Science.gov

Sample records for rare-earth-doped yttrium aluminium

  1. Evidence of dilute ferromagnetism in rare-earth doped yttrium aluminium garnet

    SciTech Connect

    Farr, Warrick G.; Goryachev, Maxim; Le Floch, Jean-Michel; Tobar, Michael E.; Bushev, Pavel

    2015-09-21

    This work demonstrates strong coupling regime between an erbium ion spin ensemble and microwave hybrid cavity-whispering gallery modes in a yttrium aluminium garnet dielectric crystal. Coupling strengths of 220 MHz and mode quality factors in excess of 10{sup 6} are demonstrated. Moreover, the magnetic response of high-Q modes demonstrates behaviour which is unusual for paramagnetic systems. This behaviour includes hysteresis and memory effects. Such qualitative change of the system's magnetic field response is interpreted as a phase transition of rare earth ion impurities. This phenomenon is similar to the phenomenon of dilute ferromagnetism in semiconductors. The clear temperature dependence of the phenomenon is demonstrated.

  2. Rare Earth Doped Yttrium Aluminum Garnet (YAG) Selective Emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L.; Pal, AnnaMarie T.; Patton, Martin O.; Jenkins, Phillip P.

    1999-01-01

    As a result of their electron structure, rare earth ions in crystals at high temperature emit radiation in several narrow bands rather than in a continuous blackbody manner. This study presents a spectral emittance model for films and cylinders of rare earth doped yttrium aluminum garnets. Good agreement between experimental and theoretical film spectral emittances was found for erbium and holmium aluminum garnets. Spectral emittances of films are sensitive to temperature differences across the film. For operating conditions of interest, the film emitter experiences a linear temperature variation whereas the cylinder emitter has a more advantageous uniform temperature. Emitter efficiency is also a sensitive function of temperature. For holminum aluminum garnet film the efficiency is 0.35 at 1446K but only 0.27 at 1270 K.

  3. Synthesis of rare earth doped yttrium-vanadate nanoparticles encapsulated within apoferritin.

    PubMed

    Harada, Tomoaki; Yoshimura, Hideyuki

    2014-07-28

    Luminescent europium (Eu) and dysprosium (Dy) doped yttrium-vanadate (Y-V) nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized in the cavity of the protein, apoferritin. Y-V NPs were synthesized by incubating a solution of apoferritin with Y(3+) and VO3(-) ions in the presence of ethylene diamine-N-N'-diacetic acid (EDDA). EDDA plays an important role in preventing Y-vanadate precipitation in bulk solution by chelating the Y(3+) ions. Using high resolution electron microscopy, the obtained NPs in the apoferritin cavities were confirmed to be amorphous, and to consist of Y and V. Eu-doped Y-V (Y-V:Eu) NPs were synthesized by the same procedure as Y-V NPs, except that Eu(NO3)3 was added. Y-V:Eu NPs exhibited a strong absorption peak due to the O-V charge transfer transition and remarkable luminescence at 618 nm due to the (5)D0 → (7)F2 transition. The luminescence lifetime of Y:Eu and Y-V:Eu NPs measured in H2O and D2O solution showed reduction of non-radiative transition to the O-H vibration in Y-V:Eu NPs. Accordingly, Y-V NPs showed strong luminescence compared to Y:Eu NPs. Dy-doped Y-V NPs were also synthesized in apoferritin cavities and showed luminescence peaks at 482 nm and 572 nm, corresponding to (4)F9/2 → (6)H15/2 and (4)F9/2 → (6)H13/2 transitions. These NPs stably dispersed in water solution since their aggregation was prevented by the protein shell. NPs encapsulated in the protein are likely to be biocompatible and would have significant potential for biological imaging applications.

  4. Optical and magnetic spectroscopy of rare-earth-doped yttrium aluminium borate (YAl3(BO3)4) single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watterich, A.; Aleshkevych, P.; Borowiec, M. T.; Zayarnyuk, T.; Szymczak, H.; Beregi, E.; Kovács, L.

    2003-05-01

    For Ce3+, Er3+ and Yb3+ ions, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra typical for S' = 1/2 ions are measured for YAl3(BO3)4 (YAB) single crystal. The spectra show axial symmetry indicating that all three dopants replace Y3+ at the given dopant concentration. Corresponding tilde g- and hyperfine tilde A-tensors are determined. The EPR linewidth of Ce broadens with increasing temperature due to an Orbach relaxation process. Fitting the curve with an exponential, the energy difference is found to be equal to 270 +/- 16 cm-1. The optical absorption and excitation spectra of Ce in YAB single crystal measured at 300 K are similar to those found for polycrystalline materials. High-resolution polarized emission from the lowest excited to the 2 F 5/2 ground state, measured at 4.2 K, indicates a splitting of the ground state into three levels. The second level is located 277 +/- 18 cm-1 above the first one, in excellent agreement with the EPR result, and the third level is located 140 +/- 10 cm-1 above the second one.

  5. Tunable, rare earth-doped solid state lasers

    DOEpatents

    Emmett, John L.; Jacobs, Ralph R.; Krupke, William F.; Weber, Marvin J.

    1980-01-01

    Laser apparatus comprising combinations of an excimer pump laser and a rare earth-doped solid matrix, utilizing the 5d-4f radiative transition in a rare earth ion to produce visible and ultra-violet laser radiation with high overall efficiency in selected cases and relatively long radiative lifetimes.

  6. Multicomponent, Rare-Earth-Doped Thermal-Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Robert A.; Zhu, Dongming

    2005-01-01

    Multicomponent, rare-earth-doped, perovskite-type thermal-barrier coating materials have been developed in an effort to obtain lower thermal conductivity, greater phase stability, and greater high-temperature capability, relative to those of the prior thermal-barrier coating material of choice, which is yttria-partially stabilized zirconia. As used here, "thermal-barrier coatings" (TBCs) denotes thin ceramic layers used to insulate air-cooled metallic components of heat engines (e.g., gas turbines) from hot gases. These layers are generally fabricated by plasma spraying or physical vapor deposition of the TBC materials onto the metal components. A TBC as deposited has some porosity, which is desirable in that it reduces the thermal conductivity below the intrinsic thermal conductivity of the fully dense form of the material. Undesirably, the thermal conductivity gradually increases because the porosity gradually decreases as a consequence of sintering during high-temperature service. Because of these and other considerations such as phase transformations, the maximum allowable service temperature for yttria-partially stabilized zirconia TBCs lies in the range of about 1,200 to 1,300 C. In contrast, the present multicomponent, rare-earth-doped, perovskite-type TBCs can withstand higher temperatures.

  7. Rare Earth Doped High Temperature Ceramic Selective Emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L.; Pal, AnnaMarie; Patton, Martin O.; Jenkins, Phillip P.

    1999-01-01

    As a result of their electron structure, rare earth ions in crystals at high temperature emit radiation in several narrow bands rather than in a continuous blackbody manner. This study develops a spectral emittance model for films of rare earth containing materials. Although there are several possible rare earth doped high temperature materials, this study was confined to rare earth aluminum garnets. Good agreement between experimental and theoretical spectral emittances was found for erbium, thulium and erbium-holmium aluminum garnets. Spectral emittances of these films are sensitive to temperature differences across the film. Emitter efficiency is also a sensitive function of temperature. For thulium aluminum garnet the efficiency is 0.38 at 1700 K but only 0.19 at 1262 K.

  8. 40 CFR 721.10423 - Complex strontium aluminate, rare earth doped (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... earth doped (generic). 721.10423 Section 721.10423 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10423 Complex strontium aluminate, rare earth doped... substances identified generically as complex strontium aluminate, rare earth doped (PMNs P-12-22, P-12-23,...

  9. Oxidation Effects in Rare Earth Doped Topological Insulator Thin Films.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, A I; van der Laan, G; Harrison, S E; Cibin, G; Hesjedal, T

    2016-01-01

    The breaking of time-reversal symmetry (TRS) in topological insulators is a prerequisite for unlocking their exotic properties and for observing the quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE). The incorporation of dopants which exhibit magnetic long-range order is the most promising approach for TRS-breaking. REBiTe3, wherein 50% of the Bi is substitutionally replaced by a RE atom (RE = Gd, Dy, and Ho), is a predicted QAHE system. Despite the low solubility of REs in bulk crystals of a few %, highly doped thin films have been demonstrated, which are free of secondary phases and of high crystalline quality. Here we study the effects of exposure to atmosphere of rare earth-doped Bi2(Se, Te)3 thin films using x-ray absorption spectroscopy. We demonstrate that these RE dopants are all trivalent and effectively substitute for Bi(3+) in the Bi2(Se, Te)3 matrix. We find an unexpected high degree of sample oxidation for the most highly doped samples, which is not restricted to the surface of the films. In the low-doping limit, the RE-doped films mostly show surface oxidation, which can be prevented by surface passivation, encapsulation, or in-situ cleaving to recover the topological surface state. PMID:26956771

  10. Review on dielectric properties of rare earth doped barium titanate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, Fatin Adila; Osman, Rozana Aina Maulat; Idris, Mohd Sobri

    2016-07-01

    Rare earth doped Barium Titanate (BaTiO3) were studied due to high permittivity, excellent electrical properties and have wide usage in various applications. This paper reviewed on the electrical properties of RE doped BaTiO3 (RE: Lanthanum (La), Erbium (Er), Samarium (Sm), Neodymium (Nd), Cerium (Ce)), processing method, phase transition occurred and solid solution range for complete study. Most of the RE doped BaTiO3 downshifted the Curie temperature (TC). Transition temperature also known as Curie temperature, TC where the ceramics had a transition from ferroelectric to a paraelectric phase. In this review, the dielectric constant of La-doped BaTiO3, Er-doped BaTiO3, Sm-doped BaTiO3, Nd-doped BaTiO3 and Ce-doped BaTiO3 had been proved to increase and the transition temperature or also known as TC also lowered down to room temperature as for all the RE doped BaTiO3 except for Er-doped BaTiO3.

  11. Oxidation Effects in Rare Earth Doped Topological Insulator Thin Films

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa, A. I.; van der Laan, G.; Harrison, S. E.; Cibin, G.; Hesjedal, T.

    2016-01-01

    The breaking of time-reversal symmetry (TRS) in topological insulators is a prerequisite for unlocking their exotic properties and for observing the quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE). The incorporation of dopants which exhibit magnetic long-range order is the most promising approach for TRS-breaking. REBiTe3, wherein 50% of the Bi is substitutionally replaced by a RE atom (RE = Gd, Dy, and Ho), is a predicted QAHE system. Despite the low solubility of REs in bulk crystals of a few %, highly doped thin films have been demonstrated, which are free of secondary phases and of high crystalline quality. Here we study the effects of exposure to atmosphere of rare earth-doped Bi2(Se, Te)3 thin films using x-ray absorption spectroscopy. We demonstrate that these RE dopants are all trivalent and effectively substitute for Bi3+ in the Bi2(Se, Te)3 matrix. We find an unexpected high degree of sample oxidation for the most highly doped samples, which is not restricted to the surface of the films. In the low-doping limit, the RE-doped films mostly show surface oxidation, which can be prevented by surface passivation, encapsulation, or in-situ cleaving to recover the topological surface state. PMID:26956771

  12. Energetics of Rare Earth Doped Uranium Oxide Solid Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lei

    The physical and chemical properties of UO2 nuclear fuels are affected as fission products accumulate during irradiation. The lanthanides, a main group of fission products, form extensive solid solutions with uranium oxide in the fluorite structure. Thermodynamic studies of such solid solutions had been performed to obtain partial molar free energies of oxygen as a function of dopant concentration and temperature; however, direct measurement of formation enthalpies was hampered by the refractory nature of these oxides. In this work, high temperature oxide melt solution calorimetry was utilized to study the thermochemistry of various rare earth doped uranium oxide LnxU 1-xO2-0.5x+y (Ln = La, Y, Nd) over a wide range of dopant concentrations and oxygen contents. The sintered solid solutions were carefully characterized to determine their phase purity, chemical composition, and uranium oxidation state, with most of the materials in the oxygen excess regime. The enthalpies of formation of LnxU1-xO2-0.5x+y were calculated from the calorimetric data. The oxidation enthalpies of these solid solutions are similar to that of UO2. The formation enthalpies from constituent oxides (LnO1.5, UO2, and UO3) become increasingly negative with addition of dopant cations and appear relatively independent of the uranium oxidation state (oxygen content) when the type and concentration of the dopants are the same. This is valid in the oxygen excess regime; thus an estimation of formation enthalpies of LnxU1-xO2 materials can be made. The formation enthalpies from elements of hyperstoichiometric LnxU1-xO 2-0.5x+y materials obtained from calorimetric measurements are in good agreement with those calculated from free energy data. A direct comparison between the formation enthalpies from calorimetric study and computational research using density functional theory was also performed. The experimental and computational energies of LnxU 1-xO2 (Ln = La, Y, Nd) generally agree within 10 k

  13. Origin of enhanced magnetization in rare earth doped multiferroic bismuth ferrite

    SciTech Connect

    Nayek, C.; Thirmal, Ch.; Murugavel, P.; Tamilselvan, A.; Balakumar, S.

    2014-02-21

    We report structural and magnetic properties of rare earth doped Bi{sub 0.95}R{sub 0.05} FeO{sub 3} (R = Y, Ho, and Er) submicron particles. Rare earth doping enhances the magnetization and the magnetization shows an increasing trend with decreasing dopant ionic radii. In contrast to the x-ray diffraction pattern, we have seen a strong evidence for the presence of rare earth iron garnets R{sub 3}Fe{sub 5}O{sub 12} in magnetization measured as a function of temperature, in selected area electron diffraction, and in Raman measurements. Our results emphasised the role of secondary phases in the magnetic property of rare earth doped BiFeO{sub 3} compounds along with the structural distortion favoring spin canting by increase in Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya exchange energy.

  14. Capillary-force-induced formation of luminescent polystyrene/(rare-earth-doped nanoparticle) hybrid hollow spheres.

    PubMed

    Chen, Min; Xie, Lin; Li, Fuyou; Zhou, Shuxue; Wu, Limin

    2010-10-01

    This paper presents a "one-pot" procedure to synthesize polystyrene/(rare-earth-doped nanoparticles) (PS/REDNPs) hybrid hollow spheres via the in situ diffusion of organic core into inorganic shell under strong capillary force. In this approach, when carboxyl-capped PS colloids were deposited by different REDNPs in aqueous medium, such as LaF3:Eu3+, LaF3:Ce3+-Tb3+, and YVO4:Dy3+, PS/REDNPs inorganic-organic hybrid hollow spheres could be directly obtained via the in situ diffusion of core PS chains into the voids between rare-earth-doped nanoparticles through the strong capillary force. Not only is the synthetic procedure versatile and very simple, but also the obtained hybrid hollow spheres are hydrophilic and luminescent and could be directly used in chemical and biological fields.

  15. Infrared spectroscopy of rare-earth-doped CaFe2As2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Zhen; Huffman, T. J.; Xu, Peng; Qazilbash, M. M.; Saha, S. R.; Drye, Tyler; Paglione, J.

    2014-03-01

    Recently, rare-earth doping in CaFe2As2 has been used to tune its electronic, magnetic, and structural properties. The substitution of rare-earth ions at the alkaline-earth sites leads to the suppression of the spin-density wave (SDW) phase transition in CaFe2As2. For example, Pr substitution results in a paramagnetic metal in the tetragonal phase that is susceptible to a low temperature structural transition to a collapsed tetragonal phase. However, La-doped CaFe2As2 remains in the uncollapsed tetragonal structure down to the lowest measured temperatures. Both the uncollapsed and collapsed tetragonal structures exhibit superconductivity with maximum Tc reaching 47 K, the highest observed in inter-metallics albeit with a small superconducting volume fraction. In this work, we perform ab-plane infrared spectroscopy of rare-earth-doped CaFe2As2 at different cryogenic temperatures. Our aim is to ascertain the contributions of electron doping and chemical pressure to the charge and lattice dynamics of this iron-arsenide system.

  16. Visible to infrared low temperature photoluminescence of rare earth doped bismuth germanate crystals.

    PubMed

    Canimoglu, A; Ayvacikli, M; Karabulut, Y; Karali, T; Can, N

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, the influence of a series of rare earth (Eu, Tm, Nd) and Cr ion doping on the optical properties of BGO was investigated by means of photoluminescence (PL) from visible to IR region in the 10-300K temperature range using different types of detectors, namely, photomultiplier tube (PMT), InGaAs (IGA), and Si. Several samples were investigated having dopants concentrations of 0.3wt%Nd, 0.4wt%Tm, 0.06wt% Cr and 3ppm Eu. The PL spectra of the samples showed different luminescence behaviour which is assigned to the 4f intra shell transition from rare earth ions. The temperature dependence of the PL from rare earth doped BGO crystals is also examined. PMID:26943903

  17. Rare Earth Doped Semiconductors and Materials Research Society Symposium Proceedings, Volume 301

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballance, John

    1994-02-01

    The properties of rare earth ions in solids were studied in detail for decades, but until recently this work was restricted to dominantly ionic hosts such as fluorides and oxides, and to a lesser extent to more covalently bonded hosts, such as tetrahedral 2-6 semiconductors. The idea of rare earth elements incorporated into covalent semiconductors such as GaAs and Si may be traced to a short communication in 1963 by R.L. Bell (J. Appl. Phys. 34, 1563 (1963)) proposing a dc-pumped rare earth laser. At about the same time, three unpublished technical reports appeared as a result of U.S. Department of Defense sponsored research in rare earth doped Si, GaAs, and InP to fabricate LED's. Attempts by other researchers to identify sharp 4f specific emissions in these hosts essentially failed.

  18. Multilayer Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC) Architectures Utilizing Rare Earth Doped YSZ and Rare Earth Pyrochlores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitt, Michael P.; Rai, Amarendra K.; Bhattacharya, Rabi; Zhu, Dongming; Wolfe, Douglas E.

    2014-01-01

    To allow for increased gas turbine efficiencies, new insulating thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) must be developed to protect the underlying metallic components from higher operating temperatures. This work focused on using rare earth doped (Yb and Gd) yttria stabilized zirconia (t' Low-k) and Gd2Zr2O7 pyrochlores (GZO) combined with novel nanolayered and thick layered microstructures to enable operation beyond the 1200 C stability limit of current 7 wt% yttria stabilized zirconia (7YSZ) coatings. It was observed that the layered system can reduce the thermal conductivity by approximately 45 percent with respect to YSZ after 20 hr of testing at 1316 C. The erosion rate of GZO is shown to be an order to magnitude higher than YSZ and t' Low-k, but this can be reduced by almost 57 percent when utilizing a nanolayered structure. Lastly, the thermal instability of the layered system is investigated and thought is given to optimization of layer thickness.

  19. Synthesis of rare earth doped TiO2 nanorods as photocatalysts for lignin degradation.

    PubMed

    Song, Liang; Zhao, Xueyuan; Cao, Lixin; Moon, Ji-Won; Gu, Baohua; Wang, Wei

    2015-10-28

    A two-step process is developed to synthesize rare earth doped titania nanorods (RE-TiO2 NRs) as photocatalysts for efficient degradation of lignin under simulated sunlight irradiation. In this approach, protonated titanate nanotubes with layered structures were first prepared by a hydrothermal approach, and rare earth metal ions were subsequently bound to the negatively charged surface of the synthesized titanate via electrostatic incorporation. The as-synthesized RE-TiO2 NRs after calcination generally showed much higher photocatalytic efficiencies than those of undoped TiO2 NRs or the commercial P25 TiO2 photocatalyst. Using methyl orange (MO) as a probing molecule, we demonstrate that Eu-TiO2 NRs are among the best for degrading MO, with an observed rate constant of 4.2 × 10(-3) s(-1). The La(3+), Sm(3+), Eu(3+) and Er(3+) doped TiO2 NRs also showed higher photocatalytic efficiencies in degrading MO than the commercial P25 TiO2. We further demonstrate that lignin can be photodegraded effectively and rapidly at room temperature under simulated sunlight through two reaction routes, which could be important in controlling ways of lignin depolymerization or the formation of reaction products. PMID:26400095

  20. Rare-earth doped colour tuneable up-conversion ZBLAN phosphor for enhancing photocatalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Méndez-Ramos, J.; Acosta-Mora, P.; Ruiz-Morales, J. C.; Sierra, M.; Redondas, A.; Ruggiero, E.; Salassa, L.; Borges, M. E.; Esparza, P.

    2015-03-01

    Rare-earth doped ZrF4-BaF2-LaF3-AlF3-NaF (ZBLAN) fluoride glasses have been successfully synthesized showing outstanding UV-VIS up-conversion luminescence of Er3+ and Tm3+, sensitized by Yb3+ ions, under near-infrared excitation at 980 nm. The ratio between blue, green and red up-conversion emission bands can be adjusted by varying the pump power density of the incident infrared radiation, resulting in a controlled tuneability of the overall emitting colour from greenish to yellowish. Additionally, the observed high energy UV intense up-conversion emissions are suitable to enhance photocatalytic activity of main water-splitting semiconductor electrodes (such as TiO2) used in sustainable production of hydrogen. Photocatalysis and photolysis degradation of methylene blue in water under sun-like irradiation using benchmark photocatalyst (TiO2 Degussa P25) have been boosted by 20% and by a factor of 2.5 respectively, due to the enhancement of UV radiation that reaches the TiO2 particles by the addition of ZBLAN powder into a slurry-type photo-reactor. Hence, up-conversion ZBLAN phosphors contribute to demonstrate the possibility of transforming the incoming infrared radiation into the UV region needed to bridge the gap of photocatalytic semiconductors.

  1. Rare-earth-doped nanophosphors for multicolor cathodoluminescence nanobioimaging using scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Taichi; Fukushima, Shoichiro; Niioka, Hirohiko; Yamamoto, Naoki; Miyake, Jun; Araki, Tsutomu; Hashimoto, Mamoru

    2015-05-01

    We describe rare-earth-doped nanophosphors (RE-NPs) for biological imaging using cathodoluminescence(CL) microscopy based on scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). We report the first demonstration of multicolor CL nanobioimaging using STEM with nanophosphors. The CL spectra of the synthesized nanophosphors (Y2O3∶Eu, Y2O3∶Tb) were sufficiently narrow to be distinguished. From CL images of RE-NPs on an elastic carbon-coated copper grid, the spatial resolution was beyond the diffraction limit of light.Y2O3∶Tb and Y2O3∶Eu RE-NPs showed a remarkable resistance against electron beam exposure even at high acceleration voltage (80 kV) and retained a CL intensity of more than 97% compared with the initial intensity for 1 min. In biological CL imaging with STEM, heavy-metal-stained cell sections containing the RE-NPs were prepared,and both the CL images of RE-NPs and cellular structures, such as mitochondria, were clearly observed from STEM images with high contrast. The cellular CL imaging using RE-NPs also had high spatial resolution even though heavy-metal-stained cells are normally regarded as highly scattering media. Moreover, since theRE-NPs exhibit photoluminescence (PL) excited by UV light, they are useful for multimodal correlative imaging using CL and PL.

  2. Synthesis of rare earth doped TiO2 nanorods as photocatalysts for lignin degradation

    DOE PAGES

    Song, Liang; Zhao, Xueyuan; Cao, Lixin; Moon, Ji-Won; Gu, Baohua; Wang, Wei

    2015-09-10

    In this paper, a two-step process is developed to synthesize rare earth doped titania nanorods (RE–TiO2 NRs) as photocatalysts for efficient degradation of lignin under simulated sunlight irradiation. In this approach, protonated titanate nanotubes with layered structures were first prepared by a hydrothermal approach, and rare earth metal ions were subsequently bound to the negatively charged surface of the synthesized titanate via electrostatic incorporation. The as-synthesized RE–TiO2 NRs after calcination generally showed much higher photocatalytic efficiencies than those of undoped TiO2 NRs or the commercial P25 TiO2 photocatalyst. Using methyl orange (MO) as a probing molecule, we demonstrate that Eu–TiO2more » NRs are among the best for degrading MO, with an observed rate constant of 4.2 × 10-3 s-1. The La3+, Sm3+, Eu3+ and Er3+ doped TiO2 NRs also showed higher photocatalytic efficiencies in degrading MO than the commercial P25 TiO2. Finally, we further demonstrate that lignin can be photodegraded effectively and rapidly at room temperature under simulated sunlight through two reaction routes, which could be important in controlling ways of lignin depolymerization or the formation of reaction products.« less

  3. Synthesis of rare earth doped TiO2 nanorods as photocatalysts for lignin degradation.

    PubMed

    Song, Liang; Zhao, Xueyuan; Cao, Lixin; Moon, Ji-Won; Gu, Baohua; Wang, Wei

    2015-10-28

    A two-step process is developed to synthesize rare earth doped titania nanorods (RE-TiO2 NRs) as photocatalysts for efficient degradation of lignin under simulated sunlight irradiation. In this approach, protonated titanate nanotubes with layered structures were first prepared by a hydrothermal approach, and rare earth metal ions were subsequently bound to the negatively charged surface of the synthesized titanate via electrostatic incorporation. The as-synthesized RE-TiO2 NRs after calcination generally showed much higher photocatalytic efficiencies than those of undoped TiO2 NRs or the commercial P25 TiO2 photocatalyst. Using methyl orange (MO) as a probing molecule, we demonstrate that Eu-TiO2 NRs are among the best for degrading MO, with an observed rate constant of 4.2 × 10(-3) s(-1). The La(3+), Sm(3+), Eu(3+) and Er(3+) doped TiO2 NRs also showed higher photocatalytic efficiencies in degrading MO than the commercial P25 TiO2. We further demonstrate that lignin can be photodegraded effectively and rapidly at room temperature under simulated sunlight through two reaction routes, which could be important in controlling ways of lignin depolymerization or the formation of reaction products.

  4. Visualization of melanoma tumor with lectin-conjugated rare-earth doped fluoride nanocrystals

    PubMed Central

    Dumych, Tetiana; Lutsyk, Maxym; Banski, Mateusz; Yashchenko, Antonina; Sojka, Bartlomiej; Horbay, Rostyslav; Lutsyk, Alexander; Stoika, Rostyslav; Misiewicz, Jan; Podhorodecki, Artur; Bilyy, Rostyslav

    2014-01-01

    Aim To develop specific fluorescent markers for melanoma tumor visualization, which would provide high selectivity and reversible binding pattern, by the use of carbohydrate-recognizing proteins, lectins, combined with the physical ability for imaging deep in the living tissues by utilizing red and near infrared fluorescent properties of specific rare-earth doped nanocrystals (NC). Methods B10F16 melanoma cells were inoculated to C57BL/6 mice for inducing experimental melanoma tumor. Tumors were removed and analyzed by lectin-histochemistry using LABA, PFA, PNA, HPA, SNA, GNA, and NPL lectins and stained with hematoxylin and eosin. NPL lectin was conjugated to fluorescent NaGdF4:Eu3+-COOH nanoparticles (5 nm) via zero length cross-linking reaction, and the conjugates were purified from unbound substances and then used for further visualization of histological samples. Fluorescent microscopy was used to visualize NPL-NaGdF4:Eu3+ with the fluorescent emission at 600-720 nm range. Results NPL lectin selectively recognized regions of undifferentiated melanoblasts surrounding neoangiogenic foci inside melanoma tumor, PNA lectin recognized differentiated melanoblasts, and LCA and WGA were bound to tumor stroma regions. NPL-NaGdF4:Eu3+ conjugated NC were efficiently detecting newly formed regions of melanoma tumor, confirmed by fluorescent microscopy in visible and near infrared mode. These conjugates possessed high photostability and were compatible with convenient xylene-based mounting systems and preserved intensive fluorescent signal at samples storage for at least 6 months. Conclusion NPL lectin-NaGdF4:Eu3+ conjugated NC permitted distinct identification of contours of the melanoma tissue on histological sections using red excitation at 590-610 nm and near infrared emission of 700-720 nm. These data are of potential practical significance for development of glycans-conjugated nanoparticles to be used for in vivo visualization of melanoma tumor. PMID:24891277

  5. Health Sensing Functions in Thermal Barrier Coatings Incorporating Rare-Earth-Doped Luminescent Sublayers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eldridge, J. I.; Singh, J.; Wolfe, D. E.

    2004-01-01

    Great effort has been directed towards developing techniques to monitor the health of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) that would detect the approach of safety-threatening conditions. An unconventional approach is presented here where health sensing functionality is integrated into the TBC itself by the incorporation of rare-earth-doped luminescent sublayers to monitor erosion as well as whether the TBC is maintaining the underlying substrate at a sufficiently low temperature. Erosion indication is demonstrated in electron-beam physical vapor deposited (EB-PVD) TBCs consisting of 7wt% yttria-stabilized zirconia (7YSZ) with europium-doped and terbium-doped sublayers. Multiple ingot deposition produced sharp boundaries between the doped sublayers without interrupting the columnar growth of the TBC. The TBC-coated specimens were subjected to alumina particle jet erosion, and the erosion depth was then indicated under ultraviolet illumination that excited easily visible luminescence characteristic of sublayer that was exposed by erosion. In addition, temperature measurements from a bottom-lying europium-doped sublayer in a TBC produced by multiple ingot EB-PVD were accomplished by measuring the temperature-dependent decay time from the 606 nm wavelength emission excited in that sublayer with a 532 nm wavelength laser that was selected for its close match to one of the europium excitation wavelengths as well as being at a wavelength where the TBC is relatively transparent. It is proposed the low dopant levels and absence of interruption of the TBC columnar growth allow the addition of the erosion and temperature sensing functions with minimal effects on TBC performance.

  6. Progress in rare-earth-doped nanocrystalline glass-ceramics for laser cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkata Krishnaiah, Kummara; Ledemi, Yannick; Soares de Lima Filho, Elton; Loranger, Sebastien; Nemova, Galina; Messaddeq, Younes; Kashyap, Raman

    2016-03-01

    Laser cooling with anti-Stokes fluorescencewas predicted by Pringsheim in 1929, but for solids was only demonstrated in 1995. There are many difficulties which have hindered laser assisted cooling, principally the chemical purity of a sample and the availability of suitable hosts. Recent progress has seen the cooled temperature plummet to 93K in Yb:YLF. One of the challenges for laser cooling to become ubiquitous, is incorporating the rare-earthcooling ion in a more easily engineered material, rather than a pure crystalline host. Rare-earth-doped nanocrystalline glass-ceramics were first developed by Wang and Ohwaki for enhanced luminescence and mechanical properties compared to their parent glasses. Our work has focused on creating a nanocrystalline environment for the cooling ion, in an easy to engineer glass. The glasses with composition 30SiO2-15Al2O3-27CdF2-22PbF2-4YF3-2YbF3 (mol%), have been prepared by the conventional melt-quenching technique. By a simple post fabrication thermal treatment, the rare-earth ions are embedded in the crystalline phase within the glass matrix. Nanocrystals with various sizes and rare-earth concentrations have been fabricated and their photoluminescence properties assessed in detail. These materials show close to unity photoluminescence quantum yield (PLQY) when pumped above the band. However, they exhibit strong up-conversion into the blue, characteristic of Tm trace impurity whose presence was confirmed. The purification of the starting materials is underway to reduce the background loss to demonstrate laser cooling. Progress in the development of these nano-glass-ceramics and their experimental characterization will be discussed.

  7. Polarization dependence of two-photon transition intensities in rare-earth doped crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Le Nguyen, An-Dien

    1996-05-01

    A polarization dependence technique has been developed as a tool to investigate phonon scattering (PS), electronic Raman scattering (ERS), and two-photon absorption (TPA) transition intensities in vanadate and phosphate crystals. A general theory for the polarization dependence (PD) of two-photon transition intensities has been given. Expressions for the polarization dependent behavior of two-photon transition intensities have been tabulated for the 32 crystallographic point groups. When the wavefunctions for the initial and final states of a rare-earth doped in crystals are known, explicit PD expressions with no unknown parameters can be obtained. A spectroscopic method for measuring and interpreting phonon and ERS intensities has been developed to study PrVO{sub 4}, NdVO{sub 4}, ErVO{sub 4}, and TmVO{sub 4} crystals. Relative phonon intensities with the polarization of the incident and scattered light arbitrarily varied were accurately predicted and subsequently used for alignment and calibration in ERS measurements in these systems for the first time. Since ERS and PS intensities generally follow different polarization curves as a function of polar angles, the two can be uniquely identified by comparing their respective polarization behavior. The most crucial application of the technique in ERS spectroscopy is the establishment of a stringent test for the Axe theory. For the first time, the F{sub 1}/F{sub 2} ratio extracted from the experimental fits of the ERS intensities were compared with those predicted by theories which include both the second- and third-order contributions. Relatively good agreement between the fitted values of F{sub 1}/F{sub 2} and the predicted values using the second-order theory has been found.

  8. Fabrication and characterization of rare earth doped wide bandgap semiconductors for spectral storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sly, Mohamed Fawzy

    Powder samples of MgS and CaS, singly doped with Eu and doubly doped with Eu and Ce, were synthesized for their usage in spectral storage. Thin films of these materials were fabricated using the pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique. This fast and simple technique is superior to the single crystal growth or molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) as far as the storage material requirements are concerned. High optical quality films of MgS:Eu and CaS:Eu have been grown and tested. Polycrystalline powder samples of MgS and CaS were synthesized using high temperature reduction of commercially available magnesium and calcium sulfates. These materials were singly doped with rare earth lanthanides using high temperature diffusion in powder forms. Rare earth lanthanide impurities in very small concentrations are necessary for optical applications such as spectral storage for which all the materials prepared during the course of this study were made. Thin films of rare earth doped calcium and magnesium sulfides have been produced by using pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique. Coating of the reactive surfaces of the PLD chamber with SiC has been performed to make them resistant to the corrosive environment and the by products of the deposition process. Solid targets needed for thin films were fabricated from the synthesized polycrystalline powders by high-pressure cold compression technique. Deposition of thin films of CaS and MgS has been performed and to protect these films from the environment, capping layers of aluminum oxide (Al2O 3) or ZnS have been deposited over the CaS and MgS thin films. In magnesium sulfide, oxygen doped magnesium sulfide and calcium sulfides, europium centers occur in different spectral regions. Therefore, multi-layer thin film structures were fabricated to allow for higher density of spectral storage. Various characterization techniques such as optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy have

  9. Chalcogenide glasses for infrared applications: New synthesis routes and rare earth doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubert, Mathieu

    shift the optical band gap toward higher wavelengths. A systematic ceramization study emphasizes the difficulty of controlling the crystallization for glasses in the systems GeSe2-Ga2Se3-In2Se 3 and GeSe2-Ga2Se3-PbSe. No crystallization of the In2Se3 and PbSe crystalline phase was obtained. Finally, the possibility of producing rare-earth doped 80GeSe2 -20Ga2Se3 glass-ceramics transparent in the infrared region up to 16 microm is demonstrated. Enhanced photoluminescence intensity and reduced radiative lifetimes are observed with increased crystallinity in these materials.

  10. New Mid-IR Lasers Based on Rare-Earth-Doped Sulfide and Chloride Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Nostrand, M

    2000-09-01

    Applications in remote-sensing and military countermeasures have driven a need for compact, solid-state mid-IR lasers. Due to multi-phonon quenching, non-traditional hosts are needed to extend current solid-state, room-temperature lasing capabilities beyond {approx} 4 {micro}m. Traditional oxide and fluoride hosts have effective phonon energies in the neighborhood of 1000 cm{sup -1} and 500 cm{sup -1}, respectively. These phonons can effectively quench radiation above 2 and 4 {micro}m, respectively. Materials with lower effective phonon energies such as sulfides and chlorides are the logical candidates for mid-IR (4-10 {micro}m) operation. In this report, laser action is demonstrated in two such hosts, CaGa{sub 2}S{sub 4} and KPb{sub 2}Cl{sub 5}. The CaGa{sub 2}S{sub 4}:Dy{sup 3+} laser operating at 4.3 {micro}m represents the first sulfide laser operating beyond 2 {micro}m. The KPb{sub 2}Cl{sub 5}:Dy{sup 3+} laser operating at 2.4 {micro}m represents the first operation of a chloride-host laser in ambient conditions. Laser action is also reported for CaGa{sub 2}S{sub 4}:Dy{sup 3+} at 2.4 {micro}m, CaGa{sub 2}S{sub 4}:Dy{sup 3+} at 1.4 {micro}m, and KPb{sub 2}Cl{sub 5}:Nd{sup 3+} at 1.06 {micro}m. Both host materials have been fully characterized, including lifetimes, absorption and emission cross sections, radiative branching ratios, and radiative quantum efficiencies. Radiative branching ratios and radiative quantum efficiencies have been determined both by the Judd-Ofelt method (which is based on absorption measurements), and by a novel method described herein which is based on emission measurements. Modeling has been performed to predict laser performance, and a new method to determine emission cross section from slope efficiency and threshold data is developed. With the introduction and laser demonstration of rare-earth-doped CaGa{sub 2}S{sub 4} and KPb{sub 2}Cl{sub 5}, direct generation of mid-IR laser radiation in a solid-state host has been demonstrated. In

  11. Microstructure and properties of in-flight rare-earth doped thermal barrier coatings prepared by suspension plasma spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Stephanie

    Thermal barrier coatings with lower thermal conductivity improve the efficiency of gas turbine engines by allowing higher operating temperatures. Recent studies were shown that coatings containing a pair of rare-earth oxides with equal molar ratio have lower thermal conductivity and improved sintering resistance compared to the undoped 4-4.5 mol.% yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ). In the present work, rare-earth doped coatings were fabricated via suspension plasma spray by spraying YSZ powder-ethanol suspensions that contained dissolved rare-earth nitrates. The compositions of the coatings determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy verified that 68 +/- 8% of the rare-earth nitrates added into the suspension was incorporated into the coatings. Two coatings containing different concentrations of the same dopant pair (Nd2O3/Yb2O3), and three coatings having similar concentrations of different dopant pairs (Nd 2O3/Yb2O3, Nd2O3/Gd 2O3, and Gd2O3/Yb2O 3) were produced and compared. The effect of dopant concentration and dopant pair type on the microstructure and properties of the coatings in the as-sprayed and heat treated conditions were investigated using XRD, SEM, TEM, STEM-EDX, and the laser flash method. The cross-sectional morphology of all coatings displayed columnar structure. The porosity content of the coating was found to increase with increasing dopant concentration, but did not significantly change with dopant pairs. Similarly, increasing the Nd2O3/Yb2O 3 concentration lowered the thermal conductivity of the as-sprayed coatings. Although the effect of changing dopant pair type is not as significant as increasing the dopant concentration, the coating that contained Gd2O 3/Yb2O3 exhibited the lowest conductivity compared to coatings that had other dopant pairs. Thermal conductivity measurement performed on the heat treated coatings indicated a larger conductivity increase for the rare-earth doped coatings. A detailed study on the

  12. The unusually high Tc in rare-earth-doped single crystalline CaFe2As2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Fengyan; Lv, Bing; Deng, Liangzi; Meen, James K.; Xue, Yu-Yi; Chu, Ching-Wu

    2014-08-01

    In rare-earth-doped single crystalline CaFe2As2, the mysterious small volume fraction which superconducts up to 49 K, much higher than the bulk Tc ~ 30 s K, has prompted a long search for a hidden variable that could enhance the Tc by more than 30% in iron-based superconductors of the same structure. Here we report a chemical, structural and magnetic study of CaFe2As2 systematically doped with La, Ce, Pr and Nd. Coincident with the high Tc phase, we find extreme magnetic anisotropy, accompanied by an unexpected doping-independent Tc and equally unexpected superparamagnetic clusters associated with As vacancies. These observations lead us to conjecture that the tantalizing Tc enhancement may be associated with naturally occurring chemical interfaces and may thus provide a new paradigm in the search for superconductors with higher Tc.

  13. Effect of temperature and rare-earth doping on charge-carrier mobility in indium-monoselenide crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Abdinov, A. Sh.; Babayeva, R. F.; Amirova, S. I.; Rzayev, R. M.

    2013-08-15

    In the temperature range T = 77-600 K, the dependence of the charge-carrier mobility ({mu}) on the initial dark resistivity is experimentally investigated at 77 K ({rho}d{sub 0}), as well as on the temperature and the level (N) of rare-earth doping with such elements as gadolinium (Gd), holmium (Ho), and dysprosium (Dy) in n-type indium-monoselenide (InSe) crystals. It is established that the anomalous behavior of the dependences {mu}(T), {mu}({rho}d{sub 0}), and {mu}(N) found from the viewpoint of the theory of charge-carrier mobility in crystalline semiconductors is related, first of all, to partial disorder in indium-monoselenide crystals and can be attributed to the presence of random drift barriers in the free energy bands.

  14. Light source with carbon nanotubes field emission cathode and rare-earth doped nanocrystalline phosphors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Psuja, P.; Strek, W.

    2007-09-01

    In this work we report a new carbon nanotubes field emission (CNT-FED) light source with nanocrystalline phosphors. The nanocrystalline powders of cerium doped yttrium aluminum garnet were obtained by modified Pechini method. The phosphor has been electrophoretically deposited on ITO-glass substrates. The cathode composed of carbon nanotubes was fabricated in the same manner. A light source was assembled and tested. Low-voltage cathodoluminescent spectra and I-V characteristics of fabricated cathodes were measured. A possibility of application of Ce doped nanocrystalline YAG phosphor in the field emission displays (FEDs) was discussed.

  15. Nanophotonic coherent light–matter interfaces based on rare-earth-doped crystals

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Tian; Kindem, Jonathan M.; Miyazono, Evan; Faraon, Andrei

    2015-01-01

    Quantum light–matter interfaces connecting stationary qubits to photons will enable optical networks for quantum communications, precise global time keeping, photon switching and studies of fundamental physics. Rare-earth-ion-doped crystals are state-of-the-art materials for optical quantum memories and quantum transducers between optical photons, microwave photons and spin waves. Here we demonstrate coupling of an ensemble of neodymium rare-earth-ions to photonic nanocavities fabricated in the yttrium orthosilicate host crystal. Cavity quantum electrodynamics effects including Purcell enhancement (F=42) and dipole-induced transparency are observed on the highly coherent 4I9/2–4F3/2 optical transition. Fluctuations in the cavity transmission due to statistical fine structure of the atomic density are measured, indicating operation at the quantum level. Coherent optical control of cavity-coupled rare-earth ions is performed via photon echoes. Long optical coherence times (T2∼100 μs) and small inhomogeneous broadening are measured for the cavity-coupled rare-earth ions, thus demonstrating their potential for on-chip scalable quantum light–matter interfaces. PMID:26364586

  16. Nanophotonic coherent light-matter interfaces based on rare-earth-doped crystals.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Tian; Kindem, Jonathan M; Miyazono, Evan; Faraon, Andrei

    2015-01-01

    Quantum light-matter interfaces connecting stationary qubits to photons will enable optical networks for quantum communications, precise global time keeping, photon switching and studies of fundamental physics. Rare-earth-ion-doped crystals are state-of-the-art materials for optical quantum memories and quantum transducers between optical photons, microwave photons and spin waves. Here we demonstrate coupling of an ensemble of neodymium rare-earth-ions to photonic nanocavities fabricated in the yttrium orthosilicate host crystal. Cavity quantum electrodynamics effects including Purcell enhancement (F=42) and dipole-induced transparency are observed on the highly coherent (4)I(9/2)-(4)F(3/2) optical transition. Fluctuations in the cavity transmission due to statistical fine structure of the atomic density are measured, indicating operation at the quantum level. Coherent optical control of cavity-coupled rare-earth ions is performed via photon echoes. Long optical coherence times (T2∼100 μs) and small inhomogeneous broadening are measured for the cavity-coupled rare-earth ions, thus demonstrating their potential for on-chip scalable quantum light-matter interfaces. PMID:26364586

  17. Nanophotonic coherent light-matter interfaces based on rare-earth-doped crystals.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Tian; Kindem, Jonathan M; Miyazono, Evan; Faraon, Andrei

    2015-09-14

    Quantum light-matter interfaces connecting stationary qubits to photons will enable optical networks for quantum communications, precise global time keeping, photon switching and studies of fundamental physics. Rare-earth-ion-doped crystals are state-of-the-art materials for optical quantum memories and quantum transducers between optical photons, microwave photons and spin waves. Here we demonstrate coupling of an ensemble of neodymium rare-earth-ions to photonic nanocavities fabricated in the yttrium orthosilicate host crystal. Cavity quantum electrodynamics effects including Purcell enhancement (F=42) and dipole-induced transparency are observed on the highly coherent (4)I(9/2)-(4)F(3/2) optical transition. Fluctuations in the cavity transmission due to statistical fine structure of the atomic density are measured, indicating operation at the quantum level. Coherent optical control of cavity-coupled rare-earth ions is performed via photon echoes. Long optical coherence times (T2∼100 μs) and small inhomogeneous broadening are measured for the cavity-coupled rare-earth ions, thus demonstrating their potential for on-chip scalable quantum light-matter interfaces.

  18. Demonstration of ultra-low NA rare-earth doped step index fiber for applications in high power fiber lasers.

    PubMed

    Jain, Deepak; Jung, Yongmin; Barua, Pranabesh; Alam, Shaiful; Sahu, Jayanta K

    2015-03-23

    In this paper, we report the mode area scaling of a rare-earth doped step index fiber by using low numerical aperture. Numerical simulations show the possibility of achieving an effective area of ~700 um² (including bend induced effective area reduction) at a bend diameter of 32 cm from a 35 μm core fiber with a numerical aperture of 0.038. An effective single mode operation is ensured following the criterion of the fundamental mode loss to be lower than 0.1 dB/m while ensuring the higher order modes loss to be higher than 10 dB/m at a wavelength of 1060 nm. Our optimized modified chemical vapor deposition process in conjunction with solution doping process allows fabrication of an Yb-doped step index fiber having an ultra-low numerical aperture of ~0.038. Experimental results confirm a Gaussian output beam from a 35 μm core fiber validating our simulation results. Fiber shows an excellent laser efficiency of ~81%and aM² less than 1.1. PMID:25837082

  19. Evidence for interface superconductivity in rare-earth doped CaFe2As2 single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Bing; Deng, L. Z.; Wei, F. Y.; Xue, Y. Y.; Chu, C. W.

    2014-03-01

    To unravel to the mysterious non-bulk superconductivity up to 49K observed in rare-earth (R =La, Ce, Pr and Nd) doped CaFe2As2 single-crystals whose Tc is higher than that of any known compounds consisting of one or more of its constituent elements of R, Ca, Fe, and As at ambient or under pressures, systematic magnetic, compositional and structural have carried out on different rare-earth-doped (Ca1-xRx) Fe2As2 samples. We have detected extremely large magnetic anisotropy, doping-level independent Tc, unexpected superparamagnetic clusters associated with As vacancies and their close correlation with the superconducting volume fraction, the existence of mesoscopic-2D structures and Josephson-junction arrays in this system. These observations lead us to conjecture that the Tc enhancement may be associated with naturally occurring chemical interfaces and thus provided evidence for the possible interface-enhanced Tc in naturally-grown single crystals of Fe-based superconductors.

  20. High pressure effects on the superconductivity in rare-earth-doped CaFe2As2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhoya, Walter; Cargill, Daniel; Gofryk, Krzysztof; Tsoi, Georgiy M.; Vohra, Yogesh K.; Sefat, Athena S.; Weir, S. T.

    2014-01-01

    High pressure superconductivity in a rare-earth-doped Ca0.86Pr0.14Fe2As2 single-crystalline sample has been studied up to 12 GPa and temperatures down to 11 K using the designer diamond anvil cell under a quasi-hydrostatic pressure medium. The electrical resistance measurements were complemented by high pressure and low-temperature X-ray diffraction studies at a synchrotron source. The electrical resistance measurements show an intriguing observation of superconductivity under pressure, with Tc as high as ∼51 K at 1.9 GPa, presenting the highest Tc reported in the intermetallic class of 122 iron-based superconductors. The resistive transition observed suggests a possible existence of two superconducting phases at low pressures of 0.5 GPa: one phase starting at Tc1 ∼ 48 K and the other starts at Tc2 ∼ 16 K. The two superconducting transitions show distinct variations with increasing pressure. High pressure and low-temperature structural studies indicate that the superconducting phase is a collapsed tetragonal ThCr2Si2-type (122) crystal structure.

  1. Synthesis of rare earth doped TiO2 nanorods as photocatalysts for lignin degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Liang; Zhao, Xueyuan; Cao, Lixin; Moon, Ji-Won; Gu, Baohua; Wang, Wei

    2015-09-10

    In this paper, a two-step process is developed to synthesize rare earth doped titania nanorods (RE–TiO2 NRs) as photocatalysts for efficient degradation of lignin under simulated sunlight irradiation. In this approach, protonated titanate nanotubes with layered structures were first prepared by a hydrothermal approach, and rare earth metal ions were subsequently bound to the negatively charged surface of the synthesized titanate via electrostatic incorporation. The as-synthesized RE–TiO2 NRs after calcination generally showed much higher photocatalytic efficiencies than those of undoped TiO2 NRs or the commercial P25 TiO2 photocatalyst. Using methyl orange (MO) as a probing molecule, we demonstrate that Eu–TiO2 NRs are among the best for degrading MO, with an observed rate constant of 4.2 × 10-3 s-1. The La3+, Sm3+, Eu3+ and Er3+ doped TiO2 NRs also showed higher photocatalytic efficiencies in degrading MO than the commercial P25 TiO2. Finally, we further demonstrate that lignin can be photodegraded effectively and rapidly at room temperature under simulated sunlight through two reaction routes, which could be important in controlling ways of lignin depolymerization or the formation of reaction products.

  2. Laser-induced generation of micrometer-sized luminescent patterns on rare-earth-doped amorphous films

    SciTech Connect

    Zanatta, A.R.; Ribeiro, C.T.M.

    2004-12-01

    Room-temperature photoluminescence has been achieved from rare-earth-doped amorphous (a-) GeN films. The samples were prepared by the radio-frequency-sputtering method, and light emission from the rare-earth (RE) centers was obtained after irradiating the films with a highly focused laser beam. As a result of this laser annealing procedure, almost circular holes with approximately 1-{mu}m diameter were produced on the surface of the a-GeN films. The area nearby these holes correspond to crystalline Ge and coincide with the regions, where relatively strong RE-related luminescence takes place. These laser-annealed areas can be easily and conveniently managed in order to generate different microscopic luminescent patterns. Depending on the RE ion employed, visible and near-infrared light emission were obtained from the patterns so produced. The development of these micrometer-sized luminescent centers, as well as their probable mechanisms of excitation-recombination, will be presented and discussed. The importance of the current experimental results to future technological applications such as microdevices, for example, will also be outlined.

  3. Fluorescence in nanocomposites based on polyethylene oxides and block copolymers of polyethylene oxide-polypropylene oxide loaded with rare earth doped fluorides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yust, Brian; Pedraza, Francisco; Sardar, Dhiraj; Saenz, Aaron; Chipara, Mircea

    2015-03-01

    Rare earth doped fluoride nanoparticles with a size of about 25 nm have been synthesized by a solvothermal process. Polymer-based nanocomposites, containing various weight fraction of nanofillers, have been obtained by dissolving the polymeric matrix (polyethylene oxide) within a solvent (deionized water), adding the nanoparticles, sonicating the mixture, and finally removing the solvent. The complete removal of the solvent has been confirmed by Thermogravimetric Analysis. Additional information about the thermal features have been obtained by Differential Scanning Calorimetry, Wide Angle X-Ray Scattering, FTIR, UV-Visible, and Raman. The effect of the loading with nanoparticles on the glass, crystallization, and melting transition temperatures of the polymeric matrix are reported. Fluorescence of rare earth doped nanoparticles dispersed within the polymeric matrix has been tested by laser spectroscopy. The dependence of fluorescence intensity on the concentration of nanofillers and on temperature in the range 300 to 400 K is analyzed.

  4. Combinatorial pulsed laser deposition of doped yttrium iron garnet films on yttrium aluminium garnet

    SciTech Connect

    Sposito, A. Eason, R. W.; Gregory, S. A.; Groot, P. A. J. de

    2014-02-07

    We investigate the crystalline growth of yttrium iron garnet (YIG) films doped with bismuth (Bi) and cerium (Ce) by combinatorial pulsed laser deposition, co-ablating a YIG target and either a Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} or a CeO{sub 2} target, for applications in microwave and optical communications. Substrate temperature is critical for crystalline growth of YIG with simultaneous inclusion of Bi in the garnet lattice, whereas Ce is not incorporated in the garnet structure, but forms a separate CeO{sub 2} phase.

  5. Rare-earth-doped materials with application to optical signal processing, quantum information science, and medical imaging technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cone, R. L.; Thiel, C. W.; Sun, Y.; Böttger, Thomas; Macfarlane, R. M.

    2012-02-01

    Unique spectroscopic properties of isolated rare earth ions in solids offer optical linewidths rivaling those of trapped single atoms and enable a variety of recent applications. We design rare-earth-doped crystals, ceramics, and fibers with persistent or transient "spectral hole" recording properties for applications including high-bandwidth optical signal processing where light and our solids replace the high-bandwidth portion of the electronics; quantum cryptography and information science including the goal of storage and recall of single photons; and medical imaging technology for the 700-900 nm therapeutic window. Ease of optically manipulating rare-earth ions in solids enables capturing complex spectral information in 105 to 108 frequency bins. Combining spatial holography and spectral hole burning provides a capability for processing high-bandwidth RF and optical signals with sub-MHz spectral resolution and bandwidths of tens to hundreds of GHz for applications including range-Doppler radar and high bandwidth RF spectral analysis. Simply stated, one can think of these crystals as holographic recording media capable of distinguishing up to 108 different colors. Ultra-narrow spectral holes also serve as a vibration-insensitive sub-kHz frequency reference for laser frequency stabilization to a part in 1013 over tens of milliseconds. The unusual properties and applications of spectral hole burning of rare earth ions in optical materials are reviewed. Experimental results on the promising Tm3+:LiNbO3 material system are presented and discussed for medical imaging applications. Finally, a new application of these materials as dynamic optical filters for laser noise suppression is discussed along with experimental demonstrations and theoretical modeling of the process.

  6. Erbium-doped yttrium aluminium garnet ablative laser treatment for endogenous ochronosis.

    PubMed

    Chaptini, Cassandra; Huilgol, Shyamala C

    2015-08-01

    Ochronosis is a rare disease characterised clinically by bluish-grey skin discolouration and histologically by yellow-brown pigment deposits in the dermis. It occurs in endogenous and exogenous forms. Endogenous ochronosis, also known as alkaptonuria, is an autosomal recessive disease of tyrosine metabolism, resulting in the accumulation and deposition of homogentisic acid in connective tissue. We report a case of facial endogenous ochronosis and coexistent photodamage, which was successfully treated with erbium-doped yttrium aluminium garnet laser resurfacing and deep focal point treatment to remove areas of residual deep pigment.

  7. Facile fabrication and photoluminescence properties of rare-earth-doped Gd₂O₃ hollow spheres via a sacrificial template method.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yu; Zhao, Qian; Fang, Qinghong; Xu, Zhenhe

    2013-08-21

    Rare-earth-doped gadolinium oxide (Gd₂O₃) hollow spheres were successfully fabricated on a large scale by using PS spheres as sacrificed templates and urea as a precipitating agent, which involved the deposition of an inorganic coating Gd(OH)CO3 on the surface of PS spheres and subsequent calcination in the air. Various approaches including X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA), as well as photoluminescence spectroscopies were used to characterize the samples. The results indicate that the sample is composed of uniform hollow Gd₂O₃ spheres with a mean particle size of about 2.3 μm and these hollow spheres have the mesoporous shell that are composed of a large amount of nanoparticles. The possible mechanism of evolution from PS spheres to the amorphous precursor and to the final hollow Gd₂O₃ spheres have been proposed. The as-obtained samples show strong light emission with different colors corresponding to different Ln³⁺ ions under ultraviolet-visible light and electron-beam excitation. Under 980 nm NIR irradiation, Gd₂O₃:Ln³⁺ (Ln³⁺ = Yb³⁺/Er³⁺, Yb³⁺/Tm³⁺ and Yb³⁺/Ho³⁺) exhibit characteristic up-conversion (UC) emissions of red (Er³⁺, ²H11/2, ⁴S3/2, ⁴F9/2 → ⁴I15/2), blue (Tm³⁺, ¹G₄ → ³H₆) and green (Ho³⁺, ⁵F₄, ⁵S₂ → ⁵I₈), respectively. These merits of multicolor emissions in the visible region endow these kinds of materials with potential applications in the field of light display systems, lasers, optoelectronic devices, and MRI contrast agents.

  8. Lanthanide Contraction Effect In Magnetic Thermoelectric Materials Of Rare Earth-doped Bi1.5Pb0.5Ca2Co2O8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutjahja, Inge Magdalena; Akbar, Taufik; Nugroho, Agung

    2010-12-01

    We report in this paper the result of synthesis and crystal structure characterization of magnetic thermoelectric materials of rare-earth-doped Bi1.5Pb0.5Ca2Co2O8, namely Bi1.5Pb0.5Ca1.9RE0.1Co2O8 (RE = La, Pr, Sm, Eu, Gd, Ho). Single phase samples have been prepared by solid state reaction process using precursors of Bi2O3, PbO, CaCO3, RE2O3, and Co3O4. The precursors were pulverized, calcinated, and sintered in air at various temperatures for several hours. Analysis of XRD data shows that Bi1.5Pb0.5Ca1.9RE0.1Co2O8 compound is a layered system consisting of an alternate stack of CoO2 layer and Bi2Sr2O4 block along the c-axis. The misfit structure along b-direction is revealed from the difference of the b-axis length belonging to two sublattices, namely hexagonal CdI2-type CoO2 layer and rock-salt (RS) NaCl-type Bi2Sr2O4 block, while they possess the common a- and c-axis lattice parameters and β angles. The overall crystal structure parameters (a, b, and c) increases with type of doping from La to Ho, namely by decreasing the ionic radii of rare-earth ion. We discuss this phenomenon in terms of the lanthanide contraction, an effect commonly found in the rare-earth compound, results from poor shielding of nuclear charge by 4f electrons. In addition, the values of b-lattice parameters in these rare-earth doped samples are almost the same with those belongs to undoped parent compound (Bi1.5Pb0.5Sr2Co2O8) and its related Y-doped (Bi1.5Pb0.5Ca1.9Y0.1Co2O8) samples, while the c-values reduced significantly in rare-earth doped samples, with opposite trend with those of variation of a-axis length. Morevover, the misfit degree in rare-earth doped compound is higher in compared to parent compound and Y-doped samples. We argue that these structural changes induced by rare-earth doping may provide information for the variation of electronic structure of Co-ions (Co3+ and Co4+), in particular their different spin states of low-spin, intermediate-spin, and high-spin. This, in

  9. Novel kinds of down/up-conversion luminescent rare earth doped fluoride BaMgF{sub 4}: RE{sup 3+} microcrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Zhi-Yuan; Yan, Bing Jia, Li-Ping

    2013-10-15

    Graphical abstract: We achieve the liquid phase chemical synthesis of rare earth fluoride system BaMgF4: RE{sup 3+} microphosphors, which realize down/up-conversion luminescence. - Highlights: • Doped BaMgF{sub 4} microphosphors are firstly prepared by hydrothermal process. • Doped BaMgF{sub 4} nanosheets are firstly prepared by high temperature solution reaction. • The down-conversion luminescence is realized in the rare earth doped BaMgF{sub 4}. • The upconversion luminescence is realized in the rare earth doped BaMgF{sub 4}. - Abstract: In this paper, we realize the liquid-phase chemical synthesis of high-quality orthorhombic polycrystalline BaMgF{sub 4}: RE{sup 3+} (RE = Eu, Tb, Sm, Dy, Yb–Er/Tm) compounds with hydrothermal and high-temperature solution methods, respectively. The products from hydrothermal technology show the micrometer size while the products from hydrothermal technology present nanosheet morphology. The rare earth ions doped BaMgF{sub 4} from hydrothermal synthesis are discussed in details, which can realize the downconversion luminescence for doped Eu{sup 3+} or Tb{sup 3+} and upconversion luminescence for Yb{sup 3+}/Er{sup 3+} (Tm{sup 3+}), respectively. To our knowledge, the hydrothermal or high temperature solution synthesis and photoluminescence (Eu{sup 3+}, Tb{sup 3+} or Yb{sup 3+}/Er{sup 3+}(Tm{sup 3+})) of these fluoride systems are firstly reported.

  10. Synthesis and crystallization of yttrium-aluminium garnet and related compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, N. J.; Maupin, G. D.; Chick, L. A.; Sunberg, D. S.; McCreedy, D. E.; Armstrong, T. R.

    1994-04-01

    Amorphous oxide combustion products with compositions corresponding to Y4Al2O9, YAlO3, and Y3Al5O12 were synthesized by the glycine-nitrate process and heat-treated to induce crystallization. The crystalline structure of the resulting powders was determined by powder x-ray diffraction techniques. The phase stabilities of the crystalline phases were investigated as functions of the glycine-to-nitrate ratio, the yttrium-to-aluminium ratio, and the heat-treatment conditions. Heat treatment for short durations resulted in incompletely crystalline powders that consisted of a mixture of Y4Al2O9, YAlO3, and Y3Al5O12 phases, regardless of the chemical composition of the amorphous combustion product. However, heat treatment for longer durations or higher temperature generated both pure-phase, monoclinic Y4Al2O9 and Y3Al5O12 with the garnet structure. Prolonged heat treatment at high temperature failed to generate pure-phase orthorhombic YAlO3. Subsequent analysis revealed a sluggish, complex crystallization process involving the formation and decomposition of several phases.

  11. Microleakage of glass ionomer formulations after erbium:yttrium-aluminium-garnet laser preparation.

    PubMed

    Delmé, Katleen I M; Deman, Peter J; De Bruyne, Mieke A A; Nammour, Samir; De Moor, Roeland J G

    2010-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the microleakage in class V cavities restored with four conventionally setting glass ionomers (CGIs) and one resin-modified glass ionomer (RMGI) following erbium:yttrium-aluminium-garnet (Er:YAG) laser or conventional preparation. Four hundred class V cavities were assigned to four groups: A and B were prepared by an Er:YAG laser; C and D were conventionally prepared. In groups B and D, the surface was additionally conditioned with Ketac conditioner. Each group was divided into five subgroups according to the glass ionomer cement (GIC) used: groups 1 (Ketac Fil), 2 (Ketac Molar), 3 (Ionofil Molar), 4 (Ionofil Molar Quick) and 5 (Photac Fil Quick). After thermocycling, a 2% methylene blue solution was used as dye. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) photographs were taken to show the conditioner's effect. Complete marginal sealing could not be reached. PhotacFil showed less microleakage than the conventionally setting glass ionomer cements (CGICs) investigated. Conditioning laser-prepared cavities did not negatively influence microleakage results except for Ionofil Molar Quick.

  12. Neodymium:yttrium-aluminium-garnet laser for excision of pulmonary nodules: an institutional review.

    PubMed

    Moghissi, Keyvan; Dixon, Kate

    2009-03-01

    Eighty patients amongst 850 undergoing pulmonary surgery with the use of neodymium:yttrium-aluminium-garnet (Nd:YAG) laser had a solitary pulmonary nodule (< or = 50 mm) on chest radiography, which was confirmed or suspected pre-operatively to be primary lung cancer. All patients had a mini-thoracotomy to expose the lesion. They then had Nd:YAG laser to excise the nodule locally. There was no hospital mortality. Six patients had non-fatal post-operative complications. Pathologically, 46 patients had primary lung cancer and ten had secondary lung cancer. Twenty-four others had benign lesions. Mean hospital stay was 5.5 days. Post-operative reduction of forced vital capacity (FVC) and forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV(1)) was 14% and 13% (mean), respectively. Thirty-seven patients with primary lung cancer were followed up for between 12 months and 60 months. Mean survival time of these patients was 39 months (s.d. 13 months). It was concluded that Nd:YAG laser for pulmonary nodular lesions should be considered for a selected group of patients unsuitable for standard resection. PMID:18214573

  13. Use of thulium-sensitized rare earth-doped low phonon energy crystalline hosts for IR sources.

    PubMed

    Ganem, Joseph; Bowman, Steven R

    2013-11-01

    Crystalline hosts with low phonon energies enable novel energy transfer processes when doped with rare earth ions. Two applications of energy transfer for rare earth ions in thulium-sensitized low phonon energy crystals that result in infrared luminescence are discussed. One application is an endothermic, phonon-assisted cross-relaxation process in thulium-doped yttrium chloride that converts lattice phonons to infrared emission, which raises the possibility of a fundamentally new method for achieving solid-state optical cooling. The other application is an optically pumped mid-IR phosphor using thulium-praseodymium-doped potassium lead chloride that converts 805-nm diode light to broadband emission from 4,000 to 5,500 nm. These two applications in chloride crystals are discussed in terms of critical radii calculated from Forster-Dexter energy transfer theory. It is found that the critical radii for electric dipole-dipole interactions in low phonon energy chloride crystals are comparable to those in conventional oxide and fluoride crystals. It is the reduction in multi-phonon relaxation rates in chloride crystals that enable these additional energy transfer processes and infrared luminescence.

  14. Use of thulium-sensitized rare earth-doped low phonon energy crystalline hosts for IR sources

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Crystalline hosts with low phonon energies enable novel energy transfer processes when doped with rare earth ions. Two applications of energy transfer for rare earth ions in thulium-sensitized low phonon energy crystals that result in infrared luminescence are discussed. One application is an endothermic, phonon-assisted cross-relaxation process in thulium-doped yttrium chloride that converts lattice phonons to infrared emission, which raises the possibility of a fundamentally new method for achieving solid-state optical cooling. The other application is an optically pumped mid-IR phosphor using thulium-praseodymium-doped potassium lead chloride that converts 805-nm diode light to broadband emission from 4,000 to 5,500 nm. These two applications in chloride crystals are discussed in terms of critical radii calculated from Forster-Dexter energy transfer theory. It is found that the critical radii for electric dipole-dipole interactions in low phonon energy chloride crystals are comparable to those in conventional oxide and fluoride crystals. It is the reduction in multi-phonon relaxation rates in chloride crystals that enable these additional energy transfer processes and infrared luminescence. PMID:24180684

  15. Use of thulium-sensitized rare earth-doped low phonon energy crystalline hosts for IR sources.

    PubMed

    Ganem, Joseph; Bowman, Steven R

    2013-01-01

    Crystalline hosts with low phonon energies enable novel energy transfer processes when doped with rare earth ions. Two applications of energy transfer for rare earth ions in thulium-sensitized low phonon energy crystals that result in infrared luminescence are discussed. One application is an endothermic, phonon-assisted cross-relaxation process in thulium-doped yttrium chloride that converts lattice phonons to infrared emission, which raises the possibility of a fundamentally new method for achieving solid-state optical cooling. The other application is an optically pumped mid-IR phosphor using thulium-praseodymium-doped potassium lead chloride that converts 805-nm diode light to broadband emission from 4,000 to 5,500 nm. These two applications in chloride crystals are discussed in terms of critical radii calculated from Forster-Dexter energy transfer theory. It is found that the critical radii for electric dipole-dipole interactions in low phonon energy chloride crystals are comparable to those in conventional oxide and fluoride crystals. It is the reduction in multi-phonon relaxation rates in chloride crystals that enable these additional energy transfer processes and infrared luminescence. PMID:24180684

  16. Use of thulium-sensitized rare earth-doped low phonon energy crystalline hosts for IR sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganem, Joseph; Bowman, Steven R.

    2013-11-01

    Crystalline hosts with low phonon energies enable novel energy transfer processes when doped with rare earth ions. Two applications of energy transfer for rare earth ions in thulium-sensitized low phonon energy crystals that result in infrared luminescence are discussed. One application is an endothermic, phonon-assisted cross-relaxation process in thulium-doped yttrium chloride that converts lattice phonons to infrared emission, which raises the possibility of a fundamentally new method for achieving solid-state optical cooling. The other application is an optically pumped mid-IR phosphor using thulium-praseodymium-doped potassium lead chloride that converts 805-nm diode light to broadband emission from 4,000 to 5,500 nm. These two applications in chloride crystals are discussed in terms of critical radii calculated from Forster-Dexter energy transfer theory. It is found that the critical radii for electric dipole-dipole interactions in low phonon energy chloride crystals are comparable to those in conventional oxide and fluoride crystals. It is the reduction in multi-phonon relaxation rates in chloride crystals that enable these additional energy transfer processes and infrared luminescence.

  17. Multicolor and near-infrared electroluminescence from the light-emitting devices with rare-earth doped TiO{sub 2} films

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Chen; Gao, Zhifei; Wang, Canxing; Li, Dongsheng; Ma, Xiangyang Yang, Deren; Lv, Chunyan

    2015-09-28

    We report on multicolor and near-infrared electroluminescence (EL) from the devices using rare-earth doped TiO{sub 2} (TiO{sub 2}:RE) films as light-emitting layers, which are ascribed to the impact excitation of RE{sup 3+} ions, with the EL onset voltages below 10 V. The devices are in the structure of ITO/TiO{sub 2}:RE/SiO{sub 2}/Si, in which the SiO{sub 2} layer is ∼10 nm thick and RE includes Eu, Er, Tm, Nd, and so on. With sufficiently high positive voltage applied on the ITO electrode, the conduction electrons in Si can tunnel into the conduction band of SiO{sub 2} layer via the trap-assisted tunneling mechanism, gaining the potential energy ∼4 eV higher than the conduction band edge of TiO{sub 2}. Therefore, as the electrons in the SiO{sub 2} layer drift into the TiO{sub 2}:RE layer, they become hot electrons. Such hot electrons impact-excite the RE{sup 3+} ions incorporated into the TiO{sub 2} host, leading to the characteristic emissions.

  18. Rare-Earth Doped Particles as Dual-Modality Contrast Agent for Minimally-Invasive Luminescence and Dual-Wavelength Photoacoustic Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Yang; Liao, Lun-De; Thakor, Nitish; Tan, Mei Chee

    2014-10-01

    Multi-modal imaging is an emerging area that integrates multiple imaging modalities to simultaneously capture visual information over many spatial scales. Complementary contrast agents need to be co-developed in order to achieve high resolution and contrast. In this work, we demonstrated that rare-earth doped particles (REDPs) can be employed as dual-modal imaging agents for both luminescence and photoacoustic (PA) imaging to achieve intrinsic high contrast, temporal and spatial resolution, reaching deeper depth. REDPs synthesized with different surfactants (citric acid, polyacrylic acid, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and sodium citrate) exhibit tunable emission properties and PA signal amplitudes. Amongst these samples, sodium citrate-modified REDPs showed the strongest PA signals. Furthermore, since REDPs have multiple absorption peaks, they offer a unique opportunity for multi-wavelength PA imaging (e.g. PA signals were measured using 520 and 975 nm excitations). The in vivo PA images around the cortical superior sagittal sinus (SSS) blood vessel captured with enhanced signal arising from REDPs demonstrated that in addition to be excellent luminescent probes, REDPs can also be used as successful PA contrast agents. Anisotropic polyacrylic acid-modified REDPs were found to be the best candidates for dual-modal luminescence and PA imaging due to their strong luminescence and PA signal intensities.

  19. Rare-Earth Doped Particles as Dual-Modality Contrast Agent for Minimally-Invasive Luminescence and Dual-Wavelength Photoacoustic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Yang; Liao, Lun-De; Thakor, Nitish; Tan, Mei Chee

    2014-01-01

    Multi-modal imaging is an emerging area that integrates multiple imaging modalities to simultaneously capture visual information over many spatial scales. Complementary contrast agents need to be co-developed in order to achieve high resolution and contrast. In this work, we demonstrated that rare-earth doped particles (REDPs) can be employed as dual-modal imaging agents for both luminescence and photoacoustic (PA) imaging to achieve intrinsic high contrast, temporal and spatial resolution, reaching deeper depth. REDPs synthesized with different surfactants (citric acid, polyacrylic acid, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and sodium citrate) exhibit tunable emission properties and PA signal amplitudes. Amongst these samples, sodium citrate-modified REDPs showed the strongest PA signals. Furthermore, since REDPs have multiple absorption peaks, they offer a unique opportunity for multi-wavelength PA imaging (e.g. PA signals were measured using 520 and 975 nm excitations). The in vivo PA images around the cortical superior sagittal sinus (SSS) blood vessel captured with enhanced signal arising from REDPs demonstrated that in addition to be excellent luminescent probes, REDPs can also be used as successful PA contrast agents. Anisotropic polyacrylic acid-modified REDPs were found to be the best candidates for dual-modal luminescence and PA imaging due to their strong luminescence and PA signal intensities. PMID:25297843

  20. Ultrathin Ca-PO4-CO3 solid-solution nanowires: a controllable synthesis and full-color emission by rare-earth doping.

    PubMed

    Hui, Junfeng; Yu, Qiyu; Long, Yong; Zhang, Zhicheng; Yang, Yong; Wang, Pengpeng; Xu, Biao; Wang, Xun

    2012-10-22

    It was found that calcium carbonate (CaCO(3)) and hydroxyapatite (Ca(10)(OH)(2)(PO(4))(6)), which are two crucial constituents of the most abundant minerals in nature and very important bioinorganic components in the tissues of mineralizing organisms, can form solid solutions in a wide range of PO(4)(3-)/CO(3)(2-) (P/C) ratios at low temperature when prepared as ultrathin nanowire structures. This is due to the special reactivity of ultrasmall nanocrystals, which can effectively lower the synthetic temperature and promote the formation of solid solutions. The as-prepared ultrathin nanowires with suitable P/C ratios presented strong blue luminescence due to the existence of abundant defects strengthened by CO(3)(2-). If used as the matrix, the as-prepared ultrathin nanowires demonstrated bright green or red luminescent properties when doped with Tb(3+) or Eu(3+) ions, and simultaneously retained their original morphologies. These three kinds of fluorescent nanowires could reproduce a full range of luminescence colors based on additive color mixtures of the three primary colors (red, green, and blue). In addition, under the same reaction system, ultrafine rare-earth-doped (Ce(3+), Tb(3+), Eu(3+)) nanowires (about 1 nm in diameter) were synthesized by using a one-step hydrothermal process, which further pushed the size of the Ca-PO(4)-CO(3) nanobuilding blocks to one unit cell region. These ultrafine nanowires displayed excellent film-forming properties and the ability to absorb UV radiation.

  1. Yttrium aluminium garnet under pressure: Structural, elastic, and vibrational properties from ab initio studies

    SciTech Connect

    Monteseguro, V.; Rodríguez-Hernández, P.; Muñoz, A.

    2015-12-28

    The structural, elastic, and vibrational properties of yttrium aluminum garnet Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12} are studied under high pressure by ab initio calculations in the framework of the density functional theory. The calculated ground state properties are in good agreement with the available experimental data. Pressure dependences of bond length and bulk moduli of the constituent polyhedra are reported. The evolution of the elastic constants and the major elastic properties, Young and shear modulus, Poisson's ratios, and Zener anisotropy ratio, are described. The mechanical stability is analyzed, on the light of “Born generalized stability criteria,” showing that the garnet is mechanically unstable above 116 GPa. Symmetries, frequencies, and pressure coefficients of the Raman-active modes are discussed on the basis of the calculated total and partial phonon density of states, which reflect the dynamical contribution of each atom. The relations between the phonon modes of Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12} and the internal and external molecular modes of the different polyhedra are discussed. Infrared-active modes, as well as the silent modes, and their pressure dependence are also investigated. No dynamical instabilities were found below 116 GPa.

  2. A randomized controlled trial of peeling and aspiration of Elschnig pearls and neodymium: yttrium-aluminium-garnet laser capsulotomy

    PubMed Central

    Bhargava, Rahul; Kumar, Prachi; Sharma, Shiv Kumar; Kaur, Avinash

    2015-01-01

    AIM To compare surgical peeling and aspiration and neodymium yttrium garnet laser capsulotomy for pearl form of posterior capsule opacification (PCO). METHODS A prospective, randomized, double blind, study was done at Rotary Eye Hospital, Maranda, Palampur, India, Santosh Medical College Hospital, Ghaziabad, India and Laser Eye Clinic, Noida India. Consecutive patients with pearl form of PCO following surgery, phacoemulsification, manual small incision cataract surgery and conventional extracapsular cataract extraction (ECCE) for age related cataract, were randomized to have peeling and aspiration or neodymium yttrium garnet laser capsulotomy. Corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA), intra-operative and post-operative complications were compared. RESULTS A total of 634 patients participated in the study, and 314 (49.5%) patients were randomized to surgical peeling and aspiration group and 320 (50.5%) to the Nd:YAG laser group. The mean pre-procedural logMAR CDVA in peeling and neodymium: yttrium-aluminium-garnet (Nd:YAG) laser group was 0.80±0.25 and 0.86±0.22, respectively. The mean final CDVA in peeling group (0.22±0.23) was comparable to Nd:YAG group (0.24±0.28; t test, P=0.240). There was a significant improvement in vision after both the procedures (P<0.001). A slightly higher percentage of patients in Nd:YAG laser group (283/88.3%) than in peeling group (262/83.4%) had a CDVA of 0.5 (20/63) or better at 9mo (P<0.001). On the contrary, patients having CDVA worse than 1.00 (20/200) was also significantly higher in Nd:YAG laser group as compared to peeling group (25/7.7% vs 15/4.7%, respectively). On application of ANCOVA, there was less than 0.001% risk that PCO thickness and total laser energy had no effect on rate of complications in Nd:YAG laser group and less than 0.001 % risk that PCO thickness had no effect on complications in peeling group respectively. Sum of square analysis suggests that in the Nd:YAG laser group, thick PCO had a stronger impact on

  3. Combined Intralesional Neodymium-Doped Yttrium Aluminium Garnet Laser and Intratumoral Ligation as Curative Treatment for Craniofacial Arteriovenous Malformations.

    PubMed

    Rojvachiranonda, Nond; Lerdlum, Sukalaya; Mahatumarat, Charan

    2016-03-01

    Craniofacial arteriovenous malformation (AVM), although very rare, has been a very difficult problem to treat especially when it is large and involves important structures. Surgical resection often results in unacceptable complications but still not curative. At our institution, treatment by combined intralesional neodymium-doped yttrium aluminium garnet laser and intratumoral ligation has been successful in venous malformation. This minimally invasive technique was then applied to more challenging AVM on the head and neck. Disease control was studied using clinical parameters and magnetic resonance imaging.Four patients with moderate-to-severe (Schobinger 2-4) craniofacial AVM were treated by this technique from 2001 to 2011. Patient age ranged from 2 to 51 years (mean: 25 years). After 2 to 4 treatments and follow-up period of 1456 days, 3 (75%) were cured. One of them was infant with huge mass and secondary pulmonary hypertension. Clinical cure was achieved after 3 treatments without residual cardiovascular compromise. The other patient (25%) had cheek mass with intraorbital involvement. The authors did not treat periorbital lesion so as to avoid triggering intraorbital spreading. The rest of the cheek lesion was clinically and radiologically cured.Laser energy setting, ablative technique, and skin cooling are the main factors determining the success. Individualized laser settings and properly set endpoints can increase treatment effectiveness in shorter period. In conclusion, this minimally invasive technique was successful in curing AVM without complication. With more clinical study and development of soft tissue monitoring tools, it is possible that intralesional laser could become the treatment of choice for all cutaneous AVM.

  4. Evaluation of critical distances for energy transfer between Pr3+ and Ce3+ in yttrium aluminium garnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Peng; Wei, Xiantao; Zhou, Shaoshuai; Yin, Min; Chen, Yonghu

    2016-09-01

    A series of Pr3+/Ce3+ doped yttrium aluminium garnet (Y3Al5O12 or simply YAG) phosphors were synthesized to investigate the energy transfer between Pr3+ and Ce3+ for their potential application in a white light-emitting diode and quantum information storage and processing. The excitation and emission spectra of YAG:Pr3+/Ce3+ were measured and analyzed, and it revealed that the reabsorption between Pr3+ and Ce3+ was so weak that it can be ignored, and the energy transfer from Pr3+ (5d) to Ce3+ (5d) and Ce3+ (5d) to Pr3+ (1D2) did occur. By analyzing the excitation and the emission spectra, the energy transfer from Pr3+ (5d) to Ce3+ (5d) and Ce3+ (5d) to Pr3+ (1D2) was examined in detail with an original strategy deduced from fluorescence dynamics and the Dexter energy transfer theory, and the critical distances of energy transfer were derived to be 7.9 Å and 4.0 Å for Pr3+ (5d) to Ce3+ (5d) and Ce3+ (5d) to Pr3+ (1D2), respectively. The energy transfer rates of the two processes of various concentrations were discussed and evaluated. Furthermore, for the purpose of sensing a single Pr3+ state with a Ce3+ ion, the optimal distance of Ce3+ from Pr3+ was evaluated as 5.60 Å, where the probability of success reaches its maximum value of 78.66%, and meanwhile the probabilities were evaluated for a series of Y3+ sites in a YAG lattice. These results will be of valuable reference for achievement of the optimal energy transfer efficiency in Pr3+/Ce3+ doped YAG and other similar systems.

  5. The evolution of melasma therapy: targeting melanosomes using low-fluence Q-switched neodymium-doped yttrium aluminium garnet lasers.

    PubMed

    Kauvar, Arielle N B

    2012-06-01

    Melasma is an acquired disorder of pigmentation that commonly affects women with phototypes III-V, and it has a negative impact on the quality of life in affected individuals. It presents clinically as symmetric tan or brown patches on the face, most often involving the forehead, cheeks, perioral region, and periorbital region. On histologic examination, there is increased melanin in the epidermis and/or an increased number of melanosomes in the dermis, with a normal number of highly melanized and dendritic melanocytes. The mainstay of treatment is the use of sunscreen along with topical medications that suppress melanogenesis. Clearance is usually incomplete and recurrences or exacerbations are frequent, probably because of the poor efficacy in clearing dermal melanosomes. Treatment with high-energy pigment-specific lasers, ablative resurfacing lasers, and fractional lasers results in an unacceptably high rate of postinflammatory hyper- and hypopigmentation and rebound melasma. Recently, promising results have been achieved with low-fluence Q-switched neodymium-doped yttrium aluminium garnet laser treatment, which can selectively target dermal melanosomes without producing inflammation or epidermal damage, in all skin phototypes. This article reviews the current treatment modalities for melasma, the rationale for using and the clinical results of combination therapy with low-fluence Q-switched neodymium-doped yttrium aluminium garnet lasers.

  6. Rare earth doped zinc oxide varistors

    DOEpatents

    McMillan, A.D.; Modine, F.A.; Lauf, R.J.; Alim, M.A.; Mahan, G.D.; Bartkowiak, M.

    1998-12-29

    A varistor includes a Bi-free, essentially homogeneous sintered body of a ceramic composition including, expressed as nominal weight %, 0.2--4.0% oxide of at least one rare earth element, 0.5--4.0% Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}, 0.05--0.4% K{sub 2}O, 0.05--0.2% Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 0--0.2% CaO, 0.00005--0.01% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 0--2% MnO, 0--0.05% MgO, 0--0.5% TiO{sub 3}, 0--0.2% SnO{sub 2}, 0--0.02% B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, balance ZnO. 4 figs.

  7. Rare earth doped zinc oxide varistors

    DOEpatents

    McMillan, April D.; Modine, Frank A.; Lauf, Robert J.; Alim, Mohammad A.; Mahan, Gerald D.; Bartkowiak, Miroslaw

    1998-01-01

    A varistor includes a Bi-free, essentially homogeneous sintered body of a ceramic composition including, expressed as nominal weight %, 0.2-4.0% oxide of at least one rare earth element, 0.5-4.0% Co.sub.3 O.sub.4, 0.05-0.4% K.sub.2 O, 0.05-0.2% Cr.sub.2 O.sub.3, 0-0.2% CaO, 0.00005-0.01% Al.sub.2 O.sub.3, 0-2% MnO, 0-0.05% MgO, 0-0.5% TiO.sub.3, 0-0.2% SnO.sub.2, 0-0.02% B.sub.2 O.sub.3, balance ZnO.

  8. Scanning Electron Microscope Comparative Evaluation of Feldspathic Porcelain Surfaces under Irradiation by Different Powers of Neodymium-Doped Yttrium Aluminium Garnet (Nd:YAG) Laser

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini, Mohammad Hashem; Sobouti, Farhad; Etemadi, Ardavan; Chiniforush, Nasim; Ayoub Bouraima, Stephane

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Recent use of lasers for porcelain surface treatment for adhesion of brackets to restorations has not only showed some promising results, but is also accompanied with less undesirable effects among other advantages. The purpose of this study is the comparative electron microscope evaluation of feldspathic porcelain surfaces under irradiation by Neodymium-Doped Yttrium Aluminium Garnet (Nd:YAG) with different powers (0.75, 1.5 and 2W) via the acid etching with hydrofluoric acid (HF) technique. Methods: The glazed porcelain samples were obtained by duplicating labial surfaces of maxillary central incisor teeth. The specimens were randomly treated by 4 different methods. Group1 was etched with hydrofluoric acid 9.6%. Samples in group 2 to 4 were also irradiated by Nd:YAG laser with different powers: 0.75, 1.5 and 2W. Then the samples were prepared for evaluation by scanning electron microscope (SEM). Results: Etching quality from a porosity point of view was similar for group2 and HF group. Laser with power of 0.75W has little potential to create mechanical porosity. Conclusion: In regard of the results of this study, it is possible to benefit from Nd:YAG laser with appropriate parameters for surface conditioning. PMID:25606311

  9. Effect of erbium-doped: yttrium, aluminium and garnet laser irradiation on the surface microstructure and roughness of sand-blasted, large grit, acid-etched implants

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji-Hun; Kwon, Young-Hyuk; Herr, Yeek; Shin, Seung-Il

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The present study was performed to evaluate the effect of erbium-doped: yttrium, aluminium and garnet (Er:YAG) laser irradiation on sand-blasted, large grit, acid-etched (SLA) implant surface microstructure according to varying energy levels and application times of the laser. Methods The implant surface was irradiated by the Er:YAG laser under combined conditions of 100, 140, or 180 mJ/pulse and an application time of 1 minute, 1.5 minutes, or 2 minutes. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to examine the surface roughness of the specimens. Results All experimental conditions of Er:YAG laser irradiation, except the power setting of 100 mJ/pulse for 1 minute and 1.5 minutes, led to an alteration in the implant surface. SEM evaluation showed a decrease in the surface roughness of the implants. However, the difference was not statistically significant. Alterations of implant surfaces included meltdown and flattening. More extensive alterations were present with increasing laser energy and application time. Conclusions To ensure no damage to their surfaces, it is recommended that SLA implants be irradiated with an Er:YAG laser below 100 mJ/pulse and 1.5 minutes for detoxifying the implant surfaces. PMID:21811689

  10. Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia treated by pulsed neodymium:yttrium-aluminium-garnet (Nd:YAG) laser (1,064 nm).

    PubMed

    Werner, A; Bäumler, W; Zietz, S; Kühnel, T; Hohenleutner, U; Landthaler, M

    2008-10-01

    Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is a familial, autosomal, dominant, multi-system, vascular, dysplasia. Besides repetitive epistaxis, cutaneous eruptive macules and nodules lead to recurring bleeding and cosmetic problems. We report on a pilot study of four cases of HHT in which cutaneous lesions were treated with a pulsed neodymium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Nd:YAG) laser (1,064 nm). Pulsed Nd:YAG laser treatment, without anaesthesia, was performed several times on eruptive angiomas on palmar and facial skin. Lesions on fingers and face mostly showed very good, or even complete, clearing after the first laser treatment. Several macules required multiple treatment; only a few lesions showed no effect. Pulsed Nd:YAG laser therapy (1,064 nm) appears to be an effective and safe treatment option for hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia on the skin of face and extremities.

  11. Morphology and magnetic characterisation of aluminium substituted yttrium-iron garnet nanoparticles prepared using sol gel technique.

    PubMed

    Yahya, Noorhana; Al Habashi, Ramadan Masoud; Koziol, Krzysztof; Borkowski, Rafal Dunin; Akhtar, Majid Niaz; Kashif, Muhammad; Hashim, Mansor

    2011-03-01

    Aluminum substituted yttrium iron garnet nano particles with compositional variation of Y(3.0-x) A1(x)Fe5O12, where x = 0.0, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5 and 3.0 were prepared using sol gel technique. The X-ray diffraction results showed that the best garnet phase appeared when the sintering temperature was 800 degrees C. Nano-crystalline particles with high purity and sizes ranging from 20 to 100 nm were obtained. It was found that the aluminum substitution had resulted in a sharp fall of the d-spacing when x = 2, which we speculated is due to the preference of the aluminum atoms to the smaller tetrahedron and octahedron sites instead of the much larger dodecahedron site. High resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM) and electron diffraction (ED) patterns showed single crystal nanoparticles were obtained from this method. The magnetic measurement gave moderate values of initial permeability; the highest value of 5.3 was shown by sample Y3Fe5O12 at more than 100 MHz which was attributed to the morphology of the microstructure which appeared to be homogeneous. This had resulted in an easy movement of domain walls. The substitution of aluminum for yttrium is speculated to cause a cubic to rhombodedral structural change and had weakened the super-exchange interactions thus a fall of real permeability was observed. This might have created a strain in the sub-lattices and had subsequently caused a shift of resonance frequencies to more than 1.8 GHz when x > 0.5.

  12. Sealing ability of three root-end filling materials prepared using an erbium: Yttrium aluminium garnet laser and endosonic tip evaluated by confocal laser scanning microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Nanjappa, A Salin; Ponnappa, KC; Nanjamma, KK; Ponappa, MC; Girish, Sabari; Nitin, Anita

    2015-01-01

    Aims: (1) To compare the sealing ability of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), Biodentine, and Chitra-calcium phosphate cement (CPC) when used as root-end filling, evaluated under confocal laser scanning microscope using Rhodamine B dye. (2) To evaluate effect of ultrasonic retroprep tip and an erbium:yttrium aluminium garnet (Er:YAG) laser on the integrity of three different root-end filling materials. Materials and Methods: The root canals of 80 extracted teeth were instrumented and obturated with gutta-percha. The apical 3 mm of each tooth was resected and 3 mm root-end preparation was made using ultrasonic tip (n = 30) and Er:YAG laser (n = 30). MTA, Biodentine, and Chitra-CPC were used to restore 10 teeth each. The samples were coated with varnish and after drying, they were immersed in Rhodamine B dye for 24 h. The teeth were then rinsed, sectioned longitudinally, and observed under confocal laser scanning microscope. Statistical Analysis Used: Data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and a post-hoc Tukey's test at P < 0.05 (R software version 3.1.0). Results: Comparison of microleakage showed maximum peak value of 0.45 mm for Biodentine, 0.85 mm for MTA, and 1.05 mm for Chitra-CPC. The amount of dye penetration was found to be lesser in root ends prepared using Er:YAG laser when compared with ultrasonics, the difference was found to be statistically significant (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Root-end cavities prepared with Er:YAG laser and restored with Biodentine showed superior sealing ability compared to those prepared with ultrasonics. PMID:26180420

  13. Results of fractional ablative facial skin resurfacing with the erbium:yttrium-aluminium-garnet laser 1 week and 2 months after one single treatment in 30 patients.

    PubMed

    Trelles, Mario A; Mordon, Serge; Velez, Mariano; Urdiales, Fernando; Levy, Jean Luc

    2009-03-01

    The erbium:yttrium-aluminium-garnet (Er:YAG) laser has recently been used in the fractional resurfacing of photo-aged skin. Our study evaluated the results after one single session of fractional resurfacing with Er:YAG. Thirty women participated in the study, with an average age of 46 years, skin types from II to IV, and wrinkle grades I to III. The 2,940 nm Er:YAG system used (Pixel, Alma Laser, Israel) had variable pulse durations (1 ms to 2 ms) and energy densities (800 mJ/cm(2) to 1,400 mJ/cm(2)) which, together with the number of passes (four to eight), were selected as a function of wrinkle severity. All patients received only one treatment. Postoperative side effects were evaluated. The number of wrinkles was documented with clinical photography and was scored. Histological assessment was carried out on two patients before and 2 months after treatment. All patients completed the study. Of the patients, 93% reported good or very good improvement of the degree of their wrinkles, with a satisfaction index of 83%. Pain was not a problem during treatment, and there were no side effects except for in one phototype IV patient, who had hyperpigmentation. Histology 2 months after the single treatment demonstrated younger morphology of both the epidermis and dermis, with improvement of the pretreatment typical elastotic appearance. At the parameters used in our study, only one treatment session of Er:YAG laser could achieve effective skin rejuvenation, with effects recognized in both the dermis and, more importantly, the epidermis. This regimen offers an interesting alternative to the conventional approach of multi-session fractional resurfacing.

  14. Decontamination efficacy of erbium:yttrium-aluminium-garnet and diode laser light on oral Candida albicans isolates of a 5-day in vitro biofilm model.

    PubMed

    Sennhenn-Kirchner, Sabine; Schwarz, Peter; Schliephake, Henning; Konietschke, Frank; Brunner, Edgar; Borg-von Zepelin, Margarete

    2009-05-01

    The different forms of superficial and systemic candidiasis are often associated with biofilm formation on surfaces of host tissues or medical devices. The biofilm formation of Candida spp., in general, necessitates significantly increased amounts of antifungal agents for therapy. Often the therapeutic effect is doubtful. A 5-day biofilm model with oral Candida isolates was established according to Chandra et al. (J Dent Res 80:903-908, 2001) on glass and titanium surfaces and was modified by Sennhenn-Kirchner et al. (Z Zahnärztl Implantol 3:45-51, 2007) to investigate different aspects unanswered in the field of dentistry. In this model, the efficacy of erbium:yttrium-aluminium-garnet (Er:YAG) light (2940 nm, 100 mJ, 10 Hz, 300 micros pulsed mode applied for 80 s) and diode laser light (810 nm, 1 W, continuous wave mode applied for 20 s with four repetitions after 30 s pauses each) was evaluated and compared to untreated controls. The photometric evaluation of the samples was completed by observations on morphological changes of yeast cells grown in the biofilm. Compared to the untreated controls Candida cells grown in mature in vitro biofilms were significantly reduced by both wavelengths investigated. Comparison between the different methods of laser treatment additionally revealed a significantly greater effect of the Er:YAG over the diode laser. Scanning electron microscopy findings proved that the diode laser light was effective in direct contact mode. In contrast, in the areas without direct contact, the fungal cells were left almost unchanged. The Er:YAG laser damaged the fungal cells to a great extent wherever it was applied.

  15. Rare Earth Doped Magnetic Clusters of Gold for Medical Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Brahm Deo; Kumar, Vijay

    2011-03-01

    In recent years gold clusters have been studied extensively due to their unusual properties and applications in cancer treatment and catalysis. Small gold clusters having up to 15 atoms are planar as shown in figure 1. Thereafter a transition occurs to 3D structures but the atomic structures continue to have high dispersion. Doping of these clusters could transform them in to new structures and affect the properties. Gold clusters with cage structures such as W@Au12 can be prepared with large highest occupied-lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (HOMO-LUMO) gap by doping with a transition metal atom such as W. By changing the transition metal atom, cage structures of different sizes as well as different HOMO-LUMO gaps can be formed which could be useful in different optical applications. In these structures gold clusters are generally non-magnetic. However, it is also possible to form magnetic clusters of gold such as Gold clusters have been found to be good for cancer treatment. We have performed ab initio calculations on doping of rare earths in small gold clusters to obtain magnetic clusters using projector augmented wave pseudopotential method within generalized gradient approximation for the exchange-correlation energy. Elemental gold clusters having up to 15 atoms are planar and thereafter 3D structures become favorable. We have explored the changes in the growth behavior when a rare earth atom is doped and studied the variation in the magnetic behavior as a function of size. Our results suggest that gold clusters may have twin advantage of treating cancer as well as be helful in magnetic imaging such as by MRI.

  16. Design and refinement of rare earth doped multicore fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prudenzano, F.; Mescia, L.; Di Tommaso, A.; Surico, M.; De Sario, M.

    2013-09-01

    A novel multicore ytterbium doped fiber laser is designed, with the target of maximizing both the effective mode area and the beam quality, by means of a complete home-made computer code. It can be employed to construct high power and Quasi-Gaussian beam lasers. The novel laser configuration exploits a single mode multicore fiber and does not need Talbot cavity or other in-phase mode selection mechanisms. This is an innovative solution, because to the best of our knowledge, for the first time, we have designed a truly single-mode multicore fiber laser. For comparison we have optimized two other laser configurations which are well known in literature, both employing a multimode multicore fiber and a Talbot cavity as a feedback for the in-phase supermode selection. All three multicore fibers, constituted by the same glass, are doped with the same ytterbium ion concentration and pumped with the same input power. Multimodal fiber lasers exhibit lower beam quality, i.e. a higher beam quality factor M2, with respect to the single mode one, even if suitable Talbot cavities are designed, but they are very competitive when a more compact laser cavity is required for the same output power. The novel single mode nineteen core laser exhibits a simulated effective mode area Aeff = 703 μm2 and a beam quality factor M2 = 1.05, showing better characteristics than the other two lasers.

  17. Photoluminescence characteristics of rare earth-doped nanoporous aluminum oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Azevedo, W. M.; de Carvalho, D. D.; de Vasconcelos, E. A.; da Silva, E. F.

    2004-07-01

    In this work we present photoluminescence characterization of rare earth ion-doped nanoporous aluminum oxide synthesized by the anodization process in diverse solvents. We find that the luminescence of doped aluminum oxide strongly depends on the synthesis medium. When synthesized in an inorganic acid only rare earth fluorescence is present, whereas nanoporous aluminum oxide synthesized in organic solvent presents two strong unexpected luminescence emission lines, one at 429 nm and the other at 491 nm, with quite long decay time when excited with long wavelength ultraviolet light. The results suggest that light simulation of primary colors and chromaticity control of the emitted light can be done by the a combination of different rare earth ions present in the sample.

  18. Promising wastewater treatment using rare earth-doped nanoferrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, M. A.; Bishay, Samiha T.; Khafagy, Rasha M.; Saleh, N. M.

    2014-01-01

    Single-phases of the spinel nanoferrites Zn0.5Co0.5Al0.5R0.04Fe1.46O4; R=Sm, Pr, Ce and La, were synthesized using the flash auto combustion method. X-ray diffraction (XRD) results indicated that doping nanoferrites with small concentrations of rare earth elements (RE) allowed their entrance to the spinel lattice. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) images revealed that doping with different RE elements resulted in the formation of different nanometric shapes such as nanospheres and nanowires. Doping with Sm3+ and Ce3+ resulted in the formation of nanospheres with average diameter of 14 and 30 nm respectively. In addition to the granular nanospheres, doping with Pr3+ and La3+ resulted in the formation of some nanowires with different aspect ratios (average length of ≈100 nm and diameter of ≈9 nm) and (average length of ≈150 nm and outer diameter of ≈22 nm) respectively. At fixed temperature, the Ac conductivity (σ) increased as the RE ionic radius increases except for Ce, due to the role of valance fluctuation from Ce3+ to Ce4+ ions. La- and Pr-doped nanoferrites showed the highest ac conductivity values, which is most probably due to the presence of large numbers of nanowires in these two types of ferrites. For all entire samples, the effective magnetic moment (μeff) decreased, while the Curie temperature (TC) increased as the RE ionic radius increases. The synthesized rare earth nanoferrites showed promising results in purifying colored wastewater. La-doped ferrite was capable for up-taking 92% of the dye content, followed by Pr-doped ferrite, which adsorbed 85% of the dye, while Sm- and Ce-doped ferrites showed lower dye removal efficiency of 80% and 72% respectively. High dye uptake shown by La- and Pr-doped ferrites is most probably due to the presence of nanowires and their higher Ac conductivity values. These excellent results were not previously reported.

  19. Sensing Using Rare-Earth-Doped Upconversion Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Shuwei; Chen, Guanying; Yang, Chunhui

    2013-01-01

    Optical sensing plays an important role in theranostics due to its capability to detect hint biochemical entities or molecular targets as well as to precisely monitor specific fundamental psychological processes. Rare-earth (RE) doped upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) are promising for these endeavors due to their unique frequency converting capability; they emit efficient and sharp visible or ultraviolet (UV) luminescence via use of ladder-like energy levels of RE ions when excited at near infrared (NIR) light that are silent to tissues. These features allow not only a high penetration depth in biological tissues but also a high detection sensitivity. Indeed, the energy transfer between UCNPs and biomolecular or chemical indicators provide opportunities for high-sensitive bio- and chemical-sensing. A temperature-sensitive change of the intensity ratio between two close UC bands promises them for use in temperature mapping of a single living cell. In this work, we review recent investigations on using UCNPs for the detection of biomolecules (avidin, ATP, etc.), ions (cyanide, mecury, etc.), small gas molecules (oxygen, carbon dioxide, ammonia, etc.), as well as for in vitro temperature sensing. We also briefly summarize chemical methods in synthesizing UCNPs of high efficiency that are important for the detection limit. PMID:23650480

  20. Sensing applications of rare-earth doped luminescent materials

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, S.W.; Cates, M.R.; Simpson, M.L.; Noel, B.W.; Turley, D.; Gillies, G.T.

    1988-01-01

    We are developing sensing techniques using phosphors and luminescing crystals. While their use in temperature sensing is becoming well known, there exists the potential to exploit them for other diagnostics. Examples are stress/strain, heat flux, skin friction, pressure, laser-beam profiling, aerodynamic flow, and radiation. We describe our recent results in these areas. 16 refs., 7 figs.

  1. Silica-optical-fiber-based rare-earth-doped sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Tong; Grattan, Kenneth T. V.; Wade, Scott A.; Forsyth, David

    2001-10-01

    This paper reports on work done with a range of silica fibres, doped with several important rare earth ions such as Er, Nd, Yb and Tm, to create a range of novel optical sensors. The approach reported herein is based on monitoring and analysis of the fluorescence decay from such fibres in the time domain as well as in the frequency domain. With these fibres, temperature sensors operating in the range from as low as -200 degree(s)C to beyond 1000 degree(s)C have been constructed. A temperature resolution of the order of a few degrees Celsius has been typically reported from these types of sensors. Fibre of this type has been used in a simple yet effective structural integrity monitoring system (being incorporated successfully into concrete samples) and an optical fire alarm system with potential applications for engine monitoring has been developed. A further recent discovery is a small level of strain sensitivity in such fibres - this has been explored over the region from 0 to 2000(mu) e, showing a level of resolution better than a few tens of microstrain, and sensors based on this effect are discussed and reported on in this work.

  2. Synthesis and Photoresponse of Rare-Earth-Doped Phosphosilicates

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Z.; Lee, Burtrand I.; Samuels, William D.; Exarhos, Gregory J.

    1998-12-14

    Phosphate ceramics doped with Tb3+ ions were synthesized through Sol-Gel process (SGP). the emission intensity as a function of various factors such as matrix composition, crystal structure, particle size, dopant concentration, and synthesis conditions was investigated.

  3. Optical properties of rare-earth-doped silicon nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hryciw, Aaron Christopher

    Silicon-based light-emitting materials show much promise for integrated photonics applications. In particular, nanocrystalline silicon can exhibit efficient visible emission, though the mechanism of luminescence is still the subject of some controversy. This thesis reports on the optical properties and device applications of silicon nanocomposite thin films with varying characteristics: amorphous and crystalline nanoclusters (NCs), both undoped and doped with rare-earth (RE) elements. Silicon nanocomposite thin films can be prepared by co-evaporation of Si, SiO, and/or SiO2 followed by annealing to induce phase separation. Such films typically exhibit a broad photoluminescence (PL) band centred between ˜600-800 nm. RE-doped a-Si-NC films can exhibit relatively sharp emission in the near infrared, with excitation cross-sections on the order of 10 -16 cm2 due to the sensitisation effect of the Si NCs---an increase in excitation efficiency by over five orders of magnitude compared with typical values for RE-doped SiO2. Er3+ in particular is important due to its emission at 1.5 mum, corresponding to the wavelength of minimum attenuation in conventional silica optical fibres. To demonstrate control over the spectral width and centre wavelength of emission for photonic applications, undoped and RE-doped a-Si-NC films have been incorporated into optical resonator structures (microcavities) with Ag mirrors. For a-Si films, the emission is tunable from 475 to 875 nm, extendable to 1630 nm upon the addition of Er. It is well known that Si NCs are capable of efficient energy transfer to many of the RE3+ ions; the specific nature of the non-radiative transfer process, however, has not been established with certainty. Efficient nanocluster-mediated excitation has been demonstrated for Nd-, Tb-, Dy-, Er-, Tm-, and Yb-doped a-Si-NC films. From luminescence modelling of ensembles of a-Si NCs, the observed quenching with increased annealing temperature can be accounted for by assuming a non-radiative defect density of ˜1020 cm-3. The population dynamics of the coupled NC-Er3+ system were investigated via a phenomenological rate-equation model for weak optical pumping. A phonon-assisted energy-transfer process is suggested by comparison with experimental time-resolved PL measurements; future work in this area is required to confirm this interpretation.

  4. Sensing using rare-earth-doped upconversion nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Hao, Shuwei; Chen, Guanying; Yang, Chunhui

    2013-01-01

    Optical sensing plays an important role in theranostics due to its capability to detect hint biochemical entities or molecular targets as well as to precisely monitor specific fundamental psychological processes. Rare-earth (RE) doped upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) are promising for these endeavors due to their unique frequency converting capability; they emit efficient and sharp visible or ultraviolet (UV) luminescence via use of ladder-like energy levels of RE ions when excited at near infrared (NIR) light that are silent to tissues. These features allow not only a high penetration depth in biological tissues but also a high detection sensitivity. Indeed, the energy transfer between UCNPs and biomolecular or chemical indicators provide opportunities for high-sensitive bio- and chemical-sensing. A temperature-sensitive change of the intensity ratio between two close UC bands promises them for use in temperature mapping of a single living cell. In this work, we review recent investigations on using UCNPs for the detection of biomolecules (avidin, ATP, etc.), ions (cyanide, mecury, etc.), small gas molecules (oxygen, carbon dioxide, ammonia, etc.), as well as for in vitro temperature sensing. We also briefly summarize chemical methods in synthesizing UCNPs of high efficiency that are important for the detection limit. PMID:23650480

  5. Aluminium plasmonics

    SciTech Connect

    Gerard, Davy; Gray, Stephen K.

    2014-12-15

    In this study, we present an overview of 'aluminium plasmonics', i.e. the study of both fundamental and practical aspects of surface plasmon excitations in aluminium structures, in particular thin films and metal nanoparticles. After a brief introduction noting both some recent and historical contributions to aluminium plasmonics, we discuss the optical properties of aluminium and aluminium nanostructures and highlight a few selected studies in a host of areas ranging from fluorescence to data storage.

  6. Metals Fact Sheet: Yttrium

    SciTech Connect

    1992-09-01

    Yttrium is a metallic element usually included among the rare earth metals, which it resembles chemically and with which it usually occurs in minerals. Yttrium was named after the village of Ytterby in Sweden---the element was discovered in a quarry near the village. This article discusses sources of the element, the world market for the element, and various applications of the material.

  7. Preparation of transparent neodymium-doped yttrium aluminate garnet (Nd:YAG) ceramics with the use of freeze granulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wajler, Anna; Węglarz, Helena; Sidorowicz, Agata; Zych, Łukasz; Nakielska, Magdalena; Jach, Katarzyna; Tomaszewski, Henryk

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents the results of the application of freeze granulation to the production of transparent neodymium-doped yttrium-aluminum garnet ceramics. Aqueous suspensions of aluminium oxide, yttrium oxide and neodymium oxide powders were prepared based on nanometric or submicronic powders which were either commercially available or prepared by precipitation. The relations between the composition of suspension, the properties of granulate and the final properties of ceramics (microstructure, optical transmission and emission spectra) were studied.

  8. Effects of rare-earth doping on femtosecond laser waveguide writing in zinc polyphosphate glass

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, Luke B.; Witcher, Jon J.; Troy, Neil; Krol, Denise M.; Reis, Signo T.; Brow, Richard K.

    2012-07-15

    We have investigated waveguide writing in Er-Yb doped zinc polyphosphate glass using a femtosecond laser with a repetition rate of 1 KHz. We find that fabrication of good waveguides requires a glass composition with an O/P ratio of 3.25. The dependence on laser writing parameters including laser fluence, focusing conditions, and scan speed is reported. Waveguide properties together with absorption and emission data indicate that these glasses can be used for the fabrication of compact, high gain amplifying devices.

  9. Estimation of cut-off wavelength of rare earth doped single-mode fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Jagneet; Thyagarajan, K.; Pal, B. P.

    1999-11-01

    A new empirical relation is proposed describing spectral variation of mode-field radius (MFR) as inferred from measurements in the far-field of the fiber. It is shown that using this relation, it is possible to estimate the cut-off wavelength ( λc) of the fiber. The proposed technique is successfully tested through measurements made on two standard step index single-mode fibers, as well as on an erbium doped fiber (EDF) having λc falling within its strong absorption band around 980 nm. This empirical formula is more accurate than the widely used Marcuse's formula to describe spectral dependence of MFR determined through measurements made in the fiber's far-field. The proposed technique is especially suited for estimation of λc of doped fibers in which λc falls within an absorption band.

  10. Pressure-temperature sensors: Solution deposition of rare earth doped garnet films

    SciTech Connect

    Hess, N.J.; Exarhos, G.J.

    1993-11-01

    An aqueous route to the deposition of multicomponent metal oxide films is based upon the complexation of precursor metal nitrate salts by glycine, or other organic complexant, followed by spin-coating the homogeneous solution onto pretreated silica substrates. Glycine serves to frustrate the formation of cation oxides, thus precipitation. Upon dehydration, a glassy matrix results through which metal cations and nitrate anions are homogeneously dispersed. Subsequent heating of coated substrates initiates an oxidation-reduction reaction, which removes the organic matrix and residual nitrate leaving behind a film of the desired oxide composition. Using this method, SM:YAG (Sm:Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12} - garnet) films about 150 nm thick have been deposited. The respective phases have been confirmed by powder XRD measurements and fluorescence spectroscopy. Analogous studies using powders generated by the same technique provided the parameters for optimizing processing conditions to generate phase pure YAG films. The fluorescence emission wavelength and related lifetime of certain electronic transitions arising from metal cation dopants vary as a function of pressure and temperature suggesting their use as optical sensors. This work suggests the possible application of these films as pressure-temperature sensors in a planar waveguide configuration or as a coating material for optical fibers.

  11. Laser-refrigeration of rare-earth-doped nanocrystals in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roder, Paden B.; Smith, Bennett; Zhou, Xuezhe; Crane, Matthew J.; Pauzauskie, Peter J.

    2015-03-01

    Single-beam laser-tweezers have been demonstrated over the past several decades to confine nanometer-scale particles in three dimensions with sufficient sensitivity to measure the spring constants of individual biological macromolecules including DNA. Large laser-irradiance values (on the order of MW/cm2) commonly are used to generate laser traps which can lead to significant laser-heating within the 3D optical potential well. To date, laser-refrigeration of particles within an aqueous medium has not been reported stemming primarily from the large near-infrared (NIR) optical absorption coefficient of liquid water (0.2 cm-1 at lambda = 1020nm). In this paper we will detail the methods on how single-beam laser-traps can be used to induce and quantify the refrigeration of optically trapped nanocrystals in an aqueous medium. Analysis of the Brownian dynamics of individual nanocrystals via forward light scattering provides a way to determine both a relative and absolute measurement of particle's temperature. Signal analysis considerations to interpreting Brownian motion data of trapped particles in nonisothermal aqueous environments, or so-called hot Brownian motion, are detailed. Applications of these methods to determining local laser-refrigeration of laser trapped nanoparticles in water show promise at realizing the first observation of particles undergoing cold Brownian motion.

  12. Rare-earth doped transparent ceramics for spectral filtering and quantum information processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunkel, Nathalie; Ferrier, Alban; Thiel, Charles W.; Ramírez, Mariola O.; Bausá, Luisa E.; Cone, Rufus L.; Ikesue, Akio; Goldner, Philippe

    2015-09-01

    Homogeneous linewidths below 10 kHz are reported for the first time in high-quality Eu3+ doped Y 2O3 transparent ceramics. This result is obtained on the 7F0→5D0 transition in Eu3+ doped Y 2O3 ceramics and corresponds to an improvement of nearly one order of magnitude compared to previously reported values in transparent ceramics. Furthermore, we observed spectral hole lifetimes of ˜15 min that are long enough to enable efficient optical pumping of the nuclear hyperfine levels. Additionally, different Eu3+ concentrations (up to 1.0%) were studied, resulting in an increase of up to a factor of three in the peak absorption coefficient. These results suggest that transparent ceramics can be useful in applications where narrow and deep spectral holes can be burned into highly absorbing lines, such as quantum information processing and spectral filtering.

  13. Up-conversion in rare earth-doped silica hollow spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortes, Luís M.; Li, Yigang; Réfega, Ricardo; Clara Gonçalves, M.

    2012-06-01

    In the present work, Er/Yb co-doped silica hollow spheres are prepared in a two-step process. In a first step, polystyrene-core is silica coated in situ by a modified Stöber sol-gel method and in the second one, the sacrificial polystyrene core is thermally removed. The core-shell and the hollow spheres are characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL). PL measurements show up-conversion phenomena upon excitation at 975 nm, through the emission of blue (˜490 nm), green (˜523 nm and ˜536 nm) and red (˜655 nm) light. The up-conversion phenomena are discussed and modelled. The developed model explains the up-conversion phenomena of Er/Yb co-doped silica hollow spheres, with special agreement for high Yb/Er ratio.

  14. Optical properties of rare earth doped strontium aluminate (SAO) phosphors: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kshatri, D. S.; Khare, A.

    2014-11-01

    After the first news on rare earth (RE) doped strontium aluminate (SAO) phosphors in late 1990s, researchers all over the world geared up to develop stable and efficient persistent phosphors. Scientists studied various features of long lasting phosphors (LLP) and tried to earmark appropriate mechanism. However, about two decades after the discovery of SrAl2O4: Eu2+, Dy3+, the number of persistent luminescent materials is not significant. In this review, we present an overview of the optical characteristics of RE doped SAO phosphors in terms of photoluminescence (PL), thermoluminescence (TL) and afterglow spectra. Also, we refresh the work undertaken to study diverse factors like dopant concentration, temperature, surface energy, role of activator, etc. Simultaneously, some of our important findings on SAO are reported and discussed in the end.

  15. Rare earth-doped lead borate glasses and transparent glass-ceramics: structure-property relationship.

    PubMed

    Pisarski, W A; Pisarska, J; Mączka, M; Lisiecki, R; Grobelny, Ł; Goryczka, T; Dominiak-Dzik, G; Ryba-Romanowski, W

    2011-08-15

    Correlation between structure and optical properties of rare earth ions in lead borate glasses and glass-ceramics was evidenced by X-ray-diffraction, Raman, FT-IR and luminescence spectroscopy. The rare earths were limited to Eu(3+) and Er(3+) ions. The observed BO(3)↔BO(4) conversion strongly depends on the relative PbO/B(2)O(3) ratios in glass composition, giving important contribution to the luminescence intensities associated to (5)D(0)-(7)F(2) and (5)D(0)-(7)F(1) transitions of Eu(3+). The near-infrared luminescence and up-conversion spectra for Er(3+) ions in lead borate glasses before and after heat treatment were measured. The more intense and narrowing luminescence lines suggest partial incorporation of Er(3+) ions into the orthorhombic PbF(2) crystalline phase, which was identified using X-ray diffraction analysis. PMID:21093353

  16. Rare-earth-doped biological composites as in vivo shortwave infrared reporters

    PubMed Central

    Naczynski, D.J.; Tan, M.C.; Zevon, M.; Wall, B.; Kohl, J.; Kulesa, A.; Chen, S.; Roth, C.M.; Riman, R.E.; Moghe, P.V.

    2013-01-01

    The extension of in vivo optical imaging for disease screening and image-guided surgical interventions requires brightly-emitting, tissue-specific materials that optically transmit through living tissue and can be imaged with portable systems that display data in real-time. Recent work suggests that a new window across the short wavelength infrared region can improve in vivo imaging sensitivity over near infrared light. Here we report on the first evidence of multispectral, real-time short wavelength infrared imaging offering anatomical resolution using brightly-emitting rare-earth nanomaterials and demonstrate their applicability toward disease-targeted imaging. Inorganic-protein nanocomposites of rare-earth nanomaterials with human serum albumin facilitated systemic biodistribution of the rare-earth nanomaterials resulting in the increased accumulation and retention in tumor tissue that was visualized by the localized enhancement of infrared signal intensity. Our findings lay the groundwork for a new generation of versatile, biomedical nanomaterials that can advance disease monitoring based on a pioneering infrared imaging technique. PMID:23873342

  17. Synthesis, properties and host effects of rare-earth doped silica nanopowders for photonic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halpern, Susan B.

    In this study, SiO2/Al2O3/Er2O 3 (SAE) nanopowders were fabricated by the CF-CVC technique with average primary particle sizes ranging from 10--30 nm. Fluorescence and lifetime measurements were made both on as-prepared powders, as well as heat treated powders, with the latter exhibiting significantly higher emission intensities. At ˜1000°C, the SAE became partially devitrified with extremely broad (FWHM ≈ 78 nm) and flat emission spectra, which is highly desirable for Wavelength Division Multiplexing (WDM) in optical amplifiers. The unique optical properties of the powders are attributed to the formation of a metastable phase consisting of an uniform nano-scale dispersion of a metastable intermediate SiO2 (Al,Er)2O3 phase in an amorphous SiO 2 matrix. At higher heat treatments (1400°C), a dual-phase equilibrium structure was formed, consisting of a pyrochlore phase in a crystobalite matrix. The SAE nanopowders were incorporated into various optical hybrid glass hosts for active planar waveguide applications. Host selection was dependent on transparency in the wavelength region of interest (900 nm--1600 nm), index matching (n ˜ 1.5), chemical/thermal stability, and ease of processing. Furthermore, the inorganic-organic glasses were hydrophobic, resulting in a minimal level of residual OH- which can quench fluorescence emission. Four separate groups of host materials were studied: Perfluoro-alkyl Hybrid Glass (n ≈ 1.42), Alumina-Silica Hybrid Glass (n ≈ 1.49), Polyurethane-Silica Hybrid Glass (n ≈ 1.44), and Methyl/Epoxy Group Hybrid Glass (n ≈ 1.48). All hosts showed high spectral transparency, uniform dispersion of the nanopowder in the host, and minimal surface quenching of emission, and therefore represent excellent candidates for fabrication of next generation nanophotonic planar devices.

  18. Luminescence properties of rare earth doped metal oxide nanostructures: A case of Eu-ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, D.; Acharya, B. S.; Panda, N. R.

    2016-05-01

    The present study reports the growth and luminescence properties of Eu doped ZnO nanostructures. The experiment has been carried out by synthesizing the materials by simple wet-chemical method. X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies show expansion of ZnO lattice with the incorporation of Eu ions which has been confirmed from the appearance of Eu2O3 as a minor phase in the XRD pattern. The estimation of crystallite size from XRD results matches closely with the results obtained from transmission electron microscopy. Further, these results show the formation of nanosized Eu-ZnO particles of average size around 60 nm stacked on each other. FTIR studies show the presence of both Zn-O and Eu-O modes in the spectra supporting the results obtained from XRD. The interesting results obtained from photoluminescence (PL) measurements show the presence of both band edge emission in UV region and the defect emissions in violet, blue and green region. The appearance of 5D0→7FJ transitions of Eu3+ ions in red region clearly suggests the possible occurrence of energy transfer between the energy states of ZnO host and Eu3+ ions.

  19. Metal enhanced fluorescence in rare earth doped plasmonic core-shell nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Derom, S; Berthelot, A; Pillonnet, A; Benamara, O; Jurdyc, A M; Girard, C; Colas des Francs, G

    2013-12-13

    We theoretically and numerically investigate metal enhanced fluorescence of plasmonic core-shell nanoparticles doped with rare earth (RE) ions. Particle shape and size are engineered to maximize the average enhancement factor (AEF) of the overall doped shell. We show that the highest enhancement (11 in the visible and 7 in the near-infrared) is achieved by tuning either the dipolar or the quadrupolar particle resonance to the rare earth ion's excitation wavelength. Additionally, the calculated AEFs are compared to experimental data reported in the literature, obtained in similar conditions (plasmon mediated enhancement) or when a metal-RE energy transfer mechanism is involved.

  20. Photoluminescence in rare-earth doped As2S3 glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iovu, Mihai S.; Andriesh, Andrei M.; Culeac, Ion P.

    2005-02-01

    Chalcogenide glasses doped with various rare-earth ions are extensively studied as potential materials for fiber optic amplifiers operating at 1.3 and 1.5 μm telecommunication windows. The experimental results on optical absorption and photoluminescence of arsenic sulfide glasses and optical fibers doped with rare-earth elements (Pr3+, Sm3+, Er3+ and Dy3+) are presented. Near the absorption edge the rare-earth impurities affect strongly the slope and the magnitude of the week absorption tail. Fluorescence spectra of bulk samples and optical fibers of arsenic sulfide doped with different concentrations of Pr3+ and Dy3+ indicate on the presence of luminescent band located around 1.3 and 1.5 μm. These bands correspond to the electron transitions from the discrete levels (6F7/2&rarr:6H13/2 and 6F5/2&rarr6H11/2 for Dy3+ and 1G4/1&rarr3H6 and 3F3&rarr3H4 for Pr3+, respectively), and which confirmed the presence of trivalent rare-earth ions in the glass matrix. The observed effects of rare-earth dopants on the As2S3 glass are discussed in connection with the expected behavior of the impurities in the glass.

  1. Surface cleaning and etching of rare-earth-doped phosphate glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Amy S.; Pantano, Carlo G.; Conzone, Samuel D.

    2001-11-01

    The surface reactions of phosphate glasses are important for the processing and application of photonic devices, biomedical materials and conventional optical components. Of particular concern are the leaching of optically-active dopant species, surface layer formation and roughening during polishing, cleaning and other fabrication processes. In this study, the effects of various cleaning treatments, and both acid and base etching, were evaluated using surface analytical techniques (XPS, AFM). It is shown that in these phosphate glasses, the aluminum and rare-earth oxides have limited aqueous solubility, whereas the phosphate network is soluble over a wider range of pH. Thus, under those conditions where polishing damage can be removed by etching the surface, a localized precipitation of rare-earth oxides occurs which influences the final roughness and surface composition. Conversely, under conditions where this precipitation can be eliminated, an in-depth leaching of the surface occurs. These aqueous surface reactions were similar for both the optically-active and passive IOG-1 glasses. An optimized surface preparation method is described.

  2. Synthesis and characterization of rare earth doped barium fluoride nanoparticles and derivatized copper phthalocyanine nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bender, Christopher Mark

    1998-12-01

    Nanoparticles of neodymium doped barium fluoride (Nd:BaFsb2) were synthesized for use as the inorganic component of an optical amplifier composite. Microemulsions were used to maintain domain size in the nano-regime (˜100 nm), and decreasing the volume fraction of the aqueous content, while simultaneously increasing the volume fraction of the cosurfactant (methanol), gave a linear relationship between decreasing domain size and increasing volume fraction of alcohol. As Nd was added to the BaFsb2 host, direct incorporation was observed at low dopant levels (0-10 mol-%), a two-phase mixture was observed at intermediate dopant levels (10-50 mol-%), and a nearly amorphous product resulted with very high Nd-dopant levels (>50 mol-%). Fluorescence measurements of the solids showed that concentration quenching was delayed until unusually high levels, probably as a result of the lost crystallinity. Praseodymium and ytterbium codoped barium fluoride (Pr,Yb:BaFsb2) were also synthesized in microemulsions. Though as-prepared powders did not fluoresce, treatment with high temperatures (900sp°C) and dynamic vacuum resulted in products which would fluoresce at 1.3 mum. Lower temperature treatments (500-750sp°C) were used to decrease sintering, however this resulted in Ybsp{3+} products in which Ybsp{3+} fluorescence was quenched by exposure to air. Contamination due to water and hydroxide is believed to be the reason. Ethanolic microemulsions were used to make copper phthalocyanine (CuPc), which was modified with either zinc phthalocyanine (ZnPc) or copper phthalcyaninesulfonic acid by means of a flow system. The sulfonic acid derivative was lost upon aqueous washing. The zinc derivatized product gave a dispersion in n-hexylamine, which was stable for seven days. The mole ratio of Cu:Zn was 1:1 for the solids dispersed in n-hexylamine, and was 6:1 for the solids that were not dispersed. Because underivatized CuPc formed by the same method did not result in a dispersed product, the dispersion mechanism is postulated to be due to interaction between the ZnPc on the surface and the n-hexylamine.

  3. Rare-earth doped transparent ceramics for spectral filtering and quantum information processing

    SciTech Connect

    Kunkel, Nathalie Goldner, Philippe; Ferrier, Alban; Thiel, Charles W.; Cone, Rufus L.; Ramírez, Mariola O.; Bausá, Luisa E.; Ikesue, Akio

    2015-09-01

    Homogeneous linewidths below 10 kHz are reported for the first time in high-quality Eu{sup 3+} doped Y {sub 2}O{sub 3} transparent ceramics. This result is obtained on the {sup 7}F{sub 0}→{sup 5}D{sub 0} transition in Eu{sup 3+} doped Y {sub 2}O{sub 3} ceramics and corresponds to an improvement of nearly one order of magnitude compared to previously reported values in transparent ceramics. Furthermore, we observed spectral hole lifetimes of ∼15 min that are long enough to enable efficient optical pumping of the nuclear hyperfine levels. Additionally, different Eu{sup 3+} concentrations (up to 1.0%) were studied, resulting in an increase of up to a factor of three in the peak absorption coefficient. These results suggest that transparent ceramics can be useful in applications where narrow and deep spectral holes can be burned into highly absorbing lines, such as quantum information processing and spectral filtering.

  4. Synthesis and characterization of rare earth doped novel optical materials and their potential applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokhrel, Madhab

    There are many application of photonic materials but selection of photonic materials are always constrained by number of factors such as cost, availability of materials, thermal and chemical stability, toxicity, size and more importantly ease of synthesis and processing along with the efficient emission. For example, quantum dots are efficient emitter but they are significantly toxic, whereas dyes are also efficient emitters but they are chemically unstable. On the other hand, display and LED requires the micron size particles but bio application requires the nano-sized particles. On the other hand, laser gain media requires the ceramics glass or single crystal not the nanoparticles. So, realization of practical optical systems critically depends on suitable materials that offer specific combinations of properties. Solid-state powders such as rare-earth ions doped nano and micron size phosphors are one of the most promising candidates for several photonic applications discussed above. In this dissertation, we investigate the upconversion (UC) fluorescence characteristics of rare earth (RE) doped M2O2S (M = Y, Gd, La) oxysulphide phosphors, for near-infrared to visible UC. Both nano and micron size phosphors were investigated depending on their applications of interest. This oxysulphide phosphor possesses several excellent properties such as chemical stability, low toxicity and can be easily mass produced at low cost. Mainly, Yb3+, Er3+, and Ho3+ were doped in the host lattice, resulting in bright red, green, blue and NIR emissions under 980 nm and 1550 nm excitation at various excitation power densities. Maximum UC quantum yields (QY) up to 6.2 %, 5.8%, and 4.6% were respectively achieved in Yb3+/Er3+ :La2O2S, Y2O2S, and Gd2O 2S. Comparisons have been made with respect to reported most efficient upconverting phosphors beta-NaYF4:20 % Yb/ 2% Er. We believe that present phosphors are the most efficient and lower excitation threshold upconverting phosphors at 980 and 1550 nm excitation reported to date for UV, green, red and NIR emissions, which makes them potential candidates for many photonic applications. In addition, UC mechanisms were proposed in these phosphors based on the time resolved spectroscopic measurements, including concentration, and power dependence studies. Potential applications of these phosphors in different areas such as solar cells, displays, etc. have been explored depending on the measured absolute quantum yield as well as color coordinate measurements. In addition, the application of nanophosphors for bioimaging application has been explored. Results from imaging of the nanoparticles together with aggregates of cultured cells have been studied. In vitro toxicity tests were conducted too. Nanoparticles internalization into the nucleus and cytoplasm were conformed using 3D reconstruction of the Z-stack images collected using the confocal mode of the two photon microscope. Measurement of the magnetization of the phosphor was conducted to study the paramagnetic strength of these Gd based nanoparticles. Magnetic resonance imaging with better contrast was also collected using these particles. Finally, the application of these UC phosphors for solar cell and display has been discussed briefly.

  5. Fibre Tip Sensors for Localised Temperature Sensing Based on Rare Earth-Doped Glass Coatings

    PubMed Central

    Schartner, Erik P.; Monro, Tanya M.

    2014-01-01

    We report the development of a point temperature sensor, based on monitoring upconversion emission from erbium:ytterbium-doped tellurite coatings on the tips of optical fibres. The dip coating technique allows multiple sensors to be fabricated simultaneously, while confining the temperature-sensitive region to a localised region on the end-face of the fibre. The strong response of the rare earth ions to changing temperature allows a resolution of 0.1–0.3 °C to be recorded over the biologically relevant range of temperatures from 23–39 °C. PMID:25407907

  6. Rare earth doped glass-ceramics containing NaLaF4 nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsts, E.; Krieke, G.; Rogulis, U.; Smits, K.; Zolotarjovs, A.; Jansons, J.; Sarakovskis, A.; Kundzins, K.

    2016-09-01

    Oxyfluoride glasses 16Na2O-9NaF-5LaF3-7Al2O3-63SiO2 (mol%) activated with 3% terbium, dysprosium, praseodymium and neodymium fluorides have been prepared and studied by differential thermal analysis, cathodoluminescence, X-ray induced luminescence, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. We found out that the presence of crystalline phase enhances the X-ray induced luminescence intensity. X-ray induced luminescence is the most intense for the sample activated with terbium and treated at 700 °C, whereas the praseodymium and neodymium activated samples have the fastest decay times.

  7. Rare-earth-doped biological composites as in vivo shortwave infrared reporters.

    PubMed

    Naczynski, D J; Tan, M C; Zevon, M; Wall, B; Kohl, J; Kulesa, A; Chen, S; Roth, C M; Riman, R E; Moghe, P V

    2013-01-01

    The extension of in vivo optical imaging for disease screening and image-guided surgical interventions requires brightly emitting, tissue-specific materials that optically transmit through living tissue and can be imaged with portable systems that display data in real-time. Recent work suggests that a new window across the short-wavelength infrared region can improve in vivo imaging sensitivity over near infrared light. Here we report on the first evidence of multispectral, real-time short-wavelength infrared imaging offering anatomical resolution using brightly emitting rare-earth nanomaterials and demonstrate their applicability toward disease-targeted imaging. Inorganic-protein nanocomposites of rare-earth nanomaterials with human serum albumin facilitated systemic biodistribution of the rare-earth nanomaterials resulting in the increased accumulation and retention in tumour tissue that was visualized by the localized enhancement of infrared signal intensity. Our findings lay the groundwork for a new generation of versatile, biomedical nanomaterials that can advance disease monitoring based on a pioneering infrared imaging technique. PMID:23873342

  8. Influence of rare earth doping on thermoelectric properties of SrTiO{sub 3} ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, J. Wang, C. L.; Li, Y.; Su, W. B.; Zhu, Y. H.; Li, J. C.; Mei, L. M.

    2013-12-14

    Thermoelectric properties of SrTiO{sub 3} ceramics, doped with different rare earth elements, were investigated in this work. It's found that the ionic radius of doping elements plays an important role on thermoelectric properties: SrTiO{sub 3} ceramics doped with large rare earth ions (such as La, Nd, and Sm) exhibit large power factors, and those doped with small ions (such as Gd, Dy, Er, and Y) exhibit low thermal conductivities. Therefore, a simple approach for enhancing the thermoelectric performance of SrTiO{sub 3} ceramics is proposed: mainly doped with large ions to obtain a large power factor and, simultaneously, slightly co-doped with small ions to obtain a low thermal conductivity. Based on this rule, Sr{sub 0.8}La{sub 0.18}Yb{sub 0.02}TiO{sub 3} ceramics were prepared, whose ZT value at 1 023 K reaches 0.31, increasing by a factor of 19% compared with the single-doped counterpart Sr{sub 0.8}La{sub 0.2}TiO{sub 3} (ZT = 0.26)

  9. Synthesis, characterization and processing of active rare earth-doped chalcohalide glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debari, Roberto Mauro

    Applications for infrared-transmitting non-oxide glass fibers span a broad range of topics. They can be used in the military, the medical field, telecommunications, and even in agriculture. Rare earth ions are used as dopants in these glasses in order to stimulate emissions in the infrared spectral region. In order to extend the host glass transmission further into the infrared, selenium atoms were substituted for sulfur in the established Ge-S-I chalcohalide glass system and the fundamental properties of these latter glasses were explored. Over 30 different compositions in the Ge-Se-I glass system were investigated as to their thermal and optical properties. The resulting optimum host with a composition of Ge15Se80I5 has a broad transmission range from 0.7 mum to 17.0 mum and a high working range over 145°C. The host glass also exhibited a Tg of 125°C, making rotational casting of a cladding tube for rod-and-tube fiberization a possibility. The base glass was doped with 1000 to 4000 ppm/wt of erbium, dysprosium, or neodymium. When doped with Er3+-ions, absorptions at 1.54 mum and 3.42 mum were observed. Nd3+-doping resulted in an absorption peak near 4.24 mum and Dy3+ ions caused absorption at 1.30 mum. Fluorescence emissions were found for neodymium at 1.396 mum with a FWHM of 74 nm, and for dysprosium at 1.145 mum with a FWHM of 75 nm, at 1.360 mum with a FWHM of 98 rim and at 1.674 mum with a FWHM of 60 nm. High optical quality tubes of the host glass could be formed using rotational casting in silica ampoules. Glass tubes, 4 to 6 cm long with a 1 cm outer diameter and a tailored inner-hole diameter ranging from 0.4 to 0.6 cm could be synthesized by this process with excellent dimensional tolerances around the circumference as well as along the length. A preform of this size provided 25 continuous meters of unclad fiber with diameters ranging from 140 to 200 mum. A UV-curable acrylate cladding was applied via an external coating cup. An x-ray analysis of the resulting fiber verified the constituents of the fiber. Due to tradeoffs between thermal properties, optical properties and rare earth solubility, the Ge-Se-I glass system must still be optimized prior to use as an active fiber device. Nevertheless, the viability of this host system has been demonstrated in this investigation. Some very promising advantages to adding halides to chalcogenide glass systems have been confirmed, including the tailoring of glass transition temperatures, enhancement of rare earth solubility, expanded fluorescence emissions in the IR, and suppression of some impurity absorption bands. Also, the potential for rod-and-tube fiberization utilizing the rotational casting method for tube synthesis has been established along with its resulting pristine core-clad interface. This research provides a foundation for active fiber device applications in the 2 to 10 mum spectral region.

  10. An alternative experimental approach to produce rare-earth-doped SiOx films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanatta, A. R.

    2016-04-01

    Rare-earth (RE) doped silicon-oxide (SiOx) films were prepared by sputtering a combined Si + RE2O3 target with argon ions. The study comprised the neodymium (Nd) and samarium (Sm) rare-earth species and the Si + RE2O3 targets were obtained by partially covering a solid disc of Si with area-defined thin layers of Nd2O3 or Sm2O3 powders. The films were investigated by energy-dispersive x-ray, Raman scattering, optical transmission, and photo-luminescence measurements. According to the experimental results, in the as-deposited form, the films were amorphous and presented RE and oxygen concentrations that scaled with the RE2O3 target area. Additional compositional-structural changes were obtained by thermal annealing the films under a flow of oxygen. Within these changes, one can mention: increase of oxygen concentration, optical bandgap widening, partial Si crystallization, and the development of RE-related light emission. The main aspects associated to the production and structural-optical properties of the films, as determined either by the deposition conditions or by the annealing treatments, are presented and discussed in detail.

  11. Monolithically integrated active waveguides and lasers using rare-earth doped spin-on glass

    SciTech Connect

    Ashby, C.I.H.; Sullivan, C.T.; Vawter, G.A.

    1996-09-01

    This LDRD program No. 3505.230 explored a new approach to monolithic integration of active waveguides and rare-earth solid state lasers directly onto III-V substrates. It involved selectively incorporating rare-earth ions into spin-on glasses (SOGs) that could be solvent cast and then patterned with conventional microelectronic processing. The patterned, rare-earth spin-on glasses (RESOGs) were to be photopumped by laser diodes prefabricated on the wafer and would serve as directly integrated active waveguides and/or rare-earth solid state lasers.

  12. Rare earth-doped materials with enhanced thermoelectric figure of merit

    DOEpatents

    Venkatasubramanian, Rama; Cook, Bruce Allen; Levin, Evgenii M.; Harringa, Joel Lee

    2016-09-06

    A thermoelectric material and a thermoelectric converter using this material. The thermoelectric material has a first component including a semiconductor material and a second component including a rare earth material included in the first component to thereby increase a figure of merit of a composite of the semiconductor material and the rare earth material relative to a figure of merit of the semiconductor material. The thermoelectric converter has a p-type thermoelectric material and a n-type thermoelectric material. At least one of the p-type thermoelectric material and the n-type thermoelectric material includes a rare earth material in at least one of the p-type thermoelectric material or the n-type thermoelectric material.

  13. Pulsed laser deposition of rare-earth-doped glasses: a step toward lightwave circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morea, R.; Fernandez, J.; Balda, R.; Gonzalo, J.

    2016-02-01

    Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) is used to produce Er-doped lead-niobium germanate (PbO-Nb2O5-GeO2) and fluorotellurite (TeO2-ZnO-ZnF2) thin film glasses. Films having high refractive index, low absorption and large transmission are obtained in a narrow processing window that depends on the actual PLD configuration (O2 pressure ˜a few Pa, Laser energy density ˜2-3 J cm-2 for the results presented in this work). However, Er-doped thin film glasses synthetized at room temperature using these experimental parameters show poor photoluminescence (PL) performance due to non-radiative decay channels, such as a large OH- concentration. Thermal annealing allows improving PL intensity and lifetime (τPL), the latter becoming close to that of the parent Er-doped bulk glass. In addition, the use of alternate PLD from host glass and rare-earth targets allows the synthesis of nanostructured thin film glasses with a controlled rare-earth concentration and in-depth distribution, as it is illustrated for Er-doped PbO-Nb2O5-GeO2 film glasses. In this case, PL intensity at 1.53 μm increases with the spacing between Er-doped layers to reach a maximum for a separation between Er-doped layers >= 5 nm, while τPL is close to the bulk value independently of the spacing. Finally, the comparison of these results with those obtained for films grown by standard PLD from Er-doped glass targets suggests that nanostructuration allows reducing rare-earth clustering and concentration quenching effects.

  14. Rare-Earth Doped Wide Bandgap Oxide Semiconductor Materials and Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wellenius, Ian Patrick

    Amorphous oxide semiconductors composed of indium gallium zinc oxide are transparent to visible light and have higher electron mobilities than conventional amorphous semiconductors, such as amorphous silicon. The advantages of higher switching speed, lack of dangling bonds leading to good electronic stability and visible spectrum transparency of amorphous oxide semiconductor devices are expected to lead to numerous applications, including transparent displays and flexible electronics. In this thesis the integration of transparent thin film transistors with transparent electroluminescent pixels was investigated. Compared with display technologies employing organic semiconductors that degrade with exposure to moisture and ultraviolet light, the all-oxide structure of this device is expected to be environmentally robust. This is believed to be the first demonstration of an integrated active matrix pixel using amorphous oxide semiconductor materials as both the light emitter and addressing circuit elements. The transparent active matrix pixel was designed, fabricated and characterized, that integrated amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide (IGZO) thin film transistors (TFTs) with a europium-doped IGZO thin film electroluminescent (TFEL) device. The integrated circuits were fabricated using room temperature pulsed laser deposition (PLD) of IGZO and ITO thin films onto substrates of Corning 7059 glass, sputter coated with an ITO back contact and subsequent atomic layer deposited ATO high-k dielectric. A second ITO layer is deposited by PLD as a contact and interconnect layer. All deposition steps were carried out at room temperature. In addition to the integration task, an important part of this thesis concerns the investigation of europium as a dopant in different oxide hosts including gallium oxide, gadolinium oxide, and amorphous IGZO. Amorphous IGZO was chosen for the integration task since it could be deposited at room temperature, however it was found that the emission intensity of Eu:IGZO thin films was strongly dependent on the oxygen pressure during deposition. It was determined that Eu3+ emission only occurs when the films are insulating, the result of increased oxygen pressure during deposition. Relatively low concentrations of Eu3+ of 1 mole percent were used for this study, with the intensity of these first generation pixels at 6 cd/m 2. Both gadolinium and gallium oxide films were investigated at higher substrate temperatures with a range of europium dopant concentrations. It was found that the both cubic and monoclinic phases of gadolinium oxide could be deposited, with the phase determined by deposition oxygen pressure. The film structure was analyzed by x-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy and optical spectra were obtained using time resolved photoluminescence (performed by a collaborator). These results were found to be in agreement with Stark-split energy levels calculated by another collaborator. Using 2.5 mole percent europium-doped gallium oxide as a host, bright thin film electroluminescent devices with intensities of 221 cd/m2 observed for a TFEL device excited by a symmetric +/-100 V max square pulse train at 1 kHz. This compares favorably with other red TFEL devices in the literature. Comparison with cathodoluminescence and photoluminescence data suggests that these performance metrics can be improved since the optimal concentration of europium by those experimental techniques was found to be near 10 mole percent. Time resolved photoluminescence revealed that radiative relaxation of the Eu3+ dopant could be modeled by two exponential decay components. Comparison of the intensity versus frequency of the electroluminescent data with time resolved photoluminescence data suggests that the faster component dominates the emission of the TFEL device.

  15. Photodarkening study of gratings written into rare-earth doped optical fibres using a femtosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Åslund, Mattias L.; Jovanovic, Nemanja; Groothoff, Nathaniel; Canning, John; Marshall, Graham D.; Jackson, Stuart D.; Fuerbach, Alex; Withford, Michael J.

    2007-12-01

    A well-known side-effect from fibre Bragg grating UV-fabrication is short wavelength attenuation, where irradiation with laser light, usually in the UV, generates both defect-induced absorption and scattering. These losses are especially problematic for high power optical fibre lasers operating at shorter wavelengths where resonant assisted coupling into the glass matrix through the rare earth ions can take place (e.g. Yb 3+). In this, work we present a study of the relative magnitude of short wavelength attenuation in gratings written by the point-by-point method using a Ti-sapphire femtosecond laser operating at 800 nm. Such gratings are very stable and have been used as the feedback elements in fibre lasers with powers exceeding 100 W. We show that the scattering properties responsible for the attenuation are analogous to those associated with type II gratings written with UV lasers.

  16. Low-temperature thermoluminescence spectra of rare-earth-doped lanthanum fluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, B.; Townsend, P.D.; Rowlands, A.P.

    1998-01-01

    Lanthanum fluoride consistently shows two strong thermoluminescence glow peaks at low temperature in pure material near 90 and 128 K. A model is proposed in which these thermoluminescence peaks arise from the annealing of halogen defect sites, similar to the H and V{sub k} centers of the alkali halides. Relaxation and decay of these defects in the pure LaF{sub 3} lattice results in broad-band intrinsic luminescence. Addition of rare-earth-impurity ions has two effects. First, the broad-band emission is replaced by narrow-band line emission defined by the trivalent rare-earth dopants. Second, it preferentially determines the formation of the halogen defect sites at impurity lattice sites and such sites appear to increase in thermal stability since the glow peak temperature increases from 128 K in the intrinsic material up to 141 K through the sequence of rare-earth dopants from La to Er. The temperature movement directly correlates with the changes in ionic size of the rare-earth ions, when allowance is made for differences in effective coordination number of the impurity ions. The data suggest two alternative lattice sites can be occupied. The model emphasizes that the intense thermoluminescence signals arise from internal charge rearrangements and annealing of defect complexes, rather than through the more conventional model of separated charge traps and recombination centers. At higher temperatures there is a complex array of glow peaks which depend not only on the dopant concentration but also are specific to each rare earth. Such effects imply defect models giving thermoluminescence within localized complexes and possible reasons are mentioned. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  17. Synthesis and thermoluminescence properties of rare earth-doped NaMgBO3 phosphor.

    PubMed

    Khan, Z S; Ingale, N B; Omanwar, S K

    2016-05-01

    Rare earth (Dy(3+) and Sm(3+))-doped sodium magnesium borate (NaMgBO3) is synthesized by solution combustion synthesis method keeping their thermoluminescence properties in mind. The reaction produced very stable crystalline NaMgBO3:RE (RE = Dy(3+), Sm(3+)) phosphors. The phosphors are exposed to (60)Co gamma-ray radiations dose of varying rate from 5 to 25 Gy, and their TL characteristics with kinetic parameters are studied. NaMgBO3:Dy(3+) phosphor shows two peaks for lower doping concentration of Dy(3+) while it reduced to single peak for the higher concentrations of activator Dy(3+). NaMgBO3:Dy(3+) shows the major glow peak around 200 °C while NaMgBO3:Sm(3+) phosphors show two well-separated glow peaks at 200 and 332 °C respectively. The thermoluminescence intensity of these phosphors was compare with the commercially available TLD-100 (Harshaw) phosphor. The TL responses for gamma-ray radiations dose were found to be linear from 5 to 25 Gy for both phosphors while the fading in each case is calculated for the tenure of 45 days.

  18. Low temperature glassy relaxation in rare earth doped Fe3O4 nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laha, Suvra; Lawes, Gavin

    2012-10-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles typically exhibit glassy relaxation at low temperature, which can be affected by doping. Gadolinium and Lanthanum doped Fe3O4 nanoparticles were synthesized using a chemical co-precipitation method. The structural and optical properties of these nanoparticles were characterized by using Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) and the Raman spectroscopy. The TEM images show the formation of nanoparticles of size ranging between 12-14 nm and Raman spectra are consistent with the formation of Fe3O4. AC magnetic measurements were also conducted on these nanoparticles. From the ac out-of-phase susceptibility (χ//) vs temperature (T) graphs, it is observed that the doped nanoparticles show larger amplitude relaxation peaks at low temperature as compared to the undoped particles. These magnetic relaxation features develop roughly between 25K to 35K and show frequency dependence. The increased magnetic relaxation at low temperatures can be attributed to structural defects which may arise due to the doping of lanthanides in Fe3O4 nanoparticles.

  19. Power scaling estimate of crystalline fiber waveguides with rare earth doped YAG cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Da; Hong, Pengda; Meissner, Stephanie K.; Meissner, Helmuth E.

    2016-03-01

    Power scaling analysis based on the model by Dawson et al. [1,2] for circular core fibers has been applied to estimating power scaling of crystalline fiber waveguides (CFWs) with RE3+ doped single crystalline or ceramic YAG (RE=rare earth: Yb, Er, Tm and Ho). Power scaling limits include stimulated Brillouin scattering, thermal lensing effect, and limits to coupling of pump light into CFWs. The CFW designs we have considered consist, in general, of a square doped RE3+:YAG core, an inner cladding of either undoped or laser-inactive-ion-doped YAG and an outer cladding of sapphire. The presented data have been developed for the structures fabricated using the Adhesive-Free Bonding (AFB®) technique, but the results should be essentially independent of fabrication technique, assuming perfect core/inner cladding/outer cladding interfaces. Hard power scaling limits exist for a specific CFW design and are strongly based on the physical constants of the material and its spectroscopic specifics. For example, power scaling limit was determined as ~16 kW for 2.5% ceramic Yb:YAG/YAG (core material/inner cladding material) at fiber length of 1.7 m and core diameter of 69 μm. Considering the present manufacturing limit for CFW length to be, e.g., 0.5 m, the actual maximum output power will be limited to ~4.4 kW for a Yb:YAG/YAG CFW. Power limit estimates have also been computed for Er3+, Tm3+ and Ho3+doped core based CFWs.

  20. Effects of rare-earth doping on femtosecond laser waveguide writing in zinc polyphosphate glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, Luke B.; Witcher, Jon J.; Troy, Neil; Reis, Signo T.; Brow, Richard K.; Krol, Denise M.

    2012-07-01

    We have investigated waveguide writing in Er-Yb doped zinc polyphosphate glass using a femtosecond laser with a repetition rate of 1 KHz. We find that fabrication of good waveguides requires a glass composition with an O/P ratio of 3.25. The dependence on laser writing parameters including laser fluence, focusing conditions, and scan speed is reported. Waveguide properties together with absorption and emission data indicate that these glasses can be used for the fabrication of compact, high gain amplifying devices.

  1. Synthesis and characterization of rare earth doped ZrO{sub 2} nanophosphors

    SciTech Connect

    Agrawal, Sadhana E-mail: jsvikasdubey@gmail.com; Dubey, Vikas E-mail: jsvikasdubey@gmail.com

    2014-10-24

    In this paper, we reports synthesis, characterization and thermoluminescence (TL) glow curves of europium and dysprosium activated zirconium dioxide (ZrO{sub 2}: Eu{sup 3+}, Dy{sup 3+}) phosphor with variable concentration of europium and fixed concentration of dysprosium. The sample was prepared by the Solid state method; thereafter, the TL glow curves were recorded for different concentration of europium with 20 min UV exposure at a heating rate of 6.7°C/s. The trapping parameters for synthesized phosphors of ZrO{sub 2}: Eu{sup 3+}, Dy{sup 3+} have been calculated by using a peak shape method. The sample was characterized for structural analysis by XRD (X-ray diffraction) and morphological analysis by FEGSEM (field emission gun scanning electron microscope) and FTIR (Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy). The effect of variable europium concentration and fixed dysprosium concentration on TL studies were interpreted and the formation of trap depth and reproducibility of prepared phosphor were analyzed by TL glow curves. The peak temperature on TL less than 200°C shows the formation of deep trapping in prepared sample. The high temperature peak shows the less fading and more stability in prepared sample.

  2. Compensation for effects of ambient temperature on rare-earth doped fiber optic thermometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamovsky, G.; Sotomayor, J. L.; Krasowski, M. J.; Eustace, J. G.

    1990-01-01

    Variations in ambient temperature have a negative effect on the performance of any fiber optic sensing system. A change in ambient temperature may alter the design parameters of fiber optic cables, connectors, sources, detectors, and other fiber optic components and eventually the performance of the entire system. The thermal stability of components is especially important in a system which employs intensity modulated sensors. Several referencing schemes have been developed to account for the variable losses that occur within the system. However, none of these conventional compensating techniques can be used to stabilize the thermal drift of the light source in a system based on the spectral properties of the sensor material. The compensation for changes in ambient temperature becomes especially important in fiber optic thermometers doped with rare earths. Different approaches to solving this problem are searched and analyzed.

  3. Compensation for effects of ambient temperature on rare-earth doped fiber optic thermometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamovsky, G.; Sotomayor, J. L.; Krasowski, M. J.; Eustace, J. G.

    1989-01-01

    Variations in ambient temperature have a negative effect on the performance of any fiber optic sensing system. A change in ambient temperature may alter the design parameters of fiber optic cables, connectors, sources, detectors, and other fiber optic components and eventually the performance of the entire system. The thermal stability of components is especially important in a system which employs intensity modulated sensors. Several referencing schemes have been developed to account for the variable losses that occur within the system. However, none of these conventional compensating techniques can be used to stabilize the thermal drift of the light source in a system based on the spectral properties of the sensor material. The compensation for changes in ambient temperature becomes especially important in fiber optic thermometers doped with rare earths. Different approaches to solving this problem are searched and analyzed.

  4. Processing of Transparent Rare Earth Doped Zirconia for High Temperature Light Emission Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardin, Corey Lee

    The high fracture toughness of stabilized zirconia makes it one of the most widely applicable high temperature structural materials. However, it is not typicality considered for optical applications since the microstructure achieved by traditional processing makes it opaque. The aim of this dissertation is to develop processing methods for the introducing new functionalities of light transparency and light emission (photoluminescence) and to understand the nanostructure-property relationships that make these functionalities possible. A processing study of rare-earth (RE) doped Zirconium Oxide (ZrO2, zirconia) via Current Activated Pressure Assisted Densification (CAPAD) is presented. The role of processing temperature and dopant concentration on the crystal structure, microstructure and properties of the RE: ZrO2 is studied. Microstructural shows sub-100 nm grain size and homogeneous dopant distribution. X-ray diffraction and Raman analysis show that with increased dopant concentration the material changes from monoclinic to tetragonal. Structural analysis shows the material shows high hardness and toughness values 30% greater than similarly processed yttria-stabilized zirconia. Despite birefringence in the tetragonal phase, optical characterization is presented showing the samples are both highly transparent and photo-luminescent. Special attention is paid to analyzing structural and photoluminescence development during densification, as well as the role of oxygen vacancies on the optical properties of the densified material. This material is shown to be a promising candidate for a number of applications including luminescence thermometry and high temperature light emission.

  5. Superposition-model analysis of rare-earth doped BaY2F8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnani, N.; Amoretti, G.; Baraldi, A.; Capelletti, R.

    The energy level schemes of four rare-earth dopants (Ce3+ , Nd3+ , Dy3+ , and Er3+) in BaY2 F-8 , as determined by optical absorption spectra, were fitted with a single-ion Hamiltonian and analysed within Newman's Superposition Model for the crystal field. A unified picture for the four dopants was obtained, by assuming a distortion of the F- ligand cage around the RE site; within the framework of the Superposition Model, this distortion is found to have a marked anisotropic behaviour for heavy rare earths, while it turns into an isotropic expansion of the nearest-neighbours polyhedron for light rare earths. It is also inferred that the substituting ion may occupy an off-center position with respect to the original Y3+ site in the crystal.

  6. Optical characterization of perturbed sites and C3i sites in rare earth doped oxide crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinemer, Gregoy Donald

    Energies, linewidths, and line strengths for some intrinsic and perturbed site transitions of seven different rare-earth ions doped into Y3Al 5O12 were measured as a function of concentration using visible and infrared absorption. Nearest and next-nearest neighbor ion pair transitions were characterized by their concentration dependence, and an analysis of Pr 3+ and Nd3+ pairs showed that those ions are distributed randomly in the lattice. For all transitions studied, the intrinsic D2 site and pair site transitions accounted for 92%--95% of the total line strength; the remaining 5%--8% was assigned to perturbed site transitions. No significant dependence of perturbed site line strength on ionic radius was observed. The nominally equal perturbed site line strength for all transitions studied implied that oscillator strengths for intrinsic and perturbed sites were similar. The perturbed sites appear to be a normal property of the Y3Al 5O12 lattice. To further investigate the nature of the perturbed sites, experiments were done showing that Er3+ occupies a site in Er3+ :Y3Al5O12 with a threefold axis along <111> that is consistent with occupation of the octahedral Al3+ site with C3i symmetry. Allowed magnetic dipole transitions at 1.5 microns were identified in the 4I15/2(1)→ 4I13/2 absorption spectrum using site selective fluorescence. Angle dependent Zeeman experiments on these transitions confirmed that they are from a site with a threefold axis along <111>. Using optical nutation experiments, the number density for Er 3+ C3i sites in 1.0 at.% Er3+:Y3Al 5O12 was determined to be (5 +/- 2) x 10 17 Er3+/cm3. Since Er3+ has nearly the same ionic radius as Y3+, the occupation of these same sites by Y3+ was deduced to be 0.6% +/- 0.3%. Assuming each Y3+ C3i site perturbs 12 D2 sites, the fractional line strength for perturbed sites would be 5% +/- 2%. Similar experiments on 0.05 at.% Er3+:Y2O 3 characterized C3i site Er3+ 4I 15/2 and 4I13/2 crystal field levels and g-tensors. The optimal direction for applying a magnetic field used to minimize dephasing of coherent interactions was determined to be along <111>. Two-pulse photon echoes using the C2 site Er3+ 4I 15/2→4I13/2 transition had longer dephasing times with the field along <111> than with the field along <110>.

  7. Direct quantification of rare earth doped titania nanoparticles in individual human cells.

    PubMed

    Jeynes, J C G; Jeynes, C; Palitsin, V; Townley, H E

    2016-07-15

    There are many possible biomedical applications for titania nanoparticles (NPs) doped with rare earth elements (REEs), from dose enhancement and diagnostic imaging in radiotherapy, to biosensing. However, there are concerns that the NPs could disintegrate in the body thus releasing toxic REE ions to undesired locations. As a first step, we investigate how accurately the Ti/REE ratio from the NPs can be measured inside human cells. A quantitative analysis of whole, unsectioned, individual human cells was performed using proton microprobe elemental microscopy. This method is unique in being able to quantitatively analyse all the elements in an unsectioned individual cell with micron resolution, while also scanning large fields of view. We compared the Ti/REE signal inside cells to NPs that were outside the cells, non-specifically absorbed onto the polypropylene substrate. We show that the REE signal in individual cells co-localises with the titanium signal, indicating that the NPs have remained intact. Within the uncertainty of the measurement, there is no difference between the Ti/REE ratio inside and outside the cells. Interestingly, we also show that there is considerable variation in the uptake of the NPs from cell-to-cell, by a factor of more than 10. We conclude that the NPs enter the cells and remain intact. The large heterogeneity in NP concentrations from cell-to-cell should be considered if they are to be used therapeutically. PMID:27255758

  8. Direct quantification of rare earth doped titania nanoparticles in individual human cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeynes, J. C. G.; Jeynes, C.; Palitsin, V.; Townley, H. E.

    2016-07-01

    There are many possible biomedical applications for titania nanoparticles (NPs) doped with rare earth elements (REEs), from dose enhancement and diagnostic imaging in radiotherapy, to biosensing. However, there are concerns that the NPs could disintegrate in the body thus releasing toxic REE ions to undesired locations. As a first step, we investigate how accurately the Ti/REE ratio from the NPs can be measured inside human cells. A quantitative analysis of whole, unsectioned, individual human cells was performed using proton microprobe elemental microscopy. This method is unique in being able to quantitatively analyse all the elements in an unsectioned individual cell with micron resolution, while also scanning large fields of view. We compared the Ti/REE signal inside cells to NPs that were outside the cells, non-specifically absorbed onto the polypropylene substrate. We show that the REE signal in individual cells co-localises with the titanium signal, indicating that the NPs have remained intact. Within the uncertainty of the measurement, there is no difference between the Ti/REE ratio inside and outside the cells. Interestingly, we also show that there is considerable variation in the uptake of the NPs from cell-to-cell, by a factor of more than 10. We conclude that the NPs enter the cells and remain intact. The large heterogeneity in NP concentrations from cell-to-cell should be considered if they are to be used therapeutically.

  9. Aluminium in human sweat.

    PubMed

    Minshall, Clare; Nadal, Jodie; Exley, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    It is of burgeoning importance that the human body burden of aluminium is understood and is measured. There are surprisingly few data to describe human excretion of systemic aluminium and almost no reliable data which relate to aluminium in sweat. We have measured the aluminium content of sweat in 20 healthy volunteers following mild exercise. The concentration of aluminium ranged from 329 to 5329μg/L. These data equate to a daily excretion of between 234 and 7192μg aluminium and they strongly suggest that perspiration is the major route of excretion of systemic aluminium in humans.

  10. Evidence of aluminium accumulation in aluminium welders.

    PubMed Central

    Elinder, C G; Ahrengart, L; Lidums, V; Pettersson, E; Sjögren, B

    1991-01-01

    Using atomic absorption spectrometry the aluminium concentrations in blood and urine and in two iliac bone biopsies obtained from welders with long term exposure to fumes containing aluminium were measured. The urinary excretion of two workers who had welded for 20 and 21 years varied between 107 and 351 micrograms Al/l, more than 10 times the concentration found in persons without occupational exposure. Urinary aluminium excretion remained high many years after stopping exposure. Blood and bone aluminium concentrations (4-53 micrograms Al/l and 18-29 micrograms Al/g respectively) were also raised but not to the same extent as urine excretion. It is concluded that long term exposure to aluminium by inhalation gives rise to accumulation of aluminium in the body and skeleton of health persons, and that the elimination of retained aluminium is very slow, in the order of several years. PMID:1954151

  11. Human exposure to aluminium.

    PubMed

    Exley, Christopher

    2013-10-01

    Human activities have circumvented the efficient geochemical cycling of aluminium within the lithosphere and therewith opened a door, which was previously only ajar, onto the biotic cycle to instigate and promote the accumulation of aluminium in biota and especially humans. Neither these relatively recent activities nor the entry of aluminium into the living cycle are showing any signs of abating and it is thus now imperative that we understand as fully as possible how humans are exposed to aluminium and the future consequences of a burgeoning exposure and body burden. The aluminium age is upon us and there is now an urgent need to understand how to live safely and effectively with aluminium.

  12. Microbial interactions with aluminium.

    PubMed

    Piña, R G; Cervantes, C

    1996-07-01

    Although aluminium is the most abundant metal in the Earth's crust, it lacks biological functions and shows a low bioavailability. Acid rain, however, solubilizes aluminium to toxic levels. Most research on the biological effects of aluminium has been centred on the analysis of aluminium-tolerant plants as well as its possible relationship with neurological disorders in humans. Also, several studies have been reported concerning aluminium effects on microorganisms, with more interest directed to cyanobacteria, soil bacteria and mycorrhizal fungi. Competition with iron and magnesium, and binding to DNA, membranes or cell walls are considered the main toxic effects of aluminium in microbes.

  13. Effect of aluminum and yttrium doping on zinc sulphide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Swati; Kashyap, Jyoti; Gupta, Shubhra; Natasha, Kapoor, A.

    2016-05-01

    In this work, pristine and doped Zinc Sulphide (ZnS) nanoparticles have been synthesized via chemical co-precipitation method. ZnS nanoparticles have been doped with Aluminium (Al) and Yttrium (Y) with doping concentration of 5wt% each. The structural and optical properties of the as prepared nanoparticles have been studied using X-Ray diffraction (XRD) technique and Photoluminescence spectroscopy. Average grain size of 2-3nm is observed through the XRD analysis. Effect of doping on stress, strain and lattice constant of the nanoparticles has also been analyzed. Photoluminescence spectra of the as prepared nanoparticles is enhanced due to Al doping and quenched due to Y doping. EDAX studies confirm the relative doping percentage to be 3.47 % and 3.94% by wt. for Al and Y doped nanoparticles respectively. Morphology of the nanoparticles studied using TEM and SEM indicates uniform distribution of spherical nanoparticles.

  14. Electronic Transitions of Yttrium Monoxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Y. W.; Wang, Na; Clark, Andrew B.; Cheung, A. S.-C.

    2013-06-01

    The electronic transition spectrum of yttrium monoxide (YO) in the spectral region between 284nm and 307nm has been recorded using laser ablation/reaction free-jet expansion and laser induced fluorescence (LIF) spectroscopy. The YO molecule was produced by reacting laser-ablated yttrium atoms with O_{2} seeded in argon. Twenty transition bands were observed in that region and a few bands were selected for further study using optical-optical double resonance (OODR) spectroscopy. The excited C^{2} Π state has been reached via the intermediate B^{2} Σ^{+} state from the ground X^{2} Σ^{+} state. The excited sub-states observed so far have Ω = 0.5 and 1.5. A least squares fit of the measured rotational lines yielded molecular constants for the newly observed excited states.

  15. Determination of Judd-Ofelt intensity parameters from the excitation spectra for rare-earth doped luminescent materials.

    PubMed

    Luo, Wenqin; Liao, Jinsheng; Li, Renfu; Chen, Xueyuan

    2010-04-01

    By utilizing the proportional relationship between the excitation and absorption spectra for some special excited multiplets of rare-earth (RE) ions that are followed by a very fast nonradiative relaxation to the monitored level, we propose a new approach to determine the Judd-Ofelt (JO) intensity parameters that are crucial to the evaluation of laser and luminescent materials via excitation spectra. To validate this approach, the JO parameters of NaGd(WO(4))(2) : Er(3+) and YLiF(4) : Nd(3+) crystals are calculated and compared through both the excitation and absorption spectra. The JO parameters derived from this approach are in good agreement with that determined from the conventional method (absorption spectra). Furthermore, the JO intensity parameters of Y(2)O(3) : Er(3+) nanocrystals are derived from the excitation spectra by taking into account the nano-size effects, which are comparable to the values of the crystal counterpart. The proposed approach is of particular importance for those powders or nanophosphors with low RE doping concentration that their quantitative absorption spectra are difficult to measure.

  16. Effect of rare-earth doping in RCrSb3 (R = La, Pr, Sm, and Gd)

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, D D; Fisk, Z

    2005-11-08

    We report on the electrical resistivity and magnetic susceptibility of La or Gd doped RCrSb{sub 3} (R=La, Pr, Sm, and Gd). Single crystals were grown by increasing the nominal dopant by 25%. In general, two magnetic ordering transitions are found, T{sub C1} is attributed to ferromagnetic ordering of the itinerant Cr sub-lattice, and, at lower temperatures, T{sub C2} is attributed to ordering of the localized rare-earth sub-lattice. Alloying on the rare-earth site varies the de Gennes factor, DG = (g-1){sup 2}J(J+1), and dT{sub C1}/d(DG) = -2K, while dT{sub C2}/d(DG) = 5K. These ordering temperatures are found to converge at GdCrSb{sub 3}, where a single ferrimagnetic transition is found at T{sub C2} = 86 K due to an anti-alignment of the itinerant Cr moments and the localized rare-earth moments. Initially, for DG < 3.5, the rare-earth moments are found to align ferromagnetically, and the paramagnetic Weiss temperature decreases at the same rate as T{sub C1}. But for DG > 4.5, the rare-earth sub-lattice anti-alignes with respect to the Cr sub-lattice, and the Weiss temperature decreases five times as fast. In the region between (3.5 < DG < 4.5), a first order phase transition is found at T{sub C2}.

  17. A novel contrast agent with rare earth-doped up-conversion luminescence and Gd-DTPA magnetic resonance properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Qing; Wei, Daixu; Cheng, Jiejun; Xu, Jianrong; Zhu, Jun

    2012-08-01

    The magnetic-luminescent multifunctional nanoparticles based on Gd-DTPA and NaYF4:Yb, Er were successfully synthesized by the conjugation of activated DTPA and silica-coated/surface-aminolated NaYF4:Yb, Er nanoparticles through EDC/NHS coupling chemistry. The as-prepared products were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, energy dispersive X-ray analysis, and fourier transform infrared spectrometry. The room-temperature upconversion luminescent spectra and T1-weighted maps of the obtained nanoparticles were carried out by 980 nm NIR light excitation and a 3T MR imaging scanner, respectively. The results indicated that the as-synthesized multifunctional nanoparticles with small size, highly solubility in water, and both high MR relaxivities and upconversion luminescence may have potential usage for MR imaging in future.

  18. Engineering rare-earth-doped heavy metal oxide glasses for 2-5 μm lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Billy D. O.; Jha, Animesh; Dorofeev, Vitaly; Manzur, Tariq

    2010-04-01

    The electronic states in trivalent rare-earth ions offer an excellent opportunity for designing efficient fibre and bulk lasers for atmospheric remote sensing and LIDAR technology. The first part of this review article focuses on engineering passive fibres for 2-5 μm transmission. The fabrication of single-mode tungsten tellurite optical fibres from high purity bulk glass rods is described. Fibres with a numerical aperture of 0.1 and core diameter of 10+/-2 μm have been drawn using suction and rod-in-tube techniques of fibre preform fabrication. Losses of 2.3 dBm-1 at 974 nm have been measured. These fibres are of interest for use as passive transmission fibre or active fibres for lasing in the 2-5 μm spectral region. The use of heavy metal oxides in the fabrication of glass leads to extended infrared transmission. In the 2nd part of the review we compare the slope efficiencies of Tm3+ and Tm3+/Ho3+ doped glasses and fibres for 1950-2080 nm lasers using a range of pumping schemes in tellurite and germanium oxide hosts. We also explain the importance of choosing 1950-2080 nm tunable lasers as a pump source for stimulated emission at longer wavelengths.

  19. Rare-earth doped gadolinia based phosphors for potential multicolor and white light emitting deep UV LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedekar, Vinila; Dutta, Dimple P.; Mohapatra, M.; Godbole, S. V.; Ghildiyal, R.; Tyagi, A. K.

    2009-03-01

    Gadolinium oxide host and europium/dysprosium/terbium doped gadolinium oxide nanoparticles were synthesized using the sonochemical technique. Gadolinium oxide nanocrystals were also co-doped with total 2 mol% of Eu3+/Dy3+,Eu3+/Tb3+,Dy3+/Tb3+, and also Eu3+/Dy3+/Tb3+ ions, by the same method. The nanoparticles obtained were characterized using powder x-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and selected area electron diffraction (SAED) techniques. The size of the particles ranged from 15 to 30 nm. The triple doped samples showed multicolor emission on single wavelength excitation. The photoluminescence results were correlated with the lifetime data to get an insight into the luminescence and energy transfer processes taking place in the system. On excitation at 247 nm, the novel nanocrystalline Gd2O3:RE (RE = Dy, Tb) phosphor resulted in having very impressive CIE chromaticity coordinates of x = 0.315 and y = 0.316, and a correlated color temperature of 6508 K, which is very close to standard daylight.

  20. Electronic structure of rare-earth doped SrFBiS2 superconductors from photoemission spectroscopic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, P.; Lohani, H.; Jha, Rajveer; Awana, V. P. S.; Sekhar, B. R.

    2016-06-01

    The electronic structure study of the Rare Earth (La, Ce) doped SrFBiS2 superconductors using valence band photoemission in conjugation with the band structure calculations have been presented. The spectral features shift towards higher binding energy, consistent with the electron doping, for the doped compounds. An enhanced metallicity in addition to the shift in the Fermi level towards the conduction band occurs for the Rare Earth (RE) doped compounds. Further, the degeneracy of bands along X-M direction at valence band maximum (VBM) and conduction band minimum (CBM) is lifted due to RE doping. An enhanced spectral weight near EF accompanied by a decrease in density of states at higher binding energy occurs for the doped compounds. This unusual spectral weight shift is substantiated by the change in Fermi surface topology and reduced distortion of Bi-S plane for the doped compounds.

  1. Rare earth doped SnO2 nanoscaled powders and coatings: enhanced photoluminescence in water and waveguiding properties.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, R R; Messaddeq, Y; Aegerter, M A; Ribeiro, S J L

    2011-03-01

    Luminescent Eu3+ and Er3+ doped SnO2 powders have been prepared by Sn4+ hydrolysis followed by a controlled growth reaction using a particle's surface modifier in order to avoid particles aggregation. The powders so obtained doped with up to 2 mol% rare earth ions are fully redispersable in water at pH > 8 and present the cassiterite structure. Particles size range from 3 to 10 nm as determined by Photon Correlation Spectroscopy. Rare earth ions were found to be essentially incorporated into the cassiterite structure, substituting for Sn4+, for doping concentration smaller than 0.05 mol%. For higher concentration they are also located at the particles surface. The presence of Eu3+ ions at the surface of the particles hinder their growth and has therefore allowed the preparation of new materials consisting of water redispersable powders coated with Eu(3+)-beta diketonate complexes. Enhanced UV excited photoluminescence was observed in water. SnO2 single layers with thickness up to 200 nm and multilayer coatings were spin coated on borosilicate glass substrates from the colloidal suspensions. Waveguiding properties were evaluated by the prism coupling technique. For a 0.3 microm planar waveguide single propagating mode was observed with attenuation coefficient of 3.5 dB/cm at 632.8 nm. PMID:21449404

  2. Coherency strain enhanced dielectric-temperature property of rare-earth doped BaTiO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Jeon, Sang-Chae; Kang, Suk-Joong L.

    2013-03-18

    Core/shell-grained BaTiO{sub 3} samples were prepared with addition of rare earth elements. The core/shell interface was semi-coherent, and many misfit dislocations formed in Dy-doped samples. In contrast, a coherent interface and few dislocations were observed in Ho- and Er-doped samples. Dy-doped samples exhibited poor temperature stability, showing a peak with no frequency dispersion. Ho- and Er-doped samples exhibited a broad curve with frequency dispersion. This improved temperature stability is attributed to the coherency strain, which leads to the formation of polar nano-regions in the shell. Coherency at the core/shell interface is critical to improve the temperature stability of core/shell-structured BaTiO{sub 3}.

  3. Thermochemical compatibility between selected (La,Sr)(Co,Fe,Ni)O 3 cathodes and rare earth doped ceria electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zając, Wojciech; Świerczek, Konrad; Molenda, Janina

    In this paper the results of thermal expansion coefficient measurements of different singly and doubly doped ceria electrolytes, together with results for selected cathode materials from (La,Sr)(Co,Fe,Ni)O 3 system are given. A high temperature chemical stability of the cathode-electrolyte interface was measured on 1:1 wt. mixtures of previously characterized ceria and perovskite powders. The samples were heated at 800, 1000 or at 1200 °C in air for 6 or 100 h. Chemical reactivity investigations were conducted using XRD with Rietveld analysis. For all heated samples the crystal structure of both components were preserved. However, their lattice parameters evolved to a different extent, suggesting the existence of cation exchange. A formation of the solid state solution between Ce 1- xRE xO 2- x/2 and La(Co,Fe,Ni)O 3- δ was found, with mobile La cation. On the basis of the obtained results a qualitative mechanism of the observed reaction was proposed.

  4. High contrast in vivo bioimaging using multiphoton upconversion in novel rare-earth-doped fluoride upconversion nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guanying; Yang, Chunhui; Prasad, Paras N.

    2013-02-01

    Upconversion in rare-earth ions is a sequential multiphoton process that efficiently converts two or more low-energy photons, which are generally near infrared (NIR) light, to produce anti-Stokes emission of a higher energy photon (e.g., NIR, visible, ultraviolet) using continuous-wave (cw) diode laser excitation. Here, we show the engineering of novel, efficient, and biocompatible NIRin-to-NIRout upconversion nanoparticles for biomedical imaging with both excitation and emission being within the "optical transparency window" of tissues. The small animal whole-body imaging with exceptional contrast (signal-to-noise ratio of 310) was shown using BALB/c mice intravenously injected with aqueously dispersed nanoparticles. An imaging depth as deep as 3.2-cm was successfully demonstrated using thick animal tissue (pork) under cw laser excitation at 980 nm.

  5. Phase Transformation and Lattice Parameter Changes of Trivalent Rare Earth Doped YSZ as a Function of Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, S. L.; Huang, X.; He, Z.

    2016-09-01

    Yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) co-doped with trivalent oxide Sc2O3 and Yb2O3 is prepared using mechanical alloying and high-temperature sintering. High-temperature XRD analysis was performed to study the phase transformation and lattice parameter changes of various phases in the baseline YSZ and co-doped samples. The results show that the structure for the co-doped samples tends to be more thermally stable at test temperature above critical value. The lattice parameters for all samples increase with temperature at which XRD is carried out, and the lattice parameters for the two trivalent rare earth oxides co-doped YSZ are smaller than that for 7YSZ under the same temperature.

  6. Rare earth doped LiYbF{sub 4} phosphors with controlled morphologies: Hydrothermal synthesis and luminescent properties

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Wenjuan; Lu, Chunhua; Jiang, Chenfei; Jin, Junyang; Ding, Mingye; Ni, Yaru; Xu, Zhongzi

    2012-06-15

    Highlights: ► LiYbF{sub 4} microparticles as an excellent upconverting materials. ► High temperature and long time can favor high crystalline LiYbF{sub 4} microparticles. ► The shape of LiYbF{sub 4} microparticles can be tuned by the molar ratio of EDTA to Yb{sup 3+}. ► Bright green emission can be obtained by changing the doping concentration of Er{sup 3+}. -- Abstract: High quality monodisperse LiYbF{sub 4} microparticles with shape of octahedron had been prepared via a facile hydrothermal route. The crystalline phase, size, morphology and luminescence properties were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), photoluminescence (PL) spectra and Commission Internationale de L’Eclairage (CIE 1931) chromaticity coordinates, respectively. The influences of reaction temperature, reaction time and the molar ratio of EDTA to Yb{sup 3+} on the crystal phases and shapes of as-prepared products had been investigated in detail. The upconversion (UC) luminescence properties of LiYb{sub 1−x}F{sub 4}:xEr{sup 3+} (x =0.1, 0.2, 0.5, 1, 2, 5 and 10 mol%) particles with octahedral microstructures were studied under 976 nm excitation. The results showed that the luminescence colors of the corresponding products could be tuned to bright green by changing the doping concentration of Er{sup 3+} ion. The luminescence mechanisms for the doped Er{sup 3+} ion were thoroughly analyzed, showing great potential in applications such as biolabels, displays and other optical technologies.

  7. The Role of Defect Complexes in the Magneto-Optical Properties of Rare Earth Doped Gallium Nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Brandon

    Wide band gap semiconductors doped with rare earth ions (RE) have shown great potential for applications in optoelectronics, photonics, and spintronics. The 1.54mum Erbium (Er) emission has been extensively utilized in optical fiber communications, and Europium (Eu) is commonly used as a red color component for LEDs and fluorescence lamps. For the realization of spintronic-type devices, a dilutely doped semiconductor that exhibits room temperature ferromagnetic behavior would be desirable. Such behavior has been observed in GaN:Er. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that strain may play an important role in the control of this ferromagnetism; however, this requires further investigation. One motivation of this work is the realization of an all solid state white light source monolithically integrated into III/V nitride semiconductor materials, ideally GaN. For this, the current AlGaAs-based LEDs need to be replaced. One approach for achieving efficient red emission from GaN is dilute doping with fluorescent ions. In this regard, Eu has consistently been the most promising candidate as a dopant in the active layer for a red, GaN based, LED due to the sharp 5D0 to 7F2 transitions that result in red emission around 620nm. The success of GaN:Eu as the active layer for a red LED is based on the ability for the Eu ions to be efficiently excited by electron hole pairs. Thus, the processes by which energy is transferred from the host to the Eu ions has been studied. Complications arise, however, from the fact that Eu ions incorporate into multiple center environments, the structures of which are found to have a profound influence on the excitation pathways and efficiencies of the Eu ion. Therefore the nature of Eu incorporation and the resulting luminescence efficiency in GaN has been extensively investigated. By performing a comparative study on GaN:Eu samples grown under a variety of controlled conditions and using a variety of experimental techniques, the majority site has been concluded to contain a nitrogen vacancy (V N) in its immediate structure. The nitrogen vacancy can appear in two symmetries, which has a profound impact on the luminescence and magnetic properties of the sample. The structure of the minority site has also been identified. For both sites, we give substantial evidence that the excitation efficiency of the red Eu emission is improved by the presence of donor-acceptor pairs in the vicinity of the Eu. Furthermore, when Mg was co-doped into GaN:Eu, additional incorporation environments were discovered that show high excitation efficiency at room temperature. These have been attributed to the coupling of Mg-H complexes to the majority Eu site. Electron beam irradiation, indirect and resonant (direct) laser excitation were found to modify these complexes, indicating that vibrational energy alone can trigger the migration of the H, while the presence of additional charges and excess energy controls the type of reconfiguration and the activation of non-radiative decay channels. We identify, experimentally, a two-step process in the dissociation of Mg-H complexes and propose, based on density functional theory, that the presence of minority carriers and the resulting charge states of complexes can also influence this process. In GaN:Er, we have given a more thorough overview of the optical and magneto-optical properties by extending to the 800nm excitation range and drastically improving the signal-to-noise ratio in the magnetic measurements, as well as applying a perpendicular magnetic field. This has allowed us to calculate g-factors for the parallel case, but revealed that the Zeeman interaction is not quite linear for perpendicular magnetic fields. We were able to assign crystal field numbers of mu = 3/2 to two crystal field levels. We have also given strong evidence that the strain in the sample, which results from lattice mismatch, enhances its magnetization, as seen through fluorescence line narrowing and asymmetry between the Zeeman transition intensities, under application of magnetic fields in anti-parallel directions.

  8. Synthesis and upconversion emission of rare earth-doped olive-like YF{sub 3} micro-particles

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Hang; Chen, Daqin; Niu, Mutong; Yu, Yunlong; Huang, Ping; Wang, Yuansheng

    2010-01-15

    The olive-like YF{sub 3} micro-particles were fabricated via a two-step route. The precursor NH{sub 4}Y{sub 3}F{sub 10} nano-cages sized 8 nm with hollow interiors were first synthesized in a solid reaction at room temperature. In the course of subsequent hydrothermal treating, the unstable NH{sub 4}Y{sub 3}F{sub 10} nano-cages were decomposed, resulted in the formation of Y(OH){sub 1.63}F{sub 1.37} micro-tubes. Prolonging the hydrothermal reaction induced the further decomposition of Y(OH){sub 1.63}F{sub 1.37} to produce YF{sub 3} nano-crystals, which then aggregated together forming the final olive-like YF{sub 3} micro-particles. For the Er{sup 3+}/Yb{sup 3+} co-doped olive-like YF{sub 3} micro-particles, intense visible upconversion emissions were measured under 976 nm excitation owing to the partition of rare earth ions in the lattice, indicating this material a promising luminescent host.

  9. Synthesis and optical characterizations of undoped and rare-earth-doped CaF{sub 2} nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Bensalah, A. . E-mail: amina-bensalah@enscp.fr; Mortier, M.; Patriarche, G.; Gredin, P.; Vivien, D.

    2006-08-15

    The synthesis of undoped as well as Yb or Er-doped CaF{sub 2} nanocrystals using a reverse micelle method is reported. X-ray powder diffraction and transmission electron microscopy analysis showed that the products were single phased and rather monodispersed with an average particles size around 20 nm. The emission spectra and fluorescence decay times of both Yb{sup 3+} and Er{sup 3+} rare earths (RE) ions in CaF{sub 2} nanoparticles are presented. The particles size is increased by heating the as-obtained nanoparticles at different temperatures. The effect of annealing on the optical properties of the two RE ions in CaF{sub 2} is also investigated. - Graphical abstract: Transmission Electron Microscopy micrograph of CaF{sub 2} nanoparticles synthesized by a reverse-micelle method.

  10. Theranostic Imaging of Yttrium-90

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Chadwick L.; Zhang, Jun; Tweedle, Michael F.; Knopp, Michael V.; Hall, Nathan C.

    2015-01-01

    This paper overviews Yttrium-90 (90Y) as a theranostic and nuclear medicine imaging of 90Y radioactivity with bremsstrahlung imaging and positron emission tomography. In addition, detection and optical imaging of 90Y radioactivity using Cerenkov luminescence will also be reviewed. Methods and approaches for qualitative and quantitative 90Y imaging will be briefly discussed. Although challenges remain for 90Y imaging, continued clinical demand for predictive imaging response assessment and target/nontarget dosimetry will drive research and technical innovation to provide greater clinical utility of 90Y as a theranostic agent. PMID:26106608

  11. Aluminium contamination from fluoride assisted dissolution of metallic aluminium.

    PubMed

    Tennakone, K; Wickramanayake, S; Fernando, C A

    1988-01-01

    Trace amounts (microg g(-1) quantities) of fluoride ion are found to catalyse the dissolution of metallic aluminium in very slightly acidic or alkaline aqueous media. Possibly hazardous levels of aluminium could get leached from cooking utensils if fluoridated water or fluoride rich foodstuffs are used. The fluoride assisted corrosion of aluminium is most dramatic in oxalic, tartaric acids or sodium bicarbonate. Carbon dioxide also corrodes aluminium in the presence of the fluoride ion, generating colloidal hydrated aluminium oxide which is readily soluble in dilute organic and mineral acids. PMID:15092668

  12. Electronic transitions of yttrium monophosphide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Biu Wa; Chan, Man-Chor; Cheung, A. S.-C.

    2015-11-01

    The electronic transition spectrum of the yttrium monophosphide (YP) molecule in the near infrared region between 715 nm and 880 nm has been recorded using laser ablation/reaction free-jet expansion and laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy. The YP molecule was produced by reacting laser - ablated yttrium atoms with PH3 gas seeded in argon. Eleven vibrational bands were analyzed and six electronic transitions have been identified, namely the [12.17] Ω = 3 - X3Π2, [13.27] Ω = 3 - X3Π2, [13.44] Ω = 3 - X3Π2, [13.46] Ω = 3 - X3Π2 and [13.40] Ω = 2 - X3Π2 transitions and a [13.69] Ω = 3 - a1Δ2 transition. Least squares fits of the measured rotational lines yielded molecular constants for the ground and excited states. The ground state has been determined to be a X3Π2 state and the bond length ro and vibrational separation, ΔG1/2, were determined to be 2.4413 Å and 390.77 cm-1 respectively. A molecular orbital energy level diagram has been used to aid the assignment of the observed electronic states. This work represents the first experimental investigation of the electronic spectrum of the YP molecule.

  13. Electronic Transitions of Yttrium Monophosphide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Allan S. C.; Li, Biu Wa; Chan, MAN-CHOR

    2015-06-01

    Electronic transition spectrum of the yttrium monophosphide (YP) molecule in the visible region between 715 nm and 880 nm has been recorded using laser ablation/reaction free-jet expansion and laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy. The YP molecule was produced by reacting laser - ablated yttrium atoms with PH3 seeded in argon. Thirteen vibrational bands were analyzed and five electronic transition systems have identified, namely the [12.2] Ω = 3 - X3 Π_2 transition, [13.3] Ω = 3 - X3 Π_2 transition, [13.4] Ω = 3 - X3 Π_2 transition, [13.5] Ω = 3 - X3 Π_2 transition, and [13.4] Ω = 2 - X3 Π_2 transition. Least squares fits of the measured rotational lines yielded molecular constants for the ground and excited states. The ground state symmetry and the bond length r_0 of the YP molecule have been determined to be a X3 Π_2 state and 2.4413 Å respectively in this work. A molecular orbital energy level diagram has been used to help the assignment of the observed electronic states. This work represents the first experimental investigation of the spectrum of the YP molecule.

  14. Optical detection of a single rare-earth ion in a crystal

    PubMed Central

    Kolesov, R.; Xia, K.; Reuter, R.; Stöhr, R.; Zappe, A.; Meijer, J.; Hemmer, P.R.; Wrachtrup, J.

    2012-01-01

    Rare-earth-doped laser materials show strong prospects for quantum information storage and processing, as well as for biological imaging, due to their high-Q 4f↔4f optical transitions. However, the inability to optically detect single rare-earth dopants has prevented these materials from reaching their full potential. Here we detect a single photostable Pr3+ ion in yttrium aluminium garnet nanocrystals with high contrast photon antibunching by using optical upconversion of the excited state population of the 4f↔4f optical transition into ultraviolet fluorescence. We also demonstrate on-demand creation of Pr3+ ions in a bulk yttrium aluminium garnet crystal by patterned ion implantation. Finally, we show generation of local nanophotonic structures and cell death due to photochemical effects caused by upconverted ultraviolet fluorescence of praseodymium-doped yttrium aluminium garnet in the surrounding environment. Our study demonstrates versatile use of rare-earth atomic-size ultraviolet emitters for nanoengineering and biotechnological applications. PMID:22929786

  15. Rare earths, the lanthanides, yttrium and scandium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hedrick, J.B.

    2006-01-01

    In 2005, rare earths were not mined in the United States. The major supplier, Molycorp, continued to maintain a large stockpile of rare-earth concentrates and compounds. Consumption decreased of refined rare-earth products. The United States remained a major importer and exporter of rare earths in 2005. During the same period, yttrium was not mined or refined in the US. Hence, supply of yttrium compounds for refined yttrium products came from China, France and Japan. Scandium was not also mined. World production was primarily in China, Russia and Ukraine. Demand for rare earths in 2006 is expected to be closely tied to economic conditions in the US.

  16. Absolute measurements of fast neutrons using yttrium

    SciTech Connect

    Roshan, M. V.; Springham, S. V.; Rawat, R. S.; Lee, P.; Krishnan, M.

    2010-08-15

    Yttrium is presented as an absolute neutron detector for pulsed neutron sources. It has high sensitivity for detecting fast neutrons. Yttrium has the property of generating a monoenergetic secondary radiation in the form of a 909 keV gamma-ray caused by inelastic neutron interaction. It was calibrated numerically using MCNPX and does not need periodic recalibration. The total yttrium efficiency for detecting 2.45 MeV neutrons was determined to be f{sub n}{approx}4.1x10{sup -4} with an uncertainty of about 0.27%. The yttrium detector was employed in the NX2 plasma focus experiments and showed the neutron yield of the order of 10{sup 8} neutrons per discharge.

  17. Rare earths, the lanthanides, yttrium and scandium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bedinger, G.; Bleiwas, D.

    2012-01-01

    In 2011, rare earths were recovered from bastnasite concentrates at the Mountain Pass Mine in California. Consumption of refined rare-earth products decreased in 2011 from 2010. U.S. rare-earth imports originated primarily from China, with lesser amounts from Austria, Estonia, France and Japan. The United States imported all of its demand for yttrium metal and yttrium compounds, with most of it originating from China. Scandium was imported in various forms and processed domestically.

  18. Aluminium and human breast diseases.

    PubMed

    Darbre, P D; Pugazhendhi, D; Mannello, F

    2011-11-01

    The human breast is exposed to aluminium from many sources including diet and personal care products, but dermal application of aluminium-based antiperspirant salts provides a local long-term source of exposure. Recent measurements have shown that aluminium is present in both tissue and fat of the human breast but at levels which vary both between breasts and between tissue samples from the same breast. We have recently found increased levels of aluminium in noninvasively collected nipple aspirate fluids taken from breast cancer patients (mean 268 ± 28 μg/l) compared with control healthy subjects (mean 131 ± 10 μg/l) providing evidence of raised aluminium levels in the breast microenvironment when cancer is present. The measurement of higher levels of aluminium in type I human breast cyst fluids (median 150 μg/l) compared with human serum (median 6 μg/l) or human milk (median 25 μg/l) warrants further investigation into any possible role of aluminium in development of this benign breast disease. Emerging evidence for aluminium in several breast structures now requires biomarkers of aluminium action in order to ascertain whether the presence of aluminium has any biological impact. To this end, we report raised levels of proteins that modulate iron homeostasis (ferritin, transferrin) in parallel with raised aluminium in nipple aspirate fluids in vivo, and we report overexpression of mRNA for several S100 calcium binding proteins following long-term exposure of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells in vitro to aluminium chlorhydrate.

  19. Aluminium and human breast diseases.

    PubMed

    Darbre, P D; Pugazhendhi, D; Mannello, F

    2011-11-01

    The human breast is exposed to aluminium from many sources including diet and personal care products, but dermal application of aluminium-based antiperspirant salts provides a local long-term source of exposure. Recent measurements have shown that aluminium is present in both tissue and fat of the human breast but at levels which vary both between breasts and between tissue samples from the same breast. We have recently found increased levels of aluminium in noninvasively collected nipple aspirate fluids taken from breast cancer patients (mean 268 ± 28 μg/l) compared with control healthy subjects (mean 131 ± 10 μg/l) providing evidence of raised aluminium levels in the breast microenvironment when cancer is present. The measurement of higher levels of aluminium in type I human breast cyst fluids (median 150 μg/l) compared with human serum (median 6 μg/l) or human milk (median 25 μg/l) warrants further investigation into any possible role of aluminium in development of this benign breast disease. Emerging evidence for aluminium in several breast structures now requires biomarkers of aluminium action in order to ascertain whether the presence of aluminium has any biological impact. To this end, we report raised levels of proteins that modulate iron homeostasis (ferritin, transferrin) in parallel with raised aluminium in nipple aspirate fluids in vivo, and we report overexpression of mRNA for several S100 calcium binding proteins following long-term exposure of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells in vitro to aluminium chlorhydrate. PMID:22099158

  20. Aluminium contents in baked meats wrapped in aluminium foil.

    PubMed

    Turhan, Sadettin

    2006-12-01

    In this investigation, the effect of cooking treatments (60min at 150°C, 40min at 200°C, and 20min at 250°C) on aluminium contents of meats (beef, water buffalo, mutton, chicken and turkey) baked in aluminium foil were evaluated. Cooking increased the aluminium concentration of both the white and red meats. The increase was 89-378% in red meats and 76-215% in poultry. The least increase (76-115%) was observed in the samples baked for 60min at 150°C, while the highest increase (153-378%) was in samples baked for 20min at 250°C. It was determined that the fat content of meat in addition to the cooking process affected the migration of aluminium (r(2)=0.83; P<0.01). It was also found that raw chicken and turkey breast meat contained higher amounts of aluminium than the raw chicken and turkey leg meat, respectively. Regarding the suggested provisional tolerable daily intake of 1mg Al/kg body weight per day of the FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives, there are no evident risks to the health of the consumer from using aluminium foil to cook meats. However, eating meals prepared in aluminium foil may carry a risk to the health by adding to other aluminium sources.

  1. Yttrium hydride nanoantennas for active plasmonics.

    PubMed

    Strohfeldt, Nikolai; Tittl, Andreas; Schäferling, Martin; Neubrech, Frank; Kreibig, Uwe; Griessen, Ronald; Giessen, Harald

    2014-03-12

    A key challenge for the development of active plasmonic nanodevices is the lack of materials with fully controllable plasmonic properties. In this work, we demonstrate that a plasmonic resonance in top-down nanofabricated yttrium antennas can be completely and reversibly turned on and off using hydrogen exposure. We fabricate arrays of yttrium nanorods and optically observe, in extinction spectra, the hydrogen-induced phase transition between the metallic yttrium dihydride and the insulating trihydride. Whereas the yttrium dihydride nanostructures exhibit a pronounced particle plasmon resonance, the transition to yttrium trihydride leads to a complete vanishing of the resonant behavior. The plasmonic resonance in the dihydride state can be tuned over a wide wavelength range by simply varying the size of the nanostructures. Furthermore, we develop an analytical diffusion model to explain the temporal behavior of the hydrogen loading and unloading trajectories observed in our experiments and gain information about the thermodynamics of our device. Thus, our nanorod system serves as a versatile basic building block for active plasmonic devices ranging from switchable perfect absorbers to active local heating control elements.

  2. Aluminium toxicity and iron homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Ward, R J; Zhang, Y; Crichton, R R

    2001-11-01

    In an animal model of aluminum overload, (aluminium gluconate), the increases in tissue aluminium content were paralleled by elevations of tissue iron in the kidney, liver heart and spleen as well as in various brain regions, frontal, temporal and parietal cortex and hippocampus. Despite such increases in iron content there were no significant changes in the activities of a wide range of cytoprotective enzymes apart from an increase in superoxide dismutase in the frontal cortex of the aluminium loaded rats. Such increases in tissue iron content may be attributed to the stabilisation of IRP-2 by aluminium thereby promoting transferrin receptor synthesis while blocking ferritin synthesis. Using the radioactive tracer (26)Al less than 1% of the injected dose was recovered in isolated ferritin, supporting previous studies which also found little evidence for aluminium storage within ferritin. The increases in brain iron may well be contributory to neurodegeneration, although the pathogenesis by which iron exerts such an effect is unclear.

  3. Aluminium, antiperspirants and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Darbre, P D

    2005-09-01

    Aluminium salts are used as the active antiperspirant agent in underarm cosmetics, but the effects of widespread, long term and increasing use remain unknown, especially in relation to the breast, which is a local area of application. Clinical studies showing a disproportionately high incidence of breast cancer in the upper outer quadrant of the breast together with reports of genomic instability in outer quadrants of the breast provide supporting evidence for a role for locally applied cosmetic chemicals in the development of breast cancer. Aluminium is known to have a genotoxic profile, capable of causing both DNA alterations and epigenetic effects, and this would be consistent with a potential role in breast cancer if such effects occurred in breast cells. Oestrogen is a well established influence in breast cancer and its action, dependent on intracellular receptors which function as ligand-activated zinc finger transcription factors, suggests one possible point of interference from aluminium. Results reported here demonstrate that aluminium in the form of aluminium chloride or aluminium chlorhydrate can interfere with the function of oestrogen receptors of MCF7 human breast cancer cells both in terms of ligand binding and in terms of oestrogen-regulated reporter gene expression. This adds aluminium to the increasing list of metals capable of interfering with oestrogen action and termed metalloestrogens. Further studies are now needed to identify the molecular basis of this action, the longer term effects of aluminium exposure and whether aluminium can cause aberrations to other signalling pathways in breast cells. Given the wide exposure of the human population to antiperspirants, it will be important to establish dermal absorption in the local area of the breast and whether long term low level absorption could play a role in the increasing incidence of breast cancer. PMID:16045991

  4. Aluminium, antiperspirants and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Darbre, P D

    2005-09-01

    Aluminium salts are used as the active antiperspirant agent in underarm cosmetics, but the effects of widespread, long term and increasing use remain unknown, especially in relation to the breast, which is a local area of application. Clinical studies showing a disproportionately high incidence of breast cancer in the upper outer quadrant of the breast together with reports of genomic instability in outer quadrants of the breast provide supporting evidence for a role for locally applied cosmetic chemicals in the development of breast cancer. Aluminium is known to have a genotoxic profile, capable of causing both DNA alterations and epigenetic effects, and this would be consistent with a potential role in breast cancer if such effects occurred in breast cells. Oestrogen is a well established influence in breast cancer and its action, dependent on intracellular receptors which function as ligand-activated zinc finger transcription factors, suggests one possible point of interference from aluminium. Results reported here demonstrate that aluminium in the form of aluminium chloride or aluminium chlorhydrate can interfere with the function of oestrogen receptors of MCF7 human breast cancer cells both in terms of ligand binding and in terms of oestrogen-regulated reporter gene expression. This adds aluminium to the increasing list of metals capable of interfering with oestrogen action and termed metalloestrogens. Further studies are now needed to identify the molecular basis of this action, the longer term effects of aluminium exposure and whether aluminium can cause aberrations to other signalling pathways in breast cells. Given the wide exposure of the human population to antiperspirants, it will be important to establish dermal absorption in the local area of the breast and whether long term low level absorption could play a role in the increasing incidence of breast cancer.

  5. The toxicity of aluminium in humans.

    PubMed

    Exley, C

    2016-06-01

    We are living in the 'aluminium age'. Human exposure to aluminium is inevitable and, perhaps, inestimable. Aluminium's free metal cation, Alaq(3+), is highly biologically reactive and biologically available aluminium is non-essential and essentially toxic. Biologically reactive aluminium is present throughout the human body and while, rarely, it can be acutely toxic, much less is understood about chronic aluminium intoxication. Herein the question is asked as to how to diagnose aluminium toxicity in an individual. While there are as yet, no unequivocal answers to this problem, there are procedures to follow to ascertain the nature of human exposure to aluminium. It is also important to recognise critical factors in exposure regimes and specifically that not all forms of aluminium are toxicologically equivalent and not all routes of exposure are equivalent in their delivery of aluminium to target sites. To ascertain if Alzheimer's disease is a symptom of chronic aluminium intoxication over decades or breast cancer is aggravated by the topical application of an aluminium salt or if autism could result from an immune cascade initiated by an aluminium adjuvant requires that each of these is considered independently and in the light of the most up to date scientific evidence. The aluminium age has taught us that there are no inevitabilities where chronic aluminium toxicity is concerned though there are clear possibilities and these require proving or discounting but not simply ignored. PMID:26922890

  6. The toxicity of aluminium in humans.

    PubMed

    Exley, C

    2016-06-01

    We are living in the 'aluminium age'. Human exposure to aluminium is inevitable and, perhaps, inestimable. Aluminium's free metal cation, Alaq(3+), is highly biologically reactive and biologically available aluminium is non-essential and essentially toxic. Biologically reactive aluminium is present throughout the human body and while, rarely, it can be acutely toxic, much less is understood about chronic aluminium intoxication. Herein the question is asked as to how to diagnose aluminium toxicity in an individual. While there are as yet, no unequivocal answers to this problem, there are procedures to follow to ascertain the nature of human exposure to aluminium. It is also important to recognise critical factors in exposure regimes and specifically that not all forms of aluminium are toxicologically equivalent and not all routes of exposure are equivalent in their delivery of aluminium to target sites. To ascertain if Alzheimer's disease is a symptom of chronic aluminium intoxication over decades or breast cancer is aggravated by the topical application of an aluminium salt or if autism could result from an immune cascade initiated by an aluminium adjuvant requires that each of these is considered independently and in the light of the most up to date scientific evidence. The aluminium age has taught us that there are no inevitabilities where chronic aluminium toxicity is concerned though there are clear possibilities and these require proving or discounting but not simply ignored.

  7. Astatine and Yttrium Resonant Ionization Laser Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teigelhoefer, Andrea

    Providing intense, contamination-free beams of rare isotopes to experiments is a challenging task. At isotope separator on-line facilities such as ISAC at TRIUMF, the choice of production target and ion source are key to the successful beam delivery. Due to their element-selectivity, high efficiency and versatility, resonant ionization laser ion sources (RILIS) gain increasingly in importance. The spectroscopic data available are typically incomplete in the region of excited- and autoionizing atomic states. In order to find the most efficient ionization scheme for a particular element, further spectroscopy is often required. The development of efficient laser resonant ionization schemes for yttrium and astatine is presented in this thesis. For yttrium, two ionization schemes with comparable relative intensities were found. Since for astatine, only two transitions were known, the focus was to provide data on atomic energy levels using resonance ionization spectroscopy. Altogether 41 previously unknown astatine energy levels were found.

  8. High temperature fracture toughness of single crystal yttrium-aluminium garnet

    SciTech Connect

    Blumenthal, W.R.; Taylor, S.T.

    1997-07-01

    Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12} (YAG) is the most creep-resistant single crystal oxide known and is therefore an attractive candidate for very high temperature applications. The fracture toughness, K{sub 1c}, was measured as a function of temperature using the single edge precracked beam (SEPB) method and was compared to notched beam method results in the literature. The fracture toughness of annealed SEPB specimens was found to be independent of both temperature from 20 C to at least 1,700 C and loading rate over two orders of magnitude. Thus the brittle-to-ductile transition does not occur before 1,700 C. Previous reports of remarkable increases in the fracture toughness below 1,700 C using notched beam methods are considered erroneous due to microcrack healing and crack blunting effects. The SEPB fracture toughness method avoids these problems since a long, sharp crack exists in the specimen prior to testing and can be effectively preserved at high temperatures using a preloading procedure.

  9. Pulmonary Fibrosis in an Aluminium Worker

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, John

    1959-01-01

    Aluminium dust has never been shown to be harmful to man in Great Britain. This paper reports a fatal case of progressive pulmonary fibrosis in a young man occupationally exposed to a heavy concentration of fine aluminium dust. Clinically, radiologically, and pathologically this case was indistinguishable from cases of aluminium fibrosis of the lung described by Shaver in Canada. Images PMID:13651554

  10. The prophylactic reduction of aluminium intake.

    PubMed

    Lione, A

    1983-02-01

    The use of modern analytical methods has demonstrated that aluminium salts can be absorbed from the gut and concentrated in various human tissues, including bone, the parathyroids and brain. The neurotoxicity of aluminium has been extensively characterized in rabbits and cats, and high concentrations of aluminium have been detected in the brain tissue of patients with Alzheimer's disease. Various reports have suggested that high aluminium intakes may be harmful to some patients with bone disease or renal impairment. Fatal aluminium-induced neuropathies have been reported in patients on renal dialysis. Since there are no demonstrable consequences of aluminium deprivation, the prophylactic reduction of aluminium intake by many patients would appear prudent. In this report, the major sources of aluminium in foods and non-prescription drugs are summarized and alternative products are described. The most common foods that contain substantial amounts of aluminium-containing additives include some processed cheeses, baking powders, cake mixes, frozen doughs, pancake mixes, self-raising flours and pickled vegetables. The aluminium-containing non-prescription drugs include some antacids, buffered aspirins, antidiarrhoeal products, douches and haemorrhoidal medications. The advisability of recommending a low aluminium diet for geriatric patients is discussed in detail. PMID:6337934

  11. Occupational asthma caused by aluminium welding.

    PubMed

    Vandenplas, O; Delwiche, J P; Vanbilsen, M L; Joly, J; Roosels, D

    1998-05-01

    Work-related asthma has been documented in workers employed in the primary aluminium industry and in the production of aluminium salts. The role of aluminium in the development of occupational asthma has, however, never been convincingly substantiated. We investigated a subject who experienced asthmatic reactions related to manual metal arc welding on aluminium. Challenge exposure to aluminium welding with flux-coated electrodes, as well as with electrodes without flux, elicited marked asthmatic reactions. Manual metal arc welding on mild steel did not cause significant bronchial response. The results of inhalation challenges combined with exposure assessments provided evidence that aluminium can cause asthmatic reactions in the absence of fluorides. Awareness of this possibility may be relevant to the investigation of asthma in workers exposed to aluminium. PMID:9648975

  12. Recovery of aluminium, nickel-copper alloys and salts from spent fluorescent lamps.

    PubMed

    Rabah, Mahmoud A

    2004-01-01

    This study explores a combined pyro-hydrometallurgical method to recover pure aluminium, nickel-copper alloy(s), and some valuable salts from spent fluorescent lamps (SFLs). It also examines the safe recycling of clean glass tubes for the fluorescent lamp industry. Spent lamps were decapped under water containing 35% acetone to achieve safe capture of mercury vapour. Cleaned glass tubes, if broken, were cut using a rotating diamond disc to a standard shorter length. Aluminium and copper-nickel alloys in the separated metallic parts were recovered using suitable flux to decrease metal losses going to slag. Operation variables affecting the quality of the products and the extent of recovery with the suggested method were investigated. Results revealed that total loss in the glass tube recycling operation was 2% of the SFLs. Pure aluminium meeting standard specification DIN 1712 was recovered by melting at 800 degrees C under sodium chloride/carbon flux for 20 min. Standard nickel-copper alloys with less than 0.1% tin were prepared by melting at 1250 degrees C using a sodium borate/carbon flux. De-tinning of the molten nickel-copper alloy was carried out using oxygen gas. Tin in the slag as oxide was recovered by reduction using carbon or hydrogen gas at 650-700 degrees C. Different valuable chloride salts were also obtained in good quality. Further research is recommended on the thermodynamics of nickel-copper recovery, yttrium and europium recovery, and process economics.

  13. Recovery of aluminium, nickel-copper alloys and salts from spent fluorescent lamps

    SciTech Connect

    Rabah, Mahmoud A

    2004-07-01

    This study explores a combined pyro-hydrometallurgical method to recover pure aluminium, nickel-copper alloy(s), and some valuable salts from spent fluorescent lamps (SFLs). It also examines the safe recycling of clean glass tubes for the fluorescent lamp industry. Spent lamps were decapped under water containing 35% acetone to achieve safe capture of mercury vapour. Cleaned glass tubes, if broken, were cut using a rotating diamond disc to a standard shorter length. Aluminium and copper-nickel alloys in the separated metallic parts were recovered using suitable flux to decrease metal losses going to slag. Operation variables affecting the quality of the products and the extent of recovery with the suggested method were investigated. Results revealed that total loss in the glass tube recycling operation was 2% of the SFLs. Pure aluminium meeting standard specification DIN 1712 was recovered by melting at 800 deg. C under sodium chloride/carbon flux for 20 min. Standard nickel-copper alloys with less than 0.1% tin were prepared by melting at 1250 deg. C using a sodium borate/carbon flux. De-tinning of the molten nickel-copper alloy was carried out using oxygen gas. Tin in the slag as oxide was recovered by reduction using carbon or hydrogen gas at 650-700 deg. C. Different valuable chloride salts were also obtained in good quality. Further research is recommended on the thermodynamics of nickel-copper recovery, yttrium and europium recovery, and process economics.

  14. Recovery of aluminium, nickel-copper alloys and salts from spent fluorescent lamps.

    PubMed

    Rabah, Mahmoud A

    2004-01-01

    This study explores a combined pyro-hydrometallurgical method to recover pure aluminium, nickel-copper alloy(s), and some valuable salts from spent fluorescent lamps (SFLs). It also examines the safe recycling of clean glass tubes for the fluorescent lamp industry. Spent lamps were decapped under water containing 35% acetone to achieve safe capture of mercury vapour. Cleaned glass tubes, if broken, were cut using a rotating diamond disc to a standard shorter length. Aluminium and copper-nickel alloys in the separated metallic parts were recovered using suitable flux to decrease metal losses going to slag. Operation variables affecting the quality of the products and the extent of recovery with the suggested method were investigated. Results revealed that total loss in the glass tube recycling operation was 2% of the SFLs. Pure aluminium meeting standard specification DIN 1712 was recovered by melting at 800 degrees C under sodium chloride/carbon flux for 20 min. Standard nickel-copper alloys with less than 0.1% tin were prepared by melting at 1250 degrees C using a sodium borate/carbon flux. De-tinning of the molten nickel-copper alloy was carried out using oxygen gas. Tin in the slag as oxide was recovered by reduction using carbon or hydrogen gas at 650-700 degrees C. Different valuable chloride salts were also obtained in good quality. Further research is recommended on the thermodynamics of nickel-copper recovery, yttrium and europium recovery, and process economics. PMID:14761750

  15. Aluminium toxicity in chronic renal insufficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Savory, J.; Bertholf, R.L.; Wills, M.R.

    1985-08-01

    Aluminium is a ubiquitous element in the environment and has been demonstrated to be toxic, especially in individuals with impaired renal function. Not much is known about the biochemistry of aluminium and the mechanisms of its toxic effects. Most of the interest in aluminium has been in the clinical setting of the hemodialysis unit. Here aluminium toxicity occurs due to contamination of dialysis solutions, and treatment of the patients with aluminium-containing phosphate binding gels. Aluminium has been shown to be the major contributor to the dialysis encephalopathy syndrome and an osteomalacic component of dialysis osteodystrophy. Other clinical disturbances associated with aluminium toxicity are a microcytic anemia and metastatic extraskeletal calcification. Aluminium overload can be treated effectively by chelation therapy with desferrioxamine and hemodialysis. Aluminium is readily transferred from the dialysate to the patient's -bloodstream during hemodialysis. Once transferred, the aluminium is tightly bound to non-dialysable plasma constituents. Very low concentrations of dialysate aluminium in the range of 10-15 micrograms/l are recommended to guard against toxic effects. Very few studies have been directed towards the separation of the various plasma species which bind eluminium. Gel filtration chromatography has been used to identify five major fractions, one of which is of low molecular weight and the others appear to be protein-aluminium complexes. Recommendations on aluminium monitoring have been published and provide safe and toxic concentrations. Also, the frequency of monitoring has been addressed. Major problems exist with the analytical methods for measuring aluminium which result from inaccurate techniques and contamination difficulties. 136 references.

  16. Terbium photoluminescence in yttrium aluminum garnet xerogels

    SciTech Connect

    Maliarevich, G. K.; Gaponenko, N. V. Mudryi, A. V.; Drozdov, Yu. N.; Stepikhova, M. V.; Stepanova, E. A.

    2009-02-15

    Based on a colloidal solution containing terbium, yttrium, and aluminum metal ions, a powder was synthesized and films of terbium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet Tb{sub 0.15}Y{sub 2.85}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12} were grown on single-crystal silicon and porous anodic alumina. Annealing of the sample in a temperature range from 200-1100 deg. C results in an increase in the photoluminescence intensity in the wavelength range from 480-640 nm, which is caused by Tb{sup 3+} ion intra-atomic transitions {sup 5}D{sub 4}{sup {yields}}{sup 7}F{sub j} (j = 3, 4, 5, 6). Annealing at 900 deg. C and higher temperatures gives rise to low-intensity photoluminescence bands in the region of 667 and 681 nm, which correspond to transitions {sup 5}D{sub 4}{sup {yields}}{sup 7}F{sub 0}, {sup 5}D{sub 4}{sup {yields}}{sup 7}F{sub 1}, and room-temperature Stark term splitting, which suggests the existence of a crystalline environment of Tb{sup 3+} ions. The FWHM of spectral lines in the region of 543 nm decreases from {approx}10 to {approx}(2-3) nm as the xerogel annealing temperature is increased from 700 to 900 deg. C and higher. Three bands with maxima at 280, 330, and 376 nm, which correspond to Tb{sup 3+} ion transitions {sup 7}F{sub 6}{sup {yields}}{sup 5}I{sub 8}, {sup 5}L{sub 6}, {sup 5}G{sub 6}, {sup 5}D{sub 3}, are observed in the photoluminescence excitation spectra of the studied structures for the emission wavelength at 543 nm. X-ray diffraction detected the formation of a crystalline phase for a terbium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet powder after annealing at 1100 deg. C.

  17. Unconventional Superfluidity in Yttrium Iron Garnet Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Chen; Nattermann, Thomas; Pokrovsky, Valery L.

    2016-06-01

    We argue that the magnon condensate in yttrium iron garnet may display experimentally observable superfluidity at room temperature despite the 100 times dominance of the normal density over superfluid ones. The superfluidity has a more complicated nature than in known superfluids since the U(1) symmetry of the global phase shift is violated by the dipolar interaction leading to the exchange of spin moment between the condensate and the crystal lattice. It produces periodic inhomogeneity in the stationary superfluid flow. We discuss the manner of observation and possible applications of magnon superfluidity. It may strongly enhance the spin-torque effects and reduce the energy consumption of the magnonic devices.

  18. Unconventional Superfluidity in Yttrium Iron Garnet Films.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chen; Nattermann, Thomas; Pokrovsky, Valery L

    2016-06-24

    We argue that the magnon condensate in yttrium iron garnet may display experimentally observable superfluidity at room temperature despite the 100 times dominance of the normal density over superfluid ones. The superfluidity has a more complicated nature than in known superfluids since the U(1) symmetry of the global phase shift is violated by the dipolar interaction leading to the exchange of spin moment between the condensate and the crystal lattice. It produces periodic inhomogeneity in the stationary superfluid flow. We discuss the manner of observation and possible applications of magnon superfluidity. It may strongly enhance the spin-torque effects and reduce the energy consumption of the magnonic devices. PMID:27391750

  19. Safety of knee radiosynovectomy with yttrium - 90

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempińska, M.; Lass, P.; Ćwikła, J. B.; Żbikowski, P.

    2011-09-01

    Radioisotope knee synovectomy is based on an Yttrium - 90 citrate injection (185 - 222 MBq) into the knee joint cavity. The performance of procedure needs participation of a nuclear medicine specialist as well as an orthopedist or a rheumatologist and a technologist, who prepares radiopharmaceuticals. The ionization doses for patients and personnel depend not only on the injected activity, but also on the method and process of injection and the radioactivity measurement procedure used. The aim of this study is the evaluation of the degree of radiation exposure of patients and medical personnel during the performance of therapy with 90Y.

  20. Bumblebee Pupae Contain High Levels of Aluminium

    PubMed Central

    Exley, Christopher; Rotheray, Ellen; Goulson, David

    2015-01-01

    The causes of declines in bees and other pollinators remains an on-going debate. While recent attention has focussed upon pesticides, other environmental pollutants have largely been ignored. Aluminium is the most significant environmental contaminant of recent times and we speculated that it could be a factor in pollinator decline. Herein we have measured the content of aluminium in bumblebee pupae taken from naturally foraging colonies in the UK. Individual pupae were acid-digested in a microwave oven and their aluminium content determined using transversely heated graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. Pupae were heavily contaminated with aluminium giving values between 13.4 and 193.4 μg/g dry wt. and a mean (SD) value of 51.0 (33.0) μg/g dry wt. for the 72 pupae tested. Mean aluminium content was shown to be a significant negative predictor of average pupal weight in colonies. While no other statistically significant relationships were found relating aluminium to bee or colony health, the actual content of aluminium in pupae are extremely high and demonstrate significant exposure to aluminium. Bees rely heavily on cognitive function and aluminium is a known neurotoxin with links, for example, to Alzheimer’s disease in humans. The significant contamination of bumblebee pupae by aluminium raises the intriguing spectre of cognitive dysfunction playing a role in their population decline. PMID:26042788

  1. Bumblebee pupae contain high levels of aluminium.

    PubMed

    Exley, Christopher; Rotheray, Ellen; Goulson, David

    2015-01-01

    The causes of declines in bees and other pollinators remains an on-going debate. While recent attention has focussed upon pesticides, other environmental pollutants have largely been ignored. Aluminium is the most significant environmental contaminant of recent times and we speculated that it could be a factor in pollinator decline. Herein we have measured the content of aluminium in bumblebee pupae taken from naturally foraging colonies in the UK. Individual pupae were acid-digested in a microwave oven and their aluminium content determined using transversely heated graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. Pupae were heavily contaminated with aluminium giving values between 13.4 and 193.4 μg/g dry wt. and a mean (SD) value of 51.0 (33.0) μg/g dry wt. for the 72 pupae tested. Mean aluminium content was shown to be a significant negative predictor of average pupal weight in colonies. While no other statistically significant relationships were found relating aluminium to bee or colony health, the actual content of aluminium in pupae are extremely high and demonstrate significant exposure to aluminium. Bees rely heavily on cognitive function and aluminium is a known neurotoxin with links, for example, to Alzheimer's disease in humans. The significant contamination of bumblebee pupae by aluminium raises the intriguing spectre of cognitive dysfunction playing a role in their population decline.

  2. Bumblebee pupae contain high levels of aluminium.

    PubMed

    Exley, Christopher; Rotheray, Ellen; Goulson, David

    2015-01-01

    The causes of declines in bees and other pollinators remains an on-going debate. While recent attention has focussed upon pesticides, other environmental pollutants have largely been ignored. Aluminium is the most significant environmental contaminant of recent times and we speculated that it could be a factor in pollinator decline. Herein we have measured the content of aluminium in bumblebee pupae taken from naturally foraging colonies in the UK. Individual pupae were acid-digested in a microwave oven and their aluminium content determined using transversely heated graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. Pupae were heavily contaminated with aluminium giving values between 13.4 and 193.4 μg/g dry wt. and a mean (SD) value of 51.0 (33.0) μg/g dry wt. for the 72 pupae tested. Mean aluminium content was shown to be a significant negative predictor of average pupal weight in colonies. While no other statistically significant relationships were found relating aluminium to bee or colony health, the actual content of aluminium in pupae are extremely high and demonstrate significant exposure to aluminium. Bees rely heavily on cognitive function and aluminium is a known neurotoxin with links, for example, to Alzheimer's disease in humans. The significant contamination of bumblebee pupae by aluminium raises the intriguing spectre of cognitive dysfunction playing a role in their population decline. PMID:26042788

  3. Why are the Tcs so high in rare-earth doped CaFe2As2 single crystals and ultrathin FeSe epi-films?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, C. W.

    2015-03-01

    Recent reports of non-bulk superconductivity with unexpectedly high onset-Tcs up to 49 K in the Pr-doped CaFe2As2 [(Ca,Pr)122] single crystals and up to 100 K in one-unit-cell (1UC) FeSe epi-films, respectively, offer an unusual opportunity to seek an answer to the question posed in the title. Through systematic compositional, structural, resistive, and magnetic investigations on (Ca,R)122 single crystals with R = La, Ce, Pr, and Nd, we have observed a doping-level-independent Tc, a large magnetic anisotropy, and the existence of mesoscopic-2D structures in these crystals, thus providing evidence consistent with the proposed interface-enhanced Tc in these naturally assembled Fe-based superconductors. Similar resistive and magnetic measurements were also made on the 1-4UC FeSe ultra thin epi-films. We have detected a Meissner state below 1 Oe with extensive weak-links up to ~ 20 K, unconnected small superconducting patches up to ~ 40 K, and an unusual dispersion of diamagnetic moment with frequency up to 80 K. The unusual frequency dependences of the diamagnetic moment observed in the films at different temperature ranges suggest that collective excitations of electron and/or spin nature may exist in the FeSe films below 20 K and 40-80 K. The experimental results will be presented and the implications discussed. Collaborators: Liangzi Deng, Bing Lv, Fengyan Wei, and Yu-Yi Xue, University of Houston; Li-Li Wang, Xu-Cun Ma, and Qi-Kun Xue, Tsinghua University, Beijing.

  4. Near-infrared (1550 nm) in vivo bioimaging based on rare-earth doped ceramic nanophosphors modified with PEG-b-poly(4-vinylbenzylphosphonate).

    PubMed

    Kamimura, Masao; Kanayama, Naoki; Tokuzen, Kimikazu; Soga, Kohei; Nagasaki, Yukio

    2011-09-01

    A novel poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-based block copolymer possessing a 4-vinylbenzylphosphonate repeating unit in another segment (PEG-block-poly(4-vinylbenzylphosphonate)) (PEG-b-PVBP) was designed and successfully synthesized. As a control, an end-functionalized PEG possessing a mono-phosphonate group (PEG-PO(3)H(2)) was also synthesized. The surface of near-infrared (NIR) phosphors (i.e., ytterbium (Yb) and erbium (Er) ion-codoped Y(2)O(3) nanoparticles (YNPs)) were modified with PEG-b-PVBP (PEG-YNP(b)s) and PEG-PO(3)H(2) (PEG-YNP(1)s). The adsorption of PEG-b-PVBP and PEG-PO(3)H(2) was estimated by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) measurements and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). The physicochemical characteristics of the obtained YNP samples were analyzed by ζ-potential and dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurements. The ζ-potentials of YNPs modified by these polymers were close to zero, indicating the effective coverage of the YNP surface by our new PEG derivatives. However, the dispersion stability of the PEGylated YNPs was strongly affected by the structure of the PEG terminus. The average diameter of the PEG-YNP(1)s increased, and aggregates precipitated after less than 1 h in phosphate buffer saline (PBS). In contrast, the size did not change at all in the case of PEG-YNP(b)s and the dispersion in PBS was stable for over 1 week. PEG-YNP(b)s also showed high erosion resistance under acidic conditions. The multiple coordinated PVBP segment of the block copolymer on the YNP surface plays a substantial role in improving such dispersion stability. The excellent dispersion stability and strong NIR luminescence of the obtained PEG-YNP(b)s were also confirmed in fetal bovine serum (FBS) solution over 1 week. Furthermore, in vivo NIR imaging of live mice was performed, and the 1550 nm NIR emission of PEG-YNP(b)s from the organ of live mice was confirmed without dissection.

  5. Photoluminescence properties of rare-earth-doped (Er³⁺,Yb³⁺) Y₂O₃ nanophosphors by a combustion synthesis method.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Manmeet; Bisen, D P; Brahme, N; Singh, Prabhjot; Sahu, I P

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we report the synthesis of Y2O3:Er(3+), Y2O3:Yb(3+) and Y2O3:Er(3+),Yb(3+) nanophosphors by the combustion synthesis method using urea as fuel. The doping agents were incorporated in the form of erbium nitrate and ytterbium nitrate. X-Ray diffraction (XRD) patterns revealed that the synthesized particles have a body-centered cubic structure with space group Ia-3. The photoluminescence (PL) properties were investigated after UV and infrared irradiation at room temperature. A strong characteristic emission of Er(3+) and Yb(3+) ions was identified, and the influence of doping concentration on the PL properties was systematically studied. Energy transfer from Yb(3+) to Er(3+) ions was observed in Y2O3 nanophosphors. The obtained result may be useful in potential applications such as bioimaging.

  6. Role of electron-electron interactions in the charge dynamics of rare-earth-doped CaF e2A s2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Zhen; Huffman, T. J.; Xu, Peng; Hollingshad, A. J.; Brooker, D. J.; Penthorn, N. E.; Qazilbash, M. M.; Saha, S. R.; Drye, T.; Roncaioli, C.; Paglione, J.

    2016-08-01

    We have investigated the charge dynamics and the nature of many-body interactions in La- and Pr- doped CaF e2A s2 . From the infrared part of the optical conductivity, we discover that the scattering rate of mobile carriers above 200 K exhibits saturation at the Mott-Ioffe-Regel limit of metallic transport. However, the dc resistivity continues to increase with temperature above 200 K due to the loss of Drude spectral weight. The loss of Drude spectral weight with increasing temperature is seen in a wide temperature range in the uncollapsed tetragonal phase, and this spectral weight is recovered at energy scales about one order of magnitude larger than the Fermi energy scale in these semimetals. The phenomena noted above have been observed previously in other correlated metals in which the dominant interactions are electronic in origin. Further evidence of significant electron-electron interactions is obtained from the presence of quadratic temperature and frequency-dependent terms in the scattering rate at low temperatures and frequencies in the uncollapsed tetragonal structures of La-doped and Pr-doped CaF e2A s2 . For temperatures below the structure collapse transition in Pr-doped CaF e2A s2 at ˜70 K , the scattering rate decreases due to weakening of electronic correlations, and the Drude spectral weight decreases due to modification of the low-energy electronic structure.

  7. Synthesis and characterization of rare-earth doped SrBi{sub 2}Nb{sub 2}O{sub 9} phase in lithium borate based nanocrystallized glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Harihara Venkataraman, B.; Fujiwara, Takumi; Komatsu, Takayuki

    2009-06-15

    Glass composites comprising of un-doped and samarium-doped SrBi{sub 2}Nb{sub 2}O{sub 9} nanocrystallites are fabricated in the glass system 16.66SrO-16.66[(1-x)Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3}-xSm{sub 2}O{sub 3}]-16.66Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}-50Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7} (0<=x<=0.5, in mol%) via the melt quenching technique. The glassy nature of the as-quenched samples is established by differential thermal analyses. Transmission electron microscopic studies reveal the presence of about 15 nm sized spherical crystallites of the fluorite-like SrBi{sub 1.9}Sm{sub 0.1}Nb{sub 2}O{sub 9} phase in the samples heat treated at 530 deg. C. The formation of layered perovskite-type un-doped and samarium-doped SrBi{sub 2}Nb{sub 2}O{sub 9} nanocrystallites with an orthorhombic structure through the intermediate fluorite phase is confirmed by X-ray powder diffraction and micro-Raman spectroscopic studies. The influence of samarium doping on the lattice parameters, lattice distortions, and the Raman peak positions of SrBi{sub 2}Nb{sub 2}O{sub 9} perovskite phase is clarified. The dielectric constants of the perovskite SrBi{sub 2}Nb{sub 2}O{sub 9} and SrBi{sub 1.9}Sm{sub 0.1}Nb{sub 2}O{sub 9} nanocrystals are relatively larger than those of the corresponding fluorite-like phase and the precursor glass. - Graphical Abstract: This figure shows the XRD patterns at room temperature for the as-quenched and heat treated samples in Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3}-doped (x=0.1) glass. Based on these results, it is concluded that the formation of samarium-doped perovskite SBN phase takes place via an intermediate fluorite-like phase in the crystallization of this glass.

  8. Stabilisation of Fe2O3-rich Perovskite Nanophase in Epitaxial Rare-earth Doped BiFeO3 Films

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Huairuo; Reaney, Ian M.; Marincel, Daniel M.; Trolier-McKinstry, Susan; Ramasse, Quentin M.; MacLaren, Ian; Findlay, Scott D.; Fraleigh, Robert D.; Ross, Ian M.; Hu, Shunbo; Ren, Wei; Mark Rainforth, W.

    2015-01-01

    Researchers have demonstrated that BiFeO3 exhibits ferroelectric hysteresis but none have shown a strong ferromagnetic response in either bulk or thin film without significant structural or compositional modification. When remanent magnetisations are observed in BiFeO3 based thin films, iron oxide second phases are often detected. Using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy, atomic resolution electron energy loss spectrum-mapping and quantitative energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis, we reveal the existence of a new Fe2O3-rich perovskite nanophase, with an approximate formula (Fe0.6Bi0.25Nd0.15)3+ Fe3+O3, formed within epitaxial Ti and Nd doped BiFeO3 perovskite films grown by pulsed laser deposition. The incorporation of Nd and Bi ions on the A-site and coherent growth with the matrix stabilise the Fe2O3-rich perovskite phase and preliminary density functional theory calculations suggest that it should have a ferrimagnetic response. Perovskite-structured Fe2O3 has been reported previously but never conclusively proven when fabricated at high-pressure high-temperature. This work suggests the incorporation of large A-site species may help stabilise perovskite-structured Fe2O3. This finding is therefore significant not only to the thin film but also to the high-pressure community. PMID:26272264

  9. Stabilisation of Fe2O3-rich Perovskite Nanophase in Epitaxial Rare-earth Doped BiFeO3 Films.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huairuo; Reaney, Ian M; Marincel, Daniel M; Trolier-McKinstry, Susan; Ramasse, Quentin M; MacLaren, Ian; Findlay, Scott D; Fraleigh, Robert D; Ross, Ian M; Hu, Shunbo; Ren, Wei; Rainforth, W Mark

    2015-08-14

    Researchers have demonstrated that BiFeO3 exhibits ferroelectric hysteresis but none have shown a strong ferromagnetic response in either bulk or thin film without significant structural or compositional modification. When remanent magnetisations are observed in BiFeO3 based thin films, iron oxide second phases are often detected. Using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy, atomic resolution electron energy loss spectrum-mapping and quantitative energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis, we reveal the existence of a new Fe2O3-rich perovskite nanophase, with an approximate formula (Fe0.6Bi0.25Nd0.15)(3+) Fe(3+)O3, formed within epitaxial Ti and Nd doped BiFeO3 perovskite films grown by pulsed laser deposition. The incorporation of Nd and Bi ions on the A-site and coherent growth with the matrix stabilise the Fe2O3-rich perovskite phase and preliminary density functional theory calculations suggest that it should have a ferrimagnetic response. Perovskite-structured Fe2O3 has been reported previously but never conclusively proven when fabricated at high-pressure high-temperature. This work suggests the incorporation of large A-site species may help stabilise perovskite-structured Fe2O3. This finding is therefore significant not only to the thin film but also to the high-pressure community.

  10. Linear and nonlinear optical properties of rare earth doped of Ba0.7Sr0.3TiO3 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reshmi, R.; Sreeja, R.; Jayaraj, M. K.; James, J.; Sebastian, M. T.

    2009-08-01

    Ba0.7Sr0.3TiO3:Eu ferroelectric films were deposited on quartz substrates by pulsed laser deposition. The linear absorption coefficient and the linear refractive index calculated from the transmission spectrum at 532 nm were found to be 1.67×104 cm-1 and 1.82 respectively. The room temperature photoluminescence shows the characteristic emission of Eu3+ ions. The nonlinear optical properties of the film were investigated by a single beam Z-scan setup. The negative nonlinear refractive index and two photon absorption coefficient was found to be -1.508×10-6 m2/GW and 240 m/GW respectively. The real and imaginary part of the third order susceptibility of the thin films is 2.58×10-17 m2/V2 and 1.16×10-16 m2/V2 respectively. The BST:Eu thin films show good optical limiting property.

  11. Stabilisation of Fe2O3-rich Perovskite Nanophase in Epitaxial Rare-earth Doped BiFeO3 Films.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huairuo; Reaney, Ian M; Marincel, Daniel M; Trolier-McKinstry, Susan; Ramasse, Quentin M; MacLaren, Ian; Findlay, Scott D; Fraleigh, Robert D; Ross, Ian M; Hu, Shunbo; Ren, Wei; Rainforth, W Mark

    2015-01-01

    Researchers have demonstrated that BiFeO3 exhibits ferroelectric hysteresis but none have shown a strong ferromagnetic response in either bulk or thin film without significant structural or compositional modification. When remanent magnetisations are observed in BiFeO3 based thin films, iron oxide second phases are often detected. Using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy, atomic resolution electron energy loss spectrum-mapping and quantitative energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis, we reveal the existence of a new Fe2O3-rich perovskite nanophase, with an approximate formula (Fe0.6Bi0.25Nd0.15)(3+) Fe(3+)O3, formed within epitaxial Ti and Nd doped BiFeO3 perovskite films grown by pulsed laser deposition. The incorporation of Nd and Bi ions on the A-site and coherent growth with the matrix stabilise the Fe2O3-rich perovskite phase and preliminary density functional theory calculations suggest that it should have a ferrimagnetic response. Perovskite-structured Fe2O3 has been reported previously but never conclusively proven when fabricated at high-pressure high-temperature. This work suggests the incorporation of large A-site species may help stabilise perovskite-structured Fe2O3. This finding is therefore significant not only to the thin film but also to the high-pressure community. PMID:26272264

  12. Multimodal bioimaging using rare earth doped Gd2O2S: Yb/Er phosphor with upconversion luminescence and magnetic resonance properties.

    PubMed

    Ajithkumar, G; Yoo, Benjamin; Goral, Dara E; Hornsby, Peter J; Lin, Ai-Ling; Ladiwala, Uma; Dravid, Vinayak P; Sardar, Dhiraj K

    2013-03-21

    While infrared upconversion imaging using halide nanoparticles are so common the search for a very efficient halide free upconverting phosphors is still lacking. In this article we report Gd2O2S:Yb/Er,YbHo,YbTm systems as a very efficient alternative phosphors that show upconversion efficiency comparable or even higher than existing halide phosphors. While the majority of rare earth dopants provide the necessary features for optical imaging, the paramagnetic Gd ion also contributes to the magnetic imaging,thereby resulting in a system with bimodal imaging features. Results from imaging of the nanoparticles together with aggregates of cultured cells have suggested that imaging of the particles in living animals may be possible. In vitro tests revealed no signficant toxicity because no cell death was observed when the nanoparticles were in the presence of growing cells in culture. Measurement of the magnetization of the phosphor shows that the particles are strongly magnetic, thus making them suitable as an MRI agent.

  13. Efficient, green laser based on a blue-diode pumped rare-earth-doped fluoride crystal in an extremely short resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strotkamp, Michael; Schwarz, Thomas; Jungbluth, Bernd; Faidel, Heinrich; Leers, Michael

    2010-02-01

    The green cw laser presented in this work is realized by means of a Pr:YLF crystal emitting at 523 nm that is pumped by a blue GaN laser diode in an extremely short resonator. With a 500 mW-diode a laser has been achieved with M2 = 1, a slope of 40 % and an output power of 140mW with an absorbed pump power of 410 mW which results in an electrooptical efficiency of 6.5 %. Despite the reduced overlap with a 1 W-diode the output power rises to 290 mW with an absorbed pump power of 850 mW and the M2 increases only slightly. Based on these results a compact laser package has been accomplished using a monolithic micro optics for the beam shaping of the diode light and joining all components with a low-shrinkage adhesive on a common base plate. In a first test of the alignment strategy a laser with an output power of 92 mW has been achieved by means of the 500 mW pump power.

  14. Synthesis and characterization of visible emission from rare-earth doped aluminum nitride, gallium nitride and gallium aluminum nitride powders and thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Jonathan Huai-Tse

    A three-step solution-based process had been used synthesize powders of GaN, AlN and their alloys. The complete solid solubility and tunable nature of these nitride band gaps in the visible spectrum were the motivation of these studies due to their application in solid state lighting. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy confirmed the reduction in oxygen content for the GaN powders to as low as 4 atom % with an 8 % oxygen to nitrogen ratio. Relative to commercial GaN powders, the bandedge of the powders synthesized by such approach also shifted to higher energy, which indicated fewer defects, as observed from reflectance measurements. Inspired by the use of rare-earth elements as color emitters in fluorescent lamp phosphors, these elements were also used as activators in our nitride material. Visible emission was demonstrated through photoluminescence measurements in AlN powders activated with rare-earth elements Eu3+, Tb3+, Tm3+. These ions showed emission in the red, green and blue regions of the visible spectrum, respectively. Eu3+ and Tb3+ co-activation was also observed in an AlN sample that indicated successful energy transfer from the host to sensitizer, and subsequently to another activator. Tb3+ emission was observed under cathodoluminescence in GaN powders synthesized by the same method, and a concentration study showed no effect of concentration quenching up to 8 atom %. Using the same source powder, a pulsed-laser deposited thin film was fabricated that showed both band gap emission and activator-related emission, suggesting a reduction of defects when the powders were deposited as thin films. Additionally, GaN:Tb3+ films were also fabricated using metallorganic vapor phase epitaxy using precursors with and without oxygen ligands. Tb3+ emission was only observed in the sample fabricated from the precursor with oxygen ligand, suggestion that oxygen may be required for effective rare earth luminescence. Finally, Ga1-xAl xN alloy powders (x=0.5) and Ga1-x-yAlxDy yN (x=0.10, 0.30, y=0.01) powders were synthesized using the solution method while incorporating a stainless steel pressure vessel, which increased the synthesis pressure and aided the formation of a single phase hydroxide precursor. This in turn produced a single phase alloy nitride in the final step. Dy3+ emission that was not observed in GaN powders was also observed in the Ga1-x-yAlxDyyN powder. This suggested that the incorporation of aluminum enabled rare-earth emission in the nitrides synthesized for these experiments. However, attempts to sputter nitride alloy thin films via radio frequency sputtering were unsuccessful; only very minor peak shifts in the X-ray diffraction patterns were observed. Nevertheless, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy indicates the presence of Al in the Ga0.5Al0.5N film deposited on a Si substrate. This suggested that Al atoms may have segregated from the alloy lattice during the deposition process, with only a small amount of Al atoms incorporated into the GaN lattice.

  15. Energies of 4f^N and 4f^N-15d States Relative to Host Bands in Rare-earth-doped Fluorides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiel, C. W.; Joubert, M.-F.; Tkachuk, A.

    2005-03-01

    Energies of 4f^N states relative to crystal band states were measured for rare-earth ions in the optical host materials LiYF4, Na0.4Y0.6F2.2, and LaF3 using x-ray photoemission spectroscopy. Spectra were modeled to determine the valence band maximum and 4f^ electron binding energies in each material. These results were combined with 4f^N to 4f^N-15d transition energies to determine 5d binding energies for the lowest levels of excited 4f^N-15d configurations. While 4f^N ground-state energies vary within several eV of the valence band maximum for different rare-earth ions in each host, the lowest 4f^N-15d states have similar energies and are several eV below the bottom of the conduction band. A simple model accurately described 4f^N and 4f^N-15d binding energies across the entire series of rare-earth ions. These results improve the understanding of optical materials for lasers, phosphors, and spectral hole burning applications for optical signal processing and data storage.

  16. White upconversion of rare-earth doped ZnO nanocrystals and its dependence on size of crystal particles and content of Yb3+ and Tm3+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yunxin; Xu, Changfu; Yang, Qibin

    2009-04-01

    Rare earth (RE) doped ZnO nanocrystals were synthesized by chemical combustion method. Bright white upconversion (UC) luminescence with the CIE coordinates close to (0.33, 0.33) was obtained in Er+Tm+Yb tridoped ZnO nanocrystals under the excitation of a cost-effective 980 nm single-wavelength laser diode. The overall and relative UC luminescence intensities of RE doped ZnO nanocrystals were found to be depended highly on the diameter of crystal particles and the concentration of Yb3+ and Tm3+, for which the involved mechanisms were demonstrated. The investigation based on UC spectra, simplified energy level diagram, and excitation power dependence indicated that the remarkable enhancement of the green emission of the RE tridoped sample was due to a dual sensitization of Er3+ by Yb3+ and Tm3+ ions. The RE tridoped ZnO nanocrystals with the CIE coordinates close to (0.33, 0.33) are potentially suitable for the widely realistic application as the multicolor fluorescent labels, due to a fact that they could be cheaply and easily obtained and excited cost effectively.

  17. Blue, yellow and orange color emitting rare earth doped BaCa2Al8O15 phosphors prepared by combustion method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yerpude, A. N.; Dhoble, S. J.; Reddy, B. Sudhakar

    2014-12-01

    Eu2+, Dy3+, Sm3+ activated BaCa2Al8O15 phosphors were prepared by the combustion method. The phosphor powders were well characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and photoluminescence (PL) spectrophotometer. Photoluminescence spectra of BaCa2Al8O15:Eu2+ phosphors show emission wavelength at 435 nm that corresponds to 4f65d1→4f7 transition of Eu2+ ion by keeping excitation wavelength extending broad-band from 270 to 400 nm centered at 334 nm. The Dy3+ doped BaCa2Al8O15 phosphors shows blue emission (485 nm) and yellow emission (566 nm) under the excitation of 347 nm, corresponding to the 4F9/2→6H15/2 transition and 4F9/2→6H13/2 transition of Dy3+ ions, respectively. The Sm3+ doped BaCa2Al8O15 phosphors have shown strong orange emission at 604 nm corresponding to the 4G5/2→6H7/2 transition of Sm3+ with intense excitation wavelength at 406 nm. Scanning electron microscopy has been used for exploring the size and morphological properties of the prepared phosphors. The obtained results show that the phosphors have potential application in the field of solid state lighting.

  18. Density functional theory study of yttrium monohalides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Tongmei; Tong, G. S.-M.; Cheung, A. S.-C.

    2012-07-01

    The molecular properties of the ground state and some low-lying excited states of the yttrium monohalides, YX (X = F, Cl, Br, and I), have been calculated using the B3P86 method of density functional theory (DFT). For each state, the equilibrium bond lengths of re , the harmonic vibrational frequencies of ωe , the dissociation energies of D0 , the term values of Te , the dipole moments of μ, for all the yttrium monohalides were obtained analytically and compared with the experimental and other theoretical values. Compared with the experimental results, the hybrid density functional B3P86 is superior to or comparable with the other theoretical results and predicts well all the spectroscopic parameters such as equilibrium bond lengths and the harmonic vibrational frequencies, but underestimates the term values. By comparing the computed results for B3P86 and CCSD(T), a reasonable explanation has been given for the discrepancy between the computed and experimental term values of YX. In addition, the effect of the halogens on the spectroscopic parameters for the group of YX has been discussed with the help of the molecular orbital diagram.

  19. Sublimation Crystal Growth of Yttrium Nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Li; Edgar, J H; Meisner, Roberta Ann; Bakalova-hadjikrasteva, Silvia; Kuball, M

    2010-01-01

    The sublimation recombination crystal growth of bulk yttrium nitride crystals is reported. The YN source material was prepared by reacting yttrium metal with nitrogen at 1200 C and 800 Torr total pressure. Crystals were produced by subliming this YN from the source zone, and recondensing it from the vapor as crystals at a lower temperature (by 50 C). Crystals were grown from 2000 to 2100 C and with a nitrogen pressure from 125 to 960 Torr. The highest rate was 9.64 10 5 mol/h (9.92 mg/h). The YN sublimation rate activation energy was 467.1 21.7 kJ/mol. Individual crystals up to 200 m in dimension were prepared. X-ray diffraction confirmed that the crystals were rock salt YN, with a lattice constant of 4.88 . The YN crystals were unstable in air; they spontaneously converted to yttria (Y2O3) in 2 4 h. A small fraction of cubic yttria was detected in the XRD of a sample exposed to air for a limited time, while non-cubic yttria was detected in the Raman spectra for a sample exposed to air for more than 1 h.

  20. ESCA studies of yttrium aluminum garnets

    SciTech Connect

    Pawlak, D.A. |; Wozniak, K.; Frukacz, Z.; Barr, T.L.; Fiorentino, D.; Seal, S.

    1999-03-04

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS/ESCA) has been employed to investigate pure single crystals and powdered samples of yttrium aluminum garnet, Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12} (YAG), and YAG crystals doped with several rare earth elements (Ln = Pr, Er, Ho, Tm) and a transition metal (Cr). Core level XPS peak shapes of the main elements forming the garnet structure can be rationalized due to different structural environments of particular ions modified by doping. The change of dopant oxidation state also results in variation of XPS peaks and helps to identify the sites in which it takes place. Single-crystal and powder samples give different XPS spectra. Possible sources of these differences are discussed. Similarities and differences between simple and mixed oxides are shown. The structure of YAG suggests the presence of only one independent oxygen ion; however the O(1s) spectra of all YAG systems exhibit two readily discerned peaks. An explanation for this dichotomy is discussed, involving the possible polarization of the oxygen valence electron density between the aluminum and yttrium. Alternative explanations are also considered.

  1. Aluminium in Allergies and Allergen immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Jensen-Jarolim, Erika

    2015-01-01

    Aluminium is a hot topic in the current debate. Exposure occurs due to environmental, dietary and intentional exposure to aluminium, such as in vaccines where it was introduced in 1926. In spite of the fact that it is a typical Th2 adjuvant, aluminium redirects the immune response in systemic allergen immunotherapy (SIT) upon prolonged immunization. SIT in the US, and SLIT in general, are at present non-adjuvanted therapies, but in Europe aluminium is used as adjuvant in most SIT preparations. It enhances the safety of SIT by local deposition of the allergen. Undesired properties of aluminium adjuvants comprise acute and chronic inflammation at the injection site, its Th2 immune stimulatory capacity, its accumulation besides biodistribution in the body. The adjuvant and safety profile of aluminium adjuvants in allergy vaccines are discussed, as well as the need for putting modern delivery systems and adjuvants on the fast track.

  2. Aluminium toxicokinetics: an updated minireview.

    PubMed

    Yokel, R A; McNamara, P J

    2001-04-01

    This MiniReview updates and expands the MiniReview of aluminium toxicokinetics by Wilhelm et al. published by this journal in 1990. The use of 26Al, analyzed by accelerator mass spectrometry, now enables determination of Al toxicokinetics under physiological conditions. There is concern about aluminium in drinking water. The common sources of aluminium for man are reviewed. Oral Al bioavailability from water appears to be about 0.3%. Food is the primary common source. Al bioavailability from food has not been adequately determined. Industrial and medicinal exposure, and perhaps antiperspirant use, can significantly increase absorbed aluminium. Inhalation bioavailability of airborne soluble Al appears to be about 1.5% in the industrial environment. Al may distribute to the brain from the nasal cavity, but the significance of this exposure route is unknown. Systemic Al bioavailability after single underarm antiperspirant application may be up to 0.012%. All intramuscularly injected Al, e.g. from vaccines, may eventually be absorbed. Al distributes unequally to all tissues. Distribution and renal excretion appear to be enhanced by citrate. Brain uptake of Al may be mediated by Al transferrin and Al citrate complexes. There appears to be carrier-mediated efflux of Al citrate from the brain. Elimination half-lives of years have been reported in man, probably reflecting release from bone. Al elimination is primarily renal with < or = 2% excreted in bile. The contribution of food to absorbed Al needs to be determined to advance our understanding of the major components of Al toxicokinetics.

  3. Grip for fatigue testing pure aluminium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, P.; Yuan, G. S.; Hartwig, K. T.

    A simple method of clamping pure aluminium for fatigue tests at cryogenic temperatures is described. Easily machined cylindrical specimens are aligned and held firmly by collet grips that counteract sample shrinkage during cooldown. Specimens are quickly mounted and removed after testing without distortion or thermal treatment 99.999% aluminium, aluminium alloys and copper were gripped successfully through tens of thousands of fully reversed tension-compression cycles at 295, 77 and 4.2 K.

  4. A biogeochemical cycle for aluminium?

    PubMed

    Exley, Christopher

    2003-09-15

    The elaboration of biogeochemical cycles for elements which are known to be essential for life has enabled a broad appreciation of the homeostatic mechanisms which underlie element essentiality. In particular they can be used effectively to identify any part played by human activities in element cycling and to predict how such activities might impact upon the lithospheric and biospheric availability of an element in the future. The same criteria were the driving force behind the construction of a biogeochemical cycle for aluminium, a non-essential element which is a known ecotoxicant and a suspected health risk in humans. The purpose of this exercise was to examine the concept of a biogeochemical cycle for aluminium and not to review the biogeochemistry of this element. The cycle as presented is rudimentary and qualitative though, even in this nascent form, it is informative and predictive and, for these reasons alone, it is deserving of future quantification. A fully fledged biogeochemical cycle for aluminium should explain the biospheric abundance of this element and whether we should expect its (continued) active involvement in biochemical evolution.

  5. Enthalpy of crystallization of amorphous yttrium oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Reznitskii, L.A.

    1988-02-01

    Measurements have been made on the enthalpies of crystallization of amorphous Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ and Y/sub 3/Fe/sub 5/O/sub 12/ from amorphous Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ and Y/sub 2/O/sub 3/ as determined by the DSC method. The heat of crystallization for Y/sub 2/O/sub 3am/ does not make itself felt on the heating thermogram, in contrast to that for Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/, evidently because it is spread out over a wide temperature range, so it is difficult to measure. One can combine thermochemical equations to calculate the enthalpy of crystallization for amorphous yttrium oxide as ..delta..H = -24.9 kJ/mole.

  6. Lactobacillus plantarum CCFM639 alleviates aluminium toxicity.

    PubMed

    Yu, Leilei; Zhai, Qixiao; Liu, Xiaoming; Wang, Gang; Zhang, Qiuxiang; Zhao, Jianxin; Narbad, Arjan; Zhang, Hao; Tian, Fengwei; Chen, Wei

    2016-02-01

    Aluminium (Al) is the most abundant metal in the earth's crust. Al exposure can cause a variety of adverse physiological effects in humans and animals. Our aim was to demonstrate that specific probiotic bacteria can play a special physiologically functional role in protection against Al toxicity in mice. Thirty strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were tested for their aluminium-binding ability, aluminium tolerance, their antioxidative capacity, and their ability to survive the exposure to artificial gastrointestinal (GI) juices. Lactobacillus plantarum CCFM639 was selected for animal experiments because of its excellent performance in vitro. Forty mice were divided into four groups: control, Al only, Al plus CCFM639, and Al plus deferiprone (DFP). CCFM639 was administered at 10(9) CFU once daily for 10 days, followed by a single oral dose of aluminium chloride hexahydrate at 5.14 mg aluminium (LD50) for each mouse. The results showed that CCFM639 treatment led to a significant reduction in the mortality rates with corresponding decrease in intestinal aluminium absorption and in accumulation of aluminium in the tissues and amelioration of hepatic histopathological damage. This probiotic treatment also resulted in alleviation of hepatic, renal, and cerebral oxidative stress. The treatment of L. plantarum CCFM639 has potential as a therapeutic dietary strategy against acute aluminium toxicity.

  7. Aluminium neurotoxicity: neurobehavioural and oxidative aspects.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vijay; Gill, Kiran Dip

    2009-11-01

    Aluminium is the most widely distributed metal in the environment and is extensively used in daily life that provides easy exposure to human beings. The exposure to this toxic metal occurs through air, food and water. However, there is no known physiological role for aluminium within the body and hence this metal may produce adverse physiological effects. Chronic exposure of animals to aluminium is associated with behavioural, neuropathological and neurochemical changes. Among them, deficits of learning and behavioural functions are most evident. Some epidemiological studies have shown poor performance in cognitive tests and a higher abundance of neurological symptoms for workers occupationally exposed to aluminium. However, in contrast to well established neurotoxic effects, neurobehavioural studies of aluminium in rodents have generally not produced consistent results. Current researches show that any impairment in mitochondrial functions may play a major role in many human disorders including neurodegenerative disorders. Being involved in the production of reactive oxygen species, aluminium may cause impairments in mitochondrial bioenergetics and may lead to the generation of oxidative stress which may lead to a gradual accumulation of oxidatively modified cellular proteins. In this review, the neuropathologies associated with aluminium exposure in terms of neurobehavioural changes have been discussed. In addition, the impact of aluminium on the mitochondrial functions has also been highlighted.

  8. Aluminium Diphosphamethanides: Hidden Frustrated Lewis Pairs.

    PubMed

    Styra, Steffen; Radius, Michael; Moos, Eric; Bihlmeier, Angela; Breher, Frank

    2016-07-01

    The synthesis and characterisation of two aluminium diphosphamethanide complexes, [Al(tBu)2 {κ(2) P,P'-Mes*PCHPMes*}] (3) and [Al(C6 F5 )2 {κ(2) P,P'-Mes*PCHPMes*}] (4), and the silylated analogue, Mes*PCHP(SiMe3 )Mes* (5), are reported. The aluminium complexes feature four-membered PCPAl core structures consisting of diphosphaallyl ligands. The silylated phosphine 5 was found to be a valuable precursor for the synthesis of 4 as it cleanly reacts with the diaryl aluminium chloride [(C6 F5 )2 AlCl]2 . The aluminium complex 3 reacts with molecular dihydrogen at room temperature under formation of the acyclic σ(2) λ(3) ,σ(3) λ(3) -diphosphine Mes*PCHP(H)Mes* and the corresponding dialkyl aluminium hydride [tBu2 AlH]3 . Thus, 3 belongs to the family of so-called hidden frustrated Lewis pairs. PMID:27271936

  9. Alkali metal yttrium neo-pentoxide double alkoxide precursors to alkali metal yttrium oxide nanomaterials

    DOE PAGES

    Boyle, Timothy J.; Neville, Michael L.; Sears, Jeremiah Matthew; Cramer, Roger

    2016-03-15

    In this study, a series of alkali metal yttrium neo-pentoxide ([AY(ONep)4]) compounds were developed as precursors to alkali yttrium oxide (AYO2) nanomaterials. The reaction of yttrium amide ([Y(NR2)3] where R=Si(CH3)3) with four equivalents of H-ONep followed by addition of [A(NR2)] (A=Li, Na, K) or Ao (Ao=Rb, Cs) led to the formation of a complex series of AnY(ONep)3+n species, crystallographically identified as [Y2Li3(μ3-ONep)(μ3-HONep)(μ-ONep)5(ONep)3(HONep)2] (1), [YNa2(μ3-ONep)4(ONep)]2 (2), {[Y2K3(μ3-ONep)3(μ-ONep)4(ONep)2(ηξ-tol)2][Y4K2(μ4-O)(μ3-ONep)8(ONep)4]•ηx-tol]} (3), [Y4K2(μ4-O)(μ3-ONep)8(ONep)4] (3a), [Y2Rb3(μ4-ONep)3(μ-ONep)6] (4), and [Y2Cs4(μ6-O)(μ3-ONep)6(μ3-HONep)2(ONep)2(ηx-tol)4]•tol (5). Compounds 1–5 were investigated as single source precursors to AYOx nanomaterials following solvothermal routes (pyridine, 185 °C for 24h). The final products after thermal processing weremore » found by powder X-ray diffraction experiments to be Y2O3 with variable sized particles based on transmission electron diffraction. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy studies indicated that the heavier alkali metal species were present in the isolated nanomaterials.« less

  10. Biological indicators of exposure to total and respirable aluminium dust fractions in a primary aluminium smelter.

    PubMed Central

    Röllin, H B; Theodorou, P; Cantrell, A C

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The study attempts to define biological indicators of aluminium uptake and excretion in workers exposed to airborne aluminium compounds in a primary aluminium smelter. Also, this study defines the total and respirable aluminium dust fractions in two different potrooms, and correlates their concentrations with biological indicators in this group of workers. METHODS: Air was sampled at defined work sites. Non-destructive and conventional techniques were used to find total and respirable aluminium content of the dust. Blood and urine was collected from 84 volunteers employed at various work stations throughout the smelter and from two different cohorts of controls matched for sex, age, and socioeconomic status. Aluminium in serum samples and urine specimens was measured by flameless atomic absorption with a PE 4100 ZL spectrometer. RESULTS: The correlation of aluminium concentrations in serum and urine samples with the degree of exposure was assessed for three arbitrary exposure categories; low (0.036 mg Al/m3), medium (0.35 mg Al/m3) and high (1.47 mg Al/m3) as found in different areas of the smelter. At medium and high exposure, the ratio of respirable to total aluminium in the dust samples varied significantly. At high exposure, serum aluminium, although significantly raised, was still within the normal range of an unexposed population. The workers with low exposure excreted aluminium in urine at levels significantly higher than the controls, but still within the normal range of the population. However, potroom workers with medium and high exposure had significantly higher urinary aluminium than the normal range. CONCLUSIONS: It is concluded that only urinary aluminium constitutes a practical index of occupational exposure at or above 0.35 mg Al/m3, and that the respirable fraction of the dust may play a major role in the biological response to exposure to aluminium in a smelter environment. PMID:8758038

  11. Aluminium electrodeposition under ambient conditions.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Andrew P; Harris, Robert C; Hsieh, Yi-Ting; Ryder, Karl S; Sun, I-Wen

    2014-07-28

    The electrodeposition of aluminium is demonstrated using a eutectic mixture of aluminium chloride and urea. The mixture is shown to be conducting through the formation of both cationic ([AlCl2·urean](+)) and anionic (AlCl4(-)) species and electrodeposition is achieved through the cationic species. The use of a biphasic system with the ionic liquid and a protective hydrocarbon layer allows metal deposition to be carried out in an environment with ambient moisture without the need for a glove box. A direct comparison is made between the AlCl3:urea and imidazolium chloride:AlCl3 systems and the differences in speciation and mass transport manifest themselves in different deposit morphologies. Brighteners which work in the chloroaluminate system such as toluene and LiCl are shown to be ineffective in the urea based system and the reasons for these differences are ascribed to the mechanism of the anodic reaction which is rate limiting. PMID:24916113

  12. Alveolar proteinosis associated with aluminium dust inhalation.

    PubMed

    Chew, R; Nigam, S; Sivakumaran, P

    2016-08-01

    Secondary alveolar proteinosis is a rare lung disease which may be triggered by a variety of inhaled particles. The diagnosis is made by detection of anti-granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor antibodies in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, which appears milky white and contains lamellar bodies. Aluminium has been suggested as a possible cause, but there is little evidence in the literature to support this assertion. We report the case of a 46-year-old former boilermaker and boat builder who developed secondary alveolar proteinosis following sustained heavy aluminium exposure. The presence of aluminium was confirmed both by histological examination and metallurgical analysis of a mediastinal lymph node. Despite cessation of exposure to aluminium and treatment with whole-lung lavage which normally results in improvements in both symptoms and lung function, the outcome was poor and novel therapies are now being used for this patient. It may be that the natural history in aluminium-related alveolar proteinosis is different, with the metal playing a mediating role in the disease process. Our case further supports the link between aluminium and secondary alveolar proteinosis and highlights the need for measures to prevent excessive aluminium inhalation in relevant industries. PMID:27099254

  13. Mechanical properties of lanthanum and yttrium chromites

    SciTech Connect

    Paulik, S.W.; Armstrong, T.R.

    1996-12-31

    In an operating high-temperature (1000{degrees}C) solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC), the interconnect separates the fuel (P(O{sub 2}){approx}10{sup -16} atm) and the oxidant (P(O2){approx}10{sup 0.2} atm), while being electrically conductive and connecting the cells in series. Such severe atmospheric and thermal demands greatly reduce the number of viable candidate materials. Only two materials, acceptor substituted lanthanum chromite and yttrium chromite, meet these severe requirements. In acceptor substituted chromites (Sr{sup 2+} or Ca{sup 2+} for La{sup 3+}), charge compensation is primarily electronic in oxidizing conditions (through the formation of Cr{sup 4+}). Under reducing conditions, ionic charge compensation becomes significant as the lattice becomes oxygen deficient. The formation of oxygen vacancies is accompanied by the reduction of Cr{sup 4+} ions to Cr{sup 3+} and a resultant lattice expansion. The lattice expansion observed in large chemical potential gradients is not desirable and has been found to result in greatly reduced mechanical strength.

  14. Tungsten - Yttrium Based Nuclear Structural Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramana, Chintalapalle; Chessa, Jack; Martinenz, Gustavo

    2013-04-01

    The challenging problem currently facing the nuclear science community in this 21st century is design and development of novel structural materials, which will have an impact on the next-generation nuclear reactors. The materials available at present include reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels, dispersion strengthened reduced activation ferritic steels, and vanadium- or tungsten-based alloys. These materials exhibit one or more specific problems, which are either intrinsic or caused by reactors. This work is focussed towards tungsten-yttrium (W-Y) based alloys and oxide ceramics, which can be utilized in nuclear applications. The goal is to derive a fundamental scientific understanding of W-Y-based materials. In collaboration with University of Califonia -- Davis, the project is designated to demonstrate the W-Y based alloys, ceramics and composites with enhanced physical, mechanical, thermo-chemical properties and higher radiation resistance. Efforts are focussed on understanding the microstructure, manipulating materials behavior under charged-particle and neutron irradiation, and create a knowledge database of defects, elemental diffusion/segregation, and defect trapping along grain boundaries and interfaces. Preliminary results will be discussed.

  15. Aluminium in Biological Environments: A Computational Approach

    PubMed Central

    Mujika, Jon I; Rezabal, Elixabete; Mercero, Jose M; Ruipérez, Fernando; Costa, Dominique; Ugalde, Jesus M; Lopez, Xabier

    2014-01-01

    The increased availability of aluminium in biological environments, due to human intervention in the last century, raises concerns on the effects that this so far “excluded from biology” metal might have on living organisms. Consequently, the bioinorganic chemistry of aluminium has emerged as a very active field of research. This review will focus on our contributions to this field, based on computational studies that can yield an understanding of the aluminum biochemistry at a molecular level. Aluminium can interact and be stabilized in biological environments by complexing with both low molecular mass chelants and high molecular mass peptides. The speciation of the metal is, nonetheless, dictated by the hydrolytic species dominant in each case and which vary according to the pH condition of the medium. In blood, citrate and serum transferrin are identified as the main low molecular mass and high molecular mass molecules interacting with aluminium. The complexation of aluminium to citrate and the subsequent changes exerted on the deprotonation pathways of its tritable groups will be discussed along with the mechanisms for the intake and release of aluminium in serum transferrin at two pH conditions, physiological neutral and endosomatic acidic. Aluminium can substitute other metals, in particular magnesium, in protein buried sites and trigger conformational disorder and alteration of the protonation states of the protein's sidechains. A detailed account of the interaction of aluminium with proteic sidechains will be given. Finally, it will be described how alumnium can exert oxidative stress by stabilizing superoxide radicals either as mononuclear aluminium or clustered in boehmite. The possibility of promotion of Fenton reaction, and production of hydroxyl radicals will also be discussed. PMID:24757505

  16. Investigation of the aluminium-aluminium oxide reversible transformation as observed by hot stage electron microscopy.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grove, C. A.; Judd, G.; Ansell, G. S.

    1972-01-01

    Thin foils of high purity aluminium and an Al-Al2O3 SAP type of alloy were oxidised in a specially designed hot stage specimen chamber in an electron microscope. Below 450 C, amorphous aluminium oxide formed on the foil surface and was first detectable at foil edges, holes, and pits. Islands of aluminium then nucleated in this amorphous oxide. The aluminium islands displayed either a lateral growth with eventual coalescence with other islands, or a reoxidation process which caused the islands to disappear. The aluminium island formation was determined to be related to the presence of the electron beam. A mechanism based upon electron charging due to the electron beam was proposed to explain the nucleation, growth, coalescence, disappearance, and geometry of the aluminium islands.

  17. The meaning of aluminium exposure on human health and aluminium-related diseases.

    PubMed

    Crisponi, Guido; Fanni, Daniela; Gerosa, Clara; Nemolato, Sonia; Nurchi, Valeria M; Crespo-Alonso, Miriam; Lachowicz, Joanna I; Faa, Gavino

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this review is to attempt to answer extremely important questions related to aluminium-related diseases. Starting from an overview on the main sources of aluminium exposure in everyday life, the principal aspects of aluminium metabolism in humans have been taken into consideration in an attempt to enlighten the main metabolic pathways utilised by trivalent metal ions in different organs. The second part of this review is focused on the available evidence concerning the pathogenetic consequences of aluminium overload in human health, with particular attention to its putative role in bone and neurodegenerative human diseases.

  18. 40 CFR 721.10177 - Phosphoric acid, yttrium(3+) salt (1:1).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Phosphoric acid, yttrium(3+) salt (1:1... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10177 Phosphoric acid, yttrium(3+) salt (1:1). (a) Chemical substance... acid, yttrium(3+) salt (1:1) (PMN P-04-153; CAS No. 13990-54-0) is subject to reporting under...

  19. 40 CFR 721.10627 - Yttrium borate phosphate vanadate with europium and additional dopants (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Yttrium borate phosphate vanadate with... SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10627 Yttrium borate phosphate... subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as yttrium borate...

  20. 40 CFR 721.10013 - Manganese yttrium oxide (Mn2YO5).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Manganese yttrium oxide (Mn2YO5). 721... Substances § 721.10013 Manganese yttrium oxide (Mn2YO5). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as manganese yttrium oxide (Mn2YO5) (PMN...

  1. 40 CFR 721.10177 - Phosphoric acid, yttrium(3+) salt (1:1).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Phosphoric acid, yttrium(3+) salt (1:1... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10177 Phosphoric acid, yttrium(3+) salt (1:1). (a) Chemical substance... acid, yttrium(3+) salt (1:1) (PMN P-04-153; CAS No. 13990-54-0) is subject to reporting under...

  2. 40 CFR 721.10013 - Manganese yttrium oxide (Mn2YO5).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Manganese yttrium oxide (Mn2YO5). 721... Substances § 721.10013 Manganese yttrium oxide (Mn2YO5). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as manganese yttrium oxide (Mn2YO5) (PMN...

  3. 40 CFR 721.10177 - Phosphoric acid, yttrium(3+) salt (1:1).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Phosphoric acid, yttrium(3+) salt (1:1... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10177 Phosphoric acid, yttrium(3+) salt (1:1). (a) Chemical substance... acid, yttrium(3+) salt (1:1) (PMN P-04-153; CAS No. 13990-54-0) is subject to reporting under...

  4. 40 CFR 721.10013 - Manganese yttrium oxide (Mn2YO5).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Manganese yttrium oxide (Mn2YO5). 721... Substances § 721.10013 Manganese yttrium oxide (Mn2YO5). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as manganese yttrium oxide (Mn2YO5) (PMN...

  5. 40 CFR 721.10177 - Phosphoric acid, yttrium(3+) salt (1:1).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Phosphoric acid, yttrium(3+) salt (1:1... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10177 Phosphoric acid, yttrium(3+) salt (1:1). (a) Chemical substance... acid, yttrium(3+) salt (1:1) (PMN P-04-153; CAS No. 13990-54-0) is subject to reporting under...

  6. 40 CFR 721.10013 - Manganese yttrium oxide (Mn2YO5).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Manganese yttrium oxide (Mn2YO5). 721... Substances § 721.10013 Manganese yttrium oxide (Mn2YO5). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as manganese yttrium oxide (Mn2YO5) (PMN...

  7. 40 CFR 721.10627 - Yttrium borate phosphate vanadate with europium and additional dopants (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Yttrium borate phosphate vanadate with... SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10627 Yttrium borate phosphate... subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as yttrium borate...

  8. 40 CFR 721.10013 - Manganese yttrium oxide (Mn2YO5).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Manganese yttrium oxide (Mn2YO5). 721... Substances § 721.10013 Manganese yttrium oxide (Mn2YO5). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as manganese yttrium oxide (Mn2YO5) (PMN...

  9. 40 CFR 721.10177 - Phosphoric acid, yttrium(3+) salt (1:1).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Phosphoric acid, yttrium(3+) salt (1:1... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10177 Phosphoric acid, yttrium(3+) salt (1:1). (a) Chemical substance... acid, yttrium(3+) salt (1:1) (PMN P-04-153; CAS No. 13990-54-0) is subject to reporting under...

  10. 40 CFR 721.10009 - Manganese yttrium oxide (MnYO3).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Manganese yttrium oxide (MnYO3). 721... Substances § 721.10009 Manganese yttrium oxide (MnYO3). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as manganese yttrium oxide (MnYO3) (PMN...

  11. 40 CFR 721.10009 - Manganese yttrium oxide (MnYO3).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Manganese yttrium oxide (MnYO3). 721... Substances § 721.10009 Manganese yttrium oxide (MnYO3). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as manganese yttrium oxide (MnYO3) (PMN...

  12. 40 CFR 721.10009 - Manganese yttrium oxide (MnYO3).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Manganese yttrium oxide (MnYO3). 721... Substances § 721.10009 Manganese yttrium oxide (MnYO3). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as manganese yttrium oxide (MnYO3) (PMN...

  13. 40 CFR 721.10009 - Manganese yttrium oxide (MnYO3).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Manganese yttrium oxide (MnYO3). 721... Substances § 721.10009 Manganese yttrium oxide (MnYO3). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as manganese yttrium oxide (MnYO3) (PMN...

  14. 40 CFR 721.10009 - Manganese yttrium oxide (MnYO3).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Manganese yttrium oxide (MnYO3). 721... Substances § 721.10009 Manganese yttrium oxide (MnYO3). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as manganese yttrium oxide (MnYO3) (PMN...

  15. Yttrium and rare earth stabilized fast reactor metal fuel

    DOEpatents

    Guon, Jerold; Grantham, LeRoy F.; Specht, Eugene R.

    1992-01-01

    To increase the operating temperature of a reactor, the melting point and mechanical properties of the fuel must be increased. For an actinide-rich fuel, yttrium, lanthanum and/or rare earth elements can be added, as stabilizers, to uranium and plutonium and/or a mixture of other actinides to raise the melting point of the fuel and improve its mechanical properties. Since only about 1% of the actinide fuel may be yttrium, lanthanum, or a rare earth element, the neutron penalty is low, the reactor core size can be reduced, the fuel can be burned efficiently, reprocessing requirements are reduced, and the nuclear waste disposal volumes reduced. A further advantage occurs when yttrium, lanthanum, and/or other rare earth elements are exposed to radiation in a reactor, they produce only short half life radioisotopes, which reduce nuclear waste disposal problems through much shorter assured-isolation requirements.

  16. Aluminium and Alzheimer's disease: An epidemiological approach.

    PubMed

    Martyn, C N

    1990-03-01

    Epidemiological methods have an important role in the investigation of the postulated connection between exposure to aluminium and the development of Alzheimer's disease. We have examined the usefulness of existing data on prevalence and mortality as a resource for studying variations in the rate of the disease with time and geography. Unfortunately, methodological differences between prevalence surveys and errors and biases in mortality data are large. No reliable conclusions can be drawn from these data about geographical differences in rates of dementia in England and Wales nor about time trends in the disease.Aluminium salts are widely used in the UK for the treatment of drinking water. Residual aluminium concentrations vary more than ten fold between different parts of the country. We have estimated diagnostic rates of pre-senile Alzheimer's disease in seven geographical areas and examined the correlation between rates of Alzheimer's disease and water aluminium concentration. PMID:24202582

  17. The removal of iron from molten aluminium

    SciTech Connect

    Donk, H.M. van der; Nijhof, G.H.; Castelijns, C.A.M.

    1995-12-31

    In this work an overview is given about the techniques available for the removal of metallic impurities from molten aluminium. The overview is focused on the removal of iron. Also, some experimental results are given about the creation of iron-rich intermetallic compounds in an aluminium system, which are subsequently removed by gravity segregation and filtration techniques. This work is part of an ongoing research project of three major European aluminium companies who are co-operating on the subject of recycling of aluminium packaging materials recovered from household waste by means of Eddy-Current techniques. Using this technique the pick-up of some contaminating metals, particularly iron, is almost unavoidable.

  18. Thermochromism in yttrium iron garnet compounds.

    PubMed

    Serier-Brault, Hélène; Thibault, Lucile; Legrain, Magalie; Deniard, Philippe; Rocquefelte, Xavier; Leone, Philippe; Perillon, Jean-Luc; Le Bris, Stéphanie; Waku, Jean; Jobic, Stéphane

    2014-12-01

    Polycrystalline yttrium iron garnet (Y3Fe5O12, hereafter labeled YIG) has been synthesized by solid-state reaction, characterized by X-ray diffraction, Mössbauer spectroscopy, and UV-vis-NIR diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, and its optical properties from room temperature (RT) to 300 °C are discussed. Namely, its greenish color at RT is assigned to an O(2-) → Fe(3+) ligand-to-metal charge transfer at 2.57 eV coupled with d-d transitions peaking at 1.35 and 2.04 eV. When the temperature is raised, YIG displays a marked thermochromic effect; i.e., the color changes continuously from greenish to brownish, which offers opportunities for potential application as a temperature indicator for everyday uses. The origin of the observed thermochromism is assigned to a gradual red shift of the ligand-to-metal charge transfer with temperature while the positioning in energy of the d-d transitions is almost unaltered. Attempts to achieve more saturated colors via doping (e.g., Al(3+), Ga(3+), Mn(3+), ...) remained unsuccessful except for chromium. Indeed, Y3Fe5O12:Cr samples exhibit at RT the same color than the undoped garnet at 200 °C. The introduction of Cr(3+) ions strongly impacts the color of the Y3Fe5O12 parent either by an inductive effect or, more probably, by a direct effect on the electronic structure of the undoped material with formation of a midgap state.

  19. Enhancement of superconductivity of lanthanum and yttrium sesquicarbide

    DOEpatents

    Krupka, M.C.; Giorgi, A.L.; Krikorian, N.H.; Szklarz, E.G.

    1971-06-22

    A method of enhancing the superconductivity of body-centered cubic lanthanum and yttrium sesquicarbide through formation of the sesquicarbides from ternary alloys of novel composition (N/sub x/M/sub 1-x/)C/sub z/, where N is yttrium or lanthanum, M is thorium, any of the Group IV and VI transition metals, or gold, germanium or silicon, and z is approximately 1.2 to 1.6. These ternary sesquicarbides have superconducting transition temperatures as high as 17.0/sup 0/K.

  20. Cellular texture of mixtures of calcium (magnesium) and yttrium oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Strelov, K.K.; Kamenskikh, V.A.; Gilev, Yu.P.; Udilova, E.Yu.

    1987-08-01

    In solid-phase sintering of calcium (magnesium) oxides with yttrium oxide, the sintered material acquires a cellular texture visible on x-ray photographs obtained in the characteristic yttrium radiation as shown in this paper. Formation of a cellular texture in materials obtained in the systems CaO-Y/sub 2/O/sub 3/ and MgO-Y/sub 2/O/sub 3/ is studied. The practical importance of formation of cellular texture lies in the shielding effect on the surface phase.

  1. Enhancement of Superconductivity of Lanthanum and Yttrium Sesquicarbide

    DOEpatents

    Krupka, M. C.; Giorgi, A. L.; Krikorian, N. H.; Szklarz, E. G.

    1972-06-22

    A method of enhancing the superconductivity of body-centered cubic lanthanum and yttrium sesquicarbide through formation of the sesquicarbides from ternary alloys of novel composition (N/sub x/M/sub 1-x/)C/sub z/, where N is yttrium or lanthanum, M is thorium, any of the Group IV and VI transition metals, or gold, germanium or silicon, and z is approximately 1.2 to 1.6. These ternary sesquicarbides have superconducting transition temperatures as high as 17.0/sup 0/K.

  2. PROCESS FOR SEPARATING YTTRIUM FROM THE RARE EARTHS BY SOLVENT EXTRACTION

    DOEpatents

    Peppard, D.F.; Mason, G.W.

    1963-11-12

    A process of isolating yttrium from other rare earths present together with it in aqueous solutions is presented. Yttrium and rare earths heavier than yttrium are first extracted with dialkyl phosphoric acid, after adjustment of the acidity to 2 N, and then back-extracted with 5-6 N mineral acid to form a strip solution. Thiocyanate is added to the strip solution and the rare earths heavier than yttrium are then selectively extracted with trialkyl phosphate, dialkyl phosphoric acid, alkyl phosphonate, or dialkyl aryl phosphonate, leaving the yttrium in the aqueous solution. (AEC)

  3. A preliminary study of the dermal absorption of aluminium from antiperspirants using aluminium-26.

    PubMed

    Flarend, R; Bin, T; Elmore, D; Hem, S L

    2001-02-01

    Aluminium chlorohydrate (ACH), the active ingredient in many antiperspirants, was labeled with the radioisotope 26Al. The labeled ACH was then fractionated into about 100 samples using gel filtration chromatography. Each fraction was analyzed for 26Al and total aluminium content. Aluminium-26 was only detected in the fractions that also contained aluminium, which verified that the ACH was uniformly labeled. 84 mg of the labeled ACH was then applied to a single underarm of two adult subjects with blood and urine samples being collected over 7 weeks. Tape-stripping and mild washings of the skin were also collected for the first 6 days. Results indicate that only 0.012% of the applied aluminium was absorbed through the skin. At this rate, about 4 microg of aluminium is absorbed from a single use of ACH on both underarms. This is about 2.5% of the aluminium typically absorbed by the gut from food over the same time period. Therefore, a one-time use of ACH applied to the skin is not a significant contribution to the body burden of aluminium.

  4. Europium-doped yttrium silicate nanophosphors prepared by flame synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Qin Xiao . E-mail: xqin@princeton.edu; Ju Yiguang; Bernhard, Stefan; Yao Nan

    2007-08-07

    Europium-doped yttrium silicate (Y{sub 2}SiO{sub 5}:Eu{sup 3+}) nanophosphors were successfully synthesized by flame spray pyrolysis method. The effect of silicon concentration on the crystal structure and morphology of the Y{sub 2}SiO{sub 5}:Eu{sup 3+} phosphors were investigated. As-prepared phosphor consists of spherical nanoparticles with filled morphology, high crystallinity, narrow size distribution, and intense photoluminescence. The crystal structure and photoluminescence intensity of Y{sub 2}SiO{sub 5}:Eu{sup 3+} nanophosphors are strongly affected by the ratio of silicon to yttrium in the precursor solution, and the maximum photoluminescence intensity is obtained from particles prepared from the silicon to yttrium ratio of 1.25. A concentration quenching limit is observed at 30 mol% Eu of yttrium. The photoluminescence intensity also increases with the increase of the concentration of precursor solution. This work demonstrates the advantages of flame spray pyrolysis method for the preparation of multi-component nanophosphor, which can be found potential application in lamp and display industries.

  5. OXIDATION-RESISTANT COATING ON ARTICLES OF YTTRIUM METAL

    DOEpatents

    Wilder, D.R.; Wirkus, C.D.

    1963-11-01

    A process for protecting yttrium metal from oxidation by applying thereto and firing thereon a liquid suspension of a fritted ground silicate or phosphate glass plus from 5 to 35% by weight of CeO/sub 2/ is presented. (AEC)

  6. Yttrium and rare earth stabilized fast reactor metal fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Guon, J.; Grantham, L.F.; Specht, E.R.

    1992-05-12

    This patent describes an improved metal alloy reactor fuel consisting essentially of uranium, plutonium, and at least one element from the group consisting of yttrium, lanthanum, cerium, praseodymium, neodymium, promethium, samarium, europium, gadolinium, terbium, dysprosium, holmium, erbium, thulium, ytterbium and lutetium.

  7. Aluminium and the human breast.

    PubMed

    Darbre, P D

    2016-06-01

    The human population is exposed to aluminium (Al) from diet, antacids and vaccine adjuvants, but frequent application of Al-based salts to the underarm as antiperspirant adds a high additional exposure directly to the local area of the human breast. Coincidentally the upper outer quadrant of the breast is where there is also a disproportionately high incidence of breast cysts and breast cancer. Al has been measured in human breast tissues/fluids at higher levels than in blood, and experimental evidence suggests that at physiologically relevant concentrations, Al can adversely impact on human breast epithelial cell biology. Gross cystic breast disease is the most common benign disorder of the breast and evidence is presented that Al may be a causative factor in formation of breast cysts. Evidence is also reviewed that Al can enable the development of multiple hallmarks associated with cancer in breast cells, in particular that it can cause genomic instability and inappropriate proliferation in human breast epithelial cells, and can increase migration and invasion of human breast cancer cells. In addition, Al is a metalloestrogen and oestrogen is a risk factor for breast cancer known to influence multiple hallmarks. The microenvironment is established as another determinant of breast cancer development and Al has been shown to cause adverse alterations to the breast microenvironment. If current usage patterns of Al-based antiperspirant salts contribute to causation of breast cysts and breast cancer, then reduction in exposure would offer a strategy for prevention, and regulatory review is now justified. PMID:26997127

  8. Evidence of yttrium silicate inclusions in YSZ-porcelain veneers.

    PubMed

    Stoner, Brian R; Griggs, Jason A; Neidigh, John; Piascik, Jeffrey R

    2014-04-01

    This report introduces the discovery of crystalline defects that can form in the porcelain veneering layer when in contact with yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ). The focus was on dental prostheses and understanding the defects that form in the YSZ/porcelain system; however the data reported herein may have broader implications toward the use and stability of YSZ-based ceramics in general. Specimens were cut from fully sintered YSZ plates and veneering porcelain was applied (<1 mm thick) to one surface and fired under manufacturer's recommended protocol. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with integrated electron dispersive X-ray (EDAX) was used for microstructural and elemental analysis. EDAX, for chemical analysis and transmission electron diffraction (TED) for structural analysis were both performed in the transmission electron microscope (TEM). Additionally, in order to spatially resolve Y-rich precipitates, micro-CT scans were conducted at varying depths within the porcelain veneer. Local EDAX (SEM) was performed in the regions of visible inclusions and showed significant increases in yttrium concentration. TEM specimens also showed apparent inclusions in the porcelain and selected area electron diffraction was performed on these regions and found the inclusions to be crystalline and identified as either yttrium-silicate (Y2 SiO5 ) or yttrium-disilicate (Y2 Si2 O7 ). Micro-CT data showed that yttrium-silicate precipitates were distributed throughout the thickness of the porcelain veneer. Future studies are needed to determine whether many of the premature failures associated with this materials system may be the result of crystalline flaws that form as a result of high temperature yttrium diffusion near the surfaces of YSZ.

  9. Lanthanum, cerium, praseodymium and yttrium in waters in an upland acidic and acid sensitive environment, mid-Wales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nea, C.

    2005-12-01

    The less than 0.45 mm filterable lanthanum (La), cerium (Ce), praseodymium (Pr) and yttrium (Y) concentrations in rainfall, cloud water, stream and groundwater in the upper River Severn catchments of mid-Wales are presented, based on up to ten years of weekly data. Results show that for rainfall, there is enrichment in the rare earth (RE) elements, especially under conditions of small volume of catch. However, within the correlations, there is a 'forked' relationship, with one line of high La, Ce and Pr with low Y, corresponding to clear pollutant events and the other with relatively low La, Ce and Pr and higher Y to background conditions. Cloud water and stream waters show a simpler relationship indicating two types of source. Cloud, stream and ground water show no split in pattern, with singular linear relationships between the rare La, Ce, Pr and Y. However, in many cases the monitoring of the streams and groundwaters post-dates the rainfall period with high pollutant Ce inputs. RE element concentrations vary systematically, in general decreasing with increasing volume of catch for cloud-water. For the streams, occasionally, there are relatively high Ce and La concentrations (up to about a tenth the maximum in rainfall), which occur in the same year as the corresponding high values in rainfall. Apart from these anomalous periods, RE element concentrations increase with decreasing pH and increasing aluminium concentrations; RE elements are mobilised under acidic conditions. The river waters are particularly enriched in Y relative to La, Ce and Pr, both in terms of average concentrations and values normalised to standard continental shales. The RE element level in the streams is variable and seems to be linked to the main soil types within the catchment; gleys in particular show higher concentrations than their peat and podzolic counterparts. On average, groundwaters are enriched in the RE elements relative to the stream but the link with pH and aluminium observed

  10. Hot tearing evaluation for aluminium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brůna, Marek

    2016-06-01

    Hot tearing during solidification of aluminium alloys castings can be a serious problem. This phenomenon is well known but still insufficiently investigated. Hot tearing occurs in form of irregular cracks in metal castings that develop during solidification and cooling. The cause of hot tearing is generally attributed to the development of thermally induced tensile stresses and strains in a casting as the molten metal contracts during solidification and solid state shrinkage. Submited paper consists of two parts. The first part introduces the reader to the phenomenon of hot tearing. The second part describes newly developed method for assessing hot tearing susceptibility of aluminium alloys, and also gives the results on hot tearing for various aluminium alloys.

  11. Diamond grooving of rapidly solidified optical aluminium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abou-El-Hossein, Khaled; Hsu, Wei-Yao; Ghobashy, Sameh; Cheng, Yuan-Chieh; Mkoko, Zwelinzima

    2015-10-01

    Traditional optical aluminium grades such as Al 6061 are intensively used for making optical components for applications ranging from mould insert fabrication to laser machine making. However, because of their irregular microstructure and relative inhomogeneity of material properties at micro scale, traditional optical aluminium may exhibit some difficulties when ultra-high precision diamond turned. Inhomogeneity and micro-variation in the material properties combined with uneven and coarse microstructure may cause unacceptable surface finish and accelerated tool wear, especially in grooving operation when the diamond tool edge is fully immersed in the material surface. Recently, new grades of optical aluminium that are featured by their ultra-fine microstructure and improved material properties have been developed to overcome the problem of high tool wear rates. The new aluminium grades have been developed using rapid solidification process which results in extremely small grain sizes combined with improved mechanical properties. The current study is concerned with investigating the performance of single-point diamond turning when grooving two grades of rapidly solidified aluminium (RSA) grades: RSA905 which is a high-alloyed aluminium grade and RSA443 which has a high silicon content. In this study, two series of experiments employed to create radial microgrooves on the two RSA grades. The surface roughness obtained on the groove surface is measured when different combinations of cutting parameters are used. Cutting speed is varied while feed rate and depth of cut were kept constant. The results show that groove surface roughness produced on RSA443 is higher than that obtained on RSA905. Also, the paper reports on the effect of cutting speed on surface roughness for each RSA grade.

  12. Evaluation of the Removal Bacteria on Failed Titanium Implants After Irradiation With Erbium-Doped Yttrium Aluminium Garnet Laser.

    PubMed

    Scarano, Antonio; Nardi, Gianna; Murmura, Giovanna; Rapani, Manuela; Mortellaro, Carmen

    2016-07-01

    Peri-implantitis may occur because of biologic or mechanical factors. It can be treated by a variety of methods. The aim of the present study is to evaluate implant surface of failed oral titanium implants after being irradiated with erbium laser. PMID:27391491

  13. The use of the erbium yttrium aluminium garnet (2,940 nm) in a laser-assisted apicectomy procedure.

    PubMed

    Reyhanian, A; Parker, S; Moshonov, J

    2008-09-27

    If conventional endodontic treatment is not possible or not successful, apical endodontic surgery may be indicated. New techniques, materials and technologies have been used to increase the already high success rate of root canal treatment. The purpose of this article is to describe the use of the Erbium:YAG (2,940 nm) laser in treatment of apicectomy as a central tool, with the advantages of enhanced patient comfort, better bactericidal and decontamination effects.

  14. Evaluation of the Removal Bacteria on Failed Titanium Implants After Irradiation With Erbium-Doped Yttrium Aluminium Garnet Laser.

    PubMed

    Scarano, Antonio; Nardi, Gianna; Murmura, Giovanna; Rapani, Manuela; Mortellaro, Carmen

    2016-07-01

    Peri-implantitis may occur because of biologic or mechanical factors. It can be treated by a variety of methods. The aim of the present study is to evaluate implant surface of failed oral titanium implants after being irradiated with erbium laser.

  15. Aluminium Sheet Metal Forming at Low Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, R.; Heine, B.; Grant, R. J.; Zouaoui, Z.

    2015-02-01

    Low-temperature forming technology offers a new potential for forming operations of aluminium wrought alloys which show a limited formability at ambient temperatures. This paper indicates the mechanical behaviour of the commercial aluminium alloys EN AW-5182 and EN AW-6016 at low temperatures. Stress-strain relationships at different temperatures were investigated through tensile testing experiments. Flow curves were extrapolated using an adapted mathematical constitutive relationship of flow stress and strain. A device which allows cupping tests at sub-zero temperatures was specially designed and a limiting dome height was determined.

  16. Efficient lasing in Yb:(YLa)2O3 ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snetkov, I. L.; Mukhin, I. B.; Balabanov, S. S.; Permin, D. A.; Palashov, O. V.

    2015-02-01

    A high-optical-quality sample of Yb0.1Y1.7La0.2O3 ceramics is prepared using a recently developed technique of selfpropagating high-temperature synthesis of rare-earth-doped yttrium oxide nanopowder from acetate - nitrates of metals. Its optical and spectral characteristics are studied, and quasi-cw lasing at a wavelength of 1033 nm is achieved with a power of 7 W and a slope efficiency of 25%.

  17. Phonon anharmonicity of monoclinic zirconia and yttrium-stabilized zirconia

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Chen W.; Smith, Hillary L.; Lan, Tian; Niedziela, Jennifer L.; Munoz, Jorge A.; Keith, J. Brian; Mauger, L.; Abernathy, Douglas L; Fultz, B.

    2015-04-13

    Inelastic neutron scattering measurements on monoclinic zirconia (ZrO2) and 8 mol% yttrium-stabilized zirconia were performed at temperatures from 300 to 1373 ωK. We reported temperature-dependent phonon densities of states (DOS) and Raman spectra obtained at elevated temperatures. First-principles lattice dynamics calculations with density functional theory gave total and partial phonon DOS curves and mode Grüneisen parameters. These mode Grüneisen parameters were used to predict the experimental temperature dependence of the phonon DOS with partial success. However, substantial anharmonicity was found at elevated temperatures, especially for phonon modes dominated by the motions of oxygen atoms. Yttrium-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) was somewhat more anharmonic and had a broader phonon spectrum at low temperatures, owing in part to defects in its structure. YSZ also has a larger vibrational entropy than monoclinic zirconia.

  18. Phonon anharmonicity of monoclinic zirconia and yttrium-stabilized zirconia

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Chen W.; Smith, Hillary L.; Lan, Tian; Niedziela, Jennifer L.; Munoz, Jorge A.; Keith, J. Brian; Mauger, L.; Abernathy, Douglas L; Fultz, B.

    2015-04-13

    Inelastic neutron scattering measurements on monoclinic zirconia (ZrO2) and 8 mol% yttrium-stabilized zirconia were performed at temperatures from 300 to 1373 ωK. We reported temperature-dependent phonon densities of states (DOS) and Raman spectra obtained at elevated temperatures. First-principles lattice dynamics calculations with density functional theory gave total and partial phonon DOS curves and mode Grüneisen parameters. These mode Grüneisen parameters were used to predict the experimental temperature dependence of the phonon DOS with partial success. However, substantial anharmonicity was found at elevated temperatures, especially for phonon modes dominated by the motions of oxygen atoms. Yttrium-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) was somewhat moremore » anharmonic and had a broader phonon spectrum at low temperatures, owing in part to defects in its structure. YSZ also has a larger vibrational entropy than monoclinic zirconia.« less

  19. Phonon anharmonicity of monoclinic zirconia and yttrium-stabilized zirconia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, C. W.; Smith, H. L.; Lan, T.; Niedziela, J. L.; Muñoz, J. A.; Keith, J. B.; Mauger, L.; Abernathy, D. L.; Fultz, B.

    2015-04-01

    Inelastic neutron scattering measurements on monoclinic zirconia (ZrO2 ) and 8 mol% yttrium-stabilized zirconia were performed at temperatures from 300 to 1373 w K . Temperature-dependent phonon densities of states (DOS) are reported, as are Raman spectra obtained at elevated temperatures. First-principles lattice dynamics calculations with density functional theory gave total and partial phonon DOS curves and mode Grüneisen parameters. These mode Grüneisen parameters were used to predict the experimental temperature dependence of the phonon DOS with partial success. However, substantial anharmonicity was found at elevated temperatures, especially for phonon modes dominated by the motions of oxygen atoms. Yttrium-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) was somewhat more anharmonic and had a broader phonon spectrum at low temperatures, owing in part to defects in its structure. YSZ also has a larger vibrational entropy than monoclinic zirconia.

  20. Aluminium in Alzheimer's disease: are we still at a crossroad?

    PubMed

    Gupta, Veer Bala; Anitha, S; Hegde, M L; Zecca, L; Garruto, R M; Ravid, R; Shankar, S K; Stein, R; Shanmugavelu, P; Jagannatha Rao, K S

    2005-01-01

    Aluminium, an environmentally abundant non-redox trivalent cation has long been implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the definite mechanism of aluminium toxicity in AD is not known. Evidence suggests that trace metal homeostasis plays a crucial role in the normal functioning of the brain, and any disturbance in it can exacerbate events associated with AD. The present paper reviews the scientific literature linking aluminium with AD. The focus is on aluminium levels in brain, region-specific and subcellular distribution, its relation to neurofibrillary tangles, amyloid beta, and other metals. A detailed mechanism of the role of aluminium in oxidative stress and cell death is highlighted. The importance of complex speciation chemistry of aluminium in relation to biology has been emphasized. The debatable role of aluminium in AD and the cross-talk between aluminium and genetic susceptibility are also discussed. Finally, it is concluded based on extensive literature that the neurotoxic effects of aluminium are beyond any doubt, and aluminium as a factor in AD cannot be discarded. However, whether aluminium is a sole factor in AD and whether it is a factor in all AD cases still needs to be understood.

  1. Structural and dielectric properties of yttrium substituted nickel ferrites

    SciTech Connect

    Ognjanovic, Stevan M.; Tokic, Ivan; Cvejic, Zeljka; Rakic, Srdjan; Srdic, Vladimir V.

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Dense NiFe{sub 2−x}Y{sub x}O{sub 4} ceramics (with 0 ≤ x ≤ 0.3) were prepared. • Pure spinels were obtained for x ≤ 0.07 while for x ≥ 0.15 samples had secondary phases. • With addition of yttrium, ac conductivity slightly increased. • We suggest several effects that can explain the observed changes in ac conduction. • With addition of yttrium, dielectric constant increased while the tg δ decreased. - Abstract: The influence of Y{sup 3+} ions on structural and dielectric properties of nickel ferrites (NiFe{sub 2−x}Y{sub x}O{sub 4}, where 0 ≤ x ≤ 0.3) has been studied. The as-synthesized samples, prepared by the co-precipitation method, were analyzed by XRD and FTIR which suggested that Y{sup 3+} ions were incorporated into the crystal lattice for all the samples. However, the XRD analysis of the sintered samples showed that secondary phases appear in the samples with x > 0.07. The samples have densities greater than 90% TD and the SEM images showed that the grain size decreases with the addition of yttrium. Dielectric properties measured from 150 to 25 °C in the frequency range of 100 Hz–1 MHz showed that the addition of yttrium slightly increases the ac conductivity and decreases the tg δ therefore making the materials better suited for the use in microwave devices.

  2. Mechanochemical synthesis of an yttrium based metal-organic framework.

    PubMed

    Singh, Niraj K; Hardi, Meenakshi; Balema, Viktor P

    2013-02-01

    For the first time a metal hydride has been used for the preparation of a metal-organic framework. MIL-78 has been synthesized by the solid-state mechanochemical reaction between yttrium hydride and trimesic acid. The process does not involve solvents and does not generate liquid by-products, thus proving the viability of the solid-state approach to the synthesis of MOFs.

  3. Upconversion luminescence in Yb 3+-doped yttrium aluminum garnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaodong; Zhao, Zhiwei; Song, Pingxin; Jiang, Benxue; Zhou, Guoqing; Xu, Jun; Deng, Peizhen; Bourdet, Gilbert; Christophe Chanteloup, Jean; Zou, Ji-Ping; Fulop, Annabelle

    2005-03-01

    In this paper, we present results on upconversion luminescence performed on Yb 3+-doped yttrium aluminum garnets under 940 nm excitation. The upconversion luminescence was ascribed to Yb 3+ cooperative luminescence and the presence of rare earth impurity ions. The cooperative luminescence spectra as a function of Yb concentration were measured and the emission intensity variation with Yb concentration was discussed. Yb 3+ energy migration quenched the cooperative luminescence of Yb:YAG crystals with doping level over 15 at%.

  4. Two-photon excitation of aluminium phthalocyanines

    SciTech Connect

    Meshalkin, Yu P; Alfimov, E E; Makukha, V K; Vasil'ev, N E; Denisov, A N; Ogirenko, A P

    1999-12-31

    A demonstration is given of the feasibility of two-photon excitation of aluminium phthalocyanine and of the pharmaceutical preparation 'Fotosens', used in photodynamic therapy. The excitation source was an Nd:YAG laser emitting at the 1064 nm wavelength. The spectra of the two-photon-excited luminescence were obtained and the two-photon absorption cross sections were determined. (lasers in medicine)

  5. Molecular breeding of cereals for aluminium resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aluminium (Al3+) toxicity is the primary factor limiting crop production on acidic soils worldwide. In addition to an application of lime for soil amelioration, Al3+ resistant plant varieties have been deployed to raise productivity on such hostile soils. This has been possible due to the exploita...

  6. Structural and magnetic properties of yttrium and lanthanum-doped Ni-Co and Ni-Co-Zn spinel ferrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stergiou, Charalampos; Litsardakis, George

    2014-11-01

    Rare earth doping of Co-rich spinel ferrites is investigated through the preparation of two groups of polycrystalline Ni-Co and Ni-Co-Zn ferrites, where Fe is partly substituted by Y and La. The characterization of the sintered ferrites by means of X-ray powder diffraction and Rietveld profile analysis, indicates the subtle expansion of the spinel unit cell and the cation redistribution in the doped ferrites in order to accommodate the incorporation of Y and La in the lattice. The impurity traces, detected only in the Ni-Co-Zn group, is ascribed to the Zn population in the tetrahedral A-sites impeding the cation transfer. Moreover, the examined microstructure of the doped Ni-Co samples comprises enlarged and more homogeneous grains, whereas grain growth is moderated in the doped Ni-Co-Zn ferrites. The discussed characteristics of the crystal and magnetic structure along with the morphological aspects define the impact of Y and La doping on the static magnetic properties of Ni-Co and Ni-Co-Zn ferrites, saturation magnetization MS and coercivity HC, which were extracted from the respective hysteresis loops.

  7. Structural and magnetic properties of yttrium and lanthanum-doped Ni-Co and Ni-Co-Zn spinel ferrites

    SciTech Connect

    Stergiou, Charalampos; Litsardakis, George

    2014-11-05

    Rare earth doping of Co-rich spinel ferrites is investigated through the preparation of two groups of polycrystalline Ni-Co and Ni-Co-Zn ferrites, where Fe is partly substituted by Y and La. The characterization of the sintered ferrites by means of X-ray powder diffraction and Rietveld profile analysis, indicates the subtle expansion of the spinel unit cell and the cation redistribution in the doped ferrites in order to accommodate the incorporation of Y and La in the lattice. The impurity traces, detected only in the Ni-Co-Zn group, is ascribed to the Zn population in the tetrahedral A-sites impeding the cation transfer. Moreover, the examined microstructure of the doped Ni-Co samples comprises enlarged and more homogeneous grains, whereas grain growth is moderated in the doped Ni-Co-Zn ferrites. The discussed characteristics of the crystal and magnetic structure along with the morphological aspects define the impact of Y and La doping on the static magnetic properties of Ni-Co and Ni-Co-Zn ferrites, saturation magnetization MS and coercivity HC, which were extracted from the respective hysteresis loops.

  8. Toxicity of dissolved and precipitated aluminium to marine diatoms.

    PubMed

    Gillmore, Megan L; Golding, Lisa A; Angel, Brad M; Adams, Merrin S; Jolley, Dianne F

    2016-05-01

    Localised aluminium contamination can lead to high concentrations in coastal waters, which have the potential for adverse effects on aquatic organisms. This research investigated the toxicity of 72-h exposures of aluminium to three marine diatoms (Ceratoneis closterium (formerly Nitzschia closterium), Minutocellus polymorphus and Phaeodactylum tricornutum) by measuring population growth rate inhibition and cell membrane damage (SYTOX Green) as endpoints. Toxicity was correlated to the time-averaged concentrations of different aluminium size-fractions, operationally defined as <0.025μm filtered, <0.45μm filtered (dissolved) and unfiltered (total) present in solution over the 72-h bioassay. The chronic population growth rate inhibition after aluminium exposure varied between diatom species. C. closterium was the most sensitive species (10% inhibition of growth rate (72-h IC10) of 80 (55-100)μg Al/L (95% confidence limits)) while M. polymorphus (540 (460-600)μg Al/L) and P. tricornutum (2100 (2000-2200)μg Al/L) were less sensitive (based on measured total aluminium). Dissolved aluminium was the primary contributor to toxicity in C. closterium, while a combination of dissolved and precipitated aluminium forms contributed to toxicity in M. polymorphus. In contrast, aluminium toxicity to the most tolerant diatom P. tricornutum was due predominantly to precipitated aluminium. Preliminary investigations revealed the sensitivity of C. closterium and M. polymorphus to aluminium was influenced by initial cell density with aluminium toxicity significantly (p<0.05) increasing with initial cell density from 10(3) to 10(5)cells/mL. No effects on plasma membrane permeability were observed for any of the three diatoms suggesting that mechanisms of aluminium toxicity to diatoms do not involve compromising the plasma membrane. These results indicate that marine diatoms have a broad range in sensitivity to aluminium with toxic mechanisms related to both dissolved and precipitated

  9. Toxicity of dissolved and precipitated aluminium to marine diatoms.

    PubMed

    Gillmore, Megan L; Golding, Lisa A; Angel, Brad M; Adams, Merrin S; Jolley, Dianne F

    2016-05-01

    Localised aluminium contamination can lead to high concentrations in coastal waters, which have the potential for adverse effects on aquatic organisms. This research investigated the toxicity of 72-h exposures of aluminium to three marine diatoms (Ceratoneis closterium (formerly Nitzschia closterium), Minutocellus polymorphus and Phaeodactylum tricornutum) by measuring population growth rate inhibition and cell membrane damage (SYTOX Green) as endpoints. Toxicity was correlated to the time-averaged concentrations of different aluminium size-fractions, operationally defined as <0.025μm filtered, <0.45μm filtered (dissolved) and unfiltered (total) present in solution over the 72-h bioassay. The chronic population growth rate inhibition after aluminium exposure varied between diatom species. C. closterium was the most sensitive species (10% inhibition of growth rate (72-h IC10) of 80 (55-100)μg Al/L (95% confidence limits)) while M. polymorphus (540 (460-600)μg Al/L) and P. tricornutum (2100 (2000-2200)μg Al/L) were less sensitive (based on measured total aluminium). Dissolved aluminium was the primary contributor to toxicity in C. closterium, while a combination of dissolved and precipitated aluminium forms contributed to toxicity in M. polymorphus. In contrast, aluminium toxicity to the most tolerant diatom P. tricornutum was due predominantly to precipitated aluminium. Preliminary investigations revealed the sensitivity of C. closterium and M. polymorphus to aluminium was influenced by initial cell density with aluminium toxicity significantly (p<0.05) increasing with initial cell density from 10(3) to 10(5)cells/mL. No effects on plasma membrane permeability were observed for any of the three diatoms suggesting that mechanisms of aluminium toxicity to diatoms do not involve compromising the plasma membrane. These results indicate that marine diatoms have a broad range in sensitivity to aluminium with toxic mechanisms related to both dissolved and precipitated

  10. Toxicity and aluminium concentration in bone following dietary administration of two sodium aluminium phosphate formulations in rats.

    PubMed

    Hicks, J S; Hackett, D S; Sprague, G L

    1987-07-01

    The effects of dietary administration of the basic sodium aluminium phosphates, KASAL and KASAL II, were examined in male rats. Aluminium levels in bone were determined in order to estimate the possible aluminium deposition by these compounds. Groups of 25 male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed control diet or diets containing 30,000 ppm KASAL, 7000 or 30,000 ppm KASAL II, or 14,470 ppm aluminium hydroxide for 28 days. The mean daily aluminium doses were calculated to be 5, 141, 67, 288 or 302 mg/kg body weight/day, respectively. Neither form of KASAL induced detectable toxicity. No adverse treatment-related clinical signs were observed. Body weights and food consumptions were similar in treated and control groups. No toxicologically significant changes were observed in haematology, clinical chemistry parameters or organ weights. No treatment-related changes were observed at autopsy or in histopathological examination of collected tissues. Femurs collected at autopsy under conditions free of aluminium contamination showed no significant deposition of aluminium after dietary administration of KASAL, KASAL II or aluminium hydroxide. All aluminium values in bone were less than 1 ppm and most values were not quantifiable. Thus, dietary administration of up to 30,000 ppm of either of the basic sodium aluminium phosphate formulations caused neither toxicity nor significant deposition of aluminium in femur.

  11. Microemulsion extraction separation and determination of aluminium species by spectrofluorimetry.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jusheng; Tian, Jiuying; Guo, Na; Wang, Yan; Pan, Yichun

    2011-01-30

    A simple and sensitive microemulsion extraction separation method was developed for the speciation of aluminium in tea samples by spectrofluorimetry. With 8-hydroxyquinoline (8-HQ) as the chelating agent and Triton X-100 Winsor II microemulsion as the extractant, separation of aluminium species in different pH solutions was achieved by microemulsion extraction. The formation of microemulsion, the conditions of extraction and determination of aluminium species were studied. The results showed that, the contents of aluminium species in tea leaves and infusions samples, such as total aluminium, total soluble aluminium, total granular aluminium, inorganic aluminium except Al-F, and (Al-F+Al-org), were obtained successfully under the optimal conditions. The limit of detection was 0.23 μg L(-1) in pH 9.5 solution, and 0.59 μg L(-1) in pH 6.0 solution respectively; the precision (RSD) for 11 replicate measurements of 10 μg L(-1) aluminium was 2.1% in pH 9.5 solution, and 2.8% in pH 6.0 solution respectively; the recoveries for the spiked samples were 96.8-103.5%. The proposed method is simple and efficient, which has been applied to the speciation of aluminium in tea samples with satisfactory results.

  12. Apoferritin-Templated Yttrium Phosphate Nanoparticle Conjugates for Radioimmunotherapy of Cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Hong; Wang, Jun; Wang, Zheming; Fisher, Darrell R.; Lin, Yuehe

    2008-05-01

    We report a templated-synthetic approach based on apoferritin to prepare radionuclide nanoparticle (NP) conjugates. Non-radioactive yttrium (89Y) was used as model target and surrogate for radioyttrium (90Y) to prepare the nanoparticle conjugate. The center cavity and multiple channel structure of apoferritin offer a fast and facile method to precipitate yttrium phosphate by diffusing yttrium and phosphate ions into the cavity of apofrritin, resulting a core-shell nanocomposite. The yttrium phosphate/apoferritin nanoparticle was functionalized with biotin for further application. The synthesized nanoparticle was characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). We found that the resulting nanoparticles were uniform in size, with a diameter of around 8 nm. We tested the pre-targeting capability of the biotin-modified yttrium phosphate/apoferritin nanoparticle (yttrium phosphate/apoferritin nanoparticle) conjugate with streptavidin-modified magnetic beads and with aid of biotin-modified fluorecein isothiocyanate (FITC) tracer. This work shows that an yttrium phosphate NP conjugate provides a fast, simple and efficient method to prepare radioactive yttrium conjugate for applications in radioimmunotherapy of cancer.

  13. Infrared spectra of oxygen-rich yttrium and lanthanum dioxygen/ozonide complexes in solid argon.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yu; Ding, Chuanfan; Zhou, Mingfei

    2009-07-30

    The reactions of yttrium and lanthanum atoms with O(2) have been reinvestigated using matrix isolation infrared spectroscopy and theoretical calculations. The ground-state yttrium and lanthanum atoms react with O(2) to produce the inserted yttrium and lanthanum dioxide molecules as the initial products. The yttrium dioxide molecule interacts spontaneously with additional O(2) molecules to form the oxygen-rich OY(eta(2)-O(3)) complex and possibly the (eta(2)-O(2))Y(eta(2)-O(3))(2) complexes upon sample annealing, which can be regarded as the side-on bonded yttrium monoxide ozonide complex and the superoxo yttrium bisozonide complex, respectively. Visible irradiation induces the isomerization of the OY(eta(2)-O(3)) complex to the superoxo yttrium peroxide Y(eta(2)-O(2))(2) isomer, in which both the superoxo and peroxo ligands are side-on bonded to the yttrium center. The lanthanum dioxide molecule reacts with additional O(2) molecules to form the lanthanum dioxide-dioxygen complex with planar C(2v) symmetry, which rearranges to the lanthanum monoxide ozonide complex, OLa(eta(2)-O(3)), under near-infrared excitation.

  14. Some aspects related to the presence of aluminium in waters.

    PubMed

    Giordano, R; Costantini, S

    1993-01-01

    Aluminium is present in very small amounts in living organisms but it is abundant in the environment, where it exists in forms with low availability to man and most biological species. Despite its abundance in the earth's crust only a small amount of aluminium is present in waters, with concentrations varying from a few tens to some hundreds of micrograms per liter. High levels of aluminium in drinking water are in most cases due either to acid precipitation or water treatment with aluminium salts. The presence of aluminium in dialysis fluids has been recognized as the major reason for development of aluminium toxicity in patients with renal failure. In subjects with normal renal function, high concentrations of this element in drinking water (> 80 micrograms/l) have been related to an elevated incidence of Alzheimer's disease, even though the real contribution of the element in the development of the disease has not yet been clarified. PMID:8279721

  15. What is the risk of aluminium as a neurotoxin?

    PubMed

    Exley, Christopher

    2014-06-01

    Aluminium is neurotoxic. Its free ion, Al(3+) (aq), is highly biologically reactive and uniquely equipped to do damage to essential cellular (neuronal) biochemistry. This unequivocal fact must be the starting point in examining the risk posed by aluminium as a neurotoxin in humans. Aluminium is present in the human brain and it accumulates with age. The most recent research demonstrates that a significant proportion of individuals older than 70 years of age have a potentially pathological accumulation of aluminium somewhere in their brain. What are the symptoms of chronic aluminium intoxication in humans? What if neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease are the manifestation of the risk of aluminium as a neurotoxin? How might such an (outrageous) hypothesis be tested?

  16. Feet sunk in molten aluminium: The burn and its prevention.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Peña, David; Arnáiz-García, María Elena; Valero-Gasalla, Javier Luis; Arnáiz-García, Ana María; Campillo-Campaña, Ramón; Alonso-Peña, Javier; González-Santos, Jose María; Fernández-Díaz, Alaska Leonor; Arnáiz, Javier

    2015-08-01

    Nowadays, despite improvements in safety rules and inspections in the metal industry, foundry workers are not free from burn accidents. Injuries caused by molten metals include burns secondary to molten iron, aluminium, zinc, copper, brass, bronze, manganese, lead and steel. Molten aluminium is one of the most common causative agents of burns (60%); however, only a few publications exist concerning injuries from molten aluminium. The main mechanisms of lesion from molten aluminium include direct contact of the molten metal with the skin or through safety apparel, or when the metal splash burns through the pants and rolls downward along the leg. Herein, we report three cases of deep dermal burns after 'soaking' the foot in liquid aluminium and its evolutive features. This paper aims to show our experience in the management of burns due to molten aluminium. We describe the current management principles and the key features of injury prevention.

  17. Novel growth of aluminium nitride nanowires.

    PubMed

    Radwan, M; Bahgat, M

    2006-02-01

    This work describes novel growth of aluminium nitride (AIN) nanowires by nitridation of a mixture consists of aluminium and ammonium chloride powders (Al:NH4Cl = 1.5:1 weight ratio) at 1000 degrees C for 1 h in flowing nitrogen gas (1 l/min). XRD analysis of the product showed the formation of pure hexagonal AIN. SEM micrographs of as-synthesized product revealed the growth of homogeneous AIN nanowires (phi 40-150 nm). No droplets were observed at the tips of obtained nanowires which suggests that they were grown mainly by a vapor-phase reactions mechanism. Thermodynamic analysis of possible intermediate reactions in the operating temperatures range illustrates that these nanowires could be grown via spontaneous vapor-phase chlorination-nitridation sequences.

  18. Studies on an aluminium-carbon cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, L. K.

    The current-voltage behaviour of an electrochemical cell that consists of an aluminium anode and a carbon cathode in a medium containing aqueous NH 4SCN has been studied, both in the presence and in the absence of a coating on the carbon electrode. It is found that activation polarization is the main factor that limits the current output when using an untreated carbon electrode. This problem is eliminated by coating the carbon electrode with an in situ deposition of HgI 2. In this condition, the current output is reduced mainly by ohmic polarization. Further studies with a coated HgI 2-carbon cathode and an aluminium anode, in a medium containing SCN - and Cl - ions together with a complexing agent (EDTA, sodium salt), revealed that a cell performance close to ideal, (i.e, showing no appreciable polarization) can be obtained at currents up to 0.6 mA/cm 2 and above.

  19. An ultrafast rechargeable aluminium-ion battery.

    PubMed

    Lin, Meng-Chang; Gong, Ming; Lu, Bingan; Wu, Yingpeng; Wang, Di-Yan; Guan, Mingyun; Angell, Michael; Chen, Changxin; Yang, Jiang; Hwang, Bing-Joe; Dai, Hongjie

    2015-04-16

    The development of new rechargeable battery systems could fuel various energy applications, from personal electronics to grid storage. Rechargeable aluminium-based batteries offer the possibilities of low cost and low flammability, together with three-electron-redox properties leading to high capacity. However, research efforts over the past 30 years have encountered numerous problems, such as cathode material disintegration, low cell discharge voltage (about 0.55 volts; ref. 5), capacitive behaviour without discharge voltage plateaus (1.1-0.2 volts or 1.8-0.8 volts) and insufficient cycle life (less than 100 cycles) with rapid capacity decay (by 26-85 per cent over 100 cycles). Here we present a rechargeable aluminium battery with high-rate capability that uses an aluminium metal anode and a three-dimensional graphitic-foam cathode. The battery operates through the electrochemical deposition and dissolution of aluminium at the anode, and intercalation/de-intercalation of chloroaluminate anions in the graphite, using a non-flammable ionic liquid electrolyte. The cell exhibits well-defined discharge voltage plateaus near 2 volts, a specific capacity of about 70 mA h g(-1) and a Coulombic efficiency of approximately 98 per cent. The cathode was found to enable fast anion diffusion and intercalation, affording charging times of around one minute with a current density of ~4,000 mA g(-1) (equivalent to ~3,000 W kg(-1)), and to withstand more than 7,500 cycles without capacity decay. PMID:25849777

  20. An ultrafast rechargeable aluminium-ion battery.

    PubMed

    Lin, Meng-Chang; Gong, Ming; Lu, Bingan; Wu, Yingpeng; Wang, Di-Yan; Guan, Mingyun; Angell, Michael; Chen, Changxin; Yang, Jiang; Hwang, Bing-Joe; Dai, Hongjie

    2015-04-16

    The development of new rechargeable battery systems could fuel various energy applications, from personal electronics to grid storage. Rechargeable aluminium-based batteries offer the possibilities of low cost and low flammability, together with three-electron-redox properties leading to high capacity. However, research efforts over the past 30 years have encountered numerous problems, such as cathode material disintegration, low cell discharge voltage (about 0.55 volts; ref. 5), capacitive behaviour without discharge voltage plateaus (1.1-0.2 volts or 1.8-0.8 volts) and insufficient cycle life (less than 100 cycles) with rapid capacity decay (by 26-85 per cent over 100 cycles). Here we present a rechargeable aluminium battery with high-rate capability that uses an aluminium metal anode and a three-dimensional graphitic-foam cathode. The battery operates through the electrochemical deposition and dissolution of aluminium at the anode, and intercalation/de-intercalation of chloroaluminate anions in the graphite, using a non-flammable ionic liquid electrolyte. The cell exhibits well-defined discharge voltage plateaus near 2 volts, a specific capacity of about 70 mA h g(-1) and a Coulombic efficiency of approximately 98 per cent. The cathode was found to enable fast anion diffusion and intercalation, affording charging times of around one minute with a current density of ~4,000 mA g(-1) (equivalent to ~3,000 W kg(-1)), and to withstand more than 7,500 cycles without capacity decay.

  1. Thermodynamic properties of uranium in gallium-aluminium based alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkovich, V. A.; Maltsev, D. S.; Yamshchikov, L. F.; Chukin, A. V.; Smolenski, V. V.; Novoselova, A. V.; Osipenko, A. G.

    2015-10-01

    Activity, activity coefficients and solubility of uranium was determined in gallium-aluminium alloys containing 1.6 (eutectic), 5 and 20 wt.% aluminium. Additionally, activity of uranium was determined in aluminium and Ga-Al alloys containing 0.014-20 wt.% Al. Experiments were performed up to 1073 K. Intermetallic compounds formed in the alloys were characterized by X-ray diffraction. Partial and excess thermodynamic functions of U in the studied alloys were calculated.

  2. The aluminium content of infant formulas remains too high

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Recent research published in this journal highlighted the issue of the high content of aluminium in infant formulas. The expectation was that the findings would serve as a catalyst for manufacturers to address a significant problem of these, often necessary, components of infant nutrition. It is critically important that parents and other users have confidence in the safety of infant formulas and that they have reliable information to use in choosing a product with a lower content of aluminium. Herein, we have significantly extended the scope of the previous research and the aluminium content of 30 of the most widely available and often used infant formulas has been measured. Methods Both ready-to-drink milks and milk powders were subjected to microwave digestion in the presence of 15.8 M HNO3 and 30% w/v H2O2 and the aluminium content of the digests was measured by TH GFAAS. Results Both ready-to-drink milks and milk powders were contaminated with aluminium. The concentration of aluminium across all milk products ranged from ca 100 to 430 μg/L. The concentration of aluminium in two soya-based milk products was 656 and 756 μg/L. The intake of aluminium from non-soya-based infant formulas varied from ca 100 to 300 μg per day. For soya-based milks it could be as high as 700 μg per day. Conclusions All 30 infant formulas were contaminated with aluminium. There was no clear evidence that subsequent to the problem of aluminium being highlighted in a previous publication in this journal that contamination had been addressed and reduced. It is the opinion of the authors that regulatory and other non-voluntary methods are now required to reduce the aluminium content of infant formulas and thereby protect infants from chronic exposure to dietary aluminium. PMID:24103160

  3. Yttrium-90 radioembolization as a palliative treatment for liver tumors: a case study.

    PubMed

    Maas, Lisa

    2015-10-01

    The best chance of cure for patients with liver cancer is surgical removal, but many tumors are too large or invasive. In addition, chemotherapy is frequently unsuccessful in this patient population. A case study is featured involving a patient determined to be a candidate for Yttrium-90 radioembolization, a minimally invasive liver-directed treatment used to target primary and metastatic liver tumors by delivering radioactive microspheres directly to the tumor. This article provides an introduction to the procedure, as well as practical information for nurses caring for patients with liver cancer following Yttrium-90 radioembolization.AT A GLANCE: Yttrium-90 radioembolization allows larger radiation doses to be used without affecting healthy tissues.An outpatient procedure, Yttrium-90 radioembolization results in fewer side effects than standard treatment.
Although Yttrium-90 radioembolization can extend and improve quality of life, its intent is palliative, not curative.

  4. RBS and GAXRD contributions to yttrium implanted extra low carbon steel characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Caudron, E.; Buscail, H.; Jacob, Y.P.; Stroosnijder, M.F.

    1999-02-01

    Extra low carbon steel samples were yttrium implanted using an ion implantation method. Composition and structural studies were carried out before and after yttrium implantations by several analytical and structural techniques (Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, reflection high energy electron diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and glancing angle X-ray diffraction) to characterize the yttrium implantation effect on extra low carbon steel. The aim of this article is to show the contributions of Rutherford back-scattering spectrometry (RBS) and glancing angle X-ray diffraction (GAXRD) to the determination of yttrium depth profiles in the samples. The results obtained by these techniques are compared to those of the other analyses performed in this work to show the existing correlation between composition and structural studies. Their results allow a better understanding of the effect of yttrium implantation in extra low carbon steel before studying their corrosion resistance at high temperature.

  5. Plasmonic enhancement of photoluminescence from aluminium nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, Chris; Stewart, Matthew

    2016-03-01

    Aluminium nitride (AlN) films were grown on c-plane sapphire wafers by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) under aluminium-rich conditions. The excess aluminium (Al) accumulated on the surface of the films as micro-scale droplets 1-10 μm in size, and as Al nanoparticles with diameters in the range 10-110 nm. Photoluminescence (PL) measurements were performed on the AlN samples using a 193 nm Excimer laser as the excitation source. Prior to PL measurements the wafers were cleaved in half. One half of each wafer was submitted to a 10 min treatment in H3PO4 heated to 70 °C to remove the excess Al from the film surface. The remaining half was left in the as-deposited condition. The mean intensities of the near-band-edge PL peaks of the as-deposited samples were 2.0-3.4 times higher compared to the samples subjected to the H3PO4 Al-removal treatment. This observation motivated calculations to determine the optimal Al surface nanosphere size for plasmonic enhancement of PL from AlN. The PL enhancement was found to peak for an Al nanosphere radius of 15 nm, which is within the range of the experimentally-observed Al nanoparticle sizes.

  6. Aluminium-aluminium nitride composites fabricated by melt infiltration under pressure

    PubMed

    Chedru; Vicens; Chermant; Mordike

    1999-11-01

    Aluminium-matrix composites containing approximately 55 vol.% AlN particles were fabricated by melt infiltration of aluminium into an AlN preform under a pressure of up to 130 MPa. Two different AlN powders (H.C. Starck, Goslar, Germany, and ESK, Elektroschmelzwerk, Kempten, Germany) and four types of aluminium alloy (2024, 1070, 6060 and 5754) were used. The initial AlN powders were characterized by scanning electron microscopy. The composites were studied by light microscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopies and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Particle-matrix interfaces were observed using high-resolution electron microscopy. As a result of the melt infiltration process, the composites are very dense and the microstructure shows a homogeneous distribution of the reinforcement. The interfaces are clean with very little porosity. Some Al2Cu precipitates were observed in the 2024 matrix.

  7. Effects of aluminium surface morphology and chemical modification on wettability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahimi, M.; Fojan, P.; Gurevich, L.; Afshari, A.

    2014-03-01

    Aluminium alloys are some of the predominant metals in industrial applications such as production of heat exchangers, heat pumps. They have high heat conductivity coupled with a low specific weight. In cold working conditions, there is a risk of frost formation on the surface of aluminium in the presence of water vapour, which can lead to the deterioration of equipment performance. This work addresses the methods of surface modification of aluminium and their effect of the underlying surface morphology and wettability, which are the important parameters for frost formation. Three groups of real-life aluminium surfaces of different morphology: unpolished aluminium, polished aluminium, and aluminium foil, were subjected to surface modification procedures which involved the formation of a layer of hydrophilic hyperbranched polyethyleneglycol via in situ polymerization, molecular vapour deposition of a monolayer of fluorinated silane, and a combination of those. The effect of these surface modification techniques on roughness and wettability of the aluminium surfaces was elucidated by ellipsometry, contact angle measurements and atomic force microscopy. We demonstrated that by employing different types of surface modifications the contact angle of water droplets on aluminium samples can be varied from 12° to more than 120°. A crossover from Cassie-Baxter to Wenzel regime upon changing the surface roughness was also observed.

  8. The potential role of aluminium in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Arezoo

    2002-01-01

    Aluminium is a trivalent cation that does not undergo redox changes. It has, nonetheless, been implicated in a variety of neurological disorders that have been associated with an increase in the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The exact mechanism of aluminium toxicity is not known. However, accumulating evidence suggests that the metal can potentiate oxidative and inflammatory events, leading to tissue damage. A review of the epidemiological and clinical evidence linking aluminium to Alzheimer's disease (AD) is presented. The article discusses the role of aluminium in two mechanisms that have been linked to neurodegenerative disorders, including AD. Studies are summarized that describe how aluminium can potentiate iron-induced oxidative events. Involvement of aluminium in inflammatory responses, mediated by interleukins and other inflammatory cytokines, is also discussed. Although a direct relationship between aluminium and AD has not been clearly demonstrated, a detailed mechanistic basis for the hypothesis that aluminium may exacerbate events associated with AD is clearly emerging. The results discussed here have broad implications for the role played by aluminium and other metals in neurodegenerative diseases, and suggest that long-term exposure to supra-physiological amounts these metals should be avoided.

  9. Production of aluminium metal matrix composites by liquid processing methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hynes, N. Rajesh Jesudoss; Kumar, R.; Tharmaraj, R.; Velu, P. Shenbaga

    2016-05-01

    Owing to high strength to low weight ratio, Aluminium matrix composites are widely used in diverse applications of many industries. This lucrative property is achieved by reinforcing the brittle ceramic particles in the aluminium matrix. Aluminium matrix composites are produced by liquid processing methods and solid processing methods. Nevertheless, liquidprocessing techniques stand out because of its simplicity and its suitability for mass production. In this review article, the production of aluminium matrix composites by different liquid processing technique is discussed and a comparative study is carried out.

  10. Development of photocatalyst by combined nitrogen and yttrium doping

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Matiullah; Cao, Wenbin

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The simulated compensated YN{sub SUB} co-doped TiO{sub 2} model can reasonably explain the experimental observations. Calculation results show that substitutional Y at Ti sites and substitutional N at O sites with an oxygen vacancy give stable configuration, reduced band gap, better visible light absorption and enhance separations of photoexcited charge carriers. The experimental observations confirmed the theoretical findings. - Highlights: • (Y, N) codoped TiO{sub 2} was synthesized by mild one pot hydrothermal method. • The Y doping concentration was varied from 0.01 to 1.38 at%. • 0.05% (Y, N) codoped TiO{sub 2} shows enhanced visible light photocatalytic activity. • Compensated and noncompensated ab-initio calculations were performed. • Calculation results reasonably explained the experimental findings. - Abstract: Titanium dioxide co-doped with yttrium and nitrogen with different yttrium doping concentration has been synthesized by mild one pot hydrothermal method without any post calcination for crystallization. Irrespective of the yttrium doping concentration, all the synthesized samples were composed of pure anatase phase with good crystallinity. And the synthesized co-doped samples have spherical morphology with uniform particle size distribution. The absorption edge of the co-doped TiO{sub 2} was shifted toward visible light region depicting that the intrinsic band gap of TiO{sub 2} was affected by the co-doping. Among the different samples, the co-doped sample with 0.05% yttrium doping concentration exhibits enhanced visible light photocatalytic activity by degradation of methylene blue in aqueous solution. Compensated and non-compensated yttrium–nitrogen co-doped TiO{sub 2} models were simulated using density functional theory to explain the experimental findings. The calculation results show that the compensated yttrium–nitrogen co-doped TiO{sub 2} model may reasonably explain the experimental observations due to its

  11. Characteristics of yttrium oxide laser ceramics with additives

    SciTech Connect

    Osipov, V V; Solomonov, V I; Orlov, A N; Shitov, V A; Maksimov, R N; Spirina, A V

    2013-03-31

    Neodymium- or ytterbium-doped laser ceramics with a disordered crystal-field structure formed by introduction of iso- and heterovalent elements into yttrium oxide are studied. It is shown that these additives broaden the spectral band of laser transitions, which makes it possible to use ceramics as active laser media emitting ultrashort pulses. Lasing was obtained in several samples of this ceramics. At the same time, it is shown that addition of zirconium and hafnium stimulates the Foerster quenching of upper laser levels and pump levels. (extreme light fields and their applications)

  12. Some aspects of the geochemistry of yttrium and the lanthanides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fleischer, Michael

    1965-01-01

    Recent data on the relative abundances of the lanthanides and yttrium in meteorites, basaltic rocks, granitic rocks and sedimentary rocks are reviewed. It is shown that the data are inadequate to substantiate or to disprove Taylor's derivation from these data of a 1:1 abundance ratio of basaltic to granitic rocks in the continental crust. Graphs are given to illustrate the variation of lanthanides in minerals with paragenesis. Both the paragenesis and the crystal chemistry of minerals affect the composition of the lanthanides.

  13. Enhanced spin pumping at yttrium iron garnet/Au interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Burrowes, C.; Heinrich, B.; Kardasz, B.; Montoya, E. A.; Girt, E.; Sun Yiyan; Song, Young-Yeal; Wu Mingzhong

    2012-02-27

    Spin injection across the ferrimagnetic insulator yttrium iron garnet (YIG)/normal metal Au interface was studied using ferromagnetic resonance. The spin mixing conductance was determined by comparing the Gilbert damping parameter {alpha} in YIG/Au and YIG/Au/Fe heterostructures. The main purpose of this study was to correlate the spin pumping efficiency with chemical modifications of the YIG film surface using in situ etching and deposition techniques. By means of Ar{sup +} ion beam etching, one is able to increase the spin mixing conductance at the YIG/Au interface by a factor of 5 compared to the untreated YIG/Au interface.

  14. Synchronization of chaos in circular yttrium iron garnet films

    SciTech Connect

    Peterman, D.W.; Ye, M.; Wigen, P.E.

    1996-04-01

    The results of the synchronization of two ferromagnetic resonance signals are presented. In the experiment, a thin yttrium iron garnet (YIG) film was placed in the perpendicular resonance configuration and the bias field, rf power, and frequency were chosen so that the rf absorption of the YIG sample was chaotic. A segment of this chaotic signal was stored into memory. The goal was to induce the sample to synchronize to its prerecorded output through a perturbation applied to a system parameter. The results of these synchronization experiments were predicted by a numerical model. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  15. Knee arthroscopy after yttrium or osmic acid injection

    SciTech Connect

    Guaydier-Souquieres, C.; Beguin, J.; Ollivier, D.; Loyau, G.

    1989-01-01

    This study presents the macroscopic and histologic results of 35 knee arthroscopies performed on patients with rheumatoid arthritis, some months after an yttrium or osmic acid intraarticular injection. The procedure was most often performed after a failure of the injection or a relapse of synovitis. Arthroscopy provides an understanding of the cause of synoviorthesis failure--insufficient action of the product on the synovitis or its poor diffusion, fibri-nonecrotic deposits, or cartilaginous lesions--and may be used both diagnostically and therapeutically.

  16. Treatment of exhaust fluorescent lamps to recover yttrium: experimental and process analyses.

    PubMed

    De Michelis, Ida; Ferella, Francesco; Varelli, Ennio Fioravante; Vegliò, Francesco

    2011-12-01

    The paper deals with recovery of yttrium from fluorescent powder coming from dismantling of spent fluorescent tubes. Metals are leached by using different acids (nitric, hydrochloric and sulphuric) and ammonia in different leaching tests. These tests show that ammonia is not suitable to recover yttrium, whereas HNO(3) produces toxic vapours. A full factorial design is carried out with HCl and H(2)SO(4) to evaluate the influence of operating factors. HCl and H(2)SO(4) leaching systems give similar results in terms of yttrium extraction yield, but the last one allows to reduce calcium extraction with subsequent advantage during recovery of yttrium compounds in the downstream. The greatest extraction of yttrium is obtained by 20% w/v S/L ratio, 4N H(2)SO(4) concentration and 90°C. Yttrium and calcium yields are nearly 85% and 5%, respectively. The analysis of variance shows that acid concentration alone and interaction between acid and pulp density have a significant positive effect on yttrium solubilization for both HCl and H(2)SO(4) medium. Two models are empirically developed to estimate yttrium and calcium concentration during leaching. Precipitation tests demonstrate that at least the stoichiometric amount of oxalic acid is necessary to recover yttrium efficiently and a pure yttrium oxalate n-hydrate can be produced (99% grade). The process is economically feasible if other components of the fluorescent lamps (glass, ferrous and non-ferrous scraps) are recovered after the equipment dismantling and valorized, besides the cost that is usually paid to recycling companies for collection, treatment or final disposal of such fluorescent powders.

  17. Nanoscale fullerene compression of an yttrium carbide cluster.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianyuan; Fuhrer, Tim; Fu, Wujun; Ge, Jiechao; Bearden, Daniel W; Dallas, Jerry; Duchamp, James; Walker, Kenneth; Champion, Hunter; Azurmendi, Hugo; Harich, Kim; Dorn, Harry C

    2012-05-23

    The nanoscale parameters of metal clusters and lattices have a crucial influence on the macroscopic properties of materials. Herein, we provide a detailed study on the size and shape of isolated yttrium carbide clusters in different fullerene cages. A family of diyttrium endohedral metallofullerenes with the general formula of Y(2)C(2n) (n = 40-59) are reported. The high field (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and density functional theory (DFT) methods are employed to examine this yttrium carbide cluster in certain family members, Y(2)C(2)@D(5)(450)-C(100), Y(2)C(2)@D(3)(85)-C(92), Y(2)C(2)@C(84), Y(2)C(2)@C(3v)(8)-C(82), and Y(2)C(2)@C(s)(6)-C(82). The results of this study suggest that decreasing the size of a fullerene cage with the same (Y(2)C(2))(4+) cluster results in nanoscale fullerene compression (NFC) from a nearly linear stretched geometry to a constrained "butterfly" structure. The (13)C NMR chemical shift and scalar (1)J(YC) coupling parameters provide a very sensitive measure of this NFC effect for the (Y(2)C(2))(4+) cluster. The crystal structural parameters of a previously reported metal carbide, Y(2)C(3) are directly compared to the (Y(2)C(2))(4+) cluster in the current metallofullerene study.

  18. MCrAlY bond coat with enhanced Yttrium layer

    DOEpatents

    Jablonski, Paul D; Hawk, Jeffrey A

    2015-04-21

    One or more embodiments relates to an MCrAlY bond coat comprising an MCrAlY layer in contact with a Y--Al.sub.2O.sub.3 layer. The MCrAlY layer is comprised of a .gamma.-M solid solution, a .beta.-MAl intermetallic phase, and Y-type intermetallics. The Y--Al.sub.2O.sub.3 layer is comprised of Yttrium atoms coordinated with oxygen atoms comprising the Al.sub.2O.sub.3 lattice. Both the MCrAlY layer and the Y--Al.sub.2O.sub.3 layer have a substantial absence of Y--Al oxides, providing advantage in the maintainability of the Yttrium reservoir within the MCrAlY bulk. The MCrAlY bond coat may be fabricated through application of a Y.sub.2O.sub.3 paste to an MCrAlY material, followed by heating in a non-oxidizing environment.

  19. Proton trapping in yttrium-doped barium zirconate.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Yoshihiro; Blanc, Frédéric; Okuyama, Yuji; Buannic, Lucienne; Lucio-Vega, Juan C; Grey, Clare P; Haile, Sossina M

    2013-07-01

    The environmental benefits of fuel cells have been increasingly appreciated in recent years. Among candidate electrolytes for solid-oxide fuel cells, yttrium-doped barium zirconate has garnered attention because of its high proton conductivity, particularly in the intermediate-temperature region targeted for cost-effective solid-oxide fuel cell operation, and its excellent chemical stability. However, fundamental questions surrounding the defect chemistry and macroscopic proton transport mechanism of this material remain, especially in regard to the possible role of proton trapping. Here we show, through a combined thermogravimetric and a.c. impedance study, that macroscopic proton transport in yttrium-doped barium zirconate is limited by proton-dopant association (proton trapping). Protons must overcome the association energy, 29 kJ mol(-1), as well as the general activation energy, 16 kJ mol(-1), to achieve long-range transport. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance studies show the presence of two types of proton environment above room temperature, reflecting differences in proton-dopant configurations. This insight motivates efforts to identify suitable alternative dopants with reduced association energies as a route to higher conductivities. PMID:23666383

  20. Proton trapping in yttrium-doped barium zirconate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Yoshihiro; Blanc, Frédéric; Okuyama, Yuji; Buannic, Lucienne; Lucio-Vega, Juan C.; Grey, Clare P.; Haile, Sossina M.

    2013-07-01

    The environmental benefits of fuel cells have been increasingly appreciated in recent years. Among candidate electrolytes for solid-oxide fuel cells, yttrium-doped barium zirconate has garnered attention because of its high proton conductivity, particularly in the intermediate-temperature region targeted for cost-effective solid-oxide fuel cell operation, and its excellent chemical stability. However, fundamental questions surrounding the defect chemistry and macroscopic proton transport mechanism of this material remain, especially in regard to the possible role of proton trapping. Here we show, through a combined thermogravimetric and a.c. impedance study, that macroscopic proton transport in yttrium-doped barium zirconate is limited by proton-dopant association (proton trapping). Protons must overcome the association energy, 29 kJ mol-1, as well as the general activation energy, 16 kJ mol-1, to achieve long-range transport. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance studies show the presence of two types of proton environment above room temperature, reflecting differences in proton-dopant configurations. This insight motivates efforts to identify suitable alternative dopants with reduced association energies as a route to higher conductivities.

  1. Speciation analysis of aluminium and aluminium fluoride complexes by HPIC-UVVIS.

    PubMed

    Frankowski, Marcin; Zioła-Frankowska, Anetta

    2010-10-15

    The study presents a new analytical method for speciation analysis in fractionation of aluminium fluoride complexes and free Al(3+) in soil samples. Aluminium speciation was studied in model solutions and soil extract samples by means of high performance ion chromatography (HPIC) with UV-VIS detection using post-column reaction with tiron for the separation and detection of aluminium fluoride complex and Al(3+) forms during one analysis. The paper presents particular stages of the chromatographic process optimization involving selecting the appropriate eluent strength, type of elution or concentration and quantity of derivatization reagent. HPIC was performed on a bifunctional analytical column Dionex IonPac CS5A. The use of gradient elution and the eluents A: 1M NH(4)Cl and B: water acidified to pH of eluent phase, enabled full separation of fluoride aluminium forms as AlF(2)(+), AlF(3)(0), AlF(4)(-) (first signal), AlF(2+) (second signal) and form Al(3+) in a single analytical procedure. The proposed new method HPIC-UVVIS was applied successfully in the quantitative and qualitative analysis of soil samples.

  2. Recovery of yttrium from cathode ray tubes and lamps' fluorescent powders: experimental results and economic simulation.

    PubMed

    Innocenzi, V; De Michelis, I; Ferella, F; Vegliò, F

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, yttrium recovery from fluorescent powder of lamps and cathode ray tubes (CRTs) is described. The process for treating these materials includes the following: (a) acid leaching, (b) purification of the leach liquors using sodium hydroxide and sodium sulfide, (c) precipitation of yttrium using oxalic acid, and (d) calcinations of oxalates for production of yttrium oxides. Experimental results have shown that process conditions necessary to purify the solutions and recover yttrium strongly depend on composition of the leach liquor, in other words, whether the powder comes from treatment of CRTs or lamp. In the optimal experimental conditions, the recoveries of yttrium oxide are about 95%, 55%, and 65% for CRT, lamps, and CRT/lamp mixture (called MIX) powders, respectively. The lower yields obtained during treatments of MIX and lamp powders are probably due to the co-precipitation of yttrium together with other metals contained in the lamps powder only. Yttrium loss can be reduced to minimum changing the experimental conditions with respect to the case of the CRT process. In any case, the purity of final products from CRT, lamps, and MIX is greater than 95%. Moreover, the possibility to treat simultaneously both CRT and lamp powders is very important and interesting from an industrial point of view since it could be possible to run a single plant treating fluorescent powder coming from two different electronic wastes.

  3. Enhanced Arsenate Removal Performance in Aqueous Solution by Yttrium-Based Adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Ho; Kim, Kyoung-Woong; Lee, Byung-Tae; Bang, Sunbaek; Kim, Hyunseok; Kang, Hyorang; Jang, Am

    2015-10-26

    Arsenic contamination in drinking water has become an increasingly important issue due to its high toxicity to humans. The present study focuses on the development of the yttrium-based adsorbents, with basic yttrium carbonate (BYC), Ti-loaded basic yttrium carbonate (Ti-loaded BYC) and yttrium hydroxide prepared using a co-precipitation method. The Langmuir isotherm results confirmed the maximum adsorption capacity of Ti-loaded BYC (348.5 mg/g) was 25% higher than either BYC (289.6 mg/g) or yttrium hydroxide (206.5 mg/g) due to its increased specific surface area (82 m²/g) and surface charge (PZC: 8.4). Pseudo first- and second-order kinetic models further confirmed that the arsenate removal rate of Ti-loaded BYC was faster than for BYC and yttrium hydroxide. It was subsequently posited that the dominant removal mechanism of BYC and Ti-loaded BYC was the carbonate-arsenate ion exchange process, whereas yttrium hydroxide was regarded to be a co-precipitation process. The Ti-loaded BYC also displayed the highest adsorption affinity for a wide pH range (3-11) and in the presence of coexisting anionic species such as phosphate, silicate, and bicarbonate. Therefore, it is expected that Ti-loaded BYC can be used as an effective and practical adsorbent for arsenate remediation in drinking water.

  4. Apoferritin-templated yttrium phosphate nanoparticle conjugates for radioimmunotherapy of cancers.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hong; Wang, Jun; Wang, Zhemin; Fisher, Darrell R; Lin, Yuehe

    2008-05-01

    We report a templated-synthetic approach based on protein-cage of apoferritin to prepare radionuclide nanoparticle (NP) conjugates. Non-radioactive yttrium (89Y) was used as a model target and surrogate for radioyttrium (90Y) to prepare the nanoparticle conjugate. The center cavity and multiple channel structure of apoferritin offer a fast and facile method to precipitate yttrium phosphate by diffusing yttrium and phosphate ions into the cavity of apoferritin, resulting a core-shell nanoparticle. The yttrium phosphate/apoferritin nanoparticle was functionalized with biotin for further application. The synthesized nanoparticle was characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). We found that the resulting nanoparticles were uniform in size, with a diameter of around 8 nm. We tested the pre-targeting capability of the biotin-modified yttrium phosphate/apoferritin nanoparticle conjugate with streptavidin-modified magnetic beads and with aid of streptavidin-modified fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) tracer. This work shows that an yttrium phosphate NP conjugate provides a fast, simple and efficient method to prepare radioactive yttrium conjugate for potential applications in radioimmunotherapy of cancer.

  5. Enhanced Arsenate Removal Performance in Aqueous Solution by Yttrium-Based Adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Ho; Kim, Kyoung-Woong; Lee, Byung-Tae; Bang, Sunbaek; Kim, Hyunseok; Kang, Hyorang; Jang, Am

    2015-10-01

    Arsenic contamination in drinking water has become an increasingly important issue due to its high toxicity to humans. The present study focuses on the development of the yttrium-based adsorbents, with basic yttrium carbonate (BYC), Ti-loaded basic yttrium carbonate (Ti-loaded BYC) and yttrium hydroxide prepared using a co-precipitation method. The Langmuir isotherm results confirmed the maximum adsorption capacity of Ti-loaded BYC (348.5 mg/g) was 25% higher than either BYC (289.6 mg/g) or yttrium hydroxide (206.5 mg/g) due to its increased specific surface area (82 m²/g) and surface charge (PZC: 8.4). Pseudo first- and second-order kinetic models further confirmed that the arsenate removal rate of Ti-loaded BYC was faster than for BYC and yttrium hydroxide. It was subsequently posited that the dominant removal mechanism of BYC and Ti-loaded BYC was the carbonate-arsenate ion exchange process, whereas yttrium hydroxide was regarded to be a co-precipitation process. The Ti-loaded BYC also displayed the highest adsorption affinity for a wide pH range (3-11) and in the presence of coexisting anionic species such as phosphate, silicate, and bicarbonate. Therefore, it is expected that Ti-loaded BYC can be used as an effective and practical adsorbent for arsenate remediation in drinking water. PMID:26516879

  6. Enhanced Arsenate Removal Performance in Aqueous Solution by Yttrium-Based Adsorbents

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Ho; Kim, Kyoung-Woong; Lee, Byung-Tae; Bang, Sunbaek; Kim, Hyunseok; Kang, Hyorang; Jang, Am

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic contamination in drinking water has become an increasingly important issue due to its high toxicity to humans. The present study focuses on the development of the yttrium-based adsorbents, with basic yttrium carbonate (BYC), Ti-loaded basic yttrium carbonate (Ti-loaded BYC) and yttrium hydroxide prepared using a co-precipitation method. The Langmuir isotherm results confirmed the maximum adsorption capacity of Ti-loaded BYC (348.5 mg/g) was 25% higher than either BYC (289.6 mg/g) or yttrium hydroxide (206.5 mg/g) due to its increased specific surface area (82 m2/g) and surface charge (PZC: 8.4). Pseudo first- and second-order kinetic models further confirmed that the arsenate removal rate of Ti-loaded BYC was faster than for BYC and yttrium hydroxide. It was subsequently posited that the dominant removal mechanism of BYC and Ti-loaded BYC was the carbonate-arsenate ion exchange process, whereas yttrium hydroxide was regarded to be a co-precipitation process. The Ti-loaded BYC also displayed the highest adsorption affinity for a wide pH range (3–11) and in the presence of coexisting anionic species such as phosphate, silicate, and bicarbonate. Therefore, it is expected that Ti-loaded BYC can be used as an effective and practical adsorbent for arsenate remediation in drinking water. PMID:26516879

  7. Aluminium removal from water after defluoridation with the electrocoagulation process.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Richa; Mathur, Sanjay; Brighu, Urmila

    2015-01-01

    Fluoride is the most electronegative element and has a strong affinity for aluminium. Owing to this fact, most of the techniques used for fluoride removal utilized aluminium compounds, which results in high concentrations of aluminium in treated water. In the present paper, a new approach is presented to meet the WHO guideline for residual aluminium concentration as 0.2 mg/L. In the present work, the electrocoagulation (EC) process was used for fluoride removal. It was found that aluminium content in water increases with an increase in the energy input. Therefore, experiments were optimized for a minimum energy input to achieve the target value (0.7 mg/L) of fluoride in resultant water. These optimized sets were used for further investigations of aluminium control. The experimental investigations revealed that use of bentonite clay as coagulant in clariflocculation brings down the aluminium concentration of water below the WHO guideline. Bentonite dose of 2 g/L was found to be the best for efficient removal of aluminium.

  8. Aluminium salt slag characterization and utilization--a review.

    PubMed

    Tsakiridis, P E

    2012-05-30

    Aluminium salt slag (also known as aluminium salt cake), which is produced by the secondary aluminium industry, is formed during aluminium scrap/dross melting and contains 15-30% aluminium oxide, 30-55% sodium chloride, 15-30% potassium chloride, 5-7% metallic aluminium and impurities (carbides, nitrides, sulphides and phosphides). Depending on the raw mix the amount of salt slag produced per tonne of secondary aluminium ranges from 200 to 500 kg. As salt slag has been classified as toxic and hazardous waste, it should be managed in compliance with the current legislation. Its landfill disposal is forbidden in most of the European countries and it should be recycled and processed in a proper way by taking the environmental impact into consideration. This paper presents a review of the aluminium salt slag chemical and mineralogical characteristics, as well as various processes for metal recovery, recycling of sodium and potassium chlorides content back to the smelting process and preparation of value added products from the final non metallic residue.

  9. Aluminium removal from water after defluoridation with the electrocoagulation process.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Richa; Mathur, Sanjay; Brighu, Urmila

    2015-01-01

    Fluoride is the most electronegative element and has a strong affinity for aluminium. Owing to this fact, most of the techniques used for fluoride removal utilized aluminium compounds, which results in high concentrations of aluminium in treated water. In the present paper, a new approach is presented to meet the WHO guideline for residual aluminium concentration as 0.2 mg/L. In the present work, the electrocoagulation (EC) process was used for fluoride removal. It was found that aluminium content in water increases with an increase in the energy input. Therefore, experiments were optimized for a minimum energy input to achieve the target value (0.7 mg/L) of fluoride in resultant water. These optimized sets were used for further investigations of aluminium control. The experimental investigations revealed that use of bentonite clay as coagulant in clariflocculation brings down the aluminium concentration of water below the WHO guideline. Bentonite dose of 2 g/L was found to be the best for efficient removal of aluminium. PMID:25903166

  10. Recovery of yttrium from cathode ray tubes and lamps’ fluorescent powders: experimental results and economic simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Innocenzi, V. De Michelis, I.; Ferella, F.; Vegliò, F.

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • Fluorescent powder of lamps. • Fluorescent powder of cathode ray rubes. • Recovery of yttrium from fluorescent powders. • Economic simulation for the processes to recover yttrium from WEEE. - Abstract: In this paper, yttrium recovery from fluorescent powder of lamps and cathode ray tubes (CRTs) is described. The process for treating these materials includes the following: (a) acid leaching, (b) purification of the leach liquors using sodium hydroxide and sodium sulfide, (c) precipitation of yttrium using oxalic acid, and (d) calcinations of oxalates for production of yttrium oxides. Experimental results have shown that process conditions necessary to purify the solutions and recover yttrium strongly depend on composition of the leach liquor, in other words, whether the powder comes from treatment of CRTs or lamp. In the optimal experimental conditions, the recoveries of yttrium oxide are about 95%, 55%, and 65% for CRT, lamps, and CRT/lamp mixture (called MIX) powders, respectively. The lower yields obtained during treatments of MIX and lamp powders are probably due to the co-precipitation of yttrium together with other metals contained in the lamps powder only. Yttrium loss can be reduced to minimum changing the experimental conditions with respect to the case of the CRT process. In any case, the purity of final products from CRT, lamps, and MIX is greater than 95%. Moreover, the possibility to treat simultaneously both CRT and lamp powders is very important and interesting from an industrial point of view since it could be possible to run a single plant treating fluorescent powder coming from two different electronic wastes.

  11. Recovery of yttrium from fluorescent powder of cathode ray tube, CRT: Zn removal by sulphide precipitation.

    PubMed

    Innocenzi, Valentina; De Michelis, Ida; Ferella, Francesco; Beolchini, Francesca; Kopacek, Bernd; Vegliò, Francesco

    2013-11-01

    This work is focused on the recovery of yttrium and zinc from fluorescent powder of cathode ray tube (CRT). Metals are extracted by sulphuric acid in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. Leaching tests are carried out according to a 2(2) full factorial plan and the highest extraction yields for yttrium and zinc equal to 100% are observed under the following conditions: 3M of sulphuric acid, 10% v/v of H2O2 concentrated solution at 30% v/v, 10% w/w pulp density, 70°C and 3h of reaction. Two series of precipitation tests for zinc are carried out: a 2(2) full factorial design and a completely randomized factorial design. In these series the factors investigated are pH of solution during the precipitation and the amount of sodium sulphide added to precipitate zinc sulphide. The data of these tests are used to describe two empirical mathematical models for zinc and yttrium precipitation yields by regression analysis. The highest precipitation yields for zinc are obtained under the following conditions: pH equal to 2-2.5% and 10-12%v/v of Na2S concentrated solution at 10%w/v. In these conditions the coprecipitation of yttrium is of 15-20%. Finally further yttrium precipitation experiments by oxalic acid on the residual solutions, after removing of zinc, show that yttrium could be recovered and calcined to obtain the final product as yttrium oxide. The achieved results allow to propose a CRT recycling process based on leaching of fluorescent powder from cathode ray tube and recovery of yttrium oxide after removing of zinc by precipitation. The final recovery of yttrium is 75-80%.

  12. Structural and magnetic properties of yttrium iron garnet (YIG) and yttrium aluminum iron garnet (YAIG) nanoferrites prepared by microemulsion method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhtar, Majid Niaz; Bakar Sulong, Abu; Khan, Muhammad Azhar; Ahmad, Mukhtar; Murtaza, Ghulam; Raza, M. R.; Raza, R.; Saleem, M.; Kashif, M.

    2016-03-01

    Yttrium iron garnet (YIG) and yttrium aluminum iron garnet (YAIG) nanoferrite samples were synthesized by microemulsion method. The effect of sintering was examined by heating the samples at 900, 1000, and 1100 °C. The YIG and YAIG samples were then characterized using X-ray diffraction and field-emission scanning electron microscopy. Static and dynamic magnetic properties were measured by evaluating initial permeability, Q factor, and vibrating sample magnetometry properties of YIG and YAIG samples. YIG samples sintered at 1100 °C showed higher initial permeability and Q factor compared with YAIG samples. However, hysteresis loops also showed variations in the saturation magnetization, remanence, and coercivity of YIG and YAIG samples sintered at 900, 1000, and 1100 °C. The observed magnetic parameter such as saturation magnetization, coercivity and initial permeability are strongly affected by increasing temperature. The saturation magnetization and coercivity of YIG and YAIG nanoferrites were found in the range 11.56-19.92 emu/g and 7.30-87.70 Oe respectively. Furthermore, the decreasing trends in the static and magnetic properties of YAIG samples may be due to the introduction of Al ions in the YIG crystal lattice. Thus, YIG and YAIG sintered at 1100 °C can be used for wide-ranging frequency applications.

  13. Coordination between yttrium ions and amide groups of polyamide 6 and the crystalline behavior of polyamide 6/yttrium composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shaoxuan; Zhang, Chengfeng; Liu, Yuhai; Zhao, Ying; Xu, Yizhuang; Ozaki, Yukihiro; Wu, Jinguang

    2012-08-01

    Different amounts of yttrium ions were introduced into polyamide 6 (PA6) matrix by solution casting process. Structure, morphology and properties of the obtained PA6/Y3+ composite films were investigated by using FT-IR spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscope (SEM), polarized optical microscope (POM) and differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) methods. Yttrium ions show strong coordination ability and their complexation with amide groups of PA6 can be reflected by the appearance of new bands in the amide A and amide I regions in FT-IR and Raman spectra. Furthermore, the FT-IR and Raman spectra of the PA6/Y3+ composite show that the resultant chain conformations of the amide groups in the composite films are twisted from the ideal trans conformation. The DSC results reveal that Y3+ ions cause a significant reduction of the melting point of PA6. In addition, the existence of Y3+ prevents the crystallization of molten PA6/Y3+ composite films during the cooling process. Moreover, the PA6/Y3+ composite can convert into γ phase PA6 or α phase PA6 when different solvents are used to remove Y3+ ions and induce crystallization of PA6.

  14. Cladding single crystal YAG fibers grown by laser heated pedestal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bera, Subhabrata; Nie, Craig D.; Harrington, James A.; Chick, Theresa; Chakrabarty, Ayan; Trembath-Reichert, Stephen; Chapman, James; Rand, Stephen C.

    2016-03-01

    Rare-earth doped single-crystal (SC) Yttrium Aluminum Garnet (YAG) fibers are excellent candidates for high power lasers. These SC fiber optics combine the favorable low Stimulated Brillouin Scattering (SBS) gain coefficient and excellent thermal properties to make them an attractive alternative to glass fiber lasers and amplifiers. Various rare-earth doped SC fibers have been grown using the laser heated pedestal growth (LHPG) technique. Several cladding methods, including in-situ and post-growth cladding techniques, are discussed in this paper. A rod-in-tube approach has been used by to grow a fiber with an Erbium doped SC YAG fiber core inserted in a SC YAG tube. The result is a radial gradient in the distribution of rare-earth ions. Post cladding methods include sol-gel deposited polycrystalline.

  15. Diffusion of aluminium in MgO from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammann, M. W.; Brodholt, J. P.; Dobson, D. P.

    2012-06-01

    We have calculated the diffusivity of aluminium in periclase, MgO, under pressures relevant to deep planetary interiors from first principles. We reconcile differences between experimental migration enthalpies and those obtained with previous theoretical studies by finding a lower energy saddle point for the aluminium atom migration. Previous studies did not recognise a bifurcation at the saddle point. We also explain differences between experimental and theoretical binding enthalpies of an aluminium with a magnesium vacancy. We find that binding enthalpies continuously increase with decreasing aluminium concentrations, such that the difference between experimental and theoretical binding energies can be attributed to differing concentrations. We also find that binding energies increase with pressure as the permittivity decreases. Aluminium therefore not only causes extrinsic vacancy formation but also binds some of them, effectively removing them for magnesium diffusion. We discuss the implications for how other 3+ ions affect diffusion in oxides and silicates.

  16. Aluminium Electroplating on Steel from a Fused Bromide Electrolyte

    SciTech Connect

    Prabhat Tripathy; Laura Wurth; Eric Dufek; Toni Y. Gutknecht; Natalie Gese; Paula Hahn; Steven Frank; Guy Fredrickson; J Stephen Herring

    2014-08-01

    A quaternary bromide bath (LiBr-KBr-CsBr-AlBr3) was used to electro-coat aluminium on steel substrates. The electrolyte was prepared by the addition of AlBr3 into the eutectic LiBr-KBr-CsBr melt. A smooth, thick, adherent and shiny aluminium coating could be obtained with 80 wt.% AlBr3 in the ternary melt. The SEM photographs of the coated surfaces suggest the formation of thick and dense coatings with good aluminium coverage. Both salt immersion and open circuit potential measurement suggest that the coatings did display good corrosion-resistance behavior. Annealing of the coated surfaces, prior to corrosion tests, suggested the robustness of the metallic aluminium coating in preventing the corrosion of the steel surfaces. Studies also indicated that the quaternary bromide plating bath can potentially provide a better aluminium coating on both ferrous and non-ferrous metals, including complex surfaces/geometries.

  17. Usage of Neural Network to Predict Aluminium Oxide Layer Thickness

    PubMed Central

    Michal, Peter; Vagaská, Alena; Gombár, Miroslav; Kmec, Ján; Spišák, Emil; Kučerka, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    This paper shows an influence of chemical composition of used electrolyte, such as amount of sulphuric acid in electrolyte, amount of aluminium cations in electrolyte and amount of oxalic acid in electrolyte, and operating parameters of process of anodic oxidation of aluminium such as the temperature of electrolyte, anodizing time, and voltage applied during anodizing process. The paper shows the influence of those parameters on the resulting thickness of aluminium oxide layer. The impact of these variables is shown by using central composite design of experiment for six factors (amount of sulphuric acid, amount of oxalic acid, amount of aluminium cations, electrolyte temperature, anodizing time, and applied voltage) and by usage of the cubic neural unit with Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm during the results evaluation. The paper also deals with current densities of 1 A·dm−2 and 3 A·dm−2 for creating aluminium oxide layer. PMID:25922850

  18. Preparation, structure, and in vitro chemical durability of yttrium phosphate microspheres for intra-arterial radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kawashita, Masakazu; Matsui, Naoko; Li, Zhixia; Miyazaki, Toshiki; Kanetaka, Hiroyasu

    2011-10-01

    Chemically durable microspheres containing yttrium and/or phosphorus are useful for intra-arterial radiotherapy. In this study, we attempted to prepare yttrium phosphate (YPO₄) microspheres with high chemical durability. YPO₄ microspheres with smooth surfaces and diameters of around 25 μm were successfully obtained when gelatin droplets containing yttrium and phosphate ions were cooled and solidified in a water-in-oil emulsion and then heat-treated at 1100°C. The chemical durability of the heat-treated microspheres in a simulated body fluid at pH = 6 and 7 was high enough for clinical application of intra-arterial radiotherapy.

  19. Mass spectroscopic characterization of yttrium-containing metallofullerene YC82 using resonant laser ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Shiliang; Tian Jiahe; Dai Songtao; Chen Dieyan; Luo Chuping; Tan Haisong; Gan Liangbing; Huang Chunhui

    1995-04-01

    In this paper, resonant laser ablation time-of-flight mass spectroscopy (RLA-TOF-MS) has been used to mass spectroscopic characterization of yttrium-containing fullerenes. Solvent soluble, yttrium-containing fullerenes are extracted from yttrium/carbon soot produced by the carbon-arc fullerene generation method. The RLA-TOF mass spectra indicate the presence of YC82. The metallofullerences YC60, YC70, Y2C82 and a series of Y2C2n are not observed by RLA-TOF-MS. This result is consistent with the ESR spectral result reported by Shinohara et al.

  20. Treatment of exhaust fluorescent lamps to recover yttrium: Experimental and process analyses

    SciTech Connect

    De Michelis, Ida; Ferella, Francesco; Varelli, Ennio Fioravante; Veglio, Francesco

    2011-12-15

    Highlights: > Recovery of yttrium from spent fluorescent lamps by sulphuric acid leaching. > The use of sulphuric acid allows to reduce calcium dissolutions. > Main contaminant of fluorescent powder are Si, Pb, Ca and Ba. > Hydrated yttrium oxalate, recovered by selective precipitation, is quite pure (>90%). > We have studied the whole process for the treatment of dangerous waste (plant capability). - Abstract: The paper deals with recovery of yttrium from fluorescent powder coming from dismantling of spent fluorescent tubes. Metals are leached by using different acids (nitric, hydrochloric and sulphuric) and ammonia in different leaching tests. These tests show that ammonia is not suitable to recover yttrium, whereas HNO{sub 3} produces toxic vapours. A full factorial design is carried out with HCl and H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} to evaluate the influence of operating factors. HCl and H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} leaching systems give similar results in terms of yttrium extraction yield, but the last one allows to reduce calcium extraction with subsequent advantage during recovery of yttrium compounds in the downstream. The greatest extraction of yttrium is obtained by 20% w/v S/L ratio, 4 N H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} concentration and 90 deg. C. Yttrium and calcium yields are nearly 85% and 5%, respectively. The analysis of variance shows that acid concentration alone and interaction between acid and pulp density have a significant positive effect on yttrium solubilization for both HCl and H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} medium. Two models are empirically developed to estimate yttrium and calcium concentration during leaching. Precipitation tests demonstrate that at least the stoichiometric amount of oxalic acid is necessary to recover yttrium efficiently and a pure yttrium oxalate n-hydrate can be produced (99% grade). The process is economically feasible if other components of the fluorescent lamps (glass, ferrous and non-ferrous scraps) are recovered after the equipment dismantling and valorized

  1. Volatilisation and oxidation of aluminium scraps fed into incineration furnaces

    SciTech Connect

    Biganzoli, Laura; Gorla, Leopoldo; Nessi, Simone; Grosso, Mario

    2012-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Aluminium packaging partitioning in MSW incineration residues is evaluated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The amount of aluminium packaging recoverable from the bottom ashes is evaluated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Aluminium packaging oxidation rate in the residues of MSW incineration is evaluated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 80% of aluminium cans, 51% of trays and 27% of foils can be recovered from bottom ashes. - Abstract: Ferrous and non-ferrous metal scraps are increasingly recovered from municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash and used in the production of secondary steel and aluminium. However, during the incineration process, metal scraps contained in the waste undergo volatilisation and oxidation processes, which determine a loss of their recoverable mass. The present paper evaluates the behaviour of different types of aluminium packaging materials in a full-scale waste to energy plant during standard operation. Their partitioning and oxidation level in the residues of the incineration process are evaluated, together with the amount of potentially recoverable aluminium. About 80% of post-consumer cans, 51% of trays and 27% of foils can be recovered through an advanced treatment of bottom ash combined with a melting process in the saline furnace for the production of secondary aluminium. The residual amount of aluminium concentrates in the fly ash or in the fine fraction of the bottom ash and its recovery is virtually impossible using the current eddy current separation technology. The average oxidation levels of the aluminium in the residues of the incineration process is equal to 9.2% for cans, 17.4% for trays and 58.8% for foils. The differences between the tested packaging materials are related to their thickness, mechanical strength and to the alloy.

  2. Hearing conservation in the primary aluminium industry

    PubMed Central

    Frisch, N.; Dixon-Ernst, C.; Chesson, B. J.; Cullen, M. R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Noise-induced hearing loss has been an intractable problem for heavy industry. Aims To report our experience in reducing the incidence of age-corrected confirmed 10 dB hearing shifts (averaged over 2, 3 and 4kHz) in employees in the primary aluminium industry in Australia over the period 2006–13. Methods We analysed annual audiometric data to determine the number of permanent hearing shifts that occurred in employees in two bauxite mines, three alumina refineries and two aluminium smelters. Annual hearing shift rates were calculated based on the number of employees tested per year. Hearing conservation initiatives undertaken during the study period are described. An assessment of similar exposure group noise exposures was also undertaken to determine the magnitude of noise exposure reduction during the study period. Results Across all operations, hearing shift rates declined from 5.5% per year in 2006 to 1.3% per year in 2013 (P < 0.001). The decline in shift rates was greater in mines and refineries, where baseline shift rates were higher, than in smelter workers. Modest reductions in noise exposure occurred during the study period. Conclusions We observed a substantial decline in hearing shift rates during the study period. We describe the hearing conservation initiatives that were collectively associated with this decline. We suspect these initiatives could be deployed relatively easily and at modest cost in other industries with noise-exposed employees. PMID:26470945

  3. Bridgman growth of large-aperture yttrium calcium oxyborate crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Anhua; Jiang, Linwen; Qian, Guoxing; Zheng, Yanqing; Xu, Jun; Shi, Erwei

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: ► YCOB is a novel non-linear optical crystal possessing good thermal, mechanical and nonlinear optical properties. ► Large size crystal growth is key technology question for YCOB crystal. ► YCOB crystals 3 in. in diameter were grown with modified vertical Bridgman method. ► It is a more effective growth method to obtain large size and high quality YCOB crystal. -- Abstract: Large-aperture yttrium calcium oxyborate YCa{sub 4}O(BO{sub 3}){sub 3} (YCOB) crystals with 3 in. in diameter were grown with modified vertical Bridgman method, and the large crystal plate (63 mm × 68 mm × 20 mm) was harvested for high-average power frequency conversion system. The crack, facet growth and spiral growth can be effectively controlled in the as-grown crystal, and Bridgman method displays more effective in obtain large size and high quality YCOB crystal plate than Czochralski technique.

  4. Structural, dielectric, and optical properties of yttrium calcium borate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Cristiane N.; De Sousa Meneses, Domingos; Echegut, Patrick; Neuville, Daniel R.; Hernandes, Antonio C.; Ibanez, Alain

    2009-04-01

    Structural and optical properties of stable glasses in the Y2O3-CaO-B2O3 system, containing the same Y/Ca ratio as the YCa4O(BO3)3 (YCOB) crystal, were determined from Raman and reflectance infrared spectroscopy. Changes in optical functions with composition are associated with an increase in the number of non-bridging oxygen and to calcium/yttrium oxides content. Refractive indexes values (from 1.597 to 1.627 at λ =2 μm) are in good agreement with those of the YCOB crystal, an indication that these glasses are potential candidates for optical applications due to their ease of shaping as large bulk samples or fibers.

  5. Nanoscale nonlinear effects in Erbium-implanted Yttrium Orthosilicate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukharchyk, Nadezhda; Shvarkov, Stepan; Probst, Sebastian; Xia, Kangwei; Becker, Hans-Werner; Pal, Shovon; Markmann, Sergej; Kolesov, Roman; Siyushev, Petr; Wrachtrup, Jörg; Ludwig, Arne; Ustinov, Alexey V.; Wieck, Andreas D.; Bushev, Pavel

    2016-09-01

    Doping of substrates at desired locations is a key technology for spin-based quantum memory devices. Focused ion beam implantation is well-suited for this task due to its high spacial resolution. In this work, we investigate ion-beam implanted erbium ensembles in Yttrium Orthosilicate crystals by means of confocal photoluminescence spectroscopy. The sample temperature and the post-implantation annealing step strongly reverberate in the properties of the implanted ions. We find that hot implantation leads to a higher activation rate of the ions. At high enough fluences, the relation between the fluence and final concentration of ions becomes non-linear. Two models are developed explaining the observed behaviour.

  6. Ferromagnetic resonance of sputtered yttrium iron garnet nanometer films

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Tao; Chang, Houchen; Sun, Yiyan; Kabatek, Michael; Wu, Mingzhong; Vlaminck, Vincent; Hoffmann, Axel; Deng, Longjiang

    2014-05-07

    Growth of nm-thick yttrium iron garnet (YIG) films by sputtering and ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) properties in the films were studied. The FMR linewidth of the YIG film decreased as the film thickness was increased from several nanometers to about 100 nm. For films with very smooth surfaces, the linewidth increased linearly with frequency. In contrast, for films with big grains on the surface, the linewidth-frequency response was strongly nonlinear. Films in the 7–26 nm thickness range showed a surface roughness between 0.1 nm and 0.4 nm, a 9.48-GHz FMR linewidth in the 6–10 Oe range, and a damping constant of about 0.001.

  7. Structural and dielectric properties of yttrium-substituted hydroxyapatites.

    PubMed

    Kaygili, Omer; Dorozhkin, Sergey V; Ates, Tankut; Gursoy, N Canan; Keser, Serhat; Yakuphanoglu, Fahrettin; Selçuk, A Birkan

    2015-02-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HAp) samples doped with 0, 2 and 4 at.% of yttrium (Y) were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy attached with energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy, antimicrobial activity tests and dielectric studies. The hydroxyl groups observed in FTIR spectra confirmed the formation of HAp phase in the studied samples. The crystallite size, crystallinity degree and lattice parameters of the samples were changed with Y content. The volume of the unit cell was gradually decreased with the addition of Y. Undoped and Y-containing HAp samples were screened to determine their in vitro antimicrobial activities against the standard strains. It was found that no samples have any antimicrobial effect. The relative dielectric permittivity and dielectric loss are affected by Y content. While the alternating current conductivity increases with increasing frequency, it decreases with increasing Y content.

  8. Novel light emissive yttrium-based nanoparticles and composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Laura Burka

    Yttrium-based inorganic optical materials generally are of practical interest for three applications: solid state lighting/displays, lasers, and scintillators. Solid-state lighting is particularly desirable commercially for its efficiency and lifetime compared to traditional incandescent alternatives. This type of lighting technology is of increasing interest as incandescent light bulbs are being gradually phased-out due to government regulations on maximum wattage of these devices. Additionally, shortcomings in the current state of the art have driven the need for a more thermally stable material for use in this area. In this dissertation, we develop and characterize a novel composite material consisting of optically active yttrium-based nanoparticles doped into silica sol-gels. For lighting and display applications, low-cost, low-temperature synthesis methods for materials that meet or exceed the quality of the materials currently on the market are highly desirable. During the course of this work, we discuss the characterization of yttrium-based nanoparticles with respect to their incorporation in a sol-gel matrix composite. We then prepared these composite materials using a variety of methods and assess their quality according to a set of selection criteria and for lighting/display applications. Novel light-emitting composites consisting of Ce:YAG or Eu:Y2O 3 (yttria) nanoparticles in an inorganic medium were successfully developed and characterized. The optical properties of the nanoparticles were maintained when incorporated into the sol-gel medium and were shown to be comparable with the current state of the art. Comparison was made between the nanoparticle emission and the composite emission and, in the case of the Ce:YAG, the CIE coordinates, showing no change between the emission intensities or peak locations. We successfully demonstrated the conversion of fluoride-based particles into Y2O3 during sol-gel processing and demonstrated that no reaction took

  9. Sodium yttrium fluoride based upconversion nano phosphors for biosensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parameswaran Nampi, Padmaja; Varma, Harikrishna; Biju, P. R.; Kakkar, Tarun; Jose, Gin; Saha, Sikha; Millner, Paul

    2015-06-01

    In the present study, NaYF4-Yb3+/Er3+ having the composition NaYF4-18%Yb3+/2%Er3+ and NaYF4-20%Yb3+/2%Er3+ with and without the addition of PVP (polyvinyl pyrolidone) have been synthesised by a solution method using NaF, yttrium nitrate, ytterbium nitrate and erbium nitrate as precursors. Upconversion spectra of prepared nanomaterial under 980 nm laser excitation have been studied. The variation in upconversion spectra with new born calf serum and myoglobin has been studied. Myoglobin (Mb) may be helpful when used in conjunction with other cardiac markers for rapid determination of acute myocardial ischemia, especially in patients with a typical chest pain or nonspecific ECG changes. The variation of UC fluorescence with addition of Mb indicates the suitability of using NaYF4 based UC nanoparticles in cardiac marker detection. The detailed study is currently under progress.

  10. A divalent rare earth oxide semiconductor: Yttrium monoxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminaga, Kenichi; Sei, Ryosuke; Hayashi, Kouichi; Happo, Naohisa; Tajiri, Hiroo; Oka, Daichi; Fukumura, Tomoteru; Hasegawa, Tetsuya

    2016-03-01

    Rare earth oxides are usually widegap insulators like Y2O3 with closed shell trivalent rare earth ions. In this study, solid phase rock salt structure yttrium monoxide, YO, with unusual valence of Y2+ (4d1) was synthesized in a form of epitaxial thin film by pulsed laser deposition method. YO has been recognized as gaseous phase in previous studies. In contrast with Y2O3, YO was dark-brown colored and narrow gap semiconductor. The tunable electrical conductivity ranging from 10-1 to 103 Ω-1 cm-1 was attributed to the presence of oxygen vacancies serving as electron donor. Weak antilocalization behavior observed in magnetoresistance indicated significant role of spin-orbit coupling as a manifestation of 4d electron carrier.

  11. Electrical properties of strontium doped yttrium manganite oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakur, Rajesh K.; Thakur, Rasna; Kaurav, N.; Okram, G. S.; Gaur, N. K.

    2013-02-01

    Powders of Y1-xSrxMnO3 (x = 0.1 and 0.2) pervoskites were obtained by using conventional solid state reaction method and their electrical properties are carefully analyzed. The XRD pattern showed the pointed peaks which correspond to the hexagonal structure of the reported compounds with space group P63cm (25-1079). The resistivity versus temperature plot infers a semiconducting like behavior in both reported compounds. The suppression in the resistivity has been witnessed with increasing concentration Sr2+ ions at yttrium site. The small polaron hopping conductivity model adequately describes the electrical conductivity behavior. The activation energy (Ea) is found to decrease as the 'x' (Sr content) increases.

  12. Mesoporous gallium oxide structurally stabilized by yttrium oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Yada, Mitsunori; Ohya, Masahumi; Machida, Masato; Kijima, Tsuyoshi

    2000-05-16

    Since the synthesis of mesoporous silicas such as MCM-41 and FSM-16 with large internal surface areas and uniform pore sizes, the surfactant templating method has been used to synthesize mesoporous metal oxides, including titanium, aluminum, niobium, and tantalum oxides. The mesostructured metal oxides are taken to be useful not only as catalysts and separating or adsorbing agents but also as functional host materials with optically, electrically, or magnetically unique properties, owing to the shape-specific and/or quantum effects of their thin inorganic skeletons. Mesoporous zirconium oxide and phosphate and hafnium oxide are promising as acid catalysts. Layered and hexagonal mesostructured titanium oxides, for example, were observed to be photocatalytically active. Aluminum and gallium oxides with a mesoporous structure are also expected to serve as a catalytic of other functional material. In this paper, the authors report the synthesis and characterization of mesoporous gallium oxide stabilized by yttrium oxide.

  13. Nanocomposite scintillator, detector, and method

    DOEpatents

    Cooke, D. Wayne; McKigney, Edward A.; Muenchausen, Ross E.; Bennett, Bryan L.

    2009-04-28

    A compact includes a mixture of a solid binder and at least one nanopowder phosphor chosen from yttrium oxide, yttrium tantalate, barium fluoride, cesium fluoride, bismuth germanate, zinc gallate, calcium magnesium pyrosilicate, calcium molybdate, calcium chlorovanadate, barium titanium pyrophosphate, a metal tungstate, a cerium doped nanophosphor, a bismuth doped nanophosphor, a lead doped nanophosphor, a thallium doped sodium iodide, a doped cesium iodide, a rare earth doped pyrosilicate, or a lanthanide halide. The compact can be used in a radiation detector for detecting ionizing radiation.

  14. Yttrium oxide transparent ceramics by low-temperature microwave sintering

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Junming; Zhong, Zhenchen; Xu, Jilin

    2012-12-15

    Graphical abstract: The figure shows the SEM photos of the surfaces of the Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} transparent ceramic samples obtained by microwave sintering and vacuum sintering. It is clearly demonstrated that the grain distribution of the vacuum sintering sample is not uniform with the smallest and the largest particle size at about 2 μm and 15 μm respectively, while the grain distribution of microwave sintering sample is uniform with the average diameter at about 2–4 μm (the smallest reported so far) and with no abnormal growth-up or coarsening phenomenon. We have further found out that the smaller the grain size, the higher the mechanical and optical properties. Display Omitted Highlights: ► The microwave sintering temperature of the sample is lower compared with vacuum. ► The microwave sintering time of the sample is shorter compared with vacuum. ► The mechanical properties of the microwave sintering sample is improved greatly. ► The Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} grain of microwave sintering sample is the smallest reported so far. -- Abstract: Yttrium oxide (Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}) transparent ceramics samples have been successfully fabricated by microwave sintering processing at relatively low temperatures. In comparison with the vacuum sintering processing, Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} transparent ceramics can be obtained by microwave sintering at lower sintering temperature and shorter sintering time, and they possess higher transmittances and mechanical properties. The technologies of low-temperature microwave sintering and the relationships of the microstructures and properties of the specified samples have been investigated in detail. We have found out that the low-temperature microwave sintering technique has its obvious advantages over the conventional methods in manufacturing yttrium oxide transparent ceramics.

  15. Antibacterial and antibiofilm properties of yttrium fluoride nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Lellouche, Jonathan; Friedman, Alexandra; Gedanken, Aharon; Banin, Ehud

    2012-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance has prompted the search for new agents that can inhibit bacterial growth. Moreover, colonization of abiotic surfaces by microorganisms and the formation of biofilms is a major cause of infections associated with medical implants, resulting in prolonged hospitalization periods and patient mortality. In this study we describe a water-based synthesis of yttrium fluoride (YF(3)) nanoparticles (NPs) using sonochemistry. The sonochemical irradiation of an aqueous solution of yttrium (III) acetate tetrahydrate [Y(Ac)(3) · (H(2)O)(4)], containing acidic HF as the fluorine ion source, yielded nanocrystalline needle-shaped YF(3) particles. The obtained NPs were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray elemental analysis. NP crystallinity was confirmed by electron and powder X-ray diffractions. YF(3) NPs showed antibacterial properties against two common bacterial pathogens (Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus) at a μg/mL range. We were also able to demonstrate that antimicrobial activity was dependent on NP size. In addition, catheters were surface modified with YF(3) NPs using a one-step synthesis and coating process. The coating procedure yielded a homogeneous YF(3) NP layer on the catheter, as analyzed by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. These YF(3) NP-modified catheters were investigated for their ability to restrict bacterial biofilm formation. The YF(3) NP-coated catheters were able to significantly reduce bacterial colonization compared to the uncoated surface. Taken together, our results highlight the potential to further develop the concept of utilizing these metal fluoride NPs as novel antimicrobial and antibiofilm agents, taking advantage of their low solubility and providing extended protection.

  16. Structural, electrical and dielectric properties of yttrium substituted nickel ferrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishaque, M.; Islam, M. U.; Azhar Khan, M.; Rahman, I. Z.; Genson, A.; Hampshire, S.

    2010-03-01

    The influence of Y 3+ substitution on the structural, electrical and dielectric properties of Ni-Y ferrites was studied in the ferrite series NiY 2xFe 2-2xO 4 where x=0-0.12 in steps of 0.02. This series was prepared by conventional double sintering ceramic method. XRD analysis reveals single phase samples up to x=0.06. At x≥0.08, a secondary phase of iron yttrium oxide (YFeO 3) appears along with the spinel phase. The incorporation of Y 3+ for Fe 3+ ions results in a slight increase of lattice constant due to larger ionic radius of the substituted ions. It was inferred that the substitution of yttrium limits the grain growth. The physical densities are about 90% of their X-ray densities. FTIR spectra obtained at room temperature in the wave number range 370-1100 cm -1 show splitting of the two fundamental absorption bands, thereby confirming the completion of solid state reaction. The increase in dc resistivity has been found with the increase in Y 3+ contents. Dielectric constant (ε‧) and loss tangent (tan δ) were measured at room temperature in the frequency range from 10 Hz to10 MHz. A significant reduction in the values of dielectric constant and dielectric loss tangent has been observed with the increase of Y 3+ ions. The high dc resistivity and low dielectric losses are the desired characteristics of Ni-Y ferrites used to prepare microwave devices.

  17. Antibacterial and antibiofilm properties of yttrium fluoride nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Lellouche, Jonathan; Friedman, Alexandra; Gedanken, Aharon; Banin, Ehud

    2012-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance has prompted the search for new agents that can inhibit bacterial growth. Moreover, colonization of abiotic surfaces by microorganisms and the formation of biofilms is a major cause of infections associated with medical implants, resulting in prolonged hospitalization periods and patient mortality. In this study we describe a water-based synthesis of yttrium fluoride (YF3) nanoparticles (NPs) using sonochemistry. The sonochemical irradiation of an aqueous solution of yttrium (III) acetate tetrahydrate [Y(Ac)3 · (H2O)4], containing acidic HF as the fluorine ion source, yielded nanocrystalline needle-shaped YF3 particles. The obtained NPs were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray elemental analysis. NP crystallinity was confirmed by electron and powder X-ray diffractions. YF3 NPs showed antibacterial properties against two common bacterial pathogens (Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus) at a μg/mL range. We were also able to demonstrate that antimicrobial activity was dependent on NP size. In addition, catheters were surface modified with YF3 NPs using a one-step synthesis and coating process. The coating procedure yielded a homogeneous YF3 NP layer on the catheter, as analyzed by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. These YF3 NP-modified catheters were investigated for their ability to restrict bacterial biofilm formation. The YF3 NP-coated catheters were able to significantly reduce bacterial colonization compared to the uncoated surface. Taken together, our results highlight the potential to further develop the concept of utilizing these metal fluoride NPs as novel antimicrobial and antibiofilm agents, taking advantage of their low solubility and providing extended protection. PMID:23152681

  18. Sorptive separation of yttrium and cerium on a weakly basic anionite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheremisina, O. V.; Ponomareva, M. A.; Chirkst, D. E.; Lobacheva, O. L.; Shul'gin, I. A.

    2015-01-01

    The sorption of complex yttrium ions with Trilon B onto the weakly basic anionite D-403 in nitrate form from an acidic medium at pH 3 with constant ionic strength (NaNO3, 1 mol/kg) is investigated. A thermodynamic evaluation of the sorption isotherm of anionic yttrium complexes is performed using a method based on the linearization of the equation of the law of active mass, modified for ionic exchange reactions. The ionic exchange constant, the Gibbs free energy of ionic exchange, the capacity of the anionite, and the sorption limit of ethylenediaminetetraacetatoyttrate ions (EDTA yttrate ions) are calculated. Using a frontal version of ion exchange chromatography, cerium and yttrium are separated on D-403 anionite with a fraction of pure yttrium at the column outlet of no less than 30%.

  19. Recovery of yttrium from fluorescent powder of cathode ray tube, CRT: Zn removal by sulphide precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Innocenzi, Valentina; De Michelis, Ida; Ferella, Francesco; Beolchini, Francesca; Kopacek, Bernd

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • Treatment of fluorescent powder of CRT waste. • Factorial experimental designs to study acid leaching of fluorescent powder and the purification of leach liquors. • Recover of yttrium by precipitation using oxalic acid. • Suitable flowsheet to recover yttrium from fluorescent powder. - Abstract: This work is focused on the recovery of yttrium and zinc from fluorescent powder of cathode ray tube (CRT). Metals are extracted by sulphuric acid in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. Leaching tests are carried out according to a 2{sup 2} full factorial plan and the highest extraction yields for yttrium and zinc equal to 100% are observed under the following conditions: 3 M of sulphuric acid, 10% v/v of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentrated solution at 30% v/v, 10% w/w pulp density, 70 °C and 3 h of reaction. Two series of precipitation tests for zinc are carried out: a 2{sup 2} full factorial design and a completely randomized factorial design. In these series the factors investigated are pH of solution during the precipitation and the amount of sodium sulphide added to precipitate zinc sulphide. The data of these tests are used to describe two empirical mathematical models for zinc and yttrium precipitation yields by regression analysis. The highest precipitation yields for zinc are obtained under the following conditions: pH equal to 2–2.5% and 10–12% v/v of Na{sub 2}S concentrated solution at 10% w/v. In these conditions the coprecipitation of yttrium is of 15–20%. Finally further yttrium precipitation experiments by oxalic acid on the residual solutions, after removing of zinc, show that yttrium could be recovered and calcined to obtain the final product as yttrium oxide. The achieved results allow to propose a CRT recycling process based on leaching of fluorescent powder from cathode ray tube and recovery of yttrium oxide after removing of zinc by precipitation. The final recovery of yttrium is 75–80%.

  20. Absence of aluminium in neuritic plaque cores in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Landsberg, J P; McDonald, B; Watt, F

    1992-11-01

    Controversy exists over whether aluminium has a role in the aetiology of Alzheimer's disease. Alzheimer's disease is neuropathologically characterized by the occurrence of a minimum density of neurofibrillary tangles and neuritic plaques in the hippocampus and the association cortex of the brain. The purported association of aluminium with Alzheimer's disease is based on: (1) the experimental induction of fibrillary changes in the neurons of animals by the injection of aluminium salts into brain tissue; (2) reported detection of aluminium in neuritic plaques and tangle-bearing neurons; (3) epidemiological studies linking aluminium levels in the environment, notably water supplies, with an increased prevalence of dementia; and (4) a reported decrease in the rate of disease progression following the administration of desferroxamine, an aluminium chelator, to clinically diagnosed sufferers of Alzheimer's disease. Here we use nuclear microscopy, a new analytical technique involving million-volt nuclear particles, to identify and analyse plaques in postmortem tissue from patients with Alzheimer's disease without using chemical staining techniques and fail to demonstrate the presence of aluminium in plaque cores in untreated tissue. PMID:1436075

  1. Does allergen-specific immunotherapy induce contact allergy to aluminium?

    PubMed

    Netterlid, Eva; Hindsén, Monica; Siemund, Ingrid; Björk, Jonas; Werner, Sonja; Jacobsson, Helene; Güner, Nuray; Bruze, Magnus

    2013-01-01

    Persistent, itching nodules have been reported to appear at the injection site after allergen-specific immuno-therapy with aluminium-precipitated antigen extract, occasionally in conjunction with contact allergy to aluminium. This study aimed to quantify the development of contact allergy to aluminium during allergen-specific immunotherapy. A randomized, controlled, single-blind multicentre study of children and adults entering allergen-specific immunotherapy was performed using questionnaires and patch-testing. A total of 205 individuals completed the study. In the 3 study groups all subjects tested negative to aluminium before allergen-specific immunotherapy and 4 tested positive after therapy. In the control group 4 participants tested positive to aluminium. Six out of 8 who tested positive also had atopic dermatitis. Positive test results were found in 5/78 children and 3/127 adults. Allergen-specific immunotherapy was not shown to be a risk factor for contact allergy to aluminium. Among those who did develop aluminium allergy, children and those with atopic dermatitis were more highly represented.

  2. Unexpected loss of contact allergy to aluminium induced by vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Gente Lidholm, Anette; Bergfors, Elisabet; Inerot, Annica; Blomgren, Ulla; Gillstedt, Martin; Trollfors, Birger

    2013-01-01

    Background In studies in Gothenburg, Sweden, in the 1990s of an aluminium hydroxide-adsorbed pertussis toxoid vaccine, 745 of ∼76 000 vaccinated children developed long-lasting itchy subcutaneous nodules at the vaccination site. Of 495 children with itchy nodules patch tested for aluminium allergy, 376 (76%) were positive. Objectives To study the prognosis of the vaccine-induced aluminium allergy. Patients and methods Two hundred and forty-one children with demonstrated aluminium allergy in the previous study were patch tested again 5–9 years after the initial test, with the same procedure as used previously. Results Contact allergy to aluminium was no longer demonstrable in 186 of the retested 241 children (77%). A negative test result was more common in children who no longer had itching at the vaccination site; it was also related to the age of the child, the time after the first aluminium-adsorbed vaccine dose, and the strength of the reaction in the first test. Conclusions Patch test reactivity to aluminium seems to disappear or weaken with time. PMID:23601064

  3. Dietary exposure to aluminium of the Hong Kong population.

    PubMed

    Wong, Waiky W K; Chung, Stephen W C; Kwong, K P; Yin Ho, Yuk; Xiao, Ying

    2010-04-01

    A total of 256 individual food samples were collected in Hong Kong for aluminium testing. Most of food samples were analysed in ready-to-eat form. High aluminium levels were found in steamed bread/bun/cake (mean: 100-320 mg kg(-1)), some bakery products such as muffin, pancake/waffle, coconut tart and cake (mean: 250, 160, 120 and 91 mg kg(-1), respectively), and jellyfish (ready-to-eat form) (mean: 1200 mg kg(-1)). The results demonstrated that aluminium-containing food additives have been widely used in these food products. The average dietary exposure to aluminium for a 60 kg adult was estimated to be 0.60 mg kg(-1) bw week(-1), which amounted to 60% of the new PTWI established by JECFA. The main dietary source was "steamed bread/bun/cake", which contributed to 60% of the total exposure, followed by "bakery products" and "jellyfish", which contributed to 23 and 10% of the total exposure, respectively. However, the estimation did not include the intake of aluminium from natural food sources, food contact materials or other sources (e.g. drinking water). Although the results indicated that aluminium it is unlikely to cause adverse health effect for the general population, the risk to some populations who regularly consume foods with aluminium-containing food additives cannot be ruled out.

  4. A joint experimental/theoretical investigation of the MMA polymerization initiated by yttrium phenoxyamine complexes.

    PubMed

    Fang, Jian; Tschan, Mathieu J-L; Brulé, E; Robert, Carine; Thomas, Christophe M; Maron, Laurent

    2013-07-01

    A joint experimental/theoretical study has been carried out on the putative MMA polymerization catalyzed by an yttrium isopropyloxide complex. Despite its high activity in lactone polymerization, this catalyst is found to be unreactive on methyl methacrylate (MMA) polymerization. This surprising result is rationalized using a computational approach at the DFT level. Indeed, the endothermicity of the initiation step explains this lack of reactivity. The theoretical proposal of yttrium amido complexes as catalysts allows overcoming this initiation problem.

  5. Superconductivity by rare earth doping in the 1038-type compounds (Ca1-xREx) 10(FeAs)10(Pt3As8) with RE=Y, La-Nd, Sm-Lu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stürzer, Tobias; Derondeau, Gerald; Bertschler, Eva-Maria; Johrendt, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    We report superconductivity in polycrystalline samples of the 1038-type compounds (Ca1-xREx) 10(FeAs)10(Pt3As8) up to Tc=35 K with RE=Y, La-Nd, Sm, Gd-Lu. The critical temperatures are nearly independent of the trivalent rare earth element used, yielding a common Tc(xRE) phase diagram for electron doping in all these systems. The absence of superconductivity in Eu2+ doped samples, as well as the close resemblance of (Ca1-xREx) 10(FeAs)10(Pt3As8) to the 1048 compound substantiate that the electron doping scenario in the RE-1038 and 1048 phases is analogous to other iron-based superconductors with simpler crystal structures.

  6. The varied functions of aluminium-activated malate transporters-much more than aluminium resistance.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Antony J; Baker, Alison; Muench, Stephen P

    2016-06-15

    The ALMT (aluminium-activated malate transporter) family comprises a functionally diverse but structurally similar group of ion channels. They are found ubiquitously in plant species, expressed throughout different tissues, and located in either the plasma membrane or tonoplast. The first family member identified was TaALMT1, discovered in wheat root tips, which was found to be involved in aluminium resistance by means of malate exudation into the soil. However, since this discovery other family members have been shown to have many other functions such as roles in stomatal opening, general anionic homoeostasis, and in economically valuable traits such as fruit flavour. Recent evidence has also shown that ALMT proteins can act as key molecular actors in GABA (γ-aminobutyric acid) signalling, the first evidence that GABA can act as a signal transducer in plants. PMID:27284052

  7. The behaviour of selected yttrium containing bioactive glass microspheres in simulated body environments.

    PubMed

    Cacaina, D; Ylänen, H; Simon, S; Hupa, M

    2008-03-01

    The study aims at the manufacture and investigation of biodegradable glass microspheres incorporated with yttrium potentially useful for radionuclide therapy of cancer. The glass microspheres in the SiO2-Na2O-P2O5-CaO-K2O-MgO system containing yttrium were prepared by conventional melting and flame spheroidization. The behaviour of the yttrium silicate glass microspheres was investigated under in vitro conditions using simulated body fluid (SBF) and Tris buffer solution (TBS), for different periods of time, according to half-life time of the Y-90. The local structure of the glasses and the effect of yttrium on the biodegradability process were evaluated by Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and Back Scattered Electron Imaging of Scanning Electron Microscopy (BEI-SEM) equipped with Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis. UV-VIS spectrometry and Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) was used for analyzing the release behaviour of silica and yttrium in the two used solutions. The results indicate that the addition of yttrium to a bioactive glass increases its structural stability which therefore, induced a different behaviour of the glasses in simulated body environments.

  8. Aluminium and iron air pollution near an iron casting and aluminium foundry in Turin district (Italy).

    PubMed

    Polizzi, Salvatore; Ferrara, Mauro; Bugiani, Massimiliano; Barbero, Domenico; Baccolo, Tiziana

    2007-09-01

    This work reports the results of an environmental survey carried out in an industrial area in the Province of Turin: its main aim is to assess the levels of iron and aluminium in the outside air during the period from July to September to assess the influence of industrial activity (a cast-iron and aluminium foundry) which is interrupted during the month of August, on the level of metals present in the air. Conducting the analysis during this period of time made it possible to avoid the confounding effect of pollution due to domestic central heating. The measurements were taken from nine areas at different distances from the foundry in the area and according to the direction of the prevailing winds, as deduced from the historical data. The results of this survey show a statistically significant difference in iron and aluminium levels in the outside air in the geographic areas between the two main periods examined: during August (no foundry activity) v/s July-September (foundry activity). The values recorded are: Aluminium 0.4+/-0.45 microg/m(3) v/s 1.12+/-1.29 microg/m(3) (p<0.0001); Iron 0.95+/-0.56 microg/m(3) v/s 1.6+/-1.0 microg/m(3) (p<0.0001). There were no statistically significant differences between the nine sampling points from the point of view of the sampling sites, climate conditions and wind directions. We found no correlation with car traffic, in terms of the number of vehicles, and metals. The values of iron tended to be higher in the areas farther away from the foundry site in the areas located along the path of the prevailing winds.

  9. Thickness Evaluation of Aluminium Plate Using Pulsed Eddy Current Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Gurpartap; Bapat, Harsh Madhukar; Singh, Bhanu Pratap; Bandyopadhyay, Manojit; Puri, Rakesh Kumar; Badodkar, Deepak Narayanrao

    2013-10-01

    This paper describes a pulsed eddy current (PEC) based non-destructive testing system used for detection of thickness variation in aluminium plate. A giant magneto-resistive sensor has been used instead of pick up coil for detecting resultant magnetic field. The PEC response signals obtained from 1 to 5 mm thickness change in aluminium plate were investigated. Two time domain features, namely peak value and time to peak, of PEC response were used for extracting information about thickness variation in aluminium plate. The variation of peak value and time to peak with thickness was compared. A program was developed to display the thickness variation of the tested sample.

  10. Acidic deposition: decline in mobilization of toxic aluminium.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Sheila M; Driscoll, Charles T

    2002-05-16

    The mobilization of aluminium from acidic forest soils is arguably the most ecologically important consequence of acid deposition in the environment because of its adverse effects on soils, forest vegetation and surface water. Here we show that there has been a significant decline in the concentrations of aluminium species in soil solutions at medium-to-high elevations in a northern hardwood forest in the United States in response to decreasing acidic deposition. Streamwater aluminium concentrations have also fallen and, if this rate of recovery persists, will within 10 years no longer pose a threat to fish.

  11. Selective liquid chromatographic separation of yttrium from heavier rare earth elements using acetic acid as a novel eluent.

    PubMed

    Kifle, Dejene; Wibetoe, Grethe

    2013-09-13

    One of the major difficulties in the rare earth elements separation is purification of yttrium from heavy rare earth elements. Thus, an HPLC method using acetic acid as novel eluent was explored for selective separation of yttrium form the heavy rare earth elements. When acetic acid is used as a mobile phase yttrium eluted with the lighter lanthanides. This is contrary to its relative position amongst heavier lanthanides when eluents commonly used for separation of rare earth elements were employed. The shift in elution position of yttrium with acetic acid as eluent may reflect a relatively lower stability constant of the yttrium-AcOH complex (in the same order as for the lighter lanthanides) compared to the corresponding AcOH complexes with heavy lanthanides, enabling selective separation of yttrium from the latter. The method was successfully used for selective separation of yttrium in mixed rare earth sample containing about 80% of yttrium and about 20% of heavy rare earth oxides. Thus, the use of AcOH as eluent is an effective approach for separating and determining the trace amounts of heavy rare earth elements in large amounts of yttrium matrix. Separation was performed on C18 column by running appropriate elution programs. The effluent from the column was monitored with diode array detector at absorbance wavelength of 658nm after post column derivatization with Arsenazo III.

  12. Aluminium alloys in municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yanjun; Rem, Peter

    2009-05-01

    With the increasing growth of incineration of household waste, more and more aluminium is retained in municipal solid waste incinerator bottom ash. Therefore recycling of aluminium from bottom ash becomes increasingly important. Previous research suggests that aluminium from different sources is found in different size fractions resulting in different recycling rates. The purpose of this study was to develop analytical and sampling techniques to measure the particle size distribution of individual alloys in bottom ash. In particular, cast aluminium alloys were investigated. Based on the particle size distribution it was computed how well these alloys were recovered in a typical state-of-the-art treatment plant. Assessment of the cast alloy distribution was carried out by wet physical separation processes, as well as chemical methods, X-ray fluorescence analysis and electron microprobe analysis. The results from laboratory analyses showed that cast alloys tend to concentrate in the coarser fractions and therefore are better recovered in bottom ash treatment plants. PMID:19423581

  13. The management of Frey's syndrome with aluminium chloride hexahydrate antiperspirant.

    PubMed Central

    Black, M. J.; Gunn, A.

    1990-01-01

    Nine patients suffering from gustatory sweating (Frey's syndrome) following parotidectomy have been treated by topical applications of aluminium chloride hexahydrate. Treatment has successfully controlled gustatory sweating using application intervals varying from 1 to 50 days. Images Figure 1 PMID:2301903

  14. Aluminium leaching from red mud by filamentous fungi.

    PubMed

    Urík, Martin; Bujdoš, Marek; Milová-Žiaková, Barbora; Mikušová, Petra; Slovák, Marek; Matúš, Peter

    2015-11-01

    This contribution investigates the efficient and environmentally friendly aluminium leaching from red mud (bauxite residue) by 17 species of filamentous fungi. Bioleaching experiments were examined in batch cultures with the red mud in static, 7-day cultivation. The most efficient fungal strains in aluminium bioleaching were Penicillium crustosum G-140 and Aspergillus niger G-10. The A. niger G-10 strain was capable to extract up to approximately 141 mg·L(-1) of aluminium from 0.2 g dry weight red mud. Chemical leaching with organic acids mixture, prepared according to A. niger G-10 strain's respective fungal excretion during cultivation, proved that organic acids significantly contribute to aluminium solubilization from red mud.

  15. Aluminium assay and evaluation of the local reaction at several time points after intramuscular administration of aluminium containing vaccines in the Cynomolgus monkey.

    PubMed

    Verdier, François; Burnett, Roger; Michelet-Habchi, Claire; Moretto, Philippe; Fievet-Groyne, Françoise; Sauzeat, Elisabeth

    2005-02-01

    Aluminium hydroxide and aluminium phosphate have been widely used as vaccine adjuvants with a good safety record for several decades. The recent observation in human deltoid muscle of macrophage aggregates containing aluminium hydroxide spicules and termed Macrophagic Myofasciitis (MMF) has encouraged research on aluminium salts. This study was conducted in order to further investigate the clearance of aluminium at the vaccine injection site and the features of induced histopathological lesions. Two groups of 12 monkeys were immunised in the quadriceps muscle with Diphtheria-Tetanus vaccines, which were adjuvanted with either aluminium hydroxide or aluminium phosphate. Three, six or twelve months after vaccination, four monkeys from each group were sacrificed and histopathological examination and aluminium assays were performed on quadriceps muscle sections. Histopathological lesions, similar to the MMF described in humans, were observed and were still present 3 months after aluminium phosphate and 12 months after aluminium hydroxide adjuvanted vaccine administration. An increase in aluminium concentration, more marked in the area of the lesions, was also observed at the 3- and 6-month time points. These findings were localised at the injection site and no similar changes were observed in the distal or proximal muscle fragments. We conclude from this study that aluminium adjuvanted vaccines administered by the intramuscular route trigger histopathological changes restricted to the area around the injection site which persist for several months but are not associated with abnormal clinical signs. PMID:15661384

  16. Role of magnesium in alleviation of aluminium toxicity in plants.

    PubMed

    Bose, Jayakumar; Babourina, Olga; Rengel, Zed

    2011-04-01

    Magnesium is pivotal for activating a large number of enzymes; hence, magnesium plays an important role in numerous physiological and biochemical processes affecting plant growth and development. Magnesium can also ameliorate aluminium phytotoxicity, but literature reports on the dynamics of magnesium homeostasis upon exposure to aluminium are rare. Herein existing knowledge on the magnesium transport mechanisms and homeostasis maintenance in plant cells is critically reviewed. Even though overexpression of magnesium transporters can alleviate aluminium toxicity in plants, the mechanisms governing such alleviation remain obscure. Possible magnesium-dependent mechanisms include (i) better carbon partitioning from shoots to roots; (ii) increased synthesis and exudation of organic acid anions; (iii) enhanced acid phosphatase activity; (iv) maintenance of proton-ATPase activity and cytoplasmic pH regulation; (v) protection against an aluminium-induced cytosolic calcium increase; and (vi) protection against reactive oxygen species. Future research should concentrate on assessing aluminium toxicity and tolerance in plants with overexpressed or antisense magnesium transporters to increase understanding of the aluminium-magnesium interaction.

  17. The binding, transport and fate of aluminium in biological cells.

    PubMed

    Exley, Christopher; Mold, Matthew J

    2015-04-01

    Aluminium is the most abundant metal in the Earth's crust and yet, paradoxically, it has no known biological function. Aluminium is biochemically reactive, it is simply that it is not required for any essential process in extant biota. There is evidence neither of element-specific nor evolutionarily conserved aluminium biochemistry. This means that there are no ligands or chaperones which are specific to its transport, there are no transporters or channels to selectively facilitate its passage across membranes, there are no intracellular storage proteins to aid its cellular homeostasis and there are no pathways which evolved to enable the metabolism and excretion of aluminium. Of course, aluminium is found in every compartment of every cell of every organism, from virus through to Man. Herein we have investigated each of the 'silent' pathways and metabolic events which together constitute a form of aluminium homeostasis in biota, identifying and evaluating as far as is possible what is known and, equally importantly, what is unknown about its uptake, transport, storage and excretion.

  18. Volatilisation and oxidation of aluminium scraps fed into incineration furnaces.

    PubMed

    Biganzoli, Laura; Gorla, Leopoldo; Nessi, Simone; Grosso, Mario

    2012-12-01

    Ferrous and non-ferrous metal scraps are increasingly recovered from municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash and used in the production of secondary steel and aluminium. However, during the incineration process, metal scraps contained in the waste undergo volatilisation and oxidation processes, which determine a loss of their recoverable mass. The present paper evaluates the behaviour of different types of aluminium packaging materials in a full-scale waste to energy plant during standard operation. Their partitioning and oxidation level in the residues of the incineration process are evaluated, together with the amount of potentially recoverable aluminium. About 80% of post-consumer cans, 51% of trays and 27% of foils can be recovered through an advanced treatment of bottom ash combined with a melting process in the saline furnace for the production of secondary aluminium. The residual amount of aluminium concentrates in the fly ash or in the fine fraction of the bottom ash and its recovery is virtually impossible using the current eddy current separation technology. The average oxidation levels of the aluminium in the residues of the incineration process is equal to 9.2% for cans, 17.4% for trays and 58.8% for foils. The differences between the tested packaging materials are related to their thickness, mechanical strength and to the alloy.

  19. Stability properties of tin-oxide-coated aluminium reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roos, Arne; Hedenqvist, Per

    1990-08-01

    The chemical and mechanical stability of tin oxide coated aluminium reflectors have been investigated. The tin oxide has been applied with the pyrolytic spray technique which results in a hard crystalline coating. Tin oxide is a wide bandgap semiconductor and is transparent in the visible part of the spectrum. The visual appearance of tin oxide coated aluminium is therefore similar to the uncoated metal. Interference effects can give a slightly coloured appearance, and owing to the higher refractive index and extinction coefficient of the tin oxide the reflectance is lower than for an anodized aluminium surface. The tin oxide was applied both on electropolished aluminium and on evaporated aluminium films on glass. In both cases an improved resistance both to alcaline and acid solutions was noted. It was found that the chemical stability was better than for an anodized surface. The mechanical stability of the evaporated film was considerably improved. The electropolished samples were also characterized with respect to film hardness and resistance to erosive and abrasive wear. The hardness of the tin oxide was found to be higher than that of the anodized layer while the opposite relation applied for the erosive wear resistance. The abrasive wear resistance was about equal for tin oxide coated and anodized aluminium.

  20. A mechanism for acute aluminium toxicity in fish.

    PubMed

    Exley, C; Chappell, J S; Birchall, J D

    1991-08-01

    Aluminium is acutely toxic to fish in acid waters. The gill is the principal target organ and death is due to a combination of ionoregulatory, osmoregulatory and respiratory dysfunction. The toxic mechanism has hitherto received little direct consideration and is unknown. In this paper the mechanism of acute aluminium toxicity is approached from a chemical perspective. Symptomatic evidence of toxicity is taken from the literature and combined with our own research to elucidate a biochemically sound model to describe a possible mechanism of acute aluminium toxicity in fish. The proposed model delineates the chemical conditions immediately adjacent to the gill surface and emphasizes their importance in aluminium's toxic mode of action. The mechanism is shown to be bipartite. Aluminium binding to functional groups both apically located at the gill surface and intracellularly located within lamellar epithelial cells disrupts the barrier properties of the gill epithelium. The concomitant iono- and osmoregulatory dysfunction results in accelerated cell necrosis, sloughing and death of the fish. The mechanism of epithelial cell death is proposed as a general mechanism of aluminium-induced accelerated cell death.

  1. Surface roughness when diamond turning RSA 905 optical aluminium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otieno, T.; Abou-El-Hossein, K.; Hsu, W. Y.; Cheng, Y. C.; Mkoko, Z.

    2015-08-01

    Ultra-high precision machining is used intensively in the photonics industry for the production of various optical components. Aluminium alloys have proven to be advantageous and are most commonly used over other materials to make various optical components. Recently, the increasing demand from optical systems for optical aluminium with consistent material properties has led to the development of newly modified grades of aluminium alloys produced by rapid solidification in the foundry process. These new aluminium grades are characterised by their finer microstructures and refined mechanical and physical properties. However the machining database of these new optical aluminium grades is limited and more research is still required to investigate their machinability performance when they are diamond turned in ultrahigh precision manufacturing environment. This work investigates the machinability of rapidly solidified aluminium RSA 905 by varying a number of diamond-turning cutting parameters and measuring the surface roughness over a cutting distance of 4 km. The machining parameters varied in this study were the cutting speed, feed rate and depth of cut. The results showed a common trend of decrease in surface roughness with increasing cutting distance. The lowest surface roughness Ra result obtained after 4 km in this study was 3.2 nm. This roughness values was achieved using a cutting speed of 1750 rpm, feed rate of 5 mm/min and depth of cut equal to 25 μm.

  2. Synthesis of nanowires and nanoparticles of cubic aluminium nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramanian, C.; Godbole, V. P.; Rohatgi, V. K.; Das, A. K.; Bhoraskar, S. V.

    2004-03-01

    Nanostructures of cubic aluminium nitride were synthesized by DC arc-plasma-induced melting of aluminium in a nitrogen-argon ambient. The material flux ejected from the molten aluminium surface was found to react with nitrogen under highly non-equilibrium conditions and subsequently condense on a water-cooled surface to yield a mixture of nanowires and nanoparticles of crystalline cubic aluminium nitride. Both x-ray diffraction and electron diffraction measurements revealed that the as-synthesized nitrides adopted the cubic phase. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was used to understand the bonding configuration. Microstructural features of the synthesized material were best studied by transmission electron microscopy. From these analyses cubic aluminium nitride was found to be the dominating phase for both nanowires and nanoparticles synthesized at low currents. The typical particle size distribution was found to range over 15-80 nm, whereas the wires varied from 30 to 100 nm in diameter and 500 to 700 nm in length, depending upon the process parameters such as arc current and the nitrogen pressure. The reaction products inside the plasma zone were also obtained theoretically by minimization of free energy and the favourable zone temperature necessary for the formation of aluminium nitride was found to be {\\sim } 6000 K. Results are discussed in view of the highly non-equilibrium conditions that prevail during the arc-plasma synthesis.

  3. Optical and structural characterization of yttrium calcium borate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Cristiane; Meneses, Domingos D. S.; Echegut, Patrick; Neuville, Daniel R.; Hernandes, Antonio C.; Ibanez, Alain

    2010-03-01

    Structural and optical properties of new stable glasses in the Y2O3 -- CaO -- B2O3 system, containing the same Y/Ca ratio as the YCa4O(BO3)3 (YCOB) crystal, were determined from Raman and reflectance infrared spectroscopy [1]. We have obtained the optical functions using a dielectric function model and their evolution with composition are associated with an increase in the number of non-bridging oxygen and to calcium/yttrium oxides content with the formation of pentaborate, metaborate, orthoborate and pyroborate groups. The orthoborate and pyroborate signatures increase with increasing the modifier cations. Refractive indexes values (from 1.597 to 1.627 at λ = 2 μm) are in good agreement with those of the YCOB crystal, an indication that these glasses are potential candidates for doping with rare-earth ions for optical applications. [4pt] [1] C. N. Santos, D.D.S. Meneses, P. Echegut, D. R. Neuville, A. C. Hernandes, A. Ibanez, Appl. Phys. Lett. 94, 151901(2009).

  4. Phase Diagram for Magnon Condensate in Yttrium Iron Garnet Film

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fuxiang; Saslow, Wayne M.; Pokrovsky, Valery L.

    2013-01-01

    Recently, magnons, which are quasiparticles describing the collective motion of spins, were found to undergo Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) at room temperature in films of Yttrium Iron Garnet (YIG). Unlike other quasiparticle BEC systems, this system has a spectrum with two degenerate minima, which makes it possible for the system to have two condensates in momentum space. Recent Brillouin Light Scattering studies for a microwave-pumped YIG film of thickness d = 5 μm and field H = 1 kOe find a low-contrast interference pattern at the characteristic wavevector Q of the magnon energy minimum. In this report, we show that this modulation pattern can be quantitatively explained as due to unequal but coherent Bose-Einstein condensation of magnons into the two energy minima. Our theory predicts a transition from a high-contrast symmetric state to a low-contrast non-symmetric state on varying the d and H, and a new type of collective oscillation. PMID:23455849

  5. MCrAlY bond coat with enhanced yttrium

    DOEpatents

    Jablonski, Paul D.; Hawk, Jeffrey A.

    2016-08-30

    One or more embodiments relates to a method of producing an MCrAlY bond coat comprising an MCrAlY layer in contact with a Y--Al.sub.2O.sub.3 layer. The MCrAlY layer is comprised of a .gamma.-M solid solution, a .beta.-MAl intermetallic phase, and Y-type intermetallics. The Y--Al.sub.2O.sub.3 layer is comprised of Yttrium atoms coordinated with oxygen atoms comprising the Al.sub.2O.sub.3 lattice. The method comprises depositing an MCrAlY material on a substrate, applying an Y.sub.2O.sub.3 paste, and heating the substrate in a non-oxidizing atmosphere at a temperature between 400-1300.degree. C. for a time sufficient to generate the Y--Al.sub.2O.sub.3 layer. Both the MCrAlY layer and the Y--Al.sub.2O.sub.3 layer have a substantial absence of Y.sub.2O.sub.3, YAG, and YAP phases.

  6. RBS and XRD Characterization of Yttrium Iron Garnet Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansour, M.; Roumie, M.; Abdel Samad, B.; Basma, H.; Korek, M.

    2015-03-01

    Magnetic materials such as yttrium iron garnet (YIG or Y3Fe5O12) present a great importance for their magneto-optic properties. They are potential materials used for applications in the domain of optical telecommunications for example. In this work, we have investigated YIG thin films deposited on substrates of quartz and GGG (gadolinium gallium garnet or Gd3Ga5O12). Using Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) we characterized the performed layers (thickness and stoichiometry) in order to correlate the films preparation conditions with the quality of the final material. We determined the optimal energy of the alpha particles beam used for RBS measurements and we fitted the experimental spectra using the SIMNRA simulated code. Our RBS results showed that the films have a stoichiometry close to that of the starting material. In addition, we found that the film thickness is proportional to deposition time but inversely proportional to the substrate temperature. Moreover, using x-ray diffraction (XRD) we determined the annealing effect on the structure of the profile of our thin films.

  7. Nanoscale inhomogeneities in yttrium-barium-copper-oxide (YBCO) superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Zahirul; Sinha, S. K.; Lang, J. C.; Liu, X.; Haskel, D.; Moss, S. C.; Srajer, G.; Veal, B. W.; Wermeille, D.; Lee, D. R.; Haeffner, D. R.; Welp, U.; Wochner, P.

    2004-03-01

    X-ray diffraction studies at the Advanced Photon Source reveal that nanoscale inhomogeneities, electronic or structural in origin, form in yttrium-barium-copper-oxide (YBa_2Cu_3O_6+x) superconductors and coexist with the superconducting (SC) state. Diffuse scattering from these inhomogeneous superstructures is due to atomic displacements with respect to equilibrium lattice sites (Z. Islam et al. Phys. Rev. B 66, 92501 (2002)), that are characterized by a wavevector of the form q=(q_x,0,0), where qx varies with hole doping from 2 unit cells (along shorter Cu-O-Cu direction) for very low doping to 4 unit cells at optimal doping. Interestingly, while these superstructures are 3-dimensionally ordered when the SC state is weakened (e.g., at x=0.4), as the doping increases, they become quasi 1D with correlation lengths comparable to SC coherence lengths in these cuprates. Recent first-principles calculations (D. de Fontaine et al., to be published) for the x=0.63 compound show that atomic displacements consistent with experimental data can be the result of ordering of O vacancies in YBCO. Models for various superstructures and their role in the phase diagram will be discussed.

  8. Generation and reactivity of yttrium-carbon cluster ions

    SciTech Connect

    Kan, S.Z.; Lee, S.A.; Freiser, B.S.

    1995-12-31

    In 1992, Castleman and coworkers reported the production of the ionic transition metal-carbon clusters, M{sub 8}C{sub 12}{sup +} (M=Ti,V, Zr and Hf). Like the observations of pure carbon clusters such as C{sub 60} and C{sub 70}, these metal-carbon clusters were observed as {open_quotes}magic{close_quotes} peaks in the mass spectra obtained from a supersonic expansion ion source. These intense peaks are indicative of the high stability of these clusters which are proposed to have symmetrical, cagelike structures with the geometry of a pentagonal dodecahedron. M{sub 8}C{sub 12}{sup +} species are thus termed metallo-carbohedrenes, or met-cars for short. Like fullerenes, met-cars are of both fundamental interest and hold promise as a new class of important materials and, hence, have become the focus of both theoretical and experimental investigations. Along with these species, metal-carbon clusters of other stoichiometries such as Ti{sub 8}C{sub 11}{sup +}, Ti{sub 8}C{sub 13}{sup +}, Ti{sub 7}C{sub 12}, V{sub 14}C{sub 13}{sup +}, V{sub 14}C{sub 12}{sup +}, and Nb{sub 4}C{sub 4}{sup +} have also been examined. Here, the authors report on the yttrium-carb system in which a broad range of metal-carbon cluster ions are observed.

  9. Aluminium content of some foods and food products in the USA, with aluminium food additives.

    PubMed

    Saiyed, Salim M; Yokel, Robert A

    2005-03-01

    The primary objective was to determine the aluminium (Al) content of selected foods and food products in the USA which contain Al as an approved food additive. Intake of Al from the labeled serving size of each food product was calculated. The samples were acid or base digested and analysed for Al using electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. Quality control (QC) samples, with matrices matching the samples, were generated and used to verify the Al determinations. Food product Al content ranged from <1-27,000 mg kg(-1). Cheese in a serving of frozen pizzas had up to 14 mg of Al, from basic sodium aluminium phosphate; whereas the same amount of cheese in a ready-to-eat restaurant pizza provided 0.03-0.09 mg. Many single serving packets of non-dairy creamer had approximately 50-600 mg Al kg(-1) as sodium aluminosilicate, providing up to 1.5 mg Al per serving. Many single serving packets of salt also had sodium aluminosilicate as an additive, but the Al content was less than in single-serving non-dairy creamer packets. Acidic sodium aluminium phosphate was present in many food products, pancakes and waffles. Baking powder, some pancake/waffle mixes and frozen products, and ready-to-eat pancakes provided the most Al of the foods tested; up to 180 mg/serving. Many products provide a significant amount of Al compared to the typical intake of 3-12 mg/day reported from dietary Al studies conducted in many countries.

  10. Yttrium-doped cobalt nanoferrites prepared by sol-gel combustion method and its characterization.

    PubMed

    Shobana, M K; Nam, Wonjong; Choe, Heeman

    2013-05-01

    Ferrites are extremely important magnetic ceramics in the production of electronic components because they reduce the energy losses by the induced currents acting as electrical insulators. Similarly, the spinel-structured cobalt-based ferrites are promising materials for stress, torsion sensors and energy storage applications (anode materials in lithium batteries, fuel cells and solar cells). Therefore, many studies have focused on cobalt ferrites obtained using conventional techniques. Different sintering conditions, types and levels of substitution result in different microstructures and magnetostriction coefficients under a wide range of preparation conditions. Despite many attempts, there are no specific reports on the trivalent substitution of yttrium in cobalt ferrite to the best of our knowledge. In the present study, yttrium-doped cobalt ferrite was prepared with different concentrations to identify the crystallite size with respect to the yttrium concentration, temperature and changes in the structural and electrical properties. In addition, the resistance of the nanostructured yttrium-doped cobalt ferrites nanopowders was analyzed. The resistance was increased by the addition of yttrium to cobalt ferrites. PMID:23858896

  11. Hydrothermal synthesis and formation mechanism of hexagonal yttrium hydroxide fluoride nanobundles

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Li; Sun, QiLiang; Zhao, RuiNi; He, HuiLin; Xue, JianRong; Lin, Jun

    2013-11-15

    Graphical abstract: The formation of yttrium hydroxide fluorides nanobundles can be expressed as a precipitation transformation from cubic NaYF{sub 4} to hexagonal NaYF{sub 4} and to hexagonal Y(OH){sub 2.02}F{sub 0.98} owing to ion exchange. - Highlights: • Novel Y(OH){sub 2.02}F{sub 0.98} nanobundles have been successfully prepared by hydrothermal method. • The branched nanobundles composed of numerous oriented-attached nanoparticles has been studied. • The growth mechanism is proposed to be ion exchange and precipitation transformation. - Abstract: This article presents the fabrication of hexagonal yttrium hydroxide fluoride nanobundles via one-pot hydrothermal process, using yttrium nitrate, sodium hydroxide and ammonia fluoride as raw materials to react in propanetriol solvent. The X-ray diffraction pattern clearly reveals that the grown product is pure yttrium hydroxide fluoride, namely Y(OH){sub 2.02}F{sub 0.98}. The morphology and microstructure of the synthesized product is testified to be nanobundles composed of numerous oriented-attached nanoparticles as observed from the field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). The chemical composition was analyzed by the energy dispersive spectrum (EDS), confirming the phase transformation of the products which was clearly consistent with the result of XRD analysis. It is proposed that the growth of yttrium hydroxide fluoride nanobundles be attributed to ion exchange and precipitation transformation.

  12. Method of forming a relatively stable slip of silicon metal particles and yttrium containing particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickie, Ray A. (Inventor); Mangels, John A. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    The method concerns forming a relatively stable slip of silicon metal particles and yttrium containing particles. In one embodiment, a casting slip of silicon metal particles is formed in water. Particles of a yttrium containing sintering aid are added to the casting slip. The yttrium containing sintering aid is a compound which has at least some solubility in water to form Y.sup.+3 ions which have a high potential for totally flocculating the silicon metal particles into a semiporous solid. A small amount of a fluoride salt is added to the casting slip which contains the yttrium containing sintering aid. The fluoride salt is one which will produce fluoride anions when dissolved in water. The small amount of the fluoride anions produced are effective to suppress the flocculation of the silicon metal particles by the Y.sup.+3 ions so that all particles remain in suspension in the casting slip and the casting slip has both an increased shelf life and can be used to cast articles having a relatively thick cross-section. The pH of the casting slip is maintained in a range from 7.5 to 9. Preferably, the fluoride salt used is one which is based on a monovalent cation such as sodium or ammonia. The steps of adding the yttrium containing sintering aid and the fluoride salt may be interchanged if desired, and the salt may be added to a solution containing the sintering aid prior to addition of the silicon metal particles.

  13. Dopant effect of yttrium and the growth and adherence of alumina on nickel-aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, A. B.; Mehandru, S. P.; Smialek, J. L.

    1985-01-01

    The atom superposition and electron delocalization molecular orbital theory and large cluster models have been employed to study cation vacancy diffusion in alpha-Al2O3 and the bonding of alpha-Al2O3 to nickel, aluminum, and yttrium surfaces. Al(3+) diffusion barriers in alpha-Al2O3 by the vacancy mechanism are in reasonable agreement with experiment. The barrier to Y(3+) diffusion is predicted to be much higher. Since addition of yttrium to transition metal alloys is known to reduce the growth rate and stress convolutions in protective alumina scales, this result suggests the rate-limiting step in scale growth is cation vacancy diffusion. This may partially explain the beneficial effect of yttrium dopants on scale adhesion. The theory also predicts a very strong bonding between alumina and yttrium at the surface of the alloy. This may also be important to the adhesion phenomenon. It is also found that aluminum and yttrium atoms bond very strongly to nickel because of charge transfer from their higher lying valence orbitals to the lower lying nickel s-d band.

  14. Yttrium-doped cobalt nanoferrites prepared by sol-gel combustion method and its characterization.

    PubMed

    Shobana, M K; Nam, Wonjong; Choe, Heeman

    2013-05-01

    Ferrites are extremely important magnetic ceramics in the production of electronic components because they reduce the energy losses by the induced currents acting as electrical insulators. Similarly, the spinel-structured cobalt-based ferrites are promising materials for stress, torsion sensors and energy storage applications (anode materials in lithium batteries, fuel cells and solar cells). Therefore, many studies have focused on cobalt ferrites obtained using conventional techniques. Different sintering conditions, types and levels of substitution result in different microstructures and magnetostriction coefficients under a wide range of preparation conditions. Despite many attempts, there are no specific reports on the trivalent substitution of yttrium in cobalt ferrite to the best of our knowledge. In the present study, yttrium-doped cobalt ferrite was prepared with different concentrations to identify the crystallite size with respect to the yttrium concentration, temperature and changes in the structural and electrical properties. In addition, the resistance of the nanostructured yttrium-doped cobalt ferrites nanopowders was analyzed. The resistance was increased by the addition of yttrium to cobalt ferrites.

  15. Facile synthesis of highly active hydrated yttrium oxide towards arsenate adsorption.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yang; Yu, Ling; Sun, Min; Paul Chen, J

    2016-07-15

    A novel hydrated yttrium oxide adsorbent with high capacity towards the arsenate (As(V)) adsorption was fabricated by a one-step hydrothermal process. Structure analysis identified the hydrated yttrium oxide to be Y2O(OH)4·1.5H2O, which displayed as irregular rods in the range of tens to hundreds of nanometers. The adsorbent exhibited favorable As(V) adsorption efficiency in a wide pH range from 4.0 to 7.0, with the maximum adsorption capacity of 480.2mg-As/g obtained at pH 5.0. Both the kinetics and isotherm studies demonstrated that the adsorption of the As(V) was a monolayer chemical adsorption process, in which the ion exchange between the hydroxyl groups on the hydrated yttrium oxide and arsenate anions played a key role in the uptake of the As(V). During the adsorption, the As(V) anions were replaced the hydroxyl groups and bound to the hydrated yttrium oxide via the linkage of AsOY. The presence of fluoride and phosphate greatly hindered the As(V) uptake on the hydrated yttrium oxide, whereas the bicarbonate, sulfate and humic acid showed insignificant impacts on the removal. PMID:27135142

  16. Treatment of unresectable intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma with yttrium-90 radioembolization: a systematic review and pooled analysis.

    PubMed

    Al-Adra, D P; Gill, R S; Axford, S J; Shi, X; Kneteman, N; Liau, S-S

    2015-01-01

    Radioembolization with yttrium-90 microspheres offers an alternative treatment option for patients with unresectable intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC). However, the rarity and heterogeneity of ICC makes it difficult to draw firm conclusions about treatment efficacy. Therefore, the goal of the current study is to systematically review the existing literature surrounding treatment of unresectable ICCs with yttrium-90 microspheres and provide a comprehensive review of the current experience and clinical outcome of this treatment modality. We performed a comprehensive search of electronic databases for ICC treatment and identified 12 studies with relevant data regarding radioembolization therapy with yttrium-90 microspheres. Based on pooled analysis, the overall weighted median survival was 15.5 months. Tumour response based on radiological studies demonstrated a partial response in 28% and stable disease in 54% of patients at three months. Seven patients were able to be downstaged to surgical resection. The complication profile of radioembolization is similar to that of other intra-arterial treatment modalities. Overall survival of patients with ICC after treatment with yttrium-90 microspheres is higher than historical survival rates and shows similar survival to those patients treated with systemic chemotherapy and/or trans-arterial chemoembolization therapy. Therefore, the use of yttrium-90 microspheres should be considered in the list of available treatment options for ICC. However, future randomized trials comparing systemic chemotherapy, TACE and local radiation will be required to identify the optimal treatment modality for unresectable ICC.

  17. Facile synthesis of highly active hydrated yttrium oxide towards arsenate adsorption.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yang; Yu, Ling; Sun, Min; Paul Chen, J

    2016-07-15

    A novel hydrated yttrium oxide adsorbent with high capacity towards the arsenate (As(V)) adsorption was fabricated by a one-step hydrothermal process. Structure analysis identified the hydrated yttrium oxide to be Y2O(OH)4·1.5H2O, which displayed as irregular rods in the range of tens to hundreds of nanometers. The adsorbent exhibited favorable As(V) adsorption efficiency in a wide pH range from 4.0 to 7.0, with the maximum adsorption capacity of 480.2mg-As/g obtained at pH 5.0. Both the kinetics and isotherm studies demonstrated that the adsorption of the As(V) was a monolayer chemical adsorption process, in which the ion exchange between the hydroxyl groups on the hydrated yttrium oxide and arsenate anions played a key role in the uptake of the As(V). During the adsorption, the As(V) anions were replaced the hydroxyl groups and bound to the hydrated yttrium oxide via the linkage of AsOY. The presence of fluoride and phosphate greatly hindered the As(V) uptake on the hydrated yttrium oxide, whereas the bicarbonate, sulfate and humic acid showed insignificant impacts on the removal.

  18. Accumulation and toxicity of aluminium-contaminated food in the freshwater crayfish, Pacifastacus leniusculus.

    PubMed

    Woodburn, Katie; Walton, Rachel; McCrohan, Catherine; White, Keith

    2011-10-01

    The accumulation and toxicity of aluminium in freshwater organisms have primarily been examined following aqueous exposure. This study investigated the uptake, excretion and toxicity of aluminium when presented as aluminium-contaminated food. Adult Pacifastacus leniusculus were fed control (3 μg aluminium/g) or aluminium-spiked pellets (420 μg aluminium/g) over 28 days. Half the crayfish in each group were then killed and the remainder fed control pellets for a further 10 days (clearance period). Concentrations of aluminium plus the essential metals calcium, copper, potassium and sodium were measured in the gill, hepatopancreas, flexor muscle, antennal gland (kidney) and haemolymph. Histopathological analysis of tissue damage and sub-cellular distribution of aluminium were examined in the hepatopancreas. Haemocyte number and protein concentration in the haemolymph were analysed as indicators of toxicity. The hepatopancreas of aluminium-fed crayfish contained significantly more aluminium than controls on days 28 and 38, and this amount was positively correlated with the amount ingested. More than 50% of the aluminium in the hepatopancreas of aluminium-fed crayfish was located in sub-cellular fractions thought to be involved in metal detoxification. Aluminium concentrations were also high in the antennal glands of aluminium-fed crayfish suggesting that some of the aluminium lost from the hepatopancreas is excreted. Aluminium exposure via contaminated food caused inflammation in the hepatopancreas but did not affect the number of circulating haemocytes, haemolymph ion concentrations or protein levels. In conclusion, crayfish accumulate, store and excrete aluminium from contaminated food with only localised toxicity.

  19. Aluminium-related osteodystrophy and desferrioxamine treatment: role of phosphorus.

    PubMed

    Jorgetti, V; Soeiro, N M; Mendes, V; Pereira, R C; Crivellari, M E; Coutris, G; Borelli, A; Leite, M O; Nussenzweig, I; Marcondes, M

    1994-01-01

    We investigated (1) the prevalence of aluminium overload among 96 patients with symptomatic bone disease haemodialysed from 1987 to 1989 in the Sao Paulo area, Brazil; (2) the effect of 6 months desferrioxamine (DFO) treatment (1-2g/week). All patients underwent a first bone biopsy. Aluminium overload (extent of stainable bone aluminium more than 20% trabecular surface) was observed in 74 of 96 patients. Forty overloaded patients were divided into patients with high bone formation rate (BFR) (group 1; n = 17) and patients with low BFR (group 2; n = 23), and had a second biopsy after DFO therapy. In both groups aluminium surface was reduced after treatment (P < 0.001), osteoblast surface (P < 0.02-P < 0.01) and plasma parathyroid hormone (iPTH) (P < 0.01) increased. In group 1 BFR remained high. In group 2 BFR remained low in 16 patients (2a) and increased in seven (P < 0.02) (2b). In group 2a plasma phosphorus was below that in group 2b patients, before (P < 0.03) and after (P < 0.01) DFO. The histological features of group 2a patients resembled hypophosphataemic osteomalacia, those of group 2b patients aluminium osteodystrophy. These data show a high prevalence of aluminium overload in Brazilian patients. Low-dose DFO therapy was safe, decreased bone pain, prevented fractures, and reduced stainable bone aluminium. Bone lesions only partially improved, suggesting that low phosphorus intake and/or plasma calcitriol concentrations may have prevented improvement of bone formation and mineralization.

  20. Elevated urinary excretion of aluminium and iron in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Exley, Christopher; Mamutse, Godwin; Korchazhkina, Olga; Pye, Eleanor; Strekopytov, Stanislav; Polwart, Anthony; Hawkins, Clive

    2006-10-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic, immune-mediated, demyelinating disease of the central nervous system of as yet unknown aetiology. A consensus of opinion has suggested that the disorder is the result of an interplay between environmental factors and susceptibility genes. We have used a battery of analytical techniques to determine if the urinary excretion of i) markers of oxidative damage; ii) iron and iii) the environmental toxin aluminium and its antagonist, silicon, are altered in relapsing-remitting (RRMS) and secondary progressive MS (SPMS). Urinary concentrations of oxidative biomarkers, MDA and TBARS, were not found to be useful indicators of inflammatory disease in MS. However, urinary concentrations of another potential marker for inflammation and oxidative stress, iron, were significantly increased in SPMS (P<0.01) and insignificantly increased in RRMS (P>0.05). Urinary concentrations of aluminium were also significantly increased in RRMS (P<0.001) and SPMS (P <0.05) such that the levels of aluminium excretion in the former were similar to those observed in individuals undergoing metal chelation therapy. The excretion of silicon was lower in MS and significantly so in SPMS (P<0.05). Increased excretion of iron in urine supported a role for iron dysmetabolism in MS. Levels of urinary aluminium excretion similar to those seen in aluminium intoxication suggested that aluminium may be a hitherto unrecognized environmental factor associated with the aetiology of MS. If aluminium is involved in MS then an increased dietary intake of its natural antagonist, silicon, might be a therapeutic option.

  1. Bioactive glasses as potential radioisotope vectors for in situ cancer therapy: investigating the structural effects of yttrium.

    PubMed

    Christie, Jamieson K; Malik, Jahangir; Tilocca, Antonio

    2011-10-21

    The incorporation of yttrium in bioactive glasses (BGs) could lead to a new generation of radionuclide vectors for cancer therapy, with high biocompatibility, controlled biodegradability and the ability to enhance the growth of new healthy tissues after the treatment with radionuclides. It is essential to assess whether and to what extent yttrium incorporation affects the favourable properties of the BG matrix: ideally, one would like to combine the high surface reactivity typical of BGs with a slow release of radioactive yttrium. Molecular Dynamics simulations show that, compared to a BG composition with the same silica fraction, incorporation of yttrium results in two opposing effects on the glass durability: a more fragmented silicate network (leading to lower durability) and a stronger yttrium-mediated association between separate silicate fragments (leading to higher durability). The simulations also highlight a high site-selectivity and some clustering of yttrium cations, which are likely linked to the observed slow rate of yttrium released from related Y-BG compositions. Optimisation of yttrium BG compositions for radiotherapy applications thus depends on the delicate balance between these effects.

  2. Role of phytohormones in aluminium rhizotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Kopittke, Peter M

    2016-10-01

    Elevated concentrations of soluble aluminium (Al) reduce root growth in acid soils, but much remains unknown regarding the toxicity of this Al as well as the mechanisms by which plants respond. This review examines changes in phytohormones in Al-stressed plants. Al often results in a rapid 'burst' of ethylene in root apical tissues within 15-30 min, with this regulating an increase in auxin. This production of ethylene and auxin seems to be a component of a plant-response to toxic Al, resulting in cell wall modification or regulation of organic acid release. There is also evidence of a role of auxin in the expression of Al toxicity itself, with Al decreasing basipetal transport of auxin, thereby potentially decreasing wall loosening as required for elongation. Increasingly, changes in abscisic acid in root apices also seem to be involved in plant-responses to toxic Al. Changes in cytokinins, gibberellins and jasmonates following exposure to Al are also examined, although little information is available. Finally, although not a phytohormone, concentrations of nitric oxide change rapidly in Al-exposed tissues. The information presented in this review will assist in focusing future research efforts in examining the importance of phytohormones in plant tissues exposed to toxic levels of Al. PMID:27352002

  3. A systematic review of aluminium phosphide poisoning.

    PubMed

    Mehrpour, Omid; Jafarzadeh, Mostafa; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2012-03-01

    Every year, about 300,000 people die because of pesticide poisoning worldwide. The most common pesticide agents are organophosphates and phosphides, aluminium phosphide (AlP) in particular. AlP is known as a suicide poison that can easily be bought and has no effective antidote. Its toxicity results from the release of phosphine gas as the tablet gets into contact with moisture. Phosphine gas primarily affects the heart, lungs, gastrointestinal tract, and kidneys. Poisoning signs and symptoms include nausea, vomiting, restlessness, abdominal pain, palpitation, refractory shock, cardiac arrhythmias, pulmonary oedema, dyspnoea, cyanosis, and sensory alterations. Diagnosis is based on clinical suspicion, positive silver nitrate paper test to phosphine, and gastric aspirate and viscera biochemistry. Treatment includes early gastric lavage with potassium permanganate or a combination with coconut oil and sodium bicarbonate, administration of charcoal, and palliative care. Specific therapy includes intravenous magnesium sulphate and oral coconut oil. Moreover, acidosis can be treated with early intravenous administration of sodium bicarbonate, cardiogenic shock with fluid, vasopresor, and refractory cardiogenic shock with intra-aortic baloon pump or digoxin. Trimetazidine may also have a useful role in the treatment, because it can stop ventricular ectopic beats and bigeminy and preserve oxidative metabolism. This article reviews the epidemiological, toxicological, and clinical/pathological aspects of AlP poisoning and its management.

  4. Fuzzy Multicriteria Ranking of Aluminium Coating Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batzias, A. F.

    2007-12-01

    This work deals with multicriteria ranking of aluminium coating methods. The alternatives used are: sulfuric acid anodization, A1; oxalic acid anodization, A2; chromic acid anodization, A3; phosphoric acid anodization, A4; integral color anodizing, A5; chemical conversion coating, A6; electrostatic powder deposition, A7. The criteria used are: cost of production, f1; environmental friendliness of production process, f2; appearance (texture), f3; reflectivity, f4; response to coloring, f5; corrosion resistance, f6; abrasion resistance, f7; fatigue resistance, f8. Five experts coming from relevant industrial units set grades to the criteria vector and the preference matrix according to a properly modified Delphi method. Sensitivity analysis of the ranked first alternative A1 against the `second best', which was A3 at low and A7 at high resolution levels proved that the solution is robust. The dependence of anodized products quality on upstream processes is presented and the impact of energy price increase on industrial cost is discussed.

  5. Production and quality control of radioactive yttrium microspheres for medical applications.

    PubMed

    Ghahramani, M R; Garibov, A A; Agayev, T N

    2014-02-01

    In this paper, a method for production of yttrium silicate microspheres is reported. Yttrium silicate microspheres with approximate sizes of 20-50µm were obtained when an aqueous solution of Y(NO3)3 was added to tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) and was pumped into silicone oil under constant stirring. The shapes of the particles produced by the proposed method were regular and nearly spherical. The spherical shapes, composition and element distribution were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), carbon/sulfur analysis and SEM/EDS mapping analysis. Paper chromatography was used to identify radiochemical impurities in the radioactive microspheres. The radionuclide purity was determined using a gamma spectrometry system and an ultra-low-level liquid scintillation spectrometer. The results indicated that the proposed silicone oil spheroidization method is suitable for the production of yttrium silicate microspheres.

  6. Fractionation of yttrium and holmium during basaltic soil weathering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Aaron; Amistadi, Mary Kay; Chadwick, Oliver A.; Chorover, Jon

    2013-10-01

    The anomalously low affinity of yttrium (Y) for iron (Fe) (oxyhydr)oxides relative to lanthanides with similar ionic radius (e.g., Ho) has been demonstrated in experiments with isolated Fe minerals and in a variety of marine systems that contain high concentrations of solid phase Fe. However, it has not previously been demonstrated to occur during soil genesis, despite the common observation that many soils become enriched in Fe over time. We hypothesized that Y would become progressively depleted in soils relative to Ho with increased weathering. Since, trivalent Y has an anomalously low Misono softness relative to other trivalent ions included in the rare earth element and yttrium group (REY3+), we also investigated whether soil REY fractionation reflects variation in Misono softness. To test this, we measured trends in total REY concentrations for Hawaiian soils derived from basaltic parent materials aged 0.3-4100 ky, and measured REYs released from the same samples during short-time (3 h) dissolution experiments conducted as part of a previous investigation linking dissolution with surface charge properties (Chorover et al., 2004). The chondrite-normalized Y/Ho ratios in the parent Hawaiian basalt (Chond[Y/Ho] = 0.998) and continental dust (Chond[Y/Ho] = 0.994) inputs are remarkably similar, and thus we can interpret deviations from Chond[Y/Ho] ∼ 1.0 to result from soil biogeochemical processes and not source mixing. Between 0.3 and 20 ky, the Chond[Y/Ho] ratio of the subsurface soils decreased from 0.96 ± 0.07(2σ) to 0.71 ± 0.05, and then remained unchanged across the rest of the weathering sequence. In contrast, the Chond[Y/Ho] ratio of the surface soils decreased from 0.99 ± 0.07 to 0.76 ± 0.05 at 150 ky and then, most likely due to continued dust inputs, increased to 1.04 ± 0.07 in the oldest soils. Analysis of the short-time dissolution experiments revealed preferential release of Y relative to Ho (and also La relative Pr) at intermediate pH where

  7. Up-regulation in the expression of renin gene by the influence of aluminium.

    PubMed

    Ezomo, Ojeiru F; Matsushima, Fumiko; Meshitsuka, Shunsuke

    2009-11-01

    The excretion of aluminium in urine was significantly increased after intake of analgesics containing aluminium, confirming increased absorption and hence exposure to aluminium with such medication. The effect of aluminium on the kidney was further investigated by study of gene expression in mice. After a single dose of aluminium, an up-regulation of renin gene was found by DNA sequencing of the products of differential display analysis. The up-regulation of renin was confirmed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blotting experiments in the dose dependent treatments and the time course observation after aluminium citrate injection. The up-regulation of the renin expression by aluminium is a strong indication of the influence of aluminium on the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone-system, resulting in possible induction of essential hypertension.

  8. Corrosion of aluminium metal in OPC- and CAC-based cement matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Kinoshita, Hajime; Swift, Paul; Utton, Claire; Carro-Mateo, Beatriz; Collier, Nick; Milestone, Neil

    2013-08-15

    Corrosion of aluminium metal in ordinary Portland cement (OPC) based pastes produces hydrogen gas and expansive reaction products causing problems for the encapsulation of aluminium containing nuclear wastes. Although corrosion of aluminium in cements has been long known, the extent of aluminium corrosion in the cement matrices and effects of such reaction on the cement phases are not well established. The present study investigates the corrosion reaction of aluminium in OPC, OPC-blast furnace slag (BFS) and calcium aluminate cement (CAC) based systems. The total amount of aluminium able to corrode in an OPC and 4:1 BFS:OPC system was determined, and the correlation between the amount of calcium hydroxide in the system and the reaction of aluminium obtained. It was also shown that a CAC-based system could offer a potential matrix to incorporate aluminium metal with a further reduction of pH by introduction of phosphate, producing a calcium phosphate cement.

  9. Rare earth activated yttrium aluminate phosphors with modulated luminescence.

    PubMed

    Muresan, L E; Popovici, E J; Perhaita, I; Indrea, E; Oro, J; Casan Pastor, N

    2016-06-01

    Yttrium aluminate (Y3 A5 O12 ) was doped with different rare earth ions (i.e. Gd(3+) , Ce(3+) , Eu(3+) and/or Tb(3+) ) in order to obtain phosphors (YAG:RE) with general formula,Y3-x-a Gdx REa Al5 O12 (x = 0; 1.485; 2.97 and a = 0.03). The synthesis of the phosphor samples was done using the simultaneous addition of reagents technique. This study reveals new aspects regarding the influence of different activator ions on the morpho-structural and luminescent characteristics of garnet type phosphor. All YAG:RE phosphors are well crystallized powders containing a cubic-Y3 Al5 O12 phase as major component along with monoclinic-Y4 Al2 O9 and orthorhombic-YAlO3 phases as the impurity. The crystallites dimensions of YAG:RE phosphors vary between 38 nm and 88 nm, while the unit cell slowly increase as the ionic radius of the activator increases. Under UV excitation, YAG:Ce exhibits yellow emission due to electron transition in Ce(3+) from the 5d level to the ground state levels ((2) F5/2 , (2) F7/2 ). The emission intensity of Ce(3+) is enhanced in the presence of the Tb(3+) ions and is decreased in the presence of Eu(3+) ions due to some radiative or non-radiative processes that take place between activator ions. By varying the rare earth ions, the emission colour can be modulated from green to white and red. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26553167

  10. Anisotropic Optical-Response of Eu-doped Yttrium Orthosilicate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Huimin; Santiago, Miguel; Jia, Weiyi; Zhang, Shoudu

    1998-01-01

    Eu-doped yttrium orthosilicate (Eu(3+) : Y2SiO5) had been a subject being investigated for coherent time-domain optical memory and information processing applications since its ultraslow optical dephasing was discovered several years ago. In this crystal the weakly allowed (7)F0 - (5)D0 transition of europium ions exhibits a sufficient long dephasing time and no spectral difli.usion on a time scale of several hours at low temperature, thus an information pattern or data can be stored as a population grating in the ground state hyperfine levels. On the other hand, the study on photon-echo relaxation shows that the dephasing time T2 of Eu (3+) and other rare-earth ions doped YAG, YAlO3 strongly depends on the intensity of the excitation pulses. In Eu (3+) :YAlO3, an exponential decay of photon-echo with T2 = 53 microseconds if the excitation pulses are weak (5 vJ/pulse) was observed. However, when the excitation pulses are strong (80 pJ/pulse) they observed a much shortened T2 with a highly nonexponential decay pattern. The conclusion they derived is that the intensity-dependent dephasing rate effects are quite general, and it depends on how much the excitation intensity varies. In this paper we use transient grating formation technique showing that a temporal lattice distortion may only occur along crystal c axis, caused by EU (3+) excitation. At high excitation level the produced exciton in conduction band may also couple to the dynamical lattice relaxation process, giving rise to an apparently much shortened dephasing time.

  11. Spectroscopic constants and potential energy curves of yttrium carbide (YC).

    PubMed

    Suo, Bingbing; Balasubramanian, Krishnan

    2007-06-14

    The potential energy curves of the low-lying electronic states of yttrium carbide (YC) and its cation are calculated at the complete active space self-consistent field and the multireference single and double excitation configuration interaction (MRSDCI) levels of theory. Fifteen low-lying electronic states of YC with different spin and spatial symmetries were identified. The X (4)Sigma- state prevails as the ground state of YC, and a low-lying excited A (4)Pi state is found to be 1661 cm(-1) higher at the MRSDCI level. The computations of the authors support the assignment of the observed spectra to a B (4)Delta(Omega=72)<--A (4)Pi(Omega=52) transition with a reinterpretation that the A (4)Pi state is appreciably populated under the experimental conditions as it is less than 2000 cm(-1) of the X (4)Sigma- ground state, and the previously suggested (4)Pi ground state is reassigned to the first low-lying excited state of YC. The potential energy curves of YC+ confirm a previous prediction by Seivers et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 105, 6322 (1996)] that the ground state of YC+ is formed through a second pathway at higher energies. The calculated ionization energy of YC is 6.00 eV, while the adiabatic electron affinity is 0.95 eV at the MRSDCI level. The computed ionization energy of YC and dissociation energy of YC+ confirm the revised experimental estimates provided by Seivers et al. although direct experimental measurements yielded results with greater errors due to uncertainty in collisional cross sections for YC+ formation.

  12. Hanford isotope project strategic business analysis yttrium-90 (Y-90)

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    The purpose of this analysis is to address the short-term direction for the Hanford yttrium-90 (Y-90) project. Hanford is the sole DOE producer of Y-90, and is the largest repository for its source in this country. The production of Y-90 is part of the DOE Isotope Production and Distribution (IP and D) mission. The Y-90 is ``milked`` from strontium-90 (Sr-90), a byproduct of the previous Hanford missions. The use of Sr-90 to produce Y-90 could help reduce the amount of waste material processed and the related costs incurred by the clean-up mission, while providing medical and economic benefits. The cost of producing Y-90 is being subsidized by DOE-IP and D due to its use for research, and resultant low production level. It is possible that the sales of Y-90 could produce full cost recovery within two to three years, at two curies per week. Preliminary projections place the demand at between 20,000 and 50,000 curies per year within the next ten years, assuming FDA approval of one or more of the current therapies now in clinical trials. This level of production would incentivize private firms to commercialize the operation, and allow the government to recover some of its sunk costs. There are a number of potential barriers to the success of the Y-90 project, outside the control of the Hanford Site. The key issues include: efficacy, Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval and medical community acceptance. There are at least three other sources for Y-90 available to the US users, but they appear to have limited resources to produce the isotope. Several companies have communicated interest in entering into agreements with Hanford for the processing and distribution of Y-90, including some of the major pharmaceutical firms in this country.

  13. Root Cause Analysis of Gastroduodenal Ulceration After Yttrium-90 Radioembolization

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, Marnix G. E. H.; Banerjee, Subhas; Louie, John D.; Abdelmaksoud, Mohamed H. K.; Iagaru, Andrei H.; Ennen, Rebecca E.; Sze, Daniel Y.

    2013-12-15

    IntroductionA root cause analysis was performed on the occurrence of gastroduodenal ulceration after hepatic radioembolization (RE). We aimed to identify the risk factors in the treated population and to determine the specific mechanism of nontarget RE in individual cases. Methods: The records of 247 consecutive patients treated with yttrium-90 RE for primary (n = 90) or metastatic (n = 157) liver cancer using either resin (n = 181) or glass (n = 66) microspheres were reviewed. All patients who developed a biopsy-proven microsphere-induced gastroduodenal ulcer were identified. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed on baseline parameters and procedural data to determine possible risk factors in the total population. Individual cases were analyzed to ascertain the specific cause, including identification of the culprit vessel(s) leading to extrahepatic deposition of the microspheres. Results: Eight patients (3.2 %) developed a gastroduodenal ulcer. Stasis during injection was the strongest independent risk factor (p = 0.004), followed by distal origin of the gastroduodenal artery (p = 0.004), young age (p = 0.040), and proximal injection of the microspheres (p = 0.043). Prolonged administrations, pain during administration, whole liver treatment, and use of resin microspheres also showed interrelated trends in multivariate analysis. Retrospective review of intraprocedural and postprocedural imaging showed a probable or possible culprit vessel, each a tiny complex collateral vessel, in seven patients. Conclusion: Proximal administrations and those resulting in stasis of flow presented increased risk for gastroduodenal ulceration. Patients who had undergone bevacizumab therapy were at high risk for developing stasis.

  14. Peptoid-ligated pentadecanuclear yttrium and dysprosium hydroxy clusters.

    PubMed

    Thielemann, Dominique T; Wagner, Anna T; Lan, Yanhua; Oña-Burgos, Pascual; Fernández, Ignacio; Rösch, Esther S; Kölmel, Dominik K; Powell, Annie K; Bräse, Stefan; Roesky, Peter W

    2015-02-01

    A new family of pentadecanuclear coordination cluster compounds (from now on simply referred to as clusters) [{Ln15 (OH)20 (PepCO2 )10 (DBM)10 Cl}Cl4 ] (PepCO2 =2-[{3-(((tert-butoxycarbonyl)amino)methyl)benzyl}amino]acetate, DBM=dibenzoylmethanide) with Ln=Y and Dy was obtained by using the cell-penetrating peptoid (CPPo) monomer PepCO2 H and dibenzoylmethane (DBMH) as supporting ligands. The combination of an inorganic cluster core with an organic cell-penetrating peptoid in the coordination sphere resulted in a core component {Ln15 (μ3 -OH)20 Cl}(24+) (Ln=Y, Dy), which consists of five vertex-sharing heterocubane {Ln4 (μ3 -OH)4 }(8+) units that assemble to give a pentagonal cyclic structure with one Cl atom located in the middle of the pentagon. The solid-state structures of both clusters were established by single-crystal X-ray crystallography. MS (ESI) experiments suggest that the cluster core is robust and maintained in solution. Pulsed gradient spin echo (PGSE) NMR diffusion measurements were carried out on the diamagnetic yttrium compound and confirmed the stability of the cluster in its dicationic form [{Y15 (μ3 -OH)20 (PepCO2 )10 (DBM)10 Cl}Cl2 ](2+) . The investigation of both static (dc) and dynamic (ac) magnetic properties in the dysprosium cluster revealed a slow relaxation of magnetization, indicative of single-molecule magnet (SMM) behavior below 8 K. Furthermore, the χT product as a function of temperature for the dysprosium cluster gave evidence that this is a ferromagnetically coupled compound below 11 K.

  15. Spectroscopic constants and potential energy curves of yttrium carbide (YC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suo, Bingbing; Balasubramanian, Krishnan

    2007-06-01

    The potential energy curves of the low-lying electronic states of yttrium carbide (YC) and its cation are calculated at the complete active space self-consistent field and the multireference single and double excitation configuration interaction (MRSDCI) levels of theory. Fifteen low-lying electronic states of YC with different spin and spatial symmetries were identified. The XΣ-4 state prevails as the ground state of YC, and a low-lying excited AΠ4 state is found to be 1661cm-1 higher at the MRSDCI level. The computations of the authors support the assignment of the observed spectra to a BΔ4(Ω =7/2)←AΠ4(Ω=5/2) transition with a reinterpretation that the AΠ4 state is appreciably populated under the experimental conditions as it is less than 2000cm-1 of the XΣ-4 ground state, and the previously suggested Π4 ground state is reassigned to the first low-lying excited state of YC. The potential energy curves of YC + confirm a previous prediction by Seivers et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 105, 6322 (1996)] that the ground state of YC+ is formed through a second pathway at higher energies. The calculated ionization energy of YC is 6.00eV, while the adiabatic electron affinity is 0.95eV at the MRSDCI level. The computed ionization energy of YC and dissociation energy of YC+ confirm the revised experimental estimates provided by Seivers et al. although direct experimental measurements yielded results with greater errors due to uncertainty in collisional cross sections for YC+ formation.

  16. Peptoid-ligated pentadecanuclear yttrium and dysprosium hydroxy clusters.

    PubMed

    Thielemann, Dominique T; Wagner, Anna T; Lan, Yanhua; Oña-Burgos, Pascual; Fernández, Ignacio; Rösch, Esther S; Kölmel, Dominik K; Powell, Annie K; Bräse, Stefan; Roesky, Peter W

    2015-02-01

    A new family of pentadecanuclear coordination cluster compounds (from now on simply referred to as clusters) [{Ln15 (OH)20 (PepCO2 )10 (DBM)10 Cl}Cl4 ] (PepCO2 =2-[{3-(((tert-butoxycarbonyl)amino)methyl)benzyl}amino]acetate, DBM=dibenzoylmethanide) with Ln=Y and Dy was obtained by using the cell-penetrating peptoid (CPPo) monomer PepCO2 H and dibenzoylmethane (DBMH) as supporting ligands. The combination of an inorganic cluster core with an organic cell-penetrating peptoid in the coordination sphere resulted in a core component {Ln15 (μ3 -OH)20 Cl}(24+) (Ln=Y, Dy), which consists of five vertex-sharing heterocubane {Ln4 (μ3 -OH)4 }(8+) units that assemble to give a pentagonal cyclic structure with one Cl atom located in the middle of the pentagon. The solid-state structures of both clusters were established by single-crystal X-ray crystallography. MS (ESI) experiments suggest that the cluster core is robust and maintained in solution. Pulsed gradient spin echo (PGSE) NMR diffusion measurements were carried out on the diamagnetic yttrium compound and confirmed the stability of the cluster in its dicationic form [{Y15 (μ3 -OH)20 (PepCO2 )10 (DBM)10 Cl}Cl2 ](2+) . The investigation of both static (dc) and dynamic (ac) magnetic properties in the dysprosium cluster revealed a slow relaxation of magnetization, indicative of single-molecule magnet (SMM) behavior below 8 K. Furthermore, the χT product as a function of temperature for the dysprosium cluster gave evidence that this is a ferromagnetically coupled compound below 11 K. PMID:25483296

  17. Recyclables recovery of europium and yttrium metals and some salts from spent fluorescent lamps.

    PubMed

    Rabah, Mahmoud A

    2008-01-01

    Europium and yttrium metals and some valuable salts were recovered from the powder coating the inner surface of the glass tubes of fluorescent lamps. The tubes were broken under 30% aqueous acetone to avoid emission of mercury vapor to the atmosphere, and the powder was collected by brushing. Metals available in the powder were pressure leached using sulfuric/nitric acid mixture. Sulphate salt of europium and yttrium so obtained was converted to thiocyanate. Trimethyl-benzylammonium chloride solvent was used to selectively extract Eu and Y from the thiocyanate solution. The metal loaded in the organic solvent was recovered by N-tributylphosphate in 1M nitric acid to produce nitrate salts of Eu and Y. Europium nitrate was separated from yttrium nitrate by dissolving in ethyl alcohol. The isolated powder contained 1.62% europium oxide, 1.65% yttrium oxide, 34.48% calcium sulphate, 61.52% Ca orthophosphate and 0.65% other impurity metals by weight. Autoclave digestion of the powder in the acid mixture for 4h at approximately 125 degrees C and 5 MPa dissolved 96.4% of the yttrium and 92.8% of the europium. Conversion of the sulphate to thiocyanate is favoured at low temperature. Extraction of Eu and Y from the thiocyanate solution attained its maximum at approximately 80 degrees C. N-tributylphosphate in 1N nitric acid at 125 degrees C achieved a stripping extent of 99%. Thermal reduction using hydrogen gas at 850 degrees C and 1575 degrees C produced europium and yttrium metals, respectively. A metal separation factor of 9.4 was achieved. Economic estimation revealed that the suggested method seemed feasible for industrial applications.

  18. Ageing characteristics of aluminium alloy aluminosilicate discontinuous fiber reinforced composites

    SciTech Connect

    Nath, D.; Singh, V.

    1999-03-05

    Development of continuous fiber reinforced metal matrix composites is aimed at providing high specific strength and stiffness needed for aerospace and some critical high temperature structural applications. Considerable efforts have been made, during the last decade, to improve the strength of age-hardening aluminium alloy matrix composites by suitable heat treatment. It has also been well established that age-hardenable aluminium alloy composites show accelerated ageing behavior because of enhanced dislocation density at the fiber/matrix interface resulting from thermal expansion mismatch between ceramic fiber and the metal matrix. The accelerated ageing of aluminium alloy composites either from dislocation density or the residual stress, as a result of thermal expansion mismatch is dependent on the size of whisker and particulate. Investigations have also been made on the effect of volume fraction of particulate on the ageing behavior of aluminium alloys. The present investigation is concerned with characterization of age-hardening behavior of an Al-Si-Cu-Mg(AA 336) alloy alumino-silicate discontinuous fiber-reinforced composites (referred to as aluminium MMCs in the present text) being developed for automotive pistons. An effort is made to study the effect of volume fraction of the reinforcement on age-hardening behavior of this composite.

  19. Online monitoring of aluminium in drinking water with fluorimetric detection.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Mateos, A; Almendral-Parra, M J; Curto-Serrano, Y; Rodríguez-Martín, F J

    2008-01-01

    We report a procedure for the online monitoring of aluminium in drinking water by flow injection analysis. The reaction used is the formation of a complex with morin. Under the working conditions, this can be accomplished in an ethanol-rich hydroalcoholic medium, which modifies the fluorescent characteristics of the complex, allowing the determination of aluminium concentrations higher than 3.1 microgl(-1), with a linear application range between 2 and 250 microgl(-1), an R.S.D. of 2.3% (n=10, 120 microgl(-1)) and a sampling frequency of 90 h(-1). The method can thus be considered one of the most sensitive and fastest for the continuous determination of aluminium. In the presence of anionic surfactants, the sensitivity of the determination is increased. In this form, aluminium is detected at concentrations higher than 2.8 microgl(-1), with a linear application range of 2-50 microgl(-1). The procedure was applied to the analysis of aluminium in drinking, river, and underground water. Under the proposed working conditions, only Fe(III), fluoride and phosphates interfere. The interference of Fe(III) can be avoided with hydroxylamine and that of phosphates and polyphosphates by acid digestion of the samples.

  20. Hydrothermal synthesis, crystal structures and photoluminescence properties of mixed europium-yttrium organic frameworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yinfeng; Fu, Lianshe; Mafra, Luís; Shi, Fa-Nian

    2012-02-01

    Three mixed europium-yttrium organic frameworks: Eu2-xYx(Mel)(H2O)6 (Mel=mellitic acid or benzene-1,2,3,4,5,6-hexacarboxylic acid, x=0.38 1, 0.74 2, and 0.86 3) have been synthesized and characterized. All the compounds contain a 3-D net with (4, 8)-flu topology. The study indicates that the photoluminescence properties are effectively affected by the different ratios of europium and yttrium ions, the quantum efficiency is increased and the Eu3+ lifetime becomes longer in these MOFs than those of the Eu analog.

  1. Study of lattice dynamics in yttrium doped NdMnO{sub 3} using Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Yadav, Ruchika Elizabeth, Suja; Nair, Harikrishnan S.

    2014-04-24

    A systematic study of Raman spectra on Yttrium doped NdMnO{sub 3} polycrystalline samples was undertaken to understand the lattice dynamics in this compound. Raman active phonons were analyzed and the observed peak were assigned to elucidate various phonon modes in the range (200 - 800) cm{sup −1}. It was observed that at 325 cm{sup −1} phonon frequency shifts upward as much as upto 4 % with increase in Yttrium content. Lattice distortions manifest themselves by frequency shifts in both bending and tilt modes of MnO{sub 6} octahedra, resulting in increase of Raman band line-widths.

  2. The nature of photoinduced changes in the magnetostriction of yttrium-iron garnet single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Vorob'eva, N. V.

    2011-05-15

    A model of the occurrence of photoinduced changes in linear magnetostriction is proposed based on a complex experimental study of magnetostrictive strains in yttrium-iron garnets Y{sub 3}Fe{sub 5}O{sub 12} with low contents of different impurities. Analytical expressions for calculating the magnetostriction in yttrium-iron garnet single crystals with different types of doping are presented. The correlation of the photoinduced change in the magnetostriction with the crystallographic features of the samples is demonstrated. The changes in the magnetostriction constants are analyzed quantitatively for samples prepared in different ways.

  3. Selective encapsulation of the carbides of yttrium and titanium into carbon nanoclusters

    SciTech Connect

    Seraphin, S.; Zhou, D. ); Jiao, J. ); Withers, J.C.; Loutfy, R. )

    1993-10-11

    Characterization of the arc-discharge deposits at the cathode from anodes containing yttrium oxide and titanium by transmission electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction shows different results with respect to an encapsulation of the metal carbides into carbon clusters. Yttrium carbide is encapsulated into carbon nanoclusters in a crystalline phase. The formation of titanium carbide, on the other hand, preempts the formation of the carbon---carbon bonds necessary to form the carbon cages, so that only titanium carbide clusters are observed. Thermodynamic data support the interpretation of the results.

  4. Selective encapsulation of the carbides of yttrium and titanium into carbon nanoclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seraphin, Supapan; Zhou, Dan; Jiao, Jun; Withers, James C.; Loutfy, Raouf

    1993-10-01

    Characterization of the arc-discharge deposits at the cathode from anodes containing yttrium oxide and titanium by transmission electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction shows different results with respect to an encapsulation of the metal carbides into carbon clusters. Yttrium carbide is encapsulated into carbon nanoclusters in a crystalline phase. The formation of titanium carbide, on the other hand, preempts the formation of the carbon—carbon bonds necessary to form the carbon cages, so that only titanium carbide clusters are observed. Thermodynamic data support the interpretation of the results.

  5. Optical bistability in erbium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet crystal combined with a laser diode.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Y

    1994-01-10

    Optical bistability was observed in a simple structure of an injection laser diode combined with an erbium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet crystal. Since a hysteresis characteristic exists in the relationship between the wavelength and the injection current of a laser diode, an optical memory function capable of holding the output status is confirmed. In addition, an optical signal inversion was caused by the decrease of transmission of the erbium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet crystal against the red shift (principally mode hopping) of the laser diode. It is suggested that the switching time of this phenomenon is the time necessary for a mode hopping by current injection.

  6. Effects on the nervous system in different groups of workers exposed to aluminium

    PubMed Central

    Iregren, A; Sjogren, B; Gustafsson, K; Hagman, M; Nylen, L; Frech, W; Andersson, M; Ljunggren, K; Wennberg, A

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To investigate possible neurotoxic effects in groups of aluminium pot room and foundry workers, aluminium welders, and a small group of workers exposed to aluminium in the production of flake powder.
METHODS—Exposure to aluminium was evaluated with aluminium concentrations in blood and urine as well as a questionnaire. The groups exposed to aluminium were compared with a group of mild steel welders. Neurotoxic effects were studied with mood and symptom questionnaires and several psychological and neurophysiological tests.
RESULTS—The pot room and foundry workers showed very low aluminium uptake as their aluminium concentrations in blood and urine were close to normal, and no effects on the nervous system were detected. The group of workers exposed to flake powder had high concentrations of aluminium in blood and urine, even higher than those of the aluminium welders. However, aluminium could not be shown to affect the functioning of the nervous system in flake powder producers. Although significant effects could not be shown in the present analysis of the data on welders, the performance of the welders exposed to high concentrations of aluminium was affected according to the analyses in the original paper from this group.
CONCLUSIONS—For the pot room and foundry workers no effects related to the exposure to aluminium could be found. For the group of flake powder producers exposed for a short term no effects on the nervous systems were evident despite high levels of exposure. Due to the high concentrations of aluminium in the biological samples of this group, measures to reduce the exposure to aluminium are recommended, as effects on the central nervous system might develop after protracted exposures. However, this assumption needs to be verified in further studies.


Keywords: aluminium; workers; nervous system PMID:11404450

  7. Does antiperspirant use increase the risk of aluminium-related disease, including Alzheimer's disease?

    PubMed

    Exley, C

    1998-03-01

    Aluminium salts are the major constituent of many widely used antiperspirant products. The use of such antiperspirants has been linked with the systemic accumulation of aluminium and an increased risk of Alzheimer's disease. But can the frequent use of aluminium-based antiperspirants lead to the accumulation of toxic levels of aluminium? And are there measures that we can take to reduce such accumulation without reducing the effectiveness of antiperspirants? PMID:9575492

  8. Determination of aluminium in groundwater samples by GF-AAS, ICP-AES, ICP-MS and modelling of inorganic aluminium complexes.

    PubMed

    Frankowski, Marcin; Zioła-Frankowska, Anetta; Kurzyca, Iwona; Novotný, Karel; Vaculovič, Tomas; Kanický, Viktor; Siepak, Marcin; Siepak, Jerzy

    2011-11-01

    The paper presents the results of aluminium determinations in ground water samples of the Miocene aquifer from the area of the city of Poznań (Poland). The determined aluminium content amounted from <0.0001 to 752.7 μg L(-1). The aluminium determinations were performed using three analytical techniques: graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GF-AAS), inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The results of aluminium determinations in groundwater samples for particular analytical techniques were compared. The results were used to identify the ascent of ground water from the Mesozoic aquifer to the Miocene aquifer in the area of the fault graben. Using the Mineql+ program, the modelling of the occurrence of aluminium and the following aluminium complexes: hydroxy, with fluorides and sulphates was performed. The paper presents the results of aluminium determinations in ground water using different analytical techniques as well as the chemical modelling in the Mineql+ program, which was performed for the first time and which enabled the identification of aluminium complexes in the investigated samples. The study confirms the occurrence of aluminium hydroxy complexes and aluminium fluoride complexes in the analysed groundwater samples. Despite the dominance of sulphates and organic matter in the sample, major participation of the complexes with these ligands was not stated based on the modelling.

  9. Determination of aluminium in groundwater samples by GF-AAS, ICP-AES, ICP-MS and modelling of inorganic aluminium complexes.

    PubMed

    Frankowski, Marcin; Zioła-Frankowska, Anetta; Kurzyca, Iwona; Novotný, Karel; Vaculovič, Tomas; Kanický, Viktor; Siepak, Marcin; Siepak, Jerzy

    2011-11-01

    The paper presents the results of aluminium determinations in ground water samples of the Miocene aquifer from the area of the city of Poznań (Poland). The determined aluminium content amounted from <0.0001 to 752.7 μg L(-1). The aluminium determinations were performed using three analytical techniques: graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GF-AAS), inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The results of aluminium determinations in groundwater samples for particular analytical techniques were compared. The results were used to identify the ascent of ground water from the Mesozoic aquifer to the Miocene aquifer in the area of the fault graben. Using the Mineql+ program, the modelling of the occurrence of aluminium and the following aluminium complexes: hydroxy, with fluorides and sulphates was performed. The paper presents the results of aluminium determinations in ground water using different analytical techniques as well as the chemical modelling in the Mineql+ program, which was performed for the first time and which enabled the identification of aluminium complexes in the investigated samples. The study confirms the occurrence of aluminium hydroxy complexes and aluminium fluoride complexes in the analysed groundwater samples. Despite the dominance of sulphates and organic matter in the sample, major participation of the complexes with these ligands was not stated based on the modelling. PMID:21274747

  10. Effects of aluminium salts on bone marrow chromosomes in rats in vivo.

    PubMed

    Roy, A K; Sharma, A; Talukder, G

    1991-01-01

    Oral administration of aluminium sulphate to laboratory bred Rattus norvegicus for prolonged period induced dose dependent inhibition of dividing cells and an increase in chromosomal aberrations. The effect was not influenced by the duration of exposure. The toxicity of the two salts, aluminium sulphate and potassium aluminium sulphate, did not differ significantly at doses in which the metal contents were kept constant. PMID:1868749

  11. IEC 61267: Feasibility of type 1100 aluminium and a copper/aluminium combination for RQA beam qualities.

    PubMed

    Leong, David L; Rainford, Louise; Zhao, Wei; Brennan, Patrick C

    2016-01-01

    In the course of performance acceptance testing, benchmarking or quality control of X-ray imaging systems, it is sometimes necessary to harden the X-ray beam spectrum. IEC 61267 specifies materials and methods to accomplish beam hardening and, unfortunately, requires the use of 99.9% pure aluminium (Alloy 1190) for the RQA beam quality, which is expensive and difficult to obtain. Less expensive and more readily available filters, such as Alloy 1100 (99.0% pure) aluminium and copper/aluminium combinations, have been used clinically to produce RQA series without rigorous scientific investigation to support their use. In this paper, simulation and experimental methods are developed to determine the differences in beam quality using Alloy 1190 and Alloy 1100. Additional simulation investigated copper/aluminium combinations to produce RQA5 and outputs from this simulation are verified with laboratory tests using different filter samples. The results of the study demonstrate that although Alloy 1100 produces a harder beam spectrum compared to Alloy 1190, it is a reasonable substitute. A combination filter of 0.5 mm copper and 2 mm aluminium produced a spectrum closer to that of Alloy 1190 than Alloy 1100 with the added benefits of lower exposures and lower batch variability.

  12. Stimulation of eryptosis by aluminium ions.

    PubMed

    Niemoeller, Olivier M; Kiedaisch, Valentin; Dreischer, Peter; Wieder, Thomas; Lang, Florian

    2006-12-01

    Aluminium salts are utilized to impede intestinal phosphate absorption in chronic renal failure. Toxic side effects include anemia, which could result from impaired formation or accelerated clearance of circulating erythrocytes. Erythrocytes may be cleared secondary to suicidal erythrocyte death or eryptosis, which is characterized by cell shrinkage and exposure of phosphatidylserine (PS) at the erythrocyte surface. As macrophages are equipped with PS receptors, they bind, engulf and degrade PS-exposing cells. The present experiments have been performed to explore whether Al(3+) ions trigger eryptosis. The PS exposure was estimated from annexin binding and cell volume from forward scatter in FACS analysis. Exposure to Al(3+) ions (> or =10 microM Al(3+) for 24 h) indeed significantly increased annexin binding, an effect paralleled by decrease of forward scatter at higher concentrations (> or =30 microM Al(3+)). According to Fluo3 fluorescence Al(3+) ions (> or =30 microM for 3 h) increased cytosolic Ca(2+) activity. Al(3+) ions (> or =10 microM for 24 h) further decreased cytosolic ATP concentrations. Energy depletion by removal of glucose similarly triggered annexin binding, an effect not further enhanced by Al(3+) ions. The eryptosis was paralleled by release of hemoglobin, pointing to loss of cell membrane integrity. In conclusion, Al(3+) ions decrease cytosolic ATP leading to activation of Ca(2+)-permeable cation channels, Ca(2+) entry, stimulation of cell membrane scrambling and cell shrinkage. Moreover, Al(3+) ions lead to loss of cellular hemoglobin, a feature of hemolysis. Both effects are expected to decrease the life span of circulating erythrocytes and presumably contribute to the development of anemia during Al(3+) intoxication. PMID:17055015

  13. Aluminium in parenteral nutrition: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Sánchez, A; Tejada-González, P; Arteta-Jiménez, M

    2013-03-01

    Aluminium (Al) toxicity problem in parenteral nutrition solutions (PNS) is decades old and is still unresolved. The aim of this review is to gather updated information about this matter, regarding legislation, manifestations, diagnostics and treatment, patient population at risk and the actions to be taken to limit its accumulation. A structured search using MeSH vocabulary and Title/Abstract searches was conducted in PubMed (http://www.pubmed.gov) up to November 2012. Al is ubiquitous, facilitating its potential for exposure. Nevertheless, humans have several mechanisms to prevent significant absorption and to aid its elimination; therefore, the vast majority of the population is not at risk for Al toxicity. However, when protective gastrointestinal mechanisms are bypassed (for example, parenteral fluids), renal function is impaired (for example, adult patients with renal compromise and neonates) or exposure is high (for example, long-term PNS), Al is prone to accumulate in the body, including manifestations such as impaired neurological development, Alzheimer's disease, metabolic bone disease, dyslipemia and even genotoxic activity. A high Al content in PNS is largely the result of three parenteral nutrient additives: calcium gluconate, inorganic phosphates and cysteine hydrochloride. Despite the legislative efforts, some factors make difficult to comply with the rule and, therefore, to limit the Al toxicity. Unfortunately, manufacturers have not universally changed their processes to obtain a lower Al content of parenteral drug products (PDP). In addition, the imprecise information provided by PDP labels and the high lot-to-lot variation make the prediction of Al content rather inaccurate.

  14. Stimulation of eryptosis by aluminium ions

    SciTech Connect

    Niemoeller, Olivier M.; Kiedaisch, Valentin; Dreischer, Peter; Wieder, Thomas; Lang, Florian . E-mail: florian.lang@uni-tuebingen.de

    2006-12-01

    Aluminium salts are utilized to impede intestinal phosphate absorption in chronic renal failure. Toxic side effects include anemia, which could result from impaired formation or accelerated clearance of circulating erythrocytes. Erythrocytes may be cleared secondary to suicidal erythrocyte death or eryptosis, which is characterized by cell shrinkage and exposure of phosphatidylserine (PS) at the erythrocyte surface. As macrophages are equipped with PS receptors, they bind, engulf and degrade PS-exposing cells. The present experiments have been performed to explore whether Al{sup 3+} ions trigger eryptosis. The PS exposure was estimated from annexin binding and cell volume from forward scatter in FACS analysis. Exposure to Al{sup 3+} ions ({>=} 10 {mu}M Al{sup 3+} for 24 h) indeed significantly increased annexin binding, an effect paralleled by decrease of forward scatter at higher concentrations ({>=} 30 {mu}M Al{sup 3+}). According to Fluo3 fluorescence Al{sup 3+} ions ({>=} 30 {mu}M for 3 h) increased cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} activity. Al{sup 3+} ions ({>=} 10 {mu}M for 24 h) further decreased cytosolic ATP concentrations. Energy depletion by removal of glucose similarly triggered annexin binding, an effect not further enhanced by Al{sup 3+} ions. The eryptosis was paralleled by release of hemoglobin, pointing to loss of cell membrane integrity. In conclusion, Al{sup 3+} ions decrease cytosolic ATP leading to activation of Ca{sup 2+}-permeable cation channels, Ca{sup 2+} entry, stimulation of cell membrane scrambling and cell shrinkage. Moreover, Al{sup 3+} ions lead to loss of cellular hemoglobin, a feature of hemolysis. Both effects are expected to decrease the life span of circulating erythrocytes and presumably contribute to the development of anemia during Al{sup 3+} intoxication.

  15. Modelling of micro- and macrosegregation for industrial multicomponent aluminium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellingsen, K.; Mortensen, D.; M'Hamdi, M.

    2015-06-01

    Realistic predictions of macrosegregation formation during casting of aluminium alloys requires an accurate modeling of solute microsegregation accounting for multicomponent phase diagrams and secondary phase formation. In the present work, the stand alone Alstruc model, a microsegregation model for industrial multicomponent aluminium alloys, is coupled with the continuum model ALSIM which calculates the macroscopic transport of mass, enthalpy, momentum, and solutes as well as stresses and deformation during solidification of aluminium. Alstruc deals with multicomponent alloys accounting for temperature dependent partition coefficients, liquidus slopes and the precipitation of secondary phases. The challenge associated with computation of microsegregation for multicomponent alloys is solved in Alstruc by approximating the phase diagram data by simple, analytical expressions which allows for a CPU-time efficient coupling with the macroscopic transport model. In the present work, the coupled model has been applied in a study of macrosegregation including thermal and solutal convection, solidification shrinkage and surface exudation on an industrial DC-cast billet.

  16. [Photophysical properties and photodynamic activity of nanostructured aluminium phthalocyanines].

    PubMed

    Udartseva, O O; Lobanov, A V; Andeeva, E R; Dmitrieva, G S; Mel'nikov, M Ia; Buravkova, L B

    2014-01-01

    We developed water-soluble supramolecular complexes of aluminium phthalocyanine based on mesoporous silica nanoparticles and polyvinylpirrolidone containing rare photoactive nanoaggregates. Radiative lifetimes, extinction coefficients and energy of electronic transitions of isolated and associated metal phthalocyanine complexes were calculated. Nontoxic concentrations of synthesized nanocomposite photosensibilizers were in vitro determined. In present study we compared photodynamic treatment efficacy using different modifications of aluminium phthalocyanine (Photosens®, AlPc-nSiO2 and AlPc-PVP). Mesenchymal stromal cells were used as a model for photodynamic treatment. Intracellular accumulation of aluminium phthalocyanine based on mesoporous silica nanoparticles AlPc-nSiO2 was the most efficient. Illumination of phthalocyanine-loaded cells led to reactive oxygen species generation and subsequent apoptotic cell death. Silica nanoparticles provided a significant decrease of effective phthalocyanine concentration and enhanced cytotoxicity of photodynamic treatment.

  17. Different Approach to the Aluminium Oxide Topography Characterisation

    SciTech Connect

    Poljacek, Sanja Mahovic; Gojo, Miroslav; Raos, Pero; Stoic, Antun

    2007-04-07

    Different surface topographic techniques are being widely used for quantitative measurements of typical industrial aluminium oxide surfaces. In this research, specific surface of aluminium oxide layer on the offset printing plate has been investigated by using measuring methods which have previously not been used for characterisation of such surfaces. By using two contact instruments and non-contact laser profilometer (LPM) 2D and 3D roughness parameters have been defined. SEM micrographs of the samples were made. Results have shown that aluminium oxide surfaces with the same average roughness value (Ra) and mean roughness depth (Rz) typically used in the printing plate surface characterisation, have dramatically different surface topographies. According to the type of instrument specific roughness parameters should be used for defining the printing plate surfaces. New surface roughness parameters were defined in order to insure detailed characterisation of the printing plates in graphic reproduction process.

  18. Constitutive modelling of aluminium alloy sheet at warm forming temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurukuri, S.; Worswick, M. J.; Winkler, S.

    2016-08-01

    The formability of aluminium alloy sheet can be greatly improved by warm forming. However predicting constitutive behaviour under warm forming conditions is a challenge for aluminium alloys due to strong, coupled temperature- and rate-sensitivity. In this work, uniaxial tensile characterization of 0.5 mm thick fully annealed aluminium alloy brazing sheet, widely used in the fabrication of automotive heat exchanger components, is performed at various temperatures (25 to 250 °C) and strain rates (0.002 and 0.02 s-1). In order to capture the observed rate- and temperature-dependent work hardening behaviour, a phenomenological extended-Nadai model and the physically based (i) Bergstrom and (ii) Nes models are considered and compared. It is demonstrated that the Nes model is able to accurately describe the flow stress of AA3003 sheet at different temperatures, strain rates and instantaneous strain rate jumps.

  19. Synthesis and characterization of a new aluminium-based compound.

    PubMed

    Pascual-Cosp, José; Artiaga, Ramón; Corpas-Iglesias, Francisco; Benítez-Guerrero, Mónica

    2009-08-28

    A new aluminium polynuclear crystalline species, Al(13)(OH)(30)(H(2)O)(15)Cl(9) has been synthesized and characterized. It is a particular case of the Al(13)(OH)(30-y)(H(2)O)(18-x)Cl(9) x zH(2)O family. It has been obtained from aluminium waste cans treated with HCl solution in strong acid media, followed by an ageing period. The crystalline structure of the complex was determined by XRD spectroscopy. Twelve reflections were found and indexed with the DICVOL04 software. Morphologically, a flattened preferred orientation was observed by SEM and FESEM. The chemical structure was studied by several absorption spectroscopy techniques: FTIR, ATR-FTIR and Raman dispersion spectroscopy. The coordination of the aluminium nuclei was determined by Al-MAS-NMR. Only octahedral sites were observed. Thermal characterization of the compound was performed by evolved gas analysis (EGA) coupled to simultaneous TGA-DSC.

  20. Synthesis and characterization of a new aluminium-based compound.

    PubMed

    Pascual-Cosp, José; Artiaga, Ramón; Corpas-Iglesias, Francisco; Benítez-Guerrero, Mónica

    2009-08-28

    A new aluminium polynuclear crystalline species, Al(13)(OH)(30)(H(2)O)(15)Cl(9) has been synthesized and characterized. It is a particular case of the Al(13)(OH)(30-y)(H(2)O)(18-x)Cl(9) x zH(2)O family. It has been obtained from aluminium waste cans treated with HCl solution in strong acid media, followed by an ageing period. The crystalline structure of the complex was determined by XRD spectroscopy. Twelve reflections were found and indexed with the DICVOL04 software. Morphologically, a flattened preferred orientation was observed by SEM and FESEM. The chemical structure was studied by several absorption spectroscopy techniques: FTIR, ATR-FTIR and Raman dispersion spectroscopy. The coordination of the aluminium nuclei was determined by Al-MAS-NMR. Only octahedral sites were observed. Thermal characterization of the compound was performed by evolved gas analysis (EGA) coupled to simultaneous TGA-DSC. PMID:19655063

  1. Time-resolved aluminium laser-induced plasma temperature measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surmick, D. M.; Parigger, C. G.

    2014-11-01

    We seek to characterize the temperature decay of laser-induced plasma near the surface of an aluminium target from laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy measurements of aluminium alloy sample. Laser-induced plasma are initiated by tightly focussing 1064 nm, nanosecond pulsed Nd:YAG laser radiation. Temperatures are inferred from aluminium monoxide spectra viewed at systematically varied time delays by comparing experimental spectra to theoretical calculations with a Nelder Mead algorithm. The temperatures are found to decay from 5173 ± 270 to 3862 ± 46 Kelvin from 10 to 100 μs time delays following optical breakdown. The temperature profile along the plasma height is also inferred from spatially resolved spectral measurements and the electron number density is inferred from Stark broadened Hβ spectra.

  2. Laser micro welding of copper and aluminium using filler materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esser, Gerd; Mys, Ihor; Schmidt, Michael H.

    2004-10-01

    The most evident trend in electronics production is towards miniaturization. Regarding the materials involved, another trend can be observed: intelligent combinations of different materials. One example is the combination of copper and aluminium. Copper is the material of choice for electronic packaging applications due to its superior electrical and thermal conductivity. On the other hand, aluminium offers technical and economical advantages with respect to cost and component weight -- still providing thermal and electrical properties acceptable for numerous applications. Especially for high volume products, the best solution often seems to be a combination of both materials. This fact raises the question of joining copper and aluminium. With respect to miniaturization laser micro welding is a very promising joining technique. Unfortunately, the metallurgical incompatibility of copper and aluminium easily results in the formation of brittle intermetallic phases and segregations during laser welding, thus generating an unacceptable quality of the joints. This paper presents investigations on enhancing the quality during laser micro welding of copper and aluminium for applications in electronics production. In order to eliminate the formation of brittle intermetallic phases, the addition of a filter material in form of a foil has been investigated. It can be shown that the addition of pure metals such as nickel and especially silver significantly reduces the occurrence of brittle phases in the joining area and therefore leads to an increase in welding quality. The proper control of the volume fractions of copper, aluminium and filler material in the melting zone helps to avoid materials segregation and reduces residual stress, consequently leading to a reduction of crack affinity and a stabilization of the mechanical and electrical properties.

  3. Carbon treated commercial aluminium alloys as anodes for aluminium-air batteries in sodium chloride electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pino, M.; Herranz, D.; Chacón, J.; Fatás, E.; Ocón, P.

    2016-09-01

    An easy treatment based in carbon layer deposition into aluminium alloys is presented to enhance the performance of Al-air primary batteries with neutral pH electrolyte. The jellification of aluminate in the anode surface is described and avoided by the carbon covering. Treated commercial Al alloys namely Al1085 and Al7475 are tested as anodes achieving specific capacities above 1.2 Ah g-1vs 0.5 Ah g-1 without carbon covering. The influence of the binder proportion in the treatment as well as different carbonaceous materials, Carbon Black, Graphene and Pyrolytic Graphite are evaluated as candidates for the covering. Current densities of 1-10 mA cm-2 are measured and the influence of the alloy explored. A final battery design of 4 cells in series is presented for discharges with a voltage plateau of 2 V and 1 Wh g-1 energy density.

  4. Electrically driven magnetization dynamics in yttrium iron garnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jungfleisch, Matthias Benjamin

    Creation and manipulation of magnetization states by spin-orbital torques are important for novel spintronics applications. Magnetic insulators were mostly ignored for this particular purpose, despite their low Gilbert damping, which makes them outstanding materials for magnonic applications and investigation of nonlinear spin-wave phenomena. Here, we demonstrate the propagation of spin-wave modes in micro-structured yttrium iron garnet (Y3Fe5O12,YIG) stripes. Spin waves propagating along the long side of the stripe are detected by means of spatially-resolved Brillouin light scattering (BLS) microscopy. The propagation distance of spin waves is determined in the linear regime, where an exponential decay of 10 μm is observed. We also explored the possibility of driving magnetization dynamics with spin Hall effects (SHE) in bilayers of YIG/Pt microstructures. For this purpose we adopted a spin-transfer torque ferromagnetic resonance (ST-FMR) approach. Here a rf charge current is passed through the Pt layer, which generates a spin-transfer torque at the interface from an oscillating spin current via the SHE. This gives rise to a resonant excitation of the magnetization dynamics. In all metallic systems the magnetization dynamics is detected via the homodyne anisotropic magnetoresistance of the ferromagnetic layer. However, since there is no charge flowing through ferromagnetic insulators there is no anisotropic magnetoresistance. Instead, we show that for the case of YIG/Pt the spin Hall magnetoresistance can be used. Our measured voltage spectra can be well fitted to an analytical model evidencing that the ST-FMR concept can be extended to insulating systems. Furthermore, we employ spatially-resolved BLS spectroscopy to map the ST-FMR driven spin dynamics. We observe the formation of a strong, self-localized spin-wave intensity in the center of the sample. This spin-wave `bullet' is created due to nonlinear cross coupling of eigenmodes existing in the magnetic

  5. Excited state dynamics of thulium ions in yttrium aluminum garnets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armagan, G.; Buoncristiani, A. M.; Dibartolo, B.

    1991-01-01

    The processes that take place in the excited states of a trivalent Thulium (Tm) ion in an Yttrium Aluminum Garnet (YAG) crystal, being relevant to the use of this system for laser applications, have been the object of several studies. We have reexamined this system focusing our attention on the dynamics of Tm following its excitation in the H-3(sub 4) level. Under these conditions the system relaxes through a cross-relaxation process. H-3(sub 4) yields F-3(sub 4), H-3(sub 6) yields F-3(sub 4), whose rate depends upon both the concentration of the Tm ion and the temperature of the crystal. The excitation spectrum obtained by monitoring the 1.8 micron emission of Tm (due to the F-3(sub 4) yields H-3(sub 6) transition) indicates an increase in the contribution to this emission from the H-3(sub 4) level relative to the H-3(sub 5) level as the Tm concentration increases; this shows the increased role played by the H-3(sub 4) level in pumping the infrared emission. Correspondingly, the duration of the luminescence originating in the H-3(sub 4) level is shortened as the concentration of Tm increases. The concentration quenching of this lifetime can be fit to a model which assumes that the cross-relaxation is due to a dipole-dipole interaction; from this fit, the intrinsic Tm lifetime in the absence of cross relaxation can be derived. We have used this lifetime to calculate the rate of the cross-relaxation process. We have evaluated this rate as a function of the temperature and found it to be fastest at 77 K. We have also calculated the microscopic interaction parameters for the cross-relaxation process by using two independent experimental features: (1) the time evolution of the emission from the H-3(sub 4) level; and (2) the spectral overlap between the H-3(sub 4) yields F-3(sub 4) emission and the H-3(sub 6) yields F-3(sub 4) absorption. We have also considered the migration of excitation among the Tm ions in the F-3(sub 4) level and calculated the relevant

  6. Kiglapait geochemistry VII: Yttrium and the rare earth elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morse, S. A.; Nolan, K. M.

    1985-07-01

    Based on 51 wholerock analyses by XRF and summation over the layered group, the Kiglapait Intrusion contains 4.7 -1.6+1.2 ppm Y, which resides principally in augite and apatite. Using liquid compositions calculated by summation, the partition coefficient D AUG/LY is 0.95 ± 0.12 from 84 to 97 PCS (percent solidified) and 1.5 ± 0.4 above 97 PCS. For feldspar, the most likely value for D is 0.028 ± 0.02 ( N = 6). REE analyses for 13 whole rocks were interpreted with the aid of yttrium models to yield trends for wholerocks and liquids vs PCS. Summations over the rocks of the layered group gave La = 2.5, Ce = 5.8, Nd = 3.9, Sm = 1.0, Eu = 0.8, Tb = 0.17, Yb = 0.37, and Lu = 0.06 ppm, with 2 s.d. errors near ± 30%. All these elements are highly incompatible until the arrival of augite, which affects chiefly the HREE, and apatite, which affects all (but more strongly, the LREE). The net result is that after apatite arrival at 94 PCS, the liquid compositions are nearly constant, hence D REEWR/L ≈ 1.0. These results are compatible with the mineralogy of the intrusion and the estimated partition coefficients for feldspar, olivine, augite, apatite, and Fe-Ti oxide minerals. For pre-apatite liquids, D REEFSP/L vary regularly with the normative di content of the liquid and change by an order of magnitude, hence the bulk liquid composition must be considered in any attempt to invert the compositions of feldspars to parent liquids. The Eu anomaly at first decreases in Kiglapait liquids due to plagioclase fractionation, but then increases due to removal of augite and apatite with negative Eu anomalies. The features dominantly responsible for Eu partitioning are liquid structure and, for monoclinic ternary feldspars, crystal structure. The former is best monitored by the augite or diopside content of the liquid and the latter, by the K content of the feldspar. The chondrite-normalized REE pattern for the intrusion has LaN = 7.4, LuN = 1.6, ( Ce/Yb) N = 3.6 , and Eu/Eu∗ = 2

  7. Do oral aluminium phosphate binders cause accumulation of aluminium to toxic levels?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Aluminium (Al) toxicity was frequent in the 1980s in patients ingesting Al containing phosphate binders (Alucaps) whilst having HD using water potentially contaminated with Al. The aim of this study was to determine the risk of Al toxicity in HD patients receiving Alucaps but never exposed to contaminated dialysate water. Methods HD patients only treated with Reverse Osmosis(RO) treated dialysis water with either current or past exposure to Alucaps were given standardised DFO tests. Post-DFO serum Al level > 3.0 μmol/L was defined to indicate toxic loads based on previous bone biopsy studies. Results 39 patients (34 anuric) were studied. Mean dose of Alucap was 3.5 capsules/d over 23.0 months. Pre-DFO Al levels were > 1.0 μmol/L in only 2 patients and none were > 3.0 μmol/L. No patients had a post DFO Al levels > 3.0 μmol/L. There were no correlations between the serum Al concentrations (pre-, post- or the incremental rise after DFO administration) and the total amount of Al ingested. No patients had unexplained EPO resistance or biochemical evidence of adynamic bone. Conclusions Although this is a small study, oral aluminium exposure was considerable. Yet no patients undergoing HD with RO treated water had evidence of Al toxicity despite doses equivalent to 3.5 capsules of Alucap for 2 years. The relationship between the DFO-Al results and the total amount of Al ingested was weak (R2 = 0.07) and not statistically significant. In an era of financial prudence, and in view of the recognised risk of excess calcium loading in dialysis patients, perhaps we should re-evaluate the risk of using Al-based phosphate binders in HD patients who remain uric. PMID:21992770

  8. Scandium and yttrium phosphasalen complexes as initiators for ring-opening polymerization of cyclic esters.

    PubMed

    Bakewell, Clare; White, Andrew J P; Long, Nicholas J; Williams, Charlotte K

    2015-03-01

    The synthesis and characterization of novel scandium and yttrium phosphasalen complexes is reported, where phosphasalen refers to two different bis(iminophosphorane) derivatives of the more ubiquitous salen ligands. The activity of the complexes as initiators for the ring-opening polymerization of cyclic esters is presented. The scandium complexes are inactive for lactide polymerization but slow and controlled initiators for ε-caprolactone polymerization. The lack of activity toward lactide exhibited by these compounds is probed, and a rare example of single-monomer insertion product, unable to undergo further reactions with lactide, is identified. In contrast, the analogous yttrium phosphasalen complex is a very active initiator for the ring-opening polymerization of rac-lactide (kobs = 1.5 × 10(-3) s(-1) at 1:500 [yttrium initiator]:[rac-lactide], 1 M overall concentration of lactide in THF at 298 K). In addition to being a very fast initiator, the yttrium complex also maintains excellent levels of polymerization control and a high degree of isoselectivity, with the probability of isotactic enchainment being Pi = 0.78 at 298 K.

  9. The effect of yttrium and thorium on the oxidation behavior of Ni-Cr-Al alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, A.; Nasrallah, M.; Douglass, D. L.

    1974-01-01

    The effect of quaternary additions of 0.5% Y, 0.5 and 1.0% Th to a base alloy of Ni-10CR-5Al on the oxidation behavior and mechanism was studied during oxidation in air over the range of 1000 to 1200 C. The presence of yttrium decreased the oxidation kinetics slightly, whereas, the addition of thorium caused a slight increase. Oxide scale adherence was markedly improved by the addition of the quaternary elements. Although a number of oxides formed on yttrium containing alloys, quantitative X-ray diffraction clearly showed that the rate-controlling step was the diffusion of aluminum through short circuit paths in a thin layer of alumina that formed parabolically with time. Although the scale adherence of the yttrium containing alloy was considerably better than the base alloys, spalling did occur that was attributed to the formation of the voluminous YAG particles which grew in a mushroom-like manner, lifting the protective scale off the subrate locally. The YAG particles formed primarily at grain boundaries in the substrate in which the yttrium originally existed as YNi9.

  10. The lanthanides and yttrium in minerals of the apatite group; a review

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fleischer, Michael; Altschuler, Z.S.

    1982-01-01

    More than 1000 analyses have been tabulated of the distribution of the lanthanides and yttrium in minerals of the apatite group, recalculated to atomic percentages. Average compositions have been calculated for apatites from 14 types of rocks. These show a progressive change of composition from apatites of granitic pegmatites, highest in the heavy lanthanides and yttrium, to those from alkalic pegmatites, highest in the light lanthanides and lowest in yttrium. This progression is clearly shown in plots of S (= at % La+Ce+Pr) vs the ratio La/Nd and of S vs the ratio 100Y/(Y+Ln), where Ln is the sum of the lanthanides. Apatites of sedimentary phosphorites occupy a special position, being relatively depleted in Ce and relatively enriched in yttrium and the heavy lanthanides, consequences of deposition from sea water. Apatites associated with iron ores are close in composition to apatites of carbonatites, alkalic ultramafic, and ultramafic rocks, being enriched in the light lanthanides and depleted in the heavy lanthanides. Their compositions do not support the hypothesis of Parak that the Kiruna-type ores are of sedimentary origin. Table 9 and Figures 1-3 show the dependence of lanthanide distribution on the nature of the host rock. Although a given analysis of the lanthanides does not unequivocally permit certain identification of the host rock, it can indicate a choice of highly probable host rocks.

  11. Temperature evolution of electromotive force from Pt on yttrium-iron-garnet under ferromagnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Ohshima, Ryo; Emoto, Hiroyuki; Shinjo, Teruya; Ando, Yuichiro; Shiraishi, Masashi

    2015-05-07

    Temperature evolution of electromotive force from Pt due to the inverse spin Hall effect is studied. Pure spin current is injected from yttrium-iron-garnet by using spin pumping technique. The electromotive force from the Pt monotonically decreases with decreasing temperature, and it is showed that there is a deviation between the measured and the calculated electromotive forces.

  12. Yttrium recovery from primary and secondary sources: A review of main hydrometallurgical processes

    SciTech Connect

    Innocenzi, Valentina; De Michelis, Ida; Kopacek, Bernd

    2014-07-15

    Highlights: • Review of the main hydrometallurgical processes to recover yttrium. • Recovery of yttrium from primary sources. • Recovery of yttrium from e-waste and other types of waste. - Abstract: Yttrium is important rare earths (REs) used in numerous fields, mainly in the phosphor powders for low-energy lighting. The uses of these elements, especially for high-tech products are increased in recent years and combined with the scarcity of the resources and the environmental impact of the technologies to extract them from ores make the recycling waste, that contain Y and other RE, a priority. The present review summarized the main hydrometallurgical technologies to extract Y from ores, contaminated solutions, WEEE and generic wastes. Before to discuss the works about the treatment of wastes, the processes to retrieval Y from ores are discussed, since the processes are similar and derived from those already developed for the extraction from primary sources. Particular attention was given to the recovery of Y from WEEE because the recycle of them is important not only for economical point of view, considering its value, but also for environmental impact that this could be generated if not properly disposal.

  13. A novel chiral yttrium complex with a tridentate linked amido-indenyl ligand for intramolecular hydroamination.

    PubMed

    Chai, Zhuo; Hua, Dezhi; Li, Kui; Chu, Jiang; Yang, Gaosheng

    2014-01-01

    A new chiral silicon-linked tridentate amido-indenyl ligand was developed from indene and enantiopure 1,2-cyclohexanediamine. Its yttrium complex was synthesized, characterized and applied to efficiently catalyze the intramolecular hydroamination of non-activated olefins with up to 97% ee.

  14. Raman calibration of the HT-7 yttrium aluminum garnet Thomson scattering for electron density measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Zang Qing; Zhao Junyu; Gao Xiang; Shi Lingwei; Zhang Tao; Xi Xiaoqi; Yang Li; Hu Qingsheng; Sajjad, S.

    2007-11-15

    A multipulse neodym doped yttrium aluminum garnet laser Thomson scattering system calibrated by the anti-Stokes rotational Raman scattering from nitrogen gas had been developed in the HT-7 superconducting Tokmak. By virtue of this system, measured electron density results of the plasma were obtained. The results showed good repeatability and its total uncertainty was estimated to be {+-}18%.

  15. Oscillator strengths for Y I and Y II and the solar abundance of yttrium

    SciTech Connect

    Hannaford, P.; Lowe, R.M.; Grevesse, N.; Biemont, E.; Whaling, W.

    1982-10-15

    Oscillator strengths have been determined from measurements of radiative lifetimes and branching ratios for 154 lines of Y I and 66 lines of Y II. These data are used, together with equivalent widths measured on the Jungfraujoch solar atlas, to perform a new determination of the solar abundance of yttrium: A/sub Y/ = 2.24 +- 0.03.

  16. Influence of bismuth substitution on yttrium orthoferrite thin films preparation by the MOD method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galstyan, Ogsen; Lee, Hanju; Park, Jongwon; Lee, Jung-Ha; Babajanyan, Arsen; Friedman, Barry; Lee, Kiejin

    2016-01-01

    Yttrium orthoferrite thin films with a thickness of about 0.4 μm were prepared on glass substrates by using a metal-organic decomposition method. Our studies reveal that it is possible to reduce the crystallization temperature of the yttrium orthoferrite by the substitution of the yttrium ion with bismuth. For the samples BixY1-xFeO3 with x=0.3 and x=0.4, orthorhombic yttrium orthoferrite characteristic peaks in the X-ray diffraction spectra have been detected. The lattice constants of the Bi0.3Y0.7FeO3 film were a=5.905 Å, b=7.66 Å, c=5.256 Å with an average grain size of about 40 nm. The magnetization data indicate that the film has in-plane easy axis and weak coercivity which might be explained by a possible secondary garnet phase crystallization. Faraday rotation angle of the sample was measured to be about 0.3°/μm.

  17. Preliminary results on a new method for producing yttrium phosphorous microspheres.

    PubMed

    Ghahramani, M R; Garibov, A A; Agayev, T N

    2014-09-01

    This paper reports on a new method to embed phosphorus particles into the matrix of yttrium aluminum silicate microspheres. Yttrium phosphorus glass microspheres about 20µm in size were obtained when an aqueous solution of YCl3 and AlCl3 were added to tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) (phosphoric acid was used to catalyze the hydrolysis and condensation of TEOS) and was pumped into silicone oil under constant stirring. The shapes of the particles produced by this method are regular and nearly spheric in shape. Paper chromatography was used to determine the radiochemical impurity of radioactive microspheres. Radionuclide purity was determined using a gamma spectrometry system and an ultra-low level liquid scintillation spectrometer. The P(+) ions implantation stage was eliminated by embedding phosphorus particles in the matrix of the glass microspheres. This paper shows that a high temperature is not required to produce yttrium phosphorus aluminum silicate microspheres. The result shows that the silicone oil spheroidization method is a very suitable way to produce yttrium phosphorus glass microspheres. The topographical analysis of microspheres shows that the Y, P, Si, and Al elements are distributed in the microspheres and the distribution of elements in the samples is homogenous.

  18. Spectrophotometric studies and applications for the determination of yttrium in pure and in nickel base alloys.

    PubMed

    Amin, A S; Mohammed, T Y; Mousa, A A

    2003-09-01

    Yttrium reacts with 5-(4'-chlorophenylazo)-6-hydroxypyrimidine-2,4-dione (I), 5-(2'-bromophenylazo)-6-hydroxypyrimidine-2,4-dione (II), 5-(2',4'-dimethylphenylazo)-6-hydroxypyrimidine-2,4-dione (III), 5-(4'-nitro-2',6'-dichlorophenylazo)-6-hydroxypyrimidine-2,4-dione (IV), 5-(2'-methyl-4'-hydroxyphenylazo)-6-hydroxypyrimidine-2,4-dione (V) to form a dark pink complexes, having an absorption maximum at 610, 577, 596, 567 and 585 nm, respectively. The complex formation was completed spontaneously in theil buffer solution and the resulting complex was stable for at least 3 h after dilution. Under the optimum conditions employed, the molar absorptivities were found to be 1.60 x 10(4), 1.29 x 10(4), 1.96 x 10(4), 1.45 x 10(4) and 1.21 x 10(4) l mol(-1) cm(-1) and the molar ratios were (1:1) and (1:2) (M:L). The linear ranges were found within 95 microg of yttrium in 25 ml solution. One of the characteristics of the complex was its high tolerance for calcium and hence a method of separation and enrichment of microamounts of yttrium by using calcium oxalate precipitate was developed and applied to measure yttrium in nickel-base alloys. Interfering species and their elimination have been studied. The precision and recovery are both satisfactory.

  19. A Numerical Analysis of the Resistance and Stiffness of the Aluminium and Concrete Composite Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polus, Łukasz; Szumigała, Maciej

    2015-03-01

    In this paper a numerical analysis of the resistance and stiffness of the aluminium and concrete composite beam is presented. Composite aluminium and concrete structures are quite new and they have not been thoroughly tested. Composite structures have a lot of advantages. The composite aluminium and concrete beam is more corrosion-resistant, fire-resistant and stiff than the aluminium beam. The contemporary idea of sustainable buildings relies on new solutions which are more environmentally friendly. Aluminium is lighter and more resistant to corrosion than steel, which is often used in composite structures.

  20. Effects of yttrium, aluminum and chromium concentrations in bond coatings on the performance of zirconia-yttria thermal barriers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecura, S.

    1980-01-01

    A cyclic furnace study was conducted on thermal barrier systems to evaluate the effects of yttrium, chromium and aluminum in nickel-base alloy bond coatings and the influence of the bond coating thickness on yttria-stabilized zirconia thermal barrier coating lifetimes. Without yttrium in the bond coatings, the zirconia coatings failed very rapidly. Increasing concentrations of chromium and aluminum in the Ni-Cr-Al-Y bond coatings increased the total coating lifetimes. This effect was not as great as that due to yttrium. Increased bond coating thickness was also found to increase the lifetimes.

  1. Effects of yttrium, aluminum and chromium concentrations in bond coatings on the performance of zirconia-yttria thermal barriers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecura, S.

    1980-01-01

    A cyclic furnace study was conducted on thermal barrier systems to evaluate the effects of yttrium, chromium and aluminum in nickel-base alloy bond coatings and the effect of bond coating thickness on yttria-stabilized zirconia thermal barrier coating life. Without yttrium in the bond coatings, the zirconia coatings failed very rapidly. Increasing chromium and aluminum in the Ni-Cr-Al-Y bond coatings increased total coating life. This effect was not as great as that due to yttrium. Increased bond coat thickness was also found to increase life.

  2. The effect of yttrium addition on oxidation of a sputtered nanocrystalline coating with moderate amount of tantalum in composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jinlong; Chen, Minghui; Yang, Lanlan; Liu, Li; Zhu, Shenglong; Wang, Fuhui; Meng, Guozhe

    2016-03-01

    The effect of yttrium addition on isothermal oxidation at 1050 °C of a sputtered nanocrystalline coating with moderate amount of tantalum in composition was investigated. Results indicate that yttrium addition delays transformation of metastable θ-Al2O3 to equilibrium α-Al2O3 grown on the nanocrystalline coatings. It prevents scale rumpling and promotes the formation of oxide pegs at interface between the oxide scale and the underlying coating. Besides, yttrium prefers to segregate at grain boundaries of the nanocrystalline coating and retards the outward transportation of tantalum from coating to oxide scale, thus reducing the excessive oxidation of tantalum.

  3. Effects of yttrium, aluminum and chromium concentrations in bond coatings on the performance of zirconia-yttria thermal barriers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecura, S.

    1980-01-01

    A cyclic furnace study was conducted on thermal barrier systems to evaluate the effects of yttrium, chromium, and aluminum in nickel-base alloy bond coatings and the effect of bond coating thickness on yttria-stabilized zirconia thermal barrier coating life. Without yttrium in the bond coatings, the zirconia coatings failed very rapidly. Increasing chromium and aluminum in the Ni-Cr-Al-Y bond coatings increased total coating life. This effect was not as great as that due to yttrium. Increased bond coat thickness was also found to increase life.

  4. Studies on the best alkaline electrolyte for aluminium/air batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapali, V.; Venkatakrishna Iyer, S.; Balaramachandran, V.; Sarangapani, K. B.; Ganesan, M.; Anbu Kulandainathan, M.; Sheik Mideen, A.

    Two types of alkaline electrolyte, based on 4 M NaOH have been developed for use in aluminium/air cells or batteries. They contain either alkaline citrate or alkaline citrate cum stannate as an additive to suppress the self-corrosion of aluminium without any deleterious effects on the efficient functioning of aluminium anode at a high negative potential. The alkaline citrate cum stannate solution has been adjudged the best electrolyte in terms of electrochemical characteristics and electrolyte management. Hence, results pertaining to the use of alkaline citrate cum stannate are presented in this paper. An aluminium/air battery with this electrolyte can be used safely and effectively at ambient temperature. An added advantage is the employment of 99.8% pure aluminium for the preparation of alloy anodes. This is expected to reduce the cost of aluminium/air batteries. The best anode based on 99.8% pure aluminium is a quaternary alloy containing lead, gallium and indium.

  5. What is wrong with aluminium? The J.D. Birchall Memorial Lecture.

    PubMed

    Williams, R J

    1999-08-30

    Aluminium chemistry has features in common with two other groups of elements: (1) divalent magnesium and calcium, and (2) trivalent chromium and iron. The essential differences between the first group and aluminium are explored and it is shown that the much higher acidity of aluminium makes it such a powerful competitor for oxygen-donor ligands, opposite functions of both magnesium and calcium, in cells that its presence is damaging. By way of contrast aluminium is a weaker acid than ferric ions but it is more available. It was necessary for iron to be utilised in the presence of aluminium so special methods had to be devised to distinguish between them. In essence aluminium has always, throughout evolution, been a threat to the biological chemistry of all these three elements. We shall examine this chemistry and then explore the relationship of calcium and aluminium under acid rain conditions.

  6. Weldability of Advanced High Strength Steels using Ytterbium:Yttrium Aluminium Garnet high power laser for Tailor-Welded Blank applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Rajashekhar Shivaram

    Use of a high power Yb:YAG laser is investigated for joining advanced high strength steel materials for use in tailor-welded blank (TWB) applications. TWB's are materials of different chemistry, coating or thicknesses that are joined before metal forming and other operations such as trimming, assembly and painting are carried out. TWB is becoming an important design tool in the automotive industry for reducing weight, improving fuel economy and passenger safety, while reducing the overall costs for the customer. Three advanced high strength steels, TRIP780, DP980 and USIBOR, which have many unique properties that are conducive to achieving these objectives, along with mild steel, are used in this work. The objective of this work is to ensure that high quality welds can be obtained using Yb:YAG lasers which are also becoming popular for metal joining operations, since they produce high quality laser beams that suffer minimal distortion when transported via fiber optic cables. Various power levels and speeds for the laser beam were used during the investigation. Argon gas was consistently used for shielding purposes during the welding process. After the samples were welded, metallographic examination of the fusion and heat-affected zones using optical and scanning electron microscopes were carried out to determine the microstructures as well as weld defects. Optical and scanning electron microscopes were also used to examine the top of welds as well as fracture surfaces. Additionally, cross-weld microhardness evaluations, tensile tests using Instron tester, limited fatigue tests as well as formability evaluations using OSU plane strain evaluation were carried out. The examinations included a 2-factor full factorial design of experiments to determine the impact of coatings on the surface roughness on the top of the welds. Tensile strengths of DP980, TRIP780 and mild steel materials as well as DP980 welded to TRIP780 and mild steel in the rolling direction as well as transverse direction were evaluated. Metallographic examinations determined that most of the fusion zone is martensitic with small regions of bainite and ferrite. High microhardness values of the order of 550--600 Hv were noted in most joints, which are attributed to high alloy content of the fusion zone as well as high rates of cooling typical of laser welds. During tensile, fatigue and formability tests, no fractures in the fusion or heat affected zones were observed. Geometric variability evaluations indicated that coatings such as aluminum (in the case of USIBOR) and galvanized zinc (TRIP780) can affect the variability of the weld zone and the surface roughness on the top of the weld. Excessive variability in the form of weld concavity in the weld zones can lead to fractures in the weld region, even though higher hardness can, to some extent, compensate for these surface irregularities. The 2-factor design of experiments further confirmed that coatings adversely affect the surface roughness on the top of the welds. Although thickness differentials alone do not make a significant impact on surface roughness, together with coatings, they can have an adverse effect on roughness. Tensile tests in the direction of rolling as well as in the transverse direction indicate that TRIP780 seems weaker in the direction of rolling when compared to transverse direction while mild steel is stronger in the direction of rolling. Weldability analyses revealed that the typical melting efficiency is on the order of 50--70% for full penetration welding. Formability tests showed that TR/MS joints fractured in a direction parallel to the weld line when tested with the loads perpendicular to the weld line. Tests have also confirmed that weld speed and power have no impact on the outcome of formability results. Overall, this work conclusively proves that high power Yb:YAG lasers can effectively join high strength materials such as DP980, TRIP780, USIBOR, as well as mild steel, for use in tailor-welded blank applications, contributing to lighter, more fuel-efficient and safer vehicles.

  7. Mechanochemical route to the synthesis of nanostructured Aluminium nitride.

    PubMed

    Rounaghi, S A; Eshghi, H; Scudino, S; Vyalikh, A; Vanpoucke, D E P; Gruner, W; Oswald, S; Kiani Rashid, A R; Samadi Khoshkhoo, M; Scheler, U; Eckert, J

    2016-01-01

    Hexagonal Aluminium nitride (h-AlN) is an important wide-bandgap semiconductor material which is conventionally fabricated by high temperature carbothermal reduction of alumina under toxic ammonia atmosphere. Here we report a simple, low cost and potentially scalable mechanochemical procedure for the green synthesis of nanostructured h-AlN from a powder mixture of Aluminium and melamine precursors. A combination of experimental and theoretical techniques has been employed to provide comprehensive mechanistic insights on the reactivity of melamine, solid state metal-organic interactions and the structural transformation of Al to h-AlN under non-equilibrium ball milling conditions. The results reveal that melamine is adsorbed through the amine groups on the Aluminium surface due to the long-range van der Waals forces. The high energy provided by milling leads to the deammoniation of melamine at the initial stages followed by the polymerization and formation of a carbon nitride network, by the decomposition of the amine groups and, finally, by the subsequent diffusion of nitrogen into the Aluminium structure to form h-AlN. PMID:27650956

  8. Aluminium in food and daily dietary intake estimate in Greece.

    PubMed

    Bratakos, Sotirios M; Lazou, Andriana E; Bratakos, Michael S; Lazos, Evangelos S

    2012-01-01

    Aluminium content of foods, as well as dietary aluminium intake of the Greek adult population, was determined using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy after microwave sample digestion and food consumption data. Al content ranged from 0.02 to 741.2 mg kg⁻¹, with spices, high-spice foods, cereal products, vegetables and pulses found to be high in Al. Differences in aluminium content were found between different food classes from Greece and those from some other countries. Aluminium intake of Greeks is 3.7 mg/day based on DAFNE Food Availability Databank, which uses data from the Household Budget Surveys. On the other hand, according to the per capita food consumption data collected by both national and international organisations, Al intake is 6.4 mg day⁻¹. Greek adult population has an Al intake lower than the Provisional Tolerable Weekly Intake of 7 mg kg⁻¹ body weight established by EFSA. Cereals and vegetables are the main Al contributors, providing 72.4% of daily intake.

  9. Treatment of dairy effluents by electrocoagulation using aluminium electrodes.

    PubMed

    Tchamango, Serge; Nanseu-Njiki, Charles P; Ngameni, Emmanuel; Hadjiev, Dimiter; Darchen, André

    2010-01-15

    This work sets out to examine the efficiency of an electrolytic treatment: electrocoagulation, applied to dairy effluents. The experiments were carried out using a soluble aluminium anode on artificial wastewater derived from solutions of milk powder. The flocks generated during this treatment were separated by filtration. The analysis of the filtrates showed that the chemical oxygen demand (COD) was reduced by up to 61% while the removal of phosphorus, nitrogen contents, and turbidity were 89, 81 and 100%, respectively. An analogous treatment applied to phosphate and lactose solutions revealed that lactose was not eliminated, a fact that could account for the rather poor lowering of the COD. Compared to the chemical coagulation treatment with aluminium sulphate, the efficiency of the electrocoagulation technique was almost identical. However the wastewaters treated by electrocoagulation differed by the fact that they exhibited a lower conductivity and a neutral pH value (by contrast to the acid nature of the solution treated by the chemical coagulation). This result (low conductivity, neutral pH) tends to show that it may be possible to recycle the treated water for some industrial uses. Moreover, the electrocoagulation process uses fewer reagents: the mass of the aluminium anode dissolved during the treatment is lower compared to the quantity of the aluminium salt used in chemical coagulation. These two observations clearly show that the electrocoagulation technique is more performing. PMID:19900696

  10. Mechanochemical route to the synthesis of nanostructured Aluminium nitride.

    PubMed

    Rounaghi, S A; Eshghi, H; Scudino, S; Vyalikh, A; Vanpoucke, D E P; Gruner, W; Oswald, S; Kiani Rashid, A R; Samadi Khoshkhoo, M; Scheler, U; Eckert, J

    2016-09-21

    Hexagonal Aluminium nitride (h-AlN) is an important wide-bandgap semiconductor material which is conventionally fabricated by high temperature carbothermal reduction of alumina under toxic ammonia atmosphere. Here we report a simple, low cost and potentially scalable mechanochemical procedure for the green synthesis of nanostructured h-AlN from a powder mixture of Aluminium and melamine precursors. A combination of experimental and theoretical techniques has been employed to provide comprehensive mechanistic insights on the reactivity of melamine, solid state metal-organic interactions and the structural transformation of Al to h-AlN under non-equilibrium ball milling conditions. The results reveal that melamine is adsorbed through the amine groups on the Aluminium surface due to the long-range van der Waals forces. The high energy provided by milling leads to the deammoniation of melamine at the initial stages followed by the polymerization and formation of a carbon nitride network, by the decomposition of the amine groups and, finally, by the subsequent diffusion of nitrogen into the Aluminium structure to form h-AlN.

  11. LASERS IN MEDICINE: Two-photon excitation of aluminium phthalocyanines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meshalkin, Yu P.; Alfimov, E. E.; Vasil'ev, N. E.; Denisov, A. N.; Makukha, V. K.; Ogirenko, A. P.

    1999-12-01

    A demonstration is given of the feasibility of two-photon excitation of aluminium phthalocyanine and of the pharmaceutical preparation 'Fotosens', used in photodynamic therapy. The excitation source was an Nd:YAG laser emitting at the 1064 nm wavelength. The spectra of the two-photon-excited luminescence were obtained and the two-photon absorption cross sections were determined.

  12. Mechanochemical route to the synthesis of nanostructured Aluminium nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rounaghi, S. A.; Eshghi, H.; Scudino, S.; Vyalikh, A.; Vanpoucke, D. E. P.; Gruner, W.; Oswald, S.; Kiani Rashid, A. R.; Samadi Khoshkhoo, M.; Scheler, U.; Eckert, J.

    2016-09-01

    Hexagonal Aluminium nitride (h-AlN) is an important wide-bandgap semiconductor material which is conventionally fabricated by high temperature carbothermal reduction of alumina under toxic ammonia atmosphere. Here we report a simple, low cost and potentially scalable mechanochemical procedure for the green synthesis of nanostructured h-AlN from a powder mixture of Aluminium and melamine precursors. A combination of experimental and theoretical techniques has been employed to provide comprehensive mechanistic insights on the reactivity of melamine, solid state metal-organic interactions and the structural transformation of Al to h-AlN under non-equilibrium ball milling conditions. The results reveal that melamine is adsorbed through the amine groups on the Aluminium surface due to the long-range van der Waals forces. The high energy provided by milling leads to the deammoniation of melamine at the initial stages followed by the polymerization and formation of a carbon nitride network, by the decomposition of the amine groups and, finally, by the subsequent diffusion of nitrogen into the Aluminium structure to form h-AlN.

  13. On the anodic aluminium oxide refractive index of nanoporous templates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hierro-Rodriguez, A.; Rocha-Rodrigues, P.; Valdés-Bango, F.; Alameda, J. M.; Jorge, P. A. S.; Santos, J. L.; Araujo, J. P.; Teixeira, J. M.; Guerreiro, A.

    2015-11-01

    In the present study, we have determined the intrinsic refractive index of anodic aluminium oxide, which is originated by the formation of nanoporous alumina templates. Different templates have been fabricated by the conventional two-step anodization procedure in oxalic acid. Their porosities were modified by chemical wet etching allowing the tuning of their effective refractive indexes (air-filled nanopores  +  anodic aluminium oxide). By standard spectroscopic light transmission measurements, the effective refractive index for each different template was extracted in the VIS-NIR region. The determination of the intrinsic anodic aluminium oxide refractive index was performed by using the Maxwell-Garnett homogenization theory. The results are coincident for all the fabricated samples. The obtained refractive index (~1.55) is quite lower (~22%) than the commonly used Al2O3 handbook value (~1.75), showing that the amorphous nature of the anodic oxide structure strongly conditions its optical properties. This difference is critical for the correct design and modeling of optical plasmonic metamaterials based on anodic aluminium oxide nanoporous templates.

  14. Synthesis of Cyclic Carbonates Catalysed by Aluminium Heteroscorpionate Complexes.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Javier; Castro-Osma, José A; Earlam, Amy; Alonso-Moreno, Carlos; Otero, Antonio; Lara-Sánchez, Agustín; North, Michael; Rodríguez-Diéguez, Antonio

    2015-06-26

    New aluminium scorpionate based complexes have been prepared and used for the synthesis of cyclic carbonates from epoxides and carbon dioxide. Bimetallic aluminium(heteroscorpionate) complexes 9-14 were synthesised in very high yields. The single-crystal X-ray structures of 12 and 13 confirm an asymmetric κ(2)-NO-μ-O arrangement in a dinuclear molecular disposition. These bimetallic aluminium complexes were investigated as catalysts for the synthesis of cyclic carbonates from epoxides and carbon dioxide in the presence of ammonium salts. Under the optimal reaction conditions, complex 9 in combination with tetrabutylammonium bromide acts as a very efficient catalyst system for the conversion of both monosubstituted and internal epoxides into the corresponding cyclic carbonates showing broad substrate scope. Complex 9 and tetrabutylammonium bromide is the second most efficient aluminium-based catalyst system for the reaction of internal epoxides with carbon dioxide. A kinetic study has been carried out and showed that the reactions were first order in complex 9 and tetrabutylammonium bromide concentrations. Based on the kinetic study, a catalytic cycle is proposed.

  15. Molecular Characterization of Aluminium (aluminum) Tolerance in Rye

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aluminium (Al) toxicity, affecting around half of the world’s arable land, severely hinders the ability of crop plants to utilize moisture and nutrients by restricting root growth and function. Among the cultivated cereals, rye is the most Al-tolerant and represents an important potential source of ...

  16. Treatment of dairy effluents by electrocoagulation using aluminium electrodes.

    PubMed

    Tchamango, Serge; Nanseu-Njiki, Charles P; Ngameni, Emmanuel; Hadjiev, Dimiter; Darchen, André

    2010-01-15

    This work sets out to examine the efficiency of an electrolytic treatment: electrocoagulation, applied to dairy effluents. The experiments were carried out using a soluble aluminium anode on artificial wastewater derived from solutions of milk powder. The flocks generated during this treatment were separated by filtration. The analysis of the filtrates showed that the chemical oxygen demand (COD) was reduced by up to 61% while the removal of phosphorus, nitrogen contents, and turbidity were 89, 81 and 100%, respectively. An analogous treatment applied to phosphate and lactose solutions revealed that lactose was not eliminated, a fact that could account for the rather poor lowering of the COD. Compared to the chemical coagulation treatment with aluminium sulphate, the efficiency of the electrocoagulation technique was almost identical. However the wastewaters treated by electrocoagulation differed by the fact that they exhibited a lower conductivity and a neutral pH value (by contrast to the acid nature of the solution treated by the chemical coagulation). This result (low conductivity, neutral pH) tends to show that it may be possible to recycle the treated water for some industrial uses. Moreover, the electrocoagulation process uses fewer reagents: the mass of the aluminium anode dissolved during the treatment is lower compared to the quantity of the aluminium salt used in chemical coagulation. These two observations clearly show that the electrocoagulation technique is more performing.

  17. Sources and speciation of aluminium and silicon in natural waters.

    PubMed

    Farmer, V C

    1986-01-01

    The aluminosilicate minerals of igneous and metamorphic rocks are mostly unstable in earth-surface weathering conditions. In the tropics and subtropics, they are transformed to stable end-products (crystalline clay minerals, oxides and hydroxides) that largely conserve aluminium and iron. In noncalcareous soils in temperature and boreal climates, aluminium can be markedly mobile, and is precipitated as metastable products that include hydrous aluminosilicates, hydroxyaluminium polymers in or on 2:1 layer silicates, and complexes with soil organic matter. The aluminosilicate precipitates formed at pH less than 5.5 have structures related to imogolite, a unidimensional crystal in the form of a tube of 2.3 nm outer diameter. These metastable precipitates, both organic and inorganic, are readily remobilized on further acidification, and can release aluminium into streams if the solutions are not neutralized in the subsoil. Three classes of soluble aluminium species in natural waters have been distinguished by their rate of reaction with complexing reagents, and their rate of adsorption on cation-exchange columns. These are: (a) unreactive, acid-soluble, Al, (b) labile monomeric Al, and (c) non-liable monomeric Al. Group (b) includes simple inorganic species (e.g. Al3+, AlOH2+, AlF2+), and group (c) is thought to include organic complexes. In contrast, silicon occurs dominantly as Si(OH)4 monomers in natural water. Its metastable precipitates include hydrous aluminosilicates and biogenic opal.

  18. Mechanochemical route to the synthesis of nanostructured Aluminium nitride

    PubMed Central

    Rounaghi, S. A.; Eshghi, H.; Scudino, S.; Vyalikh, A.; Vanpoucke, D. E. P.; Gruner, W.; Oswald, S.; Kiani Rashid, A. R.; Samadi Khoshkhoo, M.; Scheler, U.; Eckert, J.

    2016-01-01

    Hexagonal Aluminium nitride (h-AlN) is an important wide-bandgap semiconductor material which is conventionally fabricated by high temperature carbothermal reduction of alumina under toxic ammonia atmosphere. Here we report a simple, low cost and potentially scalable mechanochemical procedure for the green synthesis of nanostructured h-AlN from a powder mixture of Aluminium and melamine precursors. A combination of experimental and theoretical techniques has been employed to provide comprehensive mechanistic insights on the reactivity of melamine, solid state metal-organic interactions and the structural transformation of Al to h-AlN under non-equilibrium ball milling conditions. The results reveal that melamine is adsorbed through the amine groups on the Aluminium surface due to the long-range van der Waals forces. The high energy provided by milling leads to the deammoniation of melamine at the initial stages followed by the polymerization and formation of a carbon nitride network, by the decomposition of the amine groups and, finally, by the subsequent diffusion of nitrogen into the Aluminium structure to form h-AlN. PMID:27650956

  19. Aluminium in allergen-specific subcutaneous immunotherapy--a German perspective.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Matthias F; Heath, Matthew D

    2014-07-16

    We are living in an "aluminium age" with increasing bioavailability of the metal for approximately 125 years, contributing significantly to the aluminium body burden of humans. Over the course of life, aluminium accumulates and is stored predominantly in the lungs, bones, liver, kidneys and brain. The toxicity of aluminium in humans is briefly summarised, highlighting links and possible causal relationships between a high aluminium body burden and a number of neurological disorders and disease states. Aluminium salts have been used as depot-adjuvants successfully in essential prophylactic vaccinations for almost 100 years, with a convincing positive benefit-risk assessment which remains unchanged. However, allergen-specific immunotherapy commonly consists of administering a long-course programme of subcutaneous injections using preparations of relevant allergens. Regulatory authorities currently set aluminium limits for vaccines per dose, rather than per treatment course. Unlike prophylactic vaccinations, numerous injections with higher proportions of aluminium-adjuvant per injection are applied in subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT) and will significantly contribute to a higher cumulative life dose of aluminium. While the human body may cope robustly with a daily aluminium overload from the environment, regulatory cumulative threshold values in immunotherapy need further addressing. Based on the current literature, predisposing an individual to an unusually high level of aluminium, such as through subcutaneous immunotherapy, has the potential to form focal accumulations in the body with the propensity to exert forms of toxicity. Particularly in relation to longer-term health effects, the safety of aluminium adjuvants in immunotherapy remains unchallenged by health authorities - evoking the need for more consideration, guidance, and transparency on what is known and not known about its safety in long-course therapy and what measures can be taken to prevent or

  20. Aluminium in allergen-specific subcutaneous immunotherapy--a German perspective.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Matthias F; Heath, Matthew D

    2014-07-16

    We are living in an "aluminium age" with increasing bioavailability of the metal for approximately 125 years, contributing significantly to the aluminium body burden of humans. Over the course of life, aluminium accumulates and is stored predominantly in the lungs, bones, liver, kidneys and brain. The toxicity of aluminium in humans is briefly summarised, highlighting links and possible causal relationships between a high aluminium body burden and a number of neurological disorders and disease states. Aluminium salts have been used as depot-adjuvants successfully in essential prophylactic vaccinations for almost 100 years, with a convincing positive benefit-risk assessment which remains unchanged. However, allergen-specific immunotherapy commonly consists of administering a long-course programme of subcutaneous injections using preparations of relevant allergens. Regulatory authorities currently set aluminium limits for vaccines per dose, rather than per treatment course. Unlike prophylactic vaccinations, numerous injections with higher proportions of aluminium-adjuvant per injection are applied in subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT) and will significantly contribute to a higher cumulative life dose of aluminium. While the human body may cope robustly with a daily aluminium overload from the environment, regulatory cumulative threshold values in immunotherapy need further addressing. Based on the current literature, predisposing an individual to an unusually high level of aluminium, such as through subcutaneous immunotherapy, has the potential to form focal accumulations in the body with the propensity to exert forms of toxicity. Particularly in relation to longer-term health effects, the safety of aluminium adjuvants in immunotherapy remains unchallenged by health authorities - evoking the need for more consideration, guidance, and transparency on what is known and not known about its safety in long-course therapy and what measures can be taken to prevent or

  1. Non-invasive therapy to reduce the body burden of aluminium in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Exley, Christopher; Korchazhkina, Olga; Job, Deborah; Strekopytov, Stanislav; Polwart, Anthony; Crome, Peter

    2006-09-01

    There are unexplained links between human exposure to aluminium and the incidence, progression and aetiology of Alzheimer's disease. The null hypothesis which underlies any link is that there would be no Alzheimer's disease in the effective absence of a body burden of aluminium. To test this the latter would have to be reduced to and retained at a level that was commensurate with an Alzheimer's disease-free population. In the absence of recent human interference in the biogeochemical cycle of aluminium the reaction of silicic acid with aluminium has acted as a geochemical control of the biological availability of aluminium. This same mechanism might now be applied to both the removal of aluminium from the body and the reduced entry of aluminium into the body while ensuring that essential metals, such as iron, are unaffected. Based upon the premise that urinary aluminium is the best non-invasive estimate of body burden of aluminium patients with Alzheimer's disease were asked to drink 1.5 L of a silicic acid-rich mineral water each day for five days and, by comparison of their urinary excretion of aluminium pre-and post this simple procedure, the influence upon their body burden of aluminium was determined. Drinking the mineral water increased significantly (P<0.001) their urinary excretion of silicic acid (34.3 +/- 15.2 to 55.7 +/- 14.2 micromol/mmol creatinine) and concomitantly reduced significantly P=0.037) their urinary excretion of aluminium (86.0 +/- 24.3 to 62.2 +/- 23.2 nmol/mmol creatinine). The latter was achieved without any significant (P>0.05) influence upon the urinary excretion of iron (20.7 +/- 9.5 to 21.7 +/- 13.8 nmol/mmol creatinine). The reduction in urinary aluminium supported the future longer-term use of silicic acid as non-invasive therapy for reducing the body burden of aluminium in Alzheimer's disease.

  2. Interfacial morphology of low-voltage anodic aluminium oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Naiping; Dongcinn, Xuecheng; He, Xueying; Argekar, Sandip; Zhang, Yan; Browning, Jim; Schaefer, Dale

    2013-01-01

    X-ray reflectivity (XRR) and neutron reflectivity (NR), as well as ultra-smallangle X-ray scattering (USAXS), are used to examine the in-plane and surfacenormal structure of anodic films formed on aluminium alloy AA2024 and pure aluminium. Aluminium and alloy films up to 3500 A thick were deposited on Si wafers by electron beam evaporation of ingots. Porous anodic aluminium oxide (AAO) films are formed by polarizing at constant voltage up to 20 V noble to the open circuit potential. The voltage sweet spot (5 V) appropriate for constant-voltage anodization of such thin films was determined for both alloy and pure Al. In addition, a new concurrent voltage- and current-control protocol was developed to prepare films with larger pores (voltages higher than 5 V), but formed at a controlled current so that pore growth is slow enough to avoid stripping the aluminium substrate layer. USAXS shows that the pore size and interpore spacing are fixed in the first 10 s after initiation of anodization. Pores then grow linearly in time, at constant radius and interpore spacing. Using a combination of XRR and NR, the film density and degree of hydration of the films were determined from the ratio of scattering length densities. Assuming a chemical formula Al2O3xH2O, it was found that x varies from 0.29 for the native oxide to 1.29 for AAO grown at 20 V under concurrent voltage and current control. The average AAO film density of the porous film at the air surface is 2.45 (20) g cm3. The density of the barrier layer at the metal interface is 2.9 (4) g cm3, which indicates that this layer is also quite porous

  3. Di- and triphenylacetate complexes of yttrium and europium.

    PubMed

    Minyaev, Mikhail E; Vinogradov, Alexandr A; Roitershtein, Dmitrii M; Lyssenko, Konstantin A; Ananyev, Ivan V; Nifant'ev, Ilya E

    2016-07-01

    The significant variety in the crystal structures of rare-earth carboxylate complexes is due to both the large coordination numbers of the rare-earth cations and the ability of the carboxylate anions to form several types of bridges between rare-earth metal atoms. Therefore, these complexes are represented by mono-, di- and polynuclear complexes, and by coordination polymers. The interaction of LnCl3(thf)x (Ln = Eu or Y; thf is tetrahydrofuran) with sodium or diethylammonium diphenylacetate in methanol followed by recrystallization from a DME/THF/hexane solvent mixture (DME is 1,2-dimethoxyethane) leads to crystals of the non-isomorphic dinuclear complexes tetrakis(μ-2,2-diphenylacetato)-κ(4)O:O';κ(3)O,O':O';κ(3)O:O,O'-bis[(1,2-dimethoxyethane-κ(2)O,O')(2,2-diphenylacetato-κ(2)O,O')europium(III)], [Eu(C14H11O2)6(C4H10O2)2], (I), and tetrakis(μ-2,2-diphenylacetato)-κ(4)O:O';κ(3)O,O':O';κ(3)O:O,O'-bis[(1,2-dimethoxyethane-κ(2)O,O')(2,2-diphenylacetato-κ(2)O,O')yttrium(III)], [Y(C14H11O2)6(C4H10O2)2], (II), possessing monoclinic (P21/c) symmetry. The [Ln(Ph2CHCOO)3(dme)]2 molecule (Ln = Eu or Y) lies on an inversion centre and exhibits three different coordination modes of the diphenylacetate ligands, namely bidentate κ(2)O,O'-terminal, bidentate μ2-κ(1)O:κ(1)O'-bridging and tridentate μ2-κ(1)O:κ(2)O,O'-semibridging. The terminal and bridging ligands in (I) are disordered over two positions, with an occupancy ratio of 0.806 (2):0.194 (2). The interaction of EuCl3(thf)2 with Na[Ph3CCOO] in methanol followed by crystallization from hot methanol produces crystals of tetrakis(methanol-κO)tris(2,2,2-triphenylacetato)-κ(4)O:O';κO-europium(III) methanol disolvate, [Eu(C19H15O2)3(CH3OH)4]·2CH3OH, (III)·2MeOH, with triclinic (P-1) symmetry. The molecule of (III) contains two O,O'-bidentate and one O-monodentate terminal triphenylacetate ligand. (III)·2MeOH possesses one intramolecular and four intermolecular hydrogen bonds, forming a [(III)·2Me

  4. Effect of Temperature Gradient on Thick Film Selective Emitter Emittance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L.; Good, Brian S.; Clark, Eric B.; Chen, Zheng

    1997-01-01

    A temperature gradient across a thick (greater than or equal to .1 mm) film selective emitter will produce a significant reduction in the spectral emittance from the no temperature gradient case. Thick film selective emitters of rare earth doped host materials such as yttrium-aluminum-garnet (YAG) are examples where temperature gradient effects are important. In this paper a model is developed for the spectral emittance assuming a linear temperature gradient across the film. Results of the model indicate that temperature gradients will result in reductions the order of 20% or more in the spectral emittance.

  5. The Effect of Temperature on the Radiative Performance of Ho-Yag Thin Film Selective Emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowe, Roland A.; Chubb, Donald L.; Good, Brian S.

    1995-01-01

    We present the emitter efficiency results for the thin film 25 percent Ho YAG (Yttrium Aluminum Garnet, Y3Al5O12) selective emitter from 1000 to 1700 K with a platinum substrate. Spectral emittance and emissive power measurements were made (1.2 less than lambda less than 3.2 microns) and used to calculate the radiative efficiency. The radiative efficiency and power density of rare earth doped selective emitters are strongly dependent on temperature and experimental results indicate an optimum temperature (1650 K for Ho YAG) for thermophotovoltaic (TPV) applications.

  6. Effects of rare earth yttrium on microstructure and properties of Ni–16Mo–7Cr–4Fe nickel-based superalloy

    SciTech Connect

    Li, X.L.; He, S.M.; Zhou, X.T.; Zou, Y.; Li, Z.J.; Li, A.G.; Yu, X.H.

    2014-09-15

    Effects of rare earth yttrium on microstructure of Ni–16Mo–7Cr–4Fe alloy were examined by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray fluorescence. M{sub 6}C phase was observed in the alloys with and without yttrium addition, and Ni{sub 17}Y{sub 2} phase existed in the alloys containing 0.05–0.43 wt.% yttrium simultaneously. The amount of Ni{sub 17}Y{sub 2} phase increased as yttrium concentration increased. When the concentration of yttrium increased to 0.43 wt.%, some multi-precipitated phase regions appeared in the form of large amount of coarse Ni{sub 3}Y phase surrounded by M{sub 6}C phase and γ phase in the alloy. Influences of rare earth yttrium on high temperature static oxidation and mechanical properties of Ni–16Mo–7Cr–4Fe alloy were also investigated. The alloy containing 0.05 wt.% yttrium showed the best oxidation resistance and mechanical properties simultaneously. The adequate concentration of yttrium at grain boundary and in the solid-solution (γ phase) and the adhesion enhancement of the outer oxidation scale to the substrate are key factors for the improvements in the mechanical properties and oxidation resistance respectively. - Highlights: • When the content of yttrium reaches to 0.43%, some multiphase regions appear. • When the content of yttrium reaches to 0.43%, some Ni{sub 17}Y{sub 2} chains appear. • The morphology of M{sub 6}C changes with increasing concentration of yttrium. • The Ni–16Mo–7Cr–4Fe alloy with 0.05% yttrium performs the best mechanical property. • The Ni–16Mo–7Cr–4Fe alloy with 0.05% yttrium performs the best oxidation resistance.

  7. Effects of yttrium, aluminum, and chromium concentrations in bond coatings on the performance of zirconia-yttria thermal barriers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecura, S.

    1979-01-01

    A cyclic furnace study was conducted between 990 - 280 C and 1095 - 280 C to evaluate the effects of yttrium, chromium, and aluminum concentrations in nickel base alloy bond coatings and also the effect of the bond coating thickness on the performance of yttria-stabilized zirconia thermal barrier coatings. The presence and the concentration of yttrium is very critical. Without yttrium, rapid oxidation of Ni-Al, Ni-Cr, and Ni-Cr-Al bond coatings causes zirconia thermal barrier coatings to fail very rapidly. Concentrations of chrominum and aluminum in Ni-Cr-Al-Y bond coating have a very significant effect on the thermal barrier coating life. This effect, however, is not as great as that due to yttrium. Furthermore, the thickness and the thickness uniformity also have a very significant effect on the life of the thermal barrier system.

  8. Comparison of the erbium-yttrium aluminum garnet and carbon dioxide lasers for in vitro bone and cartilage ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, C.; van de Merwe, W.P.; Smith, M.; Reinisch, L. )

    1990-01-01

    The in vitro bone- and cartilage-ablation characteristics of the solid-state erbium:yttrium aluminum garnet laser were compared to those of the carbon dioxide laser. Ablations of fresh, frozen cadaver septal cartilage and maxillary sinus bone were performed using total energies between 1 and 6 J. Specimens were studied using hematoxylin and eosin stain and digitized, computer-assisted measurements of 35-mm photographs. Erbium-yttrium aluminum garnet-ablated bone averaged 5 microns of adjacent tissue thermal injury, compared with 67 microns with carbon dioxide-ablated bone. Erbium-yttrium aluminum garnet-ablated cartilage averaged 2 microns of adjacent tissue thermal injury, compared with 21 microns with the carbon dioxide-ablated cartilage. The tissue-ablation characteristics of the erbium-yttrium aluminum garnet laser are promising for future otolaryngologic applications.

  9. Protective effect of curcumin (Curcuma longa), against aluminium toxicity: Possible behavioral and biochemical alterations in rats.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anil; Dogra, Samrita; Prakash, Atish

    2009-12-28

    Aluminium is a potent neurotoxin and has been associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD) causality for decades. Prolonged aluminium exposure induces oxidative stress and increases amyloid beta levels in vivo. Current treatment modalities for AD provide only symptomatic relief thus necessitating the development of new drugs with fewer side effects. The aim of the study was to demonstrate the protective effect of chronic curcumin administration against aluminium-induced cognitive dysfunction and oxidative damage in rats. Aluminium chloride (100 mg/kg, p.o.) was administered to rats daily for 6 weeks. Rats were concomitantly treated with curcumin (per se; 30 and 60 mg/kg, p.o.) daily for a period of 6 weeks. On the 21st and 42nd day of the study behavioral studies to evaluate memory (Morris water maze and elevated plus maze task paradigms) and locomotion (photoactometer) were done. The rats were sacrificed on 43rd day following the last behavioral test and various biochemical tests were performed to assess the extent of oxidative damage. Chronic aluminium chloride administration resulted in poor retention of memory in Morris water maze, elevated plus maze task paradigms and caused marked oxidative damage. It also caused a significant increase in the acetylcholinesterase activity and aluminium concentration in aluminium treated rats. Chronic administration of curcumin significantly improved memory retention in both tasks, attenuated oxidative damage, acetylcholinesterase activity and aluminium concentration in aluminium treated rats (P<0.05). Curcumin has neuroprotective effects against aluminium-induced cognitive dysfunction and oxidative damage.

  10. Performance of commercial aluminium alloys as anodes in gelled electrolyte aluminium-air batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pino, M.; Chacón, J.; Fatás, E.; Ocón, P.

    2015-12-01

    The evaluation of commercial aluminium alloys, namely, Al2024, Al7475 and Al1085, for Al-air batteries is performed. Pure Al cladded Al2024 and Al7475 are also evaluated. Current rates from 0.8 mA cm-2 to 8.6 mA cm-2 are measured in a gel Al-air cell composed of the commercial alloy sample, a commercial air-cathode and an easily synthesizable gelled alkaline electrolyte. The influence of the alloying elements and the addition to the electrolyte of ZnO and ZnCl2, as corrosion inhibitors is studied and analysed via EDX/SEM. Specific capacities of up to 426 mAh/g are obtained with notably flat potential discharges of 1.3-1.4 V. The competition between self-corrosion and oxidation reactions is also discussed, as well as the influence of the current applied on that process. Al7475 is determined to have the best behaviour as anode in Al-air primary batteries, and cladding process is found to be an extra protection against corrosion at low current discharges. Conversely, Al1085 provided worse results because of an unfavourable metallic composition.

  11. Aluminium content of foods originating from aluminium-containing food additives.

    PubMed

    Ogimoto, Mami; Suzuki, Kumi; Haneishi, Nahoko; Kikuchi, Yuu; Takanashi, Mayu; Tomioka, Naoko; Uematsu, Yoko; Monma, Kimio

    2016-09-01

    Aluminium (Al) levels of 90 food samples were investigated. Nineteen samples contained Al levels exceeding the tolerable weekly intake (TWI) for young children [body weight (bw): 16 kg] when consuming two servings/week. These samples were purchased multiple times at specific intervals and were evaluated for Al levels. Al was detected in 27 of the 90 samples at levels ranging from 0.01 (limit of quantitation) to 1.06 mg/g. Of these, the Al intake levels in two samples (cookie and scone mix, 1.3 and 2 mg/kg bw/week, respectively) exceeded the TWI as established by European Food Safety Authority, although the level in the scone mix was equivalent to the provisional TWI (PTWI) as established by Joint Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations/World Health Organization Expert Committee on Food Additives. The Al levels markedly decreased in 14 of the 19 samples with initially high Al levels. These results indicated reductions in the Al levels to below the PTWI limits in all but two previously identified food samples.

  12. Aluminium content of foods originating from aluminium-containing food additives.

    PubMed

    Ogimoto, Mami; Suzuki, Kumi; Haneishi, Nahoko; Kikuchi, Yuu; Takanashi, Mayu; Tomioka, Naoko; Uematsu, Yoko; Monma, Kimio

    2016-09-01

    Aluminium (Al) levels of 90 food samples were investigated. Nineteen samples contained Al levels exceeding the tolerable weekly intake (TWI) for young children [body weight (bw): 16 kg] when consuming two servings/week. These samples were purchased multiple times at specific intervals and were evaluated for Al levels. Al was detected in 27 of the 90 samples at levels ranging from 0.01 (limit of quantitation) to 1.06 mg/g. Of these, the Al intake levels in two samples (cookie and scone mix, 1.3 and 2 mg/kg bw/week, respectively) exceeded the TWI as established by European Food Safety Authority, although the level in the scone mix was equivalent to the provisional TWI (PTWI) as established by Joint Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations/World Health Organization Expert Committee on Food Additives. The Al levels markedly decreased in 14 of the 19 samples with initially high Al levels. These results indicated reductions in the Al levels to below the PTWI limits in all but two previously identified food samples. PMID:27092423

  13. Effect of sintering on electrical properties of yttrium doped Li-based NASICON compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Kothari, Dharmesh H.; Kanchan, D. K. Dave, Gargi

    2015-08-28

    Electrical properties of Lithium based Li{sub 1.3}Al{sub 0.3-x}Y{sub x}Ti{sub 1.7}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3} (LAYTP) system was prepared using solid state reaction route. The samples were subjected to differing duration of sintering. X-ray diffraction was used to investigate the microstructure while density measurement was performed to determine the effect of sintering on the density of the prepared samples. Electrical properties of the material were studied using impedance spectroscopy, in frequency range 20 MHz to 1 Hz and in temperature range 303 K to 423 K. It was found that sample with least amount of yttrium and which was sintered for least duration had superior conductivity over other samples. It was also found that grain boundary conductivity improved marginally for sample with higher proportion of yttrium heat treated for longer duration.

  14. Co-sputtering yttrium into hafnium oxide thin films to produce ferroelectric properties

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, T.; Schroeder, U.; Mueller, S.; Krause, A.; Martin, D.; Singh, A.; Mueller, J.; Geidel, M.; Mikolajick, T.

    2012-08-20

    Thin film capacitors were fabricated by sputtering TiN-Y doped HfO{sub 2}-TiN stacks on silicon substrates. Yttrium was incorporated into the HfO{sub 2} layers by simultaneously sputtering from Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} and HfO{sub 2} sources. Electric polarization and relative permittivity measurements yield distinct ferroelectric properties as a result of low yttrium dopant concentrations in the range of 0.9-1.9 mol. %. Grazing incidence x-ray diffraction measurements show the formation of an orthorhombic phase in this range. Compared to atomic layer deposition films, the highest remanent polarization and the highest relative permittivity were obtained at significantly lower doping concentrations in these sputtered films.

  15. Interactions between aggressive ions and the surface of a magnesium-yttrium alloy.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Ian; Perchy, Daniel; Liu, Huinan

    2012-01-01

    Magnesium alloys possess many desirable properties for biodegradable orthopedic implants. Unfortunately, magnesium degrades too rapidly in vivo. This rapid degradation reduces the alloys' mechanical properties and increases the alkalinity of the local environment. Controlling the degradation rate and mode is an essential step in the development of magnesium based biomaterials. Accomplishing this essential step will require an improved understanding of magnesium alloy degradation. Herein, three interacting factors controlling magnesium degradation were investigated; (1) alloy composition, (2) alloy surface, (3) presence of aggressive ions in the immersion media. The magnesium-yttrium alloy was more susceptible to degradation in water than the high purity magnesium alloy. However, the polished surface magnesium-yttrium alloy had the least susceptibility to degradation in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) among all the sample compositions and surfaces.

  16. First principles DFT investigation of yttrium-doped graphene: Electronic structure and hydrogen storage

    SciTech Connect

    Desnavi, Sameerah; Chakraborty, Brahmananda; Ramaniah, Lavanya M.

    2014-04-24

    The electronic structure and hydrogen storage capability of Yttrium-doped grapheme has been theoretically investigated using first principles density functional theory (DFT). Yttrium atom prefers the hollow site of the hexagonal ring with a binding energy of 1.40 eV. Doping by Y makes the system metallic and magnetic with a magnetic moment of 2.11 μ{sub B}. Y decorated graphene can adsorb up to four hydrogen molecules with an average binding energy of 0.415 eV. All the hydrogen atoms are physisorbed with an average desorption temperature of 530.44 K. The Y atoms can be placed only in alternate hexagons, which imply a wt% of 6.17, close to the DoE criterion for hydrogen storage materials. Thus, this system is potential hydrogen storage medium with 100% recycling capability.

  17. Quantum design and synthesis of a boron-oxygen-yttrium phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Music, Denis; Chirita, Valeriu; Kreissig, Ulrich; Czigány, Zsolt; Schneider, Jochen M.; Helmersson, Ulf

    2003-06-01

    Ab initio calculations are used to design a crystalline boron-oxygen-yttrium (BOY) phase. The essential constituent is yttrium substituting for oxygen in the boron suboxide structure (BO0.17) with Y/B and O/B ratios of 0.07. The calculations predict that the BOY phase is 0.36 eV/atom more stable than crystalline BO0.17 and experiments confirm the formation of crystalline thin films. The BOY phase was synthesized with reactive rf magnetron sputtering and identified with x-ray and selected area electron diffraction. Films with Y/B ratios ranging from 0.10 to 0.32, as determined via elastic recoil detection analysis, were grown over a wide range of temperatures (300-600 °C) and found to withstand 1000 °C.

  18. Mechanism for radiation damage resistance in yttrium oxide dispersion strengthened steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodrick, J.; Hepburn, D. J.; Ackland, G. J.

    2014-02-01

    ODS steels based on yttrium oxide have been suggested as potential fusion reactor wall materials due to their observed radiation resistance properties. Presumably this radiation resistance can be related to the interaction of the particle with vacancies, self-interstitial atoms (SIAs) and other radiation damage debris. Density functional theory has been used to investigate this at the atomic scale. Four distinct interfaces, some based on HRTEM observations, between iron and yttrium oxide were investigated. It is been shown that the Y2O3-Fe interface acts as a strong trap with long-range attraction for both interstitial and vacancy defects, allowing recombination without altering the interface structure. The catalytic elimination of defects without change to the microstructure explains the improved behaviour of ODS steels with respect to radiation creep and swelling.

  19. Spectroscopic investigation of the Cr to Tm energy transfer in Yttrium Aluminum Garnet (YAG) crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dibartolo, B.

    1988-01-01

    New and interesting schemes have recently been considered for the efficient operation of solid-state ionic laser systems. Often the available data on these systems were obtained only because they seemed directly related to the laser performance and provide no insight into the physical processes. A more systematic approach is desirable, where more attention is devoted to the elementary basic processes and to the nature of the mechanisms at work. It is with this aim that we have undertaken the present study. Yttrium Aluminum Garnet (Y4Al5O12), called YAG, has two desirable properties as host for rare earth impurities: (1) trivalent rare earth ions can replace the yttrium without any charge compensation problem, and (2) YAG crystals have high cutoff energies. The results of measurements and calculations indicate that the Cr(3+) ion in YAG can be used to sensitize efficiently the Tm(3+) ion.

  20. Bulky Pulmonary Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue Lymphoma Treated with Yttrium-90 Ibritumomab Tiuxetan

    PubMed Central

    Tamura, Shinobu; Ikeda, Tokuji; Kurihara, Toshio; Kakuno, Yoshiteru; Nasu, Hideki; Nakano, Yoshio; Oshima, Koichi; Fujimoto, Tokuzo

    2013-01-01

    An 84-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital with nonproductive cough and dyspnea on exertion. Computed tomography (CT) scan revealed extensive consolidation in the right lung. She was diagnosed with pulmonary mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma using CT-guided lung biopsy. Her pulmonary images and respiratory symptoms did not improve two months after receiving 4 cycles of rituximab weekly; therefore, yttrium-90 ibritumomab tiuxetan was chosen as salvage therapy. The abnormal shadow on her pulmonary images was significantly reduced two months later, and she had no symptoms without nonhematological toxicities. She has had no progression for 18 months. Furthermore, radiation pneumonitis has not also been observed. We herein reported bulky pulmonary MALT lymphoma treated with yttrium-90 ibritumomab tiuxetan. PMID:24371530

  1. The Effect of Yttrium on Ti-5111 Gas Tungsten Arc Welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuberger, B. W.; Oberson, P. G.; Ankem, S.

    2011-05-01

    Much interest has developed in the near- α titanium alloy Ti-5Al-1Sn-1V-1Zr-0.8Mo (Ti-5111) for naval applications. When gas tungsten arc welded with filler metal that has the same chemical composition as the base metal, however, the weld FZ tends to be harder and less ductile than the base metal, which may make the weld susceptible to failure. This behavior may be attributed to the presence of oxygen impurities and the large prior- β grain size in the weld. In this investigation, the addition of a small amount of yttrium to the weld filler metal can decrease hardening and increase the ductility of Ti-5111 welds, which is beneficial for weld performance. Microstructural and chemical analyses of unmodified and yttrium-modified Ti-5111 welds are presented along with results from mechanical testing of the welds.

  2. Electronic and magnetic properties of yttrium-doped silicon carbide nanotubes: Density functional theory investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Khaira, Jobanpreet S.; Jain, Richa N.; Chakraborty, Brahmananda; Ramaniah, Lavanya M.

    2015-06-24

    The electronic structure of yttrium-doped Silicon Carbide Nanotubes has been theoretically investigated using first principles density functional theory (DFT). Yttrium atom is bonded strongly on the surface of the nanotube with a binding energy of 2.37 eV and prefers to stay on the hollow site at a distance of around 2.25 Å from the tube. The semi-conducting nanotube with chirality (4, 4) becomes half mettalic with a magnetic moment of 1.0 µ{sub B} due to influence of Y atom on the surface. There is strong hybridization between d orbital of Y with p orbital of Si and C causing a charge transfer from d orbital of the Y atom to the tube. The Fermi level is shifted towards higher energy with finite Density of States for only upspin channel making the system half metallic and magnetic which may have application in spintronic devices.

  3. Aluminium in food and daily dietary intake assessment from 15 food groups in Zhejiang Province, China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hexiang; Tang, Jun; Huang, Lichun; Shen, Xianghong; Zhang, Ronghua; Chen, Jiang

    2016-06-01

    Aluminium was measured in 2580 samples of 15 food groups and dietary exposure was estimated. Samples were purchased and analysed during 2010 to 2014. High aluminium levels were found in jellyfish (mean 4862 mg/kg), laver (mean 455.2 mg/kg) and fried twisted cruller (mean 392.4 mg/kg). Dietary exposure to aluminium was estimated for Zhejiang residents. The average dietary exposure to aluminium via 15 food groups in Zhejiang Province was 1.15 mg/kg bw/week, which is below the provisional tolerable weekly intake of 2 mg/kg bw /week. Jellyfish is the main Al contributor, providing 37.6% of the daily intake via these 15 food groups. This study provided new information on aluminium levels and assessment of aluminium (Al) dietary exposure in Zhejiang Province of China. PMID:26727195

  4. RESPONSE OF PHENOLIC METABOLISM INDUCED BY ALUMINIUM TOXICITY IN FAGOPYRUM ESCULENTUM MOENCH. PLANTS.

    PubMed

    Smirnov, O E; Kosyan, A M; Kosyk, O I; Taran, N Yu

    2015-01-01

    Buckwheat genus (Fagopyrum Mill.) is one of the aluminium tolerant taxonomic units of plants. The aim of the study was an evaluation of the aluminium (50 μM effect on phenolic accumulation in various parts of buckwheat plants (Fagopyrum esculentum Moench). Detection of increasing of total phenolic content, changes in flavonoid and anthocyanin content and phenylalanine ammonia-lyase activity (PAL) were revealed over a period of 10 days of exposure to aluminium. The most significant effects of aluminium treatment on phenolic compounds accumulation were total phenolic content increasing (by 27.2%) and PAL activity rising by 2.5 times observed in leaves tissues. Received data could be helpful to understand the aluminium tolerance principles and relationships of phenolic compounds to aluminium phytotoxicity.

  5. RESPONSE OF PHENOLIC METABOLISM INDUCED BY ALUMINIUM TOXICITY IN FAGOPYRUM ESCULENTUM MOENCH. PLANTS.

    PubMed

    Smirnov, O E; Kosyan, A M; Kosyk, O I; Taran, N Yu

    2015-01-01

    Buckwheat genus (Fagopyrum Mill.) is one of the aluminium tolerant taxonomic units of plants. The aim of the study was an evaluation of the aluminium (50 μM effect on phenolic accumulation in various parts of buckwheat plants (Fagopyrum esculentum Moench). Detection of increasing of total phenolic content, changes in flavonoid and anthocyanin content and phenylalanine ammonia-lyase activity (PAL) were revealed over a period of 10 days of exposure to aluminium. The most significant effects of aluminium treatment on phenolic compounds accumulation were total phenolic content increasing (by 27.2%) and PAL activity rising by 2.5 times observed in leaves tissues. Received data could be helpful to understand the aluminium tolerance principles and relationships of phenolic compounds to aluminium phytotoxicity. PMID:27025067

  6. Numerical Modelling of Drawbeads for Forming of Aluminium Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Y.; Christiansen, P.; Masters, I.; Bay, N.; Dashwood, R.

    2016-08-01

    The drawbeads in stamping tools are usually designed based on experience from the forming of steel. However, aluminium alloys display different forming behaviour to steels, which is not reflected in the drawbead design for tools used for stamping aluminium. This paper presents experimental results from different semi-circular drawbead geometries commonly encountered in automotive dies and compares them to those obtained from Stoughton's analytical drawbead model and the 2D plane strain drawbead model set up using LS-DYNA. The study was conducted on lubricated NG5754 strips. The results presented are in terms of drawbead restraining force versus strip displacement, as a function of drawbead depth. The FE drawbead model agrees well with the experiments whereas the analytical model overpredicted the drawbead forces.

  7. Prediction of the ballistic limit of an aluminium sandwich panel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, J.; De Vuyst, T.; Vignjevic, R.; Hughes, K.

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents research on modelling the impact of a 150g projectile on a 35mm thick aluminium sandwich panel. The objective of the work is a predictive modelling capability for the ballistic limit of the panel. A predictive modelling capability supports the design of capture and deorbit missions for large items of space debris such as satellites and rocket upper stages. A detailed explicit finite element model was built using the LSDYNA software and results were compared with experimental data for the projectile exit velocity to establish key parameters. The primary parameters influencing the model behaviour were the strength and failure of the aluminium face sheets and the friction between projectile and panel. The model results showed good agreement with experimental results for ogive nose projectiles, but overestimated the exit velocity for flat nose projectiles.

  8. Evaluation of femtosecond LIBS for spectrochemical microanalysis of aluminium alloys.

    PubMed

    Cravetchi, Igor V; Taschuk, Mike T; Tsui, Ying Y; Fedosejevs, Robert

    2006-05-01

    The analytical performance of femtosecond laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for elemental microanalysis of aluminium alloys and for mapping precipitate distribution on the sample surface has been studied in detail. A Ti-sapphire laser system producing pulses of 130 fs at 800 nm was used to generate the laser-induced plasma. Multi-element microanalysis of commercially available aluminium alloys was performed in air at atmospheric pressure. Crater characteristics such as diameter and crater morphology were characterized by optical and scanning-electron microscopy. Scaling of plasma emission and limit of detection as a function of laser pulse energy was also investigated. Current experimental results are presented and are compared with previous nanosecond microLIBS measurements.

  9. Experimental evidence for a dynamical crossover in liquid aluminium.

    PubMed

    Demmel, F; Fraile, A; Szubrin, D; Pilgrim, W-C; Morkel, C

    2015-11-18

    The temperature dependence of the dynamic structure factor at next-neighbour distances has been investigated for liquid aluminium. This correlation function is a sensitive parameter for changes in the local environment and its Fourier transform was measured in a coherent inelastic neutron scattering experiment. The zero frequency amplitude decreases in a nonlinear way and indicates a change in dynamics around 1.4 ∙ Tmelting. From that amplitude a generalized viscosity can be derived which is a measure of local stress correlations on next-neighbour distances. The derived generalized longitudinal viscosity shows a changing slope at the same temperature range. At this temperature the freezing out of degrees of freedom for structural relaxation upon cooling sets in which can be understood as a precursor towards the solid state. That crossover in dynamics of liquid aluminium shows the same signatures as previously observed in liquid rubidium and lead, indicating an universal character. PMID:26465204

  10. Modelling of aluminium sheet forming at elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Boogaard, A. H.; Huétink, J.

    2004-06-01

    The formability of Al-Mg sheet can be improved considerably, by increasing the temperature. By heating the sheet in areas with large shear strains, but cooling it on places where the risk of necking is high, the limiting drawing ratio can be increased to values above 2.5. At elevated temperatures, the mechanical response of the material becomes strain rate dependent. To accurately simulate warm forming of aluminium sheet, a material model is required that incorporates the temperature and strain-rate dependency. In this paper simulations are presented of the deep drawing of a cylindrical cup, using shell elements. It is demonstrated that the familiar quadratic Hill yield function is not capable of describing the plastic deformation of aluminium. Hardening can be described successfully with a physically based material model for temperatures up to 200 °C. At higher temperatures and very low strain rates, the flow curve deviates significantly from the model.

  11. Histopathological changes in cases of aluminium phosphide poisoning.

    PubMed

    Sinha, U S; Kapoor, A K; Singh, A K; Gupta, A; Mehrotra, Ravi

    2005-04-01

    Of a total of 205 poisoning deaths in our hospital in 2003, 83 cases were due to Aluminium phosphide poisoning and were further analyzed. Most vulnerable age group was 21-40 years and M:F ratio was 2:1. On naked eye examination, almost all the vital organs were found to be congested. On microscopic study, the liver showed central venous congestion, degeneration, haemorrhage, sinusoidal dilation, bile stasis, centrilobular necrosis, Kupffer cell hyperplasia, infiltration by mononuclear cells and fatty change. Microscopy of the lungs revealed alveolar thickening, oedema, dilated capillaries, collapsed alveoli and haemorrhage. In the kidney, changes were degeneration, infiltration, tubular dilation and cloudy swelling. Changes in the brain included congestion and coagulative necrosis and in the stomach, congestion and haemorrhage. Easy availability of this cheap and highly toxic substance was responsible for the sudden spurt of poisoning with aluminium phosphide. PMID:16758658

  12. Structural elucidation of crystallization centers in aluminium inoculated with titanium

    SciTech Connect

    Banerji, A.; Reif, W. . Inst. fuer Metallforschung-Metallkunde); Feng, Q. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1993-08-01

    The heterogeneous nucleation process in commercially pure aluminium (99.7%) castings inoculated with hypoperitectic titanium additions (<0.15%) was investigated. Electron diffraction of the crystallization center particles, which formed in situ by reaction of added titanium with carbon impurity in the melt and subsequently nucleated [alpha]-aluminium, showed that they were essentially composed of Ti[sub 2]C, having orthorhombic lattice with a = 1.2 nm, b = 1.06 nm and c = 0.50 nm, and stoichiometric TiC, having cubic lattice with a = 0.4380 nm. Traces of Ti[sub 3]AlC and Al[sub 4]C[sub 3] were recorded only in rare cases.

  13. Hydrothermal synthesis, crystal structures and photoluminescence properties of mixed europium-yttrium organic frameworks

    SciTech Connect

    Han Yinfeng; Fu Lianshe; Mafra, Luis; Shi, Fa-Nian

    2012-02-15

    Three mixed europium-yttrium organic frameworks: Eu{sub 2-x}Y{sub x}(Mel)(H{sub 2}O){sub 6} (Mel=mellitic acid or benzene-1,2,3,4,5,6-hexacarboxylic acid, x=0.38 1, 0.74 2, and 0.86 3) have been synthesized and characterized. All the compounds contain a 3-D net with (4, 8)-flu topology. The study indicates that the photoluminescence properties are effectively affected by the different ratios of europium and yttrium ions, the quantum efficiency is increased and the Eu{sup 3+} lifetime becomes longer in these MOFs than those of the Eu analog. - Graphical abstract: Three mixed europium and yttrium organic frameworks: Eu{sub 2-x}Y{sub x}(Mel)(H{sub 2}O){sub 6} (Mel=mellitic acid) have been synthesized and characterized. All the compounds contain a 3-D net with (4, 8)-flu topology. The study indicates that the photoluminescence properties are effectively affected by the different ratios of europium and yttrium ions, the quantum efficiency is increased and the Eu{sup 3+} lifetime becomes longer in these MOFs than those of the Eu analog. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Three (4, 8)-flu topological mixed Eu and Y MOFs were synthesized under mild conditions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Metal ratios were refined by the single crystal data consistent with the EDS analysis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mixed Eu and Y MOFs show longer lifetime and higher quantum efficiency than the Eu analog. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adding inert lanthanide into luminescent MOFs enlarges the field of luminescent MOFs.

  14. Generalized stochastic Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation for yttrium-iron garnet films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rückriegel, Andreas; Kopietz, Peter

    2015-03-01

    We derive a generalization of the well-known stochastic Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation starting from a microscopic Heisenberg model coupled to the lattice degrees of freedom. By integrating out the phonons we obtain a non-Markovian, stochastic equation of motion for the spin degrees of freedom satisfying a Fluctuation-Dissipation theorem. We apply our theory to study the parametric pumping and thermalization of spin excitations in thin yttrium-iron garnet films.

  15. Spin wave localization in one-dimensional magnonic microcavity comprising yttrium iron garnet

    SciTech Connect

    Kanazawa, Naoki; Goto, Taichi Inoue, Mitsuteru

    2014-08-28

    We demonstrate the localization of magnetostatic surface waves, i.e., spin waves, in a one-dimensional magnonic microcavity substantialized with periodical conductivity modulation. The narrow localized state is observed inside band gaps and is responsible for a sharp transmission peak. The experimental results strongly agree with the theoretical prediction made with the shape magnetic anisotropy of the propagating medium composed of yttrium iron garnet taken into account.

  16. Engineering of the band gap and optical properties of thin films of yttrium hydride

    SciTech Connect

    You, Chang Chuan; Mongstad, Trygve; Maehlen, Jan Petter; Karazhanov, Smagul

    2014-07-21

    Thin films of oxygen-containing yttrium hydride show photochromic effect at room temperature. In this work, we have studied structural and optical properties of the films deposited at different deposition pressures, discovering the possibility of engineering the optical band gap by variation of the oxygen content. In sum, the transparency of the films and the wavelength range of photons triggering the photochromic effect can be controlled by variation of the deposition pressure.

  17. Observation of spin rectification in Pt/yttrium iron garnet bilayer

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, Jinwei; Fan, Xiaolong Zhou, Hengan; Zhao, Xiaobing; Zhao, Jing; Zhang, Fengzhen; Xue, Desheng; Ma, Li; Zhou, Shiming

    2015-05-07

    We used the ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) to study the dc voltage generation in Pt 20 nm layer deposited on yttrium iron garnet. Although the main contribution to the FMR voltage comes from the inverse spin Hall effect associated with spin pumping, the spin rectification would also contribute the resonance signal via the “new” magnetoresistance effect in Pt layer. Based on a symmetry consideration, we can separate those two effects through angular dependent resonance amplitude.

  18. High-spin europium and gadolinium centers in yttrium-aluminum garnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazhenin, V. A.; Potapov, A. P.; Asatryan, G. R.; Uspenskaya, Yu. A.; Petrosyan, A. G.; Fokin, A. V.

    2016-08-01

    Electron-spin resonance spectra of Eu2+ and Gd3+ centers substituting Y3+ ions in single-crystal yttrium-aluminum garnet have been studied and the parameters of their rhombic spin Hamiltonian have been determined. The fine-structure parameters of the above ions have been calculated in the superposition model disregarding changes in the angular coordinates of the ligand environment of the impurity defect thus demonstrating the necessity of taking these changes into account.

  19. Superselective Internal Radiation With Yttrium-90 Microspheres in the Management of a Chemorefractory Testicular Liver Metastasis

    SciTech Connect

    Sideras, Panagiotis A.; Sofocleous, Constantinos T. Brody, Lynn A.; Siegelbaum, Robert H.; Shah, Rajesh P.; Taskar, Neeta-Pandit

    2012-04-15

    We treated a patient with biopsy-proven, chemotherapy-resistant testicular cancer liver metastasis using Y-90 selective internal radiation treatment. We chose yttrium-90 rather than surgery and ablation due to tumor location and size as well as the patient's clinical history. The result was marked tumor response by positron emission tomography and computed tomography as well as significant improvement of the patient's quality of life accompanied by a substantial decrease of his tumor markers.

  20. Diffusion permeability of yttrium-based heat-resistant ion-plasma coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncharov, V. S.; Goncharov, M. V.; Vasil'ev, E. V.

    2016-09-01

    The diffusion permeability of yttrium-containing ion-plasma coatings on substrates made of the low-alloy chromium-based Cr-0.7V-0.17La alloy has been studied. It has been found that protective coatings of this type have a strong barrier effect on diffusion fluxes in the substrate-coating-environment system and that YCr + YCrO3 coatings ensure the best protection of the substrates against gas saturation.