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Sample records for ras alters lens

  1. Altered detoxification status and increased resistance to oxidative stress by K-ras transformation.

    PubMed

    Recktenwald, Christian V; Kellner, Roland; Lichtenfels, Rudolf; Seliger, Barbara

    2008-12-15

    Mutated K-ras is frequently found in human malignancies and plays a key role in many signal transduction processes resulting in an altered gene and/or protein expression pattern. Proteins controlled by a constitutive activated mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway are primarily related to alterations in the mitochondrial and nuclear compartments. Therefore, different K-Ras mutants and respective control cells were subjected to two-dimensional gel electrophoresis using basic pH gradients. This approach led to the identification of differentially expressed proteins, such as members of the heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein family, and enzymes involved in cellular detoxification as well as in oxidative stress. Increased expression of these enzymes was paralleled by an elevated tolerance of K-ras mutants against the cytotoxic potential of hydrogen peroxide and formaldehyde as well as an altered redox status based on enhanced intracellular glutathione (GSH) levels indicating an improved detoxification potential of defined K-ras transfectants, whereas down-regulation by RNA interference of candidate proteins reversed the tolerance against these compounds. This hypothesis is supported by an up-regulated expression of a key enzyme of the pentose phosphate pathway resulting in an increased production of NADPH required for anabolic processes as well as the rebuilding of oxidized GSH. Both the enhanced resistance against xenobiotic compounds as well as an altered oxidative pathway might confer growth advantages for tumor cells carrying dominant-positive K-ras mutations such as in lung or pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

  2. Alteration of glycolipids in ras-transfected NIH 3T3 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Matyas, G.R.; Aaronson, S.A.; Brady, R.O.; Fishman, P.H.

    1987-09-01

    Glycosphingolipid alterations upon viral transformation are well documented. Transformation of mouse 3T3 cells with murine sarcoma viruses results in marked decreases in the levels of gangliosides GM1 and GD1a and an increase in gangliotriaosylceramide. The transforming oncogenes of these viruses have been identified as members of the ras gene family. The authors analyzed NIH 3T3 cells transfected with human H-, K- and N-ras oncogenes for their glycolipid composition and expression of cell surface gangliosides. Using conventional thin-layer chromatographic analysis, they found that the level of GM3 was increased and that of GD1a was slightly decreased or unchanged, and GM1 was present but not in quantifiable levels. Cell surface levels of GM1 were determined by /sup 125/I-labeled cholera toxin binding to intact cells. GD1a was determined by cholera toxin binding to cells treated with sialidase prior to toxin binding. All ras-transfected cells had decreased levels of surface GM1 and GD1 as compared to logarithmically growing normal NIH 3T3 cells. Levels of GM1 and, to a lesser extent, GD1a increased as the latter cells became confluent. Using a monoclonal antibody assay, they found that gangliotriaosylceramide was present in all ras-transfected cells studied but not in logarithmically growing untransfected cells. These results indicated that ras oncogenes derived form human tumors are capable of inducing alterations in glycolipid composition.

  3. Raft Protein Clustering Alters N-Ras Membrane Interactions and Activation Pattern ▿

    PubMed Central

    Eisenberg, Sharon; Beckett, Alison J.; Prior, Ian A.; Dekker, Frank J.; Hedberg, Christian; Waldmann, Herbert; Ehrlich, Marcelo; Henis, Yoav I.

    2011-01-01

    The trafficking, membrane localization, and lipid raft association of Ras proteins, which are crucial oncogenic mediators, dictate their isoform-specific biological responses. Accordingly, their spatiotemporal dynamics are tightly regulated. While extensively studied for H- and K-Ras, such information on N-Ras, an etiological oncogenic factor, is limited. Here, we report a novel mechanism regulating the activation-dependent spatiotemporal organization of N-Ras, its modulation by biologically relevant stimuli, and isoform-specific effects on signaling. We combined patching/immobilization of another membrane protein with fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (patch-FRAP) and FRAP beam size analysis to investigate N-Ras membrane interactions. Clustering of raft-associated proteins, either glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA-GPI) or fibronectin receptors, selectively enhanced the plasma membrane-cytoplasm exchange of N-Ras–GTP (preferentially associated with raft domains) in a cholesterol-dependent manner. Electron microscopy (EM) analysis showed N-Ras–GTP localization in cholesterol-sensitive clusters, from which it preferentially detached upon HA-GPI cross-linking. HA-GPI clustering enhanced the Golgi compartment (GC) accumulation and signaling of epidermal growth factor (EGF)-stimulated N-Ras–GTP. Notably, the cross-linking-mediated enhancement of N-Ras–GTP exchange and GC accumulation depended strictly on depalmitoylation. We propose that the N-Ras activation pattern (e.g., by EGF) is altered by raft protein clustering, which enhances N-Ras–GTP raft localization and depalmitoylation, entailing its exchange and GC accumulation following repalmitoylation. This mechanism demonstrates a functional signaling role for the activation-dependent differential association of Ras isoforms with raft nanodomains. PMID:21807892

  4. Expression of simple epithelial cytokeratins in mouse epidermal keratinocytes harboring Harvey ras gene alterations.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Guerra, M; Haddow, S; Bauluz, C; Jorcano, J L; Cano, A; Balmain, A; Quintanilla, M

    1992-02-01

    Activation of a Harvey ras (H-ras) protooncogene is a frequent event associated with mouse epidermal carcinogenesis. We report that the transfection of a human H-ras oncogene into an immortalized mouse epidermal cell line (MCA3D) induces the anomalous expression of cytokeratins (CKs) 8 and 18 characteristic of simple epithelia. The comparison of various transfectant cell clones indicated a direct correlation between the levels of CK8 expression and the mutated H-ras p21s. The expression of simple epithelial CKs is also described in cell lines derived from mouse skin carcinomas (HaCa4, CarC) and in keratinocytes transformed in vitro by a chemical carcinogen (PDV, PDVC57), all of which contain altered H-ras genes. The induction of CK8 and CK18 occurs at the mRNA level and, although both CK8 and CK18 mRNAs are expressed, CK18 protein does not accumulate whereas CK8 is incorporated into intermediate filaments. Immunofluorescence studies show that the pattern of CK8 protein expression is heterogeneous; some cells express very low amounts of CK8, whereas others synthesize relatively high levels of this protein. However, selection of strongly CK8-positive cells was found in one case where a more malignant population of cells (PDVC57) was derived by tumor transplantation of PDV. Our results suggest that activation of a H-ras gene can alter the normal differentiation program of epidermal cells and that the ability to synthesize CK8 and CK18 could be related to tumor progression.

  5. Genome profiling of chronic myelomonocytic leukemia: frequent alterations of RAS and RUNX1 genes

    PubMed Central

    Gelsi-Boyer, Véronique; Trouplin, Virginie; Adélaïde, José; Aceto, Nicola; Remy, Virginie; Pinson, Stephane; Houdayer, Claude; Arnoulet, Christine; Sainty, Danielle; Bentires-Alj, Mohamed; Olschwang, Sylviane; Vey, Norbert; Mozziconacci, Marie-Joëlle; Birnbaum, Daniel; Chaffanet, Max

    2008-01-01

    Background Chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML) is a hematological disease close to, but separate from both myeloproliferative disorders (MPD) and myelodysplastic syndromes and may show either myeloproliferative (MP-CMML) or myelodysplastic (MD-CMML) features. Not much is known about the molecular biology of this disease. Methods We studied a series of 30 CMML samples (13 MP- and 11 MD-CMMLs, and 6 acutely transformed cases) from 29 patients by using Agilent high density array-comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) and sequencing of 12 candidate genes. Results Two-thirds of samples did not show any obvious alteration of aCGH profiles. In one-third we observed chromosome abnormalities (e.g. trisomy 8, del20q) and gain or loss of genes (e.g. NF1, RB1 and CDK6). RAS mutations were detected in 4 cases (including an uncommon codon 146 mutation in KRAS) and PTPN11 mutations in 3 cases. We detected 11 RUNX1 alterations (9 mutations and 2 rearrangements). The rearrangements were a new, cryptic inversion of chromosomal region 21q21-22 leading to break and fusion of RUNX1 to USP16. RAS and RUNX1 alterations were not mutually exclusive. RAS pathway mutations occurred in MP-CMMLs (~46%) but not in MD-CMMLs. RUNX1 alterations (mutations and cryptic rearrangement) occurred in both MP and MD classes (~38%). Conclusion We detected RAS pathway mutations and RUNX1 alterations. The latter included a new cryptic USP16-RUNX1 fusion. In some samples, two alterations coexisted already at this early chronic stage. PMID:18925961

  6. Alterations in the K-ras and p53 genes in rat lung tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Belinsky, S.A.; Swafford, D.S.; Finch, G.L.; Mitchell, C.E.

    1997-06-01

    Activation of the K-ras protooncogene and inactivation of the p53 tumor suppressor gene are events common to many types of human cancers. Molecular epidemiology studies have associated mutational profiles in these genes with specific exposures. The purpose of this paper is to review investigations that have examined the role of the K-ras and p53 genes in lung tumors induced in the F344 rat by mutagenic and nonmutagenic exposures. Mutation profiles within the K-ras and p53 genes, if present in rat lung tumors, would help to define some of the molecular mechanisms underlying cancer induction by various environmental agents. Pulmonary adenocarcinomas or squamous cell carcinomas were induced by tetranitromethane (TNM), 4-methylnitrosamino-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK), beryllium metal, plutonium-239, X-ray, diesel exhaust, or carbon black. These agents were chosen because the tumors they produced could arise via different types of DNA damage. Mutation of the K-ras gene was determined by approaches that included DNA transfection, direct sequencing, mismatch hybridization, and restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. The frequency for mutation of the K-ras gene was exposure dependent. The transition mutations formed could have been derived from deamination of cytosine. Alteration in the p53 gene was assessed by immunohistochemical analysis for p53 protein and single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis of exons 4 to 9. None of the 93 adenocarinomas examined was immunoreactive toward the anti-p53 antibody CM1. In contrast, 14 of 71 squamous cell carcinomas exhibited nuclear p53 immunoreactivity with no correlation to type of exposure. However, SSCP analysis only detected mutations in 2 of 14 squamous cell tumors that were immunoreactive, suggesting that protein stabilization did not stem from mutations within the p53 gene. Thus, the p53 gene does not appear to be involved in the genesis of most rat lung tumors. 2 figs., 2 tabs., 48 refs.

  7. Alteration of glycerolipid and sphingolipid-derived second messenger kinetics in ras transformed 3T3 cells.

    PubMed

    Laurenz, J C; Gunn, J M; Jolly, C A; Chapkin, R S

    1996-01-05

    The effect of ras transformation (rasB fibroblasts) on basal and serum-stimulated diacylglycerol (DAG) composition and mass was examined over time with respect to changes in membrane phospholipid composition and ceramide mass. RasB cells vs. nontransformed control cells (rasD and NR6) had chronically elevated DAG levels (up to 240 min) following serum stimulation, indicating a defect in the recovery phase of the intracellular DAG pulse. Ras transformation also had a dramatic effect on DAG composition. Molecular species analysis revealed that DAG from unstimulated rasB cells was enriched in the delta 9 desaturase fatty acyl species (monoenoate 18:1(n - 7) and 18:1(n - 9)), and depleted in arachidonic acid (20:4(n - 6)). With the exception of glycerophosphoinositol (GPI), DAG remodeling paralleled the compositional alterations in individual phospholipid classes. Importantly, ras transformation altered the fatty acyl composition of sphingomyelin, a precursor to the ceramide second messenger. With the addition of serum, control cells (rasD) had a progressive increase in ceramide mass with levels approximately 5-fold higher by 240 min. In contrast, ceramide levels did not increase in rasB cells at either 4 or 240 min. These results demonstrate that ras-oncogene, in addition to its effects on DAG metabolism, can also abolish the cellular increase in ceramide mass in response to serum stimulation. Since DAG and ceramide may have opposing biological functions, the prolonged elevation of DAG and the suppression of ceramide levels would be consistent with an enhanced proliferative capacity.

  8. Alterations in K-ras, APC and p53-multiple genetic pathway in colorectal cancer among Indians.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, Pooja; Anwar, Mumtaz; Nanda, Neha; Kochhar, Rakesh; Wig, Jai Dev; Vaiphei, Kim; Mahmood, Safrun

    2013-06-01

    The incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) is increasing rapidly in Asian countries during the past few decades, but no comprehensive analysis has been done to find out the exact cause of this disease. In this study, we investigated the frequencies of mutations and expression pattern of K-ras, APC (adenomatosis polyposis coli) and p53 in tumor, adjoining and distant normal mucosa and to correlate these alterations with patients clinicopathological parameters as well as with the survival. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-restriction digestion was used to detect mutations in K-ras and PCR-SSCP (Single Strand Conformation Polymorphism) followed by DNA sequencing was used to detect mutations in APC and p53 genes. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect the expression pattern of K-ras, APC and p53 proteins. The frequencies of mutations of K-ras, APC and p53 in 30 tumor tissues samples were 26.7 %, 46.7 % and 20 %, respectively. Only 3.3 % of tumors contained mutations in all the three genes. The most common combination of mutation was APC and p53 whereas mutation in both p53 and K-ras were extremely rare. There was no association between the mutations and expression pattern of K-ras, APC and p53 (p>0.05). In Indians, the frequency of alterations of K-ras and APC is similar as in Westerns, whereas the frequency of p53 mutation is slightly lower. The lack of multiple mutations in tumor specimens suggests that these genetic alterations might have independent influences on CRC development and there could be multiple alternative genetic pathways to CRC in our present study cohort.

  9. Expression of activated Ras during Dictyostelium development alters cell localization and changes cell fate.

    PubMed

    Jaffer, Z M; Khosla, M; Spiegelman, G B; Weeks, G

    2001-03-01

    There is now a body of evidence to indicate that Ras proteins play important roles in development. Dictyostelium expresses several ras genes and each appears to perform a distinct function. Previous data had indicated that the overexpression of an activated form of the major developmentally regulated gene, rasD, caused a major aberration in morphogenesis and cell type determination. We now show that the developmental expression of an activated rasG gene under the control of the rasD promoter causes a similar defect. Our results indicate that the expression of activated rasG in prespore cells results in their transdifferentiation into prestalk cells, whereas activated rasG expression in prestalk causes gross mislocalization of the prestalk cell populations.

  10. Inverse Relationship between Microsatellite Instability and K-ras and p53 Gene Alterations in Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Samowitz, Wade S.; Holden, Joseph A.; Curtin, Karen; Edwards, Sandra L.; Walker, Adrianne R.; Lin, Heather A.; Robertson, Margaret A.; Nichols, Melanie F.; Gruenthal, Kristin M.; Lynch, Beverly J.; Leppert, Mark F.; Slattery, Martha L.

    2001-01-01

    Some studies have shown an inverse relationship between microsatellite instability in colon cancer and mutations in p53 and K-ras, whereas others have not. We therefore evaluated these features in a population-based sample of 496 individuals with colon cancer. Microsatellite instability was determined by a panel of 10 tetranucleotide repeats, the Bethesda consensus panel of mono- and dinucleotide repeats, and coding mononucleotide repeats in transforming growth factor-beta receptor type II, hMSH3, BAX, hMSH6, and insulin-like growth factor receptor type II. Mutations in codons 12 and 13 in K-ras were evaluated by sequencing. p53 overexpression (as detected by immunohistochemistry) was used as an indicator of p53 mutation; this was evaluated in 275 of the tumors. K-ras mutations were present in 33.2% of tumors, p53 overexpression in 51.5%, and microsatellite instability (as determined by the Bethesda consensus panel) in 12.5%. K-ras mutations were significantly less common in unstable tumors than stable tumors (11.8% versus 36.9%, P < 0.001). p53 overexpression was significantly less common in unstable tumors than stable tumors (20.0% versus 55.7%, P < 0.001). These inverse relationships between microsatellite instability and ras gene mutations and p53 overexpression were shown to be independent of tumor site in logistic regression analyses. All other measures of instability also showed statistically significant inverse relationships independent of tumor site with alterations in ras and p53, and instability results determined by the panel of 10 tetranucleotide repeats were highly significantly related to those determined by the Bethesda consensus panel. Coding mononucleotide repeat mutations were significantly more common in unstable tumors than stable tumors (85.7% versus 1.0%, P < 0.001). We conclude that there is an inverse relationship between microsatellite instability and mutations in p53 and K-ras, and that the molecular profile of colon cancers with

  11. Newborn Mouse Lens Proteome and Its Alteration by Lysine 6 Mutant Ubiquitin

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Ubiquitin is a tag that often initiates degradation of proteins by the proteasome in the ubiquitin proteasome system. Targeted expression of K6W mutant ubiquitin (K6W-Ub) in the lens results in defects in lens development and cataract formation, suggesting critical functions for ubiquitin in lens. To study the developmental processes that require intact ubiquitin, we executed the most extensive characterization of the lens proteome to date. We quantified lens protein expression changes in multiple replicate pools of P1 wild-type and K6W-Ub-expressing mouse lenses. Lens proteins were digested with trypsin, peptides were separated using strong cation exchange and reversed-phase liquid chromatography, and tandem mass (MS/MS) spectra were collected with a linear ion trap. Transgenic mice that expressed low levels of K6W-Ub (low expressers) had normal, clear lenses at birth, whereas the lenses that expressed high levels of K6W-Ub (higher expressers) had abnormal lenses and cataracts at birth. A total of 2052 proteins were identified, of which 996 were reliably quantified and compared between wild-type and K6W-Ub transgenic mice. Consistent with a delayed developmental program, fiber-cell-specific proteins, such as γ-crystallins (γA, γB, γC, and γE), were down-regulated in K6W-Ub higher expressers. Up-regulated proteins were involved in energy metabolism, signal transduction, and proteolysis. The K6W-Ub low expressers exhibited delayed onset and milder cataract consistent with smaller changes in protein expression. Because lens protein expression changes occurred prior to lens morphological abnormalities and cataract formation in K6W-Ub low expressers, it appears that expression of K6W-Ub sets in motion a process of altered protein expression that results in developmental defects and cataract. PMID:24450463

  12. R-(+)-perillyl alcohol-induced cell cycle changes, altered actin cytoskeleton, and decreased ras and p34(cdc2) expression in colonic adenocarcinoma SW480 cells.

    PubMed

    Cerda, S R; Wilkinson, J; Thorgeirsdottir, S; Broitman, S A

    1999-01-01

    Monoterpenes as S-(-)-perillyl alcohol (PA) have been shown to inhibit the isoprenylation of such growth regulatory proteins as ras. In this study, we investigated the effects of the R-(+) enantiomer of PA on cell cycle, signaling, and cytoskeletal control in the colonic adenocarcinoma cell line SW480, which carries a K-ras mutation. Cell cycle analysis by flow cytometry of SW480 cells treated with 1 mM PA for 24 hours demonstrated an increase in the number of cells in G0/G1 with a decrease in S phase, compared with untreated control cells. These cell cycle changes correlated with an inhibition of protein isoprenylation from (14)C-mevalonate and decreased expression of the cell cycle regulatory kinase p34(cdc2). Additionally, PA-treated cells acquired a flattened morphology with a condensation of cytoskeletal actin spikes to the periphery. This was in contrast to treatment with 15 microM mevinolin (MVN), a direct mevalonate synthesis inhibitor, which imparted to SW480 cells a more rounded and spindly morphology, associated with the depolymerization of actin microfilaments. Together, these data suggest that fluctuations in mevalonate and isoprenoid pools may involve different morphologic phenomenon. Because ras mediated signaling is related to the organization of the actin cytoskeleton, we investigated the effects of PA on the isoprenylation of ras. Although MVN treatment inhibited ras farnesylation, PA treatment decreased the expression of total ras protein. In summary, R-(+)-PA-induced cell signaling events correlated with alterations in the organization of cytoskeletal actin and decreased protein expression of growth regulatory proteins, such as ras and cdc2 kinase. These effects may contribute to the growth inhibitory activity of R-(+)-PA.

  13. [Ocular and visual alterations in computer workers contact lens wearers: scoping review].

    PubMed

    Tauste Francés, Ana; Ronda-Pérez, Elena; Seguí Crespo, María del Mar

    2014-01-01

    The high number of computer workers wearing contact lenses raises the question whether the sum of these two risk factors for eye health may cause a worsening of Computer Vision Syndrome. The aim of this review is to synthesize the knowledge about ocular and visual alterations related with computer use in contact lens wearers. International review of scientific papers (2003-2013) in Spanish and English, using Scoping Review method, in Medline through PubMed and in Scopus. The initial search provided 114 references, after applying inclusion/exclusion criteria six of them were included. All of them reveal that symptoms when using computer are more prevalent in contact lens wearers, with values of symptoms presentation prevalence ranging from 95.0% to 16.9% in wearers and from 57.5% to 9.9% in non-wearers, and four times more likely to develop dry eye [OR: 4.07 (95% CI: 3.52 to 4.71)]. Computer workers suffer more ocular and visual disturbances if they also are contact lens users, but studies are few and non conclusive. Likewise, further research regarding contact lens type and their conditions of use, both in symptoms and tear quality and ocular surface are needed. Silicone hydrogel lenses are associated with more comfort.

  14. Syndecan-1 alterations during the tumorigenic progression of human colonic Caco-2 cells induced by human Ha-ras or polyoma middle T oncogenes.

    PubMed Central

    Levy, P.; Munier, A.; Baron-Delage, S.; Di Gioia, Y.; Gespach, C.; Capeau, J.; Cherqui, G.

    1996-01-01

    The products of ras and src proto-oncogenes are frequently activated in a constitutive state in human colorectal cancer. In this study we attempted to establish whether the tumorigenic progression induced by oncogenic activation of p21ras and pp60c-src in human colonic Caco-2 cells is associated with specific alterations of syndecan-1, a membrane-anchored proteoglycan playing a role in cell-matrix interaction and neoplastic growth control. To this end, we used Caco-2 cells made highly tumorigenic by transfection with an activated (Val 12) human Ha-ras gene or with the polyoma middle T (Py-MT) oncogene, a constitutive activator of pp60c-src tyrosine kinase activity. Compared with control vector-transfected Caco-2 cells, both oncogene-transfected cell lines (1) contained smaller amounts of membrane-anchored PGs; (2) exhibited decreased syndecan-1 expression at the protein but not the mRNA level; (3) synthesized 35S-labelled syndecan-1 with decreased specific activity; (4) produced a syndecan-1 ectodomain with a lower molecular mass and reduced GAG chain size and sulphation; and (5) expressed heparanase degradative activity. These results show that the dramatic activation of the tumorigenic potential induced by oncogenic p21ras or Py-MT/pp60c-src in Caco-2 cells is associated with marked alterations of syndecan-1 expression at the translational and post-translational levels. Images Figure 2 PMID:8695359

  15. RAS Insight

    Cancer.gov

    David Heimbrook, now CEO of the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, played a major role in a large pharma as it tried to develop an anti-RAS drug. Lessons from that failure inform the RAS Initiative today.

  16. Classic Ras Proteins Promote Proliferation and Survival Via Distinct Phosphoproteome Alterations in Neurofibromin-Null Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Brossier, Nicole M.; Prechtl, Amanda M.; Longo, Jody Fromm; Barnes, Stephen; Wilson, Landon S.; Byer, Stephanie J.; Brosius, Stephanie N.; Carroll, Steven L.

    2015-01-01

    Neurofibromin, the tumor suppressor encoded by the neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) gene, potentially suppresses the activation of H-Ras, N-Ras and K-Ras. However, it is not known whether these classic Ras proteins are hyperactivated in NF1-null nerve sheath tumors, how they contribute to tumorigenesis and what signaling pathways mediate their effects. Here we show that H-Ras, N-Ras and K-Ras are coexpressed with their activators, (guanine nucleotide exchange factors), in neurofibromin-null malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) cells and that all 3 Ras proteins are activated. Dominant negative (DN) H-Ras, a pan-inhibitor of the classic Ras family, inhibited MPNST proliferation and survival, but not migration. However, NF1-null MPNST cells were variably dependent on individual Ras proteins. In some lines, ablation of H-Ras, N-Ras and/or K-Ras inhibited mitogenesis. In others, ablation of a single Ras protein had no effect on proliferation; in these lines, ablation of a single Ras protein resulted in compensatory increases in the activation and/or expression of other Ras proteins. Using mass spectrometry-based phosphoproteomics, we identified 7 signaling networks affecting morphology, proliferation and survival that are regulated by DN H-Ras. Thus, neurofibromin loss activates multiple classic Ras proteins that promote proliferation and survival by regulating several distinct signaling cascades. PMID:25946318

  17. Transcriptomic and proteomic analyses of mouse cerebellum reveals alterations in RasGRF1 expression following in vivo chronic treatment with delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Graziano; Rusconi, Francesco; Rubino, Tiziana; Cattaneo, Angela; Martegani, Enzo; Parolaro, Daniela; Bachi, Angela; Zippel, Renata

    2009-02-01

    We have applied transcriptomic and proteomic techniques to identify changes in the RNA and the protein levels in the mouse cerebellum after chronic treatment with Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). Among approximately 14,000 transcripts in a mouse cDNA microarray library, we found 11 genes with altered expression. RasGRF1, a neuron-specific Ras guanine nucleotide exchange factor, showed a reduction both at the RNA and protein levels with a specific decrease of the protein pool associated to cell membranes. In addition, proteomic analysis on cerebellum obtained from chronically THC-treated mice detected quantitative changes of additional 27 spots, mostly in the membranous fraction. We found enrichment of alpha (Galphao, Galphaq) and beta subunits (beta4/beta2 and beta5) of guanine nucleotide-binding proteins and of two calcium-binding proteins, calretinin and hippocalcin-like protein-1. In addition, we also detected a significant increase in the membrane fraction of proteins involved in exo-endocytosis such as septins, dynamin-1, and vesicle protein sorting 29. By western blotting, we confirmed increased membrane localization of calretinin and of dynamin-1 isoforms with higher isoelectric point, indicative for an underphosphorylated state of the molecule. In conclusion, our results indicate that chronic THC modulates the expression and subcellular localization of proteins implicated in Ras signaling, calcium-buffering potential, and trafficking.

  18. p53, erbB-2 and K-ras gene alterations are rare in spontaneous and plutonium-239-induced canine lung neoplasia

    SciTech Connect

    Tierney, L.A.; Hahn, F.F.; Lechner, J.F.

    1996-02-01

    Inhalation of high-linear energy transfer radiation in the form of radon progeny is a suspected cause of human lung cancer. To gain insight into the types of genetic derangements caused by this type of radiation, lung tumors from beagle dogs exposed to {sup 239}PuO{sub 2} and those arising in animals with no known carcinogen exposure were examined for evidence of aberrations in genes known to be altered in lung tumors. Altered expression of the p53 tumor suppressor gene and proto-oncogene erbB-2 proteins (p185{sup erbB2}) was evaluated by immunohistochemical analysis of 117 tumors representing different histological types in exposed (n = 80) and unexposed (n = 37) animals. Twenty-eight tumors were analyzed for K-ras proto-oncogene mutations by polymerase chain reaction amplification and direct sequencing. Fourteen percent (16/116) of all lung neoplasms showed elevated nuclear accumulation of p53 protein. Regardless of exposure history, adenosquamous and squamous cell cancers comprised 94% of all tumors with p53 abnormalities. Eighteen percent (21/117) of all tumors had evidence of erbB-2 protein overexpression. K-ras mutations were not detected in codons 12, 13 or 61 of tumors from unexposed (n = 9) or plutonium-exposed dogs (n = 19). These data indicate that p53 and K-ras gene abnormalities as a result of missense mutation are infrequent events in spontaneous and {sup 239}PuO{sub 2}-induced lung neoplasia in this colony of beagle dogs. Alternative mechanisms of gene alteration may be involved in canine pulmonary carcinogenesis. 45 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. The structural alteration and aggregation propensity of glycated lens crystallins in the presence of calcium: Importance of lens calcium homeostasis in development of diabetic cataracts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ZM, Sara Zafaranchi; Khoshaman, Kazem; Masoudi, Raheleh; Hemmateenejad, Bahram; Yousefi, Reza

    2017-01-01

    The imbalance of the calcium homeostasis in the lenticular tissues of diabetic patients is an important risk factor for development of cataract diseases. In the current study, the impact of elevated levels of calcium ions were investigated on structure and aggregation propensity of glycated lens crystallins using gel electrophoresis and spectroscopic assessments. The glycated proteins indicated significant resistance against calcium-induced structural insults and aggregation. While, glycated crystallins revealed an increased conformational stability; a slight instability was observed for these proteins upon interaction with calcium ions. Also, in the presence of calcium, the proteolytic pattern of native crystallins was altered and that of glycated protein counterparts remained almost unchanged. According to results of this study it is suggested that the structural alteration of lens crystallins upon glycation may significantly reduce their calcium buffering capacity in eye lenses. Therefore, under chronic hyperglycemia accumulation of this cataractogenic metal ion in the lenticular tissues may subsequently culminate in activation of different pathogenic pathways, leading to development of lens opacity and cataract diseases.

  20. Newborn mouse lens proteome and its alteration by lysine 6 mutant ubiquitin

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ubiquitin is a tag that often initiates degradation of proteins by the proteasome in the ubiquitin proteasome system. Targeted expression of K6W mutant ubiquitin (K6W-Ub) in the lens results in defects in lens development and cataract formation, suggesting critical functions for ubiquitin in lens. T...

  1. Ras history

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Although the roots of Ras sprouted from the rich history of retrovirus research, it was the discovery of mutationally activated RAS genes in human cancer in 1982 that stimulated an intensive research effort to understand Ras protein structure, biochemistry and biology. While the ultimate goal has been developing anti-Ras drugs for cancer treatment, discoveries from Ras have laid the foundation for three broad areas of science. First, they focused studies on the origins of cancer to the molecular level, with the subsequent discovery of genes mutated in cancer that now number in the thousands. Second, elucidation of the biochemical mechanisms by which Ras facilitates signal transduction established many of our fundamental concepts of how a normal cell orchestrates responses to extracellular cues. Third, Ras proteins are also founding members of a large superfamily of small GTPases that regulate all key cellular processes and established the versatile role of small GTP-binding proteins in biology. We highlight some of the key findings of the last 28 years. PMID:21686117

  2. CAVEOLIN-1 REGULATES HIV-1 TAT-INDUCED ALTERATIONS OF TIGHT JUNCTION PROTEIN EXPRESSION VIA MODULATION OF THE RAS SIGNALING

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Yu; Smart, Eric J.; Weksler, Babette; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier; Hennig, Bernhard; Toborek, Michal

    2009-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is the critical structure for preventing HIV trafficking into the brain. Specific HIV proteins, such as Tat protein, can contribute to the dysfunction of tight junctions at the BBB and HIV entry into the brain. Tat is released by HIV-1 infected cells and can interact with a variety of cell surface receptors activating several signal transduction pathways, including those localized in caveolae. The present study focused on the mechanisms of Tat-induced caveolae-associated Ras signaling at the level of the BBB. Treatment with Tat activated the Ras pathway in human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC). However, caveolin-1 silencing markedly attenuated these effects. Because the integrity of the brain endothelium is regulated by intercellular tight junctions, these structural elements of the BBB were also evaluated in the present study. Exposure to Tat diminished the expression of several tight junction proteins, namely, occludin, zonula occludens (ZO)-1, and ZO-2 in the caveolar fraction of HBMEC. These effects were effectively protected by pharmacological inhibition of the Ras signaling and by silencing of caveolin-1. The present data indicate the importance of caveolae-associated signaling in the disruption of tight junctions upon Tat exposure. They also demonstrate that caveolin-1 may constitute an early and critical modulator that controls signaling pathways leading to the disruption of tight junction proteins. Thus, caveolin-1 may provide an effective target to protect against Tat-induced HBMEC dysfunction and the disruption of the BBB in HIV-1-infected patients. PMID:18667611

  3. Proton Irradiation Alters Expression of FGF-2 In Human Lens Epithelial Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blakely, E. A.; Bjornstad, K. A.; Chang, P. Y.; McNamara, M. P.; Chang, E.

    1999-01-01

    We are investigating a role for proton radiation-induced changes in FGF-2 gene expression as part of the mechanism(s) underlying lens cell injury. Radiation injury to the human lens is associated with the induction of cataract following exposure to protons.

  4. Mutation-Specific RAS Oncogenicity Explains N-RAS Codon 61 Selection in Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Burd, Christin E.; Liu, Wenjin; Huynh, Minh V.; Waqas, Meriam A.; Gillahan, James E.; Clark, Kelly S.; Fu, Kailing; Martin, Brit L.; Jeck, William R.; Souroullas, George P.; Darr, David B.; Zedek, Daniel C.; Miley, Michael J.; Baguley, Bruce C.; Campbell, Sharon L.

    2014-01-01

    N-RAS mutation at codon 12, 13 or 61 is associated with transformation; yet, in melanoma, such alterations are nearly exclusive to codon 61. Here, we compared the melanoma susceptibility of an N-RasQ61R knock-in allele to similarly designed K-RasG12D and N-RasG12D alleles. With concomitant p16INK4a inactivation, K-RasG12D or N-RasQ61R expression efficiently promoted melanoma in vivo, whereas N-RasG12D did not. Additionally, N-RasQ61R mutation potently cooperated with Lkb1/Stk11 loss to induce highly metastatic disease. Functional comparisons of N-RasQ61R and N-RasG12D revealed little difference in the ability of these proteins to engage PI3K or RAF. Instead, N-RasQ61R showed enhanced nucleotide binding, decreased intrinsic GTPase activity and increased stability when compared to N-RasG12D. This work identifies a faithful model of human N-RAS mutant melanoma, and suggests that the increased melanomagenecity of N-RasQ61R over N-RasG12D is due to heightened abundance of the active, GTP-bound form rather than differences in the engagement of downstream effector pathways. PMID:25252692

  5. GABA and GABA receptors alterations in the primary visual cortex of concave lens-induced myopic model.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wen; Bi, Ai-Ling; Xu, Chao-Li; Ye, Xiang; Chen, Mei-Qing; Wang, Xin-Ting; Zhang, Xiao-Yan; Guo, Jun-Guo; Jiang, Wen-Jun; Zhang, Jin; Bi, Hong-Sheng

    2017-02-02

    Until recently most researches on myopia mechanisms have mainly been focused on the eye ball and few investigations were explored on the upper visual pathway, such as the visual cortex. The roles of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the retinal and in the upper visual pathway are inter-correlated. As the retinal glutamate decarboxylase (GAD), GABA, and the mRNA levels of GABA receptors increased during the concave lens induced myopia formation, however, whether GABA alterations also occurred in the visual cortex during the concave lens induction is still unknown. In the present study, using HPLC, Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) and Real-Time Quantitative-PCR (RT-PCR) methods, we observed the changing trends of GABA, glutamate decarboxylase (GAD), and GABA receptors in the visual cortex of concave lens-induced myopic guinea pigs. Similar to the changing patterns of retinal GABA, the concentrations of GAD, GABA and the mRNA levels of GABA receptors in the visual cortex also increased. These results indicate that the exploration on myopia mechanisms should possibly be investigated on the whole visual pathway and the detailed significance of cortical GABA alterations needs further investigation.

  6. Members of the src and ras oncogene families supplant the epidermal growth factor requirement of BALB/MK-2 keratinocytes and induce distinct alterations in their terminal differentiation program.

    PubMed Central

    Weissman, B; Aaronson, S A

    1985-01-01

    BALB-/MK-2 mouse epidermal keratinocytes required epidermal growth factor for proliferation and terminally differentiated in response to high Ca2+ concentration. Infection with retroviruses containing transforming genes of the src and ras oncogene families led to rapid loss of epidermal growth factor dependence, in some cases, accompanied by alterations in cellular morphology. The virus-altered cells continued to proliferate in the presence of high levels of extracellular calcium but exhibited alterations in normal keratinocyte terminal differentiation that appear to be specific to the particular oncogene. These alterations bore similarities to abnormalities in differentiation observed in naturally occurring squamous epithelial malignancies. Images PMID:2427928

  7. Ras in Cancer and Developmental Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Medarde, Alberto; Santos, Eugenio

    2011-01-01

    Somatic, gain-of-function mutations in ras genes were the first specific genetic alterations identified in human cancer about 3 decades ago. Studies during the last quarter century have characterized the Ras proteins as essential components of signaling networks controlling cellular proliferation, differentiation, or survival. The oncogenic mutations of the H-ras, N-ras, or K-ras genes frequently found in human tumors are known to throw off balance the normal outcome of those signaling pathways, thus leading to tumor development. Oncogenic mutations in a number of other upstream or downstream components of Ras signaling pathways (including membrane RTKs or cytosolic kinases) have been detected more recently in association with a variety of cancers. Interestingly, the oncogenic Ras mutations and the mutations in other components of Ras/MAPK signaling pathways appear to be mutually exclusive events in most tumors, indicating that deregulation of Ras-dependent signaling is the essential requirement for tumorigenesis. In contrast to sporadic tumors, separate studies have identified germline mutations in Ras and various other components of Ras signaling pathways that occur in specific association with a number of different familial, developmental syndromes frequently sharing common phenotypic cardiofaciocutaneous features. Finally, even without being a causative force, defective Ras signaling has been cited as a contributing factor to many other human illnesses, including diabetes and immunological and inflammatory disorders. We aim this review at summarizing and updating current knowledge on the contribution of Ras mutations and altered Ras signaling to development of various tumoral and nontumoral pathologies. PMID:21779504

  8. Deamidation alters the structure and decreases the stability of human lens betaA3-crystallin.

    PubMed

    Takata, Takumi; Oxford, Julie T; Brandon, Theodore R; Lampi, Kirsten J

    2007-07-31

    According to the World Health Organization, cataracts account for half of the blindness in the world, with the majority occurring in developing countries. A cataract is a clouding of the lens of the eye due to light scattering of precipitated lens proteins or aberrant cellular debris. The major proteins in the lens are crystallins, and they are extensively deamidated during aging and cataracts. Deamidation has been detected at the domain and monomer interfaces of several crystallins during aging. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of two potential deamidation sites at the predicted interface of the betaA3-crystallin dimer on its structure and stability. The glutamine residues at the reported in vivo deamidation sites of Q180 in the C-terminal domain and at the homologous site Q85 in the N-terminal domain were substituted with glutamic acid residues by site-directed mutagenesis. Far-UV and near-UV circular dichroism spectroscopy indicated that there were subtle differences in the secondary structure and more notable differences in the tertiary structure of the mutant proteins compared to that of the wild type betaA3-crystallin. The Q85E/Q180E mutant also was more susceptible to enzymatic digestion, suggesting increased solvent accessibility. These structural changes in the deamidated mutants led to decreased stability during unfolding in urea and increased precipitation during heat denaturation. When simulating deamidation at both residues, there was a further decrease in stability and loss of cooperativity. However, multiangle-light scattering and quasi-elastic light scattering experiments showed that dimer formation was not disrupted, nor did higher-order oligomers form. These results suggest that introducing charges at the predicted domain interface in the betaA3 homodimer may contribute to the insolubilization of lens crystallins or favor other, more stable, crystallin subunit interactions.

  9. Analysis on the alterations of lens proteins by Vitex negundo in selenite cataract models

    PubMed Central

    Rooban, B.N.; Sasikala, V.; Sahasranamam, V.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Cataract is the leading cause of blindness and is associated with oxidative damage and protein modification in the lens. In the present study, we have employed proteomic and microscopic approaches to investigate the attenuation of selenite cataract by the flavonoids from Vitex negundo (FVN). Methods To demonstrate this attenuation, Sprague-Dawley rat pups were divided into control (G I), selenite induced (G II), and selenite + FVN treated (G III). Cataract was induced by single subcutaneous injection of sodium selenite (4 mg/Kg bodyweight) on the 10th day and FVN (1 mg/Kg bodyweight) administered intraperitoneally from the 8th to the 15th day. Results Our study indicated that chaperone property of α-crystallin and soluble protein levels were reduced in the selenite induced group. Post translational modifications identified by two dimensional-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE) and immunoblot analysis revealed the loss of cytoskeletal proteins in selenite induced group. Damage of lenticular membrane and abnormal fiber structure were observed by electron microscopy. Conclusions The results of this study suggest that FVN modulated selenite induced cataractogensis in rat pups by preventing loss of chaperone property, various changes in lens proteins, and lens structure, further strengthening its protective role. PMID:21617749

  10. The RAS Initiative

    Cancer.gov

    NCI established the RAS Initiative to explore innovative approaches for attacking the proteins encoded by mutant forms of RAS genes and to ultimately create effective, new therapies for RAS-related cancers.

  11. Oncogenic RAS alters the global and gene-specific histone modification pattern during epithelial-mesenchymal transition in colorectal carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Peláez, Ignacio Mazón; Kalogeropoulou, Margarita; Ferraro, Angelo; Voulgari, Angeliki; Pankotai, Tibor; Boros, Imre; Pintzas, Alexander

    2010-06-01

    The presence of different forms of histone covalent modifications, such as phosphorylation, acetylation and methylation in localized promoter regions are markers for chromatin packing and transcription. Activation of RAS signalling pathways through oncogenic RAS mutations is a hallmark of colorectal cancer. Overexpression of Harvey-Ras oncogene induces epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in Caco-2 cells. We focused on the role of epigenetic modifications of histone H3 and its dependence on RAS signal transduction pathways and oncogenic transformation. Using cell lines stably overexpressing oncogenic Harvey-RAS with EMT phenotype, we studied the acquired changes in the H3 histone modification patterns. Two genes show inverse protein expression patterns after Ha-RAS overexpression: Cyclin D1, a cell cycle-related gene, and the EMT marker-gene E-cadherin. We report that these two genes demonstrate matching inverse histone repression patterns on their promoter, while histone markers associated with an active state of genes were affected by the RAS-activated signalling pathway MEK-ERK-MSK1. Furthermore, we show that though the level of methyltransferases enzymes was increased, the status of H3 three-methylation at lysine 27 (H3K27me(3)), associated with gene repression on the promoter of Cyclin D1, was lower. Together, these results suggest that histone covalent modifications can be affected by oncogenic RAS pathways to regulate the expression of target genes like Cyclin D1 or E-cadherin and that the dynamic balance of opposing histone-modifying enzymes is critical for the regulation of cell proliferation.

  12. Genetic Alterations in K-ras and p53 Cancer Genes in Lung Neoplasms From B6C3F1 Mice Exposed to Cumene

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Hue-Hua L.; Ton, Thai-Vu. T.; Kim, Yongbaek; Wakamatsu, Nobuko; Clayton, Natasha P.; Chan, Po-Chuen; Sills, Robert C.; Lahousse, Stephanie A.

    2009-01-01

    The incidences of alveolar/bronchiolar adenomas and carcinomas in cumene-treated B6C3F1 mice were significantly greater than those of the controls. We evaluated these lung neoplasms for point mutations in the K-ras and p53 genes that are often mutated in humans. K-ras and p53 mutations were detected by cycle sequencing of PCR-amplified DNA isolated from paraffin-embedded neoplasms. K-ras mutations were detected in 87 % cumene-induced lung neoplasms, and the predominant mutations were exon 1 codon 12 G to T transversions and exon 2 codon 61 A to G transitions. P53 protein expression was detected by immunohistochemistry in 56 % cumene-induced neoplasms and mutations were detected in 52 % neoplasms. The predominant mutations were exon 5, codon 155 G to A transitions and codon 133 C to T transitions. No p53 mutation and one of 7 (14 %) K-ras mutation was detected in spontaneous neoplasms. Cumene-induced lung carcinomas showed loss of heterozygosity (LOH) on chromosome 4 near the p16 gene (13 %) and on chromosome 6 near the K-ras gene (12 %). No LOH was observed in spontaneous carcinomas or normal lung tissues examined. The pattern of mutations identified in the lung tumors suggests that DNA damage and genomic instability may be contributing factors to the mutation profile and development of lung cancer in mice exposed to cumene. PMID:18648094

  13. Genetic alterations in K-ras and p53 cancer genes in lung neoplasms from B6C3F1 mice exposed to cumene.

    PubMed

    Hong, Hue-Hua L; Ton, Thai-Vu T; Kim, Yongbaek; Wakamatsu, Nobuko; Clayton, Natasha P; Chan, Po-Chuen; Sills, Robert C; Lahousse, Stephanie A

    2008-07-01

    The incidences of alveolar/bronchiolar adenomas and carcinomas in cumene-treated B6C3F1 mice were significantly greater than those of the control animals. We evaluated these lung neoplasms for point mutations in the K-ras and p53 genes that are often mutated in humans. K-ras and p53 mutations were detected by cycle sequencing of PCR-amplified DNA isolated from paraffin-embedded neoplasms. K-ras mutations were detected in 87% of cumene-induced lung neoplasms, and the predominant mutations were exon 1 codon 12 G to T transversions and exon 2 codon 61 A to G transitions. P53 protein expression was detected by immunohistochemistry in 56% of cumene-induced neoplasms, and mutations were detected in 52% of neoplasms. The predominant mutations were exon 5, codon 155 G to A transitions, and codon 133 C to T transitions. No p53 mutations and one of seven (14%) K-ras mutations were detected in spontaneous neoplasms. Cumene-induced lung carcinomas showed loss of heterozygosity (LOH) on chromosome 4 near the p16 gene (13%) and on chromosome 6 near the K-ras gene (12%). No LOH was observed in spontaneous carcinomas or normal lung tissues examined. The pattern of mutations identified in the lung tumors suggests that DNA damage and genomic instability may be contributing factors to the mutation profile and development of lung cancer in mice exposed to cumene.

  14. Mechanical Aqueous Alteration Dominates Textures of Gale Crater Rocks: Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aileen Yingst, R.; Minitti, Michelle; Edgett, Kenneth; McBride, Marie; Stack, Kathryn

    2015-04-01

    The Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) acquired sub-mm/pixel scale color images of over 70 individual rocks and outcrops during Curiosity's first year on Mars, permitting the study of textures down to the distinction between silt and very fine sand. We group imaged rock textures into classes based on their grain size, sorting, matrix characteristics, and abundance of pores. Because the recent campaign at Pahrump Hills acquired many more MAHLI images than elsewhere along the rover traverse [6], textural analysis there is more detailed and thus types observed there are sub-divided. Mudstones: These rocks contain framework grains smaller than the highest resolution MAHLI images (16 μm/pixel), and thus are interpreted to consist of grains that are silt-sized or smaller. Some rocks contain nodules, sulfate veins, and Mg-enriched erosionally-resistant ridges. The Pahrump Hills region contains mudstones of at least four different sub-textures: recessive massive, recessive parallel-laminated, resistant laminated-to-massive, and resistant cross-stratified. Recessive mudstones are slope-forming; parallel-laminated recessive mudstones display mm-scale parallel (and in some cases rhythmic) lamination that extends laterally for many meters, and are interbedded with recessive massive mudstones. Coarse cm- to mm-scale laminae appear within resistant mudstones though some portions are more massive; laminae tend to be traceable for cm to meters. Well-sorted sandstones: Rocks in this class are made of gray, fine-to-medium sand and exhibit little to no porosity. Two examples of this class show fine lineations with sub-mm spacing. Aillik, a target in the Shaler outcrop, shows abundant cross-lamination. The Pahrump Hills region contains a sub-texture of well-sorted, very fine to fine-grained cross-stratified sandstone at the dune and ripple-scale. Poorly-sorted sandstones. This class is subdivided into two sub-classes: rounded, coarse-to-very coarse sand grains of variable colors and

  15. The Zonules Selectively Alter the Shape of the Lens During Accommodation Based on the Location of Their Anchorage Points

    PubMed Central

    Nankivil, Derek; Maceo Heilman, Bianca; Durkee, Heather; Manns, Fabrice; Ehrmann, Klaus; Kelly, Shawn; Arrieta-Quintero, Esdras; Parel, Jean-Marie

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To determine the role of anterior and posterior zonular tension on the optomechanical lens response during accommodation simulation. Methods. Ten eyes from nine hamadryas baboons (4.9 ± 0.7 years) and 20 eyes from 18 cynomolgus monkeys (5.4 ± 0.3 years) were dissected, leaving the lens, zonules, ciliary body, hyaloid membrane, anterior vitreous, and a segmented scleral rim intact. The lens preparation was mounted in a lens stretcher, and the outer scleral shell was displaced radially in a stepwise fashion. The load, lens, and ciliary body diameters, lens power, lens thickness, and the anterior and posterior radius of curvature were measured during stretching. The zonular fibers attached to either the posterior or anterior lens surface were then carefully transected and the experiment was repeated. Zonular transection was confirmed in four eyes via laser scanning confocal microscopy after immunostaining. The effect of zonular transection on the tissue response to stretching was quantified. Results. Without anterior zonules, 48% and 97% of the changes in anterior and posterior radii are retained. Without posterior zonules, 81% and 67% of the changes in anterior and posterior radii are retained. The changes in lens shape were reduced after transecting either the anterior or posterior zonules; however, both surfaces still changed shape. Conclusions. While either the anterior or posterior zonules alone are capable of changing the shape of both lens surfaces, the anterior zonules have a greater effect on the anterior lens surface, and the posterior zonules have a greater effect on the posterior lens surface. PMID:25698707

  16. RAS Initiative - Events

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI RAS Initiative has organized multiple events with outside experts to discuss how the latest scientific and technological breakthroughs can be applied to discover vulnerabilities in RAS-driven cancers.

  17. About the RAS Initiative

    Cancer.gov

    The RAS Initiative, a "hub and spoke" model, connects researchers to better understand and target the more than 30% of cancers driven by mutations in RAS genes. Includes oversight and contact information.

  18. RAS Initiative - Community Outreach

    Cancer.gov

    Through community and technical collaborations, workshops and symposia, and the distribution of reference reagents, the RAS Initiative seeks to increase the sharing of knowledge and resources essential to defeating cancers caused by mutant RAS genes.

  19. RAS - Screens & Assays

    Cancer.gov

    A primary goal of the RAS Initiative is to develop assays for RAS activity, localization, and signaling and adapt those assays so they can be used for finding new drug candidates. Explore the work leading to highly validated screening protocols.

  20. RAS - Target Identification - Informatics

    Cancer.gov

    The RAS Informatics lab group develops tools to track and analyze “big data” from the RAS Initiative, as well as analyzes data from external projects. By integrating internal and external data, this group helps improve understanding of RAS-driven cancers.

  1. [Lens platform].

    PubMed

    Łukaszewska-Smyk, Agnieszka; Kałuzny, Józef

    2010-01-01

    The lens platform defines lens structure and lens material. Evolution of lens comprises change in their shape, angulation of haptens and transition of three-piece lens into one-piece lens. The lens fall into two categories: rigid (PMMA) and soft (siliconic, acrylic, colameric). The main lens maaterials are polymers (hydrophilic and hydrophobic). The lens platform has an effect on biocompatibility, bioadhesion, stability of lens in capsule, degree of PCO evolution and sensitiveness to laser damages.

  2. Acquisition of anoikis resistance promotes alterations in the Ras/ERK and PI3K/Akt signaling pathways and matrix remodeling in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    de Sousa Mesquita, Ana Paula; de Araújo Lopes, Silvana; Pernambuco Filho, Paulo Castanho A; Nader, Helena B; Lopes, Carla Cristina

    2017-06-26

    Anoikis is a programmed cell death induced upon cell detachment from extracellular matrix. Anoikis resistance is a critical mechanism in tumor metastasis. Cancer cells deregulate and adapt their metabolism to survive in the absence of adhesion, spreading metastases to distant organs. These adaptations include abnormal regulation of growth factor receptors activating prosurvival signaling pathways, such as the Ras/ERK and PI3K/Akt pathways, and extracellular matrix remodeling, leading to metastasis by an increase of invasiveness and inhibiting anoikis. This study investigates the possible involvement of ECM components and signaling pathways in the regulation of resistance to anoikis in endothelial cells (EC). Endothelial cells submitted to stressful conditions by blocking adhesion to substrate (anoikis resistance) display an up-regulation of Ras/ERK and PI3k/Akt pathways by high expression of Ras, ERK, PI3K (p110α) and Akt (Thr 308). After ERK and PI3K inhibiting, all EC-derived cell lines studied showed lower growth, a decrease in invasive potential and a higher rate of apoptosis. Furthermore, anoikis-resistant cell lines display a decrease in the expression of fibronectin, collagen IV and hyaluronic acid and an increase in the expression of laminin, perlecan, αv, β3, α5 and β1 integrins subunits, hyaluronidades 1, 2 and 3 and metalloproteinases 2 and 9. These results indicate that the acquisition of anoikis resistance induced remodeling of the extracellular matrix and overexpression of the PI3K/Akt and Ras/ERK pathway components. Acquisition of resistance to anoikis is a potentially crucial step in endothelial cell transformation.

  3. Oncogenic K-ras expression is associated with derangement of the cAMP/PKA pathway and forskolin-reversible alterations of mitochondrial dynamics and respiration.

    PubMed

    Palorini, R; De Rasmo, D; Gaviraghi, M; Sala Danna, L; Signorile, A; Cirulli, C; Chiaradonna, F; Alberghina, L; Papa, S

    2013-01-17

    The Warburg effect in cancer cells has been proposed to involve several mechanisms, including adaptation to hypoxia, oncogenes activation or loss of oncosuppressors and impaired mitochondrial function. In previous papers, it has been shown that K-ras transformed mouse cells are much more sensitive as compared with normal cells to glucose withdrawal (undergoing apoptosis) and present a high glycolytic rate and a strong reduction of mitochondrial complex I. Recent observations suggest that transformed cells have a derangement in the cyclic adenosine monophosphate/cAMP-dependent protein kinase (cAMP/PKA) pathway, which is known to regulate several mitochondrial functions. Herein, the derangement of the cAMP/PKA pathway and its impact on transformation-linked changes of mitochondrial functions is investigated. Exogenous stimulation of PKA activity, achieved by forskolin treatment, protected K-ras-transformed cells from apoptosis induced by glucose deprivation, enhanced complex I activity, intracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) levels, mitochondrial fusion and decreased intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. Several of these effects were almost completely prevented by inhibiting the PKA activity. Short-time treatment with compounds favoring mitochondrial fusion strongly decreased the cellular ROS levels especially in transformed cells. These findings support the notion that glucose shortage-induced apoptosis, specific of K-ras-transformed cells, is associated to a derangement of PKA signaling that leads to mitochondrial complex I decrease, reduction of ATP formation, prevalence of mitochondrial fission over fusion, and thereby opening new approaches for development of anticancer drugs.

  4. Absolute Quantification of Endogenous Ras Isoform Abundance

    PubMed Central

    Mageean, Craig J.; Griffiths, John R.; Smith, Duncan L.; Clague, Michael J.; Prior, Ian A.

    2015-01-01

    Ras proteins are important signalling hubs situated near the top of networks controlling cell proliferation, differentiation and survival. Three almost identical isoforms, HRAS, KRAS and NRAS, are ubiquitously expressed yet have differing biological and oncogenic properties. In order to help understand the relative biological contributions of each isoform we have optimised a quantitative proteomics method for accurately measuring Ras isoform protein copy number per cell. The use of isotopic protein standards together with selected reaction monitoring for diagnostic peptides is sensitive, robust and suitable for application to sub-milligram quantities of lysates. We find that in a panel of isogenic SW48 colorectal cancer cells, endogenous Ras proteins are highly abundant with ≥260,000 total Ras protein copies per cell and the rank order of isoform abundance is KRAS>NRAS≥HRAS. A subset of oncogenic KRAS mutants exhibit increased total cellular Ras abundance and altered the ratio of mutant versus wild type KRAS protein. These data and methodology are significant because Ras protein copy number is required to parameterise models of signalling networks and informs interpretation of isoform-specific Ras functional data. PMID:26560143

  5. Inhibition of diabetic-cataract by vitamin K1 involves modulation of hyperglycemia-induced alterations to lens calcium homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Sai Varsha, M K N; Raman, Thiagarajan; Manikandan, Ramar

    2014-11-01

    This study investigated the potential of vitamin K1 against streptozotocin-induced diabetic cataract in Wistar rats. A single, intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ) (35 mg/kg) resulted in hyperglycemia, accumulation of sorbitol and formation of advanced glycation end product (AGE) in eye lens. Hyperglycemia in lens also resulted in superoxide anion and hydroxyl radical generation and less reduced glutathione suggesting oxidative stress in lens. Hyperglycemia also resulted in increase in lens Ca2+ and significant inhibition of lens Ca2+ ATPase activity. These changes were associated with cataract formation in diabetic animals. By contrast treatment of diabetic rats with vitamin K1 (5 mg/kg, sc, twice a week) resulted in animals with partially elevated blood glucose and with transparent lenses having normal levels of sorbitol, AGE, Ca2+ ATPase, Ca2+, and oxidative stress. Vitamin K 1 may function to protect against cataract formation in the STZ induced diabetic rat by affecting the homeostasis of blood glucose and minimizing subsequent oxidative and osmotic stress. Thus, these results show that Vitamin K1 inhibits diabetic-cataract by modulating lens Ca2+ homeostasis and its hypoglycemic effect through its direct action on the pancreas.

  6. The renaissance of Ras.

    PubMed

    Milroy, Lech-Gustav; Ottmann, Christian

    2014-11-21

    Increased signaling by the small G protein Ras is found in many human cancers and is often caused by direct mutation of this protein. Hence, small-molecule attenuation of pathological Ras activity is of utmost interest in oncology. However, despite nearly three decades of intense drug discovery efforts, no clinically viable option for Ras inhibition has been developed. Very recently, reports of a number of new approaches of addressing Ras activity have led to the revival of this molecular target with the prospect of finally fulfilling the therapy promises associated with this important protein.

  7. Metabolic Dependencies in RAS-Driven Cancers.

    PubMed

    Kimmelman, Alec C

    2015-04-15

    The ability to inhibit the RAS oncogene has been the holy grail of oncology because of the critical role of this gene in a multitude of tumor types. In addition, RAS-mutant tumors are among the most aggressive and refractory to treatment. Although directly targeting the RAS oncogene has proven challenging, an alternative approach for treating RAS-driven cancers is to inhibit critical downstream events that are required for tumor maintenance. Indeed, much focus has been put on inhibiting signaling cascades downstream of RAS. Recent studies have shown that oncogenic RAS promotes a metabolic reprogramming of tumor cells, shifting them toward an anabolic metabolism necessary to produce biomass to support unconstrained proliferation. These cancers also use a diverse set of fuel sources to meet their metabolic needs and have even developed a variety of mechanisms to act as metabolic scavengers to obtain necessary metabolic substrates from both extracellular and intracellular sources. Collectively, these adaptations can create "metabolic bottlenecks" whereby tumor cells rely on particular pathways or rate-limiting metabolites. In this regard, inhibiting individual or combinations of these metabolic pathways can attenuate growth in preclinical models. Because these dependencies are tumor selective and downstream of oncogenic RAS, there is the opportunity for therapeutic intervention. Although targeting tumor metabolism is still in the early days of translation to patients, our continued advances in understanding critical metabolic adaptations in RAS-driven cancers, as well as the ability to study this altered metabolism in relevant tumor models, will accelerate the development of new therapeutic approaches. Clin Cancer Res; 21(8); 1828-34. ©2015 AACR. See all articles in this CCR Focus section, "Targeting RAS-Driven Cancers."

  8. Src promotes GTPase activity of Ras via tyrosine 32 phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Bunda, Severa; Heir, Pardeep; Srikumar, Tharan; Cook, Jonathan D.; Burrell, Kelly; Kano, Yoshihito; Lee, Jeffrey E.; Zadeh, Gelareh; Raught, Brian; Ohh, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in Ras GTPase and various other components of the Ras signaling pathways are among the most common genetic alterations in human cancers and also have been identified in several familial developmental syndromes. Over the past few decades it has become clear that the activity or the oncogenic potential of Ras is dependent on the nonreceptor tyrosine kinase Src to promote the Ras/Raf/MAPK pathway essential for proliferation, differentiation, and survival of eukaryotic cells. However, no direct relationship between Ras and Src has been established. We show here that Src binds to and phosphorylates GTP-, but not GDP-, loaded Ras on a conserved Y32 residue within the switch I region in vitro and that in vivo, Ras-Y32 phosphorylation markedly reduces the binding to effector Raf and concomitantly increases binding to GTPase-activating proteins and the rate of GTP hydrolysis. These results suggest that, in the context of predetermined crystallographic structures, Ras-Y32 serves as an Src-dependent keystone regulatory residue that modulates Ras GTPase activity and ensures unidirectionality to the Ras GTPase cycle. PMID:25157176

  9. CDK4 coexpression with Ras generates malignant human epidermal tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Lazarov, Mirella; Kubo, Yoshiaki; Cai, Ti; Dajee, Maya; Tarutani, Masahito; Lin, Qun; Fang, Min; Tao, Shiying; Green, Cheryl L; Khavari, Paul A

    2002-10-01

    Ras acts with other proteins to induce neoplasia. By itself, however, strong Ras signaling can suppress proliferation of normal cells. In primary epidermal cells, we found that oncogenic Ras transiently decreases cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 4 expression in association with cell cycle arrest in G1 phase. CDK4 co-expression circumvents Ras growth suppression and induces invasive human neoplasia resembling squamous cell carcinoma. Tumorigenesis is dependent on CDK4 kinase function, with cyclin D1 required but not sufficient for this process. In facilitating escape from G1 growth restraints, Ras and CDK4 alter the composition of cyclin D and cyclin E complexes and promote resistance to growth inhibition by INK4 cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors. These data identify a new role for oncogenic Ras in CDK4 regulation and highlight the functional importance of CDK4 suppression in preventing uncontrolled growth.

  10. The C-terminus of H-Ras as a target for the covalent binding of reactive compounds modulating Ras-dependent pathways.

    PubMed

    Oeste, Clara L; Díez-Dacal, Beatriz; Bray, Francesca; García de Lacoba, Mario; de la Torre, Beatriz G; Andreu, David; Ruiz-Sánchez, Antonio J; Pérez-Inestrosa, Ezequiel; García-Domínguez, Carlota A; Rojas, José M; Pérez-Sala, Dolores

    2011-01-06

    Ras proteins are crucial players in differentiation and oncogenesis and constitute important drug targets. The localization and activity of Ras proteins are highly dependent on posttranslational modifications at their C-termini. In addition to an isoprenylated cysteine, H-Ras, but not other Ras proteins, possesses two cysteine residues (C181 and C184) in the C-terminal hypervariable domain that act as palmitoylation sites in cells. Cyclopentenone prostaglandins (cyPG) are reactive lipidic mediators that covalently bind to H-Ras and activate H-Ras dependent pathways. Dienone cyPG, such as 15-deoxy-Δ(12,14)-PGJ(2) (15d-PGJ(2)) and Δ(12)-PGJ(2) selectively bind to the H-Ras hypervariable domain. Here we show that these cyPG bind simultaneously C181 and C184 of H-Ras, thus potentially altering the conformational tendencies of the hypervariable domain. Based on these results, we have explored the capacity of several bifunctional cysteine reactive small molecules to bind to the hypervariable domain of H-Ras proteins. Interestingly, phenylarsine oxide (PAO), a widely used tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor, and dibromobimane, a cross-linking agent used for cysteine mapping, effectively bind H-Ras hypervariable domain. The interaction of PAO with H-Ras takes place in vitro and in cells and blocks modification of H-Ras by 15d-PGJ(2). Moreover, PAO treatment selectively alters H-Ras membrane partition and the pattern of H-Ras activation in cells, from the plasma membrane to endomembranes. These results identify H-Ras as a novel target for PAO. More importantly, these observations reveal that small molecules or reactive intermediates interacting with spatially vicinal cysteines induce intramolecular cross-linking of H-Ras C-terminus potentially contributing to the modulation of Ras-dependent pathways.

  11. Targeted Genomic Disruption of H-ras and N-ras, Individually or in Combination, Reveals the Dispensability of Both Loci for Mouse Growth and Development

    PubMed Central

    Esteban, Luis M.; Vicario-Abejón, Carlos; Fernández-Salguero, Pedro; Fernández-Medarde, Alberto; Swaminathan, Nalini; Yienger, Kate; Lopez, Eva; Malumbres, Marcos; McKay, Ron; Ward, Jerrold M.; Pellicer, Angel; Santos, Eugenio

    2001-01-01

    Mammalian cells harbor three highly homologous and widely expressed members of the ras family (H-ras, N-ras, and K-ras), but it remains unclear whether they play specific or overlapping cellular roles. To gain insight into such functional roles, here we generated and analyzed H-ras null mutant mice, which were then also bred with N-ras knockout animals to ascertain the viability and properties of potential double null mutations in both loci. Mating among heterozygous H-ras+/− mice produced H-ras−/− offspring with a normal Mendelian pattern of inheritance, indicating that the loss of H-ras did not interfere with embryonic and fetal viability in the uterus. Homozygous mutant H-ras−/− mice reached sexual maturity at the same age as their littermates, and both males and females were fertile. Characterization of lymphocyte subsets in the spleen and thymus showed no significant differences between wild-type and H-ras−/− mice. Analysis of neuronal markers in the brains of knockout and wild-type H-ras mice showed that disruption of this locus did not impair or alter neuronal development. Breeding between our H-ras mutant animals and previously available N-ras null mutants gave rise to viable double knockout (H-ras−/−/N-ras−/−) offspring expressing only K-ras genes which grew normally, were fertile, and did not show any obvious phenotype. Interestingly, however, lower-than-expected numbers of adult, double knockout animals were consistently obtained in Mendelian crosses between heterozygous N-ras/H-ras mice. Our results indicate that, as for N-ras, H-ras gene function is dispensable for normal mouse development, growth, fertility, and neuronal development. Additionally, of the three ras genes, K-ras appears to be not only essential but also sufficient for normal mouse development. PMID:11238881

  12. RAS Ordinary Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-08-01

    Here are summarized talks from the February and March RAS Ordinary Meetings. The February meeting also enjoyed the Eddington Lecture from Prof. Lisa Kewley (Australian National University) on galaxy evolution in 3D.

  13. Plasma membrane phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate and 4,5-bisphosphate determine the distribution and function of K-Ras4B but not H-Ras proteins.

    PubMed

    Gulyás, Gergö; Radvánszki, Glória; Matuska, Rita; Balla, András; Hunyady, László; Balla, Tamas; Várnai, Péter

    2017-09-22

    Plasma membrane (PM) localization of Ras proteins is crucial for transmitting signals upon mitogen stimulation. Posttranslational lipid modification of Ras proteins plays an important role in their recruitment to the PM. Electrostatic interactions between negatively charged PM phospholipids and basic amino acids found in K-Ras4B (K-Ras) but not in H-Ras are important for permanent K-Ras localization to the PM. Here, we investigated how acute depletion of negatively charged PM polyphosphoinositides (PPIns) from the PM alters the intracellular distribution and activity of K- and H-Ras proteins. PPIns depletion from the PM was achieved either by agonist-induced activation of phospholipase C β or with a rapamycin-inducible system in which various PI phosphatases were recruited to the PM. Redistribution of the two Ras proteins was monitored with confocal microscopy or with a recently developed bioluminescent energy transfer (BRET)-based approach involving fusion of the Ras C-terminal targeting sequences or the entire Ras proteins to Venus fluorescent protein. We found that PM PPIns depletion caused rapid translocation of K-Ras but not H-Ras from the PM to the Golgi. PM depletion of either phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PtdIns4P) or PtdIns(4,5)P2, but not PtdIns(3,4,5)P3, was sufficient to evoke K-Ras translocation. This effect was diminished by deltarasine, an inhibitor of the Ras-phosphodiesterase interaction, or by simultaneous depletion of the Golgi PtdIns4P. The PPIns depletion decreased incorporation of [3H]-Leucine in K-Ras-expressing cells, suggesting that Golgi-localized K-Ras is not as signaling competent as its PM-bound form. We conclude that PPIns in the PM are important regulators of K-Ras mediated signals. Copyright © 2017, The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  14. Functional overlap of the dictyostelium RasG, RasD and RasB proteins.

    PubMed

    Khosla, M; Spiegelman, G B; Insall, R; Weeks, G

    2000-04-01

    Disruption of the rasG gene in Dictyostelium discoideum results in several distinct phenotypes: a defect in cytokinesis, reduced motility and reduced growth. Reintroduction of the rasG gene restores all of the properties of the rasG(-) cells to those of the wild type. To determine whether the defects are due to impaired interactions with a single or multiple downstream effectors, we tested the ability of the highly related but non identical Dictyostelium ras genes, rasD and rasB, to rescue the defects. Introduction of the rasD gene under the control of the rasG promoter into rasG null (rasG(-)) cells corrected all phenotypes except the motility defect, suggesting that motility is regulated by a RasG mediated pathway that is different to those regulating growth or cytokinesis. Western blot analysis of RasD protein levels revealed that vegetative rasG(- )cells contained considerably more protein than the parental AX-3 cells, suggesting that RasD protein levels are negatively regulated in vegetative cells by RasG. The level of RasD was enhanced when the rasD gene was introduced under the control of the rasG promoter, and this increase in protein is presumably responsible for the reversal of the growth and cytokinesis defects of the rasG(- )cells. Thus, RasD protein levels are controlled by the level of RasG, but not by the level of RasD. Introduction of the rasB gene under the control of the rasG promoter into rasG(-) cells produced a complex phenotype. The transformants were extremely small and mononucleate and exhibited enhanced motility. However, the growth of these cells was considerably slower than the growth of the rasG(-) cells, suggesting the possibility that high levels of RasB inhibit an essential process. This was confirmed by expressing rasB in wild-type cells; the resulting transformants exhibited severely impaired growth. When RasB protein levels were determined by western blot analysis, it was found that levels were higher in the rasG(- )cells than they

  15. RasIns: Genetically Encoded Intrabodies of Activated Ras Proteins.

    PubMed

    Cetin, Mehmet; Evenson, William E; Gross, Garrett G; Jalali-Yazdi, Farzad; Krieger, Daniel; Arnold, Don; Takahashi, Terry T; Roberts, Richard W

    2017-02-17

    K- and H-Ras are the most commonly mutated genes in human tumors and are critical for conferring and maintaining the oncogenic phenotype in tumors with poor prognoses. Here, we design genetically encoded antibody-like ligands (intrabodies) that recognize active, GTP-bound K- and H-Ras. These ligands, which use the 10th domain of human fibronectin as their scaffold, are stable inside the cells and when fused with a fluorescent protein label, the constitutively active G12V mutant H-Ras. Primary selection of ligands against Ras with mRNA display resulted in an intrabody (termed RasIn1) that binds with a KD of 2.1μM to H-Ras(G12V) (GTP), excellent state selectivity, and remarkable specificity for K- and H-Ras. RasIn1 recognizes residues in the Switch I region of Ras, similar to Raf-RBD, and competes with Raf-RBD for binding. An affinity maturation selection based on RasIn1 resulted in RasIn2, which binds with a KD of 120nM and also retains excellent state selectivity. Both of these intrabodies colocalize with H-Ras, K-Ras, and G12V mutants inside the cells, providing new potential tools to monitor and modulate Ras-mediated signaling. Finally, RasIn1 and Rasin2 both display selectivity for the G12V mutants as compared with wild-type Ras providing a potential route for mutant selective recognition of Ras. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. The ras superfamily proteins.

    PubMed

    Chardin, P

    1988-07-01

    Several recent discoveries indicate that the ras genes, frequently activated to a transforming potential in some human tumours, belong to a large family that can be divided into three main branches: the first branch represented by the ras, ral and rap genes; the second branch, by the rho genes; and the third branch, by the rab genes. The C-terminal end of the encoded proteins always includes a cystein, which may become fatty-acylated, suggesting a sub-membrane localization. The ras superfamily proteins share four regions of high homology corresponding to the GTP binding site; however, even in these regions, significant differences are found, suggesting that the various proteins may possess slightly different biochemical properties. Recent reports show that some of these proteins play an essential role in the control of physical processes such as cell motility, membrane ruffling, endocytosis and exocytosis. Nevertheless, the characterization of the proteins directly interacting with the ras or ras-related gene-products will be required to precisely understand their function.

  17. RAS - Screens & Assays - Drug Discovery

    Cancer.gov

    The RAS Drug Discovery group aims to develop assays that will reveal aspects of RAS biology upon which cancer cells depend. Successful assay formats are made available for high-throughput screening programs to yield potentially effective drug compounds.

  18. Differentiated functions of Ras1 and Ras2 proteins in regulating the germination, growth, conidiation, multi-stress tolerance and virulence of Beauveria bassiana.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xue-Qin; Guan, Yi; Ying, Sheng-Hua; Feng, Ming-Guang

    2013-02-01

    Ras1 and Ras2 are two distinct Ras GTPases in Beauveria bassiana, an entomopathogenic fungus whose biocontrol potential against insect pests depends largely on virulence and multi-stress tolerance. The functions of both proteins were characterized for the first time by constructing dominant-active (GTP-bound) Ras1(G19V) and dominant-negative (GDP-bound) Ras1(D126A) and integrating them and normal Ras1 into wild type and ΔRas2 for a series of phenotypic and transcriptional analyses. The resultant mutants showed gradient changes of multiple phenotypes but little difference in conidial thermotolerance. Expression of Ras1(D126A) caused vigorous hyphal growth, severely defective conidiation, and increased tolerances to oxidation, cell wall disturbance, fungicide and UV-A/UV-B irradiations, but affected slightly germination, osmosensitivity and virulence. These phenotypes were antagonistically altered by mRas1(G19V) expressed in either wild type or ΔRas2, which was severely defective in conidial germination and hyphal growth and displayed intermediate changes in other mentioned phenotypes between paired mutants expressing Ras1(G19V) or Ras1(D126A) in wild type and ΔRas2. Their growth, UV tolerance or virulence was significantly correlated with cellular response to oxidation or cell wall disturbance. Transcriptional changes of 35 downstream effector genes involved in conidiation and multi-stress responses also related to most of the phenotypic changes among the mutants. Our findings highlight that Ras1 and Ras2 regulate differentially or antagonistically the germination, growth, conidiation, multi-stress tolerance and virulence of B. bassiana, thereby exerting profound effects on the fungal biocontrol potential.

  19. Spatial Segregation of Ras Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Eric C.; Philips, Mark R.

    2010-01-01

    The Ras GTPases act as binary switches for signal transduction pathways that are important for growth regulation and tumorigenesis. Despite the biochemical simplicity of this switch, Ras proteins control multiple pathways, and the functions of the four mammalian Ras proteins are not overlapping. This raises an important question—how does a Ras protein selectively regulate a particular activity? One recently emerging model suggests that a single Ras protein can control different functions by acting in distinct cellular compartments. A critical test of this model is to identify pathways that are selectively controlled by Ras when it is localized to a particular compartment. A recent study has examined Ras signaling in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, which expresses only one Ras protein that controls two separate evolutionarily conserved pathways. This study demonstrates that whereas Ras localized to the plasma membrane selectively regulates a MAP kinase pathway to mediate mating pheromone signaling, Ras localized to the endomembrane activates a Cdc42 pathway to mediate cell polarity and protein trafficking. This study has provided unambiguous evidence for compartmentalized signaling of Ras. PMID:16931912

  20. Fabry lens.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michlovic, J.

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of the properties, operation, and applications of the Fabry lens. As used in stellar photometry, a Fabry lens is nothing more than a simple converging lens inserted into the optical train of a photometer to construct an image of the objective on the photomultiplier cathode. The thereby derived advantages are reviewed, and some techniques designed to maximize these advantages are outlined.

  1. Dietary turmeric modulates DMBA-induced p21{sup ras}, MAP kinases and AP-1/NF-{kappa}B pathway to alter cellular responses during hamster buccal pouch carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Garg, Rachana; Ingle, Arvind; Maru, Girish

    2008-11-01

    The chemopreventive efficacy of turmeric has been established in experimental systems. However, its mechanism(s) of action are not fully elucidated in vivo. The present study investigates the mechanism of turmeric-mediated chemoprevention in 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA)-induced hamster buccal pouch (HBP) carcinogenesis at 2, 4, 6, 10 and 12 weeks. Dietary turmeric (1%) led to decrease in DMBA-induced tumor burden and multiplicity, and enhanced the latency period in parallel, to its modulatory effects on oncogene products and various cellular responses during HBP tumorigenesis. DMBA-induced expression of ras oncogene product, p21 and downstream target, the mitogen-activated protein kinases were significantly decreased by turmeric during HBP carcinogenesis. Turmeric also diminished the DMBA-induced mRNA expression of proto-oncogenes (c-jun, c-fos) and NF-{kappa}B, leading to decreased protein levels and in further attenuation of DMBA-induced AP-1/NF-{kappa}B DNA-binding in the buccal pouch nuclear extracts. Besides, buccal pouch of hamsters receiving turmeric diet showed significant alterations in DMBA-induced effects: (a) decrease in cell proliferation (diminished PCNA and Bcl2 expression), (b) enhanced apoptosis (increased expression of Bax, caspase-3 and apoptotic index), (c) decrease in inflammation (levels of Cox-2, the downstream target of AP-1/NF-{kappa}B, and PGE2) and (d) aberrant expression of differentiation markers, the cytokeratins (1, 5, 8, and 18). Together, the protective effects of dietary turmeric converge on augmenting apoptosis of the initiated cells and decreasing cell proliferation in DMBA-treated animals, which in turn, is reflected in decreased tumor burden, multiplicity and enhanced latency period. Some of these biomarkers are likely to be helpful in monitoring clinical trials and evaluating drug effect measurements.

  2. v-K-ras leads to preferential farnesylation of p21ras in FRTL-5 cells: Multiple interference with the isoprenoid pathway

    PubMed Central

    Laezza, Chiara; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Bifulco, Maurizio

    1998-01-01

    The isoprenoid pathway in FRTL-5 thyroid cells was found to be deeply altered on transformation with v-K-ras. A dramatic overall reduction of protein prenylation was found in v-K-ras-transformed cells in comparison with the parent FRTL-5 cells, as shown by labeling cells with [3H]mevalonic acid. This phenomenon was accompanied by a relative increase of p21ras farnesylation and by a decrease of the ratio between the amounts of geranylgeraniol and farnesol bound to prenylated proteins. Analysis of protein prenylation in FRTL-5 cells transformed by a temperature-sensitive mutant of the v-K-ras oncogene indicated that these variations represent an early and specific marker of active K-ras. Conversely, FRTL-5 cells transformed with Harvey-ras showed a pattern of [3H]-mevalonate (MVA)-labeled proteins similar to that of nontransformed cells. The K-ras oncogene activation also resulted in an overall decrease of [3H]-MVA incorporation into isopentenyl-tRNA together with an increase of unprocessed [3H]-MVA and no alteration in [3H]-MVA uptake. The effects of v-K-ras on protein prenylation could be mimicked in FRTL-5 cells by lowering the concentration of exogenous [3H]-MVA whereas increasing the [3H]-MVA concentration did not revert the alterations observed in transformed cells. Accordingly, v-K-ras expression was found to: (i) down-regulate mevalonate kinase; (ii) induce farnesyl-pyrophosphate synthase expression; and (iii) augment protein farnesyltransferase but not protein geranylgeranyl-transferase-I activity. Among these events, mevalonate kinase down-regulation appeared to be related strictly to differential protein prenylation. This study represents an example of how expression of the v-K-ras oncogene, through multiple interferences with the isoprenoid metabolic pathway, may result in the preferential farnesylation of the ras oncogene product p21ras. PMID:9811854

  3. ras activation in human tumors and in animal model systems.

    PubMed Central

    Corominas, M; Sloan, S R; Leon, J; Kamino, H; Newcomb, E W; Pellicer, A

    1991-01-01

    Environmental agents such as radiation and chemicals are known to cause genetic damage. Alterations in a limited set of cellular genes called proto-oncogenes lead to unregulated proliferation and differentiation. We have studied the role of the ras gene family in carcinogenesis using two different animal models. In one case, thymic lymphomas were induced in mice by either gamma or neutron radiation, and in the other, keratoacanthomas were induced in rabbit skin with dimethylbezanthracene. Human keratoacanthomas similar to the ones induced in rabbits were also analyzed. We found that different types of radiation such as gamma rays and neutrons, induced different point mutations in ras genes. A novel K-ras mutation in codon 146 has been found in thymic lymphomas induced by neutrons. Keratoacanthomas induced in rabbit skin by dimethylbenzanthracene show a high frequency of H-ras-activated genes carrying a mutation in codon 61. The same is observed in human keratoacanthomas, although mutations are in both the 12th and the 61st codons of the H-ras gene. H-ras activation is less frequent in human squamous cell carcinomas than in keratoacanthomas, suggesting that ras genes could play a role in vivo in differentiation as well as in proliferation. Images FIGURE 1. FIGURE 2. FIGURE 3. FIGURE 4. PMID:1773791

  4. Massive formation of square array junctions dramatically alters cell shape but does not cause lens opacity in the cav1-KO mice.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Sondip K; Brako, Lawrence; Lo, Woo-Kuen

    2014-08-01

    The wavy square array junctions are composed of truncated aquaporin-0 (AQP0) proteins typically distributed in the deep cortical and nuclear fibers in wild-type lenses. These junctions may help maintain the narrowed extracellular spaces between fiber cells to minimize light scattering. Herein, we investigate the impact of the cell shape changes, due to abnormal formation of extensive square array junctions, on the lens opacification in the caveolin-1 knockout mice. The cav1-KO and wild-type mice at age 1-22 months were used. By light microscopy examinations, cav1-KO lenses at age 1-18 months were transparent in both cortical and nuclear regions, whereas some lenses older than 18 months old exhibited nuclear cataracts. Scanning EM consistently observed the massive formation of ridge-and-valley membrane surfaces in young fibers at approximately 150 μm deep in all cav1-KO lenses studied. In contrast, the typical ridge-and-valleys were only seen in mature fibers deeper than 400 μm in wild-type lenses. The resulting extensive ridge-and-valleys dramatically altered the overall cell shape in cav1-KO lenses. Remarkably, despite dramatic shape changes, these deformed fiber cells remained intact and made close contact with their neighboring cells. By freeze-fracture TEM, ridge-and-valleys exhibited the typical orthogonal arrangement of 6.6 nm square array intramembrane particles and displayed the narrowed extracellular spaces. Immunofluorescence analysis showed that AQP0 C-terminus labeling was significantly decreased in outer cortical fibers in cav1-KO lenses. However, freeze-fracture immunogold labeling showed that the AQP0 C-terminus antibody was sparsely distributed on the wavy square array junctions, suggesting that the cleavage of AQP0 C-termini might not yet be complete. The cav1-KO lenses with nuclear cataracts showed complete cellular breakdown and large globule formation in the lens nucleus. This study suggests that despite dramatic cell shape changes, the

  5. Massive formation of square array junctions dramatically alters cell shape but does not cause lens opacity in the cav1-KO mice

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Sondip K.; Brako, Lawrence; Lo, Woo-Kuen

    2014-01-01

    The wavy square array junctions are composed of truncated aquaporin-0 (AQP0) proteins typically distributed in the deep cortical and nuclear fibers in wild-type lenses. These junctions may help maintain the narrowed extracellular spaces between fiber cells to minimize light scattering. Herein, we investigate the impact of the cell shape changes, due to abnormal formation of extensive square array junctions, on the lens opacification in the caveolin-1 knockout mice. The cav1-KO and wild-type mice at age 1 to 22 months were used. By light microscopy examinations, cav1-KO lenses at age 1 to 18 months were transparent in both cortical and nuclear regions, whereas some lenses older than 18 months old exhibited nuclear cataracts. Scanning EM consistently observed the massive formation of ridge-and-valley membrane surfaces in young fibers at approximately 150 μm deep in all cav1-KO lenses studied. In contrast, the typical ridge-and-valleys were only seen in mature fibers deeper than 400 μm in wild-type lenses. The resulting extensive ridge-and-valleys dramatically altered the overall cell shape in cav1-KO lenses. Remarkably, despite dramatic shape changes, these deformed fiber cells remained intact and made close contact with their neighboring cells. By freeze-fracture TEM, ridge-and-valleys exhibited the typical orthogonal arrangement of 6.6 nm square array intramembrane particles and displayed the narrowed extracellular spaces. Immunofluorescence analysis showed that AQP0 C-terminus labeling was significantly decreased in outer cortical fibers in cav1-KO lenses. However, freeze-fracture immunogold labeling showed that the AQP0 C-terminus antibody was sparsely distributed on the wavy square array junctions, suggesting that the cleavage of AQP0 C-termini might not yet be complete. The cav1-KO lenses with nuclear cataracts showed complete cellular breakdown and large globule formation in the lens nucleus. This study suggests that despite dramatic cell shape changes, the

  6. Biological and structural characterization of a Ras transforming mutation at the phenylalanine-156 residue, which is conserved in all members of the Ras superfamily.

    PubMed Central

    Quilliam, L A; Zhong, S; Rabun, K M; Carpenter, J W; South, T L; Der, C J; Campbell-Burk, S

    1995-01-01

    Although Ras residue phenylalanine-156 (F156) is strictly conserved in all members of the Ras superfamily of proteins, it is located outside of the consensus GDP/GTP-binding pocket. Its location within the hydrophobic core of Ras suggests that its strict conservation reflects a crucial role in structural stability. However, mutation of the equivalent residue (F157L) in the Drosophila Ras-related protein Rap results in a gain-of-function phenotype, suggesting an alternative role for this residue. Therefore, we have introduced an F156L mutation into Ras to evaluate the role of this residue in Ras structure and function. Whereas introduction of this mutation activated the transforming potential of wild-type Ras, it did not impair that of oncogenic Ras. Further, Ras (156L) exhibited an extremely rapid off rate for bound GDP/GTP in vitro and showed increased levels of Ras.GTP in vivo. To determine the structural basis for these altered properties, we used high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The F156L mutation caused loss of contact with residues 6, 23, 55, and 79, resulting in disruption of secondary structure in alpha-helix 1 and in beta-sheets 1-5. These major structural changes contrast with the isolated alterations induced by oncogenic mutation (residues 12 or 61) that perturb GTPase activity, and instead, weaken Ras contacts with Mg2+ and its guanine nucleotide substrate and result in increased rates of GDP/GTP dissociation. Altogether, these observations demonstrate the essential role of this conserved residue in Ras structure and its function as a regulated GDP/GTP switch. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 5 PMID:7877967

  7. Beside P53 and PTEN: Identification of molecular alterations of the RAS/MAPK and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways in high-grade serous ovarian carcinomas to determine potential novel therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shuhui; Cavazza, Elisa; Barlier, Catherine; Salleron, Julia; Filhine-Tresarrieu, Pierre; Gavoilles, Céline; Merlin, Jean-Louis; Harlé, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Despite great histological and molecular heterogeneity, the clinical management of high-grade ovarian carcinomas remains unspecialized. As a major subgroup, high-grade serous ovarian carcinomas (HGSOCs) require novel therapies. In addition to utilizing conventional histological prognostic markers and performing oncogenetic investigations, the molecular diagnostic method of next generation sequencing (NGS) was performed to identify ‘druggable’ targets that could provide access to innovative therapy. The present study was performed in 45 HGSOC patients (mean age, 59.1 years; range, 25–87 years) with histologically proven HGSOC. Breast cancer 1/2 (BRCA1/2) germline mutations were screened in 17 patients with a familial or personal history of cancer, which was justified by oncogenetic investigations. Tumor protein 53 (P53) and phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) expression were assessed in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues using immunohistochemistry. Somatic mutations of Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog, neuroblastoma RAS viral oncogene homolog (NRAS), B-Raf proto-oncogene, serine/threonine kinase, phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase catalytic subunit α (PIK3CA) and MET proto-oncogene, receptor tyrosine kinase (MET) were screened using NGS on DNA extracts from frozen tumor specimens obtained at diagnosis. With a median follow-up of 38 months (range, 6–93 months), 20 patients are alive, 10 patients are disease-free and 14 patients progressed within 6 months following platinum-based therapy. P53 overexpression was detected in 67% of patients and PTEN loss was detected in 38% of the patients. The overexpression of mutant P53 was found to be associated with a longer progression-free and overall survival. In total, 2 NRAS (exon 3), 3 PIK3CA (exon 5 and 10) and 5 MET mutations (exons 14 and 18) were detected. In HGSOCs, in addition to P53 and PTEN alterations, somatic genetic abnormalities can be detected using NGS and provide molecular

  8. [Ras gene analysis in mammary tumors of dogs by means of PCR-SSCP and direct genomic analysis].

    PubMed

    Castagnaro, M

    1995-01-01

    The oncogenic capacities of RAS family genes (Ha-ras, Ki-ras, and N-ras) are usually activated by point mutations in the conserved regions (codons 12, 13, and 61), resulting in single amino acid substitution in the specific proteins (p21). In order to verify the involvement of RAS genes in dog mammary tumors we analyzed the genomic DNA from 20 mammary tumors of dog by means of the Polymerase Chain Reaction-Single Strand Conformation Polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) method and the direct genomic sequencing. The absence of point mutations in the "hot spots" of RAS genes suggests a lack or a low frequency of such a pattern of RAS genes activation in dog mammary tumors. The results are also in agreement to what reported in human mammary tumors. However, the presence of genetic alterations in other functional areas of the RAS genes or other mechanisms of activations cannot be ruled out.

  9. Objective lens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olczak, Eugene G. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    An objective lens and a method for using same. The objective lens has a first end, a second end, and a plurality of optical elements. The optical elements are positioned between the first end and the second end and are at least substantially symmetric about a plane centered between the first end and the second end.

  10. Cooperative loss of RAS feedback regulation drives myeloid leukemognesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhen; Chen, Chi-Chao; Rillahan, Cory D.; Shen, Ronglai; Kitzing, Thomas; McNerney, Megan E.; Diaz-Flores, Ernesto; Zuber, Johannes; Shannon, Kevin; Le Beau, Michelle M.; Spector, Mona S.; Kogan, Scott C.; Lowe, Scott W.

    2015-01-01

    RAS network activation is common in human cancers and, in acute myeloid leukemia (AML), achieved mainly through gain-of-function mutations in KRAS, NRAS, or the FLT3 receptor tyrosine kinase1. In mice, we show that premalignant myeloid cells harboring a KrasG12D allele retain low Ras signaling owing to a negative feedback involving Spry4 that prevents transformation. In humans, SPRY4 is located on chromosome 5q, a region affected by large heterozygous deletion that are associated with an aggressive disease in which gain-of-function RAS pathway mutations are rare. These 5q deletions often co-occur with chromosome 17 alterations involving deletion of NF1 - another RAS negative regulator - and TP53. Accordingly, combined suppression of Spry4, Nf1 and Trp53 produces high Ras signaling and drives AML in mice. Therefore, SPRY4 is a 5q tumor suppressor whose disruption contributes to a lethal AML subtype that appears to acquire RAS pathway activation through loss of negative regulators. PMID:25822087

  11. The farnesyltransferase inhibitor, LB42708, inhibits growth and induces apoptosis irreversibly in H-ras and K-ras-transformed rat intestinal epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Han-Soo; Kim, Ju Won; Gang, Jingu; Wen, Jing; Koh, Sang Seok; Koh, Jong Sung; Chung, Hyun-Ho; Song, Si Young . E-mail: gisong@yumc.yonsei.ac.kr

    2006-09-15

    LB42708 (LB7) and LB42908 (LB9) are pyrrole-based orally active farnesyltransferase inhibitors (FTIs) that have similar structures. The in vitro potencies of these compounds against FTase and GGTase I are remarkably similar, and yet they display different activity in apoptosis induction and morphological reversion of ras-transformed rat intestinal epithelial (RIE) cells. Both FTIs induced cell death despite K-ras prenylation, implying the participation of Ras-independent mechanism(s). Growth inhibition by these two FTIs was accompanied by G1 and G2/M cell cycle arrests in H-ras and K-ras-transformed RIE cells, respectively. We identified three key markers, p21{sup CIP1/WAF1}, RhoB and EGFR, that can explain the differences in the molecular mechanism of action between two FTIs. Only LB7 induced the upregulation of p21{sup CIP1/WAF1} and RhoB above the basal level that led to the cell cycle arrest and to distinct morphological alterations of ras-transformed RIE cells. Both FTIs successfully inhibited the ERK and activated JNK in RIE/K-ras cells. While the addition of conditioned medium from RIE/K-ras reversed the growth inhibition of ras-transformed RIE cells by LB9, it failed to overcome the growth inhibitory effect of LB7 in both H-ras- and K-ras-transformed RIE cells. We found that LB7, but not LB9, decreased the expression of EGFRs that confers the cellular unresponsiveness to EGFR ligands. These results suggest that LB7 causes the induction of p21{sup CIP1/WAF1} and RhoB and downregulation of EGFR that may serve as critical steps in the mechanism by which FTIs trigger irreversible inhibitions on the cell growth and apoptosis in ras-transformed cells.

  12. Fresnel Lens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Michael D.; Scott, Steve; Lamb, David; Zimmerman, Joe E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Fresnel lenses span the full range of sizes from lens a few micrometers in diameter to lens several meters in diameter. These lenses are utilized in various fields including optical communication, theatrical lighting, office equipment, video entertainment systems, solar concentrators, and scientific research instruments. These lenses function either as diffractive or refractive optical elements depending on the geometrical feature size of the lens. The basic functions of these lenses is described followed by an overview of fabrication methods. A summary of applications is then provided illustrating the rich variety of applications for which fresnel lenses may be designed to fulfill.

  13. Oncolytic reovirus induces intracellular redistribution of Ras to promote apoptosis and progeny virus release.

    PubMed

    Garant, K A; Shmulevitz, M; Pan, L; Daigle, R M; Ahn, D-G; Gujar, S A; Lee, P W K

    2016-02-11

    Reovirus is a naturally oncolytic virus that preferentially replicates in Ras-transformed cells and is currently undergoing clinical trials as a cancer therapeutic. Ras transformation promotes reovirus oncolysis by enhancing virion disassembly during entry, viral progeny production, and virus release through apoptosis; however, the mechanism behind the latter is not well understood. Here, we show that reovirus alters the intracellular location of oncogenic Ras to induce apoptosis of H-RasV12-transformed fibroblasts. Reovirus infection decreases Ras palmitoylation levels and causes accumulation of Ras in the Golgi through Golgi fragmentation. With the Golgi being the site of Ras palmitoylation, treatment of target cells with the palmitoylation inhibitor, 2-bromopalmitate (2BP), prompts a greater accumulation of H-RasV12 in the Golgi, and a dose-dependent increase in progeny virus release and subsequent spread. Conversely, tethering H-RasV12 to the plasma membrane (thereby preventing its movement to the Golgi) allows for efficient virus production, but results in basal levels of reovirus-induced cell death. Analysis of Ras downstream signaling reveals that cells expressing cycling H-RasV12 have elevated levels of phosphorylated JNK (c-Jun N-terminal kinase), and that Ras retained at the Golgi body by 2BP increases activation of the MEKK1/MKK4/JNK signaling pathway to promote cell death. Collectively, our data suggest that reovirus induces Golgi fragmentation of target cells, and the subsequent accumulation of oncogenic Ras in the Golgi body initiates apoptotic signaling events required for virus release and spread.

  14. Aspergillus fumigatus RasA Regulates Asexual Development and Cell Wall Integrity▿

    PubMed Central

    Fortwendel, Jarrod R.; Fuller, Kevin K.; Stephens, Timothy J.; Bacon, W. Clark; Askew, David S.; Rhodes, Judith C.

    2008-01-01

    The Ras family of proteins is a large group of monomeric GTPases. Members of the fungal Ras family act as molecular switches that transduce signals from the outside of the cell to signaling cascades inside the cell. A. fumigatus RasA is 94% identical to the essential RasA gene of Aspergillus nidulans and is the Ras family member sharing the highest identity to Ras homologs studied in many other fungi. In this study, we report that rasA is not essential in A. fumigatus, but its absence is associated with slowed germination and a severe defect in radial growth. The ΔrasA hyphae were more than two times the diameter of wild-type hyphae, and they displayed repeated changes in the axis of polarity during hyphal growth. The deformed hyphae accumulated numerous nuclei within each hyphal compartment. The ΔrasA mutant conidiated poorly, but this phenotype could be ameliorated by growth on osmotically stabilized media. The ΔrasA mutant also showed increased susceptibility to cell wall stressors, stained more intensely with calcofluor white, and was refractory to lysing enzymes used to make protoplasts, suggesting an alteration of the cell wall. All phenotypes associated with deletion of rasA could be corrected by reinsertion of the wild-type gene. These data demonstrate a crucial role for RasA in both hyphal growth and asexual development in A. fumigatus and provide evidence that RasA function is linked to cell wall integrity. PMID:18606827

  15. Compound lens

    DOEpatents

    Brixner, B.B.; Klein, M.M.; Winkler, M.A.

    1980-05-21

    The disclosure relates to at least one calcium fluoride optical element used in combination with at least two ordinary crown glass lens elements to greatly reduce secondary spectrum in optical systems.

  16. Compound lens

    DOEpatents

    Brixner, Berlyn B.; Klein, Morris M.; Winkler, Max A.

    1982-01-01

    The disclosure relates to at least one calcium fluoride optical element used in combination with at least two ordinary crown glass lens elements to greatly reduce secondary spectrum in optical systems.

  17. Radiosensitizing effects of the prenyltransferase inhibitor AZD3409 against RAS mutated cell lines.

    PubMed

    Cengel, Keith A; Deutsch, Eric; Stephens, Trevor C; Voong, K Ranh; Kao, Gary D; Bernhard, Eric J

    2006-09-01

    Mutations at the H-, N- and K-ras loci are among the most frequent genetic alterations in human cancers. In this study, we have investigated the effect of AZD3409, a novel, peptidomimetic prenyltransferase inhibitor (PTI), on the radiosensitivity of cells with mutated ras alleles. AZD3409, developed by AstraZeneca, inhibits both farnesyl- and geranylgeranyl transferase in cell free systems. AZD3409 inhibits the growth of a variety of human cancer cell lines, including cells that express mutant alleles of either K- or H- ras and was well tolerated when administered orally to healthy volunteers in a phase I clinical trial. We have previously shown that PTI can radiosensitize human and rodent cancer cell lines that express activated RAS. Here we assessed the ability of AZD3409 to radiosensitize human cancer cell lines in vivo and in vitro and the activation state of RAS proteins in treated cells. Once daily oral administration of AZD3409 to nude mice bearing PSN-1 and MiaPaCa-2 human pancreatic cancer xenografts expressing mutant K-ras was well tolerated and resulted in a supra-additive reduction in clonogenic cell survival after irradiation. Similarly, AZD3409 reduced clonogenic survival in cells that express either mutant K- or H- ras in vitro. We next examined the effect of AZD3409 on the processing and activation of K- and H-RAS. AZD3409-mediated radiosensitization, both in vivo and in vitro, correlates with a decrease in H-RAS processing without detectable effect on K-RAS processing. RAS activation assays show that the decreased H-RAS processing is accompanied by decreased H-RAS activation in cell lines with mutations in either K- or H-ras. However, no decrease in K-RAS activation was detected. Thus, radiosensitization of human cancer cells that express mutated K-RAS occurred under conditions where AZD3409 inihibits the activation of farneyslated H-RAS, but did not inhibit K-RAS activation.

  18. Barlow Lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    An additional lens that increases the effective focal length and magnification of a telescope. It is a negative diverging lens (either concave on both sides or, more usually, `plano-concave'—flat on one side and concave on the other) that is placed in the converging cone of light a short distance in front of the focal plane of the objective or primary mirror. By decreasing the angle at which the ...

  19. Sunglass Lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1984-01-01

    Foster Grant's Space Technology Lens, manufactured under license from NASA, combines NASA technology with Foster Grant's own technology. The NASA contribution was a highly abrasion-resistant coating developed at Ames Research Center as a means of protecting plastic surfaces of aerospace equipment from the sometimes harsh environments to which they are subjected. The Space Tech Lens, now manufactured by Fosta-Tek, surpasses glass in abrasion resistant properties and has five times better scratch resistance than the most popular corrective lenses.

  20. Plasma membrane regulates Ras signaling networks

    PubMed Central

    Chavan, Tanmay Sanjeev; Muratcioglu, Serena; Marszalek, Richard; Jang, Hyunbum; Keskin, Ozlem; Gursoy, Attila; Nussinov, Ruth; Gaponenko, Vadim

    2015-01-01

    Ras GTPases activate more than 20 signaling pathways, regulating such essential cellular functions as proliferation, survival, and migration. How Ras proteins control their signaling diversity is still a mystery. Several pieces of evidence suggest that the plasma membrane plays a critical role. Among these are: (1) selective recruitment of Ras and its effectors to particular localities allowing access to Ras regulators and effectors; (2) specific membrane-induced conformational changes promoting Ras functional diversity; and (3) oligomerization of membrane-anchored Ras to recruit and activate Raf. Taken together, the membrane does not only attract and retain Ras but also is a key regulator of Ras signaling. This can already be gleaned from the large variability in the sequences of Ras membrane targeting domains, suggesting that localization, environment and orientation are important factors in optimizing the function of Ras isoforms. PMID:27054048

  1. Plasma membrane regulates Ras signaling networks.

    PubMed

    Chavan, Tanmay Sanjeev; Muratcioglu, Serena; Marszalek, Richard; Jang, Hyunbum; Keskin, Ozlem; Gursoy, Attila; Nussinov, Ruth; Gaponenko, Vadim

    2015-01-01

    Ras GTPases activate more than 20 signaling pathways, regulating such essential cellular functions as proliferation, survival, and migration. How Ras proteins control their signaling diversity is still a mystery. Several pieces of evidence suggest that the plasma membrane plays a critical role. Among these are: (1) selective recruitment of Ras and its effectors to particular localities allowing access to Ras regulators and effectors; (2) specific membrane-induced conformational changes promoting Ras functional diversity; and (3) oligomerization of membrane-anchored Ras to recruit and activate Raf. Taken together, the membrane does not only attract and retain Ras but also is a key regulator of Ras signaling. This can already be gleaned from the large variability in the sequences of Ras membrane targeting domains, suggesting that localization, environment and orientation are important factors in optimizing the function of Ras isoforms.

  2. R-Ras C-terminal sequences are sufficient to confer R-Ras specificity to H-Ras.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Malene; Rusyn, Elena V; Hughes, Paul E; Ginsberg, Mark H; Cox, Adrienne D; Willumsen, Berthe M

    2002-06-27

    Activated versions of the similar GTPases, H-Ras and R-Ras, have differing effects on biological phenotypes: Activated H-Ras strongly transforms many fibroblast cell lines causing dramatic changes in cell shape and cytoskeletal organization. In contrast, R-Ras transforms fewer cell lines and the transformed cells display only some of the morphological changes associated with H-Ras transformation. H-Ras cells can survive in the absence of serum whereas R-Ras cells seem to die by an apoptotic-like mechanism in response to removal of serum. H-Ras can suppress integrin activation and R-Ras specifically antagonizes this effect. To map sequences responsible for these differences we have generated and investigated a panel of H-Ras and R-Ras chimeras. We found that the C-terminal 53 amino acids of R-Ras were necessary and sufficient to specify the contrasting biological properties of R-Ras with respect to focus morphology, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and reversal of H-Ras-induced integrin suppression. Surprisingly, we found chimeras in which the focus formation and integrin-mediated phenotypes were separated, suggesting that different effectors could be involved in mediating these responses. An integrin profile of H-Ras and R-Ras cell pools showed no significant differences; both activated H-Ras and R-Ras expressing cells were found to have reduced beta(1) activity, suggesting that the activity state of the beta(1) subunit is not sufficient to direct an H-Ras transformed cell morphology.

  3. Mapping the functional versatility and fragility of Ras GTPase signaling circuits through in vitro network reconstitution.

    PubMed

    Coyle, Scott M; Lim, Wendell A

    2016-01-14

    The Ras-superfamily GTPases are central controllers of cell proliferation and morphology. Ras signaling is mediated by a system of interacting molecules: upstream enzymes (GEF/GAP) regulate Ras's ability to recruit multiple competing downstream effectors. We developed a multiplexed, multi-turnover assay for measuring the dynamic signaling behavior of in vitro reconstituted H-Ras signaling systems. By including both upstream regulators and downstream effectors, we can systematically map how different network configurations shape the dynamic system response. The concentration and identity of both upstream and downstream signaling components strongly impacted the timing, duration, shape, and amplitude of effector outputs. The distorted output of oncogenic alleles of Ras was highly dependent on the balance of positive (GAP) and negative (GEF) regulators in the system. We found that different effectors interpreted the same inputs with distinct output dynamics, enabling a Ras system to encode multiple unique temporal outputs in response to a single input. We also found that different Ras-to-GEF positive feedback mechanisms could reshape output dynamics in distinct ways, such as signal amplification or overshoot minimization. Mapping of the space of output behaviors accessible to Ras provides a design manual for programming Ras circuits, and reveals how these systems are readily adapted to produce an array of dynamic signaling behaviors. Nonetheless, this versatility comes with a trade-off of fragility, as there exist numerous paths to altered signaling behaviors that could cause disease.

  4. Ras proteins have multiple functions in vegetative cells of Dictyostelium.

    PubMed

    Bolourani, Parvin; Spiegelman, George; Weeks, Gerald

    2010-11-01

    During the aggregation of Dictyostelium cells, signaling through RasG is more important in regulating cyclic AMP (cAMP) chemotaxis, whereas signaling through RasC is more important in regulating the cAMP relay. However, RasC is capable of substituting for RasG for chemotaxis, since rasG⁻ cells are only partially deficient in chemotaxis, whereas rasC⁻/rasG⁻ cells are totally incapable of chemotaxis. In this study we have examined the possible functional overlap between RasG and RasC in vegetative cells by comparing the vegetative cell properties of rasG⁻, rasC⁻, and rasC⁻/rasG⁻ cells. In addition, since RasD, a protein not normally found in vegetative cells, is expressed in vegetative rasG⁻ and rasC⁻/rasG⁻ cells and appears to partially compensate for the absence of RasG, we have also examined the possible functional overlap between RasG and RasD by comparing the properties of rasG⁻ and rasC⁻/rasG⁻ cells with those of the mutant cells expressing higher levels of RasD. The results of these two lines of investigation show that RasD is capable of totally substituting for RasG for cytokinesis and growth in suspension, whereas RasC is without effect. In contrast, for chemotaxis to folate, RasC is capable of partially substituting for RasG, but RasD is totally without effect. Finally, neither RasC nor RasD is able to substitute for the role that RasG plays in regulating actin distribution and random motility. These specificity studies therefore delineate three distinct and none-overlapping functions for RasG in vegetative cells.

  5. Aurora kinase A interacts with H-Ras and potentiates Ras-MAPK signaling.

    PubMed

    Umstead, MaKendra; Xiong, Jinglin; Qi, Qi; Du, Yuhong; Fu, Haian

    2017-02-03

    In cancer, upregulated Ras promotes cellular transformation and proliferation in part through activation of oncogenic Ras-MAPK signaling. While directly inhibiting Ras has proven challenging, new insights into Ras regulation through protein-protein interactions may offer unique opportunities for therapeutic intervention. Here we report the identification and validation of Aurora kinase A (Aurora A) as a novel Ras binding protein. We demonstrate that the kinase domain of Aurora A mediates the interaction with the N-terminal domain of H-Ras. Further more, the interaction of Aurora A and H-Ras exists in a protein complex with Raf-1. We show that binding of H-Ras to Raf-1 and subsequent MAPK signaling is enhanced by Aurora A, and requires active H-Ras. Thus, the functional linkage between Aurora A and the H-Ras/Raf-1 protein complex may provide a mechanism for Aurora A's oncogenic activity through direct activation of the Ras/MAPK pathway.

  6. Calcium activation of Ras mediated by neuronal exchange factor Ras-GRF.

    PubMed

    Farnsworth, C L; Freshney, N W; Rosen, L B; Ghosh, A; Greenberg, M E; Feig, L A

    1995-08-10

    Tyrosine kinase receptors stimulate the Ras signalling pathway by enhancing the activity of the SOS nucleotide-exchange factor. This occurs, at least in part, by the recruitment of an SOS-GRB2 complex to Ras in the plasma membrane. Here we describe a different signalling pathway to Ras that involves activation of the Ras-GRF exchange factor in response to Ca2+ influx. In particular, we show that the ability of Ras-GRF to activate Ras in vivo is markedly enhanced by raised Ca2+ concentrations. Activation is mediated by calmodulin binding to an IQ motif in Ras-GRF, because substitutions in conserved amino acids in this motif prevent both calmodulin binding to Ras-GRF and Ras-GRF activation in vivo. So far, full-length Ras-GRF has been detected only in brain neurons. Our findings implicate Ras-GRF in the regulation of neuronal functions that are influenced by Ca2+ signals.

  7. Lens Biodiversity

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The Lens genus includes the cultivated L. culinaris, and wild subspecies orientalis - the progenitor, tomentosus, and odemensis, are in the primary genepool, while L. ervoides, L. nigricans and L. lamottei are in the secondary – tertiary gene pool. The Middle East is the primary centre of diversity ...

  8. Cardiac remodelling and RAS inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Ferrario, Carlos M.

    2016-01-01

    Risk factors such as hypertension and diabetes are known to augment the activity and tissue expression of angiotensin II (Ang II), the major effector peptide of the renin–angiotensin system (RAS). Overstimulation of the RAS has been implicated in a chain of events that contribute to the pathogenesis of cardiovascular (CV) disease, including the development of cardiac remodelling. This chain of events has been termed the CV continuum. The concept of CV disease existing as a continuum was first proposed in 1991 and it is believed that intervention at any point within the continuum can modify disease progression. Treatment with antihypertensive agents may result in regression of left ventricular hypertrophy, with different drug classes exhibiting different degrees of efficacy. The greatest decrease in left ventricular mass is observed following treatment with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE-Is), which inhibit Ang II formation. Although ACE-Is and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) provide significant benefits in terms of CV events and stroke, mortality remains high. This is partly due to a failure to completely suppress the RAS, and, as our knowledge has increased, an escape phenomenon has been proposed whereby the human sequence of the 12 amino acid substrate angiotensin-(1-12) is converted to Ang II by the mast cell protease, chymase. Angiotensin-(1-12) is abundant in a wide range of organs and has been shown to increase blood pressure in animal models, an effect abolished by the presence of ACE-Is or ARBs. This review explores the CV continuum, in addition to examining the influence of the RAS. We also consider novel pathways within the RAS and how new therapeutic approaches that target this are required to further reduce Ang II formation, and so provide patients with additional benefits from a more complete blockade of the RAS. PMID:27105891

  9. Mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae defective in the farnesylation of Ras proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, L E; Judd, S R; Farnsworth, C C; Powers, S; Gelb, M H; Glomset, J A; Tamanoi, F

    1990-01-01

    Ras proteins are post-translationally modified by farnesylation. In the present investigation, we identified an activity in crude soluble extracts of yeast cells that catalyzes the transfer of a farnesyl moiety from farnesyl pyrophosphate to yeast RAS2 protein. RAS2 proteins having a C-terminal Cys-Ali-Ali-Xaa sequence (where Ali is an aliphatic amino acid and Xaa is the unspecified C-terminal amino acid) served as substrates for this reaction, whereas RAS2 proteins with an altered or deleted Cys-Ali-Ali-Xaa sequence did not. A yeast mutant, dpr1/ram1, originally isolated as a Ras-processing mutant was shown to be defective in farnesyltransferase activity. In addition, another mutant, ram2, also was defective in the transferase activity. These results demonstrate that at least two genes, DPR1/RAM1 and RAM2, are required for the farnesyltransferase activity in yeast. Images PMID:2124698

  10. Bionic intraocular lens with variable focus and integrated structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Dan; Wang, Xuan-Yin; Du, Jia-Wei; Xiang, Ke

    2015-10-01

    This paper proposes a bionic accommodating intraocular lens (IOL) for ophthalmic surgery. The designed lens has a solid-liquid mixed integrated structure, which mainly consists of a support ring, elastic membrane, rigid lens, and optical liquid. The lens focus can be adjusted through the deformation of the lens front surface when compressed. The integrated structure of the IOL is presented, as well as a detailed description of the lens materials and fabrication process. Images under different radial pressures are captured, and the lens deformation process, accommodating range, density, and optical property are analyzed. The designed lens achieves a 14.6 D accommodating range under a radial pressure of 51.4 mN and a 0.24 mm alteration of the lens outer radius. The deformation property of the lens matches well with the characteristic of the eye and shows the potential to help patients fully recover their vision accommodation ability after the cataract surgery.

  11. Oncogenic Ras promotes butyrate-induced apoptosis through inhibition of gelsolin expression.

    PubMed

    Klampfer, Lidija; Huang, Jie; Sasazuki, Takehiko; Shirasawa, Senji; Augenlicht, Leonard

    2004-08-27

    Activation of Ras promotes oncogenesis by altering a multiple of cellular processes, such as cell cycle progression, differentiation, and apoptosis. Oncogenic Ras can either promote or inhibit apoptosis, depending on the cell type and the nature of the apoptotic stimuli. The response of normal and transformed colonic epithelial cells to the short chain fatty acid butyrate, a physiological regulator of epithelial cell maturation, is also divergent: normal epithelial cells proliferate, and transformed cells undergo apoptosis in response to butyrate. To investigate the role of k-ras mutations in butyrate-induced apoptosis, we utilized HCT116 cells, which harbor an oncogenic k-ras mutation and two isogenic clones with targeted inactivation of the mutant k-ras allele, Hkh2, and Hke-3. We demonstrated that the targeted deletion of the mutant k-ras allele is sufficient to protect epithelial cells from butyrate-induced apoptosis. Consistent with this, we showed that apigenin, a dietary flavonoid that has been shown to inhibit Ras signaling and to reverse transformation of cancer cell lines, prevented butyrate-induced apoptosis in HCT116 cells. To investigate the mechanism whereby activated k-ras sensitizes colonic cells to butyrate, we performed a genome-wide analysis of Ras target genes in the isogenic cell lines HCT116, Hkh2, and Hke-3. The gene exhibiting the greatest down-regulation by the activating k-ras mutation was gelsolin, an actin-binding protein whose expression is frequently reduced or absent in colorectal cancer cell lines and primary tumors. We demonstrated that silencing of gelsolin expression by small interfering RNA sensitized cells to butyrate-induced apoptosis through amplification of the activation of caspase-9 and caspase-7. These data therefore demonstrate that gelsolin protects cells from butyrate-induced apoptosis and suggest that Ras promotes apoptosis, at least in part, through its ability to down-regulate the expression of gelsolin.

  12. A misexpression screen identifies genes that can modulate RAS1 pathway signaling in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, A M; Rubin, G M

    2000-01-01

    Differentiation of the R7 photoreceptor cell is dependent on the Sevenless receptor tyrosine kinase, which activates the RAS1/mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling cascade. Kinase suppressor of Ras (KSR) functions genetically downstream of RAS1 in this signal transduction cascade. Expression of dominant-negative KSR (KDN) in the developing eye blocks RAS pathway signaling, prevents R7 cell differentiation, and causes a rough eye phenotype. To identify genes that modulate RAS signaling, we screened for genes that alter RAS1/KSR signaling efficiency when misexpressed. In this screen, we recovered three known genes, Lk6, misshapen, and Akap200. We also identified seven previously undescribed genes; one encodes a novel rel domain member of the NFAT family, and six encode novel proteins. These genes may represent new components of the RAS pathway or components of other signaling pathways that can modulate signaling by RAS. We discuss the utility of gain-of-function screens in identifying new components of signaling pathways in Drosophila. PMID:11063696

  13. Transgenic Activation of Ras in Neurons Promotes Hypertrophy and Protects from Lesion-Induced Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Heumann, Rolf; Goemans, Christoph; Bartsch, Daniela; Lingenhöhl, Kurt; Waldmeier, Peter C.; Hengerer, Bastian; Allegrini, Peter R.; Schellander, Karl; Wagner, Erwin F.; Arendt, Thomas; Kamdem, Rigobert H.; Obst-Pernberg, Kirstin; Narz, Frank; Wahle, Petra; Berns, Hartmut

    2000-01-01

    Ras is a universal eukaryotic intracellular protein integrating extracellular signals from multiple receptor types. To investigate its role in the adult central nervous system, constitutively activated V12-Ha-Ras was expressed selectively in neurons of transgenic mice via a synapsin promoter. Ras-transgene protein expression increased postnatally, reaching a four- to fivefold elevation at day 40 and persisting at this level, thereafter. Neuronal Ras was constitutively active and a corresponding activating phosphorylation of mitogen-activated kinase was observed, but there were no changes in the activity of phosphoinositide 3-kinase, the phosphorylation of its target kinase Akt/PKB, or expression of the anti-apoptotic proteins Bcl-2 or Bcl-XL. Neuronal Ras activation did not alter the total number of neurons, but induced cell soma hypertrophy, which resulted in a 14.5% increase of total brain volume. Choline acetyltransferase and tyrosine hydroxylase activities were increased, as well as neuropeptide Y expression. Degeneration of motorneurons was completely prevented after facial nerve lesion in Ras-transgenic mice. Furthermore, neurotoxin-induced degeneration of dopaminergic substantia nigra neurons and their striatal projections was greatly attenuated. Thus, the Ras signaling pathway mimics neurotrophic effects and triggers neuroprotective mechanisms in adult mice. Neuronal Ras activation might become a tool to stabilize donor neurons for neural transplantation and to protect neuronal populations in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:11134081

  14. Fluidic adaptive lens of transformable lens type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, De-Ying; Justis, Nicole; Lo, Yu-Hwa

    2004-05-01

    Fluidic adaptive lenses with a transformable lens type were demonstrated. By adjusting the fluidic pressure, not only can the lens properties, such as the focal distance and numerical aperture, be tuned dynamically but also different lens types, such as planoconvex, planoconcave, biconvex, biconcave, positive meniscus, and negative meniscus lenses, can be formed. The shortest focal length for a 20 mm aperture adaptive lens is 14.3 mm when the device is transformed into a positive lens, and -6.3 mm when transformed into a negative lens. The maximum resolution of the fluidic lens is better than 40 line pairs/mm.

  15. Mechanisms of Ras membrane organization and signaling

    PubMed Central

    Abankwa, Daniel; Gorfe, Alemayehu A.; Hancock, John F.

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the signalling function of Ras GTPases has been the focus of much research for over 20 years. Both the catalytic domain and the membrane anchoring C terminal hypervariable region (HVR) of Ras are necessary for its cellular function. However, while the highly conserved catalytic domain has been characterized in atomic detail, the structure of the full-length membrane-bound Ras has remained elusive. Lack of structural knowledge on the full-length protein limited our understanding of Ras signalling. For example, structures of the Ras catalytic domain solved in complex with effectors do not provide a basis for the functional specificity of different Ras isoforms. Recent molecular dynamics simulations in combination with biophysical and cell biological experiments have shown that the HVR and parts of the G domain cofunction with the lipid tails to anchor H-ras to the plasma membrane. In the GTP-bound state, H-ras adopts an orientation that allows read out by Ras effectors and translation into corresponding MAPK signalling. Here we discuss details of an analysis that suggests a novel balance model for Ras functioning. The balance model rationalizes Ras membrane orientation and may help explain isoform specific interactions of Ras with its effectors and modulators. PMID:18758236

  16. The greedy nature of mutant RAS: a boon for drug discovery targeting cancer metabolism?

    PubMed

    Lv, Jing; Wang, Jieqiong; Chang, Siyu; Liu, Mingyao; Pang, Xiufeng

    2016-01-01

    RAS oncogene mutations are frequently detected in human cancers. Among RAS-mediated tumorigenesis, KRAS-driven cancers are the most frequently diagnosed and resistant to current therapies. Despite more than three decades of intensive efforts, there are still no specific therapies for mutant RAS proteins. While trying to block those well-established downstream pathways, such as the RAF-MAPK pathway and the PI3K-AKT pathway, attentions have been paid to potential effects of RAS on metabolic pathways and the feasibility for targeting these pathways. Recent studies have proved that RAS not only promotes aerobic glycolysis and glutamine metabolism reprograming to provide energy, but it also facilitates branched metabolism pathways, autophagy, and macropinocytosis. These alterations generate building blocks for tumor growth and strengthen antioxidant defense in tumor cells. All of these metabolic changes meet different demands of RAS-driven cancers, making them distinct from normal cells. Indeed, some achievements have been made to inhibit tumor growth through targeting specific metabolism rewiring in preclinical models. Although there is still a long way to elucidate the landscape of altered metabolism, we believe that specific metabolic enzymes or pathways could be therapeutically targeted for selective inhibition of RAS-driven cancers.

  17. The cornerstone K-RAS mutation in pancreatic adenocarcinoma: From cell signaling network, target genes, biological processes to therapeutic targeting.

    PubMed

    Jonckheere, Nicolas; Vasseur, Romain; Van Seuningen, Isabelle

    2017-03-01

    RAS belongs to the super family of small G proteins and plays crucial roles in signal transduction from membrane receptors in the cell. Mutations of K-RAS oncogene lead to an accumulation of GTP-bound proteins that maintains an active conformation. In the pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), one of the most deadly cancers in occidental countries, mutations of the K-RAS oncogene are nearly systematic (>90%). Moreover, K-RAS mutation is the earliest genetic alteration occurring during pancreatic carcinogenetic sequence. In this review, we discuss the central role of K-RAS mutations and their tremendous diversity of biological properties by the interconnected regulation of signaling pathways (MAPKs, NF-κB, PI3K, Ral…). In pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, transcriptome analysis and preclinical animal models showed that K-RAS mutation alters biological behavior of PDAC cells (promoting proliferation, migration and invasion, evading growth suppressors, regulating mucin pattern, and miRNA expression). K-RAS also impacts tumor microenvironment and PDAC metabolism reprogramming. Finally we discuss therapeutic targeting strategies of K-RAS that have been developed without significant clinical success so far. As K-RAS is considered as the undruggable target, targeting its multiple effectors and target genes should be considered as potential alternatives.

  18. d-Cycloserine improves sociability in the BTBR T+ Itpr3tf/J mouse model of autism spectrum disorders with altered Ras/Raf/ERK1/2 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Burket, Jessica A.; Benson, Andrew D.; Tang, Amy H.; Deutsch, Stephen I.

    2017-01-01

    The genetically inbred BTBR T+ Itpr3tf/J (BTBR) mouse is a proposed model of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). Similar to several syndromic forms of ASDs, mTOR activity may be enhanced in this mouse strain as a result of increased Ras signaling. Recently, d-cycloserine, a partial glycineB site agonist that targets the NMDA receptor, was shown to improve the sociability of the Balb/c mouse strain, another proposed genetically inbred model of ASDs. NMDA receptor activation is an important regulator of mTOR signaling activity. Given the ability of d-cycloserine to improve the sociability of the Balb/c mouse strain and the regulatory role of the NMDA receptor in mTOR signaling, we wondered if d-cycloserine would improve the impaired sociability of the BTBR mouse strain. d-Cycloserine (320 mg/kg, ip) improved measures of sociability in a standard sociability paradigm and spontaneous grooming that emerged during social interaction with an ICR stimulus mouse in the BTBR strain; however, similar effects were observed in the Swiss Webster comparator strain, raising questions about their strain-selectivity. Importantly, the profile of d-cycloserine's effects on both measures of sociability and stereotypies is consistent with that of a desired medication for ASDs; specifically, a desired medication would not improve sociability at the expense of worsening stereotypic behaviors or vice versa. PMID:23685206

  19. Functional significance of the novel H-RAS gene mutation M72I in a patient with medullary thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Barollo, S; Pezzani, R; Cristiani, A; Bertazza, L; Rubin, B; Bulfone, A; Pelizzo, M R; Torresan, F; Mantero, F; Pennelli, G; Moro, S; Mian, C

    2013-10-01

    Medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) accounts for around 5-10% of all thyroid cancers. Though usually sporadic, 1 in 4 cases are of genetic origin, with germinal mutations in the RET proto-oncogene in familial forms and somatic mutations both in RET and in the RAS family genes in sporadic ones.This study aimed to characterize a rare H-RAS sequence variant -M72I- in a patient with sporadic MTC, focusing on its functional significance.Mutation analysis was performed for the RET, N-RAS, K-RAS and H-RAS genes by direct sequencing. Western blot analysis was done on 4 thyroid tissues from 1 patient carrying the M72I mutation in H-RAS, 1 with the Q61R mutation in H-RAS, 1 with no RET, H-RAS, K-RAS or N-RAS gene mutations, and 1 normal thyroid, using different antibodies against Erk1/2, phospho-Erk1/2 (Thr202/Tyr204), Akt and phospho-Akt (Ser473). Large-scale molecular dynamics simulations were completed for H-RAS wt and H-RAS M72I.Western blot analysis demonstrated that both MAPK and PI3K/Akt pathways were activated in the MTC patient carrying the M72I variant. In silico results showed conformational changes in H-RAS that could influence its activation by Sos and phosphate binding. Results of molecular dynamics were consistent with Western blot experiments.The M72I mutation may contribute effectively to proliferation and survival signaling throughout the MAPK and PI3K/Akt pathways. This work underscores the importance of studying genetic alterations that may lead to carcinogenesis.

  20. Drugging the undruggable Ras: mission possible?

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Adrienne D.; Fesik, Stephen W.; Kimmelman, Alec C.; Luo, Ji; Der, Channing J.

    2015-01-01

    Despite more than three decades of intensive effort, no effective pharmacologic inhibitors of the Ras oncoproteins have reached the clinic, prompting the widely held perception that Ras proteins are “undruggable”. However, there is renewed hope that this is not the case. In this review, we summarize the progress and promise of five key directions. First, we focus on the prospects of direct inhibitors of Ras. Second, we revisit the issue of whether blocking Ras membrane association is a viable approach. Third, we assess the status of targeting Ras downstream effector signalling, arguably the most favourable current direction. Fourth, we address whether the search for synthetic lethal interactors of mutant RAS still holds promise. Finally, Ras-mediated changes in cell metabolism have recently been described. Can these changes be exploited for new therapeutic directions? We conclude with perspectives on how additional complexities, not yet fully understood, may impact each of these approaches. PMID:25323927

  1. Expression of renin–angiotensin system (RAS) components in endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    Delforce, Sarah J; Lumbers, Eugenie R; Corbisier de Meaultsart, Celine; Wang, Yu; Proietto, Anthony; Otton, Geoffrey; Scurry, Jim; Verrills, Nicole M; Scott, Rodney J

    2017-01-01

    A dysfunctional endometrial renin–angiotensin system (RAS) could aid the growth and spread of endometrial cancer. To determine if the RAS is altered in endometrial cancer, we measured RAS gene expression and protein levels in 30 human formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) endometrioid carcinomas and their adjacent endometrium. All components of the RAS were expressed in most tumours and in adjacent endometrium; mRNA levels of (pro)renin receptor (ATP6AP2), angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AGTR1), angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE1) and angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) mRNA levels were greater in tumour tissue than adjacent non-cancerous endometrium (P = 0.023, 0.008, 0.004 and 0.046, respectively). Prorenin, ATP6AP2, AGTR1, AGTR2 and ACE2 proteins were abundantly expressed in both cancerous and adjacent non-cancerous endometrium. Staining was most intense in cancerous glandular epithelium. One potential target of the endometrial RAS, transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGFB1), which is essential for epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, was also upregulated in endometrial cancer tissue (P = 0.001). Interestingly, TGFB1 was strongly correlated with RAS expression and was upregulated in tumour tissue. This study is the first to characterise the mRNA and protein expression of all RAS components in cancerous and adjacent non-cancerous endometrium. The greater expression of ATP6AP2, AGTR1 and ACE1, key elements of the pro-angiogenic/proliferative arm of the RAS, suggests that the RAS plays a role in the growth and spread of endometrial cancer. Therefore, existing drugs that inhibit the RAS and which are used to treat hypertension may have potential as treatments for endometrial cancer. PMID:27956412

  2. R-Ras Regulates Migration through an Interaction with Filamin A in Melanoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gawecka, Joanna E.; Griffiths, Genevieve S.; Ek-Rylander, Barbro; Ramos, Joe W.; Matter, Michelle L.

    2010-01-01

    Background Changes in cell adhesion and migration in the tumor microenvironment are key in the initiation and progression of metastasis. R-Ras is one of several small GTPases that regulate cell adhesion and migration on the extracellular matrix, however the mechanism has not been completely elucidated. Using a yeast two-hybrid approach we sought to identify novel R-Ras binding proteins that might mediate its effects on integrins. Methods and Findings We identified Filamin A (FLNa) as a candidate interacting protein. FLNa is an actin-binding scaffold protein that also binds to integrin β1, β2 and β7 tails and is associated with diverse cell processes including cell migration. Indeed, M2 melanoma cells require FLNa for motility. We further show that R-Ras and FLNa interact in co-immunoprecipitations and pull-down assays. Deletion of FLNa repeat 3 (FLNaΔ3) abrogated this interaction. In M2 melanoma cells active R-Ras co-localized with FLNa but did not co-localize with FLNa lacking repeat 3. Thus, activated R-Ras binds repeat 3 of FLNa. The functional consequence of this interaction was that active R-Ras and FLNa coordinately increased cell migration. In contrast, co-expression of R-Ras and FLNaΔ3 had a significantly reduced effect on migration. While there was enhancement of integrin activation and fibronectin matrix assembly, cell adhesion was not altered. Finally, siRNA knockdown of endogenous R-Ras impaired FLNa-dependent fibronectin matrix assembly. Conclusions These data support a model in which R-Ras functionally associates with FLNa and thereby regulates integrin-dependent migration. Thus in melanoma cells R-Ras and FLNa may cooperatively promote metastasis by enhancing cell migration. PMID:20585650

  3. Collection Mode Lens System

    DOEpatents

    Fletcher, Daniel A.; Kino, Gordon S.

    2002-11-05

    A lens system including a collection lens and a microlens spaced from the collection lens adjacent the region to be observed. The diameter of the observablel region depends substantially on the radius of the microlens.

  4. Altered expression of retinoic acid (RA) receptor mRNAs in the fetal mouse secondary palate by all-trans and 13-cis RAs: implications for RA-induced teratogenesis.

    PubMed

    Naitoh, H; Mori, C; Nishimura, Y; Shiota, K

    1998-01-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) is mandatory for various biological processes and normal embryonic development but is teratogenic at high concentrations. In rodents, one of the major malformations induced by RA is cleft palate (CP). RA mediates its effects by RA receptors (RARs), but the expression patterns of RARs in the developing palate are still unclear. We investigated the normal expression of RAR alpha, beta, and gamma messenger RNAs (mRNAs) in the fetal mouse secondary palate and the effects of all-trans and 13-cis RAs on the expression of RAR mRNAs by Northern blot analysis. RAR alpha (2.8, 3.8 kb), RAR beta (3.3 kb), and RAR gamma (3.7 kb) mRNAs were detected in the fetal palate on gestational days (GD) 12.5-14.5. The expression of RAR alpha and gamma mRNAs did not show apparent sequential changes, but that of RAR beta mRNA increased at GD 13.5. Treatment of pregnant mice with 100 mg/kg all-trans RA induced CP in 94% of the fetuses and elevated the levels of RAR beta and gamma mRNAs in the fetal palate. The up-regulation of RAR beta mRNA by all-trans RA was more marked than that of RAR gamma mRNA. Treatment with 100 mg/kg 13-cis RA induced CP in only 19% of the fetuses. Although 13-cis RA elevated the RAR beta and gamma mRNA levels in fetal palates, its up-regulation was slower and less marked than that induced by all-trans RA. These findings indicate that the induction of RAR beta mRNA in the fetal palate correlates well with the tissue concentration of all-trans RA after RA treatment, and RAR beta may be one of the most influential candidate molecules for RA-induced teratogenesis.

  5. Differential expression of the ras gene family in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Leon, J; Guerrero, I; Pellicer, A

    1987-01-01

    We compared the expression of the ras gene family (H-ras, K-ras, and N-ras) in adult mouse tissues and during development. We found substantial variations in expression among different organs and in the amounts of the different transcripts originating from each gene, especially for the N-ras gene. The expression patterns were consistent with the reported preferential tissue activation of ras genes and suggested different cellular functions for each of the ras genes. Images PMID:3600635

  6. RAS-MAPK pathway epigenetic activation in cancer: miRNAs in action

    PubMed Central

    Masliah-Planchon, Julien; Garinet, Simon; Pasmant, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The highly conserved RAS-mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway is involved in a wide range of cellular processes including differentiation, proliferation, and survival. Somatic mutations in genes encoding RAS-MAPK components frequently occur in many tumors, making the RAS-MAPK a critical pathway in human cancer. Since the pioneering study reporting that let-7 miRNA acted as tumor suppressor by repressing the RAS oncogene, growing evidence has suggested the importance of miRNAs targeting the RAS-MAPK in oncogenesis. MiRNAs alterations in human cancers may act as a rheostat of the oncogenic RAS signal that is often amplified as cancers progress. However, specific mechanisms leading to miRNAs deregulation and their functional consequences in cancer are far from being fully elucidated. In this review, we provide an experimental-validated map of RAS-MAPK oncomiRs and tumor suppressor miRNAs from transmembrane receptor to downstream ERK proteins. MiRNAs could be further considered as potential genetic biomarkers for diagnosis, prognosis, or therapeutic purpose. PMID:26646588

  7. RAS and Hedgehog--partners in crime.

    PubMed

    Lauth, Matthias

    2011-06-01

    Both RAS and Hedgehog (HH) pathway activation can be found in approximately one third of all cancers. In many cases, this activation occurs in the same tumor types, suggesting a positive impact of a simultaneous activation of RAS and HH on tumor development. This review aims to summarize the current knowledge about the molecular and functional crosstalk of RAS and HH signaling in the development of hyperproliferative disease.

  8. Concurrent mutation in exons 1 and 2 of the K-ras oncogene in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Palmirotta, Raffaele; Savonarola, Annalisa; Ludovici, Giorgia; De Marchis, Maria Laura; Covello, Renato; Ettorre, Giuseppe Maria; Ialongo, Cristiano; Guadagni, Fiorella

    2011-01-01

    The K-ras gene is frequently mutated in colorectal cancer and has been associated with tumor initiation and progression; approximately 90% of the activating mutations are found in codons 12 and 13 of exon 1 and just under 5% in codon 61 located in exon 2. These mutations determine single aminoacidic substitutions in the GTPase pocket leading to a block of the GTP hydrolytic activity of the K-ras p21 protein, and therefore to its constitutive activation. Point mutations in sites of the K-ras gene, other than codons 12, 13 and 61, and other types of genetic alterations, may occur in a minority of cases, such as in the less frequent cases of double mutations in the K-ras gene. However, all mutations in this gene, even those which occur in non-canonical sites or double mutations, are relevant oncogenic alterations in colorectal cancer and may underlie K-ras pathway hyperactivation. In the present study, we report the case of a patient with colorectal cancer presenting a concurrent point mutation in exons 1 and 2 of the K-ras gene, a GGT to TGT substitution (Glycine to Cysteine) at codon 12, and a GAC to AAC substitution (Aspartic Acid to Asparagine) at codon 57. In addition, we found in the same patient's sample a silent polymorphism at codon 11 (Ala11Ala) of exon 1.

  9. Importance of the REM (Ras exchange) domain for membrane interactions by RasGRP3.

    PubMed

    Czikora, Agnes; Kedei, Noemi; Kalish, Heather; Blumberg, Peter M

    2017-09-11

    RasGRP comprises a family of guanine nucleotide exchange factors, regulating the dissociation of GDP from Ras GTPases to enhance the formation of the active GTP-bound form. RasGRP1 possesses REM (Ras exchange), GEF (catalytic), EF-hand, C1, SuPT (suppressor of PT), and PT (plasma membrane-targeting) domains, among which the C1 domain drives membrane localization in response to diacylglycerol or phorbol ester and the PT domain recognizes phosphoinositides. The homologous family member RasGRP3 shows less plasma membrane localization. The objective of this study was to explore the role of the different domains of RasGRP3 in membrane translocation in response to phorbol esters. The full-length RasGRP3 shows limited translocation to the plasma membrane in response to PMA, even when the basic hydrophobic cluster in the PT domain, reported to be critical for RasGRP1 translocation to endogenous activators, is mutated to resemble that of RasGRP1. Moreover, exchange of the C-termini (SuPT-PT domain) of the two proteins had little effect on their plasma membrane translocation. On the other hand, while the C1 domain of RasGRP3 alone showed partial plasma membrane translocation, truncated RasGRP3 constructs, which contain the PT domain and are missing the REM, showed stronger translocation, indicating that the REM of RasGRP3 was a suppressor of its membrane interaction. The REM of RasGRP1 failed to show comparable suppression of RasGRP3 translocation. The marked differences between RasGRP3 and RasGRP1 in membrane interaction necessarily will contribute to their different behavior in cells and are relevant to the design of selective ligands as potential therapeutic agents. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Ras trafficking, localization and compartmentalized signalling.

    PubMed

    Prior, Ian A; Hancock, John F

    2012-04-01

    Ras proteins are proto-oncogenes that are frequently mutated in human cancers. Three closely related isoforms, HRAS, KRAS and NRAS, are expressed in all cells and have overlapping but distinctive functions. Recent work has revealed how differences between the Ras isoforms in their trafficking, localization and protein-membrane orientation enable signalling specificity to be determined. We review the various strategies used to characterize compartmentalized Ras localization and signalling. Localization is an important contextual modifier of signalling networks and insights from the Ras system are of widespread relevance for researchers interested in signalling initiated from membranes.

  11. Ras Regulates Rb via NORE1A.

    PubMed

    Barnoud, Thibaut; Donninger, Howard; Clark, Geoffrey J

    2016-02-05

    Mutations in the Ras oncogene are one of the most frequent events in human cancer. Although Ras regulates numerous growth-promoting pathways to drive transformation, it can paradoxically promote an irreversible cell cycle arrest known as oncogene-induced senescence. Although senescence has clearly been implicated as a major defense mechanism against tumorigenesis, the mechanisms by which Ras can promote such a senescent phenotype remain poorly defined. We have shown recently that the Ras death effector NORE1A plays a critical role in promoting Ras-induced senescence and connects Ras to the regulation of the p53 tumor suppressor. We now show that NORE1A also connects Ras to the regulation of a second major prosenescent tumor suppressor, the retinoblastoma (Rb) protein. We show that Ras induces the formation of a complex between NORE1A and the phosphatase PP1A, promoting the activation of the Rb tumor suppressor by dephosphorylation. Furthermore, suppression of Rb reduces NORE1A senescence activity. These results, together with our previous findings, suggest that NORE1A acts as a critical tumor suppressor node, linking Ras to both the p53 and the Rb pathways to drive senescence. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. Ras Regulates Rb via NORE1A*

    PubMed Central

    Barnoud, Thibaut; Donninger, Howard; Clark, Geoffrey J.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the Ras oncogene are one of the most frequent events in human cancer. Although Ras regulates numerous growth-promoting pathways to drive transformation, it can paradoxically promote an irreversible cell cycle arrest known as oncogene-induced senescence. Although senescence has clearly been implicated as a major defense mechanism against tumorigenesis, the mechanisms by which Ras can promote such a senescent phenotype remain poorly defined. We have shown recently that the Ras death effector NORE1A plays a critical role in promoting Ras-induced senescence and connects Ras to the regulation of the p53 tumor suppressor. We now show that NORE1A also connects Ras to the regulation of a second major prosenescent tumor suppressor, the retinoblastoma (Rb) protein. We show that Ras induces the formation of a complex between NORE1A and the phosphatase PP1A, promoting the activation of the Rb tumor suppressor by dephosphorylation. Furthermore, suppression of Rb reduces NORE1A senescence activity. These results, together with our previous findings, suggest that NORE1A acts as a critical tumor suppressor node, linking Ras to both the p53 and the Rb pathways to drive senescence. PMID:26677227

  13. [Clinical relevance of the K-ras oncogene in colorectal cancer: experience in a Mexican population].

    PubMed

    Cabrera-Mendoza, F; Gainza-Lagunes, S; Castañeda-Andrade, I; Castro-Zárate, A

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is frequent in the developed countries, with a cancer-specific mortality rate of 33%. Different biomarkers are associated with overall survival and the prediction of monoclonal treatment effectiveness. The presence of mutations in the K-ras oncogene alters the response to target therapy with cetuximab and could be an independent prognostic factor. To analyze the difference in survival between patients with mutated K-ras and those with K-ras wild-type status. Thirty-one clinical records were retrospectively analyzed of patients presenting with colorectal cancer that underwent K-ras sequencing through real-time polymerase chain reaction within the time frame of 2009 to 2012 at the Hospital de Alta Especialidad de Veracruz of the Instituto para la Salud y Seguridad Social de los Trabajadores del Estado (HAEV-ISSSTE). Survival analysis for patients with and without K-ras mutation was performed using the Kaplan Meier method. Contrast of covariates was performed using logarithmic transformations. No statistically significant difference was found in relation to survival in the patients with mutated K-ras vs. those with K-ras wild-type (P=.416), nor were significant differences found when analyzing the covariants and survival in the patients with mutated K-ras: ECOG scale (P=.221); age (less than, equal to or greater than 65years, P=.441); clinical stage according to the AJCC (P=.057), and primary lesion site (P=.614). No relation was found between the K-ras oncogene mutation and reduced survival, in contrast to what has been established in the international medical literature. Further studies that include both a larger number of patients and those receiving monoclonal treatment, need to be conducted. There were only 5 patients in the present study that received cetuximab, resulting in a misleading analysis. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Mexicana de Gastroenterología. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  14. Converging or Diverging Lens?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branca, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Why does a lens magnify? Why does it shrink objects? Why does this happen? The activities that we propose here are useful in helping us to understand how lenses work, and they show that the same lens can have different magnification capabilities. A converging lens can also act as a diverging lens. (Contains 4 figures.)

  15. Converging or Diverging Lens?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branca, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Why does a lens magnify? Why does it shrink objects? Why does this happen? The activities that we propose here are useful in helping us to understand how lenses work, and they show that the same lens can have different magnification capabilities. A converging lens can also act as a diverging lens. (Contains 4 figures.)

  16. Contact lens in keratoconus

    PubMed Central

    Rathi, Varsha M; Mandathara, Preeji S; Dumpati, Srikanth

    2013-01-01

    Contact lenses are required for the visual improvement in patients with keratoconus. Various contact lens options, such as rigid gas permeable (RGP) lenses, soft and soft toric lenses, piggy back contact lenses (PBCL), hybrid lenses and scleral lenses are availble. This article discusses about selection of a lens depending on the type of keratoconus and the fitting philosophies of various contact lenses including the starting trial lens. A Medline search was carried out for articles in the English language with the keywords keratoconus and various contact lenses such as Rose k lens, RGP lens, hybrid lens, scleral lens and PBCL. PMID:23925325

  17. The Lens Capsule

    PubMed Central

    Danysh, Brian P.; Duncan, Melinda K.

    2009-01-01

    The lens capsule is a modified basement membrane that completely surrounds the ocular lens. It is known that this extracellular matrix is important for both the structure and biomechanics of the lens in addition to providing informational cues to maintain lens cell phenotype. This review covers the development and structure of the lens capsule, lens diseases associated with mutations in extracellular matrix genes and the role of the capsule in lens function including those proposed for visual accommodation, selective permeability to infectious agents, and cell signaling. PMID:18773892

  18. Implication of K-ras and p53 in colorectal cancer carcinogenesis in Tunisian population cohort.

    PubMed

    Ines, Chaar; Donia, Ounissi; Rahma, Boughriba; Ben Ammar, Azza; Sameh, Amara; Khalfallah, Taher; Abdelmajid, Ben Hmida; Sabeh, Mzabi; Saadia, Bouraoui

    2014-07-01

    According to the multistep route of genetic alterations in the colorectal adenoma-carcinoma sequence, the complex K-ras/p53 mutation is one of the first alterations to occur and represent an important genetic event in colorectal cancer (CRC). An evaluation of the mutation spectra in K-ras and p53 gene was effected in 167 Tunisian patients with sporadic CRC to determine whether our populations have similar pattern of genetic alteration as in Maghrebin's population. Mutation patterns of codon 12-13 of K-ras and exon 5-8 of p53 were analyzed by immunohistochemistry and PCR-SSCP and confirmed by sequencing. Mutations in the K-ras gene were detected in 31.13 % and affect the women more than the men (p = 0.008). Immunostaining showed that expression of p21 ras was correlated with the advanced age (p = 0.004), whereas loss of signal was associated with mucinous histotype (p = 0.003). Kaplan-Meier survival curve found that patients with the K-ras mutation had a shorter survival compared with patients without mutation (p = 0.005). Alteration in p53 was seen in 17.4 % of patients and affects three hot spot codons such as 175, 245, and 248. Overexpression of p53 was seen in 34.1 % and correlated with tumor node metastasis (TNM) advanced stage (p = 0.037) and mucinous histotype (p = 0.001). A high concordance between p53 expression and alteration (p<0.005) was shown. Concomitant mutations in K-ras and p53 gene were detected in only 4 % of tumors. K-ras and p53 undergo separate pathways in colorectal tumorogenesis. Interestingly, mutations in the K-ras gene might be considered a valuable prognostic factor correlated to poor outcome. p53 gene alterations were rather low in our set, and methylation pattern of p53 is required to elucidate the molecular basis of this protein in CRC.

  19. Targeting RAS Membrane Association: Back to the Future for Anti-RAS Drug Discovery?

    PubMed

    Cox, Adrienne D; Der, Channing J; Philips, Mark R

    2015-04-15

    RAS proteins require membrane association for their biologic activity, making this association a logical target for anti-RAS therapeutics. Lipid modification of RAS proteins by a farnesyl isoprenoid is an obligate step in that association, and is an enzymatic process. Accordingly, farnesyltransferase inhibitors (FTI) were developed as potential anti-RAS drugs. The lack of efficacy of FTIs as anticancer drugs was widely seen as indicating that blocking RAS membrane association was a flawed approach to cancer treatment. However, a deeper understanding of RAS modification and trafficking has revealed that this was an erroneous conclusion. In the presence of FTIs, KRAS and NRAS, which are the RAS isoforms most frequently mutated in cancer, become substrates for alternative modification, can still associate with membranes, and can still function. Thus, FTIs failed not because blocking RAS membrane association is an ineffective approach, but because FTIs failed to accomplish that task. Recent findings regarding RAS isoform trafficking and the regulation of RAS subcellular localization have rekindled interest in efforts to target these processes. In particular, improved understanding of the palmitoylation/depalmitoylation cycle that regulates RAS interaction with the plasma membrane, endomembranes, and cytosol, and of the potential importance of RAS chaperones, have led to new approaches. Efforts to validate and target other enzymatically regulated posttranslational modifications are also ongoing. In this review, we revisit lessons learned, describe the current state of the art, and highlight challenging but promising directions to achieve the goal of disrupting RAS membrane association and subcellular localization for anti-RAS drug development. Clin Cancer Res; 21(8); 1819-27. ©2015 AACR. See all articles in this CCR Focus section, "Targeting RAS-Driven Cancers."

  20. Degradation of Activated K-Ras Orthologue via K-Ras-specific Lysine Residues Is Required for Cytokinesis*

    PubMed Central

    Sumita, Kazutaka; Yoshino, Hirofumi; Sasaki, Mika; Majd, Nazanin; Kahoud, Emily Rose; Takahashi, Hidenori; Takeuchi, Koh; Kuroda, Taruho; Lee, Susan; Charest, Pascale G.; Takeda, Kosuke; Asara, John M.; Firtel, Richard A.; Anastasiou, Dimitrios; Sasaki, Atsuo T.

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian cells encode three closely related Ras proteins, H-Ras, N-Ras, and K-Ras. Oncogenic K-Ras mutations frequently occur in human cancers, which lead to dysregulated cell proliferation and genomic instability. However, mechanistic role of the Ras isoform regulation have remained largely unknown. Furthermore, the dynamics and function of negative regulation of GTP-loaded K-Ras have not been fully investigated. Here, we demonstrate RasG, the Dictyostelium orthologue of K-Ras, is targeted for degradation by polyubiquitination. Both ubiquitination and degradation of RasG were strictly associated with RasG activity. High resolution tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis indicated that RasG ubiquitination occurs at C-terminal lysines equivalent to lysines found in human K-Ras but not in H-Ras and N-Ras homologues. Substitution of these lysine residues with arginines (4KR-RasG) diminished RasG ubiquitination and increased RasG protein stability. Cells expressing 4KR-RasG failed to undergo proper cytokinesis and resulted in multinucleated cells. Ectopically expressed human K-Ras undergoes polyubiquitin-mediated degradation in Dictyostelium, whereas human H-Ras and a Dictyostelium H-Ras homologue (RasC) are refractory to ubiquitination. Our results indicate the existence of GTP-loaded K-Ras orthologue-specific degradation system in Dictyostelium, and further identification of the responsible E3-ligase may provide a novel therapeutic approach against K-Ras-mutated cancers. PMID:24338482

  1. ras gene Amplification and malignant transformation.

    PubMed Central

    Pulciani, S; Santos, E; Long, L K; Sorrentino, V; Barbacid, M

    1985-01-01

    Morphologic transformation of NIH 3T3 mouse cells occurs upon transfection of these cells with large amounts (greater than or equal to 10 micrograms) of recombinant DNA molecules carrying the normal human H-ras-1 proto-oncogene. We provide experimental evidence indicating that transformation of these NIH 3T3 cells results from the combined effect of multiple copies of the H-ras-1 proto-oncogene rather than from spontaneous mutation of one of the transfected H-ras-1 clones (E. Santos, E.P. Reddy, S. Pulciani, R.J. Feldman, and M. Barbacid, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 80:4679-4683, 1983). Levels of H-ras-1 RNA and p21 expression are highly elevated in the NIH 3T3 transformants, and in those cases examined, these levels correlate with the malignant properties of these cells. We have also investigated the presence of amplified ras genes in a variety of human carcinomas. In 75 tumor biopsies, we found amplification of the human K-ras-2 locus in one carcinoma of the lung. These results indicate that ras gene amplification is an alternative pathway by which ras genes may participate in the development of human neoplasia. Images PMID:3915535

  2. Optimizing depuration of salmon in RAS

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fish cultured within water recirculating aquaculture systems (RAS) can acquire "earthy" or "musty" off-flavors due to bioaccumulation of the compounds geosmin and 2-methylisoborneol (MIB), respectively, which are produced by certain bacterial species present in RAS biosolids and microbial biofilms. ...

  3. Where no Ras has gone before: VPS35 steers N-Ras through the cytosol.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Mo; Philips, Mark R

    2017-01-27

    Ras is the best-studied member of the superfamily of small GTPases because of its role in cancer. Ras proteins transmit signals for proliferation, differentiation and survival. Three RAS genes encode 4 isoforms. All Ras isoforms have long been considered membrane bound, a localization required for function. Our recent study revealed that N-Ras differs from all other isoforms in being largely cytosolic even following modification with a prenyl lipid. Endogenous, cytosolic N-Ras chromatographed in both high and low molecular weight pools, a pattern that required prenylation, suggesting prenyl-dependent interaction with other proteins. VPS35, a coat protein of the retromer, was shown to interact with prenylated N-Ras in the cytosol. Silencing VPS35 results in partial N-Ras mislocalization on vesicular and tubulovesicular structures, reduced GTP-loading of Ras proteins, and inhibited proliferation and MAPK signaling in an oncogenic N-Ras-driven tumor cell line. Our data revealed a novel regulator of N-Ras trafficking and signaling.

  4. Molecular interaction between K-Ras and H-REV107 in the Ras signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Han, Chang Woo; Jeong, Mi Suk; Jang, Se Bok

    2017-09-16

    Ras proteins are small GTPases that serve as master moderators of a large number of signaling pathways involved in various cellular processes. Activating mutations in Ras are found in about one-third of cancers. H-REV107, a K-Ras binding protein, plays an important role in determining K-Ras function. H-REV107 is a member of the HREV107 family of class II tumor suppressor genes and a growth inhibitory Ras target gene that suppresses cellular growth, differentiation, and apoptosis. Expression of H-REV107 was strongly reduced in about 50% of human carcinoma cell lines. However, the specific molecular mechanism by which H-REV107 inhibits Ras is still unknown. In the present study, we suggest that H-REV107 forms a strong complex with activating oncogenic mutation Q61H K-Ras from various biochemical binding assays and modeled structures. In addition, the interaction sites between K-Ras and H-REV107 were predicted based on homology modeling. Here, we found that some structure-based mutants of the K-Ras disrupted the complex formation with H-REV107. Finally, a novel molecular mechanism describing K-Ras and H-REV107 binding is suggested and insights into new K-Ras effector target drugs are provided. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. SIRT6 regulates Ras-related protein R-Ras2 by lysine defatty-acylation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoyu; Spiegelman, Nicole A; Nelson, Ornella D; Jing, Hui; Lin, Hening

    2017-04-13

    The Ras family of GTPases are important in cell signaling and frequently mutated in human tumors. Understanding their regulation is thus important for studying biology and human diseases. Here, we report that a novel posttranslational mechanism, reversible lysine fatty acylation, regulates R-Ras2, a member of the Ras family. SIRT6, a sirtuin with established tumor suppressor function, regulates the lysine fatty acylation of R-Ras2. In mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs), Sirt6 knockout (KO) increased R-Ras2 lysine fatty acylation. Lysine fatty acylation promotes the plasma membrane localization of R-Ras2 and its interaction with phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase PI3K, leading to activated Akt and increased cell proliferation. Our study establishes lysine fatty acylation as a previously unknown mechanism that regulates the Ras family of GTPases and provides an important mechanism by which SIRT6 functions as a tumor suppressor.

  6. Ras oncogene and inflammation: partners in crime.

    PubMed

    Sparmann, Anke; Bar-Sagi, Dafna

    2005-06-01

    It is well established that Ras oncogenes facilitate neoplastic conversion by stimulating tumor cell growth, survival and motility. However, current studies have indicated that the role of Ras in malignant transformation extends beyond these cell-intrinsic effects to include the establishment of a pro-tumorigenic host environment. We have recently demonstrated that Ras-induced secretion of the chemokine Interleukin-8 (CXCL-8/IL-8) elicits a local inflammatory reaction that is critical for neo-vascularization and sustained tumor growth. Our data identify a novel mechanism by which the Ras oncogene promotes tumor-host interactions that are essential for cancer progression, and suggest that CXCL-8 could serve as a surrogate marker for in-vivo Ras activity.

  7. Isolation of two novel ras genes in Dictyostelium discoideum; evidence for a complex, developmentally regulated ras gene subfamily.

    PubMed

    Daniel, J; Bush, J; Cardelli, J; Spiegelman, G B; Weeks, G

    1994-02-01

    In Dictyostelium discoideum, three ras genes (rasD, rasG and rasB) and one ras-related gene (rap1) have been previously isolated and characterized, and the deduced amino acid sequence of their predicted protein products share at least 50% sequence identity with the human H-Ras protein. We have now cloned and characterized two additional members of the ras gene subfamily in Dictyostelium, rasC and rasS. These genes are developmentally regulated and unlike the previously isolated Dictyostelium ras genes, maximum levels of their transcripts were detected during aggregation, suggesting that the encoded proteins have distinct functions during aggregation. The rasC cDNA encodes a 189 amino acid protein that is 65% identical to the Dictyostelium RasD and RasG proteins and 56% identical to the human H-Ras protein. The predicted 194 amino acid gene product encoded by rasS is 60% identical to the Dictyostelium RasD and RasG proteins and 54% identical to the human H-Ras protein. Whereas RasD, RasG, RasB and Rap1 are totally conserved in their putative effector domains relative to H-Ras, RasC and RasS have single amino acid substitutions in their effector domains, consistent with the idea that they have unique functions. In RasC, aspartic acid-38 has been replaced by asparagine (D38N), and in RasS, isoleucine-36 has been replaced by leucine (I36L). In addition, both proteins have several differences in the effector-proximal domain, a domain which is believed to play a role in Ras target activation. In RasC, there is a single conservative amino acid change in the canonical sequence of the binding site for the Ras-specific monoclonal antibody Y13-259, and consequently, RasC is less immunoreactive with the antibody than either of the Dictyostelium RasD or RasG proteins. In contrast, RasS, which has three substitutions in the Y13-259 binding site, does not react with the Y13-259 antibody.

  8. Targeting RAS Membrane Association: Back to the Future for Anti-RAS Drug Discovery?

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Adrienne D.; Der, Channing J.; Philips, Mark R.

    2015-01-01

    RAS proteins require membrane association for their biological activity, making this association a logical target for anti-RAS therapeutics. Lipid modification of RAS proteins by a farnesyl isoprenoid is an obligate step in that association, and is an enzymatic process. Accordingly, farnesyltransferase inhibitors (FTIs) were developed as potential anti-RAS drugs. The lack of efficacy of FTIs as anti-cancer drugs was widely seen as indicating that blocking RAS membrane association was a flawed approach to cancer treatment. However, a deeper understanding of RAS modification and trafficking has revealed that this was an erroneous conclusion. In the presence of FTIs, KRAS and NRAS, which are the RAS isoforms most frequently mutated in cancer, become substrates for alternative modification, can still associate with membranes, and can still function. Thus, FTIs failed not because blocking RAS membrane association is an ineffective approach, but because FTIs failed to accomplish that task. Recent findings regarding RAS isoform trafficking and the regulation of RAS subcellular localization have rekindled interest in efforts to target these processes. In particular, improved understanding of the palmitoylation/depalmitoylation cycle that regulates RAS interaction with the plasma membrane, endomembranes and cytosol, and of the potential importance of RAS chaperones, have led to new approaches. Efforts to validate and target other enzymatically regulated post-translational modifications are also ongoing. In this review, we revisit lessons learned, describe the current state of the art, and highlight challenging but promising directions to achieve the goal of disrupting RAS membrane association and subcellular localization for anti-RAS drug development. PMID:25878363

  9. Astigmatism of the Ex Vivo Human Lens: Surface and Gradient Refractive Index Age-Dependent Contributions.

    PubMed

    Birkenfeld, Judith; de Castro, Alberto; Marcos, Susana

    2015-08-01

    We estimated the contribution of the gradient refractive index (GRIN) and lens surfaces to lens astigmatism and lens astigmatic angle as a function of age in human donor lenses. Human lenses were imaged, ex vivo, with 3D-spectral optical coherence tomography (OCT) and their back focal length was measured using laser ray tracing. The contribution of lens surfaces and GRIN to lens astigmatism were evaluated by computational ray tracing on the GRIN lens and a homogenous equivalent index lens. Astigmatism magnitude and relative astigmatic angle of and between lens surfaces, GRIN lens, and lens with homogeneous refractive index were evaluated, and all results were correlated with age. The magnitude of astigmatism in the anterior lens surface decreased with age (slope = -0.005 diopters [D]/y; r = 0.397, P = 0.018). Posterior surface astigmatism and lens astigmatism were not age-dependent. Presence of GRIN did not alter significantly the magnitude or axis of the lens astigmatism. The astigmatism of GRIN lens and lens with homogeneous refractive index correlated with anterior lens surface astigmatism (GRIN, P = 3.9E - 6, r = 0.693; equivalent refractive index lens, P = 4.1E - 4, r = 0.565). The astigmatic angle of posterior surface, GRIN lens, and homogeneous refractive index lens did not change significantly with age. The axis of lens astigmatism is close to the astigmatic axis of the anterior lens surface. Age-related changes in lens astigmatism appear to be related to changes in the anterior lens astigmatism. The influence of the GRIN on lens astigmatism and the astigmatic axis is minor.

  10. Membrane-associated Ras dimers are isoform-specific: K-Ras dimers differ from H-Ras dimers.

    PubMed

    Jang, Hyunbum; Muratcioglu, Serena; Gursoy, Attila; Keskin, Ozlem; Nussinov, Ruth

    2016-06-15

    Are the dimer structures of active Ras isoforms similar? This question is significant since Ras can activate its effectors as a monomer; however, as a dimer, it promotes Raf's activation and MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) cell signalling. In the present study, we model possible catalytic domain dimer interfaces of membrane-anchored GTP-bound K-Ras4B and H-Ras, and compare their conformations. The active helical dimers formed by the allosteric lobe are isoform-specific: K-Ras4B-GTP favours the α3 and α4 interface; H-Ras-GTP favours α4 and α5. Both isoforms also populate a stable β-sheet dimer interface formed by the effector lobe; a less stable β-sandwich interface is sustained by salt bridges of the β-sheet side chains. Raf's high-affinity β-sheet interaction is promoted by the active helical interface. Collectively, Ras isoforms' dimer conformations are not uniform; instead, the isoform-specific dimers reflect the favoured interactions of the HVRs (hypervariable regions) with cell membrane microdomains, biasing the effector-binding site orientations, thus isoform binding selectivity.

  11. Maternal RAS influence on the ontogeny of thirst.

    PubMed

    Perillan, C; Costales, M; Vijande, M; Arguelles, J

    2007-11-23

    Perillan, C., Costales, M., Vijande, M., and J. Arguelles. Maternal RAS influence on the ontogeny of thirst. Physiol Behav XX (X) 000-000, 2006. The main objective of this study was to investigate the effect of an altered ambiance in utero, on the development of thirst mechanisms in the offspring. Female rats underwent a partial ligature of the aorta (PAL), which induces an intrinsic activation of the renin angiotensin system (RAS), thirst and sodium appetite. A second group of female rats was treated with desoxycorticosterone (DOCA) which depresses the RAS. The offspring of these two groups were tested for their responses to several thirst stimuli at 2, 4 and 6 days of age. The offspring from PAL mothers responded like their controls to cellular dehydration (NaCl hypertonic injection) at 2 days of age, and also did to extracellular dehydration by polyethyleneglycol at 4 days. Nevertheless, they responded more to isoproterenol at 6 days of age in comparison to their control group. The offspring from DOCA treated mothers did not show statistically significant responses (in comparison with vehicle injected pups) to hypertonic NaCl at two days nor to polyethyleneglycol at four days. Water intake at 6 days of age after isoproterenol administration in DOCA was statistically enhanced, but not differently from the response obtained from pseudo-DOCA treated pups. In particular, rats developed in a hypereninemic ambiance (O-PAL) during gestation, responded with higher water intake when treated with a strong RAS and thirst activator (isoproterenol) but responded normally to a more gentle and complex stimulus (PG). Therefore it seems that in utero conditions can determine the chronology and intensity of thirst responses in offspring.

  12. Acute sensitivity of the oral mucosa to oncogenic K-ras

    PubMed Central

    van der Weyden, Louise; Alcolea, Maria P; Jones, Philip H; Rust, Alistair G; Arends, Mark J; Adams, David J

    2011-01-01

    Mouse models of cancer represent powerful tools for analysing the role of genetic alterations in carcinogenesis. Using a mouse model that allows tamoxifen-inducible somatic activation (by Cre-mediated recombination) of oncogenic K-rasG12D in a wide range of tissues, we observed hyperplasia of squamous epithelium located in moist or frequently abraded mucosa, with the most dramatic effects in the oral mucosa. This epithelium showed a sequence of squamous hyperplasia followed by squamous papilloma with dysplasia, in which some areas progressed to early invasive squamous cell carcinoma, within 14 days of widespread oncogenic K-ras activation. The marked proliferative response of the oral mucosa to K-rasG12D was most evident in the basal layers of the squamous epithelium of the outer lip with hair follicles and wet mucosal surface, with these cells staining positively for pAKT and cyclin D1, showing Ras/AKT pathway activation and increased proliferation with Ki-67 and EdU positivity. The stromal cells also showed gene activation by recombination and immunopositivity for pERK indicating K-Ras/ERK pathway activation, but without Ki-67 positivity or increase in stromal proliferation. The oral neoplasms showed changes in the expression pattern of cytokeratins (CK6 and CK13), similar to those observed in human oral tumours. Sporadic activation of the K-rasG12D allele (due to background spontaneous recombination in occasional cells) resulted in the development of benign oral squamous papillomas only showing a mild degree of dysplasia with no invasion. In summary, we show that oral mucosa is acutely sensitive to oncogenic K-ras, as widespread expression of activated K-ras in the murine oral mucosal squamous epithelium and underlying stroma can drive the oral squamous papilloma–carcinoma sequence. Copyright © 2011 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:21381032

  13. Mapping the functional versatility and fragility of Ras GTPase signaling circuits through in vitro network reconstitution

    PubMed Central

    Coyle, Scott M; Lim, Wendell A

    2016-01-01

    The Ras-superfamily GTPases are central controllers of cell proliferation and morphology. Ras signaling is mediated by a system of interacting molecules: upstream enzymes (GEF/GAP) regulate Ras’s ability to recruit multiple competing downstream effectors. We developed a multiplexed, multi-turnover assay for measuring the dynamic signaling behavior of in vitro reconstituted H-Ras signaling systems. By including both upstream regulators and downstream effectors, we can systematically map how different network configurations shape the dynamic system response. The concentration and identity of both upstream and downstream signaling components strongly impacted the timing, duration, shape, and amplitude of effector outputs. The distorted output of oncogenic alleles of Ras was highly dependent on the balance of positive (GAP) and negative (GEF) regulators in the system. We found that different effectors interpreted the same inputs with distinct output dynamics, enabling a Ras system to encode multiple unique temporal outputs in response to a single input. We also found that different Ras-to-GEF positive feedback mechanisms could reshape output dynamics in distinct ways, such as signal amplification or overshoot minimization. Mapping of the space of output behaviors accessible to Ras provides a design manual for programming Ras circuits, and reveals how these systems are readily adapted to produce an array of dynamic signaling behaviors. Nonetheless, this versatility comes with a trade-off of fragility, as there exist numerous paths to altered signaling behaviors that could cause disease. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12435.001 PMID:26765565

  14. Contact Lens Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... For Consumers Consumer Information by Audience For Women Contact Lens Care Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ... 1088, www.fda.gov/medwatch Learn More about Contact Lens Care Other Tips on Contact Lenses Decorative ...

  15. MicroRNA-based Therapeutic Strategies for Targeting Mutant and Wild Type RAS in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sriganesh B.; Ruppert, J. Michael

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRs) have been causally implicated in the progression and development of a wide variety of cancers. miRs modulate the activity of key cell signaling networks by regulating the translation of pathway component proteins. Thus, the pharmacological targeting of miRs that regulate cancer cell signaling networks, either by promoting (using miR-supplementation) or by suppressing (using anti-sense oligonucleotide based strategies) miR activity is an area of intense research. The RAS-Extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) pathway represents a major miR-regulated signaling network that endows cells with some of the classical hallmarks of cancer, and is often inappropriately activated in malignancies by somatic genetic alteration through point mutation or alteration of gene copy number. In addition, recent progress indicates that many tumors may be deficient in GTPase activating proteins (GAPs) due to the collaborative action of oncogenic microRNAs. Recent studies also suggest that in tumors harboring a mutant RAS allele there is a critical role for wild type RAS proteins in determining overall RAS-ERK pathway activity. Together, these two advances comprise a new opportunity for therapeutic intervention. In this review, we evaluate miR-based therapeutic strategies for modulating RAS-ERK signaling in cancers, in particular for more direct modulation of RAS-GTP levels, with the potential to complement current strategies in order to yield more durable treatment responses. To this end, we discuss the potential for miR-based therapies focused on three prominent miRs including the pan-RAS regulator let-7 and the GAP regulator comprised of miR-206 and miR-21 (miR-206/21). PMID:26284568

  16. Conditional deletion of beta1-integrin from the developing lens leads to loss of the lens epithelial phenotype.

    PubMed

    Simirskii, Vladimir N; Wang, Yan; Duncan, Melinda K

    2007-06-15

    Beta1-integrins are cell surface receptors that participate in sensing the cell's external environment. We used the Cre-lox system to delete beta1-integrin in all lens cells as the lens vesicle transitions into the lens. Adult mice lacking beta1-integrin in the lens are microphthalmic due to apoptosis of the lens epithelium and neonatal disintegration of the lens fibers. The first morphological alterations in beta1-integrin null lenses are seen at 16.5 dpc when the epithelium becomes disorganized and begins to upregulate the fiber cell markers beta- and gamma-crystallins, the transcription factors cMaf and Prox1 and downregulate Pax6 levels demonstrating that beta1-integrin is essential to maintain the lens epithelial phenotype. Furthermore, beta1-integrin null lens epithelial cells upregulate the expression of alpha-smooth muscle actin and nuclear Smad4 and downregulate Smad6 suggesting that beta1-integrin may brake TGFbeta family signaling leading to epithelial-mesenchymal transitions in the lens. In contrast, beta1-integrin null lens epithelial cells show increased E-cadherin immunoreactivity which supports the proposed role of beta1-integrins in mediating complete EMT in response to TGFbeta family members. Thus, beta1-integrin is required to maintain the lens epithelial phenotype and block inappropriate activation of some aspects of the lens fiber cell differentiation program.

  17. Regulation of Ras Exchange Factors and Cellular Localization of Ras Activation by Lipid Messengers in T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Jesse E.; Rubio, Ignacio; Roose, Jeroen P.

    2013-01-01

    The Ras-MAPK signaling pathway is highly conserved throughout evolution and is activated downstream of a wide range of receptor stimuli. Ras guanine nucleotide exchange factors (RasGEFs) catalyze GTP loading of Ras and play a pivotal role in regulating receptor-ligand induced Ras activity. In T cells, three families of functionally important RasGEFs are expressed: RasGRF, RasGRP, and Son of Sevenless (SOS)-family GEFs. Early on it was recognized that Ras activation is critical for T cell development and that the RasGEFs play an important role herein. More recent work has revealed that nuances in Ras activation appear to significantly impact T cell development and selection. These nuances include distinct biochemical patterns of analog versus digital Ras activation, differences in cellular localization of Ras activation, and intricate interplays between the RasGEFs during distinct T cell developmental stages as revealed by various new mouse models. In many instances, the exact nature of these nuances in Ras activation or how these may result from fine-tuning of the RasGEFs is not understood. One large group of biomolecules critically involved in the control of RasGEFs functions are lipid second messengers. Multiple, yet distinct lipid products are generated following T cell receptor (TCR) stimulation and bind to different domains in the RasGRP and SOS RasGEFs to facilitate the activation of the membrane-anchored Ras GTPases. In this review we highlight how different lipid-based elements are generated by various enzymes downstream of the TCR and other receptors and how these dynamic and interrelated lipid products may fine-tune Ras activation by RasGEFs in developing T cells. PMID:24027568

  18. Novel aspects of Ras proteins biology: regulation and implications.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Sala, D; Rebollo, A

    1999-08-01

    The importance of Ras proteins as crucial crossroads in cellular signaling pathways has been well established. In spite of the elucidation of the mechanism of RAS activation by growth factors and the delineation of MAP kinase cascades, the overall framework of Ras interactions is far from being complete. Novel regulators of Ras GDP/GTP exchange have been identified that may mediate the activation of Ras in response to changes in intracellular calcium and diacylglycerol. The direct activation of Ras by free radicals such as nitric oxide also suggests potential regulation of Ras function by the cellular redox state. In addition, the array of Ras effectors continues to expand, uncovering links between Ras and other cellular signaling pathways. Ras is emerging as a dual regulator of cellular functions, playing either positive or negative roles in the regulation of proliferation and apoptosis. The signals transmitted by Ras may be modulated by other pathways triggered in parallel, resulting in the final order for proliferation or apoptosis. The diversity of ras-mediated effects may be related in part to differential involvement of Ras homologues in distinct cellular processes. The study of Ras posttranslational modifications has yielded a broad battery of inhibitors that have been envisaged as anti-cancer agents. Although an irreversible modification, Ras isoprenylation appears to be modulated by growth factors and by the activity of the isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway, which may lead to changes in Ras activity.

  19. Cell surface protease activation during RAS transformation: Critical role of the plasminogen receptor, S100A10

    PubMed Central

    Madureira, Patricia A.; Bharadwaj, Alamelu G.; Bydoun, Moamen; Garant, Katy; O'Connell, Paul; Lee, Patrick; Waisman, David M.

    2016-01-01

    The link between oncogenic RAS expression and the acquisition of the invasive phenotype has been attributed to alterations in cellular activities that control degradation of the extracellular matrix. Oncogenic RAS-mediated upregulation of matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2), MMP-9 and urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) is critical for invasion through the basement membrane and extracellular matrix. The uPA converts cell surface-bound plasminogen to plasmin, a process that is regulated by the binding of plasminogen to specific receptors on the cell surface, however, the identity of the plasminogen receptors that function in this capacity is unclear. We have observed that transformation of cancer cells with oncogenic forms of RAS increases plasmin proteolytic activity by 2- to 4-fold concomitant with a 3-fold increase in cell invasion. Plasminogen receptor profiling revealed RAS-dependent increases in both S100A10 and cytokeratin 8. Oncogenic RAS expression increased S100A10 gene expression which resulted in an increase in S100A10 protein levels. Analysis with the RAS effector-loop mutants that interact specifically with Raf, Ral GDS pathways highlighted the importance of the RalGDS pathways in the regulation of S100A10 gene expression. Depletion of S100A10 from RAS-transformed cells resulted in a loss of both cellular plasmin generation and invasiveness. These results strongly suggest that increases in cell surface levels of S100A10, by oncogenic RAS, plays a critical role in RAS-stimulated plasmin generation, and subsequently, in the invasiveness of oncogenic RAS expressing cancer cells. PMID:27351226

  20. SPRED1 Interferes with K-ras but Not H-ras Membrane Anchorage and Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Siljamäki, Elina

    2016-01-01

    The Ras/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway is tightly controlled by negative feedback regulators, such as the tumor suppressor SPRED1. The SPRED1 gene also carries loss-of-function mutations in the RASopathy Legius syndrome. Growth factor stimulation translocates SPRED1 to the plasma membrane, triggering its inhibitory activity. However, it remains unclear whether SPRED1 there acts at the level of Ras or Raf. We show that pharmacological or galectin-1 (Gal-1)-mediated induction of B- and C-Raf-containing dimers translocates SPRED1 to the plasma membrane. This is facilitated in particular by SPRED1 interaction with B-Raf and, via its N terminus, with Gal-1. The physiological significance of these novel interactions is supported by two Legius syndrome-associated mutations that show diminished binding to both Gal-1 and B-Raf. On the plasma membrane, SPRED1 becomes enriched in acidic membrane domains to specifically perturb membrane organization and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling of active K-ras4B (here, K-ras) but not H-ras. However, SPRED1 also blocks on the nanoscale the positive effects of Gal-1 on H-ras. Therefore, a combinatorial expression of SPRED1 and Gal-1 potentially regulates specific patterns of K-ras- and H-ras-dependent signaling output. More broadly, our results open up the possibility that related SPRED and Sprouty proteins act in a similar Ras and Raf isoform-specific manner. PMID:27503857

  1. SPRED1 Interferes with K-ras but Not H-ras Membrane Anchorage and Signaling.

    PubMed

    Siljamäki, Elina; Abankwa, Daniel

    2016-10-15

    The Ras/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway is tightly controlled by negative feedback regulators, such as the tumor suppressor SPRED1. The SPRED1 gene also carries loss-of-function mutations in the RASopathy Legius syndrome. Growth factor stimulation translocates SPRED1 to the plasma membrane, triggering its inhibitory activity. However, it remains unclear whether SPRED1 there acts at the level of Ras or Raf. We show that pharmacological or galectin-1 (Gal-1)-mediated induction of B- and C-Raf-containing dimers translocates SPRED1 to the plasma membrane. This is facilitated in particular by SPRED1 interaction with B-Raf and, via its N terminus, with Gal-1. The physiological significance of these novel interactions is supported by two Legius syndrome-associated mutations that show diminished binding to both Gal-1 and B-Raf. On the plasma membrane, SPRED1 becomes enriched in acidic membrane domains to specifically perturb membrane organization and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling of active K-ras4B (here, K-ras) but not H-ras. However, SPRED1 also blocks on the nanoscale the positive effects of Gal-1 on H-ras. Therefore, a combinatorial expression of SPRED1 and Gal-1 potentially regulates specific patterns of K-ras- and H-ras-dependent signaling output. More broadly, our results open up the possibility that related SPRED and Sprouty proteins act in a similar Ras and Raf isoform-specific manner.

  2. Phosphorylation of synaptic GTPase-activating protein (synGAP) by Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) and cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) alters the ratio of its GAP activity toward Ras and Rap GTPases.

    PubMed

    Walkup, Ward G; Washburn, Lorraine; Sweredoski, Michael J; Carlisle, Holly J; Graham, Robert L; Hess, Sonja; Kennedy, Mary B

    2015-02-20

    synGAP is a neuron-specific Ras and Rap GTPase-activating protein (GAP) found in high concentrations in the postsynaptic density (PSD) fraction from the mammalian forebrain. We have previously shown that, in situ in the PSD fraction or in recombinant form in Sf9 cell membranes, synGAP is phosphorylated by Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), another prominent component of the PSD. Here, we show that recombinant synGAP (r-synGAP), lacking 102 residues at the N terminus, can be purified in soluble form and is phosphorylated by cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) as well as by CaMKII. Phosphorylation of r-synGAP by CaMKII increases its HRas GAP activity by 25% and its Rap1 GAP activity by 76%. Conversely, phosphorylation by CDK5 increases r-synGAP's HRas GAP activity by 98% and its Rap1 GAP activity by 20%. Thus, phosphorylation by both kinases increases synGAP activity; CaMKII shifts the relative GAP activity toward inactivation of Rap1, and CDK5 shifts the relative activity toward inactivation of HRas. GAP activity toward Rap2 is not altered by phosphorylation by either kinase. CDK5 phosphorylates synGAP primarily at two sites, Ser-773 and Ser-802. Phosphorylation at Ser-773 inhibits r-synGAP activity, and phosphorylation at Ser-802 increases it. However, the net effect of concurrent phosphorylation of both sites, Ser-773 and Ser-802, is an increase in GAP activity. synGAP is phosphorylated at Ser-773 and Ser-802 in the PSD fraction, and its phosphorylation by CDK5 and CaMKII is differentially regulated by activation of NMDA-type glutamate receptors in cultured neurons. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Phosphorylation of Synaptic GTPase-activating Protein (synGAP) by Ca2+/Calmodulin-dependent Protein Kinase II (CaMKII) and Cyclin-dependent Kinase 5 (CDK5) Alters the Ratio of Its GAP Activity toward Ras and Rap GTPases*

    PubMed Central

    Walkup, Ward G.; Washburn, Lorraine; Sweredoski, Michael J.; Carlisle, Holly J.; Graham, Robert L.; Hess, Sonja; Kennedy, Mary B.

    2015-01-01

    synGAP is a neuron-specific Ras and Rap GTPase-activating protein (GAP) found in high concentrations in the postsynaptic density (PSD) fraction from the mammalian forebrain. We have previously shown that, in situ in the PSD fraction or in recombinant form in Sf9 cell membranes, synGAP is phosphorylated by Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), another prominent component of the PSD. Here, we show that recombinant synGAP (r-synGAP), lacking 102 residues at the N terminus, can be purified in soluble form and is phosphorylated by cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) as well as by CaMKII. Phosphorylation of r-synGAP by CaMKII increases its HRas GAP activity by 25% and its Rap1 GAP activity by 76%. Conversely, phosphorylation by CDK5 increases r-synGAP's HRas GAP activity by 98% and its Rap1 GAP activity by 20%. Thus, phosphorylation by both kinases increases synGAP activity; CaMKII shifts the relative GAP activity toward inactivation of Rap1, and CDK5 shifts the relative activity toward inactivation of HRas. GAP activity toward Rap2 is not altered by phosphorylation by either kinase. CDK5 phosphorylates synGAP primarily at two sites, Ser-773 and Ser-802. Phosphorylation at Ser-773 inhibits r-synGAP activity, and phosphorylation at Ser-802 increases it. However, the net effect of concurrent phosphorylation of both sites, Ser-773 and Ser-802, is an increase in GAP activity. synGAP is phosphorylated at Ser-773 and Ser-802 in the PSD fraction, and its phosphorylation by CDK5 and CaMKII is differentially regulated by activation of NMDA-type glutamate receptors in cultured neurons. PMID:25533468

  4. Aberration design of zoom lens systems using thick lens modules.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinkai; Chen, Xiaobo; Xi, Juntong; Wu, Zhuoqi

    2014-12-20

    A systematic approach for the aberration design of a zoom lens system using a thick lens module is presented. Each component is treated as a thick lens module at the beginning of the design. A thick lens module refers to a thick lens component with a real lens structure, like lens materials, lens curvatures, lens thicknesses, and lens interval distances. All nine third-order aberrations of a thick lens component are considered during the design. The relationship of component aberrations in different zoom positions can be approximated from the aberration shift. After minimizing the aberrations of the zoom lens system, the nine third-order aberrations of every lens component can be determined. Then the thick lens structure of every lens component can be determined after optimization according to their first-order properties and third-order aberration targets. After a third optimization for minimum practical third-order aberrations of a zoom lens system, the aberration design using the thick lens module is complete, which provides a practical zoom lens system with thick lens structures. A double-sided telecentric zoom lens system is designed using the thick lens module in this paper, which shows that this method is practical for zoom lens design.

  5. Role of Aquaporin 0 in lens biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Sindhu Kumari, S; Gupta, Neha; Shiels, Alan; FitzGerald, Paul G; Menon, Anil G; Mathias, Richard T; Varadaraj, Kulandaiappan

    2015-07-10

    Maintenance of proper biomechanics of the eye lens is important for its structural integrity and for the process of accommodation to focus near and far objects. Several studies have shown that specialized cytoskeletal systems such as the beaded filament (BF) and spectrin-actin networks contribute to mammalian lens biomechanics; mutations or deletion in these proteins alters lens biomechanics. Aquaporin 0 (AQP0), which constitutes ∼45% of the total membrane proteins of lens fiber cells, has been shown to function as a water channel and a structural cell-to-cell adhesion (CTCA) protein. Our recent ex vivo study on AQP0 knockout (AQP0 KO) mouse lenses showed the CTCA function of AQP0 could be crucial for establishing the refractive index gradient. However, biomechanical studies on the role of AQP0 are lacking. The present investigation used wild type (WT), AQP5 KO (AQP5(-/-)), AQP0 KO (heterozygous KO: AQP0(+/-); homozygous KO: AQP0(-/-); all in C57BL/6J) and WT-FVB/N mouse lenses to learn more about the role of fiber cell AQPs in lens biomechanics. Electron microscopic images exhibited decreases in lens fiber cell compaction and increases in extracellular space due to deletion of even one allele of AQP0. Biomechanical assay revealed that loss of one or both alleles of AQP0 caused a significant reduction in the compressive load-bearing capacity of the lenses compared to WT lenses. Conversely, loss of AQP5 did not alter the lens load-bearing ability. Compressive load-bearing at the suture area of AQP0(+/-) lenses showed easy separation while WT lens suture remained intact. These data from KO mouse lenses in conjunction with previous studies on lens-specific BF proteins (CP49 and filensin) suggest that AQP0 and BF proteins could act co-operatively in establishing normal lens biomechanics. We hypothesize that AQP0, with its prolific expression at the fiber cell membrane, could provide anchorage for cytoskeletal structures like BFs and together they help to confer

  6. Characterization of a third ras gene, rasB, that is expressed throughout the growth and development of Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Daniel, J; Spiegelman, G B; Weeks, G

    1993-04-01

    Previous reports have indicated that the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum possesses two ras genes (rasG and rasD) and one rap gene (rap1). All three genes are developmentally regulated, with each showing a different pattern of transcription during the Dictyostelium life cycle. To establish whether there are additional ras or rap genes in Dictyostelium, we used degenerate oligonucleotide primers to the highly conserved GTP-binding domains and both ras- and rap-unique sequences to amplify products from cDNA using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). No additional rap genes were amplified, but a fragment whose nucleotide sequence predicted a novel ras gene was isolated. Using this PCR product as a probe, a full-length cDNA clone was isolated and sequenced. Its deduced amino acid sequence predicted a 197 amino acid protein that is 71% and 68% identical to RasG and RasD respectively. The new ras gene contains the conserved Ras-specific effector domain, the conserved binding site for the Ras-specific Y13-259 monoclonal antibody, and shows greater sequence similarity to the human H-Ras protein than to any other mammalian Ras protein. In view of this high level of identity to the ras gene subfamily, we have designated this gene rasB. Northern blot analysis has shown that rasB is developmentally regulated with maximum levels of a single 950-bp message detected during vegetative growth and the first 8 h of development.

  7. Role of Aquaporin 0 in lens biomechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Sindhu Kumari, S.; Gupta, Neha; Shiels, Alan; FitzGerald, Paul G.; Menon, Anil G.; Mathias, Richard T.; Varadaraj, Kulandaiappan

    2015-07-10

    Maintenance of proper biomechanics of the eye lens is important for its structural integrity and for the process of accommodation to focus near and far objects. Several studies have shown that specialized cytoskeletal systems such as the beaded filament (BF) and spectrin-actin networks contribute to mammalian lens biomechanics; mutations or deletion in these proteins alters lens biomechanics. Aquaporin 0 (AQP0), which constitutes ∼45% of the total membrane proteins of lens fiber cells, has been shown to function as a water channel and a structural cell-to-cell adhesion (CTCA) protein. Our recent ex vivo study on AQP0 knockout (AQP0 KO) mouse lenses showed the CTCA function of AQP0 could be crucial for establishing the refractive index gradient. However, biomechanical studies on the role of AQP0 are lacking. The present investigation used wild type (WT), AQP5 KO (AQP5{sup −/−}), AQP0 KO (heterozygous KO: AQP0{sup +/−}; homozygous KO: AQP0{sup −/−}; all in C57BL/6J) and WT-FVB/N mouse lenses to learn more about the role of fiber cell AQPs in lens biomechanics. Electron microscopic images exhibited decreases in lens fiber cell compaction and increases in extracellular space due to deletion of even one allele of AQP0. Biomechanical assay revealed that loss of one or both alleles of AQP0 caused a significant reduction in the compressive load-bearing capacity of the lenses compared to WT lenses. Conversely, loss of AQP5 did not alter the lens load-bearing ability. Compressive load-bearing at the suture area of AQP0{sup +/−} lenses showed easy separation while WT lens suture remained intact. These data from KO mouse lenses in conjunction with previous studies on lens-specific BF proteins (CP49 and filensin) suggest that AQP0 and BF proteins could act co-operatively in establishing normal lens biomechanics. We hypothesize that AQP0, with its prolific expression at the fiber cell membrane, could provide anchorage for cytoskeletal structures like BFs and

  8. Exploiting the bad eating habits of Ras-driven cancers.

    PubMed

    White, Eileen

    2013-10-01

    Oncogenic Ras promotes glucose fermentation and glutamine use to supply central carbon metabolism, but how and why have only emerged recently. Ras-mediated metabolic reprogramming generates building blocks for growth and promotes antioxidant defense. To fuel metabolic pathways, Ras scavenges extracellular proteins and lipids. To bolster metabolism and mitigate stress, Ras activates cellular self-cannibalization and recycling of proteins and organelles by autophagy. Targeting these distinct features of Ras-driven cancers provides novel approaches to cancer therapy.

  9. Ras GTPases’ interaction with effector domains

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Manishha; Côté, Jean-François

    2013-01-01

    The Ras superfamily of proteins consists of five branches: Ras, Rho, Arf, Rab and Ran subfamilies. These proteins are involved in a plethora of biological functions spanning cytoskeletal organization, cell proliferation, transcription and intracellular trafficking. Ras-Binding Domains (RBDs) have classically been identified as autonomous ubiquitin-like folded regions that bind certain activated Ras GTPases of the Ras subfamily. In general, RBDs in many proteins have been tagged with membrane-targeting functions as in the case of the well-characterized c-Raf-RBD/Ras interaction. However, it is becoming apparent that the definition and functions of RBDs need to be revamped in order to reflect the new discoveries associated with this domain. Here, we discuss in more detail the recent advances associated with these RBDs. We highlight research identifying RBDs in formins, ELMOs and the RhoGEF, Syx and discuss the emerging role for RBDs in controlling autoinhibition relief and the newly recognized versatility of RBDs to interact with Rho and Arf family GTPases. In addition, these recent findings raise the exciting hypothesis that functional RBDs remain hidden in the proteome and are ready to be uncovered. PMID:23986800

  10. LENS: Prototyping Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rountree, S. Derek

    2013-04-01

    The Low-Energy Neutrino Spectrometer (LENS) prototyping program is broken into two phases. The first of these is μLENS, a small prototype to study the light transmission in the as built LENS scintillation lattice--- a novel detector method of high segmentation in a large liquid scintillation detector. The μLENS prototype is currently deployed and taking data at the Kimballton Underground Research Facility (KURF) near Virginia Tech. I will discuss the Scintillation Lattice construction methods and schemes of the μLENS program for running with minimal channels instrumented to date ˜41 compared to full coverage 216). The second phase of prototyping is the miniLENS detector for which construction is under way. I will discuss the overall design from the miniLENS Scintillation Lattice to the shielding.

  11. Staurosporines disrupt phosphatidylserine trafficking and mislocalize Ras proteins.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kwang-jin; Park, Jin-Hee; Piggott, Andrew M; Salim, Angela A; Gorfe, Alemaheyu A; Parton, Robert G; Capon, Robert J; Lacey, Ernest; Hancock, John F

    2012-12-21

    Oncogenic mutant Ras is frequently expressed in human cancers, but no anti-Ras drugs have been developed. Since membrane association is essential for Ras biological activity, we developed a high content assay for inhibitors of Ras plasma membrane localization. We discovered that staurosporine and analogs potently inhibit Ras plasma membrane binding by blocking endosomal recycling of phosphatidylserine, resulting in redistribution of phosphatidylserine from plasma membrane to endomembrane. Staurosporines are more active against K-Ras than H-Ras. K-Ras is displaced to endosomes and undergoes proteasomal-independent degradation, whereas H-Ras redistributes to the Golgi and is not degraded. K-Ras nanoclustering on the plasma membrane is also inhibited. Ras mislocalization does not correlate with protein kinase C inhibition or induction of apoptosis. Staurosporines selectively abrogate K-Ras signaling and proliferation of K-Ras-transformed cells. These results identify staurosporines as novel inhibitors of phosphatidylserine trafficking, yield new insights into the role of phosphatidylserine and electrostatics in Ras plasma membrane targeting, and validate a new target for anti-Ras therapeutics.

  12. Consequences of RAS and MAPK activation in the ovary: the good, the bad and the ugly.

    PubMed

    Fan, Heng-Yu; Liu, Zhilin; Mullany, Lisa K; Richards, JoAnne S

    2012-06-05

    This review summarizes studies providing evidence (1) that endogenous RAS activation regulates important physiological events during ovulation and luteinization (2) that expression of the mutant, active KRAS(G12D) in granulosa cells in vivo causes abnormal follicle growth arrest leading to premature ovarian failure and (3) that KRAS(G12D) expression in ovarian surface epithelial (OSE) cells renders them susceptible to the pathological outcome of transformation and tumor formation. These diverse effects of RAS highlight how critical its activation is linked to cell- and stage-specific events in the ovary that control normal processes and that can also lead to altered granulosa cell and OSE cell fates.

  13. K-Ras(V14I) -induced Noonan syndrome predisposes to tumour development in mice.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Porras, Isabel; Schuhmacher, Alberto J; Garcia-Medina, Raquel; Jiménez, Beatriz; Cañamero, Marta; de Martino, Alba; Guerra, Carmen

    2016-06-01

    The Noonan syndrome (NS) is an autosomal dominant genetic disorder characterized by short stature, craniofacial dysmorphism, and congenital heart defects. A significant proportion of NS patients may also develop myeloproliferative disorders (MPDs), including juvenile myelomonocytic leukaemia (JMML). Surprisingly, scarce information is available in relation to other tumour types in these patients. We have previously developed and characterized a knock-in mouse model that carries one of the most frequent KRAS-NS-related mutations, the K-Ras(V14I) substitution, which recapitulates most of the alterations described in NS patients, including MPDs. The K-Ras(V14I) mutation is a mild activating K-Ras protein; thus, we have used this model to study tumour susceptibility in comparison with mice expressing the classical K-Ras(G12V) oncogene. Interestingly, our studies have shown that these mice display a generalized tumour predisposition and not just MPDs. In fact, we have observed that the K-Ras(V14I) mutation is capable of cooperating with the p16Ink4a/p19Arf and Trp53 tumour suppressors, as well as with other risk factors such as pancreatitis, thereby leading to a higher cancer incidence. In conclusion, our results illustrate that the K-Ras(V14I) activating protein is able to induce cancer, although at a much lower level than the classical K-Ras(G12V) oncogene, and that it can be significantly modulated by both genetic and non-genetic events. Copyright © 2016 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Metrology and test requirements for movement of the RAS/HOMS test facility to NASA-GSFC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenzel, Greg; Redman, Kevin; Eichhorn, William

    2006-06-01

    The Refractive Aberrated Simulator/Hubble Opto-Mechanical Simulator (RAS/HOMS) test facility previously located at Ball Aerospace Division in Boulder (BASD), CO will be relocated to NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). This paper will highlight the metrology and test methods used to characterize the facility prior to disassembly as well as assemble and align the facility once it has been moved to GSFC. The HOMS portion of the facility simulates the mechanical latch mechanisms that hold an axial instrument in alignment with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) optical path. Two sets of three latches must be aligned in position on the HOMS structure to match that of the two axial bays in HST. The RAS portion of the facility is a refractive optical system that simulates the aberrations in HST's optical telescope assembly. Each mount and lens must be properly aligned within the RAS system in order to accurately simulate the aberrations of HST's optical system. The optical axis of the RAS system must be brought into alignment with the optical axis of HOMS system. Photogrammetry, theodolite auto-collimation data, theodolite coordinate data, and laser tracker coordinate data were used to characterize the system prior to disassembly. The same data will be used to bring the RAS/HOMS system as close to the original alignment as possible.

  15. Live-cell imaging of endogenous Ras-GTP illustrates predominant Ras activation at the plasma membrane

    PubMed Central

    Augsten, Martin; Pusch, Rico; Biskup, Christoph; Rennert, Knut; Wittig, Ute; Beyer, Katja; Blume, Alfred; Wetzker, Reinhard; Friedrich, Karlheinz; Rubio, Ignacio

    2006-01-01

    Ras-GTP imaging studies using the Ras-binding domain (RBD) of the Ras effector c-Raf as a reporter for overexpressed Ras have produced discrepant results about the possible activation of Ras at the Golgi apparatus. We report that RBD oligomerization provides probes for visualization of endogenous Ras-GTP, obviating Ras overexpression and the side effects derived thereof. RBD oligomerization results in tenacious binding to Ras-GTP and interruption of Ras signalling. Trimeric RBD probes fused to green fluorescent protein report agonist-induced endogenous Ras activation at the plasma membrane (PM) of COS-7, PC12 and Jurkat cells, but do not accumulate at the Golgi. PM illumination is exacerbated by Ras overexpression and its sensitivity to dominant-negative RasS17N and pharmacological manipulations matches Ras-GTP formation assessed biochemically. Our data illustrate that endogenous Golgi-located Ras is not under the control of growth factors and argue for the PM as the predominant site of agonist-induced Ras activation. PMID:16282985

  16. BRAF vs RAS oncogenes: are mutations of the same pathway equal? differential signalling and therapeutic implications

    PubMed Central

    Oikonomou, Eftychia; Koustas, Evangelos; Goulielmaki, Maria; Pintzas, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    As the increased knowledge of tumour heterogeneity and genetic alterations progresses, it exemplifies the need for further personalized medicine in modern cancer management. Here, the similarities but also the differential effects of RAS and BRAF oncogenic signalling are examined and further implications in personalized cancer diagnosis and therapy are discussed. Redundant mechanisms mediated by the two oncogenes as well as differential regulation of signalling pathways and gene expression by RAS as compared to BRAF are addressed. The implications of RAS vs BRAF differential functions, in relevant tumour types including colorectal cancer, melanoma, lung cancer are discussed. Current therapeutic findings and future viewpoints concerning the exploitation of RAS-BRAF-pathway alterations for the development of novel therapeutics and efficient rational combinations, as well as companion tests for relevant markers of response will be evaluated. The concept that drug-resistant cells may also display drug dependency, such that altered dosing may prevent the emergence of lethal drug resistance posed a major therapy hindrance. PMID:25361007

  17. Signaling through mitogen-activated protein kinase and Rac/Rho does not duplicate the effects of activated Ras on skeletal myogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Ramocki, M B; Johnson, S E; White, M A; Ashendel, C L; Konieczny, S F; Taparowsky, E J

    1997-01-01

    The ability of basic helix-loop-helix muscle regulatory factors (MRFs), such as MyoD, to convert nonmuscle cells to a myogenic lineage is regulated by numerous growth factor and oncoprotein signaling pathways. Previous studies have shown that H-Ras 12V inhibits differentiation to a skeletal muscle lineage by disrupting MRF function via a mechanism that is independent of the dimerization, DNA binding, and inherent transcriptional activation properties of the proteins. To investigate the intracellular signaling pathway(s) that mediates the inhibition of MRF-induced myogenesis by oncogenic Ras, we tested two transformation-defective H-Ras 12V effector domain variants for their ability to alter terminal differentiation. H-Ras 12V,35S retains the ability to activate the Raf/MEK/mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase cascade, whereas H-Ras 12V,40C is unable to interact directly with Raf-1 yet still influences other signaling intermediates, including Rac and Rho. Expression of each H-Ras 12V variant in C3H10T1/2 cells abrogates MyoD-induced activation of the complete myogenic program, suggesting that MAP kinase-dependent and -independent Ras signaling pathways individually block myogenesis in this model system. However, additional studies with constitutively activated Rac1 and RhoA proteins revealed no negative effects on MyoD-induced myogenesis. Similarly, treatment of Ras-inhibited myoblasts with the MEK1 inhibitor PD98059 revealed that elevated MAP kinase activity is not a significant contributor to the H-Ras 12V effect. These data suggest that an additional Ras pathway, distinct from the well-characterized MAP kinase and Rac/Rho pathways known to be important for the transforming function of activated Ras, is primarily responsible for the inhibition of myogenesis by H-Ras 12V. PMID:9199290

  18. VPS35 binds farnesylated N-Ras in the cytosol to regulate N-Ras trafficking.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Mo; Wiener, Heidi; Su, Wenjuan; Zhou, Yong; Liot, Caroline; Ahearn, Ian; Hancock, John F; Philips, Mark R

    2016-08-15

    Ras guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases) regulate signaling pathways only when associated with cellular membranes through their C-terminal prenylated regions. Ras proteins move between membrane compartments in part via diffusion-limited, fluid phase transfer through the cytosol, suggesting that chaperones sequester the polyisoprene lipid from the aqueous environment. In this study, we analyze the nature of the pool of endogenous Ras proteins found in the cytosol. The majority of the pool consists of farnesylated, but not palmitoylated, N-Ras that is associated with a high molecular weight (HMW) complex. Affinity purification and mass spectrographic identification revealed that among the proteins found in the HMW fraction is VPS35, a latent cytosolic component of the retromer coat. VPS35 bound to N-Ras in a farnesyl-dependent, but neither palmitoyl- nor guanosine triphosphate (GTP)-dependent, fashion. Silencing VPS35 increased N-Ras's association with cytoplasmic vesicles, diminished GTP loading of Ras, and inhibited mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling and growth of N-Ras-dependent melanoma cells.

  19. Past, Present, and Future of Targeting Ras for Cancer Therapies.

    PubMed

    Tan, Zhi; Zhang, Shuxing

    2016-01-01

    For decades, mutant Ras (mut-Ras) proteins have been identified as drivers of multiple cancers including pancreatic, lung, and colon cancers. However, targeting this oncogene has been challenging and no Ras inhibitors are on the market to date. Lately several candidates targeting the downstream pathways of Ras signaling, including PI3K and Raf, were approved for cancer treatment. However, they do not present promising therapeutic effects on patients harboring Ras mutations. Recently, a variety of compounds have been reported to impair the activity of Ras, and these exciting discoveries reignite the hope for development of novel drugs targeting mut-Ras. In this article, we will review the progress made in this field and the current state-of-the-art technologies to develop Ras inhibitors. Also we will discuss the future direction of targeting Ras.

  20. Membrane binding of a lipidated N-Ras protein studied in lipid monolayers.

    PubMed

    Bringezu, Frank; Majerowicz, Monika; Wen, Shaoying; Reuther, Guido; Tan, Kui-Thong; Kuhlmann, Jürgen; Waldmann, Herbert; Huster, Daniel

    2007-04-01

    The adsorption of doubly lipidated full-length N-Ras protein on 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) monolayers was studied by lateral pressure analysis, grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXD), and specular reflectivity (XR). N-Ras protein adsorbs to the DPPC monolayer (lateral pressure of 20 mN/m) from the subphase thereby increasing the lateral pressure in the monolayer by 4 mN/m. The protein insertion does not alter the tilt angle and structure of the lipid molecules at the air/water interface but influences the electron density profile of the monolayer. Further, electron density differences into the subphase were observed. The Fresnel normalized reflectivity could be reconstructed in the analysis using box models yielding electron density profiles of the DPPC monolayer in the absence and in the presence of N-Ras protein. The electron density profiles of the DPPC monolayer in the presence of Ras showed clear intensity variations in the headgroup/glycerol/upper chain region, the so-called interface region where previous bilayer studies had confirmed Ras binding.

  1. miR-11 regulates pupal size of Drosophila melanogaster via directly targeting Ras85D.

    PubMed

    Li, Yao; Li, Shengjie; Jin, Ping; Chen, Liming; Ma, Fei

    2017-01-01

    MicroRNAs play diverse roles in various physiological processes during Drosophila development. In the present study, we reported that miR-11 regulates pupal size during Drosophila metamorphosis via targeting Ras85D with the following evidences: pupal size was increased in the miR-11 deletion mutant; restoration of miR-11 in the miR-11 deletion mutant rescued the increased pupal size phenotype observed in the miR-11 deletion mutant; ectopic expression of miR-11 in brain insulin-producing cells (IPCs) and whole body shows consistent alteration of pupal size; Dilps and Ras85D expressions were negatively regulated by miR-11 in vivo; miR-11 targets Ras85D through directly binding to Ras85D 3'-untranslated region in vitro; removal of one copy of Ras85D in the miR-11 deletion mutant rescued the increased pupal size phenotype observed in the miR-11 deletion mutant. Thus, our current work provides a novel mechanism of pupal size determination by microRNAs during Drosophila melanogaster metamorphosis. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  2. Cooperativity of Oncogenic K-Ras and Downregulated p16/INK4A in Human Pancreatic Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Jianhua; Zhuang, Zhuonan; Li, Zhongkui; Wang, Huamin; Fleming, Jason B.; Freeman, James W.; Yu, Dihua; Huang, Peng; Chiao, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    Activation of K-ras and inactivation of p16 are the most frequently identified genetic alterations in human pancreatic epithelial adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Mouse models engineered with mutant K-ras and deleted p16 recapitulate key pathological features of PDAC. However, a human cell culture transformation model that recapitulates the human pancreatic molecular carcinogenesis is lacking. In this study, we investigated the role of p16 in hTERT-immortalized human pancreatic epithelial nestin-expressing (HPNE) cells expressing mutant K-ras (K-rasG12V). We found that expression of p16 was induced by oncogenic K-ras in these HPNE cells and that silencing of this induced p16 expression resulted in tumorigenic transformation and development of metastatic PDAC in an orthotopic xenograft mouse model. Our results revealed that PI3K/Akt, ERK1/2 pathways and TGFα signaling were activated by K-ras and involved in the malignant transformation of human pancreatic cells. Also, p38/MAPK pathway was involved in p16 up-regulation. Thus, our findings establish an experimental cell-based model for dissecting signaling pathways in the development of human PDAC. This model provides an important tool for studying the molecular basis of PDAC development and gaining insight into signaling mechanisms and potential new therapeutic targets for altered oncogenic signaling pathways in PDAC. PMID:25029561

  3. Cooperativity of oncogenic K-ras and downregulated p16/INK4A in human pancreatic tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Chang, Zhe; Ju, Huaiqiang; Ling, Jianhua; Zhuang, Zhuonan; Li, Zhongkui; Wang, Huamin; Fleming, Jason B; Freeman, James W; Yu, Dihua; Huang, Peng; Chiao, Paul J

    2014-01-01

    Activation of K-ras and inactivation of p16 are the most frequently identified genetic alterations in human pancreatic epithelial adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Mouse models engineered with mutant K-ras and deleted p16 recapitulate key pathological features of PDAC. However, a human cell culture transformation model that recapitulates the human pancreatic molecular carcinogenesis is lacking. In this study, we investigated the role of p16 in hTERT-immortalized human pancreatic epithelial nestin-expressing (HPNE) cells expressing mutant K-ras (K-rasG12V). We found that expression of p16 was induced by oncogenic K-ras in these HPNE cells and that silencing of this induced p16 expression resulted in tumorigenic transformation and development of metastatic PDAC in an orthotopic xenograft mouse model. Our results revealed that PI3K/Akt, ERK1/2 pathways and TGFα signaling were activated by K-ras and involved in the malignant transformation of human pancreatic cells. Also, p38/MAPK pathway was involved in p16 up-regulation. Thus, our findings establish an experimental cell-based model for dissecting signaling pathways in the development of human PDAC. This model provides an important tool for studying the molecular basis of PDAC development and gaining insight into signaling mechanisms and potential new therapeutic targets for altered oncogenic signaling pathways in PDAC.

  4. Adjustable hybrid diffractive/refractive achromatic lens

    PubMed Central

    Valley, Pouria; Savidis, Nickolaos; Schwiegerling, Jim; Dodge, Mohammad Reza; Peyman, Gholam; Peyghambarian, N.

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate a variable focal length achromatic lens that consists of a flat liquid crystal diffractive lens and a pressure-controlled fluidic refractive lens. The diffractive lens is composed of a flat binary Fresnel zone structure and a thin liquid crystal layer, producing high efficiency and millisecond switching times while applying a low ac voltage input. The focusing power of the diffractive lens is adjusted by electrically modifying the sub-zones and re-establishing phase wrapping points. The refractive lens includes a fluid chamber with a flat glass surface and an opposing elastic polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membrane surface. Inserting fluid volume through a pump system into the clear aperture region alters the membrane curvature and adjusts the refractive lens’ focal position. Primary chromatic aberration is remarkably reduced through the coupling of the fluidic and diffractive lenses at selected focal lengths. Potential applications include miniature color imaging systems, medical and ophthalmic devices, or any design that utilizes variable focal length achromats. PMID:21503055

  5. Glycation precedes lens crystallin aggregation

    SciTech Connect

    Swamy, M.S.; Perry, R.E.; Abraham, E.C.

    1987-05-01

    Non-enzymatic glycosylation (glycation) seems to have the potential to alter the structure of crystallins and make them susceptible to thiol oxidation leading to disulfide-linked high molecular weight (HMW) aggregate formation. They used streptozotocin diabetic rats during precataract and cataract stages and long-term cell-free glycation of bovine lens crystallins to study the relationship between glycation and lens crystallin aggregation. HMW aggregates and other protein components of the water-soluble (WS) and urea-soluble (US) fractions were separated by molecular sieve high performance liquid chromatography. Glycation was estimated by both (/sup 3/H)NaBH/sub 4/ reduction and phenylboronate agarose affinity chromatography. Levels of total glycated protein (GP) in the US fractions were about 2-fold higher than in the WS fractions and there was a linear increase in GP in both WS and US fractions. This increase was parallelled by a corresponding increase in HMW aggregates. Total GP extracted by the affinity method from the US fraction showed a predominance of HMW aggregates and vice versa. Cell-free glycation studies with bovine crystallins confirmed the results of the animals studies. Increasing glycation caused a corresponding increase in protein insolubilization and the insoluble fraction thus formed also contained more glycated protein. It appears that lens protein glycation, HMW aggregate formation, and protein insolubilization are interrelated.

  6. Ras Proteins Have Multiple Functions in Vegetative Cells of Dictyostelium ▿

    PubMed Central

    Bolourani, Parvin; Spiegelman, George; Weeks, Gerald

    2010-01-01

    During the aggregation of Dictyostelium cells, signaling through RasG is more important in regulating cyclic AMP (cAMP) chemotaxis, whereas signaling through RasC is more important in regulating the cAMP relay. However, RasC is capable of substituting for RasG for chemotaxis, since rasG− cells are only partially deficient in chemotaxis, whereas rasC−/rasG− cells are totally incapable of chemotaxis. In this study we have examined the possible functional overlap between RasG and RasC in vegetative cells by comparing the vegetative cell properties of rasG−, rasC−, and rasC−/rasG− cells. In addition, since RasD, a protein not normally found in vegetative cells, is expressed in vegetative rasG− and rasC−/rasG− cells and appears to partially compensate for the absence of RasG, we have also examined the possible functional overlap between RasG and RasD by comparing the properties of rasG− and rasC−/rasG− cells with those of the mutant cells expressing higher levels of RasD. The results of these two lines of investigation show that RasD is capable of totally substituting for RasG for cytokinesis and growth in suspension, whereas RasC is without effect. In contrast, for chemotaxis to folate, RasC is capable of partially substituting for RasG, but RasD is totally without effect. Finally, neither RasC nor RasD is able to substitute for the role that RasG plays in regulating actin distribution and random motility. These specificity studies therefore delineate three distinct and none-overlapping functions for RasG in vegetative cells. PMID:20833893

  7. Aurora kinase A interacts with H-Ras and potentiates Ras-MAPK signaling | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    In cancer, upregulated Ras promotes cellular transformation and proliferation in part through activation of oncogenic Ras-MAPK signaling. While directly inhibiting Ras has proven challenging, new insights into Ras regulation through protein-protein interactions may offer unique opportunities for therapeutic intervention. Here we report the identification and validation of Aurora kinase A (Aurora A) as a novel Ras binding protein. We demonstrate that the kinase domain of Aurora A mediates the interaction with the N-terminal domain of H-Ras.

  8. RAS Symposium Draws Hundreds of Attendees | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    They call themselves “rasologists”: scientists who study the RAS family of genes and the cancers that can arise due to mutations within them. This field of research is at the heart of some sobering numbers. Almost a third of all human cancers, including 95 percent of pancreatic cancers, are driven by mutated RAS genes. The American Cancer Society estimates there were 48,960 new cases of pancreatic cancer in the United States in 2015 and 40,560 deaths from the disease.

  9. RAS Symposium Draws Hundreds of Attendees | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    They call themselves “rasologists”: scientists who study the RAS family of genes and the cancers that can arise due to mutations within them. This field of research is at the heart of some sobering numbers. Almost a third of all human cancers, including 95 percent of pancreatic cancers, are driven by mutated RAS genes. The American Cancer Society estimates there were 48,960 new cases of pancreatic cancer in the United States in 2015 and 40,560 deaths from the disease.

  10. The neurofibromin recruitment factor Spred1 binds to the GAP related domain without affecting Ras inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Dunzendorfer-Matt, Theresia; Mercado, Ellen L.; Maly, Karl; McCormick, Frank; Scheffzek, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) and Legius syndrome are related diseases with partially overlapping symptoms caused by alterations of the tumor suppressor genes NF1 (encoding the protein neurofibromin) and SPRED1 (encoding sprouty-related, EVH1 domain-containing protein 1, Spred1), respectively. Both proteins are negative regulators of Ras/MAPK signaling with neurofibromin functioning as a Ras-specific GTPase activating protein (GAP) and Spred1 acting on hitherto undefined components of the pathway. Importantly, neurofibromin has been identified as a key protein in the development of cancer, as it is genetically altered in a large number of sporadic human malignancies unrelated to NF1. Spred1 has previously been demonstrated to interact with neurofibromin via its N-terminal Ena/VASP Homology 1 (EVH1) domain and to mediate membrane translocation of its target dependent on its C-terminal Sprouty domain. However, the region of neurofibromin required for the interaction with Spred1 has remained unclear. Here we show that the EVH1 domain of Spred1 binds to the noncatalytic (GAPex) portion of the GAP-related domain (GRD) of neurofibromin. Binding is compatible with simultaneous binding of Ras and does not interfere with GAP activity. Our study points to a potential targeting function of the GAPex subdomain of neurofibromin that is present in all known canonical RasGAPs. PMID:27313208

  11. Increased association of dynamin II with myosin II in ras transformed NIH3T3 cells.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Soon-Jeong; Kim, Su-Gwan; Yoo, Jiyun; Han, Mi-Young; Park, Joo-Cheol; Kim, Heung-Joong; Kang, Seong-Soo; Choi, Baik-Dong; Jeong, Moon-Jin

    2006-08-01

    Dynamin has been implicated in the formation of nascent vesicles through both endocytic and secretory pathways. However, dynamin has recently been implicated in altering the cell membrane shape during cell migration associated with cytoskeleton-related proteins. Myosin II has been implicated in maintaining cell morphology and in cellular movement. Therefore, reciprocal immunoprecipitation was carried out to identify the potential relationship between dynamin II and myosin II. The dynamin II expression level was higher when co-expressed with myosin II in Ras transformed NIH3T3 cells than in normal NIH3T3 cells. Confocal microscopy also confirmed the interaction between these two proteins. Interestingly, exposing the NIH3T3 cells to platelet-derived growth factor altered the interaction and localization of these two proteins. The platelet-derived growth factor treatment induced lamellipodia and cell migration, and dynamin II interacted with myosin II. Grb2, a 24 kDa adaptor protein and an essential element of the Ras signaling pathway, was found to be associated with dynamin II and myosin II gene expression in the Ras transformed NIH3T3 cells. These results suggest that dynamin II acts as an intermediate messenger in the Ras signal transduction pathway leading to membrane ruffling and cell migration.

  12. Improved optical lens system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, L. F.

    1970-01-01

    Objective lens produces a backwardly curving image of a star field that matches the similarly curved surface of the photocathode of an image dissector tube. Lens eliminates the need for a fiber-optics translation between the flat plane image and curved photocathode.

  13. The RAS Problem: Turning Off a Broken Switch

    Cancer.gov

    The RAS gene is commonly mutated in cancer and researchers are working to better understand how to develop drugs that can target the RAS protein, which for many years has been considered to be “undruggable.”

  14. Quantitative Assays for RAS Pathway Proteins and Phosphorylation States

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI CPTAC program is applying its expertise in quantitative proteomics to develop assays for RAS pathway proteins. Targets include key phosphopeptides that should increase our understanding of how the RAS pathway is regulated.

  15. Elevated K-ras activity with cholestyramine and lovastatin, but not konjac mannan or niacin in lung—importance of mouse strain

    PubMed Central

    Calvert, Richard J.; Tepper, Shirley; Kammouni, Wafa; Anderson, Lucy M.; Kritchevsky, David

    2007-01-01

    Our previous work established that hypocholesterolemic agents altered K-ras intracellular localization in lung. Here, we examined K-ras activity to define further its potential importance in lung carcinogenesis. K-ras activity in lungs from male A/J, Swiss and C57BL/6 mice was examined. For three weeks, mice consumed either 2 or 4% cholestyramine (CS), 1% niacin, 5% konjac mannan (KM), or were injected with lovastatin 25 mg/kg three or five times weekly (Lov-3X and Lov-5X). A pair-fed (PF) group was fed the same quantity of diet consumed by the Lov-5X mice to control for lower body weights in Lov-5X mice. After three weeks, serum cholesterol was assayed with a commercial kit. Activated K-ras protein from lung was affinity precipitated with a Raf-1 ras binding domain-glutathione-S-transferase fusion protein bound to glutathione-agarose beads, followed by Western blotting, K-ras antibody treatment, and chemiluminescent detection. Only KM reduced serum cholesterol (in 2 of 3 mouse strains). In C56BL/6 mice treated with Lov-3X, lung K-ras activity increased 1.8-fold versus control (p = 0.009). In normal lung with wild-type K-ras, this would be expected to be associated with maintenance of differentiation. In A/J mice fed 4% CS, K-ras activity increased 2.1-fold (p = 0.02), which might be responsible for the reported enhancement of carcinogenesis in carcinogen-treated rats fed CS. KM feeding and PF treatment had no significant effects on K-ras activity. These data are consistent with the concept that K-ras in lung has an oncogenic function when mutated, but may act as a tumor suppressor when wild-type. PMID:17005160

  16. Contact lens hygiene compliance and lens case contamination: A review.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yvonne Tzu-Ying; Willcox, Mark; Zhu, Hua; Stapleton, Fiona

    2015-10-01

    A contaminated contact lens case can act as a reservoir for microorganisms that could potentially compromise contact lens wear and lead to sight threatening adverse events. The rate, level and profile of microbial contamination in lens cases, compliance and other risk factors associated with lens case contamination, and the challenges currently faced in this field are discussed. The rate of lens case contamination is commonly over 50%. Coagulase-negative Staphylococcus, Bacillus spp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Serratia marcescens are frequently recovered from lens cases. In addition, we provide suggestions regarding how to clean contact lens cases and improve lens wearers' compliance as well as future lens case design for reducing lens case contamination. This review highlights the challenges in reducing the level of microbial contamination which require an industry wide approach. Copyright © 2015 British Contact Lens Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The oblique electron lens.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, C. B.; Hallam, K. L.

    1973-01-01

    An oblique electron lens is described that is especially applicable to image converters and camera tubes employing flat opaque photocathodes. The use of optical lenses, corrector plates, and/or mirrors (often employed in other electron lenses designed for use with opaque photocathodes) are eliminated. The oblique electron lens is well suited to ultraviolet and vacuum ultraviolet image converters, and to image converters employing opaque negative electron affinity photocathodes. It is also possible to use this oblique electron lens for electronography. Measurements on an experimental tube show that a limiting resolution of 50 line pairs/mm is possible, but the intrinsic lens quality is believed to approach that of a conventional electromagnetic lens having uniform and colinear electric and magnetic fields.

  18. ASPP2 Is a Novel Pan-Ras Nanocluster Scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Posada, Itziar M. D.; Serulla, Marc; Zhou, Yong; Oetken-Lindholm, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Ras-induced senescence mediated through ASPP2 represents a barrier to tumour formation. It is initiated by ASPP2’s interaction with Ras at the plasma membrane, which stimulates the Raf/MEK/ERK signaling cascade. Ras to Raf signalling requires Ras to be organized in nanoscale signalling complexes, called nanocluster. We therefore wanted to investigate whether ASPP2 affects Ras nanoclustering. Here we show that ASPP2 increases the nanoscale clustering of all oncogenic Ras isoforms, H-ras, K-ras and N-ras. Structure-function analysis with ASPP2 truncation mutants suggests that the nanocluster scaffolding activity of ASPP2 converges on its α-helical domain. While ASPP2 increased effector recruitment and stimulated ERK and AKT phosphorylation, it did not increase colony formation of RasG12V transformed NIH/3T3 cells. By contrast, ASPP2 was able to suppress the transformation enhancing ability of the nanocluster scaffold Gal-1, by competing with the specific effect of Gal-1 on H-rasG12V- and K-rasG12V-nanoclustering, thus imposing ASPP2’s ERK and AKT signalling signature. Similarly, ASPP2 robustly induced senescence and strongly abrogated mammosphere formation irrespective of whether it was expressed alone or together with Gal-1, which by itself showed the opposite effect in Ras wt or H-ras mutant breast cancer cells. Our results suggest that Gal-1 and ASPP2 functionally compete in nanocluster for active Ras on the plasma membrane. ASPP2 dominates the biological outcome, thus switching from a Gal-1 supported growth-promoting setting to a senescence inducing and stemness suppressive program in cancer cells. Our results support Ras nanocluster as major integrators of tumour fate decision events. PMID:27437940

  19. Rethinking contact lens aftercare.

    PubMed

    Efron, Nathan; Morgan, Philip B

    2017-09-01

    The evolution of contact lens technology and clinical practice over the past three decades has been remarkable, with dramatic improvements in material biocompatibility, better lens designs and care systems, and more flexible and convenient modalities of wear. However, our approach to the aftercare examination has remained conservative, with the general modus operandi having not fully evolved from the difficult, early years of fitting non-regular replacement rigid and low water content hydrogel lenses. In this paper, we review current aftercare practice and in particular, the preferred frequency that lens wearers should return for routine visits and the appropriateness of regulations governing contact lens prescription expiry. Four key clinical reasons for conducting a routine aftercare visit are identified: preserving ocular health, maintaining good vision, optimising comfort and ensuring satisfactory lens fitting performance. Commercial reasons for conducting aftercare visits are also considered. A decision matrix is presented to help practitioners decide on an appropriate time interval between routine aftercare visits. The first aftercare visit should always take place within one to two weeks of lens dispensing. After this, the following time intervals between routine aftercare visits are advised as a general guideline: soft daily disposable, 24 months; soft daily reusable and rigid daily wear, 12 months; soft and rigid extended wear, six months. These aftercare visit frequencies may need to be adjusted when rapid rates of refractive change are anticipated, such as every six months during child/teenager myopic progression and every 12 months during the advancement of presbyopia. Numerous clinical caveats for varying these recommended aftercare frequencies are also discussed. Those new to lens wear should be seen within the first two months of lens dispensing. Regulatory authorities charged with the responsibility of stipulating the validity of a contact

  20. Ras1 and Ras2 play antagonistic roles in regulating cellular cAMP level, stationary-phase entry and stress response in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yong; Fang, Hao-Ming; Wang, Yan-Ming; Zeng, Gui-Sheng; Zheng, Xin-De; Wang, Yue

    2009-11-01

    The GTPase Ras1 activates the yeast-to-hypha transition in Candida albicans by activating cAMP synthesis. Here, we have characterized Ras2. Ras2 belongs to a group of atypical Ras proteins in some fungal species that share poor identity with other Ras GTPases with many variations in conserved motifs thought to be crucial for Ras-associated activities. We find that recombinant Ras2 is enzymatically as active as Ras1. However, only RAS1 can rescue the lethality of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae ras1 ras2 mutant, suggesting functional divergence of the two genes. ras2Delta is normal in hyphal growth, but deleting RAS2 in the ras1Delta background greatly aggravates the hyphal defect, indicating that Ras2 also has a role in hyphal development. Strikingly, while RAS1 deletion causes a approximately 20-fold decrease in cellular cAMP, further deletion of RAS2 restores it to approximately 30% of the wild-type level. Consistently, while the ras1Delta mutant enters the stationary phase prematurely, the double mutant does so normally. Moreover, ras1Delta cells exhibit increased resistance to H(2)O(2) and higher sensitivity to the heavy metal Co(2+), whereas ras2Delta cells show the opposite phenotypes. Together, our data reveal a novel regulatory mechanism by which two antagonizing Ras GTPases balance each other in regulating multiple cellular processes in C. albicans.

  1. Ribozyme-mediated inactivation of mutant K-ras oncogene in a colon cancer cell line

    PubMed Central

    Tokunaga, T; Tsuchida, T; Kijima, H; Okamoto, K; Oshika, Y; Sawa, N; Ohnishi, Y; Yamazaki, H; Miura, S; Ueyama, Y; Nakamura, M

    2000-01-01

    Mutation of c-K-ras oncogene is an important step in progression of colon cancer. We used a hammerhead ribozyme (KrasRz) against mutated K-ras gene transcripts (codon 12, GTT) to inactivate mutant K-ras function in the colon cancer cell line SW480, harbouring a mutant K-ras gene. The β-actin promoter-driven KrasRz sequence (pHβ/KrasRz) was introduced into these cells (SW480/KrasRz), and we evaluated its effects on growth of the colon cancer. The gene expression of angiogenesis-related molecules (vascular endothelial growth factor and thrombospondin) was also estimated in SW480/KrasRz. KrasRz specifically and efficiently cleaved the mutant K-ras mRNA but not wild-type mRNA in vitro. SW480/KrasRz showed decreased growth rate under tissue culture conditions (P< 0.01, Dunnett’s test). The xenotransplantability of SW480/KrasRz (XeSW480/KrasRz) was significantly decreased in nude mice (P< 0.05, Fisher’s exact test). Tumour volume of the xenografts XeSW480/KrasRz was significantly smaller than that of XeSW480/DisKrasRz (P< 0.01, Dunnett’s test). Gene expression of VEGF was suppressed in SW480/KrasRz, while TSP1 gene expression was enhanced. The SW480/KrasRz cells showed apoptosis-related features including nuclear condensation and DNA fragmentation. These results suggested that the hammerhead ribozyme-mediated inactivation of the mutated K-ras mRNA induced growth suppression, apoptosis and alteration of angiogenic factor expression. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10952790

  2. Prevalence of K-Ras mutations in hepatocellular carcinoma: A Turkish Oncology Group pilot study

    PubMed Central

    TURHAL, NAZIM SERDAR; SAVAŞ, BERNA; ÇOŞKUN, ÖZNUR; BAŞ, EMINE; KARABULUT, BÜLENT; NART, DENIZ; KORKMAZ, TANER; YAVUZER, DILEK; DEMIR, GÖKHAN; DOĞUSOY, GÜLEN; ARTAÇ, MEHMET

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the fifth most common male-predominant type of cancer worldwide. There is no effective treatment regimen available for advanced-stage disease and chemotherapy is generally ineffective in these patients. The number of studies on the prevalence of K-Ras mutations in HCC patients is currently limited. A total of 58 patients from 6 comprehensive cancer centers in 4 metropolitan cities of Turkey were enrolled in this study. Each center committed to enroll approximately 10 random patients whose formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumor tissues were available for K-Ras, exon 2 genotyping. Two methods were applied based on the availability of adequate amounts of tumor DNA. In the first method, the samples were processed using TheraScreen. The genomic DNA was further used to detect the 7 most frequent somatic mutations (35G>A; 35G>C; 35G>T; 34G>A; 34G>C; 34G>T and 38G>A) in codons 12 and 13 in exon 2 of the K-Ras oncogene by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR). In the second method, the genomic DNA was amplified by PCR using primers specific for K-Ras exon 2 with the GML SeqFinder Sequencing System's KRAS kit. The identified DNA sequence alterations were confirmed by sequencing both DNA strands in two independent experiments with forward and reverse primers. A total of 40 samples had adequate tumor tissue for the mutation analysis. A total of 33 (82.5%) of the investigated samples harbored no mutations in exon 2. All the mutations were identified via a direct sequencing technique, whereas none were identified by TheraScreen. In conclusion, in our patients, HCC exhibited a remarkably low (<20%) K-Ras mutation rate. Patients harboring K-Ras wild-type tumors may be good candidates for treatment with epidermal growth factor inhibitors, such as cetuximab. PMID:26807232

  3. Novel fabrication technique of hybrid structure lens array for 3D images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Junsik; Kim, Junoh; Kim, Cheoljoong; Shin, Dooseub; Koo, Gyohyun; Won, Yong Hyub

    2016-03-01

    Tunable liquid lens arrays can produce three dimensional images by using electrowetting principle that alters surface tensions by applying voltage. This method has advantages of fast response time and low power consumption. However, it is challenging to fabricate a high fill factor liquid lens array and operate three dimensional images which demand high diopter. This study describes a hybrid structure lens array which has not only a liquid lens array but a solid lens array. A concave-shape lens array is unavoidable when using only the liquid lens array and some voltages are needed to make the lens flat. By placing the solid lens array on the liquid lens array, initial diopter can be positive. To fabricate the hybrid structure lens array, a conventional lithographic process in semiconductor manufacturing is needed. A negative photoresist SU-8 was used as chamber master molds. PDMS and UV adhesive replica molding are done sequentially. Two immiscible liquids, DI water and dodecane, are injected in the fabricated chamber, followed by sealing. The fabricated structure has a 20 by 20 pattern of cylindrical shaped circle array and the aperture size of each lens is 1mm. The thickness of the overall hybrid structure is about 2.8mm. Hybrid structure lens array has many advantages. Solid lens array has almost 100% fill factor and allow high efficiency. Diopter can be increased by more than 200 and negative diopter can be shifted to the positive region. This experiment showed several properties of the hybrid structure and demonstrated its superiority.

  4. Spatial distributions of glutathione and its endogenous conjugates in normal bovine lens and a model of lens aging.

    PubMed

    Nye-Wood, Mitchell G; Spraggins, Jeffrey M; Caprioli, Richard M; Schey, Kevin L; Donaldson, Paul J; Grey, Angus C

    2016-11-09

    Glutathione (GSH) is the archetypal antioxidant, and plays a central role in the protection of the ocular lens from cataract formation. High levels of GSH are maintained in the transparent lens, but with advancing age, GSH levels fall in the lens nucleus relative to outer cortical cells, thereby exposing the nucleus of the lens to the damaging effects of oxygen radicals, which ultimately leads to age-related nuclear (ARN) cataract. Under normal conditions, GSH also forms endogenous conjugates to detoxify the lens of reactive cellular metabolites and to maintain cell homeostasis. Due to the intrinsic gradient of lens fibre cell age, the lens contains distinct regions with different metabolic requirements for GSH. To investigate the impact of fibre cell and lens aging on the varied roles that GSH plays in the lens, we have utilised high mass resolution MALDI mass spectrometry profiling and imaging analysis of lens tissue sections. High Dynamic Range (HDR)-MALDI FTICR mass spectrometry was used as an initial screening method to detect regional differences in lens metabolites from normal bovine lenses and in those subjected to hyperbaric oxygen as a model of lens aging. Subsequent MALDI imaging analysis was used to spatially map GSH and its endogenous conjugates throughout all lenses. Accurate mass measurement by MALDI FTICR analysis and LC-MS/MS mass spectrometry of lens region homogenates were subsequently used to identify endogenous GSH conjugates. While the distribution and relative abundance of GSH-related metabolic intermediates involved in detoxification pathways remained relatively unchanged upon HBO treatment, those involved in its antioxidant function were altered under conditions of oxidative stress. For example, reduced glutathione levels were decreased in the lens cortex while oxidised glutathione levels were elevated in the lens outer cortex upon HBO treatment. Interestingly, cysteineglutathione disulfide, was detected in the inner cortex of the normal

  5. RAS Symposium Draws Hundreds of Attendees | FNLCR

    Cancer.gov

    They call themselves “rasologists”: scientists who study the RAS family of genes and the cancers that can arise due to mutations within them. This field of research is at the heart of some sobering numbers. Almost a third of all human cancers, in

  6. Ras and Nox: linked signaling networks?

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ru Feng; Terada, Lance S.

    2009-01-01

    Both Ras and Nox represent ancient gene families which control a broad range of cellular responses. Both families mediate signals governing motility, differentiation, and proliferation, and both inhabit overlapping subcellular microdomains. Yet little is known of the precise functional relationship between these two ubiquitous families. In this review, we examine the interface where these two large fields meet. PMID:19501154

  7. Superoxide Inhibits Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor (GEF) Action on Ras, but not on Rho, through Desensitization of Ras to GEF

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Ras and Rho GTPases are molecular switches for various vital cellular signaling pathways. Overactivation of these GTPases often causes development of cancer. Guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) and oxidants function to upregulate these GTPases through facilitation of guanine nucleotide exchange (GNE) of these GTPases. However, the effect of oxidants on GEF functions, or vice versa, has not been known. We show that, via targeting Ras Cys51, an oxidant inhibits the catalytic action of Cdc25—the catalytic domain of RasGEFs—on Ras. However, the enhancement of Ras GNE by an oxidant continues regardless of the presence of Cdc25. Limiting RasGEF action by an oxidant may function to prevent the pathophysiological overactivation of Ras in the presence of both RasGEFs and oxidants. The continuous exposure of Ras to nitric oxide and its derivatives can form S-nitrosated Ras (Ras-SNO). This study also shows that an oxidant not only inhibits the catalytic action of Cdc25 on Ras-SNO but also fails to enhance Ras-SNO GNE. This lack of enhancement then populates the biologically inactive Ras-SNO in cells, which may function to prevent the continued redox signaling of the Ras pathophysiological response. Finally, this study also demonstrates that, unlike the case with RasGEFs, an oxidant does not inhibit the catalytic action of RhoGEF—Vav or Dbs—on Rho GTPases such as Rac1, RhoA, RhoC, and Cdc42. This result explains the results of the previous study in which, despite the presence of an oxidant, the catalytic action of Dbs in cells continued to enhance RhoC GNE. PMID:24422478

  8. VPS35 binds farnesylated N-Ras in the cytosol to regulate N-Ras trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Wiener, Heidi; Su, Wenjuan; Liot, Caroline; Hancock, John F.

    2016-01-01

    Ras guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases) regulate signaling pathways only when associated with cellular membranes through their C-terminal prenylated regions. Ras proteins move between membrane compartments in part via diffusion-limited, fluid phase transfer through the cytosol, suggesting that chaperones sequester the polyisoprene lipid from the aqueous environment. In this study, we analyze the nature of the pool of endogenous Ras proteins found in the cytosol. The majority of the pool consists of farnesylated, but not palmitoylated, N-Ras that is associated with a high molecular weight (HMW) complex. Affinity purification and mass spectrographic identification revealed that among the proteins found in the HMW fraction is VPS35, a latent cytosolic component of the retromer coat. VPS35 bound to N-Ras in a farnesyl-dependent, but neither palmitoyl- nor guanosine triphosphate (GTP)–dependent, fashion. Silencing VPS35 increased N-Ras’s association with cytoplasmic vesicles, diminished GTP loading of Ras, and inhibited mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling and growth of N-Ras–dependent melanoma cells. PMID:27502489

  9. A sensitive dual-fluorescence reporter system enables positive selection of ras suppressors by suppression of ras-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Dolnikov, Alla; Shen, Sylvie; Millington, Michelle; Passioura, Toby; Pedler, Michelle; Rasko, John Edward Joshua; Symonds, Geoff

    2003-10-01

    We have developed a novel dual-fluorescence reporter system incorporating green (GFP) and red (RFP) fluorescent proteins to monitor expression of the N-ras(m) gene and an N-ras(m) suppressor, respectively. Retroviral vectors were produced in which human N-ras(m) (codon 13 mutation) was coexpressed with GFP, and a ribozyme specifically targeting N-ras(m) was coexpressed with RFP. N-Ras(m) suppression was monitored by measurement of GFP fluorescence in dual-fluorescent (GFP and RFP) cells. We demonstrated that the degree of N-ras(m) suppression was dependent on the ribozyme dose, proportional to red fluorescence, in dual-fluorescent cells. We further showed that ribozyme-mediated N-ras(m)suppression inhibited growth of NIH3T3 and CD34-positive TF-1 cells. In these cultures, ras suppressor activity resulted in the depletion of suppressor-positive cells due to inhibition of cell growth. In contrast, N-ras(m) suppression produced a growth advantage to human leukemic K562 cells, presumably by inhibiting N-ras(m)-induced apoptosis. In K562 cells, ras suppression resulted in the outgrowth of suppressor-positive cells. This provides a platform to identify suppressors of ras that is based on function.

  10. Rb and N-ras Function Together To Control Differentiation in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Chiaki; Bronson, Roderick T.; Socolovsky, Merav; Contreras, Bernardo; Lee, Kwang Youl; Jacks, Tyler; Noda, Makoto; Kucherlapati, Raju; Ewen, Mark E.

    2003-01-01

    The product of the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor gene (Rb) can control cell proliferation and promote dif-ferentiation. Murine embryos nullizygous for Rb die midgestation with defects in cell cycle regulation, control of apoptosis, and terminal differentiation of several tissues, including skeletal muscle, nervous system, and lens. Previous cell culture-based experiments have suggested that the retinoblastoma protein (pRb) and Ras operate in a common pathway to control cellular differentiation. Here we have tested the hypothesis that the proto-oncogene N-ras participates in Rb-dependent regulation of differentiation by generating and characterizing murine embryos deficient in both N-ras and Rb. We show that deletion of N-ras rescues a unique subset of the developmental defects associated with nullizygosity of Rb, resulting in a significant extension of life span. Rb−/−; N-ras−/− skeletal muscle has normal fiber density, myotube length and thickness, in contrast to Rb-deficient embryos. Additionally, Rb−/−; N-ras−/− muscle shows a restoration in the expression of the late muscle-specific gene MCK, and this correlates with a significant potentiation of MyoD transcriptional activity in Rb−/−; N-ras−/−, compared to Rb−/− myoblasts in culture. The improved differentiation of skeletal muscle in Rb−/−; N-ras−/− embryos occurs despite evidence of deregulated proliferation and apoptosis, as seen in Rb-deficient animals. Our findings suggest that the control of differentiation and proliferation by Rb are genetically separable. PMID:12861012

  11. Telescopic vision contact lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremblay, Eric J.; Beer, R. Dirk; Arianpour, Ashkan; Ford, Joseph E.

    2011-03-01

    We present the concept, optical design, and first proof of principle experimental results for a telescopic contact lens intended to become a visual aid for age-related macular degeneration (AMD), providing magnification to the user without surgery or external head-mounted optics. Our contact lens optical system can provide a combination of telescopic and non-magnified vision through two independent optical paths through the contact lens. The magnified optical path incorporates a telescopic arrangement of positive and negative annular concentric reflectors to achieve 2.8x - 3x magnification on the eye, while light passing through a central clear aperture provides unmagnified vision.

  12. Intraocular lens fabrication

    DOEpatents

    Salazar, Mike A.; Foreman, Larry R.

    1997-01-01

    This invention describes a method for fabricating an intraocular lens made rom clear Teflon.TM., Mylar.TM., or other thermoplastic material having a thickness of about 0.025 millimeters. These plastic materials are thermoformable and biocompatable with the human eye. The two shaped lenses are bonded together with a variety of procedures which may include thermosetting and solvent based adhesives, laser and impulse welding, and ultrasonic bonding. The fill tube, which is used to inject a refractive filling material is formed with the lens so as not to damage the lens shape. A hypodermic tube may be included inside the fill tube.

  13. Intraocular lens fabrication

    DOEpatents

    Salazar, M.A.; Foreman, L.R.

    1997-07-08

    This invention describes a method for fabricating an intraocular lens made from clear Teflon{trademark}, Mylar{trademark}, or other thermoplastic material having a thickness of about 0.025 millimeters. These plastic materials are thermoformable and biocompatable with the human eye. The two shaped lenses are bonded together with a variety of procedures which may include thermosetting and solvent based adhesives, laser and impulse welding, and ultrasonic bonding. The fill tube, which is used to inject a refractive filling material is formed with the lens so as not to damage the lens shape. A hypodermic tube may be included inside the fill tube. 13 figs.

  14. The lens circulation.

    PubMed

    Mathias, Richard T; Kistler, Joerg; Donaldson, Paul

    2007-03-01

    The lens is the largest organ in the body that lacks a vasculature. The reason is simple: blood vessels scatter and absorb light while the physiological role of the lens is to be transparent so it can assist the cornea in focusing light on the retina. We hypothesize this lack of blood supply has led the lens to evolve an internal circulation of ions that is coupled to fluid movement, thus creating an internal micro-circulatory system, which makes up for the lack of vasculature. This review covers the membrane transport systems that are believed to generate and direct this internal circulatory system.

  15. Unitary lens semiconductor device

    DOEpatents

    Lear, K.L.

    1997-05-27

    A unitary lens semiconductor device and method are disclosed. The unitary lens semiconductor device is provided with at least one semiconductor layer having a composition varying in the growth direction for unitarily forming one or more lenses in the semiconductor layer. Unitary lens semiconductor devices may be formed as light-processing devices such as microlenses, and as light-active devices such as light-emitting diodes, photodetectors, resonant-cavity light-emitting diodes, vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers, and resonant cavity photodetectors. 9 figs.

  16. Unitary lens semiconductor device

    DOEpatents

    Lear, Kevin L.

    1997-01-01

    A unitary lens semiconductor device and method. The unitary lens semiconductor device is provided with at least one semiconductor layer having a composition varying in the growth direction for unitarily forming one or more lenses in the semiconductor layer. Unitary lens semiconductor devices may be formed as light-processing devices such as microlenses, and as light-active devices such as light-emitting diodes, photodetectors, resonant-cavity light-emitting diodes, vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers, and resonant cavity photodetectors.

  17. Ras pathway activation in hepatocellular carcinoma and anti-tumoral effect of combined sorafenib and rapamycin in vivo☆

    PubMed Central

    Newell, Pippa; Toffanin, Sara; Villanueva, Augusto; Chiang, Derek Y.; Minguez, Beatriz; Cabellos, Laia; Savic, Radoslav; Hoshida, Yujin; Lim, Kiat Hon; Melgar-Lesmes, Pedro; Yea, Steven; Peix, Judit; Deniz, Kemal; Fiel, M. Isabel; Thung, Swan; Alsinet, Clara; Tovar, Victoria; Mazzaferro, Vincenzo; Bruix, Jordi; Roayaie, Sasan; Schwartz, Myron; Friedman, Scott L.; Llovet, Josep M.

    2010-01-01

    Background/Aims The success of sorafenib in the treatment of advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has focused interest on the role of Ras signaling in this malignancy. We investigated the molecular alterations of the Ras pathway in HCC and the antineoplastic effects of sorafenib in combination with rapamycin, an inhibitor of mTOR pathway, in experimental models. Methods Gene expression (qRT-PCR, oligonucleotide microarray), DNA copy number changes (SNP-array), methylation of tumor suppressor genes (methylation-specific PCR) and protein activation (immunohistochemistry) were analysed in 351 samples. Anti-tumoral effects of combined therapy targeting the Ras and mTOR pathways were evaluated in cell lines and HCC xenografts. Results Different mechanisms accounted for Ras pathway activation in HCC. H-ras was up-regulated during different steps of hepatocarcinogenesis. B-raf was overexpressed in advanced tumors and its expression was associated with genomic amplification. Partial methylation of RASSF1A and NORE1A was detected in 89% and 44% of tumors respectively, and complete methylation was found in 11 and 4% of HCCs. Activation of the pathway (pERK immunostaining) was identified in 10.3% of HCC. Blockade of Ras and mTOR pathways with sorafenib and rapamycin reduced cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in cell lines. In vivo, the combination of both compounds enhanced tumor necrosis and ulceration when compared with sorafenib alone. Conclusions Ras activation results from several molecular alterations, such as methylation of tumor suppressors and amplification of oncogenes (B-raf). Sorafenib blocks signaling and synergizes with rapamycin in vivo, preventing tumor progression. These data provide the rationale for testing this combination in clinical studies. PMID:19665249

  18. Reflections From a Fresnel Lens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeports, David

    2005-01-01

    Reflection of light by a convex Fresnel lens gives rise to two distinct images. A highly convex inverted real reflective image forms on the object side of the lens, while an upright virtual reflective image forms on the opposite side of the lens. I describe here a set of laser experiments performed upon a Fresnel lens. These experiments provide…

  19. Reflections From a Fresnel Lens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeports, David

    2005-01-01

    Reflection of light by a convex Fresnel lens gives rise to two distinct images. A highly convex inverted real reflective image forms on the object side of the lens, while an upright virtual reflective image forms on the opposite side of the lens. I describe here a set of laser experiments performed upon a Fresnel lens. These experiments provide…

  20. Design and fabrication of soft zoom lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Wei-Cheng; Chen, Chao-Chang A.; Huang, Kuo-Cheng

    2008-08-01

    With minimization of optical-electronics devices, conventional optical zoom lens component has been explored with liquid lens and soft polymer membranes. This paper introduces a novel zoom lens system with a soft polymer material, Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), its shape and curvature can be controlled by pneumatic pressure. Therefore, effective focal length (EFL) of soft zoom lens (SZL) system can be controlled and altered. According to desired opto-mechanical design, this ZL has been accessed to determine the optical specifications. After the pressure activated from 0 to 0.02MPa, the change of EFL of the SZL system can reach up to 18.77% (33.44mm to 39.717mm). Experimental results show that zoom effects of the developed SZL system are significantly affected by the shape, thickness and curing parameter of PDMS soft lens. The SZL system has been verified with the function of zoom ability. Further research works on the integration of the SZL system with imaging system for mobile devices or robot vision applications.

  1. The RAS-Effector Interaction as a Drug Target.

    PubMed

    Keeton, Adam B; Salter, E Alan; Piazza, Gary A

    2017-01-15

    About a third of all human cancers harbor mutations in one of the K-, N-, or HRAS genes that encode an abnormal RAS protein locked in a constitutively activated state to drive malignant transformation and tumor growth. Despite more than three decades of intensive research aimed at the discovery of RAS-directed therapeutics, there are no FDA-approved drugs that are broadly effective against RAS-driven cancers. Although RAS proteins are often said to be "undruggable," there is mounting evidence suggesting it may be feasible to develop direct inhibitors of RAS proteins. Here, we review this evidence with a focus on compounds capable of inhibiting the interaction of RAS proteins with their effectors that transduce the signals of RAS and that drive and sustain malignant transformation and tumor growth. These reports of direct-acting RAS inhibitors provide valuable insight for further discovery and development of clinical candidates for RAS-driven cancers involving mutations in RAS genes or otherwise activated RAS proteins. Cancer Res; 77(2); 221-6. ©2017 AACR.

  2. Early regulation of membrane excitability by ras oncogene proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Collin, C; Papageorge, A G; Sakakibara, M; Huddie, P L; Lowy, D R; Alkon, D L

    1990-01-01

    Two electrode voltage clamp conditions were used to study the early effects on ionic membrane channels of the intracellularly injected proto-oncogenic form of c-Ha-ras (c-ras) and its oncogenic counterpart v-Ha-ras (v-ras). These experiments were conducted on isolated somata of identified fully differentiated neurons of the sea snail Hermissenda. 20 min after c-ras, and 10 min after v-ras intracellular injections into type B medial photoreceptors of Hermissenda, the peak amplitude of two outward potassium currents (IA and IC), across the isolated Type B soma membrane begin to decrease. These two currents have been previously isolated by differences in activation and inactivation kinetics and their response to pharmacological blockers. c- or v-ras injections did not have any effect on a voltage-dependent inward calcium current. Reduction of IA preceded that of IC. Current reductions due to c-ras, but not to v-ras injection reversed spontaneously after 40 min. The voltage dependence of the steady state inactivation of IA shifted toward more negative potentials with ras injections. Ras-mediated cell transformations therefore, could involve, perhaps as initial events, prolonged modification of membrane currents. PMID:2207264

  3. Evolutionary expansion of the Ras switch regulatory module in eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Díez, Diego; Sánchez-Jiménez, Francisca; Ranea, Juan A. G.

    2011-01-01

    Ras proteins control many aspects of eukaryotic cell homeostasis by switching between active (GTP-bound) and inactive (GDP-bound) conformations, a reaction catalyzed by GTPase exchange factors (GEF) and GTPase activating proteins (GAP) regulators, respectively. Here, we show that the complexity, measured as number of genes, of the canonical Ras switch genetic system (including Ras, RasGEF, RasGAP and RapGAP families) from 24 eukaryotic organisms is correlated with their genome size and is inversely correlated to their evolutionary distances from humans. Moreover, different gene subfamilies within the Ras switch have contributed unevenly to the module’s expansion and speciation processes during eukaryote evolution. The Ras system remarkably reduced its genetic expansion after the split of the Euteleostomi clade and presently looks practically crystallized in mammals. Supporting evidence points to gene duplication as the predominant mechanism generating functional diversity in the Ras system, stressing the leading role of gene duplication in the Ras family expansion. Domain fusion and alternative splicing are significant sources of functional diversity in the GAP and GEF families but their contribution is limited in the Ras family. An evolutionary model of the Ras system expansion is proposed suggesting an inherent ‘decision making’ topology with the GEF input signal integrated by a homologous molecular mechanism and bifurcation in GAP signaling propagation. PMID:21447561

  4. SodC modulates ras and PKB signaling in Dictyostelium.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Boris; Kim, Seon-Hee; Sharief, Mujataba; Sun, Tong; Kim, Lou W

    2017-01-01

    We have previously reported that the basal RasG activity is aberrantly high in cells lacking Superoxide dismutase C (SodC). Here we report that other Ras proteins such as RasC and RasD activities are not affected in sodC(-) cells and mutagenesis studies showed that the presence of the Cys(118) in the Ras proteins is essential for the superoxide-mediated activation of Ras proteins in Dictyostelium. In addition to the loss of SodC, lack of extracellular magnesium ions increased the level of intracellular superoxide and active RasG proteins. Aberrantly active Ras proteins in sodC(-) cells persistently localized at the plasma membrane, but those in wild type cells under magnesium deficient medium exhibited intracellular vesicular localization. Interestingly, the aberrantly activated Ras proteins in wild type cells were largely insulated from their normal downstream events such as Phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-P3 (PIP3) accumulation, Protein Kinase B (PKB) activation, and PKBs substrates phosphorylation. Intriguingly, however, aberrantly activated Ras proteins in sodC(-) cells were still engaged in signaling to their downstream targets, and thus excessive PKBs substrates phosphorylation persisted. In summary, we suggest that SodC and RasG proteins are essential part of a novel inhibitory mechanism that discourages oxidatively stressed cells from chemotaxis and thus inhibits the delivery of potentially damaged genome to the next generation.

  5. Contact Lens Risks

    MedlinePlus

    ... contact lenses to any water: tap, bottled, distilled, lake or ocean water. Never use non-sterile water ( ... from bacteria in swimming pool water, hot tubs, lakes and the ocean Replace your contact lens storage ...

  6. Plasmonic achromatic doublet lens.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyookeun; Lee, Seung-Yeol; Jung, Jaehoon; Lee, Byoungho

    2015-03-09

    An achromatic doublet lens (ADL) for surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) is designed. Similar to the conventional ADL, the proposed plasmonic ADL is composed of two lens layers with different dispersion relations. Considering these layers as effective media, their refractive indices with respect to the free-space wavelength are calculated. Geometric parameters of the lens are initially set according to the geometrical optic theory, and then optimized by reduced dimensional calculations. The performance of proposed device is verified by using full-wave simulations and compared with a double-convex plasmonic lens to verify its achromatic characteristics. It is shown that the standard deviation of the focal length shift is reduced from 668 nm to 168 nm, after introducing the ADL.

  7. Tunable Polymer Lens

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-08-04

    Sylgard® 184). Poly ( methyl methacrylate ) (PMMA) was provided by Atofina Chemicals, Inc. (Plexiglas V920). The SEBS copolymer and PMMA resins...convex poly ( methyl methacrylate ) (PMMA) lens, R=25.8 mm, with a tunable elastomeric lens membrane, R=38.6 mm. The PMMA is rigid; the variable focal...using a combination of deformable and rigid polymeric materials. An elastomeric styrene- ethylene /butylene-styrene (SEBS) block copolymer was

  8. Lens auto-centering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamontagne, Frédéric; Desnoyers, Nichola; Doucet, Michel; Côté, Patrice; Gauvin, Jonny; Anctil, Geneviève; Tremblay, Mathieu

    2015-09-01

    In a typical optical system, optical elements usually need to be precisely positioned and aligned to perform the correct optical function. This positioning and alignment involves securing the optical element in a holder or mount. Proper centering of an optical element with respect to the holder is a delicate operation that generally requires tight manufacturing tolerances or active alignment, resulting in costly optical assemblies. To optimize optical performance and minimize manufacturing cost, there is a need for a lens mounting method that could relax manufacturing tolerance, reduce assembly time and provide high centering accuracy. This paper presents a patent pending lens mounting method developed at INO that can be compared to the drop-in technique for its simplicity while providing the level of accuracy close to that achievable with techniques using a centering machine (usually < 5 μm). This innovative auto-centering method is based on the use of geometrical relationship between the lens diameter, the lens radius of curvature and the thread angle of the retaining ring. The autocentering principle and centering test results performed on real optical assemblies are presented. In addition to the low assembly time, high centering accuracy, and environmental robustness, the INO auto-centering method has the advantage of relaxing lens and barrel bore diameter tolerances as well as lens wedge tolerances. The use of this novel lens mounting method significantly reduces manufacturing and assembly costs for high performance optical systems. Large volume productions would especially benefit from this advancement in precision lens mounting, potentially providing a drastic cost reduction.

  9. The role of non-ras transforming genes in chemical carcinogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, C S

    1991-01-01

    DNA transfection experiments using the NIH 3T3 mouse fibroblast cell line have demonstrated that chemically induced tumors and chemically transformed cell lines frequently contain dominant transforming genes. Although many of the genes detected using the NIH 3T3 transfection-transformation assay are activated versions of H-ras, K-ras, and N-ras, in some experimental systems activated forms of genes such as met and neu that are unrelated to ras have been observed. The activated met gene was originally detected in a human cell line that had been transformed by exposure to N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine. Subsequent studies demonstrated that the met proto-oncogene encodes a novel growth factor receptor and that gene activation involves the production of a chimeric gene in which the regions of met encoding the extracellular and transmembrane domains of the receptor are replaced by the 5'-region of an unrelated gene called trp. The activated neu gene was detected in tumors of the nervous system that arose in mice following transplacental exposure to N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea. The neu gene also encodes a novel growth factor receptor but, in contrast to met, its activation involves a single T:A----A:T point mutation in the region of the neu gene encoding the receptor transmembrane domain. The presence of genetic alterations in chemically induced malignancies has also been assessed in cytogenetic studies and by Southern analysis of DNA from neoplastic cells.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1685444

  10. Precise in situ etch depth control of multilayered III−V semiconductor samples with reflectance anisotropy spectroscopy (RAS) equipment

    PubMed Central

    Kleinschmidt, Ann-Kathrin; Barzen, Lars; Strassner, Johannes; Doering, Christoph; Bock, Wolfgang; Wahl, Michael; Kopnarski, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Reflectance anisotropy spectroscopy (RAS) equipment is applied to monitor dry-etch processes (here specifically reactive ion etching (RIE)) of monocrystalline multilayered III–V semiconductors in situ. The related accuracy of etch depth control is better than 16 nm. Comparison with results of secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) reveals a deviation of only about 4 nm in optimal cases. To illustrate the applicability of the reported method in every day settings for the first time the highly etch depth sensitive lithographic process to form a film lens on the waveguide ridge of a broad area laser (BAL) is presented. This example elucidates the benefits of the method in semiconductor device fabrication and also suggests how to fulfill design requirements for the sample in order to make RAS control possible. PMID:28144528

  11. Terahertz Artificial Dielectric Lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendis, Rajind; Nagai, Masaya; Wang, Yiqiu; Karl, Nicholas; Mittleman, Daniel M.

    2016-03-01

    We have designed, fabricated, and experimentally characterized a lens for the THz regime based on artificial dielectrics. These are man-made media that mimic properties of naturally occurring dielectric media, or even manifest properties that cannot generally occur in nature. For example, the well-known dielectric property, the refractive index, which usually has a value greater than unity, can have a value less than unity in an artificial dielectric. For our lens, the artificial-dielectric medium is made up of a parallel stack of 100 μm thick metal plates that form an array of parallel-plate waveguides. The convergent lens has a plano-concave geometry, in contrast to conventional dielectric lenses. Our results demonstrate that this lens is capable of focusing a 2 cm diameter beam to a spot size of 4 mm, at the design frequency of 0.17 THz. The results further demonstrate that the overall power transmission of the lens can be better than certain conventional dielectric lenses commonly used in the THz regime. Intriguingly, we also observe that under certain conditions, the lens boundary demarcated by the discontinuous plate edges actually resembles a smooth continuous surface. These results highlight the importance of this artificial-dielectric technology for the development of future THz-wave devices.

  12. Sprouty, an intracellular inhibitor of Ras signaling.

    PubMed

    Casci, T; Vinós, J; Freeman, M

    1999-03-05

    Sprouty was identified in a genetic screen as an inhibitor of Drosophila EGF receptor signaling. The Egfr triggers cell recruitment in the eye, and sprouty- eyes have excess photoreceptors, cone cells, and pigment cells. Sprouty's function is, however, more widespread. We show that it also interacts genetically with the receptor tyrosine kinases Torso and Sevenless, and it was first discovered through its effect on FGF receptor signaling. In contrast to an earlier proposal that Sprouty is extracellular, we show by biochemical analysis that Sprouty is an intracellular protein, associated with the inner surface of the plasma membrane. Sprouty binds to two intracellular components of the Ras pathway, Drk and Gap1. Our results indicate that Sprouty is a widespread inhibitor of Ras pathway signal transduction.

  13. Ras-Independent Function of NF1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-01

    required to fulfill this process. Moreover, the skin disease we observed in those mice is psoriasis . 15. SUBJECT TERMS Neurofibromin (NF1), Ras...factor such as age contributes to the process. 3d. Proposed work: Determine the relation between NF1 and psoriasis (months 13-24). We will collect...several psoriasis related genes, such as Th17, IL22, IL23, CD68, CXCL8, CCL2, defensin-2 by quantitative PCR in the skin samples from the lesions

  14. K-ras oncogene mutation in pterygium.

    PubMed

    Ozturk, B T; Yıldırım, M S; Zamani, A; Bozkurt, B

    2017-03-01

    PurposePterygium is claimed to be a benign proliferation triggered by prolonged exposure to ultraviolet radiation. The frequency of K-ras oncogene mutation, which is among the initial mutations in tumorigenesis, is evaluated in this study.Patients and methodsIn this prospective randomized clinical, trial pterygium tissues and normal conjunctiva tissue specimens are obtained from the superotemporal quadrant of patients who underwent primary pterygium excision with autograft transplantation. DNA extraction from tissues was performed using the QIAamp DNA FFPE tissue kit. A PCR reaction was performed to amplify sequences containing codons 12, 13, and 61 of the K-ras gene in DNA. These PCR products then underwent the 'pyrosequencing' procedure for mutations at these codons.ResultsPterygium and normal conjunctival tissue samples of 25 patients (10 females, 15 males) were evaluated in the study. The mean age of the patients was 54.54±13.13 years. Genetic analysis revealed no K-ras mutations in normal conjunctival tissues, whereas pterygium tissues of the same cases demonstrated mutation at codon 12 in one case and mutations at codon 61 in seven cases, which was statistically significant (P<0.05). The point missense mutations at codon 61 were glutamine to arginine (Glu61Arg CAA>CGA) in four cases and glutamine to leucine (Glu61Leu CAA>CTA) in three cases.ConclusionThe significantly higher frequency of codon 61 mutation of the ras oncogene in primary and bilateral pterygium specimens compared with normal conjunctiva supports the tumoral origin of pterygium, and thus set the stage for research into a targeted therapy for pterygium with better outcomes than surgical excision.

  15. RAS signaling dysregulation in human embryonal Rhabdomyosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Martinelli, Simone; McDowell, Heather P; Vigne, Silvia Delle; Kokai, George; Uccini, Stefania; Tartaglia, Marco; Dominici, Carlo

    2009-11-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is a common childhood solid tumor, resulting from dysregulation of the skeletal myogenesis program. Two major histological subtypes occur in childhood RMS, embryonal and alveolar. While chromosomal rearrangements account for the majority of alveolar tumors, the genetic defects underlying the pathogenesis of embryonal RMS remain largely undetermined. A few studies performed on small series of embryonal tumors suggest that dysregulation of RAS function may be relevant to disease pathogenesis. To explore further the biological and clinical relevance of mutations with perturbing consequences on RAS signaling in embryonal RMS, we investigated the prevalence of PTPN11, HRAS, KRAS, NRAS, BRAF, MEK1, and MEK2 mutations in a relatively large cohort of primary tumors. While HRAS and KRAS were found to be rarely mutated, we identified somatic NRAS lesions in 20% of cases. All mutations were missense and affected codon 61, with the introduction of a positive charged amino acid residue representing the most common event. PTPN11 was found mutated in one tumor specimen, confirming that somatic defects in this gene are relatively uncommon in RMS, while no mutation was observed in BRAF and MEK genes. Although no clear association of mutations with any clinical variable was observed, comparison of the outcome between mutation-positive and mutation-negative cases indicated a trend for a higher percentage of patients exhibiting a better outcome in the former. Our findings provide evidence that dysregulation of RAS signaling is a major event contributing to embryonal RMS pathogenesis. Copyright 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. IAA RAS Radio Telescope Monitoring System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailov, A.; Lavrov, A.

    2007-07-01

    Institute of Applied Astronomy of the Russian Academy of Sciences (IAA RAS) has three identical radio telescopes, the receiving complex of which consists of five two-channel receivers of different bands, six cryogen systems, and additional devices: four local oscillators, phase calibration generators and IF commutator. The design, hardware and data communication protocol are described. The most convenient way to join the devices of the receiving complex into the common monitoring system is to use the interface which allows to connect numerous devices to the data bus. For the purpose of data communication regulation and to exclude conflicts, a data communication protocol has been designed, which operates with complex formatted data sequences. Formation of such sequences requires considerable data processing capability. That is provided by a microcontroller chip in each slave device. The test version of the software for the central computer has been developed in IAA RAS. We are developing the Mark IV FS software extension modules, which will allow us to control the receiving complex of the radio telescope by special SNAP commands from both operator input and schedule files. We are also developing procedures of automatic measurements of SEFD, system noise temperature and other parameters, available both in VLBI and single-dish modes of operation. The system described has been installed on all IAA RAS radio telescopes at "Svetloe", "Zelenchukskaya" and "Badary" observatories. It has proved to be working quite reliably and to show the perfonmance expected.

  17. Digital signaling and hysteresis characterize Ras activation in lymphoid cells

    PubMed Central

    Das, Jayajit; Ho, Mary; Zikherman, Julie; Govern, Christopher; Yang, Ming; Weiss, Arthur; Chakraborty, Arup K.; Roose, Jeroen P.

    2009-01-01

    Activation of Ras proteins underlies functional decisions in diverse cell types. Two molecules, RasGRP and SOS, catalyze Ras activation in lymphocytes. Binding of active Ras to SOS′ allosteric pocket markedly increases SOS′ activity establishing a positive feedback loop for SOS-mediated Ras activation. Integrating in silico and in vitro studies, we demonstrate that digital signaling in lymphocytes (cells are “on” or “off”) is predicated upon feedback regulation of SOS. SOS′ feedback loop leads to hysteresis in the dose-response curve, which can enable a capacity to sustain Ras activation as stimuli are withdrawn and exhibit “memory” of past encounters with antigen. Ras activation via RasGRP alone is analog (graded increase in amplitude with stimulus). We describe how complementary analog (RasGRP) and digital (SOS) pathways act on Ras to efficiently convert analog input to digital output. Numerous predictions regarding the impact of our findings on lymphocyte function and development are noted. PMID:19167334

  18. Nuclear Ras2-GTP controls invasive growth in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Broggi, Serena; Martegani, Enzo; Colombo, Sonia

    2013-01-01

    Using an eGFP-RBD3 probe, which specifically binds Ras-GTP, we recently showed that the fluorescent probe was localized to the plasma membrane and to the nucleus in wild type cells growing exponentially on glucose medium, indicating the presence of active Ras in these cellular compartments. To investigate the nuclear function of Ras-GTP, we generated a strain where Ras2 is fused to the nuclear export signal (NES) from the HIV virus, in order to exclude this protein from the nucleus. Our results show that nuclear active Ras2 is required for invasive growth development in haploid yeast, while the expression of the NES-Ras2 protein does not cause growth defects either on fermentable or non-fermentable carbon sources and does not influence protein kinase A (PKA) activity related phenotypes analysed. Moreover, we show that the cAMP/PKA pathway controls invasive growth influencing the localization of active Ras. In particular, we show that PKA activity plays a role in the localization of active Ras and influences the ability of the cells to invade the agar: high PKA activity leads to a predominant nuclear accumulation of active Ras and induces invasive growth, while low PKA activity leads to plasma membrane localization of active Ras and to a defective invasive growth phenotype.

  19. Cytosolic Ras Supports Eye Development in Drosophila ▿

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Pamela J.; Rodrigues, Aloma B.; Kleinberger, Andrew; Quatela, Steven; Bach, Erika A.; Philips, Mark R.

    2010-01-01

    Ras proteins associate with cellular membranes as a consequence of a series of posttranslational modifications of a C-terminal CAAX sequence that include prenylation and are thought to be required for biological activity. In Drosophila melanogaster, Ras1 is required for eye development. We found that Drosophila Ras1 is inefficiently prenylated as a consequence of a lysine in the A1 position of its CAAX sequence such that a significant pool remains soluble in the cytosol. We used mosaic analysis with a repressible cell marker (MARCM) to assess if various Ras1 transgenes could restore photoreceptor fate to eye disc cells that are null for Ras1. Surprisingly, we found that whereas Ras1 with an enhanced efficiency of membrane targeting could not rescue the Ras1 null phenotype, Ras1 that was not at all membrane targeted by virtue of a mutation of the CAAX cysteine was able to fully rescue eye development. In addition, constitutively active Ras112V,C186S not targeted to membranes produced a hypermorphic phenotype and stimulated mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling in S2 cells. We conclude that the membrane association of Drosophila Ras1 is not required for eye development. PMID:20937772

  20. Nuclear Ras2-GTP Controls Invasive Growth in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Broggi, Serena; Martegani, Enzo; Colombo, Sonia

    2013-01-01

    Using an eGFP-RBD3 probe, which specifically binds Ras-GTP, we recently showed that the fluorescent probe was localized to the plasma membrane and to the nucleus in wild type cells growing exponentially on glucose medium, indicating the presence of active Ras in these cellular compartments. To investigate the nuclear function of Ras-GTP, we generated a strain where Ras2 is fused to the nuclear export signal (NES) from the HIV virus, in order to exclude this protein from the nucleus. Our results show that nuclear active Ras2 is required for invasive growth development in haploid yeast, while the expression of the NES-Ras2 protein does not cause growth defects either on fermentable or non-fermentable carbon sources and does not influence protein kinase A (PKA) activity related phenotypes analysed. Moreover, we show that the cAMP/PKA pathway controls invasive growth influencing the localization of active Ras. In particular, we show that PKA activity plays a role in the localization of active Ras and influences the ability of the cells to invade the agar: high PKA activity leads to a predominant nuclear accumulation of active Ras and induces invasive growth, while low PKA activity leads to plasma membrane localization of active Ras and to a defective invasive growth phenotype. PMID:24244466

  1. K-Ras, H-Ras, N-Ras and B-Raf mutation and expression analysis in Wilms tumors: association with tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Dalpa, Efterpi; Gourvas, Victor; Soulitzis, Nikolaos; Spandidos, Demetrios A

    2017-01-01

    Nephroblastoma (Wilms tumor) is a kidney neoplasia, predominately occurring at very young age, resulting from the malignant transformation of renal stem cells. The Ras proto-oncogenes and B-Raf are members of an intracellular cascade pathway, which regulates cell growth and differentiation, and ultimately cancer development. Our objective was to determine the mutation rate and to measure the mRNA levels of the three Ras genes and of B-Raf in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue samples from 32 patients with nephroblastoma and 10 controls. No mutations were detected in the four studied genes among our Wilms tumors cases, while Ras and B-Raf expression was higher in malignant samples versus controls. Statistical analysis revealed a positive correlation of K-Ras (p < 0.001) and B-Raf (p = 0.006) with tumor size, a negative correlation of K-Ras (p = 0.041) and H-Ras (p = 0.033) with the percentage of tissue necrosis, and an association of N-Ras (p = 0.047) and B-Raf (p = 0.044) with tissue histology. From the above, we deduce that although Ras and B-Raf mutations are rare events in Wilms tumors, their expression pattern suggests that they play an important role in the development and progression of this malignancy.

  2. Severe craniosynostosis with Noonan syndrome phenotype associated with SHOC2 mutation: clinical evidence of crosslink between FGFR and RAS signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Takenouchi, Toshiki; Sakamoto, Yoshiaki; Miwa, Tomoru; Torii, Chiharu; Kosaki, Rika; Kishi, Kazuo; Takahashi, Takao; Kosaki, Kenjiro

    2014-11-01

    Dysregulation in the RAS signaling cascade results in a family of malformation syndromes called RASopathies. Meanwhile, alterations in FGFR signaling cascade are responsible for various syndromic forms of craniosynostosis. In general, the phenotypic spectra of RASopathies and craniosynostosis syndromes do not overlap. Recently, however, mutations in ERF, a downstream molecule of the RAS signaling cascade, have been identified as a cause of complex craniosynostosis, suggesting that the RAS and FGFR signaling pathways can interact in the pathogenesis of malformation syndromes. Here, we document a boy with short stature, developmental delay, and severe craniosynostosis involving right coronal, bilateral lambdoid, and sagittal sutures with a de novo mutation in exon1 of SHOC2 (c.4A>G p.Ser2Gly). This observation further supports the existence of a crosslink between the RAS signaling cascade and craniosynostosis. In retrospect, the propositus had physical features suggestive of a dysregulated RAS signaling cascade, such as fetal pleural effusion, fetal hydrops, and atrial tachycardia. In addition to an abnormal cranial shape, which has been reported for this specific mutation, craniosynostosis might be a novel associated phenotype. In conclusion, the phenotypic combination of severe craniosynostosis and RASopathy features observed in the propositus suggests an interaction between the RAS and FGFR signaling cascades. Patients with craniosynostosis in combination with any RASopathy feature may require mutation screening for molecules in the FGFR-RAS signaling cascade.

  3. The 70-kilodalton adenylyl cyclase-associated protein is not essential for interaction of Saccharomyces cerevisiae adenylyl cyclase with RAS proteins.

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Suzuki, N; Kataoka, T

    1992-11-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, adenylyl cyclase is regulated by RAS proteins. We show here that the yeast adenylyl cyclase forms at least two high-molecular-weight complexes, one with the RAS protein-dependent adenylyl cyclase activity and the other with the Mn(2+)-dependent activity, which are separable by their size difference. The 70-kDa adenylyl cyclase-associated protein (CAP) existed in the former complex but not in the latter. Missense mutations in conserved motifs of the leucine-rich repeats of the catalytic subunit of adenylyl cyclase abolished the RAS-dependent activity, which was accompanied by formation of a very high molecular weight complex having the Mn(2+)-dependent activity. Contrary to previous results, disruption of the gene encoding CAP did not alter the extent of RAS protein-dependent activation of adenylyl cyclase, while a concomitant decrease in the size of the RAS-responsive complex was observed. These results indicate that CAP is not essential for interaction of the yeast adenylyl cyclase with RAS proteins even though it is an inherent component of the RAS-responsive adenylyl cyclase complex.

  4. Ras-Mek-Erk signaling regulates Nf1 heterozygous neointima formation.

    PubMed

    Stansfield, Brian K; Bessler, Waylan K; Mali, Raghuveer; Mund, Julie A; Downing, Brandon D; Kapur, Reuben; Ingram, David A

    2014-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) results from mutations in the NF1 tumor-suppressor gene, which encodes neurofibromin, a negative regulator of diverse Ras signaling cascades. Arterial stenosis is a nonneoplastic manifestation of NF1 that predisposes some patients to debilitating morbidity and sudden death. Recent murine studies demonstrate that Nf1 heterozygosity (Nf1(+/-)) in monocytes/macrophages significantly enhances intimal proliferation after arterial injury. However, the downstream Ras effector pathway responsible for this phenotype is unknown. Based on in vitro assays demonstrating enhanced extracellular signal-related kinase (Erk) signaling in Nf1(+/-) macrophages and vascular smooth muscle cells and in vivo evidence of Erk amplification without alteration of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase signaling in Nf1(+/-) neointimas, we tested the hypothesis that Ras-Erk signaling regulates intimal proliferation in a murine model of NF1 arterial stenosis. By using a well-established in vivo model of inflammatory cell migration and standard cell culture, neurofibromin-deficient macrophages demonstrate enhanced sensitivity to growth factor stimulation in vivo and in vitro, which is significantly diminished in the presence of PD0325901, a specific inhibitor of Ras-Erk signaling in phase 2 clinical trials for cancer. After carotid artery injury, Nf1(+/-) mice demonstrated increased intimal proliferation compared with wild-type mice. Daily administration of PD0325901 significantly reduced Nf1(+/-) neointima formation to levels of wild-type mice. These studies identify the Ras-Erk pathway in neurofibromin-deficient macrophages as the aberrant pathway responsible for enhanced neointima formation.

  5. CREBBP knockdown enhances RAS/RAF/MEK/ERK signaling in Ras pathway mutated acute lymphoblastic leukemia but does not modulate chemotherapeutic response.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Zach A; Nicholson, Lindsay; Zeppetzauer, Martin; Matheson, Elizabeth; Sinclair, Paul; Harrison, Christine J; Irving, Julie A E

    2017-04-01

    Relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia is the most common cause of cancer-related mortality in young people and new therapeutic strategies are needed to improve outcome. Recent studies have shown that heterozygous inactivating mutations in the histone acetyl transferase, CREBBP, are particularly frequent in relapsed childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia and associated with a hyperdiploid karyotype and KRAS mutations. To study the functional impact of CREBBP haploinsufficiency in acute lymphoblastic leukemia, RNA interference was used to knock down expression of CREBBP in acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell lines and various primagraft acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells. We demonstrate that attenuation of CREBBP results in reduced acetylation of histone 3 lysine 18, but has no significant impact on cAMP-dependent target gene expression. Impaired induction of glucocorticoid receptor targets was only seen in 1 of 4 CREBBP knockdown models, and there was no significant difference in glucocorticoid-induced apoptosis, sensitivity to other acute lymphoblastic leukemia chemotherapeutics or histone deacetylase inhibitors. Importantly, we show that CREBBP directly acetylates KRAS and that CREBBP knockdown enhances signaling of the RAS/RAF/MEK/ERK pathway in Ras pathway mutated acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells, which are still sensitive to MEK inhibitors. Thus, CREBBP mutations might assist in enhancing oncogenic RAS signaling in acute lymphoblastic leukemia but do not alter response to MEK inhibitors. Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  6. Myc and Ras oncogenes engage different energy metabolism programs and evoke distinct patterns of oxidative and DNA replication stress.

    PubMed

    Maya-Mendoza, Apolinar; Ostrakova, Jitka; Kosar, Martin; Hall, Arnaldur; Duskova, Pavlina; Mistrik, Martin; Merchut-Maya, Joanna Maria; Hodny, Zdenek; Bartkova, Jirina; Christensen, Claus; Bartek, Jiri

    2015-03-01

    Both Myc and Ras oncogenes impact cellular metabolism, deregulate redox homeostasis and trigger DNA replication stress (RS) that compromises genomic integrity. However, how are such oncogene-induced effects evoked and temporally related, to what extent are these kinetic parameters shared by Myc and Ras, and how are these cellular changes linked with oncogene-induced cellular senescence in different cell context(s) remain poorly understood. Here, we addressed the above-mentioned open questions by multifaceted comparative analyses of human cellular models with inducible expression of c-Myc and H-RasV12 (Ras), two commonly deregulated oncoproteins operating in a functionally connected signaling network. Our study of DNA replication parameters using the DNA fiber approach and time-course assessment of perturbations in glycolytic flux, oxygen consumption and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) revealed the following results. First, overabundance of nuclear Myc triggered RS promptly, already after one day of Myc induction, causing slow replication fork progression and fork asymmetry, even before any metabolic changes occurred. In contrast, Ras overexpression initially induced a burst of cell proliferation and increased the speed of replication fork progression. However, after several days of induction Ras caused bioenergetic metabolic changes that correlated with slower DNA replication fork progression and the ensuing cell cycle arrest, gradually leading to senescence. Second, the observed oncogene-induced RS and metabolic alterations were cell-type/context dependent, as shown by comparative analyses of normal human BJ fibroblasts versus U2-OS sarcoma cells. Third, the energy metabolic reprogramming triggered by Ras was more robust compared to impact of Myc. Fourth, the detected oncogene-induced oxidative stress was due to ROS (superoxide) of non-mitochondrial origin and mitochondrial OXPHOS was reduced (Crabtree effect). Overall, our study provides novel

  7. Induction of Non-Apoptotic Cell Death by Activated Ras Requires Inverse Regulation of Rac1 and Arf6

    PubMed Central

    Bhanot, Haymanti; Young, Ashley M.; Overmeyer, Jean H.; Maltese, William A.

    2010-01-01

    Methuosis is a unique form of non-apoptotic cell death triggered by alterations in the trafficking of clathrin-independent endosomes, ultimately leading to extreme vacuolization and rupture of the cell. Methuosis can be induced in glioblastoma cells by expression of constitutively active Ras. This study identifies the small GTPases, Rac1 and Arf6, and the Arf6 GTPase-activating-protein, GIT1, as key downstream components of the signaling pathway underlying Ras-induced methuosis. The extent to which graded expression of active H-Ras(G12V) triggers cytoplasmic vacuolization correlates with the amount of endogenous Rac1 in the active GTP state. Blocking Rac1 activation with the specific Rac inhibitor, EHT 1864, or co-expression of dominant-negative Rac1(T17N), prevents the accumulation of vacuoles induced by H-Ras(G12V). Coincident with Rac1 activation, H-Ras(G12V) causes a decrease in the amount of active Arf6, a GTPase that functions in recycling of clathrin-independent endosomes. The effect of H-Ras(G12V) on Arf6 is blocked by EHT 1864, indicating that the decrease in Arf6-GTP is directly linked to activation of Rac1. Constitutively active Rac1(G12V) interacts with GIT1 in immunoprecipitation assays. Ablation of GIT1 by shRNA prevents the decrease in active Arf6, inhibits vacuolization, and prevents loss of cell viability in cells expressing Rac1(G12V). Together the results suggest that perturbations of endosome morphology associated with Ras-induced methuosis are due to downstream activation of Rac1, combined with reciprocal inactivation of Arf6. The latter appears to be mediated through Rac1 stimulation of GIT1. Further insights into this pathway could suggest opportunities for induction of methuosis in cancers that are resistant to apoptotic cell death. PMID:20713492

  8. Overexpressed Galectin-3 in Pancreatic Cancer Induces Cell Proliferation and Invasion by Binding Ras and Activating Ras Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Song, Shumei; Ji, Baoan; Ramachandran, Vijaya; Wang, Huamin; Hafley, Margarete; Logsdon, Craig; Bresalier, Robert S.

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PDAC) is a lethal disease with a five-year survival of 3–5%. Mutations in K-Ras are found in nearly all cases, but K-Ras mutations alone are not sufficient for the development of PDAC. Additional factors contribute to activation of Ras signaling and lead to tumor formation. Galectin-3 (Gal-3), a multifunctional β-galactoside-binding protein, is highly expressed in PDAC. We therefore investigated the functional role of Gal-3 in pancreatic cancer progression and its relationship to Ras signaling. Expression of Gal-3 was determined by immunohistochemistry, Q-PCR and immunoblot. Functional studies were performed using pancreatic cell lines genetically engineered to express high or low levels of Gal-3. Ras activity was examined by Raf pull-down assays. Co-immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence were used to assess protein-protein interactions. In this study, we demonstrate that Gal-3 was highly up-regulated in human tumors and in a mutant K-Ras mouse model of PDAC. Down-regulation of Gal-3 by lentivirus shRNA decreased PDAC cell proliferation and invasion in vitro and reduced tumor volume and size in an orthotopic mouse model. Gal-3 bound Ras and maintained Ras activity; down-regulation of Gal-3 decreased Ras activity as well as Ras down-stream signaling including phosphorylation of ERK and AKT and Ral A activity. Transfection of Gal-3 cDNA into PDAC cells with low-level Gal-3 augmented Ras activity and its down-stream signaling. These results suggest that Gal-3 contributes to pancreatic cancer progression, in part, by binding Ras and activating Ras signaling. Gal-3 may therefore be a potential novel target for this deadly disease. PMID:22900040

  9. The role of Gln61 and Glu63 of Ras GTPases in their activation by NF1 and Ras GAP.

    PubMed Central

    Nur-E-Kamal, M S; Maruta, H

    1992-01-01

    Two distinct GAPs of 120 and 235 kDa called GAP1 and NF1 serve as attenuators of Ras, a member of GTP-dependent signal transducers, by stimulating its intrinsic guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) activity. The GAP1 (also called Ras GAP) is highly specific for Ras and does not stimulate the intrinsic GTPase activity of Rap1 or Rho. Using GAP1C, the C-terminal GTPase activating domain (residues 720-1044) of bovine GAP1, we have shown previously that the GAP1 specificity is determined by the Ras domain (residues 61-65) where Gln61 plays the primary role. The corresponding domain (residues 1175-1531) of human NF1 (called NF1C), which shares only 26% sequence identity with the GAP1C, also activates Ras GTPases. In this article, we demonstrate that the NF1C, like the GAP1C, is highly specific for Ras and does not activate either Rap1 or Rho GTPases. Furthermore, using a series of chimeric Ras/Rap1 and mutated Ras GTPases, we show that Gln at position 61 of the GTPases primarily determines that NF1C as well as GAP1C activates Ras GTPases, but not Rap1 GTPases, and Glu at position 63 of the GTPases is required for maximizing the sensitivity of Ras GTPases to both NF1C and GAP1C. Interestingly, replacement of Glu63 of c-HaRas by Lys reduces its intrinsic GTPase activity and abolishes the GTPase activation by both NF1C and GAP1C. Thus, the potentiation of oncogenicity by Lys63 mutation of c-HaRas appears primarily to be due to the loss of its sensitivity to the two major Ras signal attenuators (NF1 and GAP1). PMID:1362901

  10. Rap1 GTPase is required for mouse lens epithelial maintenance and morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Maddala, Rupalatha; Nagendran, Tharkika; Lang, Richard A; Morozov, Alexei; Rao, Ponugoti V

    2015-10-01

    Rap1, a Ras-like small GTPase, plays a crucial role in cell-matrix adhesive interactions, cell-cell junction formation, cell polarity and migration. The role of Rap1 in vertebrate organ development and tissue architecture, however, remains elusive. We addressed this question in a mouse lens model system using a conditional gene targeting approach. While individual germline deficiency of either Rap1a or Rap1b did not cause overt defects in mouse lens, conditional double deficiency (Rap1 cKO) prior to lens placode formation led to an ocular phenotype including microphthalmia and lens opacification in embryonic mice. The embryonic Rap1 cKO mouse lens exhibited striking defects including loss of E-cadherin- and ZO-1-based cell-cell junctions, disruption of paxillin and β1-integrin-based cell adhesive interactions along with abnormalities in cell shape and apical-basal polarity of epithelium. These epithelial changes were accompanied by increased levels of α-smooth muscle actin, vimentin and N-cadherin, and expression of transcriptional suppressors of E-cadherin (Snai1, Slug and Zeb2), and a mesenchymal metabolic protein (Dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase). Additionally, while lens differentiation was not overtly affected, increased apoptosis and dysregulated cell cycle progression were noted in epithelium and fibers in Rap1 cKO mice. Collectively these observations uncover a requirement for Rap1 in maintenance of lens epithelial phenotype and morphogenesis.

  11. Rap1 GTPase is required for mouse lens epithelial maintenance and morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Maddala, Rupalatha; Nagendran, Tharkika; Lang, Richard A.; Morozov, Alexei; Rao, Ponugoti V.

    2015-01-01

    Rap1, a Ras-like small GTPase, plays a crucial role in cell-matrix adhesive interactions, cell-cell junction formation, cell polarity and migration. The role of Rap1 in vertebrate organ development and tissue architecture, however, remains elusive. We addressed this question in a mouse lens model system using a conditional gene targeting approach. While individual germline deficiency of either Rap1a or Rap1b did not cause overt defects in mouse lens, conditional double deficiency (Rap1 cKO) prior to lens placode formation led to an ocular phenotype including microphthalmia and lens opacification in embryonic mice. The embryonic Rap1 cKO mouse lens exhibited striking defects including loss of E-cadherin- and ZO-1-based cell-cell junctions, disruption of paxillin and β1-integrin-based cell adhesive interactions along with abnormalities in cell shape and apical-basal polarity of epithelium. These epithelial changes were accompanied by increased levels of α-smooth muscle actin, vimentin and N-cadherin, and expression of transcriptional suppressors of E-cadherin (Snai1, Slug and Zeb2), and a mesenchymal metabolic protein (Dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase). Additionally, while lens differentiation was not overtly affected, increased apoptosis and dysregulated cell cycle progression were noted in epithelium and fibers in Rap1 cKO mice. Collectively these observations uncover a requirement for Rap1 in maintenance of lens epithelial phenotype and morphogenesis. PMID:26212757

  12. 51. (no plate) Lens, lens pedestal, mercury float, shade holder ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    51. (no plate) Lens, lens pedestal, mercury float, shade holder installation, drawing # 3101, sheet 2 of 2. Approved April 6, 1928. - Block Island Southeast Light, Spring Street & Mohegan Trail at Mohegan Bluffs, New Shoreham, Washington County, RI

  13. 50. (no plate) Lens, lens pedestal, mercury float, drawing # ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    50. (no plate) Lens, lens pedestal, mercury float, drawing # 3101, sheet 1 of 2. Approved April 6, 1928. - Block Island Southeast Light, Spring Street & Mohegan Trail at Mohegan Bluffs, New Shoreham, Washington County, RI

  14. Fresnel lens study

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-05-01

    Thick film sol-gel technology was evaluated to determine the feasibility of utilizing sol-gels to produce embossable materials ultimately for the production of all-glass Fresnel optics. The feasibility study has utilized the relatively undeveloped branch of organically modified sol-gels. The results of this work shown that organically modified sol-gels posses properties which allow the formation of thick, patternable and adherent coatings. The study resulted in the fabrication of over 600 samples based on over 100 sol-gel formulations. Samples were evaluated for clarity, transmittance and other optical properties. Environmental tests were performed on selected groups. Although moderate success was obtained on producing a Fresnel lens layer bonded to glass, a fully densified lens was not achieved. The process and chemistries indicate that improvements based on these materials and techniques may lead to an acceptable all-glass Fresnel lens.

  15. Fresnel lens study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1986-05-01

    Thick film sol-gel technology was evaluated to determine the feasibility of utilizing sol-gels to produce embossable materials ultimately for the production of all-glass Fresnel optics. The feasibility study has utilized the relatively undeveloped branch of organically modified sol-gels. The results of this work show that organically modified sol-gels possess properties which allow the formation of thick, patternable and adherent coatings. The study resulted in the fabrication of over 600 samples based on over 100 sol-gel formulations. Samples were evaluated for clarity, transmittance and other optical properties. Environmental tests were performed on selected groups. Although moderate success was obtained on producing a Fresnel lens layer bonded to glass, a fully densified lens was not achieved. The process and chemistries indicate that improvements based on these materials and techniques may lead to an acceptable all-glass Fresnel lens.

  16. Targeted next generation sequencing of mucosal melanomas identifies frequent NF1 and RAS mutations.

    PubMed

    Cosgarea, Ioana; Ugurel, Selma; Sucker, Antje; Livingstone, Elisabeth; Zimmer, Lisa; Ziemer, Mirjana; Utikal, Jochen; Mohr, Peter; Pfeiffer, Christiane; Pföhler, Claudia; Hillen, Uwe; Horn, Susanne; Schadendorf, Dirk; Griewank, Klaus G; Roesch, Alexander

    2017-06-20

    Mucosal melanoma represents ~1% of all melanomas, frequently having a poor prognosis due to diagnosis at a late stage of disease. Mucosal melanoma differs from cutaneous melanoma not only in terms of poorer clinical outcome but also on the molecular level having e.g. less BRAF and more frequent KIT mutations than cutaneous melanomas. For the majority of mucosal melanomas oncogenic driver mutations remain unknown. In our study, 75 tumor tissues from patients diagnosed with mucosal melanoma were analyzed, applying a targeted next generation sequencing panel covering 29 known recurrently mutated genes in melanoma. NF1 and RAS mutations were identified as the most frequently mutated genes occurring in 18.3% and 16.9% of samples, respectively. Mutations in BRAF were identified in 8.4% and KIT in 7.0% of tumor samples. Our study identifies NF1 as the most frequently occurring driver mutation in mucosal melanoma. RAS alterations, consisting of NRAS and KRAS mutations, were the second most frequent mutation type. BRAF and KIT mutations were rare with frequencies below 10% each. Our data indicate that in mucosal melanomas RAS/NF1 alterations are frequent, implying a significant pathogenetic role for MAPK and potentially PI3K pathway activation in these tumors.

  17. Targeting N-RAS as a Therapeutic Approach for Melanoma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    targeted cytotoxicity in these tumors. The Specific Aims/Study Design of this Discovery Proposal are: Test the hypothesis that inhibition or down...downstream of RAS (in the setting of wild-type RAS alleles) will similarly sensitize human melanoma cells to PKCd inhibition; 3) Test this targeted...3’ 7 TASK 1: Testing N-RAS-mutant human melanoma cells for apoptosis after inhibition or down- regulation of PKCδ: Status: Completed. Please

  18. Dimerize RACK1 upon transformation with oncogenic ras

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, L.-Y.; Chen, Y.-H.; Chuang, N.-N. . E-mail: zonnc@sinica.edu.tw

    2005-05-06

    From our previous studies, we learned that syndecan-2/p120-GAP complex provided docking site for Src to prosecute tyrosine kinase activity upon transformation with oncogenic ras. And, RACK1 protein was reactive with syndecan-2 to keep Src inactivated, but not when Ras was overexpressed. In the present study, we characterized the reaction between RACK1 protein and Ras. RACK1 was isolated from BALB/3T3 cells transfected with plasmids pcDNA3.1-[S-ras(Q{sub 61}K)] of shrimp Penaeus japonicus and RACK1 was revealed to react with GTP-K{sub B}-Ras(Q{sub 61}K), not GDP-K{sub B}-Ras(Q{sub 61}K). This selective interaction between RACK1 and GTP-K{sub B}-Ras(Q{sub 61}K) was further confirmed with RACK1 of human placenta and mouse RACK1-encoded fusion protein. We found that RACK1 was dimerized upon reaction with GTP-K{sub B}-Ras(Q{sub 61}K), as well as with 14-3-3{beta} and geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate, as revealed by phosphorylation with Src tyrosine kinase. We reported the complex of RACK1/GTP-K{sub B}-Ras(Q{sub 61}K) reacted selectively with p120-GAP. This interaction was sufficient to dissemble RACK1 into monomers, a preferred form to compete for the binding of syndecan-2. These data indicate that the reaction of GTP-K{sub B}-Ras(Q{sub 61}K) with RACK1 in dimers may operate a mechanism to deplete RACK1 from reaction with syndecan-2 upon transformation by oncogenic ras and the RACK1/GTP-Ras complex may provide a route to react with p120-GAP and recycle monomeric RACK1 to syndecan-2.

  19. Retroviral transduction of the human c-Ha-ras-1 oncogene into midgestation mouse embryos promotes rapid epithelial hyperplasia

    SciTech Connect

    Compere, S.J.; Baldacci, P.A.; Jaenisch, R.

    1989-01-01

    Infection of mouse embryos at 8 days of gestation with a replication-defective retrovirus carrying the human c-Ha-ras-1 oncogene led to efficient and rapid induction of hyperplastic lesions. Twenty-four percent of viable offspring developed abnormal growths after infection with purified virus. The lesions contained a single integrated provirus and produced viral RNA and the Ha-ras oncogene product (p21). The latency period between the time of infection and appearance of the lesions suggested that secondary alterations in addition to activated ras were necessary for neoplasms to develop. The earliest and most abundant growths were cutaneous and appeared from 4 to 36 weeks of age, with a median of 4 weeks of age. A number of subcutaneous lesions also developed over the same time span but at a median of 18 weeks of age. The rapid development of cutaneous lesions in response to transduction of the ras oncogene contrasts with other studies in which adult skin required secondary treatment with promoters prior to ras induction of epithelial hyperplasia. These results demonstrate that infection of midgestation mouse embryos allows rapid analysis of oncogene potency in skin.

  20. Retroviral transduction of the human c-Ha-ras-1 oncogene into midgestation mouse embryos promotes rapid epithelial hyperplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Compere, S J; Baldacci, P A; Sharpe, A H; Jaenisch, R

    1989-01-01

    Infection of mouse embryos at 8 days of gestation with a replication-defective retrovirus carrying the human c-Ha-ras-1 oncogene led to efficient and rapid induction of hyperplastic lesions. Twenty-four percent of viable off-spring developed abnormal growths after infection with purified virus. The lesions contained a single integrated provirus and produced viral RNA and the Ha-ras oncogene product (p21). The latency period between the time of infection and appearance of the lesions suggested that secondary alterations in addition to activated ras were necessary for neoplasms to develop. The earliest and most abundant growths were cutaneous and appeared from 4 to 36 weeks of age, with a median of 4 weeks of age. A number of subcutaneous lesions also developed over the same time span but at a median of 18 weeks of age. The rapid development of cutaneous lesions in response to transduction of the ras oncogene contrasts with other studies in which adult skin required secondary treatment with promoters prior to ras induction of epithelial hyperplasia. These results demonstrate that infection of midgestation mouse embryos allows rapid analysis of oncogene potency in skin. Images PMID:2648134

  1. Comparative Analysis of Renin-Angiotensin System (RAS)-Related Gene Expression Between Hypertensive and Normotensive Rats

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Chad R.; Khurana, Sandhya; Nguyen, Phong; Byrne, Collin J.; Tai, T.C.

    2017-01-01

    Background The renal renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is physiologically important for blood pressure regulation. Altered regulation of RAS-related genes has been observed in an animal model of hypertension (spontaneously hypertensive rats – SHRs). The current understanding of certain RAS-related gene expression differences between Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKYs) and SHRs is either limited or has not been compared. The purpose of this study was to compare the regulation of key RAS-related genes in the kidneys of adult WKYs and SHRs. Material/Methods Coronal sections were dissected through the hilus of kidneys from 16-week-old male WKYs and SHRs. RT-PCR analysis was performed for Ace, Ace2, Agt, Agtr1a, Agtr1b, Agtr2, Atp6ap2 (PRR), Mas1, Ren, Rnls, and Slc12a3 (NCC). Results Increased mRNA expression was observed for Ace, Ace2, Agt, Agtr1a, Agtr1b, and Atp6ap2 in SHRs compared to WKYs. Mas1, Ren, Slc12a3, and Rnls showed no difference in expression between animal types. Conclusions This study shows that the upregulation of several key RAS-related genes in the kidney may account for the increased blood pressure of adult SHRs. PMID:28138124

  2. Microoptical compound lens

    DOEpatents

    Sweatt, William C.; Gill, David D.

    2007-10-23

    An apposition microoptical compound lens comprises a plurality of lenslets arrayed around a segment of a hollow, three-dimensional optical shell. The lenslets collect light from an object and focus the light rays onto the concentric, curved front surface of a coherent fiber bundle. The fiber bundle transports the light rays to a planar detector, forming a plurality of sub-images that can be reconstructed as a full image. The microoptical compound lens can have a small size (millimeters), wide field of view (up to 180.degree.), and adequate resolution for object recognition and tracking.

  3. Activation of ras oncogenes preceding the onset of neoplasia

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, R.; Barbacid, M. ); Sukumar, S. )

    1990-06-01

    The identification of ras oncogenes in human and animal cancers including precancerous lesions indicates that these genes participate in the early stages of neoplastic development. Yet, these observations do not define the timing of ras oncogene activation in the multistep process of carcinogenesis. To ascertain the timing of ras oncogene activation, an animal model system was devised that involves the induction of mammary carcinomas in rats exposed at birth to the carcinogen nitrosomethylurea. High-resolution restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of polymerase chain reaction-amplified ras sequences revealed the presence of both H-ras and K-ras oncogenes in normal mammary glands 2 weeks after carcinogen treatment and at least 2 months before the onset of neoplasia. These ras oncogenes can remain latent within the mammary gland until exposure to estrogens, demonstrating that activation of ras oncogenes can precede the onset of neoplasia and suggesting that normal physiological proliferative processes such as estrogen-induced mammary gland development may lead to neoplasia if the targeted cells harbor latent ras oncogenes.

  4. Latest Advances Towards Ras Inhibition: A Medicinal Chemistry Perspective.

    PubMed

    Sautier, Brice; Nising, Carl F; Wortmann, Lars

    2016-12-23

    Owing to their high occurrence rate across many human cancers and their lack of druggability so far, mutant forms of the signaling protein Ras are currently among the most attractive (and elusive) oncology targets. This strong appeal explains the sustained effort in the field, and the ensuing progress has rekindled optimism regarding the discovery of Ras inhibitors. In this Minireview, we discuss the most recent advances towards irreversible inhibitors, and highlight approaches to inhibitors of Ras-effector interactions that have been overshadowed by the current focus on direct Ras inhibition. At the same time, we provide a critical assessment from a medicinal chemistry perspective.

  5. Ras proteins control mitochondrial biogenesis and function in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Hlavatá, L; Nyström, T

    2003-01-01

    The evolutionarily conserved Ras proteins function as a point of convergence for different signaling pathways in eukaryotes and have been implicated in both aging and cancer development. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae the plasma membrane proteins Ras1 and Ras2 are sensing the nutritional status of the environments, e.g., the abundance and quality of available carbon sources. The cAMP-protein kinase A pathway is the most explored signaling pathway controlled by Ras proteins; it affects a large number of genes, some of which are important to defend the cell against oxidative stress. In addition, recent analysis has shown that the Ras system of yeast is involved in the development of mitochondria and in regulating their activity. As a sensor of environmental status and an effector of mitochondrial activity, Ras serves as a Rosetta stone of cellular energy transduction. This review summarizes the physical and functional involvement of Ras proteins and Ras-dependent signaling pathways in mitochondrial function in S. cerevisiae. Since mitochondria produce harmful reactive oxygen species as an inevitable byproduct and are partly under control of Ras, illuminating these regulatory interactions may improve our understanding of both cancer and aging.

  6. N-myc regulates growth and fiber cell differentiation in lens development

    PubMed Central

    Cavalheiro, Gabriel R.; Matos-Rodrigues, Gabriel E.; Zhao, Yilin; Gomes, Anielle L.; Anand, Deepti; Predes, Danilo; de Lima, Silmara; Abreu, Jose G.; Zheng, Deyou; Lachke, Salil A.; Cvekl, Ales; Martins, Rodrigo A. P.

    2017-01-01

    Myc proto-oncogenes regulate diverse cellular processes during development, but their roles during morphogenesis of specific tissues are not fully understood. We found that c-myc regulates cell proliferation in mouse lens development and previous genome-wide studies suggested functional roles for N-myc in developing lens. Here, we examined the role of N-myc in mouse lens development. Genetic inactivation of N-myc in the surface ectoderm or lens vesicle impaired eye and lens growth, while "late" inactivation in lens fibers had no effect. Unexpectedly, defective growth of N-myc--deficient lenses was not associated with alterations in lens progenitor cell proliferation or survival. Notably, N-myc-deficient lens exhibited a delay in degradation of DNA in terminally differentiating lens fiber cells. RNA-sequencing analysis of N-myc--deficient lenses identified a cohort of down-regulated genes associated with fiber cell differentiation that included DNaseIIβ. Further, an integrated analysis of differentially expressed genes in N-myc-deficient lens using normal lens expression patterns of iSyTE, N-myc-binding motif analysis and molecular interaction data from the String database led to the derivation of an N-myc-based gene regulatory network in the lens. Finally, analysis of N-myc and c-myc double-deficient lens demonstrated that these Myc genes cooperate to drive lens growth prior to lens vesicle stage. Together, these findings provide evidence for exclusive and cooperative functions of Myc transcription factors in mouse lens development and identify novel mechanisms by which N-myc regulates cell differentiation during eye morphogenesis. PMID:28716713

  7. Lens window simplifies TDL housing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, D. M.; Rowland, C. W.

    1979-01-01

    Lens window seal in tunable-diode-laser housing replaces plan parallel window. Lens seals housing and acts as optical-output coupler, thus eliminating need for additional reimaging or collimating optics.

  8. Zoom optical system using tunable polymer lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Dan; Wang, Xuan Yin

    2016-07-01

    This paper demonstrated a zoom optical system with variable magnification based on the tunable polymer lens. The designed system mainly consists of two polymer lenses, voice coil motors, a doublet lens and CMOS chip. The zoom magnification can be adjusted by altering the focal length of the two elastic polymer lenses synergistically through controlling the output displacement of the voice coil motor. A static doublet lens in combination with the polymer lenses stabilize the image plane at the CMOS chip. The optical structure of the zoom system is presented, as well as a detailed description including the lens materials and fabrication process. Images with each zoom magnification are captured, and the Spot diagram and MTF are simulated using Zemax software. A change in magnification from 0.13×to 8.44×is demonstrated within the tiny 0.4 mm variation of the displacement load, and produce a 16.1×full range of magnification experimentally. Simulation analyses show that all the radii of the spot diagram under different magnifications are less than 11.3 um, and the modulation transfer function reaches 107 line pairs per mm. The designed optical system shows the potential for developing stable, integrated, and low-cost zoom systems with large magnification range.

  9. Effects of mutant human Ki-ras{sup G12C} gene dosage on murine lung tumorigenesis and signaling to its downstream effectors

    SciTech Connect

    Dance-Barnes, Stephanie T.; Kock, Nancy D.; Floyd, Heather S.; Moore, Joseph E.; Mosley, Libyadda J.; D'Agostino, Ralph B.; Pettenati, Mark J.; Miller, Mark Steven

    2008-08-15

    Studies in cell culture have suggested that the level of RAS expression can influence the transformation of cells and the signaling pathways stimulated by mutant RAS expression. However, the levels of RAS expression in vivo appear to be subject to feedback regulation, limiting the total amount of RAS protein that can be expressed. We utilized a bitransgenic mouse lung tumor model that expressed the human Ki-ras{sup G12C} allele in a tetracycline-inducible, lung-specific manner. Treatment for 12 months with 500 {mu}g/ml of doxycycline (DOX) allowed for maximal expression of the human Ki-ras{sup G12C} allele in the lung, and resulted in the development of focal hyperplasia and adenomas. We determined if different levels of mutant RAS expression would influence the phenotype of the lung lesions. Treatment with 25, 100 and 500 {mu}g/ml of DOX resulted in dose-dependent increases in transgene expression and tumor multiplicity. Microscopic analysis of the lungs of mice treated with the 25 {mu}g/ml dose of DOX revealed infrequent foci of hyperplasia, whereas mice treated with the 100 and 500 {mu}g/ml doses exhibited numerous hyperplastic foci and also adenomas. Immunohistochemical and RNA analysis of the downstream effector pathways demonstrated that different levels of mutant RAS transgene expression resulted in differences in the expression and/or phosphorylation of specific signaling molecules. Our results suggest that the molecular alterations driving tumorigenesis may differ at different levels of mutant Ki-ras{sup G12C} expression, and this should be taken into consideration when inducible transgene systems are utilized to promote tumorigenesis in mouse models.

  10. Differential Regulation of N-Myc and c-Myc Synthesis, Degradation, and Transcriptional Activity by the Ras/Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase Pathway*

    PubMed Central

    Kapeli, Katannya; Hurlin, Peter J.

    2011-01-01

    Myc transcription factors are important regulators of proliferation and can promote oncogenesis when deregulated. Deregulated Myc expression in cancers can result from MYC gene amplification and translocation but also from alterations in mitogenic signaling pathways that affect Myc levels through both transcriptional and post-transcription mechanisms. For example, mutations in Ras family GTPase proteins that cause their constitutive activation can increase cellular levels of c-Myc by interfering with its rapid proteasomal degradation. Although enhanced protein stability is generally thought to be applicable to other Myc family members, here we show that c-Myc and its paralog N-Myc respond to oncogenic H-Ras (H-RasG12V) in very different ways. H-RasG12V promotes accumulation of both c-Myc and N-Myc, but although c-Myc accumulation is achieved by enhanced protein stability, N-Myc accumulation is associated with an accelerated rate of translation that overcomes a surprising H-RasG12V-mediated destabilization of N-Myc. We show that H-RasG12V-mediated degradation of N-Myc functions independently of key phosphorylation sites in the highly conserved Myc homology box I region that controls c-Myc protein stability by oncogenic Ras. Finally, we found that N-Myc and c-Myc transcriptional activity is associated with their proteasomal degradation but that N-Myc may be uniquely dependent on Ras-stimulated proteolysis for target gene expression. Taken together, these studies provide mechanistic insight into how oncogenic Ras augments N-Myc levels in cells and suggest that enhanced N-Myc translation and degradation-coupled transactivation may contribute to oncogenesis. PMID:21908617

  11. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation enhances H-RAS protein stability and causes abnormal cell cycle progression in human TK6 lymphoblastoid cells treated with hydroquinone.

    PubMed

    Liu, Linhua; Ling, Xiaoxuan; Tang, Huanwen; Chen, Jialong; Wen, Qiaosheng; Zou, Fei

    2015-08-05

    Hydroquinone (HQ), one of the most important benzene-derived metabolites, can induce aberrant cell cycle progression; however, the mechanism of this induction remains unclear. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation (PARylation), which is catalysed primarily by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1), participates in various biological processes, including cell cycle control. The results of the present study show an accumulation in G1 phase versus S phase of TK6 human lymphoblast cells treated with HQ for 48h compared with PBS-treated cells; after 72h of HQ treatment, the cells transitioned from G1 arrest to S phase arrest. We examined the expression of six genes related to the cell cycle or leukaemia to further explore the reason for this phenomenon. Among these genes, H-RAS was found to be associated with this phenomenon because its mRNA and protein expression decreased at 48h and increased at 72h. Experiments for PARP activity induction and inhibition revealed that the observed PARylation was positively associated with H-RAS expression. Moreover, in cells treated with HQ in conjunction with PARP-1 knockdown, expression of the H-RAS protein decreased and the number of cells in G1 phase increased. The degree of poly(ADP-ribosyl) modification of the H-RAS protein increased in cells treated with HQ for 72h, further supporting that changes in PARylation contributed to the rapid alteration of H-RAS protein expression, followed by abnormal progression of the cell cycle. Co-immunoprecipitation (co-IP) assays were employed to determine whether protein complexes were formed by PARP-1 and H-RAS proteins, and the direct interaction between these proteins indicated that PARylation regulated H-RAS expression. As detected by confocal microscopy, the H-RAS protein was found in the nucleus and cytoplasm. To our knowledge, this study is the first to reveal that H-RAS protein can be modified by PARylation.

  12. Growth Regulation via Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Protein-4 and -2 in Association with Mutant K-ras in Lung Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Hanako; Yazawa, Takuya; Suzuki, Takehisa; Shimoyamada, Hiroaki; Okudela, Koji; Ikeda, Masaichi; Hamada, Kenji; Yamada-Okabe, Hisafumi; Yao, Masayuki; Kubota, Yoshinobu; Takahashi, Takashi; Kamma, Hiroshi; Kitamura, Hitoshi

    2006-01-01

    Gain-of-function point mutations in K-ras affect early events in pulmonary bronchioloalveolar carcinoma. We investigated altered mRNA expression on K-Ras activation in human peripheral lung epithelial cells (HPL1A) using oligonucleotide microarrays. Mutated K-Ras stably expressed in HPL1A accelerated cell growth and induced the expression of insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-binding protein (IGFBP)-4 and IGFBP-2, which modulate cell growth via IGF. Other lung epithelial cell lines (NHBE and HPL1D) revealed the same phenomena as HPL1A by mutated K-ras transgene. Lung cancer cell growth was also accelerated by mutated K-ras gene transduction, whereas IGFBP-4/2 induction was weaker compared with mutated K-Ras-expressing lung epithelial cells. To understand the differences in IGFBP-4/2 inducibility via K-Ras-activated signaling between nonneoplastic lung epithelia and lung carcinoma, we addressed the mechanisms of IGFBP-4/2 transcriptional activation. Our results revealed that Egr-1, which is induced on activation of Ras-mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling, is crucial for transactivation of IGFBP-4/2. Furthermore, IGFBP-4 and IGFBP-2 promoters were often hypermethylated in lung carcinoma, yielding low basal expression/weak induction of IGFBP-4/2. These findings suggest that continuous K-Ras activation accelerates cell growth and evokes a feedback system through IGFBP-4/2 to prevent excessive growth. Moreover, this growth regulation is disrupted in lung cancers because of promoter hypermethylation of IGFBP-4/2 genes. PMID:17071580

  13. Deletion of Pim Kinases Elevates the Cellular Levels of Reactive Oxygen Species and Sensitizes to K-Ras-Induced Cell Killing

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jin H.; An, Ningfei; Chatterjee, Shilpak; Kistner-Griffin, Emily; Mahajan, Sandeep; Mehrotra, Shikhar; Kraft, Andrew S.

    2014-01-01

    The Pim protein kinases contribute to transformation by enhancing the activity of oncogenic Myc and Ras, which drives significant metabolic changes during tumorigenesis. In this report, we demonstrate that mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) lacking all three isoforms of Pim protein kinases, triple knockout (TKO), cannot tolerate the expression of activated K-Ras (K-RasG12V) and undergo cell death. Transduction of K-RasG12V into these cells markedly increased the level of cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). The addition of N-acetyl cysteine attenuates ROS production and reversed the cytotoxic effects of K-RasG12V in the TKO MEFs. The altered cellular redox state caused by the loss of Pim occurred as a result of lower levels of metabolic intermediates in the glycolytic and pentose phosphate pathways as well as abnormal mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. TKO MEFs exhibit reduced levels of superoxide dismutase (Sod), glutathione peroxidase 4 (Gpx4) and peroxiredoxin 3 (Prdx3) that render them susceptible to killing by K-RasG12V-mediated ROS production. In contrast, the transduction of c-Myc into TKO cells can overcome the lack of Pim protein kinases by regulating cellular metabolism and Sod2. In the absence of the Pim kinases, c-Myc transduction permitted K-RasG12V-induced cell growth by decreasing Ras-induced cellular ROS levels. These results demonstrate that the Pim protein kinases play an important role in regulating cellular redox, metabolism and K-Ras-stimulated cell growth. PMID:25241892

  14. Cellular Redox Imbalance and Changes of Protein S-glutathionylation Patterns Are Associated with Senescence Induced by Oncogenic H-Ras

    PubMed Central

    Urbanelli, Lorena; Magini, Alessandro; Magherini, Francesca; Pugnaloni, Armanda; Piva, Francesco; Modesti, Alessandra; Emiliani, Carla; Principato, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    H-Ras oncogene requires deregulation of additional oncogenes or inactivation of tumor suppressor proteins to increase cell proliferation rate and transform cells. In fact, the expression of the constitutively activated H-RasV12 induces cell growth arrest and premature senescence, which act like barriers in pre-neoplastic lesions. In our experimental model, human fibroblasts transfected with H-RasV12 show a dramatic modification of morphology. H-RasV12 expressing cells also show premature senescence followed by cell death, induced by autophagy and apoptosis. In this context, we provide evidence that in H-RasV12 expressing cells, the premature senescence is associated with cellular redox imbalance as well as with altered post-translation protein modification. In particular, redox imbalance is due to a strong reduction of total antioxidant capacity, and significant decrease of glutathione level. As the reversible addition of glutathione to cysteinyl residues of proteins is an important post-translational regulative modification, we investigated S-glutathionylation in cells expressing active H-Ras. In this contest we observed different S-glutathionylation patterns in control and H-RasV12 expressing cells. Particularly, the GAPDH enzyme showed S-glutathionylation increase and significant enzyme activity depletion in H-Ras V12 cells. In conclusion, we proposed that antioxidant defense reduction, glutathione depletion and subsequent modification of S-glutathionylation of target proteins contribute to arrest cell growth, leading to death of fibroblasts expressing constitutively active H-Ras oncogene, thus acting as oncogenic barriers that obstacle the progression of cell transformation. PMID:23284910

  15. Broadband Achromatic Telecentric Lens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mouroulis, Pantazis

    2007-01-01

    A new type of lens design features broadband achromatic performance as well as telecentricity, using a minimum number of spherical elements. With appropriate modifications, the lens design form can be tailored to cover the range of response of the focal-plane array, from Si (400-1,000 nm) to InGaAs (400-1,700 or 2,100 nm) or InSb/HgCdTe reaching to 2,500 nm. For reference, lenses typically are achromatized over the visible wavelength range of 480-650 nm. In remote sensing applications, there is a need for broadband achromatic telescopes, normally satisfied with mirror-based systems. However, mirror systems are not always feasible due to size or geometry restrictions. They also require expensive aspheric surfaces. Non-obscured mirror systems can be difficult to align and have a limited (essentially one-dimensional) field of view. Centrally obscured types have a two-dimensional but very limited field in addition to the obscuration. Telecentricity is a highly desirable property for matching typical spectrometer types, as well as for reducing the variation of the angle of incidence and cross-talk on the detector for simple camera types. This rotationally symmetric telescope with no obscuration and using spherical surfaces and selected glass types fills a need in the range of short focal lengths. It can be used as a compact front unit for a matched spectrometer, as an ultra-broadband camera objective lens, or as the optics of an integrated camera/spectrometer in which the wavelength information is obtained by the use of strip or linear variable filters on the focal plane array. This kind of camera and spectrometer system can find applications in remote sensing, as well as in-situ applications for geological mapping and characterization of minerals, ecological studies, and target detection and identification through spectral signatures. Commercially, the lens can be used in quality-control applications via spectral analysis. The lens design is based on the rear landscape

  16. The IAA RAS Correlator First Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surkis, Igor; Melnikov, Alexey; Shantyr, Violet; Zimovsky, Vladimir

    2010-01-01

    In 2009 the national Russian VLBI observations were processed by the new correlator ARC (Astrometric Radiointerferometric Correlator). The ARC is a VSI-H correlator and equipped with Mark 5B playback terminals. During 2009 ARC was used to process a series of VLBI sessions, observed on stations Svetloe, Zelenchukskaya, and Badary. NGS files were formed, and EOP parameters were obtained by IAA RAS Analysis Center. The accuracies of the pole coordinates and UT1-UTC were 1-2 mas and 0.07-0.1 ms, respectively.

  17. Luneburg lens in silicon photonics.

    PubMed

    Di Falco, Andrea; Kehr, Susanne C; Leonhardt, Ulf

    2011-03-14

    The Luneburg lens is an aberration-free lens that focuses light from all directions equally well. We fabricated and tested a Luneburg lens in silicon photonics. Such fully-integrated lenses may become the building blocks of compact Fourier optics on chips. Furthermore, our fabrication technique is sufficiently versatile for making perfect imaging devices on silicon platforms.

  18. A Tribute to Len Barton

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomlinson, Sally

    2010-01-01

    This article constitutes a short personal tribute to Len Barton in honour of his work and our collegial relationship going back over 30 years. It covers how Len saw his intellectual project of providing critical sociological and political perspectives on special education, disability and inclusion, and his own radical political perspectives. Len's…

  19. The Lens of Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thalos, Mariam

    2013-01-01

    Chemistry possesses a distinctive theoretical lens--a distinctive set of theoretical concerns regarding the dynamics and transformations of a perplexing variety of organic and nonorganic substances--to which it must be faithful. Even if it is true that chemical facts bear a special (reductive) relationship to physical facts, nonetheless it will…

  20. Thin Lens Ray Tracing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gatland, Ian R.

    2002-01-01

    Proposes a ray tracing approach to thin lens analysis based on a vector form of Snell's law for paraxial rays as an alternative to the usual approach in introductory physics courses. The ray tracing approach accommodates skew rays and thus provides a complete analysis. (Author/KHR)

  1. Wearable telescopic contact lens.

    PubMed

    Arianpour, Ashkan; Schuster, Glenn M; Tremblay, Eric J; Stamenov, Igor; Groisman, Alex; Legerton, Jerry; Meyers, William; Amigo, Goretty Alonso; Ford, Joseph E

    2015-08-20

    We describe the design, fabrication, and testing of a 1.6 mm thick scleral contact lens providing both 1× and 2.8× magnified vision paths, intended for use as a switchable eye-borne telescopic low-vision aid. The F/9.7 telescopic vision path uses an 8.2 mm diameter annular entrance pupil and 4 internal reflections in a polymethyl methacrylate precision optic. This gas-impermeable insert is contained inside a smooth outer casing of rigid gas-permeable polymer, which also provides achromatic correction for refraction at the curved lens face. The unmagnified F/4.1 vision path is through the central aperture of the lens, with additional transmission between the annular telescope rings to enable peripheral vision. We discuss potential solutions for providing oxygenation for an extended wear version of the lens. The prototype lenses were characterized using a scale-model human eye, and telescope functionality was confirmed in a small-scale clinical (nondispensed) demonstration.

  2. Thermal Lens Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchiyama, Kenji; Hibara, Akihide; Kimura, Hiroko; Sawada, Tsuguo; Kitamori, Takehiko

    2000-09-01

    We developed a novel laser microscope based on the thermal lens effect induced by a coaxial beam comprised of excitation and probe beams. The signal generation mechanism was confirmed to be an authentic thermal lens effect from the measurement of signal and phase dependences on optical configurations between the sample and the probe beam focus, and therefore, the thermal lens effect theory could be applied. Two-point spatial resolution was determined by the spot size of the excitation beam, not by the thermal diffusion length. Sensitivity was quite high, and the detection ability, evaluated using a submicron microparticle containing dye molecules, was 0.8 zmol/μm2, hence a distribution image of trace chemical species could be obtained quantitatively. In addition, analytes are not restricted to fluorescent species, therefore, the thermal lens microscope is a promising analytical microscope. A two-dimensional image of a histamine molecule distribution, which was produced in mast cells at the femtomole level in a human nasal mucous polyp, was obtained.

  3. The Lens of Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thalos, Mariam

    2013-01-01

    Chemistry possesses a distinctive theoretical lens--a distinctive set of theoretical concerns regarding the dynamics and transformations of a perplexing variety of organic and nonorganic substances--to which it must be faithful. Even if it is true that chemical facts bear a special (reductive) relationship to physical facts, nonetheless it will…

  4. Thin Lens Ray Tracing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gatland, Ian R.

    2002-01-01

    Proposes a ray tracing approach to thin lens analysis based on a vector form of Snell's law for paraxial rays as an alternative to the usual approach in introductory physics courses. The ray tracing approach accommodates skew rays and thus provides a complete analysis. (Author/KHR)

  5. Society News: Why become a Fellow of the Society? The 2010 RAS Fellowships; Using the RAS Library; Think grants! New Fellows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-04-01

    There are many arguments for joining the Society - supporting the RAS in lobbying, funding research and holding meetings, for example - but don't forget that benefits also come to individual Fellows. The RAS is pleased to announce the award of three RAS Fellowships in addition to the RAS Sir Norman Lockyer Fellowship.

  6. Ras chaperones: new targets for cancer and immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kloog, Yoel; Elad-Sfadia, Galit; Haklai, Roni; Mor, Adam

    2013-01-01

    The Ras inhibitor S-trans,trans-farnesylthiosalicylic acid (FTS, Salirasib®) interferes with Ras membrane interactions that are crucial for Ras-dependent signaling and cellular transformation. FTS had been successfully evaluated in clinical trials of cancer patients. Interestingly, its effect is mediated by targeting Ras chaperones that serve as key coordinators for Ras proper folding and delivery, thus offering a novel target for cancer therapy. The development of new FTS analogs has revealed that the specific modifications to the FTS carboxyl group by esterification and amidation yielded compounds with improved growth inhibitory activity. When FTS was combined with additional therapeutic agents its activity toward Ras was significantly augmented. FTS should be tested not only in cancer but also for genetic diseases associated with abnormal Ras signaling, as well as for various inflammatory and autoimmune disturbances, where Ras plays a major role. We conclude that FTS has a great potential both as a safe anticancer drug and as a promising immune modulator agent. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Understanding the accommodating intraocular lens.

    PubMed

    Rana, Azhar; Miller, David; Magnante, Peter

    2003-12-01

    To review current accommodating intraocular lens (IOL) designs and introduce a new design consisting of a plus lens and a minus lens. Cornea Consultants of Boston, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. Computer simulation studies of a model eye calculated the pseudoaccommodation range with different powers of 1 IOL or of 2 IOLs acting as a doublet. The doublet consisting of a convex (plus) lens and a concave (minus) lens gave a greater range of power change than a single convex lens or a doublet consisting of 2 convex lenses. The greater range of power results from the plus lens moving forward. The results show that an IOL design consisting of positive and negative lenses that move closer or farther from each other offers a greater range of pseudoaccommodation than other designs.

  8. Elemental profiles in Emory mouse lens

    SciTech Connect

    Bagchi, M.; Emanuel, K. )

    1991-01-01

    Energy dispersive x-ray microprobe analysis was used to determine the distribution of chloride, potassium, phosphorus and sulfur in the epithelial cells of the lenses obtained from 3 to 7 month old Emory mice and 7 month old cataract resistant strain of Emory mice. Rapidly frozen lenses were fractured in the frozen state and lyophilized. The anterior epithelial cells were analyzed from equator to equator. The results show that the epithelial cells of the 7 month old Emory mouse lens have considerably higher amounts of chloride, sulfur, potassium and phosphorus. Presence of increased amount of potassium in the epithelial cells is intriguing. The data obtained from these experiments show that the changes in the elemental levels of epithelial cells are similar to observed alteration found in the lens fiber mass of 7 month old Emory mouse.

  9. The neurotensin gene is a downstream target for Ras activation.

    PubMed Central

    Evers, B M; Zhou, Z; Celano, P; Li, J

    1995-01-01

    Ras regulates novel patterns of gene expression and the differentiation of various eukaryotic cell types. Stable transfection of Ha-ras into the human colon cancer line CaCo2 results in the morphologic differentiation to a small bowel phenotype. The purpose of our study was to determine whether the Ras regulatory pathway plays a role in the expression of the neurotensin gene (NT/N), a terminally differentiated endocrine product specifically localized in the gastrointestinal tract to the adult small bowel. We found that CaCo2-ras cells, but not parental CaCo2, express high levels of the human NT/N gene and, moreover, that this increase in gene expression is regulated at the level of transcription. Transfection experiments using NT/N-CAT mutation constructs identify the proximal 200 bp of NT/N flanking sequence as sufficient for maximal Ras-mediated NT/N reporter gene induction. Furthermore, a proximal AP-1/CRE motif is crucial for this Ras-mediated NT/N activation. Wild-type Ha-ras induces NT/N gene expression, albeit at lower levels than activated Ras; a dominant-negative Raf blocks this NT/N induction, suggesting that Raf lies down-stream of Ras in this pathway. In addition, postconfluent cultures of CaCo2 cells, which are differentiated to a small bowel phenotype, express the NT/N gene by 6 d after reaching confluency; this increase of NT/N expression is associated with concomitant increases of cellular p21ras protein. We conclude that Ras (both wild-type and activated) enhances expression of the NT/N gene in the gut-derived CaCo2 cell line, suggesting an important role for the Ras signaling pathway in NT/N gene transcription. Our results underscore the possibility that tissue-specific genes (such as NT/N) expressed in distinct subpopulations of the gut may be subject to Ras regulation. Finally, we speculate that the NT/N gene and the CaCo2 and CaCo2-ras cell systems will provide unique models to further define the cellular mechanisms leading to mammalian

  10. Endogenous K-ras signaling in erythroid differentiation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Lodish, Harvey F

    2007-08-15

    K-ras is one of the most frequently mutated genes in virtually all types of human cancers. Using mouse fetal liver erythroid progenitors as a model system, we studied the role of endogenous K-ras signaling in erythroid differentiation. When oncogenic K-ras is expressed from its endogenous promoter, it hyperactivates cytokine-dependent signaling pathways and results in a partial block in erythroid differentiation. In erythroid progenitors deficient in K-ras, cytokine-dependent Akt activation is greatly reduced, leading to delays in erythroid differentiation. Thus, both loss- and gain-of-Kras functions affect erythroid differentiation through modulation of cytokine signaling. These results support the notion that in human cancer patients oncogenic Ras signaling might be controlled by antagonizing essential cytokines.

  11. Multivalent Small-Molecule Pan-RAS Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Welsch, Matthew E; Kaplan, Anna; Chambers, Jennifer M; Stokes, Michael E; Bos, Pieter H; Zask, Arie; Zhang, Yan; Sanchez-Martin, Marta; Badgley, Michael A; Huang, Christine S; Tran, Timothy H; Akkiraju, Hemanth; Brown, Lewis M; Nandakumar, Renu; Cremers, Serge; Yang, Wan Seok; Tong, Liang; Olive, Kenneth P; Ferrando, Adolfo; Stockwell, Brent R

    2017-02-23

    Design of small molecules that disrupt protein-protein interactions, including the interaction of RAS proteins and their effectors, may provide chemical probes and therapeutic agents. We describe here the synthesis and testing of potential small-molecule pan-RAS ligands, which were designed to interact with adjacent sites on the surface of oncogenic KRAS. One compound, termed 3144, was found to bind to RAS proteins using microscale thermophoresis, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and isothermal titration calorimetry and to exhibit lethality in cells partially dependent on expression of RAS proteins. This compound was metabolically stable in liver microsomes and displayed anti-tumor activity in xenograft mouse cancer models. These findings suggest that pan-RAS inhibition may be an effective therapeutic strategy for some cancers and that structure-based design of small molecules targeting multiple adjacent sites to create multivalent inhibitors may be effective for some proteins. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Recent changes in the landscape of combination RAS blockade.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Benjamin J; Smith, Steven M; Choksi, Rushab

    2009-11-01

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is a prime target for cardiovascular drug therapy. Inhibition of the RAS lowers blood pressure and confers protection against cardiovascular and renal events. These latter benefits cannot be entirely attributed to blood pressure lowering. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)-inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) have been studied extensively and, while there is irrefutable evidence that these agents mitigate the risk for cardiovascular and renal events, their protection is incomplete. In outcomes studies that have employed ACE-inhibitors or ARBs there has been a relatively high residual event rate in the treatment arm and this has been ascribed, by some, to the fact that neither ACE-inhibitors nor ARBs completely repress RAS. For this reason, combined RAS blockade with an ACE-inhibitor and ARB has emerged as a therapeutic option. In hypertension, combined RAS blockade elicits only a marginal incremental drop in blood pressure and it does not further lower the risk for cardiovascular events. In chronic heart failure and proteinuric renal disease, combining these agents in carefully selected patients is associated with a reduction in clinical events. Irrespective of the setting, dual RAS blockade is associated with an increase in the risk for adverse events, primarily hyperkalemia and worsening renal function. The emergence of the direct renin inhibitor, aliskiren, has afforded clinicians a new strategy for RAS blockade. Renin system blockade with aliskiren plus another RAS agent is the subject of ongoing large-scale clinical trials and early studies suggest promise for this strategy. Currently, combined RAS blockade with an ACE-inhibitor and an ARB should not be routinely employed for hypertension; however, the combination of an ACE-inhibitor or ARB with aliskiren might be considered in some patients given the more formidable blood pressure-lowering profile of this regimen. In carefully selected patients with heart

  13. Regulation of collagen I gene expression by ras.

    PubMed Central

    Slack, J L; Parker, M I; Robinson, V R; Bornstein, P

    1992-01-01

    Although transformation of rodent fibroblasts can lead to dramatic changes in expression of extracellular matrix genes, the molecular basis and physiological significance of these changes remain poorly understood. In this study, we have investigated the mechanism(s) by which ras affects expression of the genes encoding type I collagen. Levels of both alpha 1(I) and alpha 2(I) collagen mRNAs were markedly reduced in Rat 1 fibroblasts overexpressing either the N-rasLys-61 or the Ha-rasVal-12 oncogene. In fibroblasts conditionally transformed with N-rasLys-61, alpha 1(I) transcript levels began to decline within 8 h of ras induction and reached 1 to 5% of control levels after 96 h. In contrast, overexpression of normal ras p21 had no effect on alpha 1(I) or alpha 2(I) mRNA levels. Nuclear run-on experiments demonstrated that the transcription rates of both the alpha 1(I) and alpha 2(I) genes were significantly reduced in ras-transformed cells compared with those in parental cells. In addition, the alpha 1(I) transcript was less stable in transformed cells. Chimeric plasmids containing up to 3.6 kb of alpha 1(I) 5'-flanking DNA and up to 2.3 kb of the 3'-flanking region were expressed at equivalent levels in both normal and ras-transformed fibroblasts. However, a cosmid clone containing the entire mouse alpha 1(I) gene, including 3.7 kb of 5'- and 4 kb of 3'-flanking DNA, was expressed at reduced levels in fibroblasts overexpressing oncogenic ras. We conclude that oncogenic ras regulates the type I collagen genes at both transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels and that this effect, at least for the alpha 1(I) gene, may be mediated by sequences located either within the body of the gene itself or in the distal 3'-flanking region. Images PMID:1406656

  14. Ras activation and symmetry breaking during Dictyostelium chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Kortholt, Arjan; Keizer-Gunnink, Ineke; Kataria, Rama; Van Haastert, Peter J M

    2013-10-01

    Central to chemotaxis is the molecular mechanism by which a shallow spatial gradient of chemoattractant induces symmetry breaking of activated signaling molecules. Previously, we have used Dictyostelium mutants to investigate the minimal requirements for chemotaxis, and identified a basal signaling module providing activation of Ras and F-actin at the leading edge. Here, we show that Ras activation after application of a pipette releasing the chemoattractant cAMP has three phases, each depending on specific guanine-nucleotide-exchange factors (GEFs). Initially a transient activation of Ras occurs at the entire cell boundary, which is proportional to the local cAMP concentrations and therefore slightly stronger at the front than in the rear of the cell. This transient Ras activation is present in gα2 (gpbB)-null cells but not in gβ (gpbA)-null cells, suggesting that Gβγ mediates the initial activation of Ras. The second phase is symmetry breaking: Ras is activated only at the side of the cell closest to the pipette. Symmetry breaking absolutely requires Gα2 and Gβγ, but not the cytoskeleton or four cAMP-induced signaling pathways, those dependent on phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-triphosphate [PtdIns(3,4,5)P3], cGMP, TorC2 and PLA2. As cells move in the gradient, the crescent of activated Ras in the front half of the cell becomes confined to a small area at the utmost front of the cell. Confinement of Ras activation leads to cell polarization, and depends on cGMP formation, myosin and F-actin. The experiments show that activation, symmetry breaking and confinement of Ras during Dictyostelium chemotaxis uses different G-protein subunits and a multitude of Ras GEFs and GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs).

  15. The Rsu-1-PINCH1-ILK complex is regulated by Ras activation in tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Dougherty, Gerard W.; Jose, Cynthia; Gimona, Mario; Cutler, Mary Lou

    2008-01-01

    The link between Ras transformation and enhanced cell migration due to altered integrin signaling is well established in tumorigenesis, however there remain gaps in our understanding of its mechanism. The Ras suppressor, Rsu-1, has recently been linked to the IPP (integrin-linked kinase {ILK}, PINCH-1/LIMS1, parvin) focal adhesion complex based on its interaction with the LIM 5 domain of PINCH1. Defining the role of the Rsu1-PINCH1-ILK-parvin complex in tumorigenesis is important because both ILK and PINCH1 are elevated in certain tumors while ectopic expression of Rsu-1 blocks tumorigenesis. Our studies previously identified an alternatively-spliced isoform of Rsu-1 in high-grade gliomas. We report here the detection of a truncated (p29) Rsu-1 protein, which correlates with the presence of the alternatively spliced Rsu-1 RNA. This RNA and the respective protein were detected in human tumor cell lines that contain high levels of activated Ras, and inhibitor studies demonstrate that the Mek-ERK pathway regulates expression of this truncated Rsu-1 product. We also show that Rsu-1 colocalizes with ILK at focal contacts and co-immunoprecipitates with the ILK-PINCH1 complex in non-transformed cells, but following Ras transformation the association of Rsu-1 with the PINCH1-ILK complex is greatly reduced. Using a human breast cancer cell line, our in vitro studies demonstrate that the depletion of Rsu-1 full-length protein enhances cell migration coincident with an increase in Rac-GTP while the depletion of the p29 Rsu-1 truncated protein inhibits migration. These findings indicate that Rsu-1 may inhibit cell migration by stabilizing the IPP adhesion complex and that Ras activation perturbs this inhibitory function by modulating both Rsu-1 splicing and association of full-length Rsu-1 with IPP. Hence, our findings demonstrate that Rsu-1 links the Ras pathway with the IPP complex and the perturbations of cell attachment-dependent signaling that occur in the malignant

  16. The Rsu-1-PINCH1-ILK complex is regulated by Ras activation in tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Dougherty, Gerard W; Jose, Cynthia; Gimona, Mario; Cutler, Mary Lou

    2008-09-01

    The link between Ras transformation and enhanced cell migration due to altered integrin signaling is well established in tumorigenesis, however there remain gaps in our understanding of its mechanism. The Ras suppressor, Rsu-1, has recently been linked to the IPP (integrin-linked kinase {ILK}, PINCH-1/LIMS1, parvin) focal adhesion complex based on its interaction with the LIM 5 domain of PINCH1. Defining the role of the Rsu1-PINCH1-ILK-parvin complex in tumorigenesis is important because both ILK and PINCH1 are elevated in certain tumors while ectopic expression of Rsu-1 blocks tumorigenesis. Our studies previously identified an alternatively spliced isoform of Rsu-1 in high-grade gliomas. We report here the detection of a truncated (p29) Rsu-1 protein, which correlates with the presence of the alternatively spliced Rsu-1 RNA. This RNA and the respective protein were detected in human tumor cell lines that contain high levels of activated Ras, and inhibitor studies demonstrate that the Mek-ERK pathway regulates expression of this truncated Rsu-1 product. We also show that Rsu-1 co-localizes with ILK at focal contacts and co-immunoprecipitates with the ILK-PINCH1 complex in non-transformed cells, but following Ras transformation the association of Rsu-1 with the PINCH1-ILK complex is greatly reduced. Using a human breast cancer cell line, our in vitro studies demonstrate that the depletion of Rsu-1 full-length protein enhances cell migration coincident with an increase in Rac-GTP while the depletion of the p29 Rsu-1 truncated protein inhibits migration. These findings indicate that Rsu-1 may inhibit cell migration by stabilizing the IPP adhesion complex and that Ras activation perturbs this inhibitory function by modulating both Rsu-1 splicing and association of full-length Rsu-1 with IPP. Hence, our findings demonstrate that Rsu-1 links the Ras pathway with the IPP complex and the perturbations of cell attachment-dependent signaling that occur in the malignant

  17. Rap1 overexpression reveals that activated RasD induces separable defects during Dictyostelium development.

    PubMed

    Louis, S A; Weeks, G; Spiegelman, G B

    1997-10-15

    One of the Dictyostelium ras genes, rasD, is expressed preferentially in prestalk cells at the slug stage of development and overexpression of this gene containing a G12T activating mutation causes the formation of aberrant multitipped aggregates that are blocked from further development (Reymond et al., 1986, Nature, 323, 340-343). The ability of the Dictyostelium rap1 gene to suppress this abnormal developmental phenotype was investigated. The rap1 gene and G12V activated and G10V negative mutant forms of the rap1 gene were independently linked to the rasD promoter and each construct used to transform M1, a Dictyostelium cell line expressing RasD[G12T]. Transformants of M1 that expressed Rap1 or Rap1[G12V] protein still formed multitipped aggregates, but most tips were able to complete development and form fruiting bodies. Cell lines showing this modified phenotype were designated ME (multitipped escape). The rap1[G10V] construct did not modify the M1 phenotype. These data suggest that overexpression of RasD[G12T] has two effects, the formation of a multitipped aggregate and a block in subsequent differentiation and that the expression of Rap1 or Rap1[G12V] reverses only the latter. Differentiation of ME cells in low density monolayers showed the identical low level of stalk and spore cell formation seen for M1 cells under the same conditions. Thus the cell autonomous defect in monolayer differentiation induced in the M1 strain was not corrected in the ME strain. Cell type-specific gene expression during the development of M1 cells is dramatically altered: prestalk cell-specific gene expression is greatly enhanced, whereas prespore-specific gene expression is almost suppressed (Louis et al., 1997, Mol. Biol. Cell, 8, 303-312). During the development of ME cells, ecmA mRNA levels were restored to those seen for Ax3, and tagB mRNA levels were also markedly reduced, although not to Ax3 levels. cotC expression in ME cells was enhanced severalfold relative to M1

  18. Characterization of c-Ki-ras and N-ras oncogenes in aflatoxin B1-induced rat liver tumors.

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, G; Davis, E F; Huber, L J; Kim, Y; Wogan, G N

    1990-01-01

    c-Ki-ras and N-ras oncogenes have been characterized in aflatoxin B1-induced hepatocellular carcinomas. Detection of different protooncogene and oncogene sequences and estimation of their frequency distribution were accomplished by polymerase chain reaction, cloning, and plaque screening methods. Two c-Ki-ras oncogene sequences were identified in DNA from liver tumors that contained nucleotide changes absent in DNA from livers of untreated control rats. Sequence changes involving G.C to T.A or G.C to A.T nucleotide substitutions in codon 12 were scored in three of eight tumor-bearing animals. Distributions of c-Ki-ras sequences in tumors and normal liver DNA indicated that the observed nucleotide changes were consistent with those expected to result from direct mutagenesis of the germ-line protooncogene by aflatoxin B1. N-ras oncogene sequences were identified in DNA from two of eight tumors. Three N-ras gene regions were identified, one of which was shown to be associated with an oncogene containing a putative activating amino acid residing at codon 13. All three N-ras sequences, including the region detected in N-ras oncogenes, were present at similar frequencies in DNA samples from control livers as well as liver tumors. The presence of a potential germ-line oncogene may be related to the sensitivity of the Fischer rat strain to liver carcinogenesis by aflatoxin B1 and other chemical carcinogens. Images PMID:2105496

  19. Down-regulation of let-7 microRNA increased K-ras expression in lung damage induced by radon.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhihai; Wang, Dapeng; Gu, Chao; Liu, Xing; Pei, Weiwei; Li, Jianxiang; Cao, Yi; Jiao, Yang; Tong, Jian; Nie, Jihua

    2015-09-01

    Radon has long been recognized as a human carcinogen leading to lung cancer, but the underlying mechanisms remain obscure. Recent studies have shown that the let-7 microRNA and K-ras play an important role in the development of various cancers. However, the exact role between let-7 and K-ras in radon induced lung damage has not been explored so far. In the present study, wistar rats and human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells were long-term exposed to radon, and then alterations in histological pathology of rat lung tissue, ROS, antioxidant enzymes activities and clonogenic formation in HBE cells, as well as changes in let-7 and K-ras expression were determined to observe the adverse effects induced by radon. The results showed that long-term exposure to radon produced severe lung damage in rats, significantly increased ROS production and clonogenic formation ratios and decreased SOD activities in HBE cells. In addition, an obvious down-regulation of let-7 and up-regulation of K-ras were also revealed both in mRNA and in protein level in lung tissue of rats and HBE cells exposed to radon. Furthermore, a significant down-regulation of K-ras was then confirmed in both let-7b-3p and let-7a-2-3p transfected HBE cells. Taken together, the present results propose an involvement of let-7 microRNA and K-ras in radon induced lung damage both in vivo and in vitro, which may thus be of potential value in early diagnosis and therapy of radon-induced lung tumorgenesis.

  20. Studies of gravitational lens systems discovered in the Cosmic Lens All-Sky Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusin, David Joseph

    2001-11-01

    This thesis describes research conducted on and inspired by the Cosmic Lens All-Sky Survey (CLASS), which searches for new cases of gravitational lensing among compact radio sources. CLASS aims to provide the largest and best-studied sample of lens systems for use in constraining the properties of galaxy mass distributions, determining the Hubble parameter and placing limits on the cosmological constant. The goal of this thesis was to complete observations of the CLASS sample, discover and thoroughly investigate new lenses, and apply them to interesting astrophysical problems. We begin with a detailed overview of the CLASS project, including scientific goals, the radio source sample, survey observations, candidate selection and follow-ups. Results are then presented from the third phase of the CLASS survey (CLASS-3), which yielded three new gravitational lens systems. 130850+054 and 131152+199 both consist of a pair of lensed images. 131359+154 features six images of a single source, and is the first arcsecond-scale system in which a source is lensed into more than four images. We also present observations and modeling of the CLASS-2 gravitational lens B2319+051. We use the absence of detectable central images in deep radio maps of CLASS lens systems to place powerful constraints on the inner mass profiles of leasing galaxies. These analyses imply that the profile slopes cannot be much shallower than isothermal. Finally, we consider the relative frequency of two and four-image lens systems, and demonstrate that there is a statistically significant overdensity of quads in the CLASS sample. We investigate a range of factors that may be increasing the frequency of radio quads, including external shear fields, mass distributions flatter than the light, shallow leasing mass profiles, finite core radii, satellite galaxies, and alterations to the luminosity function for faint flat-spectrum radio sources. Surprisingly, none of these mechanisms provide a particularly

  1. Foveated endoscopic lens

    PubMed Central

    Hagen, Nathan

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. We present a foveated miniature endoscopic lens implemented by amplifying the optical distortion of the lens. The resulting system provides a high-resolution region in the central field of view and low resolution in the outer fields, such that a standard imaging fiber bundle can provide both the high resolution needed to determine tissue health and the wide field of view needed to determine the location within the inspected organ. Our proof of concept device achieves 7∼8  μm resolution in the fovea and an overall field of view of 4.6 mm. Example images and videos show the foveated lens’ capabilities. PMID:22463022

  2. The ARF tumor suppressor controls Drosha translation to prevent Ras-driven transformation

    PubMed Central

    Kuchenreuther, Michael J.; Weber, Jason D.

    2014-01-01

    ARF is a multifunctional tumor suppressor that acts as both a sensor of oncogenic stimuli and as a key regulator of ribosome biogenesis. Recently, our group established the DEAD-box RNA helicase and microRNA (miRNA) microprocessor accessory subunit, DDX5, as a critical target of basal ARF function. To identify other molecular targets of ARF, we focused on known interacting proteins of DDX5 in the microprocessor complex. Drosha, the catalytic core of the microprocessor complex, plays a critical role in the maturation of specific non-coding RNAs, including miRNAs and rRNAs. Here, we report that chronic or acute loss of Arf enhanced Drosha protein expression. This induction did not involve Drosha mRNA transcription or protein stability but rather relied on the increased translation of existing Drosha mRNAs. Enhanced Drosha expression did not alter global miRNA production, but rather modified expression of a subset of miRNAs in the absence of Arf. Elevated Drosha protein levels were required to maintain the increased rRNA synthesis and cellular proliferation observed in the absence of Arf. Arf-deficient cells transformed by oncogenic RasV12 were dependent on increased Drosha expression as Drosha knockdown was sufficient to inhibit Ras-dependent cellular transformation. Thus, we propose that ARF regulates Drosha mRNA translation to prevent aberrant cell proliferation and Ras-dependent transformation. PMID:23318441

  3. Syndecan-1 is up-regulated in ras-transformed intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Z. M.; Choo, B.; Li, M.; Carey, D. J.; Cano-Gauci, D. F.; Buick, R. N.

    1998-01-01

    The syndecans, a family of cell-surface heparan sulphate proteoglycans, have been proposed to mediate cellular interactions with extracellular effector molecules, such as growth factors and components of the extracellular matrix, during critical phases of development. Transcripts of all four syndecans are expressed at varying levels in the developing rat intestine and in a series of immature rat intestinal epithelial cell lines. In addition, we report the novel finding that, in the intestinal epithelial cell lines, expression of syndecan-1 transcript is up-regulated by transformation with activated H-ras. This is in contrast to other cell lines in which ras transformation is associated with a decrease in syndecan-1 levels. The observed increase in the syndecan-1 occurs as a result of increased transcription and can be correlated with the degree of transformation of the IEC-18 cells. Transformation is also associated with a decrease in apparent molecular weight and increased shedding of the proteoglycan into the culture medium. Increased shedding of syndecan-1 into the culture medium after transformation with H-ras may contribute to the disruption of proteoglycan interactions with the extracellular matrix, leading to alterations in cell adhesion and organization. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:9528830

  4. Gradient Index Lens Research.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-11-25

    over six to nine readings at two to three input polarizations each. The first set of index values is calculated assuming ei = 450 These values are...TECHNICAL REPORT RG-CR-84-2 Sli GRADIENT INDEX LENS RESEARCH Prepared by: Duncan T. Moore The Institute of Optics University of Rochester Rochester...CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE (Miten Data Fntered) READ INSTRUCTIONSREPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE BEFORE COMPLETING FORM 1. REPORT NU14MU R GOVT ACCESSION No. 3

  5. HoloLens

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-02-20

    ISS046e043637 (02/20/2016) --- NASA astronaut Scott Kelly tweeted out this image to his followers Feb 20, 2016 with the tag: "This #Saturday morning checked out the @Microsoft #HoloLens aboard @Space_Station! Wow! #YearInSpace ". The device is part of NASA’s project Sidekick which is exploring the use of augmented reality to reduce crew training requirements and increase the efficiency at which astronauts can work in space.

  6. Insulin-like growth factor-1 induces hyperproliferation of PKD1 cystic cells via a Ras/Raf dependent signalling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Emma; Newby, Linda J; Sharpe, Claire C; Rossetti, Sandro; Streets, Andrew J; Harris, Peter C; O’Hare, Michael J; Ong, Albert CM

    2008-01-01

    Tubular cell proliferation occurs early and precedes cyst formation in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). To identify key alterations in cell signalling which regulate cell proliferation in ADPKD, we examined the potential role of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) mediated signalling pathways. Conditionally immortalised tubular epithelial cells were generated from ADPKD patients with characterised germline PKD1 mutations and normal individuals. Germline and somatic PKD1 (but not PKD2) mutations were identified in PKD1 cystic cells by DHPLC. All lines showed a reduction or absence of polycystin-1 but normal polycystin-2 expression. Polycystin-1 deficiency was associated with increased sensitivity to IGF-1 as well as a permissive effect of cAMP on cell growth. The increase in cell proliferation to both agents was dependent on PI3 kinase and ERK activity. Inhibition of Ras or Raf activity also abolished stimulated cell proliferation. Ras activation assays revealed significantly higher IGF-1 stimulated levels of GTP-Ras in cystic cells compared to control cells but cAMP alone had no effect on GTP-Ras levels. These results suggest that haploinsufficiency of PC1 may lower the threshold for activation of a Ras-Raf mediated signalling cascade leading to growth-factor induced hyperproliferation. Inhibition of Ras or Raf activation could be a useful therapeutic approach to reducing tubular cell proliferation in ADPKD. PMID:17396115

  7. High-density growth arrest in Ras-transformed cells: low Cdk kinase activities in spite of absence of p27(Kip) Cdk-complexes.

    PubMed

    Groth, Anja; Willumsen, Berthe M

    2005-09-01

    The ras oncogene transforms immortalized, contact-inhibited non-malignant murine fibroblasts into cells that are focus forming, exhibit increased saturation density, and are malignant in suitable hosts. Here, we examined changes in cell cycle control complexes as normal and Ras-transformed cells ceased to grow exponentially, to reveal the molecular basis for Ras-dependent focus formation. As normal cells entered density-dependent arrest, cyclin D1 decreased while cyclin D2 was induced and replaced D1 in Cdk4 complexes. Concomitantly, p27(Kip1) levels rose and the inhibitor accumulated in both Cdk4 and Cdk2 complexes, as these kinases were inactivated. Ras-transformed cells failed to arrest at normal saturation density and showed no significant alterations in cell control complexes at this point. Yet, at an elevated density the Ras-transformed cells ceased to proliferate and entered a quiescent-like state with low Cdk4 and Cdk2 activity. Surprisingly, this delayed arrest was molecularly distinct from contact inhibition of normal cells, as it occurred in the absence of p27(Kip1) induction and cyclin D1 levels remained high. This demonstrates that although oncogenic Ras efficiently disabled the normal response to contact inhibition, a separate back-up mechanism enforced cell cycle arrest at higher cell density.

  8. Light-adjustable lens.

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Daniel M

    2003-01-01

    PURPOSE: First, to determine whether a silicone light-adjustable intraocular lens (IOL) can be fabricated and adjusted precisely with a light delivery device (LDD). Second, to determine the biocompatibility of an adjustable IOL and whether the lens can be adjusted precisely in vivo. METHODS: After fabrication of a light-adjustable silicone formulation, IOLs were made and tested in vitro for cytotoxicity, leaching, precision of adjustment, optical quality after adjustment, and mechanical properties. Light-adjustable IOLs were then tested in vivo for biocompatibility and precision of adjustment in a rabbit model. In collaboration with Zeiss-Meditec, a digital LDD was developed and tested to correct for higher-order aberrations in light-adjustable IOLs. RESULTS: The results establish that a biocompatible silicone IOL can be fabricated and adjusted using safe levels of light. There was no evidence of cytotoxicity or leaching. Testing of mechanical properties revealed no significant differences from commercial controls. Implantation of light-adjustable lenses in rabbits demonstrated- excellent biocompatibility after 6 months, comparable to a commercially available IOL. In vivo spherical (hyperopic and myopic) adjustment in rabbits was achieved using an analog light delivery system. The digital light delivery system was tested and achieved correction of higher-order aberrations. CONCLUSION: A silicone light-adjustable IOL and LDD have been developed to enable postoperative, noninvasive adjustment of lens power. The ability to correct higher-order aberrations in these materials has broad potential applicability for optimization of vision in patients undergoing cataract and refractive surgery. PMID:14971588

  9. News and Views: Cold comfort; RAS responds to new STFC priorities; RAS joint fellowship supports retraining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-02-01

    The announcement of the funding decisions made by the Science and Technology Facilities Council in December represent a narrowing of the horizons for UK astronomy, ending support for significant facilities and missions and permitting limited development of new projects. The RAS has teamed up with the Daphne Jackson Trust to offer a joint fellowship aimed at people wishing to return to research after a career break.

  10. Absence of SPARC leads to impaired lens circulation.

    PubMed

    Greiling, Teri M S; Stone, Brad; Clark, John I

    2009-09-01

    SPARC is a matricellular glycoprotein involved in regulation of extracellular matrix, growth factors, adhesion, and migration. SPARC-null mice have altered basement membranes and develop posterior sub-capsular cataracts with cell swelling and equatorial vacuoles. Exchange of fluid, nutrients, and waste products in the avascular lens is driven by a unique circulating ion current. In the absence of SPARC, increased circulation of fluid, ions, and small molecules led to increased fluorescein distribution in vivo, loss of resting membrane polarization, and altered distribution of small molecules. Microarray analysis of SPARC-null lenses showed changes in gene expression of ion channels and receptors, matrix and adhesion genes, cytoskeleton, immune response genes, and cell signaling molecules. Our results confirm the hypothesis that the regulation of SPARC on cell-capsular matrix interactions can increase the circulation of fluid and ions in the lens, and the phenotype in the SPARC-null mouse lens is the result of multiple intersecting functional pathways.

  11. Evolution of ephemerides EPM of IAA RAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitjeva, E.

    2015-08-01

    The evolution of numerical EPM ephemerides of the IAA RAS from available EPM2004, EPM2008, EPM2011, to the new EPM2014 version is presented briefly. The comparison progress of ephemerides includes: the growing database of different types of observations from classical optical to radio technical of spacecraft from 1913 to 2014, enlarged up to more 800000 measurements; improved dynamical model from mutual perturbations of all planets, the Sun, the Moon, 301 largest asteroids to additional perturbations from of 30 largest trans-neptunian objects (TNO) and perturbations from remaining smaller asteroids and TNO modeled by the two-dimensional asteroid ring and the one-dimensional TNO ring; program software ERA-7 to ERA-8.

  12. Ras Laffan helium recovery unit 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fauve, Eric Arnaud; Grabié, Veronique; Grillot, David; Delcayre, Franck; Deschildre, Cindy

    2012-06-01

    In May 2010, Air Liquide was awarded a contract for the Engineering Procurement and Construction (Turnkey EPC) for a second helium recovery unit [RLH II] dedicated to the Ras Laffan refinery in Qatar. This unit will come in addition to the one [RLH I] delivered and commissioned by Air Liquide in 2005. It will increase the helium production of Qatar from 10% to 28% of worldwide production. RLH I and RLH II use Air Liquide Advanced Technologies helium liquefiers. With a production of 8 tons of liquid helium per day, the RLH I liquefier is the world largest, but not for long. Thanks to the newly developed turbine TC7, Air Liquide was able to propose for RLH II a single liquefier able to produce over 20 tons per day of liquid helium without liquid nitrogen pre-cooling. This liquefier using 6 Air Liquide turbines (TC series) will set a new record in the world of helium liquefaction.

  13. Targeting the RAS pathway in melanoma.

    PubMed

    Ji, Zhenyu; Flaherty, Keith T; Tsao, Hensin

    2012-01-01

    Metastatic melanoma is a highly lethal type of skin cancer and is often refractory to all traditional chemotherapeutic agents. Key insights into the genetic makeup of melanoma tumors have led to the development of promising targeted agents. An activated RAS pathway, anchored by oncogenic BRAF, appears to be the central motor driving melanoma proliferation. Although recent clinical trials have brought enormous hope to patients with melanoma, adverse effects and novel escape mechanisms of these inhibitors have already emerged. Definition of the limits of the first successful targeted therapies will provide the basis for further advances in management of disseminated melanoma. In this review, the current state of targeted therapy for melanoma is discussed, including the potent BRAF(V600E) inhibitor vemurafenib. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. K-Ras mutation detection in liquid biopsy and tumor tissue as prognostic biomarker in patients with pancreatic cancer: a systematic review with meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Tao; Zheng, Yuanting; Sun, Hong; Zhuang, Rongyuan; Liu, Jing; Liu, Tianshu; Cai, Weimin

    2016-07-01

    K-Ras gene mutations have been found in most pancreatic cancers; however, conflicting data on the prognostic value of K-Ras mutations in pancreatic cancer have been published. We conducted a meta-analysis to assess its prognostic significance. Literature searches of PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, Web of Science and Google Scholar were performed through December 2015 to identify publications exploring the association of K-Ras mutation with overall survival. Forty eligible studies involving 3427 patients with pancreatic cancer were included in the present meta-analysis. Our analysis showed a hazard ratio (HR) of negative association with survival of 1.61 [95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.36-1.90; p < 0.01] in K-Ras mutant pancreatic cancer patients. In subgroup analyses, K-Ras mutations detected in tumor tissues and in liquid biopsies had HRs of 1.37 (95 % CI 1.20-1.57; p < 0.01) and 3.16 (95 % CI 2.1-4.71; p < 0.01), respectively. In addition, the HR was higher when K-Ras mutations were detected in fresh frozen samples (HR = 2.01, 95 % CI 1.28-3.16, p = 0.002) than in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples (HR = 1.29, 95 % CI 1.12-1.49, p < 0.01). Though K-Ras alterations are more frequent among non-East Asian individuals than East Asian individuals, there were no significant differences in HRs of survival between the two ethnic subgroups. In conclusion, this meta-analysis suggests that K-Ras mutations are associated with a worse overall survival in pancreatic cancer patients, especially when mutations are detected in liquid biopsies or fresh frozen tumor tissue samples.

  15. Opposing effects of a ras oncogene on growth factor-stimulated phosphoinositide hydrolysis: desensitization to platelet-derived growth factor and enhanced sensitivity to bradykinin

    SciTech Connect

    Parries, G.; Hoebel, R.; Racker, E.

    1987-05-01

    Expression of a transforming Harvey or Kirsten ras gene caused opposing effects in the ability of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and bradyknin to activate phospholipase C-mediated phosphoinositide hydrolysis. In (/sup 3/H)inositol-labeled rat-1 fibroblasts, PDGF resulted in a 2-fold increase in the level of (/sup 3/H)inositol trisphosphate (InsP/sub 3/) after 2 min and, in the presence of LiCl, a 3- to 8-fold increase in the level of (/sup 3/H)inositol monophosphate (InsP/sub 1/) after 30 min. However, in EJ-ras-transfected rat-1 cells, which exhibit near normal levels of PDGF receptors, PDGF resulted in little or no accumulation of either (/sup 3/H)InsP/sub 3/ or (/sup 3/H)InsP/sub 1/. Similarly, marked stimulations by PDGF were observed in NIH 3T3 cells, as well as in v-src-transformed 3T3 cells, but not in 3T3 cells transformed by Kirsten sarcoma virus or by transfection with v-Ha-ras DNA. This diminished phosphoinositide response in ras-transformed cells was associated with a markedly attenuated mitogenic response to PDGF. On the other hand, both phosphoinositide metabolism and DNA synthesis in ras-transformed fibroblasts were stimulated several-fold by serum. In NIH 3T3 cells carrying a glucocorticoid-inducible v-Ha-ras gene, a close correlation was found between the expression of p21/sup ras/ and the loss of PDGF-stimulated (/sup 3/H)InsP/sub 1/ accumulation. The authors propose that a ras gene product (p21) can, directly or indirectly, influence growth factor-stimulated phosphoinositide hydrolysis, as well as DNA synthesis, via alterations in the properties of specific growth factor receptors.

  16. Prospero and Pax2 combinatorially control neural cell fate decisions by modulating Ras- and Notch-dependent signaling

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The concept of an equivalence group, a cluster of cells with equal potential to adopt the same specific fate, has served as a useful paradigm to understand neural cell type specification. In the Drosophila eye, a set of five cells, called the 'R7 equivalence group', generates a single photoreceptor neuron and four lens-secreting epithelial cells. This choice between neuronal versus non-neuronal cell fates rests on differential requirements for, and cross-talk between, Notch/Delta- and Ras/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-dependent signaling pathways. However, many questions remain unanswered related to how downstream events of these two signaling pathways mediate distinct cell fate decisions. Results Here, we demonstrate that two direct downstream targets of Ras and Notch signaling, the transcription factors Prospero and dPax2, are essential regulators of neuronal versus non-neuronal cell fate decisions in the R7 equivalence group. Prospero controls high activated MAPK levels required for neuronal fate, whereas dPax2 represses Delta expression to prevent neuronal fate. Importantly, activity from both factors is required for proper cell fate decisions to occur. Conclusions These data demonstrate that Ras and Notch signaling are integrated during cell fate decisions within the R7 equivalence group through the combinatorial and opposing activities of Pros and dPax2. Our study provides one of the first examples of how the differential expression and synergistic roles of two independent transcription factors determine cell fate within an equivalence group. Since the integration of Ras and Notch signaling is associated with many developmental and cancer models, these findings should provide new insights into how cell specificity is achieved by ubiquitously used signaling pathways in diverse biological contexts. PMID:21539742

  17. Analysis of Ras-induced overproliferation in Drosophila hemocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Asha, H; Nagy, Istvan; Kovacs, Gabor; Stetson, Daniel; Ando, Istvan; Dearolf, Charles R

    2003-01-01

    We use the Drosophila melanogaster larval hematopoietic system as an in vivo model for the genetic and functional genomic analysis of oncogenic cell overproliferation. Ras regulates cell proliferation and differentiation in multicellular eukaryotes. To further elucidate the role of activated Ras in cell overproliferation, we generated a collagen promoter-Gal4 strain to overexpress Ras(V12) in Drosophila hemocytes. Activated Ras causes a dramatic increase in the number of circulating larval hemocytes (blood cells), which is caused by cellular overproliferation. This phenotype is mediated by the Raf/MAPK pathway. The mutant hemocytes retain the ability to phagocytose bacteria as well as to differentiate into lamellocytes. Microarray analysis of hemocytes overexpressing Ras(V12) vs. Ras(+) identified 279 transcripts that are differentially expressed threefold or more in hemocytes expressing activated Ras. This work demonstrates that it will be feasible to combine genetic and functional genomic approaches in the Drosophila hematopoietic system to systematically identify oncogene-specific downstream targets. PMID:12586708

  18. Deconstruction of the Ras switching cycle through saturation mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bandaru, Pradeep; Shah, Neel H; Bhattacharyya, Moitrayee; Barton, John P; Kondo, Yasushi; Cofsky, Joshua C; Gee, Christine L; Chakraborty, Arup K; Kortemme, Tanja; Ranganathan, Rama; Kuriyan, John

    2017-01-01

    Ras proteins are highly conserved signaling molecules that exhibit regulated, nucleotide-dependent switching between active and inactive states. The high conservation of Ras requires mechanistic explanation, especially given the general mutational tolerance of proteins. Here, we use deep mutational scanning, biochemical analysis and molecular simulations to understand constraints on Ras sequence. Ras exhibits global sensitivity to mutation when regulated by a GTPase activating protein and a nucleotide exchange factor. Removing the regulators shifts the distribution of mutational effects to be largely neutral, and reveals hotspots of activating mutations in residues that restrain Ras dynamics and promote the inactive state. Evolutionary analysis, combined with structural and mutational data, argue that Ras has co-evolved with its regulators in the vertebrate lineage. Overall, our results show that sequence conservation in Ras depends strongly on the biochemical network in which it operates, providing a framework for understanding the origin of global selection pressures on proteins. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.27810.001 PMID:28686159

  19. Inhibition of SHP2-mediated dephosphorylation of Ras suppresses oncogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bunda, Severa; Burrell, Kelly; Heir, Pardeep; Zeng, Lifan; Alamsahebpour, Amir; Kano, Yoshihito; Raught, Brian; Zhang, Zhong-Yin; Zadeh, Gelareh; Ohh, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Ras is phosphorylated on a conserved tyrosine at position 32 within the switch I region via Src kinase. This phosphorylation inhibits the binding of effector Raf while promoting the engagement of GTPase-activating protein (GAP) and GTP hydrolysis. Here we identify SHP2 as the ubiquitously expressed tyrosine phosphatase that preferentially binds to and dephosphorylates Ras to increase its association with Raf and activate downstream proliferative Ras/ERK/MAPK signalling. In comparison to normal astrocytes, SHP2 activity is elevated in astrocytes isolated from glioblastoma multiforme (GBM)-prone H-Ras(12V) knock-in mice as well as in glioma cell lines and patient-derived GBM specimens exhibiting hyperactive Ras. Pharmacologic inhibition of SHP2 activity attenuates cell proliferation, soft-agar colony formation and orthotopic GBM growth in NOD/SCID mice and decelerates the progression of low-grade astrocytoma to GBM in a spontaneous transgenic glioma mouse model. These results identify SHP2 as a direct activator of Ras and a potential therapeutic target for cancers driven by a previously ‘undruggable' oncogenic or hyperactive Ras. PMID:26617336

  20. Inhibition of SHP2-mediated dephosphorylation of Ras suppresses oncogenesis.

    PubMed

    Bunda, Severa; Burrell, Kelly; Heir, Pardeep; Zeng, Lifan; Alamsahebpour, Amir; Kano, Yoshihito; Raught, Brian; Zhang, Zhong-Yin; Zadeh, Gelareh; Ohh, Michael

    2015-11-30

    Ras is phosphorylated on a conserved tyrosine at position 32 within the switch I region via Src kinase. This phosphorylation inhibits the binding of effector Raf while promoting the engagement of GTPase-activating protein (GAP) and GTP hydrolysis. Here we identify SHP2 as the ubiquitously expressed tyrosine phosphatase that preferentially binds to and dephosphorylates Ras to increase its association with Raf and activate downstream proliferative Ras/ERK/MAPK signalling. In comparison to normal astrocytes, SHP2 activity is elevated in astrocytes isolated from glioblastoma multiforme (GBM)-prone H-Ras(12V) knock-in mice as well as in glioma cell lines and patient-derived GBM specimens exhibiting hyperactive Ras. Pharmacologic inhibition of SHP2 activity attenuates cell proliferation, soft-agar colony formation and orthotopic GBM growth in NOD/SCID mice and decelerates the progression of low-grade astrocytoma to GBM in a spontaneous transgenic glioma mouse model. These results identify SHP2 as a direct activator of Ras and a potential therapeutic target for cancers driven by a previously 'undruggable' oncogenic or hyperactive Ras.

  1. Analysis of Ras/ERK Compartmentalization by Subcellular Fractionation.

    PubMed

    Agudo-Ibañez, Lorena; Crespo, Piero; Casar, Berta

    2017-01-01

    A vast number of stimuli use the Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK signaling cascade to transmit signals from their cognate receptors, in order to regulate multiple cellular functions, including key processes such as proliferation, cell cycle progression, differentiation, and survival. The duration, intensity and specificity of the responses are, in part, controlled by the compartmentalization/subcellular localization of the signaling intermediaries. Ras proteins are found in different plasma membrane microdomains and endomembranes. At these localizations, Ras is subject to site-specific regulatory mechanisms, distinctively engaging effector pathways and switching-on diverse genetic programs to generate a multitude of biological responses. The Ras effector pathway leading to ERKs activation is also subject to space-related regulatory processes. About half of ERK1/2 substrates are found in the nucleus and function mainly as transcription factors. The other half resides in the cytosol and other cellular organelles. Such subcellular distribution enhances the complexity of the Ras/ERK cascade and constitutes an essential mechanism to endow variability to its signals, which enables their participation in the regulation of a broad variety of functions. Thus, analyzing the subcellular compartmentalization of the members of the Ras/ERK cascade constitutes an important factor to be taken into account when studying specific biological responses evoked by Ras/ERK signals. Herein, we describe methods for such purpose.

  2. KSR: a MAPK scaffold of the Ras pathway?

    PubMed

    Morrison, D K

    2001-05-01

    Kinase Suppressor of Ras (KSR) is an intriguing component of the Ras pathway that was first identified by genetic studies performed in Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans. In both organisms, inactivating mutations in KSR suppress the phenotypic effects induced by activated Ras. These findings together with the fact that KSR contains many structural features characteristic of a protein kinase led to early speculation that KSR is a kinase functioning upstream of the Ras pathway component Raf-1 or in a parallel Ras-dependent pathway. However, in the six years since its discovery, KSR has been found to lack several key properties of known protein kinases, which has cast doubt on whether KSR is indeed a functional enzyme. A major breakthrough in our understanding of the role of KSR in signal transduction has come from recent findings that KSR interacts with several components of the MAP kinase cascade, including Raf-1, MEK1/2 and ERK1/2. The model now emerging is that KSR acts as a scaffolding protein that coordinates the assembly of a membrane-localized, multiprotein MAP kinase complex, a vital step in Ras-mediated signal transduction. Thus, while Kinase Suppressor of Ras may be its name, phosphorylation may not be its game.

  3. Regulation of Ras signaling and function by plasma membrane microdomains.

    PubMed

    Goldfinger, Lawrence E; Michael, James V

    2017-02-07

    Together H-, N- and KRAS mutations are major contributors to ~30% of all human cancers. Thus, Ras inhibition remains an important anti-cancer strategy. The molecular mechanisms of isotypic Ras oncogenesis are still not completely understood. Monopharmacological therapeutics have not been successful in the clinic. These disappointing outcomes have led to attempts to target elements downstream of Ras, mainly targeting either the Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase (PI3K) or Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) pathways. While several such approaches are moderately effective, recent efforts have focused on preclinical evaluation of combination therapies to improve efficacies. This review will detail current understanding of the contributions of plasma membrane microdomain targeting of Ras to mitogenic and tumorigenic signaling and tumor progression. Moreover, this review will outline novel approaches to target Ras in cancers, including targeting schemes for new drug development, as well as putative re-purposing of drugs in current use to take advantage of blunting Ras signaling by interfering with Ras plasma membrane microdomain targeting and retention.

  4. Oncogenic K-Ras signals through epidermal growth factor receptor and wild-type H-Ras to promote radiation survival in pancreatic and colorectal carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Cengel, Keith A; Voong, K Rahn; Chandrasekaran, Sanjay; Maggiorella, Laurence; Brunner, Thomas B; Stanbridge, Eric; Kao, Gary D; McKenna, W Gillies; Bernhard, Eric J

    2007-04-01

    Pancreatic and colorectal carcinomas frequently express oncogenic/mutant K-Ras that contributes to both tumorigenesis and clinically observed resistance to radiation treatment. We have previously shown that farnesyltransferase inhibitors (FTI) radiosensitize many pancreatic and colorectal cancer cell lines that express oncogenic K-ras at doses that inhibit the prenylation and activation of H-Ras but not K-Ras. In the present study, we have examined the mechanism of FTI-mediated radiosensitization in cell lines that express oncogenic K-Ras and found that wild-type H-Ras is a contributor to radiation survival in tumor cells that express oncogenic K-Ras. In these experiments, inhibiting the expression of oncogenic K-Ras, wild-type H-Ras, or epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) led to similar levels of radiosensitization as treatment with the FTI tipifarnib. Treatment with the EGFR inhibitor gefitinib led to similar levels of radiosensitization, and the combinations of tipifarnib or gefitinib plus inhibition of K-Ras, H-Ras, or EGFR expression did not provide additional radiosensitization compared with tipifarnib or gefitinib alone. Finally, supplementing culture medium with the EGFR ligand transforming growth factor alpha was able to reverse the radiosensitizing effect of inhibiting K-ras expression. Taken together, these findings suggest that EGFR-activated H-Ras signaling is initiated by oncogenic K-Ras to promote radiation survival in pancreatic and colorectal cancers.

  5. Oncogenic K-Ras Signals through Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor and Wild-Type H-Ras to Promote Radiation Survival in Pancreatic and Colorectal Carcinoma Cells1

    PubMed Central

    Cengel, Keith A.; Voong, K. Rahn; Chandrasekaran, Sanjay; Maggiorella, Laurence; Brunner, Thomas B.; Stanbridge, Eric; Kao, Gary D.; McKenna, W. Gillies; Bernhard, Eric J.

    2007-01-01

    Pancreatic and colorectal carcinomas frequently express oncogenic/mutant K-Ras that contributes to both tumorigenesis and clinically observed resistance to radiation treatment. We have previously shown that farnesyltransferase inhibitors (FTI) radiosensitize many pancreatic and colorectal cancer cell lines that express oncogenic K-ras at doses that inhibit the prenylation and activation of H-Ras but not K-Ras. In the present study, we have examined the mechanism of FTI-mediated radiosensitization in cell lines that express oncogenic K-Ras and found that wild-type H-Ras is a contributor to radiation survival in tumor cells that express oncogenic K-Ras. In these experiments, inhibiting the expression of oncogenic K-Ras, wild-type H-Ras, or epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) led to similar levels of radiosensitization as treatment with the FTI tipifarnib. Treatment with the EGFR inhibitor gefitinib led to similar levels of radiosensitization, and the combinations of tipifarnib or gefitinib plus inhibition of K-Ras, H-Ras, or EGFR expression did not provide additional radiosensitization compared with tipifarnib or gefitinib alone. Finally, supplementing culture medium with the EGFR ligand transforming growth factor α was able to reverse the radiosensitizing effect of inhibiting K-ras expression. Taken together, these findings suggest that EGFR-activated H-Ras signaling is initiated by oncogenic K-Ras to promote radiation survival in pancreatic and colorectal cancers. PMID:17460778

  6. Miniature hybrid optical imaging lens

    DOEpatents

    Sitter, D.N. Jr.; Simpson, M.L.

    1997-10-21

    A miniature lens system that corrects for imaging and chromatic aberrations is disclosed, the lens system being fabricated from primarily commercially-available components. A first element at the input to a lens housing is an aperture stop. A second optical element is a refractive element with a diffractive element closely coupled to, or formed a part of, the rear surface of the refractive element. Spaced closely to the diffractive element is a baffle to limit the area of the image, and this is closely followed by a second refractive lens element to provide the final correction. The image, corrected for aberrations exits the last lens element to impinge upon a detector plane were is positioned any desired detector array. The diffractive element is fabricated according to an equation that includes, as variables, the design wavelength, the index of refraction and the radius from an optical axis of the lens system components. 2 figs.

  7. Miniature hybrid optical imaging lens

    DOEpatents

    Sitter, Jr., David N.; Simpson, Marc L.

    1997-01-01

    A miniature lens system that corrects for imaging and chromatic aberrations, the lens system being fabricated from primarily commercially-available components. A first element at the input to a lens housing is an aperture stop. A second optical element is a refractive element with a diffractive element closely coupled to, or formed a part of, the rear surface of the refractive element. Spaced closely to the diffractive element is a baffle to limit the area of the image, and this is closely followed by a second refractive lens element to provide the final correction. The image, corrected for aberrations exits the last lens element to impinge upon a detector plane were is positioned any desired detector array. The diffractive element is fabricated according to an equation that includes, as variables, the design wavelength, the index of refraction and the radius from an optical axis of the lens system components.

  8. THE OPTIMAL GRAVITATIONAL LENS TELESCOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Surdej, J.; Hanot, C.; Sadibekova, T.; Delacroix, C.; Habraken, S.; Coleman, P.; Dominik, M.; Le Coroller, H.; Mawet, D.; Quintana, H.; Sluse, D.

    2010-05-15

    Given an observed gravitational lens mirage produced by a foreground deflector (cf. galaxy, quasar, cluster, ...), it is possible via numerical lens inversion to retrieve the real source image, taking full advantage of the magnifying power of the cosmic lens. This has been achieved in the past for several remarkable gravitational lens systems. Instead, we propose here to invert an observed multiply imaged source directly at the telescope using an ad hoc optical instrument which is described in the present paper. Compared to the previous method, this should allow one to detect fainter source features as well as to use such an optimal gravitational lens telescope to explore even fainter objects located behind and near the lens. Laboratory and numerical experiments illustrate this new approach.

  9. Retinoic acid regulation by CYP26 in vertebrate lens regeneration.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Alvin G; Henry, Jonathan J

    2014-02-15

    Xenopus laevis is among the few species that are capable of fully regenerating a lost lens de novo. This occurs upon removal of the lens, when secreted factors from the retina are permitted to reach the cornea epithelium and trigger it to form a new lens. Although many studies have investigated the retinal factors that initiate lens regeneration, relatively little is known about what factors support this process and make the cornea competent to form a lens. We presently investigate the role of Retinoic acid (RA) signaling in lens regeneration in Xenopus. RA is a highly important morphogen during vertebrate development, including the development of various eye tissues, and has been previously implicated in several regenerative processes as well. For instance, Wolffian lens regeneration in the newt requires active RA signaling. In contrast, we provide evidence here that lens regeneration in Xenopus actually depends on the attenuation of RA signaling, which is regulated by the RA-degrading enzyme CYP26. Using RT-PCR we examined the expression of RA synthesis and metabolism related genes within ocular tissues. We found expression of aldh1a1, aldh1a2, and aldh1a3, as well as cyp26a1 and cyp26b1 in both normal and regenerating corneal tissue. On the other hand, cyp26c1 does not appear to be expressed in either control or regenerating corneas, but it is expressed in the lens. Additionally in the lens, we found expression of aldh1a1 and aldh1a2, but not aldh1a3. Using an inhibitor of CYP26, and separately using exogenous retinoids, as well as RA signaling inhibitors, we demonstrate that CYP26 activity is necessary for lens regeneration to occur. We also find using phosphorylated Histone H3 labeling that CYP26 antagonism reduces cell proliferation in the cornea, and using qPCR we find that exogenous retinoids alter the expression of putative corneal stem cell markers. Furthermore, the Xenopus cornea is composed of an outer layer and inner basal epithelium, as well as a

  10. High Dk piggyback contact lens system for contact lens-intolerant keratoconus patients.

    PubMed

    Sengor, Tomris; Kurna, Sevda Aydin; Aki, Suat; Ozkurt, Yelda

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the clinical success of high Dk (oxygen permeability) piggyback contact lens (PBCL) systems for the correction of contact lens intolerant keratoconus patients. Sixteen patients (29 eyes) who were not able to wear gas-permeable rigid lenses were included in this study. Hyper Dk silicone hydrogel (oxygen transmissibility or Dk/t = 150 units) and fluorosilicone methacrylate copolymer (Dk/t = 100 units) lenses were chosen as the PBCL systems. The clinical examinations included visual acuity and corneal observation by biomicroscopy, keratometer reading, and fluorescein staining before and after fitting the PBCL system. INDICATIONS FOR USING PBCL SYSTEM WERE: lens stabilization and comfort, improving comfort, and adding protection to the cone. Visual acuities increased significantly in all of the patients compared with spectacles (P = 0). Improvement in visual acuity compared with rigid lenses alone was recorded in 89.7% of eyes and no alteration of the visual acuity was observed in 10.3% of the eyes. Wearing time of PBCL systems for most of the patients was limited time (mean 6 months, range 3-12 months); thereafter they tolerated rigid lenses alone except for 2 patients. The PBCL system is a safe and effective method to provide centering and corneal protection against mechanical trauma by the rigid lenses for keratoconus patients and may increase contact lens tolerance.

  11. High Dk piggyback contact lens system for contact lens-intolerant keratoconus patients

    PubMed Central

    Sengor, Tomris; Kurna, Sevda Aydin; Aki, Suat; Özkurt, Yelda

    2011-01-01

    Background: The aim of the study was to examine the clinical success of high Dk (oxygen permeability) piggyback contact lens (PBCL) systems for the correction of contact lens intolerant keratoconus patients. Methods: Sixteen patients (29 eyes) who were not able to wear gas-permeable rigid lenses were included in this study. Hyper Dk silicone hydrogel (oxygen transmissibility or Dk/t = 150 units) and fluorosilicone methacrylate copolymer (Dk/t = 100 units) lenses were chosen as the PBCL systems. The clinical examinations included visual acuity and corneal observation by biomicroscopy, keratometer reading, and fluorescein staining before and after fitting the PBCL system. Results: Indications for using PBCL system were: lens stabilization and comfort, improving comfort, and adding protection to the cone. Visual acuities increased significantly in all of the patients compared with spectacles (P = 0). Improvement in visual acuity compared with rigid lenses alone was recorded in 89.7% of eyes and no alteration of the visual acuity was observed in 10.3% of the eyes. Wearing time of PBCL systems for most of the patients was limited time (mean 6 months, range 3–12 months); thereafter they tolerated rigid lenses alone except for 2 patients. Conclusion: The PBCL system is a safe and effective method to provide centering and corneal protection against mechanical trauma by the rigid lenses for keratoconus patients and may increase contact lens tolerance. PMID:21468342

  12. Canonical RTK-Ras-ERK signaling and related alternative pathways

    PubMed Central

    Sundaram, Meera V.

    2013-01-01

    Receptor Tyrosine Kinase (RTK)-Ras-Extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathways control many aspects of C. elegans development and behavior. Studies in C. elegans helped elucidate the basic framework of the RTK-Ras-ERK pathway and continue to provide insights into its complex regulation, its biological roles, how it elicits cell-type appropriate responses, and how it interacts with other signaling pathways to do so. C. elegans studies have also revealed biological contexts in which alternative RTK- or Ras-dependent pathways are used instead of the canonical pathway. PMID:23908058

  13. Dispersion-compensated fresnel lens

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Kenneth C.

    1992-01-01

    A transmission grating is used to reduce chromatic aberration in a Fresnel lens, wherein the lens chromatic dispersion is offset and substantially canceled by the grating's diffraction-induced dispersion. The grating comprises a Fresnel-type pattern of microscopic facets molded directly into the lens surface. The facets would typically have a profile height of around 4.multidot.10.sup.-5 inch and a profile width of at least 10.sup.-3 inch. In its primary intended application, the invention would function to improve the optical performance of a Fresnel lens used to concentrate direct sunlight.

  14. Dispersion-compensated Fresnel lens

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, K.C.

    1992-11-03

    A transmission grating is used to reduce chromatic aberration in a Fresnel lens, wherein the lens chromatic dispersion is offset and substantially canceled by the grating's diffraction-induced dispersion. The grating comprises a Fresnel-type pattern of microscopic facets molded directly into the lens surface. The facets would typically have a profile height of around 4[times]10[sup [minus]5] inch and a profile width of at least 10[sup [minus]3] inch. In its primary intended application, the invention would function to improve the optical performance of a Fresnel lens used to concentrate direct sunlight. 10 figs.

  15. Sensitivity of wild type and mutant ras alleles to Ras specific exchange factors: Identification of factor specific requirements.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, K H; Gredsted, L; Broach, J R; Willumsen, B M

    2001-04-19

    We have investigated the productive interaction between the four mammalian Ras proteins (H-, N-, KA- and KB-Ras) and their activators, the mammalian exchange factors mSos1, GRF1 and GRP, by using a modified Saccharomyces cerevisiae whose growth is dependent on activation of a mammalian Ras protein by its activator. All four mammalian Ras proteins were activated with similar efficiencies by the individual exchange factors. The H-Ras mutant V103E, which is competent for membrane localization, nucleotide binding, intrinsic and stimulated GTPase activity as well as intrinsic exchange, was defective for activation by all factors tested, suggesting that the integrity of this residue is necessary for catalyzed exchange. However, when other H-Ras mutants were studied, some distinct sensitivities to the exchange factors were observed. GRP-mediated, but not mSos1-mediated, exchange was blocked in additional mutants, suggesting different structural requirements for GRP. Analysis of Ras-mediated gene activation in murine fibroblasts confirmed these results.

  16. PGA1-induced apoptosis involves specific activation of H-Ras and N-Ras in cellular endomembranes

    PubMed Central

    Anta, B; Pérez-Rodríguez, A; Castro, J; García- Domínguez, C A; Ibiza, S; Martínez, N; Durá, L M; Hernández, S; Gragera, T; Peña-Jiménez, D; Yunta, M; Zarich, N; Crespo, P; Serrador, J M; Santos, E; Muñoz, A; Oliva, J L; Rojas-Cabañeros, J M

    2016-01-01

    The cyclopentenone prostaglandin A1 (PGA1) is an inducer of cell death in cancer cells. However, the mechanism that initiates this cytotoxic response remains elusive. Here we report that PGA1 triggers apoptosis by a process that entails the specific activation of H- and N-Ras isoforms, leading to caspase activation. Cells without H- and N-Ras did not undergo apoptosis upon PGA1 treatment; in these cells, the cellular demise was rescued by overexpression of either H-Ras or N-Ras. Consistently, the mutant H-Ras-C118S, defective for binding PGA1, did not produce cell death. Molecular analysis revealed a key role for the RAF-MEK-ERK signaling pathway in the apoptotic process through the induction of calpain activity and caspase-12 cleavage. We propose that PGA1 evokes a specific physiological cell death program, through H- and N-Ras, but not K-Ras, activation at endomembranes. Our results highlight a novel mechanism that may be of potential interest for tumor treatment. PMID:27468687

  17. PGA1-induced apoptosis involves specific activation of H-Ras and N-Ras in cellular endomembranes.

    PubMed

    Anta, B; Pérez-Rodríguez, A; Castro, J; García-Domínguez, C A; Ibiza, S; Martínez, N; Durá, L M; Hernández, S; Gragera, T; Peña-Jiménez, D; Yunta, M; Zarich, N; Crespo, P; Serrador, J M; Santos, E; Muñoz, A; Oliva, J L; Rojas-Cabañeros, J M

    2016-07-28

    The cyclopentenone prostaglandin A1 (PGA1) is an inducer of cell death in cancer cells. However, the mechanism that initiates this cytotoxic response remains elusive. Here we report that PGA1 triggers apoptosis by a process that entails the specific activation of H- and N-Ras isoforms, leading to caspase activation. Cells without H- and N-Ras did not undergo apoptosis upon PGA1 treatment; in these cells, the cellular demise was rescued by overexpression of either H-Ras or N-Ras. Consistently, the mutant H-Ras-C118S, defective for binding PGA1, did not produce cell death. Molecular analysis revealed a key role for the RAF-MEK-ERK signaling pathway in the apoptotic process through the induction of calpain activity and caspase-12 cleavage. We propose that PGA1 evokes a specific physiological cell death program, through H- and N-Ras, but not K-Ras, activation at endomembranes. Our results highlight a novel mechanism that may be of potential interest for tumor treatment.

  18. Dominant negative Ras attenuates pathological ventricular remodeling in pressure overload cardiac hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Kuri, Manuel; Rapti, Kleopatra; Mehel, Hind; Zhang, Shihong; Dhandapany, Perundurai S; Liang, Lifan; García-Carrancá, Alejandro; Bobe, Regis; Fischmeister, Rodolphe; Adnot, Serge; Lebeche, Djamel; Hajjar, Roger J; Lipskaia, Larissa; Chemaly, Elie R

    2015-11-01

    The importance of the oncogene Ras in cardiac hypertrophy is well appreciated. The hypertrophic effects of the constitutively active mutant Ras-Val12 are revealed by clinical syndromes due to the Ras mutations and experimental studies. We examined the possible anti-hypertrophic effect of Ras inhibition in vitro using rat neonatal cardiomyocytes (NRCM) and in vivo in the setting of pressure-overload left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy (POH) in rats. Ras functions were modulated via adenovirus directed gene transfer of active mutant Ras-Val12 or dominant negative mutant N17-DN-Ras (DN-Ras). Ras-Val12 expression in vitro activates NFAT resulting in pro-hypertrophic and cardio-toxic effects on NRCM beating and Z-line organization. In contrast, the DN-Ras was antihypertrophic on NRCM, inhibited NFAT and exerted cardio-protective effects attested by preserved NRCM beating and Z line structure. Additional experiments with silencing H-Ras gene strategy corroborated the antihypertrophic effects of siRNA-H-Ras on NRCM. In vivo, with the POH model, both Ras mutants were associated with similar hypertrophy two weeks after simultaneous induction of POH and Ras-mutant gene transfer. However, LV diameters were higher and LV fractional shortening lower in the Ras-Val12 group compared to control and DN-Ras. Moreover, DN-Ras reduced the cross-sectional area of cardiomyocytes in vivo, and decreased the expression of markers of pathologic cardiac hypertrophy. In isolated adult cardiomyocytes after 2 weeks of POH and Ras-mutant gene transfer, DN-Ras improved sarcomere shortening and calcium transients compared to Ras-Val12. Overall, DN-Ras promotes a more physiological form of hypertrophy, suggesting an interesting therapeutic target for pathological cardiac hypertrophy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Dominant negative Ras attenuates pathological ventricular remodeling in pressure overload cardiac hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Ramos-Kuri, Manuel; Rapti, Kleopatra; Mehel, Hind; Zhang, Shihong; Dhandapany, Perundurai S.; Liang, Lifan; García-Carrancá, Alejandro; Bobe, Regis; Fischmeister, Rodolphe; Adnot, Serge; Lebeche, Djamel; Hajjar, Roger J.; Lipskaia, Larissa; Chemaly, Elie R.

    2015-01-01

    The importance of the oncogene Ras in cardiac hypertrophy is well appreciated. The hypertrophic effects of the constitutively active mutant Ras-Val12 are revealed by clinical syndromes due to the Ras mutations and experimental studies. We examined the possible anti-hypertrophic effect of Ras inhibition in vitro using rat neonatal cardiomyocytes (NRCM) and in vivo in the setting of pressure-overload left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy (POH) in rats. Ras functions were modulated via adenovirus directed gene transfer of active mutant Ras-Val12 or dominant negative mutant N17-DN-Ras (DN-Ras). Ras-Val12 expression in vitro activates NFAT resulting in pro-hypertrophic and cardio-toxic effects on NRCM beating and Z-line organization. In contrast, the DN-Ras was antihypertrophic on NRCM, inhibited NFAT and exerted cardio-protective effects attested by preserved NRCM beating and Z line structure. Additional experiments with silencing H-Ras gene strategy corroborated the antihypertrophic effects of siRNA-H-Ras on NRCM. In vivo, with the POH model, both Ras mutants were associated with similar hypertrophy two weeks after simultaneous induction of POH and Ras-mutant gene transfer. However, LV diameters were higher and LV fractional shortening lower in the Ras-Val12 group compared to control and DN-Ras. Moreover, DN-Ras reduced the cross-sectional area of cardiomyocytes in vivo, and decreased the expression of markers of pathologic cardiac hypertrophy. In isolated adult cardiomyocytes after 2 weeks of POH and Ras-mutant gene transfer, DN-Ras improved sarcomere shortening and calcium transients compared to Ras-Val12. Overall, DN-Ras promotes a more physiological form of hypertrophy, suggesting an interesting therapeutic target for pathological cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:26260012

  20. Chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan is involved in lens vesicle morphogenesis in chick embryos.

    PubMed

    Gato, A; Martin, C; Alonso, M I; Martinez-Alvarez, C; Moro, J A

    2001-10-01

    Proteoglycans have been implicated in the invagination and formation of various embryonal cavitied primordia. In this paper the expression of chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan (CSPG) is analysed in the lens primordium during lens vesicle formation, and demonstrate that this proteoglycan has a specific distribution pattern with regard to invagination and fusion processes in the transformation of placode into lens vesicle. More specifically, CSPG was detected in: (1) the apical surface of lens epithelial cells, where early CSPG expression was observed in the whole of the lens placode whilst in the vesicle phase it was restricted to the posterior epithelium; (2) intense CSPG expression in the basal lamina, which remained constant for the entire period under study; (3) CSPG expression in the intercellular spaces of the lens primordium epithelium, which increased during the invagination of the primordium and which at the vesicle stage was more evident in the posterior epithelium; and (4) CSPG expression on the edges of the lens placode both prior to and during fusion. Treatment with beta- D -xyloside causes significant CSPG depletion in the lens primordium together with severe alterations in the invagination and fusion of the lens vesicle; this leads to the formation of lens primordia which in some cases remain practically flat or show partial invagination defects or fusion disruption. Similar results were obtained by enzyme digestion with chondroitinase AC but not with type II heparinase, which indicates that alterations induced by beta- D -xyloside were due to interference in CSPG synthesis. The findings demonstrate that CSPG is a common component of the lens primordium at the earliest developmental stages during which it undergoes specific modifications. It also includes experimental evidence to show that 'in vivo' CSPG plays an important role in the invagination and fusion processes of the lens primordium.

  1. Transcriptomic analysis of the role of RasGEF1B circular RNA in the TLR4/LPS pathway.

    PubMed

    Ng, Wei Lun; Marinov, Georgi K; Chin, Yoon-Ming; Lim, Yat-Yuen; Ea, Chee-Kwee

    2017-09-25

    Circular RNAs (circRNAs) have recently emerged as a large class of novel non-coding RNA species. However, the detailed functional significance of the vast majority of them remains to be elucidated. Most functional characterization studies targeting circRNAs have been limited to resting cells, leaving their role in dynamic cellular responses to stimuli largely unexplored. In this study, we focus on the LPS-induced cytoplasmic circRNA, mcircRasGEF1B, and combine targeted mcircRasGEF1B depletion with high-throughput transcriptomic analysis to gain insight into its function during the cellular response to LPS stimulation. We show that knockdown of mcircRasGEF1B results in altered expression of a wide array of genes. Pathway analysis revealed an overall enrichment of genes involved in cell cycle progression, mitotic division, active metabolism, and of particular interest, NF-κB, LPS signaling pathways, and macrophage activation. These findings expand the set of functionally characterized circRNAs and support the regulatory role of mcircRasGEF1B in immune response during macrophage activation and protection against microbial infections.

  2. Ras GTPase-activating protein gap1 of the homobasidiomycete Schizophyllum commune regulates hyphal growth orientation and sexual development.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Daniela; Raudaskoski, Marjatta; Knabe, Nicole; Kothe, Erika

    2006-04-01

    The white rot fungus Schizophyllum commune is used for the analysis of mating and sexual development in homobasidiomycete fungi. In this study, we isolated the gene gap1 encoding a GTPase-activating protein for Ras. Disruption of gap1 should therefore lead to strains accumulating Ras in its activated, GTP-bound state and to constitutive Ras signaling. Haploid Deltagap1 monokaryons of different mating types did not show alterations in mating behavior in the four different mating interactions possible in fungi expressing a tetrapolar mating type system. Instead, the growth rate in Deltagap1 monokaryons was reduced by ca. 25% and ca. 50% in homozygous Deltagap1/Deltagap1 dikaryons. Monokaryons, as well as homozygous dikaryons, carrying the disrupted gap1 alleles exhibited a disorientated growth pattern. Dikaryons showed a strong phenotype during clamp formation since hook cells failed to fuse with the peg beside them. Instead, the dikaryotic character of the hyphae was rescued by fusion of the hooks with nearby developing branches. Deltagap1/Deltagap1 dikaryons formed increased numbers of fruitbody primordia, whereas the amount of fruitbodies was not raised. Mature fruitbodies formed no or abnormal gills. No production of spores could be observed. The results suggest Ras involvement in growth, clamp formation, and fruitbody development.

  3. Lovastatin and perillyl alcohol inhibit glioma cell invasion, migration, and proliferation--impact of Ras-/Rho-prenylation.

    PubMed

    Afshordel, Sarah; Kern, Beatrice; Clasohm, Jasmin; König, Hildegard; Priester, Maike; Weissenberger, Jakob; Kögel, Donat; Eckert, Gunter P

    2015-01-01

    Alterations in small GTPase mediated signal transduction pathways have emerged as a central step in the molecular pathogenesis of glioblastoma (GBM), the most common malignant brain tumor in adults. Farnesylpyrophosphate (FPP) and geranylgeranylpyrophosphate (GGPP) are derived from mevalonate, whose production is catalyzed by 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA) reductase. Prenylation by FPP and GGPP is required for membrane insertion and oncogenic function of Ras- and Rho-proteins, within the stimulation of the Ras-Raf-MEK-ERK pathway. A straightforward prediction from HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor studies is that statins decrease FPP and GGPP levels and diminish ERK signaling ensuring less proliferation and migration of cancer cells. Perillyl alcohol (POH), a naturally occurring monoterpene inhibits prenyltransferases and is able to inhibit cancer cell growth, but the underlying mechanism is still unclear. We here report that lovastatin (LOV) and POH impair the regulation of the mevalonate- and the Ras-Raf-MEK-ERK pathway in U87 and U343 glioblastoma cells. Both compounds affected the post-translational modification of H-Ras and Rac1. While LOV diminished the substrates of the transferase reaction that catalyze prenylation, POH inhibited the enzymes itself. Our data highlight the impact of isoprenoids for post-translational modification of small GTPases promoting proliferation, migration and invasion capabilities in glioma cells.

  4. Photochemical Modulation of Ras-Mediated Signal Transduction using Caged Farnesyltransferase Inhibitors: Activation via One- and Two-Photon Excitation

    PubMed Central

    Abate-Pella, Daniel; Zeliadt, Nicholette A.; Ochocki, Joshua D.; Warmka, Janel K.; Dore, Timothy M.; Blank, David A.; Wattenberg, Elizabeth V.; Distefano, Mark D.

    2012-01-01

    The creation of caged molecules involves the attachment of protecting groups to biologically active compounds such as ligands, substrates, and drugs that can be removed under specific conditions. Photoremovable caging groups are the most common due to their ability to be removed with high spatial and temporal resolution. Here, the synthesis and photochemistry of a caged inhibitor of protein farnesyltransferase, Bhc-FTI, is described. The inhibitor was caged by alkylation of a critical thiol functional group with a Bhc moiety; while Bhc is well established as a protecting group for carboxylates and phosphates, it has not been extensively used to cage sulfhydryls. The resulting caged molecule, Bhc-FTI, can be photolyzed with UV light to release the inhibitor (FTI) that prevents Ras farnesylation, Ras membrane localization and downstream signaling. Finally, it is shown that Bhc-FTI can be uncaged by two-photon excitation to produce FTI at levels sufficient to inhibit Ras localization and alter cell morphology. Given the widespread involvement of Ras proteins in signal transduction pathways, this caged inhibitor should be useful in a plethora of studies. PMID:22492666

  5. Photochemical modulation of Ras-mediated signal transduction using caged farnesyltransferase inhibitors: activation by one- and two-photon excitation.

    PubMed

    Abate-Pella, Daniel; Zeliadt, Nicholette A; Ochocki, Joshua D; Warmka, Janel K; Dore, Timothy M; Blank, David A; Wattenberg, Elizabeth V; Distefano, Mark D

    2012-05-07

    The creation of caged molecules involves the attachment of protecting groups to biologically active compounds such as ligands, substrates and drugs that can be removed under specific conditions. Photoremovable caging groups are the most common due to their ability to be removed with high spatial and temporal resolution. Here, the synthesis and photochemistry of a caged inhibitor of protein farnesyltransferase is described. The inhibitor, FTI, was caged by alkylation of a critical thiol group with a bromohydroxycoumarin (Bhc) moiety. While Bhc is well established as a protecting group for carboxylates and phosphates, it has not been extensively used to cage sulfhydryl groups. The resulting caged molecule, Bhc-FTI, can be photolyzed with UV light to release the inhibitor that prevents Ras farnesylation, Ras membrane localization and downstream signaling. Finally, it is shown that Bhc-FTI can be uncaged by two-photon excitation to produce FTI at levels sufficient to inhibit Ras localization and alter cell morphology. Given the widespread involvement of Ras proteins in signal transduction pathways, this caged inhibitor should be useful in a plethora of studies.

  6. Lens of Eye Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Mallett, Michael Wesley

    2015-03-23

    An analysis of LANL occupational dose measurements was made with respect to lens of eye dose (LOE), in particular, for plutonium workers. Table 1 shows the reported LOE as a ratio of the “deep” (photon only) and “deep+neutron” dose for routine monitored workers at LANL for the past ten years. The data compares the mean and range of these values for plutonium workers* and non-routine plutonium workers. All doses were reported based on measurements with the LANL Model 8823 TLD.

  7. Diffractive Alvarez lens

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, Ian M.; Dixit, Sham N.; Summers, Leslie J.; Thompson, Charles A.; Avicola, Kenneth; Wilhelmsen, Julia

    2000-01-01

    A diffractive Alvarez lens is demonstrated that consists of two separate phase plates, each having complementary 16-level surface-relief profiles that contain cubic phase delays. Translation of these two components in the plane of the phase plates is shown to produce a variable astigmatic focus. Both spherical and cylindrical phase profiles are demonstrated with good accuracy, and the discrete surface-relief features are shown to cause less than {lambda}/10 wave-front aberration in the transmitted wave front over a 40 mmx80 mm region. (c) 2000 Optical Society of America.

  8. Overexpression of wild-type p21Ras plays a prominent role in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Shuang; Feng, Qiang; Pan, Xin-Yan; Zou, Hong; Chen, Hao-Bin; Wang, Peng; Zhou, Xin-Liang; Hong, Yan-Ling; Song, Shu-Ling; Yang, Ju-Lun

    2017-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the most common gastrointestinal type of cancer. The overexpression of Ras proteins, particularly p21Ras, are involved in the development of CRC. However, the subtypes of the p21Ras proteins that are overexpressed and the mutation status remain unknown restricting the development of therapeutic antibodies targeting p21Ras proteins. The present study aimed to investigate the mutation status of ras genes associated with Ras proteins that are overexpressed in CRC and explore whether or not wild-type p21Ras could be a target for CRC therapy. p21Ras expression was examined immunohistochemically in normal colorectal epithelium, benign lesions and malignant colorectal tumor tissues by monoclonal antibody (Mab) KGH-R1 which is able to react with three types of p21Ras proteins: H-p21Ras, N-p21Ras and K-p21Ras. Then, the expression levels of p21Ras subtypes were determined in CRC by a specific Mab for each p21Ras subtype. Mutation status of ras genes in p21Ras-overexpressing CRC was detected by DNA sequencing. There was rare p21Ras expression in normal colorectal epithelium but a high level of p21Ras expression in CRC, with a significant increase from normal colorectal epithelium to inflammatory polyps, low-grade intraepithelial neoplasia, high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia and invasive colorectal adenocarcinoma, respectively. Overexpression of K-p21Ras was found in all CRC tissues tested, overexpression of N-p21Ras was found in 85.7% of the CRC tissues, while H-p21Ras expression was not found in any CRC tissue. DNA sequencing showed that there were no K-ras mutations in 60% of the K-p21Ras-overexpressing CRC, while 40% of the CRC tissues harbored K-ras mutations. N-ras mutations were not found in any N-p21Ras-overexpressing CRC. Our findings indicate that overexpression of wild-type p21Ras may play a prominent role in the development of CRC in addition to ras mutations and could be a promising target for CRC therapy. PMID:28259994

  9. ras mutations and expression in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Yarbrough, W G; Shores, C; Witsell, D L; Weissler, M C; Fidler, M E; Gilmer, T M

    1994-11-01

    Mutational activation and overexpression of the family of ras proto-oncogenes have been associated with many human tumors. The role of mutations of H-ras, K-ras, and N-ras, as well as expression of the respective protein products (p21s) in normal mucosa, dysplastic mucosa, and squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) of the head and neck has not been fully described. In our study, 51 tumors (40 paraffin embedded and 11 fresh frozen) were examined to determine if mutational activation of ras is an important molecular event in head and neck SCC. Analyses of codons 12, 13, and 61 of H-ras, K-ras, and N-ras revealed no mutations, suggesting that mutational activation of ras is not important in the majority of head and neck SCCs. Immunocytochemistry (ICC) was used to define the expression of H-ras, K-ras, and N-ras in normal mucosa, dysplastic mucosa, and SCC of the head and neck and to determine if expression of ras family members correlated with early or late events in the development of SCC. Expression of p21N-ras in nine samples of histologically normal head and neck mucosa revealed moderate staining in the basal proliferative layers with progressively less staining as cells matured. The most superficial layers of normal mucosa failed to express p21N-ras. A low level of p21H-ras was expressed in all layers of normal mucosa while K-ras was not expressed. ICC of SCC tumor sections revealed cytoplasmic expression of N-ras in nine of nine tumors, H-ras in five of nine tumors, and K-ras in one of nine tumors. Expression of H-ras, K-ras, and N-ras in head and neck SCC was not related to histologic differentiation or TNM staging; however, p21N-ras was overexpressed in seven of nine tumors. Furthermore, the pattern of N-ras expression in dysplastic lesions revealed expression in all layers of the mucosa in contrast to normal mucosa, which expresses p21N-ras primarily in the basal proliferative layer. The change in p21N-ras expression pattern in dysplastic mucosa and its

  10. Elevated insulin signaling disrupts the growth and differentiation pattern of the mouse lens

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Leike; Chen, Huiyi; Overbeek, Paul A.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose Insulin and insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) are putative regulators of cell proliferation and differentiation during lens development. Transgenic mice that overexpress IGF-1 in the lens have been previously described. To further understand the ocular functions of this growth factor family, the in vivo effects of insulin expression on lens development were investigated using transgenic mice. Methods Expression of insulin receptor (IR) and IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R) in mouse lens was examined by reverse-transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and in situ hybridization. Transgenic mice that overexpress insulin in the lens were generated using two different promoters: a fiber-cell specific αA-crystallin (αA) promoter and a modified αA-promoter linked to the chicken δ1-crystallin enhancer (called the δenαA promoter). The δenαA promoter is active in both lens epithelial and fiber cells. The lens phenotypes were analyzed by histology and immunohistochemistry. Protein expression was examined by western blotting. Results Normal mouse lenses express both the insulin receptor (IR) and the IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R), and their expression is highest at the lens periphery where the germinative and transitional zones are located. In transgenic mice, insulin expression in the lens induced cataract formation. The severity of the cataracts reflected the level of transgene expression, independent of the type of promoter used. In severely affected families, the spherical shape of the lens was altered and the lenses were smaller than normal. Histological analysis showed no evidence of premature differentiation of the anterior epithelial cells. In contrast to the IGF-1 mice, insulin transgenic mice exhibited an anterior shift in the location of the germinative and transitional zones, leading to a reduction of the lens epithelial compartment. Additional alterations included expansion of the lens transitional zone, variable nuclear positioning in the lens bow region

  11. [Intraocular lens implantation in developmental lens disorders in children].

    PubMed

    Kanigowska, Krystyna; Grałek, Mirosława; Kepa, Beata; Chipczyńska, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    The pediatric cataract surgery in eyes with developmental disorders, stay with still considerable challenge. At children, the lasting vision development extorts necessity quick settlement of refraction defect formed after operation. The intraocular lens old boy with cataract in microspherophakia and 12 years old boy with cataract in lens with coloboma. One-piece flexible and rigid PMMA intraocular lens was placed with success at posterior chamber without scleral fixations and without using capsular tension ring in this cases. After 3 years of observation there were no decentration or dislocation of intraocular lens in both children. Authors concluded that in some cases posterior chamber intraocular lens implantation despite defective zonular or capsular support, can make up the effective method of surgical treatment without risk of early dislocation.

  12. From Ras to Rap and Back, a Journey of 35 Years.

    PubMed

    Bos, Johannes L

    2017-08-04

    Our laboratory has studied Ras and Ras-like proteins since the discovery of the Ras oncogene 35 years ago. In this review, I will give an account of what we have done in these 35 years and indicate the main papers that have guided our research. Our efforts started with the early analysis of mutant Ras in human tumors followed by deciphering of the role of Ras in signal transduction pathways. In an attempt to interfere in Ras signaling we turned to Rap proteins. These proteins are the closest relatives of Ras and were initially identified as Ras antagonists. However, our studies revealed that the Rap signaling network primarily is involved in spatiotemporal control of cell adhesion, in part through regulation of the actin cytoskeleton. More recently we returned to Ras, trying to interfere in Ras signaling by combinatorial drug testing using the organoid technology. Copyright © 2017 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  13. Identification and expression analysis of ras gene in silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Ogura, Takehiko; Tan, Anjiang; Tsubota, Takuya; Nakakura, Takayo; Shiotsuki, Takahiro

    2009-11-25

    Ras proteins play important roles in development especially for cell proliferation and differentiation in various organisms. However, their functions in the most insect species are still not clear. We identified three ras cDNAs from the silk worm, Bombyx mori. These sequences corresponded to three Ras of Drosophila melanogaster, but not to three mammalian Ras (H-Ras, K-Ras, N-Ras). Subsequently, the expression profiles of ras were investigated by quantitative real-time PCR using whole body of individuals from the embryonic to adult stages, and various tissues of 4th and 5th instar larvae. Each of three Bombyx ras showed different expression patterns. We also showed membrane localization of their products. These results indicate that the three Bombyx Ras are functional and have different roles.

  14. Chaperone-mediated specificity in Ras and Rap signaling.

    PubMed

    Azoulay-Alfaguter, Inbar; Strazza, Marianne; Mor, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Ras and Rap proteins are closely related small guanosine triphosphatase (GTPases) that share similar effector-binding domains but operate in a very different signaling networks; Ras has a dominant role in cell proliferation, while Rap mediates cell adhesion. Ras and Rap proteins are regulated by several shared processes such as post-translational modification, phosphorylation, activation by guanine exchange factors and inhibition by GTPase-activating proteins. Sub-cellular localization and trafficking of these proteins to and from the plasma membrane are additional important regulatory features that impact small GTPases function. Despite its importance, the trafficking mechanisms of Ras and Rap proteins are not completely understood. Chaperone proteins play a critical role in trafficking of GTPases and will be the focus of the discussion in this work. We will review several aspects of chaperone biology focusing on specificity toward particular members of the small GTPase family. Understanding this specificity should provide key insights into drug development targeting individual small GTPases.

  15. Women and the RAS: 100 years of Fellowship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Mandy

    2016-02-01

    In January 1916, the RAS elected its first women Fellows. Mandy Bailey looks back at the social and scientific circumstances of this step towards equality, introducing a year of articles celebrating the centenary.

  16. What makes Ras an efficient molecular switch: a computational, biophysical, and structural study of Ras-GDP interactions with mutants of Raf.

    PubMed

    Filchtinski, Daniel; Sharabi, Oz; Rüppel, Alma; Vetter, Ingrid R; Herrmann, Christian; Shifman, Julia M

    2010-06-11

    Ras is a small GTP-binding protein that is an essential molecular switch for a wide variety of signaling pathways including the control of cell proliferation, cell cycle progression and apoptosis. In the GTP-bound state, Ras can interact with its effectors, triggering various signaling cascades in the cell. In the GDP-bound state, Ras looses its ability to bind to known effectors. The interaction of the GTP-bound Ras (Ras(GTP)) with its effectors has been studied intensively. However, very little is known about the much weaker interaction between the GDP-bound Ras (Ras(GDP)) and Ras effectors. We investigated the factors underlying the nucleotide-dependent differences in Ras interactions with one of its effectors, Raf kinase. Using computational protein design, we generated mutants of the Ras-binding domain of Raf kinase (Raf) that stabilize the complex with Ras(GDP). Most of our designed mutations narrow the gap between the affinity of Raf for Ras(GTP) and Ras(GDP), producing the desired shift in binding specificity towards Ras(GDP). A combination of our best designed mutation, N71R, with another mutation, A85K, yielded a Raf mutant with a 100-fold improvement in affinity towards Ras(GDP). The Raf A85K and Raf N71R/A85K mutants were used to obtain the first high-resolution structures of Ras(GDP) bound to its effector. Surprisingly, these structures reveal that the loop on Ras previously termed the switch I region in the Ras(GDP).Raf mutant complex is found in a conformation similar to that of Ras(GTP) and not Ras(GDP). Moreover, the structures indicate an increased mobility of the switch I region. This greater flexibility compared to the same loop in Ras(GTP) is likely to explain the natural low affinity of Raf and other Ras effectors to Ras(GDP). Our findings demonstrate that an accurate balance between a rigid, high-affinity conformation and conformational flexibility is required to create an efficient and stringent molecular switch. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd

  17. Ras Homolog Enriched in Brain (Rheb) Enhances Apoptotic Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Karassek, Sascha; Berghaus, Carsten; Schwarten, Melanie; Goemans, Christoph G.; Ohse, Nadine; Kock, Gerd; Jockers, Katharina; Neumann, Sebastian; Gottfried, Sebastian; Herrmann, Christian; Heumann, Rolf; Stoll, Raphael

    2010-01-01

    Rheb is a homolog of Ras GTPase that regulates cell growth, proliferation, and regeneration via mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Because of the well established potential of activated Ras to promote survival, we sought to investigate the ability of Rheb signaling to phenocopy Ras. We found that overexpression of lipid-anchored Rheb enhanced the apoptotic effects induced by UV light, TNFα, or tunicamycin in an mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1)-dependent manner. Knocking down endogenous Rheb or applying rapamycin led to partial protection, identifying Rheb as a mediator of cell death. Ras and c-Raf kinase opposed the apoptotic effects induced by UV light or TNFα but did not prevent Rheb-mediated apoptosis. To gain structural insight into the signaling mechanisms, we determined the structure of Rheb-GDP by NMR. The complex adopts the typical canonical fold of RasGTPases and displays the characteristic GDP-dependent picosecond to nanosecond backbone dynamics of the switch I and switch II regions. NMR revealed Ras effector-like binding of activated Rheb to the c-Raf-Ras-binding domain (RBD), but the affinity was 1000-fold lower than the Ras/RBD interaction, suggesting a lack of functional interaction. shRNA-mediated knockdown of apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK-1) strongly reduced UV or TNFα-induced apoptosis and suppressed enhancement by Rheb overexpression. In conclusion, Rheb-mTOR activation not only promotes normal cell growth but also enhances apoptosis in response to diverse toxic stimuli via an ASK-1-mediated mechanism. Pharmacological regulation of the Rheb/mTORC1 pathway using rapamycin should take the presence of cellular stress into consideration, as this may have clinical implications. PMID:20685651

  18. Panoramic lens applications revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thibault, Simon

    2008-04-01

    During the last few years, innovative optical design strategies to generate and control image mapping have been successful in producing high-resolution digital imagers and projectors. This new generation of panoramic lenses includes catadioptric panoramic lenses, panoramic annular lenses, visible/IR fisheye lenses, anamorphic wide-angle attachments, and visible/IR panomorph lenses. Given that a wide-angle lens images a large field of view on a limited number of pixels, a systematic pixel-to-angle mapping will help the efficient use of each pixel in the field of view. In this paper, we present several modern applications of these modern types of hemispheric lenses. Recently, surveillance and security applications have been proposed and published in Security and Defence symposium. However, modern hemispheric lens can be used in many other fields. A panoramic imaging sensor contributes most to the perception of the world. Panoramic lenses are now ready to be deployed in many optical solutions. Covered applications include, but are not limited to medical imaging (endoscope, rigiscope, fiberscope...), remote sensing (pipe inspection, crime scene investigation, archeology...), multimedia (hemispheric projector, panoramic image...). Modern panoramic technologies allow simple and efficient digital image processing and the use of standard image analysis features (motion estimation, segmentation, object tracking, pattern recognition) in the complete 360° hemispheric area.

  19. A Reconfigurable Plasmofluidic Lens

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Chenglong; Liu, Yongmin; Zhao, Yanhui; Fang, Nicholas; Huang, Tony Jun

    2014-01-01

    Plasmonics provides an unparalleled method for manipulating light beyond the diffraction limit, making it a promising technology for the development of ultra-small, ultra-fast, power-efficient optical devices. To date, the majority of plasmonic devices are in the solid state and have limited tunability or configurability. Moreover, individual solid-state plasmonic devices lack the ability to deliver multiple functionalities. Here we utilize laser-induced surface bubbles on a metal film to demonstrate, for the first time, a plasmonic lens in a microfluidic environment. Our “plasmofluidic lens” device is dynamically tunable and reconfigurable. We record divergence, collimation, and focusing of surface plasmon polaritons using this device. The plasmofluidic lens requires no sophisticated nanofabrication and utilizes only a single low-cost diode laser. Our results show that the integration of plasmonics and microfluidics allows for new opportunities in developing complex plasmonic elements with multiple functionalities, high-sensitivity and high-throughput biomedical detection systems, as well as on-chip, all-optical information processing techniques. PMID:23929463

  20. Investigating RAS Signaling in Cancer | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    CPTAC expertise has been charged to develop RAS specific targeted proteomic assays to study the important pathways of human cancer. The oncogene RAS is linked to 30 percent of human cancers, but the search for a targeted therapy for RAS has remained elusive. To advance our understanding of this oncogene and to develop improved targeted therapies against RAS pathway, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) has launched a RAS Initiative.

  1. Crystalline lens and refractive development.

    PubMed

    Iribarren, Rafael

    2015-07-01

    Individual refractive errors usually change along lifespan. Most children are hyperopic in early life. This hyperopia is usually lost during growth years, leading to emmetropia in adults, but myopia also develops in children during school years or during early adult life. Those subjects who remain emmetropic are prone to have hyperopic shifts in middle life. And even later, at older ages, myopic shifts are developed with nuclear cataract. The eye grows from 15 mm in premature newborns to approximately 24 mm in early adult years, but, in most cases, refractions are maintained stable in a clustered distribution. This growth in axial length would represent a refractive change of more than 40 diopters, which is compensated by changes in corneal and lens powers. The process which maintains the balance between the ocular components of refraction during growth is still under study. As the lens power cannot be measured in vivo, but can only be calculated based on the other ocular components, there have not been many studies of lens power in humans. Yet, recent studies have confirmed that the lens loses power during growth in children, and that hyperopic and myopic shifts in adulthood may be also produced by changes in the lens. These studies in children and adults give a picture of the changing power of the lens along lifespan. Other recent studies about the growth of the lens and the complexity of its internal structure give clues about how these changes in lens power are produced along life.

  2. Ras, Raf, and MAP kinase in melanoma.

    PubMed

    Solus, Jason F; Kraft, Stefan

    2013-07-01

    A growing understanding of the biology and molecular mechanisms of melanoma has led to the identification of a number of driver mutations for this aggressive tumor. The most common mutations affect signaling of the Ras/Raf/MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) pathway. This review will focus on mutations in genes encoding proteins that play a role in the MAPK pathway and that have been implicated in melanoma biology, such as BRAF, NRAS, and MEK (MAPK kinase), and detail the current understanding of their role in melanoma progression from a molecular biology perspective. Furthermore, this review will also consider some additional mutations in genes such as KIT, GNAQ, and GNA11, which can be seen in certain subtypes of melanoma and whose gene products interact with the MAPK pathway. In addition, the association of these molecular changes with clinical and classical histopathologic characteristics of melanoma will be outlined and their role in diagnosis of melanocytic lesions discussed. Finally, a basic overview of the current targeted therapy landscape, as far as relevant to the pathologist, will be provided.

  3. Quantification of spatiotemporal patterns of Ras isoform expression during development

    PubMed Central

    Newlaczyl, Anna U.; Coulson, Judy M.; Prior, Ian A.

    2017-01-01

    Ras proteins are important signalling hubs frequently dysregulated in cancer and in a group of developmental disorders called Rasopathies. Three Ras genes encode four proteins that differentially contribute to these phenotypes. Using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) we have measured the gene expression profiles of each of the Ras isoforms in a panel of mouse tissues derived from a full developmental time course spanning embryogenesis through to adulthood. In most tissues and developmental stages we observe a relative contribution of KRas4B > > NRas ≥ KRas4A > HRas to total Ras expression with KRas4B typically representing 60–99% of all Ras transcripts. KRas4A is the most dynamically regulated Ras isoform with significant up-regulation of expression observed pre-term in stomach, intestine, kidney and heart. The expression patterns assist interpretation of the essential role of KRas in development and the preponderance of KRas mutations in cancer. PMID:28117393

  4. Ras and Rap signaling in synaptic plasticity and mental disorders.

    PubMed

    Stornetta, Ruth L; Zhu, J Julius

    2011-02-01

    The Ras family GTPases (Ras, Rap1, and Rap2) and their downstream mitogen-activated protein kinases (ERK, JNK, and p38MAPK) and PI3K signaling cascades control various physiological processes. In neuronal cells, recent studies have shown that these parallel cascades signal distinct forms of AMPA-sensitive glutamate receptor trafficking during experience-dependent synaptic plasticity and adaptive behavior. Interestingly, both hypo- and hyperactivation of Ras/ Rap signaling impair the capacity of synaptic plasticity, underscoring the importance of a "happy-medium" dynamic regulation of the signaling. Moreover, accumulating reports have linked various genetic defects that either up- or down-regulate Ras/Rap signaling with several mental disorders associated with learning disability (e.g., Alzheimer's disease, Angelman syndrome, autism, cardio-facio-cutaneous syndrome, Coffin-Lowry syndrome, Costello syndrome, Cowden and Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba syndromes, fragile X syndrome, neurofibromatosis type 1, Noonan syndrome, schizophrenia, tuberous sclerosis, and X-linked mental retardation), highlighting the necessity of happy-medium dynamic regulation of Ras/Rap signaling in learning behavior. Thus, the recent advances in understanding of neuronal Ras/Rap signaling provide a useful guide for developing novel treatments for mental diseases.

  5. PRG3 induces Ras-dependent oncogenic cooperation in gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Yakubov, Eduard; Chen, Daishi; Broggini, Thomas; Sehm, Tina; Majernik, Gökce Hatipoglu; Hock, Stefan W.; Schwarz, Marc; Engelhorn, Tobias; Doerfler, Arnd; Buchfelder, Michael; Eyupoglu, Ilker Y.; Savaskan, Nicolai E.

    2016-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are one of the most devastating cancers in humans. One characteristic hallmark of malignant gliomas is their cellular heterogeneity with frequent genetic lesions and disturbed gene expression levels conferring selective growth advantage. Here, we report on the neuronal-associated growth promoting gene PRG3 executing oncogenic cooperation in gliomas. We have identified perturbed PRG3 levels in human malignant brain tumors displaying either elevated or down-regulated PRG3 levels compared to non-transformed specimens. Further, imbalanced PRG3 levels in gliomas foster Ras-driven oncogenic amplification with increased proliferation and cell migration although angiogenesis was unaffected. Hence, PRG3 interacts with RasGEF1 (RasGRF1/CDC25), undergoes Ras-induced challenges, whereas deletion of the C-terminal domain of PRG3 (PRG3ΔCT) inhibits Ras. Moreover PRG3 silencing makes gliomas resistant to Ras inhibition. In vivo disequilibrated PRG3 gliomas show aggravated proliferation, invasion, and deteriorate clinical outcome. Thus, our data show that the interference with PRG3 homeostasis amplifies oncogenic properties and foster the malignancy potential in gliomas. PMID:27058420

  6. [Mouse models of K-ras-initiated oncogenesis].

    PubMed

    Barrière, C; Marjou, F El; Louvard, D; Robine, S

    2009-12-01

    Activating mutations of the oncogene K-ras are found in one third of all human cancers. Much of our knowledge on K-ras signal transduction and its influence on tumor initiation and progression come from in vitro studies with cell lines. However, mouse models of human cancer allow a much more faithful recapitulation of the human disease, and the in vivo perspective is crucial for our understanding of neoplasia. In recent years, several new murine models for K-ras-induced tumorigenesis have been described. They allow new insights into the specific role that oncogenic K-ras proteins play in different solid tumors, and they permit the molecular dissection of the pathways that are initiated by somatic mutations in subsets of cells. Key advances have been made by the use of tissue-specific and inducible control of expression, which is achieved by the Cre/loxP technology or the tetracycline system. From these sophisticated models, a common picture emerges: the effects of K-ras on tumor initiation depend strongly on the cellular context, and different tissues vary in their susceptibility to K-ras transformation.

  7. Azoxymethane induces KI-ras activation in the tumor resistant AKR/J mouse colon.

    PubMed

    Bolt, A B; Papanikolaou, A; Delker, D A; Wang, Q S; Rosenberg, D W

    2000-03-01

    A differential susceptibility phenotype to the organotropic colon carcinogen azoxymethane (AOM) has been described in mice. The following studies were undertaken to test the hypothesis that intraspecific susceptibility can be accounted for by the specific complement of genetic alterations acquired by precancerous colon lesions referred to as aberrant crypt foci (ACF). As an initial approach to this question, mutations in codons 12 and 13 of the Ki-ras proto-oncogene were assessed in ACF, normal-appearing AOM-treated colonic epithelium, and tumors from A/J and SWR/J (susceptible) as well as AKR/J (resistant) mice. Four-week-old male mice were injected intraperitonealy, with AOM once a week for a total of 6 wk and killed 4 and 24 wk after the last injection. DNA was isolated from microdissected tissue, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-amplified products of Ki-ras exon 1 (codons 12 and 13) were directly sequenced from microdissected tissues. At 4 wk after AOM exposure, there was no significant difference in the frequency of Ki-ras activation (20-33%) between the three strains. Ki-ras mRNA expression was also evaluated by reverse transcription (RT)-PCR analysis and was comparably reduced (40-50%) in all three strains at the 4 wk time point. However, Ki-ras expression returned to normal by 24 wk after treatment. Finally, to gain further insight into the molecular pathogenesis underlying this experimental tumor model, analysis of the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) protein within the colonic epithelium was undertaken by using an immunohistochemical approach. Although the APC protein was lost to a varying extent in tumors from A/J and SWR/J mice, the full-length form of the protein was still present in precancerous ACF isolated from each of the three strains, regardless of the degree of dysplasia of the lesion. A further molecular genetic analyses of ACF will be required to gain a more complete understanding of the molecular basis of tumor susceptibility phenotype in

  8. Yeast screens for inhibitors of Ras-Raf interaction and characterization of MCP inhibitors of Ras-Raf interaction.

    PubMed

    Khazak, Vladimir; Kato-Stankiewicz, Juran; Tamanoi, Fuyu; Golemis, Erica A

    2006-01-01

    Because of the central role of Ras in cancer cell signaling, there has been considerable interest in developing small molecule inhibitors of the Ras signaling pathways as potential chemotherapeutic agents. This chapter describes the use of a two-hybrid approach to identify the MCP compounds, small molecules that disrupt the interaction between Ras and its effector Raf. We first outline the reagent development and selection/counter selection methods required to successfully apply a two-hybrid approach to isolation of MCP compounds. Separately, we describe the collateral benefits of this screening approach in yielding novel antifungal compounds. We then discuss secondary physiological validation approaches to confirm the MCP compounds specifically target Ras-Raf signaling. Finally, we develop a decision tree for subsequent preclinical characterization and optimization of this class of pathway-targeted reagent.

  9. Characterization of c-Ki-ras and N-ras oncogenes in aflatoxin B sub 1 -induced rat liver tumors

    SciTech Connect

    McMahon, G.; Davis, E.F.; Huber, L.J.; Kim, Youngsoo; Wogan, G.N. )

    1990-02-01

    c-Ki-ras and N-ras oncogenes have been characterized in aflatoxin B{sub 1}-induced hepatocellular carcinomas. Detection of different protooncogene and oncogene sequences and estimation of their frequency distribution were accomplished by polymerase chain reaction, cloning, and plaque screening methods. Two c-Ki-ras oncogene sequences were identified in DNA from liver tumors that contained nucleotide changes absent in DNA from livers of untreated control rats. Sequence changes involving G{center dot}C to T{center dot}A or G{center dot}C to A{center dot}T nucleotide substitutions in codon 12 were scored in three of eight tumor-bearing animals. Distributions of c-Ki-ras sequences in tumors and normal liver DNA indicated that the observed nucleotide changes were consistent with those expected to result from direct mutagenesis of the germ-line protooncogene by aflatoxin B{sub 1}. N-ras oncogene sequences were identified in DNA from two of eight tumors. Three N-ras gene regions were identified, one of which was shown to be associated with an oncogene containing a putative activating amino acid residing at codon 13. All three N-ras sequences, including the region detected in N-ras oncogenes, were present at similar frequencies in DNA samples from control livers as well as liver tumors. The presence of a potential germ-line oncogene may be related to the sensitivity of the Fischer rat strain to liver carcinogenesis by aflatoxin B{sub 1} and other chemical carcinogens.

  10. Association of yeast adenylyl cyclase with cyclase-associated protein CAP forms a second Ras-binding site which mediates its Ras-dependent activation.

    PubMed

    Shima, F; Okada, T; Kido, M; Sen, H; Tanaka, Y; Tamada, M; Hu, C D; Yamawaki-Kataoka, Y; Kariya, K; Kataoka, T

    2000-01-01

    Posttranslational modification, in particular farnesylation, of Ras is crucial for activation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae adenylyl cyclase (CYR1). Based on the previous observation that association of CYR1 with cyclase-associated protein (CAP) is essential for its activation by posttranslationally modified Ras, we postulated that the associated CAP might contribute to the formation of a Ras-binding site of CYR1, which mediates CYR1 activation, other than the primary Ras-binding site, the leucine-rich repeat domain. Here, we observed a posttranslational modification-dependent association of Ras with a complex between CAP and CYR1 C-terminal region. When CAP mutants defective in Ras signaling but retaining the CYR1-binding activity were isolated by screening of a pool of randomly mutagenized CAP, CYR1 complexed with two of the obtained three mutants failed to be activated efficiently by modified Ras and exhibited a severely impaired ability to bind Ras, providing a genetic evidence for the importance of the physical association with Ras at the second Ras-binding site. On the other hand, CYR1, complexed with the other CAP mutant, failed to be activated by Ras but exhibited a greatly enhanced binding to Ras. Conversely, a Ras mutant E31K, which exhibits a greatly enhanced binding to the CYR1-CAP complex, failed to activate CYR1 efficiently. Thus, the strength of interaction at the second Ras-binding site appears to be a critical determinant of CYR1 regulation by Ras: too-weak and too-strong interactions are both detrimental to CYR1 activation. These results, taken together with those obtained with mammalian Raf, suggest the importance of the second Ras-binding site in effector regulation.

  11. Gene expression studies demonstrate that the K-ras/Erk MAP kinase signal transduction pathway and other novel pathways contribute to the pathogenesis of cumene-induced lung tumors.

    PubMed

    Wakamatsu, Nobuko; Collins, Jennifer B; Parker, Joel S; Tessema, Mathewos; Clayton, Natasha P; Ton, Thai-Vu T; Hong, Hue-Hua L; Belinsky, Steven; Devereux, Theodora R; Sills, Robert C; Lahousse, Stephanie A

    2008-07-01

    National Toxicology Program (NTP) inhalation studies demonstrated that cumene significantly increased the incidence of alveolar/bronchiolar adenomas and carcinomas in B6C3F1 mice. Cumene or isopropylbenzene is a component of crude oil used primarily in the production of phenol and acetone. The authors performed global gene expression analysis to distinguish patterns of gene regulation between cumene-induced tumors and normal lung tissue and to look for patterns based on the presence or absence of K-ras and p53 mutations in the tumors. Principal component analysis segregated the carcinomas into groups with and without K-ras mutations, but failed to separate the tumors based on p53 mutation status. Expression of genes associated with the Erk MAP kinase signaling pathway was significantly altered in carcinomas with K-ras mutations compared to tumors without K-ras mutations or normal lung. Gene expression analysis also suggested that cumene-induced carcinomas with K-ras mutations have greater malignant potential than those without mutations. In addition, significance analysis of function and expression (SAFE) demonstrated expression changes of genes regulated by histone modification in carcinomas with K-ras mutations. The gene expression analysis suggested the formation of alveolar/bronchiolar carcinomas in cumene-exposed mice typically involves mutation of K-ras, which results in increased Erk MAP kinase signaling and modification of histones.

  12. Mice Lacking Ras-GRF1 Show Contextual Fear Conditioning but not Spatial Memory Impairments: Convergent Evidence from Two Independently Generated Mouse Mutant Lines

    PubMed Central

    d’Isa, Raffaele; Clapcote, Steven J.; Voikar, Vootele; Wolfer, David P.; Giese, Karl Peter; Brambilla, Riccardo; Fasano, Stefania

    2011-01-01

    Ras-GRF1 is a neuronal specific guanine exchange factor that, once activated by both ionotropic and metabotropic neurotransmitter receptors, can stimulate Ras proteins, leading to long-term phosphorylation of downstream signaling. The two available reports on the behavior of two independently generated Ras-GRF1 deficient mouse lines provide contrasting evidence on the role of Ras-GRF1 in spatial memory and contextual fear conditioning. These discrepancies may be due to the distinct alterations introduced in the mouse genome by gene targeting in the two lines that could differentially affect expression of nearby genes located in the imprinted region containing the Ras-grf1 locus. In order to determine the real contribution of Ras-GRF1 to spatial memory we compared in Morris Water Maze learning Brambilla’s mice with a third mouse line (GENA53) in which a non-sense mutation was introduced in the Ras-GRF1 coding region without additional changes in the genome and we found that memory in this task is normal. Also, we measured both contextual and cued fear conditioning, which were previously reported to be affected in Brambilla’s mice, and we confirmed that contextual learning but not cued conditioning is impaired in both mouse lines. In addition, we also tested both lines for the first time in conditioned place aversion in the Intellicage, an ecological and remotely controlled behavioral test, and we observed normal learning. Finally, based on previous reports of other mutant lines suggesting that Ras-GRF1 may control body weight, we also measured this non-cognitive phenotype and we confirmed that both Ras-GRF1 deficient mutants are smaller than their control littermates. In conclusion, we demonstrate that Ras-GRF1 has no unique role in spatial memory while its function in contextual fear conditioning is likely to be due not only to its involvement in amygdala functions but possibly to some distinct hippocampal connections specific to contextual learning. PMID

  13. Human iPS Cell-Derived Neurons Uncover the Impact of Increased Ras Signaling in Costello Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rooney, Gemma E.; Goodwin, Alice F.; Depeille, Philippe; Sharir, Amnon; Schofield, Claude M.; Yeh, Erika; Roose, Jeroen P.; Klein, Ophir D.; Rauen, Katherine A.; Weiss, Lauren A.

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence implicates abnormal Ras signaling as a major contributor in neurodevelopmental disorders, yet how such signaling causes cortical pathogenesis is unknown. We examined the consequences of aberrant Ras signaling in the developing mouse brain and uncovered several critical phenotypes, including increased production of cortical neurons and morphological deficits. To determine whether these phenotypes are recapitulated in humans, we generated induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell lines from patients with Costello syndrome (CS), a developmental disorder caused by abnormal Ras signaling and characterized by neurodevelopmental abnormalities, such as cognitive impairment and autism. Directed differentiation toward a neuroectodermal fate revealed an extended progenitor phase and subsequent increased production of cortical neurons. Morphological analysis of mature neurons revealed significantly altered neurite length and soma size in CS patients. This study demonstrates the synergy between mouse and human models and validates the use of iPS cells as a platform to study the underlying cellular pathologies resulting from signaling deficits. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Increasing evidence implicates Ras signaling dysfunction as a major contributor in psychiatric and neurodevelopmental disorders, such as cognitive impairment and autism, but the underlying cortical cellular pathogenesis remains unclear. This study is the first to reveal human neuronal pathogenesis resulting from abnormal Ras signaling and provides insights into how these phenotypic abnormalities likely contribute to neurodevelopmental disorders. We also demonstrate the synergy between mouse and human models, thereby validating the use of iPS cells as a platform to study underlying cellular pathologies resulting from signaling deficits. Recapitulating human cellular pathologies in vitro facilitates the future high throughput screening of potential therapeutic agents that may reverse phenotypic and

  14. Gain-of-Function Mutations in RIT1 Cause Noonan Syndrome, a RAS/MAPK Pathway Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Aoki, Yoko; Niihori, Tetsuya; Banjo, Toshihiro; Okamoto, Nobuhiko; Mizuno, Seiji; Kurosawa, Kenji; Ogata, Tsutomu; Takada, Fumio; Yano, Michihiro; Ando, Toru; Hoshika, Tadataka; Barnett, Christopher; Ohashi, Hirofumi; Kawame, Hiroshi; Hasegawa, Tomonobu; Okutani, Takahiro; Nagashima, Tatsuo; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Funayama, Ryo; Nagashima, Takeshi; Nakayama, Keiko; Inoue, Shin-ichi; Watanabe, Yusuke; Ogura, Toshihiko; Matsubara, Yoichi

    2013-01-01

    RAS GTPases mediate a wide variety of cellular functions, including cell proliferation, survival, and differentiation. Recent studies have revealed that germline mutations and mosaicism for classical RAS mutations, including those in HRAS, KRAS, and NRAS, cause a wide spectrum of genetic disorders. These include Noonan syndrome and related disorders (RAS/mitogen-activated protein kinase [RAS/MAPK] pathway syndromes, or RASopathies), nevus sebaceous, and Schimmelpenning syndrome. In the present study, we identified a total of nine missense, nonsynonymous mutations in RIT1, encoding a member of the RAS subfamily, in 17 of 180 individuals (9%) with Noonan syndrome or a related condition but with no detectable mutations in known Noonan-related genes. Clinical manifestations in the RIT1-mutation-positive individuals are consistent with those of Noonan syndrome, which is characterized by distinctive facial features, short stature, and congenital heart defects. Seventy percent of mutation-positive individuals presented with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy; this frequency is high relative to the overall 20% incidence in individuals with Noonan syndrome. Luciferase assays in NIH 3T3 cells showed that five RIT1 alterations identified in children with Noonan syndrome enhanced ELK1 transactivation. The introduction of mRNAs of mutant RIT1 into 1-cell-stage zebrafish embryos was found to result in a significant increase of embryos with craniofacial abnormalities, incomplete looping, a hypoplastic chamber in the heart, and an elongated yolk sac. These results demonstrate that gain-of-function mutations in RIT1 cause Noonan syndrome and show a similar biological effect to mutations in other RASopathy-related genes. PMID:23791108

  15. Novel peptides from the RAS-p21 and p53 proteins for the treatment of cancer.

    PubMed

    Bowne, Wilbur B; Michl, Josef; Bluth, Martin H; Zenilman, Michael E; Pincus, Matthew R

    2007-01-01

    We have employed a novel computer-based molecular modeling method to design peptides from the ras-p21 and p53 proteins that block proliferation of cancer cells. The rationale of our approach is to identify peptide domains from each protein that alter conformation in response to oncogenic amino acid substitutions in their polypeptide chain. We accomplish this by first generating and comparing low energy average structures for oncogenic and wild-type proteins using conformational energy calculations. Peptides are then synthesized corresponding to these domains. These domains are then linked to a trans-membrane-penetrating sequence (called penetratin) and tested against cancer and untransformed cell lines. Remarkably, we have found that two ras-p21 peptides, 35-47 and 96-110, called PNC-7 and PNC-2, respectively, can induce phenotypic reversion of ras-transformed TUC-3 pancreatic cancer cells and ras-transformed HT1080 human fibrosarcoma cells to their untransformed phenotypes. Moreover, both peptides were found to be cytotoxic to ras-transformed human MIA-PaCa-2 pancreatic carcinoma cells and human U-251 astrocytoma cells. Importantly, these peptides have no effect on the growth of their normal cellular counterparts. We have also synthesized peptides from the p53 protein corresponding to its hdm-2-binding domain sequences (residues 12-26), also linked to the penetratin sequence. Surprisingly, we have found that these peptides induce 100 percent tumor cell necrosis, not apoptosis, in 13 different human cancer cell lines but have no effect on normal pancreatic acinar cells, breast epithelial cells, and human stem cells. Moreover, these peptides are cytotoxic to TUC-3 pancreatic tumor cells in nude mice plus eradicate these tumor cells when administered at sites near these tumors. These novel peptides appear to hold much promise as new, non-toxic anti-cancer agents.

  16. Gain-of-function mutations in RIT1 cause Noonan syndrome, a RAS/MAPK pathway syndrome.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Yoko; Niihori, Tetsuya; Banjo, Toshihiro; Okamoto, Nobuhiko; Mizuno, Seiji; Kurosawa, Kenji; Ogata, Tsutomu; Takada, Fumio; Yano, Michihiro; Ando, Toru; Hoshika, Tadataka; Barnett, Christopher; Ohashi, Hirofumi; Kawame, Hiroshi; Hasegawa, Tomonobu; Okutani, Takahiro; Nagashima, Tatsuo; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Funayama, Ryo; Nagashima, Takeshi; Nakayama, Keiko; Inoue, Shin-Ichi; Watanabe, Yusuke; Ogura, Toshihiko; Matsubara, Yoichi

    2013-07-11

    RAS GTPases mediate a wide variety of cellular functions, including cell proliferation, survival, and differentiation. Recent studies have revealed that germline mutations and mosaicism for classical RAS mutations, including those in HRAS, KRAS, and NRAS, cause a wide spectrum of genetic disorders. These include Noonan syndrome and related disorders (RAS/mitogen-activated protein kinase [RAS/MAPK] pathway syndromes, or RASopathies), nevus sebaceous, and Schimmelpenning syndrome. In the present study, we identified a total of nine missense, nonsynonymous mutations in RIT1, encoding a member of the RAS subfamily, in 17 of 180 individuals (9%) with Noonan syndrome or a related condition but with no detectable mutations in known Noonan-related genes. Clinical manifestations in the RIT1-mutation-positive individuals are consistent with those of Noonan syndrome, which is characterized by distinctive facial features, short stature, and congenital heart defects. Seventy percent of mutation-positive individuals presented with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy; this frequency is high relative to the overall 20% incidence in individuals with Noonan syndrome. Luciferase assays in NIH 3T3 cells showed that five RIT1 alterations identified in children with Noonan syndrome enhanced ELK1 transactivation. The introduction of mRNAs of mutant RIT1 into 1-cell-stage zebrafish embryos was found to result in a significant increase of embryos with craniofacial abnormalities, incomplete looping, a hypoplastic chamber in the heart, and an elongated yolk sac. These results demonstrate that gain-of-function mutations in RIT1 cause Noonan syndrome and show a similar biological effect to mutations in other RASopathy-related genes.

  17. KLF4 regulates adult lung tumor-initiating cells and represses K-Ras-mediated lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Yu, T; Chen, X; Zhang, W; Liu, J; Avdiushko, R; Napier, D L; Liu, A X; Neltner, J M; Wang, C; Cohen, D; Liu, C

    2016-02-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality in both men and women worldwide. To identify novel factors that contribute to lung cancer pathogenesis, we analyzed a lung cancer database from The Cancer Genome Atlas and found that Krüppel-like Factor 4 (KLF4) expression is significantly lower in patients' lung cancer tissue than in normal lung tissue. In addition, we identified seven missense mutations in the KLF4 gene. KLF4 is a transcription factor that regulates cell proliferation and differentiation as well as the self-renewal of stem cells. To understand the role of KLF4 in the lung, we generated a tamoxifen-induced Klf4 knockout mouse model. We found that KLF4 inhibits lung cancer cell growth and that depletion of Klf4 altered the differentiation pattern in the developing lung. To understand how KLF4 functions during lung tumorigenesis, we generated the K-ras(LSL-G12D/+);Klf4(fl/fl) mouse model, and we used adenovirus-expressed Cre to induce K-ras activation and Klf4 depletion in the lung. Although Klf4 deletion alone or K-ras mutation alone can trigger lung tumor formation, Klf4 deletion combined with K-ras mutation significantly enhanced lung tumor formation. We also found that Klf4 deletion in conjunction with K-ras activation caused lung inflammation. To understand the mechanism whereby KLF4 is regulated during lung tumorigenesis, we analyzed KLF4 promoter methylation and the profiles of epigenetic factors. We found that Class I histone deacetylases (HDACs) are overexpressed in lung cancer and that HDAC inhibitors induced expression of KLF4 and inhibited proliferation of lung cancer cells, suggesting that KLF4 is probably repressed by histone acetylation and that HDACs are valuable drug targets for lung cancer treatment.

  18. The developmental pattern of the RAS/RAF/Erk1/2 pathway in the BTBR autism mouse model.

    PubMed

    Yin, Ailan; Qiu, Yuwen; Jia, Bei; Song, Tianrong; Yu, Yanhong; Alberts, Ian; Zhong, Mei

    2014-12-01

    BTBR mice exhibit several autistic-like behaviors and are currently used as a model for understanding mechanisms that may be responsible for the pathogenesis of autism. Ras/Raf/ERK1/2 signaling has been suggested to play an important role in neural development, learning, memory, and cognition. Two studies reported that a deletion of a locus on chromosome 16 containing the mitogen-activated protein kinase 3 (MAPK3) gene, which encodes ERK1, is associated with autism. In the present study, Ras/Raf/ERK1/2 signaling was found to be up-regulated in BTBR mice relative to matched control B6 mice, to further suggest involvement in the pathogenesis of autism. To further characterize the developmental pattern of Ras/Raf/ERK1/2 signaling, varying stages during development were sampled to reveal an up-regulation in newborn and 2-week old BTBR mice relative to age-matched B6 mice. By the age of 3-week, Ras/Raf/ERK1/2 signaling in the brain of BTBR mice was unaltered relative to B6 mice, with this trend maintained in 6-week samples. These results suggest that the alteration of Ras/Raf/ERK signaling in the early developmental stages in mice could contribute to the noted autistic phenotype. Furthermore, these findings support the value of BTBR mice to serve as a human analog for autistic etiological research and aid in a better understanding of the developmental mechanisms of autism. Copyright © 2014 ISDN. All rights reserved.

  19. Wedged multilayer Laue Lens.

    SciTech Connect

    Conley, R.; Liu, C.; Qian, J.; Kewish, C. M.; Macrander, A. T.; Yan, H.; Kang, H. C.; Maser, J.; Stephenson, G. B.

    2008-05-01

    A multilayer Laue lens (MLL) is an x-ray focusing optic fabricated from a multilayer structure consisting of thousands of layers of two different materials produced by thin-film deposition. The sequence of layer thicknesses is controlled to satisfy the Fresnel zone plate law and the multilayer is sectioned to form the optic. An improved MLL geometry can be created by growing each layer with an in-plane thickness gradient to form a wedge, so that every interface makes the correct angle with the incident beam for symmetric Bragg diffraction. The ultimate hard x-ray focusing performance of a wedged MLL has been predicted to be significantly better than that of a nonwedged MLL, giving subnanometer resolution with high efficiency. Here, we describe a method to deposit the multilayer structure needed for an ideal wedged MLL and report our initial deposition results to produce these structures.

  20. Clinicopathologic characteristics and gene expression analyses of non-KRAS 12/13, RAS-mutated metastatic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Morris, V K; Lucas, F A San; Overman, M J; Eng, C; Morelli, M P; Jiang, Z-Q; Luthra, R; Meric-Bernstam, F; Maru, D; Scheet, P; Kopetz, S; Vilar, E

    2014-10-01

    KRAS mutations in codons 12 and 13 are present in ∼40% of all colorectal cancers (CRC). Activating mutations in codons 61 and 146 of KRAS and in codons 12, 13, and 61 of NRAS also occur but are less frequent. The clinicopathologic features and gene expression profiles of this latter subpopulation of RAS-mutant colorectal tumors have not yet been clearly defined but in general are treated similarly to those with KRAS 12 or 13 mutations. Records of patients with metastatic CRC (mCRC) treated at MD Anderson Cancer Center between December 2000 and August 2012 were reviewed for RAS (KRAS or NRAS) and BRAF mutation status, clinical characteristics, and survival outcomes. To study further with an independent cohort, data from The Cancer Genome Atlas were analyzed to define a gene expression signature for patients whose tumors feature these atypical RAS mutations and explore differences with KRAS 12/13-mutated colorectal tumors. Among the 484 patients reviewed, KRAS 12/13, KRAS 61/146, NRAS, and BRAF mutations were detected in 47.7%, 3.0%, 4.1%, and 7.4%, respectively, of patients who were tested for each of these aberrations. Lung metastases were more common in both the KRAS 12/13-mutated and atypical RAS-mutated cohorts relative to patients with RAS/BRAF wild-type tumors. Gene expression analyses revealed similar patterns regardless of the site of RAS mutation, and in silico functional algorithms predicted that KRAS and NRAS mutations in codons 12, 13, 61, and 146 alter the protein function and drive tumorgenesis. Clinicopathologic characteristics, survival outcomes, functional impact, and gene expression profiling were similar between patients with KRAS 12/13 and those with NRAS or KRAS 61/146-mutated mCRC. These clinical and bioinformatic findings support the notion that colorectal tumors driven by these RAS mutations are phenotypically similar. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology. All rights

  1. Activation of mutant TERT promoter by RAS-ERK signaling is a key step in malignant progression of BRAF-mutant human melanomas

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yinghui; Cheng, Hui Shan; Chng, Wee Joo; Tergaonkar, Vinay

    2016-01-01

    Although activating BRAF/NRAS mutations are frequently seen in melanomas, they are not sufficient to drive malignant transformation and require additional events. Frequent co-occurrence of mutations in the promoter for telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT), along with BRAF alterations, has recently been noted and correlated with poorer prognosis, implicating a functional link between BRAF signaling and telomerase reactivation in melanomas. Here, we report that RAS-ERK signaling in BRAF mutant melanomas is critical for regulating active chromatin state and recruitment of RNA polymerase II at mutant TERT promoters. Our study provides evidence that the mutant TERT promoter is a key substrate downstream of the RAS-ERK pathway. Reactivating TERT and hence reconstituting telomerase is an important step in melanoma progression from nonmalignant nevi with BRAF mutations. Hence, combined targeting of RAS-ERK and TERT promoter remodeling is a promising avenue to limit long-term survival of a majority of melanomas that harbor these two mutations. PMID:27911794

  2. Activation of mutant TERT promoter by RAS-ERK signaling is a key step in malignant progression of BRAF-mutant human melanomas.

    PubMed

    Li, Yinghui; Cheng, Hui Shan; Chng, Wee Joo; Tergaonkar, Vinay

    2016-12-13

    Although activating BRAF/NRAS mutations are frequently seen in melanomas, they are not sufficient to drive malignant transformation and require additional events. Frequent co-occurrence of mutations in the promoter for telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT), along with BRAF alterations, has recently been noted and correlated with poorer prognosis, implicating a functional link between BRAF signaling and telomerase reactivation in melanomas. Here, we report that RAS-ERK signaling in BRAF mutant melanomas is critical for regulating active chromatin state and recruitment of RNA polymerase II at mutant TERT promoters. Our study provides evidence that the mutant TERT promoter is a key substrate downstream of the RAS-ERK pathway. Reactivating TERT and hence reconstituting telomerase is an important step in melanoma progression from nonmalignant nevi with BRAF mutations. Hence, combined targeting of RAS-ERK and TERT promoter remodeling is a promising avenue to limit long-term survival of a majority of melanomas that harbor these two mutations.

  3. The Significance of Ras Activity in Pancreatic Cancer Initiation

    PubMed Central

    Logsdon, Craig D.; Lu, Weiqin

    2016-01-01

    The genetic landscape of pancreatic cancer shows nearly ubiquitous mutations of K-RAS. However, oncogenic K-Rasmt alone is not sufficient to lead to pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) in either human or in genetically modified adult mouse models. Many stimulants, such as high fat diet, CCK, LPS, PGE2 and others, have physiological effects at low concentrations that are mediated in part through modest increases in K-Ras activity. However, at high concentrations, they induce inflammation that, in the presence of oncogenic K-Ras expression, substantially accelerates PDAC formation. The mechanism involves increased activity of oncogenic K-Rasmt. Unlike what has been proposed in the standard paradigm for the role of Ras in oncogenesis, oncogenic K-Rasmt is now known to not be constitutively active. Rather, it can be activated by standard mechanisms similar to wild-type K-Ras, but its activity is sustained for a prolonged period. Furthermore, if the level of K-Ras activity exceeds a threshold at which it begins to generate its own activators, then a feed-forward loop is formed between K-Ras activity and inflammation and pathological processes including oncogenesis are initiated. Oncogenic K-Rasmt activation, a key event in PDAC initiation and development, is subject to complex regulatory mechanisms. Reagents which inhibit inflammation, such as the Cox2 inhibitor celecoxib, block the feed-forward loop and prevent induction of PDAC in models with endogenous oncogenic K-Rasmt. Increased understanding of the role of activating and inhibitory mechanisms on oncogenic K-Rasmt activity is of paramount importance for the development of preventive and therapeutic strategies to fight against this lethal disease. PMID:26929740

  4. Renewing the conspiracy theory debate: does Raf function alone to mediate Ras oncogenesis?

    PubMed

    Repasky, Gretchen A; Chenette, Emily J; Der, Channing J

    2004-11-01

    Ras proteins function as signal transducers and are mutationally activated in many human cancers. In 1993, Raf was identified as a key downstream effector of Ras signaling, and it was believed then that the primary function of Ras was simply to facilitate Raf activation. However, the subsequent discovery of other proteins that are effectors of Ras function suggested that oncogenic activities of Ras are mediated by both Raf-dependent and Raf-independent signaling. Further complexity arose with the identification of Ras effectors with putative tumor suppressor, rather than oncogenic, functions. However, the recent identification of B-raf mutations in human cancers has renewed the debate regarding whether Raf activation alone promotes Ras-mediated oncogenesis. In this article, we summarize the current knowledge of the contribution of Ras effectors in Ras-mediated oncogenesis.

  5. Signal Integration by Lipid-Mediated Spatial Cross Talk between Ras Nanoclusters

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yong; Liang, Hong; Rodkey, Travis; Ariotti, Nicholas; Parton, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    Lipid-anchored Ras GTPases form transient, spatially segregated nanoclusters on the plasma membrane that are essential for high-fidelity signal transmission. The lipid composition of Ras nanoclusters, however, has not previously been investigated. High-resolution spatial mapping shows that different Ras nanoclusters have distinct lipid compositions, indicating that Ras proteins engage in isoform-selective lipid sorting and accounting for different signal outputs from different Ras isoforms. Phosphatidylserine is a common constituent of all Ras nanoclusters but is only an obligate structural component of K-Ras nanoclusters. Segregation of K-Ras and H-Ras into spatially and compositionally distinct lipid assemblies is exquisitely sensitive to plasma membrane phosphatidylserine levels. Phosphatidylserine spatial organization is also modified by Ras nanocluster formation. In consequence, Ras nanoclusters engage in remote lipid-mediated communication, whereby activated H-Ras disrupts the assembly and operation of spatially segregated K-Ras nanoclusters. Computational modeling and experimentation reveal that complex effects of caveolin and cortical actin on Ras nanoclustering are similarly mediated through regulation of phosphatidylserine spatiotemporal dynamics. We conclude that phosphatidylserine maintains the lateral segregation of diverse lipid-based assemblies on the plasma membrane and that lateral connectivity between spatially remote lipid assemblies offers important previously unexplored opportunities for signal integration and signal processing. PMID:24366544

  6. H-Ras Exerts Opposing Effects on Type I Interferon Responses Depending on Its Activation Status.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guann-An; Lin, Yun-Ru; Chung, Hai-Ting; Hwang, Lih-Hwa

    2017-01-01

    Using shRNA high-throughput screening, we identified H-Ras as a regulator of antiviral activity, whose depletion could enhance Sindbis virus replication. Further analyses indicated that depletion of H-Ras results in a robust increase in vesicular stomatitis virus infection and a decrease in Sendai virus (SeV)-induced retinoic acid-inducible gene-I-like receptor (RLR) signaling. Interestingly, however, ectopic expression of wild-type H-Ras results in a biphasic mode of RLR signaling regulation: while low-level expression of H-Ras enhances SeV-induced RLR signaling, high-level expression of H-Ras significantly inhibits this signaling. The inhibitory effects correlate with the activation status of H-Ras. As a result, oncogenic H-Ras, H-RasV12, strongly inhibits SeV-induced IFN-β promoter activity and type I interferon signaling. Conversely, the positive effects exerted by H-Ras on RLR signaling are independent of its signaling activity, as a constitutively inactive form of H-Ras, H-RasN17, also positively regulates RLR signaling. Mechanistically, we demonstrate that depletion of H-Ras reduces the formation of MAVS-TNF receptor-associated factor 3 signaling complexes. These results reveal that the H-Ras protein plays a role in promoting MAVS signalosome assembly in the mitochondria, whereas oncogenic H-Ras exerts a negative effect on type I IFN responses.

  7. The ras and myc oncogenes cooperate in tumor induction in many tissues when introduced into midgestation mouse embryos by retroviral vectors.

    PubMed Central

    Compere, S J; Baldacci, P; Sharpe, A H; Thompson, T; Land, H; Jaenisch, R

    1989-01-01

    Midgestation embryos were infected with replication-defective retroviral vectors that either transduced the myc oncogene, the ras oncogene, or both oncogenes simultaneously. The myc virus induced tumors in diverse organs at a very low frequency and with a long latency period, while approximately 20% of the mice derived from embryos infected with the ras virus developed tumors in the skin with a latency of 4-8 weeks. In contrast, infection of embryos with the ras/myc double oncogene virus resulted in 27% of the animals developing rapidly growing and malignant tumors in a great variety of tissues after a median latency period of 2-3 weeks. All tumors were of monoclonal origin, as shown by Southern analysis using the provirus as a molecular marker. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that the ras and myc oncogenes cooperate in transforming cells, but that additional alterations are necessary for realization of the fully malignant phenotype. Our observations also suggest that a much wider range of cell types become targets for malignant transformation when the embryos are exposed to the myc and the ras oncogenes simultaneously than when exposed to the same oncogenes separately. Infection of mouse embryos with vectors carrying different oncogenes or oncogene combinations may be an efficient and rapid method for evaluating the spectrum of cell types at risk for malignant conversion following mutation of a protooncogene to a transforming gene. Images PMID:2648394

  8. Effects of contact lens wearing on keratoconus: a confocal microscopy observation

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Somnath; Mutalib, Haliza A; Sharanjeet-Kaur; Ghoshal, Rituparna; Retnasabapathy, Shamala

    2017-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the corneal cell morphology of new keratoconus patients wearing two different types of rigid gas-permeable (RGP) contact lenses for 1y. METHODS Thirty nine eyes of 39 new keratoconus patients were selected and randomly fitted with two types of RGP contact lenses. Group 1 had 21 eyes with regular rigid gas-permeable (RRGP) contact lens and rest 18 eyes were in group 2 with specially designed rigid gas-permeable (SRGP) contact lens. Corneal cell morphology was evaluated using a slit scanning confocal microscope at no-lens wear and after 1y of contact lens wearing. RESULTS After 1y of contact lens wearing in group 1, the mean anterior and posterior stromal keratocyte density were significantly less (P=0.006 and P=0.001, respectively) compared to no-lens wear. The mean cell area of anterior and posterior stromal keratocyte were also significantly different (P=0.005 and P=0.001) from no-lens wear. The anterior and posterior stromal haze increased by 18.74% and 23.81%, respectively after 1y of contact lens wearing. Whereas in group 2, statistically significant changes were observed only in cell density & area of anterior stroma (P=0.001 and P=0.001, respectively) after 1y. While, level of anterior and posterior stromal haze increased by 16.67% and 11.11% after 1y of contact lens wearing. Polymegathism and pleomorphism also increased after 1y of contact lens wearing in both the contact lens groups. CONCLUSION Confocal microscopy observation shows the significant alterations in corneal cell morphology of keratoconic corneas wearing contact lenses especially in group 1. The type of contact lens must be carefully selected to minimize changes in corneal cell morphology. PMID:28251081

  9. Changes in the Eye Microbiota Associated with Contact Lens Wearing.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hakdong; Price, Kenneth; Albert, Luong; Dodick, Jack; Park, Lisa; Dominguez-Bello, Maria Gloria

    2016-03-22

    Wearing contact lenses has been identified as a risk factor for the development of eye conditions such as giant papillary conjunctivitis and keratitis. We hypothesized that wearing contact lenses is associated with changes in the ocular microbiota. We compared the bacterial communities of the conjunctiva and skin under the eye from 58 subjects and analyzed samples from 20 subjects (9 lens wearers and 11 non-lens wearers) taken at 3 time points using a 16S rRNA gene-based sequencing technique (V4 region; Illumina MiSeq). We found that using anesthetic eye drops before sampling decreases the detected ocular microbiota diversity. Compared to those from non-lens wearers, dry conjunctival swabs from lens wearers had more variable and skin-like bacterial community structures (UniFrac;P value = <0.001), with higher abundances of Methylobacterium,Lactobacillus,Acinetobacter, andPseudomonasand lower abundances of Haemophilus,Streptococcus,Staphylococcus, and Corynebacterium(linear discriminant analysis [LDA] score = >3.0). The results indicate that wearing contact lenses alters the microbial structure of the ocular conjunctiva, making it more similar to that of the skin microbiota. Further research is needed to determine whether the microbiome structure provides less protection from ocular infections. As in other body sites (i.e., the gut, skin, and mouth), the eye has a normal community of bacteria which are expected to confer resistance that provides protection from invaders. However, the eye microbiome has been largely neglected and is relevant to eye health and understanding eye diseases and to discovery of its functions. This report of a baseline study shows differences in the eye microbiome of contact lens wearers in relation to those of non-lens wearers and has the potential to help future studies explore novel insights into a possible role of the microbiome in the increased risk for eye infections in contact lens wearers. Copyright © 2016 Shin et al.

  10. A liquid crystal adaptive lens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kowel, S. T.; Cleverly, D.

    1981-01-01

    Creation of an electronically controlled liquid crystal lens for use as a focusing mechanism in a multi-element lens system or as an adaptive optical element is analyzed. Varying the index of refraction is shown to be equivalent to the shaping of a solid refracting material. Basic characteristics of liquid crystals, essential for the creation of a lens, are reviewed. The required variation of index of refraction is provided by choosing appropriate electrode voltages. The configuration required for any incoming polarization is given and its theoretical performance in terms of modulation transfer function derived.

  11. IL-6 blockade reprograms the lung tumor microenvironment to limit the development and progression of K-ras mutant lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Caetano, Mauricio S.; Zhang, Huiyuan; Cumpian, Amber M.; Gong, Lei; Unver, Nese; Ostrin, Edwin J.; Daliri, Soudabeh; Chang, Seon Hee; Ochoa, Cesar E.; Hanash, Samir; Behrens, Carmen; Wistuba, Ignacio I.; Sternberg, Cinthya; Kadara, Humam; Ferreira, Carlos Gil; Watowich, Stephanie S.; Moghaddam, Seyed Javad

    2016-01-01

    Activating mutations of K-ras are the most common oncogenic alterations found in lung cancer. Unfortunately, attempts to target K-ras mutant lung tumors have thus far failed, clearly indicating the need for new approaches in patients with this molecular profile. We have previously shown NF-κB activation, release of IL-6, and activation of its responsive transcription factor STAT3 in K-ras mutant lung tumors, which was further amplified by the tumor enhancing effect of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)-type airway inflammation. These findings suggest an essential role for this inflammatory pathway in K-ras mutant lung tumorigenesis and its enhancement by COPD. Therefore, here we blocked IL-6 using a monoclonal anti-IL-6 antibody in a K-ras mutant mouse model of lung cancer in the absence or presence of COPD-type airway inflammation. IL-6 blockade significantly inhibited lung cancer promotion, tumor cell intrinsic STAT3 activation, tumor cell proliferation, and angiogenesis markers. Moreover, IL-6 inhibition reduced expression of pro-tumor type 2 molecules (Arginase 1, Fizz 1, Mgl, and IDO), number of M2 type macrophages and G-MDSCs, and pro-tumor T-regulatory/T helper 17 cell responses. This was accompanied by increased expression of anti-tumor type 1 molecule (Nos2), and anti-tumor T helper 1/CD8 T cell responses. Our study demonstrates that IL-6 blockade not only has direct intrinsic inhibitory effect on tumor cells, but also re-educates the lung microenvironment toward an anti-tumor phenotype by altering the relative proportion between pro-tumor and anti-tumor immune cells. This information introduces IL-6 as a potential druggable target for prevention and treatment of K-ras mutant lung tumors. PMID:27197187

  12. Transferring Lens Prescriptions Between Lens-Design Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stacy, John E.; Wooley, Laura; Carlin, Brian

    1989-01-01

    Optical Lens Prescription Data Formatter computer program enables user to transfer complicated lens prescriptions quickly and easily from one major optical-design program to another and back again. One can take advantage of inherent strength of either program. Programs are ACCOS V from Scientific Calculations, Inc., of Fishers, NY, and CODE V from Optical Research Associates of Pasadena, CA. VAX version written in FORTRAN.

  13. Transferring Lens Prescriptions Between Lens-Design Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stacy, John E.; Wooley, Laura; Carlin, Brian

    1989-01-01

    Optical Lens Prescription Data Formatter computer program enables user to transfer complicated lens prescriptions quickly and easily from one major optical-design program to another and back again. One can take advantage of inherent strength of either program. Programs are ACCOS V from Scientific Calculations, Inc., of Fishers, NY, and CODE V from Optical Research Associates of Pasadena, CA. VAX version written in FORTRAN.

  14. 21 CFR 886.1375 - Bagolini lens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Bagolini lens. 886.1375 Section 886.1375 Food and... OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1375 Bagolini lens. (a) Identification. A Bagolini lens is a device that consists of a plane lens containing almost imperceptible striations that do not...

  15. 21 CFR 886.1375 - Bagolini lens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Bagolini lens. 886.1375 Section 886.1375 Food and... OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1375 Bagolini lens. (a) Identification. A Bagolini lens is a device that consists of a plane lens containing almost imperceptible striations that do not...

  16. Lens system for a photo ion spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, Dieter M.; Young, Charles E.; Pellin, Michael J.

    1990-01-01

    A lens system in a photo ion spectrometer for manipulating a primary ion beam and ionized atomic component. The atomic components are removed from a sample by a primary ion beam using the lens system, and the ions are extracted for analysis. The lens system further includes ionization resistant coatings for protecting the lens system.

  17. Lens system for a photo ion spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, D.M.; Young, C.E.; Pellin, M.J.

    1990-11-27

    A lens system in a photo ion spectrometer for manipulating a primary ion beam and ionized atomic component is disclosed. The atomic components are removed from a sample by a primary ion beam using the lens system, and the ions are extracted for analysis. The lens system further includes ionization resistant coatings for protecting the lens system. 8 figs.

  18. Contact Lens-Related Eye Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stories Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Contact Lens-Related Eye Infections Sections Contact Lens-Related ... symptoms 6 steps to avoid contact lens infections Contact Lens-Related Eye Infections Leer en Español: Infecciones ...

  19. 21 CFR 886.1375 - Bagolini lens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Bagolini lens. 886.1375 Section 886.1375 Food and... OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1375 Bagolini lens. (a) Identification. A Bagolini lens is a device that consists of a plane lens containing almost imperceptible striations that do not...

  20. Heterogeneity of cell lines derived after transformation of early passage rodent cells by the Ha-ras1 human oncogene.

    PubMed

    Spandidos, D A; Freshney, M; Wilkie, N M

    1985-01-01

    The chromosome patterns of Chinese hamster cell lines derived after immortalization or tumorigenic conversion of early passage cells with recombinants carrying the mutated T24 or the normal human Ha-ras1 gene have been characterized by trypsin-Giemsa banding. Whereas immortalized Chinese hamster cell lines exhibited a near normal karyotype, tumorigenic cell lines were found to have abnormal karyotypes carrying marker chromosomes. Moreover, chromosomal patterns correlated with growth in semisolid media and tumourigenicity in nude mice. Similarly, malignant conversion of early passage Syrian hamster cells, with a recombinant carrying the mutated T24 human Ha-ras1 gene, resulted in cells with a near diploid karyotype. On the other hand, tumorigenic conversion of early passage Wistar rat cells with the same oncogene produced cell lines with heteroploid karyotypes. More chromosomal alterations have been observed during further growth of these cells. It is suggested that the transformed phenotype in these cells may be dependent on the chromosomal instability.

  1. Nanoceria have no genotoxic effect on human lens epithelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierscionek, Barbara K.; Li, Yuebin; Yasseen, Akeel A.; Colhoun, Liza M.; Schachar, Ronald A.; Chen, Wei

    2010-01-01

    There are no treatments for reversing or halting cataract, a disease of the structural proteins in the eye lens, that has associations with other age-related degenerative conditions such as Alzheimer's disease. The incidence of cataract and associated conditions is increasing as the average age of the population rises. Protein folding diseases are difficult to assess in vivo as proteins and their age-related changes are assessed after extraction. Nanotechnology can be used to investigate protein changes in the intact lens as well as for a potential means of drug delivery. Nanoparticles, such as cerium oxide (CeO2) which have antioxidant properties, may even be used as a means of treating cataract directly. Prior to use in treatments, nanoparticle genotoxicity must be tested to assess the extent of any DNA or chromosomal damage. Sister chromatid exchanges were measured and DNA damage investigated using the alkaline COMET assay on cultured human lens epithelial cells, exposed to 5 and 10 µg ml-1 of CeO2 nanoparticles (nanoceria). Nanoceria at these dosages did not cause any DNA damage or significant increases in the number of sister chromatid exchanges. The absence of genotoxic effects on lens cells suggests that nanoceria, in the doses and exposures tested in this study, are not deleterious to the eye lens and have the potential for use in studying structural alterations, in developing non-surgical cataract treatments and in investigating other protein folding diseases.

  2. Lens design based on lens form parameters using Gaussian brackets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Xiangyu; Cheng, Xuemin

    2014-11-01

    The optical power distribution and the symmetry of the lens components are two important attributes that decide the ultimate lens performance and characteristics. Lens form parameters W and S are the key criteria describing the two attributes mentioned above. Lens components with smaller W and S will have a good nature of aberration balance and perform well in providing good image quality. Applying the Gaussian brackets, the two lens form parameters and the Seidel Aberration Coefficients are reconstructed. An initial lens structure can be analytically described by simultaneous equations of Seidel Aberration Coefficients and third-order aberration theory. Adding the constraints of parameters W and S in the solving process, a solution with a proper image quality and aberration distribution is achieved. The optical properties and image quality of the system based on the parameters W and S are also analyzed in this article. In the method, the aberration distribution can be controlled to some extent in the beginning of design, so that we can reduce some workload of optimization later.

  3. Histopathological characterization of the skeletal myopathy in rasH2 mice carrying human prototype c-Ha-ras gene.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Takayuki; Okada, Miyoko; Sakairi, Tetsuya; Sano, Fumiko; Sugimoto, Jiro; Takagi, Shirou

    2005-05-01

    A skeletal myopathy is found in approximately 100% of rasH2 mice. To confirm detailed features of the rasH2 skeletal myopathy, the biceps femoris, diaphragm, triceps brachii, gastrocnemial (types I and II fiber-mixed muscles) and soleus muscle (type I fiber-dominant muscle) obtained from male rasH2 and non-transgenic littermates aged 10-13 and 34 weeks were examined. Variations in the muscle fiber size, early-scattered degeneration/necrosis and regeneration of muscle fibers were detected in 10-13-week-old rasH2 mice. The severity of the above muscular lesions was more prominent in older rasH2 mice. These lesions were noted in the type II myofiber dominant muscles (biceps femoris, triceps brachii and gastrocnemial). NADH-TR stain clearly demonstrated a disorganized intermyofibrillar network and necrotic change in muscle fibers. No specific morphological changes, like rod structure or tubular aggregation seen in some types of myopathy, were noted in Gomori trichrome and NADH-TR stains in the rasH2 mouse like in many types of muscular dystrophy. Electronmicroscopically, occasional muscle fiber degeneration/regeneration, invaded phagocytic cells, indistinct Z-band suggesting excessive contraction and dilatation of the sarcoplasmic reticulum were observed. In summary, the skeletal myopathy occurring in rasH2 mice is consistent with muscular dystrophy characterized morphologically by progressive degeneration and regeneration of myofibers. The myopathy is confined to the type II myofiber predominant muscles and is not associated with any pathognomonic lesions. These characteristics will provide us with a useful model for research in muscular dystrophy of diverse myofibers.

  4. Ras regulation of DNA-methylation and cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Patra, Samir Kumar

    2008-04-01

    Genome wide hypomethylation and regional hypermethylation of cancer cells and tissues remain a paradox, though it has received a convincing confirmation that epigenetic switching systems, including DNA-methylation represent a fundamental regulatory mechanism that has an impact on genome maintenance and gene transcription. Methylated cytosine residues of vertebrate DNA are transmitted by clonal inheritance through the strong preference of DNA methyltransferase, DNMT1, for hemimethylated-DNA. Maintenance of methylation patterns is necessary for normal development of mice, and aberrant methylation patterns are associated with many human tumours. DNMT1 interacts with many proteins during cell cycle progression, including PCNA, p53, EZH2 and HP1. Ras family of GTPases promotes cell proliferation by its oncogenic nature, which transmits signals by multiple pathways in both lipid raft dependent and independent fashion. DNA-methylation-mediated repression of DNA-repair protein O6-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) gene and increased rate of K-Ras mutation at codon for amino acids 12 and 13 have been correlated with a secondary role for Ras-effector homologues (RASSFs) in tumourigenesis. Lines of evidence suggest that DNA-methylation associated repression of tumour suppressors and apoptotic genes and ceaseless proliferation of tumour cells are regulated in part by Ras-signaling. Control of Ras GTPase signaling might reduce the aberrant methylation and accordingly may reduce the risk of cancer development.

  5. Backtracking RAS mutations in high hyperdiploid childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Wiemels, Joseph L; Kang, Michelle; Chang, Jeffrey S; Zheng, Lily; Kouyoumji, Carina; Zhang, Luoping; Smith, Martyn T; Scelo, Ghislaine; Metayer, Catherine; Buffler, Patricia; Wiencke, John K

    2010-10-15

    High hyperdiploidy is the single largest subtype of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and is defined by the presence of 51-68 chromosomes in a karyotype. The 5 or more extra chromosomes characterizing this subtype are known to occur in a single mitotic event, prenatally. We screened for RAS mutations among 517 acute childhood leukemias (including 437 lymphocytic, of which 393 were B-cell subtypes) and found mutations in 30% of high hyperdiploids compared to only 10% of leukemias of other subtypes (P<0.0001). We assessed whether KRAS mutations occurred before birth using a PCR-restriction enzyme-mediated Taqman quantitative PCR reaction, and found no evidence for prenatal KRAS mutations in 14 patients tested. While RAS mutations were previously associated with prior chemical exposures in childhood and adult leukemias, in this study RAS-mutated cases were not significantly associated with parental smoking when compared to study controls. IGH rearrangements were backtracked in three RAS-positive patients (which were negative for KRAS mutation at birth) and found to be evident before birth, confirming a prenatal origin for the leukemia clone. We posit a natural history for hyperdiploid leukemia in which prenatal mitotic catastrophe is followed by a postnatal RAS mutation to produce the leukemic cell phenotype.

  6. Pleiotrophin mediates hematopoietic regeneration via activation of RAS.

    PubMed

    Himburg, Heather A; Yan, Xiao; Doan, Phuong L; Quarmyne, Mamle; Micewicz, Eva; McBride, William; Chao, Nelson J; Slamon, Dennis J; Chute, John P

    2014-11-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are highly susceptible to ionizing radiation-mediated death via induction of ROS, DNA double-strand breaks, and apoptotic pathways. The development of therapeutics capable of mitigating ionizing radiation-induced hematopoietic toxicity could benefit both victims of acute radiation sickness and patients undergoing hematopoietic cell transplantation. Unfortunately, therapies capable of accelerating hematopoietic reconstitution following lethal radiation exposure have remained elusive. Here, we found that systemic administration of pleiotrophin (PTN), a protein that is secreted by BM-derived endothelial cells, substantially increased the survival of mice following radiation exposure and after myeloablative BM transplantation. In both models, PTN increased survival by accelerating the recovery of BM hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells in vivo. PTN treatment promoted HSC regeneration via activation of the RAS pathway in mice that expressed protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor-zeta (PTPRZ), whereas PTN treatment did not induce RAS signaling in PTPRZ-deficient mice, suggesting that PTN-mediated activation of RAS was dependent upon signaling through PTPRZ. PTN strongly inhibited HSC cycling following irradiation, whereas RAS inhibition abrogated PTN-mediated induction of HSC quiescence, blocked PTN-mediated recovery of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, and abolished PTN-mediated survival of irradiated mice. These studies demonstrate the therapeutic potential of PTN to improve survival after myeloablation and suggest that PTN-mediated hematopoietic regeneration occurs in a RAS-dependent manner.

  7. Pleiotrophin mediates hematopoietic regeneration via activation of RAS

    PubMed Central

    Himburg, Heather A.; Yan, Xiao; Doan, Phuong L.; Quarmyne, Mamle; Micewicz, Eva; McBride, William; Chao, Nelson J.; Slamon, Dennis J.; Chute, John P.

    2014-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are highly susceptible to ionizing radiation–mediated death via induction of ROS, DNA double-strand breaks, and apoptotic pathways. The development of therapeutics capable of mitigating ionizing radiation–induced hematopoietic toxicity could benefit both victims of acute radiation sickness and patients undergoing hematopoietic cell transplantation. Unfortunately, therapies capable of accelerating hematopoietic reconstitution following lethal radiation exposure have remained elusive. Here, we found that systemic administration of pleiotrophin (PTN), a protein that is secreted by BM-derived endothelial cells, substantially increased the survival of mice following radiation exposure and after myeloablative BM transplantation. In both models, PTN increased survival by accelerating the recovery of BM hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells in vivo. PTN treatment promoted HSC regeneration via activation of the RAS pathway in mice that expressed protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor-zeta (PTPRZ), whereas PTN treatment did not induce RAS signaling in PTPRZ-deficient mice, suggesting that PTN-mediated activation of RAS was dependent upon signaling through PTPRZ. PTN strongly inhibited HSC cycling following irradiation, whereas RAS inhibition abrogated PTN-mediated induction of HSC quiescence, blocked PTN-mediated recovery of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, and abolished PTN-mediated survival of irradiated mice. These studies demonstrate the therapeutic potential of PTN to improve survival after myeloablation and suggest that PTN-mediated hematopoietic regeneration occurs in a RAS-dependent manner. PMID:25250571

  8. Spred is a Sprouty-related suppressor of Ras signalling.

    PubMed

    Wakioka, T; Sasaki, A; Kato, R; Shouda, T; Matsumoto, A; Miyoshi, K; Tsuneoka, M; Komiya, S; Baron, R; Yoshimura, A

    2001-08-09

    Cellular proliferation, and differentiation of cells in response to extracellular signals, are controlled by the signal transduction pathway of Ras, Raf and MAP (mitogen-activated protein) kinase. The mechanisms that regulate this pathway are not well known. Here we describe two structurally similar tyrosine kinase substrates, Spred-1 and Spred-2. These two proteins contain a cysteine-rich domain related to Sprouty (the SPR domain) at the carboxy terminus. In Drosophila, Sprouty inhibits the signalling by receptors of fibroblast growth factor (FGF) and epidermal growth factor (EGF) by suppressing the MAP kinase pathway. Like Sprouty, Spred inhibited growth-factor-mediated activation of MAP kinase. The Ras-MAP kinase pathway is essential in the differentiation of neuronal cells and myocytes. Expression of a dominant negative form of Spred and Spred-antibody microinjection revealed that endogenous Spred regulates differentiation in these types of cells. Spred constitutively associated with Ras but did not prevent activation of Ras or membrane translocation of Raf. Instead, Spred inhibited the activation of MAP kinase by suppressing phosphorylation and activation of Raf. Spred may represent a class of proteins that modulate Ras-Raf interaction and MAP kinase signalling.

  9. Backtracking RAS mutations in High Hyperdiploid Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Wiemels, Joseph L.; Kang, Michelle; Chang, Jeffrey S.; Zheng, Lily; Kouyoumji, Carina; Zhang, Luoping; Smith, Martyn T.; Scelo, Ghislaine; Metayer, Catherine; Buffler, Patricia; Wiencke, John K.

    2010-01-01

    High hyperdiploidy is the single largest subtype of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and is defined by the presence of 51-68 chromosomes in a karyotype. The 5 or more extra chromosomes characterizing this subtype are known to occur in a single mitotic event, prenatally. We screened for RAS mutations among 517 acute childhood leukemias (including 437 lymphocytic, of which 393 were B-cell subtypes) and found mutations in 30% of high hyperdiploids compared to only 10% of leukemias of other subtypes (P < 0.0001). We assessed whether KRAS mutations occurred before birth using a PCR-restriction enzyme-mediated Taqman quantitative PCR reaction, and found no evidence for prenatal KRAS mutations in 14 patients tested. While RAS mutations were previously associated with prior chemical exposures in childhood and adult leukemias, in this study RAS-mutated cases were not significantly associated with parental smoking when compared to study controls. IGH rearrangements were backtracked in three RAS-positive patients (which were negative for KRAS mutation at birth) and found to be evident before birth, confirming a prenatal origin for the leukemia clone. We posit a natural history for hyperdiploid leukemia in which prenatal mitotic catastrophe is followed by a postnatal RAS mutation to produce the leukemic cell phenotype. PMID:20688547

  10. Small GTPase R-Ras regulates Integrity and Functionality of Tumor Blood Vessels

    PubMed Central

    Sawada, Junko; Urakami, Takeo; Li, Fangfei; Urakami, Akane; Zhu, Weiquan; Fukuda, Minoru; Li, Dean Y.; Ruoslahti, Erkki; Komatsu, Masanobu

    2012-01-01

    Summary We show that R-Ras, a small GTPase of the Ras family, is essential for the establishment of mature, functional blood vessels in tumors. The genetic disruption of R-Ras severely impaired the maturation processes of tumor vessels in mice. Conversely, the gain of function of R-Ras improved vessel structure and blood perfusion and blocked plasma leakage by enhanced endothelial barrier function and pericyte association with nascent blood vessels. Thus, R-Ras promotes normalization of the tumor vasculature. These findings identify R-Ras as a critical regulator of vessel integrity and function during tumor vascularization. PMID:22897853

  11. Small GTPase R-Ras regulates integrity and functionality of tumor blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Junko; Urakami, Takeo; Li, Fangfei; Urakami, Akane; Zhu, Weiquan; Fukuda, Minoru; Li, Dean Y; Ruoslahti, Erkki; Komatsu, Masanobu

    2012-08-14

    We show that R-Ras, a small GTPase of the Ras family, is essential for the establishment of mature, functional blood vessels in tumors. The genetic disruption of R-Ras severely impaired the maturation processes of tumor vessels in mice. Conversely, the gain of function of R-Ras improved vessel structure and blood perfusion and blocked plasma leakage by enhanced endothelial barrier function and pericyte association with nascent blood vessels. Thus, R-Ras promotes normalization of the tumor vasculature. These findings identify R-Ras as a critical regulator of vessel integrity and function during tumor vascularization. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Expression patterns of genes encoding small GTPases Ras-dva-1 and Ras-dva-2 in the Xenopus laevis tadpoles.

    PubMed

    Tereshina, Maria B; Bayramov, Andrey V; Zaraisky, Andrey G

    2011-01-01

    Small GTPases of the recently discovered Ras-dva family are specific to the Vertebrate phylum. In Xenopus laevis, Ras-dva-1 is expressed during gastrulation and neurulation in the anterior ectoderm where it regulates the early development of the forebrain and cranial placodes (Tereshina et al., 2006). In the present work, we studied the expression of Ras-dva-1 at later developmental stages. As a result, the Ras-dva-1 expression was revealed in the eye retina, epiphysis (pineal gland), hypophysis (pituitary), branchial arches, pharynx, oesophagus, stomach and gall bladder of swimming tadpoles. Additionally, we investigated for the first time the expression pattern of Ras-dva-2. This gene encodes a protein belonging to a novel sub-group of Ras-dva GTPases that we identified by phylogenetic analysis within Ras-dva family. In contrast to Ras-dva-1, Ras-dva-2 is not expressed before the swimming tadpole stage. At the swimming tadpole stage, however, Ras-dva-2 transcripts can be detected in the eye retina and brain. Later in development, the expression of Ras-dva-2 can also be revealed in the mesonephros and stomach. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Advances in lens implant technology

    PubMed Central

    Kampik, Anselm; Dexl, Alois K.; Zimmermann, Nicole; Glasser, Adrian; Baumeister, Martin; Kohnen, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Cataract surgery is one of the oldest and the most frequent outpatient clinic operations in medicine performed worldwide. The clouded human crystalline lens is replaced by an artificial intraocular lens implanted into the capsular bag. During the last six decades, cataract surgery has undergone rapid development from a traumatic, manual surgical procedure with implantation of a simple lens to a minimally invasive intervention increasingly assisted by high technology and a broad variety of implants customized for each patient’s individual requirements. This review discusses the major advances in this field and focuses on the main challenge remaining – the treatment of presbyopia. The demand for correction of presbyopia is increasing, reflecting the global growth of the ageing population. Pearls and pitfalls of currently applied methods to correct presbyopia and different approaches under investigation, both in lens implant technology and in surgical technology, are discussed. PMID:23413369

  14. Focusing on Contact Lens Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... solution) because it can be a source of microorganisms that may cause serious eye infections. (Contact lens ... means it is free from living germs or microorganisms.) Never put your lenses in your mouth or ...

  15. Investigation of the Zoom Lens.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Auty, Geoff

    1999-01-01

    Describes an open-ended investigation in which students have to look into a feature of lens performance that is not commonly found in textbook materials on optics. Presents explanations and sample results. (WRM)

  16. Mucins in contact lens wear and dry eye conditions.

    PubMed

    Ramamoorthy, Padmapriya; Nichols, Jason J

    2008-08-01

    Ocular mucins are thought to play integral roles in ocular surface lubrication, anchoring of the aqueous, stabilizing the lipid components of the tear film, eliminating foreign bodies and pathogens, and with potential involvement in cell cycle mediation and apoptotic activity of ocular surface epithelia. Ocular mucins are of secreted and membrane-associated types. Secreted mucins may be of large gel-forming type or small soluble mucins (e.g., MUC5AC and MUC7). Membrane-associated mucins such as MUCs 1 and 4 are a major component of the glycocalyx. They are thought to render structural support to the microplicae and mediate epithelial cell cycle and apoptotic activity. The alterations in ocular mucins with contact lens wear are unclear. Recent work shows mucin expression may be up-regulated during the early years of contact lens wear, and with long-term lens wear, mucin expression may return to normal levels or sub-normal levels, although this is not well understood. Further, the polar nature of mucins may be associated with their affinity for contact lens surfaces making them a component of contact lens deposition. This has potential implications in the wettability and tolerability of contact lenses, and may be impacted by surface coatings, polymer characteristics, or care solutions. Conjunctival mucin gene expression and secretion may be deficient in several ocular surface disorders associated with dry eye. Deficiency and alterations in glycosylation characteristics of MUC5AC and MUC2 have been reported in both Sjögren and non-Sjögren dry eye types. Decreased binding of the membrane-associated mucin MUC16 to the conjunctival epithelium has been reported in Sjögren dry eye while MUC1 alterations have been reported in Sjögren and non-Sjögren dry eye states. In view of the mucin involvement in dry eye conditions, stimulation of mucus secretion pathways may hold promise in the pharmaceutical treatment of dry eye.

  17. Adjustable internal structure for reconstructing gradient index profile of crystalline lens.

    PubMed

    Bahrami, Mehdi; Goncharov, Alexander V; Pierscionek, Barbara K

    2014-03-01

    Employing advanced technologies in studying the crystalline lens of the eye has improved our understanding of the refractive index gradient of the lens. Reconstructing and studying such a complex structure requires models with adaptable internal geometry that can be altered to simulate geometrical and optical changes of the lens with aging. In this Letter, we introduce an optically well-defined, geometrical structure for modeling the gradient refractive index profile of the crystalline lens with the advantage of an adjustable internal structure that is not available with existing models. The refractive index profile assigned to this rotationally symmetric geometry is calculated numerically, yet it is shown that this does not limit the model. The study provides a basis for developing lens models with sophisticated external and internal structures without the need for analytical solutions to calculate refractive index profiles.

  18. Electronically Reconfigurable Microwave Lens Antennas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-13

    d: diameter of holes in the holey dielectric material and the holey metal plate; f: frequency; k: propagation constant in parallel plate region in...Control ) A planar Luneburg Lens whose permittivity distribution is controlled by two types of hole density methodology in the central region and by...dielectric thickness control in the edge region is reported. The lens was designed to operate at 24 GHz in TEM mode. Experimental radiation patterns

  19. Single lens laser beam shaper

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Chuyu [Newport News, VA; Zhang, Shukui [Yorktown, VA

    2011-10-04

    A single lens bullet-shaped laser beam shaper capable of redistributing an arbitrary beam profile into any desired output profile comprising a unitary lens comprising: a convex front input surface defining a focal point and a flat output portion at the focal point; and b) a cylindrical core portion having a flat input surface coincident with the flat output portion of the first input portion at the focal point and a convex rear output surface remote from the convex front input surface.

  20. Hepatitis B virus HBx protein activates Ras-GTP complex formation and establishes a Ras, Raf, MAP kinase signaling cascade.

    PubMed Central

    Benn, J; Schneider, R J

    1994-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus produces a small (154-amino acid) transcriptional transactivating protein, HBx, which is required for viral infection and has been implicated in virus-mediated liver oncogenesis. However, the molecular mechanism for HBx activity and its possible influence on cell proliferation have remained obscure. A number of studies suggest that HBx may stimulate transcription by indirectly activating transcription factors, possibly by influencing cell signaling pathways. We now present biochemical evidence that HBx activates Ras and rapidly induces a cytoplasmic signaling cascade linking Ras, Raf, and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAP kinase), leading to transcriptional transactivation. HBx strongly elevates levels of GTP-bound Ras, activated and phosphorylated Raf, and tyrosine-phosphorylated and activated MAP kinase. Transactivation of transcription factor AP-1 by HBx is blocked by inhibition of Ras or Raf activities but not by inhibition of Ca(2+)- and diacylglycerol-dependent protein kinase C. HBx was also found to stimulate DNA synthesis in serum-starved cells. The hepatitis B virus HBx protein therefore stimulates Ras-GTP complex formation and promotes downstream signaling through Raf and MAP kinases, and may influence cell proliferation. Images PMID:7937954

  1. Silencing the expression of Ras family GTPase homologues decreases inflammation and joint destruction in experimental arthritis.

    PubMed

    de Launay, Daphne; Vreijling, Jeroen; Hartkamp, Linda M; Karpus, Olga N; Abreu, Joana R F; van Maanen, Marjolein A; Sanders, Marjolein E; Grabiec, Aleksander M; Hamann, Jörg; Ørum, Henrik; Vervoordeldonk, Margriet J; Fluiter, Kees; Tak, Paul P; Reedquist, Kris A

    2010-12-01

    Changes in the expression and activation status of Ras proteins are thought to contribute to the pathological phenotype of stromal fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) in rheumatoid arthritis, a prototypical immune-mediated inflammatory disease. Broad inhibition of Ras and related proteins has shown protective effects in animal models of arthritis, but each of the Ras family homologues (ie, H-, K-, and N-Ras) makes distinct contributions to cellular activation. We examined the expression of each Ras protein in synovial tissue and FLS obtained from patients with rheumatoid arthritis and other forms of inflammatory arthritis. Each Ras protein was expressed in synovial tissue and cultured FLS. Each homolog was also activated following FLS stimulation with tumor necrosis factor-α or interleukin (IL)-1β. Constitutively active mutants of each Ras protein enhanced IL-1β-induced FLS matrix metalloproteinase-3 production, while only active H-Ras enhanced IL-8 production. Gene silencing demonstrated that each Ras protein contributed to IL-1β-dependent IL-6 production, while H-Ras and N-Ras supported IL-1β-dependent matrix metalloproteinase-3 and IL-8 production, respectively. The overlap in contributions of Ras homologues to FLS activation suggests that broad targeting of Ras GTPases in vivo suppresses global inflammation and joint destruction in arthritis. Consistent with this, simultaneous silencing of H-Ras, K-Ras, and N-Ras expression significantly reduces inflammation and joint destruction in murine collagen-induced arthritis, while specific targeting of N-Ras alone is less effective in providing clinical benefits.

  2. K-Ras4B proteins are expressed in the nucleolus: Interaction with nucleolin

    SciTech Connect

    Birchenall-Roberts, Maria C. . E-mail: birchena@mail.ncifcrf.gov; Fu, Tao; Kim, Soo-Gyung; Huang, Ying K.; Dambach, Michael; Resau, James H.; Ruscetti, Francis W.

    2006-09-22

    Kirsten Ras4B (K-Ras4B) is a potent onco-protein that is expressed in the majority of human cell types and is frequently mutated in carcinomas. K-Ras4B, like other members of the Ras family of proteins, is considered to be a cytoplasmic protein that must be localized to the plasma membrane for activation. Here, using confocal microscopy and biochemical analysis, we show that K-Ras4B, but not H-Ras or the closely related K-Ras4A, is also present in the nucleoli of normal and transformed cells. Subcellular fractionation and immunostaining show that K-Ras4B is located not only in the cytoplasm, but also in the nucleolar compartment. Modification of a C-terminal hexa-lysine motif unique to K-Ras4B results in exclusively cytoplasmic forms of the protein. Nucleolin, a pleiotropic regulator of cellular processes, including transcriptional regulation, is also characterized by a nucleolar-like nuclear appearance. We show that K-Ras4B and nucleolin co-localize within the nucleus and that nucleolin physically associates with K-Ras4B. Inhibition of K-Ras4B/nucleolin association blocked nucleolar localization of K-Ras4B. Using siRNA to knockdown the expression of nucleolin eliminated the nucleolar localization of K-Ras4B and significantly repressed the activation of the well-characterized K-Ras4B transcriptional target Ap-1, but stimulated Elk1. These data provide evidence of a nucleolar localization of K-Ras4B and describe a functional association between K-Ras4B and nucleolin.

  3. ralGDS family members interact with the effector loop of ras p21.

    PubMed Central

    Kikuchi, A; Demo, S D; Ye, Z H; Chen, Y W; Williams, L T

    1994-01-01

    Using a yeast two-hybrid system, we identified a novel protein which interacts with ras p21. This protein shares 69% amino acid homology with ral guanine nucleotide dissociation stimulator (ralGDS), a GDP/GTP exchange protein for ral p24. We designated this protein RGL, for ralGDS-like. Using the yeast two-hybrid system, we found that an effector loop mutant of ras p21 was defective in interacting with the ras p21-interacting domain of RGL, suggesting that this domain binds to ras p21 through the effector loop of ras p21. Since ralGDS contained a region highly homologous with the ras p21-interacting domain of RGL, we examined whether ralGDS could interact with ras p21. In the yeast two-hybrid system, ralGDS failed to interact with an effector loop mutant of ras p21. In insect cells, ralGDS made a complex with v-ras p21 but not with a dominant negative mutant of ras p21. ralGDS interacted with the GTP-bound form of ras p21 but not with the GDP-bound form in vitro. ralGDS inhibited both the GTPase-activating activity of the neurofibromatosis gene product (NF1) for ras p21 and the interaction of Raf with ras p21 in vitro. These results demonstrate that ralGDS specifically interacts with the active form of ras p21 and that ralGDS can compete with NF1 and Raf for binding to the effector loop of ras p21. Therefore, ralGDS family members may be effector proteins of ras p21 or may inhibit interactions between ras p21 and its effectors. Images PMID:7935463

  4. Galectin-1 dimers can scaffold Raf-effectors to increase H-ras nanoclustering

    PubMed Central

    Blaževitš, Olga; Mideksa, Yonatan G.; Šolman, Maja; Ligabue, Alessio; Ariotti, Nicholas; Nakhaeizadeh, Hossein; Fansa, Eyad K.; Papageorgiou, Anastassios C.; Wittinghofer, Alfred; Ahmadian, Mohammad R.; Abankwa, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Galectin-1 (Gal-1) dimers crosslink carbohydrates on cell surface receptors. Carbohydrate-derived inhibitors have been developed for cancer treatment. Intracellularly, Gal-1 was suggested to interact with the farnesylated C-terminus of Ras thus specifically stabilizing GTP-H-ras nanoscale signalling hubs in the membrane, termed nanoclusters. The latter activity may present an alternative mechanism for how overexpressed Gal-1 stimulates tumourigenesis. Here we revise the current model for the interaction of Gal-1 with H-ras. We show that it indirectly forms a complex with GTP-H-ras via a high-affinity interaction with the Ras binding domain (RBD) of Ras effectors. A computationally generated model of the Gal-1/C-Raf-RBD complex is validated by mutational analysis. Both cellular FRET as well as proximity ligation assay experiments confirm interaction of Gal-1 with Raf proteins in mammalian cells. Consistently, interference with H-rasG12V-effector interactions basically abolishes H-ras nanoclustering. In addition, an intact dimer interface of Gal-1 is required for it to positively regulate H-rasG12V nanoclustering, but negatively K-rasG12V nanoclustering. Our findings suggest stacked dimers of H-ras, Raf and Gal-1 as building blocks of GTP-H-ras-nanocluster at high Gal-1 levels. Based on our results the Gal-1/effector interface represents a potential drug target site in diseases with aberrant Ras signalling. PMID:27087647

  5. Corneo-scleral limbal changes following short-term soft contact lens wear.

    PubMed

    Consejo, Alejandra; Bartuzel, Maciej M; Iskander, D Robert

    2017-10-01

    To assess whether short-term soft contact lens wear alters the anterior eye surface. Twenty-two neophyte subjects wore soft contact lenses for a period of five hours. Topography based corneo-scleral limbal radius estimates were derived from height measurements acquired with a corneo-scleral profilometer. Additionally, central corneal thickness (CCT), anterior chamber depth (ACD), corneal curvature radius (R) and white-to-white (WTW) diameter were acquired with an OCT-assisted biometer. Measurements were obtained without lens wear (baseline), immediately after lens removal following five hours of wear and three hours after lens removal. Short-term soft contact lens wear significantly modifies corneo-scleral limbal radius (mean±SD: 130±74μm, p < 0.001) and the changes are repeatable. In contrast, the WTW diameter and R were not modified. ACD and CCT were significantly affected but no significant correlations were found between the increment of the limbal radius and the decrease in ACD and CCT. Limbal radius increment was reversed three hours after lens removal for 68% of the subjects but the time course of this reversal was not uniform. It is possible to accurately quantify limbal radius changes as a consequence of soft contact lens wear. The increment in the limbal diameter could reach over 0.5mm but that alteration does not correspond to changes in WTW diameter and it was not observable to the examiner using a slit lamp. Assessing topographical limbus after contact lens wear could be a tool to optimize the selection of the contact lens, from the perspective of anterior eye surface changes. Copyright © 2017 British Contact Lens Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Intramembrane protease RasP boosts protein production in Bacillus.

    PubMed

    Neef, Jolanda; Bongiorni, Cristina; Goosens, Vivianne J; Schmidt, Brian; van Dijl, Jan Maarten

    2017-04-04

    The microbial cell factory Bacillus subtilis is a popular industrial platform for high-level production of secreted technical enzymes. Nonetheless, the effective secretion of particular heterologous enzymes remains challenging. Over the past decades various studies have tackled this problem, and major improvements were achieved by optimizing signal peptides or removing proteases involved in product degradation. On the other hand, serious bottlenecks in the protein export process per se remained enigmatic, especially for protein secretion at commercially significant levels by cells grown to high density. The aim of our present study was to assess the relevance of the intramembrane protease RasP for high-level protein production in B. subtilis. Deletion of the rasP gene resulted in reduced precursor processing and extracellular levels of the overproduced α-amylases AmyE from B. subtilis and AmyL from Bacillus licheniformis. Further, secretion of the overproduced serine protease BPN' from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens was severely impaired in the absence of RasP. Importantly, overexpression of rasP resulted in threefold increased production of a serine protease from Bacillus clausii, and 2.5- to 10-fold increased production of an AmyAc α-amylase from Paenibacillus curdlanolyticus, depending on the culture conditions. Of note, growth defects due to overproduction of the two latter enzymes were suppressed by rasP-overexpression. Here we show that an intramembrane protease, RasP, sets a limit to high-level production of two secreted heterologous enzymes that are difficult to produce in the B. subtilis cell factory. This finding was unexpected and suggests that proteolytic membrane sanitation is key to effective enzyme production in Bacillus.

  7. The Tumor Suppressor DiRas3 Forms a Complex with H-Ras and C-RAF Proteins and Regulates Localization, Dimerization, and Kinase Activity of C-RAF*

    PubMed Central

    Baljuls, Angela; Beck, Matthias; Oenel, Ayla; Robubi, Armin; Kroschewski, Ruth; Hekman, Mirko; Rudel, Thomas; Rapp, Ulf R.

    2012-01-01

    The maternally imprinted Ras-related tumor suppressor gene DiRas3 is lost or down-regulated in more than 60% of ovarian and breast cancers. The anti-tumorigenic effect of DiRas3 is achieved through several mechanisms, including inhibition of cell proliferation, motility, and invasion, as well as induction of apoptosis and autophagy. Re-expression of DiRas3 in cancer cells interferes with the signaling through Ras/MAPK and PI3K. Despite intensive research, the mode of interference of DiRas3 with the Ras/RAF/MEK/ERK signal transduction is still a matter of speculation. In this study, we show that DiRas3 associates with the H-Ras oncogene and that activation of H-Ras enforces this interaction. Furthermore, while associated with DiRas3, H-Ras is able to bind to its effector protein C-RAF. The resulting multimeric complex consisting of DiRas3, C-RAF, and active H-Ras is more stable than the two protein complexes H-Ras·C-RAF or H-Ras·DiRas3, respectively. The consequence of this complex formation is a DiRas3-mediated recruitment and anchorage of C-RAF to components of the membrane skeleton, suppression of C-RAF/B-RAF heterodimerization, and inhibition of C-RAF kinase activity. PMID:22605333

  8. Ras-related TC21 is activated by mutation in a breast cancer cell line, but infrequently in breast carcinomas in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Barker, K. T.; Crompton, M. R.

    1998-01-01

    Activating ras mutations are found in many types of human tumour. Mutations in Harvey (H-), Kirsten (K-) and neuronal (N-) ras are, however, rarely found in breast carcinomas. TC21 is a ras family member that shares close homology to H-, K- and N-ras, and activating mutations have been found in ovarian carcinoma and leiomyosarcoma cell lines. We have examined panels of cDNAs from breast, ovarian and cervical cell lines, and primary and metastatic breast tumours for mutations in TC21 using a single-strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP)-based assay. One breast cancer cell line, CAL51, exhibited an altered SSCP pattern, compared with normal tissue, which was due to an A-T base change in codon 72, causing a predicted Gln-Leu activating mutation. Of nine primary and 15 metastatic breast tumour cDNAs analysed, none exhibited an altered pattern by SSCP. The apparently wild-type pattern by SSCP analysis was confirmed by sequence analysis of some of the cDNAs assayed. Thus, we conclude that mutations in TC21 are uncommon in breast carcinomas. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9703274

  9. RCP is a human breast cancer–promoting gene with Ras-activating function

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jinqiu; Liu, Xuejing; Datta, Arpita; Govindarajan, Kunde; Tam, Wai Leong; Han, Jianyong; George, Joshy; Wong, Christopher; Ramnarayanan, Kalpana; Phua, Tze Yoong; Leong, Wan Yee; Chan, Yang Sun; Palanisamy, Nallasivam; Liu, Edison Tak-Bun; Karuturi, Krishna Murthy; Lim, Bing; Miller, Lance David

    2009-01-01

    Aggressive forms of cancer are often defined by recurrent chromosomal alterations, yet in most cases, the causal or contributing genetic components remain poorly understood. Here, we utilized microarray informatics to identify candidate oncogenes potentially contributing to aggressive breast cancer behavior. We identified the Rab-coupling protein RCP (also known as RAB11FIP1), which is located at a chromosomal region frequently amplified in breast cancer (8p11–12) as a potential candidate. Overexpression of RCP in MCF10A normal human mammary epithelial cells resulted in acquisition of tumorigenic properties such as loss of contact inhibition, growth-factor independence, and anchorage-independent growth. Conversely, knockdown of RCP in human breast cancer cell lines inhibited colony formation, invasion, and migration in vitro and markedly reduced tumor formation and metastasis in mouse xenograft models. Overexpression of RCP enhanced ERK phosphorylation and increased Ras activation in vitro. As these results indicate that RCP is a multifunctional gene frequently amplified in breast cancer that encodes a protein with Ras-activating function, we suggest it has potential importance as a therapeutic target. Furthermore, these studies provide new insight into the emerging role of the Rab family of small G proteins and their interacting partners in carcinogenesis. PMID:19620787

  10. RCP is a human breast cancer-promoting gene with Ras-activating function.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinqiu; Liu, Xuejing; Datta, Arpita; Govindarajan, Kunde; Tam, Wai Leong; Han, Jianyong; George, Joshy; Wong, Christopher; Ramnarayanan, Kalpana; Phua, Tze Yoong; Leong, Wan Yee; Chan, Yang Sun; Palanisamy, Nallasivam; Liu, Edison Tak-Bun; Karuturi, Krishna Murthy; Lim, Bing; Miller, Lance David

    2009-08-01

    Aggressive forms of cancer are often defined by recurrent chromosomal alterations, yet in most cases, the causal or contributing genetic components remain poorly understood. Here, we utilized microarray informatics to identify candidate oncogenes potentially contributing to aggressive breast cancer behavior. We identified the Rab-coupling protein RCP (also known as RAB11FIP1), which is located at a chromosomal region frequently amplified in breast cancer (8p11-12) as a potential candidate. Overexpression of RCP in MCF10A normal human mammary epithelial cells resulted in acquisition of tumorigenic properties such as loss of contact inhibition, growth-factor independence, and anchorage-independent growth. Conversely, knockdown of RCP in human breast cancer cell lines inhibited colony formation, invasion, and migration in vitro and markedly reduced tumor formation and metastasis in mouse xenograft models. Overexpression of RCP enhanced ERK phosphorylation and increased Ras activation in vitro. As these results indicate that RCP is a multifunctional gene frequently amplified in breast cancer that encodes a protein with Ras-activating function, we suggest it has potential importance as a therapeutic target. Furthermore, these studies provide new insight into the emerging role of the Rab family of small G proteins and their interacting partners in carcinogenesis.

  11. K-ras, p53 mutations, and microsatellite instability (MSI) in gallbladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Saetta, Angelica A

    2006-06-15

    Despite the considerable progress in understanding the molecular pathology of carcinogenesis, the genetic mechanisms underlying the development and progression of gallbladder cancer (GC) are poorly understood. The survival of GC patients is generally poor. Therefore, it is very useful to define valuable prognostic factors. The most extensively studied oncogenes in gallbladder carcinogenesis are ras, commonly mutated in neoplasms of the gastrointestinal tract. K-ras oncogene is altered in a subset of gallbladder patients and mainly in those having anomalous junction of the pancreaticobiliary tract. Most of the studies of genetic abnormalities in GC have focused on p53 gene. p53 mutation/overexpression and/or LOH is present in more than 50% of gallbladder carcinomas, suggesting an important role in their pathogenesis. However, these results have not any predictive value yet. Moreover, the involvement of an alternative molecular pathway, that of microsatellite instability (MSI), is found in a limited group of GC patients. Additional research is necessary to establish its possible relation to defects of the mismatch repair (MMR) system and its proposed prognostic significance. Further elucidation of the molecular events specific to GC will help to identify novel molecular targets for the diagnosis and clinical management of the patients. Copyright 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. Cooperative effects of INK4a and ras in melanoma susceptibility in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Lynda; Pomerantz, Jason; Polsky, David; Jacobson, Mark; Cohen, Carlos; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Horner, James W.; DePinho, Ronald A.

    1997-01-01

    The familial melanoma gene (INK4a/MTS1/CDKN2) encodes potent tumor suppressor activity. Although mice null for the ink4a homolog develop a cancer-prone condition, a pathogenetic link to melanoma susceptibility has yet to be established. Here we report that mice with melanocyte-specific expression of activated H-rasG12V on an ink4a-deficient background develop spontaneous cutaneous melanomas after a short latency and with high penetrance. Consistent loss of the wild-type ink4a allele was observed in tumors arising in ink4a heterozygous transgenic mice. No homozygous deletion of the neighboring ink4b gene was detected. Moreover, as in human melanomas, the p53 gene remained in a wild-type configuration with no observed mutation or allelic loss. These results show that loss of ink4a and activation of Ras can cooperate to accelerate the development of melanoma and provide the first in vivo experimental evidence for a causal relationship between ink4a deficiency and the pathogenesis of melanoma. In addition, this mouse model affords a system in which to identify and analyze pathways involved in tumor progression against the backdrop of genetic alterations encountered in human melanomas. PMID:9353252

  13. Protective Effects of Acetylation on the Pathological Reactions of the Lens Crystallins with Homocysteine Thiolactone

    PubMed Central

    Moafian, Zeinab; Khoshaman, Kazem; Oryan, Ahmad; Kurganov, Boris I.; Yousefi, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Various post-translational lens crystallins modifications result in structural and functional insults, contributing to the development of lens opacity and cataract disorders. Lens crystallins are potential targets of homocysteinylation, particularly under hyperhomocysteinemia which has been indicated in various eye diseases. Since both homocysteinylation and acetylation primarily occur on protein free amino groups, we applied different spectroscopic methods and gel mobility shift analysis to examine the possible preventive role of acetylation against homocysteinylation. Lens crystallins were extensively acetylated in the presence of acetic anhydride and then subjected to homocysteinylation in the presence of homocysteine thiolactone (HCTL). Extensive acetylation of the lens crystallins results in partial structural alteration and enhancement of their stability, as well as improvement of α-crystallin chaperone-like activity. In addition, acetylation partially prevents HCTL-induced structural alteration and aggregation of lens crystallins. Also, acetylation protects against HCTL-induced loss of α-crystallin chaperone activity. Additionally, subsequent acetylation and homocysteinylation cause significant proteolytic degradation of crystallins. Therefore, further experimentation is required in order to judge effectively the preventative role of acetylation on the structural and functional insults induced by homocysteinylation of lens crystallins. PMID:27706231

  14. Structural and functional characterization of a DARPin which inhibits Ras nucleotide exchange.

    PubMed

    Guillard, Sandrine; Kolasinska-Zwierz, Paulina; Debreczeni, Judit; Breed, Jason; Zhang, Jing; Bery, Nicolas; Marwood, Rose; Tart, Jon; Overman, Ross; Stocki, Pawel; Mistry, Bina; Phillips, Christopher; Rabbitts, Terence; Jackson, Ronald; Minter, Ralph

    2017-07-14

    Ras mutations are the oncogenic drivers of many human cancers and yet there are still no approved Ras-targeted cancer therapies. Inhibition of Ras nucleotide exchange is a promising new approach but better understanding of this mechanism of action is needed. Here we describe an antibody mimetic, DARPin K27, which inhibits nucleotide exchange of Ras. K27 binds preferentially to the inactive Ras GDP form with a Kd of 4 nM and structural studies support its selectivity for inactive Ras. Intracellular expression of K27 significantly reduces the amount of active Ras, inhibits downstream signalling, in particular the levels of phosphorylated ERK, and slows the growth in soft agar of HCT116 cells. K27 is a potent, non-covalent inhibitor of nucleotide exchange, showing consistent effects across different isoforms of Ras, including wild-type and oncogenic mutant forms.

  15. Micro lens actuator and polymer objective lens for optical pickup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pei; Pan, Longfa; Zappe, Hans

    Lens actuator is one of the most important components in an optical pickup system, which decides the performance of the disc readout system. A significant advance in technical capability has recently been achieved in the fabrication of integrated micro lens actuators of optical pickup by microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technology. A comb-drive tracking and focusing integrated lens actuator fabricated on a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafer has been reported. Twodimensional tuning of the objective lens is generated by the integrated comb structures. Large displacements of about ±24.6μm in tracking direction and 5.7μm in focusing direction are demonstrated. The device has a high sensitivity and an ignorable coupling between the two dimensional driving movements. The small-form-factor device provides an excellent performance and size reduction. Furthermore, high quality polymer micro-lenses with high numerical aperture (NA) are fabricated on a pre-patterned hydrophobic glass substrate by liquid dispensing. The surface profiles are adjusted by the patterned diameter and the volume of the dispensed polymer, which is controlled by the dispensing time. This extremely low cost, high NA and easily fabricated lens represents an important step for further integration of the pickup system, thus expands the application area of optical storage.

  16. C-terminal sequences in R-Ras are involved in integrin regulation and in plasma membrane microdomain distribution.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Malene; Prior, Ian A; Hughes, Paul E; Oertli, Beat; Chou, Fan-Li; Willumsen, Berthe M; Hancock, John F; Ginsberg, Mark H

    2003-11-28

    The small GTPases R-Ras and H-Ras are highly homologous proteins with contrasting biological properties, for example, they differentially modulate integrin affinity: H-Ras suppresses integrin activation in fibroblasts whereas R-Ras can reverse this effect of H-Ras. To gain insight into the sequences directing this divergent phenotype, we investigated a panel of H-Ras/R-Ras chimeras and found that sequences in the R-Ras hypervariable C-terminal region including amino acids 175-203 are required for the R-Ras ability to increase integrin activation in CHO cells; however, the proline-rich site in this region, previously reported to bind the adaptor protein Nck, was not essential for this effect. In addition, we found that the GTPase TC21 behaved similarly to R-Ras. Because the C-termini of Ras proteins can control their subcellular localization, we compared the localization of H-Ras and R-Ras. In contrast to H-Ras, which migrates out of lipid rafts upon activation, we found that activated R-Ras remained localized to lipid rafts. However, functionally distinct H-Ras/R-Ras chimeras containing different C-terminal R-Ras segments localized to lipid rafts irrespective of their integrin phenotype.

  17. A RasGAP SH3 Peptide Aptamer Inhibits RasGAP-Aurora Interaction and Induces Caspase-Independent Tumor Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Bickle, Marc; Corneloup, Claudine; Barthelaix, Audrey; Lepelletier, Yves; Mercier, Perrine; Schapira, Matthieu; Samson, Jérôme; Mathieu, Anne-Laure; Hugo, Nicolas; Moncorgé, Olivier; Mikaelian, Ivan; Dufour, Sylvie; Garbay, Christiane; Colas, Pierre

    2008-01-01

    The Ras GTPase-activating protein RasGAP catalyzes the conversion of active GTP-bound Ras into inactive GDP-bound Ras. However, RasGAP also acts as a positive effector of Ras and exerts an anti-apoptotic activity that is independent of its GAP function and that involves its SH3 (Src homology) domain. We used a combinatorial peptide aptamer approach to select a collection of RasGAP SH3 specific ligands. We mapped the peptide aptamer binding sites by performing yeast two-hybrid mating assays against a panel of RasGAP SH3 mutants. We examined the biological activity of a peptide aptamer targeting a pocket delineated by residues D295/7, L313 and W317. This aptamer shows a caspase-independent cytotoxic activity on tumor cell lines. It disrupts the interaction between RasGAP and Aurora B kinase. This work identifies the above-mentioned pocket as an interesting therapeutic target to pursue and points its cognate peptide aptamer as a promising guide to discover RasGAP small-molecule drug candidates. PMID:18682833

  18. Exploring the interactions of the RAS family in the human protein network and their potential implications in RAS-directed therapies

    PubMed Central

    Bueno, Anibal; Morilla, Ian; Diez, Diego; Moya-Garcia, Aurelio A.; Lozano, José; Ranea, Juan A.G.

    2016-01-01

    RAS proteins are the founding members of the RAS superfamily of GTPases. They are involved in key signaling pathways regulating essential cellular functions such as cell growth and differentiation. As a result, their deregulation by inactivating mutations often results in aberrant cell proliferation and cancer. With the exception of the relatively well-known KRAS, HRAS and NRAS proteins, little is known about how the interactions of the other RAS human paralogs affect cancer evolution and response to treatment. In this study we performed a comprehensive analysis of the relationship between the phylogeny of RAS proteins and their location in the protein interaction network. This analysis was integrated with the structural analysis of conserved positions in available 3D structures of RAS complexes. Our results show that many RAS proteins with divergent sequences are found close together in the human interactome. We found specific conserved amino acid positions in this group that map to the binding sites of RAS with many of their signaling effectors, suggesting that these pairs could share interacting partners. These results underscore the potential relevance of cross-talking in the RAS signaling network, which should be taken into account when considering the inhibitory activity of drugs targeting specific RAS oncoproteins. This study broadens our understanding of the human RAS signaling network and stresses the importance of considering its potential cross-talk in future therapies. PMID:27713118

  19. Rasputin, the Drosophila homologue of the RasGAP SH3 binding protein, functions in ras- and Rho-mediated signaling.

    PubMed

    Pazman, C; Mayes, C A; Fanto, M; Haynes, S R; Mlodzik, M

    2000-04-01

    The small GTPase Ras plays an important role in many cellular signaling processes. Ras activity is negatively regulated by GTPase activating proteins (GAPs). It has been proposed that RasGAP may also function as an effector of Ras activity. We have identified and characterized the Drosophila homologue of the RasGAP-binding protein G3BP encoded by rasputin (rin). rin mutants are viable and display defects in photoreceptor recruitment and ommatidial polarity in the eye. Mutations in rin/G3BP genetically interact with components of the Ras signaling pathway that function at the level of Ras and above, but not with Raf/MAPK pathway components. These interactions suggest that Rin is required as an effector in Ras signaling during eye development, supporting an effector role for RasGAP. The ommatidial polarity phenotypes of rin are similar to those of RhoA and the polarity genes, e.g. fz and dsh. Although rin/G3BP interacts genetically with RhoA, affecting both photoreceptor differentiation and polarity, it does not interact with the gain-of-function genotypes of fz and dsh. These data suggest that Rin is not a general component of polarity generation, but serves a function specific to Ras and RhoA signaling pathways.

  20. A smiling lens

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-02-09

    In the centre of this image, taken with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, is the galaxy cluster SDSS J1038+4849 — and it seems to be smiling. You can make out its two orange eyes and white button nose. In the case of this “happy face”, the two eyes are very bright galaxies and the misleading smile lines are actually arcs caused by an effect known as strong gravitational lensing. Galaxy clusters are the most massive structures in the Universe and exert such a powerful gravitational pull that they warp the spacetime around them and act as cosmic lenses which can magnify, distort and bend the light behind them. This phenomenon, crucial to many of Hubble’s discoveries, can be explained by Einstein’s theory of general relativity. In this special case of gravitational lensing, a ring  — known as an Einstein Ring  — is produced from this bending of light, a consequence of the exact and symmetrical alignment of the source, lens and observer and resulting in the ring-like structure we see here. Hubble has provided astronomers with the tools to probe these massive galaxies and model their lensing effects, allowing us to peer further into the early Universe than ever before. This object was studied by Hubble’s Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) and Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) as part of a survey of strong lenses. A version of this image was entered into the Hubble’s Hidden Treasures image processing competition by contestant Judy Schmidt.

  1. Deletion of cyclooxygenase-2 inhibits K-ras-induced lung carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yong; Jiang, Yan; Tan, Lin; Ravoori, Murali K; Gagea, Mihai; Kundra, Vikas; Fischer, Susan M; Yang, Peiying

    2015-11-17

    The purpose of this study was to identify the role COX-2 plays in K-ras-induced lung carcinogenesis. We crossed COX-2-homozygous knockout mice with K-rasLA1 (G12D) expressing mice to obtain COX-2-deficient mice with K-ras expression (K-ras/COX-2(-/-) mice) and COX-2 wild type mice with K-ras expression (K-ras mice). At 3.5 months of age, the K-ras/COX-2(-/-) mice had significantly fewer lung adenocarcinomas and substantially smaller tumors than K-ras mice. K-ras/COX-2(-/-) mice also had significantly fewer bronchioalveolar hyperplasias than K-ras mice. Compared with lung tumors from K-Ras mice, the levels of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) were significantly lower, whereas levels of the PGE2 metabolite 13,14-dihydro-15-keto-PGE2 were significantly higher, in lung tumors from K-ras/COX-2(-/-) mice. In addition, K-ras/COX-2(-/-) mice had strikingly lower rates of tumor cell proliferation and expressed less MEK and p-Erk1/2 protein than K-ras mice did. In line with this, knocking down COX-2 in mutant K-ras non-small cell lung cancer A549 cells reduced colony formation, PGE2 synthesis and ERK phosphorylation compared to that of vector control cells. Taken together, these findings suggest that COX-2 deletion contributes to the repression of K-ras-induced lung tumorigenesis by reducing tumor cell proliferation, decreasing the production of PGE2, and increasing the production of 13,14-dihydro-15-keto-PGE2, possibly via the MAPK pathway. Thus, COX-2 is likely important in lung tumorigenesis, and COX-2 and its product, PGE2, are potential targets for lung cancer prevention.

  2. 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D inhibits glutamine metabolism in Harvey-ras transformed MCF10A human breast epithelial cell.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xuanzhu; Zheng, Wei; Nagana Gowda, G A; Raftery, Daniel; Donkin, Shawn S; Bequette, Brian; Teegarden, Dorothy

    2016-10-01

    Breast cancer is the second most common cancer among women in the US. The active form of vitamin D, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH)2D), is proposed to inhibit cellular processes and to prevent breast cancer. The current studies investigated the effect of 1,25(OH)2D on glutamine metabolism during cancer progression employing Harvey-ras oncogene transformed MCF10A human breast epithelial cells (MCF10A-ras). Treatment with 1,25(OH)2D significantly reduced intracellular glutamine and glutamate levels measured by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) by 23±2% each. Further, 1,25(OH)2D treatment reduced glutamine and glutamate flux, determined by [U-(13)C5] glutamine tracer kinetics, into the TCA cycle by 31±0.2% and 17±0.4%, respectively. The relative levels of mRNA and protein abundance of the major glutamine transporter, solute linked carrier family 1 member A5 (SLC1A5), was significantly decreased by 1,25(OH)2D treatment in both MCF10A-ras cells and MCF10A which overexpress ErbB2 (HER-2/neu). Consistent with these results, glutamine uptake was reduced by 1,25(OH)2D treatment and the impact was eliminated with the SLC1A5 inhibitor L-γ-Glutamyl-p-nitroanilide (GPNA). A consensus sequence to the vitamin D responsive element (VDRE) was identified in silico in the SLC1A5 gene promoter, and site-directed mutagenesis analyses with reporter gene studies demonstrate a functional negative VDRE in the promoter of the SLC1A5 gene. siRNA-SLC1A5 transfection in MCF10A-ras cells significantly reduced SLC1A5 mRNA expression as well as decreased viable cell number similar to 1,25(OH)2D treatment. SLC1A5 knockdown also induced an increase in apoptotic cells in MCF10A-ras cells. These results suggest 1,25(OH)2D alters glutamine metabolism in MCF10A-ras cells by inhibiting glutamine uptake and utilization, in part through down-regulation of SLC1A5 transcript abundance. Thus, 1,25(OH)2D down-regulation of the glutamine transporter, SLC1A5, may facilitate vitamin D prevention of breast

  3. Equarin is involved in cell adhesion by means of heparan sulfate proteoglycan during lens development.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiaohong; Sato, Yuya; Sekiguchi, Kiyotoshi; Tanaka, Hideaki; Ohta, Kunimasa

    2013-01-01

    Adhesion molecules are known to be instructive for both development and differentiation. During lens differentiation, epithelial cells undergo vertical elongation, with the anterior and posterior tips of the elongating fiber cells sliding along the epithelium and capsule, respectively. These cellular processes are highly coordinated through cell adhesive interactions, actin cytoskeletal reorganization and contractile force generation. Alterations in extracellular matrix composition that interfere with these interactions can lead to defects that alter tissue morphogenesis and the state of differentiation. We have demonstrated that Equarin, which is a secreted molecule expressed in the equator region of the lens, plays an important role in chick lens fiber differentiation through fibroblast growth factor signaling. Here, we explored the function of Equarin in chick lens cell adhesion. Equarin protein was expressed in the extracellular region of lens differentiating cells. We found that Equarin promoted lens cell adhesion through heparan sulfate proteoglycan. By biochemical analysis, we found that Equarin directly binds syndecan-3, which displayed a similar expression pattern to Equarin. Overexpression of Equarin resulted in altered actin localization. Equarin is involved in cell adhesion during fiber differentiation and development. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Two ras genes in Dictyostelium minutum show high sequence homology, but different developmental regulation from Dictyostelium discoideum rasD and rasG genes.

    PubMed

    van Es, S; Kooistra, R A; Schaap, P

    1997-03-10

    The social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum expresses five ras genes at different stages of development. One of them, DdrasD is expressed during postaggregative development and transcription is induced by extracellular cAMP. A homologue of DdrasD, the DdrasG gene, is expressed exclusively during vegetative growth. We cloned two ras homologues Dmras1 and Dmras2 from the primitive species D. minutum, which show high homology to DdrasD and DdrasG and less homology to the other Ddras genes. In contrast to the DdrasD and DdrasG genes, both the Dmras1 and Dmras2 genes are expressed during the entire course of development. The expression levels are low during growth, increase at the onset of starvation and do not decrease until fruiting bodies have formed. Expression of neither Dmras1 or Dmras2 is regulated by cAMP. So even though the high degree of homology between the ras genes of different species suggests conservation of function, this function is apparently not associated with a specific developmental stage.

  5. Pinhole Zone Plate Lens for Ultrasound Focusing.

    PubMed

    Rubio, Constanza; Fuster, José Miguel; Castiñeira-Ibáñez, Sergio; Uris, Antonio; Belmar, Francisco; Candelas, Pilar

    2017-07-22

    The focusing capabilities of a pinhole zone plate lens are presented and compared with those of a conventional Fresnel zone plate lens. The focusing properties are examined both experimentally and numerically. The results confirm that a pinhole zone plate lens can be an alternative to a Fresnel lens. A smooth filtering effect is created in pinhole zone plate lenses, giving rise to a reduction of the side lobes around the principal focus associated with the conventional Fresnel zone plate lens. The manufacturing technique of the pinhole zone plate lens allows the designing and constructing of lenses for different focal lengths quickly and economically and without the need to drill new plates.

  6. Pinhole Zone Plate Lens for Ultrasound Focusing

    PubMed Central

    Fuster, José Miguel; Castiñeira-Ibáñez, Sergio; Uris, Antonio; Belmar, Francisco; Candelas, Pilar

    2017-01-01

    The focusing capabilities of a pinhole zone plate lens are presented and compared with those of a conventional Fresnel zone plate lens. The focusing properties are examined both experimentally and numerically. The results confirm that a pinhole zone plate lens can be an alternative to a Fresnel lens. A smooth filtering effect is created in pinhole zone plate lenses, giving rise to a reduction of the side lobes around the principal focus associated with the conventional Fresnel zone plate lens. The manufacturing technique of the pinhole zone plate lens allows the designing and constructing of lenses for different focal lengths quickly and economically and without the need to drill new plates. PMID:28737674

  7. Attenuation of TGF-β signaling suppresses premature senescence in a p21-dependent manner and promotes oncogenic Ras-mediated metastatic transformation in human mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shu; Yang, Junhua; Elkahloun, Abdel G; Bandyopadhyay, Abhik; Wang, Long; Cornell, John E; Yeh, I-Tien; Agyin, Joseph; Tomlinson, Gail; Sun, Lu-Zhe

    2012-04-01

    The molecular mechanisms that drive triple-negative, basal-like breast cancer progression are elusive. Few molecular targets have been identified for the prevention or treatment of this disease. Here we developed a series of isogenic basal-like human mammary epithelial cells (HMECs) with altered transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) sensitivity and different malignancy, resembling a full spectrum of basal-like breast carcinogenesis, and determined the molecular mechanisms that contribute to oncogene-induced transformation of basal-like HMECs when TGF-β signaling is attenuated. We found that expression of a dominant-negative type II receptor (DNRII) of TGF-β abrogated autocrine TGF-β signaling in telomerase-immortalized HMECs and suppressed H-Ras-V12-induced senescence-like growth arrest (SLGA). Furthermore, coexpression of DNRII and H-Ras-V12 rendered HMECs highly tumorigenic and metastatic in vivo in comparison with H-Ras-V12-transformed HMECs that spontaneously escaped H-Ras-V12-induced SLGA. Microarray analysis revealed that p21 was the major player mediating Ras-induced SLGA, and attenuated or loss of p21 expression contributed to the escape from SLGA when autocrine TGF-β signaling was blocked in HMECs. Furthermore, knockdown of p21 also suppressed H-Ras-V12-induced SLGA. Our results identify that autocrine TGF-β signaling is an integral part of the cellular anti-transformation network by suppressing the expression of a host of genes, including p21-regulated genes, that mediate oncogene-induced transformation in basal-like breast cancer.

  8. Senescence-Associated Secretory Phenotypes Reveal Cell-Nonautonomous Functions of Oncogenic RAS and the p53 Tumor Suppressor

    PubMed Central

    Coppé, Jean-Philippe; Sun, Yu; Muñoz, Denise P; Goldstein, Joshua; Nelson, Peter S; Desprez, Pierre-Yves; Campisi, Judith

    2008-01-01

    Cellular senescence suppresses cancer by arresting cell proliferation, essentially permanently, in response to oncogenic stimuli, including genotoxic stress. We modified the use of antibody arrays to provide a quantitative assessment of factors secreted by senescent cells. We show that human cells induced to senesce by genotoxic stress secrete myriad factors associated with inflammation and malignancy. This senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) developed slowly over several days and only after DNA damage of sufficient magnitude to induce senescence. Remarkably similar SASPs developed in normal fibroblasts, normal epithelial cells, and epithelial tumor cells after genotoxic stress in culture, and in epithelial tumor cells in vivo after treatment of prostate cancer patients with DNA-damaging chemotherapy. In cultured premalignant epithelial cells, SASPs induced an epithelial–mesenchyme transition and invasiveness, hallmarks of malignancy, by a paracrine mechanism that depended largely on the SASP factors interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8. Strikingly, two manipulations markedly amplified, and accelerated development of, the SASPs: oncogenic RAS expression, which causes genotoxic stress and senescence in normal cells, and functional loss of the p53 tumor suppressor protein. Both loss of p53 and gain of oncogenic RAS also exacerbated the promalignant paracrine activities of the SASPs. Our findings define a central feature of genotoxic stress-induced senescence. Moreover, they suggest a cell-nonautonomous mechanism by which p53 can restrain, and oncogenic RAS can promote, the development of age-related cancer by altering the tissue microenvironment. PMID:19053174

  9. TRAF6 is an amplified oncogene bridging the RAS and NF-κB pathways in human lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Starczynowski, Daniel T.; Lockwood, William W.; Deléhouzée, Sophie; Chari, Raj; Wegrzyn, Joanna; Fuller, Megan; Tsao, Ming-Sound; Lam, Stephen; Gazdar, Adi F.; Lam, Wan L.; Karsan, Aly

    2011-01-01

    Somatic mutations and copy number alterations (as a result of deletion or amplification of large portions of a chromosome) are major drivers of human lung cancers. Detailed analysis of lung cancer–associated chromosomal amplifications could identify novel oncogenes. By performing an integrative cytogenetic and gene expression analysis of non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) cell lines and tumors, we report here the identification of a frequently recurring amplification at chromosome 11 band p13. Within this region, only TNF receptor–associated factor 6 (TRAF6) exhibited concomitant mRNA overexpression and gene amplification in lung cancers. Inhibition of TRAF6 in human lung cancer cell lines suppressed NF-κB activation, anchorage-independent growth, and tumor formation. In these lung cancer cell lines, RAS required TRAF6 for its oncogenic capabilities. Furthermore, TRAF6 overexpression in NIH3T3 cells resulted in NF-κB activation, anchorage-independent growth, and tumor formation. Our findings show that TRAF6 is an oncogene that is important for RAS-mediated oncogenesis and provide a mechanistic explanation for the previously apparent importance of constitutive NF-κB activation in RAS-driven lung cancers. PMID:21911935

  10. TRAF6 is an amplified oncogene bridging the RAS and NF-κB pathways in human lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Starczynowski, Daniel T; Lockwood, William W; Deléhouzée, Sophie; Chari, Raj; Wegrzyn, Joanna; Fuller, Megan; Tsao, Ming-Sound; Lam, Stephen; Gazdar, Adi F; Lam, Wan L; Karsan, Aly

    2011-10-01

    Somatic mutations and copy number alterations (as a result of deletion or amplification of large portions of a chromosome) are major drivers of human lung cancers. Detailed analysis of lung cancer-associated chromosomal amplifications could identify novel oncogenes. By performing an integrative cytogenetic and gene expression analysis of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) cell lines and tumors, we report here the identification of a frequently recurring amplification at chromosome 11 band p13. Within this region, only TNF receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6) exhibited concomitant mRNA overexpression and gene amplification in lung cancers. Inhibition of TRAF6 in human lung cancer cell lines suppressed NF-κB activation, anchorage-independent growth, and tumor formation. In these lung cancer cell lines, RAS required TRAF6 for its oncogenic capabilities. Furthermore, TRAF6 overexpression in NIH3T3 cells resulted in NF-κB activation, anchorage-independent growth, and tumor formation. Our findings show that TRAF6 is an oncogene that is important for RAS-mediated oncogenesis and provide a mechanistic explanation for the previously apparent importance of constitutive NF-κB activation in RAS-driven lung cancers.

  11. Senescence-Associated Secretory Phenotypes Reveal Cell-Nonautonomous Functions of Oncogenic RAS and the p53 Tumor Suppressor

    SciTech Connect

    Coppé, Jean-Philippe; Patil, Christopher; Rodier, Francis; Sun, Yu; Munoz, Denise; Goldstein, Joshua; Nelson, Peter; Desprez, Pierre-Yves; Campisi, Judith

    2008-10-24

    Cellular senescence suppresses cancer by arresting cell proliferation, essentially permanently, in response to oncogenic stimuli, including genotoxic stress. We modified the use of antibody arrays to provide a quantitative assessment of factors secreted by senescent cells. We show that human cells induced to senesce by genotoxic stress secrete myriad factors associated with inflammation and malignancy. This senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) developed slowly over several days and only after DNA damage of sufficient magnitude to induce senescence. Remarkably similar SASPs developed in normal fibroblasts, normal epithelial cells, and epithelial tumor cells after genotoxic stress in culture, and in epithelial tumor cells in vivo after treatment of prostate cancer patients with DNA-damaging chemotherapy. In cultured premalignant epithelial cells, SASPs induced an epithelial-mesenchyme transition and invasiveness, hallmarks of malignancy, by a paracrine mechanism that depended largely on the SASP factors interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8. Strikingly, two manipulations markedly amplified, and accelerated development of, the SASPs: oncogenic RAS expression, which causes genotoxic stress and senescence in normal cells, and functional loss of the p53 tumor suppressor protein. Both loss of p53 and gain of oncogenic RAS also exacerbated the promalignant paracrine activities of the SASPs. Our findings define a central feature of genotoxic stress-induced senescence. Moreover, they suggest a cell-nonautonomous mechanism by which p53 can restrain, and oncogenic RAS can promote, the development of age-related cancer by altering the tissue microenvironment.

  12. Lens Aging: Effects of Crystallins

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, K. Krishna; Santhoshkumar, Puttur

    2009-01-01

    The primary function of the eye lens is to focus light on the retina. The major proteins in the lens—a, b, and g-crystallins—are constantly subjected to age-related changes such as oxidation, deamidation, truncation, glycation, and methylation. Such age-related modifications are cumulative and affect crystallin structure and function. With time, the modified crystallins aggregate, causing the lens to increasingly scatter light on the retina instead of focusing light on it and causing the lens to lose its transparency gradually and become opaque. Age-related lens opacity, or cataract, is the major cause of blindness worldwide. We review deamidation, and glycation that occur in the lenses during aging keeping in mind the structural and functional changes that these modifications bring about in the proteins. In addition, we review proteolysis and discuss recent observations on how crystallin fragments generated in vivo, through their anti-chaperone activity may cause crystallin aggregation in aging lenses. We also review hyperbaric oxygen treatment induced guinea pig and ‘humanized’ ascorbate transporting mouse models as suitable options for studies on age-related changes in lens proteins. PMID:19463898

  13. [Contact lens care and maintenance].

    PubMed

    Bloise, L

    2017-04-01

    All contact lenses with replacement schedules longer than daily must be maintained. At each step of their use, the lenses may be contaminated. Contact lens solutions perform the essential functions of cleaning, decontaminating and preserving the lenses to prevent infectious problems and improve wearing comfort. Contact lens contamination essentially comes from hands, cleaning solutions, cases, water and the environment. The pathogenic microorganisms are mainly Gram-negative bacteria, fungi and amoebae. Contact lens deposits may or may not have an organic origin. Their presence increases the risk of infection because they serve as a nutrient matrix for microbes, and they are responsible for wearing discomfort. Contact lens solutions differ in their composition, their mechanism of action and the concentration of the various agents. To prescribe the best lens care system to each wearer and for each material, it is necessary to be very familiar with them. Maintenance is the main cause of discomfort with contact lenses, either through improper use, solution-material incompatibility, or a reaction of the wearer to the components.

  14. RAS and BRAF in metastatic colorectal cancer management

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Jun; Cho, May

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) has been further refined with the development of monoclonal antibodies, cetuximab and panitumumab, towards the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Anti-EGFR therapy has afforded improved survival in those with wild-type RAS mCRC but provides no benefit and even harm in those with RAS-mutant tumors. BRAF mutations have also been shown to predict lack of clinically meaningful benefit to anti-EGFR therapy in mCRC. Mechanisms of resistance to EGFR blockade in wild-type RAS or BRAF metastatic colorectal tumors appear to converge on the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway. Clinical trials involving combined BRAF, EGFR, and/or MAPK kinase (MEK) inhibition have shown promising activity in BRAF-mutant mCRC. Here, we review pivotal clinical trials that have redefined our treatment approach in mCRC with respect to anti-EGFR therapy based on RAS and BRAF mutation status. Future studies will likely focus on improving efficacy of anti-EGFR-based therapy in mCRC through sustained MAPK pathway inhibition. PMID:27747083

  15. RAS Symposium Draws Hundreds of Attendees | FNLCR Staging

    Cancer.gov

    They call themselves “rasologists”: scientists who study the RAS family of genes and the cancers that can arise due to mutations within them. This field of research is at the heart of some sobering numbers. Almost a third of all human cancers, in

  16. K-ras-driven engineered mouse models for pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xuyuan; Su, Jingna; Zhou, Xiuxiao; Guo, Jianping; Wei, Wenyi; Wang, Zhiwei

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is one of the most fatal cancers largely due to the lack of early diagnosis and effective therapies. Therefore, further understanding the underlying molecular mechanisms of PC development and progression is pivotal to the development of more effective targeted therapies. Emerging evidence has suggested that using mouse models, especially genetically engineered mouse models, is ideal to explore the mechanisms of pancreatic tumorigenesis. To this end, it has been known that a K-ras mutation on codon 12 (K-ras G12D) plays a critical role in the PC development. Thus, most mouse models of PC have been developed by targeting a conditionally mutated K-ras (G12D) together with concomitant deletion or mutation of other key genes to recapitulate the PC progression in human patients. Here, we summarize a number of K-ras-driven engineered mouse models to provide molecular insights into PC disease development and progression. We hope that these mouse models will help design a novel therapeutic strategy and to further improve the treatment of PC patients.

  17. Interplay between RAS and opioids: opening the Pandora of complexities.

    PubMed

    Bali, Anjana; Randhawa, Puneet Kaur; Jaggi, Amteshwar Singh

    2014-08-01

    Angiotensin and endogenous opioids are important bioactive neuropeptides, which are widely distributed in the brain and peripheral regions to produce diverse biological and neurobiological activities. An endogenous opioid system includes proopiomelanocortin-derived enkephalin, dynorphin and endorphin that act on their specific receptors such as delta (δ), kappa (κ) and mu (μ) receptors. Research evidence demonstrates significant positive as well as negative interactions between renin angiotensin system (RAS) and endogenous opioids in the brain and periphery. The diverse actions of Ang II are possibly mediated indirectly through endogenous opioids, while opioids are also shown to activate RAS components suggesting the up-regulation of each system in concern with each other. On the contrary, there are reports suggesting a negative correlation between RAS and opioid system. Research evidence also supports the notion that Ang II acts as anti-opioid peptide to decrease the actions of opioids. Moreover, opioids-induced decline in angiotensin release and functioning has also been reported. Co-administration of ACE inhibitors with opioids exhibits significant interactions possibly due to decreased metabolism of opioids leading to potentiation of their actions. The present review describes the complexities of positive and negative interactions between RAS and opioids along with possible mechanisms responsible for these interactions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. NF2 loss promotes oncogenic RAS-induced thyroid cancers via YAP-dependent transactivation of RAS proteins and sensitizes them to MEK inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Rendueles, Maria E.R.; Ricarte-Filho, Julio C.; Untch, Brian R.; Landa, Iňigo; Knauf, Jeffrey A.; Voza, Francesca; Smith, Vicki E.; Ganly, Ian; Taylor, Barry S.; Persaud, Yogindra; Oler, Gisele; Fang, Yuqiang; Jhanwar, Suresh C.; Viale, Agnes; Heguy, Adriana; Huberman, Kety H.; Giancotti, Filippo; Ghossein, Ronald; Fagin, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Ch22q LOH is preferentially associated with RAS mutations in papillary and in poorly differentiated thyroid cancer (PDTC). The 22q tumor suppressor NF2, encoding merlin, is implicated in this interaction because of its frequent loss of function in human thyroid cancer cell lines. Nf2 deletion or Hras mutation are insufficient for transformation, whereas their combined disruption leads to murine PDTC with increased MAPK signaling. Merlin loss induces RAS signaling in part through inactivation of Hippo, which activates a YAP-TEAD transcriptional program. We find that the three RAS genes are themselves YAP-TEAD1 transcriptional targets, providing a novel mechanism of promotion of RAS-induced tumorigenesis. Moreover, pharmacological disruption of YAP-TEAD with verteporfin blocks RAS transcription and signaling, and inhibits cell growth. The increased MAPK output generated by NF2 loss in RAS-mutant cancers may inform therapeutic strategies, as it generates greater dependency on the MAPK pathway for viability. PMID:26359368

  19. Ras-Mediated Deregulation of the Circadian Clock in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Relógio, Angela; Thomas, Philippe; Medina-Pérez, Paula; Reischl, Silke; Bervoets, Sander; Gloc, Ewa; Riemer, Pamela; Mang-Fatehi, Shila; Maier, Bert; Schäfer, Reinhold; Leser, Ulf; Herzel, Hanspeter; Kramer, Achim; Sers, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are essential to the temporal regulation of molecular processes in living systems and as such to life itself. Deregulation of these rhythms leads to failures in biological processes and eventually to the manifestation of pathological phenotypes including cancer. To address the questions as to what are the elicitors of a disrupted clock in cancer, we applied a systems biology approach to correlate experimental, bioinformatics and modelling data from several cell line models for colorectal and skin cancer. We found strong and weak circadian oscillators within the same type of cancer and identified a set of genes, which allows the discrimination between the two oscillator-types. Among those genes are IFNGR2, PITX2, RFWD2, PPARγ, LOXL2, Rab6 and SPARC, all involved in cancer-related pathways. Using a bioinformatics approach, we extended the core-clock network and present its interconnection to the discriminative set of genes. Interestingly, such gene signatures link the clock to oncogenic pathways like the RAS/MAPK pathway. To investigate the potential impact of the RAS/MAPK pathway - a major driver of colorectal carcinogenesis - on the circadian clock, we used a computational model which predicted that perturbation of BMAL1-mediated transcription can generate the circadian phenotypes similar to those observed in metastatic cell lines. Using an inducible RAS expression system, we show that overexpression of RAS disrupts the circadian clock and leads to an increase of the circadian period while RAS inhibition causes a shortening of period length, as predicted by our mathematical simulations. Together, our data demonstrate that perturbations induced by a single oncogene are sufficient to deregulate the mammalian circadian clock. PMID:24875049

  20. [Contact lens-related keratitis].

    PubMed

    Steiber, Zita; Berta, András; Módis, László

    2013-11-10

    Nowadays, keratitis, corneal infection due to wearing contact lens means an increasingly serious problem. Neglected cases may lead to corneal damage that can cause blindness in cases of otherwise healthy eyes. Early diagnosis based on the clinical picture and the typical patient history is an important way of prevention. Prophylaxis is substantial to avoid bacterial and viral infection that is highly essential in this group of diseases. Teaching contact lens wearers the proper contact lens care, storage, sterility, and hygiene regulations is of great importance. In case of corneal inflammation early accurate diagnosis supported by microbiological culture from contact lenses, storage boxes or cornea is very useful. Thereafter, targeted drug therapy or in therapy-resistant cases surgical treatment may even be necessary in order to sustain suitable visual acuity.

  1. International rigid contact lens prescribing.

    PubMed

    Efron, Nathan; Morgan, Philip B; Helland, Magne; Itoi, Motozumi; Jones, Deborah; Nichols, Jason J; van der Worp, Eef; Woods, Craig A

    2010-06-01

    Rigid lenses have been fitted less since the introduction of soft lenses nearly 40 years ago. Data that we have gathered from annual contact lens fitting surveys conducted in Australia, Canada, Japan, the Netherlands, Norway, the UK and the USA between 2000 and 2008 facilitate an accurate characterization of the pattern of the decline of rigid lens fitting during the first decade of this century. There is a trend for rigid lenses to be utilized primarily for refitting those patients who are already successful rigid lens wearers-most typically older females being refit with higher Dk materials. Rigid lenses are generally fitted on a full-time basis (four or more days of wear per week) without a planned replacement schedule. Orthokeratology is especially popular in the Netherlands, but is seldom prescribed in the other countries surveyed.

  2. Automated Fresnel lens tester system

    SciTech Connect

    Phipps, G.S.

    1981-07-01

    An automated data collection system controlled by a desktop computer has been developed for testing Fresnel concentrators (lenses) intended for solar energy applications. The system maps the two-dimensional irradiance pattern (image) formed in a plane parallel to the lens, whereas the lens and detector assembly track the sun. A point detector silicon diode (0.5-mm-dia active area) measures the irradiance at each point of an operator-defined rectilinear grid of data positions. Comparison with a second detector measuring solar insolation levels results in solar concentration ratios over the image plane. Summation of image plane energies allows calculation of lens efficiencies for various solar cell sizes. Various graphical plots of concentration ratio data help to visualize energy distribution patterns.

  3. Phenotypic Screening Identifies Protein Synthesis Inhibitors as H-Ras-Nanocluster-Increasing Tumor Growth Inducers.

    PubMed

    Najumudeen, Arafath K; Posada, Itziar M D; Lectez, Benoit; Zhou, Yong; Landor, Sebastian K-J; Fallarero, Adyary; Vuorela, Pia; Hancock, John; Abankwa, Daniel

    2015-12-15

    Ras isoforms H-, N-, and K-ras are each mutated in specific cancer types at varying frequencies and have different activities in cell fate control. On the plasma membrane, Ras proteins are laterally segregated into isoform-specific nanoscale signaling hubs, termed nanoclusters. As Ras nanoclusters are required for Ras signaling, chemical modulators of nanoclusters represent ideal candidates for the specific modulation of Ras activity in cancer drug development. We therefore conducted a chemical screen with commercial and in-house natural product libraries using a cell-based H-ras-nanoclustering FRET assay. Next to established Ras inhibitors, such as a statin and farnesyl-transferase inhibitor, we surprisingly identified five protein synthesis inhibitors as positive regulators. Using commonly employed cycloheximide as a representative compound, we show that protein synthesis inhibition increased nanoclustering and effector recruitment specifically of active H-ras but not of K-ras. Consistent with these data, cycloheximide treatment activated both Erk and Akt kinases and specifically promoted H-rasG12V-induced, but not K-rasG12V-induced, PC12 cell differentiation. Intriguingly, cycloheximide increased the number of mammospheres, which are enriched for cancer stem cells. Depletion of H-ras in combination with cycloheximide significantly reduced mammosphere formation, suggesting an exquisite synthetic lethality. The potential of cycloheximide to promote tumor cell growth was also reflected in its ability to increase breast cancer cell tumors grown in ovo. These results illustrate the possibility of identifying Ras-isoform-specific modulators using nanocluster-directed screening. They also suggest an unexpected feedback from protein synthesis inhibition to Ras signaling, which might present a vulnerability in certain tumor cell types.

  4. Oncogenicity of human N-ras oncogene and proto-oncogene introduced into retroviral vectors

    SciTech Connect

    Souyri, M.; Vigon, I.; Charon, M.; Tambourin, P. )

    1989-09-01

    The N-ras gene is the only member of the ras family which has never been naturally transduced into a retrovirus. In order to study the in vitro and in vivo oncogenicity of N-ras and to compare its pathogenicity to that of H-ras, the authors have inserted an activated or a normal form of human N-ras cDNA into a slightly modified Harvey murine sarcoma virus-derived vector in which the H-ras p21 coding region had been deleted. The resulting constructions were transfected into NIH 3T3 cells. The activated N-ras-containing construct (HSN) induced 10{sup 4} foci per {mu}g of DNA and was found to be as transforming as H-ras was. After infection of the transfected cells by either the ecotropic Moloney murine leukemia virus or the amphotropic 4070A helper viruses, rescued transforming viruses were injected into newborn mice. Both pseudotypes of HSN virus containing activated N-ras induced the typical Harvey disease with similar latency. However, they found that the virus which contained normal N-ras p21 (HSn) was also pathogenic and induced splenomegaly, lymphadenopathies, and sarcoma in mice after a latency of 3 to 7 weeks. In addition, Moloney murine leukemia virus pseudotypes of N-ras caused neurological disorders in 30% of the infected animals. These results differed markedly from those of previous experiments in which the authors had inserted the activated form of N-ras in the pSV(X) vector: the resulting SVN-ras virus was transforming on NIH 3T3 cells but was poorly oncogenic in vivo. Altogether, these data demonstrated unequivocally that N-ras is potentially as oncogenic as H-ras and that such oncogenic effect could depend on the vector environment.

  5. Inhibition of Acid Sphingomyelinase Depletes Cellular Phosphatidylserine and Mislocalizes K-Ras from the Plasma Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Kwang-jin; van der Hoeven, Dharini; Zhou, Yong; Maekawa, Masashi; Ma, Xiaoping; Chen, Wei

    2015-01-01

    K-Ras must localize to the plasma membrane for biological activity; thus, preventing plasma membrane interaction blocks K-Ras signal output. Here we show that inhibition of acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) mislocalizes both the K-Ras isoforms K-Ras4A and K-Ras4B from the plasma membrane to the endomembrane and inhibits their nanoclustering. We found that fendiline, a potent ASM inhibitor, reduces the phosphatidylserine (PtdSer) and cholesterol content of the inner plasma membrane. These lipid changes are causative because supplementation of fendiline-treated cells with exogenous PtdSer rapidly restores K-Ras4A and K-Ras4B plasma membrane binding, nanoclustering, and signal output. Conversely, supplementation with exogenous cholesterol restores K-Ras4A but not K-Ras4B nanoclustering. These experiments reveal different operational pools of PtdSer on the plasma membrane. Inhibition of ASM elevates cellular sphingomyelin and reduces cellular ceramide levels. Concordantly, delivery of recombinant ASM or exogenous ceramide to fendiline-treated cells rapidly relocalizes K-Ras4B and PtdSer to the plasma membrane. K-Ras4B mislocalization is also recapitulated in ASM-deficient Neimann-Pick type A and B fibroblasts. This study identifies sphingomyelin metabolism as an indirect regulator of K-Ras4A and K-Ras4B signaling through the control of PtdSer plasma membrane content. It also demonstrates the critical and selective importance of PtdSer to K-Ras4A and K-Ras4B plasma membrane binding and nanoscale spatial organization. PMID:26572827

  6. Inhibition of Acid Sphingomyelinase Depletes Cellular Phosphatidylserine and Mislocalizes K-Ras from the Plasma Membrane.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kwang-Jin; van der Hoeven, Dharini; Zhou, Yong; Maekawa, Masashi; Ma, Xiaoping; Chen, Wei; Fairn, Gregory D; Hancock, John F

    2015-11-16

    K-Ras must localize to the plasma membrane for biological activity; thus, preventing plasma membrane interaction blocks K-Ras signal output. Here we show that inhibition of acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) mislocalizes both the K-Ras isoforms K-Ras4A and K-Ras4B from the plasma membrane to the endomembrane and inhibits their nanoclustering. We found that fendiline, a potent ASM inhibitor, reduces the phosphatidylserine (PtdSer) and cholesterol content of the inner plasma membrane. These lipid changes are causative because supplementation of fendiline-treated cells with exogenous PtdSer rapidly restores K-Ras4A and K-Ras4B plasma membrane binding, nanoclustering, and signal output. Conversely, supplementation with exogenous cholesterol restores K-Ras4A but not K-Ras4B nanoclustering. These experiments reveal different operational pools of PtdSer on the plasma membrane. Inhibition of ASM elevates cellular sphingomyelin and reduces cellular ceramide levels. Concordantly, delivery of recombinant ASM or exogenous ceramide to fendiline-treated cells rapidly relocalizes K-Ras4B and PtdSer to the plasma membrane. K-Ras4B mislocalization is also recapitulated in ASM-deficient Neimann-Pick type A and B fibroblasts. This study identifies sphingomyelin metabolism as an indirect regulator of K-Ras4A and K-Ras4B signaling through the control of PtdSer plasma membrane content. It also demonstrates the critical and selective importance of PtdSer to K-Ras4A and K-Ras4B plasma membrane binding and nanoscale spatial organization.

  7. K-rasG12V mediated lung tumor models identified three new quantitative trait loci modifying events post-K-ras mutation.

    PubMed

    Saito, Hiromitsu; Suzuki, Noboru

    2014-10-03

    A high incidence of oncogenic K-ras mutations is observed in lung adenocarcinoma of human cases and carcinogen-induced animal models. The process of oncogenic K-ras-mediated lung adenocarcinogenesis can be dissected into two parts: pre- and post-K-ras mutation. Adoption of transgenic lines containing a flox-K-rasG12V transgene eliminates the use of chemical carcinogens and enables us to study directly crucial events post-K-ras mutation without considering the cellular events involved with oncogenic K-ras mutation, e.g., distribution and metabolism of chemical carcinogens, DNA repair, and somatic recombination by host factors. We generated two mouse strains C57BL/6J-Ryr2(tm1Nobs) and A/J-Ryr2(tm1Nobs) in which K-rasG12V can be transcribed from the cytomegalovirus early enhancer/chicken beta actin promoter in virtually any tissue. Upon K-rasG12V induction in lung epithelial cells by an adenovirus expressing the Cre recombinase, the number of tumors in the C57BL/6J-Ryr2(tm1Nobs/+) mouse line was 12.5 times that in the A/J-Ryr2(tm1Nobs/+) mouse line. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis revealed that new three modifier loci, D3Mit19, D3Mit45 and D11Mit20, were involved in the differential susceptibility between the two lines. In addition, we found that differential expression of the wild-type K-ras gene, which was genetically turn out to be anti-oncogenic activity on K-rasG12V, could not account for the different susceptibility in our two K-rasG12V-mediated lung tumor models. Thus, we provide a genetic system that enables us to explore new downstream modifiers post-K-ras mutation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Targeting the K-Ras/PDEδ protein-protein interaction: the solution for Ras-driven cancers or just another therapeutic mirage?

    PubMed

    Frett, Brendan; Wang, Yuanxiang; Li, Hong-Yu

    2013-10-01

    The holy grail, finally? After years of unsuccessful attempts at drugging the Ras oncogene, a recent paper by Zimmerman et al. has revealed the possibility of inhibiting Ras signaling on a clinically relevant level by blocking the K-Ras/PDEδ protein-protein interaction. The results, reported in Nature, are highlighted herein with future implications and directions to evaluate the full clinical potential of this research. Copyright © 2013 WILEY‐VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Current contact lens care systems.

    PubMed

    Rakow, Phyllis L

    2003-09-01

    Contact lens care has been revolutionized and simplified with the development of multipurpose solutions, less sensitizing preservatives and disinfectants, better protein removers, and reaction-free, one-bottle care systems for patients who have had adverse responses to existing care products. As the complexity of lens care has decreased, compliance has increased. Nevertheless, good compliance is dependent on technician training and a thorough understanding of the chemistry and mechanism of action of each care system. Care products are constantly evolving, and the practitioner should become familiar with each new solution as it is introduced to ensure that patients are also kept up-to-date.

  10. Liquid crystal Fresnel lens display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao-Qian; Abhishek Kumar, Srivastava; Alwin Tam, Ming-Wai; Zheng, Zhi-Gang; Shen, Dong; Vladimir, Chigrinov G.; Kwok, Hoi-Sing

    2016-09-01

    A novel see-through display with a liquid crystal lens array was proposed. A liquid crystal Fresnel lens display (LCFLD) with a holographic screen was demonstrated. The proposed display system has high efficiency, simple fabrication, and low manufacturing cost due to the absence of a polarizer and color filter. Project supported by Partner State Key Laboratory on Advanced Displays and Optoelectronics Technologies HKUST, China, the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61435008 and 61575063), and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, China (Grant No. WM1514036).

  11. Ensuring Safe Use of Contact Lens Solution

    MedlinePlus

    ... For Consumers Consumer Updates Ensuring Safe Use of Contact Lens Solution Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ... back to top Dos and Don'ts for Contact Lens Wearers DO: Always wash your hands before ...

  12. Improved flight-simulator viewing lens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahlbaum, W. M.

    1979-01-01

    Triplet lens system uses two acrylic plastic double convex lenses and one polystyrene plastic single convex lens to reduce chromatic distortion and lateral aberation, especially at large field angles within in-line systems of flight simulators.

  13. The Hominoid-specific Oncogene TBC1D3 Activates Ras and Modulates Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Signaling and Trafficking*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Wainszelbaum, Marisa J.; Charron, Audra J.; Kong, Chen; Kirkpatrick, Donald S.; Srikanth, Priya; Barbieri, M. Alejandro; Gygi, Steven P.; Stahl, Philip D.

    2008-01-01

    Hominoid- and human-specific genes may have evolved to modulate signaling pathways of a higher order of complexity. TBC1D3 is a hominoid-specific oncogene encoded by a cluster of eight paralogs on chromosome 17. Initial work indicates that TBC1D3 is widely expressed in human tissues (Hodzic, D., Kong, C., Wainszelbaum, M. J., Charron, A. J., Su, X., and Stahl, P. D. (2006) Genomics 88,731 -73616863688). In this study, we show that TBC1D3 expression has a powerful effect on cell proliferation that is further enhanced by epidermal growth factor (EGF) in both human and mouse cell lines. EGF activation of the Erk and protein kinase B/Akt pathways is enhanced, both in amplitude and duration, by TBC1D3 expression, whereas RNA interference silencing of TBC1D3 suppresses the activation. Light microscopy and Western blot experiments demonstrate that increased signaling in response to EGF is coupled with a significant delay in EGF receptor (EGFR) trafficking and degradation, which significantly extends the life span of EGFR. Moreover, TBC1D3 suppresses polyubiquitination of the EGFR and the recruitment of c-Cbl. Using the Ras binding domain of Raf1 to monitor GTP-Ras we show that TBC1D3 expression enhances Ras activation in quiescent cells, which is further increased by EGF treatment. We speculate that TBC1D3 may alter Ras GTP loading. We conclude that the expression of TBC1D3 generates a delay in EGFR degradation, a decrease in ubiquitination, and a failure to recruit adapter proteins that ultimately dysregulate EGFR signal transduction and enhance cell proliferation. Altered growth factor receptor trafficking and GTP-Ras turnover may be sites where recently evolved genes such as TBC1D3 selectively modulate signaling in hominoids and humans. PMID:18319245

  14. v-rasH induces non-small cell phenotype, with associated growth factors and receptors, in a small cell lung cancer cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Falco, J P; Baylin, S B; Lupu, R; Borges, M; Nelkin, B D; Jasti, R K; Davidson, N E; Mabry, M

    1990-01-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) tumor progression can involve partial or complete conversion to a more treatment-resistant non-small cell (NSCLC) phenotype. In a cell culture model of this phenomenon, we have previously demonstrated that insertion of the viral Harvey ras gene (v-Ha-ras) into SCLC cell lines with amplification and overexpression of the c-myc gene induced many NSCLC phenotypic features. We now report that the v-Ha-ras gene can also induce morphologic, biochemical, and growth characteristics consistent with the NSCLC phenotype in an N-myc amplified SCLC cell line, NCI-H249. We show that v-Ha-ras has novel effects on these cells, abrogating an SCLC-specific growth requirement for gastrin-releasing peptide, and inducing mRNA expression of three NSCLC-associated growth factors and receptors, platelet-derived growth factor B chain, transforming growth factor-alpha (TGF-alpha), and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R). TGF-alpha secretion and EGF-R also appear, consistent with the induction of an autocrine loop previously shown to be growth stimulatory for NSCLC in culture. These data suggest that N-myc and v-Ha-ras represent functional classes of genes that may complement each other in bringing about the phenotypic alterations seen during SCLC tumor progression, and suggest that such alterations might include the appearance of growth factors and receptors of potential importance for the growth of the tumor and its surrounding stroma. Images PMID:2161428

  15. CNS germinomas are characterized by global demethylation, chromosomal instability and mutational activation of the Kit-, Ras/Raf/Erk- and Akt-pathways

    PubMed Central

    Schulte, Simone Laura; Waha, Andreas; Steiger, Barbara; Denkhaus, Dorota; Dörner, Evelyn; Calaminus, Gabriele; Leuschner, Ivo; Pietsch, Torsten

    2016-01-01

    CNS germinomas represent a unique germ cell tumor entity characterized by undifferentiated tumor cells and a high response rate to current treatment protocols. Limited information is available on their underlying genomic, epigenetic and biological alterations. We performed a genome-wide analysis of genomic copy number alterations in 49 CNS germinomas by molecular inversion profiling. In addition, CpG dinucleotide methylation was studied by immunohistochemistry for methylated cytosine residues. Mutational analysis was performed by resequencing of candidate genes including KIT and RAS family members. Ras/Erk and Akt pathway activation was analyzed by immunostaining with antibodies against phospho-Erk, phosho-Akt, phospho-mTOR and phospho-S6. All germinomas coexpressed Oct4 and Kit but showed an extensive global DNA demethylation compared to other tumors and normal tissues. Molecular inversion profiling showed predominant genomic instability in all tumors with a high frequency of regional gains and losses including high level gene amplifications. Activating mutations of KIT exons 11, 13, and 17 as well as a case with genomic KIT amplification and activating mutations or amplifications of RAS gene family members including KRAS, NRAS and RRAS2 indicated mutational activation of crucial signaling pathways. Co-activation of Ras/Erk and Akt pathways was present in 83% of germinomas. These data suggest that CNS germinoma cells display a demethylated nuclear DNA similar to primordial germ cells in early development. This finding has a striking coincidence with extensive genomic instability. In addition, mutational activation of Kit-, Ras/Raf/Erk- and Akt- pathways indicate the biological importance of these pathways and their components as potential targets for therapy. PMID:27391150

  16. The transcription factor Gfi1 regulates G-CSF signaling and neutrophil development through the Ras activator RasGRP1

    PubMed Central

    de la Luz Sierra, Maria; Sakakibara, Shuhei; Gasperini, Paola; Salvucci, Ombretta; Jiang, Kan; McCormick, Peter J.; Segarra, Marta; Stone, Jim; Maric, Dragan; Zhu, Jinfang; Qian, Xiaolan; Lowy, Douglas R.

    2010-01-01

    The transcription factor growth factor independence 1 (Gfi1) and the growth factor granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) are individually essential for neutrophil differentiation from myeloid progenitors. Here, we provide evidence that the functions of Gfi1 and G-CSF are linked in the regulation of granulopoiesis. We report that Gfi1 promotes the expression of Ras guanine nucleotide releasing protein 1 (RasGRP1), an exchange factor that activates Ras, and that RasGRP1 is required for G-CSF signaling through the Ras/mitogen–activated protein/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MEK/Erk) pathway. Gfi1-null mice have reduced levels of RasGRP1 mRNA and protein in thymus, spleen, and bone marrow, and Gfi1 transduction in myeloid cells promotes RasGRP1 expression. When stimulated with G-CSF, Gfi1-null myeloid cells are selectively defective at activating Erk1/2, but not signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) or STAT3, and fail to differentiate into neutrophils. Expression of RasGRP1 in Gfi1-deficient cells rescues Erk1/2 activation by G-CSF and allows neutrophil maturation by G-CSF. These results uncover a previously unknown function of Gfi1 as a regulator of RasGRP1 and link Gfi1 transcriptional control to G-CSF signaling and regulation of granulopoiesis. PMID:20203268

  17. The inflammatory cytokine TNFα cooperates with Ras in elevating metastasis and turns WT-Ras to a tumor-promoting entity in MCF-7 cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In the present study we determined the relative contribution of two processes to breast cancer progression: (1) Intrinsic events, such as activation of the Ras pathway and down-regulation of p53; (2) The inflammatory cytokines TNFα and IL-1β, shown in our published studies to be highly expressed in tumors of >80% of breast cancer patients with recurrent disease. Methods Using MCF-7 human breast tumor cells originally expressing WT-Ras and WT-p53, we determined the impact of the above-mentioned elements and cooperativity between them on the expression of CXCL8 (ELISA, qRT-PCR), a member of a “cancer-related chemokine cluster” that we have previously identified. Then, we determined the mechanisms involved (Ras-binding-domain assays, Western blot, luciferase), and tested the impact of Ras + TNFα on angiogenicity (chorioallantoic membrane assays) and on tumor growth at the mammary fat pad of mice and on metastasis, in vivo. Results Using RasG12V that recapitulates multiple stimulations induced by receptor tyrosine kinases, we found that RasG12V alone induced CXCL8 expression at the mRNA and protein levels, whereas down-regulation of p53 did not. TNFα and IL-1β potently induced CXCL8 expression and synergized with RasG12V, together leading to amplified CXCL8 expression. Testing the impact of WT-Ras, which is the common form in breast cancer patients, we found that WT-Ras was not active in promoting CXCL8; however, TNFα has induced the activation of WT-Ras: joining these two elements has led to cooperative induction of CXCL8 expression, via the activation of MEK, NF-κB and AP-1. Importantly, TNFα has led to increased expression of WT-Ras in an active GTP-bound form, with properties similar to those of RasG12V. Jointly, TNFα + Ras activities have given rise to increased angiogenesis and to elevated tumor cell dissemination to lymph nodes. Conclusions TNFα cooperates with Ras in promoting the metastatic phenotype of MCF-7 breast tumor cells

  18. NF2 Loss Promotes Oncogenic RAS-Induced Thyroid Cancers via YAP-Dependent Transactivation of RAS Proteins and Sensitizes Them to MEK Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Rendueles, Maria E R; Ricarte-Filho, Julio C; Untch, Brian R; Landa, Iňigo; Knauf, Jeffrey A; Voza, Francesca; Smith, Vicki E; Ganly, Ian; Taylor, Barry S; Persaud, Yogindra; Oler, Gisele; Fang, Yuqiang; Jhanwar, Suresh C; Viale, Agnes; Heguy, Adriana; Huberman, Kety H; Giancotti, Filippo; Ghossein, Ronald; Fagin, James A

    2015-11-01

    Ch22q LOH is preferentially associated with RAS mutations in papillary and in poorly differentiated thyroid cancer (PDTC). The 22q tumor suppressor NF2, encoding merlin, is implicated in this interaction because of its frequent loss of function in human thyroid cancer cell lines. Nf2 deletion or Hras mutation is insufficient for transformation, whereas their combined disruption leads to murine PDTC with increased MAPK signaling. Merlin loss induces RAS signaling in part through inactivation of Hippo, which activates a YAP-TEAD transcriptional program. We find that the three RAS genes are themselves YAP-TEAD1 transcriptional targets, providing a novel mechanism of promotion of RAS-induced tumorigenesis. Moreover, pharmacologic disruption of YAP-TEAD with verteporfin blocks RAS transcription and signaling and inhibits cell growth. The increased MAPK output generated by NF2 loss in RAS-mutant cancers may inform therapeutic strategies, as it generates greater dependency on the MAPK pathway for viability. Intensification of mutant RAS signaling through copy-number imbalances is commonly associated with transformation. We show that NF2/merlin inactivation augments mutant RAS signaling by promoting YAP/TEAD-driven transcription of oncogenic and wild-type RAS, resulting in greater MAPK output and increased sensitivity to MEK inhibitors. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  19. Changes in the Eye Microbiota Associated with Contact Lens Wearing

    PubMed Central

    Price, Kenneth; Albert, Luong; Dodick, Jack; Park, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Wearing contact lenses has been identified as a risk factor for the development of eye conditions such as giant papillary conjunctivitis and keratitis. We hypothesized that wearing contact lenses is associated with changes in the ocular microbiota. We compared the bacterial communities of the conjunctiva and skin under the eye from 58 subjects and analyzed samples from 20 subjects (9 lens wearers and 11 non-lens wearers) taken at 3 time points using a 16S rRNA gene-based sequencing technique (V4 region; Illumina MiSeq). We found that using anesthetic eye drops before sampling decreases the detected ocular microbiota diversity. Compared to those from non-lens wearers, dry conjunctival swabs from lens wearers had more variable and skin-like bacterial community structures (UniFrac; P value = <0.001), with higher abundances of Methylobacterium, Lactobacillus, Acinetobacter, and Pseudomonas and lower abundances of Haemophilus, Streptococcus, Staphylococcus, and Corynebacterium (linear discriminant analysis [LDA] score = >3.0). The results indicate that wearing contact lenses alters the microbial structure of the ocular conjunctiva, making it more similar to that of the skin microbiota. Further research is needed to determine whether the microbiome structure provides less protection from ocular infections. PMID:27006462

  20. Tunable-focus lens for adaptive eyeglasses.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Nazmul; Banerjee, Aishwaryadev; Kim, Hanseup; Mastrangelo, Carlos H

    2017-01-23

    We demonstrate the implementation of a compact tunable-focus liquid lens suitable for adaptive eyeglass application. The lens has an aperture diameter of 32 mm, optical power range of 5.6 diopter, and electrical power consumption less than 20 mW. The lens inclusive of its piezoelectric actuation mechanism is 8.4 mm thick and weighs 14.4 gm. The measured lens RMS wavefront aberration error was between 0.73 µm and 0.956 µm.

  1. Panoramic lens designed with transformation optics

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huaping; Deng, Yangyang; Zheng, Bin; Li, Rujiang; Jiang, Yuyu; Dehdashti, Shahram; Xu, Zhiwei; Chen, Hongsheng

    2017-01-01

    The panoramic lens is a special kind of lens, which is applied to observe full view. In this letter, we theoretically present a panoramic lens (PL) using transformation optics method. The lens is designed with inhomogeneous and anisotropic constitutive parameters, which has the ability to gather light from all directions and confine light within the visual angle of observer. Simulation results validate our theoretical design. PMID:28059142

  2. Panoramic lens designed with transformation optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huaping; Deng, Yangyang; Zheng, Bin; Li, Rujiang; Jiang, Yuyu; Dehdashti, Shahram; Xu, Zhiwei; Chen, Hongsheng

    2017-01-01

    The panoramic lens is a special kind of lens, which is applied to observe full view. In this letter, we theoretically present a panoramic lens (PL) using transformation optics method. The lens is designed with inhomogeneous and anisotropic constitutive parameters, which has the ability to gather light from all directions and confine light within the visual angle of observer. Simulation results validate our theoretical design.

  3. Absence of K-Ras Reduces Proliferation and Migration But Increases Extracellular Matrix Synthesis in Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Félix, José M; Fuentes-Calvo, Isabel; Cuesta, Cristina; Eleno, Nélida; Crespo, Piero; López-Novoa, José M; Martínez-Salgado, Carlos

    2016-10-01

    The involvement of Ras-GTPases in the development of renal fibrosis has been addressed in the last decade. We have previously shown that H- and N-Ras isoforms participate in the regulation of fibrosis. Herein, we assessed the role of K-Ras in cellular processes involved in the development of fibrosis: proliferation, migration, and extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins synthesis. K-Ras knockout (KO) mouse embryonic fibroblasts (K-ras(-/-) ) stimulated with transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) exhibited reduced proliferation and impaired mobility than wild-type fibroblasts. Moreover, an increase on ECM production was observed in K-Ras KO fibroblasts in basal conditions. The absence of K-Ras was accompanied by reduced Ras activation and ERK phosphorylation, and increased AKT phosphorylation, but no differences were observed in TGF-β1-induced Smad signaling. The MEK inhibitor U0126 decreased cell proliferation independently of the presence of K-ras but reduced migration and ECM proteins expression only in wild-type fibroblasts, while the PI3K-AKT inhibitor LY294002 decreased cell proliferation, migration, and ECM synthesis in both types of fibroblasts. Thus, our data unveil that K-Ras and its downstream effector pathways distinctively regulate key biological processes in the development of fibrosis. Moreover, we show that K-Ras may be a crucial mediator in TGF-β1-mediated effects in this cell type. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2224-2235, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Involvement of p21ras distinguishes positive and negative selection in thymocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Swan, K A; Alberola-Ila, J; Gross, J A; Appleby, M W; Forbush, K A; Thomas, J F; Perlmutter, R M

    1995-01-01

    Small molecular weight GTP binding proteins of the ras family have been implicated in signal transduction from the T cell antigen receptor (TCR). To test the importance of p21ras in the control of thymocyte development, we generated mice expressing a dominant-negative p21ras protein (H-rasN17) in T lineage cells under the control of the lck proximal promoter. Proliferation of thymocytes from lck-H-rasN17 mice in response to TCR stimulation was nearly completely blocked, confirming the importance of p21ras in mediating TCR-derived signals in mature CD4+8- or CD8+4- thymocytes. In contrast, some TCR-derived signals proceeded unimpaired in the CD4+8+ thymocytes of mice expressing dominant-negative p21ras. Analysis of thymocyte development in mice made doubly transgenic for the H-Y-specific TCR and lck-H-rasN17 demonstrated that antigen-specific negative selection occurs normally in the presence of p21H-rasN17. Superantigen-induced negative selection in vivo also proceeded unhindered in H-rasN17 thymocytes. In contrast, positive selection of thymocytes in the H-Y mice was severely compromised by the presence of p21H-rasN17. These observations demonstrate that positive and negative selection, two conceptually antithetical consequences of TCR stimulation, are biochemically distinguishable. Images PMID:7835338

  5. RasGRP1 Transgenic Mice Develop Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinomas in Response to Skin Wounding

    PubMed Central

    Diez, Federico R.; Garrido, Ann A.; Sharma, Amrish; Luke, Courtney T.; Stone, James C.; Dower, Nancy A.; Cline, J. Mark; Lorenzo, Patricia S.

    2009-01-01

    Models of epidermal carcinogenesis have demonstrated that Ras is a critical molecule involved in tumor initiation and progression. Previously, we have shown that RasGRP1 increases the susceptibility of mice to skin tumorigenesis when overexpressed in the epidermis by a transgenic approach, related to its ability to activate Ras. Moreover, RasGRP1 transgenic mice develop spontaneous papillomas and cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas, some of which appear to originate in sites of injury, suggesting that RasGRP1 may be responding to signals generated during the wound-healing process. In this study, we examined the response of the RasGRP1 transgenic animals to full-thickness incision wounding of the skin, and demonstrated that they respond by developing tumors along the wounded site. The tumors did not present mutations in the H-ras gene, but Rasgrp1 transgene dosage correlated with tumor susceptibility and size. Analysis of serum cytokines showed increased levels of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in transgenic animals after wounding. Furthermore, in vitro experiments with primary keratinocytes showed that granulocyte colony-stimulating factor stimulated Ras activation, although RasGRP1 was dispensable for this effect. Since granulocyte colony-stimulating factor has been recently associated with proliferation of skin cancer cells, our results may help in the elucidation of pathways that activate Ras in the epidermis during tumorigenesis in the absence of oncogenic ras mutations. PMID:19497993

  6. Regulated proteolysis of Candida albicans Ras1 is involved in morphogenesis and quorum sensing regulation

    PubMed Central

    Piispanen, Amy; Grahl, Nora; Hollomon, Jeffrey M.; Hogan, Deborah A.

    2013-01-01

    Summary In Candida albicans, a fungal pathogen, the small G-protein Ras1 regulates many important behaviors including white-opaque switching, biofilm formation, and the induction and maintenance of hyphal growth. Like other Ras proteins, Ras1 is activated upon guanine triphosphate binding, and its activity is further modulated by post-translational lipid modifications. Here, we report that the levels of membrane-associated, full-length Ras1 were higher in hyphae than in yeast, and that yeast contained a shorter, soluble Ras1 species that resulted from cleavage. Deletion of the putative cleavage site led to more rapid induction of hyphal growth and delayed hypha-to-yeast transitions. The cleaved Ras1 species was less able to activate its effector, adenylate cyclase (Cyr1), unless tethered to the membrane by a heterologous membrane-targeting domain. Ras1 cleavage was repressed by cAMP-signaling, indicating the presence of a positive feedback loop in which Cyr1 and cAMP influence Ras1. The C. albicans quorum sensing molecule farnesol, which inhibits Cyr1 and represses filamentation, caused an increase in the fraction of Ras1 in the cleaved form, particularly in nascent yeast formed from hyphae. This newly recognized mode of Ras regulation may control C. albicans Ras1 activity in important ways. PMID:23692372

  7. Dissecting the senescence-like program in tumor cells activated by Ras signaling.

    PubMed

    Bihani, Teeru; Chicas, Agustin; Lo, Crystal Pui-Kwan; Lin, Athena W

    2007-01-26

    Activated Ras signaling can induce a permanent growth arrest in osteosarcoma cells. Here, we report that a senescence-like growth inhibition is also achieved in human carcinoma cells upon the transduction of H-Ras(V12). Ras-induced tumor senescence can be recapitulated by the transduction of activated, but not wild-type, MEK. The ability for H-Ras(V12) to suppress tumor cell growth is drastically compromised in cells that harbor endogenous activating ras mutations. Notably, growth inhibition of tumor cells containing ras mutations can be achieved through the introduction of activated MEK. Tumor senescence induced by Ras signaling can occur in the absence of p16 or Rb and is not interrupted by the inactivation of Rb, p107, or p130 via short hairpin RNA or the transduction with HPV16 E7. In contrast, inactivation of p21 via short hairpin RNA disrupts Ras-induced tumor senescence. In summary, this study uncovers a senescence-like program activated by Ras signaling to inhibit cancer cell growth. This program appears to be intact in cancer cells that do not harbor ras mutations. Moreover, cancer cells that carry ras mutations remain susceptible to tumor senescence induced by activated MEK. These novel findings can potentially lead to the development of innovative cancer intervention.

  8. Orchestration of Morphogenesis in Filamentous Fungi: Conserved Roles for Ras Signaling Networks

    PubMed Central

    Fortwendel, Jarrod R.

    2015-01-01

    Filamentous fungi undergo complex developmental programs including conidial germination, polarized morphogenesis, and differentiation of sexual and asexual structures. For many fungi, the coordinated completion of development is required for pathogenicity, as specialized morphological structures must be produced by the invading fungus. Ras proteins are highly conserved GTPase signal transducers and function as major regulators of growth and development in eukaryotes. Filamentous fungi typically express two Ras homologues, comprising distinct groups of Ras1-like and Ras2-like proteins based on sequence homology. Recent evidence suggests shared roles for both Ras1 and Ras2 homologues, but also supports the existence of unique functions in the areas of stress response and virulence. This review focuses on the roles played by both Ras protein groups during growth, development, and pathogenicity of a diverse array of filamentous fungi. PMID:26257821

  9. Structure of the G60A mutant of Ras: Implications for the Dominant Negative Effect.

    SciTech Connect

    Ford,B.; Skowronek, K.; Boykevisch, S.; Bar-Sagi, D.; Nassar, N.

    2005-01-01

    Substituting alanine for glycine at position 60 in v-H-Ras generated a dominant negative mutant that completely abolished the ability of v-H-Ras to transform NIH 3T3 cells and to induce germinal vesicle breakdown in Xenopus oocytes. The crystal structure of the GppNp-bound form of RasG60A unexpectedly shows that the switch regions adopt an open conformation reminiscent of the structure of the nucleotide-free form of Ras in complex with Sos. Critical residues that normally stabilize the guanine nucleotide and the Mg{sup 2+} ion have moved considerably. Sos binds to RasG60A but is unable to catalyze nucleotide exchange. Our data suggest that the dominant negative effect observed for RasG60A{center_dot}GTP could result from the sequestering of Sos in a non-productive Ras-GTP-guanine nucleotide exchange factor ternary complex.

  10. 21 CFR 886.3600 - Intraocular lens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Intraocular lens. 886.3600 Section 886.3600 Food... DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 886.3600 Intraocular lens. (a) Identification. An intraocular lens is a device made of materials such as glass or plastic intended to be implanted to...

  11. 21 CFR 886.3600 - Intraocular lens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Intraocular lens. 886.3600 Section 886.3600 Food... DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 886.3600 Intraocular lens. (a) Identification. An intraocular lens is a device made of materials such as glass or plastic intended to be implanted to...

  12. 21 CFR 886.3600 - Intraocular lens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Intraocular lens. 886.3600 Section 886.3600 Food... DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 886.3600 Intraocular lens. (a) Identification. An intraocular lens is a device made of materials such as glass or plastic intended to be implanted to...

  13. 21 CFR 886.3600 - Intraocular lens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Intraocular lens. 886.3600 Section 886.3600 Food... DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 886.3600 Intraocular lens. (a) Identification. An intraocular lens is a device made of materials such as glass or plastic intended to be implanted to...

  14. Contact Lens-related Complications: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Alipour, Fateme; Khaheshi, Saeed; Soleimanzadeh, Mahya; Heidarzadeh, Somayeh; Heydarzadeh, Sepideh

    2017-01-01

    Contact lens-related problems are common and can result in severe sight-threatening complications or contact lens drop out if not addressed properly. We systematically reviewed the most important and the most common contact lens-related complications and their diagnosis, epidemiology, and management according to the literature published in the last 20 years. PMID:28540012

  15. Luneburg modified lens for surface water waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pichard, Helene; Maurel, Agnes; Petitjeans, Phillipe; Martin, Paul; Pagneux, Vincent

    2015-11-01

    It is well known that when the waves pass across an elevated bathymetry, refraction often results in amplification of waves behind it. In this sense, focusing of liquid surface waves can be used to enhance the harvest efficiency of ocean power. An ocean wave focusing lens concentrates waves on a certain focal point by transforming straight crest lens of incident waves into circular ones just like an optical lens. These devices have attracted ocean engineers and are promising because they enable the effective utilization of wave energy, the remaining challenge being to increase the harvest efficiency of the lens. In this work, in order to improve well known focusing of surface liquid waves by lens, the propagation of liquid surface waves through a Luneburg modified lens is investigated. The traditional Luneburg lens is a rotationally symmetric lens with a spatially varying refractive-index profile that focuses an incident plane wave on the rim of the lens. The modified Luneburg lens allows to choose the position of the focal point, which can lie inside or outside the lens. This new degree of freedom leads to enhanced focusing and tunable focusing. The focusing of linear surface waves through this lens is investigated and is shown to be more efficient than classical profile lenses.

  16. In vivo human crystalline lens topography

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, Sergio; Pérez-Merino, Pablo; Gambra, Enrique; de Castro, Alberto; Marcos, Susana

    2012-01-01

    Custom high-resolution high-speed anterior segment spectral domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) was used to characterize three-dimensionally (3-D) the human crystalline lens in vivo. The system was provided with custom algorithms for denoising and segmentation of the images, as well as for fan (scanning) and optical (refraction) distortion correction, to provide fully quantitative images of the anterior and posterior crystalline lens surfaces. The method was tested on an artificial eye with known surfaces geometry and on a human lens in vitro, and demonstrated on three human lenses in vivo. Not correcting for distortion overestimated the anterior lens radius by 25% and the posterior lens radius by more than 65%. In vivo lens surfaces were fitted by biconicoids and Zernike polynomials after distortion correction. The anterior lens radii of curvature ranged from 10.27 to 14.14 mm, and the posterior lens radii of curvature ranged from 6.12 to 7.54 mm. Surface asphericities ranged from −0.04 to −1.96. The lens surfaces were well fitted by quadrics (with variation smaller than 2%, for 5-mm pupils), with low amounts of high order terms. Surface lens astigmatism was significant, with the anterior lens typically showing horizontal astigmatism (Z22 ranging from −11 to −1 µm) and the posterior lens showing vertical astigmatism (Z22 ranging from 6 to 10 µm). PMID:23082289

  17. A broadband transformation-optics metasurface lens

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, Xiang; Xiang Jiang, Wei; Feng Ma, Hui; Jun Cui, Tie

    2014-04-14

    We present a transformational metasurface Luneburg lens based on the quasi-conformal mapping method, which has weakly anisotropic constitutive parameters. We design the metasurface lens using inhomogeneous artificial structures to realize the required surface refractive indexes. The transformational metasurface Luneburg lens is fabricated and the measurement results demonstrate very good performance in controlling the radiated surface waves.

  18. 21 CFR 886.1400 - Maddox lens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Maddox lens. 886.1400 Section 886.1400 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1400 Maddox lens. (a) Identification. A Maddox lens is a...

  19. 21 CFR 886.3600 - Intraocular lens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Intraocular lens. 886.3600 Section 886.3600 Food... DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 886.3600 Intraocular lens. (a) Identification. An intraocular lens is a device made of materials such as glass or plastic intended to be implanted to...

  20. The Fyodorov Sputnik intraocular lens.

    PubMed

    Kwitko, M L

    1979-04-01

    The author has implanted 197 Fyodorov intraocular lenses. With careful selection of patients, good surgical judgment, and meticulous surgery, a degree of success can be obtained with this lens, which will equal that of conventional cataract surgery. The surgical technique of implantation will be described.