curium values are further purified by increasing the concentration of lithium chloride in the solution to at least 8 molar and selectively extracting rare earth values from the resulting solution with a monoalkylphosphoric acid. (AEC)

  17. Lunar anorthosites: rare-Earth and other elemental abundances.

    PubMed

    Wakita, H; Schmitt, R A

    1970-11-27

    Elemental abundances of major (Ti, Al, Fe, and Ca), minor (Na, Mn, and Cr), and trace elements [14 rare-earth elements (REE), Y, In, Cd, Rb, Cs, Ba, Co, and Sc] in lunar anorthosites separated from Apollo 11 sample 10085 coarse fines have been determined by means of instrumental and radiochemical neutron activation analysis. The REE distribution pattern of lunar anorthosites, relative to ordinary chondrites, has a positive Eu anomaly. On the assumption that (i) the lunar composition is similar to that of ordinary chondritic meteorites low in total Fe ( approximately 13 percent); (ii) lunar anorthosites are derived from highland cratering events and are representative of the highlands; and (iii) the moon differentiated into olivine, hypersthene, and basaltic and anorthositic phases, and plagioclase crysstallization began after approximately 93 percent solidification, then mass balance calculations yield approximately 30-kilometer and approximately 10-kilometer thicknesses for the lunar highlands for the melting and chemical differentiation of the entire moon and of the upper 200 kilometers, respectively. Corresponding thicknesses of the basaltic basement rocks were approximately 5 kilometers and approximately 2 kilometers, respectively. Alternatively, if the anorthosites of this study are representative of the highlands and the onset of plagioclase crystallization occurred after approximately 50 percent solidification of the initially melted moon, calculations with REE and Ba partition coefficients suggest that the REE and Ba abundances in the primeval moon were similar to those observed in basaltic achondrites.

  18. The chemistry of rare earth elements in the solar nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larimer, J. W.; Bartholomay, H. A.; Fegley, B.

    1984-01-01

    The high concentration of rare earth elements (REE) in primitive CaS suggests that the REE along with the other normally lithophile elements form stable sulfides under the unusual conditions which existed during the formation of enstatite chrondites. In order to acquire a more quantitative framework in which to interpret these data, the behavior of the REE in systems with solar, or slightly fractionated solar, composition is being studied. These new data introduce modest changes in the behavior of some of the REE when compared to previous studies. For example, the largest differences are in the stabilities of the gaseous monoxides of Ce, Eu, Tb, Ho, and Tm, all of which now appear to be less stable than previously thought, and YbO(g) which is somewhat more stable. Much more significant are the changes in REE distribution in the gas phase in fractionated systems, especially those made more reducing by changing the C/O ratio from the solar value of 0.6 to about 1.0. In almost all cases, the exceptions being Eu, Tm and Yb whose elemental gaseous species dominate, the monosulfides become more abundant. Moreover, the solid oxides of Eu, Tm and Yb become less stable under more reducing conditions which, in effect, should reduce the condensation temperature of all REE in more reduced systems.

  19. [Physiological effects of rare earth elements and their application in traditional Chinese medicine].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jie; Guo, Lanping; Xiao, Wenjuan; Geng, Yanling; Wang, Xiao; Shi, Xin'gang; Dan, Staerk

    2012-08-01

    The process in the studies on physiological effects of rare earth elements in plants and their action mechanisms were summarized in the aspects of seed germination, photosynthesis, mineral metabolism and stress resistance. And the applications of rare earth elements in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) in recent years were also overviewed, which will provide reference for further development and application of rare earth elements in TCM.

  20. Google Earth locations of USA and seafloor hydrothermal vents with associated rare earth element data

    DOE Data Explorer

    Andrew Fowler

    2016-02-10

    Google Earth .kmz files that contain the locations of geothermal wells and thermal springs in the USA, and seafloor hydrothermal vents that have associated rare earth element data. The file does not contain the actual data, the actual data is available through the GDR website in two tier 3 data sets entitled "Compilation of Rare Earth Element Analyses from US Geothermal Fields and Mid Ocean Ridge (MOR) Hydrothermal Vents" and "Rare earth element content of thermal fluids from Surprise Valley, California"

  1. Rare earth elements exploitation, geopolitical implications and raw materials trading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chemin, Marie-Charlotte

    2015-04-01

    Rare earth elements (REE) correspond to seventeen elements of the periodic table. They are used in high technology, cracking, electric cars' magnet, metal alloy for batteries, and also in phone construction or ceramics for electronic card. REEs are an important resource for high technology. This project targets 16 years old students in the subject "personalized aid" and will last six weeks. The purpose of this project is to develop autonomy and research in groups for a transdisciplinary work. This project gathers knowledge in geology, geography and economics. During the first session students analyze the geology applications of the REE. They begin the analysis with learning the composition in different rocks such as basalt and diorite to make the link with crystallization. Then they compare it with adakite to understand the formation of these rocks. In the second session, they study REE exploitation. We can find them as oxides in many deposits. The principal concentrations of rare earth elements are associated with uncommon varieties of igneous rocks, such as carbonatites. They can use Qgis, to localize this high concentration. In the third session, they study the environmental costs of REE exploitation. Indeed, the exploitation produces thorium and carcinogenic toxins: sulphates, ammonia and hydrochloric acid. Processing one ton of rare earths produces 2,000 tons of toxic waste. This session focuses, first, on Baotou's region, and then on an example they are free to choose. In the fourth session, they study the geopolitical issues of REE with a focus on China. In fact this country is the largest producer of REE, and is providing 95% of the overall production. REE in China are at the center of a geopolitical strategy. In fact, China implements a sort of protectionism. Indeed, the export tax on REE is very high so, as a foreign company, it is financially attractive to establish a manufacturing subsidiary in China in order to use REE. As a matter of fact

  2. Rare earth elements as a fingerprint of soil components solubilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davranche, M.; Grybos, M.; Gruau, G.; Pédrot, M.; Dia, A.

    2009-04-01

    The retention of rare earth element (REE) in the soil profile are mainly controlled by three factors, (i) the stability of the primary REE-carrying minerals, (ii) the presence of secondary phases as clays and Fe- and Mn-oxyhydroxides and (ii) the concentration of colloidal organic matter (OM). Considering that each soil phases (mineral or organic) displays (ii) various surface properties, such as specific area, surface sites density and nature and (ii) their own REE distribution inherited from the rock weathering, their mobilization through various chemical reactions (dissolution, colloidal release….) may involve the development of various shaped REE patterns in the soil solutions. REE fractionation from the different soil phases may therefore be used to identify the response of the soil system to a particular chemical process such as reductive and/or acidic dissolution. To test this purpose, an organic-rich wetland soil sample was incubated under anaerobic condition at both pH 5 and uncontrolled pH. The REE patterns developed in the soil solution were then compared to the REE patterns obtained through either aerobic at pH 3 and 7 incubations or a chemical reduction experiment (using hydroxylamine). REE patterns in anaerobic and aerobic at pH 7 experiments exhibited the same middle rare earth element (MREE) downward concavity significant of the complexation of REE with soil OM. By contrast, under acidic condition, the REE pattern exhibited a positive Eu anomaly due to the dissolution of soil feldspar. Finally, REE pattern obtained from the chemical reducing experiment showed an intermediary flat shape corresponding to a mixing between the soil organic and mineral phases dissolution. The comparison of the various REE pattern shapes allowed to conclude that (i) biological reduction of wetland soil involved amorphous Fe(III) colloids linked to OM and, (ii) that the REE mobility was controlled by the dynamic of OM in wetland soil. They also evidence the potential of

  3. Origin of enhanced magnetization in rare earth doped multiferroic bismuth ferrite

    SciTech Connect

    Nayek, C.; Thirmal, Ch.; Murugavel, P.; Tamilselvan, A.; Balakumar, S.

    2014-02-21

    We report structural and magnetic properties of rare earth doped Bi{sub 0.95}R{sub 0.05} FeO{sub 3} (R = Y, Ho, and Er) submicron particles. Rare earth doping enhances the magnetization and the magnetization shows an increasing trend with decreasing dopant ionic radii. In contrast to the x-ray diffraction pattern, we have seen a strong evidence for the presence of rare earth iron garnets R{sub 3}Fe{sub 5}O{sub 12} in magnetization measured as a function of temperature, in selected area electron diffraction, and in Raman measurements. Our results emphasised the role of secondary phases in the magnetic property of rare earth doped BiFeO{sub 3} compounds along with the structural distortion favoring spin canting by increase in Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya exchange energy.

  4. Rare Earth elements in individual minerals in Shergottites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wadhwa, Meenakshi; Crozaz, Ghislaine

    1993-01-01

    Shergottites (i.e., Shergotty, Zagami, EETA79001, ALHA77005, and LEW88516) are an important set of achondrites because they comprise the majority of the SNC group of meteorites (nine, in total, known to us), which are likely to be samples of the planet Mars. Study of these meteorites may therefore provide valuable information about petrogenetic processes on a large planetary body other than Earth. Rare earth element (REE) distributions between various mineral phases were found to be useful in geochemically modeling the petrogenesis of various rock types (terrestrial and meteoritic). However, with the exception of a few ion microprobe studies and analyses of mineral separates, there has previously not been any comprehensive effort to characterize and directly compare REE in individual minerals in each of the five known shergottites. Ion microprobe analyses were made on thin sections of each of the shergottites. Minerals analyzed were pyroxenes (pigeonite and augite), maskelynite, and whitlockite. The REE concentrations in each mineral type in each shergottite is given.

  5. Size distribution of rare earth elements in coal ash

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scott, Clinton T.; Deonarine, Amrika; Kolker, Allan; Adams, Monique; Holland, James F.

    2015-01-01

    Rare earth elements (REEs) are utilized in various applications that are vital to the automotive, petrochemical, medical, and information technology industries. As world demand for REEs increases, critical shortages are expected. Due to the retention of REEs during coal combustion, coal fly ash is increasingly considered a potential resource. Previous studies have demonstrated that coal fly ash is variably enriched in REEs relative to feed coal (e.g, Seredin and Dai, 2012) and that enrichment increases with decreasing size fractions (Blissett et al., 2014). In order to further explore the REE resource potential of coal ash, and determine the partitioning behavior of REE as a function of grain size, we studied whole coal and fly ash size-fractions collected from three U.S commercial-scale coal-fired generating stations burning Appalachian or Powder River Basin coal. Whole fly ash was separated into , 5 um, to 5 to 10 um and 10 to 100 um particle size fractions by mechanical shaking using trace-metal clean procedures. In these samples REE enrichments in whole fly ash ranges 5.6 to 18.5 times that of feedcoals. Partitioning results for size separates relative to whole coal and whole fly ash will also be reported. 

  6. Spectroscopy of Luminescent Crystals Containing Rare Earth Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Meng-Ling; Lii, Kwang-Hwa; Chang, Bor-Chen

    2013-06-01

    We have studied the spectroscopy of luminescent crystals containing rare earth elements such as KEuGe_2O_6, Cs_3EuSi_6O_{15}, K_4[(UO_2)Eu_2(Ge_2O_7)_2], and R_2(C_8H_{10}O_4)_3 (R= Y, Tb, or Eu). The emission and excitation spectra of these compounds were recorded at ambient temperature. These spectra are consistent with the structures which were determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction. Crystals containing hybrid luminescent centers were also synthesized and interesting energy transfer mechanisms were observed. For example, dramatic luminescence quenching was found in KEu_xNd_{1-x}Ge_2O_6 (x= 0.98, 0.96, 0.94, and 0.84) as well as in Cs_3Eu_{0.98}Nd_{0.02}Si_6O_{15}, while different compositions of Y_xEu_yTb_{2-x-y}(C_8H_{10}O_4)_3 exhibit different emission colors. Emission lifetimes were also measured for these compounds, and the results shed light on the energy transfer mechanisms. Detailed results of our research will be presented. P.-L. Chen, P.-Y. Chiang, H.-C. Yeh, B.-C. Chang, and K.-H. Lii, Dalton Trans., 1721 (2008). M.-Y. Hung, Y.-H. Chen, B.-C. Chang, and K.-H. Lii, Chem. Mater. 17, 5743 (2005).

  7. Rare earth element analysis indicates micropollutants in an urban estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohajerin, T. J.; Johannesson, K. H.; Kolker, A.; Burdige, D. J.; Chevis, D.

    2011-12-01

    Rare earth element analysis of Bayou Bienvenue waters shows anomalously high gadolinium, Gd, concentrations relative to its nearest neighbors in the REE series, europium and terbium. The anomalously high Gd concentrations indicate anthropogenic input from waste-water treatment plants in the area as anthropogenic Gd input can be traced back to its use as a contrast agent in magnetic resonance imaging in hospitals. Others have shown that anomalously high levels of Gd in natural waters are likely to be associated with other micropollutants that also occur in hospital effluent and that are not removed in the wastewater treatment process, including pharmaceuticals in the form of steroids, antihistamines, and antibiotics. Estuaries serve as many important ecological roles and have been shown to act as a filter for pollutants. To better understand the transport, biogeochemical cycling, and ultimate fate of trace elements in estuaries, I collected surface water samples from Bayou Bienvenue, a wetland triangle that covers an area of 427 acres directly adjacent to New Orleans, Louisiana. Water samples from Bayou Bienvenue were collected along the salinity gradient and subsequently filtered through progressively smaller pore-size filters. The resulting fractions were analyzed for trace element concentions, including the REEs, by magnetic sector ICP-MS. The attached figure shows the Gd anomaly present in the particulate (>0.45μm) fraction. Upper continental crust (UCC)-normalized plots of colloidal REEs (0.02μm - 0.45μm) fraction is lacking this anomaly indicating anthropogenic Gd is found chiefly in the particulate fraction in Bayou Bienvenue. No clear relationship between Gd concentration and salinity was apparent.

  8. Isotopic fractionation of rare earth elements in geochemical samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishibashi, T.; Ohno, T.

    2015-12-01

    The isotopic composition of Rare Earth Elements(REEs) can be fractionated through various physical and chemical reactions in nature [1]. The isotopic variations of REEs occurring naturally has a potentially significant influence in geochemical research fields. The REEs has key features that their chemical similarities and gradual changes of ionic radius, which may help us to understand the mechanisms of isotopic variations of REEs in nature. Among the REEs, geochemical and physicochemical features of Ce, which could be presence as the tetravalent state, be anomalous, and oxidation state of Ce can change by reflecting the redox conditions of the environment. Therefore, the study of the difference in the degree of isotopic fractionation between Ce and other REEs may provide information on the redox conditions. In this study, we developed a new separation method to determine the mass-dependent isotopic fractionations of REEs in geochemical samples, and examined the optimum concentration of hydrochloric acid for the separation. The samples were decomposed by a mixture of acids, then REEs were separated as a group from major elements using cation exchange resin columns and RE Spec resin. The separations within the REEs group were carried out using Ln2Spec resin. For the recovery of La, Ce, Pr, and Nd, 0.1 M HCl was used, and for isolation of Sm, Eu, and Gd, 0.25 M HCl was used. Then, 0.6 M HCl was used for separation of Tb, and Dy, 1 M HCl was used for separation of Ho, Y, and Er, finally, Tm, Yb, and Lu were collected using 2 M HCl. The yields of all REEs were enough to examine isotopic fractionation in geochemical samples. [1] Ohno and Hirata,Analytical Sciences, 29, 271, 2013

  9. Rare Earth Element Partitioning in Lunar Minerals: An Experimental Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McIntosh, E. C.; Rapp, J. F.; Draper, D. S.

    2016-01-01

    The partitioning behavior of rare earth elements (REE) between minerals and melts is widely used to interpret the petrogenesis and geologic context of terrestrial and extra-terrestrial samples. REE are important tools for modelling the evolution of the lunar interior. The ubiquitous negative Eu anomaly in lunar basalts is one of the main lines of evidence to support the lunar magma ocean (LMO) hypothesis, by which the plagioclase-rich lunar highlands were formed as a flotation crust during differentiation of a global-scale magma ocean. The separation of plagioclase from the mafic cumulates is thought to be the source of the Eu depletion, as Eu is very compatible in plagioclase. Lunar basalts and volcanic glasses are commonly depleted in light REEs (LREE), and more enriched in heavy REEs (HREE). However, there is very little experimental data available on REE partitioning between lunar minerals and melts. In order to interpret the source of these distinctive REE patterns, and to model lunar petrogenetic processes, REE partition coefficients (D) between lunar minerals and melts are needed at conditions relevant to lunar processes. New data on D(sub REE) for plagioclase, and pyroxenes are now available, but there is limited available data for olivine/melt D(sub REE), particularly at pressures higher than 1 bar, and in Fe-rich and reduced compositions - all conditions relevant to the lunar mantle. Based on terrestrial data, REE are highly incompatible in olivine (i.e. D much less than 1), however olivine is the predominant mineral in the lunar interior, so it is important to understand whether it is capable of storing even small amounts of REE, and how the REEs might be fractionatied, in order to understand the trace element budget of the lunar interior. This abstract presents results from high-pressure and temperature experiments investigating REE partitioning between olivine and melt in a composition relevant to lunar magmatism.

  10. Automated Quantitative Rare Earth Elements Mineralogy by Scanning Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sindern, Sven; Meyer, F. Michael

    2016-09-01

    Increasing industrial demand of rare earth elements (REEs) stems from the central role they play for advanced technologies and the accelerating move away from carbon-based fuels. However, REE production is often hampered by the chemical, mineralogical as well as textural complexity of the ores with a need for better understanding of their salient properties. This is not only essential for in-depth genetic interpretations but also for a robust assessment of ore quality and economic viability. The design of energy and cost-efficient processing of REE ores depends heavily on information about REE element deportment that can be made available employing automated quantitative process mineralogy. Quantitative mineralogy assigns numeric values to compositional and textural properties of mineral matter. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) combined with a suitable software package for acquisition of backscatter electron and X-ray signals, phase assignment and image analysis is one of the most efficient tools for quantitative mineralogy. The four different SEM-based automated quantitative mineralogy systems, i.e. FEI QEMSCAN and MLA, Tescan TIMA and Zeiss Mineralogic Mining, which are commercially available, are briefly characterized. Using examples of quantitative REE mineralogy, this chapter illustrates capabilities and limitations of automated SEM-based systems. Chemical variability of REE minerals and analytical uncertainty can reduce performance of phase assignment. This is shown for the REE phases parisite and synchysite. In another example from a monazite REE deposit, the quantitative mineralogical parameters surface roughness and mineral association derived from image analysis are applied for automated discrimination of apatite formed in a breakdown reaction of monazite and apatite formed by metamorphism prior to monazite breakdown. SEM-based automated mineralogy fulfils all requirements for characterization of complex unconventional REE ores that will become

  11. Recovery and separation of rare Earth elements using salmon milt.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Yoshio; Kondo, Kazuhiro; Miyaji, Asami; Watanabe, Yusuke; Fan, Qiaohui; Honma, Tetsuo; Tanaka, Kazuya

    2014-01-01

    Recycling rare earth elements (REEs) used in advanced materials such as Nd magnets is important for the efficient use of REE resources when the supply of several REEs is limited. In this work, the feasibility of using salmon milt for REE recovery and separation was examined, along with the identification of the binding site of REEs in salmon milt. Results showed that (i) salmon milt has a sufficiently high affinity to adsorb REEs and (ii) the adsorption capacity of the milt is 1.04 mEq/g, which is comparable with that of commercial cation exchange resin. Heavier REEs have higher affinity for milt. A comparison of stability constants and adsorption patterns of REEs discussed in the literature suggests that the phosphate is responsible for the adsorption of REE in milt. The results were supported by dysprosium (Dy) and lutetium (Lu) LIII-edge extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. The REE-P shell was identified for the second neighboring atom, which shows the importance of the phosphate site as REE binding sites. The comparison of REE adsorption pattern and EXAFS results between the milt system and other adsorbent systems (cellulose phosphate, Ln-resin, bacteria, and DNA-filter hybrid) revealed that the coordination number of phosphate is correlated with the slope of the REE pattern. The separation column loaded with milt was tested to separate REE for the practical use of salmon milt for the recovery and separation of REE. However, water did not flow through the column possibly because of the hydrophobicity of the milt. Thus, sequential adsorption-desorption approach using a batch-type method was applied for the separation of REE. As an example of the practical applications of REE separation, Nd and Fe(III) were successfully separated from a synthetic solution of Nd magnet waste by a batch-type method using salmon milt.

  12. Recovery and Separation of Rare Earth Elements Using Salmon Milt

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Yoshio; Kondo, Kazuhiro; Miyaji, Asami; Watanabe, Yusuke; Fan, Qiaohui; Honma, Tetsuo; Tanaka, Kazuya

    2014-01-01

    Recycling rare earth elements (REEs) used in advanced materials such as Nd magnets is important for the efficient use of REE resources when the supply of several REEs is limited. In this work, the feasibility of using salmon milt for REE recovery and separation was examined, along with the identification of the binding site of REEs in salmon milt. Results showed that (i) salmon milt has a sufficiently high affinity to adsorb REEs and (ii) the adsorption capacity of the milt is 1.04 mEq/g, which is comparable with that of commercial cation exchange resin. Heavier REEs have higher affinity for milt. A comparison of stability constants and adsorption patterns of REEs discussed in the literature suggests that the phosphate is responsible for the adsorption of REE in milt. The results were supported by dysprosium (Dy) and lutetium (Lu) LIII-edge extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. The REE-P shell was identified for the second neighboring atom, which shows the importance of the phosphate site as REE binding sites. The comparison of REE adsorption pattern and EXAFS results between the milt system and other adsorbent systems (cellulose phosphate, Ln-resin, bacteria, and DNA-filter hybrid) revealed that the coordination number of phosphate is correlated with the slope of the REE pattern. The separation column loaded with milt was tested to separate REE for the practical use of salmon milt for the recovery and separation of REE. However, water did not flow through the column possibly because of the hydrophobicity of the milt. Thus, sequential adsorption–desorption approach using a batch-type method was applied for the separation of REE. As an example of the practical applications of REE separation, Nd and Fe(III) were successfully separated from a synthetic solution of Nd magnet waste by a batch-type method using salmon milt. PMID:25490035

  13. Carbonatite and alkaline intrusion-related rare earth element deposits–A deposit model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Verplanck, Philip L.; Van Gosen, Bradley S.

    2011-01-01

    The rare earth elements are not as rare in nature as their name implies, but economic deposits with these elements are not common and few deposits have been large producers. In the past 25 years, demand for rare earth elements has increased dramatically because of their wide and diverse use in high-technology applications. Yet, presently the global production and supply of rare earth elements come from only a few sources. China produces more than 95 percent of the world's supply of rare earth elements. Because of China's decision to restrict exports of these elements, the price of rare earth elements has increased and industrial countries are concerned about supply shortages. As a result, understanding the distribution and origin of rare earth elements deposits, and identifying and quantifying our nation's rare earth elements resources have become priorities. Carbonatite and alkaline intrusive complexes, as well as their weathering products, are the primary sources of rare earth elements. The general mineral deposit model summarized here is part of an effort by the U.S. Geological Survey's Mineral Resources Program to update existing models and develop new descriptive mineral deposit models to supplement previously published models for use in mineral-resource and mineral-environmental assessments. Carbonatite and alkaline intrusion-related REE deposits are discussed together because of their spatial association, common enrichment in incompatible elements, and similarities in genesis. A wide variety of commodities have been exploited from carbonatites and alkaline igneous rocks, such as rare earth elements, niobium, phosphate, titanium, vermiculite, barite, fluorite, copper, calcite, and zirconium. Other enrichments include manganese, strontium, tantalum, thorium, vanadium, and uranium.

  14. Rare Earth elements as sediment tracers in Mangrove ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramanathan, A. L.; Swathi, S.

    2013-05-01

    Rare earth elements have been widely used as geochemical source fingerprints of rocks and sediments to study processes involving cosmo-chemistry, igneous petrology, tectonic setting and for investigations of water-rock interactions and weathering processes including transport of weathering products to the oceans.Many studies have addressed the use of REEs in investigating the environmental impact of human activity and demonstrated that the REE natural distribution in sediment from densely industrialised and populated regions can be altered by anthropogenic influences.The coastal wetlands like Mangroves are ultimate sinks for all the material derived from the terrestrial and marine environment.The high productivity and low ratio of sediment respiration to net primary production gives mangrove sediments the potential for long-term sequestration of these pollutants/metals before reaching the coastal ocean. Geochemical study of REE in these sedimentary systems is useful for determining the nature of the biogeochemical processes. In particular, REE show a great sensitivity to pH changes, redox conditions and adsorption/ desorption reactions. So, they may be used as markers of discharge provenance, weathering processes, changes in environmental conditions in the water and sediments of Mangrove/wetland systems. Our study aims to establish the abundance, distribution and enrichment of REEs to track the sediment sources and biogeochemical processes occurring in the mangrove environment.Core sediments were collected from the different environmental settings within the Pichavaram mangrove area.Higher REE concentration in Pichavaram sediments indicated greater input from sources like terrestrial weathering and anthropogenic activities which in turn are affected by saline mixing and dynamic physico-chemical processes occurring in the mangrove environment. REE enrichment order was attributed to the alkaline pH (7-8.5) and reducing conditions prevailing in the mangrove

  15. Rare earth element complexation by carbonate and oxalate ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantrell, Kirk J.; Byrne, Robert H.

    1987-03-01

    Rare earth carbonate and oxalate complexation constants have been determined through ex-amination of distribution equilibria between tributyl phosphate and an aqueous perchlorate phase. Carbonate complexation constants appropriate to the REE in seawater (25°C, 35%., 1 atm) can be described in terms of atomic number, Z. nlog swβ1 = 4.853 + 0.1135( Z - 57) - 0.003643( Z - 57) 2log swβ2 = 80.197 + 0.1730( Z - 57) - 0.002714( Z -57) 2 where swβ 1 = [MCO +3] /[M 3+][CO 2-3] T, swβ 2 = [M(CO 3) -3] /[M 3+][CO 2-3] 2' T [ M3+] is an uncomplexed rare earth concentration in seawater, [ MCO+3] and [ M( CO-3) 2] are carbonate complex concentrations, and [CO 2-3] T is the total (free plus ion paired) carbonate ion concentration in seawater (molal scale). Our analyses indicate that in seawater with a total carbonate ion concentration of 1.39 × 10 -4 moles/Kg H 2O, carbonate complexes for the lightest rare earth, La, constitute 86% of the total metal, 7% is free La 3+ and the remaining 7% exists as hydroxide, sulfate, chloride and fluoride complexes. For Lu, the heaviest rare earth, carbonate complexes are 98% of the total metal, 0.3% is uncomplexed and 1.5% is complexed with hydroxide, sulfate, chloride and fluoride. Oxalate and carbonate constants are linearly correlated. This correlation appears to be quite useful for estimating trivalent metal-arbonate stability constants from their respective oxalate stability constants.

  16. Metal enhanced fluorescence in rare earth doped plasmonic core-shell nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Derom, S; Berthelot, A; Pillonnet, A; Benamara, O; Jurdyc, A M; Girard, C; Colas des Francs, G

    2013-12-13

    We theoretically and numerically investigate metal enhanced fluorescence of plasmonic core-shell nanoparticles doped with rare earth (RE) ions. Particle shape and size are engineered to maximize the average enhancement factor (AEF) of the overall doped shell. We show that the highest enhancement (11 in the visible and 7 in the near-infrared) is achieved by tuning either the dipolar or the quadrupolar particle resonance to the rare earth ion's excitation wavelength. Additionally, the calculated AEFs are compared to experimental data reported in the literature, obtained in similar conditions (plasmon mediated enhancement) or when a metal-RE energy transfer mechanism is involved.

  17. Review of rare earth element concentrations in oil shales of the Eocene Green River Formation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Birdwell, Justin E.

    2012-01-01

    Concentrations of the lanthanide series or rare earth elements and yttrium were determined for lacustrine oil shale samples from the Eocene Green River Formation in the Piceance Basin of Colorado and the Uinta Basin of Utah. Unprocessed oil shale, post-pyrolysis (spent) shale, and leached shale samples were examined to determine if oil-shale processing to generate oil or the remediation of retorted shale affects rare earth element concentrations. Results for unprocessed Green River oil shale samples were compared to data published in the literature on reference materials, such as chondritic meteorites, the North American shale composite, marine oil shale samples from two sites in northern Tibet, and mined rare earth element ores from the United States and China. The Green River oil shales had lower rare earth element concentrations (66.3 to 141.3 micrograms per gram, μg g-1) than are typical of material in the upper crust (approximately 170 μg g-1) and were also lower in rare earth elements relative to the North American shale composite (approximately 165 μg g-1). Adjusting for dilution of rare earth elements by organic matter does not account for the total difference between the oil shales and other crustal rocks. Europium anomalies for Green River oil shales from the Piceance Basin were slightly lower than those reported for the North American shale composite and upper crust. When compared to ores currently mined for rare earth elements, the concentrations in Green River oil shales are several orders of magnitude lower. Retorting Green River oil shales led to a slight enrichment of rare earth elements due to removal of organic matter. When concentrations in spent and leached samples were normalized to an original rock basis, concentrations were comparable to those of the raw shale, indicating that rare earth elements are conserved in processed oil shales.

  18. Biogeochemistry of the rare-earth elements with particular reference to hickory trees

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, W.O.; Bastron, H.; Murata, K.J.

    1958-01-01

    Hickory trees concentrate the rare-earth elements in their leaves to a phenomenal degree and may contain as much as 2300 p.p.m. of total rare earths based on the dry weight of the leaves. The average proportions of the individual elements (atomic percent of the total rare-earth elements) in the leaves are: Y 36, La 16, Ce 14, Pr 2, Nd 20, Sm 1, Eu 0.7, Gd 3, Tb 0.6, Dy 3, Ho 0.7, Er 2, Tm 0.2, Yb 1, and Lu 0.2. The similarity in the proportions of the rare-earth elements in the leaves and in the exchange complex of the soil on which the hickory trees grow indicates that the trees do not fractionate the rare earths appreciably. The variation of the rare-earth elements in the leaves and soils can be explained generally in terms of the relative abundance of the cerium group and the yttrium group, except for the element cerium. The large fluctuations in the proportion of cerium [Ce/(La + Nd) atomic ratios of 0.16 to 0.86] correlate with oxidation-reduction conditions in the soil profile. The substitution of dilute H2SO3 for dilute HC1 in the determination of available rare-earth elements brings about a large increase in the proportion of cerium that is extracted from an oxygenated subsoil. These relationships strongly suggest that quadrivalent cerium is present in oxygenated subsoil and is less available to plants than the other rare-earth elements that do not undergo such a change in valence. A few parts per billion of rare-earth elements have been detected in two samples of ground water. ?? 1958.

  19. Rare Earth Elements: A Tool for Understanding the Behaviour of Trivalent Actinides in the Geosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Buil, Belen; Gomez, Paloma; Garralon, Antonio; Turrero, M. Jesus

    2007-07-01

    Rare earth element (REE) concentrations have been determined in groundwaters, granite and fracture fillings in a restored uranium mine. The granitoids normalized REE patterns of groundwaters show heavy rare earth elements (HREE)-enrichment and positive Eu anomalies. This suggests that the REE are fractionated during leaching from the source rocks by groundwaters. Preferential leaching of HREE would be consistent with the greater stability of their aqueous complexes compared to those of the light rare earth elements (LREE), together with the dissolution of certain fracture filling minerals, dissolution/alteration of phyllosilicates and colloidal transport. (authors)

  20. Rare earth elements in weathering profiles and sediments of Minnesota: Implications for provenance studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morey, G.B.; Setterholm, D.R.

    1997-01-01

    The relative abundance of rare earth elements in sediments has been suggested as a tool for determining their source rocks. This correlation requires that weathering, erosion, and sedimentation do not alter the REE abundances, or do so in a predictable manner. We find that the rare earth elements are mobilized and fractionated by weathering, and that sediments derived from the weathered materials can display modifications of the original pattern of rare earth elements of some due to grain-size sorting of the weathered material. However, the REE distribution pattern of the provenance terrane can be recognized in the sediments.

  1. Visible to infrared low temperature photoluminescence of rare earth doped bismuth germanate crystals.

    PubMed

    Canimoglu, A; Ayvacikli, M; Karabulut, Y; Karali, T; Can, N

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, the influence of a series of rare earth (Eu, Tm, Nd) and Cr ion doping on the optical properties of BGO was investigated by means of photoluminescence (PL) from visible to IR region in the 10-300K temperature range using different types of detectors, namely, photomultiplier tube (PMT), InGaAs (IGA), and Si. Several samples were investigated having dopants concentrations of 0.3wt%Nd, 0.4wt%Tm, 0.06wt% Cr and 3ppm Eu. The PL spectra of the samples showed different luminescence behaviour which is assigned to the 4f intra shell transition from rare earth ions. The temperature dependence of the PL from rare earth doped BGO crystals is also examined. PMID:26943903

  2. Synthesis and Photoresponse of Rare-Earth-Doped Phosphosilicates

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Z.; Lee, Burtrand I.; Samuels, William D.; Exarhos, Gregory J.

    1998-12-14

    Phosphate ceramics doped with Tb3+ ions were synthesized through Sol-Gel process (SGP). the emission intensity as a function of various factors such as matrix composition, crystal structure, particle size, dopant concentration, and synthesis conditions was investigated.

  3. [Analysis of rare earth elements in pu'er tea of Yunnan by ICP-AES].

    PubMed

    Ning, Peng-bo; Gong, Chun-mei; Zhang, Yan-ming; Guo, Kang-kang

    2010-10-01

    The 150 samples of pu'er tea collected from the main producing area of Yunnan were detected by ICP-AES method, to investigate the current safety status of pu'er tea rare earth elements. The rare earth elements contents were found to be in the range 0.26-4.07 mg x kg(-1) in all detected samples, with the 43.0% samples exceeding the maximum levels of contaminants of 2 mg x kg(-1) set by GB 2762-2005 "Maximum levels of contaminants in foods". There was a significant difference between ripened tea rare earth elements and raw tea's from the same sources, which affected some ripened tea quality at last. There was a significant difference among the rare earth elements contents of the pu'er tea main producing areas, and the condition of pu'er tea quality and safety controlling was not optimistic at individual producing areas.

  4. Characterization of the Rare Earth Elements in Murchison Leachates: Relative Abundances and Future Prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ireland, T. J.; Dauphas, N.

    2011-03-01

    We present rare earth element (REE) data for six leachates from the Murchison CM2 chondrite, and present some preliminary experimental data for separating the REE from each other using Ln-resin (HDEHP).

  5. Experimental Parameters Affecting Stripping of Rare Earth Elements from Loaded Sorptive Media in Simulated Geothermal Brines

    DOE Data Explorer

    Dean Stull

    2016-05-24

    Experimental results from several studies exploring the impact of pH and acid volume on the stripping of rare earth elements (REEs) loaded onto ligand-based media via an active column. The REEs in this experiment were loaded onto the media through exposure to a simulated geothermal brine with known mineral concentrations. The data include the experiment results, rare earth element concentrations, and the experimental parameters varied.

  6. SEPARATION OF TRANSURANIC ELEMENTS FROM RARE EARTH COMPOUNDS

    DOEpatents

    Kohman, T.P.

    1961-11-21

    A process of separating neptunium and plutonium values from rare earths and alkaline earth fission products present on a solid mixed actinide carrier (Th or U(IV) oxalate or fluoride) --fission product carrier (LaF/sub 3/, CeF/sub 3/, SrF/sub 2/, CaF/sub 2/, YF/sub 3/, La oxalate, cerous oxalate, Sr oxalate, Ca oxalate or Y oxalate) by extraction of the actinides at elevated temperature with a solution of ammonium fluoride and/or ammonium oxalate is described. Separation of the fission-product-containing carriers from the actinide solution formed and precipitation of the neptunium and plutonium from the solution with mineral acid are also accomplished. (AEC)

  7. Design and refinement of rare earth doped multicore fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prudenzano, F.; Mescia, L.; Di Tommaso, A.; Surico, M.; De Sario, M.

    2013-09-01

    A novel multicore ytterbium doped fiber laser is designed, with the target of maximizing both the effective mode area and the beam quality, by means of a complete home-made computer code. It can be employed to construct high power and Quasi-Gaussian beam lasers. The novel laser configuration exploits a single mode multicore fiber and does not need Talbot cavity or other in-phase mode selection mechanisms. This is an innovative solution, because to the best of our knowledge, for the first time, we have designed a truly single-mode multicore fiber laser. For comparison we have optimized two other laser configurations which are well known in literature, both employing a multimode multicore fiber and a Talbot cavity as a feedback for the in-phase supermode selection. All three multicore fibers, constituted by the same glass, are doped with the same ytterbium ion concentration and pumped with the same input power. Multimodal fiber lasers exhibit lower beam quality, i.e. a higher beam quality factor M2, with respect to the single mode one, even if suitable Talbot cavities are designed, but they are very competitive when a more compact laser cavity is required for the same output power. The novel single mode nineteen core laser exhibits a simulated effective mode area Aeff = 703 μm2 and a beam quality factor M2 = 1.05, showing better characteristics than the other two lasers.

  8. Rare earth element recycling from waste nickel-metal hydride batteries.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiuli; Zhang, Junwei; Fang, Xihui

    2014-08-30

    With an increase in number of waste nickel-metal hydride batteries, and because of the importance of rare earth elements, the recycling of rare earth elements is becoming increasingly important. In this paper, we investigate the effects of temperature, hydrochloric acid concentration, and leaching time to optimize leaching conditions and determine leach kinetics. The results indicate that an increase in temperature, hydrochloric acid concentration, and leaching time enhance the leaching rate of rare earth elements. A maximum rare earth elements recovery of 95.16% was achieved at optimal leaching conditions of 70°C, solid/liquid ratio of 1:10, 20% hydrochloric acid concentration, -74μm particle size, and 100min leaching time. The experimental data were best fitted by a chemical reaction-controlled model. The activation energy was 43.98kJ/mol and the reaction order for hydrochloric acid concentration was 0.64. The kinetic equation for the leaching process was found to be: 1-(1-x)(1/3)=A/ρr0[HCl](0.64)exp-439,8008.314Tt. After leaching and filtration, by adding saturated oxalic solution to the filtrate, rare earth element oxalates were obtained. After removing impurities by adding ammonia, filtering, washing with dilute hydrochloric acid, and calcining at 810°C, a final product of 99% pure rare earth oxides was obtained.

  9. Rare earth element recycling from waste nickel-metal hydride batteries.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiuli; Zhang, Junwei; Fang, Xihui

    2014-08-30

    With an increase in number of waste nickel-metal hydride batteries, and because of the importance of rare earth elements, the recycling of rare earth elements is becoming increasingly important. In this paper, we investigate the effects of temperature, hydrochloric acid concentration, and leaching time to optimize leaching conditions and determine leach kinetics. The results indicate that an increase in temperature, hydrochloric acid concentration, and leaching time enhance the leaching rate of rare earth elements. A maximum rare earth elements recovery of 95.16% was achieved at optimal leaching conditions of 70°C, solid/liquid ratio of 1:10, 20% hydrochloric acid concentration, -74μm particle size, and 100min leaching time. The experimental data were best fitted by a chemical reaction-controlled model. The activation energy was 43.98kJ/mol and the reaction order for hydrochloric acid concentration was 0.64. The kinetic equation for the leaching process was found to be: 1-(1-x)(1/3)=A/ρr0[HCl](0.64)exp-439,8008.314Tt. After leaching and filtration, by adding saturated oxalic solution to the filtrate, rare earth element oxalates were obtained. After removing impurities by adding ammonia, filtering, washing with dilute hydrochloric acid, and calcining at 810°C, a final product of 99% pure rare earth oxides was obtained. PMID:25089667

  10. Determination of thorium and of rare earth elements in cerium earth minerals and ores

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carron, M.K.; Skinner, D.L.; Stevens, R.E.

    1955-01-01

    The conventional oxalate method for precipitating thorium and the rare earth elements in acid solution exhibits definite solubilities of these elements. The present work was undertaken to establish conditions overcoming these solubilities and to find optimum conditions for precipitating thorium and the rare earth elements as hydroxides and sebacates. The investigations resulted in a reliable procedure applicable to samples in which the cerium group elements predominate. The oxalate precipitations are made from homogeneous solution at pH 2 by adding a prepared solution of anhydrous oxalic acid in methanol instead of the more expensive crystalline methyl oxalate. Calcium is added as a carrier. Quantitative precipitation of thorium and the rare earth elements is ascertained by further small additions of calcium to the supernatant liquid, until the added calcium precipitates as oxalate within 2 minutes. Calcium is removed by precipitating the hydroxides of thorium and rare earths at room temperature by adding ammonium hydroxide to pH > 10. Thorium is separated as the sebacate at pH 2.5, and the rare earths are precipitated with ammonium sebacate at pH 9. Maximum errors for combined weights of thorium and rare earth oxides on synthetic mixtures are ??0.6 mg. Maximum error for separated thoria is ??0.5 mg.

  11. Molecular Polyarsenides of the Rare-Earth Elements.

    PubMed

    Arleth, Nicholas; Gamer, Michael T; Köppe, Ralf; Konchenko, Sergey N; Fleischmann, Martin; Scheer, Manfred; Roesky, Peter W

    2016-01-22

    Reduction of [Cp*Fe(η(5)-As5)] with [Cp''2Sm(thf)] (Cp''=η(5)-1,3-(tBu)2C5H3) under various conditions led to [(Cp''2Sm)(μ,η(4):η(4)-As4)(Cp*Fe)] and [(Cp''2Sm)2As7(Cp*Fe)]. Both compounds are the first polyarsenides of the rare-earth metals. [(Cp''2Sm)(μ,η(4):η(4)-As4)(Cp*Fe)] is also the first d/f-triple decker sandwich complex with a purely inorganic planar middle deck. The central As4(2-) unit is isolobal with the 6π-aromatic cyclobutadiene dianion (CH)4(2-). [(Cp''2Sm)2As7(Cp*Fe)] contains an As7(3-) cage, which has a norbornadiene-like structure with two short As-As bonds in the scaffold. DFT calculations confirm all the structural observations. The As-As bond order inside the cyclo As4 ligand in [(Cp''2Sm)(μ,η(4):η(4)-As4)(Cp*Fe)] was estimated to be in between an As-As single bond and a formally aromatic As4(2-) system. PMID:26676537

  12. Molecular Polyarsenides of the Rare-Earth Elements.

    PubMed

    Arleth, Nicholas; Gamer, Michael T; Köppe, Ralf; Konchenko, Sergey N; Fleischmann, Martin; Scheer, Manfred; Roesky, Peter W

    2016-01-22

    Reduction of [Cp*Fe(η(5)-As5)] with [Cp''2Sm(thf)] (Cp''=η(5)-1,3-(tBu)2C5H3) under various conditions led to [(Cp''2Sm)(μ,η(4):η(4)-As4)(Cp*Fe)] and [(Cp''2Sm)2As7(Cp*Fe)]. Both compounds are the first polyarsenides of the rare-earth metals. [(Cp''2Sm)(μ,η(4):η(4)-As4)(Cp*Fe)] is also the first d/f-triple decker sandwich complex with a purely inorganic planar middle deck. The central As4(2-) unit is isolobal with the 6π-aromatic cyclobutadiene dianion (CH)4(2-). [(Cp''2Sm)2As7(Cp*Fe)] contains an As7(3-) cage, which has a norbornadiene-like structure with two short As-As bonds in the scaffold. DFT calculations confirm all the structural observations. The As-As bond order inside the cyclo As4 ligand in [(Cp''2Sm)(μ,η(4):η(4)-As4)(Cp*Fe)] was estimated to be in between an As-As single bond and a formally aromatic As4(2-) system.

  13. Addressing Rare-Earth Element Criticality: An Example from the Aviation Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ku, Anthony Y.; Dosch, Christopher; Grossman, Theodore R.; Herzog, Joseph L.; Maricocchi, Antonio F.; Polli, Drew; Lipkin, Don M.

    2014-11-01

    Rare-earth (RE) elements are enablers for a wide range of technologies, including high-strength permanent magnets, energy-efficient lighting, high-temperature thermal barrier coatings, and catalysts. While direct material substitution is difficult in many of these applications because of the specific electronic, optical, or electrochemical properties imparted by the individual rare-earth elements, we describe an example from the aviation industry where supply chain optimization may be an option. Ceramic matrix composite engine components require environmental barrier coatings (EBCs) to protect them from extreme temperatures and adverse reactions with water vapor in the hot gas path. EBC systems based on rare-earth silicates offer a unique combination of environmental resistance, thermal expansion matching, thermal conductivity, and thermal stability across the service temperature window. Several pure rare-earth silicates and solid solutions have been demonstrated in EBC applications. However, all rely on heavy rare-earth elements (HREEs) for phase stability. This article considers the possibility of using separation tailings containing a mixture of HREEs as a source material in lieu of using the high-purity HREE oxides. This option arises because the desired properties of RE-silicate EBCs derive from the average cation size rather than the electronic properties of the individual rare-earth cations. Because separation tailings have not incurred the costs associated with the final stages of separation, they offer an economical alternative to high-purity oxides for this emerging application.

  14. Addressing Rare-Earth Element Criticality: An Example from the Aviation Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ku, Anthony Y.; Dosch, Christopher; Grossman, Theodore R.; Herzog, Joseph L.; Maricocchi, Antonio F.; Polli, Drew; Lipkin, Don M.

    2014-09-01

    Rare-earth (RE) elements are enablers for a wide range of technologies, including high-strength permanent magnets, energy-efficient lighting, high-temperature thermal barrier coatings, and catalysts. While direct material substitution is difficult in many of these applications because of the specific electronic, optical, or electrochemical properties imparted by the individual rare-earth elements, we describe an example from the aviation industry where supply chain optimization may be an option. Ceramic matrix composite engine components require environmental barrier coatings (EBCs) to protect them from extreme temperatures and adverse reactions with water vapor in the hot gas path. EBC systems based on rare-earth silicates offer a unique combination of environmental resistance, thermal expansion matching, thermal conductivity, and thermal stability across the service temperature window. Several pure rare-earth silicates and solid solutions have been demonstrated in EBC applications. However, all rely on heavy rare-earth elements (HREEs) for phase stability. This article considers the possibility of using separation tailings containing a mixture of HREEs as a source material in lieu of using the high-purity HREE oxides. This option arises because the desired properties of RE-silicate EBCs derive from the average cation size rather than the electronic properties of the individual rare-earth cations. Because separation tailings have not incurred the costs associated with the final stages of separation, they offer an economical alternative to high-purity oxides for this emerging application.

  15. Direct quantification of rare earth doped titania nanoparticles in individual human cells.

    PubMed

    Jeynes, J C G; Jeynes, C; Palitsin, V; Townley, H E

    2016-07-15

    There are many possible biomedical applications for titania nanoparticles (NPs) doped with rare earth elements (REEs), from dose enhancement and diagnostic imaging in radiotherapy, to biosensing. However, there are concerns that the NPs could disintegrate in the body thus releasing toxic REE ions to undesired locations. As a first step, we investigate how accurately the Ti/REE ratio from the NPs can be measured inside human cells. A quantitative analysis of whole, unsectioned, individual human cells was performed using proton microprobe elemental microscopy. This method is unique in being able to quantitatively analyse all the elements in an unsectioned individual cell with micron resolution, while also scanning large fields of view. We compared the Ti/REE signal inside cells to NPs that were outside the cells, non-specifically absorbed onto the polypropylene substrate. We show that the REE signal in individual cells co-localises with the titanium signal, indicating that the NPs have remained intact. Within the uncertainty of the measurement, there is no difference between the Ti/REE ratio inside and outside the cells. Interestingly, we also show that there is considerable variation in the uptake of the NPs from cell-to-cell, by a factor of more than 10. We conclude that the NPs enter the cells and remain intact. The large heterogeneity in NP concentrations from cell-to-cell should be considered if they are to be used therapeutically. PMID:27255758

  16. Direct quantification of rare earth doped titania nanoparticles in individual human cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeynes, J. C. G.; Jeynes, C.; Palitsin, V.; Townley, H. E.

    2016-07-01

    There are many possible biomedical applications for titania nanoparticles (NPs) doped with rare earth elements (REEs), from dose enhancement and diagnostic imaging in radiotherapy, to biosensing. However, there are concerns that the NPs could disintegrate in the body thus releasing toxic REE ions to undesired locations. As a first step, we investigate how accurately the Ti/REE ratio from the NPs can be measured inside human cells. A quantitative analysis of whole, unsectioned, individual human cells was performed using proton microprobe elemental microscopy. This method is unique in being able to quantitatively analyse all the elements in an unsectioned individual cell with micron resolution, while also scanning large fields of view. We compared the Ti/REE signal inside cells to NPs that were outside the cells, non-specifically absorbed onto the polypropylene substrate. We show that the REE signal in individual cells co-localises with the titanium signal, indicating that the NPs have remained intact. Within the uncertainty of the measurement, there is no difference between the Ti/REE ratio inside and outside the cells. Interestingly, we also show that there is considerable variation in the uptake of the NPs from cell-to-cell, by a factor of more than 10. We conclude that the NPs enter the cells and remain intact. The large heterogeneity in NP concentrations from cell-to-cell should be considered if they are to be used therapeutically.

  17. Trace Element Distributions In San Diego Bay: Copper, zinc, manganese, and the rare earth elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gieskes, J. M.; Mahn, C. L.; Rivera-Duarte, I.; Chadwick, B.

    2002-12-01

    San Diego Bay is characterized by the occurrence of large concentration increases in copper and zinc, often related to the inputs of ships in this important harbor (Katz, 1998; Zirino et al, 1978, 1998; Esser and Volpe, 2002). In this paper we report the first data on the distribution of rare earth elements (REE) in the waters of San Diego Bay. The combination of the rare earths data set as well as the other trace element distributions allow us to determine the importance of sediment recycling on trace metals in the Bay. The data suggest that remobilization of trace metals at or near the sediment water interface is of importance (Leather et al., 1995; Chadwick, personal communication). Relevant data from both sedimentary pore fluids and benthic flux measurements that support these interpretations will also be shown.

  18. Infrared spectroscopy of rare-earth-doped CaFe2As2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Zhen; Huffman, T. J.; Xu, Peng; Qazilbash, M. M.; Saha, S. R.; Drye, Tyler; Paglione, J.

    2014-03-01

    Recently, rare-earth doping in CaFe2As2 has been used to tune its electronic, magnetic, and structural properties. The substitution of rare-earth ions at the alkaline-earth sites leads to the suppression of the spin-density wave (SDW) phase transition in CaFe2As2. For example, Pr substitution results in a paramagnetic metal in the tetragonal phase that is susceptible to a low temperature structural transition to a collapsed tetragonal phase. However, La-doped CaFe2As2 remains in the uncollapsed tetragonal structure down to the lowest measured temperatures. Both the uncollapsed and collapsed tetragonal structures exhibit superconductivity with maximum Tc reaching 47 K, the highest observed in inter-metallics albeit with a small superconducting volume fraction. In this work, we perform ab-plane infrared spectroscopy of rare-earth-doped CaFe2As2 at different cryogenic temperatures. Our aim is to ascertain the contributions of electron doping and chemical pressure to the charge and lattice dynamics of this iron-arsenide system.

  19. Quantification of rare earth elements using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Martin, Madhavi; Martin, Rodger C.; Allman, Steve; Brice, Deanne; Wymore, Ann; Andre, Nicolas

    2015-10-21

    In this paper, a study of the optical emission as a function of concentration of laser-ablated yttrium (Y) and of six rare earth elements, europium (Eu), gadolinium (Gd), lanthanum (La), praseodymium (Pr), neodymium (Nd), and samarium (Sm), has been evaluated using the laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique. Statistical methodology using multivariate analysis has been used to obtain the sampling errors, coefficient of regression, calibration, and cross-validation of measurements as they relate to the LIBS analysis in graphite-matrix pellets that were doped with elements at several concentrations. Each element (in oxide form) was mixed in the graphite matrix in percentages rangingmore » from 1% to 50% by weight and the LIBS spectra obtained for each composition as well as for pure oxide samples. Finally, a single pellet was mixed with all the elements in equal oxide masses to determine if we can identify the elemental peaks in a mixed pellet. This dataset is relevant for future application to studies of fission product content and distribution in irradiated nuclear fuels. These results demonstrate that LIBS technique is inherently well suited for the future challenge of in situ analysis of nuclear materials. Finally, these studies also show that LIBS spectral analysis using statistical methodology can provide quantitative results and suggest an approach in future to the far more challenging multielemental analysis of ~ 20 primary elements in high-burnup nuclear reactor fuel.« less

  20. Quantification of rare earth elements using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Madhavi; Martin, Rodger C.; Allman, Steve; Brice, Deanne; Wymore, Ann; Andre, Nicolas

    2015-10-21

    In this paper, a study of the optical emission as a function of concentration of laser-ablated yttrium (Y) and of six rare earth elements, europium (Eu), gadolinium (Gd), lanthanum (La), praseodymium (Pr), neodymium (Nd), and samarium (Sm), has been evaluated using the laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique. Statistical methodology using multivariate analysis has been used to obtain the sampling errors, coefficient of regression, calibration, and cross-validation of measurements as they relate to the LIBS analysis in graphite-matrix pellets that were doped with elements at several concentrations. Each element (in oxide form) was mixed in the graphite matrix in percentages ranging from 1% to 50% by weight and the LIBS spectra obtained for each composition as well as for pure oxide samples. Finally, a single pellet was mixed with all the elements in equal oxide masses to determine if we can identify the elemental peaks in a mixed pellet. This dataset is relevant for future application to studies of fission product content and distribution in irradiated nuclear fuels. These results demonstrate that LIBS technique is inherently well suited for the future challenge of in situ analysis of nuclear materials. Finally, these studies also show that LIBS spectral analysis using statistical methodology can provide quantitative results and suggest an approach in future to the far more challenging multielemental analysis of ~ 20 primary elements in high-burnup nuclear reactor fuel.

  1. Rare Earth Element Fractionation During Evaporation of Chondritic Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Davis, A. M.; Clayton, R. N.

    1993-07-01

    Evaporation experiments suggest that enrichments in the heavy isotopes of oxygen, magnesium, and silicon in some CAIs are caused by kinetic effects during evaporation [1]. Volatility-fractionated REE patterns found in some CAIs have been modeled with some success using equilibrium thermodynamics [2,3], but little is known about kinetic effects on REE patterns. We have begun an investigation of REE fractionation under conditions where large isotope effects are produced by the kinetic isotope effect. We synthesized a starting material containing CI chondritic relative proportions of MgO, Al2O3, SiO2, CaO, TiO2, and FeO, and doped it with 100 ppm each of the REE. Samples of this material were evaporated in a vacuum furnace [4] at 10^-6 torr and 1800 or 2000 degrees C for periods of a few seconds to 5 hr. The mass fraction evaporated ranged from 7.6 to 95.4%. Most residues consist of olivine and glass. Chemical compositions of the residues were determined by electron and ion microprobe. Results for selected elements are shown in Fig. 1. There is no significant evaporation of Ca, Al, and Ti up to 95% mass loss; the evaporation behavior of Mg, Si, and Fe is similar to that found by Hashimoto [5]. There is no significant evaporation of most of the REE up to 95% mass loss. Ce is much more volatile than the other REE under these conditions: a tenfold negative Ce anomaly developed between 60 and 70% mass loss and the anomaly reached 5 X 10^-4 at 95% mass loss. A small Pr anomaly (50% Pr loss) also appeared in the highest-mass-loss residue. Thermodynamic calculations show that Ce has approximately the same volatility as other LREE under solar nebular oxygen fugacity, but is much more volatile than the other REE under oxidizing conditions [6]. We suspect that conditions in the residue in our vacuum evaporation experiments became oxidizing because evaporation reactions involving most major element oxides involve release of oxygen. The four known HAL-type hibonite

  2. Incorporation of rare earth elements in titanite: Stabilization of the A2/a dimorph by creation of antiphase boundaries

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hughes, J.M.; Bloodaxe, E.S.; Hanchar, J.M.; Foord, E.E.

    1997-01-01

    The atomic arrangement of a natural rare-earth-rich titanite and two synthetic rare-earth-doped titanites have been refined in space group A2/a, and the atomic arrangement of an undoped P21/a synthetic titanite was also refined for comparison. Previous work has shown that titanite possesses a domain structure, with domains formed of like-displaced Ti atoms in the [100] octahedral chains. P21/a titanite results when the crystal is formed of a single domain, but as Ti-reversal sites occur in the octahedral chain the apparent A2/a structure results from the average of antiphase domains. Antiphase boundaries occur at O1, which is alternately overbonded or underbonded at the boundaries, depending on the displacement of the neighboring Ti atoms. Type 2 antiphase boundaries exist where two Ti atoms are displaced away from the intervening O1 atom and are energetically unfavorable because of underbonding of that O1 atom. However, substitution of a trivalent rare earth element in the adjacent Ca2+ site relieves that underbonding, favoring the creation of type 2 antiphase boundaries and stabilization of the A2/a dimorph. The results of high-precision crystal structure analyses demonstrate that rare earth substituents for Ca stabilize the A2/a dimorph at lower substitution levels than required for octahedral substitutions.

  3. Capillary-force-induced formation of luminescent polystyrene/(rare-earth-doped nanoparticle) hybrid hollow spheres.

    PubMed

    Chen, Min; Xie, Lin; Li, Fuyou; Zhou, Shuxue; Wu, Limin

    2010-10-01

    This paper presents a "one-pot" procedure to synthesize polystyrene/(rare-earth-doped nanoparticles) (PS/REDNPs) hybrid hollow spheres via the in situ diffusion of organic core into inorganic shell under strong capillary force. In this approach, when carboxyl-capped PS colloids were deposited by different REDNPs in aqueous medium, such as LaF3:Eu3+, LaF3:Ce3+-Tb3+, and YVO4:Dy3+, PS/REDNPs inorganic-organic hybrid hollow spheres could be directly obtained via the in situ diffusion of core PS chains into the voids between rare-earth-doped nanoparticles through the strong capillary force. Not only is the synthetic procedure versatile and very simple, but also the obtained hybrid hollow spheres are hydrophilic and luminescent and could be directly used in chemical and biological fields.

  4. [Application of ICP-MS to Detect Rare Earth Elements in Three Economic Macroalgaes in China].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan-fang; Shang, De-rong; Zhai, Yu-xiu; Ning, Jin-song; Ding, Hai-yan; Sheng, Xiao-feng

    2015-11-01

    In order to investigate the content and distribution of rare earth elements (REE) in main economic macroalgaes in our country, fifteen rare earth elements in three economic macroalgaes (including 30 samples of kelp, 30 samples of laver and 15 samples of Enteromorpha) were detected using ICP-MS method. Results showed that the total content of REE in different species of macroalgaes was different. The highest total content of REE was in Enteromorpha (16,012.0 ng · g⁻¹), while in kelp and laver, the total REE was similar for two macroalgaes (3887.4 and 4318.1 ng · g⁻¹ respectively). The content of fifteen rare earth elements in kelp ranged from 7.9 to 1496.4 ng · g⁻¹; in laver, it ranged from 8.2 to 1836.6 ng · g⁻¹. For Enteromorpha, the concentration of 15 rare earth elements were between 19.2 and 6014.5 ng · g⁻¹. In addition, the content and distribution of different rare earth elements in different macroalgaes was also different. For kelp, the highest content of REE was Ce (1 496.4 ng · g⁻¹), and the second was La (689.1 ng · g⁻¹). For laver, the highest was Y (1836.6 ng · g⁻¹), and the second was Ce (682.2 ng · g⁻¹). For Enteromorpha, the highest was Ce (6014.5 ng · g⁻¹), and the second was La (2902.9 ng · g⁻¹). Present results also showed that three macroalgaes accumulated the light rare earth elements much more than the high rare earth elements. The light rare earth elements occupied 90.9%, 87.3% and 91.1% for kelp, laver and Enteromorpha respectively. The result that the Enteromorpha had high content of rare earth elements could provide important support for opening new research directions for the utilization of Enteromorpha. PMID:26978935

  5. [Application of ICP-MS to Detect Rare Earth Elements in Three Economic Macroalgaes in China].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan-fang; Shang, De-rong; Zhai, Yu-xiu; Ning, Jin-song; Ding, Hai-yan; Sheng, Xiao-feng

    2015-11-01

    In order to investigate the content and distribution of rare earth elements (REE) in main economic macroalgaes in our country, fifteen rare earth elements in three economic macroalgaes (including 30 samples of kelp, 30 samples of laver and 15 samples of Enteromorpha) were detected using ICP-MS method. Results showed that the total content of REE in different species of macroalgaes was different. The highest total content of REE was in Enteromorpha (16,012.0 ng · g⁻¹), while in kelp and laver, the total REE was similar for two macroalgaes (3887.4 and 4318.1 ng · g⁻¹ respectively). The content of fifteen rare earth elements in kelp ranged from 7.9 to 1496.4 ng · g⁻¹; in laver, it ranged from 8.2 to 1836.6 ng · g⁻¹. For Enteromorpha, the concentration of 15 rare earth elements were between 19.2 and 6014.5 ng · g⁻¹. In addition, the content and distribution of different rare earth elements in different macroalgaes was also different. For kelp, the highest content of REE was Ce (1 496.4 ng · g⁻¹), and the second was La (689.1 ng · g⁻¹). For laver, the highest was Y (1836.6 ng · g⁻¹), and the second was Ce (682.2 ng · g⁻¹). For Enteromorpha, the highest was Ce (6014.5 ng · g⁻¹), and the second was La (2902.9 ng · g⁻¹). Present results also showed that three macroalgaes accumulated the light rare earth elements much more than the high rare earth elements. The light rare earth elements occupied 90.9%, 87.3% and 91.1% for kelp, laver and Enteromorpha respectively. The result that the Enteromorpha had high content of rare earth elements could provide important support for opening new research directions for the utilization of Enteromorpha.

  6. Distribution characteristics of rare earth elements in children's scalp hair from a rare earths mining area in southern China.

    PubMed

    Tong, Shi-Lu; Zhu, Wang-Zhao; Gao, Zhao-Hua; Meng, Yu-Xiu; Peng, Rui-Ling; Lu, Guo-Cheng

    2004-01-01

    In order to demonstrate the validity of using scalp hair rare earth elements (REEs) content as a biomarker of human REEs exposure, data were collected on REEs exposure levels from children aged 11-15 years old and living in an ion-adsorptive type light REEs (LREEs) mining and surrounding areas in southern China. Sixty scalp hair samples were analyzed by ICP-MS for 16 REEs (La Lu, Y and Sc). Sixteen REEs contents in the samples from the mining area (e.g., range: La: 0.14-6.93 microg/g; Nd: 0.09-5.27 microg/g; Gd: 12.2-645.6ng/g; Lu: 0.2-13.3 ng/g; Y: 0.03-1.27 microg/g; Sc: 0.05-0.30 microg/g) were significantly higher than those from the reference area (range: La: 0.04-0.40 microg/g; Nd: 0.04-0.32 microg/g; Gd: 8.3-64.6 ng/g; Lu: 0.4-3.3ng/g; Y: 0.03-0.29 microg/g; Sc: 0.11-0.36 microg/g) and even much higher than those published in the literature. The distribution pattern of REEs in scalp hair from the mining area was very similar to that of REEs in the mine and the atmosphere shrouding that area. In conclusion, the scalp hair REEs contents may indicate not only quantitatively but also qualitatively (distribution pattern) the absorption of REEs from environmental exposure into human body. The children living in this mining area should be regarded as a high-risk group with REEs (especially LREEs) exposure, and their health status should be examined from a REEs health risk assessment perspective. PMID:15478941

  7. Coherency strain enhanced dielectric-temperature property of rare-earth doped BaTiO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Jeon, Sang-Chae; Kang, Suk-Joong L.

    2013-03-18

    Core/shell-grained BaTiO{sub 3} samples were prepared with addition of rare earth elements. The core/shell interface was semi-coherent, and many misfit dislocations formed in Dy-doped samples. In contrast, a coherent interface and few dislocations were observed in Ho- and Er-doped samples. Dy-doped samples exhibited poor temperature stability, showing a peak with no frequency dispersion. Ho- and Er-doped samples exhibited a broad curve with frequency dispersion. This improved temperature stability is attributed to the coherency strain, which leads to the formation of polar nano-regions in the shell. Coherency at the core/shell interface is critical to improve the temperature stability of core/shell-structured BaTiO{sub 3}.

  8. RARE EARTH ELEMENTS: A REVIEW OF PRODUCTION, PROCESSING, RECYCLING, AND ASSOCIATED ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rare earth elements (REEs) are a group of 15 chemical elements in the periodic table, specifically the lanthanides. Two other elements, scandium and yttrium, have a similar physiochemistry to the lanthanides, are commonly found in the same mineral assemblages, and are often refe...

  9. Nanophotonic coherent light–matter interfaces based on rare-earth-doped crystals

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Tian; Kindem, Jonathan M.; Miyazono, Evan; Faraon, Andrei

    2015-01-01

    Quantum light–matter interfaces connecting stationary qubits to photons will enable optical networks for quantum communications, precise global time keeping, photon switching and studies of fundamental physics. Rare-earth-ion-doped crystals are state-of-the-art materials for optical quantum memories and quantum transducers between optical photons, microwave photons and spin waves. Here we demonstrate coupling of an ensemble of neodymium rare-earth-ions to photonic nanocavities fabricated in the yttrium orthosilicate host crystal. Cavity quantum electrodynamics effects including Purcell enhancement (F=42) and dipole-induced transparency are observed on the highly coherent 4I9/2–4F3/2 optical transition. Fluctuations in the cavity transmission due to statistical fine structure of the atomic density are measured, indicating operation at the quantum level. Coherent optical control of cavity-coupled rare-earth ions is performed via photon echoes. Long optical coherence times (T2∼100 μs) and small inhomogeneous broadening are measured for the cavity-coupled rare-earth ions, thus demonstrating their potential for on-chip scalable quantum light–matter interfaces. PMID:26364586

  10. Nanophotonic coherent light-matter interfaces based on rare-earth-doped crystals.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Tian; Kindem, Jonathan M; Miyazono, Evan; Faraon, Andrei

    2015-01-01

    Quantum light-matter interfaces connecting stationary qubits to photons will enable optical networks for quantum communications, precise global time keeping, photon switching and studies of fundamental physics. Rare-earth-ion-doped crystals are state-of-the-art materials for optical quantum memories and quantum transducers between optical photons, microwave photons and spin waves. Here we demonstrate coupling of an ensemble of neodymium rare-earth-ions to photonic nanocavities fabricated in the yttrium orthosilicate host crystal. Cavity quantum electrodynamics effects including Purcell enhancement (F=42) and dipole-induced transparency are observed on the highly coherent (4)I(9/2)-(4)F(3/2) optical transition. Fluctuations in the cavity transmission due to statistical fine structure of the atomic density are measured, indicating operation at the quantum level. Coherent optical control of cavity-coupled rare-earth ions is performed via photon echoes. Long optical coherence times (T2∼100 μs) and small inhomogeneous broadening are measured for the cavity-coupled rare-earth ions, thus demonstrating their potential for on-chip scalable quantum light-matter interfaces. PMID:26364586

  11. Nanophotonic coherent light-matter interfaces based on rare-earth-doped crystals.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Tian; Kindem, Jonathan M; Miyazono, Evan; Faraon, Andrei

    2015-09-14

    Quantum light-matter interfaces connecting stationary qubits to photons will enable optical networks for quantum communications, precise global time keeping, photon switching and studies of fundamental physics. Rare-earth-ion-doped crystals are state-of-the-art materials for optical quantum memories and quantum transducers between optical photons, microwave photons and spin waves. Here we demonstrate coupling of an ensemble of neodymium rare-earth-ions to photonic nanocavities fabricated in the yttrium orthosilicate host crystal. Cavity quantum electrodynamics effects including Purcell enhancement (F=42) and dipole-induced transparency are observed on the highly coherent (4)I(9/2)-(4)F(3/2) optical transition. Fluctuations in the cavity transmission due to statistical fine structure of the atomic density are measured, indicating operation at the quantum level. Coherent optical control of cavity-coupled rare-earth ions is performed via photon echoes. Long optical coherence times (T2∼100 μs) and small inhomogeneous broadening are measured for the cavity-coupled rare-earth ions, thus demonstrating their potential for on-chip scalable quantum light-matter interfaces.

  12. Pulsed laser deposition of rare-earth-doped glasses: a step toward lightwave circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morea, R.; Fernandez, J.; Balda, R.; Gonzalo, J.

    2016-02-01

    Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) is used to produce Er-doped lead-niobium germanate (PbO-Nb2O5-GeO2) and fluorotellurite (TeO2-ZnO-ZnF2) thin film glasses. Films having high refractive index, low absorption and large transmission are obtained in a narrow processing window that depends on the actual PLD configuration (O2 pressure ˜a few Pa, Laser energy density ˜2-3 J cm-2 for the results presented in this work). However, Er-doped thin film glasses synthetized at room temperature using these experimental parameters show poor photoluminescence (PL) performance due to non-radiative decay channels, such as a large OH- concentration. Thermal annealing allows improving PL intensity and lifetime (τPL), the latter becoming close to that of the parent Er-doped bulk glass. In addition, the use of alternate PLD from host glass and rare-earth targets allows the synthesis of nanostructured thin film glasses with a controlled rare-earth concentration and in-depth distribution, as it is illustrated for Er-doped PbO-Nb2O5-GeO2 film glasses. In this case, PL intensity at 1.53 μm increases with the spacing between Er-doped layers to reach a maximum for a separation between Er-doped layers >= 5 nm, while τPL is close to the bulk value independently of the spacing. Finally, the comparison of these results with those obtained for films grown by standard PLD from Er-doped glass targets suggests that nanostructuration allows reducing rare-earth clustering and concentration quenching effects.

  13. Oxides doped with rare-earth ions as a recording medium with multiple rewriting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimenko, Vladislav I.; Petrov, Viacheslav V.; Kravets, Vasyliy G.; Motuz, Vasily V.; Prygun, Alexander V.; Yanchuk, N. E.

    1997-02-01

    The optical memory on materials having the properties of electron trapping is a new direction at development of information storage and rewrite. Currently are pursued investigations directed on creation of a new type recording medium with the opportunity of information rewrite by optical methods as well as a medium for heteroassociative memory in optical neural systems. Primarily as such medium are used alkaline-earth metal sulphides activated by two rare-earth elements. When creating the memory on materials with electron trapping on the basis of alkaline-earth sulphides there arises a number of difficulties: (1) these materials are chemically unstable, especially they are subject to the action of water vapors; (2) films prepared by electron-beam evaporation technique have a polycrystalline structure with grain sizes in the order of 20 nm what has an essential influence on the signal-to-noise ratio at information reading. The main objective which is pursued by us consists in investigating the optical properties of new synthesized materials having the electron trapping properties which are characterized by chemical stability and are easy manufacture at preparation of amorphous structures. We have also recommended to use CaO (MgO) doped with Eu, Sm. It has known, that the optical stimulated luminescence (OSL) obtains in CaO. But OSL appears in the special prepared structures with defects. For this aim there are some methods: thermochemical reduction or radiation processing by electron beam. Besides that the OSL obtains only by nitrogen temperature (77 K).

  14. Effects of rare earth elements on telomerase activity and apoptosis of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Li; Dai, Yucheng; Yuan, Zhaokang; Li, Jie

    2007-04-01

    To study the effects of rare earth exposure on human telomerase and apoptosis of mononuclear cells from human peripheral blood (PBMNCs). The blood contents of 15 rare earth elements, including La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, Lu, and Y, were measured by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. Telomeric repeat amplification protocol assay and flow cytometer analysis were carried out to analyze the telomerase activity and apoptosis of PBMNCs, respectively. The total content of rare earth elements in the blood showed significant differences between the exposed group and the control group. The rare earth exposure increased the telomerase activity and the percentages of cells in the S-phase and the G2/M phase in PBMNCs, but it had no effect on the apoptotic rate of PBMNCs. Under the exposure to lower concentrations of rare earth elements, the telomerase activity of PBMNCs in the exposed group was higher than that of the control group, and there was no effect on the apoptotic rate of PBMNCs, but promoted the diploid DNA replication and increased the percentages of G2/M- and S-phase cells.

  15. Numerical simulations of the optical gain of crystalline fiber doped by rare earth and transition ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daoui, A. K.; Boubir, B.; Adouane, A.; Demagh, N.; Ghoumazi, M.

    2015-02-01

    A fiber laser is a laser whose gain medium is a doped fiber, although lasers whose cavity is made wholly of fibers have also been called fiber lasers. The gain media in a fiber laser is usually fiber doped with rare-earth ions, such as erbium (Er), neodymium (Nd), ytterbium (Yb), thulium (Tm), or praseodymium (Pr), which is doped into the core of the optical fiber, similar to those used to transmit telecommunications signals. Fiber lasers find many applications in materials processing, including cutting, welding, drilling, and marking metal. To maximize their market penetration, it is necessary to increase their output power. In this work, we present a detailed study based on the numerical simulation using MATLAB, of one of the principal characteristics of a fiber laser doped with rare earth ions and transition ion. The gain depends on several parameters such as the length of the doped fiber, the density, the pump power, noise, etc.). The used program resolves the state equations in this context together with those governing the light propagation phenomena. The developed code can also be used to study the dynamic operating modes of a doped fiber laser.

  16. Germanium and Rare Earth Element accumulation in woody bioenergy crops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hentschel, Werner

    2016-04-01

    Germanium and REEs are strategic elements that are used for high tech devices and engineered systems, however these elements are hardly concentrated into mineable ore deposits. Since these elements occur widely dispersed in the earth crust with concentrations of several mgṡkg‑1 (Ge 1.6 mgṡkg‑1, Nd 25 mgṡkg‑1) a new possibility to gain these elements could be phytomining, a technique that uses plants to extract elements from soils via their roots. Since knowledge about accumulating plant species is quite limited we conducted research on the concentrations of strategic elements in wood and leaves of fast growing tree species (Salix spec., Populus spec., Betula pendula, Alnus glutinosa, Fraxinus excelsior, Acer pseudoplatanus). In total 35 study sites were selected in the mining affected area around Freiberg (Saxony, Germany), differing in their species composition and degree of contamination with toxic trace metals (Pb, As, Cd). On each site plant tissues (wood and leaves, respectively) of different species were sampled. In addition soil samples were taken from a soil depth of 0 - 30 cm and 30 - 60 cm. The aim of our work was to investigate correlations between the concentrations of the target elements in plant tissues and soil characteristics like pH, texture, nutrients and concentrations in six operationally defined soil fractions (mobile, acid soluble, oxidizable, amorphic oxides, crystalline oxides, residual or siliceous). Concentrations of elements in soil extracts and plant tissues were measured with ICP-MS. The element Nd was selected as representative for the group of REEs, since this element showed a high correlation with the concentrations of the other REE We found that the concentration of Nd in the leaves (0.31 mgṡkg‑1Nd) were several times higher than in herbaceous species (0.05 mgṡkg‑1 Nd). The concentration of Ge in leaves were ten times lower than that of Nd whereas in herbaceous species Nd and Ge were in equal magnitude. Within

  17. Germanium and Rare Earth Element accumulation in woody bioenergy crops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hentschel, Werner

    2016-04-01

    Germanium and REEs are strategic elements that are used for high tech devices and engineered systems, however these elements are hardly concentrated into mineable ore deposits. Since these elements occur widely dispersed in the earth crust with concentrations of several mgṡkg-1 (Ge 1.6 mgṡkg-1, Nd 25 mgṡkg-1) a new possibility to gain these elements could be phytomining, a technique that uses plants to extract elements from soils via their roots. Since knowledge about accumulating plant species is quite limited we conducted research on the concentrations of strategic elements in wood and leaves of fast growing tree species (Salix spec., Populus spec., Betula pendula, Alnus glutinosa, Fraxinus excelsior, Acer pseudoplatanus). In total 35 study sites were selected in the mining affected area around Freiberg (Saxony, Germany), differing in their species composition and degree of contamination with toxic trace metals (Pb, As, Cd). On each site plant tissues (wood and leaves, respectively) of different species were sampled. In addition soil samples were taken from a soil depth of 0 - 30 cm and 30 - 60 cm. The aim of our work was to investigate correlations between the concentrations of the target elements in plant tissues and soil characteristics like pH, texture, nutrients and concentrations in six operationally defined soil fractions (mobile, acid soluble, oxidizable, amorphic oxides, crystalline oxides, residual or siliceous). Concentrations of elements in soil extracts and plant tissues were measured with ICP-MS. The element Nd was selected as representative for the group of REEs, since this element showed a high correlation with the concentrations of the other REE We found that the concentration of Nd in the leaves (0.31 mgṡkg-1Nd) were several times higher than in herbaceous species (0.05 mgṡkg-1 Nd). The concentration of Ge in leaves were ten times lower than that of Nd whereas in herbaceous species Nd and Ge were in equal magnitude. Within the tree

  18. [Effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi on the growth and rare earth elements uptake of soybean grown in rare earth mine tailings].

    PubMed

    Guo, Wei; Zhao, Ren-xin; Zhao, Wen-jing; Fu, Rui-ying; Guo, Jiang-yuan; Zhang, Jun

    2013-05-01

    A greenhouse pot experiment was conducted to investigate the influence of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi Glomus versiforme on the plant growth, nutrient uptake, C: N: P stoichiometric, uptake of heavy metals and rare earth elements by soybean (Glycine max) grown in rare earth mine tailings. The aim was to provide a basis for the revegetation of rare earth mine tailings. The results indicated that soybean had a high mycorrhizal colonization and symbiotic associations were successfully established with G. versiforme, with an average rate of approximately 67%. The colonization of G. versiforme significantly promoted the growth of soybean, increased P, K contents, and decreased C: N: P ratios, supporting the growth rate hypothesis. Inoculation with G. versiforme significantly decreased shoots and roots La, Ce, Pr and Nd concentrations of soybean compared to the control treatment. However, inoculation with G. versiforme had no significant effect on the heavy metal concentrations, except for significantly decreased shoot Fe and Cr concentrations and increased root Cd concentrations. The experiment demonstrates that AM fungi have a potential role for soybean to adapt the composite adversity of rare earth tailings and play a positive role in revegetation of rare earth mine tailings. Further studies on the role of AM fungi under natural conditions should be conducted.

  19. Trace Elemental Imaging of Rare Earth Elements Discriminates Tissues at Microscale in Flat Fossils

    PubMed Central

    Gueriau, Pierre; Mocuta, Cristian; Dutheil, Didier B.; Cohen, Serge X.; Thiaudière, Dominique; Charbonnier, Sylvain; Clément, Gaël; Bertrand, Loïc

    2014-01-01

    The interpretation of flattened fossils remains a major challenge due to compression of their complex anatomies during fossilization, making critical anatomical features invisible or hardly discernible. Key features are often hidden under greatly preserved decay prone tissues, or an unpreparable sedimentary matrix. A method offering access to such anatomical features is of paramount interest to resolve taxonomic affinities and to study fossils after a least possible invasive preparation. Unfortunately, the widely-used X-ray micro-computed tomography, for visualizing hidden or internal structures of a broad range of fossils, is generally inapplicable to flattened specimens, due to the very high differential absorbance in distinct directions. Here we show that synchrotron X-ray fluorescence spectral raster-scanning coupled to spectral decomposition or a much faster Kullback-Leibler divergence based statistical analysis provides microscale visualization of tissues. We imaged exceptionally well-preserved fossils from the Late Cretaceous without needing any prior delicate preparation. The contrasting elemental distributions greatly improved the discrimination of skeletal elements material from both the sedimentary matrix and fossilized soft tissues. Aside content in alkaline earth elements and phosphorus, a critical parameter for tissue discrimination is the distinct amounts of rare earth elements. Local quantification of rare earths may open new avenues for fossil description but also in paleoenvironmental and taphonomical studies. PMID:24489809

  20. Trace elemental imaging of rare earth elements discriminates tissues at microscale in flat fossils.

    PubMed

    Gueriau, Pierre; Mocuta, Cristian; Dutheil, Didier B; Cohen, Serge X; Thiaudière, Dominique; Charbonnier, Sylvain; Clément, Gaël; Bertrand, Loïc

    2014-01-01

    The interpretation of flattened fossils remains a major challenge due to compression of their complex anatomies during fossilization, making critical anatomical features invisible or hardly discernible. Key features are often hidden under greatly preserved decay prone tissues, or an unpreparable sedimentary matrix. A method offering access to such anatomical features is of paramount interest to resolve taxonomic affinities and to study fossils after a least possible invasive preparation. Unfortunately, the widely-used X-ray micro-computed tomography, for visualizing hidden or internal structures of a broad range of fossils, is generally inapplicable to flattened specimens, due to the very high differential absorbance in distinct directions. Here we show that synchrotron X-ray fluorescence spectral raster-scanning coupled to spectral decomposition or a much faster Kullback-Leibler divergence based statistical analysis provides microscale visualization of tissues. We imaged exceptionally well-preserved fossils from the Late Cretaceous without needing any prior delicate preparation. The contrasting elemental distributions greatly improved the discrimination of skeletal elements material from both the sedimentary matrix and fossilized soft tissues. Aside content in alkaline earth elements and phosphorus, a critical parameter for tissue discrimination is the distinct amounts of rare earth elements. Local quantification of rare earths may open new avenues for fossil description but also in paleoenvironmental and taphonomical studies.

  1. Trace elemental imaging of rare earth elements discriminates tissues at microscale in flat fossils.

    PubMed

    Gueriau, Pierre; Mocuta, Cristian; Dutheil, Didier B; Cohen, Serge X; Thiaudière, Dominique; Charbonnier, Sylvain; Clément, Gaël; Bertrand, Loïc

    2014-01-01

    The interpretation of flattened fossils remains a major challenge due to compression of their complex anatomies during fossilization, making critical anatomical features invisible or hardly discernible. Key features are often hidden under greatly preserved decay prone tissues, or an unpreparable sedimentary matrix. A method offering access to such anatomical features is of paramount interest to resolve taxonomic affinities and to study fossils after a least possible invasive preparation. Unfortunately, the widely-used X-ray micro-computed tomography, for visualizing hidden or internal structures of a broad range of fossils, is generally inapplicable to flattened specimens, due to the very high differential absorbance in distinct directions. Here we show that synchrotron X-ray fluorescence spectral raster-scanning coupled to spectral decomposition or a much faster Kullback-Leibler divergence based statistical analysis provides microscale visualization of tissues. We imaged exceptionally well-preserved fossils from the Late Cretaceous without needing any prior delicate preparation. The contrasting elemental distributions greatly improved the discrimination of skeletal elements material from both the sedimentary matrix and fossilized soft tissues. Aside content in alkaline earth elements and phosphorus, a critical parameter for tissue discrimination is the distinct amounts of rare earth elements. Local quantification of rare earths may open new avenues for fossil description but also in paleoenvironmental and taphonomical studies. PMID:24489809

  2. Rare earths and other trace elements in Apollo 14 samples.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helmke, P. A.; Haskin, L. A.; Korotev, R. L.; Ziege, K. E.

    1972-01-01

    REE and other trace elements have been determined in igneous rocks 14053, 14072, and 14310, in breccias 14063 and 14313, and in fines 14163. All materials analyzed have typical depletions of Eu except for feldspar fragments from the breccias and igneous fragments from 14063. Igneous rocks 14072 and 14053 have REE concentrations very similar to Apollo 12 basalts; 14310 has the highest REE concentrations yet observed for a large fragment of lunar basalt. The effects of crystallization of a basaltic liquid as a closed system on the concentrations of Sm and Eu in feldspar are considered. Small anorthositic fragments may have originated by simple crystallization from very highly differentiated basalt (KREEP) or by closed-system crystallization in a less differentiated starting material. Application of independent models of igneous differentiation to Sm and Eu in massive anorthosite 15415 and to Sm and Eu in lunar basalts suggests a common starting material with a ratio of concentrations of Sm and Eu about the same as that in chondrites and with concentrations of those elements about 15 times enriched over chondrites.

  3. [Geochemical characteristics of rare earth elements on sunflower growing area in the west of Jilin Province].

    PubMed

    Li, Shu-Jie; Dou, Sen; Wang, Li-Min; Liu, Zhao-Shun

    2011-07-01

    Soil and plant samples were collected from the sunflower growing area in the west of Jilin province. A variety of ancillary methods were used to determine the soil element content. Then the rare earth elements geochemistry in soil was studied, and the correlation of REEs in this region with other elements and the quality of plant was investigated. The results show that, (1) REE content of the soil in Nong'an is relatively higher to those in Daan and Tongyu. Distribution pattern of rare earth elements in soil for the right tilt of the light rare earth enrichment patterns which is consistent with the national distribution pattern of rare earth elements; (2) REE contents in the three studying areas in the soil are different, and this primarily relates to the soil parent materials; (3) The REEs which positively correlate with soil available potassium are Se, Fe2O3, Ti, P, Mn, Cu, Zn, Cr, Mo, B, F. The protein content of sunflower seeds has a negative correlation with REE. With the exception of Lu, all REEs show a similar correlation.

  4. Evidence for interface superconductivity in rare-earth doped CaFe2As2 single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Bing; Deng, L. Z.; Wei, F. Y.; Xue, Y. Y.; Chu, C. W.

    2014-03-01

    To unravel to the mysterious non-bulk superconductivity up to 49K observed in rare-earth (R =La, Ce, Pr and Nd) doped CaFe2As2 single-crystals whose Tc is higher than that of any known compounds consisting of one or more of its constituent elements of R, Ca, Fe, and As at ambient or under pressures, systematic magnetic, compositional and structural have carried out on different rare-earth-doped (Ca1-xRx) Fe2As2 samples. We have detected extremely large magnetic anisotropy, doping-level independent Tc, unexpected superparamagnetic clusters associated with As vacancies and their close correlation with the superconducting volume fraction, the existence of mesoscopic-2D structures and Josephson-junction arrays in this system. These observations lead us to conjecture that the Tc enhancement may be associated with naturally occurring chemical interfaces and thus provided evidence for the possible interface-enhanced Tc in naturally-grown single crystals of Fe-based superconductors.

  5. The effect of rare earth elements on the texture and formability of asymmetrically rolled magnesium sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Alderman, Dr. Martyn; Cavin, Odis Burl; Davis, Dr. Bruce; Muralidharan, Govindarajan; Muth, Thomas R; Peter, William H; Randman, David; Watkins, Thomas R

    2011-01-01

    The lack of formability is a serious issue when considering magnesium alloys for various applications. Standard symmetric rolling introduces a strong basal texture that decreases the formability; however, asymmetric rolling has been put forward as a possible route to produce sheet with weaker texture and greater ductility. It has also been shown in recent work that weaker textures can be produced through the addition of rare earth elements to magnesium alloys. Therefore, this study has been carried out to investigate the effect of rare earth additions on the texture changes during asymmetric rolling. Two alloys have been used, AZ31B and ZEK100. The effect that the rare earth additions have on the texture of asymmetrically rolled sheet and the subsequent changes in formability will be discussed.

  6. Undecaprenyl Pyrophosphate Involvement in Susceptibility of Bacillus subtilis to Rare Earth Elements

    PubMed Central

    Ochi, Kozo

    2012-01-01

    The rare earth element scandium has weak antibacterial potency. We identified a mutation responsible for a scandium-resistant phenotype in Bacillus subtilis. This mutation was found within the uppS gene, which encodes undecaprenyl pyrophosphate synthase, and designated uppS86 (for the Thr-to-Ile amino acid substitution at residue 86 of undecaprenyl pyrophosphate synthase). The uppS86 mutation also gave rise to increased resistance to bacitracin, which prevents cell wall synthesis by inhibiting the dephosphorylation of undecaprenyl pyrophosphate, in addition to enhanced amylase production. Conversely, overexpression of the wild-type uppS gene resulted in increased susceptibilities to both scandium and bacitracin. Moreover, the mutant lacking undecaprenyl pyrophosphate phosphatase (BcrC) showed increased susceptibility to all rare earth elements tested. These results suggest that the accumulation of undecaprenyl pyrophosphate renders cells more susceptible to rare earth elements. The availability of undecaprenyl pyrophosphate may be an important determinant for susceptibility to rare earth elements, such as scandium. PMID:22904278

  7. Compilation of Rare Earth Element Analyses from US Geothermal Fields and Mid Ocean Ridge Hydrothermal Vents

    DOE Data Explorer

    Andrew Fowler

    2015-10-01

    Compilation of rare earth element and associated major and minor dissolved constituent analytical data for USA geothermal fields and global seafloor hydrothermal vents. Data is in original units. Reference to and use of this data should be attributed to the original authors and publications according to the provisions outlined therein.

  8. Catalytic Graphitization of Coal-Based Carbon Materials with Light Rare Earth Elements.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rongyan; Lu, Guimin; Qiao, Wenming; Yu, Jianguo

    2016-08-30

    The catalytic graphitization mechanism of coal-based carbon materials with light rare earth elements was investigated using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, selected-area electron diffraction, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The interface between light rare earth elements and carbon materials was carefully observed, and two routes of rare earth elements catalyzing the carbon materials were found: dissolution-precipitation and carbide formation-decomposition. These two simultaneous processes certainly accelerate the catalytic graphitization of carbon materials, and light rare earth elements exert significant influence on the microstructure and thermal conductivity of graphite. Moreover, by virtue of praseodymium (Pr), it was found that a highly crystallographic orientation of graphite was induced and formed, which was reasonably attributed to the similar arrangements of the planes perpendicular to (001) in both graphite and Pr crystals. The interface between Pr and carbon was found to be an important factor for the orientation of graphite structure. PMID:27482724

  9. Technical Information Resource on Rare Earth Elements Now Available to Public and Private Sector Stakeholders

    EPA Science Inventory

    A new EPA technical information resource, “Rare Earth Elements: A Review of Production, Processing, Recycling, and Associated Environmental Issues” has been produced as an introductory resource for those interested in learning more about REE mining and alternatives to meet demand...

  10. Undecaprenyl pyrophosphate involvement in susceptibility of Bacillus subtilis to rare earth elements.

    PubMed

    Inaoka, Takashi; Ochi, Kozo

    2012-10-01

    The rare earth element scandium has weak antibacterial potency. We identified a mutation responsible for a scandium-resistant phenotype in Bacillus subtilis. This mutation was found within the uppS gene, which encodes undecaprenyl pyrophosphate synthase, and designated uppS86 (for the Thr-to-Ile amino acid substitution at residue 86 of undecaprenyl pyrophosphate synthase). The uppS86 mutation also gave rise to increased resistance to bacitracin, which prevents cell wall synthesis by inhibiting the dephosphorylation of undecaprenyl pyrophosphate, in addition to enhanced amylase production. Conversely, overexpression of the wild-type uppS gene resulted in increased susceptibilities to both scandium and bacitracin. Moreover, the mutant lacking undecaprenyl pyrophosphate phosphatase (BcrC) showed increased susceptibility to all rare earth elements tested. These results suggest that the accumulation of undecaprenyl pyrophosphate renders cells more susceptible to rare earth elements. The availability of undecaprenyl pyrophosphate may be an important determinant for susceptibility to rare earth elements, such as scandium.

  11. Catalytic Graphitization of Coal-Based Carbon Materials with Light Rare Earth Elements.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rongyan; Lu, Guimin; Qiao, Wenming; Yu, Jianguo

    2016-08-30

    The catalytic graphitization mechanism of coal-based carbon materials with light rare earth elements was investigated using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, selected-area electron diffraction, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The interface between light rare earth elements and carbon materials was carefully observed, and two routes of rare earth elements catalyzing the carbon materials were found: dissolution-precipitation and carbide formation-decomposition. These two simultaneous processes certainly accelerate the catalytic graphitization of carbon materials, and light rare earth elements exert significant influence on the microstructure and thermal conductivity of graphite. Moreover, by virtue of praseodymium (Pr), it was found that a highly crystallographic orientation of graphite was induced and formed, which was reasonably attributed to the similar arrangements of the planes perpendicular to (001) in both graphite and Pr crystals. The interface between Pr and carbon was found to be an important factor for the orientation of graphite structure.

  12. Tracing sediment movement on semi-arid watershed using Rare Earth Elements 1988

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A multi-tracer method employing rare earth elements (REE) was used to determine sediment yield and to track sediment movement in a small semiarid watershed. A 0.33 ha watershed near Tombstone, AZ was divided into five morphological units, each tagged with one of five REE oxides. Relative contributi...

  13. Interactions between exogenous rare earth elements and phosphorus leaching in packed soil columns

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rare earth elements (REEs) increasingly used in agriculture as an amendment for crop growth may help to lessen environmental losses of phosphorus (P) from heavily fertilized soils. The vertical transport characteristics of P and REEs, lanthanum (La), neodymium (Nd), samarium (Sm), and cerium (Ce), w...

  14. Preliminary study on using rare earth elements to trace non-point source phosphorous loss

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The environmental fate of phosphorus (P) is of concern as P is a primary cause of freshwater eutrophication. Rare earth elements (REEs) have been successfully used in the analysis of soil erosion and pollutant sources, as well as in the analysis of mineral genesis. To better understand the potential...

  15. Fluid rare earth element anlayses from wells RN-12 and RN-19, Reykjanes, Iceland

    SciTech Connect

    Andrew Fowler

    2015-07-24

    Results for fluid rare earth elment analyses from Reykjanes wells RN-12 and RN-19. The data have not been corrected for flashing. Samples preconcetrated using chelating resin with IDA functional group (InertSep ME-1). Analyzed using and Element magnetic sctor ICP-MS.

  16. Kiglapait geochemistry VII: Yttrium and the rare earth elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morse, S. A.; Nolan, K. M.

    1985-07-01

    Based on 51 wholerock analyses by XRF and summation over the layered group, the Kiglapait Intrusion contains 4.7 -1.6+1.2 ppm Y, which resides principally in augite and apatite. Using liquid compositions calculated by summation, the partition coefficient D AUG/LY is 0.95 ± 0.12 from 84 to 97 PCS (percent solidified) and 1.5 ± 0.4 above 97 PCS. For feldspar, the most likely value for D is 0.028 ± 0.02 ( N = 6). REE analyses for 13 whole rocks were interpreted with the aid of yttrium models to yield trends for wholerocks and liquids vs PCS. Summations over the rocks of the layered group gave La = 2.5, Ce = 5.8, Nd = 3.9, Sm = 1.0, Eu = 0.8, Tb = 0.17, Yb = 0.37, and Lu = 0.06 ppm, with 2 s.d. errors near ± 30%. All these elements are highly incompatible until the arrival of augite, which affects chiefly the HREE, and apatite, which affects all (but more strongly, the LREE). The net result is that after apatite arrival at 94 PCS, the liquid compositions are nearly constant, hence D REEWR/L ≈ 1.0. These results are compatible with the mineralogy of the intrusion and the estimated partition coefficients for feldspar, olivine, augite, apatite, and Fe-Ti oxide minerals. For pre-apatite liquids, D REEFSP/L vary regularly with the normative di content of the liquid and change by an order of magnitude, hence the bulk liquid composition must be considered in any attempt to invert the compositions of feldspars to parent liquids. The Eu anomaly at first decreases in Kiglapait liquids due to plagioclase fractionation, but then increases due to removal of augite and apatite with negative Eu anomalies. The features dominantly responsible for Eu partitioning are liquid structure and, for monoclinic ternary feldspars, crystal structure. The former is best monitored by the augite or diopside content of the liquid and the latter, by the K content of the feldspar. The chondrite-normalized REE pattern for the intrusion has LaN = 7.4, LuN = 1.6, ( Ce/Yb) N = 3.6 , and Eu/Eu∗ = 2

  17. Experimental productivity rate optimization of rare earth element separation through preparative solid phase extraction chromatography.

    PubMed

    Knutson, Hans-Kristian; Max-Hansen, Mark; Jönsson, Christian; Borg, Niklas; Nilsson, Bernt

    2014-06-27

    Separating individual rare earth elements from a complex mixture with several elements is difficult and this is emphasized for the middle elements: Samarium, Europium and Gadolinium. In this study we have accomplished an overloaded one-step separation of these rare earth elements through preparative ion-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography with an bis (2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid impregnated column and nitric acid as eluent. An inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry unit was used for post column element detection. The main focus was to optimize the productivity rate, subject to a yield requirement of 80% and a purity requirement of 99% for each element, by varying the flow rate and batch load size. The optimal productivity rate in this study was 1.32kgSamarium/(hmcolumn(3)), 0.38kgEuropium/(hmcolumn(3)) and 0.81kgGadolinium/(hmcolumn(3)).

  18. Oceanic crustal thickness from seismic measurements and rare earth element inversions

    SciTech Connect

    White, R.S.; McKenzie, D.; O'Nions, R.K. )

    1992-12-10

    Seismic refraction results show that the igneous section of oceanic crust averages 7.1 [plus minus] 0.8 km thick away from anomalous regions such as fracture zones and hot-spots, with extremal bounds of 5.0-8.5 km. Rare earth element inversions of the melt distribution in the mantle source region suggest that sufficient melt is generated under normal oceanic spreading centers to produce an 8.3 [plus minus] 1.5 km thick igneous crust. The difference between the thickness estimates from seismics and from rare earth element inversions is not significant given the uncertainties in the mantle source composition. The inferred igneous thickness increases to 10.3 [plus minus] 1.7 km (seismic measurements) and 10.7 [plus minus] 1.6 km (rare earth element inversions) where spreading centers intersect the regions of hotter than normal mantle surrounding mantle plumes. This is consistent with melt generation by decompression of the hotter mantle as it rises beneath spreading centers. Maximum inferred melt volumes are found on aseismic ridges directly above the central rising cores of mantle plumes, and average 20 [plus minus] 1 and 18 [plus minus] 1 km for seismic profiles and rare earth element inversions respectively. Both seismic measurements and rare earth element inversions show evidence for variable local crustal thinning beneath fracture zones, though some basalts recovered from fracture zones are indistinguishable geochemically from those generated on normal ridge segments away from fracture zones. The authors attribute the decreased mantle melting on very slow-spreading ridges to the conductive heat loss that enables the mantle to cool as it rises beneath the rift.

  19. Fibre Tip Sensors for Localised Temperature Sensing Based on Rare Earth-Doped Glass Coatings

    PubMed Central

    Schartner, Erik P.; Monro, Tanya M.

    2014-01-01

    We report the development of a point temperature sensor, based on monitoring upconversion emission from erbium:ytterbium-doped tellurite coatings on the tips of optical fibres. The dip coating technique allows multiple sensors to be fabricated simultaneously, while confining the temperature-sensitive region to a localised region on the end-face of the fibre. The strong response of the rare earth ions to changing temperature allows a resolution of 0.1–0.3 °C to be recorded over the biologically relevant range of temperatures from 23–39 °C. PMID:25407907

  20. White light emission from GaN stack layers doped by different rare-earth metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lei; Liu, Chang

    2015-02-01

    Experimental progress of electroluminescence devices (ELDs) employing GaN doped with rare-earth metals had been significantly made targeting RGB displays. However, reports on the theoretical models to design the devices and the applications were limited. Our previous paper proposed a device model using the quantum collision theory and Judd-Ofelt approximation to design the ELDs for white light illumination. In the present study, the model is modified by considering the light extraction efficiency and optical loss during propagating in the films. To improve the luminous efficiency, an ELD with three stack layers of GaN:Tm/GaN:Er/GaN:Eu is proposed and designed. The model predicts that the color of the integrated light can be controlled by applied voltage, thickness of each doping layer and doping concentrations of the rare earth metals. The luminous efficacy of white light emission at a bias of -100 V is calculated to be 274 lm/W, which is much higher than that of fluorescent lumps. The proposed ELD will open a door to efficient solid-state lighting.

  1. Modification of phonon processes in nanostructured rare-earth-ion-doped crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutz, Thomas; Veissier, Lucile; Thiel, Charles W.; Cone, Rufus L.; Barclay, Paul E.; Tittel, Wolfgang

    2016-07-01

    Nano-structuring impurity-doped crystals affects the phonon density of states and thereby modifies the atomic dynamics induced by interaction with phonons. We propose the use of nano-structured materials in the form of powders or phononic bandgap crystals to enable or improve persistent spectral hole burning and coherence for inhomogeneously broadened absorption lines in rare-earth-ion-doped crystals. This is crucial for applications such as ultra-precise radio-frequency spectrum analyzers and optical quantum memories. As an example, we discuss how phonon engineering can enable spectral hole burning in erbium-doped materials operating in the convenient telecommunication band and present simulations for density of states of nano-sized powders and phononic crystals for the case of Y2SiO5 , a widely used material in current quantum memory research.

  2. Raman spectral analysis of TiO2 thin films doped with rare-earth samarium.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chang-Hu; Ma, Zhong-Quan

    2012-08-01

    TiO(2) thin films doped with rare-earth samarium were prepared on a quartz plate by the sol-gel/spin-coating technique. The samples were annealed at 700 °C to 1100 °C, and the Raman spectra of the samples were obtained. Analyses of Raman spectra show that samarium doping can inhibit the anatase-rutile phase transition. Samarium doping can refine grains of TiO(2) thin films and increase the internal stress, thereby preventing lattice vibration. Nanocrystalline TiO(2) thin films obviously show the phonon confinement effect, i.e., the blueshift of characteristic Raman peak and full width at half-height increase, and the peak shapes asymmetrically broaden with a decrease in the grain sizes of the samples.

  3. Cerium-doped mixed-alkali rare-earth double-phosphate scintillators for x- and gamma-ray detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neal, John S.; Boatner, Lynn A.; Spurrier, Merry; Szupryczynski, Piotr; Melcher, Charles L.

    2006-08-01

    Previous measurements of the scintillation properties of members of the single-alkali, rare-earth double-phosphate family have demonstrated high light output and fast decay times when exposed to ionizing radiation. Cerium-doped K 3Lu(PO 4) II and Rb 3Lu(PO 4) II scintillators have exhibited light outputs of 32,500 and 28,200 photons/MeV respectively and decay times of 37 and 34 nanoseconds respectively. Because of the ease with which the alkali constituents (Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs) of the crystal matrix may be interchanged (e.g. K IICsLu(PO 4) II and CsLi IILu(PO 4) II), the rare-earth double-phosphate family of scintillators provides an ideal system for the study of matrix effects on scintillation efficiency and kinetics. In order to better understand and to ultimately optimize the scintillation properties of these scintillators, new members of the rare-earth double-phosphate family have been synthesized by high temperature flux growth. These new samples, represented by the general formula (A,B) 3Lu(PO 4) II:Ce where A and B are alkali elements, incorporate mixed alkali rather than single alkali components and varying levels of Ce doping. Light output, scintillation decay times, and photoluminescence measurements for the most promising of the samples to date are reported. In this paper, we identify promising samples and results that clearly demonstrate outstanding light output, up to 270% of BGO, fast decay times, 29-39 nanoseconds, and peak emission wavelengths of ~ 400 nm for many of the samples.

  4. Determination of rare-earth elements in Luna 16 regolith sample by chemical spectral method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stroganova, N. S.; Ryabukhin, V. A.; Laktinova, N. V.; Ageyeva, L. V.; Galkina, I. P.; Gatinskaya, N. G.; Yermakov, A. N.; Karyakin, A. V.

    1974-01-01

    An analysis was made of regolith from layer A of the Luna 16 sample for rare earth elements, by a chemical spectral method. Chemical and ion exchange concentrations were used to determine the content of 12 elements and Y at the level 0.001 to 0.0001 percent with 10 to 15 percent reproducibility of the emission determination. Results within the limits of reproducibility agree with data obtained by mass spectra, activation, and X-ray fluorescent methods.

  5. Rare earth element content of thermal fluids from Surprise Valley, California

    SciTech Connect

    Andrew Fowler

    2015-09-23

    Rare earth element measurements for thermal fluids from Surprise Valley, California. Samples were collected in acid washed HDPE bottles and acidified with concentrated trace element clean (Fisher Scientific) nitric acid. Samples were pre-concentratated by a factor of approximately 10 using chelating resin with and IDA functional group and measured on magnetic sector ICP-MS. Samples include Seyferth Hot Springs, Surprise Valley Resort Mineral Well, Leonard's Hot Spring, and Lake City Mud Volcano Boiling Spring.

  6. Systematic variation of rare-earth elements in cerium-earth minerals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Murata, K.J.; Rose, H.J.; Carron, M.K.; Glass, J.J.

    1957-01-01

    In a continuation of a study reported previously, rare-earth elements and thorium have been determined in monazite, allanite, cerite, bastnaesite, and a number of miscellaneous cerium-earth minerals. A quantity called sigma (???), which is the sum of the atomic percentages of La, Ce, and Pr, is proposed as an index of composition of all cerium-earth minerals with respect to the rare-earth elements. The value of ??? for all of the minerals analysed falls between 58 and 92 atomic per cent. Monazites, allanites, and cerites cover the entire observed range, whereas bastnaesites are sharply restricted to the range between 80 and 92 atomic per cent. The minimum value of ??? for a cerium-earth mineral corresponds to the smallest possible unit-cell size of the mineral. In monazite, this structurally controlled minimum value of ??? is estimated to be around 30 atomic per cent. Neodymium, because of its abundance, and yttrium, because of its small size, have dominant roles in contraction of the structure. In the other direction, the limit of variation in composition will be reached when lanthanum becomes the sole rare-earth element in a cerium-earth mineral. Cerium-earth minerals from alkalic rocks are all characterized by values of ??? greater than 80 atomic per cent, indicating that the processes that formed these rocks were unusually efficient in fractionating the rare-earth elements-efficient in the sense that a highly selected assemblage is produced without eliminating the bulk of these elements. Analyses of inner and outer parts of two large crystals of monazite from different deposits show no difference in ??? in one crystal and a slightly smaller value of ??? in the outer part of the other crystal compared to the inner part. The ??? of monazites from pegmatites that intrude genetically related granitic rocks in North Carolina is found to be either higher or lower than the ??? of monazites in the intruded host rock. These results indicate that the fractionation of the

  7. Synthesis of rare earth doped TiO2 nanorods as photocatalysts for lignin degradation.

    PubMed

    Song, Liang; Zhao, Xueyuan; Cao, Lixin; Moon, Ji-Won; Gu, Baohua; Wang, Wei

    2015-10-28

    A two-step process is developed to synthesize rare earth doped titania nanorods (RE-TiO2 NRs) as photocatalysts for efficient degradation of lignin under simulated sunlight irradiation. In this approach, protonated titanate nanotubes with layered structures were first prepared by a hydrothermal approach, and rare earth metal ions were subsequently bound to the negatively charged surface of the synthesized titanate via electrostatic incorporation. The as-synthesized RE-TiO2 NRs after calcination generally showed much higher photocatalytic efficiencies than those of undoped TiO2 NRs or the commercial P25 TiO2 photocatalyst. Using methyl orange (MO) as a probing molecule, we demonstrate that Eu-TiO2 NRs are among the best for degrading MO, with an observed rate constant of 4.2 × 10(-3) s(-1). The La(3+), Sm(3+), Eu(3+) and Er(3+) doped TiO2 NRs also showed higher photocatalytic efficiencies in degrading MO than the commercial P25 TiO2. We further demonstrate that lignin can be photodegraded effectively and rapidly at room temperature under simulated sunlight through two reaction routes, which could be important in controlling ways of lignin depolymerization or the formation of reaction products. PMID:26400095

  8. Synthesis of rare earth doped TiO2 nanorods as photocatalysts for lignin degradation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Song, Liang; Zhao, Xueyuan; Cao, Lixin; Moon, Ji-Won; Gu, Baohua; Wang, Wei

    2015-09-10

    In this paper, a two-step process is developed to synthesize rare earth doped titania nanorods (RE–TiO2 NRs) as photocatalysts for efficient degradation of lignin under simulated sunlight irradiation. In this approach, protonated titanate nanotubes with layered structures were first prepared by a hydrothermal approach, and rare earth metal ions were subsequently bound to the negatively charged surface of the synthesized titanate via electrostatic incorporation. The as-synthesized RE–TiO2 NRs after calcination generally showed much higher photocatalytic efficiencies than those of undoped TiO2 NRs or the commercial P25 TiO2 photocatalyst. Using methyl orange (MO) as a probing molecule, we demonstrate that Eu–TiO2more » NRs are among the best for degrading MO, with an observed rate constant of 4.2 × 10-3 s-1. The La3+, Sm3+, Eu3+ and Er3+ doped TiO2 NRs also showed higher photocatalytic efficiencies in degrading MO than the commercial P25 TiO2. Finally, we further demonstrate that lignin can be photodegraded effectively and rapidly at room temperature under simulated sunlight through two reaction routes, which could be important in controlling ways of lignin depolymerization or the formation of reaction products.« less

  9. Synthesis of rare earth doped TiO2 nanorods as photocatalysts for lignin degradation.

    PubMed

    Song, Liang; Zhao, Xueyuan; Cao, Lixin; Moon, Ji-Won; Gu, Baohua; Wang, Wei

    2015-10-28

    A two-step process is developed to synthesize rare earth doped titania nanorods (RE-TiO2 NRs) as photocatalysts for efficient degradation of lignin under simulated sunlight irradiation. In this approach, protonated titanate nanotubes with layered structures were first prepared by a hydrothermal approach, and rare earth metal ions were subsequently bound to the negatively charged surface of the synthesized titanate via electrostatic incorporation. The as-synthesized RE-TiO2 NRs after calcination generally showed much higher photocatalytic efficiencies than those of undoped TiO2 NRs or the commercial P25 TiO2 photocatalyst. Using methyl orange (MO) as a probing molecule, we demonstrate that Eu-TiO2 NRs are among the best for degrading MO, with an observed rate constant of 4.2 × 10(-3) s(-1). The La(3+), Sm(3+), Eu(3+) and Er(3+) doped TiO2 NRs also showed higher photocatalytic efficiencies in degrading MO than the commercial P25 TiO2. We further demonstrate that lignin can be photodegraded effectively and rapidly at room temperature under simulated sunlight through two reaction routes, which could be important in controlling ways of lignin depolymerization or the formation of reaction products.

  10. [Spectroscopic Research on Slag Nanocrystal Glass Ceramics Containing Rare Earth Elements].

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Shun-li; Li, Bao-wei; Zhang, Xue-feng; Jia, Xiao-lin; Zhao, Ming; Deng, Lei-bo

    2015-08-01

    The research group prepared the high-performance slag nanocrystal glass ceramics by utilizing the valuable elements of the wastes in the Chinese Bayan Obo which are characterized by their symbiotic or associated existence. In this paper, inductively coupled plasma emission spectroscopy (ICP), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy (Raman) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) are all used in the depth analysis for the composition and structure of the samples. The experiment results of ICP, XRD and SEM showed that the principal crystalline phase of the slag nanocrystal glass ceramics containing rare earth elements is diopside, its grain size ranges from 45 to 100 nm, the elements showed in the SEM scan are basically in consistent with the component analysis of ICP. Raman analysis indicated that its amorphous phase is a three-dimensional network structure composed by the structural unit of silicon-oxy tetrahedron with different non-bridging oxygen bonds. According to the further analysis, we found that the rare earth microelement has significant effect on the network structure. Compared the nanocrystal slag glass ceramic with the glass ceramics of similar ingredients, we found that generally, the Raman band wavenumber for the former is lower than the later. The composition difference between the glass ceramics and the slag nanocrystal with the similar ingredients mainly lies on the rare earth elements and other trace elements. Therefore, we think that the rare earth elements and other trace elements remains in the slag nanocrystal glass ceramics have a significant effect on the network structure of amorphous phase. The research method of this study provides an approach for the relationship among the composition, structure and performance of the glass ceramics.

  11. U.S. trade dispute with China over rare earth elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2012-03-01

    The U.S. government has brought a new trade case against China over rare earth elements (REE) as well as tungsten and molybdenum, President Barack Obama announced on 13 March. Japan and the European Union also have taken similar actions against China about REEs, which are a group of 17 chemically similar metallic elements that are used in a variety of electronic, optical, magnetic, and catalytic applications. REEs are plentiful in the Earth's crust, although China currently has about 37% of the world's reserves and accounts for more than 95% of the world's production of the elements, according to the British Geological Survey. The United States has requested consultations with China at the World Trade Organization (WTO) concerning "China's unfair export restraints on rare earths, as well as tungsten and molybdenum," the Office of the United States Trade Representative announced in a 13 March statement.

  12. Fabrication and characterization of rare earth doped wide bandgap semiconductors for spectral storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sly, Mohamed Fawzy

    Powder samples of MgS and CaS, singly doped with Eu and doubly doped with Eu and Ce, were synthesized for their usage in spectral storage. Thin films of these materials were fabricated using the pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique. This fast and simple technique is superior to the single crystal growth or molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) as far as the storage material requirements are concerned. High optical quality films of MgS:Eu and CaS:Eu have been grown and tested. Polycrystalline powder samples of MgS and CaS were synthesized using high temperature reduction of commercially available magnesium and calcium sulfates. These materials were singly doped with rare earth lanthanides using high temperature diffusion in powder forms. Rare earth lanthanide impurities in very small concentrations are necessary for optical applications such as spectral storage for which all the materials prepared during the course of this study were made. Thin films of rare earth doped calcium and magnesium sulfides have been produced by using pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique. Coating of the reactive surfaces of the PLD chamber with SiC has been performed to make them resistant to the corrosive environment and the by products of the deposition process. Solid targets needed for thin films were fabricated from the synthesized polycrystalline powders by high-pressure cold compression technique. Deposition of thin films of CaS and MgS has been performed and to protect these films from the environment, capping layers of aluminum oxide (Al2O 3) or ZnS have been deposited over the CaS and MgS thin films. In magnesium sulfide, oxygen doped magnesium sulfide and calcium sulfides, europium centers occur in different spectral regions. Therefore, multi-layer thin film structures were fabricated to allow for higher density of spectral storage. Various characterization techniques such as optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy have

  13. Optical properties of rare earth doped strontium aluminate (SAO) phosphors: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kshatri, D. S.; Khare, A.

    2014-11-01

    After the first news on rare earth (RE) doped strontium aluminate (SAO) phosphors in late 1990s, researchers all over the world geared up to develop stable and efficient persistent phosphors. Scientists studied various features of long lasting phosphors (LLP) and tried to earmark appropriate mechanism. However, about two decades after the discovery of SrAl2O4: Eu2+, Dy3+, the number of persistent luminescent materials is not significant. In this review, we present an overview of the optical characteristics of RE doped SAO phosphors in terms of photoluminescence (PL), thermoluminescence (TL) and afterglow spectra. Also, we refresh the work undertaken to study diverse factors like dopant concentration, temperature, surface energy, role of activator, etc. Simultaneously, some of our important findings on SAO are reported and discussed in the end.

  14. Scanning Electron Microscope-Cathodoluminescence Analysis of Rare-Earth Elements in Magnets.

    PubMed

    Imashuku, Susumu; Wagatsuma, Kazuaki; Kawai, Jun

    2016-02-01

    Scanning electron microscope-cathodoluminescence (SEM-CL) analysis was performed for neodymium-iron-boron (NdFeB) and samarium-cobalt (Sm-Co) magnets to analyze the rare-earth elements present in the magnets. We examined the advantages of SEM-CL analysis over conventional analytical methods such as SEM-energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy and SEM-wavelength-dispersive X-ray (WDX) spectroscopy for elemental analysis of rare-earth elements in NdFeB magnets. Luminescence spectra of chloride compounds of elements in the magnets were measured by the SEM-CL method. Chloride compounds were obtained by the dropwise addition of hydrochloric acid on the magnets followed by drying in vacuum. Neodymium, praseodymium, terbium, and dysprosium were separately detected in the NdFeB magnets, and samarium was detected in the Sm-Co magnet by the SEM-CL method. In contrast, it was difficult to distinguish terbium and dysprosium in the NdFeB magnet with a dysprosium concentration of 1.05 wt% by conventional SEM-EDX analysis. Terbium with a concentration of 0.02 wt% in an NdFeB magnet was detected by SEM-CL analysis, but not by conventional SEM-WDX analysis. SEM-CL analysis is advantageous over conventional SEM-EDX and SEM-WDX analyses for detecting trace rare-earth elements in NdFeB magnets, particularly dysprosium and terbium.

  15. Scanning Electron Microscope-Cathodoluminescence Analysis of Rare-Earth Elements in Magnets.

    PubMed

    Imashuku, Susumu; Wagatsuma, Kazuaki; Kawai, Jun

    2016-02-01

    Scanning electron microscope-cathodoluminescence (SEM-CL) analysis was performed for neodymium-iron-boron (NdFeB) and samarium-cobalt (Sm-Co) magnets to analyze the rare-earth elements present in the magnets. We examined the advantages of SEM-CL analysis over conventional analytical methods such as SEM-energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy and SEM-wavelength-dispersive X-ray (WDX) spectroscopy for elemental analysis of rare-earth elements in NdFeB magnets. Luminescence spectra of chloride compounds of elements in the magnets were measured by the SEM-CL method. Chloride compounds were obtained by the dropwise addition of hydrochloric acid on the magnets followed by drying in vacuum. Neodymium, praseodymium, terbium, and dysprosium were separately detected in the NdFeB magnets, and samarium was detected in the Sm-Co magnet by the SEM-CL method. In contrast, it was difficult to distinguish terbium and dysprosium in the NdFeB magnet with a dysprosium concentration of 1.05 wt% by conventional SEM-EDX analysis. Terbium with a concentration of 0.02 wt% in an NdFeB magnet was detected by SEM-CL analysis, but not by conventional SEM-WDX analysis. SEM-CL analysis is advantageous over conventional SEM-EDX and SEM-WDX analyses for detecting trace rare-earth elements in NdFeB magnets, particularly dysprosium and terbium. PMID:26739864

  16. A Study on Removal of Rare Earth Elements from U.S. Coal Byproducts by Ion Exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozelle, Peter L.; Khadilkar, Aditi B.; Pulati, Nuerxida; Soundarrajan, Nari; Klima, Mark S.; Mosser, Morgan M.; Miller, Charles E.; Pisupati, Sarma V.

    2016-03-01

    Rare earth elements are known to occur in low concentrations in U.S. coals and coal byproducts. These low concentrations may make rare earth element recovery from these materials unattractive, using only physical separation techniques. However, given the significant production of rare earths through ion exchange extraction in China, two U.S. coal byproducts were examined for ion extraction, using ammonium sulfate, an ionic liquid, and a deep eutectic solvent as lixiviants. Extraction of rare earth elements in each case produced high recoveries of rare earth elements to the solution. This suggests that in at least the cases of the materials examined, U.S. coal byproducts may be technically suitable as REE ores. More work is required to establish economic suitability.

  17. Progress in rare-earth-doped nanocrystalline glass-ceramics for laser cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkata Krishnaiah, Kummara; Ledemi, Yannick; Soares de Lima Filho, Elton; Loranger, Sebastien; Nemova, Galina; Messaddeq, Younes; Kashyap, Raman

    2016-03-01

    Laser cooling with anti-Stokes fluorescencewas predicted by Pringsheim in 1929, but for solids was only demonstrated in 1995. There are many difficulties which have hindered laser assisted cooling, principally the chemical purity of a sample and the availability of suitable hosts. Recent progress has seen the cooled temperature plummet to 93K in Yb:YLF. One of the challenges for laser cooling to become ubiquitous, is incorporating the rare-earthcooling ion in a more easily engineered material, rather than a pure crystalline host. Rare-earth-doped nanocrystalline glass-ceramics were first developed by Wang and Ohwaki for enhanced luminescence and mechanical properties compared to their parent glasses. Our work has focused on creating a nanocrystalline environment for the cooling ion, in an easy to engineer glass. The glasses with composition 30SiO2-15Al2O3-27CdF2-22PbF2-4YF3-2YbF3 (mol%), have been prepared by the conventional melt-quenching technique. By a simple post fabrication thermal treatment, the rare-earth ions are embedded in the crystalline phase within the glass matrix. Nanocrystals with various sizes and rare-earth concentrations have been fabricated and their photoluminescence properties assessed in detail. These materials show close to unity photoluminescence quantum yield (PLQY) when pumped above the band. However, they exhibit strong up-conversion into the blue, characteristic of Tm trace impurity whose presence was confirmed. The purification of the starting materials is underway to reduce the background loss to demonstrate laser cooling. Progress in the development of these nano-glass-ceramics and their experimental characterization will be discussed.

  18. Symmetric charge-transfer cross sections of IIIa rare-earth-metal elements

    SciTech Connect

    Hashida, Masaki; Sakabe, Shuji; Izawa, Yasukazu

    2011-03-15

    Symmetric charge-transfer cross sections of IIIa rare-earth-metal elements (Sc, Y, and Gd) in the impact energy range of 30 to 1000 eV were measured for the first time. The experiments were performed with a crossed-beam apparatus that featured primary ion production by photoionization with a tunable dye laser. Comparing the cross sections of IIIa rare-earth-metal elements ({sigma}{sub Sc}, {sigma}{sub Y}, and {sigma}{sub Gd}) with those of alkali metals or helium {sigma}{sub 0}, we found that {sigma}{sub 0{approx_equal}{sigma}Sc}<{sigma}{sub Y}<{sigma}{sub Gd{approx_equal}}2{sigma}{sub 0}at an impact energy of 1000 eV.

  19. Effects of rare earth elements on the distribution of mineral elements and heavy metals in horseradish.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lihong; Huang, Xiaohua; Zhou, Qing

    2008-09-01

    In order to investigate the effects of rare earth elements (REEs) on horseradish, the distribution of the mineral elements and heavy metals in different organs of horseradish have been studied by using inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). Meanwhile, three variable major parameters, namely the concentration of REEs, the type of REEs, and the growth stage of plant were chosen. The results indicated that the test REEs, Ce(III) and Tb(III), could be accumulated in leaves, stems and roots of horseradish. In addition, we found that the content of mineral elements was increased in horseradish treated with 20mgl(-1) of Ce(III), but not those with the 20mgl(-1) of Tb(III). Moreover, the content of mineral elements in horseradish was decreased with the increasing concentration of REEs (100, 300mgl(-1)). Furthermore, we found that there were the opposite effects on the content of the heavy metals in horseradish treated with REEs. Finally, we found that the effect of REEs on the accumulation of REEs, and the content of mineral elements or heavy metals of horseradish during vigorous growth stage, no matter positive or negative, was more obvious than that of the other growth stages. These results demonstrated that the distribution behaviors of mineral elements and heavy metals in horseradish can be affected by the type and concentration of REEs, and the growth period of plant.

  20. Geochemical behavior of rare earth elements and other trace elements in the Amazon River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merschel, Gila; Bau, Michael; Dantas, Elton Luiz

    2014-05-01

    Rivers transport large amounts of dissolved and suspended particulate material from the catchment area to the oceans and are a major source of trace metals to seawater. The Amazon River is the world's largest river and supplies approximately 20% of the oceans' freshwater (Molinier et al., 1997). However, the behavior of trace elements, especially particle-reactive elements such as the rare earth elements (REE), within the river as well as in the estuary is not well constrained and rather little is known about their transport mechanisms. This study aims at understanding the transport properties of particle-reactive elements in the Amazon River and some of its major tributaries, including the Rio Solimões, Rio Negro, Tapajos, Xingu and Jari Rivers. Samples were taken at 12 stations, seven of which were located in the Amazon mainstream, while the other five stations sampled its tributaries. To account for the effects of variable discharge, the samples were collected during periods of high and low discharge. We present data for major and trace elements, including REE, of the dissolved and suspended load of these samples. First results indicate that the shale-normalized REE pattern of the dissolved load (filtered through 0.2 µm membranes) of the Amazon mainstream and the Rio Solimões confirm earlier studies (Elderfield et al., 1990; Gerard et al., 2003) and show an enrichment of the middle REE relative to the light and heavy REE (LaSN/GdSN: 0.25 - 0.32; GdSN/YbSN: 1.54 - 1.78). In contrast to the Amazon mainstream and the Rio Solimões, which are considered to be whitewater rivers, blackwater rivers, such as the Rio Negro, have a flat REE pattern with higher REE concentrations than whitewater rivers. The third water-type found in the Amazon Basin is clearwater, e.g. Rio Tapajos, with REE patterns in between those of the other two types, i.e. LaSN/GdSN: 0.55 - 0.70; GdSN/YbSN: 1.26 - 1.55. A similar behavior can be identified for other major and trace elements. While

  1. Chalcogenide glasses for infrared applications: New synthesis routes and rare earth doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubert, Mathieu

    shift the optical band gap toward higher wavelengths. A systematic ceramization study emphasizes the difficulty of controlling the crystallization for glasses in the systems GeSe2-Ga2Se3-In2Se 3 and GeSe2-Ga2Se3-PbSe. No crystallization of the In2Se3 and PbSe crystalline phase was obtained. Finally, the possibility of producing rare-earth doped 80GeSe2 -20Ga2Se3 glass-ceramics transparent in the infrared region up to 16 microm is demonstrated. Enhanced photoluminescence intensity and reduced radiative lifetimes are observed with increased crystallinity in these materials.

  2. Cerium-doped mixed-alkali rare-earth double-phosphate scintillators for thermal neutron detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neal, John S.; Boatner, Lynn A.; Spurrier, Merry; Szupryczynski, Piotr; Melcher, Charles L.

    2007-08-01

    Previous measurements of the scintillation properties of members of the single-alkali, rare-earth double-phosphate family have demonstrated high light output and fast decay times when exposed to ionizing radiation. Because of the ease with which the alkali constituents (Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs) of the crystal matrix may be interchanged (e.g. K 2CsLu(PO 4) 2 and CsLi 2Lu(PO 4) 2), the rare-earth double-phosphate family of scintillators provides an ideal system for the study of matrix effects on scintillation efficiency and kinetics. New members of the rare-earth double-phosphate family have been synthesized by high-temperature flux growth. These new samples, represented by the general formula (A,B) 3Lu(PO 4) 2:Ce where A and B are alkali elements, incorporate lithium as one of the components and varying levels of Ce doping. Characteristics important to gamma-ray and thermal neutron excitation are calculated for three model systems which incorporate total lithium-ion substitution. Light output, scintillation decay times, and photoluminescence measurements for the most promising of the samples to date are reported. Future work includes (1) synthesis of mixed-alkali scandium and yttrium double-phosphates in which Li ions are substitutional in the structure with varying lithium-ion content up to and including total lithium-ion substitution on the alkali ion site and (2) measurements of light output and pulse shape using thermal neutron excitation.

  3. Evaluating rare earth element availability: a case with revolutionary demand from clean technologies.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Elisa; Sherman, Andrew M; Wallington, Timothy J; Everson, Mark P; Field, Frank R; Roth, Richard; Kirchain, Randolph E

    2012-03-20

    The future availability of rare earth elements (REEs) is of concern due to monopolistic supply conditions, environmentally unsustainable mining practices, and rapid demand growth. We present an evaluation of potential future demand scenarios for REEs with a focus on the issue of comining. Many assumptions were made to simplify the analysis, but the scenarios identify some key variables that could affect future rare earth markets and market behavior. Increased use of wind energy and electric vehicles are key elements of a more sustainable future. However, since present technologies for electric vehicles and wind turbines rely heavily on dysprosium (Dy) and neodymium (Nd), in rare-earth magnets, future adoption of these technologies may result in large and disproportionate increases in the demand for these two elements. For this study, upper and lower bound usage projections for REE in these applications were developed to evaluate the state of future REE supply availability. In the absence of efficient reuse and recycling or the development of technologies which use lower amounts of Dy and Nd, following a path consistent with stabilization of atmospheric CO(2) at 450 ppm may lead to an increase of more than 700% and 2600% for Nd and Dy, respectively, over the next 25 years if the present REE needs in automotive and wind applications are representative of future needs.

  4. Evaluating rare earth element availability: a case with revolutionary demand from clean technologies.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Elisa; Sherman, Andrew M; Wallington, Timothy J; Everson, Mark P; Field, Frank R; Roth, Richard; Kirchain, Randolph E

    2012-03-20

    The future availability of rare earth elements (REEs) is of concern due to monopolistic supply conditions, environmentally unsustainable mining practices, and rapid demand growth. We present an evaluation of potential future demand scenarios for REEs with a focus on the issue of comining. Many assumptions were made to simplify the analysis, but the scenarios identify some key variables that could affect future rare earth markets and market behavior. Increased use of wind energy and electric vehicles are key elements of a more sustainable future. However, since present technologies for electric vehicles and wind turbines rely heavily on dysprosium (Dy) and neodymium (Nd), in rare-earth magnets, future adoption of these technologies may result in large and disproportionate increases in the demand for these two elements. For this study, upper and lower bound usage projections for REE in these applications were developed to evaluate the state of future REE supply availability. In the absence of efficient reuse and recycling or the development of technologies which use lower amounts of Dy and Nd, following a path consistent with stabilization of atmospheric CO(2) at 450 ppm may lead to an increase of more than 700% and 2600% for Nd and Dy, respectively, over the next 25 years if the present REE needs in automotive and wind applications are representative of future needs. PMID:22304002

  5. Transport of rare earth element-tagged soil particles in response to thunderstorm runoff.

    PubMed

    Matisoff, G; Ketterer, M E; Wilson, C G; Layman, R; Whiting, P J

    2001-08-15

    The downslope transport of rare earth element-tagged soil particles remobilized during a spring thunderstorm was studied on both a natural prairie and an agricultural field in southwestern Iowa (U.S.A.). A technique was developed for tagging natural soils with the rare earth elements Eu, Tb, and Ho to approximately 1,000 ppm via coprecipitation with MnO2. Tagged material was replaced in target locations; surficial soil samples were collected following precipitation and runoff; and rare earth element concentrations were determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Diffusion and exponential models were applied to the concentration-distance data to determine particle transport distances. The results indicate that the concentration-distance data are well described by the diffusion model, butthe exponential model does not simulate the rapid drop-off in concentrations near the tagged source. Using the diffusion model, calculated particle transport distances at all hillside locations and at both the cultivated and natural prairie sites were short, ranging from 3 to 73 cm during this single runoff event. This study successfully demonstrates a new tool for studying soil erosion. PMID:11529577

  6. Transport of rare earth element-tagged soil particles in response to thunderstorm runoff.

    PubMed

    Matisoff, G; Ketterer, M E; Wilson, C G; Layman, R; Whiting, P J

    2001-08-15

    The downslope transport of rare earth element-tagged soil particles remobilized during a spring thunderstorm was studied on both a natural prairie and an agricultural field in southwestern Iowa (U.S.A.). A technique was developed for tagging natural soils with the rare earth elements Eu, Tb, and Ho to approximately 1,000 ppm via coprecipitation with MnO2. Tagged material was replaced in target locations; surficial soil samples were collected following precipitation and runoff; and rare earth element concentrations were determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Diffusion and exponential models were applied to the concentration-distance data to determine particle transport distances. The results indicate that the concentration-distance data are well described by the diffusion model, butthe exponential model does not simulate the rapid drop-off in concentrations near the tagged source. Using the diffusion model, calculated particle transport distances at all hillside locations and at both the cultivated and natural prairie sites were short, ranging from 3 to 73 cm during this single runoff event. This study successfully demonstrates a new tool for studying soil erosion.

  7. [Leaching of Rare Earth Elements from Coal Ashes Using Acidophilic Chemolithotrophic Microbial Communities].

    PubMed

    Muravyov, M I; Bulaev, A G; Melamud, V S; Kondrat'eva, T F

    2015-01-01

    A method for leaching rare earth elements from coal ash in the presence of elemental sulfur using communities of acidophilic chemolithotrophic microorganisms was proposed. The optimal parameters determined for rare element leaching in reactors were as follows: temperature, 45 degrees C; initial pH, 2.0; pulp density, 10%; and the coal ash to elemental sulfur ratio, 10 : 1. After ten days of leaching, 52.0, 52.6, and 59.5% of scandium, yttrium, and lanthanum, respectively, were recovered.

  8. [Leaching of Rare Earth Elements from Coal Ashes Using Acidophilic Chemolithotrophic Microbial Communities].

    PubMed

    Muravyov, M I; Bulaev, A G; Melamud, V S; Kondrat'eva, T F

    2015-01-01

    A method for leaching rare earth elements from coal ash in the presence of elemental sulfur using communities of acidophilic chemolithotrophic microorganisms was proposed. The optimal parameters determined for rare element leaching in reactors were as follows: temperature, 45 degrees C; initial pH, 2.0; pulp density, 10%; and the coal ash to elemental sulfur ratio, 10 : 1. After ten days of leaching, 52.0, 52.6, and 59.5% of scandium, yttrium, and lanthanum, respectively, were recovered. PMID:26263628

  9. Rare-earth metal oxide doped transparent mesoporous silica plates under non-aqueous condition as a potential UV sensor.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Joon; Park, Sung Soo; Lee, Sang Hyun; Hong, Sang-Hyun; Ha, Chang-Sik

    2013-11-01

    Transparent mesoporous silica plates doped with rare-earth metal oxide were prepared using solvent-evaporation method based on the self-organization between structure-directing agent and silicate in a non-aqueous solvent. A triblock copolymer, Pluronic (F127 or P123), was used as the structure-directing agent, while tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) was used as a silica source. The pore diameter and the surface area of the mesoporous silica plate prepared with the optimized conditions were ca 40 A and 600 m2 g(-1), respectively, for both structure-directing agent. Rare-earth metal oxides (Eu, Tb, Tm oxide) in mesochannel were formed via one-step synthetic route based on the preparation method of a silica plate. Optical properties of rare-earth metal oxide-doped mesoporous silica plates were investigated by UV irradiation and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. Under the exitation wavelength of 254 nm, the doped mesoporous silica plates emitted red, green and blue for Eu, Tb and Tm oxides, respectively. Rare-earth metal oxide-doped mesoporous silica plates showed enhanced PL intensity compared to that of the bulk rare-earth metal oxide.

  10. An alternative experimental approach to produce rare-earth-doped SiOx films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanatta, A. R.

    2016-04-01

    Rare-earth (RE) doped silicon-oxide (SiOx) films were prepared by sputtering a combined Si + RE2O3 target with argon ions. The study comprised the neodymium (Nd) and samarium (Sm) rare-earth species and the Si + RE2O3 targets were obtained by partially covering a solid disc of Si with area-defined thin layers of Nd2O3 or Sm2O3 powders. The films were investigated by energy-dispersive x-ray, Raman scattering, optical transmission, and photo-luminescence measurements. According to the experimental results, in the as-deposited form, the films were amorphous and presented RE and oxygen concentrations that scaled with the RE2O3 target area. Additional compositional-structural changes were obtained by thermal annealing the films under a flow of oxygen. Within these changes, one can mention: increase of oxygen concentration, optical bandgap widening, partial Si crystallization, and the development of RE-related light emission. The main aspects associated to the production and structural-optical properties of the films, as determined either by the deposition conditions or by the annealing treatments, are presented and discussed in detail.

  11. Electronic structure of rare-earth doped SrFBiS2 superconductors from photoemission spectroscopic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, P.; Lohani, H.; Jha, Rajveer; Awana, V. P. S.; Sekhar, B. R.

    2016-06-01

    The electronic structure study of the Rare Earth (La, Ce) doped SrFBiS2 superconductors using valence band photoemission in conjugation with the band structure calculations have been presented. The spectral features shift towards higher binding energy, consistent with the electron doping, for the doped compounds. An enhanced metallicity in addition to the shift in the Fermi level towards the conduction band occurs for the Rare Earth (RE) doped compounds. Further, the degeneracy of bands along X-M direction at valence band maximum (VBM) and conduction band minimum (CBM) is lifted due to RE doping. An enhanced spectral weight near EF accompanied by a decrease in density of states at higher binding energy occurs for the doped compounds. This unusual spectral weight shift is substantiated by the change in Fermi surface topology and reduced distortion of Bi-S plane for the doped compounds.

  12. Influence of rare-earth elements doping on thermoelectric properties of Ca{sub 0.98}Dy{sub 0.02}MnO{sub 3} at high temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Yuanhu Wang, Chunlei; Su, Wenbin; Liu, Jian; Li, Jichao; Zhang, Xinhua; Mei, Liangmo

    2015-05-15

    Ca{sub 0.98}Dy{sub 0.02}MnO{sub 3} and Ca{sub 0.96}Dy{sub 0.02}Re{sub 0.02}MnO{sub 3} (Re=La, Pr, Sm, Eu, Ho, and Yb) have been synthesized by the solid state reaction method. Samples with relative densities all over 96% have been obtained. Thermoelectric properties are evaluated between 300 and 1000 K. The electrical resistivity shows a typical metal-like conductivity behavior, and at high temperature, 973 K, decreases from 36.1 mΩ cm for Ca{sub 0.98}Dy{sub 0.02}MnO{sub 3} to 8.6 mΩ cm for Ca{sub 0.96}Dy{sub 0.02}Yb{sub 0.02}MnO{sub 3}. Both the absolute values of Seebeck coefficient and thermal conductivity are reduced by the introduction of second rare-earth element. The highest power factor of 415 μW/(K{sup 2}m) is obtained for Ca{sub 0.96}Dy{sub 0.02}Yb{sub 0.02}MnO{sub 3} sample, resulting in the highest dimensionless figure of merit (ZT) 0.25 at 973 K. This value shows an improvement of 144% compared with that of Ca{sub 0.98}Dy{sub 0.02}MnO{sub 3} ceramics at the same temperature. - Graphical abstract: The Ca{sub 0.96}Dy{sub 0.02}Re{sub 0.02}MnO{sub 3} (Re=La, Pr, …, Yb) were prepared by solid state reaction. Highest ZT value obtained is 0.25 at 973 K for Re=Yb, which shows 144% improvement compared with Ca{sub 0.98}Dy{sub 0.02}MnO{sub 3}. - Highlights: • Ca{sub 0.96}Dy{sub 0.02}Re{sub 0.02}MnO{sub 3} (Re=La, Pr, …, Yb) are produced by solid state reaction. • Lowest resistivity is obtained due to the highest carrier mobility for Re=Yb. • Highest power factor obtained is 415 μW/(K{sup 2}m) at 973 K for Re=Yb. • Highest ZT value obtained is 0.25 at 973 K for Ca{sub 0.96}Dy{sub 0.02}Yb{sub 0.02}MnO{sub 3} sample.

  13. The chemistry of the light rare-earth elements as determined by electron energy loss spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Fortner, J.A.; Buck, E.C.

    1996-06-01

    The energy loss spectra of the rare earths are characterized by sharp {ital M}{sub 4,5} edges, the relative intensities of which are characteristic of the 4{ital f}-shell occupancy of the excited ion. For the light rare earths, the dependence of these relative peak heights on 4{ital f}-shell occupancy is quite pronounced. Thus they may be used to determine the oxidation state of the multivalent elements Ce and Pr. The second derivative of the spectrum is shown to be extremely sensitive to the chemical environment. Modern instrumentation and detection techniques allow the oxidation state of Ce and Pr to be determined even when they are present as only minor constituents. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  14. Neutron Activation Analysis of the Rare Earth Elements (REE) - With Emphasis on Geological Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stosch, Heinz-Günter

    2016-08-01

    Neutron activation analysis (NAA) has been the analytical method of choice for rare earth element (REE) analysis from the early 1960s through the 1980s. At that time, irradiation facilitieswere widely available and fairly easily accessible. The development of high-resolution gamma-ray detectors in the mid-1960s eliminated, formany applications, the need for chemical separation of the REE from the matrix material, making NAA a reliable and effective analytical tool. While not as precise as isotopedilution mass spectrometry, NAA was competitive by being sensitive for the analysis of about half of the rare earths (La, Ce, Nd, Sm, Eu, Tb, Yb, Lu). The development of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry since the 1980s, together with decommissioning of research reactors and the lack of installation of new ones in Europe and North America has led to the rapid decline of NAA.

  15. Spectral analysis of rare earth elements using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Madhavi Z.; Fox, Robert V.; Miziolek, Andrzej W.; DeLucia, Frank C.; André, Nicolas

    2015-06-01

    There is growing interest in rapid analysis of rare earth elements (REEs) both due to the need to find new natural sources to satisfy increased demand in their use in various electronic devices, as well as the fact that they are used to estimate actinide masses for nuclear safeguards and nonproliferation. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) appears to be a particularly well-suited spectroscopy-based technology to rapidly and accurately analyze the REEs in various matrices at low concentration levels (parts-per-million). Although LIBS spectra of REEs have been reported for a number of years, further work is still necessary in order to be able to quantify the concentrations of various REEs in realworld complex samples. LIBS offers advantages over conventional solution-based radiochemistry in terms of cost, analytical turnaround, waste generation, personnel dose, and contamination risk. Rare earth elements of commercial interest are found in the following three matrix groups: 1) raw ores and unrefined materials, 2) as components in refined products such as magnets, lighting phosphors, consumer electronics (which are mostly magnets and phosphors), catalysts, batteries, etc., and 3) waste/recyclable materials (aka e-waste). LIBS spectra for REEs such as Gd, Nd, and Sm found in rare earth magnets are presented.

  16. Geochemical fractions of rare earth elements in soil around a mine tailing in Baotou, China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lingqing; Liang, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Rare earth mine tailing dumps are environmental hazards because tailing easily leaches and erodes by water and wind. To assess the influence of mine tailing on the geochemical behavior of rare earth elements (REEs) in soil, sixty-seven surface soil samples and three soil profile samples were collected from different locations near China’s largest rare earth mine tailing. The total concentration of REEs in surface soils ranged from 156 to 5.65 × 104 mg·kg−1 with an average value of 4.67 × 103 mg·kg−1, which was significantly higher than the average value in China (181 mg·kg−1). We found obvious fractionation of both light and heavy REEs, which was supported by the North American Shale Composite (NASC) and the Post-Archean Average Australian Shale (PAAS) normalized concentration ratios calculated for selected elements (LaN/YbN, LaN/SmN and GdN/YbN). A slightly positive Ce anomaly and a negative Eu anomaly were also found. For all 14 REEs in soils, enrichment was intensified by the mine tailing sources and influenced by the prevailing wind. PMID:26198417

  17. Spectral Analysis of Rare Earth Elements using Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Madhavi Z. Martin; Robert V. Fox; Andrzej W. Miziolek; Frank C. DeLucia, Jr.; Nicolas Andre

    2001-05-01

    There is growing interest in rapid analysis of rare earth elements (REEs) both due to the need to find new natural sources to satisfy increased demand in their use in various electronic devices, as well as the fact that they are used to estimate actinide masses for nuclear safeguards and nonproliferation. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) appears to be a particularly well-suited spectroscopy-based technology to rapidly and accurately analyze the REEs in various matrices at low concentration levels (parts-per-million). Although LIBS spectra of REEs have been reported for a number of years, further work is still necessary in order to be able to quantify the concentrations of various REEs in realworld complex samples. LIBS offers advantages over conventional solution-based radiochemistry in terms of cost, analytical turnaround, waste generation, personnel dose, and contamination risk. Rare earth elements of commercial interest are found in the following three matrix groups: 1) raw ores and unrefined materials, 2) as components in refined products such as magnets, lighting phosphors, consumer electronics (which are mostly magnets and phosphors), catalysts, batteries, etc., and 3) waste/recyclable materials (aka e-waste). LIBS spectra for REEs such as Gd, Nd, and Sm found in rare earth magnets are presented.

  18. Rare earth elements recycling from waste phosphor by dual hydrochloric acid dissolution.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hu; Zhang, Shengen; Pan, Dean; Tian, Jianjun; Yang, Min; Wu, Maolin; Volinsky, Alex A

    2014-05-15

    This paper is a comparative study of recycling rare earth elements from waste phosphor, which focuses on the leaching rate and the technical principle. The traditional and dual dissolution by hydrochloric acid (DHA) methods were compared. The method of dual dissolution by hydrochloric acid has been developed. The Red rare earth phosphor (Y0.95Eu0.05)2O3 in waste phosphor is dissolved during the first step of acid leaching, while the Green phosphor (Ce0.67Tb0.33MgAl11O19) and the Blue phosphor (Ba0.9Eu0.1MgAl10O17) mixed with caustic soda are obtained by alkali sintering. The excess caustic soda and NaAlO2 are removed by washing. The insoluble matter is leached by the hydrochloric acid, followed by solvent extraction and precipitation (the DHA method). In comparison, the total leaching rate of the rare earth elements was 94.6% by DHA, which is much higher than 42.08% achieved by the traditional method. The leaching rate of Y, Eu, Ce and Tb reached 94.6%, 99.05%, 71.45%, and 76.22%, respectively. DHA can decrease the consumption of chemicals and energy. The suggested DHA method is feasible for industrial applications.

  19. Geochemical fractions of rare earth elements in soil around a mine tailing in Baotou, China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lingqing; Liang, Tao

    2015-07-22

    Rare earth mine tailing dumps are environmental hazards because tailing easily leaches and erodes by water and wind. To assess the influence of mine tailing on the geochemical behavior of rare earth elements (REEs) in soil, sixty-seven surface soil samples and three soil profile samples were collected from different locations near China's largest rare earth mine tailing. The total concentration of REEs in surface soils ranged from 156 to 5.65 × 10(4) mg·kg(-1) with an average value of 4.67 × 10(3) mg·kg(-1), which was significantly higher than the average value in China (181 mg·kg(-1)). We found obvious fractionation of both light and heavy REEs, which was supported by the North American Shale Composite (NASC) and the Post-Archean Average Australian Shale (PAAS) normalized concentration ratios calculated for selected elements (La(N)/Yb(N), La(N)/Sm(N) and Gd(N)/Yb(N)). A slightly positive Ce anomaly and a negative Eu anomaly were also found. For all 14 REEs in soils, enrichment was intensified by the mine tailing sources and influenced by the prevailing wind.

  20. Spectral Analysis of Rare Earth Elements using Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Madhavi Z; Fox, Dr. Richard V; Miziolek, Andrzej W; DeLucia, Frank C; Andre, Nicolas O

    2015-01-01

    There is growing interest in rapid analysis of rare earth elements (REEs) both due to the need to find new natural sources to satisfy increased demand in their use in various electronic devices, as well as the fact that they are used to estimate actinide masses for nuclear safeguards and nonproliferation. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) appears to be a particularly well-suited spectroscopy-based technology to rapidly and accurately analyze the REEs in various matrices at low concentration levels (parts-per-million). Although LIBS spectra of REEs have been reported for a number of years, further work is still necessary in order to be able to quantify the concentrations of various REEs in real-world complex samples. LIBS offers advantages over conventional solution-based radiochemistry in terms of cost, analytical turnaround, waste generation, personnel dose, and contamination risk. Rare earth elements of commercial interest are found in the following three matrix groups: 1) raw ores and unrefined materials, 2) as components in refined products such as magnets, lighting phosphors, consumer electronics (which are mostly magnets and phosphors), catalysts, batteries, etc., and 3) waste/recyclable materials (aka e-waste). LIBS spectra for REEs such as Gd, Nd, and Sm found in rare earth magnets are presented.

  1. Spectral Analysis of Rare Earth Elements using Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Madhavi Z; Fox, Dr. Richard V; Miziolek, Andrzej W; DeLucia, Frank C; Andre, Nicolas O

    2015-01-01

    There is growing interest in rapid analysis of rare earth elements (REEs) both due to the need to find new natural sources to satisfy increased demand in their use in various electronic devices, as well as the fact that they are used to estimate actinide masses for nuclear safeguards and nonproliferation. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) appears to be a particularly well-suited spectroscopy-based technology to rapidly and accurately analyze the REEs in various matrices at low concentration levels (parts-per-million). Although LIBS spectra of REEs have been reported for a number of years, further work is still necessary in order to be able to quantify the concentrations of various REEs in realworld complex samples. LIBS offers advantages over conventional solution-based radiochemistry in terms of cost, analytical turnaround, waste generation, personnel dose, and contamination risk. Rare earth elements of commercial interest are found in the following three matrix groups: 1) raw ores and unrefined materials, 2) as components in refined products such as magnets, lighting phosphors, consumer electronics (which are mostly magnets and phosphors), catalysts, batteries, etc., and 3) waste/recyclable materials (aka e-waste). LIBS spectra for REEs such as Gd, Nd, and Sm found in rare earth magnets are presented.

  2. Geochemical fractions of rare earth elements in soil around a mine tailing in Baotou, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lingqing; Liang, Tao

    2015-07-01

    Rare earth mine tailing dumps are environmental hazards because tailing easily leaches and erodes by water and wind. To assess the influence of mine tailing on the geochemical behavior of rare earth elements (REEs) in soil, sixty-seven surface soil samples and three soil profile samples were collected from different locations near China’s largest rare earth mine tailing. The total concentration of REEs in surface soils ranged from 156 to 5.65 × 104 mg·kg-1 with an average value of 4.67 × 103 mg·kg-1, which was significantly higher than the average value in China (181 mg·kg-1). We found obvious fractionation of both light and heavy REEs, which was supported by the North American Shale Composite (NASC) and the Post-Archean Average Australian Shale (PAAS) normalized concentration ratios calculated for selected elements (LaN/YbN, LaN/SmN and GdN/YbN). A slightly positive Ce anomaly and a negative Eu anomaly were also found. For all 14 REEs in soils, enrichment was intensified by the mine tailing sources and influenced by the prevailing wind.

  3. Investigation of recovery and recycling of rare earth elements from waste fluorescent lamp phosphors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eduafo, Patrick Max

    Characterization techniques and experimental measurements were used to evaluate a process for recycling rare earth elements (REEs) from spent fluorescent lamp phosphors. QEMSCAN analysis revealed that over 60% of the rare earth bearing minerals was less than 10 microm. A representative sample of the as-received feed contained 14.59 wt% total rare earth elements (TREE) and upon sieving to below 75 microm, the grade increased to 19.60 wt% REE with 98.75% recovery. Based on experimental work, a new process for extracting the chief REEs from end of life fluorescent lamps has been developed. The proposed flowsheet employs a three-stage leaching and precipitation process for selective extraction and recovery of the REEs. Hydrochloric acid was used as lixiviant in batch leach experiments on the phosphor powder. The maximum extraction obtained was 100% for both yttrium and europium under the following leaching conditions: 2.5 M HCl, 70°C, 1 hour, 180 g/L and 600 rpm. However, the solubility of cerium, lanthanum and terbium remained low at these conditions. Kinetic data of the leaching of yttrium and europium showed best fit to the logarithmic rate expression of the empirical model of leaching. Activation energy was calculated to be 77.49 kJ/mol for Y and 72.75 kJ/mol for Eu in the temperature range of 298 to 343 K. Precipitation tests demonstrate that at least 50% excess the stoichiometric amount of oxalic acid is needed to recover yttrium and europium efficiently to produce a pure (Y, Eu) mixed oxide. Total recovery of the REEs was achieved even at very low pH or without any base added. Over 99% pure mixed rare earth oxide at 99% recovery has been attained. An economic assessment of the developed process using operating and capital cost have be undertaken and based on the analysis of the three economic scenarios, two are economic and one is non-economic.

  4. Effect of temperature and rare-earth doping on charge-carrier mobility in indium-monoselenide crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Abdinov, A. Sh.; Babayeva, R. F.; Amirova, S. I.; Rzayev, R. M.

    2013-08-15

    In the temperature range T = 77-600 K, the dependence of the charge-carrier mobility ({mu}) on the initial dark resistivity is experimentally investigated at 77 K ({rho}d{sub 0}), as well as on the temperature and the level (N) of rare-earth doping with such elements as gadolinium (Gd), holmium (Ho), and dysprosium (Dy) in n-type indium-monoselenide (InSe) crystals. It is established that the anomalous behavior of the dependences {mu}(T), {mu}({rho}d{sub 0}), and {mu}(N) found from the viewpoint of the theory of charge-carrier mobility in crystalline semiconductors is related, first of all, to partial disorder in indium-monoselenide crystals and can be attributed to the presence of random drift barriers in the free energy bands.

  5. Improving the intensity and efficiency of compressed echo in rare-earth-ion-doped crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiu-Rong, Ma; Yu-Qing, Liang; Song, Wang; Shuang-Gen, Zhang; Yun-Long, Shan

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the intensity and efficiency of a compressed echo, which is important in arbitrary waveform generation (AWG). A new model of compressed echo is proposed based on the optical Bloch equations, which exposes much more detailed parameters than the conventional model, such as the time delay of the chirp lasers, the nature of the rare-earth-ion-doped crystal, etc. According to the novel model of compressed echo, we find that reducing the time delay of the chirp lasers and scanning the lasers around the center frequency of the inhomogeneously broadened spectrum, while utilizing a crystal with larger coherence time and excitation lifetime can improve the compressed echo’s intensity and efficiency. The theoretical analysis is validated by numerical simulations. Project supported by Special Funds for Scientific and Technological Innovation Projects in Tianjin, China (Grant No. 10FDZDGX00400) and the Tianjin Research Program of Application Foundation and Advanced Technology, China (Grant No. 15JCQNJC01100).

  6. Compensation for effects of ambient temperature on rare-earth doped fiber optic thermometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamovsky, G.; Sotomayor, J. L.; Krasowski, M. J.; Eustace, J. G.

    1990-01-01

    Variations in ambient temperature have a negative effect on the performance of any fiber optic sensing system. A change in ambient temperature may alter the design parameters of fiber optic cables, connectors, sources, detectors, and other fiber optic components and eventually the performance of the entire system. The thermal stability of components is especially important in a system which employs intensity modulated sensors. Several referencing schemes have been developed to account for the variable losses that occur within the system. However, none of these conventional compensating techniques can be used to stabilize the thermal drift of the light source in a system based on the spectral properties of the sensor material. The compensation for changes in ambient temperature becomes especially important in fiber optic thermometers doped with rare earths. Different approaches to solving this problem are searched and analyzed.

  7. Compensation for effects of ambient temperature on rare-earth doped fiber optic thermometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamovsky, G.; Sotomayor, J. L.; Krasowski, M. J.; Eustace, J. G.

    1989-01-01

    Variations in ambient temperature have a negative effect on the performance of any fiber optic sensing system. A change in ambient temperature may alter the design parameters of fiber optic cables, connectors, sources, detectors, and other fiber optic components and eventually the performance of the entire system. The thermal stability of components is especially important in a system which employs intensity modulated sensors. Several referencing schemes have been developed to account for the variable losses that occur within the system. However, none of these conventional compensating techniques can be used to stabilize the thermal drift of the light source in a system based on the spectral properties of the sensor material. The compensation for changes in ambient temperature becomes especially important in fiber optic thermometers doped with rare earths. Different approaches to solving this problem are searched and analyzed.

  8. Improving the intensity and efficiency of compressed echo in rare-earth-ion-doped crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiu-Rong, Ma; Yu-Qing, Liang; Song, Wang; Shuang-Gen, Zhang; Yun-Long, Shan

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the intensity and efficiency of a compressed echo, which is important in arbitrary waveform generation (AWG). A new model of compressed echo is proposed based on the optical Bloch equations, which exposes much more detailed parameters than the conventional model, such as the time delay of the chirp lasers, the nature of the rare-earth-ion-doped crystal, etc. According to the novel model of compressed echo, we find that reducing the time delay of the chirp lasers and scanning the lasers around the center frequency of the inhomogeneously broadened spectrum, while utilizing a crystal with larger coherence time and excitation lifetime can improve the compressed echo’s intensity and efficiency. The theoretical analysis is validated by numerical simulations. Project supported by Special Funds for Scientific and Technological Innovation Projects in Tianjin, China (Grant No. 10FDZDGX00400) and the Tianjin Research Program of Application Foundation and Advanced Technology, China (Grant No. 15JCQNJC01100).

  9. Measurements of defect structures by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy of the tellurite glass TeO2-P2O5-ZnO-LiNbO3 doped with ions of rare earth elements: Er3+, Nd3+ and Gd3+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golis, E.; Yousef, El. S.; Reben, M.; Kotynia, K.; Filipecki, J.

    2015-12-01

    The objective of the study was the structural analysis of the TeO2-P2O5-ZnO-LiNbO3 tellurite glasses doped with ions of the rare-earth elements: Er3+, Nd3+ and Gd3+ based on the PALS (Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy) method of measuring positron lifetimes. Values of positron lifetimes and the corresponding intensities may be connected with the sizes and number of structural defects, such as vacancies, mono-vacancies, dislocations or pores, the sizes of which range from a few angstroms to a few dozen nanometres. Experimental positron lifetime spectrum revealed existence of two positron lifetime components τ1 and τ2. Their interpretation was based on two-state positron trapping model where the physical parameters are the annihilation velocity and positron trapping rate.

  10. Physical and electrochemical properties of alkaline earth doped, rare earth vanadates

    SciTech Connect

    Adijanto, Lawrence; Balaji Padmanabhan, Venu; Holmes, Kevin J.; Gorte, Raymond J.; Vohs, John M.

    2012-06-15

    The effect of partial substitution of alkaline earth (AE) ions, Sr{sup 2+} and Ca{sup 2+}, for the rare earth (RE) ions, La{sup 3+}, Ce{sup 3+}, Pr{sup 3+}, and Sm{sup 3+}, on the physical properties of REVO{sub 4} compounds were investigated. The use of the Pechini method to synthesize the vanadates allowed for high levels of AE substitution to be obtained. Coulometric titration was used to measure redox isotherms for these materials and showed that the addition of the AE ions increased both reducibility and electronic conductivity under typical solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) anode conditions, through the formation of compounds with mixed vanadium valence. In spite of their high electronic conductivity, REVO{sub 4}-yttira stabilized zirconia (YSZ) composite anodes exhibited only modest performance when used in SOFCs operating with H{sub 2} fuel at 973 K due to their low catalytic activity. High performance was obtained, however, after the addition of a small amount of catalytically active Pd to the anode. - Graphical abstract: Coulometric titration isotherms for ({open_square}) LaVO{sub 4}, ( White-Circle ) PrVO{sub 4}, ( Lozenge ) CeVO{sub 4}, ( Black-Up-Pointing-Triangle ) Ce{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3}VO{sub 3.85}, and ( Black-Square ) Ce{sub 0.7}Ca{sub 0.3}VO{sub 3.85}, at 973 K. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Infiltration procedures were used to prepare SOFC anodes from various vanadates. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Doping of Alkaline Earth to Rare Earth Vanadates showed to improve conductivity and chemical stability. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Alkaline Earth Doped Rare Earth Vanadates-YSZ composites showed conductivities as high as 5 S cm{sup -1} at 973 K. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer As with other ceramic anodes, the addition of a catalyst was required to achieve low anode impedance.

  11. Selective liquid chromatographic separation of yttrium from heavier rare earth elements using acetic acid as a novel eluent.

    PubMed

    Kifle, Dejene; Wibetoe, Grethe

    2013-09-13

    One of the major difficulties in the rare earth elements separation is purification of yttrium from heavy rare earth elements. Thus, an HPLC method using acetic acid as novel eluent was explored for selective separation of yttrium form the heavy rare earth elements. When acetic acid is used as a mobile phase yttrium eluted with the lighter lanthanides. This is contrary to its relative position amongst heavier lanthanides when eluents commonly used for separation of rare earth elements were employed. The shift in elution position of yttrium with acetic acid as eluent may reflect a relatively lower stability constant of the yttrium-AcOH complex (in the same order as for the lighter lanthanides) compared to the corresponding AcOH complexes with heavy lanthanides, enabling selective separation of yttrium from the latter. The method was successfully used for selective separation of yttrium in mixed rare earth sample containing about 80% of yttrium and about 20% of heavy rare earth oxides. Thus, the use of AcOH as eluent is an effective approach for separating and determining the trace amounts of heavy rare earth elements in large amounts of yttrium matrix. Separation was performed on C18 column by running appropriate elution programs. The effluent from the column was monitored with diode array detector at absorbance wavelength of 658nm after post column derivatization with Arsenazo III.

  12. Bishop tuff revisited: new rare Earth element data consistent with crystal fractionation.

    PubMed

    Cameron, K L

    1984-06-22

    The Bishop Tuff of eastern California is the type example of a high-silica rhyolite that, according to Hildreth, supposedly evolved by liquid-state differentiation. New analyses establish that the Bishop Tuff "earlyllate" rare earth element trend reported by Hildreth mimics the relations between groundmass glasses and whole rocks for allanite-bearing pumice. Differences in elemental concentrations between whole rock and groundmass are the result of phenocryst precipitation; thus the data of Hildreth are precisely those expected to result from crystal fractionation. PMID:17837193

  13. Bishop tuff revisited: new rare Earth element data consistent with crystal fractionation.

    PubMed

    Cameron, K L

    1984-06-22

    The Bishop Tuff of eastern California is the type example of a high-silica rhyolite that, according to Hildreth, supposedly evolved by liquid-state differentiation. New analyses establish that the Bishop Tuff "earlyllate" rare earth element trend reported by Hildreth mimics the relations between groundmass glasses and whole rocks for allanite-bearing pumice. Differences in elemental concentrations between whole rock and groundmass are the result of phenocryst precipitation; thus the data of Hildreth are precisely those expected to result from crystal fractionation.

  14. Health Sensing Functions in Thermal Barrier Coatings Incorporating Rare-Earth-Doped Luminescent Sublayers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eldridge, J. I.; Singh, J.; Wolfe, D. E.

    2004-01-01

    Great effort has been directed towards developing techniques to monitor the health of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) that would detect the approach of safety-threatening conditions. An unconventional approach is presented here where health sensing functionality is integrated into the TBC itself by the incorporation of rare-earth-doped luminescent sublayers to monitor erosion as well as whether the TBC is maintaining the underlying substrate at a sufficiently low temperature. Erosion indication is demonstrated in electron-beam physical vapor deposited (EB-PVD) TBCs consisting of 7wt% yttria-stabilized zirconia (7YSZ) with europium-doped and terbium-doped sublayers. Multiple ingot deposition produced sharp boundaries between the doped sublayers without interrupting the columnar growth of the TBC. The TBC-coated specimens were subjected to alumina particle jet erosion, and the erosion depth was then indicated under ultraviolet illumination that excited easily visible luminescence characteristic of sublayer that was exposed by erosion. In addition, temperature measurements from a bottom-lying europium-doped sublayer in a TBC produced by multiple ingot EB-PVD were accomplished by measuring the temperature-dependent decay time from the 606 nm wavelength emission excited in that sublayer with a 532 nm wavelength laser that was selected for its close match to one of the europium excitation wavelengths as well as being at a wavelength where the TBC is relatively transparent. It is proposed the low dopant levels and absence of interruption of the TBC columnar growth allow the addition of the erosion and temperature sensing functions with minimal effects on TBC performance.

  15. Photon-pair source with controllable delay based on shaped inhomogeneous broadening of rare-earth-metal-doped solids

    SciTech Connect

    Sekatski, Pavel; Sangouard, Nicolas; Gisin, Nicolas; Afzelius, Mikael; Riedmatten, Hugues de

    2011-05-15

    Spontaneous Raman emission in atomic gases provides an attractive source of photon pairs with a controllable delay. We show how this technique can be implemented in solid state systems by appropriately shaping the inhomogeneous broadening. Our proposal is eminently feasible with current technology and provides a realistic solution to entangle remote rare-earth-metal-doped solids in a heralded way.

  16. Determination of rare earth elements in tomato plants by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry techniques.

    PubMed

    Spalla, S; Baffi, C; Barbante, C; Turetta, C; Turretta, C; Cozzi, G; Beone, G M; Bettinelli, M

    2009-10-30

    In recent years identification of the geographical origin of food has grown more important as consumers have become interested in knowing the provenance of the food that they purchase and eat. Certification schemes and labels have thus been developed to protect consumers and genuine producers from the improper use of popular brand names or renowned geographical origins. As the tomato is one of the major components of what is considered to be the healthy Mediterranean diet, it is important to be able to determine the geographical origin of tomatoes and tomato-based products such as tomato sauce. The aim of this work is to develop an analytical method to determine rare earth elements (RRE) for the control of the geographic origin of tomatoes. The content of REE in tomato plant samples collected from an agricultural area in Piacenza, Italy, was determined, using four different digestion procedures with and without HF. Microwave dissolution with HNO3 + H2O2 proved to be the most suitable digestion procedure. Inductively coupled plasma quadrupole mass spectrometry (ICPQMS) and inductively coupled plasma sector field plasma mass spectrometry (ICPSFMS) instruments, both coupled with a desolvation system, were used to determine the REE in tomato plants in two different laboratories. A matched calibration curve method was used for the quantification of the analytes. The detection limits (MDLs) of the method ranged from 0.03 ng g(-1) for Ho, Tm, and Lu to 2 ng g(-1) for La and Ce. The precision, in terms of relative standard deviation on six replicates, was good, with values ranging, on average, from 6.0% for LREE (light rare earth elements) to 16.5% for HREE (heavy rare earth elements). These detection limits allowed the determination of the very low concentrations of REE present in tomato berries. For the concentrations of REE in tomato plants, the following trend was observed: roots > leaves > stems > berries.

  17. Rare earth elements geochemistry in springs from Taftan geothermal area SE Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakeri, Ata; Ghoreyshinia, Sayedkazem; Mehrabi, Behzad; Delavari, Morteza

    2015-10-01

    Concentrations of rare earth elements (REEs) were determined in springs and andesitic-dacitic rocks of Taftan geothermal field. Hydrochemical results of major ions indicate that thermal springs are Na-SO4-Cl and Ca-SO4-Cl types. Concentrations of REEs are in ranges of 10- 4 to 1.2 and 49 to ~ 62 times of chondrite for springwater and rock samples, respectively. The thermal (STS and TTS) and the cold (APS) springs with low pH values exhibit a very high REE contents (0.64 to 3.15 mg/l). Saturation index indicates that Fe and Al phases can control dissolved REE concentration in FTS and PF cold springs. The speciation of REE complexes indicates dominant presence of LnSO4+ and free ion in the Taftan thermal springs. In APS cold spring with pH ~ 4, fluoride complexes are dominate over the free ion and sulfate species, while in PF and FTS cold springs with pH 6.4 and 7, respectively, carbonate complexes (LnCO3+) are predominant species. Chondrite-normalized pattern for the low-pH waters show very distinctive gull-wing patterns, characteristic feature of acid-sulfate geothermal systems, and are similar to those of the host rocks. Chemical characteristics of rare earth elements in spring and volcanic rock samples indicate that REEs are originated from the andesitic-dacitic host rocks. Whole-rock-normalized REE patterns and petrographic evidences show that rare earth elements leached mainly from marginal alteration of minerals and matrix decomposition in volcanic rocks. In chondrite-normalized REE patterns, significant negative Eu anomaly in the cold springs compare to the thermal and acidic springs indicates that alteration of plagioclase is more intense in the later, corresponding to increasing in temperature and acidic state of reactant water.

  18. [Effect of rare earth elements on the seedling ratio of crops].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z; Chang, J; Wang, C; Chai, S; Han, X; Li, R

    2001-06-01

    The effects of rare earth elements(REEs) on the relative seedling ratio of three crops(rice, rape and soybean) in three soil(red soil, yellow fluvo-aquic soil and yellow cinnamon soil) were studied according to OECD method, and the LC50 were obtained. Toxicity effect of REEs on rice was minimum among the crops tested. The toxicity on crops in yellow cinnamon soil was lower, whereas on soybean in yellow fluvo-aquic soil and on rape in red earth were higher.

  19. Extraction of rare earth elements from hydrate-phosphate precipitates of apatite processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andropov, M. O.; Anufrieva, A. V.; Buynovskiy, A. S.; Makaseev, Y. N.; Mazov, I. N.; Nefedov, R. A.; Sachkov, V. I.; Stepanova, O. B.; Valkov, AV

    2016-01-01

    The features of extraction of rare earth elements (REE) were considered from hydrate-phosphate precipitates of REE of apatite processing by nitric acid technology. The preliminary purification of nitrate solution of REE from impurities of titanium, aluminum, iron, uranium and thorium was suggested to obtain stable solutions not forming precipitates. Washing the extract was recommended with the evaporated reextract that allows to obtain directly on the cascade of REE extraction the concentrated solutions suitable for the separation into groups by the extraction method. Technical decisions were suggested for the separation of REE in groups without the use of salting-out agent.

  20. Application of solid phase extraction procedures for rare earth elements determination in environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Pyrzynska, Krystyna; Kubiak, Anna; Wysocka, Irena

    2016-07-01

    Determination of rare earth elements in environmental samples requires often pre-concentration and separation step due to a low metal content and high concentration of the interfering matrix components. A solid phase extraction technique with different kind of solid sorbents offers a high enrichment factor, rapid phase separation and the possibility of its combination with various detection techniques used either in on-line or off-line mode. The recent developments in this area published over the last five years are presented and discussed in this paper.

  1. Use of X-ray Fluorescence Analysis for the Determination of Rare Earth Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schramm, Rainer

    2016-09-01

    X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF) is a powerful tool for the analysis of solid material. That is the reason why the technique was applied for the determination of rare earth elements (REEs) since about 1970. At present, energy-dispersive XRF and wavelength-dispersive XRF are used for the analysis of pressed powder pellets or fused Li-borate beads containing REEs. The production of reliable results can only be achieved by careful optimization of the parameter, in particular the selection of spectral lines. The quantification is based on a calibration realized by using reference samples.

  2. Influence of rare earth elements (Nd, Sm, Gd) on the physicochemical properties of ges crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madatov, R. S.; Alekperov, A. S.; Magerramova, Dzh. A.

    2015-11-01

    Layered semiconductors (including GeS), which are widely used in modern electronics, are of great interest for researchers. New GeS-based devices have been developed for holographic recording, optical processing, and storage of information. In the last few years, American scientists have developed a unique GeS-based device that makes it possible to accumulate an immense amount of solar energy. The introduction of rare earth elements (REEs) facilitates the healing of metal and chalcogenide vacancies, removes polytypism, and enhances interlayer interaction.

  3. Monolithically integrated active waveguides and lasers using rare-earth doped spin-on glass

    SciTech Connect

    Ashby, C.I.H.; Sullivan, C.T.; Vawter, G.A.

    1996-09-01

    This LDRD program No. 3505.230 explored a new approach to monolithic integration of active waveguides and rare-earth solid state lasers directly onto III-V substrates. It involved selectively incorporating rare-earth ions into spin-on glasses (SOGs) that could be solvent cast and then patterned with conventional microelectronic processing. The patterned, rare-earth spin-on glasses (RESOGs) were to be photopumped by laser diodes prefabricated on the wafer and would serve as directly integrated active waveguides and/or rare-earth solid state lasers.

  4. Synthesis and thermoluminescence properties of rare earth-doped NaMgBO3 phosphor.

    PubMed

    Khan, Z S; Ingale, N B; Omanwar, S K

    2016-05-01

    Rare earth (Dy(3+) and Sm(3+))-doped sodium magnesium borate (NaMgBO3) is synthesized by solution combustion synthesis method keeping their thermoluminescence properties in mind. The reaction produced very stable crystalline NaMgBO3:RE (RE = Dy(3+), Sm(3+)) phosphors. The phosphors are exposed to (60)Co gamma-ray radiations dose of varying rate from 5 to 25 Gy, and their TL characteristics with kinetic parameters are studied. NaMgBO3:Dy(3+) phosphor shows two peaks for lower doping concentration of Dy(3+) while it reduced to single peak for the higher concentrations of activator Dy(3+). NaMgBO3:Dy(3+) shows the major glow peak around 200 °C while NaMgBO3:Sm(3+) phosphors show two well-separated glow peaks at 200 and 332 °C respectively. The thermoluminescence intensity of these phosphors was compare with the commercially available TLD-100 (Harshaw) phosphor. The TL responses for gamma-ray radiations dose were found to be linear from 5 to 25 Gy for both phosphors while the fading in each case is calculated for the tenure of 45 days.

  5. Power scaling estimate of crystalline fiber waveguides with rare earth doped YAG cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Da; Hong, Pengda; Meissner, Stephanie K.; Meissner, Helmuth E.

    2016-03-01

    Power scaling analysis based on the model by Dawson et al. [1,2] for circular core fibers has been applied to estimating power scaling of crystalline fiber waveguides (CFWs) with RE3+ doped single crystalline or ceramic YAG (RE=rare earth: Yb, Er, Tm and Ho). Power scaling limits include stimulated Brillouin scattering, thermal lensing effect, and limits to coupling of pump light into CFWs. The CFW designs we have considered consist, in general, of a square doped RE3+:YAG core, an inner cladding of either undoped or laser-inactive-ion-doped YAG and an outer cladding of sapphire. The presented data have been developed for the structures fabricated using the Adhesive-Free Bonding (AFB®) technique, but the results should be essentially independent of fabrication technique, assuming perfect core/inner cladding/outer cladding interfaces. Hard power scaling limits exist for a specific CFW design and are strongly based on the physical constants of the material and its spectroscopic specifics. For example, power scaling limit was determined as ~16 kW for 2.5% ceramic Yb:YAG/YAG (core material/inner cladding material) at fiber length of 1.7 m and core diameter of 69 μm. Considering the present manufacturing limit for CFW length to be, e.g., 0.5 m, the actual maximum output power will be limited to ~4.4 kW for a Yb:YAG/YAG CFW. Power limit estimates have also been computed for Er3+, Tm3+ and Ho3+doped core based CFWs.

  6. Photodarkening study of gratings written into rare-earth doped optical fibres using a femtosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Åslund, Mattias L.; Jovanovic, Nemanja; Groothoff, Nathaniel; Canning, John; Marshall, Graham D.; Jackson, Stuart D.; Fuerbach, Alex; Withford, Michael J.

    2007-12-01

    A well-known side-effect from fibre Bragg grating UV-fabrication is short wavelength attenuation, where irradiation with laser light, usually in the UV, generates both defect-induced absorption and scattering. These losses are especially problematic for high power optical fibre lasers operating at shorter wavelengths where resonant assisted coupling into the glass matrix through the rare earth ions can take place (e.g. Yb 3+). In this, work we present a study of the relative magnitude of short wavelength attenuation in gratings written by the point-by-point method using a Ti-sapphire femtosecond laser operating at 800 nm. Such gratings are very stable and have been used as the feedback elements in fibre lasers with powers exceeding 100 W. We show that the scattering properties responsible for the attenuation are analogous to those associated with type II gratings written with UV lasers.

  7. Recovery of rare earth elements from the sulfothermophilic red alga Galdieria sulphuraria using aqueous acid.

    PubMed

    Minoda, Ayumi; Sawada, Hitomi; Suzuki, Sonoe; Miyashita, Shin-ichi; Inagaki, Kazumi; Yamamoto, Takaiku; Tsuzuki, Mikio

    2015-02-01

    The demand for rare earth elements has increased dramatically in recent years because of their numerous industrial applications, and considerable research efforts have consequently been directed toward recycling these materials. The accumulation of metals in microorganisms is a low-cost and environmentally friendly method for the recovery of metals present in the environment at low levels. Numerous metals, including rare earth elements, can be readily dissolved in aqueous acid, but the efficiency of metal biosorption is usually decreased under the acidic conditions. In this report, we have investigated the use of the sulfothermophilic red alga Galdieria sulphuraria for the recovery of metals, with particular emphasis on the recovery of rare earth metals. Of the five different growth conditions investigated where G. sulphuraria could undergo an adaptation process, Nd(III), Dy(III), and Cu(II) were efficiently recovered from a solution containing a mixture of different metals under semi-anaerobic heterotrophic condition at a pH of 2.5. G. sulphuraria also recovered Nd(III), Dy(III), La(III), and Cu(II) with greater than 90% efficiency at a concentration of 0.5 ppm. The efficiency remained unchanged at pH values in the range of 1.5-2.5. Furthermore, at pH values in the range of 1.0-1.5, the lanthanoid ions were collected much more efficiently into the cell fractions than Cu(II) and therefore successfully separated from the Cu(II) dissolved in the aqueous acid. Microscope observation of the cells using alizarin red suggested that the metals were accumulating inside of the cells. Experiments using dead cells suggested that this phenomenon was a biological process involving specific activities within the cells.

  8. Recovery of rare earth elements from the sulfothermophilic red alga Galdieria sulphuraria using aqueous acid.

    PubMed

    Minoda, Ayumi; Sawada, Hitomi; Suzuki, Sonoe; Miyashita, Shin-ichi; Inagaki, Kazumi; Yamamoto, Takaiku; Tsuzuki, Mikio

    2015-02-01

    The demand for rare earth elements has increased dramatically in recent years because of their numerous industrial applications, and considerable research efforts have consequently been directed toward recycling these materials. The accumulation of metals in microorganisms is a low-cost and environmentally friendly method for the recovery of metals present in the environment at low levels. Numerous metals, including rare earth elements, can be readily dissolved in aqueous acid, but the efficiency of metal biosorption is usually decreased under the acidic conditions. In this report, we have investigated the use of the sulfothermophilic red alga Galdieria sulphuraria for the recovery of metals, with particular emphasis on the recovery of rare earth metals. Of the five different growth conditions investigated where G. sulphuraria could undergo an adaptation process, Nd(III), Dy(III), and Cu(II) were efficiently recovered from a solution containing a mixture of different metals under semi-anaerobic heterotrophic condition at a pH of 2.5. G. sulphuraria also recovered Nd(III), Dy(III), La(III), and Cu(II) with greater than 90% efficiency at a concentration of 0.5 ppm. The efficiency remained unchanged at pH values in the range of 1.5-2.5. Furthermore, at pH values in the range of 1.0-1.5, the lanthanoid ions were collected much more efficiently into the cell fractions than Cu(II) and therefore successfully separated from the Cu(II) dissolved in the aqueous acid. Microscope observation of the cells using alizarin red suggested that the metals were accumulating inside of the cells. Experiments using dead cells suggested that this phenomenon was a biological process involving specific activities within the cells. PMID:25283836

  9. An EDTA-β-cyclodextrin material for the adsorption of rare earth elements and its application in preconcentration of rare earth elements in seawater.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Feiping; Repo, Eveliina; Meng, Yong; Wang, Xueting; Yin, Dulin; Sillanpää, Mika

    2016-03-01

    The separation and recovery of Rare earth elements (REEs) from diluted aqueous streams has attracted great attention in recent years because of ever-increasing REEs demand. In this study, a green synthesized EDTA-cross-linked β-cyclodextrin (EDTA-β-CD) biopolymer was prepared and employed in adsorption of aqueous REEs, such as La(III), Ce(III), and Eu(III). EDTA acts not only as cross-linker but also as coordination site for binding of REEs. The adsorption properties for the adsorption of REEs by varying experimental conditions were carried out by batch tests. The kinetics results revealed that the surface chemical sorption and the external film diffusion were the rate-determining steps of the adsorption process. The obtained maximum adsorption capacities of EDTA-β-CD were 0.343, 0.353, and 0.365mmolg(-1) for La(III), Ce(III) and Eu(III), respectively. Importantly, the isotherms fitted better to Langmuir than Freundlich and Sips models, suggesting a homogenous adsorption surface for REEs on the adsorbent. Moreover, the multi-component adsorption, which was modeled by extended Sips isotherms, revealed adsorbent's selectivity to Eu(III). More significantly, the successful recoveries of the studied ions from tap water and seawater samples makes EDTA-β-CD a promising sorbent for the preconcentration of REEs from diluted aqueous streams.

  10. Synthesis, characterization and processing of active rare earth-doped chalcohalide glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debari, Roberto Mauro

    Applications for infrared-transmitting non-oxide glass fibers span a broad range of topics. They can be used in the military, the medical field, telecommunications, and even in agriculture. Rare earth ions are used as dopants in these glasses in order to stimulate emissions in the infrared spectral region. In order to extend the host glass transmission further into the infrared, selenium atoms were substituted for sulfur in the established Ge-S-I chalcohalide glass system and the fundamental properties of these latter glasses were explored. Over 30 different compositions in the Ge-Se-I glass system were investigated as to their thermal and optical properties. The resulting optimum host with a composition of Ge15Se80I5 has a broad transmission range from 0.7 mum to 17.0 mum and a high working range over 145°C. The host glass also exhibited a Tg of 125°C, making rotational casting of a cladding tube for rod-and-tube fiberization a possibility. The base glass was doped with 1000 to 4000 ppm/wt of erbium, dysprosium, or neodymium. When doped with Er3+-ions, absorptions at 1.54 mum and 3.42 mum were observed. Nd3+-doping resulted in an absorption peak near 4.24 mum and Dy3+ ions caused absorption at 1.30 mum. Fluorescence emissions were found for neodymium at 1.396 mum with a FWHM of 74 nm, and for dysprosium at 1.145 mum with a FWHM of 75 nm, at 1.360 mum with a FWHM of 98 rim and at 1.674 mum with a FWHM of 60 nm. High optical quality tubes of the host glass could be formed using rotational casting in silica ampoules. Glass tubes, 4 to 6 cm long with a 1 cm outer diameter and a tailored inner-hole diameter ranging from 0.4 to 0.6 cm could be synthesized by this process with excellent dimensional tolerances around the circumference as well as along the length. A preform of this size provided 25 continuous meters of unclad fiber with diameters ranging from 140 to 200 mum. A UV-curable acrylate cladding was applied via an external coating cup. An x-ray analysis of the

  11. Spectroscopic analyses of trivalent rare-earth ions doped in different host materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandrasekharan, Sreerenjini

    2011-12-01

    Trivalent rare-earth (RE3+) ions of 4f n electronic configurations are found to possess potential applications in the field of optoelectronic and biophotonic technologies owing to their unique optical properties. They have been used as optical activators in a large number of solid-state laser host materials due to their rich energy level structure. This work focuses on the spectroscopic study of two RE 3+ ions, namely, trivalent erbium and neodymium (Er3+ and Nd3+, respectively), embedded in some important single crystal and nanocrystalline host materials including yttrium orthoaluminate (YAlO3), erbium oxide (Er2O3), yttrium oxide (Y2O3) and a combined host system of Y2O 3 and a vinyl polymer named Polymethyl Methacrylate (PMMA). Each one of these host materials are known to be unique for their characteristic properties such as chemical durability, thermal stability, optical clarity, wide band gaps, biocompatibility, and success as phosphors in various optoelectronic devices. The complete material characterization has been performed through morphology analyses using advanced microscopy techniques and spectroscopic analyses of the characteristic absorption and emission spectra by applying phenomenological crystal-field splitting and Judd-Ofelt techniques. The important spectroscopic parameters such as line strengths, radiative decay rates, and branching ratios have been obtained for the intermanifold transitions from the upper multiplets to the corresponding lower-lying multiplet manifolds 2S+1LJ of RE3+ ions doped in various host systems. Using the radiative decay rates, radiative life times are obtained and the experimental analyses of the fluorescent spectra yield the measured lifetimes of emitting metastable states. Finally, the results are compared with the previously published set of values for the same ions doped in similar type of host systems. Detailed analyses of the spectroscopic properties show that the studied systems RE3+ doped single crystals and

  12. Rare earth elements in soils from selected areas on the Island of Hawaii

    SciTech Connect

    Barnard, W.M.; Halbig, J.B.

    1985-07-01

    Fifty soil samples for the wet, windward (east) side and dry, leeward (west) side of the Island of Hawaii were analyzed for La, Ce, Sm, Eu, Yb, and Lu by neutron activation/gamma-ray spectroscopic analysis. Data on concentrations in each sample are listed and analyzed statistically for soil samples collected from the western slope of Kohala Mountain, the western coastal plain of Mauna Kea, and the Northeastern coastal plain of Maunal Loa. Rare earth element (REE) concentrations are two to six times greater in soils from the western, dry side of the island, and good statistical correlation is exhibited among the samples for pairs of individual REEs. In the organic-rich soils of the east side, correlations are poor but are markedly improved when sample weights are adjusted for weight due to organic matter and water in soil colloids. If the mean compositions of selected rock samples from the Hawaii Reference Suite are representative of the compositions of the parent materials, REEs in the soils are moderately enriched (up to two times, based on oven-dry weights). Rare earth element concentrations in the island's western soils are as much as two times greater than the mean REE values of common sedimentary rocks worldwide; however, they are well within the concentration ranges of soils of continental origin. The eastern soils tend to have less La and Ce, but similar amounts of the middle and heavy REEs.

  13. Rare earth elements in sediments of the Vigo Ria, NW Iberian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prego, Ricardo; Caetano, Miguel; Vale, Carlos; Marmolejo-Rodríguez, Judith

    2009-04-01

    The abundance and distribution of rare earth elements (REE) and their signatures in the Vigo Ria were studied from 50 samples of surface sediments and related to the geological formation in its watershed. The total amount of REE in the Ria is heterogeneous. It ranges from 220 mg kg -1 in the southern middle Ria margin in the vicinity of the Galiñeiro geological shore complex, which contains REE-enriched minerals, to 2 mg kg -1 near the Ria mouth due to dilution with high levels of carbonated biogenic particles (31% of Ca). Rare earth elements of the Ria sediments are considerably enriched in light-REE relative to heavy-REE (a LREE/HREE ratio of 9.7±1.6) and also show a slightly negative Eu-anomaly. Low European shale normalised REE patterns were distinguished in the innermost sediments of Vigo Ria, but were not correlated with Al. This suggests a minor contribution of REE from upstream freshwater inputs to the sediments in the middle Vigo Ria zone. Normalised REE ratios in the middle Ria imply that fine particles enriched in REE may be exported from the Ria to shelf mud patches and REE can be useful as sediment tracers of Ria input on the shelf.

  14. Rare earth element components in atmospheric particulates in the Bayan Obo mine region.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lingqing; Liang, Tao; Zhang, Qian; Li, Kexin

    2014-05-01

    The Bayan Obo mine, located in Inner Mongolia, China, is the largest light rare earth body ever found in the world. The research for rare earth elements (REEs) enrichment in atmospheric particulates caused by mining and ore processing is fairly limited so far. In this paper, atmospheric particulates including total suspended particulate (TSP) matter and particles with an equivalent aerodynamic diameter less than 10 μm (PM10) were collected around the Bayan Obo mine region, in August 2012 and March 2013, to analyze the levels and distributions of REEs in particles. The total concentrations of REEs for TSP were 149.8 and 239.6 ng/m(3), and those for PM10 were 42.8 and 68.9 ng/m(3), in August 2012 and March 2013, respectively. Enrichment factor was calculated for all 14 REEs in the TSP and PM10 and the results indicated that REEs enrichment in atmosphere particulates was caused by anthropogenic sources and influenced by the strong wind in springtime. The spatial distribution of REEs in TSP showed a strong gradient concentration in the prevailing wind direction. REE chondrite normalized patterns of TSP and PM10 were similar and the normalized curves inclined to the right side, showing the conspicuous fractionation between the light REEs and heavy REE, which supported by the chondrite normalized concentration ratios calculated for selected elements (La(N)/Yb(N), La(N)/Sm(N), Gd(N)/Yb(N)).

  15. Seawater rare-earth element patterns preserved in apatite of Pennsylvanian conodonts?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bright, Camomilia A.; Cruse, Anna M.; Lyons, Timothy W.; MacLeod, Kenneth G.; Glascock, Michael D.; Ethington, Raymond L.

    2009-03-01

    Past workers have used rare-earth element patterns recorded in biogenic apatite as proxies for original seawater chemistry. To explore the potency of this approach, we analyzed Pennsylvanian conodonts from limestones, gray shales, and black shales of the Fort Scott and Pawnee formations (Desmoinesian) and Swope and Dennis formations (Missourian) in Kansas, Missouri, and Iowa, U.S.A. Analysis of individual platform conodonts from seven taxa using laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) revealed a consistent enrichment in the middle rare-earth elements (MREE). Analogous MREE enrichment has been observed in authigenic apatite and bulk samples of phosphate-rich black shales from the same formations. Importantly, however, phosphate-depleted shales intimately associated with the P-rich intervals are relatively depleted in MREE. These antithetic patterns argue convincingly for secondary migration from the bulk sediment into the phosphate, and the extent of MREE enrichment in the conodonts is correlated positively with the total REE content. MREE enrichment in conodonts does not vary systematically as a function of lithology, stratigraphic level, conodont genus, geographic location, or with independent estimates of paleoredox conditions in the bottom waters. Collectively, these results argue for postmortem (diagenetic) REE uptake resulting in a pronounced (and progressive) MREE enrichment. Any cerium anomalies, if initially present, were masked by diagenetic uptake of REE. Paleoenvironmental interpretations of conodont REE, particularly for samples exhibiting MREE enrichment, should therefore be viewed with caution.

  16. Experimental partitioning of rare earth elements and scandium among armalcolite, ilmenite, olivine and mare basalt liquid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irving, A. J.; Merrill, R. B.; Singleton, D. E.

    1978-01-01

    An experimental study was carried out to measure partition coefficients for two rare-earth elements (Sm and Tm) and Sc among armalcolite, ilmenite, olivine and liquid coexisting in a system modeled on high-Ti mare basalt 74275. This 'primitive' sample was chosen for study because its major and trace element chemistry as well as its equilibrium phase relations at atmospheric pressure are known from previous studies. Beta-track analytical techniques were used so that partition coefficients could be measured in an environment whose bulk trace element composition is similar to that of the natural basalt. Partition coefficients for Cr and Mn were determined in the same experiments by microprobe analysis. The only equilibrium partial melting model appears to be one in which ilmenite is initially present in the source region but is consumed by melting before segregation of the high-Ti mare basalt liquid from the residue.

  17. Normalized rare earth elements in water, sediments, and wine: identifying sources and environmental redox conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Piper, David Z.; Bau, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The concentrations of the rare earth elements (REE) in surface waters and sediments, when normalized on an element-by-element basis to one of several rock standards and plotted versus atomic number, yield curves that reveal their partitioning between different sediment fractions and the sources of those fractions, for example, between terrestrial-derived lithogenous debris and seawater-derived biogenous detritus and hydrogenous metal oxides. The REE of ancient sediments support their partitioning into these same fractions and further contribute to the identification of the redox geochemistry of the sea water in which the sediments accumulated. The normalized curves of the REE that have been examined in several South American wine varietals can be interpreted to reflect the lithology of the bedrock on which the vines may have been grown, suggesting limited fractionation during soil development.

  18. Bioleaching of rare earth and radioactive elements from red mud using Penicillium tricolor RM-10.

    PubMed

    Qu, Yang; Lian, Bin

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate biological leaching of rare earth elements (REEs) and radioactive elements from red mud, and to evaluate the radioactivity of the bioleached red mud used for construction materials. A filamentous, acid-producing fungi named RM-10, identified as Penicillium tricolor, is isolated from red mud. In our bioleaching experiments by using RM-10, a total concentration of 2% (w/v) red mud under one-step bioleaching process was generally found to give the maximum leaching ratios of the REEs and radioactive elements. However, the highest extraction yields are achieved under two-step bioleaching process at 10% (w/v) pulp density. At pulp densities of 2% and 5% (w/v), red mud processed under both one- and two-step bioleaching can meet the radioactivity regulations in China.

  19. Trace Element Inputs to the Upper West Pacific from Nd Isotopes and Rare Earth Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrens, M. K.; Pahnke, K.; Schnetger, B.; Brumsack, H. J.

    2015-12-01

    Neodymium isotopes (143Nd/144Nd, expressed as ɛNd) and rare earth element (REE) concentrations in the ocean trace water mass transport and margin-seawater exchange processes. The distinct ɛNd and REE signatures of the lithogenic components of margin sediments of the West Pacific allow characterization of trace element inputs to the Pacific Ocean. We present dissolved ɛNdand REE concentrations from twelve vertical profiles of a transect from South Korea to Fiji. Near South Korea, surface waters are marked by unradiogenic ɛNd (as low as -7.3), high REE concentrations (e.g., Nd = 15.3 pmol/kg) and low salinity. Towards the open ocean, these parameters gradually change towards typical Pacific open ocean values (ɛNd = -3.3, [Nd] = 5.55 pmol/kg). Subsurface waters show REE depletions, followed by the typical REE increase with increasing water depth. These distributions indicate trace element input near South Korea and enhanced subsurface scavenging, as indicated by strong heavy REE to light REE fractionation. In the tropical West Pacific (10°N-15°S), high surface and subsurface water ɛNd values (+0.7) and positive Eu anomalies trace the influence of volcanic islands. Yet, absolute REE concentrations are extremely low at these depths (e.g., Nd = 2.77 pmol/kg). Using shale-normalized Nd/Er and Ho/Dy ratios, that show a much stronger surface to subsurface decrease in coastal waters compared to the open ocean, we suggest enhanced scavenging in this area. Eastward flowing intermediate waters (NPIW, AAIW) have ɛNd values up to +1.9 (NPIW) and +3.7 (AAIW) higher than those entering the tropical West Pacific from north and south, respectively. Modified ɛNd at intermediate depths and no change in REE patterns suggest that boundary exchange along volcanic island margins modifies the seawater ɛNd without changing the REE budget.

  20. Rare-earth doped colour tuneable up-conversion ZBLAN phosphor for enhancing photocatalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Méndez-Ramos, J.; Acosta-Mora, P.; Ruiz-Morales, J. C.; Sierra, M.; Redondas, A.; Ruggiero, E.; Salassa, L.; Borges, M. E.; Esparza, P.

    2015-03-01

    Rare-earth doped ZrF4-BaF2-LaF3-AlF3-NaF (ZBLAN) fluoride glasses have been successfully synthesized showing outstanding UV-VIS up-conversion luminescence of Er3+ and Tm3+, sensitized by Yb3+ ions, under near-infrared excitation at 980 nm. The ratio between blue, green and red up-conversion emission bands can be adjusted by varying the pump power density of the incident infrared radiation, resulting in a controlled tuneability of the overall emitting colour from greenish to yellowish. Additionally, the observed high energy UV intense up-conversion emissions are suitable to enhance photocatalytic activity of main water-splitting semiconductor electrodes (such as TiO2) used in sustainable production of hydrogen. Photocatalysis and photolysis degradation of methylene blue in water under sun-like irradiation using benchmark photocatalyst (TiO2 Degussa P25) have been boosted by 20% and by a factor of 2.5 respectively, due to the enhancement of UV radiation that reaches the TiO2 particles by the addition of ZBLAN powder into a slurry-type photo-reactor. Hence, up-conversion ZBLAN phosphors contribute to demonstrate the possibility of transforming the incoming infrared radiation into the UV region needed to bridge the gap of photocatalytic semiconductors.

  1. Structure-property-composition relationships in doped zinc oxides: enhanced photocatalytic activity with rare earth dopants.

    PubMed

    Goodall, Josephine B M; Illsley, Derek; Lines, Robert; Makwana, Neel M; Darr, Jawwad A

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the use of continuous hydrothermal flow synthesis (CHFS) technology to rapidly produce a library of 56 crystalline (doped) zinc oxide nanopowders and two undoped samples, each with different particle properties. Each sample was produced in series from the mixing of an aqueous stream of basic zinc nitrate (and dopant ion or modifier) solution with a flow of superheated water (at 450 °C and 24.1 MPa), whereupon a crystalline nanoparticle slurry was rapidly formed. Each composition was collected in series, cleaned, freeze-dried, and then characterized using analytical methods, including powder X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area measurement, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and UV-vis spectrophotometry. Photocatalytic activity of the samples toward the decolorization of methylene blue dye was assessed, and the results revealed that transition metal dopants tended to reduce the photoactivity while rare earth ions, in general, increased the photocatalytic activity. In general, low dopant concentrations were more beneficial to having greater photodecolorization in all cases.

  2. Rare-earth-doped nanophosphors for multicolor cathodoluminescence nanobioimaging using scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Taichi; Fukushima, Shoichiro; Niioka, Hirohiko; Yamamoto, Naoki; Miyake, Jun; Araki, Tsutomu; Hashimoto, Mamoru

    2015-05-01

    We describe rare-earth-doped nanophosphors (RE-NPs) for biological imaging using cathodoluminescence(CL) microscopy based on scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). We report the first demonstration of multicolor CL nanobioimaging using STEM with nanophosphors. The CL spectra of the synthesized nanophosphors (Y2O3∶Eu, Y2O3∶Tb) were sufficiently narrow to be distinguished. From CL images of RE-NPs on an elastic carbon-coated copper grid, the spatial resolution was beyond the diffraction limit of light.Y2O3∶Tb and Y2O3∶Eu RE-NPs showed a remarkable resistance against electron beam exposure even at high acceleration voltage (80 kV) and retained a CL intensity of more than 97% compared with the initial intensity for 1 min. In biological CL imaging with STEM, heavy-metal-stained cell sections containing the RE-NPs were prepared,and both the CL images of RE-NPs and cellular structures, such as mitochondria, were clearly observed from STEM images with high contrast. The cellular CL imaging using RE-NPs also had high spatial resolution even though heavy-metal-stained cells are normally regarded as highly scattering media. Moreover, since theRE-NPs exhibit photoluminescence (PL) excited by UV light, they are useful for multimodal correlative imaging using CL and PL.

  3. Visible WGM emissions from rare earth ion doped ZnO microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    K, Fabitha; Rao, M. S. Ramachandra

    ZnO is known to be an ideal candidate for short wavelength range opto-electronic device applications due to its wide and direct bandgap (3.37 eV) and high excitonic binding energy (60 meV). Apart from the UV emission at ~380 nm (free exciton emission) ZnO also possesses a broad emission band centered at ~530 nm which is expected to be originated from the oxygen vacancy (Vo) defects. In rare earth (RE) ion doped ZnO, emissions originate from the 4f levels of RE ions will be obtained in addition to the characteristic emissions of ZnO. Small micro/nanostructures made of ZnO with high crystalline quality show unique characteristics in light emission, especially in lasing applications. A micro/ nanostructured ZnO crystal generally has a wurtzite structure with a natural hexagonal cross section, which serves as a WGM lasing micro cavity owing to its high reflective index (~2). However, there exists a potential optical loss at corners of hexagons; therefore, an isotropic structure like spheres may be a better candidate to achieve efficient light confinement. In our work, highly smooth micro spheres with different diameters were grown. Raman spectroscopy measurements confirm the hexagonal wurtzite structure of ZnO, SEM and AFM studies shows the smooth surfaced spheres. WGM lasing characteristics of ZnO spheres have been investigated using optical pumping with 488 nm laser in a micro-PL system. Details of the results will be presented.

  4. Synthesis and structure of some nano-sized rare-earth metal ions doped potassium hexacyanoferrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayan, Himanshu; Alemu, Hailemichael; Nketsa, Pusetso F.; Manatha, Toka J.; Madhavi Thakurdesai, And

    2015-05-01

    Rare-earth ions doped potassium hexacyanoferrates (KR-HCF); with the general formula KRFe(CN)6 · 3H2 O [with, R≡Y, Gd and Yb] nanoparticles were synthesized through precipitation. Characterization was done through particle-size analyzer, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier Transform infra-red (FTIR) and Raman spectroscopy, and powder X-ray diffraction (XRD). The XRD data was analyzed on FullProf Software Suite program and the unit-cell structure and lattice parameters of KR-HCF samples were determined from scratch and refined further. All the three KR-HCF nanoparticles seem to crystallize in the orthorhombic primitive PMMM space-group. Reasonably good agreement was found with the previously reported lattice constants of KGd-HCF and KYb-HCF orthorhombic single-crystals, except that they assume different space-groups. The observed dissimilarity of space-groups may be attributed to the different time scales involved in the synthesis process. Moreover, the crystal structure of KYFe(CN)6 · 3H2 O nanoparticles is being reported for the very first time.

  5. Processing of Transparent Rare Earth Doped Zirconia for High Temperature Light Emission Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardin, Corey Lee

    The high fracture toughness of stabilized zirconia makes it one of the most widely applicable high temperature structural materials. However, it is not typicality considered for optical applications since the microstructure achieved by traditional processing makes it opaque. The aim of this dissertation is to develop processing methods for the introducing new functionalities of light transparency and light emission (photoluminescence) and to understand the nanostructure-property relationships that make these functionalities possible. A processing study of rare-earth (RE) doped Zirconium Oxide (ZrO2, zirconia) via Current Activated Pressure Assisted Densification (CAPAD) is presented. The role of processing temperature and dopant concentration on the crystal structure, microstructure and properties of the RE: ZrO2 is studied. Microstructural shows sub-100 nm grain size and homogeneous dopant distribution. X-ray diffraction and Raman analysis show that with increased dopant concentration the material changes from monoclinic to tetragonal. Structural analysis shows the material shows high hardness and toughness values 30% greater than similarly processed yttria-stabilized zirconia. Despite birefringence in the tetragonal phase, optical characterization is presented showing the samples are both highly transparent and photo-luminescent. Special attention is paid to analyzing structural and photoluminescence development during densification, as well as the role of oxygen vacancies on the optical properties of the densified material. This material is shown to be a promising candidate for a number of applications including luminescence thermometry and high temperature light emission.

  6. Bioadsorption of rare earth elements through cell surface display of lanthanide binding tags

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Park, Dan M.; Reed, David W.; Yung, Mimi C.; Eslamimanesh, Ali; Lencka, Malgorzata M.; Anderko, Andrzej; Fujita, Yoshiko; Riman, Richard E.; Navrotsky, Alexandra; Jiao, Yongqin

    2016-02-02

    In this study, with the increasing demand for rare earth elements (REEs) in many emerging clean energy technologies, there is an urgent need for the development of new approaches for efficient REE extraction and recovery. As a step toward this goal, we genetically engineered the aerobic bacterium Caulobacter crescentus for REE adsorption through high-density cell surface display of lanthanide binding tags (LBTs) on its S-layer. The LBT-displayed strains exhibited enhanced adsorption of REEs compared to cells lacking LBT, high specificity for REEs, and an adsorption preference for REEs with small atomic radii. Adsorbed Tb3+ could be effectively recovered using citrate,more » consistent with thermodynamic speciation calculations that predicted strong complexation of Tb3+ by citrate. No reduction in Tb3+ adsorption capacity was observed following citrate elution, enabling consecutive adsorption/desorption cycles. The LBT-displayed strain was effective for extracting REEs from the acid leachate of core samples collected at a prospective rare earth mine. Our collective results demonstrate a rapid, efficient, and reversible process for REE adsorption with potential industrial application for REE enrichment and separation.« less

  7. Quantitative estimation of concentrations of dissolved rare earth elements using reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Jingjing; Wang, Denghong; Wang, Runsheng; Chen, Zhenghui

    2013-01-01

    Characteristic spectral parameters such as the wavelength and depth of absorption bands are widely used to quantitatively estimate the composition of samples from hyperspectral reflectance data in soil science, mineralogy as well as vegetation study. However, little research has been conducted on the spectral characteristic of rare earth elements (REE) and their relationship with chemical composition of aqueous solutions. Reflectance spectra of ore leachate solutions and contaminated stream water from a few REE mines in the Jiangxi Province, China, are studied for the first time in this work. The results demonstrate that the six diagnostic absorption features of the rare earths are recognized in visible and near-infrared wavelengths at 574, 790, 736, 520, 861, and 443 nm. The intensity of each of these six absorption bands is linearly correlated with the abundance of total REE, with the r2 value >0.95 and the detection limit at ≥75,000 μg/L. It is suggested that reflectance spectroscopy provides an ideal routine analytical tool for characterizing leachate samples. The outcome of this study also has implications for monitoring the environmental effect of REE mining, in particular in stream water systems by hyperspectral remote sensing.

  8. Bioadsorption of Rare Earth Elements through Cell Surface Display of Lanthanide Binding Tags.

    PubMed

    Park, Dan M; Reed, David W; Yung, Mimi C; Eslamimanesh, Ali; Lencka, Malgorzata M; Anderko, Andrzej; Fujita, Yoshiko; Riman, Richard E; Navrotsky, Alexandra; Jiao, Yongqin

    2016-03-01

    With the increasing demand for rare earth elements (REEs) in many emerging clean energy technologies, there is an urgent need for the development of new approaches for efficient REE extraction and recovery. As a step toward this goal, we genetically engineered the aerobic bacterium Caulobacter crescentus for REE adsorption through high-density cell surface display of lanthanide binding tags (LBTs) on its S-layer. The LBT-displayed strains exhibited enhanced adsorption of REEs compared to cells lacking LBT, high specificity for REEs, and an adsorption preference for REEs with small atomic radii. Adsorbed Tb(3+) could be effectively recovered using citrate, consistent with thermodynamic speciation calculations that predicted strong complexation of Tb(3+) by citrate. No reduction in Tb(3+) adsorption capacity was observed following citrate elution, enabling consecutive adsorption/desorption cycles. The LBT-displayed strain was effective for extracting REEs from the acid leachate of core samples collected at a prospective rare earth mine. Our collective results demonstrate a rapid, efficient, and reversible process for REE adsorption with potential industrial application for REE enrichment and separation. PMID:26836847

  9. Rare earth elements in human hair from a mining area of China.

    PubMed

    Wei, Binggan; Li, Yonghua; Li, Hairong; Yu, Jiangping; Ye, Bixiong; Liang, Tao

    2013-10-01

    Rare earth minerals have been mined for more than 50 years in Inner Mongolia of China. In the mining area rare earth elements (REE) may be significantly accumulated in humans. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to characterize the REE concentrations in hair of local residents. REE concentrations in hair of 118 subjects were determined. The results showed that the mean concentrations of the determined REE in the hair of both females and males were usually higher from mining area than from control area. The mean concentrations of all the fifteen REE were much higher in hair of males than in hair of females from mining area. This suggested that males might be more sensitive to REE than females. In addition, the mean contents of the REE in hair of miners, particularly light REE (La, Ce, Pr and Nd), were usually much higher than the values in hair of non-miners from both mining area and control area, indicating that the miners were exposed to higher concentrations of REE in occupational environment. Among age groups, the relationships between REE concentrations and age groups showed that more and more concentrations of light REE accumulated in body of both females and males with age until 60 years, while heavy REE concentrations decreased with age in males who were exposed to low concentrations of heavy REE.

  10. Bioadsorption of Rare Earth Elements through Cell Surface Display of Lanthanide Binding Tags.

    PubMed

    Park, Dan M; Reed, David W; Yung, Mimi C; Eslamimanesh, Ali; Lencka, Malgorzata M; Anderko, Andrzej; Fujita, Yoshiko; Riman, Richard E; Navrotsky, Alexandra; Jiao, Yongqin

    2016-03-01

    With the increasing demand for rare earth elements (REEs) in many emerging clean energy technologies, there is an urgent need for the development of new approaches for efficient REE extraction and recovery. As a step toward this goal, we genetically engineered the aerobic bacterium Caulobacter crescentus for REE adsorption through high-density cell surface display of lanthanide binding tags (LBTs) on its S-layer. The LBT-displayed strains exhibited enhanced adsorption of REEs compared to cells lacking LBT, high specificity for REEs, and an adsorption preference for REEs with small atomic radii. Adsorbed Tb(3+) could be effectively recovered using citrate, consistent with thermodynamic speciation calculations that predicted strong complexation of Tb(3+) by citrate. No reduction in Tb(3+) adsorption capacity was observed following citrate elution, enabling consecutive adsorption/desorption cycles. The LBT-displayed strain was effective for extracting REEs from the acid leachate of core samples collected at a prospective rare earth mine. Our collective results demonstrate a rapid, efficient, and reversible process for REE adsorption with potential industrial application for REE enrichment and separation.

  11. Effects of rare earth elements and REE-binding proteins on physiological responses in plants.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dongwu; Wang, Xue; Chen, Zhiwei

    2012-02-01

    Rare earth elements (REEs), which include 17 elements in the periodic table, share chemical properties related to a similar external electronic configuration. REEs enriched fertilizers have been used in China since the 1980s. REEs could enter the cell and cell organelles, influence plant growth, and mainly be bound with the biological macromolecules. REE-binding proteins have been found in some plants. In addition, the chlorophyll activities and photosynthetic rate can be regulated by REEs. REEs could promote the protective function of cell membrane and enhance the plant resistance capability to stress produced by environmental factors, and affect the plant physiological mechanism by regulating the Ca²⁺ level in the plant cells. The focus of present review is to describe how REEs and REE-binding proteins participate in the physiological responses in plants.

  12. Geochemistry of rare earth elements in Permian coals from the Huaibei Coalfield, China

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zheng, Lingyun; Liu, Gaisheng; Chou, C.-L.; Qi, C.; Zhang, Y.

    2007-01-01

    The rare earth elements (REEs) in coals are important because of: (a) REE patterns can be an indicator of the nature of source rocks of the mineral matter as well as sedimentary environments; (b) REEs abundance in coal may have industrial-significance. In this study, a total of thirty-four samples of Permian coal, partings, roof, and floor were collected from the Huaibei Coalfield, Anhui Province, China. Abundances of rare earth elements (REEs) and other elements in the samples were determined by inductively coupled-plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and inductively coupled-plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). The results show that the REEs are enriched in coals in the Huaibei Coalfield as compared with Chinese and U.S. coals and the world coal average. Coals in the Lower Shihezi Formation (No. 7, 5, and 4 Coals) and Upper Shihezi Formation (No. 3) have higher REE abundances than the coals in Shanxi Formation (No. 10). Magmatic intrusion resulted in high enrichment of REEs concentrations in No. 5 and 7 Coals. The REE abundances are positively correlated with the ash content. The mineral matter in these coals is mainly made up of clay minerals and carbonates. The REEs are positively correlated with lithophile elements including Si, Al, Ti, Fe, and Na, which are mainly distributed in clay minerals, indicating that REEs are contained mainly in clay minerals. The REE abundances in coals normalized by the ash are higher than that in partings. REEs abundances of coals cannot be accounted for by the REE content in the mineral matter, and some REEs associated with organic matter in coals. ?? 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The Not-So-Rare Earths.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muecke, Gunter K.; Moller, Peter

    1988-01-01

    Describes the characteristics of rare earth elements. Details the physical chemistry of rare earths. Reviews the history of rare earth chemistry and mineralogy. Discusses the mineralogy and crystallography of the formation of rare earth laden minerals found in the earth's crust. Characterizes the geologic history of rare earth elements. (CW)

  14. Effect of the addition of low rare earth elements (lanthanum, neodymium, cerium) on the biodegradation and biocompatibility of magnesium.

    PubMed

    Willbold, Elmar; Gu, Xuenan; Albert, Devon; Kalla, Katharina; Bobe, Katharina; Brauneis, Maria; Janning, Carla; Nellesen, Jens; Czayka, Wolfgang; Tillmann, Wolfgang; Zheng, Yufeng; Witte, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Rare earth elements are promising alloying element candidates for magnesium alloys used as biodegradable devices in biomedical applications. Rare earth elements have significant effects on the high temperature strength as well as the creep resistance of alloys and they improve magnesium corrosion resistance. We focused on lanthanum, neodymium and cerium to produce magnesium alloys with commonly used rare earth element concentrations. We showed that low concentrations of rare earth elements do not promote bone growth inside a 750 μm broad area around the implant. However, increased bone growth was observed at a greater distance from the degrading alloys. Clinically and histologically, the alloys and their corrosion products caused no systematic or local cytotoxicological effects. Using microtomography and in vitro experiments, we could show that the magnesium-rare earth element alloys showed low corrosion rates, both in in vitro and in vivo. The lanthanum- and cerium-containing alloys degraded at comparable rates, whereas the neodymium-containing alloy showed the lowest corrosion rates.

  15. Effect of the addition of low rare earth elements (lanthanum, neodymium, cerium) on the biodegradation and biocompatibility of magnesium.

    PubMed

    Willbold, Elmar; Gu, Xuenan; Albert, Devon; Kalla, Katharina; Bobe, Katharina; Brauneis, Maria; Janning, Carla; Nellesen, Jens; Czayka, Wolfgang; Tillmann, Wolfgang; Zheng, Yufeng; Witte, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Rare earth elements are promising alloying element candidates for magnesium alloys used as biodegradable devices in biomedical applications. Rare earth elements have significant effects on the high temperature strength as well as the creep resistance of alloys and they improve magnesium corrosion resistance. We focused on lanthanum, neodymium and cerium to produce magnesium alloys with commonly used rare earth element concentrations. We showed that low concentrations of rare earth elements do not promote bone growth inside a 750 μm broad area around the implant. However, increased bone growth was observed at a greater distance from the degrading alloys. Clinically and histologically, the alloys and their corrosion products caused no systematic or local cytotoxicological effects. Using microtomography and in vitro experiments, we could show that the magnesium-rare earth element alloys showed low corrosion rates, both in in vitro and in vivo. The lanthanum- and cerium-containing alloys degraded at comparable rates, whereas the neodymium-containing alloy showed the lowest corrosion rates. PMID:25278442

  16. Microstructure and properties of in-flight rare-earth doped thermal barrier coatings prepared by suspension plasma spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Stephanie

    Thermal barrier coatings with lower thermal conductivity improve the efficiency of gas turbine engines by allowing higher operating temperatures. Recent studies were shown that coatings containing a pair of rare-earth oxides with equal molar ratio have lower thermal conductivity and improved sintering resistance compared to the undoped 4-4.5 mol.% yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ). In the present work, rare-earth doped coatings were fabricated via suspension plasma spray by spraying YSZ powder-ethanol suspensions that contained dissolved rare-earth nitrates. The compositions of the coatings determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy verified that 68 +/- 8% of the rare-earth nitrates added into the suspension was incorporated into the coatings. Two coatings containing different concentrations of the same dopant pair (Nd2O3/Yb2O3), and three coatings having similar concentrations of different dopant pairs (Nd 2O3/Yb2O3, Nd2O3/Gd 2O3, and Gd2O3/Yb2O 3) were produced and compared. The effect of dopant concentration and dopant pair type on the microstructure and properties of the coatings in the as-sprayed and heat treated conditions were investigated using XRD, SEM, TEM, STEM-EDX, and the laser flash method. The cross-sectional morphology of all coatings displayed columnar structure. The porosity content of the coating was found to increase with increasing dopant concentration, but did not significantly change with dopant pairs. Similarly, increasing the Nd2O3/Yb2O 3 concentration lowered the thermal conductivity of the as-sprayed coatings. Although the effect of changing dopant pair type is not as significant as increasing the dopant concentration, the coating that contained Gd2O 3/Yb2O3 exhibited the lowest conductivity compared to coatings that had other dopant pairs. Thermal conductivity measurement performed on the heat treated coatings indicated a larger conductivity increase for the rare-earth doped coatings. A detailed study on the

  17. [Speciation and distribution characters of rare earth elements in the Baotou Section of the Yellow River].

    PubMed

    He, Jiang; Mi, Na; Kuang, Yun-chen; Fan, Qing-yun; Wang, Xia; Guan, Wei; Li, Gui-hai; Li, Chao-sheng; Wang, Xi-wei

    2004-03-01

    As a whole of water column, suspended matter and surface sediment in the mainstream and the branch taking up industry wastewater, speciation and distribution characters of rare earth elements (REEs) were investigated systemically in the Baotou section of the Yellow River. This study shows that rare earth elements in the mainstream of the Baotou section of the Yellow River mainly exist in suspended particles, and the dissolved contents are in extremely minute quantities. REEs mainly exist in dissolved particles in the branch taking up industry wastewater, and suspended sigma REE and dissolved sigma REE are obviously higher than those in the mainstream. The change of sigma REE of dissolved particles in water phase along the Baotou section of the Yellow River is very similar to that of sigma REE of suspended particles, and consistent along the main river, it is that sigma REE increase appreciably from the control profile to the keystone discharged section, come to a head in the D site and reduce in the E site. This distribution pattern indicates pile industry wastewater of Baotou to rare earth elements in the mainstream of the Yellow River, particularly LREE. The REE distribution in the mainstream of the Baotou section of the Yellow River is the same, with LREE enrichment and Eu depletion. But LREE origin of D site is different from the other sites by excursion of LREE distribution curve and other geochemical parameters, they are origin of industry wastewater piled, otherwise the other four sites are origin of loess altiplano. And HREE are origin of loess altiplano in all the sites. The speciation characteristics of REE in the sediments and suspended matter are quite similar with the amount in as follows: residual > bound to carbonates, bound to Fe-Mn oxides > bound to organic matter > exchangeable. REEs exchangeable in surface sediment and suspended matter in the branch taking up industry wastewater are higher than those in the mainstream, it confirms that REEs in

  18. Synthesis and characterization of rare earth doped novel optical materials and their potential applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokhrel, Madhab

    There are many application of photonic materials but selection of photonic materials are always constrained by number of factors such as cost, availability of materials, thermal and chemical stability, toxicity, size and more importantly ease of synthesis and processing along with the efficient emission. For example, quantum dots are efficient emitter but they are significantly toxic, whereas dyes are also efficient emitters but they are chemically unstable. On the other hand, display and LED requires the micron size particles but bio application requires the nano-sized particles. On the other hand, laser gain media requires the ceramics glass or single crystal not the nanoparticles. So, realization of practical optical systems critically depends on suitable materials that offer specific combinations of properties. Solid-state powders such as rare-earth ions doped nano and micron size phosphors are one of the most promising candidates for several photonic applications discussed above. In this dissertation, we investigate the upconversion (UC) fluorescence characteristics of rare earth (RE) doped M2O2S (M = Y, Gd, La) oxysulphide phosphors, for near-infrared to visible UC. Both nano and micron size phosphors were investigated depending on their applications of interest. This oxysulphide phosphor possesses several excellent properties such as chemical stability, low toxicity and can be easily mass produced at low cost. Mainly, Yb3+, Er3+, and Ho3+ were doped in the host lattice, resulting in bright red, green, blue and NIR emissions under 980 nm and 1550 nm excitation at various excitation power densities. Maximum UC quantum yields (QY) up to 6.2 %, 5.8%, and 4.6% were respectively achieved in Yb3+/Er3+ :La2O2S, Y2O2S, and Gd2O 2S. Comparisons have been made with respect to reported most efficient upconverting phosphors beta-NaYF4:20 % Yb/ 2% Er. We believe that present phosphors are the most efficient and lower excitation threshold upconverting phosphors at 980 and

  19. Effect of Rare Earth Elements (Er, Ho) on Semi-Metallic Materials (ScN) in an Applied Electric Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Hyunjung; Park, Yeonjoon; King, Glen C.; Lee, Kunik; Choi, Sang H.

    2012-01-01

    The development of materials and fabrication technology for field-controlled spectrally active optics is essential for applications such as membrane optics, filters for LIDARs, windows for sensors, telescopes, spectroscopes, cameras and flat-panel displays. The dopants of rare earth elements, in a host of optical systems, create a number of absorption and emission band structures and can easily be incorporated into many high quality crystalline and amorphous hosts. In wide band-gap semiconductors like ScN, the existing deep levels can capture or emit the mobile charges, and can be ionized with the loss or capture of the carriers which are the fundamental basis of concept for smart optic materials. The band gap shrinkage or splitting with dopants supports the possibility of this concept. In the present work, a semi-metallic material (ScN) was doped with rare earth elements (Er, Ho) and tested under an applied electric field to characterize spectral and refractive index shifts by either Stark or Zeeman Effect. These effects can be verified using the UV-Vis spectroscopy, the Hall Effect measurement and the ellipsometric spectroscopy. The optical band gaps of ScN doped with Er and doped with Ho were experimentally estimated as 2.33eV and 2.24eV ( 0.2eV) respectively. This is less than that of undoped ScN (2.5 0.2eV). The red-shifted absorption onset is a direct evidence for the decrease of band gap energy (Eg), and the broadening of valence band states is attributable to the doping cases. A decrease in refractive index with an applied field was observed as a small shift in absorption coefficient using a variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometer. In the presence of an electric field, mobile carriers are redistributed within the space charge region (SCR) to produce this electro-refractive effect. The shift in refractive index is also affected by the density and location of deep potential wells within the SCR. In addition, the microstructure change was observed by a TEM

  20. Effect of rare earth elements (Er, Ho) on semi-metallic materials (ScN) in an applied electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyunjung; Park, Yeonjoon; King, Glen C.; Lee, Kunik; Choi, Sang H.

    2012-04-01

    The development of materials and fabrication technology for field-controlled spectrally active optics is essential for applications such as membrane optics, filters for LIDARs, windows for sensors, telescopes, spectroscopes, cameras and flat-panel displays. The dopants of rare earth elements, in a host of optical systems, create a number of absorption and emission band structures and can easily be incorporated into many high quality crystalline and amorphous hosts. In wide band-gap semiconductors like ScN, the existing deep levels can capture or emit the mobile charges, and can be ionized with the loss or capture of the carriers which are the fundamental basis of concept for smart optic materials. The band gap shrinkage or splitting with dopants supports the possibility of this concept. In the present work, a semi-metallic material (ScN) was doped with rare earth elements (Er, Ho) and tested under an applied electric field to characterize spectral and refractive index shifts by either Stark or Zeeman Effect. These effects can be verified using the UV-Vis spectroscopy, the Hall Effect measurement and the ellipsometric spectroscopy. The optical band gaps of ScN doped with Er and doped with Ho were experimentally estimated as 2.33eV and 2.24eV (+/-0.2eV) respectively. This is less than that of undoped ScN (2.5+/-0.2eV). The red-shifted absorption onset is a direct evidence for the decrease of band gap energy (Eg), and the broadening of valence band states is attributable to the doping cases. A decrease in refractive index with an applied field was observed as a small shift in absorption coefficient using a variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometer. In the presence of an electric field, mobile carriers are redistributed within the space charge region (SCR) to produce this electro-refractive effect. The shift in refractive index is also affected by the density and location of deep potential wells within the SCR. In addition, the microstructure change was observed by a

  1. Electrical, magnetic, and magneto-electrical properties in quasi-two-dimensional K{sub 0.58}RhO{sub 2} single crystals doped with rare-earth elements

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Bin-Bin; Dong, Song-Tao; Yao, Shu-Hua E-mail: ybchen@nju.edu.cn; Zhang, Shan-Tao; Gu, Zheng-Bin; Zhou, Jian; Lu, Ming-Hui; Chen, Yan-Feng; Chen, Y. B. E-mail: ybchen@nju.edu.cn; Shi, Y. G.

    2014-08-11

    In this Letter, we studied the electrical transport, magnetic property, magnetoresistance and anomalous Hall properties of La-, Sm-, Ho-, and Dy-doped quasi-two dimensional K{sub 0.58}RhO{sub 2} single crystals. At low temperature (<10 K), a significant magnetoresistance (36%) can be observed in these samples. Accordingly, the “glassy ferromagnetism” is revealed by temperature-dependent magnetization in these samples. The significant magnetoresistance is related to the granular ferromagnetism. The unconventional anomalous Hall effect is also observed in magnetic atoms doped samples. Our finding shields more light on the magnetic, magnetoresistance, and anomalous Hall properties of quasi-two-dimensional material systems doped with magnetic ions.

  2. Solid solubility of rare earth elements (Nd, Eu, Tb) in In2-xSnxO3 - effect on electrical conductivity and optical properties.

    PubMed

    Sunde, T O L; Lindgren, M; Mason, T O; Einarsrud, M-A; Grande, T

    2014-07-01

    Wide band-gap semiconductors doped with luminescent rare earth elements (REEs) have attracted recent interest due to their unique optical properties. Here we report on the synthesis of the transparent conducting oxides (TCOs) indium oxide and indium tin oxide (ITO) doped with neodymium, europium and terbium. The solid solubility in the systems was investigated and isothermal phase diagrams at 1400 °C were proposed. The solubility of the REEs in In2O3 is mainly determined by the size of the rare earth dopant, while in ITO the solid solubility was reduced due to a strong tendency of the tin and REE co-dopants to form a pyrochlore phase. The effect of the REE-doping on the conductivity of the host was determined and optical activity of the REE dopants were investigated in selected host materials. The conductivity of sintered materials of REE-doped In2O3 was significantly reduced, even at small doping concentrations, due to a decrease in carrier mobility. The same decrease in mobility was not observed in thin films of the material processed at lower temperatures. Strong emissions at around 611 nm were observed for Eu-doped In2O3, demonstrating the possibility of obtaining photoluminescence in a TCO host, while no emissions was observed for Nd- and Tb-doping. PMID:24832103

  3. Developing alternative resources of rare earth elements in Europe - EURARE and the red mud challenge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deady, Eimear; Mouchos, Evangelos; Goodenough, Kathryn; Wall, Frances; Williamson, Ben

    2015-04-01

    Rare earth elements (REE) are considered to be highly "critical" by the European Commission [1], owing to the concentration of global supply [2] and their use in a wide range of emerging technologies (e.g. smart phones, electric cars and wind turbines). The main source of REE is the mineral bastnäsite, which is primarily extracted from carbonatites. Alternative resources of REE have been identified in a variety of other environments such as alluvial placers, bauxites and ore tailings. The EURARE project (www.eurare.eu), funded by the European Commission, aims to improve understanding of potential REE resources in Europe with the overall objective of establishing the basis for a European REE industry. As a part of this project, alternative sources of rare earth elements in Europe are being considered. REE have been identified as being particularly enriched in karst-bauxites and hence in the red muds generated as a waste product from the processing of these bauxites to alumina through the Bayer process [3]. Karst-bauxites are widely distributed with deposits known across the Mediterranean and with intermittent exploitation occurring over many decades. REE become concentrated in the bauxite deposits by the bauxitisation process and are retained due to the geochemical barrier created by the limestone bedrock below. This can result in several processes, including the crystallisation of authigenic REE-bearing minerals, the accumulation of residual phases and the adsorption of ions onto clays and other mineral surfaces [4]. Red muds produced from alumina processing represent a potentially important concentration of REE as it has been demonstrated that the REE pass through the alumina extraction process into the waste, and the total REE concentrations are typically enriched by a factor of two compared with the original bauxite ore [5]. Bauxites and red muds from the Parnassus Ghiona region of Greece [6] and the Seydişehir-Akseki region of Turkey have been assessed as

  4. Behavior of Rare Earth Element In Geothermal Systems; A New Exploration/Exploitation Tool

    SciTech Connect

    Scott A. Wood

    2002-01-28

    The goal of this four-year project was to provide a database by which to judge the utility of the rare earth elements (REE) in the exploration for and exploitation of geothermal fields in the United States. Geothermal fluids from hot springs and wells have been sampled from a number of locations, including: (1) the North Island of New Zealand (1 set of samples); (2) the Cascades of Oregon; (3) the Harney, Alvord Desert and Owyhee geothermal areas of Oregon; (4) the Dixie Valley and Beowawe fields in Nevada; (5) Palinpion, the Philippines: (6) the Salton Sea and Heber geothermal fields of southern California; and (7) the Dieng field in Central Java, Indonesia. We have analyzed the samples from all fields for REE except the last two.

  5. Rare earth elements in Ca-phosphates of Allende carbonaceous chondrite

    SciTech Connect

    Ebihara, M.; Honda, M.

    1987-09-01

    The Ca-phosphate phases in the Allende CV3 meteorite were selectively dissolved in ammoniacal EDTA solution and measured for abundances of the rare earth elements (REE) by radiochemical neutron activation and mass-spectrometric isotope dilution analyses. The REE abundances in CA-phosphates of Allende are remarkably different from those of ordinary chondrites. All the REE except Eu were observed to be enriched by factors of 50-100 relative to the Cl values. This is 3-4 times lower than concentrations of REE in the ordinary-chondrite phosphates. Allende phosphates have a small positive Eu anomaly, in contrast to the large negative Eu anomaly in phosphates from ordinary chondrites. Though the positive Eu anomaly in Allende Ca-phosphates is puzzling, the lack of a negative Eu anomaly in Allende Ca-phosphates suggests that they never have been in equilibrium with Allende coarse-grained Ca, Al-rich inclusions or their precursor materials. 42 references.

  6. Binary rare earth element-Ni/Co metallic glasses with distinct β-relaxation behaviors

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Z. G.; Wang, Z.; Wang, W. H.

    2015-10-21

    We report the formation of a series of rare earth element (RE)-Ni/Co binary metallic glasses (MGs) with unusual distinct β-relaxation peak compared with that of most of the reported MGs which usually exhibit as an excess wing or a shoulder. The β-relaxation behavior of RE-Ni/Co MGs is sensitive to the composition and the atomic radii of the RE and can be tuned through changing the fraction of RE-Ni (or Co) atomic pairs. The novel RE-Ni/Co MGs with distinct β-relaxation can serve as model system to investigate the nature of the β-relaxation as well as its relations with other physical and mechanical properties of MGs.

  7. Naturally occurring radionuclides and rare earth elements in weathered Japanese soil samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, Sarata; Hosoda, Masahiro; Prasad, Ganesh; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Sorimachi, Atsuyuki; Ishikawa, Tetsuo; Tokonami, Shinji; Uchida, Shigeo

    2013-08-01

    The activity concentrations of 226Ra and 228Ac in weathered Japanese soils from two selected prefectures have been measured using a γ-ray spectroscopy system with high purity germanium detector. The uranium, thorium, and rare earth elements (REEs) concentrations were determined from the same soil samples using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). For example, granitic rocks contain higher amounts of U, Th, and light REEs compared to other igneous rocks such as basalt and andesites. Therefore, it is necessary to understand the interaction between REEs and nature of soils since soils are complex heterogeneous mixture of organic and inorganic solids, water, and gases. In this paper, we will discuss about distribution pattern of 238U and 232Th along with REEs in soil samples of weathered acid rock (granite) collected from two prefectures of Japan: Hiroshima and Miyagi.

  8. The distribution of Sr and REE between diopside and silicate liquid. [Rare Earth Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grutzeck, M.; Kridelbaugh, S.; Weill, D.

    1974-01-01

    Experimental determination of the distribution coefficients in diopside-liquid pairs for strontium and nine rare-earth elements in the system CaMgSi2O6-NaAlSi3O8-CaAl2Si2O8. In experiments in air at 1265 C it is found that most of the Sr(2+), Eu(2+), and RE(3+) ions substitute for Ca(2+) and, in addition, a coupled substitution of Al(3+) for Si(4+) occurs. All of the trace ions considered are found to be excluded from the diopside lattice relative to the liquid. In the case of the trivalent ions the exclusion is much more pronounced for La and Ce, which have ionic radii larger than that of Ca(2+) in 8-fold oxygen coordination. Divalent Sr and Eu with even larger radii are also strongly excluded.

  9. Rare earths, other trace elements and iron in Luna 20 samples.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helmke, P. A.; Blanchard, D. P.; Jacobs, J. W.; Haskin, L.; Haskin, A.

    1973-01-01

    The results of the analysis by neutron activation of six samples from the Luna 20 mission and one sample of less than 1 mm fines from Apollo 16 are reported. The concentrations of the rare-earth elements (REE) in the samples of fines from Luna 20 and Apollo 16 are less than those found for corresponding materials from the mare areas but a negative Eu anomaly is still present. The concentrations of the REE in fines from Luna 20 are only about two-thirds as great as in the sample of Apollo 16 fines, but the concentration of Co, Sc and Cr are greater by factors ranging from 1.5 to 2.3.

  10. Study on the electrochemical extraction of rare earth elements from FLINAK

    SciTech Connect

    Long, Dewu; Huang, Wei; Jiang, Feng; Tian, Lifang; Li, Qingnuan

    2013-07-01

    Electrochemical behaviors of rare earth elements, such as NdF{sub 3}, GdF{sub 3}, SmF{sub 3}, YF{sub 3}, and EuF{sub 3}, were investigated in a LiF-NaF-KF (46.5-11.5-42.0 mol %, FLINAK, m. p. 454 Celsius degrees) solvent. The results indicated that it is possible to extract Nd, Gd and Y directly by electrochemical deposition since the reductions of those cations to metal are located in the electrochemical window of the FLINAK eutectic, while the reductions of Sm and Eu metal are out of the range of the medium. Subsequently electro-deposition of Nd was carried out with two kinds of cathodic materials, namely, an inert cathode, Pt, and a reactive electrode, Cu. The collected products were characterized by various techniques revealing that a Nd-rich product was obtained. (authors)

  11. Spectrophotometric determination of Rare Earth Elements in aqueous nitric acid solutions for process control.

    PubMed

    Rodionova, Oxana Ye; Tikhomirova, Tatyana I; Pomerantsev, Alexey L

    2015-04-15

    Noninvasive analytical control is of special interest for the complicated and hazardous production processes. On-line monitoring provides a unique opportunity to determine critical concentrations rapidly and without serious risks to operating personnel and the environment. Models for quantitative determination of concentrations of Rare Earth Elements in complex mixtures in nitric acid serve for these purposes. Here, the feasibility of simultaneous determination of cerium, praseodymium, and neodymium using the whole UV-vis spectroscopic range, together with chemometric data processing, is studied. The predictability of two chemometric techniques, partial least squares regression and correlation constrained multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares are compared. Models' performances are analyzed in out-of-control cases.

  12. Predictive model for ionic liquid extraction solvents for rare earth elements

    SciTech Connect

    Grabda, Mariusz; Oleszek, Sylwia; Panigrahi, Mrutyunjay; Kozak, Dmytro; Shibata, Etsuro; Nakamura, Takashi; Eckert, Franck

    2015-12-31

    The purpose of our study was to select the most effective ionic liquid extraction solvents for dysprosium (III) fluoride using a theoretical approach. Conductor-like Screening Model for Real Solvents (COSMO-RS), based on quantum chemistry and the statistical thermodynamics of predefined DyF{sub 3}-ionic liquid systems, was applied to reach the target. Chemical potentials of the salt were predicted in 4,400 different ionic liquids. On the base of these predictions set of ionic liquids’ ions, manifesting significant decrease of the chemical potentials, were selected. Considering the calculated physicochemical properties (hydrophobicity, viscosity) of the ionic liquids containing these specific ions, the most effective extraction solvents for liquid-liquid extraction of DyF{sub 3} were proposed. The obtained results indicate that the COSMO-RS approach can be applied to quickly screen the affinity of any rare earth element for a large number of ionic liquid systems, before extensive experimental tests.

  13. Geochemistry of rare earth elements in a passive treatment system built for acid mine drainage remediation.

    PubMed

    Prudêncio, Maria Isabel; Valente, Teresa; Marques, Rosa; Sequeira Braga, Maria Amália; Pamplona, Jorge

    2015-11-01

    Rare earth elements (REE) were used to assess attenuation processes in a passive system for acid mine drainage treatment (Jales, Portugal). Hydrochemical parameters and REE contents in water, soils and sediments were obtained along the treatment system, after summer and winter. A decrease of REE contents in the water resulting from the interaction with limestone after summer occurs; in the wetlands REE are significantly released by the soil particles to the water. After winter, a higher water dynamics favors the AMD treatment effectiveness and performance since REE contents decrease along the system; La and Ce are preferentially sequestered by ochre sludge but released to the water in the wetlands, influencing the REE pattern of the creek water. Thus, REE fractionation occurs in the passive treatment systems and can be used as tracer to follow up and understand the geochemical processes that promote the remediation of AMD.

  14. Rare earth and trace element geochemistry of a fragment of Jurassic seafloor, Point Sal, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menzies, M.; Blanchard, D.; Brannon, J.; Korotev, R.

    1977-01-01

    Rocks from an ophiolite suite once on the seafloor were analyzed for rare earth elements (REE), Sc, Co, Na2O, Cr, Zn and FeO. Strontium isotope exchange noted in some of the lavas is attributed to basalt-seawater interaction; the Ce abundance in smectite- and zeolite-bearing lavas may also be due to prolonged exposure to seawater. The higher grades of metamorphic rock, however, show no variation from the usual flat or slightly light REE depleted profiles. Plutonic igneous rock, all light REE depleted, have total REE abundances varying by a factor of 100 between the dunites and diorites. In order of decreasing REE abundance are hornblende, clinopyroxene, plagioclase, orthopyroxene and olivine. Calculations of REE contents of liquids in equilibrium with early cumulative clinopyroxenes suggest that the parent to the stratiform sequence was more depleted in light REE than the parent to the lava pile.

  15. Spectrophotometric determination of Rare Earth Elements in aqueous nitric acid solutions for process control.

    PubMed

    Rodionova, Oxana Ye; Tikhomirova, Tatyana I; Pomerantsev, Alexey L

    2015-04-15

    Noninvasive analytical control is of special interest for the complicated and hazardous production processes. On-line monitoring provides a unique opportunity to determine critical concentrations rapidly and without serious risks to operating personnel and the environment. Models for quantitative determination of concentrations of Rare Earth Elements in complex mixtures in nitric acid serve for these purposes. Here, the feasibility of simultaneous determination of cerium, praseodymium, and neodymium using the whole UV-vis spectroscopic range, together with chemometric data processing, is studied. The predictability of two chemometric techniques, partial least squares regression and correlation constrained multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares are compared. Models' performances are analyzed in out-of-control cases. PMID:25818140

  16. Geochemistry of rare earth elements in a passive treatment system built for acid mine drainage remediation.

    PubMed

    Prudêncio, Maria Isabel; Valente, Teresa; Marques, Rosa; Sequeira Braga, Maria Amália; Pamplona, Jorge

    2015-11-01

    Rare earth elements (REE) were used to assess attenuation processes in a passive system for acid mine drainage treatment (Jales, Portugal). Hydrochemical parameters and REE contents in water, soils and sediments were obtained along the treatment system, after summer and winter. A decrease of REE contents in the water resulting from the interaction with limestone after summer occurs; in the wetlands REE are significantly released by the soil particles to the water. After winter, a higher water dynamics favors the AMD treatment effectiveness and performance since REE contents decrease along the system; La and Ce are preferentially sequestered by ochre sludge but released to the water in the wetlands, influencing the REE pattern of the creek water. Thus, REE fractionation occurs in the passive treatment systems and can be used as tracer to follow up and understand the geochemical processes that promote the remediation of AMD. PMID:26247412

  17. Natural radioactivity and rare earth elements in feldspar samples, Central Eastern desert, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Walley El-Dine, Nadia; El-Shershaby, Amal; Afifi, Sofia; Sroor, Amany; Samir, Eman

    2011-05-01

    The pegmatite bodies of the Eastern Desert of Egypt are widely distributed especially along the Marsa-Alam-Idfu road. The Abu Dob area covers about 150km(2) of the Arabian Nubian shield at the central part of the Eastern Desert of Egypt. Most of the pegmatite is zoned; the zonation starts with milky quartz at the core followed by alkali feldspar at the margins. The feldspars vary in color from rose to milky and in composition from K-feldspar to Na-feldspar, sometimes interactions of both types are encountered. Thirteen feldspar samples were collected from different locations in the Abu Dob area for measuring the natural radioactivity of (238)U, (232)Th and (40)K using an HPGe detector. The variation in concentration of radionuclides for the area under investigation can be classified into regions of high, medium and low natural radioactivity. The average concentration in BqKg(-1) has been observed to be from 9.5 to 183675.7BqKg(-1) for (238)U, between 6.1 and 94,314.2BqKg(-1) for (232)Th and from 0 to 7894.6BqKg(-1) for (40)K. Radium equivalent activities (Ra(eq)), dose rate (D(R)) and external hazard (H(ex)) have also been determined. In the present work, the concentration of rare earth elements are measured for two feldspar samples using two techniques, Environmental Scanning Electron microscope XIL 30 ESEM, Philips, and Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS). The existence of rare earth elements in this area are very high and can be used in different important industries.

  18. Geology and market-dependent significance of rare earth element resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simandl, G. J.

    2014-12-01

    China started to produce rare earth elements (REEs) in the 1980s, and since the mid-1990s, it has become the dominant producer. Rare earth element export quotas first introduced by the Chinese government in the early 2000s were severely reduced in 2010 and 2011. This led to strong government-created disparity between prices within China and the rest of the world. Industrialized countries identified several REEs as strategic metals. Because of rapid price increases of REE outside of China, we have witnessed a world-scale REE exploration rush. The REE resources are concentrated in carbonatite-related deposits, peralkaline igneous rocks, pegmatites, monazite ± apatite veins, ion adsorption clays, placers, and some deep ocean sediments. REE could also be derived as a by-product of phosphate fertilizer production, U processing, mining of Ti-Zr-bearing placers, and exploitation of Olympic Dam subtype iron oxide copper gold (IOCG) deposits. Currently, REEs are produced mostly from carbonatite-related deposits, but ion adsorption clay deposits are an important source of heavy REE (HREE). Small quantities of REE are derived from placer deposits and one peralkaline intrusion-related deposit. The ideal REE development targets would be located in a politically stable jurisdiction with a pro-mining disposition such as Canada and Australia. REE grade, HREE/light REE (LREE) ratio of the mineralization, tonnage, mineralogy, and permissive metallurgy are some of the key technical factors that could be used to screen potential development projects. As REEs are considered strategic metals from economic, national security, and environmental points of view, technical and economic parameters alone are unlikely to be used in REE project development decision-making. Recycling of REE is in its infancy and unless legislated, in the short term, it is not expected to contribute significantly to the supply of REE.

  19. Natural radioactivity and rare earth elements in feldspar samples, Central Eastern desert, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Walley El-Dine, Nadia; El-Shershaby, Amal; Afifi, Sofia; Sroor, Amany; Samir, Eman

    2011-05-01

    The pegmatite bodies of the Eastern Desert of Egypt are widely distributed especially along the Marsa-Alam-Idfu road. The Abu Dob area covers about 150km(2) of the Arabian Nubian shield at the central part of the Eastern Desert of Egypt. Most of the pegmatite is zoned; the zonation starts with milky quartz at the core followed by alkali feldspar at the margins. The feldspars vary in color from rose to milky and in composition from K-feldspar to Na-feldspar, sometimes interactions of both types are encountered. Thirteen feldspar samples were collected from different locations in the Abu Dob area for measuring the natural radioactivity of (238)U, (232)Th and (40)K using an HPGe detector. The variation in concentration of radionuclides for the area under investigation can be classified into regions of high, medium and low natural radioactivity. The average concentration in BqKg(-1) has been observed to be from 9.5 to 183675.7BqKg(-1) for (238)U, between 6.1 and 94,314.2BqKg(-1) for (232)Th and from 0 to 7894.6BqKg(-1) for (40)K. Radium equivalent activities (Ra(eq)), dose rate (D(R)) and external hazard (H(ex)) have also been determined. In the present work, the concentration of rare earth elements are measured for two feldspar samples using two techniques, Environmental Scanning Electron microscope XIL 30 ESEM, Philips, and Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS). The existence of rare earth elements in this area are very high and can be used in different important industries. PMID:21324705

  20. Rare earth element components in atmospheric particulates in the Bayan Obo mine region

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lingqing Liang, Tao Zhang, Qian; Li, Kexin

    2014-05-01

    The Bayan Obo mine, located in Inner Mongolia, China, is the largest light rare earth body ever found in the world. The research for rare earth elements (REEs) enrichment in atmospheric particulates caused by mining and ore processing is fairly limited so far. In this paper, atmospheric particulates including total suspended particulate (TSP) matter and particles with an equivalent aerodynamic diameter less than 10 μm (PM{sub 10}) were collected around the Bayan Obo mine region, in August 2012 and March 2013, to analyze the levels and distributions of REEs in particles. The total concentrations of REEs for TSP were 149.8 and 239.6 ng/m{sup 3}, and those for PM{sub 10} were 42.8 and 68.9 ng/m{sup 3}, in August 2012 and March 2013, respectively. Enrichment factor was calculated for all 14 REEs in the TSP and PM{sub 10} and the results indicated that REEs enrichment in atmosphere particulates was caused by anthropogenic sources and influenced by the strong wind in springtime. The spatial distribution of REEs in TSP showed a strong gradient concentration in the prevailing wind direction. REE chondrite normalized patterns of TSP and PM{sub 10} were similar and the normalized curves inclined to the right side, showing the conspicuous fractionation between the light REEs and heavy REE, which supported by the chondrite normalized concentration ratios calculated for selected elements (La{sub N}/Yb{sub N}, La{sub N}/Sm{sub N}, Gd{sub N}/Yb{sub N}). - Highlights: • TSP and PM{sub 10} samples were collected to analyze the levels and distributions of REE. • Enrichment factors indicated that REE enrichment was caused by anthropogenic sources. • The distribution of REEs showed a strong gradient in the prevailing wind direction. • Obvious fractionation between LREEs and HREEs is observed in atmospheric particulates.

  1. A major light rare-earth element (LREE) resource in the Khanneshin carbonatite complex, southern Afghanistan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tucker, Robert D.; Belkin, Harvey E.; Schulz, Klaus J.; Peters, Stephen G.; Horton, Forrest; Buttleman, Kim; Scott, Emily R.

    2012-01-01

    The rapid rise in world demand for the rare-earth elements (REEs) has expanded the search for new REE resources. We document two types of light rare-earth element (LREE)-enriched rocks in the Khanneshin carbonatite complex of southern Afghanistan: type 1 concordant seams of khanneshite-(Ce), synchysite-(Ce), and parisite-(Ce) within banded barite-strontianite alvikite, and type 2 igneous dikes of coarse-grained carbonatite, enriched in fluorine or phosphorus, containing idiomorphic crystals of khanneshite-(Ce) or carbocernaite. Type 1 mineralized barite-strontianite alvikite averages 22.25 wt % BaO, 4.27 wt % SrO, and 3.25 wt % ∑ LREE2O3 (sum of La, Ce, Pr, and Nd oxides). Type 2 igneous dikes average 14.51 wt % BaO, 5.96 wt % SrO, and 3.77 wt % ∑ LREE2O3. A magmatic origin is clearly indicated for the type 2 LREE-enriched dikes, and type 1 LREE mineralization probably formed in the presence of LREE-rich hydrothermal fluid. Both types of LREE mineralization may be penecontemporaneous, having formed in a carbonate-rich magma in the marginal zone of the central vent, highly charged with volatile constituents (i.e., CO2, F, P2O5), and strongly enriched in Ba, Sr, and the LREE. Based on several assumptions, and employing simple geometry for the zone of LREE enrichment, we estimate that at least 1.29 Mt (million metric tonnes) of LREE2O3 is present in this part of the Khanneshin carbonatite complex.

  2. Visualization of melanoma tumor with lectin-conjugated rare-earth doped fluoride nanocrystals

    PubMed Central

    Dumych, Tetiana; Lutsyk, Maxym; Banski, Mateusz; Yashchenko, Antonina; Sojka, Bartlomiej; Horbay, Rostyslav; Lutsyk, Alexander; Stoika, Rostyslav; Misiewicz, Jan; Podhorodecki, Artur; Bilyy, Rostyslav

    2014-01-01

    Aim To develop specific fluorescent markers for melanoma tumor visualization, which would provide high selectivity and reversible binding pattern, by the use of carbohydrate-recognizing proteins, lectins, combined with the physical ability for imaging deep in the living tissues by utilizing red and near infrared fluorescent properties of specific rare-earth doped nanocrystals (NC). Methods B10F16 melanoma cells were inoculated to C57BL/6 mice for inducing experimental melanoma tumor. Tumors were removed and analyzed by lectin-histochemistry using LABA, PFA, PNA, HPA, SNA, GNA, and NPL lectins and stained with hematoxylin and eosin. NPL lectin was conjugated to fluorescent NaGdF4:Eu3+-COOH nanoparticles (5 nm) via zero length cross-linking reaction, and the conjugates were purified from unbound substances and then used for further visualization of histological samples. Fluorescent microscopy was used to visualize NPL-NaGdF4:Eu3+ with the fluorescent emission at 600-720 nm range. Results NPL lectin selectively recognized regions of undifferentiated melanoblasts surrounding neoangiogenic foci inside melanoma tumor, PNA lectin recognized differentiated melanoblasts, and LCA and WGA were bound to tumor stroma regions. NPL-NaGdF4:Eu3+ conjugated NC were efficiently detecting newly formed regions of melanoma tumor, confirmed by fluorescent microscopy in visible and near infrared mode. These conjugates possessed high photostability and were compatible with convenient xylene-based mounting systems and preserved intensive fluorescent signal at samples storage for at least 6 months. Conclusion NPL lectin-NaGdF4:Eu3+ conjugated NC permitted distinct identification of contours of the melanoma tissue on histological sections using red excitation at 590-610 nm and near infrared emission of 700-720 nm. These data are of potential practical significance for development of glycans-conjugated nanoparticles to be used for in vivo visualization of melanoma tumor. PMID:24891277

  3. Polarization dependence of two-photon transition intensities in rare-earth doped crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Le Nguyen, An-Dien

    1996-05-01

    A polarization dependence technique has been developed as a tool to investigate phonon scattering (PS), electronic Raman scattering (ERS), and two-photon absorption (TPA) transition intensities in vanadate and phosphate crystals. A general theory for the polarization dependence (PD) of two-photon transition intensities has been given. Expressions for the polarization dependent behavior of two-photon transition intensities have been tabulated for the 32 crystallographic point groups. When the wavefunctions for the initial and final states of a rare-earth doped in crystals are known, explicit PD expressions with no unknown parameters can be obtained. A spectroscopic method for measuring and interpreting phonon and ERS intensities has been developed to study PrVO{sub 4}, NdVO{sub 4}, ErVO{sub 4}, and TmVO{sub 4} crystals. Relative phonon intensities with the polarization of the incident and scattered light arbitrarily varied were accurately predicted and subsequently used for alignment and calibration in ERS measurements in these systems for the first time. Since ERS and PS intensities generally follow different polarization curves as a function of polar angles, the two can be uniquely identified by comparing their respective polarization behavior. The most crucial application of the technique in ERS spectroscopy is the establishment of a stringent test for the Axe theory. For the first time, the F{sub 1}/F{sub 2} ratio extracted from the experimental fits of the ERS intensities were compared with those predicted by theories which include both the second- and third-order contributions. Relatively good agreement between the fitted values of F{sub 1}/F{sub 2} and the predicted values using the second-order theory has been found.

  4. Rare-earth elements in Egyptian granite by instrumental neutron activation analysis.

    PubMed

    El-Taher, A

    2007-04-01

    The mobilization of rare-earth elements (REEs) in the environment requires monitoring of these elements in environmental matrices, in which they are mainly present at trace levels. The similarity in REEs chemical behavior makes the separate determination of each element by chemical methods difficult; instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA), based on nuclear properties of the elements to be determined, is a method of choice in trace analysis of REEs and related elements. Therefore, INAA was applied as a sensitive nondestructive analytical tool for the determination of REEs to find out what information could be obtained about the REEs of some Egyptian granite collected from four locations in Aswan area in south Egypt as follows wadi El-Allaqi, El-Shelal, Gabel Ibrahim Pasha and from Sehyel Island and to estimate the accuracy, reproducibility and detection limit of NAA method in case of the given samples. The samples were properly prepared together with standards and simultaneously irradiated in a neutron flux of 7 x 10(11)n/cm(2)s in the TRIGA Mainz research reactor facilities. The following elements have been determined: La, Ce, Nd, Sm, Eu, Yb and Lu. The gamma spectra was collected by HPGe detector and the analysis was done by means of computerized multichannel analyzer. The X-ray fluorescence (XRF) was also used.

  5. Study on the activated laser welding of ferritic stainless steel with rare earth elements yttrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yonghui; Hu, Shengsun; Shen, Junqi

    2015-10-01

    The ferritic stainless steel SUS430 was used in this work. Based on a multi-component activating flux, composed of 50% ZrO2, 12.09 % CaCO3, 10.43 % CaO, and 27.49 % MgO, a series of modified activating fluxes with 0.5%, 1%, 2%, 5%, 10%, 15%, and 20% of rare earth (RE) element yttrium (Y) respectively were produced, and their effects on the weld penetration (WP) and corrosion resistant (CR) property were studied. Results showed that RE element Y hardly had any effects on increasing the WP. In the FeCl3 spot corrosion experiment, the corrosion rates of almost all the samples cut from welded joints turned out to be greater than the parent metal (23.51 g/m2 h). However, there was an exception that the corrosion rate of the sample with 5% Y was only 21.96 g/m2 h, which was even better than parent metal. The further Energy Dispersive Spectrometer (EDS) test showed the existence of elements Zr, Ca, O, and Y in the molten slag near the weld seam while none of them were found in the weld metal, indicating the direct transition of element from activating fluxes to the welding seam did not exist. It was known that certain composition of activating fluxes effectively restrain the loss of Cr element in the process of laser welding, and as a result, the CR of welded joints was improved.

  6. Heavy metals and rare earth elements source-sink in some Egyptian cigarettes as determined by neutron activation analysis.

    PubMed

    Nada, A; Abdel-Wahab, M; Sroor, A; Abdel-Haleem, A S; Abdel-Sabour, M F

    1999-07-01

    Heavy metals and rare earth elements in two types of cigarettes were studied. The contents of trace elements were determined by using delayed neutron activation analysis. In the present study 11 elements have been detected in popular and fine brand cigarettes marketed in Egypt. Evaluation of these elements with their potential hazards for smokers is briefly discussed. The material balance (source and sink) for each element was determined. Also the ratio of element recovery to the total amount was assessed.

  7. Heavy metals and rare earth elements source-sink in some Egyptian cigarettes as determined by neutron activation analysis.

    PubMed

    Nada, A; Abdel-Wahab, M; Sroor, A; Abdel-Haleem, A S; Abdel-Sabour, M F

    1999-07-01

    Heavy metals and rare earth elements in two types of cigarettes were studied. The contents of trace elements were determined by using delayed neutron activation analysis. In the present study 11 elements have been detected in popular and fine brand cigarettes marketed in Egypt. Evaluation of these elements with their potential hazards for smokers is briefly discussed. The material balance (source and sink) for each element was determined. Also the ratio of element recovery to the total amount was assessed. PMID:10376325

  8. Effect of rare-earth doping in RCrSb3 (R = La, Pr, Sm, and Gd)

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, D D; Fisk, Z

    2005-11-08

    We report on the electrical resistivity and magnetic susceptibility of La or Gd doped RCrSb{sub 3} (R=La, Pr, Sm, and Gd). Single crystals were grown by increasing the nominal dopant by 25%. In general, two magnetic ordering transitions are found, T{sub C1} is attributed to ferromagnetic ordering of the itinerant Cr sub-lattice, and, at lower temperatures, T{sub C2} is attributed to ordering of the localized rare-earth sub-lattice. Alloying on the rare-earth site varies the de Gennes factor, DG = (g-1){sup 2}J(J+1), and dT{sub C1}/d(DG) = -2K, while dT{sub C2}/d(DG) = 5K. These ordering temperatures are found to converge at GdCrSb{sub 3}, where a single ferrimagnetic transition is found at T{sub C2} = 86 K due to an anti-alignment of the itinerant Cr moments and the localized rare-earth moments. Initially, for DG < 3.5, the rare-earth moments are found to align ferromagnetically, and the paramagnetic Weiss temperature decreases at the same rate as T{sub C1}. But for DG > 4.5, the rare-earth sub-lattice anti-alignes with respect to the Cr sub-lattice, and the Weiss temperature decreases five times as fast. In the region between (3.5 < DG < 4.5), a first order phase transition is found at T{sub C2}.

  9. Rare earth element mineralogy, geochemistry, and preliminary resource assessment of the Khanneshin carbonatite complex, Helmand Province, Afghanistan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tucker, Robert D.; Belkin, Harvey E.; Schulz, Klaus J.; Peters, Stephen G.; Buttleman, Kim P.

    2011-01-01

    There is increased concern about the future availability of rare earth elements (REE) because of China's dominance as the supplier of more than 95 percent of world REE output, their decision to restrict exports of rare earth products, and the rapid increase in world-wide consumption of rare earth product. As a result, countries such as the United States, Japan, and member nations of the European Union face a future of tight supplies and high prices for rare earth products unless other sources of REE are found and developed (Long and others, 2010; U.S. Geological Survey, 2011, p. 128-129, 184-185). We report and describe a significant new deposit of light rare earth elements (LREE), estimated at 1 Mt, within the Khanneshin carbonatite complex of south Afghanistan. The potential resource is located in a remote and rugged part of the igneous complex in a region previously identified by Soviet geologists in the 1970s. This report reviews the geologic setting of LREE deposit, presents new geochemical data documenting the grade of LREE mineralization, briefly describes the mineralogy and mineralogical associations of the deposit, and presents a preliminary estimate of LREE resources based on our current understanding of the geology.

  10. Rare earth-doped materials with enhanced thermoelectric figure of merit

    DOEpatents

    Venkatasubramanian, Rama; Cook, Bruce Allen; Levin, Evgenii M.; Harringa, Joel Lee

    2016-09-06

    A thermoelectric material and a thermoelectric converter using this material. The thermoelectric material has a first component including a semiconductor material and a second component including a rare earth material included in the first component to thereby increase a figure of merit of a composite of the semiconductor material and the rare earth material relative to a figure of merit of the semiconductor material. The thermoelectric converter has a p-type thermoelectric material and a n-type thermoelectric material. At least one of the p-type thermoelectric material and the n-type thermoelectric material includes a rare earth material in at least one of the p-type thermoelectric material or the n-type thermoelectric material.

  11. Superposition-model analysis of rare-earth doped BaY2F8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnani, N.; Amoretti, G.; Baraldi, A.; Capelletti, R.

    The energy level schemes of four rare-earth dopants (Ce3+ , Nd3+ , Dy3+ , and Er3+) in BaY2 F-8 , as determined by optical absorption spectra, were fitted with a single-ion Hamiltonian and analysed within Newman's Superposition Model for the crystal field. A unified picture for the four dopants was obtained, by assuming a distortion of the F- ligand cage around the RE site; within the framework of the Superposition Model, this distortion is found to have a marked anisotropic behaviour for heavy rare earths, while it turns into an isotropic expansion of the nearest-neighbours polyhedron for light rare earths. It is also inferred that the substituting ion may occupy an off-center position with respect to the original Y3+ site in the crystal.

  12. Rare earths

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gambogi, J.

    2013-01-01

    Global mine production of rare earths was estimated to have declined slightly in 2012 relative to 2011 (Fig. 1). Production in China was estimated to have decreased to 95 from 105 kt (104,700 from 115,700 st) in 2011, while new mine production in the United States and Australia increased.

  13. A chemical-spectrochemical method for the determination of rare earth elements and thorium in cerium minerals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rose, H.J.; Murata, K.J.; Carron, M.K.

    1954-01-01

    In a combined chemical-spectrochemical procedure for quantitatively determining rare earth elements in cerium minerals, cerium is determined volumetrically, a total rare earths plus thoria precipitate is separated chemically, the ceria content of the precipitate is raised to 80??0 percent by adding pure ceria, and the resulting mixture is analyzed for lanthanum, praseodymium, neodymium, samarium, gadolinium, yttrium, and thorium spectrochemically by means of the d.c. carbon arc. Spectral lines of singly ionized cerium are used as internal standard lines in the spectrochemical determination which is patterned after Fassel's procedure [1]. Results of testing the method with synthetic mixtures of rare earths and with samples of chemically analyzed cerium minerals show that the coefficient of variation for a quadruplicate determination of any element does not exceed 5??0 (excepting yttrium at concentrations less than 1 percent) and that the method is free of serious systematic error. ?? 1954.

  14. Preparation, crystal structure, spectra and energy levels of the trivalent ytterbium ion doped into rare earth stannates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Kaijie; Zhang, Qingli; Sun, Dunlu; Yin, Shaotang; Jiang, Haihe

    2011-11-01

    Yb3+-doped Rare Earth Stannates Ln2Sn2O7(Ln=Y, Gd) with space group Fd3m were synthesized by co-precipitation technique. Their structures were determined by Rietveld refinement to their X-ray diffraction, and their atom coordinates, lattice parameters and temperature factors were given. From emission, absorption and excitation spectra, the energy levels of Yb3+ in Ln2Sn2O7(Ln=Y, Gd) were assigned and the crystal field parameters were fitted to energy splitting of Yb3+-doped Ln2Sn2O7 (Ln=Y, Gd).

  15. Preparation, crystal structure, spectra and energy levels of the trivalent ytterbium ion doped into rare earth stannates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Kaijie; Zhang, Qingli; Sun, Dunlu; Yin, Shaotang; Jiang, Haihe

    2012-01-01

    Yb3+-doped Rare Earth Stannates Ln2Sn2O7(Ln=Y, Gd) with space group Fd3m were synthesized by co-precipitation technique. Their structures were determined by Rietveld refinement to their X-ray diffraction, and their atom coordinates, lattice parameters and temperature factors were given. From emission, absorption and excitation spectra, the energy levels of Yb3+ in Ln2Sn2O7(Ln=Y, Gd) were assigned and the crystal field parameters were fitted to energy splitting of Yb3+-doped Ln2Sn2O7 (Ln=Y, Gd).

  16. Chemical properties of rare earth elements in typical medical waste incinerator ashes in China.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lijuan; Zhang, Fu-Shen; Zhang, Jingxin

    2008-10-30

    Medical waste (MW) ashes from different types of MW incinerators were examined to detect the characteristics and environmental impact of rare earth elements (REEs). The results showed that total REE contents in the ash samples ranged from 10.2 to 78.9 mg/kg. REEs in bottom ash were apparently higher than those in fly ash. Average REE contents in the ashes followed the sequence of Ce>La>Nd>Y>Gd>Pr>Sm>Dy>Er>Yb>Ho>Eu>Tb>Lu>Tm. Some of the elements, such as Sm, Dy, Ho, Er, Yb in the ash samples were in normal or nearly normal distribution, but Y, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Eu, Gd, Tb, Tm, Lu were not normally distributed, indicating some of the ash samples were enriched with these elements. Crust-normalized REE patterns indicated that two types of the MW ashes were obviously enriched with Gd and La. Sequential extraction results showed that REEs in the ash mainly presented as residual fraction, while exchangeable and carbonate fractions were relatively low. DTPA- and EDTA-extraction tests indicated that REEs in the MW ashes were generally in low bioavailability. PMID:18329796

  17. Using rare earth elements for the identification of the geographic origin of food

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meisel, T.; Bandoniene, D.; Joebstl, D.

    2009-04-01

    The European Union defined regimes within the Protected Geographical Status (PGS) framework to protect names of regional food specialities. Thus only food produced in a specific geographical area with a specific way of production or quality can be protected by a protected geographical indication (PGI) label. As such Styrian Pumpkin Seed Oil has been approved with this label, but as with many other high priced regional specialities, fraud cannot be excluded or nor identified. Thus the aim of this work is, to develop an analytical method for the control of the geographic origin of pumpkin seed oil and also to test the method for other protected products. The development of such a method is not only of interest for scientists, but also of importance for the consumer wanting to know the origin of the food products and the assurance of the purity and quality. The group of rare earth elements (REE) in plants also have a characteristic distribution pattern similar to upper crustal REE distributions. Since the REE concentrations are extremely low in pumpkin seed oil (ppt to low ppb), ICP-MS was the only sensitive tool able to produce validated results. The carrier of the REE are most likely small particles distributed within the pumpkin seed oil. Unlike, e.g., olive oil, pumpkin seed oil is bottled and sold unfiltered, which makes this Styrian speciality an interesting sampling target. As pumpkin seed oils from different geographic origin show variable trace element and rare earth distribution patterns, is should possible to trace the origin of these oils. In the current project pumpkin seeds from different regions in Austria and from abroad were sampled. The trace element patterns in the extracted oil of these seeds were determined and a preliminary classification with discriminate analysis was successfully done on a statistical basis. In addition to the study of the geographic origin it was demonstrated that REE distribution patterns can also be used for the

  18. New Mid-IR Lasers Based on Rare-Earth-Doped Sulfide and Chloride Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Nostrand, M

    2000-09-01

    Applications in remote-sensing and military countermeasures have driven a need for compact, solid-state mid-IR lasers. Due to multi-phonon quenching, non-traditional hosts are needed to extend current solid-state, room-temperature lasing capabilities beyond {approx} 4 {micro}m. Traditional oxide and fluoride hosts have effective phonon energies in the neighborhood of 1000 cm{sup -1} and 500 cm{sup -1}, respectively. These phonons can effectively quench radiation above 2 and 4 {micro}m, respectively. Materials with lower effective phonon energies such as sulfides and chlorides are the logical candidates for mid-IR (4-10 {micro}m) operation. In this report, laser action is demonstrated in two such hosts, CaGa{sub 2}S{sub 4} and KPb{sub 2}Cl{sub 5}. The CaGa{sub 2}S{sub 4}:Dy{sup 3+} laser operating at 4.3 {micro}m represents the first sulfide laser operating beyond 2 {micro}m. The KPb{sub 2}Cl{sub 5}:Dy{sup 3+} laser operating at 2.4 {micro}m represents the first operation of a chloride-host laser in ambient conditions. Laser action is also reported for CaGa{sub 2}S{sub 4}:Dy{sup 3+} at 2.4 {micro}m, CaGa{sub 2}S{sub 4}:Dy{sup 3+} at 1.4 {micro}m, and KPb{sub 2}Cl{sub 5}:Nd{sup 3+} at 1.06 {micro}m. Both host materials have been fully characterized, including lifetimes, absorption and emission cross sections, radiative branching ratios, and radiative quantum efficiencies. Radiative branching ratios and radiative quantum efficiencies have been determined both by the Judd-Ofelt method (which is based on absorption measurements), and by a novel method described herein which is based on emission measurements. Modeling has been performed to predict laser performance, and a new method to determine emission cross section from slope efficiency and threshold data is developed. With the introduction and laser demonstration of rare-earth-doped CaGa{sub 2}S{sub 4} and KPb{sub 2}Cl{sub 5}, direct generation of mid-IR laser radiation in a solid-state host has been demonstrated. In

  19. Optical characterization of perturbed sites and C3i sites in rare earth doped oxide crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinemer, Gregoy Donald

    Energies, linewidths, and line strengths for some intrinsic and perturbed site transitions of seven different rare-earth ions doped into Y3Al 5O12 were measured as a function of concentration using visible and infrared absorption. Nearest and next-nearest neighbor ion pair transitions were characterized by their concentration dependence, and an analysis of Pr 3+ and Nd3+ pairs showed that those ions are distributed randomly in the lattice. For all transitions studied, the intrinsic D2 site and pair site transitions accounted for 92%--95% of the total line strength; the remaining 5%--8% was assigned to perturbed site transitions. No significant dependence of perturbed site line strength on ionic radius was observed. The nominally equal perturbed site line strength for all transitions studied implied that oscillator strengths for intrinsic and perturbed sites were similar. The perturbed sites appear to be a normal property of the Y3Al 5O12 lattice. To further investigate the nature of the perturbed sites, experiments were done showing that Er3+ occupies a site in Er3+ :Y3Al5O12 with a threefold axis along <111> that is consistent with occupation of the octahedral Al3+ site with C3i symmetry. Allowed magnetic dipole transitions at 1.5 microns were identified in the 4I15/2(1)→ 4I13/2 absorption spectrum using site selective fluorescence. Angle dependent Zeeman experiments on these transitions confirmed that they are from a site with a threefold axis along <111>. Using optical nutation experiments, the number density for Er 3+ C3i sites in 1.0 at.% Er3+:Y3Al 5O12 was determined to be (5 +/- 2) x 10 17 Er3+/cm3. Since Er3+ has nearly the same ionic radius as Y3+, the occupation of these same sites by Y3+ was deduced to be 0.6% +/- 0.3%. Assuming each Y3+ C3i site perturbs 12 D2 sites, the fractional line strength for perturbed sites would be 5% +/- 2%. Similar experiments on 0.05 at.% Er3+:Y2O 3 characterized C3i site Er3+ 4I 15/2 and 4I13/2 crystal field levels and g

  20. Levels of major and trace elements, including rare earth elements, and ²³⁸U in Croatian tap waters.

    PubMed

    Fiket, Željka; Rožmarić, Martina; Krmpotić, Matea; Benedik, Ljudmila

    2015-05-01

    Concentrations of 46 elements, including major, trace, and rare earth elements, and (238)U in Croatian tap waters were investigated. Selected sampling locations include tap waters from various hydrogeological regions, i.e., different types of aquifers, providing insight into the range of concentrations of studied elements and (238)U activity concentrations in Croatian tap waters. Obtained concentrations were compared with the Croatian maximum contaminant levels for trace elements in water intended for human consumption, as well as WHO and EPA drinking water standards. Concentrations in all analyzed tap waters were found in accordance with Croatian regulations, except tap water from Šibenik in which manganese in concentration above maximum permissible concentration (MPC) was measured. Furthermore, in tap water from Osijek, levels of arsenic exceeded the WHO guidelines and EPA regulations. In general, investigated tap waters were found to vary considerably in concentrations of studied elements, including (238)U activity concentrations. Causes of variability were further explored using statistical methods. Composition of studied tap waters was found to be predominately influenced by hydrogeological characteristics of the aquifer, at regional and local level, the existing redox conditions, and the household plumbing system. Rare earth element data, including abundances and fractionation patterns, complemented the characterization and facilitated the interpretation of factors affecting the composition of the analyzed tap waters.

  1. Developing alternative resources of rare earth elements in Europe - EURARE and the red mud challenge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deady, Eimear; Mouchos, Evangelos; Goodenough, Kathryn; Wall, Frances; Williamson, Ben

    2015-04-01

    Rare earth elements (REE) are considered to be highly "critical" by the European Commission [1], owing to the concentration of global supply [2] and their use in a wide range of emerging technologies (e.g. smart phones, electric cars and wind turbines). The main source of REE is the mineral bastnäsite, which is primarily extracted from carbonatites. Alternative resources of REE have been identified in a variety of other environments such as alluvial placers, bauxites and ore tailings. The EURARE project (www.eurare.eu), funded by the European Commission, aims to improve understanding of potential REE resources in Europe with the overall objective of establishing the basis for a European REE industry. As a part of this project, alternative sources of rare earth elements in Europe are being considered. REE have been identified as being particularly enriched in karst-bauxites and hence in the red muds generated as a waste product from the processing of these bauxites to alumina through the Bayer process [3]. Karst-bauxites are widely distributed with deposits known across the Mediterranean and with intermittent exploitation occurring over many decades. REE become concentrated in the bauxite deposits by the bauxitisation process and are retained due to the geochemical barrier created by the limestone bedrock below. This can result in several processes, including the crystallisation of authigenic REE-bearing minerals, the accumulation of residual phases and the adsorption of ions onto clays and other mineral surfaces [4]. Red muds produced from alumina processing represent a potentially important concentration of REE as it has been demonstrated that the REE pass through the alumina extraction process into the waste, and the total REE concentrations are typically enriched by a factor of two compared with the original bauxite ore [5]. Bauxites and red muds from the Parnassus Ghiona region of Greece [6] and the Seydişehir-Akseki region of Turkey have been assessed as

  2. Selective Emitter Pumped Rare Earth Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L. (Inventor); Patton, Martin O. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A selective emitter pumped rare earth laser provides an additional type of laser for use in many laser applications. Rare earth doped lasers exist which are pumped with flashtubes or laser diodes. The invention uses a rare earth emitter to transform thermal energy input to a spectral band matching the absorption band of a rare earth in the laser in order to produce lasing.

  3. While China's dominance in rare earths dips, concerns remain about these and other elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2012-05-01

    China's dominance in the production of rare earth elements (REEs) peaked with that nation producing 97% of them in 2010; this number already has dipped to 90% in 2012 as mines in other nations are coming online, according to REE expert Karl Gschneidner Jr., a professor at Iowa State University's Ames Laboratory. Chinese production could drop to 60% by 2014, with production increasing at mines in the United States and other countries, he said. However, this reduction in China's share of REE production does not signal an end to the production crisis in REEs and other critical minerals, Gschneidner and others noted during a 1 May panel discussion on critical materials shortages at the AGU Science Policy Conference in Washington, D. C. REEs are a group of 17 chemically similar metallic elements used in a variety of electronic, optical, magnetic, and catalytic applications, and despite their name, they are relatively plentiful in the Earth's crust. China's control of known REE reserves has dropped from 75% in 1975 to 30.9% in 2012, with other regions also having large reserves, including the Commonwealth of Independent States (some former Soviet Republic states), the United States, and Australia, according to Gschneidner. Critical minerals are mineral commodities that are particularly important for a nation's economy or national defense that could potentially face supply disruptions.

  4. Distribution of rare earth elements in soil and grape berries of Vitis vinifera cv. "Glera".

    PubMed

    Pepi, Salvatore; Sansone, Luigi; Chicca, Milvia; Marrocchino, Elena; Vaccaro, Carmela

    2016-08-01

    The renowned Vitis vinifera L. cultivar "Glera" (Magnoliopsida Vitaceae) has been grown for hundreds of years in the Italian regions of Veneto and Friuli to produce the sparkling Prosecco wine, with controlled designation of origin (DOC). We evaluated the relationship among the concentrations of rare earth elements (REE) in soil and in "Glera" grape berries in vineyards belonging to five different localities in the Veneto alluvial plain, all included in the DOC area of Prosecco. The concentration of REE in samples of soil and juice or solid residues of grape berries was determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), and the index of bioaccumulation was calculated to define the specific assimilation of these elements from soil to grape berries. The concentration of REE in soil samples allowed an identification of each locality examined, and REE were mostly detected in solid grape berry residues in comparison to juice. These data may be useful to associate REE distribution in soil and grape berries to a specific geographical origin, in order to prevent fraudulent use of wine denomination labels. PMID:27447714

  5. Uranium, thorium and rare earth elements in macrofungi: what are the genuine concentrations?

    PubMed

    Borovička, Jan; Kubrová, Jaroslava; Rohovec, Jan; Randa, Zdeněk; Dunn, Colin E

    2011-10-01

    Concentrations of uranium, thorium and rare earth elements (REE) in 36 species of ectomycorrhizal (26 samples) and saprobic (25 samples) macrofungi from unpolluted sites with differing bedrock geochemistry were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Analytical results are supported by use of certified reference materials (BCR-670, BCR-667, NIST-1575a) and the reliability of the determination of uranium was verified by epithermal neutron activation analysis (ENAA). It appears that data recently published on these elements are erroneous, in part because of use of an inappropriate analytical method; and in part because of apparent contamination by soil particles resulting in elevated levels of thorium and REE. Macrofungi from unpolluted areas, in general, did not accumulate high levels of the investigated metals. Concentrations of uranium and thorium were generally below 30 and 125 μg kg(-1) (dry weight), respectively. Concentrations of REE in macrofungi did not exceed 360 μg kg(-1) (dry weight) and their distribution more or less followed the trend observed in post-Archean shales and loess.

  6. A New Fungal Isolate, Penidiella sp. Strain T9, Accumulates the Rare Earth Element Dysprosium

    PubMed Central

    Horiike, Takumi

    2015-01-01

    With an aim to develop a highly efficient method for the recovery of rare earth elements (REEs) by using microorganisms, we attempted to isolate dysprosium (Dy)-accumulating microorganisms that grow under acidic conditions from environmental samples containing high concentrations of heavy metals. One acidophilic strain, T9, which was isolated from an abandoned mine, decreased the concentration of Dy in medium that contained 100 mg/liter Dy to 53 mg/liter Dy after 3 days of cultivation at pH 2.5. The Dy content in the cell pellet of the T9 strain was 910 μg/mg of dry cells. The T9 strain also accumulated other REEs. Based on the results of 28S-D1/D2 rRNA gene sequencing and morphological characterization, we designated this fungal strain Penidiella sp. T9. Bioaccumulation of Dy was observed on the cell surface of the T9 strain by elemental mapping using scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Our results indicate that Penidiella sp. T9 has the potential to recover REEs such as Dy from mine drainage and industrial liquid waste under acidic conditions. PMID:25710372

  7. Effects of exogenous rare earth elements on phosphorus adsorption and desorption in different types of soils.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lingqing; Liang, Tao

    2014-05-01

    Phosphorus (P) is an important biogeochemical element and the environmental fate of P receives increasing attention. Through batch equilibration experiments, the adsorption and desorption of P in the absence and presence of exogeneous rare earth elements (REEs) were investigated in five types of agricultural soil samples collected from China. The results showed that the addition of different doses of REEs had influences on P adsorption processes in the soils, and there were differences in different soil types and different P concentrations of the P solutions. The amount of P adsorption tended to decline when the five types of soils were amended with low concentrations of REEs. The characteristics of P adsorption were more complicated when high concentrations of REEs were added to the different soils. Affected by the high concentrations of REEs, when the P concentration of the P solution added to soils was less than 20 mg L(-1), the rate of P adsorption tended to increase in all the five types of soils. However, when the P concentration of the P solution added to soil was greater than 30 mg L(-1), the rate of P adsorption tended to decrease. The Langmuir equation fitted P adsorption in all the five types of soils well. Compared with the control, when soil samples were amended with REEs, the P desorption rates of the five types of soils increased.

  8. A new fungal isolate, Penidiella sp. strain T9, accumulates the rare earth element dysprosium.

    PubMed

    Horiike, Takumi; Yamashita, Mitsuo

    2015-05-01

    With an aim to develop a highly efficient method for the recovery of rare earth elements (REEs) by using microorganisms, we attempted to isolate dysprosium (Dy)-accumulating microorganisms that grow under acidic conditions from environmental samples containing high concentrations of heavy metals. One acidophilic strain, T9, which was isolated from an abandoned mine, decreased the concentration of Dy in medium that contained 100 mg/liter Dy to 53 mg/liter Dy after 3 days of cultivation at pH 2.5. The Dy content in the cell pellet of the T9 strain was 910 μg/mg of dry cells. The T9 strain also accumulated other REEs. Based on the results of 28S-D1/D2 rRNA gene sequencing and morphological characterization, we designated this fungal strain Penidiella sp. T9. Bioaccumulation of Dy was observed on the cell surface of the T9 strain by elemental mapping using scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Our results indicate that Penidiella sp. T9 has the potential to recover REEs such as Dy from mine drainage and industrial liquid waste under acidic conditions.

  9. Geochemistry of the rare earth elements in ferromanganese nodules from DOMES Site A, northern equatorial Pacific

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Calvert, S.E.; Piper, D.Z.; Baedecker, P.A.

    1987-01-01

    The distribution of rare earth elements (REE) in ferromanganese nodules from DOMES Site A has been determined by instrumental neutron activation methods. The concentrations of the REE vary markedly. Low concentrations characterize samples from a depression (the valley), in which Quaternary sediments are thin or absent; high concentrations are found in samples from the surrounding abyssal hills (the highlands) where the Quaternary sediment section is relatively thick. Moreover, the valley nodules are strongly depleted in the light trivalent REE (LREE) and Ce compared with nodules from the highlands, some of the former showing negative Ce anomalies. The REE abundances in the nodules are strongly influenced by the REE abundances in coexisting bottom water. Some controls on the REE chemistry of bottom waters include: a) the more effective removal of the LREE relative to the HREE from seawater because of the greater degree of complexation of the latter elements with seawater ligands, b) the very efficient oxidative scavenging of Ce on particle surfaces in seawater, and c) the strong depletion of both Ce and the LREE in, or a larger benthic flux of the HREE into, the Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW) which flows through the valley. The distinctive REE chemistry of valley nodules is a function of their growth from geochemically evolved AABW. In contrast, the REE chemistry of highland nodules indicates growth from a local, less evolved seawater source. ?? 1987.

  10. Distribution of rare earth elements in soil and grape berries of Vitis vinifera cv. "Glera".

    PubMed

    Pepi, Salvatore; Sansone, Luigi; Chicca, Milvia; Marrocchino, Elena; Vaccaro, Carmela

    2016-08-01

    The renowned Vitis vinifera L. cultivar "Glera" (Magnoliopsida Vitaceae) has been grown for hundreds of years in the Italian regions of Veneto and Friuli to produce the sparkling Prosecco wine, with controlled designation of origin (DOC). We evaluated the relationship among the concentrations of rare earth elements (REE) in soil and in "Glera" grape berries in vineyards belonging to five different localities in the Veneto alluvial plain, all included in the DOC area of Prosecco. The concentration of REE in samples of soil and juice or solid residues of grape berries was determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), and the index of bioaccumulation was calculated to define the specific assimilation of these elements from soil to grape berries. The concentration of REE in soil samples allowed an identification of each locality examined, and REE were mostly detected in solid grape berry residues in comparison to juice. These data may be useful to associate REE distribution in soil and grape berries to a specific geographical origin, in order to prevent fraudulent use of wine denomination labels.

  11. Rare earth elements and critical metal content of extracted landfilled material and potential recovery opportunities

    SciTech Connect

    Gutiérrez-Gutiérrez, Silvia C.; Coulon, Frédéric; Jiang, Ying; Wagland, Stuart

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • Samples from multiple core drills were obtained from 4× landfill sites in the UK. • Each sample analysed for rare earth elements, critical metals and valuable metals. • Two stage microwave digestion method ensuring high yield. • High quantities of copper and aluminium were observed in the soil layers of landfill. • Across 4× landfills aluminium and copper present has a value of around $400 million. - Abstract: Rare earth elements (REEs), Platinum group metals (PGMs) and other critical metals currently attract significant interest due to the high risks of supply shortage and substantial impact on the economy. Their uses in many applications have made them present in municipal solid waste (MSW) and in commercial and industrial waste (C&I), since several industrial processes produce by-products with high content of these metals. With over 4000 landfills in the UK alone, the aim of this study was to assess the existence of these critical metals within landfills. Samples collected from four closed landfills in UK were subjected to a two-step acid digestion to extract 27 metals of interest. Concentrations across the four landfill sites were 58 ± 6 mg kg{sup −1} for REEs comprising 44 ± 8 mg kg{sup −1} for light REEs, 11 ± 2 mg kg{sup −1} for heavy REEs and 3 ± 1 mg kg{sup −1} for Scandium (Sc) and 3 ± 1.0 mg kg{sup −1} of PGMs. Compared to the typical concentration in ores, these concentrations are too low to achieve a commercially viable extraction. However, content of other highly valuable metals (Al and Cu) was found in concentrations equating to a combined value across the four landfills of around $400 million, which increases the economic viability of landfill mining. Presence of critical metals will mainly depend on the type of waste that was buried but the recovery of these metals through landfill mining is possible and is economically feasible only if additional materials (plastics, paper, metallic items and other) are

  12. Rare-earth elements enrichment of Pacific seafloor sediments: the view from volcanic islands of Polynesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melleton, Jérémie; Tuduri, Johann; Pourret, Olivier; Bailly, Laurent; Gisbert, Thierry

    2014-05-01

    Rare-earth elements (REEs) are key metals for «green» technologies such as energy saving lamps or permanent magnets used in, e.g., wind turbines, hard disk drives, portable phone or electric or hybrid vehicles. Since several years, world demand for these metals is therefore drastically increasing. The quasi-monopolistic position of China, which produces around 95 % of global REEs production, generates risks for the industries that depend on a secure supply of REEs. In response, countries are developing and diversifying their supply sources, with new mining projects located outside China and efforts in the area of REEs recycling. Most of these projects focus on deposits related to carbonatites and alkaline-peralkaline magmatism, which are generally enriched in light REEs (LREEs) compared to the heavy REEs (HREEs)-enriched deposits of the ion-adsorption types, located in southern China. However, a recent study revealed new valuable resources corresponding to seafloor sediments located in the south-eastern and north-central Pacific. The deep-sea mud described by these authors show a higher HREE/LREE ratio than ion-adsorption deposits, a feature which significantly increases their economic interest. The authors suggest mid-ocean ridge hydrothermal activity as an explanation to this anomalous enrichment. However, several contributions have documented considerable REEs enrichment in basalts and peridotitic xenoliths from French Polynesia. Several arguments have been exposed in favour of a supergene origin, with a short migration, suggesting that REEs were collected from weathered basalts. The Tahaa volcanic island (Sous-le-Vent Island, Society Archipelago, French Polynesia) is the first location where such enrichment has been described. New petrographic and mineralogical investigations confirm a supergene mobilization of this abnormal occurrence. REE-bearing minerals (mainly phosphates of the rhabdophane group) are primarily located within basalt vesicles but also in

  13. An Operationally Simple Method for Separating the Rare-Earth Elements Neodymium and Dysprosium.

    PubMed

    Bogart, Justin A; Lippincott, Connor A; Carroll, Patrick J; Schelter, Eric J

    2015-07-01

    Rare-earth metals are critical components of electronic materials and permanent magnets. Recycling of consumer materials is a promising new source of rare earths. To incentivize recycling there is a clear need for simple methods for targeted separations of mixtures of rare-earth metal salts. Metal complexes of a tripodal nitroxide ligand [{(2-(t) BuNO)C6 H4 CH2 }3 N](3-) (TriNOx(3-) ), feature a size-sensitive aperture formed of its three η(2) -(N,O) ligand arms. Exposure of metal cations in the aperture induces a self-associative equilibrium comprising [M(TriNOx)thf]/ [M(TriNOx)]2 (M=rare-earth metal). Differences in the equilibrium constants (Keq ) for early and late metals enables simple Nd/Dy separations through leaching with a separation ratio SNd/Dy =359. PMID:26014901

  14. An Operationally Simple Method for Separating the Rare-Earth Elements Neodymium and Dysprosium.

    PubMed

    Bogart, Justin A; Lippincott, Connor A; Carroll, Patrick J; Schelter, Eric J

    2015-07-01

    Rare-earth metals are critical components of electronic materials and permanent magnets. Recycling of consumer materials is a promising new source of rare earths. To incentivize recycling there is a clear need for simple methods for targeted separations of mixtures of rare-earth metal salts. Metal complexes of a tripodal nitroxide ligand [{(2-(t) BuNO)C6 H4 CH2 }3 N](3-) (TriNOx(3-) ), feature a size-sensitive aperture formed of its three η(2) -(N,O) ligand arms. Exposure of metal cations in the aperture induces a self-associative equilibrium comprising [M(TriNOx)thf]/ [M(TriNOx)]2 (M=rare-earth metal). Differences in the equilibrium constants (Keq ) for early and late metals enables simple Nd/Dy separations through leaching with a separation ratio SNd/Dy =359.

  15. Low-temperature thermoluminescence spectra of rare-earth-doped lanthanum fluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, B.; Townsend, P.D.; Rowlands, A.P.

    1998-01-01

    Lanthanum fluoride consistently shows two strong thermoluminescence glow peaks at low temperature in pure material near 90 and 128 K. A model is proposed in which these thermoluminescence peaks arise from the annealing of halogen defect sites, similar to the H and V{sub k} centers of the alkali halides. Relaxation and decay of these defects in the pure LaF{sub 3} lattice results in broad-band intrinsic luminescence. Addition of rare-earth-impurity ions has two effects. First, the broad-band emission is replaced by narrow-band line emission defined by the trivalent rare-earth dopants. Second, it preferentially determines the formation of the halogen defect sites at impurity lattice sites and such sites appear to increase in thermal stability since the glow peak temperature increases from 128 K in the intrinsic material up to 141 K through the sequence of rare-earth dopants from La to Er. The temperature movement directly correlates with the changes in ionic size of the rare-earth ions, when allowance is made for differences in effective coordination number of the impurity ions. The data suggest two alternative lattice sites can be occupied. The model emphasizes that the intense thermoluminescence signals arise from internal charge rearrangements and annealing of defect complexes, rather than through the more conventional model of separated charge traps and recombination centers. At higher temperatures there is a complex array of glow peaks which depend not only on the dopant concentration but also are specific to each rare earth. Such effects imply defect models giving thermoluminescence within localized complexes and possible reasons are mentioned. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  16. Enhanced negative thermal expansion in La(1-x)Pr(x)Fe10.7Co0.8Si1.5 compounds by doping the magnetic rare-earth element praseodymium.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen; Huang, Rongjin; Wang, Wei; Tan, Jie; Zhao, Yuqiang; Li, Shaopeng; Huang, Chuanjun; Shen, Jun; Li, Laifeng

    2014-06-01

    Experiments have been performed to enhance negative thermal expansion (NTE) in the La(Fe,Co,Si)13-based compounds by optimizing the chemical composition, i.e., proper substitution of La by magnetic element Pr. It is found that increasing the absolute value of the average coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) in the NTE temperature region (200-300 K) attributes to enhancement of the spontaneous magnetization and its growth rate with increasing Pr content. Typically, the average CTE of La(1-x)Pr(x)Fe10.7Co0.8Si1.5 with x = 0.5 reaches as large as -38.5 × 10(-6) K(-1) between 200 and 300 K (ΔT = 100 K), which is 18.5% larger than that of x = 0. The present results highlight the potential applications of La(Fe,Co,Si)13-based compounds with a larger NTE coefficient.

  17. Enhanced negative thermal expansion in La(1-x)Pr(x)Fe10.7Co0.8Si1.5 compounds by doping the magnetic rare-earth element praseodymium.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen; Huang, Rongjin; Wang, Wei; Tan, Jie; Zhao, Yuqiang; Li, Shaopeng; Huang, Chuanjun; Shen, Jun; Li, Laifeng

    2014-06-01

    Experiments have been performed to enhance negative thermal expansion (NTE) in the La(Fe,Co,Si)13-based compounds by optimizing the chemical composition, i.e., proper substitution of La by magnetic element Pr. It is found that increasing the absolute value of the average coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) in the NTE temperature region (200-300 K) attributes to enhancement of the spontaneous magnetization and its growth rate with increasing Pr content. Typically, the average CTE of La(1-x)Pr(x)Fe10.7Co0.8Si1.5 with x = 0.5 reaches as large as -38.5 × 10(-6) K(-1) between 200 and 300 K (ΔT = 100 K), which is 18.5% larger than that of x = 0. The present results highlight the potential applications of La(Fe,Co,Si)13-based compounds with a larger NTE coefficient. PMID:24848739

  18. Enhanced phytoextraction of germanium and rare earth elements - a rhizosphere-based approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiche, Oliver

    2016-04-01

    Germanium (Ge) and rare earth elements (REEs) are economically valuable raw materials that have become an integral part of our modern high tech society. While most of these elements are not actually rare in terms of general amounts in the earth's crust, they are rarely found in sufficient abundances in single locations for their mining to be economically viable. The average concentration of Ge in soils is estimated at 1.6 μg g-1. The REEs comprise a group of 16 elements including La, the group of lanthanides and Y that are abundant in the earth crust with concentrations varying from 35 μg g-1 (La), 40 μg g-1 (Nd), 6 μg g-1 (Gd) and 3.5 μg g-1 (Er) to 0.5 μg g-1 in Tm. Thus, a promising chance to improve supply of these elements could be phytomining. Unfortunately, bioavailability of Ge and REEs in soils appears to be low, in particular in neutral or alkaline soils. A sequential dissolution analysis of 120 soil samples taken from the A-horizons of soils in the area of Freiberg (Saxony, Germany) revealed that only 0.2% of total Ge and about 0.5% of La, Nd, Gd and Er of bulk concentrations were easily accessible by leaching with NH4-acetate (pH 7). Most of the investigated elements were bound to Fe-/Mn-oxides and silicates and were therefore only poorly available for plant uptake. Here we report an environmentally friendly approach for enhanced phytoextraction of Ge and REEs from soils using mixed cultures of plant species with efficient mechanisms for the acquisition of nutrients in the rhizosphere. The rhizosphere is characterized as the zone in soil sourrounding a plant root that consists of a gradient in chemical, physical and biological soil properties driven by rhizodeposits like carboxylates and protons. Some species like white lupin (Lupinus albus) are able to excrete large amounts of organic acid anions(predominantly citrate and malate) and show a particularly high potential for the acidification of the rhizosphere. In our experiments, mixed cultures

  19. Cracking the Code of Soil Genesis. The Early Role of Rare Earth Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaharescu, D. G.; Dontsova, K.; Burghelea, C. I.; Maier, R. M.; Huxman, T. E.; Chorover, J.

    2014-12-01

    Soil is terrestrial life support system. Its genesis involves tight interactions between biota and mineral surfaces that mobilize structural elements into biogeochemical cycles. Of all chemical elements rare earth elements (REE) are a group of 16 non-nutrient elements of unusual geochemical similarity and present in all components of the surface environment. While much is known about the role of major nutrients in soil development we lack vital understanding of how early biotic colonization affects more conservative elements such as REE. A highly controlled experiment was set up at University of Arizona's Biosphere-2 that tested the effect of 4 biological treatments, incorporating a combination of microbe, grass, mycorrhiza and uninoculated control on REE leaching and uptake in 4 bedrock substrates: basalt, rhyolite, granite and schist. Generally the response of REE to biota presence was synergistic. Variation in total bedrock chemistry could explain major trends in pore water REE. There was a fast transition from chemistry-dominated to a biota dominated environment in the first 3-4 months of inoculation/seeding which translated into increase in REE signal over time. Relative REE abundances in water were generally reflected in plant concentrations, particularly in root, implying that below ground biomass is the main sync of REE in the ecosystem. Mycorrhiza effect on REE uptake in plant organs was significant and increased with infection rates. Presence of different biota translated into subtle differences in REE release, reveling potential biosignatures of biolota-rock colonization. The results thus bring fundamental insight into early stages non-nutrient cycle and soil genesis.

  20. Phase Transformation and Lattice Parameter Changes of Trivalent Rare Earth Doped YSZ as a Function of Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, S. L.; Huang, X.; He, Z.

    2016-09-01

    Yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) co-doped with trivalent oxide Sc2O3 and Yb2O3 is prepared using mechanical alloying and high-temperature sintering. High-temperature XRD analysis was performed to study the phase transformation and lattice parameter changes of various phases in the baseline YSZ and co-doped samples. The results show that the structure for the co-doped samples tends to be more thermally stable at test temperature above critical value. The lattice parameters for all samples increase with temperature at which XRD is carried out, and the lattice parameters for the two trivalent rare earth oxides co-doped YSZ are smaller than that for 7YSZ under the same temperature.

  1. Drill core major, trace and rare earth element anlayses from wells RN-17B and RN-30, Reykjanes, Iceland

    SciTech Connect

    Andrew Fowler

    2015-04-01

    Analytical results for X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) measurement of major, trace and rare earth elements in drill core from geothermal wells in Reykjanes, Iceland. Total Fe was analyzed as FeO, therefore is not included under the Fe2O3 column.

  2. X-ray fluorescence analysis of rare earth elements in rocks using low dilution glass beads.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Kenichi; Nakamura, Toshihiro

    2005-07-01

    Major and trace elements (Na, Mg, Al, Si, P, K, Ca, Ti, Mn, Fe, Rb, Sr, Y, Zr, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Gd, Dy, Th and U) in igneous rocks were assayed with fused lithium borate glass beads using X-ray fluorescence spectrometry. Low dilution glass beads, which had a 1:1 sample-to-flux ratio, were prepared for determination of rare earth elements. Complete vitrification of 1:1 mixture required heating twice at 1200 degrees C with agitation. Extra pure reagents containing determinants were used for calibrating standards instead of the rock standard. The calibration curves of the 23 elements showed good linearity. Furthermore, the lower limits of detection corresponding to three times the standard deviation for blank measurements were 26 mass ppm for Na2O, 6.7 for MgO, 4.5 for Al2O3, 4.5 for SiO2, 18 for P2O5, 1.1 for K2O, 4.0 for CaO, 3.9 for TiO2, 1.6 for MnO, 0.8 for Fe2O3, 0.5 for Rb, 0.2 for Sr, 0.4 for Y, 0.5 for Zr, 3.3 for La, 6.5 for Ce, 2.7 for Pr, 2.1 for Nd, 1.7 for Sm, 0.7 for Gd, 2.7 for Dy, 0.5 for Th, and 0.6 for U. Using the present method, we determined the contents of these 23 elements in four rhyolitic and granitic rocks from Japan. PMID:16038502

  3. X-ray fluorescence analysis of rare earth elements in rocks using low dilution glass beads.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Kenichi; Nakamura, Toshihiro

    2005-07-01

    Major and trace elements (Na, Mg, Al, Si, P, K, Ca, Ti, Mn, Fe, Rb, Sr, Y, Zr, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Gd, Dy, Th and U) in igneous rocks were assayed with fused lithium borate glass beads using X-ray fluorescence spectrometry. Low dilution glass beads, which had a 1:1 sample-to-flux ratio, were prepared for determination of rare earth elements. Complete vitrification of 1:1 mixture required heating twice at 1200 degrees C with agitation. Extra pure reagents containing determinants were used for calibrating standards instead of the rock standard. The calibration curves of the 23 elements showed good linearity. Furthermore, the lower limits of detection corresponding to three times the standard deviation for blank measurements were 26 mass ppm for Na2O, 6.7 for MgO, 4.5 for Al2O3, 4.5 for SiO2, 18 for P2O5, 1.1 for K2O, 4.0 for CaO, 3.9 for TiO2, 1.6 for MnO, 0.8 for Fe2O3, 0.5 for Rb, 0.2 for Sr, 0.4 for Y, 0.5 for Zr, 3.3 for La, 6.5 for Ce, 2.7 for Pr, 2.1 for Nd, 1.7 for Sm, 0.7 for Gd, 2.7 for Dy, 0.5 for Th, and 0.6 for U. Using the present method, we determined the contents of these 23 elements in four rhyolitic and granitic rocks from Japan.

  4. Cerium redox cycles and rare earth elements in the Sargasso Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Sholkovitz, E.R.; Schneider, D.L. )

    1991-10-01

    Two profiles of the rare earth elements (REEs) are reported for the upper water column of the Sargasso Sea. The trivalent-only REEs have remarkably constant concentrations in the upper 500m of an April 1989 profile and in the upper 200m of a May 1989 profile. In contrast, Ce concentrations decrease smoothly with increasing depth. In April 1989 Ce decreases from 15.7 pmol/kg at 20 m to 5.1 pmol/kg at 750 m. Cerium, which has Redox transformations in seawater, behaves anomalously with respect to its REE(III) neighbors. While both dissolved Ce and Mn have elevated concentrations in the upper 200m, their vertical gradients are distinctly different. In contrast to Mn, which reaches a minimum dissolved concentration near the zone (150-250 m) of a particulate Mn maximum, Ce is being removed both near this zone and to depths of at least 750m. These new profiles indicate that Ce is involved in an upper ocean redox cycle. This interpretation is consistent with the MOFFETT (1990) incubation tracer experiments on the same May 1989 seawater. He showed that Ce(III) oxidation is biologically mediated, probably light inhibited, increases with depth, and 3-4 times slower than Mn(II) oxidation in the 100-200 m zone. CERoclines provide new information into the fine scale zonation of redox process operating in the upper columns of oligotrophic oceans.

  5. Uptake and effect of rare earth elements on gene expression in Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b.

    PubMed

    Gu, Wenyu; Farhan Ul Haque, Muhammad; DiSpirito, Alan A; Semrau, Jeremy D

    2016-07-01

    It is well known that Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b has two forms of methane monooxygenase (MMO) responsible for the initial conversion of methane to methanol, a cytoplasmic (soluble) methane monooxygenase and a membrane-associated (particulate) methane monooxygenase, and that copper strongly regulates expression of these alternative forms of MMO. More recently, it has been discovered that M. trichosporium OB3b has multiple types of the methanol dehydrogenase (MeDH), i.e. the Mxa-type MeDH (Mxa-MeDH) and Xox-type MeDH (Xox-MeDH), and the expression of these two forms is regulated by the availability of the rare earth element (REE), cerium. Here, we extend these studies and show that lanthanum, praseodymium, neodymium and samarium also regulate expression of alternative forms of MeDH. The effect of these REEs on MeDH expression, however, was only observed in the absence of copper. Further, a mutant of M. trichosporium OB3b, where the Mxa-MeDH was knocked out, was able to grow in the presence of lanthanum, praseodymium and neodymium, but was not able to grow in the presence of samarium. Collectively, these data suggest that multiple levels of gene regulation by metals exist in M. trichosporium OB3b, but that copper overrides the effect of other metals by an as yet unknown mechanism. PMID:27190151

  6. Remediation of Rare Earth Element Pollutants by Sorption Process Using Organic Natural Sorbents.

    PubMed

    Butnariu, Monica; Negrea, Petru; Lupa, Lavinia; Ciopec, Mihaela; Negrea, Adina; Pentea, Marius; Sarac, Ionut; Samfira, Ionel

    2015-09-01

    The effects of the sorption of environmental applications by various source materials of natural organic matter, i.e., bone powder, was examined. Sorption capacities and subsequent rare earth element retention characteristics of all metals tested were markedly increased by ionic task-specific. In this study, the abilities of three models' isotherms widely were used for the equilibrium sorption data: Langmuir, Freundlich and Redlich-Peterson. For all studied metal ions the maximum adsorption capacity is close to those experimentally determined. The characteristic parameters for each isotherm and related coefficients of determination have been determined. The experimental data achieved excellent fits within the following isotherms in the order: Langmuir > Redlich-Peterson > Freundlich, based on their coefficient of determination values. The bone powder has developed higher adsorption performance in the removal process of Nd(III), Eu(III), La(III) from aqueous solutions than in the case of the removal process of Cs(I), Sr(II) and Tl(I) from aqueous solutions. The described relationships provide direct experimental evidence that the sorption-desorption properties of bone powder are closely related to their degree of the type of the metal. The results suggest a potential for obtaining efficient and cost-effective engineered natural organic sorbents for environmental applications. PMID:26378553

  7. Innovative Application of Mechanical Activation for Rare Earth Elements Recovering: Process Optimization and Mechanism Exploration.

    PubMed

    Tan, Quanyin; Deng, Chao; Li, Jinhui

    2016-01-01

    With the rapidly expanding use of fluorescent lamps (FLs) and increasing interest in conservation and sustainable utilization of critical metals such as rare earth elements (REEs), the recovering of REEs from phosphors in waste FLs is becoming a critical environmental and economic issue. To effectively recycle REEs with metallurgical methods, mechanical activation by ball milling was introduced to pretreat the waste phosphors. This current study put the emphasis on the mechanical activation and leaching processes for REEs, and explored the feasibility of the method from both theoretical and practical standpoints. Results showed physicochemical changes of structural destruction and particle size reduction after mechanical activation, leading to the easy dissolution of REEs in the activated samples. Under optimal conditions, dissolution yields of 89.4%, 93.1% and 94.6% for Tb, Eu and Y, respectively, were achieved from activated waste phosphors using hydrochloric acid as the dissolution agent. The shrinking core model proved to be the most applicable for the leaching procedure, with an apparent activation energy of 10.96 ± 2.79 kJ/mol. This novel process indicates that mechanical activation is an efficient method for recovering REEs from waste phosphors, and it has promising potential for REE recovery with low cost and high efficiency. PMID:26819083

  8. Rare-earth elements in geothermal waters from Oregon, Nevada, and California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Scott A.; Shannon, William M.

    2003-02-01

    The concentrations of rare-earth elements (REE) were determined in thermal waters from hot springs in the Oregon Cascades and southeastern Oregon, and from wells in the Beowawe (NV), Dixie Valley (NV) and Heber (CA) geothermal fields. The waters are all near-neutral to slightly alkaline, and dominated by sodium chloride or sodium bicarbonate. Concentrations of REE range from <10 -6 to approximately 10 -3 times chondrite. In general, filtered aliquots of the fluids contain substantially less REE (sometimes by an order of magnitude or more) than corresponding unfiltered aliquots, suggesting a considerable particulate contribution to the total REE. Concentrations of REE in the waters from Beowawe and Dixie Valley are generally quite low, possibly owing to loss of REE on boiling. Most of the waters exhibit LREE-enriched, chondrite-normalized REE patterns, with slight or non-existent Eu anomalies. The main exceptions are the waters from Heber, which exhibit a concave-upward pattern with a prominent, positive Eu anomaly ("Mexican hat" pattern). The behavior of REE in waters from continental geothermal systems is a useful indicator of water-rock interaction and holds promise as a potential tool for exploration.

  9. Using rare earth elements to constrain particulate organic carbon flux in the East China Sea

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Chin-Chang; Chen, Ya-Feng; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Wang, Kui; Chen, Jian Feng; Burdige, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Fluxes of particulate organic carbon (POC) in the East China Sea (ECS) have been reported to decrease from the inner continental shelf towards the outer continental shelf. Recent research has shown that POC fluxes in the ECS may be overestimated due to active sediment resuspension. To better characterize the effect of sediment resuspension on particle fluxes in the ECS, rare earth elements (REEs) and organic carbon (OC) were used in separate two-member mixing models to evaluate trap-collected POC fluxes. The ratio of resuspended particles from sediments to total trap-collected particles in the ECS ranged from 82–94% using the OC mixing model, and 30–80% using the REEs mixing model, respectively. These results suggest that REEs may be better proxies for sediment resuspension than OC in high turbidity marginal seas because REEs do not appear to undergo degradation during particle sinking as compared to organic carbon. Our results suggest that REEs can be used as tracers to provide quantitative estimates of POC fluxes in marginal seas. PMID:27670426

  10. Rare earth element geochemistry of outcrop and core samples from the Marcellus Shale

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Noack, Clinton W.; Jain, Jinesh C.; Stegmeier, John; Hakala, J. Alexandra; Karamalidis, Athanasios K.

    2015-06-26

    In this paper, we studied the geochemistry of the rare earth elements (REE) in eleven outcrop samples and six, depth-interval samples of a core from the Marcellus Shale. The REE are classically applied analytes for investigating depositional environments and inferring geochemical processes, making them of interest as potential, naturally occurring indicators of fluid sources as well as indicators of geochemical processes in solid waste disposal. However, little is known of the REE occurrence in the Marcellus Shale or its produced waters, and this study represents one of the first, thorough characterizations of the REE in the Marcellus Shale. In thesemore » samples, the abundance of REE and the fractionation of REE profiles were correlated with different mineral components of the shale. Namely, samples with a larger clay component were inferred to have higher absolute concentrations of REE but have less distinctive patterns. Conversely, samples with larger carbonate fractions exhibited a greater degree of fractionation, albeit with lower total abundance. Further study is necessary to determine release mechanisms, as well as REE fate-and-transport, however these results have implications for future brine and solid waste management applications.« less

  11. Rare earth element geochemistry of outcrop and core samples from the Marcellus Shale

    SciTech Connect

    Noack, Clinton W.; Jain, Jinesh C.; Stegmeier, John; Hakala, J. Alexandra; Karamalidis, Athanasios K.

    2015-06-26

    In this paper, we studied the geochemistry of the rare earth elements (REE) in eleven outcrop samples and six, depth-interval samples of a core from the Marcellus Shale. The REE are classically applied analytes for investigating depositional environments and inferring geochemical processes, making them of interest as potential, naturally occurring indicators of fluid sources as well as indicators of geochemical processes in solid waste disposal. However, little is known of the REE occurrence in the Marcellus Shale or its produced waters, and this study represents one of the first, thorough characterizations of the REE in the Marcellus Shale. In these samples, the abundance of REE and the fractionation of REE profiles were correlated with different mineral components of the shale. Namely, samples with a larger clay component were inferred to have higher absolute concentrations of REE but have less distinctive patterns. Conversely, samples with larger carbonate fractions exhibited a greater degree of fractionation, albeit with lower total abundance. Further study is necessary to determine release mechanisms, as well as REE fate-and-transport, however these results have implications for future brine and solid waste management applications.

  12. Marine phosphorites as potential resources for heavy rare earth elements and yttrium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hein, James; Koschinsky, Andrea; Mikesell, Mariah; Mizell, Kira; Glenn, Craig R.; Wood, Ray

    2016-01-01

    Marine phosphorites are known to concentrate rare earth elements and yttrium (REY) during early diagenetic formation. Much of the REY data available are decades old and incomplete, and there has not been a systematic study of REY distributions in marine phosphorite deposits that formed over a range of oceanic environments. Consequently, we initiated this study to determine if marine phosphorite deposits found in the global ocean host REY concentrations of high enough grade to be of economic interest. This paper addresses continental-margin (CM) and open-ocean seamount phosphorites. All 75 samples analyzed are composed predominantly of carbonate fluorapatite and minor detrital and authigenic minerals. CM phosphorites have low total REY contents (mean 161 ppm) and high heavy REY (HREY) complements (mean 49%), while seamount phosphorites have 4–6 times higher individual REY contents (except for Ce, which is subequal; mean ΣREY 727 ppm), and very high HREY complements (mean 60%). The predominant causes of higher concentrations and larger HREY complements in seamount phosphorites compared to CM phosphorites are age, changes in seawater REY concentrations over time, water depth of formation, changes in pH and complexing ligands, and differences in organic carbon content in the depositional environments. Potential ore deposits with high HREY complements, like the marine phosphorites analyzed here, could help supply the HREY needed for high-tech and green-tech applications without creating an oversupply of the LREY.

  13. Rare earth elements tracing the soil erosion processes on slope surface under natural rainfall.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Mingyong; Tan, Shuduan; Dang, Haishan; Zhang, Quanfa

    2011-12-01

    A field experiment using rare earth elements (REEs) as tracers was conducted to investigate soil erosion processes on slope surfaces during rainfall events. A plot of 10m×2m×0.16m with a gradient of 20° (36.4%) was established and the plot was divided into two layers and four segments. Various REE tracers were applied to the different layers and segments to determine sediment dynamics under natural rainfall. Results indicated that sheet erosion accounted for more than 90% of total erosion when the rainfall amount and density was not large enough to generate concentrated flows. Sediment source changed in different sections on the slope surface, and the primary sediment source area tended to move upslope as erosion progressed. In rill erosion, sediment discharge mainly originated from the toe-slope and moved upwards as erosion intensified. The results obtained from this study suggest that multi-REE tracer technique is valuable in understanding the erosion processes and determining sediment sources. PMID:21839555

  14. Recovery of Rare Earth Elements and Yttrium from Passive-Remediation Systems of Acid Mine Drainage.

    PubMed

    Ayora, Carlos; Macías, Francisco; Torres, Ester; Lozano, Alba; Carrero, Sergio; Nieto, José-Miguel; Pérez-López, Rafael; Fernández-Martínez, Alejandro; Castillo-Michel, Hiram

    2016-08-01

    Rare earth elements and yttrium (REY) are raw materials of increasing importance for modern technologies, and finding new sources has become a pressing need. Acid mine drainage (AMD) is commonly considered an environmental pollution issue. However, REY concentrations in AMD can be several orders of magnitude higher than in naturally occurring water bodies. With respect to shale standards, the REY distribution pattern in AMD is enriched in intermediate and valuable REY, such as Tb and Dy. The objective of the present work is to study the behavior of REY in AMD passive-remediation systems. Traditional AMD passive remediation systems are based on the reaction of AMD with calcite-based permeable substrates followed by decantation ponds. Experiments with two columns simulating AMD treatment demonstrate that schwertmannite does not accumulate REY, which, instead, are retained in the basaluminite residue. The same observation is made in two field-scale treatments from the Iberian Pyrite Belt (IPB, southwest Spain). On the basis of the amplitude of this process and on the extent of the IPB, our findings suggest that the proposed AMD remediation process can represent a modest but suitable REY source. In this sense, the IPB could function as a giant heap-leaching process of regional scale in which rain and oxygen act as natural driving forces with no energy investment. In addition to having environmental benefits of its treatment, AMD is expected to last for hundreds of years, and therefore, the total reserves are practically unlimited. PMID:27351211

  15. New fission fragment distributions and r-process origin of the rare-earth elements.

    PubMed

    Goriely, S; Sida, J-L; Lemaître, J-F; Panebianco, S; Dubray, N; Hilaire, S; Bauswein, A; Janka, H-T

    2013-12-13

    Neutron star (NS) merger ejecta offer a viable site for the production of heavy r-process elements with nuclear mass numbers A≳140. The crucial role of fission recycling is responsible for the robustness of this site against many astrophysical uncertainties, but calculations sensitively depend on nuclear physics. In particular, the fission fragment yields determine the creation of 110≲A≲170 nuclei. Here, we apply a new scission-point model, called SPY, to derive the fission fragment distribution (FFD) of all relevant neutron-rich, fissioning nuclei. The model predicts a doubly asymmetric FFD in the abundant A≃278 mass region that is responsible for the final recycling of the fissioning material. Using ejecta conditions based on relativistic NS merger calculations, we show that this specific FFD leads to a production of the A≃165 rare-earth peak that is nicely compatible with the abundance patterns in the Sun and metal-poor stars. This new finding further strengthens the case of NS mergers as possible dominant origin of r nuclei with A≳140.

  16. Remediation of Rare Earth Element Pollutants by Sorption Process Using Organic Natural Sorbents.

    PubMed

    Butnariu, Monica; Negrea, Petru; Lupa, Lavinia; Ciopec, Mihaela; Negrea, Adina; Pentea, Marius; Sarac, Ionut; Samfira, Ionel

    2015-09-10

    The effects of the sorption of environmental applications by various source materials of natural organic matter, i.e., bone powder, was examined. Sorption capacities and subsequent rare earth element retention characteristics of all metals tested were markedly increased by ionic task-specific. In this study, the abilities of three models' isotherms widely were used for the equilibrium sorption data: Langmuir, Freundlich and Redlich-Peterson. For all studied metal ions the maximum adsorption capacity is close to those experimentally determined. The characteristic parameters for each isotherm and related coefficients of determination have been determined. The experimental data achieved excellent fits within the following isotherms in the order: Langmuir > Redlich-Peterson > Freundlich, based on their coefficient of determination values. The bone powder has developed higher adsorption performance in the removal process of Nd(III), Eu(III), La(III) from aqueous solutions than in the case of the removal process of Cs(I), Sr(II) and Tl(I) from aqueous solutions. The described relationships provide direct experimental evidence that the sorption-desorption properties of bone powder are closely related to their degree of the type of the metal. The results suggest a potential for obtaining efficient and cost-effective engineered natural organic sorbents for environmental applications.

  17. Rare earth element distributions and fractionation in plankton from the northwestern Mediterranean Sea.

    PubMed

    Strady, Emilie; Kim, Intae; Radakovitch, Olivier; Kim, Guebuem

    2015-01-01

    Rare earth element (REE) concentrations were measured for the first time in plankton from the northwestern Mediterranean Sea. The REE concentrations in phytoplankton (60-200 μm) were 5-15 times higher than those in four size fractions of zooplankton: 200-500 μm, 500-1000 μm, 1000-2000 μm and >2000 μm. The concentrations within these zooplankton fractions exhibited the same ranges with some variation attributed to differences in zooplankton taxonomy. The REE concentrations in plankton were poorly related to the reported REE concentrations of seawater, but they correlated well with the calculated REE(3+), concentrations especially with regard to middle REE (MREEs) and heavy REEs (HREEs). Plankton and seawater revealed different PAAS-normalised REE distributions, with the greatest differences observed in the light REEs. Interestingly, a comparison of PAAS-normalized sediment particles from the study of Fowler et al. (1992) showed concentrations of the same order of magnitude and a similar REE distribution without MREE enrichment. Based on this comparison, we propose a conceptual model that emphasizes the importance of biological scavenging of REEs (especially LREEs) in surface waters.

  18. Examination of rare earth element concentration patterns in freshwater fish tissues.

    PubMed

    Mayfield, David B; Fairbrother, Anne

    2015-02-01

    Rare earth elements (REEs or lanthanides) were measured in ten freshwater fish species from a reservoir in Washington State (United States). The REE distribution patterns were examined within fillet and whole body tissues for three size classes. Total concentrations (ΣREE) ranged from 0.014 to 3.0 mg kg(-1) (dry weight) and averaged 0.243 mg kg(-1) (dry weight). Tissue concentration patterns indicated that REEs accumulated to a greater extent in organs, viscera, and bone compared to muscle (fillet) tissues. Benthic feeding species (exposed to sediments) exhibited greater concentrations of REEs than pelagic omnivorous or piscivorous fish species. Decreasing REE concentrations were found with increasing age, total length or weight for largescale and longnose suckers, smallmouth bass, and walleye. Concentration patterns in this system were consistent with natural conditions without anthropogenic sources of REEs. These data provide additional reference information with regard to the fate and transport of REEs in freshwater fish tissues in a large aquatic system.

  19. Rare earth element partitioning between hydrous ferric oxides and acid mine water during iron oxidation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Verplanck, P.L.; Nordstrom, D.K.; Taylor, H.E.; Kimball, B.A.

    2004-01-01

    Ferrous iron rapidly oxidizes to Fe (III) and precipitates as hydrous Fe (III) oxides in acid mine waters. This study examines the effect of Fe precipitation on the rare earth element (REE) geochemistry of acid mine waters to determine the pH range over which REEs behave conservatively and the range over which attenuation and fractionation occur. Two field studies were designed to investigate REE attenuation during Fe oxidation in acidic, alpine surface waters. To complement these field studies, a suite of six acid mine waters with a pH range from 1.6 to 6.1 were collected and allowed to oxidize in the laboratory at ambient conditions to determine the partitioning of REEs during Fe oxidation and precipitation. Results from field experiments document that even with substantial Fe oxidation, the REEs remain dissolved in acid, sulfate waters with pH below 5.1. Between pH 5.1 and 6.6 the REEs partitioned to the solid phases in the water column, and heavy REEs were preferentially removed compared to light REEs. Laboratory experiments corroborated field data with the most solid-phase partitioning occurring in the waters with the highest pH. ?? 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The profile of the rare earth elements in the Canada Basin, Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jon; Haley, Brian

    2016-08-01

    We analyzed the dissolved rare earth element (REE) content of three water column profiles (two shelf sites and one deep basin site) in the Canada Basin in order to better constrain the behavior of REEs in the Arctic Ocean. Dissolved concentrations of the REEs in the surface are 1.3-1.9 times higher than deep water (>500 m) concentrations, which are constant with depth (La: 19-23 pM, Nd: 14-17 pM, Yb: 4.0-4.3 pM). The dominant source of REEs to the surface waters of the Canada Basin is most likely Pacific water flowing through the Bering Strait and Chukchi Sea and/or the Mackenzie River. Dissolved REEs in the intermediate and deep waters are constant and appear to behave conservatively, allowing us to investigate this aspect of REE behavior in the oceans. Calculated deep ocean residence times of the REEs in the Canada Basin range from 450 to 700 years and match the age of these waters. We postulate that these values are likely applicable to global deep ocean reservoirs and that observed deviations from this conservative value can help to constrain nonconservative processes acting on the REEs.

  1. Ionic conductivity of binary fluorides of potassium and rare earth elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorokin, N. I.

    2016-01-01

    The ionic conductivity s of KYF4 and K2 RF5 single crystals ( R = Gd, Ho, Er) and KNdF4 and K2 RF5 ceramic samples ( R = Dy, Er) has been studied in the temperature range of 340-500°C. A comparative analysis of the σ values for these objects has been performed. Binary fluorides of potassium and rare earth elements were synthesized by the hydrothermal method (temperature 480°C, pressure 100-150 MPa) in the R 2O3-KF-H2O systems. The σ values of tetraf luorides are 3 × 10-5 S/cm (KYF4 single crystal) and 3 × 10-6 S/cm (KNdF4 ceramics) at 435°C. A K2ErF5 single crystal with σ = 1.2 × 10-4 S/cm at 435°C has the maximum value of ionic conductivity among pentafluorides. The anisotropy of ionic transport was found in K2HoF5 single crystals, σ∥ c /σ⊥ c = 2.5, where σ∥ c and σ⊥ c are, respectively, the conductivities along the crystallographic c axis and in the perpendicular direction.

  2. Rare earth element distribution in some hydrothermal minerals: evidence for crystallographic control

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morgan, J.W.; Wandless, G.A.

    1980-01-01

    Rare earth element (REE) abundances were measured by neutron activation analysis in anhydrite (CaSO4), barite (BaSO4), siderite (FeCO3) and galena (PbS). A simple crystal-chemical model qualitatively describes the relative affinities for REE substitution in anhydrite, barite, and siderite. When normalized to 'crustal' abundances (as an approximation to the hydrothermal fluid REE pattern), log REE abundance is a surprisingly linear function of (ionic radius of major cation-ionic radius of REE)2 for the three hydrothermal minerals, individually and collectively. An important exception, however, is Eu, which is anomalously enriched in barite and depleted in siderite relative to REE of neighboring atomic number and trivalent ionic radius. In principle, REE analyses of suitable pairs of co-existing hydrothermal minerals, combined with appropriate experimental data, could yield both the REE content and the temperature of the parental hydrothermal fluid. The REE have only very weak chalcophilic tendencies, and this is reflected by the very low abundances in galena-La, 0.6 ppb; Sm, 0.06 ppb; the remainder are below detection limits. ?? 1980.

  3. Rare earth elements in Solnhofen biogenic apatite: geochemical clues to the palaeoenvironment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemp, Richard A.; Trueman, Clive N.

    2003-01-01

    Rare earth element (REE) concentrations in biogenic apatite samples (coprolite, bone and soft-tissue) were used to investigate the environment of deposition of the celebrated Solnhofen fossil Lagerstätten. The measured REE patterns are similar between different localities, lithologies (flinz, fäule) and levels in the Upper Solnhofen Plattenkalk, suggestive of a stable REE supply during deposition. The behaviour of cerium in the Solnhofen samples implies that bottom water conditions were not anoxic, and variations in the cerium anomaly can be explained by differences in burial rate. These results provide further geochemical support for current depositional models [Barthel, K.W., 1978. Solnhofen: Ein Blick in die Erdgeschichte. Ott Verlag, Thun.; Barthel, K.W., Swinburne, N.H.M., Conway Morris, S., 1990, Solnhofen. A Study in Mesozoic Palaeontology. Cambridge Univ. Press, Cambridge.] that propose that extra-basinal processes are responsible for the interbedded nature of the Solnhofen deposits, rather than intra-basinal processes such as water turnover events.

  4. Selective Extraction of Rare Earth Elements from Permanent Magnet Scraps with Membrane Solvent Extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Daejin; Powell, Lawrence E.; Delmau, Lætitia H.; Peterson, Eric S.; Herchenroeder, Jim; Bhave, Ramesh R.

    2015-06-24

    In this paper, the rare earth elements (REEs) such as neodymium, praseodymium, and dysprosium were successfully recovered from commercial NdFeB magnets and industrial scrap magnets via membrane assisted solvent extraction (MSX). A hollow fiber membrane system was evaluated to extract REEs in a single step with the feed and strip solutions circulating continuously through the MSX system. The effects of several experimental variables on REE extraction such as flow rate, concentration of REEs in the feed solution, membrane configuration, and composition of acids were investigated with the MSX system. A multimembrane module configuration with REEs dissolved in aqueous nitric acid solutions showed high selectivity for REE extraction with no coextraction of non-REEs, whereas the use of aqueous hydrochloric acid solution resulted in coextraction of non-REEs due to the formation of chloroanions of non-REEs. The REE oxides were recovered from the strip solution through precipitation, drying, and annealing steps. Finally, the resulting REE oxides were characterized with XRD, SEM-EDX, and ICP-OES, demonstrating that the membrane assisted solvent extraction is capable of selectively recovering pure REEs from the industrial scrap magnets.

  5. Selective Extraction of Rare Earth Elements from Permanent Magnet Scraps with Membrane Solvent Extraction

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kim, Daejin; Powell, Lawrence E.; Delmau, Lætitia H.; Peterson, Eric S.; Herchenroeder, Jim; Bhave, Ramesh R.

    2015-06-24

    In this paper, the rare earth elements (REEs) such as neodymium, praseodymium, and dysprosium were successfully recovered from commercial NdFeB magnets and industrial scrap magnets via membrane assisted solvent extraction (MSX). A hollow fiber membrane system was evaluated to extract REEs in a single step with the feed and strip solutions circulating continuously through the MSX system. The effects of several experimental variables on REE extraction such as flow rate, concentration of REEs in the feed solution, membrane configuration, and composition of acids were investigated with the MSX system. A multimembrane module configuration with REEs dissolved in aqueous nitric acidmore » solutions showed high selectivity for REE extraction with no coextraction of non-REEs, whereas the use of aqueous hydrochloric acid solution resulted in coextraction of non-REEs due to the formation of chloroanions of non-REEs. The REE oxides were recovered from the strip solution through precipitation, drying, and annealing steps. Finally, the resulting REE oxides were characterized with XRD, SEM-EDX, and ICP-OES, demonstrating that the membrane assisted solvent extraction is capable of selectively recovering pure REEs from the industrial scrap magnets.« less

  6. Selective Extraction of Rare Earth Elements from Permanent Magnet Scraps with Membrane Solvent Extraction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Daejin; Powell, Lawrence E; Delmau, Lætitia H; Peterson, Eric S; Herchenroeder, Jim; Bhave, Ramesh R

    2015-08-18

    The rare earth elements (REEs) such as neodymium, praseodymium, and dysprosium were successfully recovered from commercial NdFeB magnets and industrial scrap magnets via membrane assisted solvent extraction (MSX). A hollow fiber membrane system was evaluated to extract REEs in a single step with the feed and strip solutions circulating continuously through the MSX system. The effects of several experimental variables on REE extraction such as flow rate, concentration of REEs in the feed solution, membrane configuration, and composition of acids were investigated with the MSX system. A multimembrane module configuration with REEs dissolved in aqueous nitric acid solutions showed high selectivity for REE extraction with no coextraction of non-REEs, whereas the use of aqueous hydrochloric acid solution resulted in coextraction of non-REEs due to the formation of chloroanions of non-REEs. The REE oxides were recovered from the strip solution through precipitation, drying, and annealing steps. The resulting REE oxides were characterized with XRD, SEM-EDX, and ICP-OES, demonstrating that the membrane assisted solvent extraction is capable of selectively recovering pure REEs from the industrial scrap magnets.

  7. Determination of Rare Earth Elements in Hypersaline Solutions Using Low-Volume, Liquid-Liquid Extraction.

    PubMed

    Noack, Clinton W; Dzombak, David A; Karamalidis, Athanasios K

    2015-08-18

    Complex, hypersaline brines-including those coproduced with oil and gas, rejected from desalination technologies, or used as working fluids for geothermal electricity generation-could contain critical materials such as the rare earth elements (REE) in valuable concentrations. Accurate quantitation of these analytes in complex, aqueous matrices is necessary for evaluation and implementation of systems aimed at recovering those critical materials. However, most analytical methods for measuring trace metals have not been validated for highly saline and/or chemically complex brines. Here we modified and optimized previously published liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) techniques using bis(2-ethylhexyl) phosphate as the extractant in a heptane diluent, and studied its efficacy for REE recovery as a function of three primary variables: background salinity (as NaCl), concentration of a competing species (here Fe), and concentration of dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Results showed that the modified LLE was robust to a range of salinity, Fe, and DOC concentrations studied as well as constant, elevated Ba concentrations. With proper characterization of the natural samples of interest, this method could be deployed for accurate analysis of REE in small volumes of hyper-saline and chemically complex brines.

  8. Composition and evolution of the eucrite parent body - Evidence from rare earth elements. [extraterrestrial basaltic melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Consolmagno, G. J.; Drake, M. J.

    1977-01-01

    Quantitative modeling of the evolution of rare earth element (REE) abundances in the eucrites, which are plagioclase-pigeonite basalt achondrites, indicates that the main group of eucrites (e.g., Juvinas) might have been produced by approximately 10% equilibrium partial melting of a single type of source region with initial REE abundances which were chondritic relative and absolute. Since the age of the eucrites is about equal to that of the solar system, extensive chemical differentiation of the eucrite parent body prior to the formation of eucrites seems unlikely. If homogeneous accretion is assumed, the bulk composition of the eucrite parent body can be estimated; two estimates are provided, representing different hypotheses as to the ratio of metal to olivine in the parent body. Since a large number of differentiated olivine meteorites, which would represent material from the interior of the parent body, have not been detected, the eucrite parent body is thought to be intact. It is suggested that the asteroid 4 Vesta is the eucrite parent body.

  9. State of rare earth elements in different environmental components in mining areas of China.

    PubMed

    Liang, Tao; Li, Kexin; Wang, Lingqing

    2014-03-01

    China has relatively abundant rare earth elements (REEs) reserves and will continue to be one of the major producers of REEs for the world market in the foreseeable future. However, due to the large scale of mining and refining activities, large amounts of REEs have been released to the surrounding environment and caused harmful effects on local residents. This paper summarizes the data about the contents and translocation of REEs in soils, waters, atmosphere, and plants in REE mining areas of China and discusses the characteristics of their forms, distribution, fractionation, and influencing factors. Obviously high concentrations of REEs with active and bioavailable forms are observed in all environmental media. The mobility and bioavailability of REEs are enhanced. The distribution patterns of REEs in soils and water bodies are all in line with their parent rocks. Significant fractionation phenomenon among individual members of REEs was found in soil-plant systems. However, limited knowledge was available for REEs in atmosphere. More studies focusing on the behavior of REEs in ambient air of REE mining areas in China are highly suggested. In addition, systematic study on the translocation and circulation of REEs in various media in REEs mining areas and their health risk assessment should be carried out. Standard analytical methods of REEs in environments need to be established, and more specific guideline values of REEs in foods should also be developed.

  10. Using rare earth elements to constrain particulate organic carbon flux in the East China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Chin-Chang; Chen, Ya-Feng; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Wang, Kui; Chen, Jian Feng; Burdige, David J.

    2016-09-01

    Fluxes of particulate organic carbon (POC) in the East China Sea (ECS) have been reported to decrease from the inner continental shelf towards the outer continental shelf. Recent research has shown that POC fluxes in the ECS may be overestimated due to active sediment resuspension. To better characterize the effect of sediment resuspension on particle fluxes in the ECS, rare earth elements (REEs) and organic carbon (OC) were used in separate two-member mixing models to evaluate trap-collected POC fluxes. The ratio of resuspended particles from sediments to total trap-collected particles in the ECS ranged from 82–94% using the OC mixing model, and 30–80% using the REEs mixing model, respectively. These results suggest that REEs may be better proxies for sediment resuspension than OC in high turbidity marginal seas because REEs do not appear to undergo degradation during particle sinking as compared to organic carbon. Our results suggest that REEs can be used as tracers to provide quantitative estimates of POC fluxes in marginal seas.

  11. Uptake and effect of rare earth elements on gene expression in Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b.

    PubMed

    Gu, Wenyu; Farhan Ul Haque, Muhammad; DiSpirito, Alan A; Semrau, Jeremy D

    2016-07-01

    It is well known that Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b has two forms of methane monooxygenase (MMO) responsible for the initial conversion of methane to methanol, a cytoplasmic (soluble) methane monooxygenase and a membrane-associated (particulate) methane monooxygenase, and that copper strongly regulates expression of these alternative forms of MMO. More recently, it has been discovered that M. trichosporium OB3b has multiple types of the methanol dehydrogenase (MeDH), i.e. the Mxa-type MeDH (Mxa-MeDH) and Xox-type MeDH (Xox-MeDH), and the expression of these two forms is regulated by the availability of the rare earth element (REE), cerium. Here, we extend these studies and show that lanthanum, praseodymium, neodymium and samarium also regulate expression of alternative forms of MeDH. The effect of these REEs on MeDH expression, however, was only observed in the absence of copper. Further, a mutant of M. trichosporium OB3b, where the Mxa-MeDH was knocked out, was able to grow in the presence of lanthanum, praseodymium and neodymium, but was not able to grow in the presence of samarium. Collectively, these data suggest that multiple levels of gene regulation by metals exist in M. trichosporium OB3b, but that copper overrides the effect of other metals by an as yet unknown mechanism.

  12. Template polymerization synthesis of hydrogel and silica composite for sorption of some rare earth elements.

    PubMed

    Borai, E H; Hamed, M G; El-kamash, A M; Siyam, T; El-Sayed, G O

    2015-10-15

    New sorbents containing 2-acrylamido 2-methyl propane sulphonic acid monomer onto poly(vinyl pyrilidone) P(VP-AMPS) hydrogel and P(VP-AMPS-SiO2) composite have been synthesized by radiation template polymerization. The effect of absorbed dose rate (kGy), crosslinker concentration and polymer/monomer ratio on the degree of template polymerization of P(VP-AMPS) hydrogel was studied. The degree of polymerization was evaluated by the calculated percent conversion and swelling degree. The maximum capacity of P(VP-AMPS) hydrogel toward Cu(+2) metal ion found to be 91 mg/gm. The polymeric composite P(VP-AMPS-SiO2) has been successfully synthesized. The structure of the prepared hydrogel and composite were confirmed by FTIR, thermal analysis (TGA and DTA) and SEM micrograph. Batch adsorption studies for La(3+), Ce(3+), Nd(3+), Eu(3+) and Pb(+2) metal ions on the prepared hydrogel and composite were investigated as a function of shaking time, pH and metal ion concentration. The sorption efficiency of the prepared hydrogel and composite toward light rare earth elements (LREEs) are arranged in the order La(3+)>Ce(3+)>Nd(3+)>Eu(3+). The obtained results demonstrated the superior adsorption capacity of the composite over the polymeric hydrogel. The maximum capacity of the polymeric composite was found to be 116, 103, 92, 76, 74 mg/gm for La(3+), Ce(3+), Nd(3+), Eu(3+) and Pb(2+) metal ions respectively.

  13. Fractionation in the solar nebula - Condensation of yttrium and the rare earth elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boynton, W. V.

    1975-01-01

    The condensation of Y and the rare earth elements (REE) from the solar nebula may be controlled by thermodynamic equilibrium between gas and condensed solids. Highly fractionated REE patterns may result if condensates are removed from the gas before condensation is complete. It is found that the fractionation is not a smooth function of REE ionic radius but varies in an extremely irregular pattern. Both Yb and Eu are predicted to be extremely depleted in the early condensate without the requirement of condensation in the divalent state. The model is discussed with respect to a highly fractionated pattern observed by Tanaka and Masuda (1973), in a pink Ca-Al-rich inclusion from the Allende meteorite and can account for the abundances of each REE determined. According to the model this inclusion represents a condensate from a previously fractionated gas rather than from a gas of solar composition. Before the condensation of this inclusion, an earlier condensate was formed and was removed from equilibrium with the gas.

  14. The geochemistry of rare earth elements in the Amazon River estuary

    SciTech Connect

    Shokovitz, E.R. )

    1993-05-01

    The estuarine geochemistry of rare earth elements (REEs) was studied using samples collected in the Amazon River estuary from the AmasSeds (Amazon Shelf SEDiment Study) cruise of August 1989. Extensive removal of dissolved (0.22 [mu]m filtered) trivalent REEs from river water occurs in the low (0--6) salinity region. Removal by the salt-induced coagulation of river colloids leads to fractionation among the REE(III) series; the order of removal is light REEs > middle REEs > heavy REEs. There also is the enhanced removal of Ce (relative to trivalent La and Nd) in the low salinity (0--6) zone and in the zone of high biological activity. This is the first field observation of strong Ce removal associated with coagulation of river colloids and biological productivity. The argument is made that the decrease in the Ce anomaly across a biological front is caused by biologically mediated oxidation of Ce(III) to Ce(IV). Coagulation of river colloids and biologically mediated oxidation of Ce(III) lead to fractionation of REE(III) and redox modification of Ce. These processes result in the REE composition becoming fractionated relative to the Amazon River water and crust and more evolved toward the REE composition of the oceans. This study implies that reactions in estuaries play significant, yet poorly understood roles in controlling the REE composition and Ce anomaly of the oceans. 46 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Rare earth elements tracing the soil erosion processes on slope surface under natural rainfall.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Mingyong; Tan, Shuduan; Dang, Haishan; Zhang, Quanfa

    2011-12-01

    A field experiment using rare earth elements (REEs) as tracers was conducted to investigate soil erosion processes on slope surfaces during rainfall events. A plot of 10m×2m×0.16m with a gradient of 20° (36.4%) was established and the plot was divided into two layers and four segments. Various REE tracers were applied to the different layers and segments to determine sediment dynamics under natural rainfall. Results indicated that sheet erosion accounted for more than 90% of total erosion when the rainfall amount and density was not large enough to generate concentrated flows. Sediment source changed in different sections on the slope surface, and the primary sediment source area tended to move upslope as erosion progressed. In rill erosion, sediment discharge mainly originated from the toe-slope and moved upwards as erosion intensified. The results obtained from this study suggest that multi-REE tracer technique is valuable in understanding the erosion processes and determining sediment sources.

  16. New Fission Fragment Distributions and r-Process Origin of the Rare-Earth Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goriely, S.; Sida, J.-L.; Lemaître, J.-F.; Panebianco, S.; Dubray, N.; Hilaire, S.; Bauswein, A.; Janka, H.-T.

    2013-12-01

    Neutron star (NS) merger ejecta offer a viable site for the production of heavy r-process elements with nuclear mass numbers A≳140. The crucial role of fission recycling is responsible for the robustness of this site against many astrophysical uncertainties, but calculations sensitively depend on nuclear physics. In particular, the fission fragment yields determine the creation of 110≲A≲170 nuclei. Here, we apply a new scission-point model, called SPY, to derive the fission fragment distribution (FFD) of all relevant neutron-rich, fissioning nuclei. The model predicts a doubly asymmetric FFD in the abundant A≃278 mass region that is responsible for the final recycling of the fissioning material. Using ejecta conditions based on relativistic NS merger calculations, we show that this specific FFD leads to a production of the A≃165 rare-earth peak that is nicely compatible with the abundance patterns in the Sun and metal-poor stars. This new finding further strengthens the case of NS mergers as possible dominant origin of r nuclei with A≳140.

  17. Rare earth element geochemistry of massive sulfides-sulfates and gossans on the Southern Explorer Ridge

    SciTech Connect

    Barrett, T.J. ); Jarvis, I. ); Jarvis, K.E. )

    1990-07-01

    Massive sulfide-sulfate deposits on the Southern Explorer Ridge were analyzed for 14 rare earth elements (REE) by a modified inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometric technique that included a correction for high Ba content. Bulk samples of finely intermixed sulfides, sulfate, and amorphous silica contain {Sigma}REE concentrations of {le} 6 ppm. REE patterns range from (1) strongly enriched in light REE with positive Eu anomalies, to (2) relatively flat with positive Eu anomalies and slightly negative Ce anomalies, to (3) slightly enriched in light REE with moderately negative Ce anomalies. Pattern 1 is similar to that of 300-350 C solutions discharging at vents on the East Pacific Rise and the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, whereas pattern 3 resembles REE distributions in normal oceanic bottom waters. The sulfide-sulfate patterns are interpreted to result from variable mixtures of hydrothermal and normal seawater. Barite in gossans capping the mounds has an REE pattern almost identical to patterns of high-temperature vent solutions. Hydrothermal barite has lower REE contents and a different REE pattern relative to hydrogenous barite formed slowly on the sea floor.

  18. Determination of Rare Earth Elements in Hypersaline Solutions Using Low-Volume, Liquid-Liquid Extraction.

    PubMed

    Noack, Clinton W; Dzombak, David A; Karamalidis, Athanasios K

    2015-08-18

    Complex, hypersaline brines-including those coproduced with oil and gas, rejected from desalination technologies, or used as working fluids for geothermal electricity generation-could contain critical materials such as the rare earth elements (REE) in valuable concentrations. Accurate quantitation of these analytes in complex, aqueous matrices is necessary for evaluation and implementation of systems aimed at recovering those critical materials. However, most analytical methods for measuring trace metals have not been validated for highly saline and/or chemically complex brines. Here we modified and optimized previously published liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) techniques using bis(2-ethylhexyl) phosphate as the extractant in a heptane diluent, and studied its efficacy for REE recovery as a function of three primary variables: background salinity (as NaCl), concentration of a competing species (here Fe), and concentration of dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Results showed that the modified LLE was robust to a range of salinity, Fe, and DOC concentrations studied as well as constant, elevated Ba concentrations. With proper characterization of the natural samples of interest, this method could be deployed for accurate analysis of REE in small volumes of hyper-saline and chemically complex brines. PMID:25920439

  19. Innovative Application of Mechanical Activation for Rare Earth Elements Recovering: Process Optimization and Mechanism Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Quanyin; Deng, Chao; Li, Jinhui

    2016-01-01

    With the rapidly expanding use of fluorescent lamps (FLs) and increasing interest in conservation and sustainable utilization of critical metals such as rare earth elements (REEs), the recovering of REEs from phosphors in waste FLs is becoming a critical environmental and economic issue. To effectively recycle REEs with metallurgical methods, mechanical activation by ball milling was introduced to pretreat the waste phosphors. This current study put the emphasis on the mechanical activation and leaching processes for REEs, and explored the feasibility of the method from both theoretical and practical standpoints. Results showed physicochemical changes of structural destruction and particle size reduction after mechanical activation, leading to the easy dissolution of REEs in the activated samples. Under optimal conditions, dissolution yields of 89.4%, 93.1% and 94.6% for Tb, Eu and Y, respectively, were achieved from activated waste phosphors using hydrochloric acid as the dissolution agent. The shrinking core model proved to be the most applicable for the leaching procedure, with an apparent activation energy of 10.96 ± 2.79 kJ/mol. This novel process indicates that mechanical activation is an efficient method for recovering REEs from waste phosphors, and it has promising potential for REE recovery with low cost and high efficiency.

  20. Determination of the rare-earth elements in geological materials by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lichte, F.E.; Meier, A.L.; Crock, J.G.

    1987-01-01

    A method of analysis of geological materials for the determination of the rare-earth elements using the Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometric technique (ICP-MS) has been developed. Instrumental parameters and factors affecting analytical results have been first studied and then optimized. Samples are analyzed directly following an acid digestion, without the need for separation or preconcentration with limits of detection of 2-11 ng/g, precision of ?? 2.5% relative standard deviation, and accuracy comparable to inductively coupled plasma emission spectrometry and instrumental neutron activation analysis. A commercially available ICP-MS instrument is used with modifications to the sample introduction system, torch, and sampler orifice to reduce the effects of high salt content of sample solutions prepared from geologic materials. Corrections for isobaric interferences from oxide ions and other diatomic and triatomic ions are made mathematically. Special internal standard procedures are used to compensate for drift in metahmetal oxide ratios and sensitivity. Reference standard values are used to verify the accuracy and utility of the method.

  1. Responses of plant calmodulin to endocytosis induced by rare earth elements.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lihong; Cheng, Mengzhu; Chu, Yunxia; Li, Xiaodong; Chen, David D Y; Huang, Xiaohua; Zhou, Qing

    2016-07-01

    The wide application of rare earth elements (REEs) have led to their diffusion and accumulation in the environment. The activation of endocytosis is the primary response of plant cells to REEs. Calmodulin (CaM), as an important substance in calcium (Ca) signaling systems, regulating almost all of the physiological activities in plants, such as cellular metabolism, cell growth and division. However, the response of CaM to endocytosis activated by REEs remains unknown. By using immunofluorescence labeling and a confocal laser scanning microscope, we found that trivalent lanthanum [La(III)], an REE ion, affected the expression of CaM in endocytosis. Using circular dichroism, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and computer simulations, we demonstrated that a low concentration of La(III) could interact with extracellular CaM by electrostatic attraction and was then bound to two Ca-binding sites of CaM, making the molecular structure more compact and orderly, whereas a high concentration of La(III) could be coordinated with cytoplasmic CaM or bound to other Ca-binding sites, making the molecular structure more loose and disorderly. Our results provide a reference for revealing the action mechanisms of REEs in plant cells.

  2. Recovery of Rare Earth Elements and Yttrium from Passive-Remediation Systems of Acid Mine Drainage.

    PubMed

    Ayora, Carlos; Macías, Francisco; Torres, Ester; Lozano, Alba; Carrero, Sergio; Nieto, José-Miguel; Pérez-López, Rafael; Fernández-Martínez, Alejandro; Castillo-Michel, Hiram

    2016-08-01

    Rare earth elements and yttrium (REY) are raw materials of increasing importance for modern technologies, and finding new sources has become a pressing need. Acid mine drainage (AMD) is commonly considered an environmental pollution issue. However, REY concentrations in AMD can be several orders of magnitude higher than in naturally occurring water bodies. With respect to shale standards, the REY distribution pattern in AMD is enriched in intermediate and valuable REY, such as Tb and Dy. The objective of the present work is to study the behavior of REY in AMD passive-remediation systems. Traditional AMD passive remediation systems are based on the reaction of AMD with calcite-based permeable substrates followed by decantation ponds. Experiments with two columns simulating AMD treatment demonstrate that schwertmannite does not accumulate REY, which, instead, are retained in the basaluminite residue. The same observation is made in two field-scale treatments from the Iberian Pyrite Belt (IPB, southwest Spain). On the basis of the amplitude of this process and on the extent of the IPB, our findings suggest that the proposed AMD remediation process can represent a modest but suitable REY source. In this sense, the IPB could function as a giant heap-leaching process of regional scale in which rain and oxygen act as natural driving forces with no energy investment. In addition to having environmental benefits of its treatment, AMD is expected to last for hundreds of years, and therefore, the total reserves are practically unlimited.

  3. Innovative Application of Mechanical Activation for Rare Earth Elements Recovering: Process Optimization and Mechanism Exploration.

    PubMed

    Tan, Quanyin; Deng, Chao; Li, Jinhui

    2016-01-28

    With the rapidly expanding use of fluorescent lamps (FLs) and increasing interest in conservation and sustainable utilization of critical metals such as rare earth elements (REEs), the recovering of REEs from phosphors in waste FLs is becoming a critical environmental and economic issue. To effectively recycle REEs with metallurgical methods, mechanical activation by ball milling was introduced to pretreat the waste phosphors. This current study put the emphasis on the mechanical activation and leaching processes for REEs, and explored the feasibility of the method from both theoretical and practical standpoints. Results showed physicochemical changes of structural destruction and particle size reduction after mechanical activation, leading to the easy dissolution of REEs in the activated samples. Under optimal conditions, dissolution yields of 89.4%, 93.1% and 94.6% for Tb, Eu and Y, respectively, were achieved from activated waste phosphors using hydrochloric acid as the dissolution agent. The shrinking core model proved to be the most applicable for the leaching procedure, with an apparent activation energy of 10.96 ± 2.79 kJ/mol. This novel process indicates that mechanical activation is an efficient method for recovering REEs from waste phosphors, and it has promising potential for REE recovery with low cost and high efficiency.

  4. Selective Extraction of Rare Earth Elements from Permanent Magnet Scraps with Membrane Solvent Extraction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Daejin; Powell, Lawrence E; Delmau, Lætitia H; Peterson, Eric S; Herchenroeder, Jim; Bhave, Ramesh R

    2015-08-18

    The rare earth elements (REEs) such as neodymium, praseodymium, and dysprosium were successfully recovered from commercial NdFeB magnets and industrial scrap magnets via membrane assisted solvent extraction (MSX). A hollow fiber membrane system was evaluated to extract REEs in a single step with the feed and strip solutions circulating continuously through the MSX system. The effects of several experimental variables on REE extraction such as flow rate, concentration of REEs in the feed solution, membrane configuration, and composition of acids were investigated with the MSX system. A multimembrane module configuration with REEs dissolved in aqueous nitric acid solutions showed high selectivity for REE extraction with no coextraction of non-REEs, whereas the use of aqueous hydrochloric acid solution resulted in coextraction of non-REEs due to the formation of chloroanions of non-REEs. The REE oxides were recovered from the strip solution through precipitation, drying, and annealing steps. The resulting REE oxides were characterized with XRD, SEM-EDX, and ICP-OES, demonstrating that the membrane assisted solvent extraction is capable of selectively recovering pure REEs from the industrial scrap magnets. PMID:26107531

  5. Innovative Application of Mechanical Activation for Rare Earth Elements Recovering: Process Optimization and Mechanism Exploration

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Quanyin; Deng, Chao; Li, Jinhui

    2016-01-01

    With the rapidly expanding use of fluorescent lamps (FLs) and increasing interest in conservation and sustainable utilization of critical metals such as rare earth elements (REEs), the recovering of REEs from phosphors in waste FLs is becoming a critical environmental and economic issue. To effectively recycle REEs with metallurgical methods, mechanical activation by ball milling was introduced to pretreat the waste phosphors. This current study put the emphasis on the mechanical activation and leaching processes for REEs, and explored the feasibility of the method from both theoretical and practical standpoints. Results showed physicochemical changes of structural destruction and particle size reduction after mechanical activation, leading to the easy dissolution of REEs in the activated samples. Under optimal conditions, dissolution yields of 89.4%, 93.1% and 94.6% for Tb, Eu and Y, respectively, were achieved from activated waste phosphors using hydrochloric acid as the dissolution agent. The shrinking core model proved to be the most applicable for the leaching procedure, with an apparent activation energy of 10.96 ± 2.79 kJ/mol. This novel process indicates that mechanical activation is an efficient method for recovering REEs from waste phosphors, and it has promising potential for REE recovery with low cost and high efficiency. PMID:26819083

  6. Novel rare earth ions-doped oxyfluoride nano-composite with efficient upconversion white-light emission

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Daqin; Wang Yuansheng Yu Yunlong; Huang Ping; Weng Fangyi

    2008-10-15

    Transparent SiO{sub 2}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-NaF-YF{sub 3} bulk nano-composites triply doped with Ho{sup 3+}, Tm{sup 3+} and Yb{sup 3+} were fabricated by melt-quenching and subsequent heating. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy measurements demonstrated the homogeneous precipitation of the {beta}-YF{sub 3} crystals with mean size of 20 nm among the glass matrix, and rare earth ions were found to partition into these nano-crystals. Under single 976 nm laser excitation, intense red, green and blue upconversion emissions were simultaneously observed owing to the successive energy transfer from Yb{sup 3+} to Ho{sup 3+} or Tm{sup 3+}. Various colors of luminescence, including bright perfect white light, can be easily tuned by adjusting the concentrations of the rare earth ions in the material. The overall energy efficiency of the white-light upconversion was estimated to be about 0.2%. - Graphical abstract: Under single 976 nm laser excitation, intense red, green and blue upconversion emissions were simultaneously observed owing to the successive energy transfer from Yb{sup 3+} to Ho{sup 3+} or Tm{sup 3+}. Various colors of luminescence, including bright perfect white light with CIE-X=0.351 and CIE-Y=0.306, can be easily tuned by adjusting the concentrations of the rare earth ions in the transparent oxyfluoride glass ceramics.

  7. [Indirect determination of rare earth elements in Chinese herbal medicines by hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Zeng, Chao; Lu, Jian-Ping; Xue, Min-Hua; Tan, Fang-Wei; Wu, Xiao-Yan

    2014-07-01

    Based on their similarity in chemical properties, rare earth elements were able to form stable coordinated compounds with arsenazo III which were extractable into butanol in the presence of diphenylguanidine. The butanol was removed under reduced pressure distillation; the residue was dissolved with diluted hydrochloric acid. As was released with the assistance of KMnO4 and determined by hydrogen generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry in terms of rare earth elements. When cesium sulfate worked as standard solution, extraction conditions, KMnO4 amount, distillation temperature, arsenazo III amount, interfering ions, etc were optimized. The accuracy and precision of the method were validated using national standard certified materials, showing a good agreement. Under optimum condition, the linear relationship located in 0.2-25 microg x mL(-1) and detection limit was 0.44 microg x mL(-1). After the herbal samples were digested with nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide, the rare earth elements were determined by this method, showing satisfactory results with relative standard deviation of 1.3%-2.5%, and recoveries of 94.4%-106.0%. The method showed the merits of convenience and rapidness, simple instrumentation and high accuracy. With the rare earths enriched into organic phase, the separation of analytes from matrix was accomplished, which eliminated the interference. With the residue dissolved by diluted hydrochloric acid after the solvent was removed, aqueous sample introduction eliminated the impact of organic phase on the tubing connected to pneumatic pump. PMID:25269316

  8. [Indirect determination of rare earth elements in Chinese herbal medicines by hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Zeng, Chao; Lu, Jian-Ping; Xue, Min-Hua; Tan, Fang-Wei; Wu, Xiao-Yan

    2014-07-01

    Based on their similarity in chemical properties, rare earth elements were able to form stable coordinated compounds with arsenazo III which were extractable into butanol in the presence of diphenylguanidine. The butanol was removed under reduced pressure distillation; the residue was dissolved with diluted hydrochloric acid. As was released with the assistance of KMnO4 and determined by hydrogen generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry in terms of rare earth elements. When cesium sulfate worked as standard solution, extraction conditions, KMnO4 amount, distillation temperature, arsenazo III amount, interfering ions, etc were optimized. The accuracy and precision of the method were validated using national standard certified materials, showing a good agreement. Under optimum condition, the linear relationship located in 0.2-25 microg x mL(-1) and detection limit was 0.44 microg x mL(-1). After the herbal samples were digested with nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide, the rare earth elements were determined by this method, showing satisfactory results with relative standard deviation of 1.3%-2.5%, and recoveries of 94.4%-106.0%. The method showed the merits of convenience and rapidness, simple instrumentation and high accuracy. With the rare earths enriched into organic phase, the separation of analytes from matrix was accomplished, which eliminated the interference. With the residue dissolved by diluted hydrochloric acid after the solvent was removed, aqueous sample introduction eliminated the impact of organic phase on the tubing connected to pneumatic pump.

  9. Rare-earth-doped materials with application to optical signal processing, quantum information science, and medical imaging technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cone, R. L.; Thiel, C. W.; Sun, Y.; Böttger, Thomas; Macfarlane, R. M.

    2012-02-01

    Unique spectroscopic properties of isolated rare earth ions in solids offer optical linewidths rivaling those of trapped single atoms and enable a variety of recent applications. We design rare-earth-doped crystals, ceramics, and fibers with persistent or transient "spectral hole" recording properties for applications including high-bandwidth optical signal processing where light and our solids replace the high-bandwidth portion of the electronics; quantum cryptography and information science including the goal of storage and recall of single photons; and medical imaging technology for the 700-900 nm therapeutic window. Ease of optically manipulating rare-earth ions in solids enables capturing complex spectral information in 105 to 108 frequency bins. Combining spatial holography and spectral hole burning provides a capability for processing high-bandwidth RF and optical signals with sub-MHz spectral resolution and bandwidths of tens to hundreds of GHz for applications including range-Doppler radar and high bandwidth RF spectral analysis. Simply stated, one can think of these crystals as holographic recording media capable of distinguishing up to 108 different colors. Ultra-narrow spectral holes also serve as a vibration-insensitive sub-kHz frequency reference for laser frequency stabilization to a part in 1013 over tens of milliseconds. The unusual properties and applications of spectral hole burning of rare earth ions in optical materials are reviewed. Experimental results on the promising Tm3+:LiNbO3 material system are presented and discussed for medical imaging applications. Finally, a new application of these materials as dynamic optical filters for laser noise suppression is discussed along with experimental demonstrations and theoretical modeling of the process.

  10. Rare earth-doped lead borate glasses and transparent glass-ceramics: structure-property relationship.

    PubMed

    Pisarski, W A; Pisarska, J; Mączka, M; Lisiecki, R; Grobelny, Ł; Goryczka, T; Dominiak-Dzik, G; Ryba-Romanowski, W

    2011-08-15

    Correlation between structure and optical properties of rare earth ions in lead borate glasses and glass-ceramics was evidenced by X-ray-diffraction, Raman, FT-IR and luminescence spectroscopy. The rare earths were limited to Eu(3+) and Er(3+) ions. The observed BO(3)↔BO(4) conversion strongly depends on the relative PbO/B(2)O(3) ratios in glass composition, giving important contribution to the luminescence intensities associated to (5)D(0)-(7)F(2) and (5)D(0)-(7)F(1) transitions of Eu(3+). The near-infrared luminescence and up-conversion spectra for Er(3+) ions in lead borate glasses before and after heat treatment were measured. The more intense and narrowing luminescence lines suggest partial incorporation of Er(3+) ions into the orthorhombic PbF(2) crystalline phase, which was identified using X-ray diffraction analysis. PMID:21093353

  11. Rare earth elements (REEs): effects on germination and growth of selected crop and native plant species.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Philippe J; Carpenter, David; Boutin, Céline; Allison, Jane E

    2014-02-01

    The phytotoxicity of rare earth elements (REEs) is still poorly understood. The exposure-response relationships of three native Canadian plant species (common milkweed, Asclepias syriaca L., showy ticktrefoil, Desmodium canadense (L.) DC. and switchgrass, Panicum virgatum L.) and two commonly used crop species (radish, Raphanus sativus L., and tomato, Solanum lycopersicum L.) to the REEs lanthanum (La), yttrium (Y) and cerium (Ce) were tested. In separate experiments, seven to eight doses of each element were added to the soil prior to sowing seeds. Effects of REE dose on germination were established through measures of total percent germination and speed of germination; effects on growth were established through determination of above ground biomass. Ce was also tested at two pH levels and plant tissue analysis was conducted on pooled samples. Effects on germination were mostly observed with Ce at low pH. However, effects on growth were more pronounced, with detectable inhibition concentrations causing 10% and 25% reductions in biomass for the two native forb species (A. syriaca and D. canadense) with all REEs and on all species tested with Ce in both soil pH treatments. Concentration of Ce in aboveground biomass was lower than root Ce content, and followed the dose-response trend. From values measured in natural soils around the world, our results continue to support the notion that REEs are of limited toxicity and not considered extremely hazardous to the environment. However, in areas where REE contamination is likely, the slow accumulation of these elements in the environment could become problematic.

  12. Rare earth elements (REEs): effects on germination and growth of selected crop and native plant species.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Philippe J; Carpenter, David; Boutin, Céline; Allison, Jane E

    2014-02-01

    The phytotoxicity of rare earth elements (REEs) is still poorly understood. The exposure-response relationships of three native Canadian plant species (common milkweed, Asclepias syriaca L., showy ticktrefoil, Desmodium canadense (L.) DC. and switchgrass, Panicum virgatum L.) and two commonly used crop species (radish, Raphanus sativus L., and tomato, Solanum lycopersicum L.) to the REEs lanthanum (La), yttrium (Y) and cerium (Ce) were tested. In separate experiments, seven to eight doses of each element were added to the soil prior to sowing seeds. Effects of REE dose on germination were established through measures of total percent germination and speed of germination; effects on growth were established through determination of above ground biomass. Ce was also tested at two pH levels and plant tissue analysis was conducted on pooled samples. Effects on germination were mostly observed with Ce at low pH. However, effects on growth were more pronounced, with detectable inhibition concentrations causing 10% and 25% reductions in biomass for the two native forb species (A. syriaca and D. canadense) with all REEs and on all species tested with Ce in both soil pH treatments. Concentration of Ce in aboveground biomass was lower than root Ce content, and followed the dose-response trend. From values measured in natural soils around the world, our results continue to support the notion that REEs are of limited toxicity and not considered extremely hazardous to the environment. However, in areas where REE contamination is likely, the slow accumulation of these elements in the environment could become problematic. PMID:23978671

  13. Rare-earth-doped biological composites as in vivo shortwave infrared reporters

    PubMed Central

    Naczynski, D.J.; Tan, M.C.; Zevon, M.; Wall, B.; Kohl, J.; Kulesa, A.; Chen, S.; Roth, C.M.; Riman, R.E.; Moghe, P.V.

    2013-01-01

    The extension of in vivo optical imaging for disease screening and image-guided surgical interventions requires brightly-emitting, tissue-specific materials that optically transmit through living tissue and can be imaged with portable systems that display data in real-time. Recent work suggests that a new window across the short wavelength infrared region can improve in vivo imaging sensitivity over near infrared light. Here we report on the first evidence of multispectral, real-time short wavelength infrared imaging offering anatomical resolution using brightly-emitting rare-earth nanomaterials and demonstrate their applicability toward disease-targeted imaging. Inorganic-protein nanocomposites of rare-earth nanomaterials with human serum albumin facilitated systemic biodistribution of the rare-earth nanomaterials resulting in the increased accumulation and retention in tumor tissue that was visualized by the localized enhancement of infrared signal intensity. Our findings lay the groundwork for a new generation of versatile, biomedical nanomaterials that can advance disease monitoring based on a pioneering infrared imaging technique. PMID:23873342

  14. Rare-earth-doped biological composites as in vivo shortwave infrared reporters.

    PubMed

    Naczynski, D J; Tan, M C; Zevon, M; Wall, B; Kohl, J; Kulesa, A; Chen, S; Roth, C M; Riman, R E; Moghe, P V

    2013-01-01

    The extension of in vivo optical imaging for disease screening and image-guided surgical interventions requires brightly emitting, tissue-specific materials that optically transmit through living tissue and can be imaged with portable systems that display data in real-time. Recent work suggests that a new window across the short-wavelength infrared region can improve in vivo imaging sensitivity over near infrared light. Here we report on the first evidence of multispectral, real-time short-wavelength infrared imaging offering anatomical resolution using brightly emitting rare-earth nanomaterials and demonstrate their applicability toward disease-targeted imaging. Inorganic-protein nanocomposites of rare-earth nanomaterials with human serum albumin facilitated systemic biodistribution of the rare-earth nanomaterials resulting in the increased accumulation and retention in tumour tissue that was visualized by the localized enhancement of infrared signal intensity. Our findings lay the groundwork for a new generation of versatile, biomedical nanomaterials that can advance disease monitoring based on a pioneering infrared imaging technique. PMID:23873342

  15. Flame synthesis and characterization of rare-earth (Er3+, Ho3+, and Tm3+) doped upconversion nanophosphors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Xiao; Yokomori, Takeshi; Ju, Yiguang

    2007-02-01

    Rare-earth doped yttria upconversion nanophosphors were synthesized using a single-step gas-phase flame synthesis method. The phosphors were characterized by x-ray diffractometry, transmission electron microscopy, and fluorescence spectroscopy. The dependence of multiphoton emissions on excitation power was examined. The results show that particle size, morphology, and photoluminescence intensity are strongly affected by flame temperature. The as-prepared nanophosphors are mostly single crystallites with an average size less than 30nm. Under laser diode excitation, bright blue, green, and red emissions are visible from these phosphors which show potential applications in biological imaging and photodynamic therapy.

  16. Rare earth doped SnO2 nanoscaled powders and coatings: enhanced photoluminescence in water and waveguiding properties.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, R R; Messaddeq, Y; Aegerter, M A; Ribeiro, S J L

    2011-03-01

    Luminescent Eu3+ and Er3+ doped SnO2 powders have been prepared by Sn4+ hydrolysis followed by a controlled growth reaction using a particle's surface modifier in order to avoid particles aggregation. The powders so obtained doped with up to 2 mol% rare earth ions are fully redispersable in water at pH > 8 and present the cassiterite structure. Particles size range from 3 to 10 nm as determined by Photon Correlation Spectroscopy. Rare earth ions were found to be essentially incorporated into the cassiterite structure, substituting for Sn4+, for doping concentration smaller than 0.05 mol%. For higher concentration they are also located at the particles surface. The presence of Eu3+ ions at the surface of the particles hinder their growth and has therefore allowed the preparation of new materials consisting of water redispersable powders coated with Eu(3+)-beta diketonate complexes. Enhanced UV excited photoluminescence was observed in water. SnO2 single layers with thickness up to 200 nm and multilayer coatings were spin coated on borosilicate glass substrates from the colloidal suspensions. Waveguiding properties were evaluated by the prism coupling technique. For a 0.3 microm planar waveguide single propagating mode was observed with attenuation coefficient of 3.5 dB/cm at 632.8 nm. PMID:21449404

  17. Use of thulium-sensitized rare earth-doped low phonon energy crystalline hosts for IR sources.

    PubMed

    Ganem, Joseph; Bowman, Steven R

    2013-11-01

    Crystalline hosts with low phonon energies enable novel energy transfer processes when doped with rare earth ions. Two applications of energy transfer for rare earth ions in thulium-sensitized low phonon energy crystals that result in infrared luminescence are discussed. One application is an endothermic, phonon-assisted cross-relaxation process in thulium-doped yttrium chloride that converts lattice phonons to infrared emission, which raises the possibility of a fundamentally new method for achieving solid-state optical cooling. The other application is an optically pumped mid-IR phosphor using thulium-praseodymium-doped potassium lead chloride that converts 805-nm diode light to broadband emission from 4,000 to 5,500 nm. These two applications in chloride crystals are discussed in terms of critical radii calculated from Forster-Dexter energy transfer theory. It is found that the critical radii for electric dipole-dipole interactions in low phonon energy chloride crystals are comparable to those in conventional oxide and fluoride crystals. It is the reduction in multi-phonon relaxation rates in chloride crystals that enable these additional energy transfer processes and infrared luminescence.

  18. Use of thulium-sensitized rare earth-doped low phonon energy crystalline hosts for IR sources

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Crystalline hosts with low phonon energies enable novel energy transfer processes when doped with rare earth ions. Two applications of energy transfer for rare earth ions in thulium-sensitized low phonon energy crystals that result in infrared luminescence are discussed. One application is an endothermic, phonon-assisted cross-relaxation process in thulium-doped yttrium chloride that converts lattice phonons to infrared emission, which raises the possibility of a fundamentally new method for achieving solid-state optical cooling. The other application is an optically pumped mid-IR phosphor using thulium-praseodymium-doped potassium lead chloride that converts 805-nm diode light to broadband emission from 4,000 to 5,500 nm. These two applications in chloride crystals are discussed in terms of critical radii calculated from Forster-Dexter energy transfer theory. It is found that the critical radii for electric dipole-dipole interactions in low phonon energy chloride crystals are comparable to those in conventional oxide and fluoride crystals. It is the reduction in multi-phonon relaxation rates in chloride crystals that enable these additional energy transfer processes and infrared luminescence. PMID:24180684

  19. Use of thulium-sensitized rare earth-doped low phonon energy crystalline hosts for IR sources.

    PubMed

    Ganem, Joseph; Bowman, Steven R

    2013-01-01

    Crystalline hosts with low phonon energies enable novel energy transfer processes when doped with rare earth ions. Two applications of energy transfer for rare earth ions in thulium-sensitized low phonon energy crystals that result in infrared luminescence are discussed. One application is an endothermic, phonon-assisted cross-relaxation process in thulium-doped yttrium chloride that converts lattice phonons to infrared emission, which raises the possibility of a fundamentally new method for achieving solid-state optical cooling. The other application is an optically pumped mid-IR phosphor using thulium-praseodymium-doped potassium lead chloride that converts 805-nm diode light to broadband emission from 4,000 to 5,500 nm. These two applications in chloride crystals are discussed in terms of critical radii calculated from Forster-Dexter energy transfer theory. It is found that the critical radii for electric dipole-dipole interactions in low phonon energy chloride crystals are comparable to those in conventional oxide and fluoride crystals. It is the reduction in multi-phonon relaxation rates in chloride crystals that enable these additional energy transfer processes and infrared luminescence. PMID:24180684

  20. Use of thulium-sensitized rare earth-doped low phonon energy crystalline hosts for IR sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganem, Joseph; Bowman, Steven R.

    2013-11-01

    Crystalline hosts with low phonon energies enable novel energy transfer processes when doped with rare earth ions. Two applications of energy transfer for rare earth ions in thulium-sensitized low phonon energy crystals that result in infrared luminescence are discussed. One application is an endothermic, phonon-assisted cross-relaxation process in thulium-doped yttrium chloride that converts lattice phonons to infrared emission, which raises the possibility of a fundamentally new method for achieving solid-state optical cooling. The other application is an optically pumped mid-IR phosphor using thulium-praseodymium-doped potassium lead chloride that converts 805-nm diode light to broadband emission from 4,000 to 5,500 nm. These two applications in chloride crystals are discussed in terms of critical radii calculated from Forster-Dexter energy transfer theory. It is found that the critical radii for electric dipole-dipole interactions in low phonon energy chloride crystals are comparable to those in conventional oxide and fluoride crystals. It is the reduction in multi-phonon relaxation rates in chloride crystals that enable these additional energy transfer processes and infrared luminescence.

  1. Bioavailable concentrations of germanium and rare earth elements in soil fractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hentschel, Werner; Wiche, Oliver

    2015-04-01

    As there is an increasing demand for germanium and the rare earth elements due to their diverse application in modern technologies (optical cables, permanent magnets in wind power stations), there is an interest to investigate a new approach to extract these ubiquitous but disperse existing elements - via Phytomining. But before this method can be established, a thorough understanding of processes regarding the intake of germanium (Ge) and the rare earth elements (REEs) is necessary. The aim of this work was to get insights or hints on correlations between the concentrations and the fractionation of Ge and REEs in the soil and the concentrations in plants - in other words we wanted to conduct research on bioavailable concentrations of Ge and REEs in soil fractions. On 18 sites situated around Freiberg, Saxony we took samples of soil and plants. To extract the elements from the plant material a decomposition with hydrofluoric acid was used. The soil samples was examined by a sequential extraction with seven steps (mobile, carbonatic, oxidisable, amorphic oxides, crystalline oxides, phytoliths and secondary clay minerals, residual or siliceous). The amounts of the REEs showed a high correlation between each other, so neodymium can be regarded as a proxy for all REEs. The average total amount of Ge in the soil samples was around 1.45 mg/kg, the one of neodymium (Nd) was around 25 mg/kg. Both values equal the overall average in the earth crust. Concerning the Ge concentration in soil the residual siliceous fractions constituted for 70% of total, whereas the fractions V and VI - dedicated as crystalline oxides and phytoliths/secondary clay minerals - made out for 25%. Only 5% of the total amount of Ge in soil accounted for the fractions I to IV. There was found a statistical significant correlation between the absolute Ge concentrations in these latter soil fractions with the Ge concentration in plant material of the same site. Therefore it seems that the fractions I to

  2. The unusually high Tc in rare-earth-doped single crystalline CaFe2As2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Fengyan; Lv, Bing; Deng, Liangzi; Meen, James K.; Xue, Yu-Yi; Chu, Ching-Wu

    2014-08-01

    In rare-earth-doped single crystalline CaFe2As2, the mysterious small volume fraction which superconducts up to 49 K, much higher than the bulk Tc ~ 30 s K, has prompted a long search for a hidden variable that could enhance the Tc by more than 30% in iron-based superconductors of the same structure. Here we report a chemical, structural and magnetic study of CaFe2As2 systematically doped with La, Ce, Pr and Nd. Coincident with the high Tc phase, we find extreme magnetic anisotropy, accompanied by an unexpected doping-independent Tc and equally unexpected superparamagnetic clusters associated with As vacancies. These observations lead us to conjecture that the tantalizing Tc enhancement may be associated with naturally occurring chemical interfaces and may thus provide a new paradigm in the search for superconductors with higher Tc.

  3. Structural, morphological and spectroscopic properties of Eu{sup 3+}-doped rare earth fluorides synthesized by the hydrothermalmethod

    SciTech Connect

    Grzyb, Tomasz; Runowski, Marcin; Szczeszak, Agata; Lis, Stefan

    2013-04-15

    Rare earth fluorides (REF{sub 3}, RE=Y, La, Gd or Yb) doped with 5% of Eu{sup 3+} ions were synthesized via the hydrothermal method and their physicochemical properties were compared. The synthesis was carried out in an aqueous medium at elevated pressure and temperature. The reaction was performed in situ, with use of NaBF{sub 4} as a source of fluoride ions. Structural and morphological properties of obtained nanophosphors were characterized with the use of powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Raman spectroscopy. Synthesized products were nanocrystalline with hexagonal or orthorhombic crystal structures. They showed different morphology, from nanoplates to nanorings, depending on the used REF{sub 3} fluoride as the host for the Eu{sup 3+} ions. The elemental composition was confirmed by the energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) results. Spectroscopic properties were investigated by measuring the excitation and emission spectra. Also luminescence lifetimes were determined. The synthesized materials showed bright red luminescence, due to the presence of Eu{sup 3+} ions in their structure. - Graphical abstract: Luminescence spectra of the REF{sub 3}:Eu{sup 3+} (RE=Y, La, Gd and Yb) fluorides and their TEM images as background. Highlights: ► Nanocrystalline fluorides were synthesized using modified hydrothermal method. ► Structural and morphological properties of in situ prepared nanomaterials were studied. ► Luminescence properties of REF{sub 3}:Eu{sup 3+} (RE=Y, La, Gd, Yb) were compared and investigated.

  4. Trends in the Rare Earth Element Content of U.S.-Based Coal Combustion Fly Ashes.

    PubMed

    Taggart, Ross K; Hower, James C; Dwyer, Gary S; Hsu-Kim, Heileen

    2016-06-01

    Rare earth elements (REEs) are critical and strategic materials in the defense, energy, electronics, and automotive industries. The reclamation of REEs from coal combustion fly ash has been proposed as a way to supplement REE mining. However, the typical REE contents in coal fly ash, particularly in the United States, have not been comprehensively documented or compared among the major types of coal feedstocks that determine fly ash composition. The objective of this study was to characterize a broad selection of U.S. fly ashes of varied geological origin in order to rank their potential for REE recovery. The total and nitric acid-extractable REE content for more than 100 ash samples were correlated with characteristics such as the major element content and coal basin to elucidate trends in REE enrichment. Average total REE content (defined as the sum of the lanthanides, yttrium, and scandium) for ashes derived from Appalachian sources was 591 mg kg(-1) and significantly greater than in ashes from Illinois and Powder River basin coals (403 and 337 mg kg(-1), respectively). The fraction of critical REEs (Nd, Eu, Tb, Dy, Y, and Er) in the fly ashes was 34-38% of the total and considerably higher than in conventional ores (typically less than 15%). Powder River Basin ashes had the highest extractable REE content, with 70% of the total REE recovered by heated nitric acid digestion. This is likely due to the higher calcium content of Powder River Basin ashes, which enhances their solubility in nitric acid. Sc, Nd, and Dy were the major contributors to the total REE value in fly ash, based on their contents and recent market prices. Overall, this study shows that coal fly ash production could provide a substantial domestic supply of REEs, but the feasibility of recovery depends on the development of extraction technologies that could be tailored to the major mineral content and origins of the feed coal for the ash. PMID:27228215

  5. Trends in the Rare Earth Element Content of U.S.-Based Coal Combustion Fly Ashes.

    PubMed

    Taggart, Ross K; Hower, James C; Dwyer, Gary S; Hsu-Kim, Heileen

    2016-06-01

    Rare earth elements (REEs) are critical and strategic materials in the defense, energy, electronics, and automotive industries. The reclamation of REEs from coal combustion fly ash has been proposed as a way to supplement REE mining. However, the typical REE contents in coal fly ash, particularly in the United States, have not been comprehensively documented or compared among the major types of coal feedstocks that determine fly ash composition. The objective of this study was to characterize a broad selection of U.S. fly ashes of varied geological origin in order to rank their potential for REE recovery. The total and nitric acid-extractable REE content for more than 100 ash samples were correlated with characteristics such as the major element content and coal basin to elucidate trends in REE enrichment. Average total REE content (defined as the sum of the lanthanides, yttrium, and scandium) for ashes derived from Appalachian sources was 591 mg kg(-1) and significantly greater than in ashes from Illinois and Powder River basin coals (403 and 337 mg kg(-1), respectively). The fraction of critical REEs (Nd, Eu, Tb, Dy, Y, and Er) in the fly ashes was 34-38% of the total and considerably higher than in conventional ores (typically less than 15%). Powder River Basin ashes had the highest extractable REE content, with 70% of the total REE recovered by heated nitric acid digestion. This is likely due to the higher calcium content of Powder River Basin ashes, which enhances their solubility in nitric acid. Sc, Nd, and Dy were the major contributors to the total REE value in fly ash, based on their contents and recent market prices. Overall, this study shows that coal fly ash production could provide a substantial domestic supply of REEs, but the feasibility of recovery depends on the development of extraction technologies that could be tailored to the major mineral content and origins of the feed coal for the ash.

  6. Rare earth elements in the phosphatic-enriched sediment of the Peru shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Piper, D.Z.; Baedecker, P.A.; Crock, J.G.; Burnett, W.C.; Loebner, B.J.

    1988-01-01

    Apatite-enriched materials from the Peru shelf have been analyzed for their major oxide and rare earth element (REE) concentrations. The samples consist of (1) the fine fraction of sediment, mostly clay material, (2) phosphatic pellets and fish debris, which are dispersed throughout the fine-grained sediment, (3) tabular-shaped phosphatic crusts, which occur within the uppermost few centimeters of sediment, and (4) phosphatic nodules, which occur on the seafloor. The bulk REE concentrations of the concretions suggest that these elements are partitioned between the enclosed detrital material and the apatite fraction. Analysis of the fine-grained sediment with which the samples are associated suggested that this detrital fraction in the concretions should have shale REE values; the analysis of the fish debris suggested that the apatite fraction might have seawater values. The seawater contribution of REE's is negligible in the nodules and crust, in which the apatite occurs as a fine-grained interstitial cement. That is, the concentration of REE's and the REE patterns are predominantly a function of the amount of enclosed fine-grained sediment. By contrast, the REE pattern of the pelletal apatite suggests a seawater source and the absolute REE concentrations are relatively high. The REE P2O5 ratios of the apatite fraction of these samples thus vary from approximately zero (in the case of the crust and nodules) to as much as approximately 1.2 ?? 10-3 (in the case of the pellets). The range of this ratio suggests that rather subtle variations in the depositional environment might cause a significant variation in the REE content of this authigenic fraction of the sediment. Pelletal glauconite was also recovered from one sediment core. Its REE concentrations closely resemble those of the fish debris. ?? 1988.

  7. Health effects and toxicity mechanisms of rare earth elements-Knowledge gaps and research prospects.

    PubMed

    Pagano, Giovanni; Guida, Marco; Tommasi, Franca; Oral, Rahime

    2015-05-01

    In the recent decades, rare earth elements (REE) have undergone a steady spread in several industrial and medical applications, and in agriculture. Relatively scarce information has been acquired to date on REE-associated biological effects, from studies of bioaccumulation and of bioassays on animal, plant and models; a few case reports have focused on human health effects following occupational REE exposures, in the present lack of epidemiological studies of occupationally exposed groups. The literature is mostly confined to reports on few REE, namely cerium and lanthanum, whereas substantial information gaps persist on the health effects of other REE. An established action mechanism in REE-associated health effects relates to modulating oxidative stress, analogous to the recognized redox mechanisms observed for other transition elements. Adverse outcomes of REE exposures include a number of endpoints, such as growth inhibition, cytogenetic effects, and organ-specific toxicity. An apparent controversy regarding REE-associated health effects relates to opposed data pointing to either favorable or adverse effects of REE exposures. Several studies have demonstrated that REE, like a number of other xenobiotics, follow hormetic concentration-related trends, implying stimulatory or protective effects at low levels, then adverse effects at higher concentrations. Another major role for REE-associated effects should be focused on pH-dependent REE speciation and hence toxicity. Few reports have demonstrated that environmental acidification enhances REE toxicity; these data may assume particular relevance in REE-polluted acidic soils and in REE mining areas characterized by concomitant REE and acid pollution. The likely environmental threats arising from REE exposures deserve a new line of research efforts.

  8. Key Factors Controlling Space- and Time-Linked Rare Earth Element Distribution in Shallow Groundwaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dia, A.; Gruau, G.; Olivie-Lauquet, G.; Henin, O.; Petitjean, P.; Le Coz-Bouhnik, M.

    2001-12-01

    This study investigates the effects of source-rock composition, redox changes and organic matter on the hydrochemistry of Rare Earth Elements (REE). Wetland groundwater samples as well as upland zone water samples were recovered weekly over a six month period (January to June 1999) from a small catchment (Petit Hermitage, France). The samples were filtered on the field using membrane filters of 0.22 μ m pore size, and then analyzed for their Dissolved Organic Carbon (DOC) as well as Fe, Mn, Al, Th, U and REE concentrations. The results are discussed in conjunction with previous published DOC and trace-element concentrations obtained on comparable samples from three other small catchments, namely : the Nsimi-Zoetele, Goyoum (both in Cameroon) and Kervidy/Coet-Dan (France) catchments (Viers et al., 1997; Braun et al., 1998; Dia et al., 2000). Despite marked differences (such as bioclimatic conditions, vegetation cover, basement rock composition or human activity), results are surprisingly similar with always the occurrence of two spatially distinct groundwater types including : (i) a shallow, organic-rich groundwater below wetlands recording high and variable REE contents and displaying slight or no negative Ce anomaly. In the wetland groundwaters, the REE and other trace-element concentrations seem to be controlled by seasonal dynamics, involving both temperature, whose onset at spring leads to higher organic carbon decomposition rates by microbial mass, and redox changes resulting in REE and other-trace element release in water when mineral phases occur to dissolve. (ii) The second groundwater type corresponds to a shallow, organic-poor groundwater type located below the hillslope domains. This second groundwater type displays lower REE (and other trace-element) concentrations, but distinguish from the former by the occurrence of very strong negative Ce anomalies, whose amplitude is variable, but appears to be linked to the sampling location along the catena. The

  9. Rare earth elements minimal harvest year variation facilitates robust geographical origin discrimination: The case of PDO "Fava Santorinis".

    PubMed

    Drivelos, Spiros A; Danezis, Georgios P; Haroutounian, Serkos A; Georgiou, Constantinos A

    2016-12-15

    This study examines the trace and rare earth elemental (REE) fingerprint variations of PDO (Protected Designation of Origin) "Fava Santorinis" over three consecutive harvesting years (2011-2013). Classification of samples in harvesting years was studied by performing discriminant analysis (DA), k nearest neighbours (κ-NN), partial least squares (PLS) analysis and probabilistic neural networks (PNN) using rare earth elements and trace metals determined using ICP-MS. DA performed better than κ-NN, producing 100% discrimination using trace elements and 79% using REEs. PLS was found to be superior to PNN, achieving 99% and 90% classification for trace and REEs, respectively, while PNN achieved 96% and 71% classification for trace and REEs, respectively. The information obtained using REEs did not enhance classification, indicating that REEs vary minimally per harvesting year, providing robust geographical origin discrimination. The results show that seasonal patterns can occur in the elemental composition of "Fava Santorinis", probably reflecting seasonality of climate. PMID:27451177

  10. Rare earth elements minimal harvest year variation facilitates robust geographical origin discrimination: The case of PDO "Fava Santorinis".

    PubMed

    Drivelos, Spiros A; Danezis, Georgios P; Haroutounian, Serkos A; Georgiou, Constantinos A

    2016-12-15

    This study examines the trace and rare earth elemental (REE) fingerprint variations of PDO (Protected Designation of Origin) "Fava Santorinis" over three consecutive harvesting years (2011-2013). Classification of samples in harvesting years was studied by performing discriminant analysis (DA), k nearest neighbours (κ-NN), partial least squares (PLS) analysis and probabilistic neural networks (PNN) using rare earth elements and trace metals determined using ICP-MS. DA performed better than κ-NN, producing 100% discrimination using trace elements and 79% using REEs. PLS was found to be superior to PNN, achieving 99% and 90% classification for trace and REEs, respectively, while PNN achieved 96% and 71% classification for trace and REEs, respectively. The information obtained using REEs did not enhance classification, indicating that REEs vary minimally per harvesting year, providing robust geographical origin discrimination. The results show that seasonal patterns can occur in the elemental composition of "Fava Santorinis", probably reflecting seasonality of climate.

  11. Genesis of the central zone of the Nolans Bore rare earth element deposit, Northern Territory, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoneveld, Louise; Spandler, Carl; Hussey, Kelvin

    2015-08-01

    The Nolans Bore rare earth element (REE) deposit consists of a network of fluorapatite-bearing veins and breccias hosted within Proterozoic granulites of the Reynolds Range, Central Australia. Mineralisation is divided into three zones (north, central, and south-east), with the north and south-east zones consisting of massive REE-bearing fluorapatite veins, with minor brecciation and carbonate infill. The central zone is distinctively different in mineralogy and structure; it features extensive brecciation, a high allanite content, and a large, epidote-rich enveloping alteration zone. The central zone is a reworking of the original solid apatite veins that formed during the Chewings Orogeny at ca. 1525 Ma. These original apatite veins are thought to derive from phosphate-rich magmatic-hydrothermal fluid exsolved from as-yet unrecognised alkaline magmatic bodies at depth. We define four ore breccia types (BX1-4) in the central zone on the basis of detailed petrological and geochemical analysis of drillcore and thin sections. BX1 ore comprises fluorapatite with minor crackle brecciation with carbonate infill and resembles ore of the north and south-east zones. Breccia types BX2, BX3, and BX4 represent progressive stages of ore brecciation and development of calc-silicate mineral (amphibole, epidote, allanite, calcite) infill. Comparison of bulk ore sample geochemistry between breccia types indicates that REEs were not mobilised more than a few centimetres during hydrothermal alteration and brecciation. Instead, most of the REEs were partitioned from the original REE fluorapatite into newly formed allanite, REE-poor fluorapatite and minor REE carbonate in the breccias. Negative europium (Eu) anomalies in the breccia minerals are accounted for by a large positive Eu anomaly in epidote from the alteration zones surrounding the ore breccias. This observation provides a direct link between ore recrystallisation and brecciation, and the formation of the alteration halo in

  12. Carbonatite: A Geophysical investigation of a rare earth element terrane, eastern Mojave Desert, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denton, K. M.; Ponce, D. A.; Miller, D. M.; MacPherson-Krutsky, C. C.

    2013-12-01

    Geophysical investigations reveal gravity and magnetic anomalies related to a Proterozoic carbonatite terrane in the eastern Mojave Desert, host to one of the largest rare earth element carbonatite deposits in the world. The deposit is located near Mountain Pass, California and occurs in a north-northwest trending fault-bounded block that extends along the eastern parts of the Clarke Mountain Range, Mescal Range, and Ivanpah Mountains. This Early to Middle Proterozoic block is composed of a 1.7 Ga metamorphic complex of gneiss and schist intruded by a 1.4 Ga suite of ultrapotassic alkaline intrusive rocks that includes carbonatite. The intrusive suite (oldest to youngest) includes shonkinite, mesosyenite, syenite, quartz syenite, potassic granite, carbonatite, and late shonkinite dikes which are spatially and temporally associated with carbonatite intrusions and dikes. Regional geophysical data reveal that the carbonatite deposit occurs along a gravity high and the northeast edge of a prominent magnetic high with an amplitude of about 200 nanoteslas. More than 1400 gravity stations and over 200 physical property samples were collected to augment existing geophysical data and will be used to determine the geophysical and geologic setting that provide an improved structural interpretation of the eastern Mojave Desert carbonatite terrane. Physical properties of representative rock types in the area include carbonatite ore, syenite, shonkinite, gneiss, granite, and dolomite. Carbonatite intrusions typically have distinctive gravity, magnetic, and radiometric signatures because these deposits are relatively dense, contain magnetite, and are enriched in thorium or uranium. However, our results show that the main carbonatite body is essentially nonmagnetic. Thus, it is unlikely that carbonatite rocks are the source of the magnetic high associated with the Clark Mountain and Mescal Ranges. Instead, we suggest that weakly to moderately magnetic intrusive rocks or

  13. PQQ-dependent methanol dehydrogenases: rare-earth elements make a difference.

    PubMed

    Keltjens, Jan T; Pol, Arjan; Reimann, Joachim; Op den Camp, Huub J M

    2014-01-01

    Methanol dehydrogenase (MDH) catalyzes the first step in methanol use by methylotrophic bacteria and the second step in methane conversion by methanotrophs. Gram-negative bacteria possess an MDH with pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) as its catalytic center. This MDH belongs to the broad class of eight-bladed β propeller quinoproteins, which comprise a range of other alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenases. A well-investigated MDH is the heterotetrameric MxaFI-MDH, which is composed of two large catalytic subunits (MxaF) and two small subunits (MxaI). MxaFI-MDHs bind calcium as a cofactor that assists PQQ in catalysis. Genomic analyses indicated the existence of another MDH distantly related to the MxaFI-MDHs. Recently, several of these so-called XoxF-MDHs have been isolated. XoxF-MDHs described thus far are homodimeric proteins lacking the small subunit and possess a rare-earth element (REE) instead of calcium. The presence of such REE may confer XoxF-MDHs a superior catalytic efficiency. Moreover, XoxF-MDHs are able to oxidize methanol to formate, rather than to formaldehyde as MxaFI-MDHs do. While structures of MxaFI- and XoxF-MDH are conserved, also regarding the binding of PQQ, the accommodation of a REE requires the presence of a specific aspartate residue near the catalytic site. XoxF-MDHs containing such REE-binding motif are abundantly present in genomes of methylotrophic and methanotrophic microorganisms and also in organisms that hitherto are not known for such lifestyle. Moreover, sequence analyses suggest that XoxF-MDHs represent only a small part of putative REE-containing quinoproteins, together covering an unexploited potential of metabolic functions.

  14. The geochemistry of rare earth elements in groundwater from the Carnmenellis area, southwest England

    SciTech Connect

    Smedley, P.L. )

    1991-10-01

    Shallow groundwater samples from the Carnmenellis area of southwest England collected from wells, boreholes, springs, adits and stream baseflow represent recently recharged waters of low salinity. Their major ion concentrations closely reflect the lithology of their host rocks which comprise the Carnmenellis granite and Devonian metasediments (and metabasite) of greenschist grade. Groundwaters from the granite are predominantly Na-Cl or Na-Ca-Cl type while those from the metasediment are Na-Ca-Mg-Cl-HCO{sub 3} waters with a larger range of compositions. The major ion compositions are predominantly a function of water-rock interaction processes and the larger range of metasediment-water compositions probably reflects the greater lithological variation. Rare earth element (REE) concentrations of 0.45 {mu}m-filtered groundwater samples have been determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). A large range of concentrations exists and many are below detection limits but levels reach up to 229 {mu}g/1 (1.6 {mu}m) total REEs. The REEs are strongly controlled by pH with higher levels in groundwaters of pH < 6. In the granite, the REEs are probably derived mainly from the accessory minerals monazite and apatite as well as the high-REE framework minerals biotite and muscovite. The source of REEs in groundwater from the metasediments is more uncertain but probably includes clay minerals, chlorite, and carbonate. The observed REE compositions of granite- and metasediment-derived groundwaters from the Carnmenellis area are so distinctive that the REEs in general and Ce in particular might be useful as future tracers in studies of water-rock interaction and groundwater provenance.

  15. Factors affecting the rare earth element compositions in massive sulfides from deep-sea hydrothermal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Zhigang; Ma, Yao; Yin, Xuebo; Selby, David; Kong, Fancui; Chen, Shuai

    2015-09-01

    To reconstruct the evolution of ore-forming fluids and determine the physicochemical conditions of deposition associated with seafloor massive sulfides, we must better understand the sources of rare earth elements (REEs), the factors that affect the REE abundance in the sulfides, and the REE flux from hydrothermal fluids to the sulfides. Here we examine the REE profiles of 46 massive sulfide samples collected from seven seafloor hydrothermal systems. These profiles feature variable total REE concentrations (37.2-4092 ppb) and REE distribution patterns (LaCN/LuCN ratios = 2.00-73.8; (Eu/Eu*)CN ratios = 0.34-7.60). The majority of the REE distribution patterns in the sulfides are similar to those of vent fluids, with the sulfides also exhibiting light REE enrichment. We demonstrate that the variable REE concentrations, Eu anomalies, and fractionation between light REEs and heavy REEs in the sulfides exhibit a relationship with the REE properties of the sulfide-forming fluids and the massive sulfide chemistry. Based on the sulfide REE data, we estimate that modern seafloor sulfide deposits contain approximately 280 t of REEs. According to the flux of hydrothermal fluids at mid-ocean ridges (MORs) and an average REE concentration of 3 ng/g in these fluids, hydrothermal vents at MORs alone transport more REEs (>360 t) to the oceans over the course of just 2 years than the total quantity of REEs in seafloor sulfides. The excess REEs (i.e., the quantity not captured by massive sulfides) may be transported away from the systems and become bound in sulfate deposits and metalliferous sediments.

  16. Rare Earth Element Partition Coefficients During High-Grade Metamorphism: Experiments, Realities, And Large Datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, R.; Clark, C.; Kylander-Clark, A. R.; Hacker, B. R.

    2015-12-01

    For 15 years rare earth element (REE) partitioning between zircon and garnet has facilitated the coupling of U-Pb ages to metamorphism, particularly in the granulite facies. The combination of in situ analysis and rapid data acquisition, particularly through combined techniques such as laser ablation split stream (LASS), means that complex terranes can be interrogated with increasing detail. However this detail provided by large datasets must also be combined with an understanding of the processes involved, for example the relative mobility of the REE, Ti, U and Pb within zircon grains that have withstood intense P-T conditions to varying degrees. Care must also be taken in identifying open system conditions, for example the presence or passage of partial melts that result in non-equilibrium, or very localised equilibrium, between the phases of interest. Visualisation of REE partition coefficients (DREE) becomes more complex with large datasets particularly when dealing with variably recrystallised zircon grains or multiple generations of garnet. Simple methods of visualising the important partitioning parameters identify temperature trends in experimental datasets [1, 2]. These trends can be used as clear indicators of zircon growing or recrystallizing in the presence of stable garnet and may be used as thermometers for zircon growth and for the identification of thermal peaks. Investigation of zircon-garnet DREE values in both long-lived high grade terranes (e.g. S. India), and complex polymetamorphic terranes (e.g. Enderby Land, E. Antarctica) provides insight into how partitioning information can be carefully interrogated, by looking at systematic or erratic variations from experimental data, even when dealing with issues such as variably recrystallised zircon and melt migration. Rubatto and Hermann, (2007). Chemical Geology. Taylor et al., (2015). Journal Metamorphic Geology.

  17. Rare earth element concentrations in geological and synthetic samples using synchrotron X-ray fluorescence analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chen, J.R.; Chao, E.C.T.; Back, J.M.; Minkin, J.A.; Rivers, M.L.; Sutton, S.R.; Cygan, G.L.; Grossman, J.N.; Reed, M.J.

    1993-01-01

    The concentrations of rare earth elements (REEs) in specific mineral grains from the Bayan Obo ore deposit and synthetic high-silica glass samples have been measured by synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (SXRF) analysis using excitation of the REE K lines between 33 and 63 keV. Because SXRF, a nondestructive analytical technique, has much lower minimum detection limits (MDLs) for REEs, it is an important device that extends the in situ analytical capability of electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). The distribution of trace amounts of REEs in common rock-forming minerals, as well as in REE minerals and minerals having minor quantities of REEs, can be analyzed with SXRF. Synchrotron radiation from a bending magnet and a wiggler source at the National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven National Laboratory, was used to excite the REEs. MDLs of 6 ppm (La) to 26 ppm (Lu) for 3600 s in 60-??m-thick standard samples were obtained with a 25-??m diameter wiggler beam. The MDLs for the light REEs were a factor of 10-20 lower than the MDLs obtained with a bending magnet beam. The SXRF REE concentrations in mineral grains greater than 25 ??m compared favorably with measurements using EPMA. Because EPMA offered REE MDLs as low as several hundred ppm, the comparison was limited to the abundant light REEs (La, Ce, Pr, Nd). For trace values of medium and heavy REEs, the SXRF concentrations were in good agreement with measurements using instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA), a bulk analysis technique. ?? 1993.

  18. The rare earth element potential of kaolin deposits in the Bohemian Massif (Czech Republic, Austria)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höhn, S.; Frimmel, H. E.; Pašava, J.

    2014-12-01

    Four kaolin deposits in the Bohemian Massif were studied in order to assess the potential for the recovery of rare earth elements (REE) as by-products from the residue after extraction and refining of the raw kaolin. The behaviour of REE + Y during kaolinitization was found to be largely a function of pre-alteration mineralogy. In the examples studied, i.e. granite-derived deposits of Kriechbaum (Austria) and Božičany, and arkose-derived deposits of Kaznějov and Podbořany (all Czech Republic), the REE + Y are predominantly hosted by monazite which has remained unaffected by kaolinitization. The overall REE + Y content of the variably kaolinitized rocks is strongly dependent on their genesis. While ion adsorption plays only a minor role in the concentration of REE + Y in the studied kaolinitized rocks, the processing and refining of the raw kaolin leads to residues that are enriched in REE + Y by a factor of up to 40. The use of a magnetic separator and a hydrocyclone in the processing of the raw material can yield REE + Y contents of as much as 0.77 wt%. Although this value compares well with the REE + Y concentration in some potentially economic REE + Y projects elsewhere, the overall tonnage of the (REE + Y)-enriched residue is by far not sufficient to consider economic extraction of REE + Y as by-product. Our results are most probably applicable also to other kaolin deposits derived from the weathering of Hercynian basement granites elsewhere (e.g. in Saxonia and Bavaria, Germany). Overall, the potential for REE + Y production as by-product from kaolin mining has to be regarded as minimal.

  19. Rare earth elements and critical metal content of extracted landfilled material and potential recovery opportunities.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Gutiérrez, Silvia C; Coulon, Frédéric; Jiang, Ying; Wagland, Stuart

    2015-08-01

    Rare earth elements (REEs), Platinum group metals (PGMs) and other critical metals currently attract significant interest due to the high risks of supply shortage and substantial impact on the economy. Their uses in many applications have made them present in municipal solid waste (MSW) and in commercial and industrial waste (C&I), since several industrial processes produce by-products with high content of these metals. With over 4000 landfills in the UK alone, the aim of this study was to assess the existence of these critical metals within landfills. Samples collected from four closed landfills in UK were subjected to a two-step acid digestion to extract 27 metals of interest. Concentrations across the four landfill sites were 58±6mgkg(-1) for REEs comprising 44±8mgkg(-1) for light REEs, 11±2mgkg(-1) for heavy REEs and 3±1mgkg(-1) for Scandium (Sc) and 3±1.0mgkg(-1) of PGMs. Compared to the typical concentration in ores, these concentrations are too low to achieve a commercially viable extraction. However, content of other highly valuable metals (Al and Cu) was found in concentrations equating to a combined value across the four landfills of around $400 million, which increases the economic viability of landfill mining. Presence of critical metals will mainly depend on the type of waste that was buried but the recovery of these metals through landfill mining is possible and is economically feasible only if additional materials (plastics, paper, metallic items and other) are also recovered for reprocessing.

  20. Determination of Rare Earth Elements in Human Sperm and Association with Semen Quality.

    PubMed

    Marzec-Wróblewska, Urszula; Kamiński, Piotr; Łakota, Paweł; Ludwikowski, Grzegorz; Szymański, Marek; Wasilow, Karolina; Stuczyński, Tomasz; Buciński, Adam; Jerzak, Leszek

    2015-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to measure lanthanum (La), cerium (Ce), europium (Eu), and gadolinium (Gd) concentrations in human semen and correlate the results with sperm quality. The median semen content of La was 19.5 µg kg(-1) dry weight (dw) (range 2.27-269), of Ce was 41.9 µg kg(-1) dw (range 4.52 to 167), of Eu was 0.68 µg kg(-1) dw (range 0.06-1.95), of Gd was 3.19 µg kg(-1) dw (range 0.38-12.0), and of calcium (Ca) was 4063 mg kg(-1) dw (range 484-17,191). Concentrations of La, Ce, Eu, Gd, and Ca were significantly lower in nondrinkers' semen than in semen from drinkers. Significant differences were detected between La, Ce, Eu, Gd, and Ca concentrations in semen from nondrinkers and moderate drinkers. Concentrations of La, Ce, and Gd in semen of short-term smokers were significantly lower than those in extremely long-term smokers. Significant differences were also detected between La concentration in semen from a group of short-term smokers and that of a group of long-term smokers. Positive correlations were found between La, Ce, Eu, Gd, and Ca concentrations in semen. La, Ce, Gd, and Ca concentrations in semen were positively associated with progressive motility and percentage of normal spermatozoa. Positive correlations were found between Ca and sperm concentration. Concentrations of La, Ce, and Gd were negatively associated with sperm concentration, whilst Ca concentration was negatively associated with volume of ejaculate. At the examined level, La, Ce, Eu, and Gd did not affect sperm quality, whereas alcohol consumption and smoking might have increased the level of rare earth elements in semen.

  1. Rare earth element geochemistry in cold-seep pore waters of Hydrate Ridge, northeast Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Himmler, Tobias; Haley, Brian A.; Torres, Marta E.; Klinkhammer, Gary P.; Bohrmann, Gerhard; Peckmann, Jörn

    2013-07-01

    The concentrations of rare earth elements (REEs), sulphate, hydrogen sulphide, total alkalinity, calcium, magnesium and phosphate were measured in shallow (<12 cm below seafloor) pore waters from cold-seep sediments on the northern and southern summits of Hydrate Ridge, offshore Oregon. Downward-decreasing sulphate and coevally increasing sulphide concentrations reveal sulphate reduction as dominant early diagenetic process from ~2 cm depth downwards. A strong increase of total dissolved REE (∑REE) concentrations is evident immediately below the sediment-water interface, which can be related to early diagenetic release of REEs into pore water resulting from the re-mineralization of particulate organic matter. The highest pore water ∑REE concentrations were measured close to the sediment-water interface at ~2 cm depth. Distinct shale-normalized REE patterns point to particulate organic matter and iron oxides as main REE sources in the upper ~2-cm depth interval. In general, the pore waters have shale-normalized patterns reflecting heavy REE (HREE) enrichment, which suggests preferential complexation of HREEs with carbonate ions. Below ~2 cm depth, a downward decrease in ∑REE correlates with a decrease in pore water calcium concentrations. At this depth, the anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) coupled to sulphate reduction increases carbonate alkalinity through the production of bicarbonate, which results in the precipitation of carbonate minerals. It seems therefore likely that the REEs and calcium are consumed during vast AOM-induced precipitation of carbonate in shallow Hydrate Ridge sediments. The analysis of pore waters from Hydrate Ridge shed new light on early diagenetic processes at cold seeps, corroborating the great potential of REEs to identify geochemical processes and to constrain environmental conditions.

  2. Rare earth elements and critical metal content of extracted landfilled material and potential recovery opportunities.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Gutiérrez, Silvia C; Coulon, Frédéric; Jiang, Ying; Wagland, Stuart

    2015-08-01

    Rare earth elements (REEs), Platinum group metals (PGMs) and other critical metals currently attract significant interest due to the high risks of supply shortage and substantial impact on the economy. Their uses in many applications have made them present in municipal solid waste (MSW) and in commercial and industrial waste (C&I), since several industrial processes produce by-products with high content of these metals. With over 4000 landfills in the UK alone, the aim of this study was to assess the existence of these critical metals within landfills. Samples collected from four closed landfills in UK were subjected to a two-step acid digestion to extract 27 metals of interest. Concentrations across the four landfill sites were 58±6mgkg(-1) for REEs comprising 44±8mgkg(-1) for light REEs, 11±2mgkg(-1) for heavy REEs and 3±1mgkg(-1) for Scandium (Sc) and 3±1.0mgkg(-1) of PGMs. Compared to the typical concentration in ores, these concentrations are too low to achieve a commercially viable extraction. However, content of other highly valuable metals (Al and Cu) was found in concentrations equating to a combined value across the four landfills of around $400 million, which increases the economic viability of landfill mining. Presence of critical metals will mainly depend on the type of waste that was buried but the recovery of these metals through landfill mining is possible and is economically feasible only if additional materials (plastics, paper, metallic items and other) are also recovered for reprocessing. PMID:25957938

  3. Geochemistry of some rare earth elements in groundwater, Vierlingsbeek, The Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Janssen, René P T; Verweij, Wilko

    2003-03-01

    Groundwater samples were taken from seven bore holes at depths ranging from 2 to 41m nearby drinking water pumping station Vierlingsbeek, The Netherlands and analysed for Y, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm and Eu. Shale-normalized patterns were generally flat and showed that the observed rare earth elements (REE) were probably of natural origin. In the shallow groundwaters the REEs were light REE (LREE) enriched, probably caused by binding of LREEs to colloids. To improve understanding of the behaviour of the REE, two approaches were used: calculations of the speciation and a statistical approach. For the speciation calculations, complexation and precipitation reactions including inorganic and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) compounds, were taken into account. The REE speciation showed REE(3+), REE(SO(4))(+), REE(CO(3))(+) and REE(DOC) being the major species. Dissolution of pure REE precipitates and REE-enriched solid phases did not account for the observed REEs in groundwater. Regulation of REE concentrations by adsorption-desorption processes to Fe(III)(OH)(3) and Al(OH)(3) minerals, which were calculated to be present in nearly all groundwaters, is a probable explanation. The statistical approach (multiple linear regression) showed that pH is by far the most significant groundwater characteristic which contributes to the variation in REE concentrations. Also DOC, SO(4), Fe and Al contributed significantly, although to a much lesser extent, to the variation in REE concentrations. This is in line with the calculated REE-species in solution and REE-adsorption to iron and aluminium (hydr)oxides. Regression equations including only pH, were derived to predict REE concentrations in groundwater. External validation showed that these regression equations were reasonably successful to predict REE concentrations of groundwater of another drinking water pumping station in quite different region of The Netherlands.

  4. β-decay of neutron-rich Zâ¼60 nuclei and the origin of rare earth elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, J.; Nishimura, S.; Lorusso, G.; Xu, Z. Y.; Baba, H.; Browne, F.; Daido, R.; Doornenbal, P.; Fang, Y. F.; Ideguchi, E.; Isobe, T.; Li, Z.; Patel, Z.; Rice, S.; Simpson, G.; Sinclair, L.; Söderström, P. A.; Sumikama, T.; Watanabe, H.; Yagi, A.; Yokoyama, R.; Aoi, N.; Garrote, F. L. Bello; Benzoni, G.; Gey, G.; Gottardo, A.; Nishibata, H.; Odahara, A.; Sakurai, H.; Tanaka, M.; Taprogge, J.; Yamamoto, T.; Eurica Collaboration

    2014-05-01

    A large fraction of the rare-earth elements observed in the solar system is produced in the astrophysical rapid neutron capture process (r-process). However, current stellar models cannot completely explain the relative abundance of these elements partially because of nuclear physics uncertainties. To address this problem, a β-decay spectroscopy experiment was performed at RI Beam Factory (RIBF) at RIKEN, aimed at studying a wide range of very neutron-rich nuclei with Z˜60 that are progenitors of the rare-earth elements with mass number A˜460. The experiment provides a test of nuclear models as well as experimental inputs for r-process calculations. This contribution presents the experimental setup and some preliminary results of the experiment.

  5. β-decay of neutron-rich Z∼60 nuclei and the origin of rare earth elements

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.; Nishimura, S.; Lorusso, G.; Baba, H.; Doornenbal, P.; Isobe, T.; Söderström, P. A.; Sakurai, H.; Xu, Z. Y.; Browne, F.; Daido, R.; Fang, Y. F.; Yagi, A.; Nishibata, H.; Odahara, A.; Yamamoto, T.; Ideguchi, E.; Aoi, N.; Tanaka, M.; Collaboration: EURICA Collaboration; and others

    2014-05-02

    A large fraction of the rare-earth elements observed in the solar system is produced in the astrophysical rapid neutron capture process (r-process). However, current stellar models cannot completely explain the relative abundance of these elements partially because of nuclear physics uncertainties. To address this problem, a β-decay spectroscopy experiment was performed at RI Beam Factory (RIBF) at RIKEN, aimed at studying a wide range of very neutron-rich nuclei with Z∼60 that are progenitors of the rare-earth elements with mass number A∼460. The experiment provides a test of nuclear models as well as experimental inputs for r-process calculations. This contribution presents the experimental setup and some preliminary results of the experiment.

  6. Evidence of dilute ferromagnetism in rare-earth doped yttrium aluminium garnet

    SciTech Connect

    Farr, Warrick G.; Goryachev, Maxim; Le Floch, Jean-Michel; Tobar, Michael E.; Bushev, Pavel

    2015-09-21

    This work demonstrates strong coupling regime between an erbium ion spin ensemble and microwave hybrid cavity-whispering gallery modes in a yttrium aluminium garnet dielectric crystal. Coupling strengths of 220 MHz and mode quality factors in excess of 10{sup 6} are demonstrated. Moreover, the magnetic response of high-Q modes demonstrates behaviour which is unusual for paramagnetic systems. This behaviour includes hysteresis and memory effects. Such qualitative change of the system's magnetic field response is interpreted as a phase transition of rare earth ion impurities. This phenomenon is similar to the phenomenon of dilute ferromagnetism in semiconductors. The clear temperature dependence of the phenomenon is demonstrated.

  7. Synthesis of rare earth doped TiO2 nanorods as photocatalysts for lignin degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Liang; Zhao, Xueyuan; Cao, Lixin; Moon, Ji-Won; Gu, Baohua; Wang, Wei

    2015-09-10

    In this paper, a two-step process is developed to synthesize rare earth doped titania nanorods (RE–TiO2 NRs) as photocatalysts for efficient degradation of lignin under simulated sunlight irradiation. In this approach, protonated titanate nanotubes with layered structures were first prepared by a hydrothermal approach, and rare earth metal ions were subsequently bound to the negatively charged surface of the synthesized titanate via electrostatic incorporation. The as-synthesized RE–TiO2 NRs after calcination generally showed much higher photocatalytic efficiencies than those of undoped TiO2 NRs or the commercial P25 TiO2 photocatalyst. Using methyl orange (MO) as a probing molecule, we demonstrate that Eu–TiO2 NRs are among the best for degrading MO, with an observed rate constant of 4.2 × 10-3 s-1. The La3+, Sm3+, Eu3+ and Er3+ doped TiO2 NRs also showed higher photocatalytic efficiencies in degrading MO than the commercial P25 TiO2. Finally, we further demonstrate that lignin can be photodegraded effectively and rapidly at room temperature under simulated sunlight through two reaction routes, which could be important in controlling ways of lignin depolymerization or the formation of reaction products.

  8. Mixing rare earth elements with manures to control phosphorus loss in runoff and track manure fate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Concern over the enrichment of agricultural runoff with phosphorus (P) from land applied livestock manures has prompted the development of manure amendments that minimize P solubility. We evaluated the effect of mixing two rare earth chlorides, lanthanum chloride and ytterbium chloride, with poultr...

  9. The distribution of rare earth elements in tropical granitic soil: a case study from Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamad, Hamzah; Ghani Rafek, Abdul

    A total of 93 samples of rock, altered soil representing various weathering grades from an ideal granite weathering profile exposed at a road cut along the Kuala Lumpur-Karak highway, Peninsular Malaysia, were studied. The fresh, unaltered parent rock is petrographically distinguished into two types: (1) coarse grained porphyritic biotite-muscovite granite, and (2) medium grained biotite-muscovite granite. The rock has undergone some degree of brittle deformation. A weathering index map based on the procedures suggested by Ibrahim Komoo et al. Warta Geologi17(3), 105-109 (1991) shows the spatial distribution of unaltered to slightly altered rocks (index 2-4), weathered rocks (5-8) and residual soil (9 and 10) for the profile under study. For each sample, 11 major elements were determined using X-ray fluorescence technique (XRF) and nine rare earth elements, La, Ce, Nd, Sm, Eu, Tb, Dy, Yb and Lu, by the instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). All REEs decrease with increasing weathering grade, suggesting a depletion of the REEs due to weathering. The depletion rate is variable, the fastest being Sm and La. A Masuda-Coryell diagram for the three groups of samples, that is (1) fresh to slightly weathered rocks, (2) moderately to highly weathered rocks, and (3) residual soils, shows three curves with a similar pattern of negative Eu anomalies. The concentration of elements is in the order 1>2>3, suggesting strongly that the REEs diminish gradually in the course of the weathering. A rock-soil interface has been recognised to exist at weathering index 4. It is believed that at this interface, most REEs leave their primary carriers which undergo rapid breakdown, most probably plagioclase, biotite and hornblende and possibly ilmenite and apatite, into weathering solution, together with Fe 2+, Ca 2+, K +, Mn 2+ and Mg 2+. Anomalously low concentration of REEs in index 4 material supports this idea. The leached-out REEs are temporarily incorporated into newly formed

  10. Rare Earth Element patterns as indicators of trace metal sources to the Pacific Equatorial Undercurrent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, J.; Henderson, G.; Measures, C. I.

    2007-12-01

    The Pacific Equatorial Undercurrent (EUC) has high Fe concentration and may represent the principle pathway for supply of this limiting micronutrient to the HNLC region of the eastern equatorial Pacific. Understanding this pathway is therefore important to assess past and future changes in the Pacific carbon cycle. The input of Fe to the EUC at its source, close to Papua New Guinea, is unclear and may come from rivers, sediments, or hydrothermal activity. Limited Rare Earth Elements (REE) data has previously suggested the potential of REE patterns to assess the source of metals in the EUC. In this study, we have fully explored this potential by measurement of about 250 REE patterns in the upper 300 m of the central and eastern Pacific, and in the Bismark Basin where the EUC is sourced. Full REE profiles were measured by HR-ICP-MS (Element2) with typical precisions of 2% and are compared with T, S, nutrient, ADCP, Fe, and Al measurements made on the same cruise (Biocomplexity 2005, RV Revelle). The EUC has a characteristic Ce concentration somewhat higher than surrounding Pacific waters and this concentration remains approximately constant with longitude at 2.5 pmol/kg. The high Ce values are observed particularly in the upper layer of the EUC with the core centred around 120 m at 140°W, shoaling to 100 m by 134°W. This excess Ce is possibly sourced by horizontal advection in the New Guinea Coastal Current and New Guinea Coastal Undercurrent (NGCU) which flow from the Coral Sea and form a large part in EUC. Relative to seawater of the Coral Sea, the EUC has higher REE concentrations, indicating the incorporation of metals during transit of these currents around Papua New Guinea. EUC REE patterns also exhibit well- developed MREE enrichment which probably reflects an island weathering signature as previously observed in the Sepik River and its estuary. Increase of MREE enrichment with depth indicates that the probable source is the shelf of Papua New Guinea

  11. Rare earth elements in the water column of Lake Vanda, McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Carlo, Eric Heinen; Green, William J.

    2002-04-01

    We present data on the composition of water from Lake Vanda, Antarctica. Vanda and other lakes in the McMurdo Dry Valleys of Antarctica are characterized by closed basins, permanent ice covers, and deep saline waters. The meromictic lakes provide model systems for the study of trace metal cycling owing to their pristine nature and the relative simplicity of their biogeochemical systems. Lake Vanda, in the Wright Valley, is supplied by a single input, the Onyx River, and has no output. Water input to the lake is balanced by sublimation of the nearly permanent ice cap that is broken only near the shoreline during the austral summer. The water column is characterized by an inverse thermal stratification of anoxic warm hypersaline water underlying cold oxic freshwater. Water collected under trace-element clean conditions was analyzed for its dissolved and total rare earth element (REE) concentrations by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Depth profiles are characterized by low dissolved REE concentrations (La, Ce, <15 pM) in surface waters that increase slightly (La, 70 pM; Ce, 20 pM) with increasing depth to ˜55 m, the limit of the fresh oxic waters. Below this depth, a sharp increase in the concentrations of strictly trivalent REE (e.g., La, 5 nM) is observed, and a submaximum in redox sensitive Ce (2.6 nM) is found at 60- to 62-m depth. At a slightly deeper depth, a sharper Ce maximum is observed with concentrations exceeding 11 nM at a 67-m depth, immediately above the anoxic zone. The aquatic concentrations of REE reported here are ˜50-fold higher than previously reported for marine oxic/anoxic boundaries and are, to our knowledge, the highest ever observed at natural oxic/anoxic interfaces. REE maxima occur within stable and warm saline waters. All REE concentrations decrease sharply in the sulfidic bottom waters. The redox-cline in Lake Vanda is dominated by diffusional processes and vertical transport of dissolved species driven by concentration

  12. Surface cleaning and etching of rare-earth-doped phosphate glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Amy S.; Pantano, Carlo G.; Conzone, Samuel D.

    2001-11-01

    The surface reactions of phosphate glasses are important for the processing and application of photonic devices, biomedical materials and conventional optical components. Of particular concern are the leaching of optically-active dopant species, surface layer formation and roughening during polishing, cleaning and other fabrication processes. In this study, the effects of various cleaning treatments, and both acid and base etching, were evaluated using surface analytical techniques (XPS, AFM). It is shown that in these phosphate glasses, the aluminum and rare-earth oxides have limited aqueous solubility, whereas the phosphate network is soluble over a wider range of pH. Thus, under those conditions where polishing damage can be removed by etching the surface, a localized precipitation of rare-earth oxides occurs which influences the final roughness and surface composition. Conversely, under conditions where this precipitation can be eliminated, an in-depth leaching of the surface occurs. These aqueous surface reactions were similar for both the optically-active and passive IOG-1 glasses. An optimized surface preparation method is described.

  13. Distribution and Geochemistry of Rare-Earth Elements in Rivers of Southern and Eastern Primorye (Far East of Russia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chudaev, O. V.; Bragin, I. V.; A, Kharitonova N.; Chelnokov, G. A.

    2016-03-01

    The distribution and geochemistry of rare earth elements (REE) in anthropogenic, technogenic and natural surface waters of southern and eastern Primorye, Far East of Russia, are presented in this study. The obtained results indicated that most of REE (up to 70%) were transported as suspended matter, ratio between dissolved and suspended forms varing from the source to the mouth of rivers. It is shown that all REE (except Ce) in the source of the rivers are predominantly presented in dissolved form, however, the content of light and heavy REE is different. Short-term enrichment of light rare earth elements (LREE) caused by REE-rich runoff from waste dumps and mining is neutralized by the increase in river flow rate. Rivers in urban areas are characterized by high content of LREE in dissolved form and very low in suspended one.

  14. Ocean particle chemistry: The fractionation of rare earth elements between suspended particles and seawater

    SciTech Connect

    Sholkovitz, E.R. ); Landing, W.M.; Lewis, B.L. )

    1994-03-01

    Sargasso Sea suspended particles were sequentially digested with three chemical treatments (acetic acid, mild HCl/HNO[sub 3], and HF/HNO[sub 3]/HCl in a bomb). The latter two treatments dissolve detrital minerals, while the acetic acid removes surface coatings (organic matter and Mn oxides). The rare earth element (REE) composition of the surface coatings, in marked contrast to the crust-like REE composition of the two detrital phases, is extensively fractionated with respect to both filtered seawater and the crust. Surface coatings are responsible for the removal and fractionation of REEs from seawater and, as such, play a key role in the marine geochemical cycles of trace elements. Relative to seawater, the surface coatings are systematically enriched tenfold across the trivalent REEs from Lu to La and develop large positive Ce-anomalies. The Ce-anomalies of the coatings switch from being negative (seawater-like) in the upper 100 m to being strongly positive at greater depths. The ingrowth of Ce and LREEs on particle surfaces reflects the in situ oxidation of dissolved Ce(III) to particulate Ce(IV), and the preferential removal of LREE(III)s over HREE(III)s. REEs(III) fractionation of this type is consistent with particle/solution models. Both processes appear to be related to the in situ formation of Mn oxide particles from the oxidation of dissolved Mn(II) in the upper 200 m of the water column. Preferential removal of LREEs in the upper waters is countered by their preferential release at depth due to remineralization of surface coatings on particles. A new method is explored for estimating the residence time of suspended particles by combining Ce concentration data of dissolved and surface-bound phases with the Ce(III) oxidation rate measurements of MOFFETT (1990). A Ce-based residence time of thirteen days is similar in magnitude to the value calculated from U-[sup 234]Th disequilibria in the Sargasso Sea.

  15. Rare-earth elements in the Permian Phosphoria Formation: Paleo proxies of ocean geochemistry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Piper, D.Z.; Perkins, R.B.; Rowe, H.D.

    2007-01-01

    The geochemistry of deposition of the Meade Peak Member of the Phosphoria Formation (MPM) in southeast Idaho, USA, a world-class sedimentary phosphate deposit of Permian age that extends over 300,000 km2, is ascertained from its rare earth element (REE) composition. Ratios of REE:Al2O3 suggest two sources-seawater and terrigenous debris. The seawater-derived marine fraction identifies bottom water in the Phosphoria Sea as O2-depleted, denitrifying (suboxic) most of the time, and seldom sulfate-reducing (anoxic). This interpretation is supported by earlier research that showed progressively greater ratios in the marine sediment fraction of Cr:Ni>V:Ni???Mo:Ni, relative to their ratios in seawater; for which marine Cr, V, and Mo can have a dominantly O2-depleted bottom-water source and Ni a photic-zone, largely algal, source. The water chemistry was maintained by a balance between bacterial oxidation of organic matter settling through the water column, determined largely by primary productivity in the photic zone, and the flux of oxidants into the bottom water via advection of seawater from the open ocean. Samples strongly enriched in carbonate fluorapatite, the dominant REE host mineral, have variable Er/Sm, Tm/Sm, and Yb/Sm ratios. Their distribution may represent greater advection of seawater between the Phosphoria Sea and open ocean during deposition of two ore zones than a center waste and greater upwelling of nutrient-enriched water into the photic zone. However, the mean rate of deposition of marine Ni, a trace nutrient of algae, and PO43-, a limiting nutrient, indicate that primary productivity was probably high throughout the depositional history. An alternative interpretation of the variable enrichments of Er, Tm, and Yb, relative to Sm, is that they may reflect temporally variable carbonate alkalinity of open-ocean seawater in Permian time. A more strongly negative Ce anomaly for all phosphatic units than the Ce anomaly of modern pelletal phosphate is

  16. Rare earth elements in pore waters from Cabo Friós western boundary upwelling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smoak, J. M.; Silva-Filho, E. V.; Rousseau, T.; Albuquerque, A. L.; Caldeira, P. P.; Moreira, M.

    2015-12-01

    Rare earth elements (REE) are a group of reactive trace elements in aqueous media, they have a coherent chemical behavior with however a subtle and gradual shift in physicochemical properties allowing their use as tracers of sources and processes. Uncertainties on their oceanic inputs and outputs still remains [Arsouze et al., 2009; Siddall et al., 2008; Tachikawa et al., 2003]. The water-sediment interface were early on identified as a relevant REE source due to the high distribution coefficient between sediments and pore waters [Elderfield and Sholkovitz, 1987] and substantially higher concentration then the water column [Abbott et al., 2015; Haley et al., 2004; Sholkovitz et al., 1989; Soyol-Erdene and Huh, 2013]. Here we present a cross shelf transect of 4 short pore waters REE profiles on a 680 km2 mud bank located in the region of Cabo Frio, Brazil. This study reveals similar trends at the four sites: a REE production zone reflected by a maximum in concentration at the top of the sediment evolving with depth toward a REE consumption zone reflected by a minimum in REE concentrations. PAAS normalized patterns shows 1) a progressive depletion in LREE with depth with HREE/LREE ratios comprised between 1.1 and 1.6 in the 2 first centimeters evolving gradually to ratios comprised between 2.8 and 4.7 above 7 cm 2) A sharp gradient in negative Ce anomaly with Ce/Ce* values reaching 0.3. With maximum Nd concentrations comprised between 780 and 1200 pmol.kg and considering that seawater Nd concentrations of Brazilian shelf bottom waters are comprised between 24 and 50 pmol.Kg-1 we apply the Fick´s First Law of diffusion and estimate that 340 +/- 90 nmol. m-2 Y-1 of Nd is released in the Cabo frio´s mudbank. This flux is in the same order of magnitude of recent estimates by [Abbott et al., 2015] in the slope of Oregon´s margin. Unraveling processes responsible for the REE production zone will help to refine the global REE fluxes estimates.

  17. Rare Earth Element Measurements of Melilite and Fassaite in Allende Cai by Nanosims

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ito, M.; Messenger, Scott

    2009-01-01

    The rare earth elements (REEs) are concentrated in CAIs by approx. 20 times the chondritic average [e.g., 1]. The REEs in CAIs are important to understand processes of CAI formation including the role of volatilization, condensation, and fractional crystallization [1,2]. REE measurements are a well established application of ion microprobes [e.g., 3]. However the spatial resolution of REE measurements by ion microprobe (approx.20 m) is not adequate to resolve heterogeneous distributions of REEs among/within minerals. We have developed methods for measuring REE with the NanoSIMS 50L at smaller spatial scales. Here we present our initial measurements of REEs in melilite and fassaite in an Allende Type-A CAI with the JSC NanoSIMS 50L. We found that the key parameters for accurate REE abundance measurements differ between the NanoSIMS and conventional SIMS, in particular the oxide-to-element ratios, the relative sensitivity factors, the energy distributions, and requisite energy offset. Our REE abundance measurements of the 100 ppm REE diopside glass standards yielded good reproducibility and accuracy, 0.5-2.5 % and 5-25 %, respectively. We determined abundances and spatial distributions of REEs in core and rim within single crystals of fassaite, and adjacent melilite with 5-10 m spatial resolution. The REE abundances in fassaite core and rim are 20-100 times CI abundance but show a large negative Eu anomaly, exhibiting a well-defined Group III pattern. This is consistent with previous work [4]. On the other hand, adjacent melilite shows modified Group II pattern with no strong depletions of Eu and Yb, and no Tm positive anomaly. REE abundances (2-10 x CI) were lower than that of fassaite. These patterns suggest that fassaite crystallized first followed by a crystallization of melilite from the residual melt. In future work, we will carry out a correlated study of O and Mg isotopes and REEs of the CAI in order to better understand the nature and timescales of its

  18. The Use of Lead Isotope and Rare Earth Element Geochemistry for Forensic Geographic Provenancing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carey, A.; Darrah, T.; Harrold, Z.; Prutsman-Pfeiffer, J.; Poreda, R.

    2008-12-01

    Lead isotope and rare earth element composition of modern human bones are analyzed to explore their utility for geographical provenancing. DNA analysis is the standard for identification of individuals. DNA analysis requires a DNA match for comparison. Thus, DNA analysis is of limited use in cases involving unknown remains. Trace elements are incorporated into bones and teeth during biomineralization, recording the characteristics of an individual's geochemical environment. Teeth form during adolescence, recording the geochemical environment of an individual's youth. Bones remodel throughout an individual's lifetime. Bones consist of two types of bone tissue (cortical and trabecular) that remodel at different rates, recording the geochemical environment at the time of biomineralization. Cortical bone tissue, forming the outer surface of bones, is dense, hard tissue that remodels in 25-30 yrs. Conversely, trabecular bone tissue, the inner cavity of bones, is low density, porous and remodels in 2-5 years. Thus, analyzing teeth and both bone tissues allows for the development of a geographical time line capable of tracking immigration patterns through time instead of only an individual's youth. Geochemical isotopic techniques (Sr, O, C, N) have been used for geographical provenancing in physical anthropology. The isotopic values of Sr, C, O, N are predominantly a function of soil compositions in areas where food is grown or water is consumed. Application of these provenancing techniques has become difficult as an individual's diet may reflect the isotopic composition of foods obtained at the local grocer as opposed to local soil compositions. Thus, we explore the use of REEs and Pb isotopes for geographical provenancing. Pb and REEs are likely more reliable indicators of modern geographical location as their composition are high in bio-available sources such as local soils, atmospheric aerosols, and dust as opposed to Sr, C, O, N that are controlled by food and

  19. Rare earth elements and neodymium isotopes in world river sediments revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayon, G.; Toucanne, S.; Skonieczny, C.; André, L.; Bermell, S.; Cheron, S.; Dennielou, B.; Etoubleau, J.; Freslon, N.; Gauchery, T.; Germain, Y.; Jorry, S. J.; Ménot, G.; Monin, L.; Ponzevera, E.; Rouget, M.-L.; Tachikawa, K.; Barrat, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    Over the past decades, rare earth elements (REE) and their radioactive isotopes have received tremendous attention in sedimentary geochemistry, as tracers for the geological history of the continental crust and provenance studies. In this study, we report on elemental concentrations and neodymium (Nd) isotopic compositions for a large number of sediments collected near the mouth of rivers worldwide, including some of the world's major rivers. Sediments were leached for removal of non-detrital components, and both clay and silt fractions were retained for separate geochemical analyses. Our aim was to re-examine, at the scale of a large systematic survey, whether or not REE and Nd isotopes could be fractionated during Earth surface processes. Our results confirmed earlier assumptions that river sediments do not generally exhibit any significant grain-size dependent Nd isotopic variability. Most sediments from rivers draining old cratonic areas, sedimentary systems and volcanic provinces displayed similar Nd isotopic signatures in both clay and silt fractions, with ΔεNd(clay-silt) < |1|. A subtle decoupling of Nd isotopes between clays and silts was identified however in a few major river systems (e.g. Nile, Mississippi, Fraser), with clays being systematically shifted towards more radiogenic values. This observation suggests that preferential weathering of volcanic and/or sedimentary rocks relative to more resistant lithologies may occur in river basins, possibly leading locally to Nd isotopic decoupling between different size fractions. Except for volcanogenic sediments, silt fractions generally displayed homogeneous REE concentrations, exhibiting relatively flat shale-normalized patterns. However, clay fractions were almost systematically characterized by a progressive enrichment from the heavy to the light REE and a positive europium (Eu) anomaly. In agreement with results from previous soil investigations, the observed REE fractionation between clays and silts

  20. LiF - a spectroscopic method for rare earth elements identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Margret; Gloaguen, Richard; Beyer, Jan; Jacob, Sandra; Heitmann, Johannes

    2016-04-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence (LiF) has a great potential for the exploration and identification of rare earth elements (REE) in natural environments. This spectroscopic technique can provide an efficient way to secure resource availability, while the economic and ecological costs are reduced. No time-consuming sample preparation and analysis is needed prior to decisions along the raw material processing chain. Such non-destructive approaches allow for a fast access to analytical results and hence, are the basis for an immediate adjustment of processing steps. The method uses the material-specific luminescence emissions that are induced by laser-stimulation of a certain wavelength. The distinct emission lines of REE make them well suited for the development of a LiF-based exploration technique. However, typical REE emission peaks known from the free elements may shift or be masked in natural materials due to their position in the crystal lattice, varying compositions of minerals or other natural conditions such as water content. The natural variability therefore, demands for comprehensive investigations of REE and their spectral characteristics in minerals. To identify those spectral information that are robust and unequivocal, we analyse spectra of REE standards measured in different matrix minerals including phosphates and fluorides. We use variable laser wavelengths from UV (325 nm) to green (532 nm) and a detection range from 340 nm to 1080 nm. Results show spectral characteristics that sort REE in three groups due to: no distinct emission lines, absorption features, distinct luminescence emission lines. Measured in different matrix minerals, we determine shifts for some of the spectral features and some disappear or decline in intensity. Changing the wavelength of the laser allows for a more selective stimulation of REE emissions, especially wavelengths longer than UV can reduce the unspecific emission of all luminescent components of a sample and thus enhance

  1. Assessment of Bioavailable Concentrations of Germanium and Rare Earth Elements in the Rhizosphere of White Lupin (Lupinus albus L.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiche, Oliver; Fischer, Ronny; Moschner, Christin; Székely, Balázs

    2015-04-01

    Concentrations of Germanium (Ge) and Rare Earth Elements in soils are estimated at 1.5 mg kg -1 (Ge), 25 mg kg -1 (La) and 20 mg kg -1 (Nd), which are only roughly smaller than concentrations of Pb and Zn. Germanium and rare earth elements are thus not rare but widely dispersed in soils and therefore up to date, only a few minable deposits are available. An environmental friendly and cost-effective way for Ge and rare earth element production could be phytomining. However, the most challenging part of a phytomining of these elements is to increase bioavailable concentrations of the elements in soils. Recent studies show, that mixed cultures with white lupine or other species with a high potential to mobilize trace metals in their rhizosphere due to an acidification of the soil and release of organic acids in the root zone could be a promising tool for phytomining. Complexation of Ge and rare earth elements by organic acids might play a key role in controlling bioavailability to plants as re-adsorption on soil particles and precipitation is prevented and thus, concentrations in the root zone of white lupine increase. This may also allow the complexes to diffuse along a concentration gradient to the roots of mixed culture growing species leading to enhanced plant uptake. However, to optimize mixed cultures it would be interesting to know to which extend mobilization of trace metals is dependent from chemical speciation of elements in soil due to the interspecific interaction of roots. A method for the identification of complexes of germanium and rare earth elements with organic acids, predominantly citric acid in the rhizosphere of white lupine was developed and successfully tested. The method is based on coupling of liquid chromatography with ICP-MS using a zic-philic column (SeQuant). As a preliminary result, we were able to show that complexes of germanium with citric acid exist in the rhizosphere of white lupin, what may contribute to the bioavailability of this

  2. Experimental Investigation of Evaporation Behavior of Polonium and Rare-Earth Elements in Lead-Bismuth Eutectic Pool

    SciTech Connect

    Shuji Ohno; Shinya Miyahara; Yuji Kurata; Ryoei Katsura; Shigeru Yoshida

    2006-07-01

    Equilibrium evaporation behavior was experimentally investigated for polonium ({sup 210}Po) in liquid lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) and for rare-earth elements gadolinium (Gd) and europium (Eu) in LBE to understand and clarify the transfer behavior of toxic impurities from LBE coolant to a gas phase. The experiments utilized the 'transpiration method' in which saturated vapor in an isothermal evaporation pot was transported by inert carrier gas and collected outside of the pot. While the previous paper ICONE12-49111 has already reported the evaporation behavior of LBE and of tellurium in LBE, this paper summarizes the outlines and the results of experiments for important impurity materials {sup 210}Po and rare-earth elements which are accumulated in liquid LBE as activation products and spallation products. In the experiments for rare-earth elements, non-radioactive isotope was used. The LBE pool is about 330-670 g in weight and has a surface area of 4 cm x 14 cm. {sup 210}Po experiments were carried out with a smaller test apparatus and radioactive {sup 210}Po produced through neutron irradiation of LBE in the Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR). We obtained fundamental and instructive evaporation data such as vapor concentration, partial vapor pressure of {sup 210}Po in the gas phase, and gas-liquid equilibrium partition coefficients of the impurities in LBE under the temperature condition between 450 and 750 deg. C. The {sup 210}Po test revealed that Po had characteristics to be retained in LBE but was still more volatile than LBE solvent. A part of Eu tests implied high volatility of rare-earth elements comparable to that of Po. This tendency is possibly related to the local enrichment of the solute near the pool surface and needs to be investigated more. These results are useful and indispensable for the evaluation of radioactive materials transfer to the gas phase in LBE-cooled nuclear systems. (authors)

  3. Origin of fluorite mineralizations in the Nuba Mountains, Sudan and their rare earth element geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, Ibrahim; Baioumy, Hassan; Ouyang, Hegen; Mossa, Hesham; Aly, Hisham Fouad

    2015-12-01

    Among other mineralizations in the basement complex of the Nuba Mountains, fluorite occurs as lenses and veins in a number of localities. The rare earth elements (REE) geochemistry in these fluorites along with their petrography and fluid inclusion was investigated in this study to discuss the origin the fluorites and shed the light on the economic importance of the REE. Fluorites in the Nuba Mountains are classified into four categories based on their petrography. Category I (F1) is characterized by pink color and free of inclusions. Category II (F2) is zoned of alternating pink and colorless zones with euhedral outline or anhedral patchy pink and colorless fluorite enclosing category I fluorite and is usually sieved with submicroscopic silicate minerals. Category III (F3) is colorless, euhedral to anhedral fluorite and associated with quartz and/or orthoclase. Category IV (F4) is colorless, either massive or dispersed, corroded grains associated with calcite and pertain to the late introduced carbonatites in Dumbeir area. Gangue minerals in the studied fluorites include quartz, calcite, orthoclase and muscovite. The ΣREE ranges between 541 and 10,430 ppm with an average of 3234 ppm. Chondrite-normalized REE patterns for fluorite from different localities exhibit LREE enrichment relative to HREE as shown by (La/Yb)N ratios that vary from 16 to 194 and significant positive Eu anomalies that are pronounced with Eu/Eu* from 1.1 to 2.5. The Tb/La and Tb/Ca ratios of fluorites in the present study indicate that they plot mainly in the pegmatitic or high-hydrothermal field with the characteristics of primary crystallization and remobilization trend. The clear heterogeneity of fluorite, abundance of growth zones, irregular shapes of grains, presence of fluorite inclusions in other minerals as well as the relatively high concentration of REE in the studied fluorites are supportive for this interpretation. The relatively high Tb/La (0.002-0.013) and low Tb/Ca (0

  4. Alteration of rare earth element distribution as a result of microbial activity and empirical methane injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo, D. J.; Davies, N. W.; Thurber, A. R.; Haley, B. A.; Colwell, F. S.

    2014-12-01

    As a result of warming, methane is being released into the marine environment in areas that have not historically experienced methane input. While methane is a potent greenhouse gas, microbial oxidation of methane within the sediment greatly limits the role of marine methane sources on atmospheric forcing. However, in these areas of new methane release, consumption of methane prior to its release into the atmosphere is a result of the response of the microbial community to this new input of methane. Further, rare earth elements (REEs) are not currently thought to be involved with microbial activity, but this assumption has not been rigorously tested. Here we test that: (1) microbial communities will rapidly respond to the onset of methane emission, and (2) the microbial response to this methane input will impact the distribution of REEs within the sediment. Undisturbed cores sampled from a tidal flat at Yaquina Bay, OR, were brought back to a lab and injected with anoxic seawater (as a control) or anoxic sea water saturated with methane gas for a total of 2 weeks. Aerobic methanotrophs proliferated over this short time period, becoming an abundant member of the microbial community as identified using fatty acid biomarkers. Excitingly, the experimental injection of methane also shifted the distribution of REEs within the sediment, a trend that appeared to follow the microbial response and that was different from the control cores. Further, the lightest REEs appeared to be used more than the heavier ones, supporting that the REEs are being actively used by the microbes. While we focused on identifying the response of those microbes responsible in methane-cycling, we also identified how the entire microbial community shifts as a result of methane input, and correlating with shifts in REE distribution. Here we have empirically demonstrated the rapid response of methanotrophs to the onset of methane emission and that REE distribution within the sediment is likely

  5. Sorption of Yttrium and the Rare Earth Elements on Non-Living Macroalgal Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schijf, J.; Straka, A. M.

    2007-12-01

    We have investigated sorption of yttrium and the rare earth elements (YREEs) on tissue of the green macroalga Ulva lactuca, commonly known as sea lettuce. Due to its nearly worldwide distribution in coastal waters, very simple morphology, and prodigious capacity for trace metal uptake from seawater, members of the Ulva genus serve as a basic but representative model of marine organic substrates in this type of study. In order to exclude active biological uptake effects, allowing us to focus on passive chemical mechanisms, we performed our initial experiments with sea lettuce Certified Reference Material consisting of a dehydrated, powdered tissue homogenate. A small quantity of this powder was suspended in NaCl solutions containing all YREEs, except Pm, at pH 3 and T = 25°C. The extent of YREE sorption was determined as a function of pH at constant temperature by titrating the solution with dilute NaOH and measuring the YREE concentrations of 0.2-μm filtered aliquots with an ICP-MS at regular time intervals after each pH adjustment. In NaCl solutions with an ionic strength approaching that of seawater, distribution coefficients, which quantify the proportion of sorbed and dissolved metal concentrations, are a highly linear function of pH in the range 3-8. The slope of the line suggests a sorption mechanism that involves ion exchange with both H+ and Na+ on surface functional groups. The shape of solution YREE patterns indicates that these functional groups are probably carboxylates at low and intermediate pH, but that other groups may contribute at high pH. The identification of carboxylate functional groups appears to be confirmed by preliminary results from EXAFS spectroscopic analyses of individual REE sorbed on the surface of Ulva lactuca tissue under similar conditions, conducted at the ANL Advanced Photon Source. In dilute NaCl solutions the distribution coefficient is largely independent of pH. We believe that prolonged exposure of the tissue to a low

  6. Rare earth elements in coastal sediments of the northern Galician shelf: Influence of geological features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prego, Ricardo; Caetano, Miguel; Bernárdez, Patricia; Brito, Pedro; Ospina-Alvarez, Natalia; Vale, Carlos

    2012-03-01

    The Northern coast of Galicia, NW Iberian Peninsula, exhibits a variety of geological features: Ortegal allochthonous complex, Ollo-de-Sapo autochthonous domain and massifs of Bares, Barqueiro and San-Ciprian. In order to examine the influence of terrestrial lithologies on coastal sediments, 103 samples were collected in the Rias of Ortigueira, Barqueiro and Viveiro, their neighbouring shelf and the estuaries of Mera, Sor and Landro rivers. Aluminium, Fe, Sc, particulate inorganic and organic carbon and rare earth elements (REE) were determined in the <2 mm fraction. In addition, calcite, muscovite, quartz and riebeckite minerals were identified and quantified in 33 selected samples. The distributions of riebeckite and Fe reflect the influence of Ortegal complex on the coastal areas around the Cape Ortegal. The highest concentrations of ΣREE were found in fine sediments from confined inner parts of the Rias (up to 233 mg kg-1), while most of the sands contained 11-70 mg kg-1. ΣREE normalised to European Shale (ES) highlights the relative abundance of lanthanides (ΣREEN>6) near Cape Ortegal and the innermost ria zones. The ratio between light and heavy REE (L/H) showed lower values (4-11) around Cape Ortegal and the shelf while higher ratios (15-23) were detected in west of the Cape Estaca-de-Bares and in the inner Viveiro Ria due to elevated contributions of La and Ce. The L/H values normalised to ES reflects the importance of HREE in the adjacent area to Ortegal Complex (LN/HN<0.8) and the LREE (LN/HN>1.4) in the inner estuaries and west Cape Estaca-de-Bares. The highest REE individual ES normalised were measured in fine-grained sediments of the Mera and Sor estuaries. Sediments from the eastern shelf of Cape Ortegal presented enhanced ratios only for HREE. These results indicate that distribution of REE in the northern Galician region is highly depending on the neighbouring lithological pattern, contrasting with the situation found in the western Galician

  7. Study of Suspended Solid in Constructed Wetland Using Rare Earth Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Z. X. Z.

    2015-12-01

    Constructed wetland (CW) is one of the commonly used technologies in wastewater treatment. By means of the biochemical interactions among water, microscopic organism, aquatic plant and sediments in natural environment CW can remove biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), ammoniacal nitrogen, suspended solid (SS) and heavy metals. In this study, rare earth elements (REEs) were used as a natural tracer for the study of SS in the CW. The studied CW, Hebao Island free water surface CW, is located in Chiayi County, south Taiwan. The CW is designed for removing SS and BOD due to the pollution from livestock farms in the upstream area. However, the removal of SS was not effective. In some cases, the SS concentration of inflow is even higher than that of outflow. That the sediments on the slope were flushed into the CW was considered as the main problem. After all the refinement, the issue has not improved yet. In the study, the water samples were filtered with 1.0μm filter paper. Then, part of water samples were digested by ultrapure nitric acid to obtain the water representing the total of dissolved and suspended matters. The others were filtered by 0.1μm filter, which represent the matters in dissolved form. REEs and most of metals were subsequently measured with ICP-MS. REEs generally have a unique source and would fractionate in certain regular patterns during biochemical reactions due to lanthanide contraction. They can be an excellent natural tracer in the environmental researches. After normalized by North American Shale Composite, the REEs pattern for the samples with the total of dissolved and suspended matters is characterized by a middle REE (MREE) enrichment and light REE (LREE) depletion. According to the previous theoretical studies, the MREE enrichment could be achieved by a selected adsorption of MREEs by organic matters, which is generally humic substance in natural surface water. It is suggested that the refinement of removal efficiency of SS should focus on

  8. Aquifer-specific Rare Earth Element patterns in groundwater of the Thuringian basin, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lonschinski, M.; Merten, D.; Büchel, G.

    2012-04-01

    The Thuringian basin is the major geological structural unit in the federal state of Thuringia, Germany. It consists of sandstones, limestones, clays, gypsum and salts, that were deposited from the Upper Permian until the Lower Jurassic (approximately 250 to 180 million years ago). The largest deposits are Buntsandstein, Muschelkalk and Keuper, all of Triassic age. Important aquifers are located in the Buntsandstein formations, which are cropping out widespread in the southeastern part and the northeastern part of the basin. These aquifers contain large resources of drinking water for the region. The hydrochemical properties of the groundwater with special emphasis on Rare Earth Elements (REE) are the main focus of this study. To investigate possible interactions between aquifers in the Buntsandstein with aquifers in adjoining formations, waters from Zechstein and Muschelkalk are considered, additionally. Since the REE in water in many case are originated from the minerals of the host rocks, REE fractionation pattern could provide information regarding the lithology of the solid aquifer material (Möller, 2002). Furthermore, interaction processes between solid and liquid phases or complexation in the water phase could be identified by REE fractionations (Ingri et al., 2000). Nevertheless, waters in circumneutral pH conditions could feature many different fractionation patterns (Johannesson & Zhou, 1997) making the interpretation difficult. Due to very low concentrations of REE in water at neutral pH condition, an enrichment procedure is necessary prior to REE determination by inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS). The used method is based on the procedure of Shabani et al. (1990) and yields enrichment factors of about 500. REE fractionation patterns were determined for different water types such as Na-Cl type originating from Zechstein, Ca-Mg-HCO3-SO4 and Ca-SO4 from Buntsandstein or Ca-HCO3 from Muschelkalk aquifers. The patterns are specific for

  9. Rare earth element metasomatism in hydrothermal systems: The Willsboro-Lewis wollastonite ores, New York, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Whitney, P.R.; Olmsted, J.F.

    1998-01-01

    Wollastonite ores and garnet-pyroxene skarns in the Willsboro-Lewis district, New York, USA were formed in a complex hydrothermal system associated with the emplacement of a large anorthosite pluton. Contact-metamorphic marbles were replaced by wollastonite, garnet, and clinopyroxene during infiltration metasomatism involving large volumes of water of chiefly meteoric origin. Rare earth elements (REE) in these rocks show large departures from the protolith REE distribution, indicative of substantial REE mobility. Three types of chondrite-normalized REE distribution patterns are present. The most common, found in ores and skarns containing andradite-rich garnet, is convex-up in the light REE (LREE) with a maximum at Pr and a positive Eu anomaly. Europium anomalies and Pr/Yb ratios are correlated with X(Ad) in garnet. This pattern (type C) results from uptake of REE from hydrothermal fluids by growing crystals of calcsilicate minerals, principally andradite, with amounts of LREE controlled by the difference in ionic radius between Ca++ and REE3+ in garnet X sites. The Eu anomaly results either from prior interaction of the fluids with plagioclase-rich, Eu-positive anorthositic rocks in and near the ore zone, or by enrichment of divalent Eu on growth surfaces of garnet followed by entrapment, or both. Relative enrichment in heavy REE (type H) occurs in ores and skarn where calcsilicates, including grossularitic garnet, in contact-metamorphic marble have been concentrated by dissolution of calcite. In most cases a negative Eu anomaly is inherited from the marble protolith. Skarns containing titanite and apatite exhibit high total REE, relative light REE enrichment, and negative Eu anomalies (type L). These appear to be intrusive igneous rocks (ferrodiorites or anorthositic gabbros) that have been converted to skarn by Ca metasomatism. REE, sequestered in titanite, apatite, and garnet, preserve the approximate REE distribution pattern of the igneous protolith. Post

  10. A new statistical analysis of rare earth element diffusion data in garnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, X.; Ague, J. J.

    2015-12-01

    The incorporation of rare earth elements (REE) in garnet, Sm and Lu in particular, links garnet chemical zoning to absolute age determinations. The application of REE-based geochronology depends critically on the diffusion behaviors of the parent and daughter isotopes. Previous experimental studies on REE diffusion in garnet, however, exhibit significant discrepancies that impact interpretations of garnet Sm/Nd and Lu/Hf ages.We present a new statistical framework to analyze diffusion data for REE using an Arrhenius relationship that accounts for oxygen fugacity, cation radius and garnet unit-cell dimensions [1]. Our approach is based on Bayesian statistics and is implemented by the Markov chain Monte Carlo method. A similar approach has been recently applied to model diffusion of divalent cations in garnet [2]. The analysis incorporates recent data [3] in addition to the data compilation in ref. [1]. We also include the inter-run bias that helps reconcile the discrepancies among data sets. This additional term estimates the reproducibility and other experimental variabilities not explicitly incorporated in the Arrhenius relationship [2] (e.g., compositional dependence [3] and water content).The fitted Arrhenius relationships are consistent with the models in ref. [3], as well as refs. [1]&[4] at high temperatures. Down-temperature extrapolation leads to >0.5 order of magnitude faster diffusion coefficients than in refs. [1]&[4] at <750 °C. The predicted diffusion coefficients are significantly slower than ref. [5]. The fast diffusion [5] was supported by a field test of the Pikwitonei Granulite—the garnet Sm/Nd age postdates the metamorphic peak (750 °C) by ~30 Myr [6], suggesting considerable resetting of the Sm/Nd system during cooling. However, the Pikwitonei Granulite is a recently recognized UHT terrane with peak temperature exceeding 900 °C [7]. The revised closure temperature (~730 °C) is consistent with our new diffusion model.[1] Carlson (2012) Am

  11. Aluminoborosilicate glasses codoped with rare-earth elements as radiation-protective covers for solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Malchukova, E. V. Abramov, A. S.; Nepomnyashchikh, A. I.; Terukov, E. I.

    2015-06-15

    The radiation hardness of aluminoborosilicate glasses codoped with rare-earth ions of Sm, Gd or Sm, Eu in various ratios is studied. The effect of codoping and β irradiation at a dose of 10{sup 9} Gr on the optical transmission and electron paramagnetic resonance spectra is examined. It is found that the introduction of Sm and Gd codopants in a 1 : 1 ratio reduces the number of radiation defects and raises the transmission of irradiated glasses in the visible spectral range.

  12. Laser-induced generation of micrometer-sized luminescent patterns on rare-earth-doped amorphous films

    SciTech Connect

    Zanatta, A.R.; Ribeiro, C.T.M.

    2004-12-01

    Room-temperature photoluminescence has been achieved from rare-earth-doped amorphous (a-) GeN films. The samples were prepared by the radio-frequency-sputtering method, and light emission from the rare-earth (RE) centers was obtained after irradiating the films with a highly focused laser beam. As a result of this laser annealing procedure, almost circular holes with approximately 1-{mu}m diameter were produced on the surface of the a-GeN films. The area nearby these holes correspond to crystalline Ge and coincide with the regions, where relatively strong RE-related luminescence takes place. These laser-annealed areas can be easily and conveniently managed in order to generate different microscopic luminescent patterns. Depending on the RE ion employed, visible and near-infrared light emission were obtained from the patterns so produced. The development of these micrometer-sized luminescent centers, as well as their probable mechanisms of excitation-recombination, will be presented and discussed. The importance of the current experimental results to future technological applications such as microdevices, for example, will also be outlined.

  13. VUV spectroscopy of nominally pure and rare-earth ions doped LiCaAIF6 single crystals as promising materials for 157 nm photolithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cefalas, Alkiviadis C.; Sarantopoulou, Evangelia; Kollia, Z.; Abdulsabirov, R. Y.; Korableva, S. L.; Naumov, A. K.; Semashko, V. V.; Kobe, S.; McGuiness, P. J.

    2002-07-01

    Recently it was found that birefringence is induced in CaF2 crystals when they are illuminated with laser light at 157 nm. Taking into consideration that CaF2 is the only optical material used in 157 nm photolithography today, the possibility to use new wide band gap fluoride crystals as optical elements for 157 nm photolithography, even those of non-cubic symmetry, should be considered. Additionally fluoride dielectric crystals with wide band gaps doped with trivalent rare-earth (RE) ions can be used as passive or active optical elements int eh VUV. For doped crystals, applications depend on the structure of the energy level pattern of the 4fn-15d electronic configuration and RE ion concentration. In this work we are exploiting the use of wide band gap fluoride dielectric crystals doped with RE ions. The laser induced fluorescence spectrum at 157 nm, and the absorption spectra of the LiCaAlF6 crystals, pure and doped with RE ions, were investigated in the VUV region of the spectrum. A new m4tehod for monitoring RE concentration in wide band gap fluoride crystals, that is based on vibrating sample magnetometer measurement is presented as well.

  14. Extraction processes and solvents for recovery of cesium, strontium, rare earth elements, technetium and actinides from liquid radioactive waste

    DOEpatents

    Zaitsev, Boris N.; Esimantovskiy, Vyacheslav M.; Lazarev, Leonard N.; Dzekun, Evgeniy G.; Romanovskiy, Valeriy N.; Todd, Terry A.; Brewer, Ken N.; Herbst, Ronald S.; Law, Jack D.

    2001-01-01

    Cesium and strontium are extracted from aqueous acidic radioactive waste containing rare earth elements, technetium and actinides, by contacting the waste with a composition of a complex organoboron compound and polyethylene glycol in an organofluorine diluent mixture. In a preferred embodiment the complex organoboron compound is chlorinated cobalt dicarbollide, the polyethylene glycol has the formula RC.sub.6 H.sub.4 (OCH.sub.2 CH.sub.2).sub.n OH, and the organofluorine diluent is a mixture of bis-tetrafluoropropyl ether of diethylene glycol with at least one of bis-tetrafluoropropyl ether of ethylene glycol and bis-tetrafluoropropyl formal. The rare earths, technetium and the actinides (especially uranium, plutonium and americium), are extracted from the aqueous phase using a phosphine oxide in a hydrocarbon diluent, and reextracted from the resulting organic phase into an aqueous phase by using a suitable strip reagent.

  15. Utilizing rare earth elements as tracers in high TDS reservoir brines in CCS applications

    DOE PAGESBeta

    McLing, Travis; Smith, William; Smith, Robert

    2014-12-31

    In this paper we report the result of research associated with the testing of a procedures necessary for utilizing natural occurring trace elements, specifically the Rare Earth Elements (REE) as geochemical tracers in Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) applications. Trace elements, particularly REE may be well suited to serve as in situ tracers for monitoring geochemical conditions and the migration of CO₂-charged waters within CCS storage systems. We have been conducting studies to determine the efficacy of using REE as a tracer and characterization tool in the laboratory, at a CCS analogue site in Soda Springs, Idaho, and at amore » proposed CCS reservoir at the Rock Springs Uplift, Wyoming. Results from field and laboratory studies have been encouraging and show that REE may be an effective tracer in CCS systems and overlying aquifers. In recent years, a series of studies using REE as a natural groundwater tracer have been conducted successfully at various locations around the globe. Additionally, REE and other trace elements have been successfully used as in situ tracers to describe the evolution of deep sedimentary Basins. Our goal has been to establish naturally occurring REE as a useful monitoring measuring and verification (MMV) tool in CCS research because formation brine chemistry will be particularly sensitive to changes in local equilibrium caused by the addition of large volumes of CO₂. Because brine within CCS target formations will have been in chemical equilibrium with the host rocks for millions of years, the addition of large volumes of CO₂ will cause reactions in the formation that will drive changes to the brine chemistry due to the pH change caused by the formation of carbonic acid. This CO₂ driven change in formation fluid chemistry will have a major impact on water rock reaction equilibrium in the formation, which will impart a change in the REE fingerprint of the brine that can measured and be used to monitor in situ reservoir

  16. Utilizing rare earth elements as tracers in high TDS reservoir brines in CCS applications

    SciTech Connect

    McLing, Travis; Smith, William; Smith, Robert

    2014-12-31

    In this paper we report the result of research associated with the testing of a procedures necessary for utilizing natural occurring trace elements, specifically the Rare Earth Elements (REE) as geochemical tracers in Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) applications. Trace elements, particularly REE may be well suited to serve as in situ tracers for monitoring geochemical conditions and the migration of CO₂-charged waters within CCS storage systems. We have been conducting studies to determine the efficacy of using REE as a tracer and characterization tool in the laboratory, at a CCS analogue site in Soda Springs, Idaho, and at a proposed CCS reservoir at the Rock Springs Uplift, Wyoming. Results from field and laboratory studies have been encouraging and show that REE may be an effective tracer in CCS systems and overlying aquifers. In recent years, a series of studies using REE as a natural groundwater tracer have been conducted successfully at various locations around the globe. Additionally, REE and other trace elements have been successfully used as in situ tracers to describe the evolution of deep sedimentary Basins. Our goal has been to establish naturally occurring REE as a useful monitoring measuring and verification (MMV) tool in CCS research because formation brine chemistry will be particularly sensitive to changes in local equilibrium caused by the addition of large volumes of CO₂. Because brine within CCS target formations will have been in chemical equilibrium with the host rocks for millions of years, the addition of large volumes of CO₂ will cause reactions in the formation that will drive changes to the brine chemistry due to the pH change caused by the formation of carbonic acid. This CO₂ driven change in formation fluid chemistry will have a major impact on water rock reaction equilibrium in the formation, which will impart a change in the REE fingerprint of the brine that can measured and be used to monitor in situ

  17. Mineral chemistry of Rare Earth Element (REE) mineralization, Browns Ranges, Western Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Nigel J.; Ciobanu, Cristiana L.; O'Rielly, Daniel; Wilson, Robin; Das, Kevin; Wade, Benjamin

    2013-07-01

    ‘Green energy futures’ are driving unprecedented demand for Rare Earth Elements (REE), underpinning significant exploration activity worldwide. Understanding how economic REE concentrations form is critical for development of exploration models. REE mineralisation in the Browns Ranges, Gordon Downs Region, Western Australia, comprises xenotime-dominant mineralisation hosted within Archaean to Palaeoproterozoic metasedimentary units (Browns Range Metamorphics). Mineralogical, petrographic and mineral-chemical investigation, including trace element analysis by Laser-Ablation Inductively-Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy, gives insights into the mineralogical distribution and partitioning of REE, and also provides evidence for the genetic evolution of the Browns Range REE mineralisation via a succession of hydrothermal processes. Two main REE-bearing minerals are identified: xenotime [(Y,REE)PO4], which is HREE selective; and subordinate florencite [(REEAl3(PO4)2(OH)6] which is LREE selective. Two morphological generations of xenotime are recognised; compositions are however consistent. Xenotime contains Dy (up to 6.5 wt.%), Er (up to 4.35 wt.%), Gd (up to 7.56 wt.%), Yb (up to 4.65 wt.%) and Y (up to 43.3 wt.%). Laser Ablation ICP-MS element mapping revealed a subtle compositional zoning in some xenotime grains. LREE appear concentrated in the grain cores or closest to the initial point of growth whereas HREE, particularly Tm, Yb and Lu, are highest at the outer margins of the grains. The HREE enrichment at the outer margins is mimicked by As, Sc, V, Sr, U, Th and radiogenic Pb. Florencite is commonly zoned and contains Ce (up to 11.54 wt.%), Nd (up to 10.05 wt.%) and La (up to 5.40 wt.%) and is also notably enriched in Sr (up to 11.63 wt.%) and Ca. Zircon (which is not a significant contributor of REEs overall due to its low abundance in the rocks) is also enriched in REE (up to 13 wt.% ΣREE) and is the principal host of Sc (up to 0.8 wt.%). Early, coarse

  18. 2nd International Symposium on Fundamental Aspects of Rare-earth Elements Mining and Separation and Modern Materials Engineering (REES-2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavadyan, Levon, Prof; Sachkov, Viktor, Prof; Godymchuk, Anna, Dr.; Bogdan, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The 2nd International Symposium «Fundamental Aspects of Rare-earth Elements Mining and Separation and Modern Materials Engineering» (REES2015) was jointly organized by Tomsk State University (Russia), National Academy of Science (Armenia), Shenyang Polytechnic University (China), Moscow Institute of Physics and Engineering (Russia), Siberian Physical-technical Institute (Russia), and Tomsk Polytechnic University (Russia) in September, 7-15, 2015, Belokuriha, Russia. The Symposium provided a high quality of presentations and gathered engineers, scientists, academicians, and young researchers working in the field of rare and rare earth elements mining, modification, separation, elaboration and application, in order to facilitate aggregation and sharing interests and results for a better collaboration and activity visibility. The goal of the REES2015 was to bring researchers and practitioners together to share the latest knowledge on rare and rare earth elements technologies. The Symposium was aimed at presenting new trends in rare and rare earth elements mining, research and separation and recent achievements in advanced materials elaboration and developments for different purposes, as well as strengthening the already existing contacts between manufactures, highly-qualified specialists and young scientists. The topics of the REES2015 were: (1) Problems of extraction and separation of rare and rare earth elements; (2) Methods and approaches to the separation and isolation of rare and rare earth elements with ultra-high purity; (3) Industrial technologies of production and separation of rare and rare earth elements; (4) Economic aspects in technology of rare and rare earth elements; and (5) Rare and rare earth based materials (application in metallurgy, catalysis, medicine, optoelectronics, etc.). We want to thank the Organizing Committee, the Universities and Sponsors supporting the Symposium, and everyone who contributed to the organization of the event and to

  19. Rare earth element and uranium-thorium variations in tufa deposits from the Mono Basin, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcox, E. S.; Tomascak, P. B.; Hemming, N.; Hemming, S. R.; Rasbury, T.; Stine, S.; Zimmerman, S. R.

    2009-12-01

    Samples of fossil tufa deposits from several localities in the Mono Basin, eastern California, were analyzed for trace element concentrations in order to better understand changes in lake composition in the past. These deposits were formed during the last glacial cycle, mostly during deglaciation (Benson et al., 1990, PPP). Three elevations are represented by the analyses. Samples from near Highway 167 were sampled between 2063 and 2069 m asl. Samples from near Thompson Road were sampled between 2015 and 2021 m. One layered mound was sampled at 1955 m. Concentrations of the lanthanide rare earth elements (REE), in particular the heavy/light (HREE/LREE) distributions, have been shown to be sensitive to alkalinity in modern saline lakes (e.g., Johannesson et al., 1994, GRL, 21, 773-776), and the same has been suggested for U/Th (Anderson et al., 1982, Science, 216, 514-516). Holocene to near-modern tufa towers exist in shallow water and around the current shoreline (1945 m). Tufa towers above 2000 m include a characteristic morphology termed thinolite, interpreted to represent pseudomorphs after the very cold water mineral ikaite. Most lower elevation towers do not have the thinolite morphology, but some layered tufa mounds at low elevations include several layers of thinolite, such as the one sampled for this project. Analyses were made on millimeter-scale bulk samples from tufa towers. Measurements were made on sample solutions with a Varian 820MS quadrupole ICP-MS. Mono Basin tufa samples have total REE concentrations ranging from 0.029 to 0.77 times average shales. Samples have flat to moderately HREE-enriched shale-normalized patterns with limited overall variability ([La/Lu]SN of 1.8 to 9.6) but with some variability in the slope of the HREE portion of the patterns. Tufa towers sampled from three elevations have (Gd/Lu)SN of 0.40 to 1.5. The REE patterns of most samples have small positive Ce anomalies, but a minority of samples, all from the layered tufa mound

  20. Natural and anthropogenic rare earth elements in Lago de Paranoá, Brasilia, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merschel, Gila; Baldewein, Linda; Bau, Michael; Dantas, Elton Luiz; Walde, Detlef; Bühn, Bernhard

    2014-05-01

    Rare earth elements (REE) belong to the group of particle reactive elements and occur at ultratrace levels in natural waters. They are exclusively trivalent, but Ce and Eu can also be tetravalent and divalent, respectively, depending on the redox-level, the pH and the temperature of the fluid. Due to these redox changes, normalized REE patterns may show Ce and/or Eu anomalies. Recently, these high-tech metals raised significant public attention, as they are of great economic importance and consumption and hence release into the environment increased sharply. The most prominent example of a REE contamination is anthropogenic Gd, which is derived from Gd-based contrast agents used in magnetic resonance imaging. Due to their high stabilities, these compounds are not readily removed by commonly applied waste water treatment technologies and, therefore, are released from treatment plants into surface and ground waters. Hence, this anthropogenic Gd can be used as a tracer for the presence of waste water-derived substances such as pharmaceuticals and personal care products in river, lake, ground and tap waters. Lago de Paranoá is an artificial reservoir lake in the city of Brasilia, Brazil, and is currently considered a potential freshwater resource. The city's two waste water treatment plants are located on its shore and their effluents are discharged into the lake. To investigate the level of contamination, we took water samples at 11 stations in the lake and compared the REE concentrations in unfiltered and filtered (<200 nm) lake water. The unfiltered water samples show light REE enrichment (LaSN/YbSN: 1.37-1.98) and high REE concentrations (Sum REE: 192 - 476 ng/L), while the unfiltered water samples are heavy REE enriched (LaSN/YbSN: 0.15-0.61) at lower concentrations (Sum REE: 50 - 85 ng/L). This is due to the fact that light REE are preferentially bound to particle surfaces, while the heavy REE are preferentially complexed with ligands in solution. In marked

  1. Synthesis and optical characterizations of undoped and rare-earth-doped CaF{sub 2} nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Bensalah, A. . E-mail: amina-bensalah@enscp.fr; Mortier, M.; Patriarche, G.; Gredin, P.; Vivien, D.

    2006-08-15

    The synthesis of undoped as well as Yb or Er-doped CaF{sub 2} nanocrystals using a reverse micelle method is reported. X-ray powder diffraction and transmission electron microscopy analysis showed that the products were single phased and rather monodispersed with an average particles size around 20 nm. The emission spectra and fluorescence decay times of both Yb{sup 3+} and Er{sup 3+} rare earths (RE) ions in CaF{sub 2} nanoparticles are presented. The particles size is increased by heating the as-obtained nanoparticles at different temperatures. The effect of annealing on the optical properties of the two RE ions in CaF{sub 2} is also investigated. - Graphical abstract: Transmission Electron Microscopy micrograph of CaF{sub 2} nanoparticles synthesized by a reverse-micelle method.

  2. Selective ion exchange recovery of rare earth elements from uranium mining solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rychkov, Vladimir N.; Kirillov, Evgeny V.; Kirillov, Sergey V.; Bunkov, Grigory M.; Mashkovtsev, Maxim A.; Botalov, Maxim S.; Semenishchev, Vladimir S.; Volkovich, Vladimir A.

    2016-09-01

    A comparative study of rare earth, ferric and aluminum ions ion exchange behavior on gel sulfonated p;olystyrene cation exchange resins depending on the degree of the matrix cross-linking and pH of the solution is presented. Selective ion exchange of REEs is possible at the pH range of 1.5-2.0 using strongly acidic cation exchange resins containing more than 8 % of DVB. The preliminary results of testing the efficiency of REEs recovery from the industrial uranium underground leaching solutions are also presented.

  3. β-Decay of Neutron-Rich Nuclei around 158Nd and the Origin of Rare-Earth Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, J.; Nishimura, S.; Lorusso, G.; Xu, Z. Y.; Ideguchi, E.; Simpson, G. S.; Baba, H.; Browne, F.; Daido, R.; Doornenbal, P.; Fang, Y. F.; Isobe, T.; Li, Z.; Patel, Z.; Rice, S.; Sinclair, L.; Söderström, P.-A.; Sumikama, T.; Watanabe, H.; Yagi, A.; Yokoyama, R.; Aoi, N.; Bello Garrote, F. L.; Benzoni, G.; Gey, G.; Gottardo, A.; Nishibata, H.; Odahara, A.; Sakurai, H.; Tanaka, M.; Taprogge, J.; Yamamoto, T.

    A large fraction of the rare-earth elements around mass number A = 160 observed in the solar system are produced in the astrophysical rapid (r-) neutron capture process. However, current stellar models cannot completely explain the relative abundance of these elements partially because of nuclear physics uncertainties. To address this problem, a β-decay spectroscopy experiment was performed at the RI Beam Factory (RIBF), aimed at studying a wide region of very neutron-rich nuclei around 158Nd. The data from this experiment provides a test of nuclear models as well as experimental inputs for r-process calculations.

  4. Rare earth element variations resulting from inversion of pigeonite and subsolidus reequilibration in lunar ferroan anorthosites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    James, O.B.; Floss, C.; McGee, J.J.

    2002-01-01

    We present results of a secondary ion mass spectrometry study of the rare earth elements (REEs) in the minerals of two samples of lunar ferroan anorthosite, and the results are applicable to studies of REEs in all igneous rocks, no matter what their planet of origin. Our pyroxene analyses are used to determine solid-solid REE distribution coefficients (D = CREE in low-Ca pyroxene/CREE in augite) in orthopyroxene-augite pairs derived by inversion of pigeonite. Our data and predictions from crystal-chemical considerations indicate that as primary pigeonite inverts to orthopyroxene plus augite and subsolidus reequilibration proceeds, the solid-solid Ds for orthopyroxene-augite pairs progressively decrease for all REEs; the decrease is greatest for the LREEs. The REE pattern of solid-solid Ds for inversion-derived pyroxene pairs is close to a straight line for Sm-Lu and turns upward for REEs lighter than Sm; the shape of this pattern is predicted by the shapes of the REE patterns for the individual minerals. Equilibrium liquids calculated for one sample from the compositions of primary phases, using measured or experimentally determined solid-liquid Ds, have chondrite-normalized REE patterns that are very slightly enriched in LREEs. The plagioclase equilibrium liquid is overall less rich in REEs than pyroxene equilibrium liquids, and the discrepancy probably arises because the calculated plagioclase equilibrium liquid represents a liquid earlier in the fractionation sequence than the pyroxene equilibrium liquids. "Equilibrium" liquids calculated from the compositions of inversion-derived pyroxenes or orthopyroxene derived by reaction of olivine are LREE depleted (in some cases substantially) in comparison with equilibrium liquids calculated from the compositions of primary phases. These discrepancies arise because the inversion-derived and reaction-derived pyroxenes did not crystallize directly from liquid, and the use of solid-liquid Ds is inappropriate. The LREE

  5. Reduction of magnetic damping constant of FeCo films by rare-earth Gd doping

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Xiaobin; Xi, Li Li, Yue; Han, Xuemeng; Li, Dong; Wang, Zhen; Zuo, Yalu

    2014-08-18

    Magnetic damping constant (α) is one of the key parameters to determine the critical current density of spin-transfer-torque devices and the switching time of magnetization for ultra-high-frequency devices. In this work, Gd doped FeCo films were fabricated to investigate α based on the ferromagnetic resonance technique. Gd doping not only can efficiently decrease the magnetic inhomogeneity and the extrinsic part of α but also the Landé g-factor and intrinsic part of α. The obtained α was roughly proportional to (g-2){sup 2} and the magnetic anisotropic constant, indicating that the decreased spin-orbit interaction decreases α by Gd doping.

  6. Demonstration of ultra-low NA rare-earth doped step index fiber for applications in high power fiber lasers.

    PubMed

    Jain, Deepak; Jung, Yongmin; Barua, Pranabesh; Alam, Shaiful; Sahu, Jayanta K

    2015-03-23

    In this paper, we report the mode area scaling of a rare-earth doped step index fiber by using low numerical aperture. Numerical simulations show the possibility of achieving an effective area of ~700 um² (including bend induced effective area reduction) at a bend diameter of 32 cm from a 35 μm core fiber with a numerical aperture of 0.038. An effective single mode operation is ensured following the criterion of the fundamental mode loss to be lower than 0.1 dB/m while ensuring the higher order modes loss to be higher than 10 dB/m at a wavelength of 1060 nm. Our optimized modified chemical vapor deposition process in conjunction with solution doping process allows fabrication of an Yb-doped step index fiber having an ultra-low numerical aperture of ~0.038. Experimental results confirm a Gaussian output beam from a 35 μm core fiber validating our simulation results. Fiber shows an excellent laser efficiency of ~81%and aM² less than 1.1. PMID:25837082

  7. Luminescence properties of barium--gadolinium-titanate ceramics doped with rare-earth ions (Eu3+ and Tb3+).

    PubMed

    Hemasundara Raju, S; Muni Sudhakar, B; Sudhakar Reddy, B; Dhoble, S J; Thyagarajan, K; Nageswara Raju, C

    2014-11-01

    Barium-gadolinium-titanate (BaGd2 Ti4 O12) powder ceramics doped with rare-earth ions (Eu(3+) and Tb(3+)) were synthesized by a solid-state reaction method. From the X-ray diffraction spectrum, it was observed that Eu(3+) and Tb(3+):BaGd2 Ti4 O12 powder ceramics are crystallized in the form of an orthorhombic structure. Scanning electron microscopy image shows that the particles are agglomerated and the particle size is about 200 nm. Eu(3+) - and Tb(3+) -doped BaGd2 Ti4 O12 powder ceramics were examined by energy dispersive X-ray analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, photoluminescence and thermoluminescence (TL) spectra. Emission spectra of Eu(3+)-doped BaGd2 Ti4 O12 powder ceramics showed bright red emission at 613 nm ((5)D0 →(7)F2) with an excitation wavelength λ(exci)  = 408 nm ((7)F0 → (5)D3) and Tb(3+):BaGd2 Ti4 O12 ceramic powder has shown green emission at 534 nm ((5)D4 → (7)F5) with an excitation wavelength λ(exci)  = 331 nm (((7)F6 → (5)D1). TL spectra show that Eu(3+) and Tb(3+) ions affect TL sensitivity.

  8. Rare-Earth Doped Wide Bandgap Oxide Semiconductor Materials and Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wellenius, Ian Patrick

    Amorphous oxide semiconductors composed of indium gallium zinc oxide are transparent to visible light and have higher electron mobilities than conventional amorphous semiconductors, such as amorphous silicon. The advantages of higher switching speed, lack of dangling bonds leading to good electronic stability and visible spectrum transparency of amorphous oxide semiconductor devices are expected to lead to numerous applications, including transparent displays and flexible electronics. In this thesis the integration of transparent thin film transistors with transparent electroluminescent pixels was investigated. Compared with display technologies employing organic semiconductors that degrade with exposure to moisture and ultraviolet light, the all-oxide structure of this device is expected to be environmentally robust. This is believed to be the first demonstration of an integrated active matrix pixel using amorphous oxide semiconductor materials as both the light emitter and addressing circuit elements. The transparent active matrix pixel was designed, fabricated and characterized, that integrated amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide (IGZO) thin film transistors (TFTs) with a europium-doped IGZO thin film electroluminescent (TFEL) device. The integrated circuits were fabricated using room temperature pulsed laser deposition (PLD) of IGZO and ITO thin films onto substrates of Corning 7059 glass, sputter coated with an ITO back contact and subsequent atomic layer deposited ATO high-k dielectric. A second ITO layer is deposited by PLD as a contact and interconnect layer. All deposition steps were carried out at room temperature. In addition to the integration task, an important part of this thesis concerns the investigation of europium as a dopant in different oxide hosts including gallium oxide, gadolinium oxide, and amorphous IGZO. Amorphous IGZO was chosen for the integration task since it could be deposited at room temperature, however it was found that the

  9. High contents of rare earth elements (REEs) in stream waters of a Cu-Pb-Zn mining area.

    PubMed

    Protano, G; Riccobono, F

    2002-01-01

    Stream waters draining an old mining area present very high rare earth element (REE) contents, reaching 928 microg/l as the maximum total value (sigmaREE). The middle rare earth elements (MREEs) are usually enriched with respect to both the light (LREEs) and heavy (HREEs) elements of this group, producing a characteristic "roof-shaped" pattern of the shale Post-Archean Australian Shales-normalized concentrations. At the Fenice Capanne Mine (FCM), the most important base metal mine of the study area, the REE source coincides with the mine tailings, mostly the oldest ones composed of iron-rich materials. The geochemical history of the REEs released into Noni stream from wastes in the FCM area is strictly determined by the pH, which controls the REE speciation and in-stream processes. The formation of Al-rich and mainly Fe-rich flocs effectively scavenges the REEs, which are readily and drastically removed from the solution when the pH approaches neutrality. Leaching experiments performed on flocs and waste materials demonstrate that Fe-oxides/oxyhydroxides play a key role in the release of lanthanide elements into stream waters. The origin of the "roof-shaped" REE distribution pattern as well as the peculiar geochemical behavior of some lanthanide elements in the aqueous system are discussed. PMID:11911532

  10. [Rare earth elements content in farmland soils and crops of the surrounding copper mining and smelting plant in Jiangxi province and evaluation of its ecological risk].

    PubMed

    Jin, Shu-Lan; Huang, Yi-Zong; Wang, Fei; Xu, Feng; Wang, Xiao-Ling; Gao, Zhu; Hu, Ying; Qiao Min; Li, Jin; Xiang, Meng

    2015-03-01

    Rare earth elements content in farmland soils and crops of the surrounding copper mining and smelting plant in Jiangxi province was studied. The results showed that copper mining and smelting could increase the content of rare earth elements in soils and crops. Rare earth elements content in farmland soils of the surrounding Yinshan Lead Zinc Copper Mine and Guixi Smelting Plant varied from 112.42 to 397.02 mg x kg(-1) and 48.81 to 250.06 mg x kg(-1), and the average content was 254.84 mg x kg(-1) and 144.21 mg x kg(-1), respectively. The average contents of rare earth elements in soils in these two areas were 1.21 times and 0.68 times of the background value in Jiangxi province, 1.36 times and 0.77 times of the domestic background value, 3.59 times and 2.03 times of the control samples, respectively. Rare earth elements content in 10 crops of the surrounding Guixi Smelting Plant varied from 0.35 to 2.87 mg x kg(-1). The contents of rare earth elements in the leaves of crops were higher than those in stem and root. The contents of rare earth elements in Tomato, lettuce leaves and radish leaves were respectively 2.87 mg x kg(-1), 1.58 mg x kg(-1) and 0.80 mg x kg(-1), which were well above the hygienic standard limit of rare earth elements in vegetables and fruits (0.70 mg x kg(-1)). According to the health risk assessment method recommended by America Environmental Protection Bureau (USEPA), we found that the residents' lifelong average daily intake of rare earth elements was 17.72 mg x (kg x d)(-1), lower than the critical value of rare earth elements damage to human health. The results suggested that people must pay attention to the impact of rare earth elements on the surrounding environment when they mine and smelt copper ore in Jiangxi.

  11. An Experimental Study on Using Rare Earth Elements to Trace Non-point source Phosphorous LossA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, T.

    2011-12-01

    Controlling phosphorous (P) inputs through management of its sources and transport is critical for limiting freshwater eutrophication. Rare earth elements (REEs) have been successfully used in the analysis of soil erosion and pollutant sources, as well as in the analysis of mineral genesis. To better understand the potential for REE use in tracing non-point sources of P, we examined the combined fate of REEs and P in Chinese soils amended with REEs and documented the formation of REE-P compounds. Laboratory leaching experiments and artificial simulated rainfall experiments were conducted. Vertical leaching transfers of REEs and P were relatively small, with transport depths less than 6 cm for most REEs and P. Export of applied REEs in leachate accounted for less that 5% of inputs. The vertical mobility order of REEs and P in Chinese soils was greatest for purple soil, followed by terra nera soil, then red soil, followed by cinnamon soil, and finally loess soil. Losses of rare earth elements and P in surface runoff exhibited a parabolic relationship to simulated rainfall intensity. With greater exogenous La application, the amount of water soluble P, bicarbonate-extractable P and hydroxide-extractable P decreased significantly, while acid-extractable and residual forms of P increased significantly. In addition, characteristics of exogenous rare earth elements (REEs) and P and their losses with surface runoff (both in the water and sediments) during simulated rainfall experiments (83 mm h-1) were investigated. The results revealed that most REEs (La, 94%; Nd, 93%; Sm, 96%) and P (96%) transported with sediments in the runoff. The total amounts of losses of REEs and P in the runoff were significantly correlated, suggesting the possibility of using REEs to trace the fate of agricultural nonpoint P losses.

  12. Light source with carbon nanotubes field emission cathode and rare-earth doped nanocrystalline phosphors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Psuja, P.; Strek, W.

    2007-09-01

    In this work we report a new carbon nanotubes field emission (CNT-FED) light source with nanocrystalline phosphors. The nanocrystalline powders of cerium doped yttrium aluminum garnet were obtained by modified Pechini method. The phosphor has been electrophoretically deposited on ITO-glass substrates. The cathode composed of carbon nanotubes was fabricated in the same manner. A light source was assembled and tested. Low-voltage cathodoluminescent spectra and I-V characteristics of fabricated cathodes were measured. A possibility of application of Ce doped nanocrystalline YAG phosphor in the field emission displays (FEDs) was discussed.

  13. Luminescent rare earth vanadate nanoparticles doped with Eu3+ and Bi3 for sensing and imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escudero, Alberto; Carrillo-Carrión, Carolina; Zyuzin, Mikhail; Hartmann, Raimo; Ashraf, Sumaira; Parak, Wolfgang J.

    2016-03-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are attracting interest in nanomedicine due to their potential medical applications, ranging from optical biolabels and contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging to carriers for drug and gene delivery for disease therapy.[1] Rare earth (RE) based nanophosphors exhibit important advantages compared with other available luminescent materials, such as quantum dots and nanostructures functionalized with organic dyes, due to their lower toxicities, photostabilities, high thermal and chemical stabilities, high luminescence quantum yields, and sharp emission bands.[2] Yttrium orthovanadate NPs doped with Eu3+ and Bi3+, functionalized with poly acryl acid (PAA), and excitable by near-ultraviolet light have been synthesized by homogeneous precipitation at 120 °C from solutions of rare earth precursors (yttrium acetylacetonate and europium nitrate), bismuth nitrate, sodium orthovanadate, and PAA, in an ethylene glycol/water mixture. Quasispheres with sizes from 93 to 51 nm were obtained. The as synthesized NPs were already functionalized with PAA. The NPs showed the typical red luminescence of Eu3+, which can be excited with near-UV light through an energy transfer from the vanadate anion. The presence of Bi3+ shifts the maximum of the broad excitation band from 280 nm to 342 nm. This excitation path is much more efficient than the direct excitation of the Eu3+ electronic levels, and results in a much higher luminescence. The NPs can be uptaken by HeLa cells, and are eventually located in the lysosomes after being internalized. Finally, the functionalization with PAA provides -COOH anchors for adding functional ligands of biomedical interest that can be used for sensing applications.

  14. Mapping of rare earth elements in nuclear waste glass-ceramic using micro laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Motto-Ros, V.; Panczer, G.; De Ligny, D.; Yu, J.; Benoit, J. M.; Dussossoy, J. L.; Peuget, S.

    2013-09-01

    A micro-LIBS system was set up based on a quadruple Nd:YAG laser at 266 nm coupled with a microscope. Elemental mapping was performed on a Mo-rich glass-ceramic sample containing CaMoO4 crystallites hundreds of microns in length and about 25 μm in section diameter. The topography of single-shot laser-induced craters was characterized using an atomic force microscope (AFM), which revealed a crater size less than 7 μm. Mappings of Mo, Ca, Sr, Al, Fe, Zr and rare earth elements such as Eu, Nd, Pr and La were undertaken. Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) was conducted to validate the micro-LIBS analysis. Principal components analysis calculation was used to investigate the correlation of elements in the two phases of glass-ceramic. Correlation between Ca, Sr, rare earth elements and Mo indicates their preferential incorporation into the calcium molybdate crystalline phase. Anti-correlation between Fe, Zr, Al and Mo revealed their affinity to the glass phase.

  15. Rare earth element abundances in rocks and minerals from the Fiskenaesset Complex, West Greenland. [comparison with lunar anorthosites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, P.; Fishlock, S. J.; Laul, J. C.; Cooper, T. D.; Conard, R. L.; Boynton, W. V.; Schmitt, R. A.

    1976-01-01

    The paper reports activation-analysis determinations of rare-earth-element (REE) and other trace-element concentrations in selected rocks, plagioclase, and mafic separates from the Fiskenaesset Complex. The REE abundances are found to be very low and atypical in comparison with other terrestrial anorthosites. The plagioclases are shown to be characterized by a deficiency in heavy RE elements relative to light ones and a positive Eu anomaly, while the mafic separates are enriched in heavy rare earths and have no Eu anomaly, except in one sample. It is found that the bulk and trace-element abundances of the plagioclases are similar to those observed in some lunar anorthosites, but the degree of Eu anomaly is less in the plagioclases. The data are taken as confirmation of the idea that fractionation processes were involved in the origin of the Complex, and it is concluded that the Complex may have been produced from a magma generated by partial melting of a garnet-bearing source.

  16. Separation and determination of rare earth elements by Dowex 2-X8 resin using sodium trimetaphosphate as elution agent.

    PubMed

    Sungur, S K; Akseli, A

    2000-04-01

    The distribution coefficients of rare earth elements and thorium with Dowex 2-X8, 200-400 mesh, a strongly basic anion-exchange resin, have been determined regarding four different concentrations of sodium trimetaphosphate (3 x 10(-3), 5 x 10(-3), 7 x 10(-3) and 0.01 M). The separation of the rare earths and thorium obtained from an Australian monazite has been investigated by anion-exchange chromatography with sodium trimetaphosphate concentration gradient on a Dowex 2-X8 ion-exchange columns. The order of elution of the elements was the reverse of the order of elution of the same elements on Dowex 1 resin. The elution was investigated using 5 mg and 250 mg samples. In the separation of 5 mg samples, all elements were separated in 29 min. It has been seen that the elution peaks are narrow, tailing effects are very small, Dy and Y are well separated. Qualitative and quantitative determinations were realized by spectrofluorometry. PMID:10817370

  17. China's rare-earth industry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tse, Pui-Kwan

    2011-01-01

    Introduction China's dominant position as the producer of over 95 percent of the world output of rare-earth minerals and rapid increases in the consumption of rare earths owing to the emergence of new clean-energy and defense-related technologies, combined with China's decisions to restrict exports of rare earths, have resulted in heightened concerns about the future availability of rare earths. As a result, industrial countries such as Japan, the United States, and countries of the European Union face tighter supplies and higher prices for rare earths. This paper briefly reviews China's rare-earth production, consumption, and reserves and the important policies and regulations regarding the production and trade of rare earths, including recently announced export quotas. The 15 lanthanide elements-lanthanum, cerium, praseodymium, neodymium, promethium, samarium, europium, gadolinium, terbium, dysprosium, holmium, erbium, thulium, ytterbium, and lutetium (atomic numbers 57-71)-were originally known as the rare earths from their occurrence in oxides mixtures. Recently, some researchers have included two other elements-scandium and yttrium-in their discussion of rare earths. Yttrium (atomic number 39), which lies above lanthanum in transition group III of the periodic table and has a similar 3+ ion with a noble gas core, has both atomic and ionic radii similar in size to those of terbium and dysprosium and is generally found in nature with lanthanides. Scandium (atomic number 21) has a smaller ionic radius than yttrium and the lanthanides, and its chemical behavior is intermediate between that of aluminum and the lanthanides. It is found in nature with the lanthanides and yttrium. Rare earths are used widely in high-technology and clean-energy products because they impart special properties of magnetism, luminescence, and strength. Rare earths are also used in weapon systems to obtain the same properties.

  18. Rare earth element contents and multiple mantle sources of the transform-related Mount Edgecumbe basalts, southeastern Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Riehle, J.R.; Budahn, J.R.; Lanphere, M.A.; Brew, D.A.

    1994-01-01

    Pleistocene basalt of the Mount Edgecumbe volcanic field (MEF) is subdivided into a plagioclase type and an olivine type. Th/La ratios of plagioclase basalt are similar to those of mid-ocean-ridge basalt (MORB), whereas those of olivine basalt are of continental affinity. Rare earth element (REE) contents of the olivine basalt, which resemble those of transitional MORB, are modelled by 10-15% partial melting of fertile spinel-plagioclase lherzolite followed by removal of 8-13% olivine. It is concluded that olivine basalt originated in subcontinental spinel lherzolite and that plagioclase basalt may have originated in suboceanic lithosphere of the Pacific plate. -from Authors

  19. Activating the expression of bacterial cryptic genes by rpoB mutations in RNA polymerase or by rare earth elements.

    PubMed

    Ochi, Kozo; Tanaka, Yukinori; Tojo, Shigeo

    2014-02-01

    Since bacteria were found to contain genes encoding enzymes that synthesize a plethora of potential secondary metabolites, interest has grown in the activation of these cryptic pathways. Homologous and heterologous expression of these cryptic secondary metabolite-biosynthetic genes, often "silent" under ordinary laboratory fermentation conditions, may lead to the discovery of novel secondary metabolites. We review current progress on this topic, describing concepts for activating silent genes. We especially focus on genetic manipulation of transcription and translation, as well as the utilization of rare earth elements as a novel method to activate the silent genes. The possible roles of silent genes in bacterial physiology are also discussed. PMID:24127067

  20. Phase stable rare earth garnets

    DOEpatents

    Kuntz, Joshua D.; Cherepy, Nerine J.; Roberts, Jeffery J.; Payne, Stephen A.

    2013-06-11

    A transparent ceramic according to one embodiment includes a rare earth garnet comprising A.sub.hB.sub.iC.sub.jO.sub.12, where h is 3.+-.10%, i is 2.+-.10%, and j is 3.+-.10%. A includes a rare earth element or a mixture of rare earth elements, B includes at least one of aluminum, gallium and scandium, and C includes at least one of aluminum, gallium and scandium, where A is at a dodecahedral site of the garnet, B is at an octahedral site of the garnet, and C is at a tetrahedral site of the garnet. In one embodiment, the rare earth garment has scintillation properties. A radiation detector in one embodiment includes a transparent ceramic as described above and a photo detector optically coupled to the rare earth garnet.

  1. Low temperature glassy relaxation in rare earth doped Fe3O4 nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laha, Suvra; Lawes, Gavin

    2012-10-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles typically exhibit glassy relaxation at low temperature, which can be affected by doping. Gadolinium and Lanthanum doped Fe3O4 nanoparticles were synthesized using a chemical co-precipitation method. The structural and optical properties of these nanoparticles were characterized by using Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) and the Raman spectroscopy. The TEM images show the formation of nanoparticles of size ranging between 12-14 nm and Raman spectra are consistent with the formation of Fe3O4. AC magnetic measurements were also conducted on these nanoparticles. From the ac out-of-phase susceptibility (χ//) vs temperature (T) graphs, it is observed that the doped nanoparticles show larger amplitude relaxation peaks at low temperature as compared to the undoped particles. These magnetic relaxation features develop roughly between 25K to 35K and show frequency dependence. The increased magnetic relaxation at low temperatures can be attributed to structural defects which may arise due to the doping of lanthanides in Fe3O4 nanoparticles.

  2. Hydrogels dispersed by doped rare earth fluoride nanocrystals: ionic liquid dispersion and down/up-conversion luminescence.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zhi-Yuan; Jia, Li-Ping; Yan, Bing

    2014-01-01

    Two typical kinds of rare earth fluoride nanocrystals codoped with rare earth ions (Eu(3+) and Tm(3+)/Er(3+),Yb(3+)) are synthesized and dispersed in ionic liquid compound (1-chlorohexane-3-methylimidazolium chloride, abbreviated as [C6mim][Cl]). Assisted by agarose, the luminescent hydrogels are prepared homogeneously. The down/up-conversion luminescence of these hydrogels can be realized for the dispersed rare earth fluoride nanocrystals. The results provide a strategy to prepare luminescent (especially up-conversion luminescent) hydrogels with ionic liquid to disperse rare earth fluoride nanocrystals.

  3. Optical properties and size distribution of the nanocolloids made of rare-earth ion-doped NaYF4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Darayas N.; Lewis, Ashley; Wright, Donald M.; Lewis, Danielle; Valentine, Rueben; Valentine, Maucus; Wessley, Dennis; Sarkisov, Sergey; Darwish, Abdalla M.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper we investigate optical properties and size distribution of the nano-colloids made of trivalent rare-earth ion doped fluorides: holmium and ytterbium, thulium and ytterbium, and erbium and ytterbium co-doped NaYF4. These materials were synthesized by using simple co-precipitation synthetic method. The initially prepared micro-crystals had very weak or no visible upconversion fluorescence signals when being pumped with a 980-nm laser. The fluorescence intensity significantly increased after the crystals were annealed at a temperature of 400°C - 600°C undergoing the transition from cubic alpha to hexagonal beta phase of the fluoride host. Nano-colloids of the crystals were made in polar solvents using the laser ablation and ball milling methods. Size analyses of the prepared nano-colloids were conducted using a dynamic light scatterometer and atomic force microscope. The nano-colloids were filled in holey PCFs and their fluorescent properties were studied and the feasibility of new a type of fiber amplifier/laser was evaluated.

  4. Effect of rare earth radius and concentration on the structural and transport properties of doped Mn Zn ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ateia, E.; Ahmed, M. A.; El-Aziz, A. K.

    2007-04-01

    Dielectric constant ( ɛ'), AC conductivity ( σ), and seebeck coefficient ( S) have been measured for the ferrite samples of the general formula Mn 0.5Zn 0.5R yFe 2O 4; where R=Dy, Gd, Sm, Ce, and La prepared by standard ceramic technique and sintered at 1200 °C with a heating rate 4 °C/min. X-ray diffractograms show that all samples posses the spinel structure with the appearance of small peaks representing secondary phases. There is a lowering in the porosity starting after Sm-doped samples due to the presence of the secondary phases, which limits the grain growth. Due to seebeck measurements the manganese-zinc (Mn-Zn) ferrite doped with the rare earth has been classified as P-type semiconductors. It is possible to increase the electrical resistivity by using a small quantity of Dy 3+ ions substitutions owing to the structural heterogeneity generated by the insulating intergranular layers. The isolation of the grains is the most promising approaches for further reduction in the eddy current losses at the operating frequencies.

  5. Distribution of rare earth elements in an alluvial aquifer affected by acid mine drainage: the Guadiamar aquifer (SW Spain).

    PubMed

    Olías, M; Cerón, J C; Fernández, I; De la Rosa, J

    2005-05-01

    This work analyses the spatial distribution, the origin, and the shale-normalised fractionation patterns of the rare earth elements (REE) in the alluvial aquifer of the Guadiamar River (south-western Spain). This river received notoriety in April 1998 for a spill that spread a great amount of slurry (mainly pyrites) and acid waters in a narrow strip along the river course. Groundwaters and surface waters were sampled to analyse, among other elements, the REEs. Their spatial distribution shows a peak close to the mining region, in an area with low values of pH and high concentrations of sulphates and other metals such as Zn, Cu, Co, Ni, Pb, and Cd. The patterns of shale-normalised fractionation at the most-contaminated points show an enrichment in the middle rare earth elements (MREE) with respect to the light (LREE) and heavy (HREE) ones, typical of acid waters. The Ce-anomaly becomes more negative as pH increases, due to the preferential fractionation of Ce in oxyhydroxides of Fe. PMID:15701392

  6. Origin and Dynamics of Rare Earth Elements during Flood Events in Contaminated River Basins: Sr-Nd-Pb Isotopic Evidence.

    PubMed

    Hissler, Christophe; Stille, Peter; Iffly, Jean François; Guignard, Cédric; Chabaux, François; Pfister, Laurent

    2016-05-01

    In order to precisely quantify the contribution of anthropogenic activities and geogenic sources to the dissolved and suspended loads of rivers we have combined for the first time Rare Earth Element (REE) concentrations with Sr-Nd-Pb isotope ratios. We observed enrichments in Anthropogenic Rare Earth Elements (AREE) for dissolved (Gd) and suspended (Ce and Nd) loads of river water. During flood events, AREE anomalies progressively disappeared and gave way to the geogenic chemical signature of the basin in both dissolved and suspended loads. The isotopic data confirm these observations and shed new light on the trace elements sources. On the one hand, dissolved loads have peculiar isotopic characteristics and carry mainly limestone-derived and anthropogenic Sr and Nd as well as significant amounts of anthropogenic Pb. On the other hand, the results clearly indicate that anthropogenic contributions impact the suspended loads in all hydrological conditions. This study demonstrates that anthropogenic contributions to the river may change not only Pb but also Sr and Nd isotopic compositions in both dissolved and suspended loads. This is of importance for future provenance studies. PMID:27045616

  7. Distribution of rare earth elements in an alluvial aquifer affected by acid mine drainage: the Guadiamar aquifer (SW Spain).

    PubMed

    Olías, M; Cerón, J C; Fernández, I; De la Rosa, J

    2005-05-01

    This work analyses the spatial distribution, the origin, and the shale-normalised fractionation patterns of the rare earth elements (REE) in the alluvial aquifer of the Guadiamar River (south-western Spain). This river received notoriety in April 1998 for a spill that spread a great amount of slurry (mainly pyrites) and acid waters in a narrow strip along the river course. Groundwaters and surface waters were sampled to analyse, among other elements, the REEs. Their spatial distribution shows a peak close to the mining region, in an area with low values of pH and high concentrations of sulphates and other metals such as Zn, Cu, Co, Ni, Pb, and Cd. The patterns of shale-normalised fractionation at the most-contaminated points show an enrichment in the middle rare earth elements (MREE) with respect to the light (LREE) and heavy (HREE) ones, typical of acid waters. The Ce-anomaly becomes more negative as pH increases, due to the preferential fractionation of Ce in oxyhydroxides of Fe.

  8. Anomalous concentrations of rare earth elements in the moss-soil system from south-central Poland.

    PubMed

    Dołęgowska, Sabina; Migaszewski, Zdzisław M

    2013-07-01

    Fourteen rare earth elements were determined in mosses (Pleurozium schreberi) and soils (subhorizon-Ofh and -Ol, mixed horizon-AE and AEB) from south-central Poland. The results were normalized against North American Shale Composite (NASC) and Post-Archean Australian Shales (PAAS). The distribution of REEs in the moss-soil system differed considerably, but all the samples showed the average percent of increase of medium rare earth elements. The shale-normalized concentration ratios calculated for selected elements (LaN/YbN, GdN/YbN, LaN/SmN) were in the range of 1.22-2.43, 1.74-3.10 and 0.86-1.09. Both subhorizon-Ofh (-Ol) and horizon-AE (-AEB) showed a weak enrichment of Gd. The shale-normalized patterns of soils showed a somewhat negative Eu anomaly in the horizon-AE (-AEB), and a slightly negative Ce anomaly in the subhorizon-Ofh (-Ol). A strongly positive Eu anomaly and a somewhat negative Nd anomaly were found in the moss samples.

  9. Origin and Dynamics of Rare Earth Elements during Flood Events in Contaminated River Basins: Sr-Nd-Pb Isotopic Evidence.

    PubMed

    Hissler, Christophe; Stille, Peter; Iffly, Jean François; Guignard, Cédric; Chabaux, François; Pfister, Laurent

    2016-05-01

    In order to precisely quantify the contribution of anthropogenic activities and geogenic sources to the dissolved and suspended loads of rivers we have combined for the first time Rare Earth Element (REE) concentrations with Sr-Nd-Pb isotope ratios. We observed enrichments in Anthropogenic Rare Earth Elements (AREE) for dissolved (Gd) and suspended (Ce and Nd) loads of river water. During flood events, AREE anomalies progressively disappeared and gave way to the geogenic chemical signature of the basin in both dissolved and suspended loads. The isotopic data confirm these observations and shed new light on the trace elements sources. On the one hand, dissolved loads have peculiar isotopic characteristics and carry mainly limestone-derived and anthropogenic Sr and Nd as well as significant amounts of anthropogenic Pb. On the other hand, the results clearly indicate that anthropogenic contributions impact the suspended loads in all hydrological conditions. This study demonstrates that anthropogenic contributions to the river may change not only Pb but also Sr and Nd isotopic compositions in both dissolved and suspended loads. This is of importance for future provenance studies.

  10. Investigation of thermal diffusivity dependence on temperature in a group of optical single crystals doped with rare earth ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trefon-Radziejewska, D.; Bodzenta, J.

    2015-07-01

    The group of YAG, YVO4 and GdCOB single crystals was examined to determine the thermal diffusivity as a function of temperature in range from 30 °C to 300 °C. Further investigations concerned on analysis of the influence of dopants on these dependencies. The experimental setup based on thermal wave method with mirage detection was used. The samples represented different crystallographic systems such as cubic (YAG) tetragonal (YVO4) and monoclinic (GdCOB). The anisotropy of thermal conductivity of investigated samples was taken into account in the investigations. The crystals were doped with calcium ions, rare earth ions such as ytterbium, neodymium, and thulium, and also with transition metal vanadium. The results confirmed that influence of doping on the thermal diffusivity of investigated materials strongly depends on temperature. In general the thermal diffusivity decreases with increasing of sample temperature from 30 °C to 300 °C, however the drop in thermal diffusivity is the highest for pure single crystals. Doping is another factor reducing the heat transport in single crystals. Introduction of dopant ions into a crystal lattice leads to a significant decrease in the thermal diffusivity at lower temperatures in comparison with pure crystals. However, the influence of dopants becomes less pronounced with increasing temperature, and in case of weakly doped crystals it becomes negligible at higher temperatures. The interpretation of thermal diffusivity dependence on temperature for single crystals was based on the Debye model of lattice thermal conductivity of solids. The results allowed to conclude that the decrease of thermal diffusivity with temperature and increasing concentration of impurities is caused by shortening of the phonons mean free path due to phonon-phonon and phonon-point defect scatterings.

  11. Fiber-optic thermometer application of thermal radiation from rare-earth end-doped SiO{sub 2} fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Katsumata, Toru Morita, Kentaro; Komuro, Shuji; Aizawa, Hiroaki

    2014-08-15

    Visible light thermal radiation from SiO{sub 2} glass doped with Y, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Eu, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, and Lu were studied for the fiber-optic thermometer application based on the temperature dependence of thermal radiation. Thermal radiations according to Planck's law of radiation are observed from the SiO{sub 2} fibers doped with Y, La, Ce, Pr, Eu, Tb, and Lu at the temperature above 1100 K. Thermal radiations due to f-f transitions of rare-earth ions are observed from the SiO{sub 2} fibers doped with Nd, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, and Yb at the temperature above 900 K. Peak intensities of thermal radiations from rare-earth doped SiO{sub 2} fibers increase sensitively with temperature. Thermal activation energies of thermal radiations by f-f transitions seen in Nd, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, and Yb doped SiO{sub 2} fibers are smaller than those from SiO{sub 2} fibers doped with Y, La, Ce, Pr, Eu, Tb, and Lu. Thermal radiation due to highly efficient f-f transitions in Nd, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, and Yb ions emits more easily than usual thermal radiation process. Thermal radiations from rare-earth doped SiO{sub 2} are potentially applicable for the fiber-optic thermometry above 900 K.

  12. Estimation of cut-off wavelength of rare earth doped single-mode fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Jagneet; Thyagarajan, K.; Pal, B. P.

    1999-11-01

    A new empirical relation is proposed describing spectral variation of mode-field radius (MFR) as inferred from measurements in the far-field of the fiber. It is shown that using this relation, it is possible to estimate the cut-off wavelength ( λc) of the fiber. The proposed technique is successfully tested through measurements made on two standard step index single-mode fibers, as well as on an erbium doped fiber (EDF) having λc falling within its strong absorption band around 980 nm. This empirical formula is more accurate than the widely used Marcuse's formula to describe spectral dependence of MFR determined through measurements made in the fiber's far-field. The proposed technique is especially suited for estimation of λc of doped fibers in which λc falls within an absorption band.

  13. Rare-earth doped transparent ceramics for spectral filtering and quantum information processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunkel, Nathalie; Ferrier, Alban; Thiel, Charles W.; Ramírez, Mariola O.; Bausá, Luisa E.; Cone, Rufus L.; Ikesue, Akio; Goldner, Philippe

    2015-09-01

    Homogeneous linewidths below 10 kHz are reported for the first time in high-quality Eu3+ doped Y 2O3 transparent ceramics. This result is obtained on the 7F0→5D0 transition in Eu3+ doped Y 2O3 ceramics and corresponds to an improvement of nearly one order of magnitude compared to previously reported values in transparent ceramics. Furthermore, we observed spectral hole lifetimes of ˜15 min that are long enough to enable efficient optical pumping of the nuclear hyperfine levels. Additionally, different Eu3+ concentrations (up to 1.0%) were studied, resulting in an increase of up to a factor of three in the peak absorption coefficient. These results suggest that transparent ceramics can be useful in applications where narrow and deep spectral holes can be burned into highly absorbing lines, such as quantum information processing and spectral filtering.

  14. Up-conversion in rare earth-doped silica hollow spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortes, Luís M.; Li, Yigang; Réfega, Ricardo; Clara Gonçalves, M.

    2012-06-01

    In the present work, Er/Yb co-doped silica hollow spheres are prepared in a two-step process. In a first step, polystyrene-core is silica coated in situ by a modified Stöber sol-gel method and in the second one, the sacrificial polystyrene core is thermally removed. The core-shell and the hollow spheres are characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL). PL measurements show up-conversion phenomena upon excitation at 975 nm, through the emission of blue (˜490 nm), green (˜523 nm and ˜536 nm) and red (˜655 nm) light. The up-conversion phenomena are discussed and modelled. The developed model explains the up-conversion phenomena of Er/Yb co-doped silica hollow spheres, with special agreement for high Yb/Er ratio.

  15. White emission materials from glass doped with rare Earth ions: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasaka, P.; Kaewkhao, J.

    2016-03-01

    Solid State Lighting (SSL) based devices are predicted to play a crucial role in the coming years. Development of W-LED, which have an edge over traditional lighting sources due to their compact size, higher reliability, shock resistance, interesting design possibilities, higher transparency and an extremely long lifetime. Over the fifteen trivalent lanthanide ions, Dy3+ ions doped glasses are most appropriate for white light generation because of the fact that it exhibits two intense emission bands corresponds to the 4F9/2→6H15/2 (magnetic dipole) and 4F9/2→6H13/2 (electric dipole) transitions at around 480-500 nm and 580-600 nm pertaining to blue and yellow regions respectively. In this work, the developments of Dy3+ doped in several glass structures for white emitting materials application have reviewed. Properties of Dy3+ doped in glasses were discussed for use as a solid state lighting materials application.

  16. Synthesis of rare earth doped yttrium-vanadate nanoparticles encapsulated within apoferritin.

    PubMed

    Harada, Tomoaki; Yoshimura, Hideyuki

    2014-07-28

    Luminescent europium (Eu) and dysprosium (Dy) doped yttrium-vanadate (Y-V) nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized in the cavity of the protein, apoferritin. Y-V NPs were synthesized by incubating a solution of apoferritin with Y(3+) and VO3(-) ions in the presence of ethylene diamine-N-N'-diacetic acid (EDDA). EDDA plays an important role in preventing Y-vanadate precipitation in bulk solution by chelating the Y(3+) ions. Using high resolution electron microscopy, the obtained NPs in the apoferritin cavities were confirmed to be amorphous, and to consist of Y and V. Eu-doped Y-V (Y-V:Eu) NPs were synthesized by the same procedure as Y-V NPs, except that Eu(NO3)3 was added. Y-V:Eu NPs exhibited a strong absorption peak due to the O-V charge transfer transition and remarkable luminescence at 618 nm due to the (5)D0 → (7)F2 transition. The luminescence lifetime of Y:Eu and Y-V:Eu NPs measured in H2O and D2O solution showed reduction of non-radiative transition to the O-H vibration in Y-V:Eu NPs. Accordingly, Y-V NPs showed strong luminescence compared to Y:Eu NPs. Dy-doped Y-V NPs were also synthesized in apoferritin cavities and showed luminescence peaks at 482 nm and 572 nm, corresponding to (4)F9/2 → (6)H15/2 and (4)F9/2 → (6)H13/2 transitions. These NPs stably dispersed in water solution since their aggregation was prevented by the protein shell. NPs encapsulated in the protein are likely to be biocompatible and would have significant potential for biological imaging applications.

  17. Effects of rare-earth doping on femtosecond laser waveguide writing in zinc polyphosphate glass

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, Luke B.; Witcher, Jon J.; Troy, Neil; Krol, Denise M.; Reis, Signo T.; Brow, Richard K.

    2012-07-15

    We have investigated waveguide writing in Er-Yb doped zinc polyphosphate glass using a femtosecond laser with a repetition rate of 1 KHz. We find that fabrication of good waveguides requires a glass composition with an O/P ratio of 3.25. The dependence on laser writing parameters including laser fluence, focusing conditions, and scan speed is reported. Waveguide properties together with absorption and emission data indicate that these glasses can be used for the fabrication of compact, high gain amplifying devices.

  18. Effects of rare-earth doping on femtosecond laser waveguide writing in zinc polyphosphate glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, Luke B.; Witcher, Jon J.; Troy, Neil; Reis, Signo T.; Brow, Richard K.; Krol, Denise M.

    2012-07-01

    We have investigated waveguide writing in Er-Yb doped zinc polyphosphate glass using a femtosecond laser with a repetition rate of 1 KHz. We find that fabrication of good waveguides requires a glass composition with an O/P ratio of 3.25. The dependence on laser writing parameters including laser fluence, focusing conditions, and scan speed is reported. Waveguide properties together with absorption and emission data indicate that these glasses can be used for the fabrication of compact, high gain amplifying devices.

  19. Ultrasoft pseudopotentials and Hubbard U values for rare-earth elements (Re=La-Lu) guided by HSE06 calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topsakal, Mehmet; Umemoto, Koichiro; Wentzcovitch, Renata

    2014-03-01

    The lanthanide series of the periodic table comprises fifteen members ranging from La to Lu - the rare-earth (Re) elements. They exhibit unique (and mostly unexplored) chemical properties depending on the fillings of 4f-orbitals. Due to strong electronic correlation, 4f valence electrons are incorrectly described by standard DFT functionals. In order to cope with these inefficiencies, the DFT+U method is often employed where Hubbard-type U is introduced into the standard DFT. Another approach is to use hybrid functionals. Both improve the treatment of strongly correlated electrons. However, DFT+U suffers from ambiguity of U while hybrid functionals suffer from extremely demanding computational costs. Here we provide Vanderbilt type ultrasoft pseudopotentials for Re elements with suggested U values allowing efficient plane-wave calculations. Hubbard U values are determined according to HSE06 calculations on Re-nitrides (ReN). Generated pseudopotentials were further tested on some Re-cobaltite (Re-CoO3) perovskites. Alternative pseudopotentials with f-electrons kept frozen in the core of pseudopotential are also provided and possible outcomes are addressed. We believe that these new pseudopotentials with suggested U values will allow further studies on rare-earth materials.

  20. Provenances of atmospheric dust over Korea from Sr-Nd isotopes and rare earth elements in early 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Min Kyung; Lee, Yong Il; Yi, Hi-Il

    2010-07-01

    Sr and Nd isotopic composition of pre- and syn-Asian dust (Hwangsa) particles collected from three different water depths at two different offshore sites, western Korea and rare earth elemental composition of syn-Asian dust particles collected from three islands around the Korean Peninsula in late April 2006 were analyzed to interpret their provenance. The dust Sr-Nd isotopic compositions vary spatiotemporally, but they show specific values when the Hwangsa event occurred. Satellite images, airmass backward trajectory modeling, and comparison with Sr-Nd isotopic ratios and rare earth elements compositions of soils and desert sands of northern China all suggest the major source of dust particles for the late April 2006 Hwangsa event to be the Mu Us Desert in northern China. Dust particles of the pre-Hwangsa period include both background dusts and the previous Hwangsa event dust particles, and they are interpreted to have been originated from various arid regions of China such as the Hobq Desert, the Mu Us Desert, and the Taklamakan Desert in different times. Different background dust sources during pre-Hwangsa period in early 2006 resulted from the changing route of the westerlies.

  1. Geochemical studies of rare earth elements in the Portuguese pyrite belt, and geologic and geochemical controls on gold distribution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grimes, David J.; Earhart, Robert L.; de Carvalho, Delfim; Oliveira, Vitor; Oliveira, Jose T.; Castro, Paulo

    1998-01-01

    This report describes geochemical and geological studies which were conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Servicos Geologicos de Portugal (SPG) in the Portuguese pyrite belt (PPB) in southern Portugal. The studies included rare earth element (REE) distributions and geological and geochemical controls on the distribution of gold. Rare earth element distributions were determined in representative samples of the volcanic rocks from five west-trending sub-belts of the PPB in order to test the usefulness of REE as a tool for the correlation of volcanic events, and to determine their mobility and application as hydrothermal tracers. REE distributions in felsic volcanic rocks show increases in the relative abundances of heavy REE and a decrease in La/Yb ratios from north to south in the Portuguese pyrite belt. Anomalous amounts of gold are distributed in and near massive and disseminated sulfide deposits in the PPB. Gold is closely associated with copper in the middle and lower parts of the deposits. Weakly anomalous concentrations of gold were noted in exhalative sedimentary rocks that are stratigraphically above massive sulfide deposits in a distal manganiferous facies, whereas anomalously low concentrations were detected in the barite-rich, proximal-facies exhalites. Altered and pyritic felsic volcanic rocks locally contain highly anomalous concentrations of gold, suggesting that disseminated sulfide deposits and the non-ore parts of massive sulfide deposits should be evaluated for their gold potential.

  2. Effect of earthworms (Eisenia fetida) on the fractionation and bioavailability of rare earth elements in nine Chinese soils.

    PubMed

    Wen, Bei; Liu, Ying; Hu, Xiao-yu; Shan, Xiao-quan

    2006-05-01

    The effect of earthworm (Eisenia fetida) activity on soil pH, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), fraction distribution pattern and bioavailability of rare earth elements (REEs) Y, La, Ce, Pr and Nd in nine Chinese soils were investigated using pot experiments. A three-step extraction procedure recommended by the European Community (Standards, Measurements and Testing Programme) was used to fractionate REEs in soils into water soluble, exchangeable and carbonate bound (B1), Fe- and Mn-oxides bound (B2) and organic matter and sulfide bound (B3). Inoculated with earthworms, the soil pH, DOC and water-soluble rare earth elements fraction increased. A significant correlation was obtained between the increased DOC and the increased water-soluble REEs. REEs in fraction B1 increased after earthworm inoculation, while those in fraction B3 decreased. No significant differences were observed for REEs in fraction B2. The biomass and the concentrations of REEs in wheat shoots and roots increased after the treatment with earthworms. The results demonstrated that earthworm activity increased the mobility and bioavailability of REEs in soils. PMID:16289225

  3. Rare-earth doped transparent ceramics for spectral filtering and quantum information processing

    SciTech Connect

    Kunkel, Nathalie Goldner, Philippe; Ferrier, Alban; Thiel, Charles W.; Cone, Rufus L.; Ramírez, Mariola O.; Bausá, Luisa E.; Ikesue, Akio

    2015-09-01

    Homogeneous linewidths below 10 kHz are reported for the first time in high-quality Eu{sup 3+} doped Y {sub 2}O{sub 3} transparent ceramics. This result is obtained on the {sup 7}F{sub 0}→{sup 5}D{sub 0} transition in Eu{sup 3+} doped Y {sub 2}O{sub 3} ceramics and corresponds to an improvement of nearly one order of magnitude compared to previously reported values in transparent ceramics. Furthermore, we observed spectral hole lifetimes of ∼15 min that are long enough to enable efficient optical pumping of the nuclear hyperfine levels. Additionally, different Eu{sup 3+} concentrations (up to 1.0%) were studied, resulting in an increase of up to a factor of three in the peak absorption coefficient. These results suggest that transparent ceramics can be useful in applications where narrow and deep spectral holes can be burned into highly absorbing lines, such as quantum information processing and spectral filtering.

  4. Tip enhancement of upconversion photoluminescence from rare earth ion doped nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Mauser, Nina; Piatkowski, Dawid; Mancabelli, Tobia; Nyk, Marcin; Mackowski, Sebastian; Hartschuh, Achim

    2015-04-28

    We present tip-enhanced upconversion photoluminescence (PL) images of Er(3+)- and Yb(3+)-doped NaYF4 nanocrystals on glass substrates with subdiffraction spatial resolution. Tip-sample distance dependent measurements clearly demonstrate the near-field origin of the image contrast. Time-resolved PL measurements show that the tip increases the spontaneous emission rate of the two emission channels of Er(3+) in the visible region. Very efficient enhancement of upconversion PL is discussed in the context of the two-photon nature of the excitation process and homoenergy transfer between the ions within the nanocrystals. Comparison between different nanocrystals and tips shows a strong influence of the tip shape on the image contrast that becomes particularly relevant for the larger dimensions of the investigated nanocrystals.

  5. Optical detection of ultrasound using AFC-based quantum memory technique in cryogenic rare earth ion doped crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Luke R.; McAuslan, David L.; Longdell, Jevon J.

    2013-03-01

    We present results of a novel and highly sensitive technique for the optical detection of ultrasound using the selective storage of frequency shifted photons in an inherently highly efficient and low noise atomic frequency comb (AFC) based quantum memory. The ultrasound `tagged' optical sidebands are absorbed within a pair of symmetric AFCs, generated via optical pumping in a Pr3+:Y2SiO5 sample (tooth separation Δ = 150 kHz, comb finesse fc ~ 2 and optical depth αL ~ 2), separated by twice the ultrasound modulation frequency (1.5 MHz) and centered on either side of a broad spectral pit (1.7 MHz width) allowing transmission of the carrier. The stored sidebands are recovered with 10-20% efficiency as a photon echo (as defined by the comb parameters), and we demonstrate a record 49 dB discrimination between the sidebands and the carrier pulse, high discrimination being important for imaging tissues at depth. We further demonstrate detector limited discrimination (~29 dB) using a highly scattered beam, confirming that the technique is immune to speckle decorrelation. We show that it also remains valid in the case of optically thin samples, and thus represents a significant improvement over other ultrasound detection methods based on rare-earth-ion-doped crystals. These results strongly suggest the suitability of our technique for high-resolution non-contact real-time imaging of biological tissues.

  6. High pressure effects on the superconductivity in rare-earth-doped CaFe2As2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhoya, Walter; Cargill, Daniel; Gofryk, Krzysztof; Tsoi, Georgiy M.; Vohra, Yogesh K.; Sefat, Athena S.; Weir, S. T.

    2014-01-01

    High pressure superconductivity in a rare-earth-doped Ca0.86Pr0.14Fe2As2 single-crystalline sample has been studied up to 12 GPa and temperatures down to 11 K using the designer diamond anvil cell under a quasi-hydrostatic pressure medium. The electrical resistance measurements were complemented by high pressure and low-temperature X-ray diffraction studies at a synchrotron source. The electrical resistance measurements show an intriguing observation of superconductivity under pressure, with Tc as high as ∼51 K at 1.9 GPa, presenting the highest Tc reported in the intermetallic class of 122 iron-based superconductors. The resistive transition observed suggests a possible existence of two superconducting phases at low pressures of 0.5 GPa: one phase starting at Tc1 ∼ 48 K and the other starts at Tc2 ∼ 16 K. The two superconducting transitions show distinct variations with increasing pressure. High pressure and low-temperature structural studies indicate that the superconducting phase is a collapsed tetragonal ThCr2Si2-type (122) crystal structure.

  7. Energy transfer kinetics in oxy-fluoride glass and glass-ceramics doped with rare-earth ions

    SciTech Connect

    Sontakke, Atul D.; Annapurna, K.

    2012-07-01

    An investigation of donor-acceptor energy transfer kinetics in dual rare earths doped precursor oxy-fluoride glass and its glass-ceramics containing NaYF{sub 4} nano-crystals is reported here, using three different donor-acceptor ion combinations such as Nd-Yb, Yb-Dy, and Nd-Dy. The precipitation of NaYF{sub 4} nano-crystals in host glass matrix under controlled post heat treatment of precursor oxy-fluoride glasses has been confirmed from XRD, FESEM, and transmission electron microscope (TEM) analysis. Further, the incorporation of dopant ions inside fluoride nano-crystals has been established through optical absorption and TEM-EDX analysis. The noticed decreasing trend in donor to acceptor energy transfer efficiency from precursor glass to glass-ceramics in all three combinations have been explained based on the structural rearrangements that occurred during the heat treatment process. The reduced coupling phonon energy for the dopant ions due to fluoride environment and its influence on the overall phonon assisted contribution in energy transfer process has been illustrated. Additionally, realization of a correlated distribution of dopant ions causing clustering inside nano-crystals has also been reported.

  8. Determination of Judd-Ofelt intensity parameters from the excitation spectra for rare-earth doped luminescent materials.

    PubMed

    Luo, Wenqin; Liao, Jinsheng; Li, Renfu; Chen, Xueyuan

    2010-04-01

    By utilizing the proportional relationship between the excitation and absorption spectra for some special excited multiplets of rare-earth (RE) ions that are followed by a very fast nonradiative relaxation to the monitored level, we propose a new approach to determine the Judd-Ofelt (JO) intensity parameters that are crucial to the evaluation of laser and luminescent materials via excitation spectra. To validate this approach, the JO parameters of NaGd(WO(4))(2) : Er(3+) and YLiF(4) : Nd(3+) crystals are calculated and compared through both the excitation and absorption spectra. The JO parameters derived from this approach are in good agreement with that determined from the conventional method (absorption spectra). Furthermore, the JO intensity parameters of Y(2)O(3) : Er(3+) nanocrystals are derived from the excitation spectra by taking into account the nano-size effects, which are comparable to the values of the crystal counterpart. The proposed approach is of particular importance for those powders or nanophosphors with low RE doping concentration that their quantitative absorption spectra are difficult to measure.

  9. Engineering rare-earth-doped heavy metal oxide glasses for 2-5 μm lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Billy D. O.; Jha, Animesh; Dorofeev, Vitaly; Manzur, Tariq

    2010-04-01

    The electronic states in trivalent rare-earth ions offer an excellent opportunity for designing efficient fibre and bulk lasers for atmospheric remote sensing and LIDAR technology. The first part of this review article focuses on engineering passive fibres for 2-5 μm transmission. The fabrication of single-mode tungsten tellurite optical fibres from high purity bulk glass rods is described. Fibres with a numerical aperture of 0.1 and core diameter of 10+/-2 μm have been drawn using suction and rod-in-tube techniques of fibre preform fabrication. Losses of 2.3 dBm-1 at 974 nm have been measured. These fibres are of interest for use as passive transmission fibre or active fibres for lasing in the 2-5 μm spectral region. The use of heavy metal oxides in the fabrication of glass leads to extended infrared transmission. In the 2nd part of the review we compare the slope efficiencies of Tm3+ and Tm3+/Ho3+ doped glasses and fibres for 1950-2080 nm lasers using a range of pumping schemes in tellurite and germanium oxide hosts. We also explain the importance of choosing 1950-2080 nm tunable lasers as a pump source for stimulated emission at longer wavelengths.

  10. Synthesis and upconversion emission of rare earth-doped olive-like YF{sub 3} micro-particles

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Hang; Chen, Daqin; Niu, Mutong; Yu, Yunlong; Huang, Ping; Wang, Yuansheng

    2010-01-15

    The olive-like YF{sub 3} micro-particles were fabricated via a two-step route. The precursor NH{sub 4}Y{sub 3}F{sub 10} nano-cages sized 8 nm with hollow interiors were first synthesized in a solid reaction at room temperature. In the course of subsequent hydrothermal treating, the unstable NH{sub 4}Y{sub 3}F{sub 10} nano-cages were decomposed, resulted in the formation of Y(OH){sub 1.63}F{sub 1.37} micro-tubes. Prolonging the hydrothermal reaction induced the further decomposition of Y(OH){sub 1.63}F{sub 1.37} to produce YF{sub 3} nano-crystals, which then aggregated together forming the final olive-like YF{sub 3} micro-particles. For the Er{sup 3+}/Yb{sup 3+} co-doped olive-like YF{sub 3} micro-particles, intense visible upconversion emissions were measured under 976 nm excitation owing to the partition of rare earth ions in the lattice, indicating this material a promising luminescent host.

  11. Luminescence properties of rare earth doped metal oxide nanostructures: A case of Eu-ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, D.; Acharya, B. S.; Panda, N. R.

    2016-05-01

    The present study reports the growth and luminescence properties of Eu doped ZnO nanostructures. The experiment has been carried out by synthesizing the materials by simple wet-chemical method. X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies show expansion of ZnO lattice with the incorporation of Eu ions which has been confirmed from the appearance of Eu2O3 as a minor phase in the XRD pattern. The estimation of crystallite size from XRD results matches closely with the results obtained from transmission electron microscopy. Further, these results show the formation of nanosized Eu-ZnO particles of average size around 60 nm stacked on each other. FTIR studies show the presence of both Zn-O and Eu-O modes in the spectra supporting the results obtained from XRD. The interesting results obtained from photoluminescence (PL) measurements show the presence of both band edge emission in UV region and the defect emissions in violet, blue and green region. The appearance of 5D0→7FJ transitions of Eu3+ ions in red region clearly suggests the possible occurrence of energy transfer between the energy states of ZnO host and Eu3+ ions.

  12. Luminescence properties of solid solutions of borates doped with rare-earth ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levushkina, V. S.; Mikhailin, V. V.; Spassky, D. A.; Zadneprovski, B. I.; Tret'yakova, M. S.

    2014-11-01

    The stru